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Sample records for instructor crn type

  1. P-type Al-doped Cr-deficient CrN thin films for thermoelectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    le Febvrier, Arnaud; Van Nong, Ngo; Abadias, Gregory; Eklund, Per

    2018-05-01

    Thermoelectric properties of chromium nitride (CrN)-based films grown on c-plane sapphire by dc reactive magnetron sputtering were investigated. In this work, aluminum doping was introduced in CrN (degenerate n-type semiconductor) by co-deposition. Under the present deposition conditions, over-stoichiometry in nitrogen (CrN1+δ) rock-salt structure is obtained. A p-type conduction is observed with nitrogen-rich CrN combined with aluminum doping. The Cr0.96Al0.04N1.17 film exhibited a high Seebeck coefficient and a sufficient power factor at 300 °C. These results are a starting point for designing p-type/n-type thermoelectric materials based on chromium nitride films, which are cheap and routinely grown on the industrial scale.

  2. P-type Al-doped Cr-deficient CrN thin films for thermoelectrics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Febvrier, Arnaud le; Van Nong, Ngo; Abadias, Gregory

    2018-01-01

    Thermoelectric properties of chromium nitride (CrN)-based films grown on c-plane sapphire by dc reactive magnetron sputtering were investigated. In this work, aluminum doping was introduced in CrN (degenerate n-type semiconductor) by co-deposition. Under the present deposition conditions, over......-type/n-type thermoelectric materials based on chromium nitride films, which are cheap and routinely grown on the industrial scale....

  3. CRN Photo Information

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Photos of CRN stations and their immediate surroundings. Taken by engineering techs from NOAA's Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Division (ATDD). Photos are used...

  4. Front-End Types. Automotive Mechanics. Steering & Suspension. Instructor's Guide [and] Student Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spignesi, B.

    This instructional package, one in a series of individualized instructional units on automotive steering and suspension, consists of a student guide and an instructor guide dealing with automobile front-end types. Covered in the module are three common types of passenger car front suspension systems and their major components as well as two types…

  5. XPS investigations of tribofilms formed on CrN coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandrino, Djordje, E-mail: djordje.mandrino@imt.si; Podgornik, Bojan

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • Formation of tribofilms from lubricant additives on CrN surfaces during tribological contact confirmed by XPS. • Chemistry & chemical state of tribofilms obtained by XPS. • Thin sulphate film forms at the top of sulphide tribofilm. • Final type of sulphide in tribolayer depends on additive chemistry and testing temperature. - Abstract: Action of lubrication additives in the case of uncoated steel surfaces, including the type and mechanism of tribofilm formation is well known and understood. However, contact type of tribofilms which might form under the tribological contact between CrN coated surfaces, remains more or less unexplored. The aim of this investigation was to study the type of tribofilms formed on the CrN coated steel samples subjected to lubricated reciprocating sliding contact under different contact conditions Contact surface and tribofilms formed were studied by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). Sample surfaces were first imaged by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) to determine areas of tribofilm formation as well as areas not affected by tribological contact. In these areas survey and high resolution (HR) XPS measurements were performed to obtain information about surface chemistry and oxidation states of the constituent elements. It was found that differences between different samples, observed by the XPS measurements, may reflect differences in chemistry of tribofilms formed under different contact conditions.

  6. Type-A Behavior, Gender, and Job Satisfaction: A Research on Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazici, Hikmet; Altun, Fatma

    2013-01-01

    There has been some research which investigates the relationship between gender, different personality traits, and job satisfaction in the field of behavioral sciences. The aim of this study is to examine the difference between male and female instructors' job satisfaction and to investigate the predict level of job satisfaction by Type-A…

  7. A Phytophthora sojae effector PsCRN63 forms homo-/hetero-dimers to suppress plant immunity via an inverted association manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qi; Zhang, Meixiang; Shen, Danyu; Liu, Tingli; Chen, Yanyu; Zhou, Jian-Min; Dou, Daolong

    2016-05-31

    Oomycete pathogens produce a large number of effectors to promote infection. Their mode of action are largely unknown. Here we show that a Phytophthora sojae effector, PsCRN63, suppresses flg22-induced expression of FRK1 gene, a molecular marker in pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMP)-triggered immunity (PTI). However, PsCRN63 does not suppress upstream signaling events including flg22-induced MAPK activation and BIK1 phosphorylation, indicating that it acts downstream of MAPK cascades. The PsCRN63-transgenic Arabidopsis plants showed increased susceptibility to bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tomato (Pst) DC3000 and oomycete pathogen Phytophthora capsici. The callose deposition were suppressed in PsCRN63-transgenic plants compared with the wild-type control plants. Genes involved in PTI were also down-regulated in PsCRN63-transgenic plants. Interestingly, we found that PsCRN63 forms an dimer that is mediated by inter-molecular interactions between N-terminal and C-terminal domains in an inverted association manner. Furthermore, the N-terminal and C-terminal domains required for the dimerization are widely conserved among CRN effectors, suggesting that homo-/hetero-dimerization of Phytophthora CRN effectors is required to exert biological functions. Indeed, the dimerization was required for PTI suppression and cell death-induction activities of PsCRN63.

  8. Structure and corrosion properties of PVD Cr-N coatings

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, C; Ziegele, H; Leyland, A; Matthews, A

    2002-01-01

    PVD Cr-N coatings produced by physical vapor deposition (PVD) are increasingly used for mechanical and tribological applications in various industrial sectors. These coatings are particularly attractive for their excellent corrosion resistance, which further enhances the lifetime and service quality of coated components. PVD Cr-N coated steels in an aqueous solution are usually corroded by galvanic attack via through-coating 'permeable' defects (e.g., pores). Therefore, the corrosion performance of Cr-N coated steel is determined by a number of variables of the coating properties and corrosive environment. These variables include: (i) surface continuity and uniformity; (ii) through-coating porosity; (iii) film density and chemical stability; (iv) growth stresses; (v) interfacial and intermediate layers; (vi) coating thickness; (vii) coating composition; and (viii) substrate properties. In this article, PVD Cr-N coatings were prepared, by electron-beam PVD and sputter deposition, with different compositions, t...

  9. Identification and Characterisation CRN Effectors in Phytophthora capsici Shows Modularity and Functional Diversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remco Stam

    Full Text Available Phytophthora species secrete a large array of effectors during infection of their host plants. The Crinkler (CRN gene family encodes a ubiquitous but understudied class of effectors with possible but as of yet unknown roles in infection. To appreciate CRN effector function in Phytophthora, we devised a simple Crn gene identification and annotation pipeline to improve effector prediction rates. We predicted 84 full-length CRN coding genes and assessed CRN effector domain diversity in sequenced Oomycete genomes. These analyses revealed evidence of CRN domain innovation in Phytophthora and expansion in the Peronosporales. We performed gene expression analyses to validate and define two classes of CRN effectors, each possibly contributing to infection at different stages. CRN localisation studies revealed that P. capsici CRN effector domains target the nucleus and accumulate in specific sub-nuclear compartments. Phenotypic analyses showed that few CRN domains induce necrosis when expressed in planta and that one cell death inducing effector, enhances P. capsici virulence on Nicotiana benthamiana. These results suggest that the CRN protein family form an important class of intracellular effectors that target the host nucleus during infection. These results combined with domain expansion in hemi-biotrophic and necrotrophic pathogens, suggests specific contributions to pathogen lifestyles. This work will bolster CRN identification efforts in other sequenced oomycete species and set the stage for future functional studies towards understanding CRN effector functions.

  10. US-LA CRN Clinical Cancer Research in Latin America

    Science.gov (United States)

    The United States – Latin America Cancer Research Network (US-LA CRN) convened its Annual Meeting, in coordination with the Ministry of Health of Chile to discuss the Network’s first multilateral clinical research study: Molecular Profiling of Breast Cancer (MPBC).

  11. Structure and corrosion properties of PVD Cr-N coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, C.; Bi, Q.; Ziegele, H.; Leyland, A.; Matthews, A.

    2002-01-01

    PVD Cr-N coatings produced by physical vapor deposition (PVD) are increasingly used for mechanical and tribological applications in various industrial sectors. These coatings are particularly attractive for their excellent corrosion resistance, which further enhances the lifetime and service quality of coated components. PVD Cr-N coated steels in an aqueous solution are usually corroded by galvanic attack via through-coating 'permeable' defects (e.g., pores). Therefore, the corrosion performance of Cr-N coated steel is determined by a number of variables of the coating properties and corrosive environment. These variables include: (i) surface continuity and uniformity; (ii) through-coating porosity; (iii) film density and chemical stability; (iv) growth stresses; (v) interfacial and intermediate layers; (vi) coating thickness; (vii) coating composition; and (viii) substrate properties. In this article, PVD Cr-N coatings were prepared, by electron-beam PVD and sputter deposition, with different compositions, thicknesses, and surface roughnesses, by changing the N 2 flow rate, applying multilayering techniques and changing the substrate finish prior to coating. The microstructure of such coatings is investigated by various analytical techniques such as glancing angle x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, which are also correlated with the corrosion performance of the coated steel. Both dc polarization and ac impedance spectroscopy were employed to investigate the corrosion resistance of Cr-N coated steel in a 0.5N NaCl solution. It has been found that the N 2 flow rate during reactive deposition strongly determines the microstructure of Cr-N coatings (due to the changing nitrogen content in the film) and can thus affect the corrosion resistance of coated systems. The surface finish of the steel substrate also affects the uniformity and coverage of PVD coatings; grooves and inclusions on the original substrate can raise the susceptibility of coated

  12. Instructor training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuzhakov, A.Yu.

    1995-01-01

    A SAT-based Instructor Training Course was developed and implemented at NVTC. The duration of the initial course is 3 weeks and 2 weeks for annual refresher course. NVTC has had much experience with this Instructor Training Course generating the following lessons-learned: SAT implementation needs to be supported by plant management; age of instructors; developments of training materials and conducting training at the same time; knowledge and use of the PC; English language skills; social transitioning from the NPP to the TC; motivation; workplace environment and conditions

  13. Investigation of preparation technique and tribological properties of CrN piston rings coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Zhihai; Zhang Ping; Zhao Junjun; Du Jun; Niu Qingyin

    2009-01-01

    By using multi-ion plating, CrN films were made on surface of piston rings to improve its tribological properties and service life. Effects of nitrogen content to prepare the film on hardness and phase structure were studied. The high-temperature tribological properties of Cr plating and CrN films were compared with CETR friction tester. The results show that nitrogen partial pressure significantly affects the mechanical properties of CrN films. With increasing N 2 partial pressure, preferential growth orientation of the film changed from Cr 2 N(211) to CrN(220) phase, leading to two hardness peaks corresponding to the Cr 2 N and CrN phases,respectively. Having higher high-temperature wear resistance and lower friction coefficient than Cr plating, the CrN films are suitable for piston rings under high temperature conditions. (authors)

  14. Machine Accounting. An Instructor's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, E. Noah, Ed.

    Designed to prepare students to operate the types of accounting machines used in many medium-sized businesses, this instructor's guide presents a full-year high school course in machine accounting covering 120 hours of instruction. An introduction for the instructor suggests how to adapt the guide to present a 60-hour module which would be…

  15. Elaboration, characterization of CrN- based coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tlili, B.; Nouveau, C.; Guillemot, G.

    2011-01-01

    Cr, CrN and CrAlN monolayers were synthesized by RF dual magnetron sputtering on AISI4140 steel and silicon substrates at 200 deg. C. Multilayers coatings based on the three mono-layers such as CrN/CrAlN and Cr/CrN/CrAlN were also synthesized only on Si. The physico-chemical and mechanical properties of the layers were determined by AFM, SEM+WDS, stress, roughness and nanoindentation measurements. The influence of the thickness on the mechanical properties of the monolayers stresses has been studied and as a consequence we compared the mono and multilayers stress state.

  16. Surface free energy of CrN x films deposited using closed field unbalanced magnetron sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, C.-C.; Lee, S.-C.; Dai, S.-B.; Fu, Y.-S.; Wang, Y.-C.; Lee, Y.-H.

    2006-01-01

    CrN x thin films have attracted much attention for semiconductor IC packaging molding dies and forming tools due to their excellent hardness, thermal stability and non-sticking properties (low surface free energy). However, few data has been published on the surface free energy (SFE) of CrN x films at temperatures in the range 20-170 deg. C. In this study CrN x thin films with CrN, Cr(N), Cr 2 N (and mixture of these phases) were prepared using closed field unbalanced magnetron sputtering at a wide range of Cr +2 emission intensity. The contact angles of water, di-iodomethane and ethylene glycol on the coated surfaces were measured at temperatures in the range 20-170 deg. C using a Dataphysics OCA-20 contact angle analyzer. The surface free energy of the CrN x films and their components (e.g., dispersion, polar) were calculated using the Owens-Wendt geometric mean approach. The influences of CrN x film surface roughness and microstructure on the surface free energy were investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. The experimental results showed that the lowest total SFE was obtained corresponding to CrN at temperature in 20 deg. C. This is lower than that of Cr(N), Cr 2 N (and mixture of these phases). The total SFE, dispersive SFE and polar SFE of CrN x films decreased with increasing surface temperature. The film roughness has an obvious effect on the SFE and there is tendency for the SFE to increase with increasing film surface roughness

  17. CrN thin films prepared by reactive DC magnetron sputtering for symmetric supercapacitors

    KAUST Repository

    Wei, Binbin; Liang, Hanfeng; Zhang, Dongfang; Wu, Zhengtao; Qi, Zhengbing; Wang, Zhoucheng

    2016-01-01

    stability are promising candidates as supercapacitor electrode materials. In this work, we report the fabrication of CrN thin films using reactive DC magnetron sputtering and further their applications for symmetric supercapacitors for the first time. The Cr

  18. Characterisation of Pristine and Recoated electron beam evaporation plasma-assisted physical vapour deposition Cr-N coatings on AISI M2 steel and WC-Co substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avelar-Batista, J.C.; Spain, E.; Housden, J.; Fuentes, G.G.; Rebole, R.; Rodriguez, R.; Montala, F.; Carreras, L.J.; Tate, T.J.

    2005-01-01

    This paper is focussed on the characterisation of electron beam evaporation plasma-assisted physical vapour deposition Cr-N coatings deposited on AISI M2 steel and hardmetal (K10) substrates in two different conditions: Pristine (i.e., coated) and Recoated (i.e., stripped and recoated). Analytical methods, including X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy, scratch adhesion and pin-on-disc tests were used to evaluate several coating properties. XRD analyses indicated that both Pristine and Recoated coatings consisted of a mixture of hexagonal Cr 2 N and cubic CrN, regardless of substrate type. For the M2 steel substrate, only small differences were found in terms of coating phases, microstructure, adhesion, friction and wear coefficients between Pristine and Recoated. Recoated on WC-Co (K10) exhibited a less dense microstructure and significant inferior adhesion compared to Pristine on WC-Co (K10). The wear coefficient of Recoated on WC-Co was 100 times higher than those exhibited by all other specimens. The results obtained confirm that the stripping process did not adversely affect the Cr-N properties when this coating was deposited onto M2 steel substrates, but it is clear from the unsatisfactory tribological performance of Recoated on WC-Co that the stripping process is unsuitable for hardmetal substrates

  19. The Military Instructor's Handbook

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjøstedt, Peter; Grønlund, Thomas

    The Military Instructor's handbook was written for the basic professional training of instructors in the danish defence. The book describes the work of instructors and their areas of responsibility, and it offers guidance and direction on how to plan, conduct and evaluate learning activities...

  20. Microstructure and wear behaviour of silicon doped Cr-N nanocomposite coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao Mingdong, E-mail: bmingd@yahoo.com.c [School of mechanical engineering, Ningbo University of Technology, Ningbo 315016 (China); Yu Lei; Xu Xuebo [School of mechanical engineering, Ningbo University of Technology, Ningbo 315016 (China); He Jiawen [State Key Lab. for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, 710049 (China); Sun Hailin [Teer Coatings Ltd., Berry Hill Industrial Estate, Droitwich Worcestershire WR9 9AS (United Kingdom); Zhejiang Huijin-Teer Coatings Technolgy Co., Ltd., Lin' an 311305 (China); Teer, D.G. [Teer Coatings Ltd., Berry Hill Industrial Estate, Droitwich Worcestershire WR9 9AS (United Kingdom)

    2009-07-01

    Hard Cr-N and silicon doped Cr-Si-N nanocomposite coatings were deposited using closed unbalanced magnetron sputtering ion plating system. Coatings doped with various Si contents were synthesized by changing the power applied on Si targets. Composition of the films was analyzed using glow discharge optical emission spectrometry (GDOES). Microstructure and properties of the coatings were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and nano-indentation. The harnesses and the elastic modulus of Cr-Si-N coatings gradually increased with rising of silicon content and exhibited a maximum at silicon content of 4.1 at.% and 5.5 at.%. The maximum hardness and elastic modulus of the Cr-Si-N nanocomposite coatings were approximately 30 GPa and 352 GPa, respectively. Further increase in the silicon content resulted in a decrease in the hardness and the elastic modulus of the coatings. Results from XRD analyses of CrN coatings indicated that strongly preferred orientations of (111) were detected. The diffraction patterns of Cr-Si-N coatings showed a clear (220) with weak (200) and (311) preferred orientations, but the peak of CrN (111) was decreased with the increase of Si concentration. The XRD data of single-phase Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} was free of peak. The peaks of CrN (111) and (220) were shifted slightly and broadened with the increase of silicon content. SEM observations of the sections of Cr-Si-N coatings with different silicon concentrations showed a typical columnar structure. It was evident from TEM observation that nanocomposite Cr-Si-N coatings exhibited nano-scale grain size. Friction coefficient and specific wear rate (SWR) of silicon doped Cr-N coatings from pin-on-disk test were significantly lower in comparison to that of CrN coatings.

  1. Characterisation of cell death inducing Phytophthora capsici CRN effectors suggests diverse activities in the host nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remco eStam

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Plant-Microbe interactions are complex associations that feature recognition of Pathogen Associated Molecular Patterns by the plant immune system and dampening of subsequent responses by pathogen encoded secreted effectors. With large effector repertoires now identified in a range of sequenced microbial genomes, much attention centres on understanding their roles in immunity or disease. These studies not only allow identification of pathogen virulence factors and strategies, they also provide an important molecular toolset suited for studying immunity in plants. The Phytophthora intracellular effector repertoire encodes a large class of proteins that translocate into host cells and exclusively target the host nucleus. Recent functional studies have implicated the CRN protein family as an important class of diverse effectors that target distinct subnuclear compartments and modify host cell signalling. Here, we characterised three necrosis inducing CRNs and show that there are differences in the levels of cell death. We show that only expression of CRN20_624 has an additive effect on PAMP induced cell death but not AVR3a induced ETI. Given their distinctive phenotypes, we assessed localisation of each CRN with a set of nuclear markers and found clear differences in CRN subnuclear distribution patterns. These assays also revealed that expression of CRN83_152 leads to a distinct change in nuclear chromatin organisation, suggesting a distinct series of events that leads to cell death upon over-expression. Taken together, our results suggest diverse functions carried by CRN C-termini, which can be exploited to identify novel processes that take place in the host nucleus and are required for immunity or susceptibility.

  2. A Study of Work Engagement among Community College Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Gemmy S.

    2017-01-01

    This study examined how community college instructors perceive their level of work engagement. Businesses have studied work engagement, but the empirical literature on work engagement of community college instructors has been limited. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent the type of faculty member (full-time instructor versus…

  3. United States-Latin America Cancer Research Network (US-LA CRN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The US–LA CRN was established in 2009 to increase cancer research capacity in Latin America. NCI formalized bilateral agreements with the governments of Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, Peru, Puerto Rico, and Uruguay, to facilitate interactions at the government, institution, and investigator levels.

  4. Porous CrN thin films by selectively etching CrCuN for symmetric supercapacitors

    KAUST Repository

    Wei, Binbin

    2018-03-18

    Transition metal nitrides are regarded as a new class of excellent electrode materials for high-performance supercapacitors due to their superior chemical stability and excellent electrical conductivity. We synthesize successfully the porous CrN thin films for binder-free supercapacitor electrodes by reactive magnetron co-sputtering and selective chemical etching. The porous CrN thin film electrodes exhibit high-capacitance performance (31.3 mF cm−2 at 1.0 mA cm−2) and reasonable cycling stability (94% retention after 20000 cycles). Moreover, the specific capacitance is more than two-fold higher than that of the CrN thin film electrodes in previous work. In addition, a symmetric supercapacitor device with a maximum energy density of 14.4 mWh cm−3 and a maximum power density of 6.6 W cm−3 is achieved. These findings demonstrate that the porous CrN thin films will have potential applications in supercapacitors.

  5. Porous CrN thin films by selectively etching CrCuN for symmetric supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Binbin; Mei, Gui; Liang, Hanfeng; Qi, Zhengbing; Zhang, Dongfang; Shen, Hao; Wang, Zhoucheng

    2018-05-01

    Transition metal nitrides are regarded as a new class of excellent electrode materials for high-performance supercapacitors due to their superior chemical stability and excellent electrical conductivity. We synthesize successfully the porous CrN thin films for binder-free supercapacitor electrodes by reactive magnetron co-sputtering and selective chemical etching. The porous CrN thin film electrodes exhibit high-capacitance performance (31.3 mF cm-2 at 1.0 mA cm-2) and reasonable cycling stability (94% retention after 20000 cycles). Moreover, the specific capacitance is more than two-fold higher than that of the CrN thin film electrodes in previous work. In addition, a symmetric supercapacitor device with a maximum energy density of 14.4 mWh cm-3 and a maximum power density of 6.6 W cm-3 is achieved. These findings demonstrate that the porous CrN thin films will have potential applications in supercapacitors.

  6. Corrosion resistance of CrN thin films produced by dc magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruden, A. [Laboratorio de Física del Plasma, Universidad Nacional de Colombia Sede Manizales, Km. 9 vía al Magdalena, Manizales (Colombia); Laboratorio de Recubrimientos Duros y Aplicaciones Industriales–RDAI, Universidad del Valle, Calle 13 N° 100-00 Ciudadela Meléndez, Cali (Colombia); Departamento de matemáticas, Universidad Tecnológica de Pereira, Pereira (Colombia); Restrepo-Parra, E., E-mail: erestrepopa@unal.edu.co [Laboratorio de Física del Plasma, Universidad Nacional de Colombia Sede Manizales, Km. 9 vía al Magdalena, Manizales (Colombia); Paladines, A.U.; Sequeda, F. [Laboratorio de Recubrimientos Duros y Aplicaciones Industriales–RDAI, Universidad del Valle, Calle 13 N° 100-00 Ciudadela Meléndez, Cali (Colombia)

    2013-04-01

    In this study, the electrochemical behavior of chromium nitride (CrN) coatings deposited on two steel substrates, AISI 304 and AISI 1440, was investigated. The CrN coatings were prepared using a reactive d.c. magnetron sputtering deposition technique at two different pressures (P1 = 0.4 Pa and P2 = 4 Pa) with a mixture of N{sub 2}–Ar (1.5-10). The microstructure and crystallinity of the CrN coatings were investigated using X-ray diffraction. The aqueous corrosion behavior of the coatings was evaluated using two methods. The polarization resistance (Tafel curves) and electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS) in a saline (3.5% NaCl solution) environment were measured in terms of the open-circuit potentials and polarization resistance (R{sub p}). The results indicated that the CrN coatings present better corrosion resistance and R{sub p} values than do the uncoated steel substrates, especially for the coatings produced on the AISI 304 substrates, which exhibited a strong enhancement in the corrosion resistance. Furthermore, better behavior was observed for the coatings produced at lower pressures (0.4 Pa) than those grown at 4 Pa.

  7. Sealing of hard CrN and DLC coatings with atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Härkönen, Emma; Kolev, Ivan; Díaz, Belén; Swiatowska, Jolanta; Maurice, Vincent; Seyeux, Antoine; Marcus, Philippe; Fenker, Martin; Toth, Lajos; Radnoczi, György; Vehkamäki, Marko; Ritala, Mikko

    2014-02-12

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a thin film deposition technique that is based on alternating and saturating surface reactions of two or more gaseous precursors. The excellent conformality of ALD thin films can be exploited for sealing defects in coatings made by other techniques. Here the corrosion protection properties of hard CrN and diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings on low alloy steel were improved by ALD sealing with 50 nm thick layers consisting of Al2O3 and Ta2O5 nanolaminates or mixtures. In cross sectional images the ALD layers were found to follow the surface morphology of the CrN coatings uniformly. Furthermore, ALD growth into the pinholes of the CrN coating was verified. In electrochemical measurements the ALD sealing was found to decrease the current density of the CrN coated steel by over 2 orders of magnitude. The neutral salt spray (NSS) durability was also improved: on the best samples the appearance of corrosion spots was delayed from 2 to 168 h. On DLC coatings the adhesion of the ALD sealing layers was weaker, but still clear improvement in NSS durability was achieved indicating sealing of the pinholes.

  8. Microstructural evolution of nanochannel CrN films under ion irradiation at elevated temperature and post-irradiation annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jun; Hong, Mengqing; Wang, Yongqiang; Qin, Wenjing; Ren, Feng; Dong, Lan; Wang, Hui; Hu, Lulu; Cai, Guangxu; Jiang, Changzhong

    2018-03-01

    High-performance radiation tolerance materials are crucial for the success of future advanced nuclear reactors. In this paper, we present a further investigation that the "vein-like" nanochannel films can enhance radiation tolerance under ion irradiation at high temperature and post-irradiation annealing. The chromium nitride (CrN) nanochannel films with different nanochannel densities and the compact CrN film are chosen as a model system for these studies. Microstructural evolution of these films were investigated using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Elastic Recoil Detection (ERD) and Grazing Incidence X-ray Diffraction (GIXRD). Under the high fluence He+ ion irradiation at 500 °C, small He bubbles with low bubble densities are observed in the irradiated nanochannel CrN films, while the aligned large He bubbles, blistering and texture reconstruction are found in the irradiated compact CrN film. For the heavy Ar2+ ion irradiation at 500 °C, the microstructure of the nanochannel CrN RT film is more stable than that of the compact CrN film due to the effective releasing of defects via the nanochannel structure. Under the He+ ion irradiation and subsequent annealing, compared with the compact film, the nanochannel films have excellent performance for the suppression of He bubble growth and possess the strong microstructural stability. Basing on the analysis on the sizes and number densities of bubbles as well as the concentrations of He retained in the nanochannel CrN films and the compact CrN film under different experimental conditions, potential mechanism for the enhanced radiation tolerance are discussed. Nanochannels play a crucial role on the release of He/defects under ion irradiation. We conclude that the tailored "vein-like" nanochannel structure may be used as advanced radiation tolerance materials for future nuclear reactors.

  9. Ion implantation induced structural changes in reactively sputtered Cr-N layers on Si substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novakovic, M.; Popovic, M.; Perusko, D.; Milinovic, V.; Radovic, I.; Bibic, N.; Mitric, M.; Milosavljevic, M.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the structure and composition of reactively sputtered Cr-N layers as a function of deposition parameters, and the effects of ion implantation on these structures. The layers were deposited on (1 0 0) Si substrates to a thickness of 240-280 nm, at different nitrogen partial pressure, and subsequently irradiated with 120 keV Ar ions. Structural characterisation of the samples was performed with Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. We also measured their electrical resistivity with a four point probe. It was found that the layers grow in form of columnar structures, and their composition, Cr 2 N or CrN, strongly depends on the nitrogen partial pressure during deposition. Ion irradiation induces local micro-structural changes, formation of nano-particles and defects, which can be nicely correlated to the measured electrical resistivity

  10. Continuously Growing Ultrathick CrN Coating to Achieve High Load-Bearing Capacity and Good Tribological Property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zechao; Wang, Yongxin; Cheng, Xiaoying; Zeng, Zhixiang; Li, Jinlong; Lu, Xia; Wang, Liping; Xue, Qunji

    2018-01-24

    Continuous growth of traditional monolayer CrN coatings up to 24 h is successfully achieved to fabricate ultrathickness of up to 80 μm on the 316 stainless steel substrate using a multiarc ion plating technique. The microstructures, mechanical properties, and tribological properties evolution with the CrN coating continuously growing was evaluated in detail. The transmission electron microscopy observations and inverse Fourier-filtered images reveal a relaxation mechanism during the continuous growth of CrN coating, which can lead to a decrease in the residual stress when coating growth time exceeds 5 h. The scratch test and friction test results both show that the load-bearing capacity of coating is significantly increased as CrN coatings growing thicker. During the scratch test, the ultrathick CrN coating of thickness 80.6 μm is not failed under the load of 180 N, and the dominant failure mechanism is the cohesive failure including wedge spallation and cracking. The dry-sliding friction test results show the mean coefficient of friction and the wear rate of ultrathick CrN are respectively decreased by 17.2 and 56.8% at most compared with the thin coating (thickness is 5.4 μm). The ultrahigh load-bearing capacity and excellent tribological property are attributed to the relaxation mechanism and limited contact pressure as the coating grows continuously.

  11. Personalized instructor responses to guided student reflections: Analysis of two instructors' perspectives and practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinholz, Daniel L.; Dounas-Frazer, Dimitri R.

    2017-11-01

    One way to foster a supportive culture in physics departments is for instructors to provide students with personal attention regarding their academic difficulties. To this end, we have developed the Guided Reflection Form (GRF), an online tool that facilitates student reflections and personalized instructor responses. In the present work, we report on the experiences and practices of two instructors who used the GRF in an introductory physics lab course. Our analysis draws on two sources of data: (i) post-semester interviews with both instructors and (ii) the instructors' written responses to 134 student reflections. Interviews focused on the instructors' perceptions about the goals and framing of the GRF activity, and characteristics of good or bad feedback. Their GRF responses were analyzed for the presence of up to six types of statement: encouraging statements, normalizing statements, empathizing statements, strategy suggestions, resource suggestions, and feedback to the student on the structure of students' reflections. We find that both instructors used all six response types, in alignment with their perceptions of what counts as good feedback. In addition, although each instructor had their own unique feedback style, both instructors' feedback practices were compatible with two principles for effective feedback: praise should focus on effort, express confidence in students' abilities, and be sincere; and process-level feedback should be specific and strategy-oriented. This exploratory qualitative investigation demonstrates that the GRF can serve as a mechanism for instructors to pay personal attention to their students. In addition, it opens the door to future work about the impact of the GRF on student-teacher interactions.

  12. CrN thin films prepared by reactive DC magnetron sputtering for symmetric supercapacitors

    KAUST Repository

    Wei, Binbin

    2016-12-29

    Supercapacitors have been becoming indispensable energy storage devices in micro-electromechanical systems and have been widely studied over the past few decades. Transition metal nitrides with excellent electrical conductivity and superior cycling stability are promising candidates as supercapacitor electrode materials. In this work, we report the fabrication of CrN thin films using reactive DC magnetron sputtering and further their applications for symmetric supercapacitors for the first time. The CrN thin film electrodes fabricated under the deposition pressure of 3.5 Pa show an areal specific capacitance of 12.8 mF cm at 1.0 mA cm and high cycling stability with 92.1% capacitance retention after 20 000 cycles in a 0.5 M HSO electrolyte. Furthermore, our developed CrN//CrN symmetric supercapacitor can deliver a high energy density of 8.2 mW h cm at the power density of 0.7 W cm along with outstanding cycling stability. Thus, the CrN thin films have great potential for application in supercapacitors and other energy storage systems.

  13. Role of N defects in paramagnetic CrN at finite temperatures from first principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozafari, E.; Alling, B.; Steneteg, P.; Abrikosov, Igor A.

    2015-03-01

    Simulations of defects in paramagnetic materials at high temperature constitute a formidable challenge to solid-state theory due to the interaction of magnetic disorder, vibrations, and structural relaxations. CrN is a material where these effects are particularly large due to a strong magnetolattice coupling and a tendency for deviations from the nominal 1:1 stoichiometry. In this work, we present a first-principles study of nitrogen vacancies and nitrogen interstitials in CrN at elevated temperature. We report on formation energetics, the geometry of interstitial nitrogen dimers, and the impact on the electronic structure caused by the defects. We find a vacancy formation energy of 2.28 eV with a small effect of temperature, i.e., a formation energy for N interstitial in the form of a -oriented split bond of 3.77 eV with an increase to 3.97 at 1000 K. Vacancies are found to add three electrons, while split-bond interstitial adds one electron to the conduction band. The band gap of defect-free CrN is smeared out due to vibrations, although it is difficult to draw a conclusion about the exact temperature at which the band gap closes from our calculations. However, it is clear that at 900 K there is a nonzero density of electronic states at the Fermi level. At 300 K, our results indicate a border case where the band gap is about to close.

  14. Training of OJT instructors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiggin, N.A.

    1987-01-01

    OJT (on-the-job) instructor training needs to include several important elements. They need to provide OJT instructors with the policies and procedures for conducting and documenting the training; they need to acquaint them with performance objectives and train them to measure performance against these objectives; but most of all they need to teach them how to demonstrate a manipulative skill at the level of the objective, for this is the most likely single teaching method that the OJT instructor will use. This teaching skill consists of several discrete elements, all of which can be taught and learned. Finally, the OJT instructor needs to know how to create a job performance measure to assess the achievement of the learners. This paper describes such a training program

  15. The Therapeutic Function of the Instructor in Abnormal Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halgin, Richard P.

    1982-01-01

    Describes three main types of therapeutic problems which college instructors of abnormal psychology courses may encounter with their students. Students may seek the instructor's assistance in helping a relative or acquaintance or for self-help. Often a student may not seek help but may display pathological behavior. (AM)

  16. Competency profile of Fitness Instructor

    OpenAIRE

    Peterová, Marta

    2011-01-01

    Title: COMPETENCY PROFILE OF FITNESS INSTRUCTOR Objectives: The aim of this work is to find out competencies of fitness instructor and make a competency profile, containing competencies, which are important for excellent fitness instructor. Methods: I applied the method of interview and the method of research in my thesis. The interview was used to make a list of competencies of fitness instructor. The research was applied in the final part of making competency profile, for an attestation of ...

  17. Marketing Research. Instructor's Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small Business Administration, Washington, DC.

    Prepared for the Administrative Management Course Program, this instructor's manual was developed to serve small-business management needs. The sections of the manual are as follows: (1) Lesson Plan--an outline of material covered, which may be used as a teaching guide, presented in two columns: the presentation, and a step-by-step indication of…

  18. Automated Accounting. Instructor Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Duane R.

    This curriculum guide was developed to assist business instructors using Dac Easy Accounting College Edition Version 2.0 software in their accounting programs. The module consists of four units containing assignment sheets and job sheets designed to enable students to master competencies identified in the area of automated accounting. The first…

  19. Evaluation of anti-scale property of CrN coatings at high temperature and high pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, Tomomi; Iwai, Yoshiro; Uno, Ryoji; Yoshinaga, Shigeki

    2007-01-01

    It is well known that oxide scale which adheres to the inner wall of the nozzle in nuclear power plant causes a serious problem. This study was carried out to obtain the knowledge about initiation and deposition behavior of oxide scale on the surface of SUS304 stainless steel and the evaluation of anti-scale property of chromium nitride (CrN) coatings at high temperature and high pressure. SUS304 stainless steel and CrN coating specimens were heated in water up to 200degC for more than 250 hours. Obtained results are summarized as follows. Initiation of the scale started from corrosive part of SUS304 stainless steel and the scale grows by deposition of magnetite particles. CrN coating can be applied to prevent the initiation and deposition of oxide scale. (author)

  20. CRN13 candidate effectors from plant and animal eukaryotic pathogens are DNA-binding proteins which trigger host DNA damage response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Garcés, Diana; Camborde, Laurent; Pel, Michiel J C; Jauneau, Alain; Martinez, Yves; Néant, Isabelle; Leclerc, Catherine; Moreau, Marc; Dumas, Bernard; Gaulin, Elodie

    2016-04-01

    To successfully colonize their host, pathogens produce effectors that can interfere with host cellular processes. Here we investigated the function of CRN13 candidate effectors produced by plant pathogenic oomycetes and detected in the genome of the amphibian pathogenic chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (BdCRN13). When expressed in Nicotiana, AeCRN13, from the legume root pathogen Aphanomyces euteiches, increases the susceptibility of the leaves to the oomycete Phytophthora capsici. When transiently expressed in amphibians or plant cells, AeCRN13 and BdCRN13 localize to the cell nuclei, triggering aberrant cell development and eventually causing cell death. Using Förster resonance energy transfer experiments in plant cells, we showed that both CRN13s interact with nuclear DNA and trigger plant DNA damage response (DDR). Mutating key amino acid residues in a predicted HNH-like endonuclease motif abolished the interaction of AeCRN13 with DNA, the induction of DDR and the enhancement of Nicotiana susceptibility to P. capsici. Finally, H2AX phosphorylation, a marker of DNA damage, and enhanced expression of genes involved in the DDR were observed in A. euteiches-infected Medicago truncatula roots. These results show that CRN13 from plant and animal eukaryotic pathogens promotes host susceptibility by targeting nuclear DNA and inducing DDR. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  1. What Drives Student Engagement: Is It Learning Space, Instructor Behavior, or Teaching Philosophy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawers, Kimberly M.; Wicks, David; Mvududu, Nyaradzo; Seeley, Lane; Copeland, Raedene

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates how instructor teaching philosophy (traditional vs. constructivist) and type of learning space (traditional vs. active) influence instructor perceptions of student engagement. In a quasi-experimental study, we found that instructors perceived that students were more engaged in the active learning classroom (ALC) than in the…

  2. Climate change and its impact on the Crn Drim Catchment Area In Macedonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todorovik, Oliviia; Aleksovska, Nina; Rikaloska, Gorica

    2004-01-01

    In this paper it will be presented the overview of the climate change and climate regimes of the world in general according different scenarios in the latest assessment (the 3d Report published in 2001) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and its impact on the Crn Drim catchment area in Macedonia.This analysis and interpretation only provides a preliminary investigation into climate change and how it will affect Ohrid and Prespa lake system as a part of Crn Drim catchment area, which is already attacked by the climate changed. From the climatological aspect two elements: temperature and rainfall, will be' calculated and their expected changes over the century in the same area. Dates used in these analyses are from the Hydro meteorological Service of Republic of Macedonia archives In the graphs are shown changes in average seasonal climate for the period around the 2080s, relative to 1961-1990 climate. Results are shown for the SRES A2 scenario, which assumes a future world of fairly conventional energy development, i.e., continuing dependence on fossil carbon fuels. The projections for average seasonal climate for temperature and precipitation are estimated and shown separately for two seasons: winter and summer. The estimated values are compared with annual mean global worming for the 2080s,-and for the SRES A2 scenario, as calculated by the IPCC (a value of about 3.2 o C). The results show rate of worming greater in summer than in winter for Ohrid Lake as well as for Prespa Lake. Concerning the precipitation, it increases slightly in winter and decreases substantially in summer, by around 30 per cent. As the conclusion it is obviously that the temperature will rise in all Crn Drim catchment area with implications for increasing water temperature and water quality, which would be degraded by higher water temperature. This will increase evaporation and as the results can be expected water level decreasing. Also, higher temperatures and heat

  3. Electrochemical Behavior and Hydrophobic Properties of CrN and CrNiN Coatings in Simulated Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JIN Jie

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The CrN and CrNiN coatings were prepared on the surface of 304 stainless steel by closed field unbalanced magnetron sputtering.X ray diffraction and field emission scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize the structure and morphology of the coatings.The electrochemical corrosion properties under the simulated proton exchange membrane fuel cell(PEMFC environment, interfacial contact resistance and hydrophobic properties of the two kinds of different coatings were investigated by electrochemical methods,contact resistance test and hydrophobic test,respectively.The results indicate that CrN coating mainly consists of CrN and Cr2N phase,CrN and Cr2N phases in the CrNiN coating are less compared to CrN film, and Ni exist as element in CrNiN coating; dynamic polarization tests show the coating is of better corrosion resistance,whereas the corrosion resistance of CrNiN coating is worse than that of CrN coating,constant potential polarization test shows the corrosion current density of CrN and CrNiN coatings are equivalent; CrN and CrNiN coatings significantly reduce the interfacial contact resistance of the 304 stainless steel,among which CrN coating has the smallest contact resistance; and CrNiN coating which has better hydrophobicity than that of CrN coating is more beneficial for the water management in proton exchange membrane fuel cell.

  4. Tribology of ZRN, CRN and TIALN thin films deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Ruden

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available El coeficiente de fricción y el coeficiente de desgaste, representan dos variables importantes para la elección de recubrimientos duros en aplicaciones críticas de ingeniería tales como corte y conformado de materiales. Para explicar de manera profunda estas variables, es necesario conocer los diferentes tipos de desgaste que ocurren en estas superficies recubiertas. Se han evaluado recubrimientos de nitruro de circonio (ZrN, nitruro de cromo (CrN y nitruro de titanio aluminio (TiAlN, producidos por la técnica magnetrón sputtering reactivo, determinando las propiedades tribológicas, midiendo coeficientes de fricción (COF y desgaste, y mostrando un análisis de los mecanismos de desgaste presentes para cada recubrimiento durante el contacto tribológico en sistemas cerámicos. Se observó que el voltaje de polarización incrementa las fallas por deformación plástica y la generación de un tercer cuerpo en la superficie del ZrN. El aumento del flujo de nitrógeno en la deposición de CrN, mejora el comportamiento tribológico al segregar la fase cúbica del material, optimizando sus propiedades superficiales. Al incrementar la temperatura de deposición del TiAlN se mejora su calidad superficial (reducción de rugosidad y densidad de poros, reduciendo la abrasión y aumentando la capacidad de carga del compuesto.

  5. Statistics Anxiety and Instructor Immediacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Amanda S.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between instructor immediacy and statistics anxiety. It was predicted that students receiving immediacy would report lower levels of statistics anxiety. Using a pretest-posttest-control group design, immediacy was measured using the Instructor Immediacy scale. Statistics anxiety was…

  6. Consultative Instructor Supervision and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, William W.

    2010-01-01

    Organizations vary greatly in how they monitor training instructors. The methods used in monitoring vary greatly. This article presents a systematic process for improving instructor skills that result in better teaching and better learning, which results in better-prepared employees for the workforce. The consultative supervision and evaluation…

  7. CrossFit® Instructor Demographics and Practice Trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waryasz, Gregory R; Suric, Vladimir; Daniels, Alan H; Gil, Joseph A; Eberson, Craig P

    2016-11-17

    CrossFit ® is an increasingly popular exercise modality that uses high intensity power training. The literature to date regarding CrossFit ® has focused on its benefits to VO2 Max, body composition and the motivational variables of participants of CrossFit ® . A computerized survey was distributed to CrossFit ® instructors using Survey Monkey ® (Palo Alto, CA, USA). One hundred and ninety-three CrossFit ® instructors responded to the survey. Of these 86.6% (155/179) reported being a certified CrossFit ® instructor with 26.7% (48/180) having a bachelor's degree in an exercise-related field. Instructors with a CrossFit ® certification have less bachelor's (P=0.04) or master's (P=0.0001) degrees compared to those without a CrossFit ® certification, more utilization of Olympic weightlifting (P=0.03), one-on-one teaching (P=0.0001), 1-RM max on snatch (P=0.004), 1-RM on clean and jerk or hang clean (P=0.0003), kettlebell use (P=0.0001) and one-on-one training (P=0.0001). Instructors report differences in their education and differences in use of weightlifting platforms and various types of footwear. Non-certified instructors differ from CrossFit ® certified instructors in regards to teaching of Olympic weightlifting and exercise programming.

  8. CrossFit® instructor demographics and practice trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory R. Waryasz

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available CrossFit® is an increasingly popular exercise modality that uses high intensity power training. The literature to date regarding CrossFit® has focused on its benefits to VO2 Max, body composition and the motivational variables of participants of CrossFit®. A computerized survey was distributed to CrossFit® instructors using Survey Monkey® (Palo Alto, CA, USA. One hundred and ninety-three CrossFit® instructors responded to the survey. Of these 86.6% (155/179 reported being a certified CrossFit® instructor with 26.7% (48/180 having a bachelor’s degree in an exercise-related field. Instructors with a CrossFit® certification have less bachelor’s (P=0.04 or master’s (P=0.0001 degrees compared to those without a CrossFit® certification, more utilization of Olympic weightlifting (P=0.03, one-on-one teaching (P=0.0001, 1-RM max on snatch (P=0.004, 1- RM on clean and jerk or hang clean (P=0.0003, kettlebell use (P=0.0001 and one-on-one training (P=0.0001. Instructors report differences in their education and differences in use of weightlifting platforms and various types of footwear. Non-certified instructors differ from CrossFit® certified instructors in regards to teaching of Olympic weightlifting and exercise programming.

  9. Microstructural and tribological investigations of CrN coated, wet-stripped and recoated functional substrates used for cutting and forming tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebole, R.; Martinez, A.; Rodriguez, R.; Fuentes, G.G.; Spain, E.; Watson, N.; Avelar-Batista, J.C.; Housden, J.; Montala, F.; Carreras, L.J.; Tate, T.J.

    2004-01-01

    Recent breakthroughs in wet-stripping Physical Vapour Deposited (PVD) CrN coatings on standard high speed and stainless steels and on hard metal substrates are reported in this work. Validation of the stripping process was evaluated in terms of substrate damage after exposure to the chemical agents and also in terms of the tribological properties of the PVD CrN layers before (Pristine) and after stripping and re-coating (Recoated). The investigation was focussed on the influence of the stripping processes on the hardness, roughness, adherence and wear resistance of the Recoated CrN coatings deposited by electron beam PVD (e-beam) after stripping. Analysis of the chemically stripped and Recoated steel substrates showed that: (a) hardness and elastic modulus of the Recoated e-beam CrN did not change significantly compared to Pristine e-beam CrN, and (b) surface roughness of the Recoated e-beam CrN layers was greater by a factor of 50-60% than the initial. For hard-metal substrates, the surface damage and its effect on the re-deposited coating performance in terms of the chemical reactions during the stripping process were discussed. It was observed that wet-stripping in a basic solution led to depletion of tungsten and carbon at the surface of the stripped WC-Co specimens

  10. Structural, morphological, and optical characterizations of Mo, CrN and Mo:CrN sputtered coatings for potential solar selective applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Khalil; Mahbubur Rahman, M.; Taha, Hatem; Mohammadpour, Ehsan; Zhou, Zhifeng; Yin, Chun-Yang; Nikoloski, Aleksandar; Jiang, Zhong-Tao

    2018-05-01

    Mo, CrN, and Mo:CrN sputtered coatings synthesized onto silicon Si(100) substrates were investigated as solar selective surfaces and their potential applications in optical devices. These coatings were characterized using XRD, SEM, UV-vis, and FTIR techniques. XRD investigation, showed a change in CrN thin film crystallite characteristic due to Mo doping. Compared to the CrN coating, the Mo:CrN film has a higher lattice parameter and lower grain size of 4.19 nm and 106.18 nm, respectively. FESEM morphology confirmed the decrement in Mo:CrN crystal size due to Mo doping. Optical analysis showed that in the visible range of the solar spectrum, the CrN coatings exhibit the highest solar absorptance of 66% while the lowest thermal emittance value of 5.67 was recorded for the CrN coating doped with Mo. Consequently, the highest solar selectivity of 9.6, and the energy band-gap of 2.88 eV were achieved with the Mo-doped CrN coatings. Various optical coefficients such as optical absorption coefficient, refractive index, extinction coefficient, real and imaginary parts of dielectric constants, and energy loss functions of these coatings were also estimated from the optical reflectance data recorded in the wavelength range of 190-2300 nm.

  11. Effects of ion implantation on the microstructure and residual stress of filter arc CrN films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weng, K.-W.; Chen, Y.-C.; Han Sheng; Hsu, C.-S.; Chen, Y.-L.; Wang, D.-Y.

    2008-01-01

    Chromium nitride coatings were deposited using a hybrid physical vapor deposition (PVD) system containing a filter arc deposition (FAD) and a metal plasma ion implantation source (MPII). Exactly how surface residual stress affects film characteristics is investigated using glancing incident X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) and pole figure analyses. Compared with unimplanted CrN, implanted carbon typically increases compressive residual stress and hardness. Wear resistance was also improved by implanted carbon

  12. Developing and maintaining instructor capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flynn, W.P.; Smith, G.

    1985-01-01

    The New York Power Authority, after surveying available courses, decided to develop an in-house instructor training program. Following the principles of the Systems Approach to Training the course embodied the results of a job analysis resulting in a program containing instruction in Educational Philosophy, the Systems Approach to Training, Methods and Media, and Testing. The course content is covered through classroom instruction, on-the-job training, instructor evaluations, and assignments. Instructors completing the program continue to maintain skills with inservice training

  13. An Automatic Course Scheduling Approach Using Instructors' Preferences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossam Faris

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available University Courses Timetabling problem has been extensively researched in the last decade. Therefore, numerous approaches were proposed to solve UCT problem. This paper proposes a new approach to process a sequence of meetings between instructors, rooms, and students in predefined periods of time with satisfying a set of constraints divided in variety of types. In addition, this paper proposes new representation for courses timetabling and conflict-free for each time slot by mining instructor preferences from previous schedules to avoid undesirable times for instructors. Experiments on different real data showed the approach achieved increased satisfaction degree for each instructor and gives feasible schedule with satisfying all hard constraints in construction operation. The generated schedules have high satisfaction degrees comparing with schedules created manually. The research conducts experiments on collected data gathered from the computer science department and other related departments in Jordan University of Science and Technology- Jordan.

  14. Simulating CRN derived erosion rates in a transient Andean catchment using the TTLEM model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campforts, Benjamin; Vanacker, Veerle; Herman, Frédéric; Schwanghart, Wolfgang; Tenrorio Poma, Gustavo; Govers, Gerard

    2017-04-01

    Assessing the impact of mountain building and erosion on the earth surface is key to reconstruct and predict terrestrial landscape evolution. Landscape evolution models (LEMs) are an essential tool in this research effort as they allow to integrate our growing understanding of physical processes governing erosion and transport of mass across the surface. The recent development of several LEMs opens up new areas of research in landscape evolution. Here, we want to seize this opportunity by answering a fundamental research question: does a model designed to simulate landscape evolution over geological timescales allows to simulate spatially varying erosion rates at a millennial timescale? We selected the highly transient Paute catchment in the Southeastern Ecuadorian Andes as a study area. We found that our model (TTLEM) is capable to better explain the spatial patterns of ca. 30 Cosmogenic Radio Nuclide (CRN) derived catchment wide erosion rates in comparison to a classical, statistical approach. Thus, the use of process-based landscape evolution models may not only be of great help to understand long-term landscape evolution but also in understanding spatial and temporal variations in sediment fluxes at the millennial time scale.

  15. CrN coatings deposited by magnetron sputtering: Mechanical and tribological properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Ruden-Muñoz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Se analizaron las propiedades mecánicas y tribológicas de recubrimientos de CrN crecidos sobre sutratos de aceros AISI 203 y AISI 4140 usando la técnica de pulverización catódica con magnetrón. Los recubrimietos fueron crecidos a dos presiones de trabajo, 0.4 y 4.0 Pa. Las películas crecidas sobre acero AISI 304 a 0.4 Pa mostraron la dureza más alta debido a que ésta presenta gran tamaño de grano y baja rugosidad. Para los recubrimientos sinterizados a o.4 Pa, el daño superficial fue bajo durante la prueba tribológica. Se realizaron estudios de adherencia, obteniéndose Lc1 y Lc2 para los recubrimietos producidos con ambas presiones y en abos sustratos. Se observó una mejor adherencia en las películas crecidas a baja presión debido a su mayor espesor (~890 nm.

  16. Implementation of TiAIN and CrN coatings and ion implantation in the modern plastics moulding industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bienk, E.J.; Mikkelsen, N.J.

    1997-01-01

    Two methods of surface improvement widely used in the modern plastics industry are compared, with a view to improving productivity and product quality. Ion implantation of plastics and physical vapour deposition coatings both offer surface engineering advantages. Each method is described and evaluated with reference to plastics moulding. TiAIN coatings are used to protect hard bulk materials, subjected to evenly distributed loads. The more ductile CrN coatings are used for softer materials which give less support to the coatings. (UK)

  17. High Rate Deposition of Thick CrN and Cr2N Coatings Using Modulated Pulse Power (MPP) Magnetron Sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    AISI 440C steel using a microtribometer (Center for Tribology , Inc) in an ambient air atmosphere without a lubricant (a relative humidity of 251...that the CTE for the 440 C stainless steel substrate is 10.2x10 -6 o C -1 [37],while the CTE values for the CrN and Cr2N coatings are 2.3x10 -6...increased scratch critical load (Fig. 12) as the coating thickness was increased. Since the coating is much harder than the stainless steel substrate

  18. Measuring Adjunct Instructor Job Satisfaction by Using Herzberg's Motivation-Hygiene Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickens, Durrell

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed to use Herzberg's motivation-hygiene theory to investigate the different levels of job satisfaction among adjunct college instructors at eight institutions of higher education located in southeast Texas. Differences in job satisfaction were measured by instructor gender, ethnicity, age, teaching experience, type of course…

  19. Military Instructor Training in Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-05-01

    RNSETT 51 supervision at a training establishment; they finally return to the school for a further two weeks of consolidation. The embryo Instructor...seriously the ideal concept of individualization, severe problems could arise over the question of who controls the destinies of learners. Institutions

  20. 14 CFR 121.412 - Qualifications: Flight instructors (airplane) and flight instructors (simulator).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... (airplane) and flight instructors (simulator). 121.412 Section 121.412 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL... OPERATIONS Training Program § 121.412 Qualifications: Flight instructors (airplane) and flight instructors (simulator). (a) For the purposes of this section and § 121.414: (1) A flight instructor (airplane) is a...

  1. Tribology and stability of organic monolayers on CrN: a comparison among silane, phosphonate, alkene, and alkyne chemistries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujari, Sidharam P; Li, Yan; Regeling, Remco; Zuilhof, Han

    2013-08-20

    The fabrication of chemically and mechanically stable monolayers on the surfaces of various inorganic hard materials is crucial to the development of biomedical/electronic devices. In this Article, monolayers based on the reactivity of silane, phosphonate, 1-alkene, and 1-alkyne moieties were obtained on the hydroxyl-terminated chromium nitride surface. Their chemical stability and tribology were systematically investigated. The chemical stability of the modified CrN surfaces was tested in aqueous media at 60 °C at pH 3, 7, and 11 and monitored by static water contact angle measurements, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), ellipsometry, and Fourier transform infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (FT-IRRAS). The tribological properties of the resulting organic monolayers with different end groups (fluorinated or nonfluorinated) were studied using atomic force microscopy (AFM). It was found that the fluorinated monolayers exhibit a dramatic reduction of adhesion and friction force as well as excellent wear resistance compared to those of nonfluorinated coatings and bare CrN substrates. The combination of remarkable chemical stability and superior tribological properties makes these fluorinated monolayers promising candidates for the development of robust high-performance devices.

  2. Changing Instructor's Roles in Virtual Worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berge, Zane L.

    2008-01-01

    Berge's Instructor's Roles Model categorized the instructor's roles as pedagogical, social, managerial, and technical. Developed more than a decade ago, this model described changing roles for instructors as they transitioned from in-person classrooms to teaching online. Today, as virtual worlds emerge and are being used as educational platforms,…

  3. An Instructor's Guide for a Program in Brake Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Secondary Curriculum Development.

    The instructor's guide is designed to present an understanding of the automotive hydraulic brake system and to help individuals develop new skills for employment in this specialized field of automotive service. Applicable for secondary or adult education, this guide describes: the brake system, types of brakes, diagnosis and correction of brake…

  4. Effects of Instructor Attractiveness on Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westfall, Richard; Millar, Murray; Walsh, Mandy

    2016-01-01

    Although a considerable body of research has examined the impact of student attractiveness on instructors, little attention has been given to the influence of instructor attractiveness on students. This study tested the hypothesis that persons would perform significantly better on a learning task when they perceived their instructor to be high in physical attractiveness. To test the hypothesis, participants listened to an audio lecture while viewing a photograph of instructor. The photograph depicted either a physically attractive instructor or a less attractive instructor. Following the lecture, participants completed a forced choice recognition task covering material from the lecture. Consistent with the predictions; attractive instructors were associated with more learning. Finally, we replicated previous findings demonstrating the role attractiveness plays in person perception.

  5. Personality differences in high risk sports amateurs and instructors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Alison E; Pulford, Briony D

    2004-08-01

    This study investigated the personality differences of 21 amateurs and 20 instructors who participated in the high risk sports of skydiving, hang-gliding, paragliding, scuba diving, microlighting, and rock climbing, versus those who did not. 38 men and 28 women (M age=32.6 yr., SD= 10.0) were assessed using the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire-Revised, the General Health Questionnaire, the Generalised Self-efficacy Scale, and a Type A/B personality measure. Instructors and Amateurs scored significantly higher on Extroversion and lower on Neuroticism than Nonparticipants; however, they differed from each other on the General Health Questionnaire and Type A/B personality scores. Amateurs scored significantly higher on Psychoticism and Self-efficacy than Instructors and Nonparticipants. In conclusion, these test scores suggest that people who are attracted to high risk sports tend to be at the extroverted and emotionally stable end of the scale, with a tendency to exhibit Type A characteristics; however, Instructors' scores on Psychoticism and Self-efficacy are more akin to those of Nonparticipants.

  6. Instructor's guide : - synchronized skating school

    OpenAIRE

    Mokkila, Eveliina

    2011-01-01

    The starting point to the Instructor’s guide for synchronized skating school was the situation that Turun Riennon Taitoluistelu figure skating club constantly struggles to get enough skaters to the Beginner team in synchronized skating. The guidebook was written to guide the skating school instructors towards providing more synchronized skating teaching in their lessons. As a result from introducing synchronized skating more in the skating school, it is expected to have more children conti...

  7. CrN/AlN superlattice coatings synthesized by pulsed closed field unbalanced magnetron sputtering with different CrN layer thicknesses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Jianliang; Moore, John J.; Mishra, Brajendra; Pinkas, Malki; Zhang Xuhai; Sproul, William D.

    2009-01-01

    CrN/AlN superlattice coatings with different CrN layer thicknesses were prepared using a pulsed closed field unbalanced magnetron sputtering system. A decrease in the bilayer period from 12.4 to 3.0 nm and simultaneously an increase in the Al/(Cr + Al) ratio from 19.1 to 68.7 at.% were obtained in the CrN/AlN coatings when the Cr target power was decreased from 1200 to 200 W. The bilayer period and the structure of the coatings were characterized by means of low angle and high angle X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The mechanical and tribological properties of the coatings were studied using the nanoindentation and ball-on-disc wear tests. It was found that CrN/AlN superlattice coatings synthesized in the current study exhibited a single phase face-centered cubic structure with well defined interfaces between CrN and AlN nanolayers. Decreases in the residual stress and the lattice parameter were identified with a decrease in the CrN layer thickness. The hardness of the coatings increased with a decrease in the bilayer period and the CrN layer thickness, and reached the highest value of 42 GPa at a bilayer period of 4.1 nm (CrN layer thickness of 1.5 nm, AlN layer thickness of 2.5 nm) and an Al/(Cr + Al) ratio of 59.3 at.% in the coatings. A low coefficient of friction of 0.35 and correspondingly low wear rate of 7 x 10 -7 mm 3 N -1 m -1 were also identified in this optimized CrN/AlN coating when sliding against a WC-6%Co ball.

  8. NRC's object-oriented simulator instructor station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, J.I.; Griffin, J.P.

    1995-06-01

    As part of a comprehensive simulator upgrade program, the simulator computer systems associated with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) nuclear power plant simulators were replaced. Because the original instructor stations for two of the simulators were dependent on the original computer equipment, it was necessary to develop and implement new instructor stations. This report describes the Macintosh-based Instructor Stations developed by NRC engineers for the General Electric (GE) and Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) simulators

  9. 14 CFR 91.1095 - Initial and transition training and checking: Flight instructors (aircraft), flight instructors...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... instructor certificate— (i) The fundamental principles of the teaching-learning process; (ii) Teaching... Management § 91.1095 Initial and transition training and checking: Flight instructors (aircraft), flight...

  10. Instructor Credibility across Disciplines: Identifying Students' Differentiated Expectations of Instructor Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obermiller, Carl; Ruppert, Bryan; Atwood, April

    2012-01-01

    Business communication instructors can face a unique set of challenges to maintain their credibility with students. Communication plays an important role in the instructor-student relationship, and students judge instructors' ability to teach communication based on their ability to practice what they teach. The authors' empirical study shows that…

  11. Students and Instructors Opinions about Piano Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, Deniz Beste Çevik

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the opinions of the students and piano instructors in the Turkish Education Faculties' Fine Arts Instruction Departments' music instruction programs about piano instruction. The study data were collected using a questionnaire administered to the piano instructors and the students who took lessons from them. The study results…

  12. Improving Supervision of Part-Time Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eney, Patricia R.; Davidson, Evelyn

    2012-01-01

    With an increasing number of colleges and universities turning to part-time instructors to teach courses at their institutions, developmental education professionals are faced with the task of finding appropriate ways to train, serve, and evaluate these instructors. Unfortunately, there is little published information on how to accomplish these…

  13. Liability exposure for surgical robotics instructors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yu L; Kilic, Gokhan; Phelps, John Y

    2012-01-01

    Surgical robotics instructors provide an essential service in improving the competency of novice gynecologic surgeons learning robotic surgery and advancing surgical skills on behalf of patients. However, despite best intentions, robotics instructors and the gynecologists who use their services expose themselves to liability. The fear of litigation in the event of a surgical complication may reduce the availability and utility of robotics instructors. A better understanding of the principles of duty of care and the physician-patient relationship, and their potential applicability in a court of law likely will help to dismantle some concerns and uncertainties about liability. This commentary is not meant to discourage current and future surgical instructors but to raise awareness of liability issues among robotics instructors and their students and to recommend certain preventive measures to curb potential liability risks. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Effect of negative bias voltage on CrN films deposited by arc ion plating. I. Macroparticles filtration and film-growth characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Qimin; Kim, Kwang Ho

    2008-01-01

    Chromium nitride (CrN) films were deposited on Si wafers by arc ion plating (AIP) at various negative bias voltages and several groups of N 2 /Ar gas flux ratios and chamber gas pressures. The authors systematically investigated the influence of negative bias voltage on the synthesis, composition, microstructure, and properties of the AIP CrN films. In this part (Part I), the investigations were mainly focused on the macroparticle distributions and film-growth characteristics. The results showed that macroparticle densities on the film surfaces decreased greatly by applying negative bias voltage, which can be affected by partial pressure of N 2 and Ar gases. From the statistical analysis of the experimental results, they proposed a new hybrid mechanism of ion bombardment and electrical repulsion. Also, the growth of the AIP CrN films was greatly altered by applying negative bias voltage. By increasing the bias voltage, the film surfaces became much smoother and the films evolved from apparent columnar microstructures to an equiaxed microstructure. The impinging high-energy Cr ions accelerated by negative bias voltages were deemed the inherent reason for the evolution of growth characteristics

  15. RXLR and CRN Effectors from the Sunflower Downy Mildew Pathogen Plasmopara halstedii Induce Hypersensitive-Like Responses in Resistant Sunflower Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gascuel, Quentin; Buendia, Luis; Pecrix, Yann; Blanchet, Nicolas; Muños, Stéphane; Vear, Felicity; Godiard, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    Plasmopara halstedii is an obligate biotrophic oomycete causing downy mildew disease on sunflower, Helianthus annuus, an economically important oil crop. Severe symptoms of the disease (e.g., plant dwarfism, leaf bleaching, sporulation and production of infertile flower) strongly impair seed yield. Pl resistance genes conferring resistance to specific P. halstedii pathotypes were located on sunflower genetic map but yet not cloned. They are present in cultivated lines to protect them against downy mildew disease. Among the 16 different P. halstedii pathotypes recorded in France, pathotype 710 is frequently found, and therefore continuously controlled in sunflower by different Pl genes. High-throughput sequencing of cDNA from P. halstedii led us to identify potential effectors with the characteristic RXLR or CRN motifs described in other oomycetes. Expression of six P. halstedii putative effectors, five RXLR and one CRN, was analyzed by qRT-PCR in pathogen spores and in the pathogen infecting sunflower leaves and selected for functional analyses. We developed a new method for transient expression in sunflower plant leaves and showed for the first time subcellular localization of P. halstedii effectors fused to a fluorescent protein in sunflower leaf cells. Overexpression of the CRN and of 3 RXLR effectors induced hypersensitive-like cell death reactions in some sunflower near-isogenic lines resistant to pathotype 710 and not in susceptible corresponding lines, suggesting they could be involved in Pl loci-mediated resistances. PMID:28066456

  16. RXLR and CRN effectors from the sunflower downy mildew pathogen Plasmopara halstedii induce hypersensitive-like responses in resistant sunflower lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quentin Gascuel

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Plasmopara halstedii is an obligate biotrophic oomycete causing downy mildew disease on sunflower, Helianthus annuus, an economically important oil crop. Severe symptoms of the disease (e.g. plant dwarfism, leaf bleaching, sporulation and production of infertile flower strongly impair seed yield. Pl resistance genes conferring resistance to specific P. halstedii pathotypes were located on sunflower genetic map but yet not cloned. They are present in cultivated lines to protect them against downy mildew disease. Among the 16 different P. halstedii pathotypes recorded in France, pathotype 710 is frequently found, and therefore continuously controlled in sunflower by different Pl genes. High-throughput sequencing of cDNA from P. halstedii led us to identify potential effectors with the characteristic RXLR or CRN motifs described in other oomycetes. Expression of six P. halstedii putative effectors, five RXLR and one CRN, was analysed by qRT-PCR in pathogen spores and in the pathogen infecting sunflower leaves and these six effectors were selected for functional analyses. We developed a new method for transient expression in sunflower plant leaves and showed for the first time subcellular localization of P. halstedii effectors fused to a fluorescent protein in sunflower leaf cells. Overexpression of the CRN and of 3 RXLR effectors induced hypersensitive-like cell death reactions in some sunflower near-isogenic lines resistant to pathotype 710 and not in susceptible corresponding lines, suggesting they could be involved in Pl loci-mediated resistances.

  17. Tribological properties of CrN coatings deposited by nitro-chromizing treatment on AISI D2 steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durmaz, M., E-mail: mdurmaz@sakarya.edu.tr; Abakay, E.; Sen, U.; Sen, S. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Engineering Faculty, Sakarya University, Esentepe Campus, 54187 Sakarya (Turkey); Kilinc, B. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Institute of Arts and Sciences, Sakarya University, Esentepe Campus, 54187 Sakarya (Turkey)

    2015-03-30

    In this work, the wear test of uncoated and chromium nitride coated AISI D2 cold work tool steel against alumina ball realized at 0.1 m/s sliding speeds and under the loads of 2.5N, 5N and 10N. Steel samples were nitrided at 575°C for 8 h in the first step of the coating process, and then chromium nitride coating was performed thermo-reactive deposition technique (TRD) in a powder mixture consisting of ferro-chromium, ammonium chloride and alumina at 1000°C for 2 h. Nitro-chromized samples were characterized by X-Ray diffraction analysis (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), micro-hardness and ball on disk wear tests. The coating layer formed on the AISI D2 steel was compact and homogeneous. X-ray studies showed that the phase formed in the coated layer is Cr{sub 2}N. The depth of the layer was 8.15 µm. The average hardness of the layer was 2160±15 HV{sub 0.025}. For uncoated and chromium nitride materials, wear rate increased with increasing load. The results of friction coefficient and wear rate of the tested materials showed that the CrN coating presents the lowest results.

  18. Tribological properties of CrN coatings deposited by nitro-chromizing treatment on AISI D2 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durmaz, M.; Abakay, E.; Sen, U.; Sen, S.; Kilinc, B.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the wear test of uncoated and chromium nitride coated AISI D2 cold work tool steel against alumina ball realized at 0.1 m/s sliding speeds and under the loads of 2.5N, 5N and 10N. Steel samples were nitrided at 575°C for 8 h in the first step of the coating process, and then chromium nitride coating was performed thermo-reactive deposition technique (TRD) in a powder mixture consisting of ferro-chromium, ammonium chloride and alumina at 1000°C for 2 h. Nitro-chromized samples were characterized by X-Ray diffraction analysis (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), micro-hardness and ball on disk wear tests. The coating layer formed on the AISI D2 steel was compact and homogeneous. X-ray studies showed that the phase formed in the coated layer is Cr 2 N. The depth of the layer was 8.15 µm. The average hardness of the layer was 2160±15 HV 0.025 . For uncoated and chromium nitride materials, wear rate increased with increasing load. The results of friction coefficient and wear rate of the tested materials showed that the CrN coating presents the lowest results

  19. Tribological properties of CrN coatings deposited by nitro-chromizing treatment on AISI D2 steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durmaz, M.; Kilinc, B.; Abakay, E.; Sen, U.; Sen, S.

    2015-03-01

    In this work, the wear test of uncoated and chromium nitride coated AISI D2 cold work tool steel against alumina ball realized at 0.1 m/s sliding speeds and under the loads of 2.5N, 5N and 10N. Steel samples were nitrided at 575°C for 8 h in the first step of the coating process, and then chromium nitride coating was performed thermo-reactive deposition technique (TRD) in a powder mixture consisting of ferro-chromium, ammonium chloride and alumina at 1000°C for 2 h. Nitro-chromized samples were characterized by X-Ray diffraction analysis (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), micro-hardness and ball on disk wear tests. The coating layer formed on the AISI D2 steel was compact and homogeneous. X-ray studies showed that the phase formed in the coated layer is Cr2N. The depth of the layer was 8.15 µm. The average hardness of the layer was 2160±15 HV0.025. For uncoated and chromium nitride materials, wear rate increased with increasing load. The results of friction coefficient and wear rate of the tested materials showed that the CrN coating presents the lowest results.

  20. Oxidation resistance of TiN, CrN, TiAlN and CrAlN coatings deposited by lateral rotating cathode arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chim, Y.C.; Ding, X.Z.; Zeng, X.T.; Zhang, S.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, four kinds of hard coatings, TiN, CrN, TiAlN and CrAlN (with Al/Ti or Al/Cr atomic ratio around 1:1), were deposited on stainless steel substrates by a lateral rotating cathode arc technique. The as-deposited coatings were annealed in ambient atmosphere at different temperatures (500-1000 o C) for 1 h. The evolution of chemical composition, microstructure, and microhardness of these coatings after annealing at different temperatures was systematically analyzed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and nanoindentation experiments. The oxidation behaviour and its influence on overall hardness of these four coatings were compared. It was found that the ternary TiAlN and CrAlN coatings have better oxidation resistance than their binary counterparts, TiN and CrN coatings. The Cr-based coatings (CrN and CrAlN) exhibited evidently better oxidation resistance than the Ti-based coatings (TiN and TiAlN). TiN coating started to oxidize at 500 o C. After annealing at 700 o C no N could be detected by EDX, indicating that the coating was almost fully oxidized. After annealed at 800 o C, the coating completely delaminated from the substrate. TiAlN started to oxidize at 600 o C. It was nearly fully oxidized (with little residual nitrogen detected in the coating by EDX) and partially delaminated at 1000 o C. Both CrN and CrAlN started to oxidize at 700 o C. CrN was almost fully oxidized (with little residual nitrogen detected in the coating by EDX) and partially delaminated at 900 o C. The oxidation rate of the CrAlN coating is quite slow. After annealing at 1000 o C, only about 19 at.% oxygen was detected and the coating showed no delamination. The Ti-based (TiN and TiAlN) coatings were not able to retain their hardness at higher temperatures (≥ 700 o C). On the other hand, the hardness of CrAlN was stable at a high level between 33 and 35 GPa up to an annealing temperature of 800 o C and still kept at a comparative high value of

  1. Simulator training effectiveness: instructor training and qualifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scholand, G.W.

    1985-01-01

    Nuclear power plant simulators have become the most important tool in training nuclear power plant operators. Yet, as these machines continue to become even more sophisticated, highly trained and experienced instructors with unique skills and insights are still essential in order to achieve effective and meaningful training. The making of a qualified simulator instructor involves training and techniques that exceed the traditional programs required of a Senior Reactor Operator (SRO). This paper discusses (i) the training necessary to produce a competent simulator instructor; and (ii) the continuing task of maintaining his or her proficiency. (author)

  2. An exploration of implications for the development of Pilates instructor system through identification of instructors? difficulties

    OpenAIRE

    Roh, Su Yeon

    2016-01-01

    This study is aimed at exploring ideas for the development of Pilates instructor qualification system by identifying a range of difficulties Pilates instructors are experiencing. Open-ended questionnaires and semi-structured interviews were conducted to collect data before they were analyzed with inductive content analysis method. In consideration of the difficulties Pilates instructors experience during three qualification stages (before-during-after qualification education), three key categ...

  3. 75 FR 56857 - Pilot, Flight Instructor, and Pilot School Certification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-17

    ...-2006-26661; Amendment No., 141-14] RIN 2120-AI86 Pilot, Flight Instructor, and Pilot School..., certification, and operating requirements for pilots, flight instructors, ground instructors, and pilot schools...: Background On August 21, 2009, the FAA published the ``Pilot, Flight Instructor, and Pilot School...

  4. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Ethical Leadership: Perceptions of Instructors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    academic leaders and instructors in the Western Cluster universities of Ethiopia. To this end, qualitative .... methods should be in place to ensure ..... dedication to the satisfaction of the interests of ... customers and take corrective measures.

  5. Food or Thought? Assessing Internal and External Factors Affecting Evaluations of Instructor Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, John; Kiggins, Ryan; Kickham, Kenneth

    2017-01-01

    Within the broader literature concerned with potential bias in student measures of instructor effectiveness, two broad types of bias have been shown to operate in a course: internal and external. Missing is an assessment of the relative influence of each bias type in the classroom. Do internal or external types of bias matter more or less to…

  6. Qualification of contractor/consultant instructors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, H.D.

    1985-01-01

    Following a brief discussion of the role of consultant instructors in Public Service Electric and Gas Company's training organization, the qualification process is presented. Consultant instructors are provided with information regarding supervision of the trainees and the instructional process and procedures required. Each individual must have his or her instructional capability, supervisory skills and technical competence verified and documented prior to conducting training independently. Concluding comments describe the overall satisfactory experience with this program

  7. Instructor development program at Three Mile Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irizarry, C.A.; Jones, J.W.; Knief, R.

    1981-01-01

    The Three Mile Island (TMI) Training Department has prepared and conducted Instructor Development Programs which have upgraded the capabilities of its instructors and provided more uniformity among its diverse efforts. The week-long course was prepared in-house by a staff that combined college teaching experience in both education and technical subjects with strong background in industrial training. Through the first two offerings of the course, twenty-five individuals have participated and eight have served on the course staff

  8. Instructor and student knowledge of study strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morehead, Kayla; Rhodes, Matthew G; DeLozier, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Students' self-reported study skills and beliefs are often inconsistent with empirically supported (ES) study strategies. However, little is known regarding instructors' beliefs about study skills and if such beliefs differ from those of students. In the current study, we surveyed college students' and instructors' knowledge of study strategies and had both groups evaluate the efficacy of learning strategies described in six learning scenarios. Results from the survey indicated that students frequently reported engaging in methods of studying that were not optimal for learning. Instructors' responses to the survey indicated that they endorsed a number of effective study skills but also held several beliefs inconsistent with research in learning and memory (e.g., learning styles). Further, results from the learning scenarios measure indicated that instructors were moderately more likely than students to endorse ES learning strategies. Collectively, these data suggest that instructors exhibited better knowledge of effective study skills than students, although the difference was small. We discuss several notable findings and argue for the improvement of both students' and instructors' study skill knowledge.

  9. Improving Teach Astronomy: A Survey of Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, Matthew; Riabokin, Malanka; Impey, Chris David

    2018-01-01

    Teach Astronomy is a website that provides educational resources for introductory astronomy. The motivation behind constructing this site was to provide quality online educational tools for use as a primary or supplementary instructional resource for teachers and students. The website provides an online textbook, glossary, podcasts and video summaries of concepts. As the popularity of online courses steadily increases, so does the demand for robust online educational resources. In order to cater to our users, our team conducted a survey of the instructors that use Teach Astronomy site for feedback for use in updating and streamlining the website content. The survey collected feedback regarding functionality of each of the website tools, in which courses the site was being used, and the motivation of the instructors use of our site. The overwhelming majority of responses indicate that instructors use the website as a class textbook in introductory astronomy courses for non-science majors, and instructors also generally tended to agree that the site content was comprehensive and lucid. One interesting result of the survey is to cluster topics in a way that is consistent with different levels of instruction (i.e. grouping middle-school level content and university level content distinctly). Our team will use this feedback to improve the Teach Astronomy website and maintain it as a high-quality, free online resource. We will also continue to gather feedback from instructors to ensure that the Teach Astronomy website stays current and remains a valuable online resource for instructors around the country.

  10. Coupling data from U-series and 10Be CRN to evaluate soil steady-state in the Betic Cordillera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoonejans, Jerome; Vanacker, Veerle; Opfergelt, Sophie; Granet, Mathieu; Chabaux, François

    2015-04-01

    The regolith mantel is produced by weathering of bedrock through physical and biochemical processes. At the same time, the upper part of the regolith is eroded by gravity mass movements, water and wind erosion. Feedback's between production and erosion of soil material are important for soil development, and are essential to reach long-term steady-state in soil chemical and physical properties. Nowadays, long-term denudation rates of regolith can be quantified by using in-situ cosmogenic nuclides (CRN). If the soil thickness remains constant over sufficiently long time, soil production rates can be determined. However, the a priori assumption of long-term steady-state can be questionable in highly dynamic environments. In this study, we present analytical data from two independent isotopic techniques, in-situ cosmogenic nuclides and Uranium series disequilibrium. The disequilibrium of Uranium isotopes (238U, 234U, 230Th, 226Ra) is an alternative method that allows assessing soil formation rates through isotopic analysis of weathering products. Nine soil profiles were sampled in three different mountain ranges of the Betic Cordillera (SE Spain): Sierra Estancias, Filabres, Cabrera. All soils overly fractured mica schist and are very thin (< 60cm). In each soil profile, we sampled 4 to 6 depth slices in the soil profile, the soil-bedrock interface and (weathered) bedrock. Three of the nine soil profiles were sampled for U-series isotope measurements at EOST (University of Strasbourg). The surface denudation rates (CRN) are about the same in the Sierra Estancias and Filabres (26 ± 10 mm/ky) and increase up to 103 ± 47 mm/ky in the Sierra Cabrera. The spatial variation in soil denudation rates is in agreement with the variation in catchment-wide denudation rates presented by Bellin et al. (2014) which present the highest rates in the Sierra Cabrera (104-246mm/kyr). Moreover it roughly coincides with the pattern of long-term exhumation of the Betic Cordillera. Results

  11. Bayesian inversion of a CRN depth profile to infer Quaternary erosion of the northwestern Campine Plateau (NE Belgium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Laloy

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The rate at which low-lying sandy areas in temperate regions, such as the Campine Plateau (NE Belgium, have been eroding during the Quaternary is a matter of debate. Current knowledge on the average pace of landscape evolution in the Campine area is largely based on geological inferences and modern analogies. We performed a Bayesian inversion of an in situ-produced 10Be concentration depth profile to infer the average long-term erosion rate together with two other parameters: the surface exposure age and the inherited 10Be concentration. Compared to the latest advances in probabilistic inversion of cosmogenic radionuclide (CRN data, our approach has the following two innovative components: it (1 uses Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC sampling and (2 accounts (under certain assumptions for the contribution of model errors to posterior uncertainty. To investigate to what extent our approach differs from the state of the art in practice, a comparison against the Bayesian inversion method implemented in the CRONUScalc program is made. Both approaches identify similar maximum a posteriori (MAP parameter values, but posterior parameter and predictive uncertainty derived using the method taken in CRONUScalc is moderately underestimated. A simple way for producing more consistent uncertainty estimates with the CRONUScalc-like method in the presence of model errors is therefore suggested. Our inferred erosion rate of 39 ± 8. 9 mm kyr−1 (1σ is relatively large in comparison with landforms that erode under comparable (paleo-climates elsewhere in the world. We evaluate this value in the light of the erodibility of the substrate and sudden base level lowering during the Middle Pleistocene. A denser sampling scheme of a two-nuclide concentration depth profile would allow for better inferred erosion rate resolution, and including more uncertain parameters in the MCMC inversion.

  12. Bayesian inversion of a CRN depth profile to infer Quaternary erosion of the northwestern Campine Plateau (NE Belgium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laloy, Eric; Beerten, Koen; Vanacker, Veerle; Christl, Marcus; Rogiers, Bart; Wouters, Laurent

    2017-07-01

    The rate at which low-lying sandy areas in temperate regions, such as the Campine Plateau (NE Belgium), have been eroding during the Quaternary is a matter of debate. Current knowledge on the average pace of landscape evolution in the Campine area is largely based on geological inferences and modern analogies. We performed a Bayesian inversion of an in situ-produced 10Be concentration depth profile to infer the average long-term erosion rate together with two other parameters: the surface exposure age and the inherited 10Be concentration. Compared to the latest advances in probabilistic inversion of cosmogenic radionuclide (CRN) data, our approach has the following two innovative components: it (1) uses Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling and (2) accounts (under certain assumptions) for the contribution of model errors to posterior uncertainty. To investigate to what extent our approach differs from the state of the art in practice, a comparison against the Bayesian inversion method implemented in the CRONUScalc program is made. Both approaches identify similar maximum a posteriori (MAP) parameter values, but posterior parameter and predictive uncertainty derived using the method taken in CRONUScalc is moderately underestimated. A simple way for producing more consistent uncertainty estimates with the CRONUScalc-like method in the presence of model errors is therefore suggested. Our inferred erosion rate of 39 ± 8. 9 mm kyr-1 (1σ) is relatively large in comparison with landforms that erode under comparable (paleo-)climates elsewhere in the world. We evaluate this value in the light of the erodibility of the substrate and sudden base level lowering during the Middle Pleistocene. A denser sampling scheme of a two-nuclide concentration depth profile would allow for better inferred erosion rate resolution, and including more uncertain parameters in the MCMC inversion.

  13. Instructor Misbehavior and Forgiveness: An Examination of Student Communicative Outcomes in the Aftermath of Instructor Misbehavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallade, Jessalyn I.; Malachowski, Colleen M.

    2015-01-01

    Using Attribution Theory as a theoretical framework, this study explored the role of forgiveness in impacting student nonverbal responsiveness, out-of-class communication (OCC), and perceptions of cognitive and affective learning following instructor misbehavior. Additionally, the role of instructor nonverbal immediacy was examined. Participants…

  14. T & I--Electric Motors. Kit No. 621. Instructor's Manual and Student Learning Activity Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomar, William

    This instructor's manual and student learning activity guide comprise a kit for trade and industrial education (T & I) activities on electric motors. Purpose stated for the activities is to teach the student the four basic types of electric motors, the advantages and disadvantages of each, the types of jobs each can perform, and how to disassemble…

  15. Sustainable transportation : technology, engineering, and science - summer camp instructor's guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    This document reproduces the instructors guide for a ten day transportation engineering summer camp that was held at the University of Idaho in July 2013. The instructors guide is split into three units: Unit 1: Vehicle Technology, Unit 2: Traf...

  16. Accommodating Oversize and Overweight Loads : Instructor and Student Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    This instructor and student guide is designed to guide the instructor in conveying information at the district level concerning Research Project 0-6404 Accommodating Oversize and Overweight Loads. The specific information focuses on the Bryan D...

  17. An Instructor's Diagnostic Aid for Feedback in Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Dee H.; Uliano, Kevin C.

    1988-01-01

    Instructor's Diagnostic Aid for Feedback in Training (IDAFT) is a computer-assisted method based on error analysis, domains of learning, and events of instruction. Its use with Navy team instructors is currently being explored. (JOW)

  18. 14 CFR 61.193 - Flight instructor privileges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... than Flight Instructors With a Sport Pilot Rating § 61.193 Flight instructor privileges. A person who...; (e) An aircraft rating; (f) An instrument rating; (g) A flight review, operating privilege, or...

  19. CRN: 1987 Progress Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    In the Nuclear Research Center activity report, the research works effected in each of the following departments are shown: Nuclear Physics: theoretical and experimental Nuclear Physics Works, technical studies, accomplishments and applications, the Vivitron, publications, conferences and diplomas. High Energies: theoretical and experimental Physics, the LEP-DELPHI project, the NA36 experiment (strange baryons and antibaryons production in relativistic ions collisions), technical developments, publications, conferences and diplomas. Radiation Chemistry and Physics (research reports are separated in six sections): (1) Molecular and Atomic Physics and Physical Chemistry, where the main subjects are Molecular Physics, matter-radiation interactions, positon and positronium chemistry and radiochemistry; (2) Materials Science and condensed matter studies, in which the main topics are the materials elaboration and characterization, Mossbauer spectroscopy and defect implantations; (3) Analysis and instrumentation describing short time applied Optics and sensors; (4) The nuclear reactor service with neutron activation analysis and short life radioisotopes; (5) Publications, communications, conferences, thesis and researchers' stay; (6) Technology transfers concerning accelerators, dosimetry and aliments ionization [fr

  20. CRN: 1986 progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    Departments activities in high energy physics, nuclear physics, radiation physics and chemistry are reported. Collaboration with university led to creation of SRNU (Service du Reacteur Nucleaire). Vivitron studies are presented [fr

  1. Instructor Active Empathic Listening and Classroom Incivility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weger, Harry

    2018-01-01

    Instructor listening skill is an understudied area in instructional communication research. This study looks at teachers' active empathic listening behavior association with student incivility. Scholars recognize student incivility as a growing problem and have called for research that identifies classroom behaviors that can affect classroom…

  2. Establish Best Practices for Supervision of Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    active participants in the feedback process, allowing them to voice their opinions and collaboratively set goals ( Norris , 1991). In the foreign...language instructional context, instructors may desire to participate in the feedback process ( Norris , 1991). Accordingly, effective instructional...13%) and Russian (11%) were the most commonly reported language offerings, followed by Chinese (9%), French (9%), Portuguese (9%), and Spanish (9

  3. Electronics lab instructors' approaches to troubleshooting instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dounas-Frazer, Dimitri R.; Lewandowski, H. J.

    2017-06-01

    In this exploratory qualitative study, we describe instructors' self-reported practices for teaching and assessing students' ability to troubleshoot in electronics lab courses. We collected audio data from interviews with 20 electronics instructors from 18 institutions that varied by size, selectivity, and other factors. In addition to describing participants' instructional practices, we characterize their perceptions about the role of troubleshooting in electronics, the importance of the ability to troubleshoot more generally, and what it means for students to be competent troubleshooters. One major finding of this work is that, while almost all instructors in our study said that troubleshooting is an important learning outcome for students in electronics lab courses, only half of instructors said they directly assessed students' ability to troubleshoot. Based on our findings, we argue that there is a need for research-based instructional materials that attend to both cognitive and noncognitive aspects of troubleshooting proficiency. We also identify several areas for future investigation related to troubleshooting instruction in electronics lab courses.

  4. Radiology Aide. Instructor Key [and] Student Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwein, Jon; Dunham, John

    This manual can be used independently by students in secondary health occupations programs or by persons receiving on-the-job training in a radiology department. The manual includes an instructor's key that provides answers to the activity sheets and unit evaluations. The manual consists of the following five units: (1) orientation to radiology;…

  5. Oral Hygiene. Instructor's Packet. Learning Activity Package.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hime, Kirsten

    This instructor's packet accompanies the learning activity package (LAP) on oral hygiene. Contents included in the packet are a time sheet, suggested uses for the LAP, an instruction sheet, final LAP reviews, a final LAP review answer key, suggested activities, additional resources (student handouts), student performance checklists for both…

  6. The Cost of Becoming an Outdoor Instructor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashel, Chris

    This article describes instructor criteria in three outdoor organizations: Outward Bound (OB), the National Outdoor Leadership School (NOLS), and the Wilderness Education Association (WEA). Common requirements for outdoor leadership programs are outdoor experience and skills, advanced first aid, CPR, and a minimum age requirement. Traditionally…

  7. Mathematics: Foundations for Business. Instructor's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopfe, Manfred W.; Bianci-Rossi, Larry

    This is the instructor's guide to a text designed for the contemporary business student who frequently questions the need for studying mathematics. The text material is presented in a "building-block" fashion, with skills learned in earlier chapters organized to provide a smooth transition into more difficult topics. This guide consists…

  8. Sales Simulation Games: Student and Instructor Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuk, Frederik

    2016-01-01

    This study combines the perspective of students (n = 137) and sales instructors (n = 248). It compares how well selling and sales management simulation games, case discussions, and traditional lectures are perceived to conform to the seven principles for good practice in undergraduate education. The study further compares each method's performance…

  9. Instructor's Guide for Human Development Student Modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Office of Vocational Education.

    This instructor's guide is designed for use with an accompanying set of 61 student learning modules on human development. Included among the topics covered in the individual modules are the following: consumer and homemaking education (health and nutrition, personal appearance and grooming, puberty, menstruation, the human reproductive system,…

  10. Motivating Instructors through Innovative Technology and Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Nicole L.; Barth, Dylan J.

    2016-01-01

    Members of the UWM CETL online and blended faculty development team share innovative technological and pedagogical strategies that they currently utilize to motivate and assist instructors in developing courses for the online or blended environments, and they discuss the lessons learned from incorporating active learning, open content, bring your…

  11. INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY COURSE, INSTRUCTORS' GUIDE. VOLUME 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas A and M Univ., College Station. Engineering Extension Service.

    INFORMATION RELATIVE TO THE LESSON PLANS IN "INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY COURSE, INSTRUCTOR'S GUIDE, VOLUME I" (VT 003 565) IS PRESENTED ON 52 INFORMATION SHEETS INCLUDING THE SUBJECTS SHIELDING EQUATIONS AND LOGARITHMS, METAL PROPERTIES, FIELD TRIP INSTRUCTIONS FOR STUDENTS, WELDING SYMBOLS AND SIZES, SAMPLE REPORT FORMS, AND TYPICAL SHIPPING…

  12. INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY COURSE, INSTRUCTOR'S GUIDE, VOLUME 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas A and M Univ., College Station. Engineering Extension Service.

    THE PURPOSE OF THE GUIDE IS TO GIVE MAXIMUM ASSISTANCE TO INSTRUCTORS IN PLANNING THE TRAINING OF LICENSED INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHERS. IT WAS DEVELOPED BY THE ENGINEERING EXTENSION SERVICE, TEXAS AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL UNIVERSITY, COLLEGE STATION, TEXAS. THE 21 UNITS INCLUDE (1) INDUSTRIAL APPLICATIONS, (2) NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTING METHODS, (3)…

  13. Online Instructors: Andragogical or Pedagogical Teaching?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Victor C. X.; Kania-Gosche, Beth

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the andragogical and pedagogical teaching philosophies of online instructors at the California State University, Long Beach in the Spring Semester of 2010. Drawing from reflective adult education theory, this article proposes a new model for this reflective adult education theory. It is either the helping relationship…

  14. Flipping a Calculus Class: One Instructor's Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Katrina

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes one instructor's experiences during a year of flipping four calculus classes. The first exploration attempts to understand student expectations of a math class and their preference towards a flipped classroom. The second examines success of students from a flipped classroom, and the last investigates relationships with student…

  15. Ten Traits of Highly Effective Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanouette, Mike

    2012-01-01

    The Bill Gates Foundation has spent as much as a third-world country's income on the following conclusion: one of the primary reasons why students struggle in class and often leave school altogether is instructor ineffectiveness. This may be a slightly painful thing to hear, but, as the saying goes, the truth sometimes hurts. Additionally, the…

  16. Listening Skills. Instructor/Lesson Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Carol; And Others

    This instructor/lesson guide provides instructional materials for a 4-hour course in listening skills in the workplace. Stated objectives are to help students to become more effective listeners, to assist students in obtaining an understanding of how effective they are as listeners, and to assist students in identifying bad listening habits. Two…

  17. Fostering Improved Anatomy and Physiology Instructor Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattheis, Allison; Jensen, Murray

    2014-01-01

    Despite widespread calls for reform in undergraduate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education, effecting lasting change in instructor practice is challenging to achieve. This article describes the results of a 2-yr research study that involved efforts to develop the pedagogical expertise of a group of anatomy and physiology…

  18. Grooming. Instructor's Packet. Learning Activity Package.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Pamela

    This instructor's packet accompanies the learning activity package (LAP) on grooming. Contents included in the packet are a time sheet, suggested uses for the LAP, an instruction sheet, final LAP reviews, a final LAP review answer key, suggested activities, an additional resources list, and student completion cards to issue to students as an…

  19. Beat the Instructor: An Introductory Forecasting Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snider, Brent R.; Eliasson, Janice B.

    2013-01-01

    This teaching brief describes a 30-minute game where student groups compete in-class in an introductory time-series forecasting exercise. The students are challenged to "beat the instructor" who competes using forecasting techniques that will be subsequently taught. All forecasts are graphed prior to revealing the randomly generated…

  20. Electronic Mail and the Writing Instructor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawisher, Gail E.; Moran, Charles

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the growing importance of electronic mail among academicians. Offers a rhetoric and a pedagogy that include electronic mail in their fields of vision. Argues that writing instructors should continue to do research into the issues inherent in electronic mail. (HB)

  1. Instructor feedback versus no instructor feedback on performance in a laparoscopic virtual reality simulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strandbygaard, Jeanett; Bjerrum, Flemming; Maagaard, Mathilde

    2013-01-01

    % vs 49%; P = 0.004). Men used less time (in minutes) than women (P = 0.037), but no sex difference was observed for repetitions (P = 0.20). Participants in the intervention group had higher self-perception regarding surgical skills after the trial (P = 0.011). CONCLUSIONS:: Instructor feedback...... increases the efficiency when training a complex operational task on a virtual reality simulator; time and repetitions used to achieve a predefined proficiency level were significantly reduced in the group that received instructor feedback compared with the control group. Trial registration number: NCT......OBJECTIVE:: To investigate the impact of instructor feedback versus no instructor feedback when training a complex operational task on a laparoscopic virtual reality simulator. BACKGROUND:: Simulators are now widely accepted as a training tool, but there is insufficient knowledge about how much...

  2. Instructor Reputation: An Expectancy Relationship Involving Student Ratings and Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Raymond P.

    1979-01-01

    Instructor expressiveness and lecture content were combined with instructor reputation in a 2 X 2 X 2 factorial design to assess interaction effects. Results indicated that reputation interacted with expressiveness but not content, in which students rated positive, high-expressive instructors more favorably than negative, high-expressive…

  3. A Fine Balance: Instructor Self-Disclosure in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Brian M.; Mishna, Faye

    2008-01-01

    This paper explores the issue of the instructor's self-disclosure within a classroom. Theoretically, the paper offers a broad relational framework from which we discuss dynamics regarding the instructor's inevitable use of self-disclosure and its impact on the student-instructor relationship and the learning process. Further, we survey the…

  4. Presence and Positioning as Components of Online Instructor Persona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennen, Vanessa Paz

    2007-01-01

    Instructor persona in online discussion may set the tone for a variety of course outcomes. Instructors establish persona via both presence (amount of instructor posts) and position (interaction relative to those in the student role). In this paper, three online classes were studied using positioning theory as a grounding framework to elicit ways…

  5. Athletic Training Clinical Instructors as Situational Leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Linda Platt

    2002-12-01

    OBJECTIVE: To present Situational Leadership as a model that can be implemented by clinical instructors during clinical education. Effective leadership occurs when the leadership style is matched with the observed followers' characteristics. Effective leaders anticipate and assess change and adapt quickly and grow with the change, all while leading followers to do the same. As athletic training students' levels of readiness change, clinical instructors also need to transform their leadership styles and strategies to match the students' ever-changing observed needs in different situations. DATA SOURCES: CINAHL (1982-2002), MEDLINE (1990-2001), SPORT Discus (1949-2002), ERIC (1966-2002), and Internet Web sites were searched. Search terms included leadership, situational leadership, clinical instructors and leadership, teachers as leaders, and clinical education. DATA SYNTHESIS: Situational Leadership is presented as a leadership model to be used by clinical instructors while teaching and supervising athletic training students in the clinical setting. This model can be implemented to improve the clinical-education process. Situational leaders, eg, clinical instructors, must have the flexibility and range of skills to vary their leadership styles to match the challenges that occur while teaching athletic training students. CONCLUSIONS/RECOMMENDATIONS: This leadership style causes the leader to carry a substantial responsibility to lead while giving power away. Communication is one of the most important leadership skills to develop to become an effective leader. It is imperative for the future of the profession that certified athletic trainers continue to develop effective leadership skills to address the changing times in education and expectations of the athletic training profession.

  6. A Grape Production Guide for Vocational Agriculture Instructors in Washington. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padelford, Stewart L.; Cvancara, Joseph G., Ed.

    This curriculum guide is intended to provide vocational agriculture instructors with an up-to-date resource dealing with grape production in Washington. Addressed in the individual units of the guide are the following topics: the history of grape production; grape types important to Washington; site selection for a vineyard; establishment and…

  7. An Explanation of the Relationship between Instructor Humor and Student Learning: Instructional Humor Processing Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanzer, Melissa B.; Frymier, Ann B.; Irwin, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes the Instructional Humor Processing Theory (IHPT), a theory that incorporates elements of incongruity-resolution theory, disposition theory, and the elaboration likelihood model (ELM) of persuasion. IHPT is proposed and offered as an explanation for why some types of instructor-generated humor result in increased student…

  8. Exploratory Theoretical Tests of the Instructor Humor-Student Learning Link

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolkan, San; Goodboy, Alan K.

    2015-01-01

    Instructors' use of humor is generally a positive influence on student outcomes. However, examinations of humor have found that specific types of messages may not impact, or may even reverse, its positive effect. Instructional humor processing theory (IHPT) has been used to explain how humor impacts student learning. The current study sought to…

  9. Instructor Support Feature Guidelines. Volume 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-05-01

    starts his final approach, the display formats change to provide graphic depictions of glideslope, lineup and airspeed parameters, and indications of...and evaluate several facets of student performance simultaneously . It may also provide objective, standardized performance measurement of the student’s...procedures monitoring feature shall provide the instructor cation with a method of monitoring the sequential mission training activities of a student. The

  10. Providing Language Instructor with Artificial Intelligence Assistant

    OpenAIRE

    K. Pietroszek

    2007-01-01

    Abstract—This paper presents the preliminary results ofdeveloping HAL for CALL, an artificial intelligenceassistant for language instructor. The assistant consists of achatbot, an avatar (a three-dimensional visualization of thechatbot), a voice (text-to-speech engine interface) andinterfaces to external sources of language knowledge. Sometechniques used in adapting freely available chatbot for theneed of a language learning system are presented.Integration of HAL with Second Life virtual wor...

  11. An observation tool for instructor and student behaviors to measure in-class learner engagement: a validation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimoglu, Mustafa K.; Sarac, Didar B.; Alparslan, Derya; Karakas, Ayse A.; Altintas, Levent

    2014-01-01

    Background Efforts are made to enhance in-class learner engagement because it stimulates and enhances learning. However, it is not easy to quantify learner engagement. This study aimed to develop and validate an observation tool for instructor and student behaviors to determine and compare in-class learner engagement levels in four different class types delivered by the same instructor. Methods Observer pairs observed instructor and student behaviors during lectures in large class (LLC, n=2) with third-year medical students, lectures in small class (LSC, n=6) and case-based teaching sessions (CBT, n=4) with fifth-year students, and problem-based learning (PBL) sessions (~7 hours) with second-year students. The observation tool was a revised form of STROBE, an instrument for recording behaviors of an instructor and four randomly selected students as snapshots for 5-min cycles. Instructor and student behaviors were scored 1–5 on this tool named ‘in-class engagement measure (IEM)’. The IEM scores were parallel to the degree of behavior's contribution to active student engagement, so higher scores were associated with more in-class learner engagement. Additionally, the number of questions asked by the instructor and students were recorded. A total of 203 5-min observations were performed (LLC 20, LSC 85, CBT 50, and PBL 48). Results Interobserver agreement on instructor and student behaviors was 93.7% (κ=0.87) and 80.6% (κ=0.71), respectively. Higher median IEM scores were found in student-centered and problem-oriented methods such as CBT and PBL. A moderate correlation was found between instructor and student behaviors (r=0.689). Conclusions This study provides some evidence for validity of the IEM scores as a measure of student engagement in different class types. PMID:25308966

  12. Fostering improved anatomy and physiology instructor pedagogy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattheis, Allison; Jensen, Murray

    2014-12-01

    Despite widespread calls for reform in undergraduate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education, effecting lasting change in instructor practice is challenging to achieve. This article describes the results of a 2-yr research study that involved efforts to develop the pedagogical expertise of a group of anatomy and physiology instructors at the college level. Data were collected through a series of individual interviews that included the use of the Teacher Beliefs Inventory questionnaire (23) along with observations onsite in participants' college classrooms and at process-oriented guided inquiry learning (POGIL) curriculum writing workshops. Findings indicated attitudinal shifts on the part of participants from teacher-centered to more student-centered pedagogy and supported the benefits of long-term professional development for instructors. Here, we documented the successful progress of these professors as they participated in a curriculum development process that emphasized student-centered teaching with the goal of promoting broader change efforts in introductory anatomy and physiology. Copyright © 2014 The American Physiological Society.

  13. College instruction is not so stress free after all: A qualitative and quantitative study of academic entitlement, uncivil behaviors, and instructor strain and burnout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lixin; Tripp, Thomas M; Hong, Phan Y

    2017-12-01

    The vast majority of today's college students are millennials, who have traits of confidence, tolerance, but also of entitlement and narcissism (Twenge, 2006). Therefore, college instructors face a unique challenge: dealing with the requests from academically entitled students, who have unreasonable expectations of receiving academic success, regardless of performance (Chowning & Campbell, 2009). We conducted two studies to examine whether student academic entitlement would increase instructors' strain and burnout via uncivil behaviors. A qualitative inquiry asked 136 instructors with college-teaching experience to describe types of behaviors entitled students display, their responses to entitled students, and the influence of these interactions on instructors' well-being. Next, a quantitative study with data from 857 college students nested in 34 instructors tested a multilevel mediation model where students' academic entitlement was related to instructor-reported uncivil behaviors, which in turn related to instructors' strain and burnout. Both studies largely support our hypothesis that uncivil behaviors fully mediate the relationship between students' academic entitlement and instructors' strain and burnout. We recommend employing behavioral modification strategies to decrease uncivil behaviors (e.g., class rules regarding uncivil behaviors might be specified in the course syllabus and consistently enforced) because academic entitlement attitudes are largely stable beliefs and thus may be less amenable to modification. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Student perceptions of native and non-native speaker language instructors: A comparison of ESL and Spanish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Callahan

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The question of the native vs. non-native speaker status of second and foreign language instructors has been investigated chiefly from the perspective of the teacher. Anecdotal evidence suggests that students have strong opinions on the relative qualities of instruction by native and non-native speakers. Most research focuses on students of English as a foreign or second language. This paper reports on data gathered through a questionnaire administered to 55 university students: 31 students of Spanish as FL and 24 students of English as SL. Qualitative results show what strengths students believe each type of instructor has, and quantitative results confirm that any gap students may perceive between the abilities of native and non-native instructors is not so wide as one might expect based on popular notions of the issue. ESL students showed a stronger preference for native-speaker instructors overall, and were at variance with the SFL students' ratings of native-speaker instructors' performance on a number of aspects. There was a significant correlation in both groups between having a family member who is a native speaker of the target language and student preference for and self-identification with a native speaker as instructor. (English text

  15. SAT for instructor training. An experience in implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioujakov, A.Yu.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, the main approaches for Instructor Training are presented been verified and approved by practice within Russian NPP Training organisations during last 5 years. The instructor selection, recruitment and followed training activities are an essential strategy plan for any NPP training organisation if the latter wants to provide effective training of NPP personnel. The strategy how to reach and maintain the competencies of instructors (or trainers) is explained; key points of instructor training programmes, both initial and continuing, are also discussed. The approaches concerned Instructor Training Programs being in compliance with the best of the Russian and international practice are defined and presented; these approaches in the field of instructor training. Initial and continuous training parts of whole program are discussed including specific modules/parts and principles to be used. Some examples extracted from verified and implemented training courses are presented and discussed. (author)

  16. Aquatic Instructors' Beliefs Toward Inclusion: The Theory of Planned Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conatser, Phillip; Block, Martin; Gansneder, Bruce

    2002-04-01

    The purpose was to (a) examine aquatic instructors' beliefs (female, n = 82; male, n = 29) about teaching swimming to individuals with disabilities in inclusive settings and (b) test the theory of planned behavior model (Ajzen, 1985, 1988, 2001). Aquatic instructors from 25 states representing 122 cities across the U.S. participated in this study. The instrument, named Aquatic Instructors' Beliefs Toward Inclusion (AIBTI), was an extended version of the Physical Educators' Attitudes Toward Teaching Individuals with Disabilities- Swim (Conatser, Block, & Lepore, 2000). A correlated t test showed aquatic instructors' beliefs (attitudes toward the behavior, normative beliefs, perceived behavioral control, intention, behavior) were significantly more favorable toward teaching aquatics to individuals with mild disabilities than individuals with severe disabilities. Stepwise multiple regression showed perceived behavioral control and attitude significantly predicted intention, and intention predicted instructors' inclusive behavior for both disability groups. Further, results indicated the theory of planned behavior predicts aquatic instructors' behavior better than the theory of reasoned action.

  17. Effective Instructor Feedback: Perceptions of Online Graduate Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beverley Getzlaf

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available This descriptive study explored online graduate students' perceptions of effective instructor feedback. The objectives of the study were to determine the students’ perceptions of the content of effective instructor feedback (“what should be included in effective feedback?” and the process of effective instructor feedback (“how should effective feedback be provided?”. The participants were students completing health-related graduate courses offered exclusively online. Data were collected via a survey that included open ended questions inviting participants to share their perspectives regarding effective online instructor feedback. Thematic analysis revealed five major themes: student involvement/individualization, gentle guidance, being positively constructive, timeliness and future orientation. We conclude that effective instructor feedback has positive outcomes for the students. Future studies are warranted to investigate strategies to make feedback a mutual process between instructor and student that supports an effective feedback cycle.

  18. Ethical leadership: perceptions of instructors and academic leaders ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ethical leadership: perceptions of instructors and academic leaders of western cluster public ... PROMOTING ACCESS TO AFRICAN RESEARCH ... to understand their respective institutions and develop effective communication systems.

  19. Providing Language Instructor with Artificial Intelligence Assistant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Pietroszek

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract—This paper presents the preliminary results ofdeveloping HAL for CALL, an artificial intelligenceassistant for language instructor. The assistant consists of achatbot, an avatar (a three-dimensional visualization of thechatbot, a voice (text-to-speech engine interface andinterfaces to external sources of language knowledge. Sometechniques used in adapting freely available chatbot for theneed of a language learning system are presented.Integration of HAL with Second Life virtual world isproposed. We will discuss technical challenges and possiblefuture work directions.

  20. The Relationship between Instructor Servant Leadership Behaviors and Satisfaction with Instructors in an Online Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahawneh, Faris George; Benuto, Lorraine T.

    2018-01-01

    Servant leadership has the potential to improve student satisfaction within online learning. However, the relationship between servant leadership and student satisfaction in an online environment had not yet been understood at the level of the individual instructor. The purpose of this quantitative, correlational study was to evaluate the…

  1. An exploration of implications for the development of Pilates instructor system through identification of instructors' difficulties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Su Yeon

    2016-08-01

    This study is aimed at exploring ideas for the development of Pilates instructor qualification system by identifying a range of difficulties Pilates instructors are experiencing. Open-ended questionnaires and semi-structured interviews were conducted to collect data before they were analyzed with inductive content analysis method. In consideration of the difficulties Pilates instructors experience during three qualification stages (before-during-after qualification education), three key categories were incorporated in the collected data: (1) lack of information on Pilates qualification system, (2) difficulties in understanding the human anatomy related with the diverse movements taught in Pilates classes and its application to Pilates practice, (3) need for professional development through retraining. Based on these findings, a need for rethinking the monitoring and evaluation process for Pilates qualification system and Pilates education in Korea was identified. In addition, we need to summarize and offer information on a range of Pilates qualifications. And the quality of Pilates instructor education program should be improved as well by proving them a range of teaching methods including microteaching, discussion-based lessons as well as reading and writing sessions and other necessary teaching media.

  2. Talent Development of Instructors in Online Higher Education: A Mixed Methods Study of Instructor Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, James W., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    With the new demand for qualified online instructors, universities have struggled with ad hoc supply models to meet it. Most institutions have poached the business world to convert business professionals into teachers. Working against academia are the trends of an aging and homogenous faculty workforce, not to mention the incompetence of…

  3. Retailing. Instructor's Guide Sheets and Instructor's Package, Modules R 1-45. Competency-Based Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kentucky State Dept. of Education, Frankfort.

    This package contains instructor's guide sheets and student task assignment sheets for Modules R 1-45 of the competency-based curriculum in retailing developed for use in secondary and postsecondary schools in Kentucky. Some of the topics covered in the modules include the following: retailing--past, present, and future; retailing occupations;…

  4. Instructor feedback versus no instructor feedback on performance in a laparoscopic virtual reality simulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oestergaard, Jeanett; Bjerrum, Flemming; Maagaard, Mathilde

    2012-01-01

    of training. This is mainly due to lack of knowledge concerning the time and human resources needed to train novice surgeons to an adequate level. The purpose of this trial is to investigate the impact of instructor feedback regarding time, repetitions and self-perception when training complex operational...

  5. NMR studies on 15N-labeled creatine (CR), creatinine (CRN), phosphocreatine (PCR), and phosphocreatinine (PCRN), and on barriers to rotation in creatine kinase-bound creatine in the enzymatic reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenyon, G.L.; Reddick, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    Recently, the authors have synthesized 15 N-2-Cr, 15 N-3-Crn, 15 N-2-Crn, 15 N-3-PCrn, 15 N-3-PCr, and 15 N-2-PCr. 1 H, 15 N, 31 P NMR data show that Crn protonates exclusively at the non-methylated ring nitrogen, confirm that PCrn is phosphorylated at the exocyclic nitrogen, and demonstrate that the 31 P- 15 N one-bond coupling constant in 15 N-3-PCr is 18 Hz, not 3 Hz as previously reported by Brindle, K.M., Porteous, R. and Radda, G.K.. The authors have found that creatine kinase is capable of catalyzing the 14 N/ 15 N positional isotope exchange of 3- 15 N-PCr in the presence of MgADP, but not in its absence. Further, the exchange does not take place when labeled PCr is resynthesized exclusively from the ternary complex E X Cr X MgATP as opposed to either E X Cr or free Cr. This suggests that the enzyme both imparts an additional rotational barrier to creatine in the complex and catalyzes the transfer of phosphoryl group with essentially complete regiospecificity

  6. Native-English Speaking Instructors Teaching Writing in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qing; Zhou, Xiaodi; Fu, Danling

    2015-01-01

    This article presents two separate but related studies on native-English speaking (NES) instructors' teaching writing practice in Chinese universities. One study is a case study that explores the teaching practice of three NES instructors' writing instruction in a southern Chinese university as well as students' responses to their practice.…

  7. When Disgruntled Students Go to Extremes: The Cyberbullying of Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogl-Bauer, Sally

    2014-01-01

    When communication technologies are used by individuals to intentionally threaten or harm others, the potential for anyone to become a target of cyberbullying is very real. Therefore, when it comes to instructor-student interactions, even the most competent or award-winning instructors are not immune from cyberbullying if disgruntled students…

  8. A Survey of Principles Instructors: Why Lecture Prevails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goffe, William L.; Kauper, David

    2014-01-01

    For many years, surveys have shown that lecture is the dominant method for teaching principles of economics (Watts and Schaur 2011; Watts and Becker 2008; Becker and Watts 1996, 2001a, b). The authors confirm this and augment it by asking why principles instructors teach the way they do. The respondents, 340 principles instructors at the 2012…

  9. Effective Pedagogical Practices for Online Teaching: Perception of Experienced Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Craig J.; Card, Karen A.

    2009-01-01

    Institutions have focused on providing faculty with technological training to enhance their online teaching, but many online instructors would like to learn more effective pedagogical practices. This phenomenological study determines what experienced, award-winning South Dakota e-learning instructors perceive to be effective pedagogical practices.…

  10. Perceptions of University Instructors When Listening to International Student Speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, Beth; Elliott, Nancy; Baese-Berk, Melissa

    2017-01-01

    Intensive English Program (IEP) Instructors and content faculty both listen to international students at the university. For these two groups of instructors, this study compared perceptions of international student speech by collecting comprehensibility ratings and transcription samples for intelligibility scores. No significant differences were…

  11. The Effect of Some Constraints on Mathematics Instructors' Problem ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was designed to examine the effect of perceived constraints on four universities mathematics department instructors' classroom practices of problem solving in teaching mathematics. To this end, the target population of the study includes mathematics instructors in the Amhara Regional state universities. From a ...

  12. Comparison of Student and Instructor Perceptions of Social Presence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Mathieson

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available As enrollment in online courses continues to grow and online education is increasingly recognized as an established instructional mode, the unique challenges posed by this learning environment should be addressed. A primary challenge for virtual educators is developing social presence such that participants feel a sense of human connection with each other. Accomplishing this within learning management systems (LMS that are often restrictive can be difficult. Prior research has established a relationship between student perceptions of social presence and satisfaction, but little research has included perceptions of instructors. This study compares student and instructor perceptions of social presence and the importance placed on social connections. While students and instructors reported high levels of social presence, students reported significantly lower levels than instructors. In particular, students found the LMS more impersonal than instructors and were less comfortable participating in LMS activities than instructors. Students had less desire for social connections with other students and instructors, and reported having less time available for such connections. Strategies to facilitate social presence, including offering social networking opportunities outside the LMS, are discussed in light of these differences in perceptions between students and instructors.

  13. College Instructors' Preparedness for Innovative Transformations in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasinskaia, L. F.

    2012-01-01

    Survey data show that instructors are aware of the need for changes in Russian higher education, but are rather demoralized by the difficult social and professional situation in which they work. And so, given the current functioning of higher education, a number of demotivating factors have an influence on instructors' satisfaction with their work…

  14. Instructor Perceptions of Web Technology Feature and Instructional Task Fit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strader, Troy J.; Reed, Diana; Suh, Inchul; Njoroge, Joyce W.

    2015-01-01

    In this exploratory study, university faculty (instructor) perceptions of the extent to which eight unique features of Web technology are useful for various instructional tasks are identified. Task-technology fit propositions are developed and tested using data collected from a survey of instructors in business, pharmacy, and arts/humanities. It…

  15. Preliminary Measures of Instructor Learning in Teaching Junctional Tourniquet Users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kragh, John F; Aden, James K; Shackelford, Stacy; Dubick, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to assess the effect of instructor learning on student performance in use of junctional tourniquets. From a convenience sample of data available after another study, we used a manikin for assessment of control of bleeding from a right groin gunshot wound. Blood loss was measured by the instructor while training users. The data set represented a group of 30 persons taught one at a time. The first measure was a plot of mean blood loss volumes for the sequential users. The second measure was a plot of the cumulative sum (CUSUM) of mean blood loss (BL) volumes for users. Mean blood loss trended down as the instructor gained experience with each newly instructed user. User performance continually improved as the instructor gained more experience with teaching. No plateau effect was observed within the 30 users. The CUSUM plot illustrated a turning point or cusp at the seventh user. The prior portion of the plot (users 1-7) had the greatest improvement; performance did not improve as much thereafter. The improvement after the seventh user was the only change detected in the instructor's trend of performance. The instructor's teaching experience appeared to directly affect user performance; in a model of junctional hemorrhage, the volume of blood loss from the manikin during junctional tourniquet placement was a useful metric of instructor learning. The CUSUM technique detected a small but meaningful change in trend where the instructor learning curve was greatest while working with the first seven users. 2016.

  16. "Back-Stage" Dissent: Student Twitter Use Addressing Instructor Ideology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linvill, Darren L.; Boatwright, Brandon C.; Grant, Will J.

    2018-01-01

    In this content analysis, we explored how students address instructor ideology in the university classroom through the social media platform Twitter. We employed Boolean search operators through Salesforce Marketing Cloud Radian6 software to gather tweets and identified English language tweets by how students referenced their instructor's…

  17. Exploration of Teaching Preferences of Instructors' Use of Social Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilis, Selcan; Gülbahar, Yasemin; Rapp, Christian

    2016-01-01

    With the excessive use of social media in the 21st century, attempts to integrate social media within higher education have also increased. In this area, research has been particularly focused on the aspects of students, rather than the instructors. This study puts the emphasis on the instructors with the aim to explore their use of social media…

  18. Emotional Development: Fostering the Child's Identity. Instructor's Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFadden, Emily Jean

    "Emotional Development: Fostering the Child's Identity" is a manual for use in training families providing service to foster children. Consisting of information to be covered in eight class sessions and numerous appendices providing supplementary material, this instructor's manual contains instructor's materials and participants' course content.…

  19. Instructor Perceptions of Plagiarism: Are We Finding Common Ground?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Kymberley K.; Behrendt, Linda S.; Boothby, Jennifer L.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined instructor views of what constitutes plagiarism. The authors collected questionnaire data from 158 participants recruited through three teaching-related electronic listservs. Results showed that most participants agreed that behaviors that claim credit for someone else's work constituted plagiarism. Instructors differed in…

  20. Teaching the Literature Review: A Practical Approach for College Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisco, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Instructors across the disciplines require their students to write literature reviews. Although numerous sources describe the literature review process, instructors and students face difficulty when approaching the structure of a literature review. This paper presents a straightforward, efficient approach for teaching students how to write a…

  1. Professional Learning of Instructors in Vocational and Professional Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoekstra, Annemarieke; Kuntz, Jeff; Newton, Paul

    2018-01-01

    This article presents insights from a study into instructor professional learning in vocational and professional education (VPE) in Canada. While most studies on instructor learning focus on learning through formal professional development programmes, this study specifically focuses on professional learning as it happens in day-to-day practice.…

  2. Instructor-Student Rapport in Taiwan ESL Classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan G. Webb

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Positive relationships between instructors and students are critical to effective learning in the classroom. Rooted in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL, and centered at the crossroads of interpersonal communication and instructional communication (Affective Learning Model, this study examines how instructors in a Taiwan ESL school build relationships with Taiwanese students. Instructors were interviewed regarding the behaviors they use to build rapport with their students. Results show that instructors build rapport with their students using several specific techniques: uncommonly attentive behaviors, common grounding behaviors, courteous behaviors, connecting behavior, information sharing behavior, a balancing of connection and authority, adaptation of rapport to student level, and provision of a respite to norms. The findings provide specific examples of how instructors can build rapport in intercultural classrooms.

  3. PCR-identification of a Nicotiana plumbaginifolia cDNA homologous to the high-affinity nitrate transporters of the crnA family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesada, A; Krapp, A; Trueman, L J; Daniel-Vedele, F; Fernández, E; Forde, B G; Caboche, M

    1997-05-01

    A family of high-affinity nitrate transporters has been identified in Aspergillus nidulans and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and recently homologues of this family have been cloned from a higher plant (barley). Based on six of the peptide sequences most strongly conserved between the barley and C. reinhardtii polypeptides, a set of degenerate primers was designed to permit amplification of the corresponding genes from other plant species. The utility of these primers was demonstrated by RT-PCR with cDNA made from poly(A)+ RNA from barley, C. reinhardtii and Nicotiana plumbaginifolia. A PCR fragment amplified from N. plumbaginifolia was used as probe to isolate a full-length cDNA clone which encodes a protein, NRT2;1Np, that is closely related to the previously isolated crnA homologue from barley. Genomic Southern blots indicated that there are only 1 or 2 members of the Nrt2 gene family in N. plumbaginifolia. Northern blotting showed that the Nrt2 transcripts are most strongly expressed in roots. The effects of external treatments with different N sources showed that the regulation of the Nrt2 gene(s) is very similar to that reported for nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase genes: their expression was strongly induced by nitrate but was repressed when reduced forms of N were supplied to the roots.

  4. A cost-effectiveness analysis of self-debriefing versus instructor debriefing for simulated crises in perioperative medicine in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaranuwatchai, Wanrudee; Alam, Fahad; Hoch, Jeffrey; Boet, Sylvain

    2017-01-01

    High-fidelity simulation training is effective for learning crisis resource management (CRM) skills, but cost is a major barrier to implementing high-fidelity simulation training into the curriculum. The aim of this study was to examine the cost-effectiveness of self-debriefing and traditional instructor debriefing in CRM training programs and to calculate the minimum willingness-to-pay (WTP) value when one debriefing type becomes more cost-effective than the other. This study used previous data from a randomized controlled trial involving 50 anesthesiology residents in Canada. Each participant managed a pretest crisis scenario. Participants who were randomized to self-debrief used the video of their pretest scenario with no instructor present during their debriefing. Participants from the control group were debriefed by a trained instructor using the video of their pretest scenario. Participants individually managed a post-test simulated crisis scenario. We compared the cost and effectiveness of self-debriefing versus instructor debriefing using net benefit regression. The cost-effectiveness estimate was reported as the incremental net benefit and the uncertainty was presented using a cost-effectiveness acceptability curve. Self-debriefing costs less than instructor debriefing. As the WTP increased, the probability that self-debriefing would be cost-effective decreased. With a WTP ≤Can$200, the self-debriefing program was cost-effective. However, when effectiveness was priced higher than cost-savings and with a WTP >Can$300, instructor debriefing was the preferred alternative. With a lower WTP (≤Can$200), self-debriefing was cost-effective in CRM simulation training when compared to instructor debriefing. This study provides evidence regarding cost-effectiveness that will inform decision-makers and clinical educators in their decision-making process, and may help to optimize resource allocation in education.

  5. A cost-effectiveness analysis of self-debriefing versus instructor debriefing for simulated crises in perioperative medicine in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanrudee Isaranuwatchai

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose High-fidelity simulation training is effective for learning crisis resource management (CRM skills, but cost is a major barrier to implementing high-fidelity simulation training into the curriculum. The aim of this study was to examine the cost-effectiveness of self-debriefing and traditional instructor debriefing in CRM training programs and to calculate the minimum willingness-to-pay (WTP value when one debriefing type becomes more cost-effective than the other. Methods This study used previous data from a randomized controlled trial involving 50 anesthesiology residents in Canada. Each participant managed a pretest crisis scenario. Participants who were randomized to self-debrief used the video of their pretest scenario with no instructor present during their debriefing. Participants from the control group were debriefed by a trained instructor using the video of their pretest scenario. Participants individually managed a post-test simulated crisis scenario. We compared the cost and effectiveness of self-debriefing versus instructor debriefing using net benefit regression. The cost-effectiveness estimate was reported as the incremental net benefit and the uncertainty was presented using a cost-effectiveness acceptability curve. Results Self-debriefing costs less than instructor debriefing. As the WTP increased, the probability that self-debriefing would be cost-effective decreased. With a WTP ≤Can$200, the self-debriefing program was cost-effective. However, when effectiveness was priced higher than cost-savings and with a WTP >Can$300, instructor debriefing was the preferred alternative. Conclusion With a lower WTP (≤Can$200, self-debriefing was cost-effective in CRM simulation training when compared to instructor debriefing. This study provides evidence regarding cost-effectiveness that will inform decision-makers and clinical educators in their decision-making process, and may help to optimize resource allocation in education.

  6. Comparison of Nursing Student and Instructor Preferences for Block and Nonblock Clinical Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohatinsky, Noelle; Chachula, Kathryn; Sedgwick, Monique; Press, Madeline M; Compton, Roslyn M; Lane, Brenda

    2017-10-05

    Clinical experiences are the hallmark of prelicensure nursing programs and assist students with applying nursing theory into practice. The literature is limited with respect to nursing student and instructor preferences for type of clinical model to facilitate student learning. This article explores these perceptions in the nursing programs of 5 universities located in 4 Western Canadian provinces. Findings support the use of both nonblock and block clinical models throughout nursing education programs.

  7. The Relationship between Students' Motives to Communicate with Their Instructors and Perceived Instructor Credibility, Attractiveness, and Homophily

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Scott A.; Huebner, Alex D.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between students' motives to communicate (i.e., relational, functional, participatory, excuse making, and sycophantic) with their instructors and perceived instructor credibility, attractiveness, and homophily. 150 undergraduate students (85 men, 64 women, one did not indicate sex) enrolled at a large…

  8. 14 CFR 61.423 - What are the recordkeeping requirements for a flight instructor with a sport pilot rating?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... a flight instructor with a sport pilot rating? 61.423 Section 61.423 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL... INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Flight Instructors With a Sport Pilot Rating § 61.423 What are the recordkeeping requirements for a flight instructor with a sport pilot rating? (a) As a flight instructor with a...

  9. Frequency and Pattern of Learner-Instructor Interaction in an Online English Language Learning Environment in Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Thach; Thalathoti, Vijay; Dakich, Eva

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the frequency and pattern of interpersonal interactions between the learners and instructors of an online English language learning course offered at a Vietnamese university. The paper begins with a review of literature on interaction type, pattern and model of interaction followed by a brief description of the online…

  10. Interprofessional team debriefings with or without an instructor after a simulated crisis scenario: An exploratory case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boet, Sylvain; Pigford, Ashlee-Ann; Fitzsimmons, Amber; Reeves, Scott; Triby, Emmanuel; Bould, M Dylan

    2016-11-01

    The value of debriefing after an interprofessional simulated crisis is widely recognised; however, little is known about the content of debriefings and topics that prompt reflection. This study aimed to describe the content and topics that facilitate reflection among learners in two types of interprofessional team debriefings (with or without an instructor) following simulated practice. Interprofessional operating room (OR) teams (one anaesthesia trainee, one surgical trainee, and one staff circulating OR nurse) managed a simulated crisis scenario and were randomised to one of two debriefing groups. Within-team groups used low-level facilitation (i.e., no instructor but a one-page debriefing form based on the Ottawa Global Rating Scale). The instructor-led group used high-level facilitation (i.e., gold standard instructor-led debriefing). All debriefings were recorded, transcribed, and thematically analysed using the inductive qualitative methodology. Thirty-seven interprofessional team-debriefing sessions were included in the analysis. Regardless of group allocation (within-team or instructor-led), the debriefings centred on targeted crisis resource management (CRM) content (i.e., communication, leadership, situation awareness, roles, and responsibilities). In both types of debriefings, three themes emerged as topics for entry points into reflection: (1) the process of the debriefing itself, (2) experience of the simulation model, including simulation fidelity, and (3) perceived performance, including the assessment of CRM. Either with or without an instructor, interprofessional teams focused their debriefing discussion on targeted CRM content. We report topics that allowed learners to enter reflection. This is important for understanding how to maximise learning opportunities when creating education activities for healthcare providers that work in interprofessional settings.

  11. Instructor Misbehaviors as Digital Expectancy Violations: What Students Despise and What They Let Slide

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacArthur, Brenda L.; Villagran, Melinda M.

    2015-01-01

    This study examines students' motives for communicating with their instructors when the instructor exhibits inappropriate or unprofessional online behavior. To understand the relationship between what we call instructors' digital expectancy violations and students' motives for communicating with instructors, students' levels of task, social, and…

  12. 76 FR 19267 - Pilot, Flight Instructor, and Pilot School Certification; Technical Amendment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-07

    .... No. 61-127] RIN 2120-AI86 Pilot, Flight Instructor, and Pilot School Certification; Technical... for pilots, flight instructors, ground instructors, and pilot schools. This document reinstates two... entitled, ``Pilot, Flight Instructor, and Pilot School Certification; Final Rule'' (74 FR 42500). That...

  13. 14 CFR 142.47 - Training center instructor eligibility requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., and speak and understand in the English language; (3) If instructing in an aircraft in flight, is... and procedures. (iii) The fundamental principles of the learning process. (iv) Instructor duties...

  14. 38 CFR 21.146 - Independent instructor course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    .... Chapter 31 Special Rehabilitation Services § 21.146 Independent instructor course. (a) Definition. An... the customary channels leading to employment may not be readily available to a veteran requiring an...

  15. Basic student nurse perceptions about clinical instructor caring

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gerda-Marie Meyer

    instructor caring. A structured self administered questionnaire using the Nursing Student .... 263). The high enthusiasm and belief in the ability to care may result in .... treatment and protection from discomfort and harm (Grove,. Burns, & Gray ...

  16. Contrasts in Student Affect by Institution and Instructor: Establishing a National Baseline for Geoscience Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcconnell, D. A.; Perkins, D.; Stempien, J.; Husman, J.

    2011-12-01

    The GARNET (Geoscience Affective Research Network) project examines the connection between student learning and the affective domain, which includes student motivations, values, attitudes and learning strategies - factors that can both promote and limit learning. This is the first study to compare and contrast the relationship between student motivation and learning strategies, the nature of classroom instruction, and learning outcomes across a common course taught by multiple instructors at different types of academic institutions. In 2009-2011 we administered pre- and post-course Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaires (MSLQ; Pintrich et al, 1993) to 1990 students in more than 40 introductory geology classes taught by 25 instructors at nine colleges and universities. Students primarily register for the introductory courses to fulfill a general education requirement with a relatively modest proportion (25%) declaring a prior interest in the course topic. This institutional requirement produces a situation where students' motivational orientation is not likely to adjust to their newfound academic environment. The students do not have an interest in the topic, they have little prior knowledge about the content, they do not see connections between the content and their future goals, and they have limited autonomy in their choice of a course (the course is required). In general, we find that across different institutions and instructors, students' motivation and self-regulation degrades. Through classroom observations, and student surveys we have evidence that specific faculty are able to help students maintain some of the positive motivational orientations students bring to the class. The MSLQ contains 15 subscales, six measure motivation (e.g., task value, self-efficacy), and nine focus on different learning strategies (e.g., elaboration, effort regulation). Regardless of institution or instructor, MSLQ scores on many subscales declined from beginning to

  17. Basic student nurse perceptions about clinical instructor caring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerda-Marie Meyer

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Caring is the core of nursing and should be cultivated in student nurses. However, there are serious concerns about the caring concern in the clinical environment and in nursing education. Clinical instructors are ideally positioned to care for student nurses so that they in turn, can learn to care for their patients. Methods: A descriptive, comparative, cross-sectional and correlational quantitative research design with convenience sampling was conducted to describe the perceptions of junior student nurses (n = 148 and senior student nurses (n = 168 regarding clinicalin structor caring. A structured self administered questionnaire using the Nursing Student Perceptions of Instructor Caring (NSPIC (Wade & Kasper, 2006 was used. Descriptive statistics and hypotheses testing using parametric and non parametric methods were conducted. The reliability of the NSPIC was determined. Results: Respondents had a positive perception of their clinical instructors' caring. No relationship could be found between the course the respondents were registered for, the frequency of contact with a clinical instructor, the ages of the respondents and their perceptions of clinical instructor caring. The NSPIC was found to be reliable if one item each from two of the subscales were omitted. Conclusions: Student nurses perceived most strongly that a caring clinical instructor made them feel confident, specifically when he/she showed genuine interest in the patients and their care, and when he/she made them feel that they could be successful.

  18. Professional Ethical Competence in nursing: the role of nursing instructors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borhani, Fariba; Alhani, Fatemeh; Mohammadi, Easa; Abbaszadeh, Abbas

    2010-01-01

    Teaching ethics to nurses leads to their involvement in providing high quality care, enable them to duly encounter ethical issues. One of the key elements of educational systems is nursing instructors. Even though lots of studies show the role of instructors in students' learning, their role in promotion of professional ethics has been attended to less. The objective of this study is surveying the experience of nursing students with respect to the role of instructors in promotion of professional ethics. This qualitative study enrolled 15 undergraduate nursing students from three nursing schools in Teheran whom depth interview was performed. The interview was semi-structured with open ended questions. The analysis was accomplished by use of qualitative content-analysis method. Data analysis demonstrated 2 main themes and 7 subcategories in regard to the role of instructors in promotion of professional ethics in nursing students including: 1) the effective professional role model 2) facilitating creative learning. The effective professional role model encompasses individual characteristics and beliefs, clinical skills and professional commitment of role model. Creative learning facilitates by encouraging critical thinking and decision-making, Providing supportive learning conditions, providing proper space for sharing knowledge followed by evaluation and creative feedback. The findings of this study provides a background for strengthening the role of instructors in promotion of professional ethics with more emphasis on research which increase capability of instructors at nursing education centers.

  19. Guide to good practices for training and qualification of instructors. DOE handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    Purpose of this guide is to provide contractor training organizations with information that can be used to verify the adquacy and/or modify existing instructor training programs, or to develop new training programs. It contains good practices for the training and qualification of technical instructors and instructional technologists at DOE reactor and non-reactor nuclear facilities. It addresses the content of initial and continuing instructor training programs, evaluation of instructor training programs, and maintenance of instructor training records.

  20. Instructor feedback versus no instructor feedback on performance in a laparoscopic virtual reality simulator: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strandbygaard, Jeanett; Bjerrum, Flemming; Maagaard, Mathilde; Winkel, Per; Larsen, Christian Rifbjerg; Ringsted, Charlotte; Gluud, Christian; Grantcharov, Teodor; Ottesen, Bent; Sorensen, Jette Led

    2013-05-01

    To investigate the impact of instructor feedback versus no instructor feedback when training a complex operational task on a laparoscopic virtual reality simulator. : Simulators are now widely accepted as a training tool, but there is insufficient knowledge about how much feedback is necessary, which is useful for sustainable implementation. A randomized trial complying with CONSORT Statement. All participants had to reach a predefined proficiency level for a complex operational task on a virtual reality simulator. The intervention group received standardized instructor feedback a maximum of 3 times. The control group did not receive instructor feedback. Participants were senior medical students without prior laparoscopic experience (n = 99). Outcome measures were time, repetitions, and performance score to reach a predefined proficiency level. Furthermore, influence of sex and perception of own surgical skills were examined. Time (in minutes) and repetitions were reduced in the intervention group (162 vs 342 minutes; P less time (in minutes) than women (P = 0.037), but no sex difference was observed for repetitions (P = 0.20). Participants in the intervention group had higher self-perception regarding surgical skills after the trial (P = 0.011). Instructor feedback increases the efficiency when training a complex operational task on a virtual reality simulator; time and repetitions used to achieve a predefined proficiency level were significantly reduced in the group that received instructor feedback compared with the control group. NCT01497782.

  1. Nursing Students’ Perceptions on Characteristics of an Effective Clinical Instructor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan E. Niederriter PhD, MSN, CMSRN, RN-BC

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose To identify characteristics and teaching techniques of effective clinical instructors that can be utilized or implemented to improve the student nurse clinical experience. Background The clinical instructor is an integral part of a quality clinical experience. They help students transfer didactic information to the practice setting. The clinical nursing experience is a vital component in the developmental process of the nursing student. Research has been done on this subject, but gaps remain. The need for a more in-depth understanding of students’ perceptions of the characteristics and teaching techniques that best aid their comprehension and learning will help instructors to maximize student learning experiences in the practice setting. Method This qualitative research study utilized the phenomenological research method. Three open-ended questions were posed to 14 nursing students to identify the characteristics and teaching techniques they believed comprised an effective clinical instructor. Individual interviews were conducted and transcribed interviews were reviewed to identify common themes. Three faculty members provided member checking to prevent bias by reviewing the transcribed interviews for common themes. Findings Participants identified four main themes which include a trusting relationship, experience or knowledge, coach, and role model. The students found that they gained more knowledge, developed more critical thinking, and felt more confident with instructors who utilized characteristics and techniques from these four areas. Conclusion Clinical instructors play an important role in preparing the student nurse in becoming a competent nurse in the practice setting. This information can be used to provide a foundation in creating an educational opportunity to inform nurse educators in the ways to become a more effective clinical instructor.

  2. Using clinical caring journaling: nursing student and instructor experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Chien-Lin; Turton, Michael; Cheng, Su-Fen; Lee-Hsieh, Jane

    2011-06-01

    Journaling has been incorporated into many nursing courses as an active reflective teaching strategy that can facilitate the learning process, personal growth, and professional development of students. There is limited research support of journaling as an appropriate tool to promote reflection for the purpose of learning caring in nursing education. The aim of this study was to explore the experiences and perceptions of student nurses and instructors who use clinical caring journaling (CCJ) in their clinical practicum. Researchers used a descriptive qualitative research design. The study population was 880 senior student nurses and 90 clinical instructors from a nursing program at a university in Taiwan who used CCJ. After completion of 1 year of clinical practicum, 16 students and 7 instructors participated voluntarily in focus group interviews. Researchers used content analysis to sort interview data into themes. Six themes were categorized that encapsulated student and instructor experiences and perceptions regarding using CCJ in their clinical practicum. These themes were guiding caring behavior toward patients, enabling students' reflective caring abilities, building up students' self-confidence, increasing interaction between students and instructors, enhancing students' self-development, and overcoming writing difficulty. Research findings may serve as a reference for nursing educators to use CCJ strategy in student nurses' clinical practicum.

  3. 14 CFR 61.413 - What are the privileges of my flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating? 61.413 Section 61.413 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL... INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Flight Instructors With a Sport Pilot Rating § 61.413 What are the privileges of my flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating? If you hold a fight flight...

  4. 14 CFR 61.431 - Are there special provisions for obtaining a flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... a flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating for persons who are registered ultralight..., FLIGHT INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Flight Instructors With a Sport Pilot Rating § 61.431 Are there special provisions for obtaining a flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating for...

  5. Risco e aventura no esporte na percepção do instrutor Risk and adventure in sport: instructor's perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jairo Antônio da Paixão

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available O presente estudo analisa o risco na percepção de instrutores de esporte de aventura. A amostra foi constituída de 121 (cento e vinte e um instrutores de diferentes modalidades de esporte de aventura praticadas em Minas Gerais, com média de idade de 31 (trinta e um anos; considerou-se o desvio-padrão com significância This study analyzes the risk perceptions of adventure sports instructors. The sample consisted of 121 (one hundred and twenty-one instructors of different types of adventure sport practiced in Minas Gerais, with a mean age of 31 (thirty-one years. It was considered the standard deviation with significance >< 0,05%. The exploratory method was used in this study. Data collection took place from a questionnaire, validated in accordance with the Delphi technique, containing 15 items based on the theoretical literature. The results express that the risk perceived by the instructors is the most genuine risk-filled adventure of the sense of play. When considering procedures and recommendations that aim to predict, calculate and minimize the risk unexpected, it was found that the perception of risk by the instructors is due to an attitude which prevails in the domain of technique and quality equipment at the time these bodily practices close to nature.

  6. Teaching the Literature Review: A Practical Approach for College Instructors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Cisco

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Instructors across the disciplines require their students to write literature reviews. Although numerous sources describe the literature review process, instructors and students face difficulty when approaching the structure of a literature review. This paper presents a straightforward, efficient approach for teaching students how to write a literature review. Developed over the course of three years at a university writing center, this lesson received substantial support from students across the disciplines. This paper reflects on one group of students’ experiences while writing literature reviews in a political science course, showing that students demonstrated a sense of confidence and direction after the lesson. University professors, writing center staff, and content-discipline instructors in higher education classrooms can alleviate their students’ anxiety about literature reviews by using this lesson in their classrooms.

  7. An elaboration of Thai vocal instructors in Thai university classes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jantana Khochprasert

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper documents a qualitative investigation on the study of instructive methods of Thai traditional singing instructors in higher education in Thailand. The information was collected in the form of document analysis and interviews with Thai traditional music instructors from several universities across Thailand. The results of the analysis of Thai traditional singing instruction methods in higher education in Thailand revealed that there are 11 universities that offer Thai traditional singing instruction. The instruction is a part of curricula under four different governing bodies and four classifications of curriculum. The sets of practicum repertoires in every university were found to be almost identical. It was found that the instructors used several techniques. Some techniques were similar while some were different. All the techniques were transmitted orally. In order to successfully produce graduates of the desired standard, singing must be correctly taught from the basics, whether theory, pronunciation or rhyming. At the same time, creativity should also be encouraged

  8. Development of instructors for nuclear power plant personnel training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-06-01

    In 1996 the IAEA published Technical Reports Series No. 380, Nuclear Power Plant Personnel Training and its Evaluation, A Guidebook, which provides guidance with respect to development, implementation and evaluation of training programmes. The IAEA Technical Working Group on Training and Qualification of Nuclear Power Plant Personnel recommended that an additional publication be prepared to provide further details concerning the development of instructors for NPP personnel training. The quality of nuclear power plant personnel training is strongly dependent on the availability of competent instructors. Instructors must have a comprehensive practical as well as theoretical understanding of all aspects of the subjects being taught and the relationship of the subject to nuclear plant operation. Instructors should have the appropriate knowledge, skills and attitudes (KSAs) in their assigned areas of responsibility. They should thoroughly understand all aspects of the contents of the training programmes and the relationship between these contents and overall plant operation. This means that they should be technically competent and show credibility with the trainees and other plant personnel. In addition, the instructors should be familiar with the basics of adult learning and a systematic approach to training, and should have adequate instructional and assessment skills. This TECDOC provides practical guidance on various aspects of instructor selection, development and deployment, by quoting actual examples from different countries. It highlights the importance of having an appropriate training policy, especially considering the various organisational arrangements that exist in different utilities/countries. This should result in: plant performance improvement, improved human performance, meeting goals and objectives of the business (quality, safety, productivity), and improving training programs. This publication is available in two formats - as a conventional printed

  9. How does teaching clinical skills influence instructors' professional behaviour?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamani N

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: "Introduction to Clinical Medicine" in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences and Health Services is an initiative in which general practitioners work as instructors and have the opportunity to experience teaching in addition to clinical practice. Since teaching, affects both teacher and students, this study aims to assess the influence of teaching clinical skills on the instructors' psychological, social and professional behaviour. Methods: This was performed as a qualitative study. The research population consisted of instructors of “Introduction to Clinical Medicine” who were all general practitioners and acted as facilitator in small groups working on physical examination and case discussion. The data collecting tool was a semi-structured interview which was recorded on the tape. Then, the interviews were transcribed and confirmed by interviewees at the end. 10 instructors were interviewed. The data were analysed according to Colaizzi model. Results: After coding the data to 38 main subjects, they were classified into three main categories including professional, psychological and social effects. The influence of teaching on professional performance included performing a thorough and correct physical examination, taking a detailed and correct history, increasing decision making ability and increasing professional knowledge. Some of the psychological effects were increasing selfconfidence, job satisfaction and morale. The social effects of teaching were increasing social contacts, having a relationship with an academic environment and having a respectful job. Conclusion: Considering the positive effects of teaching on instructors, teaching clinical skills by general practitioners can increase general practitioners knowledge and clinical skills and improve their morale. It is recommended to train general practitioners both for teaching skills and clinical skills and consider this, as an opportunity for physicians’ continuing

  10. Instructors' Support of Student Autonomy in an Introductory Physics Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Nicholas; Webb, David

    2014-12-01

    The role of autonomy in the student experience in a large-enrollment undergraduate introductory physics course was studied from a self-determination theory perspective. A correlational study investigated whether certain aspects of the student experience correlated with how autonomy supportive (versus controlling) students perceived their instructors to be. An autonomy-supportive instructor acknowledges students' perspectives and feelings and provides students with information and opportunities for choice while minimizing external pressures (e.g., incentives or deadlines). It was found that the degree to which students perceived their instructors as autonomy supportive was positively correlated with student interest and enjoyment in learning physics (β =0.31***) and negatively correlated with student anxiety about taking physics (β =-0.23**). It was also positively correlated with how autonomous (versus controlled) students' reasons for studying physics became over the duration of the course (i.e., studying physics more because they wanted to versus had to; β =0.24***). This change in autonomous reasons for studying physics was in turn positively correlated with student performance in the course (β =0.17*). Additionally, the degree to which students perceived their instructors as autonomy supportive was directly correlated with performance for those students entering the course with relatively autonomous reasons for studying physics (β =0.25**). In summary, students who perceived their instructors as more autonomy supportive tended to have a more favorable motivational, affective, and performance experience in the course. The findings of the present study are consistent with experimental studies in other contexts that argue for autonomy-supportive instructor behaviors as the cause of a more favorable student experience.

  11. Biotechnology risks and benefits: Science instructor perspectives and practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Grant Ean

    Developing scientifically literate students who understand the socially contextualized nature of science and technology is a national focus of science education reform. Understanding teachers' views on this topic is of equal importance. This document focuses on the topic of risks and benefits posed by science and technology as an important topic for which the socially contextualized nature of science and technology readily emerges. Following introduction of a theoretical model and a review of the literature, two research studies are described that examined teachers' perceptions of the risks posed by biotechnology and the role of risk topics in an undergraduate science course. The first research study examines four groups of science educators; pre-service science teachers, in-service science teachers, science graduate teaching assistants, and science professors (n = 91). The participants completed a survey and card sort task to determine their perceptions of the risks of biotechnology. The results show that teacher perceptions were shaped by the risk severity, regulation processes, public acceptance, fear, reciprocal benefits, and whether the applications would impact humans or the environment. Factors determining risk perception included personal worldviews, trust in communicating institutions, and personal experiences with biotechnology. The different types of science teachers were compared and contrasted in light of these factors and the implications of instructor perceptions on science pedagogy are discussed. The second research manuscript describes a case study in which six biology graduate teaching assistants (GTAs) were observed teaching as lesson on the potential risks and benefits of biotechnology. The data sources included classroom observations and semi-structured interviews. Qualitative analysis reveals that GTAs framed the instruction of risk in one of three ways: analytical, focus on perspectives and biases, and promotion of individual reflection

  12. CrossFit® instructor demographics and practice trends

    OpenAIRE

    Gregory R. Waryasz; Vladimir Suric; Alan H. Daniels; Joseph A. Gil; Craig P. Eberson

    2016-01-01

    CrossFit® is an increasingly popular exercise modality that uses high intensity power training. The literature to date regarding CrossFit® has focused on its benefits to VO2 Max, body composition and the motivational variables of participants of CrossFit®. A computerized survey was distributed to CrossFit® instructors using Survey Monkey® (Palo Alto, CA, USA). One hundred and ninety-three CrossFit® instructors responded to the survey. Of these 86.6% (155/179) reported being a certified CrossF...

  13. Instructor's manual to accompany calculus with analytic geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Yong

    1978-01-01

    Instructor's Manual to Accompany Calculus with Analytic Geometry is an instructor's manual on calculus with analytic geometry. It contains answers to even-numbered exercises and solutions of selected even- and odd-numbered exercises. Comments on selected exercises are included.Comprised of 18 chapters, this book first presents answers and solutions to exercises relating to functions and graphs. The next chapter is about derivatives and covers topics ranging from the slope problem to limits, sums and products, and quotients and square roots, along with limits and continuity. Subsequent chapters

  14. Enhancing the Classroom Experience: Instructor Use of Tablets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Jeff; Hill, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Instructors continually search for innovative approaches to interact with and engage students in the classroom. The tablet offers a potential innovation for this purpose. Tablet devices from Apple, Microsoft, and other hardware vendors have overcome many of the challenges of the past (e.g. cost and limited applications) to become useful tools for…

  15. Welding. Pre-Apprenticeship Phase 1 Training. Instructor's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane Community Coll., Eugene, OR.

    This instructor's guide accompanies the self-paced student training modules on welding, three of which are available separately as CE 032 889-891. Introductory materials include a description of the components of the pre-apprenticeship project, a discussion of the teacher's role in conducting the course, and scope and contents of the four phases…

  16. University of Toronto Instructors' Experiences with Developing MOOCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi, Hedieh; Rolheiser, Carol; Harrison, Laurie; Håklev, Stian

    2015-01-01

    We interviewed eight University of Toronto (U of T) instructors who have offered MOOCs on Coursera or EdX between 2012 and 2014 to understand their motivation for MOOC instruction, their experience developing and teaching MOOCs, and their perceptions of the implications of MOOC instruction on their teaching and research practices. Through…

  17. Anaerobic Digestion. Instructor's Guide. Biological Treatment Process Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnegie, John W., Ed.

    This instructor's guide contains materials needed to teach a four-lesson unit on anaerobic digestion control. These materials include: (1) unit overview; (2) lesson plans; (3) lecture outlines; (4) student worksheets for each lesson (with answers); and (5) two copies of a final quiz (with and without answers). Lesson 1 is a review of the theory of…

  18. Attendance Policies, Instructor Communication, Student Attendance, and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Jason; Frank, Lisa A. C.

    2016-01-01

    The authors utilized a quasiexperimental design across five sections of a managerial communication course (N = 150) to test the role of course policies and student perceptions of the instructor in influencing student absenteeism and three indicators of student learning: grades, affective learning, and cognitive learning. The experimental group…

  19. Attendance Policies, Student Attendance, and Instructor Verbal Aggressiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Jason; Forbus, Robert; Cistulli, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The authors utilized an experimental design across six sections of a managerial communications course (N = 173) to test the impact of instructor verbal aggressiveness and class attendance policies on student class attendance. The experimental group received a policy based on the principle of social proof (R. B. Cialdini, 2001), which indicated…

  20. Process Memos: Facilitating Dialogues about Writing between Students and Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrott, Heather Macpherson; Cherry, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    We have created a new teaching tool--process memos--to improve student writing. Process memos are guided reflections submitted with scaffolded assignments that facilitate a written dialogue between students and instructors about the process of writing. Within these memos, students critically assess available teaching tools, discuss their writing…

  1. Interpersonal Skills Training: Online versus Instructor-Led Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Erika R.; Fritsch, Paula J.

    2001-01-01

    Compares instructional methods used in interpersonal skills training courses delivered online to the methods used in similar courses delivered in a traditional instructor-led classroom. Discusses implications for performance improvement professionals who are responsible for selecting and designing interpersonal skills training interventions.…

  2. Export Management Specialist. A Training Program. Instructor's Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This publication provides instructors with materials for an export management specialist (EMS) training program. The objective of the training program is to assist companies in reaching their export goals by educating current and potential managers about the basics of exporting. It provides a foundation for considering international trade and for…

  3. Small Business Management. Instructor's Manual. Volume I. Third Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanneau, Joseph A.; And Others

    The instructor's manual is one of four prepared as a guide in conducting a small Business Management course for American Indians to prepare them for jobs as owners/managers of their own businesses and for management positions with business owned by bonds, cooperatives, and others. The manual contains lesson plans, suggested methodologies, and…

  4. Dental Radiology I Student Guide [and Instructor Guide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox Valley Technical Coll., Appleton, WI.

    The dental radiology student and instructor guides provide instruction in the following units: (1) x-ray physics; (2) x-ray production; (3) radiation health and safety; (4) radiographic anatomy and pathology; (5) darkroom setup and chemistry; (6) bisecting angle technique; (7) paralleling technique; (8) full mouth survey technique--composition and…

  5. Transforming Public Education: Cases in Education Entrepreneurship. Instructor's Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childress, Stacey M., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    This instructor's guide is intended for use with "Transforming Public Education: Cases in Education Entrepreneurship." This volume includes a teaching note for each case in the student edition; the note provides basic guidance in how to initaite and organize the flow of the case discussion as well as how the case links to others before…

  6. Evolution Kills: A Web Resource for Instructors of Evolutionary Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vondrasek, Joanna R.; Antonovics, Janis; Taylor, Douglas R.

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a laboratory course that demonstrates how evolution can be taught as a participatory, investigative science at the undergraduate college or advanced secondary high school level. The course emphasizes the applied importance of evolution to areas such as medicine and agriculture. Because many instructors face budgetary or other…

  7. Training of instructors on nuclear safety in Asian Countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikuta, Yuko; Shitomi, Hajimu; Saeki, Masakatsu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Nuclear Technology and Education Center

    2002-11-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI)is conducting the international cooperation's of training of the foreign instructors and sending the Japanese teacher to the countries of Indonesia, Thailand (both from 1996) and Vietnam (2000). The training is performed in the JAERI for the future instructors of the concerned country for the period of essentially 2 months and is mainly on nuclear safety principles and safety handling of unsealed radioactive sources. Until 2001, 22 instructors from those countries have been trained in 142 courses. The sent Japanese teacher together with the trained instructor conduct the education of mainly radiation protection and measurement for personnel in ETC of BATAN (Education and Training Center, Indonesia atomic energy agency), radiation protection and atomic energy technology/application in OAEP (Office of Atomic Energy for Peace, Thailand) and the same subjects as BATAN in VAEC (Vietnam Atomic Energy Commission). Instruments for radiation measurement are essentially from Japan. This JAERI international cooperation will be open to other Asian countries. (K.H.)

  8. Pedagogical Techniques of Improvisation Instructors without Academic Credentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salonen, Richard Wayne

    2010-01-01

    The importance of music improvisation can be seen in its inclusion in the National Standards for Music Education and the accreditation standards for the National Association of Schools of Music. The purpose of this study was to examine the pedagogical techniques and materials of improvisation instructors who do not hold academic credentials. The…

  9. Instructor Attitudes toward Students: Job Satisfaction and Student Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Janie H.

    2008-01-01

    The relational teaching approach suggests that instructors should develop positive relationships with students, with benefits including greater job satisfaction. One way to build positive relationships with students involves exhibiting immediacy behaviors. The author examined relationships among professors' attitudes toward students, immediacy…

  10. Impact of Instructor Expressiveness and some Students' Personal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the effects of Instructor Expressiveness (a teaching behaviour), Students' Locus of Control (LOC), gender and cognitive entry behaviour (CEB) on secondary school students' attitude towards biology. After determining the LOC, CEB, gender and attitude towards biology of the study sample, the ...

  11. Training of instructors on nuclear safety in Asian Countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikuta, Yuko; Shitomi, Hajimu; Saeki, Masakatsu

    2002-01-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI)is conducting the international cooperation's of training of the foreign instructors and sending the Japanese teacher to the countries of Indonesia, Thailand (both from 1996) and Vietnam (2000). The training is performed in the JAERI for the future instructors of the concerned country for the period of essentially 2 months and is mainly on nuclear safety principles and safety handling of unsealed radioactive sources. Until 2001, 22 instructors from those countries have been trained in 142 courses. The sent Japanese teacher together with the trained instructor conduct the education of mainly radiation protection and measurement for personnel in ETC of BATAN (Education and Training Center, Indonesia atomic energy agency), radiation protection and atomic energy technology/application in OAEP (Office of Atomic Energy for Peace, Thailand) and the same subjects as BATAN in VAEC (Vietnam Atomic Energy Commission). Instruments for radiation measurement are essentially from Japan. This JAERI international cooperation will be open to other Asian countries. (K.H.)

  12. Aerobic Digestion. Biological Treatment Process Control. Instructor's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klopping, Paul H.

    This unit on aerobic sludge digestion covers the theory of the process, system components, factors that affect the process performance, standard operational concerns, indicators of steady-state operations, and operational problems. The instructor's guide includes: (1) an overview of the unit; (2) lesson plan; (3) lecture outline (keyed to a set of…

  13. Machine Shop. Module 8: CNC (Computerized Numerical Control). Instructor's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosswhite, Dwight

    This document consists of materials for a five-unit course on the following topics: (1) safety guidelines; (2) coordinates and dimensions; (3) numerical control math; (4) programming for numerical control machines; and (5) setting and operating the numerical control machine. The instructor's guide begins with a list of competencies covered in the…

  14. Computer Assisted Drafting (CNC) Drawings. Drafting Module 6. Instructor's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Missouri Vocational Instruction Management System instructor's drafting guide has been keyed to the drafting competency profile developed by state industry and education professionals. This unit contains information on computer-assisted drafting drawings. The guide contains a cross-reference table of instructional materials and 20 worksheets.…

  15. Looking into Burnout Levels among English Language Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirel, Eda Ercan; Cephe, Pasa Tevfik

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the burnout levels of English language instructors who are currently teaching at School of Foreign Languages, namely Konya Necmettin Erbakan University, Selçuk University and Gazi University, to look for the factors leading to burnout and to see if there is a relationship between their burnout levels and teaching…

  16. Electronics. Module 2: Fundamentals of Electronics. Instructor's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, Jim

    This guide contains instructor's materials for a nine-unit secondary school course on fundamentals of electronics. The units are conductors, insulators, semiconductors, and atomic structure; basic concepts and sources of electrical quantities; Ohm's Law; units and conversions; use of multimeters; circuits; electromagnetics and electrostatics;…

  17. Collaborative Teaching from English Language Instructors' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasdemir, Hanife; Yildirim, Tugba

    2017-01-01

    Collaborative teaching, a significant concept in the field of English language teaching, involves teachers in sharing expertise, decision-making, lesson delivery, and assessment. It is a common practice for instructors in many schools and universities where English is taught as a foreign/second language (EFL/ESL) in intensive programs or…

  18. Providing Business English Instruction: Thai Instructors' Practices and Students' Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratoomrat, Panadda; Rajprasit, Krich

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to examine how Business English courses are conducted in the Thai Higher Education, and to investigate students' perceptions toward the instructional management of the courses in their universities. The participants were four instructors, and one hundred and forty students enrolling in the courses of four universities in…

  19. The Influence of Typeface on Students' Perceptions of Online Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louch, Michelle O'Brien; Stork, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    At its base, advertising is the process of using visual images and words to attract and convince consumers that a certain product has certain attributes. The same effect exists in electronic communication, strongly so in online courses where most if not all interaction between instructor and student is in writing. Arguably, if consumers make…

  20. Instructor and course evaluation based on student-identified criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, M O

    1977-02-01

    Students have come to school for an education and it is their right to evaluate the quality of the education they are receiving. They should not have to demand or even ask for the privilege of saying what they think. Instructors should be providing the opportunity for evaluation by requesting that information from the students. No value judgment can be totally objective, but an instrument composed of mutually agreed upon statements should encourage the greatest possible degree of objectivity. Using one accepted form throughout the school, all students would be considering the same characteristics and traits for every instructor and course evaluated. Each instructor would receive similar information about personal performance and about the course presented. Students would be free to talk to the faculty or to add comments if they so desired; but, a questionnaire used in every course would allow and even encourage responses from every student enrolled. Faculty responsibility would not end with the preparation and implementation of an evaluation instrument. Instructors would have to let the students know their opinions are important and will be considered in curricular and instructional decisions. Faculty and students would be communicating and hopefully fulfilling the needs of and responsibilities to each other.

  1. Instructor Time Requirements to Develop and Teach Online Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Lee A.

    2015-01-01

    How much time does it take to teach an online course? Does teaching online take more or less time than teaching face-to-face? Instructors, department chairs, deans, and program administrators have long believed that teaching online is more time-consuming than teaching face-to-face. Many research studies and practitioner articles indicate…

  2. My Instructor Made Me Do It: Task Characteristics of Procrastination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, David S.; Gross, Barbara L.

    2005-01-01

    Procrastination can have a negative effect on learning. Many previous studies have examined personality factors that contribute to procrastination. This study examines selected assignment characteristics controllable by the instructor that might influence student procrastination. Results found less procrastination on assignments that were…

  3. WWER-1000 simulator instructor service in NV TC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pogrebitsky, S.L.

    1997-01-01

    In July 1996 a full-scope simulator developed by the joint efforts of ATOMTECHENERGO, VNII AES (Russia) and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (Japan) was put into service Novovoronezh Training Centre (NV TC). this paper describes the Instructor Station equipment and its capabilities for training process monitoring and simulation. (author)

  4. Instructor Learning Styles as Indicators of Online Faculty Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLawhon, Ryan; Cutright, Marc

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between instructor learning style/preference and online faculty job satisfaction. Learning style was assessed using the Readiness for Education At a Distance Indicator (READI) now called Smarter Measure. Online faculty job satisfaction was assessed using the National Study of…

  5. Designing Instructor-Led Schools with Rapid Prototyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Steven R.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Rapid prototyping involves abandoning many of the linear steps of traditional prototyping; it is instead a series of design iterations representing each major stage. This article describes the development of an instructor-led course for midlevel auditors using the principles and procedures of rapid prototyping, focusing on the savings in time and…

  6. Instructor-Provided Summary Infographics to Support Online Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elena Gallagher, Silvia; O'Dulain, Mairtin; O'Mahony, Niamh; Kehoe, Claire; McCarthy, Fintan; Morgan, Gerard

    2017-01-01

    Infographics are a visualisation tool that can be used to improve retention, comprehension and appeal of complex concepts. The rise of infographic use in education has facilitated new forms of application and design of these tools. Instructor-provided summary infographics are a new form of infographic, whereby key learning objectives and content…

  7. College Students' Perceptions of Professor/Instructor Bullying: Questionnaire Development and Psychometric Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marraccini, Marisa E.; Weyandt, Lisa L.; Rossi, Joseph S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study developed and examined the psychometric properties of a newly formed measure designed to assess professor/instructor bullying, as well as teacher bullying occurring prior to college. Additionally, prevalence of instructor bullying and characteristics related to victims of instructor bullying were examined. Participants:…

  8. Instructor Strategic Ambiguity: Delineation of the Construct and Development of a Measure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klyukovski, Andrei A.; Medlock-Klyukovski, Amanda L.

    2016-01-01

    This article presents research to delineate the construct of instructor strategic ambiguity (ISA) and develop a measure. The first study analyzed instructor uses of ambiguity, identified 18 strategies, and classified them into four categories. The second study developed an Instructor Strategic Ambiguity Measure (ISAM) for the college classroom.…

  9. 76 FR 78141 - Pilot, Flight Instructor, and Pilot School Certification; Technical Amendment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-16

    ...-26661; Amdt. No. 61-129] RIN 2120-AI86 Pilot, Flight Instructor, and Pilot School Certification... requirements for pilots, flight instructors, ground instructors, and pilot schools. This document corrects an... a practical test for the issuance of a sport pilot certificate in a light-sport aircraft other than...

  10. 77 FR 61721 - Pilot, Flight Instructor, and Pilot School Certification; Technical Amendment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-11

    ...-26661; Amdt. No. 61-129A] RIN 2120-AI86 Pilot, Flight Instructor, and Pilot School Certification... revise the training, qualification, certification, and operating requirements for pilots, flight instructors, ground instructors, and pilot schools. A portion of the codified text was inadvertently deleted...

  11. Foreign-Born Instructors in the U.S.: Intercultural Competence, Teaching Strategies, and Job Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasilik, Oksana

    2011-01-01

    This study examines intercultural competence, teaching strategies, and job satisfaction of foreign-born instructors in a small U.S. higher education institution. The research questions addressed by this study are: (1) How do foreign-born instructors score on intercultural competence? (2) How do foreign-born instructors' teaching strategies differ…

  12. Understanding Instructor Nonverbal Immediacy, Verbal Immediacy, and Student Motivation at a Small Liberal Arts University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlich, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    Instructor communication behaviors and student motivation to learn relationships were studied at a small liberal arts university. Specifically, relationships between instructor nonverbal immediacy, verbal immediacy behaviors and student motivation to learn were measured. Only instructor verbal immediacy behaviors had a significant linear…

  13. Conceptualizing movement by expert Bobath instructors in neurological rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan-Graham, Julie; Patterson, Kara; Zabjek, Karl; Cott, Cheryl A

    2017-12-01

    Movement, a core aspect of physiotherapy practice, and integral to the clinical reasoning process has undergone limited theoretical development. Instead, research has focused on intervention effectiveness embedded within the positivist paradigm. The purpose of this study was to explore how expert neurorehabilitation therapists conceptualize movement as part of their clinical reasoning. A qualitative interpretive descriptive approach consisting of stimulated recall using video-recorded treatment sessions and in-depth interviews was used. Theoretical sampling was used to recruit members of the International Bobath Instructors Training Association (IBITA) who are recognized experts in neurorehabilitation. Interview transcripts were transcribed verbatim. Data analysis was progressive, iterative, and inductive. Twenty-two IBITA instructors from 7 different countries volunteered to participate. They ranged in clinical experience from 12 to 40 years and instructor experience from 1 to 35 years. The conceptualization of movement by the IBITA instructors involves the following elements: (1) movement comprises the whole person and the whole body, not just individual body segments; (2) active alignment of body segments is integral to movement performance; and (3) efficient movement requires the relative integration of postural control/stability and selective movement/mobility. The IBITA instructors conceptualize movement from a person-centred perspective. The integration of postural control and selective movement, with alignment and variability as key components, forms the foundation of their understanding of movement. Further investigation into the role of postural control in movement recovery post central nervous system lesion is required. Likewise, the dimensions of movement critical to the conceptualization of movement are not well understood from the perspective of the physiotherapist or persons with neurological impairments. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. The Relationship between Instructor Misbehaviors and Student Antisocial Behavioral Alteration Techniques: The Roles of Instructor Attractiveness, Humor, and Relational Closeness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claus, Christopher J.; Booth-Butterfield, Melanie; Chory, Rebecca M.

    2012-01-01

    Using rhetorical/relational goal theory as a guiding frame, we examined relationships between instructor misbehaviors (i.e., indolence, incompetence, and offensiveness) and the likelihood of students communicating antisocial behavioral alteration techniques (BATs). More specifically, the study focused on whether students' perceptions of instructor…

  15. The Effectiveness of Instructor Personalized and Formative Feedback Provided by Instructor in an Online Setting: Some Unresolved Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planar, Dolors; Moya, Soledad

    2016-01-01

    Formative feedback has great potential for teaching and learning in online undergraduate programmes. There is a large number of courses where the main source of feedback is provided by the instructor. This is particularly seen in subjects where assessments are designed based on specific activities which are the same for all students, and where the…

  16. Machine Shop. Module 5: Lathes. Instructor's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobles, Jack

    This document consists of materials for a 10-unit course on the following topics: (1) types and parts of lathes; (2) lathe accessories, maintenance, and safety; (3) lathe operations and tooling; (4) lathe calculations; (5) lathe taper and thread applications; (6) planning considerations; (7) cutting fluids, lathe center alignment, and lathe gaps;…

  17. A comparative study of the effect of student and instructor cognitive mapping on student achievement and attitudes in introductory college biology for nonmajors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dardis, Deborah J. Athas

    Within a single research design, this investigation compared the effects of student and instructor cognitive mapping on student achievement and attitudes in introductory college biology for nonmajors. Subjects self-selected into either a Control Group that experienced no cognitive mapping, an Experimental Group 1 that experienced instructor cognitive mapping, or an Experimental Group 2 in which students constructed cognitive maps. Data were collected by a Students' Opinions of Teaching Poll and instructor prepared tests that included objective questions representing all levels of the cognitive domain. An ANCOVA revealed no significant differences in the academic achievement of students in the control and experimental groups. The academic performance of males and females was similar among all three groups of students and data confirmed a lack of interaction between gender and instructional strategy. This investigation confirmed that cognitive mapping will not disrupt a gender-neutral classroom environment. Students' opinions of teaching were overwhelmingly positive. A Kruskal Wallis analysis, followed by a nonparametric Tukey-type multiple comparison, revealed that students who experienced no mapping consistently rated the instructor with higher scores than did students who experienced instructor mapping. Students who cooperatively constructed cognitive maps reported the lowest scores on the opinion polls.

  18. Teaching and Learning Against all Odds: A Video-Based Study of Learner-to-Instructor Interaction in International Distance Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Marie Muhirwa

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Distance education and information and communication technologies (ICTs have been marketed as cost-effective ways to rescue struggling educational institutions in developing countries, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA. This study uses classroom video analysis and follow-up interviews with teachers, students, and local tutors to analyse the interaction at a distance between learners in Mali and Burkina Faso and their French and Canadian instructors. Findings reveal multiple obstacles to quality interaction: frequent Internet disconnections, limited student access to computers, lack of instructor presence, ill-prepared local tutors, student unfamiliarity with typing and computer technology, ineffective technical support, poor social dynamics, learner-learner conflict, learner-instructor conflict, and student withdrawal and resignation. In light of the near death of the costly World Bank-initiated African Virtual University (AVU, this paper concludes by re-visiting the educational potential of traditional technologies, such as radio and video, to foster development in poor countries.

  19. Preparing Stocks. Learning Activity Pack and Instructor's Guide 5.10a. Commercial Foods and Culinary Arts Competency-Based Series. Section 5: Basic Food Preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florida State Univ., Tallahassee. Center for Studies in Vocational Education.

    This document consists of a learning activity packet (LAP) for the student and an instructor's guide for the teacher. The LAP is intended to acquaint occupational home economics students with the uses for and types of stocks and also gives information on how to cook, cool, and store stocks. Illustrated information sheets and learning activities…

  20. Vegetables. Learning Activity Pack and Instructor's Guide 5.14. Commercial Foods and Culinary Arts Competency-Based Series. Section 5: Basic Food Preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florida State Univ., Tallahassee. Center for Studies in Vocational Education.

    This document consists of a learning activity packet (LAP) for the student and an instructor's guide for the teacher. The LAP is intended to acquaint occupational home economics students with the major types of vegetables, with the procedures for storing vegetables, and with the general rules and methods of vegetable cookery. Illustrated…

  1. College Students’ Perceptions of Professor/Instructor Bullying: Questionnaire Development and Psychometric Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marraccini, Marisa E.; Weyandt, Lisa L.; Rossi, Joseph S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study developed and examined the psychometric properties of a newly formed measure designed to assess professor/instructor bullying, as well as teacher bullying occurring prior to college. Additionally, prevalence of instructor bullying and characteristics related to victims of instructor bullying were examined. Participants Participants were 337 college students recruited in 2012 from a northeastern university. Methods An online questionnaire was administered to college students. A split-half, cross-validation approach was employed for measurement development. Results The measure demonstrated strong criterion validity and internal consistency. Approximately half of students reported witnessing professor/instructor bullying and 18% reported being bullied by a professor/instructor. Report of teacher bullying occurring prior to college was related to professor/instructor bullying in college, and sex was a moderating variable. Conclusion College students perceive instructor bullying as occurring but may not know how to properly address it. Prevention efforts should be made by university administrators, faculty and staff. PMID:26151235

  2. University-industry consortium: maximizing the use of limited resources for instructor training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norton, R.E.; Williams, T.M.

    1987-01-01

    This proposed development effort would accomplish three major objectives, as follows: 1. To identify and verify, through job analysis, the critical professional tasks that must be performed by electric utility instructors. 2. To adapt and revise existing instructor training modules to make them self-contained and highly specific to the professional knowledge and skills needed by electric utility instructors. 3. To develop new instructor training modules, if needed, to meet utility instructor training needs that are not addressed by any existing materials. It is anticipated that approximately twenty (20) modules will be needed to address all of the critical instructor tasks identified during the job analysis phase. The National Center for Research in Vocational Education proposes that it would be very cost-effective and time-efficient to cooperatively undertake the development of the needed instructor training modules with a consortium of about to ten interested electric utility companies

  3. College Students' Perceptions of Professor/Instructor Bullying: Questionnaire Development and Psychometric Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marraccini, Marisa E; Weyandt, Lisa L; Rossi, Joseph S

    2015-01-01

    This study developed and examined the psychometric properties of a newly formed measure designed to assess professor/instructor bullying, as well as teacher bullying occurring prior to college. Additionally, prevalence of instructor bullying and characteristics related to victims of instructor bullying were examined. Participants were 337 college students recruited in 2012 from a northeastern university. An online questionnaire was administered to college students. A split-half, cross-validation approach was employed for measurement development. The measure demonstrated strong criterion validity and internal consistency. Approximately half of students reported witnessing professor/instructor bullying and 18% reported being bullied by a professor/instructor. Report of teacher bullying occurring prior to college was related to professor/instructor bullying in college, and sex was a moderating variable. College students perceive instructor bullying as occurring but may not know how to properly address it. Prevention efforts should be made by university administrators, faculty, and staff.

  4. Arabic Instructors' Attitudes on Communicative Language Teaching (CLT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deniz Gokcora

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a study on Arabic instructors' perceptions on some aspects of communicative language teaching. The data were gathered through an attitude scale and some focus group and one-on-one interviews in a major foreign language institute involving 96 Arabic instructors. The survey included a the significance of grammar; b error correction; c pair and group work; and d student and teacher roles dimensions of communicative language teaching. Discussion of the survey results in relation to these four constructs is followed by the discussion of emergent themes in these four areas in the interviews. We argue that the results of the study are revelations of teachers at certain time in their career, and more professional development could come true through carrying out action research projects.

  5. Designing Internet research assignments: building a framework for instructor collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Ward

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Internet knowledge is increasing steadily among instructors in the academic world. As courses incorporate more instructional technology, traditional undergraduate research assignments are adapting to reflect the changing world of information and information access. New library assignments reflect this shift as well, with term papers and research projects asking students to use Web sites as an information resource, in addition to the standard literature of periodicals and monographs. But the many pitfalls the library profession has learned in its own metamorphosis during the past decade are often repeated in these newer course assignments. The authors in this paper present a framework for librarians to interact with instructors to incorporate Internet resources into traditional term paper and research assignments. They suggest a framework for creating sample assignments librarians can take to campus instructional units, to show the teaching community at large what the library profession has learned from first-hand experience.

  6. Certified Basic Life Support Instructors Assess Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Skills Poorly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Camilla; Rasmussen, Stinne E; Kristensen, Mette Amalie

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: High-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) improves survival from cardiac arrest. During basic life support (BLS) training, instructors assess CPR skills to enhance learning outcome. Emergency department staff and senior residents have been shown to assess chest compression...... quality poorly. Currently no studies have evaluated CPR assessment among certified BLS instructors. The aim of this study was to investigate certified BLS instructors’ assessment of chest compressions and rescue breathing.Methods: Data were collected at BLS courses for medical students at Aarhus...... of CPR skills may be beneficial to ensure high-quality learning outcome.Author Disclosures: C. Hansen: None. S.E. Rasmussen: None. M.A. Nebsbjerg: None. M. Stærk: None. B. Løfgren: None....

  7. Memorable Exemplification in Undergraduate Biology: Instructor Strategies and Student Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Alandeom W.; Bretzlaff, Tiffany; Brown, Adam O.

    2018-03-01

    The present study examines the exemplification practices of a university biology instructor during a semester-long course. Attention is given specifically to how the instructor approaches memorable exemplification—classroom episodes identified by students as a source of memorable learning experiences. A mixed-method research approach is adopted wherein descriptive statistics is combined with qualitative multimodal analysis of video recordings and survey data. Our findings show that memorable experiencing of examples may depend on a multiplicity of factors, including whether students can relate to the example, how unique and extreme the example is, how much detail is provided, whether the example is enacted rather than told, and whether the example makes students feel sad, surprised, shocked, and/or amused. It is argued that, rather than simply assuming that all examples are equally effective, careful consideration needs be given to how exemplification can serve as an important source of memorable science learning experiences.

  8. The professional valeological portrait of instructor of physical culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.M. Semanyshyn

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: identify components of the readiness of the future physical education specialist to valeological activity in preschool education. Material : a review and theoretical analysis of the scientific literature. Results : defines the general and special competence, the individual components. The degree of their relationship in the process of preparing an instructor of physical education in preschool education. Theoretically proved that the readiness of the future specialist organization based on skill valeological activities (including major tasks specific functions and values valeological culture. Such an organization implies unity of general and special components health-preserving technologies. Conclusions : the process of forming a professional portrait valeological instructor in physical education in pre-school educational institution should provide its willingness to valeological activities. This is based on the awareness of its organization and unity of general and special health- technology components.

  9. The engineering capstone course fundamentals for students and instructors

    CERN Document Server

    Hoffman, Harvey F

    2014-01-01

    This essential book takes students and instructors through steps undertaken in a start-to-finish engineering project as conceived and presented in the engineering capstone course. The learning experience follows an industry model to prepare students to recognize a need for a product or service and work in a team; identify competition, patent overlap, and necessary resources; generate a project proposal that accounts for business issues; prepare a design, develop and fabricate the product or service; develop a test plan to evaluate the product or service; and prepare and deliver a final report and presentation. Throughout the book, students are asked to examine the business viability of the project. The Engineering Capstone Course: Fundamentals for Students and Instructors emphasizes that a design must meet a set of realistic technical specifications and constraints, including examination of attendant economics, environmental needs, sustainability, manufacturability, health and safety, governmental regulations...

  10. The Dark Side of Teaching: Destructive Instructor Leadership and Its Association with Students' Affect, Behaviour, and Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balwant, Paul T.

    2017-01-01

    Leadership theory can provide a route for investigating teaching via the concept of instructor leadership. Instructor leadership is defined as a process whereby instructors exert intentional influence over students to guide, structure and facilitate classroom activities and relationships in a class. Instructor leadership in higher education…

  11. 14 CFR 61.411 - What aeronautical experience must I have to apply for a flight instructor certificate with a...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... airship that is a light-sport aircraft. (e) Lighter-than-air category and balloon class privileges, (1) 35... apply for a flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating? 61.411 Section 61.411 Aeronautics... CERTIFICATION: PILOTS, FLIGHT INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Flight Instructors With a Sport Pilot Rating...

  12. 14 CFR 61.427 - What must I do if my flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating expires?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... certificate with a sport pilot rating expires? 61.427 Section 61.427 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... GROUND INSTRUCTORS Flight Instructors With a Sport Pilot Rating § 61.427 What must I do if my flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating expires? You may exchange your expired flight instructor...

  13. 14 CFR 61.415 - What are the limits of a flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... certificate with a sport pilot rating? 61.415 Section 61.415 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... GROUND INSTRUCTORS Flight Instructors With a Sport Pilot Rating § 61.415 What are the limits of a flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating? If you hold a flight instructor certificate with a sport...

  14. Building Interagency Partnerships Curriculum: Instructor’s Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    includes instructor-led components, documentary -style footage of subject matter experts, and true stories from the field to elicit reflection and discussion...context. The documentary -style films included in the curriculum are based on an analysis of interviews with military personnel, U.S. government... management tasks while collaborating with interagency partners. 29 Lesson 1: Boundary-Spanning OBJECTIVES The student will be: • Introduced to the

  15. Instructor qualification for radiation safety training at a national laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trinoskey, P.A.

    1994-10-01

    Prior to 1993, Health Physics Training (HPT) was conducted by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) health physics group. The job requirements specified a Masters Degree and experience. In fact, the majority of Health Physicists in the group were certified by the American Board of Health Physics. Under those circumstances, it was assumed that individuals in the group were technically qualified and the HPT instructor qualification stated that. In late 1993, the Health Physics Group at the LLNL was restructured and the training function was assigned to the training group. Additional requirements for training were mandated by the Department of Energy (DOE), which would necessitate increasing the existing training staff. With the need to hire, and the policy of reassignment of employees during downsizing, it was imperative that formal qualification standards be developed for technical knowledge. Qualification standards were in place for instructional capability. In drafting the new training qualifications for instructors, the requirements of a Certified Health Physicists had to be modified due to supply and demand. Additionally, for many of the performance-based training courses, registration by the National Registry of Radiation Protection Technologists is more desirable. Flexibility in qualification requirements has been incorporated to meet the reality of ongoing training and the compensation for desirable skills of individuals who may not meet all the criteria. The qualification requirements for an instructor rely on entry-level requirements and emphasis on goals (preferred) and continuing development of technical and instructional capabilities

  16. Cultural responsiveness in EFL teaching: reflections from native instructors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinarbas H. Ibrahim

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, many international students from different parts of the world have been studying at Turkish universities, which creates a multicultural educational setting. Due to the multicultural educational setting, English has become the most widely used language for exchanging and sharing knowledge, therefore many international universities in Turkey put a great emphasis on English language education and offer English preparatory courses to students. In order to succeed at better language education, universities employ native English instructors to provide a richer language experience with cultural components embedded in language content. In this qualitative case study, cultural reflections of native English instructors at a Turkish university were investigated. Individual and focus group interviews were data sources for the study. Findings indicated that cultural responsiveness was considered to be constructed through time, and a necessity of orientation process was emphasized. However, the native instructors’ presumptions cause intolerance and underestimation of the host culture. In addition, educational issues and students’ misbehaviors, such as cheating and calling their instructors by their first name, were attributed to cultural background of the students.

  17. Instructor-Created Activities to Engage Undergraduate Nursing Research Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Linda L; Reuille, Kristina M

    2018-03-01

    In flipped or blended classrooms, instruction intentionally shifts to a student-centered model for a problem-based learning approach, where class time explores topics in greater depth, creating meaningful learning opportunities. This article describes instructor-created activities focused on research processes linked to evidence-based practice that engage undergraduate nursing research students. In the classroom, these activities include individual and team work to foster critical thinking and stimulate student discussion of topic material. Six activities for small and large student groups are related to quantitative, qualitative, and both research processes, as well as applying research evidence to practice. Positive student outcomes included quantitative success on assignments and robust student topic discussions, along with instructor-noted overall group engagement and interest. Using these activities can result in class time for the construction of meaning, rather than primarily information transmission. Instructors may adopt these activities to involve and stimulate students' critical thinking about research and evidence-based practice. [J Nurs Educ. 2018;57(3):174-177.]. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  18. Beyond the Biology: A Systematic Investigation of Noncontent Instructor Talk in an Introductory Biology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Shannon B.; Reggi, Amanda L.; Schinske, Jeffrey N.; Burrus, Laura W.; Tanner, Kimberly D.

    2015-01-01

    Instructors create classroom environments that have the potential to impact learning by affecting student motivation, resistance, and self-efficacy. However, despite the critical importance of the learning environment in increasing conceptual understanding, little research has investigated what instructors say and do to create learning environments in college biology classrooms. We systematically investigated the language used by instructors that does not directly relate to course content and defined the construct of Instructor Talk. Transcripts were generated from a semester-long, cotaught introductory biology course (n = 270 students). Transcripts were analyzed using a grounded theory approach to identify emergent categories of Instructor Talk. The five emergent categories from analysis of more than 600 quotes were, in order of prevalence, 1) Building the Instructor/Student Relationship, 2) Establishing Classroom Culture, 3) Explaining Pedagogical Choices, 4) Sharing Personal Experiences, and 5) Unmasking Science. Instances of Instructor Talk were present in every class session analyzed and ranged from six to 68 quotes per session. The Instructor Talk framework is a novel research variable that could yield insights into instructor effectiveness, origins of student resistance, and methods for overcoming stereotype threat. Additionally, it holds promise in professional development settings to assist instructors in reflecting on the learning environments they create. PMID:26582237

  19. Support from a prenatal instructor during childbirth is associated with reduced rates of caesarean section in a Mexican study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campero, Lourdes; Hernández, Bernardo; Osborne, Jomo; Morales, Sara; Ludlow, Teresa; Muñoz, Christian

    2004-12-01

    to assess the association between non-clinical factors and the incidence of caesarean section (CS); to estimate the effect of a prenatal instructor's presence during childbirth on birth outcome (vaginal or CS). cross-sectional study from a register of women who attended prenatal classes. Multivariate logistic regression was used to measure the effects of each variable on whether the birth was vaginal or CS. Mexico City, Mexico. 992 births to 847 women from the register of the Birth Education Centre (CEPAPAR) between 1987 and 2000. the incidence of CS was 33%. The most commonly reported (by the women) reason for performing a CS was dystocia (53%). Most women were middle or upper-middle class professionals, and 85% of the women gave birth in private institutions. Odds of having a CS were higher among women who gave birth in a large hospital, women who were over 25 years of age, primigravidae, and women who were not supported by a prenatal instructor during childbirth. non-clinical factors considerably affect the type of birth outcome (vaginal vs. CS). A system in which a prenatal instructor provided support to the woman during childbirth could contribute significantly to reducing initial and repeat CS.

  20. The impact of transition training on adapting to Technically Advanced Aircraft at regional airlines: Perceptions of pilots and instructor pilots

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Renzo, John Carl, Jr.

    Scope and method of study. The purpose of this study was to test a hypothesis about pilot and instructor pilot perceptions of how effectively pilots learn and use new technology, found in Technically Advanced Aircraft (TAA), given initial type of instrumentation training. New aviation technologies such as Glass Cockpits in technically advanced aircraft are complex and can be difficult to learn and use. The research questions focused on the type of initial instrumentation training to determine the differences among pilots trained using various types of instrumentation ranging from aircraft equipped with traditional analog instrumentation to aircraft equipped with glass cockpits. A convenience sample of Pilots in Training (PT) and Instructor Pilots (IP) was selected from a regional airline. The research design used a mixed methodology. Pilots in training completed a thirty-two question quantitative questionnaire and instructor pilots completed a five question qualitative questionnaire. Findings and conclusions. This investigation failed to disprove the null hypothesis. The type of instrumentation training has no significant effect on newly trained regional airline pilot perceived ability to adapt to advanced technology cockpits. Therefore, no evidence exists from this investigation to support the early introduction and training of TAA. While the results of this investigation were surprising, they are nonetheless, instructive. Even though it would seem that there would be a relationship between exposure to and use of technically advanced instrumentation, apparently there was no perceived relationship for this group of airline transport pilots. However, a point of interest is that these pilots were almost evenly divided in their opinion of whether or not their previous training had prepared them for transition to TAA. The majority also believed that the type of initial instrumentation training received does make a difference when transitioning to TAA. Pilots believed

  1. Content and Community Redux: Instructor and Student Interpretations of Online Communication in a Graduate Seminar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary E. Dykes

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The experiences of an instructor and teaching assistant who employed online communication strategies in a graduate seminar are examined in this paper. This paper expands on the findings reported in an earlier article on virtual learning communities founded on social constructivist pedagogy (Schwier & Balbar, 2002. We examine how the instructors constructed and refined structured discussions of content with synchronous and asynchronous communication at the graduate level. The instructors offer several observations and principles that are organized into categories that illustrate the source, message, channel and receiver in the communication system. The critical reflections of the instructors are compared with data from interviews with students about learning experienced in the online discussions (Dykes, 2003. Findings include the realization that instructors may fundamentally misinterpret or overlook important elements of communication, but that students are robust learners who can transcend the limitations of the medium and the instructor if given the authority in a social constructivist learning environment.

  2. A CERN fireman is an instructor for French-speaking Switzerland

    CERN Document Server

    Alizée Dauvergne

    2010-01-01

    Davide Pagnani, a team leader in the CERN Fire Brigade, is a Swiss Federal expert and instructor in the field of interventions involving radioactivity. Firemen from throughout the French-speaking part of Switzerland come to CERN for training exercises supervised by Davide.   Training on the radiation protection techniques.   Before joining the CERN Fire Brigade, Davide Pagnani studied in Rome to be a radiation protection technician working in control rooms. Since joining, he has specialised in interventions in incidents involving radioactive materials. "The CERN firemen are trained in this type of work. If there is a radioactive leak, special measures are needed to protect the firemen, bystanders and the environment", says Davide. The training of qualified firemen in radiation protection is organised in collaboration with the Radiation Protection Group of CERN's Occupational Health and Safety and Environmental Protection Unit (HSE). "I have been collaboratin...

  3. Touching for attention: How flight instructors support a pilot wearing a view-limiting device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nevile, Maurice Richard; Tuccio, William A.

    2018-01-01

    We use video recordings from pilot training flights to show how instructors support attention of a student wearing ‘foggles’, a view-limiting device designed to train pilots to fly by reference only to the cockpit flight instruments. The instructors touch cockpit displays with a pointing finger...... demonstrates a technique for controlling descent. The data examples are taken from a corpus of almost 100 hours of video recordings of actual in-flight instruction. We consider how our analyses can inform flight instructor training and improve instructor effectiveness, for example by revealing possible...

  4. 14 CFR 61.429 - May I exercise the privileges of a flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating if I...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating if I hold a flight instructor certificate with another... Instructors With a Sport Pilot Rating § 61.429 May I exercise the privileges of a flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating if I hold a flight instructor certificate with another rating? If you...

  5. 14 CFR 61.405 - What tests do I have to take to obtain a flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating? 61.405 Section 61.405 Aeronautics and Space..., FLIGHT INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Flight Instructors With a Sport Pilot Rating § 61.405 What tests do I have to take to obtain a flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating? To obtain a...

  6. Instructor feedback versus no instructor feedback on performance in a laparoscopic virtual reality simulator: a randomized educational trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oestergaard Jeanett

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several studies have found a positive effect on the learning curve as well as the improvement of basic psychomotor skills in the operating room after virtual reality training. Despite this, the majority of surgical and gynecological departments encounter hurdles when implementing this form of training. This is mainly due to lack of knowledge concerning the time and human resources needed to train novice surgeons to an adequate level. The purpose of this trial is to investigate the impact of instructor feedback regarding time, repetitions and self-perception when training complex operational tasks on a virtual reality simulator. Methods/Design The study population consists of medical students on their 4th to 6th year without prior laparoscopic experience. The study is conducted in a skills laboratory at a centralized university hospital. Based on a sample size estimation 98 participants will be randomized to an intervention group or a control group. Both groups have to achieve a predefined proficiency level when conducting a laparoscopic salpingectomy using a surgical virtual reality simulator. The intervention group receives standardized instructor feedback of 10 to 12 min a maximum of three times. The control group receives no instructor feedback. Both groups receive the automated feedback generated by the virtual reality simulator. The study follows the CONSORT Statement for randomized trials. Main outcome measures are time and repetitions to reach the predefined proficiency level on the simulator. We include focus on potential sex differences, computer gaming experience and self-perception. Discussion The findings will contribute to a better understanding of optimal training methods in surgical education. Trial Registration NCT01497782

  7. Instructor feedback versus no instructor feedback on performance in a laparoscopic virtual reality simulator: a randomized educational trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oestergaard, Jeanett; Bjerrum, Flemming; Maagaard, Mathilde; Winkel, Per; Larsen, Christian Rifbjerg; Ringsted, Charlotte; Gluud, Christian; Grantcharov, Teodor; Ottesen, Bent; Soerensen, Jette Led

    2012-02-28

    Several studies have found a positive effect on the learning curve as well as the improvement of basic psychomotor skills in the operating room after virtual reality training. Despite this, the majority of surgical and gynecological departments encounter hurdles when implementing this form of training. This is mainly due to lack of knowledge concerning the time and human resources needed to train novice surgeons to an adequate level. The purpose of this trial is to investigate the impact of instructor feedback regarding time, repetitions and self-perception when training complex operational tasks on a virtual reality simulator. The study population consists of medical students on their 4th to 6th year without prior laparoscopic experience. The study is conducted in a skills laboratory at a centralized university hospital. Based on a sample size estimation 98 participants will be randomized to an intervention group or a control group. Both groups have to achieve a predefined proficiency level when conducting a laparoscopic salpingectomy using a surgical virtual reality simulator. The intervention group receives standardized instructor feedback of 10 to 12 min a maximum of three times. The control group receives no instructor feedback. Both groups receive the automated feedback generated by the virtual reality simulator. The study follows the CONSORT Statement for randomized trials. Main outcome measures are time and repetitions to reach the predefined proficiency level on the simulator. We include focus on potential sex differences, computer gaming experience and self-perception. The findings will contribute to a better understanding of optimal training methods in surgical education. NCT01497782.

  8. Instructor feedback versus no instructor feedback on performance in a laparoscopic virtual reality simulator: a randomized educational trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Several studies have found a positive effect on the learning curve as well as the improvement of basic psychomotor skills in the operating room after virtual reality training. Despite this, the majority of surgical and gynecological departments encounter hurdles when implementing this form of training. This is mainly due to lack of knowledge concerning the time and human resources needed to train novice surgeons to an adequate level. The purpose of this trial is to investigate the impact of instructor feedback regarding time, repetitions and self-perception when training complex operational tasks on a virtual reality simulator. Methods/Design The study population consists of medical students on their 4th to 6th year without prior laparoscopic experience. The study is conducted in a skills laboratory at a centralized university hospital. Based on a sample size estimation 98 participants will be randomized to an intervention group or a control group. Both groups have to achieve a predefined proficiency level when conducting a laparoscopic salpingectomy using a surgical virtual reality simulator. The intervention group receives standardized instructor feedback of 10 to 12 min a maximum of three times. The control group receives no instructor feedback. Both groups receive the automated feedback generated by the virtual reality simulator. The study follows the CONSORT Statement for randomized trials. Main outcome measures are time and repetitions to reach the predefined proficiency level on the simulator. We include focus on potential sex differences, computer gaming experience and self-perception. Discussion The findings will contribute to a better understanding of optimal training methods in surgical education. Trial Registration NCT01497782 PMID:22373062

  9. Professional Development in Remote Sensing for Community College Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, J. E.; Cruz, C.

    2014-11-01

    The ingredients for the highly successful, ongoing educator professional development program, "Integrated Geospatial Education and Technology Training-Remote Sensing (iGETT-RS)" came into place in 2006 when representatives of public and private organizations convened a two-day workshop at the National Science Foundation (NSF) to explore issues around integrating remote sensing with Geographic Information Systems (GIS) instruction at two-year (community and Tribal) colleges. The results of that 2006 workshop informed the shape of a grant proposal, and two phases of iGETT-RS were funded by NSF's Advanced Technological Education Program (NSF DUE #0703185, 2007-2011, and NSF DUE #1205069, 2012-2015). 76 GIS instructors from all over the country have been served. Each of them has spent 18 months on the project, participating in monthly webinars and two Summer Institutes, and creating their own integrated geospatial exercises for the classroom. The project will be completed in June 2015. As the external evaluator for iGETT expressed it, the impact on participating instructors "can only be described as transformative." This paper describes how iGETT came about, how it was designed and implemented, how it affected participants and their programs, and what has been learned by the project staff about delivering professional development in geospatial technologies for workforce preparedness.

  10. The MovieClassroom: An Internet Based Application for Students and Instructors to Create Captioned Animations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbano, L.

    2005-12-01

    We have developed and tested an internet based application that facilitates the creation of animations for use in lectures and permits movie production by students in laboratory classes. Animation have been found to be extremely useful educational aids in the geosciences, particularly relating to topics requiring comprehension of geospatial relationships. With this program, instructors are able to assemble and caption animations using an online video clip catalogue and present these movies through a standard internet browser. Captioning increases student comprehension by increasing the multimodality of information delivery. For student use, we developed an exercise for introductory, undergraduate, laboratory class sections that was informed by learning pedagogy, particularly as related to game-based learning. Students were asked to assemble video clips and captions into a coherent movie to explain geospatial concepts, with questions such as "Explain why we have seasons?" The affinity of students to digital technology, particularly computer games and digital media, makes this type of exercise particularly captivating to the typical undergraduate. The opportunity to select and arrange video clips (and add background music) into a unique production offers students a greater degree of ownership of the learning process and allows unique non-linear pathways for accomplishing learning objectives. Use in a laboratory section permitted rapid feedback from the instructor. The application was created using open-sourced software and the database populated with video clips and music contributed by faculty and students under a non-commercial-use license. This tool has the potential to permit the wider dissemination of scientific research results given the increasing use animations for scientific visualization, because it eases the creation of multiple presentations targeted to various audiences and allows user participation in the creation of multimedia.

  11. Medical students and physical education students as CPR instructors: an appropriate solution to the CPR-instructor shortage in secondary schools?

    OpenAIRE

    Cuijpers, P. J. P. M.; Bookelman, G.; Kicken, W.; de Vries, W.; Gorgels, A. P. M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Integrating cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training in secondary schools will increase the number of potential CPR providers. However, currently too few certified instructors are available for this purpose. Training medical students and physical education student teachers to become CPR instructors could decrease this shortage. Aim Examine whether medical students and physical education student teachers can provide CPR training for secondary school pupils as well as (i.?e., non...

  12. Anaerobic Digestion I. Sludge Treatment and Disposal Course #166. Instructor's Guide [and] Student Workbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arasmith, E. E.

    This lesson is the first of a two-part series on anaerobic digestion. Topics discussed include the five basic functions of an anaerobic digester, basic theory of the biological processes involved, basic equipment necessary for digestion, and the products of digestion. The lesson includes an instructor's guide and student workbook. The instructor's…

  13. The Importance of Being…Social? Instructor Credibility and the Millennials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardt, Megan W.

    2016-01-01

    Using the framework of generational identity, the current study explores how a range of characteristics impact Millennial perceptions of instructor credibility. Millennial Generation student ratings of the impact of competence, character, and sociability on instructor credibility were compared to faculty ratings of the same characteristics.…

  14. Course-Specific Intrinsic Motivation: Effects of Instructor Support and Global Academic Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zook, J. M.; Herman, A. P.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the effects of instructor support and students' global academic motivation on students' course-specific intrinsic motivation. The authors hypothesized, based on self-determination theory (Ryan & Deci, 2000), that instructor support for students' psychological needs would enhance intrinsic motivation. Students reported their…

  15. Instructional skills training - the Westinghouse program to insure competence of nuclear training instructors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widen, W.C.

    1983-01-01

    The nuclear training engineer as well as being competent technically must be able to teach effectively. Westinghouse have developed a course for training instructors which aims to improve their teaching skills. The course, which has both theoretical and practical content covers the role of the instructor, the learning process, communications, test construction and analysis and stress identification and analysis. (U.K.)

  16. Development of PCK for Novice and Experienced University Physics Instructors: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Syh-Jong; Tsai, Meng-Fang; Chen, Ho-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    The current study assessed and compared university students' perceptions' of a novice and an experienced physics instructor's Pedagogical Content Knowledge (PCK). Two college physics instructors and 116 students voluntarily participated in this study. The research model comprised three workshops, mid-term and final evaluations and instructor…

  17. The Advisor and Instructor as a Dynamic Duo: Academic Motivation and Basic Psychological Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Tracie D.; Young-Jones, Adena D.; Yadon, Carly A.; Carr, Michael T.

    2013-01-01

    Students learn in and out of a formal classroom, and instructors and academic advisors play key roles in academic motivation and learning. Therefore, through the lens of self-determination theory, we examined the ways perceived support from instructors and advisors relates to satisfaction of college students' basic psychological needs. Advisor and…

  18. Collaborative e-learning course design: Impacts on instructors in the Open University of Tanzania

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nihuka, Kassimu A.; Voogt, Joke

    2012-01-01

    Efforts by universities in sub-Sahara Africa to promote professional development of instructors in course design and delivery by e-learning technologies have often lacked meaningful impacts. This study investigated the impact of collaborative course design on instructors' professional learning about

  19. Biochemistry Instructors' Views toward Developing and Assessing Visual Literacy in Their Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linenberger, Kimberly J.; Holme, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    Biochemistry instructors are inundated with various representations from which to choose to depict biochemical phenomena. Because of the immense amount of visual know-how needed to be an expert biochemist in the 21st century, there have been calls for instructors to develop biochemistry students' visual literacy. However, visual literacy has…

  20. Matching Student Expectations with Instructors' Dispositions: Insight into Quality of Online Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Anita G.; Orso, Don; Doolittle, Joan; Areepattamannil, Shaljan

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the similarities and differences between student expectations of online instructors and the teaching dispositions of online instructors. Our research goal is to develop insight into factors related to online student success. Although researchers have identified key characteristics of effective teaching in the face-to-face…

  1. LMS Use and Instructor Performance: The Role of Task-Technology Fit

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, Tanya; Klobas, Jane; Renzi, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    The introduction of learning management systems (LMS) has changed the way in which instructors work. This paper uses Goodhue and Thompson's (1995) technology-to-performance chain (TPC) to explore the roles of task-technology fit (TTF) and level of LMS use in the performance impacts of LMS for instructors. A mixed method approach was used: an…

  2. Instructor Strategies for Responding to Disclosures of Gender-Based Violence on Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root, Jennifer L.; Godderis, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    While increasing attention has been paid to the issue of sexual violence (SV) on university and college campuses, there is a paucity of research about how post-secondary instructors should respond to student disclosures of SV and other forms of gender-based violence (GBV). The limited amount of evidence suggests instructors who receive disclosures…

  3. EFL Instructors' Perceptions of Blackboard Learning Management System (LMS) at University Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawalbeh, Thaer Issa

    2018-01-01

    The present paper aims to investigate EFL instructors' perceptions of Blackboard learning management system (LMS) at Taif University in Saudi Arabia. To achieve this purposes, the researcher attempted to answer two questions. The first question investigates EFL instructors' perceptions of Blackboard LMS. The second question aims to identify…

  4. A Gold Standards Approach to Training Instructors to Evaluate Crew Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, David P.; Dismukes, R. Key

    2003-01-01

    The Advanced Qualification Program requires that airlines evaluate crew performance in Line Oriented Simulation. For this evaluation to be meaningful, instructors must observe relevant crew behaviors and evaluate those behaviors consistently and accurately against standards established by the airline. The airline industry has largely settled on an approach in which instructors evaluate crew performance on a series of event sets, using standardized grade sheets on which behaviors specific to event set are listed. Typically, new instructors are given a class in which they learn to use the grade sheets and practice evaluating crew performance observed on videotapes. These classes emphasize reliability, providing detailed instruction and practice in scoring so that all instructors within a given class will give similar scores to similar performance. This approach has value but also has important limitations; (1) ratings within one class of new instructors may differ from those of other classes; (2) ratings may not be driven primarily by the specific behaviors on which the company wanted the crews to be scored; and (3) ratings may not be calibrated to company standards for level of performance skill required. In this paper we provide a method to extend the existing method of training instructors to address these three limitations. We call this method the "gold standards" approach because it uses ratings from the company's most experienced instructors as the basis for training rater accuracy. This approach ties the training to the specific behaviors on which the experienced instructors based their ratings.

  5. The Relationship between Instructor Humor Orientation and Students' Report on Second Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziyaeemehr, Ali; Kumar, Vijay

    2014-01-01

    Humor is an integral component of any language and therefore has an impact on the way languages are acquired/learned. Numerous studies have investigated the role of instructor humor in teaching/learning processes; however, there is little empirical research on the relationship between instructor humor and learning of a second language. This paper…

  6. Aerobic Digestion. Sludge Treatment and Disposal Course #166. Instructor's Guide [and] Student Workbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klopping, Paul H.

    This lesson is a basic description of aerobic digestion. Topics presented include a general process overview discussion of a typical digester's components, factors influencing performance, operational controls, and biological considerations for successful operation. The lesson includes an instructor's guide and student workbook. The instructor's…

  7. Theory of Planned Behavior in the Classroom: An Examination of the Instructor Confirmation-Interaction Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Michael E.; Houser, Marian L.; Farris, Kristen LeBlanc

    2018-01-01

    The current study utilizes the theory of planned behavior (Ajzen "Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes," 50, 179-211 Ajzen 1991) to examine an instructor confirmation-interaction model in the instructional communication context to discover a means by which instructors might cultivate positive student attitudes and…

  8. Instructors' Application of the Theory of Planned Behavior in Teaching Undergraduate Physical Education Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filho, Paulo Jose Barbosa Gutierres; Monteiro, Maria Dolores Alves Ferreira; da Silva, Rudney; Hodge, Samuel R.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze adapted physical education instructors' views about the application of the theory of planned behavior (TpB) in teaching physical education undergraduate courses. Participants ("n" = 17) were instructors of adapted physical activity courses from twelve randomly selected institutions of higher…

  9. Determinants of the Use of Technological Innovation in Distance Learning: A Study with Business School Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo Leal, Edvalda; Luiz Albertin, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    This study's overall purpose is to identify the factors determining the use of technological innovation in Distance Learning (DL), as perceived by instructors of Business Education programs. The theoretical basis for the study is the Innovation Diffusion Theory (IDT). The study's sample is made up of 436 instructors; we used a quantitative…

  10. Managing Instructor Cyberanxiety: The Role of Self-Efficacy in Decreasing Resistance to Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Gerard; Camarata, M. R.

    1996-01-01

    Discussion of educational technology innovations focuses on some of the behavioral challenges facing the drive toward multimedia instruction and suggests a method by which instructor resistance to technological change can be lessened or eliminated based on the concept of self-efficacy. A typology of instructors is explained. (Author/LRW)

  11. Effect of Distributive Leadership Behaviours of Foreign Language Schools' Principals on the Job Satisfaction of Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanriögen, A.; Iscan, S.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of distributive leadership behavior of foreign language schools' principals on the job satisfaction of instructors. Sample size of 416 instructors working in foreign language school for the academic year 2013 to 2014 was used in the study. The data was gathered using questionnaires tag…

  12. Twitter Use and Its Effects on Student Perception of Instructor Credibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGroot, Jocelyn M.; Young, Valerie J.; VanSlette, Sarah H.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates college student perceptions of instructor credibility based on the content of an instructor's Twitterfeed and student beliefs about Twitter as a communication tool. Quantitative and qualitative methods were utilized to explore the effects of three manipulated Twitter feeds (e.g., tweeting social topics, professional topics,…

  13. How Iranian Instructors Teach L2 Pragmatics in Their Classroom Practices? A Mixed-Methods Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthasamy, Paramasivam; Farashaiyan, Atieh

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the teaching approaches and techniques that Iranian instructors utilize for teaching L2 pragmatics in their classroom practices. 238 Iranian instructors participated in this study. The data for this study were accumulated through questionnaire and semi-structured interviews. In terms of the instructional approaches, both the…

  14. An Investigation of First-Year Engineering Student and Instructor Perspectives of Learning Analytics Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, David B.; Brozina, Cory; Novoselich, Brian

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates how first-year engineering undergraduates and their instructors describe the potential for learning analytics approaches to contribute to student success. Results of qualitative data collection in a first-year engineering course indicated that both students and instructors\temphasized a preference for learning analytics…

  15. 14 CFR Appendix H to Part 141 - Ground Instructor Certification Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... planning; and (6) Classroom training techniques. (c) Ground training for a basic ground instructor..., required under this part, for the following ratings: (a) Ground Instructor—Basic. (b) Ground Instructor...) Ground training must include the following aeronautical knowledge areas: (1) Learning process; (2...

  16. Military and Civilian L2 Instructors: Decoding Perceptions of U.S. Service Academy Cadets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Zachary F.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined whether cadets at a U.S. service academy perceived attitudinal differences toward their military and civilian L2 instructors along three variables: foreign language expertise, communicative anxiety, and relatability. Cadets' proficiency levels (divided by beginning and intermediate classes) and current instructor (civilian or…

  17. Sanitary Landfill. Sludge Treatment and Disposal Course #166. Instructor's Guide [and] Student Workbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharman, Ronald M.

    This lesson is an introduction to disposal of sludge by landfill. A brief explanation of the complete process is provided, including discussions of sludge suitability, site selection, method selection and operation, site closure, and ultimate reuse. The lesson includes an instructor's guide and student workbook. The instructor's guide contains a…

  18. Student Personality Differences Are Related to Their Responses on Instructor Evaluation Forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, Stewart; Gardner, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    The relation of student personality to student evaluations of teaching (SETs) was determined in a sample of 144 undergraduates. Student Big Five personality variables and core self-evaluation (CSE) were assessed. Students rated their most preferred instructor (MPI) and least preferred instructor (LPI) on 11 common evaluation items. Pearson and…

  19. Humor on Learning in the College Classroom: Evaluating Benefits and Drawbacks from Instructors' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Simon A.; Cohen, Jillian L.; Russler, Kristen M.

    2010-01-01

    Some college instructors believe that the only way for students to take their education seriously is to be serious and solemn in the classroom. This often means creating a strict classroom environment built on discipline and hard work, perhaps with little or no room for discussion and laughter. However, the most effective instructors are those who…

  20. An Exploration of College Instructors' Use of Classroom Justice, Power, and Behavior Alteration Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horan, Sean M.; Myers, Scott A.

    2009-01-01

    A growing body of research indicates that classroom justice concerns are important to students. When students perceive their instructors are not concerned about justice, they report a host of negative outcomes. Due to the importance of justice assigned to students, the present study sought to understand how instructors view justice. Results…

  1. Conditions for Contingent Instructors Engaged in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Kloet, Marie; Frake-Mistak, Mandy; McGinn, Michelle K.; Caldecott, Marion; Aspenlieder, Erin D.; Beres, Jacqueline L.; Fukuzawa, Sherry; Cassidy, Alice; Gill, Apryl

    2017-01-01

    An increasingly large number of courses in Canadian postsecondary institutions are taught by contingent instructors who hold full- or part-time positions for contractually limited time periods. Despite strong commitments to advancing teaching and learning, the labour and employment conditions for contingent instructors affect the incentives and…

  2. Decomposing University Grades: A Longitudinal Study of Students and Their Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beenstock, Michael; Feldman, Dan

    2018-01-01

    First-degree course grades for a cohort of social science students are matched to their instructors, and are statistically decomposed into departmental, course, instructor, and student components. Student ability is measured alternatively by university acceptance scores, or by fixed effects estimated using panel data methods. After controlling for…

  3. Strategies Reported Used by Instructors to Address Student Alternate Conceptions in Chemical Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piquette, Jeff S.; Heikkinen, Henry W.

    2005-01-01

    This study explores general-chemistry instructors' awareness of and ability to identify and address common student learning obstacles in chemical equilibrium. Reported instructor strategies directed at remediating student alternate conceptions were investigated and compared with successful, literature-based conceptual change methods. Fifty-two…

  4. Examining the Impact of Video Feedback on Instructor Social Presence in Blended Courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jered Borup

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This mixed method research examined instructors’ use of video feedback and its impact on instructor social presence in 12 blended sections of three preservice educational technology courses. An independent samples t-test was conducted and found no significant difference in perceptions of instructor social presence between students who received video feedback (M = 5.77, SD = 0.85 and those who received text (M = 5.62, SD = 0.75; t(178 = 1.23, p = 0.22. The analysis of 22 student and nine teacher interviews found that participants generally viewed video feedback to be more effective at establishing instructor social presence because instructors could better speak with emotions, talk in a conversational manner, and create a sense of closeness with students. Students also explained that the blended learning format lessened the impact of video feedback on instructor social presence, which may help to explain why statistical differences were not found.

  5. Exploring the Relationship Between Students with Accommodations and Instructor Self-Efficacy in Complying with Accommodations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna M. Wright

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The willingness and flexibility of university instructors to comply with and provide accommodations for students with disabilities is critical to academic success. The authors examine how communication between students needing accommodations and university instructors impacts instructor self-efficacy, or instructors’ perception that they can meet the accommodation. Specifically, the authors’ explored the relationship between student self-disclosure of a disability and instructor empathy, flexibility, and self-efficacy in meeting student accommodation needs. Results revealed that the more a student self-discloses about a needed accommodation, the more self-efficacy an instructor has in making that accommodation. For the low-disclosure condition, empathy and flexibility were both significant predictors of self-efficacy, whereas, for the high-disclosure condition, only flexibility was a significant predictor of self-efficacy. Finally, instructors’ levels of empathy and flexibility both decreased after reading both the high and low self-disclosure scenarios.

  6. Instructor training at the Swedish Nuclear Power Training and Safety Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, P.-E.

    1988-01-01

    In spite of the fact that full-scope simulators are very powerful training tools, the transfer of knowledge and skills to the trainees during simulator training is completely dependent on the instructors' technical competence and their ability to transfer it to the trainees by efficient use of these training tools. Accordingly, the instructor candidates must pass a technical training programme equivalent to that for shift supervisors and have at least a few months of experience in each operator position at a nuclear power plant. To be authorized, the instructors must also pass a teacher training programme consisting of four 2 week instructor courses. To stay authorized the instructors must pass an annual retraining programme consisting of at least two weeks of technical refresher and one week teacher retraining. The retraining programme also includes at least three weeks of operational practice at a nuclear power plant. (author)

  7. Bridging the gap between what is praised and what is practiced: Supporting the work of change as anatomy and physiology instructors introduce active learning into their undergraduate classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorn, Patti Marie

    When college Anatomy & Physiology instructors begin using active learning in their classrooms, what do they experience? How do their beliefs about teaching and learning change? What obstacles do they encounter and how do they respond? How do their responses influence future decisions regarding the use of active learning? This study documented the experiences of seven instructors from diverse types of institutions as they began using active learning in their classrooms. Conceptual change and social cognitive motivation theory provided guidance for the 15-month project. A classroom-situated professional development framework that included goal setting, planning and doing active learning and formative assessment, and reflecting on experiences was used. Multiple data sources (verbatim transcripts from emergent and semi-structured interviews, observation notes, surveys, written correspondence, instructional materials, and student surveys) and research methods allowed rigorous exploration of the research questions. A number of important findings emerged from the study. Data indicated that instructors struggled with a lack of instructional, pedagogical and clinical content knowledge, student resistance, personal and professional risk-taking issues, and widely shifting attitudes toward active learning. Data also suggested a developmental progression in beliefs about teaching and learning as instructors implemented active learning, and the progression shared similarities with reports of preservice teacher development documented in the learning-to-teach literature. Initially, instructors' beliefs shifted from knowledge transmission and intuitive theories to constructivist theories; however there was marked variation in the intelligibility, status, and endurance of the new beliefs. Data also allowed identification of two distinct conceptual change experiences. Analysis of instructor beliefs within and between the change groups strongly suggested that causal attribution

  8. Pediatric Basic Life Support Self-training is Comparable to Instructor-led Training: A randomized manikin study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, L. D.; Løfgren, Bo; Jessen, C.

    2011-01-01

    Pediatric Basic Life Support Self-training is comparable to Instructor-led Training: A randomized manikin study.......Pediatric Basic Life Support Self-training is comparable to Instructor-led Training: A randomized manikin study....

  9. Beyond the Biology: A Systematic Investigation of Noncontent Instructor Talk in an Introductory Biology Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Shannon B; Reggi, Amanda L; Schinske, Jeffrey N; Burrus, Laura W; Tanner, Kimberly D

    2015-01-01

    Instructors create classroom environments that have the potential to impact learning by affecting student motivation, resistance, and self-efficacy. However, despite the critical importance of the learning environment in increasing conceptual understanding, little research has investigated what instructors say and do to create learning environments in college biology classrooms. We systematically investigated the language used by instructors that does not directly relate to course content and defined the construct of Instructor Talk. Transcripts were generated from a semester-long, cotaught introductory biology course (n = 270 students). Transcripts were analyzed using a grounded theory approach to identify emergent categories of Instructor Talk. The five emergent categories from analysis of more than 600 quotes were, in order of prevalence, 1) Building the Instructor/Student Relationship, 2) Establishing Classroom Culture, 3) Explaining Pedagogical Choices, 4) Sharing Personal Experiences, and 5) Unmasking Science. Instances of Instructor Talk were present in every class session analyzed and ranged from six to 68 quotes per session. The Instructor Talk framework is a novel research variable that could yield insights into instructor effectiveness, origins of student resistance, and methods for overcoming stereotype threat. Additionally, it holds promise in professional development settings to assist instructors in reflecting on the learning environments they create. © 2015 S. B. Seidel et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2015 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  10. Supporting the development of curricular knowledge among novice physics instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Amy D.

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, my aim is to problematize the invisibility (to instructors) of the purposes of particular exercises within research-based instructional materials (RBIMs) and to provide one possible solution to this problem that other teacher educators may adapt for their institutional contexts. In particular, I show that many RBIMs anticipate and respond to particular (often incorrect) learner ideas, that teachers often do not recognize this, and that not recognizing this can cause teachers to miss opportunities to build on learner ideas and/or engage students in scientific practices. I share an instructional activity I designed that is meant to support teachers—including university physics Learning Assistants—in recognizing the purposes of particular questions or sequences of questions within RBIMs, and I illustrate that this activity can be a productive starting place for conversation about RBIMs.

  11. Effectiveness of the students' evaluation process of teaching instructors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorta-González, Pablo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available When the college student satisfaction survey is considered in the promotion and recognition of instructors, a usual complaint is related to the impact that biased ratings have on the arithmetic mean (used as a measure of teaching effectiveness. This is especially significant when the number of students responding to the survey is small. In this work a new methodology, considering student to student perceptions, is presented. Two different estimators of student rating credibility, based on centrality properties of the student social network, are proposed. This method is established on the idea that in the case of on-site higher education, students often know which others are competent in rating the teaching and learning process.

  12. Digital education reform for improving interaction between students and instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Qiansong; Li, Yuanjie; Zheng, Lixin

    2017-08-01

    Nowadays it is difficult to attract undergraduate students' interesting to put sufficient time to learn major courses in China, which are too hard for them to quick grasp and fully understanding. Here we report a digital education reform for improving interactions between students and instructors, in which we transform the abstract, obscure and boring knowledge, such as physical, mathematical, electronic or optical concepts into direct and dynamic 3-D model and flash. Therefore, this method can convert theoretical concepts into easy understanding pictures. Our several years' experience shows that this education mode can make students' willing to think and practice, then it is helpful for attracting their learning interests. Most students benefit from this education mode which can greatly enhance their understanding abilities.

  13. Voice advisory manikin versus instructor facilitated training in cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isbye, Dan L; Høiby, Pernilla; Rasmussen, Maria B

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Training of healthcare staff in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is time-consuming and costly. It has been suggested to replace instructor facilitated (IF) training with an automated voice advisory manikin (VAM), which increases skill level by continuous verbal feedback during...... individual training. AIMS: To compare a VAM (ResusciAnne CPR skills station, Laerdal Medical A/S, Norway) with IF training in CPR using a bag-valve-mask (BVM) in terms of skills retention after 3 months. METHODS: Forty-three second year medical students were included and CPR performance (ERC Guidelines...... for Resuscitation 2005) was assessed in a 2 min test before randomisation to either IF training in groups of 8 or individual VAM training. Immediately after training and after 3 months, CPR performance was assessed in identical 2 min tests. Laerdal PC Skill Reporting System 2.0 was used to collect data. To quantify...

  14. The Relationship of Instructor Self-Disclosure, Nonverbal Immediacy, and Credibility to Student Incivility in the College Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Ann Neville; Katt, James A.; Brown, Tim; Sivo, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we examined the potential mediating role of instructor credibility in the relationship of instructor self-disclosure and nonverbal immediacy to student incivility in the college classroom. Four hundred thirty-eight students completed online questionnaires regarding the instructor of the class they attended prior to the one in which…

  15. Students' Perceptions about Online Teaching Effectiveness: A Bottom-Up Approach for Identifying Online Instructors' Roles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Rey, Pilar; Barbera, Elena; Fernández-Navarro, Francisco

    2018-01-01

    The topic of online instructors' roles has been of interest to the educational community since the late twentieth century. In previous studies, the identification of online instructors' roles was done using a top-down (deductive) approach. This study applied a bottom-up (inductive) procedure to examine not only the roles of online instructors from…

  16. The use of technology as one of the possible means of performing instructor tasks: Putting technology acceptance in context.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoonenboom, J.I.

    2012-01-01

    For many instructors in higher education, use of a learning management system (LMS) is de facto mandatory. Nevertheless, instructors often have much freedom in deciding which functionalities of the LMS they use; that is, whether they perform each individual instructor task using the LMS.

  17. Repurposing traditional instructor-led lectures for continuing education: rewarding instructors as authors and maximizing return on investment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushinek, Avi; Rushinek, Sara; Lippincott, Christine; Ambrosia, Todd

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this article is to describe the repurposing of classroom video surveillance and on-screen archives (RCVSOSA) model, which is an innovative, technology-enabled approach to continuing education in nursing. The RCVSOSA model leverages network Internet-protocol, high-definition surveillance cameras to record videos of classroom lectures that can be automatically uploaded to the Internet or converted to DVD, either in their entirety or as content-specific modules, with the production work embedded in the technology. The proposed model supports health care continuing education through the use of online assessments for focused education modules, access to archived online recordings and DVD training courses, voice-to-text transcripts, and possibly continuing education modules that may be translated into multiple languages. Potential benefits of this model include increased access to educational modules for students, instant authorship, and financial compensation for instructors and their respective organizations.

  18. Simulation Training: Evaluating the Instructor's Contribution to a Wizard of Oz Simulator in Obstetrics and Gynecology Ultrasound Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Aric; Tepper, Ronnie; Shtub, Avraham

    2017-04-21

    Workplaces today demand graduates who are prepared with field-specific knowledge, advanced social skills, problem-solving skills, and integration capabilities. Meeting these goals with didactic learning (DL) is becoming increasingly difficult. Enhanced training methods that would better prepare tomorrow's graduates must be more engaging and game-like, such as feedback based e-learning or simulation-based training, while saving time. Empirical evidence regarding the effectiveness of advanced learning methods is lacking. Objective quantitative research comparing advanced training methods with DL is sparse. This quantitative study assessed the effectiveness of a computerized interactive simulator coupled with an instructor who monitored students' progress and provided Web-based immediate feedback. A low-cost, globally accessible, telemedicine simulator, developed at the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel-was used. A previous study in the field of interventional cardiology, evaluating the efficacy of the simulator to enhanced learning via knowledge exams, presented promising results of average scores varying from 94% after training and 54% before training (n=20) with Padvantage (P=.01) was found in favor of the WOZ training approach. Content type and training audience were not significant. This study evaluated the contribution of an integrated teaching environment using a computerized interactive simulator, with an instructor providing immediate Web-based immediate feedback to trainees. Involvement of an instructor in the simulation-based training process provided better learning outcomes that varied training content and trainee populations did not affect the overall learning gains. ©Aric Katz, Ronnie Tepper, Avraham Shtub. Originally published in JMIR Medical Education (http://mededu.jmir.org), 21.04.2017.

  19. It’s Personal: Biology Instructors Prioritize Personal Evidence over Empirical Evidence in Teaching Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Tessa C.; Lemons, Paula P.

    2015-01-01

    Despite many calls for undergraduate biology instructors to incorporate active learning into lecture courses, few studies have focused on what it takes for instructors to make this change. We sought to investigate the process of adopting and sustaining active-learning instruction. As a framework for our research, we used the innovation-decision model, a generalized model of how individuals adopt innovations. We interviewed 17 biology instructors who were attempting to implement case study teaching and conducted qualitative text analysis on interview data. The overarching theme that emerged from our analysis was that instructors prioritized personal experience—rather than empirical evidence—in decisions regarding case study teaching. We identified personal experiences that promote case study teaching, such as anecdotal observations of student outcomes, and those that hinder case study teaching, such as insufficient teaching skills. By analyzing the differences between experienced and new case study instructors, we discovered that new case study instructors need support to deal with unsupportive colleagues and to develop the skill set needed for an active-learning classroom. We generated hypotheses that are grounded in our data about effectively supporting instructors in adopting and sustaining active-learning strategies. We also synthesized our findings with existing literature to tailor the innovation-decision model. PMID:25713092

  20. The effects of training group exercise class instructors to adopt a motivationally adaptive communication style.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntoumanis, N; Thøgersen-Ntoumani, C; Quested, E; Hancox, J

    2017-09-01

    Drawing from self-determination theory (Deci & Ryan, 2002), we developed and tested an intervention to train fitness instructors to adopt a motivationally adaptive communication style when interacting with exercisers. This was a parallel group, two-arm quasi-experimental design. Participants in the intervention arm were 29 indoor cycling instructors (n = 10 for the control arm) and 246 class members (n = 75 for the control arm). The intervention consisted of face-to-face workshops, education/information video clips, group discussions and activities, brainstorming, individual planning, and practical tasks in the cycling studio. Instructors and exercisers responded to validated questionnaires about instructors' use of motivational strategies and other motivation-related variables before the first workshop and at the end of the third and final workshop (4 months later). Time × arm interactions revealed no significant effects, possibly due to the large attrition of instructors and exercisers in the control arm. Within-group analyses in the intervention arm showed that exercisers' perceptions of instructor motivationally adaptive strategies, psychological need satisfaction, and intentions to remain in the class increased over time. Similarly, instructors in the intervention arm reported being less controlling and experiencing more need satisfaction over time. These results offer initial promising evidence for the positive impact of the training. © 2016 The Authors Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Electrochemical behavior of single layer CrN, TiN, TiAlN coatings and nanolayered TiAlN/CrN multilayer coatings prepared by reactive direct current magnetron sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    William Grips, V.K.; Barshilia, Harish C.; Selvi, V. Ezhil; Kalavati; Rajam, K.S.

    2006-01-01

    The corrosion behaviors of single layer TiN, CrN, TiAlN and multilayer TiAlN/CrN coatings, deposited on steel substrate using a multi-target reactive direct current magnetron sputtering process, were studied in 3.5% NaCl solution by potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The total thickness of the coatings was about 1.5 μm. About 0.5 μm thick chromium interlayer was used for improved adhesion of the coatings. The potentiodynamic polarization measurements showed that for all the coatings the corrosion potential shifted to higher values as compared to the uncoated substrate. Similarly, the corrosion current density decreased for coated samples, indicating better corrosion resistance of the coated samples. The multilayer coatings of TiAlN/CrN exhibited superior corrosion behavior as compared to the single layer coatings. The Nyquist and the Bode plots obtained from the EIS measurements were fitted by appropriate equivalent circuits to calculate the pore resistance, the charge transfer resistance and the capacitance. These studies revealed that the pore resistance was lowest for TiN coatings, which increased for TiAlN coatings. TiAlN/CrN multilayer coatings exhibited highest pore resistance. No significant change in the capacitive behavior of the coatings was observed, suggesting minimal morphological changes as a result of immersion in the electrolyte. This could be attributed to shorter immersion durations. These studies were confirmed by examining the corroded samples under scanning electron microscope. Preliminary experiments conducted with additional interlayer of electroless nickel (5.0 μm thick) have shown significant improvement in the corrosion resistance of the coatings

  2. Instructor station of full scope simulator for Qinshan 300 MW Nuclear Power Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Fanghui

    1996-01-01

    The instructor station of Full Scope Simulator for Qinshan 300 MW Nuclear Power Unit is based on SGI graphic workstation. The operation system is real time UNIX, and the development of man-machine interface, mainly depends on standard X window system, special for X TOOLKITS and MOTIF. The instructor station has been designed to increase training effectiveness and provide the most flexible environment possible to enhance its usefulness. Based on experiences in the development of the instructor station, many new features have been added including I/O panel diagrams, simulation diagrams, graphic operation of malfunction, remote function and I/O overrides etc

  3. Learning from patients: students' perceptions of patient-instructors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, Ann-Helen; Ringsted, Charlotte

    2011-09-01

    Prior research on the use of patients as teachers has focused on testing the effectiveness of this practice and exploring its benefits for students. However, very little is known about the added value of patient teaching and how it relates to patient-centred learning. The aim of this study was to explore whether there is added value in using patients as instructors in health professions education and, if there is, to examine how it is constituted. Group interviews were conducted with physiotherapy and occupational therapy students who had attended a 3-hour optional class entitled 'Thoughtful joint examination and respectful patient contact'. This class was delivered by patient-instructors (PIs), who were patients with rheumatism certified to teach. A semi-structured interview guide was used. Interviews continued until data saturation occurred (seven interviews). The interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Data were analysed using content analysis. The main finding of this study is that PI sessions facilitate a learning environment in which the content matter is complemented by the provision of realism and individual perspectives on rheumatism, the pedagogical format is characterised by authenticity and intimacy in the style of instruction and feedback, and the PI-student relationship is characterised by balanced teacher-student power relations that support the legitimacy of learning and make space for the asking of questions and the making of mistakes. This study indicates that, in terms of power relations, the PI-student relationship differs from those between faculty teachers and students, and students and patients in the clinic. The formation of a professional identity by students may clash with the fulfilment of their learning tasks in the clinical environment. The study indicates that patient-centredness can be fostered in the PI-student relationship. This is probably supported by the absence of faculty staff involvement in PI teaching sessions

  4. The Significance of Emotional Intelligence on Entrepreneurial Behavior of Instructors (Case study: Iran Technical and vocational Training Organization (TVTO’s Instructors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Karimi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Entrepreneurial characteristics, in fact, are the entrepreneur’s behavioral outputs in different conditions. The behavior, which can be increasingly changed during the times, is a function of acquired and inherent factors. Emotional intelligence as a set of teachable and acquisitive behaviors, can affect the entrepreneurs’ behavioral characteristics. This paper tried to study the relationship between emotional intelligence and entrepreneurial behavioral characteristics among the Iran Technical and vocational Training Organization (TVTO’s Instructors. The statistical sample population in this research is 105 instructors from all over the Iran. Two standardized questionnaires including; Measurement Instrument of Personality characteristics of Iranian’s Entrepreneurs and “Bar- On” Test for assessing the Emotional Intelligence has been used for data collection after testing their validity and reliability. Results from data analysis using descriptive and inferential statistical techniques showed that there is a significant positive relationship between entrepreneurial characteristics and emotional intelligence among Iran TVTO’s instructors.

  5. Technical Training: CERN Technical Training 2004: Instructor-led WBTechT Course for Microsoft Applications

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch The Instructor-led CERN WBTechT course for Microsoft Applications is a new type of course offered in the framework of the Technical Training Programme, combining instructor-led and computer-based multimedia training, also known as "blended learning". The next sessions will take place on the 12, 19, and 26 February (Thursday mornings), and subsequent sessions will be organised following demand. Based on the new ElementK 2004 CERN WBTechT catalogue, courses will be self-paced and self-d...

  6. Desempeño Laboral de Instructores de Gimnasios Ubicados en Guayaquil, Samborondón, Milagro y Naranjito

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rondan Elizalde, Manuel De Jesús

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This research, conducted in the cities of Guayaquil, Samborondón, Milagro and Naranjito, all in the province of Guayas, Ecuador, shows the empiricism which instructors apply in guiding weight training and also a lack of scientific knowledge in planning routines, lack of knowledge of exercises and the proper amount for rehabilitation, in each pathology and sport. It also considers the wide study area as a sport or as a complementary activity as well as the benefits of weight training.The results of surveys and observation forms reveal that, of the 30 respondents only 3 gyms have designed a training program or routine not based on the maximum force test and 3 gyms have a training program which isn´t based on such a test.The purpose of this work was to mark the starting point for instructors and users who go to the gym to learn about the evolution of the weights and the number of methods used to develop muscle hypertrophy, definition and all types of strength.

  7. 14 CFR 61.407 - What aeronautical knowledge must I have to apply for a flight instructor certificate with a sport...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... apply for a flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating? 61.407 Section 61.407 Aeronautics... CERTIFICATION: PILOTS, FLIGHT INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Flight Instructors With a Sport Pilot Rating... sport pilot rating? (a) Except as specified in paragraph (c) of this section you must receive and log...

  8. The lived experience of neophyte nursing instructors: mentorship and its role in their development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nowell LS

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Lorelli S Nowell Faculty of Nursing, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada Abstract: Numerous studies have identified the need for the mentorship of nursing instructors, yet there is a gap in literature identifying outcomes of successful mentorship programs. The purpose of this phenomenological inquiry was to uncover the lived experience of neophyte nursing instructors and the essence of the phenomenon of mentorship. Data were collected through individual interviews with six neophyte nursing instructors. Interviews were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim. Data were analyzed using a phenomenological procedural process. Four themes emerged: 1 what neophyte nurse educators want in a mentor, 2 identifying a new role, 3 mentorship experiences, and 4 becoming proficient as an instructor and mentor. This inquiry provides preliminary evidence-based knowledge for designing and implementing a mentorship program that is grounded in sound education principles, theory, and research. Keywords: nursing education, mentoring, qualitative study, nursing faculty

  9. Outlook of Instructors and Students on Ethical Issues in Computer Assisted Language Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. R. Mirzaeian

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available One of major concerns of human beings regardless of their religion or school of thought is to observe ethical issues. This paper discusses the issue and lays emphasis on observing ethical matters in teaching in virtual learning environments in general and computer assisted language learning in particular. The paper tries to throw light on the current status of observing ethical issues in virtual learning environments and drawing both instructors and students’ attention to this issue. The research has been conducted by using two questionnaires one given to students and the other to instructors. Data analysis revealed that majority of instructors observed ethical issues when confronted with students’ personal details. Students were most sensitive regarding disclosing their personal photos in these virtual environments; however, they were comfortable if their personal details were controlled by the instructors. The Chi-Square test showed no substantial difference between gender and observing ethical issues in virtual learning environments.

  10. Teaching 3D computer animation to illustrators: the instructor as translator and technical director.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koning, Wobbe F

    2012-01-01

    An art instructor discusses the difficulties he's encountered teaching computer graphics skills to undergraduate art students. To help the students, he introduced an automated-rigging script for character animation.

  11. Review of 'Education in Parapsychology: Student and Instructor Perspectives' by Harvey Irwin

    OpenAIRE

    Roe, Chris A

    2014-01-01

    Book review of Education in Parapsychology: Student and Instructor Perspectives by Harvey Irwin. Foreword by Nancy\\ud Zingrone. Gladesville, NSW, Australia: AIPR Mongraphs, 2013. Pp xv + 106. (paperback). ISBN 9780987077219.

  12. 14 CFR 61.41 - Flight training received from flight instructors not certificated by the FAA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... the FAA. (a) A person may credit flight training toward the requirements of a pilot certificate or... flight instructor described in paragraph (a) of this section is only authorized to give endorsements to...

  13. Instructors of psychotherapy in M.A. and Ph.D. clinical programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, H B

    1996-08-01

    The present study investigated the characteristics and orientations of the instructors of the initial psychotherapy course of the 44 members and affiliates of the Council of Applied Master's Programs in Psychology. Also examined were the focus of instruction in the course and the teachers' style of instruction. Responses for 26 completed surveys (58%) were compared with responses from instructors of initial psychotherapy courses in 69 of the 170 APA accredited doctoral programs. Five general theoretical orientations were represented by the M.A. instructors with 28% self-identifying as humanistic, 24% as dynamic, 20% as cognitive behavioral, 16% as interpersonal, and 12% as behavioral. No significant differences were found on demographic characteristics, theoretical orientation, focus of instruction, or method of instruction between instructors in M.A. and those in Ph.D. programs.

  14. A Comparison of Resume Content Preferences of Fortune 500 Personnel Administrators and Business Communication Instructors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harcourt, Jules; Krizan, A. C.

    1989-01-01

    Compares current and past resume content preferences of Fortune 500 personnel administrators and business communication instructors. Finds that personnel administrators now want less personal information and more evidence of achievement and accomplishments in college and on the job. (MS)

  15. A Study on Professional Acquisitions and Improvements of Foreign Instructors Who are Teaching in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tasan Deniz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Importance of education has been increasing day by day in globalizing world. Borders around the education are being broken and internationalization is growing in education field. Beside this, there are many academic papers and studies in this field in international journals. Those papers also have shown that the international experiences provide many acquisitions to the instructors. This study aims to determine the acquisitions of the foreign instructors who are teaching in Turkey. For this purpose, we have interviewed with 17 foreign instructors in Turkey. Interviews have been performed face to face. The findings of the study show that the instructors’ acquisitions are: self-confidence, recognition of new systems, researcher instructors, and pleasure of international experiences. The remaining details have been discussed in the findings, conclusions, and recommendations section.

  16. Classroom Assessment in Web-Based Instructional Environment: Instructors' Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Liang

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available While a great deal has been written on the advantage and benefits of online teaching, little is known on how..assessment is implemented in online classrooms to monitor and inform performance and progress. The..purpose of this study is to investigate the dynamics of WebCT classroom assessment by analyzing the..perceptions and experience of the instructors. Grounded theory method was employed to generate a - process..theory- . The study included 10 faculties who taught WebCT classes, and 216 students in the College of..Education in an urban university in the Mid west. Interviews and classroom observations were undertaken..on line. The findings indicated that, performance-based assessment, writing skills, interactive assessment..and learner autonomy were major assessment aspects to inform teaching and enhance learning. If one of..the major roles of online instruction is to increase self-directed learning, as part of the pedagogical..mechanism, web-based classroom assessment should be designed and practiced to impact learner autonomy.

  17. Development and Psychometric Evaluation of the Nursing Instructors? Clinical Teaching Performance Inventory

    OpenAIRE

    Farahani, Mansoureh A.; Ghasemi, Hormat Sadat Emamzadeh; Nikpeyma, Nasrin; Fereidouni, Zhila; Rassouli, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Evaluation of nursing instructors? clinical teaching performance is a prerequisite to the quality assurance of nursing education. One of the most common procedures for this purpose is using student evaluations. This study was to develop and evaluate the psychometric properties of Nursing Instructors? Clinical Teaching Performance Inventory (NICTPI). The primary items of the inventory were generated by reviewing the published literature and the existing questionnaires as well as consulting wit...

  18. Planning, implementing and evaluating a social and communication skills course for riding instructors

    OpenAIRE

    Seefeld, Annika

    2016-01-01

    Social and emotional skills are very important for effective coaching. As research in this field is still very limited, the purpose of this study was to plan, implement and evaluate a course teaching social and emotional skills to riding instructors. The objective of this research project was to analyse the usefulness and feasibility of a social and communication skills course for riding instructors. The present research study is an educational action research case study approa...

  19. Transforming Warrant Officer Career College Instructor Assessment for the Army Learning Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Career College (WOCC) to reflect the Army Learning Model (ALM)’s emphasis on adult pedagogical approaches. An instructor guide was also developed to...and digital communications, building of effective relationships through interpersonal tact, influence, and communication. • Critical thinking and...students to learn. Foster respect and rapport in the instructor-student relationship and the student-student relationship . Encourage student

  20. Explicating Filipino student nurses' preferences of clinical instructors' attributes: A conjoint analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Factor, Elisa Monette R; de Guzman, Allan B

    2017-08-01

    The role of clinical instructor in student nurses' preparation for the professional nursing practice cannot be underestimated. The extent to which such role is achieved depends highly on the instructors' ability to realize the desired qualities expected of them. While a number of empirical studies have qualitatively explored the attributes of an effective clinical instructor, no attempt has ventured yet on the power of experimental vignettes for conjoint analysis in explicating the preferences of a select group of Filipino student nurses relative to their clinical instructors' attributes. Junior and senior nursing students (n=227), recruited from one of the comprehensive universities in the Philippines, were asked to sort out orthogonal cards generated by Sawtooth Software. As shown, the full-profile conjoint analysis was considerably fit for this study: Pearson's R=0.988, (prelationship and caring behavior (33.17%). In regard to the clinical teaching capability, a clinical instructor who parallels clinical teaching skills with the students' understanding and experience (0.089) was the highest part-worth. As for the interpersonal relationship and caring behavior, the highest part-worth was a clinical instructor who respects a student nurse as an individual and cares about him/her as a person (0.114). Findings of this study can be a basis for clinical instructors as to which qualities to cultivate best to facilitate a first-rate clinical nursing instruction. Likewise, the results of this study can inform current practices of clinical instructors by making them aware of how they can nurture a pedagogical approach consistent with the student nurses' preferences. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The roles of the instructors in an ESP-task based language teaching course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vargas Vásquez, José Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The graduate program in Teaching English at the University of Costa Rica offers yearly English courses to satisfy the language learning needs at different departments, research centers, or similar institutions. The objective of this article was to analyze the extent to which a group of student teachers fulfilled the roles of the instructors in the Task Based Language Teaching method used in the graduate program. The study used a mixed-methods approach and the subjects were three instructors during their teaching practicum. The roles of the instructors were assessed by the practicum supervisors, fellow students in the practicum, the students in the course, and the instructors themselves through rubrics, observation sheets, surveys, and teaching journals. The results from the different instruments using different scales pointed to the instructors fulfilling the roles of sequencing tasks and motivating the learners a majority of the times. The roles of preparing the learners for tasks and raising consciousness were fulfilled to a lesser extent, which indicated that the instructors needed to work further on these areas. The study concluded with recommendations for improving the roles that revealed weaknesses, notably aimed to provide a manageable numbers of vocabulary items and grammar structures in the pretask, as well as to provide prompt feedback, and to elicit students’ knowledge for the development of lessons.

  2. Nursing students' perspectives on clinical instructors' effective teaching strategies: A descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiee, Sina; Moridi, Glorokh; Khaledi, Shahnaz; Garibi, Fardin

    2016-01-01

    An important factor contributing to the quality of clinical education is instructors' teaching performance. The aim of this study was to identify clinical instructors' most effective teaching strategies from nursing and midwifery students' perspectives. This was a descriptive cross-sectional study. All third- and fourth-year bachelor's nursing and midwifery students studying at the Nursing and Midwifery Faculty of Kurdistan University of Medical Sciences were recruited to the study by using the census method. The study instrument consisted of a demographic questionnaire and the self-report 30-item Clinical Instructors' Effective Teaching Strategies Inventory. The SPSS v.16.0 was used for data analysis. The most effective teaching strategies of clinical instructors from nursing and midwifery students' perspectives were respectively 'treating students, clients, and colleagues with respect' and 'being eager for guiding students and manage their problems'. Clinical instructors need to be eager for education and also be able to establish effective communication with students. Empowering clinical instructors in specialized and technical aspects of clinical education seems necessary. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. "We definitely are role models": Exploring how clinical instructors' influence nursing students' attitudes towards older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Sheena Simpkins; Kulig, Judith C

    2017-09-01

    The world's population is getting older, which will inevitably cause increased demands for nurses to provide high quality care to this demographic. Attitudes have been shown to influence the quality of care that older adults receive. It is therefore important to gain a better understanding of what influences nursing students' attitudes towards older adults. This article reports on one of three inter-connected research questions of a mixed methods study that explored the relationship between clinical instructors' attitudes and nursing students' attitudes towards older adults. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 6 clinical instructors and 13 nursing students. Interview data was analyzed using thematic analysis. A conceptual model was developed from the research findings, which revealed that nursing instructors are seen as strong role models for their students, and as role models, they influence students through demonstrations, expectations and support. As a result, nursing students mirror the attitudes of their instructors towards older adults. Findings from this study highlight the strong connection between nursing instructors' and students' attitudes. This has important implications for nursing education including strategies that instructors can employ to enhance students' attitudes towards older adults. Insights from this study also have the potential to improve the quality of care that future nurses provide to older adults. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Chat Transcript Analysis Reveals that Undergraduate Students are Open to Instruction, While Instructors and Librarians Care About Supporting Student Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Sullo

    2017-03-01

    helping these students. Opinions regarding the traditional reference interview, including specific techniques that made the interaction successful, were categorized as “question negotiation.” The “open and closed questions” theme focused on feedback on the types of questions used by librarians in the reference interview. Several components related to chat and instruction were encompassed within the “instruction” theme, including whether those participating in the study were conscious of librarians providing instructions via chat and whether it was deemed valuable; the impact of a library instruction session in which students participated; and identification of missed teachable moments during the chat. The “speed and convenience” theme represented thoughts regarding the balance of instruction and librarian support of news skills, with the student expectation of having their question answered quickly and efficiently. The “customer service” theme focused on the service quality of the reference transaction, while the “referrals” theme encompassed thoughts related to whether students were referred to subject specialists, writing specialists, instructors, or if there was a lack of a referral altogether. Conclusion – Based on the research results, the authors highlighted the importance of the interconnectedness of teaching that is done in the classroom, in library instruction sessions, and on the reference desk, as all three types of instruction should align. Furthermore, because students are open to instruction via the chat service when they are creating and revising their research question and delving into subject research, chat can be viewed as a key teaching and learning opportunity.

  5. The evaluation and planning method of Spanish sport and physical activity instructors: A comparative study across gender, age, level of studies and work experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernabé, Beatriz; González-Rivera, María Dolores; Campos-Izquierdo, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the planning and the evaluation of Spanish sport and physical activity instructors as well as to analyze and compare the two variables in terms of their gender, age, level of studies and work experience. This research falls inside the quantitative type methodology of descriptive cut through standardized interview using the standardized questionnaire: "Human resources of sport and physical activity". It analyses the situation and performance of people working in functions of sport and physical activity. The questionnaire was completed by 600 sport and physical activity instructors from Spain. Key results revealed that 48.0% of them plan their classes and 58.17% assess. The study also found male university graduates between the ages of 60 and 70, with 10 years of experience or more spend the most time on planning and assessment. Daily classroom observation was the tool which physical activity and sport instructors used the most, followed by execution tests. The lesser used tools were theoretical knowledge exams, diaries and the personally created tests, across all of the variables.

  6. Analysis of the chronic lower limb injuries occurrence in step aerobic instructors in relation to their working step class profile: a three year longitudinal prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malliou, P; Rokka, S; Beneka, A; Gioftsidou, A; Mavromoustakos, S; Godolias, G

    2014-01-01

    There is limited information on injury patterns in Step Aerobic Instructors (SAI) who exclusively execute "step" aerobic classes. To record the type and the anatomical position in relation to diagnosis of muscular skeletal injuries in step aerobic instructors. Also, to analyse the days of absence due to chronic injury in relation to weekly working hours, height of the step platform, working experience and working surface and footwear during the step class. The Step Aerobic Instructors Injuries Questionnaire was developed, and then validity and reliability indices were calculated. 63 SAI completed the questionnaire. For the statistical analysis of the data, the method used was the analysis of frequencies, the non-parametric test χ^{2} (chi square distribution), correlation and linear and logistic regressions analysis from the SPSS statistical package. 63 SAI reported 115 injuries that required more than 2 days absence from step aerobic classes. The chronic lower extremity injuries were 73.5%, with the leg pain, the anterior knee pain, the plantar tendinopathy and the Achilles tendinopathy being most common overuse syndromes. The working hours, the platform height, the years of aerobic dance seem to affect the days of absence due to chronic lower limb injury occurrence in SAI.

  7. The evaluation and planning method of Spanish sport and physical activity instructors: A comparative study across gender, age, level of studies and work experience.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Bernabé

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to investigate the planning and the evaluation of Spanish sport and physical activity instructors as well as to analyze and compare the two variables in terms of their gender, age, level of studies and work experience. This research falls inside the quantitative type methodology of descriptive cut through standardized interview using the standardized questionnaire: "Human resources of sport and physical activity". It analyses the situation and performance of people working in functions of sport and physical activity. The questionnaire was completed by 600 sport and physical activity instructors from Spain. Key results revealed that 48.0% of them plan their classes and 58.17% assess. The study also found male university graduates between the ages of 60 and 70, with 10 years of experience or more spend the most time on planning and assessment. Daily classroom observation was the tool which physical activity and sport instructors used the most, followed by execution tests. The lesser used tools were theoretical knowledge exams, diaries and the personally created tests, across all of the variables.

  8. Effect of electroless nickel interlayer on the electrochemical behavior of single layer CrN, TiN, TiAlN coatings and nanolayered TiAlN/CrN multilayer coatings prepared by reactive dc magnetron sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grips, V.K. William; Ezhil Selvi, V.; Barshilia, Harish C.; Rajam, K.S.

    2006-01-01

    The electrochemical behavior of single layer TiN, CrN, TiAlN and multilayer TiAlN/CrN coatings, deposited on steel substrates using a multi-target reactive direct current (dc) magnetron sputtering process, was studied in 3.5% NaCl solution. The total thickness of the coatings was about 1.5 μm. About 0.5 μm thick chromium interlayer was used to improve adhesion of the coatings. With an aim to improve the corrosion resistance, an additional interlayer of approximately 5 μm thick electroless nickel (EN) was deposited on the substrate. Potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were used to study the corrosion behavior of the coatings. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis were used to characterize the corroded samples. The potentiodynamic polarization tests showed lower corrosion current density and higher polarization resistance (R p ) for the coatings with EN interlayer. For example, the corrosion current density of TiN coated steel was decreased by a factor of 10 by incorporating 5 μm thick EN interlayer. Similarly, multilayer coatings of TiAlN/CrN with EN interlayer showed about 30 times improved corrosion resistance as compared to the multilayers without EN interlayer. The porosity values were calculated from the potentiodynamic polarization data. The Nyquist and the Bode plots obtained from the EIS data were fitted by appropriate equivalent circuits. The pore resistance (R pore ), the charge transfer resistance (R ct ), the coating capacitance (Q coat ) and the double layer capacitance (Q dl ) of the coatings were obtained from the equivalent circuit. Multilayer coatings showed higher R pore and R ct values as compared to the single layer coatings. Similarly, the Q coat and Q dl values decreased from uncoated substrate to the multilayer coatings, indicating a decrease in the defect density by the addition of EN interlayer. These studies were confirmed by examining the corroded samples under

  9. Role Strain in Collegiate Athletic Training Approved Clinical Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, Jolene M; Weidner, Thomas G

    2008-01-01

    Context: Certified athletic trainers who serve as Approved Clinical Instructors (ACIs) in the collegiate setting are balancing various roles (eg, patient care and related administrative tasks, clinical education). Whether this balancing act is associated with role strain in athletic trainers has not been examined. Objective: To examine the degree of, and contributing factors (eg, socialization experiences, professional and employment demographics, job congruency) to, role strain in collegiate ACIs. Design: Cross-sectional survey design. Setting: Geographically stratified random sample of ACIs affiliated with accredited athletic training education programs at National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I, II, and III institutions. Patients or Other Participants: 118 collegiate ACIs (47 head athletic trainers, 45 assistant athletic trainers, 26 graduate assistant athletic trainers). Main Outcome Measure(s): The Athletic Training ACI Role Strain Inventory, which measures total degree of role strain, 7 subscales of role strain, socialization experiences, professional and employment characteristics, and congruency in job responsibilities. Results: A total of 49% (n  =  58) of the participants experienced a moderate to high degree of role strain. Role Overload was the highest contributing subscale to total role strain. No differences were noted between total role strain and role occupant groups, NCAA division, or sex. Graduate assistant athletic trainers experienced a greater degree of role incompetence than head athletic trainers did (P  =  .001). Division II ACIs reported a greater degree of inter-role conflict than those in Division I (P  =  .02). Female ACIs reported a greater degree of role incompetence than male ACIs (P  =  .01). Those ACIs who stated that the ACI training provided by their institution did not adequately prepare them for the role as an ACI experienced greater role strain (P < .001). Conclusions: The ACIs in the

  10. Understanding the persona of clinical instructors: the use of students' doodles in nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Guzman, Allan; Pablo, Lewis Anthony; Prieto, Rei Joseph; Purificacion, Vena Nova; Que, Joyce Jamilla; Quia, Precious

    2008-01-01

    While it is true that understanding the attributes and unique distinction of the nursing faculty has been the subject of most of the studies, little is known about how the use of doodles can help surface the persona of the clinical instructors. This study aims to capture the essence or the lebenswelt of the concept of "clinical instructor" from the lens of students' doodles which have been considered as a powerful qualitative tool in articulating individual experiences. A total of 195 senior nursing students recruited from a comprehensive university in the Philippines were the subjects in this qualitative study. Data were gathered from self-generated illustrations and written explanations made by the subjects to identify their concept of effective and ineffective clinical instructors. Phenomenological reduction was observed through a repertory grid, where doodles drawn were listed, categorized and thematised to reveal the qualities of the clinical instructor. The subjective nature of the findings, though not generalizable, has surfaced how doodling can be a potent tool in identifying collective interpretation of the essence of health professions construct such as the one under study. The doodles revealed that an effective clinical instructor (enlightening, engaging and embracing) is one who is able to facilitate the learning of the students as well as being able to establish a harmonious learning atmosphere for and with the students. On the other hand, an ineffective clinical instructor (detrimental, dangling, and disturbing) impedes students' development in the clinical practice by causing conflict through their personal attitudes and their teaching strategies. This can have benefits for clinical instructors, to improve themselves and realize the impact of their attributes to the clinical learning of students.

  11. Multimodal integration of anatomy and physiology classes: How instructors utilize multimodal teaching in their classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGraw, Gerald M., Jr.

    Multimodality is the theory of communication as it applies to social and educational semiotics (making meaning through the use of multiple signs and symbols). The term multimodality describes a communication methodology that includes multiple textual, aural, and visual applications (modes) that are woven together to create what is referred to as an artifact. Multimodal teaching methodology attempts to create a deeper meaning to course content by activating the higher cognitive areas of the student's brain, creating a more sustained retention of the information (Murray, 2009). The introduction of multimodality educational methodologies as a means to more optimally engage students has been documented within educational literature. However, studies analyzing the distribution and penetration into basic sciences, more specifically anatomy and physiology, have not been forthcoming. This study used a quantitative survey design to determine the degree to which instructors integrated multimodality teaching practices into their course curricula. The instrument used for the study was designed by the researcher based on evidence found in the literature and sent to members of three associations/societies for anatomy and physiology instructors: the Human Anatomy and Physiology Society; the iTeach Anatomy & Physiology Collaborate; and the American Physiology Society. Respondents totaled 182 instructor members of two- and four-year, private and public higher learning colleges collected from the three organizations collectively with over 13,500 members in over 925 higher learning institutions nationwide. The study concluded that the expansion of multimodal methodologies into anatomy and physiology classrooms is at the beginning of the process and that there is ample opportunity for expansion. Instructors continue to use lecture as their primary means of interaction with students. Email is still the major form of out-of-class communication for full-time instructors. Instructors with

  12. Stress gradients in CrN coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, G.C.A.M.; Tichelaar, F.D.; Visser, C.C.G.

    2006-01-01

    Stress in hard films is the net sum of tensile stress generated at the grain boundaries, compressive stress due to ion peening, and thermal stress due to the difference in thermal expansion of the coating and substrate. The tensile part due to grain boundaries is thickness dependent. The other two

  13. Experiences of instructors delivering the Mental Health First Aid training programme: a descriptive qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, J

    2010-09-01

    Mental health literacy among the public is often poor, and although people frequently encounter others experiencing mental distress in their workplace, families and communities, they may be ill-equipped to provide appropriate support. 'Mental Health First Aid' (MHFA), a 12-h mental health promotion programme seeks to address this, training people in the knowledge and skills needed to engage with someone experiencing mental health problems. Research relating to the MHFA programme has centred on course attendees, with a paucity of research surrounding the delivery of basic mental health training programmes. Understanding experiences of instructors delivering such programmes is key to the success of future delivery. This study sought to identify the views and experiences of instructors delivering the MHFA programme in Wales. Fourteen MHFA instructors participated in semi-structured audio-recorded interviews, with the transcripts analysed to identify key themes. This paper explores two of the identified themes namely prerequisite skills and support required by instructors. The study highlighted that because of the ensuing emotional labour experienced by instructors, universal mental health training programmes must put in place a clear infrastructure to train, support and monitor those delivering them, for programme roll-out to be effective.

  14. Instructor satisfaction with a technology-based resource for diabetes education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Deanne L; Corman, Shelby L; Drab, Scott R; Meyer, Susan M; Smith, Randall B

    2009-05-27

    To evaluate instructor use patterns and satisfaction with DM Educate, a comprehensive, Web-based diabetes course. Instructors completed a post-course survey instrument to assess their use of course materials and components, as well as satisfaction with the course content, design, and technology utilized, and to solicit their suggestions for additional content areas. Thirty-eight percent of respondents utilized DM Educate as a standalone elective and 62% had integrated materials into existing courses. The pharmacotherapy module was the most utilized at 91% and slide sets were the most utilized course components at 63%. All instructors stated that they would use the course again the following year. Suggestions for improvement included incorporation of more active-learning activities and patient cases. Instructors' were highly satisfied with the course materials and technology used by DM Educate, a Web-based diabetes education course, and indicated they were able to customize the course materials both to establish new courses and supplement existing courses. All instructors planned to use the course again.

  15. Teaching Design in Middle-School: Instructors' Concerns and Scaffolding Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamberger, Yael M.; Cahill, Clara S.

    2013-04-01

    This study deals with engineering education in the middle-school level. Its focus is instructors' concerns in teaching design, as well as scaffolding strategies that can help teachers deal with these concerns. Through participatory action research, nine instructors engaged in a process of development and instruction of a curriculum about energy along with engineering design. A 50-h curriculum was piloted during a summer camp for 38 middle-school students. Data was collected through instructors' materials: observation field notes, daily reflections and post-camp discussions. In addition, students' artifacts and planning graphical models were collected in order to explore how instructors' concerns were aligned with students' learning. Findings indicate three main tensions that reflect instructors' main concerns: how to provide sufficient scaffolding yet encourage creativity, how to scaffold hands-on experiences that promote mindful planning, and how to scaffold students' modeling practices. Pedagogical strategies for teaching design that developed through this work are described, as well as the ways they address the National Research Council (A framework for K-12 science education: practices, crosscutting concepts, and core ideas. National Academies Press, Washington, DC, 2011) core ideas of engineering education and the International Technological Literacy standards (ITEA in Standards for technological literacy, 3rd edn. International Technology education Association, Reston, VA, 2007).

  16. Poor Demonstration and Knowledge of AED Electrode Placement by Certified and Experienced BLS/AED Instructors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stærk, Mathilde; Vammen, Lauge; Hansen, Camilla

    2017-01-01

    to demonstrate correct use of an AED remains to be investigated.Aim: To determine BLS instructors’ competence in using an AED.Methods: Certified BLS instructors were asked to operate a training AED (Lifepak ® CR-T Plus, PhysioControl, default audiotape duration of 67 sec from start to time of shock......Introduction: Use of an automated external defibrillator (AED) improves survival. Incorrect AED electrode placement may affect defibrillation success and survival. During courses in basic life support (BLS), instructors teach laypeople how to use an AED. However, BLS instructors’ ability......) on a resuscitation manikin with arms (AMBU ® Man, AMBU) as they would do in a teaching situation but without any explanations. The demonstration by the instructor was video recorded. After shock delivery the AED electrode position was assessed i.e. the distance from the center of the electrode to the recommended...

  17. Instructors' use of technology in post-secondary undergraduate mathematics teaching: a local study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesso, A. T.; Kondratieva, M. F.

    2016-02-01

    In this study, instructors of undergraduate mathematics from post-secondary institutions in Newfoundland were surveyed (N = 13) and interviewed (N = 8) about their use of, experiences with, and views on, technologically assisted teaching. It was found that the majority of them regularly use technologies for organizational and communication purposes. However, the use of math-specific technology such as computer algebra systems, or dynamic geometry software for instructional, exploratory, and creative activities with students takes place mostly on an individual basis, only occasionally, and is very much topic specific. This was even the case for those instructors who use technology proficiently in their research. The data also suggested that familiarity with and discussions of examples of technology implementation in teaching at regular and field-oriented professional development seminars within mathematics departments could potentially increase the use of math-specific technology by instructors.

  18. Rapport sur le déroulement de l'expérience sur le double échange de charge des mésons $\\pi^{+} \\pi^{-}$ de 70 MeV/c effectuée les 14-15 mai 1965 au CS du CERN par le Départment de Physique Corpusculaire CRN Strasbourg Utilisation d'un bobinage supra-conducteur niobium-zicornium (dans HE liquide) donnant 42 KG pour aider la détermination du signe des pions au sein des émulsions chargées en lithium isotopique

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva. Emulsion Experiments Committee

    1965-01-01

    Rapport sur le déroulement de l'expérience sur le double échange de charge des mésons $\\pi^{+} \\pi^{-}$ de 70 MeV/c effectuée les 14-15 mai 1965 au CS du CERN par le Départment de Physique Corpusculaire CRN Strasbourg

  19. Helping without harming: the instructor's feedback dilemma in debriefing--a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, Jenny W; Foldy, Erica Gabrielle; Robinson, Traci; Kendall, Sandy; Taylor, Steven S; Simon, Robert

    2013-10-01

    Simulation instructors often feel caught in a task-versus-relationship dilemma. They must offer clear feedback on learners' task performance without damaging their relationship with those learners, especially in formative simulation settings. Mastering the skills to resolve this dilemma is crucial for simulation faculty development. We conducted a case study of a debriefer stuck in this task-versus-relationship dilemma. The "2-column case" captures debriefing dialogue and instructor's thoughts and feelings or the "subjective experience." The "learning pathways grid" guides a peer group of faculty in a step-by-step, retrospective analysis of the debriefing. The method uses vivid language to highlight the debriefer's dilemmas and how to surmount them. The instructor's initial approach to managing the task-versus-relationship dilemma included (1) assuming that honest critiques will damage learners, (2) using vague descriptions of learner actions paired with guess-what-I-am-thinking questions, and (3) creating a context she worried would leave learners feeling neither safe nor clear how they could improve. This case study analysis identified things the instructor could do to be more effective including (1) making generous inferences about the learners' qualities, (2) normalizing the challenges posed by the simulation, (3) assuming there are different understandings of what it means to be a team. There are key assumptions and ways of interacting that help instructors resolve the task-versus-relationship dilemma. The instructor can then provide honest feedback in a rigorous yet empathic way to help sustain good or improve suboptimal performance in the future.

  20. Developing an understanding of research-based nursing pedagogy among clinical instructors: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakari, Nazik M A; Hamadi, Hanadi Y; Salem, Olfat

    2014-11-01

    Effective instruction is imperative to the learning process of clinical nursing instructors. Faculty members are required to provide high-quality teaching and training by using new ways of teaching pedagogical methods to clinical instructors, which have transformed pedagogies from an exclusive clinical model to a holistic model. The purpose of this study was to explore clinical instructors' use of planning, implementation, feedback loops, and reflection frameworks to apply research-based teaching and to examine the pedagogy used during field experience. Data for the qualitative study were obtained from twenty purposefully sampled clinical teachers (n=20) via lists of questioned instructional practices and discussions, semi-structured interviews, observational notes, field notes, and written reflections. Data were analyzed by using a triangulation method to ensure trustworthiness, credibility, and reliability. Three main themes emerged regarding the use of research-based teaching strategies: the need for learning about research-based pedagogy, support mechanisms to implement innovative teaching strategies, and transitioning from nursing student to nursing clinical instructors. It has been well documented that the nursing profession faces a serious shortage of nursing faculty, impacting the quality of clinical teaching. Developing clinical instructor programs to give students opportunities to select instructor pathways, focusing on knowledge promoting critical thinking and life-long professional development, is essential. Nursing colleges must collaborate by using a partnership model to achieve competency in planning, implementation, feedback loops, and reflection. Applying research-based clinical teaching requires the development of programs that integrate low-fidelity simulation and assisted instruction through the use of computers in Nursing Colleges. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. THE CULTURAL IDENTITY IN THE INSTRUCTOR'S OF ART FORMATIVE PROCESS / LA IDENTIDAD CULTURAL EN EL PROCESO FORMATIVO DEL INSTRUCTOR DE ARTE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleida Best Rivero

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The culture identity is present trough the plays and history to represent it like: Myth artistic and literary production, monument, languages, oral traditions, and some others categories. One of the elements that integrate the professional pedagogical development of the instructor arte is the contribution to preserve and develop the local and national identity taking into account the specialize attention to the expression and manifestation of the popular traditional culture, this demanding the materialization of the appreciation workshops that integrate the specific activities of the instructor, and permit them to profitable the potentialities of the cultural event for the formation of the new generations and at the same time to increase their integral formation.

  2. Tribological properties of anti-wear PVD coatings for elevated temperatures application deposited onto X37CrMoV5-1 type hot work steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrzanski, L.A.; Polok, M.; Adamiak, M.

    2003-01-01

    The paper presents results of tribological and adhesion investigations of anti-wear PVD coatings TiN, TiN/(Ti,Al)N and CrN types deposited in ion plating PVD process onto X37CrMoV5-1 type hot work tool steel. It was found that damage mechanism during scratch test in all investigated coatings begins with multiple spallings located on the scratch edges followed by cracking and tool coatings delamination. Regarding to the coating types it can be seen different location of such damages and loads typical for them. According to this observations it can be stated that highest adhesion among investigated coating present, CrN monolayer coating and the lowest one multilayers Ti/(Ti,Al)N coating. The wear resistance was investigated by pin-on-disc method performed in room and elevated to 500 o C temperatures. It was found that the lowest wear in to fixed investigation conditions in both room and elevated temperatures shows TiN monolayer coating. Additionally one can see that TiN coatings application improve wear resistance some five times. (author)

  3. The relationship between students' self-reported aggressive communication and motives to communicate with their instructors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Chad; Myers, Scott A

    2010-02-01

    Using a convenience sample, 172 college students' (M age = 20.2 yr., SD = 2.5) motives for communicating with their instructors and their own verbal aggressiveness and argumentativeness were studied using the Argumentativeness Scale, the Verbal Aggressiveness Scale, and the Student Motives to Communicate Scale. Significant negative relationships were obtained between students' self-reports of argumentativeness and the sycophantic motive and between students' self-reports of verbal aggressiveness and the functional motive, but generally, students' motives to communicate with their instructors generally were not associated with their self-reported aggressive communication behaviors.

  4. Teaching Students, Not Standards: Threshold Crossings for Students and Instructors Alike

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colleen Burgess

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The new ACRL Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education is an opportunity for IL instructors to ask themselves whether their current approaches to instruction are meeting the higher goals of IL education. Instructors might re-examine their pedagogical approaches by considering their own knowledge practices and dispositions in teaching IL. How might we best create a space in which the desired student knowledge practices and dispositions flourish? How can we approach IL education as fellow students – ones who just happen to be at a different point on the same path of lifelong learning?

  5. A Team of Instructors' Use of Social Presence, Teaching Presence, and Attitudinal Dissonance Strategies: An Animal Behaviour and Welfare MOOC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Sunnie Lee; Watson, William R.; Janakiraman, Shamila; Richardson, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    This case study examined a team of instructors' use of social presence, teaching presence, and attitudinal dissonance in a Massive Online Open Course (MOOC) on Animal Behaviour and Welfare (ABW), designed to facilitate attitudinal learning. The study reviewed a team of six instructors' use of social presence and teaching presence by applying the…

  6. Attitudes toward Learning Oral Communication Skills Online: The Importance of Intrinsic Interest and Student-Instructor Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Keith M.; Phelan, Liam; McBain, Bonnie; Archer, Jennifer; Drew, Antony J.; James, Carole

    2016-01-01

    This study examined and compared attitudes of both students and instructors, motivated by an interest in improving the development and delivery of online oral communication learning (OOCL). Few studies have compared student and instructor attitudes toward learning technologies, and no known studies have conducted item response theory (IRT)…

  7. An Investigation of the Amount of Emphasis Placed on Content and Delivery by Instructors of Public Speaking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddens, Paul J., III

    A study examined how much emphasis instructors of public speaking place on content and delivery when teaching and delivering oral and written critiques. The study sought to determine whether when teaching a hybrid introduction to communication course, or public speaking course, instructors are challenged with teaching their students about issues…

  8. The Effects of Instructor Transformational Leadership and Verbal Immediacy on Learner Autonomy and Creativity in Online Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Janelle L.

    2013-01-01

    Transformational leadership and immediacy behaviors within educational contexts have received a great deal of attention from researchers in the past few decades. Generally, the literature has focused on the impact of instructor transformational behaviors and instructor immediacy behaviors on educational outcomes. However, the relationship between…

  9. Training New Instructors to Implement Discrete Trial Teaching Strategies with Children with Autism in a Community-Based Intervention Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Andrew; Downs, Robyn Conley

    2013-01-01

    The effects of training and supervision on instructor knowledge and performance of discrete trial teaching (DTT) within three domains (DTT Technical Skills; Work Session Preparation/Conclusion; and Student Engagement/Management) were examined in this study. Eight undergraduate student instructors received an 8-[hour] training in DTT and support…

  10. Transformational and Passive Leadership: An Initial Investigation of University Instructors as Leaders in a Virtual Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogler, Ronit; Caspi, Avner; Roccas, Sonia

    2013-01-01

    The study investigated whether students perceive their university instructors in a virtual learning environment as leaders. Referring to the full range leadership theory (FRLT), we examined the effects of transformational and passive leadership styles of university instructors on students' satisfaction and learning outcomes. Completed web-based…

  11. The Effects of Instructor Differences Upon Student Progress in Naval Aviation Training. Medical Research Progress No. 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waag, Wayne L.; Shannon, Richard H.

    The investigation attempted to determine: whether instructor differences could be measured quantitatively; if such differences affected the grades which they assigned; if such differences affected the student's progress through the flight training program. Using an unstructured rating form, it was found that reliable instructor differences could…

  12. Agency, Ideology, and Information/Communication Technology: English Language Instructor Use of Instructional Technology at a South Korean College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Brandon James

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the ways that instructors think about classroom technology and how this might relate to their classroom use of it. This qualitative case study explores the relationship between instructors and classroom information/communication technology (ICT). Specifically, this study followed three native…

  13. Effects of Classroom Technology Policies on Students' Perceptions of Instructors: What Is Your Syllabus Saying about You?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stowell, Jeffrey R.; Addison, William E.; Clay, Samuel L.

    2018-01-01

    The technology policies included on instructors' syllabi vary greatly and, in some cases, may unfavorably influence students' perceptions of the instructor. To examine this hypothesis, we randomly assigned college students enrolled in psychology courses at two different institutions (N = 163) to groups in which they viewed different syllabi for a…

  14. Effects of Online Interaction and Instructor Presence on Students' Satisfaction and Success with Online Undergraduate Public Relations Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jensen

    2014-01-01

    This study examined student success, failure, withdrawal, and satisfaction in online public relations courses based on instructor-student interaction, student-student interaction, and instructor presence. Student passing rates, D/F rates, withdrawal rates, and evaluations of instruction were compiled from fifty-one online PR courses run over the…

  15. "Kaizen" and Technology Transfer Instructors as Work-based Learning Facilitators in Overseas Transplants: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsey, Barry; Fujiwara, Asahi

    2000-01-01

    A study of 240 instructors of kaizen (continuous quality improvement) and technology transfer in overseas assignments for Toyota found that commitment to work and corporate cultural values were significant. Instructors recognized the responsibility and challenges of communicating and transferring their know-how across cultures. (SK)

  16. A Generational Examination of Instructional Facebook Use and the Effects on Perceived Instructor Immediacy, Credibility and Student Affective Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enskat, Aaron; Hunt, Stephen K.; Hooker, John F.

    2017-01-01

    This study examined Millennial student perceptions of use of social networking, specifically Facebook, by instructors. Two independent variables were examined: instructor age (Baby Boomer or Millennial) and use of Facebook (utilising a course group site through the service versus not using the service at all). Results revealed that Baby Boomer…

  17. Using LectureTools to Enhance Student-Instructor Relations and Student Engagement in the Large Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Jerie; Kominko, Sofiya; Terrion, Jenepher Lennox

    2015-01-01

    Positive student-instructor relationships are important for student engagement, motivation, retention and achievement. Yet, as class sizes grow, these relationships can be increasingly difficult to develop. This study explores LectureTools--a web-based student response and learning platform that facilitates communication between instructors and…

  18. Farm Business Management Analysis: Adjusting the Farm Business to Increase Profit. Unit III. Volume 15, Number 3. Instructor's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denker, Robert; And Others

    Designed primarily for Missouri vocational agricultural instructors participating in the Farm Business Management Analysis Program, this instructor's guide, consisting of 10 lessons, deals with adjusting a farm business to increase profits. The following topics are covered in the individual lessons: law and the farm family, planning income tax…

  19. Empowering Students through Project-Based Learning: Perceptions of Instructors and Students in Vocational Education Institutes in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tongsakul, Anuvat; Jitgarun, Kalayanee; Chaokumnerd, Weerachai

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and compare instructors' and students' perceptions of factors that contribute to the effective use of Project-Based Learning (PBL) in Thailand. The sample for the study consisted of 247 electrical technology instructors from Thai vocational education institutes and 161 students who were electrical power…

  20. Predicting the Use of Instructional Technology among Community College Instructors: An Extension of the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Emma Rebecca

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine what variables predict the use of instructional technology among community college instructors. Legislators, community college administrators, and students expect innovative lessons from instructors that use technology. This study addresses the problem of not knowing what predicts instructional technology…

  1. Near-peer teaching strategy in a large human anatomy course: perceptions of near-peer instructors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Hernández, Cynthia Guadalupe; Carmona Pulido, Juan Manuel; De la Garza Chapa, Roberto Isaac; Serna Vázquez, Ruth Patricia; Alcalá Briones, Ricardo Daniel; Plasencia Banda, Perla Marina; Villarreal Silva, Eliud Enrique; Jacobo Baca, Guillermo; de la Garza Castro, Oscar; Elizondo Omaña, Rodrigo Enrique; Guzmán López, Santos

    2015-01-01

    Near-peer teaching (NPT) is a strategy in which senior students assume the instructor role with junior peers (mentees). Senior students develop unique skills and knowledge through NPT, an experience which extends their learning beyond content mastery. Different teaching modules featuring NPT were utilized in the human anatomy course at the School of Medicine, Autonomous University of Nuevo Leon in Monterrey, Mexico. Modules included: Theory, Clinical Hour, Imaging Anatomy, and Laboratory. The aim of this study was to assess instructor participants' perceptions on the benefits of the NPT strategy in the anatomy classroom. A survey was administered to anatomy course instructors who utilized NPT strategies during winter, fall, and spring semesters of the 2012-2013 school year. A total of 120 instructors were enrolled in the study. There were different perceptions of instructors' roles. Theory and Imaging Anatomy instructors considered themselves to be information providers and resource developers, whereas Clinical Hour and Laboratory instructors saw themselves more as facilitators, role models, and planners. All instructors' opinions on the benefits of NPT were positive. Thus, in this article, the authors find NPT to be a strategy that promotes self-learning, a vital skill. © 2014 American Association of Anatomists.

  2. The Role of Student Aggressive Communication Traits in the Perception of Instructor Ideological Bias in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linvill, Darren L.; Mazer, Joseph P.

    2013-01-01

    Research indicates that Americans believe instructor political bias to be a serious problem in the college classroom, as many professors are considered a liberal elite. In light of scholarship suggesting that characteristics students bring with them to the classroom may influence their perception of instructor communication behaviors, the present…

  3. What's the Rush? IFRS, the SEC, and the Pressure on Accounting Instructors to Teach Still More Financial Reporting Rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Alan A.; Schwartz, Bill N.

    2013-01-01

    This paper addresses the problems facing accounting instructors in the U.S. as they struggle with pressure to incorporate IFRS into an already crowded financial accounting curriculum. To help instructors better understand the advantages and disadvantages of financial reporting under IFRS, we provide a critical analysis of arguments that have been…

  4. Evaluation of the In-Service Education and Training Programme for Kuwait Army Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mutawa, Najat; Al-Furaih, Suad

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluates the In-Service Education and Training (INSET) programme organised for Kuwait Army instructors. The focus is on their perceptual gain in related topics and skills, as they attended 10 courses at the College of Education--Kuwait University. Pre- and post-assessments involved 20 trainees. The analysis indicates significant…

  5. 14 CFR 142.53 - Training center instructor training and testing requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... instruction in at least— (i) The fundamental principles of the learning process; (ii) Elements of effective... training device controls and systems; (ii) Proper operation of environmental and fault panels; (iii... covering aircraft subsystems and operating rules applicable to the training courses that the instructor is...

  6. The Pedagogical Readiness of Instructors towards Achieving Integration of ICT's in TVET Institutions in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maina, Tirus Muya; Ogalo, James; Mwai, Naomi

    2016-01-01

    This paper points to the necessity to conduct research on the pedagogical readiness of instructors towards achieving integration of ICT's in Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) institutions in Kenya. Research on the integration of ICTs in teaching and learning in TVET institution in Kenya have been done to improve the learning…

  7. Home Economics--Food Service Catering. Kit No. 54. Instructor's Manual [and] Student Learning Activity Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowery, Ann

    An instructor's manual and student activity guide on food service, catering are provided in this set of prevocational education materials which focuses on the vocational area of home economics. (This set of materials is one of ninety-two prevocational education sets arranged around a cluster of seven vocational offerings: agriculture, home…

  8. Tailored instructor feedback leads to more effective virtual-reality laparoscopic training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschold, M; Huber, T; Zeißig, S R; Lang, H; Kneist, Werner

    2014-03-01

    Laparoscopic novices begin at different performance levels, and studies on tailored training concepts are warranted. The effect of verbal instructor feedback has been investigated with varying results, and its effectiveness in virtual-reality laparoscopic (VRL) simulations still is unclear. This study aimed to determine whether laparoscopic novices with lower initial performance statuses may profit from training with intensive instructor feedback. A prospective, single-blinded study was performed within a week-long curricular course. In this study, 20 medical students performed a complex bimanual maneuver on a VRL simulator. There was a division in performance levels, with a high-performer group (HPG) that received a better median score and a low-performer group (LPG). During the training phase, only the initial LPG received standardized instructor feedback in a one-to-one setting. The final assessment of skills for both groups involved performing the task without feedback at the end of the course. The HPG and LPG showed significantly different initial performance levels according global and categorized (time, economics, error) scores (p training concept with instructor feedback limited to the LPG. The tailored training was effective and economic for the laparoscopic novices and their teachers.

  9. Conversion of Gasoline Engines to Use Ethanol as the Sole Fuel. Instructor's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishler, Glenn; Spignesi, Bill

    This instructor's guide contains materials that are intended for use as part of the regular auto mechanics curriculum and that provide information necessary to convert a gasoline engine with a niminum of modifications to successfully be operated on ethanol alcohol. It accompanies a student guide that is available separately. Contents include a…

  10. Agriculture--Agricultural Mechanics, Electric Motors. Kit No. 56. Instructor's Manual [and] Student Learning Activity Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomar, William

    An instructor's manual and student activity guide on agricultural mechanics (electric motors) are provided in this set of prevocational education materials which focuses on the vocational area of agriculture. (This set of materials is one of ninety-two prevocational education sets arranged around a cluster of seven vocational offerings:…

  11. STS-31 crewmembers review checklist with instructor on JSC's FB-SMS middeck

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    STS-31 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Mission Specialist (MS) Bruce McCandless II (left) and Pilot Charles F. Bolden (right) discuss procedures with a training instructor on the middeck of JSC's fixed-based (FB) Shuttle Mission Simulator (SMS). The three are pointing to a checklist during this training simulation in the Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5.

  12. Perceptions of Tutoring Roles and Psychological Distance among Instructors, Tutors and Students at a Korean University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hye-Jung; Hong, Youngil; Choi, Hyoseon

    2017-01-01

    This study explores issues related to the tutor's role when initiating tutoring as an institutional strategy at a conventional university. Based on a pilot tutoring program implemented in four college courses, we investigated the perceptions of instructors, tutors and students regarding the role of tutoring and whether it affected the…

  13. Anaerobic Digestion II. Sludge Treatment and Disposal Course #166. Instructor's Guide [and] Student Workbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arasmith, E. E.

    This lesson is the second of a two-part series on anaerobic digestion. Topics discussed include classification of digester by function, roof design, and temperature range, mixing systems, gas system components, operational control basics, and general safety considerations. The lesson includes an instructor's guide and student workbook. The…

  14. Project LINC: Supporting Lecturers and Adjunct Instructors in Foreign Language Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Sally S.; Edwards, Wade

    2012-01-01

    Foreign language learning can pose a barrier to some students with disabilities. This practice brief describes a collaborative process used on one campus to provide professional development for foreign language instructors. Training opportunities were intentionally focused on the needs of adjunct and temporary lecturers in providing inclusive…

  15. T & I--Machine Shop. Kit No. 83. Instructor's Manual [and] Student Learning Activity Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Jim

    An instructor's manual and student activity guide on the machine shop are provided in this set of prevocational education materials which focuses on the vocational area of trade and industry. (This set of materials is one of ninety-two prevocational education sets arranged around a cluster of seven vocational offerings: agriculture, home…

  16. Assisting in Radiology/Imaging. Instructor's Guide, Student's Manual, and Student Learning Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fair, Helena J.

    The instructor's guide, the first of three documents in this package, is designed for a course to help students who are investigating the activities within a radiology department or considering any of the imaging technologies as a career. The material is designed to relate training experience to information studied in the classroom. This…

  17. Teaching through 10,000 Earthquakes: Constructive Practice for Instructors in a Post-Disaster Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Sarah; Wordsworth, Russell

    2013-01-01

    The authors describe their experiences of teaching through a series of major earthquakes and the lessons learned regarding sustaining teaching and learning through an ongoing natural disaster. Student feedback data from across the university is analyzed to generate a model of constructive practice for instructors responding to a crisis. The…

  18. Changes in Syllabus Tone Affect Warmth (But Not Competence) Ratings of Both Male and Female Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waggoner Denton, Ashley; Veloso, James

    2018-01-01

    The syllabus is often the first meaningful piece of information that students receive about a course. Previous research has indicated that students form more positive impressions of a course instructor after reading a syllabus that has been manipulated to convey information in a friendly, rather than unfriendly, tone (Harnish and Bridges in…

  19. World of Work--Personality Development. Kit No. WW-703. Instructor's Manual. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Mamie Rose; Frank, Louise

    This instructor's manual contains activities for teaching students about desirable and objectionable personality traits, the role that physical appearance plays in the way that others perceive them, business manners, and character traits. It is designed for use in three to four periods in classes in prevocational education in South Carolina. The…

  20. The Extent of Instructor Participation in an Online Computer Science Course How Much Is Enough?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslanyilmaz, Abdurrahman; Sullins, John

    2013-01-01

    This study compares the discussion participation and performance of 7 undergraduate students enrolled in an e-commerce programming course during the spring semester of 2010 to that of 13 students enrolled in the same course during fall of that year. In the former course, the instructor participated in the required discussion only at the very end…

  1. The SingAboutScience.org Database: An Educational Resource for Instructors and Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowther, Gregory J.

    2012-01-01

    Potential benefits of incorporating music into science and math curricula include enhanced recall of information, counteraction of perceptions that the material is dull or impenetrable, and opportunities for active student engagement and creativity. To help instructors and others find songs suited to their needs, I created the "Math And Science…

  2. Experiences and Practices of Evolution Instructors at Christian Universities That Can Inform Culturally Competent Evolution Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, M. Elizabeth; Brownell, Sara E.

    2018-01-01

    Students' religious beliefs and religious cultures have been shown to be the main factors predicting whether they will accept evolution, yet college biology instructors teaching evolution at public institutions often have religious beliefs and cultures that are different from their religious students. This difference in religious beliefs and…

  3. Decision, Implementation, and Confirmation: Experiences of Instructors behind Tourism and Hospitality MOOCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jingjing; Cantoni, Lorenzo

    2018-01-01

    As the popularity of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) continues to grow, studies are emerging to investigate various topics in this area. Most have focused on the learners' perspective, leaving a gap in the literature about MOOC instructors. The current research--conducted in the field of tourism and hospitality--explored early experiences of…

  4. Computer Literacy in Learning Academic English: Iranian EAP Students' and Instructors' Attitudes and Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi, Seyed Mohammad; Borzabadi, Davood; Dashtestani, Reza

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to analyze perceptions of Iranian English for Academic Purposes (EAP) students on their computer literacy levels. A total of 641 undergraduate students of civil engineering and 34 EAP instructors participated in the study. Data collection instruments included questionnaires and semi-structured interviews. Findings confirmed that…

  5. "Supersizing" the College Classroom: How One Instructor Teaches 2,670 Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, Marc

    2012-01-01

    In October, Myanmar's pro-democracy leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, got a quirky request on YouTube. A hyperactive instructor in a plaid jacket posted a video inviting her to do a Skype interview with his "World Regions" geography class at Virginia Tech. Ms. Suu Kyi, a Nobel Peace Prize laureate often compared to Nelson Mandela, might have…

  6. Expectations, Motivations, and Barriers to Professional Development: Perspectives from Adjunct Instructors Teaching Online

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dailey-Hebert, Amber; Mandernach, B. Jean; Donnelli-Sallee, Emily; Norris, Virgil Rusty

    2014-01-01

    Adjunct instructors are the fastest growing population of faculty in the academy; and, given the current economic condition and its impact on institutions of higher learning, the proportion of adjunct faculty is likely to increase (Gappa, Austin & Trice, 2007; NCES, 2011). Yet the adjunct population continues to remain disconnected from the…

  7. World of Work--Education and Jobs. Kit No. WW-705. Instructor's Manual. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Mamie Rose; Killingsworth, Linda

    This instructor's manual contains activities for teaching students about the benefits derived from completing high school, sources of training for occupations, and information on finding job openings and on working part-time and full-time. It is designed for use in five periods in classes in prevocational education in South Carolina. The guide…

  8. World of Work--The Interview and Working Relationships. Kit No. WW-706. Instructor's Manual. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Mamie Rose; Killingsworth, Linda

    This instructor's manual contains activities for teaching students about how to obtain a Social Security card, how to fill out an employment application, how to dress and conduct themselves on job interviews, desirable traits for employees, and getting along with others on the job. It is designed for use during eight periods in classes in…

  9. World of Work--Choosing a Career. Kit No. WW-704. Instructor's Manual. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Mamie Rose; Killingsworth, Linda

    This instructor's manual contains activities for teaching students about occupational categories, job requirements versus personal characteristics, the steps to take in making an occupational choice, and the vocational training programs offered by area vocational centers. It is designed for use in six to eight periods in classes in prevocational…

  10. A Longitudinal Analysis of Students' Motives for Communicating with Their Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Scott A.

    2017-01-01

    This study utilized the longitudinal survey research design using students' motives to communicate with their instructors as a test case. Participants were 282 undergraduate students enrolled in introductory communication courses at a large Mid-Atlantic university who completed the Student Communication Motives scale at three points (Time 1:…

  11. 76 FR 35103 - Training and Qualification Requirements for Check Airmen and Flight Instructors; Technical Amendment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-16

    ... which initial and transition flight training must include an in-flight element. Technical Amendment This.... 28471; Amendment Nos. 121-355 and 135-125] RIN 2120-AF08 Training and Qualification Requirements for Check Airmen and Flight Instructors; Technical Amendment AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA...

  12. Mentoring Professors: A Model for Developing Quality Online Instructors and Courses in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barczyk, Casimir; Buckenmeyer, Janet; Feldman, Lori

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a four-stage model for mentoring faculty in higher education to deliver high quality online instruction. It provides a timeline that shows the stages of program implementation. Known as the Distance Education Mentoring Program, its major outcomes include certified instructors, student achievement, and the attainment of a…

  13. Determination of Residual Chlorine and Turbidity in Drinking Water. Instructor's Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Office of Water Program Operations (EPA), Cincinnati, OH. National Training and Operational Technology Center.

    This instructor's guide presents analytical methods for residual chlorine and turbidity. Topics include sample handling, permissable concentration levels, substitution of residual chlorine for bacteriological work, public notification, and the required analytical techniques to determine residual chlorine and turbidity. This publication is intended…

  14. How to Start Your Own Business. [Women Entrepreneurs Project.] Instructor's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Patricia P.

    This guide was developed to help instructors teach the course for women entrepreneurs as presented in the text, "How to Start Your Own Business." (This small business management course, a product of the California Women Entrepreneurs Project, and the final project report are contained in two related documents--CE 017 320 and 322.) The…

  15. Instructors' choices for a WWW-based course-support environment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Willem; Collis, Betty

    2000-01-01

    In 1997 the Faulty of Educational Science and Technology at the University of Twente made the decision to start using the Web for course support. This was the start of a faculty-wide implementation. In the first year we started working extensively with our instructors, particularly all of those

  16. How do instructors design a WWW-based course-support environment?. Vol. 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Willem; Collis, Betty; Oliver, Ron

    1999-01-01

    After one year (1997-1998) of working extensively with our instructors, particularly all of those responsible for our first-year courses, 17 courses required for all students and several senior elective courses (3) are now using their tailored-made Web-based course-support environments. In addition,

  17. Teaching Language and Content: Instructor Strategies in a Bilingual Science Class at a Chinese University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiaoping; Smith, Sara W.

    2012-01-01

    The present research analyzes instructional strategies used to integrate the learning of content and English as a foreign language in a bilingual physics class at a university in Shanghai, China. It examines how the instructor handles meaning and form of new English science vocabulary in concept-focused physics lectures and the strategies he used…

  18. Part-Time Community College Instructors Teaching in Learning Communities: An Exploratory Multiple Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, John W.

    2017-01-01

    Community colleges have a greater portion of students at-risk for college completion than four-year schools and faculty at these institutions are overwhelmingly and increasingly part-time. Learning communities have been identified as a high-impact practice with numerous benefits documented for community college instructors and students: a primary…

  19. Crash Injury Management: Emergency Medical Services for Traffic Law Enforcement Officers. Instructor's Lesson Plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    To assist in the continuing efforts to improve the safety of the motorist on the nation's highways and roads, this instructor's guide provides a standardized approach for providing training in emergency medical care for first responders to traffic accidents. The objective of the course is to provide training in all aspects of emergency medical…

  20. Bridging content and EFL: a one-day ESP workshop for flight instructors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turner, Dorothy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This workshop allows an ESP provider with limited specialized knowledge in the field of aviation to train English-speaking flight instructors in basic EFL communication strategies. While the present workshop is based on a Canadian model of flight instruction, it can be easily adapted to other jurisdictions

  1. Air Conditioner Charging. Automotive Mechanics. Air Conditioning. Instructor's Guide [and] Student Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spignesi, B.

    This instructional package, one in a series of individualized instructional units on automobile air conditioning, consists of a student guide and an instructor guide dealing with air conditioning charging. Covered in the module are checking the air conditioning system for leaks, checking and adding refrigerant oil as needed, evacuating the system,…

  2. Socializing Intellectual Talk: A Case Study of Instructor Follow-Up Statements in Classroom Discourse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Caroline S.

    2017-01-01

    By analyzing the audio recording and transcription of classroom discourse, this case study focused on the ways in which the instructor used follow-up statements to socialize students into intellectual talk. Four relevant categories of follow-up statements emerged: (a) revoicing, (b) contextualization, (c) parallel elaboration, and (d) assistive…

  3. A Correlational Study: Code of Ethics in Testing and EFL Instructors' Professional Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Hamid; Kafi, Zahra; Saeedan, Azaam

    2018-01-01

    The present study has aimed at delving the code of ethics in testing in English language institutions to see how far adhering to these ethical codes will result in EFL teachers' professional behavior. Therefore, 300 EFL instructors teaching at English language schools in Khorasan Razavi Province, Zabansara Language School, as well as Khorasan…

  4. Citation Analysis for the Modern Instructor: An Integrated Review of Emerging Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowski, Chris

    2013-01-01

    While online instructors may be versed in conducting e-Research (Hung, 2012; Thelwall, 2009), today's faculty are probably less familiarized with the rapidly advancing fields of bibliometrics and informetrics. One key feature of research in these areas is Citation Analysis, a rather intricate operational feature available in modern indexes…

  5. Andragogical Content Knowledge as a Key Component in the Training of the Instructors of Nonformal Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurhayati, Sri

    2015-01-01

    Currently, professionals and academics of non-formal education in Indonesia have began to question the competences of the non-formal education instructors. Non-formal education is a profession that requires knowledge (subject-content area), skill (ability to deliver content in regard to the needs of society) and programme content (the content…

  6. Epistemological Belief Congruency in Mathematics between Vocational Technology Students and Their Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schommer-Aikins, Marlene; Unruh, Susan; Morphew, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Three questions were addressed in this study. Is there evidence of epistemological beliefs congruency between students and their instructor? Do students' epistemological beliefs, students' epistemological congruence, or both predict mathematical anxiety? Do students' epistemological beliefs, students' epistemological congruence, or both predict…

  7. How Instructors Develop Their Beliefs, Knowledge, and Practice as They Teach Online Professional Development (OPD) Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jung Jin

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated how three instructors developed their professional learning of beliefs, knowledge, and practice by examining their professional learning processes using constructive, social constructive, and transformative theoretical perspectives on learning. It also focused on their challenges and supports in developing their…

  8. Teaching Macroeconomics after the Crisis: A Survey among Undergraduate Instructors in Europe and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gärtner, Manfred; Griesbach, Björn; Jung, Florian

    2013-01-01

    The Great Recession raised questions of what and how macroeconomists teach at academic institutions around the globe, and what changes in the macroeconomics curriculum should be made. The authors conducted a survey of undergraduate macroeconomics instructors affiliated with colleges and universities in Europe and the United States at the end of…

  9. Using Social Media to Improve Student-Instructor Communication in an Online Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Rong; Shen, Yide; Li, Lei

    2018-01-01

    The lack of effective faculty-student interaction has been identified as a main contributor to the high dropout rate in online education. For this paper, the authors conducted an empirical study using a social networking tool, specifically Facebook, to improve student-instructor communication and student performance in an online learning…

  10. Complexity of International Sign for inexperienced interpreters: Insights From a Deaf IS Instructor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oyserman, J.; Rosenstock, R.; Napier, J.

    2016-01-01

    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content: 192 Complexity of International Sign for Inexperienced Interpreters: Insights From a Deaf IS Instructor Joni Oyserman In this chapter, I focus on how inexperienced interpreters view, acquire, and use International Sign (IS). A profile

  11. What Is "Good" Technical Communication? A Comparison of the Standards of Writing and Engineering Instructors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Summer

    2003-01-01

    Presents the results of an empirical study comparing writing and engineering instructors' responses to students' technical writing. Indicates that the gap between engineering and writing teachers' standards for evaluating technical writing is not as wide as is generally assumed. Concludes that the differences that do emerge suggest ways that the…

  12. Urban Stormwater Runoff. Instructor Guide. Working for Clean Water: An Information Program for Advisory Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simko, Robert A.

    Urban stormwater runoff collects pollutants from many parts of a city and is an important consideration in water quality planning. Presented is an instructor's guide for a learning session covering various aspects of urban runoff including pollutant sources, management practices, and regulatory programs. Intended for citizen advisory groups, this…

  13. The Accounting Principles Instructor's Influence on Students' Decision To Major in Accounting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauldin, Shawn; Crain, John L.; Mounce, Patricia H.

    2000-01-01

    A survey of 81 accounting majors, 60 business majors, 12 nonbusiness majors, and 13 undecided students in accounting principles courses found that accounting principles instructors play the most significant role in the decision to major in accounting. Many students decide to major during their first principles course. (SK)

  14. Instructor Use of Tablet PCs in a College Pre-Calculus Course: Implementation & Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connelly Stockton, Julianna; Gregory, Peter

    2012-01-01

    A group of six math instructors used tablet PCs to teach their individual sections of a high enrollment gateway Pre-Calculus course in a diverse urban four-year college. Student performance in the experimental sections were compared to those in 31 other sections in terms of student retention, pass rates, and score on the department-wide…

  15. Undergraduate Psychology's Scientific Identity Dilemma: Student and Instructor Interests and Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Jeffrey D.

    2014-01-01

    Could the same interests that draw many students to psychology also predict departure from the major? I present a comparison of students and instructors with respect to professional interests and views of the scientific nature of psychology (Study 1) and an examination of the link between student interests and persistence in the major (Study 2).…

  16. The Effects of Online Syllabus Interactivity on Students' Perception of the Course and Instructor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigorovici, Dan; Nam, Siho; Russill, Chris

    2003-01-01

    Examines whether level of interactivity in an online syllabus influences students' first impressions of course and instructor. Participants viewed identical syllabi, differing only in number and relationship of hyperlinks. The independent variable, interactivity, had three ordinal levels: website with no links (low interactivity), website with…

  17. Income Tax Law: U.S. Armed Forces Training: Instructor Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Internal Revenue Service (Dept. of Treasury), Washington, DC.

    The instructor's guide provides eight detailed lesson plans for instructing military personnel in the preparation of their U.S. Income Tax Returns. The plans cover the following subjects: requirements for filing returns of income and declaration of estimated tax; exemptions; gross income; exclusions and deductions to arrive at adjusted gross…

  18. Assessing and Analyzing Behavior Strategies of Instructors in College Science Laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyle, William C., Jr.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Analyzed are university instructor behaviors in introductory and advanced level laboratories of botany, chemistry, geology, physics and zoology. Science Laboratory Interaction Categories--Teacher (SLIC) was used to assess 15 individual categories of teacher behaviors in the areas of questioning, giving directions, transmitting information,…

  19. Equine Science. Instructor Guide [and] Student Reference. Volume 27, Number 4 [and] Volume 27, Number 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leffert, Kenneth L.; And Others

    This instructor guide and the corresponding student reference contain 10 lessons to enhance an Agricultural Science I course for grade 9. The lessons cover the following topics: introduction, psychology and handling, conformation and selection, genetics and reproduction, herd health, hoof care, nutrition, equipment and facilities, handling horses,…

  20. Metaphor Clusters: Characterizing Instructor Metaphorical Reasoning on Limit Concepts in College Calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Rita Manubhai; McCombs, Paul; Zollman, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Novice students have difficulty with the topic of limits in calculus. We believe this is in part because of the multiple perspectives and shifting metaphors available to solve items correctly. We investigated college calculus instructors' personal concepts of limits. Based upon previous research investigating introductory calculus student…

  1. Practices and Perspectives of College Instructors on Addressing Religious Beliefs When Teaching Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, M. Elizabeth; Brownell, Sara E.

    2016-01-01

    Evolution is a core concept of biology, and yet many college biology students do not accept evolution because of their religious beliefs. However, we do not currently know how instructors perceive their role in helping students accept evolution or how they address the perceived conflict between religion and evolution when they teach evolution.…

  2. An exploration of implications for the development of Pilates instructor system through identification of instructors’ difficulties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Su Yeon

    2016-01-01

    This study is aimed at exploring ideas for the development of Pilates instructor qualification system by identifying a range of difficulties Pilates instructors are experiencing. Open-ended questionnaires and semi-structured interviews were conducted to collect data before they were analyzed with inductive content analysis method. In consideration of the difficulties Pilates instructors experience during three qualification stages (before-during-after qualification education), three key categories were incorporated in the collected data: (1) lack of information on Pilates qualification system, (2) difficulties in understanding the human anatomy related with the diverse movements taught in Pilates classes and its application to Pilates practice, (3) need for professional development through retraining. Based on these findings, a need for rethinking the monitoring and evaluation process for Pilates qualification system and Pilates education in Korea was identified. In addition, we need to summarize and offer information on a range of Pilates qualifications. And the quality of Pilates instructor education program should be improved as well by proving them a range of teaching methods including microteaching, discussion-based lessons as well as reading and writing sessions and other necessary teaching media. PMID:27656634

  3. The Fundamentals and Fun of Electronic Teamwork for Students and Their Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Jeffrey R.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reviews and integrates best practices for online teamwork for students and instructors from current and classical literature as well as the author's own six years of online teaching experience (over 40 online courses). A qualitative reflection of six graduate and six undergraduate courses in management, human resource management and…

  4. Office Occupations--Accounting, Payroll. Kit No. 64. Instructor's Manual [and] Student Learning Activity Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner, Connie

    An instructor's manual and student activity guide on payroll management are provided in this set of prevocational education materials which focuses on the vocational area of office occupations (accounting). (This set of materials is one of ninety-two prevocational education sets arranged around a cluster of seven vocational offerings: agriculture,…

  5. Preparing Payroll Register, Employee Earnings' Records, and Paychecks. Student's Manual and Instructor's Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElveen, Peggy C.

    Supporting performance objective 28 of the V-TECS (Vocational-Technical Education Consortium of States) Secretarial Catalog, both a set of student materials and an instructor's manual on preparing a payroll register, employee earnings' records, and paychecks are included in this packet, which is one in a series. The student materials include a…

  6. Health Services: Clinical. Pharmacy Aide. Instructor's Manual. Competency-Based Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cave, Julie; And Others

    This instructor's manual consists of materials for use in presenting a course in the occupational area of pharmacy aide. Included in the first part of the guide are a program master sequence; a master listing of instructional materials, equipment, and supplies; an overview of the competency-based vocational education (CBVE) system; and guidelines…

  7. Calculus Students' and Instructors' Conceptualizations of Slope: A Comparison across Academic Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagle, Courtney; Moore-Russo, Deborah; Viglietti, Janine; Martin, Kristi

    2013-01-01

    This study considers tertiary calculus students' and instructors' conceptualizations of slope. Qualitative techniques were employed to classify responses to 5 items using conceptualizations of slope identified across various research settings. Students' responses suggest that they rely on procedurally based conceptualizations of…

  8. Fieldcrest Cannon, Inc. Advanced Technical Preparation. Statistical Process Control (SPC). PRE-SPC I. Instructor Book.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averitt, Sallie D.

    This instructor guide, which was developed for use in a manufacturing firm's advanced technical preparation program, contains the materials required to present a learning module that is designed to prepare trainees for the program's statistical process control module by improving their basic math skills and instructing them in basic calculator…

  9. The Degree of Practicing Democracy in the EFL Classroom According to Perceptions of Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Zubi, Mohammad

    2018-01-01

    One of the aims at Albalqa Applied University is to prepare the student to contribute positively in society so the main important goal of the comprehensive reform of the education system in Jordan is to contribute to the democratic development of the country. The study has been investigated to find out if the English instructors adopt the…

  10. Adult Cycling. An Instructor's Manual. Series MR-001, Publication Number 78-016-01.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charest, Laurie; Condrey, John

    This instructor's manual is designed for use by an experienced cyclist to teach a 10-week, 30-hour course. The course provides on-bike and classroom instruction in defensive maneuvers in traffic, long-distance riding, health and physiology, bike maintenance, legal considerations of biking, and route selection. Participants should be at least…

  11. Techniques for Eliminating Sex Discrimination from Vocational Education: An Instructor's Guide for Culinary Arts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glick, Georgia S.; Upton, Linda Kulow

    This instructor's guide addresses issues of sex bias as they occur in the shop area of the Culinary Arts Program. The first part gives general background by discussing sex discrimination and schools and course enrollments by sex and the Culinary Arts shop at the Minuteman Regional Vocational Technical School, Massachusetts. A second, and much…

  12. Carpentry, Culinary Arts Instructor Guide and Curriculums. Bilingual Vocational Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Densmore, Roxanne T.

    This guide is intended to assist vocational English as a second language (VESL) instructors in teaching courses in carpentry and the culinary arts to residents of Navajo reservations. The first section outlines the rationale and content of the two training programs as well as the basic VESL objectives that they seek to address. The next section, a…

  13. The Lived Experiences of Instructors Co-Teaching in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lock, Jennifer; Clancy, Tracey; Lisella, Rita; Rosenau, Patricia; Ferreira, Carla; Rainsbury, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    The strength of co-teaching informs educators' understanding of their own teaching practice and fosters a rediscovery of their passion for teaching. Instructors bring their skills and competencies to the co-teaching relationship in ways that create an instructional dynamic greater than can be achieved individually. From a qualitative research…

  14. Relationships between Students' Engagement and the Dissimilar Cognitive Styles of Their Undergraduate Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedel, Curtis R.; Rudd, Rick D.

    2009-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine if the dissimilarity of cognitive style between the instructor and the student was related to student engagement in nine undergraduate classes. Kirton's Adaption-Innovation Inventory was used to measure cognitive style as a preference to a method of solving problems: either more adaptively or more…

  15. A Case Study of Student and Instructor Reactions to a Calculus E-Book

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode, Martina; Khorami, Mehdi; Visscher, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    This article details the results of testing an e-book in two differential calculus classes. Although we, as math instructors, were drawn to the components of the e-book that promote conceptual understanding--such as the interactive figures--the students reported liking the assessment support most. We found that students were initially excited…

  16. Perceived Instructor Affective Support in Relation to Academic Emotions and Motivation in College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakiz, Gonul

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the associations among perceived instructor affective support, academic enjoyment, academic hopelessness, behavioural engagement and academic help seeking in college classrooms. A self-report survey was administered to 277 college students enrolled in a teacher training department of a major…

  17. Student and faculty perceptions of effective clinical instructors in ADN programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gignac-Caille, A M; Oermann, M H

    2001-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the perceptions of associate degree nursing (ADN) students and faculty of characteristics of effective clinical teachers and determine whether there were differences between these two groups. A survey was conducted of 292 students in various levels of their ADN programs and 59 faculty members from the same five programs, which were randomly selected from across Michigan. Data were collected using the Nursing Clinical Effectiveness Inventory, which includes 48 characteristics of effective clinical instructors arranged in five subscales. Students identified "demonstrates clinical skills and judgment" as the most important characteristic of effective clinical instructors, while faculty identified "explains clearly" as the most important characteristic. There was agreement on 6 of the top 10 characteristics identified by both groups. Both groups rated "directs student to useful literature in nursing" as the least important characteristic of effective clinical instructors. The students' and faculty's perceptions of effective clinical instructors differed by subscales, with students identifying evaluation characteristics as most important (mean = 4.73, SD = .42) and faculty identifying interpersonal relationships as most important (mean = 4.72, SD = .31). A t test indicated a significant difference between student and faculty means for the interpersonal relationships subscales, with faculty rating this group of characteristics as more important than students did (t = 2.49, p = .0 14).

  18. Collaborative course design to support implementation of e-learning by instructors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nihuka, Kassimu A.; Nihuka, Kassimu Ali

    2011-01-01

    Distance education at the Open University of Tanzania (OUT) is dominated by a print-based mode of delivery . Because of that, several challenges confront instructors and students at OUT, which include (i) delays in the delivery of print study materials, course outlines and learning resources, (ii)

  19. Learning on the Fly: Exploring the Informal Learning Process of Aviation Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wofford, Michael Grant; Ellinger, Andrea D.; Watkins, Karen E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to examine the process of informal learning of aviation instructors. Design/methodology/approach: A qualitative instrumental case study design was used for this study. In-depth, multiple semi-structured interviews and document review were the primary approaches to data collection and the data were analyzed using constant…

  20. Assessment of Teaching Effectiveness: Lack of Alignment between Instructors, Institutions, and Research Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Charles; Turpen, Chandra; Dancy, Melissa; Chapman, Tricia

    2014-01-01

    Ideally, instructors and their institutions would have a shared set of metrics by which they determine teaching effectiveness. And, ideally, these metrics would overlap with research findings on measuring teaching effectiveness. Unfortunately, the current situation at most institutions is far from this ideal. As part of a larger interview study,…

  1. Alignment Adjustment Procedures. Automotive Mechanics. Steering & Suspension. Instructor's Guide [and] Student Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spignesi, B.

    This instructional package, one in a series of individualized instructional units on automotive steering and suspension, consists of a student guide and an instructor guide dealing with automobile alignment and adjustment procedures. Covered in the module are identifying positive and negative cambers, positive and negative casters, and toe-ins;…

  2. Principles of Refrigeration. Automotive Mechanics. Air Conditioning. Instructor's Guide [and] Student Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spignesi, B.

    This instructional package, one in a series of individualized instructional units on automobile air conditioning, consists of a student guide and an instructor guide dealing with the principles of refrigeration. Covered in the module are defining the term heat, defining the term British Thermal Unit (BTU), defining the term latent heat, listing…

  3. Pre-Alignment Checks. Automotive Mechanics. Steering & Suspension. Instructor's Guide [and] Student Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spignesi, B.

    This instructional package, one in a series of individualized instructional units on automotive steering and suspension, consists of a student guide and an instructor guide dealing with prealignment checks. Covered in the module are the following steps in a prealignment check: checking the ride height of a vehicle, checking the ball joints and the…

  4. Identifying Student Competencies in Macro Practice: Articulating the Practice Wisdom of Field Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regehr, Cheryl; Bogo, Marion; Donovan, Kirsten; Lim, April; Anstice, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Although a growing literature examines competencies in clinical practice, competencies of students in macro social work practice have received comparatively little attention. A grounded-theory methodology was used to elicit field instructor views of student competencies in community, organization, and policy contexts. Competencies described by…

  5. Innovation Diffusion: Learner Benefits and Instructor Insights with the DIFFUSION SIMULATION GAME

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalik, Cindy L.; Kuo, Chia-Ling

    2012-01-01

    This research project investigated student reaction to playing the DIFFUSION SIMULATION GAME (DSG) and how an instructor, who is a novice in playing online games, implemented the DSG in an online higher education course. The goal of this research project was to determine whether playing the DSG helps students learn and apply course content. In…

  6. Using a Design-Based Research Study to Identify Principles for Training Instructors to Teach Online

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shattuck, Julie; Anderson, Terry

    2013-01-01

    Within the overall framework of design-based research, this paper reports on a study that focused on evaluating an online training course for online instructors. This intervention was designed as a possible solution to the problem facing some higher education institutions of how to provide quality, accessible training for mostly part-time…

  7. Operation of Wastewater Treatment Plants: A Field Study Training Program. Volume II, Instructor's Guide. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California State Univ., Sacramento. Dept. of Civil Engineering.

    The objective of this instructor's guide is to help provide students with knowledge and skills for employment in the field of wastewater treatment. Included in each chapter outline are: (1) objectives, (2) instructional approach, (3) answers to the objective test in the student's text, and (4) an explanation of these answers. The material…

  8. Operation of Wastewater Treatment Plants: A Field Study Training Program. Volume I, Instructor's Guide. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California State Univ., Sacramento. Dept. of Civil Engineering.

    The objective of this instructor's guide is to help provide students with knowledge and skills for employment in the field of wastewater treatment. Included in each chapter outline are: (1) objectives, (2) instructional approach, (3) answers to the objective test in the student's text, and (4) an explanation of these answers. The material…

  9. An Experimental Analysis of the Relation between Assigned Grades and Instructor Evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Dale L.; Cook, Patrick; Buskist, William

    2011-01-01

    The perceived relation between assigned student grades and instructor evaluations of teaching has been the subject of much debate, though few laboratory studies have been conducted with adequate controls. Marsh and Roche suggested that experimental field studies may be a particularly promising avenue for further analyses of this relation. The…

  10. Facilitating the Research Paper Process: A Guide for the Social Science Instructor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Suzanne L.

    This paper describes the approach used successfully at California State University, Dominguez Hills, to instruct college students in the research paper writing process. To achieve the results, the instructor followed a specific set of steps during a class meeting set aside for this specialized training. This paper details each step in the…

  11. Groundwork for a Better Vocabulary. Second Edition. Instructor's Edition. Townsend Press Vocabulary Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R. Kent; Johnson, Beth; Mohr, Carole

    This instructor's edition of a vocabulary textbook for college students, who read at the fifth to eighth grade level, features 25 chapters and teaches 250 basic words. The first and third chapters in each unit contain word-part practices. The second and fourth chapters in each unit contain synonym-antonym practices. The book's last chapter in each…

  12. Deep and Surface Processing of Instructor's Feedback in an Online Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kun; Ge, Xun; Law, Victor

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the characteristics of deep and surface approaches to learning in online students' responses to instructor's qualitative feedback given to a multi-stage, ill-structured design project. Further, the study examined the relationships between approaches to learning and two learner characteristics: epistemic beliefs (EB) and…

  13. The Changing Role of Instructors in Distance Education: Impact on Tool Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biedebach, Anke; Bomsdorf, Birgit; Schlageter, Gunter

    At the university of Hagen a lot of experience exists in performing Web-based teaching and in implementing tools supporting e-learning. To share this knowledge, (inexperienced) instructors more and more ask for tool-based assistance in designing and administrating e-learning courses. Considering experience from other universities, it becomes…

  14. Careers in Construction: Construction Industry Series: Student Manual and Instructor's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Education Agency, Austin. Dept. of Occupational Education and Technology.

    The guide for instructors of construction occupations provides instructional suggestions and informational sources for structuring an exploratory program. The program is divided into the following blocks, representing different experiences in construction: (1) wood; (2) finishing; (3) engineering, support, and management services; (4) metal; (5)…

  15. Greenhouse Operation and Management. Instructor Guide and Student Reference. Missouri Agricultural Education. Volume 21, Number 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Judith A.; And Others

    These student and instructor materials for a one-semester course intended for high school juniors and seniors teach the following 24 lessons: (1) the scope and development of greenhouse production; (2) the economic importance of greenhouse crops; (3) careers in greenhouse operation and management; (4) greenhouse parts, structures, and coverings;…

  16. Mass Balance. Operational Control Tests for Wastewater Treatment Facilities. Instructor's Manual [and] Student Workbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnegie, John W.

    This module describes the process used to determine solids mass and location throughout a waste water treatment plant, explains how these values are used to determine the solids mass balance around single treatment units and the entire system, and presents calculations of solids in pounds and sludge units. The instructor's manual contains a…

  17. Composting. Sludge Treatment and Disposal Course #166. Instructor's Guide [and] Student Workbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arasmith, E. E.

    Composting is a lesson developed for a sludge treatment and disposal course. The lesson discusses the basic theory of composting and the basic operation, in a step-by-step sequence, of the two typical composting procedures: windrow and forced air static pile. The lesson then covers basic monitoring and operational procedures. The instructor's…

  18. Is the Receptivity of Substance Abuse Prevention Programming Affected by Students' Perceptions of the Instructor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Peggy C.; Sloboda, Zili; Grey, Scott; Stephens, Richard; Hammond, Augustine; Hawthorne, Richard; Teasdale, Brent; Williams, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    Drawing on the elaboration likelihood model of persuasive communication, the authors examine the impact of the perceptions of the instructor or source on students' receptivity to a new substance abuse prevention curriculum. Using survey data from a cohort of students participating in the Adolescent Substance Abuse Prevention Study, the authors use…

  19. Introduction to Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC). Instructor Edition. Introduction to Construction Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This instructor's guide contains the materials required to teach a competency-based introductory course in heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) to students who have chosen to explore careers in construction. It contains three units: HVAC materials, HVAC tools, and applied skills. Each instructional unit includes some or all of the…

  20. The Effect of Academics' Dress and Gender on Student Perceptions of Instructor Approachability and Likeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatelain, Amber M.

    2015-01-01

    This study sought to discover student perceptions of academics' dress and gender and their impact on perceived instructor approachability and likeability. Three categories of dress were examined: casual, business casual and professional. The results of this study suggest students at career-arts institutions perceive female teachers as less…

  1. T & I--Cosmetology, Skin Care. Kit No. 77. Instructor's Manual [and] Student Learning Activity Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Carolyn

    An instructor's manual and student activity guide on skin care are provided in this set of prevocational education materials which focuses on the vocational area of trade and industry (cosmetology). (This set of materials is one of ninety-two prevocational education sets arranged around a cluster of seven vocational offerings: agriculture, home…

  2. Water Conservation and Reuse. Instructor Guide. Working for Clean Water: An Information Program for Advisory Committees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennsylvania State Univ., Middletown. Inst. of State and Regional Affairs.

    Described is a learning session on water conservation intended for citizen advisory groups interested in water quality planning. Topics addressed in this instructor's manual include water conservation needs, benefits, programs, technology, and problems. These materials are components of the Working for Clean Water Project. (Author/WB)

  3. Crop Science. Instructor Guide [and] Student Reference. Volume 24, Numbers 5 and 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, John Kevin

    This document consists of two separately published guides for a course on crop science: an instructor's guide and a student's reference manual. Each part contains nine lessons on the following topics: (1) economic importance of crops; (2) crop uses (products and byproducts); (3) plant and seed identification; (4) certified seed and variety…

  4. Plant Science. Instructor Guide [and] Student Reference. Volume 24, Numbers 3 and 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, John Kevin

    This document consists of two separately published guides for a course on plant science: an instructor's guide and a student's reference manual. Each part consists of eight lessons and cover the following topics: (1) importance of plants; (2) classification of plants; (3) plant growth factors; (4) weeds, diseases, insects; (5) germination; (6)…

  5. What Role Does Humor in the Higher Education Classroom Play in Student-Perceived Instructor Effectiveness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halula, Stephen Paul

    2013-01-01

    Everyone has had college instructors who they thought were excellent and those who were not. In pondering what attributes might have made the difference between these groups, the idea of "humor" came to mind, setting the researcher on course to study the research question "What role does humor in the higher education classroom play…

  6. Turkish EFL Instructors' Perceived Importance of Motivational Strategies: A Descriptive Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustuk, Özgehan

    2018-01-01

    This study investigated how important Turkish EFL teachers perceive the ELT motivational strategies that are implemented in adult EFL teaching. 52 EFL instructors working in preparatory schools of foreign languages in four state universities in Turkey participated in the current study. The perceived importance of ELT motivational strategies was…

  7. The Effects of Writing Instructors' Motivational Strategies on Student Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Yin Ling

    2018-01-01

    While the last decade has witnessed a growing body of research on student motivation in second language acquisition, research about the impact of writing instructors' motivational strategies on student motivation has remained underexplored. In order to fill this important gap, this study, guided by motivational strategy framework, investigates the…

  8. 14 CFR Appendix F to Part 141 - Flight Instructor Certification Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flight Instructor Certification Course F Appendix F to Part 141 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION...) Takeoffs, landings, and go-arounds; (viii) Fundamentals of flight; (ix) Performance maneuvers; (x) Ground...

  9. Being There: A Grounded-Theory Study of Student Perceptions of Instructor Presence in Online Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feeler, William

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions of experienced individual online students at a community college in Texas in order to generate a substantive theory of community college student perceptions of online instructor presence. This qualitative study used Active Interviewing and followed a Straussian grounded-theory design to…

  10. Business and Office Education: Accounting, Clerk. Instructor's Manual [and] Student Learning Activity Guide. Kit No. 204.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cliatt, Katherine H.

    This learning activity guide and instructor's manual provide information and exercises for an exploratory activity in accounting. Instructional objectives covered in the guide are for the students to learn (1) reasons for studying accounting and related job descriptions, (2) definitions for accounting terms, (3) the accounting equation, (4) how to…

  11. A Professor Like Me: The Influence of Instructor Gender on College Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Florian; Oreopoulos, Philip

    2009-01-01

    Many wonder whether teacher gender plays an important role in higher education by influencing student achievement and subject interest. The data used in this paper help identify average effects from male and female college students assigned to male or female teachers. We find instructor gender plays only a minor role in determining college student…

  12. Participation Apprehensive Students: The Influence of Face Support and Instructor-Student Rapport on Classroom Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisby, Brandi N.; Berger, Erin; Burchett, Molly; Herovic, Emina; Strawser, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    Participation is considered a positive student classroom behavior that can also create a face-threatening classroom climate that may be alleviated through interpersonal relationships with the instructor. Participants (N?=?189) categorized as low apprehensives perceived less face threat and more face support when participating; moderate…

  13. Effect of Instructor Feedback on Skills Retention After Laparoscopic Simulator Training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, Flemming; Maagaard, Mathilde; Sørensen, Jette Led

    2015-01-01

    . Participants were surgical novices (medical students). All participants (n = 99) initially practiced a laparoscopic salpingectomy on the LapSim virtual reality simulator to proficiency. The intervention group could request instructor feedback, whereas the control group could not. After 6 months...

  14. Differences of Teachers', Field Instructors', and Students' Views on Job Analysis of Social Work Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherer, Moshe; Peleg-Oren, Neta

    2005-01-01

    This study compares the assessment of 30 teachers, 120 field instructors, and 287 students with regard to what students of social work do during their fieldwork practice and the importance they attach to these activities. The study used a Job Analysis Questionnaire developed specifically for this study. Results indicated differences among the…

  15. Current Piano Education of Turkish Music Teacher Candidates: Comparisons of Instructors and Students Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelen, Birsen

    2015-01-01

    In recent years almost every newly opened government funded university in Turkey has established a music department where future music teachers are educated and piano is compulsory for every single music teacher candidate in Turkey. The aim of this research is to compare piano teaching instructors' and their students' perceptions about the current…

  16. Promoting Perceived Benefits of Group Projects: The Role of Instructor Contributions and Intragroup Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Sarah; Barber, Larissa K.; Ferguson, Amanda J.

    2015-01-01

    Group projects are often used in psychology courses to prepare students for future collaborative work. However, psychology alumni report that their education did not adequately prepare them for collaborative work. To better understand these perceptions, this study examined how instructor contributions (involvement and evaluation techniques)…

  17. A Case Study of Women Instructors and Their Education in the Reign of Abdulhamid II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabekmez, Meryem

    2017-01-01

    This study demonstrates how the cultural role of Ottoman women began to change during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries as well as considering emerging conflicts due to their altering roles in society as they were educated in the "Darulmuallimat" (teachers' college for women) and acquired social positions as woman instructors. The…

  18. 78 FR 66261 - Certified Flight Instructor Flight Reviews; Recent Pilot in Command Experience; Airmen Online...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-05

    ...-0780; Amdt. No. 61-131] RIN 2120-AK23 Certified Flight Instructor Flight Reviews; Recent Pilot in Command Experience; Airmen Online Services; Confirmation of Effective Date AGENCY: Federal Aviation...-calendar month flight review requirements. This rule also clarifies that the generally applicable recent...

  19. 78 FR 56822 - Certified Flight Instructor Flight Reviews; Recent Pilot in Command Experience; Airmen Online...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-16

    ...-0780; Amdt. No. 61-131] RIN 2120-AK23 Certified Flight Instructor Flight Reviews; Recent Pilot in Command Experience; Airmen Online Services AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION... review requirements. This rule also clarifies that the generally applicable recent flight experience...

  20. Examining the Perceptions of English Instructors Regarding the Incorporation of Global Citizenship Education into ELT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma BAŞARIR

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to explore the perceptions of ELT instructors working at a higher education institution in Turkey regarding integrating global citizenship education into ELT courses. The study was carried out by using phenomenological design, which is one of the qualitative studies. The data were collected using interview method and a semi-structured interview form was developed by the researcher as the data collection tool. The participants, selected on the basis of easily accessible sampling method, which is one of the purposeful sampling methods. The participants comprises of 13 English instructors who work at a higher education institution in the Central Anatolia Region in the academic year 2015-2016. Instructors’ opinions were taken regarding how they described global citizenship, what were their roles and responsibilities in educating students as global citizens, how they practiced global citizenship education in their classes, and the challenges they were facing in practicing global citizenship education in ELT courses. Data were analysed with content analysis technique. Findings revealed that participants mostly focused on the “value” dimension of global citizenship such as respect, sensitivity, sense of belonging, responsibility, openness, etc. The instructors deemed their roles and responsibilities in preparing students as global citizens as an informer and role model. While most of the participants stated that they did not involve any specific teaching practices in their classes to educate students as global citizens, as they thought ELT lessons and global citizenship education were irrelevant, addressing global issues in the courses and role modelling were conducted by few instructors to promote global citizenship. Predominantly grammar-based teaching and student unwillingness were found as challenges of integrating global citizenship into ELT. As a result, it was concluded that ELT instructors have insufficient levels