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Sample records for insanity a medical theory

  1. A Narrow Definition of Insanity Opined by Medical Experts in the Oliver Smith Will Case in 1847

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    Jeremia Heinik

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Physicians specializing in the diagnosis and treatment of insane people (alienists emerged in the early 19th century and offered their expertise for the courts to consider in judgments of mental competence. In the Oliver Smith will case (1847, the competency of an attesting witness was contested on the issue of insanity. Four well-known alienists testified at trial. Although the insanity of the witness could have been viewed in broader terms, the experts used a narrow definition of insanity based primarily on the presence of delusions. These opinions were only partially consistent with contemporaneous medical notions of insanity and the broad definition of criminal responsibility. We suggest three explanatory factors for the narrow definition related to available medical knowledge, courtroom restrictions including the case itself, and mid-19th-century relationships between mental medicine and the law.

  2. Murder, insanity, and medical expert witnesses.

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    Ciccone, J R

    1992-06-01

    Recent advances in the ability to study brain anatomy and function and attempts to link these findings with human behavior have captured the attention of the legal system. This had led to the increasing use of the "neurological defense" to support a plea of not guilty by reason of insanity. This article explores the history of the insanity defense and explores the role of the medical expert witnesses in integrating clinical and laboratory findings, eg, computed tomographic scans, magnetic resonance scans, and single-photon emission computed tomographic scans. Three cases involving murder and brain dysfunction are discussed: the first case involves a subarachnoid hemorrhage resulting in visual perceptual and memory impairment; the second case, a diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease; and the third case, the controverted diagnosis of complex partial seizures in a serial killer.

  3. A Forensic Psychology Exercise: Role Playing and the Insanity Defense.

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    Fass, Michael E.

    1999-01-01

    Presents a role playing exercise that provides students with an introduction to forensic psychology and the insanity defense. Reports that 87% of the students found this exercise to be an enjoyable teaching technique and useful in providing an understanding of the insanity defense. Concludes that the exercise increases student interest and…

  4. [A state without memory. The ideological abolition of the insane asylum in Mexico (1945-1968)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacristán, Cristina

    2011-01-01

    The present article analyzes a campaign by the Mexican government, among the public and the medical profession, to disseminate a health care reform that culminated with the opening of thirteen Farms for the mentally ill and the ideological abolition of the insane asylum in the sixties of the twentieth century. To do this, renowned psychiatrists who held public positions built a black legend over the most emblematic insane asylum of the country, pointing out as the main cause of failure the constraint to which patients were subjected. In doing so, they resembled the mental hospital to a prison and the insane to a social threat, because they reduced that institution's function and denied the many experiences that would ?t in it: a place of confinement and refuge, a therapeutic and knowledge production space. Even though Mexican psychiatry was professionalized in the space of the asylum, the State wanted to erase the memory of that past to suggest the establishment of a new era in mental health, where the patients would no longer be subject to any restrictions which could curtail their freedom. Overcoming the asylum model meant creating "open door" therapeutic alternatives, but the decision was to distort the past to exalt the future.

  5. Insanity and adultery: forensic implications of a divorce case.

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    McKee, G R

    1995-04-01

    Legal responsibility for acts presumes that a person's behavior is rationally intentional and under voluntary control. Automatism, a type of insanity defense, contends that the person's conscious, voluntary control of behavior has been impaired by a mental disorder. In a recent case in South Carolina, automatism was offered as a defense to adultery, an at-fault grounds to divorce. On appeal, the State Supreme Court recognized the novel application of mental impairment defenses in domestic litigation and remanded the case for rehearing. Implications of the ruling for clinical and forensic practice in family court are discussed.

  6. Insanity Defense: Past, Present, and Future.

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    Math, Suresh Bada; Kumar, Channaveerachari Naveen; Moirangthem, Sydney

    2015-01-01

    Insanity defense is primarily used in criminal prosecutions. It is based on the assumption that at the time of the crime, the defendant was suffering from severe mental illness and therefore, was incapable of appreciating the nature of the crime and differentiating right from wrong behavior, hence making them not legally accountable for crime. Insanity defense is a legal concept, not a clinical one (medical one). This means that just suffering from a mental disorder is not sufficient to prove insanity. The defendant has the burden of proving the defense of insanity by a "preponderance of the evidence" which is similar to a civil case. It is hard to determine legal insanity, and even harder to successfully defend it in court. This article focuses on the recent Supreme Court decision on insanity defense and standards employed in Indian court. Researchers present a model for evaluating a defendant's mental status examination and briefly discuss the legal standards and procedures for the assessment of insanity defense evaluations. There is an urgent need to initiate formal graduation course, setup Forensic Psychiatric Training and Clinical Services Providing Centers across the country to increase the manpower resources and to provide fair and speedy trail.

  7. Arte, clínica e loucura: um território em mutação Art, medical treatment and insanity: a territory in flux

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    Elizabeth Maria Freire de Araújo Lima

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available A experiência clínica e didática no campo da terapia ocupacional, na qual práticas artísticas e processos terapêuticos se atravessavam, levou-nos à realização de uma pesquisa histórica visando investigar como se constituíram, no Brasil, as relações entre os campos da saúde mental e da arte, a partir de meados do século XIX e durante o século XX. Os métodos utilizados para realizar esta pesquisa - que tem como horizonte teórico o pensamento de Foucault, Deleuze e Guattari - foram a cartografia e a arqueologia. Com a arqueologia, tratamos dos discursos e acontecimentos históricos, procurando as forças que os engendraram. Ao cartografar, buscamos acompanhar algumas linhas que, emergindo de cada um desses campos em relação ao outro, se cruzaram formando diferentes configurações no território em estudo.Based on a combination of clinical and pedagogical experience in occupational therapy, which interlinks artistic practices and therapeutic processes, we carried out a historical study designed to investigate how the fields of mental health and art became interrelated in Brazil between the mid 19th and 20th centuries. The methods used for this research, which is underpinned by the thinking of Foucault, Deleuze and Guattari, were cartography and archeology. We used archeology to investigate the historical discourses and events, seeking out the forces behind them. Through cartography we sought to map out some lines which, emerging from each of these fields in relation to the other, intersect to form different patterns in the area under study.

  8. [The quarrel of 1843 on the "relationship between the physical and the moral" in the causes of insanity].

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    Carbonel, Frederic

    2010-12-01

    Moreau de Jonnès, in his statistical Documents on France, published in 1835, and in his Statistics of the Insane, recorded "idiocy" and "epilepsy" among the physical causes of insanity. In contrast, Parchappe held that "epilepsy" and "idiocy "constituted" in no way, real causes" of insanity. They were singular diseases, different from "madness". Their "cause" was "an imperfection of organization, and this is an essential cause", he emphasized, that was purely organic and physiological. During this quarrel, which occurred in 1843, Dr Parchappe wanted to make a clean sweep of medical data which did not differentiate sufficiently between the "moral" and "physical" causes of insanity.

  9. “Sooner or later most of us get hooked”: the question of insanity in Patricia Highsmith’s 'Strangers on a train' and 'The talented Mr. Ripley'

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    This article considers constructions of insanity in 'Strangers on a Train' and 'The Talented Mr. Ripley' in the context of historical understandings of psychopathy and sociopathic personality disturbance. It examines Patricia Highsmith’s psychological influences and assesses how her novels have been read in relation to changing notions of criminal insanity in psychiatry, law, and culture.

  10. In the aftermath of State v. Becker: a review of state and federal jury instructions on insanity acquittal disposition.

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    Piel, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    An important topic related to the insanity defense is what jurors should be told about the disposition of a defendant found not guilty by reason of insanity (NGRI). In the federal court system, jurors are not instructed about the consequences of an NGRI verdict. State courts, however, are divided on the question. The federal precedent, Shannon v. United States, and the most recent state case to rule on NGRI juror instructions, State v. Becker, are reviewed in detail. What follows is the author's critique of the principal arguments for and against a jury instruction on NGRI disposition. The author argues in favor of a jury instruction on the consequences of an NGRI verdict.

  11. Intelligence and psychopathy: a correlational study on insane female offenders.

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    Spironelli, C; Segrè, D; Stegagno, L; Angrilli, A

    2014-01-01

    The occurrence of a significant relationship between psychopathic traits and intelligence is still open to debate. Most of the relevant information has been obtained from crystallized IQ tests or on psychopathic male offenders. In this study we hypothesized a negative correlation between psychopathic traits and fluid intelligence on a sample of criminal female in-patients. We carried out a correlational study on a selected sample of 56 criminal female offenders. Variables that were measured include the Hare Psychopathy Checklist Revised (PCL-R) total score (and, separately, the scores from its four subscales: Interpersonal, Affective, Lifestyle and Antisocial) and fluid IQ measured by Raven's Progressive Matrices (RPM). Pearson's correlation between RPM IQ and total PCL-R score was negative (r(54) = -0.55, p correlations were also found between IQ and the four PCL-R subscales, Interpersonal, Affective, Lifestyle and Antisocial (r(54) = -0.35, p < 0.01, r(54) = -0.52, p < 0.001, r(54) = -0.53, p < 0.001, and r(54) = -0.49, p < 0.001 respectively). The results indicate a general negative relationship between PCL-R and IQ, equally distributed across the four subcomponents of the psychopathic trait, and support the view that unsuccessful psychopathic women have poor planning and are unable to foresee and represent future consequences of their actions.

  12. Applying the learning theories to medical education: A commentary

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    Sivalingam Nalliah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Medical education of today continues to evolve to meet the challenges of the stakeholders. Medical professionals today are expected to play multiple roles besides being experts. Thus, the curriculum has to be developed in a manner that facilitates learners to achieve the intended goal of becoming a medical professional with multiple competencies. The understanding of learning theories will be helpful in designing and delivering the curriculum to meet the demands of producing a medical professional who would meet the CanMEDS model. This commentary explores and reflects on the learning theories of behaviorism, cognitivism and constructivism as they have evolved over time and the application of these learning theories in medical education, particularly in the context of medical education in Malaysia. The authors are convinced that these three theories are not mutually exclusive but should be operationalized contextually and throughout the different stages of learning in the MBBS curriculum. Understanding these theories and their application will enhance the learning experience of students.

  13. Definitions of Insanity in College Students

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    Geiger, John F.; Weinstein, Lawrence

    2008-01-01

    The legal concept of insanity has had many definitions throughout the years, and the precise definition used is critical in determining the status of a person in the legal system. Past research has demonstrated that different professions working in the legal system cannot agree on the definition of insanity (Weinstein & Geiger, 2003). However,…

  14. Definitions of Insanity in College Students

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    Geiger, John F.; Weinstein, Lawrence

    2008-01-01

    The legal concept of insanity has had many definitions throughout the years, and the precise definition used is critical in determining the status of a person in the legal system. Past research has demonstrated that different professions working in the legal system cannot agree on the definition of insanity (Weinstein & Geiger, 2003). However,…

  15. Clinical Presentation of General Paralysis of the Insane in a Dutch Psychiatric Hospital, 1924-1954.

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    Daey Ouwens, Ingrid M; Lens, C Elisabeth; Fiolet, Aernoud T L; Ott, Alewijn; Koehler, Peter J; Verhoeven, Willem M A

    2015-01-01

    General paralysis of the insane (GPI) or dementia paralytica was once a fatal complication of syphilitic infection and a major reason for psychiatric hospitalization. Nowadays, physicians consider GPI to be exceptional. It should be noted, however, that syphilis re-emerged worldwide at the turn of the 20th to 21st century and a revival of GPI can, therefore, be expected. Advanced diagnosis is crucial in that treatment in the early, inflammatory phase is warranted before irreversible tissue damage occurs. Therefore, a renewed clinical awareness of the broad spectrum of psychiatric and neurologic signs and symptoms of GPI is needed. In this historical cohort study, comprising 105 patients with GPI admitted to the Dutch Vincent van Gogh Psychiatric Hospital in the period 1924-1954, the clinical presentation of this invalidating disorder is investigated and described in detail.

  16. Neuroscience, ethics and legal responsibility: the problem of the insanity defense. Commentary on "The ethics of neuroscience and the neuroscience of ethics: a phenomenological-existential approach".

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    Smith, Steven R

    2012-09-01

    The insanity defense presents many difficult questions for the legal system. It attracts attention beyond its practical significance (it is seldom used successfully) because it goes to the heart of the concept of legal responsibility. "Not guilty by reason of insanity" generally requires that as a result of mental illness the defendant was unable to distinguish right from wrong at the time of the crime. The many difficult and complex questions presented by the insanity defense have led some in the legal community to hope that neuroscience might help resolve some of these problems, but that hope is not likely to be realized.

  17. Expert testimony and the effects of a biological approach, psychopathy, and juror attitudes in cases of insanity.

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    Rendell, Jariel A; Huss, Matthew T; Jensen, Maren L

    2010-01-01

    Amid growing psychological controversy and legal interest surrounding the uses of PCL-R and biological evidence in the legal system, this mock jury study assessed the effects of PCL-R and biological evidence on outcomes in an insanity defense case. A sample of 428 undergraduates read a trial transcript of an insanity defense murder case. Three variables of interest were manipulated: rebuttal illness (no mental illness, personality disorder, or psychopathy), evidentiary basis (biological or psychological), and evidentiary strength (moderately strong or moderately weak). Consistent with the hypotheses, biological evidence was more persuasive than psychological evidence, and the rebuttal was slightly more successful when the prosecution labeled the defendant as a "psychopath" than when they described him simply as "not mentally ill." 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. [The concept of insanity in Danish penal and mental health codes].

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    Brandt-Christensen, Mette; Bertelsen, Aksel

    2010-04-26

    The medical terms insanity and psychosis are used synonymously to describe a condition with substantial changes in the "total" personality and loss of realism. In the 10th revision of the diagnostic classification system ICD-10 (1994) the intention was to replace the term "psychosis" with "psychotic" to indicate the presence of hallucinations and delusions. However, in Danish legislation - most importantly in the penal code and the Mental Health Act - the term "insanity" is still in use. This difference has lead to diagnostic uncertainty, especially in clinical and forensic psychiatric practice.

  19. From stack-firing to pyromania: medico-legal concepts of insane arson in British, US and European contexts, c. 1800-1913. Part I.

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    Andrews, Jonathan

    2010-09-01

    This article surveys evolving and competing medico-legal concepts of pyromania and insane arson. Exploiting evidence from medical jurisprudence, medico-legal publications, medical lexicography and case histories, it seeks to explicate the key positions in contemporary professional debates concerning arson and mental derangement. A major focus is the application of the doctrines of moral and partial insanity, monomania, instinctive insanity and irresistible impulse to understandings of pyromania and insane arson. The limited extent to which mental defect provided a satisfactory diagnosis and exculpatory plea for morbid arson is also explored. Additionally, this article compares and contrasts contemporary debates about other special manias, especially kleptomania. Part 2 will be published in the next issue, History of Psychiatry 21 (4).

  20. If the Moon Smiles on the Mappers of Madness: A Critique of the Cartographers of Insanity in Chandani Lokug's If the Moon Smiled

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    Anway Mukhopadhyay

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In her novel, If the Moon Smiled, Chandani Lokuge, the Sri Lankan-Australian writer, presents us with a madwoman figure whose gendered body, it can be argued, reflects the symbolic crisscrossing between the body as a 'bounded system' and the nation's territory as a bounded space. The constrictions that this boundedness and embodiedness entail, along with their various cultural encodings, are deftly and subtly treated in Lokuge's novel. The madwoman, Manthri, in the narrative, challenges many of our received ideas about place and displacement, and more importantly, sanity and insanity. Again, the novel stages a metaphorical interplay between the topoi of (gendered insanity and political insanity, social 'normalization'(a la Michel Foucault of the sexed body and political normalization of the nation's territorial body. The present article seeks to explore all these themes from the vantage point of gender. At the same time, it also interrogates the political dimension of the 'ethics of sexual difference'(a la Luce Irigaray. The main objective of this article is to situate a diasporic text within the problematic no-man's-land between place and displacement, sanity and insanity, dissent and dismemberment, Self and Other(individual/national/cultural.

  1. 37 CFR 1.43 - When the inventor is insane or legally incapacitated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false When the inventor is insane... Processing Provisions Who May Apply for A Patent § 1.43 When the inventor is insane or legally incapacitated. In case an inventor is insane or otherwise legally incapacitated, the legal representative...

  2. Forensic psychiatry and the birth of the criminal insane asylum in modern Italy.

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    Gibson, Mary

    2014-01-01

    This paper focuses on the creation of the criminal insane asylum in Italy between unification in 1861 and World War I. The establishment of criminal insane asylums was a triumph of the positivist criminology of Cesare Lombroso, who advocated for an institution to intern insane criminals in his classic work, Criminal Man (1876). As a context for the analysis of the birth of the criminal insane asylum in Italy, this essay also outlines the history of the insanity plea in Italian criminal law and the young discipline of psychiatry during the fifty years after Italian unification. © 2013.

  3. Pediatric psychotropic medication initiation and adherence: a literature review based on social exchange theory.

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    Hamrin, Vanya; McCarthy, Erin M; Tyson, Veda

    2010-08-01

    Psychotropic medication initiation and adherence is an identified problem. This literature review explores factors that determine families' decisions to initiate, sustain, or discontinue use of psychotropic medication in children and adolescents. Social exchange theory is used as a framework to explore decisions to initiate and adhere to psychotropic medications. Contributing factors related to psychotropic medication initiation, adherence, and discontinuation are explored. Themes in the literature encompassing costs and benefits of psychotropic medication adherence include family experiences with adverse effects, previous psychotropic medication experience, medication psychoeducation, stigma, societal views about psychotropic medication, particular diagnosis, the effect of comorbid diagnosis on adherence, attitudes and beliefs about medication by both children and parents, and relationships with the provider. The impact of family demographics including parent gender, age of the child, ethnicity, and parent educational level on psychotropic medication adherence is evaluated. International and U.S. studies from Medline, Cumulative Index for Nursing and Allied Health Literature and PsychInfo evaluating medication initiation and adherence in the pediatric psychiatric population and social exchange theory was incorporated from relevant textbook resources. Rewards experienced from medication treatment include improvement in symptoms, school performance and family relationships, and reduced level of parenting stress. Identified costs include impact of adverse side effects, social stigma, lack of response, fears of addiction, and changing the child's personality. Acceptance of the diagnosis influences adherence while medication education has varying effects. Families' attitudes, beliefs and perceptions about psychiatric illness and treatment play a large role in medication treatment decisions. A trusting provider relationship has a positive effect on adherence

  4. 精神病人强制医疗程序立法之不足与完善%Insufifciency in and Perfection of Legislation Concerning the Compulsory Medical Treatment Procedure of the Insane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张斌; 浦娟娟

    2014-01-01

    2012年新《刑事诉讼法》在第四章中规定了对依法不负刑事责任的精神病人的强制医疗程序,该规定在很大程度上弥补了《刑法》第18条有关精神病人强制医疗仅有实体法规定但欠缺程序法规范的不足。同时,强制医疗司法化的转变也更有利于兼顾精神病人的权益及社会的公共安全。但是,强制医疗程序在适用对象、决定权的归属、权利救济、检察监督等诸多细节方面尚有待更明确的界定和完善。%Special procedure contents is added to the new Criminal Procedure Law enacted in 2012, the fourth chapter of which stipulates the compulsory medical treatment procedure of the insane who do not bear criminal responsibilities. This stipulation has made up the insufficiency in the 18th article of Criminal Law concerning the compulsory treatment procedure. Meanwhile, the judicial change in the compulsory medical treatment is conducive to the protection of rights of the insane and the public security. However, the objects of the compulsory medical treatment procedure, attachment of the right, the right of relief, the supervision of the prosecution units and so on are waiting to be deifned in details and perfected.

  5. The insanity defense: Related issues

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    Asokan, T. V.

    2016-01-01

    For the past 150 years, there is no change in the understanding and knowledge other than autonomy and capacity to choose the right and wrong for criminal liability. The alternative concept that human behavior is the result of an interaction between biological and environmental factors other than free choice failed to impress the criminal justice system because of a direct threat to a society's deep seated need to blame someone than themselves for criminal harms that occur. The insanity defense has a long history, and is evolved after many tests that have been tried and tested. McNaughton's rules stressed on “understandability of right and wrong” and “intellectual” rather than a moral or affective definition dominated in its formulation. Lack of control and irresistible drives or impulses were neglected Going by the current understanding of neurological evidences of compulsion and lack of impulse control, rationality tests without the inclusion of lack of control, seem to be outdated. Separate “Control determination” than the “Rationality determination” by the jurors may improve the accuracy of Juror's categorizations. There is a suggestion that Relevance ratio is ideal for ‘Evidentiary relevance” and there should be a quality control on expert testimonies. With progress in neuroscience, the law may need to abandon or alter some of its current assumptions about the nature of voluntary conduct, which underlies various defenses PMID:28216769

  6. The theory of planned behaviour in medical education: a model for integrating professionalism training.

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    Archer, Ray; Elder, William; Hustedde, Carol; Milam, Andrea; Joyce, Jennifer

    2008-08-01

    Teaching and evaluating professionalism remain important issues in medical education. However, two factors hinder attempts to integrate curricular elements addressing professionalism into medical school training: there is no common definition of medical professionalism used across medical education, and there is no commonly accepted theoretical model upon which to integrate professionalism into the curriculum. This paper proposes a definition of professionalism, examines this definition in the context of some of the previous definitions of professionalism and connects this definition to the attitudinal roots of professionalism. The problems described above bring uncertainty about the best content and methods with which to teach professionalism in medical education. Although various aspects of professionalism have been incorporated into medical school curricula, content, teaching and evaluation remain controversial. We suggest that intervening variables, which may augment or interfere with medical students' implementation of professionalism knowledge, skills and, therefore, attitudes, may go unaddressed. We offer a model based on the theory of planned behaviour (TPB), which describes the relationships of attitudes, social norms and perceived behavioural control with behaviour. It has been used to predict a wide range of behaviours, including doctor professional behaviours. Therefore, we propose an educational model that expands the TPB as an organisational framework that can integrate professionalism training into medical education. We conclude with a discussion about the implications of using this model to transform medical school curricula to develop positive professionalism attitudes, alter the professionalism social norms of the medical school and increase students' perceived control over their behaviours.

  7. Toward a systematic and informational theory of medical diagnostic process.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Raimondo

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available La Teoría General de Sistemas de Bertalanffy creó la posibilidad de lograr la comprensión regular de una realidad y de los cambios que en ella ocurren, suponiendo que alguna parte de tal realidad pueda ser aislada como un sistema. Por su parte, Prigogine estableció que es posible asumir que sistemas complejos pueden mantener incrementos evolucionarios de orden y energía opuestos a la entropía creciente en el sistema. A su vez, Rimoldi definió el proceso diagnóstico como de tipo informacional para reducir incertidumbre. Desde estos puntos de partida, se postula en el presente trabajo que un correcto proceso diagnóstico posee una equivalencia significativa entre la situación clínica de un paciente y la comprensión que el médico logra acerca de ella. También se postula que ambos comparten objetivos: reducir la incertidumbre - entropía en la condición del paciente. Sobre estas bases se propone una clasificación general acerca de los pasos del proceso diagnóstico. Además, como ejemplo práctico, se realiza una aplicación de esa clasificación para cuatro de los procedimientos más generales utilizables para evaluar proceso diagnóstico.

  8. Therapeutic landscapes and postcolonial theory: a theoretical approach to medical tourism.

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    Buzinde, Christine N; Yarnal, Careen

    2012-03-01

    This paper draws on two conceptual frameworks, therapeutic landscapes and postcolonial theory, to discuss aspects of medical tourism not addressed in extant literature. Building on the intersection between postcolonial and therapeutic landscapes scholarship, it highlights inequalities related to the production of national therapeutic landscapes located in postcolonial regions as well as their discursive (re)positioning as medical tourism destinations. As a framework, therapeutic landscapes can facilitate an understanding of medical tourism sites as curative spaces which combine modern and alternative forms of medicine with travel and leisure. Postcolonial theory critiques the economic, moral and cultural tensions emerging from the intersection between corporations that provide cheaper and more attractive medical services, and the nations on the periphery struggling to offer high medical standards that may not be accessible to their own local populations. In an effort to enhance scholarship on medical tourism, these conceptual frameworks are offered as points of departure, rather than sites of arrival, through which critical dialog on medical tourism can be sustained and broadened. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. 'Insane criminals' and the 'criminally insane': criminal asylums in Norway, 1895-1940.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Hilde

    2017-02-01

    This article looks into the establishment and development of two criminal asylums in Norway. Influenced by international psychiatry and a European reorientation of penal law, the country chose to institutionalize insane criminals and criminally insane in separate asylums. Norway's first criminal asylum was opened in 1895, and a second in 1923, both in Trondheim. Both asylums quickly filled up with patients who often stayed for many years, and some for their entire lives. The official aim of these asylums was to confine and treat dangerous and disruptive lunatics. Goffman postulates that total institutions typically fall short of their official aims. This study examines records of the patients who were admitted to the two Trondheim asylums, in order to see if the official aims were achieved.

  10. [A non-classical approach to medical practices: Michel Foucault and Actor-Network Theory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bińczyk, E

    2001-01-01

    The text presents an analysis of medical practices stemming from two sources: Michel Foucault's conception and the research of Annemarie Mol and John Law, representatives of a trend known as Actor-Network Theory. Both approaches reveal significant theoretical kinship: they can be successfully consigned to the framework of non-classical sociology of science. I initially refer to the cited conceptions as a version of non-classical sociology of medicine. The identity of non-classical sociology of medicine hinges on the fact that it undermines the possibility of objective definitions of disease, health and body. These are rather approached as variable social and historical phenomena, co-constituted by medical practices. To both Foucault and Mol the main object of interest was not medicine as such, but rather the network of medical practices. Mol and Law sketch a new theoretical perspective for the analysis of medical practices. They attempt to go beyond the dichotomous scheme of thinking about the human body as an object of medical research and the subject of private experience. Research on patients suffering blood-sugar deficiency provide the empirical background for the thesis of Actor-Network Theory representatives. Michel Foucault's conceptions are extremely critical of medical practices. The French researcher describes the processes of 'medicalising' Western society as the emergence of a new type of power. He attempts to sensitise the reader to the ethical dimension of the processes of medicalising society.

  11. Insane in the membrane: a structural perspective of MLKL function in necroptosis.

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    Petrie, Emma J; Hildebrand, Joanne M; Murphy, James M

    2017-02-01

    Necroptosis (or 'programmed necrosis') is a caspase-independent cell death pathway that operates downstream of death receptors, including Tumour Necrosis Factor Receptor-1 (TNFR1), and the Toll-like receptors, TLR3 and TLR4. Owing to its immunogenicity, necroptosis has been attributed roles in the pathogenesis of several diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease and the tissue damage arising from ischaemic-reperfusion injuries. Only over the past 7 years has the core machinery of this pathway, the receptor-interacting protein kinase-3 (RIPK3) and the pseudokinase, Mixed Lineage Kinase domain-Like (MLKL), been defined. Our current understanding of the pathway is that RIPK3-mediated phosphorylation activates cytoplasmic MLKL, which is the most terminal known effector in the pathway, leading to MLKL's oligomerisation, translocation to, and permeabilisation of, the plasma membrane. Here, we discuss the insights gleaned from structural and biophysical studies of MLKL and highlight the known unknowns surrounding MLKL's mechanism of action and activation.

  12. Effecting change through dialogue: Habermas' theory of communicative action as a tool in medical lifestyle interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walseth, Liv Tveit; Schei, Edvin

    2011-02-01

    Adjustments of everyday life in order to prevent disease or treat illness afflict partly unconscious preferences and cultural expectations that are often difficult to change. How should one, in medical contexts, talk with patients about everyday life in ways that might penetrate this blurred complexity, and help people find goals and make decisions that are both compatible with a good life and possible to accomplish? In this article we pursue the question by discussing how Habermas' theory of communicative action can be implemented in decision-making processes in general practice. The theory of deliberative decision-making offers practical guidelines for what to talk about and how to do it. For a decision to be rooted in patients' everyday life it has to take into consideration the patient's practical circumstances, emotions and preferences, and what he or she perceives as ethically right behaviour towards other people. The aim is a balanced conversation, demonstrating respect, consistency and sincerity, as well as offering information and clarifying reasons. Verbalising reasons for one's preferences may increase awareness of values and norms, which can then be reflected upon, producing decisions rooted in what the patient perceives as good and right behaviour. The asymmetry of medical encounters is both a resource and a challenge, demanding patient-centred medical leadership, characterised by empathy and ability to take the patient's perspective. The implementation and adjustments of Habermas' theory in general practice is illustrated by a case story. Finally, applications of the theory are discussed.

  13. The theory of planned behaviour explains intentions to use antiresorptive medication after a fragility fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sale, Joanna E M; Cameron, Cathy; Thielke, Stephen; Meadows, Lynn; Senior, Kevin

    2017-06-01

    Our objective was to ascertain whether the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) explains patient intentions to use antiresorptive medication after a fracture. A qualitative study was conducted with English-speaking members of the Canadian Osteoporosis Patient Network (COPN) who had sustained a fragility fracture at 50+ years of age and were not taking antiresorptive medication at the time of that fracture. Questions during a 1-h telephone interview were guided by the domains of the TPB: they addressed the antecedent constructs regarding antiresorptive medication (attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived behavioural control) as well as intentions regarding antiresorptive medication use. We created a coding template a priori based on the TPB domains and applied this template to the interview data. Twenty-six eligible participants (24 females, 2 males) aged 51-89 completed an interview. The TPB appeared to be predictive of intentions in 19 (73%) participants. In the majority of participants where the TPB did not appear to be predictive (57%), a positive attitude toward antiresorptive medication was the most important antecedent variable in determining intentions. The TPB appeared to be predictive of intentions to use antiresorptive medication among individuals who had experienced a fragility fracture. Attitudes towards medication were especially important.

  14. Why assessment in medical education needs a solid foundation in modern test theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauber, Stefan K; Hecht, Martin; Nouns, Zineb M

    2017-03-16

    Despite the frequent use of state-of-the-art psychometric models in the field of medical education, there is a growing body of literature that questions their usefulness in the assessment of medical competence. Essentially, a number of authors raised doubt about the appropriateness of psychometric models as a guiding framework to secure and refine current approaches to the assessment of medical competence. In addition, an intriguing phenomenon known as case specificity is specific to the controversy on the use of psychometric models for the assessment of medical competence. Broadly speaking, case specificity is the finding of instability of performances across clinical cases, tasks, or problems. As stability of performances is, generally speaking, a central assumption in psychometric models, case specificity may limit their applicability. This has probably fueled critiques of the field of psychometrics with a substantial amount of potential empirical evidence. This article aimed to explain the fundamental ideas employed in psychometric theory, and how they might be problematic in the context of assessing medical competence. We further aimed to show why and how some critiques do not hold for the field of psychometrics as a whole, but rather only for specific psychometric approaches. Hence, we highlight approaches that, from our perspective, seem to offer promising possibilities when applied in the assessment of medical competence. In conclusion, we advocate for a more differentiated view on psychometric models and their usage.

  15. Designing a Digital Medical Management Training Simulator Using Distributed Cognition Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Rybing, Jonas; Prytz, Erik; Hornwall, Johan; Nilsson, Helene; Jonson, Carl-Oscar; Bång, Magnus

    2017-01-01

    Background Training of medical professionals is important to improve care during mass-causality events. Therefore, it is essential to extend knowledge on how to design valid and usable simulation-based training environments. Purpose This article investigates how distributed cognition and simulation theory concepts can guide design of simulation-based training environments. We present the design and user evaluation of DigEmergo, a simulator for training and assessing emergency medicine managem...

  16. Ethnic Differences And Motivation Based On Maslow’s Theory At a MedicaL University

    OpenAIRE

    Jagmohni Kaur Sidhu

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: Motivation in Malaysia is to a largeextent influenced by the value system amongst allMalaysians. Being able to motivate employees is one ofthe important keys to the success of the organization.In this paper, an attempt was made to look into theneeds of employees in organizations and in particular,the needs based on Maslow’s theory on motivation. Subjects and Methods: Employees which consisted ofboth academic and administrative employees of theInternational Medical University (...

  17. [The rights of criminally insane individuals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Ludmila Cerqueira; Lima, Isabel Maria Sampaio Oliveira; Alves, Vânia Sampaio

    2007-09-01

    The Psychiatric Reform Movement has supported proposals to reorient the hegemonic mental health care model. In Brazil, a facility for the criminally insane was created, called the Custody and Psychiatric Treatment Hospital (CPTH). The maintenance of such a structure, known as total institutionalization, has reinforced individual exclusion, limiting the patients' social rehabilitation. This article discusses the right to health in the CPTH from a human rights perspective. The advances achieved in Brazil under the National Mental Health Policy have failed to include reorientation of the care provided in such facilities for the criminally insane. The institution has remained an isolationist asylum, reflecting a historical denial of human rights. Progress in policy, per se, does not guarantee the materialization of recent strides gained through the Psychiatric Reform, particularly in relation to criminals with mental disorders. The state, through shared responsibility with society, should promote the effective reorientation of the health care model for these individuals, whose criminal responsibility should be acknowledged, while providing simultaneously for specialized care. Respect for human rights is not synonymous with impunity.

  18. Complementary medicines in medicine: Conceptualising terminology among Australian medical students using a constructivist grounded theory approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templeman, Kate; Robinson, Anske; McKenna, Lisa

    2015-02-01

    Terminology around the use of complementary medicines (CM) within medical discourse is ambiguous. Clear collective discourse within the medical context is required. This study reports the findings of a Constructivist Grounded Theory Method study used to explore medical students' conceptualisation of terminology and associated value components around CMs as evidenced within their discourse community. The results show that terminology surrounding CMs within medicine is politically charged and fraught with value judgements. Terms used to describe CMs were considered, many of which were deemed problematic. Categorisation of specific medicines was also deemed inappropriate in certain contexts. Conceptualisation of CM terminology, categorisation and value implications, discriminated between levels of evidence for CMs and provided insights into the social change of medicine towards emergence of an evidence-based integrative approach. The results show that terminology surrounding CM is a social construct consistent with fluid conceptualisation and operationalisation in different social contexts.

  19. A critical theory of medical discourse: how patients and health professionals deal with social problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waitzkin, H; Britt, T

    1989-01-01

    Criticism of social context does not generally appear in medical encounters. When contextual issues arise in medical discourse, messages of ideology and social control may become apparent, usually without the conscious awareness of the participants. By easing the physical or psychological impact of contextual difficulties, or by encouraging patients' conformity to mainstream expectations of desirable behavior, encounters with doctors can help win patients' consent to troubling social conditions. Seen in this light, doctor-patient encounters become micropolitical situations that do not typically encourage explicit statements or actions by health professionals to change contextual sources of their patients' difficulties. A critical theory influenced by structuralism suggests that the surface meanings of signs in medical discourse prove less important than their structural relationships. In addition, a theoretical approach adopting elements of post-structuralism and Marxist literary criticism emphasizes the marginal, absent, or excluded elements of medical discourse. Contextual features that shape a text include social class, sex, age, and race. Through the underlying structure of medical discourse, contextual problems are expressed, marginalized, and managed.

  20. Use of the SADS Diagnostic Interview in Evaluating Legal Insanity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Richard; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Examined clinical usefulness of the Schedule of Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia (SADS) diagnostic interview in evaluations of criminal responsibility. Findings, based on 78 evaluations from a forensic clinic, indicated that SADS successfully differentiated between sane and insane evaluatees. Differences were primarily in severity of symptoms…

  1. [A method for the medical image registration based on the statistics samples averaging distribution theory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Peng; Yao, Dezhong; Luo, Fen

    2005-08-01

    The registration method based on mutual information is currently a popular technique for the medical image registration, but the computation for the mutual information is complex and the registration speed is slow. In engineering process, a subsampling technique is taken to accelerate the registration speed at the cost of registration accuracy. In this paper a new method based on statistics sample theory is developed, which has both a higher speed and a higher accuracy as compared with the normal subsampling method, and the simulation results confirm the validity of the new method.

  2. Applying the theory of constraints to the logistics service of medical records of a hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor-G. Aguilar-Escobar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Management of patient records in a hospital is of major importance, for its impact both on the quality of care and on the associated costs. Since this process is circular, the prevention of the building up of bottlenecks is especially important. Thus, the objective of this paper was to analyze whether the Theory of Constraints (TOC can be useful to the logistics of medical records in hospitals. The paper is based on a case study conducted about the 2007-2011 period in the Medical Records Logistics Service at the Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena in Seville (Spain. From April 2008, a set of actions in the clinical record logistics system were implemented based on the application of TOC principles. The results obtained show a significant increase in the level of service and employee productivity, as well as a reduction of cost and the number of patients’ complaints.

  3. Making sense of medically unexplained symptoms in general practice: a grounded theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Louise

    2013-06-01

    Background General practitioners often encounter patients with medically unexplained symptoms. These patients share many common features, but there is little agreement about the best diagnostic framework for describing them. Aims This study aimed to explore how GPs make sense of medically unexplained symptoms. Design Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 24 GPs. Each participant was asked to describe a patient with medically unexplained symptoms and discuss their assessment and management. Setting The study was conducted among GPs from teaching practices across Australia. Methods Participants were selected by purposive sampling and all interviews were transcribed. Iterative analysis was undertaken using constructivist grounded theory methodology. Results GPs used a variety of frameworks to understand and manage patients with medically unexplained symptoms. They used different frameworks to reason, to help patients make sense of their suffering, and to communicate with other health professionals. GPs tried to avoid using stigmatising labels such as 'borderline personality disorder', which were seen to apply a 'layer of dismissal' to patients. They worried about missing serious physical disease, but managed the risk by deliberately attending to physical cues during some consultations, and focusing on coping with medically unexplained symptoms in others. They also used referrals to exclude serious disease, but were wary of triggering a harmful cycle of uncoordinated care. Conclusion GPs were aware of the ethical relevance of psychiatric diagnoses, and attempted to protect their patients from stigma. They crafted helpful explanatory narratives for patients that shaped their experience of suffering. Disease surveillance remained an important role for GPs who were managing medically unexplained symptoms.

  4. [An insane dialogue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boer, Max; Brignole, Éric

    2015-01-01

    How should madness and in particular delusional manifestations be considered? The caregiver's perception of delirium has an impact on how they view the function of the caregiver in psychiatry. Should delirium be suppressed? Delirium is an individual phenomenon but the themes are linked to social issues. Must we not take into account everyone's "thresholds" with regard to the place of delirium, in order to make it part of "living together". Two patients of a psychiatric care system discuss these issues.

  5. Personality Makes a Difference: Attachment Orientation Moderates Theory of Planned Behavior Prediction of Cardiac Medication Adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peleg, Shira; Vilchinsky, Noa; Fisher, William A; Khaskia, Abed; Mosseri, Morris

    2016-11-24

    To achieve a comprehensive understanding of patients' adherence to medication following acute coronary syndrome (ACS), we assessed the possible moderating role played by attachment orientation on the effects of attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived behavioral control (PBC), as derived from the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB; Ajzen, 1991), on intention and reported adherence. A prospective longitudinal design was employed. During hospitalization, ACS male patients (N = 106) completed a set of self-report questionnaires including sociodemographic variables, attachment orientation, and measures of TPB constructs. Six months post-discharge, 90 participants completed a questionnaire measuring adherence to medication. Attachment orientations moderated some of the predictions of the TPB model. PBC predicted intention and reported adherence, but these associations were found to be significant only among individuals with lower, as opposed to higher, attachment anxiety. The association between attitudes and intention was stronger among individuals with higher, as opposed to lower, attachment anxiety. Only among individuals with higher attachment avoidance, subjective norms were negatively associated with intention to take medication. Cognitive variables appear to explain both adherence intention and behavior, but differently, depending on individuals' attachment orientations. Integrating personality and cognitive models may prove effective in understanding patients' health behaviors. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Weygandt's On the Mixed States of Manic-Depressive Insanity: a translation and commentary on its significance in the evolution of the concept of bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvatore, Paola; Baldessarini, Ross J; Centorrino, Franca; Egli, Samy; Albert, Matthew; Gerhard, Angela; Maggini, Carlo

    2002-01-01

    Wilhelm Weygandt's Uber die Mischzustände des manisch-depressiven Irreseins (On the Mixed States of Manic-Depressive Insanity) describes and conceptualizes mixed states of mood, behavior, and thinking commonly found in manic-depressive disorders. These ideas emerged from Weygandt's service in the 1890s at the Psychiatric Clinic of the University of Heidelberg, directed by Emil Kraepelin. In the sixth (1899) edition of Kraepelin's influential textbook, the concept of manic-depressive illnesses underwent a fundamental shift from a complex group of syndromal subtypes to a single integrated disorder, widely known from the 1921 English translation of the eighth (1920) edition. In the 1899 edition, Kraepelin acknowledged Weygandt for a new section on mixed manic-depressive states within the new integrated view of manic-depressive disorder. We provide biographical notes on Weygandt, a little-known but historically important figure, as well as the first English translation of his monograph and interpretive summaries of his findings. We also consider whether Weygandt's important insight that the same person could be both manic and depressed not only at different times but even at the same time served as an important stimulus to Kraepelin's unified manic-depressive disorder concept, which survives as bipolar disorder a century later.

  7. [Insanity, life crises and longing for a "real life". On the discussion of deviant behavior and mental disorders in psychiatry of the 19th and 20th century].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanis-Seyfried, Uta

    On insanity, life crises and the longing for a "right life". A contribution to the discussion on the deviant behavior and mental disorders in the psychiatry of the 19th and 20th centuries using the example of patient stories. History of psychiatry, understood as social and cultural history, provides the framework for this micro-historical article. Using the example of three patients treated in Wuerttemberg or Baden psychiatric asylums between 1875 and 1912, the article focuses on the critical analysis of types of asylums, their practices of admissions, therapies and power relations between patients and staff. Ways of thinking and acting, subjective experiences and emotions are exemplified by patient records, personal testimonials and contemporary publications again by patients and staff. The article examines options of patients to influence the institutional daily asylum routine against the background of its complexity and dynamics. Borders, manipulations, malingering and querulous paranoia are at stake here. Furthermore, the article reflects various forms of social interaction with the power regulating therapeutic and disciplinary aspects against the backdrop of the "canons of rules" of the asylum as well as the contemporary political and legal framework.

  8. Task analysis of patients' medication-taking practice and the role of making sense: a grounded theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajcar, Jana

    2006-03-01

    Patients on long-term medications have varied medication-taking practices and complex and often unmet medication information needs. The objective of this qualitative study was to describe from the patient's perspective the medication-taking tasks performed by patients currently receiving long-term medications and then to hypothesize how these tasks relate to patients' medication information needs. In-depth semistructured interviews were conducted with individuals between the ages of 18 and 65, who had a college or university education, and who were on at least one long-term medication. Grounded theory approach was used for data gathering and data analysis. Maximum variation and theoretical sampling were used and the sample size was determined when theoretical saturation was reached in the core category. Interpretive and theoretical validity were ensured through member checking, through the use of the constant comparative method, and by a review of the results by a panel of pharmacists and physicians. Ten participants aged between 41 and 64 years were included in the study sample. The participants had between one and 7 chronic illnesses, duration of these illnesses to date varied from 1 year to 40 years, and each participant was taking between one and 13 medications. A model was developed that consists of 4 thematic categories: (a) making sense of medication taking, (b) medication-taking acts, (c) mediation-taking self-assessment, and (d) context of medication taking. The main category was making sense of medication taking that consisted of 3 subcategories: (a) nonproblematic mode, (b) problematic mode, and (c) stunned mode. The model explains how and why a patients' need for medication-taking education may vary because their medication-taking practices changes. The model also connects each category to medication information that people may need. Findings contribute to our understanding of medication-taking practice of individuals on long-term medication and have

  9. The Study of Electronic Medical Record Adoption in a Medicare Certified Home Health Agency Using a Grounded Theory Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Joy L.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative grounded theory study was to examine the experiences of clinicians in the adoption of Electronic Medical Records in a Medicare certified Home Health Agency. An additional goal for this study was to triangulate qualitative research between describing, explaining, and exploring technology acceptance. The experiences…

  10. How do physicians become medical experts? A test of three competing theories: distinct domains, independent influence and encapsulation models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Violato, Claudio; Gao, Hong; O'Brien, Mary Claire; Grier, David; Shen, E

    2017-07-12

    The distinction between basic sciences and clinical knowledge which has led to a theoretical debate on how medical expertise is developed has implications for medical school and lifelong medical education. This longitudinal, population based observational study was conducted to test the fit of three theories-knowledge encapsulation, independent influence, distinct domains-of the development of medical expertise employing structural equation modelling. Data were collected from 548 physicians (292 men-53.3%; 256 women-46.7%; mean age = 24.2 years on admission) who had graduated from medical school 2009-2014. They included (1) Admissions data of undergraduate grade point average and Medical College Admission Test sub-test scores, (2) Course performance data from years 1, 2, and 3 of medical school, and (3) Performance on the NBME exams (i.e., Step 1, Step 2 CK, and Step 3). Statistical fit indices (Goodness of Fit Index-GFI; standardized root mean squared residual-SRMR; root mean squared error of approximation-RSMEA) and comparative fit [Formula: see text] of three theories of cognitive development of medical expertise were used to assess model fit. There is support for the knowledge encapsulation three factor model of clinical competency (GFI = 0.973, SRMR = 0.043, RSMEA = 0.063) which had superior fit indices to both the independent influence and distinct domains theories ([Formula: see text] vs [Formula: see text] [[Formula: see text

  11. Ethnic Differences And Motivation Based On Maslow’s Theory At a MedicaL University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagmohni Kaur Sidhu

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Motivation in Malaysia is to a largeextent influenced by the value system amongst allMalaysians. Being able to motivate employees is one ofthe important keys to the success of the organization.In this paper, an attempt was made to look into theneeds of employees in organizations and in particular,the needs based on Maslow’s theory on motivation. Subjects and Methods: Employees which consisted ofboth academic and administrative employees of theInternational Medical University (IMU were surveyedusing a standard questionnaire. The aim of this studywas to compare which levels of Maslow’s hierarchy ofneeds theory had been fulfilled and which needs wereyet to be fulfilled in the different ethnic groups at IMU. Results: Amongst the males, the Chinese and Indianethnic groups placed most emphasis on the esteem needsand on self-actualization needs. The Malay males gaveimportance to Safety needs. Amongst the female ethnicgroups, all three groups placed most importance on theesteem needs and self-actualization needs. The Chinesefemales scored the lowest for the Basic needs comparedto the Malay and Indian females. The Indian femalesscored the lowest for Social needs.Conclusion: Organisations should play an importantrole in the motivation of employees. Human resourcedevelopment is an integral part in the development ofits employees.

  12. Statewide survey of living arrangements for conditionally released insanity acquittees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novosad, David; Follansbee, Juliet; Banfe, Shelley; Bloom, Joseph D

    2014-09-01

    There is a large population (n =389) of insanity acquittees on monitored conditional release in Oregon. This article focuses on the living situation for these individuals, which can range from a secure residential treatment facility to independent living. This article will define all the different placement options available and then review the current living situation for all conditionally released insanity acquittees in the state of Oregon on a single day, February 1, 2014. This article shows that the majority of individuals on conditional release live in the most highly structured settings available. The article then ends with a discussion of these findings, including a comparison of current placement options, with previous descriptions in the literature demonstrating that current community options offer more structure and more individuals reside in structured settings than was previously the case. Current findings will be related to inpatient psychiatric bed reduction strategies and the question of possible transinstitutionalization.

  13. Care of the insane in Lübeck during the 17th and 18th centuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilling, Horst; Thomsen, Hans Peter; Hohagen, Fritz

    2010-12-01

    Only selected aspects of the history of the House of the Poor Insane in the Hanseatic Free City of Lübeck have been studied to date.This article presents the results of an entire source study of this small institution in the 17th and 18th centuries, and briefly also during the next 40 years after the opening of a new building. In addition to the minute-book of the Governors, now kept in the Lübeck Municipal Archives, the results are based primarily on the account-books,which illustrate the institution's social history and activities. Examples are given. During most of the 17th century, the House was generally rather like a prison for the insane, but at the end of this century and in the early 18th there was a reform phase.This was followed by phases of repression and 'containment' at the end of the 18th century and in the early 19th century, before a renewed reform by the medical profession.The findings for Lübeck are compared with the development of inpatient care in institutions elsewhere, and the decisive factors in Lübeck are discussed.

  14. Assessment of causal associations between illness and criminal acts in those who are acquitted by reason of insanity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeie, Christian Aarup; Rasmussen, Kirsten

    2015-02-24

    The court proceedings after the terrorist attacks on 22 July 2011 reignited the debate on the justification for having a rule that regulates the insanity defence exclusively on the basis of a medical condition – the medical principle. The psychological principle represents an alternative that requires a causal relationship between the psychosis and the acts committed. In this article we investigate rulings made by the courts of appeal where the accused have been found legally insane at the time of the act, and elucidate the extent to which a causal relationship between the illness and the act appears to be in evidence. Data have been retrieved from rulings by the courts of appeal published at lovdata.no, which include anonymised rulings. Searches were made for cases under Section 39 (verdict of special sanctions) and Section 44 (acquittal by reason of insanity) of the General Civil Penal Code. Court rulings in which a possible causal relationship could be considered were included. The included rulings were carefully assessed with regard to whether a causal relationship existed between the mental disorder of the accused at the time and the criminal act. The search returned a total of 373 rulings, of which 75 were included. The vast majority of the charges referred to serious crimes. Diagnoses under ICD-10 category codes F20-29 (schizophrenia, schizotypal and delusional disorders) were the most frequently occurring type. In 17 of the 75 rulings (23%), it was judged that no causal relationship between the illness and the act existed. In 25 of 26 cases that involved homicide, a causal relationship between the illness and the act was judged to be evident. The data may indicate that the medical principle results in impunity in a considerable number of rulings where the illness of the accused apparently has had no effect on the acts committed.

  15. Insanity, methamphetamine and psychiatric expertise in New Zealand courtrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thom, Katey; Finlayson, Mary; McKenna, Brian

    2011-06-01

    The use of methamphetamine in New Zealand has increased significantly over the last decade. Due to the potential of methamphetamine to induce, exacerbate and precipitate psychotic symptoms, this drug has also taken centre stage in several criminal trials considering the sanity of defendants. Highly publicised and often involving contested expert evidence, these criminal trials have illustrated the limits of using psychiatric expertise to answer legal questions. This article considers the implications of such cases in light of material from a qualitative study that aimed to generate insights into the difficulties forensic psychiatrists and their instructing lawyers face when providing expert evidence on the relationship between methamphetamine, psychosis and insanity. It reports material from 31 in-depth interviews with lawyers and forensic psychiatrists and observation of one criminal trial that considered the relationship between methamphetamine and legal insanity. The findings are correlated with the clinical and medico-legal literature on the topic and subjected to scrutiny through the lens of "sanism". The article concludes that the continued use of forensic psychiatry to meet the legal objectives of insanity, where methamphetamine is involved, has the potential to reinforce sanist attitudes and practices.

  16. Law & psychiatry: Does the constitution require an insanity defense?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appelbaum, Paul S

    2013-10-01

    Idaho is one of four states that have abolished the insanity defense. Hence, John Delling, on trial for two murders in Idaho, was unable to plead insanity or to argue that he lacked intent to kill, the only available option under Idaho law. After being sentenced to life in prison without parole, Delling challenged the constitutionality of Idaho's law. The state's supreme court rejected his appeal, holding that--despite the long history of the insanity defense and its widespread acceptance--there was no constitutional right to an insanity defense. Delling's petition to the U.S. Supreme Court was turned away, leaving the constitutional status of the insanity defense uncertain.

  17. Resourcing the clinical complementary medicine information needs of Australian medical students: Results of a grounded theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templeman, Kate; Robinson, Anske; McKenna, Lisa

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to identify Australian medical students' complementary medicine information needs. Thirty medical students from 10 medical education faculties across Australian universities were recruited. Data were generated using in-depth semi-structured interviews and constructivist grounded theory method was used to analyze and construct data. Students sought complementary medicine information from a range of inadequate sources, such as pharmacological texts, Internet searches, peer-reviewed medical journals, and drug databases. The students identified that many complementary medicine resources may not be regarded as objective, reliable, differentiated, or comprehensive, leaving much that medical education needs to address. Most students sought succinct, easily accessible, evidence-based information to inform safe and appropriate clinical decisions about complementary medicines. A number of preferred resources were identified that can be recommended and actively promoted to medical students. Therefore, specific, evidence-based complementary medicine databases and secondary resources should be subscribed and recommended to medical schools and students, to assist meeting professional responsibilities regarding complementary medicines. These findings may help inform the development of appropriate medical information resources regarding complementary medicines. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  18. Bakhtin's philosophy and medical practice--toward a semiotic theory of doctor-patient interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puustinen, R

    1999-01-01

    Doctor-patient interaction has gained increasing attention among sociologists and linguists during the last few decades. The problem with the studies performed so far, however, has been a lack of a theoretical framework which could bring together the various phenomena observed within medical consultations. Mikhail Bakhtin's philosophy of language offers us tools for studying medical practice as socio-cultural semiotic phenomenon. Applying Bakhtin's ideas of polyphonic, context-dependent and open-ended nature of human communication opens the possibilities to develop prevailing theoretical and empirical approaches to the study of medical consultations.

  19. Electronic medical records as tools for quality improvement in ambulatory practice: theory and a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ornstein, S M; Jenkins, R G; MacFarlane, L; Glaser, A; Snyder, K; Gundrum, T

    1998-11-01

    Information management is critical in today's health care environment. Traditional paper-based medical records are inadequate information management tools. Electronic medical records (EMRs) overcome many problems with paper records and are ideally suited to help physicians increase productivity and improve the quality of care they provide. The Department of Family Medicine at the Medical University of South Carolina uses the Practice Partner Patient Record EMR system. Department members have developed a quality improvement model based on this EMR system. The model has been used to improve care for acute bronchitis, diabetes mellitus, tobacco abuse, asthma, and postmenopausal osteoporosis.

  20. Unpacking insanity defence standards: An experimental study of rationality and control tests in criminal law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca K. Helm

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the impact of different legal standards on mock juror decisions concerning whether a defendant was guilty or not guilty by reason of insanity. Undergraduate students (N = 477 read a simulated case summary involving a murder case and were asked to make an insanity determination. The cases differed in terms of the condition of the defendant (rationality deficit or control deficit and the legal standard given to the jurors to make the determination (Model Penal Code, McNaughten or McNaughten plus a separate control determination. The effects of these variables on the insanity determination were investigated. Jurors also completed questionnaires measuring individualism and hierarchy attitudes and perceptions of facts in the case. Results indicate that under current insanity standards jurors do not distinguish between defendants with rationality deficits and defendants with control deficits regardless of whether the legal standard requires them to do so. Even defendants who lacked control were found guilty at equal rates under a legal standard excusing rationality deficits only and a legal standard excluding control and rationality deficits. This was improved by adding a control test as a partial defence, to be determined after a rationality determination. Implications for the insanity defence in the Criminal Justice System are discussed.

  1. On-the-Job Ethics – Proximity Morality Forming in Medical School: A grounded theory analysis using survey data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans O. Thulesius, MD, Ph.D.

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available On-the-job-ethics exist in all businesses and can also be called proximity morality forming. In this paper we propose that medical students take a proximity morality stance towards ethics education at medical school. This means that they want to form physician morality “on the job” instead of being taught ethics like any other subject. On-the-job-ethics for medical students involves learning ethics that is used when practicing ethics. Learning ethics includes comprehensive ethics courses in which quality lectures provide ethics grammar useful for the ethics practicing in attitude exercises and vignette reflections in tutored group discussions. On-the-job-ethics develops professional identity, handles diversity of religious and existential worldviews, trains students described as ethically naive, processes difficult clinical experiences, and desists negative role modeling from physicians in clinical or teaching situations. This grounded theory analysis was made from a questionnaire survey on attitudes to ethics education with 409 Swedish medical students participating. We analyzed over 8000 words of open-ended responses and multiplechoice questions using classic grounded theory procedures, but also compared questionnaire data using statistics such as multiple regression models. The paper gives an example of how grounded theory can be used with a limited amount of survey data.

  2. FRENDAK to PHENIS to BREIVIK: An Examination of the Imposed Insanity Defense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Donald Richie

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The imposition of the insanity defense is a complicated psycho-legal scenario. Globally, definitions of insanity differ from country to country. In a multitude of cases, a determination of insanity at the time of a criminal act means the offender will not be considered responsible for his or her action(s. In many jurisdictions, concerns have been raised that the insanity defense has been used to mitigate punishment, usually after a particularly heinous crime. In this review, the authors use three cases - FRENDAK, PHENIS, and BREIVIK to demonstrate how the imposition of the insanity defense has been used for legal purposes in the past and present. In an effort to give more background to each of the above-mentioned cases, the writers have provided some details to aid comprehension. The authors offer recommendations for the ethical forensic evaluator unburdened by partisan allegiance and invested in the search for truth. This review article relies on peer-reviewed articles available from PubMed, Meharry Online Library and legal dictionaries. We also cross-referenced reputable news sources to ensure the validity of the facts we present.

  3. Have motivation theories guided the development and reform of medical education curricula? A review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusurkar, Rashmi A; Croiset, Gerda; Mann, Karen V; Custers, Eugene; Ten Cate, Olle

    2012-06-01

    Educational psychology indicates that learning processes can be mapped on three dimensions: cognitive (what to learn), affective or motivational (why learn), and metacognitive regulation (how to learn). In a truly student-centered medical curriculum, all three dimensions should guide curriculum developers in constructing learning environments. The authors explored whether student motivation has guided medical education curriculum developments. The authors reviewed the literature on motivation theory related to education and on medical education curriculum development to identify major developments. Using the Learning-Oriented Teaching model as a framework, they evaluated the extent to which motivation theory has guided medical education curriculum developers. Major developments in the field of motivation theory indicate that motivation drives learning and influences students' academic performance, that gender differences exist in motivational mechanisms, and that the focus has shifted from quantity of motivation to quality of motivation and its determinants, and how they stimulate academic motivation. Major developments in medical curricula include the introduction of standardized and regulated medical education as well as problem-based, learner-centered, integrated teaching, outcome-based, and community-based approaches. These curricular changes have been based more on improving students' cognitive processing of content or metacognitive regulation than on stimulating motivation. Motivational processes may be a substantially undervalued factor in curriculum development. Building curricula to specifically stimulate motivation in students may powerfully influence the outcomes of curricula. The elements essential for stimulating intrinsic motivation in students, including autonomy support, adequate feedback, and emotional support, appear lacking as a primary aim in many curricular plans.

  4. Race, Apology, and Public Memory at Maryland's Hospital for the 'Negro' Insane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zosha Stuckey

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available To respond to a recent demand of the ACLU of Maryland, and to augment theories from Disability Incarcerated (2014 about the convergence of race, disability, and due process (or lack thereof, this essay analyzes the extent to which racism informed the creation of Maryland's Hospital for the 'Negro' Insane (Crownsville Hospital. In order to understand the extent of racism in Crownsville's earlier years, I will take into account 14 categories within conditions of confinement from 1921-1928 and compare them to the nearby, white asylum. Ultimately, the hospital joins the ranks of separate and unequal (Plessy vs. Ferguson institutions founded alongside a rhetoric of fear that the Baltimore Sun daily paper deemed "a Black invasion" of the city of Baltimore. Even more, I add to public memory of this racialized space invoking the rhetorical frame, as Kendall Phillips advises, of responsibility and apology (versus absolution within the context of present-day racial justice movements.

  5. Non-medical use of prescription stimulants for academic purposes among college students: a test of social learning theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Jason A; Ong, Julianne

    2014-11-01

    The current research examines whether measures associated with Akers' social learning theory are related to non-medical use of prescription stimulants for academic reasons among college students. We examine data from a sample of 549 undergraduate students at one public university in the Southeastern United States. We estimate several logistic regression models to test our hypotheses. The findings indicated that roughly 17% of students reported non-medical use of prescription stimulants for academic reasons during the past year. In separate models, all four of the social learning measures were significantly correlated to non-medical use. In the complete model, the risk of non-medical prescription stimulant use for academic reasons was increased for respondents who reported more of their friends used and also for respondents who believed that prescription stimulants were an effective study aid. The current research fills an important gap in the literature regarding theoretical explanations for non-medical prescription stimulant use. Given the high prevalence of non-medical prescription stimulant use and the known risks associated with non-medical use this research can help inform intervention strategies for college populations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A Theory-Based Approach for Developing Interventions to Change Patient Behaviours: A Medication Adherence Example from Paediatric Secondary Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemma Heath

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article we introduce a Health Psychology approach to changing patient behaviour, in order to demonstrate the value of Health Psychology professional practice as applied within healthcare settings. Health Psychologists are experts in understanding, predicting and changing health-related behaviours at the individual, group and population level. They combine psychological theory, research evidence and service-user views to design interventions to solve clinically relevant behavioural problems and improve health outcomes. We provide a pragmatic overview of a theory and evidence-based Intervention Mapping approach for developing, implementing and evaluating interventions to change health-related behaviour. An example of a real behaviour change intervention designed to improve medication adherence in an adolescent patient with poorly controlled asthma is described to illustrate the main stages of the intervention development process.

  7. Grounded theory in medical education research: AMEE Guide No. 70.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watling, Christopher J; Lingard, Lorelei

    2012-01-01

    Qualitative research in general and the grounded theory approach in particular, have become increasingly prominent in medical education research in recent years. In this Guide, we first provide a historical perspective on the origin and evolution of grounded theory. We then outline the principles underlying the grounded theory approach and the procedures for doing a grounded theory study, illustrating these elements with real examples. Next, we address key critiques of grounded theory, which continue to shape how the method is perceived and used. Finally, pitfalls and controversies in grounded theory research are examined to provide a balanced view of both the potential and the challenges of this approach. This Guide aims to assist researchers new to grounded theory to approach their studies in a disciplined and rigorous fashion, to challenge experienced researchers to reflect on their assumptions, and to arm readers of medical education research with an approach to critically appraising the quality of grounded theory studies.

  8. A survey of mindset theories of intelligence and medical error self-reporting among pediatric housestaff and faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jegathesan, Mithila; Vitberg, Yaffa M; Pusic, Martin V

    2016-02-11

    Intelligence theory research has illustrated that people hold either "fixed" (intelligence is immutable) or "growth" (intelligence can be improved) mindsets and that these views may affect how people learn throughout their lifetime. Little is known about the mindsets of physicians, and how mindset may affect their lifetime learning and integration of feedback. Our objective was to determine if pediatric physicians are of the "fixed" or "growth" mindset and whether individual mindset affects perception of medical error reporting.  We sent an anonymous electronic survey to pediatric residents and attending pediatricians at a tertiary care pediatric hospital. Respondents completed the "Theories of Intelligence Inventory" which classifies individuals on a 6-point scale ranging from 1 (Fixed Mindset) to 6 (Growth Mindset). Subsequent questions collected data on respondents' recall of medical errors by self or others. We received 176/349 responses (50 %). Participants were equally distributed between mindsets with 84 (49 %) classified as "fixed" and 86 (51 %) as "growth". Residents, fellows and attendings did not differ in terms of mindset. Mindset did not correlate with the small number of reported medical errors. There is no dominant theory of intelligence (mindset) amongst pediatric physicians. The distribution is similar to that seen in the general population. Mindset did not correlate with error reports.

  9. Building bridges between theory and practice in medical education using a design-based research approach: AMEE Guide No. 60.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolmans, Diana H J M; Tigelaar, D

    2012-01-01

    Medical education research has grown enormously over the past 20 years, but it does not sufficiently make use of theories, according to influential leaders and researchers in this field. In this AMEE Guide, it is argued that design-based research (DBR) studies should be conducted much more in medical education design research because these studies both advance the testing and refinement of theories and advance educational practice. In this Guide, the essential characteristics of DBR as well as how DBR differs from other approach such as formative evaluation are explained. It is also explained what the pitfalls and challenges of DBR are. The main challenges deal with how to insure that DBR studies reveal findings that are of a broader relevance than the local situation and how to insure that DBR contributes toward theory testing and refinement. An example of a series of DBR studies on the design of a teaching portfolio in higher education that is aimed at stimulating a teacher's professional development is described, to illustrate how DBR studies actually work in practice. Finally, it is argued that DBR-studies could play an important role in the advancement of theory and practice in the two broad domains of designing or redesigning work-based learning environments and assessment programs.

  10. Medical semiotics in the 18th century: a theory of practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, V

    1998-06-01

    Medical semiotics in the 18th century was more than a premodern form of diagnosis. Its structure allowed for the combination of empirically proven rules of instruction with the theoretical knowledge of the new sciences, employing the relation between the sign and the signified.

  11. Proximity morality in medical school – medical students forming physician morality "on the job": Grounded theory analysis of a student survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sallin Karl

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The value of ethics education have been questioned. Therefore we did a student survey on attitudes about the teaching of ethics in Swedish medical schools. Methods Questionnaire survey on attitudes to ethics education with 409 Swedish medical students participating. We analyzed > 8000 words of open-ended responses and multiple-choice questions using classic grounded theory procedures. Results In this paper we suggest that medical students take a proximity morality stance towards their ethics education meaning that they want to form physician morality "on the job". This involves comprehensive ethics courses in which quality lectures provide "ethics grammar" and together with attitude exercises and vignette reflections nurture tutored group discussions. Goals of forming physician morality are to develop a professional identity, handling diversity of religious and existential worldviews, training students described as ethically naive, processing difficult clinical experiences, and desisting negative role modeling from physicians in clinical or teaching situations, some engaging in "ethics suppression" by controlling sensitive topic discussions and serving students politically correct attitudes. Conclusion We found that medical students have a proximity morality attitude towards ethics education. Rather than being taught ethics they want to form their own physician morality through tutored group discussions in comprehensive ethics courses.

  12. Proximity morality in medical school--medical students forming physician morality "on the job": grounded theory analysis of a student survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thulesius, Hans O; Sallin, Karl; Lynoe, Niels; Löfmark, Rurik

    2007-08-06

    The value of ethics education have been questioned. Therefore we did a student survey on attitudes about the teaching of ethics in Swedish medical schools. Questionnaire survey on attitudes to ethics education with 409 Swedish medical students participating. We analyzed > 8000 words of open-ended responses and multiple-choice questions using classic grounded theory procedures. In this paper we suggest that medical students take a proximity morality stance towards their ethics education meaning that they want to form physician morality "on the job". This involves comprehensive ethics courses in which quality lectures provide "ethics grammar" and together with attitude exercises and vignette reflections nurture tutored group discussions. Goals of forming physician morality are to develop a professional identity, handling diversity of religious and existential worldviews, training students described as ethically naive, processing difficult clinical experiences, and desisting negative role modeling from physicians in clinical or teaching situations, some engaging in "ethics suppression" by controlling sensitive topic discussions and serving students politically correct attitudes. We found that medical students have a proximity morality attitude towards ethics education. Rather than being taught ethics they want to form their own physician morality through tutored group discussions in comprehensive ethics courses.

  13. Avoiding Evasion: Medical Ethics Education and Emotion Theory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    C. Leget

    2004-01-01

    .... It is argued that in order to avoid an attitude of evasion in medical ethics teaching, a philosophical theory of emotions is needed that is able to clarify on a conceptual level the ethical importance of emotions...

  14. The Epileptic Genius: The Use of Dostoevsky as Example in the Medical Debate over the Pathology of Genius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlkvist, Tobias

    2015-10-01

    This paper examines how Fyodor Dostoevsky was used as an example in the debate over genius as a pathological phenomenon in nineteenth century medicine and criminal anthropology. When Dostoevsky's novels became known in Western Europe medical interest in the relation between genius and insanity reached its pinnacle. A known epileptic, Dostoevsky was exceptionally well suited to illustrate Cesare Lombroso's theory of genius as an epileptoid psychosis. Dostoevsky was also claimed as an example by the rivalling Lyon school, whose representatives argued that Dostoevsky's life and works demonstrate that genius is a higher form of health rather than a pathological deviation.

  15. Remediation of at-risk medical students: theory in action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winston, K.A.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der; Scherpbier, A.J.J.A.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous work has shown that a programme that draws on a blend of theories makes a positive difference to outcomes for students who fail and repeat their first semester at medical school. Exploration of student and teacher perspectives revealed that remediation of struggling medical

  16. Remediation of at-risk medical students: theory in action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winston, K.A.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der; Scherpbier, A.J.J.A.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous work has shown that a programme that draws on a blend of theories makes a positive difference to outcomes for students who fail and repeat their first semester at medical school. Exploration of student and teacher perspectives revealed that remediation of struggling medical stud

  17. Eliminating mental disability as a legal criterion in deprivation of liberty cases: The impact of the Convention on the Rights of Persons With Disabilities on the insanity defense, civil commitment, and competency law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slobogin, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    A number of laws that are associated with deprivations of liberty, including the insanity defense, civil commitment, guardianship of the person and numerous competency doctrines in the criminal context, require proof of mental disability as a predicate. The Convention on the Rights of Persons With Disabilities commands signatory states to eliminate that predicate. Summarizing principles set out in my book Minding Justice: Laws That Deprive People With Mental Disability of Life and Liberty, I explain how this seemingly radical stance can be implemented. Specifically, this article proposes adoption of an "integrationist defense" in the criminal context, an "undeterrability requirement" when the state seeks preventive detention outside of the criminal process, and a "basic rationality and self-regard test" for incompetency determinations. None of these proposals requires proof of a mental disorder as a predicate condition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. More on pseudoscience in science and the case for psychiatric diagnosis. A critique of D.L. Rosenhan's "On Being Sane in Insane Places" and "The Contestual Nature of Psychiatric Diagnosis".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitzer, R L

    1976-04-01

    Rosenhan's 1973 article, "On Being Sane in Insane Places," was pseudoscience presented as science. Just as his pseudopatients were diagnosed at discharge as having "schizophrenia in remission", so a careful examination of this study's methods, results, and conclusions leads to a diagnosis of "logic in remission." Rosenhan's study proves that pseudopatients are not detected by psychiatrists as having simulated signs of mental illness and that the implementation of certain invalid research designs can make psychiatrists appear foolish. These rather unremarkable findings are irrelevant to the real problems of the reliability and validity of psychiatric diagnosis and only serve to obscure them. A correct interpretation of his own data contradicts his conclusions. There are purposes to psychiatric diagnosis that Rosenhan's article ignores. His more recent suggestion that certain requirements be met prior to the adoption of a new psychiatric classification system is unrealistic.

  19. MULTIPLE INTELLIGENCES THEORYA MILESTONE INNOVATION IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE TEACHING AT THE UNIVERSITY OF NIŠ MEDICAL SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataša Bakić-Mirić

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Theory of multiple intelligences is considered an innovation in both teaching and learning English language because it helps students develop all the eight intelligences that are grouped as verbal/linguistic, logical/mathematical, visual/spatial, bodily/kinesthetic, musical/rhythmic, interpersonal, intrapersonal and naturalist. The aforementioned intelligences are thought to represent ways in which individuals understand and perceive the world, solve problems and learn. Correspondingly, by focusing on the problem solving activities, teachers, by implementing theory of multiple intelligences encourage students not only to build-up their existing language knowledge but also learn new content and skills. The implementation of the theory of multiple intelligences in teaching the English language at the University of Niš Medical School has had a positive impact on learning English language and increased students' interest in language learning. Genarally speaking, this theory offers a better understanding of students’ intelligence and a greater appreciation of their strengths. It provides numerous opportunities for students to use and develop all the eight intelligences not just the few they excel in prior to enrolling a university or college.

  20. The Process of Parents' Decision-Making to Discharge Their Child against Medical Advice (DAMA: A grounded theory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikbakht Nasrabadi Alireza

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Discharge against medical advice (DAMA refers to the phenomenon that patient or the patient’s surrogate decides to leave the hospital before the attending physician confirms the patient is discharged. Children are much more vulnerable to such discharges. This process occurs with different mechanisms that identifying them can be helpful in reducing this phenomenon. We aimed to explore the process of parents' decision-making to discharge their child against medical advice. In-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 10 fathers, 10 mothers, 6 nurses and 3 physician assistants and the data were collected to the point of saturation. Grounded theory methodology was adopted for data collection and analysis. The results of qualitative analysis in the field of the parents' decisionmaking on the DAMA revealed 4 main themes: "lack of family-centered care", "disruption of the parenting process", "distrust to the medical team and center" and "psychological strategy of shirk responsibility for child care and treatment ". By providing family-centered care, adopting measures to empowering the families, developing the trust of parents to the health care team and developing a discharge plan from the beginning of children hospitalization with the cooperation of health care team and parents and considering all factors such as child's special health condition and parent's health related perceptions and beliefs, children will not be discharged against medical advice and will experience better outcomes.

  1. Nuclear Disarmament and the Insanity Defense: What Happened to Political Responsiveness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, John H.; Shaver, Kelly G.

    A study which explored the degree to which belief in a politically responsive/unresponsive world might be related to opinions concerning nuclear disarmament, the insanity defense, and women's rights is described. A total of 206 male and female undergraduates completed a 63-item questionnaire consisting of 46 Likert-format I-E items and 17 attitude…

  2. Decision theory on the quality evaluation of medical images; A teoria da decisao na avaliacao da qualidade da imagem medica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lessa, Patricia Silva

    2001-10-01

    The problem of quality has been a constant issue in every organization.One is always seeking to produce more, to do it at a lower cost, and to do it with better quality. However, in this country, there is no radiographic film quality control system for radiographic services. The tittle that actually gets done is essentially ad hoc and superficial. The implications of this gap, along with some other shortcomings that exist in process as a whole (the state of the x-ray equipment, the adequate to use in order to obtain a radiography, the quality of the film, the processing of the film, the brightness and homogeneity of the viewing boxes, the ability of the radiologist), have a very negative impact on the quality of the medical image, and, as result, to the quality of the medical diagnosis and therapy. It frequently happens that many radiographs have to be repeated, which leads to an increase of the patient's exposure to radiation, as well as of the cost of the procedure for the patient. Low quality radiographs that are not repeated greatly increase the probability of a wrong diagnosis, and consequently, of inadequate therapeutical procedures, thus producing increased incidence of bad outcomes and higher costs. The paradigm proposed in order to establish a system for the measurement of the image's quality is Decision Theory. The problem of the assessment of the image is studied by proposing a Decision Theory approach. The review of the literature reveals a great concern with the quality of the image, along with an absence of an adequate paradigm and several essentially empirical procedures. Image parameters are developed in order to formalize the problem in terms of Decision Theory, and various aspects of image digitalisation are exposed. Finally, a solution is presented, including a protocol for quality control. (author)

  3. From cure to custodianship of the insane poor in nineteenth-century Connecticut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodheart, Lawrence B

    2010-01-01

    Connecticut was the exception among the Northeastern and Middle Atlantic states in not founding a public institution for the insane until after the Civil War when it opened the Hospital for the Insane at Middletown in 1868, a facility previously neglected by scholars. The state had relied on the expedient of subsidizing the impoverished at the private Hartford Retreat for the Insane that overtaxed that institution and left hundreds untreated. Despite abundant evidence to the contrary, well meaning officials oversold the idea that the Middletown site would promote cures and be cost effective. A number of unanticipated consequences occurred that mirrored fundamental changes in nineteenth-century psychiatry. The new hospital swelled by 1900 to over 2,000 patients, the largest in New England. Custodianship at the monolithic hospital became the norm. The hegemony of monopoly capitalism legitimated the ruling idea that bigger institutions were better and was midwife to the birth of eugenic responses. Class based psychiatry--the few rich at the Retreat and the many poor at Middletown--was standard as it was in other aspects of the Gilded Age. Public policy toward the insane poor in Connecticut represents an outstanding example of the transition from antebellum romanticism to fin de siècle fatalism.

  4. Teaching Clinical (and Nonclinical) Psychology through Applications to the Legal System: Violence Risk Assessment and the Insanity Defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costanzo, Marina L.; Costanzo, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    The prediction of dangerousness and the insanity defense are two areas where psychologists provide research-based expertise to the courts. Teachers of psychology can use these topics to capture the attention of students and to show how psychological research and theory can inform and influence the legal system. Specifically, teachers can use the…

  5. Teaching Clinical (and Nonclinical) Psychology through Applications to the Legal System: Violence Risk Assessment and the Insanity Defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costanzo, Marina L.; Costanzo, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    The prediction of dangerousness and the insanity defense are two areas where psychologists provide research-based expertise to the courts. Teachers of psychology can use these topics to capture the attention of students and to show how psychological research and theory can inform and influence the legal system. Specifically, teachers can use the…

  6. Making sense of grounded theory in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Tara J T; Lingard, Lorelei A

    2006-02-01

    Grounded theory is a research methodology designed to develop, through collection and analysis of data that is primarily (but not exclusively) qualitative, a well-integrated set of concepts that provide a theoretical explanation of a social phenomenon. This paper aims to provide an introduction to key features of grounded theory methodology within the context of medical education research. In this paper we include a discussion of the origins of grounded theory, a description of key methodological processes, a comment on pitfalls encountered commonly in the application of grounded theory research, and a summary of the strengths of grounded theory methodology with illustrations from the medical education domain. The significant strengths of grounded theory that have resulted in its enduring prominence in qualitative research include its clearly articulated analytical process and its emphasis on the generation of pragmatic theory that is grounded in the data of experience. When applied properly and thoughtfully, grounded theory can address research questions of significant relevance to the domain of medical education.

  7. The Academic Medical Center Linear Disability Score (ALDS) item bank: item response theory analysis in a mixed patient population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Rebecca; Weisscher, Nadine; Glas, Cees A W; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G W; Vermeulen, Marinus; de Haan, Rob J; Lindeboom, Robert

    2005-12-29

    Currently, there is a lot of interest in the flexible framework offered by item banks for measuring patient relevant outcomes. However, there are few item banks, which have been developed to quantify functional status, as expressed by the ability to perform activities of daily life. This paper examines the measurement properties of the Academic Medical Center linear disability score item bank in a mixed population. This paper uses item response theory to analyse data on 115 of 170 items from a total of 1002 respondents. These were: 551 (55%) residents of supported housing, residential care or nursing homes; 235 (23%) patients with chronic pain; 127 (13%) inpatients on a neurology ward following a stroke; and 89 (9%) patients suffering from Parkinson's disease. Of the 170 items, 115 were judged to be clinically relevant. Of these 115 items, 77 were retained in the item bank following the item response theory analysis. Of the 38 items that were excluded from the item bank, 24 had either been presented to fewer than 200 respondents or had fewer than 10% or more than 90% of responses in the category 'can carry out'. A further 11 items had different measurement properties for younger and older or for male and female respondents. Finally, 3 items were excluded because the item response theory model did not fit the data. The Academic Medical Center linear disability score item bank has promising measurement characteristics for the mixed patient population described in this paper. Further studies will be needed to examine the measurement properties of the item bank in other populations.

  8. The Academic Medical Center Linear Disability Score (ALDS) item bank: item response theory analysis in a mixed patient population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Rebecca; Weisscher, Nadine; Glas, Cees AW; Dijkgraaf, Marcel GW; Vermeulen, Marinus; de Haan, Rob J; Lindeboom, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Background Currently, there is a lot of interest in the flexible framework offered by item banks for measuring patient relevant outcomes. However, there are few item banks, which have been developed to quantify functional status, as expressed by the ability to perform activities of daily life. This paper examines the measurement properties of the Academic Medical Center linear disability score item bank in a mixed population. Methods This paper uses item response theory to analyse data on 115 of 170 items from a total of 1002 respondents. These were: 551 (55%) residents of supported housing, residential care or nursing homes; 235 (23%) patients with chronic pain; 127 (13%) inpatients on a neurology ward following a stroke; and 89 (9%) patients suffering from Parkinson's disease. Results Of the 170 items, 115 were judged to be clinically relevant. Of these 115 items, 77 were retained in the item bank following the item response theory analysis. Of the 38 items that were excluded from the item bank, 24 had either been presented to fewer than 200 respondents or had fewer than 10% or more than 90% of responses in the category 'can carry out'. A further 11 items had different measurement properties for younger and older or for male and female respondents. Finally, 3 items were excluded because the item response theory model did not fit the data. Conclusion The Academic Medical Center linear disability score item bank has promising measurement characteristics for the mixed patient population described in this paper. Further studies will be needed to examine the measurement properties of the item bank in other populations. PMID:16381611

  9. The Academic Medical Center Linear Disability Score (ALDS item bank: item response theory analysis in a mixed patient population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vermeulen Marinus

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Currently, there is a lot of interest in the flexible framework offered by item banks for measuring patient relevant outcomes. However, there are few item banks, which have been developed to quantify functional status, as expressed by the ability to perform activities of daily life. This paper examines the measurement properties of the Academic Medical Center linear disability score item bank in a mixed population. Methods This paper uses item response theory to analyse data on 115 of 170 items from a total of 1002 respondents. These were: 551 (55% residents of supported housing, residential care or nursing homes; 235 (23% patients with chronic pain; 127 (13% inpatients on a neurology ward following a stroke; and 89 (9% patients suffering from Parkinson's disease. Results Of the 170 items, 115 were judged to be clinically relevant. Of these 115 items, 77 were retained in the item bank following the item response theory analysis. Of the 38 items that were excluded from the item bank, 24 had either been presented to fewer than 200 respondents or had fewer than 10% or more than 90% of responses in the category 'can carry out'. A further 11 items had different measurement properties for younger and older or for male and female respondents. Finally, 3 items were excluded because the item response theory model did not fit the data. Conclusion The Academic Medical Center linear disability score item bank has promising measurement characteristics for the mixed patient population described in this paper. Further studies will be needed to examine the measurement properties of the item bank in other populations.

  10. Making sense of medically unexplained symptoms in general practice: a grounded theory study

    OpenAIRE

    Stone, Louise

    2013-01-01

    Background General practitioners often encounter patients with medically unexplained symptoms. These patients share many common features, but there is little agreement about the best diagnostic framework for describing them.

  11. Developing a grounded theory for interprofessional collaboration acquisition using facilitator and actor perspectives in simulated wilderness medical emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Heather A; Reade, Maurianne; Marr, Marion; Jeeves, Nicholas

    2017-01-01

    Interprofessional collaboration is a complex process that has the potential to transform patient care for the better in urban, rural and remote healthcare settings. Simulation has been found to improve participants' interprofessional competencies, but the mechanisms by which interprofessionalism is learned have yet to be understood. A rural wilderness medicine conference (WildER Med) in northern Ontario, Canada with simulated medical scenarios has been demonstrated to be effective in improving participants' collaboration without formal interprofessional education (IPE) curriculum. Interprofessionalism may be taught through rural and remote medical simulation, as done in WildER Med where participants' interprofessional competencies improved without any formal IPE curriculum. This learning may be attributed to the informal and hidden curriculum. Understanding the mechanism by which this rural educational experience contributed to participants' learning to collaborate requires insight into the events before, during and after the simulations. The authors drew upon feedback from facilitators and patient actors in one-on-one interviews to develop a grounded theory for how collaboration is taught and learned. Sharing emerged as the core concept of a grounded theory to explain how team members acquired interprofessional collaboration competencies. Sharing was enacted through the strategies of developing common goals, sharing leadership, and developing mutual respect and understanding. Further analysis of the data and literature suggests that the social wilderness environment was foundational in enabling sharing to occur. Medical simulations in other rural and remote settings may offer an environment conducive to collaboration and be effective in teaching collaboration. When designing interprofessional education, health educators should consider using emergency response teams or rural community health teams to optimize the informal and hidden curriculum contributing to

  12. An Extended Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB Used to Predict Smoking Behavior Among a Sample of Iranian Medical Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karimy

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Smoking among the youth is an important public health concern. Although several studies have investigated the correlates of smoking behavior, no theory-based study has particularly assessed this problem among medical students. Objectives This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of the extended theory of planned behavior (TPB to predict smoking behavior among a sample of Iranian medical students. Patients and Methods This is a cross-sectional study carried out in Ahvaz, Iran, 2014. The data were collected through a self-administered questionnaire, which included items on demographics, smoking behavior, and components of the TPB model (attitude, subjective norms, perceived behavior control, and intention, and an added construct on smoking refusal skill. Data were analyzed using descriptive correlation, and linear regression statistics by SPSS, version 16. Results One hundred and seventy medical students with a mean age of 21.25 (SD = 2.9 years were enrolled in the study. Of them, 24 (13.5% students were smokers. All components of the TPB model and smoking refusal skill were statistically significant as to intention to smoke (P < 0.001. The TPB constructs with and without smoking refusal skill accounted for 77% (adjusted R2 and 78% of the variance observed for intention to smoke, respectively. The results also revealed the highest weight for perceived behavior control (β= -0.40. Conclusions The findings of this study indicated that all TPB variables are useful tools for prediction of the smoking behaviors among students. Particularly, students’ perceived behavioral control and attitudes towards smoking were found to be important determinants of smoking intentions. Thus, the findings could be used for planning effective tobacco control programs targeting University students.

  13. Avoiding evasion: medical ethics education and emotion theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leget, C

    2004-10-01

    Beginning with an exemplary case study, this paper diagnoses and analyses some important strategies of evasion and factors of hindrance that are met in the teaching of medical ethics to undergraduate medical students. Some of these inhibitions are inherent to ethical theories; others are connected with the nature of medicine or cultural trends. It is argued that in order to avoid an attitude of evasion in medical ethics teaching, a philosophical theory of emotions is needed that is able to clarify on a conceptual level the ethical importance of emotions. An approach is proposed with the help of the emotion theory Martha Nussbaum works out in her book Upheavals of thought. The paper ends with some practical recommendations.

  14. Change Theory for Accounting System Reform in Health Sector: A Case Study of Kerman University of Medical Sciences in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hossein Mehrolhasani

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundChange theories provide an opportunity for organizational managers to plan, monitor and evaluate changes using a framework which enable them, among others, to show a fast response to environmental fluctuations and to predict the changing patterns of individuals and technology. The current study aimed to explore whether the change in the public accounting system of the Iranian health sector has followed Kurt Lewin’s change theory or not. MethodsThis study which adopted a mixed methodology approach, qualitative and quantitative methods, was conducted in 2012. In the first phase of the study, 41 participants using purposive sampling and in the second phase, 32 affiliated units of Kerman University of Medical Sciences (KUMS were selected as the study sample. Also, in phase one, we used face-to-face in-depth interviews (6 participants and the quote method (35 participants for data collection. We used a thematic framework analysis for analyzing data. In phase two, a questionnaire with a ten-point Likert scale was designed and then, data were analyzed using descriptive indicators, principal component and factorial analyses. ResultsThe results of phase one yielded a model consisting of four categories of superstructure, apparent infrastructure, hidden infrastructure and common factors. By linking all factors, totally, 12 components based on the quantitative results showed that the state of all components were not satisfactory at KUMS (5.06±2.16. Leadership and management; and technology components played the lowest and the greatest roles in implementing the accrual accounting system respectively. ConclusionThe results showed that the unfreezing stage did not occur well and the components were immature, mainly because the emphasis was placed on superstructure components rather than the components of hidden infrastructure. The study suggests that a road map should be developed in the financial system based on Kurt Lewin’s change theory and

  15. Change theory for accounting system reform in health sector: a case study of kerman university of medical sciences in iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrolhassani, Mohammad Hossein; Emami, Mozhgan

    2013-11-01

    Change theories provide an opportunity for organizational managers to plan, monitor and evaluate changes using a framework which enable them, among others, to show a fast response to environmental fluctuations and to predict the changing patterns of individuals and technology. The current study aimed to explore whether the change in the public accounting system of the Iranian health sector has followed Kurt Lewin's change theory or not. This study which adopted a mixed methodology approach, qualitative and quantitative methods, was conducted in 2012. In the first phase of the study, 41 participants using purposive sampling and in the second phase, 32 affiliated units of Kerman University of Medical Sciences (KUMS) were selected as the study sample. Also, in phase one, we used face-to-face in-depth interviews (6 participants) and the quote method (35 participants) for data collection. We used a thematic framework analysis for analyzing data. In phase two, a questionnaire with a ten-point Likert scale was designed and then, data were analyzed using descriptive indicators, principal component and factorial analyses. The results of phase one yielded a model consisting of four categories of superstructure, apparent infrastructure, hidden infrastructure and common factors. By linking all factors, totally, 12 components based on the quantitative results showed that the state of all components were not satisfactory at KUMS (5.06±2.16). Leadership and management; and technology components played the lowest and the greatest roles in implementing the accrual accounting system respectively. The results showed that the unfreezing stage did not occur well and the components were immature, mainly because the emphasis was placed on superstructure components rather than the components of hidden infrastructure. The study suggests that a road map should be developed in the financial system based on Kurt Lewin's change theory and the model presented in this paper underpins the change

  16. Change Theory for Accounting System Reform in Health Sector: A Case Study of Kerman University of Medical Sciences in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrolhassani, Mohammad Hossein; Emami, Mozhgan

    2013-01-01

    Background: Change theories provide an opportunity for organizational managers to plan, monitor and evaluate changes using a framework which enable them, among others, to show a fast response to environmental fluctuations and to predict the changing patterns of individuals and technology. The current study aimed to explore whether the change in the public accounting system of the Iranian health sector has followed Kurt Lewin’s change theory or not. Methods: This study which adopted a mixed methodology approach, qualitative and quantitative methods, was conducted in 2012. In the first phase of the study, 41 participants using purposive sampling and in the second phase, 32 affiliated units of Kerman University of Medical Sciences (KUMS) were selected as the study sample. Also, in phase one, we used face-to-face in-depth interviews (6 participants) and the quote method (35 participants) for data collection. We used a thematic framework analysis for analyzing data. In phase two, a questionnaire with a ten-point Likert scale was designed and then, data were analyzed using descriptive indicators, principal component and factorial analyses. Results: The results of phase one yielded a model consisting of four categories of superstructure, apparent infrastructure, hidden infrastructure and common factors. By linking all factors, totally, 12 components based on the quantitative results showed that the state of all components were not satisfactory at KUMS (5.06±2.16). Leadership and management; and technology components played the lowest and the greatest roles in implementing the accrual accounting system respectively. Conclusion: The results showed that the unfreezing stage did not occur well and the components were immature, mainly because the emphasis was placed on superstructure components rather than the components of hidden infrastructure. The study suggests that a road map should be developed in the financial system based on Kurt Lewin’s change theory and the

  17. [Common paths of psychiatry and forensic medicine--history and evolution of insanity defense concept from antiquity to modern times].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolechała, Filip

    2009-01-01

    Forensic psychiatry and psychology were in their beginnings inseparably associated with the forensic medicine, constituting one of its related branches of knowledge. Progress and development of these disciplines, education and the practical application for the purposes of the law were a contribution of a several generations of forensic pathologists in the 19th and 20th centuries. One of the major issues of common interest was opinionating on the sanity of offenders. However, the problem of criminal responsibility of the mentally ill perpetrators dates back to much earlier times and has its roots in the distant beginnings of human civilization. In this paper, the history and evolution of the insanity concept (as a circumstance excluding the guilt of the offender) were presented, from the oldest theories to ideas underlying modern codifications.

  18. Using activity theory to study cultural complexity in medical education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frambach, J.M.; Driessen, E.W.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing need for research on culture, cultural differences and cultural effects of globalization in medical education, but these are complex phenomena to investigate. Socio-cultural activity theory seems a useful framework to study cultural complexity, because it matches current views on

  19. Using activity theory to study cultural complexity in medical education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frambach, Janneke M; Driessen, Erik W; van der Vleuten, Cees P M

    There is a growing need for research on culture, cultural differences and cultural effects of globalization in medical education, but these are complex phenomena to investigate. Socio-cultural activity theory seems a useful framework to study cultural complexity, because it matches current views on

  20. Using activity theory to study cultural complexity in medical education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frambach, J.M.; Driessen, E.W.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing need for research on culture, cultural differences and cultural effects of globalization in medical education, but these are complex phenomena to investigate. Socio-cultural activity theory seems a useful framework to study cultural complexity, because it matches current views on

  1. [Medical theories and urban management: Fortaleza's 1877-79 drought].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Maria Clélia Lustosa

    2004-01-01

    Down through the nineteenth century, new medical theories on the origin of disease influenced the norms and regulations that controlled the population's behavior and the urban space. The present study discusses the ideas, medical practices , and administrative initiatives adopted during the 1877-79 drought in Fortaleza, capital of Ceará province. The drought was accompanied by a smallpox epidemic, along with the increased migration of sertão dwellers to the capitol. The city lacked a public service network capable of meeting the needs of this new population, which took up lodgings on the city and periphery. The municipal administration endeavored to implement the recommendations of physicians based on modern principles of hygienization. Through an analysis of reports by the provincial presidents and by public health inspectors, the study intends to show how these medical theories influenced the practices of urban reorganization at a moment of public emergency.

  2. Reducing the time-lag between onset of chest pain and seeking professional medical help: a theory-based review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baxter Susan K

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research suggests that there are a number of factors which can be associated with delay in a patient seeking professional help following chest pain, including demographic and social factors. These factors may have an adverse impact on the efficacy of interventions which to date have had limited success in improving patient action times. Theory-based methods of review are becoming increasingly recognised as important additions to conventional systematic review methods. They can be useful to gain additional insights into the characteristics of effective interventions by uncovering complex underlying mechanisms. Methods This paper describes the further analysis of research papers identified in a conventional systematic review of published evidence. The aim of this work was to investigate the theoretical frameworks underpinning studies exploring the issue of why people having a heart attack delay seeking professional medical help. The study used standard review methods to identify papers meeting the inclusion criterion, and carried out a synthesis of data relating to theoretical underpinnings. Results Thirty six papers from the 53 in the original systematic review referred to a particular theoretical perspective, or contained data which related to theoretical assumptions. The most frequently mentioned theory was the self-regulatory model of illness behaviour. Papers reported the potential significance of aspects of this model including different coping mechanisms, strategies of denial and varying models of treatment seeking. Studies also drew attention to the potential role of belief systems, applied elements of attachment theory, and referred to models of maintaining integrity, ways of knowing, and the influence of gender. Conclusions The review highlights the need to examine an individual’s subjective experience of and response to health threats, and confirms the gap between knowledge and changed behaviour. Interventions face

  3. From theory to application and back again: implications of research on medical expertise for psychological theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Geoffrey

    2005-03-01

    Research directed at an understanding of medical expertise is about 30 years old, and many developments in this literature parallel progress in cognitive psychology. Over the past 15 years or so, this research became much more closely identified with particular psychological theories. Initial forays into medicine were essentially direct applications of methods developed in the psychology lab to the more natural domain of medicine, with varying degrees of success. These attempts were followed by a second wave that took the psychological theories themselves more seriously in a more thoughtful application of psychological methods to the medical domain. I will argue in the present paper that the methods and theories used in the study of medical expertise have advanced to the point that there is some reverse flow and they are providing a unique and valuable perspective on the nature of thinking.

  4. A novel beamformer design method for medical ultrasound. Part I: Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranganathan, Karthik; Walker, William F

    2003-01-01

    The design of transmit and receive aperture weightings is a critical step in the development of ultrasound imaging systems. Current design methods are generally iterative, and consequently time consuming and inexact. We describe a new and general ultrasound beamformer design method, the minimum sum squared error (MSSE) technique. The MSSE technique enables aperture design for arbitrary beam patterns (within fundamental limitations imposed by diffraction). It uses a linear algebra formulation to describe the system point spread function (psf) as a function of the aperture weightings. The sum squared error (SSE) between the system psf and the desired or goal psf is minimized, yielding the optimal aperture weightings. We present detailed analysis for continuous wave (CW) and broadband systems. We also discuss several possible applications of the technique, such as the design of aperture weightings that improve the system depth of field, generate limited diffraction transmit beams, and improve the correlation depth of field in translated aperture system geometries. Simulation results are presented in an accompanying paper.

  5. Washington's Senate Bill 6610 on transferring provisions for persons found not guilty by reason of insanity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piel, Jennifer; Goldenberg, Edward

    2012-01-01

    In Washington state, public concern about the potential dangerousness of mentally ill offenders has led to increasing legislative efforts to contain them in secure settings. A recently enacted law authorizes the transfer of persons found not guilty by reason of insanity from state psychiatric hospitals to prison facilities. The authors review the recent legislation and discuss some of the legal, policy, and clinical ramifications of the law.

  6. Using activity theory to study cultural complexity in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frambach, Janneke M; Driessen, Erik W; van der Vleuten, Cees P M

    2014-06-01

    There is a growing need for research on culture, cultural differences and cultural effects of globalization in medical education, but these are complex phenomena to investigate. Socio-cultural activity theory seems a useful framework to study cultural complexity, because it matches current views on culture as a dynamic process situated in a social context, and has been valued in diverse fields for yielding rich understandings of complex issues and key factors involved. This paper explains how activity theory can be used in (cross-)cultural medical education research. We discuss activity theory's theoretical background and principles, and we show how these can be applied to the cultural research practice by discussing the steps involved in a cross-cultural study that we conducted, from formulating research questions to drawing conclusions. We describe how the activity system, the unit of analysis in activity theory, can serve as an organizing principle to grasp cultural complexity. We end with reflections on the theoretical and practical use of activity theory for cultural research and note that it is not a shortcut to capture cultural complexity: it is a challenge for researchers to determine the boundaries of their study and to analyze and interpret the dynamics of the activity system.

  7. 3D Medical Image Segmentation Based on Rough Set Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Shi-hao; TIAN Yun; WANG Yi; HAO Chong-yang

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a method which uses multiple types of expert knowledge together in 3D medical image segmentation based on rough set theory. The focus of this paper is how to approximate a ROI (region of interest) when there are multiple types of expert knowledge. Based on rough set theory, the image can be split into three regions:positive regions; negative regions; boundary regions. With multiple knowledge we refine ROI as an intersection of all of the expected shapes with single knowledge. At last we show the results of implementing a rough 3D image segmentation and visualization system.

  8. The agency problem and medical acting: an example of applying economic theory to medical ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Andreas; Schröder-Bäck, Peter; Brink, Alexander; Eurich, Johannes

    2009-03-01

    In this article, the authors attempt to build a bridge between economic theory and medical ethics to offer a new perspective to tackle ethical challenges in the physician-patient encounter. They apply elements of new institutional economics to the ethically relevant dimensions of the physician-patient relationship in a descriptive heuristic sense. The principal-agent theory can be used to analytically grasp existing action problems in the physician-patient relationship and as a basis for shaping recommendations at the institutional level. Furthermore, the patients' increased self-determination and modern opportunities for the medical laity to inform themselves lead to a less asymmetrical distribution of information between physician and patient and therefore require new interaction models. Based on the analysis presented here, the authors recommend that, apart from the physician's necessary individual ethics, greater consideration should be given to approaches of institutional ethics and hence to incentive systems within medical ethics.

  9. The civil liability for damages of the criminally insane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melamed, Yuval; Ganot, Nitza; Mester, Roberto; Bleich, Avi

    2008-01-01

    As a rule, mentally ill patients are held to be responsible for their acts just like everyone else. Notwithstanding, the law in Israel contains special rules which distinguish individuals with mental illness from other people. The instructions laid out in article 34h of the Israeli Penal Law empower the court to release a defendant from criminal responsibility. To do this the following criteria must be met: (a) the defendant was mentally ill, (b) he/she was in a psychotic state at the time he/she performed the felony, (c) his/her mental illness deprived him/her of his/her abilities in at least one of the two following areas: 1] he/she could not understand what he/she was doing, or the forbidden nature of the act; 2] he/she was incapable of preventing him/herself from carrying it out. In the case presented, a mentally ill individual was charged with the murder of his child and with an attempt to murder another child. The court ruled him to be legally insane and therefore non-punishable. He was later sued by the other child's parents for damages on the grounds of the assault tort. The issue in question was how does the fact that the defendant was ruled legally insane while committing the wrong doing affect the legal ruling of the defendant's liability especially regarding the tort of assault? The Magistrate's Court ruled that the Israeli Tort Law did not determine exemption from responsibility for the mentally ill. Liability for damages will be imposed upon an individual whenever the prerequisites to define a tort are met, even if the mental requisite is an outcome of one's mentally ill state. The District Court determined that an individual who intended to inflict harm is guilty of assault, even though the intent was an outcome of his mental state. Lack of volition due to one's inability to refrain from action does not constitute a defense for assault. In this case liability for damages was imposed on the defendant. The Court related to the issue of justice

  10. 37 CFR 1.423 - When the inventor is insane or legally incapacitated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false When the inventor is insane... International Processing Provisions Who May File An International Application § 1.423 When the inventor is insane or legally incapacitated. In case an inventor is insane or otherwise legally incapacitated,...

  11. How does an increase in undergraduate teaching load affect GP teacher motivation? A grounded theory study using data from a new medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Alex; Sweeney, Grace

    2013-07-01

    The opening of a new medical school is a cause for celebration. Starting with a clean slate often gives the opportunity to adopt more modern teaching practices. However, encouraging large numbers of clinicians to start teaching and to adopt these new methods brings its own set of challenges. During the expansion phase of a new medical school, it was often noted that new teachers seemed to have considerable difficulties, and often expressed these as negativity towards student placements. This did not chime with much of the work from established schools, which seemed to evaluate expansion of teaching more positively. We wanted to better understand the issues involved. Semi-structured interviews were conducted involving GPs who had received medical students over the first four years of a newly established medical school. The aims were to assess the impact of the students on the new teachers, and to try to better understand why some teachers were experiencing difficulties. We collected qualitative and quantitative data at the interviews. The qualitative data were analysed using grounded theory which aims to link emerging themes together. The findings suggest that as the quantity of teaching medical students increases, the enjoyment and commitment to teaching may decrease. Concerns over the administration of teaching may begin to predominate. Two factors may help to reduce this: 1 Adequate investment in manpower and premises to reduce time and space constraints on teaching. 2 Practices considering themselves as teaching practices where education is a part of the practice identity.

  12. Vozes da loucura cantada: sentidos sobre a loucura e o louco em canções brasileiras Voices of madness in song: outlooks on madness and the insane in Brazilian songs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Paulo Pereira Barros

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available O artigo resulta de uma pesquisa que objetivou compreender os sentidos sobre a loucura e o louco que atravessam canções brasileiras contemporâneas. As considerações de Michael Foucault sobre a História da Loucura e as de Mary Jane Spink sobre práticas discursivas e a produção de sentidos formaram as bases teóricas do estudo. A metodologia consistiu na realização de uma cartografia da circulação de sentidos sobre o louco e a loucura em trinta canções reunidas pelo motor de busca Google. Os resultados da cartografia indicam a polifonia do discurso literomusical e apontam uma paisagem discursiva heterogênea onde se destacam cinco zonas de sentido sobre a loucura e o louco. Conclui-se que estes signos estão em disputa no dia-a-dia, sendo que alguns sentidos circulantes nas canções remetem a modos instituídos de lidar com essa situação, enquanto outros podem constituir vetores de subjetivações fugidias às normalizações cotidianas. Assim, ao realçar algumas conformações simbólicas que perpassam o imaginário social, o artigo chama a atenção para a relevância de o campo multidisciplinar da saúde mental escutar as vozes sociais sobre as várias loucuras, perscrutando suas condições de produção e suas possíveis ressonâncias.This article is the result of research associated with the representation of madness and the insane in contemporary Brazilian songs. Michel Foucault's considerations about the history of madness and those of Mary Jane Spink about discursive practices and the production of meaning formed the theoretical base for the study. The methodology consisted in mapping the circulation of words and meanings about madness in thirty songs collected by Google's search engine. The results of the mapping reveal the polyphony of the literary/musical discourse, and a heterogeneous discursive panorama in which five zones of meaning about madness and the insane stand out. Thus, it can be concluded that these signs

  13. Moral Treatment of the Insane: Provisions for Lifelong Learning, Cultural Engagement, and Creativity in Nineteenth-Century Asylums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Maureen; Hamilton, Robert

    2010-01-01

    The current interest in the role of lifelong learning and cultural engagement for change is not new. This article looks at a most unusual precedent and a neglected area in the historiography of adult education--the use of cultural education provision in asylums in the nineteenth century to promote cure and restoration of the "insane" to…

  14. Moral Treatment of the Insane: Provisions for Lifelong Learning, Cultural Engagement, and Creativity in Nineteenth-Century Asylums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Maureen; Hamilton, Robert

    2010-01-01

    The current interest in the role of lifelong learning and cultural engagement for change is not new. This article looks at a most unusual precedent and a neglected area in the historiography of adult education--the use of cultural education provision in asylums in the nineteenth century to promote cure and restoration of the "insane" to…

  15. [The Firmin case (1794-1799) and the absence of crime legislation on "insanity" during the French Revolution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangin-Lazarus, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    Examining the so-called "affaire Firmin" (1794-1799), the author wonders about the reason (idealistic or political) for the lack a special law on insanity defense during the French revolution, and she tries to find a link the present state of the law.

  16. [Risk factors and protective factors of the insanities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clément, Jean-Pierre

    2007-12-01

    The Alzheimer's disease (AD) is multifactorial. How to explain this group of very heterogeneous factors? Many of them can be considered as biopsychosocial risk factors. In other words, the risk factors, in link with the physiological functioning and a physiopathology, are difficultly dissociable of contingencies of psychological and/or social nature. The vital lead could be the stress bound to these variables, be it biological or psychosocial. It remains to ask the question of the preventive efficiency of treatments to relieve the impact of the traumatizing events of life that entail a depressive state or a state of posttraumatic stress. The hippocamp has to be the object of a quite particular attention. AD is a disease of the adaptation. This integrative model combines three vulnerabilities: a genetic vulnerability which would be there to dictate the type of lesions, their localization and the age of occurence; a psychobiographic vulnerability corresponding to a personality with inadequate mechanisms of defence, precarious adaptability in front of the adversity, weak impact strength and biography built on events of life during childhood, then during the grown-up life of traumatic nature, with a psychosocial environment insufficiently auxiliary; a neuroendocrinologic vulnerability which would base on a deregulation of the corticotrope axis, acquired during its infantile maturation, hampered by too premature stress. It would lead to a bad biological adaptability in stress later, at the origin of the observable lesions in the insanities.

  17. Means of determining the condition of insanity in administrative proceedings based on the court practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana Mikhailovna Sekretareva

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective in the absence in the Russian administrative legislation of the provisions on the procedure and the ways to detect the condition of insanity of a physical person who has committed an administrative wrongful act there is a variety of lawenforcement acts for the resolution of these issues. In order to further systematize the enforcement acts for the resolution of these issues we consider it necessary to assess the practical application of the provisions of Article 2.8 quotInsanityquot of the Administrative Code by the courts in different Russian regions. Methods the methodological basis of research is the general scientific dialectic method of cognition the author used methods such as analysis synthesis description explanation. Results the author has conducted an analysis of practice of application of the provisions of Article 2.8 quotInsanityquot of the Administrative Code by courts of the Russian Federation. On the basis of this analysis it is found that courts use different methods of establishing the state of insanity of the person who committed the violation of the legislation on administrative offences. This is due to the fact that the courts base on a variety of actual data when establishing the state of insanity in the resolution of specific cases. These actual data were combined into 4 groups. Each method for establishing the state of insanity was evaluated which allowed to conclude about the need to organize the actions of individuals considering the cases on administrative offences aimed at defining the state of insanity of the offender and to offer one of the possible options for resolving the identified problems. Scientific novelty for the first time the analysis of practice of application of Article 2.8 quotInsanityquot of the Administrative Code was made and the author39s assessment of its provisions is given. Practical value the results of the study can be used for the generalization of judicial practice at the level of

  18. A clonal theory of parasitic protozoa : the population structures of Entamoeba, Giardia, Leishmania, Naegleria, Plasmodium, Trichomonas, and Trypanosoma and their medical and taxonomical consequences

    OpenAIRE

    1990-01-01

    We propose a general theory of clonal reproduction for parasitic protozoa, which has important medical and biological consequences. Many parasitic protozoa have been assumed to reproduce sexually, because of diploidy and occasional sexuality in the laboratory. However, a population genetic analysis of extensive data on biochemical polymorphisms indicates that the two fundamental consequences of sexual reproduction (i.e. segregation and recombination) are apparently rare or absent in natural p...

  19. The psychiatric asylum in Bnei-Brak and "The Society for the Help of the Insane," 1929-1939.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalashik, Rakefet

    The article explores the activity of the Bnei-Brak psychiatric asylum and "The Society for the Help of the Insane" in the years 1929-1939 and its role in the development of mental health care in mandatory Palestine. Based on archival materials from the municipal archive of Tel-Aviv-Jaffa and the Israeli State Archive, as well as on the Hebrew daily press, the article concentrates on the administrative, the medical and the political aspects of the Bnei-Brak asylum and on the activities of "The Society for the Help of the Insane" discussing the central problems of the psychiatric field and the mentally ill people in the country during the reviewed period.

  20. Group processes in medical education: learning from social identity theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burford, Bryan

    2012-02-01

    The clinical workplace in which doctors learn involves many social groups, including representatives of different professions, clinical specialties and workplace teams. This paper suggests that medical education research does not currently take full account of the effects of group membership, and describes a theoretical approach from social psychology, the social identity approach, which allows those effects to be explored. The social identity approach has a long history in social psychology and provides an integrated account of group processes, from the adoption of group identity through a process of self-categorisation, to the biases and conflicts between groups. This paper outlines key elements of this theoretical approach and illustrates their relevance to medical education. The relevance of the social identity approach is illustrated with reference to a number of areas of medical education. The paper shows how research questions in medical education may be usefully reframed in terms of social identity in ways that allow a deeper exploration of the psychological processes involved. Professional identity and professionalism may be viewed in terms of self-categorisation rather than simply attainment; the salience of different identities may be considered as influences on teamwork and interprofessional learning, and issues in communication and assessment may be considered in terms of intergroup biases. Social identity theory provides a powerful framework with which to consider many areas of medical education. It allows disparate influences on, and consequences of, group membership to be considered as part of an integrated system, and allows assumptions, such as about the nature of professional identity and interprofessional tensions, to be made explicit in the design of research studies. This power to question assumptions and develop deeper and more meaningful research questions may be increasingly relevant as the nature and role of the medical profession change

  1. Holland's Theory Applied to Medical Specialty Choice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Nicole J.; Savickas, Mark L.; Jones, Bonnie J.

    2004-01-01

    The present study tested the hypothesis that medical specialties classified as technique oriented or patient oriented would be distinguished by RIASEC code, with technique-oriented specialists resembling Investigative-Realistic types and patient-oriented specialists resembling Investigative-Social types. Using longitudinal data obtained from 447…

  2. Holland's Theory Applied to Medical Specialty Choice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Nicole J.; Savickas, Mark L.; Jones, Bonnie J.

    2004-01-01

    The present study tested the hypothesis that medical specialties classified as technique oriented or patient oriented would be distinguished by RIASEC code, with technique-oriented specialists resembling Investigative-Realistic types and patient-oriented specialists resembling Investigative-Social types. Using longitudinal data obtained from 447…

  3. [Outsourcing: theory and practice at a clinical hospital in Szczecin exemplified by medical waste transport and treatment service].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotlega, Dariusz; Nowacki, Przemysław; Lewiński, Dariusz; Chmurowicz, Ryszard; Ciećwiez, Sylwester

    2011-01-01

    Outsourcing proves to be a useful tool in the difficult process of improving the financial result of hospitals. Outsourcing means separation of some functions and services in one entity and their transfer to another. The aim of this study was to analyze the use of outsourcing at the Second Independent Public University Hospital of the Pomeranian Medical University (SPSK 2 PUM) in Szczecin. We studied the transport and treatment of medical waste. Outsourcing of waste treatment services led to financial savings. The cost of treatment of one kilogram of waste by an external company was PLN 2.53. The same service provided by the hospital would cost approximately PLN 7 per kilogram. Appropriate attention should be paid to the quality of services. It seems useful to have appropriate tools for quality control and monitoring. SPSK 2 PUM can serve as a good example of effective use of outsourcing.

  4. Integrating Theory, Content, and Method to Foster Critical Consciousness in Medical Students: A Comprehensive Model for Cultural Competence Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dao, Diane K; Goss, Adeline L; Hoekzema, Andrew S; Kelly, Lauren A; Logan, Alexander A; Mehta, Sanjiv D; Sandesara, Utpal N; Munyikwa, Michelle R; DeLisser, Horace M

    2017-03-01

    Many efforts to design introductory "cultural competence" courses for medical students rely on an information delivery (competence) paradigm, which can exoticize patients while obscuring social context, medical culture, and power structures. Other approaches foster a general open-minded orientation, which can remain nebulous without clear grounding principles. Medical educators are increasingly recognizing the limitations of both approaches and calling for strategies that reenvision cultural competence training. Successfully realizing such alternative strategies requires the development of comprehensive models that specify and integrate theoretical frameworks, content, and teaching principles.In this article, the authors present one such model: Introduction to Medicine and Society (IMS), a required cultural competence course launched in 2013 for first-year medical students at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. Building on critical pedagogy, IMS is centered on a novel specification of "critical consciousness" in clinical practice as an orientation to understanding and pragmatic action in three relational domains: internal, interpersonal, and structural. Instead of transmitting discrete "facts" about patient "types," IMS content provokes students to engage with complex questions bridging the three domains. Learning takes place in a small-group space specifically designed to spur transformation toward critical consciousness. After discussing the three key components of the course design and describing a representative session, the authors discuss the IMS model's implications, reception by students and faculty, and potential for expansion. Their early experience suggests the IMS model successfully engages students and prepares future physicians to critically examine experiences, manage interpersonal dynamics, and structurally contextualize patient encounters.

  5. Predicting intention to treat HIV-infected patients among Tanzanian and Sudanese medical and dental students using the theory of planned behaviour--a cross sectional study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Astrøm, Anne N; Nasir, Elwalid F

    2009-01-01

    .... This study aimed to predict the intention to provide surgical treatment to HIV infected patients among medical- and dental students in Tanzania and Sudan using an extended version of the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB...

  6. Practice, theory and authority in a Middle English medical text: "Barton's Urines Which He Treated at Tilney".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavormina, M Teresa

    2009-01-01

    A medieval English text on the theory and practice of uroscopic analysis is found in British Library, Sloane MS 280, and Cambridge, St. John's College MS B.16. The treatise, the title of which is given in the fuller and earlier copy in Sloane 280 as "Barton's Urines Which He Treated at Tilney," offers an unusual mix of practical diagnostic methodology focused mainly on uroscopy, and a conceptual framework for that methodology which begins with humoral physiological theory but continues with digressions on astronomy, the calendar, Aristotelian psychology, reproductive anatomy and physiology, embryology and ensoulment. This paper discusses the possible authorship and dating of the original text, the author's intellectual interests and habits, his approach to his vernacular audience, and the relation of the treatise to the Latin authorities on which it draws, particularly but not exclusively Isaac Israeli and Giles of Corbeil.

  7. [The evolution theory in the medical sciences in Chile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Coke, R

    1994-02-01

    The evolutionist ideas of Lamarck, Darwin and Haeckel entered the country through the arrival of their books. "On the origin of Species" arrived in Chile in 1869. The most outstanding immigrant european physicians that discussed these ideas were Rodulfo A Phillippi (1808-1904) and Juan José Brunner (1825-1899). Both discussed Darwin's ideas in their books and conferences as academics of the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Chile. The first Chilean physicians that read and discussed the validity of evolution theory were Adolfo Valderrama (1834-1902) and Pedro Candia Salgado. Both wrote articles about this matter in Revista Médica de Chile in 1872 and 1874. The professor of general biology, Juan Noé Crevani, italian physician and zoologist that arrived in Chile in 1912, was the first to teach directly the concepts of the evolution theory until his death in 1947. Professor Noé founded the great biological school of the twentieth century in Chile and his disciples introduced the concepts of Mendelian theory and neodarwinism in the decade of fifties. The theory of evolution was taught as a chapter of general biology in the Faculty of Medicine between 1913 and 1947, but its practical applications to medicine were introduced with the birth of medical genetics in the decade of fifties and the foundation of Chilean Genetics society in 1964, under the direction of professors Danko Brncic and Gustavo Hoecker, both awarded with the National Sciences Prize.

  8. Is expected utility theory normative for medical decision making?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, B J

    1996-01-01

    Expected utility theory is felt by its proponents to be a normative theory of decision making under uncertainty. The theory starts with some simple axioms that are held to be rules that any rational person would follow. It can be shown that if one adheres to these axioms, a numerical quantity, generally referred to as utility, can be assigned to each possible outcome, with the preferred course of action being that which has the highest expected utility. One of these axioms, the independence principle, is controversial, and is frequently violated in experimental situations. Proponents of the theory hold that these violations are irrational. The independence principle is simply an axiom dictating consistency among preferences, in that it dictates that a rational agent should hold a specified preference given another stated preference. When applied to preferences between lotteries, the independence principle can be demonstrated to be a rule that is followed only when preferences are formed in a particular way. The logic of expected utility theory is that this demonstration proves that preferences should be formed in this way. An alternative interpretation is that this demonstrates that the independence principle is not a valid general rule of consistency, but in particular, is a rule that must be followed if one is to consistently apply the decision rule "choose the lottery that has the highest expected utility." This decision rule must be justified on its own terms as a valid rule of rationality by demonstration that violation would lead to decisions that conflict with the decision maker's goals. This rule does not appear to be suitable for medical decisions because often these are one-time decisions in which expectation, a long-run property of a random variable, would not seem to be applicable. This is particularly true for those decisions involving a non-trivial risk of death.

  9. Key Theories from Critical Medical Anthropology for Public Health Research. Part II: Medicine in the Social System, Medicine as a Social System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer J. Carroll

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article summarizes four significant theoretical concepts from the field of Critical Medical Anthropology in two parts: in the first part, biopower/discipline and explanatory models; in the second, structural violence, and identity politics and biological citizenship. The four subjects reviewed here have been chosen for their importance to our understanding of human behaviors related to health and illness, as well as for the impact that they can have on theory, research, and practice in the field of public health. These critical theories can provide new ways of thinking about professional roles, medical decisions, disease diagnosis and etiology, treatment adherence, prevention messaging, and all sorts of health-related behaviors and systems of understanding. They can also help public health researchers shed light on the human beliefs and activities that shape patterns of disease within and across populations. Whether a research question is being formulated or research findings are being analyzed, the critical social theories outlined here can foster a more holistic understanding of the human element in any public health project.

  10. Using Principal-Agent Theory as a Framework for Analysis in Evaluating the Multiple Stakeholders Involved in the Accreditation and Quality Assurance of International Medical Branch Campuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgos, Jill E.

    2013-01-01

    This article applies the theoretical framework of principal-agent theory in order to better understand the complex organisational relationships emerging between entities invested in the establishment and monitoring of cross-border international branch campus medical schools. Using the key constructs of principal-agent theory, information asymmetry…

  11. A clonal theory of parasitic protozoa: the population structures of Entamoeba, Giardia, Leishmania, Naegleria, Plasmodium, Trichomonas, and Trypanosoma and their medical and taxonomical consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibayrenc, M; Kjellberg, F; Ayala, F J

    1990-04-01

    We propose a general theory of clonal reproduction for parasitic protozoa, which has important medical and biological consequences. Many parasitic protozoa have been assumed to reproduce sexually, because of diploidy and occasional sexuality in the laboratory. However, a population genetic analysis of extensive data on biochemical polymorphisms indicates that the two fundamental consequences of sexual reproduction (i.e., segregation and recombination) are apparently rare or absent in natural populations of the parasitic protozoa. Moreover, the clones recorded appear to be stable over large geographical areas and long periods of time. A clonal population structure demands that the medical attributes of clones be separately characterized; ubiquitous clones call for priority characterization. Uniparental reproduction renders unsatisfactory Linnean taxonomy; this needs to be supplemented by the "natural clone" as an additional taxonomic unit, which is best defined by means of genetic markers.

  12. Psychometric Properties of a Protection Motivation Theory-based Questionnaire to Assess Self-Medication in a Sample of Elderly Iranians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasser Hatamzadeh

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The existence of standard tools is one of the basic needs of scientists of healthy behavior for predicting health-related behaviors. The aim of the present study was to design a psychometrically sound instrument to measure the protection motivation theory constructs regarding self-medication for elderly Iranians. Methods: The study was conducted in spring 2016. The sample consisted of 196 Iranians between the ages of 60 and 74. The study took place in Ahvaz, Iran.  The instrument included perceived susceptibility, severity, response costs, response efficacy, self-efficacy, rewards, and fear constructs. The qualitative component of the study, which consisted of interviews with experts and a systematic review of the literature, provided the data to write the items for the instrument, followed by determining the content validity. Principal components analysis with Oblique rotation was performed to extract correlated constructs. The Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin (KMO and Bartlett's tests were performed to examine the suitability of the data for factor analysis. Cronbach’s Coefficient Alpha was used to estimate the internal consistency of the scales. Results: The KMO test statistic of 0.90 revealed the sampling adequacy for doing factor analysis and Bartlett's test of sphericity was significant (p < 0.001. Seven constructs were extracted based on Eigenvalues of ≥ 1.00 and factor loadings of ≥ 0.40. Cronbach’s α for the constructs, namely, perceived susceptibility, severity, response costs, response efficacy, self-efficacy, rewards and fear were 0.84, 0.86, 0.81, 0.82, 0.88, 0.89, and 0.85, respectively.  The seven constructs accounted for 69.41% of the variation. Conclusion: The developed scales for measuring the protection motivation theory constructs regarding self-medication have acceptable psychometric properties among elderly Iranians.

  13. A Review on the Medical Care Justice Theory Abroad%国外医疗公正代表性理论研究述评

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李杰; 郝文君

    2014-01-01

    公正是伦理学的核心范畴。医疗公正是公正问题在医疗领域的体现,其根本目的是保证人的健康权利实现。医疗公正的核心是医疗资源的合理分配。国外不同学派的公正医疗观各不相同,功利主义、平等主义、激进自由主义、社群主义,分别强调公共效益的最大化、分配正义、市场分配、共同体价值。国外医疗公正理论具有标准多元、学科交叉、思路统一的特点,在特殊性、可操作性及日常生活进路方面的研究欠缺。我们可借鉴国外医疗公正思想,探索适合我国实际的医疗公正理论,推进我国的医疗公正实践。%Justice is the core category and the major topic in ethics studies, which involves the issues of e-conomy,education,medicine and other fields. Medical justice relates to people’ s life and health, and it has cer-tain different characteristics compared with other justice studies, which is particularly important. The kernel of justice of medical care is how to distribute the limited medical resources among the members of society. In this regard, different academic schools abroad hold a variety of different points of view. This essay first gives a sur-vey of the major theories and viewpoints on medical care justice in overseas countries such as utilitarianism, equalitarianism, radical liberalism and communitarianism, and then analyzes their characteristics and problems, thus highlighting the important inspiring significance to the construction of Chinese medical care justice theory.

  14. Taking decision general theory and its application in the medical assistance field (I.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Alberto Corona Martínez

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Decision making is a necessary element in the medical work. This article is a part of a series of articles that is aimed at divulging some theoretical aspects about decision making and their concrete application in the medical assistance. This paper analyses the classic (rational and behavioural theories in decision making.

  15. A combined data mining approach using rough set theory and case-based reasoning in medical datasets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Taghi Rezvan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Case-based reasoning (CBR is the process of solving new cases by retrieving the most relevant ones from an existing knowledge-base. Since, irrelevant or redundant features not only remarkably increase memory requirements but also the time complexity of the case retrieval, reducing the number of dimensions is an issue worth considering. This paper uses rough set theory (RST in order to reduce the number of dimensions in a CBR classifier with the aim of increasing accuracy and efficiency. CBR exploits a distance based co-occurrence of categorical data to measure similarity of cases. This distance is based on the proportional distribution of different categorical values of features. The weight used for a feature is the average of co-occurrence values of the features. The combination of RST and CBR has been applied to real categorical datasets of Wisconsin Breast Cancer, Lymphography, and Primary cancer. The 5-fold cross validation method is used to evaluate the performance of the proposed approach. The results show that this combined approach lowers computational costs and improves performance metrics including accuracy and interpretability compared to other approaches developed in the literature.

  16. Conditional Release Placements of Insanity Acquittees in Oregon: 2012-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novosad, David; Banfe, Shelley; Britton, Juliet; Bloom, Joseph D

    2016-03-01

    Between January 1, 2012 and December 31, 2014, there was a large population (N = 200) of insanity acquittees placed on conditional release (CR) in the state of Oregon. This article looks at the demographic and system characteristics of this large group of individuals. The authors then focus on the initial housing placement and what happens to individuals after their release in relation to their housing placement. In Oregon, insanity acquittees are either conditionally released directly by the court or placed in the hospital prior to potential CR by a supervising board. In general, once CR occurs, individuals tend to stay in their initial placement without moving to less structured levels of care, raising concerns about transinstitutionalization. This is especially true for individuals released to the most structured living arrangement (secure residential treatment facility). Those individuals who are conditionally released to less structured settings have a higher rate of revocation back to the hospital. Those individuals who do move to less structured levels of care usually have longer hospital stays and start off in more structured levels of care to start their CR. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Kepler's theory of force and his medical sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regier, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Johannes Kepler (1571-1630) makes extensive use of souls and spiritus in his natural philosophy. Recent studies have highlighted their importance in his accounts of celestial generation and astrology. In this study, I would like to address two pressing issues. The first is Kepler's context. The biological side of his natural philosophy is not naively Aristotelian. Instead, he is up to date with contemporary discussions in medically flavored natural philosophy. I will examine his relationship to Melanchthon's anatomical-theological Liber de anima (1552) and to Jean Femel's very popular Physiologia (1567), two Galenic sources with a noticeable impact on how he understands the functions of life. The other issue that will direct my article is force at a distance. Medical ideas deeply inform Kepler's theories of light and solar force (virtus motrix). It will become clear that they are not a hindrance even to the hardcore of his celestial physics. Instead, he makes use of soul and spiritus in order to develop a fully mathematized dynamics.

  18. [Voices of madness in song: outlooks on madness and the insane in Brazilian songs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, João Paulo Pereira; Jorge, Maria Salete Bessa

    2011-12-01

    This article is the result of research associated with the representation of madness and the insane in contemporary Brazilian songs. Michel Foucault's considerations about the history of madness and those of Mary Jane Spink about discursive practices and the production of meaning formed the theoretical base for the study. The methodology consisted in mapping the circulation of words and meanings about madness in thirty songs collected by Google's search engine. The results of the mapping reveal the polyphony of the literary/musical discourse, and a heterogeneous discursive panorama in which five zones of meaning about madness and the insane stand out. Thus, it can be concluded that these signs are prevalent on a day-to-day basis, Some of the meanings in the songs refer to institutionalized ways of dealing with madness, others constitute modes of subjectivity that flee from routine treatment. By delineating symbolic formations that permeate social imagery, this article brings systematic attention to popular representations of various forms of madness of relevance to multidisciplinary fields in mental health, discussing their appearance in popular music and their possible repercussions.

  19. Learning theory and its application to the use of social media in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Leslie; Jalali, Alireza; Moreau, Katherine A

    2015-10-01

    There is rapidly increasing pressure to employ social media in medical education, but a review of the literature demonstrates that its value and role are uncertain. To determine if medical educators have a conceptual framework that informs their use of social media and whether this framework can be mapped to learning theory. Thirty-six participants engaged in an iterative, consensus building process that identified their conceptual framework and determined if it aligned with one or more learning theories. The results show that the use of social media by the participants could be traced to two dominant theories-Connectivism and Constructivism. They also suggest that many medical educators may not be fully informed of these theories. Medical educators' use of social media can be traced to learning theories, but these theories may not be explicitly utilised in instructional design. It is recommended that formal education (faculty development) around learning theory would further enhance the use of social media in medical education. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  20. Family physicians' effort to stay in charge of the medical treatment when patients have home care by district nurses. A grounded theory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hylander Ingrid

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background District nurses (DNs provide home care for old persons with a mixture of chronic diseases, symptoms and reduced functional ability. Family physicians (FPs have been criticised for their lack of involvement in this care. The aim of this study was to obtain increased knowledge concerning the FP's experience of providing medical treatment for patients with home care provided by DNs by developing a theoretical model that elucidates how FPs handle the problems they encounter regarding the individual patients and their conditions. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 13 Swedish FPs concerning one of their registered patients with home care by a DN, and the treatment of this patient. Grounded theory methodology (GTM was used in the analyses. Results The core category was the effort to stay in charge of the medical treatment. This involved three types of problems: gaining sufficient insight, making adequate decisions, and maintaining appropriate medical treatment. For three categories of patients, the FPs had problems staying in charge. Patients with reduced functional ability had problems providing information and maintaining treatment. Patients who were "fixed in their ways" did not provide information and did not comply with recommendations, and for patients with complex conditions, making adequate decisions could be problematic. To overcome the problems, four different strategies were used: relying on information from others, supporting close observation and follow-up by others, being constantly ready to change the goal of the treatment, and relying on others to provide treatment. Conclusion The patients in this study differed from most other patients seen at the healthcare centre as the consultation with the patient could not provide the usual foundation for decisions concerning medical treatment. Information from and collaboration with the DN and other home care providers was essential for the FP's effort to

  1. A Method for Fuzzy Soft Sets in Decision Making Based on Grey Relational Analysis and D-S Theory of Evidence: Application to Medical Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ningxin Xie

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A method based on grey relational analysis and D-S theory of evidence is proposed for fuzzy soft sets in decision making. Firstly, grey relational analysis is used to calculate grey mean relational degrees and determine uncertain degrees of parameters. Then based on uncertain degrees, suitable mass functions of different independent alternatives with different parameters can be constructed. Next, D-S rule of evidence combination is applied to aggregate these alternatives into a collective alternative. Finally, these alternatives are ranked and the best alternative(s are obtained. Moreover, the effectiveness and feasibility of this method are demonstrated by comparing with the mean potentiality approach and giving an application to medical diagnosis.

  2. A method for fuzzy soft sets in decision making based on grey relational analysis and d-s theory of evidence: application to medical diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Ningxin; Wen, Guoqiu; Li, Zhaowen

    2014-01-01

    A method based on grey relational analysis and D-S theory of evidence is proposed for fuzzy soft sets in decision making. Firstly, grey relational analysis is used to calculate grey mean relational degrees and determine uncertain degrees of parameters. Then based on uncertain degrees, suitable mass functions of different independent alternatives with different parameters can be constructed. Next, D-S rule of evidence combination is applied to aggregate these alternatives into a collective alternative. Finally, these alternatives are ranked and the best alternative(s) are obtained. Moreover, the effectiveness and feasibility of this method are demonstrated by comparing with the mean potentiality approach and giving an application to medical diagnosis.

  3. A survey of mindset theories of intelligence and medical error self-reporting among pediatric housestaff and faculty

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Background Intelligence theory research has illustrated that people hold either “fixed” (intelligence is immutable) or “growth” (intelligence can be improved) mindsets and that these views may affect how people learn throughout their lifetime. Little is known about the mindsets of physicians, and how mindset may affect their lifetime learning and integration of feedback. Our objective was to determine if pediatric physicians are of the "fixed" or "growth" mindset and whether individual mindse...

  4. Meta-analyses of Theory use in Medication Adherence Intervention Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conn, Vicki S.; Enriquez, Maithe; Ruppar, Todd M.; Chan, Keith C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective This systematic review applied meta-analytic procedures to integrate primary research that examined theory- or model-linked medication adherence interventions. Methods Extensive literature searching strategies were used to locate trials testing interventions with medication adherence behavior outcomes measured by electronic event monitoring, pharmacy refills, pill counts, and self-reports. Random-effects model analysis was used to calculate standardized mean difference effect sizes for medication adherence outcomes. Results Codable data were extracted from 146 comparisons with 19,348 participants. The most common theories and models were social cognitive theory and motivational interviewing. The overall weighted effect size for all interventions comparing treatment and control participants was 0.294. The effect size for interventions based on single-theories was 0.323 and for multiple-theory interventions was 0.214. Effect sizes for individual theories and models ranged from 0.041 to 0.447. The largest effect sizes were for interventions based on the health belief model (0.477) and adult learning theory (0.443). The smallest effect sizes were for interventions based on PRECEDE (0.041) and self-regulation (0.118). Conclusion These findings suggest that theory- and model-linked interventions have a significant but modest effect on medication adherence outcomes. PMID:26931748

  5. A Framework for Understanding Lapses in Professionalism Among Medical Students: Applying the Theory of Planned Behavior to Fitness to Practice Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Vikram; Brockbank, Susannah; Roberts, Trudie

    2016-06-28

    Fitness to practice decisions are often based on a student's digression from the regulations, with limited exploration of the reasoning behind the student's behavior. However, behavior is underpinned by complex, "hidden" variables, including an individual's attitudes and social norms. Examining hidden determinants of professionalism, such as context, interpersonal relationships, social norms, and local cultures, then allows medical educators to develop a richer understanding of unprofessional behavior.In this article, the authors propose the use of the theory of planned behavior (TPB) as a framework to help evaluate unprofessional behavior in students. The TPB is a deliberative processing model that explains how an individual's behavior is underpinned by his or her cognitions, with behavior being primarily dependent on the intention to perform the behavior (behavioral intention). Intention, in turn, is determined by three variables: attitude, subjective norm, and perceived behavioral control.To understand the practical use of the TPB, the authors present four complex, anonymized case studies in which they employed the TPB to help deal with serious professionalism lapses among medical students. The outcomes of these cases as well as the student and program director perspectives, all explained via the TPB variables, are presented. The strengths and limitations of the TPB are discussed.

  6. Clinical reasoning assessment through medical expertise theories: past, present and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boushehri, Elham; Soltani Arabshahi, Kamran; Monajemi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Exploration into the concept of "medical expert" dates back to more than 50 years ago, yet yielding three leading theories in the area of clinical reasoning, namely, knowledge structure, hypotheticdeductive, and dual process. Each theory defines "medical expert" in a dissimilar way. Therefore, the methods of assessment through which the experts are identified have been changed during the time. In this paper, we tried to categorize and introduce some widely used tests for identification of experts within the framework of existing main theories. Implementation of the proposed categorization for providing future assessment tools is discussed.

  7. Predicting substance-abuse treatment providers' communication with clients about medication assisted treatment: a test of the theories of reasoned action and planned behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberto, Anthony J; Shafer, Michael S; Marmo, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to determine if the theory of reasoned action (TRA) and theory of planned behavior (TPB) can retrospectively predict whether substance-abuse treatment providers encourage their clients to use medicated-assisted treatment (MAT) as part of their treatment plan. Two-hundred and ten substance-abuse treatment providers completed a survey measuring attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioral control, intentions, and behavior. Results indicate that substance-abuse treatment providers have very positive attitudes, neutral subjective norms, somewhat positive perceived behavioral control, somewhat positive intentions toward recommending MAT as part of their clients' treatment plan, and were somewhat likely to engage in the actual behavior. Further, the data fit both the TRA and TPB, but with the TPB model having better fit and predictive power for this target audience and behavior. The theoretical and practical implications for the developing messages for substance-abuse treatment providers and other health-care professionals who provide treatment to patients with substance use disorders are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Medical education and cognitive continuum theory: an alternative perspective on medical problem solving and clinical reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custers, Eugène J F M

    2013-08-01

    Recently, human reasoning, problem solving, and decision making have been viewed as products of two separate systems: "System 1," the unconscious, intuitive, or nonanalytic system, and "System 2," the conscious, analytic, or reflective system. This view has penetrated the medical education literature, yet the idea of two independent dichotomous cognitive systems is not entirely without problems.This article outlines the difficulties of this "two-system view" and presents an alternative, developed by K.R. Hammond and colleagues, called cognitive continuum theory (CCT). CCT is featured by three key assumptions. First, human reasoning, problem solving, and decision making can be arranged on a cognitive continuum, with pure intuition at one end, pure analysis at the other, and a large middle ground called "quasirationality." Second, the nature and requirements of the cognitive task, as perceived by the person performing the task, determine to a large extent whether a task will be approached more intuitively or more analytically. Third, for optimal task performance, this approach needs to match the cognitive properties and requirements of the task. Finally, the author makes a case that CCT is better able than a two-system view to describe medical problem solving and clinical reasoning and that it provides clear clues for how to organize training in clinical reasoning.

  9. High theory/mass markets: Newsweek magazine and the circuits of medical culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Bradley

    2007-01-01

    Medicine is driven by much more than science and reason (ethics); it is also driven by the circuits of culture within which it operates. This article examines how postmodern theory deconstructs standard ideals of science and reason and allows medical humanities scholars to better contextualize the world of medicine. As such, postmodern theory provides an invaluable tool for understanding the circuits of popular culture and medicine's place within these circuits. Using a recent issue of Newsweek magazine devoted to health and technology to illustrate the main points, this essay argues that contemporary popular influences on medicine are deeply problematic, and that through an appreciation of the dynamics of culture, medical humanities scholars can join the struggle over medical culture. This perspective allows medical humanities to make important contributions toward alternative circuits of medical representation, consumption, and identification.

  10. The problem of theory and practice in the medical profession1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques R. Kriel

    1994-03-01

    Full Text Available Scientific knowledge is a symbolic system consisting of hypotheses, models and theories generated by means of a paradigm-mediated interaction between a scientific community and a research domain. Such a knowledge generating paradigm consists of already existing theories, as well as methodological and ontological beliefs or assumptions. In this article it is argued that the meaning ascribed to the central concepts of medical science(such as patient, disease, causality and therapy are fundamentally determined by the 19th century logical positivist scientific paradigm. The ontological and methodological implications of the postmodern natural sciences (e.g. quantum physics have not been applied to medical science. The 19th century ‘natural science paradigm’ therefore acts as a metatheory for both medical science and medical practice. However, the theoretical knowledge system generated by medical science acts as the theory for the practice of scientific clinical medicine which therefore functions with the same understanding of the central concepts such as patient, disease and disease causality, therapy etc. The limitations of this paradigmatic monism are illustrated by an analysis of the medical and societal response to the AIDS epidemic and it is concluded that medical science and practice, because of the complexity o f its research and practice domain, must accept in principle the possibility of paradigmatic pluralism (as in the social sciences or should attempt to develop a holistic paradigm that will cope more adequately with its fields of research and practice.

  11. Predicting parental anticonvulsant medication compliance using the theory of reasoned action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, J K

    1989-04-01

    One approach to better understanding compliance behavior is the use of the theory of reasoned action. In this article, the theory of reasoned action is used to predict the compliance behavior of 29 parents of children with epilespy. In support of the theory, behavioral intention was found to significantly predict (p less than 0.01) parental medicine-giving behavior. Contrary to the results predicted by the theory, parents' attitudes toward giving the medication correlated with a significant amount of variance in medicine-giving behavior beyond that accounted for by behavioral intention.

  12. Medical student selection and society: Lessons we learned from sociological theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaghmaei, Minoo; Yazdani, Shahram; Ahmady, Soleiman

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to show the interaction between the society, applicants and medical schools in terms of medical student selection. In this study, the trends to implement social factors in the selection process were highlighted. These social factors were explored through functionalism and conflict theories, each focusing on different categories of social factors. While functionalist theorists pay attention to diversity in the selection process, conflict theorists highlight the importance of socio-economic class. Although both theories believe in sorting, their different views are reflected in their sorting strategies. Both theories emphasize the importance of the person-society relationship in motivation to enter university. Furthermore, the impacts of social goals on the selection policies are derived from both theories. Theories in the sociology of education offer an approach to student selection that acknowledges and supports complexity, plurality of approaches and innovative means of selection. Medical student selection does not solely focus on the individual assessment and qualification, but it focuses on a social and collective process, which includes all the influences and interactions between the medical schools and the society. Sociological perspective of medical student selection proposes a model that envelops the individual and the society. In this model, the selection methods should meet the criteria of merit at the individual level, while the selection policies should aim at the society goals at the institutional level.

  13. Medical student selection and society: Lessons we learned from sociological theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaghmaei, Minoo; Yazdani, Shahram; Ahmady, Soleiman

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to show the interaction between the society, applicants and medical schools in terms of medical student selection. In this study, the trends to implement social factors in the selection process were highlighted. These social factors were explored through functionalism and conflict theories, each focusing on different categories of social factors. While functionalist theorists pay attention to diversity in the selection process, conflict theorists highlight the importance of socio-economic class. Although both theories believe in sorting, their different views are reflected in their sorting strategies. Both theories emphasize the importance of the person-society relationship in motivation to enter university. Furthermore, the impacts of social goals on the selection policies are derived from both theories. Theories in the sociology of education offer an approach to student selection that acknowledges and supports complexity, plurality of approaches and innovative means of selection. Medical student selection does not solely focus on the individual assessment and qualification, but it focuses on a social and collective process, which includes all the influences and interactions between the medical schools and the society. Sociological perspective of medical student selection proposes a model that envelops the individual and the society. In this model, the selection methods should meet the criteria of merit at the individual level, while the selection policies should aim at the society goals at the institutional level. PMID:28210608

  14. Commentary: postpartum psychosis, infanticide, and insanity--implications for forensic psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatters Friedman, Susan; Sorrentino, Renée

    2012-01-01

    Two dozen nations have infanticide laws that decrease the penalty for mothers who kill their children of up to one year of age. The United States does not have such a law, but mentally ill mothers may plead not guilty by reason of insanity. As in other crimes, in addition to the diagnosis of a mental disorder, other factors, such as knowledge of wrongfulness and motive, are critical to the assessment. Postpartum psychosis has been described for 2,000 years and modern science supports a genetic component to the risk. Yet, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders does not include it as a diagnosis, leading to difficulty in testimony. In this article, we discuss postpartum psychosis, infanticide law, and research regarding mothers who kill, and we make recommendations to forensic psychiatrists.

  15. Friedrich Nietzsche's mental illness--general paralysis of the insane vs. frontotemporal dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, M; Trimble, M R

    2006-12-01

    For a long time it was thought that Nietzsche suffered from general paralysis of the insane (GPI). However, this diagnosis has been questioned recently, and alternative diagnoses have been proposed. We have charted Friedrich Nietzsche's final fatal illness, and viewed the differential diagnosis in the light of recent neurological understandings of dementia syndromes. It is unclear that Nietzsche ever had syphilis. He lacked progressive motor and other neurological features of a progressive syphilitic central nervous system (CNS) infection and lived at least 12 years following the onset of his CNS signs, which would be extremely rare for patients with untreated GPI. Finally, his flourish of productivity in 1888 would be quite uncharacteristic of GPI, but in keeping with reports of burgeoning creativity at some point in the progression of frontotemporal dementia (FTD). We suggest that Nietzsche did not have GPI, but died from a chronic dementia, namely FTD.

  16. Psychotropic medication from an object relations theory perspective: an analysis of vignettes from group psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fain, Dana Shindel; Sharon, Amos; Moscovici, Lucian; Schreiber, Shaul

    2008-07-01

    In this article we explore the content and dynamics of patients' verbalizations within a "living with medications" group. Patients' perceptions of their psychotropic medications are interpreted and classified within the framework of object relations theory. One's perception of the role of medication in one's life can serve as a gateway to one's inner world and the way that he or she perceives authority figures, peers, and oneself. We suggest that working through patients' relationships with their medications can help them to achieve better integration of internal object relations. Discussing patients' views about medications should therefore be seen as an important part of psychotherapy with many individuals. Such a discussion may enhance and improve efficacy of both psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy. It is of particular importance in group therapy, within milieu environments and with individuals reluctant to explicitly discuss interpersonal matters. Vignettes from the group sessions illustrate the way in which discussing medication advances group process.

  17. Pavel Ivanovich Karpov (1873-1932?)--the Russian Prinzhorn: art of the insane in Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Vladimir; Podolsky, Grigory; Witztum, Eliezer

    2016-03-01

    The complicated relationship between the discipline of mental health and the arts has barely been studied systematically. Mental hospitals, shelters and prisons--institutions that accommodate the mentally ill--sometimes promote but often discourage and disrupt the patients' artistic creativity and the images created. In psychiatric circles, the recognition of patient art was a long, slow and frustrating process. Among the Western psychiatrists who studied the creative activity of the mentally ill, researchers usually mention such names as C. Lombroso, M. Shearing, V. Morgentaller, H. Prinzhorn and others, but rarely refer to their Russian colleagues and contemporaries. Pavel Ivanovich Karpov (1873-1932?), a Russian psychiatrist, was one of the most extensive researchers in the field of the art of the insane, but unfortunately his name is little known among modern psychiatrists. For his clinical and scientific contributions, he deserves to be remembered in the history of psychiatry.

  18. A theory of everything?

    CERN Multimedia

    't Hooft, Gerardus; Witten, Edward

    2005-01-01

    In his later years, Einstein sought a unified theory that would extend general relativity and provide an alternative to quantum theory. There is now talk of a "theory of everything"; fifty years after his death, how close are we to such a theory? (3 pages)

  19. Aging, evolvability, and the individual benefit requirement; medical implications of aging theory controversies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Theodore C

    2008-06-21

    There is a class of theories of aging (variously termed adaptive aging, aging by design, aging selected for its own sake, or programmed death theories) that hold that an organism design that limits life span conveys benefits and was selected specifically because it limits life span. These theories have enjoyed a resurgence of popularity because of the discovery of genes that promote aging in various organisms. However, traditional evolution theory has a core tenet that excludes the possibility of evolving and retaining an individually adverse organism design, i.e. a design characteristic that reduces the ability of individual organisms to survive or reproduce without any compensating individual benefit. Various theories of aging dating from the 1950s and based on traditional evolution theory enjoy substantial popularity. Therefore, any theorist proposing an adaptive theory of aging must necessarily also propose some adjustment to traditional evolution theory that specifically addresses the individual benefit issue. This paper describes an adaptive theory of aging and describes how one of the proposed adjustments (evolvability theory) supports adaptive aging. This issue is important because adaptive theories are generally more optimistic regarding prospects for medical intervention in the aging process and also suggest different approaches in achieving such intervention.

  20. Evaluation of a theory-informed implementation intervention for the management of acute low back pain in general medical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    French, Simon D; McKenzie, Joanne E; O'Connor, Denise A

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: This cluster randomised trial evaluated an intervention to decrease x-ray referrals and increase giving advice to stay active for people with acute low back pain (LBP) in general practice. Methods: General practices were randomised to either access to a guideline for acute LBP...... and 45 practices (59 GPs) to the intervention. The number of GPs available for analysis at 12 months varied by outcome due to missing confounder information; a minimum of 38 GPs were available from the intervention group, and a minimum of 40 GPs from the control group. For the behavioural constructs...

  1. A soul, monsters and life on the Moon. Anthropological theory in Wojciech Tylkowski’s baroque scientia curiosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Raubo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the main points of the anthropological theory presented in the work of a baroque encyclopedist Wojciech Tylkowski which is entitled Uczone rozmowy [Learned Conversations] (1692. This theory combined the elements of theology, philosophy, science and common knowledge. It was presented as scientia curiosa, i.e. a convention which was used during the baroque era to popularize science. The most important aspects of the theory are: the concept of the human soul, four temperaments, the structure and operation of sense organs, the reasons for monstrous births, origins and manifestations of insanity, care of a guardian angel for a man, speculations about the idea of plurality of worlds and the possibility of people living on the Moon.

  2. The academic medical center linear disability score (ALDS) item bank: item response theory analysis in a mixed patient population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holman, Rebecca; Weisscher, Nadine; Glas, Cornelis A.W.; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G.W.; Vermeulen, Martinus; de Haan, Rob J.; Lindeboom, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Background: Currently, there is a lot of interest in the flexible framework offered by item banks for measuring patient relevant outcomes. However, there are few item banks, which have been developed to quantify functional status, as expressed by the ability to perform activities of daily life. This

  3. A Statistical Theory for Shape Analysis of Curves and Surfaces with Applications in Image Analysis, Biometrics, Bioinformatics and Medical Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-10

    targets in noisy/corrupted images (Bayesian active contours), finding shape models in point clouds derived from images, shape analysis of facial surfaces...Srivastava and I. H. Jermyn, Bayesian Classification of Shapes Hidden in Point Clouds , Proceedings of 13th Digital Signal Processing Workshop, Marco...CA, June 2010. 18. J. Su, Z. Zhu, F. Huffer, and A. Srivastava, Detecting Shapes in 2D Point Clouds Generated from Images, International Conference on

  4. A New Theory on the Evaluation of Traditional Chinese Acupuncture Mechanisms from the Latest Medical Scientific Point of View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inanç, Betül Battaloğlu

    2015-01-01

    Acupuncture is a key component of traditional Chinese medicine involving the insertion of needles through the skin at specific points on the body to achieve therapeutic effects and is an ancient Chinese art of healing. Using ancient scientific principles, acupuncture treats illnesses by bringing a person's body into harmony and regulating the balance of Yin and Yang. Balancing Yin and Yang is one basic principle of Chinese medicine, and balancing methods for combination of meridians and acupoints have been described throughout the history of Chinese medicine. Clinical observations and principal research on acupuncture focus on the adjustment of the Zang-Fu organ and have shown that the adjustment by acupuncture relied largely on the effective components in different organs. What does this effectiveness mean? In fact, is acupuncture a treatment that shows its effects with signals to the autocrine, paracrine and endocrine pathways? What role does embryology play in this area? Furthermore, molecular biology has opened avenues to newer methods for the study of embryology and to enhance our understanding of growth and development. Can evaluation of acupuncture with these branches of science be more scientific? We discuss this interesting topic in this original article. After all this time, it is reasonable that different therapeutic techniques and approaches are developed for acupuncture.

  5. Considering "Nonlinearity" Across the Continuum in Medical Education Assessment: Supporting Theory, Practice, and Future Research Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durning, Steven J; Lubarsky, Stuart; Torre, Dario; Dory, Valérie; Holmboe, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to propose new approaches to assessment that are grounded in educational theory and the concept of "nonlinearity." The new approaches take into account related phenomena such as "uncertainty," "ambiguity," and "chaos." To illustrate these approaches, we will use the example of assessment of clinical reasoning, although the principles we outline may apply equally well to assessment of other constructs in medical education. Theoretical perspectives include a discussion of script theory, assimilation theory, self-regulated learning theory, and situated cognition. Assessment examples to include script concordance testing, concept maps, self-regulated learning microanalytic technique, and work-based assessment, which parallel the above-stated theories, respectively, are also highlighted. We conclude with some practical suggestions for approaching nonlinearity.

  6. Medication Errors - A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Vinay BC; Nikhitha MK; Patel Sunil B

    2015-01-01

    In this present review article, regarding medication errors its definition, medication error problem, types of medication errors, common causes of medication errors, monitoring medication errors, consequences of medication errors, prevention of medication error and managing medication errors have been explained neatly and legibly with proper tables which is easy to understand.

  7. Medication Errors - A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Vinay BC; Nikhitha MK; Patel Sunil B

    2015-01-01

    In this present review article, regarding medication errors its definition, medication error problem, types of medication errors, common causes of medication errors, monitoring medication errors, consequences of medication errors, prevention of medication error and managing medication errors have been explained neatly and legibly with proper tables which is easy to understand.

  8. Competency-based medical education : theory to practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frank, Jason R.; Snell, Linda S.; Ten Cate, Olle; Holmboe, Eric S.; Carraccio, Carol; Swing, Susan R.; Harris, Peter; Glasgow, Nicholas J.; Campbell, Craig; Dath, Deepak; Harden, Ronald M.; Iobst, William; Long, Donlin M.; Mungroo, Rani; Richardson, Denyse L.; Sherbino, Jonathan; Silver, Ivan; Taber, Sarah; Talbot, Martin; Harris, Kenneth A.

    2010-01-01

    Although competency-based medical education (CBME) has attracted renewed interest in recent years among educators and policy-makers in the health care professions, there is little agreement on many aspects of this paradigm. We convened a unique partnership - the International CBME Collaborators - to

  9. Medical diagnosis of legal culpability: the impact of early psychiatric testimony in the 19th century English criminal trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toole, Ciara J

    2012-01-01

    Fast-paced developments in psychiatry, neuroscience and emerging neuroimaging technologies place continual pressure on the legal recognition of mental illness and disease across jurisdictional boundaries. Nevertheless, the Canadian legal definition of exculpatory mental disease in the context of criminal liability has remained largely static, sheltered from the immediate influence of medical theory and advancements. In order to effectively reflect on the intersection of mental health and criminal justice systems in this area, it is important to understand its historical development and the English common law origins of the current approach. Specifically turning to the early 19th century, documented history and accounts of early medical witness testimony on the mental state of the accused provide a unique opportunity to understand the initial collision between fundamental concepts of moral and legal culpability and new scientific understandings of mental function and disease. In this article, I suggest that early psychiatric testimony to the accused's mental state challenged the evolving criminal law of 19th century England to reconcile its restrictive definition of "insanity" with expanding scientific reasoning and accounts of mental disease. The trial of Edward Oxford, an attempted royal assassination case of 1840, is examined as a symbolic height in this conflict prior to the first common law pronouncement of the current approach in 1843. As debate continues on the role of medical advancement in the identification of exculpatory medical disorders in law, this historical perspective may serve as a touchstone in balancing the enforcement of legal culpability with our society's greater appreciation for mental illness.

  10. Towards a theory of spacetime theories

    CERN Document Server

    Schiemann, Gregor; Scholz, Erhard

    2017-01-01

    This contributed volume is the result of a July 2010 workshop at the University of Wuppertal Interdisciplinary Centre for Science and Technology Studies which brought together world-wide experts from physics, philosophy and history, in order to address a set of questions first posed in the 1950s: How do we compare spacetime theories? How do we judge, objectively, which is the “best” theory? Is there even a unique answer to this question? The goal of the workshop, and of this book, is to contribute to the development of a meta-theory of spacetime theories. Such a meta-theory would reveal insights about specific spacetime theories by distilling their essential similarities and differences, deliver a framework for a class of theories that could be helpful as a blueprint to build other meta-theories, and provide a higher level viewpoint for judging which theory most accurately describes nature. But rather than drawing a map in broad strokes, the focus is on particularly rich regions in the “space of spaceti...

  11. Rethinking agency and medical adherence technology: applying Actor Network Theory to the case study of Digital Pills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado-de-Mendoza, Alejandra; Cabling, Mark L; Sheppard, Vanessa B

    2015-12-01

    Much literature surrounding medical technology and adherence posits that technology is a mechanism for social control. This assumes that the medical establishment can take away patients' agency. Although power relationships and social control can play a key role, medical technology can also serve as an agentive tool to be utilized. We (1) offer the alternative framework of Actor Network Theory to view medical technology, (2) discuss the literature on medication adherence and technology, (3) delve into the ramifications of looking at adherence as a network and (4) use Digital Pills as a case study of dispersed agency.

  12. General Medical Practitioners Need to Be Aware of the Theories on Which Our Work Depend

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Paul

    2006-01-01

    When general practitioners and family physicians listen, reflect, and diagnose, we use 3 different theories of knowledge. This essay explores these theories to highlight an approach to clinical practice, inquiry, and learning that can do justice to the complex and uncertain world we experience. The following points are made: (1) A variety of approaches to research and audit are needed to illuminate the richness of experience witnessed by general medical practitioners. (2) Evidence about the past cannot predict the future except in simple, short-term, or slowly changing situations. (3) We consciously or unconsciously weave together evidence generated through 3 fundamental theories of knowledge, termed postpositivism, critical theory, and constructivism, to make sense of everyday experience. We call it listening, reflecting, and diagnosing. (4) These 3 fundamental theories of knowledge highlight different aspects within a world that is more complex, integrated, and changing than any single theory can reveal on its own; they frame what we see and how we act in everyday situations. (5) Moving appropriately between these different theories helps us to see a fuller picture and provides a framework for improving our skills as clinicians, researchers, and learners. (6) Narrative unity offers a way to bring together different kinds of evidence to understand the overall health of patients and of communities; evidence of all kinds provides discrete snapshots of more complex stories in evolution. (7) We need to understand these issues so we can create an agenda for clinical practice, inquiry, and learning appropriate to our discipline. PMID:17003147

  13. Evolution of Aging Theories: Why Modern Programmed Aging Concepts Are Transforming Medical Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Theodore C

    2016-12-01

    Programmed aging refers to the idea that senescence in humans and other organisms is purposely caused by evolved biological mechanisms to obtain an evolutionary advantage. Until recently, programmed aging was considered theoretically impossible because of the mechanics of the evolution process, and medical research was based on the idea that aging was not programmed. Theorists struggled for more than a century in efforts to develop non-programmed theories that fit observations, without obtaining a consensus supporting any non-programmed theory. Empirical evidence of programmed lifespan limitations continued to accumulate. More recently, developments, especially in our understanding of biological inheritance, have exposed major issues and complexities regarding the process of evolution, some of which explicitly enable programmed aging of mammals. Consequently, science-based opposition to programmed aging has dramatically declined. This progression has major implications for medical research, because the theories suggest that very different biological mechanisms are ultimately responsible for highly age-related diseases that now represent most research efforts and health costs. Most particularly, programmed theories suggest that aging per se is a treatable condition and suggest a second path toward treating and preventing age-related diseases that can be exploited in addition to the traditional disease-specific approaches. The theories also make predictions regarding the nature of biological aging mechanisms and therefore suggest research directions. This article discusses developments of evolutionary mechanics, the consequent programmed aging theories, and logical inferences concerning biological aging mechanisms. It concludes that major medical research organizations cannot afford to ignore programmed aging concepts in assigning research resources and directions.

  14. The Determinants of Medical Tourism Intentions: Applying the Theory of Planned Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramamonjiarivelo, Zo; Martin, David S; Martin, Warren S

    2015-01-01

    This study introduces the theory of planned behavior to health care marketers by extending and replicating a prior study that predicted student's intention to engage in medical tourism. Based on a sample of 164 usable survey responses, our findings suggested that the MEDTOUR scale (developed and introduced a prior study) is robust and works reasonably well with a national sample. Based on these findings, MEDTOUR appears to be worthy of further consideration by health marketing scholars.

  15. Using the theory of planned behavior to predict self-medication with over-the-counter analgesics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineles, Lisa L; Parente, Rick

    2013-12-01

    Millions of people worldwide use over-the-counter analgesics on a regular basis; yet little is known about how decisions to self-medicate are made. This study used the theory of planned behavior to explore the influence of beliefs about medicines (Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire) and individual pain experience as predictors of intent to self-medicate. Both emerged as significant predictors of intent to self-medicate. Furthermore, intent to self-medicate significantly predicted reported use of analgesics. These findings indicate that use of over-the-counter pain medication is more likely when the value of the pain relief is greater than concerns about harm.

  16. 计划行为理论在医药消费行为领域的适用性研究%A Study on the Applicability of Theory of Planned Behavior in the Field of Medical Consumer Behavior

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马婕; 常峰

    2011-01-01

    Theory of planned behavior is considered to be the most famous social psychology attitude behavior relations theory, in foreign countries has been widely used in many research areas for action.This paper,with the theory of planned behavior as a starting point,inquires into its applicability in medical consumer behavior.%计划行为理论被认为是社会心理学中最著名的态度行为关系理论,在国外已被广泛应用于多个行为领域的研究。文章以计划行为理论为出发点,对其在医药消费行为研究中的适用性进行探讨。

  17. Leadership theory and motivation of medical imaging employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalar, Traci; Wright, Donna Lee

    2007-01-01

    *This literature review explores how transactional, transformational, and charismatic leadership theories might be applied in a typical stressful hypothetical department situation. *Transactional department leaders motivate employees using extrinsic rewards, encouraging them to do what is needed to get the minimal results with no encouragement for higher levels of thinking. *Transformational department leaders motivate employees by transforming their beliefs and values to be more in alignment with the organization's values and goals. This alignment helps create higher levels of intrinsic motivation. *Charismatic leaders exhibit the same behaviors as transformational leaders to motivate employees; however; because of their specific characteristics, their effectiveness can be limited to only times of distress or crisis. The situation in the particular department determines which leadership theory is likely to be most successful.

  18. Existentialism and postmodernism. Continuities, breaks, and some consequences for medical theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, D

    1994-01-01

    Since existentialism lost its influence in philosophy in the 1960s, postmodern theory has taken over criticizing basic concepts of western thought. From a postmodern point of view, the main shortcomings of existentialism is that it criticizes traditional unitarian concepts, while re-inventing new unitarian models. Against these unitarian approaches postmodernism holds that the world can only be described in terms of difference. In this article the postmodern program and its differences from existentialism are explained in reference to three concepts of western philosophy: subject, truth, and ethics. Applying these concepts, the relevance of postmodernism for medical theory is illustrated.

  19. Fake insanes and fools: another way of playing (without disguise in Lope de Vega's theatre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Enrique López Martínez

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:In this work I study the theme of fake insanity and foolishness in Spanish Baroque Drama, starting with the work of Lope de Vega. In the first place, I consider some important sources in Italian Drama, specially Grazzini’s La Spiritata and Girolamo Bargagli’s La Pellegrina. Afterwards, I analyse in chronological order some of Lope’s plays that introduce this theme in Hispanic Theater, written at the turn of the XVIIth Century, such as Los locos de Valencia and El mármol de Felisardo; until many late plays by Lope and other playwrights that kept on reproducing the literary elements of those early comedias. In this survey, I examine the metatheatrical sense of fake insanity, the dramatic subgenres where it was featured, its importance for the plots, and its relation to other forms of dramatic deception, like the woman in male disguise and the nobleman as servant; as well as some dramatic and literary devices it relied on: the different kinds of simulated madness, its discoursive features, and the motif of the fake wedding. Resumen:En este trabajo se analiza el desarrollo del tema de la locura y la simpleza fingida en el teatro barroco español, a partir de la obra de Lope de Vega. Primero, se consideran algunos importantes antecedentes italianos, especialmente las obras La Spiritata, de Grazzini, y La Pellegrina, de Girolamo Bargagli. Después, se analizan con detalle y en orden cronológico algunas comedias del Fénix escritas en la última década del siglo XVI y primera del XVII en que introduce este tema en el teatro hispánico, como Los locos de Valencia o El mármol de Felisardo, hasta mencionar varias obras tardías del propio Lope y otros autores que continuaron reproduciendo los recursos de aquellas comedias tempranas. En este recorrido, se hace énfasis en el carácter metateatral de la locura fingida, los subgéneros dramáticos en la que fue incluida, importancia argumental, formas de caracterización y relación con

  20. Predicting intention to treat HIV-infected patients among Tanzanian and Sudanese medical and dental students using the theory of planned behaviour - a cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasir Elwalid F

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The HIV epidemic poses significant challenges to the low income countries in sub Saharan Africa (SSA, affecting the attrition rate among health care workers, their level of motivation, and absenteeism from work. Little is known about how to deal with deterioration of human resources in the health care systems. This study aimed to predict the intention to provide surgical treatment to HIV infected patients among medical- and dental students in Tanzania and Sudan using an extended version of the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB. Methods Four hundred and seventy five medical- and dental students at the University of Dar es Salaam (mean age, 25 yr and 642 dental students attending 6 public and private dental faculties in Khartoum (mean age 21.7 yr completed self-administered TPB questionnaires in 2005 and 2007, respectively. Results Both Tanzanian and Sudanese students demonstrated strong intentions to provide care for people with HIV and AIDS. Stepwise linear regression revealed that the TPB accounted for 51% (43% in Tanzania and Sudan of the variance in intention across study sites. After having controlled for country and past behaviour, the TPB in terms of attitudes, subjective norms and perceived behavioural control accounted for 34% and moral norms for an additional 2,3% of the explainable variance in intention. Across both study sites, attitudes were the strongest predictor of intention followed in descending order by subjective norms, moral norms and perceived behavioural control. Conclusion The TPB is applicable to students' care delivery intentions in the context of HIV and AIDS across the two SSA countries investigated. It is suggested that attitudes, subjective norms, moral norms and perceived behavioural control are key factors in students' willingness to treat AIDS and HIV infected patients and should be targets of interventions aimed at improving the quality of health care delivery in this context.

  1. Translational ethics? The theory-practice gap in medical ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cribb, Alan

    2010-04-01

    Translational research is now a critically important current in academic medicine. Researchers in all health-related fields are being encouraged not only to demonstrate the potential benefits of their research but also to help identify the steps through which their research might be 'made practical'. This paper considers the prospects of a corresponding movement of 'translational ethics'. Some of the advantages and disadvantages of focusing upon the translation of ethical scholarship are reviewed. While emphasising the difficulties of crossing the gap between scholarship and practice, the paper concludes that a debate about the business of translation would be useful for medical ethics.

  2. A Medical Delivery Device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention relates to a medical delivery device comprising at least two membrane electrode assembly units each of which comprises three layers: an upper and a lower electrode and a selective ionic conductive membrane provided there-between. At least one of the three layers are shared...

  3. A Medical Delivery Device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention relates to a medical delivery device comprising at least two membrane electrode assembly units each of which comprises three layers: an upper and a lower electrode and a selective ionic conductive membrane provided there-between. At least one of the three layers are shared...

  4. A CONFORMATIONAL ELASTICITY THEORY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    A new statistical theory based on the rotational isomeric state model describing the chain conformational free energy has been proposed. This theory can be used to predict different tensions of rubber elongation for chemically different polymers, and the energy term during the elongation of natural rubber coincides with the experimental one.

  5. Practical trials in medical education: linking theory, practice and decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolsgaard, Martin G; Kulasegaram, Kulamakan M; Ringsted, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    Concerns have been raised over the gap between education theory and practice and how research can contribute to inform decision makers on their choices and priorities. Little is known about how educational theories and research outcomes produced under optimal conditions in highly controlled settings generalise to the real-life education context. One way of bridging this gap is applying the concept of practical trials in medical education. In this paper we elaborate on characteristics of practical trials and based on examples from medical education we discuss the challenges, limitations and future directions for this kind of research. Practical trials have the overall aim of informing decision makers. They are carried out in real-life settings and are characterised by (i) comparison of viable alternative education strategies, (ii) broad inclusion criteria regarding participants across several settings and (iii) multiple outcome measures with long-term follow-up to evaluate both benefits and risks. Questions posed by practical trials may be proactive in applying theory in the development of educational innovations or reactive to educational reforms and innovations. Non-inferiority or equivalence designs are recommended when comparing viable alternatives and the use of crossover designs, cluster randomisation or stepped wedge trial designs are feasible when studying implementations across several settings. Outcome measures may include variables related to learners, teachers, educational administration, quality of care, patient outcomes and cost. Practical trials in medical education may contribute to bridge the gap between education theory and practice and aid decision makers in making evidence-based choices and priorities. Conducting practical trials is not without challenges and rigorous design and methods must be applied. Of concern is that the practical focus may lead to failure to include a sound theoretical basis in the research questions and the interventions

  6. The investigation of children and insane'scriminal liability in Imamiyah jurisprudence (Figh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohaddese Yahyapour

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A punishment decree regarding children is not contrary to the hadith of Raf' al-Qalam and lack of criminal liability.In other words, since the Islamic criminal law have rational system and deliberate policy, so it has chosen a balanced approach about child offenders.This means that, they are not exempt from any responsibility in general but is not considered like adults responsible for them.That is, the determination of criminal liability in this comprehensive legal system is considering the physical and psychological situation of children and the development of sense of discernment in them.Considering the importance of child delinquency issue and their and society improvement in the future,Islam hasconsidered it is necessary to adopt certain security and training measures in criminal law and even some mild safeguarding measures and has ordered some punishment, such as censure, reprimand, beat. Furthermore, the insane person is free of obligations and responsibilities inImamiyah jurisprudence, Hadd in Sahih narration of Abu Ubaidah which is mentioned earlier,does not include punishment, and it is bind by those narration that considered the respect of interest is necessary in implementing punishment. As a result, the second decree is regardedlimited toHudud, otherwise, there is no another reason in relation to this issue. Therefore, the madness make toexclude the punishment.

  7. “武疯子”事件武力控制及专项教学研究%The Military Control and Special Teaching of the“Violent Insane Persons”

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈晓明; 陈永辉

    2015-01-01

    “武疯子”是一个特殊社会群体,“武疯子”暴力行为对社会危害性大,开展“武疯子”事件武力控制专项教学意义重大。对“武疯子”闹事特征、“武疯子”闹事武力控制特征、警察处置“武疯子”闹事能力进行分析,在此基础上制定公安院校武力控制专项教学的科学训练板块、科学训练流程和明确教官分工和组织实施任务尤为重要。%Is a distinct group of people in a society, the violent behaviour of the? “Violent Insane Persons”poses a big threat to the society, introducing a course in the“Control on the Violent Insane Persons”is therefore very important and in need.Regarding the common? factors found on the“Violent Insane Persons”, the special control methods used against the“Violent Insane Persons” after violent crimes are caused, analysis on police actions in the control of “Violent Insane Persons”, based on the above stated points, Public Security University/Colleges will develop a training course on the use of force to control, to arrange a scientific training timetable, specific tasks assigned to the instructors, and to organise operations.

  8. A novel method to use fuzzy soft sets in decision making based on ambiguity measure and Dempster-Shafer theory of evidence: An application in medical diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianwei; Hu, Yong; Xiao, Fuyuan; Deng, Xinyang; Deng, Yong

    2016-05-01

    Recently, fuzzy soft sets-based decision making has attracted more and more interest. Although plenty of works have been done, they cannot provide the uncertainty or certainty of their results. To manage uncertainty is one of the most important and toughest tasks of decision making especially in medicine. In this study, we improve the performance of reducing uncertainty and raising the choice decision level in fuzzy soft set-based decision making. We make use of two appropriate tools (ambiguity measure and Dempster-Shafer theory of evidence) to improve fuzzy soft set-based decision making. Our proposed approach consists of three procedures: primarily, the uncertainty degree of each parameter is obtained by using ambiguity measure; next, the suitable basic probability assignment with respect to each parameter (or evidence) is constructed based on the uncertainty degree of each parameter obtained in the first step; in the end, the classical Dempster's combination rule is applied to aggregate independent evidences into the collective evidence, by which the candidate alternatives are ranked and the best alternative will be obtained. We compare the results of our proposed method with the recent relative works. Through employing our presented approach, in Example 5, the belief measure of the uncertainty falls to 0.0051 from 0.0751; in Example 6, the belief measure of the uncertainty drops to 0.0086 from 0.0547; in Example 7, the belief measure of the uncertainty falls to 0.0847 from 0.1647; in application, the belief measure of the uncertainty drops 0.0001 from 0.0069. Three numerical examples and an application in medical diagnosis are provided to demonstrate adequately that, on the one hand, our proposed method is feasible and efficient; on the other hand, our proposed method can reduce uncertainty caused by people's subjective cognition and raise the choice decision level with the best performance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Coverage of Rosenhan's "On Being Sane in Insane Places" in Abnormal Psychology Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Jared M.; Peters, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    The present study examined 12 abnormal psychology textbooks to determine whether Rosenhan's classic study, "Being sane in insane places," was covered, and if so, the nature of that coverage. Only 50% covered the study, with all describing the study as demonstrating the biasing power of psychiatric labels. Two key aspects of the study…

  10. Medical radiation dosimetry theory of charged particle collision energy loss

    CERN Document Server

    McParland, Brian J

    2014-01-01

    Accurate radiation dosimetry is a requirement of radiation oncology, diagnostic radiology and nuclear medicine. It is necessary so as to satisfy the needs of patient safety, therapeutic and diagnostic optimisation, and retrospective epidemiological studies of the biological effects resulting from low absorbed doses of ionising radiation. The radiation absorbed dose received by the patient is the ultimate consequence of the transfer of kinetic energy through collisions between energetic charged particles and atoms of the tissue being traversed. Thus, the ability of the medical physicist to both measure and calculate accurately patient dosimetry demands a deep understanding of the physics of charged particle interactions with matter. Interestingly, the physics of charged particle energy loss has an almost exclusively theoretical basis, thus necessitating an advanced theoretical understanding of the subject in order to apply it appropriately to the clinical regime. ​ Each year, about one-third of the worl...

  11. Taking decision theory and its application in the medical assistance field (I. La teoría sobre la toma de decisiones y su aplicación al campo de la asistencia médica (I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Alberto Corona Martínez

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Decision making is a necessary element in the medical work. This article is a part of a series of articles that is aimed at divulging some theoretical aspects about decision making and their concrete application in the medical assistance. This paper analyses the classic (rational and behavioural theories in decision making.

    La toma de decisiones es un elemento necesariamente presente en la labor asistencial del médico. Este artículo forma parte de una serie que tiene como propósito la divulgación de algunos aspectos teóricos generales acerca del proceso de toma de decisiones y la aplicación concreta de estos en la asistencia médica. En este trabajo son analizadas las teorías clásica (racional y conductista de la toma de decisiones.

  12. Hell of a theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Joachim I

    2016-01-01

    The theory of group-selected Big God religions is a master narrative of cultural evolution. The evidence is a positive manifold of correlated assumptions and variables. Although provocative, the theory is overly elastic. Its critical ingredient - belief in Big Gods - is neither necessary nor sufficient to account for in-group prosociality and discipline. Four specific issues illustrate this elasticity.

  13. When is a theory a theory? A case example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkin, Marvin C

    2016-10-15

    This discussion comments on the approximately 20years history of writings on the prescriptive theory called Empowerment Evaluation. To do so, involves examining how "Empowerment Evaluation Theory" has been defined at various points of time (particularly 1996 and now in 2015). Defining a theory is different from judging the success of a theory. This latter topic has been addressed elsewhere by Michael Scriven, Michael Patton, and Brad Cousins. I am initially guided by the work of Robin Miller (2010) who has written on the issue of how to judge the success of a theory. In doing so, she provided potential standards for judging the adequacy of theories. My task is not judging the adequacy or success of the Empowerment Evaluation prescriptive theory in practice, but determining how well the theory is delineated. That is, to what extent do the writings qualify as a prescriptive theory.

  14. The Application of Catastrophe Theory to Medical Image Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijper, Arjan; Florack, L.M.J.

    2002-01-01

    In order to investigate the deep structure of Gaussian scale space images, one needs to understand the behaviour of critical points under the influence of blurring. We show how the mathematical framework of catastrophe theory can be used to describe the various different types of annihilations and c

  15. Factors affecting nursing students' intention to report medication errors: An application of the theory of planned behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Natan, Merav; Sharon, Ira; Mahajna, Marlen; Mahajna, Sara

    2017-11-01

    Medication errors are common among nursing students. Nonetheless, these errors are often underreported. To examine factors related to nursing students' intention to report medication errors, using the Theory of Planned Behavior, and to examine whether the theory is useful in predicting students' intention to report errors. This study has a descriptive cross-sectional design. Study population was recruited in a university and a large nursing school in central and northern Israel. A convenience sample of 250 nursing students took part in the study. The students completed a self-report questionnaire, based on the Theory of Planned Behavior. The findings indicate that students' intention to report medication errors was high. The Theory of Planned Behavior constructs explained 38% of variance in students' intention to report medication errors. The constructs of behavioral beliefs, subjective norms, and perceived behavioral control were found as affecting this intention, while the most significant factor was behavioral beliefs. The findings also reveal that students' fear of the reaction to disclosure of the error from superiors and colleagues may impede them from reporting the error. Understanding factors related to reporting medication errors is crucial to designing interventions that foster error reporting. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Sorting a distribution theory

    CERN Document Server

    Mahmoud, Hosam M

    2011-01-01

    A cutting-edge look at the emerging distributional theory of sorting Research on distributions associated with sorting algorithms has grown dramatically over the last few decades, spawning many exact and limiting distributions of complexity measures for many sorting algorithms. Yet much of this information has been scattered in disparate and highly specialized sources throughout the literature. In Sorting: A Distribution Theory, leading authority Hosam Mahmoud compiles, consolidates, and clarifies the large volume of available research, providing a much-needed, comprehensive treatment of the

  17. Direitos das pessoas com transtorno mental autoras de delitos The rights of criminally insane individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludmila Cerqueira Correia

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available O Movimento pela Reforma Psiquiátrica tem subsidiado propostas de reorientação do modelo assistencial hegemônico em saúde mental. Para a assistência às pessoas com transtorno mental autoras de delitos instituiu-se o manicômio judiciário, atualmente denominado Hospital de Custódia e Tratamento Psiquiátrico (HCTP. A manutenção dessa estrutura, reconhecida como instituição total, tem reforçado a exclusão individual, limitando a reinserção social dos internos. Este artigo discute o direito à saúde nos HCTP na perspectiva dos direitos humanos. Os avanços conferidos pela Política Nacional de Saúde Mental não têm contemplado a reorientação da prática assistencial desenvolvida no âmbito do HCTP. Essa instituição tem preservado o seu caráter asilar/segregacionista, evidenciando uma tradição fundada na negação dos direitos humanos. O avanço normativo não consolida, de per si, a materialização das recentes conquistas advindas a partir da Reforma Psiquiátrica, particularmente quanto ao segmento das pessoas com transtorno mental autoras de delitos. O Estado, em co-responsabilidade com a sociedade, deve promover a efetiva reorientação do modelo de atenção à saúde dessas pessoas, cuja responsabilidade penal deverá ser reconhecida ao tempo em que se propicie o tratamento especializado. O respeito aos direitos humanos não implica a inimputabilidade.The Psychiatric Reform Movement has supported proposals to reorient the hegemonic mental health care model. In Brazil, a facility for the criminally insane was created, called the Custody and Psychiatric Treatment Hospital (CPTH. The maintenance of such a structure, known as total institutionalization, has reinforced individual exclusion, limiting the patients' social rehabilitation. This article discusses the right to health in the CPTH from a human rights perspective. The advances achieved in Brazil under the National Mental Health Policy have failed to include

  18. How Iranian Medical Trainees Approach their Responsibilities in Clinical Settings; A Grounded Theory Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Asemani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: It seems we are now experiencing “responsibility problems” among medical trainees (MTs and some of those recently graduated from medical schools in Iran. Training responsible professionals have always been one of the main concerns of medical educators. Nevertheless, there is a dearth of research in the literature on “responsibility” especially from the medical education point of view. Therefore, the present study was carried out with the aim of presenting a theoretical based framework for understanding how MTs approach their responsibilities in educational settings. Method: This qualitative study was conducted at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences (SUMS using the grounded theory methodology. 15 MTs and 10 clinical experts and professional nurses were purposefully chosen as participants. Data was analyzed using the methodology suggested by Corbin and Strauss, 1998. Results: “Try to find acceptance toward expectations”, “try to be committed to meet the expectations” and “try to cope with unacceptable expectations” were three main categories extracted based on the research data. Abstractly, the main objective for using these processes was “to preserve the integrity of student identity” which was the core category of this research too. Moreover, it was also found that practically, “responsibility” is considerably influenced by lots of positive and negative contextual and intervening conditions. Conclusion: “Acceptance” was the most decisive variable highly effective in MTs’ responsibility. Therefore, investigating the “process of acceptance” regarding the involved contextual and intervening conditions might help medical educators correctly identify and effectively control negative factors and reinforce the constructive ones that affect the concept of responsibility in MTs.

  19. Expert Medical Decision-Making: How the Data-Frame Theory Can Explain Physician Sense-Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Darren; Singh, Gurmeet

    2017-01-01

    The major task of physicians is decision making. This is often done in time pressured situations. The traditional theory of decision making does not reflect this reality and naturalistic decision making is a more appropriate model. The first step is to make sense of the patient or the problem and the Data-Frame Theory of Klein seems to be the best model. This model has significant implications in the way we view clinical information systems, communication and medical education.

  20. Photography and insanity: a sight over the human condition on the experience of the mental disturbance Fotografia e loucura: um olhar sobre a condição humana na experiência do transtorno mental

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Carlos Bulla Júnior

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available This work came out of a project which consisted in the building of a photo essay in a psychiatric institution, in order to achieve an imagetic discourse over the experience of the mental disturbance. A presupposition was adopted, that of photography allowing the proximity of the observer to this reality, by means of a visual message. This procedure should be instrumental in making people become more concerned about the significance of such proximity, which is not confined to those who are inside of an institution. O presente trabalho é resultado de um projeto que consistiu na realização de um ensaio fotográfico numa instituição psiquiátrica, a fim de construir um discurso imagético sobre a experiência do transtorno mental. Partiu-se do pressuposto de que a fotografia possibilita a aproximação do observador a esta realidade, por meio de uma mensagem visual que faz também refletir sobre o que significa essa proximidade, a qual não se torna restrita somente àqueles que se encontram por detrás dos muros de uma instituição.

  1. String Theory as a Higher Spin Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Gaberdiel, Matthias R

    2015-01-01

    The symmetries of string theory on ${\\rm AdS}_3 \\times {\\rm S}^3 \\times \\mathbb{T}^4$ at the dual of the symmetric product orbifold point are described by a so-called Higher Spin Square (HSS). We show that the massive string spectrum in this background organises itself in terms of representations of this HSS, just as the matter in a conventional higher spin theory does so in terms of representations of the higher spin algebra. In particular, the entire untwisted sector of the orbifold can be viewed as the Fock space built out of the multiparticle states of a single representation of the HSS, the so-called `minimal' representation. The states in the twisted sector can be described in terms of tensor products of a novel family of representations that are somewhat larger than the minimal one.

  2. Literary Theory: A Pedagogy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, Roger Lee

    This dissertation dealt with the preparation, designing, teaching, and evaluation of a course in literary theory. The course examined the following areas of literary study: definition, perception, description, explication, interpretation, and evaluation. It is centered on the following theses: (1) in literary pursuits criticism is teaching and…

  3. STRATEGI PENINGKATAN ASET PT BPR SYARIAH HARTA INSAN KARIMAH (HIK CILEDUG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fajri Ryan Isnandar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were 1 to analyze the conditions of the performance competition on the financial aspect of BPRS HIK Ciledug and the market leader in BPRS industry; 2 to identify the internal and external factors affecting the corporate development and strategic position of BPRS HIK Ciledug based on these factors; and 3 to formulate an accurate alternative strategy and a priority that can be recommended to the company in achieving its goals. Analysis of the evaluation of internal and external factors based on the components contained in the Shari'ah Maqashid and based on the components on The Porter's Five Forces. The analysis of the company's strategic position based on the market growth rate and relative market share on the internal strength was conducted by using BCG matrix (Boston Consulting Group, and the analysis on the alternative strategy formulation was conducted by using IE matrix (Internal-External Matrix, and the QSPM analysis served to determine the priority strategies to increase the assets of BPRS HIK Ciledug. The main weaknesses that should be handled is the lack of scoring systems of financing and the main opportunity is the great number of written requirements for obtaining the financing provided by its competitors. The prioritized strategies of SRB HIK Ciledug include: 1 product development strategy to create innovative products, 2 Market penetration strategy by changing the amount of share returns, 3 Market development strategy by opening new branches, and 4 Backward, forward and horizontal integration strategies by introducing products to various industries.Keywords:  strategies in increasing assets, sharia community financing bank, BPRS Harta Insan Karimah, QSPM

  4. A clockwork theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giudice, Gian F.; McCullough, Matthew

    2017-02-01

    The clockwork is a mechanism for generating light particles with exponentially suppressed interactions in theories which contain no small parameters at the fundamental level. We develop a general description of the clockwork mechanism valid for scalars, fermions, gauge bosons, and gravitons. This mechanism can be implemented with a discrete set of new fields or, in its continuum version, through an extra spatial dimension. In both cases the clockwork emerges as a useful tool for model-building applications. Notably, the continuum clockwork offers a solution to the Higgs naturalness problem, which turns out to be the same as in linear dilaton duals of Little String Theory. We also elucidate the similarities and differences of the continuum clockwork with large extra dimensions and warped spaces. All clockwork models, in the discrete and continuum, exhibit novel phenomenology with a distinctive spectrum of closely spaced resonances.

  5. A Clockwork Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Giudice, Gian F.

    2016-01-01

    The clockwork is a mechanism for generating light particles with exponentially suppressed interactions in theories which contain no small parameters at the fundamental level. We develop a general description of the clockwork mechanism valid for scalars, fermions, gauge bosons, and gravitons. This mechanism can be implemented with a discrete set of new fields or, in its continuum version, through an extra spatial dimension. In both cases the clockwork emerges as a useful tool for model-building applications. Notably, the continuum clockwork offers a solution to the Higgs naturalness problem, which turns out to be the same as in linear dilaton duals of Little String Theory. We also elucidate the similarities and differences of the continuum clockwork with large extra dimensions and warped spaces. All clockwork models, in the discrete and continuum, exhibit novel phenomenology with a distinctive spectrum of closely spaced resonances.

  6. The Theory of Bio-Medical Knowledge Integration(Ⅵ)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAO Han-fei

    2006-01-01

    This paper introduced the following new concepts:the cognitive goal, the cognitive goal for the declarative data of the patient records (PRs), The basic attributes of PR's data at the sides of generation, construction and cognition, the generalized data creator (GDC), type Ⅰ to Ⅵ+ of GDC, the cognitive directions of data: forward direction and backward direction, the apparent cognitive orientation and inapparent cognitive orientation, the cognitive granularity difference principle between the natural intelligence and the artificial intelligence, the generalized variable(GVAR) and the generalized value(GVAL), the variable and value transitivity law(V-V transitivity law), the attribute-combination irreversibility between the concept abstracting and embodying, an open model of the launching engine of bio-medical cognition, etc

  7. Islamic medical ethics: a primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padela, Aasim I

    2007-03-01

    Modern medical practice is becoming increasingly pluralistic and diverse. Hence, cultural competency and awareness are given more focus in physician training seminars and within medical school curricula. A renewed interest in describing the varied ethical constructs of specific populations has taken place within medical literature. This paper aims to provide an overview of Islamic Medical Ethics. Beginning with a definition of Islamic Medical Ethics, the reader will be introduced to the scope of Islamic Medical Ethics literature, from that aimed at developing moral character to writings grounded in Islamic law. In the latter form, there is an attempt to derive an Islamic perspective on bioethical issues such as abortion, gender relations within the patient-doctor relationship, end-of-life care and euthanasia. It is hoped that the insights gained will aid both clinicians and ethicists to better understand the Islamic paradigm of medical ethics and thereby positively affect patient care.

  8. Effectiveness of skeleton handouts during ophthalmology theory lectures for undergraduate medical students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, Venkatesan; Sahoo, Soumendra; Soe, Htoo Htoo Kyaw

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although lecture handouts are commonly given to students during theory lectures, students’ perception, as well as their performance, can vary depending on the type of handouts they receive for information processing. Methodology: This is a quasi-experimental study involving 6th semester medical students. The study was conducted during theory lectures on ophthalmology. The two types of notes given to the students were comprehensive handout and a skeleton handout, which included some lecture notes but required substantial annotation by the students. Pre-test and post-test in the form of multiple choice questions were conducted before and after the lecture session, respectively. Results: There was a significant difference of mean score of pre- and post-test between skeletal handout (pre = 1.85 ± 1.275, post = 4.85 ± 0.363) and full handout (pre = 1.92 ± 1.09 post = 2.61 ± 0.771) with P < 0.001. However, the students’ responses to questionnaires indicated a strong preference for much detailed handouts as essential to preparation for examinations. Conclusion: The student can improve their performance during examination while working on skeletal handouts during theory lectures in spite of showing a preference for complete handouts. PMID:26380205

  9. From Theory to Practice: Utilizing Competency-based Milestones to Assess Professional Growth and Development in the Foundational Science Blocks of a Pre-Clerkship Medical School Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettepher, Cathleen C; Lomis, Kimberly D; Osheroff, Neil

    2016-09-01

    Physicians-in-training require skills and attitudes beyond medical knowledge in order to mature into successful clinicians. However, because assessments in pre-clerkship curricula historically have focused almost exclusively on medical knowledge, faculty contributions to early student development often have been limited. To address this challenge and enhance student progress, we re-designed our pre-clerkship curriculum to include settings in which diverse facets of student performance could be observed and fostered. Concurrently, we transitioned to an assessment strategy focused on competency-based milestones. The implementation of this strategy has allowed pre-clerkship science faculty to provide early-stage students with rich holistic feedback designed to stimulate their professional growth.

  10. Older adults' pain communication during ambulatory medical visits: an exploration of communication accommodation theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hehl, Jennifer; McDonald, Deborah Dillon

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this descriptive secondary analysis was to explore the use of Communication Accommodation Theory as a framework to examine pain communication strategies used by older adults and their primary care practitioners during medical ambulatory care visits. Ambulatory medical visits for 22 older adults with moderate or greater osteoarthritis pain were audiotaped, transcribed verbatim, and coded by two independent raters for six a priori communication strategies derived from the attuning strategies of Communication Accommodation Theory: (1) patient selecting the pain topic; (2) patient taking a turn; (3) patient maintaining focus on the pain topic; (4) practitioner using an open-ended question without social desirability to start the pain discussion; (5) practitioner encouraging the patient to take a turn by asking open-ended questions; and (6) practitioner interruptions. The majority of practitioners did not start the pain discussion with an open-ended question, but did not interrupt the older adults as they discussed their pain. Five (22.7%) of the older adults did not discuss their osteoarthritis pain during the ambulatory medical visit. The majority of patients took their turn during the pain discussion, but did not maintain focus while describing important osteoarthritis pain information to their practitioner. Practitioners might assist older adults to communicate more information about their pain by initiating the pain discussion with an open-ended pain question. Older adults might provide more pain information to their practitioner by staying on the pain topic until they have completed all of the pain information they wish to discuss with the practitioner.

  11. Evaluation of a theory-informed implementation intervention for the management of acute low back pain in general medical practice: the IMPLEMENT cluster randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Simon D; McKenzie, Joanne E; O'Connor, Denise A; Grimshaw, Jeremy M; Mortimer, Duncan; Francis, Jill J; Michie, Susan; Spike, Neil; Schattner, Peter; Kent, Peter; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Page, Matthew J; Green, Sally E

    2013-01-01

    This cluster randomised trial evaluated an intervention to decrease x-ray referrals and increase giving advice to stay active for people with acute low back pain (LBP) in general practice. General practices were randomised to either access to a guideline for acute LBP (control) or facilitated interactive workshops (intervention). We measured behavioural predictors (e.g. knowledge, attitudes and intentions) and fear avoidance beliefs. We were unable to recruit sufficient patients to measure our original primary outcomes so we introduced other outcomes measured at the general practitioner (GP) level: behavioural simulation (clinical decision about vignettes) and rates of x-ray and CT-scan (medical administrative data). All those not involved in the delivery of the intervention were blinded to allocation. 47 practices (53 GPs) were randomised to the control and 45 practices (59 GPs) to the intervention. The number of GPs available for analysis at 12 months varied by outcome due to missing confounder information; a minimum of 38 GPs were available from the intervention group, and a minimum of 40 GPs from the control group. For the behavioural constructs, although effect estimates were small, the intervention group GPs had greater intention of practising consistent with the guideline for the clinical behaviour of x-ray referral. For behavioural simulation, intervention group GPs were more likely to adhere to guideline recommendations about x-ray (OR 1.76, 95%CI 1.01, 3.05) and more likely to give advice to stay active (OR 4.49, 95%CI 1.90 to 10.60). Imaging referral was not statistically significantly different between groups and the potential importance of effects was unclear; rate ratio 0.87 (95%CI 0.68, 1.10) for x-ray or CT-scan. The intervention led to small changes in GP intention to practice in a manner that is consistent with an evidence-based guideline, but it did not result in statistically significant changes in actual behaviour. Australian New Zealand

  12. Evaluation of a theory-informed implementation intervention for the management of acute low back pain in general medical practice: the IMPLEMENT cluster randomised trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon D French

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: This cluster randomised trial evaluated an intervention to decrease x-ray referrals and increase giving advice to stay active for people with acute low back pain (LBP in general practice. METHODS: General practices were randomised to either access to a guideline for acute LBP (control or facilitated interactive workshops (intervention. We measured behavioural predictors (e.g. knowledge, attitudes and intentions and fear avoidance beliefs. We were unable to recruit sufficient patients to measure our original primary outcomes so we introduced other outcomes measured at the general practitioner (GP level: behavioural simulation (clinical decision about vignettes and rates of x-ray and CT-scan (medical administrative data. All those not involved in the delivery of the intervention were blinded to allocation. RESULTS: 47 practices (53 GPs were randomised to the control and 45 practices (59 GPs to the intervention. The number of GPs available for analysis at 12 months varied by outcome due to missing confounder information; a minimum of 38 GPs were available from the intervention group, and a minimum of 40 GPs from the control group. For the behavioural constructs, although effect estimates were small, the intervention group GPs had greater intention of practising consistent with the guideline for the clinical behaviour of x-ray referral. For behavioural simulation, intervention group GPs were more likely to adhere to guideline recommendations about x-ray (OR 1.76, 95%CI 1.01, 3.05 and more likely to give advice to stay active (OR 4.49, 95%CI 1.90 to 10.60. Imaging referral was not statistically significantly different between groups and the potential importance of effects was unclear; rate ratio 0.87 (95%CI 0.68, 1.10 for x-ray or CT-scan. CONCLUSIONS: The intervention led to small changes in GP intention to practice in a manner that is consistent with an evidence-based guideline, but it did not result in statistically significant

  13. Medication adherence as a learning process: insights from cognitive psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rottman, Benjamin Margolin; Marcum, Zachary A; Thorpe, Carolyn T; Gellad, Walid F

    2017-03-01

    Non-adherence to medications is one of the largest contributors to sub-optimal health outcomes. Many theories of adherence include a 'value-expectancy' component in which a patient decides to take a medication partly based on expectations about whether it is effective, necessary, and tolerable. We propose reconceptualising this common theme as a kind of 'causal learning' - the patient learns whether a medication is effective, necessary, and tolerable, from experience with the medication. We apply cognitive psychology theories of how people learn cause-effect relations to elaborate this causal-learning challenge. First, expectations and impressions about a medication and beliefs about how a medication works, such as delay of onset, can shape a patient's perceived experience with the medication. Second, beliefs about medications propagate both 'top-down' and 'bottom-up', from experiences with specific medications to general beliefs about medications and vice versa. Third, non-adherence can interfere with learning about a medication, because beliefs, adherence, and experience with a medication are connected in a cyclic learning problem. We propose that by conceptualising non-adherence as a causal-learning process, clinicians can more effectively address a patient's misconceptions and biases, helping the patient develop more accurate impressions of the medication.

  14. Basic Theory and Theory System of Medical Classic of Yellow Emperor%《黄帝内经》的基础理论与理论体系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马卫东

    2012-01-01

    《黄帝内经》作为中国古代医学的奠基之作,内容十分丰富,并已形成了较为完备的基础理论和理论体系.《内经》的基础理论可以概括为:以阴阳五行学说为理论基础,天地人一体而人为自然界一部分;人体是一个有机整体而五脏为六腑、五体、五官、九窍、四肢、百骸中心的医学理论.而《内经》的理论体系,依其内容可概括为三大组成部分,共九个主要学说.即:生理卫生部分的藏象学说、经络学说、养生运气学说;病因病理部分的病因学说、病机学说、病证学说;辨证施治部分的诊法学说、治则学说、针刺学说.《内经》理论体系的博大精深,在于上述三大组成部分的九个主要学说有其严密的内在逻辑关系.%As the foundation's work of the medical science in ancient China, the Medical Classic of Yellow Emperor had rich content and formed a set of relatively complete basic theory and theory system. The basic theory of Medical Classic of Yellow Emperor can be summarized as: taking the Yin-Yang and five elements philosophy as the basic theory; believing that the Sky, the Ground and the Human being forming a whole and the Human being was one of the parts of the nature; regarding the human body as an organic whole and claiming that the five internal organs were the rulers of the six hollow organs, the five body constituents, the five sense organs, the nine orifices, the four limbs and the hundred human bones. According to its content, the theory system of Medical Classic of Yellow Emperor can be summed up in three major parts and nine main theories: the part of the physiological health consists of the viscera-state doctrine, the Meridian theory and the wellness and breathing exercising theory; the part of the etiology and pathology consists of the cause of disease theory, the pathogenesis theory and the sickness syndrome theory; the part of the differentiation treatment consists of the

  15. Theory of Multiple Intelligences: Is It a Scientific Theory?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jie-Qi

    2004-01-01

    This essay discusses the status of multiple intelligences (MI) theory as a scientific theory by addressing three issues: the empirical evidence Gardner used to establish MI theory, the methodology he employed to validate MI theory, and the purpose or function of MI theory.

  16. Teorias médicas e gestão urbana: a seca de 1877-79 em Fortaleza Medical theories and urban management: Fortaleza's 1877-79 drought

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Clélia Lustosa Costa

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Ao longo do século XIX, as novas teorias médicas sobre a origem das doenças influenciaram normas e regulamentos de controle do comportamento da população e do espaço urbano. Neste trabalho, apresentam-se e discutem-se as idéias, práticas médicas e ações administrativas adotadas durante a seca de 1877-79 em Fortaleza, capital da província do Ceará. A seca foi acompanhada de uma epidemia de varíola e do aumento da migração da população sertaneja para a capital. Sem rede de serviços públicos capaz de atender à população de retirantes que se alojaram na cidade e nos arredores, a administração municipal esforçou-se para implementar recomendações dos médicos, baseadas nos modernos princípios de higienização. Demonstra-se, por meio da análise dos relatórios dos presidentes da província e dos inspetores de saúde pública, a influência daquelas teorias médicas sobre as práticas de reorganização urbana, numa situação de calamidade como o de Fortaleza em 1877.Down through the nineteenth century, new medical theories on the origin of disease influenced the norms and regulations that controlled the population's behavior and the urban space. The present study discusses the ideas, medical practices, and administrative initiatives adopted during the 1877-79 drought in Fortaleza, capital of Ceará province. The drought was accompanied by a smallpox epidemic, along with the increased migration of sertão dwellers to the capital. The city lacked a public service network capable of meeting the needs of this new population, which took up lodgings on the city and periphery. The municipal administration endeavored to implement the recommendations of physicians, based on modern principles of hygienization. Through an analysis of reports by the provincial presidents and by public health inspectors, the study intends to show how these medical theories influenced the practices of urban reorganization at a moment of public

  17. The relationship between the theory of planned behavior and medication adherence in patients with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chung-Ying; Updegraff, John A; Pakpour, Amir H

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to apply the theory of planned behavior (TPB) with two other factors (action planning and coping planning) to the medication adherence of adults with epilepsy. We measured the elements of the theory of planned behavior (attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioral control, and behavioral intention), action planning, and coping planning at baseline among adults with epilepsy (n=567, mean±SD age=38.37±6.71years, male=48.5%). Medication adherence was measured using the Medication Adherence Report Scale (MARS) and antiepileptic serum level at the 24-month follow-up. Structural equation modeling (SEM) examined three models relating TPB elements to medication adherence. Three SEM models all had satisfactory fit indices. Moreover, attitude, subjective norms, perceived behavioral control, and intention together explained more than 50% of the variance for medication adherence measured using MARS. The explained variance increased to 61.8% when coping planning and action planning were included in the model, with coping planning having greater association than action planning. In addition, MARS explained 3 to 5% of the objective serum level. The theory of planned behavior is useful in understanding medication adherence in adults with epilepsy, and future interventions may benefit by improving such beliefs as well as beliefs about coping planning. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Using the Medical Research Council Framework for the Development and Evaluation of Complex Interventions in a Theory-Based Infant Feeding Intervention to Prevent Childhood Obesity: The Baby Milk Intervention and Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajalakshmi Lakshman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. We describe our experience of using the Medical Research Council framework on complex interventions to guide the development and evaluation of an intervention to prevent obesity by modifying infant feeding behaviours. Methods. We reviewed the epidemiological evidence on early life risk factors for obesity and interventions to prevent obesity in this age group. The review suggested prevention of excess weight gain in bottle-fed babies and appropriate weaning as intervention targets; hence we undertook systematic reviews to further our understanding of these behaviours. We chose theory and behaviour change techniques that demonstrated evidence of effectiveness in altering dietary behaviours. We subsequently developed intervention materials and evaluation tools and conducted qualitative studies with mothers (intervention recipients and healthcare professionals (intervention deliverers to refine them. We developed a questionnaire to assess maternal attitudes and feeding practices to understand the mechanism of any intervention effects. Conclusions. In addition to informing development of our specific intervention and evaluation materials, use of the Medical Research Council framework has helped to build a generalisable evidence base for early life nutritional interventions. However, the process is resource intensive and prolonged, and this should be taken into account by public health research funders. This trial is registered with ISRTCN: 20814693 Baby Milk Trial.

  19. Teoría feminista y sociología médica: bases para una discusión Feminist theory and medical sociology: issues for discussion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto P. Castro

    1993-09-01

    Full Text Available Se analiza la contribución de la teoría feminista a la sociología médica. En la primera parte se desarrollan los conceptos feministas más importantes: patriarcado, género, y sistema sexo/género. Se señala que cada concepto aclara aspectos sociales que han sido descuidados, aunque se reconoce que el concepto de patriarcado requiere aún de mayor desarrollo teórico. En la segunda parte se discuten los intentos del feminismo para desarrollar un nuevo conocimiento. Se discuten las ventajas de una ciencia feminista que problematice la dominación de género - que la ciencia común da por hecho -, y que permitiría una aproximación novedosa a la realidad social. Se enfatiza en la importancia de distinguir entre sexo y género, el aporte reciente de mayor relevancia para comprender la noción de ciencia feminista. Se señalan algunas de las aportaciones epistemológicas y metodológicas feministas. La tercera parte analiza las contribuciones más importantes de la teoría feminista en el campo de la sociología médica. Se indica como una de ellas a la problematización de los conceptos de "salud" y "enfermedad", así como la demostración de que son conceptos socialmente construidos como producto del orden patriarcal prevaleciente. Finalmente, se ilustra cómo el acercamiento feminista es útil para cuestionar las nociones y prácticas medicas, las que se basan en en la dominación de género y la reproducen.The contribution of feminist theory to medical sociology is analyzed. The first part discusses the main feminist concepts: patriarchy, gender, and sex/gender system. The article points out that such concepts illuminate social aspects that have been neglected. It is acknowledged that the concept of patriarchy requires further theoretical development. The second part discusses the feminist attempt to develop new knowledge. A "Feminist Science" would problematize gender domination, which current science takes for granted, and would allow

  20. Cycles of insanity and creativity within contemplative neural systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaler, Stephen L

    2016-09-01

    , during which confabulatory notions incubate, and (2) synaptic calm when these incubated thoughts reemerge and reinforce themselves as they are then recognized for their value by a lucid perceptual apparatus. Extremes in such cycling, especially within the former dysfunctional phase, would be problematic from a mental health perspective. Whereas the literature is replete with findings linking creativity and various psychopathologies, the main hypothesis advanced herein is that the neurodynamics of both phenomena are the same. If vindicated, this theory may lead to advanced treatments that could potentially boost creativity as well as safeguard against the associated cognitive and psychological disorders, all through control of just one parameter, the difference between cortical concentrations of excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters.

  1. Application of space syntax theory in the study of medical-surgical nursing units in urban hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trzpuc, Stefnee J; Martin, Caren S

    2010-01-01

    Additional research is needed to explore how the design of urban, medical-surgical nursing units influences communication patterns, perceptions of social support, and overall job satisfaction for nurses. Space syntax theory has typically been used to study communication in office environments; more recently, it has been applied to the study of healthcare environments. The purpose of this study was to explore the applicability of space syntax theory as a theoretical framework for studying nurses' communication in medical-surgical nursing units in urban hospitals. The nursing profession is rapidly changing, and nurses' work is psychologically and physically intense. At the same time, nurses are responsible for patient safety, optimal care delivery, and patient outcomes (Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2009; Clarke, 2007; Clarke & Donaldson, 2008; Institute of Medicine, 2000; Institute of Medicine, 2004). Nurses are central to the delivery of care and act as a conduit for communication among members of the patient care team. Some of the design characteristics that create a more appealing environment for patients, such as views of nature and single-patient rooms, may not be fully understood as they relate to nurses' tasks and responsibilities, and they could be detrimental to nursing communication. This study analyzed three medical-surgical nursing unit floor plans using two constructs of space syntax theory, and it verified analysis through three semi-structured interviews with end users. The use of space syntax theory for analyzing medical-surgical nursing unit floor plans is complex. Findings indicated that nurses' perceptions of two constructs of space syntax theory, visibility and accessibility, did not consistently match the anticipated benefits of the floor plan designs. Understanding how and when nurses communicate with each other could help designers of healthcare spaces create more effective environments that support nurses' work and personal health and welfare

  2. The Theory of Bio-Medical Knowledge Integration(Ⅷ)——The Intrinsic Medical Informatics(IMI) and Meta-dimensions(MDs) of SNOMED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAO Han-fei

    2008-01-01

    This paper presented the profile of Intrinsic Medical Informatics(IMI), which consists of Medical Cognition Informatics(MCI) and Organism Informatics (OI). MCI and OI are taken as two cornerstones of the Theory of BioMedical Knowledge Integration(BMKI). Additionally, so called Meta-dimension architecture of SNOMED is discussed in order to venture its context computing.

  3. 'It begins with the goose and ends with the goose': medical, legal, and lay understandings of imbecility in Ingram v Wyatt, 1824-1832.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, M

    1998-12-01

    A number of historians have recently suggested that we need to get out of the asylum if we are to fully understand attitudes to insanity in the nineteenth century. Arguing that accounts of the medicalization of madness have ignored the importance of non-medical attitudes to lunacy and idiocy, recent studies have stressed the need to explore family attitudes and responses in more detail. Unfortunately, efforts to escape the asylum have to some extent been hampered by a persistent reliance on institutional records. This institutional dependence is understandable: certificates of insanity, reception orders, case-books, and asylum registers, together with published documents, constitute the major record of historical constructions of the lunatic and idiotic mind. However, there may be more resourceful ways of exploring both medical and non-medical attitudes to idiocy. In this paper, I want to use the records from a contested will case, Ingram v Wyatt, to demonstrate that records from the ecclesiastical courts can provide access to a domain where the definitions and meanings of idiocy and imbecility were routinely considered by lawyers, lay witnesses, judges, and doctors. I shall argue that such cases constitute a fruitful site for excavating lay, professional legal, and medical attitudes to imbecility, for exploring the complex relationship between medical and non-medical understandings of capacity, and for situating those understandings within the context of professional developments in law and medicine and contemporary concerns about inheritance.

  4. Search for a "Gravitoid" Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Nieto, J A

    2003-01-01

    By combining the concepts of graviton and matroid, we outline a new gravitational theory which we call gravitoid theory. The idea of this theory emerged as an attempt to link the mathematical structure of matroid theory with M-theory. Our observations are essentially based on the formulation of matroid bundle due to MacPherson and Anderson. Also, by considering the oriented matroid theory, we add new observations about the link between the Fano matroid and D=11 supergravity which was discussed in some of our recent papers. In particular we find a connection between the affine matroid AG(3,2) and the $G_ {2}-$symmetry of D=11 supergravity.

  5. Toward a theory of nursing ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, S T

    1989-07-01

    The development of nursing ethics as a field of inquiry has largely paralleled developments within the field of biomedical ethics. However, there is growing evidence that the development of a theory of nursing ethics might not necessarily follow a similar pattern. The value foundations of nursing ethics are derived from the nature of the nurse-patient relationship instead of from models of patient good, rights-based notions of autonomy, or the social contract of professional practice as articulated in prominent theories of medical ethics. The value foundations of nursing are analyzed, and a moral-point-of-view theory with caring as a fundamental value is proposed for the development of a theory of nursing ethics.

  6. A medical social work perspective on rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fugl-Meyer, Kerstin Sjögren

    2016-10-12

    This paper introduces a biopsychosocial model for use as a tool by medical social workers and other rehabilitation professionals for the descriptive analysis of the case history and follow-up of patients needing rehabilitative support. The model is based on action theory and emphasizes the demands on evidence-based clarification of the interplay between a subject's contextual life situation, their ability to act in order to realize their goals, and their emotional adaptation. Using clinical experience and literature searches, a standard operations procedure to adequately document the case history in clinical practice is suggested, thus providing strategies through which the work of medical social workers can be based on evidence. Some specific areas of concern for the medical social worker within the rehabilitation of disabled people are highlighted.

  7. Teoria da mente: uma revisão com enfoque na sua incorporação pela psicologia médica Theory of mind: a review with focus on its incorporation into medical psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Caixeta

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Um constructo nascido da psicologia cognitiva e que se refere à capacidade de atribuir estados mentais para si mesmo e para os outros, denominado Teoria da Mente, tem sido exportado para outros campos do saber e tem sido mais recentemente incorporado pela psicologia médica com a pretensão de explicar determinadas alterações de comportamento que constituem o cerne de distúrbios como o Autismo Infantil, Esquizofrenia e Psicoses afins. Esta incorporação trouxe a necessidade de desenhar metodologias que possam mensurar e definir a Teoria da Mente em termos neurobiológicos. Nos objetivamos a descrever os mecanismos pelos quais a Teoria da Mente tem contribuído para o esclarecimento de alguns fenômenos mentais, bem como arrolar as dificuldades metodológicas associadas a tal empreedimento. Antes disto, uma revisão geral da Teoria da Mente é proporcionada enfocando os aspectos mais relevantes do constructo. Existem poucos trabalhos nesta área no Brasil, razão pela qual justificamos a reflexão conduzida.A concept derived from cognitive psychology which refers to the ability to impute mental states to the self and others, termed Theory of Mind, has been disseminated to others fields of knowledge and has been more recently incorporated by medical psychology with the intention of explaining behavior disturbances that constitute the core features of disorders such as Infantile Autism, Schizophrenia and related Psychosis. Such incorporation has given rise to the necessity of designing a methodological approach to measure and define Theory of Mind in neurobiological terms. The aim of this work is related to describe the mechanisms by which Theory of Mind has been contributed to the elucidation of some mental phenomena, as well as enroll the methodological difficulties related to this attitude. Before that, a review of the field of Theory of Mind is done, focusing on the more relevant aspects of this concept. There are a few articles in Brazil

  8. Risk analysis using fuzzy set theory of the accidental exposure of medical staff during brachytherapy procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castiglia, F; Giardina, M; Tomarchio, E

    2010-03-01

    Using fuzzy set theory, this paper presents results from risk analyses that explore potential exposure of medical operators working in a high dose rate brachytherapy irradiation plant. In these analyses, the HEART methodology, a first generation method for human reliability analysis, has been employed to evaluate the probability of human error. This technique has been modified on the basis of fuzzy set concepts to take into account, more directly, the uncertainties of the so-called error-promoting factors on which the method is based. Moreover, with regard to some identified accident scenarios, fuzzy potential dose was also evaluated to estimate the relevant risk. The results also provide some recommendations for procedures and safety equipment to reduce the occurrence of radiological exposure accidents.

  9. A panorama of discrepancy theory

    CERN Document Server

    Srivastav, Anand; Travaglini, Giancarlo

    2014-01-01

    Discrepancy theory concerns the problem of replacing a continuous object with a discrete sampling. Discrepancy theory is currently at a crossroads between number theory, combinatorics, Fourier analysis, algorithms and complexity, probability theory and numerical analysis. There are several excellent books on discrepancy theory but perhaps no one of them actually shows the present variety of points of view and applications covering the areas "Classical and Geometric Discrepancy Theory", "Combinatorial Discrepancy Theory" and "Applications and Constructions". Our book consists of several chapters, written by experts in the specific areas, and focused on the different aspects of the theory. The book should also be an invitation to researchers and students to find a quick way into the different methods and to motivate interdisciplinary research.

  10. Medical waste: a minimal hazard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keene, J H

    1991-11-01

    Medical waste is a subset of municipal waste, and regulated medical waste comprises less than 1% of the total municipal waste volume in the United States. As part of the overall waste stream, medical waste does contribute in a relative way to the aesthetic damage of the environment. Likewise, some small portion of the total release of hazardous chemicals and radioactive materials is derived from medical wastes. These comments can be made about any generated waste, regulated or unregulated. Healthcare professionals, including infection control personnel, microbiologists, public health officials, and others, have unsuccessfully argued that there is no evidence that past methods of treatment and disposal of regulated medical waste constitute any public health hazard. Historically, discovery of environmental contamination by toxic chemical disposal has followed assurances that the material was being disposed of in a safe manner. Therefore, a cynical public and its elected officials have demanded proof that the treatment and disposal of medical waste (i.e., infectious waste) do not constitute a public health hazard. Existent studies on municipal waste provide that proof. In order to argue that the results of these municipal waste studies are demonstrative of the minimal potential infectious environmental impact and lack of public health hazard associated with medical waste, we must accept the following: that the pathogens are the same whether they come from the hospital or the community, and that the municipal waste studied contained waste materials we now define as regulated medical waste.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Obesity: Prevalence, Theories, Medical Consequences, Management, and Research Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nassar Erika

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Obesity and its associated disorders are a growing epidemic across the world. Many genetic, physiological, and behavioral factors play a role in the etiology of obesity. Diet and exercise are known to play a valuable role in the treatment and prevention of obesity and associated disorders such as hypertension, heart disease, and diabetes. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to examine the prevalence, etiology, consequences, and treatment of obesity.

  12. Triathlon Medical Coverage: A Guide for Medical Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asplund, Chad A; Miller, Thomas K; Creswell, Lawrence; Getzin, Andrew; Hunt, Andrew; Martinez, John; Diehl, Jason; Hiller, William D; Berlin, Paul

    Interest and participation in triathlon has grown rapidly over the past 20 yr and with this growth, there has been an increase in the number of new events. To maximize the safety of participation, triathlons require medical directors to plan and oversee medical care associated with event participation. Provision of proper medical care requires knowledge of staffing requirements, common triathlon medical conditions, impact of course design, communication skill, and a familiarity of administrative requirements. These guidelines serve as a tool for triathlon medical and race directors to improve race safety for athletes.

  13. Political strategy, business strategy, and the academic medical center: linking theory and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souba, W W; Weitekamp, M R; Mahon, J F

    2001-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to link external political strategy theory to a specific health care setting-that of the academic medical center (AMC). Political strategy encompasses those activities undertaken by AMCs to acquire, develop, and use power (clout, influence, and credibility) to gain an advantage in situations of conflict. It should be differentiated from internal politics, a topic that will not be dealt with in this review. Political strategy should also be distinguished from but not divorced from competitive strategy. As political and social action can change the competitive landscape and the rules of competition, AMCs must become adept in issues management and stakeholder management. The focus on political strategy is a reflection of the enormous changes in the external environment that have impacted AMCs in recent years. These changes have often emerged out of political and social action and they impact significantly on the organization's more traditional business strategies. We suggest that a tighter alignment between political and business strategies in the future will help ensure organizational survival and success. This article reviews the literature and theory in corporate political strategy and illustrates the application of political strategy with examples of issues and problems faced by AMCs. Models of political strategy are well crafted, and this article concludes with succinct observations on the use of political strategies to enhance the business-based strategies of AMCs. Although the focus is on AMCs, the use of political strategies is applicable to any health care institution. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  14. Prediction of pharmacist intention to provide medication disposal education using the theory of planned behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Bik-Wai Bilvick; Hata, Micah; Wu, Stephanie; Frausto, Sonya; Law, Anandi V

    2016-10-01

    Lack of familiarity with proper medication disposal options among patients can lead to personal and environmental safety concerns, besides signalling non-adherence. Given that community pharmacists are in a position to educate patients, this study assessed community pharmacists' knowledge on medication disposal and examined the utility of the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) in predicting their intention to provide medication disposal education to their patients. A cross-sectional, self-administered survey was distributed to community pharmacists in California. Descriptive statistics were reported for all survey items. Cronbach's alpha and Pearson correlation were used to determine the reliability for the four TPB constructs (attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioural control and intention). Multiple linear regressions were performed to predict intent using the other three TPB constructs. Pharmacists (n = 142) demonstrated a positive intention to provide education (mean = 5.91 ± 1.22; range: 2 to 8), but most (67.9%) provided this information once a month or less. Attitude (β = 0.266, P = 0.001), subjective norm (β = 0.333, P behavioural control (β = 0.211, P = 0.009) were significant predictors of intention, accounting for 40.8% of the variance in intention to provide disposal education. Scale reliability ranged from 0.596 to 0.619 for the four constructs. Few pharmacists accurately selected all of the appropriate recommendations of disposal for non-controlled and controlled substances (15.9% and 10.1%, respectively). Pharmacists showed favourable attitude, subjective norm, perceived behaviour control and intention in providing such education. However, their knowledge in this area may be lacking and they are not consistently providing this information to their patients. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Towards a Theory of Convention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Pelle Guldborg

    2006-01-01

    theory. Like for the study of common knowledge much has happened in this latter field since then. The theory of convention has been developed and extended so as to include multiple types as well as a basis for the study of social norms. However, classical game theory is currently undergoing severe crisis...... as a tool for understanding and explaining social phenomena; a crisis emerging from the problem of equilibrium selection around which any theory of convention must revolve. The so-called evolutionary turn in game theory marks a transition from the classical assumptions of rationality and common knowledge...

  16. The shadow, the tyrant and the insane: the east and west dualism in the visual journalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Klein

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the East and West dualism considering three images: the shadow, the tyrant and the insane, respectively linked to Osama Bin Laden, Saddam Hussein and Mahmoud Ahmadinejad. These representations, given their occurrence in the media, appear as stereotypes in the visual journalism, being in total opposition to western values, such as illuminism, democracy and reason. From the perspective of the concept of Orientalism, the text also analyzes semiotic procedures which constitute the process of demonization, according to the contribuitions of Ivan Bystrina, Gilbert Durand and Stuart Clark.

  17. Fake insanes and fools: another way of playing (without disguise) in Lope de Vega's theatre

    OpenAIRE

    José Enrique López Martínez

    2014-01-01

    Abstract:In this work I study the theme of fake insanity and foolishness in Spanish Baroque Drama, starting with the work of Lope de Vega. In the first place, I consider some important sources in Italian Drama, specially Grazzini’s La Spiritata and Girolamo Bargagli’s La Pellegrina. Afterwards, I analyse in chronological order some of Lope’s plays that introduce this theme in Hispanic Theater, written at the turn of the XVIIth Century, such as Los locos de Valencia and El mármol de Felisardo;...

  18. [Material base on Chinese medical theory of 'Fei and Dachang being interior-exteriorly correlated'].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Cheng, Xin; Jia, Yu-Hua

    2011-02-01

    By reviewing pertinent literatures, we found that there existed some defects in studying material base on Chinese medical theory of "Fei and Dachang being interior-exteriorly related", such as the low efficacy of research methods; the neglect of intestinal and respiratory microhabitat and Chinese medical functional condition; and the unconformity of research design with evidence-based medicinal requirements. Thereby, the authors offered that the researches method of initiating merely from sole material or line linkage path should be rejected. The new research strategy should be established based on the feature of the lung and large intestine network connective structure, cutting-in from correlative changes in the two terminals (respiratory system and intestinal tissue), and the intermedial key knot of connection (blood serum), screen out in high throughput the relevant materials adopting microecological, proteomic and metabonomic techniques, and catch hold of the knots of network as much as possible. Based on these to perfect the researches on coordinating mechanism of the network, and to establish a new strategy for future researching.

  19. Towards a Multilingual Medical Lexicon

    OpenAIRE

    Markó, Kornél; Baud, Robert; Zweigenbaum, Pierre; Borin, Lars; Merkel, Magnus; Schulz, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    We present results of the collaboration of a multinational team of researchers from (computational) linguistics, medicine, and medical informatics with the goal of building a multilingual medical lexicon with high coverage and complete morpho-syntactic information. Monolingual lexical resources were collected and subsequently mapped between languages using a morpho-semantic term normalization engine, which captures intra- as well as interlingual synonymy relationships on the level of subwords.

  20. Towards a multilingual medical lexicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marko, Kornél; Baud, Robert; Zweigenbaum, Pierre; Borin, Lars; Merkel, Magnus; Schulz, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    We present results of the collaboration of a multinational team of researchers from (computational) linguistics, medicine, and medical informatics with the goal of building a multilingual medical lexicon with high coverage and complete morpho-syntactic information. Monolingual lexical resources were collected and subsequently mapped between languages using a morpho-semantic term normalization engine, which captures intra- as well as interlingual synonymy relationships on the level of subwords.

  1. Medical professionalism: a Parsonian view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latham, Stephen R

    2002-11-01

    This paper argues for a normative conception of medical professionalism based on the work of sociologist Talcott Parsons. Such a conception grounds medical professionalism on the expert authority of the physician; the concept of authority is therefore discussed at length. Parsons view also lays much stress on the fact that the proper exercise of medical authority nearly always involves aligning the interests of individual patients with those of society at large. Parsonian professionalism looks to professional institutions such as medical schools, societies and journals to secure the competence and ethical behavior of professionals, and to help ensure that professionals exercise of authority is never biased by private financial interests or by public political power. Professional institutions should encourage professionals to develop a set of preferences and desires (e.g., for respect of their peers, and not for power or financial gain) that will tend to make them trustworthy authorities.

  2. The Theory of Bio-Medical Knowledge Integration(Ⅸ)——A venture in methodology for operations on the cognitive segment in HER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAO Han-fei

    2008-01-01

    This paper pointed out, in the cognitive or semantic processes, the data of EHR reflect their physical nature, which makes mathematics and informatics of less computing capability. Based on this argument a new concept cognitive segment (CS), which is considered with having both physical and formalized quality, was introduced. Centered on CS, the paper presented a series of new basic concepts and their definitions, a set of symbols and expressions, and afterwards explored the types, quasi-formalized expressions, mapping nature, methodology for operations, two distinguished differences, commonsensible background analyses, cognitive dimension regression, supervising function of CSs.

  3. A Qualitative Analysis of Resource Sharing Agreements Between Naval Hospital Great Lakes and North Chicago Veterans Affairs Medical Center: The Iron Triangle Theory of Healthcare Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-05-19

    in Healthcare Administration ) 3151 Scott Road, Suite 1411- 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234-6135 NUMBER(S) --32-05 12...the Requirements for A Master in Health Administration By Lieutenant Melissa J. Harnly, MSC Naval Hospital Great Lakes, Illinois May 19, 2005 20060315...Services Capital Asset Realignment for Enhanced Services, announced on May 7, 2004, by former Secretary of Veterans Affairs Anthony J. Principi , is a

  4. A Landscape of Field Theories

    CERN Document Server

    Maxfield, Travis; Sethi, Savdeep

    2015-01-01

    Studying a quantum field theory involves a choice of space-time manifold and a choice of background for any global symmetries of the theory. We argue that many more choices are possible when specifying the background. In the context of branes in string theory, the additional data corresponds to a choice of supergravity tensor fluxes. We propose the existence of a landscape of field theory backgrounds, characterized by the space-time metric, global symmetry background and a choice of tensor fluxes. As evidence for this landscape, we study the supersymmetric six-dimensional (2,0) theory compactified to two dimensions. Different choices of metric and flux give rise to distinct two-dimensional theories, which can preserve differing amounts of supersymmetry.

  5. A landscape of field theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxfield, Travis [Enrico Fermi Institute, University of Chicago,Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Robbins, Daniel [George P. and Cynthia W. Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy,Texas A& M University,College Station, TX 77843-4242 (United States); Sethi, Savdeep [Enrico Fermi Institute, University of Chicago,Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2016-11-28

    Studying a quantum field theory involves a choice of space-time manifold and a choice of background for any global symmetries of the theory. We argue that many more choices are possible when specifying the background. In the context of branes in string theory, the additional data corresponds to a choice of supergravity tensor fluxes. We propose the existence of a landscape of field theory backgrounds, characterized by the space-time metric, global symmetry background and a choice of tensor fluxes. As evidence for this landscape, we study the supersymmetric six-dimensional (2,0) theory compactified to two dimensions. Different choices of metric and flux give rise to distinct two-dimensional theories, which can preserve differing amounts of supersymmetry.

  6. A landscape of field theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxfield, Travis; Robbins, Daniel; Sethi, Savdeep

    2016-11-01

    Studying a quantum field theory involves a choice of space-time manifold and a choice of background for any global symmetries of the theory. We argue that many more choices are possible when specifying the background. In the context of branes in string theory, the additional data corresponds to a choice of supergravity tensor fluxes. We propose the existence of a landscape of field theory backgrounds, characterized by the space-time metric, global symmetry background and a choice of tensor fluxes. As evidence for this landscape, we study the supersymmetric six-dimensional (2, 0) theory compactified to two dimensions. Different choices of metric and flux give rise to distinct two-dimensional theories, which can preserve differing amounts of supersymmetry.

  7. Searching for a Connection Between Matroid Theory and String Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Nieto, J A

    2004-01-01

    We make a number of observations about matter-ghost string phase, which may eventually lead to a formal connection between matroid theory and string theory. In particular, in order to take advantage of the already established connection between matroid theory and Chern-Simons theory, we propose a generalization of string theory in terms of some kind of Kahler metric. We show that this generalization is closely related to the Kahler-Chern-Simons action due to Nair and Schiff. We also add new information about the relationship between matroid theory, D=11 supergravity and Chern-Simons formalism.

  8. Towards a Theory of Convention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Pelle Guldborg

    2006-01-01

    theory. Like for the study of common knowledge much has happened in this latter field since then. The theory of convention has been developed and extended so as to include multiple types as well as a basis for the study of social norms. However, classical game theory is currently undergoing severe crisis...... as a tool for understanding and explaining social phenomena; a crisis emerging from the problem of equilibrium selection around which any theory of convention must revolve. The so-called evolutionary turn in game theory marks a transition from the classical assumptions of rationality and common knowledge...... of such to evolutionary game theoretical frameworks inspired by the models of (Maynard Smith & Price 1973), (Taylor & Jonker 1978) and (Maynard Smith 1982). By providing an account of equilibrium selection these are thought to work as well-defined metaphors of learning processes upon which a revised theory of convention...

  9. Chameleonic Theories: A Short Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Zanzi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the chameleon mechanism, a field (typically scalar has a mass that depends on the matter density of the environment: the larger is the matter density, the larger is the mass of the chameleon. We briefly review some aspects of chameleonic theories. In particular, in a typical class of these theories, we discuss the lagrangian, the role of conformal transformations, the equation of motion and the thin-shell effect. We also discuss f ( R theories and chameleonic quantum gravity.

  10. A book of set theory

    CERN Document Server

    Pinter, Charles C

    2014-01-01

    Suitable for upper-level undergraduates, this accessible approach to set theory poses rigorous but simple arguments. Each definition is accompanied by commentary that motivates and explains new concepts. Starting with a repetition of the familiar arguments of elementary set theory, the level of abstract thinking gradually rises for a progressive increase in complexity.A historical introduction presents a brief account of the growth of set theory, with special emphasis on problems that led to the development of the various systems of axiomatic set theory. Subsequent chapters explore classes and

  11. Toward a Unified Consciousness Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Richard H.

    1977-01-01

    The beginning of a holistic theory that can treat paranormal phenomena as normal human development is presented. Implications for counseling, counselor education, and counselor supervision are discussed. (Author)

  12. Game theory a nontechnical introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, Morton D

    1997-01-01

    ""A lucid and penetrating development of game theory that will appeal to the intuition . . . a most valuable contribution."" - Douglas R. Hofstadter Fascinating, accessible introduction to enormously important intellectual system with numerous applications to social, economic, political problems. Newly revised edition offers overview of game theory, then lucid coverage of the two-person zero-sum game with equilibrium points; the general, two-person zero-sum game; utility theory; other topics. Problems at start of each chapter.

  13. Theory, Criticism and a Philosophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heisenberg, Werner

    The following sections are included: * WHEN A GOLDEN AGE STARTED * FIRST STEPS IN PHYSICS * PHENOMENOLOGICAL THEORY * BOHR'S CONJECTURE * EINSTEIN ON THEORY AND OBSERVATION * STABILITY OF LAMINAR FLOW * SEQUEL AFTER TWENTY YEARS * FINDING A MATHEMATICAL MISTAKE * RIGOROUS AND DIRTY MATHEMATICS * ABANDONING OLD CONCEPTS * QUANTUM THEORY UNDERSTOOD * EINSTEIN'S FICTITIOUS EXPERIMENTS * ELECTRONS AND THE NUCLEUS * CHANGING THE OUTLOOK OF ATOMIC PHYSICS * PAIR CREATION * PHENOMENON ESTABLISHED * PAULI'S CRITICAL ACUMEN * MY GENERAL PHILOSOPHY

  14. A seminar on graph theory

    CERN Document Server

    Harary, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Presented in 1962-63 by experts at University College, London, these lectures offer a variety of perspectives on graph theory. Although the opening chapters form a coherent body of graph theoretic concepts, this volume is not a text on the subject but rather an introduction to the extensive literature of graph theory. The seminar's topics are geared toward advanced undergraduate students of mathematics.Lectures by this volume's editor, Frank Harary, include ""Some Theorems and Concepts of Graph Theory,"" ""Topological Concepts in Graph Theory,"" ""Graphical Reconstruction,"" and other introduc

  15. Association between Perceived Value and Self-Medication with Antibiotics: An Observational Study Based on Health Belief Model Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annisa N. Insany

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available High prevalence of self medication with antibiotics can increase the probability of irrational use of antibiotics which may lead antibiotics resistance. Thus, shifting of behavior is required to minimize the irrational use of antibiotics. This study was aimed to determine the association between public perceived value and self-medication with antibiotics which can be used to develop an intervention model in order to reduce the practice of self-medication with antibiotics. An observational study was conducted during the period of November–December 2014.The subjects were patients who visit primary health care facilities in Bandung. A structured-interview that has been validated was used to investigate the association between perceived value and self-medication behavior based on the Health Belief Model theory (perceived susceptibility, benefits, barrier, and cues to action. Approximately 506 respondents were drawn randomly from 43 community healthcare centers and 8 pharmacies. Data was analyzed by using descriptive statistics and logistic regression (CI 95%, α = 5%. Validity and reliability of the questionnaire were shown with a correlation coefficient of >0.3 and a cronbach-alpha value of 0.719, respectively. We found that 29.45% of respondents practiced self-medication with antibiotics over the last six months. Additionally, there was no significant association between the perceived susceptibility, benefits, barrier, and cues to action with self-medication behavior (p>0.05. Easiness to access antibiotics without prescription was presumed as a factor that contribute to self-medication with antibiotics, therefore strict regulation in antibiotics use is very needed as a basic intervention to decrease self-medication with antibiotic.

  16. A primer on string theory

    CERN Document Server

    Schomerus, Volker

    2017-01-01

    Since its conception in the 1960s, string theory has been hailed as one of the most promising routes we have to unify quantum mechanics and general relativity. This book provides a concise introduction to string theory explaining central concepts, mathematical tools and covering recent developments in physics including compactifications and gauge/string dualities. With string theory being a multidisciplinary field interfacing with high energy physics, mathematics and quantum field theory, this book is ideal for both students with no previous knowledge of the field and scholars from other disciplines who are looking for an introduction to basic concepts.

  17. A critique of Theory Z.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, J J

    1983-01-01

    Ouchi's Theory Z prescribes how employees should be motivated for increased productivity. Based on the theoretical work of Emile Durkheim, it views the modern large corporation as a communal alternative to the shortcomings of other institutions in industrial mass society. Ouchi's assertion that Japan is the industrial society in which Theory Z has flourished received limited support from research findings. Moreover, Ouchi's grounding of the theory in humanistic management seem unwarranted.

  18. A Review of Medical Education and Medical Informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, R. Brian; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Information technology may help physicians to manage information more effectively through more accessible clinical indexes, databases of diagnostic test characteristics, computerized audits of clinical activities, on-line access to medical literature, etc. Medical informatics, a new discipline dedicated to the solution of information problems in…

  19. Creating a digital medical illustration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culley, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    This paper covers the steps required to complete a medical illustration in a digital format using Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop. The project example is the surgical procedure for the release of the glenohumeral joint for the condition known as 'frozen shoulder'. The purpose is to demonstrate one method which an artist can use within digital media to create a colour illustration such as the release of the glenohumeral joint. Included is a general overview as how to deal with the administration of a medical illustration commission through the experience of a professional freelance artist.

  20. Insanity: Four Decades of U.S. Counterdrug Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    study, by Louisa Degenhardt (University of New South Wales , Sydney, Australia) and colleagues, is based on the World Health Organization’s Composite...Newsweek story reported that: Among hostesses in the smart sets of Los Angeles and New York, a little cocaine, like Dom Perignon and Beluga caviar, is...have the highest levels of illegal cocaine and cannabis use. The study, by Louisa Degenhardt (University of New South Wales , Sydney, Australia) and

  1. [Towards a philosophy of medication].

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Cléber Domingos Cunha

    2015-09-01

    Medicine and philosophy: where do these concepts intersect? From a biopolitical standpoint, the scope of this essay is to highlight the existence of new challenges for those who deal with the issue of pharmaceuticalization in contemporary society. The analyses revealed that essentially technical approaches are insufficient to confront issues such as: the exorbitant profits from the sale of medication; the disproportionate ratio of these amounts with the number of new innovative molecules; and the difficulty of access to the few new drugs. It would seem to be the opportune moment for adopting a more critical stance for drafting a philosophy of medication in the field of public health with the establishment of areas of resistance to the omnipresent pharmacotherapeutic onslaught. After all, medication is not a constitutive element that is isolated from human life; although, it has become a central component in the management of contemporary life, its adequate use requires the exercise of in-depth introspection.

  2. Genetics: A New Landscape for Medical Geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrel, Margaret; Emch, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The emergence and re-emergence of human pathogens resistant to medical treatment will present a challenge to the international public health community in the coming decades. Geography is uniquely positioned to examine the progressive evolution of pathogens across space and through time, and to link molecular change to interactions between population and environmental drivers. Landscape as an organizing principle for the integration of natural and cultural forces has a long history in geography, and, more specifically, in medical geography. Here, we explore the role of landscape in medical geography, the emergent field of landscape genetics, and the great potential that exists in the combination of these two disciplines. We argue that landscape genetics can enhance medical geographic studies of local-level disease environments with quantitative tests of how human-environment interactions influence pathogenic characteristics. In turn, such analyses can expand theories of disease diffusion to the molecular scale and distinguish the important factors in ecologies of disease that drive genetic change of pathogens.

  3. Failure to consider a radically new scientific idea or theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagne, Michael

    2012-01-01

    From plate tectonics theory to psychoneuroimmunology, to medical uses of marijuana, and controlled drinking by alcoholics, there has been a consistent failure by scientists and medical researchers to consider radically new ideas and theories. A review and analysis of these cases and other examples identified numerous reasons or barriers for this failure. Learning from these episodes of failure requires attention to and reflection on these barriers, an understanding of how the scientific process progresses and scientific knowledge evolves, and a willingness to test and evaluate these new ideas and theories before passing final judgment on them.

  4. Structure of a viscoplastic theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, Alan D.

    1988-01-01

    The general structure of a viscoplastic theory is developed from physical and thermodynamical considerations. The flow equation is of classical form. The dynamic recovery approach is shown to be superior to the hardening function approach for incorporating nonlinear strain hardening into the material response through the evolutionary equation for back stress. A novel approach for introducing isotropic strain hardening into the theory is presented, which results in a useful simplification. In particular, the limiting stress for the kinematic saturation of state (not the drag stress) is the chosen scalar-valued state variable. The resulting simplification is that there is no coupling between dynamic and thermal recovery terms in each evolutionary equation. The derived theory of viscoplasticity has the structure of a two-surface plasticity theory when the response is plasticlike, and the structure of a Bailey-Orowan creep theory when the response is creeplike.

  5. Medical hyperspectral imaging: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Guolan; Fei, Baowei

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is an emerging imaging modality for medical applications, especially in disease diagnosis and image-guided surgery. HSI acquires a three-dimensional dataset called hypercube, with two spatial dimensions and one spectral dimension. Spatially resolved spectral imaging obtained by HSI provides diagnostic information about the tissue physiology, morphology, and composition. This review paper presents an overview of the literature on medical hyperspectral imaging technology and its applications. The aim of the survey is threefold: an introduction for those new to the field, an overview for those working in the field, and a reference for those searching for literature on a specific application. PMID:24441941

  6. Medical hyperspectral imaging: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Guolan; Fei, Baowei

    2014-01-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is an emerging imaging modality for medical applications, especially in disease diagnosis and image-guided surgery. HSI acquires a three-dimensional dataset called hypercube, with two spatial dimensions and one spectral dimension. Spatially resolved spectral imaging obtained by HSI provides diagnostic information about the tissue physiology, morphology, and composition. This review paper presents an overview of the literature on medical hyperspectral imaging technology and its applications. The aim of the survey is threefold: an introduction for those new to the field, an overview for those working in the field, and a reference for those searching for literature on a specific application.

  7. Bullying among medical students in a Saudi medical school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alzahrani Hasan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bullying and sexual harassment of medical students by their teachers appears to be widespread phenomenon. However, nothing is published about its prevalence in conservative countries such as Saudi Arabia. This survey aims to ascertain the extent of these mistreatments among students in a Saudi medical school. Findings A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was conducted on a group of 542 clinical years’ medical students in a Saudi medical school to explore students' perceptions of their educational environment including exposure to different kinds of bullying. Bullying was defined as “a “persistent behaviour against a medical student that is intimidating, degrading, offensive or malicious and undermines the confidence and self- esteem of the recipient”. Results revealed that more than one quarter (28.0% of the surveyed students reported exposure to some sort of bullying during their clinical. Ninety percent of the reported insults were verbal, 6% sexual and 4% physical. Males were more exposed but difference was not statistically significant. Conclusions Bullying among Saudi medical students is an existing problem. A policy against bullying and harassment should be adopted in all of medical colleges to monitor this phenomenon and support students who have been bullied.

  8. Medical audible alarms: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edworthy, Judy

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This paper summarizes much of the research that is applicable to the design of auditory alarms in a medical context. It also summarizes research that demonstrates that false alarm rates are unacceptably high, meaning that the proper application of auditory alarm design principles are compromised. Target audience Designers, users, and manufacturers of medical information and monitoring systems that indicate when medical or other parameters are exceeded and that are indicated by an auditory signal or signals. Scope The emergence of alarms as a ‘hot topic’; an outline of the issues and design principles, including IEC 60601-1-8; the high incidence of false alarms and its impact on alarm design and alarm fatigue; approaches to reducing alarm fatigue; alarm philosophy explained; urgency in audible alarms; different classes of sound as alarms; heterogeneity in alarm set design; problems with IEC 60601-1-8 and ways of approaching this design problem. PMID:23100127

  9. Medical photography: a Trinidad experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Richard

    2004-06-01

    In 1991, the creation of the Media Unit at the St. Augustine Campus, University of West Indies, first established medical illustration as an organized profession within the public healthcare provision of Trinidad and Tobago. Since then the Unit has overcome many difficulties, some of them unusual for medical illustrators in the developed world, not least in obtaining equipment unavailable in the country, in finding suitable working facilities, and in developing practices for veterinary work. Today the Media Unit services a wide range of the University's schools, clinics and media services, and has been instrumental in educating a new generation of healthcare professionals.

  10. Being a paperless medic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua James Harding

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Am I the student of the future? After presenting at the 36th UKSG Annual Conference on ‘The Student-Information Relationship’, Joshua Harding gives an updated, honest opinion of his relationship with consuming information as a digital student. Throughout this article, he discusses personal viewpoints based on subjective experience. Joshua hopes that through his blue sky thinking and outsider’s perspective, he is able to provoke debate and inspiration amongst readers, to stimulate or challenge the current system and boundaries in which they may work. Joshua’s workflows, however, are more grounded and based on years of trial and error, analysis of apps, and reassessment. Through his experiences, he hopes to give an insight into how students of the future will use technology like the iPad; what they will expect, what problems they are likely to encounter and, finally, to suggest ways in which stakeholders can prepare and support this new wave of digital students.

  11. Medication reconciliation as a medication safety initiative in Ethiopia: a study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekonnen, Alemayehu B; McLachlan, Andrew J; Brien, Jo-Anne E; Mekonnen, Desalew; Abay, Zenahebezu

    2016-11-24

    Medication related adverse events are common, particularly during transitions of care, and have a significant impact on patient outcomes and healthcare costs. Medication reconciliation (MedRec) is an important initiative to achieve the Quality Use of Medicines, and has been adopted as a standard practice in many developed countries. However, the impact of this strategy is rarely described in Ethiopia. The aims of this study are to explore patient safety culture, and to develop, implement and evaluate a theory informed MedRec intervention, with the aim of minimising the incidence of medication errors during hospital admission. The study will be conducted in a resource limited setting. There are three phases to this project. The first phase is a mixed methods study of healthcare professionals' perspectives of patient safety culture and patients' experiences of medication related adverse events. In this phase, the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture will be used along with semi-structured indepth interviews to investigate patient safety culture and experiences of medication related adverse events. The second phase will use a semi-structured interview guide, designed according to the 12 domains of the Theoretical Domains Framework, to explore the barriers and facilitators to medication safety activities delivered by hospital pharmacists. The third phase will be a single centre, before and after study, that will evaluate the impact of pharmacist conducted admission MedRec in an emergency department (ED). The main outcome measure is the incidence and potential clinical severity of medication errors. We will then analyse the differences in the incidence and severity of medication errors before and after initiation of an ED pharmacy service. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  12. Medical negligence. An overview of legal theory and neurosurgical practice: duty of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Nicholas V

    2014-04-01

    A working knowledge of the legal principles of medical negligence is helpful to neurosurgeons. It helps them to act in a "reasonable, responsible and logical" manner, that is a practice that is consistent with the surgical practice of their peers. This article will review and explain the relevant medical law in relation to duty of care with illustrative neurosurgical cases.

  13. Using the Theory of Planned Behaviour to examine health professional students' behavioural intentions in relation to medication safety and collaborative practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapkin, Samuel; Levett-Jones, Tracy; Gilligan, Conor

    2015-08-01

    Safe medication practices depend upon, not only on individual responsibilities, but also effective communication and collaboration between members of the medication team. However, measurement of these skills is fraught with conceptual and practical difficulties. The aims of this study were to explore the utility of a Theory of Planned Behaviour-based questionnaire to predict health professional students' behavioural intentions in relation to medication safety and collaborative practice; and to determine the contribution of attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived control to behavioural intentions. A descriptive cross-sectional survey based upon the Theory of Planned Behaviour was designed and tested. A convenience sample of 65 undergraduate pharmacy, nursing and medicine students from one semi-metropolitan Australian university were recruited for the study. Participants' behavioural intentions, attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived control to behavioural intentions in relation to medication safety were measured using an online version of the Theory of Planned Behaviour Medication Safety Questionnaire. The Questionnaire had good internal consistency with a Cronbach's alpha of 0.844. The three predictor variables of attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived control accounted for between 30 and 46% of the variance in behavioural intention; this is a strong prediction in comparison to previous studies using the Theory of Planned Behaviour. Data analysis also indicated that attitude was the most significant predictor of participants' intention to collaborate with other team members to improve medication safety. The results from this study provide preliminary support for the Theory of Planned Behaviour-Medication Safety Questionnaire as a valid instrument for examining health professional students' behavioural intentions in relation to medication safety and collaborative practice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Medication reconciliation as a medication safety initiative in Ethiopia: a study protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekonnen, Alemayehu B; McLachlan, Andrew J; Brien, Jo-anne E; Mekonnen, Desalew; Abay, Zenahebezu

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Medication related adverse events are common, particularly during transitions of care, and have a significant impact on patient outcomes and healthcare costs. Medication reconciliation (MedRec) is an important initiative to achieve the Quality Use of Medicines, and has been adopted as a standard practice in many developed countries. However, the impact of this strategy is rarely described in Ethiopia. The aims of this study are to explore patient safety culture, and to develop, implement and evaluate a theory informed MedRec intervention, with the aim of minimising the incidence of medication errors during hospital admission. Methods and analyses The study will be conducted in a resource limited setting. There are three phases to this project. The first phase is a mixed methods study of healthcare professionals' perspectives of patient safety culture and patients' experiences of medication related adverse events. In this phase, the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture will be used along with semi-structured indepth interviews to investigate patient safety culture and experiences of medication related adverse events. The second phase will use a semi-structured interview guide, designed according to the 12 domains of the Theoretical Domains Framework, to explore the barriers and facilitators to medication safety activities delivered by hospital pharmacists. The third phase will be a single centre, before and after study, that will evaluate the impact of pharmacist conducted admission MedRec in an emergency department (ED). The main outcome measure is the incidence and potential clinical severity of medication errors. We will then analyse the differences in the incidence and severity of medication errors before and after initiation of an ED pharmacy service. PMID:27884844

  15. Medical sociology: a personal fifty year perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straus, R

    1999-06-01

    This paper reviews the author's experience in becoming a medical sociologist before the field had become formalized. The contributions to medical sociology of sociologist Selden D. Bacon and physician and medical educator William R. Willard are described. The relationship of medical sociology to medical behavioral science, as experienced at the University of Kentucky, is discussed. Finally, the thesis of the author's 1957 paper on the nature and status of medical sociology is re-examined.

  16. Architectural Theory: A Construction Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ákos Moravánszky

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Around 1968 we saw the birth of a new architectural theory as the conjunction of architectural history and politically engaged architectural criticism. Not the aesthetics of architecture, but architecture itself in its structural relations with social life became the focus of attention. As a result of this development, it is no longer possible to study architectural history without a critical reflection on the method of the study itself and without a grade of interdisciplinarity. Traditional methods of historiography and iconography have been replaced by new approaches configured by psychoanalysis, deconstruction, cultural studies etc. Appropriation has become the proof of criticality both in architectural theory and in design; however, the understanding of the concepts and methods of other disciplines is basically metaphorical. The problem for a school of architecture lies not in the ‘criticality’ of the kind of architectural theory we described as emerging from the spirit of 1968, but in its discursive nature. The disciplinary specificity of architecture resists a discursive approach, and architectural students frequently question the usefulness of theory which undermines the notion of the ‘project’, without articulating a constructive proposal. Projectivity does not seem to provide an answer; its claim of performativity lacks the program to regain its organising power over contributions from other specialised disciplines and practices. Theory should focus on the terms of our discipline, which are so close to our ‘core beliefs’ regarding architecture that we usually take their meaning for granted. It would be wrong to see this focus of theory as a withdrawal into the realm of language. Indeed, after a period of theory alienating architects and the general public, it could now create a rhetoric to influence our understanding of our environment, which is itself organised on the level of language. The requirement that theory should

  17. [Medical oncology: is it a new medical speciality in Africa?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahmi, Sami Aziz; Ziani, Fatima Zahra; Seddik, Youssef; Afqir, Said

    2017-01-01

    Cancer is a major public health problem in Africa. Advances in the treatment of cancers over the last decade are undeniable. Multidisciplinary approach is essential for improved patient's management. Medical oncology is a recently-recognized speciality in Africa Indeed, many African countries do not have doctors or a sufficient number of doctors qualified to practice in this medical specialty. The fight against cancer in Africa involves oncology speciality training and the development of curricula in order to ensure optimum patient management.

  18. Autonomic dysreflexia: a medical emergency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bycroft, J; Shergill, I; Choong, E; Arya, N; Shah, P

    2005-01-01

    Autonomic dysreflexia is an important clinical diagnosis that requires prompt treatment to avoid devastating complications. The condition may present itself to all members of medical and surgical specialties, who may not be accustomed to treating it. It is the clinician's responsibility to have a basic understanding of the pathophysiology of the condition and the simple steps required to treat it. PMID:15811886

  19. Penggunaan Incoterms dalam Perjanjian Perdagangan Internasional (Studi Pada Pt. Insan Bonafide di Banjarmasin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adhitya Christanto Henry Dalim

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Tujuan penelitian ini untuk mengetahui dan menganalisis kedudukan incoterms selaku hukum kebiasaan internasional dalan perjanjian perdagangan internasional serta untuk mengetahui dan menganalisis hak dan kewajiban pengusaha eksportir dan importir sehubungan dengan penggunaan Incoterms dalam perjanjian perdagangan internasional (Studi pada PT. Insan Bonafide di Banjarmasin. Kegunaan yang di harapakan dari hasil penelitian Sebagai sumbangan pemikiran dalam bidang ilmu hukum khususnya terkait dengan hukum perdagangan internasional, bagi pelaku usaha di bidang perdagangan internasional dan bagi pemerintah dalam membuat peraturan perundang-undangan (legislasi berkenaan dengan perdagangan internasional. Metode penelitian ini menggunakan jenis penelitian hukum normatif,yaitu penelitian hukum yang dilakukan dengan cara meneliti bahan hukum(bahan hukum primer, bahan hukum sekunder, dan bahan hukum tersier, yang relevan dengan judul yang di angkat penulis. Ada pun tipe penelitianadalah penelitian dengan menitikberatkan permasalahan yang sering timbul berkaitan dengan kekaburan hukum (vage norm berkenaan dengan makna dan ruang lingkup dari Incoterms tersebut. Pendekatan penelitian menggunakan pendekatan analitis (analytical approach.Menurut hasil dari penelitian tesis ini menunjukan bahwa : Pertama, mengenai kekuatan hukum Incoterms dalam perjanjian perdagangan internasional, Incoterms yang lahir dari hukum kebiasaan dan sebagai suatu kebiasaan internasional yang berkedudukan hukum yang merupakan sumber hukum perdagangan internasional. namun demikian kekuatan hukum Incoterms selaku hukum kebiasaan internasional tidak sama dengan kekuatan hukum dari Perjanjian Internasional seperti Konvensi, Traktat, Piagam, Agreement, Covenant, Protocol, Pacta, dan lain-lain. Kedua, hak dan kewajiban pengusaha eksportir dan importir sehubungan dengan penggunaan Incoterms dalam perjanjian perdagangan internasional khususnya pada PT. Insan Bonafide dengan menggunakan

  20. Advanced signal processing theory and implementation for sonar, radar, and non-invasive medical diagnostic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Stergiopoulos, Stergios

    2009-01-01

    Integrates topics of signal processing from sonar, radar, and medical system technologies by identifying their concept similarities. This book covers non-invasive medical diagnostic system applications, including intracranial ultrasound, a technology that attempts to address non-invasive detection on brain injuries and stroke.

  1. Medical leaders or masters?-A systematic review of medical leadership in hospital settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berghout, Mathilde A; Fabbricotti, Isabelle N; Buljac-Samardžić, Martina; Hilders, Carina G J M

    2017-01-01

    Medical leadership is increasingly considered as crucial for improving the quality of care and the sustainability of healthcare. However, conceptual clarity is lacking in the literature and in practice. Therefore, a systematic review of the scientific literature was conducted to reveal the different conceptualizations of medical leadership in terms of definitions, roles and activities, and personal-and context-specific features. Eight databases were systematically searched for eligible studies, including empirical studies published in peer-reviewed journals that included physicians carrying out a manager or leadership role in a hospital setting. Finally, 34 articles were included and their findings were synthesized and analyzed narratively. Medical leadership is conceptualized in literature either as physicians with formal managerial roles or physicians who act as informal 'leaders' in daily practices. In both forms, medical leaders must carry out general management and leadership activities and acts to balance between management and medicine, because these physicians must accomplish both organizational and medical staff objectives. To perform effectively, credibility among medical peers appeared to be the most important factor, followed by a scattered list of fields of knowledge, skills and attitudes. Competing logics, role ambiguity and a lack of time and support were perceived as barriers. However, the extent to which physicians must master all elicited features, remains ambiguous. Furthermore, the extent to which medical leadership entails a shift or a reallocation of tasks that are at the core of medical professional work remains unclear. Future studies should implement stronger research designs in which more theory is used to study the effect of medical leadership on professional work, medical staff governance, and subsequently, the quality and efficiency of care.

  2. Medical leaders or masters?—A systematic review of medical leadership in hospital settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbricotti, Isabelle N.; Buljac-Samardžić, Martina; Hilders, Carina G. J. M.

    2017-01-01

    Medical leadership is increasingly considered as crucial for improving the quality of care and the sustainability of healthcare. However, conceptual clarity is lacking in the literature and in practice. Therefore, a systematic review of the scientific literature was conducted to reveal the different conceptualizations of medical leadership in terms of definitions, roles and activities, and personal–and context-specific features. Eight databases were systematically searched for eligible studies, including empirical studies published in peer-reviewed journals that included physicians carrying out a manager or leadership role in a hospital setting. Finally, 34 articles were included and their findings were synthesized and analyzed narratively. Medical leadership is conceptualized in literature either as physicians with formal managerial roles or physicians who act as informal ‘leaders’ in daily practices. In both forms, medical leaders must carry out general management and leadership activities and acts to balance between management and medicine, because these physicians must accomplish both organizational and medical staff objectives. To perform effectively, credibility among medical peers appeared to be the most important factor, followed by a scattered list of fields of knowledge, skills and attitudes. Competing logics, role ambiguity and a lack of time and support were perceived as barriers. However, the extent to which physicians must master all elicited features, remains ambiguous. Furthermore, the extent to which medical leadership entails a shift or a reallocation of tasks that are at the core of medical professional work remains unclear. Future studies should implement stronger research designs in which more theory is used to study the effect of medical leadership on professional work, medical staff governance, and subsequently, the quality and efficiency of care. PMID:28910335

  3. Location theory a unified approach

    CERN Document Server

    Nickel, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    Although modern location theory is now more than 90 years old, the focus of researchers in this area has been mainly problem oriented. However, a common theory, which keeps the essential characteristics of classical location models, is still missing.This monograph addresses this issue. A flexible location problem called the Ordered Median Problem (OMP) is introduced. For all three main subareas of location theory (continuous, network and discrete location) structural properties of the OMP are presented and solution approaches provided. Numerous illustrations and examples help the reader to bec

  4. A Narrative Theory of Games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarseth, Espen

    2012-01-01

    In this article I present a narrative theory of games, building on standard narra-tology, as a solution to the conundrum that has haunted computer game studies from the start: How to approach software that combines games and stories?......In this article I present a narrative theory of games, building on standard narra-tology, as a solution to the conundrum that has haunted computer game studies from the start: How to approach software that combines games and stories?...

  5. A Narrative Theory of Games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarseth, Espen

    2012-01-01

    In this article I present a narrative theory of games, building on standard narra-tology, as a solution to the conundrum that has haunted computer game studies from the start: How to approach software that combines games and stories?......In this article I present a narrative theory of games, building on standard narra-tology, as a solution to the conundrum that has haunted computer game studies from the start: How to approach software that combines games and stories?...

  6. The Development and Initial Validation of Social Cognitive Career Theory Instruments to Measure Choice of Medical Specialty and Practice Location

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Mary E.; Creed, Peter A.; Searle, Judy

    2009-01-01

    Social cognitive career theory served as the basis for the instrument development for scales assessing self-efficacy, outcome expectations, and goals to predict medical career choice. Lent and Brown's conceptualization of social cognitive constructs guided the development of items to measure choice of medical specialty and practice location. Study…

  7. Fasa University Medical School: a novel experience in medical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HOSSAIN A. RONAGHY

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In early 1970`s a combination of a shortage and misdistribution of health services and growing public dissatisfaction about the health care available, along with increasing expectations, has put great strain on the mind of the staff of the Department of Medicine Shiraz University School of Medicine. The purpose of this report is to give an account of what was originally planned and what has happened since the start of Fasa Medical School in April 1978. Methods: This is a case report about an experience in medical education in Iran. At the time, two major problems were facing our country. The first was gross mal-distribution of these healthcare facilities, which were mostly concentrated in Tehran and big cities of Iran, and the second problem was continuous exodus of Iranian Medical graduates to the Western countries. Results: The main idea of creating Fasa Medical School was to create a system in which primary care in small villages are provided by VHW with the middle level health workers of “Behdar Roustaee” to be supported by local physicians who reside in small towns. Conclusion: For Fasa Medical School, education was emphasized on community based, student centered, and problem based medical education located in the community and based on teamwork and cooperation.

  8. Constraints on Extensions of a Default Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU Kaile

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, the representability of a family of theories as the set of extensions of a default theory is studied. First, a new necessary condition is given for the representability by means of general default theories; then a sufficient one is presented. The families of theories represented by default theories are also fully characterized. Finally, the paper gives an example of denumerable families of mutually inconsistent theories that are represented by a default theory but not by normal ones.

  9. State of Digital Education Options in the areas of Medical Terminology and the History, Theory and Ethics of Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schochow, Maximilian

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Institutes of the history of medicine, the theory of medicine, and medical ethics at German institutions of higher learning have created various e-learning options that are based on different learning platforms and tailored to the specific curricular needs of individual teaching. Up to now no valid data has been available about the types of such e-learning options as well as possibilities of future developments thanks to coordinated cooperation among the different institutes.Methods: Of 31 German institutes of the history and theory of medicine and medical ethics that were asked to fill out a questionnaire, 30 answered, which equals a return rate of 97 per cent. The questionnaire was completed between July and August 2012 using a telephone survey.Results: Available to students online, digitally interactive teaching tools have boomed in the course of the last few years at German institutes of the history of medicine, the theory of medicine, and medical ethics. This trend is also reflected in a willingness of more than half of the respective departments (67 per cent to expand their e-learning options on the basis of previous experience. The offered e-learning systems are accepted very well by the students. 57 per cent of the institutes stated, that 90-100 per cent of the students use the offered systems regularly. E-learning courses for terminology are offered particularly often, this is also reflected in the intended extension of these courses by the majority of institutes which plan to expand their e-learning systems.Conclusions: This article discusses the results of a comprehensive empirical survey about e-learning. It illustrates ways in which individual German institutes plan to expand their e-learning options in the future. Finally, specific proposals for cooperation among institutions (not just online are introduced, the purpose of which is to produce synergy in e-learning.

  10. State of Digital Education Options in the areas of Medical Terminology and the History, Theory and Ethics of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schochow, Maximilian; Steger, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Institutes of the history of medicine, the theory of medicine, and medical ethics at German institutions of higher learning have created various e-learning options that are based on different learning platforms and tailored to the specific curricular needs of individual teaching. Up to now no valid data has been available about the types of such e-learning options as well as possibilities of future developments thanks to coordinated cooperation among the different institutes. Of 31 German institutes of the history and theory of medicine and medical ethics that were asked to fill out a questionnaire, 30 answered, which equals a return rate of 97 per cent. The questionnaire was completed between July and August 2012 using a telephone survey. Available to students online, digitally interactive teaching tools have boomed in the course of the last few years at German institutes of the history of medicine, the theory of medicine, and medical ethics. This trend is also reflected in a willingness of more than half of the respective departments (67 per cent) to expand their e-learning options on the basis of previous experience. The offered e-learning systems are accepted very well by the students. 57 per cent of the institutes stated, that 90-100 per cent of the students use the offered systems regularly. E-learning courses for terminology are offered particularly often, this is also reflected in the intended extension of these courses by the majority of institutes which plan to expand their e-learning systems. This article discusses the results of a comprehensive empirical survey about e-learning. It illustrates ways in which individual German institutes plan to expand their e-learning options in the future. Finally, specific proposals for cooperation among institutions (not just online) are introduced, the purpose of which is to produce synergy in e-learning.

  11. State of Digital Education Options in the areas of Medical Terminology and the History, Theory and Ethics of Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schochow, Maximilian; Steger, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Background: Institutes of the history of medicine, the theory of medicine, and medical ethics at German institutions of higher learning have created various e-learning options that are based on different learning platforms and tailored to the specific curricular needs of individual teaching. Up to now no valid data has been available about the types of such e-learning options as well as possibilities of future developments thanks to coordinated cooperation among the different institutes. Methods: Of 31 German institutes of the history and theory of medicine and medical ethics that were asked to fill out a questionnaire, 30 answered, which equals a return rate of 97 per cent. The questionnaire was completed between July and August 2012 using a telephone survey. Results: Available to students online, digitally interactive teaching tools have boomed in the course of the last few years at German institutes of the history of medicine, the theory of medicine, and medical ethics. This trend is also reflected in a willingness of more than half of the respective departments (67 per cent) to expand their e-learning options on the basis of previous experience. The offered e-learning systems are accepted very well by the students. 57 per cent of the institutes stated, that 90-100 per cent of the students use the offered systems regularly. E-learning courses for terminology are offered particularly often, this is also reflected in the intended extension of these courses by the majority of institutes which plan to expand their e-learning systems. Conclusions: This article discusses the results of a comprehensive empirical survey about e-learning. It illustrates ways in which individual German institutes plan to expand their e-learning options in the future. Finally, specific proposals for cooperation among institutions (not just online) are introduced, the purpose of which is to produce synergy in e-learning. PMID:26038682

  12. Predicting medical staff intention to use an online reporting system with modified unified theory of acceptance and use of technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, I-Chiu; Hsu, Hui-Mei

    2012-01-01

    Barriers to report incident events using an online information system (IS) may be different from those of a paper-based reporting system. The nationwide online Patient-Safety Reporting System (PSRS) contains a value judgment behind use of the system, similar to the Value of Perceived Consequence (VPC), which is seldom discussed in ISs applications of other disciplines. This study developed a more adequate research framework by integrating the VPC construct into the well-known Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) model as a theoretical base to explore the predictors of medical staff's intention to use online PSRS. The results showed that management support was an important factor to influence medical staff's intention of using PSRS. The effects of factors such as performance expectancy, perceived positive, and perceived negative consequence on medical staff's intention of using PSRS were moderated by gender, age, experience, and occupation. The results proved that the modified UTAUT model is significant and useful in predicting medical staff's intention of using the nationwide online PSRS.

  13. Toward a Theory of Organizational Commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-08-01

    A0D-AI03 358 OREGON UNIV EUGENE GRADUATE SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT AND--ETC F/0 5/1 TOWARD A THEORY OF ORGANIZATIONAL COMMITMENT.(U) AUG A1 R T MOWDAY, R...M STEERS, L W PORTER N00014-81-K 0026 UNCLASSIFIED TR-8 ML EhEE"hE hhEEE~EE7hhhh LEVEr / 00 Gradate choo of anagmen Univrsit of rego -VI Euee0reo 70...Oregon Eugene , OR 97403 Dr. Gerald R. Stoffer Aerospace Psychologist LT, Medical Service Corp. Code N-712 HAVTRAEQUIPCEN Orlando, FL 32813 Dr

  14. Medical sociology as a vocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosk, Charles L

    2014-12-01

    This article extends Weber's discussion of science as a vocation by applying it to medical sociology. Having used qualitative methods for nearly 40 years to interpret problems of meaning as they arise in the context of health care, I describe how ethnography, in particular, and qualitative inquiry, more generally, may be used as a tool for understanding fundamental questions close to the heart but far from the mind of medical sociology. Such questions overlap with major policy questions such as how do we achieve a higher standard for quality of care and assure the safety of patients. Using my own research, I show how this engagement takes the form of showing how simple narratives of policy change fail to address the complexities of the problems that they are designed to remedy. I also attempt to explain how I balance objectivity with a commitment to creating a more equitable framework for health care. © American Sociological Association 2014.

  15. Medical Tourism, Medical Migration, and Global Justice: Implications for Biosecurity in a Globalized World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, I Glenn

    2017-05-01

    We live in the age of globalization. In medicine, that globalization has brought many benefits such as the diffusion of technology and the spread of health care training, but it has also brought threats to biosecurity. This article examines how medical tourism and medical migration pose risks to biosecurity. It also argues that designing legal responses to these risks requires not only technical competence but also a theory of global justice to guide that design. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press; all rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Putting a Realistic Theory of Mind into Agency Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Nicolai Juul; Stea, Diego

    2014-01-01

    concerning other such content. More realistically, individuals have some limited access to the minds of others. We explore the implications for classical agency theory of realistic assumptions regarding the human potential for interpersonal sensemaking. We discuss implications for the design and management......Agency theory is one of the most important foundational theories in management research, but it rests on contestable cognitive assumptions. Specifically, the principal is assumed to hold a perfect (correct) theory regarding some of the content of the agent's mind, while he is entirely ignorant...... of rewards, and trace implications for value creation in principal-agent relations....

  17. Birth Territory: a theory for midwifery practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahy, Kathleen M; Parratt, Jenny Anne

    2006-07-01

    The theory of Birth Territory describes, explains and predicts the relationships between the environment of the individual birth room, issues of power and control, and the way the woman experiences labour physiologically and emotionally. The theory was synthesised inductively from empirical data generated by the authors in their roles as midwives and researchers. It takes a critical post-structural feminist perspective and expands on some of the ideas of Michel Foucault. Theory synthesis was also informed by current research about the embodied self and the authors' scholarship in the fields of midwifery, human biology, sociology and psychology. In order to demonstrate the significance of the theory, it is applied to two clinical stories that both occur in hospital but are otherwise different. This analysis supports the central proposition that when midwives use 'midwifery guardianship' to create and maintain the ideal Birth Territory then the woman is most likely to give birth naturally, be satisfied with the experience and adapt with ease in the post-birth period. These benefits together with the reduction in medical interventions also benefit the baby. In addition, a positive Birth Territory is posited to have a broader impact on the woman's partner, family and society in general.

  18. Rough sets and near sets in medical imaging: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanien, Aboul Ella; Abraham, Ajith; Peters, James F; Schaefer, Gerald; Henry, Christopher

    2009-11-01

    This paper presents a review of the current literature on rough-set- and near-set-based approaches to solving various problems in medical imaging such as medical image segmentation, object extraction, and image classification. Rough set frameworks hybridized with other computational intelligence technologies that include neural networks, particle swarm optimization, support vector machines, and fuzzy sets are also presented. In addition, a brief introduction to near sets and near images with an application to MRI images is given. Near sets offer a generalization of traditional rough set theory and a promising approach to solving the medical image correspondence problem as well as an approach to classifying perceptual objects by means of features in solving medical imaging problems. Other generalizations of rough sets such as neighborhood systems, shadowed sets, and tolerance spaces are also briefly considered in solving a variety of medical imaging problems. Challenges to be addressed and future directions of research are identified and an extensive bibliography is also included.

  19. Astaxanthin as a Medical Food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiji Yamashita

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTAstaxanthin is a red pigment that belongs to the carotenoid family like β-carotene. And it’s found in seafood such as crustaceans: shrimp and crabs and fish: salmon and sea bream. Recently, astaxanthin has been reported to have antioxidant activity up to 100 times more potent than that of vitamin E against lipid peroxidation and about 40 times more potent than that of β-carotene on singlet oxygen quenching. Astaxanthin does not show any pro-oxidant activity and its main sight of action is on/in the cell membrane. Various important benefits to date have suggested for human health such as immunomodulation, anti-stress, anti-inflammation, LDL cholesterol oxidation suppression, enhanced skin health, improved semen quality, attenuating eye fatigue, sport performance and endurance, limiting exercised induced muscle damage, suppressing the development of life-style related diseases such as obesity, atherosclerosis, diabetes, hyperlipidemia and hypertension. Nowadays, the research and demand for natural astaxanthin in human health application are explosively growing worldwide. Especially, the clinicians use the astaxanthin extracted from the microalgae, Haematotoccus pluvialis, as an add-on supplementation for the patients who are unsatisfied with the current medications or who can’t receive any medications because of their serious symptom. For example, the treatment enhances their daily activity levels or QOL in heart failure or benign prostatic hypertrophy/lower urinary tract symptom patients. Other studies and trials are under way on chronic diseases such as non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, diabetes and CVD. We may call astaxanthin “a medical food” in the near future.Keywords: astaxanthin, medical food, Haematococcus, add-on supplementation

  20. The moral development of medical students: a pilot study of the possible influence of medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Self, D J; Schrader, D E; Baldwin, D C; Wolinsky, F D

    1993-01-01

    Medicine endorses a code of ethics and encourages a high moral character among doctors. This study examines the influence of medical education on the moral reasoning and development of medical students. Kohlberg's Moral Judgment Interview was given to a sample of 20 medical students (41.7% of students in that class). The students were tested at the beginning and at the end of their medical course to determine whether their moral reasoning scores had increased to the same extent as other people who extend their formal education. It was found that normally expected increases in moral reasoning scores did not occur over the 4 years of medical education for these students, suggesting that their educational experience somehow inhibited their moral reasoning ability rather than facilitating it. With a range of moral reasoning scores between 315 and 482, the finding of a mean increase from first year to fourth year of 18.5 points was not statistically significant at the P moral reasoning scores and age, gender, Medical College Admission Test scores, or grade point average scores. Along with a brief description of Kohlberg's cognitive moral development theory, some interpretations and explanations are given for the findings of the study.

  1. Grounded theory: building a middle-range theory in nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria João Fernandes

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The development of nursing as a discipline results from a boom of investigations underway for nearly a century, and of the construction of theories that have arisen during the 1950’s, with greater relevance since the 1960’s. Giving continuation to the production of knowledge in nursing and seeking to contribute to the increase in the number of explanatory theories of the functional content of nurses, there is interest in answering the question: how can a middle-range theory in nursing be built that explains the nurse-elderly interaction in a successful aging process? As well, we address the goal of describing the process of building a middle-range theory in nursing. Middle-range theory refers to a qualitative paradigm study of inductive thinking, developed in the context of primary health care. The information was collected through participant observation and interviews. Method of analysis grounded theory by Corbin and Strauss(1 was followed, utilizing the triangulation of data and theoretical sampling. Grounded theory has become a method of analysis which facilitates the understanding and explanation of the phenomenon under study. By making clear the nature and process of the nurse-elderly interaction in the selected context and within the context of successful aging, a middle-range theory proposal emerged.

  2. A succession of theories: purging redundancy from disturbance theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulsford, Stephanie A; Lindenmayer, David B; Driscoll, Don A

    2016-02-01

    The topics of succession and post-disturbance ecosystem recovery have a long and convoluted history. There is extensive redundancy within this body of theory, which has resulted in confusion, and the links among theories have not been adequately drawn. This review aims to distil the unique ideas from the array of theory related to ecosystem change in response to disturbance. This will help to reduce redundancy, and improve communication and understanding between researchers. We first outline the broad range of concepts that have developed over the past century to describe community change in response to disturbance. The body of work spans overlapping succession concepts presented by Clements in 1916, Egler in 1954, and Connell and Slatyer in 1977. Other theories describing community change include state and transition models, biological legacy theory, and the application of functional traits to predict responses to disturbance. Second, we identify areas of overlap of these theories, in addition to highlighting the conceptual and taxonomic limitations of each. In aligning each of these theories with one another, the limited scope and relative inflexibility of some theories becomes apparent, and redundancy becomes explicit. We identify a set of unique concepts to describe the range of mechanisms driving ecosystem responses to disturbance. We present a schematic model of our proposed synthesis which brings together the range of unique mechanisms that were identified in our review. The model describes five main mechanisms of transition away from a post-disturbance community: (i) pulse events with rapid state shifts; (ii) stochastic community drift; (iii) facilitation; (iv) competition; and (v) the influence of the initial composition of a post-disturbance community. In addition, stabilising processes such as biological legacies, inhibition or continuing disturbance may prevent a transition between community types. Integrating these six mechanisms with the functional

  3. [A pragmatic vision of medical education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumplido-Hernández, Gustavo

    2009-01-01

    Some aspects of the educative system at the Mexican Institute of Social Security are described. It is based on the perception of a problematic situation that constitutes a challenge. An educational process to enhance the quality of medical education is proposed, with the adoption of a participative model of self-constructive learning. This proposal is based on theoretical references in a both philosophical and sociological knowledge perspective of an individual related to institutional behavior, to end with a psychological view from which some learning theories are explored. An educational model is built with the inclusion of institutional elements, like the new evaluation system for residents; centers for educational investigation and a teacher training process. Three axes of the educational process are proposed: tutorial teaching, development of complex abilities of thought and critical reading. The evaluation system includes guides for measuring the operational process established and the professional responsibilities of the different participants.

  4. Medical Students’ and Interns’ Attitudes toward Medical Ethics Education in a Thai Medical School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakda Sathirareuangchai

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medical ethics has been accepted as part of every accredited medical curriculum for the past 40 years. Medical students’ attitudes have an important role for development and improvement of the curriculum. Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital is the oldest and largest medical school in Thailand, and has been teaching medical ethics since 1907. Objective: To determine attitudes among medical students and interns toward medical ethics education and understand the factors influencing their attitudes. Methods: Mixed quantitative and qualitative research was conducted with early 6th year medical students and interns. A questionnaire was adapted from previous studies and included some original items. Results: Of the 550 questionnaires distributed, 386 were returned (70.2% response rate. Males (n=180 made up 46.63 % of the sample. Interns (n=219, 56.74 % tended to have more positive attitudes toward ethics learning than did medical students (n = 167, 43.26 %. Male participants tended to agree more with negative statements about ethics learning than did females. There was no statistically significant effect of hometown (Bangkok versus elsewhere or grade point average on attitudes. The main problem cited with medical ethics education was lack of engaging methods. Conclusion: Because clinical experience has an effect on learners’ attitudes towards ethics education, medical ethics should be taught at the appropriate time and with proper techniques, such as drawing explicit ties between ethical principles and real-life situations. Attention to the more detailed aspects of these data should also facilitate improvements to curriculum content, thereby ensuring better educational outcomes.

  5. A course in field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Baal, Pierre Van

    2014-01-01

    ""… a pleasant novelty that manages the impossible: a full course in field theory from a derivation of the Dirac equation to the standard electroweak theory in less than 200 pages. Moreover, the final chapter consists of a careful selection of assorted problems, which are original and either anticipate or detail some of the topics discussed in the bulk of the chapters. Instead of building a treatise out of a collection of lecture notes, the author took the complementary approach and constructed a course out of a number of well-known and classic treatises. The result is fresh and useful. … the

  6. Toward a cognitive taxonomy of medical errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiajie; Patel, Vimla L; Johnson, Todd R; Shortliffe, Edward H

    2002-01-01

    One critical step in addressing and resolving the problems associated with human errors is the development of a cognitive taxonomy of such errors. In the case of errors, such a taxonomy may be developed (1) to categorize all types of errors along cognitive dimensions, (2) to associate each type of error with a specific underlying cognitive mechanism, (3) to explain why, and even predict when and where, a specific error will occur, and (4) to generate intervention strategies for each type of error. Based on Reason's (1992) definition of human errors and Norman's (1986) cognitive theory of human action, we have developed a preliminary action-based cognitive taxonomy of errors that largely satisfies these four criteria in the domain of medicine. We discuss initial steps for applying this taxonomy to develop an online medical error reporting system that not only categorizes errors but also identifies problems and generates solutions.

  7. A survey of hidden-variables theories

    CERN Document Server

    Belinfante, F J

    1973-01-01

    A Survey of Hidden-Variables Theories is a three-part book on the hidden-variable theories, referred in this book as """"theories of the first kind"""". Part I reviews the motives in developing different types of hidden-variables theories. The quest for determinism led to theories of the first kind; the quest for theories that look like causal theories when applied to spatially separated systems that interacted in the past led to theories of the second kind. Parts II and III further describe the theories of the first kind and second kind, respectively. This book is written to make the literat

  8. The Economic Impact of Medical Migration: A Receiving Country's Perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, M.M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper seeks to determine the macroeconomic impacts of migration of skilled medical personnel from a receiving country's perspective. The resource allocation issues are explored in theory, by developing an extension of the Rybczynski theorem in a low-dimension Heckscher–Ohlin framework, and empi

  9. Patient adherence to medical treatment. A review of reviews.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dulmen, S. van; Sluijs, E.; Dijk, L. van; Ridder, D. de; Heerdink, R.; Bensing, J.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients' non-adherence to medical treatment remains a persistent problem. Many interventions to improve patient adherence are unsuccessful and sound theoretical foundations are lacking. Innovations in theory and practice are badly needed. A new and promising way could be to review the

  10. Patient adherence to medical treatment. A review of reviews.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dulmen, S. van; Sluijs, E.; Dijk, L. van; Ridder, D. de; Heerdink, R.; Bensing, J.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients' non-adherence to medical treatment remains a persistent problem. Many interventions to improve patient adherence are unsuccessful and sound theoretical foundations are lacking. Innovations in theory and practice are badly needed. A new and promising way could be to review the e

  11. Undergraduate medical education in emergency medical care: a nationwide survey at German medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckers, Stefan K; Timmermann, Arnd; Müller, Michael P; Angstwurm, Matthias; Walcher, Felix

    2009-05-12

    Since June 2002, revised regulations in Germany have required "Emergency Medical Care" as an interdisciplinary subject, and state that emergency treatment should be of increasing importance within the curriculum. A survey of the current status of undergraduate medical education in emergency medical care establishes the basis for further committee work. Using a standardized questionnaire, all medical faculties in Germany were asked to answer questions concerning the structure of their curriculum, representation of disciplines, instructors' qualifications, teaching and assessment methods, as well as evaluation procedures. Data from 35 of the 38 medical schools in Germany were analysed. In 32 of 35 medical faculties, the local Department of Anaesthesiology is responsible for the teaching of emergency medical care; in two faculties, emergency medicine is taught mainly by the Department of Surgery and in another by Internal Medicine. Lectures, seminars and practical training units are scheduled in varying composition at 97% of the locations. Simulation technology is integrated at 60% (n = 21); problem-based learning at 29% (n = 10), e-learning at 3% (n = 1), and internship in ambulance service is mandatory at 11% (n = 4). In terms of assessment methods, multiple-choice exams (15 to 70 questions) are favoured (89%, n = 31), partially supplemented by open questions (31%, n = 11). Some faculties also perform single practical tests (43%, n = 15), objective structured clinical examination (OSCE; 29%, n = 10) or oral examinations (17%, n = 6). Emergency Medical Care in undergraduate medical education in Germany has a practical orientation, but is very inconsistently structured. The innovative options of simulation technology or state-of-the-art assessment methods are not consistently utilized. Therefore, an exchange of experiences and concepts between faculties and disciplines should be promoted to guarantee a standard level of education in emergency medical care.

  12. Undergraduate medical education in emergency medical care: A nationwide survey at German medical schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timmermann Arnd

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since June 2002, revised regulations in Germany have required "Emergency Medical Care" as an interdisciplinary subject, and state that emergency treatment should be of increasing importance within the curriculum. A survey of the current status of undergraduate medical education in emergency medical care establishes the basis for further committee work. Methods Using a standardized questionnaire, all medical faculties in Germany were asked to answer questions concerning the structure of their curriculum, representation of disciplines, instructors' qualifications, teaching and assessment methods, as well as evaluation procedures. Results Data from 35 of the 38 medical schools in Germany were analysed. In 32 of 35 medical faculties, the local Department of Anaesthesiology is responsible for the teaching of emergency medical care; in two faculties, emergency medicine is taught mainly by the Department of Surgery and in another by Internal Medicine. Lectures, seminars and practical training units are scheduled in varying composition at 97% of the locations. Simulation technology is integrated at 60% (n = 21; problem-based learning at 29% (n = 10, e-learning at 3% (n = 1, and internship in ambulance service is mandatory at 11% (n = 4. In terms of assessment methods, multiple-choice exams (15 to 70 questions are favoured (89%, n = 31, partially supplemented by open questions (31%, n = 11. Some faculties also perform single practical tests (43%, n = 15, objective structured clinical examination (OSCE; 29%, n = 10 or oral examinations (17%, n = 6. Conclusion Emergency Medical Care in undergraduate medical education in Germany has a practical orientation, but is very inconsistently structured. The innovative options of simulation technology or state-of-the-art assessment methods are not consistently utilized. Therefore, an exchange of experiences and concepts between faculties and disciplines should be promoted to guarantee a standard

  13. A Developmental Test of Mertonian Anomie Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menard, Scott

    1995-01-01

    Carefully reviewed Merton's writings on anomie theory to construct a more complete and rigorous test of the theory for respondents in early, middle, and late adolescence. Concluded that misspecified models of strain theory have underestimated the predictive power of strain theory in general and of anomie theory in particular. (JBJ)

  14. A Developmental Test of Mertonian Anomie Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menard, Scott

    1995-01-01

    Carefully reviewed Merton's writings on anomie theory to construct a more complete and rigorous test of the theory for respondents in early, middle, and late adolescence. Concluded that misspecified models of strain theory have underestimated the predictive power of strain theory in general and of anomie theory in particular. (JBJ)

  15. Web life: Just A Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    After a few months of physics videos, amateur science sites and educational games, the website we are highlighting in this month's column is a straightforward blog. Just A Theory was started in 2008 by freelance science journalist Jacob Aron while he was studying for a Master's degree in science communication at Imperial College London. The blog's title, Aron explains, reflects a popular misconception that scientific theories are "dreamed up by mad scientists in laboratories somewhere" rather than well-crafted explanations based on observations and experiments. To combat this impression, the site aims to highlight good and bad science coverage in the mainstream media, and to provide original commentary on current scientific events.

  16. 湖南省1808例犯罪精神病人司法精神病学鉴定资料分析%Study on the Forensic Psychiatric Assessment of 1808 Criminal Insanes in Hunan Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈伟华; 周亮; 邬力祥; 肖水源; 黎芝

    2012-01-01

    目的:探讨湖南省司法精神病学鉴定结果为无/限定刑事责任能力的犯罪精神病人的特征.方法:利用自编档案资料采集表,对湖南省2005 -2009年经司法精神病学鉴定为无/限定刑事责任能力的1808例犯罪精神病人进行资料收集.结果:1808例犯罪精神病人中,生活在农村的未婚中青年男性占绝大多数,受教育程度较低,职业以农民为主,犯罪类型中以故意杀人罪(39.0%)和故意伤害罪(31.1%)分布最多,精神障碍诊断类型中以精神病性障碍(79.1%)最多,接受强制治疗者有284(15.7%)例.结论:湖南省犯罪精神病人大多数为农村中青年男性,接受强制治疗的比例很低.%Objective: To describe the characteristics of forensic psychiatrics expertise of criminal insanes in Hunan province. Methods: Data on 1808 criminal insanes in Hunan province from 2005 to 2009 were collected by self-compiled archive-collected table. Results: From 2005 to 2009, a total of 1808 criminal insanes were identified in Hunan Province. The majority of the 1808 cases were male, young and middle-aged, lived in rural area, and had low education level. The main types of the criminal cases were homicide and intentional injury, and psychotic disorder ranked the first mental illness diagnosis. Conclusion: Only a small proportion of criminal insanes had received compulsory treatment in Hunan province.

  17. A course in Galois theory

    CERN Document Server

    Garling, D J H

    2000-01-01

    Galois theory is one of the most beautiful branches of mathematics. By synthesising the techniques of group theory and field theory it provides a complete answer to the problem of the solubility of polynomials by radicals: that is, the problem of determining when and how a polynomial equation can be solved by repeatedly extracting roots and using elementary algebraic operations. This textbook, based on lectures given over a period of years at Cambridge, is a detailed and thorough introduction to the subject. The work begins with an elementary discussion of groups, fields and vector spaces, and then leads the reader through such topics as rings, extension fields, ruler-and-compass constructions, to automorphisms and the Galois correspondence. By these means, the problem of the solubility of polynomials by radicals is answered; in particular it is shown that not every quintic equation can be solved by radicals. Throughout, Dr Garling presents the subject not as something closed, but as one with many application...

  18. Gravity: a gauge theory perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Nester, James M

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of a generally covariant theory is under-determined. One hundred years ago such dynamics had never before been considered; its ramifications were perplexing, its future important role for all the fundamental interactions under the name gauge principle could not be foreseen. We recount some history regarding Einstein, Hilbert, Klein and Noether and the novel features of gravitational energy that led to Noether's two theorems. Under-determined evolution is best revealed in the Hamiltonian formulation. We developed a covariant Hamiltonian formulation. The Hamiltonian boundary term gives covariant expressions for the quasi-local energy, momentum and angular momentum. Gravity can be considered as a gauge theory of the local Poincar\\'e group. The dynamical potentials of the Poincar\\'e gauge theory of gravity are the frame and the connection. The spacetime geometry has in general both curvature and torsion. Torsion naturally couples to spin; it could have a significant magnitude and yet not be noticed,...

  19. A Minimal Propositional Type Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Kaminski, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Propositional type theory, first studied by Henkin, is the restriction of simple type theory to a single base type that is interpreted as the set of the two truth values. We show that two constants (falsity and implication) suffice for denotational and deductive completeness. Denotational completeness means that every value of the full set-theoretic type hierarchy can be described by a closed term. Deductive completeness is shown for a sequent-based proof system that extends a propositional natural deduction system with lambda conversion and Boolean replacement.

  20. A Theory of Taxonomy

    CERN Document Server

    D'Amico, Guido; Kleban, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    A taxonomy is a standardized framework to classify and organize items into categories. Hierarchical taxonomies are ubiquitous, ranging from the classification of organisms to the file system on a computer. Characterizing the typical distribution of items within taxonomic categories is an important question with applications in many disciplines. Ecologists have long sought to account for the patterns observed in species-abundance distributions (the number of individuals per species found in some sample), and computer scientists study the distribution of files per directory. Is there a universal statistical distribution describing how many items are typically found in each category in large taxonomies? Here, we analyze a wide array of large, real-world datasets -- including items lost and found on the New York City transit system, library books, and a bacterial microbiome -- and discover such an underlying commonality. A simple, non-parametric branching model that randomly categorizes items and takes as input o...

  1. Assessment of blood donation intention among medical students in Pakistan--An application of theory of planned behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faqah, Anadil; Moiz, Bushra; Shahid, Fatima; Ibrahim, Mariam; Raheem, Ahmed

    2015-12-01

    Theory of Planned Behavior proposes a model which can measure how human actions are guided. It has been successfully utilized in the context of blood donation. We employed a decision-making framework to determine the intention of blood donation among medical students who have never donated blood before the study. Survey responses were collected from 391 medical students from four various universities on a defined questionnaire. The tool composed of 20 questions that were formulated to explain donation intention based on theory of planned behavior. The construct included questions related to attitude, subjective norm and perceived behavior control, descriptive norm, moral norm, anticipated regret, donation anxiety and religious norm. Pearson's correlational relationships were measured between independent and dependent variables of intention to donate blood. ANOVA was applied to observe the model fit; a value of 0.000 was considered statistically significant. A multiple regression analysis was conducted to explore the relative importance of the main independent variables in the prediction of intention. Multi-collinearity was also evaluated to determine that various independent variables determine the intention. The reliability of measures composed of two items was assessed using inter-item correlations. Three hundred and ninety-one medical students (M:F; 1:2.2) with mean age of 21.96 years ± 1.95 participated in this study. Mean item score was 3.8 ± 0.83. Multiple regression analysis suggested that perceived behavioral control, anticipated regret and attitude were the most influential factors in determining intention of blood donation. Donation anxiety was least correlated and in fact bore a negative correlation with intention. ANOVA computed an F value of 199.082 with a p-value of 0.000 indicating fitness of model. The value of R square and adjusted R square was 0.811 and 0.807 respectively indicating strong correlation between various independent and dependent

  2. Probability theory a foundational course

    CERN Document Server

    Pakshirajan, R P

    2013-01-01

    This book shares the dictum of J. L. Doob in treating Probability Theory as a branch of Measure Theory and establishes this relation early. Probability measures in product spaces are introduced right at the start by way of laying the ground work to later claim the existence of stochastic processes with prescribed finite dimensional distributions. Other topics analysed in the book include supports of probability measures, zero-one laws in product measure spaces, Erdos-Kac invariance principle, functional central limit theorem and functional law of the iterated logarithm for independent variables, Skorohod embedding, and the use of analytic functions of a complex variable in the study of geometric ergodicity in Markov chains. This book is offered as a text book for students pursuing graduate programs in Mathematics and or Statistics. The book aims to help the teacher present the theory with ease, and to help the student sustain his interest and joy in learning the subject.

  3. "Portfolios" as a method of assessment in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldane, Thea

    2014-01-01

    Portfolios are increasingly used in postgraduate medical education and in gastroenterology training as an assessment tool, as documentation of competence, a database of procedure experience (for example endoscopy experience) and for revalidation purposes. In this paper the educational theory behind their use is described and the evidence for their use is discussed.

  4. [A theory on care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svandra, Philippe

    2008-12-01

    Trying to define the nature of care when you are a health care professional, means, inevitably, going back to the very source of your professional commitment. Caring, an essential form of responsibility for the other, is thus revealed as a way of behaving towards other people, as an active and concrete commitment testifying as much to the humanity of the one who gives it as to that of the one who receives it. Starting with the notion of the phenomenology of human capacity, Paul Ricoeur thinks of independence in terms of capacity. He calls upon work of the Indian economist Amartya Sen published in the 1980s on the notion of capabilities. This leads to conceiving disease or disability as a lack of elementary or basic capacity. According to Ricoeur, this notion of capacity can only be understood by looking at its contrary: vulnerability. In this way, only a weakened frail person can be called upon to become independent. Thus the human being, and particularly the ill human being, must be looked upon as both vulnerable, and thus suffering, and capable, and thus active.

  5. A Theory of Ritual

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jørgen Podemann

    2008-01-01

    Et forsøg på at forene teorier om myte og ritual, teorier om offer og teorier om liminalitet i en overordnet teori. Dens anvendelighed søges demonstreret med særligt henblik på antikkens religionshistorie. Bl.a. behandles Attismyten og Kybelekulten, det græske slagtoffer (Vernant), det delfiske o...

  6. A Turing test of a timing theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Russell M; Guilhardi, Paulo

    2005-04-29

    A quantitative theory of timing or conditioning can be evaluated with a Turing test in which the behavioral results of an experiment can be compared with the predicted results from the theory. An example is described based upon an experiment in which 12 rats were trained on three fixed-interval schedules of reinforcement, and a simulation of the predicted results from a packet theory of timing. An objective classification rule was used to determine whether a sample from the data or a sample from the theory was more similar to another sample from the theory. With an ideal theory, the expected probability of a correct classification would be 0.5. The observed probability of a correct classification was 0.6, which was slightly, but reliably, greater than 0.5. A Turing test provides a graded metric for the evaluation of a quantitative theory.

  7. Professional identity formation in medical education for humanistic, resilient physicians: pedagogic strategies for bridging theory to practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wald, Hedy S; Anthony, David; Hutchinson, Tom A; Liben, Stephen; Smilovitch, Mark; Donato, Anthony A

    2015-06-01

    Recent calls for an expanded perspective on medical education and training include focusing on complexities of professional identity formation (PIF). Medical educators are challenged to facilitate the active constructive, integrative developmental process of PIF within standardized and personalized and/or formal and informal curricular approaches. How can we best support the complex iterative PIF process for a humanistic, resilient health care professional? How can we effectively scaffold the necessary critical reflective learning and practice skill set for our learners to support the shaping of a professional identity?The authors present three pedagogic innovations contributing to the PIF process within undergraduate and graduate medical education (GME) at their institutions. These are (1) interactive reflective writing fostering reflective capacity, emotional awareness, and resiliency (as complexities within physician-patient interactions are explored) for personal and professional development; (2) synergistic teaching modules about mindful clinical practice and resilient responses to difficult interactions, to foster clinician resilience and enhanced well-being for effective professional functioning; and (3) strategies for effective use of a professional development e-portfolio and faculty development of reflective coaching skills in GME.These strategies as "bridges from theory to practice" embody and integrate key elements of promoting and enriching PIF, including guided reflection, the significant role of relationships (faculty and peers), mindfulness, adequate feedback, and creating collaborative learning environments. Ideally, such pedagogic innovations can make a significant contribution toward enhancing quality of care and caring with resilience for the being, relating, and doing of a humanistic health care professional.

  8. Medical anthropology: toward a third moment in social science?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dressler, W W

    2001-12-01

    This article about medical anthropology was inspired by the work of Pierre Bourdieu, specifically, his efforts to reconcile the antinomy of a "social structuralist" and a "cultural constructivist" perspective. These perspectives are often opposed in the literature, but, in Bourdieu's view, human life cannot be studied without taking into account both how individuals are situated within and constrained by social structures and how those individuals construct an understanding of and impose meaning on the world around them. I argue that the special subject matter of medical anthropology--human health--demands that a synthetic approach be taken in our theory and research. I illustrate this argument with examples from my own research on social and cultural factors associated with blood pressure, and I point to other examples of this synthesis in medical anthropology. The results of this research hold promise for the continuing refinement of culture theory.

  9. S-Denying a Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smaradache F.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we introduce the operators of validation and invalidation of a proposition, and we extend the operator of S-denying a proposition, or an axiomatic system, from the geometric space to respectively any theory in any domain of knowledge, and show six examples in geometry, in mathematical analysis, and in topology.

  10. Learning a Theory of Causality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Noah D.; Ullman, Tomer D.; Tenenbaum, Joshua B.

    2011-01-01

    The very early appearance of abstract knowledge is often taken as evidence for innateness. We explore the relative learning speeds of abstract and specific knowledge within a Bayesian framework and the role for innate structure. We focus on knowledge about causality, seen as a domain-general intuitive theory, and ask whether this knowledge can be…

  11. 'Theory of Mind' I: a theory of knowledge?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plastow, Michael

    2012-06-01

    'Theory of mind' is a cognitive notion introduced by Simon Baron-Cohen and colleagues to explain certain deficits in autistic disorders. It has, however, been extended beyond this, and applied more broadly. It proposes a means of knowing the mind of others, and suggests that this means fails in autism. The epistemological basis of 'theory of mind' will be examined critically, not just in terms of its endeavour as a theory of knowledge, but also in regard to the principles that underlie it. The proponents of 'theory of mind' eschew the rich field of psychological and phenomenological research, privileging only the biological sciences into which they endeavour to place their theorizations. In doing this, they fail to recognize the epistemological problems involved. This leads to the theory remaining hamstrung by the very Cartesian ontological problems that it seeks to avoid. For some, 'theory of mind' is but an artefact of the cognitive approach that it employs. It is argued that these difficulties are compounded by the failure of 'theory of mind' to take account of the place of language in the interpersonal encounters it attempts to describe.

  12. IS PT -SYMMETRIC QUANTUM THEORY FALSE AS A FUNDAMENTAL THEORY?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miloslav Znojil

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Yi-Chan Lee et al. claim (cf. Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 130404 (2014 that the “recent extension of quantum theory to non-Hermitian Hamiltonians” (which is widely known under the nickname of “PT-symmetric quantum theory” is “likely false as a fundamental theory”. By their opinion their results “essentially kill any hope of PT-symmetric quantum theory as a fundamental theory of nature”. In our present text we explain that their toy-model-based considerations are misleading and that they do not imply any similar conclusions.

  13. MEDICAL BRAIN DRAIN - A THEORETICAL APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boncea Irina

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Medical brain drain is defined as the migration of health personnel from developing countries to developed countries and between industrialized nations in search for better opportunities. This phenomenon became a global growing concern due to its impact on both the donor and the destination countries. This article aims to present the main theoretical contributions starting from 1950 until today and the historical evolution, in the attempt of correlating the particular case of medical brain drain with the theory and evolution of the brain drain in general. This article raises questions and offers answers, identifies the main issues and looks for possible solutions in order to reduce the emigration of medical doctors. Factors of influence include push (low level of income, poor working conditions, the absence of job openings and social recognition, oppressive political climate and pull (better remuneration and working conditions, prospects for career development, job satisfaction, security factors. Developing countries are confronting with the loss of their most valuable intellectuals and the investment in their education, at the benefit of developed nations. An ethical debate arises as the disparities between countries increases, industrialized nations filling in the gaps in health systems with professionals from countries already facing shortages. However, recent literature emphasizes the possibility of a “beneficial brain drain” through education incentives offered by the emigration prospects. Other sources of “brain gain” for donor country are the remittances, the scientific networks and return migration. Measures to stem the medical brain drain involve the common effort and collaboration between developing and developed countries and international organizations. Measures adopted by donor countries include higher salaries, better working conditions, security, career opportunities, incentives to stimulate return migration. Destination

  14. Vibration Theory, Vol. 1A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren R. K.

    The present collection of solved problems has been published as a supplement to the textbook Svingningsteori. Bind 1. Lineær svingningsteori,Aalborg tekniske Universitetsforlag, 1991, whicj is used in the introductory course on linear vibration theory that is being given on th e8th semester at th...

  15. Medical Mysteries: "Thankful They Found a Cause"

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Medical Mysteries “Thankful They Found a Cause” Past Issues / ... conditions that have long eluded diagnosis, and advance medical knowledge about rare and common diseases. Accepted into ...

  16. A Simple Theory for Waterspouts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennó, Nilton O.; Bluestein, Howard B.

    2001-04-01

    It is shown that the simple thermodynamic theory for dust devils, proposed by Rennó et al., also applies to waterspouts. The theory is based on the thermodynamics of heat engines and predicts the central pressure and the wind speed of these convective vortices. Moreover, it provides a simple physical interpretation of their general characteristics. In particular, the heat engine theory shows that convective vortices are more likely to form in the regions where the occurrence of the warmest and moistest updrafts and the coldest and driest downdrafts are supported by the local environment. These are the regions where both the heat input into the convective heat engine is maximum and the solenoidal generation of vorticity is the greatest. This explains why waterspouts are frequently observed near the boundaries between relatively warm and relatively cold waters. Moreover, since the work done by the convective heat engine is equal to the total heat input multiplied by the thermodynamic efficiency, the theory shows that another necessary condition for the formation of intense vortices is the presence of intense convection.

  17. A Career in Medical Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, P. N. T.

    1983-01-01

    Careers in medical physics are discussed. Considers types of hospital departments and responsibilities in same for medical physicists and the education/training needed to enter the field. Indicates that the field is not large and that opportunities to enter it are keenly contested. (JN)

  18. A competency-based longitudinal core curriculum in medical neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlin, Lisa R; Horak, Holli A; Milligan, Tracey A; Kraakevik, Jeff A; Ali, Imran I

    2014-07-29

    Current medical educational theory encourages the development of competency-based curricula. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's 6 core competencies for resident education (medical knowledge, patient care, professionalism, interpersonal and communication skills, practice-based learning, and systems-based practice) have been embraced by medical schools as the building blocks necessary for becoming a competent licensed physician. Many medical schools are therefore changing their educational approach to an integrated model in which students demonstrate incremental acquisition and mastery of all competencies as they progress through medical school. Challenges to medical schools include integration of preclinical and clinical studies as well as development of learning objectives and assessment measures for each competency. The Undergraduate Education Subcommittee (UES) of the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) assembled a group of neuroscience educators to outline a longitudinal competency-based curriculum in medical neuroscience encompassing both preclinical and clinical coursework. In development of this curriculum, the committee reviewed United States Medical Licensing Examination content outlines, Liaison Committee on Medical Education requirements, prior AAN-mandated core curricula for basic neuroscience and clinical neurology, and survey responses from educators in US medical schools. The newly recommended curriculum provides an outline of learning objectives for each of the 6 competencies, listing each learning objective in active terms. Documentation of experiences is emphasized, and assessment measures are suggested to demonstrate adequate achievement in each competency. These guidelines, widely vetted and approved by the UES membership, aspire to be both useful as a stand-alone curriculum and also provide a framework for neuroscience educators who wish to develop a more detailed focus in certain areas of study.

  19. Adult learning theories: implications for learning and teaching in medical education: AMEE Guide No. 83.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, David C M; Hamdy, Hossam

    2013-11-01

    There are many theories that explain how adults learn and each has its own merits. This Guide explains and explores the more commonly used ones and how they can be used to enhance student and faculty learning. The Guide presents a model that combines many of the theories into a flow diagram which can be followed by anyone planning learning. The schema can be used at curriculum planning level, or at the level of individual learning. At each stage of the model, the Guide identifies the responsibilities of both learner and educator. The role of the institution is to ensure that the time and resources are available to allow effective learning to happen. The Guide is designed for those new to education, in the hope that it can unravel the difficulties in understanding and applying the common learning theories, whilst also creating opportunities for debate as to the best way they should be used.

  20. A general theory of linear cosmological perturbations: bimetric theories

    CERN Document Server

    Lagos, Macarena

    2016-01-01

    We implement the method developed in [1] to construct the most general parametrised action for linear cosmological perturbations of bimetric theories of gravity. Specifically, we consider perturbations around a homogeneous and isotropic background, and identify the complete form of the action invariant under diffeomorphism transformations, as well as the number of free parameters characterising this cosmological class of theories. We discuss, in detail, the case without derivative interactions, and compare our results with those found in massive bigravity.

  1. A Contextualised General Systems Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Kirsty Kitto

    2014-01-01

    A system is something that can be separated from its surrounds, but this definition leaves much scope for refinement. Starting with the notion of measurement, we explore increasingly contextual system behaviour and identify three major forms of contextuality that might be exhibited by a system: (1) between components; (2) between system and experimental method; and (3) between a system and its environment. Quantum theory is shown to provide a highly useful formalism from which all three forms...

  2. A probabilistic model for reducing medication errors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phung Anh Nguyen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Medication errors are common, life threatening, costly but preventable. Information technology and automated systems are highly efficient for preventing medication errors and therefore widely employed in hospital settings. The aim of this study was to construct a probabilistic model that can reduce medication errors by identifying uncommon or rare associations between medications and diseases. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Association rules of mining techniques are utilized for 103.5 million prescriptions from Taiwan's National Health Insurance database. The dataset included 204.5 million diagnoses with ICD9-CM codes and 347.7 million medications by using ATC codes. Disease-Medication (DM and Medication-Medication (MM associations were computed by their co-occurrence and associations' strength were measured by the interestingness or lift values which were being referred as Q values. The DMQs and MMQs were used to develop the AOP model to predict the appropriateness of a given prescription. Validation of this model was done by comparing the results of evaluation performed by the AOP model and verified by human experts. The results showed 96% accuracy for appropriate and 45% accuracy for inappropriate prescriptions, with a sensitivity and specificity of 75.9% and 89.5%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: We successfully developed the AOP model as an efficient tool for automatic identification of uncommon or rare associations between disease-medication and medication-medication in prescriptions. The AOP model helps to reduce medication errors by alerting physicians, improving the patients' safety and the overall quality of care.

  3. How to do a grounded theory study: a worked example of a study of dental practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evans R

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Qualitative methodologies are increasingly popular in medical research. Grounded theory is the methodology most-often cited by authors of qualitative studies in medicine, but it has been suggested that many 'grounded theory' studies are not concordant with the methodology. In this paper we provide a worked example of a grounded theory project. Our aim is to provide a model for practice, to connect medical researchers with a useful methodology, and to increase the quality of 'grounded theory' research published in the medical literature. Methods We documented a worked example of using grounded theory methodology in practice. Results We describe our sampling, data collection, data analysis and interpretation. We explain how these steps were consistent with grounded theory methodology, and show how they related to one another. Grounded theory methodology assisted us to develop a detailed model of the process of adapting preventive protocols into dental practice, and to analyse variation in this process in different dental practices. Conclusions By employing grounded theory methodology rigorously, medical researchers can better design and justify their methods, and produce high-quality findings that will be more useful to patients, professionals and the research community.

  4. A Contextualised General Systems Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsty Kitto

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A system is something that can be separated from its surrounds, but this definition leaves much scope for refinement. Starting with the notion of measurement, we explore increasingly contextual system behaviour and identify three major forms of contextuality that might be exhibited by a system: (1 between components; (2 between system and experimental method; and (3 between a system and its environment. Quantum theory is shown to provide a highly useful formalism from which all three forms of contextuality can be analysed, offering numerous tests for contextual behaviour, as well as modelling possibilities for systems that do indeed display it. I conclude with the introduction of a contextualised general systems theory based on an extension of this formalism

  5. A longitudinal medical Spanish program at one US medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuland, Daniel S; Frasier, Pamela Y; Slatt, Lisa M; Alemán, Marco A

    2008-07-01

    Policymakers have recommended recruiting or training (or both) more US physicians who can provide care in Spanish. Few longitudinal medical Spanish programs have been described and evaluated. This study aims to describe development and evaluation of the preclinical phase of a 4-y program designed to graduate physicians who can provide language-concordant care in Spanish. Study was done in one public medical school in southeastern USA. The program targeted intermediate/advanced Spanish speakers. Standardized fluency assessments were used to determine eligibility and evaluate participants' progress. Curriculum included didactic coursework, simulated patients, socio-cultural seminars, clinical skills rotations at sites serving Latinos, service-learning, and international immersion. For the first two cohorts (n = 45) qualitative evaluation identified program improvement opportunities and found participants believed the program helped them maintain their Spanish skills. Mean interim (2-y) speaking proficiency scores were unchanged from baseline: 9.0 versus 8.7 at baseline on 12-point scale (p = 0.15). Mean interim listening comprehension scores (second cohort only, n = 25) increased from a baseline of 77 to 86% (p = 0.003). Proportions "passing" the listening comprehension test increased from 72 to 92% (p = 0.06). We describe development of a longitudinal Spanish program within a medical school. Participation was associated with improved Spanish listening comprehension and no change in speaking proficiency.

  6. The rise and decline of character: humoral psychology in ancient and early modern medical theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, J.

    2009-01-01

    Humoralism, the view that the human body is composed of a limited number of elementary fluids, is one of the most characteristic aspects of ancient medicine. The psychological dimension of humoral theory in the ancient world has thus far received a relatively small amount of scholarly attention.

  7. What Do the Theories of Egon Brunswik Have to Say to Medical Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigton, Robert S.

    2008-01-01

    Every day physicians make judgments about patient management and diagnosis based on less than perfect information from many different sources. Judgment and decision-making research has taught us a great deal about such decisions, but these insights rarely find their way into the medical curriculum. One productive line of investigation in the study…

  8. Playing doctor: application of game theory to medical decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, G A; Rozanski, A; Steuer, M

    1986-01-01

    Decision analysis is an explicit, quantitative and prescriptive means by which the physician can identify optimal clinical strategies under conditions of uncertainty. It is incomplete, however, since it dispenses clinical advice without regard for the fact that the patient--for whatever reason--might choose to reject that advice. Game theory provides a supplementary means to explicate optimal rational strategies in situations where the actual outcome depends on the choices of both the patient and the physician. To determine its potential clinical relevance, we used game theory to reassess a clinical problem which has been used as a textbook exemplar of decision analysis: Should patients with chronic liver failure undergo liver biopsy before being treated? Decision analysis prescribes a pure (deterministic) strategy: the physician should always perform a biopsy. In contrast, given the proper conditions, game theory mandates a mixed (probabilistic) strategy: the physician should (randomly) recommend biopsy to only some fraction of patients, and only some fraction of these should (randomly) accept this advice. Thus, whenever the patient is free to accept or reject the physician's advice, game theory provides a prescriptive decision-making model which is qualitatively and quantitatively different from decision analysis.

  9. Holistic integrative medicine: toward a new era of medical advancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Daiming

    2017-03-01

    Medicine has encountered unprecedented problems associated with changes in nature, society, and environment, as well as with new human quests for survival, longevity, and health. In the meantime, the development of medicine is facing challenges that resulted from the over-division and specialization of disciplines and the fragmentation of medical knowledge. To construct a new medical system that is more suitable for human health and disease treatment, holistic integrative medicine (HIM), which regards the human body as a holistic entity, organically integrates the most advanced knowledge and theories in each medical field and the most effective practices in various clinical specialties to revise and adjust on the basis of social, environmental, and psychological conditions. HIM is the inevitable and necessary direction for the future development of medicine. In this article, we illustrated the connotation of HIM, the differences between HIM and other medical conceptions, and the practice of HIM in recent years.

  10. Probability theory a comprehensive course

    CERN Document Server

    Klenke, Achim

    2014-01-01

    This second edition of the popular textbook contains a comprehensive course in modern probability theory. Overall, probabilistic concepts play an increasingly important role in mathematics, physics, biology, financial engineering and computer science. They help us in understanding magnetism, amorphous media, genetic diversity and the perils of random developments at financial markets, and they guide us in constructing more efficient algorithms.   To address these concepts, the title covers a wide variety of topics, many of which are not usually found in introductory textbooks, such as:   • limit theorems for sums of random variables • martingales • percolation • Markov chains and electrical networks • construction of stochastic processes • Poisson point process and infinite divisibility • large deviation principles and statistical physics • Brownian motion • stochastic integral and stochastic differential equations. The theory is developed rigorously and in a self-contained way, with the c...

  11. A Brief Research on Polysystem Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    狄东睿

    2012-01-01

    Polysystem theory, a new branch of translation studies, was developed in 1970s by Israeli scholar Itamar Even-Zohar. It came into being in 1970s on the basis of the modern translation theories. The thesis will analyze in detail of polysystem theory including the background, origins, main contents and the development of the theory.

  12. Game Theory, Decision Theory, and Social Choice Theory in the Context of a New Theory of Equity

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-12-01

    singular deficiency in moral theory. Additionally, both Nozick (1974) and Wolff (1977) have criticized the Rawlsian and the utilitarian theories for...neglecting the question of contribution. 3. The distinction between manna and nonmanna environments was apparently introduced by Robert Nozick (1974, Chapter...Econometrica. Nozick , Robert, 1974, Anarchy, State and Utopia, New York: Basic Books. Rawls, John, 1971, A Theory of Justice, Cambridge: The Bellknap

  13. Gravity: A gauge theory perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nester, James M.; Chen, Chiang-Mei

    2016-07-01

    The evolution of a generally covariant theory is under-determined. One hundred years ago such dynamics had never before been considered; its ramifications were perplexing, its future important role for all the fundamental interactions under the name gauge principle could not be foreseen. We recount some history regarding Einstein, Hilbert, Klein and Noether and the novel features of gravitational energy that led to Noether’s two theorems. Under-determined evolution is best revealed in the Hamiltonian formulation. We developed a covariant Hamiltonian formulation. The Hamiltonian boundary term gives covariant expressions for the quasi-local energy, momentum and angular momentum. Gravity can be considered as a gauge theory of the local Poincaré group. The dynamical potentials of the Poincaré gauge theory of gravity are the frame and the connection. The spacetime geometry has in general both curvature and torsion. Torsion naturally couples to spin; it could have a significant magnitude and yet not be noticed, except on a cosmological scale where it could have significant effects.

  14. Peer teaching in medical education: twelve reasons to move from theory to practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten Cate, Olle; Durning, Steven

    2007-09-01

    To provide an estimation of how often peer teaching is applied in medical education, based on reports in the literature and to summarize reasons that support the use of this form of teaching. We surveyed the 2006 medical education literature and categorised reports of peer teaching according to educational distance between students teaching and students taught, group size, and level of formality of the teaching. Subsequently, we analysed the rationales for applying peer teaching. Most reports were published abstracts in either Medical Education's annual feature 'Really Good Stuff' or the AMEE's annual conference proceedings. We identified twelve distinct reasons to apply peer teaching, including 'alleviating faculty teaching burden', 'providing role models for junior students', 'enhancing intrinsic motivation' and 'preparing physicians for their future role as educators'. Peer teaching appears to be practiced often, but many peer teaching reports do not become full length journal articles. We conclude that specifically 'near-peer teaching' appears beneficial for student teachers and learners as well as for the organisation. The analogy of the 'journeyman', as intermediate between 'apprentice' and 'master', with both learning and teaching tasks, is a valuable but yet under-recognized source of education in the medical education continuum.

  15. A structural theory of everything

    CERN Document Server

    Josephson, Brian D

    2015-01-01

    Karen Barad's Agential Realism provides a non-paradoxical realist account of quantum reality, but does not show how the complex picture that it implies can be applied to the familiar physics of the laboratory. Here, motivated by parallels with the way human cultures evolve, the theory is augmented by the inclusion of evolutionary processes. The outcome is the understanding that organised activity at deeper levels can result in the emergence of entities such as universes, and phenomena in these universes, including possibly life and the evolution of life. It is argued that agential realism is not essentially new to science, differing from the kinds of ordered structures familiar in physics mainly through the role played by the semiotic, or interpretive information-processing, aspects of the theory.

  16. A synthetic axiomatization of Map Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berline, Chantal; Grue, Klaus Ebbe

    2016-01-01

    of ZFC set theory including the axiom of foundation are provable in Map Theory, and if one omits Hilbert's epsilon operator from Map Theory then one is left with a computer programming language. Map Theory fulfills Church's original aim of lambda calculus. Map Theory is suited for reasoning about......”. The class of wellfounded maps in Map Theory corresponds to the universe of sets in ZFC. The first axiomatization MT 0 of Map Theory had axioms which populated the class of wellfounded maps, much like the power set axiom along with others populate the universe of ZFC. The new axiomatization MT of Map Theory......This paper presents a substantially simplified axiomatization of Map Theory and proves the consistency of this axiomatization (called MT) in ZFC under the assumption that there exists an inaccessible ordinal. Map Theory axiomatizes lambda calculus plus Hilbert's epsilon operator. All theorems...

  17. A New Theory of Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langston, Leland

    2016-06-01

    I argue that time cannot pass at the same rate throughout the duration of the universe. Specifically, clocks ran more slowly in the early universe than they do today. We can reasonably ask: "How has time varied with respect to proper time over the life of the universe?" The current Big Bang model of the universe theorizes that the universe began with an infinitely small, hot, dense entity that expanded and cooled over time. In this model, the early universe was infinitely dense, and hence the gravitational field was infinitely strong. This means that clocks ran infinitely more slowly than clocks do today. The obvious question is: What is the relationship of clocks in the early universe with respect to our current clocks? The purpose of this paper is to propose a new theory that attempts to answer this question. This paper shows the theory to be consistent with: (1) Hubble's Law; (2) Gravitational Time Dilation; and (3) The so-called Pioneer Anomaly. A Time Transform pair is introduced that permits time in earlier epocs to be calculated with respect to time in the current epoc (i.e., proper time). Am experiment is proposed to verify the data obtained from the pioneer probe and this proposed theory of time.

  18. Evolution is only a theory?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peshkin, Murray

    2008-04-01

    I have been speaking to diverse groups about science and religion in the context of the attacks on the teaching of biological evolution in public schools. My audiences have included church groups, classrooms, business clubs, and general public. In explaining why science does not threaten most people's religious beliefs and why belief in evolution is not really optional, I have learned that most people have never been told what a theory is and how we know when it's right, or what it means that our theories are always provisional but well-established theories are nevertheless reliable where they apply. It seems that we have taught students and the public about gravity and DNA, but never told them what science is all about. We need to do better. The people I have addressed have mostly appreciated hearing about these things and about why science, properly understood, does not deny most people's religious beliefs. I will discuss these and other lessons I have learned from the reactions to my talks. *For identification. This work is not supported by Argonne Natl. Lab.

  19. Exercises de style: a homotopy theory for set theory, I

    CERN Document Server

    Hasson, Assaf

    2011-01-01

    We construct a model category (in the sense of Quillen) for set theory, starting from a couple of arbitrary, but natural, conventions. This is the simplest category satisfying our conventions and modelling the notions of finiteness, countability and infinite equi-cardinality. In a subsequent paper [GH10] we give a homotopy theoretic dictionary of set theoretic concepts, most notably Shelah's covering number cov(\\lambda, \\aleph_1,\\aleph_1, 2), recuperated from this model category. We argue that from the homotopy theory point of view our construction is, essentially, automatic following basic existing methods, and so is (almost all) the verification that the construction works.

  20. Prediction of pharmacist intention to provide Medicare medication therapy management services using the theory of planned behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Kathleen E; Urmie, Julie M; Newland, Brand A; Farris, Karen B

    2006-09-01

    Medicare Part D is a voluntary prescription drug benefit for Medicare beneficiaries. As part of the coverage, medication therapy management services (MTMS) are mandated for beneficiaries with chronic diseases who take multiple medications covered under part D and who are likely to incur annual costs that exceed a specified level. To predict the behavioral intention of pharmacists to provide Medicare medication therapy management services (MTMS) using the theory of planned behavior (TPB) and to determine the relationship between pharmacists' characteristics and intention to provide MTMS. The population for this cross-sectional descriptive study consisted of all community pharmacists in Iowa. Data collection occurred through a self-administered anonymous mail survey. Two surveys each were mailed to 500 pharmacies selected through a stratified random sample, 1 survey for the pharmacy manager and 1 survey for a staff pharmacist if applicable. Descriptive statistics and scale reliability were calculated for each of the 4 TPB scales (attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioral control, and intention). Linear regression was used to predict intent as a function of the other 3 TPB factors, demographic factors, experience, and type of pharmacy. Out of 212 surveys received, 203 had usable data. The usable response rate ranged from 21% to 41%. Pharmacists' intent to provide MTMS was generally positive but varied in strength with a mean score of 22.47 (+/-4.00) and a range of 7-30. Pharmacists mostly agreed that they had appropriate training to provide MTMS but lacked time and support. The linear regression analysis found the constructs of attitude, subjective norm, and perceived behavioral control to be significant predictors of intent (Pbehavioral control, subjective norm, and attitude were significant predictors of intent (P<.05). Strategies to help pharmacists provide MTMS should focus on finding time and support to provide MTMS rather than individual educational needs.

  1. Medical nanobiosensors: A tutorial review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamideh Razavi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A sensitive monitoring of biological analytes, such as biomolecules (protein, lipid, DNA and RNA, and biological cells (blood cell, virus and bacteria, is essential to assess and avoid risks for human health. Nanobiosensors, analytical devices that combine a biologically sensitive element with a nanostructured transducer, are being widely used for molecular detection of biomarkers associated with diagnosis of disease and detection of infectious organisms. Nanobiosensors show certain advantages over laboratory and many field methods due to their inherent specificity, simplicity and quick response. In this review, recent progress in the development of nanobiosensors in medicine is illuminated. In addition, this article reviews different kinds of bio-receptors and transducers employed in nanobiosensors. In the last section, overview of the development and application of various nanomaterials and nanostructures in biosensing has been provided. Considering all of these aspects, it can be stated that nanobiosensors offer the possibility of diagnostic tools with increased sensitivity, specificity, and reliability for medical applications.  

  2. Contributions of Decision Making Theory to comprehensive medical attention. Contribución de la teoría sobre la toma de decisiones a la atención médica integral.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes Fonseca Hernández

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Decision Making Theory contributes many useful elements for General Comprehensive Doctors, associated with their function of integral attention, mainly related with treatment. In this article we present as core elements: the need for logic to make decisions, the usefulness of programmed and non-programmed decisions concepts and the importance of make individual decisions using determination factors.La teoría sobre la toma de decisiones aporta elementos de clara aplicación en la actividad del médico general integral básico relacionada con su función de atención médica integral a pacientes, fundamentalmente en el área del tratamiento. En este artículo son expuestos como principales elementos: la existencia de una lógica para tomar decisiones, la utilidad del concepto de decisiones programadas y no programadas y la necesidad de individualizar las decisiones mediante el empleo de los factores de decisión.

  3. Control-value theory: using achievement emotions to improve understanding of motivation, learning, and performance in medical education: AMEE Guide No. 64.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artino, Anthony R; Holmboe, Eric S; Durning, Steven J

    2012-01-01

    In this AMEE Guide, we consider the emergent theoretical and empirical work on human emotion and how this work can inform the theory, research, and practice of medical education. In the Guide, we define emotion, in general, and achievement emotions, more specifically. We describe one of the leading contemporary theories of achievement emotions, control-value theory (Pekrun 2006), and we distinguish between different types of achievement emotions, their proximal antecedents, and their consequences for motivation, learning, and performance. Next, we review the empirical support for control-value theory from non-medical fields and suggest several important implications for educational practice. In this section, we highlight the importance of designing learning environments that foster a high degree of control and value for students. Finally, we end with a discussion of the need for more research on achievement emotions in medical education, and we propose several key research questions we believe will facilitate our understanding of achievement emotions and their impact on important educational outcomes.

  4. Examining the attitudes of hospital pharmacists to reporting medication safety incidents using the theory of planned behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Steven David; Phipps, Denham L; Ashcroft, Darren

    2015-08-01

    To assess the effect of factors within hospital pharmacists' practice on the likelihood of their reporting a medication safety incident. Theory of planned behaviour (TPB) survey. Twenty-one general and teaching hospitals in the North West of England. Two hundred and seventy hospital pharmacists (response rate = 45%). Hospital pharmacists were invited to complete a TPB survey, based on a prescribing error scenario that had resulted in serious patient harm. Multiple regression was used to determine the relative influence of different TPB variables, and participant demographics, on the pharmacists' self-reported intention to report the medication safety incident. The TPB variables predicting intention to report: attitude towards behaviour, subjective norm, perceived behavioural control and descriptive norm. Overall, the hospital pharmacists held strong intentions to report the error, with senior pharmacists being more likely to report. Perceived behavioural control (ease or difficulty of reporting), Descriptive Norms (belief that other pharmacists would report) and Attitudes towards Behaviour (expected benefits of reporting) showed good correlation with, and were statistically significant predictors of, intention to report the error [R = 0.568, R(2) = 0.323, adjusted R(2) = 0.293, P behavioural and control beliefs about the reporting process. This should include instilling greater confidence about the benefits of reporting and not harming professional relationships with doctors, greater clarity about what/not to report and a simpler reporting system. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care; all rights reserved.

  5. A Theory of Service Dependency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mats Neovius

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Service composition has become commonplace nowadays, in large part due to the increased complexity of software and supporting networks. Composition can be of many types, for instance sequential, prioritising, non-deterministic. However, a fundamental feature of the services to be composed consists in their dependencies with respect to each other. In this paper we propose a theory of service dependency, modelled around a dependency operator in the Action Systems formalism. We analyze its properties, composition behaviour, and refinement conditions with accompanying examples.

  6. New trends in medical and service robots theory and integrated applications

    CERN Document Server

    Bleuler, Hannes; Rodic, Aleksandar; Vaida, Calin; Pisla, Adrian; First International Workshop on Medical and Service Robots

    2014-01-01

    This book contains mainly the selected papers of the First International Workshop on Medical and Service Robots, held in Cluj-Napoca, Romania, in 2012. The high quality of the scientific contributions is the result of a rigorous selection and improvement based on the participants’ exchange of opinions and extensive peer-review. This process has led to the publishing of the present collection of 16 independent valuable contributions and points of view and not as standard symposium or conference proceedings.  The addressed issues are: Computational Kinematics, Mechanism Design, Linkages and Manipulators, Mechanisms for Biomechanics, Mechanics of Robots, Control Issues for Mechanical Systems, Novel Designs, Teaching Methods, all of these being concentrated around robotic systems for medical and service applications.  The results are of interest to researchers and professional practitioners as well as to Ph.D. students in the field of mechanical and electrical engineering.  This volume marks the start of a s...

  7. Perceptions and preferences of medical students regarding teaching methods in a Medical College, Mangalore India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanna, K M; Kulkarni, V; Tanvi, D; Lakshmi, V; Kriti, L; Unnikrishnan, B; Akash, S; Tejesh, S; Sumit Kumar, S

    2013-09-01

    In the complex setting of a medical school it becomes essential to utilize an approach to teaching and learning that is best suited to the needs of the students. In developing countries like India, where there is an exponential increase of institutions catering to medical students, it becomes a challenge to teach to large number of students per class. Hence, research is needed to identify the needs of students in relation to their day to day learning activities. To understand the preferences and perception of medical students about the current methods of teaching, aids used for teaching and also identify barriers in learning as perceived by the students. A Cross-sectional study was carried out at Kasturba Medical College, Mangalore during May 2012. Study participants included 2(nd) and 3(rd) year medical students. A semi-structured questionnaire was used to collect the information in relation to preferences and perceptions regarding teaching methods utilized for theory and clinical teaching. SPSS version 11.5 was used for analysis of data. The association between variables of interest was tested using Chi-square test. A total of 286 students (56.6 % females and 43.4% males) participated with a dropout rate of 10.6%. The study revealed that 71.3% of the students had an attendance above 75%. The most preferred teaching method was Problem Based Learning (PBL) (71.4%) as students felt that it enhanced lateral thinking while Didactic Lectures was the least preferred (32.8%). The most preferred modality of teaching aid was found to be Black board preferred by 46.9% students. In learning rare signs and cases, students preferred video lectures (41%) and mannequins (75.9%) in learning clinical skills. The main barrier in theory learning identified was inappropriate teaching methods (15%) and being new to clinical posting (38.5%) in case of learning clinical skills. The findings of the study suggest that a combination of traditional methods with other methods such as PBL

  8. A homotopy approach to set theory

    CERN Document Server

    Gavrilovich, Misha

    2010-01-01

    We observe that the notion of two sets being equal up to finitely many elements is a homotopy equivalence relation in a model category, and suggest a homotopy-invariant variant of Generalised Continuum Hypothesis about which more can be proven within ZFC and which first appeared in PCF theory. The formalism allows to draw analogies between notions of set theory and those of homotopy theory, and we indeed observe a similarity between homotopy theory ideology/yoga and that of PCF theory. We also briefly discuss conjectural connections with model theory and arithmetics and geometry.

  9. Medical employee ethics: a staff training tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Laura Sachs

    2009-01-01

    Ethics is a critical part of medical employee education and is a subject that requires frequent and regular consideration and attention. This article defines ethics particularly as it applies to an individual who works in a medical practice and explores five core ethical values for all medical practice personnel. It suggests the benefits of basing management practices and decisions on ethical core values and explores specific ways that ethics can affect an individual's emotional and physical well being. This article also offers ethical guidelines specifically for medical practice employees regarding the use of their time at work and their workplace communications. Finally, this article offers a set of questions a medical practice employee can use when working through an ethical dilemma and dispels six common myths about medical practice ethics.

  10. Toward a Theory of Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-12-01

    but few practical methods to solve large-scale, uomplex, real-life problems. ;- -- . 5r OI the other hand, areas of study such as decision theory...sim:ulatLed uorlt’!; . a succ-nssful systci’ for auitoriatie ATC ’:iould silare with systeris w orki n., in o the r environm-,ents t’.e( i rmpo rta nt o a...1OL~rCCS of’ uncertalinty are .luo to it-iperfect adlerenice tu comrd , [ f, uS IUZ, .-i Ine’?3Ss int 1 oca t ioan of Iai rc r ft on r nio r 2

  11. 'God's ethicist': Albert Moll and his medical ethics in theory and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maehle, Andreas-Holger

    2012-04-01

    In 1902, Albert Moll, who at that time ran a private practice for nervous diseases in Berlin, published his comprehensive book on medical ethics, Ärztliche Ethik. Based on the concept of a contractual relationship between doctor and client, it gave more room to the self-determination of patients than the contemporary, usually rather paternalistic, works of this genre. In the first part of the present paper this is illustrated by examining Moll's views and advice on matters such as truthfulness towards patients, euthanasia, and abortion. The second part of this article discusses how Moll engaged with the then publicly debated issues of experimentation on hospital patients and the 'trade' of foreign private patients between agents and medical consultants. In both matters Moll collected evidence of unethical practices and tried to use it to bring about change without damaging his or the profession's reputation. However, with his tactical manoeuvres, Moll made no friends for himself among his colleagues or the authorities; his book on ethics also met with a generally cool response from the medical profession and seems to have been more appreciated by lawyers than by other doctors.

  12. Can behavioral theory inform the understanding of depression and medication nonadherence among HIV-positive substance users?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magidson, Jessica F; Listhaus, Alyson; Seitz-Brown, C J; Safren, Steven A; Lejuez, C W; Daughters, Stacey B

    2015-04-01

    Medication adherence is highly predictive of health outcomes across chronic conditions, particularly HIV/AIDS. Depression is consistently associated with worse adherence, yet few studies have sought to understand how depression relates to adherence. This study tested three components of behavioral depression theory--goal-directed activation, positive reinforcement, and environmental punishment--as potential indirect effects in the relation between depressive symptoms and medication nonadherence among low-income, predominantly African American substance users (n = 83). Medication nonadherence was assessed as frequency of doses missed across common reasons for nonadherence. Non-parametric bootstrapping was used to evaluate the indirect effects. Of the three intermediary variables, there was only an indirect effect of environmental punishment; depressive symptoms were associated with greater nonadherence through greater environmental punishment. Goal-directed activation and positive reinforcement were unrelated to adherence. Findings suggest the importance of environmental punishment in the relation between depression and medication adherence and may inform future intervention efforts for this population.

  13. Analysis of a Medical Internship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaus, William A.; O'Leary, Dennis S.

    1975-01-01

    In response to discussion concerning the fate of the medical internship, the authors analyze the patient experiences an intern encountered--finding them to deal exclusively with care of acutely ill persons--and conclude that the traditional internship is unrealistic with respect to the practice of medicine. The importance of record keeping is…

  14. John Gregory (1724-1773) and his lectures on the duties and qualifications of a physician establishing modern medical ethics on the base of the moral philosophy and the theory of science of the empiric British Enlightenment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strätling, M

    1997-01-01

    In 1769/70 the Scottish physician and philosopher John Gregory (1724-1773) published Lectures On the Duties and Qualifications of a Physician. Gregory developed a truely ethical - in the sense of (moral) philosophically based - system of conduct in a physician. His concept of practising and teaching ethics in medicine and science is established on a very broad footing: combining Bacon's (1561-1626) general philosophy of nature and science with both, the general, likewise empirically based moral philosophy of his personal friend David Hume (1711-1776), and with the principles upheld by the so-called Common-Sense Philosophy. His Lectures had - particularly via the famous Code of Medical Ethics of Thomas Percival (1740-1804) - a decisive influence on our contemporary concepts of ethics in medicine and science. John Gregory is, without doubt, one of the most important and certainly the most comprehensive among the founders of what is known today as modern Bioethics.

  15. A Quantum Theory of Magnetism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gift S.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new Quantum Theory of Magnetic Interaction is proposed. This is done under a relaxation of the requirement of covariance for Lorentz Boost Transformations. A modified form of local gauge invariance in which fermion field phase is allowed to vary with each space point but not each time point, leads to the introduction of a new compensatory field different from the electromagnetic field associated with the photon. This new field is coupled to the magnetic flux of the fermions and has quanta called magnatons, which are massless spin 1 particles. The associated equation of motion yields the Poisson equation for magnetostatic potentials. The magnatons mediate the magnetic interaction between magnetic dipoles including magnets and provide plausi- ble explanations for the Pauli exclusion principle, Chemical Reactivity and Chemical Bonds. This new interaction has been confirmed by numerical experiments. It estab- lishes magnetism as a force entirely separate from the electromagnetic interaction and converts all of classical magnetism into a quantum theory.

  16. A theory of behavioral contrast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killeen, Peter R

    2014-11-01

    The reinforcers that maintain target instrumental responses also reinforce other responses that compete with them for expression. This competition, and its imbalance at points of transition between different schedules of reinforcement, causes behavioral contrast. The imbalance is caused by differences in the rates at which different responses come under the control of component stimuli. A model for this theory of behavioral contrast is constructed by expanding the coupling coefficient of MPR (Killeen, 1994). The coupling coefficient gives the degree of association of a reinforcer with the target response (as opposed to other competing responses). Competing responses, often identified as interim or adjunctive or superstitious behavior, are intrinsic to reinforcement schedules, especially interval schedules. In addition to that base-rate of competition, additional competing responses may spill over from the prior component, causing initial contrast; and they may be modulated by conditioned reinforcement or punishment from stimuli associated with subsequent component change, causing terminal contrast. A formalization of these hypotheses employed (a) a hysteresis model of off-target responses giving rise to initial contrast, and (b) a competing traces model of the suppression or enhancement of ongoing competitive responses by signals of following-schedule transition. The theory was applied to transient contrast, the following schedule effect, and the component duration effect.

  17. A Review on Conceptual Blending Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘丽

    2010-01-01

    The CBT(Conceptual Blending Theory)is rapidly emerging as a major force in cognitive science and provides a unifying umbrella framework for a range of cognitive phenomena.The present paper is to have a general review of the conceptual blending theory through illustrating its four-space theory in order to have a better comprehension of its nature.

  18. Malcolm Knowles' Theory of Andragogy: A Critique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartree, Anne

    1984-01-01

    The author suggests that Knowles's concept of andragogy offers a philosophical position rather than a unified theory of adult learning. She examines weaknesses of the theory and discusses it in relation to humanistic psychology and existentialism. (SK)

  19. A unified theory of superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Xiuqing

    2008-01-01

    In this work, we argue that the phonon-mediated BCS theory may be incorrect. Two kinds of glues, pairing (pseudogap) glue and superconducting glue, are suggested based on a real space Coulomb confinement effect. The scenarios provide a unified explanation of the pairing symmetry, pseudogap and superconducting states, spin--charge stripe order, magic doping fractions and vortex structures in conventional and unconventional (the high-Tc cuprates, MgB2 and the newly-discovered Fe-based family) superconductors. The theory agrees with the existence of a pseudogap in high-temperature superconductors, while no pseudogap feature could be observed in MgB2, iron-based and most of the conventional superconductors. Our results indicate that the superconducting phase can coexist with a triangular vortex lattice in pure MgB2 single crystal with a charge carrier density n=1.49*10^22/cm3. For iron-based superconductors, the relationship between the superconducting vortex phases and the optimal doping levels are analytically ...

  20. A theory of neurolinguistic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, J L

    1997-06-15

    This article offers a developmental theory of language and the neural systems that lead to and subserve linguistic capabilities. Early perceptual experience and discontinuities in linguistic development suggest that language develops in four phases that occur in a fixed, interdependent sequence. In each phase of language, a unique ontogenetic function is accomplished. These functions have proprietary neural systems that vary in their degree of specialization. Of particular interest is an analytical mechanism that is responsible for linguistic grammar. This mechanism is time-locked and can only be turned on in the third phase. Confirming evidence is provided by children who are delayed in the second phase of the language learning process. These children store insufficient lexical material to activate their analytic mechanism. Inactivation behaves like damage, shifting language functions to homologous mechanisms in the nondominant hemisphere, thereby increasing functional and anatomical symmetry across the hemispheres. This atypical assembly of neurolinguistic resources produces functional but imperfect command of spoken language and may complicate learning of written language. The theory thus offers a different role for genetics and early experience, and a different interpretation of neuroanatomic findings, from those entertained in most other proposals on developmental language disorders.

  1. Informing the scaling up of voluntary medical male circumcision efforts through the use of theory of reasoned action: survey findings among uncircumcised young men in Swaziland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurman, Tilly A; Dhillon, Preeti; Greene, Jessica L; Makadzange, Panganai; Khumlao, Philisiwe; Shekhar, Navendu

    2015-04-01

    Assessing predictors of intention to circumcise can help to identify effective strategies for increasing uptake of voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC). Grounded in the theory of reasoned action (TRA), the current study of uncircumcised males ages 13-29 in Swaziland (N = 1,257) employed multivariate logistic regression to determine predictors of VMMC intention. The strongest predictors were strongly disagreeing/disagreeing that sex was more painful for a circumcised man (odds ratio [OR] = 4.37; p = theory to explore young men's intention to circumcise and can help inform interventions aimed at increasing uptake of VMMC.

  2. Medical Image Retrieval: A Multimodal Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yu; Steffey, Shawn; He, Jianbiao; Xiao, Degui; Tao, Cui; Chen, Ping; Müller, Henning

    2014-01-01

    Medical imaging is becoming a vital component of war on cancer. Tremendous amounts of medical image data are captured and recorded in a digital format during cancer care and cancer research. Facing such an unprecedented volume of image data with heterogeneous image modalities, it is necessary to develop effective and efficient content-based medical image retrieval systems for cancer clinical practice and research. While substantial progress has been made in different areas of content-based image retrieval (CBIR) research, direct applications of existing CBIR techniques to the medical images produced unsatisfactory results, because of the unique characteristics of medical images. In this paper, we develop a new multimodal medical image retrieval approach based on the recent advances in the statistical graphic model and deep learning. Specifically, we first investigate a new extended probabilistic Latent Semantic Analysis model to integrate the visual and textual information from medical images to bridge the semantic gap. We then develop a new deep Boltzmann machine-based multimodal learning model to learn the joint density model from multimodal information in order to derive the missing modality. Experimental results with large volume of real-world medical images have shown that our new approach is a promising solution for the next-generation medical imaging indexing and retrieval system.

  3. Advanced Medical Technology Capacity Building and the Medical Mentoring Event: A Unique Application of SOF Counterinsurgency Medical Engagement Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irizarry, Dan; Tate, Charmaine; Wey, Pierre-Francois; Batjom, Emmanuel; Nicholas, Thomas A; Boedeker, Ben H

    2012-01-01

    Background The Medical Civic Assistance Program (MEDCAP) is a military commander?s tool developed during the Vietnam War to gain access to and positively influence an indigenous population through the provision of direct medical care provided by military medical personnel, particularly in Counter Insurgency Operations (COIN). An alternative to MEDCAPs is the medical seminar (MEDSEM). The MEDSEM uses a Commander?s military medical assets to share culturally appropriate medical information with a defined indigenous population in order to create a sustainable training resource for the local population?s health system. At the heart of the MEDSEM is the ?train the trainer? concept whereby medical information is passed to indigenous trainers who then pass that information to an indigenous population. The MEDSEM achieves the Commander?s objectives of increasing access and influence with the population through a medical training venue rather than direct patient care. Previous MEDSEMS conducted in Afghanistan by military forces focused on improvement of rural healthcare through creation of Village Health Care Workers. This model can also be used to engage host nation (HN) medical personnel and improve medical treatment capabilities in population centers. The authors describe a modification of the MEDSEM, a Medical Mentorship (MM), conducted in November 2010 in Kabul, Afghanistan, at the Afghan National Army (ANA) National Medical Hospital. This training was designed to improve intubation skills in Afghan National Army Hospitals by ANA medical providers, leave residual training capability, and build relationships within the institution that not only assist the institution, but can also be leveraged to foster Commanders? objectives, such as health and reconstruction initiatives and medical partnering for indigenous corps and medical forces described below. Methods We, the authors, developed a culturally appropriate endotracheal intubation training package including a Dari and

  4. A Relational Localisation Theory for Topological Algebras

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis, we develop a relational localisation theory for topological algebras, i.e., a theory that studies local approximations of a topological algebra’s relational counterpart. In order to provide an appropriate framework for our considerations, we first introduce a general Galois theory between continuous functions and closed relations on an arbitrary topological space. Subsequently to this rather foundational discussion, we establish the desired localisation theory comprising the i...

  5. Medical clowning: even adults deserve a dream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuttman-Shwartz, Orit; Scheyer, Rachel; Tzioni, Herzl

    2010-01-01

    The article examines the significance of the integration of medical clowns as an intervention strategy with adult outpatients suffering from chronic illnesses. The study is based on content analysis of the documentation of the work of two medical clowns over two years. The dominant theme involves the definition of the clown's role and includes perspectives on his integration into the hospital's multidisciplinary medical staff and his impact on the staff and on patients and their families. The finding is discussed in light of the dual role of the medical social worker as coordinator and as a case manager, and the challenge of integrating medical clowns in treatment of adult patients. There is room for further exploration of the contribution of medical clowns to assisting and improving the quality of life for patients and hospital staff.

  6. A Probabilistic Model for Reducing Medication Errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Phung Anh; Syed-Abdul, Shabbir; Iqbal, Usman; Hsu, Min-Huei; Huang, Chen-Ling; Li, Hsien-Chang; Clinciu, Daniel Livius; Jian, Wen-Shan; Li, Yu-Chuan Jack

    2013-01-01

    Background Medication errors are common, life threatening, costly but preventable. Information technology and automated systems are highly efficient for preventing medication errors and therefore widely employed in hospital settings. The aim of this study was to construct a probabilistic model that can reduce medication errors by identifying uncommon or rare associations between medications and diseases. Methods and Finding(s) Association rules of mining techniques are utilized for 103.5 million prescriptions from Taiwan’s National Health Insurance database. The dataset included 204.5 million diagnoses with ICD9-CM codes and 347.7 million medications by using ATC codes. Disease-Medication (DM) and Medication-Medication (MM) associations were computed by their co-occurrence and associations’ strength were measured by the interestingness or lift values which were being referred as Q values. The DMQs and MMQs were used to develop the AOP model to predict the appropriateness of a given prescription. Validation of this model was done by comparing the results of evaluation performed by the AOP model and verified by human experts. The results showed 96% accuracy for appropriate and 45% accuracy for inappropriate prescriptions, with a sensitivity and specificity of 75.9% and 89.5%, respectively. Conclusions We successfully developed the AOP model as an efficient tool for automatic identification of uncommon or rare associations between disease-medication and medication-medication in prescriptions. The AOP model helps to reduce medication errors by alerting physicians, improving the patients’ safety and the overall quality of care. PMID:24312659

  7. A STUDY OF DEPRESSION AMONG MEDICAL STUDENTS OF PRIVATE MEDICAL COLLEGE IN SOUTH INDIA

    OpenAIRE

    Jai; Arvinda Prabhu

    2014-01-01

    CONTEXT: Medical Education in Private Medical Colleges is a great contributor to stress among the medical students & possibly even in developing syndromic depression among medical students which is an area of concern worldwide. The objective of this study is to assess the prevalence of depressive symptoms and its associate factors among medical students. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A cross sectional survey was conducted among 400 medical students from first to fourth year in Pr...

  8. Quantum Field Theory A Modern Perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Parameswaran Nair, V

    2005-01-01

    Quantum field theory, which started with Paul Dirac’s work shortly after the discovery of quantum mechanics, has produced an impressive and important array of results. Quantum electrodynamics, with its extremely accurate and well-tested predictions, and the standard model of electroweak and chromodynamic (nuclear) forces are examples of successful theories. Field theory has also been applied to a variety of phenomena in condensed matter physics, including superconductivity, superfluidity and the quantum Hall effect. The concept of the renormalization group has given us a new perspective on field theory in general and on critical phenomena in particular. At this stage, a strong case can be made that quantum field theory is the mathematical and intellectual framework for describing and understanding all physical phenomena, except possibly for a quantum theory of gravity. Quantum Field Theory: A Modern Perspective presents Professor Nair’s view of certain topics in field theory loosely knit together as it gr...

  9. Toward a medical anthropology of sensations: definitions and research agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinton, Devon E; Howes, David; Kirmayer, Laurence J

    2008-06-01

    In this article, we outline the importance of a medical anthropology of sensations for theories of psychopathology and psychological healing. We define what is meant by ;sensation' (differentiating monomodal and polymodal sensations) and describe some of the mechanisms that generate and amplify sensations. We propose the heuristic use of the concepts of sensation schemas, sensation interpretants, and sensation scripts. We argue against the naive assumption that sensation experience is the same across cultures. Finally, we consider how healing may occur through 'sensation semiosis.'

  10. Towards a (new) theory of the retailer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skytte, Hans

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a new 'theory of the retailer'. The theory is built on the constructivist paradigm, and the research strategy applied is the constructivist approach to grounded theory. A conceptual framework is employed for the analysis of a number of companies. The main result of the study...

  11. Formulating a Theory of Second Language Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spolsky, Bernard

    1985-01-01

    Krashen's Monitor Model of second language learning is examined critically in light of other research, and a unified, more comprehensive theory combining theories of first and second language learning is called for. (MSE)

  12. Toward a gauge field theory of gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, H.

    Joint use of two differential identities (Bianchi and Freud) permits a gauge field theory of gravity in which the gravitational energy is localizable. The theory is compatible with quantum mechanics and is experimentally viable.

  13. Action Theory, Control and Motivation: A Symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckensberger, L. H.; Meacham, J. A., Eds.

    1984-01-01

    Describes the symposium on action theory presented at the 1983 meeting of the International Society for the Study of Behavioral Development in Munich. The symposium included reactions to action theory from a variety of theoretical perspectives. (Author/RH)

  14. Theory in a Virtual Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Teuben, P; Hut, P; Levy, S; Makino, J; McMillan, S; Zwart, S P; Slavin, S D; Teuben, Peter; Young, Dave De; Hut, Piet; Levy, Stuart; Makino, Jun; Millan, Steve Mc; Zwart, Simon Portegies; Slavin, Shawn

    2001-01-01

    During the last couple of years, observers have started to make plans for a Virtual Observatory, as a federation of existing data bases, connected through levels of software that enable rapid searches, correlations, and various forms of data mining. We propose to extend the notion of a Virtual Observatory by adding archives of simulations, together with interactive query and visualization capabilities, as well as ways to simulate observations of simulations in order to compare them with observations. For this purpose, we have already organized two small workshops, earlier in 2001, in Tucson and Aspen. We have also provided concrete examples of theory data, designed to be federated with a Virtual Observatory. These data stem from a project to construct an archive for our large-scale simulations using the GRAPE-6 (a 32-Teraflops special purpose computer for stellar dynamics). We are constructing interfaces by which remote observers can observe these simulations. In addition, these data will enable detailed comp...

  15. The problematization of medical tourism: a critique of neoliberalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kristen

    2012-04-01

    The past two decades have seen the extensive privatisation and marketisation of health care in an ever reaching number of developing countries. Within this milieu, medical tourism is being promoted as a rational economic development strategy for some developing nations, and a makeshift solution to the escalating waiting lists and exorbitant costs of health care in developed nations. This paper explores the need to problematize medical tourism in order to move beyond one dimensional neoliberal discourses that have, to date, dominated the arena. In this problematization, the paper discusses a range of understandings and uses of the term 'medical tourism' and situates it within the context of the neoliberal economic development of health care internationally. Drawing on theory from critical medical anthropology and health and human rights perspectives, the paper critically analyzes the assumed independence between the medical tourism industry and local populations facing critical health issues, where social, cultural and economic inequities are widening in terms of access, cost and quality of health care. Finally, medical tourism is examined in the local context of India, critiquing the increasingly indistinct roles played by government and private sectors, whilst linking these shifts to global market forces. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Measuring the impact of an interprofessional multimedia learning resource on Japanese nurses and nursing students using the Theory of Planned Behavior Medication Safety Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omura, Mieko; Levett-Jones, Tracy; Stone, Teresa Elizabeth; Maguire, Jane; Lapkin, Samuel

    2015-12-01

    Interprofessional communication and teamwork are essential for medication safety; however, limited educational opportunities for health professionals and students to develop these skills exist in Japan. This study evaluated the impact of an interprofessional multimedia learning resource on registered nurses' and nursing students' intention to practice in a manner promoting medication safety. Using a quasi-experimental design, Japanese registered nurses and nursing students (n = 203) were allocated to an experimental (n = 109) or control group (n = 94). Behavioral intentions of medication safety and the predictor variables of attitudes, perceived behavioral control, and subjective norms were measured using a Japanese version of the Theory of Planned Behavior Medication Safety Questionnaire. Registered nurses in the experimental group demonstrated a greater intention to collaborate and practice in a manner that enhanced medication safety, evidenced by higher scores than the control group on all predictor variables. The results demonstrate the potential for interprofessional multimedia learning resources to positively impact the behaviors of Japanese registered nurses in relation to safe medication practices. Further research in other contexts and with other cohorts is warranted.

  17. How to become a competent medical writer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhasini Sharma

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Medical writing involves writing scientific documents of different types which include regulatory and research-related documents, disease or drug-related educational and promotional literature, publication articles like journal manuscripts and abstracts, content for healthcare websites, health-related magazines or news articles. The scientific information in these documents needs to be presented to suit the level of understanding of the target audience, namely, patients or general public, physicians or the regulators. Medical writers require an understanding of the medical concepts and terminology, knowledge of relevant guidelines as regards the structure and contents of specific documents, and good writing skills. They also need to be familiar with searching medical literature, understanding and presenting research data, the document review process, and editing and publishing requirements. Many resources are now available for medical writers to get the required training in the science and art of medical writing, and upgrade their knowledge and skills on an ongoing basis. The demand for medical writing is growing steadily in pharmaceutical and healthcare communication market. Medical writers can work independently or be employed as full time professionals. Life sciences graduates can consider medical writing as a valuable career option.

  18. TOWARD A THEORY OF SUSTAINABLE SYSTEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    While there is tremendous interest in the topic of sustainability, a fundamental theory of sustainability does not exist. We present our efforts at constructing such a theory starting with Information Theory and ecological models. We discuss the state of complex sustainable syste...

  19. Towards a Mathematical Theory of Knowledge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ru-Qian Lu

    2005-01-01

    A typed category theory is proposed for the abstract description of knowledge and knowledge processing. It differs from the traditional category theory in two directions: all morphisms have types and the composition of morphisms is not necessary a morphism. Two aspects of application of typed category theory are discussed: cones and limits of knowledge complexity classes and knowledge completion with pseudo-functors.

  20. Interpreting Quantum Theory : A Therapeutic Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friederich, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Debates about the foundations of quantum theory usually circle around two main challenges: the so-called 'measurement problem' and a claimed tension between quantum theory and relativity theory that arises from the phenomena labelled 'quantum non-locality'. This work explores the possibility of a 't

  1. Toward a Theory of Entrepreneurial Behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teague, Bruce T.; Gartner, Bill

    2017-01-01

    The chapter reviews several of the most prominent entrepreneurship frameworks to demonstrate that the entrepreneurship field lacks a theory of entrepreneurial behavior. However, each of these existing frameworks would benefit from, and be complemented by, an entrepreneurial behavioral theory....... Drawing from multiple streams of research, the chapter offers a preliminary theory of entrepreneurial behavior. Several propositions are offered and new research opportunities are identified....

  2. Interpreting Quantum Theory : A Therapeutic Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friederich, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Debates about the foundations of quantum theory usually circle around two main challenges: the so-called 'measurement problem' and a claimed tension between quantum theory and relativity theory that arises from the phenomena labelled 'quantum non-locality'. This work explores the possibility of a 't

  3. Ernst Rüdin's Unpublished 1922-1925 Study "Inheritance of Manic-Depressive Insanity": Genetic Research Findings Subordinated to Eugenic Ideology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kösters, Gundula; Steinberg, Holger; Kirkby, Kenneth Clifford; Himmerich, Hubertus

    2015-11-01

    In the early 20th century, there were few therapeutic options for mental illness and asylum numbers were rising. This pessimistic outlook favoured the rise of the eugenics movement. Heredity was assumed to be the principal cause of mental illness. Politicians, scientists and clinicians in North America and Europe called for compulsory sterilisation of the mentally ill. Psychiatric genetic research aimed to prove a Mendelian mode of inheritance as a scientific justification for these measures. Ernst Rüdin's seminal 1916 epidemiological study on inheritance of dementia praecox featured large, systematically ascertained samples and statistical analyses. Rüdin's 1922-1925 study on the inheritance of "manic-depressive insanity" was completed in manuscript form, but never published. It failed to prove a pattern of Mendelian inheritance, counter to the tenets of eugenics of which Rüdin was a prominent proponent. It appears he withheld the study from publication, unable to reconcile this contradiction, thus subordinating his carefully derived scientific findings to his ideological preoccupations. Instead, Rüdin continued to promote prevention of assumed hereditary mental illnesses by prohibition of marriage or sterilisation and was influential in the introduction by the National Socialist regime of the 1933 "Law for the Prevention of Hereditarily Diseased Offspring" (Gesetz zur Verhütung erbkranken Nachwuchses).

  4. A BASIC CAMERA UNIT FOR MEDICAL PHOTOGRAPHY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SMIALOWSKI, A; CURRIE, D J

    1964-08-22

    A camera unit suitable for most medical photographic purposes is described. The unit comprises a single-lens reflex camera, an electronic flash unit and supplementary lenses. Simple instructions for use of th's basic unit are presented. The unit is entirely suitable for taking fine-quality photographs of most medical subjects by persons who have had little photographic training.

  5. [G. W. Leibniz: medicine and the sciences of life. Ist part: Leibniz as a "medical practioner].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chazaud, J

    1995-01-01

    A universal thinker, Leibniz always expressed a marked interest for matters of life. A reader and a correspondent of the most famous physicians of his time, he exhorted them - with some results - to found their theories on the ground of detailed comparative observations and of verified experiments, firmly distinguishing scientific and metaphysic points of view. He worked out a primal organismic theory, but devoted himself mostly to set up a coherent medical training programme and a requiring health policy. Nevertheless, beyond anecdote, Leibniz never pretended to be a medical practioner, but thought he was a "medically-minded" philosopher.

  6. A temporal extension to the parsimonious covering theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wainer, J; Rezende, A de M

    1997-07-01

    In this paper, parsimonious covering theory is extended in such a way that temporal knowledge can be accommodated. In addition to causally associating possible manifestations with disorders, temporal relationships about duration and the time elapsed before a manifestation comes into existence can be represented by a graph. Precise definitions of the solution of a temporal diagnostic problem as well as algorithms to compute the solutions are provided. The medical suitability of the extended parsimonious cover theory is studied in the domain of food-borne disease.

  7. Regional medical campuses: a new classification system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheifetz, Craig E; McOwen, Katherine S; Gagne, Pierre; Wong, Jennifer L

    2014-08-01

    There is burgeoning belief that regional medical campuses (RMCs) are a significant part of the narrative about medical education and the health care workforce in the United States and Canada. Although RMCs are not new, in the recent years of medical education enrollment expansion, they have seen their numbers increase. Class expansion explains the rapid growth of RMCs in the past 10 years, but it does not adequately describe their function. Often, RMCs have missions that differ from their main campus, especially in the areas of rural and community medicine. The absence of an easy-to-use classification system has led to a lack of current research about RMCs as evidenced by the small number of articles in the current literature. The authors describe the process of the Group on Regional Medical Campuses used to develop attributes of a campus separate from the main campus that constitute a "classification" of a campus as an RMC. The system is broken into four models-basic science, clinical, longitudinal, and combined-and is linked to Liaison Committee on Medical Education standards. It is applicable to all schools and can be applied by any medical school dean or medical education researcher. The classification system paves the way for stakeholders to agree on a denominator of RMCs and conduct future research about their impact on medical education.

  8. Critical Social Theory: A Portrait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Carlos A.

    2012-01-01

    The term Critical Social Theory is employed in this article following the tradition of the Frankfurt School, and particularly the work of Herbert Marcuse and his interpretation of the political and social philosophy of Hegel and Marx. Discussing the contribution of G.W.F. Hegel to social theory Marcuse argued that: "Hegel's system brings to a…

  9. A Reconsideration of Prototype Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马立文

    2008-01-01

    This paper makes an attempt to review the background when prototype theory was proposed,affirm its significant role in the study of psychology and linguistics and point out its theoretical deficiencies,which is helpful to reduce the Vacuous nature of the theory.

  10. Critical Social Theory: A Portrait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Carlos A.

    2012-01-01

    The term Critical Social Theory is employed in this article following the tradition of the Frankfurt School, and particularly the work of Herbert Marcuse and his interpretation of the political and social philosophy of Hegel and Marx. Discussing the contribution of G.W.F. Hegel to social theory Marcuse argued that: "Hegel's system brings to a…

  11. A Small Deformation of a Simple Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Buican, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    We study an interesting relevant deformation of the simplest interacting N=2 SCFT---the original Argyres-Douglas (AD) theory. We argue that, although this deformation is not strictly speaking Banks-Zaks like (certain operator dimensions change macroscopically), there are senses in which it constitutes a mild deformation of the parent AD theory: the exact change in the "a" anomaly is small and is essentially saturated at one loop. Moreover, contributions from IR operators that have a simple description in the UV theory reproduce a particular limit of the IR index to a remarkably high order. These results lead us to conclude that the IR theory is an N=1 SCFT with the smallest-known "a" and "c" central charges for an interacting SCFT in four dimensions.

  12. Venture Theory: A Model of Decision Weights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    restrictions are important in that nonadditive decision weights can be used to "explain" many anomalies of standard choice theory . Implications. There are...1974). On utility functions. Theory and Decision, 5, 205-242. Chew, S. H., & MacCrimmon, K. R. Alpha-nu choice theory : A generalization of expected

  13. Propositions to a Marxist Theory of Personality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Robert J.

    1985-01-01

    Presents propositions fundamental to a comprehensive Marxist theory of personality: five premises about the ontological nature of the person and four about underlying expresssive personality characteristics. Differences between the proposed theory and traditional theories are discussed in terms of sociohistorical influence, the nature of…

  14. Gatekeepers of a Profession? Employability as Capital in the Recruitment of Medical Interns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindberg, Ola

    2013-01-01

    The present article concerns employability in physicians' professional practice. Drawing on interview data from recruiters at 21 Swedish hospitals with the most applicants for a medical internship, the article seeks to develop a theory of what constitutes an "employable medical intern". Using Pierre Bourdieu's concept of…

  15. Gatekeepers of a Profession? Employability as Capital in the Recruitment of Medical Interns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindberg, Ola

    2013-01-01

    The present article concerns employability in physicians' professional practice. Drawing on interview data from recruiters at 21 Swedish hospitals with the most applicants for a medical internship, the article seeks to develop a theory of what constitutes an "employable medical intern". Using Pierre Bourdieu's concept of capital, two…

  16. Medical research in emergency research in the European Union member states: tensions between theory and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kompanje, Erwin J O; Maas, Andrew I R; Menon, David K; Kesecioglu, Jozef

    2014-04-01

    In almost all of the European Union member states, prior consent by a legal representative is used as a substitute for informed patient consent for non-urgent medical research. Deferred (patient and/or proxy) consent is accepted as a substitute in acute emergency research in approximately half of the member states. In 12 European Union member states emergency research is not mentioned in national law. Medical research in the European Union is covered by the Clinical Trial Directive 2001/20/EC. A proposal for a regulation by the European Commission is currently being examined by the European Parliament and the Council and will replace Directive 2001/20/EC. Deferred patient and/or proxy consent is allowed in the proposed regulation, but does not fit completely in the practice of emergency research. For example, deferred consent is only possible when legal representatives are not available. This criterion will delay inclusion of patients in acute life-threatening conditions in short time frames. As the regulation shall be binding in its entirety in all member states, emergency research in acute situations is still not possible as it should be.

  17. [Medication-induced dysphagia : A review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwemmle, C; Jungheim, M; Miller, S; Kühn, D; Ptok, M

    2015-07-01

    As a highly differentiated physiological process, swallowing may be affected by a variety of confounding factors. Primarily described are swallowing disorders caused by mechanical anatomic changes (e. g., alteration of the cervical spine, goiter), surgery for head and neck tumors, thyroid abnormalities, and neuromuscular disorders. Age-related cerebral neurological and blood vessel-associated changes can also cause dysphagia (so-called presbyphagia) or worsen the condition.Medication-associated dysphagia is recognized far less frequently, not paid due attention, or accepted in silence; particularly in older patients. Furthermore, pharmacological interference of different medications is frequently inadequately considered, particularly in the case of polypharmacy.Initial treatment of medication-induced dysphagia includes a critical review of medication status, with the aim of reducing/discontinuing the causative medication by giving precise instructions regarding its administration; as well as antacid medication, diet, and professional oral stimulation or swallowing training.To date, medication-induced dysphagia has not occupied the focus of physicians and therapists. This is despite the fact that many active agents can have a negative effect on swallowing and medication-induced dysphagia caused by polypharmacy is not uncommon, particularly in old age. This article presents an overview of the different classes of drugs in terms of their direct or indirect negative effects on the swallowing function.

  18. Burnout in medical residents : a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, J.T.; Gazendam-Donofrio, S.M.; Tubben, B.J.; van der Heijden, F.M.M.A.; De Wiel, H.B.M.V.; Hoekstra-Weebers, J.E.H.M.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES This study aimed to review current knowledge on burnout in medical residents, including reported prevalence rates, and to establish which risk and resistance factors contribute to or prevent burnout in medical residents. METHODS We conducted a comprehensive search of the literature publis

  19. A Dissecting Competition for Medical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samalia, Latika; Stringer, Mark D.

    2012-01-01

    After repeated requests from medical students for more cadaver dissection opportunities, a voluntary dissecting "competition" was initiated for the third year medical students in 2006. This has been held annually on five occasions since, offering up to 30 dissection stations and accommodating an average of 53 students (range 40-66) per year,…

  20. Humanities for medical students? A qualitative study of a medical humanities curriculum in a medical school program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Troein Margareta

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Today, there is a trend towards establishing the medical humanities as a component of medical education. However, medical humanities programs that exist within the context of a medical school can be problematic. The aim of this study was to explore problems that can arise with the establishment of a medical humanities curriculum in a medical school program. Methods Our theoretical approach in this study is informed by derridean deconstruction and by post-structuralist analysis. We examined the ideology of the Humanities and Medicine program at Lund University, Sweden, the practical implementation of the program, and how ideology and practice corresponded. Examination of the ideology driving the humanities and medicine program was based on a critical reading of all available written material concerning the Humanities and Medicine project. The practice of the program was examined by means of a participatory observation study of one course, and by in-depth interviews with five students who participated in the course. Data was analysed using a hermeneutic editing approach. Results The ideological language used to describe the program calls it an interdisciplinary learning environment but at the same time shows that the conditions of the program are established by the medical faculty's agenda. In practice, the "humanities" are constructed, defined and used within a medical frame of reference. Medical students have interesting discussions, acquire concepts and enjoy the program. But they come away lacking theoretical structure to understand what they have learned. There is no place for humanities students in the program. Conclusion A challenge facing cross-disciplinary programs is creating an environment where the disciplines have equal standing and contribution.

  1. A 1+1 field theory spectrum from M theory

    CERN Document Server

    Rodríguez, M J; Rodriguez, Maria Jose; Talavera, Pere

    2005-01-01

    The spectrum of a 1+1 dimensional field theory with dynamical quarks is constructed. We focus in testing the possible brane embeddings that can support fundamental matter. The requirement on the wave function normalisation and the dependence on the quark mass of the quark condensate allow to discard most of the embeddings. We pay attention to some more general considerations comparing the behaviour of the non-compact theory at different dimensions. In particular we explored the possibility that the AdS/CFT duality ``formalism'' introduce a scale breaking parameter at (1+1)d allowing the existence of classical glueballs and its possible relation with point-like string configurations. The screening effects and the appearance of a possible phase transition is also discussed.

  2. A theory of latticed plates and shells

    CERN Document Server

    Pshenichnon, Gi

    1993-01-01

    The book presents the theory of latticed shells as continual systems and describes its applications. It analyses the problems of statics, stability and dynamics. Generally, a classical rod deformation theory is applied. However, in some instances, more precise theories which particularly consider geometrical and physical nonlinearity are employed. A new effective method for solving general boundary value problems and its application for numerical and analytical solutions of mathematical physics and reticulated shell theory problems is described. A new method of solving the shell theory's nonli

  3. Situational judgement tests in medical education and training: Research, theory and practice: AMEE Guide No. 100.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Fiona; Zibarras, Lara; Ashworth, Vicki

    2016-01-01

    Why use SJTs? Traditionally, selection into medical education professions has focused primarily upon academic ability alone. This approach has been questioned more recently, as although academic attainment predicts performance early in training, research shows it has less predictive power for demonstrating competence in postgraduate clinical practice. Such evidence, coupled with an increasing focus on individuals working in healthcare roles displaying the core values of compassionate care, benevolence and respect, illustrates that individuals should be selected on attributes other than academic ability alone. Moreover, there are mounting calls to widen access to medicine, to ensure that selection methods do not unfairly disadvantage individuals from specific groups (e.g. regarding ethnicity or socio-economic status), so that the future workforce adequately represents society as a whole. These drivers necessitate a method of assessment that allows individuals to be selected on important non-academic attributes that are desirable in healthcare professionals, in a fair, reliable and valid way. What are SJTs? Situational judgement tests (SJTs) are tests used to assess individuals' reactions to a number of hypothetical role-relevant scenarios, which reflect situations candidates are likely to encounter in the target role. These scenarios are based on a detailed analysis of the role and should be developed in collaboration with subject matter experts, in order to accurately assess the key attributes that are associated with competent performance. From a theoretical perspective, SJTs are believed to measure prosocial Implicit Trait Policies (ITPs), which are shaped by socialisation processes that teach the utility of expressing certain traits in different settings such as agreeable expressions (e.g. helping others in need), or disagreeable actions (e.g. advancing ones own interest at others, expense). Are SJTs reliable, valid and fair? Several studies, including good

  4. Toward a Child Rights Theory in Pediatric Bioethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldhagen, Jeffrey; Mercer, Raul; Webb, Elspeth; Nathawad, Rita; Shenoda, Sherry; Lansdown, Gerison

    2016-01-01

    This article offers a child rights theory in pediatric bioethics, applying the principles, standards, and norms of child rights, health equity, and social justice to medical and ethical decision-making. We argue that a child rights theory in pediatric bioethics will help pediatricians and pediatric bioethicists analyze and address the complex interplay of biomedical and social determinants of child health. These core principles, standards and norms, grounded in the U.N. Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC), provide the foundational elements for the theory and a means for better understanding the complex determinants of children's health and well-being. Rights-based approaches to medical and ethical decision-making provide strategies for applying and translating these elements into the practice of pediatrics and pediatric bioethics by establishing a coherent, consistent, and contextual theory that is relevant to contemporary practice. The proposed child rights theory extends evolving perspectives on the relationship between human rights and bioethics to both child rights and pediatric bioethics.

  5. A unified theory of bone healing and nonunion: BHN theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, D S; Newman, K J H; Forward, D P; Hahn, D M; Ollivere, B; Kojima, K; Handley, R; Rossiter, N D; Wixted, J J; Smith, R M; Moran, C G

    2016-07-01

    This article presents a unified clinical theory that links established facts about the physiology of bone and homeostasis, with those involved in the healing of fractures and the development of nonunion. The key to this theory is the concept that the tissue that forms in and around a fracture should be considered a specific functional entity. This 'bone-healing unit' produces a physiological response to its biological and mechanical environment, which leads to the normal healing of bone. This tissue responds to mechanical forces and functions according to Wolff's law, Perren's strain theory and Frost's concept of the "mechanostat". In response to the local mechanical environment, the bone-healing unit normally changes with time, producing different tissues that can tolerate various levels of strain. The normal result is the formation of bone that bridges the fracture - healing by callus. Nonunion occurs when the bone-healing unit fails either due to mechanical or biological problems or a combination of both. In clinical practice, the majority of nonunions are due to mechanical problems with instability, resulting in too much strain at the fracture site. In most nonunions, there is an intact bone-healing unit. We suggest that this maintains its biological potential to heal, but fails to function due to the mechanical conditions. The theory predicts the healing pattern of multifragmentary fractures and the observed morphological characteristics of different nonunions. It suggests that the majority of nonunions will heal if the correct mechanical environment is produced by surgery, without the need for biological adjuncts such as autologous bone graft. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2016;98-B:884-91.

  6. Medical managers in contemporary healthcare organisations: a consideration of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Alison J

    2010-11-01

    To consider the literature supporting the evolution of the roles of a Medical Manager within contemporary healthcare organisations. Consideration of available literature. Limited dedicated literature available. Consideration of available studies and expert opinion reveals benefit of doctors in management positions within healthcare organisations. The roles of Medical Managers arise from: organisational structure-theory of healthcare's 'professional bureaucracy'; clinical directorate models; clinical governance, legislative and public health requirements; and the duality of combining medical knowledge with business and healthcare management training. Roles identified are: (1) leadership and management of medical staff including appointments and credentialing, and mentoring of medical staff in Clinical Directorate roles; (2) strategy development including Medical Advisory Role to Executive; (3) clinical governance including quality and risk management and legislative requirements; and (4) operational areas that benefit from clinical and management skills. Strengths of this review include considering contexts of Medical Managers in medical and healthcare management literature. Weaknesses include drawing inferences from theory. Future recommendations include formal studies and systematic reviews of available literature of the subject. In light of falling Medical Management trainee numbers, this study highlights the value to the health system of a dwindling Medical Management profession, the urgent need to encourage more medical practitioners into management and for organisations to further embrace Medical Managers in key leadership roles.

  7. Electronic health record training in undergraduate medical education: bridging theory to practice with curricula for empowering patient- and relationship-centered care in the computerized setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wald, Hedy S; George, Paul; Reis, Shmuel P; Taylor, Julie Scott

    2014-03-01

    While electronic health record (EHR) use is becoming state-of-the-art, deliberate teaching of health care information technology (HCIT) competencies is not keeping pace with burgeoning use. Medical students require training to become skilled users of HCIT, but formal pedagogy within undergraduate medical education (UME) is sparse. How can medical educators best meet the needs of learners while integrating EHRs into medical education and practice? How can they help learners preserve and foster effective communication skills within the computerized setting? In general, how can UME curricula be devised for skilled use of EHRs to enhance rather than hinder provision of effective, humanistic health care?Within this Perspective, the authors build on recent publications that "set the stage" for next steps: EHR curricula innovation and implementation as concrete embodiments of theoretical underpinnings. They elaborate on previous calls for maximizing benefits and minimizing risks of EHR use with sufficient focus on physician-patient communication skills and for developing core competencies within medical education. The authors describe bridging theory into practice with systematic longitudinal curriculum development for EHR training in UME at their institution, informed by Kern and colleagues' curriculum development framework, narrative medicine, and reflective practice. They consider this innovation within a broader perspective-the overarching goal of empowering undergraduate medical students' patient- and relationship-centered skills while effectively demonstrating HCIT-related skills.

  8. Taking decision general theory and its application in the medical assistance field (II La teoría general sobre la toma de decisiones y su aplicación al campo de la asistencia médica (II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Alberto Corona Martínez

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available

    This article deals with methods and techniques for assessing and selecting opinions. Among the ones used by the doctors investigation and analysis are used by the doctors and as a most concrete technique the cost-benefit analysis as well as the so called the tree decision in which subjective probabilities are assessed as a qualitative category not as a quantitative one. These methods and techniques allow to elicit options in risky conditions that characterise the decision making process in the medical field.

    En este artículo son abordados los métodos y técnicas para la evaluación y selección de opciones. Entre los utilizados por el médico se encuentran fundamentalmente la investigación y análisis como método general; y como técnicas más concretas el análisis costo-beneficio , así como los llamados árboles de decisión , en el cual se utilizan probabilidades subjetivas valoradas como categoría cualitativa, no cuantitativamente. Estos métodos y técnicas permiten escoger opciones en las condiciones de incertidumbre y riesgo que suelen caracterizar al proceso de toma de decisiones en el campo médico.

  9. Constructivism: the view of knowledge that ended philosophy or a theory of learning and instruction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colliver, Jerry A

    2002-01-01

    Constructivism is referred to in two very different ways in education including medical education: to refer to a view of knowledge and to refer to a theory of learning and hence instruction. This proposal (a) distinguishes between these two usages of constructivism and (b) concludes that constructivism is not a theory of learning and thus as such has little to offer that might be of value to medical education.

  10. Medical marijuana: a public health perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ushang Desai

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Over the few years medical marijuana is growing in the United States. Because of the medical marijuana legislators able to legalized recreational marijuana in the two states in the US. Marijuana has several potential benefits that help in certain disease. The delivery of marijuana is also important because smoking marijuana has severe side effects. Physicians also play important role in medical marijuana, physicians also divided on the use of medical marijuana. Their attitude towards medical marijuana important for the treatment of disease is important for the community. Marijuana is the most commonly used illegal drug in the US and all over world, several risks associated with it. Major concern is medical marijuana increased the use of marijuana and will create the public health problem in the society. There are several medical benefits from the marijuana but require more research to establish the marijuana as a medicine. Control of medical marijuana is also major issue for the law enforcement agencies and challenge for policymakers also in the United States. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2013; 2(2.000: 136-143

  11. The Utility of the SASSI-3 in Early Detection of Substance Use Disorders in Not Guilty by Reason of Insanity Acquittees: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Ervin E., II; Piazza, Nick J.; Laux, John M.

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies have shown the Substance Abuse Subtle Screening Inventory-3 (G. Miller, 1999) to be valid in classifying substance use disorders in forensic and mentally ill populations. The authors found that it also correctly classified substance use disorders in the understudied not guilty by reason of insanity population. (Contains 3 tables.)

  12. Machine medical ethics

    CERN Document Server

    Pontier, Matthijs

    2015-01-01

    The essays in this book, written by researchers from both humanities and sciences, describe various theoretical and experimental approaches to adding medical ethics to a machine in medical settings. Medical machines are in close proximity with human beings, and getting closer: with patients who are in vulnerable states of health, who have disabilities of various kinds, with the very young or very old, and with medical professionals. In such contexts, machines are undertaking important medical tasks that require emotional sensitivity, knowledge of medical codes, human dignity, and privacy. As machine technology advances, ethical concerns become more urgent: should medical machines be programmed to follow a code of medical ethics? What theory or theories should constrain medical machine conduct? What design features are required? Should machines share responsibility with humans for the ethical consequences of medical actions? How ought clinical relationships involving machines to be modeled? Is a capacity for e...

  13. A general theory of rotorcraft trim

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Peters

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we offer a general theory of rotorcraft trim. The theory is set in the context of control theory. It allows for completely arbitrary trim controls and trim settings for multi-rotor aircraft with tests to ensure that a system is trimmable. In addition, the theory allows for “optimal trim” in which some variable is minimized or maximized rather than set to a specified value. The theory shows that sequential trim cannot work for free flight. The theory is not tied to any particular trim algorithm; but, in this paper, it is exercised with periodic shooting to show how free-flying rotorcraft can be trimmed in a variety of ways (zero yaw, zero pitch, zero roll, minimum power, etc. by use of the general theory. The paper also discusses applications to harmonic balance and auto-pilot trim techniques.

  14. Towards a critical theory of disability in social work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hiranandani, Vanmala Sunder

    2005-01-01

    The dominant discourse on disability in social work has been that of an individual/medical model, which largely relegates the ‘problem’ of disability to a deficit within the individual. This paper calls for re-visioning disability: notions of disability in social work are contrasted with alternat...... the foundation of a dynamic critical theory of disability that questions impairment as necessarily a personal tragedy, and asserts that the notion of individual inadequacy is socially reproduced....

  15. Analytic dimensions of a prescription-medication benefit in medicare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, R J; Cox, E R

    2000-04-01

    Many analysts believe that the lack of coverage for outpatient prescription medications represents a conspicuous deficiency in the Medicare benefits package. This paper uses insurance theory to design and estimate the costs of a Medicare catastrophic-medication outpatient benefit. For efficiency and equity purposes, and to accommodate the tradeoff between the cost to the federal government and the insurance value of such a benefit to Medicare enrollees, we favor a benefit that would be means-tested by employing deductibles, coinsurance rates, and catastrophic limits, all of which would be progressively graduated for 7 household income classes. For equity reasons, we propose that the government's share of the medication benefit be financed from the general tax fund, using the progressive income tax. Another source of potential savings within the Medicare program that could pay for a medication benefit would be elimination of fraud, waste, and abuse. Because our proposal addresses both the efficiency and equity dimensions of a Medicare outpatient medication benefit, we believe it is worthy of serious consideration by both policymakers and Congress.

  16. Active Inference: A Process Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friston, Karl; FitzGerald, Thomas; Rigoli, Francesco; Schwartenbeck, Philipp; Pezzulo, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    This article describes a process theory based on active inference and belief propagation. Starting from the premise that all neuronal processing (and action selection) can be explained by maximizing Bayesian model evidence-or minimizing variational free energy-we ask whether neuronal responses can be described as a gradient descent on variational free energy. Using a standard (Markov decision process) generative model, we derive the neuronal dynamics implicit in this description and reproduce a remarkable range of well-characterized neuronal phenomena. These include repetition suppression, mismatch negativity, violation responses, place-cell activity, phase precession, theta sequences, theta-gamma coupling, evidence accumulation, race-to-bound dynamics, and transfer of dopamine responses. Furthermore, the (approximately Bayes' optimal) behavior prescribed by these dynamics has a degree of face validity, providing a formal explanation for reward seeking, context learning, and epistemic foraging. Technically, the fact that a gradient descent appears to be a valid description of neuronal activity means that variational free energy is a Lyapunov function for neuronal dynamics, which therefore conform to Hamilton's principle of least action.

  17. A mathematical theory of citing

    CERN Document Server

    Simkin, M V

    2005-01-01

    Recently we proposed a model in which when a scientist writes a manuscript, he picks up several random papers, cites them and also copies a fraction of their references (cond-mat/0305150). The model was stimulated by our discovery that a majority of scientific citations are copied from the lists of references used in other papers (cond-mat/0212043). It accounted quantitatively for several properties of empirically observed distribution of citations. However, important features, such as power-law distribution of citations to papers published during the same year and the fact that the average rate of citing decreases with aging of a paper, were not accounted for by that model. Here we propose a modified model: when a scientist writes a manuscript, he picks up several random recent papers, cites them and also copies some of their references. The difference with the original model is the word recent. We solve the model using methods of the theory of branching processes, and find that it can explain the aforementi...

  18. Making a meaningful contribution to theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boer, Harry; Holweg, Matthias; Kilduff, Martin

    2015-01-01

    discussed in the “OM Theory” workshop in Dublin in 2011 and the special sessions at the 2011 and the 2013 EurOMA Conferences in Cambridge and Dublin. Design/methodology/approach – This paper presents six short essays that explore the role and use of theory in management research, and specifically ask what...... is a good or meaningful contribution to theory. The authors comment on the current state of theory in OperationsManagement (OM) (Harry Boer), the type of theories the authors have in OM (Chris Voss), the role of theory in increasing the general understanding of OM problems (Roger Schmenner), whether...

  19. A Geometrically—Nonlinear Plate Theory 12

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AlbertC.J.LUO

    1999-01-01

    An approximate plate theory developed in this paper is based on an assumed displacement field,the strains described by a Taylor series in the normal distance from the middle surface,the exact strains of the middle surface and the equations of equilibrium governing the exact configuration of the deformed middle surface,In this theory the exact geometry of the deformed middle surface is used to derive the strains and equilibrium of the plate.Application of this theory does not depend on the constitutive law.THis theory can reduce to some existing nonlinear theories through imposition of constraints.

  20. Quantum theory a wide spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Manoukian, E B

    2006-01-01

    Suitable for instructors and graduate students in Physics, and researchers and professional scientists in Theoretical Physics, this textbook focuses on Quantum Theory. It includes traditional topics and contains numerous problems some of which are challenging enough for research

  1. Towards effective evaluation and reform in medical education: a cognitive and learning sciences perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Vimla L; Yoskowitz, Nicole A; Arocha, Jose F

    2009-12-01

    Health professions education is dealing with major transformations in light of the changing nature of the health care delivery system, including the use of technology for "just in time" delivery of care, evidence-based practice, personalized medical care and learning, as health professionals strive to integrate biomedical advances and clinical practice. This has forced the medical education community to reassess the current teaching and learning practices and more importantly, the evaluation of the medical education process. There have been recent advances in cognitive and learning sciences theories, some of which can inform medical educators about best teaching and learning practices and their impact on the evaluation process. An understanding of these theories provides a sound rationale for choosing specific instructional strategies and choosing evaluation measures that assess the curricular objectives. The review begins with an overview of evaluation and assessment in education, followed by an overview of major theories from the cognitive and learning sciences. Next, the role of cognitive and learning sciences theories in informing the process of medical education evaluation is discussed, including its impact on student learning, performance and professional competence, as well as recommendations for reform of medical curricula based on such theories. The paper continues with the elaboration of current trends in health sciences education, particularly medical education, and available evidence for the impact on student learning and performance as well as areas where more research is needed.

  2. Representation theory a first course

    CERN Document Server

    Fulton, William

    1991-01-01

    The primary goal of these lectures is to introduce a beginner to the finite­ dimensional representations of Lie groups and Lie algebras. Since this goal is shared by quite a few other books, we should explain in this Preface how our approach differs, although the potential reader can probably see this better by a quick browse through the book. Representation theory is simple to define: it is the study of the ways in which a given group may act on vector spaces. It is almost certainly unique, however, among such clearly delineated subjects, in the breadth of its interest to mathematicians. This is not surprising: group actions are ubiquitous in 20th century mathematics, and where the object on which a group acts is not a vector space, we have learned to replace it by one that is {e. g. , a cohomology group, tangent space, etc. }. As a consequence, many mathematicians other than specialists in the field {or even those who think they might want to be} come in contact with the subject in various ways. It is for ...

  3. Medical students' emotional development in early clinical experience: a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmich, Esther; Bolhuis, Sanneke; Laan, Roland; Dornan, Tim; Koopmans, Raymond

    2014-08-01

    Dealing with emotions is a critical feature of professional behaviour. There are no comprehensive theoretical models, however, explaining how medical students learn about emotions. We aimed to explore factors affecting their emotions and how they learn to deal with emotions in themselves and others. During a first-year nursing attachment in hospitals and nursing homes, students wrote daily about their most impressive experiences, explicitly reporting what they felt, thought, and did. In a subsequent interview, they discussed those experiences in greater detail. Following a grounded theory approach, we conducted a constant comparative analysis, collecting and then interpreting data, and allowing the interpretation to inform subsequent data collection. Impressive experiences set up tensions, which gave rise to strong emotions. We identified four 'axes' along which tensions were experienced: 'idealism versus reality', 'critical distance versus adaptation', 'involvement versus detachment' and 'feeling versus displaying'. We found many factors, which influenced how respondents relieved those tensions. Their personal attributes and social relationships both inside and outside the medical community were important ones. Respondents' positions along the different dimensions, as determined by the balance between attributes and tensions, shaped their learning outcomes. Medical students' emotional development occurs through active participation in medical practice and having impressive experiences within relationships with patients and others on wards. Tensions along four dimensions give rise to strong emotions. Gaining insight into the many conditions that influence students' learning about emotions might support educators and supervisors in fostering medical students' emotional and professional development.

  4. A Unifying Theory for SIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David T. Mage

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS has four distinctive characteristics that must be explained by any theory proposed for it. (1 A characteristic male fraction of approximately 0.61 for all postneonatal SIDS in the US; (2 a distinctive lognormal-type age distribution arising from zero at birth, mode at about 2 months, median at about 3 months, and an exponential decrease with age going towards zero beyond one year; (3 a marked decrease in SIDS rate from the discovery that changing the recommended infant sleep position from prone to supine reduced the rate of SIDS, but it did not change the form of the age or gender distributions cited above; (4 a seasonal variation, maximal in winter and minimal in summer, that implies subsets of SIDS displaying evidence of seasonal low-grade respiratory infection and nonseasonal neurological prematurity. A quadruple-risk model is presented that fits these conditions but requires confirmatory testing by finding a dominant X-linked allele protective against cerebral anoxia that is missing in SIDS.

  5. Learning a commonsense moral theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleiman-Weiner, Max; Saxe, Rebecca; Tenenbaum, Joshua B

    2017-10-01

    We introduce a computational framework for understanding the structure and dynamics of moral learning, with a focus on how people learn to trade off the interests and welfare of different individuals in their social groups and the larger society. We posit a minimal set of cognitive capacities that together can solve this learning problem: (1) an abstract and recursive utility calculus to quantitatively represent welfare trade-offs; (2) hierarchical Bayesian inference to understand the actions and judgments of others; and (3) meta-values for learning by value alignment both externally to the values of others and internally to make moral theories consistent with one's own attachments and feelings. Our model explains how children can build from sparse noisy observations of how a small set of individuals make moral decisions to a broad moral competence, able to support an infinite range of judgments and decisions that generalizes even to people they have never met and situations they have not been in or observed. It also provides insight into the causes and dynamics of moral change across time, including cases when moral change can be rapidly progressive, changing values significantly in just a few generations, and cases when it is likely to move more slowly. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Writing for publication in a medical journal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Grant Steen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The essence of writing for publication in the medical field is distilled into a dozen precepts to guide the anxious author. These precepts focus on the attitude of the writer, rather than the mechanics of writing. A medical author must strive to be the following: Original, honest, innovative, organized, careful, clear, modest, fair-minded, frank, persistent, rigorous, and realistic. These attributes are essential because there is a new climate of skepticism among the lay public as to the validity of scientific and medical claims. This climate has encouraged journal editors to be demanding of authors and to be especially vigilant about plagiarism; originality of all contributions is therefore essential.

  7. Know how. A guide to medical photography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melhuish, J

    A medical photograph can transfer more information to a health professional than subjective descriptions, which are open to misinterpretation. For the best photographic results, a medical photographer should be used. However, in small hospitals, or in the community, this is not always practicable, therefore nurses should have some knowledge of the most appropriate equipment to use, and know the techniques to employ to attain consistent results. Consistency is one of the most important aspects of medical photography as it allows for comparisons between photographic images over time.

  8. Is there a European medical sociology?

    OpenAIRE

    Henckes, Nicolas; Baszanger, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    International audience; Is there a European sociology of health, illness and medicine – or, in short, a European medical sociology? While the answer to this question would certainly have been negative just a few years ago, this chapter argues that over the last thirty years a series of new analyses have emerged in the field which have laid the groundwork for a medical sociology at the European level. These examine how health issues are increasingly framed as consumer goods, public issues and ...

  9. Dizziness and Daylight:Aspects of Insanity in Modern Society%眩感和日光:现代社会的疯癫诸相

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙菁

    2013-01-01

      Foucault's Insanity and Civilization shows the three stages of insanity in Western society , and with the continuous de-velopment of rationalization, irrational and rational relationship has been the focus of social exploration .This paper draws on Foucault's understanding of insanity and finds that “dizziness” and “daylight” is the characterized irrational and rational relations in modern society.It tries to analyze the present state of various aspects of insanity in society mania and depression , violent power abuse, large scale emigration of elite class etc to explore the development of the social action structure .Rationalization is the in-evitable trend of modern society and through the practice of power discourse , aspects of irrational insanity will gradually disap -pear.%  福柯的《疯癫与文明》展示了西方社会三个阶段的疯癫状态,随着理性化的不断发展,非理性与理性的关系一直是社会探究的焦点。笔者借鉴福柯对疯癫的理解,发现“眩感”和“日光”正是现代社会非理性与理性的特征关系,并试图分析当下社会中狂躁症和忧郁症、权力暴力运作、精英阶层的规模化外迁等疯癫诸相的状态,以探究社会行动结构的发展。理性化是现代社会的必然趋势,通过权力话语实践,非理性的疯癫诸相将逐渐趋于消失。

  10. Medical Ethics in Nephrology: A Jewish Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allon J. Friedman

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Jewish medical ethics is arguably the oldest recorded system of bioethics still in use. It should be of interest to practicing nephrologists because of its influence on the ethical systems of Christianity, Islam, and Western secular society; because of the extensive written documentation of rabbinical response in addressing a broad range of bioethical dilemmas; and in understanding the values of patients who choose to adhere to religious Jewish law. The goal of this review is to provide a brief overview of the basic principles underlying mainstream traditional Jewish medical ethics, apply them to common clinical scenarios experienced in nephrology practice, and contrast them with that of secular medical ethics.

  11. Medical Ethics in Nephrology: A Jewish Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Allon N

    2016-04-19

    Jewish medical ethics is arguably the oldest recorded system of bioethics still in use. It should be of interest to practicing nephrologists because of its influence on the ethical systems of Christianity, Islam, and Western secular society; because of the extensive written documentation of rabbinical response in addressing a broad range of bioethical dilemmas; and in understanding the values of patients who choose to adhere to religious Jewish law. The goal of this review is to provide a brief overview of the basic principles underlying mainstream traditional Jewish medical ethics, apply them to common clinical scenarios experienced in nephrology practice, and contrast them with that of secular medical ethics.

  12. [The medical technologist as a key professional in medical care in the 21st century].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwatani, Yoshinori

    2008-10-01

    and patients, resulting in the highest level of management efficiency. For the development of such medical technologists, university education, specialist capabilities in medical technology and clinical laboratory diagnostics, and a research capability are essential. Thus, it is crucial for clinical laboratory physicians and the Japanese medical care system of the 21st century to urgently develop such an education system.

  13. A first course in topos quantum theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flori, Cecilia [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Studies, Waterloo, ON (Canada)

    2013-06-01

    Written by a leading researcher in the field. Concise course-tested textbook. Includes worked-out problems In the last five decades various attempts to formulate theories of quantum gravity have been made, but none has fully succeeded in becoming the quantum theory of gravity. One possible explanation for this failure might be the unresolved fundamental issues in quantum theory as it stands now. Indeed, most approaches to quantum gravity adopt standard quantum theory as their starting point, with the hope that the theory's unresolved issues will get solved along the way. However, these fundamental issues may need to be solved before attempting to define a quantum theory of gravity. The present text adopts this point of view, addressing the following basic questions: What are the main conceptual issues in quantum theory? How can these issues be solved within a new theoretical framework of quantum theory? A possible way to overcome critical issues in present-day quantum physics - such as a priori assumptions about space and time that are not compatible with a theory of quantum gravity, and the impossibility of talking about systems without reference to an external observer - is through a reformulation of quantum theory in terms of a different mathematical framework called topos theory. This course-tested primer sets out to explain to graduate students and newcomers to the field alike, the reasons for choosing topos theory to resolve the above-mentioned issues and how it brings quantum physics back to looking more like a ''neo-realist'' classical physics theory again.

  14. Continuing medical education, quality improvement, and organizational change: implications of recent theories for twenty-first-century CME.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, David

    2005-05-01

    Healthcare providers and systems are being asked to measure and improve the quality of care delivered to their patients. Additionally, the American Board of Medical Specialties now requires physicians to participate in systems-based practice and practice-based learning and improvement activities as part of maintenance of specialty board certification. These changing paradigms provide opportunities for continuing medical education to become more aligned with health system goals and help prepare clinicians to practice in this new environment. Organizational change and quality improvement principles have much in common with continuing medical education planning processes. Medical education can play a role in helping organizations improve. Continuing medical education must move beyond delivering content to individual clinicians towards becoming a facilitator of organizational improvement. Research is needed to determine the effect of integrating continuing medical education with organizational change approaches on professional competence, organizational processes and patient outcomes.

  15. A Lesson on Social Role Theory: An Example of Human Behavior in the Social Environment Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Agnes M. Dulin

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses the social role theory, a theory of Human Behavior in the Social Environment (HBSE). Relevance of this topic is briefly discussed, as well as a definition of the theory and its historical background. Empirical research that employs this theory will be discussed.Recommendations will be made for future theory development and implications for social work education will conclude the discussion.

  16. Medical professionalism from a socio-cultural perspective: evaluating medical residents communicative attitudes during the medical encounter in malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganasegeran, K; Al-Dubai, S A R

    2014-01-01

    The practice of medicine requires good communication skills to foster excellent rapport in doctor patient relationship. Reports on communication skills learning attitude among medical professionals are key essentials toward improving patient safety and quality of care. We aimed to determine factors affecting communication skills learning attitudes among medical residents in Malaysia. Cross-sectional survey, in a Malaysian public health hospital. A total of 191 medical residents across medical and surgical based rotations were included. We assessed the validated communication skills attitude scale among medical residents from different rotations. Statistical Package of Social Sciences (SPSS®) (version 16.0, IBM, Armonk, NY) was used. Cronbach's alpha was used to test the internal consistency of the scale. Descriptive analysis was conducted for all variables. Bivariate analysis was employed across the socio-demographic variables. Majority of the residents believed that communication skills training should be made compulsory in Malaysia (78.5%). Medical residents agreed that acquiring good communication skills is essential to be a good doctor. However, the majority cited time pressures for not being able to learn communication skills. Significant differences in communication skills learning attitude scores were found between Malays and Chinese. The majority of medical residents had a positive attitude toward communication skills learning. Socio-demographic factors influenced communication skills learning attitude among medical residents. Incorporating communicative skills modules during hospital Continuous Medical Education for medical residents is essential to cultivate communicative skills attitudes for effective doctor-patient relationship during the routine medical encounters.

  17. Group theory in a nutshell for physicists

    CERN Document Server

    Zee, A

    2016-01-01

    Although group theory is a mathematical subject, it is indispensable to many areas of modern theoretical physics, from atomic physics to condensed matter physics, particle physics to string theory. In particular, it is essential for an understanding of the fundamental forces. Yet until now, what has been missing is a modern, accessible, and self-contained textbook on the subject written especially for physicists. Group Theory in a Nutshell for Physicists fills this gap, providing a user-friendly and classroom-tested text that focuses on those aspects of group theory physicists most need to know. From the basic intuitive notion of a group, A. Zee takes readers all the way up to how theories based on gauge groups could unify three of the four fundamental forces. He also includes a concise review of the linear algebra needed for group theory, making the book ideal for self-study.

  18. Medical Geology : a globally emerging discipline

    OpenAIRE

    Joseph E. Bunnell; Robert B. Finkelman; Centeno, Jose A.; Selinus, O. (Olle)

    2007-01-01

    Medical Geology, the study of the impacts of geologic materials and processes on animal and human health, is a dynamic emerging discipline bringing together the geoscience, biomedical, and public health communities to solve a wide range of environmental health problems. Among the Medical Geology described in this review are examples of both deficiency and toxicity of trace element exposure. Goiter is a widespread and potentially serious health problem caused by deficiency of iodine. In many l...

  19. How do medical student journals fare? A global survey of journals run by medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamri, Yassar

    2016-01-01

    Medical students have made significant contributions to the medical and scientific fields in the past. Today, medical students still contribute to biomedical research; however, they often face disappointment from journals when trying to publish their findings. This led to the development of medical student journals, which take a more "student-friendly" approach. This article reviews the current medical student journals published in English and sheds light on current trends and challenges.

  20. Sociomateriality: a theoretical framework for studying distributed medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, Anna; Kits, Olga; Whelan, Emma; Fournier, Cathy; Wilson, Keith; Power, Gregory; Mann, Karen; Tummons, Jonathan; Brown, Peggy Alexiadis

    2015-11-01

    Distributed medical education (DME) is a type of distance learning in which students participate in medical education from diverse geographic locations using Web conferencing, videoconferencing, e-learning, and similar tools. DME is becoming increasingly widespread in North America and around the world.Although relatively new to medical education, distance learning has a long history in the broader field of education and a related body of literature that speaks to the importance of engaging in rigorous and theoretically informed studies of distance learning. The existing DME literature is helpful, but it has been largely descriptive and lacks a critical "lens"-that is, a theoretical perspective from which to rigorously conceptualize and interrogate DME's social (relationships, people) and material (technologies, tools) aspects.The authors describe DME and theories about distance learning and show that such theories focus on social, pedagogical, and cognitive considerations without adequately taking into account material factors. They address this gap by proposing sociomateriality as a theoretical framework allowing researchers and educators to study DME and (1) understand and consider previously obscured actors, infrastructure, and other factors that, on the surface, seem unrelated and even unimportant; (2) see clearly how the social and material components of learning are intertwined in fluid, messy, and often uncertain ways; and (3) perhaps think differently, even in ways that disrupt traditional approaches, as they explore DME. The authors conclude that DME brings with it substantial investments of social and material resources, and therefore needs careful study, using approaches that embrace its complexity.

  1. A study of theory of mind in paranoid schizophrenia: A theory or many theories?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter B. Scherzer

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Social cognitive psychologists (Frith, 1992; Hardy-Baylé et al, 2003 sought to explain the social problems and clarify the clinical picture of schizophrenia by proposing a model that relates many of the symptoms to a problem of metarepresentation i.e. theory of mind (ToM. Given the differences in clinical samples and results between studies, and considering the wide range of what is considered to constitute ToM, the question is, is there a core function, or is ToM multifaceted with dissociable facets? If there are dissociable dimensions or facets which are affected in patients with paranoid schizophrenia? To answer these questions, a group of 21 individuals diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia and 29 non-clinical control subjects, were tested on a battery of five different measures of theory of mind. The results confirmed that there was little difference in specificity of three of the tests in distinguishing between the clinical and non-clinical group, but there were important differences in the shared variance between the tests. Further analyses hint at two dimensions although a single factor with the same variance and the same contributing weights in both groups could explain the results. The deficits related to the attribution of cognitive and affective states to others inferred from available verbal and non-verbal information. Further analyses revealed incorrect attributions of mental states including the attribution of threatening intentions to others non-interpretative responses and incomplete answers, depending on the test of theory of mind.

  2. Patient adherence to medical treatment: a review of reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heerdink Rob

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients' non-adherence to medical treatment remains a persistent problem. Many interventions to improve patient adherence are unsuccessful and sound theoretical foundations are lacking. Innovations in theory and practice are badly needed. A new and promising way could be to review the existing reviews of adherence to interventions and identify the underlying theories for effective interventions. That is the aim of our study. Methods The study is a review of 38 systematic reviews of the effectiveness of adherence interventions published between 1990 and 2005. Electronic literature searches were conducted in Medline, Psychinfo, Embase and the Cochrane Library. Explicit inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied. The scope of the study is patient adherence to medical treatment in the cure and care sector. Results Significant differences in the effectiveness of adherence interventions were found in 23 of the 38 systematic reviews. Effective interventions were found in each of four theoretical approaches to adherence interventions: technical, behavioural, educational and multi-faceted or complex interventions. Technical solutions, such as a simplification of the regimen, were often found to be effective, although that does not count for every therapeutic regimen. Overall, our results show that, firstly, there are effective adherence interventions without an explicit theoretical explanation of the operating mechanisms, for example technical solutions. Secondly, there are effective adherence interventions, which clearly stem from the behavioural theories, for example incentives and reminders. Thirdly, there are other theoretical models that seem plausible for explaining non-adherence, but not very effective in improving adherence behaviour. Fourthly, effective components within promising theories could not be identified because of the complexity of many adherence interventions and the lack of studies that explicitly compare

  3. Einstein's strugges with quantum theory a reappraisal

    CERN Document Server

    Home, Dipankar

    2007-01-01

    Einstein’s Struggles with Quantum Theory: A Reappraisal by Dipankar Home and Andrew Whitaker provides a detailed account of Albert Einstein’s thinking in regard to quantum physics. Until recently, most of Einstein’s views on quantum physics were dismissed and even ridiculed; some critics even suggested that Einstein was not able to grasp the complexities of the formalism of quantum theory and subtleties of the standard interpretation of this theory known as the Copenhagen interpretation put forward by Niels Bohr and his colleagues. But was that true? Modern scholarship argues otherwise, insist Drs. Home and Whitaker, who painstakingly explain the questions Einstein raised as well as offer a detailed discussion of Einstein’s position and major contributions to quantum theory, connecting them with contemporary studies on fundamental aspects of this theory. This unique book presents a mathematical as well as a non-mathematical route through the theories, controversies, and investigations, making the disc...

  4. A Topological Perspective on Interacting Algebraic Theories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amar Hadzihasanovic

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Techniques from higher categories and higher-dimensional rewriting are becoming increasingly important for understanding the finer, computational properties of higher algebraic theories that arise, among other fields, in quantum computation. These theories have often the property of containing simpler sub-theories, whose interaction is regulated in a limited number of ways, which reveals a topological substrate when pictured by string diagrams. By exploring the double nature of computads as presentations of higher algebraic theories, and combinatorial descriptions of "directed spaces", we develop a basic language of directed topology for the compositional study of algebraic theories. We present constructions of computads, all with clear analogues in standard topology, that capture in great generality such notions as homomorphisms and actions, and the interactions of monoids and comonoids that lead to the theory of Frobenius algebras and of bialgebras. After a number of examples, we describe how a fragment of the ZX calculus can be reconstructed in this framework.

  5. Theory Summary {\\large (a Perspective}

    CERN Document Server

    Hou, George W -S

    2012-01-01

    This is the Theory Summary of the "Flavor Physics and CP Violation 2012" conference, with emphasis on New Physics. Besides covering the theory part of the conference, we pay attention also to the physics highlights of experimental talks. I then give my perspective on the false "Godot sightings" of the past decade, with some firsthand accounts. With all coming to naught (well, SM) at the moment, I look ahead to the near future, and to 2015 and beyond. An Epilogue is added with the advent of "the Higgs" at the LHC.

  6. The Integrated Medical Model: A Risk Assessment and Decision Support Tool for Space Flight Medical Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerstman, Eric; Minard, Charles; Saile, Lynn; deCarvalho, Mary Freire; Myers, Jerry; Walton, Marlei; Butler, Douglas; Iyengar, Sriram; Johnson-Throop, Kathy; Baumann, David

    2009-01-01

    The Integrated Medical Model (IMM) is a decision support tool that is useful to mission planners and medical system designers in assessing risks and designing medical systems for space flight missions. The IMM provides an evidence based approach for optimizing medical resources and minimizing risks within space flight operational constraints. The mathematical relationships among mission and crew profiles, medical condition incidence data, in-flight medical resources, potential crew functional impairments, and clinical end-states are established to determine probable mission outcomes. Stochastic computational methods are used to forecast probability distributions of crew health and medical resource utilization, as well as estimates of medical evacuation and loss of crew life. The IMM has been used in support of the International Space Station (ISS) medical kit redesign, the medical component of the ISS Probabilistic Risk Assessment, and the development of the Constellation Medical Conditions List. The IMM also will be used to refine medical requirements for the Constellation program. The IMM outputs for ISS and Constellation design reference missions will be presented to demonstrate the potential of the IMM in assessing risks, planning missions, and designing medical systems. The implementation of the IMM verification and validation plan will be reviewed. Additional planned capabilities of the IMM, including optimization techniques and the inclusion of a mission timeline, will be discussed. Given the space flight constraints of mass, volume, and crew medical training, the IMM is a valuable risk assessment and decision support tool for medical system design and mission planning.

  7. General theory on taking decisions and its application in the medical assistance area. (IV La teoría general sobre la toma de decisiones y su aplicación al campo de la asistencia médica (IV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Alberto Corona Martínez

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The general theory about decision taking makes reference mainly to those concepts related to decision taking for the individual. The present article is aimed at group decision taking and at stating the principal advantages and disadvantages in group decision taking and at analyzing the implications of these aspects in medical decisions.
    La teoría general sobre la toma de decisiones hace referencia fundamentalmente a aquellos conceptos relacionados con la toma de decisiones por individuos. El presente artículo está dedicado a la toma grupal de decisiones; son señaladas las principales ventajas y desventajas de la toma de decisiones por grupos de individuos, y se analizan las implicaciones de estos aspectos en la toma de decisiones médicas.

  8. A medical risk attitude subscale for DOSPERT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoshana Butler

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Domain-Specific Risk Taking scale (DOSPERT is a widely used instrument that measures perceived risk and benefit and attitude toward risk for activities in several domains, but does not include medical risks. Objective: To develop a medical risk domain subscale for DOSPERT. Methods: Sixteen candidate risk items were developed through expert discussion. We conducted cognitive telephone interviews, an online survey, and a random-digit dialing (RDD telephone survey to reduce and refine the scale, explore its factor structure, and obtain estimates of reliability. Participants: Eight patients recruited from UIC medical center waiting rooms participated in 45-60 minute cognitive interviews. Thirty Amazon Mechanical Turk workers completed the online survey. One hundred Chicago-area residents completed the RDD telephone survey. Results: On the basis of cognitive interviews, we eliminated five items due to poor variance or participant misunderstanding. The online survey suggested that two additional items were negatively correlated with the scale, and we considered them candidates for removal. Factor analysis of the responses in the RDD telephone survey and non-statistical factors led us to recommend a final set of 6 items to represent the medical risk domain. The final set of items included blood donation, kidney donation, daily medication use for allergies, knee replacement surgery, general anesthesia in dentistry, and clinical trial participation. The interitem reliability (Cronbach's alpha of the final set of 6 items ranged from 0.57-0.59 depending on the response task. Older respondents gave lower overall ratings of expected benefit from the activities. Conclusion: We refined a set of items to measure risk and benefit perceptions for medical activities. Our next step will be to add these items to the complete DOSPERT scale, confirm the scale's psychometric properties, determine whether medical risks constitute a psychologically

  9. Towards a unified medical lexicon for French.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zweigenbaum, Pierre; Baud, Robert; Burgun, Anita; Namer, Fiammetta; Jarrousse, Eric; Grabar, Natalia; Ruch, Patrick; Le Duff, Franck; Thirion, Benoît; Darmoni, Stéfan

    2003-01-01

    Medical Informatics has a constant need for basic Medical Language Processing tasks, e.g., for coding into controlled vocabularies, free text indexing and information retrieval. Most of these tasks involve term matching and rely on lexical resources: lists of words with attached information, including inflected forms and derived words, etc. Such resources are publicly available for the English language with the UMLS Specialist Lexicon, but not in other languages. For the French language, several teams have worked on the subject and built local lexical resources. The goal of the present work is to pool and unify these resources and to add extensively to them by exploiting medical terminologies and corpora, resulting in a unified medical lexicon for French (UMLF). This paper exposes the issues raised by such an objective, describes the methods on which the project relies and illustrates them with experimental results.

  10. UMLF: a unified medical lexicon for French.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zweigenbaum, Pierre; Baud, Robert; Burgun, Anita; Namer, Fiammetta; Jarrousse, Eric; Grabar, Natalia; Ruch, Patrick; Le Duff, Franck; Forget, Jean-François; Douyère, Magaly; Darmoni, Stéfan

    2005-03-01

    Medical Informatics has a constant need for basic medical language processing tasks, e.g. for coding into controlled vocabularies, free text indexing and information retrieval. Most of these tasks involve term matching and rely on lexical resources: lists of words with attached information, including inflected forms and derived words, etc. Such resources are publicly available for the English language with the UMLS Specialist Lexicon, but not in other languages. For the French language, several teams have worked on the subject and built local lexical resources. The goal of the present work is to pool and unify these resources and to add extensively to them by exploiting medical terminologies and corpora, resulting in a unified medical lexicon for French (UMLF). This paper exposes the issues raised by such an objective, describes the methods on which the project relies and illustrates them with experimental results.

  11. A survey of medical diagnostic imaging technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heese, V.; Gmuer, N.; Thomlinson, W.

    1991-10-01

    The fields of medical imaging and medical imaging instrumentation are increasingly important. The state-of-the-art continues to advance at a very rapid pace. In fact, various medical imaging modalities are under development at the National Synchrotron Light Source (such as MECT and Transvenous Angiography.) It is important to understand how these techniques compare with today's more conventional imaging modalities. The purpose of this report is to provide some basic information about the various medical imaging technologies currently in use and their potential developments as a basis for this comparison. This report is by no means an in-depth study of the physics and instrumentation of the various imaging modalities; instead, it is an attempt to provide an explanation of the physical bases of these techniques and their principal clinical and research capabilities.

  12. A survey of medical diagnostic imaging technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heese, V.; Gmuer, N.; Thomlinson, W.

    1991-10-01

    The fields of medical imaging and medical imaging instrumentation are increasingly important. The state-of-the-art continues to advance at a very rapid pace. In fact, various medical imaging modalities are under development at the National Synchrotron Light Source (such as MECT and Transvenous Angiography.) It is important to understand how these techniques compare with today`s more conventional imaging modalities. The purpose of this report is to provide some basic information about the various medical imaging technologies currently in use and their potential developments as a basis for this comparison. This report is by no means an in-depth study of the physics and instrumentation of the various imaging modalities; instead, it is an attempt to provide an explanation of the physical bases of these techniques and their principal clinical and research capabilities.

  13. Morphological Techniques for Medical Images: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isma Irum

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Image processing is playing a very important role in medical imaging with its versatile applications and features towards the development of computer aided diagnostic systems, automatic detections of abnormalities and enhancement in ultrasonic, computed tomography, magnetic resonance images and lots more applications. Medical images morphology is a field of study where the medical images are observed and processed on basis of geometrical and changing structures. Medical images morphological techniques has been reviewed in this study underlying the some human organ images, the associated diseases and processing techniques to address some anatomical problem detection. Images of Human brain, bone, heart, carotid, iris, lesion, liver and lung have been discussed in this study.

  14. Nursing student medication errors: a retrospective review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Lorill; Petrick, Teresa

    2008-01-01

    This article presents the findings of a retrospective review of medication errors made and reported by nursing students in a 4-year baccalaureate program. Data were examined in relation to the semester of the program, kind of error according to the rights of medication administration, and contributing factors. Three categories of contributing factors were identified: rights violations, system factors, and knowledge and understanding. It became apparent that system factors, or the context in which medication administration takes place, are not fully considered when students are taught about medication administration. Teaching strategies need to account for the dynamic complexity of this process and incorporate experiential knowledge. This review raised several important questions about how this information guides our practice as educators in the clinical and classroom settings and how we can work collaboratively with practice partners to influence change and increase patient safety.

  15. Fidelity to the healing relationship: a medical student's challenge to contemporary bioethics and prescription for medical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Blake C; Brandt, Lea; Fleming, David A; Gu, Chris N

    2016-04-01

    As a medical  student, I observed that different physicians had strikingly different attitudes and approaches when caring for patients. The care of one patient in particular continues to challenge my understanding of illness and moral responsibility in the practice of medicine. In this paper, I illustrate the care of this patient in order to evaluate the dominant ethics I was taught in medical school, in theory and in practice, and argue neither principlism nor the ethics of care fully captures the moral responsibility of physicians. Emphasising fidelity to the healing relationship, a core principle derived from Pellegrino's virtue theory, I conclude that this approach to clinical ethics fully explains physician responsibility. Pellegrino deconstructs the practice of medicine to clarify the moral event within the clinical encounter and offers a sufficiently useful and justified approach to patient care.

  16. A Theory of Sequential Reciprocity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dufwenberg, M.; Kirchsteiger, G.

    1998-01-01

    Many experimental studies indicate that people are motivated by reciprocity. Rabin (1993) develops techniques for incorporating such concerns into game theory and economics. His model, however, does not fare well when applied to situations with an interesting dynamic structure (like many experimenta

  17. Equilibrium theory : A salient approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schalk, S.

    1999-01-01

    Whereas the neoclassical models in General Equilibrium Theory focus on the existence of separate commodities, this thesis regards 'bundles of trade' as the unit objects of exchange. Apart from commodities and commodity bundles in the neoclassical sense, the term `bundle of trade' includes, for

  18. Options for a Joint Medical Readiness System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Hepatitis A, Hepatitis B, influenza (in season), and Tetanus -Diphtheria  No temporary or permanent deployment-limiting conditions  Medical...readiness and deployability for the unit or individuals.  Installation Commanders or Military Treatment Facility Commanders at Joint Bases can...service personnel that present themselves in any medical treatment facility. The key benefit is DoD will make one system modification for each policy

  19. A national survey of medical student suicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jacklyn; Kumar, Shelley; Nelson, Elizabeth; Harris, Toi; Coverdale, John

    2014-10-01

    Because there is no current information on medical student suicides, the authors surveyed US medical schools about deaths by suicide of medical students from June 2006 to July 2011. In spring through summer of 2012, the authors sent electronic surveys to the 133 accredited US allopathic medical schools at the time, excluding Puerto Rican schools. The 15-item survey included questions about deaths by suicide and deaths by means other than suicide. In the case of a reported suicide, the survey obtained information regarding demographic characteristics and method of suicide. The 90 responding schools (response rate 69 %) reported a total of six suicides (four males, two females; five Caucasians, one Asian) from July 2006 to June 2011. Two deaths by suicide occurred in first year, two in second year, and two in third year. Two of the suicides occurred by gunshot, two by hanging, one by overdose, and for one, the cause of death was unknown. Three of the six students left a suicide note. Although the number and rate of suicides among medical students may be lower than a prior survey that was conducted more than 15 years ago, these data affirm the importance of suicide prevention programs for medical students.

  20. A psychophysical theory of Shannon entropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Taiki

    2013-01-01

    Connections between information theory and decision under uncertainty have been attracting attention in econophysics, neuroeconomics and quantum decision theory. This paper proposes a psychophysical theory of Shannon entropy based on a mathematical equivalence of delay and uncertainty in decision-making, and psychophysics of the perception of waiting time in probabilistic choices. Furthermore, it is shown that the well-known Shannon entropy is a special case of the general psychophysical entropy. Future directions in the application of the present theory to studies in econophysics and neuroeconomics are discussed.

  1. A communication-theory based view on telemedical communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schall, Thomas; Roeckelein, Wolfgang; Mohr, Markus; Kampshoff, Joerg; Lange, Tim; Nerlich, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Communication theory based analysis sheds new light on the use of health telematics. This analysis of structures in electronic medical communication shows communicative structures with special features. Current and evolving telemedical applications are analyzed. The methodology of communicational theory (focusing on linguistic pragmatics) is used to compare it with its conventional counterpart. The semiotic model, the roles of partners, the respective message and their relation are discussed. Channels, sender, addressee, and other structural roles are analyzed for different types of electronic medical communication. The communicative processes are shown as mutual, rational action towards a common goal. The types of communication/texts are analyzed in general. Furthermore the basic communicative structures of medical education via internet are presented with their special features. The analysis shows that electronic medical communication has special features compared to everyday communication: A third participant role often is involved: the patient. Messages often are addressed to an unspecified partner or to an unspecified partner within a group. Addressing in this case is (at least partially) role-based. Communication and message often directly (rather than indirectly) influence actions of the participants. Communication often is heavily regulated including legal implications like liability, and more. The conclusion from the analysis is that the development of telemedical applications so far did not sufficiently take communicative structures into consideration. Based on these results recommendations for future developments of telemedical applications/services are given.

  2. A study with Paperless Electronic Medical Advice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Sheng Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to drive the EMR’s further application and rapid expansion clinically based on the electronic medical advice as the core thereby realizing the paperless EMR. This paper has analyzed the implementation effects of electronic medical advice, followed by discussion of frequently asked questions (FAQ and development direction, and finally analyzed the solution of paperless EMR. It indicates that electronic signatures and unitrust time stamp are keys to achieve the paperless EMR. The laws and regulations, new ideas, paperless consultation sheets, all data integration and sharing, virtual printing technology, application of wireless and mobile ward-round trolley, etc. within the health care field shall be proposed to be improved. It is significantly important to save the medical costs, reduce the medical negligence, achieve the paperless EMR and build a high-quality digital hospital.

  3. Ideal and nonideal theory: A conceptual overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trifunović Milica

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article gives conceptual clarification on a distinction between ideal and nonideal theory by analyzing John Rawls´ theory as presented in his books “A Theory of Justice” and ”The Law of Peoples.“ The article tries to show the importance of ideal theory, while at the same time pointing out that the distinction, ideal and nonideal, needs further qualification. Further, the article also introduces the distinction of normative and descriptive into ideal and consequently nonideal theory. Through this four-fold distinction it is easier to establish the function of each theory and the separation of work-fields between philosophers, politicians and lawyers.

  4. A Logical Framework for Set Theories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnon Avron

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Axiomatic set theory is almost universally accepted as the basic theory which provides the foundations of mathematics, and in which the whole of present day mathematics can be developed. As such, it is the most natural framework for Mathematical Knowledge Management. However, in order to be used for this task it is necessary to overcome serious gaps that exist between the "official" formulations of set theory (as given e.g. by formal set theory ZF and actual mathematical practice. In this work we present a new unified framework for formalizations of axiomatic set theories of different strength, from rudimentary set theory to full ZF. It allows the use of set terms, but provides a static check of their validity.

  5. A Pilot Project Demonstrating that Combat Medics Can Safely Administer Parenteral Medications in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauer, Steven G; Cunningham, Cord W; Fisher, Andrew D; DeLorenzo, Robert A

    2017-08-15

    Introduction Select units in the military have improved combat medic training by integrating their functions into routine clinical care activities with measurable improvements in battlefield care. This level of integration is currently limited to special operations units. It is unknown if regular Army units and combat medics can emulate these successes. The goal of this project was to determine whether US Army combat medics can be integrated into routine emergency department (ED) clinical care, specifically medication administration. Project Design This was a quality assurance project that monitored training of combat medics to administer parenteral medications and to ensure patient safety. Combat medics were provided training that included direct supervision during medication administration. Once proficiency was demonstrated, combat medics would prepare the medications under direct supervision, followed by indirect supervision during administration. As part of the quality assurance and safety processes, combat medics were required to document all medication administrations, supervising provider, and unexpected adverse events. Additional quality assurance follow-up occurred via complete chart review by the project lead. Data During the project period, the combat medics administered the following medications: ketamine (n=13), morphine (n=8), ketorolac (n=7), fentanyl (n=5), ondansetron (n=4), and other (n=6). No adverse events or patient safety events were reported by the combat medics or discovered during the quality assurance process. In this limited case series, combat medics safely administered parenteral medications under indirect provider supervision. Future research is needed to further develop this training model for both the military and civilian setting. Schauer SG , Cunningham C W, Fisher AD , DeLorenzo RA . A pilot project demonstrating that combat medics can safely administer parenteral medications in the emergency department.

  6. A generalized Theory of Diffusion based on Kinetic Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Schaefer, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We propose to use spin hydrodynamics, a two-fluid model of spin propagation, as a generalization of the diffusion equation. We show that in the dense limit spin hydrodynamics reduces to Fick's law and the diffusion equation. In the opposite limit spin hydrodynamics is equivalent to a collisionless Boltzmann treatment of spin propagation. Spin hydrodynamics avoids unphysical effects that arise when the diffusion equation is used to describe to a strongly interacting gas with a dilute corona. We apply spin hydrodynamics to the problem of spin diffusion in a trapped atomic gas. We find that the observed spin relaxation rate in the high temperature limit [Sommer et al., Nature 472, 201 (2011)] is consistent with the diffusion constant predicted by kinetic theory.

  7. A Density Functional Theory Study

    KAUST Repository

    Lim, XiaoZhi

    2011-12-11

    Complexes with pincer ligand moieties have garnered much attention in the past few decades. They have been shown to be highly active catalysts in several known transition metal-catalyzed organic reactions as well as some unprecedented organic transformations. At the same time, the use of computational organometallic chemistry to aid in the understanding of the mechanisms in organometallic catalysis for the development of improved catalysts is on the rise. While it was common in earlier studies to reduce computational cost by truncating donor group substituents on complexes such as tertbutyl or isopropyl groups to hydrogen or methyl groups, recent advancements in the processing capabilities of computer clusters and codes have streamlined the time required for calculations. As the full modeling of complexes become increasingly popular, a commonly overlooked aspect, especially in the case of complexes bearing isopropyl substituents, is the conformational analysis of complexes. Isopropyl groups generate a different conformer with each 120 ° rotation (rotamer), and it has been found that each rotamer typically resides in its own potential energy well in density functional theory studies. As a result, it can be challenging to select the most appropriate structure for a theoretical study, as the adjustment of isopropyl substituents from a higher-energy rotamer to the lowest-energy rotamer usually does not occur during structure optimization. In this report, the influence of the arrangement of isopropyl substituents in pincer complexes on calculated complex structure energies as well as a case study on the mechanism of the isomerization of an iPrPCP-Fe complex is covered. It was found that as many as 324 rotamers can be generated for a single complex, as in the case of an iPrPCP-Ni formato complex, with the energy difference between the global minimum and the highest local minimum being as large as 16.5 kcalmol-1. In the isomerization of a iPrPCP-Fe complex, it was found

  8. A Smartwatch-Driven Medication Management System Compliant to the German Medication Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keil, Andreas; Gegier, Konstantin; Pobiruchin, Monika; Wiesner, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Medication adherence is an important factor for the outcome of medical therapies. To support high adherence levels, smartwatches can be used to assist the patient. However, a successful integration of such devices into clinicians' or general practitioners' information systems requires the use of standards. In this paper, a medication management system supplied with smartwatch generated feedback events is presented. It allows physicians to manage their patients' medications and track their adherence in real time. Moreover, it fosters interoperability via a ISO/IEC 16022 data matrix which encodes related medication data in compliance with the German Medication Plan specification.

  9. Social Accountable Medical Education: A concept analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ABDOLMALEKI, MOHAMMADREZA; YAZDANI, SHAHRAM; MOMENI, SEDIGHEH; MOMTAZMANESH, NADER

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Considering the pervasiveness of social accountable medical education concept around the world and the growing trend of literature in this regard as well as various interpretations made about this concept, we found it necessary to analyze the concept of social accountable medical education. Methods: In this study, the modified version of McKenna’s approach to concept analysis was used to determine the concept, explain structures and substructures and determine the border concepts neighboring and against social accountability in medical education. Results: By studying the selected sources,the components of the concept were obtained to identify it and express an analytic definition of social accountability in medical education system. Then, a model case with all attributes of the given concept and the contrary and related concepts were mentioned to determine the boundary between the main concept and auxiliary ones. Conclusion: According to the results of this study in the field of social accountability, the detailed and transparent analytical definition of social accountable medical education can be used in future studies as well as the function and evaluation of medical education system. PMID:28761884

  10. Social Accountable Medical Education: A concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdolmaleki, Mohammadreza; Yazdani, Shahram; Momeni, Sedigheh; Momtazmanesh, Nader

    2017-07-01

    Considering the pervasiveness of social accountable medical education concept around the world and the growing trend of literature in this regard as well as various interpretations made about this concept, we found it necessary to analyze the concept of social accountable medical education. In this study, the modified version of McKenna's approach to concept analysis was used to determine the concept, explain structures and substructures and determine the border concepts neighboring and against social accountability in medical education. By studying the selected sources,the components of the concept were obtained to identify it and express an analytic definition of social accountability in medical education system. Then, a model case with all attributes of the given concept and the contrary and related concepts were mentioned to determine the boundary between the main concept and auxiliary ones. According to the results of this study in the field of social accountability, the detailed and transparent analytical definition of social accountable medical education can be used in future studies as well as the function and evaluation of medical education system.

  11. A cloud solution for medical image processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Mirarab,

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The rapid growth in the use of Electronic Health Records across the globe along with the rich mix of multimedia held within an EHR combined with the increasing level of detail due to advances in diagnostic medical imaging means increasing amounts of data can be stored for each patient. Also lack of image processing and analysis tools for handling the large image datasets has compromised researchers and practitioner‟s outcome. Migrating medical imaging applications and data to the Cloud can allow healthcare organizations to realize significant cost savings relating to hardware, software, buildings, power and staff, in addition to greater scalability, higher performance and resilience. This paper reviews medical image processing and its challenges, states cloud computing and cloud computing benefits due to medical image processing. Also, this paper introduces tools and methods for medical images processing using the cloud. Finally a method is provided for medical images processing based on Eucalyptus cloud infrastructure with image processing software “ImageJ” and using improved genetic algorithm for the allocation and distribution of resources. Based on conducted simulations and experimental results, the proposed method brings high scalability, simplicity, flexibility and fully customizability in addition to 40% cost reduction and twice increase in speed.

  12. Holographic Aspects of a Relativistic Nonconformal Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chanyong Park

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We study a general D-dimensional Schwarzschild-type black brane solution of the Einstein-dilaton theory and derive, by using the holographic renormalization, its thermodynamics consistent with the geometric results. Using the membrane paradigm, we calculate the several hydrodynamic transport coefficients and compare them with the results obtained by the Kubo formula, which shows the self-consistency of the gauge/gravity duality in the relativistic nonconformal theory. In order to understand more about the relativistic non-conformal theory, we further investigate the binding energy, drag force, and holographic entanglement entropy of the relativistic non-conformal theory.

  13. Human Capital Theory: A Holistic Criticism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Emrullah

    2014-01-01

    Human capital theory has had a profound impact on a range of disciplines from economics to education and sociology. The theory has always been the subject of bitter criticisms from the very beginning, but it has comfortably survived and expanded its influence over other research disciplines. Not surprisingly, a considerable number of criticisms…

  14. A Theory of Rhetoric for Contemporary Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushman, Donald P.; Tompkins, Phillip K.

    1980-01-01

    Proposes a theory of rhetoric which argues that all problems can be stated as problems of communication, and communication can be employed as a means for their definition, analysis, and resolution. Suggests a theory which can make people of one mind, yet of different opinion, act in coordination. (JMF)

  15. Human Capital Theory: A Holistic Criticism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Emrullah

    2014-01-01

    Human capital theory has had a profound impact on a range of disciplines from economics to education and sociology. The theory has always been the subject of bitter criticisms from the very beginning, but it has comfortably survived and expanded its influence over other research disciplines. Not surprisingly, a considerable number of criticisms…

  16. More than mere games: a review of card and board games for medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochennek, Konrad; Wittekindt, Boris; Zimmermann, Stefanie-Yvonne; Klingebiel, Thomas

    2007-11-01

    During recent years, attempts have been made to complement more classical concepts of medical teaching by introducing card and board games on medical topics. These teaching tools cover every age and education group, and many different medical topics. In this article we have reviewed all card and board games for medical education purpose listed in NCBI PubMed database and Internet game databases (n = 29). It summarizes games that might be useful to medical teaching staff. To categorize these games, a new schema for medical games categorization, based on the game mechanism and theories on experiential learning circles, is proposed and discussed. Additionally we have a view on card and board games with medical topics for entertainment (n = 22).

  17. A new medical mission to El Salvador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, J; Eisenberg, C; Gloyd, S; Quiroga, J; Schlenker, T; Scrimshaw, N; Devin, J

    1989-10-19

    El Salvador has a long history of human right abuses and a record of violations of medical neutrality and international humanitarian law. A civil war broke out between the Salvadorian armed forces and a guerrilla opposition, the Farabundo Marti Liberacion Nacional (FMLN) in 1979. To investigate and report on specific allegations of abuses of human rights and medical neutrality by both sides in the conflict, a medical mission visited El Salvador in early June, 1989. It was sponsored by Physicians for Human Rights. The delegation consisted of 5 physicians, an attorney, and an observer from the staff of the Select Committee on Hunger of the US House of Representatives. The mission explored violations of medical neutrality. It investigated the reported obstruction of civil health personnel and of the delivery of supplies to people living in congested rural areas, refugees, and displaced persons, allegations of assault, intimidation, harassment, and torture of health workers; reports of attacks on hospitals and clinics; and the impact of 19 years civil war on El Salvador's medical institutions. The Salvadorian public health system has been seriously damaged by the civil war. A network of "community health promoters"--Salvadorians trained to give simple prevention and curative care--has begun. This network serves primarily those in contested areas. Nearly all roads in rural areas are controlled by military road blocks. Health workers have reported military interference with vaccination campaigns. The Salvadorian army harasses people they believe support the FMLN and obstructs their access to the communities. In February, 1989, the Atlacatl Battalion of the Salvadorian army attacked FMLN medical personnel. The Nongovernmental Human Rights Commission of El Salvador claims to have identified 40 different kinds of torture. Medical education has suffered from budgetary restrictions and from the hostility of the Salvadorian government.

  18. Basic Concepts of a Quantum Event Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Bostroem, K J

    2004-01-01

    A physical theory is proposed that obeys both the principles of special relativity and of quantum mechanics. Time and space are treated on exactly the same footing, namely as quantum mechanical observables on a Hilbert space. The theory is not based upon Lagrangian or Hamiltonian mechanics and cannot be formulated within the framework of unitary dynamics. As a most important aspect, the theory breaks with the concept of a continuously flowing time in favour of a discrete jump process in spacetime. All physical statements are formulated in terms of detector events rather than particle states. The physical object under consideration is a spinless particle in empty space. Yet the theory also accounts for particle-antiparticle pair creation and annihilation, and is therefore not a single-particle theory in the strict sense. The Maxwell equations are derived as a straightforward consequence of some fundamental commutation relations. In the non-relativistic limit, and in the limit of infinitely small time uncertain...

  19. Empathy in medical education: A case for social construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirshfield, Laura E; Underman, Kelly

    2017-04-01

    In this brief review, we build upon suggestions in Pedersen's [1] excellent critical review of empathy research in medical education and make the case for an increase in social constructivist scholarship related to emotions and empathy within medical education contexts. In the process, we define social construction, as well as provide several key opportunities in which these types of theories could provide insights for medical educators. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. No Time for Nostalgia!: Asylum-Making, Medicalized Colonialism in British Columbia (1859-97) and Artistic Praxis for Social Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Leslie G.; Brown, Sheena; Noble, Steven; Wainer, Rafael; Young, Alannah Earl

    2009-01-01

    This article asks: How have disability, indigenous arts and cultural praxis transformed and challenged the historical sociological archival research into relationships among asylum-making, medicalized colonialism and eugenics in the Woodlands School, formerly the Victoria Lunatic Asylum, the Provincial Asylum for the Insane in Victoria, BC 1859-72…