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Sample records for inpatient health care

  1. Nutritional care of medical inpatients: a health technology assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kruse Filip

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The inspiration for the present assessment of the nutritional care of medical patients is puzzlement about the divide that exists between the theoretical knowledge about the importance of the diet for ill persons, and the common failure to incorporate nutritional aspects in the treatment and care of the patients. The purpose is to clarify existing problems in the nutritional care of Danish medical inpatients, to elucidate how the nutritional care for these inpatients can be improved, and to analyse the costs of this improvement. Methods Qualitative and quantitative methods are deployed to outline how nutritional care of medical inpatients is performed at three Danish hospitals. The practices observed are compared with official recommendations for nutritional care of inpatients. Factors extraneous and counterproductive to optimal nutritional care are identified from the perspectives of patients and professional staff. A review of the literature illustrates the potential for optimal nutritional care. A health economic analysis is performed to elucidate the savings potential of improved nutritional care. Results The prospects for improvements in nutritional care are ameliorated if hospital management clearly identifies nutritional care as a priority area, and enjoys access to management tools for quality assurance. The prospects are also improved if a committed professional at the ward has the necessary time resources to perform nutritional care in practice, and if the care staff can requisition patient meals rich in nutrients 24 hours a day. At the kitchen production level prospects benefit from a facilitator contact between care and kitchen staff, and if the kitchen staff controls the whole food path from the kitchen to the patient. At the patient level, prospects are improved if patients receive information about the choice of food and drink, and have a better nutrition dialogue with the care staff. Better nutritional care of

  2. Beyond satisfaction, what service users expect of inpatient mental health care: a literature review.

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    Hopkins, J E; Loeb, S J; Fick, D M

    2009-12-01

    To provide efficient and effective inpatient mental health services, it is imperative to not only ascertain if service users are satisfied with the care received from nurses, but also the degree to which initial expectations are being met. Ten reports of primary research on service users' experiences, perceptions and expectations of inpatient mental health care were examined to understand what service users' expect of inpatient mental health care and the implications for nursing practice. The World Health Organization's description of responsiveness to service users' non-medical expectations of care was used as a framework for retrieving literature and organizing the research outcomes. Responsiveness includes seven categories of healthcare performance ranging from respect for the dignity of the person, to adequacy of amenities, and choice of provider. Service users expect to form interpersonal relationships with nurses; however, non-clinical responsibilities serve as barriers which consume considerable available nursing time that otherwise could be spent developing therapeutic relationships. In addition, inpatient programming ideas are identified for the provision of better services. Hospitals' expectations of mental health nurses will need to be reconsidered if these nurses are to provide the time and resources necessary to meet current service users' expectations.

  3. FUNDAMENTALS OF OPTIMIZING INPATIENT CARE FOR CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Baranov

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Inpatient care for children has been considered to play an important role and to be influential in Russian healthcare system. However, a long lasting extensive development of health care system lacking sufficient finance and recourses has created a gap between the healthcare structure and capacity to provide healthcare and the needs of qualitative healthcare in the population. High number of limited ability hospitals without appropriate recourse base has already had its's day as a stage of inpatients care development. These hospitals could not provide a base for modern technology implementation and provision of present day high b quality medical care. Moreover, the current mechanism of financing «the hospital bed» but the patient has hampered medical care intensification and implementation of new technologies through loss of result orientation in medical specialists. Elaboration of efficacious means to optimize inpatient care would allow to control the rates assessing TH children's health in the country's population and to promote medical, social and economic efficacy of the inpatient care system.Key words: inpatient care, healthcare quality.

  4. Inpatient Volume and Quality of Mental Health Care Among Patients With Unipolar Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Line Ryberg; Mainz, Jan; Jørgensen, Mette

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The relationship between inpatient volume and the quality of mental health care remains unclear. This study examined the association between inpatient volume in psychiatric hospital wards and quality of mental health care among patients with depression admitted to wards in Denmark...... was assessed by receipt of process performance measures reflecting national clinical guidelines for care of depression. RESULTS: Compared with patients admitted to low-volume psychiatric hospital wards, patients admitted to very-high-volume wards were more likely to receive a high overall quality of mental...... wards was associated with a greater chance of receiving guideline-recommended process performance measures for care of depression....

  5. Care coordinators: a controlled evaluation of an inpatient mental health service innovation.

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    Stewart, Malcolm W; Wilson, Michael; Bergquist, Karla; Thorburn, John

    2012-02-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the impact of introducing designated care coordinators into an acute mental health inpatient unit in terms of service delivery, clinical outcomes, and service user and significant other perceptions. A pre-post-controlled design was implemented with a consecutive sample of 292 service users admitted and staying more than 5 days in two wards, with care coordinators introduced in one ward. Data were obtained from clinical records, standard measures, and service user and significant other surveys. Care coordinator input was associated with significant improvements in service delivery and stronger involvement of significant others and community resources. Care-coordinated clients showed significantly better clinical outcomes, including the Health of Nations Outcome Scales behaviour subscale, less time in the intensive care subunit, less community crisis team input in the week following discharge, and lower rates of readmission in the month following discharge. Care-coordinated service users and their significant others gave higher ratings of service delivery, outcome, and satisfaction. The results indicate that designated care coordinators significantly improve care processes, outcomes, and service user experience in acute inpatient mental health settings. © 2011 The Authors. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing © 2011 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  6. Alternatives to inpatient mental health care for children and young people

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    Shepperd, Sasha; Doll, Helen; Gowers, Simon; James, Anthony; Fazel, Mina; Fitzpatrick, Ray; Pollock, Jon

    2014-01-01

    Background Current policy in the UK and elsewhere places emphasis on the provision of mental health services in the least restrictive setting, whilst also recognising that some children will require inpatient care. As a result, there are a range of mental health services to manage young people with serious mental health problems who are at risk of being admitted to an inpatient unit in community or outpatient settings. Objectives 1. To assess the effectiveness, acceptability and cost of mental health services that provide an alternative to inpatient care for children and young people. 2. To identify the range and prevalence of different models of service that seek to avoid inpatient care for children and young people. Search methods Our search included the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care Group Specialised Register (2007), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library 2006, issue 4), MEDLINE (1966 to 2007), EMBASE (1982 to 2006), the British Nursing Index (1994 to 2006), RCN database (1985 to 1996), CINAHL (1982 to 2006) and PsycInfo (1972 to 2007). Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials of mental health services providing specialist care, beyond the scope of generic outpatient provision, as an alternative to inpatient mental health care, for children or adolescents aged from five to 18 years who have a serious mental health condition requiring specialist services beyond the capacity of generic outpatient provision. The control group received mental health services in an inpatient or equivalent setting. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently extracted data and assessed study quality. We grouped studies according to the intervention type but did not pool data because of differences in the interventions and measures of outcome. Where data were available we calculated confidence intervals (CIs) for differences between groups at follow up. We also calculated standardised mean differences (SMDs) and

  7. Ready for eHealth? Health Professionals' Acceptance and Adoption of eHealth Interventions in Inpatient Routine Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennemann, Severin; Beutel, Manfred E; Zwerenz, Rüdiger

    2017-03-01

    eHealth interventions can be effective in treating health problems. However, adoption in inpatient routine care seems limited. The present study therefore aimed to investigate barriers and facilitators to acceptance of eHealth interventions and of online aftercare in particular in health professionals of inpatient treatment. A total of 152 out of 287 health professionals of various professional groups in four inpatient rehabilitation facilities filled out a self-administered web-based questionnaire (response rate: 53%); 128 individuals were eligible for further data analysis. Acceptance and possible predictors were investigated with a complex research model based on the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology. Acceptance of eHealth interventions was rather low (M = 2.47, SD = 0.98); however, acceptance of online aftercare was moderate (M = 3.08, SD = 0.96, t(127) = 8.22, p eHealth literacy was elevated. Social influence, performance expectancy, and treatment-related internet and mobile use significantly predicted overall acceptance. No differences were found between professional and age groups. Although acceptance of eHealth interventions was limited in health professionals of inpatient treatment, moderate acceptance of online aftercare for work-related stress implies a basis for future implementation. Tailored eHealth education addressing misconceptions about inferiority and incongruity with conventional treatment considering the systemic aspect of acceptance formation are needed.

  8. Pediatric aspects of inpatient health information technology systems.

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    Lehmann, Christoph U

    2015-03-01

    In the past 3 years, the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act accelerated the adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) with providers and hospitals, who can claim incentive monies related to meaningful use. Despite the increase in adoption of commercial EHRs in pediatric settings, there has been little support for EHR tools and functionalities that promote pediatric quality improvement and patient safety, and children remain at higher risk than adults for medical errors in inpatient environments. Health information technology (HIT) tailored to the needs of pediatric health care providers can improve care by reducing the likelihood of errors through information assurance and minimizing the harm that results from errors. This technical report outlines pediatric-specific concepts, child health needs and their data elements, and required functionalities in inpatient clinical information systems that may be missing in adult-oriented HIT systems with negative consequences for pediatric inpatient care. It is imperative that inpatient (and outpatient) HIT systems be adapted to improve their ability to properly support safe health care delivery for children. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  9. 42 CFR 409.62 - Lifetime maximum on inpatient psychiatric care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lifetime maximum on inpatient psychiatric care. 409....62 Lifetime maximum on inpatient psychiatric care. There is a lifetime maximum of 190 days on inpatient psychiatric hospital services available to any beneficiary. Therefore, once an individual receives...

  10. 29 CFR 825.114 - Inpatient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inpatient care. 825.114 Section 825.114 Labor Regulations... LEAVE ACT OF 1993 Coverage Under the Family and Medical Leave Act § 825.114 Inpatient care. Inpatient care means an overnight stay in a hospital, hospice, or residential medical care facility, including...

  11. Inpatient care of the elderly in Brazil and India: Assessing social inequalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Channon, Andrew Amos; Andrade, Monica Viegas; Noronha, Kenya; Leone, Tiziana; Dilip, T.R.

    2012-01-01

    The rapidly growing older adult populations in Brazil and India present major challenges for health systems in these countries, especially with regard to the equitable provision of inpatient care. The objective of this study was to contrast inequalities in both the receipt of inpatient care and the length of time that care was received among adults aged over 60 in two large countries with different modes of health service delivery. Using the Brazilian National Household Survey from 2003 and the Indian National Sample Survey Organisation survey from 2004 inequalities by wealth (measured by income in Brazil and consumption in India) were assessed using concentration curves and indices. Inequalities were also examined through the use of zero-truncated negative binomial models, studying differences in receipt of care and length of stay by region, health insurance, education and reported health status. Results indicated that there was no evidence of inequality in Brazil for both receipt and length of stay by income per capita. However, in India there was a pro-rich bias in the receipt of care, although once care was received there was no difference by consumption per capita for the length of stay. In both countries the higher educated and those with health insurance were more likely to receive care, while the higher educated had longer stays in hospital in Brazil. The health system reforms that have been undertaken in Brazil could be credited as a driver for reducing healthcare inequalities amongst the elderly, while the significant differences by wealth in India shows that reform is still needed to ensure the poor have access to inpatient care. Health reforms that move towards a more public funding model of service delivery in India may reduce inequality in elderly inpatient care in the country. PMID:23041128

  12. Managed care and inpatient mortality in adults: effect of primary payer.

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    Hines, Anika L; Raetzman, Susan O; Barrett, Marguerite L; Moy, Ernest; Andrews, Roxanne M

    2017-02-08

    Because managed care is increasingly prevalent in health care finance and delivery, it is important to ascertain its effects on health care quality relative to that of fee-for-service plans. Some stakeholders are concerned that basing gatekeeping, provider selection, and utilization management on cost may lower quality of care. To date, research on this topic has been inconclusive, largely because of variation in research methods and covariates. Patient age has been the only consistently evaluated outcome predictor. This study provides a comprehensive assessment of the association between managed care and inpatient mortality for Medicare and privately insured patients. A cross-sectional design was used to examine the association between managed care and inpatient mortality for four common inpatient conditions. Data from the 2009 Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project State Inpatient Databases for 11 states were linked to data from the American Hospital Association Annual Survey Database. Hospital discharges were categorized as managed care or fee for service. A phased approach to multivariate logistic modeling examined the likelihood of inpatient mortality when adjusting for individual patient and hospital characteristics and for county fixed effects. Results showed different effects of managed care for Medicare and privately insured patients. Privately insured patients in managed care had an advantage over their fee-for-service counterparts in inpatient mortality for acute myocardial infarction, stroke, pneumonia, and congestive heart failure; no such advantage was found for the Medicare managed care population. To the extent that the study showed a protective effect of privately insured managed care, it was driven by individuals aged 65 years and older, who had consistently better outcomes than their non-managed care counterparts. Privately insured patients in managed care plans, especially older adults, had better outcomes than those in fee-for-service plans

  13. A Novel Mental Health Crisis Service - Outcomes of Inpatient Data.

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    Morrow, R; McGlennon, D; McDonnell, C

    2016-01-01

    Northern Ireland has high mental health needs and a rising suicide rate. Our area has suffered a 32% reduction of inpatient beds consistent with the national drive towards community based treatment. Taking these factors into account, a new Mental Health Crisis Service was developed incorporating a high fidelity Crisis Response Home Treatment Team (CRHTT), Acute Day Care facility and two inpatient wards. The aim was to provide alternatives to inpatient admission. The new service would facilitate transition between inpatient and community care while decreasing bed occupancy and increasing treatment in the community. All services and processes were reviewed to assess deficiencies in current care. There was extensive consultation with internal and external stakeholders and process mapping using the COBRAs framework as a basis for the service improvement model. The project team set the service criteria and reviewed progress. In the original service model, the average inpatient occupancy rate was 106.6%, admission rate was 48 patients per month and total length of stay was 23.4 days. After introducing the inpatient consultant hospital model, the average occupancy rate decreased to 90%, admissions to 43 per month and total length of stay to 22 days. The results further decreased to 83% occupancy, 32 admissions per month and total length of stay 12 days after CRHTT initiation. The Crisis Service is still being evaluated but currently the model has provided safe alternatives to inpatient care. Involvement with patients, carers and all multidisciplinary teams is maximised to improve the quality and safety of care. Innovative ideas including structured weekly timetable and regular interface meetings have improved communication and allowed additional time for patient care.

  14. Parental satisfaction with inpatient care of children with cerebral palsy.

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    Iannelli, Maria; Harvey, Adrienne; O'Neill, Jenny; Reddihough, Dinah

    2015-11-01

    Children with cerebral palsy (CP) have complex health-care needs. This study examines levels of parental satisfaction with inpatient care for children with CP at a tertiary care hospital to identify areas for improvement. Parents/guardians of children with CP and parents/guardians of children without a disability admitted to hospital completed a custom-designed questionnaire assessing six areas of the hospital admission: (i) the admission process; (ii) the child's personal care; (iii) the child's medical care; (iv) overall care of the child; (v) the parent's experience in hospital; and (vi) keeping up to date in hospital. Differences between the two groups were analysed using Student's t-tests. Parents of children with CP were significantly less satisfied with the inpatient care as compared with parents of children without a disability in four of the six categories: 'my child's personal care' (P = 0.0033), 'my child's medical care' (P = 0.0350), 'overall care' (P = 0.0081) and 'my experience in the hospital' (P = 0.0209). When the overall questionnaire was compared between the two groups, parents of children with CP were less satisfied with care than parents of children without a disability (P = 0.0036). Parents of children with CP are less satisfied with the inpatient care of their child compared with parents of children without a disability. This information should be instrumental in informing change to ensure that parent satisfaction levels improve to a level consistent with other children admitted to a tertiary care setting. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2015 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  15. Mental health inpatient treatment expenditure trends in China, 2005-2012: evidence from Shandong.

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    Xu, Junfang; Wang, Jian; Liu, Ruiyun; Xing, Jinshui; Su, Lei; Yu, Fenghua; Lu, Mingshan

    2014-12-01

    Mental health is increasingly becoming a huge public health issue in China. Yet for various cultural, healthcare system, and social economic reasons, people with mental health need have long been under-served in China. In order to inform the current on-going health care reform, empirical evidences on the economic burden of mental illnesses in China are urgently needed to contribute to health policy makers' understanding of the potential benefits to society from allocating more resources to preventing and treating mental illness. However, the cost of mental illnesses and particularly its trend in China remains largely unknown. To investigate the trend of health care resource utilization among inpatients with mental illnesses in China, and to analyze what are the factors influencing the inpatient costs. Our study sample included 15,721 patients, both adults and children, who were hospitalized over an eight-year period (2005-2012) in Shandong Center for Mental Health (SCMH), the only provincial psychiatric hospital in Shandong province, China. Data were extracted from the Health Information System (HIS) at SCMH, with detailed and itemized cost data on all inpatient expenses incurred during hospitalization. The identification of the patients was based on the ICD-10 diagnoses recorded in the HIS. Descriptive analysis was done to analyze the trend of hospitalization cost and length of stay during the study period. Multivariate stepwise regression analysis was conducted to assess the factors that influence hospitalization cost. Among the inpatients in our sample, the most common mental disorders were schizophrenia, schizotypal and delusional disorders. The disease which had the highest per capita hospital expense was behavioral and emotional disorders with onset usually occurring in childhood and adolescence (RMB 8,828.4; US$ 1,419.4, as compared to the average reported household annual income of US$ 2,095.3 in China). The average annual growth rate of per capita

  16. Geriatric Inpatient Units in the Care of Hospitalized Frail Adults with a History of Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahyar Michael Gharacholou

    2012-06-01

    Conclusion: Inpatient GEM was associated with better maintenance of physical function and basic ADLs at hospital discharge; however, no differences in HRQOL or survival were observed between GEM and UC at 1 year post randomization. Restructuring inpatient care models to incorporate inpatient GEM principles may be one method to optimize health-care delivery.

  17. Portuguese Adaptation and Input for the Validation of the Views on Inpatient Care (VOICE) Outcome Measure to Assess Service Users'Perceptions of Inpatient Psychiatric Care.

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    Palha, João; Palha, Filipa; Dias, Pedro; Gonçalves-Pereira, Manuel

    2017-11-29

    Patient satisfaction is an important measure of health care quality. Patients' views have seldom been considered in the construction of measures addressing satisfaction with inpatient facilities in psychiatry. The Views on Inpatient Care - VOICE - is a first service-user generated outcome measure relying solely on their perceptions of acute care, representing a valuable indicator of service users' perceived quality of care. The present study aimed to contribute to the validation of the Portuguese version of VOICE. The questionnaire was translated into Portuguese and applied to a sample of eighty-five female inpatients of a psychiatric institution. Data analysis focused on assessing reliability and exploring the impact of demographic and clinical variables on participants' satisfaction. Internal consistency of the questionnaire was high (α = 0.87). Participants' age and marital status were associated with differences in scores, with older patients and patients who were married or involved in a close relationship presenting higher satisfaction levels. The questionnaire demonstrated good internal consistency and acceptability, as well as construct validity. Further studies should expand the analysis of the psychometric properties of this measure e.g., test-retest reliability. The Portuguese version of VOICE is a promising tool to assess service users' perceptions of inpatient psychiatric care in Portugal.

  18. Safety in psychiatric inpatient care: The impact of risk management culture on mental health nursing practice.

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    Slemon, Allie; Jenkins, Emily; Bungay, Vicky

    2017-10-01

    The discourse of safety has informed the care of individuals with mental illness through institutionalization and into modern psychiatric nursing practices. Confinement arose from safety: out of both societal stigma and fear for public safety, as well as benevolently paternalistic aims to protect individuals from self-harm. In this paper, we argue that within current psychiatric inpatient environments, safety is maintained as the predominant value, and risk management is the cornerstone of nursing care. Practices that accord with this value are legitimized and perpetuated through the safety discourse, despite evidence refuting their efficacy, and patient perspectives demonstrating harm. To illustrate this growing concern in mental health nursing care, we provide four exemplars of risk management strategies utilized in psychiatric inpatient settings: close observations, seclusion, door locking and defensive nursing practice. The use of these strategies demonstrates the necessity to shift perspectives on safety and risk in nursing care. We suggest that to re-centre meaningful support and treatment of clients, nurses should provide individualized, flexible care that incorporates safety measures while also fundamentally re-evaluating the risk management culture that gives rise to and legitimizes harmful practices. © 2017 The Authors Nursing Inquiry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Does certificate of need law enhance competition in inpatient care market? An empirical analysis.

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    Paul, Jomon A; Ni, Huan; Bagchi, Aniruddha

    2017-06-29

    This article investigates the impact of Certificate of Need (CON) laws on competition in the inpatient care market. One of the major criticisms of these laws is that it may hinder competition in the health care market, which can lead to higher prices. However, from a theoretical standpoint, CON laws could also promote competition by limiting excessive expansion from incumbents. Our main conclusion is that CON laws by and large enhanced competition in the inpatient market during the period of our study. This indicates that the effects of CON laws to hinder predatory behavior could dominate its effects of preventing new entrants into the inpatient care market. We do not find statistically significant evidence to reject the exogeneity assumption of either CON laws or their stringency in our study. We also find factors such as proportion of population aged 18-44, proportion of Asian American population, obesity rate, political environment, etc., in a state significantly impact competition. Our findings could shed some light to public policy makers when deciding the appropriate health programs or legislative framework to promote health care market competition and thereby facilitate quality health care.

  20. Utilization of inpatient care from private hospitals: trends emerging from Kerala, India.

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    Dilip, T R

    2010-09-01

    There is a gap in knowledge on the overall role and characteristics of private health care providers in India. This research is aimed at understanding changes in the consumption of inpatient care services from private hospitals between 1986 and 2004, with a particular focus on equitable outreach. Secondary analysis of National Sample Survey data on the utilization of inpatient care services in Kerala is performed for the periods 1986-87, 1995-96 and 2004. Household survey data are examined to understand the users of the private health system as there are limitations in obtaining reliable data from unregulated private health care providers. The annual hospitalization rate increased from 69 per 1000 population in 1986-87 to 126 per 1000 population by 2004. The proportion of persons seeking care from private rather than government hospitals increased from 55% in 1986-87 to 65% by 2004. Concentration indices revealed that the year 1995-96 witnessed the highest income inequality in hospitalization rates. A decline both in hospitalization rates and in the relative preference for private hospitals over government hospitals among the poorest two quintiles between 1986-87 and 1995-96 indicates that the poor avoided inpatient treatment. The rich-poor divide in care seeking from private hospitals was moderated by 2004. Improvements in the purchasing power of the population, and the strategy of private hospitals in this highly competitive market to generate revenue from the poorer quintiles by offering different pricing options, have reduced the observed rich-poor divide in the consumption of inpatient treatment from this sector. However, while this gap in utilization has closed, the burden of out-of-pocket expenditure is higher among the poor.

  1. Mortality-related resource utilization in the inpatient care of hypoplastic left heart syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danford, David A; Karels, Quentin; Kulkarni, Aparna; Hussain, Aysha; Xiao, Yunbin; Kutty, Shelby

    2015-10-22

    Quantifying resource utilization in the inpatient care of congenital heart diease is clinically relevant. Our purpose is to measure the investment of inpatient care resources to achieve survival in hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS), and to determine how much of that investment occurs in hospitalizations that have a fatal outcome, the mortality-related resource utilization fraction (MRRUF). A collaborative administrative database, the Pediatric Health Information System (PHIS) containing data for 43 children's hospitals, was queried by primary diagnosis for HLHS admissions of patients ≤21 years old during 2004-2013. Institution, patient age, inpatient deaths, billed charges (BC) and length of stay (LOS) were recorded. In all, 11,122 HLHS admissions were identified which account for total LOS of 277,027 inpatient-days and $3,928,794,660 in BC. There were 1145 inpatient deaths (10.3%). LOS was greater among inpatient deaths than among patients discharged alive (median 17 vs. 12, p providers and consumers that current practices often result in major resource expenditure for inpatient care of HLHS that does not result in survival to hospital dismissal. They highlight the need for data-driven critical review of standard practices to identify patterns of care associated with success, and to modify approaches objectively.

  2. Nursing staff-led behavioural group intervention in psychiatric in-patient care: Patient and staff experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salberg, Johanna; Folke, Fredrik; Ekselius, Lisa; Öster, Caisa

    2018-02-15

    A promising intervention in mental health in-patient care is behavioural activation (BA). Interventions based on BA can be used by mental health nurses and other staff members. The aim of this study was to evaluate patients' and staff members' experiences of a nursing staff-led behavioural group intervention in mental health in-patient care. The intervention was implemented at three adult acute general mental health in-patient wards in a public hospital setting in Sweden. A self-administrated questionnaire, completed by 84 patients and 34 nurses and nurse assistants, was administered, and nonparametric data analysed using descriptive statistics. Our findings revealed that both patients and nursing staff ranked nursing care and care environment as important aspects in the recovery process. Patients and staff members reported overall positive experiences of the group sessions. Patients with higher frequencies of attendance and patients satisfied with overall care had a more positive attitude towards the intervention. A more positive experience of being a group leader was reported by staff members who had been leading groups more than ten times. The most common impeding factor during implementation, reported by staff members, was a negative attitude to change. Conducive factors were having support from a psychologist and the perception that patients were showing interest. These positive experiences reported by patients and nursing staff, combined with previous research in this field, are taking us one step further in evaluating group sessions based on BA as a meaningful nursing intervention in mental health in-patient care. © 2018 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  3. Identifying alternatives to old age psychiatry inpatient admission: an application of the balance of care approach to health and social care planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Sue; Brand, Christian; Wilberforce, Mark; Abendstern, Michele; Challis, David

    2015-07-17

    Mental health problems in older people are common and costly, posing multiple challenges for commissioners. Against this backdrop, a series of initiatives have sought to shift resources from institutional to community care in the belief that this will save money and concurs with user preferences. However, most of this work has focused on the use of care home beds and general hospital admissions, and relatively little attention has been given to reducing the use of mental health inpatient beds, despite their very high cost. The study employed a 'Balance of Care approach' in three areas of North-West England. This long-standing strategic planning framework identifies people whose needs can be met in more than one setting, and compares the costs and consequences of the possible alternatives in a simulation modelling exercise. Information was collected about a six-month cohort of admissions in 2010/11 (n = 216). The sample was divided into groups of people with similar needs for care, and vignettes were formulated to represent the most prevalent groups. A range of key staff judged the appropriateness of these admissions and suggested alternative care for those considered least appropriate for hospital. A public sector costing approach was used to compare the estimated costs of the recommended care with that people currently receive. The findings suggest that more than a sixth of old age psychiatry inpatient admissions could be more appropriately supported in other settings if enhanced community services were available. Such restructuring could involve the provision of intensive support from Care Home Outreach and Community Mental Health Teams, rather than the development of crisis intervention and home treatment teams as currently advocated. Estimated savings were considerable, suggesting local agencies might release up to £1,300,000 per annum. No obvious trade-off between health and social care costs was predicted. There is considerable potential to change the

  4. Communication elements supporting patient safety in psychiatric inpatient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanerva, A; Kivinen, T; Lammintakanen, J

    2015-06-01

    Communication is important for safe and quality health care. The study provides needed insight on the communication elements that support patient safety from the psychiatric care view. Fluent information transfer between the health care professionals and care units is important for care planning and maintaining practices. Information should be documented and implemented accordingly. Communication should happen in an open communication culture that enables discussion, the opportunity to have debriefing discussions and the entire staff can feel they are heard. For effective communication, it is also important that staff are active themselves in information collecting about the essential information needed in patient care. In mental health nursing, it is important to pay attention to all elements of communication and to develop processes concerning communication in multidisciplinary teams and across unit boundaries. The study aims to describe which communication elements support patient safety in psychiatric inpatient care from the viewpoint of the nursing staff. Communication is an essential part of care and one of the core competencies of the psychiatric care. It enables safe and quality patient care. Errors in health care are often connected with poor communication. The study brings needed insight from the psychiatric care view to the topic. The data were gathered from semi-structured interviews in which 26 nurses were asked to describe the elements that constitute patient safety in psychiatric inpatient care. The data were analysed inductively from the viewpoint of communication. The descriptions connected with communication formed a main category of communication elements that support patient safety; this main category was made up of three subcategories: fluent information transfer, open communication culture and being active in information collecting. Fluent information transfer consists of the practical implementation of communication; open communication

  5. Addressing long-term physical healthcare needs in a forensic mental health inpatient population using the UK primary care Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF): an audit.

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    Ivbijaro, Go; Kolkiewicz, LA; McGee, Lsf; Gikunoo, M

    2008-03-01

    Objectives This audit aims to evaluate the effectiveness of delivering an equivalent primary care service to a long-term forensic psychiatric inpatient population, using the UK primary care national Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF).Method The audit compares the targets met by the general practitioner with special interest (GPwSI) service, using local and national QOF benchmarks (2005-2006), and determines the prevalence of chronic disease in a long-term inpatient forensic psychiatry population.Results The audit results show that the UK national QOF is a useful tool for assessment and evaluation of physical healthcare needs in a non-community based population. It shows an increased prevalence of all QOF-assessed long-term physical conditions when compared to the local East London population and national UK population, confirming previously reported elevated levels of physical healthcare need in psychiatric populations.Conclusions This audit shows that the UK General Practice QOF can be used as a standardised instrument for commissioning and monitoring the delivery of physical health services to in-patient psychiatric populations, and for the evaluation of the effectiveness of clinical interventions in long-term physical conditions. The audit also demonstrates the effectiveness of using a GPwSI in healthcare delivery in non-community based settings. We suggest that the findings may be generalisable to other long-term inpatient psychiatric and prison populations in order to further the objective of delivering an equivalent primary care service to all populations.The QOF is a set of national primary care audit standards and is freely available on the British Medical Association website or the UK Department of Health website. We suggest that primary care workers in health economies who have not yet developed their own national primary care standards can access and adapt these standards in order to improve the clinical standards of care given to the primary care

  6. Inpatient care expenditure of the elderly with chronic diseases who use public health insurance: Disparity in their last year of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandoevwit, Worawan; Phatchana, Phasith

    2018-06-01

    The Thai elderly are eligible for the Civil Servant Medical Benefit Scheme (CS) or Universal Coverage Scheme (UCS) depending on their pre-retirement or their children work status. This study aimed to investigate the disparity in inpatient care expenditures in the last year of life among Thai elderly individuals who used the two public health insurance schemes. Using death registration and inpatient administrative data from 2007 to 2011, our subpopulation group included the elderly with four chronic disease groups: diabetes mellitus, hypertension and cardiovascular disease, heart disease, and cancer. Among 1,242,150 elderly decedents, about 40% of them had at least one of the four chronic disease conditions and were hospitalized in their last year of life. The results showed that the means of inpatient care expenditures in the last year of life paid by CS and UCS per decedent were 99,672 Thai Baht and 52,472 Thai Baht, respectively. On average, UCS used higher healthcare resources by diagnosis-related group relative weight measure per decedent compared with CS. In all cases, the rates of payment for inpatient treatment per diagnosis-related group adjusted relative weight were higher for CS than UCS. This study found that the disparities in inpatient care expenditures in the last year of life stemmed mainly from the difference in payment rates. To mitigate this disparity, unified payment rates for various types of treatment that reflect costs of hospital care across insurance schemes were recommended. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The experience and views of mental health nurses regarding nursing care delivery in an integrated, inpatient setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Michelle; Walter, Garry; Hunt, Glenn

    2005-06-01

    Positive and effective consumer outcomes hinge on having in place optimal models of nursing care delivery. The aim of this study was to ascertain the experience and views of mental health nurses, working in hospitals in an area mental health service, regarding nursing care delivery in those settings. Surveys (n = 250) were sent to all mental health nurses working in inpatient settings and 118 (47%) were returned. Results showed that the quality of nursing care achieved high ratings (by 87%), and that two-thirds of respondents were proud to be a mental health nurse and would choose to be a mental health nurse again. Similarly, the majority (71%) would recommend mental health nursing to others. Concern was, however, expressed about the continuity and consistency of nursing work and information technology resources. Nurses with community experiences rated the importance of the following items, or their confidence, higher than those without previous community placements: the importance of interdisciplinary teamwork; the importance of participating in case review; the importance of collaborating with community staff; confidence in performing mental state examinations; and confidence in collaborating with community staff, suggesting that this placement had positive effects on acute care nursing.

  8. Suicide after absconding from inpatient care in England: an exploration of mental health professionals' experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Isabelle M; Clements, Caroline; Saini, Pooja; Rahman, Mohammad Shaiyan; Shaw, Jenny; Appleby, Louis; Kapur, Nav; Windfuhr, Kirsten

    2016-06-01

    Absconding from inpatient care is associated with suicide risk in psychiatric populations. However, little is known about the real world context of suicide after absconding from a psychiatric ward or the experiences of clinical staff caring for these patients. To identify the characteristics of inpatients who died by suicide after absconding and to explore these and further key issues related to suicide risk from the perspective of clinical staff. A mixed-methods study using quantitative data of all patient suicides in England between 1997 and 2011 and a thematic analysis of semi-structured interviews with 21 clinical staff. Four themes were identified as areas of concern for clinicians: problems with ward design, staffing problems, difficulties in assessing risk, and patient specific factors. Results suggest that inpatients who died by suicide after absconding may have more complex and severe illness along with difficult life events, such as homelessness. Closer monitoring of inpatients and access points, and improved risk assessments are important to reduce suicide in this patient group.

  9. The Determinants of the Technical Efficiency of Acute Inpatient Care in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Grignon, Michel; Perry, Sheril; Chen, Xi-Kuan; Ytsma, Alison; Allin, Sara; Gapanenko, Katerina

    2018-04-17

    To evaluate the technical efficiency of acute inpatient care at the pan-Canadian level and to explore the factors associated with inefficiency-why hospitals are not on their production frontier. Canadian Management Information System (MIS) database (CMDB) and Discharge Abstract Database (DAD) for the fiscal year of 2012-2013. We use a nonparametric approach (data envelopment analysis) applied to three peer groups (teaching, large, and medium hospitals, focusing on their acute inpatient care only). The double bootstrap procedure (Simar and Wilson 2007) is adopted in the regression. Information on inpatient episodes of care (number and quality of outcomes) was extracted from the DAD. The cost of the inpatient care was extracted from the CMDB. On average, acute hospitals in Canada are operating at about 75 percent efficiency, and this could thus potentially increase their level of outcomes (quantity and quality) by addressing inefficiencies. In some cases, such as for teaching hospitals, the factors significantly correlated with efficiency scores were not related to management but to the social composition of the caseload. In contrast, for large and medium nonteaching hospitals, efficiency related more to the ability to discharge patients to postacute care facilities. The efficiency of medium hospitals is also positively related to treating more clinically noncomplex patients. The main drivers of efficiency of acute inpatient care vary by hospital peer groups. Thus, the results provide different policy and managerial implications for teaching, large, and medium hospitals to achieve efficiency gains. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  10. Patient Satisfaction with Hospital Inpatient Care: Effects of Trust, Medical Insurance and Perceived Quality of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Linghan; Li, Ye; Ding, Ding; Wu, Qunhong; Liu, Chaojie; Jiao, Mingli; Hao, Yanhua; Han, Yuzhen; Gao, Lijun; Hao, Jiejing; Wang, Lan; Xu, Weilan; Ren, Jiaojiao

    2016-01-01

    Deteriorations in the patient-provider relationship in China have attracted increasing attention in the international community. This study aims to explore the role of trust in patient satisfaction with hospital inpatient care, and how patient-provider trust is shaped from the perspectives of both patients and providers. We adopted a mixed methods approach comprising a multivariate logistic regression model using secondary data (1200 people with inpatient experiences over the past year) from the fifth National Health Service Survey (NHSS, 2013) in Heilongjiang Province to determine the associations between patient satisfaction and trust, financial burden and perceived quality of care, followed by in-depth interviews with 62 conveniently selected key informants (27 from health and 35 from non-health sectors). A thematic analysis established a conceptual framework to explain deteriorating patient-provider relationships. About 24% of respondents reported being dissatisfied with hospital inpatient care. The logistic regression model indicated that patient satisfaction was positively associated with higher level of trust (OR = 14.995), lower levels of hospital medical expenditure (OR = 5.736-1.829 as compared with the highest quintile of hospital expenditure), good staff attitude (OR = 3.155) as well as good ward environment (OR = 2.361). But patient satisfaction was negatively associated with medical insurance for urban residents and other insurance status (OR = 0.215-0.357 as compared with medical insurance for urban employees). The qualitative analysis showed that patient trust-the most significant predictor of patient satisfaction-is shaped by perceived high quality of service delivery, empathic and caring interpersonal interactions, and a better designed medical insurance that provides stronger financial protection and enables more equitable access to health care. At the core of high levels of patient dissatisfaction with hospital care is the lack of trust. The

  11. A critical narrative analysis of shared decision-making in acute inpatient mental health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, Gemma; Felton, Anne; Morgan, Alastair; Stickley, Theo; Willis, Martin; Diamond, Bob; Houghton, Philip; Johnson, Beverley; Dumenya, John

    2016-01-01

    Shared decision-making (SDM) is a high priority in healthcare policy and is complementary to the recovery philosophy in mental health care. This agenda has been operationalised within the Values-Based Practice (VBP) framework, which offers a theoretical and practical model to promote democratic interprofessional approaches to decision-making. However, these are limited by a lack of recognition of the implications of power implicit within the mental health system. This study considers issues of power within the context of decision-making and examines to what extent decisions about patients' care on acute in-patient wards are perceived to be shared. Focus groups were conducted with 46 mental health professionals, service users, and carers. The data were analysed using the framework of critical narrative analysis (CNA). The findings of the study suggested each group constructed different identity positions, which placed them as inside or outside of the decision-making process. This reflected their view of themselves as best placed to influence a decision on behalf of the service user. In conclusion, the discourse of VBP and SDM needs to take account of how differentials of power and the positioning of speakers affect the context in which decisions take place.

  12. Analysis of Factors Influencing Inpatient and Outpatient Satisfaction with the Chinese Military Health Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Yipeng; Xue, Chen; Ge, Yang; Ye, Feng; Liu, Xu; Liu, Yuan; Zhang, Lulu

    2016-01-01

    Relatively few articles have focused on exploring factors influencing soldiers' overall satisfaction and differences between inpatients' and outpatients' satisfaction, particularly in the Chinese army. Elucidating factors influencing military inpatient and outpatient care separately and analyzing their differences may provide more information for the health system. The Revised China National Health Service Survey questionnaire was used in the survey. The questionnaire included 5 sections and 32 items concerning demographic, inpatient, and outpatient characteristics and perception variables for both inpatients and outpatients. Bivariate and multivariate techniques were used to reveal relationships between satisfaction and the variables assessed. Outpatients' and inpatients' overall satisfaction rates were 19.0% and 18.5%, respectively. The strongest determinant of outpatients' satisfaction was satisfaction with doctor's communication regarding therapeutic regimen followed by length of military service, level of trust in medical staff, and disease severity. Determinants of inpatients' satisfaction included staff categories, satisfaction with environment, and satisfaction with medical quality. The factors influencing military outpatients' satisfaction differed from those of inpatients. Exploring the causes of satisfaction and dissatisfaction with military health institutions is important in their fulfillment of their responsibility to maintain soldiers' health.

  13. Analysis of Factors Influencing Inpatient and Outpatient Satisfaction with the Chinese Military Health Service.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yipeng Lv

    Full Text Available Relatively few articles have focused on exploring factors influencing soldiers' overall satisfaction and differences between inpatients' and outpatients' satisfaction, particularly in the Chinese army. Elucidating factors influencing military inpatient and outpatient care separately and analyzing their differences may provide more information for the health system.The Revised China National Health Service Survey questionnaire was used in the survey. The questionnaire included 5 sections and 32 items concerning demographic, inpatient, and outpatient characteristics and perception variables for both inpatients and outpatients. Bivariate and multivariate techniques were used to reveal relationships between satisfaction and the variables assessed.Outpatients' and inpatients' overall satisfaction rates were 19.0% and 18.5%, respectively. The strongest determinant of outpatients' satisfaction was satisfaction with doctor's communication regarding therapeutic regimen followed by length of military service, level of trust in medical staff, and disease severity. Determinants of inpatients' satisfaction included staff categories, satisfaction with environment, and satisfaction with medical quality.The factors influencing military outpatients' satisfaction differed from those of inpatients. Exploring the causes of satisfaction and dissatisfaction with military health institutions is important in their fulfillment of their responsibility to maintain soldiers' health.

  14. Decreased health care utilization and health care costs in the inpatient and emergency department setting following initiation of ketogenic diet in pediatric patients: The experience in Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiting, Sharon; Donner, Elizabeth; RamachandranNair, Rajesh; Grabowski, Jennifer; Jetté, Nathalie; Duque, Daniel Rodriguez

    2017-03-01

    To assess the change in inpatient and emergency department utilization and health care costs in children on the ketogenic diet for treatment of epilepsy. Data on children with epilepsy initiated on the ketogenic diet (KD) Jan 1, 2000 and Dec 31, 2010 at Ontario pediatric hospitals were linked to province wide inpatient, emergency department (ED) data at the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences. ED and inpatient visits and costs for this cohort were compared for a maximum of 2 years (730days) prior to diet initiation and for a maximum of 2 years (730days) following diet initiation. KD patient were compared to matched group of children with epilepsy who did not receive the ketogenic diet (no KD). Children on the KD experienced a mean decrease in ED visits of 2.5 visits per person per year [95% CI (1.5-3.4)], and a mean decrease of 0.8 inpatient visits per person per year [95% CI (0.3-1.3)], following diet initiation. They had a mean decrease in ED costs of $630 [95% CI (249-1012)] per person per year and a median decrease in inpatient costs of $1059 [IQR: 7890; pdiet experienced a mean reduction of 2.1 ED visits per child per year [95% CI (1.0-3.2)] and a mean decrease of 0.6 [95% CI (0.1-1.1)] inpatient visits per child per year. Patients on the KD experienced a reduction of $442 [95% CI (34.4-850)] per child per year more in ED costs than the matched group. The ketogenic diet group had greater median decrease in inpatient costs per child per year than the matched group [pketogenic diet, experienced decreased ED and inpatient visits as well as costs following diet initiation in Ontario, Canada. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of reducing cost sharing for outpatient care on children's inpatient services in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Hirotaka; Goto, Rei

    2017-08-15

    Assessing the impact of cost sharing on healthcare utilization is a critical issue in health economics and health policy. It may affect the utilization of different services, but is yet to be well understood. This paper investigates the effects of reducing cost sharing for outpatient services on hospital admissions by exploring a subsidy policy for children's outpatient services in Japan. Data were extracted from the Japanese Diagnosis Procedure Combination database for 2012 and 2013. A total of 366,566 inpatients from 1390 municipalities were identified. The impact of expanding outpatient care subsidy on the volume of inpatient care for 1390 Japanese municipalities was investigated using the generalized linear model with fixed effects. A decrease in cost sharing for outpatient care has no significant effect on overall hospital admissions, although this effect varies by region. The subsidy reduces the number of overall admissions in low-income areas, but increases it in high-income areas. In addition, the results for admissions by type show that admissions for diagnosis increase particularly in high-income areas, but emergency admissions and ambulatory-care-sensitive-condition admissions decrease in low-income areas. These results suggest that outpatient and inpatient services are substitutes in low-income areas but complements in high-income ones. Although the subsidy for children's healthcare would increase medical costs, it would not improve the health status in high-income areas. Nevertheless, it could lead to some health improvements in low-income areas and, to some extent, offset costs by reducing admissions in these regions.

  16. An oral hygiene protocol improves oral health for patients in inpatient stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Joanne; Scholten, Ingrid

    2018-03-01

    To determine whether a simple oral hygiene protocol improves the oral health of inpatients in stroke rehabilitation. Poor oral health can lead to serious complications, such as pneumonia. The comorbidities associated with stroke, such as dysphagia, hemiparesis and cognitive impairment, can further impede independent oral care. International stroke guidelines recommend routine oral care but stop short of detailing specific regimes. The oral health assessment tool (OHAT) was conducted by speech-language pathologists with 100 patients with and without dysphagia in three metropolitan inpatient stroke rehabilitation facilities. A simple nurse-led oral hygiene regime was then implemented with all participants, which included twice daily tooth brushing and mouth rinsing after lunch, and oral health was measured again one week later. Initially, dysphagia was negatively associated with OHAT scores, and independence for oral hygiene was positively associated with oral health. After one week of a simple oral hygiene regime, the OHAT scores available for 89 participants indicated an improvement on average for all participants. In particular, 59% of participants with dysphagia had an improvement of 1 or more points. None of the participants developed pneumonia. A simple, inexpensive oral hygiene regime resulted in positive outcomes for patients with and without dysphagia in inpatient stroke rehabilitation settings. Oral health assessments and oral hygiene regimes that are simple to implement by the interdisciplinary team can be incorporated into standard stroke care with positive effect. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Association. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. 42 CFR 424.14 - Requirements for inpatient services of inpatient psychiatric facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... psychiatric facilities. 424.14 Section 424.14 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... Certification and Plan Requirements § 424.14 Requirements for inpatient services of inpatient psychiatric... requirements differ from those for other hospitals because the care furnished in psychiatric hospitals is often...

  18. Secondary analysis of data can inform care delivery for Indigenous women in an acute mental health inpatient unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Pat; Cunningham, Teresa; Lowell, Anne; Nagel, Tricia; Dunn, Sandra

    2017-02-01

    There is a paucity of research exploring Indigenous women's experiences in acute mental health inpatient services in Australia. Even less is known of Indigenous women's experience of seclusion events, as published data are rarely disaggregated by both indigeneity and gender. This research used secondary analysis of pre-existing datasets to identify any quantifiable difference in recorded experience between Indigenous and non-Indigenous women, and between Indigenous women and Indigenous men in an acute mental health inpatient unit. Standard separation data of age, length of stay, legal status, and discharge diagnosis were analysed, as were seclusion register data of age, seclusion grounds, and number of seclusion events. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the data, and where warranted, inferential statistical methods used SPSS software to apply analysis of variance/multivariate analysis of variance testing. The results showed evidence that secondary analysis of existing datasets can provide a rich source of information to describe the experience of target groups, and to guide service planning and delivery of individualized, culturally-secure mental health care at a local level. The results are discussed, service and policy development implications are explored, and suggestions for further research are offered. © 2016 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  19. Nurses experiences of delivering care in acute inpatient mental health settings: A narrative synthesis of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyder, Marianne; Ehrlich, Carolyn; Crompton, David; McArthur, Leianne; Delaforce, Caroline; Dziopa, Fiona; Ramon, Shulamit; Powell, Elizabeth

    2017-12-01

    Inpatient psychiatric care requires a balance between working with consumers' priorities and goals, managing expectations of the community, legal, professional and service responsibilities. In order to improve service delivery within acute mental health units, it is important to understand the constraints and facilitating factors for good care. We conducted a systematic narrative synthesis, where findings of qualitative studies are synthesised to generate new insights. 21 articles were identified. Our results show that personal qualities, professional skills as well as environmental factors all influence the ability to provide recovery focused care. Three overarching themes which either facilitated or hindered were identified. These included: (i) Complexity of the nursing role (clinical care; practical and emotional support: advocacy and education; enforcing aspects of the Mental Health Act. and, maintaining ward safety); (ii) Constraining factors (operational barriers; change in patient characteristic; and competing understandings of care); and (iii) Facilitating factors (ward factors; nursing tools; nurse characteristics; approach to people; approach to work and ability to self-care). We suggest that the therapeutic use of self is central to the provision of recovery oriented care. However person-centred practice can be fragile and fluid and a compassionate system of support is needed to enable an understanding of context and self. It is critical to have a work environment which fosters hope and optimism and is supportive of autonomy, ensures workload balance, and is safe. © 2017 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  20. Applying sensory modulation to mental health inpatient care to reduce seclusion and restraint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Charlotte; Kolmos, Anne; Andersen, Kjeld

    2017-01-01

    that is associated with reduced rates of seclusion and restraint in mental healthcare, but there is need for more research in this area. AIMS: Using SM to reduce restraint and seclusion in inpatient mental health care. METHODS: The study included two similar psychiatric units where one unit implemented SM and one...... unit served as the control group. In the very beginning of the study, a staff-training program in the use of SM including assessment tools and intervention strategies was established. Data on restraint and forced medicine were sampled post the course of the year of implementation and compared...... with the control group. RESULTS: The use of belts decreased with 38% compared to the control group. The use of forced medication decreased with 46% compared to the control group. Altogether the use of physical restraint and forced medication decreased significantly with 42% (p 

  1. Developing family rooms in mental health inpatient units: an exploratory descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isobel, Sophie; Foster, Kim; Edwards, Clair

    2015-06-19

    Family-friendly spaces for children and families to visit inpatient mental health units are recommended in international mental health guidelines as one way to provide service delivery that is responsive to the needs of parent-consumers and families. There is a lack of evidence on the implementation of family-friendly spaces or Family Rooms. This study aimed to explore the development, role, and function of Family Rooms in four mental health inpatient units in a local health district in NSW Australia. An exploratory descriptive inductive-deductive design using multiple data sources was employed. Methods included Family Room usage and parental status data over a 12 week period, an open-ended questionnaire, and semi-structured interviews with 20 nurses. Available parental status data indicated that between 8-14 % of inpatients were parents of dependent children under 18. Family Room usage was multipurpose and used specifically for children & families 29 % of the time. As spaces in the units, Family Rooms were perceived as acknowledging of the importance of family, and providing comfortable, secure spaces for parent-consumers and their children and family to maintain connections. Units did not have local policies or guidelines on the development, maintenance, and/or use of the rooms. Despite long-standing recognition of the need to identify consumers' parental status, there remains a lack of systematic processes for identifying parents in mental health inpatient services nationally. Family Rooms as spaces within inpatient units acknowledge the importance of families and are a step towards provision of family-focused mental health care. Recommendations for establishing and maintaining Family Rooms are outlined.

  2. CORRELATION OF INPATIENT AND OUTPATIENT MEASURES OF STROKE CARE QUALITY WITHIN VETERANS HEALTH ADMINISTRATION HOSPITALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Joseph S.; Arling, Greg; Ofner, Susan; Roumie, Christianne L.; Keyhani, Salomeh; Williams, Linda S.; Ordin, Diana L.; Bravata, Dawn M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Quality of care delivered in the inpatient and ambulatory settings may be correlated within an integrated health system such as the Veterans Health Administration (VHA). We examined the correlation between stroke care quality at hospital discharge and within 6 months post-discharge. Methods Cross-sectional hospital-level correlation analyses of chart-abstracted data for 3467 veterans discharged alive after an acute ischemic stroke from 108 VHA medical centers and 2380 veterans with post-discharge follow-up within 6 months, in fiscal year 2007. Four risk-standardized processes of care represented discharge care quality: prescription of anti-thrombotic and anti-lipidemic therapy, anti-coagulation for atrial fibrillation, and tobacco cessation counseling, along with a composite measure of defect-free care. Five risk-standardized intermediate outcomes represented post-discharge care quality: achievement of blood pressure, low-density lipoprotein (LDL), international normalized ratio (INR), and glycosylated hemoglobin target levels, and delivery of appropriate treatment for post-stroke depression, along with a composite measure of achieved outcomes. Results Median risk-standardized composite rate of defect-free care at discharge was 79%. Median risk-standardized post-discharge rates of achieving goal were 56% for blood pressure, 36% for LDL, 41% for INR, 40% for glycosylated hemoglobin, and 39% for depression management and the median risk-standardized composite six-month outcome rate was 44%. The hospital composite rate of defect-free care at discharge was correlated with meeting the LDL goal (r=0.31; p=0.007) and depression management (r=0.27; p=0.03) goal, but was not correlated with blood pressure, INR, or glycosylated hemoglobin goals, nor with the composite measure of achieved post-discharge outcomes (p-values >0.15). Conclusions Hospital discharge care quality was not consistently correlated with ambulatory care quality. PMID:21719771

  3. Retention in mental health care of Portuguese-speaking patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Marta; Cook, Benjamin; Mulvaney-Day, Norah; Alegría, Margarita; Kinrys, Gustavo

    2013-01-01

    We compared service outcomes of dedicated language and cultural competency services in adequacy of care, ER, and inpatient care among Portuguese-speaking patients in ethnic- and non-ethnic-specific behavioral health clinics. We assessed adequacy of mental health care, and use of inpatient emergency department among Portuguese-speaking patients, comparing individuals receiving care from a culturally and linguistically competent mental health care setting (the Portuguese Mental Health Program [PMHP]) with usual mental health care in a community health care system in the USA. Propensity score matching was used to balance patients in treatment and control groups on gender, marital status, age, diagnosis of mental disorder, and insurance status. We used de-identified, longitudinal, administrative data of 854 Portuguese-speaking patients receiving care from the PMHP and 541 Portuguese-speaking patients receiving usual care from 2005–2008. Adequate treatment was defined as receipt of at least eight outpatient psychotherapy visits, or at least four outpatient visits of which one was a psychopharmacological visit. PMHP patients were more likely to receive adequate care. No differences were found in rates of ER use or inpatient mental health care. The present study suggests increased quality of care for patients that have contact with a clinic that dedicates resources specifically to a minority/immigrant group. Advantages of this setting include greater linguistic and cultural concordance among providers and patients. Further research is warranted to better understand the mechanisms by which culturally appropriate mental health care settings benefit minority/immigrant patients. PMID:23427258

  4. Using project management methodology to plan and track inpatient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Darren S

    2005-08-01

    Effective care of each patient throughout a hospital admission involves executing a specific set of tasks to produce a favorable outcome within an appropriate time frame. The ProjectRounds methodology, which can be implemented using widely available software, incorporates the principles of project management in planning and control hospital inpatient care. It consists of four stages--clinical assessment, planning, scheduling, and tracking. OVERVIEW OF PROJECTROUNDS AND EXAMPLE: As an example, a 68-year-old-man is admitted with pneumonia. In clinical assessment, the admitting physician uses an assessment tool that prompts her to list all the patient's clinical issues, define the conditions that need to be met to discharge the patient, highlight special problems, and list any consultations, diagnostic tests, and procedures that are planned. In planning, the work breakdown structure--a tabulation of all the tasks in the "project" (the admission)--is created. In scheduling, a project schedule is generated, and in tracking, the clinical team evaluates and monitors the project's course. During interdisciplinary clinical rounds, the progress of the patient's hospital care can be tracked and quantified by employing the percent complete method. Tracking can be used as a "dashboard," providing a concise summary of the care that needs to be and has been rendered to the patient. Applying the tenets of project management can optimize the process of providing health care to hospital inpatients.

  5. The ED-inpatient dashboard: Uniting emergency and inpatient clinicians to improve the efficiency and quality of care for patients requiring emergency admission to hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staib, Andrew; Sullivan, Clair; Jones, Matt; Griffin, Bronwyn; Bell, Anthony; Scott, Ian

    2017-06-01

    Patients who require emergency admission to hospital require complex care that can be fragmented, occurring in the ED, across the ED-inpatient interface (EDii) and subsequently, in their destination inpatient ward. Our hospital had poor process efficiency with slow transit times for patients requiring emergency care. ED clinicians alone were able to improve the processes and length of stay for the patients discharged directly from the ED. However, improving the efficiency of care for patients requiring emergency admission to true inpatient wards required collaboration with reluctant inpatient clinicians. The inpatient teams were uninterested in improving time-based measures of care in isolation, but they were motivated by improving patient outcomes. We developed a dashboard showing process measures such as 4 h rule compliance rate coupled with clinically important outcome measures such as inpatient mortality. The EDii dashboard helped unite both ED and inpatient teams in clinical redesign to improve both efficiencies of care and patient outcomes. © 2016 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  6. Recovery-Oriented Practice in Mental Health Inpatient Settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waldemar, Anna Kristine; Arnfred, Sidse M; Petersen, Lone

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Implementation of recovery-oriented practice has proven to be challenging, and little is known about the extent to which recovery-oriented principles are integrated into mental health inpatient settings. This review of the literature examined the extent to which a recovery......-oriented approach is an integrated part of mental health inpatient settings. METHODS: A systematic search (2000-2014) identified quantitative and qualitative studies that made explicit reference to the concept of recovery and that were conducted in adult mental health inpatient settings or that used informants from......, the United States, Australia, and Ireland were included. The results highlight the limited number of studies of recovery-oriented practice in mental health inpatient settings and the limited extent to which such an approach is integrated into these settings. Findings raise the question of whether recovery...

  7. Estimates of economic burden of providing inpatient care in childhood rotavirus gastroenteritis from Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Way Seah; Poo, Muhammad Izzuddin; Nagaraj, Shyamala

    2007-12-01

    To estimate the cost of an episode of inpatient care and the economic burden of hospitalisation for childhood rotavirus gastroenteritis (GE) in Malaysia. A 12-month prospective, hospital-based study on children less than 14 years of age with rotavirus GE, admitted to University of Malaya Medical Centre, Kuala Lumpur, was conducted in 2002. Data on human resource expenditure, costs of investigations, treatment and consumables were collected. Published estimates on rotavirus disease incidence in Malaysia were searched. Economic burden of hospital care for rotavirus GE in Malaysia was estimated by multiplying the cost of each episode of hospital admission for rotavirus GE with national rotavirus incidence in Malaysia. In 2002, the per capita health expenditure by Malaysian Government was US$71.47. Rotavirus was positive in 85 (22%) of the 393 patients with acute GE admitted during the study period. The median cost of providing inpatient care for an episode of rotavirus GE was US$211.91 (range US$68.50-880.60). The estimated average cases of children hospitalised for rotavirus GE in Malaysia (1999-2000) was 8571 annually. The financial burden of providing inpatient care for rotavirus GE in Malaysian children was estimated to be US$1.8 million (range US$0.6 million-7.5 million) annually. The cost of providing inpatient care for childhood rotavirus GE in Malaysia was estimated to be US$1.8 million annually. The financial burden of rotavirus disease would be higher if cost of outpatient visits, non-medical and societal costs are included.

  8. Health Care Information System (HCIS) Data File

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The data was derived from the Health Care Information System (HCIS), which contains Medicare Part A (Inpatient, Skilled Nursing Facility, Home Health Agency (Part A...

  9. Recovery orientation in mental health inpatient settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waldemar, Anna Kristine; Esbensen, Bente Appel; Korsbek, Lisa

    2018-01-01

    Offering mental health treatment in line with a recovery-oriented practice has become an objective in the mental health services in many countries. However, applying recovery-oriented practice in inpatient settings seems challenged by unclear and diverging definitions of the concept......-structured interviews were conducted with 14 inpatients from two mental health inpatient wards using an interview guide based on factors from the Recovery Self-Assessment. Qualitative content analysis was applied in the analysis. Six themes covering the participants’ experiences were identified. The participants felt...... accepted and protected in the ward and found comfort in being around other people but missed talking and engaging with health professionals. They described limited choice and influence on the course of their treatment, and low information levels regarding their treatment, which they considered to consist...

  10. Preventing compulsory admission to psychiatric inpatient care through psycho-education and crisis focused monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lay, Barbara; Salize, Hans Joachim; Dressing, Harald; Rüsch, Nicolas; Schönenberger, Thekla; Bühlmann, Monika; Bleiker, Marco; Lengler, Silke; Korinth, Lena; Rössler, Wulf

    2012-09-05

    The high number of involuntary placements of people with mental disorders in Switzerland and other European countries constitutes a major public health issue. In view of the ethical and personal relevance of compulsory admission for the patients concerned and given the far-reaching effects in terms of health care costs, innovative interventions to improve the current situation are much needed. A number of promising approaches to prevent involuntary placements have been proposed that target continuity of care by increasing self-management skills of patients. However, the effectiveness of such interventions in terms of more robust criteria (e.g., admission rates) has not been sufficiently analysed in larger study samples. The current study aims to evaluate an intervention programme for patients at high risk of compulsory admission to psychiatric hospitals. Effectiveness will be assessed in terms of a reduced number of psychiatric hospitalisations and days of inpatient care in connection with involuntary psychiatric admissions as well as in terms of cost-containment in inpatient mental health care. The intervention furthermore intends to reduce the degree of patients' perceived coercion and to increase patient satisfaction, their quality of life and empowerment. This paper describes the design of a randomised controlled intervention study conducted currently at four psychiatric hospitals in the Canton of Zurich. The intervention programme consists of individualised psycho-education focusing on behaviours prior to and during illness-related crisis, the distribution of a crisis card and, after inpatient admission, a 24-month preventive monitoring of individual risk factors for compulsory re-admission to hospital. All measures are provided by a mental health care worker who maintains permanent contact to the patient over the course of the study. In order to prove its effectiveness the intervention programme will be compared with standard care procedures (control group

  11. Preventing compulsory admission to psychiatric inpatient care through psycho-education and crisis focused monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lay Barbara

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The high number of involuntary placements of people with mental disorders in Switzerland and other European countries constitutes a major public health issue. In view of the ethical and personal relevance of compulsory admission for the patients concerned and given the far-reaching effects in terms of health care costs, innovative interventions to improve the current situation are much needed. A number of promising approaches to prevent involuntary placements have been proposed that target continuity of care by increasing self-management skills of patients. However, the effectiveness of such interventions in terms of more robust criteria (e.g., admission rates has not been sufficiently analysed in larger study samples. The current study aims to evaluate an intervention programme for patients at high risk of compulsory admission to psychiatric hospitals. Effectiveness will be assessed in terms of a reduced number of psychiatric hospitalisations and days of inpatient care in connection with involuntary psychiatric admissions as well as in terms of cost-containment in inpatient mental health care. The intervention furthermore intends to reduce the degree of patients’ perceived coercion and to increase patient satisfaction, their quality of life and empowerment. Methods/Design This paper describes the design of a randomised controlled intervention study conducted currently at four psychiatric hospitals in the Canton of Zurich. The intervention programme consists of individualised psycho-education focusing on behaviours prior to and during illness-related crisis, the distribution of a crisis card and, after inpatient admission, a 24-month preventive monitoring of individual risk factors for compulsory re-admission to hospital. All measures are provided by a mental health care worker who maintains permanent contact to the patient over the course of the study. In order to prove its effectiveness the intervention programme will be

  12. Inpatient care of mentally ill people in prison: results of a year's programme of semistructured inspections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, John L; Lyne, Maggi

    2000-01-01

    Objective To investigate the facilities for inpatient care of mentally disordered people in prison. Design Semistructured inspections conducted by doctor and nurse. Expected standards were based on healthcare quality standards published by the Prison Service or the NHS. Setting 13 prisons with inpatient beds in England and Wales subject to the prison inspectorate's routine inspection programme during 1997-8. Main outcomes measures Appraisals of quality of care against published standards. Results The 13 prisons had 348 beds, 20% of all beds in prisons. Inpatient units had between 3 and 75 beds. No doctor in charge of inpatients had completed specialist psychiatric training. 24% of nursing staff had mental health training; 32% were non-nursing trained healthcare officers. Only one prison had occupational therapy input; two had input from a clinical psychologist. Most patients were unlocked for about 3.5 hours a day and none for more than nine hours a day. Four prisons provided statistics on the use of seclusion. The average length of an episode of seclusion was 50 hours. Conclusion The quality of services for mentally ill prisoners fell far below the standards in the NHS. Patients' lives were unacceptably restricted and therapy limited. The present policy dividing inpatient care of mentally disordered prisoners between the prison service and the NHS needs reconsideration. PMID:10764360

  13. Inpatient Dialysis Unit Project Development: Redesigning Acute Hemodialysis Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    Executive leaders of an acute care hospital performed a market and financial analysis, and created a business plan to establish an inpatient hemodialysis unit operated by the hospital to provide safe, high-quality, evidence-based care to the population of individuals experiencing end stage renal disease (ESRD) within the community. The business plan included a SWOT (Strengths - Weaknesses - Opportunities - Threats) analysis to assess advantages of the hospital providing inpatient hemodialysis services versus outsourcing the services with a contracted agency. The results of the project were a newly constructed tandem hemodialysis room and an operational plan with clearly defined key performance indicators, process improvement initiatives, and financial goals. This article provides an overview of essential components of a business plan to guide the establishment of an inpatient hemodialysis unit. Copyright© by the American Nephrology Nurses Association.

  14. Cost analysis of in-patient cancer chemotherapy at a tertiary care hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wani, Mohammad Ashraf; Tabish, S A; Jan, Farooq A; Khan, Nazir A; Wafai, Z A; Pandita, K K

    2013-01-01

    Cancer remains a major health problem in all communities worldwide. Rising healthcare costs associated with treating advanced cancers present a significant economic challenge. It is a need of the hour that the health sector should devise cost-effective measures to be put in place for better affordability of treatments. To achieve this objective, information generation through indigenous hospital data on unit cost of in-patient cancer chemotherapy in medical oncology became imperative and thus hallmark of this study. The present prospective hospital based study was conducted in Medical Oncology Department of tertiary care teaching hospital. After permission from the Ethical Committee, a prospective study of 6 months duration was carried out to study the cost of treatment provided to in-patients in Medical Oncology. Direct costs that include the cost of material, labor and laboratory investigations, along with indirect costs were calculated, and data analyzed to compute unit cost of treatment. The major cost components of in-patient cancer chemotherapy are cost of drugs and materials as 46.88% and labor as 48.45%. The average unit cost per patient per bed day for in-patient chemotherapy is Rs. 5725.12 ($125.96). This includes expenditure incurred both by the hospital and the patient (out of pocket). The economic burden of cancer treatment is quite high both for the patient and the healthcare provider. Modalities in the form of health insurance coverage need to be established and strengthened for pooling of resources for the treatment and transfer of risks of these patients.

  15. Serious reportable events within the inpatient mental health care: Impact on physicians and nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, J; Van Gerven, E; Lannoy, K; Panella, M; Euwema, M; Sermeus, W; De Hert, M; Vanhaecht, K

    2016-07-01

    To investigate the prevalence of physicians and nurses involved in an adverse event within mental health. A quantitative, cross-sectional study was performed. Six Flemish psychiatric hospitals (Belgium) participated in this exploratory cross-sectional study. All psychiatrists and nurses working in these hospitals were invited to complete an online questionnaire in March 2013. 28 psychiatrists and 252 nurses completed the survey. 205 (73%) of the 280 respondents were personally involved at least once in an adverse event within their entire career. Respondents reported that the adverse event with the greatest impact was related to suicide in almost 64% of the cases. About one in eight respondents considered quitting their job because of it. Almost 18% declared that due to the impact of the event, they believed that the quality of the administered care was affected for longer than one month. Respondents stated that they received much support of colleagues (95%), the chief nurse (86%) and the partner (71%). Colleagues seemed to be most supportive in the recovery process. Physicians and nurses working in inpatient mental health care may be at high risk to being confronted with an adverse event at some point in their career. The influence on health professionals involved in an adverse event on their work is particularly important in the first 4-24h. Professionals at those moments had higher likelihood to be involved in another adverse event. Institutions should seriously consider giving support almost at that time. Copyright © 2016 SECA. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. ALARM, a life saving training program for inpatient mental health care staff. Tallinn, Estland (27-30 augustus 2014) : Oral presentation European Symposium on Suicide and Suicidal Behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nienke Kool

    2014-01-01

    Oral presentation European Symposium on Suicide and Suicidal Behaviour. Titel: ALARM, a life saving training program for inpatient mental health care staff. Tallinn, Estland (27-30 augustus 2014) Introduction Despite precautions, suicide does happen. Sometimes patients are found while attempting

  17. [Impact of nurse, nurses' aid staffing and turnover rate on inpatient health outcomes in long term care hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yunmi; Lee, Ji Yun; Kang, Hyuncheol

    2014-02-01

    This study was conducted to explore the impact of registered nurse/nurses' aid (RN/NA) staffing and turnover rate on inpatient health outcomes in long term care hospitals. A secondary analysis was done of national data from the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Services including evaluation of long term care hospitals in October-December 2010 and hospital general characteristics in July-September 2010. Final analysis of data from 610 hospitals included RN/NA staffing, turnover rate of nursing staff and 5 patient health outcome indicators. Finding showed that, when variables of organization and community level were controlled, patients per RN was a significant indicator of decline in ADL for patients with dementia, and new pressure ulcer development in the high risk group and worsening of pressure ulcers. Patients per NA was a significant indicator for new pressure ulcer development in the low risk group. Turnover rate was not significant for any variable. To maintain and improve patient health outcomes of ADL and pressure ulcers, policies should be developed to increase the staffing level of RN. Studies are also needed to examine causal relation of NA staffing level, RN staffing level and patient health outcomes with consideration of the details of nursing practice.

  18. Hospital and Health Insurance Markets Concentration and Inpatient Hospital Transaction Prices in the U.S. Health Care Market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauda, Seidu

    2018-04-01

    To examine the effects of hospital and insurer markets concentration on transaction prices for inpatient hospital services. Measures of hospital and insurer markets concentration derived from American Hospital Association and HealthLeaders-InterStudy data are linked to 2005-2008 inpatient administrative data from Truven Health MarketScan Databases. Uses a reduced-form price equation, controlling for cost and demand shifters and accounting for possible endogeneity of market concentration using instrumental variables (IV) technique. The findings suggest that greater hospital concentration raises prices, whereas greater insurer concentration depresses prices. A hypothetical merger between two of five equally sized hospitals is estimated to increase hospital prices by about 9 percent (p costs. © Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  19. Health care restructuring and family physician care for those who died of cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnston Grace

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the 1990s, health care restructuring in Nova Scotia resulted in downsized hospitals, reduced inpatient length of stay, capped physician incomes and restricted practice locations. Concurrently, the provincial homecare program was redeveloped and out-of-hospital cancer deaths increased from 20% (1992 to 30% (1998. These factors all pointed to a transfer of end-of-life inpatient hospital care to more community-based care. The purpose of this study was to describe the trends in the provision of Family Physician (FP visits to advanced cancer patients in Nova Scotia (NS during the years of health care restructuring. Methods Design Secondary multivariate analysis of linked population-based datafiles including the Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Centre Oncology Patient Information System (NS Cancer Registry, Vital Statistics, the NS Hospital Admissions/Separations file and the Medical Services Insurance Physician Services database. Setting Nova Scotia, an eastern Canadian province (population: 950,000. Subjects: All patients who died of lung, colorectal, breast or prostate cancer between April 1992 and March 1998 (N = 7,212. Outcome Measures Inpatient and ambulatory FP visits, ambulatory visits by location (office, home, long-term care facility, emergency department, time of day (regular hours, after hours, total length of inpatient hospital stay and number of hospital admissions during the last six months of life. Results In total, 139,641 visits were provided by family physicians: 15% of visits in the office, 10% in the home, 5% in the emergency department (ED, 5% in a long-term-care centre and 64% to hospital inpatients. There was no change in the rate of FP visits received for office, home and long-term care despite the fact that there were 13% fewer hospital admissions, and length of hospital stay declined by 21%. Age-sex adjusted estimates using negative binomial regression indicate a decline in hospital inpatient FP

  20. Funding a Health Disparities Research Agenda: The Case of Medicare Home Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davitt, Joan K.

    2014-01-01

    Medicare home health care provides critical skilled nursing and therapy services to patients in their homes, generally after a period in an inpatient facility or nursing home. Disparities in access to, or outcomes of, home health care can result in patient deterioration and increased cost to the Medicare program if patient care needs intensify.…

  1. Management of inpatient aggression in forensic mental health nursing : the application of the Early Recognition Method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fluttert, F.A.J.

    2011-01-01

    Management of Inpatient Aggression in Forensic Mental Health Nursing. The application of the Early Recognition Method. Forensic mental health nurses take care of forensic patients convicted for an offense for which they were assessed not to be fully accountable due to their psychiatric disorder. For

  2. [The state of quality management implementation in ambulatory care nursing and inpatient nursing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farin, E; Hauer, J; Schmidt, E; Kottner, J; Jäckel, W H

    2013-02-01

    The demands being made on quality assurance and quality management in ambulatory care nursing and inpatient nursing facilities continue to grow. As opposed to health-care facilities such as hospitals and rehabilitation centres, we know of no other empirical studies addressing the current state of affairs in quality management in nursing institutions. The aim of this investigation was, by means of a questionnaire, to analyse the current (as of spring 2011) dissemination of quality management and certification in nursing facilities using a random sample as representative as possible of in- and outpatient institutions. To obtain our sample we compiled 800 inpatient and 800 outpatient facilities as a stratified random sample. Federal state, holder and, for inpatient facilities, the number of beds were used as stratification variables. 24% of the questionnaires were returned, giving us information on 188 outpatient and 220 inpatient institutions. While the distribution in the sample of outpatient institutions is equivalent to the population distribution, we observed discrepancies in the inpatient facilities sample. As they do not seem to be related to any demonstrable bias, we assume that our data are sufficiently representative. 4 of 5 of the responding facilities claim to employ their own quality management system, however the degree to which the quality management mechanisms are actually in use is an estimated 75%. Almost 90% of all the facilities have a quality management representative who often possesses specific additional qualifications. Many relevant quality management instruments (i. e., nursing standards of care, questionnaires, quality circles) are used in 75% of the responding institutions. Various factors in our data give the impression that quality management and certification efforts have made more progress in the inpatient facilities. Although 80% of the outpatient institutions claim to have a quality management system, only 32.1% of them admit to

  3. Day hospital as an alternative to inpatient care for cancer patients: a random assignment trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mor, V; Stalker, M Z; Gralla, R; Scher, H I; Cimma, C; Park, D; Flaherty, A M; Kiss, M; Nelson, P; Laliberte, L

    1988-01-01

    A stratified, random-assignment trial of 442 cancer patients was conducted to evaluate medical, psychosocial, and financial outcomes of day hospital treatment as an alternative to inpatient care for certain cancer patients. Eligible patients required: a 4- to 8-hour treatment plan, including chemotherapy and other long-term intravenous (i.v.) treatment; a stable cardiovascular status; mental competence; no skilled overnight nursing; and a helper to assist with home care. Patients were ineligible if standard outpatient treatment was possible. No statistically significant (p less than 0.05) differences were found between the Adult Day Hospital (ADH) and Inpatient care in medical or psychosocial outcomes over the 60-day study period. The major difference was in medical costs--approximately one-third lower for ADH patients (p less than 0.001) than for the Inpatient group. The study demonstrates that day hospital care of medical oncology patients is clinically equivalent to Inpatient care, causes no negative psychosocial effects, and costs less than Inpatient care. Findings support the trend toward dehospitalization of medical treatment.

  4. Establishing an ISO 10001-based promise in inpatients care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohammad Ashiqur Rahman; Karapetrovic, Stanislav

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore ISO 10001:2007 in planning, designing and developing a customer satisfaction promise (CSP) intended for inpatients care. Through meetings and interviews with research participants, who included a program manager, unit managers and registered nurses, information about potential promises and their implementation was obtained and analyzed. A number of promises were drafted and one was finally selected to be developed as a CSP. Applying the standard required adaptation and novel interpretation. Additionally, ISO 10002:2004 (Clause 7) was used to design the feedback handling activities. A promise initially chosen for development turned out to be difficult to implement, experience that helped in selecting and developing the final promise. Research participants found the ISO 10001-based method useful and comprehensible. This paper presents a specific health care example of how to adapt a standard's guideline in establishing customer promises. The authors show how a promise can be used in alleviating an existing issue (i.e. communication between carers and patients). The learning can be beneficial in various health care settings. To the knowledge, this paper shows the first example of applying ISO 10001:2007 in a health care case. A few activities suggested by the standard are further detailed, and a new activity is introduced. The integrated use of ISO 10001:2007 and 10002:2004 is presented and how one can be "augmented" by the other is demonstrated.

  5. Integral resource capacity planning for inpatient care services based on hourly bed census predictions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kortbeek, Nikky; Braaksma, Aleida; Smeenk, H.F.; Bakker, P.J.M; Boucherie, Richardus J.

    The design and operations of inpatient care facilities are typically largely historically shaped. A better match with the changing environment is often possible, and even inevitable due to the pressure on hospital budgets. Effectively organizing inpatient care requires simultaneous consideration of

  6. Severe forms of fibromyalgia with acute exacerbation of pain: costs, comorbidities, and length of stay in inpatient care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romeyke T

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Tobias Romeyke,1,2 Elisabeth Noehammer,1 Hans Christoph Scheuer,2 Harald Stummer1,3 1Institute for Management and Economics in Health Care, University of Health Sciences, Medical Informatics and Technology (UMIT, Hall in Tirol, Austria; 2Waldhausklinik Deuringen, Acute Hospital for Internal Medicine, Pain Therapy, Complementary, and Individualized Patient-Centered Medicine, Stadtbergen, Germany; 3Institute for Management and Innovation in Healthcare, University Schloss Seeburg, Seekirchen/Wallersee, Austria Background and purpose: As a disease of the musculoskeletal system, fibromyalgia is becoming increasingly important, because of the direct and indirect costs to health systems. The purpose of this study of health economics was to obtain information about staff costs differentiated by service provider, and staff and material costs of the nonmedical infrastructure in inpatient care.Patients and methods: This study looked at 263 patients who received interdisciplinary inpatient treatment for severe forms of fibromyalgia with acute exacerbation of pain between 2011 and 2014. Standardized cost accounting and an analysis of additional diagnoses were performed.Results: The average cost per patient was €3,725.84, with staff and material costs of the nonmedical infrastructure and staff costs of doctors and nurses accounting for the highest proportions of the costs. Each fibromyalgia patient had an average of 6.1 additional diagnoses.Conclusion: Severe forms of fibromyalgia are accompanied by many concomitant diseases and associated with both high clinical staff costs and high medical and nonmedical infrastructure costs. Indication-based cost calculations provide important information for health policy and hospital managers if they include all elements that incur costs in both a differentiated and standardized way. Keywords: fibromyalgia, DRG, cost, length of stay, comorbidities, interdisciplinary care, inpatient care, musculoskeletal, pain

  7. Relationship between care dependency and behavioral symptoms among elderly in-patients with Alzheimer’s disease in Japan and the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ate Dijkstra

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study investigates the influence of personal characteristics and health-related variables on the care dependency status among elderly in-patients with clinically diagnosed Alzheimer’s disease in two countries. Methods: A descriptive cross-cultural survey was administered to a convenience sample of 137 elderly in-patients. Patients were recruited from a hospital in Japan (N = 77 and from a nursing home in the Netherlands (N = 60. Results: In both countries, almost all participants are assessed on the severity level of care dependency in the range of “completely care dependent” (Japan: 35.1%; the Netherlands: 20.0%, or “to a great extent care dependent” (Japan: 24.7%; the Netherlands: 45.0%, to “partially care dependent” (Japan: 22.1%; the Netherlands: 21.7%. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that there is no interdependence between the severity level of care dependency and personal characteristics of patients with Alzheimer’s disease in both countries. Regarding the interplay of health-related variables on the severity level of care dependency, a difference was found between countries.

  8. Caring for inpatient boarders in the emergency department: improving safety and patient and staff satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornemann-Shepherd, Melanie; Le-Lazar, Jamie; Makic, Mary Beth Flynn; DeVine, Deborah; McDevitt, Kelly; Paul, Marcee

    2015-01-01

    Hospital capacity constraints lead to large numbers of inpatients being held for extended periods in the emergency department. This creates concerns with safety, quality of care, and dissatisfaction of patients and staff. The aim of this quality-improvement project was to improve satisfaction and processes in which nurses provided care to inpatient boarders held in the emergency department. A quality-improvement project framework that included the use of a questionnaire was used to ascertain employee and patient dissatisfaction and identify opportunities for improvement. A task force was created to develop action plans related to holding and caring for inpatients in the emergency department. A questionnaire was sent to nursing staff in spring 2012, and responses from the questionnaire identified improvements that could be implemented to improve care for inpatient boarders. Situation-background-assessment-recommendation (SBAR) communications and direct observations were also used to identify specific improvements. Post-questionnaire results indicated improved satisfaction for both staff and patients. It was recognized early that the ED inpatient area would benefit from the supervision of an inpatient director, managers, and staff. Outcomes showed that creating an inpatient unit within the emergency department had a positive effect on staff and patient satisfaction. Copyright © 2015 Emergency Nurses Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Onconeural Antibodies in Acute Psychiatric Inpatient Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sæther, Sverre Georg; Schou, Morten; Stoecker, Winfried

    2017-01-01

    , GLRA1B, DPPX, GRM1, GRM5, DNER, Yo, ZIC4, GAD67, amphiphysin, CV2, Hu, Ri, Ma2, and recoverin. Only one sample was positive (antirecoverin IgG). The present findings suggest that serum onconeural antibody positivity is rare among patients acutely admitted for inpatient psychiatric care. The clinical...

  10. Administrative Costs Associated With Physician Billing and Insurance-Related Activities at an Academic Health Care System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Phillip; Kaplan, Robert S; Richman, Barak D; Shah, Mahek A; Schulman, Kevin A

    2018-02-20

    Administrative costs in the US health care system are an important component of total health care spending, and a substantial proportion of these costs are attributable to billing and insurance-related activities. To examine and estimate the administrative costs associated with physician billing activities in a large academic health care system with a certified electronic health record system. This study used time-driven activity-based costing. Interviews were conducted with 27 health system administrators and 34 physicians in 2016 and 2017 to construct a process map charting the path of an insurance claim through the revenue cycle management process. These data were used to calculate the cost for each major billing and insurance-related activity and were aggregated to estimate the health system's total cost of processing an insurance claim. Estimated time required to perform billing and insurance-related activities, based on interviews with management personnel and physicians. Estimated billing and insurance-related costs for 5 types of patient encounters: primary care visits, discharged emergency department visits, general medicine inpatient stays, ambulatory surgical procedures, and inpatient surgical procedures. Estimated processing time and total costs for billing and insurance-related activities were 13 minutes and $20.49 for a primary care visit, 32 minutes and $61.54 for a discharged emergency department visit, 73 minutes and $124.26 for a general inpatient stay, 75 minutes and $170.40 for an ambulatory surgical procedure, and 100 minutes and $215.10 for an inpatient surgical procedure. Of these totals, time and costs for activities carried out by physicians were estimated at a median of 3 minutes or $6.36 for a primary care visit, 3 minutes or $10.97 for an emergency department visit, 5 minutes or $13.29 for a general inpatient stay, 15 minutes or $51.20 for an ambulatory surgical procedure, and 15 minutes or $51.20 for an inpatient surgical procedure. Of

  11. Oral health status and treatment needs of psychiatric inpatients in Ranchi, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhuvan Jyoti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oral health has an impact on general health, self-esteem and quality of life, but it often has a low priority in the context of mental health and in some phases of illness, the priority may be nonexistent Patients with psychiatric illness have poor oral hygiene than general population. Very few studies have been reported regarding the oral health among Indian psychiatric inpatients. Aim: To assess the oral health status of long-term psychiatric inpatients in a psychiatric institute and to evaluate the treatment requirements of psychiatric inpatients for maintaining the oral hygiene. Materials and methods: Psychiatric inpatients were examined and data was collected using the WHO standardized dental evaluation form in the psychiatric institute. Results: One hundred and forty-one patents (53% female: mean age: 36.56 ± 13.28 years: 47% male: mean age: 37.36 ± 12.49 years: length of illness: More than 5 years, 35.5%: less than 5 years, 84.5% were included in the study. 73% being schizophrenics. Dental canes was found in 55.3% patients. Calculus was present in 94.3% patients. Missing teeth was found in 22.7% patients. Mucosal lesions and oral ulcers were seen in 5.7 and 1 4% of total examined patients respectively. Percentages of patient requiring extractions were 34.8%. oral prophylaxis 98.6%. conservative treatment 31.9% and prosthesis 20.6%. Age was significantly correlated with number of decayed (r = 0.294, p < 0.01 and missing teeth (r = 0.436, p < 0.01. Length of illness was significantly correlated with number of decayed (r = 0.258. p < 0.01 and missing teeth (r = 0.229. p < 0.0 1 Conclusion: Oral health is an important and integral part of health care. Members of multidisciplinary team should be encouraged to assist psychiatric patients in maintaining their oral health with good oral hygiene and access to dental treatment taking into account their special needs.

  12. Theory of Inpatient Circadian Care (TICC): A Proposal for a Middle-Range Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo-Sanchez, Andrés; Niño, Carmen L; Sánchez, Leonardo; Echeverri, Sonia; Gutiérrez, Diana P; Duque, Andrés F; Pianeta, Oscar; Jaramillo-Gómez, Jenny A; Pilonieta, Martin A; Cataño, Nhora; Arboleda, Humberto; Agostino, Patricia V; Alvarez-Baron, Claudia P; Vargas, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    The circadian system controls the daily rhythms of a variety of physiological processes. Most organisms show physiological, metabolic and behavioral rhythms that are coupled to environmental signals. In humans, the main synchronizer is the light/dark cycle, although non-photic cues such as food availability, noise, and work schedules are also involved. In a continuously operating hospital, the lack of rhythmicity in these elements can alter the patient’s biological rhythms and resilience. This paper presents a Theory of Inpatient Circadian Care (TICC) grounded in circadian principles. We conducted a literature search on biological rhythms, chronobiology, nursing care, and middle-range theories in the databases PubMed, SciELO Public Health, and Google Scholar. The search was performed considering a period of 6 decades from 1950 to 2013. Information was analyzed to look for links between chronobiology concepts and characteristics of inpatient care. TICC aims to integrate multidisciplinary knowledge of biomedical sciences and apply it to clinical practice in a formal way. The conceptual points of this theory are supported by abundant literature related to disease and altered biological rhythms. Our theory will be able to enrich current and future professional practice. PMID:25767632

  13. 75 FR 60640 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...; RIN 0938-AP33 Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System Changes and FY 2011 Rates; Provider... Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective...

  14. Patient experience and satisfaction with inpatient service: development of short form survey instrument measuring the core aspect of inpatient experience.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliza L Y Wong

    Full Text Available Patient experience reflects quality of care from the patients' perspective; therefore, patients' experiences are important data in the evaluation of the quality of health services. The development of an abbreviated, reliable and valid instrument for measuring inpatients' experience would reflect the key aspect of inpatient care from patients' perspective as well as facilitate quality improvement by cultivating patient engagement and allow the trends in patient satisfaction and experience to be measured regularly. The study developed a short-form inpatient instrument and tested its ability to capture a core set of inpatients' experiences. The Hong Kong Inpatient Experience Questionnaire (HKIEQ was established in 2010; it is an adaptation of the General Inpatient Questionnaire of the Care Quality Commission created by the Picker Institute in United Kingdom. This study used a consensus conference and a cross-sectional validation survey to create and validate a short-form of the Hong Kong Inpatient Experience Questionnaire (SF-HKIEQ. The short-form, the SF-HKIEQ, consisted of 18 items derived from the HKIEQ. The 18 items mainly covered relational aspects of care under four dimensions of the patient's journey: hospital staff, patient care and treatment, information on leaving the hospital, and overall impression. The SF-HKIEQ had a high degree of face validity, construct validity and internal reliability. The validated SF-HKIEQ reflects the relevant core aspects of inpatients' experience in a hospital setting. It provides a quick reference tool for quality improvement purposes and a platform that allows both healthcare staff and patients to monitor the quality of hospital care over time.

  15. Do health care workforce, population, and service provision significantly contribute to the total health expenditure? An econometric analysis of Serbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santric-Milicevic, M; Vasic, V; Terzic-Supic, Z

    2016-08-15

    In times of austerity, the availability of econometric health knowledge assists policy-makers in understanding and balancing health expenditure with health care plans within fiscal constraints. The objective of this study is to explore whether the health workforce supply of the public health care sector, population number, and utilization of inpatient care significantly contribute to total health expenditure. The dependent variable is the total health expenditure (THE) in Serbia from the years 2003 to 2011. The independent variables are the number of health workers employed in the public health care sector, population number, and inpatient care discharges per 100 population. The statistical analyses include the quadratic interpolation method, natural logarithm and differentiation, and multiple linear regression analyses. The level of significance is set at P Total health expenditure increased by 1.21 standard deviations, with an increase in health workforce growth rate by 1 standard deviation. Furthermore, this rate decreased by 1.12 standard deviations, with an increase in (negative) population growth rate by 1 standard deviation. Finally, the growth rate increased by 0.38 standard deviation, with an increase of the growth rate of inpatient care discharges per 100 population by 1 standard deviation (P < 0.001). Study results demonstrate that the government has been making an effort to control strongly health budget growth. Exploring causality relationships between health expenditure and health workforce is important for countries that are trying to consolidate their public health finances and achieve universal health coverage at the same time.

  16. Mortality among inpatients of a psychiatric hospital: Indian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinde, Shireesh Shatwaji; Nagarajaiah; Narayanaswamy, Janardhanan C; Viswanath, Biju; Kumar, Naveen C; Gangadhar, B N; Math, Suresh Bada

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this study is to assess mortality and its correlates among psychiatric inpatients of a tertiary care neuropsychiatric hospital. Given the background that such a study has never been undertaken in India, the findings would have a large bearing on policy making from a mental health-care perspective. The medical records of those psychiatric inpatients (n = 333) who died during their stay at the National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences in past 26 years (January 1983 to December 2008) constituted the study population. During the 26 years, there were a total of 103,252 psychiatric in-patient admissions, out of which 333 people died during their inpatient stay. Majority (n = 135, 44.6%) of the mortality was seen in the age group of 21-40 years. Most of the subjects were males (n = 202, 67%), married (n = 172, 56.8%) and from urban areas (n = 191, 63%). About, 54% of the subjects had short inpatient stay (history of physical illness. Leading cause of death were cardiovascular system disorders (n = 132, 43.6%), followed by respiratory system disorders (n = 45, 14.9%), nervous system disorders (n = 30, 9.9%) and infections (n = 31, 10.1%). In 21 (7%), cause of death was suicide. Identifying the factors associated with the death of inpatients is of utmost importance in assessing the care in a neuropsychiatric hospital and in formulating better treatment plan and policy in mental health. The discussion focuses on the analysis of different factors associated with inpatient mortality.

  17. Integral resource capacity planning for inpatient care services based on bed census predictions by hour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kortbeek, Nikky; Braaksma, Aleida; Smeenk, Ferry H.F.; Bakker, Piet J.M.; Boucherie, Richardus J.

    2015-01-01

    The design and operations of inpatient care facilities are typically largely historically shaped. A better match with the changing environment is often possible, and even inevitable due to the pressure on hospital budgets. Effectively organizing inpatient care requires simultaneous consideration of

  18. What Contributes Most to High Health Care Costs? Health Care Spending in High Resource Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, Daryl; Petrilla, Allison; Hallinan, Shawn; Taylor, Donald H; Schabert, Vernon F; Dubois, Robert W

    2016-02-01

    U.S. health care spending nearly doubled in the decade from 2000-2010. Although the pace of increase has moderated recently, the rate of growth of health care costs is expected to be higher than the growth in the economy for the near future. Previous studies have estimated that 5% of patients account for half of all health care costs, while the top 1% of spenders account for over 27% of costs. The distribution of health care expenditures by type of service and the prevalence of particular health conditions for these patients is not clear, and is likely to differ from the overall population. To examine health care spending patterns and what contributes to costs for the top 5% of managed health care users based on total expenditures. This retrospective observational study employed a large administrative claims database analysis of health care claims of managed care enrollees across the full age and care spectrum. Direct health care expenditures were compared during calendar year 2011 by place of service (outpatient, inpatient, and pharmacy), payer type (commercially insured, Medicare Advantage, and Medicaid managed care), and therapy area between the full population and high resource patients (HRP). The mean total expenditure per HRP during calendar year 2011 was $43,104 versus $3,955 per patient for the full population. Treatment of back disorders and osteoarthritis contributed the largest share of expenditures in both HRP and the full study population, while chronic renal failure, heart disease, and some oncology treatments accounted for disproportionately higher expenditures in HRP. The share of overall expenditures attributed to inpatient services was significantly higher for HRP (40.0%) compared with the full population (24.6%), while the share of expenditures attributed to pharmacy (HRP = 18.1%, full = 21.4%) and outpatient services (HRP = 41.9%, full = 54.1%) was reduced. This pattern was observed across payer type. While the use of physician

  19. Evaluation of cognitive and social functioning in patients requiring long-term inpatient psychiatric care using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health: a large-scale, multi-institutional observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Hideaki; Taguchi, Masamoto; Sukigara, Masune; Sakuragi, Shoji; Sugiyama, Naoya; Chiba, Hisomu; Kawasaki, Tatsuhito

    2017-06-15

    We comprehensively evaluated cognitive and social functioning in patients requiring long-term inpatient psychiatric care using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health. We surveyed 1967 patients receiving long-term inpatient psychiatric care. Patients were further categorized into an old long-stay group (n = 892, >5 years in hospitals) and a new long-stay group (n = 1075, 1-5 years in hospitals). We obtained responses for all the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health items in domain b (Body Functions) and domain d (Activities and Participation). We estimated weighted means for each item using the propensity score to adjust for confounding factors. Responses were received from 307 hospitals (response rate of hospitals: 25.5%). Cognitive and social functioning in the old long-stay group was more severely impaired than in the new long-stay group. No statistically significant differences were observed regarding the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health items associated with basic activities of daily living between the two groups. Combined therapy consisting of cognitive remediation and rehabilitation on social functioning for this patient population should be started from the early stage of hospitalization. Non-restrictive, independent environments may also be optimal for this patient population. Implications for rehabilitation Rehabilitation of cognitive and social functioning for patients requiring long-term inpatient psychiatric care should be started in the early stages of hospitalization. In psychiatric fields, the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health checklist could facilitate individualized rehabilitation planning by allowing healthcare professionals to visually assess the comprehensive functioning of each patient using graphics such as radar charts.

  20. Psychological therapy for inpatients receiving acute mental health care: A systematic review and meta-analysis of controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Charlotte; Karatzias, Thanos; Dickson, Adele; Harper, Sean; Dougall, Nadine; Hutton, Paul

    2018-04-16

    The effectiveness of psychological therapies for those receiving acute adult mental health inpatient care remains unclear, partly because of the difficulty in conducting randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in this setting. The aim of this meta-analysis was to synthesize evidence from all controlled trials of psychological therapy carried out with this group, to estimate its effects on a number of important outcomes and examine whether the presence of randomization and rater blinding moderated these estimates. A systematic review and meta-analysis of all controlled trials of psychological therapy delivered in acute inpatient settings was conducted, with a focus on psychotic symptoms, readmissions or emotional distress (anxiety and depression). Studies were identified through ASSIA, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane, MEDLINE, and PsycINFO using a combination of the key terms 'inpatient', 'psychological therapy', and 'acute'. No restriction was placed on diagnosis. The moderating effect of the use of assessor-blind RCT methodology was examined via subgroup and sensitivity analyses. Overall, psychological therapy was associated with small-to-moderate improvements in psychotic symptoms at end of therapy but the effect was smaller and not significant at follow-up. Psychological therapy was also associated with reduced readmissions, depression, and anxiety. The use of single-blind randomized controlled trial methodology was associated with significantly reduced benefits on psychotic symptoms and was also associated with reduced benefits on readmission and depression; however, these reductions were not statistically significant. The provision of psychological therapy to acute psychiatric inpatients is associated with improvements; however, the use of single-blind RCT methodology was associated with reduced therapy-attributable improvements. Whether this is a consequence of increased internal validity or reduced external validity is unclear. Trials with both high internal and

  1. Criteria of medical care evaluation in daily in-patient department in pediatrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grozdova T.U.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The research goal is to work out criteria for the evaluation of medical care quality. Materials included 386 medical cards of daily in-patients, 216 medical cards of in-patients; 602 cards of analysis of case histories; 4 computer data bases. Methods of mathematical statistics were successfully used in the study. The comparative method of data analysis was applied to the research work. Intensity of medical care in values from 0,1 to 0,5 conditional units corresponded to requirements of criterion of estimation of medical care quality. Parameters of medicinal treatment were close to the standards of treatment in interval from 44,4 to 100%, as criterion of quality of medical care. Specific weight of apparatus and instrumental researches constituted an interval from 7, 4% to 22, 6%, forming corresponding criterion. Interval of effectiveness according to standards of consultations is from 0, 26 to 1, 04 conditional units. In conclusion the article stated that the characteristics for criteria to evaluate medical care in daily in-patient departments were worked out on the basis of indices obtained during the research work

  2. Can rural health insurance improve equity in health care utilization? a comparison between China and Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Xiaoyun

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Health care financing reforms in both China and Vietnam have resulted in greater financial difficulties in accessing health care, especially for the rural poor. Both countries have been developing rural health insurance for decades. This study aims to evaluate and compare equity in access to health care in rural health insurance system in the two countries. Methods Household survey and qualitative study were conducted in 6 counties in China and 4 districts in Vietnam. Health insurance policy and its impact on utilization of outpatient and inpatient service were analyzed and compared to measure equity in access to health care. Results In China, Health insurance membership had no significant impact on outpatient service utilization, while was associated with higher utilization of inpatient services, especially for the higher income group. Health insurance members in Vietnam had higher utilization rates of both outpatient and inpatient services than the non-members, with higher use among the lower than higher income groups. Qualitative results show that bureaucratic obstacles, low reimbursement rates, and poor service quality were the main barriers for members to use health insurance. Conclusions China has achieved high population coverage rate over a short time period, starting with a limited benefit package. However, poor people have less benefit from NCMS in terms of health service utilization. Compared to China, Vietnam health insurance system is doing better in equity in health service utilization within the health insurance members. However with low population coverage, a large proportion of population cannot enjoy the health insurance benefit. Mutual learning would help China and Vietnam address these challenges, and improve their policy design to promote equitable and sustainable health insurance.

  3. Can rural health insurance improve equity in health care utilization? a comparison between China and Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Health care financing reforms in both China and Vietnam have resulted in greater financial difficulties in accessing health care, especially for the rural poor. Both countries have been developing rural health insurance for decades. This study aims to evaluate and compare equity in access to health care in rural health insurance system in the two countries. Methods Household survey and qualitative study were conducted in 6 counties in China and 4 districts in Vietnam. Health insurance policy and its impact on utilization of outpatient and inpatient service were analyzed and compared to measure equity in access to health care. Results In China, Health insurance membership had no significant impact on outpatient service utilization, while was associated with higher utilization of inpatient services, especially for the higher income group. Health insurance members in Vietnam had higher utilization rates of both outpatient and inpatient services than the non-members, with higher use among the lower than higher income groups. Qualitative results show that bureaucratic obstacles, low reimbursement rates, and poor service quality were the main barriers for members to use health insurance. Conclusions China has achieved high population coverage rate over a short time period, starting with a limited benefit package. However, poor people have less benefit from NCMS in terms of health service utilization. Compared to China, Vietnam health insurance system is doing better in equity in health service utilization within the health insurance members. However with low population coverage, a large proportion of population cannot enjoy the health insurance benefit. Mutual learning would help China and Vietnam address these challenges, and improve their policy design to promote equitable and sustainable health insurance. PMID:22376290

  4. Constructing Episodes of Inpatient Care: How to Define Hospital Transfer in Hospital Administrative Health Data?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Mingkai; Li, Bing; Southern, Danielle A; Eastwood, Cathy A; Quan, Hude

    2017-01-01

    Hospital administrative health data create separate records for each hospital stay of patients. Treating a hospital transfer as a readmission could lead to biased results in health service research. This is a cross-sectional study. We used the hospital discharge abstract database in 2013 from Alberta, Canada. Transfer cases were defined by transfer institution code and were used as the reference standard. Four time gaps between 2 hospitalizations (6, 9, 12, and 24 h) and 2 day gaps between hospitalizations [same day (up to 24 h), ≤1 d (up to 48 h)] were used to identify transfer cases. We compared the sensitivity and positive predictive value (PPV) of 6 definitions across different categories of sex, age, and location of residence. Readmission rates within 30 days were compared after episodes of care were defined at the different time gaps. Among the 6 definitions, sensitivity ranged from 93.3% to 98.7% and PPV ranged from 86.4% to 96%. The time gap of 9 hours had the optimal balance of sensitivity and PPV. The time gaps of same day (up to 24 h) and 9 hours had comparable 30-day readmission rates as the transfer indicator after defining episode of care. We recommend the use of a time gap of 9 hours between 2 hospitalizations to define hospital transfer in inpatient databases. When admission or discharge time is not available in the database, a time gap of same day (up to 24 h) can be used to define hospital transfer.

  5. Psychiatric inpatient expenditures and public health insurance programmes: analysis of a national database covering the entire South Korean population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung Woojin

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medical spending on psychiatric hospitalization has been reported to impose a tremendous socio-economic burden on many developed countries with public health insurance programmes. However, there has been no in-depth study of the factors affecting psychiatric inpatient medical expenditures and differentiated these factors across different types of public health insurance programmes. In view of this, this study attempted to explore factors affecting medical expenditures for psychiatric inpatients between two public health insurance programmes covering the entire South Korean population: National Health Insurance (NHI and National Medical Care Aid (AID. Methods This retrospective, cross-sectional study used a nationwide, population-based reimbursement claims dataset consisting of 1,131,346 claims of all 160,465 citizens institutionalized due to psychiatric diagnosis between January 2005 and June 2006 in South Korea. To adjust for possible correlation of patients characteristics within the same medical institution and a non-linearity structure, a Box-Cox transformed, multilevel regression analysis was performed. Results Compared with inpatients 19 years old or younger, the medical expenditures of inpatients between 50 and 64 years old were 10% higher among NHI beneficiaries but 40% higher among AID beneficiaries. Males showed higher medical expenditures than did females. Expenditures on inpatients with schizophrenia as compared to expenditures on those with neurotic disorders were 120% higher among NHI beneficiaries but 83% higher among AID beneficiaries. Expenditures on inpatients of psychiatric hospitals were greater on average than expenditures on inpatients of general hospitals. Among AID beneficiaries, institutions owned by private groups treated inpatients with 32% higher costs than did government institutions. Among NHI beneficiaries, inpatients medical expenditures were positively associated with the proportion of

  6. Teledermatology as a means to improve access to inpatient dermatology care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Priyank; Kovarik, Carrie L; Lipoff, Jules B

    2016-07-01

    Many hospitals have limited inpatient dermatology consultation access. Most dermatologists are outpatient-based and may find the distance and time to complete inpatient consultations prohibitive. Teledermatology may improve access to inpatient dermatology care by reducing barriers of distance and time. We conducted a prospective two-phase pilot study at two academic hospitals comparing time needed to complete inpatient consultations after resident dermatologists initially evaluated patients, called average handling time (AHT), and time needed to respond to the primary team, called time to response (TTR), with and without teledermatology with surveys to capture changes in dermatologist opinion on teledermatology. Teledermatology was only used in the study phase, and patients were seen in-person in both study phases. Teledermatology alone sufficiently answered consultations in 10 of 25 study consultations. The mean AHT in the study phase (sAHT) was 26.9 min compared to the baseline phase (bAHT) of 43.5 min, a 16.6 min reduction (p = 0.004). The 10 study cases where teledermatology alone was sufficient had mean study TTR (sTTR) of 273.3 min compared to a baseline TTR (bTTR) of 405.7 min, a 132.4 min reduction (p = 0.032). Teledermatology reduces the time required for an attending dermatologist to respond and the time required for a primary team to receive a response for an inpatient dermatology consultation in a subset of cases. These findings suggest teledermatology can be used as a tool to improve access to inpatient dermatology care. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Ranking of healthcare programmes based on health outcome, health costs and safe delivery of care in hospital pharmacy practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisseau, Lionel; Bussières, Jean-François; Bois, Denis; Vallée, Marc; Racine, Marie-Claude; Bonnici, André

    2013-02-01

    To establish a consensual and coherent ranking of healthcare programmes that involve the presence of ward-based and clinic-based clinical pharmacists, based on health outcome, health costs and safe delivery of care. This descriptive study was derived from a structured dialogue (Delphi technique) among directors of pharmacy department. We established a quantitative profile of healthcare programmes at five sites that involved the provision of ward-based and clinic-based pharmaceutical care. A summary table of evidence established a unique quality rating per inpatient (clinic-based) or outpatient (ward-based) healthcare programme. Each director rated the perceived impact of pharmaceutical care per inpatient or outpatient healthcare programme on three fields: health outcome, health costs and safe delivery of care. They agreed by consensus on the final ranking of healthcare programmes. A ranking was assigned for each of the 18 healthcare programmes for outpatient care and the 17 healthcare programmes for inpatient care involving the presence of pharmacists, based on health outcome, health costs and safe delivery of care. There was a good correlation between ranking based on data from a 2007-2008 Canadian report on hospital pharmacy practice and the ranking proposed by directors of pharmacy department. Given the often limited human and financial resources, managers should consider the best evidence available on a profession's impact to plan healthcare services within an organization. Data are few on ranking healthcare programmes in order to prioritize which healthcare programme would mostly benefit from the delivery of pharmaceutical care by ward-based and clinic-based pharmacists. © 2012 The Authors. IJPP © 2012 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  8. Endocrine surgery as a model for value-based health care delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulla, Amer G; Ituarte, Philip H G; Wiggins, Randi; Teisberg, Elizabeth O; Harari, Avital; Yeh, Michael W

    2012-01-01

    Experts advocate restructuring health care in the United States into a value-based system that maximizes positive health outcomes achieved per dollar spent. We describe how a value-based system implemented by the University of California, Los Angeles UCLA Section of Endocrine Surgery (SES) has optimized both quality and costs while increasing patient volume. Two SES clinical pathways were studied, one allocating patients to the most appropriate surgical care setting based on clinical complexity, and another standardizing initial management of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). The mean cost per endocrine case performed from 2005 to 2010 was determined at each of three care settings: A tertiary care inpatient facility, a community inpatient facility, and an ambulatory facility. Blood tumor marker levels (thyroglobulin, Tg) and reoperation rates were compared between PTC patients who underwent routine central neck dissection (CND) and those who did not. Surgical patient volume and regional market share were analyzed over time. The cost of care was substantially lower in both the community inpatient facility (14% cost savings) and the ambulatory facility (58% cost savings) in comparison with the tertiary care inpatient facility. Patients who underwent CND had lower Tg levels (6.6 vs 15.0 ng/mL; P = 0.024) and a reduced need for re-operation (1.5 vs 6.1%; P = 0.004) compared with those who did not undergo CND. UCLA maintained its position as the market leader in endocrine procedures while expanding its market share by 151% from 4.9% in 2003 to 7.4% in 2010. A value-driven health care delivery system can deliver improved clinical outcomes while reducing costs within a subspecialty surgical service. Broader application of these principles may contribute to resolving current dilemmas in the provision of care nationally.

  9. So, you want to design an acute mental health inpatient unit: physical issues for consideration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arya, Dinesh

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to explore important considerations when planning an acute mental health inpatient unit. Planning a mental health acute inpatient facility should be about more than just building a beautiful, fabulous facility. A novel architectural design, fancy gadgets, safe tapware, new lounge suites, good light and air circulation are all incredibly important and good architects and designers can inform us about new developments in architecture and design that we must incorporate in our design plans. However, to design a facility that is right for tomorrow, it is also important to spend time trying to understand what happens in the facility and how the new facility is going to make things different and better. Planning of a health facility should be about creating an environment that is not only pleasant, comfortable and safe but also one that would enable and facilitate better care. It is important to map processes before rather than after building a facility, so that this process mapping can inform design and we do not keep falling into the trap of building a beautiful new facility but losing the opportunity to make care better.

  10. How are allied health notes used for inpatient care and clinical decision-making? A qualitative exploration of the views of doctors, nurses and allied health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pain, Tilley; Kingston, Gail; Askern, Janet; Smith, Rebecca; Phillips, Sandra; Bell, Leanne

    2017-01-01

    Inpatient care is dependent upon the effective transfer of clinical information across multiple professions. However, documented patient clinical information generated by different professions is not always successfully transferred between them. One obstacle to successful information transfer may be the reader's perception of the information, which is framed in a particular professional context, rather than the information per se. The aim of this research was to investigate how different health professionals perceive allied health documentation and to investigate how clinicians of all experience levels across medicine, nursing and allied health perceive and use allied health notes to inform their decision-making and treatment of patients. The study used a qualitative approach. A total of 53 speech pathologists, nurses, doctors, occupational therapists, dieticians and social workers (8 males; 43 females) from an Australian regional tertiary hospital participated in eleven single discipline focus groups, conducted over 4 months in 2012. Discussions were recorded and transcribed verbatim and coded into themes by content analysis. Six themes contributing to the efficacy of clinical information transference emerged from the data: day-to-day care, patient function, discharge and discharge planning, impact of busy workloads, format and structure of allied health documentation and a holistic approach to patient care. Other professions read and used allied health notes albeit with differences in focus and need. Readers searched for specific pieces of information to answer their own questions and professional needs, in a process akin to purposive sampling. Staff used allied health notes to explore specific aspects of patient function but did not obtain a holistic picture. Improving both the relationship between the various health professions and interpretation of other professions' documented clinical information may reduce the frequency of communication errors, thereby

  11. Comparative costs of inpatient care for HIV-infected and uninfected children and adults in Soweto, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Leena S; Manning, Arthur; Holmes, Charles B; Naidoo, Shan; van der Linde, Frans; Gray, Glenda E; Martinson, Neil A

    2007-12-01

    HIV/AIDS creates a massive burden of care for health systems. A better understanding of the impact of HIV infection on health care utilization and costs may enable better use of limited resources. We compared public sector inpatient costs of HIV-infected versus uninfected adults and children at a large hospital in Soweto, South Africa. Daily hotel costs estimated from hospital financial data and total patient visits were combined with utilization, abstracted from patients' charts, and costed using government price lists to estimate total inpatient costs. A total of 1185 eligible records were included over a 6-week period in 2005. Eight hundred twelve were from HIV-infected patients, and of these, 77 were on antiretroviral (ARV) therapy. The mean length of stay (LOS) and mean drug and intravenous fluid utilization of HIV-infected adults not on ARVs was greater than those of uninfected adults, resulting in a $200 higher total average admission cost. Patients on ARVs had longer LOS and incurred a total average admission cost of $750 more than HIV-infected adults not on ARVs. Inpatient costs were greater for this selected group of HIV-infected adults, and even higher for the small proportion of individuals receiving ARVs. Budget allocations should incorporate case mix by HIV and ARV status as a key determinant of hospital expenditure.

  12. Health Services Utilization in Older Adults with Dementia Receiving Care Coordination: The MIND at Home Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amjad, Halima; Wong, Stephanie K; Roth, David L; Huang, Jin; Willink, Amber; Black, Betty S; Johnston, Deirdre; Rabins, Peter V; Gitlin, Laura N; Lyketsos, Constantine G; Samus, Quincy M

    2018-02-01

    To investigate effects of a novel dementia care coordination program on health services utilization. A total of 303 community-dwelling adults aged ≥70 with a cognitive disorder in Baltimore, Maryland (2008-2011). Single-blind RCT evaluating efficacy of an 18-month care coordination intervention delivered through community-based nonclinical care coordinators, supported by an interdisciplinary clinical team. Study partners reported acute care/inpatient, outpatient, and home- and community-based service utilization at baseline, 9, and 18 months. From baseline to 18 months, there were no significant group differences in acute care/inpatient or total outpatient services use, although intervention participants had significantly increased outpatient dementia/mental health visits from 9 to 18 months (p = .04) relative to controls. Home and community-based support service use significantly increased from baseline to 18 months in the intervention compared to control (p = .005). While this dementia care coordination program did not impact acute care/inpatient services utilization, it increased use of dementia-related outpatient medical care and nonmedical supportive community services, a combination that may have helped participants remain at home longer. Future care model modifications that emphasize delirium, falls prevention, and behavior management may be needed to influence inpatient service use. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  13. Inpatient Portals for Hospitalized Patients and Caregivers: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Michelle M; Coller, Ryan J; Hoonakker, Peter Lt

    2018-06-01

    Patient portals, web-based personal health records linked to electronic health records (EHRs), provide patients access to their healthcare information and facilitate communication with providers. Growing evidence supports portal use in ambulatory settings; however, only recently have portals been used with hospitalized patients. Our objective was to review the literature evaluating the design, use, and impact of inpatient portals, which are patient portals designed to give hospitalized patients and caregivers inpatient EHR clinical information for the purpose of engaging them in hospital care. Literature was reviewed from 2006 to 2017 in PubMed, Web of Science, CINALPlus, Cochrane, and Scopus to identify English language studies evaluating patient portals, engagement, and inpatient care. Data were analyzed considering the following 3 themes: inpatient portal design, use and usability, and impact. Of 731 studies, 17 were included, 9 of which were published after 2015. Most studies were qualitative with small samples focusing on inpatient portal design; 1 nonrandomized trial was identified. Studies described hospitalized patients' and caregivers' information needs and design recommendations. Most patient and caregiver participants in included studies were interested in using an inpatient portal, used it when offered, and found it easy to use and/or useful. Evidence supporting the role of inpatient portals in improving patient and caregiver engagement, knowledge, communication, and care quality and safety is limited. Included studies indicated providers had concerns about using inpatient portals; however, the extent to which these concerns have been realized remains unclear. Inpatient portal research is emerging. Further investigation is needed to optimally design inpatient portals to maximize potential benefits for hospitalized patients and caregivers while minimizing unintended consequences for healthcare teams. © 2017 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  14. Transboundary smoke haze pollution in Malaysia: Inpatient health impacts and economic valuation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Othman, Jamal; Sahani, Mazrura; Mahmud, Mastura; Sheikh Ahmad, Md Khadzir

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed the economic value of health impacts of transboundary smoke haze pollution in Kuala Lumpur and adjacent areas in the state of Selangor, Malaysia. Daily inpatient data from 2005, 2006, 2008, and 2009 for 14 haze-related illnesses were collected from four hospitals. On average, there were 19 hazy days each year during which the air pollution levels were within the Lower Moderate to Hazardous categories. No seasonal variation in inpatient cases was observed. A smoke haze occurrence was associated with an increase in inpatient cases by 2.4 per 10,000 populations each year, representing an increase of 31 percent from normal days. The average annual economic loss due to the inpatient health impact of haze was valued at MYR273,000 ($91,000 USD). - Highlights: • Transboundary smoke haze is an annual phenomenon in Malaysia. • No evidence of seasonal factors in smoke haze related inpatient cases. • Inpatient rates during a haze event increased by 31% relative to normal days. • Annual economic loss due to inpatient health impact of haze valued at $91,000. • Present value of economic loss estimated at $1.1 million to $1.7 million. - Inpatient rates soared by 31% while economic loss valued at USD91,000 annually

  15. 77 FR 63751 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-17

    ... [CMS-1588-F2] RIN 0938-AR12 Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Fiscal Year 2013 Rates..., 2012 Federal Register entitled ``Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for...

  16. Information technology-based standardized patient education in psychiatric inpatient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anttila, Minna; Koivunen, Marita; Välimäki, Maritta

    2008-10-01

    This paper is a report of a study to describe nurses' experiences of information technology-based standardized patient education in inpatient psychiatric care. Serious mental health problems are an increasing global concern. Emerging evidence supports the implementation of practices that are conducive to patient self-management and improved patient outcomes among chronically ill patients with mental health problems. In contrast, the attitude of staff towards information technology has been reported to be contradictory in mental health care. After 1 year of using an Internet-based portal (Mieli.Net) developed for patients with schizophrenia spectrum psychosis, all 89 participating nurses were asked to complete questionnaires about their experiences. The data were collected in 2006. Fifty-six participants (63%) returned completed questionnaires and the data were analysed using content analysis. Nurses' experiences of the information technology-based standardized patient education were categorized into two major categories describing the advantages and obstacles in using information technology. Nurses thought that it brought the patients and nurses closer to each other and helped nurses to provide individual support for their patients. However, the education was time-consuming. Systematic patient education using information technology is a promising method of patient-centred care which supports nurses in their daily work. However, it must fit in with clinical activities, and nurses need some guidance in understanding its benefits. The study data can be used in policy-making when developing methods to improve the transparency of information provision in psychiatric nursing.

  17. Vitamin D and health care costs: Results from two independent population-based cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannemann, A; Wallaschofski, H; Nauck, M; Marschall, P; Flessa, S; Grabe, H J; Schmidt, C O; Baumeister, S E

    2017-10-31

    Vitamin D deficiency is associated with higher morbidity. However, there is few data regarding the effect of vitamin D deficiency on health care costs. This study examined the cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between the serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D concentration (25OHD) and direct health care costs and hospitalization in two independent samples of the general population in North-Eastern Germany. We studied 7217 healthy individuals from the 'Study of Health in Pomerania' (SHIP n = 3203) and the 'Study of Health in Pomerania-Trend' (SHIP-Trend n = 4014) who had valid 25OHD measurements and provided data on annual total costs, outpatient costs, hospital stays, and inpatient costs. The associations between 25OHD concentrations (modelled continuously using factional polynomials) and health care costs were examined using a generalized linear model with gamma distribution and a log link. Poisson regression models were used to estimate relative risks of hospitalization. In cross-sectional analysis of SHIP-Trend, non-linear associations between the 25OHD concentration and inpatient costs and hospitalization were detected: participants with 25OHD concentrations of 5, 10 and 15 ng/ml had 226.1%, 51.5% and 14.1%, respectively, higher inpatient costs than those with 25OHD concentrations of 20 ng/ml (overall p-value = 0.001) in multivariable models. We found a relation between lower 25OHD concentrations and increased inpatient health care costs and hospitalization. Our results thus indicate an influence of vitamin D deficiency on health care costs in the general population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  18. Comparative Analysis of Health Care Needs among Children with Special Health Care Needs in Ohio's Metropolitan and Appalachian Counties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earley, Elizabeth; Asti, Lindsey; Chisolm, Deena

    2015-08-01

    The study assessed whether children with special health care needs (CSHCN) living in Appalachian Ohio have differential health care utilization, unmet needs, and health outcomes compared with CSHCN in Ohio's metropolitan counties using a statewide Ohio survey. Based on this survey, an estimated 28% of children in Appalachian Ohio counties have special health care needs compared with 25% of children in metropolitan counties. In Appalachia, CSHCN are poorer and more likely to have Medicaid than their metropolitan counterparts, but had no reported significant differences in health outcomes or unmet needs. Data suggested a trend toward higher use of emergency department care and inpatient services and lower use of well-child visits but these differences did not reach significance. We conclude that CSHCN in Appalachian and metropolitan areas face similar levels of health status and unmet needs but results suggest a need for additional research on access to primary care services.

  19. Frequency and Reasons for Return to Acute Care in Leukemia Patients Undergoing Inpatient Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jack Brian; Lee, Jay; Smith, Dennis W.; Bruera, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess the frequency and reasons for return to the primary acute care service among leukemia patients undergoing inpatient rehabilitation. Design Retrospective study of all patients with leukemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, aplastic anemia, or myelofibrosis admitted to inpatient rehabilitation at a tertiary referral-based cancer center between January 1, 2005, and April 10, 2012. Items analyzed from patient records included return to the primary acute care service with demographic information, leukemia characteristics, medications, hospital admission characteristics, and laboratory values. Results 225 patients were admitted a total of 255 times. 93/255 (37%) of leukemia inpatient rehabilitation admissions returned to the primary acute care service. 18/93 (19%) and 42/93 (45%) of these patients died in the hospital and were discharged home respectively. Statistically significant factors (p<.05) associated with return to the primary acute care service include peripheral blast percentage and the presence of an antifungal agent on the day of inpatient rehabilitation transfer. Using an additional two factors (platelet count and the presence of an antiviral agent both with a p<.11), a Return To Primary (RTP) - Leukemia index was formulated. Conclusions Leukemia patients with the presence of circulating peripheral blasts and/or antifungal agent may be at increased risk of return to the primary acute care service. The RTP-Leukemia index should be tested in prospective studies to determine its usefulness. PMID:23117267

  20. Impact of comprehensive insurance parity on follow-up care after psychiatric inpatient treatment in Oregon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Neal T; McConnell, K John

    2013-10-01

    This study assessed the impact of Oregon's 2007 parity law, which required behavioral health insurance parity, on rates of follow-up care provided within 30 days of psychiatric inpatient care. Data sources were claims (2005-2008) for 737 individuals with inpatient stays for a mental disorder who were continuously enrolled in insurance plans affected by the parity law (intervention group) or in commercial, self-insured plans that were not affected by the law (control group). A difference-in-difference analysis was used to compare rates of follow-up care before and after the parity law between discharges of individuals in the intervention group and the control group and between discharges of individuals in the intervention group who had or had not met preparity quantitative coverage limits during a coverage year. Estimates of the marginal effects of the parity law were adjusted for gender, discharge diagnosis, relationship to policy holder, and calendar quarter of discharge. The study included 353 discharges in the intervention group and 535 discharges in the control group. After the parity law, follow-up rates increased by 11% (p=.042) overall and by 20% for discharges of individuals who had met coverage limits (p=.028). The Oregon parity law was associated with a large increase in the rate of follow-up care, predominantly for discharges of individuals who had met preparity quantitative coverage limits. Given similarities between the law and the 2008 Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act, the results may portend a national effect of more comprehensive parity laws.

  1. Does public health system provide adequate financial risk protection to its clients? Out of pocket expenditure on inpatient care at secondary level public health institutions: Causes and determinants in an eastern Indian state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rout, Sarit Kumar; Choudhury, Sarmistha

    2018-02-09

    This study is undertaken to estimate the out of pocket expenditure (OOPE) for various diseases and its determinants at secondary level public health facilities in Odisha. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among the inpatients utilising secondary level public health facilities in the 2 districts of Odisha. More than 80% of the inpatients were selected conveniently, and data on OOPE and socioeconomic status of patients were collected. The OOPE was estimated separately on surgery, nonsurgery, and child birth conditions. Ordinary least square regression models were developed to explain the factors determining OOPE. The mean OOPE for the secondary care facility was Indian National Rupee 3136.14, (95% CI: 2869.08-3403.19), of which, Indian National Rupee 1622.79 (95% CI: 1462.70-1782.89) was on medicine constituting 79% of total medical expenditure. The mean OOPE on surgery was highest followed by nonsurgery and child birth conditions. The OOPE is mainly influenced by caste and educational status of patients as revealed by the regression results. With increase in social status, the OOPE increases and the results are statistically significant. This evidence should be used to design financial strategies to reduce OOPE at secondary care public health facilities, which is largely due to medicine, diagnostic services, and transport expenditure. Efforts should be made to protect the interest of the poor, who utilise public health facility in a low resource setting in India. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Universal health coverage in emerging economies: findings on health care utilization by older adults in China, Ghana, India, Mexico, the Russian Federation, and South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltzer, Karl; Williams, Jennifer Stewart; Kowal, Paul; Negin, Joel; Snodgrass, James Josh; Yawson, Alfred; Minicuci, Nadia; Thiele, Liz; Phaswana-Mafuya, Nancy; Biritwum, Richard Berko; Naidoo, Nirmala; Chatterji, Somnath

    2014-01-01

    The achievement of universal health coverage (UHC) in emerging economies is a high priority within the global community. This timely study uses standardized national population data collected from adults aged 50 and older in China, Ghana, India, Mexico, the Russian Federation, and South Africa. The objective is to describe health care utilization and measure association between inpatient and outpatient service use and patient characteristics in these six low- and middle-income countries. Secondary analysis of data from the World Health Organization's Study on global AGEing and adult health Wave 1 was undertaken. Country samples are compared by socio-demographic characteristics, type of health care, and reasons for use. Logistic regressions describe association between socio-demographic and health factors and inpatient and outpatient service use. In the pooled multi-country sample of over 26,000 adults aged 50-plus, who reported getting health care the last time it was needed, almost 80% of men and women received inpatient or outpatient care, or both. Roughly 30% of men and women in the Russian Federation used inpatient services in the previous 3 years and 90% of men and women in India used outpatient services in the past year. In China, public hospitals were the most frequently used service type for 52% of men and 51% of women. Multivariable regression showed that, compared with men, women were less likely to use inpatient services and more likely to use outpatient services. Respondents with two or more chronic conditions were almost three times as likely to use inpatient services and twice as likely to use outpatient services compared with respondents with no reported chronic conditions. This study provides a basis for further investigation of country-specific responses to UHC.

  3. A work-based learning approach for clinical support workers on mental health inpatient wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Philip; Gilding, Moorene; Seewooruttun, Khooseal; Walsh, Hannah

    2016-09-14

    Background With a rise in the number of unqualified staff providing health and social care, and reports raising concerns about the quality of care provided, there is a need to address the learning needs of clinical support workers. This article describes a qualitative evaluation of a service improvement project that involved a work-based learning approach for clinical support workers on mental health inpatient wards. Aim To investigate and identify insights in relation to the content and process of learning using a work-based learning approach for clinical support workers. Method This was a qualitative evaluation of a service improvement project involving 25 clinical support workers at the seven mental health inpatient units in South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust. Three clinical skills tutors were appointed to develop, implement and evaluate the work-based learning approach. Four sources of data were used to evaluate this approach, including reflective journals, qualitative responses to questionnaires, three focus groups involving the clinical support workers and a group interview involving the clinical skills tutors. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. Findings The work-based learning approach was highly valued by the clinical support workers and enhanced learning in practice. Face-to-face learning in practice helped the clinical support workers to develop practice skills and reflective learning skills. Insights relating to the role of clinical support workers were also identified, including the benefits of face-to-face supervision in practice, particularly in relation to the interpersonal aspects of care. Conclusion A work-based learning approach has the potential to enhance care delivery by meeting the learning needs of clinical support workers and enabling them to apply learning to practice. Care providers should consider how the work-based learning approach can be used on a systematic, organisation-wide basis in the context of budgetary

  4. Progressing recovery-oriented care in psychiatric inpatient units: Occupational therapy’s role in supporting a stronger peer workforce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Lloyd

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose - Initiated by the service user movement, recovery-oriented practices are one of the keystones of modern mental health care. Over the past two decades, substantial gains have been made with introducing recovery-oriented practice in many areas of mental health practice, but there remain areas where progress is delayed, notably, the psychiatric inpatient environment. The peer support workforce can play a pivotal role in progressing recovery-oriented practices. The purpose of this paper is to provide a pragmatic consideration of how occupational therapists can influence mental health systems to work proactively with a peer workforce. Design/methodology/approach - The authors reviewed current literature and considered practical approaches to building a peer workforce in collaboration with occupational therapists. Findings - It is suggested that the peer support workforce should be consciously enhanced in the inpatient setting to support culture change as a matter of priority. Occupational therapists working on inpatient units should play a key role in promoting and supporting the growth in the peer support workforce. Doing so will enrich the Occupational Therapy profession as well as improving service user outcomes. Originality/value - This paper seeks to provide a pragmatic consideration of how occupational therapists can influence mental health systems to work proactively with a peer workforce.

  5. Inpatient Nursing and Parental Comfort in Managing Pediatric Tracheostomy Care and Emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchett, Cedric V; Foster Rietz, Melissa; Ray, Amrita; Brenner, Michael J; Brown, David

    2016-02-01

    Tracheostomy is a critical and often life-saving intervention, but associated risks are not negligible. The vulnerability of the pediatric population underlies the importance of caregiver comfort and competence in tracheostomy care. To assess inpatient nursing staff and parental perspectives in managing tracheostomy care. Cross-sectional analysis of survey data from (1) a volunteer sample of inpatient nurses in a tertiary care, freestanding pediatric hospital in the Midwest, assigned to clinical wards that provide care for children with tracheostomy tubes and (2) a consecutive sample of families whose child underwent tracheostomy tube placement at the same institution between March 1 and December 31, 2013. Nurse and parental comfort in managing acute and established tracheostomy tubes. Nursing data were analyzed with attention to years' experience and primary unit of practice. Respondents included 129 of 820 nurses (16% response rate) and family members of 19 of 38 children (50% response rate). When queried about changing established tracheostomies, 59 of 128 nurses (46%) reported being "totally comfortable," including 46 of 82 intensive care unit (ICU) nurses (56%) vs 13 of 46 floor nurses (28%) (P = .002) and 48 of 80 nurses with at least 5 years' experience (60%) vs 12 of 49 less experienced nurses (24%) (P tracheostomy, 61 nurses (47%) described being completely uncomfortable, including 27 of 83 ICU nurses (33%) vs 34 of 46 floor nurses (73%) (P = .006), and 33 of 80 nurses with at least 5 years' experience (41% ) vs 28 of 49 less experienced nurses (57%) (P = .03). Most families felt prepared for discharge (16 of 17 [94%]) and found the health care team accessible (16 of 17 [94%]), although only 5 of 18 families (28%) indicated that tracheostomy teaching was consistent. Nurses' comfort with tracheostomy was higher among nurses with at least 5 years' experience and primary ICU location. Whereas parental comfort with tracheostomy care was high

  6. Perceived importance of caring behaviors to Swedish psychiatric inpatients and staff, with comparisons to somatically-ill samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Essen, L; Sjödén, P O

    1993-08-01

    The present study identified psychiatric inpatient (N = 61) and staff (N = 63) perceptions of most and least important nurse caring behaviors using a modified Swedish version of the CARE-Q instrument (Larson, 1981) and compared the results with data from somatic care (von Essen & Sjödén, 1991a, 1991b). The results demonstrated 13 significant mean between-group differences in the rating of 50 specific CARE-Q behaviors. Two significant mean value differences out of six subscales combining individual items were demonstrated between groups. Psychiatric inpatients considered the cognitive aspect, and somatic inpatients the task-oriented aspect of caring as the most important. Staff, in psychiatric as well as somatic care, considered the emotional aspect of caring as the most important. The results suggest that staff has a relatively invariant, human-oriented perception of caring, irrespective of subdisciplines, while patients' perceptions of caring vary more over specialties.

  7. Do mental health consumers want to improve their long-term disease risk behaviours? A survey of over 2000 psychiatric inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlem, Kate; Bailey, Jacqueline; Metse, Alexandra; Asara, Ashley; Wye, Paula; Clancy, Richard; Wiggers, John; Bowman, Jenny

    2017-12-02

    Policies and clinical guidelines acknowledge the role mental health services have in addressing the physical health of individuals with a mental illness; however, little research has explored interest in reducing health risk behaviours or the acceptability of receiving support to reduce such risks among psychiatric inpatients. This study estimated the prevalence of four long-term disease risk behaviours (tobacco smoking, hazardous alcohol consumption, inadequate fruit and/or vegetable consumption, and inadequate physical activity); patient interest in reducing these risks; and acceptability of being provided care to do so during a psychiatric inpatient stay. A cross-sectional survey was undertaken with 2075 inpatients from four inpatient psychiatric facilities in one health district in Australia (October 2012-April 2014). Prevalence of risk behaviours ranged from 50.2% (inadequate physical activity) to 94.8% (inadequate fruit and/or vegetable consumption). The majority of respondents (88.4%) had more than one risk behaviour, and most were seriously considering improving their risk behaviours (47.6% to 65.3%). The majority (80.4%) agreed that it would be acceptable to be provided support and advice to change such behaviours during their psychiatric inpatient stay. Some diagnoses were associated with smoking and hazardous alcohol consumption, interest in reducing alcohol consumption and increasing fruit and/or vegetable consumption, and acceptability of receiving advice and support. The findings reinforce the need and opportunity for psychiatric inpatient facilities to address the long-term disease risk behaviours of their patients. © 2017 The Authors International Journal of Mental Health Nursing published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  8. The role of parental health care utilization in children's unnecessary utilization in China: evidence from Shaanxi province.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Zhou, Zhongliang; Si, Yafei

    2017-03-09

    China has a large population of children under 18 years of age, whose health is of great concern to the Chinese health care system. However, few studies have been conducted to analyze the factors associated with children's unnecessary health care utilization in China. The objective of this study is to provide some empirical evidence on this issue by investigating the role of parental health care utilization in children's unnecessary health care use. The data were obtained from the fifth Health Service Survey of Shaanxi province in 2013. We employed three dependent variables to measure children's health care utilization: the number of children's outpatient visits during the past 2 weeks, whether or not infusion was used if the child had any outpatient visits during the past 2 weeks, and the number of children's inpatient visits during last year. Based on specific characteristics of these outcome variables, negative binomial models were used for the non-negative numbers of outpatient and inpatient visits, while a probit model was used for the zero-one indicator variable showing whether infusion was used during outpatient visits. Based on a sample of 11,024 children, our results of multivariate analysis showed that children whose parents used outpatient care were estimated to have a larger number of outpatient visits than those whose parents did not have outpatient visits in the past 2 weeks (with a difference of 0.0393 visits). Among children having outpatient visits in the last 2 weeks, the probability of obtaining infusion was 57.01 percentage points higher for children whose parents used infusion in the past 2 weeks than the probability for those whose parents did not use infusion. The predicted number of inpatient visits was higher for children whose parents used inpatient services in the last year, compared with the group whose parents did not use (with a difference of 0.0567 visits). Moreover, we noted that the positive association between parental and

  9. Local inpatient units may increase patients' utilization of outpatient services: a comparative cohort-study in Nordland County, Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myklebust LH

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Lars Henrik Myklebust,1 Knut Sørgaard,1,2 Rolf Wynn21Psychiatric Research Centre of North Norway, Nordland Hospital Trust, Bodø, 2Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, NorwayObjectives: In the last few decades, there has been a restructuring of the psychiatric services in many countries. The complexity of these systems may represent a challenge to patients that suffer from serious psychiatric disorders. We examined whether local integration of inpatient and outpatient services in contrast to centralized institutions strengthened continuity of care.Methods: Two different service-systems were compared. Service-utilization over a 4-year period for 690 inpatients was extracted from the patient registries. The results were controlled for demographic variables, model of service-system, central inpatient admission or local inpatient admission, diagnoses, and duration of inpatient stays.Results: The majority of inpatients in the area with local integration of inpatient and outpatient services used both types of care. In the area that did not have beds locally, many patients that had been hospitalized did not receive outpatient follow-up. Predictors of inpatients' use of outpatient psychiatric care were: Model of service-system (centralized vs decentralized, a diagnosis of affective disorder, central inpatient admission only, and duration of inpatient stays.Conclusion: Psychiatric centers with local inpatient units may positively affect continuity of care for patients with severe psychiatric disorders, probably because of a high functional integration of inpatient and outpatient care.Keywords: psychiatry, hospitalization, decentralization, outpatients, continuity of care, health service research, affective

  10. Inpatient Consults and Complications During Primary Total Joint Arthroplasty in a Bundled Care Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, Billy T; Karas, Vasili; Kildow, Beau J; Cunningham, Daniel J; Klement, Mitchell R; Green, Cindy L; Attarian, David E; Seyler, Thorsten M

    2018-04-01

    The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) are implementing changes in hospital reimbursement models for total joint arthroplasty (TJA), moving to value-based bundled payments from the fee-for-service model. The purpose of this study is to identify consults and complications during the perioperative period that increase financial burden. We combined CMS payment data for inpatient, professional, and postoperative with retrospective review of patients undergoing primary TJA and developed profiles of patients included in the Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement bundle undergoing TJA. Statistical comparison of episode inpatient events and payments was conducted. Multiple regression analysis was adjusted for length of stay, disposition, and Charlson-Deyo comorbidity profile. Median total payment was $21,577.36, which exceeded the median bundle target payment of $20,625.00. Adjusted analyses showed that psychiatry consults (increase of $73,123.32; P care unit admission ($14,078.37; P care unit admission, and medical/psychiatric consultation exceeded the CMS target. Although study results showed typical complication rates, acute inpatient consultation significantly increased utilization beyond the CMS target even when adjusted for length of stay, patient comorbidities, and discharge. Needed medical care should continue to be a priority for inpatients, and allowance for individual outliers should be considered in policy discussions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Minding the gap: Interprofessional communication during inpatient and post discharge chasm care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotten, Mitzi; Manos, Eva LaVerne; Malicoat, Allison; Paolo, Anthony M

    2015-07-01

    Poor communication is cited as a main cause of poor patient outcomes and errors in healthcare, and clear communication can be especially critical during transitions such as discharge. In this project, communication was standardized for clarity, and techniques were implemented to continue care from inpatient, to discharge, across the post-discharge chasm, to hand-off with the primary care provider (PCP). The interprofessional (IP) quality improvement initiative included: (1) evidence-based teamwork system; (2) in situ simulation; (3) creation of an IP model of care; and (4) innovations in use of telehealth technology to continue care post-discharge. Measures inpatient/parent satisfaction and the attitudes of the care team have improved. Traditional methods of communication and transition do not meet patient or healthcare provider needs. Communication must be standardized to be understandable and be used by the IP team. Care must continue post-discharge by utilizing technology to increase quality and continuity of care. Improving and practicing communication skills may lead to reductions in healthcare errors and readmissions, and may decrease the length of stay and improve satisfaction of care teams. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  12. Admissions to inpatient care facilities in the last year of life of community-dwelling older people in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overbeek, Anouk; Van den Block, Lieve; Korfage, Ida J; Penders, Yolanda W H; van der Heide, Agnes; Rietjens, Judith A C

    2017-10-01

    In the last year of life, many older people rather avoid admissions to inpatient care facilities. We describe and compare such admissions in the last year of life of 5092 community-dwelling older people in 15 European countries (+Israel). Proxy-respondents of the older people, who participated in the longitudinal SHARE study, reported on admissions to inpatient care facilities (hospital, nursing home or hospice) during the last year of their life. Multivariable regression analyses assessed associations between hospitalizations and personal/contextual characteristics. The proportion of people who had been admitted at least once to an inpatient care facility in the last year of life ranged from 54% (France) to 76% (Austria, Israel, Slovenia). Admissions mostly concerned hospitalizations. Multivariable analyses showed that especially Austrians, Israelis and Poles had higher chances of being hospitalized. Further, hospitalizations were more likely for those being ill for 6 months or more (OR:1.67, CI:1.39-2.01), and less likely for persons aged 80+ (OR:0.54, CI:0.39-0.74; compared with 48-65 years), females (OR:0.74, CI:0.63-0.89) and those dying of cardiovascular diseases (OR:0.66, CI:0.51-0.86; compared with those dying of cancer). Although healthcare policies increasingly stress the importance that people reside at home as long as possible, admissions to inpatient care facilities in the last year of life are relatively common across all countries. Furthermore, we found a striking variation concerning the proportion of admissions across countries which cannot only be explained by patient needs. It suggests that such admissions are at least partly driven by system-level or cultural factors. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  13. AUDIT-C Alcohol Screening Results and Postoperative Inpatient Health Care Use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rubinsky, Anna D; Sun, Haili; Blough, David K

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Alcohol screening scores ≥5 on the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test-Consumption (AUDIT-C) up to a year before surgery have been associated with postoperative complications, but the association with postoperative health care use is unknown. This study evaluated whether AUDIT...... surgery, but not increased hospital readmission within 30 days postdischarge, relative to the low-risk group. CONCLUSIONS: AUDIT-C screening results could be used to identify patients at risk for increased postoperative health care use who might benefit from preoperative alcohol interventions....... September 2006) and were hospitalized for nonemergent noncardiac major operations in the following year. Postoperative health care use was evaluated across 4 AUDIT-C risk groups (scores 0, 1 to 4, 5 to 8, and 9 to 12) using linear or logistic regression models adjusted for sociodemographics, smoking status...

  14. Casemix classification payment for sub-acute and non-acute inpatient care, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khiaocharoen, Orathai; Pannarunothai, Supasit; Zungsontiporn, Chairoj; Riewpaiboon, Wachara

    2010-07-01

    There is a need to develop other casemix classifications, apart from DRG for sub-acute and non-acute inpatient care payment mechanism in Thailand. To develop a casemix classification for sub-acute and non-acute inpatient service. The study began with developing a classification system, analyzing cost, assigning payment weights, and ended with testing the validity of this new casemix system. Coefficient of variation, reduction in variance, linear regression, and split-half cross-validation were employed. The casemix for sub-acute and non-acute inpatient services contained 98 groups. Two percent of them had a coefficient of variation of the cost of higher than 1.5. The reduction in variance of cost after the classification was 32%. Two classification variables (physical function and the rehabilitation impairment categories) were key determinants of the cost (adjusted R2 = 0.749, p = .001). Validity results of split-half cross-validation of sub-acute and non-acute inpatient service were high. The present study indicated that the casemix for sub-acute and non-acute inpatient services closely predicted the hospital resource use and should be further developed for payment of the inpatients sub-acute and non-acute phase.

  15. Development of the Competency Assessment Tool-Mental Health, an instrument to assess core competencies for mental health care workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clasen, Carla; Meyer, Cheryl; Brun, Carl; Mase, William; Cauley, Kate

    2003-01-01

    As the focus on accountability in health care increases, there has been a corresponding emphasis on establishing core competencies for health care workers. This article discusses the development of an instrument to establish core competencies for workers in inpatient mental health settings. Twenty-six competencies were identified and rated by mental health care personnel on two subscales: the importance of the competency and how much behavioral health care workers could benefit from training on the competency. The reliability of the scale and its contributions to the training, retention and recruitment of direct care workers for behavioral health are discussed.

  16. Health-based risk adjustment: is inpatient and outpatient diagnostic information sufficient?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamers, L M

    Adequate risk adjustment is critical to the success of market-oriented health care reforms in many countries. Currently used risk adjusters based on demographic and diagnostic cost groups (DCGs) do not reflect expected costs accurately. This study examines the simultaneous predictive accuracy of inpatient and outpatient morbidity measures and prior costs. DCGs, pharmacy cost groups (PCGs), and prior year's costs improve the predictive accuracy of the demographic model substantially. DCGs and PCGs seem complementary in their ability to predict future costs. However, this study shows that the combination of DCGs and PCGs still leaves room for cream skimming.

  17. Client evaluation of a specialist inpatient parent-infant psychiatric service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Revi; Bilszta, Justin; Salam, Nilam; Shafira, Nadia; Buist, Anne

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this paper was to collect feedback on a specialist parent-infant psychiatric service in terms of client satisfaction with inpatient treatment, and the impact on health outcomes of providing written information about available support options in the community following discharge. Women (n = 37) from consecutive admissions between January 2006 and December 2007 were contacted by telephone and administered a service quality evaluation questionnaire. Women were happy with the quality of inpatient care provided but suggested areas of improvement included continuity of staff during the inpatient stay and better communication between inpatient and outpatient services post-discharge. At discharge, women were not confident with their ability in coping with motherhood but confidence with parenting skills increased post-discharge. Use of recommended post-discharge community support and/or health services was poor. As adherence with discharge recommendations was less than ideal, greater involvement of primary/community health care professionals, and active participation of clients and carers, in discharge planning is required. Increased emphasis on the practical skills of motherhood as well as opportunities to develop the mother-infant relationship may assist mothers in gaining confidence to interact with their baby and pick up infant cues.

  18. Real-world comparison of health care utilization between duloxetine and pregabalin initiators with fibromyalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng X

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available X Peng,1 P Sun,2 D Novick,1 J Andrews,1 S Sun2 1Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USA; 2Kailo Research Group, Indianapolis, IN, USA Objectives: To compare health care utilization of duloxetine initiators and pregabalin initiators among fibromyalgia patients in a real-world setting. Methods: A retrospective cohort study was conducted based on a US national commercial health claims database (2006–2009. Fibromyalgia patients who initiated duloxetine or pregabalin in 2008, aged 18–64 years, and who maintained continuous health insurance coverage 1 year before and 1 year after initiation were assigned to duloxetine or pregabalin cohorts on the basis of their initiated agent. Patients who had pill coverage of the agents over the course of 90 days preceding the initiation were excluded. The two comparative cohorts were constructed using propensity score greedy match methods. Descriptive analysis and paired t-test were performed to compare health care utilization rates in the postinitiation year and the changes of these rates from the preinitiation year to the postinitiation year. Results: Both matched cohorts (n=1,265 pairs had a similar mean initiation age (49–50 years, percentage of women (87%–88%, and prevalence of baseline comorbid conditions (neuropathic pain other than diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain, low back pain, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, headache or migraine, and osteoarthritis. In the preinitiation year, both cohorts had similar inpatient, outpatient, and medication utilization rates (inpatient, 15.7%–16.1%; outpatient, 100.0%; medication, 97.9%–98.7%. The utilization rates diverged in the postinitiation year, with the pregabalin cohort using more fibromyalgia-related inpatient care (3.2% versus 2.2%; P<0.05, any inpatient care (19.3% versus 16.8%; P<0.05, and fibromyalgia-related outpatient care (62.1% versus 51.8%; P<0.05. From the preinitiation period to the postinitiation period, the duloxetine cohort

  19. Use of in-patient hospital beds by people living in residential care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finucane, P; Wundke, R; Whitehead, C; Williamson, L; Baggoley, C

    2000-01-01

    There is concern that people living in residential care in Australia make significant and often inappropriate use of acute in-patient hospital services. To date, no factual information has been collected in Australia and its absence may allow myths and negative stereotypes to proliferate. To determine how and why people living in residential care in Australia use in-patient hospital beds. To determine the outcome of hospitalisation and functional status at 3 months following discharge. Prospective study of 184 consecutive admissions to hospital following Emergency Department (ED) attendance involving people aged over 65 years and living in residential care in southern Adelaide, South Australia. Information was obtained from the facilities' transfer letters, and where these were inadequate or absent, telephone interviews were held with residential care staff. 153 people accounted for the 184 admissions. They had a mean age of 84 years and 69% were female. 61% came from hostels and 35% from nursing homes. They had a wide range of clinical problems and twice as many were admitted to medical than to surgical units. Their mean length of hospital stay was 7.9 days, 2.3 days higher than for non-same-day patients and was higher for hostel than for nursing home residents. All but two admissions were considered unavoidable though the provision of specialised care within residential care could have prevented a further 19 (10%) admissions. 96% of admissions resulted in survival to leave hospital and in 74%, people returned directly to their place of origin. At 3 months follow-up, a further 20% of the group had died while 5% were in hospital. In all, 14% of the original group were in a different long-term care facility while 56% were living at their former residence. People living in residential care are often hospitalised because of acute illness. In the vast majority of cases hospitalisation is both appropriate and unavoidable. Most did not require prolonged hospitalisation

  20. Econometric estimation of WHO-CHOICE country-specific costs for inpatient and outpatient health service delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenberg, Karin; Lauer, Jeremy A; Gkountouras, Georgios; Fitzpatrick, Christopher; Stanciole, Anderson

    2018-01-01

    Policy makers require information on costs related to inpatient and outpatient health services to inform resource allocation decisions. Country data sets were gathered in 2008-2010 through literature reviews, website searches and a public call for cost data. Multivariate regression analysis was used to explore the determinants of variability in unit costs using data from 30 countries. Two models were designed, with the inpatient and outpatient models drawing upon 3407 and 9028 observations respectively. Cost estimates are produced at country and regional level, with 95% confidence intervals. Inpatient costs across 30 countries are significantly associated with the type of hospital, ownership, as well as bed occupancy rate, average length of stay, and total number of inpatient admissions. Changes in outpatient costs are significantly associated with location, facility ownership and the level of care, as well as to the number of outpatient visits and visits per provider per day. These updated WHO-CHOICE service delivery unit costs are statistically robust and may be used by analysts as inputs for economic analysis. The models can predict country-specific unit costs at different capacity levels and in different settings.

  1. Latent Growth Modeling of nursing care dependency of acute neurological inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piredda, M; Ghezzi, V; De Marinis, M G; Palese, A

    2015-01-01

    Longitudinal three-time point study, addressing how neurological adult patient care dependency varies from the admission time to the 3rd day of acute hospitalization. Nursing care dependency was measured with the Care Dependency Scale (CDS) and a Latent Growth Modeling approach was used to analyse the CDS trend in 124 neurosurgical and stroke inpatients. Care dependence followed a decreasing linear trend. Results can help nurse-managers planning an appropriate amount of nursing care for acute neurological patients during their initial stage of hospitalization. Further studies are needed aimed at investigating the determinants of nursing care dependence during the entire in-hospital stay.

  2. Characteristics of Inpatient Care and Rehabilitation for Acute First-Ever Stroke Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Won Hyuk; Shin, Yong-Il; Lee, Sam-Gyu; Oh, Gyung-Jae; Lim, Young Shil

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to analyze the status of inpatient care for acute first-ever stroke at three general hospitals in Korea to provide basic data and useful information on the development of comprehensive and systematic rehabilitation care for stroke patients. Materials and Methods This study conducted a retrospective complete enumeration survey of all acute first-ever stroke patients admitted to three distinct general hospitals for 2 years by reviewing medical records. Both ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes were included. Survey items included demographic data, risk factors, stroke type, state of rehabilitation treatment, discharge destination, and functional status at discharge. Results A total of 2159 patients were reviewed. The mean age was 61.5±14.4 years and the ratio of males to females was 1.23:1. Proportion of ischemic stroke comprised 54.9% and hemorrhagic stroke 45.1%. Early hospital mortality rate was 8.1%. Among these patients, 27.9% received rehabilitation consultation and 22.9% underwent inpatient rehabilitation treatment. The mean period from admission to rehabilitation consultation was 14.5 days. Only 12.9% of patients were transferred to a rehabilitation department and the mean period from onset to transfer was 23.4 days. Improvements in functional status were observed in the patients who had received inpatient rehabilitation treatment after acute stroke management. Conclusion Our analysis revealed that a relatively small portion of patients who suffered from an acute first-ever stroke received rehabilitation consultation and inpatient rehabilitation treatment. Thus, applying standardized clinical practice guidelines for post-acute rehabilitation care is needed to provide more effective and efficient rehabilitation services to patients with stroke. PMID:25510773

  3. Adapting the balanced scorecard for mental health and addictions: an inpatient example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Elizabeth; Durbin, Janet

    2008-05-01

    The Balanced Scorecard (BSC) is a performance-monitoring framework that originated in the business sector but has more recently been applied to health services. The province of Ontario is using the BSC approach to monitor quality of inpatient care in five service areas. Feasibility of the scorecard framework for each area has been assessed using a standard approach. This paper reports results of the feasibility study for the mental health sector, focusing on three issues: framework relevance, underlying strategic goals and indicator selection. Based on a literature review and extensive stakeholder input, the BSC quadrant structure was recommended with some modifications, and indicators were selected that aligned with provincial mental health reform policy goals. The mental health report has completed two cycles of reporting, and has received good support from the field. Copyright © 2008 Longwoods Publishing.

  4. Participation in and Satisfaction With an Exercise Program for Inpatient Mental Health Consumers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Robert; Donohue, Trish; Garnon, Michelle; Happell, Brenda

    2016-01-01

    This study examines attendance at, and satisfaction with, a group exercise program in an inpatient mental health setting. Thirty-two inpatients completed discharge surveys to evaluate group activities. Data were analyzed for participation and satisfaction. More inpatients (n = 16, 50%) rated exercise as "excellent" compared with all other activities. Nonattendance rates were lowest for cognitive behavioral therapy (n = 2, 6.3%), highest for the relaxation group (n = 6, 18.8%), and 12.5% (n = 4) for the group exercise program. Group exercise programs delivered by highly trained personnel are well attended and achieve high satisfaction ratings by inpatient mental health consumers. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Shifting chronic disease management from hospitals to primary care in Estonian health system: analysis of national panel data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atun, Rifat; Gurol-Urganci, Ipek; Hone, Thomas; Pell, Lisa; Stokes, Jonathan; Habicht, Triin; Lukka, Kaija; Raaper, Elin; Habicht, Jarno

    2016-12-01

    Following independence from the Soviet Union in 1991, Estonia introduced a national insurance system, consolidated the number of health care providers, and introduced family medicine centred primary health care (PHC) to strengthen the health system. Using routinely collected health billing records for 2005-2012, we examine health system utilisation for seven ambulatory care sensitive conditions (ACSCs) (asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [COPD], depression, Type 2 diabetes, heart failure, hypertension, and ischemic heart disease [IHD]), and by patient characteristics (gender, age, and number of co-morbidities). The data set contained 552 822 individuals. We use patient level data to test the significance of trends, and employ multivariate regression analysis to evaluate the probability of inpatient admission while controlling for patient characteristics, health system supply-side variables, and PHC use. Over the study period, utilisation of PHC increased, whilst inpatient admissions fell. Service mix in PHC changed with increases in phone, email, nurse, and follow-up (vs initial) consultations. Healthcare utilisation for diabetes, depression, IHD and hypertension shifted to PHC, whilst for COPD, heart failure and asthma utilisation in outpatient and inpatient settings increased. Multivariate regression indicates higher probability of inpatient admission for males, older patient and especially those with multimorbidity, but protective effect for PHC, with significantly lower hospital admission for those utilising PHC services. Our findings suggest health system reforms in Estonia have influenced the shift of ACSCs from secondary to primary care, with PHC having a protective effect in reducing hospital admissions.

  6. Addressing long-term physical healthcare needs in a forensic mental health inpatient population using the UK primary care Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF): an audit

    OpenAIRE

    Ivbijaro, GO; Kolkiewicz, LA; McGee, LSF; Gikunoo, M

    2008-01-01

    Objectives This audit aims to evaluate the effectiveness of delivering an equivalent primary care service to a long-term forensic psychiatric inpatient population, using the UK primary care national Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF).

  7. Effect of Pediatric Behavioral Health Screening and Colocated Services on Ambulatory and Inpatient Utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Karen A; Penfold, Robert B; Arsenault, Lisa N; Zhang, Fang; Soumerai, Stephen B; Wissow, Lawrence S

    2015-11-01

    The study sought to determine the impact of a pediatric behavioral health screening and colocation model on utilization of behavioral health care. In 2003, Cambridge Health Alliance, a Massachusetts public health system, introduced behavioral health screening and colocation of social workers sequentially within its pediatric practices. An interrupted time-series study was conducted to determine the impact on behavioral health care utilization in the 30 months after model implementation compared with the 18 months prior. Specifically, the change in trends of ambulatory, emergency, and inpatient behavioral health utilization was examined. Utilization data for 11,223 children ages ≥4 years 9 months to <18 years 3 months seen from 2003 to 2008 contributed to the study. In the 30 months after implementation of pediatric behavioral health screening and colocation, there was a 20.4% cumulative increase in specialty behavioral health visit rates (trend of .013% per month, p=.049) and a 67.7% cumulative increase in behavioral health primary care visit rates (trend of .019% per month, p<.001) compared with the expected rates predicted by the 18-month preintervention trend. In addition, behavioral health emergency department visit rates increased 245% compared with the expected rate (trend .01% per month, p=.002). After the implementation of a behavioral health screening and colocation model, more children received behavioral health treatment. Contrary to expectations, behavioral health emergency department visits also increased. Further study is needed to determine whether this is an effect of how care was organized for children newly engaged in behavioral health care or a reflection of secular trends in behavioral health utilization or both.

  8. Trends in out-of-pocket payments for health care in Kyrgyzstan, 2001-2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkingham, Jane; Akkazieva, Baktygul; Baschieri, Angela

    2010-09-01

    Within the countries of the former Soviet Union, the Kyrgyz Republic has been a pioneer in reforming the system of health care finance. Since the introduction of its compulsory health insurance fund in 1997, the country has gradually moved from subsidizing the supply of services to subsidizing the purchase of services through the 'single payer' of the health insurance fund. In 2002 the government introduced a new co-payment for inpatients along with a basic benefit package. A key objective of the reforms has been to replace the burgeoning system of unofficial informal payments for health care with a transparent official co-payment, thereby reducing the financial burden of health care spending for the poor. This article investigates trends in out-of-pocket payments for health care using the results of a series of nationally representative household surveys conducted over the period 2001-2007, when the reforms were being rolled out. The analysis shows that there has been a significant improvement in financial access to health care amongst the population. The proportion paying state providers for consultations fell between 2004 and 2007. As a result of the introduction of co-payments for hospital care, fewer inpatients report making payments to medical personnel, but when they are made, payments are high, especially to surgeons and anaesthetists. However, although financial access for outpatient care has improved, the burden of health care payments amongst the poor remains significant.

  9. Community mental health nursing: keeping pace with care delivery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Julie; Willis, Eileen; Walter, Bonnie; Toffoli, Luisa

    2008-06-01

    The National Mental Health Strategy has been associated with the movement of service delivery into the community, creating greater demand for community services. The literature suggests that the closure of psychiatric beds and earlier discharge from inpatient services, have contributed to an intensification of the workload of community mental health nurses. This paper reports findings from the first stage of an action research project to develop a workload equalization tool for community mental health nurses. The study presents data from focus groups conducted with South Australian community mental health nurses to identify issues that impact upon their workload. Four themes were identified, relating to staffing and workforce issues, clients' characteristics or needs, regional issues, and the impact of the health-care system. The data show that the workload of community mental health nurses is increased by the greater complexity of needs of community mental health clients. Service change has also resulted in poor integration between inpatient and community services and tension between generic case management and specialist roles resulting in nurses undertaking tasks for other case managers. These issues, along with difficulties in recruiting and retaining staff, have led to the intensification of community mental health work and a crisis response to care with less time for targeted interventions.

  10. Trends in resource utilization by children with neurological impairment in the United States inpatient health care system: a repeat cross-sectional study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay G Berry

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Care advances in the United States (US have led to improved survival of children with neurological impairment (NI. Children with NI may account for an increasing proportion of hospital resources. However, this assumption has not been tested at a national level.We conducted a study of 25,747,016 US hospitalizations of children recorded in the Kids' Inpatient Database (years 1997, 2000, 2003, and 2006. Children with NI were identified with International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification diagnoses resulting in functional and/or intellectual impairment. We assessed trends in inpatient resource utilization for children with NI with a Mantel-Haenszel chi-square test using all 4 y of data combined. Across the 4 y combined, children with NI accounted for 5.2% (1,338,590 of all hospitalizations. Epilepsy (52.2% [n = 538,978] and cerebral palsy (15.9% [n = 164,665] were the most prevalent NI diagnoses. The proportion of hospitalizations attributable to children with NI did not change significantly (p = 0.32 over time. In 2006, children with NI accounted for 5.3% (n = 345,621 of all hospitalizations, 13.9% (n = 3.4 million of bed days, and 21.6% (US$17.7 billion of all hospital charges within all hospitals. Over time, the proportion of hospitalizations attributable to children with NI decreased within non-children's hospitals (3.0% [n = 146,324] in 1997 to 2.5% [n = 113,097] in 2006, p<.001 and increased within children's hospitals (11.7% [n = 179,324] in 1997 to 13.5% [n = 209,708] in 2006, p<0.001. In 2006, children with NI accounted for 24.7% (2.1 million of bed days and 29.0% (US$12.0 billion of hospital charges within children's hospitals.Children with NI account for a substantial proportion of inpatient resources utilized in the US. Their impact is growing within children's hospitals. We must ensure that the current health care system is staffed, educated, and equipped to serve this growing segment of vulnerable children.

  11. Development of a hospital-based care coordination program for children with special health care needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petitgout, Janine M; Pelzer, Daniel E; McConkey, Stacy A; Hanrahan, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    A hospital-based Continuity of Care program for children with special health care needs is described. A family-centered team approach provides care coordination and a medical home. The program has grown during the past 10 years to include inpatients and outpatients from multiple services and outreach clinics. Improved outcomes, including decreased length of stay, decreased cost, and high family satisfaction, are demonstrated by participants in the program. Pediatric nurse practitioners play an important role in the medical home, collaborating with primary care providers, hospital-based specialists, community services, and social workers to provide services to children with special health care needs. Copyright © 2013 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of competition on the cost and quality of inpatient rehabilitation care under prospective payment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colla, Carrie Hoverman; Escarce, José J; Buntin, Melinda Beeuwkes; Sood, Neeraj

    2010-12-01

    To determine the effect of competition in postacute care (PAC) markets on resource intensity and outcomes of care in inpatient rehabilitation facilities (IRFs) after prospective payment was implemented. Medicare claims, Provider of Services file, Enrollment file, Area Resource file, Minimum Data Set. We created an exogenous measure of competition based on patient travel distances and used instrumental variables models to estimate the effect of competition on inpatient rehabilitation costs, length of stay, and death or institutionalization. A file was constructed linking data for Medicare patients discharged from acute care between 2002 and 2003 and admitted to an IRF with a diagnosis of hip fracture or stroke. Competition had different effects on treatment intensity and outcomes for hip fracture and stroke patients. In the treatment of hip fracture, competition increased costs and length of stay, while increasing rates of death or institutionalization. In the treatment of stroke, competition decreased costs and length of stay and produced inferior outcomes. The effects of competition in PAC markets may vary by condition. It is important to study the effects of competition by diagnostic condition and to study the effects across populations that vary in severity. Our finding that higher competition under prospective payment led to worse IRF outcomes raises concerns and calls for additional research. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  13. Role of emerging private hospitals in a post-Soviet mixed health system: a mixed methods comparative study of private and public hospital inpatient care in Mongolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsevelvaanchig, Uranchimeg; Gouda, Hebe; Baker, Peter; Hill, Peter S

    2017-05-01

    The collapse of the Soviet Union in 1990 severely impacted the health sector in Mongolia. Limited public funding for the post-Soviet model public system and a rapid growth of poorly regulated private providers have been pressing issues for a government seeking to re-establish universal health coverage. However, the evidence available on the role of private providers that would inform sector management is very limited. This study analyses the current contribution of private hospitals in Mongolia for the improvement of accessibility of health care and efficiency. We used mixed research methods. A descriptive analysis of nationally representative hospital admission records from 2013 was followed by semi-structured interviews that were carried out with purposively selected key informants (N = 45), representing the main actors in Mongolia's mixed health system. Private-for-profit hospitals are concentrated in urban areas, where their financial model is most viable. The result is the duplication of private and public inpatient services, both in terms of their geographical location and the range of services delivered. The combination of persistent inpatient-oriented care and perverse financial incentives that privilege admission over outpatient management, have created unnecessary health costs. The engagement of the private sector to improve population health outcomes is constrained by a series of issues of governance, regulation and financing and the failure of the state to manage the private sector as an integral part of its health system planning. For a mixed system like in Mongolia, a comprehensive policy and plan which defines the complementary role of private providers to optimize private public service mix is critical in the early stages of the private sector development. It further supports the importance of a system perspective that combines regulation and incentives in consistent policy, rather than an isolated approach to provide regulation. © The Author

  14. Tides of change: improving glucometrics in a large multihospital health care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulla, Christopher M; Lieb, David C; McFarland, Raymie; Aloi, Joseph A

    2015-05-01

    This study explores the relationship between education for inpatient diabetes providers and the utilization of insulin order sets, inpatient glucometrics, and length of stay in a large health care system. The study included patients with and without the diagnosis of diabetes. An education campaign included provider-directed diabetes education administered via online learning modules and in-person presentations by trained individuals. Relationships among provider-attended diabetes education, order set usage, and inpatient glucometrics (hypo- and hyperglycemia) were analyzed, as well as length of stay. Insulin use knowledge scores for all providers averaged 52%, and improved significantly to 93% (P < .001) by the end of the education intervention period. Likewise utilization of electronic basal-bolus order sets increased from a baseline of 20% for patients receiving insulin to 86% within 6 weeks (P < .01) of introduction of order sets. During the study, the incidence of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia declined from 1.47% to 1.27% and from 23.21% to 17.80%, respectively. However, these improvements were not sustained beyond the completion of the education campaign. Education of diabetes health care providers was provided in a large, multihospital system through the use of online learning modules. Adoption of standardized insulin order sets was associated with an improvement in glucometrics. This educational and quality initiative resulted in overall improvements in insulin knowledge, adherence to recommended order sets, inpatient glucometrics, and patient length of stay. These improvements were not sustained, reinforcing the need for repeated educational interventions for those involved in providing inpatient diabetes care. © 2014 Diabetes Technology Society.

  15. Readmission to an Acute Care Hospital During Inpatient Rehabilitation for Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Flora M; Horn, Susan D; Smout, Randall J; Beaulieu, Cynthia L; Barrett, Ryan S; Ryser, David K; Sommerfeld, Teri

    2015-08-01

    To assess the incidence of, causes for, and factors associated with readmission to an acute care hospital (RTAC) during inpatient rehabilitation for traumatic brain injury (TBI). Prospective observational cohort. Inpatient rehabilitation. Individuals with TBI admitted consecutively for inpatient rehabilitation (N=2130). Not applicable. RTAC incidence, RTAC causes, rehabilitation length of stay (RLOS), and rehabilitation discharge location. A total of 183 participants (9%) experienced RTAC for a total of 210 episodes. Of 183 participants, 161 patients experienced 1 RTAC episode, 17 had 2, and 5 had 3. The mean time from rehabilitation admission to first RTAC was 22±22 days. The mean duration in acute care during RTAC was 7±8 days. Eighty-four participants (46%) had ≥1 RTAC episodes for medical reasons, 102 (56%) had ≥1 RTAC episodes for surgical reasons, and 6 (3%) participants had RTAC episodes for unknown reasons. Most common surgical RTAC reasons were neurosurgical (65%), pulmonary (9%), infection (5%), and orthopedic (5%); most common medical reasons were infection (26%), neurological (23%), and cardiac (12%). Any RTAC was predicted as more likely for patients with older age, history of coronary artery disease, history of congestive heart failure, acute care diagnosis of depression, craniotomy or craniectomy during acute care, and presence of dysphagia at rehabilitation admission. RTAC was less likely for patients with higher admission FIM motor scores and education less than high school diploma. RTAC occurrence during rehabilitation was significantly associated with longer RLOS and smaller likelihood of discharge home. Approximately 9% of patients with TBI experienced RTAC episodes during inpatient rehabilitation for various medical and surgical reasons. This information may help inform interventions aimed at reducing interruptions in rehabilitation for RTAC. RTACs were associated with longer RLOS and discharge to an institutional setting. Copyright

  16. Impact on continuity of care of decentralized versus partly centralized mental health care in Northern Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Henrik Myklebust

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The issue of continuity of care is central in contemporary psychiatric services research. In Norway, inpatient admissions are mainly to take place locally, in a system of small bed-units that represent an alternative to traditional central psychiatric hospitals. This type of organization may be advantageous for accessibility and cooperation, but has been given little scientific attention.Aims: To study whether inpatients' utilization of outpatient services differ between an area with a decentralized care model in comparison to an adjacent area with a partly centralized model.  Method: The study was based on data from a one-year registered prevalence sample, drawing on routinely sampled data supplemented with data from medical records. Service-utilization for 247 inpatients was analyzed. The results were controlled for diagnosis, demographic variables, type of service system, localization of inpatient admissions, and length of hospitalization. Results: Most inpatients in the area with the decentralized care model also utilized outpatient consultations, whereas a considerable number of inpatients in the area with a partly centralized model did not enter outpatient care at all. Type of service system, localization of inpatient admission, and length of hospitalization predicted inpatients' utilization of outpatient consultations. The results are discussed in the light of systems integration, particularly management-arrangements and clinical bridging over the transitional phase from inpatient to outpatient care. Conclusion: Inpatients' utilization of outpatient services differed between an area with a decentralized care model in comparison to an adjacent area with a partly centralized care model. In the areas studied, extensive decentralization of the psychiatric services positively affected coordination of inpatient and outpatient services for people with severe psychiatric disorders. Small, local-bed units may therefore represent a

  17. Impact on continuity of care of decentralized versus partly centralized mental health care in Northern Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Henrik Myklebust

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The issue of continuity of care is central in contemporary psychiatric services research. In Norway, inpatient admissions are mainly to take place locally, in a system of small bed-units that represent an alternative to traditional central psychiatric hospitals. This type of organization may be advantageous for accessibility and cooperation, but has been given little scientific attention. Aims: To study whether inpatients' utilization of outpatient services differ between an area with a decentralized care model in comparison to an adjacent area with a partly centralized model.   Method: The study was based on data from a one-year registered prevalence sample, drawing on routinely sampled data supplemented with data from medical records. Service-utilization for 247 inpatients was analyzed. The results were controlled for diagnosis, demographic variables, type of service system, localization of inpatient admissions, and length of hospitalization.  Results: Most inpatients in the area with the decentralized care model also utilized outpatient consultations, whereas a considerable number of inpatients in the area with a partly centralized model did not enter outpatient care at all. Type of service system, localization of inpatient admission, and length of hospitalization predicted inpatients' utilization of outpatient consultations. The results are discussed in the light of systems integration, particularly management-arrangements and clinical bridging over the transitional phase from inpatient to outpatient care.  Conclusion: Inpatients' utilization of outpatient services differed between an area with a decentralized care model in comparison to an adjacent area with a partly centralized care model. In the areas studied, extensive decentralization of the psychiatric services positively affected coordination of inpatient and outpatient services for people with severe psychiatric disorders. Small, local-bed units may therefore

  18. Transboundary smoke haze pollution in Malaysia: inpatient health impacts and economic valuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Jamal; Sahani, Mazrura; Mahmud, Mastura; Ahmad, Md Khadzir Sheikh

    2014-06-01

    This study assessed the economic value of health impacts of transboundary smoke haze pollution in Kuala Lumpur and adjacent areas in the state of Selangor, Malaysia. Daily inpatient data from 2005, 2006, 2008, and 2009 for 14 haze-related illnesses were collected from four hospitals. On average, there were 19 hazy days each year during which the air pollution levels were within the Lower Moderate to Hazardous categories. No seasonal variation in inpatient cases was observed. A smoke haze occurrence was associated with an increase in inpatient cases by 2.4 per 10,000 populations each year, representing an increase of 31 percent from normal days. The average annual economic loss due to the inpatient health impact of haze was valued at MYR273,000 ($91,000 USD). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The effects of hospital competition on inpatient quality of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutter, Ryan L; Wong, Herbert S; Goldfarb, Marsha G

    2008-01-01

    Existing empirical studies have produced inconclusive, and sometimes contradictory, findings on the effects of hospital competition on inpatient quality of care. These inconsistencies may be due to the use of different methodologies, hospital competition measures, and hospital quality measures. This paper applies the Quality Indicator software from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality to the 1997 Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project State Inpatient Databases to create three versions (i.e., observed, risk-adjusted, and "smoothed") of 38 distinct measures of inpatient quality. The relationship between 12 different hospital competition measures and these quality measures are assessed, using ordinary least squares, two-step efficient generalized method of moments, and negative binomial regression techniques. We find that across estimation strategies, hospital competition has an impact on a number of hospital quality measures. However, the effect is not unidirectional: some indicators show improvements in hospital quality with greater levels of competition, some show decreases in hospital quality, and others are unaffected. We provide hypotheses based on emerging areas of research that could explain these findings, but inconsistencies remain.

  20. Western impressions of the Hong Kong health care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, C L; Pei, G K; Ultmann, J E

    1996-01-01

    Hong Kong, Taiwan, Singapore, and Malaysia are initiating health care reform to meet the changing demands of populations with improved socioeconomic status and access to modern technologies and who are living longer than in previous generations. Hong Kong, in particular, is facing a unique set of circumstances as its people prepare for the transition in 1997 from a British colony to a Special Administrative Region of China. While spending only 4% of its gross domestic product on health care, it has a large and regulated public hospital system for most inpatient medical care and a separate, loosely regulated private health care system for most outpatient medical care. In 1993 the Secretary for Health and Welfare of Hong Kong initiated a year-long process to debate the pros and cons of 5 fundamental programs for health care reform. After a year of open consultation, options were chosen. We describe the Hong Kong health care system, the fundamental changes that have been adopted, and lessons for reformers in the United States.

  1. 75 FR 34614 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-17

    ... Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and Fiscal Year 2010 Rates and to the Long- Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Rate Year 2010 Rates... Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and Fiscal Year 2010 Rates and to the Long-Term Care...

  2. Dual factor model of mental health: Co-occurrence of positive mental health and suicide ideation in inpatients and outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teismann, Tobias; Brailovskaia, Julia; Siegmann, Paula; Nyhuis, Peter; Wolter, Marcus; Willutzki, Ulrike

    2017-12-06

    Positive and negative mental health are independent but correlated concepts. Yet, it is unknown whether positive mental health does co-occur with suicide ideation. The present study aimed to determine the proportion of patients who have positive mental health as well as suicide ideation. Inpatients (N=100) and outpatients (N=182) completed self-report measures of positive mental health, suicide ideation and lifetime suicide attempts. Eleven outpatients (6%) and ten inpatients (10%) with suicide ideation reported moderate to high levels of positive mental health. Lifetime suicide attempts were less likely in inpatients who suffered from suicide ideation in the presence of positive mental health. Positive mental health does co-occur with suicide ideation and should be considered as a protective factor in suicide risk assessments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Alcohol dependence and health care utilization in African Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Vanessa J; Kalu, Nnenna; Kwagyan, John; Scott, Denise M; Cain, Gloria E; Hill, Karen; Hesselbrock, Victor; Ferguson, Clifford L; Taylor, Robert E

    2013-01-01

    Ethnic and cultural differences in patterns of alcohol use disorders must be understood in order to address improvement in prevention of such disorders and accessibility to health care services. The purpose of this study was to evaluate factors that influence the utilization of medical and mental health services among alcohol-dependent and non-alcohol-dependent African Americans. A cohort of 454 African Americans was evaluated. Alcohol-dependent participants were recruited from various inpatient treatment facilities in the Washington, DC, metropolitan area and through advertisement and word of mouth. Non-alcohol-dependent participants were recruited by advertisements. Each participant was administered the Semi-Structured Assessment for the Genetics of Alcoholism to assess alcohol dependency and the Family History Assessment module to access family history of alcoholism. Xl Test and analysis of variance were used to analyze the data. Alcohol dependence was more prevalent among men, those with lower income, those with less education, and they utilized mental health counseling as opposed to medical-based therapy. Increased reports of medical conditions such as migraine (p<.001), loss of consciousness (p=.001), and sexually transmitted diseases: (p<.001) were also associated with alcohol dependency. Other factors, including visits to inpatient treatment programs, were directly related to incidence of alcohol dependency regardless of gender status (p<.001). This study suggests an association exists among alcohol dependence, medical conditions, health care, and mental care utilization among African Americans. Future research may benefit from investigating if an association exists between alcohol use disorders and health care utilization for other ethnic groups.

  4. 76 FR 13209 - United States and State of Texas v. United Regional Health Care System; Proposed Final Judgment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-10

    ... of Texas v. United Regional Health Care System, Civil Action No. 7:11-cv- 00030-O. On February 25..., ambulatory surgery center or radiology center in [a] 15 mile radius of United Regional Health Care System... 95% of billed charges for all inpatient and outpatient services at United Regional Health Care System...

  5. Readmission to Acute Care Hospital during Inpatient Rehabilitation for Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Flora M.; Horn, Susan D.; Smout, Randall J.; Beaulieu, Cynthia L.; Barrett, Ryan S.; Ryser, David K.; Sommerfeld, Teri

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate frequency, reasons, and factors associated with readmission to acute care (RTAC) during inpatient rehabilitation for traumatic brain injury (TBI). Design Prospective observational cohort. Setting Inpatient rehabilitation. Participants 2,130 consecutive admissions for TBI rehabilitation. Interventions Not applicable. Main Outcome Measure(s) RTAC incidence, RTAC causes, rehabilitation length of stay (RLOS), and rehabilitation discharge location. Results 183 participants (9%) experienced RTAC for a total 210 episodes. 161 patients experienced 1 RTAC episode, 17 had 2, and 5 had 3. Mean days from rehabilitation admission to first RTAC was 22 days (SD 22). Mean duration in acute care during RTAC was 7 days (SD 8). 84 participants (46%) had >1 RTAC episode for medical reasons, 102 (56%) had >1 RTAC for surgical reasons, and RTAC reason was unknown for 6 (3%) participants. Most common surgical RTAC reasons were: neurosurgical (65%), pulmonary (9%), infection (5%), and orthopedic (5%); most common medical reasons were infection (26%), neurologic (23%), and cardiac (12%). Older age, history of coronary artery disease, history of congestive heart failure, acute care diagnosis of depression, craniotomy or craniectomy during acute care, and presence of dysphagia at rehabilitation admission predicted patients with RTAC. RTAC was less likely for patients with higher admission Functional Independence Measure Motor scores and education less than high school diploma. RTAC occurrence during rehabilitation was significantly associated with longer RLOS and smaller likelihood of discharge home. Conclusion(s) Approximately 9% of patients with TBI experience RTAC during inpatient rehabilitation for various medical and surgical reasons. This information may help inform interventions aimed at reducing interruptions in rehabilitation due to RTAC. RTACs were associated with longer RLOS and discharge to an institutional setting. PMID:26212405

  6. Mobile integrated health to reduce post-discharge acute care visits: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddle, Jennica; Pang, Peter S; Weaver, Christopher; Weinstein, Elizabeth; O'Donnell, Daniel; Arkins, Thomas P; Miramonti, Charles

    2018-05-01

    Mobile Integrated Health (MIH) leverages specially trained paramedics outside of emergency response to bridge gaps in local health care delivery. To evaluate the efficacy of a MIH led transitional care strategy to reduce acute care utilization. This was a retrospective cohort analysis of a quality improvement pilot of patients from an urban, single county EMS, MIH transitional care initiative. We utilized a paramedic/social worker (or social care coordinator) dyad to provide in home assessments, medication review, care coordination, and improve access to care. The primary outcome compared acute care utilization (ED visits, observation stays, inpatient visits) 90days before MIH intervention to 90days after. Of the 203 patients seen by MIH teams, inpatient utilization decreased significantly from 140 hospitalizations pre-MIH to 26 post-MIH (83% reduction, p=0.00). ED and observation stays, however, increased numerically, but neither was significant. (ED 18 to 19 stays, p=0.98; observation stays 95 to 106, p=0.30) Primary care visits increased 15% (p=0.11). In this pilot before/after study, MIH significantly reduces acute care hospitalizations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Cost recovery of NGO primary health care facilities: a case study in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alam Khurshid

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the cost recovery of primary health care facilities in Bangladesh. This study estimated the cost recovery of a primary health care facility run by Building Resources Across Community (BRAC, a large NGO in Bangladesh, for the period of July 2004 - June 2005. This health facility is one of the seven upgraded BRAC facilities providing emergency obstetric care and is typical of the government and private primary health care facilities in Bangladesh. Given the current maternal and child mortality in Bangladesh and the challenges to addressing health-related Millennium Development Goal (MDG targets the financial sustainability of such facilities is crucial. Methods The study was designed as a case study covering a single facility. The methodology was based on the 'ingredient approach' using the allocation techniques by inpatient and outpatient services. Cost recovery of the facility was estimated from the provider's perspective. The value of capital items was annualized using 5% discount rate and its market price of 2004 (replacement value. Sensitivity analysis was done using 3% discount rate. Results The cost recovery ratio of the BRAC primary care facility was 59%, and if excluding all capital costs, it increased to 72%. Of the total costs, 32% was for personnel while drugs absorbed 18%. Capital items were17% of total costs while operational cost absorbed 12%. Three-quarters of the total cost was variable costs. Inpatient services contributed 74% of total revenue in exchange of 10% of total utilization. An average cost per patient was US$ 10 while it was US$ 67 for inpatient and US$ 4 for outpatient. Conclusion The cost recovery of this NGO primary care facility is important for increasing its financial sustainability and decreasing donor dependency, and achieving universal health coverage in a developing country setting. However, for improving the cost recovery of the health facility, it needs to increase

  8. HCUP National (Nationwide) Inpatient Sample (NIS) - Restricted Access File

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The NIS is the largest publicly available all-payer inpatient care database in the United States. It contains data from approximately 8 million hospital stays each...

  9. The health care cost of dying: a population-based retrospective cohort study of the last year of life in Ontario, Canada.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Tanuseputro

    Full Text Available Coordinated and appropriate health care across sectors is an ongoing challenge, especially at the end-of-life. Population-level data on end-of-life health care use and cost, however, are seldom reported across a comprehensive array of sectors. Such data will identify the level of care being provided and areas where care can be optimized.This retrospective cohort study identified all deaths in Ontario from April 1, 2010 to March 31, 2013. Using population-based health administrative databases, we examined health care use and cost in the last year of life.Among 264,755 decedents, the average health care cost in the last year of life was $53,661 (Quartile 1-Quartile 3: $19,568-$66,875. The total captured annual cost of $4.7 billion represents approximately 10% of all government-funded health care. Inpatient care, incurred by 75% of decedents, contributed 42.9% of total costs ($30,872 per user. Physician services, medications/devices, laboratories, and emergency rooms combined to less than 20% of total cost. About one-quarter used long-term-care and 60% used home care ($34,381 and $7,347 per user, respectively. Total cost did not vary by sex or neighborhood income quintile, but were less among rural residents. Costs rose sharply in the last 120 days prior to death, predominantly for inpatient care.This analysis adds new information about the breadth of end-of-life health care, which consumes a large proportion of Ontario's health care budget. The cost of inpatient care and long-term care are substantial. Introducing interventions that reduce or delay institutional care will likely reduce costs incurred at the end of life.

  10. Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Policy Changes and Fiscal Year 2018 Rates; Quality Reporting Requirements for Specific Providers; Medicare and Medicaid Electronic Health Record (EHR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-14

    We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems for FY 2018. Some of these changes implement certain statutory provisions contained in the Pathway for Sustainable Growth Rate (SGR) Reform Act of 2013, the Improving Medicare Post-Acute Care Transformation Act of 2014, the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015, the 21st Century Cures Act, and other legislation. We also are making changes relating to the provider-based status of Indian Health Service (IHS) and Tribal facilities and organizations and to the low-volume hospital payment adjustment for hospitals operated by the IHS or a Tribe. In addition, we are providing the market basket update that will apply to the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis subject to these limits for FY 2018. We are updating the payment policies and the annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital services provided by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) for FY 2018. In addition, we are establishing new requirements or revising existing requirements for quality reporting by specific Medicare providers (acute care hospitals, PPS-exempt cancer hospitals, LTCHs, and inpatient psychiatric facilities). We also are establishing new requirements or revising existing requirements for eligible professionals (EPs), eligible hospitals, and critical access hospitals (CAHs) participating in the Medicare and Medicaid Electronic Health Record (EHR) Incentive Programs. We are updating policies relating to the Hospital Value-Based Purchasing (VBP) Program, the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program, and the Hospital-Acquired Condition (HAC) Reduction Program. We also are making changes relating to transparency of accrediting organization survey

  11.  Nutritional care of Danish medical in-patients - patients' perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Karin Østergaard; Kruse, Filip; Bjerrum, Merete

    2005-01-01

    with the nutritional care.The patients includeed a total of 91 medical inpatients at two internal medical wards, aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. Their average age was 72 (+/-) 11 yerars. They were individually interviewed about the fodd service ad the nutritinal care upon discharge.Patients satifaction...... with the meals was overall high (90%). About 80% found the meals to be very important, but they lacked information about the food service, and the patient-staff communication about the food service was poor. The reults indicate that the nursing staff was exercising a 'knowledge monopoly' in relation to the food...... service. In conclusion, a majority of the patients dis not perceive the nutritional care as part of the therapy and nursing care during their hospitalization....

  12. Quality of care indicators for the structure and organization of inpatient rehabilitation care of children with traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumsteg, Jennifer M; Ennis, Stephanie K; Jaffe, Kenneth M; Mangione-Smith, Rita; MacKenzie, Ellen J; Rivara, Frederick P

    2012-03-01

    To develop evidence-based and expert-driven quality indicators for measuring variations in the structure and organization of acute inpatient rehabilitation for children after traumatic brain injury (TBI) and to survey centers across the United States to determine the degree of variation in care. Quality indicators were developed using the RAND/UCLA modified Delphi method. Adherence to these indicators was determined from a survey of rehabilitation facilities. Inpatient rehabilitation units in the United States. A sample of rehabilitation programs identified using data from the National Association of Children's Hospitals and Related Institutions, Uniform Data System for Medical Rehabilitation, and the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities yielded 74 inpatient units treating children with TBI. Survey respondents comprised 31 pediatric and 28 all age units. Not applicable. Variations in structure and organization of care among institutions providing acute inpatient rehabilitation for children with TBI. Twelve indicators were developed. Pediatric inpatient rehabilitation units and units with higher volumes of children with TBI were more likely to have: a census of at least 1 child admitted with a TBI for at least 90% of the time; adequate specialized equipment; a classroom; a pediatric subspecialty trained medical director; and more than 75% of therapists with pediatric training. There were clinically and statistically significant variations in the structure and organization of acute pediatric rehabilitation based on the pediatric focus of the unit and volume of children with TBI. Copyright © 2012 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Coping with health-care costs: implications for the measurement of catastrophic expenditures and poverty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Gabriela; Krishnakumar, Jaya; O'Donnell, Owen; van Doorslaer, Eddy

    2008-12-01

    In the absence of formal health insurance, we argue that the strategies households adopt to finance health care have important implications for the measurement and interpretation of how health payments impact on consumption and poverty. Given data on source of finance, we propose to (a) approximate the relative impact of health payments on current consumption with a 'coping'-adjusted health expenditure ratio, (b) uncover poverty that is 'hidden' because total household expenditure is inflated by financial coping strategies and (c) identify poverty that is 'transient' because necessary consumption is temporarily sacrificed to pay for health care. Measures that ignore coping strategies not only overstate the risk to current consumption and exaggerate the scale of catastrophic payments but also overlook the long-run burden of health payments. Nationally representative data from India reveal that coping strategies finance as much as three-quarters of the cost of inpatient care. Payments for inpatient care exceed 10% of total household expenditure for around 30% of hospitalized households but less than 4% sacrifice more than 10% of current consumption to accommodate this spending.Ignoring health payments leads to underestimate poverty by 7-8% points among hospitalized households; 80% of this adjustment is hidden poverty due to coping.

  14. THE EFFECTIVENESS OF THE IMPLEMENTATION OF TECHNOLOGY SUBSTITUTING INPATIENT TREATMENT DURING THE MEDICAL CARE PROVISION TO WOMEN WITH BENIGN GYNECOLOGICAL NEOPLASMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Lobganidze

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Relevance. Over the last decades, such technology substituting inpatient treatment as outpatient treatment has been actively discussed and used in practice. Despite this fact, many problems of outpatient treatment have not been solved in full, no effective leverages contributing to creating economic incentives for increasing the volume and range of medical services in day hospitals have been found in the mandatory medical insurance system.Objective. Based on an in-depth analysis of medical care provision to women with benign gynaecological neoplasms, to offer measures for improvement of medical care in outpatient facilities, particularly by using technologies substituting inpatient treatment, and to evaluate their effectiveness.Materials and methods. A comprehensive retrospective evaluation of outpatient and inpatient medical care was conducted in St. Petersburg over the period from 2008 to 2015. The information contained in the database of billed and paid invoices of the obligatory medical insurance system of St. Petersburg was studied. For the total period of eight years, the data on medical care provision to 81 622 women suffering from benign tumors of the female reproductive organs, particularly in day hospitals, were obtained. In the period 2015–2016, medical care provision to patients with benign neoplasms of the gynecological sphere was thoroughly analyzed. In 18 women’s health departments and 19 in-patient facilities in all districts of the city, all cases of treatment of patients in the basic women’s health departments and in-patient facilities were analyzed by experts. By Taking into account the obtained results, an organizational experiment on introducing substituting technologies followed by evaluating the effectiveness of their use was developed and implemented on the basis of the medical institutions in one of the districts of St. Petersburg.Results. The activeness of outpatient facilities for treatment of women with benign

  15. 77 FR 4908 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    ... Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Fiscal... the final rule entitled ``Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Fiscal Year 2012 Rates...

  16. 77 FR 65495 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-29

    ... Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and... Federal Register entitled ``Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Fiscal Year 2013 Rates...

  17. 78 FR 15882 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-13

    ... Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and... Register entitled ``Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Fiscal Year 2013 Rates; Hospitals...

  18. Communication partner training for health care professionals in an inpatient rehabilitation setting: A parallel randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heard, Renee; O'Halloran, Robyn; McKinley, Kathryn

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine if the E-Learning Plus communication partner training (CPT) programme is as effective as the Supported Conversation for Adults with Aphasia (SCA TM ) CPT programme in improving healthcare professionals' confidence and knowledge communicating with patients with aphasia. Forty-eight healthcare professionals working in inpatient rehabilitation participated. Participants were randomised to one of the CPT programmes. The three outcome measures were self-rating of confidence, self-rating of knowledge and a test of knowledge of aphasia. Measures were taken pre-, immediately post- and 3-4 months post-training. Data were analysed using mixed between within ANOVAs. Homogeneity of variance was adequate for self-rating of confidence and test of knowledge of aphasia data to continue analysis. There was a statistically significant difference in self-rating of confidence and knowledge of aphasia for both interventions across time. No statistically significant difference was found between the two interventions. Both CPT interventions were associated with an increase in health care professionals' confidence and knowledge of aphasia, but neither programme was superior. As the E-Learning Plus CPT programme is more accessible and sustainable in the Australian healthcare context, further work will continue on this CPT programme.

  19. Partnerships in health care: creating a strong value chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhart, C M; Alsup, R G

    2001-01-01

    The health care climate is one of stormy relations between various entities. Employers, managed care organizations, hospitals, and physicians battle over premiums, inpatient rates, fee schedules, and percent of premium dollars. Patients are angry at health plans over problems with access, choice, and quality of care. Employers dicker with managed care organizations over prices, benefits, and access. Hospitals struggle to maintain operations, as occupancy rates decline and the shift to ambulatory care continues. Physicians strive to assure their patients get quality care while they try to maintain stable incomes. Businesses, faced with similar challenges in the competitive marketplace, have formed partnerships for mutual benefit. Successful partnerships are based upon trust and the concept of "win-win." Communication, ongoing evaluation, long-term relations, and shared values are also essential. In Japan, the keiretsu contains the elements of a bonafide partnership. Examples in U.S. businesses abound. In health care, partnerships will improve quality and access. When health care purchasers and providers link together, these partnerships create a new value chain that has patients as the focal point.

  20. Impact of Inpatient Versus Outpatient Total Joint Arthroplasty on 30-Day Hospital Readmission Rates and Unplanned Episodes of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Bryan D; Odum, Susan M; Vegari, David N; Mokris, Jeffrey G; Beaver, Walter B

    2017-01-01

    This article describes a study comparing 30-day readmission rates between patients undergoing outpatient versus inpatient total hip (THA) and knee (TKA) arthroplasty. A retrospective review of 137 patients undergoing outpatient total joint arthroplasty (TJA) and 106 patients undergoing inpatient (minimum 2-day hospital stay) TJA was conducted. Unplanned hospital readmissions and unplanned episodes of care were recorded. All patients completed a telephone survey. Seven inpatients and 16 outpatients required hospital readmission or an unplanned episode of care following hospital discharge. Readmission rates were higher for TKA than THA. The authors found no statistical differences in 30-day readmission or unplanned care episodes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Computed tomography in Brazil: frequency and pattern of usage among inpatients of the Unified Health System (SUS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dovales, Ana Cristina M.; Souza, Andressa A. de; Veiga, Lene H.S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper shows the frequency, pattern and trend of computed tomography use in inpatients of the Brazilian public health care system (SUS), from 2008 to 2011. Data were extracted from an Internet database provided by SUS. Head/neck examinations were the most frequent type of CT over the study period. The use of CT increased over time, with the greatest increase being observed for CT of extremities. (author)

  2. Transition of Care Practices from Emergency Department to Inpatient: Survey Data and Development of Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangil Lee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to assess the current scope of handoff education and practice among resident physicians in academic centers and to propose a standardized handoff algorithm for the transition of care from the emergency department (ED to an inpatient setting. This was a cross-sectional survey targeted at the program directors, associate or assistant program directors, and faculty members of emergency medicine (EM residency programs in the United States (U.S.. The web-based survey was distributed to potential subjects through a listserv. A panel of experts used a modified Delphi approach to develop a standardized algorithm for ED to inpatient handoff. 121 of 172 programs responded to the survey for an overall response rate of 70.3%. Our survey showed that most EM programs in the U.S. have some form of handoff training, and the majority of them occur either during orientation or in the clinical setting. The handoff structure from ED to inpatient is not well standardized, and in those places with a formalized handoff system, over 70% of residents do not uniformly follow it. Approximately half of responding programs felt that their current handoff system was safe and effective. About half of the programs did not formally assess the handoff proficiency of trainees. Handoffs most commonly take place over the phone, though respondents disagree about the ideal place for a handoff to occur, with nearly equivalent responses between programs favoring the bedside over the phone or faceto-face on a computer. Approximately two-thirds of responding programs reported that their residents were competent in performing ED to inpatient handoffs. Based on this survey and on the review of the literature, we developed a five-step algorithm for the transition of care from the ED to the inpatient setting. Our results identified the current trends of education and practice in transitions of care, from the ED to the inpatient setting in U.S. academic medical centers. An algorithm

  3. World Health Organization Public Health Model: A Roadmap for Palliative Care Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaway, Mary V; Connor, Stephen R; Foley, Kathleen M

    2018-02-01

    The Open Society Foundation's International Palliative Care Initiative (IPCI) began to support palliative care development in Central and Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union in 1999. Twenty-five country representatives were invited to discuss the need for palliative care in their countries and to identify key areas that should be addressed to improve the care of adults and children with life-limiting illnesses. As a public health concern, progress in palliative care requires integration into health policy, education and training of health care professionals, availability of essential pain relieving medications, and health care services. IPCI created the Palliative Care Roadmap to serve as a model for government and/or nongovernment organizations to use to frame the necessary elements and steps for palliative care integration. The roadmap includes the creation of multiple Ministry of Health-approved working groups to address: palliative care inclusion in national health policy, legislation, and finance; availability of essential palliative care medications, especially oral opioids; education and training of health care professionals; and the implementation of palliative care services at home or in inpatient settings for adults and children. Each working group is tasked with developing a pathway with multiple signposts as indicators of progress made. The roadmap may be entered at different signposts depending upon the state of palliative care development in the country. The progress of the working groups often takes place simultaneously but at variable rates. Based on our experience, the IPCI Roadmap is one possible framework for palliative care development in resource constrained countries but requires both health care professional engagement and political will for progress to be made. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Features of everyday life in psychiatric inpatient care for self-harming: an observational study of six women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgren, Britt-Marie; Aminoff, Carina; Hällgren Graneheim, Ulla

    2015-02-01

    This study aimed to describe the features of everyday life in psychiatric inpatient care as experienced by women who self-harm. Participant observations and informal interviews were conducted with six women and were subjected to qualitative content analysis. The major feature of everyday life in psychiatric inpatient care was 'being surrounded by disorder', which consisted of 'living in a confusing environment, being subject to routines and rules that offer safety but lack consistency' and 'waiting both in loneliness and in togetherness'. The nursing staff spent minimal time with the patients and the women turned to each other for support, care and companionship.

  5. Hospital heavies. Venture capital bulks up companies that outsource medicine's newest specialty: inpatient-only care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, C

    They're the designated drivers of inpatient care, cutting hospital stays by 19 percent on average. Yet as venture capital firms infuse hospitalist startup companies, some primary care doctors complain that their sickest patients are being taken away from them.

  6. Advancing the recovery orientation of hospital care through staff engagement with former clients of inpatient units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, Sean A; McKenzie, Kwame; Collins, April; Clark, Carrie; Costa, Lucy; Mihalakakos, George; Paterson, Jane

    2014-02-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the impact of consumer narratives on the recovery orientation and job satisfaction of service providers on inpatient wards that focus on the treatment of schizophrenia. It was developed to address the paucity of literature and service development tools that address advancing the recovery model of care in inpatient contexts. A mixed-methods design was used. Six inpatient units in a large urban psychiatric facility were paired on the basis of characteristic length of stay, and one unit from each pair was assigned to the intervention. The intervention was a series of talks (N=58) to inpatient staff by 12 former patients; the talks were provided approximately biweekly between May 2011 and May 2012. Self-report measures completed by staff before and after the intervention assessed knowledge and attitudes regarding the recovery model, the delivery of recovery-oriented care at a unit level, and job satisfaction. In addition, focus groups for unit staff and individual interviews with the speakers were conducted after the speaker series had ended. The hypothesis that the speaker series would have an impact on the attitudes and knowledge of staff with respect to the recovery model was supported. This finding was evident from both quantitative and qualitative data. No impact was observed for recovery orientation of care at the unit level or for job satisfaction. Although this engagement strategy demonstrated an impact, more substantial change in inpatient practices likely requires a broader set of strategies that address skill levels and accountability.

  7. Validation of the Child HCAHPS survey to measure pediatric inpatient experience of care in Flanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruyneel, Luk; Coeckelberghs, Ellen; Buyse, Gunnar; Casteels, Kristina; Lommers, Barbara; Vandersmissen, Jo; Van Eldere, Johan; Van Geet, Chris; Vanhaecht, Kris

    2017-07-01

    The recently developed Child HCAHPS provides a standard to measure US hospitals' performance on pediatric inpatient experiences of care. We field-tested Child HCAHPS in Belgium to instigate international comparison. In the development stage, forward/backward translation was conducted and patients assessed content validity index as excellent. The draft Flemish Child HCAHPS included 63 items: 38 items for five topics hypothesized to be similar to those proposed in the US (communication with parent, communication with child, attention to safety and comfort, hospital environment, and global rating), 10 screeners, a 14-item demographic and descriptive section, and one open-ended item. A 6-week pilot test was subsequently performed in three pediatric wards (general ward, hematology and oncology ward, infant and toddler ward) at a JCI-accredited university hospital. An overall response rate of 90.99% (303/333) was achieved and was consistent across wards. Confirmatory factor analysis largely confirmed the configuration of the proposed composites. Composite and single-item measures related well to patients' global rating of the hospital. Interpretation of different patient experiences across types of wards merits further investigation. Child HCAHPS provides an opportunity for systematic and cross-national assessment of pediatric inpatient experiences. Sharing and implementing international best practices are the next logical step. What is Known: • Patient experience surveys are increasingly used to reflect on the quality, safety, and centeredness of patient care. • While adult inpatient experience surveys are routinely used across countries around the world, the measurement of pediatric inpatient experiences is a young field of research that is essential to reflect on family-centered care. What is New: • We demonstrate that the US-developed Child HCAHPS provides an opportunity for international benchmarking of pediatric inpatient experiences with care through parents

  8. MEDICARE PAYMENTS AND SYSTEM-LEVEL HEALTH-CARE USE

    Science.gov (United States)

    ROBBINS, JACOB A.

    2015-01-01

    The rapid growth of Medicare managed care over the past decade has the potential to increase the efficiency of health-care delivery. Improvements in care management for some may improve efficiency system-wide, with implications for optimal payment policy in public insurance programs. These system-level effects may depend on local health-care market structure and vary based on patient characteristics. We use exogenous variation in the Medicare payment schedule to isolate the effects of market-level managed care enrollment on the quantity and quality of care delivered. We find that in areas with greater enrollment of Medicare beneficiaries in managed care, the non–managed care beneficiaries have fewer days in the hospital but more outpatient visits, consistent with a substitution of less expensive outpatient care for more expensive inpatient care, particularly at high levels of managed care. We find no evidence that care is of lower quality. Optimal payment policies for Medicare managed care enrollees that account for system-level spillovers may thus be higher than those that do not. PMID:27042687

  9. Day-care versus inpatient pediatric surgery: a comparison of costs incurred by parents.

    OpenAIRE

    Stanwick, R S; Horne, J M; Peabody, D M; Postuma, R

    1987-01-01

    The cost-effectiveness for parents of day-care pediatric surgery was assessed by comparing time and financial costs associated with two surgical procedures, one (squint repair) performed exclusively as a day-care procedure, the other (adenoidectomy) performed exclusively as an inpatient procedure. All but 1 of 165 eligible families participated. The children underwent surgery between February and July 1981. The day-care surgery group (59 families) incurred average total time costs of 16.1 hou...

  10. [Family health and infant palliative care: listening the relatives of technology dependent children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabello, Claudia Azevedo Ferreira Guimarães; Rodrigues, Paulo Henrique de Almeida

    2010-10-01

    This study discusses the creation of a new child palliative care program based on the Family Health Program, considering the level of care at home and yielding to family requests. Eighteen members of nine families of technology dependent children (TDC) who were hospital patients in the Instituto Fernandes Figueira (IFF) participated on the study. From those four were being assisted by its palliative care program Programa de Assistência Domiciliar Interdisciplinar (PADI); three were inpatients waiting for inclusion in the program, and finally two inpatients already included in PADI. PADI was chosen because it is the only child palliative care program in Brazil. The results are positive in regards to the connection established between the families and the health care team, the reception of the children, the explanation to the family concerning the disease, and the functional dynamics between the PADI and the IFF. As negative points, difficulties arose as a result of the implementation of the program, from its continuity to the worsening or illness of the entire family. In conclusion, although the PADI is the IFF's way of discharging patients, the domiciliary care provided by the Family Health Program, well articulated with the healthcare system, would be ideal for being the adequate assistance for it.

  11. Effect of changed organisation of nutritional care of Danish medical inpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyholm Ruth

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many patients are undernourished during hospitalisation. The clinical consequences of this include lassitude, an increased risk of complications and prolonged convalescence. The aim of the study is 1 to implement a new organisation with a focus on improving the quality of the nutritional care of medical inpatients at risk of undernutrition, and 2 to investigate the effect of the intervention. Methods Social and healthcare assistants are educated to the higher level of nutritional and healthcare assistants to provide nutritional care in daily practice to undernourished medical inpatients. The effect of the intervention is investigated before and five months after the employment of the nutritional and healthcare assistants. Data are obtained from structured interviews with patients and staff, and the amount of ordered and wasted food is recorded. Results Patients regard the work of the nutritional and healthcare assistant as very important for their recovery and weight gain: the assistant takes care of the individual patient's nutritional requirements and wishes, and she imparts knowledge to the patient about optimum nutrition. Staff members benefit from the knowledge and dedication of the nutritional and healthcare assistant and from her work; the staff is often too busy with other nursing tasks to make it a priority to ensure that patients who are nibblers get sufficient nutrition. The choices of food from the production kitchen are utilised to a higher degree, and more of the food is eaten by the patients. Before the intervention, a 20% increase in ordered food in relation to the food budget is found. During the intervention a 20% decrease in ordered food in relation to the food budget is found, and food wastage decreases from 55% to 18% owing to the intervention. Conclusion The job function of the nutritional and healthcare assistants on the medical wards is of great value to patients, nursing staff members and the

  12. The economic and clinical impact of an inpatient palliative care consultation service: a multifaceted approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciemins, Elizabeth L; Blum, Linda; Nunley, Marsha; Lasher, Andrew; Newman, Jeffrey M

    2007-12-01

    While there has been a rapid increase of inpatient palliative care (PC) programs, the financial and clinical benefits have not been well established. Determine the effect of an inpatient PC consultation service on costs and clinical outcomes. Multifaceted study included: (1) interrupted time-series design utilizing mean daily costs preintervention and postintervention; (2) matched cohort analysis comparing PC to usual care patients; and (3) analysis of symptom control after consultation. Large private, not-for-profit, academic medical center in San Francisco, California, 2004-2006. Time series analysis included 282 PC patients; matched cohorts included 27 PC with 128 usual care patients; clinical outcome analysis of 48 PC patients. Mean daily patient costs and length of stay (LOS); pain, dyspnea, and secretions assessment scores. Mean daily costs were reduced 33% (p reduction in mean daily costs and LOS resulted in an estimated annual savings of $2.2 million in the study hospital. Our results extend the evidence base of financial and clinical benefits associated with inpatient PC programs. We recommend additional study of best practices for identifying patients and providing consultation services, in addition to progressive management support and reimbursement policy.

  13. Reforming health care in Canada: current issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baris Enis

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the current health care reform issues in Canada. The provincial health insurance plans of the 1960s and 1970s had the untoward effects of limiting the federal government's clout for cost control and of promoting a system centered on inpatient and medical care. Recently, several provincial commissions reported that the current governance structures and management processes are outmoded in light of new knowledge, new fiscal realities and the evolution of power among stake-holders. They recommend decentralized governance and restructuring for better management and more citizen participation. Although Canada's health care system remains committed to safeguarding its guiding principles, the balance of power may be shifting from providers to citizens and "technocrats". Also, all provinces are likely to increase their pressure on physicians by means of salary caps, by exploring payment methods such as capitation, limiting access to costly technology, and by demanding practice changes based on evidence of cost-effectiveness.

  14. Improving the physical health of people with severe mental illness in a low secure forensic unit: An uncontrolled evaluation study of staff training and physical health care plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Mark; Llewellyn-Jones, Sian; Yarnold, Steve; Simpson, Alan

    2016-12-01

    The life expectancy of people with severe mental illnesses is substantially reduced, and monitoring and screening for physical health problems is a key part of addressing this health inequality. Inpatient admission presents a window of opportunity for this health-care activity. The present study was conducted in a forensic mental health unit in England. A personal physical health plan incorporating clearly-presented and easily-understood values and targets for health status in different domains was developed. Alongside this, a brief physical education session was delivered to health-care staff (n = 63). Printed learning materials and pedometers and paper tape measures were also provided. The impact was evaluated by a single-group pretest post-test design; follow-up measures were 4 months' post-intervention. The feasibility and acceptability of personal health plans and associated resources were examined by free-text questionnaire responses. Fifty-seven staff provided measures of attitudes and knowledge before training and implementation of the physical health plans. Matched-pairs analysis indicated a modest but statistically-significant improvement in staff knowledge scores and attitudes to involvement in physical health care. Qualitative feedback indicated limited uptake of the care plans and perceived need for additional support for better adoption of this initiative. Inpatient admission is a key setting for assessing physical health and promoting improved management of health problems. Staff training and purpose-designed personalized care plans hold potential to improve practice and outcomes in this area, but further support for such innovations appears necessary for their uptake in inpatient mental health settings. © 2016 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  15. Impact on continuity of care of decentralized versus partly centralized mental health care in Northern Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myklebust, Lars Henrik; Olstad, Reidun; Bjorbekkmo, Svein; Eisemann, Martin; Wynn, Rolf; Sørgaard, Knut

    2011-01-01

    Background The issue of continuity of care is central in contemporary psychiatric services research. In Norway, inpatient admissions are mainly to take place locally, in a system of small bed-units that represent an alternative to traditional central psychiatric hospitals. This type of organization may be advantageous for accessibility and cooperation, but has been given little scientific attention. Aims To study whether inpatients’ utilization of outpatient services differ between an area with a decentralized care model in comparison to an adjacent area with a partly centralized model. Method The study was based on data from a one-year registered prevalence sample, drawing on routinely sampled data supplemented with data from medical records. Service-utilization for 247 inpatients was analyzed. The results were controlled for diagnosis, demographic variables, type of service system, localization of inpatient admissions, and length of hospitalization. Results Most inpatients in the area with the decentralized care model also utilized outpatient consultations, whereas a considerable number of inpatients in the area with a partly centralized model did not enter outpatient care at all. Type of service system, localization of inpatient admission, and length of hospitalization predicted inpatients’ utilization of outpatient consultations. The results are discussed in the light of systems integration, particularly management-arrangements and clinical bridging over the transitional phase from inpatient to outpatient care. Conclusion Inpatients’ utilization of outpatient services differed between an area with a decentralized care model in comparison to an adjacent area with a partly centralized care model. In the areas studied, extensive decentralization of the psychiatric services positively affected coordination of inpatient and outpatient services for people with severe psychiatric disorders. Small, local-bed units may therefore represent a favourable alternative

  16. Does Churning in Medicaid Affect Health Care Use?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Eric T.; Pollack, Craig Evan

    2017-01-01

    Background Transitions into and out of Medicaid, termed churning, may disrupt access to and continuity of care. Low-income, working adults who became eligible for Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act are particularly susceptible to income and employment changes that lead to churning. Objective To compare health care use among adults who do and do not churn into and out of Medicaid. Data Longitudinal data from 6 panels of the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey. Methods We used differences-in-differences regression to compare health care use when adults reenrolled in Medicaid following a loss of coverage, to utilization in a control group of continuously enrolled adults. Outcome Measures Emergency department (ED) visits, ED visits resulting in an inpatient admission, and visits to office-based providers. Results During the study period, 264 adults churned into and out of Medicaid and 627 had continuous coverage. Churning adults had an average of approximately 0.05 Medicaid-covered office-based visits per month 4 months before reenrolling in Medicaid, significantly below the rate of approximately 0.20 visits in the control group. Visits to office-based providers did not reach the control group rate until several months after churning adults had resumed Medicaid coverage. Our comparisons found no evidence of significantly elevated ED and inpatient admission rates in the churning group following reenrollment. Conclusions Adults who lose Medicaid tend to defer their use of office-based care to periods when they are insured. Although this suggests that enrollment disruptions lead to suboptimal timing of care, we do not find evidence that adults reenroll in Medicaid with elevated acute care needs. PMID:26908088

  17. Neonatal Intensive Care and Child Psychiatry Inpatient Care: Do Different Working Conditions Influence Stress Levels?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evalotte Mörelius

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Nurses often experience work-related stress. High stress can negatively affect job satisfaction and lead to emotional exhaustion with risk of burnout. Aim. To analyse possible differences in biological stress markers, psychosocial working conditions, health, and well-being between nurses working in two different departments. Methods. Stress was evaluated in nurses working in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU (n=33 and nurses working in a child and adolescent psychiatry inpatient ward (CAP (n=14 using salivary cortisol and HbA1c. Salivary cortisol was measured three times a day on two consecutive days during two one-week periods, seven weeks apart (= 12 samples/person. Psychosocial working conditions, health, and well-being were measured once. Results. NICU nurses had better social support and more self-determination. CAP nurses had a lower salivary cortisol quotient, poorer general health, and higher client-related burnout scores. Conclusion. When comparing these nurses with existing norm data for Sweden, as a group their scores reflect less work-related stress than Swedes overall. However, the comparison between NICU and CAP nurses indicates a less healthy work situation for CAP nurses. Relevance to Clinical Practice. Healthcare managers need to acknowledge the less healthy work situation CAP nurses experience in order to provide optimal support and promote good health.

  18. Managing health care costs: strategies available to small businesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, C W; Finley, L; Kinard, J

    1990-07-01

    Although health care costs continue to rise at an alarming rate, small businesses can take steps to help moderate these costs. First, business firms must restructure benefits so that needless surgery is eliminated and inpatient hospital care is minimized. Next, small firms should investigate the feasibility of partial self-insurance options such as risk pooling and purchasing preferred premium plans. Finally, small firms should investigate the cost savings that can be realized through the use of alternative health care delivery systems such as HMOs and PPOs. Today, competition is reshaping the health care industry by creating more options and rewarding efficiency. The prospect of steadily rising prices and more choices makes it essential that small employers become prudent purchasers of employee health benefits. For American businesses, the issue is crucial. Unless firms can control health care costs, they will have to keep boosting the prices of their goods and services and thus become less competitive in the global marketplace. In that event, many workers will face a prospect even more grim than rising medical premiums: losing their jobs.

  19. A chief of service rotation as an alternative approach to pediatric otolaryngology inpatient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adil, Eelam; Xiao, Roy; McGill, Trevor; Rahbar, Reza; Cunningham, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Maintaining an outpatient practice and providing high-quality inpatient care pose significant challenges to the traditional call team approach. To introduce a unique rotating hospitalist inpatient program and assess its clinical, educational, and financial impact. The chief of service (COS) program requires 1 attending physician to rotate weekly as chief of the inpatient service with no conflicting elective duties. This was a retrospective internal billing data review performed at a tertiary pediatric hospital. A total of 1241 patients were evaluated by the COS from October 2012 through October 2013. All patients were treated by the inpatient service under the supervision of the COS. A retrospective analysis of patient encounters and procedures, including International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) and Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) codes, locations of service, clinicians, service dates, and average weekly relative value units (RVUs). Over the study period, the COS was involved in the care of 1241 patients, generating 2786 billable patient encounters. The COS averaged 11.2 patient encounters per day. The most common reasons for consultation were respiratory distress, dysphagia, and stridor. Of patient encounters, 63.0% resulted in a procedure; 82.8% of those procedures were performed in the operating room with the most common being lower airway endoscopy (340 [19.4%]). The average weekly RVUs for the COS (232) were comparable with those of the average weekly outpatient clinic and procedural RVUs of the other otolaryngology faculty in the group (240). The COS program was created to meet the clinical, educational, and organizational demands of a high-volume and high-acuity inpatient service. It is a financially sustainable model with unique advantages, particularly for the staff who maintain their outpatient practices without disruption and for the trainees who have the opportunity to work closely with the entire faculty. Patients are

  20. Mental health nurses' diabetes care skills - a training needs analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Michael

    2009-05-28

    This article explores mental health nurses' diabetes training needs. A survey of inpatient and community mental health nurses was undertaken using a 16-item self-reporting questionnaire. Two hundred and twenty questionnaires were sent out and 138 returned, providing a response rate of 63%. Analysis shows that mental health nurses are currently involved in a range of diabetes care activities, however, their knowledge and skills may not be up to date. Mental health nurses also report the growing impact of diabetes care on their workload. Areas of identified training needs include taking blood glucose readings, giving dietary advice, liaison with diabetes nurse specialists and weight management. Mental health services and education providers need to consider developing specific training courses for mental health nurses.

  1. Practice what you preach: developing person-centred culture in inpatient mental health settings through strengths-based, transformational leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckett, Paul; Field, John; Molloy, Luke; Yu, Nickolas; Holmes, Douglas; Pile, Emily

    2013-08-01

    The experience of nursing staff and consumers in inpatient mental health wards is often reported as being negative. Efforts to improve culture and practice have had limited success, with ineffective leadership, staff resistance, and unresponsive organisational culture identified as common barriers to change. Practice development has been promoted as an approach to developing person-centred culture that enables professional development through participation, learning and empowerment. For person-centred practice to flourish, organisational leadership at all levels must reflect the same principles. In preparation for the opening of a new integrated mental health service, an inpatient mental health team participated in a practice development project. An action research approach was used to facilitate a series of "away days," initially with the nursing team and then other members of the multidisciplinary team (MDT). Transformational leadership principles were adopted in the facilitation of team activities underpinned by strengths and solution-focused practices. Evaluation of the project by staff members was very positive and there was a high level of participation in practice development activities. The project resulted in the creation of a development plan for the ward, which prioritised five key themes: person-centred care, personal recovery, strengths-based principles, and evidence-based and values-based care. The project outcomes highlight the importance of leadership, which parallels the ideals promoted for clinical practice.

  2. Integrated versus fragmented implementation of complex innovations in acute health care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woiceshyn, Jaana; Blades, Kenneth; Pendharkar, Sachin R.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Increased demand and escalating costs necessitate innovation in health care. The challenge is to implement complex innovations—those that require coordinated use across the adopting organization to have the intended benefits. Purpose: We wanted to understand why and how two of five similar hospitals associated with the same health care authority made more progress with implementing a complex inpatient discharge innovation whereas the other three experienced more difficulties in doing so. Methodology: We conducted a qualitative comparative case study of the implementation process at five comparable urban hospitals adopting the same inpatient discharge innovation mandated by their health care authority. We analyzed documents and conducted 39 interviews of the health care authority and hospital executives and frontline managers across the five sites over a 1-year period while the implementation was ongoing. Findings: In two and a half years, two of the participating hospitals had made significant progress with implementing the innovation and had begun to realize benefits; they exemplified an integrated implementation mode. Three sites had made minimal progress, following a fragmented implementation mode. In the former mode, a semiautonomous health care organization developed a clear overall purpose and chose one umbrella initiative to implement it. The integrative initiative subsumed the rest and guided resource allocation and the practices of hospital executives, frontline managers, and staff who had bought into it. In contrast, in the fragmented implementation mode, the health care authority had several overlapping, competing innovations that overwhelmed the sites and impeded their implementation. Practice Implications: Implementing a complex innovation across hospital sites required (a) early prioritization of one initiative as integrative, (b) the commitment of additional (traded off or new) human resources, (c) deliberate upfront planning and

  3. In-patient costs of agitation and containment in a mental health catchment area

    OpenAIRE

    Serrano-Blanco, Antoni; Rubio-Valera, Maria; Aznar-Lou, Ignacio; Balad?n Higuera, Luisa; Gibert, Karina; Gracia Canales, Alfredo; Kaskens, Lisette; Ortiz, Jos? Miguel; Salvador-Carulla, Luis

    2017-01-01

    Background There is a scarce number of studies on the cost of agitation and containment interventions and their results are still inconclusive. We aimed to calculate the economic consequences of agitation events in an in-patient psychiatric facility providing care for an urban catchment area. Methods A mixed approach combining secondary analysis of clinical databases, surveys and expert knowledge was used to model the 2013 direct costs of agitation and containment events for adult inpatients ...

  4. In-patient costs of agitation and containment in a mental health catchment area

    OpenAIRE

    Serrano-Blanco, Antoni; Rubio-Valera, Maria; Aznar, Ignacio; Baladón, Luisa; Gibert, Karina; Gracia Canales, Alfredo; Kaskens, Lisette; Ortiz, José Miguel; Salvador Carulla, Luís

    2017-01-01

    Background: There is a scarce number of studies on the cost of agitation and containment interventions and their results are still inconclusive. We aimed to calculate the economic consequences of agitation events in an in-patient psychiatric facility providing care for an urban catchment area. Methods: A mixed approach combining secondary analysis of clinical databases, surveys and expert knowledge was used to model the 2013 direct costs of agitation and containment events for adult inpatient...

  5. Comparison of Long-term Care in Nursing Homes Versus Home Health: Costs and Outcomes in Alabama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, Justin; Locher, Julie L; Kilgore, Meredith L

    2016-04-01

    To compare acute care outcomes and costs among nursing home residents with community-dwelling home health recipients. A matched retrospective cohort study of Alabamians aged more than or equal to 65 years admitted to a nursing home or home health between March 31, 2007 and December 31, 2008 (N = 1,291 pairs). Medicare claims were compared up to one year after admission into either setting. Death, emergency department and inpatient visits, inpatient length of stay, and acute care costs were compared using t tests. Medicaid long-term care costs were compared for a subset of matched beneficiaries. After one year, 77.7% of home health beneficiaries were alive compared with 76.2% of nursing home beneficiaries (p Home health beneficiaries averaged 0.2 hospital visits and 0.1 emergency department visits more than nursing home beneficiaries, differences that were statistically significant. Overall acute care costs were not statistically different; home health beneficiaries' costs averaged $31,423, nursing home beneficiaries' $32,239 (p = .5032). Among 426 dual-eligible pairs, Medicaid long-term care costs averaged $4,582 greater for nursing home residents (p nursing home or home health care. Additional research controlling for exogenous factors relating to long-term care decisions is needed. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Preventing dehydration-related hospitalizations: a mixed-methods study of parents, inpatient attendings, and primary care physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanley, Leticia; Mittal, Vineeta; Flores, Glenn

    2013-07-01

    The goal of this study was to identify the proportion of dehydration-related ambulatory care-sensitive condition hospitalizations, the reasons why these hospitalizations were preventable, and factors associated with preventability. A cross-sectional survey of primary care providers (PCPs), inpatient attending physicians, and parents was conducted in a consecutive series of children with ambulatory care-sensitive conditions admitted to an urban hospital over 14 months. Eighty-five children were diagnosed with dehydration. Their mean age was 1.6 years; most had public (74%) or no (17%) insurance, and were nonwhite (91%). The proportion of hospitalizations assessed as preventable varied from 12% for agreement among all 3 sources to 45% for any source. Parents identified inadequate prevention (50%), poor self-education (34%), and poor quality of care (38%) as key factors. PCPs identified parents providing insufficient home rehydration (33%), not visiting the clinic (25%), and not calling earlier (16%) as reasons. Inpatient attending physicians cited home rehydration (40%), delays in seeking care (40%), and lacking a PCP (20%) as contributors. Physicians (PCPs and inpatient attending physicians) were more likely than parents to describe the admission as inappropriate (75% vs 67% vs 0%; P dehydration-related hospitalizations may be preventable. Inadequate parental education by physicians, insufficient home rehydration, deferring clinic visits, insurance and cost barriers, inappropriate admissions, poor quality of care, and parental dissatisfaction with PCPs are the reasons that these hospitalizations might have been prevented.

  7. [Evaluating the activity of the Italian Mental Health Services inpatient and residential facilities: the PRISM (Process Indicator System for Mental health) indicators].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picardi, Angelo; Tarolla, Emanuele; de Girolamo, Giovanni; Gigantesco, Antonella; Neri, Giovanni; Rossi, Elisabetta; Biondi, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the activities of a project aimed at developing a system of process and process/outcome indicators suitable to monitor over time the quality of psychiatric care of Italian inpatient and residential psychiatric facilities. This system, named PRISM (Process Indicator System for Mental health), was developed by means of a standardized evaluation made by a panel of experts and a consecutive pilot study in 17 inpatient and 13 residential psychiatric facilities. A total of 28 indicators were selected from a set of 251 candidate indicators developed by the most relevant and qualified Italian and international authorities. These indicators are derived by data from medical records and information about characteristics of facilities, and they cover processes of care, operational equipment of facilities, staff training and working, relationships with external agencies, and sentinel events. The procedure followed for the development of the indicator system was reliable and innovative. The data collected from the pilot study suggested a favourable benefit-cost ratio between the workload associated with regular use of the indicators into the context of daily clinical activities and the advantages related to the information gathered through regular use of the indicators. CONCLUSIONS.:The PRISM system provides additional information about the healthcare processes with respect to the information gathered via routine information systems, and it might prove useful for both continuous quality improvement programs and health services research.

  8. Accounting for Inpatient Wards when developing Master Surgical Schedules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanberkel, P.T.; Boucherie, Richardus J.; Hans, Elias W.; Hurink, Johann L.; van Lent, W.A.M.; van Harten, Willem H.; van Harten, Wim H.

    BACKGROUND: As the demand for health care services increases, the need to improve patient flow between departments has likewise increased. Understanding how the master surgical schedule (MSS) affects the inpatient wards and exploiting this relationship can lead to a decrease in surgery

  9. Applying sensory modulation to mental health inpatient care to reduce seclusion and restraint: a case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Charlotte; Kolmos, Anne; Andersen, Kjeld; Sippel, Volkmar; Stenager, Elsebeth

    2017-10-01

    Clinical training in managing conflicts and preventing violence seldom contains sensory modulation (SM) as a method to de-escalate and prevent restraint and seclusion. Sensory-based interventions promote adaptive regulation of arousal and emotion. SM is a complementary approach that is associated with reduced rates of seclusion and restraint in mental healthcare, but there is need for more research in this area. Using SM to reduce restraint and seclusion in inpatient mental health care. The study included two similar psychiatric units where one unit implemented SM and one unit served as the control group. In the very beginning of the study, a staff-training program in the use of SM including assessment tools and intervention strategies was established. Data on restraint and forced medicine were sampled post the course of the year of implementation and compared with the control group. The use of belts decreased with 38% compared to the control group. The use of forced medication decreased with 46% compared to the control group. Altogether the use of physical restraint and forced medication decreased significantly with 42% (p mental healthcare facilities has a significant effect on the reduction of restraint and seclusion. As a part of the implementation, staff training and education in SM are crucial.

  10. Rising utilization of inpatient pediatric asthma pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Sunitha V; Rodean, Jonathan; Bekmezian, Arpi; Hall, Matt; Shah, Samir S; Mahant, Sanjay; Parikh, Kavita; Morse, Rustin; Puls, Henry; Cabana, Michael D

    2018-02-01

    Clinical pathways are detailed care plans that operationalize evidence-based guidelines into an accessible format for health providers. Their goal is to link evidence to practice to optimize patient outcomes and delivery efficiency. It is unknown to what extent inpatient pediatric asthma pathways are being utilized nationally. (1) Describe inpatient pediatric asthma pathway design and implementation across a large hospital network. (2) Compare characteristics of hospitals with and without pathways. We conducted a descriptive, cross-sectional, survey study of hospitals in the Pediatric Research in Inpatient Settings Network (75% children's hospitals, 25% community hospitals). Our survey determined if each hospital used a pathway and pathway characteristics (e.g. pathway elements, implementation methods). Hospitals with and without pathways were compared using Chi-square tests (categorical variables) and Student's t-tests (continuous variables). Surveys were distributed to 3-5 potential participants from each hospital and 302 (74%) participants responded, representing 86% (106/123) of surveyed hospitals. From 2005-2015, the proportion of hospitals utilizing inpatient asthma pathways increased from 27% to 86%. We found variation in pathway elements, implementation strategies, electronic medical record integration, and compliance monitoring across hospitals. Hospitals with pathways had larger inpatient pediatric programs [mean 12.1 versus 6.1 full-time equivalents, p = 0.04] and were more commonly free-standing children's hospitals (52% versus 23%, p = 0.05). From 2005-2015, there was a dramatic rise in implementation of inpatient pediatric asthma pathways. We found variation in many aspects of pathway design and implementation. Future studies should determine optimal implementation strategies to better support hospital-level efforts in improving pediatric asthma care and outcomes.

  11. [Family Health Program and children palliative care: listening the relatives of technology dependent children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabello, Cláudia Azevedo Ferreira Guimarães; Rodrigues, Paulo Henrique de Almeida

    2010-03-01

    This study discusses the creation of a new children palliative care program based on the Family Health Program, considering the level of care at home and yielding to family requests. The study focused on eighteen members of nine families of technology dependent children (TDC) who were hospital patients at Instituto Fernandes Figueira (IFF): four who are being assisted by its palliative care program Programa de Assistência Domiciliar Interdisciplinar (PADI); three who were inpatients waiting for inclusion in the Program, and finally two inpatients already included in PADI. PADI was chosen because it is the only child palliative care program in Brazil. The results are positive in regards to the connection established between the families and the health care team, the reception of the children, the explanation to the family concerning the disease, and the functional dynamics between the PADI and IFF. As negative points, difficulties arose as a result of the implementation of the program, from its continuity to the worsening or illness of the entire family. In conclusion, although the PADI is the IFF's way of discharging patients, the domiciliary cares taken by the Family Health Program, well articulated with the healthcare system, would be ideal for being the adequate assistance for such.

  12. Recent Health Care Use and Medicaid Entry of Medicare Beneficiaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keohane, Laura M; Trivedi, Amal N; Mor, Vincent

    2017-10-01

    To examine the relationship between Medicaid entry and recent health care use among Medicare beneficiaries. We identified Medicare beneficiaries without full Medicaid or use of hospital or nursing home services in 2008 (N = 2,163,387). A discrete survival analysis estimated beneficiaries' monthly likelihood of entry into the full Medicaid program between January 2009 and June 2010. During the 18-month study period, Medicaid entry occurred for 1.1% and 3.7% of beneficiaries who aged into Medicare or originally qualified for Medicare due to disability, respectively. Among beneficiaries who aged into Medicare, 49% of new Medicaid participants had no use of inpatient, skilled nursing facility, or nursing home services during the study period. Individuals who recently used inpatient, skilled nursing facility or nursing home services had monthly rates of 1.9, 14.0, and 38.1 new Medicaid participants per 1,000 beneficiaries, respectively, compared with 0.4 new Medicaid participants per 1,000 beneficiaries with no recent use of these services. Although recent health care use predicted greater likelihood of Medicaid entry, half of new Medicaid participants used no hospital or nursing home care during the study period. These patterns should be considered when designing and evaluating interventions to reform health care delivery for dual-eligible beneficiaries. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. The role of a palliative care inpatient unit in disease management of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. To monitor the success of an inpatient palliative care unit combining private and state patients, and accessible to patients with cancer and AIDS. Design. An observational study was conducted of patients admitted to the unit in the first 3 months following opening of the ward (1 March - 31 May 2006). Methods.

  14. Geriatric Patient Safety Indicators Based on Linked Administrative Health Data to Assess Anticoagulant-Related Thromboembolic and Hemorrhagic Adverse Events in Older Inpatients: A Study Proposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Pogam, Marie-Annick; Quantin, Catherine; Reich, Oliver; Tuppin, Philippe; Fagot-Campagna, Anne; Paccaud, Fred; Peytremann-Bridevaux, Isabelle; Burnand, Bernard

    2017-05-11

    Frail older people with multiple interacting conditions, polypharmacy, and complex care needs are particularly exposed to health care-related adverse events. Among these, anticoagulant-related thromboembolic and hemorrhagic events are particularly frequent and serious in older inpatients. The growing use of anticoagulants in this population and their substantial risk of toxicity and inefficacy have therefore become an important patient safety and public health concern worldwide. Anticoagulant-related adverse events and the quality of anticoagulation management should thus be routinely assessed to improve patient safety in vulnerable older inpatients. This project aims to develop and validate a set of outcome and process indicators based on linked administrative health data (ie, insurance claims data linked to hospital discharge data) assessing older inpatient safety related to anticoagulation in both Switzerland and France, and enabling comparisons across time and among hospitals, health territories, and countries. Geriatric patient safety indicators (GPSIs) will assess anticoagulant-related adverse events. Geriatric quality indicators (GQIs) will evaluate the management of anticoagulants for the prevention and treatment of arterial or venous thromboembolism in older inpatients. GPSIs will measure cumulative incidences of thromboembolic and bleeding adverse events based on hospital discharge data linked to insurance claims data. Using linked administrative health data will improve GPSI risk adjustment on patients' conditions that are present at admission and will capture in-hospital and postdischarge adverse events. GQIs will estimate the proportion of index hospital stays resulting in recommended anticoagulation at discharge and up to various time frames based on the same electronic health data. The GPSI and GQI development and validation process will comprise 6 stages: (1) selection and specification of candidate indicators, (2) definition of administrative data

  15. Reductions in inpatient mortality following interventions to improve emergency hospital care in Freetown, Sierra Leone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Clark

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The demand for high quality hospital care for children in low resource countries is not being met. This paper describes a number of strategies to improve emergency care at a children's hospital and evaluates the impact of these on inpatient mortality. In addition, the cost-effectiveness of improving emergency care is estimated. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A team of local and international staff developed a plan to improve emergency care for children arriving at The Ola During Children's Hospital, Freetown, Sierra Leone. Following focus group discussions, five priority areas were identified to improve emergency care; staff training, hospital layout, staff allocation, medical equipment, and medical record keeping. A team of international volunteers worked with local staff for six months to design and implement improvements in these five priority areas. The improvements were evaluated collectively rather than individually. Before the intervention, the inpatient mortality rate was 12.4%. After the intervention this improved to 5.9%. The relative risk of dying was 47% (95% CI 0.369-0.607 lower after the intervention. The estimated number of lives saved in the first two months after the intervention was 103. The total cost of the intervention was USD 29 714, the estimated cost per death averted was USD 148. There are two main limitation of the study. Firstly, the brevity of the study and secondly, the assumed homogeneity of the clinical cases that presented to the hospital before and after the intervention. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstarted a signficant reductuion in inpatient mortality rate after an intervention to improve emergency hospital care If the findings of this paper could be reproduced in a larger more rigorous study, improving the quality of care in hospitals would be a very cost effective strategy to save children's lives in low resource settings.

  16. Identifying palliative care issues in inpatients dying following stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntlholang, O; Walsh, S; Bradley, D; Harbison, J

    2016-08-01

    Stroke leads to high mortality and morbidity but often there is a conflict between need for palliative care and avoidance of 'therapeutic nihilism'. We aimed to elicit the palliative care needs of stroke patients at the end of their lives in our unit with a low overall mortality rate (1 month: 8.8 %, inpatient: 12.9 %). We identified consecutive stroke patients who died over 2 years. Their clinical records were used for data collection. Of 54 deaths, 33 (61.1 %) were females, mean (SD) age at death was 79.3 ± 12.9 years. 41 (75.9 %) died after first stroke, 9 (16.7 %) were inpatient strokes, 7 (13.0 %) thrombolysed and 7 (13.0 %) had strokes as treatment complication. There were clear statements recorded in 26 (48.1 %) that patients were dying and death was thought to be due primarily to extent of brain injury in 24 (44.4 %). Palliative needs identified included dyspnoea 21 (38.9 %), pain 17 (31.5 %), respiratory secretions 17 (31.5 %), agitation 14 (25.9 %) and psychological distress 1 (1.9 %). Symptoms were due to premorbid diseases in 6 (11.1 %). Palliative care expertise were sought in 13 (24.1 %) and continuous subcutaneous infusion was used in 18 (33.3 %) to control symptoms. 4 (7.4 %) subjects underwent cardiac arrest calls and 9 (16.7 %) deaths occurred in ICU/HDU. The median Stroke-Death interval was 20 days (range 0-389). Do Not Attempt Resuscitation (DNAR) orders were in place in 86.8 % of patients. The median DNAR-Death interval was 7 days (range 0-311) with 7-day DNAR-Death rate of 53.2 % and 30-day of 78.7 % of the total deaths. Dyspnoea, pain and respiratory secretions were identified as the main palliative care needs.

  17. Psychometric evaluation of an inpatient consumer survey measuring satisfaction with psychiatric care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Glorimar; Schacht, Lucille

    2012-01-01

    Measurement of consumers' satisfaction in psychiatric settings is important because it has been correlated with improved clinical outcomes and administrative measures of high-quality care. These consumer satisfaction measurements are actively used as performance measures required by the accreditation process and for quality improvement activities. Our objectives were (i) to re-evaluate, through exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), the structure of an instrument intended to measure consumers' satisfaction with care in psychiatric settings and (ii) to examine and publish the psychometric characteristics, validity and reliability, of the Inpatient Consumer Survey (ICS). To psychometrically test the structure of the ICS, 34 878 survey results, submitted by 90 psychiatric hospitals in 2008, were extracted from the Behavioral Healthcare Performance Measurement System (BHPMS). Basic descriptive item-response and correlation analyses were performed for total surveys. Two datasets were randomly created for analysis. A random sample of 8229 survey results was used for EFA. Another random sample of 8261 consumer survey results was used for CFA. This same sample was used to perform validity and reliability analyses. The item-response analysis showed that the mean range for a disagree/agree five-point scale was 3.10-3.94. Correlation analysis showed a strong relationship between items. Six domains (dignity, rights, environment, empowerment, participation, and outcome) with internal reliabilities between good to moderate (0.87-0.73) were shown to be related to overall care satisfaction. Overall reliability for the instrument was excellent (0.94). Results from CFA provided support for the domains structure of the ICS proposed through EFA. The overall findings from this study provide evidence that the ICS is a reliable measure of consumer satisfaction in psychiatric inpatient settings. The analysis has shown the ICS to provide valid and

  18. The effect of an occupational therapy mental health day treatment centre on the use of inpatient services in the Western Cape, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelbrecht, Riekie; Plastow, Nicola; Botha, Ulla; Niehaus, Djh; Koen, Liezl

    2018-04-27

    The aim of this study was to determine whether attendance at an occupational therapy-led day treatment centre for mental health care users affects the use of inpatient services in South Africa. A retrospective pre-test/post-test quasi-experimental study design was used to compare admissions and days spent in hospital during the 24 months before and after attendance at the centre, using the hospital's electronic records. Total population sampling yielded data for 44 mental health care users who made first contact with the service between July 2009 and June 2010. Data were compared using the Kruskal-Wallis test, Wilcoxon Signed Ranks test and Mann-Whitney U test. There was a significant decrease in the number of admissions (z = -4.093, p = 0.00) and the number of days spent in hospital (z = -4.730, p = 0.00). Participants were admitted to psychiatric care 33 times less in the 24 months' post-intervention, indicating a medium effect (r = 0.436). They also spend 2569 days less in hospital, indicating a large effect (r = 0.504). The findings suggest that an occupational therapy-led day treatment centre could be effective in reducing the use of inpatient mental health services in South Africa. Implications for Rehabilitation Attendance at an occupational therapy-led community day treatment centre decreases the number of admissions and number of days spent in hospital and is therefore beneficial to mental health care users and service providers. The study indicates that the successful implementation of a community day treatment centre for mental health care users on the grounds of a tertiary hospital by utilising existing resources is possible.

  19. 77 FR 34326 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-11

    ... identify outlier cases for both inpatient operating and inpatient capital related payments, which is... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services 42 CFR Parts 412... Fiscal Year 2013 Rates; Hospitals' Resident Caps for Graduate Medical Education Payment Purposes; Quality...

  20. Burnout intervention studies for inpatient elderly care nursing staff: systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westermann, Claudia; Kozak, Agnessa; Harling, Melanie; Nienhaus, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Staff providing inpatient elderly and geriatric long-term care are exposed to a large number of factors that can lead to the development of burnout syndrome. Burnout is associated with an increased risk of absence from work, low work satisfaction, and an increased intention to leave. Due to the fact that the number of geriatric nursing staff is already insufficient, research on interventions aimed at reducing work-related stress in inpatient elderly care is needed. The aim of this systematic review was to identify and analyse burnout intervention studies among nursing staff in the inpatient elderly and geriatric long-term care sector. A systematic search of burnout intervention studies was conducted in the databases Embase, Medline and PsycNet published from 2000 to January 2012. We identified 16 intervention studies. Interventions were grouped into work-directed (n=2), person-directed (n=9) and combined approaches (work- and person-directed, n=5). Seven out of 16 studies observed a reduction in staff burnout. Among them are two studies with a work-directed, two with a person-directed and three with a combined approach. Person-directed interventions reduced burnout in the short term (up to 1 month), while work-directed interventions and those with a combined approach were able to reduce burnout over a longer term (from 1 month to more than 1 year). In addition to staff burnout, three studies observed positive effects relating to the client outcomes. Only three out of ten Randomised Control Trials (RCT) found that interventions had a positive effect on staff burnout. Work-directed and combined interventions are able to achieve beneficial longer-term effects on staff burnout. Person-directed interventions achieve short-term results in reducing staff burnout. However, the evidence is limited. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Comparing Self-Concept Among Youth Currently Receiving Inpatient Versus Outpatient Mental Health Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Chris; Ferro, Mark A

    2018-01-01

    This study compared levels of self-concept among youth who were currently receiving inpatient versus outpatient mental health services. Forty-seven youth were recruited from the Child & Youth Mental Health Program at McMaster Children's Hospital. Self-concept was measured using the Self-Perception Profile for Children and Adolescents. The mean age was 14.5 years and most participants were female (70.2%). ANOVAs comparing self-concept with population norms showed large significant effects (d = 0.77 to 1.93) indicating compromised self-concept among youth receiving mental health services. Regression analyses controlling for patient age, sex, family income, and diagnoses of major depressive disorder, generalized social phobia, and generalized anxiety showed that the inpatient setting was a significant predictor of lower global self-worth (β=-.26; p=.035). Compared to outpatients, inpatients generally reported lower self-concept, but differences were significant only for global self-worth. Future research replicating this finding and assessing its clinical significance is encouraged.

  2. Health Care Access and Use Among Low-Income Children on Subsidized Insurance Programs in California.

    OpenAIRE

    Christopher Trenholm; Anna Saltzman; Shanna Shulman; Michael Cousineau; Dana Hughes

    2008-01-01

    This paper summarizes the CaliforniaKids and Healthy Kids programs—county-based insurance programs in California for low-income children. The study examined features of both programs, use of basic health care services by the children enrolled, and typical experiences accessing inpatient and other high-cost care. Children enrolled in the two programs made substantial use of outpatient health care, despite important variation in program features. The study concludes with recommendations on ho...

  3. Equity and efficiency in Italian health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paci, P; Wagstaff, A

    1993-04-01

    Health care finance and provision in Italy is unusual by international standards: public financing relies heavily on both general taxation and social insurance, and although the vast majority of expenditure is publicly financed, the majority of care is provided by the private sector. The system suffers, however, from a chronic failure to control expenditures and its record on perinatal and infant mortality is poor. Hospitals in Italy have a low bed-occupancy rate by international standards and the per diem system of reimbursing private hospitals encourages unduly long stays. Costs per inpatient day are high by international standards, but costs per admission are close to the OECD average. Ambulatory care costs are extremely low, but this appears to be due to the fact that GPs see so many patients that their role is inevitably mainly administrative. Consumption of medicines is extremely high, but because the cost per item is low, expenditure per capita is not unduly high. Despite the emphasis on social insurance, the financing system appears to be progressive. There is evidence of inequalities in health in Italy, and some evidence that health care is not provided equally to those in the same degree of need.

  4. Influence of multi-level anaesthesia care and patient profile on perioperative patient satisfaction in short-stay surgical inpatients: A preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amarjeet Singh

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and goals of study: Patient satisfaction in relation to perioperative anesthesia care represents essential aspect of quality health-care management. We analyzed the influence of multi-level anesthesia care exposure and patient profile on perioperative patient satisfaction in short-stay surgical inpatients. Methods : 120 short-stay surgical inpatients who underwent laparoscopic surgery have been included in this prospective study. Pertaining to demographic parameters (age, gender, education, profession, duration of stay (preoperative room, recovery room, various patient problems and patient satisfaction (various levels, overall were recorded by an independent observer and analyzed. Overall, adults, male and uneducated patients experienced more problems. Conversely, elderly, females and educated patients were more dissatisfied. Female patients suffered more during immediate postoperative recovery room stay and were more dissatisfied than their male counterparts (p< 0.05. However, patient′s professional status had no bearing on the problems encountered and dissatisfaction levels. Preoperative and early postoperative period accounted for majority of the problems encountered among the study population. There was a positive correlation between problems faced and dissatisfaction experienced at respective levels of anesthesia care (p< 0.05. Conclusion(s : Patient′s demographic profile and problems faced during respective level of anesthesia care has a correlation with dissatisfaction. Interestingly, none of the above stated factors had any effect on overall satisfaction level.

  5. Unpasteurized Shared Human Milk Use in Pediatric Inpatients: Health and Ethical Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbas, Kimberly H; Sussman-Karten, Karen; Kamin, Daniel; Huh, Susanna Y

    2017-06-01

    Growing evidence supporting the health benefits of human milk, particularly in the preterm population, has led to rising demand for donor human milk in NICUs and pediatric hospitals. There are no previous reports describing the use of unpasteurized shared human milk (USHM) in the hospital setting, but the use of USHM solicited from community donors through social networks appears to be common. Many pediatric hospitals permit inpatients to receive breast milk that has been screened and pasteurized by a human milk banking organization and will provide pasteurized donor human milk (PDHM) only to infants who are preterm or have specific medical conditions. These policies are designed to minimize potential adverse effects from improperly handled or screened donor milk and to target patients who would experience the greatest benefit in health outcomes with donor milk use. We explore the ethical and health implications of 2 cases of medically complex infants who did not meet criteria in our tertiary care hospital for the use of PDHM from a regulated human milk bank and were incidentally found to be using USHM. These cases raise questions about how best to balance the ethical principles of beneficence, nonmaleficence, justice, and patient autonomy in the provision of PDHM, a limited resource. Health care staff should ask about USHM use to provide adequate counseling about the risks and benefits of various feeding options in the context of an infant's medical condition. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  6. Sharing the load: parents and carers talk to consumer consultants at a child and youth mental health inpatient unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraghty, Kerry; McCann, Karen; King, Robert; Eichmann, Kathryn

    2011-08-01

    Caring for a child or adolescent affected by mental illness has been identified as imposing stresses and burdens in excess of those usually associated with child rearing. Peer support has been identified as one means by which these stresses and burdens can be reduced. This study investigated the work of a peer support service provided by Mater Child and Youth Mental Health Service in Brisbane, Australia. The study took the form of a content analysis of records of consultations between consumer consultants and 50 families/carers of children admitted into the acute inpatient unit during the period May 2006-April 2008. The content analysis identified four key themes or domains: experience of service provision, emotions and feelings associated with the admission, need for information, and coping with challenges. The findings from the study affirm the role of consumer consultants in child and adolescent inpatient services. Some families value a peer perspective and the opportunity to seek advice and information around a wide variety of topics from people not directly involved in the treatment of their child. © 2011 Mater Health Services. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing © 2011 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  7. Self-harm and attempted suicide within inpatient psychiatric services: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Karen; Stewart, Duncan; Bowers, Len

    2012-08-01

    Self harm is a major public health concern, yet there are considerable challenges in providing support for those who self harm within psychiatric inpatient services. This paper presents the first review of research into self harm within inpatient settings. Searches of the main electronic databases were conducted using key words for self harm and inpatient care. There was substantial variation in the rates of self-harm and attempted suicide between studies, but rates were highest on forensic wards. There was no evidence of differences in prevalence of self-harm between men and women; women, however, were at increased risk of attempting suicide. People were more likely to self-harm in private areas of the ward and in the evening hours, and often self-harmed in response to psychological distress, or elements of nursing care that restricted their freedom. Wards used a variety of strategies to prevent self-harm; however, there is little research into their effectiveness. © 2012 The Authors. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing © 2012 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  8. Implementation of inpatient models of pharmacogenetics programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallari, Larisa H; Lee, Craig R; Duarte, Julio D; Nutescu, Edith A; Weitzel, Kristin W; Stouffer, George A; Johnson, Julie A

    2016-12-01

    The operational elements essential for establishing an inpatient pharmacogenetic service are reviewed, and the role of the pharmacist in the provision of genotype-guided drug therapy in pharmacogenetics programs at three institutions is highlighted. Pharmacists are well positioned to assume important roles in facilitating the clinical use of genetic information to optimize drug therapy given their expertise in clinical pharmacology and therapeutics. Pharmacists have assumed important roles in implementing inpatient pharmacogenetics programs. This includes programs designed to incorporate genetic test results to optimize antiplatelet drug selection after percutaneous coronary intervention and personalize warfarin dosing. Pharmacist involvement occurs on many levels, including championing and leading pharmacogenetics implementation efforts, establishing clinical processes to support genotype-guided therapy, assisting the clinical staff with interpreting genetic test results and applying them to prescribing decisions, and educating other healthcare providers and patients on genomic medicine. The three inpatient pharmacogenetics programs described use reactive versus preemptive genotyping, the most feasible approach under the current third-party payment structure. All three sites also follow Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium guidelines for drug therapy recommendations based on genetic test results. With the clinical emergence of pharmacogenetics into the inpatient setting, it is important that pharmacists caring for hospitalized patients are well prepared to serve as experts in interpreting and applying genetic test results to guide drug therapy decisions. Since genetic test results may not be available until after patient discharge, pharmacists practicing in the ambulatory care setting should also be prepared to assist with genotype-guided drug therapy as part of transitions in care. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Health

  9. Sociodemographic and medical characteristics of involuntary psychiatric inpatients--retrospective study of five-year experience with Croatian Act on Mental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potkonjak, Jelena; Karlović, Dalibor

    2008-09-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze sociodemographic and medical characteristics of involuntary psychiatric inpatients treated during the five-year period of implementation of the Croatian Act on Mental Health. Data on involuntarily hospitalized patients according to the Croatian Act on Mental Health were singled out from the pool of inpatients treated at University Department of Psychiatry, Sestre milosrdnice University Hospital from January 1, 1998 till December 31, 2002. Data were collected from medical records. Patients were diagnosed according to the International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision criteria. The prevalence of involuntary hospitalization was 2%, including a comparative number of male and female patients. Most patients had secondary school, were living alone, were unmarried, widowed or divorced, and did not work at the time of hospitalization; however, most patients had some kind of health insurance. Schizophrenia was the most common diagnosis in involuntary psychiatric inpatients. In conclusion, scientific evaluation of involuntary hospitalization poses a major problem because of the many different factors that can influence the prevalence of involuntary hospitalization. Some of this factors are type of institution (psychiatric hospital or psychiatry department at a general hospital), organization of psychiatric care in the region, psychiatric morbidity and dynamics of changes in psychiatric morbidity in a specific region, public opinion about people with mental disorders, legal provisions on this very sensitive topic, etc.

  10. Health Care Utilization and Costs Associated with Pediatric Chronic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumin, Dmitry; Drees, David; Miller, Rebecca; Wrona, Sharon; Hayes, Don; Tobias, Joseph D; Bhalla, Tarun

    2018-03-30

    The population prevalence of pediatric chronic pain is not well characterized, in part due to lack of nationally representative data. Previous research suggests that pediatric chronic pain prolongs inpatient stay and increases costs, but the population-level association between pediatric chronic pain and health care utilization is unclear. We use the 2016 National Survey of Children's Health to describe the prevalence of pediatric chronic pain, and compare health care utilization among children ages 0-17 years according to the presence of chronic pain. Using a sample of 43,712 children, we estimate the population prevalence of chronic pain to be 6%. On multivariable analysis, chronic pain was not associated with increased odds of primary care or mental health care use, but was associated with greater odds of using other specialty care (OR=2.01, 95% CI: 1.62, 2.47; pcomplementary and alternative medicine (OR=2.32, 95% CI: 1.79, 3.03; pchronic pain were more likely to use specialty care but not mental health care. The higher likelihood of emergency care use in this group raises the question of whether better management of pediatric chronic pain could reduce emergency department use. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Inpatient cost for hip fracture patients managed with an orthogeriatric care model in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Lester Teong Jin; Wong, Seng Joung; Kwek, Ernest Beng Kee

    2017-03-01

    The estimated incidence of hip fractures worldwide was 1.26 million in 1990 and is expected to double to 2.6 million by 2025. The cost of care for hip fracture patients is a significant economic burden. This study aimed to look at the inpatient cost of hip fractures among elderly patients placed under a mature orthogeriatric co-managed system. This study was a retrospective analysis of 244 patients who were admitted to the Department of Orthopaedics of Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore, in 2011 for hip fractures under a mature orthogeriatric hip fracture care path. Information regarding costs, surgical procedures performed and patient demographics was collected. The mean cost of hospitalisation was SGD 13,313.81. The mean cost was significantly higher for the patients who were managed surgically than for the patients who were managed non-surgically (SGD 14,815.70 vs. SGD 9,011.38; p 48 hours was SGD 2,716.63. Reducing the time to surgery and preventing pre- and postoperative complications can help reduce overall costs. A standardised care path that empowers allied health professionals can help to reduce perioperative complications, and a combined orthogeriatric care service can facilitate prompt surgical treatment. Copyright: © Singapore Medical Association

  12. Access to Health Care and the Out‑of‑Pocket Burden of the European Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Krůtilová

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Provision of access to health care is a desirable feature of health care systems. Access to health care is caused to be restricted whether out‑of‑pocket burden is too high. The paper focuses on the European elderly with restricted access to health care and evaluates their health care burden and determines factors affecting the burden. The data from the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe from the fifth wave is used. The methods of descriptive and multivariate analysis are applied. A linear regression model with a bootstrapped method is used. The results showed that inequalities in access to health care exist. Unmet need is a critical issue in Estonia and Italy. The highest burden is found in Estonia, Italy and Belgium. Chronic diseases and limitation in activities significantly contributes to health care burden. Expenditure on drugs, outpatient and nursing care have a significant effect on the burden. The effect is found to be insignificant for inpatient care. Income and the employment status is a preventing factor.

  13. Responding to demand for inpatient care in the process of health development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Asefzadeh

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available During recent decades, many changes are happening in health sector and countries are trying to respond to the increasing health demands of people. Although hospitals have important role in health delivery system of any country, numerous factors have to be taken into account before establishing a new hospital in certain area. During recent decades, in many developing countries, new hospitals are built and equipped with sophisticated plant, without any scientific investigation. This means wastage of scarce resources. This paper aims to introduce need assessment methodology to establish hospitals and discuss the criteria to be met prior to their construction in the process of health care development.

  14. Cost analysis of in-patient cancer chemotherapy at a tertiary care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ashraf Wani

    2013-01-01

    Materials and Methods: After permission from the Ethical Committee, a prospective study of 6 months duration was carried out to study the cost of treatment provided to in-patients in Medical Oncology. Direct costs that include the cost of material, labor and laboratory investigations, along with indirect costs were calculated, and data analyzed to compute unit cost of treatment. Results: The major cost components of in-patient cancer chemotherapy are cost of drugs and materials as 46.88% and labor as 48.45%. The average unit cost per patient per bed day for in-patient chemotherapy is Rs. 5725.12 ($125.96. This includes expenditure incurred both by the hospital and the patient (out of pocket. Conclusion: The economic burden of cancer treatment is quite high both for the patient and the healthcare provider. Modalities in the form of health insurance coverage need to be established and strengthened for pooling of resources for the treatment and transfer of risks of these patients.

  15. Medicare program; hospital inpatient prospective payment systems for acute care hospitals and the long-term care hospital prospective payment system and Fiscal Year 2014 rates; quality reporting requirements for specific providers; hospital conditions of participation; payment policies related to patient status. Final rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-19

    We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems. Some of the changes implement certain statutory provisions contained in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (collectively known as the Affordable Care Act) and other legislation. These changes will be applicable to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2013, unless otherwise specified in this final rule. We also are updating the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis subject to these limits. The updated rate-of-increase limits will be effective for cost reporting periods beginning on or after October 1, 2013. We also are updating the payment policies and the annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital services provided by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) and implementing certain statutory changes that were applied to the LTCH PPS by the Affordable Care Act. Generally, these updates and statutory changes will be applicable to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2013, unless otherwise specified in this final rule. In addition, we are making a number of changes relating to direct graduate medical education (GME) and indirect medical education (IME) payments. We are establishing new requirements or have revised requirements for quality reporting by specific providers (acute care hospitals, PPS-exempt cancer hospitals, LTCHs, and inpatient psychiatric facilities (IPFs)) that are participating in Medicare. We are updating policies relating to the Hospital Value-Based Purchasing (VBP) Program and the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program. In addition, we are revising the conditions of participation (CoPs) for hospitals relating to the

  16. Addiction and suicidal behavior in acute psychiatric inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ries, Richard K; Yuodelis-Flores, Christine; Roy-Byrne, Peter P; Nilssen, Odd; Russo, Joan

    2009-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the relationship of alcohol/drug use and effect severities to the degree of suicidality in acutely admitted psychiatric patients. Both degree of substance dependency and degree of substance-induced syndrome were analyzed. In addition, length of stay, involuntary status, and against medical advice discharge status were determined as they related to these variables. Structured clinical admissions and discharge ratings were gathered from 10,667 consecutive, single-case individual records, from an urban acute care county psychiatric hospital. Data indicate that of the most severely suicidal group, 56% had substance abuse or dependence, 40% were rated as having half or more of their admission syndrome substance induced, and most had nonpsychotic diagnoses. There was an inverse relationship between degree of substance problem and length of stay. Although these patients more commonly left against medical advice, and were readmitted more frequently, they were less likely to be involuntarily committed. A large, potentially lethal, and highly expensive subgroup of patients has been characterized, which might be called the "New Revolving Door acute psychiatric inpatient." This group, which uses the most expensive level of care in the mental health system but is substantially addiction related, poses special challenges for inpatient psychiatric units, addiction treatment providers, and health care planners.

  17. Effect of health insurance on direct hospitalisation costs for in-patients with ischaemic stroke in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Ma; Xianjun, Xiong; Jinghu, Li; Yunyun, Fang

    2018-02-01

    Objectives The aim of the present study was to determine the direct medical costs of hospitalisations for ischaemic stroke (IS) in-patients with different types of health insurance in China and to analyse the demographic characteristics of hospitalised patients, based on data supplied by the China Health Insurance Research Association (CHIRA). Methods A nationwide and cross-sectional sample of IS in-patients with International Classifications of Diseases 10th Revision (ICD-10) Code I63 who were ensured under either the Basic Medical Insurance Scheme for Employees (BMISE) or the Basic Medical Insurance Scheme for Urban Residents (BMISUR) was extracted from the CHIRA claims database. A retrospective analysis was used with regard to patient demographics, total hospital charges and costs. Results Of the 49588 hospitalised patients who had been diagnosed with IS in the CHIRA claims database, 28850 (58.2%) were men (mean age 67.34 years) and 20738 (41.8%) were women (mean age 69.75 years). Of all patients, 40347 (81.4%) were insured by the BMISE, whereas 8724 (17.6%) were insured by the BMISUR; the mean age of these groups was 68.55 and 67.62 years respectively. For BMISE-insured in-patients, the cost per hospitalisation was RMB10131 (95% confidence interval (CI) 10014-10258), the cost per hospital day was RMB787 (95% CI 766-808), the out-of-pocket costs per patient were RMB2346 (95% CI 2303-2388) and the reimbursement rate was 74.61% (95% CI 74.48-74.73%). For BMISUR-insured in-patients the cost per hospitalisation was RMB7662 (95% CI 7473-7852), the cost per hospital day was RMB744 (95% CI 706-781), the out-of-pocket costs per patient were RMB3356 (95% CI 3258-3454) and the reimbursement rate was 56.46% (95% CI 56.08-56.84%). Conclusions Costs per hospitalisation, costs per hospital day and the reimbursement rate were higher for BMISE- than BMISUR-insured in-patients, but BMISE-insured patients had lower out-of-pocket costs. The financial burden was higher for BMISUR

  18. A Gap Analysis Needs Assessment Tool to Drive a Care Delivery and Research Agenda for Integration of Care and Sharing of Best Practices Across a Health System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Sherita Hill; Hager, Daniel; Gould, Lois J; Mathioudakis, Nestoras; Pronovost, Peter J

    2017-01-01

    In a complex health system, it is important to establish a systematic and data-driven approach to identifying needs. The Diabetes Clinical Community (DCC) of Johns Hopkins Medicine's Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality developed a gap analysis tool and process to establish the system's current state of inpatient diabetes care. The collectively developed tool assessed the following areas: program infrastructure; protocols, policies, and order sets; patient and health care professional education; and automated data access. For the purposes of this analysis, gaps were defined as those instances in which local resources, infrastructure, or processes demonstrated a variance against the current national evidence base or institutionally defined best practices. Following the gap analysis, members of the DCC, in collaboration with health system leadership, met to identify priority areas in order to integrate and synergize diabetes care resources and efforts to enhance quality and reduce disparities in care across the system. Key gaps in care identified included lack of standardized glucose management policies, lack of standardized training of health care professionals in inpatient diabetes management, and lack of access to automated data collection and analysis. These results were used to gain resources to support collaborative diabetes health system initiatives and to successfully obtain federal research funding to develop and pilot a pragmatic diabetes educational intervention. At a health system level, the summary format of this gap analysis tool is an effective method to clearly identify disparities in care to focus efforts and resources to improve care delivery. Copyright © 2016 The Joint Commission. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Paediatric in-patient care in a conflict-torn region of Somalia: are hospital outcomes of acceptable quality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachariah, R.; Hinderaker, S. G.; Khogali, M.; Manzi, M.; van Griensven, J.; Ayada, L.; Jemmy, J. P.; Maalim, A.; Amin, H.

    2013-01-01

    Setting: A district hospital in conflict-torn Somalia. Objective: To report on in-patient paediatric morbidity, case fatality and exit outcomes as indicators of quality of care. Design: Cross-sectional study. Results: Of 6211 children, lower respiratory tract infections (48%) and severe acute malnutrition (16%) were the leading reasons for admission. The highest case-fatality rate was for meningitis (20%). Adverse outcomes occurred in 378 (6%) children, including 205 (3.3%) deaths; 173 (2.8%) absconded. Conclusion: Hospital exit outcomes are good even in conflict-torn Somalia, and should boost efforts to ensure that such populations are not left out in the quest to achieve universal health coverage. PMID:26393014

  20. Health care utilization in patients with gout: a prospective multicenter cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jasvinder A; Bharat, Aseem; Khanna, Dinesh; Aquino-Beaton, Cleopatra; Persselin, Jay E; Duffy, Erin; Elashoff, David; Khanna, Puja P

    2017-05-31

    All published studies of health care utilization in gout have been cross-sectional to date, and most used a patient-reported diagnosis of gout. Our objective was to assess health care utilization and its predictors in patients with physician-confirmed gout in a prospective cohort study. In a multi-center prospective cohort study of U.S. veterans with rheumatologist-confirmed gout (N = 186; two centers), we assessed patient self-reported overall and gout-specific health care utilization with the Gout Assessment Questionnaire (GAQ) every 3-months for a 9-month period. Comparisons were made using the student's t test or the chi-square, Wilcoxon rank sum test or Fisher exact test, as appropriate. Mixed effects Poisson regression was used to assess potential correlates of gout-related health care utilization. Mean age was 64.6 years, 98% were men, 13% Hispanic or Latino, 32% were African-American, 6% did not graduate high school, mean serum urate was 8.3 and mean Deyo-Charlson score was 3.1. During the past year, mean gout-related visits were as follows: rheumatologist, 1.5; primary care physician, 2 visits; ≥1 inpatient visits, 7%; ≥1 ER visits, 26%; and urgent care/walk-in visit, 33%. In longitudinal analyses, African-American race and gout flares in the last 3 months were associated with significantly higher rate ratio of gout-related outpatient visits. African-American race and lack of college education were associated with significantly higher rate ratio for gout-related urgent visits and overnight stays. African-American race and recent gout flares were associated with higher outpatient utilization and African-American race and no college education with higher urgent or inpatient utilization. Future studies should examine whether modifiable predictors of utilization can be targeted to reduce healthcare utilization in patients with gout.

  1. Protecting health care workers from tuberculosis: a 10-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welbel, Sharon F; French, Audrey L; Bush, Patricia; DeGuzman, Delia; Weinstein, Robert A

    2009-10-01

    Cook County Hospital (CCH) is an inner-city, large public hospital. Twenty-five percent of Chicago's tuberculosis (TB) cases are diagnosed at CCH. We wanted to review and analyze interventions implemented over a 10-year period at CCH to prevent TB infection in health care workers. We performed a retrospective review of interventions to prevent health care-associated tuberculosis. We collated and analyzed tuberculin skin test conversions in our employees for the same time period. From 1990 to 2002, we cared for over 1800 in-patients with tuberculosis. During 1992-1997, multiple interventions to eliminate health care-associated spread of tuberculosis were implemented. Tuberculin skin test conversions in our employees decreased markedly from January 1994 through December 2002. Two drops in tuberculin skin test conversion rates occurred: one after introduction of basic administrative and engineering controls and a second after we experienced a decrease in missed TB cases and the introduction of N-95 personal respirators with 1-time qualitative fit testing. Our annual health care worker skin test conversion rate fell significantly when our primary interventions were relatively simple administrative and engineering controls. Educating health care workers to promptly recognize patients with TB and placing exhaust fans to create negative-pressure respiratory isolation rooms were probably our 2 most potent infection control measures.

  2. Rapid spread of complex change: a case study in inpatient palliative care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipski Marta I

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Based on positive findings from a randomized controlled trial, Kaiser Permanente's national executive leadership group set an expectation that all Kaiser Permanente and partner hospitals would implement a consultative model of interdisciplinary, inpatient-based palliative care (IPC. Within one year, the number of IPC consultations program-wide increased almost tenfold from baseline, and the number of teams nearly doubled. We report here results from a qualitative evaluation of the IPC initiative after a year of implementation; our purpose was to understand factors supporting or impeding the rapid and consistent spread of a complex program. Methods Quality improvement study using a case study design and qualitative analysis of in-depth semi-structured interviews with 36 national, regional, and local leaders. Results Compelling evidence of impacts on patient satisfaction and quality of care generated 'pull' among adopters, expressed as a remarkably high degree of conviction about the value of the model. Broad leadership agreement gave rise to sponsorship and support that permeated the organization. A robust social network promoted knowledge exchange and built on an existing network with a strong interest in palliative care. Resource constraints, pre-existing programs of a different model, and ambiguous accountability for implementation impeded spread. Conclusions A complex, hospital-based, interdisciplinary intervention in a large health care organization spread rapidly due to a synergy between organizational 'push' strategies and grassroots-level pull. The combination of push and pull may be especially important when the organizational context or the practice to be spread is complex.

  3. The National Heart Failure Project: a health care financing administration initiative to improve the care of Medicare beneficiaries with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoudi, F A; Ordin, D L; Delaney, R J; Krumholz, H M; Havranek, E P

    2000-01-01

    This is the second in a series describing Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA) initiatives to improve care for Medicare beneficiaries with heart failure. The first article outlined the history of HCFA quality-improvement projects and current initiatives to improve care in six priority areas: heart failure, acute myocardial infarction, stroke, pneumonia, diabetes, and breast cancer. This article details the objectives and design of the Medicare National Heart Failure Quality Improvement Project (NHF), which has as its goal the improvement of inpatient heart failure care. (c)2000 by CHF, Inc.

  4. Incentives of Health Care Expenditure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eero Siljander

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The incentives of health care expenditure (HCE have been a topic of discussion in the USA (Obama reforms and in Europe (adjustment to debt crisis. There are competing views of institutional versus GDP (unit income elasticity and productivity related factors of growth of expenditure. However ageing of populations, technology change and economic incentives related to institutions are also key drivers of growth according to the OECD and EU’s AWG committee. Simulation models have been developed to forecast the growth of social expenditure (including HCEs to 2050. In this article we take a historical perspective to look at the institutional structures and their relationship to HCE growth. When controlling for age structure, price developments, doctor density and in-patient and public shares of expenditures, we find that fee-for-service in primary care, is according to the results, in at least 20 percent more costly than capitation or salary remuneration. Capitation and salary (or wage remuneration are at same cost levels in primary care. However we did not find the cost lowering effect for gatekeeping which could have been expected based on previous literature. Global budgeting 30 (partly DRG based percent less costly in specialized care than other reimbursement schemes like open contracting or volume based reimbursement. However the public integration of purchaser and provider cost seems to result to about 20 higher than public reimbursement or public contracting. Increasing the number of doctors or public financing share results in increased HCEs. Therefore expanding public reimbursement share of health services seems to lead to higher HCE. On the contrary, the in-patient share reduced expenditures. Compared to the previous literature, the finding on institutional dummies is in line with similar modeling papers. However the results for public expansion of services is a contrary one to previous works on the subject. The median lag length of

  5. Staffing Levels and Inpatient Outcomes at Military Health Care Facilities: A Resource-Based View

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yap, Glenn

    2004-01-01

    Using a Resource-Based Theory/View of the firm, this study examined if increased inpatient staffing levels at military hospitals can generate a competitive advantage based on better patient quality outcomes...

  6. [Violence against health care providers and its correlations with sociodemographic and workplace-related factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irinyi, Tamás; Németh, Anikó; Lampek, Kinga

    2017-02-01

    Violence against health care providers is getting more awareness nowadays. This topic is in the focus of international scientific attention also, although in Hungary exact data is lacking. The present study aimed to assess the correlations between violent acts against health care workers and their effects with different sociodemographic and workplace-related factors. A quantitative cross-sectional online survey was conducted enrolling 1201 health care providers. Data were analysed trough chi-square, Kolmogorov-Smirnov, Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis tests, where appropriate. Verbal and physical aggression was experienced more frequently by nurses who were males, above the age of fifty, working in in-patient care or in 12 hours shifts or constant night shifts. The same groups of health care providers suffered more from the negative emotional consequences of violent acts. Aggression is a serious problem in the Hungarian health care system, therefore employees have to be prepared for these acts. Orv. Hetil., 2017, 158(6), 229-237.

  7. Regional differences in the validity of self-reported use of health care in Belgium: selection versus reporting bias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Van der Heyden

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Health Care Module of the European Health Interview Survey (EHIS is aimed to obtain comparable information on the use of inpatient and ambulatory care in all EU member states. In this study we assessed the validity of self-reported information on the use of health care, collected through this instrument, in the Belgian Health Interview Survey (BHIS, and explored the impact of selection and reporting bias on the validity of regional differences in health care use observed in the BHIS. Methods To assess reporting bias, self-reported BHIS 2008 data were linked with register-based data from the Belgian compulsory health insurance (BCHI. The latter were compared with similar estimates from a random sample of the BCHI to investigate the selection bias. Outcome indicators included the prevalence of a contact with a GP, specialist, dentist and a physiotherapist, as well as inpatient and day patient hospitalisation. The validity of the estimates and the regional differences were explored through measures of agreement and logistic regression analyses. Results Validity of self-reported health care use varies by type of health service and is more affected by reporting than by selection bias. Compared to health insurance estimates, self-reported results underestimate the percentage of people with a specialist contact in the past year (50.5 % versus 65.0 % and a day patient hospitalisation (7.8 % versus 13.9 %. Inversely, survey results overestimated the percentage of people having visited a dentist in the past year: 58.3 % versus 48.6 %. The best concordance was obtained for an inpatient hospitalisation (kappa 0.75. Survey data overestimate the higher prevalence of a contact with a specialist [OR 1.51 (95 % CI 1.33–1.72 for self-report and 1.08 (95 % CI 1.05–1.15 for register] and underestimate the lower prevalence of a contact with a GP [ORs 0.59 (95 % CI 0.51–0.70 and 0.41 (95 % CI 0.39–0.42 respectively] in

  8. Inpatient migration patterns in persons with spinal cord injury: A registry study with hospital discharge data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elias Ronca

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated and compared patient migration patterns of persons with spinal cord injury, the general population and persons with morbid obesity, rheumatic conditions and bowel disease, for secondary health conditions, across administrative boundaries in Switzerland. The effects of patient characteristics and health conditions on visiting hospitals outside the residential canton were examined using complete, nationwide, inpatient health records for the years 2010 and 2011. Patients with spinal cord injury were more likely to obtain treatment outside their residential canton as compared to all other conditions. Facilitators of patient migration in persons with spinal cord injury and the general hospital population were private or accidental health insurances covering costs. Barriers of patient migration in persons with spinal cord injury were old age, severe multimorbidity, financial coverage by basic health insurance, and minority language region. Keywords: Spinal cord injury, Patient migration, Health services accessibility, Health care utilization, Inpatient hospital care

  9. Socioeconomic inequalities of outpatient and inpatient service utilization in China: personal and regional perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dawei; Guo, Na; Wang, Jian; Nicholas, Stephen; Chen, Li

    2017-12-04

    China's health system has shown remarkable progress in health provision and health outcomes in recent decades, however inequality in health care utilization persists and poses a serious social problem. While government pro-poor health policies addressed affordability as the major obstacle to equality in health care access, this policy direction deserves further examination. Our study examines the issue of health care inequalities in China, analyzing both regional and individual socioeconomic factors associated with the inequality, and provides evidence to improve governmental health policies. The China Health and Nutrition Survey (CHNS) 1991-2011 data were used to analyze the inequality of health care utilization. The random effects logistic regression technique was used to model health care utilization as the dependent variable, and income and regional location as the independent variables, controlling for individuals' age, gender, marital status, education, health insurance, body mass index (BMI), and period variations. The dynamic trend of 1991-2011 regional disparities was estimated using an interaction term between the regional group dummy and the wave dummy. The probability of using outpatient service and inpatient services during the previous 4 weeks was 8.6 and 1.1% respectively. Compared to urban residents, suburban (OR: 0.802, 95% CI: 0.720-0.893), town (OR: 0.722, 95% CI: 0.648-0.804), rich (OR: 0.728, 95% CI: 0.656-0.807) and poor village (OR: 0.778, 95% CI: 0.698-0.868) residents were less likely to use outpatient service; and rich (OR: 0.609, 95% CI: 0.472-0.785) and poor village (OR: 0.752, 95% CI: 0. 576-0.983) residents were less likely to use inpatient health care. But the differences between income groups were not significant, except the differences between top and bottom income group in outpatient service use. Regional location was a more important factor than individual characteristics in determining access to health care. Besides demand

  10. Use of Inpatient Palliative Care by Type of Malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruck, Jessica M; Canner, Joseph K; Smith, Thomas J; Johnston, Fabian M

    2018-06-05

    Although mounting evidence supports the use of palliative care (PC) to improve care experiences and quality of life for oncology patients, the frequency of and factors associated with PC use during oncology-related hospitalizations remain unknown. Using the National Inpatient Sample dataset, hospitalizations during 2012-2014 for a primary diagnosis of cancer with high risk of in-hospital mortality were identified. PC use was identified using the V66.7 ICD-9 code. Factors associated with the cost of hospitalization were identified using multivariable gamma regression. During the study period, 124,186 hospitalizations were identified with a primary diagnosis of malignancy (melanoma, breast, colon, gynecologic, prostate, male genitourinary, head/neck, urinary tract, noncolon gastrointestinal, lung, brain, bone/soft tissue, endocrine, or nonlung thoracic). Most patients were treated at a teaching hospital (51-77% by cancer type), and use of PC ranged from 10% for patients with endocrine cancers to 31% for patients with melanoma. Patients utilizing PC had a lower frequency of operative procedures (4-33% vs. 34-79% by cancer type, all p ≤ 0.001), a higher rate of in-hospital death (30-45% vs. 4-10% by cancer type, all p < 0.001), and a lower total hospitalization cost (median: $5076-17,151 vs. $10,918-29,287 by cancer type, p ≤ 0.01 except male genitourinary). In an adjusted analysis, the cost of hospitalization was significantly associated (all p < 0.001) with patient gender, race, age, operative, in-hospital death, extended length of stay, and PC. In summary, inpatient PC utilization varied by cancer type. PC was associated with lower utilization of surgical procedures, shorter length of stay, and lower hospitalization cost. Lower hospitalization cost was also seen for patients who were older, female, or African American.

  11. Development of a recovery education program for inpatient mental health providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shu-Ping; Krupa, Terry; Lysaght, Rosemary; McCay, Elizabeth; Piat, Myra

    2014-12-01

    Mental health system transformation toward a recovery-orientation has created a demand for education to equip providers with recovery competencies. This report describes the development of a recovery education program designed specifically for inpatient providers. Part 1 of the education is a self-learning program introducing recovery concepts and a recovery competency framework; Part 2 is a group-learning program focusing on real-life dilemmas and applying the Appreciative Inquiry approach to address these clinical dilemmas. A pilot study with a pretest/posttest design was used to evaluate the program. Participants included 26 inpatient multidisciplinary providers from 3 hospitals. The results showed participants' improvement on recovery knowledge (z = -2.55, p = .011) after the self-learning program. Evaluations of the group-learning program were high (4.21 out of 5). These results support continued efforts to refine the program. Inpatient providers could use this program to lead interprofessional practice in promoting recovery. (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  12. Fire-related injuries with inpatient care in Finland: a 10-year nationwide study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haikonen, Kari; Lillsunde, Pirjo M; Lunetta, Philippe; Lounamaa, Anne; Vuola, Jyrki

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine fire-related injuries leading to inpatient care in Finland. The Finnish National Hospital Discharge Register (2000-2009) and a sample of 222 patients from the Helsinki Burn Centre who sustained flame burns was used. During the 10-years study period, the incidence of fire-related injuries with inpatient care was approximately 5.6 per 100000 persons-years (n=295; males 74%, females 26%). Approximately three quarters involved burns and the remaining cases were mostly combustion gas poisonings. Burns declined from 5.4 in 2000 to 4.0 per 100000 person-years in 2009. The decline was accounted for by young people primarily. Socio-economic features and smoking habits differ between the injured and general population. House fire victims were mainly middle aged and older, while injures involving flammable substances, campfires, etc., were mostly associated with young people. House fires caused the worst damage in terms of Total Body Surface Area burned and inhalation burns. Significantly more people die on the scene of the incident than during the hospital care. Targeting preventive measures in particular at older people and those with a tendency for alcohol abuse and smoking could potentially reduce the burden of the most severe flame burns. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  13. Multidisciplinary, multi-modal nutritional care in acute hip fracture inpatients - results of a pragmatic intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Jack J; Bauer, Judith D; Capra, Sandra; Pulle, Ranjeev Chrys

    2014-12-01

    Malnutrition is highly prevalent and resistant to intervention following hip fracture. This study investigated the impact of individualised versus multidisciplinary nutritional care on nutrition intake and outcomes in patients admitted to a metropolitan hospital acute hip fracture unit. A prospective, controlled before and after comparative interventional study aligning to the CONSORT guidelines for pragmatic clinical trials. Randomly selected patients receiving individualised nutritional care (baseline) were compared with post-interventional patients receiving a new model of nutritional care promoting nutrition as a medicine, multidisciplinary nutritional care, foodservice enhancements, and improved nutrition knowledge and awareness. Malnutrition was diagnosed using the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics criteria. Fifty-eight weighed food records were available for each group across a total of 82 patients (n = 44, n = 38). Group demographics were not significantly different with predominantly community dwelling (72%), elderly (82.2 years), female (70%), malnourished (51.0%) patients prone to co-morbidities (median 5) receiving early surgical intervention (median D1). Multidisciplinary nutritional care reduced intake barriers and increased total 24-h energy (6224 vs. 2957 kJ; p hip fracture inpatients. Similar pragmatic study designs should be considered in other elderly inpatient populations perceived resistant to nutritional intervention. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  14. Thank you for asking: Exploring patient perceptions of barcode medication administration identification practices in inpatient mental health settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strudwick, Gillian; Clark, Carrie; McBride, Brittany; Sakal, Moshe; Kalia, Kamini

    2017-09-01

    Barcode medication administration systems have been implemented in a number of healthcare settings in an effort to decrease medication errors. To use the technology, nurses are required to login to an electronic health record, scan a medication and a form of patient identification to ensure that these correspond correctly with the ordered medications prior to medication administration. In acute care settings, patient wristbands have been traditionally used as a form of identification; however, past research has suggested that this method of identification may not be preferred in inpatient mental health settings. If barcode medication administration technology is to be effectively used in this context, healthcare organizations need to understand patient preferences with regards to identification methods. The purpose of this study was to elicit patient perceptions of barcode medication administration identification practices in inpatient mental health settings. Insights gathered can be used to determine patient-centered preferences of identifying patients using barcode medication administration technology. Using a qualitative descriptive approach, fifty-two (n=52) inpatient interviews were completed by a Peer Support Worker using a semi-structured interview guide over a period of two months. Interviews were conducted in a number of inpatient mental health areas including forensic, youth, geriatric, acute, and rehabilitation services. An interprofessional team, inclusive of a Peer Support Worker, completed a thematic analysis of the interview data. Six themes emerged as a result of the inductive data analysis. These included: management of information, privacy and security, stigma, relationships, safety and comfort, and negative associations with the technology. Patients also indicated that they would like a choice in the type of identification method used during barcode medication administration. As well, suggestions were made for how barcode medication

  15. Prevalence and related factors of psychological distress among cancer inpatients using routine Distress Thermometer and Chinese Health Questionnaire screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiou YJ

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Yu-Jie Chiou,1 Nien-Mu Chiu,1 Liang-Jen Wang,2 Shau-Hsuan Li,3 Chun-Yi Lee,1 Ming-Kung Wu,1 Chien-Chih Chen,1 Yi-Shan Wu,1 Yu Lee1 1Department of Psychiatry, 2Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 3Department of Hematology-Oncology, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, Republic of China Background: Clinical practice guidelines suggest routine screening for distress among cancer patients for immediate early psychiatric care. However, previous studies focusing on routine screening for psychological distress among cancer inpatients in Taiwan are scant. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and related factors of psychological distress and mental illness among cancer inpatients in Taiwan. Patients and methods: This study was conducted as a retrospective chart review in a general hospital in southern Taiwan. Cancer inpatients were regularly screened by nursing staff using the Distress Thermometer and the 12-item Chinese Health Questionnaire. Positive screening results on either instrument were followed by a non-commanded referral to psychiatrists for clinical psychiatric diagnosis and treatment. Results: Of the 810 participants in this study, 179 (22.1% were recognized as having psychological distress. Younger age (odds ratio [OR] =1.82, having head and neck cancer (OR =2.43, and having not received chemotherapy (OR =1.58 were significantly related to psychological distress. Among the 56 patients (31.3% with psychological distress who were referred to psychiatrists, the most common mental illness was adjustment disorder (n=22, 39.2%, followed by major depressive disorder (n=13, 23.2%, depressive disorder not otherwise specified (n=6, 10.7%, and anxiety disorder not otherwise specified (n=4, 7.1%. Conclusion: Our study indicated that cancer inpatients with psychological distress were more likely to be younger in age, have head and neck cancer, and have not

  16. Comparing common reasons for inpatient and outpatient visits between commercially-insured duloxetine or pregabalin initiators with fibromyalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Y

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Yang Zhao,1 Peter Sun,2 Mark Bernauer31Eli Lilly and Company, 2Kailo Research Group, 3OptumInsight, Indianapolis, IN, USABackground: The purpose of this study was to examine the main reasons for inpatient or outpatient visits after initiating duloxetine or pregabalin.Methods: Commercially insured patients with fibromyalgia and aged 18–64 years who initiated duloxetine or pregabalin in 2006 with 12-month continuous enrollment before and after initiation were identified. Duloxetine and pregabalin cohorts with similar demographics, pre-index clinical and economic characteristics, and pre-index treatment patterns were constructed via propensity scoring stratification. Reasons for inpatient admissions, physician office visits, outpatient hospital visits, emergency room visits, and primary or specialty care visits over the 12 months post-index period were examined and compared. Logistic regression was used to assess the contribution of duloxetine versus pregabalin initiation to the most common reasons for visits, controlling for cross-cohort differences.Results: Per the study design, the duloxetine (n = 3711 and pregabalin (n = 4111 cohorts had similar demographics (mean age 51 years, 83% female and health care costs over the 12-month pre-index period. Total health care costs during the 12-month post-index period were significantly lower for duloxetine patients than for pregabalin patients ($19,378 versus $27,045, P < 0.05. Eight of the 10 most common reasons for inpatient admissions and outpatient hospital (physician office, emergency room, primary or specialty care visits were the same for both groups. Controlling for cross-cohort differences, duloxetine patients were less likely to be hospitalized due to an intervertebral disc disorder or major depressive disorder, to have a physician office visit due to nonspecific backache/other back/neck pain (NB/OB/NP disorder, or to go to specialty care due to a soft tissue, NB/OP/NP, or intervertebral disc

  17. Medicare Advantage Members' Expected Out-Of-Pocket Spending For Inpatient And Skilled Nursing Facility Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keohane, Laura M; Grebla, Regina C; Mor, Vincent; Trivedi, Amal N

    2015-06-01

    Inpatient and skilled nursing facility (SNF) cost sharing in Medicare Advantage (MA) plans may reduce unnecessary use of these services. However, large out-of-pocket expenses potentially limit access to care and encourage beneficiaries at high risk of needing inpatient and postacute care to avoid or leave MA plans. In 2011 new federal regulations restricted inpatient and skilled nursing facility cost sharing and mandated limits on out-of-pocket spending in MA plans. After these regulations, MA members in plans with low premiums averaged $1,758 in expected out-of-pocket spending for an episode of seven hospital days and twenty skilled nursing facility days. Among members with the same low-premium plan in 2010 and 2011, 36 percent of members belonged to plans that added an out-of-pocket spending limit in 2011. However, these members also had a $293 increase in average cost sharing for an inpatient and skilled nursing facility episode, possibly to offset plans' expenses in financing out-of-pocket limits. Some MA beneficiaries may still have difficulty affording acute and postacute care despite greater regulation of cost sharing. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  18. Health care utilization among Medicare-Medicaid dual eligibles: a count data analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Jaeun

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medicare-Medicaid dual eligibles are the beneficiaries of both Medicare and Medicaid. Dual eligibles satisfy the eligibility conditions for Medicare benefit. Dual eligibles also qualify for Medicaid because they are aged, blind, or disabled and meet the income and asset requirements for receiving Supplement Security Income (SSI assistance. The objective of this study is to explore the relationship between dual eligibility and health care utilization among Medicare beneficiaries. Methods The household component of the nationally representative Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS 1996–2000 is used for the analysis. Total 8,262 Medicare beneficiaries are selected from the MEPS data. The Medicare beneficiary sample includes individuals who are covered by Medicare and do not have private health insurance during a given year. Zero-inflated negative binomial (ZINB regression model is used to analyse the count data regarding health care utilization: office-based physician visits, hospital inpatient nights, agency-sponsored home health provider days, and total dental visits. Results Dual eligibility is positively correlated with the likelihood of using hospital inpatient care and agency-sponsored home health services and the frequency of agency-sponsored home health days. Frequency of dental visits is inversely associated with dual eligibility. With respect to racial differences, dually eligible Afro-Americans use more office-based physician and dental services than white duals. Asian duals use more home health services than white duals at the 5% statistical significance level. The dual eligibility programs seem particularly beneficial to Afro-American duals. Conclusion Dual eligibility has varied impact on health care utilization across service types. More utilization of home healthcare among dual eligibles appears to be the result of delayed realization of their unmet healthcare needs under the traditional Medicare-only program

  19. [Data supporting quality circle management of inpatient depression treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, S; Härter, M; Sitta, P; van Calker, D; Menke, R; Heindl, A; Herold, K; Kudling, R; Luckhaus, C; Rupprecht, U; Sanner, Dirk; Schmitz, D; Schramm, E; Berger, M; Gaebel, W; Schneider, F

    2005-07-01

    Several quality assurance initiatives in health care have been undertaken during the past years. The next step consists of systematically combining single initiatives in order to built up a strategic quality management. In a German multicenter study, the quality of inpatient depression treatment was measured in ten psychiatric hospitals. Half of the hospitals received comparative feedback on their individual results in comparison to the other hospitals (bench marking). Those bench markings were used by each hospital as a statistic basis for in-house quality work, to improve the quality of depression treatment. According to hospital differences concerning procedure and outcome, different goals were chosen. There were also differences with respect to structural characteristics, strategies, and outcome. The feedback from participants about data-based quality circles in general and the availability of bench-marking data was positive. The necessity of carefully choosing quality circle members and professional moderation became obvious. Data-based quality circles including bench-marking have proven to be useful for quality management in inpatient depression care.

  20. Mental health nursing and physical health care: a cross-sectional study of nurses' attitudes, practice, and perceived training needs for the physical health care of people with severe mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, Debbie; Haddad, Mark; Gray, Richard; Gournay, Kevin

    2013-10-01

    Mental health nurses have a key role in improving the physical health of people with a serious mental illness, however, there have been few studies of their attitudes or the extent of their involvement in this work. The aim of this study was to examine mental health nurses' attitudes to physical health care and explore associations with their practice and training. A postal questionnaire survey including the Physical Health Attitude Scale for mental health nurses (PHASe) was used within a UK mental health trust. The 52% (n = 585) of staff who responded reported varying levels of physical health practice; this most frequently involved providing dietary and exercise advice and less frequently included advice regarding cancer screening and smoking cessation. Having received post-registration physical health-care training and working in inpatient settings was associated with greater reported involvement. More positive attitudes were also evident for nurses who had attended post-registration physical health training or had an additional adult/general nursing qualification. Overall, the attitudes of mental health nurses towards physical health care appear positive and the willingness of nurses to take on these roles needs to be recognized. However, there are areas where nurses in our sample were more ambivalent such as cancer screening and smoking cessation. © 2012 The Authors; International Journal of Mental Health Nursing © 2012 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  1. First 2 Years of Experience of "Residential Care" at "Sakalawara Rehabilitation Services," National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Bengaluru, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjunatha, Narayana; Agarwal, Preeti Pansari; Shashidhara, Harihara N; Palakode, Mohan; Raj, E Aravind; Mary Kapanee, Aruna Rose; Nattala, Prashanthi; Kumar, C Naveen; Sudhir, Paulomi; Thirthalli, Jagadisha; Bharath, Srikala; Sekar, Kasi; Varghese, Mathew

    2017-01-01

    There is an unmet need for continuity-of-care is well known for those with severe mental disorders (SMDs) after acute care at hospitals in India. The "Sakalawara Rehabilitation Services (SRS)" functioned from March 2014 at "Sakalawara Community Mental Health Centre" (SCMHC) of "National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences," Bengaluru, India in the concepts of residential care (half-way-home) with the aim to develop a replicable model. To review the inpatient records after the initial 2 years of experience in residential care at SCMHC. Retrospective file review of inpatients at SCMHC from March 2014 to March 2016 in a semi-structured proforma designed for the study. Ethical committee of NIMHANS Bengaluru has approved the study. The total number of inpatients during this period was 85. It was found that Schizophrenia spectrum disorders were the most common diagnosis among these patients. The activity of daily living and psycho-education were the most common individual interventions. The majority of families underwent structured family psycho-educational interventions. This review also demonstrated the feasibility of tele-aftercare in continuity of care after discharge of patients. SRS kind of residential set-up is feasible and demonstrated effectiveness in maintaining continuity of care of SMDs. There is a need for better structured and customized interventions. There is further a scope for tele (video) aftercare for those with SMDs.

  2. Religious attitudes and spiritual health among elderly inpatient adults in Shahrekord hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raziye Sadat hosseiny

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Human is a multidimensional creature and spiritual domain is the central dimension which has an undeniable effect on gaining health. The most important part of nursing care with family based approach is to help people in achieving optimal level of health. On the other hand, religious attitudes and spiritual health is an important domain of life in ageing period. Therefore, this study was conducted to assess the religious attitudes and spiritual health among elderly inpatients in Shahrekord hospitals. Methods: This descriptive correlational study was conducted in 1392 in Shahrekord hospitals. A total of 308 geriatric patients who were admitted to a surgical ward, were recruited through random sampling. Two sets of questionnaires regarding religious and spiritual health were used as the instruments. After collecting the data, descriptive (frequency, mean, variance, standard deviation and analytical (independent t test, Pearson correlation statistics were used by SPSS statistical software. Results: The results showed that 68.8% of patients possessed large religious attitude with an average of 140.68 ±30.14. Spiritual health in 51.3 percent of samples was described to be low while the obtained average score was 86.18 ± 16.61. However, Pearson test showed that there is a positive significant correlation between religious attitudes and spiritual health (r =0.83, P =0.05. Conclusions: The present study revealed that there is a significant relationship between religious attitudes and spiritual health and people with high religious attitudes have high spiritual health.

  3. 78 FR 50495 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-19

    ... Connective Tissue) a. Reverse Shoulder Procedures b. Total Ankle Replacement Procedures 6. MDC 15 (Newborns... specific providers (acute care hospitals, PPS-exempt cancer hospitals, LTCHs, and inpatient psychiatric... Issues. James Poyer, (410) 786-2261, PPS-Exempt Cancer Hospital Quality Reporting Issues. Allison Lee...

  4. Acute mental health care according to recent mental health legislation Part II. Activity-based costing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janse van Rensburg, A B; Jassat, W

    2011-03-01

    This is the second of three reports on the follow-up review of mental health care at Helen Joseph Hospital (HJH). Objectives for the review were to provide realistic estimates of cost for unit activities and to establish a quality assurance cycle that may facilitate cost centre management. The study described and used activity-based costing (ABC) as an approach to analyse the recurrent cost of acute in-patient care for the financial year 2007-08. Fixed (e.g. goods and services, staff salaries) and variable recurrent costs (including laboratory' 'pharmacy') were calculated. Cost per day, per user and per diagnostic group was calculated. While the unit accounted for 4.6% of the hospital's total clinical activity (patient days), the cost of R8.12 million incurred represented only 2.4% of the total hospital expenditure (R341.36 million). Fixed costs constituted 90% of the total cost. For the total number of 520 users that stayed on average 15.4 days, the average cost was R1,023.00 per day and R15748.00 per user. Users with schizophrenia accounted for the most (35%) of the cost, while the care of users with dementia was the most expensive (R23,360.68 per user). Costing of the application of World Health Organization norms for acute care staffing for the unit, projected an average increase of 103% in recurrent costs (R5.1 million), with the bulk (a 267% increase) for nursing. In the absence of other guidelines, aligning clinical activity with the proportion of the hospital's total budget may be an approach to determine what amount should be afforded to acute mental health in-patient care activities in a general regional hospital such as HJH. Despite the potential benefits of ABC, its continued application will require time, infrastructure and staff investment to establish the capacity to maintain routine annual cost analyses for different cost centres.

  5. Health and functional status and utilization of health care services among holocaust survivors and their counterparts in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iecovich, Esther; Carmel, Sara

    2010-01-01

    To examine differences in health and functional status and in utilization of health services between holocaust survivors and their counterparts; and (b) to investigate if holocaust survivor status is a significant predictor of health status, functional status, and utilization of health services. The study included 1255 respondents of whom 272 were holocaust survivors. Interviews were conducted face-to-face at the respondents' homes. Participants were asked about their health (self-rated health and comorbidity) and functional (ADL and IADL) status, utilization of inpatient and outpatient health care services, age, gender, education, marital status, length of residence in Israel, and if they were holocaust survivors. Holocaust survivors, who were frailer and more chronically ill compared to their counterparts, visited their family physician and the nurse at the health care clinic more often than their counterparts did, and received more homecare services. Yet, there were no differences between them in the utilization of other health care services such as visits to specialists, emergency department, and hospitalizations. Holocaust survivors are more homebound due to more morbidity and functional limitations and therefore receive more health home care services that offset the utilization of other health services. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Understanding Health Care Costs in a Wisconsin Acute Leukemia Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Steinert

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: We investigated factors driving health care costs of patients with a diagnosis of acute myeloid and acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Methods: Standard costs identified in insurance claims data obtained from the Wisconsin Health Information Organization were used in a sample of 837 acute leukemia patients from April 2009 to June 2011. The Andersen behavioral model of health care utilization guided selection of patient and community factors expected to influence health care costs. A generalized linear model fitting gamma-distributed data with log-link technique was used to analyze cost. Results: Type of treatment received and disease severity represented significant cost drivers, and patients receiving at least some of their treatment from academic medical centers experienced higher costs. Inpatient care and pharmacy costs of patients who received treatment from providers located in areas of higher poverty experienced lower costs, raising questions of potential treatment and medical practice disparities between provider locations. Directions of study findings were not consistent between different types of services received and underscore the complexity of investigating health care cost. Conclusions: While prevalence of acute leukemia in the United States is low compared to other diseases, its extreme high cost of treatment is not well understood and potentially influences treatment decisions. Acute leukemia health care costs may not follow expected patterns; further exploration of the relationship between cost and the treatment decision, and potential treatment disparities between providers in different socioeconomic locations, is needed.

  7. Out-of-pocket medical expenses for inpatient care among beneficiaries of the National Health Insurance Program in the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobe, Makoto; Stickley, Andrew; del Rosario, Rodolfo B; Shibuya, Kenji

    2013-08-01

    OBJECTIVE The National Health Insurance Program (NHIP) in the Philippines is a social health insurance system partially subsidized by tax-based financing which offers benefits on a fee-for-service basis up to a fixed ceiling. This paper quantifies the extent to which beneficiaries of the NHIP incur out-of-pocket expenses for inpatient care, and examines the characteristics of beneficiaries making these payments and the hospitals in which these payments are typically made. METHODS Probit and ordinary least squares regression analyses were carried out on 94 531 insurance claims from Benguet province and Baguio city during the period 2007 to 2009. RESULTS Eighty-six per cent of claims involved an out-of-pocket payment. The median figure for out-of-pocket payments was Philippine Pesos (PHP) 3016 (US$67), with this figure varying widely [inter-quartile range (IQR): PHP 9393 (US$209)]. Thirteen per cent of claims involved very large out-of-pocket payments exceeding PHP 19 213 (US$428)-the equivalent of 10% of the average annual household income in the region. Membership type, disease severity, age and residential location of the patient, length of hospitalization, and ownership and level of the hospital were all significantly associated with making out-of-pocket payments and/or the size of these payments. CONCLUSION Although the current NHIP reduces the size of out-of-pocket payments, NHIP beneficiaries are not completely free from the risk of large out-of-pocket payments (as the size of these payments varies widely and can be extremely large), despite NHIP's attempts to mitigate this by setting different benefit ceilings based on the level of the hospital and the severity of the disease. To reduce these large out-of-pocket payments and to increase financial risk protection further, it is essential to ensure more investment for health from social health insurance and/or tax-based government funding as well as shifting the provider payment mechanism from a fee

  8. Health care utilization in persons with spinal cord injury: part 2-determinants, geographic variation and comparison with the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronca, E; Scheel-Sailer, A; Koch, H G; Gemperli, A

    2017-09-01

    Cross-sectional survey. To investigate annual rates and geographic variation of health care utilization in persons with spinal cord injury (SCI), and to identify factors associated with health care utilization. Community setting, entire country of Switzerland. Annual rates of planned and emergency visits to the general practitioner (GP), planned and emergency outpatient clinic visits and in-patient hospitalizations were compared between individuals with chronic SCI, over 16 years of age residing in Switzerland between late 2011 and early 2013 and a population sample (2012) of the Swiss general population. Risk factors for increased health service utilization were identified by means of regression models adjusted for spatial variation. Of 492 participants (86.2% response rate), 94.1% visited a health care provider in the preceding year, with most persons visiting GPs (88.4%) followed by outpatient clinics (53.1%) and in-patient hospitals (35.9%). The increase in utilization as compared with the general population was 1.3-, 4.0- and 2.9-fold for GP, outpatient clinic and in-patient hospital visit, respectively. GP utilization was highest in persons with low income (incidence rate ratio (IRR) 1.85) and old age (IRR 2.62). In the first 2 years post injury, health service visits were 1.7 (GP visits) to 5.8 times (emergency outpatient clinic visits) more likely compared with those later post injury. People with SCI more frequently use health services as compared with the general population, across all types of medical service institutions. GP services were used most often in areas where availability of specialized outpatient clinic services was low.

  9. Coverage and development of specialist palliative care services across the World Health Organization European Region (2005-2012): Results from a European Association for Palliative Care Task Force survey of 53 Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centeno, Carlos; Lynch, Thomas; Garralda, Eduardo; Carrasco, José Miguel; Guillen-Grima, Francisco; Clark, David

    2016-04-01

    The evolution of the provision of palliative care specialised services is important for planning and evaluation. To examine the development between 2005 and 2012 of three specialised palliative care services across the World Health Organization European Region - home care teams, hospital support teams and inpatient palliative care services. Data were extracted and analysed from two editions of the European Association for Palliative Care Atlas of Palliative Care in Europe. Significant development of each type of services was demonstrated by adjusted residual analysis, ratio of services per population and 2012 coverage (relationship between provision of available services and demand services estimated to meet the palliative care needs of a population). For the measurement of palliative care coverage, we used European Association for Palliative Care White Paper recommendations: one home care team per 100,000 inhabitants, one hospital support team per 200,000 inhabitants and one inpatient palliative care service per 200,000 inhabitants. To estimate evolution at the supranational level, mean comparison between years and European sub-regions is presented. Of 53 countries, 46 (87%) provided data. Europe has developed significant home care team, inpatient palliative care service and hospital support team in 2005-2012. The improvement was statistically significant for Western European countries, but not for Central and Eastern countries. Significant development in at least a type of services was in 21 of 46 (46%) countries. The estimations of 2012 coverage for inpatient palliative care service, home care team and hospital support team are 62%, 52% and 31% for Western European and 20%, 14% and 3% for Central and Eastern, respectively. Although there has been a positive development in overall palliative care coverage in Europe between 2005 and 2012, the services available in most countries are still insufficient to meet the palliative care needs of the population. © The

  10. Factors affecting staff morale on inpatient mental health wards in England: a qualitative investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Moli

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Good morale among staff on inpatient psychiatric wards is an important requirement for the maintenance of strong therapeutic alliances and positive patient experiences, and for the successful implementation of initiatives to improve care. More understanding is needed of mechanisms underlying good and poor morale. Method We conducted individual and group interviews with staff of a full range of disciplines and levels of seniority on seven NHS in-patient wards of varying types in England. Results Inpatient staff feel sustained in their potentially stressful roles by mutual loyalty and trust within cohesive ward teams. Clear roles, supportive ward managers and well designed organisational procedures and structures maintain good morale. Perceived threats to good morale include staffing levels that are insufficient for staff to feel safe and able to spend time with patients, the high risk of violence, and lack of voice in the wider organisation. Conclusions Increasing employee voice, designing jobs so as to maximise autonomy within clear and well-structured operational protocols, promoting greater staff-patient contact and improving responses to violence may contribute more to inpatient staff morale than formal support mechanisms.

  11. Community household income and resource utilization for common inpatient pediatric conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fieldston, Evan S; Zaniletti, Isabella; Hall, Matthew; Colvin, Jeffrey D; Gottlieb, Laura; Macy, Michelle L; Alpern, Elizabeth R; Morse, Rustin B; Hain, Paul D; Sills, Marion R; Frank, Gary; Shah, Samir S

    2013-12-01

    Child health is influenced by biomedical and socioeconomic factors. Few studies have explored the relationship between community-level income and inpatient resource utilization for children. Our objective was to analyze inpatient costs for children hospitalized with common conditions in relation to zip code-based median annual household income (HHI). Retrospective national cohort from 32 freestanding children's hospitals for asthma, diabetes, bronchiolitis and respiratory syncytial virus, pneumonia, and kidney and urinary tract infections. Standardized cost of care for individual hospitalizations and across hospitalizations for the same patient and condition were modeled by using mixed-effects methods, adjusting for severity of illness, age, gender, and race. Main exposure was median annual HHI. Posthoc tests compared adjusted standardized costs for patients from the lowest and highest income groups. From 116,636 hospitalizations, 4 of 5 conditions had differences at the hospitalization and at the patient level, with lowest-income groups having higher costs. The individual hospitalization level cost differences ranged from $187 (4.1%) to $404 (6.4%). Patient-level cost differences ranged from $310 to $1087 or 6.5% to 15% higher for the lowest-income patients. Higher costs were typically not for laboratory, imaging, or pharmacy costs. In total, patients from lowest income zip codes had $8.4 million more in hospitalization-level costs and $13.6 million more in patient-level costs. Lower community-level HHI is associated with higher inpatient costs of care for 4 of 5 common pediatric conditions. These findings highlight the need to consider socioeconomic status in health care system design, delivery, and reimbursement calculations.

  12. Nursing care dependence in the experiences of advanced cancer inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piredda, Michela; Bartiromo, Chiara; Capuzzo, Maria Teresa; Matarese, Maria; De Marinis, Maria Grazia

    2016-02-01

    Increasing burden of cancer in Europe and socio-demographic trends imply that more cancer patients will face high levels of dependency. Care dependency is often perceived as a distressing experience by cancer patients who are concerned about becoming a burden to others. The experience of care dependence has been scarcely investigated in advanced cancer patients, especially in the hospital setting. This study aimed at describing advanced cancer patients' experiences of care dependence in hospital and of the factors perceived by them as contributing to decrease or increase this dependence. The study used a descriptive phenomenological approach based on Husserl's (1913) life world perspective. Data collection and analysis followed Giorgi's (1997) five basic methodological steps. Data were gathered by semi-structured interviews with thirteen advanced cancer adult inpatients of a teaching hospital. The interviews were audio-recorded and the recordings transcribed word for word. Three themes emerged: 'dependency discovers new meanings of life', 'active coping with dependency' and 'the care cures the dependent person'. The essential meaning of care dependency was the possibility to become aware of being a person as both an object and subject of care. Dependence appears as an experience with strong relational connotations, which enable patients to see differently their life, themselves, the world and others. Dependency is revealed as a natural experience, only partly in accordance with previous studies. Deeper insight into the meaning patients attach to care dependency can enable nurses to better meet the patient's needs, e.g. by improving caring relationships with patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Race-ethnicity and gender differences in VA health care service utilization among U.S. veterans of recent conflicts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Kelly H; Madden, Erin; Maguen, Shira

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare health care utilization patterns by race-ethnicity and gender among veterans returning from Iraq and Afghanistan. A retrospective analysis was conducted with records from U.S. service members and veterans returning from Iraq and Afghanistan who enrolled in health care through the Veterans Health Administration, who received a psychiatric diagnosis, and who had used primary or mental health outpatient care between October 7, 2001, and December 31, 2012 (N=309,050). Racial-ethnic minority groups were first collapsed together and compared with whites and then separated by racial-ethnic group. Gender was also tested as a moderator of utilization. Although rates of mental health outpatient care, primary care, and emergency service utilization were relatively similar for racial-ethnic minority groups and whites, minority groups were admitted to psychiatric inpatient care at lower rates than whites. When veterans were separately categorized by specific racial-ethnic groups, some differences in utilization rates emerged; most notably, only black and Hispanic men were admitted less frequently to psychiatric inpatient care, and male and female Asian/Pacific Islander veterans used emergency services less, than their white counterparts. Gender moderated the association between race-ethnicity and mental health outpatient use, such that American Indian and Hispanic women used mental health outpatient services less than white women, but American Indian and Hispanic men showed the opposite pattern. Furthermore, black men were more likely than white men to use mental health outpatient services, but there was no difference between these women. Although service utilization rates between minority groups and whites were similar when minority groups were combined, examination of utilization by racial-ethnic groups and by men and women separately yielded more robust findings.

  14. Measuring Inpatient Rehabilitation Facility Quality of Care: Discharge Self-Care Functional Status Quality Measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardasaney, Poonam K; Deutsch, Anne; Iriondo-Perez, Jeniffer; Ingber, Melvin J; McMullen, Tara

    2018-06-01

    To describe the calculation and psychometric properties of the discharge self-care functional status quality measure implemented in the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services' (CMS) Inpatient Rehabilitation Facility (IRF) Quality Reporting Program on October 1, 2016. Medicare fee-for-service (FFS) patients from 38 IRFs that participated in the CMS Post-Acute Care Payment Reform Demonstration were included in this cohort study. Data came from the Continuity Assessment Record and Evaluation Item Set, IRF-Patient Assessment Instrument, and Medicare claims. For each patient, we calculated an expected discharge self-care score, risk-adjusted for demographic and baseline clinical characteristics. The performance score of each IRF equaled the percentage of patient stays where the observed discharge self-care score met or exceeded the expected score. We assessed the measure's discriminatory ability across IRFs and reliability. IRFs. Medicare FFS patients aged ≥21 years (N=4769). Not applicable. Facility-level discharge self-care quality measure performance score. A total of 4769 patient stays were included; 57% of stays were in women, and 12.1% were in patients aged quality measure showed strong reliability, with intraclass correlation coefficients of .91. The discharge self-care quality measure showed strong discriminatory ability and reliability, representing an important initial step in evaluation of IRF self-care outcomes. A wide range in performance scores suggested a gap in quality of care across IRFs. Future work should include testing the measure with nationwide data from all IRFs. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Inpatient capacity at children's hospitals during pandemic (H1N1) 2009 outbreak, United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sills, Marion R; Hall, Matthew; Fieldston, Evan S; Hain, Paul D; Simon, Harold K; Brogan, Thomas V; Fagbuyi, Daniel B; Mundorff, Michael B; Shah, Samir S

    2011-09-01

    Quantifying how close hospitals came to exhausting capacity during the outbreak of pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 can help the health care system plan for more virulent pandemics. This ecologic analysis used emergency department (ED) and inpatient data from 34 US children's hospitals. For the 11-week pandemic (H1N1) 2009 period during fall 2009, inpatient occupancy reached 95%, which was lower than the 101% occupancy during the 2008-09 seasonal influenza period. Fewer than 1 additional admission per 10 inpatient beds would have caused hospitals to reach 100% occupancy. Using parameters based on historical precedent, we built 5 models projecting inpatient occupancy, varying the ED visit numbers and admission rate for influenza-related ED visits. The 5 scenarios projected median occupancy as high as 132% of capacity. The pandemic did not exhaust inpatient bed capacity, but a more virulent pandemic has the potential to push children's hospitals past their maximum inpatient capacity.

  16. Out of pocket payments and social health insurance for private hospital care: Evidence from Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigorakis, Nikolaos; Floros, Christos; Tsangari, Haritini; Tsoukatos, Evangelos

    2016-08-01

    The Greek state has reduced their funding on health as part of broader efforts to limit the large fiscal deficits and rising debt ratios to GDP. Benefits cuts and limitations of Social Health Insurance (SHI) reimbursements result in substantial Out of Pocket (OOP) payments in the Greek population. In this paper, we examine social health insurance's risk pooling mechanisms and the catastrophic impact that OOP payments may have on insured's income and well-being. Using data collected from a cross sectional survey in Greece, we find that the OOP payments for inpatient care in private hospitals have a positive relationship with SHI funding. Moreover, we show that the SHI funding is inadequate to total inpatient financing. We argue that the Greek health policy makers have to give serious consideration to the perspective of a SHI system which should be supplemented by the Private Health Insurance (PHI) sector. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Progressivity of health care financing and incidence of service benefits in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akazili, James; Garshong, Bertha; Aikins, Moses; Gyapong, John; McIntyre, Di

    2012-03-01

    The National Health Insurance (NHI) scheme was introduced in Ghana in 2004 as a pro-poor financing strategy aimed at removing financial barriers to health care and protecting all citizens from catastrophic health expenditures, which currently arise due to user fees and other direct payments. A comprehensive assessment of the financing and benefit incidence of health services in Ghana was undertaken. These analyses drew on secondary data from the Ghana Living Standards Survey (2005/2006) and from an additional household survey which collected data in 2008 in six districts covering the three main ecological zones of Ghana. Findings show that Ghana's health care financing system is progressive, driven largely by the progressivity of taxes. The national health insurance levy (which is part of VAT) is mildly progressive while NHI contributions by the informal sector are regressive. The distribution of total benefits from both public and private health services is pro-rich. However, public sector district-level hospital inpatient care is pro-poor and benefits of primary-level health care services are relatively evenly distributed. For Ghana to attain an equitable health system and fully achieve universal coverage, it must ensure that the poor, most of whom are not currently covered by the NHI, are financially protected, and it must address the many access barriers to health care.

  18. A qualitative study of the experiences and expectations of women receiving in-patient postnatal care in one English maternity unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bick Debra

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies consistently highlight in-patient postnatal care as the area of maternity care women are least satisfied with. As part of a quality improvement study to promote a continuum of care from the birthing room to discharge home from hospital, we explored women's expectations and experiences of current in-patient care. Methods For this part of the study, qualitative data from semi-structured interviews were transcribed and analysed using content analyses to identify issues and concepts. Women were recruited from two postnatal wards in one large maternity unit in the South of England, with around 6,000 births a year. Results Twenty women, who had a vaginal or caesarean birth, were interviewed on the postnatal ward. Identified themes included; the impact of the ward environment; the impact of the attitude of staff; quality and level of support for breastfeeding; unmet information needs; and women's low expectations of hospital based postnatal care. Findings informed revision to the content and planning of in-patient postnatal care, results of which will be reported elsewhere. Conclusions Women's responses highlighted several areas where changes could be implemented. Staff should be aware that how they inter-act with women could make a difference to care as a positive or negative experience. The lack of support and inconsistent advice on breastfeeding highlights that units need to consider how individual staff communicate information to women. Units need to address how and when information on practical aspects of infant care is provided if women and their partners are to feel confident on the woman's transfer home from hospital.

  19. [Mental health service utilization among borderline personality disorder patients inpatient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cailhol, L; Thalamas, C; Garrido, C; Birmes, P; Lapeyre-Mestre, M

    2015-04-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is characterized by a pervasive pattern of instability and impulsivity. Several North American prospective studies support the high level of mental health care utilization in this population. There is little data in other systems of health organization, such as France. Furthermore, little is known on the variables associated with the mental health service utilization among BPD patients. The main objective was to compare the utilization of mental health care among BPD patients, to the general population and patients with another personality disorder (PD) and to describe the demographic and clinical factors associated with the group of patients who use the most health care. A multi-center (5 public and private centers), epidemiological study. Data were collected prospectively (database of an insurance fund covering 80% of the population) and viewed, retrospectively. We used the data collected during the five years previously to the inclusion. Inclusion criteria were age (18-60 years) and membership in the health insurance fund targeted. Patients on legal protection, forced hospitalization, with a chronic psychotic disorder, manic, mental retardation, or not reading French were excluded. First, four groups were composed: BPD, other PD, control groups for PD and other PD. The first two groups were recruited from a screening of inpatients including a self-administered questionnaire (Personality Disorder Questionnaire 4+). Assessment by a psychologist including the Structured Interview for DSM-IV Personality Disorders (SIDP-IV) was given straight to those who had a score above 28. This questionnaire allowed us to distinguish one group of subjects with BPD and a group with other PD (without BPD). Clinical evaluation included Axis I (MINI), Axis II (SIDP-IV), psychopathological features (YSQ-I, DSQ-40), demographic variables and therapeutic alliance (Haq-II). Matched controls (age, sex) composed the 3rd and 4th group (BPD control and

  20. Inpatient Behavioral Health Recapture A Busiess Case Analysis at Evans Army Community Hospital Fort Carson, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-20

    and Obstetrics /Gynecology. Inpatient care includes Obstetrics , Intensive Care, and Post Anesthesia Care/Same Day Surgery. EACH Mission: Delivering...charged with murder in Iraq shooting deaths, 2009). EACH Inpt Psych 13 Fort Carson has not been immune to the increase in suicides and violence among...to identify Soldiers with PTSD symptoms. In 2008, however, attention returned to Fort Carson as a number of local homicides and other violence tied

  1. Hospitalization for urinary tract infections and the quality of preventive health care received by people with spina bifida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Brian S; Ouyang, Lijing; Thibadeau, Judy; Grosse, Scott D; Campbell, Vincent A; Joseph, David

    2009-07-01

    The preventive health care needs of people with disabilities often go unmet, resulting in medical complications that may require hospitalization. Such complications could be due, in part, to difficulty accessing care or the quality of ambulatory care services received. To use hospitalizations for urinary tract infections (UTIs) as a marker of the potential quality of ambulatory care services received by people affected by spina bifida. MarketScan inpatient and outpatient medical claims data for 2000 through 2003 were used to identify hospitalizations for UTI, which is an ambulatory care sensitive condition, for people affected by spina bifida and to calculate inpatient discharge rates, average lengths of stay, and average medical care expenditures for such hospitalizations. People affected by spina bifida averaged 0.5 hospitalizations per year, and there were 22.8 inpatient admissions with UTI per 1000 persons with spina bifida during the period 2000-2003, in comparison to an average of 0.44 admission with UTI per 1000 persons for those without spina bifida. If the number of UTI hospitalizations among people affected by spina bifida were reduced by 50%, expenditures could be reduced by $4.4 million per 1000 patients. Consensus on the evaluation and management of bacteriuria could enhance clinical care and reduce the disparity in UTI discharge rates among people affected by spina bifida compared to those without spina bifida. National evidence-based guidelines are needed.

  2. Leadership support for ward managers in acute mental health inpatient settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonner, Gwen; McLaughlin, Sue

    2014-05-01

    This article shares findings of work undertaken with a group of mental health ward managers to consider their roles through workshops using an action learning approach. The tensions between the need to balance the burden of administrative tasks and act as clinical role models, leaders and managers are considered in the context of providing recovery-focused services. The group reviewed their leadership styles, broke down the administrative elements of their roles using activity logs, reviewed their working environments and considered how recovery focused they believed their wards to be. Findings support the notion that the ward manager role in acute inpatient settings is at times unmanageable. Administration is one aspect of the role for which ward managers feel unprepared and the high number of administrative tasks take them away from front line clinical care, leading to frustration. Absence from clinical areas reduces opportunities for role modeling good clinical practice to other staff. Despite the frustrations of administrative tasks, overall the managers thought they were supportive to their staff and that their wards were recovery focused.

  3. Self-reported Function, Health Resource Use, and Total Health Care Costs Among Medicare Beneficiaries With Glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prager, Alisa J; Liebmann, Jeffrey M; Cioffi, George A; Blumberg, Dana M

    2016-04-01

    The effect of glaucoma on nonglaucomatous medical conditions and resultant secondary health care costs is not well understood. To assess self-reported medical conditions, the use of medical services, and total health care costs among Medicare beneficiaries with glaucoma. Longitudinal observational study of 72,587 Medicare beneficiaries in the general community using the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (2004-2009). Coding to extract data started in January 2015, and analyses were performed between May and July 2015. Self-reported health, the use of health care services, adjusted mean annual total health care costs per person, and adjusted mean annual nonoutpatient costs per person. Participants were 72,587 Medicare beneficiaries 65 years or older with (n = 4441) and without (n = 68,146) a glaucoma diagnosis in the year before collection of survey data. Their mean age was 76.9 years, and 43.2% were male. Patients with glaucoma who responded to survey questions on visual disability were stratified into those with (n = 1748) and without (n = 2639) self-reported visual disability. Medicare beneficiaries with glaucoma had higher adjusted odds of inpatient hospitalizations (odds ratio [OR], 1.27; 95% CI, 1.17-1.39; P total health care costs and $2599 (95% CI, $1985-$3212; P total and nonoutpatient medical costs. Perception of vision loss among patients with glaucoma may be associated with depression, falls, and difficulty walking. Reducing the prevalence and severity of glaucoma may result in improvements in associated nonglaucomatous medical conditions and resultant reduction in health care costs.

  4. Measuring equity in household's health care payments (Tehran-Iran 2013): technical points for health policy decision makers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezapour, Aziz; Ebadifard Azar, Farbod; Azami Aghdash, Saber; Tanoomand, Asghar; Hosseini Shokouh, Seyed Morteza; Yousefzadeh, Negar; Atefi Manesh, Pezhman; Sarabi Asiabar, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Households' financial protection against health payments and expenditures and equity in utilization of health care services are of the most important tasks of governments. This study aims to measuring equity in household's health care payments according to fairness in financial contribution (FFC) and Kakwani indices in Tehran-Iran, 2013. This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2014.The study sample size was estimated to be 2200 households. Households were selected using stratified-cluster sampling including typical families who reside in the city of Tehran. The data were analyzed through Excel and Stata v.11software. Recall period for the inpatient care was 1 year and for outpatient1 month. The indicator of FFC for households in health financing was estimated to be 0.68 and the trend of the indicator was ascending by the rise in the ranking of households' financial level. The Kakwani index was estimated to be a negative number (-0.00125) which indicated the descending trend of health financing system. By redistribution of incomes or the exempt of the poorest quintiles from health payments, Kakwani index was estimated to be a positive number (0.090555) which indicated the ascending trend of health financing system. According to this study, the equity indices in health care financing denote injustice and a descending trend in the health care financing system. This finding clearly shows that deliberate policy making in health financing by national health authorities and protecting low-income households against health expenditures are required to improve the equity in health.

  5. Delivering HIV care in challenging operating environments: the MSF experience towards differentiated models of care for settings with multiple basic health care needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ssonko, Charles; Gonzalez, Lucia; Mesic, Anita; da Fonseca, Marcio Silveira; Achar, Jay; Safar, Nadia; Martin, Beatriz; Wong, Sidney; Casas, Esther C

    2017-07-21

    Countries in the West and Central African regions struggle to offer quality HIV care at scale, despite HIV prevalence being relatively low. In these challenging operating environments, basic health care needs are multiple, systems are highly fragile and conflict disrupts health care. Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has been working to integrate HIV care in basic health services in such settings since 2000. We review the implementation of differentiated HIV care and treatment approaches in MSF-supported programmes in South Sudan (RoSS), Central African Republic (CAR) and Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). A descriptive analysis from CAR, DRC and RoSS programmes reviewing methodology and strategies of HIV care integration between 2010 and 2015 was performed. We describe HIV care models integrated within the provision of general health care and highlight best practices and challenges. Services included provision of general health care, with out-patient care (range between countries 43,343 and 287,163 consultations/year in 2015) and in-patient care (range 1076-16,595 in 2015). By the end of 2015 antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiations reached 12-255 patients/year. A total of 1101 and 1053 patients were on ART in CAR and DRC, respectively. In RoSS 186 patients were on ART when conflict recommenced late in 2013. While ART initiation and monitoring were mostly clinically driven in the early phase of the programmes, DRC implemented CD4 monitoring and progressively HIV viral load (VL) monitoring during study period. Attacks to health care facilities in CAR and RoSS disrupted service provision temporarily. Programmatic challenges include: competing health priorities influencing HIV care and need to integrate within general health services. Differentiated care approaches that support continuity of care in these programmes include simplification of medical protocols, multi-month ART prescriptions, and community strategies such as ART delivery groups, contingency plans and

  6. A randomized comparison of care provided by a clinical nurse specialist, an inpatient team, and a day patient team in rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijhuis, Gerhardus J.; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.; Hazes, Johanna M. W.; van den Hout, Wilbert B.; Breedveld, Ferdinand C.; Vliet Vlieland, Theodora P. M.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare in a randomized, controlled trial the clinical effectiveness of care delivered by a clinical nurse specialist, inpatient team care, and day patient team care in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who have increasing functional limitations. METHODS: Between December 1996

  7. Early Exercise in the Burn Intensive Care Unit Decreases Hospital Stay, Improves Mental Health, and Physical Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    Decreases Hospital Stay, Improves Mental Health , and Physical Performance 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Oscar E. Suman, PhD...Multicenter Study of the Effect of In-Patient Exercise Training on Length of Hospitalization, Mental Health , and Physical Performance in Burned...Intensive Care Unit Decreases Hospital Stay, Improves Mental Health , and Physical Performance,” Proposal Log Number 13214039, Award Number W81XWH-14

  8. Progressive universalism? The impact of targeted coverage on health care access and expenditures in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neelsen, Sven; O'Donnell, Owen

    2017-12-01

    Like other countries seeking a progressive path to universalism, Peru has attempted to reduce inequalities in access to health care by granting the poor entitlement to tax-financed basic care without charge. We identify the impact of this policy by comparing the target population's change in health care utilization with that of poor adults already covered through employment-based insurance. There are positive effects on receipt of ambulatory care and medication that are largest among the elderly and the poorest. The probability of getting formal health care when sick is increased by almost two fifths, but the likelihood of being unable to afford treatment is reduced by more than a quarter. Consistent with the shallow coverage offered, there is no impact on use of inpatient care. Neither is there any effect on average out-of-pocket health care expenditure, but medical spending is reduced by up to 25% in the top quarter of the distribution. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Factors associated with discharge to home versus discharge to institutional care after inpatient stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Vu Q C; PrvuBettger, Janet; Guerrier, Tami; Hirsch, Mark A; Thomas, J George; Pugh, Terrence M; Rhoads, Charles F

    2015-07-01

    To examine sociodemographic and clinical characteristics independently associated with discharge home compared with discharge to a skilled nursing facility (SNF) after acute inpatient rehabilitation. Retrospective cohort study. Three tertiary accredited acute care rehabilitation facilities. Adult patients with stroke (N=2085). Not applicable. Not applicable. Of 2085 patients with stroke treated at 3 centers over a 4-year period, 78.2% (n=1631) were discharged home and 21.8% (n=454) discharged to an SNF. Findings from a multivariable logistic regression analysis indicated that patients were less likely to be discharged home if they were older (odds ratio [OR], .98; 95% confidence interval [CI], .96-.99), separated or divorced (compared with married; OR, .61; 95% CI, .48-.79), or with Medicare health insurance (compared with private insurance; OR, .69; 95% CI, .55-.88), or had dysphagia (OR, .83; 95% CI, .71-.98) or cognitive deficits (OR, .79; 95% CI, .77-.81). The odds of being discharged home were higher for those admitted with a higher motor FIM score (OR, 1.10; 95% CI, 1.09-1.11). The following were not associated with discharge disposition: sex, race, prestroke vocational status, availability of secondary health insurance, number of days from stroke onset to rehabilitation facility admission, stroke type, impairment group, cognitive FIM on admission, other stroke deficits (aphasia, ataxia, neglect, or speech disturbance), stroke complications of hyponatremia or urinary tract infection, or comorbid conditions. One in 5 patients with stroke were discharged to an SNF after inpatient rehabilitation. On admission, several sociodemographic and clinical characteristics were identified that could be considered as important factors in early discussions for discharge planning. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The effects of simultaneous exercise and psychotherapy on depressive symptoms in inpatient, psychiatric older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquart, Son D; Marshak, Helen H; Dos Santos, Hildemar; Luu, Sen M; Berk, Lee S; McMahon, Paul T; Riggs, Matt

    2014-01-01

    Depression is the leading cause of early death, affecting 15% of Americans older than 65 y and costing $43 billion each year. The current mental health service system for seniors, particularly for the population hospitalized in acute inpatient psychiatric units, is fragmented because of poor funding and a shift to a transitory health care paradigm, leading to inadequate treatment modalities, questionable quality of care, and lack of research demonstrating the superiority of a particular treatment. These issues are likely to lead to a public health crisis in the coming years. To investigate the effectiveness of combining exercise and psychotherapy in improving acute depressive symptoms among older adults who were receiving treatment in an inpatient psychiatric unit. Based on rolling admissions, inpatients were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 treatment groups. The study was blinded and controlled. This study took place in inpatient psychiatric units at the Loma Linda University's Behavioral Medicine Center (LLUBMC) in Redlands, California. Participants were 78 inpatients, aged 50-89 y. Participants in the simultaneous exercise and psychotherapy (STEP) group (n = 26) took part in exercise and received psychotherapy for 30 min per session, whereas those in the TALK group (n = 26) received individual psychotherapy for 30 min per session. Participants in the control group (n = 26) served as a comparison group, receiving standard therapy. The effects of the interventions were determined by assessing differences from baseline to postintervention in the symptomatology of all 3 groups. The research team also administered the Behavioral and Symptom Identification Scale (BASIS-32) and the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) pre- and postintervention. At posttest, the STEP group (M = 4.24, SE = 0.62) had a better response than the TALK group (M = 11.34, SE = 0.62, P exercise program consisting of 30 min of walking in conjunction with individual psychotherapy was an effective

  11. Disability and Hospital Care Expenses among National Health Insurance Beneficiaries: Analyses of Population-Based Data in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lan-Ping; Lee, Jiunn-Tay; Lin, Fu-Gong; Lin, Pei-Ying; Tang, Chi-Chieh; Chu, Cordia M.; Wu, Chia-Ling; Lin, Jin-Ding

    2011-01-01

    Nationwide data were collected concerning inpatient care use and medical expenditure of people with disabilities (N = 937,944) among national health insurance beneficiaries in Taiwan. Data included gender, age, hospitalization frequency and expenditure, healthcare setting and service department, discharge diagnose disease according to the ICD-9-CM…

  12. Gender bias in child care and child health: global patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khera, Rohan; Jain, Snigdha; Lodha, Rakesh; Ramakrishnan, Sivasubramanian

    2014-04-01

    Gender-based discrimination is reported across the spectrum of paediatric healthcare including emergency, inpatient, outpatient and preventive care and is mostly reported from South Asia and China with sporadic reports from Africa and South America. Biases against young girls have been documented even in immunisation percentage, home food allocation, seeking medical care for childhood ailments and percentage of household healthcare expenditures allocated to them. Such gender discrimination in access to medical care is likely to have an influence on the overall health of female children. Over the last five decades, the under-5 sex ratios are worsening in India with declining number of girls. Deliberate parental neglect of girls' essential and life-saving medical care is also an important contributing factor apart from sex-selective abortions to the declining gender ratios. Corrective measures and focused action are needed.

  13. Next level of board accountability in health care quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pronovost, Peter J; Armstrong, C Michael; Demski, Renee; Peterson, Ronald R; Rothman, Paul B

    2018-03-19

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to offer six principles that health system leaders can apply to establish a governance and management system for the quality of care and patient safety. Design/methodology/approach Leaders of a large academic health system set a goal of high reliability and formed a quality board committee in 2011 to oversee quality and patient safety everywhere care was delivered. Leaders of the health system and every entity, including inpatient hospitals, home care companies, and ambulatory services staff the committee. The committee works with the management for each entity to set and achieve quality goals. Through this work, the six principles emerged to address management structures and processes. Findings The principles are: ensure there is oversight for quality everywhere care is delivered under the health system; create a framework to organize and report the work; identify care areas where quality is ambiguous or underdeveloped (i.e. islands of quality) and work to ensure there is reporting and accountability for quality measures; create a consolidated quality statement similar to a financial statement; ensure the integrity of the data used to measure and report quality and safety performance; and transparently report performance and create an explicit accountability model. Originality/value This governance and management system for quality and safety functions similar to a finance system, with quality performance documented and reported, data integrity monitored, and accountability for performance from board to bedside. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first description of how a board has taken this type of systematic approach to oversee the quality of care.

  14. 29 CFR 825.113 - Serious health condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... illness, injury, impairment or physical or mental condition that involves inpatient care as defined in... medications such as aspirin, antihistamines, or salves; or bed-rest, drinking fluids, exercise, and other... “serious health conditions” unless inpatient hospital care is required or unless complications develop...

  15. Cost of delivering secondary-level health care services through public sector district hospitals in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinja, Shankar; Balasubramanian, Deepak; Jeet, Gursimer; Verma, Ramesh; Kumar, Dinesh; Bahuguna, Pankaj; Kaur, Manmeet; Kumar, Rajesh

    2017-01-01

    Background & objectives: Despite an impetus for strengthening public sector district hospitals for provision of secondary health care in India, there is lack of robust evidence on cost of services provided through these district hospitals. In this study, an attempt was made to determine the unit cost of an outpatient visit consultation, inpatient bed-day of hospitalization, surgical procedure and overall per-capita cost of providing secondary care through district hospitals. Methods: Economic costing of five randomly selected district hospitals in two north Indian States - Haryana and Punjab, was undertaken. Cost analysis was done using a health system perspective and employing bottom-up costing methodology. Quantity of all resources - capital or recurrent, used for delivering services was measured and valued. Median unit costs were estimated along with their 95 per cent confidence intervals. Sensitivity analysis was undertaken to assess the effect of uncertainties in prices and other assumptions; and to generalize the findings for Indian set-up. Results: The overall annual cost of delivering secondary-level health care services through a public sector district hospital in north India was 11,44,13,282 [US Dollars (USD) 2,103,185]. Human resources accounted for 53 per cent of the overall cost. The unit cost of an inpatient bed-day, surgical procedure and outpatient consultation was 844 (USD 15.5), i; 3481 (USD 64) and 170 (USD 3.1), respectively. With the current set of resource allocation, per-capita cost of providing health care through district hospitals in north India was 139 (USD 2.5). Interpretation & conclusions: The estimates obtained in our study can be used for Fiscal planning of scaling up secondary-level health services. Further, these may be particularly useful for future research such as benefit-incidence analysis, cost-effectiveness analysis and national health accounts including disease-specific accounts in India. PMID:29355142

  16. Cost of delivering secondary-level health care services through public sector district hospitals in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinja, Shankar; Balasubramanian, Deepak; Jeet, Gursimer; Verma, Ramesh; Kumar, Dinesh; Bahuguna, Pankaj; Kaur, Manmeet; Kumar, Rajesh

    2017-09-01

    Despite an impetus for strengthening public sector district hospitals for provision of secondary health care in India, there is lack of robust evidence on cost of services provided through these district hospitals. In this study, an attempt was made to determine the unit cost of an outpatient visit consultation, inpatient bed-day of hospitalization, surgical procedure and overall per-capita cost of providing secondary care through district hospitals. Economic costing of five randomly selected district hospitals in two north Indian States - Haryana and Punjab, was undertaken. Cost analysis was done using a health system perspective and employing bottom-up costing methodology. Quantity of all resources - capital or recurrent, used for delivering services was measured and valued. Median unit costs were estimated along with their 95 per cent confidence intervals. Sensitivity analysis was undertaken to assess the effect of uncertainties in prices and other assumptions; and to generalize the findings for Indian set-up. The overall annual cost of delivering secondary-level health care services through a public sector district hospital in north India was ' 11,44,13,282 [US Dollars (USD) 2,103,185]. Human resources accounted for 53 per cent of the overall cost. The unit cost of an inpatient bed-day, surgical procedure and outpatient consultation was ' 844 (USD 15.5), ' 3481 (USD 64) and ' 170 (USD 3.1), respectively. With the current set of resource allocation, per-capita cost of providing health care through district hospitals in north India was ' 139 (USD 2.5). The estimates obtained in our study can be used for Fiscal planning of scaling up secondary-level health services. Further, these may be particularly useful for future research such as benefit-incidence analysis, cost-effectiveness analysis and national health accounts including disease-specific accounts in India.

  17. The Influence of Co-Morbidity and Other Health Measures on Dental and Medical Care Use among Medicare beneficiaries 2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haiyan; Moeller, John; Manski, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To assess the impact of co-morbidity and other health measures on the use of dental and medical care services among the community-based Medicare population with data from the 2002 Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey. Methods A co-morbidity index is the main independent variable of our study. It includes oral cancer as a co-morbidity condition and was developed from Medicare claims data. The two outcome variables indicate whether a beneficiary had a dental visit during the year and whether the beneficiary had an inpatient hospital stay during the year. Logistic regressions estimated the relationship between the outcome variables and co-morbidity after controlling for other explanatory variables. Results High scores on the co-morbidity index, high numbers of self-reported physical limitations, and fair or poor self-reported health status were correlated with higher hospital use and lower dental care utilization. Similar results were found for other types of medical care including medical provider visits, outpatient care, and prescription drugs. A multiple imputation technique was used for the approximate 20% of the sample with missing claims, but the resulting co-morbidity index performed no differently than the index constructed without imputation. Conclusions Co-morbidities and other health status measures are theorized to play either a predisposing or need role in determining health care utilization. The study’s findings confirm the dominant role of these measures as predisposing factors limiting access to dental care for Medicare beneficiaries and as need factors producing higher levels of inpatient hospital and other medical care for Medicare beneficiaries. PMID:21972460

  18. Horizontal Inequity in Health Care Utilization among the Middle-Aged and Elderly in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chaofan; Dou, Lei; Wang, Haipeng; Jing, Shanshan; Yin, Aitian

    2017-07-26

    Equitable utilization of health care is a primary goal of the Chinese health system. This study aimed to examine horizontal inequity in health care utilization and identify the factors resulting in inequity among the middle-aged and elderly in China. The data were obtained from the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study (CHARLS). We employed the concentration index (CI) and horizontal inequity (HI) to measure inequity in health care utilization. Non-linear regression models were used to decompose the CI into the contribution of each factor. The CIs for the probability of and total number of outpatient visits were 0.0642 and 0.0780, respectively, and those for inpatient visits were 0.1418 and 0.1471, respectively. The HIs were also significantly positive. Living standard was the most important contributor. The contribution of health insurance varied between plans. This study supported the presence of pro-rich inequity in health care utilization for both probability and frequency among the middle-aged and elderly in China. Narrowing the living standard gap and improving the health insurance benefit package for the elderly should help to resolve these inequities.

  19. Improving inpatient postnatal services: midwives views and perspectives of engagement in a quality improvement initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wray Julie

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite major policy initiatives in the United Kingdom to enhance women's experiences of maternity care, improving in-patient postnatal care remains a low priority, although it is an aspect of care consistently rated as poor by women. As part of a systems and process approach to improving care at one maternity unit in the South of England, the views and perspectives of midwives responsible for implementing change were sought. Methods A Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI approach was adopted to support a systems and process change to in-patient care and care on transfer home in a large district general hospital with around 6000 births a year. The CQI approach included an initial assessment to identify where revisions to routine systems and processes were required, developing, implementing and evaluating revisions to the content and documentation of care in hospital and on transfer home, and training workshops for midwives and other maternity staff responsible for implementing changes. To assess midwifery views of the quality improvement process and their engagement with this, questionnaires were sent to those who had participated at the outset. Results Questionnaires were received from 68 (46% of the estimated 149 midwives eligible to complete the questionnaire. All midwives were aware of the revisions introduced, and two-thirds felt these were more appropriate to meet the women's physical and emotional health, information and support needs. Some midwives considered that the introduction of new maternal postnatal records increased their workload, mainly as a consequence of colleagues not completing documentation as required. Conclusions This was the first UK study to undertake a review of in-patient postnatal services. Involvement of midwives at the outset was essential to the success of the initiative. Midwives play a lead role in the planning and organisation of in-patient postnatal care and it was important to obtain their

  20. Right care, right place, right time: improving the timeliness of health care in New South Wales through a public-private hospital partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Carla; Carter, David J

    2017-10-01

    Objective The overall aim of the study was to investigate and assess the feasibility of improving the timeliness of public hospital care through a New South Wales (NSW)-wide public-private hospital partnership. Methods The study reviewed the academic and professional grey literature, and undertook exploratory analyses of secondary data acquired from two national health data repositories informing in-patient access and utilisation across NSW public and private hospitals. Results In 2014-15, the NSW public hospital system was unable to deliver care within the medically recommended time frame for over 27400 people who were awaiting elective surgery. Available information indicates that the annual commissioning of 15% of public in-patient rehabilitation bed days to the private hospital system would potentially free up enough capacity in the NSW public hospital system to enable elective surgery for all public patients within recommended time frames. Conclusions The findings of the study justify a strategic whole-of-health system approach to reducing public patient wait times in NSW and highlight the need for research efforts aimed at securing a better understanding of available hospital capacity across the public and private hospital systems, and identifying and testing workable models that improve the timeliness of public hospital care. What is known about the topic? There are very few studies available to inform public-private hospital service partnerships and the opportunities available to improve timely health care access through such partnerships. What does this paper add? This paper has the potential to open and prompt timely discussion and debate, and generate further fundamental investigation, on public-private hospital service partnerships in Australia where opportunity is available to address elective surgery wait times in a reliable and effective manner. What are the implications for practitioners? The NSW Ministry of Health and its Local Health Districts

  1. In-patient costs of agitation and containment in a mental health catchment area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Blanco, Antoni; Rubio-Valera, Maria; Aznar-Lou, Ignacio; Baladón Higuera, Luisa; Gibert, Karina; Gracia Canales, Alfredo; Kaskens, Lisette; Ortiz, José Miguel; Salvador-Carulla, Luis

    2017-06-06

    There is a scarce number of studies on the cost of agitation and containment interventions and their results are still inconclusive. We aimed to calculate the economic consequences of agitation events in an in-patient psychiatric facility providing care for an urban catchment area. A mixed approach combining secondary analysis of clinical databases, surveys and expert knowledge was used to model the 2013 direct costs of agitation and containment events for adult inpatients with mental disorders in an area of 640,572 adult inhabitants in South Barcelona (Spain). To calculate costs, a seven-step methodology with novel definition of agitation was used along with a staff survey, a database of containment events, and data on aggressive incidents. A micro-costing analysis of specific containment interventions was used to estimate both prevalence and direct costs from the healthcare provider perspective, by means of a mixed approach with a probabilistic model evaluated on real data. Due to the complex interaction of the multivariate covariances, a sensitivity analysis was conducted to have empirical bounds of variability. During 2013, 918 patients were admitted to the Acute Inpatient Unit. Of these, 52.8% were men, with a mean age of 44.6 years (SD = 15.5), 74.4% were compulsory admissions, 40.1% were diagnosed with schizophrenia or non-affective psychosis, with a mean length of stay of 24.6 days (SD = 16.9). The annual estimate of total agitation events was 508. The cost of containment interventions ranges from 282€ at the lowest level of agitation to 822€ when verbal containment plus seclusion and restraint have to be used. The annual total cost of agitation was 280,535€, representing 6.87% of the total costs of acute hospitalisation in the local area. Agitation events are frequent and costly. Strategies to reduce their number and severity should be implemented to reduce costs to the Health System and alleviate patient suffering.

  2. Hospital administrator's perspectives regarding the health care industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, D R; Little, M W

    1988-01-01

    Based on responses from 52 hospital administrators, four areas of managerial concern have been addressed, including: (1) decision-making factors; (2) hospital service offerings: current and future; (3) marketing strategy and service priorities; and (4) health care industry challenges. Of the total respondents, 35 percent indicate a Director of Marketing has primary responsibility for making marketing-related decisions in their hospital, and 19 percent, a Vice-President of Marketing, thus demonstrating the increased priority of the marketing function. The continued importance of the physician being the primary market target is highlighted by 70 percent of the administrators feeling physician referrals will be more important regarding future admissions than in the past, compared to only two percent feeling the physicians' role will be less important. Of primary importance to patients selecting a hospital, as perceived by the administrators, are the physician's referral, the patient's previous experience, the hospital's reputation, and the courtesy of the staff. The clear majority of the conventional-care hospitals surveyed offer out-patient surgery, a hospital pharmacy, obstetrics/maternity care, and diabetic services. The future emphasis on expanding services is evidenced by some 50 percent of the hospital administrators indicating they either possibly or definitely plan to offer long-term nursing care, out-patient substance abuse programs, and cancer clinics by 1990. In addition, some one-third of the respondents are likely to expand their offerings to include wellness/fitness centers, in-patient substance abuse programs, remote or satellite primary care clinics, and diabetic services. Other areas having priority for future offerings include services geared specifically toward women and the elderly. Perceived as highest in priority by the administrators regarding how their hospital can achieve its goals in the next three years are market development strategies

  3. The effects of homelessness on Veterans' health care service use: an evaluation of independence from comorbidities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LePage, J P; Bradshaw, L D; Cipher, D J; Crawford, A M; Hoosyhar, D

    2014-11-01

    This study evaluates the prevalence of Multiple Comorbid Chronic Disease (MCCD) within homeless and non-homeless Veterans and the association between MCCD and inpatient medical care. All individuals seen in the VA North Texas Health Care System between October 1, 2009 and September 30, 2010 (n = 102,034) were evaluated. Homelessness during the year and the number of common chronic diseases were evaluated for an association with likelihood of medical and psychiatric hospitalizations, bed days of care, inpatient substance treatment, rehabilitation admissions, and emergency department visits. Homeless Veterans had higher all-cause mortality rates and rates of use of almost all resources after controlling for chronic disease burden using the Charlson Comorbidity Index, psychiatric illnesses, substance use disorders, and demographic variables. Homelessness Veterans are vulnerable to a high use of resources and mortality, independent of medical and psychiatric conditions. This finding should focus additional attention on reducing homelessness. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Characterising health care-associated bloodstream infections in public hospitals in Queensland, 2008-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Damin; Runnegar, Naomi; Marquess, John; Rajmokan, Mohana; Playford, Elliott G

    2016-04-18

    To describe the epidemiology and rates of all health care-associated bloodstream infections (HA-BSIs) and of specific HA-BSI subsets in public hospitals in Queensland. Standardised HA-BSI surveillance data were collected in 23 Queensland public hospitals, 2008-2012. HA-BSIs were prospectively classified in terms of place of acquisition (inpatient, non-inpatient); focus of infection (intravascular catheter-associated, organ site focus, neutropenic sepsis, or unknown focus); and causative organisms. Inpatient HA-BSI rates (per 10,000 patient-days) were calculated. There were 8092 HA-BSIs and 9418 causative organisms reported. Inpatient HA-BSIs accounted for 79% of all cases. The focus of infection in 2792 cases (35%) was an organ site, intravascular catheters in 2755 (34%; including 2240 central line catheters), neutropenic sepsis in 1063 (13%), and unknown in 1482 (18%). Five per cent (117 of 2240) of central line-associated BSIs (CLABSIs) were attributable to intensive care units (ICUs). Eight groups of organisms provided 79% of causative agents: coagulase-negative staphylococci (18%), Staphylococcus aureus (15%), Escherichia coli (11%), Pseudomonas species (9%), Klebsiella pneumoniae/oxytoca (8%), Enterococcus species (7%), Enterobacter species (6%), and Candida species (5%). The overall inpatient HA-BSI rate was 6.0 per 10,000 patient-days. The rates for important BSI subsets included: intravascular catheter-associated BSIs, 1.9 per 10,000 patient-days; S. aureus BSIs, 1.0 per 10,000 patient-days; and methicillin-resistant S. aureus BSIs, 0.3 per 10,000 patient-days. The rate of HA-BSIs in Queensland public hospitals is lower than reported by similar studies elsewhere. About one-third of HA-BSIs are attributable to intravascular catheters, predominantly central venous lines, but the vast majority of CLABSIs are contracted outside ICUs. Different sources of HA-BSIs require different prevention strategies.

  5. Evaluation of a Home-Based Hospice and Palliative Care Program in a Community Health Center in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Hyun Kim

    2009-03-01

    Conclusions: A home-based palliative service program delivered by the community health center appears to be an appropriate care model for managing physical symptoms. Reinforcing services for psychosocial and spiritual counseling and encouraging affiliation with free-standing inpatient healthcare providers are warranted. [Asian Nursing Research 2009;3(1:24–30

  6. Local inpatient units may increase patients' utilization of outpatient services: a comparative cohort-study in Nordland County, Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myklebust, Lars Henrik; Sørgaard, Knut; Wynn, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    In the last few decades, there has been a restructuring of the psychiatric services in many countries. The complexity of these systems may represent a challenge to patients that suffer from serious psychiatric disorders. We examined whether local integration of inpatient and outpatient services in contrast to centralized institutions strengthened continuity of care. Two different service-systems were compared. Service-utilization over a 4-year period for 690 inpatients was extracted from the patient registries. The results were controlled for demographic variables, model of service-system, central inpatient admission or local inpatient admission, diagnoses, and duration of inpatient stays. The majority of inpatients in the area with local integration of inpatient and outpatient services used both types of care. In the area that did not have beds locally, many patients that had been hospitalized did not receive outpatient follow-up. Predictors of inpatients' use of outpatient psychiatric care were: Model of service-system (centralized vs decentralized), a diagnosis of affective disorder, central inpatient admission only, and duration of inpatient stays. Psychiatric centers with local inpatient units may positively affect continuity of care for patients with severe psychiatric disorders, probably because of a high functional integration of inpatient and outpatient care.

  7. The effect of a clinical medical librarian on in-patient care outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esparza, Julia M; Shi, Runhua; McLarty, Jerry; Comegys, Marianne; Banks, Daniel E

    2013-07-01

    The research sought to determine the effect of a clinical medical librarian (CML) on outcomes of in-patients on the internal medicine service. A prospective study was performed with two internal medicine in-patient teams. Team 1 included a CML who accompanied the team on daily rounds. The CML answered questions posed at the point of care immediately or in emails post-rounds. Patients on Team 2, which did not include a CML, as well as patients who did not require consultation by the CML on Team 1, served as the control population. Numerous clinical and library metrics were gathered on each question. Patients on Team 1 who required an answer to a clinical question were more ill and had a longer length of stay, higher costs, and higher readmission rates compared to those in the control group. Using a matched pair analysis, we showed no difference in clinical outcomes between the intervention group and the control group. This study is the largest attempt to prospectively measure changes in patient outcomes when physicians were accompanied by a CML on rounds. This approach may serve as a model for further studies to define when and how CMLs are most effective.

  8. Principles of Child Health Care Financing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudak, Mark L; Helm, Mark E; White, Patience H

    2017-09-01

    After passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, more children and young adults have become insured and have benefited from health care coverage than at any time since the creation of the Medicaid program in 1965. From 2009 to 2015, the uninsurance rate for children younger than 19 years fell from 9.7% to 5.3%, whereas the uninsurance rate for young adults 19 to 25 years of age declined from 31.7% to 14.5%. Nonetheless, much work remains to be done. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) believes that the United States can and should ensure that all children, adolescents, and young adults from birth through the age of 26 years who reside within its borders have affordable access to high-quality and comprehensive health care, regardless of their or their families' incomes. Public and private health insurance should safeguard existing benefits for children and take further steps to cover the full array of essential health care services recommended by the AAP. Each family should be able to afford the premiums, deductibles, and other cost-sharing provisions of the plan. Health plans providing these benefits should ensure, insofar as possible, that families have a choice of professionals and facilities with expertise in the care of children within a reasonable distance of their residence. Traditional and innovative payment methodologies by public and private payers should be structured to guarantee the economic viability of the pediatric medical home and of other pediatric specialty and subspecialty practices to address developing shortages in the pediatric specialty and subspecialty workforce, to promote the use of health information technology, to improve population health and the experience of care, and to encourage the delivery of evidence-based and quality health care in the medical home, as well as in other outpatient, inpatient, and home settings. All current and future health care insurance plans should incorporate the principles for child

  9. Electronic health record use, intensity of hospital care, and patient outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blecker, Saul; Goldfeld, Keith; Park, Naeun; Shine, Daniel; Austrian, Jonathan S; Braithwaite, R Scott; Radford, Martha J; Gourevitch, Marc N

    2014-03-01

    Previous studies have suggested that weekend hospital care is inferior to weekday care and that this difference may be related to diminished care intensity. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a metric for measuring intensity of hospital care based on use of the electronic health record was associated with patient-level outcomes. We performed a cohort study of hospitalizations at an academic medical center. Intensity of care was defined as the hourly number of provider accessions of the electronic health record, termed "electronic health record interactions." Hospitalizations were categorized on the basis of the mean difference in electronic health record interactions between the first Friday and the first Saturday of hospitalization. We used regression models to determine the association of these categories with patient outcomes after adjusting for covariates. Electronic health record interactions decreased from Friday to Saturday in 77% of the 9051 hospitalizations included in the study. Compared with hospitalizations with no change in Friday to Saturday electronic health record interactions, the relative lengths of stay for hospitalizations with a small, moderate, and large decrease in electronic health record interactions were 1.05 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.00-1.10), 1.11 (95% CI, 1.05-1.17), and 1.25 (95% CI, 1.15-1.35), respectively. Although a large decrease in electronic health record interactions was associated with in-hospital mortality, these findings were not significant after risk adjustment (odds ratio 1.74, 95% CI, 0.93-3.25). Intensity of inpatient care, measured by electronic health record interactions, significantly diminished from Friday to Saturday, and this decrease was associated with length of stay. Hospitals should consider monitoring and correcting temporal fluctuations in care intensity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Patient engagement in the inpatient setting: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prey, Jennifer E; Woollen, Janet; Wilcox, Lauren; Sackeim, Alexander D; Hripcsak, George; Bakken, Suzanne; Restaino, Susan; Feiner, Steven; Vawdrey, David K

    2014-01-01

    To systematically review existing literature regarding patient engagement technologies used in the inpatient setting. PubMed, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) Digital Library, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Xplore, and Cochrane databases were searched for studies that discussed patient engagement ('self-efficacy', 'patient empowerment', 'patient activation', or 'patient engagement'), (2) involved health information technology ('technology', 'games', 'electronic health record', 'electronic medical record', or 'personal health record'), and (3) took place in the inpatient setting ('inpatient' or 'hospital'). Only English language studies were reviewed. 17 articles were identified describing the topic of inpatient patient engagement. A few articles identified design requirements for inpatient engagement technology. The remainder described interventions, which we grouped into five categories: entertainment, generic health information delivery, patient-specific information delivery, advanced communication tools, and personalized decision support. Examination of the current literature shows there are considerable gaps in knowledge regarding patient engagement in the hospital setting and inconsistent use of terminology regarding patient engagement overall. Research on inpatient engagement technologies has been limited, especially concerning the impact on health outcomes and cost-effectiveness. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  11. Service Line Management: A New Paradigm in Health Care System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafat Rezapour Nasrabad

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Health care organizations are required to implement modern management practices and approaches due to the importance of improving quality and increasing efficiency of health care services. Service line management of healthcare services is one of the new approaches that managers of health sectors are interested in. The “service line” approach will organize the management of inpatient and outpatient in clinical services focusing on patient diagnostic clusters. Services specific in each patient diagnostic cluster will be offered by a multidisciplinary team including nurses, physicians, and so no. Accordingly, the present study aims to evaluate the features, process and benefits of service line management approach in the provision of health services. In this descriptive study, internal and external scientific database have been reviewed and the necessary data have been extracted from the latest research projects and related scientific documents. The results showed that the new management approach is based on a paradigm shift from traditional health care system management to healthcare service line management with a focus on managers’ competencies. Four specific manager’s competencies in this new management model are: conceptual, collaborative, interpersonal, and leadership competencies. Theses competencies should be developed in health system managers so as to lead to organizational excellency and improvement of health service quality. The health sector managers should strengthen these four key competencies and act on them. Then they will become effective leaders and managers in the health system.

  12. Clinical reasoning and population health: decision making for an emerging paradigm of health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Ian; Richardson, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    Chronic conditions now provide the major disease and disability burden facing humanity. This development has necessitated a reorientation in the practice skills of health care professions away from hospital-based inpatient and outpatient care toward community-based management of patients with chronic conditions. Part of this reorientation toward community-based management of chronic conditions involves practitioners' understanding and adoption of a concept of population health management based on appropriate theoretical models of health care. Drawing on recent studies of expertise in physiotherapy, this article proposes a clinical reasoning and decision-making framework to meet these challenges. The challenge of population and community-based management of chronic conditions also provides an opportunity for physiotherapists to further clarify a professional epistemology of practice that embraces the kinds of knowledge and clinical reasoning processes used in physiotherapy practice. Three case studies related to the management of chronic musculoskeletal pain in different populations are used to exemplify the range of epistemological perspectives that underpin community-based practice. They illustrate the link between conceptualizations of practice problems and knowledge sources that are used as a basis for clinical reasoning and decision making as practitioners are increasingly required to move between the clinic and the community.

  13. Adjusting health spending for the presence of comorbidities: an application to United States national inpatient data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieleman, Joseph L; Baral, Ranju; Johnson, Elizabeth; Bulchis, Anne; Birger, Maxwell; Bui, Anthony L; Campbell, Madeline; Chapin, Abigail; Gabert, Rose; Hamavid, Hannah; Horst, Cody; Joseph, Jonathan; Lomsadze, Liya; Squires, Ellen; Tobias, Martin

    2017-08-29

    One of the major challenges in estimating health care spending spent on each cause of illness is allocating spending for a health care event to a single cause of illness in the presence of comorbidities. Comorbidities, the secondary diagnoses, are common across many causes of illness and often correlate with worse health outcomes and more expensive health care. In this study, we propose a method for measuring the average spending for each cause of illness with and without comorbidities. Our strategy for measuring cause of illness-specific spending and adjusting for the presence of comorbidities uses a regression-based framework to estimate excess spending due to comorbidities. We consider multiple causes simultaneously, allowing causes of illness to appear as either a primary diagnosis or a comorbidity. Our adjustment method distributes excess spending away from primary diagnoses (outflows), exaggerated due to the presence of comorbidities, and allocates that spending towards causes of illness that appear as comorbidities (inflows). We apply this framework for spending adjustment to the National Inpatient Survey data in the United States for years 1996-2012 to generate comorbidity-adjusted health care spending estimates for 154 causes of illness by age and sex. The primary diagnoses with the greatest number of comorbidities in the NIS dataset were acute renal failure, septicemia, and endocarditis. Hypertension, diabetes, and ischemic heart disease were the most common comorbidities across all age groups. After adjusting for comorbidities, chronic kidney diseases, atrial fibrillation and flutter, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease increased by 74.1%, 40.9%, and 21.0%, respectively, while pancreatitis, lower respiratory infections, and septicemia decreased by 21.3%, 17.2%, and 16.0%. For many diseases, comorbidity adjustments had varying effects on spending for different age groups. Our methodology takes a unified approach to account for excess spending caused

  14. Opting in and opting out: a grounded theory of nursing's contribution to inpatient rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryor, Julie; Walker, Annette; O'Connell, Beverly; Worrall-Carter, Linda

    2009-12-01

    To develop a grounded theory of nursing's contribution to patient rehabilitation from the perspective of nurses working in inpatient rehabilitation. Grounded theory method, informed by the theoretical perspective of symbolic interactionism, was used to guide data collection and analysis, and the development of a grounded theory. Five inpatient rehabilitation units in Australia. Thirty-five registered and 18 enrolled nurses participated in audio-taped interviews and/or were observed during periods of their everyday practice. The analysis revealed a situation whereby nurses made decisions about when to 'opt in' and when to 'opt out' of inpatient rehabilitation. This occurred on two levels: with their interaction with patients and allied health professionals, and when faced with negative system issues that impacted on their ability to contribute to patient rehabilitation. The primary contribution nurses made to inpatient rehabilitation was working directly with patients, enabling them to self-care. Nurses coached patients when their decisions about 'opting in' and 'opting out' were based on assessment of the person in their particular context. In contrast, the nurses mostly distanced themselves from system-based problems, 'opting out' of addressing them. They did this not to make their working lives easier, but more manageable. System-based problems impacted negatively on the nurses' ability to deliver comprehensive rehabilitation care. As a consequence, some nurses felt unable to influence the care and they withdrew professionally to make their work lives more manageable.

  15. An observational pre-post study of re-structuring Medicine inpatient teaching service: Improved continuity of care within constraint of 2011 duty hours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Joseph Y; Mueller, Daniel; Blum, Marissa; Ravreby, Hannah; Williams, Paul; Moyer, Darilyn; Caroline, Malka; Zack, Chad; Fisher, Susan G; Feldman, Arthur M

    2015-09-01

    Implementation of more stringent regulations on duty hours and supervision by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education in July 2011 makes it challenging to design inpatient Medicine teaching service that complies with the duty hour restrictions while optimizing continuity of patient care. To prospectively compare two inpatient Medicine teaching service structures with respect to residents' impression of continuity of patient care (primary outcome), time available for teaching, resident satisfaction and length-of-stay (secondary endpoints). Observational pre-post study. Surveys were conducted both before and after Conventional Medicine teaching service was changed to a novel model (MegaTeam). Academic General Medicine inpatient teaching service. Surveys before and after MegaTeam implementation were completed by 68.5% and 72.2% of internal medicine residents, respectively. Comparing conventional with MegaTeam, the % of residents who agreed or strongly agreed that the (i) ability to care for majority of patients from admission to discharge increased from 29.7% to 86.6% (pcare, decreases number of handoffs, provides adequate supervision and teaching of interns and medical students, increases resident overall satisfaction and decreases length-of-stay. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The relationship between inpatient discharge timing and emergency department boarding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Emilie S; Khare, Rahul K; Venkatesh, Arjun K; Van Roo, Ben D; Adams, James G; Reinhardt, Gilles

    2012-02-01

    Patient crowding and boarding in Emergency Departments (EDs) impair the quality of care as well as patient safety and satisfaction. Improved timing of inpatient discharges could positively affect ED boarding, and this hypothesis can be tested with computer modeling. Modeling enables analysis of the impact of inpatient discharge timing on ED boarding. Three policies were tested: a sensitivity analysis on shifting the timing of current discharge practices earlier; discharging 75% of inpatients by 12:00 noon; and discharging all inpatients between 8:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. A cross-sectional computer modeling analysis was conducted of inpatient admissions and discharges on weekdays in September 2007. A model of patient flow streams into and out of inpatient beds with an output of ED admitted patient boarding hours was created to analyze the three policies. A mean of 38.8 ED patients, 22.7 surgical patients, and 19.5 intensive care unit transfers were admitted to inpatient beds, and 81.1 inpatients were discharged daily on September 2007 weekdays: 70.5%, 85.6%, 82.8%, and 88.0%, respectively, occurred between noon and midnight. In the model base case, total daily admitted patient boarding hours were 77.0 per day; the sensitivity analysis showed that shifting the peak inpatient discharge time 4h earlier eliminated ED boarding, and discharging 75% of inpatients by noon and discharging all inpatients between 8:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. both decreased boarding hours to 3.0. Timing of inpatient discharges had an impact on the need to board admitted patients. This model demonstrates the potential to reduce or eliminate ED boarding by improving inpatient discharge timing in anticipation of the daily surge in ED demand for inpatient beds. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The effects of Snoezelen (multi-sensory behavior therapy) and psychiatric care on agitation, apathy, and activities of daily living in dementia patients on a short term geriatric psychiatric inpatient unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staal, Jason A; Sacks, Amanda; Matheis, Robert; Collier, Lesley; Calia, Tina; Hanif, Henry; Kofman, Eugene S

    2007-01-01

    A randomized, controlled, single-blinded, between group study of 24 participants with moderate to severe dementia was conducted on a geriatric psychiatric unit. All participants received pharmacological therapy, occupational therapy, structured hospital environment, and were randomized to receive multi sensory behavior therapy (MSBT) or a structured activity session. Greater independence in activities of daily living (ADLs) was observed for the group treated with MSBT and standard psychiatric inpatient care on the Katz Index of Activities of Daily Living (KI-ADL; P = 0.05) than standard psychiatric inpatient care alone. The combination treatment of MSBT and standard psychiatric care also reduced agitation and apathy greater than standard psychiatric inpatient care alone as measured with the Pittsburgh Agitation Scale and the Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms in Alzheimer's Disease (P = 0.05). Multiple regression analysis predicted that within the multi-sensory group, activities of daily living (KI-ADL) increased as apathy and agitation reduced (R2 = 0.42; p = 0.03). These data suggest that utilizing MSBT with standard psychiatric inpatient care may reduce apathy and agitation and additionally improve activities of daily living in hospitalized people with moderate to severe dementia more than standard care alone.

  18. Pre-fracture individual characteristics associated with high total health care costs after hip fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schousboe, J T; Paudel, M L; Taylor, B C; Kats, A M; Virnig, B A; Dowd, B E; Langsetmo, L; Ensrud, K E

    2017-03-01

    Older women with pre-fracture slow walk speed, high body mass index, and/or a high level of multimorbidity have significantly higher health care costs after hip fracture compared to those without those characteristics. Studies to investigate if targeted health care interventions for these individuals can reduce hip fracture costs are warranted. The aim of this study is to estimate the associations of individual pre-fracture characteristics with total health care costs after hip fracture, using Study of Osteoporotic Fractures (SOF) cohort data linked to Medicare claims. Our study population was 738 women age 70 and older enrolled in Medicare Fee for Service (FFS) who experienced an incident hip fracture between January 1, 1992 and December 31, 2009. We assessed pre-fracture individual characteristics at SOF study visits and estimated costs of hospitalizations, skilled nursing facility and inpatient rehabilitation stays, home health care visits, and outpatient utilization from Medicare FFS claims. We used generalized linear models to estimate the associations of predictor variables with total health care costs (2010 US dollars) after hip fracture. Median total health care costs for 1 year after hip fracture were $35,536 (inter-quartile range $24,830 to $50,903). Multivariable-adjusted total health care costs for 1 year after hip fracture were 14 % higher ($5256, 95 % CI $156 to $10,356) in those with walk speed total health care costs after hip fracture in older women. Studies to investigate if targeted health care interventions for these individuals can reduce the costs of hip fractures are warranted.

  19. Treatment persistence & health care costs of adult MDD patients treated with escitalopram vs. citalopram in a medicaid population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Eric Q; Ben-Hamadi, Rym; Lu, Mei; Beaulieu, Nicolas; Yu, Andrew P; Erder, M Haim

    2012-01-01

    Compare treatment persistence and health care costs of major depressive disorder (MDD) Medicaid patients treated with escitalopram versus citalopram. Retrospective analysis of Medicaid administrative claims data. Analyzed administrative claims data from the Florida Medicaid program (07/2002-06/2006) for patients ages 18-64 years with 21 inpatient claim or 2 independent medical claims for MDD. Outcomes included discontinuation and switching rates and prescription drug, medical, and total health care costs, all-cause and related to mental disorder. Contingency table analysis and survival analysis were used to compare outcomes between treatment groups, using both unadjusted analysis and multivariate analysis adjusting for baseline characteristics. The study included 2,650 patients initiated on escitalopram and 630 patients initiated on citalopram. Patients treated with escitalopram were less likely to discontinue the index drug (63.7% vs. 68.9%, P=0.015) or to switch to another second-generation antidepressant (14.9% vs. 18.4%, P=0.029) over the six months post-index date. Patients treated with escitalopram had $1,014 lower total health care costs (P=0.032) and $519 lower health care costs related to mental disorder (P=0.023). More than half of the total cost difference was attributable to savings in inpatient hospitalizations related to mental disorder ($571, P=0.003) and to outpatient costs ($53, PEscitalopram therapy was also associated with $736 lower medical costs related to mental disorder (P=0.009). In the Florida Medicaid program, compared to adult MDD patients initiated on citalopram, escitalopram patients have better treatment persistence and lower total health care costs due to any cause and due to mental disorder, mostly driven by lower hospitalization costs related to mental disorder.

  20. Health Insurance and Health Care among the Mid-Aged and Older Chinese: Evidence from the National Baseline Survey of CHARLS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chuanchuan; Lei, Xiaoyan; Strauss, John; Zhao, Yaohui

    2017-04-01

    We document the recent profile of health insurance and health care among mid-aged and older Chinese using data from the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study conducted in 2011. Overall health insurance coverage is about 93%. Multivariate regressions show that respondents with lower income as measured by per capita expenditure have a lower chance of being insured, as do the less-educated, older, and divorced/widowed women and rural-registered people. Premiums and reimbursement rates of health insurance vary significantly by schemes. Inpatient reimbursement rates for urban people increase with total cost to a plateau of 60%; rural people receive much less. Demographic characteristics such as age, education, marriage status, per capita expenditure, and self-reported health status are not significantly associated with share of out-of-pocket cost after controlling community effects. For health service use, we find large gaps that vary across health insurance plans, especially for inpatient service. People with access to urban health insurance plans are more likely to use health services. In general, Chinese people have easy access to median low-level medical facilities. It is also not difficult to access general hospitals or specialized hospitals, but there exists better access to healthcare facilities in urban areas. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Health care expenses in relation to obesity and smoking among U.S. adults by gender, race/ethnicity, and age group: 1998-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, R

    2015-01-01

    Obesity and smoking are two leading health risk factors and consume substantial health care resources. This study estimates and tracks annual per-capita health care expenses associated with obesity and smoking among U.S. adults aged 18 years and older from 1998 to 2011. Retrospective data analysis. Individual-level data came from the National Health Interview Survey 1996-2010 waves and the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey 1998-2011 waves. Annual per-capita health care expenses associated with obesity and smoking were estimated in two-part models, accounting for individual characteristics and sampling design. Obesity and smoking were associated with an increase in annual per-capita total health care expenses (2011 US$) by $1360 (95% confidence interval: $1134-$1587) and $1046 ($846-$1247), out-of-pocket expenses by $143 ($110-$176) and $70 ($37-$104), hospital inpatient expenses by $406 ($283-$529) and $405 ($291-$519), hospital outpatient expenses by $164 ($119-$210) and $95 ($52-$138), office-based medical provider service expenses by $219 ($157-$280) and $117 ($62-$172), emergency room service expenses by $45 ($28-$63) and $57 ($44-$71), and prescription expenses by $439 ($382-$496) and $251 ($199-$302), respectively. From 1998 to 2011, the estimated per-capita expenses associated with obesity and smoking increased by 25% and 30% for total health care, 41% and 48% for office-based medical provider services, 59% and 66% for emergency room services, and 62% and 70% for prescriptions but decreased by 16% and 15% for out-of-pocket health care expenses, 3% and 0.3% for inpatient care, and 6% and 2% for outpatient care, respectively. Health care expenses associated with obesity and smoking were considerably larger among women, Non-Hispanic whites, and older adults compared with their male, racial/ethnic minority, and younger counterparts. Health care costs associated with obesity and smoking are substantial and increased noticeably during 1998-2011. They also vary

  2. Barriers and motivators affecting tuberculosis infection control practices of Russian health care workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woith, W; Volchenkov, G; Larson, J

    2012-08-01

    Five in-patient and out-patient tuberculosis (TB) care facilities in two regions of Russia. To identify barriers and motivators to the use of infection control measures among Russian TB health care workers. In this qualitative study, a convenience sample of 96 health care workers (HCWs) was used to generate 15 homogeneous focus groups, consisting of physicians, nurses, and laboratory or support staff. Barriers and motivators related to knowledge, attitudes and beliefs, and practices were identified. The three main barriers were 1) knowledge deficits, including the belief that TB was transmitted by dust, linens and eating utensils; 2) negative attitudes related to the discomfort of respirators; and 3) practices with respect to quality and care of respirators. Education and training, fear of infecting loved ones, and fear of punishment were the main motivators. Our results point to the need for evaluation of current educational programs. Positive health promotion messages that appeal to fear might also be successful in promoting TB infection control. Individualized rewards based on personal motivators or group rewards that build on collectivist theory could be explored.

  3. Local inpatient units may increase patients’ utilization of outpatient services: a comparative cohort-study in Nordland County, Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myklebust, Lars Henrik; Sørgaard, Knut; Wynn, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Objectives In the last few decades, there has been a restructuring of the psychiatric services in many countries. The complexity of these systems may represent a challenge to patients that suffer from serious psychiatric disorders. We examined whether local integration of inpatient and outpatient services in contrast to centralized institutions strengthened continuity of care. Methods Two different service-systems were compared. Service-utilization over a 4-year period for 690 inpatients was extracted from the patient registries. The results were controlled for demographic variables, model of service-system, central inpatient admission or local inpatient admission, diagnoses, and duration of inpatient stays. Results The majority of inpatients in the area with local integration of inpatient and outpatient services used both types of care. In the area that did not have beds locally, many patients that had been hospitalized did not receive outpatient follow-up. Predictors of inpatients’ use of outpatient psychiatric care were: Model of service-system (centralized vs decentralized), a diagnosis of affective disorder, central inpatient admission only, and duration of inpatient stays. Conclusion Psychiatric centers with local inpatient units may positively affect continuity of care for patients with severe psychiatric disorders, probably because of a high functional integration of inpatient and outpatient care. PMID:26604843

  4. Basic Stand Alone Medicare Inpatient Claims PUF

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This release contains the Basic Stand Alone (BSA) Inpatient Public Use Files (PUF) named CMS 2008 BSA Inpatient Claims PUF with information from 2008 Medicare...

  5. Return-on-Investment (ROI) Analyses of an Inpatient Lay Health Worker Model on 30-Day Readmission Rates in a Rural Community Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardarelli, Roberto; Bausch, Gregory; Murdock, Joan; Chyatte, Michelle Renee

    2017-07-07

    The purpose of the study was to assess the return-on-investment (ROI) of an inpatient lay health worker (LHW) model in a rural Appalachian community hospital impacting 30-day readmission rates. The Bridges to Home (BTH) study completed an evaluation in 2015 of an inpatient LHW model in a rural Kentucky hospital that demonstrated a reduction in 30-day readmission rates by 47.7% compared to a baseline period. Using the hospital's utilization and financial data, a validated ROI calculator specific to care transition programs was used to assess the ROI of the BTH model comparing 3 types of payment models including Diagnosis Related Group (DRG)-only payments, pay-for-performance (P4P) contracts, and accountable care organizations (ACOs). The BTH program had a -$0.67 ROI if the hospital had only a DRG-based payment model. If the hospital had P4P contracts with payers and 0.1% of its annual operating revenue was at risk, the ROI increased to $7.03 for every $1 spent on the BTH program. However, if the hospital was an ACO as was the case for this study's community hospital, the ROI significantly increased to $38.48 for every $1 spent on the BTH program. The BTH model showed a viable ROI to be considered by community hospitals that are part of an ACO or P4P program. A LHW care transition model may be a cost-effective alternative for impacting excess 30-day readmissions and avoiding associated penalties for hospital systems with a value-based payment model. © 2017 National Rural Health Association.

  6. High Health Care Utilization Preceding Diagnosis of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus in Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Joyce C; Mandell, David S; Knight, Andrea M

    2017-12-01

    Childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is associated with high risk for organ damage, which may be mitigated by early diagnosis and treatment. We characterized health care utilization for youth in the year preceding SLE diagnosis compared to controls. Using Clinformatics ™ DataMart (OptumInsight, Eden Prairie, MN) de-identified administrative data from 2000 to 2013, we identified 682 youth ages 10-24 years with new-onset SLE (≥3 International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) codes for SLE 710.0, each >30 days apart), and 1,364 age and sex-matched healthy controls. We compared the incidence of ambulatory, emergency, and inpatient visits 12 months before SLE diagnosis, and frequency of primary diagnoses. We examined subject characteristics associated with utilization preceding SLE diagnosis. Youth with SLE had significantly more visits in the year preceding diagnosis than controls across ambulatory (incidence rate ratio (IRR) 2.48, p<0.001), emergency (IRR 3.42, p<0.001) and inpatient settings (IRR 3.02, p<0.001). The most frequent acute care diagnoses and median days to SLE diagnosis were: venous thromboembolism (313, interquartile range (IQR) 18-356), thrombocytopenia (278, IQR 39-354), chest pain (73, IQR 29.5-168), fever (52, IQR 17-166), and acute kidney failure (14, IQR 5-168). Having a psychiatric diagnosis prior to SLE diagnosis was strongly associated with increased utilization across all settings. Youth with SLE have high health care utilization throughout the year preceding SLE diagnosis. Examining variable diagnostic trajectories of youth presenting for acute care preceding SLE diagnosis, and increased attention to psychiatric morbidity may help improve care for youth with new-onset SLE. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. Walking a fine line: managing the tensions associated with medication non-adherence in an acute inpatient psychiatric setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijnveld, Anne-Marie; Crowe, Marie

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this study was to use a phenomenological methodology to examine mental health nurses' experiences of administering medications to patients who were non-adherent in an acute inpatient service. There is a large body of literature focused on exploring the issue of non-adherence to prescribed medication, but there is very little examining this from mental health nurses' perspectives. Many of the medications prescribed for patients diagnosed with a psychiatric disorder have serious side effects and limited efficacy. Mental health nurses in acute inpatient environments are regularly confronted with the difficulties inherent in the conflicting roles associated with the need to maintain therapeutic relationships and the expectation that they ensure patients take their medications. This is a qualitative study exploring mental health nurses' descriptions of managing medication adherence in an acute inpatient unit. The interpretive phenomenological methodology of Van Manen (Researching Lived Experience: Human Science for an Action Sensitive Pedagogy, 1990) was used in this study to capture the experiences of a group of nurses. This research process involves a dynamic interplay between the following six research activities: (1) turning to the nature of the lived experience; (2) investigating the experience as we live it; (3) reflecting on essential themes; (4) a description of the phenomenon through the art of writing and rewriting; (5) maintaining a strong and oriented pedagogical relation to the phenomenon; and (6) balancing the research context by considering parts and whole. Four themes emerged from the existential analysis that described the mental health nurses' experiences: doing the job for doctors (relationality); stopping and listening (temporality); stepping in (corporeality); and walking a fine line (spatiality). It is proposed that models of therapeutic interventions offering alternative or conjunctive treatment to medications could be incorporated into

  8. Quality of Health Care for Children in Australia, 2012-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braithwaite, Jeffrey; Hibbert, Peter D; Jaffe, Adam; White, Les; Cowell, Christopher T; Harris, Mark F; Runciman, William B; Hallahan, Andrew R; Wheaton, Gavin; Williams, Helena M; Murphy, Elisabeth; Molloy, Charlotte J; Wiles, Louise K; Ramanathan, Shanthi; Arnolda, Gaston; Ting, Hsuen P; Hooper, Tamara D; Szabo, Natalie; Wakefield, John G; Hughes, Clifford F; Schmiede, Annette; Dalton, Chris; Dalton, Sarah; Holt, Joanna; Donaldson, Liam; Kelley, Ed; Lilford, Richard; Lachman, Peter; Muething, Stephen

    2018-03-20

    The quality of routine care for children is rarely assessed, and then usually in single settings or for single clinical conditions. To estimate the quality of health care for children in Australia in inpatient and ambulatory health care settings. Multistage stratified sample with medical record review to assess adherence with quality indicators extracted from clinical practice guidelines for 17 common, high-burden clinical conditions (noncommunicable [n = 5], mental health [n = 4], acute infection [n = 7], and injury [n = 1]), such as asthma, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, tonsillitis, and head injury. For these 17 conditions, 479 quality indicators were identified, with the number varying by condition, ranging from 9 for eczema to 54 for head injury. Four hundred medical records were targeted for sampling for each of 15 conditions while 267 records were targeted for anxiety and 133 for depression. Within each selected medical record, all visits for the 17 targeted conditions were identified, and separate quality assessments made for each. Care was evaluated for 6689 children 15 years of age and younger who had 15 240 visits to emergency departments, for inpatient admissions, or to pediatricians and general practitioners in selected urban and rural locations in 3 Australian states. These visits generated 160 202 quality indicator assessments. Quality indicators were identified through a systematic search of local and international guidelines. Individual indicators were extracted from guidelines and assessed using a 2-stage Delphi process. Quality of care for each clinical condition and overall. Of 6689 children with surveyed medical records, 53.6% were aged 0 to 4 years and 55.5% were male. Adherence to quality of care indicators was estimated at 59.8% (95% CI, 57.5%-62.0%; n = 160 202) across the 17 conditions, ranging from a high of 88.8% (95% CI, 83.0%-93.1%; n = 2638) for autism to a low of 43.5% (95% CI, 36.8%-50.4%; n

  9. Cost Analysis and Policy Implications of a Pediatric Palliative Care Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gans, Daphna; Hadler, Max W; Chen, Xiao; Wu, Shang-Hua; Dimand, Robert; Abramson, Jill M; Ferrell, Betty; Diamant, Allison L; Kominski, Gerald F

    2016-09-01

    In 2010, California launched Partners for Children (PFC), a pediatric palliative care pilot program offering hospice-like services for children eligible for full-scope Medicaid delivered concurrently with curative care, regardless of the child's life expectancy. We assessed the change from before PFC enrollment to the enrolled period in 1) health care costs per enrollee per month (PEPM), 2) costs by service type and diagnosis category, and 3) health care utilization (days of inpatient care and length of hospital stay). A pre-post analysis compared enrollees' health care costs and utilization up to 24 months before enrollment with their costs during participation in the pilot, from January 2010 through December 2012. Analyses were conducted using paid Medicaid claims and program enrollment data. The average PEPM health care costs of program enrollees decreased by $3331 from before their participation in PFC to the enrolled period, driven by a reduction in inpatient costs of $4897 PEPM. PFC enrollees experienced a nearly 50% reduction in the average number of inpatient days per month, from 4.2 to 2.3. Average length of stay per hospitalization dropped from an average of 16.7 days before enrollment to 6.5 days while in the program. Through the provision of home-based therapeutic services, 24/7 access to medical advice, and enhanced, personally tailored care coordination, PFC demonstrated an effective way to reduce costs for children with life-limiting conditions by moving from costly inpatient care to more coordinated and less expensive outpatient care. PFC's home-based care strategy is a cost-effective model for pediatric palliative care elsewhere. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Patient satisfaction between primary care providers and hospitals: a cross-sectional survey in Jilin province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinghua; Wang, Pingping; Kong, Xuan; Liang, Hailun; Zhang, Xiumin; Shi, Leiyu

    2016-06-01

    To assess patient satisfaction with outpatient and inpatient care between primary care providers and secondary/tertiary hospitals, and to examine its association with socio-demographic characteristics and type of institution, based on self-reported survey data. Cross-sectional survey. Healthcare facilities within Jilin province, China. In total, 993 outpatients and 925 inpatients aged ≥15 years old were recruited. Patient satisfaction with the care experience. Patient satisfaction with outpatient and inpatient care was significantly associated with type of healthcare delivery setting in Jilin, China. Seeking outpatient care from community health centers (CHCs) was significantly associated with a higher ratio of patient satisfaction. Patients of county and tertiary hospitals complained about long-waiting times, bad attitudes of health workers, high expense of treatment, and their overall satisfaction towards outpatient care was lower. In the terms of inpatient care, patients were more satisfied with treatment expense in CHCs compared with county hospitals. CHCs and hospitals face different challenges regarding patient satisfaction. Further healthcare reform in China need to adopt more measures (e.g. increasing quality of primary care, setting up a referral medical system etc.) to improve patient satisfaction. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care; all rights reserved.

  11. Individual psychological therapy in an acute inpatient setting: Service user and psychologist perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Catherine; Pistrang, Nancy; Huddy, Vyv; Williams, Claire

    2018-01-18

    The acute inpatient setting poses potential challenges to delivering one-to-one psychological therapy; however, there is little research on the experiences of both receiving and delivering therapies in this environment. This qualitative study aimed to explore service users' and psychologists' experiences of undertaking individual therapy in acute inpatient units. It focused on the relationship between service users and psychologists, what service users found helpful or unhelpful, and how psychologists attempted to overcome any challenges in delivering therapy. The study used a qualitative, interview-based design. Eight service users and the six psychologists they worked with were recruited from four acute inpatient wards. They participated in individual semi-structured interviews eliciting their perspectives on the therapy. Service users' and psychologists' transcripts were analysed together using Braun and Clarke's (2006, Qualitative Research in Psychology, 3, 77) method of thematic analysis. The accounts highlighted the importance of forming a 'human' relationship - particularly within the context of the inpatient environment - as a basis for therapeutic work. Psychological therapy provided valued opportunities for meaning-making. To overcome the challenges of acute mental health crisis and environmental constraints, psychologists needed to work flexibly and creatively; the therapeutic work also extended to the wider context of the inpatient unit, in efforts to promote a shared understanding of service users' difficulties. Therapeutic relationships between service users and clinicians need to be promoted more broadly within acute inpatient care. Psychological formulation can help both service users and ward staff in understanding crisis and working collaboratively. Practice-based evidence is needed to demonstrate the effectiveness of adapted psychological therapy models. Developing 'human' relationships at all levels of acute inpatient care continues to be an

  12. Impact of a New Palliative Care Program on Health System Finances: An Analysis of the Palliative Care Program Inpatient Unit and Consultations at Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isenberg, Sarina R; Lu, Chunhua; McQuade, John; Chan, Kelvin K W; Gill, Natasha; Cardamone, Michael; Torto, Deirdre; Langbaum, Terry; Razzak, Rab; Smith, Thomas J

    2017-05-01

    Palliative care inpatient units (PCUs) can improve symptoms, family perception of care, and lower per-diem costs compared with usual care. In March 2013, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions (JHMI) added a PCU to the palliative care (PC) program. We studied the financial impact of the PC program on JHMI from March 2013 to March 2014. This study considered three components of the PC program: PCU, PC consultations, and professional fees. Using 13 months of admissions data, the team calculated the per-day variable cost pre-PCU (ie, in another hospital unit) and after transfer to the PCU. These fees were multiplied by the number of patients transferred to the PCU and by the average length of stay in the PCU. Consultation savings were estimated using established methods. Professional fees assumed a collection rate of 50%. The total positive financial impact of the PC program was $3,488,863.17. There were 153 transfers to the PCU, 60% with cancer, and an average length of stay of 5.11 days. The daily loss pretransfer to the PCU of $1,797.67 was reduced to $1,345.34 in the PCU (-25%). The PCU saved JHMI $353,645.17 in variable costs, or $452.33 per transfer. Cost savings for PC consultations in the hospital, 60% with cancer, were estimated at $2,765,218. $370,000 was collected in professional fees savings. The PCU and PC program had a favorable impact on JHMI while providing expert patient-centered care. As JHMI moves to an accountable care organization model, value-based patient-centered care and increased intensive care unit availability are desirable.

  13. Obstetric Outcomes and Delivery-Related Health Care Utilization and Costs Among Pregnant Women With Multiple Chronic Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelman, Tyler N. A.; Heisler, Michele; Dalton, Vanessa K.

    2018-01-01

    Our objective was to measure obstetric outcomes and delivery-related health care utilization and costs among pregnant women with multiple chronic conditions. We used 2013–2014 data from the National Inpatient Sample to measure obstetric outcomes and delivery-related health care utilization and costs among women with no chronic conditions, 1 chronic condition, and multiple chronic conditions. Women with multiple chronic conditions were at significantly higher risk than women with 1 chronic condition or no chronic conditions across all outcomes measured. High-value strategies are needed to improve birth outcomes among vulnerable mothers and their infants. PMID:29420168

  14. [Home care and place of death for elderly people living in the remote islands of Japan. An examination on the presence of inpatient facilities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horikoshi, Naoko; Kuwahara, Yuki; Taguchi, Atsuko; Nagata, Tomoko; Murashima, Sachiyo

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the actual status of end-of-life care for elderly people living in the remote islands of Japan, and whether the presence of inpatient facilities was related to the place of death, so as to obtain suggestions for constructing a system of end-of-life care. The survey targeted caregivers (85 people) who cared for elderly people (aged 65 and over), who had been legally certified for long-term care, and who had died between April 2009 and July 2011 in five islands of Japan. Islands were selected from a list of remote islands specified in the Remote Islands Development Act and related laws. Using a mixed method embedded design, we conducted semi-structured interviews using a questionnaire that assessed the place and cause of the elderly patient's death, age at death, gender, and whether the patient or family members had requested that the patient be allowed to die at home. The proportion of elderly people who died at home in the group living on remote islands with no inpatient facilities was 39.0% (16 of 41 people), compared with 18.2% (8 of 44 people) living on islands with inpatient facilities. The difference was significant (P=0.029). Among the 24 elderly people who died at home, 6 died of cancer. Terminally ill cancer patients were released to die at home under three conditions: the caregivers could provide sufficient care, the visiting physician was present, and pain control was provided. It was also possible for elderly cancer patients to receive end-of-life care in remote islands that did not have inpatient facilities. In addition, among the elderly people who died at home in the remote islands, home care had been recommended by medical staff. It is important for professionals coordinating home care to understand the characteristics of diseases, perform early assessment of caregiver situations, and collaborate with medical staff.

  15. Insular pathways to health care in the city: a multilevel analysis of access to hospital care in urban Kerala, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levesque, Jean-Frédéric; Haddad, Slim; Narayana, Delampady; Fournier, Pierre

    2007-07-01

    To identify individual and urban unit characteristics associated with access to inpatient care in public and private sectors in urban Kerala, and to discuss policy implications of inequalities in access. We analysed the NSSO survey (1995-1996) for urban Kerala with regard to source and trajectories of hospitalization. Multinomial multilevel regression models were built for 695 cases nested in 24 urban units. Private sector accounts for 62% of hospitalizations. Only 31% of hospitalizations are in free wards and 20% of public hospitalizations involve payment. Hospitalization pathways suggest a segmentation of public and private health markets. Members of poor and casual worker households have lower propensity of hospitalization in paying public wards or private hospitals. There were important variations between cities, with higher odds of private hospitalization in towns with fewer hospital beds overall and in districts with high private-public bed ratios. Cities from districts with better economic indicators and dominance of private services have higher proportion of private hospitalizations. The private sector is the predominant source of inpatient care in urban Kerala. The public sector has an important role in providing access to care for the poor. Investing in the quality of public services is essential to ensure equity in access.

  16. Situations of Agitation and Violence: the Reality in an Acute Inpatient Ward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fátima Honrado Ferreira

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Although aggressiveness/violence is present in all individuals and societies, it may have different manifestations. Even though, on one hand, it is considered innate to Man, on the other it is viewed as a social phenomenon with a cultural, social and historical frames. Violent behaviour in a psychiatric inpatient ward cannot, and should no,t be solely at-tributed to factors that are directly linked to the patient; there is a set of factors that may contribute to a hostile environment within the inpatient ward. The environment in the ward as well as the role of the mental health care professionals, and in particular the role of the nurse, should be taken into account.

  17. Two-year follow-up of a randomized controlled trial of a clinical nurse specialist intervention, inpatient, and day patient team care in rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijhuis, Gerhardus J.; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.; Hazes, Johanna M. W.; Breedveld, Ferdinand C.; Vliet Vlieland, Theodora P. M.

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To compare the long-term effectiveness of care delivered by a clinical nurse specialist (CNS) with inpatient team care and day patient team care in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and increasing functional limitations. Background. The role of CNSs in the management of patients with

  18. Two-year follow-up of a randomized controlled trial of a clinical nurse specialist intervention, inpatient, and day patient team care in rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.T.F. Tijhuis (Marijke); A.H. Zwinderman (Ailko); J.M.W. Hazes (Mieke); F.C. Breedveld (Ferdinand); P.M.T. Vliet Vlieland (P.M. Theodora)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractAim. To compare the long-term effectiveness of care delivered by a clinical nurse specialist (CNS) with inpatient team care and day patient team care in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and increasing functional limitations. Background. The role of CNSs in the management of patients

  19. Productivity and quality improvements in health care through airboss mobile messaging services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, P J; Martinez, R; Cooney, E

    1997-01-01

    The US health care industry is in the midst of revolutionary changes. Under tremendous pressures from third-party payers and managed care programs to control costs while providing high quality medical services, health care entities are now looking at information technologies to help them achieve their goals. These goals typically include improved productivity, efficiency and decision-making capabilities among staff members. Moreover, hospitals and other health care facilities that provide a broad and integrated range of inpatient and outpatient care, wellness and home care services are in the best position to offer comprehensive packages to managed care and private insurers. Many health care providers and administrators are considered mobile employees. This mobility can range from intra-building and intra-campus to multi-site and metropolitan areas. This group often relies on a variety of information technologies such as personal computers, communicating laptops, pagers, cellular phones, wireline phones, cordless phones and fax machines to stay in touch and handle information needs. These health care professionals require mobile information access and messaging tools to improve communications, control accessibility and enhance decision-making capabilities. AirBoss mobile messaging services could address the health care industry's need for improved messaging capabilities for its mobile employees. The AirBoss family of services supports integrated voice services, data messaging, mobile facsimile and customized information delivery. This paper describes overview of the current mobile data networking capability, the AirBoss architecture, the health care-related applications it addresses and long-term benefits. In addition, a prototype application for mobile home health care workers is illustrated. This prototype application provides integrated e-mail, information services, web access, real-time access and update of patient records from wireline or wireless networks

  20. The logistics of an inpatient dermatology service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbach, Misha

    2017-03-01

    Inpatient dermatology represents a unique challenge as caring for hospitalized patients with skin conditions is different from most dermatologists' daily outpatient practice. Declining rates of inpatient dermatology participation are often attributed to a number of factors, including challenges navigating the administrative burdens of hospital credentialing, acclimating to different hospital systems involving potential alternate electronic medical records systems, medical-legal concerns, and reimbursement concerns. This article aims to provide basic guidelines to help dermatologists establish a presence as a consulting physician in the inpatient hospital-based setting. The emphasis is on identifying potential pitfalls, problematic areas, and laying out strategies for tackling some of the challenges of inpatient dermatology including balancing financial concerns and optimizing reimbursements, tracking data and developing a plan for academic productivity, optimizing workflow, and identifying metrics to document the impact of an inpatient dermatology consult service. ©2017 Frontline Medical Communications.

  1. Psychosocial Work Environment, Stress Factors and Individual Characteristics among Nursing Staff in Psychiatric In-Patient Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuvesson Hanna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The psychosocial work environment is an important factor in psychiatric in-patient care, and knowing more of its correlates might open up new paths for future workplace interventions. Thus, the aims of the present study were to investigate perceptions of the psychosocial work environment among nursing staff in psychiatric in-patient care and how individual characteristics—Mastery, Moral Sensitivity, Perceived Stress, and Stress of Conscience—are related to different aspects of the psychosocial work environment. A total of 93 nursing staff members filled out five questionnaires: the QPSNordic 34+, Perceived Stress Scale, Stress of Conscience Questionnaire, Moral Sensitivity Questionnaire, and Mastery scale. Multivariate analysis showed that Perceived Stress was important for Organisational Climate perceptions. The Stress of Conscience subscale Internal Demands and Experience in current units were indicators of Role Clarity. The other Stress of Conscience subscale, External Demands and Restrictions, was related to Control at Work. Two types of stress, Perceived Stress and Stress of Conscience, were particularly important for the nursing staff’s perception of the psychosocial work environment. Efforts to prevent stress may also contribute to improvements in the psychosocial work environment.

  2. Factors predicting health services use among older people in China: An analysis of the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Cathy Honge; Kendig, Hal; He, Xiaojun

    2016-02-18

    Rapid population ageing in China is increasing the numbers of older people who are likely to require health services in response to higher levels of poor perceived health and chronic diseases. Understanding factors influencing health services use at late life will help to plan for increasing needs for health care, reducing inequalities in health services use and releasing severe pressures on a highly variable health care system that has constrained public resources and increasing reliance on health insurance and user payments. Drawing on the nationally representative China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study 2013 data, we apply the Andersen healthcare utilization conceptual model to binary logistic regression multivariate analyses to examine the joint predictors of physical examinations, outpatient and inpatient care among the middle-aged and elderly in China. The multivariate analyses find that both physical examinations and inpatient care rates increase significantly by age when health deteriorates. Females are less likely to use inpatient care. Significant socio-economic variations exist in healthcare utilization. Older people with higher education, communist party membership, urban residence, non-agricultural household registration, better financial situation are more likely to have physical examinations or inpatient care. Factors influencing all three types of health care utilization are household expenditure, losing a partner, having multiple chronic diseases or perceiving poor health. With activities of daily living limitations or pain increases the probability of seeing a doctor while with functional loss increases the rates of having physical examinations, but being the ethnic minorities, no social health insurance, with depression, fair or poor memory could be a barrier to having physical examinations or seeing a doctor, which might delay the early diagnose of severe health problems among these groups. Not drinking, not smoking and regular physical

  3. The "Surgeon on Service" Model for Timely, Economically Viable Inpatient Care of Tracheostomy Patients in Academic Pediatric Otolaryngology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavin, Jennifer M; Schroeder, James W; Thompson, Dana M

    2017-10-01

    The traditional practice model for pediatric otolaryngologists at high-volume academic centers is to simultaneously balance outpatient care responsibilities with those of the inpatient service, emergency department, and ambulatory care clinics. This model leads to challenges with care coordination, timeliness of nonemergency operative care, and consistent participation in care and consultation at the attending surgeon level. The "surgeon on service" (SOS) model-where faculty members rotate to manage the inpatient service in lieu of outpatient responsibilities-has been described as one method to address this conundrum. The operational and economic feasibility of the SOS model has been demonstrated; however, its impact on care coordination, time from consultation to surgical care, and length of stay (LOS) have not been evaluated. To determine the impact of the SOS model on the quality principles of timeliness and efficiency of tracheostomy tube placement and to determine if the SOS model is fiscally feasible in an academic pediatric otolaryngology practice. Medical record review of patients undergoing tracheostomy in a pediatric academic medical center and survey of their treating physician trainees, comparing the 6-month SOS pilot phase (postimplementation, January-June 2016) with the 6-month preimplementation period (January-June 2015). Implementation of the SOS model. Time to tracheostomy, frequency of successful coordination of tracheostomy with gastrostomy tube placement, total LOS, productivity measured in work relative value units, and responses to trainee surveys. Of the 41 patients included in the study (24 boys and 17 girls; mean age, 3 years; range, 3 months to 17 years), 15 were treated before SOS implementation, and 26 after. Also included were 21 trainees. Before SOS implementation, median time to tracheostomy was 7 days (range, 2-20 days); after SOS implementation, it was 4 days (range, 1-10 days) (difference between the medians, before to after, -3

  4. Exercise interventions for patients with pediatric cancer during inpatient acute care: A systematic review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustler, Vanessa; Hagerty, Meaghan; Daeggelmann, Julia; Marjerrison, Stacey; Bloch, Wilhelm; Baumann, Freerk T

    2017-11-01

    Physical inactivity has been shown to exacerbate negative side effects experienced by pediatric patients undergoing cancer therapy. Exercise interventions are being created in response. This review summarizes current exercise intervention data in the inpatient pediatric oncology setting. Two independent reviewers collected literature from three databases, and analyzed data following the PRISMA statement for systematic reviews and meta-analyses. Ten studies were included, representing 204 patients. Good adherence, positive trends in health status, and no adverse events were noted. Common strategies included individual, supervised, combination training with adaptability to meet fluctuating patient abilities. We recommend that general physical activity programming be offered to pediatric oncology inpatients. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. The role of surgery in global health: analysis of United States inpatient procedure frequency by condition using the Global Burden of Disease 2010 framework.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Rose

    Full Text Available The role of surgical care in promoting global health is the subject of much debate. The Global Burden of Disease 2010 study (GBD 2010 offers a new opportunity to consider where surgery fits amongst global health priorities. The GBD 2010 reinforces the DALY as the preferred methodology for determining the relative contribution of disease categories to overall global burden of disease without reference to the likelihood of each category requiring surgery. As such, we hypothesize that the GBD framework underestimates the role of surgery in addressing the global burden of disease.We compiled International Classification of Diseases, Version 9, codes from the United States Nationwide Inpatient Sample from 2010. Using the primary diagnosis code for each hospital admission, we aggregated admissions into GBD 2010 disease sub-categories. We queried each hospitalization for a major operation to determine the frequency of admitted patients whose care required surgery. Major operation was defined according to the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ. In 2010, 10 million major inpatient operations were performed in the United States, associated with 28.6% of all admissions. Major operations were performed in every GBD disease subcategory (range 0.2%-84.0%. The highest frequencies of operation were in the subcategories of Musculoskeletal (84.0%, Neoplasm (61.4%, and Transport Injuries (43.2%. There was no disease subcategory that always required an operation; nor was there any disease subcategory that never required an operation.Surgical care cuts across the entire spectrum of GBD disease categories, challenging dichotomous traditional classifications of 'surgical' versus 'nonsurgical' diseases. Current methods of measuring global burden of disease do not reflect the fundamental role operative intervention plays in the delivery of healthcare services. Novel methodologies should be aimed at understanding the integration of surgical services into

  6. Overall satisfaction of health care users with the quality of and access to health care services: a cross-sectional study in six Central and Eastern European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepurko, Tetiana; Pavlova, Milena; Groot, Wim

    2016-08-02

    The measurement of consumer satisfaction is an essential part of the assessment of health care services in terms of service quality and health care system responsiveness. Studies across Europe have described various strategies health care users employ to secure services with good quality and quick access. In Central and Eastern European countries, such strategies also include informal payments to health care providers. This paper analyzes the satisfaction of health care users with the quality of and access to health care services. The study focuses on six Central and Eastern European countries (Bulgaria, Hungary, Lithuania, Poland, Romania and Ukraine). We use data on past experience with health care use collected in 2010 through uniform national surveys in these countries. Based on these data, we carry out a multi-country analysis to investigate factors associated with the satisfaction of health care users in the six countries. The results indicate that about 10-14 % of the service users are not satisfied with the quality of, or access to health care services they used in the preceding year. However, significant differences across countries and services are observed, e.g. the highest level of dissatisfaction with access to outpatient services (16.4 %) is observed among patients in Lithuania, while in Poland, the level of dissatisfaction with quality of outpatient and inpatient services are much lower than dissatisfaction with access. The study also analyses the association of users' satisfaction with factors such as making informal payments, inability to pay and relative importance of service attributes stated by the service users. These multi-country findings provide evidence for health policy making in the Central and Eastern European countries. Although the average rates of satisfactions per country are relatively high, the results suggest that there is ample room for improvements. Specifically, many service-users still report dissatisfaction especially those

  7. The effect of a clinical medical librarian on in-patient care outcomes*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esparza, Julia M.; Shi, Runhua; McLarty, Jerry; Comegys, Marianne; Banks, Daniel E.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The research sought to determine the effect of a clinical medical librarian (CML) on outcomes of in-patients on the internal medicine service. Methods: A prospective study was performed with two internal medicine in-patient teams. Team 1 included a CML who accompanied the team on daily rounds. The CML answered questions posed at the point of care immediately or in emails post-rounds. Patients on Team 2, which did not include a CML, as well as patients who did not require consultation by the CML on Team 1, served as the control population. Numerous clinical and library metrics were gathered on each question. Results: Patients on Team 1 who required an answer to a clinical question were more ill and had a longer length of stay, higher costs, and higher readmission rates compared to those in the control group. Using a matched pair analysis, we showed no difference in clinical outcomes between the intervention group and the control group. Conclusions: This study is the largest attempt to prospectively measure changes in patient outcomes when physicians were accompanied by a CML on rounds. This approach may serve as a model for further studies to define when and how CMLs are most effective. PMID:23930088

  8. The effect of centralization of health care services on travel time and its equality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Daisuke; Otsubo, Tetsuya; Imanaka, Yuichi

    2015-03-01

    To analyze the regional variations in travel time between patient residences and medical facilities for the treatment of ischemic heart disease and breast cancer, and to simulate the effects of health care services centralization on travel time and equality of access. We used medical insurance claims data for inpatients and outpatients for the two target diseases that had been filed between September 2008 and May 2009 in Kyoto Prefecture, Japan. Using a geographical information system, patient travel times were calculated based on the driving distance between patient residences and hospitals via highways and toll roads. Locations of residences and hospital locations were identified using postal codes. We then conducted a simulation analysis of centralization of health care services to designated regional core hospitals. The simulated changes in potential spatial access to care were examined. Inequalities in access to care were examined using Gini coefficients, which ranged from 0.4109 to 0.4574. Simulations of health care services centralization showed reduced travel time for most patients and overall improvements in equality of access, except in breast cancer outpatients. Our findings may contribute to the decision-making process in policies aimed at improving the potential spatial access to health care services. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Dermatologic challenges of health care for displaced people. lessons from a German emergency refugee camp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe Wollina

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The World faces the highest waves of displaced people since World War II. There is limited knowledge about need of dermatological care for refugees and asylum seekers. Methods: We report the experience with a temporary emergency refugee camp in Dresden form the viewpoint of a hospital department. This is a descriptive report covering the period of 10 weeks. Results: In this refugee camp up to 1 100 people were hosted. The male to female ratio was 5.3. The majority of inhabitants were young males (60%, 20% were children. While 40% of refuges came from Syria, Afghanistan, Iraq and Pakistan were also important countries of origin. Communication war a crucial issue while providing health care. Dermatologic service was granted as consultation, outpatient and inpatient clinic. Most contacts were noted in the outpatient clinic. The majority of patient attended the clinic with communicable diseases such as bacterial or viral infections and infestations. Wounds and chronic inflammatory diseases were rather uncommon. Only 4 patients had to be treated in the hospital (inpatient clinic. Conclusions: Displaced people (refugees, asylum seekers come in big waves to Europe. Dermatologic service is an important part of first aid health care in an emergency camp. Language barriers and cultural barriers have to overcome for optimal service. This is the first report from Germany.

  10. Place of Death and Use of Health Services in the Last Year of Life

    OpenAIRE

    Grande, Gunn E.; McKerral, Angela; Addington-Hall, Julia M.; Todd, Chris J.

    2003-01-01

    Aim: To investigate whether health service input in the last year of life differs between cancer patients who die at home versus those dying in inpatient care. Methods: Post hoc exploratory case-control study of 127 home deaths and 200 inpatient deaths. Retrospective electronic record linkage of patients' community and inpatient care during the last year of life. Results: Patients who died at home began their home nursing care closer to death than those who died as inpatients. Their first con...

  11. Association of Financial Integration Between Physicians and Hospitals With Commercial Health Care Prices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neprash, Hannah T; Chernew, Michael E; Hicks, Andrew L; Gibson, Teresa; McWilliams, J Michael

    2015-12-01

    Financial integration between physicians and hospitals may help health care provider organizations meet the challenges of new payment models but also may enhance the bargaining power of provider organizations, leading to higher prices and spending in commercial health care markets. To assess the association between recent increases in physician-hospital integration and changes in spending and prices for outpatient and inpatient services. Using regression analysis, we estimated the relationship between changes in physician-hospital integration from January 1, 2008, through December 31, 2012, in 240 metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) and concurrent changes in spending. Adjustments were made for patient, plan, and market characteristics, including physician, hospital, and insurer market concentration. The study population included a cohort of 7,391,335 nonelderly enrollees in preferred-provider organizations or point-of-service plans included in the Truven Health MarketScan Commercial Database during the study period. Data were analyzed from December 1, 2013, through July 13, 2015. Physician-hospital integration, measured using Medicare claims data as the share of physicians in an MSA who bill for outpatient services with a place-of-service code indicating employment or practice ownership by a hospital. Annual inpatient and outpatient spending per enrollee and associated use of health care services, with utilization measured by price-standardized spending (the sum of annual service counts multiplied by the national mean of allowed charges for the service). Among the 240 MSAs, physician-hospital integration increased from 2008 to 2012 by a mean of 3.3 percentage points, with considerable variation in increases across MSAs (interquartile range, 0.8-5.2 percentage points). For our study sample of 7,391,335 nonelderly enrollees, an increase in physician-hospital integration equivalent to the 75th percentile of changes experienced by MSAs was associated with a mean

  12. Explaining regional variations in health care utilization between Swiss cantons using panel econometric models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camenzind, Paul A

    2012-03-13

    In spite of a detailed and nation-wide legislation frame, there exist large cantonal disparities in consumed quantities of health care services in Switzerland. In this study, the most important factors of influence causing these regional disparities are determined. The findings can also be productive for discussing the containment of health care consumption in other countries. Based on the literature, relevant factors that cause geographic disparities of quantities and costs in western health care systems are identified. Using a selected set of these factors, individual panel econometric models are calculated to explain the variation of the utilization in each of the six largest health care service groups (general practitioners, specialist doctors, hospital inpatient, hospital outpatient, medication, and nursing homes) in Swiss mandatory health insurance (MHI). The main data source is 'Datenpool santésuisse', a database of Swiss health insurers. For all six health care service groups, significant factors influencing the utilization frequency over time and across cantons are found. A greater supply of service providers tends to have strong interrelations with per capita consumption of MHI services. On the demand side, older populations and higher population densities represent the clearest driving factors. Strategies to contain consumption and costs in health care should include several elements. In the federalist Swiss system, the structure of regional health care supply seems to generate significant effects. However, the extent of driving factors on the demand side (e.g., social deprivation) or financing instruments (e.g., high deductibles) should also be considered.

  13. Key successes and challenges in providing mental health care in an urban male remand prison: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samele, Chiara; Forrester, Andrew; Urquía, Norman; Hopkin, Gareth

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to describe the workings of an urban male remand prison mental health service exploring the key challenges and successes, levels of integration and collaboration with other services. A purposive sampling was used to recruit key prison and healthcare professionals for in-depth interviews. A thematic analysis was used to analyse transcripts based on an initial coding frame of several predefined themes. Other key themes were also identified. Twenty-eight interviews were conducted. Prisoners referred to the service had complex, sometimes acute mental illness requiring specialist assessment and treatment. Key successes of the in-reach service included the introduction of an open referral system, locating a mental health nurse at reception to screen all new prisoners and a zoning system to prioritise urgent or non-urgent cases. Achieving an integrated system of healthcare was challenging because of the numerous internal and external services operating across the prison, a highly transient population, limited time and space to deliver services and difficulties with providing inpatient care (e.g., establishing the criteria for admission and managing patient flow). Collaborative working between prison and healthcare staff was required to enable best care for prisoners. The prison mental health in-reach service worked well in assessing and prioritising those who required specialist mental health care. Although the challenges of working within the prison context limited what the in-reach team could achieve. Further work was needed to improve the unit environment and how best to target and deliver inpatient care within the prison.

  14. Using Merged Clinical and Claims Registry Data to Identify High Utilizers of Surgical Inpatient Care 1 Year after Colectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stey, Anne M; Russell, Marcia M; Zingmond, David S; Gibbons, Melinda M; Hall, Bruce L; Needleman, Jack; Lawson, Elise H; Liu, Nancy; Ko, Clifford Y

    2015-08-01

    Under bundled payment initiatives, providers will be held financially responsible for patients' acute and post-acute care costs. Certain patients, termed high utilizers, use disproportionate shares of resources during 1 year. The aim of this study was to identify high utilizers, describe their costs, and determine whether preoperative characteristics predict high utilizer status. Colectomy patients with 1-year follow-up were identified in a linked clinical (American College of Surgeons NSQIP) and administrative (Medicare inpatient claims) dataset (2005 to 2008). Cost of inpatient care was calculated by multiplying patient Medicare charges in each cost center by cost-to-charge ratios from the Medicare cost reports. A mixed-effects logistic model quantified the association between preoperative characteristics and being a high utilizer after elective and emergent colectomies. One thousand and fifty-five of 10,561 colectomy patients accounted for >50% of the inpatient care cost of the entire cohort during 1 year postoperatively. This top decile of patients were labeled high utilizers and had substantially greater costs in the following cost centers: intensive care ($36,322 vs $0), respiratory ($2,875 vs $22), radiology ($649 vs $29), and cardiology ($5,057 vs $166) (all p < 0.001). High utilizers more frequently had emergent index colectomies (43% vs 17%; p < 0.001). Patients with American Society of Anesthesiologists class IV and V had 2-fold increased odds of being high utilizers after both elective (odds ratio = 2.72; 95% CI, 1.89-3.90) and emergent colectomies (odds ratio = 2.09; 95% CI, 1.23-3.55). Patients in the top cost decile account for the majority of costs in the year after colectomy, disproportionately accumulate those costs in particular cost centers, and can be identified preoperatively. Copyright © 2015 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The epidemiology of assault-related hospital in-patient admissions and ED attendances.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Farrell, A

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the epidemiology and impact of serious assault warranting in-patient care over six years and its impact on ED attendances in a large teaching hospital in Dublin over 2 years. There were 16,079 emergency assault-related inpatient hospital discharges reducing from 60.1 per 100,000 population in 2005 to 50.6 per 100,000 population in 2010. The median length of stay was 1 day (1-466) representing 49,870 bed days. The majority were young males (13,921, 86.6%; median age 26 years). Overall crime figures showed a similar reduction. However, knife crimes did not reduce over this period. Data on ED attendances confirmed the age and gender profile and also showed an increase at weekends. Alcohol misuse was recorded in 2,292\\/16079 (14%) of in-patient cases and 242\\/2484 (10%) in ED attendances. An inter-sectoral preventative approach specifically targeting knife crime is required to reduce this burden on health services.

  16. Impact of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea on acute care length of stay, hospital costs, and readmission: A multicenter retrospective study of inpatients, 2009-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, Glenn; Strauss, Marcie E; Thomas, Sheila M; Brown, Harold; Baumer, Dorothy; Broderick, Kelly C

    2015-11-01

    The recent epidemiologic changes of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD) have resulted in substantial economic burden to U.S. acute care hospitals. Past studies evaluating CDAD-attributable costs have been geographically and demographically limited. Here, we describe CDAD-attributable burden in inpatients, overall, and in vulnerable subpopulations from the Premier hospital database, a large, diverse cohort with a wide range of high-risk subgroups. Discharges from the Premier database were retrospectively analyzed to assess length of stay (LOS), total inpatient costs, readmission, and inpatient mortality. Patients with CDAD had significantly worse outcomes than matched controls in terms of total LOS, rates of intensive care unit (ICU) admission, and inpatient mortality. After adjustment for risk factors, patients with CDAD had increased odds of inpatient mortality, total and ICU LOS, costs, and odds of 30-, 60- and 90-day all-cause readmission versus non-CDAD patients. CDAD-attributable costs were higher in all studied vulnerable subpopulations, which also had increased odds of 30-, 60- and 90-day all-cause readmission than those without CDAD. Given the significant economic impact CDAD has on hospitals, prevention of initial episodes and targeted therapy to prevent recurrences in vulnerable patients are essential to decrease the overall burden to hospitals. Copyright © 2015 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. HCUP State Inpatient Databases (SID) - Restricted Access File

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The State Inpatient Databases (SID) contain the universe of hospital inpatient discharge abstracts in States participating in HCUP that release their data through...

  18. Rebuilding Emergency Care After Hurricane Sandy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, David C; Smith, Silas W; McStay, Christopher M; Portelli, Ian; Goldfrank, Lewis R; Husk, Gregg; Shah, Nirav R

    2014-04-09

    A freestanding, 911-receiving emergency department was implemented at Bellevue Hospital Center during the recovery efforts after Hurricane Sandy to compensate for the increased volume experienced at nearby hospitals. Because inpatient services at several hospitals remained closed for months, emergency volume increased significantly. Thus, in collaboration with the New York State Department of Health and other partners, the Health and Hospitals Corporation and Bellevue Hospital Center opened a freestanding emergency department without on-site inpatient care. The successful operation of this facility hinged on key partnerships with emergency medical services and nearby hospitals. Also essential was the establishment of an emergency critical care ward and a system to monitor emergency department utilization at affected hospitals. The results of this experience, we believe, can provide a model for future efforts to rebuild emergency care capacity after a natural disaster such as Hurricane Sandy. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2014;0:1-4).

  19. Inpatient Hospitalization Costs: A Comparative Study of Micronesians, Native Hawaiians, Japanese, and Whites in Hawai‘i

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Hagiwara

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Considerable interest exists in health care costs for the growing Micronesian population in the United States (US due to their significant health care needs, poor average socioeconomic status, and unique immigration status, which impacts their access to public health care coverage. Using Hawai‘i statewide impatient data from 2010 to 2012 for Micronesians, whites, Japanese, and Native Hawaiians (N = 162,152 hospitalizations, we compared inpatient hospital costs across racial/ethnic groups using multivariable models including age, gender, payer, residence location, and severity of illness (SOI. We also examined total inpatient hospital costs of Micronesians generally and for Medicaid specifically. Costs were estimated using standard cost-to-charge metrics overall and within nine major disease categories determined by All Patient Refined Diagnosis Related Groups. Micronesians had higher unadjusted hospitalization costs overall and specifically within several disease categories (including infectious and heart diseases. Higher SOI in Micronesians explained some, but not all, of these higher costs. The total cost of the 3486 Micronesian hospitalizations in the three-year study period was $58.1 million and 75% was covered by Medicaid; 23% of Native Hawaiian, 3% of Japanese, and 15% of white hospitalizations costs were covered by Medicaid. These findings may be of particular interests to hospitals, Medicaid programs, and policy makers.

  20. Psychometric properties and relations with coping and family strain of the Health Services and Caregiver Experience questionnaire (HSCE): an outcome measure of informal caregivers' experience for inpatient care in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coluccia, Anna; Ferretti, Fabio; Fagiolini, Andrea; Pozza, Andrea

    2017-07-17

    In the last decade, the number of patients supported by informal caregivers has substantially increased. In the Italian healthcare context, informal caregivers' experience of care is a new under-recognized construct, and no assessment tool is available. Measuring caregivers' experience is important since in Italy the relationship between doctors and patients/relatives is still considered asymmetrical. The current study presented development and initial psychometric properties of the Health Services and Caregiver Experience questionnaire (HSCE), a self-report tool of caregivers' global experience for inpatient clinical care, including factor structure, reliability and its relations with measures of coping strategies and family strain. The HSCE was administered to a total of 503 informal caregivers of inpatients admitted at an Italian University Hospital (mean age = 48.08 years, SD = 14.82, females = 61.40%). Family Strain Questionnaire-Short Form (FSQ-SF) and Coping Orientations to Problems Experience-New Italian Version (COPE-NVI) were administered to a subgroup of participants. First-grade relatives were 73.10%, whereas 13.20% were second-grade relatives and 13.70% were home-watch caregivers. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses showed a structure with a single factor, which explained 64.80% of the total variance. All the items had salient loadings. In the two subsamples, HSCE had excellent internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = 0.95-0.97). Positive moderate correlations were found between HSCE and FSQ-SF scores (r = 0.45, p caregivers' experience correlated with stronger family strain but also with better problem solving and social support. The study expanded knowledge on caregiver's experience in Italy and indicated that HSCE is a valid and reliable tool to measure this under-recognized construct in Italy.

  1. The Impact of Out-of-Pocket Payments on Health Care Inequity: The Case of National Health Insurance in South Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weon-Young Lee

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The global financial crisis of 2008 has led to the reinforcement of patient cost sharing in health care policy. This study aimed to explore the impact of direct out-of pocket payments (OOPs on health care utilization and the resulting financial burden across income groups under the South Korean National Health Insurance (NHI program with universal population coverage. We used the fourth Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHNES-IV and the Korean Household Income and Expenditure Survey (KHIES of 2007, 2008 and 2009. The Horizontal Inequity Index (HIwv and the average unit OOPs were used to measure income-related inequity in the quantitative and qualitative aspects of health care utilization, respectively. For financial burden, the incidence rates of catastrophic health expenditure (CHE were compared across income groups. For outpatient and hospital visits, there was neither pro-poor or pro-rich inequality. The average unit OOPs of the poorest quintile was approximately 75% and 60% of each counterpart in the richest quintile in the outpatient and inpatient services. For the CHE threshold of 40%, the incidence rates were 5.7%, 1.67%, 0.72%, 0.33% and 0.27% in quintiles I (the poorest quintile, II, III, IV and V, respectively. Substantial OOPs under the NHI are disadvantageous, particularly for the lowest income group in terms of health care quality and financial burden.

  2. Trends in health care expenditure among US adults with heart failure: The Medical Expenditure Panel Survey 2002-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echouffo-Tcheugui, Justin B; Bishu, Kinfe G; Fonarow, Gregg C; Egede, Leonard E

    2017-04-01

    Population-based national data on the trends in expenditures related to heart failure (HF) are scarce. Assessing the time trends in health care expenditures for HF in the United States can help to better define the burden of this condition. Using 10-year data (2002-2011) from the national Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (weighted sample of 188,708,194US adults aged ≥18years) and a 2-part model (adjusting for demographics, comorbidities, and time); we estimated adjusted mean and incremental medical expenditures by HF status. The costs were direct total health care expenditures (out-of-pocket payments and payments by private insurance, Medicaid, Medicare, and other sources) from various sources (office-based visits, hospital outpatient, emergency department, inpatient hospital, pharmacy, home health care, and other medical expenditures). Compared with expenditures for individuals without HF ($5511 [95% CI 5405-5617]), individuals with HF had a 4-fold higher mean expenditures of ($23,854 [95% CI 21,733-25,975]). Individuals with HF had $3446 (95% CI 2592-4299) higher direct incremental expenditures compared with those without HF, after adjusting for demographics and comorbidities. Among those with HF, costs continuously increased by $5836 (28% relative increase), from $21,316 (95% CI 18,359-24,272) in 2002/2003 to $27,152 (95% CI 20,066-34,237) in 2010/2011, and inpatient costs ($11,318 over the whole period) were the single largest component of total medical expenditure. The estimated unadjusted total direct medical expenditures for US adults with HF were $30 billion/y and the adjusted total incremental expenditure was $5.8 billion/y. Heart failure is costly and over a recent 10-year period, and direct expenditure related to HF increased markedly, mainly driven by inpatient costs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Palliative Care in Romania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosoiu, Daniela; Mitrea, Nicoleta; Dumitrescu, Malina

    2018-02-01

    HOSPICE Casa Sperantei has been pioneering palliative care development in Romania since 1992. The have developed specialist palliative care services in home-based settings, inpatient units, day care centers, and as hospital support teams. They have provided national and international education programs for professionals in the palliative care field, as well as promoting palliative care integration in the health care system. Legislative improvements were adopted, including funding mechanisms for the reimbursement of palliative care services through the health insurance funds, review of opioid policy, and quality standards of care. By the end of 2015, Romania had 115 specialist palliative care services (78 palliative care inpatient units, 24 home-based palliative care services, five outpatient palliative care clinics, four day care centers, and four hospital support teams). A palliative care subspecialty for doctors was recognized as early as 2000, and a multidisciplinary master's degree program has been available at Transilvania University since 2010, when the first palliative care academic position was established. Nursing education includes mandatory palliative care modules in nursing schools. For coordinated development of palliative care at the national level, a national strategy was proposed defining three levels of palliative care provision, local, district, and national. The implementation of the palliative care strategy is partially funded through a World Bank loan. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Cost evaluation of out-of-country care for patients with eating disorders in Ontario: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Claire; Macdonald, Erin M; Green, Diane; Colton, Patricia; Olmsted, Marion; Bondy, Susan; Kurdyak, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Eating disorders, specifically anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and eating disorder not otherwise specified, represent a substantial burden to the health care system. Our goal was to estimate the economic burden of patients who received specialized inpatient care for an eating disorder out of country. We conducted a cost-of-illness study evaluating health care costs among patients in Ontario who received specialized inpatient care for an eating disorder out of country from 2003 to 2011, from the public third-party payer perspective. Using linked administrative databases, we estimated net costs of eating disorders for 2 patient groups: those who received specialized inpatient care both out of country and in province ( n = 160), and those who received specialized inpatient care out of country only ( n = 126). Patients approved for specialized out-of-country inpatient care were mostly girls and young women from high-income, urban neighbourhoods. Total net costs varied annually and were higher for patients treated both out of country and in province (about $11 million before 2007, $6.5 million after) than for those treated out of country alone (about $5 million and $2 million, respectively). The main cost drivers were out-of-country care and physician services. Costs associated with eating disorder care represent a substantial economic burden to the Ontario health care system. Given the high costs of out-of-country care, there may be opportunity to redirect these funds to increase capacity and expertise for eating disorder treatment within Ontario.

  5. The Effect of Acute Exercise on Affect and Arousal in Inpatient Mental Health Consumers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Robert; Reaburn, Peter; Happell, Brenda

    2016-09-01

    Acute exercise performed at a self-selected intensity improves affect and may improve long-term adherence. Similarly, in people with severe depression, acute aerobic exercise performed at self-selected intensity improves affect and arousal. However, the relationship between changes in affect and arousal and perceived exercise intensity in people with mental illness has not been evaluated. Affect and arousal were assessed immediately prior to, and immediately following, a group exercise program performed at a self-selected intensity in 40 inpatient mental health consumers who received a diagnosis of anxiety or bipolar or depressive disorders. Exercise intensity was assessed immediately after exercise. Postexercise affect was significantly improved for people with bipolar and depressive disorders but not for people with anxiety disorders. For the group as a whole, results showed a significant curvilinear relationship between ratings of perceived exertion and postexercise affect. These data will inform the development and delivery of future exercise interventions for inpatient mental health consumers.

  6. The Cost of Health Care for AIDS Patients in Saskatchewan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin P Browne

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available The medical records of 19 patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (aids were reviewed in an attempt to estimate their health care costs. The patients were all male, members of high risk groups and diagnosed between April 1985 and February 1988. Twelve of the patients died; they lived a mean of 240 days (range 0 to 580 after diagnosis, were admitted three times (range one to six to hospital for 65 total days (range one to 148 for a cost per patient of $33,721 (range $2,768 to $64,981 for inpatient care. They made five (range zero to 25 office visits per patient costing $196 per patient (range $0 to $4,999 for outpatient care. The seven survivors (one was lost to follow-up have lived 375 days (range 186 to 551 since diagnosis, have been admitted to hospital two times (range zero to seven for 30 total days (range zero to 86 for a total cost per patient of $14,223 (range $0 to $39,410 for inpatient care. They have made 11 office/emergency room visits (range zero to 46 costing in total $4322 (range $0 to $13,605 for outpatient care. The total expenditure was $546,332 ($28,754 per patient, of which total fees to physicians were $37,210 (6.8%, and estimated costs of laboratory tests $117,917 (21.6%, drugs $36,930 (6.7%, and medical imaging $20,794 (3.8%. Patients now deceased cost $416,445 (mean $34,704 per patient, accounting for 76.2% of overall expenditures. The average medical/surgical and drug costs per patient day in hospital were greater for aids patients than for the average medical/surgical patient in the authors’ institution.

  7. Post-Discharge Care Duration, Charges, and Outcomes Among Medicare Patients After Primary Total Hip and Knee Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponnusamy, Karthikeyan E; Naseer, Zan; El Dafrawy, Mostafa H; Okafor, Louis; Alexander, Clayton; Sterling, Robert S; Khanuja, Harpal S; Skolasky, Richard L

    2017-06-07

    In April 2016, the U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services initiated mandatory 90-day bundled payments for total hip and knee arthroplasty for much of the country. Our goal was to determine duration of care, 90-day charges, and readmission rates by discharge disposition and U.S. region after hip or knee arthroplasty. Using the 2008 Medicare Provider Analysis and Review database 100% sample, we identified patients who had undergone elective primary total hip or knee arthroplasty. We collected data on patient age, sex, comorbidities, U.S. Census region, discharge disposition, duration of care, 90-day charges, and readmission. Multivariate regression was used to assess factors associated with readmission (logistic) and charges (linear). Significance was set at p total hip arthroplasties were discharged to home (18%), home health care (34%), extended-care facilities (35%), and inpatient rehabilitation (13%); patients undergoing 329,233 total knee arthroplasties were discharged to home (21%), home health care (38%), extended-care facilities (31%), and inpatient rehabilitation (10%). Patients in the Northeast were more likely to be discharged to extended-care facilities or inpatient rehabilitation than patients in other regions. Patients in the West had the highest 90-day charges. Approximately 70% of patients were discharged home from extended-care facilities, whereas after inpatient rehabilitation, >50% of patients received home health care. Among those discharged to home, 90-day readmission rates were highest in the South (9.6%) for patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty and in the Midwest (8.7%) and the South (8.5%) for patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty. Having ≥4 comorbidities, followed by discharge to inpatient rehabilitation or an extended-care facility, had the strongest associations with readmission, whereas the region of the West and the discharge disposition to inpatient rehabilitation had the strongest association with higher charges

  8. Health insurance benefit design and healthcare utilization in northern rural China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong; Liu, Yu; Zhu, Yan; Xue, Lei; Dale, Martha; Sipsma, Heather; Bradley, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Poverty due to illness has become a substantial social problem in rural China since the collapse of the rural Cooperative Medical System in the early 1980s. Although the Chinese government introduced the New Rural Cooperative Medical Schemes (NRCMS) in 2003, the associations between different health insurance benefit package designs and healthcare utilization remain largely unknown. Accordingly, we sought to examine the impact of health insurance benefit design on health care utilization. We conducted a cross-sectional study using data from a household survey of 15,698 members of 4,209 randomly-selected households in 7 provinces, which were representative of the provinces along the north side of the Yellow River. Interviews were conducted face-to-face and in Mandarin. Our analytic sample included 9,762 respondents from 2,642 households. In each household, respondents indicated the type of health insurance benefit that the household had (coverage for inpatient care only or coverage for both inpatient and outpatient care) and the number of outpatient visits in the 30 days preceding the interview and the number of hospitalizations in the 365 days preceding the household interview. People who had both outpatient and inpatient coverage compared with inpatient coverage only had significantly more village-level outpatient visits, township-level outpatient visits, and total outpatient visits. Furthermore, the increased utilization of township and village-level outpatient care was experienced disproportionately by people who were poorer, whereas the increased inpatient utilization overall and at the county level was experienced disproportionately by people who were richer. The evidence from this study indicates that the design of health insurance benefits is an important policy tool that can affect the health services utilization and socioeconomic equity in service use at different levels. Without careful design, health insurance may not benefit those who are most in need

  9. The Staff Observation Aggression Scale - Revised (SOAS-R) - adjustment and validation for emergency primary health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morken, Tone; Baste, Valborg; Johnsen, Grethe E; Rypdal, Knut; Palmstierna, Tom; Johansen, Ingrid Hjulstad

    2018-05-08

    Many emergency primary health care workers experience aggressive behaviour from patients or visitors. Simple incident-reporting procedures exist for inpatient, psychiatric care, but a similar and simple incident-report for other health care settings is lacking. The aim was to adjust a pre-existing form for reporting aggressive incidents in a psychiatric inpatient setting to the emergency primary health care settings. We also wanted to assess the validity of the severity scores in emergency primary health care. The Staff Observation Scale - Revised (SOAS-R) was adjusted to create a pilot version of the Staff Observation Scale - Revised Emergency (SOAS-RE). A Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) was added to the form to judge the severity of the incident. Data for validation of the pilot version of SOAS-RE were collected from ten casualty clinics in Norway during 12 months. Variance analysis was used to test gender and age differences. Linear regression analysis was performed to evaluate the relative impact that each of the five SOAS-RE columns had on the VAS score. The association between SOAS-RE severity score and VAS severity score was calculated by the Pearson correlation coefficient. The SOAS-R was adjusted to emergency primary health care, refined and called The Staff Observation Aggression Scale - Revised Emergency (SOAS-RE). A total of 350 SOAS-RE forms were collected from the casualty clinics, but due to missing data, 291 forms were included in the analysis. SOAS-RE scores ranged from 1 to 22. The mean total severity score of SOAS-RE was 10.0 (standard deviation (SD) =4.1) and the mean VAS score was 45.4 (SD = 26.7). We found a significant correlation of 0.45 between the SOAS-RE total severity scores and the VAS severity ratings. The linear regression analysis showed that individually each of the categories, which described the incident, had a low impact on the VAS score. The SOAS-RE seems to be a useful instrument for research, incident-recording and management

  10. Defining pediatric inpatient cardiology care delivery models: A survey of pediatric cardiology programs in the USA and Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mott, Antonio R; Neish, Steven R; Challman, Melissa; Feltes, Timothy F

    2017-05-01

    The treatment of children with cardiac disease is one of the most prevalent and costly pediatric inpatient conditions. The design of inpatient medical services for children admitted to and discharged from noncritical cardiology care units, however, is undefined. North American Pediatric Cardiology Programs were surveyed to define noncritical cardiac care unit models in current practice. An online survey that explored institutional and functional domains for noncritical cardiac care unit was crafted. All questions were multi-choice with comment boxes for further explanation. The survey was distributed by email four times over a 5-month period. Most programs (n = 45, 60%) exist in free-standing children's hospitals. Most programs cohort cardiac patients on noncritical cardiac care units that are restricted to cardiac patients in 39 (54%) programs or restricted to cardiac and other subspecialty patients in 23 (32%) programs. The most common frontline providers are categorical pediatric residents (n = 58, 81%) and nurse practitioners (n = 48, 67%). However, nurse practitioners are autonomous providers in only 21 (29%) programs. Only 33% of programs use a postoperative fast-track protocol. When transitioning care to referring physicians, most programs (n = 53, 72%) use facsimile to deliver pertinent patient information. Twenty-two programs (31%) use email to transition care, and eighteen (25%) programs use verbal communication. Most programs exist in free-standing children's hospitals in which the noncritical cardiac care units are in some form restricted to cardiac patients. While nurse practitioners are used on most noncritical cardiac care units, they rarely function as autonomous providers. The majority of programs in this survey do not incorporate any postoperative fast-track protocols in their practice. Given the current era of focused handoffs within hospital systems, relatively few programs utilize verbal handoffs to the referring pediatric

  11. 42 CFR 412.540 - Method of payment for preadmission services under the long-term care hospital prospective payment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... the long-term care hospital prospective payment system. 412.540 Section 412.540 Public Health CENTERS... PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES Prospective Payment System for Long-Term Care Hospitals... payment system. The prospective payment system includes payment for inpatient operating costs of...

  12. Recovery-oriented care in a secure mental health setting: "striving for a good life".

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Brian; Furness, Trentham; Dhital, Deepa; Park, Malcolm; Connally, Fiona

    2014-01-01

    Recovery-oriented care acknowledges the unique journey of the consumer to regain control of his or her life in order to live a good life. Recovery has become a dominant policy-directed model of mental health service delivery. Even services that have traditionally been institutional and custodial have been challenged to embrace a recovery-oriented model. The aim of this qualitative study was to provide a description of service delivery in a secure in-patient mental health service, which has developed a self-professed recovery-oriented model of service delivery. An in-depth case study of the secure in-patient service using an exploratory research design was undertaken to meet the aim of this study. Qualitative data was gathered from interviews with consumers and staff (n = 15) and a focus group with carers (n = 5). Data were analyzed using a content analysis approach. Ethical approval for the study was obtained. The stakeholders readily described the secure service within recovery domains. They described a common vision; ways to promote hope and autonomy; examples of collaborative partnership which enhanced the goal of community integration; a focus on strength-based, holistic care; and the management of risk by taking calculated risks. Discrepancies in the perceptions of stakeholders were determined. This case study research provides a demonstrable example of recovery-in-action in one secure mental health service in Australia. It is intended to assist mental health services and clinicians seeking guidance in developing strategies for building and maintaining partnerships with consumers and carers in order for secure services to become truly recovery-oriented.

  13. Personal Communication Device Use by Nurses Providing In-Patient Care: Survey of Prevalence, Patterns, and Distraction Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Deborah L; LeVasseur, Sandra A

    2017-04-13

    Coincident with the proliferation of employer-provided mobile communication devices, personal communication devices, including basic and enhanced mobile phones (smartphones) and tablet computers that are owned by the user, have become ubiquitous among registered nurses working in hospitals. While there are numerous benefits of personal communication device use by nurses at work, little is known about the impact of these devices on in-patient care. Our aim was to examine how hospital-registered nurses use their personal communication devices while doing both work-related and non‒work-related activities and to assess the impact of these devices on in-patient care. A previously validated survey was emailed to 14,797 members of two national nursing organizations. Participants were asked about personal communication device use and their opinions about the impact of these devices on their own and their colleagues' work. Of the 1268 respondents (8.57% response rate), only 5.65% (70/1237) never used their personal communication device at work (excluding lunch and breaks). Respondents self-reported using their personal communication devices at work for work-related activities including checking or sending text messages or emails to health care team members (29.02%, 363/1251), as a calculator (25.34%, 316/1247), and to access work-related medical information (20.13%, 251/1247). Fewer nurses reported using their devices for non‒work-related activities including checking or sending text messages or emails to friends and family (18.75%, 235/1253), shopping (5.14%, 64/1244), or playing games (2.73%, 34/1249). A minority of respondents believe that their personal device use at work had a positive effect on their work including reducing stress (29.88%, 369/1235), benefiting patient care (28.74%, 357/1242), improving coordination of patient care among the health care team (25.34%, 315/1243), or increasing unit teamwork (17.70%, 220/1243). A majority (69.06%, 848/1228) of

  14. 78 FR 29139 - Medicare Program; Bundled Payments for Care Improvement Model 1 Open Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-17

    .... Beneficiaries can experience improved health outcomes and encounters in the health care system when providers... providers that are working to redesign care to meet these goals. Payment approaches that reward providers... Care Improvement initiative. Acute care hospitals paid under the inpatient prospective payment systems...

  15. Health care utilization and cost among children with asthma who were enrolled in a health maintenance organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, P; Fishman, P; VonKorff, M; Hecht, J

    1997-06-01

    To measure the impact of asthma on the use and cost of health care by children in a managed care organization. Population-based historical cohort study. A medium-sized staff model health maintenance organization in western Washington state. All 71 818 children, between age 1 to 17 years, who were enrolled and used services during 1992. Children were identified with one or more asthma diagnoses during 1992 using automated encounter data. Nonurgent outpatient visits, pharmacy fills, urgent care visits, and hospital days, as well as associated costs were measured. All services were categorized as asthma care or nonasthma care. Multivariate regression analysis was used to compute marginal cost for asthma (difference in total cost between children with asthma and other children using services, adjusted for covariates). Treated prevalence of asthma was 4.9%. Children with asthma incurred 88% more costs ($1060.32 vs $563. 81/yr), filled 2.77 times as many prescriptions (11.59 vs 4.19/yr), made 65% more nonurgent outpatient visits (5.75 vs 3.48/yr), and had twice as many inpatient days (.23 vs .11/yr) compared with the general population of children using services. Asthma care represented 37% of all health care received by children with asthma, while the remaining 63% were for nonasthma services. Almost two-thirds of asthma-related costs were attributable to nonurgent outpatient care and prescriptions; only one third was attributable to urgent care and hospitalizations. Controlling for age, sex, and comorbidities, the marginal cost of asthma was $615.17/yr (95% confidence interval $502.73, $727.61), which includes asthma as well as nonasthma services. This marginal cost represents 58% of all health care costs for children with asthma. Children with asthma use significantly more health services (and incur significantly more costs) than other children using services, attributable largely to asthma care. The majority of all health care costs for children with asthma were for

  16. Inpatient Psychiatric Facility PPS

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Since October 1, 1983, most hospitals have been paid under the hospital inpatient prospective payment system (PPS). However, certain types of specialty hospitals and...

  17. Distressed financing of household out-of-pocket health care payments in India: incidence and correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joe, William

    2015-07-01

    Out-of-pocket (OOP) health care payments financed through borrowings or sale of household assets are referred to as distressed health care financing. This article expands this concept (to include contributions from friends or relatives) and examines the incidence and correlates of distressed health care financing in India. The analysis finds a decisive influence of distressed financing in India as over 60 and 40% of hospitalization cases from rural and urban areas, respectively, report use of such coping strategies. Altogether, sources such as borrowings, sale of household assets and contributions from friends and relatives account for 58 and 42% share in total OOP payments for inpatient care in rural and urban India, respectively. Further, the results show significant socioeconomic gradient in the distribution of distressed financing with huge disadvantages for marginalized sections, particularly females, elderly and backward social groups. Multivariate logistic regression informs that households are at an elevated risk of indebtedness while seeking treatment for non-communicable diseases, particularly cancer. Evidence based on intersectional framework reveals that, despite similar socioeconomic background, males are more likely to use borrowings for health care financing than females. In conclusion, the need for social protection policies and improved health care coverage is emphasized to curtail the incidence of distressed health care financing in India. Published by Oxford University Press in association with The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine © The Author 2014; all rights reserved.

  18. Communication strategies for a successful inpatient dermatology consultative service: a narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afifi, Ladan; Shinkai, Kanade

    2017-03-01

    Inpatient dermatology consultative services care for hospitalized patients with skin disease in collaboration with the primary inpatient team. Effective, efficient communication is important. A consultation service must develop strong relationships with primary inpatient teams requesting consults in order to provide optimal patient care. Prior studies have identified effective communication practices for inpatient consultative services. This narrative review provides a summary of effective communication practices for an inpatient dermatology consultation service organized into 5 domains: (1) features of the initial consult request; (2) best practices in responding to the initial consult; (3) effective communication of recommendations; (4) interventions to improve consultations; and (5) handling curbside consultations. Recommendations include identifying the specific reason for consult; establishing urgency; secure sharing of sensitive clinical information such as photographs; ensuring timely responses; providing clear yet brief documentation of the differential diagnosis, problem list, final diagnosis and recommendations; and limiting curbside consultations. Future studies are needed to validate effective strategies to enhance communication practices within an inpatient dermatology consultative service. ©2017 Frontline Medical Communications.

  19. Estimating average inpatient and outpatient costs and childhood pneumonia and diarrhoea treatment costs in an urban health centre in Zambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chola Lumbwe

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Millions of children die every year in developing countries, from preventable diseases such as pneumonia and diarrhoea, owing to low levels of investment in child health. Investment efforts are hampered by a general lack of adequate information that is necessary for priority setting in this sector. This paper measures the health system costs of providing inpatient and outpatient services, and also the costs associated with treating pneumonia and diarrhoea in under-five children at a health centre in Zambia. Methods Annual economic and financial cost data were collected in 2005-2006. Data were summarized in a Microsoft excel spreadsheet to obtain total department costs and average disease treatment costs. Results The total annual cost of operating the health centre was US$1,731,661 of which US$1 284 306 and US$447,355 were patient care and overhead departments costs, respectively. The average cost of providing out-patient services was US$3 per visit, while the cost of in-patient treatment was US$18 per bed day. The cost of providing dental services was highest at US$20 per visit, and the cost of VCT services was lowest, with US$1 per visit. The cost per out-patient visit for under-five pneumonia was US$48, while the cost per bed day was US$215. The cost per outpatient visit attributed to under-five diarrhoea was US$26, and the cost per bed day was US$78. Conclusion In the face of insufficient data, a cost analysis exercise is a difficult but feasible undertaking. The study findings are useful and applicable in similar settings, and can be used in cost effectiveness analyses of health interventions.

  20. Effectiveness of liaison psychiatric nursing in older medical inpatients with depression: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullum, Sarah; Tucker, Sue; Todd, Chris; Brayne, Carol

    2007-07-01

    To compare liaison psychiatric nursing with usual medical care in the management of older medical inpatients who screen positive for depression. Pragmatic randomised controlled trial. Medical wards of UK district general hospital in rural East Anglia. One hundred and thirty-eight medical inpatients aged 65+ screened positive on the 15-item geriatric depression scale (GDS). One hundred and twenty-one out of 138 screen positives entered the trial (58/121 fulfilled criteria for depressive disorder at baseline). (i) A liaison psychiatric nurse assessed participants, formulated a care plan for treatment of their depression, ensured its implementation through liaison with appropriate agencies, and monitored participants' mood and response to treatment for up to 12 weeks. (ii) Usual treatment by hospital and primary care staff. ICD-10 depressive disorder, change in GDS-15 score, quality-adjusted life weeks (QALWs) and patient satisfaction rating. Eighty-six out of 121 participants completed the 16-week trial. Participants in the intervention group were more satisfied with their care, but no significant differences in depressive disorder, depression rating or QALWs gained were found between groups. However, there was a trend towards improvement in the intervention group and effect sizes were higher in the subgroup with depressive disorder. This study is the first RCT to evaluate liaison psychiatric nursing specifically for depression in older medical inpatients; the findings suggest improvement in mental health and quality of life, but a larger trial is required to provide convincing evidence.

  1. Estimating inpatient hospital prices from state administrative data and hospital financial reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levit, Katharine R; Friedman, Bernard; Wong, Herbert S

    2013-10-01

    To develop a tool for estimating hospital-specific inpatient prices for major payers. AHRQ Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project State Inpatient Databases and complete hospital financial reporting of revenues mandated in 10 states for 2006. Hospital discharge records and hospital financial information were merged to estimate revenue per stay by payer. Estimated prices were validated against other data sources. Hospital prices can be reasonably estimated for 10 geographically diverse states. All-payer price-to-charge ratios, an intermediate step in estimating prices, compare favorably to cost-to-charge ratios. Estimated prices also compare well with Medicare, MarketScan private insurance, and the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey prices for major payers, given limitations of each dataset. Public reporting of prices is a consumer resource in making decisions about health care treatment; for self-pay patients, they can provide leverage in negotiating discounts off of charges. Researchers can also use prices to increase understanding of the level and causes of price differentials among geographic areas. Prices by payer expand investigational tools available to study the interaction of inpatient hospital price setting among public and private payers--an important asset as the payer mix changes with the implementation of the Affordable Care Act. © Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  2. Outpatient Foley catheter versus inpatient prostaglandin E2 gel for induction of labour: a randomised trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Amanda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Induction of labour (IOL is one of the commonest obstetric interventions, with significant impact on both the individual woman and health service delivery. Outpatient IOL is an attractive option to reduce these impacts. To date there is little data comparing outpatient and inpatient IOL methods, and potential safety concerns (hyperstimulation if prostaglandins, the standard inpatient IOL medications, are used in the outpatient setting. The purpose of this study was to assess feasibility, clinical effectiveness and patient acceptability of outpatient Foley catheter (OPC vs. inpatient vaginal PGE2 (IP for induction of labour (IOL at term. Methods Women with an unfavourable cervix requiring IOL at term (N = 101 were randomised to outpatient care using Foley catheter (OPC, n = 50 or inpatient care using vaginal PGE2 (IP, n = 51. OPC group had Foley catheter inserted and were discharged overnight following a reassuring cardiotocograph. IP group received 2 mg/1 mg vaginal PGE2 if nulliparous or 1 mg/1 mg if multiparous. Main outcome measures were inpatient stay (prior to birth, in Birthing Unit, total, mode of birth, induction to delivery interval, adverse reactions and patient satisfaction. Results OPC group had shorter hospital stay prior to birth (21.3 vs. 32.4 hrs, p  Conclusions OPC was feasible and acceptable for IOL of women with an unfavourable cervix at term compared to IP, however did not show a statistically significant reduction in total inpatient stay and was associated with increased oxytocin IOL. Trial registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry, ACTRN:12609000420246.

  3. A Thorn in the Flesh? Forensic Inpatients in General Psychiatry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møllerhøj, Jette; Stølan, Liv Os; Brandt-Christensen, Anne Mette

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To illuminate whether and how taking care of forensic inpatients is experienced as a burden among staff and managers in general psychiatry. DESIGN AND METHODS: Qualitative analytical strategies based on interviews and questionnaires. FINDINGS: The interplay between physical environment...... of staff identify the care of mentally disordered offenders in general psychiatric units as either "a parking space" or a very difficult or frightening course, where staff members tend to behave like pleasers in order to avoid risks of conflict or physical violence. Either way, it seems hard to provide...... sufficient mental health care. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Nationwide training and teaching as well as knowledge exchange between specialized forensic psychiatry and general psychiatry are recommended. Further exploration is needed on patient perspectives and on avenues to increase efficiency and decrease...

  4. [Effects of an inpatient pulmonary rehabilitation program on dyspnea, exercise capacity, and health related quality of life for patients with chronic lung disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang Kwan

    2007-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of an inpatient pulmonary rehabilitation program on dyspnea, exercise capacity, and health related quality of life in inpatients with chronic lung disease. This quasi experimental study was designed with a nonequivalent control group pre-post test time series. Twenty three patients were assigned to the experimental group and nineteen to the control group. The inpatient pulmonary rehabilitation program was composed of upper and lower extremity exercise, breathing retraining, inspiratory muscle training, education, relaxation and telephone contacts. This program consisted of 4 sessions with inpatients and 4 weeks at home after discharge. The control group was given a home based pulmonary rehabilitation program at the time of discharge. The outcomes were measured by the Borg score, 6MWD and the Chronic Respiratory Disease Questionnaire(CRQ). There was a statistically significant difference in dyspnea between the experimental group and control group, but not among time sequence, or interaction between groups and time sequence. Also significant improvements in exercise capacity and health related quality of life were found only in the experimental group. An Inpatient pulmonary rehabilitation program may be a useful intervention to reduce dyspnea, and increase exercise capacity and health related quality of life for chronic lung disease patients.

  5. Hospital care for mental health and substance abuse conditions in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Allison W; Thibault, Dylan P; Schmidt, Peter N; Dorsey, E Ray; Weintraub, Daniel

    2016-12-01

    The objective of this study was to examine mental health conditions among hospitalized individuals with Parkinson's disease in the United States. This was a serial cross-sectional study of hospitalizations of individuals aged ≥60 identified in the Nationwide Inpatient Sample dataset from 2000 to 2010. We identified all hospitalizations with a diagnosis of PD, alcohol abuse, anxiety, bipolar disorder, depression, impulse control disorders, mania, psychosis, substance abuse, and attempted suicide/suicidal ideation. National estimates of each mental health condition were compared between hospitalized individuals with and without PD. Hierarchical logistic regression models determined which inpatient mental health diagnoses were associated with PD, adjusting for demographic, payer, geographic, and hospital characteristics. We identified 3,918,703 mental health and substance abuse hospitalizations. Of these, 2.8% (n = 104, 437) involved a person also diagnosed with PD. The majority of mental health and substance abuse patients were white (86.9% of PD vs 83.3% of non-PD). Women were more common than men in both groups (male:female prevalence ratio, PD: 0.78, 0.78-0.79, non-PD: 0.58, 0.57-0.58). Depression (adjusted odds ratio 1.32, 1.31-1.34), psychosis (adjusted odds ratio 1.25, 1.15-1.33), bipolar disorder (adjusted odds ratio 2.74, 2.69-2.79), impulse control disorders (adjusted odds ratio 1.51, 1.31-1.75), and mania (adjusted odds ratio 1.43, 1.18-1.74) were more likely among PD patients, alcohol abuse was less likely (adjusted odds ratio 0.26, 0.25-0.27). We found no PD-associated difference in suicide-related care. PD patients have unique patterns of acute care for mental health and substance abuse. Research is needed to guide PD treatment in individuals with pre-existing psychiatric illnesses, determine cross provider reliability of psychiatric diagnoses in PD patients, and inform efforts to improve psychiatric outcomes. © 2016 International Parkinson and

  6. Community Health Centers: Providers, Patients, and Content of Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can be more easily delivered than specialty and inpatient care, and if properly distributed could be effective ... services : Include education about asthma, diet and nutrition, exercise, growth and development, injury prevention, stress management, tobacco ...

  7. Falls Risk Prediction for Older Inpatients in Acute Care Medical Wards: Is There an Interest to Combine an Early Nurse Assessment and the Artificial Neural Network Analysis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauchet, O; Noublanche, F; Simon, R; Sekhon, H; Chabot, J; Levinoff, E J; Kabeshova, A; Launay, C P

    2018-01-01

    Identification of the risk of falls is important among older inpatients. This study aims to examine performance criteria (i.e.; sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy) for fall prediction resulting from a nurse assessment and an artificial neural networks (ANNs) analysis in older inpatients hospitalized in acute care medical wards. A total of 848 older inpatients (mean age, 83.0±7.2 years; 41.8% female) admitted to acute care medical wards in Angers University hospital (France) were included in this study using an observational prospective cohort design. Within 24 hours after admission of older inpatients, nurses performed a bedside clinical assessment. Participants were separated into non-fallers and fallers (i.e.; ≥1 fall during hospitalization stay). The analysis was conducted using three feed forward ANNs (multilayer perceptron [MLP], averaged neural network, and neuroevolution of augmenting topologies [NEAT]). Seventy-three (8.6%) participants fell at least once during their hospital stay. ANNs showed a high specificity, regardless of which ANN was used, and the highest value reported was with MLP (99.8%). In contrast, sensitivity was lower, with values ranging between 98.4 to 14.8%. MLP had the highest accuracy (99.7). Performance criteria for fall prediction resulting from a bedside nursing assessment and an ANNs analysis was associated with a high specificity but a low sensitivity, suggesting that this combined approach should be used more as a diagnostic test than a screening test when considering older inpatients in acute care medical ward.

  8. Inpatient child mortality by travel time to hospital in a rural area of Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manongi, Rachel; Mtei, Frank; Mtove, George; Nadjm, Behzad; Muro, Florida; Alegana, Victor; Noor, Abdisalan M; Todd, Jim; Reyburn, Hugh

    2014-05-01

    To investigate the association, if any, between child mortality and distance to the nearest hospital. The study was based on data from a 1-year study of the cause of illness in febrile paediatric admissions to a district hospital in north-east Tanzania. All villages in the catchment population were geolocated, and travel times were estimated from availability of local transport. Using bands of travel time to hospital, we compared admission rates, inpatient case fatality rates and child mortality rates in the catchment population using inpatient deaths as the numerator. Three thousand hundred and eleven children under the age of 5 years were included of whom 4.6% died; 2307 were admitted from time between admission and death. Assuming uniform mortality in the catchment population, the predicted number of deaths not benefiting from hospital admission prior to death increased by 21.4% per hour of travel time to hospital. If the same admission and death rates that were found at <3 h from the hospital applied to the whole catchment population and if hospital care conferred a 30% survival benefit compared to home care, then 10.3% of childhood deaths due to febrile illness in the catchment population would have been averted. The mortality impact of poor access to hospital care in areas of high paediatric mortality is likely to be substantial although uncertainty over the mortality benefit of inpatient care is the largest constraint in making an accurate estimate. © 2014 The Authors Tropical Medicine & International Health Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. The costs of HIV/AIDS care at government hospitals in Zimbabwe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristian Schultz; Chapman, Glyn; Chitsike, Inam

    2000-01-01

    and care of HIV/AIDS patients in health facilities is necessary in order to have an idea of the likely costs of the increasing number of HIV/AIDS patients. Therefore, the present study estimated the costs per in-patient day as well as per in-patient stay for patients in government health facilities...... of the study indicate that hospital care for HIV/AIDS patients was considerably higher than for non-HIV/AIDS patients. In five of the seven hospitals visited, the average costs of an in-patient stay for an HIV/AIDS patient were found to be as much as twice as high as a non-HIV/AIDS patient. This difference...... could be attributed to higher direct costs per in-patient day (medication, laboratory tests and X-rays) as well as longer average lengths of stay in hospital for HIV/AIDS patients compared with non-infected patients. Therefore, the impact on hospital services of increasing number of HIV/AIDS patients...

  10. Purchased Behavioral Health Care Received by Military Health System Beneficiaries in Civilian Medical Facilities, 2000-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooten, Nikki R; Brittingham, Jordan A; Pitner, Ronald O; Tavakoli, Abbas S; Jeffery, Diana D; Haddock, K Sue

    2018-02-06

    Behavioral health conditions are a significant concern for the U.S. military and the Military Health System (MHS) because of decreased military readiness and increased health care utilization. Although MHS beneficiaries receive direct care in military treatment facilities, a disproportionate majority of behavioral health treatment is purchased care received in civilian facilities. Yet, limited evidence exists about purchased behavioral health care received by MHS beneficiaries. This longitudinal study (1) estimated the prevalence of purchased behavioral health care and (2) identified patient and visit characteristics predicting receipt of purchased behavioral health care in acute care facilities from 2000 to 2014. Medical claims with Major Diagnostic Code 19 (mental disorders/diseases) or 20 (alcohol/drug disorders) as primary diagnoses and TRICARE as the primary/secondary payer were analyzed for MHS beneficiaries (n = 17,943) receiving behavioral health care in civilian acute care facilities from January 1, 2000, to December 31, 2014. The primary dependent variable, receipt of purchased behavioral health care, was modeled for select mental health and substance use disorders from 2000 to 2014 using generalized estimating equations. Patient characteristics included time, age, sex, and race/ethnicity. Visit types included inpatient hospitalization and emergency department (ED). Time was measured in days and visits were assumed to be correlated over time. Behavioral health care was described by both frequency of patients and visit type. The University of South Carolina Institutional Review Board approved this study. From 2000 to 2014, purchased care visits increased significantly for post-traumatic stress disorder, adjustment, anxiety, mood, bipolar, tobacco use, opioid/combination opioid dependence, nondependent cocaine abuse, psychosocial problems, and suicidal ideation among MHS beneficiaries. The majority of care was received for mental health disorders (78

  11. Scientific basis of priority directions of the health care development for cardiac patients in city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. I. Danilchenko

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: the scientific basis of priority directions of the health care development for cardiac patients in city according to public health system. Improving medical and demographic situation, increasing the availability and quality of care to all segments of the population is the priority task of modern health care system in Ukraine. Various aspects of population health due to diseases of the cardiovascular system and the issues of improving public health system and the system of cardiac care for the population, is the subject of many years researches. Cardiovascular diseases are leading causes of premature death, disability, temporary disability. According to the experience of developed countries in recent decades, the prevalence of this pathology and the severity of the harm to public health can reduce significantly in case of effective organization of medical-diagnostic process and prevention system. Specialized in patient care for patients suffering from cardiovascular diseases, is very expensive. At the same time, the number of patients with such pathology is high enough in ambulatory practice. Among them, special attention should be paid to those patients, who require daily monitoring, but do not require the round-the-clock stationary mode. The organization of inpatient forms of medical care for this category of patients is a very urgent task. Equally important are the training of personnel for the cardiology service, the sustainability of human resources, economic motivation, which ensures high quality, the effectiveness of complex labor processes.

  12. The costs of HIV/AIDS care at government hospitals in Zimbabwe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristian Schultz; Chapman, Glyn; Chitsike, Inam

    2000-01-01

    According to official figures, HIV infection in Zimbabwe stood at 700 000-1 000 000 in 1995, representing 7-10% of the population, with even higher expected numbers in 2000. Such high numbers will have far reaching effects on the economy and the health care sector. Information on costs of treatment...... and care of HIV/AIDS patients in health facilities is necessary in order to have an idea of the likely costs of the increasing number of HIV/AIDS patients. Therefore, the present study estimated the costs per in-patient day as well as per in-patient stay for patients in government health facilities...... an in-patient note review) to identify the direct treatment and diagnostic costs such as medication, laboratory tests and X-rays, and the standard step-down costing methodology to capture all the remaining resources used such as hospital administration, meals, housekeeping, laundry, etc. The findings...

  13. Trends in Health Care Expenditure among U.S. Adults with Heart Failure - The Medical Expenditure Panel Survey 2002–2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echouffo-Tcheugui, Justin B.; Bishu, Kinfe G.; Fonarow, Gregg C; Egede, Leonard E.

    2017-01-01

    Background Population-based national data on the trends in expenditures related to heart failure (HF) is scarce. Assessing the time trends in health care expenditures for HF in the United States can help to better define the burden of this condition. Methods Using 10-year data (2002–2011) from the national Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (weighted sample of 188,708,194 U.S adults aged ≥18 years) and a two-part model (adjusting for demographics, comorbidities and time); we estimated adjusted mean and incremental medical expenditures by HF status. The costs were direct total health care expenditures (out-of-pocket payments and payments by private insurance, Medicaid, Medicare, and other sources) from various sources (office-based visits, hospital outpatient, emergency room, inpatient hospital, pharmacy, home health care, and other medical expenditures). Results Compared to expenditures for individuals without HF ($5,511 [95% confidence interval (CI): 5,405–5,617]), individuals with HF had a four-fold higher mean expenditures of ($23,854 [95%CI: 21,733–25,975]). Individuals with HF had $3,446 (95%CI: 2,592–4,299) higher direct incremental expenditures compared with those without HF, after adjusting for demographics and comorbidities. Among those with HF, costs continuously increased by $5836 (28% relative increase), from $21,316 (95%CI: 18,359–24,272) in 2002/2003 to $27,152 (95%CI: 20,066–34,237) in 2010/2011; and inpatient costs ($11,318 over the whole period) were the single largest component of total medical expenditure. The estimated unadjusted total direct medical expenditures for US adults with HF were $30 billion/year and the adjusted total incremental expenditure $5.8 billion/year. Conclusions Heart failure is costly and over a recent 10-year period, direct expenditure related to HF increased markedly, mainly driven by inpatient costs. PMID:28454834

  14. Reforming health care in Canada: current issues La reforma del sistema de atención a la salud en Canadá: situación actual

    OpenAIRE

    Enis Baris

    1998-01-01

    This paper examines the current health care reform issues in Canada. The provincial health insurance plans of the 1960s and 1970s had the untoward effects of limiting the federal government’s clout for cost control and of promoting a system centered on inpatient and medical care. Recently, several provincial commissions reported that the current governance structures and management processes are outmoded in light of new knowledge, new fiscal realities and the evolution of power among sta...

  15. A tertiary care-primary care partnership model for medically complex and fragile children and youth with special health care needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, John B; Colby, Holly H; Bartelt, Tera; Jablonski, Debra; Krauthoefer, Mary L; Havens, Peter

    2007-10-01

    To evaluate the impact of a tertiary care center special needs program that partners with families and primary care physicians to ensure seamless inpatient and outpatient care and assist in providing medical homes. Up to 3 years of preenrollment and postenrollment data were compared for patients in the special needs program from July 1, 2002, through June 30, 2005. A tertiary care center pediatric hospital and medical school serving urban and rural patients. A total of 227 of 230 medically complex and fragile children and youth with special needs who had a wide range of chronic disorders and were enrolled in the special needs program. Care coordination provided by a special needs program pediatric nurse case manager with or without a special needs program physician. Preenrollment and postenrollment tertiary care center resource utilization, charges, and payments. A statistically significant decrease was found in the number of hospitalizations, number of hospital days, and tertiary care center charges and payments, and an increase was found in the use of outpatient services. Aggregate data revealed a decrease in hospital days from 7926 to 3831, an increase in clinic visits from 3150 to 5420, and a decrease in tertiary care center payments of $10.7 million. The special needs program budget for fiscal year 2005 had a deficit of $400,000. This tertiary care-primary care partnership model improved health care and reduced costs with relatively modest institutional support.

  16. ‘The Remembering Group’; facilitating a cognitive stimulation group in an inpatient health and rehabilitation setting.

    OpenAIRE

    Peacock-Brennan, Sinead; Jamal, S.; O’Sullivan, G.

    2016-01-01

    A trainee clinical psychologist and two occupational therapists reflect upon the\\ud experience of adapting a cognitive stimulation therapy group for an inpatient health\\ud and rehabilitation setting. The adaptations, benefits and challenges of implementing\\ud the group are discussed.

  17. Catalog of Completed Health Care and Dental Care Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-12-01

    Army Oral lie ith jaintenanc, AD A0()’ )’rtjr, ur, on 1x--ntal Itealth Status of Army lersonnel Jun 79 Current Dental Officer Practice and Uti ...HCSD Report No. 80-001B) Sep 80 Decentralized Inpatient Pharmacy Service Study AD) A)OU’,()’, (Job Satisfaction Between Pharmacists Perfotm irj Patient...Care Activities and Pharmacists Perfotrninq Dispensary or Supervisory Flinctions): Part C (HCSD Report No. 80-001C) Jun 30 Non-Poductive Factor

  18. National Characteristics of Lymphatic Malformations in Children: Inpatient Estimates and Trends in the United States, 2000 to 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jeffrey; Liu, Beiyu; Farjat, Alfredo E; Routh, Jonathan

    2018-04-01

    With ever increasing demands to manage finite resources for health care utilization, we performed an investigation to identify inpatient clinical characteristics and trends in children with lymphatic malformations using the Kids' Inpatient Database, years 2000 to 2009, to help identify populations best suited for resource deployment. Subjects included children 18 years and below with International Classification of Diseases (ICD), ninth revision code: 228.1-lymphangioma, any site. In the United States, between 2000 and 2009, inpatient pediatric patients with lymphatic malformations most commonly affected children aged 3 years and younger, urban hospital locations, and the South and West regions. There was no significant change in age of children with lymphatic malformations or the distribution of their age from year to year, P=0.948 and 0.4223, respectively. No significant evidence for seasonal variation or effect on inpatient admission was identified, P=0.7071. A great majority of admissions (>96%) were in urban locations across each year. There was also no significant change in breakdown of admissions by geographic location, P=0.7133. Further investigation may help to elucidate how to improve access to multidisciplinary vascular anomalies teams to optimize care for these children with unique and complex lymphatic malformations.

  19. Advancing Care Within an Adult Mental Health Day Hospital: Program Re-Design and Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taube-Schiff, Marlene; Mehak, Adrienne; Marangos, Sandy; Kalim, Anastasia; Ungar, Thomas

    2017-11-13

    Day hospital mental health programs provide alternate care to individuals of high acuity that do not require an inpatient psychiatric stay. Ensuring provision of best practice within these programs is essential for patient stabilization and recovery. However, there is scant literature to review when creating such a program. This paper provides an overview of the steps an acute care hospital took when designing and implementing new programming within a day hospital program. Qualitative data was collected following initial program rollout. This data helped to inform the ongoing modification of groups offered, group scheduling and content, as well as ensuring patient satisfaction and adequate skill delivery during the rollout period and beyond. The goal of this paper is to inform health service delivery for other programs when attempting to build or re-design a day hospital program.

  20. Update of Inpatient Treatment for Refractory Chronic Daily Headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Tzu-Hsien; Wang, Shuu-Jiun

    2016-01-01

    Chronic daily headache (CDH) is a group of headache disorders, in which headaches occur daily or near-daily (>15 days per month) and last for more than 3 months. Important CDH subtypes include chronic migraine, chronic tension-type headache, hemicrania continua, and new daily persistent headache. Other headaches with shorter durations (headache and various psychiatric disorders, such as depression and anxiety. Indications of inpatient treatment for CDH patients include poor responses to outpatient management, need for detoxification for overuse of specific medications (particularly opioids and barbiturates), and severe psychiatric comorbidities. Inpatient treatment usually involves stopping acute pain, preventing future attacks, and detoxifying medication overuse if present. Multidisciplinary integrated care that includes medical staff from different disciplines (e.g., psychiatry, clinical psychology, and physical therapy) has been recommended. The outcomes of inpatient treatment are satisfactory in terms of decreasing headache intensity or frequency, withdrawal from medication overuse, reducing disability, and improving life quality, although long-term relapse is not uncommon. In conclusion, inpatient treatment may be useful for select patients with refractory CDH and should be incorporated in a holistic headache care program.

  1. DOT for patients with limited access to health care facilities in a hill district of eastern Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wares, D F; Akhtar, M; Singh, S

    2001-08-01

    The hill district in Nepal, where access to health care facilities is difficult. To compare results before and after a decentralised directly observed treatment (DOT) intervention. Prospective study of patients registered in Dhankuta district, Nepal, 1996-1999. Patients received their intensive phase treatment under health worker supervision via one of three DOT options: 1) ambulatory from the peripheral government health facilities; 2) ambulatory from an international non-governmental organisation (INGO) TB clinic in district centre; or 3) resident in INGO TB hostel in district centre. Historical data from 1995-1996, with unsupervised short-course chemotherapy, were used for comparison. Of 307 new cases, respectively 126 (41%), 86 (28%) and 95 (31%) took their intensive phase treatment via options 1, 2 and 3. Smear conversion (at 2 months) and cure rates in new smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis cases were respectively 81.6% (vs. 58.8% historical, P = 0.001) and 84.9% (vs. 76.7% historical, P = 0.03). Overall costs to the INGO provider fell by 7%, mainly as a result of staffing reductions in the INGO services made possible by rationalisation with government services during the intervention. By offering varied DOT delivery routes, including an in-patient option, satisfactory results are possible with DOT even in areas where access to health care facilities is difficult. Provision of in-patient care via an INGO TB hostel allowed a significant proportion of new cases (31%) to receive their intensive phase treatment who otherwise may have had difficulty accessing treatment, due either to the distance to the nearest health facility or to disease severity. Substitution of government hospital beds or local hotel beds for the INGO hostel beds may allow the model to be reproduced elsewhere in similar geographical conditions in Nepal, but further studies should be performed in a non-INGO supported district beforehand.

  2. Health insurance benefit design and healthcare utilization in northern rural China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Poverty due to illness has become a substantial social problem in rural China since the collapse of the rural Cooperative Medical System in the early 1980s. Although the Chinese government introduced the New Rural Cooperative Medical Schemes (NRCMS in 2003, the associations between different health insurance benefit package designs and healthcare utilization remain largely unknown. Accordingly, we sought to examine the impact of health insurance benefit design on health care utilization. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We conducted a cross-sectional study using data from a household survey of 15,698 members of 4,209 randomly-selected households in 7 provinces, which were representative of the provinces along the north side of the Yellow River. Interviews were conducted face-to-face and in Mandarin. Our analytic sample included 9,762 respondents from 2,642 households. In each household, respondents indicated the type of health insurance benefit that the household had (coverage for inpatient care only or coverage for both inpatient and outpatient care and the number of outpatient visits in the 30 days preceding the interview and the number of hospitalizations in the 365 days preceding the household interview. People who had both outpatient and inpatient coverage compared with inpatient coverage only had significantly more village-level outpatient visits, township-level outpatient visits, and total outpatient visits. Furthermore, the increased utilization of township and village-level outpatient care was experienced disproportionately by people who were poorer, whereas the increased inpatient utilization overall and at the county level was experienced disproportionately by people who were richer. CONCLUSION: The evidence from this study indicates that the design of health insurance benefits is an important policy tool that can affect the health services utilization and socioeconomic equity in service use at different levels. Without careful

  3. Stigma, Social Structure, and the Biomedical Framework: Exploring the Stigma Experiences of Inpatient Service Users in Two Belgian Psychiatric Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sercu, Charlotte; Bracke, Piet

    2017-07-01

    The study discusses the stigma experiences of service users in mental health care, within the debate on the role of the biomedical framework for mental health care and power relations in society. Interview data of inpatient users ( n = 42) and care providers ( n = 43) from two Belgian psychiatric hospitals were analyzed using a constructivist grounded theory approach: Findings offer insight into how stigma experiences are affected by social structure. Stigma seemed to be related to the relation between care providers and service users their social position. The concept "mental health literacy" is used to frame this finding. In paying attention to the specific cultural and normative context, which influences the relationship between mental health literacy and stigma, it is further possible to cast some light on the meaning of the biomedical model for the construction and maintenance of power relations in mental health care and broader society.

  4. Association Between a Wider Availability of Health Information and Health Care Utilization in Vietnam: Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hoang Thuy Linh; Nakamura, Keiko; Seino, Kaoruko; Vo, Van Thang

    2017-12-18

    The rapid and widespread development of mass media sources including the Internet is occurring worldwide. Users are being confronted with a flood of health information through a wide availability of sources. Studies on how the availability of health information has triggered users' interest in utilizing health care services remain limited within the Vietnamese population. This study examined the associations between the wider availability of sources for health information and health care utilization in Vietnam after adjusting for potential confounding variables. The data for this study were drawn from a cross-sectional study conducted over a 6-month period in Hue, a city in central Vietnam. The participants were 993 randomly selected adults aged between 18 and 60 years. Information was collected through face-to-face interviews on the types of information sources that were consulted, including traditional media (television), Internet, and health education courses, as well as the impact of such information on health care use (emergency department visits, hospitalizations, doctor visits). Multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed at a 95% confidence level. The prevalence of watching television, using the Internet, and attending health education courses to obtain health information were 50.9% (505/993), 32.9% (327/993), and 8.7% (86/993), respectively. After further adjustments for self-reported health status, the presence of health insurance, and monthly income, respondents who watched television and used the Internet to obtain health information were 1.7 times more likely to visit a doctor (television: adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 1.69, 95% CI 1.30-2.19; Internet: AOR 1.64, 95% CI 1.23-2.19), and also significantly associated with inpatient hospitalization (P=.003). The use of widely available mass media sources (eg, television and the Internet) to obtain health information was associated with higher health care utilization. How this interest in health

  5. From admission to discharge in mental health services: a qualitative analysis of service user involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Nicola; Rowley, Emma; Chopra, Arun; Gregoriou, Kyriakos; Waring, Justin

    2016-04-01

    User involvement and recovery are now widely used terms within the mental health policy, research and practice discourse. However, there is a question mark about the impact these ideas have in everyday practice. Of interest is the degree of involvement in key transitions of care. In particular, admission to and discharge from acute inpatient mental health wards. To explore the nature of service user involvement in the admission and discharge process into and out of acute inpatient mental health care. A qualitative study using focus groups. One acute, inpatient mental health ward was the focus of the study. Seven uniprofessional focus group interviews were conducted with ward staff, community staff and service users (total number of participants = 52). Conventional, thematic qualitative techniques were used to analyse the data. The data analysed and presented in this article relate to the loss of the service user voice at the key transition points into and out of acute inpatient care. Due to the lack of resources (inpatient beds and community care follow-up), the role service users could play was diminished. In their narratives, clinical staff associated the person with the process and used language which dehumanized the individual. Service users experience numerous care transitions into and out of hospital. As there is the potential for these encounters to have a lasting negative effect, the importance of ensuring service users have a voice in what is happening to them is crucial. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. The relation of intrinsic religiousness to the subjective health of Greek medical inpatients: the mediating role of illness-related coping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karademas, Evangelos C; Petrakis, Charoula

    2009-08-01

    A large number of studies suggest a significant beneficial relationship between religiousness and many health indicators. The aim of this study was to (1) examine the association between intrinsic religiousness and subjective health in a sample of medical inpatients; (2) examine the mediating role of illness-related coping. A cross-sectional design was employed. Participants were 128 inpatients suffering from a coronary artery disease, cancer, or a renal disease. Intrinsic religiousness was found to be uncorrelated to psychological symptoms or self-rated health. Weak to modest positive correlations were noticed with wishful thinking, emotional reactions, and palliative coping. These coping strategies were also found to mediate the relationship to subjective health measures. Results suggest a weak, indirect, and negative relation of intrinsic religiousness to participants' subjective health. Situational, assessment, and conceptual factors may underlie the discrepancy between these findings and research supporting the health benefits of religiousness.

  7. Experience in health care organization for victims of Chernobyl accident under conditions of spatial hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadezhina, N.M.

    1990-01-01

    Experience in organization of health care for victims of Chernobyl accidents under conditions of spatial hospitals are discussed taking into account patients with residual contamination of skin and clothe. A necessity of well-adjusted organization activites, including an inpatient clinic with well-equipped reception, dosimetric, haryological and bacteriological laboratories, an intensive care department, a surgical (burn) department, a blood transfusion laboratory and equipment for plasmopheresis and hemosorption is marked. Therapy of such patients should be developed along the following lines: 1) prevention and therapy of infectious complications; 2) blood cell substitution therapy; 3) bone marrow transplantation; 4) detoxicating therapy; 5) correction of water-electrolyte metabolism; 6) therapy of local radiation injuries

  8. Assessment of Biopsychosocial Complexity and Health Care Needs: Measurement Properties of the INTERMED Self-Assessment Version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Reedt Dortland, Arianne K B; Peters, Lilian L; Boenink, Annette D; Smit, Jan H; Slaets, Joris P J; Hoogendoorn, Adriaan W; Joos, Andreas; Latour, Corine H M; Stiefel, Friedrich; Burrus, Cyrille; Guitteny-Collas, Marie; Ferrari, Silvia

    2017-05-01

    The INTERMED Self-Assessment questionnaire (IMSA) was developed as an alternative to the observer-rated INTERMED (IM) to assess biopsychosocial complexity and health care needs. We studied feasibility, reliability, and validity of the IMSA within a large and heterogeneous international sample of adult hospital inpatients and outpatients as well as its predictive value for health care use (HCU) and quality of life (QoL). A total of 850 participants aged 17 to 90 years from five countries completed the IMSA and were evaluated with the IM. The following measurement properties were determined: feasibility by percentages of missing values; reliability by Cronbach α; interrater agreement by intraclass correlation coefficients; convergent validity of IMSA scores with mental health (Short Form 36 emotional well-being subscale and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), medical health (Cumulative Illness Rating Scale) and QoL (Euroqol-5D) by Spearman rank correlations; and predictive validity of IMSA scores with HCU and QoL by (generalized) linear mixed models. Feasibility, face validity, and reliability (Cronbach α = 0.80) were satisfactory. Intraclass correlation coefficient between IMSA and IM total scores was .78 (95% CI = .75-.81). Correlations of the IMSA with the Short Form 36, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Cumulative Illness Rating Scale, and Euroqol-5D (convergent validity) were -.65, .15, .28, and -.59, respectively. The IMSA significantly predicted QoL and also HCU (emergency department visits, hospitalization, outpatient visits, and diagnostic examinations) after 3- and 6-month follow-up. Results were comparable between hospital sites, inpatients and outpatients, as well as age groups. The IMSA is a generic and time-efficient method to assess biopsychosocial complexity and to provide guidance for multidisciplinary care trajectories in adult patients, with good reliability and validity across different cultures.

  9. Health literacy and English language comprehension among elderly inpatients at an urban safety-net hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordasco, Kristina M; Asch, Steven M; Franco, Idalid; Mangione, Carol M

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the relationship between health literacy and age in chronically-ill inpatients at a safety-net hospital. We recruited 399 English- and Spanish-speaking inpatients being evaluated or treated for Congestive Heart Failure or Coronary Artery Disease at a large, urban safety-net teaching hospital in Southern California. Participants were interviewed to ascertain education, English comprehension, and in-home language use. Health literacy was assessed using The Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults (TOFHLA). We compared by age (aged 65 or more, 51 to 64 years of age, and less than age 50) levels of health literacy, educational attainment, English comprehension, and language use. Prevalence of inadequate health literacy significantly increased with increasing age (87.2% in > or = 65, 48.9% for 51-64, and 26.3% in immigration status. Additionally, older patients were more likely to have never learned to read (34.9% in > or = 65, 6.5% for 51-64, and 1.5% in or = 65, 9.0% for 51-64, and 0.8% in or = 65, 43.5% for 51-64, and 35.8% in language at home (82.3% in > or = 65, 70.2% for 51-64, and 62.2% in < or = 50, p=0.015). To prepare to meet the chronic disease needs of a growing older patient population, and ameliorate the negative health effects of associated low literacy, safety-net hospital leaders and providers need to prioritize the development and implementation of low-literacy educational materials, programs, and services.

  10. Improving Inpatient Surveys: Web-Based Computer Adaptive Testing Accessed via Mobile Phone QR Codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Tsair-Wei; Lin, Weir-Sen

    2016-03-02

    The National Health Service (NHS) 70-item inpatient questionnaire surveys inpatients on their perceptions of their hospitalization experience. However, it imposes more burden on the patient than other similar surveys. The literature shows that computerized adaptive testing (CAT) based on item response theory can help shorten the item length of a questionnaire without compromising its precision. Our aim was to investigate whether CAT can be (1) efficient with item reduction and (2) used with quick response (QR) codes scanned by mobile phones. After downloading the 2008 inpatient survey data from the Picker Institute Europe website and analyzing the difficulties of this 70-item questionnaire, we used an author-made Excel program using the Rasch partial credit model to simulate 1000 patients' true scores followed by a standard normal distribution. The CAT was compared to two other scenarios of answering all items (AAI) and the randomized selection method (RSM), as we investigated item length (efficiency) and measurement accuracy. The author-made Web-based CAT program for gathering patient feedback was effectively accessed from mobile phones by scanning the QR code. We found that the CAT can be more efficient for patients answering questions (ie, fewer items to respond to) than either AAI or RSM without compromising its measurement accuracy. A Web-based CAT inpatient survey accessed by scanning a QR code on a mobile phone was viable for gathering inpatient satisfaction responses. With advances in technology, patients can now be offered alternatives for providing feedback about hospitalization satisfaction. This Web-based CAT is a possible option in health care settings for reducing the number of survey items, as well as offering an innovative QR code access.

  11. Co-occurring Mental Disorders in Substance Abuse Treatment: the Current Health Care Situation in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauber, Hanna; Braun, Barbara; Pfeiffer-Gerschel, Tim; Kraus, Ludwig; Pogarell, Oliver

    2018-01-01

    Aim of this study was to investigate the current health care situation for patients with co-occurring mental disorders in addiction treatment. Therefore, data from the German Substance Abuse Treatment System ( N  = 194,406) was analysed with regard to the prevalence of comorbid mental disorders, treatment characteristics and outcomes of patients with comorbid psychiatric diagnosis. In outpatient setting, the prevalence of comorbid diagnoses was considerably lower (4.6%) than in inpatient setting (50.7%), but mood and anxiety disorders were the most prevalent additional diagnoses in both settings. In the treatment of patients with these comorbid disorders, we found higher rates of complementary internal and external (psychiatric) treatment, more co-operations and referrals after treatment, and positive treatment process outcomes. Findings indicate that the knowledge of an additional diagnosis influences the health care provision of affected patients and can therefore be seen as the essential precondition for providing adequate and comprehensive treatment. This highlights the importance of a sufficient consideration and diagnostic assessment of mental disorders in addiction treatment to further improve the health care situation of comorbid patients.

  12. 38 CFR 17.108 - Copayments for inpatient hospital care and outpatient medical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...); (12) Weight management counseling (individual and group); (13) Smoking cessation counseling... associated with military service; (4) Counseling and care for sexual trauma as authorized under 38 U.S.C... dental care provided under 38 U.S.C. 1712; (8) Readjustment counseling and related mental health services...

  13. Changes in alcohol-related inpatient care in Stockholm County in relation to socioeconomic status during a period of decline in alcohol consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Romelsjö, A; Diderichsen, Finn

    1989-01-01

    in 1975 and 1980 with the inpatient care registers for 1976 and 1981. In both years, all rates were highest for people outside the labor market and lowest among white collar employees. The employment rate for those aged 25-44 years and treated in 1981 for alcohol psychosis, alcoholism, and alcohol...... intoxication--already low in 1975--had drifted further downward by 1980. Total rates of inpatient treatment for alcohol-related diagnoses generally declined but the gap between blue collar workers and white collar workers widened. We conclude that the goal for national alcohol policy, suggested by the WHO...

  14. Has the Rajiv Aarogyasri Community Health Insurance Scheme of Andhra Pradesh Addressed the Educational Divide in Accessing Health Care?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mala Rao

    Full Text Available Equity of access to healthcare remains a major challenge with families continuing to face financial and non-financial barriers to services. Lack of education has been shown to be a key risk factor for 'catastrophic' health expenditure (CHE, in many countries including India. Consequently, ways to address the education divide need to be explored. We aimed to assess whether the innovative state-funded Rajiv Aarogyasri Community Health Insurance Scheme of Andhra Pradesh state launched in 2007, has achieved equity of access to hospital inpatient care among households with varying levels of education.We used the National Sample Survey Organization 2004 survey as our baseline and the same survey design to collect post-intervention data from 8623 households in the state in 2012. Two outcomes, hospitalisation and CHE for inpatient care, were estimated using education as a measure of socio-economic status and transforming levels of education into ridit scores. We derived relative indices of inequality by regressing the outcome measures on education, transformed as a ridit score, using logistic regression models with appropriate weights and accounting for the complex survey design.Between 2004 and 2012, there was a 39% reduction in the likelihood of the most educated person being hospitalised compared to the least educated, with reductions observed in all households as well as those that had used the Aarogyasri. For CHE the inequality disappeared in 2012 in both groups. Sub-group analyses by economic status, social groups and rural-urban residence showed a decrease in relative indices of inequality in most groups. Nevertheless, inequalities in hospitalisation and CHE persisted across most groups.During the time of the Aarogyasri scheme implementation inequalities in access to hospital care were substantially reduced but not eliminated across the education divide. Universal access to education and schemes such as Aarogyasri have the synergistic potential

  15. Medicare program; hospital inpatient prospective payment systems for acute care hospitals and the long-term care hospital prospective payment system and fiscal year 2013 rates; hospitals' resident caps for graduate medical education payment purposes; quality reporting requirements for specific providers and for ambulatory surgical centers. final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-31

    We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems. Some of the changes implement certain statutory provisions contained in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (collectively known as the Affordable Care Act) and other legislation. These changes will be applicable to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2012, unless otherwise specified in this final rule. We also are updating the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis subject to these limits. The updated rate-of-increase limits will be effective for cost reporting periods beginning on or after October 1, 2012. We are updating the payment policies and the annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital services provided by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) and implementing certain statutory changes made by the Affordable Care Act. Generally, these changes will be applicable to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2012, unless otherwise specified in this final rule. In addition, we are implementing changes relating to determining a hospital's full-time equivalent (FTE) resident cap for the purpose of graduate medical education (GME) and indirect medical education (IME) payments. We are establishing new requirements or revised requirements for quality reporting by specific providers (acute care hospitals, PPS-exempt cancer hospitals, LTCHs, and inpatient psychiatric facilities (IPFs)) that are participating in Medicare. We also are establishing new administrative, data completeness, and extraordinary circumstance waivers or extension requests requirements, as well as a reconsideration process, for quality reporting by ambulatory surgical centers

  16. Variation in Payment Rates under Medicare's Inpatient Prospective Payment System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krinsky, Sam; Ryan, Andrew M; Mijanovich, Tod; Blustein, Jan

    2017-04-01

    To measure variation in payment rates under Medicare's Inpatient Prospective Payment System (IPPS) and identify the main payment adjustments that drive variation. Medicare cost reports for all Medicare-certified hospitals, 1987-2013, and Dartmouth Atlas geographic files. We measure the Medicare payment rate as a hospital's total acute inpatient Medicare Part A payment, divided by the standard IPPS payment for its geographic area. We assess variation using several measures, both within local markets and nationally. We perform a factor decomposition to identify the share of variation attributable to specific adjustments. We also describe the characteristics of hospitals receiving different payment rates and evaluate changes in the magnitude of the main adjustments over time. Data downloaded from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, the National Bureau of Economic Research, and the Dartmouth Atlas. In 2013, Medicare paid for acute inpatient discharges at a rate 31 percent above the IPPS base. For the top 10 percent of discharges, the mean rate was double the IPPS base. Variations were driven by adjustments for medical education and care to low-income populations. The magnitude of variation has increased over time. Adjustments are a large and growing share of Medicare hospital payments, and they create significant variation in payment rates. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  17. Reforming the health care system: implications for health care marketers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrochuk, M A; Javalgi, R G

    1996-01-01

    Health care reform has become the dominant domestic policy issue in the United States. President Clinton, and the Democratic leaders in the House and Senate have all proposed legislation to reform the system. Regardless of the plan which is ultimately enacted, health care delivery will be radically changed. Health care marketers, given their perspective, have a unique opportunity to ensure their own institutions' success. Organizational, managerial, and marketing strategies can be employed to deal with the changes which will occur. Marketers can utilize personal strategies to remain proactive and successful during an era of health care reform. As outlined in this article, responding to the health care reform changes requires strategic urgency and action. However, the strategies proposed are practical regardless of the version of health care reform legislation which is ultimately enacted.

  18. [Study of public and private hospital care on a population basis, 1986-1996].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, J S; Simões, B J

    1999-02-01

    The last decade saw the creation and implementation of the Brazilian National Health System (NHS)--public, universal and equalitarian--with the objective of offering wide coverage to meet the population's health needs. The objective of the study was the assessment of the evolution of public and private hospital care on a populational basis during the period of the implementation of the NHS. The 984,142 inpatients of the general hospitals of Ribeirão Preto, Brazil, during the period 1986 to 1996 were studied and those of them living in their own municipal district were selected. The inpatients are classified according to the financing system as private, pre-payment and NHS; the social situation of the patients and the profile of hospital morbidity are analysed. In the period studied a continuous growth in the number of hospitalizations is observed, both in absolute numbers and in coefficient per thousand inhabitants, increasing from 43,773 to 55,844 inpatients per year. Though when the categories of the hospitalizations are studied, it is seen that private inpatients present a reduction both in absolute numbers and as a coefficient from 3,181 (7.3%) to 2,215 (3.9%); the NHS inpatients decrease in absolute numbers and in a percentage by a third at the end of the period--falling from 33,254 (76.0%) to 29,373 (51.7%). On the other hand the pre-payment inpatient system triplicates in absolute numbers and duplicates by rate for inhabitant--from 7,338 (16.8%) to 25,256 (44.4%). The NHS hospital care attends mainly unskilled and semi-skilled manual workers; the professionals, technicians, non manual and skilled manual workers being assisted by the private services. The hospital morbidity of NHS inpatients is different from that of the private inpatient systems. The health policy in that period, limiting NHS financing, repressing demand and discouraging the private providers to work with NHS inpatients led to negative selectivity. The result was an increase in difference

  19. Self-perceived attitudes toward interprofessional collaboration and interprofessional education among different health care professionals in pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode, Sebastian Felix Nepomuk; Giesler, Marianne; Heinzmann, Andrea; Krüger, Marcus; Straub, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Interprofessional education (IPE) is the basis for interprofessional collaboration (IPC) in health care systems. It has beneficial effects for both patients and health care professionals. IPC is paramount for adequate care of patients and their families, especially in pediatrics. To determine the attitudes of medical doctors (n=121), nurses (n=15), psychologists (n=14), and social workers (n=19) toward IPE and IPC in a tertiary pediatric university teaching hospital, as well as the inpatient and outpatient settings in pediatrics, we developed a questionnaire with 21 items in four categories based on established questionnaires. All participants worked as part of interprofessional teams, and the overwhelming majority valued IPC highly. Most competencies important for IPC were acquired on the job. There was a substantial lack of interprofessional education, especially for medical doctors and psychologists. IPE still needs to be established as part of the undergraduate curriculum at German universities.

  20. Developing a costing framework for palliative care services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosoiu, Daniela; Dumitrescu, Malina; Connor, Stephen R

    2014-10-01

    Palliative care services have been reported to be a less expensive alternative to traditional treatment; however, little is known about how to measure the cost of delivering quality palliative care. The purpose of this project was to develop a standardized method for measuring the cost of palliative care delivery that could potentially be replicated in multiple settings. The project was implemented in three stages. First, an interdisciplinary group of palliative care experts identified standards of quality palliative care delivery in the inpatient and home care services. Surveys were conducted of government agencies and palliative care providers to identify payment practices and budgets for palliative care services. In the second phase, unit costs were defined and a costing framework was designed to measure inpatient and home-based palliative care unit costs. The final phase was advocacy for inclusion of calculated costs into the national funding system. In this project, a reliable framework for determining the cost of inpatient and home-based palliative care services was developed. Inpatient palliative care cost in Romania was calculated at $96.58 per day. Home-based palliative care was calculated at $30.37 per visit, $723.60 per month, and $1367.71 per episode of care, which averaged 45 visits. A standardized methodology and framework for costing palliative care are presented. The framework allows a country or provider of care to substitute their own local costs to generate cost information relevant to the health-care system. In Romania, this allowed the palliative care provider community to advocate for a consistent payment system. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. User-Centered Collaborative Design and Development of an Inpatient Safety Dashboard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlaver, Eli; Schnipper, Jeffrey L; Boxer, Robert B; Breuer, Dominic J; Gershanik, Esteban F; Dykes, Patricia C; Massaro, Anthony F; Benneyan, James; Bates, David W; Lehmann, Lisa S

    2017-12-01

    Patient safety remains a key concern in hospital care. This article summarizes the iterative participatory development, features, functions, and preliminary evaluation of a patient safety dashboard for interdisciplinary rounding teams on inpatient medical services. This electronic health record (EHR)-embedded dashboard collects real-time data covering 13 safety domains through web services and applies logic to generate stratified alerts with an interactive check-box function. The technological infrastructure is adaptable to other EHR environments. Surveyed users perceived the tool as highly usable and useful. Integration of the dashboard into clinical care is intended to promote communication about patient safety and facilitate identification and management of safety concerns. Copyright © 2017 The Joint Commission. All rights reserved.

  2. Psychiatric Boarding in the Pediatric Inpatient Medical Setting: A Retrospective Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Katherine A S; Bujoreanu, I Simona; Cheung, Priscilla; Choi, Christine; Golden, Sara; Brodziak, Kerry; Andrade, Gabriela; Ibeziako, Patricia

    2017-08-01

    Psychiatric concerns are a common presenting problem for pediatric providers across many settings, particularly on inpatient medical services. The volume of youth requiring intensive psychiatric treatment outnumbers the availability of psychiatric placements, and as a result many youth must board on pediatric medical units while awaiting placement. As the phenomenon of boarding in the inpatient pediatric setting increases, it is important to understand trends in boarding volume and characteristics of pediatric psychiatric boarders (PBs) and understand the supports they receive while boarding. A retrospective chart review of patients admitted as PBs to a medical inpatient unit at a large northeastern US pediatric hospital during 2013. Four hundred thirty-seven PBs were admitted to the medical service from January to December 2013, representing a more than 50% increase from PB admissions in 2011 and 2012. Most PBs were admitted for suicidal attempt and/or ideation. Average length of boarding was 3.11 ± 3.34 days. PBs received a wide range of mental health supports throughout their admissions. PBs demonstrated modest but statistically significant clinical improvements over the course of their stay, with only a small proportion demonstrating clinical deterioration. Psychiatric boarding presents many challenges for families, providers, and the health care system, and PBs have complex psychiatric histories and needs. However, boarding may offer a valuable opportunity for psychiatric intervention and stabilization among psychiatrically vulnerable youth. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  3. Depression and its impact on health-related quality of life among Chinese inpatients with lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Wen; Xu, Yan-Min; Zhu, Jun-Hong; Zhong, Bao-Liang

    2017-12-01

    Depression is of great concern for patients with cancer. A detailed epidemiological profile of depression in Chinese patients with lung cancer and whether depression impacts patients' health-related quality of life (HRQOL) remain unknown. This study examined the prevalence and socio-demographic and clinical correlates of depression and its effect on HRQOL in Chinese inpatients with lung cancer of two large general hospitals. A total of 148 inpatients were consecutively recruited, and administered with a standardized questionnaire to collect socio-demographic and clinical data. Depression and HRQOL were assessed with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and World Health Organization QOL Scale Brief Version, respectively. As high as 43.2% Chinese inpatients with lung cancer had clinically significant depressive symptoms. Multiple logistic regression found that depression was significantly associated with moderate-to-severe pain (OR: 4.43), metastatic cancer (OR: 3.63), a short duration after cancer diagnosis (OR: 1.04), poor performance status (OR: 3.41), and small-cell cancer (OR: 4.52). Depressed patients had significantly poorer HRQOL than not depressed patients in terms of all four domains of HRQOL. After controlling for the potential confounding effects of socio-demographic and clinical factors with analysis of covariance, these group-differences in physical (F = 29.074, P environmental (F = 27.685, P assessment and treatment, should be routinely provided in oncology departments of Chinese general hospitals.

  4. 42 CFR 412.432 - Method of payment under the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... facility prospective payment system. 412.432 Section 412.432 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES Prospective Payment System for Inpatient Hospital Services of Inpatient...

  5. Sarcopenia and Health Care Utilization in Older Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Li-Yung; McCulloch, Charles E.; Cauley, Jane A.; Paudel, Misti L.; Taylor, Brent; Schousboe, John T.; Ensrud, Kristine E.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Although there are several consensus definitions of sarcopenia, their association with health care utilization has not been studied. Methods: We included women from the prospective Study of Osteoporotic Fractures with complete assessment of sarcopenia by several definitions at the Study of Osteoporotic Fractures Year 10 (Y10) exam (1997–1998) who also had available data from Medicare Fee- For-Service Claims (N = 566) or Kaiser Encounter data (N = 194). Sarcopenia definitions evaluated were: International Working Group, European Working Group for Sarcopenia in Older Persons, Foundation for the NIH Sarcopenia Project, Baumgartner, and Newman. Hurdle models and logistic regression were used to assess the relation between sarcopenia status (the summary definition and the components of slowness, weakness and/or lean mass) and outcomes that included hospitalizations, cumulative inpatient days/year, short-term (part A paid) skilled nursing facility stay in the 3 years following the Y10 visit. Results: None of the consensus definitions, nor the definition components of weakness or low lean mass, was associated with increased risk of hospitalization or greater likelihood of short-term skilled nursing facility stay. Women with slowness by any criterion definition were about 50% more likely to be hospitalized; had a greater rate of hospitalization days amongst those hospitalized; and had 1.8 to 2.1 times greater likelihood of a short-term skilled nursing facility stay than women without slowness. There was the suggestion of a protective association of low lean mass by the various criterion definitions on short-term skilled nursing facility stay. Conclusion: Estimated effects of sarcopenia on health care utilization were negligible. However, slowness was associated with greater health care utilization. PMID:27402050

  6. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    care policy which was intended to make health care which of the two alternative methods of health care available to individuals and families in the financing options of free health or DRF was community at very little or no cost at all. However, preferred by the community members within most health facilities would appear to ...

  7. Clinicians' perception of the preventability of inpatient mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Robert; Srinivasan, Ramya; Kenway, Bruno; Quinn, James

    2018-03-12

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to assess whether clinicians have an accurate perception of the preventability of their patients' mortality. Case note review estimates that approximately 5 percent of inpatient deaths are preventable. Design/methodology/approach The design involved in the study is a prospective audit of inpatient mortality in a single NHS hospital trust. The case study includes 979 inpatient mortalities. A number of outcome measures were recorded, including a Likert scale of the preventability of death- and NCEPOD-based grading of care quality. Findings Clinicians assessed only 1.4 percent of deaths as likely to be preventable. This is significantly lower than previously published values ( p<0.0001). Clinicians were also more likely to rate the quality of care as "good," and less likely to identify areas of substandard clinical or organizational management. Research limitations/implications The implications of objective assessment of the preventability of mortality are essential to drive quality improvement in this area. Practical implications There is a wide disparity between independent case note review and clinicians assessing the care of their own patients. This may be due to a "knowledge gap" between reviewers and treating clinicians, or an "objectivity gap" meaning clinicians may not recognize preventability of death of patients under their care. Social implications This study gives some insight into deficiencies in clinical governance processes. Originality/value No similar study has been performed. This has significant implications for the idea of the preventability of mortality.

  8. Evaluating health services with point of service feedback: perspectives and experiences of patients, staff and community volunteers in an inpatient rehabilitation facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Stephen D; Dolley, Pamela J; Dunning, Trisha L; Hughes, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    To determine patient, staff and community volunteer opinions and experiences of point of service feedback (POSF) in an inpatient rehabilitation facility. Participants were recruited by purposeful sampling. Two researchers conducted in-depth semi-scripted interviews with patients, staff or volunteers until no new issues emerged. Manually transcribed interview data underwent thematic analysis that grouped information into categories of related information. Twenty patients, 26 staff from 10 different professional groups, and 2 community volunteers were interviewed. Patient and volunteer data were grouped into five main categories: patients wanted their voice heard and acted on; patients could be positively and negatively affected by POSF; patients could be reluctant to evaluate staff; patients preferred POSF to post-discharge mailed questionnaires; and patients' feedback was influenced by the data collector. Staff wanted: feedback to help them improve the patient experience; and feedback that was trustworthy, usable and used. Staff believed that the feedback-collector influenced patients' feedback and affected how feedback could be used. Patients, staff and community volunteers identified issues that determine the appropriateness and usefulness of POSF. Policy and practise should address the preferences, needs and experiences of health service users and providers so that POSF produces maximum benefits for both patients and health services. Implications for Rehabilitation POSF can enhance patients' experiences of inpatient rehabilitation by providing a mechanism to be heard and communicating that patients are valued; care must be exercised with patients who find giving feedback stressful. Collecting POSF is most beneficial when coupled with methods to efficiently and effectively respond to feedback. POSF requires interpretation in light of its limitations including patients' ability to accurately and unreservedly communicate their experiences. Who collects POSF

  9. Innovative use of technologies and methods to redesign care: the problem of care transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richman, Mark; Sklaroff, Laura Myerchin; Hoang, Khathy; Wasson, Elijah; Gross-Schulman, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Organizations are redesigning models of care in today's rapidly changing health care environment. Using proven innovation techniques maximizes likelihood of effective change. Our safety-net hospital aims to reduce high emergency department visit, admission, and readmission rates, key components to health care cost control. Twenty-five clinical stakeholders participated in mixed-methods innovation exercises to understand stakeholders, frame problems, and explore solutions. We identified existing barriers and means to improve post-emergency department/post-inpatient discharge care coordination/communication among patient-centered medical home care team members, including patients. Physicians and staff preferred automated e-mail notifications, including patient identifiers, medical home/primary care provider information, and relevant clinical documentation, to improve communication efficiency/efficacy.

  10. [Declared dead? Recommendations regarding integrated care from the perspective of German statutory health insurance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amelung, Volker; Wolf, S; Ozegowski, S; Eble, S; Hildebrandt, H; Knieps, F; Lägel, R; Schlenker, R-U; Sjuts, R

    2015-04-01

    The traditional separation of health care into sectors in Germany causes communication problems that hinder continuous, patient-oriented care. This is most evident in the transition from inpatient to outpatient care. That said, there are also breaks in the flow of information, a lack of supply, or even incorrect information flowing within same-sector care. The transition from a division of functions into sectors to a patient-oriented process represents a change in the paradigm of health care that can only be successfully completed with considerable effort. Germany's statutory health insurance (SHI) funds play a key role here, as they are the contracting parties as well as the financiers of integrated care, and are strategically located at the center of the development process.The objective of this article is to explore how Germany's SHI funds view integrated care, what they regard as being the drivers of and barriers to transitioning to such a system, and what recommendations they can provide with regard to the further development of integrated care. For this purpose semi-structured interviews with board members and those responsible for implementing integrated care into the operations of ten SHI funds representing more than half of Germany's SHI-insured population were conducted. According to the interviewees, a better framework for integrated care urgently needs to be developed and rendered more receptive to innovation.Only in this way will the widespread stagnation of the past several years be overcome. The deregulation of § 140a-d SGB V and the establishment of a uniform basis for new forms of care in terms of a new innovation clause are among the central recommendations of this article. The German federal government's innovation fund was met with great hope, but also implied risks. Nonetheless, the new law designed to strengthen health care overall generated high expectations.

  11. Structured health care for subjects with diabetic foot ulcers results in a reduction of major amputation rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Objective We tested the effects of structured health care for the diabetic foot in one region in Germany aiming to reduce the number of major amputations. Research design and methods In a prospective study we investigated patients with diabetic foot in a structured system of outpatient, in-patient and rehabilitative treatment. Subjects were recruited between January 1st, 2000 and December 31, 2007. All participants underwent a two-year follow-up. The modified University of Texas Wound Classification System (UT) was the basis for documentation and data analysis. We evaluated numbers of major amputations, rates of ulcer healing and mortality. In order to compare the effect of the structured health care program with usual care in patients with diabetic foot we evaluated the same parameters at another regional hospital without interdisciplinary care of diabetic foot (controls). Results 684 patients with diabetic foot and 508 controls were investigated. At discharge from hospital 28.3% (structured health care program, SHC) vs. 23.0% (controls) of all ulcers had healed completely. 51.5% (SHC) vs. 49.8% (controls) were in UT grade 1. Major amputations were performed in 32 subjects of the structured health care program group (4.7%) vs. 110 (21.7%) in controls (p<0.0001). Mortality during hospitalization was 2.5% (SHC) vs. 9.4% in controls (p<0.001). Conclusions With the structured health care program we achieved a significant reduction of major amputation rates by more than 75% as compared to standard care. PMID:23497152

  12. Maternal Medical Complexity: Impact on Prenatal Health Care Spending among Women at Low Risk for Cesarean Section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Shayna D; Herrera, Carolina; Udo, Ifeyinwa E; Kozhimannil, Katy B; Barrette, Eric; Magriples, Urania; Ickovics, Jeannette R

    Obstetric procedures are among the most expensive health care services, yet relatively little is known about health care spending among pregnant women, particularly the commercially-insured. The objective of this study was to examine the association between maternal medical complexity, as a result of having one or more comorbid conditions, and health care spending during the prenatal period among a national sample of 95,663 commercially-insured women at low risk for cesarean delivery. We conducted secondary analyses of 2010-2011 inpatient, outpatient, and professional claims for health care services from the Health Care Cost Institute. Allowed charges were summed for the prenatal and childbirth periods. Ordinary least squares regressions tested associations between maternal health conditions and health care expenditures during pregnancy. Thirty-four percent of pregnant women had one or more comorbidities; 8% had two or more. Pregnant women with one or more comorbidities had significantly higher allowed charges than those without comorbidities (p prenatal period was nearly three times higher for women with preexisting diabetes compared with women with no comorbid conditions. Average levels of prenatal period spending associated with maternal comorbidities were similar for women who had vaginal and cesarean deliveries. Patient characteristics accounted for 30% of the variance in prenatal period expenditures. The impact of maternal comorbidities, and in particular preexisting diabetes, on prenatal care expenditures should be taken into account as provider payment reforms, such as pay-for performance incentives and bundled payments for episodes of care, extend to maternal and child health-related services. Copyright © 2017 Jacobs Institute of Women's Health. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The effects of health information technology on the costs and quality of medical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agha, Leila

    2014-03-01

    Information technology has been linked to productivity growth in a wide variety of sectors, and health information technology (HIT) is a leading example of an innovation with the potential to transform industry-wide productivity. This paper analyzes the impact of health information technology (HIT) on the quality and intensity of medical care. Using Medicare claims data from 1998 to 2005, I estimate the effects of early investment in HIT by exploiting variation in hospitals' adoption statuses over time, analyzing 2.5 million inpatient admissions across 3900 hospitals. HIT is associated with a 1.3% increase in billed charges (p-value: 5.6%), and there is no evidence of cost savings even five years after adoption. Additionally, HIT adoption appears to have little impact on the quality of care, measured by patient mortality, adverse drug events, and readmission rates. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Child and Adolescent Mental Health Care in Iran: Current Status and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi, Vandad; Mojtabai, Ramin; Shahrivar, Zahra; Alaghband-Rad, Javad; Zarafshan, Hadi; Wissow, Lawrence

    2016-11-01

    The need for mental health care among children and adolescents in Iran, as in other low and middle income countries (LAMIC) remains mostly unmet. In this paper, we sought to provide an overview of the extent of unmet need and mental health services in Iran. We also aimed to propose approaches to address this gap. We reviewed the published epidemiologic studies of child and adolescent mental and behavioral health problems in Iran. We also examined the current status of child mental health services and the gaps between current needs and available services based on published literature that included papers published in scientific journals, as well as governmental and other administrative reports. The contextual issues relevant to child mental health care were also explored, as well as the possibilities to introduce new or scale up promising services. Child and adolescent mental and behavioral health problems are highly prevalent in Iran. Different studies have estimated that 16.7% to 36.4% of children and adolescents suffer from one or more mental health problems. However, there is a serious scarcity of resources to meet this need. Available services are delivered by independent public organizations (e.g., Ministry of Health, Welfare Organization, and Ministry of Education) or private sector with inefficient communication and collaboration among them and no mandatory national mental health policy. Available specialized child and adolescent services are mostly confined to small inpatient units and university outpatient facilities in larger cities, and there is a scarce evidence for  the effectiveness of the available services. Expansion of primary care's role in timely detection and management of child and adolescent mental health problems, implementation of task-shifting and -sharing initiatives, as well as improved collaboration among responsible governmental and non-governmental sectors are some of the most promising future venues to improve mental health care for

  15. IMPLEMENTING AN ISO 10001-BASED PROMISE IN INPATIENTS CARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ashiqur Rahman Khan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the implementation of a Customer Satisfaction Promise (CSP that requires nurses to introduce themselves and explain the care plan to the patients of a hospital unit in Canada. The CSP implementation, maintenance and improvement activities were based on ISO 10001:2007. Qualitative and quantitative performance data were collected from nurses, the unit manager and patients, and improvement suggestions were made. During the implementation, nurses introduced themselves 95% of the time and explained the care plan 86% of the time. When interviewed, some nurses stated that the CSP was a good reinforcement of a practice already expected of them, which made patients happy, satisfied and more comfortable. Data from a small sample of patients was not adequate in clearly indicating the CSP's performance or improvement, but was useful in validating the survey and the feedback form. To our knowledge, applications of ISO 10001:2007 in health care have not been studied. Furthermore, this paper may be the first example of the integrated use of ISO 10001 and ISO 10002 in health care.

  16. Knowledge and Perceptions About Community-acquired Staphylococcal Infections Among Health Care Workers in Hawai‘i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tice, Alan D; Hurwitz, Eric L; Katz, Alan R

    2013-01-01

    Since the early 1990s, national rates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections have increased dramatically.1,2 Initially identified in health care settings, community-acquired MRSA is now a major public health concern. With Hawai‘i's expanding S. aureus and MRSA epidemic closely approximating the national trend in inpatient and outpatient settings,7,8 a high level of knowledge and awareness among health care workers is essential to successfully control this evolving epidemic. Health care and related workers were surveyed to assess their knowledge and perceptions about staphylococcal and MRSA infections. Knowledge was estimated by demonstrated ability to correctly identify risk factors including diabetes and obesity, as well as to demonstrate awareness of a growing staphylococcal and MRSA epidemic.9,10 Perceptions were estimated by level of concern of antibiotic resistance as well as of the severity of the staphylococcal and MRSA epidemic. Variations in knowledge and perception concerning basic principles associated with S. aureus infections as well as characteristics of the evolving S. aureus and MRSA epidemic were observed among various occupations (advance clinical practitioners, nurses, public health professionals, athletic trainers, and non-medical workers) as well as work locations (hospital, community, and non-clinical community). Overall, health care and related workers in community settings demonstrated disparities in knowledge regarding S. aureus and MRSA infections. They were also more likely to misperceive this growing threat. These findings provide support for focused educational interventions targeting community health care and related workers to improve awareness of staphylococcal infections in order to successfully address and combat this evolving epidemic. PMID:24069572

  17. Knowledge and perceptions about community-acquired staphylococcal infections among health care workers in Hawai'i.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Brandyn S; Tice, Alan D; Hurwitz, Eric L; Katz, Alan R

    2013-09-01

    Since the early 1990s, national rates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections have increased dramatically.1,2 Initially identified in health care settings, community-acquired MRSA is now a major public health concern. With Hawai'i's expanding S. aureus and MRSA epidemic closely approximating the national trend in inpatient and outpatient settings,7,8 a high level of knowledge and awareness among health care workers is essential to successfully control this evolving epidemic. Health care and related workers were surveyed to assess their knowledge and perceptions about staphylococcal and MRSA infections. Knowledge was estimated by demonstrated ability to correctly identify risk factors including diabetes and obesity, as well as to demonstrate awareness of a growing staphylococcal and MRSA epidemic.9,10 Perceptions were estimated by level of concern of antibiotic resistance as well as of the severity of the staphylococcal and MRSA epidemic. Variations in knowledge and perception concerning basic principles associated with S. aureus infections as well as characteristics of the evolving S. aureus and MRSA epidemic were observed among various occupations (advance clinical practitioners, nurses, public health professionals, athletic trainers, and non-medical workers) as well as work locations (hospital, community, and non-clinical community). Overall, health care and related workers in community settings demonstrated disparities in knowledge regarding S. aureus and MRSA infections. They were also more likely to misperceive this growing threat. These findings provide support for focused educational interventions targeting community health care and related workers to improve awareness of staphylococcal infections in order to successfully address and combat this evolving epidemic.

  18. Nutritional care of Danish medical inpatients: Effect on dietary intake and the occupational groups' perspectives of intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jensen Lillian

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many patients do not eat and drink sufficiently during hospitalisation. The clinical consequences of this under nutrition include lassitude, an increased risk of complications and prolonged convalescence. The aim of the study was 1 to introduce intervention targeting nutritional care for medical inpatients, 2 to investigate the effect of this intervention, and 3 to investigate the occupational groups' attitudes towards nutritional intervention and nutritional care in general. Methods The design was to determinate the extent to which the protein and energy requirements of medical inpatients were met before and after intervention. Dietary protein and energy intakes were assessed by 72-hour weighed food records. A total number of 108 medical patients at four bed sections and occupational groups in the two intervention bed sections, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark participated. The intervention included introduction and implementation of nursing procedures targeting nutritional care during a five-month investigation period using standard food produced at the hospital. The effect of intervention for independent groups of patients were tested by one-way analysis of variance. After the intervention occupational groups were interviewed in focus groups. Results Before the intervention hospital food on average met 72% of the patients' protein requirement and 85% of their energy requirement. After intervention hospital food satisfied 85% of the protein and 103% of the energy requirements of 14 patients in one intervention section and 56% of the protein and 76% of the energy requirement of 17 patients in the other intervention section. Hospital food satisfied 61% of the protein and 75% of the energy requirement in a total of 29 controls. From the occupational groups' point of view lack of time, lack of access to food, and lack of knowledge of nutritional care for patients were identified as barriers to better integration of

  19. Evaluation of an inpatient fall risk screening tool to identify the most critical fall risk factors in inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Wen-Hsuan; Kang, Chun-Mei; Ho, Mu-Hsing; Kuo, Jessie Ming-Chuan; Chen, Hsiao-Lien; Chang, Wen-Yin

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of the inpatient fall risk screening tool and to identify the most critical fall risk factors in inpatients. Variations exist in several screening tools applied in acute care hospitals for examining risk factors for falls and identifying high-risk inpatients. Secondary data analysis. A subset of inpatient data for the period from June 2011-June 2014 was extracted from the nursing information system and adverse event reporting system of an 818-bed teaching medical centre in Taipei. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics, receiver operating characteristic curve analysis and logistic regression analysis. During the study period, 205 fallers and 37,232 nonfallers were identified. The results revealed that the inpatient fall risk screening tool (cut-off point of ≥3) had a low sensitivity level (60%), satisfactory specificity (87%), a positive predictive value of 2·0% and a negative predictive value of 99%. The receiver operating characteristic curve analysis revealed an area under the curve of 0·805 (sensitivity, 71·8%; specificity, 78%). To increase the sensitivity values, the Youden index suggests at least 1·5 points to be the most suitable cut-off point for the inpatient fall risk screening tool. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed a considerably increased fall risk in patients with impaired balance and impaired elimination. The fall risk factor was also significantly associated with days of hospital stay and with admission to surgical wards. The findings can raise awareness about the two most critical risk factors for falls among future clinical nurses and other healthcare professionals and thus facilitate the development of fall prevention interventions. This study highlights the needs for redefining the cut-off points of the inpatient fall risk screening tool to effectively identify inpatients at a high risk of falls. Furthermore, inpatients with impaired balance and impaired elimination should be closely

  20. Clinical Characteristics and Precipitating Factors of Adolescent Suicide Attempters Admitted for Psychiatric Inpatient Care in South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Subin; Kim, Jae-Won; Kim, Bung-Nyun; Bae, Jeong-Hoon; Shin, Min-Sup; Yoo, Hee-Jeong

    2015-01-01

    Objective We aimed to examine the rates, correlates, methods, and precipitating factors of suicide attempts among adolescent patients admitted for psychiatric inpatient care from 1999 to 2010 in a university hospital in Korea. Methods The subjects consisted of 728 patients who were admitted for psychiatric inpatient care in a university hospital over a 12-year period and who were aged 10-19 years at the time of admission. We retrospectively investigated the information on suicidal behaviors and other clinical information by reviewing the subjects' electronic medical records. Whether these patients had completed their suicide on 31 December 2010 was determined by a link to the database of the National Statistical Office. Results Among 728 subjects, 21.7% had suicidal ideation at admission, and 10.7% admitted for suicidal attempts. Female gender, divorced/widowed parents, and the presence of mood disorders were associated with a significantly increased likelihood of suicide attempts. Most common method of suicide attempts was cutting, and most common reason for suicide attempts was relationship problems within the primary support group. A diagnosis of schizophrenia was associated with increased risk of death by suicide after discharge. Conclusion These results highlight the role of specific psychosocial factor (e.g., relational problems) and psychiatric disorders (e.g., mood disorders) in the suicide attempts of Korean adolescents, and the need for effective prevention strategies for adolescents at risk for suicide. PMID:25670943