WorldWideScience

Sample records for inosine

  1. Rapid synthesis of triazine inhibitors of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, William J; Guo, Junqing; Dhar, T G Murali; Shen, Zhongqi; Gu, Henry H; Watterson, Scott H; Bednarz, Mark S; Chen, Bang Chi; Barrish, Joel C; Bassolino, Donna; Cheney, Daniel; Fleener, Catherine A; Rouleau, Katherine A; Hollenbaugh, Diane L; Iwanowicz, Edwin J

    2002-08-19

    A series of novel triazine-based small molecule inhibitors (IV) of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase was prepared. The synthesis and the structure-activity relationships (SAR) derived from in vitro studies are described.

  2. Novel amide-based inhibitors of inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watterson, Scott H; Liu, Chunjian; Dhar, T G Murali; Gu, Henry H; Pitts, William J; Barrish, Joel C; Fleener, Catherine A; Rouleau, Katherine; Sherbina, N Z; Hollenbaugh, Diane L; Iwanowicz, Edwin J

    2002-10-21

    A series of novel amide-based small molecule inhibitors of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) was explored. The synthesis and the structure-activity relationships (SARs) derived from in vitro studies are described.

  3. Novel guanidine-based inhibitors of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanowicz, Edwin J; Watterson, Scott H; Liu, Chunjian; Gu, Henry H; Mitt, Toomas; Leftheris, Katerina; Barrish, Joel C; Fleener, Catherine A; Rouleau, Katherine; Sherbina, N Z; Hollenbaugh, Diane L

    2002-10-21

    A series of novel guanidine-based small molecule inhibitors of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) was explored. IMPDH catalyzes the rate determining step in guanine nucleotide biosynthesis and is a target for anticancer, immunosuppressive and antiviral therapy. The synthesis and the structure-activity relationships (SARs), derived from in vitro studies, for this new series of inhibitors is given.

  4. [Immunological and clinical study on therapeutic efficacy of inosine pranobex].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gołebiowska-Wawrzyniak, Maria; Markiewicz, Katarzyna; Kozar, Agata; Derentowicz, Piotr; Czerwińska-Kartowicz, Iwona; Jastrzebska-Janas, Krystyna; Wacławek, Jolanta; Wawrzyniak, Zbigniew M; Siwińska-Gołebiowska, Henryka

    2005-09-01

    Many studies in vitro and in vivo have shown immunomodulating and antiviral activities of inosine pranobex. The object of this research was to examine the potential beneficial effects of inosine pranobex (Groprinosin) on immune system in children with cellular immunodeficiency as a prophylaxis of recurrent infections, mainly of viral origin. 50 mg/kg b.w/day of inosine pranobex in divided doses was given to the group of 30 children aged 3-15 years for 10 days in 3 following months. Clinical and immunological investigations were done before and after the treatment. Statistically significant rise of CD3T lymphocytes number (p = 0.02) and in this CD4T lymphocytes number (p = 0.02) as well as statistically significant improvement of their function (p = 0.005) evaluated with blastic transformation method were found. These laboratory findings were parallel to clinical benefits. Control study was performed in the group of children completed by randomization and treated in the same way with garlic (Alliofil).

  5. Inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase messenger RNA expression is correlated to clinical outcomes in mycophenolate mofetil-treated kidney transplant patients, whereas inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase activity is not

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sombogaard, Ferdi; Peeters, Annemiek M. A.; Baan, Carla C.; Mathot, Ron A. A.; Quaedackers, Monique E.; Vulto, Arnold G.; Weimar, Willem; van Gelder, Teun

    2009-01-01

    Measurement of the pharmacodynamic biomarker inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) activity in renal transplant recipients has been proposed to reflect the biological effect better than using pharmacokinetic parameters to monitor mycophenolate mofetil therapy. The IMPDH assays are however

  6. Structure of the orthorhombic form of human inosine triphosphate pyrophosphatase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porta, Jason; Kolar, Carol; Kozmin, Stanislav G.; Pavlov, Youri I.; Borgstahl, Gloria E. O.

    2006-01-01

    X-ray crystallographic analysis of human inosine triphosphate pyrophosphohydrolase provided the secondary structure and active-site structure at 1.6 Å resolution in an orthorhombic crystal form. The structure gives a framework for future structure–function studies employing site-directed mutagenesis and for the identification of substrate/product-binding sites. The structure of human inosine triphosphate pyrophosphohydrolase (ITPA) has been determined using diffraction data to 1.6 Å resolution. ITPA contributes to the accurate replication of DNA by cleansing cellular dNTP pools of mutagenic nucleotide purine analogs such as dITP or dXTP. A similar high-resolution unpublished structure has been deposited in the Protein Data Bank from a monoclinic and pseudo-merohedrally twinned crystal. Here, cocrystallization of ITPA with a molar ratio of XTP appears to have improved the crystals by eliminating twinning and resulted in an orthorhombic space group. However, there was no evidence for bound XTP in the structure. Comparison with substrate-bound NTPase from a thermophilic organism predicts the movement of residues within helix α1, the loop before α6 and helix α7 to cap off the active site when substrate is bound

  7. Signaling pathways underlying the antidepressant-like effect of inosine in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Filipe Marques; Neis, Vivian Binder; Rieger, Débora Kurrle; Lopes, Mark William; Heinrich, Isabella A; Costa, Ana Paula; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S; Kaster, Manuella P; Leal, Rodrigo Bainy

    2017-06-01

    Inosine is a purine nucleoside formed by the breakdown of adenosine that elicits an antidepressant-like effect in mice through activation of adenosine A 1 and A 2A receptors. However, the signaling pathways underlying this effect are largely unknown. To address this issue, the present study investigated the influence of extracellular-regulated protein kinase (ERK)1/2, Ca 2+ /calmoduline-dependent protein kinase (CaMKII), protein kinase A (PKA), phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt, and glycogen synthase kinase 3beta (GSK-3β) modulation in the antiimmobility effect of inosine in the tail suspension test (TST) in mice. In addition, we attempted to verify if inosine treatment was capable of altering the immunocontent and phosphorylation of the transcription factor cyclic adenosine monophosphatate (cAMP) response-binding element protein (CREB) in mouse prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. Intracerebroventricular administration of U0126 (5 μg/mouse, MEK1/2 inhibitor), KN-62 (1 μg/mouse, CaMKII inhibitor), H-89 (1 μg/mouse, PKA inhibitor), and wortmannin (0.1 μg/mouse, PI3K inhibitor) prevented the antiimmobility effect of inosine (10 mg/kg, intraperitoneal (i.p.)) in the TST. Also, administration of a sub-effective dose of inosine (0.1 mg/kg, i.p.) in combination with a sub-effective dose of AR-A014418 (0.001 μg/mouse, GSK-3β inhibitor) induced a synergic antidepressant-like effect. None of the treatments altered locomotor activity of mice. Moreover, 24 h after a single administration of inosine (10 mg/kg, i.p.), CREB phosphorylation was increased in the hippocampus. Our findings provided new evidence that the antidepressant-like effect of inosine in the TST involves the activation of PKA, PI3K/Akt, ERK1/2, and CaMKII and the inhibition of GSK-3β. These results contribute to the comprehension of the mechanisms underlying the purinergic system modulation and indicate the intracellular signaling pathways involved in the antidepressant-like effect of inosine

  8. Diphosphoglycerate and Inosine Hexaphosphate Control of Oxygen Binding by Hemoglobin: A Theoretical Interpretation of Experimental Data*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Gilbert N.

    1970-01-01

    A theoretical equation is presented for the control of cooperative adsorption on proteins and other linear macromolecules by hormones, drugs, ATP, and other „cardinal adsorbents.” With reasonable accuracy, this equation describes quantitatively the control of oxygen binding to hemoglobin by 2,3-diphosphoglycerate and by inosine hexaphosphate. PMID:5272319

  9. 3-cyanoindole-based inhibitors of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase: synthesis and initial structure-activity relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, T G Murali; Shen, Zhongqi; Gu, Henry H; Chen, Ping; Norris, Derek; Watterson, Scott H; Ballentine, Shelley K; Fleener, Catherine A; Rouleau, Katherine A; Barrish, Joel C; Townsend, Robert; Hollenbaugh, Diane L; Iwanowicz, Edwin J

    2003-10-20

    A series of novel small molecule inhibitors of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH), based upon a 3-cyanoindole core, were explored. IMPDH catalyzes the rate determining step in guanine nucleotide biosynthesis and is a target for anticancer, immunosuppressive and antiviral therapy. The synthesis and the structure-activity relationships (SAR), derived from in vitro studies, for this new series of inhibitors is given.

  10. A survey of cyclic replacements for the central diamide moiety of inhibitors of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, T G Murali; Liu, Chunjian; Pitts, William J; Guo, Junquing; Watterson, Scott H; Gu, Henry; Fleener, Catherine A; Rouleau, Katherine; Sherbina, N Z; Barrish, Joel C; Hollenbaugh, Diane; Iwanowicz, Edwin J

    2002-11-04

    A series of heterocyclic replacements for the central diamide moiety of 1, a potent small molecule inhibitor of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) were explored The synthesis and the structure-activity relationships (SARs), derived from in vitro studies, for these new series of inhibitors is given.

  11. Efficacy of inosine pranobex in frequently ill children with chronic Epstein–Barr virus infection: randomized study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.N. Simovanyan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available High incidence of acute respiratory infections (ARI in immunocompromised frequently ill children with chronic Epstein–Barr infection forces the prescription of drugs with complex antivirus and immunocorrecting effect. The objective: to study the efficacy of inosine pranobex (Isoprinosine in treatment of active Epstein–Barr virus infection in frequently ill children. Methods: patients were randomized in group of standard treatment (n = 24 and standard treatment + inosine pranobex 50 mg/kg of body weight divided to 3–4 parts daily (3 courses of 10 days every other 10 days. Primary efficacy criterion was the incidence of ARI episodes during 12 months of observation. Results: the treatment with inosine pranobex resulted in decrease of incidence (4 and 25% and duration of ARI (5.6 ± 1.2 and 8.8 ± 3.3 days compared to standard treatment. Besides, inosine pranobex decreased the frequency of lymphoproliferation, arthralgic and cardiac syndromes, favored to rapid elimination of serologic markers of Epstein–Barr virus replication and normalization of blood concentrations of interferon _ and interleukine 4. Side effects of treatment with inosine pranobex were not registered. Conclusion: inosine pranobex is efficient and safe drug in treatment of active form of chronic Epstein–Barr virus infection in frequently ill children.Key words: frequently ill children, Epstein–Barr virus, inosine pranobex, treatment.

  12. CLINICAL AND IMMUNOLOGICAL EFFICACY OF INOSINE PRANOBEX FOR ACUTE RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS IN CHILDREN WITH ATOPIC ASTHMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A. Bulgakova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence rate of atopic asthma in children remains high. One of the reasons for lack of control over asthma symptoms is repeated infection. The article describes results from the study of immunomodulating medication inosine pranobex used in treatment of acute respiratory infections in children with atopic asthma. The results obtained prove the efficacy and safety of this medication. The use of this immunomodifier with antiviral activity during the period of acute respiratory infection in children with atopic asthma contributes to shortening of intoxication and catarrhal signs duration, elimination of viral agents. Key words: asthma, acute respiratory infections, immunomodifiers, inosine pranobex, children. (Pediatric Pharmacology. – 2010; 7(3:98-105

  13. Therapeutic efficacy of inosine against radiation-induced damage at cellular, biochemical and chromosomal levels in swiss albino mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Shamy, E.; Sallam, M. H.

    2010-01-01

    Inosine has been used for treatment of various diseases and disorders in medicine. Modulator effect of inosine against γ radiation-induced histological alterations in testis, reduced glutathione (GSH), lipid peroxidation (LPO), acid and alkaline phosphatases activities (AP and ALP) and chromosomal aberrations (CA) in mice was studied at various experimental intervals between 1 and 30 days. Mice exposed to 8 Gy γ-rays showed acute radiation sickness including marked testis histological changes and chromosomal aberrations (CA) in bone marrow cells with 100 % mortality within 22 days. When inosine was given orally at a dose of 80 mg/ kg body wt for 15 consecutive days after exposure to γ-rays, death in radiation + inosine group was reduced to 70 % at 30 days. The radiation - dose reduction factor (DRF) was 1.43. There was significantly lesser degree of damage to testis tissue architecture and various cell populations including spermatogonia, spermatids and leydig cells. Correspondingly, a significant decrease in the LPO and increase in the GSH levels were observed in testis of radiation + inosine group. Similarly, a significant decrease in level of AP and increase in level of ALP were observed. Inosine treatment significantly prevented γ-rays-induced CA frequency in bone marrow cells.

  14. Secondary deuterium isotope effects for acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of inosine and adenosine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, R.; Stein, R.; Bull, H.G.; Cordes, E.H.

    1978-01-01

    Kinetic α deuterium isotope effects have been measured for acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of inosine and adenosine. For inosine hydrolysis, values of k/sub H/k/sub D/ follow: in 1.0 M HCl, 1.21 and 1.20 at 25 and 50 0 C, respectively; in 0.1 M HCl, 1.19 and 1.18 at 25 and 50 0 C, respectively. For adenosine hydrolysis, k/sub H/k/sub D/ is 1.23 in 0.1 M HCl at 25 0 C. The values require that the transition states for hydrolysis of both the monocation and dication of inosine and the dication of adenosine have marked oxocarbonium ion character. Detailed mechanisms which accord with this and other experimental observations include (1) a classical Al mechanism in which the C--N bond is largely cleaved in the transition state; (2) a mechanism involving some form of nucleophilic participation by solvent in which bond cleavage is advanced relative to bond formation in the transition state; or (3) complete C--N bond cleavage with rate-determining diffusion apart of oxocarbonium ion and purine base. 53 references, 1 figure, 2 tables

  15. Extended-gate field-effect transistor (EG-FET) with molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) film for selective inosine determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskierko, Zofia; Sosnowska, Marta; Sharma, Piyush Sindhu; Benincori, Tiziana; D'Souza, Francis; Kaminska, Izabela; Fronc, Krzysztof; Noworyta, Krzysztof

    2015-12-15

    A novel recognition unit of chemical sensor for selective determination of the inosine, renal disfunction biomarker, was devised and prepared. For that purpose, inosine-templated molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) film was deposited on an extended-gate field-effect transistor (EG-FET) signal transducing unit. The MIP film was prepared by electrochemical polymerization of bis(bithiophene) derivatives bearing cytosine and boronic acid substituents, in the presence of the inosine template and a thiophene cross-linker. After MIP film deposition, the template was removed, and was confirmed by UV-visible spectroscopy. Subsequently, the film composition was characterized by spectroscopic techniques, and its morphology and thickness were determined by AFM. The finally MIP film-coated extended-gate field-effect transistor (EG-FET) was used for signal transduction. This combination is not widely studied in the literature, despite the fact that it allows for facile integration of electrodeposited MIP film with FET transducer. The linear dynamic concentration range of the chemosensor was 0.5-50 μM with inosine detectability of 0.62 μM. The obtained detectability compares well to the levels of the inosine in body fluids which are in the range 0-2.9 µM for patients with diagnosed diabetic nephropathy, gout or hyperuricemia, and can reach 25 µM in certain cases. The imprinting factor for inosine, determined from piezomicrogravimetric experiments with use of the MIP film-coated quartz crystal resonator, was found to be 5.5. Higher selectivity for inosine with respect to common interferents was also achieved with the present molecularly engineered sensing element. The obtained analytical parameters of the devised chemosensor allow for its use for practical sample measurements. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Regulatory factors governing adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, HuiQi; Lin, Jaymie Siqi; Chen, Leilei

    2015-03-31

    Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing, the most prevalent mode of transcript modification in higher eukaryotes, is catalysed by the adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs). A-to-I editing imposes an additional layer of gene regulation as it dictates various aspects of RNA metabolism, including RNA folding, processing, localization and degradation. Furthermore, editing events in exonic regions contribute to proteome diversity as translational machinery decodes inosine as guanosine. Although it has been demonstrated that dysregulated A-to-I editing contributes to various diseases, the precise regulatory mechanisms governing this critical cellular process have yet to be fully elucidated. However, integration of previous studies revealed that regulation of A-to-I editing is multifaceted, weaving an intricate network of auto- and transregulations, including the involvement of virus-originated factors like adenovirus-associated RNA. Taken together, it is apparent that tipping of any regulatory components will have profound effects on A-to-I editing, which in turn contributes to both normal and aberrant physiological conditions. A complete understanding of this intricate regulatory network may ultimately be translated into new therapeutic strategies against diseases driven by perturbed RNA editing events. Herein, we review the current state of knowledge on the regulatory mechanisms governing A-to-I editing and propose the role of other co-factors that may be involved in this complex regulatory process.

  17. A rapid and simple chemiluminescence method for screening levels of inosine and hypoxanthine in non-traumatic chest pain patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farthing, Don E; Sica, Domenic; Hindle, Michael; Edinboro, Les; Xi, Lei; Gehr, Todd W B; Gehr, Lynne; Farthing, Christine A; Larus, Terri L; Fakhry, Itaf; Karnes, H Thomas

    2011-01-01

    A rapid and simple chemiluminescence method was developed for detection of inosine and hypoxanthine in human plasma. The method utilized a microplate luminometer with direct injectors to automatically dispense reagents during sample analysis. Enzymatic conversions of inosine to hypoxanthine, followed by hypoxanthine to xanthine to uric acid, generated superoxide anion radicals as a useful metabolic by-product. The free radicals react with Pholasin(®) , a sensitive photoprotein used for chemiluminescence detection, to produce measurable blue-green light. The use of Pholasin(®) and a chemiluminescence signal enhancer, Adjuvant-K™, eliminated the need for plasma clean-up steps prior to analysis. The method used 20 μL of heparinized plasma, with complete analysis of total hypoxanthine levels (inosine is metabolized to hypoxanthine using purine nucleoside phosphorylase) in approximately 3.7 min. The rapid chemiluminescence method demonstrated the capability of differentiating total hypoxanthine levels between healthy individuals, and patients presenting with non-traumatic chest pain and potential acute cardiac ischemia. The results support the potential use of chemiluminescence methodology as a diagnostic tool to rapidly screen for elevated levels of inosine and hypoxanthine in human plasma, potential biomarkers of acute cardiac ischemia. Copyright © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Inhibitors of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase: SARs about the N-[3-Methoxy-4-(5-oxazolyl)phenyl moiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanowicz, Edwin J; Watterson, Scott H; Guo, Junqing; Pitts, William J; Murali Dhar, T G; Shen, Zhongqi; Chen, Ping; Gu, Henry H; Fleener, Catherine A; Rouleau, Katherine A; Cheney, Daniel L; Townsend, Robert M; Hollenbaugh, Diane L

    2003-06-16

    The first reported structure-activity relationships (SARs) about the N-[3-methoxy-4-(5-oxazolyl)phenyl moiety for a series of recently disclosed inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) inhibitors are described. The syntheses and in vitro inhibitory values for IMPDH II, and T-cell proliferation (for select analogues) are given.

  19. Inosine Released from Dying or Dead Cells Stimulates Cell Proliferation via Adenosine Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Zhao

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionMany antitumor therapies induce apoptotic cell death in order to cause tumor regression. Paradoxically, apoptotic cells are also known to promote wound healing, cell proliferation, and tumor cell repopulation in multicellular organisms. We aimed to characterize the nature of the regenerative signals concentrated in the micromilieu of dead and dying cells.MethodsCultures of viable melanoma B16F10 cells, mouse fibroblasts, and primary human fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS in the presence of dead and dying cells, their supernatants (SNs, or purified agonists and antagonists were used to evaluate the stimulation of proliferation. Viable cell quantification was performed by either flow cytometry of harvested cells or by crystal violet staining of adherent cells. High-performance liquid chromatography and liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry of cell SNs were deployed to identify the nature of growth-promoting factors. Coimplantation of living cells in the presence of SNs collected from dead and dying cells and specific agonists was used to evaluate tumor growth in vivo.ResultsThe stimulation of proliferation of few surviving cells by bystander dead cells was confirmed for melanoma cells, mouse fibroblasts, and primary FLS. We found that small soluble molecules present in the protein-free fraction of SNs of dead and dying cells were responsible for the promotion of proliferation. The nucleoside inosine released by dead and dying cells acting via adenosine receptors was identified as putative inducer of proliferation of surviving tumor cells after irradiation and heat treatment.ConclusionInosine released by dead and dying cells mediates tumor cell proliferation via purinergic receptors. Therapeutic strategies surmounting this pathway may help to reduce the rate of recurrence after radio- and chemotherapy.

  20. Inhibiting Inosine Hydrolase and Alanine Racemase to Enhance the Germination of Bacillus anthracis Sterne Spores: Potential Spore Decontamination Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-19

    decontamination strategies>> Maryline DEFEZ 1𔃼, Melissa HUNTER3J Susan WELKOS :~J Christopher COTE3 1 University Grenoble-Alpes, Grenoble, France. 1...inosine hydrolase and alanine racemase to enhance the germination of Bacillus anthracis Sterne spores potential spore decontamination strategies 5a...8217 • Accidentally in Humans • Natural reservoir is soil • Anthrax Disease Cycle: - animals infected by soilborne spores in food and water or bites from certain

  1. Inosine-5'-monophosphate is a candidate agent to resolve rigor mortis of skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuishi, Masanori; Tsuji, Mariko; Yamaguchi, Megumi; Kitamura, Natsumi; Tanaka, Sachi; Nakamura, Yukinobu; Okitani, Akihiro

    2016-11-01

    The object of the present study was to reveal the action of inosine-5'-monophosphate (IMP) toward myofibrils in postmortem muscles. IMP solubilized isolated actomyosin within a narrow range of KCl concentration, 0.19-0.20 mol/L, because of the dissociation of actomyosin into actin and myosin, but it did not solubilize the proteins in myofibrils with 0.2 mol/L KCl. However, IMP could solubilize both proteins in myofibrils with 0.2 mol/L KCl in the presence of 1 m mol/L pyrophosphate or 1.0-3.3 m mol/L adenosine-5'-diphosphate (ADP). Thus, we presumed that pyrophosphate and ADP released thin filaments composed of actin, and thick filaments composed of myosin from restraints of myofibrils, and then both filaments were solubilized through the IMP-induced dissociation of actomyosin. Thus, we concluded that IMP is a candidate agent to resolve rigor mortis because of its ability to break the association between thick and thin filaments. © 2016 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  2. Interleukin28B and inosine triphosphatase help to personalize hepatitis C treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yasuhito

    2011-01-01

    In the therapy using a combination of pegylated interferon-α and ribavirin (PEG-IFN/RBV) for chronic hepatitis C (CHC), approximately 50% of CHC patients infected with high viremia of HCV genotype 1 reached sustained viral response. The recent discovery revealed by a genome-wide association study technology provides the unexpected role of IL28B and inosine triphosphatase (ITPA) in HCV infection. The former single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) around the IL28B gene could improve the diagnostics on the prediction of spontaneous clearance and the response to anti-HCV treatment, suggesting that these findings could be strong evidence to enhance the development of a novel therapeutic strategy and the basic study of IFN-λs. Interestingly, the discovered IL28B SNPs revealed the enigma that the viral clearance rate was dependent on ethnicity. The latter functional SNP in ITPA locus was the most significant SNP associated with RBV-induced anemia as well as IFN-induced thrombocytopenia. Note that severe Hb decline, which is mainly found in ITPA-CC patients, was inversely correlated with platelet reduction, contributing to an association between severe anemia and relative reactive increase in platelet count. These data may provide a valuable pharmacogenetic diagnostic tool for tailoring PEG-IFN/RBV dosing to minimize drug-induced adverse events and for further optimization of clinical anti-HCV chemotherapeutics. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Hit discovery of Mycobacterium tuberculosis inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase, GuaB2, inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Niteshkumar U; Singh, Vinayak; Ferraris, Davide M; Rizzi, Menico; Kharkar, Prashant S

    2018-04-18

    Tuberculosis remains a global concern. There is an urgent need of newer antitubercular drugs due to the development of resistant forms of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH), guaB2, of Mtb, required for guanine nucleotide biosynthesis, is an attractive target for drug development. In this study, we screened a focused library of 73 drug-like molecules with desirable calculated/predicted physicochemical properties, for growth inhibitory activity against drug-sensitive MtbH37Rv. The eight hits and mycophenolic acid, a prototype IMPDH inhibitor, were further evaluated for activity on purified Mtb-GuaB2 enzyme, target selectivity using a conditional knockdown mutant of guaB2 in Mtb, followed by cross-resistance to IMPDH inhibitor-resistant SRMV2.6 strain of Mtb, and activity on human IMPDH2 isoform. One of the hits, 13, a 5-amidophthalide derivative, has shown growth inhibitory potential and target specificity against the Mtb-GuaB2 enzyme. The hit, 13, is a promising molecule with potential for further development as an antitubercular agent. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Different characteristics and nucleotide binding properties of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH isoforms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine C Thomas

    Full Text Available We recently reported that Inosine Monophosphate Dehydrogenase (IMPDH, a rate-limiting enzyme in de novo guanine nucleotide biosynthesis, clustered into macrostructures in response to decreased nucleotide levels and that there were differences between the IMPDH isoforms, IMPDH1 and IMPDH2. We hypothesised that the Bateman domains, which are present in both isoforms and serve as energy-sensing/allosteric modules in unrelated proteins, would contribute to isoform-specific differences and that mutations situated in and around this domain in IMPDH1 which give rise to retinitis pigmentosa (RP would compromise regulation. We employed immuno-electron microscopy to investigate the ultrastructure of IMPDH macrostructures and live-cell imaging to follow clustering of an IMPDH2-GFP chimera in real-time. Using a series of IMPDH1/IMPDH2 chimera we demonstrated that the propensity to cluster was conferred by the N-terminal 244 amino acids, which includes the Bateman domain. A protease protection assay suggested isoform-specific purine nucleotide binding characteristics, with ATP protecting IMPDH1 and AMP protecting IMPDH2, via a mechanism involving conformational changes upon nucleotide binding to the Bateman domain without affecting IMPDH catalytic activity. ATP binding to IMPDH1 was confirmed in a nucleotide binding assay. The RP-causing mutation, R224P, abolished ATP binding and nucleotide protection and this correlated with an altered propensity to cluster. Collectively these data demonstrate that (i the isoforms are differentially regulated by AMP and ATP by a mechanism involving the Bateman domain, (ii communication occurs between the Bateman and catalytic domains and (iii the RP-causing mutations compromise such regulation. These findings support the idea that the IMPDH isoforms are subject to distinct regulation and that regulatory defects contribute to human disease.

  5. The pentose moiety of adenosine and inosine is an important energy source for the fermented-meat starter culture Lactobacillus sakei CTC 494.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimaux, T; Vrancken, G; Vuylsteke, B; De Vuyst, L; Leroy, F

    2011-09-01

    The genome sequence of Lactobacillus sakei 23K has revealed that the species L. sakei harbors several genes involved in the catabolism of energy sources other than glucose in meat, such as glycerol, arginine, and nucleosides. In this study, a screening of 15 L. sakei strains revealed that arginine, inosine, and adenosine could be used as energy sources by all strains. However, no glycerol catabolism occurred in any of the L. sakei strains tested. A detailed kinetic analysis of inosine and adenosine catabolism in the presence of arginine by L. sakei CTC 494, a fermented-meat starter culture, was performed. It showed that nucleoside catabolism occurred as a mixed-acid fermentation in a pH range (pH 5.0 to 6.5) relevant for sausage fermentation. This resulted in the production of a mixture of acetic acid, formic acid, and ethanol from ribose, while the nucleobase (hypoxanthine and adenine in the case of fermentations with inosine and adenosine, respectively) was excreted into the medium stoichiometrically. This indicates that adenosine deaminase activity did not take place. The ratios of the different fermentation end products did not vary with environmental pH, except for the fermentation with inosine at pH 5.0, where lactic acid was produced too. In all cases, no other carbon-containing metabolites were found; carbon dioxide was derived only from arginine catabolism. Arginine was cometabolized in all cases and resulted in the production of both citrulline and ornithine. Based on these results, a pathway for inosine and adenosine catabolism in L. sakei CTC 494 was presented, whereby both nucleosides are directly converted into their nucleobase and ribose, the latter entering the heterolactate pathway. The present study revealed that the pentose moiety (ribose) of the nucleosides inosine and adenosine is an effective fermentable substrate for L. sakei. Thus, the ability to use these energy sources offers a competitive advantage for this species in a meat environment.

  6. CD38 Structure-Based Inhibitor Design Using the N1-Cyclic Inosine 5'-Diphosphate Ribose Template.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christelle Moreau

    Full Text Available Few inhibitors exist for CD38, a multifunctional enzyme catalyzing the formation and metabolism of the Ca(2+-mobilizing second messenger cyclic adenosine 5'-diphosphoribose (cADPR. Synthetic, non-hydrolyzable ligands can facilitate structure-based inhibitor design. Molecular docking was used to reproduce the crystallographic binding mode of cyclic inosine 5'-diphosphoribose (N1-cIDPR with CD38, revealing an exploitable pocket and predicting the potential to introduce an extra hydrogen bond interaction with Asp-155. The purine C-8 position of N1-cIDPR (IC50 276 µM was extended with an amino or diaminobutane group and the 8-modified compounds were evaluated against CD38-catalyzed cADPR hydrolysis. Crystallography of an 8-amino N1-cIDPR:CD38 complex confirmed the predicted interaction with Asp-155, together with a second H-bond from a realigned Glu-146, rationalizing the improved inhibition (IC50 56 µM. Crystallography of a complex of cyclic ADP-carbocyclic ribose (cADPcR, IC50 129 µM with CD38 illustrated that Glu-146 hydrogen bonds with the ligand N6-amino group. Both 8-amino N1-cIDPR and cADPcR bind deep in the active site reaching the catalytic residue Glu-226, and mimicking the likely location of cADPR during catalysis. Substantial overlap of the N1-cIDPR "northern" ribose monophosphate and the cADPcR carbocyclic ribose monophosphate regions suggests that this area is crucial for inhibitor design, leading to a new compound series of N1-inosine 5'-monophosphates (N1-IMPs. These small fragments inhibit hydrolysis of cADPR more efficiently than the parent cyclic compounds, with the best in the series demonstrating potent inhibition (IC50 = 7.6 µM. The lower molecular weight and relative simplicity of these compounds compared to cADPR make them attractive as a starting point for further inhibitor design.

  7. Effect of level of dietary protein on the distribution of 14C-activity from exogenous 14C-inosine in chicks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masushige, Shoichi; Tadokoro, Tadahiro; Suzuki, Takao; Nakajima, Hisao.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of dietary protein level on the metabolic fate of intraperitoneally administered (exogeneous) 8- 14 C-inosine in chicks was studied. Three different protein level diets (low, standard and high) were prepared. Chicks were fed on these diets for 10 days, respectively and the following results were found: (1) RNA content of liver, small intestine and muscle in chicks fed on a low protein diet was decreased as compared to other diet groups, but no difference was observed in kidney or pancreas. (2) 14 C uptake by organs from exogeneous 8- 14 C-inosine was determined. The uptake of 14 C in kidney, pancreas and small intestine was higher than that in liver and muscle. Moreover, the uptake by tissues in the low protein groups was significantly higher than that in either the standard or high protein groups, but no difference was observed between these latter two groups. (3) The rate of incorporation of 14 C labelled purine by acid soluble materials and RNA was higher in kidney, pancreas and small intestine than in liver and muscle, and also higher in chicks fed on a low protein diet than in either the standard or high protein groups. (4) It was revealed that the 14 C-labelled purine rings from 8- 14 C-inosine were incorporated into AMP and GMP as constituents of RNA. (author)

  8. Differential Sensitivities of Fast- and Slow-Cycling Cancer Cells to Inosine Monophosphate Dehydrogenase 2 Inhibition by Mycophenolic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kan; Cao, Wanlu; Li, Juan; Sprengers, Dave; Hernanda, Pratika Y; Kong, Xiangdong; van der Laan, Luc JW; Man, Kwan; Kwekkeboom, Jaap; Metselaar, Herold J; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P; Pan, Qiuwei

    2015-01-01

    As uncontrolled cell proliferation requires nucleotide biosynthesis, inhibiting enzymes that mediate nucleotide biosynthesis constitutes a rational approach to the management of oncological diseases. In practice, however, results of this strategy are mixed and thus elucidation of the mechanisms by which cancer cells evade the effect of nucleotide biosynthesis restriction is urgently needed. Here we explored the notion that intrinsic differences in cancer cell cycle velocity are important in the resistance toward inhibition of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) by mycophenolic acid (MPA). In short-term experiments, MPA treatment of fast-growing cancer cells effectively elicited G0/G1 arrest and provoked apoptosis, thus inhibiting cell proliferation and colony formation. Forced expression of a mutated IMPDH2, lacking a binding site for MPA but retaining enzymatic activity, resulted in complete resistance of cancer cells to MPA. In nude mice subcutaneously engrafted with HeLa cells, MPA moderately delayed tumor formation by inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis. Importantly, we developed a lentiviral vector–based Tet-on label-retaining system that enables to identify, isolate and functionally characterize slow-cycling or so-called label-retaining cells (LRCs) in vitro and in vivo. We surprisingly found the presence of LRCs in fast-growing tumors. LRCs were superior in colony formation, tumor initiation and resistance to MPA as compared with fast-cycling cells. Thus, the slow-cycling compartment of cancer seems predominantly responsible for resistance to MPA. PMID:26467706

  9. Experimental measurement and modelling of solubility of inosine-5′-monophosphate disodium in pure and mixed solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou, Fengxia; Zhuang, Wei; Wu, Jinglan; Zhou, Jingwei; Liu, Qiyan; Chen, Yong; Xie, Jingjing; Zhu, Chenjie; Guo, Ting; Ying, Hanjie

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Solubility of 5′-IMPNa 2 in various solvents was studied for the first time. • The solubility could be ranked as follows: water > methanol > ethanol > acetone. • Modified Apelblat equation gave the best correlating results. • Mixing Gibbs free energies, enthalpies, and entropies were predicted. • Solubility data and equations can optimise the crystallization conditions. - Abstract: The solubility of biological chemicals in solvents provide important fundamental data and is generally considered as an essential factor in the design of crystallization processes. The equilibrium solubility data of inosine-5′-monophosphate disodium (5′-IMPNa 2 ) in water, methanol, ethanol, acetone, as well as in the solvent mixtures (methanol + water, ethanol + water, acetone + water), were measured by an isothermal method at temperatures ranging from (293.15 to 313.15) K. The measured data in pure and mixed solvents were then modelled using the modified Apelblat equation, van’t Hoff equation, λh equation, ideal model and the Wilson model. The modified Apelblat equation showed the best modelling results, and it was therefore used to predict the mixing Gibbs free energies, enthalpies, and entropies of 5′-IMPNa 2 in pure and binary solvents. The positive values of the calculated partial molar Gibbs free energies indicated the variations in the solubility trends of 5′-IMPNa 2 . Water and ethanol (in the binary mixture with water) were found to be the most effective solvent and anti-solvent, respectively

  10. Effects of exogenous inosine monophosphate on growth performance, flavor compounds, enzyme activity, and gene expression of muscle tissues in chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Junshu; Liu, Peifeng; Xu, Liangmei; Huan, Hailin; Zhou, Weiren; Xu, Xiaoming; Shi, Zhendan

    2018-04-01

    The goal of this experiment was to examine effects of diets supplemented with exogenous inosine monophosphate (IMP) on the growth performance, flavor compounds, enzyme activity and gene expression of chicken. A total of 1,500 healthy, 1-day-old male 3-yellow chickens were used for a 52-d experimental period. Individuals were randomly divided into 5 groups (group I, II, III, IV, V) with 6 replicates per group, and fed a basal diet supplemented with 0.0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3% IMP, respectively. There was no significant response to the increasing dietary IMP level in average daily feed intake (ADFI), average daily gain (ADG), and feed:gain ratio (F/G) (P ≥ 0.05). IMP content of the breast and thigh muscle showed an exponential and linear response to the increasing dietary IMP level (P exogenous IMP was fed. There were significant effects of IMP level in diet on free amino acids (FAA) (exponential, linear and quadratic effect, P exogenous IMP was fed. Dietary IMP supplementation had a quadratic effect on 5΄-NT and the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) enzyme activity in the breast muscle (P exogenous IMP group had the highest (AMPD1) gene expression of the breast muscle and ATIC gene expression of the thigh muscle. These results indicate that dietary IMP did not affect the growth performance of chicken, the diet with 0.2 to 0.3% exogenous IMP is optimal to improve the meat flavor quality in chicken.

  11. Myricetin is a novel inhibitor of human inosine 5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase with anti-leukemia activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Huiling; Hu, Qian; Wang, Jingyuan; Liu, Zehui; Wu, Dang; Lu, Weiqiang; Huang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Human inosine 5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase (hIMPDH) is a rate-limiting enzyme in the de novo biosynthetic pathway of purine nucleotides, playing crucial roles in cellular proliferation, differentiation, and transformation. Dysregulation of hIMPDH expression and activity have been found in a variety of human cancers including leukemia. In this study, we found that myricetin, a naturally occurring phytochemical existed in berries, wine and tea, was a novel inhibitor of human type 1 and type 2 IMPDH (hIMPDH1/2) with IC_5_0 values of 6.98 ± 0.22 μM and 4.10 ± 0.14 μM, respectively. Enzyme kinetic analysis using Lineweaver-Burk plot revealed that myricetin is a mix-type inhibitor for hIMPDH1/2. Differential scanning fluorimetry and molecular docking simulation data demonstrate that myricetin is capable of binding with hIMPDH1/2. Myricetin treatment exerts potent anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects on K562 human leukemia cells in a dose-dependent manner. Importantly, cytotoxicity of myricetin on K562 cells were markedly attenuated by exogenous addition of guanosine, a salvage pathway of maintaining intracellular pool of guanine nucleotides. Taking together, these results indicate that natural product myricetin exhibits potent anti-leukemia activity by interfering with purine nucleotides biosynthetic pathway through the suppression of hIMPDH1/2 catalytic activity. - Highlights: • Myricetin, a common dietary flavonoid, is a novel inhibitor of hIMPDH1/2. • Myricetin directly binds with hIMPDH1/2 and induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of leukemia cells. • The cytotoxicity of myricetin on K562 cells is markedly attenuated by exogenous addition of guanosine.

  12. Myricetin is a novel inhibitor of human inosine 5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase with anti-leukemia activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Huiling; Hu, Qian; Wang, Jingyuan; Liu, Zehui; Wu, Dang [Shanghai Key Laboratory of New Drug Design, School of Pharmacy, East China University of Science and Technology, 130 Mei Long Road, Shanghai 200237 (China); Lu, Weiqiang, E-mail: wqlu@bio.ecnu.edu.cn [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Regulatory Biology, Institute of Biomedical Sciences and School of Life Sciences, East China Normal University, 500 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200241 (China); Huang, Jin, E-mail: huangjin@ecust.edu.cn [Shanghai Key Laboratory of New Drug Design, School of Pharmacy, East China University of Science and Technology, 130 Mei Long Road, Shanghai 200237 (China)

    2016-09-02

    Human inosine 5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase (hIMPDH) is a rate-limiting enzyme in the de novo biosynthetic pathway of purine nucleotides, playing crucial roles in cellular proliferation, differentiation, and transformation. Dysregulation of hIMPDH expression and activity have been found in a variety of human cancers including leukemia. In this study, we found that myricetin, a naturally occurring phytochemical existed in berries, wine and tea, was a novel inhibitor of human type 1 and type 2 IMPDH (hIMPDH1/2) with IC{sub 50} values of 6.98 ± 0.22 μM and 4.10 ± 0.14 μM, respectively. Enzyme kinetic analysis using Lineweaver-Burk plot revealed that myricetin is a mix-type inhibitor for hIMPDH1/2. Differential scanning fluorimetry and molecular docking simulation data demonstrate that myricetin is capable of binding with hIMPDH1/2. Myricetin treatment exerts potent anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects on K562 human leukemia cells in a dose-dependent manner. Importantly, cytotoxicity of myricetin on K562 cells were markedly attenuated by exogenous addition of guanosine, a salvage pathway of maintaining intracellular pool of guanine nucleotides. Taking together, these results indicate that natural product myricetin exhibits potent anti-leukemia activity by interfering with purine nucleotides biosynthetic pathway through the suppression of hIMPDH1/2 catalytic activity. - Highlights: • Myricetin, a common dietary flavonoid, is a novel inhibitor of hIMPDH1/2. • Myricetin directly binds with hIMPDH1/2 and induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of leukemia cells. • The cytotoxicity of myricetin on K562 cells is markedly attenuated by exogenous addition of guanosine.

  13. Effect of two non-synonymous ecto-5'-nucleotidase variants on the genetic architecture of inosine 5'-monophosphate (IMP) and its degradation products in Japanese Black beef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uemoto, Yoshinobu; Ohtake, Tsuyoshi; Sasago, Nanae; Takeda, Masayuki; Abe, Tsuyoshi; Sakuma, Hironori; Kojima, Takatoshi; Sasaki, Shinji

    2017-11-13

    Umami is a Japanese term for the fifth basic taste and is an important sensory property of beef palatability. Inosine 5'-monophosphate (IMP) contributes to umami taste in beef. Thus, the overall change in concentration of IMP and its degradation products can potentially affect the beef palatability. In this study, we investigated the genetic architecture of IMP and its degradation products in Japanese Black beef. First, we performed genome-wide association study (GWAS), candidate gene analysis, and functional analysis to detect the causal variants that affect IMP, inosine, and hypoxanthine. Second, we evaluated the allele frequencies in the different breeds, the contribution of genetic variance, and the effect on other economical traits using the detected variants. A total of 574 Japanese Black cattle were genotyped using the Illumina BovineSNP50 BeadChip and were then used for GWAS. The results of GWAS showed that the genome-wide significant single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on BTA9 were detected for IMP, inosine, and hypoxanthine. The ecto-5'-nucleotidase (NT5E) gene, which encodes the enzyme NT5E for the extracellular degradation of IMP to inosine, was located near the significant region on BTA9. The results of candidate gene analysis and functional analysis showed that two non-synonymous SNPs (c.1318C > T and c.1475 T > A) in NT5E affected the amount of IMP and its degradation products in beef by regulating the enzymatic activity of NT5E. The Q haplotype showed a positive effect on IMP and a negative effect on the enzymatic activity of NT5E in IMP degradation. The two SNPs were under perfect linkage disequilibrium in five different breeds, and different haplotype frequencies were seen among breeds. The two SNPs contribute to about half of the total genetic variance in IMP, and the results of genetic relationship between IMP and its degradation products showed that NT5E affected the overall concentration balance of IMP and its degradation products

  14. Targeting the immune system to fight cancer using chemical receptor homing vectors carrying Poly Inosine/Cytosine (PolyIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander eLevitzki

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Cancer researchers have been looking for ways to harness the immune system and to reinstate immune surveillance, to kill cancer cells without collateral damage. Here we scan current approaches to targeting the immune system against cancer, and emphasize our own approach. We are using chemical vectors attached to a specific ligand, to introduce synthetic dsRNA, poly Inosine/Cytosine (polyIC, into tumors. The ligand binds to a receptor protein that is overexpressed on the surface of the tumor cells. Upon ligand binding, the receptor complex is internalized, introducing the polyIC into the cell. In this fashion a large amount of synthetic dsRNA can be internalized, leading to the activation of dsRNA binding proteins, such as dsRNA dependent protein kinase (PKR, Toll-3 receptor (TLR3, retinoic acid–inducible gene I (RIG-1 and melanoma differentiation–associated gene 5 (MDA5. The simultaneous activation of these signaling proteins leads to the rapid demise of the targeted cell and to cytokine secretion. The cytokines lead to a strong bystander effect and to the recruitment of immune cells that converge upon the targeted cells. The bystander effects lead to the destruction of neighboring tumor cells not targeted themselves by the vector. Normal cells, being more robust than tumor cells, survive. This strategy has several advantages: (1 Recruitment of the immune system is localized to the tumor. (2 The response is rapid, leading to fast tumor eradication. (3 The bystander effects lead to the eradication of tumor cells not harboring the target. (4 The multiplicity of pro-death signaling pathways elicited by PolyIC minimizes the likelihood of the emergence of resistance. In this chapter we focus on EGFR as the targeted receptor, which is overexpressed in many tumors. In principle, the strategy can be extended to other tumors that overexpress a protein that can be internalized by a ligand, which be a small molecule, a single chain antibody or an

  15. Modulation of growth performance, immunological responses and disease resistance of juvenile Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus (Linnaeus, 1758 by supplementing dietary inosine monophosphate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Abdul Kader

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available This study was investigated to examine supplemental effects of dietary inosine monophosphate (IMP on growth performance, feed utilization, biochemical, hematological and immunological parameters of juvenile Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus. Disease resistance to experimental infection with Streptococcus agalactiae was also assessed. A semi-purified basal diet was supplemented with 0 (IMP0, Control, 1 (IMP1, 2 (IMP2, 4 (IMP4 and 8 (IMP8 g purified IMP kg−1 diet to formulate five experimental diets. Each diet was randomly allocated to triplicate groups of fish (0.59 g for 60 days. The results indicated that supplementation of IMP significantly (P  0.05. Among whole body proximate composition and somatic parameters, condition factor was significantly influenced by dietary supplementation of IMP. A wide variation in hematological parameters were observed and dietary supplementation increased the hematocrit content (P  0.05. Total serum protein (TSP, lysozyme activity (LA, superoxide dismutase activity (SOD and bactericidal activity (BA tended to increase with the supplementation of dietary IMP. TSP and SOD were significantly improved with ≥4 g kg−1 supplementation, while LA with 8 g kg−1 and BA with ≥1 g kg−1 supplementations. IMP supplemented groups showed higher (P > 0.05 cumulative survival compared to that of supplementation free control group. IMP supplemented diet groups also showed significantly higher BA in the post challenge test. Based on the overall performances, the results of the current study indicated that the inclusion of IMP in Nile tilapia diet can improve growth performance, feed utilization, haematological and immunological parameters; and disease resistance of juvenile Nile tilapia. Keywords: Nucleotides, Inosine monophosphate, Growth, Immunity, Disease resistance, Nile tilapia, Streptococcus agalactiae

  16. Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase and inosine 5’-monophosphate dehydrogenase activities in three mammalian species: aquatic (Mirounga angustirostris, semiaquatic (Lontra longicaudis annectens and terrestrial (Sus scrofa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myrna eBarjau Perez-Milicua

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Aquatic and semiaquatic mammals have the capacity of breath hold (apnea diving. Northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris have the ability to perform deep and long duration dives; during a routine dive, adults can hold their breath for 25 min. Neotropical river otters (Lontra longicaudis annectens can hold their breath for about 30 sec. Such periods of apnea may result in reduced oxygen concentration (hypoxia and reduced blood supply (ischemia to tissues. Production of adenosine 5’-triphosphate (ATP requires oxygen, and most mammalian species, like the domestic pig (Sus scrofa, are not adapted to tolerate hypoxia and ischemia, conditions that result in ATP degradation. The objective of this study was to explore the differences in purine synthesis and recycling in erythrocytes and plasma of three mammalian species adapted to different environments: aquatic (northern elephant seal (n=11, semiaquatic (neotropical river otter (n=4 and terrestrial (domestic pig (n=11. Enzymatic activity of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT was determined by spectrophotometry, and activity of inosine 5’-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH and the concentration of hypoxanthine (HX, inosine 5’-monophosphate (IMP, adenosine 5’-monophosphate (AMP, adenosine 5’-diphosphate (ADP, ATP, guanosine 5’-diphosphate (GDP, guanosine 5’-triphosphate (GTP, and xanthosine 5’-monophosphate (XMP were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. The activities of HGPRT and IMPDH and the concentration of HX, IMP, AMP, ADP, ATP, GTP and XMP in erythrocytes of domestic pigs were higher than in erythrocytes of northern elephant seals and river otters. These results suggest that under basal conditions (no diving, sleep apnea or exercise, aquatic and semiaquatic mammals have less purine mobilization than their terrestrial counterparts.

  17. Discovery of N-[2-[2-[[3-methoxy-4-(5-oxazolyl)phenyl]amino]-5-oxazolyl]phenyl]-N-methyl-4- morpholineacetamide as a novel and potent inhibitor of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase with excellent in vivo activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, T G Murali; Shen, Zhongqi; Guo, Junqing; Liu, Chunjian; Watterson, Scott H; Gu, Henry H; Pitts, William J; Fleener, Catherine A; Rouleau, Katherine A; Sherbina, N Z; McIntyre, Kim W; Shuster, David J; Witmer, Mark R; Tredup, Jeffrey A; Chen, Bang-Chi; Zhao, Rulin; Bednarz, Mark S; Cheney, Daniel L; MacMaster, John F; Miller, Laura M; Berry, Karen K; Harper, Timothy W; Barrish, Joel C; Hollenbaugh, Diane L; Iwanowicz, Edwin J

    2002-05-23

    Inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) is a key enzyme that is involved in the de novo synthesis of purine nucleotides. Novel 2-aminooxazoles were synthesized and tested for inhibition of IMPDH catalytic activity. Multiple analogues based on this chemotype were found to inhibit IMPDH with low nanomolar potency. One of the analogues (compound 23) showed excellent in vivo activity in the inhibition of antibody production in mice and in the adjuvant induced arthritis model in rats.

  18. Inosine triphosphatase allele frequency and association with ribavirin-induced anaemia in Brazilian patients receiving antiviral therapy for chronic hepatitis C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathália Delvaux

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Inosine triphosphatase (ITPA single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs are strongly associated with protection against ribavirin (RBV-induced anaemia in European, American and Asian patients; however, there is a paucity of data for Brazilian patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ITPA SNP (rs7270101/rs1127354 frequency in healthy and hepatitis C virus (HCV-infected patients from Brazil and the association with the development of severe anaemia during antiviral therapy. ITPA SNPs were determined in 200 HCV infected patients and 100 healthy individuals by sequencing. Biochemical parameters and haemoglobin (Hb levels were analysed in 97 patients who underwent antiviral therapy. A combination of AArs7270101+CCrs1127354 (100% ITPase activity was observed in 236/300 individuals. Anaemia was observed in 87.5% and 86.2% of treated patients with AA (rs7270101 and CC genotypes (rs1127354, respectively. Men with AA (rs7270101 showed a considerable reduction in Hb at week 12 compared to those with AC/CC (p = 0.1475. In women, there was no influence of genotype (p = 0.5295. For rs1127354, men with the CC genotype also showed a sudden reduction in Hb compared to those with AC. Allelic distribution of rs7270101 and rs1127354 shows high rates of the genotypes AA and CC, respectively, suggesting that the study population had a great propensity for developing RBV-induced anaemia. A progressive Hb reduction during treatment was observed; however, this reduction was greater in men at week 12 than in women.

  19. Inosine triphosphatase polymorphisms and ribavirin pharmacokinetics as determinants of ribavirin-associate anemia in patients receiving standard anti-HCV treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DʼAvolio, Antonio; Ciancio, Alessia; Siccardi, Marco; Smedile, Antonina; Baietto, Lorena; Simiele, Marco; Marucco, Diego Aguilar; Cariti, Giuseppe; Calcagno, Andrea; de Requena, Daniel Gonzalez; Sciandra, Mauro; Cusato, Jessica; Troshina, Giulia; Bonora, Stefano; Rizzetto, Mario; Di Perri, Giovanni

    2012-04-01

    Functional variants of inosine triphosphatase (ITPA) were recently found to protect against ribavirin (RBV)-induced hemolytic anemia. However, no definitive data are yet available on the role of plasma RBV concentrations on hemoglobin (Hb) decrement. Moreover, no data have been published on the possible interplay between these 2 factors. A retrospective analysis included 167 patients. The ITPA variants rs7270101 and rs1127354 were genotyped and tested using the χ test for association with Hb reduction at week 4. We also investigated, using multivariate logistic regression, the impact of RBV plasma exposure on Hb concentrations. Both single nucleotide polymorphisms were associated with Hb decrease. The carrier of at least 1 variant allele in the functional ITPA single nucleotide polymorphisms was associated with a lower decrement of Hb (-1.1 g/dL), as compared with patients without a variant allele (-2.75 g/dL; P = 4.09 × 10). RBV concentrations were not influenced by ITPA genotypes. A cut-off of 2.3 μg/mL of RBV was found to be associated with anemia (area-under-receiver operating characteristic = 0.630, sensitivity = 50.0%, and specificity = 69.5%, P = 0.008). In multivariate logistic regression analyses, the carrier of a variant allele (P = 0.005) and plasma RBV concentrations model based on ITPA genetic polymorphisms and RBV trough concentration was developed for predicting the risk of anemia. By relying upon these 2 variables, an individualized management of anemia seems to be feasible in recipients of pegylated interferon-RBV therapy.

  20. As to the clastogenic-, sister-chromatid exchange inducing-and cytotoxic activity of inosine triphosphate in cultures of human peripheral lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vormittag, W; Brannath, W

    2001-05-09

    The influence of commercial inosine triphosphate (ITP) on the chromosome aberration rate, the mitotic rate, sister-chromatid exchange (SCE) frequency, and the proportion of first (X1), second (X2) and third (X3) division metaphases was investigated in 72h cultures of human peripheral lymphocytes. The blood donors had mild inactive arthrosis and a normal health check-up. All cultures of each volunteer were set-up simultaneously. In contrast to a previous report [Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 278 (1990) 238-244], it was demonstrated in two preliminary studies (number of subjects, n=5 each) that ITP at a final concentration of 100 microM does not induce chromosomal aberrations and, furthermore, that not ITP concentrations higher than 100 microM but ITP doses higher than 3.8mM prohibit culture growth. Based on these results, cultures with a final ITP concentration of 3.6mM (max.) and 1.8mM (max./2) were compared with control cultures (number of subjects n=10; three males and seven females, mean age x=57.6 years). Whereas no increase in the chromosomal breakage rate was observed in cultures with an ITP concentration of 1.8mM and only a marginally significant one (P=0.048) for 3.6mM ITP cultures, a highly significant induction of SCEs, not only at an ITP concentration of 3.6mM (Prate from 0 to 1.8mM as well as from 1.8 to 3.6mM in the aberration studies (all P values are equal to smallest possible one for a sample size of 10, namely, 0.002), and in the SCE studies there is a significant decrease in the X3 frequency when ITP is increased (0-1.8mM: P=0.0061 and 1.8-3.6mM: Pchanges significantly only at the second dose step (0-1.8mM ITP: P=0.22 and 1.8-3.6mM ITP: P<0.0001). The results are discussed.

  1. Acridone-based inhibitors of inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase: discovery and SAR leading to the identification of N-(2-(6-(4-ethylpiperazin-1-yl)pyridin-3-yl)propan-2-yl)-2- fluoro-9-oxo-9,10-dihydroacridine-3-carboxamide (BMS-566419).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watterson, Scott H; Chen, Ping; Zhao, Yufen; Gu, Henry H; Dhar, T G Murali; Xiao, Zili; Ballentine, Shelley K; Shen, Zhongqi; Fleener, Catherine A; Rouleau, Katherine A; Obermeier, Mary; Yang, Zheng; McIntyre, Kim W; Shuster, David J; Witmer, Mark; Dambach, Donna; Chao, Sam; Mathur, Arvind; Chen, Bang-Chi; Barrish, Joel C; Robl, Jeffrey A; Townsend, Robert; Iwanowicz, Edwin J

    2007-07-26

    Inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH), a key enzyme in the de novo synthesis of guanosine nucleotides, catalyzes the irreversible nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide dependent oxidation of inosine-5'-monophosphate to xanthosine-5'-monophosphate. Mycophenolate Mofetil (MMF), a prodrug of mycophenolic acid, has clinical utility for the treatment of transplant rejection based on its inhibition of IMPDH. The overall clinical benefit of MMF is limited by what is generally believed to be compound-based, dose-limiting gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity that is related to its specific pharmacokinetic characteristics. Thus, development of an IMPDH inhibitor with a novel structure and a different pharmacokinetic profile may reduce the likelihood of GI toxicity and allow for increased efficacy. This article will detail the discovery and SAR leading to a novel and potent acridone-based IMPDH inhibitor 4m and its efficacy and GI tolerability when administered orally in a rat adjuvant arthritis model.

  2. An Examination of the Role of L-Glutamate and Inosine 5'-Monophosphate in Hedonic Taste-Guided Behavior by Mice Lacking the T1R1 + T1R3 Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blonde, Ginger D; Spector, Alan C

    2017-06-01

    The heterodimeric T1R1 + T1R3 receptor is considered critical for normal signaling of L-glutamate and 5'-ribonucleotides in the oral cavity. However, some taste-guided responsiveness remains in mice lacking one subunit of the receptor, suggesting that other receptors are sufficient to support some behaviors. Here, mice lacking both receptor subunits (KO) and wild-type (WT, both n = 13) mice were tested in a battery of behavioral tests. Mice were trained and tested in gustometers with a concentration series of Maltrin-580, a maltodextrin, in a brief-access test (10-s trials) as a positive control. Similar tests followed with monosodium glutamate (MSG) with and without the ribonucleotide inosine 5'-monophosphate (IMP), but always in the presence of the epithelial sodium channel blocker amiloride (A). Brief-access tests were repeated following short-term (30-min) and long-term (48-h) exposures to MSG + A + IMP and were also conducted with sodium gluconate replacing MSG. Finally, progressive ratio tests were conducted with Maltrin-580 or MSG + A + IMP, to assess appetitive behavior while minimizing satiation. Overall, MSG generated little concentration-dependent responding in either food-restricted WT or KO mice, even in combination with IMP. However, KO mice licked less to the amino acid stimuli, a measure of consummatory behavior in the brief-access tests. In contrast, both groups initiated a similar number of trials and had a similar breakpoint in the progressive ratio task, both measures of appetitive (approach) behavior. Collectively, these results suggest that while the T1R1 + T1R3 receptor is necessary for consummatory responding to MSG (+IMP), other receptors are sufficient to maintain appetitive responding to this "umami" stimulus complex in food-restricted mice. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. 21 CFR 172.535 - Disodium inosinate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION... of water of crystallization. (b) The food additive is used as a flavoring adjuvant in food. ...

  4. New Inosine and Guanosine Analogs as Inhibitors of Parasitic Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-11-30

    infections. Although chloroquine (CQ) is generally considered to be one of the most fascinating, useful and versatile drugs developed during the modern...ribonucleosides are of particular interest since these nucleosides may be looked upon as aza- analogues of formycin B. The parent s-triazolo[3,4-f]-as...hexopyranosyl)adenine indicate slightly altered glycon. This type of nucleoside analogues could mimic either as ribonucleo- sides or as 2

  5. The hormonal regulation of purine biosynthesis: control of the inosinic acid branch point

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pizzichini, M.; Di Stefano, A.; Marinello, E.; Pompucci, G.

    1986-01-01

    This paper studies the behavior of purine biosynthesis de novo in the levator animal muscle (LAM) of adult rats, before, after castration, and after testosterone administration. The incorporation of C 14-formate into the acid-soluble bases was performed as an index of the overall rate of purine nucleotide synthesis. It is shown that castration reduces the content, the specific activity of total bases and of the single bases in the LAM, indicating an inferior turnover. The increased turnover of guanylic acid, which is always present although not as much as adenylic acid, will favor the sunthesis of RNA in the sexual organs

  6. Characteristics and crystal structure of bacterial inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, R.; Evans, G.; Rotella, F. J.; Westbrook, E. M.; Beno, D.; Huberman, E.; Joachimiak, A.; Collart, F. R.

    1999-01-01

    IMP dehydrogenase (IMPDH) is an essential enzyme that catalyzes the first step unique to GTP synthesis. To provide a basis for the evaluation of IMPDH inhibitors as antimicrobial agents, we have expressed and characterized IMPDH from the pathogenic bacterium Streptococcus pyogenes. Our results show that the biochemical and kinetic characteristics of S. pyogenes IMPDH are similar to other bacterial IMPDH enzymes. However, the lack of sensitivity to mycophenolic acid and the K{sub m} for NAD (1180 {mu}M) exemplify some of the differences between the bacterial and mammalian IMPDH enzymes, making it an attractive target for antimicrobial agents. To evaluate the basis for these differences, we determined the crystal structure of the bacterial enzyme at 1.9 {angstrom} with substrate bound in the catalytic site. The structure was determined using selenomethionine-substituted protein and multiwavelength anomalous (MAD) analysis of data obtained with synchrotron radiation from the undulator beamline (19ID) of the Structural Biology Center at Argonne's Advanced Photon Source. S. pyogenes IMPDH is a tetramer with its four subunits related by a crystallographic 4-fold axis. The protein is composed of two domains: a TIM barrel domain that embodies the catalytic framework and a cystathione {beta}-synthase (CBS) dimer domain of so far unknown function. Using information provided by sequence alignments and the crystal structure, we prepared several site-specific mutants to examine the role of various active site regions in catalysis. These variants implicate the active site flap as an essential catalytic element and indicate there are significant differences in the catalytic environment of bacterial and mammalian IMPDH enzymes. Comparison of the structure of bacterial IMPDH with the known partial structures from eukaryotic organisms will provide an explanation of their distinct properties and contribute to the design of specific bacterial IMPDH inhibitors.

  7. Pharmacodynamic Monitoring of Inosine Monophosphate Dehydrogenase Activity: A Basis For Optimized and Individualized Mycophenolate Mofetil Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Sombogaard (Ferdi)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractIn 1896 Gosic isolated for the first time mycophenolic acid (MPA) from Penicillium glaucum.It was subsequently isolated from Penicillium stoloniferum Thom (synonym P. brevi-compactum Dierckx) by Alsberg and Black in 1913 who gave the acid phenolic substance its name mycophenolic acid

  8. Effect of Guanine to Inosine Substitution on Stability of Canonical DNA and RNA Duplexes: Molecular Dynamics Thermodynamics Integration Study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krepl, Miroslav; Otyepka, M.; Banáš, Pavel; Šponer, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 117, č. 6 (2013), s. 1872-1879 ISSN 1520-6106 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP305/12/G034 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GPPP301/11/P558; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0068 Program:ED Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : FREE-ENERGY CALCULATIONS * PARTICLE MESH EWALD * ACID BASE-PAIRS Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.377, year: 2013

  9. Dissecting direct and indirect readout of cAMP receptor protein DNA binding using an inosine and 2,6-diaminopurine in vitro selection system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindemose, Søren; Nielsen, Peter E.; Møllegaard, Niels Erik

    2008-01-01

    The DNA interaction of the Escherichia coli cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) represents a typical example of a dual recognition mechanism exhibiting both direct and indirect readout. We have dissected the direct and indirect components of DNA recognition by CRP employing in vitro selection...... is functionally intact. The majority of the selected sites contain the natural consensus sequence TGTGAN(6)TCACA (i.e. TITIDN(6)TCDCD). Thus, direct readout of the consensus sequence is independent of minor groove conformation. Consequently, the indirect readout known to occur in the TG/CA base pair step (primary...... kink site) in the consensus sequence is not affected by I-D substitutions. In contrast, the flanking regions are selected as I/C rich sequences (mostly I-tracts) instead of A/T rich sequences which are known to strongly increase CRP binding, thereby demonstrating almost exclusive indirect readout...

  10. Purification and characterization of RihC, a xanthosine-inosine-uridine-adenosine-preferring hydrolase from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael Riis; Dandanell, Gert

    2005-01-01

    as the sole carbon and energy source. By functional complementation, we have isolated a nucleoside hydrolase (rihC) that can complement a xapA deletion in E. coli and we have overexpressed, purified and characterized this hydrolase. RihC is a heat stable homotetrameric enzyme with a molecular weight of 135 k...... the neutral form of xanthosine....

  11. Specific DNA Binding of a Potential Transcriptional Regulator, Inosine 5′-Monophosphate Dehydrogenase-Related Protein VII, to the Promoter Region of a Methyl Coenzyme M Reductase I-Encoding Operon Retrieved from Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus Strain ΔH▿

    OpenAIRE

    Shinzato, Naoya; Enoki, Miho; Sato, Hiroaki; Nakamura, Kohei; Matsui, Toru; Kamagata, Yoichi

    2008-01-01

    Two methyl coenzyme M reductases (MCRs) encoded by the mcr and mrt operons of the hydrogenotrophic methanogen Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus ΔH are expressed in response to H2 availability. In the present study, cis elements and trans-acting factors responsible for the gene expression of MCRs were investigated by using electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and affinity particle purification. A survey of their operator regions by EMSA with protein extracts from mrt-expressing cul...

  12. Specific DNA binding of a potential transcriptional regulator, inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase-related protein VII, to the promoter region of a methyl coenzyme m reductase I-encoding operon retrieved from Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus strain DeltaH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinzato, Naoya; Enoki, Miho; Sato, Hiroaki; Nakamura, Kohei; Matsui, Toru; Kamagata, Yoichi

    2008-10-01

    Two methyl coenzyme M reductases (MCRs) encoded by the mcr and mrt operons of the hydrogenotrophic methanogen Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus DeltaH are expressed in response to H(2) availability. In the present study, cis elements and trans-acting factors responsible for the gene expression of MCRs were investigated by using electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and affinity particle purification. A survey of their operator regions by EMSA with protein extracts from mrt-expressing cultures restricted them to 46- and 41-bp-long mcr and mrt upstream regions, respectively. Affinity particle purification of DNA-binding proteins conjugated with putative operator regions resulted in the retrieval of a protein attributed to IMP dehydrogenase-related protein VII (IMPDH VII). IMPDH VII is predicted to have a winged helix-turn-helix DNA-binding motif and two cystathionine beta-synthase domains, and it has been suspected to be an energy-sensing module. EMSA with oligonucleotide probes with unusual sequences showed that the binding site of IMPDH VII mostly overlaps the factor B-responsible element-TATA box of the mcr operon. The results presented here suggest that IMPDH VII encoded by MTH126 is a plausible candidate for the transcriptional regulator of the mcr operon in this methanogen.

  13. Structural bioinformatics study of PNP from Schistosoma mansoni

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silveira, Nelson Jose Freitas da; Uchoa, Hugo Brandao; Canduri, Fernanda; Pereira, Jose Henrique; Camera, Joao Carlos; Basso, Luiz Augusto; Palma, Mario Sergio; Santos, Diogenes Santiago; Filgueira de Azevedo, Walter

    2004-01-01

    The parasite Schistosoma mansoni lacks the de novo pathway for purine biosynthesis and depends on salvage pathways for its purine requirements. Schistosomiasis is endemic in 76 countries and territories and amongst the parasitic diseases ranks second after malaria in terms of social and economic impact and public health importance. The PNP is an attractive target for drug design and it has been submitted to extensive structure-based design. The atomic coordinates of the complex of human PNP with inosine were used as template for starting the modeling of PNP from S. mansoni complexed with inosine. Here we describe the model for the complex SmPNP-inosine and correlate the structure with differences in the affinity for inosine presented by human and S. mansoni PNPs

  14. Two purine nucleoside phosphorylases in Bacillus subtilis. Purification and some properties of the adenosine-specific phosphorylase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kaj Frank

    1978-01-01

    Two purine nucleoside phosphorylases (purine-nucleoside:orthophosphate ribosyltransferase, EC 2.4.2.1) were purified from vegetative Bacillus subtilis cells. One enzyme, inosine-guanosine phosphorylase, showed great similarity to the homologous enzyme of Bacillus cereus. It appeared...

  15. Novel diamide-based inhibitors of IMPDH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Henry H; Iwanowicz, Edwin J; Guo, Junqing; Watterson, Scott H; Shen, Zhongqi; Pitts, William J; Dhar, T G Murali; Fleener, Catherine A; Rouleau, Katherine; Sherbina, N Z; Witmer, Mark; Tredup, Jeffrey; Hollenbaugh, Diane

    2002-05-06

    A series of novel amide-based small molecule inhibitors of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase is described. The synthesis and the structure-activity relationships (SARs) derived from in vitro studies are presented.

  16. Novel inhibitors of IMPDH: a highly potent and selective quinolone-based series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watterson, Scott H; Carlsen, Marianne; Dhar, T G Murali; Shen, Zhongqi; Pitts, William J; Guo, Junqing; Gu, Henry H; Norris, Derek; Chorba, John; Chen, Ping; Cheney, Daniel; Witmer, Mark; Fleener, Catherine A; Rouleau, Katherine; Townsend, Robert; Hollenbaugh, Diane L; Iwanowicz, Edwin J

    2003-02-10

    A series of novel quinolone-based small molecule inhibitors of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) was explored. The synthesis and the structure-activity relationships (SARs) derived from in vitro studies are described.

  17. New Insights into the Biological Role of Mammalian ADARs; the RNA Editing Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niamh Mannion

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The ADAR proteins deaminate adenosine to inosine in double-stranded RNA which is one of the most abundant modifications present in mammalian RNA. Inosine can have a profound effect on the RNAs that are edited, not only changing the base-pairing properties, but can also result in recoding, as inosine behaves as if it were guanosine. In mammals there are three ADAR proteins and two ADAR-related proteins (ADAD expressed. All have a very similar modular structure; however, both their expression and biological function differ significantly. Only two of the ADAR proteins have enzymatic activity. However, both ADAR and ADAD proteins possess the ability to bind double-strand RNA. Mutations in ADARs have been associated with many diseases ranging from cancer, innate immunity to neurological disorders. Here, we will discuss in detail the domain structure of mammalian ADARs, the effects of RNA editing, and the role of ADARs in human diseases.

  18. New Insights into the Biological Role of Mammalian ADARs; the RNA Editing Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannion, Niamh; Arieti, Fabiana; Gallo, Angela; Keegan, Liam P.; O’Connell, Mary A.

    2015-01-01

    The ADAR proteins deaminate adenosine to inosine in double-stranded RNA which is one of the most abundant modifications present in mammalian RNA. Inosine can have a profound effect on the RNAs that are edited, not only changing the base-pairing properties, but can also result in recoding, as inosine behaves as if it were guanosine. In mammals there are three ADAR proteins and two ADAR-related proteins (ADAD) expressed. All have a very similar modular structure; however, both their expression and biological function differ significantly. Only two of the ADAR proteins have enzymatic activity. However, both ADAR and ADAD proteins possess the ability to bind double-strand RNA. Mutations in ADARs have been associated with many diseases ranging from cancer, innate immunity to neurological disorders. Here, we will discuss in detail the domain structure of mammalian ADARs, the effects of RNA editing, and the role of ADARs in human diseases. PMID:26437436

  19. Effects of salicylic acid on post-ischaemic ventricular function and purine efflux in isolated mouse hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farthing, Don; Gehr, Lynne; Karnes, H Thomas; Sica, Domenic; Gehr, Todd; Larus, Terri; Farthing, Christine; Xi, Lei

    2007-01-01

    Acetyl salicylic acid (aspirin) is one of the most widely used drugs in the world. Various plasma concentrations of aspirin and its predominant metabolite, salicylic acid, are required for its antiarthritic (1.5-2.5 mM), anti-inflammatory (0.5-5.0 mM) or antiplatelet (0.18-0.36 mM) actions. A recent study demonstrated the inhibitory effects of both aspirin and salicylic acid on oxidative phosphorylation and ATP synthesis in isolated rat cardiac mitochondria in a dose-dependent manner (0-10 mM concentration range). In this context, the present study was conducted to determine the effects of salicylic acid on inosine efflux (a potential biomarker of acute cardiac ischaemia) as well as cardiac contractile function in the isolated mouse heart following 20 min of zero-flow global ischaemia. Inosine efflux was found at significantly higher concentrations in ischaemic hearts perfused with Krebs buffer fortified with 1.0 mM salicylic acid compared with those without salicylic acid (12575+/-3319 vs. 1437+/-348 ng ml(-1) min(-1), mean+/-SEM, n=6 per group, psalicylic acid potentiates 8.8-fold ATP nucleotide purine catabolism into its metabolites (e.g. inosine, hypoxanthine). Salicylic acid (0.1 or 1.0 mM) did not appreciably inhibit purine nucleoside phosphorylase (the enzyme converts inosine to hypoxanthine) suggesting the augmented inosine efflux was due to the salicylic acid effect on upstream elements of cellular respiration. Whereas post-ischaemic cardiac function was further depressed by 1.0 mM salicylic acid, perfusion with 0.1 mM salicylic acid led to a remarkable functional improvement despite moderately increased inosine efflux (2.7-fold). We conclude that inosine is a sensitive biomarker for detecting cardiac ischaemia and salicylic acid-induced effects on cellular respiration. However, the inosine efflux level appears to be a poor predictor of the individual post-ischaemic cardiac functional recovery in this ex vivo model.

  20. Evaluation of secondary metabolites from the Red Sea tunicate polyclinum constellatum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemical investigation of the Red Sea tunicate Polyclinum constellatum afforded nine compounds, identified as thymidine (1), uridine (2), adenosine (3), inosine (4), 24-methylene cholesterol (5), dihydrocholesterol (6), cholesterol (7), oleic acid (8) and 1,3-palmityl-2-palmitoleoylglycerol (9). All...

  1. Hybridization properties of long nucleic acid probes for detection of variable target sequences, and development of a hybridization prediction algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öhrmalm, Christina; Jobs, Magnus; Eriksson, Ronnie; Golbob, Sultan; Elfaitouri, Amal; Benachenhou, Farid; Strømme, Maria; Blomberg, Jonas

    2010-01-01

    One of the main problems in nucleic acid-based techniques for detection of infectious agents, such as influenza viruses, is that of nucleic acid sequence variation. DNA probes, 70-nt long, some including the nucleotide analog deoxyribose-Inosine (dInosine), were analyzed for hybridization tolerance to different amounts and distributions of mismatching bases, e.g. synonymous mutations, in target DNA. Microsphere-linked 70-mer probes were hybridized in 3M TMAC buffer to biotinylated single-stranded (ss) DNA for subsequent analysis in a Luminex® system. When mismatches interrupted contiguous matching stretches of 6 nt or longer, it had a strong impact on hybridization. Contiguous matching stretches are more important than the same number of matching nucleotides separated by mismatches into several regions. dInosine, but not 5-nitroindole, substitutions at mismatching positions stabilized hybridization remarkably well, comparable to N (4-fold) wobbles in the same positions. In contrast to shorter probes, 70-nt probes with judiciously placed dInosine substitutions and/or wobble positions were remarkably mismatch tolerant, with preserved specificity. An algorithm, NucZip, was constructed to model the nucleation and zipping phases of hybridization, integrating both local and distant binding contributions. It predicted hybridization more exactly than previous algorithms, and has the potential to guide the design of variation-tolerant yet specific probes. PMID:20864443

  2. Taste perception with age: pleasantness and its relationships with threshold sensitivity and supra-threshold intensity of five taste qualities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mojet, J.; Christ-Hazelhof, E.; Heidema, J.

    2005-01-01

    The relationships between threshold sensitivity, supra-threshold intensity of NaCl, KCl, sucrose, aspartame, acetic acid, citric acid, caffeine, quinine HCl, monosodium glutamate (MSG) and inosine 5¿-monophosphate (IMP), and the pleasantness of these stimuli in products, were studied in 21 young

  3. Biochemistry of Trypanosomatidae of Importance in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-12-01

    translocation of the substrate across the cytoplasmic menbrane . As a consequence of this trans- location, substrates may become available to intracellular...concentration in plasma (Arnold and Cysyk, 1983). These authors found that in rat liver the purines hypoxanthine, inosine, and adenine were all found

  4. Protective effect of DNA-spermidine (DA-51) against radiation-induced leukopenia. A study on breast cancer patients receiving postoperative prophylactic irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuya, A; Kaneta, K; Okawa, T; Nakama, M [Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo. Hospital; Watari, T

    1976-08-01

    DNA-spermidine (DA-51), which has been originally developed by Dr. Sekiguchi et al. as a protective agent against radiation-induced leukopenia, was submitted to clinical trial by the double blind test. The protective effect against radiation-induced leukopenia and side effect of DA-51 were compared with those of Inosine, selected as a control agent, on breast cancer cases receiving prophylactic irradiation. Daily dose of 2700 mg of DA-51 and 1800 mg of Inosine were administered orally during a 5 week period of irradiation. The differences between the white blood cell counts, the thrombocyte counts and the percentages of lymphocytes in the DA-51 and the Inosine treated groups were assessed at 1, 3 and 5 weeks by x/sup 2/ and T tests, and the following results are obtained: No significant difference in white blood cell or thrombocyte counts was demonstrated at 1, 3 or 5 weeks between the two groups. The only significant difference noted was in the percentage of lymphocyte at 5 weeks, and the thrombocyte counts at 3 weeks. DNA-spermidine is considered to be an effective drug against radiation-induced leukopenia, comparable to Inosine and without noticeable side effects.

  5. Anaerobic energy production and O2 deficit-debt relationship during exhaustive exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsbo, Jens; Gollnick, PD; Graham, T

    1990-01-01

    oxygen uptake, heart rate, blood pressure, leg blood flow, and femoral arterial-venous differences of oxygen content and lactate were performed as well as determination of ATP, creatine phosphate (CP) inosine monophosphate (IMP) and lactate concentrations on biopsy material from the quadriceps muscle...

  6. Novel indole-based inhibitors of IMPDH: introduction of hydrogen bond acceptors at indole C-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watterson, Scott H; Dhar, T G Murali; Ballentine, Shelley K; Shen, Zhongqi; Barrish, Joel C; Cheney, Daniel; Fleener, Catherine A; Rouleau, Katherine A; Townsend, Robert; Hollenbaugh, Diane L; Iwanowicz, Edwin J

    2003-04-07

    The development of a series of novel indole-based inhibitors of 5'-inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) is described. Various hydrogen bond acceptors at C-3 of the indole were explored. The synthesis and the structure-activity relationships (SARs) derived from in vitro studies are outlined.

  7. The TosMIC approach to 3-(oxazol-5-yl) indoles: application to the synthesis of indole-based IMPDH inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, T G Murali; Shen, Zhongqi; Fleener, Catherine A; Rouleau, Katherine A; Barrish, Joel C; Hollenbaugh, Diane L; Iwanowicz, Edwin J

    2002-11-18

    A modified approach to the synthesis of 3-(oxazolyl-5-yl) indoles is reported. This method was applied to the synthesis of series of novel indole based inhibitors of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH). The synthesis and the structure-activity relationships (SARs), derived from in vitro studies, for this new series of inhibitors is given.

  8. Structure of Cryptosporidium IMP dehydrogenase bound to an inhibitor with in vivo antiparasitic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Youngchang; Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Gorla, Suresh Kumar; Gollapalli, Deviprasad R.; Cuny, Gregory D.; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Hedstrom, Lizbeth

    2015-04-21

    Inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) is a promising target for the treatment ofCryptosporidiuminfections. Here, the structure ofC. parvumIMPDH (CpIMPDH) in complex with inosine 5'-monophosphate (IMP) and P131, an inhibitor within vivoanticryptosporidial activity, is reported. P131 contains two aromatic groups, one of which interacts with the hypoxanthine ring of IMP, while the second interacts with the aromatic ring of a tyrosine in the adjacent subunit. In addition, the amine and NO2moieties bind in hydrated cavities, forming water-mediated hydrogen bonds to the protein. The design of compounds to replace these water molecules is a new strategy for the further optimization ofC. parvuminhibitors for both antiparasitic and antibacterial applications.

  9. Analysis of the bioactive components from different growth stages of Fritillaria taipaiensis P. Y. Li

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Peng

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC coupled with an evaporative light scattering detector (ELSD or a diode array detector (DAD were utilized for the quantitative analysis of 4 alkaloids (peimisine, sipeimine, peimine and peiminine and 9 nucleosides and nucleobases (uracil, uridine, adenosine, adenine, inosine, thymine, cytidine, guanosine and thymidine from Fritillaria taipaiensis P. Y. Li that had been cultivated in the same field for 2–6 years. The content of peimisine, sipeimine, peimine, peiminine, uracil, thymine, adenine and inosine in plants cultivated for 2–4 years was significantly higher than that of plants cultivated for 5–6 years, while the content of cytidine, uridine, guanosine, thymidine and adenosine did not change over this period. This is the first evaluation of variation in the bioactive compounds in F. taipaiensis over its life cycle.

  10. CURRENT STATUS OF PROBLEM: CHILDREN WITH RECURRENT RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A. Bulgakova

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with children suffered from recurrent respiraatory infections. The authors attempted to summarize the literature data on the research findings of inosine pranobex application (Isoa prinosine, Teva, Israel in complex therapy against virulent and inflammatory diseases. Within recent years, many experts emphaasize the persistence of viruses and other pathogenic microorganaisms in the human body, which leads to changes in reactivity and emergence of the chronic diseases. These disorders are especially urgent for sickly children, suffering from respiratory infections, what well justifies the application of bacteriogenic immunomodulaa tors, interferon synthesis inductors, expediency for incorporating immunomodulators with antiviral action into complex therapy along with special vaccination against flu, pneumococcus and etc.Key words: sickly children, acute respiratory infections, immunomodulators, inosine pranobex.

  11. Structural basis of the substrate specificity of Bacillus cereus adenosine phosphorylase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dessanti, Paola [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-1301 (United States); Università di Sassari, (Italy); Zhang, Yang [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-1301 (United States); Allegrini, Simone [Università di Sassari, (Italy); Tozzi, Maria Grazia [Università di Pisa, (Italy); Sgarrella, Francesco [Università di Sassari, (Italy); Ealick, Steven E., E-mail: see3@cornell.edu [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-1301 (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Adenosine phosphorylase from B. cereus shows a strong preference for adenosine over other 6-oxopurine nucleosides. Mutation of Asp204 to asparagine reduces the efficiency of adenosine cleavage but does not affect inosine cleavage, effectively reversing the substrate specificity. The structures of D204N complexes explain these observations. Purine nucleoside phosphorylases catalyze the phosphorolytic cleavage of the glycosidic bond of purine (2′-deoxy)nucleosides, generating the corresponding free base and (2′-deoxy)ribose 1-phosphate. Two classes of PNPs have been identified: homotrimers specific for 6-oxopurines and homohexamers that accept both 6-oxopurines and 6-aminopurines. Bacillus cereus adenosine phosphorylase (AdoP) is a hexameric PNP; however, it is highly specific for 6-aminopurines. To investigate the structural basis for the unique substrate specificity of AdoP, the active-site mutant D204N was prepared and kinetically characterized and the structures of the wild-type protein and the D204N mutant complexed with adenosine and sulfate or with inosine and sulfate were determined at high resolution (1.2–1.4 Å). AdoP interacts directly with the preferred substrate through a hydrogen-bond donation from the catalytically important residue Asp204 to N7 of the purine base. Comparison with Escherichia coli PNP revealed a more optimal orientation of Asp204 towards N7 of adenosine and a more closed active site. When inosine is bound, two water molecules are interposed between Asp204 and the N7 and O6 atoms of the nucleoside, thus allowing the enzyme to find alternative but less efficient ways to stabilize the transition state. The mutation of Asp204 to asparagine led to a significant decrease in catalytic efficiency for adenosine without affecting the efficiency of inosine cleavage.

  12. Effects of cooking method and final core-temperature on cooking loss, lipid oxidation, nucleotide-related compounds and aroma volatiles of Hanwoo brisket

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dicky Tri Utama

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective This study observed the effects of cooking method and final core temperature on cooking loss, lipid oxidation, aroma volatiles, nucleotide-related compounds and aroma volatiles of Hanwoo brisket (deep pectoralis. Methods Deep pectoralis muscles (8.65% of crude fat were obtained from three Hanwoo steer carcasses with 1+ quality grade. Samples were either oven-roasted at 180°C (dry heat or cooked in boiling water (moist heat to final core temperature of 70°C (medium or 77°C (well-done. Results Boiling method reduced more fat but retained more moisture than did the oven roasting method (p<0.001, thus no significant differences were found on cooking loss. However, samples lost more weight as final core temperature increased (p<0.01. Further, total saturated fatty acid increased (p = 0.02 while total monounsaturated fatty acid decreased (p = 0.03 as final core temperature increased. Regardless the method used for cooking, malondialdehyde (p<0.01 and free iron contents (p<0.001 were observed higher in samples cooked to 77°C. Oven roasting retained more inosinic acid, inosine and hypoxanthine in samples than did the boiling method (p<0.001, of which the concentration decreased as final core temperature increased except for hypoxanthine. Samples cooked to 77°C using oven roasting method released more intense aroma than did the others and the aroma pattern was discriminated based on the intensity. Most of aldehydes and pyrazines were more abundant in oven-roasted samples than in boiled samples. Among identified volatiles, hexanal had the highest area unit in both boiled and oven-roasted samples, of which the abundance increased as the final core temperature increased. Conclusion The boiling method extracted inosinic acid and rendered fat from beef brisket, whereas oven roasting intensified aroma derived from aldehydes and pyrazines and prevented the extreme loss of inosinic acid.

  13. DAMP-Mediated Innate Immune Failure and Pneumonia after Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AMP , CD39, Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS), Trauma Patients, Acute Lung Injury, Pneumonia, Oligonucleotides, CyTOF, Computational Modeling, Signal...experimental and clinical/translational studies to define interactions between purinergic signaling mediators (ATP, AMP , Ado, inosine) with oxygen, oxidative...genetic deletion (Figure 1A) • Increase in ATP and ADP hydrolysis and decrease in AMP hydrolysis in peritoneal cells from CLP septic mice (Figure 1B

  14. Diagnosis of immunodeficiency caused by a purine nucleoside phosphorylase defect by using tandem mass spectrometry on dried blood spots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    la Marca, Giancarlo; Canessa, Clementina; Giocaliere, Elisa; Romano, Francesca; Malvagia, Sabrina; Funghini, Silvia; Moriondo, Maria; Valleriani, Claudia; Lippi, Francesca; Ombrone, Daniela; Della Bona, Maria Luisa; Speckmann, Carsten; Borte, Stephan; Brodszki, Nicholas; Gennery, Andrew R; Weinacht, Katja; Celmeli, Fatih; Pagel, Julia; de Martino, Maurizio; Guerrini, Renzo; Wittkowski, Helmut; Santisteban, Ines; Bali, Pawan; Ikinciogullari, Aydan; Hershfield, Michael; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Resti, Massimo; Azzari, Chiara

    2014-07-01

    Purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) deficiency is a rare form of autosomal recessive combined primary immunodeficiency caused by a enzyme defect leading to the accumulation of inosine, 2'-deoxy-inosine (dIno), guanosine, and 2'-deoxy-guanosine (dGuo) in all cells, especially lymphocytes. Treatments are available and curative for PNP deficiency, but their efficacy depends on the early approach. PNP-combined immunodeficiency complies with the criteria for inclusion in a newborn screening program. This study evaluate whether mass spectrometry can identify metabolite abnormalities in dried blood spots (DBSs) from affected patients, with the final goal of individuating the disease at birth during routine newborn screening. DBS samples from 9 patients with genetically confirmed PNP-combined immunodeficiency, 10,000 DBS samples from healthy newborns, and 240 DBSs from healthy donors of different age ranges were examined. Inosine, dIno, guanosine, and dGuo were tested by using tandem mass spectrometry (TMS). T-cell receptor excision circle (TREC) and kappa-deleting recombination excision circle (KREC) levels were evaluated by using quantitative RT-PCR only for the 2 patients (patients 8 and 9) whose neonatal DBSs were available. Mean levels of guanosine, inosine, dGuo, and dIno were 4.4, 133.3, 3.6, and 3.8 μmol/L, respectively, in affected patients. No indeterminate or false-positive results were found. In patient 8 TREC levels were borderline and KREC levels were abnormal; in patient 9 TRECs were undetectable, whereas KREC levels were normal. TMS is a valid method for diagnosis of PNP deficiency on DBSs of affected patients at a negligible cost. TMS identifies newborns with PNP deficiency, whereas TREC or KREC measurement alone can fail. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Role of guanosine kinase in the utilization of guanosine for nucleotide synthesis in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hove-Jensen, Bjarne; Nygaard, Per

    1989-01-01

    Using purine auxotrophic strains of Escherichia coli with additional genetic lesions in the pathways of interconversion and salvage of purine compounds, we demonstrated the in vivo function of guanosine kinase and inosine kinase. Mutants with increased ability to utilize guanosine were isolated b...... a purF, a purL or a purM mutation. A revised map location of the gsk gene is presented and the gene order established as proC-acrA-apt-adk-gsk-purE....

  16. Protective effect of L-Cysteine upon leukopenic syndrome due to radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jingu, K; Matsuura, K [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Medicine; Bussaka, Y

    1981-08-01

    L-Cysteine, glutathione, inosine, and cepharanthin are the agents which have been widely used to prevent and treat the leukopenic syndrome following radiotherapy. Among these, the efficacy of inosine has been demonstrated in a double-blind comparative study. A double-blind controlled study of L-Cysteine compared to inosine and lactose-placebo was performed. Patients designated to receive radiotherapy for cancer of the lung, breast and uterine cervix were randomly allocated to 3 groups; namely, those to receive L-Cysteine 480 mg TID (CG group), inosine 1,800 mg TID (IN group) and placebo capsules (PL group) for 6 to 7 weeks. Among 159 cases, 152 were subjected to statistical analyses, and the latter consisted of 54 CG, 52 IN and 46 PL subjects. Any discrepancies among these 3 groups concerning sex, age, disease, WBC count, radiation procedure, or combined use of carcinostatics were negligible. According to the life-table analysis, the cumulative rates for the 3 groups were compared with respect to maintenance of WBC counts higher than 4,000/mm/sup 3/. Maintenance was best in the CG group, intermediate in the IN, and poorest in the PL group, the difference between CG and PL being statistically significant at the 5% level. Similar results were obtained in separate analyses of strata with and without concomitant carcinostatics. Furthermore, nearly the same results were obtained as those in the life-table analyses when data concerning efficacy and clinical usefulness as judged by physicians were analyzed. The present study indicates that the oral administration of L-Cysteine is safe and effective in preventing and treating leukopenic complications associated with radiotherapy.

  17. Inhibition by nucleosides of glucose-transport activity in human erythrocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    Jarvis, S M

    1988-01-01

    The interaction of nucleosides with the glucose carrier of human erythrocytes was examined by studying the effect of nucleosides on reversible cytochalasin B-binding activity and glucose transport. Adenosine, inosine and thymidine were more potent inhibitors of cytochalasin B binding to human erythrocyte membranes than was D-glucose [IC50 (concentration causing 50% inhibition) values of 10, 24, 28 and 38 mM respectively]. Moreover, low concentrations of thymidine and adenosine inhibited D-glu...

  18. Simultaneous quantification by HPLC of purines in umami soup stock and evaluation of their effects on extracellular and intracellular purine metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuuchi, T; Iyama, N; Yamaoka, N; Kaneko, K

    2018-04-13

    Ribonucleotide flavor enhancers such as inosine monophosphate (IMP) and guanosine monophosphate (GMP) provide umami taste, similarly to glutamine. Japanese cuisine frequently uses soup stocks containing these nucleotides to enhance umami. We quantified 18 types of purines (nucleotides, nucleosides, and purine bases) in three soup stocks (chicken, consommé, and dried bonito soup). IMP was the most abundant purine in all umami soup stocks, followed by hypoxanthine, inosine, and GMP. The IMP content of dried bonito soup was the highest of the three soup stocks. We also evaluated the effects of these purines on extracellular and intracellular purine metabolism in HepG2 cells after adding each umami soup stock to the cells. An increase in inosine and hypoxanthine was evident 1 h and 4 h after soup stock addition, and a low amount of xanthine and guanosine was observed in the extracellular medium. The addition of chicken soup stock resulted in increased intracellular and extracellular levels of uric acid and guanosine. Purine metabolism may be affected by ingredients present in soups.

  19. Purine-related metabolites and their converting enzymes are altered in frontal, parietal and temporal cortex at early stages of Alzheimer's disease pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Andrés, Patricia; Albasanz, José Luis; Ferrer, Isidro; Martín, Mairena

    2018-01-24

    Adenosine, hypoxanthine, xanthine, guanosine and inosine levels were assessed by HPLC, and the activity of related enzymes 5'-nucleotidase (5'-NT), adenosine deaminase (ADA) and purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) measured in frontal (FC), parietal (PC) and temporal (TC) cortices at different stages of disease progression in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and in age-matched controls. Significantly decreased levels of adenosine, guanosine, hypoxanthine and xanthine, and apparently less inosine, are found in FC from the early stages of AD; PC and TC show an opposing pattern, as adenosine, guanosine and inosine are significantly increased at least at determinate stages of AD whereas hypoxanthine and xanthine levels remain unaltered. 5'-NT is reduced in membranes and cytosol in FC mainly at early stages but not in PC, and only at advanced stages in cytosol in TC. ADA activity is decreased in AD when considered as a whole but increased at early stages in TC. Finally, PNP activity is increased only in TC at early stages. Purine metabolism alterations occur at early stages of AD independently of neurofibrillary tangles and β-amyloid plaques. Alterations are stage dependent and region dependent, the latter showing opposite patterns in FC compared with PC and TC. Adenosine is the most affected of the assessed purines. © 2018 International Society of Neuropathology.

  20. Structural basis of the substrate specificity of Bacillus cereus adenosine phosphorylase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dessanti, Paola; Zhang, Yang; Allegrini, Simone; Tozzi, Maria Grazia; Sgarrella, Francesco; Ealick, Steven E. (Cornell); (Sassari); (Pisa)

    2012-10-08

    Purine nucleoside phosphorylases catalyze the phosphorolytic cleavage of the glycosidic bond of purine (2{prime}-deoxy)nucleosides, generating the corresponding free base and (2{prime}-deoxy)ribose 1-phosphate. Two classes of PNPs have been identified: homotrimers specific for 6-oxopurines and homohexamers that accept both 6-oxopurines and 6-aminopurines. Bacillus cereus adenosine phosphorylase (AdoP) is a hexameric PNP; however, it is highly specific for 6-aminopurines. To investigate the structural basis for the unique substrate specificity of AdoP, the active-site mutant D204N was prepared and kinetically characterized and the structures of the wild-type protein and the D204N mutant complexed with adenosine and sulfate or with inosine and sulfate were determined at high resolution (1.2-1.4 {angstrom}). AdoP interacts directly with the preferred substrate through a hydrogen-bond donation from the catalytically important residue Asp204 to N7 of the purine base. Comparison with Escherichia coli PNP revealed a more optimal orientation of Asp204 towards N7 of adenosine and a more closed active site. When inosine is bound, two water molecules are interposed between Asp204 and the N7 and O6 atoms of the nucleoside, thus allowing the enzyme to find alternative but less efficient ways to stabilize the transition state. The mutation of Asp204 to asparagine led to a significant decrease in catalytic efficiency for adenosine without affecting the efficiency of inosine cleavage.

  1. The Epitranscriptome and Innate Immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary A O'Connell

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Our knowledge of the variety and abundances of RNA base modifications is rapidly increasing. Modified bases have critical roles in tRNAs, rRNAs, translation, splicing, RNA interference, and other RNA processes, and are now increasingly detected in all types of transcripts. Can new biological principles associated with this diversity of RNA modifications, particularly in mRNAs and long non-coding RNAs, be identified? This review will explore this question by focusing primarily on adenosine to inosine (A-to-I RNA editing by the adenine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR enzymes that have been intensively studied for the past 20 years and have a wide range of effects. Over 100 million adenosine to inosine editing sites have been identified in the human transcriptome, mostly in embedded Alu sequences that form potentially innate immune-stimulating dsRNA hairpins in transcripts. Recent research has demonstrated that inosine in the epitranscriptome and ADAR1 protein establish innate immune tolerance for host dsRNA formed by endogenous sequences. Innate immune sensors that detect viral nucleic acids are among the readers of epitranscriptome RNA modifications, though this does preclude a wide range of other modification effects.

  2. Hypoxic Vasospasm Mediated by cIMP: When Soluble Guanylyl Cyclase Turns Bad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yuansheng; Chen, Zhengju; Leung, Susan W S; Vanhoutte, Paul M

    2015-06-01

    In a number of isolated blood vessel types, hypoxia causes an acute contraction that is dependent on the presence of nitric oxide and activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase. It is more pronounced when the preparations are constricted and is therefore termed hypoxic augmentation of vasoconstriction. This hypoxic response is accompanied by increases in the intracellular level of inosine 5'-triphosphate and in the synthesis of inosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cIMP) by soluble guanylyl cyclase. The administration of exogenous cIMP or inosine 5'-triphosphate causes augmented vasoconstriction to hypoxia. Furthermore, the vasoconstriction evoked by hypoxia and cIMP is associated with increased activity of Rho kinase (ROCK), indicating that cIMP may mediate the hypoxic effect by sensitizing the myofilaments to Ca through ROCK. Hypoxia is implicated in exaggerated vasoconstriction in the pathogenesis of coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction, hypertension, and stroke. The newly found role of cIMP may help to identify unique therapeutic targets for certain cardiovascular disorders.

  3. Gene expression profiles associated with anaemia and ITPA genotypes in patients with chronic hepatitis C (CH-C).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birerdinc, A; Estep, M; Afendy, A; Stepanova, M; Younossi, I; Baranova, A; Younossi, Z M

    2012-06-01

    Anaemia is a common side effect of ribavirin (RBV) which is used for the treatment of hepatitis C. Inosine triphosphatase gene polymorphism (C to A) protects against RBV-induced anaemia. The aim of our study was to genotype patients for inosine triphosphatase gene polymorphism rs1127354 SNP (CC or CA) and associate treatment-induced anaemia with gene expression profile and genotypes. We used 67 hepatitis C patients with available gene expression, clinical, laboratory data and whole-blood samples. Whole blood was used to determine inosine triphosphatase gene polymorphism rs1127354 genotypes (CC or CA). The cohort with inosine triphosphatase gene polymorphism CA genotype revealed a distinct pattern of protection against anaemia and a lower drop in haemoglobin. A variation in the propensity of CC carriers to develop anaemia prompted us to look for additional predictors of anaemia during pegylated interferon (PEG-IFN) and RBV. Pretreatment blood samples of patients receiving a full course of PEG-IFN and RBV were used to assess expression of 153 genes previously implicated in host response to viral infections. The gene expression data were analysed according to presence of anaemia and inosine triphosphatase gene polymorphism genotypes. Thirty-six genes were associated with treatment-related anaemia, six of which are involved in the response to hypoxia pathway (HIF1A, AIF1, RHOC, PTEN, LCK and PDGFB). There was a substantial overlap between sustained virological response (SVR)-predicting and anaemia-related genes; however, of the nine JAK-STAT pathway-related genes associated with SVR, none were implicated in anaemia. These observations exclude the direct involvement of antiviral response in the development of anaemia associated with PEG-IFN and RBV treatment, whereas another, distinct component within the SVR-associated gene expression response may predict anaemia. We have identified baseline gene expression signatures associated with RBV-induced anaemia and identified

  4. Rapid, reliable, and sensitive detection of adenosine deaminase activity by UHPLC-Q-Orbitrap HRMS and its application to inhibitory activity evaluation of traditional Chinese medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Shenglan; Guan, Huida; Deng, Gang; Yang, Tao; Cheng, Xuemei; Liu, Wei; Liu, Ping; Wang, Changhong

    2018-05-10

    Adenosine deaminase (ADA), which is a key enzyme in the metabolism of purine nucleosides, plays important roles in diverse disorders, such as tuberculosis, diabetes, liver disorders, and cancer. Determination of the activities of ADA and its isoenzymes in body fluids has received considerable attention in the diagnosis and treatment of relative diseases. Ultraviolet spectroscopy with adenosine (AD) as a substrate is a classical approach for screening potential ADA inhibitors by measuring the decrease in substrate (AD) at 265 nm or increase in the product (inosine) at 248 nm. However, AD and inosine share a very close maximum absorption wavelength, and the reaction is uncertain and is frequently interfered by the background color of matrix compounds or plant extracts. Thus, the method usually yields false positive or negative results. In this study, a novel, rapid, sensitive, and accurate ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-Q exactive hybrid quadrupole orbitrap high-resolution accurate mass spectrometric (UHPLC-Q-Orbitrap HRMS) method was developed for determining and screening ADA inhibitors by directly determining the deamination product of AD, inosine. A proper separation was achieved for inosine and chlormequat (internal standard) within 2 min via isocratic elution (0.1% formic acid:methanol = 85:15, v/v) at a flow rate of 0.3 mL min -1 on a Waters ACQUITY HSS T3 column (2.1 mm × 100 mm, 1.8 μm) following a simple precipitation of proteins. The intra- and inter-day precisions of the developed method were below 7.17% and 8.99%, respectively. The method exhibited advantages of small total reaction volume (60 μL), short running time (2 min), high sensitivity (lowest limit of quantification of 0.02 μM for inosine), and low cost (small enzyme consumption of 0.007 unit mL -1 for ADA and substrate of 3.74 μM for AD in individual inhibition), and no matrix effects (101.64%-107.12%). Stability results showed that all

  5. Conflict RNA modification, host-parasite co-evolution, and the origins of DNA and DNA-binding proteins1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Paul J; Keegan, Liam P

    2014-08-01

    Nearly 150 different enzymatically modified forms of the four canonical residues in RNA have been identified. For instance, enzymes of the ADAR (adenosine deaminase acting on RNA) family convert adenosine residues into inosine in cellular dsRNAs. Recent findings show that DNA endonuclease V enzymes have undergone an evolutionary transition from cleaving 3' to deoxyinosine in DNA and ssDNA to cleaving 3' to inosine in dsRNA and ssRNA in humans. Recent work on dsRNA-binding domains of ADARs and other proteins also shows that a degree of sequence specificity is achieved by direct readout in the minor groove. However, the level of sequence specificity observed is much less than that of DNA major groove-binding helix-turn-helix proteins. We suggest that the evolution of DNA-binding proteins following the RNA to DNA genome transition represents the major advantage that DNA genomes have over RNA genomes. We propose that a hypothetical RNA modification, a RRAR (ribose reductase acting on genomic dsRNA) produced the first stretches of DNA in RNA genomes. We discuss why this is the most satisfactory explanation for the origin of DNA. The evolution of this RNA modification and later steps to DNA genomes are likely to have been driven by cellular genome co-evolution with viruses and intragenomic parasites. RNA modifications continue to be involved in host-virus conflicts; in vertebrates, edited cellular dsRNAs with inosine-uracil base pairs appear to be recognized as self RNA and to suppress activation of innate immune sensors that detect viral dsRNA.

  6. Uric acid ameliorates indomethacin-induced enteropathy in mice through its antioxidant activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasutake, Yuichi; Tomita, Kengo; Higashiyama, Masaaki; Furuhashi, Hirotaka; Shirakabe, Kazuhiko; Takajo, Takeshi; Maruta, Koji; Sato, Hirokazu; Narimatsu, Kazuyuki; Yoshikawa, Kenichi; Okada, Yoshikiyo; Kurihara, Chie; Watanabe, Chikako; Komoto, Shunsuke; Nagao, Shigeaki; Matsuo, Hirotaka; Miura, Soichiro; Hokari, Ryota

    2017-11-01

    Uric acid is excreted from blood into the intestinal lumen, yet the roles of uric acid in intestinal diseases remain to be elucidated. The study aimed to determine whether uric acid could reduce end points associated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-induced enteropathy. A mouse model of NSAID-induced enteropathy was generated by administering indomethacin intraperitoneally to 8-week-old male C57BL/6 mice, and then vehicle or uric acid was administered orally. A group of mice treated with indomethacin was also concurrently administered inosinic acid, a uric acid precursor, and potassium oxonate, an inhibitor of uric acid metabolism, intraperitoneally. For in vitro analysis, Caco-2 cells treated with indomethacin were incubated in the presence or absence of uric acid. Oral administration of uric acid ameliorated NSAID-induced enteropathy in mice even though serum uric acid levels did not increase. Intraperitoneal administration of inosinic acid and potassium oxonate significantly elevated serum uric acid levels and ameliorated NSAID-induced enteropathy in mice. Both oral uric acid treatment and intraperitoneal treatment with inosinic acid and potassium oxonate significantly decreased lipid peroxidation in the ileum of mice with NSAID-induced enteropathy. Treatment with uric acid protected Caco-2 cells from indomethacin-induced oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation, and cytotoxicity. Uric acid within the intestinal lumen and in serum had a protective effect against NSAID-induced enteropathy in mice, through its antioxidant activity. Uric acid could be a promising therapeutic target for NSAID-induced enteropathy. © 2017 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  7. An incubation medium for the elevation of adenosine triphosphate and 2,3-diphosphoglycerate in fresh and long-preserved human erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, D; Warrendorf, E

    1975-06-01

    The levels of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and 2,3-diphosphoglycerate in freshly drawn human erythrocytes can be tripled by a 2 h incubation at 37 degrees C in a medium containing 21 mM glucose, 1.8 mM adenine, 5 mM pyruvate, 10 mM inosine, and 96 mM phosphate. Similar incubation conditions will restore the levels of ATP and 2,3-diphosphoglycerate in erythrocytes from blood levels preserved for 12 and 15 weeks, respectively, to those of fresh cells. Omission of pyruvate from the incubation medium further increases the level of ATP slightly, but there is little elevation of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate. Under these conditions labelled pyruvate and lactate production from [14-C]glucose or [14-C]inosine is not diminished, but labelled fructose 1,6-diphosphate, rather than 2,3-diphosphoglycerate, accumulates. In addition, omission of pyruvate from the incubation medium, with a concomitant decrease in accumulation of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate, diminishes the concentration of inorganic phosphate required for optimal ATP elevation. A 5 h incubation in the glucose-adenine-pyruvate-inosine-phosphate medium elevates the levels of ATP and 2,3-diphosphoglycerate in erythrocytes from blood preserved in the cold for 15 weeks to twice that of fresh cells, indicating that the cells retain their metabolic potential even after prolonged storage at 2 degrees C. The medium may provide a method of rejuvenating 10-12 week cold-preserved erythrocytes for transfusion purposes, by a 1 h incubation at 37 degrees C.

  8. Chemical and metabolomic screens identify novel biomarkers and antidotes for cyanide exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Anjali K.; Roberts, Lee D.; Liu, Yan; Mahon, Sari B.; Kim, Sonia; Ryu, Justine H.; Werdich, Andreas; Januzzi, James L.; Boss, Gerry R.; Rockwood, Gary A.; MacRae, Calum A.; Brenner, Matthew; Gerszten, Robert E.; Peterson, Randall T.

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to cyanide causes a spectrum of cardiac, neurological, and metabolic dysfunctions that can be fatal. Improved cyanide antidotes are needed, but the ideal biological pathways to target are not known. To understand better the metabolic effects of cyanide and to discover novel cyanide antidotes, we developed a zebrafish model of cyanide exposure and scaled it for high-throughput chemical screening. In a screen of 3120 small molecules, we discovered 4 novel antidotes that block cyanide toxicity. The most potent antidote was riboflavin. Metabolomic profiling of cyanide-treated zebrafish revealed changes in bile acid and purine metabolism, most notably by an increase in inosine levels. Riboflavin normalizes many of the cyanide-induced neurological and metabolic perturbations in zebrafish. The metabolic effects of cyanide observed in zebrafish were conserved in a rabbit model of cyanide toxicity. Further, humans treated with nitroprusside, a drug that releases nitric oxide and cyanide ions, display increased circulating bile acids and inosine. In summary, riboflavin may be a novel treatment for cyanide toxicity and prophylactic measure during nitroprusside treatment, inosine may serve as a biomarker of cyanide exposure, and metabolites in the bile acid and purine metabolism pathways may shed light on the pathways critical to reversing cyanide toxicity.—Nath, A. K., Roberts, L. D., Liu, Y., Mahon, S. B., Kim, S., Ryu, J. H., Werdich, A., Januzzi, J. L., Boss, G. R., Rockwood, G. A., MacRae, C. A., Brenner, M., Gerszten, R. E., Peterson, R. T. Chemical and metabolomic screens identify novel biomarkers and antidotes for cyanide exposure. PMID:23345455

  9. Uric acid and allopurinol aggravate absence epileptic activity in Wistar Albino Glaxo Rijswijk rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakatos, Renáta Krisztina; Dobolyi, Árpád; Kovács, Zsolt

    2018-05-01

    Uric acid has a role in several physiological and pathophysiological processes. For example, uric acid may facilitate seizure generalization while reducing uric acid level may evoke anticonvulsant/antiepileptic effects. Allopurinol blocks the activity of xanthine oxidase, by which allopurinol inhibits catabolism of hypoxanthine to xanthine and uric acid and, as a consequence, decreases the level of uric acid. Although the modulation of serum uric acid level is a widely used strategy in the treatment of certain diseases, our knowledge regarding the effects of uric acid on epileptic activity is far from complete. Thus, the main aim of this study was the investigation of the effect of uric acid on absence epileptic seizures (spike-wave discharges: SWDs) in a model of human absence epilepsy, the Wistar Albino Glaxo/Rijswijk (WAG/Rij) rat. We investigated the influence of intraperitoneally (i.p.) injected uric acid (100 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg), allopurinol (50 mg/kg and 100 mg/kg), a cyclooxygenase 1 and 2 (COX-1 and COX-2) inhibitor indomethacin (10 mg/kg) and inosine (500 mg/kg) alone and the combined application of allopurinol (50 mg/kg) with uric acid (100 mg/kg) or inosine (500 mg/kg) as well as indomethacin (10 mg/kg) with uric acid (100 mg/kg) and inosine (500 mg/kg) with uric acid (100 mg/kg) on absence epileptic activity. We demonstrated that both uric acid and allopurinol alone significantly increased the number of SWDs whereas indomethacin abolished the uric acid-evoked increase in SWD number. Our results suggest that uric acid and allopurinol have proepileptic effects in WAG/Rij rats. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Kidney Disease and the Nexus of Chronic Kidney Disease and Acute Kidney Injury: The Role of Novel Biomarkers as Early and Accurate Diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yerramilli, Murthy; Farace, Giosi; Quinn, John; Yerramilli, Maha

    2016-11-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and acute kidney injury (AKI) are interconnected and the presence of one is a risk for the other. CKD is an important predictor of AKI after exposure to nephrotoxic drugs or major surgery, whereas persistent or repetitive injury could result in the progression of CKD. This brings new perspectives to the diagnosis and monitoring of kidney diseases highlighting the need for a panel of kidney-specific biomarkers that reflect functional as well as structural damage and recovery, predict potential risk and provide prognosis. This article discusses the kidney-specific biomarkers, symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA), clusterin, cystatin B, and inosine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Indole Alkaloids from the Sea Anemone Heteractis aurora and Homarine from Octopus cyanea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaker, Kamel H; Göhl, Matthias; Müller, Tobias; Seifert, Karlheinz

    2015-11-01

    The two new indole alkaloids 2-amino-1,5-dihydro-5-(1H-indol-3-ylmethyl)-4H-imidazol-4-one (1), 2-amino-5-[(6-bromo-1H-indol-3-yl)methyl]-3,5-dihydro-3-methyl-4H-imidazol-4-one (2), and auramine (3) have been isolated from the sea anemone Heteractis aurora. Both indole alkaloids were synthesized for the confirmation of the structures. Homarine (4), along with uracil (5), hypoxanthine (6), and inosine (7) have been obtained from Octopus cyanea. Copyright © 2015 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.

  12. Metabolomic elucidation of pork from different crossbreds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertram, Hanne Christine S.; Straadt, Ida Krestine; Clausen, Morten Rahr

    , and correlations between individual metabolites and sensory attributes were elucidated. A high content of carnosine in the meat was associated with a low value of many sensory attributes related to meat flavor/taste. Surprsingly, IMP and inosine were in general not correlated with sensory attributes related...... to meat flavor/taste. Water-holding capacity and oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) of the meat were determined to elucidate the correlations between individual metabolites and these two parameters that are of importance for the technological meat quality. In conclusion, the present study reveals...

  13. Simultaneous quantification of purine and pyrimidine bases, nucleosides and their degradation products in bovine blood plasma by high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Charlotte Stentoft; Vestergaard, Mogens; Løvendahl, Peter

    2014-01-01

    describes the development and validation of a sensitive and specific method for simultaneous determination of 20 purines (adenine, guanine, guanosine, inosine, 2′-deoxyguanosine, 2′-deoxyinosine, xanthine, hypoxanthine), pyrimidines (cytosine, thymine, uracil, cytidine, uridine, thymidine, 2′-deoxyuridine...... investigated. It was confirmed that using a log-calibration model rather than a linear calibration model resulted in lower CV% and a lack of fit test demonstrated a satisfying linear regression. The method covers concentration ranges for each metabolite according to that in actual samples, e.g. guanine: 0...... veins and, with a few exceptions, also for other species such as chicken, pig, mink, human and rat....

  14. In vivo survival of [14C]sucrose-loaded porcine carrier erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeLoach, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    Porcine carrier erythrocyte survival was measured in adult pigs. [14C]Sucrose-loaded erythrocytes had a biphasic survival curve, with as much as 50% of the cells removed from circulation in the first 24 hours. The remaining cells had a 35-day half-life. Encapsulation values were measured for porcine erythrocytes and entrapment of [14C]sucrose was greater than 45%. Addition of inosine and glucose to the dialyzed cells and to the final wash buffer before reinjection of autologous cells did not improve their survival

  15. Polynucleotides. XXXII. Further studies on the synthesis of oligonucleotides containing 8,2'-S-cycloadenosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikehara, M; Tezuka, T

    1975-01-01

    A dinucleoside monophosphate, 8,2'-anhydro-8-mercapto-9-beta-D-arabinofuranosyladenine phosphoryl-(3'-5')-inosine (AspI) was synthesized by the condensation of protected 8-mercapto-adenosine 2',3'-cyclic phosphate and 2',3'-isopropylideneinosine with diphenylphosphorochloridate. 8-Mercaptoadenosine 2',3'-cyclic phosphate was polymerized by using tetraphenyl pyrophosphate as the condensing reagent. As oligonucleotides, thus obtained, contained some uncyclized 8-mercaptoadenosine residues and were cleaved at these sites with 0.3N KOH. As 5'-phosphate was synthesized and polymerized with DCC to give oligonucleotides with chain lengths 2 to 9. PMID:170595

  16. The Structural Basis of Cryptosporidium-Specific IMP Dehydrogenase Inhibitor Selectivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacPherson, Iain S.; Kirubakaran, Sivapriya; Gorla, Suresh Kumar; Riera, Thomas V.; D’Aquino, J. Alejandro; Zhang, Minjia; Cuny, Gregory D.; Hedstrom, Lizbeth (BWH); (Brandeis)

    2010-03-29

    Cryptosporidium parvum is a potential biowarfare agent, an important AIDS pathogen, and a major cause of diarrhea and malnutrition. No vaccines or effective drug treatment exist to combat Cryptosporidium infection. This parasite relies on inosine 5{prime}-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) to obtain guanine nucleotides, and inhibition of this enzyme blocks parasite proliferation. Here, we report the first crystal structures of CpIMPDH. These structures reveal the structural basis of inhibitor selectivity and suggest a strategy for further optimization. Using this information, we have synthesized low-nanomolar inhibitors that display 10{sup 3} selectivity for the parasite enzyme over human IMPDH2.

  17. Variation of meat quality traits among five genotypes of chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, H; Gong, Y Z; Wu, C X; Jiang, J; Wang, Y; Li, K

    2009-10-01

    The main objective of this study was to examine the diversity of meat quality traits among 5 chicken genotypes. The genotypes included 2 Chinese native breeds (Wenchang,WCH, and Xianju), 1 commercial broiler line (Avian, AV), 1 commercial layer line (Hy-Line Brown, HLB), and 1 Chinese commercial broiler line (Lingnanhuang, LNH) synthesized by exotic and native breeds, which were slaughtered at their market ages: 16, 7, 16, and 8 wk, respectively. The effects of genotype, muscle type, and sex on meat quality traits were examined. Birds from slow-growing genotypes (WCH, Xianju, and HLB) exhibited higher shear value, inosine-5'-monophosphate concentration, lower cook loss, and more fat than those from fast-growing genotypes (AV and LNH). Chickens from WCH possessed the lowest expressible moisture, cook loss, and the highest lipid (%) among the 3 slow-growing genotypes. The HLB birds were intermediate in expressible moisture and cook loss and lowest in lipid among all genotypes. The LNH cross birds were similar to AV broilers in most meat quality parameters, although they had a lower shear force value and higher fat content than AV broilers. Breast muscle had higher expressible moisture, shear force, protein (%), inosine-5'-monophosphate content, lower cook loss, and lipid (%) than leg muscle. Muscles from male chickens had higher expressible moisture than those from the females. Variability of meat quality characteristics is mainly related to genotype and muscle type differences.

  18. The absence of A-to-I editing in the anticodon of plant cytoplasmic tRNA (Arg) ACG demands a relaxation of the wobble decoding rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldinger, Carolin A; Leisinger, Anne-Katrin; Gaston, Kirk W; Limbach, Patrick A; Igloi, Gabor L

    2012-10-01

    It is a prevalent concept that, in line with the Wobble Hypothesis, those tRNAs having an adenosine in the first position of the anticodon become modified to an inosine at this position. Sequencing the cDNA derived from the gene coding for cytoplasmic tRNA (Arg) ACG from several higher plants as well as mass spectrometric analysis of the isoacceptor has revealed that for this kingdom an unmodified A in the wobble position of the anticodon is the rule rather than the exception. In vitro translation shows that in the plant system the absence of inosine in the wobble position of tRNA (Arg) does not prevent decoding. This isoacceptor belongs to the class of tRNA that is imported from the cytoplasm into the mitochondria of higher plants. Previous studies on the mitochondrial tRNA pool have demonstrated the existence of tRNA (Arg) ICG in this organelle. In moss the mitochondrial encoded distinct tRNA (Arg) ACG isoacceptor possesses the I34 modification. The implication is that for mitochondrial protein biosynthesis A-to-I editing is necessary and occurs by a mitochondrion-specific deaminase after import of the unmodified nuclear encoded tRNA (Arg) ACG.

  19. IMP metabolism in human skeletal muscle after exhaustive exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tullson, P. C.; Bangsbo, Jens; Hellsten, Ylva

    1995-01-01

    This study addressed whether AMP deaminase (AMPD)myosin binding occurs with deamination during intense exercise in humans and the extent of purine loss from muscle during the initial minutes of recovery. Male subjects performed cycle exercise (265 +/- 2 W for 4.39 +/- 0.04 min) to stimulate muscle...... inosine 5'-monophosphate (IMP) formation. After exercise, blood flow to one leg was occluded. Muscle biopsies (vastus lateralis) were taken before and 3.6 +/- 0.2 min after exercise from the occluded leg and 0.7 +/- 0.0, 1.1 +/- 0.0, and 2.9 +/- 0.1 min postexercise in the nonoccluded leg. Exercise...... activated AMPD; at exhaustion IMP was 3.5 +/- 0.4 mmol/kg dry muscle. Before exercise, 16.0 +/- 1.6% of AMPD cosedimented with the myosin fraction; the extent of AMPD:myosin binding was unchanged by exercise. Inosine content increased about threefold during exercise and twofold more during recovery; by 2...

  20. CE-TOF MS-based metabolomic profiling revealed characteristic metabolic pathways in postmortem porcine fast and slow type muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muroya, Susumu; Oe, Mika; Nakajima, Ikuyo; Ojima, Koichi; Chikuni, Koichi

    2014-12-01

    To determine key compounds and metabolic pathways associated with meat quality, we profiled metabolites in postmortem porcine longissimus lumborum (LL) and vastus intermedius (VI) muscles with different aging times by global metabolomics using capillary electrophoresis-time of flight mass spectrometry. Loading analyses of the principal component analysis showed that hydrophilic amino acids and β-alanine-related compounds contributed to the muscle type positively and negatively, respectively, whereas glycolytic and ATP degradation products contributed to aging time. At 168h postmortem, LL samples were characterized by abundance of combinations of amino acids, dipeptides, and glycolytic products, whereas the VI samples were characterized by abundance of both sulfur-containing compounds and amino acids. The AMP and inosine contents in the VI were approx. 10 times higher than those in the LL at 4h postmortem, suggesting different rates of inosine 5'-monophosphate (IMP) accumulation by adenylate kinase 7 and 5'-nucleotidase, and subsequent different production levels of IMP and hypoxanthine between these two porcine muscles. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. IMPDH2 Is an Intracellular Target of the Cyclophilin A and Sanglifehrin A Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khian Hong Pua

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Natural products have demonstrated utility in the clinic and can also act as probes to understand complex cellular pathways. Sanglifehrin A (SFA is a mixed polyketide and non-ribosomal peptide synthase natural product with sub-nano-molar affinity for its receptor cyclophilin A (PPIA. It has been shown to behave in vitro as an immune suppressant. Here, we identify inosine-5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase 2 (IMPDH2 as an intracellular target of the PPIA-SFA binary complex. The formation of this ternary complex does not inhibit the enzymatic activity of IMPDH2. Rather, ternary complex formation modulates cell growth through interaction with the cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS domain of IMPDH2. We further demonstrate that the SFA complex is highly isoform selective for IMPDH2 (versus IMPDH1. This work reveals a role for the CBS domains of IMPDH2 in cellular proliferation, suggesting a more complex role than previously suspected for IMPDH2 in T cell activation and proliferation. : Pua et al. identify IMPDH2 as an intracellular target of the PPIA-SFA complex and show that the CBS domains of IMPDH2 are required for cellular proliferation. Keywords: cyclophilin A, sanglifehrin A, inosine-5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase, cystathionine-β-synthase domains, protein-protein interactions

  2. Molecular Properties of Poliovirus Isolates: Nucleotide Sequence Analysis, Typing by PCR and Real-Time RT-PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Cara C; Kilpatrick, David R; Iber, Jane C; Chen, Qi; Kew, Olen M

    2016-01-01

    Virologic surveillance is essential to the success of the World Health Organization initiative to eradicate poliomyelitis. Molecular methods have been used to detect polioviruses in tissue culture isolates derived from stool samples obtained through surveillance for acute flaccid paralysis. This chapter describes the use of realtime PCR assays to identify and serotype polioviruses. In particular, a degenerate, inosine-containing, panpoliovirus (panPV) PCR primer set is used to distinguish polioviruses from NPEVs. The high degree of nucleotide sequence diversity among polioviruses presents a challenge to the systematic design of nucleic acid-based reagents. To accommodate the wide variability and rapid evolution of poliovirus genomes, degenerate codon positions on the template were matched to mixed-base or deoxyinosine residues on both the primers and the TaqMan™ probes. Additional assays distinguish between Sabin vaccine strains and non-Sabin strains. This chapter also describes the use of generic poliovirus specific primers, along with degenerate and inosine-containing primers, for routine VP1 sequencing of poliovirus isolates. These primers, along with nondegenerate serotype-specific Sabin primers, can also be used to sequence individual polioviruses in mixtures.

  3. The role of inorganic phosphate in intact human erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishiguchi, Eiko; Umeda, Masahiro.

    1988-01-01

    The role of inorganic phosphate in intact human erythrocytes was investigated by phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance ( 31 P NMR). When erythrocytes stored for 5 weeks were incubated at 37 deg C, pH 7.4, in medium containing 2 mM adenine and 10 mM inosine, with or without 5 mM glucose, a substance of around 4 ppm, as assessed by 31 P NMR chemical shift, was detected in the mixture. However, this substance disappeared by the addition of inorganic phosphate. When erythrocytes stored for 4 weeks in acid citrate dextrose (ACD) solution were incubated with 2 mM adenine, 10 mM inosine, 5 mM glucose, 50 mM inorganic phosphate and 10 mM pyruvate at 37 deg C, pH 7.4, the 2,3-DPG level increased gradually, whereas the ATP level initially increased and then decreased. Intracellular inorganic phosphate appeared to be used for the synthesis of ATP and 2,3-DPG during the first 30 min. of the reaction. These results suggests that the inorganic phosphate accelerates glycolysis by increasing the activity of glycolytic enzymes rather than its direct involvement in synthesizing organic phosphorus compounds in stored erythrocytes. The results also suggests that the reserve energy from ATP synthesis is not sufficient for the synthesis of 2,3-DPG. (author)

  4. Enhancement of Nucleoside Production in Hirsutella sinensis Based on Biosynthetic Pathway Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Zhang, Bo; Lin, Shan; Baker, Peter James; Chen, Mao-Sheng; Xue, Ya-Ping; Wu, Hui; Xu, Feng; Yuan, Shui-Jin; Teng, Yi; Wu, Ling-Fang

    2017-01-01

    To enhance nucleoside production in Hirsutella sinensis, the biosynthetic pathways of purine and pyrimidine nucleosides were constructed and verified. The differential expression analysis showed that purine nucleoside phosphorylase, inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase, and guanosine monophosphate synthase genes involved in purine nucleotide biosynthesis were significantly upregulated 16.56-fold, 8-fold, and 5.43-fold, respectively. Moreover, dihydroorotate dehydrogenase, uridine nucleosidase, uridine/cytidine monophosphate kinase, and inosine triphosphate pyrophosphatase genes participating in pyrimidine nucleoside biosynthesis were upregulated 4.53-fold, 10.63-fold, 4.26-fold, and 5.98-fold, respectively. To enhance the nucleoside production, precursors for synthesis of nucleosides were added based on the analysis of biosynthetic pathways. Uridine and cytidine contents, respectively, reached 5.04 mg/g and 3.54 mg/g when adding 2 mg/mL of ribose, resulting in an increase of 28.6% and 296% compared with the control, respectively. Meanwhile, uridine and cytidine contents, respectively, reached 10.83 mg/g 2.12 mg/g when adding 0.3 mg/mL of uracil, leading to an increase of 176.3% and 137.1%, respectively. This report indicated that fermentation regulation was an effective way to enhance the nucleoside production in H. sinensis based on biosynthetic pathway analysis. PMID:29333435

  5. Comparison of the amounts of taste-related compounds in raw and cooked meats from broilers and Korean native chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasena, Dinesh D; Kim, Sun Hyo; Lee, Hyun Jung; Jung, Samooel; Lee, Jun Heon; Park, Hee Bok; Jo, Cheorun

    2014-12-01

    This study was aimed at comparing the taste-related compound content in the breast and leg meat from 100-d-old Korean native chickens (KNC-100) and 32-d-old commercial broilers (CB-32) and determining the changes in these compounds during cooking. Cocks from certified meat-type commercial broiler (Ross) and Korean native chicken (Woorimatdag) strains were raised under similar standard commercial conditions, and a total of 10 birds from each breed were slaughtered at 32 and 100 d of age, which represents their market ages, respectively. Raw and cooked meat samples were prepared separately from the breast and leg and analyzed. The KNC-100 showed significantly higher concentrations of inosine 5'-monophosphate, reducing sugars, glutamic acid, linoleic acid, arachidonic acid, and docosahexaenoic acid than CB-32 did. Additionally, significantly higher inosine 5'-monophosphate, cysteine, arachidonic acid, and docosahexaenoic acid concentrations were observed in the breast meat, whereas the leg meat had higher concentration of glutamic acid, oleic acid, and linoleic acid (P cooking process, except oleic and linoleic acids. We suggest that the higher levels of taste-related compounds present in KNC-100 meat compared with CB-32 meat may result in the unique taste of the former meat, as has been previously reported. In addition, the results of this study may provide useful information for selection and breeding programs. ©2014 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  6. Biochemical, sensory and microbiological attributes of bream (Megalobrama amblycephala) during partial freezing and chilled storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yongling; Luo, Yongkang; You, Juan; Shen, Huixing; Hu, Sumei

    2012-01-15

    Bream is one of the main farmed freshwater fish species in China. This study aimed to examine the nucleotide degradation of bream during partial freezing and chilled storage and to assess the possible usefulness of nucleotide ratios (K, Ki, H, P, Fr and G values) as freshness indices in comparison with sensory assessment and total viable counts. Total viable counts were 5.74 and 4.66 log(colony-forming units g(-1)) on the day of sensory rejection under chilled storage and partial freezing storage respectively. The inosine 5-monophosphate decrease and inosine increase were faster in chilled storage than in partial freezing storage. Hypoxanthine levels increased continuously with time under both storage regimes. Among the nucleotide ratios, the K, Ki, P, G and Fr values were superior to the H value and provided useful freshness indicators for both storage conditions. Bream in chilled storage were sensorially acceptable only up to 10 days, compared with 33 days for bream in partial freezing storage. Partial freezing delayed the nucleotide degradation of bream. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  7. Modulation of guanosine nucleotides biosynthetic pathways enhanced GDP-L-fucose production in recombinant Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Won-Heong; Shin, So-Yeon; Kim, Myoung-Dong; Han, Nam Soo; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2012-03-01

    Guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP) is the key substrate for biosynthesis of guanosine 5'-diphosphate (GDP)-L-fucose. In this study, improvement of GDP-L-fucose production was attempted by manipulating the biosynthetic pathway for guanosine nucleotides in recombinant Escherichia coli-producing GDP-L-fucose. The effects of overexpression of inosine 5'-monophosphate (IMP) dehydrogenase, guanosine 5'-monophosphate (GMP) synthetase (GuaB and GuaA), GMP reductase (GuaC) and guanosine-inosine kinase (Gsk) on GDP-L-fucose production were investigated in a series of fed-batch fermentations. Among the enzymes tested, overexpression of Gsk led to a significant improvement of GDP-L-fucose production. Maximum GDP-L-fucose concentration of 305.5 ± 5.3 mg l(-1) was obtained in the pH-stat fed-batch fermentation of recombinant E. coli-overexpressing Gsk, which corresponds to a 58% enhancement in the GDP-L-fucose production compared with the control strain overexpressing GDP-L-fucose biosynthetic enzymes. Such an enhancement of GDP-L-fucose production could be due to the increase in the intracellular level of GMP.

  8. Metabonomics profiling of marinated meat in soy sauce during processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Ye, Yangfang; Pan, Daodong; Sun, Yangying; Wang, Ying; Cao, Jinxuan

    2018-03-01

    Marinated meat in soy sauce is one of the most popular traditional cured meat products in China. Its taste quality is directly related to primary and secondary metabolites. Herein, the change of metabolite composition of marinated meat in soy sauce during processing was systematically characterised using 1 H NMR and multivariate data analysis. The marinated meat in soy sauce metabonome was dominated by 26 metabolites, including amino acids, sugars, organic acids, nucleic aides and their derivatives. PC1 and PC2 explained a total of 78.6% and 16.6% of variables, respectively. Amino acids, sugars, acetate, succinate, uracil and inosine increased during marinating, while lactate, creatine, inosine-5'-monophosphate (5'-IMP) and anserine decreased (P meat in soy sauce during the late stage of dry-ripening. These findings indicated that the potential of NMR-based metabonomics is of importance for taste quality of marinated meat in soy sauce, which could contribute to a better understanding of the changes of taste compounds in meat products during processing. Shortening the dry-ripening period could be considered to improve the taste quality. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  9. A comparison study on flesh quality of large yellow croaker ( Larimichthys croceus) cultured with three different modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoqin; Li, Baian; Chen, Naisong; Huang, Xuxiong; Hua, Xuemin; Leng, Xiangjun

    2017-12-01

    To compare the flesh quality of large yellow croaker cultured with three different modes, enclosure culture (EC), cage culture with feeding trash fish (CCF) and cage culture with feeding formula diet (CCD), thirty six fish individuals of EC (484.6 ± 79.8 g), CCF (432.7 ± 87.9 g) and CCD (416.9 ± 49.5 g) were sampled to measure body color, flesh water holding capacity, flesh proximate composition, amino acids and fatty acids composition, and collagen and inosinic acid contents. The analysis showed that there was no significant difference in the yellowness of skin and the contents of crude protein and inosinic acid between CCD and EC (P >0.05), and the two modes showed higher values than CCF ( P 0.05). EC and CCD had higher contents of collagen, free AA and lower drip loss than CC ( P < 0.05). In polyunsaturated fatty acids, EC showed significantly higher levels of C20:5n-3 and C22:6n-3 than CCF and CCD ( P < 0.05), but CCD had significantly higher C18:2n-6 than CCF and EC ( P < 0.05). In conclusion, the flesh quality of CCD fish is similar to EC fish, and these two modes have better flesh quality than CCF.

  10. In Silico Investigation of Flavonoids as Potential Trypanosomal Nucleoside Hydrolase Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Hung Hung Ha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human African Trypanosomiasis is endemic to 37 countries of sub-Saharan Africa. It is caused by two related species of Trypanosoma brucei. Current therapies suffer from resistance and public accessibility of expensive medicines. Finding safer and effective therapies of natural origin is being extensively explored worldwide. Pentamidine is the only available therapy for inhibiting the P2 adenosine transporter involved in the purine salvage pathway of the trypanosomatids. The objective of the present study is to use computational studies for the investigation of the probable trypanocidal mechanism of flavonoids. Docking experiments were carried out on eight flavonoids of varying level of hydroxylation, namely, flavone, 5-hydroxyflavone, 7-hydroxyflavone, chrysin, apigenin, kaempferol, fisetin, and quercetin. Using AutoDock 4.2, these compounds were tested for their affinity towards inosine-adenosine-guanosine nucleoside hydrolase and the inosine-guanosine nucleoside hydrolase, the major enzymes of the purine salvage pathway. Our results showed that all of the eight tested flavonoids showed high affinities for both hydrolases (lowest free binding energy ranging from −10.23 to −7.14 kcal/mol. These compounds, especially the hydroxylated derivatives, could be further studied as potential inhibitors of the nucleoside hydrolases.

  11. Use of alternative curing salts for processing salamis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Gyun Yim

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective This study was performed to determine effects of different curing salts on the quality of salamis and to assess feasibility of using NaCl-alternative salts. Methods Various types of curing salts (KCl or MgCl2 as well as NaCl (sun-dried or refined were incorporated for processing of salamis. The proximate composition, fatty acids, nucleotide-related compounds, and free amino acids of the salamis were analyzed during 40 days of ripening. Results The substitution of NaCl by KCl caused higher fat and ash content, but lower moisture content of the salami after 20 days of ripening (p<0.05. Compared with the sun-dried NaCl, use of KCl in salami also led to greater inosine 5′-monophosphate whereas refined NaCl had more inosine (p<0.05. KCl-added salami also had a higher C12:0, C17:1, and C20:0 than other types of salami (p<0.05. MgCl2-added salami had higher content of free amino acids compared to the other salamis (p<0.05. Conclusion Alternative curing salts such as KCl and MgCl2 could substitute NaCl in consideration of quality factor of a fermented meat product. Especially replacement of NaCl with KCl will be a suitable strategy for developing relatively low sodium salami products without compromising product quality.

  12. Inherited variants affecting RNA editing may contribute to ovarian cancer susceptibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Permuth, Jennifer B; Reid, Brett; Earp, Madalene

    2016-01-01

    RNA editing in mammals is a form of post-transcriptional modification in which adenosine is converted to inosine by the adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADAR) family of enzymes. Based on evidence of altered ADAR expression in epithelial ovarian cancers (EOC), we hypothesized that single nucleo......, including rs1127313 (G/A), a SNP in the 3' untranslated region. In summary, germline variation involving RNA editing genes may influence EOC susceptibility, warranting further investigation of inherited and acquired alterations affecting RNA editing.......RNA editing in mammals is a form of post-transcriptional modification in which adenosine is converted to inosine by the adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADAR) family of enzymes. Based on evidence of altered ADAR expression in epithelial ovarian cancers (EOC), we hypothesized that single...... nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in ADAR genes modify EOC susceptibility, potentially by altering ovarian tissue gene expression. Using directly genotyped and imputed data from 10,891 invasive EOC cases and 21,693 controls, we evaluated the associations of 5,303 SNPs in ADAD1, ADAR, ADAR2, ADAR3, and SND1...

  13. Radiochromatographic determination of activity of adenosine deaminase and purine nucleoside phosphorylase in blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pechan, I.; Rendekova, V.; Pechanova, E.; Krizko, J.

    1982-01-01

    Expeditious and sensitive methods are described for determining the activities of adenosine deaminase (ADA) and purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) in human lymphocytes and erythrocytes. ADA and PNP activity is determined on the basis of the reaction of (U- 14 C)adenosine or (8- 14 C)inosine with the lysate of human blood cells. Reaction products are separated using paper chromatography. Following the measurement of the radioactivity of spots of adenosine, inosine and hypoxanthine, a calculation is made of ADA and PNP activity from the results of the said measurements. On a sample of 52 clinically healthy people average ADA and PNP activity in isolated lymphocytes was found to be (51.6+-18.8) and (185.6+-94.7) pcat/10 6 cells and in erythrocytes (9.8+-2.98) and (17.1+-3.19) pcat/mg of proteins, respectively. The advantage of the method is the small amount of sample needed (1 to 2 ml) which allows its application in pediatrics. (Ha)

  14. Functional and genetic evidence that nucleoside transport is highly conserved in Leishmania species: Implications for pyrimidine-based chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzahrani, Khalid J H; Ali, Juma A M; Eze, Anthonius A; Looi, Wan Limm; Tagoe, Daniel N A; Creek, Darren J; Barrett, Michael P; de Koning, Harry P

    2017-08-01

    Leishmania pyrimidine salvage is replete with opportunities for therapeutic intervention with enzyme inhibitors or antimetabolites. Their uptake into cells depends upon specific transporters; therefore it is essential to establish whether various Leishmania species possess similar pyrimidine transporters capable of drug uptake. Here, we report a comprehensive characterization of pyrimidine transport in L. major and L. mexicana. In both species, two transporters for uridine/adenosine were detected, one of which also transported uracil and the antimetabolites 5-fluoruracil (5-FU) and 5F,2'deoxyuridine (5F,2'dUrd), and was designated uridine-uracil transporter 1 (UUT1); the other transporter mediated uptake of adenosine, uridine, 5F,2'dUrd and thymidine and was designated Nucleoside Transporter 1 (NT1). To verify the reported L. donovani model of two NT1-like genes encoding uridine/adenosine transporters, and an NT2 gene encoding an inosine transporter, we cloned the corresponding L. major and L. mexicana genes, expressing each in T. brucei. Consistent with the L. donovani reports, the NT1-like genes of either species mediated the adenosine-sensitive uptake of [ 3 H]-uridine but not of [ 3 H]-inosine. Conversely, the NT2-like genes mediated uptake of [ 3 H]-inosine but not [ 3 H]-uridine. Among pyrimidine antimetabolites tested, 5-FU and 5F,2'dUrd were the most effective antileishmanials; resistance to both analogs was induced in L. major and L. mexicana. In each case it was found that the resistant cells had lost the transport capacity for the inducing drug. Metabolomics analysis found that the mechanism of action of 5-FU and 5F-2'dUrd was similar in both Leishmania species, with major changes in deoxynucleotide metabolism. We conclude that the pyrimidine salvage system is highly conserved in Leishmania species - essential information for the development of pyrimidine-based chemotherapy. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights

  15. Functional and genetic evidence that nucleoside transport is highly conserved in Leishmania species: Implications for pyrimidine-based chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid J.H. Alzahrani

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Leishmania pyrimidine salvage is replete with opportunities for therapeutic intervention with enzyme inhibitors or antimetabolites. Their uptake into cells depends upon specific transporters; therefore it is essential to establish whether various Leishmania species possess similar pyrimidine transporters capable of drug uptake. Here, we report a comprehensive characterization of pyrimidine transport in L. major and L. mexicana. In both species, two transporters for uridine/adenosine were detected, one of which also transported uracil and the antimetabolites 5-fluoruracil (5-FU and 5F,2′deoxyuridine (5F,2′dUrd, and was designated uridine-uracil transporter 1 (UUT1; the other transporter mediated uptake of adenosine, uridine, 5F,2′dUrd and thymidine and was designated Nucleoside Transporter 1 (NT1. To verify the reported L. donovani model of two NT1-like genes encoding uridine/adenosine transporters, and an NT2 gene encoding an inosine transporter, we cloned the corresponding L. major and L. mexicana genes, expressing each in T. brucei. Consistent with the L. donovani reports, the NT1-like genes of either species mediated the adenosine-sensitive uptake of [3H]-uridine but not of [3H]-inosine. Conversely, the NT2-like genes mediated uptake of [3H]-inosine but not [3H]-uridine. Among pyrimidine antimetabolites tested, 5-FU and 5F,2′dUrd were the most effective antileishmanials; resistance to both analogs was induced in L. major and L. mexicana. In each case it was found that the resistant cells had lost the transport capacity for the inducing drug. Metabolomics analysis found that the mechanism of action of 5-FU and 5F-2′dUrd was similar in both Leishmania species, with major changes in deoxynucleotide metabolism. We conclude that the pyrimidine salvage system is highly conserved in Leishmania species - essential information for the development of pyrimidine-based chemotherapy. Keywords: Leishmania, Pyrimidine metabolism, Uracil

  16. Functional and Structural Characterization of Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase from Kluyveromyces lactis and Its Potential Applications in Reducing Purine Content in Food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahor, Durga; Priyanka, Anu; Prasad, Gandham S; Thakur, Krishan Gopal

    2016-01-01

    Consumption of foods and beverages with high purine content increases the risk of hyperuricemia, which causes gout and can lead to cardiovascular, renal, and other metabolic disorders. As patients often find dietary restrictions challenging, enzymatically lowering purine content in popular foods and beverages offers a safe and attractive strategy to control hyperuricemia. Here, we report structurally and functionally characterized purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) from Kluyveromyces lactis (KlacPNP), a key enzyme involved in the purine degradation pathway. We report a 1.97 Å resolution crystal structure of homotrimeric KlacPNP with an intrinsically bound hypoxanthine in the active site. KlacPNP belongs to the nucleoside phosphorylase-I (NP-I) family, and it specifically utilizes 6-oxopurine substrates in the following order: inosine > guanosine > xanthosine, but is inactive towards adenosine. To engineer enzymes with broad substrate specificity, we created two point variants, KlacPNPN256D and KlacPNPN256E, by replacing the catalytically active Asn256 with Asp and Glu, respectively, based on structural and comparative sequence analysis. KlacPNPN256D not only displayed broad substrate specificity by utilizing both 6-oxopurines and 6-aminopurines in the order adenosine > inosine > xanthosine > guanosine, but also displayed reversal of substrate specificity. In contrast, KlacPNPN256E was highly specific to inosine and could not utilize other tested substrates. Beer consumption is associated with increased risk of developing gout, owing to its high purine content. Here, we demonstrate that KlacPNP and KlacPNPN256D could be used to catalyze a key reaction involved in lowering beer purine content. Biochemical properties of these enzymes such as activity across a wide pH range, optimum activity at about 25°C, and stability for months at about 8°C, make them suitable candidates for food and beverage industries. Since KlacPNPN256D has broad substrate specificity, a

  17. Guanine nucleotide binding to the Bateman domain mediates the allosteric inhibition of eukaryotic IMP dehydrogenases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buey, Rubén M.; Ledesma-Amaro, Rodrigo; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Balsera, Mónica; Chagoyen, Mónica; de Pereda, José M.; Revuelta, José L.

    2015-11-01

    Inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) plays key roles in purine nucleotide metabolism and cell proliferation. Although IMPDH is a widely studied therapeutic target, there is limited information about its physiological regulation. Using Ashbya gossypii as a model, we describe the molecular mechanism and the structural basis for the allosteric regulation of IMPDH by guanine nucleotides. We report that GTP and GDP bind to the regulatory Bateman domain, inducing octamers with compromised catalytic activity. Our data suggest that eukaryotic and prokaryotic IMPDHs might have developed different regulatory mechanisms, with GTP/GDP inhibiting only eukaryotic IMPDHs. Interestingly, mutations associated with human retinopathies map into the guanine nucleotide-binding sites including a previously undescribed non-canonical site and disrupt allosteric inhibition. Together, our results shed light on the mechanisms of the allosteric regulation of enzymes mediated by Bateman domains and provide a molecular basis for certain retinopathies, opening the door to new therapeutic approaches.

  18. Improving meat quality through cattle feed enriched with mate extract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zawadzki, Andressa

    The use of plant extracts in animal feeding trials has been considered as a potential alternative to improve the redox stability of meat. Bioactive compounds from plant extracts can provide the antioxidative mechanisms required to improve animal health and welfare and, to protect meat against...... oxidation. Pharmacological properties and antioxidant effects have been associated to the extract of hops and to the extracts of yerba mate. However, the effects of hops and yerba mate as dietary supplement for animal feeding on the metabolic profile and the redox stability of meat have not been reported...... yet. Addition of extract of mate to a standard maize/soy feed at a level of 0.5, 1.0 or 1.5% to the diet of feedlot for cattle resulted in an increased level of inosine monophosphate, creatine, carnosine and of conjugated linoleic acid in the fresh meat. The tendency to radical formation in meat...

  19. Direct saccharification of milo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-10-28

    Crude or unrefined milo grain is pulverized to less than 100 mesh, suspended in water, and directly saccharified with enzymes. Thus, 10 kg of pulverized milo (100 mesh) was suspended in 20 liters water, liquified in the presence of bacterial amylase at 90/sup 0/ for 30 minutes and autoclaved for 10 minutes at 120/sup 0/, the liquifaction autoclave procedures were then repeated. The liquified preparation was saccharified in the presence of bacterial glucoamylase at 55/sup 0/ for 72 hours. The percentage saccharification of unrefined milo was 92-97%, which was comparable to that obtained with refined milo or a milo starch preparation. The saccharified milo preparation, when used as a sugar source in glutamic acid, lysine, or inosine fermentation, also showed similar efficiency to that of saccharified milo starch.

  20. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a nucleoside kinase from the hyperthermophile Methanocaldococcus jannaschii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnfors, Linda; Hansen, Thomas; Meining, Winfried; Schönheit, Peter; Ladenstein, Rudolf

    2005-01-01

    Nucleoside kinase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon M. jannaschii is a member of the PFK-B family which belongs to the ribokinase superfamily. Here, its expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis are described. Methanocaldococcus jannaschii nucleoside kinase (MjNK) is an ATP-dependent non-allosteric phosphotransferase that shows high catalytic activity for guanosine, inosine and cytidine. MjNK is a member of the phosphofructokinase B family, but participates in the biosynthesis of nucleoside monophosphates rather than in glycolysis. MjNK was crystallized as the apoenzyme as well as in complex with an ATP analogue and Mg 2+ . The latter crystal form was also soaked with fructose-6-phosphate. Synchrotron-radiation data were collected to 1.70 Å for the apoenzyme crystals and 1.93 Å for the complex crystals. All crystals exhibit orthorhombic symmetry; however, the apoenzyme crystals contain one monomer per asymmetric unit whereas the complex crystals contain a dimer

  1. Cloning, characterization and sequence comparison of the gene coding for IMP dehydrogenase from Pyrococcus furiosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collart, F R; Osipiuk, J; Trent, J; Olsen, G J; Huberman, E

    1996-10-03

    We have cloned and characterized the gene encoding inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) from Pyrococcus furiosus (Pf), a hyperthermophillic archeon. Sequence analysis of the Pf gene indicated an open reading frame specifying a protein of 485 amino acids (aa) with a calculated M(r) of 52900. Canonical Archaea promoter elements, Box A and Box B, are located -49 and -17 nucleotides (nt), respectively, upstream of the putative start codon. The sequence of the putative active-site region conforms to the IMPDH signature motif and contains a putative active-site cysteine. Phylogenetic relationships derived by using all available IMPDH sequences are consistent with trees developed for other molecules; they do not precisely resolve the history of Pf IMPDH but indicate a close similarity to bacterial IMPDH proteins. The phylogenetic analysis indicates that a gene duplication occurred prior to the division between rodents and humans, accounting for the Type I and II isoforms identified in mice and humans.

  2. Cloning and characterization of the gene encoding IMP dehydrogenase from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collart, F R; Osipiuk, J; Trent, J; Olsen, G J; Huberman, E

    1996-10-03

    We have cloned and characterized the gene encoding inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) from Arabidopsis thaliana (At). The transcription unit of the At gene spans approximately 1900 bp and specifies a protein of 503 amino acids with a calculated relative molecular mass (M(r)) of 54,190. The gene is comprised of a minimum of four introns and five exons with all donor and acceptor splice sequences conforming to previously proposed consensus sequences. The deduced IMPDH amino-acid sequence from At shows a remarkable similarity to other eukaryotic IMPDH sequences, with a 48% identity to human Type II enzyme. Allowing for conservative substitutions, the enzyme is 69% similar to human Type II IMPDH. The putative active-site sequence of At IMPDH conforms to the IMP dehydrogenase/guanosine monophosphate reductase motif and contains an essential active-site cysteine residue.

  3. Retrotransposons as regulators of gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbarbary, Reyad A; Lucas, Bronwyn A; Maquat, Lynne E

    2016-02-12

    Transposable elements (TEs) are both a boon and a bane to eukaryotic organisms, depending on where they integrate into the genome and how their sequences function once integrated. We focus on two types of TEs: long interspersed elements (LINEs) and short interspersed elements (SINEs). LINEs and SINEs are retrotransposons; that is, they transpose via an RNA intermediate. We discuss how LINEs and SINEs have expanded in eukaryotic genomes and contribute to genome evolution. An emerging body of evidence indicates that LINEs and SINEs function to regulate gene expression by affecting chromatin structure, gene transcription, pre-mRNA processing, or aspects of mRNA metabolism. We also describe how adenosine-to-inosine editing influences SINE function and how ongoing retrotransposition is countered by the body's defense mechanisms. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  4. Precursors of chicken flavor. II. Identification of key flavor precursors using sensory methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliani, Michel; Farmer, Linda J

    2005-08-10

    Sensory evaluation was used to identify flavor precursors that are critical for flavor development in cooked chicken. Among the potential flavor precursors studied (thiamin, inosine 5'-monophosphate, ribose, ribose-5-phosphate, glucose, and glucose-6-phosphate), ribose appears most important for chicken aroma. An elevated concentration (added or natural) of only 2-4-fold the natural concentration gives an increase in the selected aroma and flavor attributes of cooked chicken meat. Assessment of the volatile odor compounds by gas chromatography-odor assessment and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry showed that ribose increased odors described as "roasted" and "chicken" and that the changes in odor due to additional ribose are probably caused by elevated concentrations of compounds such as 2-furanmethanethiol, 2-methyl-3-furanthiol, and 3-methylthiopropanal.

  5. Solid-phase Synthesis of Combinatorial 2,4-Disubstituted-1,3,5-Triazine via Amine Nucleophilic Reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Sung Won [KIST Gangneung Institute, Gangneung (Korea, Republic of); Ham, Jungyeob [Gangneung-Wonju National University, Gangneung (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Young-Tae [National University of Singapore, Singapore (Singapore); Lee, Jae Wook [University of Science and Technology, Daejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    In combinatorial chemistry, solid-phase synthesis is a popular approach formass production of small molecules. Compared to solution-phase synthesis, it is easy to prepare and purify a large number of heterocyclic small molecules via solid-phase chemistry; the overall reaction time is decreased as well. 1,3,5-Triazine is a nitrogen-containing heterocyclic aromatic scaffold that was shown to be a druggable scaffold in recent studies. These structures have been reported as anticancer, antimicrobial, and antiretroviral compounds, as CDKs and p38 MAP kinase inhibitors, as estrogen receptor modulators, and as inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase inhibitors. we designed and synthesized disubstituted triazine compounds as an analog of disubstituted pyrimidine compounds. These disubstituted triazine compounds possess a linear structure which may have biological activity similar to that of disubstituted pyrimidine. Here we report the solid-phase synthesis of disubstituted triazine compounds.

  6. Studies on the influences of. gamma. -ray irradiation upon food additives, (7). Radiolysis of 5'-nucleotides due to. gamma. -ray irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamada, M [Shimonoseki Univ. of Fisheries, Yamaguchi (Japan); Gohya, Y; Ishio, S

    1981-08-01

    The effect of ..gamma..-ray irradiation on inosine-5'-monophosphate (5'-IMP) and guanosine-5'-monophosphate (5'-GMP) in aqueous solution and in ''kamaboko'' was investigated to evaluate the rate of decomposition and to elucidate the safety of the decomposed products, under the concentration of 0.025% and irradiation dose of 3.00 x 10/sup 5/ rad. Ribose-phosphate compound, inorganic phosphate and 2'-, 3'-nucleotides were ascertained when either 5'-IMP or 5'-GMP aqueous solution was irradiated. G value of 5'-IMP and 5'-GMP in aqueous solution were estimated to be 1.29 and 0.97, respectively. The radiolysis of both 5'-IMP and 5'-GMP in ''kamaboko'' was hardly proceeded.

  7. Solid-phase Synthesis of Combinatorial 2,4-Disubstituted-1,3,5-Triazine via Amine Nucleophilic Reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Sung Won; Ham, Jungyeob; Chang, Young-Tae; Lee, Jae Wook

    2015-01-01

    In combinatorial chemistry, solid-phase synthesis is a popular approach formass production of small molecules. Compared to solution-phase synthesis, it is easy to prepare and purify a large number of heterocyclic small molecules via solid-phase chemistry; the overall reaction time is decreased as well. 1,3,5-Triazine is a nitrogen-containing heterocyclic aromatic scaffold that was shown to be a druggable scaffold in recent studies. These structures have been reported as anticancer, antimicrobial, and antiretroviral compounds, as CDKs and p38 MAP kinase inhibitors, as estrogen receptor modulators, and as inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase inhibitors. we designed and synthesized disubstituted triazine compounds as an analog of disubstituted pyrimidine compounds. These disubstituted triazine compounds possess a linear structure which may have biological activity similar to that of disubstituted pyrimidine. Here we report the solid-phase synthesis of disubstituted triazine compounds

  8. RNA editing in Drosophila melanogaster: new targets and functionalconsequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stapleton, Mark; Carlson, Joseph W.; Celniker, Susan E.

    2006-09-05

    Adenosine deaminases that act on RNA (ADARs) catalyze the site-specific conversion of adenosine to inosine in primary mRNA transcripts. These re-coding events affect coding potential, splice-sites, and stability of mature mRNAs. ADAR is an essential gene and studies in mouse, C. elegans, and Drosophila suggest its primary function is to modify adult behavior by altering signaling components in the nervous system. By comparing the sequence of isogenic cDNAs to genomic DNA, we have identified and experimentally verified 27 new targets of Drosophila ADAR. Our analyses lead us to identify new classes of genes whose transcripts are targets of ADAR including components of the actin cytoskeleton, and genes involved in ion homeostasis and signal transduction. Our results indicate that editing in Drosophila increases the diversity of the proteome, and does so in a manner that has direct functional consequences on protein function.

  9. Mate extract as feed additive for improvement of beef quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Zawadzki, Andressa; Arrivetti, Leandro de O.R.; Vidal, Marília P.

    2017-01-01

    Mate (Ilex paraguariensis A.St.-Hil.) is generally recognized as safe (GRAS status) and has a high content of alkaloids, saponins, and phenolic acids. Addition of mate extract to broilers feed has been shown to increase the oxidative stability of chicken meat, however, its effect on beef quality...... from animals supplemented with mate extract has not been investigated so far. Addition of extract of mate to a standard maize/soy feed at a level of 0.5, 1.0 or 1.5% w/w to the diet of feedlot for cattle resulted in increased levels of inosine monophosphate, creatine and carnosine in the fresh meat....... The content of total conjugated linoleic acid increased in the meat as mate extract concentration was increased in the feed. The tendency to radical formation in meat slurries as quantified by EPR spin-trapping decreased as increasing mate extract addition to feed, especially after storage of the meat...

  10. Targeting a Novel Plasmodium falciparum Purine Recycling Pathway with Specific Immucillins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ting, L; Shi, W; Lewandowicz, A; Singh, V; Mwakingwe, A; Birck, M R; Taylor Ringia, E A; Bench, G; Madrid, D C; Tyler, P C; Evans, G B; Furneaux, R H; Schramm, V L; Kim, K.

    2004-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum is unable to synthesize purine bases and relies upon purine salvage and purine recycling to meet its purine needs. We report that purines formed as products of the polyamine pathway are recycled in a novel pathway in which 5'-methylthioinosine is generated by adenosine deaminase. The action of P. falciparum purine nucleoside phosphorylase is a convergent step of purine salvage, converting both 5'-methylthioinosine and inosine to hypoxanthine. We used accelerator mass spectrometry to verify that 5'-methylthioinosine is an active nucleic acid precursor in P. falciparum. Prior studies have shown that inhibitors of purine salvage enzymes kill malaria, but potent malaria-specific inhibitors of these enzymes have not previously been described. 5'-methylthio-Immucillin-H, a transition state analogue inhibitor that is selective for malarial over human purine nucleoside phosphorylase, kills P. falciparum in culture. Immucillins are currently in clinical trials for other indications and may have application as antimalarials

  11. 1-Methyl-beta-carboline (harmane), a potent endogenous inhibitor of benzodiazepine receptor binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rommelspacher, H; Nanz, C; Borbe, H O; Fehske, K J; Müller, W E; Wollert, U

    1980-10-01

    The interaction of several beta-carbolines with specific [3H]-flunitrazepam binding to benzodiazepine receptors in rat brain membranes was investigated. Out of the investigated compounds, harmane and norharmane were the most potent inhibitors of specific [3H]-flunitrazepam binding, with IC50-values in the micromolar range. All other derivatives, including harmine, harmaline, and several tetrahydroderivatives were at least ten times less potent. Harmane has been previously found in rat brain and human urine, so it is the most potent endogenous inhibitor of specific [3H]-flunitrazepam binding known so far, with a several fold higher affinity for the benzodiazepine receptor than inosine and hypoxanthine. Thus, we suggest that harmane or other related beta-carbolines could be potential candidates as endogenous ligands of the benzodiazepine receptor.

  12. Stimulation of Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin formation by caffeine and theobromine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labbe, R G; Nolan, L L

    1981-01-01

    In the presence of 100 micrograms of caffeine per ml or 200 micrograms of theobromine per ml, sporulation of Clostridium perfringens NCTC 8679 rose from less than 1 to 80 or 85%. Enterotoxin concentration increased from undetectable levels to 450 micrograms/mg of cell extract protein. Heat-resistant spore levels increased from less than 1,000 to between 1 X 10(7) and 2 X 10(7)/ml. These effects were partially reversible by the addition of adenosine or thymidine. In the case of NCTC 8238, caffeine and theobromine caused a three- to fourfold increase in the percentages of cells possessing refractile spores and a similar increase in enterotoxin concentration. Heat-resistant spore levels, however, were unaffected. Inosine was ineffective in promoting sporulation in NCTC 8679. PMID:6271685

  13. Sequence-specific label-free nucleic acid biosensor for the detection of the hepatitis C virus genotype 1a using a disposable pencil graphite electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donmez, Soner; Arslan, Fatma; Arslan, Halit

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate a simple, sensitive, inexpensive, disposable and label-free electrochemical nucleic acid biosensor for the detection of the hepatitis C virus genotype 1a (HCV1a). The nucleic acid biosensor was designed with the amino-linked inosine-substituted 20-mer probes, which were immobilized onto a disposable pencil graphite electrode (PGE) by covalent linking. The proposed nucleic acid biosensor was linear in the range of 0.05 and 0.75 μM, exhibiting a limit of detection of 54.9 nM. The single-stranded synthetic PCR product analogs of HCV1a were also detected with satisfactory results under optimal conditions, showing the potential application of this biosensor.

  14. 3',5'-cIMP as Potential Second Messenger in the Vascular Wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Susan W S; Gao, Yuansheng; Vanhoutte, Paul M

    2017-01-01

    Traditionally, only the 3',5'-cyclic monophosphates of adenosine and guanosine (produced by adenylyl cyclase and guanylyl cyclase, respectively) are regarded as true "second messengers" in the vascular wall, despite the presence of other cyclic nucleotides in different tissues. Among these noncanonical cyclic nucleotides, inosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cIMP) is synthesized by soluble guanylyl cyclase in porcine coronary arteries in response to hypoxia, when the enzyme is activated by endothelium-derived nitric oxide. Its production is associated with augmentation of vascular contraction mediated by stimulation of Rho kinase. Based on these findings, cIMP appears to meet most, if not all, of the criteria required for it to be accepted as a "second messenger," at least in the vascular wall.

  15. Argon laser treatment of central serous chorioretinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting- Bing Fang

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To observe the efficacy of the argon laser photocoagulation treatment of central serous chorioretinopathy(CSC. METHODS: The treatment groups: 18 patients(18 eyes, argon laser photocoagulation and oral jolethin, vitamin B1, inosine and venoruton tablets. Control group: 18 patients(18 eyes, oral lecithin complex iodine, vitamin B1, inosine, venoruton tablets. Foveal thickness and neuroepithelial layer detachment range were measured by optical coherence tomography(OCTbefore treatment, after 1 month and 3 months post-operation to compare the decline in value of foveal thickness and neuroepithelial layer detachment range of the two groups. RESULTS: After 1 month of treatment, the decline in value of the center foveal thickness: the value of treatment group was 256±72μm; the value of the control group was 82±57μm, and the difference of the two groups, P <0.05; the decline in value of neuroepithelial layer detachment range: the value of the treatment group was 3 548±168μm, the value of the control group was 1 520±143μm, And the difference of the two groups, P<0.05. After three months of treatment, the decline in value of the center foveal thickness: the value of treatment group was 383±75μm, the value of the control group was 312±67 μm, and the difference of the two groups, P<0.05; decline in value of neuroepithelial layer detachment range: the value of the treatment group was 4 908±172μm, the value of the control group was 4 211±153μm, and the difference of the two groups, P <0.05. The differences were statistically significant between the treatment and the control groups(two independent samples t-test. CONCLUSION:Argon laser photocoagulation treatment of CSC is an effective treatment method and can significantly shorten the course.

  16. Exquisite Modulation of the Active Site of Methanocaldococcus jannaschii Adenylosuccinate Synthetase in Forward Reaction Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnawat, Vishakha; Mehrotra, Sonali; Balaram, Hemalatha; Puranik, Mrinalini

    2016-05-03

    In enzymes that conduct complex reactions involving several substrates and chemical transformations, the active site must reorganize at each step to complement the transition state of that chemical step. Adenylosuccinate synthetase (ADSS) utilizes a molecule each of guanosine 5'-monophosphate (GTP) and aspartate to convert inosine 5'-monophosphate (IMP) into succinyl adenosine 5'-monophosphate (sAMP) through several kinetic intermediates. Here we followed catalysis by ADSS through high-resolution vibrational spectral fingerprints of each substrate and intermediate involved in the forward reaction. Vibrational spectra show differential ligand distortion at each step of catalysis, and band positions of substrates are influenced by binding of cosubstrates. We found that the bound IMP is distorted toward its N1-deprotonated form even in the absence of any other ligands. Several specific interactions between GTP and active-site amino acid residues result in large Raman shifts and contribute substantially to intrinsic binding energy. When both IMP and GTP are simultaneously bound to ADSS, IMP is converted into an intermediate 6-phosphoryl inosine 5'-monophosphate (6-pIMP). The 6-pIMP·ADSS complex was found to be stable upon binding of the third ligand, hadacidin (HDA), an analogue of l-aspartate. We find that in the absence of HDA, 6-pIMP is quickly released from ADSS, is unstable in solution, and converts back into IMP. HDA allosterically stabilizes ADSS through local conformational rearrangements. We captured this complex and determined the spectra and structure of 6-pIMP in its enzyme-bound state. These results provide important insights into the exquisite tuning of active-site interactions with changing substrate at each kinetic step of catalysis.

  17. The Use of Germinants to Potentiate the Sensitivity of Bacillus anthracis Spores to Peracetic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celebi, Ozgur; Buyuk, Fatih; Pottage, Tom; Crook, Ant; Hawkey, Suzanna; Cooper, Callum; Bennett, Allan; Sahin, Mitat; Baillie, Leslie

    2016-01-01

    Elimination of Bacillus anthracis spores from the environment is a difficult and costly process due in part to the toxicity of current sporicidal agents. For this reason we investigated the ability of the spore germinants L-alanine (100 mM) and inosine (5 mM) to reduce the concentration of peracetic acid (PAA) required to inactivate B. anthracis spores. While L-alanine significantly enhanced (p = 0.0085) the bactericidal activity of 500 ppm PAA the same was not true for inosine suggesting some form of negative interaction. In contrast the germinant combination proved most effective at 100 ppm PAA (p = 0.0009). To determine if we could achieve similar results in soil we treated soil collected from the burial site of an anthrax infected animal which had been supplemented with spores of the Sterne strain of B. anthracis to increase the level of contamination to 10(4) spores/g. Treatment with germinants followed 1 h later by 5000 ppm PAA eliminated all of the spores. In contrast direct treatment of the animal burial site using this approach delivered using a back pack sprayer had no detectable effect on the level of B. anthracis contamination or on total culturable bacterial numbers over the course of the experiment. It did trigger a significant, but temporary, reduction (p < 0.0001) in the total spore count suggesting that germination had been triggered under real world conditions. In conclusion, we have shown that the application of germinants increase the sensitivity of bacterial spores to PAA. While the results of the single field trial were inconclusive, the study highlighted the potential of this approach and the challenges faced when attempting to perform real world studies on B. anthracis spores contaminated sites.

  18. The use of germinants to potentiate the sensitivity of Bacillus anthracis spores to peracetic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozgur eCelebi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Elimination of Bacillus anthracis spores from the environment is a difficult and costly process due in part to the toxicity of current sporicidal agents. For this reason we investigated the ability of the spore germinants L-alanine (100 mM and inosine (5 mM to reduce the concentration of peracetic acid (PAA required to inactivate B.anthracis spores. While L-alanine significantly enhanced (p=0.0085 the bactericidal activity of 500 ppm PAA the same was not true for inosine suggesting some form of negative interaction. In contrast the germinant combination proved most effective at 100 ppm PAA (p=0.0009. To determine if we could achieve similar results in soil we treated soil collected from the burial site of an anthrax infected animal which had been supplemented with spores of the Sterne strain of B.anthracis to increase the level of contamination to 104 spores/g. Treatment with germinants followed one hour later by 5000 ppm PAA eliminated all of the spores. In contrast direct treatment of the animal burial site using this approach delivered using a back pack sprayer had no detectable effect on the level of B.anthracis contamination or on total culturable bacterial numbers over the course of the experiment. It did trigger a significant, but temporary, reduction (p<0.0001 in the total spore count suggesting that germination had been triggered under real world conditions. In conclusion, we have shown that the application of germinants increase the sensitivity of bacterial spores to PAA. While the results of the single field trial were inconclusive, the study highlighted the potential of this approach and the challenges faced when attempting to perform real world studies on B.anthracis spores contaminated sites.

  19. Analysis of metabolomic patterns in thoroughbreds before and after exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Jun Jang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective Evaluation of exercise effects in racehorses is important in horseracing industry and animal health care. In this study, we compared metabolic patterns between before and after exercise to screen metabolic biomarkers for exercise effects in thoroughbreds. Methods The concentration of metabolites in muscle, plasma, and urine was measured by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy analysis and the relative metabolite levels in the three samples were compared between before and after exercise. Subsequently, multivariate data analysis based on the metabolic profiles was performed using orthogonal partial least square discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA and variable important plots and t-test was used for basic statistical analysis. Results From 1H NMR spectroscopy analysis, 35, 25, and 34 metabolites were detected in the muscle, plasma, and urine. Aspartate, betaine, choline, cysteine, ethanol, and threonine were increased over 2-fold in the muscle; propionate and trimethylamine were increased over 2-fold in the plasma; and alanine, glycerol, inosine, lactate, and pyruvate were increased over 2-fold whereas acetoacetate, arginine, citrulline, creatine, glutamine, glutarate, hippurate, lysine, methionine, phenylacetylglycine, taurine, trigonelline, trimethylamine, and trimethylamine N-oxide were decreased below 0.5-fold in the urine. The OPLS-DA showed clear separation of the metabolic patterns before and after exercise in the muscle, plasma, and urine. Statistical analysis showed that after exercise, acetoacetate, arginine, glutamine, hippurate, phenylacetylglycine trimethylamine, trimethylamine N-oxide, and trigonelline were significantly decreased and alanine, glycerol, inosine, lactate, and pyruvate were significantly increased in the urine (p<0.05. Conclusion In conclusion, we analyzed integrated metabolic patterns in the muscle, plasma, and urine before and after exercise in racehorses. We found changed patterns of metabolites in

  20. Concentration of Umami Compounds in Pork Meat and Cooking Juice with Different Cooking Times and Temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotola-Pukkila, Minna K; Pihlajaviita, Seija T; Kaimainen, Mika T; Hopia, Anu I

    2015-12-01

    This study examined the concentrations of umami compounds in pork loins cooked at 3 different temperatures and 3 different lengths of cooking times. The pork loins were cooked with the sous vide technique. The free amino acids (FAAs), glutamic acid and aspartic acid; the 5'-nucleotides, inosine-5'-monophosphate (IMP) and adenosine-5'-monophosphate (AMP); and corresponding nucleoside inosine of the cooked meat and its released juice were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Under the experimental conditions used, the cooking temperature played a more important role than the cooking time in the concentration of the analyzed compounds. The amino acid concentrations in the meat did not remain constant under these experimental conditions. The most notable effect observed was that of the cooking temperature and the higher amino acid concentrations in the released juice of meat cooked at 80 °C compared with 60 and 70 °C. This is most likely due to the heat induced hydrolysis of proteins and peptides releasing water soluble FAAs from the meat into the cooking juice. In this experiment, the cooking time and temperature had no influence on the IMP concentrations observed. However, the AMP concentrations increased with the increasing temperature and time. This suggests that the choice of time and temperature in sous vide cooking affects the nucleotide concentration of pork meat. The Sous vide technique proved to be a good technique to preserve the cooking juice and the results presented here show that cooking juice is rich in umami compounds, which can be used to provide a savory or brothy taste. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  1. Assessment of nucleosides as putative tumor biomarkers in prostate cancer screening by CE-UV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzatto, Adriana Zardini; de Oliveira Silva, Mariana; Poppi, Ronei Jesus; Simionato, Ana Valéria Colnaghi

    2017-05-01

    Cancer is responsible for millions of deaths worldwide, but most base diseases may be cured if detected early. Screening tests may be used to identify early-stage malignant neoplasms. However, the major screening tool for prostate cancer, the prostate-specific antigen test, has unsuitable sensitivity. Since cancer cells may affect the pattern of consumption and excretion of nucleosides, such biomolecules are putative biomarkers that can be used for diagnosis and treatment evaluation. Using a previously validated method for the analysis of nucleosides in blood serum by capillary electrophoresis with UV-vis spectroscopy detection, we investigated 60 samples from healthy individuals and 42 samples from prostate cancer patients. The concentrations of nucleosides in both groups were compared and a multivariate partial least squares-discriminant analysis classification model was optimized for prediction of prostate cancer. The validation of the model with an independent sample set resulted in the correct classification of 82.4% of the samples, with sensitivity of 90.5% and specificity of 76.7%. A significant downregulation of 5-methyluridine and inosine was observed, which can be indicative of the carcinogenic process. Therefore, such analytes are potential candidates for prostate cancer screening. Graphical Abstract Separation of the studied nucleosides and the internal standard 8-Bromoguanosine by CE-UV (a); classification of the external validation samples (30 from healthy volunteers and 21 from prostate cancer patients) by the developed Partial Least Square - Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA) model with accuracy of 82.4% (b); Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC) curve (c); and Variable Importance in the Projection (VIP) values for the studied nucleosides (d). A significant down-regulation of 5- methyluridine (5mU) and inosine (I) was observed, which can be indicative of the presence of prostate tumors.

  2. Reciprocal regulation of A-to-I RNA editing and the vertebrate nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Charles Penn

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The fine control of molecules mediating communication in the nervous system is key to adjusting neuronal responsiveness during development and in maintaining the stability of established networks in the face of altered sensory input. To prevent culmination of pathological recurrent network excitation or debilitating periods of quiescence, adaptive alterations occur in the signalling molecules and ion channels that control membrane excitability and synaptic transmission. However, rather than encoding (and thus ‘hardwiring’ modified gene copies, the nervous systems of metazoa have opted for expanding on post-transcriptional pre-mRNA splicing by altering key encoded amino acids using a conserved mechanism of A-to-I RNA editing: the enzymatic deamination of adenosine resulting in a change in the nucleotide to inosine. Inosine exhibits similar base-pairing properties to guanosine with respect to tRNA codon recognition, replication by polymerases and RNA secondary structure forming capacity. In addition to recoding within the open reading frame, adenosine deamination also occurs with high frequency throughout the non-coding transcriptome, where it affects multiple aspects of RNA metabolism and gene expression. We will describe here the recoding function of key RNA editing targets in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS and their potential to be regulated. We will then discuss how interactions of A-to-I editing with gene expression and alternative splicing could play a wider role in regulating the neuronal transcriptome. Finally, we will highlight the increasing complexity of this multifaceted control hub by summarising new findings from high-throughput studies.

  3. Influence of infection by Toxoplasma gondii on purine levels and E-ADA activity in the brain of mice experimentally infected mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonin, Alexandre A; Da Silva, Aleksandro S; Casali, Emerson A; Silveira, Stephanie S; Moritz, Cesar E J; Camillo, Giovana; Flores, Mariana M; Fighera, Rafael; Thomé, Gustavo R; Morsch, Vera M; Schetinger, Maria Rosa C; Rue, Mario De La; Vogel, Fernanda S F; Lopes, Sonia T A

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the purine levels and E-ADA activity in the brain of mice (BALB/c) experimentally infected with Toxoplasma gondii. In experiment I (n=24) the mice were infected with RH strain of T. gondii, while in experiment II (n=36) they were infected with strain ME-49 of T. gondii. Our results showed that, for RH strain (acute phase), an increase in both periods in the levels of ATP, ADP, AMP, adenosine, hypoxanthine, xanthine (only on day 6 PI) and uric acid (only on day 6 PI). By the other hand, the RH strain led, on days 4 and 6 PI, to a reduction in the concentration of inosine. ME-49, a cystogenic strain, showed some differences in acute and chronic phase, since on day 6 PI the levels of ATP and ADP were increased, while on day 30 these same nucleotides were reduced. On day 60 PI, ME-49 induced a reduction in the levels of ATP, ADP, AMP, adenosine, inosine and xanthine, while uric acid was increased. A decrease of E-ADA activity was observed in brain on days 4 and 6 PI (RH), and 30 PI (ME-49); however on day 60 PI E-ADA activity was increased for infection by ME-49 strain. Therefore, it was possible to conclude that infection with T. gondii changes the purine levels and the activity of E-ADA in brain, which may be associated with neurological signs commonly observed in this disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. cIMP synthesized by sGC as a mediator of hypoxic contraction of coronary arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhengju; Zhang, Xu; Ying, Lei; Dou, Dou; Li, Yanhui; Bai, Yun; Liu, Juan; Liu, Limei; Feng, Han; Yu, Xiaoxing; Leung, Susan Wai-Sum; Vanhoutte, Paul M; Gao, Yuansheng

    2014-08-01

    cGMP is considered the only mediator synthesized by soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) in response to nitric oxide (NO). However, purified sGC can synthesize several other cyclic nucleotides, including inosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cIMP). The present study was designed to determine the role of cIMP in hypoxic contractions of isolated porcine coronary arteries. Vascular responses were examined by measuring isometric tension. Cyclic nucleotides were assayed by HPLC tandem mass spectroscopy. Rho kinase (ROCK) activity was determined by measuring the phosphorylation of myosin phosphatase target subunit 1 using Western blot analysis and an ELISA kit. The level of cIMP, but not that of cGMP, was elevated by hypoxia in arteries with, but not in those without, endothelium [except if treated with diethylenetriamine (DETA) NONOate]; the increases in cIMP were inhibited by the sGC inhibitor 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3,-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ). Hypoxia (Po2: 25-30 mmHg) augmented contractions of arteries with and without endothelium if treated with DETA NONOate; these hypoxic contractions were blocked by ODQ. In arteries without endothelium, hypoxic augmentation of contraction was also obtained with exogenous cIMP. In arteries with endothelium, hypoxic augmentation of contraction was further enhanced by inosine 5'-triphosphate, the precursor for cIMP. The augmentation of contraction caused by hypoxia or cIMP was accompanied by increased phosphorylation of myosin phosphatase target subunit 1 at Thr(853), which was prevented by the ROCK inhibitor Y-27632. ROCK activity in the supernatant of isolated arteries was stimulated by cIMP in a concentration-dependent fashion. These results demonstrate that cIMP synthesized by sGC is the likely mediator of hypoxic augmentation of coronary vasoconstriction, in part by activating ROCK. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  5. Purine biosynthesis in archaea: variations on a theme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown Anne M

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability to perform de novo biosynthesis of purines is present in organisms in all three domains of life, reflecting the essentiality of these molecules to life. Although the pathway is quite similar in eukaryotes and bacteria, the archaeal pathway is more variable. A careful manual curation of genes in this pathway demonstrates the value of manual curation in archaea, even in pathways that have been well-studied in other domains. Results We searched the Integrated Microbial Genome system (IMG for the 17 distinct genes involved in the 11 steps of de novo purine biosynthesis in 65 sequenced archaea, finding 738 predicted proteins with sequence similarity to known purine biosynthesis enzymes. Each sequence was manually inspected for the presence of active site residues and other residues known or suspected to be required for function. Many apparently purine-biosynthesizing archaea lack evidence for a single enzyme, either glycinamide ribonucleotide formyltransferase or inosine monophosphate cyclohydrolase, suggesting that there are at least two more gene variants in the purine biosynthetic pathway to discover. Variations in domain arrangement of formylglycinamidine ribonucleotide synthetase and substantial problems in aminoimidazole carboxamide ribonucleotide formyltransferase and inosine monophosphate cyclohydrolase assignments were also identified. Manual curation revealed some overly specific annotations in the IMG gene product name, with predicted proteins without essential active site residues assigned product names implying enzymatic activity (21 proteins, 2.8% of proteins inspected or Enzyme Commission (E. C. numbers (57 proteins, 7.7%. There were also 57 proteins (7.7% assigned overly generic names and 78 proteins (10.6% without E.C. numbers as part of the assigned name when a specific enzyme name and E. C. number were well-justified. Conclusions The patchy distribution of purine biosynthetic genes in archaea is

  6. Use of potassium chloride and flavor enhancers in low sodium Cheddar cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grummer, J; Bobowski, N; Karalus, M; Vickers, Z; Schoenfuss, T

    2013-03-01

    We investigated use of potassium chloride (KCl) to maintain both the salty flavor and to replace the preservative effects of salt when reducing the sodium content in natural cheese. Because salt replacers can affect flavor because of inherent off-flavors, such as bitter and metallic, we examined the use of flavor enhancers for their ability to modulate some of these undesirable sensory effects. Stirred-curd Cheddar-style cheese was manufactured using 2 cheese-making procedures (different curd knife sizes and target salting titratable acidities), in duplicate. Curd was salted with sodium chloride (NaCl) or 60% reduced sodium blends of NaCl and KCl (2 different sources). Curd was also salted at a 60% reduced sodium rate with NaCl and KCl with added flavor enhancers. A hydrolyzed vegetable protein/yeast extract blend, a natural "potassium-blocking type" flavor, disodium inosinate, or disodium guanylate were each blended with the reduced sodium salt blend and added to curd at the salting step. The resulting blocks of cheese were aged for 5 mo and evaluated monthly for chemical, microbial, and sensory differences. At 5 mo of aging, we measured liking for the cheeses using a consumer panel. Overall, cheeses were well liked by the consumer panel, and the scores of reduced sodium cheese with 2 different KCl sources were not different from those of the full-sodium control. The addition of flavor enhancers to Cheddar curd had mixed results, with one improving the consumer flavor liking only slightly over KCl, and one (disodium inosinate) significantly reducing consumer flavor liking scores, presumably due to the amount of umami flavor it contributed. Potassium chloride replacement salts sourced from different manufacturers affected the chemical and flavor properties of cheese, and changes to pH and temperature targets may be necessary to yield cheese with the moisture and pH targets desired. The cheese-making procedure used also influenced flavors observed, which resulted in

  7. A strategy for isolation of cDNAs encoding proteins affecting human intestinal epithelial cell growth and differentiation: characterization of a novel gut-specific N-myristoylated annexin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wice, B M; Gordon, J I

    1992-01-01

    The human intestinal epithelium is rapidly and perpetually renewed as the descendants of multipotent stem cells located in crypts undergo proliferation, differentiation, and eventual exfoliation during a very well organized migration along the crypt to villus axis. The mechanisms that establish and maintain this balance between proliferation and differentiation are largely unknown. We have utilized HT-29 cells, derived from a human colon adenocarcinoma, as a model system for identifying gene products that may regulate these processes. Proliferating HT-29 cells cultured in the absence of glucose (e.g., using inosine as the carbon source) have some of the characteristics of undifferentiated but committed crypt epithelial cells while postconfluent cells cultured in the absence of glucose resemble terminally differentiated enterocytes or goblet cells. A cDNA library, constructed from exponentially growing HT-29 cells maintained in inosine-containing media, was sequentially screened with a series of probes depleted of sequences encoding housekeeping functions and enriched for intestine-specific sequences that are expressed in proliferating committed, but not differentiated, epithelial cells. Of 100,000 recombinant phage surveyed, one was found whose cDNA was derived from an apparently gut-specific mRNA. It encodes a 316 residue, 35,463-D protein that is a new member of the annexin/lipocortin family. Other family members have been implicated in regulation of cellular growth and in signal transduction pathways. RNA blot and in situ hybridization studies indicate that the gene encoding this new annexin exhibits region-specific expression along both axes of the human gut: (a) highest levels of mRNA are present in the jejunum with marked and progressive reductions occurring distally; (b) its mRNA appears in crypt-associated epithelial cells and increases in concentration as they exit the crypt. Villus-associated epithelial cells continue to transcribe this gene during their

  8. All or none cell responses of Ca2+-dependent K channels elicited by calcium or lead in human red cells can be explained by heterogeneity of agonist distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, J.; Garcia-Sancho, J.; Herreros, B.

    1988-01-01

    We have studied the all or none cell response of Ca2+-dependent K+ channels to added Ca in human red cells depleted of ATP by incubation with iodoacetate and inosine. A procedure was used which allows separation and differential analysis of responding and nonresponding cells. Responding (H for heavy) cells incubated in medium containing 5 mM K lose KCl and water and increase their density to the point of sinking on diethylphthalate (specific gravity = 1.12) on centrifugation. Nonresponding (L for light) cells do not lose KCl at all. There is no intermediate behavior. Increasing the Ca concentration in the medium increases the fraction of cells which become H. No differences in the sensitivity to Ca2+ of the individual K+ channels were detected in inside-out vesicles prepared either from H or from L cells. The Ca content of H cells was higher than that of L cells. Cells depleted of ATP by incubation with iodoacetate and inosine sustain pump-leak Ca fluxes of about 15 mumol/liter cells per hour. ATP seems to be resynthesized in these cells at the expense of cell 2,3-diphosphoglycerate stores at a rate of about 150 mumol/liter cells per hour. Inhibition of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate phosphatase by tetrathionate increased 6-8 times the measured rate of uptake of external 45Ca. This was accompanied by an increase in the fraction of H cells. All or none cell responses of Ca2+-dependent K channels have also been evidenced in intact human red cells on addition of Pb. They have the same characteristics as those in responding and nonresponding cells. The detailed study of the kinetics of Pb-induced shrinkage of red cells suspended in medium containing 5 mM K showed that changes of Pb concentration changed not only the fraction of H cells but also the rate of shrinkage of responding cells. H cells generated by Pb treatment contained significantly more lead than L cells

  9. Comparison of carcass yields and meat quality between Baicheng-You chickens and Arbor Acres broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarsenbek, A; Wang, T; Zhao, J K; Jiang, W

    2013-10-01

    This study examined carcass yields and meat quality traits between Baicheng-You (BCY) chickens and Arbor Acres (AA) broilers. Thirty birds for each strain were selected and slaughtered at market ages of 49 d for AA broilers and 120 d for BCY. The results showed that BCY chickens had lower dressing (2.99%), semi-evisceration (5.10%), breast muscle (5.80%), and abdominal fat (1.55%) than those for AA broilers (P 0.05) difference of CP content in the same muscles of the 2 strains. The intramuscular fat (IMF) content was greater (P < 0.05) in thigh muscles of BCY chickens (6.80%) than those of AA broilers (4.28%), and inosine-5'-monophosphate (IMP) content was greater (P < 0.05) in breast and thigh muscles of BCY chickens (IMP: 3.79 and 1.47 mg/g) than same muscles in AA broilers (1.42 and 0.47 mg/g). In this study, muscle from 120-d-old BCY chickens was judged to have better quality traits with regard to cooking loss, drip loss, contents of IMF, and IMP compared with meat from 42-d-old AA broilers. At the same time, greater carcass yields, greater thigh pH24, and lower IMF content were observed in AA broilers compared with the BCY chickens.

  10. Aedes aegypti Molecular Responses to Zika Virus: Modulation of Infection by the Toll and Jak/Stat Immune Pathways and Virus Host Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yesseinia I. Angleró-Rodríguez

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Zika (ZIKV and dengue virus (DENV are transmitted to humans by Aedes mosquitoes. However, the molecular interactions between the vector and ZIKV remain largely unexplored. In this work, we further investigated the tropism of ZIKV in two different Aedes aegypti strains and show that the virus infection kinetics, tissue migration, and susceptibility to infection differ between mosquito strains. We also compare the vector transcriptome changes upon ZIKV or DENV infection demonstrating that 40% of the mosquito’s midgut infection-responsive transcriptome is virus-specific at 7 days after virus ingestion. Regulated genes included key factors of the mosquito’s anti-viral immunity. Comparison of the ZIKV and DENV infection-responsive transcriptome data to those available for yellow fever virus and West Nile virus identified 26 genes likely to play key roles in virus infection of Aedes mosquitoes. Through reverse genetic analyses, we show that the Toll and the Jak/Stat innate immune pathways mediate increased resistance to ZIKV infection, and the conserved DENV host factors vATPase and inosine-5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase are also utilized for ZIKV infection.

  11. Review. Elimination of viruses in plants: twenty years of progress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Panattoni

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available To shed light on trends about elimination of viruses from plants, a bibliographic research was conducted to identify thermotherapy, chemotherapy and tissue culture trials published from 1991 through 2010. Among woody plants, grapevine, apple and peach are the most frequent targets of sanitation protocols because their health status is strictly regulated. Even if thermotherapy represents the preferred method for the host, grapevine viruses can also be eliminated with chemotherapy and tissue culture; apple viruses respond to chemotherapy as well. Although a similar trend was reported among herbaceous plants, chemotherapy was the most frequently used technique in potato. With regard to virus, thermotherapy was successfully applied against viruses belonging to 13 families and an unassigned genus. Instead, chemotherapy and tissue culture techniques eradicated viruses belonging to fewer families (nine. An interpretation of thermotherapy effects considers the new metabolic “pathways” triggered by the natural antiviral response emitted by the infected plant, with particular reference to virus-induced gene silencing. With regard to chemotherapy, several groups of antiviral drugs belong to inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase inhibitors, S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase inhibitors, neuraminidase inhibitors. Tissue culture, usually adopted to regenerate plantlets in biotechnological breeding programs, represents the less used tool for eliminate viruses from plants.

  12. Celebrating wobble decoding: Half a century and still much is new.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agris, Paul F; Eruysal, Emily R; Narendran, Amithi; Väre, Ville Y P; Vangaveti, Sweta; Ranganathan, Srivathsan V

    2017-08-16

    A simple post-transcriptional modification of tRNA, deamination of adenosine to inosine at the first, or wobble, position of the anticodon, inspired Francis Crick's Wobble Hypothesis 50 years ago. Many more naturally-occurring modifications have been elucidated and continue to be discovered. The post-transcriptional modifications of tRNA's anticodon domain are the most diverse and chemically complex of any RNA modifications. Their contribution with regards to chemistry, structure and dynamics reveal individual and combined effects on tRNA function in recognition of cognate and wobble codons. As forecast by the Modified Wobble Hypothesis 25 years ago, some individual modifications at tRNA's wobble position have evolved to restrict codon recognition whereas others expand the tRNA's ability to read as many as four synonymous codons. Here, we review tRNA wobble codon recognition using specific examples of simple and complex modification chemistries that alter tRNA function. Understanding natural modifications has inspired evolutionary insights and possible innovation in protein synthesis.

  13. Serial Metabolome Changes in a Prospective Cohort of Subjects with Influenza Viral Infection and Comparison with Dengue Fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Liang; Fang, Jinling; Ooi, Eng Eong; Lee, Yie Hou

    2017-07-07

    Influenza virus infection (IVI) and dengue virus infection (DVI) are major public health threats. Between IVI and DVI, clinical symptoms can be overlapping yet infection-specific, but host metabolome changes are not well-described. Untargeted metabolomics and targeted oxylipinomic analyses were performed on sera serially collected at three phases of infection from a prospective cohort study of adult subjects with either H3N2 influenza infection or dengue fever. Untargeted metabolomics identified 26 differential metabolites, and major perturbed pathways included purine metabolism, fatty acid biosynthesis and β-oxidation, tryptophan metabolism, phospholipid catabolism, and steroid hormone pathway. Alterations in eight oxylipins were associated with the early symptomatic phase of H3N2 flu infection, were mostly arachidonic acid-derived, and were enriched in the lipoxygenase pathway. There was significant overlap in metabolome profiles in both infections. However, differences specific to IVI and DVI were observed. DVI specifically attenuated metabolites including serotonin, bile acids and biliverdin. Additionally, metabolome changes were more persistent in IVI in which metabolites such as hypoxanthine, inosine, and xanthine of the purine metabolism pathway remained significantly elevated at 21-27 days after fever onset. This study revealed the dynamic metabolome changes in IVI subjects and provided biochemical insights on host physiological similarities and differences between IVI and DVI.

  14. The effect of ethionine on ribonucleic acid synthesis in rat liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swann, P F

    1975-01-01

    1. By 1h after administration of ethionine to the female rat the appearance of newly synthesized 18SrRNA in the cytoplasm is completely inhibited. This is not caused by inhibition of RNA synthesis, for the synthesis of the large ribosomal precursor RNA (45S) and of tRNA continues. Cleavage of 45S RNA to 32S RNA also occurs, but there was no evidence for the accumulation of mature or immature rRNA in the nucleus. 2. The effect of ethionine on the maturation of rRNA was not mimicked by an inhibitor of protein synthesis (cycloheximide) or an inhibitor of polyamine synthesis [methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone)]. 3. Unlike the ethionine-induced inhibition of protein synthesis, this effect was not prevented by concurrent administration of inosine. A similar effect could be induced in HeLa cells by incubation for 1h in a medium lacking methionine. The ATP concentration in these cells was normal. From these two observations it was concluded that the effect of etionine on rRNA maturation is not caused by an ethionine-induced lack of ATP. It is suggested that ethionine, by lowering the hepatic concentration of S-adenosylmethionine, prevents methylation of the ribosomal precursor. The methylation is essential for the correct maturation of the molecule; without methylation complete degradation occurs. PMID:1212195

  15. Evaluation of Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei health during a superintensive aquaculture growout using NMR-based metabolomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracey B Schock

    Full Text Available Success of the shrimp aquaculture industry requires technological advances that increase production and environmental sustainability. Indoor, superintensive, aquaculture systems are being developed that permit year-round production of farmed shrimp at high densities. These systems are intended to overcome problems of disease susceptibility and of water quality issues from waste products, by operating as essentially closed systems that promote beneficial microbial communities (biofloc. The resulting biofloc can assimilate and detoxify wastes, may provide nutrition for the farmed organisms resulting in improved growth, and may aid in reducing disease initiated from external sources. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR-based metabolomic techniques were used to assess shrimp health during a full growout cycle from the nursery phase through harvest in a minimal-exchange, superintensive, biofloc system. Aberrant shrimp metabolomes were detected from a spike in total ammonia nitrogen in the nursery, from a reduced feeding period that was a consequence of surface scum build-up in the raceway, and from the stocking transition from the nursery to the growout raceway. The biochemical changes in the shrimp that were induced by the stressors were essential for survival and included nitrogen detoxification and energy conservation mechanisms. Inosine and trehalose may be general biomarkers of stress in Litopenaeus vannamei. This study demonstrates one aspect of the practicality of using NMR-based metabolomics to enhance the aquaculture industry by providing physiological insight into common environmental stresses that may limit growth or better explain reduced survival and production.

  16. Serum and Plasma Metabolomic Biomarkers for Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Nishith; Shahjaman, Md; Mollah, Md Nurul Haque; Islam, S M Shahinul; Hoque, Md Aminul

    2017-01-01

    In drug invention and early disease prediction of lung cancer, metabolomic biomarker detection is very important. Mortality rate can be decreased, if cancer is predicted at the earlier stage. Recent diagnostic techniques for lung cancer are not prognosis diagnostic techniques. However, if we know the name of the metabolites, whose intensity levels are considerably changing between cancer subject and control subject, then it will be easy to early diagnosis the disease as well as to discover the drug. Therefore, in this paper we have identified the influential plasma and serum blood sample metabolites for lung cancer and also identified the biomarkers that will be helpful for early disease prediction as well as for drug invention. To identify the influential metabolites, we considered a parametric and a nonparametric test namely student׳s t-test as parametric and Kruskal-Wallis test as non-parametric test. We also categorized the up-regulated and down-regulated metabolites by the heatmap plot and identified the biomarkers by support vector machine (SVM) classifier and pathway analysis. From our analysis, we got 27 influential (p-value<0.05) metabolites from plasma sample and 13 influential (p-value<0.05) metabolites from serum sample. According to the importance plot through SVM classifier, pathway analysis and correlation network analysis, we declared 4 metabolites (taurine, aspertic acid, glutamine and pyruvic acid) as plasma biomarker and 3 metabolites (aspartic acid, taurine and inosine) as serum biomarker.

  17. Formulation of yeast-leavened bread with reduced salt content by using a Lactobacillus plantarum fermentation product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valerio, Francesca; Conte, Amalia; Di Biase, Mariaelena; Lattanzio, Veronica M T; Lonigro, S Lisa; Padalino, Lucia; Pontonio, Erica; Lavermicocca, Paola

    2017-04-15

    A Lactobacillus plantarum fermentation product (Bio21B), obtained after strain growth (14h) in a wheat flour-based medium, was applied in the bread-making process as taste enhancer, in order to obtain a yeast-leavened bread with reduced salt content (20% and 50%) with respect to a reference bread (REF) not containing the fermentation product. Sensory analysis indicated that the Bio21B bread with salt reduced by 50% had a pleasant taste similar to the salt-containing bread (REF). l-Glutamate and total free amino acid content did not differ between REF and Bio21B breads, while the acids lactic, acetic, phenyllactic, 4-OH-phenyllactic and indole-3-lactic were present only in Bio21B breads. Moreover, the presence of several umami (uridine monophosphate, inosine monophosphate, adenosine, and guanosine) and kokumi (γ-l-glutamyl-l-valine) taste-related molecules was ascertained both in REF and in Bio21B breads. Therefore, a possible role of the acidic molecules in compensating the negative perception of salt reduction can be hypothesized. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The effect of adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) on tenderness, microstructure and chemical-physical index of duck breast meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Daoying; Deng, Shaoying; Zhang, Muhan; Geng, Zhiming; Sun, Chong; Bian, Huan; Xu, Weimin; Zhu, Yongzhi; Liu, Fang; Wu, Haihong

    2016-03-30

    Adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) is often used in meat and poultry soups as a flavor enhancer (flavor modifier), or as food additives for specific nutritional purposes. Our previous research as well as evidence from others showed that actomyosin could be dissociated into myosin and actin by AMP in extracted muscle solution. However, there is no report available on the application of AMP to dissociate actomyosin and to improve meat tenderness. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effect of AMP on duck meat tenderness and other quality traits and to explore the mechanism of the action of AMP on meat tenderness. Duck breast muscle was treated with 0, 10, 20, 30, 40 mmol L(-1) AMP at 5 °C for 10 h and examined for shear force, microstructure, actomyosin dissociation, myofibril fragmentation index (MFI), pH, water content, cooking loss, CIE* color (L*, a*, b*), inosine monophosphate (IMP) and free amino acid (FAA) contents. Results showed that shear force, cooking loss, L* and b* of the muscles significantly decreased after AMP treatment (P 0.05), and muscle shrinkage in transverse and longitudinal directions were restrained after AMP treatment. The results suggest that AMP could notably improve meat tenderness, and this effect was probably mainly through increasing muscle pH, promoting actomyosin dissociation and disrupting the Z-line; meanwhile, the conversion of AMP to IMP may contribute to the flavor of meat. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. Discovery of a cAMP Deaminase That Quenches Cyclic AMP-Dependent Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goble, Alissa M.; Feng, Youjun; Raushel, Frank M.; Cronan, John E.

    2013-01-01

    An enzyme of unknown function within the amidohydrolase superfamily was discovered to catalyze the hydrolysis of the universal second messenger, cyclic-3’, 5’-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). The enzyme, which we have named CadD, is encoded by the human pathogenic bacterium Leptospira interrogans. Although CadD is annotated as an adenosine deaminase, the protein specifically deaminates cAMP to cyclic-3’, 5’-inosine monophosphate (cIMP) with a kcat/Km of 2.7 ± 0.4 × 105 M−1 s−1 and has no activity on adenosine, adenine, or 5’-adenosine monophosphate (AMP). This is the first identification of a deaminase specific for cAMP. Expression of CadD in Escherichia coli mimics the loss of adenylate cyclase in that it blocks growth on carbon sources that require the cAMP-CRP transcriptional activator complex for expression of the cognate genes. The cIMP reaction product cannot replace cAMP as the ligand for CRP binding to DNA in vitro and cIMP is a very poor competitor of cAMP activation of CRP for DNA binding. Transcriptional analyses indicate that CadD expression represses expression of several cAMP-CRP dependent genes. CadD adds a new activity to the cAMP metabolic network and may be a useful tool in intracellular study of cAMP-dependent processes. PMID:24074367

  20. A continuous spectrophotometric assay for monitoring adenosine 5'-monophosphate production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    First, Eric A

    2015-08-15

    A number of biologically important enzymes release adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) as a product, including aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, cyclic AMP (cAMP) phosphodiesterases, ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like ligases, DNA ligases, coenzyme A (CoA) ligases, polyA deadenylases, and ribonucleases. In contrast to the abundance of assays available for monitoring the conversion of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) to ADP, there are relatively few assays for monitoring the conversion of ATP (or cAMP) to AMP. In this article, we describe a homogeneous assay that continuously monitors the production of AMP. Specifically, we have coupled the conversion of AMP to inosine 5'-monophosphate (IMP) (by AMP deaminase) to the oxidation of IMP (by IMP dehydrogenase). This results in the reduction of oxidized nicotine adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) to reduced nicotine adenine dinucleotide (NADH), allowing AMP formation to be monitored by the change in the absorbance at 340 nm. Changes in AMP concentrations of 5 μM or more can be reliably detected. The ease of use and relatively low expense make the AMP assay suitable for both high-throughput screening and kinetic analyses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. NMR studies of the fate of adenine nucleotides in glucose-starved erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bubb, W.A.; Mulquiney, P.J.; Kuchel, P.W.; Rohwer, J.; De Atauri, P.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: As a consequence of many refinements during the past 30 years, we now have a detailed understanding of the glycolytic pathway in human erythrocytes. By comparison, and notwithstanding their central importance to four key steps in erythrocyte glycolysis, our knowledge of the catabolism of adenine nucleotides remains relatively limited. In particular, the mechanism for the degradation of AMP, whose concentration rises under conditions of oxidative stress or glucose deprivation, remains poorly understood, AMP degradation may proceed via two possible pathways which converge in the production of inosine. Analysis of the key intermediates for the respective pathways, adenosine and AMP, as well as determination of end products is not straightforward. High-resolution NMR spectroscopy affords a potentially simple analytical solution to this problem but is complicated by spectral overlap and the sensitivity of key resonances to variations in pH and the concentrations of cations such as Mg 2+ . We describe a multinuclear NMR approach towards characterising the intermediates and end-products of adenine nucleotide metabolism in glucose-starved human erythrocytes. Assignments based on homo- and heteronuclear correlation experiments for both 13 C and 31 P are presented

  2. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of adenosine 5′-monophosphate deaminase (AMPD) from Arabidopsis thaliana in complex with coformycin 5′-phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Byung Woo; Bingman, Craig A.; Mahnke, Donna K.; Sabina, Richard L.; Phillips, George N. Jr

    2005-01-01

    Adenosine 5′-monophosphate deaminase from A. thaliana has been crystallized in complex with coformycin 5′-phosphate. Diffraction data have been collected to 3.34 Å resolution. Adenosine 5′-monophosphate deaminase (AMPD) is a eukaryotic enzyme that converts adenosine 5′-monophosphate (AMP) to inosine 5′-monophosphate (IMP) and ammonia. AMPD from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtAMPD) was cloned into the baculoviral transfer vector p2Bac and co-transfected along with a modified baculoviral genome into Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) cells. The resulting recombinant baculovirus were plaque-purified, amplified and used to overexpress recombinant AtAMPD. Crystals of purified AtAMPD have been obtained to which coformycin 5′-phosphate, a transition-state inhibitor, is bound. Crystals belong to space group P6 2 22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 131.325, c = 208.254 Å, α = β = 90, γ = 120°. Diffraction data were collected to 3.34 Å resolution from a crystal in complex with coformycin 5′-phosphate and to 4.05 Å resolution from a crystal of a mercury derivative

  3. Metabolic profiles and free radical scavenging activity of Cordyceps bassiana fruiting bodies according to developmental stage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun-Hee Hyun

    Full Text Available The metabolic profiles of Cordyceps bassiana according to fruiting body developmental stage were investigated using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. We were able to detect 62 metabolites, including 48 metabolites from 70% methanol extracts and 14 metabolites from 100% n-hexane extracts. These metabolites were classified as alcohols, amino acids, organic acids, phosphoric acids, purine nucleosides and bases, sugars, saturated fatty acids, unsaturated fatty acids, or fatty amides. Significant changes in metabolite levels were found according to developmental stage. Relative levels of amino acids, purine nucleosides, and sugars were higher in development stage 3 than in the other stages. Among the amino acids, valine, isoleucine, lysine, histidine, glutamine, and aspartic acid, which are associated with ABC transporters and aminoacyl-tRNA biosynthesis, also showed higher levels in stage 3 samples. The free radical scavenging activities, which were significantly higher in stage 3 than in the other stages, showed a positive correlation with purine nucleoside metabolites such as adenosine, guanosine, and inosine. These results not only show metabolic profiles, but also suggest the metabolic pathways associated with fruiting body development stages in cultivated C. bassiana.

  4. Involvement of purinergic signaling on nitric oxide production by neutrophils stimulated with Trichomonas vaginalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frasson, Amanda Piccoli; De Carli, Geraldo Attilio; Bonan, Carla Denise; Tasca, Tiana

    2012-03-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a parasite from the human urogenital tract that causes trichomonosis, the most prevalent non-viral sexually transmitted disease. The neutrophil infiltration has been considered to be primarily responsible for cytological changes observed at infection site, and the chemoattractants can play an important role in this leukocytic recruitment. Nitric oxide (NO) is one of the most widespread mediator compounds, and it is implicated in modulation of immunological mechanisms. Extracellular nucleotides and nucleosides are signaling molecules involved in several processes, including immune responses and control of leukocyte trafficking. Ectonucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase members, ecto-5'-nucleotidase, and adenosine deaminase (ectoADA) have been characterized in T. vaginalis. Herein, we investigated the effects of purinergic system on NO production by neutrophils stimulated with T. vaginalis. The trophozoites were able to induce a high NO synthesis by neutrophils through iNOS pathway. The extracellular nucleotides ATP, ADP, and ATPγS (a non-hydrolyzable ATP analog) showed no significant change in NO secretion. In contrast, adenosine and its degradation product, inosine, promoted a low production of the compound. The immunosuppressive effect of adenosine upon NO release by neutrophils occurred due to adenosine A(2A) receptor activation. The ecto-5'-nucleotidase activity displayed by T. vaginalis was shown to be important in adenosine generation, indicating the efficiency of purinergic cascade. Our data suggest the influence of purinergic signaling, specifically adenosinergic system, on NO production by neutrophils in T. vaginalis infection, contributing to the immunological aspects of disease.

  5. The necrotic signal induced by mycophenolic acid overcomes apoptosis-resistance in tumor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwendaline Guidicelli

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The amount of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH, a pivotal enzyme for the biosynthesis of the guanosine tri-phosphate (GTP, is frequently increased in tumor cells. The anti-viral agent ribavirin and the immunosuppressant mycophenolic acid (MPA are potent inhibitors of IMPDH. We recently showed that IMPDH inhibition led to a necrotic signal requiring the activation of Cdc42. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Herein, we strengthened the essential role played by this small GTPase in the necrotic signal by silencing Cdc42 and by the ectopic expression of a constitutive active mutant of Cdc42. Since resistance to apoptosis is an essential step for the tumorigenesis process, we next examined the effect of the MPA-mediated necrotic signal on different tumor cells demonstrating various mechanisms of resistance to apoptosis (Bcl2-, HSP70-, Lyn-, BCR-ABL-overexpressing cells. All tested cells remained sensitive to MPA-mediated necrotic signal. Furthermore, inhibition of IMPDH activity in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia cells was significantly more efficient at eliminating malignant cells than apoptotic inducers. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings indicate that necrosis and apoptosis are split signals that share few if any common hub of signaling. In addition, the necrotic signaling pathway induced by depletion of the cellular amount of GTP/GDP would be of great interest to eliminate apoptotic-resistant tumor cells.

  6. Umami Increases Consumer Acceptability, and Perception of Sensory and Emotional Benefits without Compromising Health Benefit Perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyaki, Takashi; Retiveau-Krogmann, Annlyse; Byrnes, Erin; Takehana, Shunji

    2016-02-01

    This study was undertaken to understand how consumers in the United States perceive umami-rich products, specifically low sodium chicken noodle soup. Results suggest that the addition of monosodium l-glutamate (MSG) at a concentration of 0.1% to 0.5%, alone or in synergy with 5'-ribonucleotides of inosine monophosphate (IMP) at 0.1% not only increases consumer acceptance but also positively impacts other aspects of consumer perception. Regardless of concentration of MSG and IMP, samples enhanced in umami compounds were perceived as more savory, flavorful, and less bland while providing a more homemade, fresh, and healthy wholesome taste than a control sample. From a functional and emotional benefit standpoint, when consuming umami-rich samples, consumers reported feeling significantly higher general satisfaction (they felt more content, relaxed, satisfied, less disappointed, dissatisfied…) and heightened positive emotions (happy, excited, indulgent…) than under the control condition. The feeling of being healthy while consuming the dish was not compromised. Last, when asked how they would feel if serving the soup sample to their family or friends, consumers projected feeling more positively under the umami-rich conditions (more happy, competent, loving, less dissatisfied or disappointed) compared to the control condition. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  7. A genome-wide map of hyper-edited RNA reveals numerous new sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porath, Hagit T.; Carmi, Shai; Levanon, Erez Y.

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine-to-inosine editing is one of the most frequent post-transcriptional modifications, manifested as A-to-G mismatches when comparing RNA sequences with their source DNA. Recently, a number of RNA-seq data sets have been screened for the presence of A-to-G editing, and hundreds of thousands of editing sites identified. Here we show that existing screens missed the majority of sites by ignoring reads with excessive (‘hyper’) editing that do not easily align to the genome. We show that careful alignment and examination of the unmapped reads in RNA-seq studies reveal numerous new sites, usually many more than originally discovered, and in precisely those regions that are most heavily edited. Specifically, we discover 327,096 new editing sites in the heavily studied Illumina Human BodyMap data and more than double the number of detected sites in several published screens. We also identify thousands of new sites in mouse, rat, opossum and fly. Our results establish that hyper-editing events account for the majority of editing sites. PMID:25158696

  8. Studies on the utilization of inedible parts produced at processing the marine products. Part 1; Suisan haikibutsu no kodo riyo ni kansuru kenkyu. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitamura, S.; Nomura, A.; Quinones, H. [Industrial Technology Center of Kochi Prefecture, Kochi (Japan)

    1995-09-01

    For the purpose of effectively using marine products in Kochi pref., analyses were made of the components of the following marine products: the head and inside of frigate mackerel disposed of at the time of producing dried frigate mackerel (an annual catch of the frigate mackerel is about 12000-15000 tons, almost half of which is used for processing for dried bonito), the head and other part of lobster disposed of at lobster restaurants (including the shell of lobster), the skin of lazard fish disposed of in boiled fish paste producing plants. The analysis was conducted in terms of the composition of coarse fatty and fatty acid, free amino acid, ATP related compounds, etc. As a result, the following were found out: in the fat of the head and inside of frigate mackerel, DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) and EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) were included by 20-30% and 10%, respectively, and the fat is promising as supply source of high-grade unsaturated fatty acid; in the head and other part of lobster, chitin chitosan is included in addition to free amino acid such as glycine and alanine; in the skin of lazard fish, ATP related compounds such as inosinic acid are included, and the skin is useful for a raw material of the seasoning. 15 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  9. Mycophenolic acid inhibits migration and invasion of gastric cancer cells via multiple molecular pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boying Dun

    Full Text Available Mycophenolic acid (MPA is the metabolized product and active element of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF that has been widely used for the prevention of acute graft rejection. MPA potently inhibits inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH that is up-regulated in many tumors and MPA is known to inhibit cancer cell proliferation as well as fibroblast and endothelial cell migration. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time MPA's antimigratory and anti-invasion abilities of MPA-sensitive AGS (gastric cancer cells. Genome-wide expression analyses using Illumina whole genome microarrays identified 50 genes with ≥2 fold changes and 15 genes with > 4 fold alterations and multiple molecular pathways implicated in cell migration. Real-time RT-PCR analyses of selected genes also confirmed the expression differences. Furthermore, targeted proteomic analyses identified several proteins altered by MPA treatment. Our results indicate that MPA modulates gastric cancer cell migration through down-regulation of a large number of genes (PRKCA, DOCK1, INF2, HSPA5, LRP8 and PDGFRA and proteins (PRKCA, AKT, SRC, CD147 and MMP1 with promigratory functions as well as up-regulation of a number of genes with antimigratory functions (ATF3, SMAD3, CITED2 and CEAMCAM1. However, a few genes that may promote migration (CYR61 and NOS3 were up-regulated. Therefore, MPA's overall antimigratory role on cancer cells reflects a balance between promigratory and antimigratory signals influenced by MPA treatment.

  10. AZIN1 RNA editing confers cancer stemness and enhances oncogenic potential in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigeyasu, Kunitoshi; Okugawa, Yoshinaga; Toden, Shusuke; Miyoshi, Jinsei; Toiyama, Yuji; Nagasaka, Takeshi; Takahashi, Naoki; Kusunoki, Masato; Takayama, Tetsuji; Yamada, Yasuhide; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi; Chen, Leilei; Goel, Ajay

    2018-06-21

    Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing, a process mediated by adenosine deaminases that act on the RNA (ADAR) gene family, is a recently discovered epigenetic modification dysregulated in human cancers. However, the clinical significance and the functional role of RNA editing in colorectal cancer (CRC) remain unclear. We have systematically and comprehensively investigated the significance of the expression status of ADAR1 and of the RNA editing levels of antizyme inhibitor 1 (AZIN1), one of the most frequently edited genes in cancers, in 392 colorectal tissues from multiple independent CRC patient cohorts. Both ADAR1 expression and AZIN1 RNA editing levels were significantly elevated in CRC tissues when compared with corresponding normal mucosa. High levels of AZIN1 RNA editing emerged as a prognostic factor for overall survival and disease-free survival and were an independent risk factor for lymph node and distant metastasis. Furthermore, elevated AZIN1 editing identified high-risk stage II CRC patients. Mechanistically, edited AZIN1 enhances stemness and appears to drive the metastatic processes. We have demonstrated that edited AZIN1 functions as an oncogene and a potential therapeutic target in CRC. Moreover, AZIN1 RNA editing status could be used as a clinically relevant prognostic indicator in CRC patients.

  11. A novel cofactor-binding mode in bacterial IMP dehydrogenases explains inhibitor selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Kim, Youngchang; Maltseva, Natalia; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Gu, Minyi; Zhang, Minjia; Mandapati, Kavitha; Gollapalli, Deviprasad R; Gorla, Suresh Kumar; Hedstrom, Lizbeth; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2015-02-27

    The steadily rising frequency of emerging diseases and antibiotic resistance creates an urgent need for new drugs and targets. Inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMP dehydrogenase or IMPDH) is a promising target for the development of new antimicrobial agents. IMPDH catalyzes the oxidation of IMP to XMP with the concomitant reduction of NAD(+), which is the pivotal step in the biosynthesis of guanine nucleotides. Potent inhibitors of bacterial IMPDHs have been identified that bind in a structurally distinct pocket that is absent in eukaryotic IMPDHs. The physiological role of this pocket was not understood. Here, we report the structures of complexes with different classes of inhibitors of Bacillus anthracis, Campylobacter jejuni, and Clostridium perfringens IMPDHs. These structures in combination with inhibition studies provide important insights into the interactions that modulate selectivity and potency. We also present two structures of the Vibrio cholerae IMPDH in complex with IMP/NAD(+) and XMP/NAD(+). In both structures, the cofactor assumes a dramatically different conformation than reported previously for eukaryotic IMPDHs and other dehydrogenases, with the major change observed for the position of the NAD(+) adenosine moiety. More importantly, this new NAD(+)-binding site involves the same pocket that is utilized by the inhibitors. Thus, the bacterial IMPDH-specific NAD(+)-binding mode helps to rationalize the conformation adopted by several classes of prokaryotic IMPDH inhibitors. These findings offer a potential strategy for further ligand optimization. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. A Novel Cofactor-binding Mode in Bacterial IMP Dehydrogenases Explains Inhibitor Selectivity*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Kim, Youngchang; Maltseva, Natalia; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Gu, Minyi; Zhang, Minjia; Mandapati, Kavitha; Gollapalli, Deviprasad R.; Gorla, Suresh Kumar; Hedstrom, Lizbeth; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    The steadily rising frequency of emerging diseases and antibiotic resistance creates an urgent need for new drugs and targets. Inosine 5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMP dehydrogenase or IMPDH) is a promising target for the development of new antimicrobial agents. IMPDH catalyzes the oxidation of IMP to XMP with the concomitant reduction of NAD+, which is the pivotal step in the biosynthesis of guanine nucleotides. Potent inhibitors of bacterial IMPDHs have been identified that bind in a structurally distinct pocket that is absent in eukaryotic IMPDHs. The physiological role of this pocket was not understood. Here, we report the structures of complexes with different classes of inhibitors of Bacillus anthracis, Campylobacter jejuni, and Clostridium perfringens IMPDHs. These structures in combination with inhibition studies provide important insights into the interactions that modulate selectivity and potency. We also present two structures of the Vibrio cholerae IMPDH in complex with IMP/NAD+ and XMP/NAD+. In both structures, the cofactor assumes a dramatically different conformation than reported previously for eukaryotic IMPDHs and other dehydrogenases, with the major change observed for the position of the NAD+ adenosine moiety. More importantly, this new NAD+-binding site involves the same pocket that is utilized by the inhibitors. Thus, the bacterial IMPDH-specific NAD+-binding mode helps to rationalize the conformation adopted by several classes of prokaryotic IMPDH inhibitors. These findings offer a potential strategy for further ligand optimization. PMID:25572472

  13. Evidence for ADAR-induced hypermutation of the Drosophila sigma virus (Rhabdoviridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Jennifer A; Keegan, Liam P; Wilfert, Lena; O'Connell, Mary A; Jiggins, Francis M

    2009-11-26

    ADARs are RNA editing enzymes that target double stranded RNA and convert adenosine to inosine, which is read by translation machinery as if it were guanosine. Aside from their role in generating protein diversity in the central nervous system, ADARs have been implicated in the hypermutation of some RNA viruses, although why this hypermutation occurs is not well understood. Here we describe the hypermutation of adenosines to guanosines in the genome of the sigma virus--a negative sense RNA virus that infects Drosophila melanogaster. The clustering of these mutations and the context in which they occur indicates that they have been caused by ADARs. However, ADAR-editing of viral RNA is either rare or edited viral RNA are rapidly degraded, as we only detected evidence for editing in two of the 104 viral isolates we studied. This is the first evidence for ADARs targeting viruses outside of mammals, and it raises the possibility that ADARs could play a role in the antiviral defences of insects.

  14. Superchilled storage (-2.5 ± 1°C) extends the retention of taste-active and volatile compounds of yellow-feather chicken soup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao; Zhu, Jing; Qi, Jun; Wang, Peng; Xu, Xinglian; Zhou, Guanghong

    2018-06-01

    This work investigated the effects of refrigerated storage (RS: 4 ± 1°C) and superchilled storage (SS: -2.5 ± 1°C) on non-volatile and volatile compounds in chicken soup made from Chinese yellow-feather broilers. The results from total viable count (TVC) and coliform analysis showed that soups were safe for human consumption after a storage period of 42 days. SS resulted in a significantly (p < .05) higher content of free amino acids (umami and sweet taste) and 5'-nucleotides (inosine 5'-monophosphate and adenosine 5'-monophosphate) from 21 to 42 days compared to RS. Hexanal, (E)-2-decenal, (E,E)-2,4-decadienal and 2-pentyl furan were described as the primary odorants. SS showed significantly lower values (p < .05) for ketones and hydrocarbons, higher values for aldehydes and alcohols from 14 to 42 days, when compared to RS. The results suggest that SS improved the flavor retention of chicken soup after 21 days of storage and is a potential alternative treatment compared to RS. © 2018 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  15. Comparison of Quality Traits of Meat from Korean Native Chickens and Broilers Used in Two Different Traditional Korean Cuisines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh D. Jayasena

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available With the aim of investigating the differences in the quality traits between Korean native chicken (Hanhyup, KNC and broilers commonly used in two different traditional Korean cuisines, the chemical composition and sensory properties of breast and thigh meat from the two chicken strains were assessed. KNC for baeksuk (chicken meat braised in soup with various Oriental medicinal plants; KNL, KNC for samgyetang (similar to baeksuk but young chickens and ginseng are used; KNS, broiler for baeksuk (BL, and broiler for samgyetang (BS were used as treatments in this study. KNL and KNS contained higher protein but lower fat content than BL and BS. The L* values of breast and thigh meat, but not the a* values, were significantly different between KNS and BS, whereas significant differences in both values were observed between KNL and BL. Compared to the other three types of chickens, KNS contained the highest total and insoluble collagen content, and KNL and BL showed higher inosine-5’-monophosphate content in their meat. Overall, KNL and KNS contributed darker, less tender meat with higher protein and less fat content together with more n-3 fatty acids, as opposed to their counterparts used for the same cuisines. Based on the results of the sensory analysis, even though there are some differences in physiochemical traits, different chicken sources do not differ in overall sensory quality. This information can help consumers to understand better the meat available for their preferred traditional cuisines.

  16. Gold nanoparticles for the bare-eye based and spectrophotometric detection of proteins, polynucleotides and DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepoitevin, Mathilde; Lemouel, Marie; Bechelany, Mikhael; Janot, Jean-Marc; Balme, Sebastien

    2015-01-01

    We have explored the potential of using gold nanoparticles (Au-NPs) in optical and bare-eye discrimination of (a) proteins (such as bovine serum albumin and lysozyme), (b) homo-polynucleotides (such as poly-adenylic acid, poly-cytidylic acid, poly-uridylic acid and poly-inosinic acid), and (c) long chain DNA (from salmon, herring and thym). Such biomacromolecules can be detected and discriminated due to their ability to prevent the formation of blue aggregates from red (non-aggregated) citrate capped Au-NPs on addition of NaCl. The effect of these biomacromolecules on the aggregation was investigated by colorimetry and UV–vis spectrometry. The results show that the two proteins can be differentiated by colorimetry, and also salmon ssDNA and dsDNA. The Au-NPs can also discriminate the dsDNAs of salmon and herring. We conclude that the use of Au-NPs represent a viable candidate to future methods of DNA analysis on the basis of visual testing, particularly in the area of food analysis. (author)

  17. A rapid enzymatic assay for high-throughput screening of adenosine-producing strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Huina; Zu, Xin; Zheng, Ping; Zhang, Dawei

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine is a major local regulator of tissue function and industrially useful as precursor for the production of medicinal nucleoside substances. High-throughput screening of adenosine overproducers is important for industrial microorganism breeding. An enzymatic assay of adenosine was developed by combined adenosine deaminase (ADA) with indophenol method. The ADA catalyzes the cleavage of adenosine to inosine and NH3, the latter can be accurately determined by indophenol method. The assay system was optimized to deliver a good performance and could tolerate the addition of inorganic salts and many nutrition components to the assay mixtures. Adenosine could be accurately determined by this assay using 96-well microplates. Spike and recovery tests showed that this assay can accurately and reproducibly determine increases in adenosine in fermentation broth without any pretreatment to remove proteins and potentially interfering low-molecular-weight molecules. This assay was also applied to high-throughput screening for high adenosine-producing strains. The high selectivity and accuracy of the ADA assay provides rapid and high-throughput analysis of adenosine in large numbers of samples. PMID:25580842

  18. Deoxyinosine triphosphate induces MLH1/PMS2- and p53-dependent cell growth arrest and DNA instability in mammalian cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneshima, Yasuto; Abolhassani, Nona; Iyama, Teruaki; Sakumi, Kunihiko; Shiomi, Naoko; Mori, Masahiko; Shiomi, Tadahiro; Noda, Tetsuo; Tsuchimoto, Daisuke; Nakabeppu, Yusaku

    2016-01-01

    Deoxyinosine (dI) occurs in DNA either by oxidative deamination of a previously incorporated deoxyadenosine residue or by misincorporation of deoxyinosine triphosphate (dITP) from the nucleotide pool during replication. To exclude dITP from the pool, mammals possess specific hydrolysing enzymes, such as inosine triphosphatase (ITPA). Previous studies have shown that deficiency in ITPA results in cell growth suppression and DNA instability. To explore the mechanisms of these phenotypes, we analysed ITPA-deficient human and mouse cells. We found that both growth suppression and accumulation of single-strand breaks in nuclear DNA of ITPA-deficient cells depended on MLH1/PMS2. The cell growth suppression of ITPA-deficient cells also depended on p53, but not on MPG, ENDOV or MSH2. ITPA deficiency significantly increased the levels of p53 protein and p21 mRNA/protein, a well-known target of p53, in an MLH1-dependent manner. Furthermore, MLH1 may also contribute to cell growth arrest by increasing the basal level of p53 activity. PMID:27618981

  19. Adar3 Is Involved in Learning and Memory in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dessislava Mladenova

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The amount of regulatory RNA encoded in the genome and the extent of RNA editing by the post-transcriptional deamination of adenosine to inosine (A-I have increased with developmental complexity and may be an important factor in the cognitive evolution of animals. The newest member of the A-I editing family of ADAR proteins, the vertebrate-specific ADAR3, is highly expressed in the brain, but its functional significance is unknown. In vitro studies have suggested that ADAR3 acts as a negative regulator of A-I RNA editing but the scope and underlying mechanisms are also unknown. Meta-analysis of published data indicates that mouse Adar3 expression is highest in the hippocampus, thalamus, amygdala, and olfactory region. Consistent with this, we show that mice lacking exon 3 of Adar3 (which encodes two double stranded RNA binding domains have increased levels of anxiety and deficits in hippocampus-dependent short- and long-term memory formation. RNA sequencing revealed a dysregulation of genes involved in synaptic function in the hippocampi of Adar3-deficient mice. We also show that ADAR3 transiently translocates from the cytoplasm to the nucleus upon KCl-mediated activation in SH-SY5Y cells. These results indicate that ADAR3 contributes to cognitive processes in mammals.

  20. A Phenotypic Screen for Functional Mutants of Human Adenosine Deaminase Acting on RNA 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuru; Havel, Jocelyn; Beal, Peter A

    2015-11-20

    Adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs) are RNA-editing enzymes responsible for the conversion of adenosine to inosine at specific locations in cellular RNAs. ADAR1 and ADAR2 are two members of the family that have been shown to be catalytically active. Earlier, we reported a phenotypic screen for the study of human ADAR2 using budding yeast S. cerevisiae as the host system. While this screen has been successfully applied to the study of ADAR2, it failed with ADAR1. Here, we report a new reporter that uses a novel editing substrate and is suitable for the study of ADAR1. We screened plasmid libraries with randomized codons for two important residues in human ADAR1 (G1007 and E1008). The screening results combined with in vitro deamination assays led to the identification of mutants that are more active than the wild type protein. Furthermore, a screen of the ADAR1 E1008X library with a reporter construct bearing an A•G mismatch at the editing site suggests one role for the residue at position 1008 is to sense the identity of the base pairing partner for the editing site adenosine. This work has provided a starting point for future in vitro evolution studies of ADAR1 and led to new insight into ADAR's editing site selectivity.

  1. Nuclear factor 90 uses an ADAR2-like binding mode to recognize specific bases in dsRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayachandran, Uma; Grey, Heather; Cook, Atlanta G

    2016-02-29

    Nuclear factors 90 and 45 (NF90 and NF45) form a protein complex involved in the post-transcriptional control of many genes in vertebrates. NF90 is a member of the dsRNA binding domain (dsRBD) family of proteins. RNA binding partners identified so far include elements in 3' untranslated regions of specific mRNAs and several non-coding RNAs. In NF90, a tandem pair of dsRBDs separated by a natively unstructured segment confers dsRNA binding activity. We determined a crystal structure of the tandem dsRBDs of NF90 in complex with a synthetic dsRNA. This complex shows surprising similarity to the tandem dsRBDs from an adenosine-to-inosine editing enzyme, ADAR2 in complex with a substrate RNA. Residues involved in unusual base-specific recognition in the minor groove of dsRNA are conserved between NF90 and ADAR2. These data suggest that, like ADAR2, underlying sequences in dsRNA may influence how NF90 recognizes its target RNAs. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  2. Biosensor. Seitai sensa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karube, I [The Univ. of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan). Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology

    1993-06-15

    Present state of the art of biosensors is described by taking taste sensors and odor sensors as examples. Bio-devices that response only to specific chemical substances are made using membranes that recognize particular molecules. Biosensors are constructed in combination of bio-devices with electronics devices that transduce the response of bio-devices to electric signals. Enzymes are used often as bio-devices to recognize molecules. They recognize strictly chemical substances and promote chemical reactions. Devices to measure electrochemically substances consumed or produced in the reactions serve as sensors. For taste sensors, inosinic acid or glutamic acid that is a component of taste, is recognized and measured. Combination of various bio-devices other than enzymes with various transducers makes it possible to produce biosensors based on a variety of principles. Odor sensors recognize odors by measuring frequency change of the electrode of quartz oscillator. The change occurs with weight change due to odorous substances absorbed on the oscillator electrode coated with lipids which exist in olfactory cells. 1 ref., 1 fig.

  3. Molecular characterization of adenosine 5'-monophosphate deaminase--the key enzyme responsible for the umami taste of nori (Porphyra yezoensis Ueda, Rhodophyta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Seiko; Sato, Minoru; Shiraiwa, Yoshihiro; Iwamoto, Koji

    2011-12-01

    The enzyme adenosine 5'-monophosphate deaminase (AMPD, EC 3.5.4.6) catalyzes the conversion of adenosine 5'-monophosphate to inosine 5'-mononucleotide (IMP). IMP is generally known as the compound responsible for the umami taste of the edible red alga Porphyra yezoensis Ueda that is known in Japan as nori. Therefore, we suspect that AMPD plays a key role in providing a favorable nori taste. In this study, we undertake the molecular characterization of nori-derived AMPD. The nori AMPD protein has a molecular mass of 55 kDa as estimated from both gel filtration and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The calculated molecular mass from the amino acid sequence deduced from cDNA is 57.1 kDa. The isoelectric point is 5.71. The coding region of AMPD consists of 1,566 bp encoding 522 amino acids and possesses a transmembrane domain and two N-glycosylation sites. The sequence identity of nori AMPD in human and yeast AMPDs was found to be less than 50% and 20% in DNA and amino acid sequences, respectively. Proline in the conserved motif of [SA]-[LIVM]-[NGS]-[STA]-D-D-P was found to be converted to glutamate. These results indicate that nori AMPD is a novel type of AMPD.

  4. Kinetic studies and evaluation of potential compounds for the chemotherapy of Leishmaniasis using LdNH-MBP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renno, M.N.; Figueroa-Villar, J.D. [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica; Silva, N.B. da; Tinoco, L.W. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Nucleo de Pesquisas de Produtos Naturais; Borja-Cabrera, G.P.; Palatnik-de-Sousa, C.B.P. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Microbiologia

    2008-07-01

    Full text: Protozoan parasites rely exclusively on purine salvage from the host for DNA and RNA synthesis and nucleoside hydrolases (N Hs) are the enzymes that catalyze the N-rib osyl hydrolysis of all commonly occurring purine and pi rimidine nucleosides, thus being excellent targets for the design of antiparasitic compounds. The general aim of our work with Leishmania donovani NH (LdNH) is to find new inhibitors for this enzyme as potential agents for the chemotherapy of visceral leishmaniasis. In this part of the work we expressed LdNH bound to maltose-binding protein (MBP) in E. coli using the pMAL-C2x vector. After purification by affinity chromatography the enzyme activity was monitored by UV (280 nm) and {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy using inosine as substrate. All the assays were carried out at 25 deg C in phosphate buffer (pH 8.0) in water (UV) and D{sub 2}O (NMR). Our results show that LdNH-MBP behaves kinetically in the same way as it have been reported for free LdNH, thus confirming that LdNH-MBP maintains the appropriate folding and activity of the enzyme active site, thus being a good model to develop and evaluate new inhibitors of LdNH. As an example, the kinetics tests with AZT have shown that this compound is not an effective inhibitor of this enzyme.

  5. Adenosine: a putative mediator of bronchoconstriction in asthma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    The protective effect of a muscarinic cholinergic antagonists, ipratropium bromide (IB) from inhaled adenosine- and methacholine-induced bronchoconstriction in asthma was studied. Inhaled IB protected from methacholine- but not adenosine-induced bronchoconstriction. Parasympathetically mediated bronchoconstriction is therefore unlikely to account for adenosine's airway effect in asthma. The capacity of theophylline, a bronchodilator and a competitive antagonist of adenosine at its cell surface receptors, to protect asthmatic subjects from adenosine- and histamine-induced bronchoconstriction was determined. Asthmatic airways are infiltrated with inflammatory cells. Human leucocytes prelabeled with (/sup 3/H)-adenine when activated with the calcium ionophore A23187 released labelled hypoxanthine, inosine and adenosine which was associated with a dose-related release of histamine. The chemotactic peptide f-MLP while inducing histamine release had an inconstant effect on release of label. In four of five experiments f-MLP produced a transient early increase in label release but in the remaining experiment no significant release was observed. Anti-human IgE failed to induce significant label release despite releasing histamine. Activated leucocytes are therefore a potential source of adenosine in asthma.

  6. Taste-active compound levels in Korean native chicken meat: The effects of bird age and the cooking process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasena, Dinesh D; Jung, Samooel; Kim, Hyun Joo; Yong, Hae In; Nam, Ki Chang; Jo, Cheorun

    2015-08-01

    The effects of bird age and the cooking process on the levels of several taste-active compounds, including inosine 5'-monophosphate (IMP), glutamic acid, cysteine, reducing sugars, as well as oleic, linoleic, arachidonic, and docosahexaenoic acids (DHA), in the breast and leg meats from a certified meat-type commercial Korean native chicken (KNC) strain (Woorimatdag) were investigated. KNC cocks were raised under similar standard conditions at a commercial chicken farm, and breast and leg meats from birds of various ages (10, 11, 12, 13, and 14 wk; 10 birds/age group) were obtained. After raw and cooked meat samples were prepared, they were analyzed for the aforementioned taste-active compounds. Compared to the leg meat, KNC breast meat had higher levels of IMP, arachidonic acid, and DHA, but lower levels of the other taste-active compounds (P cooking process (P cooking process. This information could be useful for selection and breeding programs, and for popularizing native chicken meat. © 2015 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  7. Biased activity of soluble guanylyl cyclase: the Janus face of thymoquinone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detremmerie, Charlotte; Vanhoutte, Paul M; Leung, Susan

    2017-07-01

    The natural compound thymoquinone, extracted from Nigella sativa (black cumin), is widely used in humans for its anti-oxidative properties. Thymoquinone is known for its acute endothelium-independent vasodilator effects in isolated rat aortae and pulmonary arteries, depending in part on activation of adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channels and inhibition of voltage-dependent calcium channels. The compound also improves endothelial dysfunction in mesenteric arteries of ageing rodents and in aortae of rabbits treated with pyrogallol, by inhibiting oxidative stress. Serendipitously, thymoquinone was found to augment contractions in isolated arteries with endothelium of both rats and pigs. The endothelium-dependent augmentation it causes counterintuitively depends on biased activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) producing inosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic IMP) rather than guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate. This phenomenon shows a striking mechanistic similarity to the hypoxic augmentation previously observed in porcine coronary arteries. The cyclic IMP preferentially produced under thymoquinone exposure causes an increased contractility of arterial smooth muscle by interfering with calcium homeostasis. This brief review summarizes the vascular pharmacology of thymoquinone, focussing in particular on how the compound causes endothelium-dependent contractions by biasing the activity of sGC.

  8. Biased activity of soluble guanylyl cyclase: the Janus face of thymoquinone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Detremmerie

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The natural compound thymoquinone, extracted from Nigella sativa (black cumin, is widely used in humans for its anti-oxidative properties. Thymoquinone is known for its acute endothelium-independent vasodilator effects in isolated rat aortae and pulmonary arteries, depending in part on activation of adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channels and inhibition of voltage-dependent calcium channels. The compound also improves endothelial dysfunction in mesenteric arteries of ageing rodents and in aortae of rabbits treated with pyrogallol, by inhibiting oxidative stress. Serendipitously, thymoquinone was found to augment contractions in isolated arteries with endothelium of both rats and pigs. The endothelium-dependent augmentation it causes counterintuitively depends on biased activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC producing inosine 3ʹ,5ʹ-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic IMP rather than guanosine 3ʹ,5ʹ-cyclic monophosphate. This phenomenon shows a striking mechanistic similarity to the hypoxic augmentation previously observed in porcine coronary arteries. The cyclic IMP preferentially produced under thymoquinone exposure causes an increased contractility of arterial smooth muscle by interfering with calcium homeostasis. This brief review summarizes the vascular pharmacology of thymoquinone, focussing in particular on how the compound causes endothelium-dependent contractions by biasing the activity of sGC.

  9. Abundant off-target edits from site-directed RNA editing can be reduced by nuclear localization of the editing enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallecillo-Viejo, Isabel C; Liscovitch-Brauer, Noa; Montiel-Gonzalez, Maria Fernanda; Eisenberg, Eli; Rosenthal, Joshua J C

    2018-01-02

    Site-directed RNA editing (SDRE) is a general strategy for making targeted base changes in RNA molecules. Although the approach is relatively new, several groups, including our own, have been working on its development. The basic strategy has been to couple the catalytic domain of an adenosine (A) to inosine (I) RNA editing enzyme to a guide RNA that is used for targeting. Although highly efficient on-target editing has been reported, off-target events have not been rigorously quantified. In this report we target premature termination codons (PTCs) in messages encoding both a fluorescent reporter protein and the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) protein transiently transfected into human epithelial cells. We demonstrate that while on-target editing is efficient, off-target editing is extensive, both within the targeted message and across the entire transcriptome of the transfected cells. By redirecting the editing enzymes from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, off-target editing is reduced without compromising the on-target editing efficiency. The addition of the E488Q mutation to the editing enzymes, a common strategy for increasing on-target editing efficiency, causes a tremendous increase in off-target editing. These results underscore the need to reduce promiscuity in current approaches to SDRE.

  10. Coupling of an indicator-free electrochemical DNA biosensor with polymerase chain reaction for the detection of DNA sequences related to the apolipoprotein E

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucarelli, Fausto; Marrazza, Giovanna; Palchetti, Ilaria; Cesaretti, S.; Mascini, Marco

    2002-09-26

    This paper describes a disposable indicator-free electrochemical DNA biosensor applied to the detection of apolipoprotein E (apoE) sequences in PCR samples. In the indicator-free assays, the duplex formation was detected by measuring the electrochemical signal of the guanine base of nucleic acids. The biosensor format involved the immobilisation of an inosine-modified (guanine-free) probe onto a screen-printed electrode (SPE) transducer and the detection of the duplex formation in connection with the square-wave voltammetric measurement of the oxidation peak of the guanine of the target sequence. The indicator-free scheme has been characterised using 23-mer oligonucleotides as model: parameters affecting the hybridisation assay such as probe immobilisation conditions, hybridisation time, use of hybridisation accelerators were examined and optimised. The analysis of PCR samples (244 bp DNA fragments, obtained by amplification of DNA extracted from human blood) required a further optimisation of the experimental procedure. In particular, a lower steric hyndrance of the probe modified surface was essential to allow an efficient hybridisation of the target DNA fragment. Negative controls have been performed using the PCR blank and amplicons unrelated to the immobilised probe. A 10 min hybridisation time allowed a full characterisation of each sample.

  11. Harmful effects of the azathioprine metabolite 6-mercaptopurine in vascular cells: induction of mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prüfer, Jasmin; Schuchardt, Mirjam; Tölle, Markus; Prüfer, Nicole; Höhne, Matthias; Zidek, Walter; van der Giet, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Vascular mineralization contributes to the high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients who suffer from chronic kidney disease and in individuals who have undergone solid organ transplantation. The immunosuppressive regimen used to treat these patients appears to have an impact on vascular alterations. The effect of 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) on vascular calcification has not yet been determined. This study investigates the effect of 6-MP on vascular mineralization by the induction of trans-differentiation of rat vascular smooth muscle cells in vitro. 6-MP not only induces the expression of osteo-chondrocyte-like transcription factors and proteins but also activates alkaline phosphatase enzyme activity and produces calcium deposition in in vitro and ex vivo models. These processes are dependent on 6-MP-induced production of reactive oxygen species, intracellular activation of mitogen-activated kinases and phosphorylation of the transcription factor Cbfa1. Furthermore, the metabolic products of 6-MP, 6-thioguanine nucleotides and 6-methyl-thio-inosine monophosphate have major impacts on cellular calcification. These data provide evidence for a possible harmful effect of the immunosuppressive drug 6-MP in vascular diseases, such as arteriosclerosis.

  12. Harmful effects of the azathioprine metabolite 6-mercaptopurine in vascular cells: induction of mineralization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmin Prüfer

    Full Text Available Vascular mineralization contributes to the high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients who suffer from chronic kidney disease and in individuals who have undergone solid organ transplantation. The immunosuppressive regimen used to treat these patients appears to have an impact on vascular alterations. The effect of 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP on vascular calcification has not yet been determined. This study investigates the effect of 6-MP on vascular mineralization by the induction of trans-differentiation of rat vascular smooth muscle cells in vitro. 6-MP not only induces the expression of osteo-chondrocyte-like transcription factors and proteins but also activates alkaline phosphatase enzyme activity and produces calcium deposition in in vitro and ex vivo models. These processes are dependent on 6-MP-induced production of reactive oxygen species, intracellular activation of mitogen-activated kinases and phosphorylation of the transcription factor Cbfa1. Furthermore, the metabolic products of 6-MP, 6-thioguanine nucleotides and 6-methyl-thio-inosine monophosphate have major impacts on cellular calcification. These data provide evidence for a possible harmful effect of the immunosuppressive drug 6-MP in vascular diseases, such as arteriosclerosis.

  13. Cordyceps collected from Bhutan, an appropriate alternative of Cordyceps sinensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ding-Tao; Lv, Guang-Ping; Zheng, Jian; Li, Qian; Ma, Shuang-Cheng; Li, Shao-Ping; Zhao, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Natural Cordyceps collected in Bhutan has been widely used as natural Cordyceps sinensis, an official species of Cordyceps used as Chinese medicines, around the world in recent years. However, whether Cordyceps from Bhutan could be really used as natural C. sinensis remains unknown. Therefore, DNA sequence, bioactive components including nucleosides and polysaccharides in twelve batches of Cordyceps from Bhutan were firstly investigated, and compared with natural C. sinensis. Results showed that the fungus of Cordyceps from Bhutan was C. sinensis and the host insect belonged to Hepialidae sp. In addition, nucleosides and their bases such as guanine, guanosine, hypoxanthine, uridine, inosine, thymidine, adenine, and adenosine, as well as compositional monosaccharides, partial acid or enzymatic hydrolysates, molecular weights and contents of polysaccharides in Cordyceps from Bhutan were all similar to those of natural C. sinensis. All data suggest that Cordyceps from Bhutan is a rational alternative of natural C. sinensis, which is beneficial for the improvement of their performance in health and medicinal food areas. PMID:27874103

  14. Current methods of the analysis of immunosuppressive agents in clinical materials: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mika, Adriana; Stepnowski, Piotr

    2016-08-05

    More than 100000 solid organ transplantations are performed every year worldwide. Calcineurin (cyclosporine A, tacrolimus), serine/threonine kinase (sirolimus, everolimus) and inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase inhibitor (mycophenolate mofetil), are the most common drugs used as immunosuppressive agents after solid organ transplantation. Immunosuppressive therapy, although necessary after transplantation, is associated with many adverse consequences, including the formation of secondary metabolites of drugs and the induction of their side effects. Calcineurin inhibitors are associated with nephrotoxicity, cardiotoxicity and neurotoxicity; moreover, they increase the risk of many diseases after transplantation. The review presents a study of the movement of drugs in the body, including the processes of absorption, distribution, localisation in tissues, biotransformation and excretion, and also their accompanying side effects. Therefore, there is a necessity to monitor immunosuppressants, especially because these drugs are characterised by narrow therapeutic ranges. Their incorrect concentrations in a patient's blood could result in transplant rejection or in the accumulation of toxic effects. Immunosuppressive pharmaceuticals are macrolide lactones, peptides, and high molecular weight molecules that can be metabolised to several metabolites. Therefore the two main analytical methods used for their determination are high performance liquid chromatography with various detection methods and immunoassay methods. Despite the rapid development of new analytical methods of analysing immunosuppressive agents, the application of the latest generation of detectors and increasing sensitivity of such methods, there is still a great demand for the development of highly selective, sensitive, specific, rapid and relatively simple methods of immunosuppressive drugs analysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The Potential Biomarkers to Identify the Development of Steatosis in Hyperuricemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Tan

    Full Text Available Hyperuricemia (HU often progresses to combine with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD in the clinical scenario, which further exacerbates metabolic disorders; early detection of biomarkers, if obtained during the HU progression, may be beneficial for preventing its combination with NAFLD. This study aimed to decipher the biomarkers and mechanisms of the development of steatosis in HU. Four groups of subjects undergoing health screening, including healthy subjects, subjects with HU, subjects with HU combined with NAFLD (HU+NAFLD and subjects with HU initially and then with HU+NAFLD one year later (HU→HU+NAFLD, were recruited in this study. The metabolic profiles of all subjects' serum were analyzed by liquid chromatography quadruple time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The metabolomic data from subjects with HU and HU+NAFLD were compared, and the biomarkers for the progression from HU to HU+NAFLD were predicted. The metabolomic data from HU→HU+NAFLD subjects were collected for further verification. The results showed that the progression was associated with disturbances of phospholipase metabolism, purine nucleotide degradation and Liver X receptor/retinoic X receptor activation as characterized by up-regulated phosphatidic acid, cholesterol ester (18:0 and down-regulated inosine. These metabolic alterations may be at least partially responsible for the development of steatosis in HU. This study provides a new paradigm for better understanding and further prevention of disease progression.

  16. Ribavirin: recent insights into antiviral mechanisms of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, G R

    2001-09-01

    Ribavirin, a nucleoside analog, used in combination with interferon-alpha (IFN alpha) results in a substantial improvement in the sustained virologic response in chronic hepatitis C. Identified antiviral mechanisms of action for ribavirin include: (i) inhibition of viral encoded polymerases; (ii) inhibition of genomic RNA capping; and (iii) inhibition of cellular encoded enzymes that control de novo synthesis of purine nucleosides. More recently, ribavirin has been shown to engender a bias toward helper T-cell (CD4+) type 1 (Th1) cytokine responses in models of immunity. Recent detailed analysis has also shown that ribavirin can be utilized and incorporated by the polio viral polymerase into genomic and antigenomic transcripts, and is capable of base pairing with either UMP (uridine monophosphate) or CMP (cytidine monophosphate). This results in ribavirin-mediated mutagenesis of the viral genome and has the potential to push the virus beyond tolerable set points in its mutation rate, leading to an overall reduced fitness of the viral population. Of the many mechanisms of action demonstrated for ribavirin, the current clinical trials of selective inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) inhibitors and immunomodulating agents in hepatitis may facilitate our understanding of what activity (if any) predominates when ribavirin is used in combination with IFN alpha.

  17. Calorimetric study on human erythrocyte glycolysis. Heat production in various metabolic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minakami, S; de Verdier, C H

    1976-06-01

    The heat production of human erythrocytes was measured on a flow microcalorimeter with simultaneous analyses of lactate and other metabolites. The heat production connected with the lactate formation was about 17 kcal (71 kJ) per mol lactate formed which corresponded to the sum of heat production due to the formation of lactate from glucose and the heat production due to neutralization. The heat production rate increased as the pH of the suspension increased, corresponding to the increase in lactate formation. Glycolytic inhibitors such as fluoride and monoiodoacetate caused a decrease in the rate of heat production, whereas arsenate induced a large transient increase in heat production associated with a transient increase in lactate formation. Decrease in pyruvate concentration was usually associated with increase in heat production, although the decreased pyruvate concentration was coupled with formation of 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate. When inosine, dihydroxyacetone or D-glyceraldehyde was used as a substrate, an increase in the heat production rate was observed. Addition of methylene blue caused an oxygen uptake which was accompanied by a remarkable increase in heat production rate corresponding to about 160 kcal (670 kJ) per mol oxygen consumed. The value for heat production in red cells in the above-mentioned metabolic conditions was considered in relation to earlier known data on free energy and enthalpy changes of the different metabolic steps in the glycolytic pathway.

  18. A Systematic Review of Non-Invasive Pharmacologic Neuroprotective Treatments for Acute Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okon, Elena; Hillyer, Jessica; Mann, Cody; Baptiste, Darryl; Weaver, Lynne C.; Fehlings, Michael G.; Tetzlaff, Wolfram

    2011-01-01

    Abstract An increasing number of therapies for spinal cord injury (SCI) are emerging from the laboratory and seeking translation into human clinical trials. Many of these are administered as soon as possible after injury with the hope of attenuating secondary damage and maximizing the extent of spared neurologic tissue. In this article, we systematically review the available pre-clinical research on such neuroprotective therapies that are administered in a non-invasive manner for acute SCI. Specifically, we review treatments that have a relatively high potential for translation due to the fact that they are already used in human clinical applications, or are available in a form that could be administered to humans. These include: erythropoietin, NSAIDs, anti-CD11d antibodies, minocycline, progesterone, estrogen, magnesium, riluzole, polyethylene glycol, atorvastatin, inosine, and pioglitazone. The literature was systematically reviewed to examine studies in which an in-vivo animal model was utilized to assess the efficacy of the therapy in a traumatic SCI paradigm. Using these criteria, 122 studies were identified and reviewed in detail. Wide variations exist in the animal species, injury models, and experimental designs reported in the pre-clinical literature on the therapies reviewed. The review highlights the extent of investigation that has occurred in these specific therapies, and points out gaps in our knowledge that would be potentially valuable prior to human translation. PMID:20146558

  19. Allelic inhibition of displacement activity: a simplified one tube allele-specific PCR for evaluation of ITPA polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galmozzi, E; Facchetti, F; Degasperi, E; Aghemo, A; Lampertico, P

    2013-02-01

    Recently, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection have identified two functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the inosine triphosphatase (ITPA) gene, that are associated strongly and independently with hemolytic anemia in patients exposed to pegylated-interferon (Peg-IFN) plus ribavirin (RBV) combined therapy. Here has been developed a simplified allele discrimination polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay named allelic inhibition of displacement activity (AIDA) for evaluation of ITPA polymorphisms. AIDA system relies on three unlabeled primers only, two outer common primers and one inner primer with allele-specific 3' terminus mismatch. DNA samples from 192 patients with chronic HCV infection were used to validate the AIDA system and results were compared with the gold standard TaqMan(®) SNP genotyping assay. Concordant data were obtained for all samples, granting for high specificity of the method. In conclusion, AIDA is a practical one-tube method to reproducibly and to assess accurately rs7270101 and rs1127354 ITPA SNPs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Influence of some mononucleotides and their corresponding nucleosides on the metabolism of carbohydrates in the isolated rat diaphragm muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beloff-Chain, Anne; Betto, P.; Bleszynski, W.; Catanzaro, Raffaella; Chain, E. B.; Dmitrovskii, A. A.; Longinotti, L.; Pocchiari, F.

    1965-01-01

    1. The influence of ATP on glucose metabolism was studied in the isolated rat diaphragm; it was shown that ATP increases the oxidation of glucose and the aerobic conversion of glucose into lactate, whereas it decreases glycogen synthesis. There was no influence of ATP on the anaerobic formation of lactate from glucose. 2. A maximum effect of ATP on the oxidation of glucose (about 160% increase) was obtained in the presence of 10mm-ATP; in the presence of 2mm-ATP the effect was about 65%, and was approximately constant from 10 to 90min. incubation period. 3. In a phosphate-free tris-buffered medium the oxidation of glucose was considerably decreased, but the percentage stimulation by ATP was about the same as in a phosphate-buffered medium. 4. ATP was shown to increase the oxidation of fructose, glucose 6-phosphate, glucose 1-phosphate, fructose 1,6-diphosphate and, to a much smaller extent, pyruvate. 5. ADP stimulated the oxidation of glucose to the same extent as ATP at a concentration of 2mm and the effect with AMP was only slightly less; IMP and adenosine had only a small stimulatory effect at this concentration, whereas inosine had no effect. PMID:16749165

  1. Metal and hydrogen catalysis in isotopic hydrogen exchange in some biologically important heterocyclic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buncel, E.; Joly, H.A.; Jones, J.R.; Onyido, I.

    1989-01-01

    This study reports on the catalytic roles of metal and hydrogen ions in tritium exchange in some heterocyclic substrates which occur as residues in many biologically important molecules. We have found that detritiation of 1-methyl[2- 3 H]imidazole is inhibited by a number of metal ions. As well, inhibition of exchange rates was noted with Ag(I) and Cu(II) for [2- 3 H]thiazole and 1-methyl[8- 3 H]inosine, with Ag(I) for [2- 3 H]benzothiazole, and with Cu(II) for 1-methyl[8- 3 H]guanosine. A complete mechanistic description, which includes the various metal ion-coordinated species generated under the experimental conditions, is presented. The results demonstrate the reactivity order: protonated >> metal-coordinated >> neutral substrates. The differential catalytic effects of metal and hydrogen ions in these processes are discussed in terms of the extent of charge developed on the ligating heteroatom in the reaction intermediate. (author). 13 refs.; 1 fig

  2. Elevated Levels of DNA Strand Breaks Induced by a Base Analog in the Human Cell Line with the P32T ITPA Variant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waisertreiger, Irina S.-R.; Menezes, Miriam R.; Randazzo, James; Pavlov, Youri I.

    2010-01-01

    Base analogs are powerful antimetabolites and dangerous mutagens generated endogenously by oxidative stress, inflammation, and aberrant nucleotide biosynthesis. Human inosine triphosphate pyrophosphatase (ITPA) hydrolyzes triphosphates of noncanonical purine bases (i.e., ITP, dITP, XTP, dXTP, or their mimic: 6-hydroxyaminopurine (HAP) deoxynucleoside triphosphate) and thus regulates nucleotide pools and protects cells from DNA damage. We demonstrate that the model purine base analog HAP induces DNA breaks in human cells and leads to elevation of levels of ITPA. A human polymorphic allele of the ITPA, 94C->A encodes for the enzyme with a P32T amino-acid change and leads to accumulation of nonhydrolyzed ITP. The polymorphism has been associated with adverse reaction to purine base-analog drugs. The level of both spontaneous and HAP-induced DNA breaks is elevated in the cell line with the ITPA P32T variant. The results suggested that human ITPA plays a pivotal role in the protection of DNA from noncanonical purine base analogs. PMID:20936128

  3. Editing of HIV-1 RNA by the double-stranded RNA deaminase ADAR1 stimulates viral infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doria, Margherita; Neri, Francesca; Gallo, Angela; Farace, Maria Giulia; Michienzi, Alessandro

    2009-01-01

    Adenosine deaminases that act on dsRNA (ADARs) are enzymes that target double-stranded regions of RNA converting adenosines into inosines (A-to-I editing) thus contributing to genome complexity and fine regulation of gene expression. It has been described that a member of the ADAR family, ADAR1, can target viruses and affect their replication process. Here we report evidence showing that ADAR1 stimulates human immuno deficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication by using both editing-dependent and editing-independent mechanisms. We show that over-expression of ADAR1 in HIV-1 producer cells increases viral protein accumulation in an editing-independent manner. Moreover, HIV-1 virions generated in the presence of over-expressed ADAR1 but not an editing-inactive ADAR1 mutant are released more efficiently and display enhanced infectivity, as demonstrated by challenge assays performed with T cell lines and primary CD4+ T lymphocytes. Finally, we report that ADAR1 associates with HIV-1 RNAs and edits adenosines in the 5′ untranslated region (UTR) and the Rev and Tat coding sequence. Overall these results suggest that HIV-1 has evolved mechanisms to take advantage of specific RNA editing activity of the host cell and disclose a stimulatory function of ADAR1 in the spread of HIV-1. PMID:19651874

  4. Clinical effect of Cystenosine on leukocytopenia at the time of therapy with radiation and antineoplastic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Kazuhide; Usui, Ryu; Inoue, Hiroshi; Mihashi, Norio; Niibe, Hideo.

    1977-01-01

    Out of 62 cases, 25 cases received only radiotherapy, 11 cases received both radiotherapy and antineoplastic agents, and 26 cases received only antineoplastic agents. Total dose of x-ray ranges from 3000 to 6200 rad in 18 of 36 cases of the former two groups, and 2600 to 6260 rad of 60 Co dose were irradiated to 18 cases of the rest. This agent was administered 9 tablets per a day (one tablet contains 200 mg of inosine and 20 mg of cystine) for 19 to 142 days. Its effects on leukocytopenia showed marked effectiveness in 9 out of 25 cases treated with only radiation, effectiveness in 8 cases, and ineffectiveness in 3 cases. Its effective rate was 72.8%. The effective rate was 65.4% in the cases treated with only antineoplastic agents, and was 67.7% in all cases. A certain relationship between dose and the effective rate was not recognized. Radiation sickness, such as loss of appetite general fatigue and mausea, decreased gradually by using this agent. Side effect was not recognized particularly. (Kanao. N.)

  5. The Promise of Pharmacogenomics in Reducing Toxicity During Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Maintenance Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoshana Rudin

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL affects a substantial number of children every year and requires a long and rigorous course of chemotherapy treatments in three stages, with the longest phase, the maintenance phase, lasting 2–3 years. While the primary drugs used in the maintenance phase, 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP and methotrexate (MTX, are necessary for decreasing risk of relapse, they also have potentially serious toxicities, including myelosuppression, which may be life-threatening, and gastrointestinal toxicity. For both drugs, pharmacogenomic factors have been identified that could explain a large amount of the variance in toxicity between patients, and may serve as effective predictors of toxicity during the maintenance phase of ALL treatment. 6-MP toxicity is associated with polymorphisms in the genes encoding thiopurine methyltransferase (TPMT, nudix hydrolase 15 (NUDT15, and potentially inosine triphosphatase (ITPA, which vary between ethnic groups. Moreover, MTX toxicity is associated with polymorphisms in genes encoding solute carrier organic anion transporter family member 1B1 (SLCO1B1 and dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR. Additional polymorphisms potentially associated with toxicities for MTX have also been identified, including those in the genes encoding solute carrier family 19 member 1 (SLC19A1 and thymidylate synthetase (TYMS, but their contributions have not yet been well quantified. It is clear that pharmacogenomics should be incorporated as a dosage-calibrating tool in pediatric ALL treatment in order to predict and minimize the occurrence of serious toxicities for these patients.

  6. Overexpression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of a hyperthermophilic adenylosuccinate synthetase from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xiaoying; Akasaka, Ryogo; Takemoto, Chie; Morita, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Machiko; Terada, Takaho; Shirozu, Mikako; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Chen, Shilin; Si, Shuyi; Xie, Yong

    2011-01-01

    A hyperthermophilic adenylosuccinate synthetase from P. horikoshii OT3, which is 90–120 amino acids shorter than those from the vast majority of organisms, was expressed, purified and crystallized and X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.5 Å resolution. Adenylosuccinate synthetase (AdSS) is a ubiquitous enzyme that catalyzes the first committed step in the conversion of inosine monophosphate (IMP) to adenosine monophosphate (AMP) in the purine-biosynthetic pathway. Although AdSS from the vast majority of organisms is 430–457 amino acids in length, AdSS sequences isolated from thermophilic archaea are 90–120 amino acids shorter. In this study, crystallographic studies of a short AdSS sequence from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3 (PhAdSS) were performed in order to reveal the unusual structure of AdSS from thermophilic archaea. Crystals of PhAdSS were obtained by the microbatch-under-oil method and X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.50 Å resolution. The crystal belonged to the trigonal space group P3 2 12, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 57.2, c = 107.9 Å. There was one molecule per asymmetric unit, giving a Matthews coefficient of 2.17 Å 3 Da −1 and an approximate solvent content of 43%. In contrast, the results of native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and analytical ultracentrifugation showed that the recombinant PhAdSS formed a dimer in solution

  7. Sensing of nucleosides, nucleotides and DNA using luminescent Eu complex by normal and time resolved fluorescence techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azab, Hassan A.; Anwar, Zeinab M. [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Suez Canal University, 41522 Ismailia (Egypt); Kamel, Rasha M., E-mail: rashamoka@yahoo.com [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Suez University, 43518 Suez (Egypt); Rashwan, Mai S. [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Suez Canal University, 41522 Ismailia (Egypt)

    2016-01-15

    The interaction of Eu-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane (Cyclen) complex by using 4,4,4 trifluoro-1-(2-naphthyl)1,3-butanedione (TNB) as antenna with some nucleosides (guanosine, adenosine, cytidine and inosine), nucleotides (AMP, GMP, CMP, ATP and IMP) and DNA is studied using fluorescence technique. Two detection modes are employed one is the time-resolved mode, and the other is the normal luminescence mode. The time-resolved mode is more sensing than the normal luminescence mode in the present study. By using Benesi–Hildebrand equation binding constants were determined at various temperatures. Thermodynamic parameters showed that the reaction is spontaneous through the obtained negative values of free energy change ΔG. The enthalpy ΔH and the entropy ΔS of reactions were all determined. - Highlights: • This is an application for the detection of biologically important ligands. • The detection limits, binding constants and thermodynamic parameters were evaluated. • Effect of some interferents on the detection of DNA has been investigated.

  8. Analysis of low-marbled Hanwoo cow meat aged with different dry-aging methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Jung Lee

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective Different dry-aging methods [traditional dry-aging (TD, simplified dry-aging (SD, and SD in an aging bag (SDB] were compared to investigate the possible use of SD and/or SDB in practical situations. Methods Sirloins from 48 Hanwoo cows were frozen (Control, 2 days postmortem or dry-aged for 28 days using the different aging methods and analyzed for chemical composition, total aerobic bacterial count, shear force, inosine 5′-monophosphate (IMP and free amino acid content, and sensory properties. Results The difference in chemical composition, total aerobic bacterial count, shear force, IMP, and total free amino acid content were negligible among the 3 dry-aged groups. The SD and SDB showed statistically similar tenderness, flavor, and overall acceptability relative to TD. However, SDB had a relatively higher saleable yield. Conclusion Both SD and SDB can successfully substitute for TD. However, SDB would be the best option for simplified dry-aging of low-marbled beef with a relatively high saleable yield.

  9. ATPase inhibitor based luciferase assay for prolonged and enhanced ATP pool measurement as an efficient fish freshness indicator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, Rajeev; Priyanka, B S; Thakur, M S

    2014-07-01

    The nucleotide degradation pathway in somatic cells leads to the accumulation of products such as hypoxanthine and inosine, which are commonly used as fish and meat freshness indicators. Assays based on these molecules cannot differentiate the postmortem time over a short period of time (5-10 h). Further, quantification of these degradation products is cumbersome, costly and time-consuming. For the proposed assay, optimal concentrations of 30 and 2 mM, respectively, for the ATPase inhibitors sodium orthovanadate and EDTA were found. Further, it was observed that a firefly luciferase based assay could enhance the sensitivity levels up to 165-fold at 30 °C. In addition, it was observed that the sensitivity for ATP assay was enhanced up to 60-fold even after 12 h. The limit of detection for the ATP assay was 1 pM, unlike other conventional methods, which are sensitive only up to micromolar levels. Moreover, as little as 0.044 g fish fillet was required for the assay, and no time-consuming sample preparation was necessary. Luminescence of prolonged duration was observed in harvested fish kept at -20 °C in comparison with fish kept at 4 and 30 °C, which reflects the shelf life of fish preserved at lower temperatures.

  10. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of adenosine 5′-monophosphate deaminase (AMPD) from Arabidopsis thaliana in complex with coformycin 5′-phosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Byung Woo [Department of Biochemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI 53706-1544 (United States); Center for Eukaryotic Structural Genomics (CESG), University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI 53706-1549 (United States); Bingman, Craig A. [Center for Eukaryotic Structural Genomics (CESG), University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI 53706-1549 (United States); Mahnke, Donna K.; Sabina, Richard L. [Department of Biochemistry, The Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI 53226-4801 (United States); Phillips, George N. Jr, E-mail: phillips@biochem.wisc.edu [Department of Biochemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI 53706-1544 (United States); Center for Eukaryotic Structural Genomics (CESG), University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI 53706-1549 (United States)

    2005-08-01

    Adenosine 5′-monophosphate deaminase from A. thaliana has been crystallized in complex with coformycin 5′-phosphate. Diffraction data have been collected to 3.34 Å resolution. Adenosine 5′-monophosphate deaminase (AMPD) is a eukaryotic enzyme that converts adenosine 5′-monophosphate (AMP) to inosine 5′-monophosphate (IMP) and ammonia. AMPD from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtAMPD) was cloned into the baculoviral transfer vector p2Bac and co-transfected along with a modified baculoviral genome into Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) cells. The resulting recombinant baculovirus were plaque-purified, amplified and used to overexpress recombinant AtAMPD. Crystals of purified AtAMPD have been obtained to which coformycin 5′-phosphate, a transition-state inhibitor, is bound. Crystals belong to space group P6{sub 2}22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 131.325, c = 208.254 Å, α = β = 90, γ = 120°. Diffraction data were collected to 3.34 Å resolution from a crystal in complex with coformycin 5′-phosphate and to 4.05 Å resolution from a crystal of a mercury derivative.

  11. Neutron crystallographic studies of amino acids and nucleic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashiwagi, Tatsuki

    2014-01-01

    Neutron crystallographic studies of two representative umami materials were executed utilizing iBLX at MLF/J-PARC. The results of them will be summarized in this report. At first, structure analysis of the alpha form crystal of L-glutamic acid was performed in order to assess the usefulness of neutron crystallography at iBIX to our company's R and D. Neutron crystal structure of it was successfully determined at 0.6 A resolution. All hydrogen atoms were clearly observed. Next, the mixed crystal of disodium Inosine-5'-phosphate (IMP · 2Na) and disodium Guanosine-5'-phosphate (GMP · 2Na) was analyzed by neutron crystallography. Neutron crystal structure of the mixed crystal of IMP and GMP (IM/GMP rate = 1.7) was successfully determined at 0.8 A resolution. In the neutron crystal structure of the mixed crystal, the hydrogen atom bonded to the C2 atom of purine base in IMP and the nitrogen atom bonded to the C2 atom of purine base in GMP were clearly observed in the nuclear density map, structurally demonstrating that this crystal is the mixed crystal. (author)

  12. In Silico Design of Human IMPDH Inhibitors Using Pharmacophore Mapping and Molecular Docking Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui-Juan Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Inosine 5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH is one of the crucial enzymes in the de novo biosynthesis of guanosine nucleotides. It has served as an attractive target in immunosuppressive, anticancer, antiviral, and antiparasitic therapeutic strategies. In this study, pharmacophore mapping and molecular docking approaches were employed to discover novel Homo sapiens IMPDH (hIMPDH inhibitors. The Güner-Henry (GH scoring method was used to evaluate the quality of generated pharmacophore hypotheses. One of the generated pharmacophore hypotheses was found to possess a GH score of 0.67. Ten potential compounds were selected from the ZINC database using a pharmacophore mapping approach and docked into the IMPDH active site. We find two hits (i.e., ZINC02090792 and ZINC00048033 that match well the optimal pharmacophore features used in this investigation, and it is found that they form interactions with key residues of IMPDH. We propose that these two hits are lead compounds for the development of novel hIMPDH inhibitors.

  13. Functional ADA polymorphism increases sleep depth and reduces vigilant attention in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Valérie; Klaus, Federica; Bodenmann, Sereina; Schäfer, Nikolaus; Brugger, Peter; Huber, Susanne; Berger, Wolfgang; Landolt, Hans-Peter

    2012-04-01

    Homeostatically regulated slow-wave oscillations in non-rapid eye movement (REM) sleep may reflect synaptic changes across the sleep-wake continuum and the restorative function of sleep. The nonsynonymous c.22G>A polymorphism (rs73598374) of adenosine deaminase (ADA) reduces the conversion of adenosine to inosine and predicts baseline differences in sleep slow-wave oscillations. We hypothesized that this polymorphism affects cognitive functions, and investigated whether it modulates electroencephalogram (EEG), behavioral, subjective, and biochemical responses to sleep deprivation. Attention, learning, memory, and executive functioning were quantified in healthy adults. Right-handed carriers of the variant allele (G/A genotype, n = 29) performed worse on the d2 attention task than G/G homozygotes (n = 191). To test whether this difference reflects elevated homeostatic sleep pressure, sleep and sleep EEG before and after sleep deprivation were studied in 2 prospectively matched groups of G/A and G/G genotype subjects. Deep sleep and EEG 0.75- to 1.5-Hz oscillations in non-REM sleep were significantly higher in G/A than in G/G genotype. Moreover, attention and vigor were reduced, whereas waking EEG alpha activity (8.5-12 Hz), sleepiness, fatigue, and α-amylase in saliva were enhanced. These convergent data demonstrate that genetic reduction of ADA activity elevates sleep pressure and plays a key role in sleep and waking quality in humans.

  14. Mode pumping experiments on biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Austin, R.H.; Erramilli, S.; Xie, A.; Schramm, A.

    1995-01-01

    We will explore several aspects of protein dynamics and energy transfer that can be explored by using the intense, picosecond, tunable mid-IR output of the FEL. In order of appearance they are: (1) Saturation recovery and inter-level coupling of the low temperature amide-I band in acetanilide. This is a continuation of earlier experiments to test soliton models in crystalline hydrogen bonded solids. In this experiment we utilize the sub-picosecond time resolution and low repetition rate of the Stanford SCLA FEL to do both T 1 and T 2 relaxation measurements at 1650 cm -1 . (2) Probing the influence of collective dynamics in sensory rhodopsin. In this experiment we use the FIR output of the Stanford FIREFLY FEL to determine the lifetime of collective modes in the photo-active protein sensory rhodopsin, and begin experiments on the influence of collective modes on retinal reaction dynamics. (3) Probing the transition states of enzymes. This experiment, in the initial stages, attempts to use the intense IR output of the FEL to probe and influence the reaction path of a transition state analog for the protein nucleoside hydrolase. The transition state of the inosine substrate is believed to have critical modes softened by the protein so that bond-breaking paths show absorption at approximately 800 cm -1 . A form of action spectrum using FEL excitation will be used to probe this state

  15. The ADAR RNA editing enzyme controls neuronal excitability in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xianghua; Overton, Ian M.; Baines, Richard A.; Keegan, Liam P.; O’Connell, Mary A.

    2014-01-01

    RNA editing by deamination of specific adenosine bases to inosines during pre-mRNA processing generates edited isoforms of proteins. Recoding RNA editing is more widespread in Drosophila than in vertebrates. Editing levels rise strongly at metamorphosis, and Adar5G1 null mutant flies lack editing events in hundreds of CNS transcripts; mutant flies have reduced viability, severely defective locomotion and age-dependent neurodegeneration. On the other hand, overexpressing an adult dADAR isoform with high enzymatic activity ubiquitously during larval and pupal stages is lethal. Advantage was taken of this to screen for genetic modifiers; Adar overexpression lethality is rescued by reduced dosage of the Rdl (Resistant to dieldrin), gene encoding a subunit of inhibitory GABA receptors. Reduced dosage of the Gad1 gene encoding the GABA synthetase also rescues Adar overexpression lethality. Drosophila Adar5G1 mutant phenotypes are ameliorated by feeding GABA modulators. We demonstrate that neuronal excitability is linked to dADAR expression levels in individual neurons; Adar-overexpressing larval motor neurons show reduced excitability whereas Adar5G1 null mutant or targeted Adar knockdown motor neurons exhibit increased excitability. GABA inhibitory signalling is impaired in human epileptic and autistic conditions, and vertebrate ADARs may have a relevant evolutionarily conserved control over neuronal excitability. PMID:24137011

  16. Evidence for ADAR-induced hypermutation of the Drosophila sigma virus (Rhabdoviridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Connell Mary A

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background ADARs are RNA editing enzymes that target double stranded RNA and convert adenosine to inosine, which is read by translation machinery as if it were guanosine. Aside from their role in generating protein diversity in the central nervous system, ADARs have been implicated in the hypermutation of some RNA viruses, although why this hypermutation occurs is not well understood. Results Here we describe the hypermutation of adenosines to guanosines in the genome of the sigma virus--a negative sense RNA virus that infects Drosophila melanogaster. The clustering of these mutations and the context in which they occur indicates that they have been caused by ADARs. However, ADAR-editing of viral RNA is either rare or edited viral RNA are rapidly degraded, as we only detected evidence for editing in two of the 104 viral isolates we studied. Conclusion This is the first evidence for ADARs targeting viruses outside of mammals, and it raises the possibility that ADARs could play a role in the antiviral defences of insects.

  17. ADAR RNA editing below the backbone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, Liam; Khan, Anzer; Vukic, Dragana; O'Connell, Mary

    2017-09-01

    ADAR RNA editing enzymes ( a denosine d e a minases acting on R NA) that convert adenosine bases to inosines were first identified biochemically 30 years ago. Since then, studies on ADARs in genetic model organisms, and evolutionary comparisons between them, continue to reveal a surprising range of pleiotropic biological effects of ADARs. This review focuses on Drosophila melanogaster , which has a single Adar gene encoding a homolog of vertebrate ADAR2 that site-specifically edits hundreds of transcripts to change individual codons in ion channel subunits and membrane and cytoskeletal proteins. Drosophila ADAR is involved in the control of neuronal excitability and neurodegeneration and, intriguingly, in the control of neuronal plasticity and sleep. Drosophila ADAR also interacts strongly with RNA interference, a key antiviral defense mechanism in invertebrates. Recent crystal structures of human ADAR2 deaminase domain-RNA complexes help to interpret available information on Drosophila ADAR isoforms and on the evolution of ADARs from tRNA deaminase ADAT proteins. ADAR RNA editing is a paradigm for the now rapidly expanding range of RNA modifications in mRNAs and ncRNAs. Even with recent progress, much remains to be understood about these groundbreaking ADAR RNA modification systems. © 2017 Keegan et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  18. Effects of chitosan oligosaccharides on microbiota composition of silver carp (Hypophthalmichthys molitrix) determined by culture-dependent and independent methods during chilled storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Shiliang; Liu, Xiaochang; Huang, Zhan; Li, Yan; Zhang, Longteng; Luo, Yongkang

    2018-03-02

    This study evaluated the effects of chitosan oligosaccharides (COS) on the changes in quality and microbiota of silver carp fillets stored at 4 °C. During storage, 1% (w/v) COS treated samples maintained good quality, as evidenced by retarding sensory deterioration, inhibiting microbial growth, attenuating the production of total volatile basic nitrogen, putrescine, cadaverine and hypoxanthine, and delaying degradation of inosine monophosphate and hypoxanthine ribonucleotide. Meanwhile, variability in the predominant microbiota in different samples was investigated by culture-dependent and -independent methods. Based on sensory analysis, shelf-life of silver carp fillets was 4 days for the control and 6 days for COS treated samples. Meanwhile, Pseudomonas, followed by Aeromonas, Acinetobacter, and Shewanella were dominated in the control samples at day 4 and contributed to fish spoilage at day 6. However, COS inhibited the growth of Pseudomonas, Aeromonas, and Shewanella significantly. Consequently, Acinetobacter followed by Pseudomonas became the predominant microbiota in COS treated samples at day 6. With the growth of Pseudomonas, COS treated samples were spoiled at day 8. Therefore, COS improved the quality of fillets and prolonged the shelf life of silver carp fillets by 2 days during chilled storage, which was mainly due to their modulating effects on microbiota. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Equilibrium partitioning of drug molecules between aqueous and amino acid ester-based ionic liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing, Jun; Li, Zhiyong; Pei, Yuanchao; Wang, Huiyong; Wang, Jianji

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Partition coefficients of twelve drug molecules in ILs have been determined. ► The possible mechanism has been investigated from 13 C NMR measurements. ► Hydrophobic π–π interaction is the main driving force for the partitioning of drug molecules. -- Abstract: In this work, a series of novel room temperature ionic liquids (ILs) have been synthesized with cheap, naturally α-amino acid ester as cations and bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide as anion. The glass transition temperature and thermal decomposition temperature of these ILs, partition coefficients of some coumarins and purine alkaloids between water and the amino acid ester-based ILs at T = 298.15 K, and Gibbs energy, enthalpy and entropy changes for the transfer of caffeine and 6,7-dihydroxycoumarin from water to [LeuC 2 ][Tf 2 N] have been determined. It is shown that these ILs are highly effective materials for the extraction of drug compounds like coumarin, 4-hydroxycoumarin, 7-hydroxycoumarin, 3-aminocoumarin, coumarin-3-carboxylic acid, 6,7-dihydroxycoumarin, 6,7-dihydroxy-4-methylcoumarin, caffeine, theobromine, theophylline, inosine, and 2,6-diaminopurine. The partition process is driven by enthalpy term, and partition coefficients of the drug molecules increase with the increase of hydrophobicity of both the drug molecules and the ILs. Furthermore, the possible partition mechanism has been investigated from 13 C NMR measurements

  20. Regulation of taste-active components of meat by dietary branched-chain amino acids; effects of branched-chain amino acid antagonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imanari, M; Kadowaki, M; Fujimura, S

    2008-05-01

    1. The effects of dietary branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) including leucine (Leu), isoleucine (Ile) and valine (Val) on taste-active components, especially free glutamate (Glu), in meat were investigated. 2. Broiler chickens (28 d old) were given varied dietary BCAA levels for 10 d before marketing. Dietary BCAA content ratios were either 100:100:100 (Low Leu group), 150:100:100 (Control group) or 150:150:150 (High Ile + Val group) for Leu:Ile:Val (% of each BCAA requirement according to NRC, 1994). Taste-related components of meat (free amino acids and ATP metabolites) and sensory scores of meat soup were estimated. 3. Free Glu content, the main taste-active component of meat, was significantly increased by dietary BCAA. Compared to the Control group, free Glu content increased by 30% in the High Ile + Val group. However, the inosine monophosphate (IMP) content in meat did not change among groups. 4. Sensory evaluation of meat soups showed that Control and High Ile + Val groups had different meat flavours. The sensory score of overall taste intensity was significantly higher in the High Ile + Val group. 5. These results suggest that dietary BCAA concentrations regulate free Glu in meat. Increasing dietary Ile + Val induces an increase in free Glu content of meat, improves meat taste and is more effective for increasing free Glu content in meat than decreasing dietary Leu level.

  1. Area, age and gender dependence of the nucleoside system in the brain: a review of current literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, Zsolt; Juhász, Gábor; Palkovits, Miklós; Dobolyi, Arpád; Kékesi, Katalin A

    2011-01-01

    Nucleosides, such as uridine, inosine, guanosine and adenosine, may participate in the regulation of sleep, cognition, memory and nociception, the suppression of seizures, and have also been suggested to play a role in the pathophysiology of some neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric diseases. Under pathological conditions, levels of nucleosides change extremely in the brain, indicating their participation in the pathophysiology of disorders like Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and schizophrenia. These findings have resulted in an increasing attention to the roles of nucleosides in the central nervous system. The specific effects of nucleosides depend on the expression of their receptors and transporters in neuronal and glial cells, as well as their extracellular concentrations in the brain. A complex interlinked metabolic network and transporters of nucleosides may balance nucleoside levels in the brain tissue under normal conditions and enable the fine modulation of neuronal and glial processes via nucleoside receptor signaling mechanisms. Brain levels of nucleosides were found to vary when measured in a variety of different brain regions. In addition, nucleoside levels also depend on age and gender. Furthermore, distributions of nucleoside transporters and receptors as well as nucleoside metabolic enzyme activities demonstrate the area, age and gender dependence of the nucleoside system, suggesting different roles of nucleosides in functionally different brain areas. The aim of this review article is to summarize our present knowledge of the area-, age- and gender-dependent distribution of nucleoside levels, nucleoside metabolic enzyme activity, nucleoside receptors and nucleoside transporters in the brain.

  2. Evaluation of Pacific White Shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) Health during a Superintensive Aquaculture Growout Using NMR-Based Metabolomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schock, Tracey B.; Duke, Jessica; Goodson, Abby; Weldon, Daryl; Brunson, Jeff; Leffler, John W.; Bearden, Daniel W.

    2013-01-01

    Success of the shrimp aquaculture industry requires technological advances that increase production and environmental sustainability. Indoor, superintensive, aquaculture systems are being developed that permit year-round production of farmed shrimp at high densities. These systems are intended to overcome problems of disease susceptibility and of water quality issues from waste products, by operating as essentially closed systems that promote beneficial microbial communities (biofloc). The resulting biofloc can assimilate and detoxify wastes, may provide nutrition for the farmed organisms resulting in improved growth, and may aid in reducing disease initiated from external sources. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomic techniques were used to assess shrimp health during a full growout cycle from the nursery phase through harvest in a minimal-exchange, superintensive, biofloc system. Aberrant shrimp metabolomes were detected from a spike in total ammonia nitrogen in the nursery, from a reduced feeding period that was a consequence of surface scum build-up in the raceway, and from the stocking transition from the nursery to the growout raceway. The biochemical changes in the shrimp that were induced by the stressors were essential for survival and included nitrogen detoxification and energy conservation mechanisms. Inosine and trehalose may be general biomarkers of stress in Litopenaeus vannamei. This study demonstrates one aspect of the practicality of using NMR-based metabolomics to enhance the aquaculture industry by providing physiological insight into common environmental stresses that may limit growth or better explain reduced survival and production. PMID:23555690

  3. Alkaliphilic Bacillus species show potential application in concrete crack repair by virtue of rapid spore production and germination then extracellular calcite formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, T K; Alazhari, M; Heath, A; Paine, K; Cooper, R M

    2017-05-01

    Characterization of alkaliphilic Bacillus species for spore production and germination and calcite formation as a prelude to investigate their potential in microcrack remediation in concrete. Conditions, extent and timing of endospore production was determined by dark-field light microscopy; germination induction and kinetics were assessed by combining reduction in optical density with formation of refractile bodies by phase-contrast microscopy. Bacillus pseudofirmus was selected from several species as the most suitable isolate. Levels and timing of calcium carbonate precipitated in vitro by B. pseudofirmus were evaluated by atomic absorption spectroscopy and structural identity confirmed as calcite and aragonite by Raman spectroscopy and FTIR. The isolate produced copious spores that germinated rapidly in the presence of germinants l-alanine, inosine and NaCl. Bacterial cells produced CaCO 3 crystals in microcracks and the resulting occlusion markedly restricted water ingress. By virtue of rapid spore production and germination, calcium carbonate formation in vitro and in situ, leading to sealing of microcracks, B. pseudofirmus shows clear potential for remediation of concrete on a commercial scale. Microbial sealing of microcracks should become a practicable and sustainable means of increasing concrete durability. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Applied Microbiology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  4. Distribution of ADAT-Dependent Codons in the Human Transcriptome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Àlbert Rafels-Ybern

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Nucleotide modifications in the anticodons of transfer RNAs (tRNA play a central role in translation efficiency, fidelity, and regulation of translation, but, for most of these modifications, the details of their function remain unknown. The heterodimeric adenosine deaminases acting on tRNAs (ADAT2-ADAT3, or ADAT are enzymes present in eukaryotes that convert adenine (A to inosine (I in the first anticodon base (position 34 by hydrolytic deamination. To explore the influence of ADAT activity on mammalian translation, we have characterized the human transcriptome and proteome in terms of frequency and distribution of ADAT-related codons. Eight different tRNAs can be modified by ADAT and, once modified, these tRNAs will recognize NNC, NNU and NNA codons, but not NNG codons. We find that transcripts coding for proteins highly enriched in these eight amino acids (ADAT-aa are specifically enriched in NNC, NNU and NNA codons. We also show that the proteins most enriched in ADAT-aa are composed preferentially of threonine, alanine, proline, and serine (TAPS. We propose that the enrichment in ADAT-codons in these proteins is due to the similarities in the codons that correspond to TAPS.

  5. Synthesis, conformational analysis, and biological activity of new analogues of thiazole-4-carboxamide adenine dinucleotide (TAD) as IMP dehydrogenase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchetti, Palmarisa; Cappellacci, Loredana; Pasqualini, Michela; Petrelli, Riccardo; Jayaprakasan, Vetrichelvan; Jayaram, Hiremagalur N; Boyd, Donald B; Jain, Manojkumar D; Grifantini, Mario

    2005-03-15

    Thiazole-4-carboxamide adenine dinucleotide (TAD) analogues T-2'-MeAD (1) and T-3'-MeAD (2) containing, respectively, a methyl group at the ribose 2'-C-, and 3'-C-position of the adenosine moiety, were prepared as potential selective human inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) type II inhibitors. The synthesis of heterodinucleotides was carried out by CDI-catalyzed coupling reaction of unprotected 2'-C-methyl- or 3'-C-methyl-adenosine 5'-monophosphate with 2',3'-O-isopropylidene-tiazofurin 5'-monophosphate, and then deisopropylidenation. Biological evaluation of dinucleotides 1 and 2 as inhibitors of recombinant human IMPDH type I and type II resulted in a good activity. Inhibition of both isoenzymes by T-2'-MeAD and T-3'-MeAD was noncompetitive with respect to NAD substrate. Binding of T-3'-MeAD was comparable to that of parent compound TAD, while T-2'-MeAD proved to be a weaker inhibitor. However, no significant difference was found in inhibition of the IMPDH isoenzymes. T-2'-MeAD and T-3'-MeAD were found to inhibit the growth of K562 cells (IC(50) 30.7 and 65.0muM, respectively).

  6. Strategy of metabolic phenotype modulation in Portunus trituberculatus exposed to low salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yangfang; An, Yanpeng; Li, Ronghua; Mu, Changkao; Wang, Chunlin

    2014-04-16

    Extreme low salinity influences normal crab growth, morphogenesis, and production. Some individuals of swimming crab Portunus trituberculatus have, however, an inherent ability to adapt to such a salinity fluctuation. This study investigated the dynamic metabolite alterations of two P. trituberculatus strains, namely, a wild one and a screened (low-salinity tolerant) one in response to low-salinity challenge by combined use of NMR spectroscopy and high-throughput data analysis. The dominant metabolites in crab muscle were found to comprise amino acids, sugars, carboxylic acids, betaine, trimethylamine-N-oxide, 2-pyridinemethanol, trigonelline, and nucleotides. These results further showed that the strategy of metabolic modulation of P. trituberculatus after low-salinity stimulus includes osmotic rebalancing, enhanced gluconeogenesis from amino acids, and energy accumulation. These metabolic adaptations were manifested in the accumulation of trimethylamine-N-oxide, ATP, 2-pyridinemethanol, and trigonelline and in the depletion of the amino acid pool as well as in the fluctuation of inosine levels. This lends support to the fact that the low-salinity training accelerates the responses of crabs to low-salinity stress. These findings provide a comprehensive insight into the mechanisms of metabolic modulation in P. trituberculatus in response to low salinity. This work highlights the approach of NMR-based metabonomics in conjunction with multivariate data analysis and univariate data analysis in understanding the strategy of metabolic phenotype modulation against stressors.

  7. Editing modifies the GABA(A) receptor subunit alpha3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ohlson, Johan; Pedersen, Jakob Skou; Haussler, David

    2007-01-01

    Adenosine to inosine (A-to-I) pre-mRNA editing by the ADAR enzyme family has the potential to increase the variety of the proteome. This editing by adenosine deamination is essential in mammals for a functional brain. To detect novel substrates for A-to-I editing we have used an experimental method...... to find selectively edited sites and combined it with bioinformatic techniques that find stem-loop structures suitable for editing. We present here the first verified editing candidate detected by this screening procedure. We show that Gabra-3, which codes for the alpha3 subunit of the GABA(A) receptor......, is a substrate for editing by both ADAR1 and ADAR2. Editing of the Gabra-3 mRNA recodes an isoleucine to a methionine. The extent of editing is low at birth but increases with age, reaching close to 100% in the adult brain. We therefore propose that editing of the Gabra-3 mRNA is important for normal brain...

  8. A distant cis acting intronic element induces site-selective RNA editing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daniel, Chammiran; Venø, Morten Trillingsgaard; Ekdahl, Ylva

    2012-01-01

    Transcripts have been found to be site selectively edited from adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) in the mammalian brain, mostly in genes involved in neurotransmission. While A-to-I editing occurs at double-stranded structures, other structural requirements are largely unknown. We have investigated...... shown to be important for A-to-I editing. We demonstrate that the element also can induce editing in related but normally not edited RNA sequences. In human, thousands of genes are edited in duplexes formed by inverted repeats in non-coding regions. It is likely that numerous such duplexes can induce...... the requirements for editing at the I/M site in the Gabra-3 transcript of the GABA(A) receptor. We identify an evolutionarily conserved intronic duplex, 150 nt downstream of the exonic hairpin where the I/M site resides, which is required for its editing. This is the first time a distant RNA structure has been...

  9. Sensing of nucleosides, nucleotides and DNA using luminescent Eu complex by normal and time resolved fluorescence techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azab, Hassan A.; Anwar, Zeinab M.; Kamel, Rasha M.; Rashwan, Mai S.

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of Eu-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane (Cyclen) complex by using 4,4,4 trifluoro-1-(2-naphthyl)1,3-butanedione (TNB) as antenna with some nucleosides (guanosine, adenosine, cytidine and inosine), nucleotides (AMP, GMP, CMP, ATP and IMP) and DNA is studied using fluorescence technique. Two detection modes are employed one is the time-resolved mode, and the other is the normal luminescence mode. The time-resolved mode is more sensing than the normal luminescence mode in the present study. By using Benesi–Hildebrand equation binding constants were determined at various temperatures. Thermodynamic parameters showed that the reaction is spontaneous through the obtained negative values of free energy change ΔG. The enthalpy ΔH and the entropy ΔS of reactions were all determined. - Highlights: • This is an application for the detection of biologically important ligands. • The detection limits, binding constants and thermodynamic parameters were evaluated. • Effect of some interferents on the detection of DNA has been investigated.

  10. The influence of immunosuppressive drugs on neural stem/progenitor cell fate in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skardelly, Marco, E-mail: Marco.Skardelly@med.uni-tuebingen.de [Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital, Leipzig (Germany); Translational Centre for Regenerative Medicine, University of Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany); Glien, Anja; Groba, Claudia; Schlichting, Nadine [Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital, Leipzig (Germany); Kamprad, Manja [Institute of Clinical Immunology, Medical Faculty, University of Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany); Meixensberger, Juergen [Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital, Leipzig (Germany); Milosevic, Javorina [Translational Centre for Regenerative Medicine, University of Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany)

    2013-12-10

    In allogenic and xenogenic transplantation, adequate immunosuppression plays a major role in graft survival, especially over the long term. The effect of immunosuppressive drugs on neural stem/progenitor cell fate has not been sufficiently explored. The focus of this study is to systematically investigate the effects of the following four different immunotherapeutic strategies on human neural progenitor cell survival/death, proliferation, metabolic activity, differentiation and migration in vitro: (1) cyclosporine A (CsA), a calcineurin inhibitor; (2) everolimus (RAD001), an mTOR-inhibitor; (3) mycophenolic acid (MPA, mycophenolate), an inhibitor of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase and (4) prednisolone, a steroid. At the minimum effective concentration (MEC), we found a prominent decrease in hNPCs' proliferative capacity (BrdU incorporation), especially for CsA and MPA, and an alteration of the NAD(P)H-dependent metabolic activity. Cell death rate, neurogenesis, gliogenesis and cell migration remained mostly unaffected under these conditions for all four immunosuppressants, except for apoptotic cell death, which was significantly increased by MPA treatment. - Highlights: • Four immunosuppresants (ISs) were tested in human neural progenitor cells in vitro. • Cyclosporine A and mycophenolic acid showed a prominent anti-proliferative activity • Mycophenolic acid exhibited a significant pro-apoptotic effect. • NAD(P)H-dependent metabolic activity was occasionally induced by ISs. • Neuronal differentiation and migration potential remained unaffected by ISs treatment.

  11. Elevated Levels of DNA Strand Breaks Induced by a Base Analog in the Human Cell Line with the P32T ITPA Variant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina S.-R. Waisertreiger

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Base analogs are powerful antimetabolites and dangerous mutagens generated endogenously by oxidative stress, inflammation, and aberrant nucleotide biosynthesis. Human inosine triphosphate pyrophosphatase (ITPA hydrolyzes triphosphates of noncanonical purine bases (i.e., ITP, dITP, XTP, dXTP, or their mimic: 6-hydroxyaminopurine (HAP deoxynucleoside triphosphate and thus regulates nucleotide pools and protects cells from DNA damage. We demonstrate that the model purine base analog HAP induces DNA breaks in human cells and leads to elevation of levels of ITPA. A human polymorphic allele of the ITPA, 94C->A encodes for the enzyme with a P32T amino-acid change and leads to accumulation of nonhydrolyzed ITP. The polymorphism has been associated with adverse reaction to purine base-analog drugs. The level of both spontaneous and HAP-induced DNA breaks is elevated in the cell line with the ITPA P32T variant. The results suggested that human ITPA plays a pivotal role in the protection of DNA from noncanonical purine base analogs.

  12. Kinetic studies and evaluation of potential compounds for the chemotherapy of Leishmaniasis using LdNH-MBP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renno, M.N.; Figueroa-Villar, J.D.; Silva, N.B. da; Tinoco, L.W.; Borja-Cabrera, G.P.; Palatnik-de-Sousa, C.B.P.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Protozoan parasites rely exclusively on purine salvage from the host for DNA and RNA synthesis and nucleoside hydrolases (N Hs) are the enzymes that catalyze the N-rib osyl hydrolysis of all commonly occurring purine and pi rimidine nucleosides, thus being excellent targets for the design of antiparasitic compounds. The general aim of our work with Leishmania donovani NH (LdNH) is to find new inhibitors for this enzyme as potential agents for the chemotherapy of visceral leishmaniasis. In this part of the work we expressed LdNH bound to maltose-binding protein (MBP) in E. coli using the pMAL-C2x vector. After purification by affinity chromatography the enzyme activity was monitored by UV (280 nm) and 1 H NMR spectroscopy using inosine as substrate. All the assays were carried out at 25 deg C in phosphate buffer (pH 8.0) in water (UV) and D 2 O (NMR). Our results show that LdNH-MBP behaves kinetically in the same way as it have been reported for free LdNH, thus confirming that LdNH-MBP maintains the appropriate folding and activity of the enzyme active site, thus being a good model to develop and evaluate new inhibitors of LdNH. As an example, the kinetics tests with AZT have shown that this compound is not an effective inhibitor of this enzyme

  13. Evolutionary analysis reveals regulatory and functional landscape of coding and non-coding RNA editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Deng, Patricia; Jacobson, Dionna; Li, Jin Billy

    2017-02-01

    Adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing diversifies the transcriptome and promotes functional diversity, particularly in the brain. A plethora of editing sites has been recently identified; however, how they are selected and regulated and which are functionally important are largely unknown. Here we show the cis-regulation and stepwise selection of RNA editing during Drosophila evolution and pinpoint a large number of functional editing sites. We found that the establishment of editing and variation in editing levels across Drosophila species are largely explained and predicted by cis-regulatory elements. Furthermore, editing events that arose early in the species tree tend to be more highly edited in clusters and enriched in slowly-evolved neuronal genes, thus suggesting that the main role of RNA editing is for fine-tuning neurological functions. While nonsynonymous editing events have been long recognized as playing a functional role, in addition to nonsynonymous editing sites, a large fraction of 3'UTR editing sites is evolutionarily constrained, highly edited, and thus likely functional. We find that these 3'UTR editing events can alter mRNA stability and affect miRNA binding and thus highlight the functional roles of noncoding RNA editing. Our work, through evolutionary analyses of RNA editing in Drosophila, uncovers novel insights of RNA editing regulation as well as its functions in both coding and non-coding regions.

  14. Genetic mapping uncovers cis-regulatory landscape of RNA editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaswami, Gokul; Deng, Patricia; Zhang, Rui; Anna Carbone, Mary; Mackay, Trudy F C; Li, Jin Billy

    2015-09-16

    Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing, catalysed by ADAR enzymes conserved in metazoans, plays an important role in neurological functions. Although the fine-tuning mechanism provided by A-to-I RNA editing is important, the underlying rules governing ADAR substrate recognition are not well understood. We apply a quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping approach to identify genetic variants associated with variability in RNA editing. With very accurate measurement of RNA editing levels at 789 sites in 131 Drosophila melanogaster strains, here we identify 545 editing QTLs (edQTLs) associated with differences in RNA editing. We demonstrate that many edQTLs can act through changes in the local secondary structure for edited dsRNAs. Furthermore, we find that edQTLs located outside of the edited dsRNA duplex are enriched in secondary structure, suggesting that distal dsRNA structure beyond the editing site duplex affects RNA editing efficiency. Our work will facilitate the understanding of the cis-regulatory code of RNA editing.

  15. Clinical importance of pharmacogenetics in the treatment of hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Adina Maria; MitruŢ, Paul; Kamal, Kamal Constantin; Tica, Oana Sorina; Niculescu, Mihaela; Alexandru, Dragoş Ovidiu; Tica, Andrei Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Globally, over 4% of the world population is affected by hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. The current standard of care for hepatitis C infection is combination therapy with pegylated interferon and ribavirin for 48 weeks, which yield a sustained virological response in only a little over half of the patients with genotype 1 HCV. We investigated the clinical importance of pharmacogenetics in treatment efficacy and prediction of hematotoxicity. A total of 148 patients infected with HCV were enrolled. All patients were treated for a period of 48 weeks or less with pegylated interferon and ribavirin. Four genotypes were investigated: inosine triphosphatase (ITPA) rs1127354, C20orf194 rs6051702, interferon lambda (IFNL)3 rs8099917, IFNL3÷4 rs12979860 in the population from southwestern Romania. Genetic variants for rs129798660 and rs6051702 proved once more to represent an indisputable clinical tool for predicting sustained virological response (SVR) (69.23%, chi-square p=0.007846, ppharmacogenetics should play a constant role in treatment decisions for patients infected with hepatitis C virus.

  16. Overproduction, Purification and Characterization of Adenylate Deaminase from Aspergillus oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shubo; Qian, Yi; Liang, Yunlong; Chen, Xinkuan; Zhao, Mouming; Guo, Yuan; Pang, Zongwen

    2016-12-01

    Adenylate deaminase (AMPD, EC 3.5.4.6) is an aminohydrolase that widely used in the food and medicine industries. In this study, the gene encoding Aspergillus oryzae AMPD was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Induction with 0.75 mM isopropyl β-D-l-thiogalactopyranoside resulted in an enzyme activity of 1773.9 U/mL. Recombinant AMPD was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity using nickel affinity chromatography, and its molecular weight was calculated as 78.6 kDa. Purified AMPD exhibited maximal activity at 35 °C, pH 6.0 and 30 mM K + , with apparent K m and V max values of 2.7 × 10 -4  M and 77.5 μmol/mg/min under these conditions. HPLC revealed that recombinant AMPD could effectively catalyse the synthesis of inosine-5'-monophosphate (IMP) with minimal by-products, indicating high specificity and suggesting that it could prove useful for IMP production.

  17. [Comparative study on specific chromatograms and main nucleosides of cultivated and wild Cordyceps sinensis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zan, Ke; Huang, Li-Li; Guo, Li-Nong; Liu, Jie; Zheng, Jian; Ma, Shuang-Cheng; Qian, Zheng-Ming; Li, Wen-Jia

    2017-10-01

    This study is to establish the HPLC specific chromatogram and determine four main nucleosides of wild and cultivated Cordyceps sinensis. Uridine, inosine, guanosine and adenosine were selected as reference substance. HPLC analysis was performed on a Waters XSelect HSS T3 C₁₈ (4.6 mm×250 mm, 5 μm), with a mobile phase consisting of water(A)-acetonitrile (B) at a flow rate of 0.6 mL•min⁻¹ (0-5 min,0% B;5-15 min,0%-10% B, 15-30 min,10%-20% B, 30-33 min, 20%-50% B, 33-35 min, 50%-0% B, 35-40 min, 0% B). The detection wavelength was 260 nm and the column temperature was controlled at 30 ℃, and the injection volume was 5 μL. HPLC specific chromatogram of wild and cultivated C. sinensis was established and four main nucleosides were simultaneously determined by the above method. Specific chromatograms and contents of four main nucleosides showed no significant differences between cultivated and wild C. sinensis. These results can provide scientific evidences for further development and utilization of cultivated C. sinensis. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  18. The first 3':5'-cyclic nucleotide-amino acid complex: L-His-cIMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slepokura, Katarzyna

    2012-08-01

    In the crystal structure of the L-His-cIMP complex, i.e. L-histidinium inosine 3':5'-cyclic phosphate [systematic name: 5-(2-amino-2-carboxyethyl)-1H-imidazol-3-ium 7-hydroxy-2-oxo-6-(6-oxo-6,9-dihydro-1H-purin-9-yl)-4a,6,7,7a-tetrahydro-4H-1,3,5,2λ(5)-furo[3,2-d][1,3,2λ(5)]dioxaphosphinin-2-olate], C(6)H(10)N(3)O(2)(+)·C(10)H(10)N(4)O(7)P(-), the Hoogsteen edge of the hypoxanthine (Hyp) base of cIMP and the Hyp face are engaged in specific amino acid-nucleotide (His···cIMP) recognition, i.e. by abutting edge-to-edge and by π-π stacking, respectively. The Watson-Crick edge of Hyp and the cIMP phosphate group play a role in nonspecific His···cIMP contacts. The interactions between the cIMP anions (anti/C3'-endo/trans-gauche/chair conformers) are realized mainly between riboses and phosphate groups. The results for this L-His-cIMP complex, compared with those for the previously reported solvated L-His-IMP crystal structure, indicate a different nature of amino acid-nucleotide recognition and interactions upon the 3':5'-cyclization of the nucleotide phosphate group.

  19. Vascular nitric oxide: Beyond eNOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingzi Zhao

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available As the first discovered gaseous signaling molecule, nitric oxide (NO affects a number of cellular processes, including those involving vascular cells. This brief review summarizes the contribution of NO to the regulation of vascular tone and its sources in the blood vessel wall. NO regulates the degree of contraction of vascular smooth muscle cells mainly by stimulating soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC to produce cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP, although cGMP-independent signaling [S-nitrosylation of target proteins, activation of sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA or production of cyclic inosine monophosphate (cIMP] also can be involved. In the blood vessel wall, NO is produced mainly from l-arginine by the enzyme endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS but it can also be released non-enzymatically from S-nitrosothiols or from nitrate/nitrite. Dysfunction in the production and/or the bioavailability of NO characterizes endothelial dysfunction, which is associated with cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension and atherosclerosis.

  20. Isolation of chicken taste buds for real-time Ca2+ imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Ken-ichi; Kawabata, Fuminori; Nomura, Toumi; Aridome, Ayumi; Nishimura, Shotaro; Tabata, Shoji

    2014-10-01

    We isolated chicken taste buds and used a real-time Ca2+ imaging technique to investigate the functions of the taste cells. With RT-PCR, we found that isolated chicken taste bud-like cell subsets express chicken gustducin messenger RNA. Immunocytochemical techniques revealed that the cell subsets were also immunopositive for chicken gustducin. These results provided strong evidence that the isolated cell subsets contain chicken taste buds. The isolated cell subsets were spindle-shaped and approximately 61-75 μm wide and 88-98 μm long, and these characteristics are similar to those of sectional chicken taste buds. Using Ca2+ imaging, we observed the buds' response to 2 mmol/L quinine hydrochloride (a bitter substance) and their response to a mixture of 25 mmol/L L-glutamic acid monopotassium salt monohydrate and 1 mmol/L inosine 5'-monophosphate disodium salt, umami substances. The present study is the first morphological demonstration of isolated chicken taste buds, and our results indicate that the isolated taste buds were intact and functional approaches for examining the taste senses of the chicken using Ca2+ imaging can be informative. © 2014 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  1. Engineering human T cells for resistance to methotrexate and mycophenolate mofetil as an in vivo cell selection strategy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahesh Jonnalagadda

    Full Text Available Gene transfer and drug selection systems that enforce ongoing transgene expression in vitro and in vivo which are compatible with human pharmaceutical drugs are currently underdeveloped. Here, we report on the utility of incorporating human enzyme muteins that confer resistance to the lymphotoxic/immunosuppressive drugs methotrexate (MTX and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF in a multicistronic lentiviral vector for in vivo T lymphocyte selection. We found that co-expression of human dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR(FS; L22F, F31S and inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase II (IMPDH2(IY; T333I, S351Y conferred T cell resistance to the cytocidal and anti-proliferative effects of these drugs at concentrations that can be achieved clinically (up to 0.1 µM MTX and 1.0 µM MPA. Furthermore, using a immunodeficient mouse model that supports the engraftment of central memory derived human T cells, in vivo selection studies demonstrate that huEGFRt(+DHFR(FS+IMPDH2(IY+ T cells could be enriched following adoptive transfer either by systemic administration of MTX alone (4.4 -fold, MMF alone (2.9-fold, or combined MTX and MMF (4.9-fold. These findings demonstrate the utility of both DHFR(FS/MTX and IMPDH2(IY/MMF for in vivo selection of lentivirally transduced human T cells. Vectors incorporating these muteins in combination with other therapeutic transgenes may facilitate the selective engraftment of therapeutically active cells in recipients.

  2. Engineering human T cells for resistance to methotrexate and mycophenolate mofetil as an in vivo cell selection strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonnalagadda, Mahesh; Brown, Christine E; Chang, Wen-Chung; Ostberg, Julie R; Forman, Stephen J; Jensen, Michael C

    2013-01-01

    Gene transfer and drug selection systems that enforce ongoing transgene expression in vitro and in vivo which are compatible with human pharmaceutical drugs are currently underdeveloped. Here, we report on the utility of incorporating human enzyme muteins that confer resistance to the lymphotoxic/immunosuppressive drugs methotrexate (MTX) and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) in a multicistronic lentiviral vector for in vivo T lymphocyte selection. We found that co-expression of human dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR(FS); L22F, F31S) and inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase II (IMPDH2(IY); T333I, S351Y) conferred T cell resistance to the cytocidal and anti-proliferative effects of these drugs at concentrations that can be achieved clinically (up to 0.1 µM MTX and 1.0 µM MPA). Furthermore, using a immunodeficient mouse model that supports the engraftment of central memory derived human T cells, in vivo selection studies demonstrate that huEGFRt(+)DHFR(FS+)IMPDH2(IY+) T cells could be enriched following adoptive transfer either by systemic administration of MTX alone (4.4 -fold), MMF alone (2.9-fold), or combined MTX and MMF (4.9-fold). These findings demonstrate the utility of both DHFR(FS)/MTX and IMPDH2(IY)/MMF for in vivo selection of lentivirally transduced human T cells. Vectors incorporating these muteins in combination with other therapeutic transgenes may facilitate the selective engraftment of therapeutically active cells in recipients.

  3. Non-Targeted Metabolomics Analysis of Golden Retriever Muscular Dystrophy-Affected Muscles Reveals Alterations in Arginine and Proline Metabolism, and Elevations in Glutamic and Oleic Acid In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Muhammad; Kornegay, Joe N.; Honcoop, Aubree; Parry, Traci L.; Balog-Alvarez, Cynthia J.; Muehlbauer, Michael J.; Newgard, Christopher B.; Patterson, Cam

    2017-01-01

    dysfunction. In contrast, two pathways, inosine-5′-monophosphate (VIP Score 3.91) and 3-phosphoglyceric acid (VIP Score 3.08) mainly contributed to the LDE signature, with two metabolites (phosphoglyceric acid and inosine-5′-monophosphate) being significantly decreased. When the BF and LDE were compared, the most significant metabolite was phosphoric acid, which was significantly less in the GRMD BF compared to control and GRMD LDE groups. Conclusions: The identification of elevated BF oleic acid (a long-chain fatty acid) is consistent with recent microarray studies identifying altered lipid metabolism genes, while alterations in arginine and proline metabolism are consistent with recent studies identifying elevated L-arginine in DMD patient sera as a biomarker of disease. Together, these studies demonstrate muscle-specific alterations in GRMD-affected muscle, which illustrate previously unidentified metabolic changes. PMID:28758940

  4. Evaluation of Meat and Egg Traits of Beijing-you Chickens Rotationally Grazing on Chicory Pasture in a Chestnut Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Meng

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Barn and cage-fed chickens have presented several problems, such as high rates of infectious disease and consequent antibiotic abuse, poorer chicken health and welfare, and often poorer meat and egg quality compared with free-range chickens. The poultry agroforestry system is becoming increasingly popular in many poultry farms nowadays. In this study, to evaluate the contribution of poultry agroforestry system to enhance some meat and egg traits of Beijing-you chickens, some indexes of meat and egg qualities, some indexes of slaughter traits, and the feed conversion efficiency were investigated in rotational grazing Beijing-you chickens on chicory (Cichorium intybus L. pasture (CGRG group and only free-ranging chickens on bare land without forage (control group in chestnut forest. Results showed that the live body weight, the dressing weight, the thigh muscle weight, and the breast muscle weight were increased (p<0.05 based on the decrease of 15% feed concentration in the CGRG group relative to the control. Furthermore, compared with the control, the crude ash, the essential amino acid content, and the inosinic acid content were increased (p<0.05, and the crude fat contents were decreased (p<0.05 in the thigh and breast muscles, while the yolk cholesterol and the feed conversion ratio were significantly decreased (p<0.05 in the CGRG group. This study would provide a scientific basis and technological support for the large-scale demonstration and application of rotational grazing chickens on the artificial pasture in forest.

  5. Induction of cytoplasmic rods and rings structures by inhibition of the CTP and GTP synthetic pathway in mammalian cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy C Carcamo

    Full Text Available Cytoplasmic filamentous rods and rings (RR structures were identified using human autoantibodies as probes. In the present study, the formation of these conserved structures in mammalian cells and functions linked to these structures were examined.Distinct cytoplasmic rods (∼3-10 µm in length and rings (∼2-5 µm in diameter in HEp-2 cells were initially observed in immunofluorescence using human autoantibodies. Co-localization studies revealed that, although RR had filament-like features, they were not enriched in actin, tubulin, or vimentin, and not associated with centrosomes or other known cytoplasmic structures. Further independent studies revealed that two key enzymes in the nucleotide synthetic pathway cytidine triphosphate synthase 1 (CTPS1 and inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase 2 (IMPDH2 were highly enriched in RR. CTPS1 enzyme inhibitors 6-diazo-5-oxo-L-norleucine and Acivicin as well as the IMPDH2 inhibitor Ribavirin exhibited dose-dependent induction of RR in >95% of cells in all cancer cell lines tested as well as mouse primary cells. RR formation by lower concentration of Ribavirin was enhanced in IMPDH2-knockdown HeLa cells whereas it was inhibited in GFP-IMPDH2 overexpressed HeLa cells. Interestingly, RR were detected readily in untreated mouse embryonic stem cells (>95%; upon retinoic acid differentiation, RR disassembled in these cells but reformed when treated with Acivicin.RR formation represented response to disturbances in the CTP or GTP synthetic pathways in cancer cell lines and mouse primary cells and RR are the convergence physical structures in these pathways. The availability of specific markers for these conserved structures and the ability to induce formation in vitro will allow further investigations in structure and function of RR in many biological systems in health and diseases.

  6. One-Pot, One-Step Production of Dietary Nucleotides by Magnetic Biocatalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon del Arco

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The enzymatic synthesis of nucleotides offers several advantages over traditional multistep chemical methods, such as stereoselectivity, regioselectivity, enantioselectivity, simple downstream processing, and the use of mild reaction conditions. However, in order to scale up these bioprocesses, several drawbacks, such as the low enzyme stability and recycling, must be considered. Enzyme immobilization may overcome these cost-related problems by enhancing protein stability and facilitating the separation of products. In this regard, tetrameric hypoxanthine–guanine–xanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGXPRT from Thermus thermophilus HB8 was covalently immobilized onto glutaraldehyde-activated MagReSyn®Amine magnetic iron oxide porous microparticles (MTtHGXPRT. In this context, two different strategies were followed: (a an enzyme immobilization through its N-terminus residues at pH 8.5 (derivatives MTtHGXPRT1-3; and (b a multipoint covalent immobilization through the surface lysine residues at pH 10 (derivatives MTtHGXPRT4-5. The immobilized derivatives of MTtHGXPRT3 (activity 1581 international units per gram of support, IU/g; retained activity 29% and MTtHGXPRT5 (activity 1108 IU/g; retained activity 23% displayed the best wet biocatalyst activity, and retained activity values in the enzymatic synthesis of inosine-5′-monophosphate (IMP. In addition, the dependence of the activities and stabilities of both derivatives on pH and temperature was tested, as well as their reusability potential. Taking these results into account, MTtHGXPRT3 was chosen as the best biocatalyst (negligible loss of activity at 60 °C during 24 h; reusable up to seven cycles. Finally, as proof of concept, the enzymatic production of dietary nucleotides from high concentrations of low soluble bases was achieved.

  7. A comparison of molecular biology mechanism of Shewanella putrefaciens between fresh and terrestrial sewage wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiajie Xu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Municipal and industrial wastewater is often discharged into the environment without appropriate treatment, especially in developing countries. As a result, many rivers and oceans are contaminated. It is urgent to control and administer treatments to these contaminated rivers and oceans. However, most mechanisms of bacterial colonization in contaminated rivers and oceans were unknown, especially in sewage outlets. We found Shewanella putrefaciens to be the primary bacteria in the terrestrial sewage wastewater outlets around Ningbo City, China. Therefore, in this study, we applied a combination of differential proteomics, metabolomics, and real-time fluorescent quantitative PCR techniques to identify bacteria intracellular metabolites. We found S. putrefaciens had 12 different proteins differentially expressed in freshwater culture than when grown in wastewater, referring to the formation of biological membranes (Omp35, OmpW, energy metabolism (SOD, deoxyribose-phosphate pyrophosphokinase, fatty acid metabolism (beta-ketoacyl synthase, secondary metabolism, TCA cycle, lysine degradation (2-oxoglutarate reductase, and propionic acid metabolism (succinyl coenzyme A synthetase. The sequences of these 12 differentially expressed proteins were aligned with sequences downloaded from NCBI. There are also 27 differentially concentrated metabolites detected by NMR, including alcohols (ethanol, isopropanol, amines (dimethylamine, ethanolamine, amino acids (alanine, leucine, amine compounds (bilinerurine, nucleic acid compounds (nucleosides, inosines, organic acids (formate, acetate. Formate and ethanolamine show significant difference between the two environments and are possibly involved in energy metabolism, glycerophospholipid and ether lipids metabolism to provide energy supply and material basis for engraftment in sewage. Because understanding S. putrefaciens’s biological mechanism of colonization (protein, gene express and metabolites in

  8. NMR metabolomics for assessment of exercise effects with mouse biofluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Moyec, Laurence; Mille-Hamard, Laurence; Breuneval, Carole; Petot, Helene; Billat, Veronique L. [Universite Evry Val d' Essonne, UBIAE INSERM U902, Evry Cedex (France); Triba, Mohamed N. [Universite Paris 13, CSPBAT UMR 7244, Bobigny (France)

    2012-08-15

    Exercise modulates the metabolome in urine or blood as demonstrated previously for humans and animal models. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) metabolomics, the present study compares the metabolic consequences of an exhaustive exercise at peak velocity (Vp) and at critical velocity (Vc) on mice. Since small-volume samples (blood and urine) were collected, dilution was necessary to acquire NMR spectra. Consequently, specific processing methods were applied before statistical analysis. According to the type of exercise (control group, Vp group and Vc group), 26 male mice were divided into three groups. Mice were sacrificed 2 h after the end of exercise, and urine and blood samples were drawn from each mouse. Proton NMR spectra were acquired with urine and deproteinized blood. The NMR data were aligned with the icoshift method and normalised using the probabilistic quotient method. Finally, data were analysed with the orthogonal projection of latent-structure analysis. The spectra obtained with deproteinized blood can neither discriminate the control mice from exercised mice nor discriminate according to the duration of the exercise. With urine samples, a significant statistical model can be estimated when comparing the control mice to both groups, Vc and Vp. The best model is obtained according to the exercise duration with all mice. Taking into account the spectral regions having the highest correlations, the discriminant metabolites are allantoin, inosine and branched-chain amino acids. In conclusion, metabolomic profiles assessed with NMR are highly dependent on the exercise. These results show that urine samples are more informative than blood samples and that the duration of the exercise is a more important parameter to influence the metabolomic status than the exercise velocity. (orig.)

  9. Guanylic nucleotide starvation affects Saccharomyces cerevisiae mother-daughter separation and may be a signal for entry into quiescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagot Isabelle

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Guanylic nucleotides are both macromolecules constituents and crucial regulators for a variety of cellular processes. Therefore, their intracellular concentration must be strictly controlled. Consistently both yeast and mammalian cells tightly correlate the transcription of genes encoding enzymes critical for guanylic nucleotides biosynthesis with the proliferation state of the cell population. Results To gain insight into the molecular relationships connecting intracellular guanylic nucleotide levels and cellular proliferation, we have studied the consequences of guanylic nucleotide limitation on Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell cycle progression. We first utilized mycophenolic acid, an immunosuppressive drug that specifically inhibits inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase, the enzyme catalyzing the first committed step in de novo GMP biosynthesis. To approach this system physiologically, we next developed yeast mutants for which the intracellular guanylic nucleotide pools can be modulated through changes of growth conditions. In both the pharmacological and genetic approaches, we found that guanylic nucleotide limitation generated a mother-daughter separation defect, characterized by cells with two unseparated daughters. We then showed that this separation defect resulted from cell wall perturbations but not from impaired cytokinesis. Importantly, cells with similar separation defects were found in a wild type untreated yeast population entering quiescence upon nutrient limitation. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that guanylic nucleotide limitation slows budding yeast cell cycle progression, with a severe pause in telophase. At the cellular level, guanylic nucleotide limitation causes the emergence of cells with two unseparated daughters. By fluorescence and electron microscopy, we demonstrate that this phenotype arises from defects in cell wall partition between mother and daughter cells. Because cells with two unseparated

  10. Use of nucleotides in weanling rats with diarrhea induced by a lactose overload: effect on the evolution of diarrhea and weight and on the histopathology of intestine, liver and spleen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norton R.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Until recently, dietary sources of nucleotides were thought not to be essential for good nutrition. Certain states with higher metabolic demands may require larger amounts that cannot be provided by endogenous production. The objective of the present study was to determine the action of nucleotides on the recovery from lactose-induced diarrhea in weaned rats. Thirty-six weanling Fisher rats were divided into two groups. Group 1 received a standard diet and group 2 received a diet containing lactose in place of starch. On the 10th day, six animals per group were sacrificed for histopathological evaluation. The remaining animals were divided into two other subgroups, each with 6 animals, receiving a control diet, a control diet with nucleotides (0.05% adenosine monophosphate, 0.05% guanosine monophosphate, 0.05% cytidine monophosphate, 0.05% uridine monophosphate and 0.05% inosine monophosphate, a diet with lactose, and a diet with lactose and nucleotides. On the 32nd day of the experiment all animals were sacrificed. Animals with diarrhea weighed less than animals without diarrhea. The introduction of nucleotides did not lead to weight gain. Mean diet consumption was lower in the group that continued to ingest lactose, with the group receiving lactose plus nucleotides showing a lower mean consumption. Animals receiving lactose had inflammatory reaction and deposits of periodic acid-Schiff-positive material in intestinal, hepatic and splenic tissues. The introduction of nucleotides led to an improvement of the intestinal inflammatory reaction. In lactose-induced diarrhea, when the stimulus is maintained - lactose overload - the nucleotides have a limited action on the weight gain and on recovery of intestinal morphology, although they have a protective effect on hepatic injury and improve the inflammatory response.

  11. Purine Turnover Metabolites and Selected Antioxidants in Blood of Goats during the Periparturient Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Skotnicka

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the relationships between the erythrocyte concentrations of ATP, ADP, AMP, NAD+, NADP+ and adenylate energy charge (AEC and their metabolites: inosine (Ino, hypoxanthine (Hyp, uric acid (UA, selected blood antioxidants: superoxide dismutase (SOD, glutathione reductase (GR of goats during the periparturient period. The study was conducted on 12 clinically healthy pregnant goats (Capra hircus - 75% genotype of the Polish noble white aged between 2-3 years. Blood was taken from the external jugular vein early in the morning before feeding and obtained twice (4 weeks and 1 week before delivery and twice (2 and 3 weeks after delivery. The ATP concentration did not change significantly. One week before delivery ADP, AMP and Ino concentrations were significantly higher and AEC value significantly lower compared to values in the third week after delivery (p ≤ 0.02, p ≤ 0.05, p ≤ 0.03 and p ≤ 0.01, respectively. One week before and two weeks after delivery we observed a significant increase in SOD and GR activities and an increase in NAD+ and NADP+ concentrations but a significant decrease in Hyp and UA concentrations. Constant ATP concentration and the changes in the dynamics and tendency of Hyp and UA concentrations show that in the periparturient period in goats, purine metabolism undergoes adaptive changes. The balance between resynthetic processes and adenine nucleotide degradation is retained in order to level the oxygen and energy lacks. The results of our study show that the maintenance of prooxidative homeostasis in goats of peripartal period depends mainly on enzymatic mechanisms.

  12. Direct NMR Evidence that Transient Tautomeric and Anionic States in dG·dT Form Watson-Crick-like Base Pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymanski, Eric S; Kimsey, Isaac J; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M

    2017-03-29

    The replicative and translational machinery utilizes the unique geometry of canonical G·C and A·T/U Watson-Crick base pairs to discriminate against DNA and RNA mismatches in order to ensure high fidelity replication, transcription, and translation. There is growing evidence that spontaneous errors occur when mismatches adopt a Watson-Crick-like geometry through tautomerization and/or ionization of the bases. Studies employing NMR relaxation dispersion recently showed that wobble dG·dT and rG·rU mismatches in DNA and RNA duplexes transiently form tautomeric and anionic species with probabilities (≈0.01-0.40%) that are in concordance with replicative and translational errors. Although computational studies indicate that these exceptionally short-lived and low-abundance species form Watson-Crick-like base pairs, their conformation could not be directly deduced from the experimental data, and alternative pairing geometries could not be ruled out. Here, we report direct NMR evidence that the transient tautomeric and anionic species form hydrogen-bonded Watson-Crick-like base pairs. A guanine-to-inosine substitution, which selectively knocks out a Watson-Crick-type (G)N2H 2 ···O2(T) hydrogen bond, significantly destabilized the transient tautomeric and anionic species, as assessed by lack of any detectable chemical exchange by imino nitrogen rotating frame spin relaxation (R 1ρ ) experiments. An 15 N R 1ρ NMR experiment targeting the amino nitrogen of guanine (dG-N2) provides direct evidence for Watson-Crick (G)N2H 2 ···O2(T) hydrogen bonding in the transient tautomeric state. The strategy presented in this work can be generally applied to examine hydrogen-bonding patterns in nucleic acid transient states including in other tautomeric and anionic species that are postulated to play roles in replication and translational errors.

  13. Efficiency of ascorbic acid and γ-rays to ameliorate the quality of ready-to-eat baked bolti fish fillets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tawfik, S.S.; El-Kabani, H.E.; SalIam, M.H.; Ragab, E.A.

    2007-01-01

    Ascorbic acid (vitamin C) is a reducing agent, inhibits oxidative reactions developed in cold-storage Bolti (Tilapia nilotica) fish. It is the most popular fish repasts in Egypt. To determine the influence of ascorbic acid on cooking (roasting) and irradiated fish fillets to extend their storage-time in refrigerators, 3 patches of fish fillets were prepared; control (0 kGy), ascorbic acid plus 2.5 kGy and ascorbic acid plus 4 kGy and were tested for bacteriological examination, chemical analysis and sensory evaluation at 0, 1, 2 and 3 weeks of cold storage at 5±1 degree C. The bacteriological examinations were total aerobic plate counts, psychotropic bacterial counts, Enterobacteriaceae counts, total mould and yeast counts and microbial pathogens counts (Salmonella and Vibrio species). The chemical analyses were thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), inosine 5-monophosphate (IMP) concentration, hypoxanthine (HX) concentration, ph figure, total volatile nitrogen (TVN) and total trimethylamine nitrogen (TMA-N). The sensory evaluation was (texture and odour factors) of the cold-storage Bolti fish fillets samples. The results revealed that aerobically packed fish fillets samples treated with ascorbic acid plus 4 kGy after cooking had satisfied bacteriological, chemical and organoleptical trails. Conclusion: using of baking, irradiation combined with natural antioxidant nd refrigeration could reduce the energy requirements for freezing and costs for the marketing of ready- to-eat fish repasts. Recommendation: combination effects of γ-irradiation plus ascorbic acid in processing fish fillets help to preserve its quality. The possible strategies for improving fish fillets quality and acceptability are discussed

  14. Increased Number of Circulating CD8/CD26 T Cells in the Blood of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Patients Is Associated with Augmented Binding of Adenosine Deaminase and Higher Muscular Strength Scores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan H. Soslow

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is an X-linked disorder that leads to cardiac and skeletal myopathy. The complex immune activation in boys with DMD is incompletely understood. To better understand the contribution of the immune system into the progression of DMD, we performed a systematic characterization of immune cell subpopulations obtained from peripheral blood of DMD subjects and control donors. We found that the number of CD8 cells expressing CD26 (also known as adenosine deaminase complexing protein 2 was increased in DMD subjects compared to control. No differences, however, were found in the levels of circulating factors associated with pro-inflammatory activation of CD8/CD26 cells, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα, granzyme B, and interferon-γ (IFNγ. The number of CD8/CD26 cells correlated directly with quantitative muscle testing (QMT in DMD subjects. Since CD26 mediates binding of adenosine deaminase (ADA to the T cell surface, we tested ADA-binding capacity of CD8/CD26 cells and the activity of bound ADA. We found that mononuclear cells (MNC obtained from DMD subjects with an increased number of CD8/CD26 T cells had a greater capacity to bind ADA. In addition, these MNC demonstrated increased hydrolytic deamination of adenosine to inosine. Altogether, our data demonstrated that (1 an increased number of circulating CD8/CD26 T cells is associated with preservation of muscle strength in DMD subjects, and (2 CD8/CD26 T cells from DMD subjects mediated degradation of adenosine by adenosine deaminase. These results support a role for T cells in slowing the decline in skeletal muscle function, and a need for further investigation into contribution of CD8/CD26 T cells in the regulation of chronic inflammation associated with DMD.

  15. Inhibitory effect of Cystenosine on leukopenia by radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Tomoyasu; Nishio, Masamichi; Sako, Ken; Koizumi, Yoichi; Komura, Ryuzo

    1977-01-01

    Cystenosine, composed of Cysteine and Inosine, was given to the patients with malignant tumors during radiotherapy. As radiotherapy, lineac x-ray 60 Co-γ ray, and 4 MV-betatron were used. Except betatron, a daily dose of 200 to 250 rads was given four times a week, and a total dose reached 5000 to 6000 rads. Administration of Cystenosine was started simultaneously with the onset of the radiotherapy, and 6 tablets a day were given. Of 40 subjects, the drug was very effective in 45 per cents, effective in 37.5 per cents, and ineffective in 17.5 per cents. The effective rate was 82.5 per cents, if the cases with effective and very effective were considered as effective. Of the patients, in whom irradiation field was larger than 15 x 15 cm, the drug was effective in 67 per cents and ineffective in 33 per cents. On the other hand, it was effective in 95 per cents of the patients, in whom irradiation field was middle or small and the size was under above size. Carcinostatic substances were concomitantly given to many of the patients, in whom malignant lymphoma and breast cancer were metastasized in a large extent. In 7 of 9 patients (77.8 per cents), hematopoietic disturbances were inhibited, and prearranged courses of therapy were effectively completed. Although the variation of the number of the blood platelets was not always parallel to that of leukocytes, interruption of the treatment because of the decrease of the blood platelets was found in none of the patients. Neither subjective not objective side effects were seen after the administration of Cystenosine. (Kumagai, S.)

  16. Pseudomonas wadenswilerensis sp. nov. and Pseudomonas reidholzensis sp. nov., two novel species within the Pseudomonas putida group isolated from forest soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frasson, David; Opoku, Michael; Picozzi, Tara; Torossi, Tanja; Balada, Stefanie; Smits, Theo H M; Hilber, Urs

    2017-08-01

    Within the frame of a biotechnological screening, we isolated two Pseudomonas strains from forest soil. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that strain CCOS 864T shared 99.8 % similarity with Pseudomonas donghuensis HYST, while strain CCOS 865T shared 99.0 % similarity with Pseudomonas putida DSM 291T and lower similarity with other P. putida group type strains. Based on multilocus sequence analysis, the two strains were genotypically distinct from each other, each forming a separate clade. Strains CCOS 864T and CCOS 865T were Gram-stain-negative, motile and rod-shaped, growing at a temperature range of 4-37 °C. Strain CCOS 864T could be phenotypically distinguished from P. putida group species by the combination of gelatinase-positive reaction and positive growth on N-acetyl-d-glucosamine, p-hydroxyphenylacetic acid and inosine but lack of fluorescein production on King's B medium, while strain CCOS 865T could be distinguished from P. putida group species by the combination of positive growth with saccharic acid and negative growth with p-hydroxyphenylacetic acid and l-pyroglutamic acid. The major polar lipid for both strains was phosphatidylethanolamine; the major quinone was ubiquinone Q-9. DNA-DNA hybridization and average nucleotide identities confirmed the novel species status for the two strains. The DNA G+C contents of CCOS 864T and CCOS 865T were 62.1 and 63.8 mol%, respectively. The phenotypic, phylogenetic and DNA-DNA relatedness data support the suggestion that CCOS 864T and CCOS 865T represent two novel Pseudomonas species. The names Pseudomonas wadenswilerensis sp. nov. (type strain CCOS 864T=LMG 29327T) and Pseudomonas reidholzensis sp. nov. (type strain CCOS 865T=LMG 29328T) are proposed.

  17. Hot shot induction and reperfusion with a specific blocker of the es-ENT1 nucleoside transporter before and after hypothermic cardioplegia abolishes myocardial stunning in acutely ischemic hearts despite metabolic derangement: Hot shot drug delivery before hypothermic cardioplegia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd-Elfattah, Anwar Saad; Tuchy, Gert E.; Jessen, Michael E.; Salter, David R.; Goldstein, Jacques P.; Brunsting, Louis A.; Wechsler, Andrew S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Simultaneous inhibition of the cardiac equilibrative-p-nitrobenzylthioinosine (NBMPR)–sensitive (es) type of the equilibrative nucleoside transport 1 (ENT1) nucleoside transporter, with NBMPR, and adenosine deaminase, with erythro-9-[2-hydroxy-3-nonyl]adenine (EHNA), prevents release of myocardial purines and attenuates myocardial stunning and fibrillation in canine models of warm ischemia and reperfusion. It is not known whether prolonged administration of hypothermic cardioplegia influences purine release and EHNA/NBMPR-mediated cardioprotection in acutely ischemic hearts. Methods Anesthetized dogs (n = 46), which underwent normothermic aortic crossclamping for 20 minutes on-pump, were divided to determine (1) purine release with induction of intermittent antegrade or continuous retrograde hypothermic cardioplegia and reperfusion, (2) the effects of postischemic treatment with 100 µM EHNA and 25 µM NBMPR on purine release and global functional recovery, and (3) whether a hot shot and reperfusion with EHNA/NBMPR inhibits purine release and attenuates ventricular dysfunction of ischemic hearts. Myocardial biopsies and coronary sinus effluents were obtained and analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography. Results Warm ischemia depleted myocardial adenosine triphosphate and elevated purines (ie, inosine > adenosine) as markers of ischemia. Induction of intermittent antegrade or continuous retrograde hypothermic (4°C) cardioplegia releases purines until the heart becomes cold (90% of purines in coronary sinus effluent. Reperfusion with EHNA/NBMPR abolished ventricular dysfunction in acutely ischemic hearts with and without a hot shot and hypothermic cardioplegic arrest. Conclusions Induction of hypothermic cardioplegia releases purines from ischemic hearts until they become cold, whereas reperfusion induces massive purine release and myocardial stunning. Inhibition of cardiac es-ENT1 nucleoside transporter abolishes postischemic reperfusion

  18. Role of Host-Driven Mutagenesis in Determining Genome Evolution of Sigma Virus (DMelSV; Rhabdoviridae) in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piontkivska, Helen; Matos, Luis F; Paul, Sinu; Scharfenberg, Brian; Farmerie, William G; Miyamoto, Michael M; Wayne, Marta L

    2016-10-05

    Sigma virus (DMelSV) is ubiquitous in natural populations of Drosophila melanogaster. Host-mediated, selective RNA editing of adenosines to inosines (ADAR) may contribute to control of viral infection by preventing transcripts from being transported into the cytoplasm or being translated accurately; or by increasing the viral genomic mutation rate. Previous PCR-based studies showed that ADAR mutations occur in DMelSV at low frequency. Here we use SOLiD TM deep sequencing of flies from a single host population from Athens, GA, USA to comprehensively evaluate patterns of sequence variation in DMelSV with respect to ADAR. GA dinucleotides, which are weak targets of ADAR, are strongly overrepresented in the positive strand of the virus, consistent with selection to generate ADAR resistance on this complement of the transient, double-stranded RNA intermediate in replication and transcription. Potential ADAR sites in a worldwide sample of viruses are more likely to be "resistant" if the sites do not vary among samples. Either variable sites are less constrained and hence are subject to weaker selection than conserved sites, or the variation is driven by ADAR. We also find evidence of mutations segregating within hosts, hereafter referred to as hypervariable sites. Some of these sites were variable only in one or two flies (i.e., rare); others were shared by four or even all five of the flies (i.e., common). Rare and common hypervariable sites were indistinguishable with respect to susceptibility to ADAR; however, polymorphism in rare sites were more likely to be consistent with the action of ADAR than in common ones, again suggesting that ADAR is deleterious to the virus. Thus, in DMelSV, host mutagenesis is constraining viral evolution both within and between hosts. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  19. Role of Host-Driven Mutagenesis in Determining Genome Evolution of Sigma Virus (DMelSV; Rhabdoviridae) in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piontkivska, Helen; Matos, Luis F.; Paul, Sinu; Scharfenberg, Brian; Farmerie, William G.; Miyamoto, Michael M.; Wayne, Marta L.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Sigma virus (DMelSV) is ubiquitous in natural populations of Drosophila melanogaster. Host-mediated, selective RNA editing of adenosines to inosines (ADAR) may contribute to control of viral infection by preventing transcripts from being transported into the cytoplasm or being translated accurately; or by increasing the viral genomic mutation rate. Previous PCR-based studies showed that ADAR mutations occur in DMelSV at low frequency. Here we use SOLiDTM deep sequencing of flies from a single host population from Athens, GA, USA to comprehensively evaluate patterns of sequence variation in DMelSV with respect to ADAR. GA dinucleotides, which are weak targets of ADAR, are strongly overrepresented in the positive strand of the virus, consistent with selection to generate ADAR resistance on this complement of the transient, double-stranded RNA intermediate in replication and transcription. Potential ADAR sites in a worldwide sample of viruses are more likely to be “resistant” if the sites do not vary among samples. Either variable sites are less constrained and hence are subject to weaker selection than conserved sites, or the variation is driven by ADAR. We also find evidence of mutations segregating within hosts, hereafter referred to as hypervariable sites. Some of these sites were variable only in one or two flies (i.e., rare); others were shared by four or even all five of the flies (i.e., common). Rare and common hypervariable sites were indistinguishable with respect to susceptibility to ADAR; however, polymorphism in rare sites were more likely to be consistent with the action of ADAR than in common ones, again suggesting that ADAR is deleterious to the virus. Thus, in DMelSV, host mutagenesis is constraining viral evolution both within and between hosts. PMID:27614234

  20. Characteristic Flavor of Traditional Soup Made by Stewing Chinese Yellow-Feather Chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Jun; Liu, Deng-Yong; Zhou, Guang-Hong; Xu, Xing-Lian

    2017-09-01

    The traditional recipe for Chinese chicken soup creates a popular taste of particular umami and aroma. The present study investigated the effects of stewing time (1, 2, and 3 h) on the principal taste-active and volatile compounds and the overall flavor profile of traditional Chinese chicken soup by measuring the contents of free amino acids (FAAs), 5'-nucleotides, minerals and volatile compounds and by evaluating the taste and aroma profiles using an electronic nose, an electronic tongue and a human panel. Results showed that the major umami-related compounds in the chicken soup were inosine 5'-monophosphate (IMP) and chloride, both of which increased significantly (P < 0.05) during stewing. The taste active values (TAVs) of the equivalent umami concentration (EUC) increased from 4.08 to 9.93 (P < 0.05) after stewing for 3 h. Although the FAA and mineral contents increased significantly (P < 0.05), their TAVs were less than 1. The volatile compounds were mainly hexanal, heptanal, octanal, nonanal, (E)-2-nonanal, (E)-2-decenal, (E,E)-2,4-decadienal, 1-hexanol, and 2-pentyl furan. With the prolonged stewing time, the aldehydes first increased and then decreased significantly (P < 0.05), while 1-hexanol and 2-pentyl furan increased steadily (P < 0.05). The aroma scores of the chicken soup reached the maximum after stewing for 3 h. The discrepancy in overall flavor characteristics tended to stabilize after 2 h of stewing. In general, stewing time has a positive effect on improving the flavor profiles of chicken soup, especially within the first 2 h. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  1. Nucleotide Selectivity in Abiotic RNA Polymerization Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coari, Kristin M.; Martin, Rebecca C.; Jain, Kopal; McGown, Linda B.

    2017-09-01

    In order to establish an RNA world on early Earth, the nucleotides must form polymers through chemical rather than biochemical reactions. The polymerization products must be long enough to perform catalytic functions, including self-replication, and to preserve genetic information. These functions depend not only on the length of the polymers, but also on their sequences. To date, studies of abiotic RNA polymerization generally have focused on routes to polymerization of a single nucleotide and lengths of the homopolymer products. Less work has been done the selectivity of the reaction toward incorporation of some nucleotides over others in nucleotide mixtures. Such information is an essential step toward understanding the chemical evolution of RNA. To address this question, in the present work RNA polymerization reactions were performed in the presence of montmorillonite clay catalyst. The nucleotides included the monophosphates of adenosine, cytosine, guanosine, uridine and inosine. Experiments included reactions of mixtures of an imidazole-activated nucleotide (ImpX) with one or more unactivated nucleotides (XMP), of two or more ImpX, and of XMP that were activated in situ in the polymerization reaction itself. The reaction products were analyzed using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) to identify the lengths and nucleotide compositions of the polymerization products. The results show that the extent of polymerization, the degree of heteropolymerization vs. homopolymerization, and the composition of the polymeric products all vary among the different nucleotides and depend upon which nucleotides and how many different nucleotides are present in the mixture.

  2. The use of nucleosides and arginine as alternative energy sources by coagulase-negative staphylococci in view of meat fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssens, M; Van der Mijnsbrugge, A; Sánchez Mainar, M; Balzarini, T; De Vuyst, L; Leroy, F

    2014-05-01

    The ability of coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) to use alternative energy sources in meat may partially explain their occurrence in fermented meats. Of 61 CNS strains tested, all metabolized adenosine and inosine in a meat simulation medium (MSM). The ability to catabolize arginine via the arginine deiminase (ADI) pathway varied between strains. All tested strains of Staphylococcus carnosus and Staphylococcus epidermidis possessed an arcA gene and showed ADI activity, whereas other species, such as Staphylococcus equorum and Staphylococcus succinus, did not. Arginine catabolic mobile elements (ACME), as in the positive control S. epidermidis ATCC 12228, were uncommon and only found in Staphylococcus xylosus 3PA6 (sausage isolate) and Staphylococcus chromogenes G222 (teat apex isolate). Monoculture experiments were performed in MSM with S. carnosus 833 and SS3-4, S. xylosus G211, and S. epidermidis ATCC 12228 and 2S7-4. At all pH values tested (5.3, 5.8, and 6.5), the strains of S. carnosus catabolized arginine faster than the strains of S. xylosus and S. epidermidis. Only at pH 6.5 could a low ADI activity be found for S. xylosus G211. Increased ADI activity occurred in the case of the ACME-positive S. epidermidis ATCC 12228, when compared to the ACME-negative S. epidermidis 2S7-4. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Bronx River bed sediments phosphorus pool and phosphorus compound identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.; Pant, H. K.

    2008-12-01

    Phosphorus (P) transport in the Bronx River degraded water quality, decreased oxygen levels, and resulted in bioaccumulation in sediment potentially resulting in eutrophication, algal blooms and oxygen depletion under certain temperature and pH conditions. The anthropogenic P sources are storm water runoff, raw sewage discharge, fertilizer application in lawn, golf course and New York Botanical Garden; manure from the Bronx zoo; combined sewoverflows (CSO's) from parkway and Hunts Point sewage plant; pollutants from East River. This research was conducted in the urban river system in New York City area, in order to control P source, figure out P transport temporal and spatial variations and the impact on water quality; aimed to regulate P application, sharing data with Bronx River Alliance, EPA, DEP and DEC. The sediment characteristics influence the distribution and bioavailbility of P in the Bronx River. The P sequential extraction gave the quantitative analysis of the P pool, quantifying the inorganic and organic P from the sediments. There were different P pool patterns at the 15 sites, and the substantial amount of inorganic P pool indicated that a large amount P is bioavailable. The 31P- NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy) technology had been used to identify P species in the 15 sites of the Bronx River, which gave a qualitative analysis on phosphorus transport in the river. The P compounds in the Bronx River bed sediments are mostly glycerophophate (GlyP), nucleoside monophosphates (NMP), polynucleotides (PolyN), and few sites showed the small amount of glucose-6-phosphate (G6P), glycerophosphoethanoamine (GPEA), phosphoenopyruvates (PEP), and inosine monophosphate (IMP). The land use spatial and temporal variations influence local water P levels, P distributions, and P compositions.

  4. Intestinal tract is an important organ for lowering serum uric acid in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhiyi; Li, Yue; Gao, Tao; Duan, Jinlian; Yang, Rong; Dong, Xianxiang; Zhang, Lumei

    2017-01-01

    The kidney was recognized as a dominant organ for uric acid excretion. The main aim of the study demonstrated intestinal tract was an even more important organ for serum uric acid (SUA) lowering. Sprague-Dawley rats were treated normally or with antibiotics, uric acid, adenine, or inosine of the same molar dose orally or intraperitoneally for 5 days. Rat’s intestinal tract was equally divided into 20 segments except the cecum. Uric acid in serum and intestinal segment juice was assayed. Total RNA in the initial intestinal tract and at the end ileum was extracted and sequenced. Protein expression of xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) and urate oxidase (UOX) was tested by Western blot analysis. The effect of oral UOX in lowering SUA was investigated in model rats treated with adenine and an inhibitor of uric oxidase for 5 days. SUA in the normal rats was 20.93±6.98 μg/ml, and total uric acid in the intestinal juice was 308.27±16.37 μg, which is two times more than the total SUA. The uric acid was very low in stomach juice, and attained maximum in the juice of the first segment (duodenum) and then declined all the way till the intestinal end. The level of uric acid in the initial intestinal tissue was very high, where XDH and most of the proteins associated with bicarbonate secretion were up-regulated. In addition, SUA was decreased by oral UOX in model rats. The results suggested that intestinal juice was an important pool for uric acid, and intestinal tract was an important organ for SUA lowering. The uric acid distribution was associated with uric acid synthesis and secretion in the upper intestinal tract, and reclamation in the lower. PMID:29267361

  5. Elevated plasma corticosterone concentrations influence the onset of rigor mortis and meat color in broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, G; Heath, J L; Wabeck, C J; Owens, S L; Mench, J A

    1998-02-01

    This experiment was conducted to determine the effect of elevated plasma corticosterone (CORT) levels on meat quality characteristics. Male broilers (Arbor Acres) were either 1) fed a diet containing corticosterone (CORT) prior to processing, 2) transported by truck for 3 h before processing, or 3) processed without either of the above treatments. Six crates of birds (10 birds per crate; two crates per treatment) were stunned or killed using CO2 gas. Six birds per crate were processed and blood samples were collected during exsanguination for plasma CORT analysis. Meat samples were collected from carcasses either at 20 min or at 4 h post-mortem. At each sampling time (ST), Pectoralis superficialis samples were collected and either individually quick frozen (IQF) in liquid nitrogen or aged on ice (AOI) for 24 h prior to pH, ratio of inosine to adenosine nucleotides (R-value), cooking loss, shear value, and color analyses. The IQF Biceps femoris samples were used for pH, R-value, color, and heme pigment analysis. Mean (+/- SEM) CORT concentrations were 12.9+/-2.57, 11.7+/-1.38 and 7.9+/-0.79 ng/mL, respectively, in the CORT, transported, and control groups. There were significant treatment by ST (P < 0.05) and ST (P < 0.001) effects on the R-value of IQF P. superficialis samples. The CORT group had the highest L* value (P < 0.01) and the lowest a* value (P < 0.06). There was also a significant main effect of ST on shear values (P < 0.05) of AOI P. superficialis samples, with the means higher at 4 h than at 20 min post-mortem. The R-value of IQF B. femoris samples was markedly influenced by treatment (P < 0.001) and ST (P < 0.001). The results indicate that artificially elevating circulating CORT concentrations results in lighter meat color in broilers.

  6. Meat quality and rigor mortis development in broiler chickens with gas-induced anoxia and postmortem electrical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sams, A R; Dzuik, C S

    1999-10-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the combined rigor-accelerating effects of postmortem electrical stimulation (ES) and argon-induced anoxia (Ar) of broiler chickens. One hundred broilers were processed in the following treatments: untreated controls, ES, Ar, or Ar with ES (Ar + ES). Breast fillets were harvested at 1 h postmortem for all treatments or at 1 and 6 h postmortem for the control carcasses. Fillets were sampled for pH and ratio of inosine to adenosine (R-value) and were then individually quick frozen (IQF) or aged on ice (AOI) until 24 h postmortem. Color was measured in the AOI fillets at 24 h postmortem. All fillets were then cooked and evaluated for Allo-Kramer shear value. The Ar treatment accelerated the normal pH decline, whereas the ES and AR + ES treatments yielded even lower pH values at 1 h postmortem. The Ar + ES treatment had a greater R-value than the ES treatment, which was greater than either the Ar or 1-h controls, which, in turn, were not different from each other. The ES treatment had the lowest L* value, and ES, Ar, and Ar + ES produced significantly higher a* values than the 1-h controls. For the IQF fillets, the ES and Ar + ES treatments were not different in shear value but were lower than Ar, which was lower than the 1-h controls. The same was true for the AOI fillets except that the ES and the Ar treatments were not different. These results indicated that although ES and Ar had rigor-accelerating and tenderizing effects, ES seemed to be more effective than Ar; there was little enhancement when Ar was added to the ES treatment and fillets were deboned at 1 h postmortem.

  7. Modulation of microRNA editing, expression and processing by ADAR2 deaminase in glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaselli, Sara; Galeano, Federica; Alon, Shahar; Raho, Susanna; Galardi, Silvia; Polito, Vinicia Assunta; Presutti, Carlo; Vincenti, Sara; Eisenberg, Eli; Locatelli, Franco; Gallo, Angela

    2015-01-13

    ADAR enzymes convert adenosines to inosines within double-stranded RNAs, including microRNA (miRNA) precursors, with important consequences on miRNA retargeting and expression. ADAR2 activity is impaired in glioblastoma and its rescue has anti-tumoral effects. However, how ADAR2 activity may impact the miRNome and the progression of glioblastoma is not known. By integrating deep-sequencing and array approaches with bioinformatics analyses and molecular studies, we show that ADAR2 is essential to edit a small number of mature miRNAs and to significantly modulate the expression of about 90 miRNAs in glioblastoma cells. Specifically, the rescue of ADAR2 activity in cancer cells recovers the edited miRNA population lost in glioblastoma cell lines and tissues, and rebalances expression of onco-miRNAs and tumor suppressor miRNAs to the levels observed in normal human brain. We report that the major effect of ADAR2 is to reduce the expression of a large number of miRNAs, most of which act as onco-miRNAs. ADAR2 can edit miR-222/221 and miR-21 precursors and decrease the expression of the corresponding mature onco-miRNAs in vivo and in vitro, with important effects on cell proliferation and migration. Our findings disclose an additional layer of complexity in miRNome regulation and provide information to better understand the impact of ADAR2 editing enzyme in glioblastoma. We propose that ADAR2 is a key factor for maintaining edited-miRNA population and balancing the expression of several essential miRNAs involved in cancer.

  8. Systematic identification of edited microRNAs in the human brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alon, Shahar; Mor, Eyal; Vigneault, Francois; Church, George M.; Locatelli, Franco; Galeano, Federica; Gallo, Angela; Shomron, Noam; Eisenberg, Eli

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) editing modifies RNA transcripts from their genomic blueprint. A prerequisite for this process is a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) structure. Such dsRNAs are formed as part of the microRNA (miRNA) maturation process, and it is therefore expected that miRNAs are affected by A-to-I editing. Editing of miRNAs has the potential to add another layer of complexity to gene regulation pathways, especially if editing occurs within the miRNA–mRNA recognition site. Thus, it is of interest to study the extent of this phenomenon. Current reports in the literature disagree on its extent; while some reports claim that it may be widespread, others deem the reported events as rare. Utilizing a next-generation sequencing (NGS) approach supplemented by an extensive bioinformatic analysis, we were able to systematically identify A-to-I editing events in mature miRNAs derived from human brain tissues. Our algorithm successfully identified many of the known editing sites in mature miRNAs and revealed 17 novel human sites, 12 of which are in the recognition sites of the miRNAs. We confirmed most of the editing events using in vitro ADAR overexpression assays. The editing efficiency of most sites identified is very low. Similar results are obtained for publicly available data sets of mouse brain-regions tissues. Thus, we find that A-to-I editing does alter several miRNAs, but it is not widespread. PMID:22499667

  9. Abundance and distribution of Macrolide-Lincosamide-Streptogramin resistance genes in an anaerobic-aerobic system treating spiramycin production wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Miaomiao; Ding, Ran; Zhang, Yu; Gao, Yingxin; Tian, Zhe; Zhang, Tong; Yang, Min

    2014-10-15

    The behaviors of the Macrolide-Lincosamide-Streptogramin (MLS) resistance genes were investigated in an anaerobic-aerobic pilot-scale system treating spiramycin (SPM) production wastewater. After screening fifteen typical MLS resistance genes with different mechanisms using conventional PCR, eight detected genes were determined by quantitative PCR, together with three mobile elements. Aerobic sludge in the pilot system exhibited a total relative abundance of MLS resistance genes (per 16S rRNA gene) 2.5 logs higher than those in control samples collected from sewage and inosine wastewater treatment systems (P resistance genes. However, the total relative gene abundance in anaerobic sludge (4.3 × 10(-1)) was lower than that in aerobic sludge (3.7 × 10(0)) despite of the higher SPM level in anaerobic reactor, showing the advantage of anaerobic treatment in reducing the production of MLS resistance genes. The rRNA methylase genes (erm(B), erm(F), erm(X)) were the most abundant in the aerobic sludge (5.3 × 10(-1)-1.7 × 10(0)), followed by esterase gene ere(A) (1.3 × 10(-1)) and phosphorylase gene mph(B) (5.7 × 10(-2)). In anaerobic sludge, erm(B), erm(F), ere(A), and msr(D) were the major ones (1.2 × 10(-2)-3.2 × 10(-1)). These MLS resistance genes (except for msr(D)) were positively correlated with Class 1 integron (r(2) = 0.74-0.93, P < 0.05), implying the significance of horizontal transfer in their proliferation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Infection by chikungunya virus modulates the expression of several proteins in Aedes aegypti salivary glands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tchankouo-Nguetcheu Stephane

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arthropod-borne viral infections cause several emerging and resurging infectious diseases. Among the diseases caused by arboviruses, chikungunya is responsible for a high level of severe human disease worldwide. The salivary glands of mosquitoes are the last barrier before pathogen transmission. Methods We undertook a proteomic approach to characterize the key virus/vector interactions and host protein modifications that occur in the salivary glands that could be responsible for viral transmission by using quantitative two-dimensional electrophoresis. Results We defined the protein modulations in the salivary glands of Aedes aegypti that were triggered 3 and 5 days after an oral infection (3 and 5 DPI with chikungunya virus (CHIKV. Gel profile comparisons showed that CHIKV at 3 DPI modulated the level of 13 proteins, and at 5 DPI 20 proteins. The amount of 10 putatively secreted proteins was regulated at both time points. These proteins were implicated in blood-feeding or in immunity, but many have no known function. CHIKV also modulated the quantity of proteins involved in several metabolic pathways and in cell signalling. Conclusion Our study constitutes the first analysis of the protein response of Aedes aegypti salivary glands infected with CHIKV. We found that the differentially regulated proteins in response to viral infection include structural proteins and enzymes for several metabolic pathways. Some may favour virus survival, replication and transmission, suggesting a subversion of the insect cell metabolism by arboviruses. For example, proteins involved in blood-feeding such as the short D7, an adenosine deaminase and inosine-uridine preferring nucleoside hydrolase, may favour virus transmission by exerting an increased anti-inflammatory effect. This would allow the vector to bite without the bite being detected. Other proteins, like the anti-freeze protein, may support vector protection.

  11. Human adenosine deaminase: properties and turnover in cultured T and B lymphoblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daddona, P.E.

    1981-01-01

    In this study, the properties and rate of turnover of adenosine deaminase are compared in cultured human T and B lymphoblast cell lines. 1) Relative to B lymphoblasts, the level of adenosine deaminase activity in extracts of T lymphoblast cell lines (MOLT-4, RPMI-8402, CCRF-CEM, and CCRF-HSB-2) is elevated 7-14-fold and differs by 2-fold between the C cell lines. 2) In both T and B lymphoblast extracts, the enzyme is apparently identical, based on K/sub m/ for adenosine and deoxyadenosine, K/sub i/ for inosine, V/sub max/ for adenosine, /sub S20,w/, isoelectric pH, and heat stability. Furthermore, by radioimmunoassay, the quantity of adenosine deaminase-immunocreative protein is proportional to the level of enzyme activity in all cell lines studies. 3) Using a purification and selective immunoprecipitation technique, the enzyme turnover could be assessed in cell lines labeled with [ 35 S]methionine. The apparent rate of adenosine deaminase synthesis, relative to total protein, is 2-fold faster in both T cell lines (RPMI-8402 and CCRF-CEM) than in the B cell lines (MGL-8 and GM-130). The apparent half-life (tsub1/2) for the enzyme degradation is 19 and 39 h, respectively, in CCFR-CEM and RPMI-8402, while the tsub1/2 in both B cell lines is 7-9 h. From the net rate of synthesis and degradation, the T cell lines, respectively, exhibit approximately a 6- and 12-fold difference in adenosine deaminase turnover relative to B cells, consistent with the observed differences in enzyme activity. This study suggests that while adenosine deaminase is apparently identical in both T and B lymphoblast cell lines, alterations in both the rate of enzyme synthesis and degradation contribute to its high steady state level in T cells

  12. Altered metabolic signature in pre-diabetic NOD mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasmus Madsen

    Full Text Available Altered metabolism proceeding seroconversion in children progressing to Type 1 diabetes has previously been demonstrated. We tested the hypothesis that non-obese diabetic (NOD mice show a similarly altered metabolic profile compared to C57BL/6 mice. Blood samples from NOD and C57BL/6 female mice was collected at 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 11, 13 and 15 weeks and the metabolite content was analyzed using GC-MS. Based on the data of 89 identified metabolites OPLS-DA analysis was employed to determine the most discriminative metabolites. In silico analysis of potential involved metabolic enzymes was performed using the dbSNP data base. Already at 0 weeks NOD mice displayed a unique metabolic signature compared to C57BL/6. A shift in the metabolism was observed for both strains the first weeks of life, a pattern that stabilized after 5 weeks of age. Multivariate analysis revealed the most discriminative metabolites, which included inosine and glutamic acid. In silico analysis of the genes in the involved metabolic pathways revealed several SNPs in either regulatory or coding regions, some in previously defined insulin dependent diabetes (Idd regions. Our result shows that NOD mice display an altered metabolic profile that is partly resembling the previously observation made in children progressing to Type 1 diabetes. The level of glutamic acid was one of the most discriminative metabolites in addition to several metabolites in the TCA cycle and nucleic acid components. The in silico analysis indicated that the genes responsible for this reside within previously defined Idd regions.

  13. Assessment of mercaptopurine (6MP) metabolites and 6MP metabolic key-enzymes in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtuszkiewicz, Anna; Barcelos, Ana; Dubbelman, Boas; De Abreu, Ronney; Brouwer, Connie; Bökkerink, Jos P; de Haas, Valerie; de Groot-Kruseman, Hester; Jansen, Gerrit; Kaspers, Gertjan L; Cloos, Jacqueline; Peters, G J

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is treated with combination chemotherapy including mercaptopurine (6MP) as an important component. Upon its uptake, 6MP undergoes a complex metabolism involving many enzymes and active products. The prognostic value of all the factors engaged in this pathway still remains unclear. This study attempted to determine which components of 6MP metabolism in leukemic blasts and red blood cells are important for 6MP's sensitivity and toxicity. In addition, changes in the enzymatic activities and metabolite levels during the treatment were analyzed. In a cohort (N=236) of pediatric ALL patients enrolled in the Dutch ALL-9 protocol, we studied the enzymes inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH), thiopurine S-methyltransferase (TPMT), hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT), and purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) as well as thioguanine nucleotides (TGN) and methylthioinosine nucleotides (meTINs). Activities of selected enzymes and levels of 6MP derivatives were measured at various time points during the course of therapy. The data obtained and the toxicity related parameters available for these patients were correlated with each other. We found several interesting relations, including high concentrations of two active forms of 6MP--TGN and meTIN--showing a trend toward association with better in vitro antileukemic effect of 6MP. High concentrations of TGN and elevated activity of HGPRT were found to be significantly associated with grade III/IV leucopenia. However, a lot of data of enzymatic activities and metabolite concentrations as well as clinical toxicity were missing, thereby limiting the number of assessed relations. Therefore, although a complex study of 6MP metabolism in ALL patients is feasible, it warrants more robust and strict data collection in order to be able to draw more reliable conclusions.

  14. Intestinal tract is an important organ for lowering serum uric acid in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Yu; Yin, Hua; Gao, Zhiyi; Li, Yue; Gao, Tao; Duan, Jinlian; Yang, Rong; Dong, Xianxiang; Zhang, Lumei; Duan, Weigang

    2017-01-01

    The kidney was recognized as a dominant organ for uric acid excretion. The main aim of the study demonstrated intestinal tract was an even more important organ for serum uric acid (SUA) lowering. Sprague-Dawley rats were treated normally or with antibiotics, uric acid, adenine, or inosine of the same molar dose orally or intraperitoneally for 5 days. Rat's intestinal tract was equally divided into 20 segments except the cecum. Uric acid in serum and intestinal segment juice was assayed. Total RNA in the initial intestinal tract and at the end ileum was extracted and sequenced. Protein expression of xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) and urate oxidase (UOX) was tested by Western blot analysis. The effect of oral UOX in lowering SUA was investigated in model rats treated with adenine and an inhibitor of uric oxidase for 5 days. SUA in the normal rats was 20.93±6.98 μg/ml, and total uric acid in the intestinal juice was 308.27±16.37 μg, which is two times more than the total SUA. The uric acid was very low in stomach juice, and attained maximum in the juice of the first segment (duodenum) and then declined all the way till the intestinal end. The level of uric acid in the initial intestinal tissue was very high, where XDH and most of the proteins associated with bicarbonate secretion were up-regulated. In addition, SUA was decreased by oral UOX in model rats. The results suggested that intestinal juice was an important pool for uric acid, and intestinal tract was an important organ for SUA lowering. The uric acid distribution was associated with uric acid synthesis and secretion in the upper intestinal tract, and reclamation in the lower.

  15. Functional Study of the P32T ITPA Variant Associated with Drug Sensitivity in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepchenkova, Elena I.; Tarakhovskaya, Elena R.; Spitler, Kathryn; Frahm, Christin; Menezes, Miriam R.; Simone, Peter D.; Kolar, Carol; Marky, Luis A.; Borgstahl, Gloria E. O.; Pavlov, Youri I.

    2009-01-01

    Sanitization of the cellular nucleotide pools from mutagenic base analogs is necessary for the accuracy of transcription and replication of genetic material and plays a substantial role in cancer prevention. The undesirable mutagenic, recombinogenic and toxic incorporation of purine base analogs (i.e. ITP, dITP, XTP, dXTP or 6-hydroxyaminopurine (HAP) deoxynucleoside triphosphate) into nucleic acids is prevented by inosine triphosphate pyrophosphatase (ITPA). The ITPA gene is a highly conserved, moderately expressed gene. Defects in ITPA orthologs in model organisms cause severe sensitivity to HAP and chromosome fragmentation. A human polymorphic allele 94C->A encodes for the enzyme with a P32T amino acid change and leads to accumulation of non-hydrolyzed ITP. ITPase activity is not detected in erythrocytes of these patients. The P32T polymorphism has also been associated with adverse sensitivity to purine base analog drugs. We have found that the ITPA-P32T mutant is a dimer in solution, as is wild-type ITPA, and has normal ITPA activity in vitro, but the melting point of ITPA-P32T is 5 degrees C lower than that of wild-type. ITPA-P32T is also fully functional in vivo in model organisms as determined by a HAP mutagenesis assay and its complementation of a bacterial ITPA defect. The amount of ITPA protein detected by western blot is severely diminished in a human fibroblast cell line with the 94C->A change. We propose that the P32T mutation exerts its effect in certain human tissues by cumulative effects of destabilization of transcripts, protein stability and availability. PMID:19631656

  16. Association of ITPA polymorphisms rs6051702/rs1127354 instead of rs7270101/rs1127354 as predictor of ribavirin-associated anemia in chronic hepatitis C treated patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Avolio, Antonio; De Nicolò, Amedeo; Cusato, Jessica; Ciancio, Alessia; Boglione, Lucio; Strona, Silvia; Cariti, Giuseppe; Troshina, Giulia; Caviglia, Gian Paolo; Smedile, Antonina; Rizzetto, Mario; Di Perri, Giovanni

    2013-10-01

    Functional variants rs7270101 and rs1127354 of inosine triphosphatase (ITPA) were recently found to protect against ribavirin (RBV)-induced hemolytic anemia. However, no definitive data are yet available on the role of no functional rs6051702 polymorphism. Since a simultaneous evaluation of the three ITPA SNPs for hemolytic anemia has not yet been investigated, we aimed to understand the contribution of each SNPs and its potential clinical use to predict anemia in HCV treated patients. A retrospective analysis included 379 HCV treated patients. The ITPA variants rs6051702, rs7270101 and rs1127354 were genotyped and tested for association with achieving anemia at week 4. We also investigated, using multivariate logistic regression, the impact of each single and paired associated polymorphism on anemia onset. All SNPs were associated with Hb decrease. The carrier of at least one variant allele in the functional ITPA SNPs was associated with a lower decrement of Hb, as compared to patients without a variant allele. In multivariate logistic regression analyses the carrier of a variant allele in the rs6051702/rs1127354 association (OR=0.11, p=1.75×10(-5)) and Hb at baseline (OR=1.51, p=1.21×10(-4)) were independently associated with protection against clinically significant anemia at week 4. All ITPA polymorphisms considered were shown to be significantly associated with anemia onset. A multivariate regression model based on ITPA genetic polymorphisms was developed for predicting the risk of anemia. Considering the characterization of pre-therapy anemia predictors, rs6051702 SNP in association to rs1127354 is more informative in order to avoid this relevant adverse event. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Rejuvenation capacity of red blood cells in additive solutions over long-term storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Erin K; Dumont, Deborah F; Baker, Sharry; Dumont, Larry J

    2011-07-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) are Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved for 42-day storage with the use of additive solutions (ASs). However, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG) levels in the RBCs decline over this time. These constituents may be restored by treatment with rejuvenation (REJ) solutions. This study was done to assess the response capability of RBCs from 30 to 120 days of storage in three FDA-licensed RBC storage solutions after incubation with a rejuvenating solution of pyruvate, inosine, phosphate, and adenine. Three units each of RBCs in approved AS (AS-1 [Adsol, Fenwal, Inc.], AS-3 [Nutricel, Medsep Corp.], and AS-5 [Optisol, Terumo Corp.]) were stored under standard conditions at 1 to 6°C for up to 120 days. Aliquots (4 mL) on Days 30, 42, 60, 80, 100, and 120 (± 2 days) were REJ by incubating with Rejuvesol (Encyte Corp.). Control untreated and REJ aliquots were extracted using perchloric acid and stored at -80°C until assayed for 2,3-DPG and ATP. RBCs responded to REJ by increasing DPG and ATP contents. The response declined linearly at 0.070 ± 0.008 µmol DPG/g hemoglobin (Hb)/day and 0.035 ± 0.004 µmol ATP/g Hb/day with no differences between ASs. We conclude that Rejuvesol is able to restore ATP and 2,3-DPG levels in RBCs stored up to 120 days in AS. The response diminishes as storage time increases. This rejuvenation (REJ) capability does not seem useful for routine assessment of RBC anabolic capacity in research programs, but may be useful to the investigator when studying unique and novel treatment methods. © 2011 American Association of Blood Banks.

  18. Nucleotide Selectivity in Abiotic RNA Polymerization Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coari, Kristin M; Martin, Rebecca C; Jain, Kopal; McGown, Linda B

    2017-09-01

    In order to establish an RNA world on early Earth, the nucleotides must form polymers through chemical rather than biochemical reactions. The polymerization products must be long enough to perform catalytic functions, including self-replication, and to preserve genetic information. These functions depend not only on the length of the polymers, but also on their sequences. To date, studies of abiotic RNA polymerization generally have focused on routes to polymerization of a single nucleotide and lengths of the homopolymer products. Less work has been done the selectivity of the reaction toward incorporation of some nucleotides over others in nucleotide mixtures. Such information is an essential step toward understanding the chemical evolution of RNA. To address this question, in the present work RNA polymerization reactions were performed in the presence of montmorillonite clay catalyst. The nucleotides included the monophosphates of adenosine, cytosine, guanosine, uridine and inosine. Experiments included reactions of mixtures of an imidazole-activated nucleotide (ImpX) with one or more unactivated nucleotides (XMP), of two or more ImpX, and of XMP that were activated in situ in the polymerization reaction itself. The reaction products were analyzed using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) to identify the lengths and nucleotide compositions of the polymerization products. The results show that the extent of polymerization, the degree of heteropolymerization vs. homopolymerization, and the composition of the polymeric products all vary among the different nucleotides and depend upon which nucleotides and how many different nucleotides are present in the mixture.

  19. Global metabolomic analysis of human saliva and plasma from healthy and diabetic subjects, with and without periodontal disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia M Barnes

    Full Text Available Recent studies suggest that periodontal disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus are bi-directionally associated. Identification of a molecular signature for periodontitis using unbiased metabolic profiling could allow identification of biomarkers to assist in the diagnosis and monitoring of both diabetes and periodontal disease. This cross-sectional study identified plasma and salivary metabolic products associated with periodontitis and/or diabetes in order to discover biomarkers that may differentiate or demonstrate an interaction of these diseases. Saliva and plasma samples were analyzed from 161 diabetic and non-diabetic human subjects with a healthy periodontium, gingivitis and periodontitis. Metabolite profiling was performed using Metabolon's platform technology. A total of 772 metabolites were found in plasma and 475 in saliva. Diabetics had significantly higher levels of glucose and α-hydroxybutyrate, the established markers of diabetes, for all periodontal groups of subjects. Comparison of healthy, gingivitis and periodontitis saliva samples within the non-diabetic group confirmed findings from previous studies that included increased levels of markers of cellular energetic stress, increased purine degradation and glutathione metabolism through increased levels of oxidized glutathione and cysteine-glutathione disulfide, markers of oxidative stress, including increased purine degradation metabolites (e.g. guanosine and inosine, increased amino acid levels suggesting protein degradation, and increased ω-3 (docosapentaenoate and ω-6 fatty acid (linoleate and arachidonate signatures. Differences in saliva between diabetic and non-diabetic cohorts showed altered signatures of carbohydrate, lipid and oxidative stress exist in the diabetic samples. Global untargeted metabolic profiling of human saliva in diabetics replicated the metabolite signature of periodontal disease progression in non-diabetic patients and revealed unique metabolic

  20. Multi-platform metabolomics assays for human lung lavage fluids in an air pollution exposure study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surowiec, Izabella; Karimpour, Masoumeh; Gouveia-Figueira, Sandra; Wu, Junfang; Unosson, Jon; Bosson, Jenny A; Blomberg, Anders; Pourazar, Jamshid; Sandström, Thomas; Behndig, Annelie F; Trygg, Johan; Nording, Malin L

    2016-07-01

    Metabolomics protocols are used to comprehensively characterize the metabolite content of biological samples by exploiting cutting-edge analytical platforms, such as gas chromatography (GC) or liquid chromatography (LC) coupled to mass spectrometry (MS) assays, as well as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) assays. We have developed novel sample preparation procedures combined with GC-MS, LC-MS, and NMR metabolomics profiling for analyzing bronchial wash (BW) and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid from 15 healthy volunteers following exposure to biodiesel exhaust and filtered air. Our aim was to investigate the responsiveness of metabolite profiles in the human lung to air pollution exposure derived from combustion of biofuels, such as rapeseed methyl ester biodiesel, which are increasingly being promoted as alternatives to conventional fossil fuels. Our multi-platform approach enabled us to detect the greatest number of unique metabolites yet reported in BW and BAL fluid (82 in total). All of the metabolomics assays indicated that the metabolite profiles of the BW and BAL fluids differed appreciably, with 46 metabolites showing significantly different levels in the corresponding lung compartments. Furthermore, the GC-MS assay revealed an effect of biodiesel exhaust exposure on the levels of 1-monostearylglycerol, sucrose, inosine, nonanoic acid, and ethanolamine (in BAL) and pentadecanoic acid (in BW), whereas the LC-MS assay indicated a shift in the levels of niacinamide (in BAL). The NMR assay only identified lactic acid (in BW) as being responsive to biodiesel exhaust exposure. Our findings demonstrate that the proposed multi-platform approach is useful for wide metabolomics screening of BW and BAL fluids and can facilitate elucidation of metabolites responsive to biodiesel exhaust exposure. Graphical Abstract Graphical abstract illustrating the study workflow. NMR Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, LC-TOFMS Liquid chromatography-Time Of Flight Mass Spectrometry, GC Gas

  1. Intrasteric control of AMPK via the gamma1 subunit AMP allosteric regulatory site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Julian; Chen, Zhi-Ping; Van Denderen, Bryce J W; Morton, Craig J; Parker, Michael W; Witters, Lee A; Stapleton, David; Kemp, Bruce E

    2004-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a alphabetagamma heterotrimer that is activated in response to both hormones and intracellular metabolic stress signals. AMPK is regulated by phosphorylation on the alpha subunit and by AMP allosteric control previously thought to be mediated by both alpha and gamma subunits. Here we present evidence that adjacent gamma subunit pairs of CBS repeat sequences (after Cystathionine Beta Synthase) form an AMP binding site related to, but distinct from the classical AMP binding site in phosphorylase, that can also bind ATP. The AMP binding site of the gamma(1) CBS1/CBS2 pair, modeled on the structures of the CBS sequences present in the inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase crystal structure, contains three arginine residues 70, 152, and 171 and His151. The yeast gamma homolog, snf4 contains a His151Gly substitution, and when this is introduced into gamma(1), AMP allosteric control is substantially lost and explains why the yeast snf1p/snf4p complex is insensitive to AMP. Arg70 in gamma(1) corresponds to the site of mutation in human gamma(2) and pig gamma(3) genes previously identified to cause an unusual cardiac phenotype and glycogen storage disease, respectively. Mutation of any of AMP binding site Arg residues to Gln substantially abolishes AMP allosteric control in expressed AMPK holoenzyme. The Arg/Gln mutations also suppress the previously described inhibitory properties of ATP and render the enzyme constitutively active. We propose that ATP acts as an intrasteric inhibitor by bridging the alpha and gamma subunits and that AMP functions to derepress AMPK activity.

  2. The characteristics exosporium antigens from different vaccine strains of bacillus antracis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baranova, E.; Biketov, S.; Dunaytsev, I.; Mironova, R.; Dyatlov, I.

    2009-01-01

    To develop of both test-systems for rapid detection and identification of B. anthracis spores and a new subunit vaccine the antigens on the spore surface should be characterized. Exosporium consists of two layers-basal and peripheral and has been form by protein, amino- and neutral polysaccharides, lipids and ash. Number of anthrax exosporium proteins was described and identified: glycoprotein BclA, BclB, alanine racemase, inosine hydrolase, glycosyl hydrolase, superoxid dismutase, ExsF, ExsY, ExsK,CotB,CotY and SoaA. So far no glycosylated proteins other then highly immunogenic glycoproteins BclA, BclB were detected in the B. anthracis spore extract although several exosporium-specific glycoprotein have been described in other members of the B.cereus family- B. thuringiensis and B. cereus. Although EA1 protein originally described as main component of S-layer from vegetative cells he can regular observed in different exosporium preparations and additionally some anti- EA1 monoclonal antibodies able to recognize spore surface. We have revealed that EA1 isolated from spore of Russians strain STI-1contain carbohydrate which determine immunogenicity of this antigen. Because some time ago we have found that exosporium protein's pattern variable among B. anthracis strains we investigated exosporium from spore of different strains of B. anthracis including STI-1, Ames, Stern and others. We have comparative characterized antigens by using Western Blotting, Two-Dimensional electrophoresis and Mass Spec analysis. The results of analysis will be presented and discussed.(author)

  3. Characterization of the residues modified when F1 - ATPases are inactivated by 7-chloro-4-nitrobenzofurazan and 5'-[p-(fluorosulfonyl)benzoyl]-1,N6-ethenoadenosine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verburg, J.G.

    1989-01-01

    Inactivation of the F 1 -ATPases isolated from spinach chloroplasts (CF 1 ) and from the plasma membrane of the thermophilic bacterium, PS3 (TF 1 ) with 7-chloro-4-nitrobenzofurazan (Nbf-Cl) results in modification of Tyr-β-328 and Tyr-β-307, respectively. These residues are homologous to Tyr-β-311 of the F 1 -ATPase isolated from beef heart mitochondria, previously identified as the residue derivatized during inactivation of that enzyme with Nbf-Cl. Interestingly, an intramolecular migration of the Nbf- moiety from the tyrosine residue to a nearby lysine residue, observed when MF 1 and TF 1 which had been inactivated with Nbf-Cl are incubated at alkaline pH, was not observed when CF 1 was treated in the same manner. CF 1 differs from other ATPases in that it contains ADP, tightly bound at a single catalytic site. It is possible that this tightly bound ADP prevents migration of the Nbf moiety. The characteristics of inactivation of MF 1 with the fluorosulfonyl benzoyl derivatives of adenosine (FSBA) and inosine (FSBI) have been described in the literature. Inactivation of MF 1 with FSBA results in the mutually exclusive modification of Tyr-368 or His-427 in all three copies of the β subunit. These residues comprise part of the noncatalytic nucleotide binding site. Inactivation of MF 1 with FSBI results in modification of Tyr-β-345 in a single catalytic site. The fluorosulfonyl benzoyl derivative of 1,N 6 -ethenoadenosine (FSBεA) has been prepared, and the characteristics and selectivity of modification of MF 1 with this reagent are presented. FSBεA binds reversibly to MF 1 with an apparent dissociation constant of 250 μM before covalent modification. The residue in MF 1 that reacts with FSBεA exhibits an apparent pK a of 8.9

  4. A to I editing in disease is not fake news.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajad, Prajakta; Jantsch, Michael F; Keegan, Liam; O'Connell, Mary

    2017-09-02

    Adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs) are zinc-containing enzymes that deaminate adenosine bases to inosines within dsRNA regions in transcripts. In short, structured dsRNA hairpins individual adenosine bases may be targeted specifically and edited with up to one hundred percent efficiency, leading to the production of alternative protein variants. However, the majority of editing events occur within longer stretches of dsRNA formed by pairing of repetitive sequences. Here, many different adenosine bases are potential targets but editing efficiency is usually much lower. Recent work shows that ADAR-mediated RNA editing is also required to prevent aberrant activation of antiviral innate immune sensors that detect viral dsRNA in the cytoplasm. Missense mutations in the ADAR1 RNA editing enzyme cause a fatal auto-inflammatory disease, Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS) in affected children. In addition RNA editing by ADARs has been observed to increase in many cancers and also can contribute to vascular disease. Thus the role of RNA editing in the progression of various diseases can no longer be ignored. The ability of ADARs to alter the sequence of RNAs has also been used to artificially target model RNAs in vitro and in cells for RNA editing. Potentially this approach may be used to repair genetic defects and to alter genetic information at the RNA level. In this review we focus on the role of ADARs in disease development and progression and on their potential use to artificially modify RNAs in a targeted manner.

  5. ADAR1 attenuates allogeneic graft rejection by suppressing miR-21 biogenesis in macrophages and promoting M2 polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junjie; Xie, Jiangang; Liu, Shanshou; Li, Xiao; Zhang, Dongliang; Wang, Xianqi; Jiang, Jinquan; Hu, Wei; Zhang, Yuan; Jin, Boquan; Zhuang, Ran; Yin, Wen

    2018-04-25

    ADAR1 (adenosine deaminase acting on double-stranded RNA 1) is an RNA-editing enzyme that mediates adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing events, an important post-transcriptional modification mechanism that can alter the coding properties of mRNA or regulate microRNA biogenesis. ADAR1 also regulates the innate immune response. Here, we have demonstrated that ADAR1 expression increased in LPS-stimulated macrophages. Silencing ADAR1 by using small interfering RNA in macrophages resulted in the pronounced polarization of macrophages to M1, whereas ADAR1 overexpression promoted M2 polarization, which indicated that ADAR1 can inhibit macrophage hyperpolarization and prevent immune hyperactivity. The RNA-RNP immunoprecipitation binding assay demonstrated a direct interaction between ADAR1 and miR-21 precursor. Significant up-regulation in IL-10 and down-regulation in miR-21 were observed in ADAR1-overexpressing macrophages. We evaluated miR-21 target mRNAs and macrophage polarization signaling pathways and found that forkhead box protein O1 (Foxo1) was up-regulated in cells that overexpressed ADAR1. In a mouse allogeneic skin transplantation model, grafts in the ADAR1-overexpressed group survived longer and suffered less immune cell infiltration. In ADAR1-overexpressed recipients, splenic macrophages were significantly polarized to M2, and levels of sera IL-10 were markedly higher than those in the control group. In summary, ADAR1 modulates macrophage M2 polarization via the ADAR1-miR-21-Foxo1-IL-10 axis, thereby suppressing allogeneic graft rejection.-Li, J., Xie, J., Liu, S., Li, X., Zhang, D., Wang, X., Jiang, J., Hu, W., Zhang, Y., Jin, B., Zhuang, R., Yin, W. ADAR1 attenuates allogeneic graft rejection by suppressing miR-21 biogenesis in macrophages and promoting M2 polarization.

  6. Molecular characterization of protease activity in Serratia sp. strain SCBI and its importance in cytotoxicity and virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Lauren M; Tisa, Louis S

    2014-11-01

    A newly recognized Serratia species, termed South African Caenorhabditis briggsae isolate (SCBI), is both a mutualist of the nematode Caenorhabditis briggsae KT0001 and a pathogen of lepidopteran insects. Serratia sp. strain SCBI displays high proteolytic activity, and because secreted proteases are known virulence factors for many pathogens, the purpose of this study was to identify genes essential for extracellular protease activity in Serratia sp. strain SCBI and to determine what role proteases play in insect pathogenesis and cytotoxicity. A bank of 2,100 transposon mutants was generated, and six SCBI mutants with defective proteolytic activity were identified. These mutants were also defective in cytotoxicity. The mutants were found defective in genes encoding the following proteins: alkaline metalloprotease secretion protein AprE, a BglB family transcriptional antiterminator, an inosine/xanthosine triphosphatase, GidA, a methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein, and a PIN domain protein. Gene expression analysis on these six mutants showed significant downregulation in mRNA levels of several different types of predicted protease genes. In addition, transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis provided insight into how inactivation of AprE, GidA, and a PIN domain protein influences motility and virulence, as well as protease activity. Using quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) to further characterize expression of predicted protease genes in wild-type Serratia sp. SCBI, the highest mRNA levels for the alkaline metalloprotease genes (termed prtA1 to prtA4) occurred following the death of an insect host, while two serine protease and two metalloprotease genes had their highest mRNA levels during active infection. Overall, these results indicate that proteolytic activity is essential for cytotoxicity in Serratia sp. SCBI and that its regulation appears to be highly complex. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Screening and characterization of purine nucleoside degrading lactic acid bacteria isolated from Chinese sauerkraut and evaluation of the serum uric acid lowering effect in hyperuricemic rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Li

    Full Text Available Hyperuricemia is well known as the cause of gout. In recent years, it has also been recognized as a risk factor for arteriosclerosis, cerebrovascular and cardiovascular diseases, and nephropathy in diabetic patients. Foods high in purine compounds are more potent in exacerbating hyperuricemia. Therefore, the development of probiotics that efficiently degrade purine compounds is a promising potential therapy for the prevention of hyperuricemia. In this study, fifty-five lactic acid bacteria isolated from Chinese sauerkraut were evaluated for the ability to degrade inosine and guanosine, the two key intermediates in purine metabolism. After a preliminary screening based on HPLC, three candidate strains with the highest nucleoside degrading rates were selected for further characterization. The tested biological characteristics of candidate strains included acid tolerance, bile tolerance, anti-pathogenic bacteria activity, cell adhesion ability, resistance to antibiotics and the ability to produce hydrogen peroxide. Among the selected strains, DM9218 showed the best probiotic potential compared with other strains despite its poor bile resistance. Analysis of 16S rRNA sequences showed that DM9218 has the highest similarity (99% to Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1. The acclimated strain DM9218-A showed better resistance to 0.3% bile salt, and its survival in gastrointestinal tract of rats was proven by PCR-DGGE. Furthermore, the effects of DM9218-A in a hyperuricemia rat model were evaluated. The level of serum uric acid in hyperuricemic rat can be efficiently reduced by the intragastric administration of DM9218-A (P<0.05. The preventive treatment of DM9218-A caused a greater reduction in serum uric acid concentration in hyperuricemic rats than the later treatment (P<0.05. Our results suggest that DM9218-A may be a promising candidate as an adjunctive treatment in patients with hyperuricemia during the onset period of disease. DM9218-A also has potential

  8. L-Amino Acids Elicit Diverse Response Patterns in Taste Sensory Cells: A Role for Multiple Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal Choudhuri, Shreoshi; Delay, Rona J.; Delay, Eugene R.

    2015-01-01

    Umami, the fifth basic taste, is elicited by the L-amino acid, glutamate. A unique characteristic of umami taste is the response potentiation by 5’ ribonucleotide monophosphates, which are also capable of eliciting an umami taste. Initial reports using human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells suggested that there is one broadly tuned receptor heterodimer, T1r1+T1r3, which detects L-glutamate and all other L-amino acids. However, there is growing evidence that multiple receptors detect glutamate in the oral cavity. While much is understood about glutamate transduction, the mechanisms for detecting the tastes of other L-amino acids are less well understood. We used calcium imaging of isolated taste sensory cells and taste cell clusters from the circumvallate and foliate papillae of C57BL/6J and T1r3 knockout mice to determine if other receptors might also be involved in detection of L-amino acids. Ratiometric imaging with Fura-2 was used to study calcium responses to monopotassium L-glutamate, L-serine, L-arginine, and L-glutamine, with and without inosine 5’ monophosphate (IMP). The results of these experiments showed that the response patterns elicited by L-amino acids varied significantly across taste sensory cells. L-amino acids other than glutamate also elicited synergistic responses in a subset of taste sensory cells. Along with its role in synergism, IMP alone elicited a response in a large number of taste sensory cells. Our data indicate that synergistic and non-synergistic responses to L-amino acids and IMP are mediated by multiple receptors or possibly a receptor complex. PMID:26110622

  9. Metabolomics Approach to Male Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms: Identification of Possible Biomarkers and Potential Targets for New Treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsui, Takahiko; Kira, Satoru; Ihara, Tatsuya; Sawada, Norifumi; Nakagomi, Hiroshi; Miyamoto, Tatsuya; Shimura, Hiroshi; Yokomichi, Hiroshi; Takeda, Masayuki

    2018-05-01

    We identified metabolites using a metabolomics approach and investigated the association between these metabolites and lower urinary tract symptoms. We used a 24-hour bladder diary and I-PSS (International Prostate Symptom Score) to assess micturition behavior and lower urinary tract symptoms in 58 male patients without apparent neurological disease. Lower urinary tract symptoms were defined as a total I-PSS score of 8 or greater. Patients with a score of 7 or less were placed in the control group. A comprehensive study of plasma metabolites was also performed by capillary electrophoresis time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Metabolites were compared between the lower urinary tract symptoms and control groups using the Mann-Whitney U test. Biomarkers of male lower urinary tract symptoms from the metabolites were analyzed using multivariable logistic regression analysis to determine the OR. Of the 58 men 32 were in the lower urinary tract symptoms group and the remaining 26 were in the control group. The 24-hour bladder diary showed that nocturnal urine volume, 24-hour micturition frequency, nocturnal micturition frequency and the nocturia index were significantly higher in the lower urinary tract symptoms group. Metabolomics analysis identified 60 metabolites from patient plasma. Multivariate analysis revealed that increased glutamate and decreased arginine, asparagine and inosine monophosphate were significantly associated with lower urinary tract symptoms in males. Decreases in citrulline and glutamine could also be associated with male lower urinary tract symptoms. Male lower urinary tract symptoms may develop due to abnormal metabolic processes in some pathways. Potential new treatments for lower urinary tract symptoms can be developed by identifying changes in the amino acid profiles. Copyright © 2018 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Characterization of Toll-like receptor 3 gene in large yellow croaker, Pseudosciaena crocea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xue-Na; Wang, Zhi-Yong; Yao, Cui-Luan

    2011-07-01

    Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) plays an important role in innate immune responses. In this report, the full-length cDNA sequence and genomic structure of Pseudosciaena crocea TLR3 (PcTLR3) were identified and characterized. The full-length cDNA of PcTLR3 was of 3384 bp, including a 5'-terminal untranslated region (UTR) of 65 bp, a 3'-terminal UTR of 589 bp and an open reading frame (ORF) of 2730 bp encoding a polypeptide of 909 amino acid residues. The full-length genome sequence of PcTLR3 was composed of 5721 nucleotides, including five exons and four introns. The putative PcTLR3 protein contained a signal peptide sequence, 16 leucine-rich repeat (LRR) motifs, a transmembrane region and a Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR analysis revealed a broad expression of PcTLR3 in most tissues, with the predominant expression in liver, then intestine, and the weakest expression in blood cells. The expression of PcTLR3 after injection with poly inosinic:cytidylic (I:C) and Vibrio parahemolyticus was tested in spleen, blood cells and liver. The results indicated that PcTLR3 transcripts could be induced in the three tissues by injection with poly I:C. The highest expression was in the blood cells with 43.5 times (at 6h) greater expression than in the control (pparahemolyticus challenge, a moderate up-regulation and down-regulation of PcTLR3 was found in blood cells and liver, respectively. Our results suggested that PcTLR3 might play an important role in fish's defense against both viral and bacterial infection. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Response properties of the pharyngeal branch of the glossopharyngeal nerve for umami taste in mice and rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagawa, Junichi; Takahashi, Yoshihiro; Matsumoto, Shigeji; Shingai, Tomio

    2007-04-24

    Many studies have reported the mechanism underlying umami taste. However, there are no investigations of responses to umami stimuli taste originating from chemoreceptors in the pharyngeal region. The pharyngeal branch of the glossopharyngeal nerve (GPN-ph) innervating the pharynx has unique responses to taste stimulation that differs from responses of the chorda tympani nerve and lingual branch of the glossopharyngeal nerve. Water evokes robust response, but NaCl solutions at physiological concentrations do not elicit responses. The present study was designed to examine umami taste (chemosensory) responses in the GPN-ph. Response characteristics to umami taste were compared between mice and rats. In mice, stimulation with compounds eliciting umami taste (0.1M monosodium L-glutamate (MSG), 0.01M inosine monophosphate (IMP) and the mixture of 0.1M MSG+0.01M IMP) evoked higher responses than application of distilled water (DW). However, synergistic response of a mixture of 0.1M MSG+0.01M IMP was not observed. In rats, there is no significant difference between the responses to umami taste (0.1M MSG, 0.01M IMP and the mixture of 0.1M MSG+0.01M IMP) and DW. Monopotassium glutamate (MPG) was used in rats to examine the contribution of the sodium component of MSG on the response. Stimulation with 0.1M MPG evoked a higher response when compared with responses to DW. The present results suggest that umami taste compounds are effective stimuli of the chemoreceptors in the pharynx of both mice and rats.

  12. Purification and properties of adenosine kinase from rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Y; Goto, H; Ogasawara, N

    1980-12-04

    Adenosine kinase (ATP:adenosine 5'-phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.1.20) has been purified to apparent homogeneity from rat brain by (NH4)2SO4 fractionation, affinity chromatography on AMP-Sepharose 4B, gel filtration with Sephadex G-100, and DE-52 cellulose column chromatography. The yield was 56% of the initial activity with a final specific activity of 7.8 mumol/min per mg protein. The molecular weight was estimated as 38 000 by gel filtration with Sephadex G-100 and 41 000 by acrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). The enzyme catalyzed the phosphorylation of adenosine, deoxyadenosine, arabinoadenosine, inosine and ribavirin. The activity of deoxyadenosine phosphorylation was 20% that of adenosine phosphorylation. The pH optimum profile was biphasic; a sharp pH optimum at pH 5.5 and a broad pH optimum at pH 7.5-8.5. The Km value for adenosine was 0.2 microM and the maximum activity was observed at 0.5 microM. At higher concentrations of adenosine, the activity was strongly inhibited. The Km value for ATP was 0.02 mM and that for Mg2+ was 0.1 mM. GTP, dGTP, dATP and UTP were also proved to be effective phosphate donors. Co2+ was as effective as Mg2+, and Ca2+, Mn2+ or Ni2+ showed about 50% of the activity for Mg2+. The kinase is quite unstable, but stable in the presence of a high concentration of salt; e.g., 0.15 M KCl.

  13. An RNA editing/dsRNA binding-independent gene regulatory mechanism of ADARs and its clinical implication in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Lihua; Song, Yangyang; Chan, Tim Hon Man; Yang, Henry; Lin, Chi Ho; Tay, Daryl Jin Tai; Hong, HuiQi; Tang, Sze Jing; Tan, Kar Tong; Huang, Xi Xiao; Lin, Jaymie Siqi; Ng, Vanessa Hui En; Maury, Julien Jean Pierre; Tenen, Daniel G; Chen, Leilei

    2017-10-13

    Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing, catalyzed by Adenosine DeAminases acting on double-stranded RNA(dsRNA) (ADAR), occurs predominantly in the 3' untranslated regions (3'UTRs) of spliced mRNA. Here we uncover an unanticipated link between ADARs (ADAR1 and ADAR2) and the expression of target genes undergoing extensive 3'UTR editing. Using METTL7A (Methyltransferase Like 7A), a novel tumor suppressor gene with multiple editing sites at its 3'UTR, we demonstrate that its expression could be repressed by ADARs beyond their RNA editing and double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) binding functions. ADARs interact with Dicer to augment the processing of pre-miR-27a to mature miR-27a. Consequently, mature miR-27a targets the METTL7A 3'UTR to repress its expression level. In sum, our study unveils that the extensive 3'UTR editing of METTL7A is merely a footprint of ADAR binding, and there are a subset of target genes that are equivalently regulated by ADAR1 and ADAR2 through their non-canonical RNA editing and dsRNA binding-independent functions, albeit maybe less common. The functional significance of ADARs is much more diverse than previously appreciated and this gene regulatory function of ADARs is most likely to be of high biological importance beyond the best-studied editing function. This non-editing side of ADARs opens another door to target cancer. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  14. Comparative pharmacogenetic analysis of risk polymorphisms in Caucasian and Vietnamese children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: prediction of therapeutic outcome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Phuong Thu Vu; Ambroise, Jérôme; Dekairelle, Anne-France; Durant, Jean-François; Butoescu, Valentina; Chi, Vu Luan Dang; Huynh, Nghia; Nguyen, Tan Binh; Robert, Annie; Vermylen, Christiane; Gala, Jean-Luc

    2015-03-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common of all paediatric cancers. Aside from predisposing to ALL, polymorphisms could also be associated with poor outcome. Indeed, genetic variations involved in drug metabolism could, at least partially, be responsible for heterogeneous responses to standardized leukemia treatments, hence requiring more personalized therapy. The aims of this study were to (a) to determine the prevalence of seven common genetic polymorphisms including those that affect the folate and/or thiopurine metabolic pathways, i.e. cyclin D1 (CCND1-G870A), γ-glutamyl hydrolase (GGH-C452T), methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR-C677T and MTHFR-A1298C), thymidylate synthase promoter (TYMS-TSER), thiopurine methyltransferase (TPMT*3A and TPMT*3C) and inosine triphosphate pyrophosphatase (ITPA-C94A), in Caucasian (n = 94, age Vietnamese (n = 141, age Vietnamese (P < 0.001 and P = 0.02, respectively). Compared with children with a low MGRS (≤ 3), those with a high MGRS (≥ 4) were 2.06 (95% CI = 1.01, 4.22; P = 0.04) times more likely to relapse. Adding MGRS into a multivariate Cox regression model with race/ethnicity and four clinical variables improved the predictive accuracy of the model (AUC from 0.682 to 0.709 at 24 months). Including MGRS into a clinical model improved the predictive accuracy of short and medium term prognosis, hence confirming the association between well determined pharmacogenotypes and outcome of paediatric ALL. Whether variants on other genes associated with folate metabolism can substantially improve the predictive value of current MGRS is not known but deserves further evaluation. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  15. Inhibitory effect of Cystenosine on leukopenia by radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakurai, T; Nishio, M; Sako, K; Koizumi, Y; Komura, R [National Hospital of Sapporo (Japan)

    1977-07-01

    Cystenosine, composed of Cysteine and Inosine, was given to the patients with malignant tumors during radiotherapy. As radiotherapy, lineac x-ray /sup 60/Co-..gamma.. ray, and 4 MV-betatron were used. Except betatron, a daily dose of 200 to 250 rads was given four times a week, and a total dose reached 5000 to 6000 rads. Administration of Cystenosine was started simultaneously with the onset of the radiotherapy, and 6 tablets a day were given. Of 40 subjects, the drug was very effective in 45 per cents, effective in 37.5 per cents, and ineffective in 17.5 per cents. The effective rate was 82.5 per cents, if the cases with effective and very effective were considered as effective. Of the patients, in whom irradiation field was larger than 15 x 15 cm, the drug was effective in 67 per cents and ineffective in 33 per cents. On the other hand, it was effective in 95 per cents of the patients, in whom irradiation field was middle or small and the size was under above size. Carcinostatic substances were concomitantly given to many of the patients, in whom malignant lymphoma and breast cancer were metastasized in a large extent. In 7 of 9 patients (77.8 per cents), hematopoietic disturbances were inhibited, and prearranged courses of therapy were effectively completed. Although the variation of the number of the blood platelets was not always parallel to that of leukocytes, interruption of the treatment because of the decrease of the blood platelets was found in none of the patients. Neither subjective not objective side effects were seen after the administration of Cystenosine.

  16. Astrocyte dysfunction following molybdenum-associated purine loading could initiate Parkinson's disease with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourke, Christopher A

    2018-01-01

    Sporadic or idiopathic Parkinson's disease is a movement disorder with a worldwide distribution, a long pre-clinical latent period and a frequent association with dementia. The combination of molybdenum deficiency and purine ingestion could explain the movement disorder, the distribution, the latent period and the dementia association. Recent studies in sheep have shown that molybdenum deficiency enables some dietary purines to accumulate in the central nervous system. This causes astrocyte dysfunction, altered neuromodulation and eventually irreversible central nervous system disease. Humans and sheep share the ability to salvage purines and this ability places humans at risk when they ingest xanthosine, inosine, adenosine and guanosine. Adenosine ingestion in molybdenum-deficient humans will lead to adenosine loading and potentially a disturbance to the A2a adenosine receptors in the nigro-striatum. This could result in Parkinson's disease. Guanosine ingestion in molybdenum-deficient humans will lead to guanosine loading and potentially a disturbance to the guanosine receptors in the hippocampus, amygdala and ventral striatum. This could result in dementia. The molybdenum content of the average daily diet in the United States is 0.07 ppm and in the United Kingdom 0.04 ppm. Central nervous system disease occurs in sheep at <0.04 ppm. Consistent with the role proposed for molybdenum deficiency in Parkinson's disease is the observation that affected individuals have elevated sulfur amino acid levels, depressed sulfate levels, and depressed uric acid levels. Likewise the geographical distribution of Parkinson's dementia complex on Guam corresponds with the distribution of molybdenum-deficient soils hence molybdenum-deficient food gardens on that island.

  17. The metabolic disturbances of isoproterenol induced myocardial infarction in rats based on a tissue targeted metabonomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yue-tao; Jia, Hong-mei; Chang, Xing; Ding, Gang; Zhang, Hong-wu; Zou, Zhong-Mei

    2013-11-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality but the precise mechanism of its pathogenesis remains obscure. To achieve the most comprehensive screening of the entire metabolome related to isoproterenol (ISO) induced-MI, we present a tissue targeted metabonomic study using an integrated approach of ultra-performance liquid chromatography/quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q/TOF MS) and proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR). Twenty-two metabolites were detected as potential biomarkers related to the formation of MI, and the levels of pantothenic acid (), lysoPC(18:0) (), PC(18:4(6Z,9Z,12Z,15Z)/18:0) (), taurine (), lysoPC(20:3(8Z,11Z,14Z)) (), threonine (), alanine (), creatine (), phosphocreatine (), glucose 1-phosphate (), glycine (), xanthosine (), creatinine () and glucose () were decreased significantly, while the concentrations of histamine (), L-palmitoylcarnitine (), GSSG (), inosine (), arachidonic acid (), linoelaidic acid (), 3-methylhistamine () and glycylproline () were increased significantly in the MI rats compared with the control group. The identified potential biomarkers were involved in twelve metabolic pathways and achieved the most entire metabolome contributing to the injury of the myocardial tissue. Five pathways, including taurine and hypotaurine metabolism, glycolysis, arachidonic acid metabolism, glycine, serine and threonine metabolism and histidine metabolism, were significantly influenced by ISO-treatment according to MetPA analysis and suggested that the most prominent changes included inflammation, interference of calcium dynamics, as well as alterations of energy metabolism in the pathophysiologic process of MI. These findings provided a unique perspective on localized metabolic information of ISO induced-MI, which gave us new insights into the pathogenesis of MI, discovery of targets for clinical diagnosis and treatment.

  18. A new class of IMP dehydrogenase with a role in self-resistance of mycophenolic acid producing fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mortensen Uffe H

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many secondary metabolites produced by filamentous fungi have potent biological activities, to which the producer organism must be resistant. An example of pharmaceutical interest is mycophenolic acid (MPA, an immunosuppressant molecule produced by several Penicillium species. The target of MPA is inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH, which catalyses the rate limiting step in the synthesis of guanine nucleotides. The recent discovery of the MPA biosynthetic gene cluster from Penicillium brevicompactum revealed an extra copy of the IMPDH-encoding gene (mpaF embedded within the cluster. This finding suggests that the key component of MPA self resistance is likely based on the IMPDH encoded by mpaF. Results In accordance with our hypothesis, heterologous expression of mpaF dramatically increased MPA resistance in a model fungus, Aspergillus nidulans, which does not produce MPA. The growth of an A. nidulans strain expressing mpaF was only marginally affected by MPA at concentrations as high as 200 μg/ml. To further substantiate the role of mpaF in MPA resistance, we searched for mpaF orthologs in six MPA producer/non-producer strains from Penicillium subgenus Penicillium. All six strains were found to hold two copies of IMPDH. A cladistic analysis based on the corresponding cDNA sequences revealed a novel group constituting mpaF homologs. Interestingly, a conserved tyrosine residue in the original class of IMPDHs is replaced by a phenylalanine residue in the new IMPDH class. Conclusions We identified a novel variant of the IMPDH-encoding gene in six different strains from Penicillium subgenus Penicillium. The novel IMPDH variant from MPA producer P. brevicompactum was shown to confer a high degree of MPA resistance when expressed in a non-producer fungus. Our study provides a basis for understanding the molecular mechanism of MPA resistance and has relevance for biotechnological and pharmaceutical applications.

  19. Characterization of ectonucleotidases in human medulloblastoma cell lines: ecto-5'NT/CD73 in metastasis as potential prognostic factor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélica Regina Cappellari

    Full Text Available Medulloblastoma (MB is the most common malignant brain tumor in children and occurs mainly in the cerebellum. Important intracellular signaling molecules, such those present in the Sonic Hedgehog and Wnt pathways, are involved in its development and can also be employed to determine tumor grade and prognosis. Ectonucleotidases, particularly ecto-5'NT/CD73, are important enzymes in the malignant process of different tumor types regulating extracellular ATP and adenosine levels. Here, we investigated the activity of ectonucleotidases in three malignant human cell lines: Daoy and ONS76, being representative of primary MB, and the D283 cell line, derived from a metastatic MB. All cell lines secreted ATP into the extracellular medium while hydrolyze poorly this nucleotide, which is in agreement with the low expression and activity of pyrophosphate/phosphodiesterase, NTPDases and alkaline phosphatase. The analysis of AMP hydrolysis showed that Daoy and ONS76 completely hydrolyzed AMP, with parallel adenosine production (Daoy and inosine accumulation (ONS76. On the other hand, D283 cell line did not hydrolyze AMP. Moreover, primary MB tumor cells, Daoy and ONS76 express the ecto-5'NT/CD73 while D283 representative of a metastatic tumor, revealed poor expression of this enzyme, while the ecto-adenosine deaminase showed higher expression in D283 compared to Daoy and ONS76 cells. Nuclear beta-catenin has been suggested as a marker for MB prognosis. Further it can promotes expression of ecto-5'NT/CD73 and suppression of adenosine deaminase. It was observed that Daoy and ONS76 showed greater nuclear beta-catenin immunoreactivity than D283, which presented mainly cytoplasmic immunoreactivity. In summary, the absence of ecto-5'NT/CD73 in the D283 cell line, a metastatic MB phenotype, suggests that high expression levels of this ectonucleotidase could be correlated with a poor prognosis in patients with MB.

  20. Serum Compounds of Energy Metabolism Impairment Are Related to Disability, Disease Course and Neuroimaging in Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzarino, Giacomo; Amorini, Angela M; Petzold, Axel; Gasperini, Claudio; Ruggieri, Serena; Quartuccio, Maria Esmeralda; Lazzarino, Giuseppe; Di Stasio, Enrico; Tavazzi, Barbara

    2017-11-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is characterized by primary inflammation, demyelination, and progressive neurodegeneration. A biochemical MS feature is neuronal mitochondrial dysfunction, compensated by anaerobic metabolism increase, likely aggravating progression of neurodegeneration. Here, we characterized a pragmatic serum profile of compounds related to mitochondrial energy metabolism of potential clinical use. Blood samples of 518 well characterized (disability, disease course) MS patients and 167 healthy controls were analyzed for serum purines, pyrimidines, creatinine, and lactate. Nine of the 15 compounds assayed, hypoxanthine, xanthine, uric acid, inosine, uracil, β-pseudouridine, uridine, creatinine, and lactate, differed significantly between MS patients and controls (p < 0.0001). Using these nine compounds, a unifying Biomarker Score was calculated. Controls and MS patients had mean Biomarker Scores of 0.4 ± 0.7 and 4.4 ± 1.9, respectively (p < 0.00001). The Biomarker Score was higher in patients with progressive (6.0 ± 1.8 than with relapsing remitting disease course (3.6 ± 1.5, p < 0.00001). High association between the Biomarker Score and increase in disability (EDSS) was also observed. Additionally, in 50 patients who underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), increase in the Biomarker Score correlated to neuroanatomical alterations. These results, obtained in a large cohort of MS patients evaluated for serum metabolic compounds connected to energy metabolism, demonstrated that the Biomarker Score might represent a pragmatic, resource saving, easy to obtain, laboratory tool useful to monitor MS patients and predict at an early stage who will switch from an RR to a progressive disease course. For the first time, it was also clearly shown a link between mitochondrial dysfunction and MRI lesions characteristic of MS.

  1. Taste sensitivity for monosodium glutamate and an increased liking of dietary protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luscombe-Marsh, Natalie D; Smeets, Astrid J P G; Westerterp-Plantenga, Margriet S

    2008-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine individuals' taste threshold for monosodium glutamate (MSG) alone and in combination with inosine 5'-monophosphate (IMP-5) and to examine if this threshold was related to an increase in sensory properties (including pleasantness of taste) and/or to one's preference for dietary protein over carbohydrate and fat. Using the triangle tasting method, the taste threshold was determined for thirty-six women and twenty-four men. Thresholds varied from zero to infinite as determined using a clear soup with added MSG in the concentration range of 0.1 to 0.8 % (w/w) MSG. Subjects rated fourteen sensory properties of the soup and also their 'liking', 'eating frequency' and 'preference' of twenty-two common high-protein, high-carbohydrate and high-fat food items. The taste threshold (and therefore sensitivity) of MSG was lowered from 0.33 (sem 0.24) to 0.26 (sem 0.22) % MSG when 0.25 % (w/w) IMP-5 was added. None of the sensory properties assessed was associated with the taste threshold of MSG +/- 0.25 % IMP-5 in the overall study population. However, the taste descriptor 'meatiness' was associated with the threshold data for individuals who could taste concentrations of

  2. Allopurinol-mediated lignocellulose-derived microbial inhibitor tolerance by Clostridium beijerinckii during acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujor, Victor; Agu, Chidozie Victor; Gopalan, Venkat; Ezeji, Thaddeus Chukwuemeka

    2015-04-01

    In addition to glucans, xylans, and arabinans, lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysates contain significant levels of nonsugar components that are toxic to the microbes that are typically used to convert biomass to biofuels and chemicals. To enhance the tolerance of acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE)-generating Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 to these lignocellulose-derived microbial inhibitory compounds (LDMICs; e.g., furfural), we have been examining different metabolic perturbation strategies to increase the cellular reductant pools and thereby facilitate detoxification of LDMICs. As part of these efforts, we evaluated the effect of allopurinol, an inhibitor of NAD(P)H-generating xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH), on C. beijerinckii grown in furfural-supplemented medium and found that it unexpectedly increased the rate of detoxification of furfural by 1.4-fold and promoted growth, butanol, and ABE production by 1.2-, 2.5-, and 2-fold, respectively. Since NAD(P)H/NAD(P)(+) levels in C. beijerinckii were largely unchanged upon allopurinol treatment, we postulated and validated a possible basis in DNA repair to account for the solventogenic gains with allopurinol. Following the observation that supplementation of allopurinol in the C. beijerinckii growth media mitigates the toxic effects of nalidixic acid, a DNA-damaging antibiotic, we found that allopurinol elicited 2.4- and 6.7-fold increase in the messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of xanthine and hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferases, key purine-salvage enzymes. Consistent with this finding, addition of inosine (a precursor of hypoxanthine) and xanthine led to 1.4- and 1.7-fold increase in butanol production in furfural-challenged cultures of C. beijerinckii. Taken together, our results provide a purine salvage-based rationale for the unanticipated effect of allopurinol in improving furfural tolerance of the ABE-fermenting C. beijerinckii.

  3. A-to-I RNA editing in the rat brain is age-dependent, region-specific and sensitive to environmental stress across generations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidan, Hiba; Ramaswami, Gokul; Golumbic, Yaela N; Sher, Noa; Malik, Assaf; Barak, Michal; Galiani, Dalia; Dekel, Nava; Li, Jin B; Gaisler-Salomon, Inna

    2018-01-08

    Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing is an epigenetic modification catalyzed by adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs), and is especially prevalent in the brain. We used the highly accurate microfluidics-based multiplex PCR sequencing (mmPCR-seq) technique to assess the effects of development and environmental stress on A-to-I editing at 146 pre-selected, conserved sites in the rat prefrontal cortex and amygdala. Furthermore, we asked whether changes in editing can be observed in offspring of stress-exposed rats. In parallel, we assessed changes in ADARs expression levels. In agreement with previous studies, we found editing to be generally higher in adult compared to neonatal rat brain. At birth, editing was generally lower in prefrontal cortex than in amygdala. Stress affected editing at the serotonin receptor 2c (Htr2c), and editing at this site was significantly altered in offspring of rats exposed to prereproductive stress across two generations. Stress-induced changes in Htr2c editing measured with mmPCR-seq were comparable to changes measured with Sanger and Illumina sequencing. Developmental and stress-induced changes in Adar and Adarb1 mRNA expression were observed but did not correlate with editing changes. Our findings indicate that mmPCR-seq can accurately detect A-to-I RNA editing in rat brain samples, and confirm previous accounts of a developmental increase in RNA editing rates. Our findings also point to stress in adolescence as an environmental factor that alters RNA editing patterns several generations forward, joining a growing body of literature describing the transgenerational effects of stress.

  4. Zebrafish Adar2 Edits the Q/R site of AMPA receptor Subunit gria2α transcript to ensure normal development of nervous system and cranial neural crest cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Chen Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Adar2 deaminates selective adenosines to inosines (A-to-I RNA editing in the double-stranded region of nuclear transcripts. Although the functions of mouse Adar2 and its biologically most important substrate gria2, encoding the GluA2 subunit of AMPA (α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid receptor, have been extensively studied, the substrates and functions of zebrafish Adar2 remain elusive. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Expression of Adar2 was perturbed in the adar2 morphant (adar2MO, generated by antisense morpholio oligonucleotides. The Q/R editing of gria2α was reduced in the adar2MO and was enhanced by overexpression of Adar2, demonstrating an evolutionarily conserved activity between zebrafish and mammalian Adar2 in editing the Q/R site of gria2. To delineate the role of Q/R editing of gria2α in the developmental defects observed in the adar2MO, the Q/R editing of gria2α was specifically perturbed in the gria2αQRMO, generated by a morpholio oligonucleotide complementary to the exon complementary sequence (ECS required for the Q/R editing. Analogous to the adar2-deficient and Q/R-editing deficient mice displaying identical neurological defects, the gria2αQRMO and adar2MO displayed identical developmental defects in the nervous system and cranial cartilages. Knockdown p53 abolished apoptosis and partially suppressed the loss of spinal cord motor neurons in these morphants. However, reducing p53 activity neither replenished the brain neuronal populations nor rescued the developmental defects. The expressions of crestin and sox9b in the neural crest cells were reduced in the adar2MO and gria2αQRMO. Overexpressing the edited GluA2αR in the adar2MO restored normal expressions of cresting and sox9b. Moreover, overexpressing the unedited GluA2αQ in the wild type embryos resulted in reduction of crestin and sox9b expressions. These results argue that an elevated GluA2αQ level is sufficient for generating the

  5. Serum depletion induces changes in protein expression in the trophoblast-derived cell line HTR-8/SVneo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novoa-Herran, Susana; Umaña-Perez, Adriana; Canals, Francesc; Sanchez-Gomez, Myriam

    2016-01-01

    How nutrition and growth factor restriction due to serum depletion affect trophoblast function remains poorly understood. We performed a proteomic differential study of the effects of serum depletion on a first trimester human immortalized trophoblast cell line. The viability of HTR-8/SVneo trophoblast cells in culture with 0, 0.5 and 10 % fetal bovine serum (FBS) were assayed via MTT at 24, 48 and 64 h. A comparative proteomic analysis of the cells grown with those FBS levels for 24 h was performed using two-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE), followed by mass spectrometry for protein spot identification, and a database search and bioinformatics analysis of the expressed proteins. Differential spots were identified using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test ( n  = 3, significance level 0.10, D > 0.642) and/or ANOVA ( n  = 3, p  depletion differentially affect cell growth and protein expression. Differential expression was seen in 25 % of the protein spots grown with 0.5 % FBS and in 84 % of those grown with 0 % FBS, using 10 % serum as the physiological control. In 0.5 % FBS, this difference was related with biological processes typically affected by the serum, such as cell cycle, regulation of apoptosis and proliferation. In addition to these changes, in the serum-depleted proteome we observed downregulation of keratin 8, and upregulation of vimentin, the glycolytic enzymes enolase and pyruvate kinase (PKM2) and tumor progression-related inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase 2 (IMPDH2) enzyme. The proteins regulated by total serum depletion, but not affected by growth in 0.5 % serum, are members of the glycolytic and nucleotide metabolic pathways and the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), suggesting an adaptive switch characteristic of malignant cells. This comparative proteomic analysis and the identified proteins are the first evidence of a protein expression response to serum depletion in a trophoblast cell model. Our results show that

  6. Enhancement of the infectivity of SARS-CoV in BALB/c mice by IMP dehydrogenase inhibitors, including ribavirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Dale L; Day, Craig W; Bailey, Kevin; Heiner, Matthew; Montgomery, Robert; Lauridsen, Larry; Winslow, Scott; Hoopes, Justin; Li, Joseph K-K; Lee, Jongdae; Carson, Dennis A; Cottam, Howard B; Sidwell, Robert W

    2006-08-01

    Because of the conflicting data concerning the SARS-CoV inhibitory efficacy of ribavirin, an inosine monophosphate (IMP) dehydrogenase inhibitor, studies were done to evaluate the efficacy of ribavirin and other IMP dehydrogenase inhibitors (5-ethynyl-1-beta-D-ribofuranosylimidazole-4-carboxamide (EICAR), mizoribine, and mycophenolic acid) in preventing viral replication in the lungs of BALB/c mice, a replication model for severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) infections (Subbarao, K., McAuliffe, J., Vogel, L., Fahle, G., Fischer, S., Tatti, K., Packard, M., Shieh, W.J., Zaki, S., Murphy, B., 2004. Prior infection and passive transfer of neutralizing antibody prevent replication of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) in the respiratory tract of mice. J. Virol. 78, 3572-3577). Ribavirin given at 75 mg/kg 4 h prior to virus exposure and then given twice daily for 3 days beginning at day 0 was found to increase virus lung titers and extend the length of time that virus could be detected in the lungs of mice. Other IMP dehydrogenase inhibitors administered near maximum tolerated doses using the same dosing regimen as for ribavirin were found to slightly enhance virus replication in the lungs. In addition, ribavirin treatment seemed also to promote the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines 4 days after cessation of treatment, although after 3 days of treatment ribavirin inhibited pro-inflammatory cytokine production in infected mice, significantly reducing the levels of the cytokines IL-1alpha, interleukin-5 (IL-5), monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF). These findings suggest that ribavirin may actually contribute to the pathogenesis of SARS-CoV by prolonging and/or enhancing viral replication in the lungs. By not inhibiting viral replication in the lungs of infected mice, ribavirin treatment may have provided a continual source of stimulation for the inflammatory response

  7. Anopheles gambiae Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase: Catalysis, Structure, and Inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor,E.; Rinaldo-Matthis, A.; Li, L.; Ghanem, M.; Hazleton, K.; Cassera, M.; Almo, S.; Schramm, V.

    2007-01-01

    The purine salvage pathway of Anopheles gambiae, a mosquito that transmits malaria, has been identified in genome searches on the basis of sequence homology with characterized enzymes. Purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) is a target for the development of therapeutic agents in humans and purine auxotrophs, including malarial parasites. The PNP from Anopheles gambiae (AgPNP) was expressed in Escherichia coli and compared to the PNPs from Homo sapiens (HsPNP) and Plasmodium falciparum (PfPNP). AgPNP has kcat values of 54 and 41 s-1 for 2'-deoxyinosine and inosine, its preferred substrates, and 1.0 s-1 for guanosine. However, the chemical step is fast for AgPNP at 226 s-1 for guanosine in pre-steady-state studies. 5'-Deaza-1'-aza-2'-deoxy-1'-(9-methylene)-Immucillin-H (DADMe-ImmH) is a transition-state mimic for a 2'-deoxyinosine ribocation with a fully dissociated N-ribosidic bond and is a slow-onset, tight-binding inhibitor with a dissociation constant of 3.5 pM. This is the tightest-binding inhibitor known for any PNP, with a remarkable Km/Ki* of 5.4 x 107, and is consistent with enzymatic transition state predictions of enhanced transition-state analogue binding in enzymes with enhanced catalytic efficiency. Deoxyguanosine is a weaker substrate than deoxyinosine, and DADMe-Immucillin-G is less tightly bound than DADMe-ImmH, with a dissociation constant of 23 pM for AgPNP as compared to 7 pM for HsPNP. The crystal structure of AgPNP was determined in complex with DADMe-ImmH and phosphate to a resolution of 2.2 Angstroms to reveal the differences in substrate and inhibitor specificity. The distance from the N1' cation to the phosphate O4 anion is shorter in the AgPNP{center_dot}DADMe-ImmH{center_dot}PO4 complex than in HsPNP{center_dot}DADMe-ImmH{center_dot}SO4, offering one explanation for the stronger inhibitory effect of DADMe-ImmH for AgPNP.

  8. Evidence for Watson-Crick and not Hoogsteen or wobble base pairing in the selection of nucleotides for insertion opposite pyrimidines and a thymine dimer by yeast DNA pol eta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Hanshin; Taylor, John-Stephen

    2005-03-29

    We have recently reported that pyrene nucleotide is preferentially inserted opposite an abasic site, the 3'-T of a thymine dimer, and most undamaged bases by yeast DNA polymerase eta (pol eta). Because pyrene is a nonpolar molecule with no H-bonding ability, the unusually high efficiencies of dPMP insertion are ascribed to its superior base stacking ability, and underscore the importance of base stacking in the selection of nucleotides by pol eta. To investigate the role of H-bonding and base pair geometry in the selection of nucleotides by pol eta, we determined the insertion efficiencies of the base-modified nucleotides 2,6-diaminopurine, 2-aminopurine, 6-chloropurine, and inosine which would make a different number of H-bonds with the template base depending on base pair geometry. Watson-Crick base pairing appears to play an important role in the selection of nucleotide analogues for insertion opposite C and T as evidenced by the decrease in the relative insertion efficiencies with a decrease in the number of Watson-Crick H-bonds and an increase in the number of donor-donor and acceptor-acceptor interactions. The selectivity of nucleotide insertion is greater opposite the 5'-T than the 3'-T of the thymine dimer, in accord with previous work suggesting that the 5'-T is held more rigidly than the 3'-T. Furthermore, insertion of A opposite both Ts of the dimer appears to be mediated by Watson-Crick base pairing and not by Hoogsteen base pairing based on the almost identical insertion efficiencies of A and 7-deaza-A, the latter of which lacks H-bonding capability at N7. The relative efficiencies for insertion of nucleotides that can form Watson-Crick base pairs parallel those for the Klenow fragment, whereas the Klenow fragment more strongly discriminates against mismatches, in accord with its greater shape selectivity. These results underscore the importance of H-bonding and Watson-Crick base pair geometry in the selection of nucleotides by both pol eta and the

  9. Improved circadian sleep-wake cycle in infants fed a day/night dissociated formula milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubero, J; Narciso, D; Aparicio, S; Garau, C; Valero, V; Rivero, M; Esteban, S; Rial, R; Rodríguez, A B; Barriga, C

    2006-06-01

    On the basis of the circadian nutritional variations present in breast milk, and of the implications for the sleep/wake cycle of the nutrients present in infant formula milks, we designed a formula milk nutritionally dissociated into a Day/Night composition. The goal was to improve the bottle-fed infant's sleep/wake circadian rhythm. A total of 21 infants aged 4-20 weeks with sleeping difficulties were enrolled in the three-week duration study. The sleep analysis was performed using an actimeter (Actiwatch) placed on an ankle of each infant to uninterruptedly record movements during the three weeks. The dissociated Day milk, designed to be administered from 06:00 to 18:00, contained low levels of tryptophan (1.5g/100g protein) and carbohydrates, high levels of proteins, and the nucleotides Cytidine 5 monophosphate, Guanosine 5 monophosphate and Inosine 5 monophosphate. The dissociated Night milk, designed to be administered from 18.00 to 06.00, contained high levels of tryptophan (3.4g/100g protein) and carbohydrates, low levels of protein, and the nucleotides Adenosine 5 monophosphate and Uridine 5 monophosphate. Three different milk-feeding experiments were performed in a double-blind procedure covering three weeks. In week 1 (control), the infants received both by day and by night a standard formula milk; in week 2 (inverse control), they received the dissociated milk inversely (Night/Day instead of Day/Night); and in week 3, they received the Day/Night dissociated formula concordant with the formula design. When the infants were receiving the Day/Night dissociated milk in concordance with their environment, they showed improvement in all the nocturnal sleep parameters analyzed: total hours of sleep, sleep efficiency, minutes of nocturnal immobility, nocturnal awakenings, and sleep latency. In conclusion, the use of a chronobiologically adjusted infant formula milk seems to be effective in improving the consolidation of the circadian sleep/wake cycle in bottle

  10. Erythrocyte deformation in ischemic acute tubular necrosis and amelioration by splenectomy in the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, A K; Taylor, C A; Bell, R D; Hillman, N M; Jarnot, M D; Cunningham, J D; Phillips, L G

    1991-11-01

    Bilateral renal artery occlusion (RAO) for 120 minutes in dogs results in acute tubular necrosis (ATN) and peritubular capillary (PTC) congestion with rapidly deteriorating renal function. We have shown that prior splenectomy minimizes RAO-induced renal functional and histopathologic changes. The purpose of this study was to examine whether this renal protection is due to prevention of red blood cell echinocyte formation and resultant renal PTC congestion. Echinocytes (burr cells) are poorly deformable, impart high viscosity to the blood, and may hinder reperfusion by increasing resistance to renal capillary blood flow. Splenectomized (SPLX) or sham-SPLX dogs were treated with bilateral RAO for 120 minutes. After RAO, renal function and renal blood flow were monitored, and peripheral blood red blood cells were examined at 1 hour and at 24-hour intervals for 96 hours. Renal biopsies were taken 1 hour after RAO and the kidneys removed 96 hours after RAO. The RBCs and renal tissues were studied using scanning electron microscopy. Renal function was assessed by endogenous creatinine clearance. Sham-SPLX animals showed a marked and sustained decrease in creatinine clearance, consistently elevated serum creatinine levels and fractional excretion of sodium, and diffuse ATN and PTC congestion with echinocytes. These animals had a peak in circulating echinocytes 1 hour after RAO (p less than 0.05), which showed an excellent negative correlation with creatinine clearance (r = -0.999; p less than 0.001). On the contrary, SPLX animals had essentially no change in serum creatinine or fractional excretion of sodium, minimal tubular changes, no PTC congestion, and no rise in circulating echinocytes during the 96-hour observation. In vitro treatment of the postischemic red blood cells from sham animals with adenosine-inosine or fresh postischemic plasma from the SPLX animals showed almost complete reversal to discocytes (normal red blood cells), whereas in vitro treatment of

  11. Metabolomic analysis of 92 pulmonary embolism patients from a nested case-control study identifies metabolites associated with adverse clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeleznik, O A; Poole, E M; Lindstrom, S; Kraft, P; Van Hylckama Vlieg, A; Lasky-Su, J A; Harrington, L B; Hagan, K; Kim, J; Parry, B A; Giordano, N; Kabrhel, C

    2018-03-01

    Essentials Risk-stratification often fails to predict clinical deterioration in pulmonary embolism (PE). First-ever high-throughput metabolomics analysis of risk-stratified PE patients. Changes in circulating metabolites reflect a compromised energy metabolism in PE. Metabolites play a key role in the pathophysiology and risk stratification of PE. Background Patients with acute pulmonary embolism (PE) exhibit wide variation in clinical presentation and outcomes. Our understanding of the pathophysiologic mechanisms differentiating low-risk and high-risk PE is limited, so current risk-stratification efforts often fail to predict clinical deterioration and are insufficient to guide management. Objectives To improve our understanding of the physiology differentiating low-risk from high-risk PE, we conducted the first-ever high-throughput metabolomics analysis (843 named metabolites) comparing PE patients across risk strata within a nested case-control study. Patients/methods We enrolled 92 patients diagnosed with acute PE and collected plasma within 24 h of PE diagnosis. We used linear regression and pathway analysis to identify metabolites and pathways associated with PE risk-strata. Results When we compared 46 low-risk with 46 intermediate/high-risk PEs, 50 metabolites were significantly different after multiple testing correction. These metabolites were enriched in the following pathways: tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, fatty acid metabolism (acyl carnitine) and purine metabolism, (hypo)xanthine/inosine containing. Additionally, energy, nucleotide and amino acid pathways were downregulated in intermediate/high-risk PE patients. When we compared 28 intermediate-risk with 18 high-risk PE patients, 41 metabolites differed at a nominal P-value level. These metabolites were enriched in fatty acid metabolism (acyl cholines), and hemoglobin and porphyrin metabolism. Conclusion Our results suggest that high-throughput metabolomics can provide insight into the

  12. Structural and catalytic effects of an invariant purine substitution in the hammerhead ribozyme: implications for the mechanism of acid–base catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Eric P.; Vasquez, Ernesto E.; Scott, William G.

    2014-01-01

    The hammerhead ribozyme catalyzes RNA cleavage via acid–base catalysis. Whether it does so by general acid–base catalysis, in which the RNA itself donates and abstracts protons in the transition state, as is typically assumed, or by specific acid–base catalysis, in which the RNA plays a structural role and proton transfer is mediated by active-site water molecules, is unknown. Previous biochemical and crystallographic experiments implicate an invariant purine in the active site, G12, as the general base. However, G12 may play a structural role consistent with specific base catalysis. To better understand the role of G12 in the mechanism of hammerhead catalysis, a 2.2 Å resolution crystal structure of a hammerhead ribozyme from Schistosoma mansoni with a purine substituted for G12 in the active site of the ribozyme was obtained. Comparison of this structure (PDB entry 3zd4), in which A12 is substituted for G, with three previously determined structures that now serve as important experimental controls, allows the identification of structural perturbations that are owing to the purine substitution itself. Kinetic measurements for G12 purine-substituted schistosomal hammerheads confirm a previously observed dependence of rate on the pK a of the substituted purine; in both cases inosine, which is similar to G in pK a and hydrogen-bonding properties, is unexpectedly inactive. Structural comparisons indicate that this may primarily be owing to the lack of the exocyclic 2-amino group in the G12A and G12I substitutions and its structural effect upon both the nucleotide base and phosphate of A9. The latter involves the perturbation of a previously identified and well characterized metal ion-binding site known to be catalytically important in both minimal and full-length hammerhead ribozyme sequences. The results permit it to be suggested that G12 plays an important role in stabilizing the active-site structure. This result, although not inconsistent with the

  13. Structural and catalytic effects of an invariant purine substitution in the hammerhead ribozyme: implications for the mechanism of acid-base catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Eric P; Vasquez, Ernesto E; Scott, William G

    2014-09-01

    The hammerhead ribozyme catalyzes RNA cleavage via acid-base catalysis. Whether it does so by general acid-base catalysis, in which the RNA itself donates and abstracts protons in the transition state, as is typically assumed, or by specific acid-base catalysis, in which the RNA plays a structural role and proton transfer is mediated by active-site water molecules, is unknown. Previous biochemical and crystallographic experiments implicate an invariant purine in the active site, G12, as the general base. However, G12 may play a structural role consistent with specific base catalysis. To better understand the role of G12 in the mechanism of hammerhead catalysis, a 2.2 Å resolution crystal structure of a hammerhead ribozyme from Schistosoma mansoni with a purine substituted for G12 in the active site of the ribozyme was obtained. Comparison of this structure (PDB entry 3zd4), in which A12 is substituted for G, with three previously determined structures that now serve as important experimental controls, allows the identification of structural perturbations that are owing to the purine substitution itself. Kinetic measurements for G12 purine-substituted schistosomal hammerheads confirm a previously observed dependence of rate on the pK(a) of the substituted purine; in both cases inosine, which is similar to G in pK(a) and hydrogen-bonding properties, is unexpectedly inactive. Structural comparisons indicate that this may primarily be owing to the lack of the exocyclic 2-amino group in the G12A and G12I substitutions and its structural effect upon both the nucleotide base and phosphate of A9. The latter involves the perturbation of a previously identified and well characterized metal ion-binding site known to be catalytically important in both minimal and full-length hammerhead ribozyme sequences. The results permit it to be suggested that G12 plays an important role in stabilizing the active-site structure. This result, although not inconsistent with the potential

  14. S-Inosyl-L-Homocysteine Hydrolase, a Novel Enzyme Involved in S-Adenosyl-L-Methionine Recycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Danielle; Xu, Huimin; White, Robert H

    2015-07-01

    S-Adenosyl-L-homocysteine, the product of S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) methyltransferases, is known to be a strong feedback inhibitor of these enzymes. A hydrolase specific for S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine produces L-homocysteine, which is remethylated to methionine and can be used to regenerate SAM. Here, we show that the annotated S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine hydrolase in Methanocaldococcus jannaschii is specific for the hydrolysis and synthesis of S-inosyl-L-homocysteine, not S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine. This is the first report of an enzyme specific for S-inosyl-L-homocysteine. As with S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine hydrolase, which shares greater than 45% sequence identity with the M. jannaschii homologue, the M. jannaschii enzyme was found to copurify with bound NAD(+) and has Km values of 0.64 ± 0.4 mM, 0.0054 ± 0.006 mM, and 0.22 ± 0.11 mM for inosine, L-homocysteine, and S-inosyl-L-homocysteine, respectively. No enzymatic activity was detected with S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine as the substrate in either the synthesis or hydrolysis direction. These results prompted us to redesignate the M. jannaschii enzyme an S-inosyl-L-homocysteine hydrolase (SIHH). Identification of SIHH demonstrates a modified pathway in this methanogen for the regeneration of SAM from S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine that uses the deamination of S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine to form S-inosyl-L-homocysteine. In strictly anaerobic methanogenic archaea, such as Methanocaldococcus jannaschii, canonical metabolic pathways are often not present, and instead, unique pathways that are deeply rooted on the phylogenetic tree are utilized by the organisms. Here, we discuss the recycling pathway for S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine, produced from S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM)-dependent methylation reactions, which uses a hydrolase specific for S-inosyl-L-homocysteine, an uncommon metabolite. Identification of the pathways and the enzymes involved in the unique pathways in the methanogens will provide insight into the

  15. Developing Quality Control Procedures to Sustain a Supply of High Quality Blood for Mass Rearing Tsetse Flies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Beer, C J; Venter, G J; Potgieter, F T [ARC-Onderstepoort Veterinary Institute, Old Soutpans Road, Private Bag X05, 0110 Onderstepoort (South Africa)

    2012-07-15

    Mass rearing tsetse flies Glossina spp. is dependent on the sustained availability of a high quality blood diet. In any mass rearing facility, the logistics for obtaining sterile, high quality fresh blood is challenging. An added complication is the influence of potential chemical, physical and microbiological elements present in the blood of donors, as well as contamination during collection, handling and storage. Research at the Agricultural Research Council - Onderstepoort Veterinary institute (ARC-OVI) is directed towards the development of quality control procedures for the supply of the in vitro diet used to maintain productive colonies of Glossina brevipalpis Newstead and Glossina austeni Newstead. Factors that may influence the blood diet, e.g. defibrination, feeding times, collection of blood in anticoagulants, treatment of blood with taste stimuli, repeated freezing and thawing of blood, effect of bovine growth hormones, and also a preference for bovine or porcine blood were tested. A 25 day bioassay was used to determine the effects of these factors on tsetse survival and reproduction. Defibrination of the blood for 10 to 15 minutes gave the best results for both species. It was found that G. brevipalpis should be fed three times per week for 5 minutes each time, and G. austeni three times per week for 10 minutes. Heparin, acid citrate dextrose (ACD), citric acid, citrate phosphate dextrose adenine (CPDA) and a combination of sodium citrate and citric acid were effective anticoagulants in the blood diets of G. brevipalpis and G. austeni. Blood treated with inosine triphosphate (ITP) gave the highest quality factor (QFC) values for both G. austeni and G. brevipalpis. Repeated freezing and thawing of blood definitely affects pupal production negatively; G. brevipalpis especially produced significantly smaller pupae. A premixed diet of equal amounts of bovine and porcine blood was found to be best suited for G. brevipalpis, and for G. austeni a mixture of

  16. Small RNA and A-to-I Editing in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eran, Alal

    One in every 88 children is diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs), a set of neurodevelopmental conditions characterized by social impairments, communication deficits, and repetitive behavior. ASDs have a substantial genetic component, but the specific cause of most cases remains unknown. Understanding gene-environment interactions underlying ASD is essential for improving early diagnosis and identifying critical targets for intervention and prevention. Towards this goal, we surveyed adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing in autistic brains. A-to-I editing is an epigenetic mechanism that fine-tunes synaptic function in response to environmental stimuli, shown to modulate complex behavior in animals. We used ultradeep sequencing to quantify A-to-I receding of candidate synaptic genes in postmortem cerebella from individuals with ASD and neurotypical controls. We found unexpectedly wide distributions of human A-to-I editing levels, whose extremes were consistently populated by individuals with ASD. We correlated A-to-I editing with isoform usage, identified clusters of correlated sites, and examined differential editing patterns. Importantly, we found that individuals with ASD commonly use a dysfunctional form of the editing enzyme ADARB1. We next profiled small RNAs thought to regulate A-to-I editing, which originate from one of the most commonly altered loci in ASD, 15q11. Deep targeted sequencing of SNORD115 and SNORD116 transcripts enabled their high-resolution detection in human brains, and revealed a strong gender bias underlying their expression. The consistent 2-fold upregulation of 15q11 small RNAs in male vs. female cerebella could be important in delineating the role of this locus in ASD, a male dominant disorder. Overall, these studies provide an accurate population-level view of small RNA and A-to-I editing in human cerebella, and suggest that A-to-I editing of synaptic genes may be informative for assessing the epigenetic risk for autism

  17. Alterações bioquímicas post-mortem de matrinxã Brycon cephalus (Günther, 1869 procedente da piscicultura, mantido em gelo Post-mortem biochemical alterations in aquacultured matrinxã fish Brycon cephalus (Günther, 1869 when stored on ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilvan Machado Batista

    2004-12-01

    be inosine (HxR forming, in experimental conditions. The K value pointed out that matrinxã specimens remained "quite fresh" up to 16 days storage time on ice corroborating the sensory, tasting evaluation.

  18. The influence of postmortem electrical stimulation on rigor mortis development, calpastatin activity, and tenderness in broiler and duck pectoralis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado, C Z; Sams, A R

    2000-09-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of electrical stimulation (ES) on rigor mortis development, calpastatin activity, and tenderness in anatomically similar avian muscles composed primarily of either red or white muscle fibers. A total of 72 broilers and 72 White Pekin ducks were either treated with postmortem (PM) ES (450 mA) at the neck in a 1% NaCl solution for 2 s on and 1 s off for a total of 15 s or were used as nonstimulated controls. Both pectoralis muscles were harvested from the carcasses after 0.25, 1.25, and 24 h PM and analyzed for pH, inosine:adenosine ratio (R-value), sarcomere length, gravimetric fragmentation index, calpastatin activity, shear value, and cook loss. All data were analyzed within species for the effects of ES. Electrically stimulated ducks had a lower muscle pH at 0.25 and 1.25 h PM and higher R-values at 0.25 h PM compared with controls. Electrically stimulated broilers had a lower muscle pH at 1.25 h and higher R-values at 0.25 and 1.25 h PM compared with controls. Muscles of electrically stimulated broilers exhibited increased myofibrillar fragmentation at 0.25 and 1.25 h PM, whereas there was no such difference over PM time in the duck muscle. Electrical stimulation did not affect calpastatin activity in either broilers or ducks; however, the calpastatin activity of the broilers did decrease over the aging time period, whereas that of the ducks did not. Electrical stimulation decreased shear values in broilers at 1.25 h PM compared with controls; however, there was no difference in shear values of duck muscle due to ES at any sampling time. Cook loss was lower for electrically stimulated broilers at 0.25 and 1.25 h PM compared with the controls, but had no effect in the ducks. These results suggest that the red fibers of the duck pectoralis have less potential for rigor mortis acceleration and tenderization due to ES than do the white fibers of the broiler pectoralis.

  19. Kinetics and mechanism of carbon-8 methylation of purine bases and nucleosides by methyl radical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zady, M.F.; Wong, J.L.

    1977-01-01

    The kinetics of homolytic methylation of the model purine compound caffeine at carbon-8 were determined as a function of several reaction variables. The methyl radical was generated from tert-butyl peracetate (BPA) either thermally (65 to 95 0 C) or photochemically (greater than 300 nm, 25 0 C). The thermal reaction k (25 0 C) was found to be 3.09 x 10 -8 s -1 from the linear log k (pseudo-first-order) vs. l/T plot. The light reactions using the 450- and 1200-W mercury lamps proceeded with k (25 0 C) 450- and 2160-fold greater, respectively. The derived activation energies are consistent with an S/sub E/Ar reaction. Increasing the concentration of caffeine from 0.25 M to 1.67 M in the presence of 3 molar equiv of BPA did not cause any side reaction. The pH-rate profile can be predicted by rate equations, which are derived on the basis of an electrophilic substitution occurring on the free base and conjugate acid of a heteroaromatic system. A competition study using tetrahydrofuran reveals the presence of a radical sigma complex IIIa and a charge transfer complex IIIb as intermediates for methylation under neutral and acidic conditions, respectively. Their rate-determining nature was indicated by the small positive kinetic isotope effect and the inverse solvent isotope effects: k/sub H 3 O + //k/sub D 3 O + / = 0.87 and k/sub H 2 O//k/sub D 2 O/ = 0.32. Thus, in acidic medium, a preequilibrium proton transfer to form the caffeine conjugate acid precedes the rate-controlling formation of IIIb. In neutral solution, the rate-determining step appears to be the protonation of the radical nitrogen in IIIa converting it to III. The acid-catalyzed caffeine-BPA reaction was shown to be general for other purines such as adenine, adenosine, guanine, guanosine, hypoxanthine, and inosine

  20. Deregulation of purine pathway in Bacillus subtilis and its use in riboflavin biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    . Based on the deregulation of purine pathway at transcription and metabolic levels, an extended application is recommended for the yield of products, like inosine, guanosine, adenosine and folate which are directly stemming from purine pathway in B. subtilis. PMID:25023436

  1. Increased activity of vascular adenosine deaminase in atherosclerosis and therapeutic potential of its inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutryb-Zajac, Barbara; Mateuszuk, Lukasz; Zukowska, Paulina; Jasztal, Agnieszka; Zabielska, Magdalena A; Toczek, Marta; Jablonska, Patrycja; Zakrzewska, Agnieszka; Sitek, Barbara; Rogowski, Jan; Lango, Romuald; Slominska, Ewa M; Chlopicki, Stefan; Smolenski, Ryszard T

    2016-11-01

    Extracellular nucleotides and adenosine that are formed or degraded by membrane-bound ecto-enzymes could affect atherosclerosis by regulating the inflammation and thrombosis. This study aimed to evaluate a relation between ecto-enzymes that convert extracellular adenosine triphosphate to adenine dinucleotide phosphate, adenosine monophosphate, adenosine, and inosine on the surface of the vessel wall with the severity or progression of experimental and clinical atherosclerosis. Furthermore, we tested whether the inhibition of adenosine deaminase will block the development of experimental atherosclerosis. Vascular activities of ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase 1, ecto-5'-nucleotidase, and ecto-adenosine deaminase (eADA) were measured in aortas of apolipoprotein E-/- low density lipoprotein receptor (ApoE-/-LDLR-/-) and wild-type mice as well as in human aortas. Plaques were analysed in the entire aorta, aortic root, and brachiocephalic artery by Oil-Red O and Orcein Martius Scarlet Blue staining and vascular accumulation of macrophages. The cellular location of ecto-enzymes was analysed by immunofluorescence. The effect of eADA inhibition on atherosclerosis progression was studied by a 2-month deoxycoformycin treatment of ApoE-/-LDLR-/- mice. The vascular eADA activity prominently increased in ApoE-/-LDLR-/- mice when compared with wild type already at the age of 1 month and progressed along atherosclerosis development, reaching a 10-fold difference at 10 months. The activity of eADA correlated with atherosclerotic changes in human aortas. High abundance of eADA in atherosclerotic vessels originated from activated endothelial cells and macrophages. There were no changes in ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase 1 activity, whereas ecto-5'-nucleotidase was moderately decreased in ApoE-/-LDLR-/- mice. Deoxycoformycin treatment attenuated plaque development in aortic root and brachiocephalic artery of ApoE-/-LDLR-/- mice, suppressed vascular

  2. Characterisation of iunH gene knockout strain from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Drumond Villela

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Tuberculosis (TB is an infectious disease caused mainly by the bacillus Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The better understanding of important metabolic pathways from M. tuberculosis can contribute to the development of novel therapeutic and prophylactic strategies to combat TB. Nucleoside hydrolase (MtIAGU-NH, encoded by iunH gene (Rv3393, is an enzyme from purine salvage pathway in M. tuberculosis. MtIAGU-NH accepts inosine, adenosine, guanosine, and uridine as substrates, which may point to a pivotal metabolic role. OBJECTIVES Our aim was to construct a M. tuberculosis knockout strain for iunH gene, to evaluate in vitro growth and the effect of iunH deletion in M. tuberculosis in non-activated and activated macrophages models of infection. METHODS A M. tuberculosis knockout strain for iunH gene was obtained by allelic replacement, using pPR27xylE plasmid. The complemented strain was constructed by the transformation of the knockout strain with pNIP40::iunH. MtIAGU-NH expression was analysed by Western blot and LC-MS/MS. In vitro growth was evaluated in Sauton’s medium. Bacterial load of non-activated and interferon-γ activated RAW 264.7 cells infected with knockout strain was compared with wild-type and complemented strains. FINDINGS Western blot and LC-MS/MS validated iunH deletion at protein level. The iunH knockout led to a delay in M. tuberculosis growth kinetics in Sauton’s medium during log phase, but did not affect bases and nucleosides pool in vitro. No significant difference in bacterial load of knockout strain was observed when compared with both wild-type and complemented strains after infection of non-activated and interferon-γ activated RAW 264.7 cells. MAIN CONCLUSION The disruption of iunH gene does not influence M. tuberculosis growth in both non-activated and activated RAW 264.7 cells, which show that iunH gene is not important for macrophage invasion and virulence. Our results indicated that MtIAGU-NH is not a

  3. Association of ITPA gene variation and serum ribavirin concentration with a decline in blood cell concentrations during pegylated interferon-alpha plus ribavirin therapy for chronic hepatitis C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Mina; Sakamoto, Naoya; Watanabe, Takako; Nishimura-Sakurai, Yuki; Onozuka, Izumi; Azuma, Seishin; Kakinuma, Sei; Nitta, Sayuri; Kiyohashi, Kei; Kusano-Kitazume, Akiko; Murakawa, Miyako; Yoshino, Kohei; Itsui, Yasuhiro; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Mizokami, Masashi; Watanabe, Mamoru

    2013-03-01

    Genetic variation leading to inosine triphosphatase (ITPA) deficiency protects chronic hepatitis C patients receiving ribavirin against hemolytic anemia. The relationship between ITPA gene variation and serum ribavirin concentration was analyzed in association with a reduction in blood cells and dose reduction of pegylated interferon (PEG-IFN) or ribavirin. A total of 300 hepatitis C patients treated with PEG-IFN plus ribavirin were analyzed. Genetic polymorphisms were determined in ITPA and the quantitative reduction in blood cells from the baseline was analyzed every 4 weeks for the duration of treatment and after the end of therapy. The decline in hemoglobin (Hb) or platelet (PLT) level at week 4 compared to baseline was also assessed according to ribavirin concentrations. Patients with the ITPA-CA/AA genotypes showed a lower degree of Hb reduction throughout therapy than those with the ITPA-CC genotype and a marked difference in mean Hb reduction was found at week 4 (CA/AA -1.0 vs. CC -2.8, p < 0.001). The ITPA-CC genotype had significantly less reduction in the mean platelet count than the ITPA-CA/AA genotypes early during treatment (p < 0.001 for weeks 4 and 8). Patients with the ITPA-CA/AA genotypes were less likely to develop anemia, regardless of the concentration of ribavirin. Patients with baseline PLT counts below 130 × 10(3)/μl had a significantly lower tendency to achieve sustained virological response (SVR), especially those with the ITPA-CA/AA genotypes. ITPA gene variation was not extracted by multivariable analysis as an important predictor of SVR. Despite the fact that ITPA variants were less likely to develop anemia, patients with low baseline PLT counts were difficult to treat, especially those with the ITPA-CA/AA genotype. These results may give a valuable pharmacogenetic diagnostic tool for the tailoring of dosing to minimize drug-induced adverse events.

  4. The relationship of muscle perfusion and metabolism with cardiovascular variables before and after detomidine injection during propofol-ketamine anaesthesia in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edner, Anna; Nyman, Görel; Essén-Gustavsson, Birgitta

    2002-10-01

    To study in horses (1) the relationship between cardiovascular variables and muscle perfusion during propofol-ketamine anaesthesia, (2) the physiological effects of a single intravenous (IV) detomidine injection, (3) the metabolic response of muscle to anaesthesia, and (4) the effects of propofol-ketamine infusion on respiratory function. Prospective experimental study. Seven standardbred trotters, 5-12 years old, 416-581 kg. Anaesthesia was induced with intravenous (IV) guaifenesin and propofol (2 mg kg -1 ) and maintained with a continuous IV infusion of propofol (0.15 mg kg -1 minute -1 ) and ketamine (0.05 mg kg -1 minute -1 ) with horses positioned in left lateral recumbency. After 1 hour, detomidine (0.01 mg kg -1 ) was administered IV and 40-50 minutes later anaesthesia was discontinued. Cardiovascular and respiratory variables (heart rate, cardiac output, systemic and pulmonary artery blood pressures, respiratory rate, tidal volume, and inspiratory and expiratory O 2 and CO 2 ) and muscle temperature were measured at pre-determined times. Peripheral perfusion was measured continuously in the gluteal muscles and skin using laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF). Muscle biopsy samples from the left and right gluteal muscles were analysed for glycogen, creatine phosphate, creatine, adenine nucleotides, inosine monophosphate and lactate. Arterial blood was analysed for PO 2 , PCO 2 , pH, oxygen saturation and HCO 3 . Mixed venous blood was analysed for PO 2 , PCO 2 , pH, oxygen saturation, HCO 3 , cortisol, lactate, uric acid, hypoxanthine, xanthine, creatine kinase, creatinine, aspartate aminotransferase, electrolytes, total protein, haemoglobin, haematocrit and white blood cell count. Circulatory function was preserved during propofol-ketamine anaesthesia. Detomidine caused profound hypertension and bradycardia and decreased cardiac output and muscle perfusion. Ten minutes after detomidine injection muscle perfusion had recovered to pre-injection levels, although

  5. A synbiotic improves the immunity of white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei: Metabolomic analysis reveal compelling evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Truong-Giang; Cheng, Ann-Chang; Chi, Chia-Chun; Chiu, Kuo-Hsun; Liu, Chun-Hung

    2018-05-18

    In this study, we examined the synergistic effects of a diet-administered synbiotic comprising galactooligosaccharide (GOS) and the probiotic Lactobacillus plantarum 7-40 on immune responses, immune-related gene expressions, and disease resistance to Vibrio alginolyticus in white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei. To unravel the regulatory role of the synbiotic in activating the immune system of shrimp, 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomic analysis were used to investigate hepatopancreas metabolites, then significantly altered metabolites were confirmed in both the hepatopancreas and plasma by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) and spectrophotometric analysis. Shrimp were fed four experimental diets for 60 days, including a basal diet with no GOS or probiotic (control), 0.4% GOS (PRE), probiotic (PRO), and 0.4% GOS in combination with the probiotic (SYN). Results showed that the SYN diet significantly increased survival of L. vannamei 24 h after a V. alginolyticus injection. Immune parameters such as phenoloxidase activity, respiratory bursts, phagocytic activity and gene expressions, including prophenoloxidase I, serine proteinase, and peroxinectin, of shrimp fed the SYN diet significantly increased, compared to the other treatments and control. In addition, results from the 1 H NMR analysis revealed that 22 hepatopancreas metabolites were matched and identified between the SYN and control groups, among which three metabolites, i.e., inosine monophosphate (IMP), valine, and betaine, significantly increased in the SYN group. Confirmation using RP-HPLC and spectrophotometric methods showed that IMP presented high amounts in the hepatopancreas, but not in the plasma of shrimp; in contrast, valine and betaine metabolites were in high concentrations in both the hepatopancreas and plasma. Our results suggested that GOS and the probiotic had a synergistic effect on enhancing immunity and disease resistance of L. vannamei against

  6. When does ALS start? ADAR2-GluA2 hypothesis for the etiology of sporadic ALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuto eHideyama

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is the most common adult-onset motor neuron disease. More than 90% of ALS cases are sporadic, and the majority of sporadic ALS patients do not carry mutations in genes causative of familial ALS; therefore, investigation specifically targeting sporadic ALS is needed to discover the pathogenesis. The motor neurons of sporadic ALS patients express unedited GluA2 mRNA at the Q/R site in a disease-specific and motor neuron-selective manner. GluA2 is a subunit of the AMPA receptor, and it has a regulatory role in the Ca2+-permeability of the AMPA receptor after the genomic Q codon is replaced with the R codon in mRNA by adenosine-inosine conversion, which is mediated by adenosine deaminase acting on RNA 2 (ADAR2. Therefore, ADAR2 activity may not be sufficient to edit all GluA2 mRNA expressed in the motor neurons of ALS patients. To investigate whether deficient ADAR2 activity plays pathogenic roles in sporadic ALS, we generated genetically modified mice (AR2 in which the ADAR2 gene was conditionally knocked out in the motor neurons. AR2 mice showed an ALS-like phenotype with the death of ADAR2-lacking motor neurons. Notably, the motor neurons deficient in ADAR2 survived when they expressed only edited GluA2 in AR2/GluR-BR/R (AR2res mice, in which the endogenous GluA2 alleles were replaced by the GluR-BR allele that encoded edited GluA2. In heterozygous AR2 mice with only one ADAR2 allele, approximately 20% of the spinal motor neurons expressed unedited GluA2 and underwent degeneration, indicating that half-normal ADAR2 activity is not sufficient to edit all GluA2 expressed in motor neurons. It is likely therefore that the expression of unedited GluA2 causes the death of motor neurons in sporadic ALS. We hypothesize that a progressive downregulation of ADAR2 activity plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of sporadic ALS and that the pathological process commences when motor neurons express unedited GluA2.

  7. Mycophenolate pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in belatacept treated renal allograft recipients – a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stenstrøm Jean

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mycophenolic acid (MPA is widely used as part of immunosuppressive regimens following allograft transplantation. The large pharmacokinetic (PK and pharmacodynamic (PD variability and narrow therapeutic range of MPA provide a potential for therapeutic drug monitoring. The objective of this pilot study was to investigate the MPA PK and PD relation in combination with belatacept (2nd generation CTLA4-Ig or cyclosporine (CsA. Methods Seven renal allograft recipients were randomized to either belatacept (n = 4 or cyclosporine (n = 3 based immunosuppression. Samples for MPA PK and PD evaluations were collected predose and at 1, 2 and 13 weeks posttransplant. Plasma concentrations of MPA were determined by HPLC-UV. Activity of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH and the expressions of two IMPDH isoforms were measured in CD4+ cells by HPLC-UV and real-time reverse-transcription PCR, respectively. Subsets of T cells were characterized by flow cytometry. Results The MPA exposure tended to be higher among belatacept patients than in CsA patients at week 1 (P = 0.057. Further, MPA concentrations (AUC0–9 h and C0 increased with time in both groups and were higher at week 13 than at week 2 (P = 0.031, n = 6. In contrast to the postdose reductions of IMPDH activity observed early posttransplant, IMPDH activity within both treatment groups was elevated throughout the dosing interval at week 13. Transient postdose increments were also observed for IMPDH1 expression, starting at week 1. Higher MPA exposure was associated with larger elevations of IMPDH1 (r = 0.81, P = 0.023, n = 7 for MPA and IMPDH1 AUC0–9 h at week 1. The maximum IMPDH1 expression was 52 (13–177% higher at week 13 compared to week 1 (P = 0.031, n = 6. One patient showed lower MPA exposure with time and did neither display elevations of IMPDH activity nor IMPDH1 expression. No difference was observed in T cell subsets between treatment groups. Conclusion The

  8. A Polyphasic Approach for Phenotypic and Genetic Characterization of the Fastidious Aquatic Pathogen Francisella noatunensis subsp. orientalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José G. Ramírez-Paredes

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Francisella noatunensis subsp. orientalis (Fno is the causative agent of piscine francisellosis, an emerging infectious disease in Asia and Latin America. In this study two outbreaks of francisellosis were diagnosed in the UK on the basis of histopathology, electron microscopy, PCR, bacterial isolation and fulfillment of Koch's postulates. Furthermore, a phenotypic fingerprint based on biochemical analyses, metabolic activity, chemotaxonomic composition, and antimicrobial assays was generated for the novel isolates, the Fno type strain Ehime-1 from Asia and other Fno from Latin America. The genetic relatedness between the novel Fno and other Francisellaceae species was investigated by sequencing and comparing the 16SrRNA gene, 8 housekeeping genes (individually and concatenated and the 16SrRNA-ITS-23SrRNA sequence. The phenotypic profiling indicated a high degree of similarity among the Fno strains as all were able to metabolize dextrin, N-acetyl-D glucosamine, D-fructose, α-D-glucose, D-mannose, methyl pyruvate, acetic acid, α-keto butyric acid, L-alaninamide, L-alanine, L-alanylglycine, L-asparagine, L-glutamic acid, L-proline, L-serine, L-threonine, inosine, uridine, glycerol, D L-α-glycerol phosphate, glucose-1-phosphate, and glucose-6-phosphate. The chemotaxonomic analyses indicated that 24:1 (20.3%, 18:1n-9 (16.9%, 24:0 (13.1% 14:0 (10.9%, 22:0 (7.8%, 16:0 (7.6%, and 18:0 (5.5% were the predominant structural fatty acids in Fno. The antimicrobial assays showed little variation between the isolates and high susceptibility to enrofloxacin, gentamicin, neomycin, streptomycin, amikacin, ciprofloxacin, gatifloxacin, nitrofurantoin, tobramycin, kanamycin, tetracycline, oxytetracycline, florfenicol, oxolinic acid, and streptomycin in all the Fno analyzed. In all the phylogenetic trees the Fno strains clustered together in independent branches confirming a high degree of homogeneity. Interestingly in five of the 11 trees i.e., mutS, putA, rpo

  9. On the Formation and Properties of Interstrand DNA-DNA Cross-links Forged by Reaction of an Abasic Site With the Opposing Guanine Residue of 5′-CAp Sequences in Duplex DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kevin M.; Price, Nathan E.; Wang, Jin; Fekry, Mostafa I.; Dutta, Sanjay; Seiner, Derrick R.; Wang, Yinsheng; Gates, Kent S.

    2014-01-01

    We recently reported that the aldehyde residue of an abasic (Ap) site in duplex DNA can generate an interstrand cross-link via reaction with a guanine residue on the opposing strand. This finding is intriguing because the highly deleterious nature of interstrand cross-links suggests that even small amounts of Ap-derived cross-links could make a significant contribution to the biological consequences stemming from the generation of Ap sites in cellular DNA. Incubation of 21-bp duplexes containing a central 5′-CAp sequence under conditions of reductive amination (NaCNBH3, pH 5.2) generated much higher yields of cross-linked DNA than reported previously. At pH 7, in the absence of reducing agents, these Ap-containing duplexes also produced cross-linked duplexes that were readily detected on denaturing polyacrylamide gels. Cross-link formation was not highly sensitive to reaction conditions and, once formed, the cross-link was stable to a variety of work-up conditions. Results of multiple experiments including MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, gel mobility, methoxyamine capping of the Ap aldehyde, inosine-for-guanine replacement, hydroxyl radical footprinting, and LCMS/MS were consistent with a cross-linking mechanism involving reversible reaction of the Ap aldehyde residue with the N2-amino group of the opposing guanine residue in 5′-CAp sequences to generate hemiaminal, imine, or cyclic hemiaminal cross-links (7-10) that were irreversibly converted under conditions of reductive amination (NaCNBH3/pH 5.2) to a stable amine linkage. Further support for the importance of the exocyclic N2-amino group in this reaction was provided by an experiment showing that installation of a 2-aminopurine-thymine base pair at the cross-linking site produced high yields (15-30%) of a cross-linked duplex at neutral pH, in the absence of NaCNBH3. PMID:23215239

  10. [Changes of productions of energy metabolism in masseter of rats induced by occlusal interference].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, X X; Cao, Y; Fu, K Y; Xie, Q F

    2017-02-18

    To investigate the effect of occlusal interference on the energy metabolism of masticatory muscle by studying the changes of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), adenosine diphosphate (ADP), inosine monophosphate (IMP), phosphocreatine, creatine, lactate and pH level in masseter muscles of rats after occlusal interference. Fifty male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned into experimental group (n=40) and control group (n=10). In experimental group, 0.4 mm thick metal crown was cemented to the upper right first molar of the rat, and maintained for 3, 7, 10, 14 d separately (n=10 for each time point). No occlusal interference was applied for control group. Bilateral masseter muscles of all the rats were acquired under general anesthesia. The samples of 5 rats in each group were fully homogenized with 0.4 mol/L perchlorate (10 mL/g). The homogenates were centrifuged, filtered and analyzed for ATP, ADP, IMP, phosphocreatine, creatine and lactate content by high performance liquid chromatography. The other samples in each group were mixed with homogenates containing 5 mmol/L sodium iodoacetate (10 mL/g), then homogenized and measured for pH value by pH meter in thermostatic water bathunder 37 degrees centigrade. Compared with control group, ATP content in bilateral masseter of the rats increased 3 d after occlusal interference [right side:(5.36±0.13) μmol/g,left side:(5.77±0.25) μmol/g] (Pocclusal interference (Pocclusal interference and maintained the low level on 10 and 14 d [right side:(10.70±0.71) μmol/g, (11.57±0.52) μmol/g, (10.74±1.39) μmol/g, left side:(10.05±0.57) μmol/g, (10.75±1.12)μmol/g, (10.61±1.15) μmol/g](Pocclusal interference was observed (P>0.05). Occlusal interference influences the content of energy metabolites in masticatory muscle of rats, which may be related to the pathological process of masticatory muscles induced by occlusal interference, such as muscle pain, dysfunction and altered fiber architecture.

  11. Reduction of the degradation activity of umami-enhancing purinic ribonucleotide supplement in miso by the targeted suppression of acid phosphatases in the Aspergillus oryzae starter culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marui, Junichiro; Tada, Sawaki; Fukuoka, Mari; Wagu, Yutaka; Shiraishi, Yohei; Kitamoto, Noriyuki; Sugimoto, Tatsuya; Hattori, Ryota; Suzuki, Satoshi; Kusumoto, Ken-Ichi

    2013-09-02

    Miso (fermented soybean paste) is a traditional Japanese fermented food, and is now used worldwide. The solid-state culture of filamentous fungus, Aspergillus oryzae, grown on rice is known as rice-koji, and is important as a starter for miso fermentation because of its prominent hydrolytic enzyme activities. Recently, commercial miso products have been supplemented with purinic ribonucleotides, such as inosine monophosphate (IMP) and guanine monophosphate, to enhance the characteristic umami taste of glutamate in miso. Because the purinic ribonucleotides are degraded by enzymes such as acid phosphatases in miso, heat inactivation is required prior to the addition of these flavorings. However, heat treatment is a costly process and reduces the quality of miso. Therefore, an approach to lower acid phosphatase activities in koji culture is necessary. Transcriptional analysis using an A. oryzae KBN8048 rice-koji culture showed that eight of the 13 acid phosphatase (aph) genes were significantly down-regulated by the addition of phosphoric acid in the preparation of the culture in a concentration-dependent manner, while aphC expression was markedly up-regulated under the same conditions. The eight down-regulated genes might be under the control of the functional counterpart of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae transcriptional activator Pho4, which specifically regulates phosphatase genes in response to the ambient phosphate availability. However, the regulatory mechanism of aphC was not clear. The IMP dephosphorylation activities in rice-koji cultures of KBN8048 and the aphC deletion mutant (ΔaphC) were reduced by up to 30% and 70%, respectively, in cultures with phosphoric acid, while protease and amylase activity, which is important for miso fermentation, was minimally affected. The miso products fermented using the rice-koji cultures of KBN8048 and ΔaphC prepared with phosphoric acid had reductions in IMP dephosphorylation activity of 80% and 90%, respectively, without

  12. Protective effect of Momordica charantia water extract against liver injury in restraint-stressed mice and the underlying mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yuanyuan; Tang, Qin; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Ruifen; Wei, Zhencheng; Tang, Xiaojun; Zhang, Mingwei

    2017-01-01

    Background : Momordica charantia is used in China for its jianghuo (heat-clearing and detoxifying) effects. The concept of shanghuo (the antonym of jianghuo , excessive internal heat) in traditional Chinese medicine is considered a type of stress response of the body. The stress process involves internal organs, especially the liver. Objective : We hypothesized that Momordica charantia water extract (MWE) has a hepatoprotective effect and can protect the body from stress. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible effects of MWE against liver injury in restraint-stressed mice. Design : The mice were intragastrically administered with MWE (250, 500 and 750 mg/kg bw) daily for 7 days. The Normal Control (NC) and Model groups were administered distilled water. A positive control group was intragastrically administered vitamin C 250 mg/kg bw. After the last administration, mice were restrained for 20 h. Results : MWE reduced the serum AST and ALT, reduced the NO content and the protein expression level of iNOSin the liver; significantly reduced the mitochondrial ROS content, increased the mitochondrial membrane potential and the activities of mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes I and II in restraint-stressed mice. Conclusions : The results indicate that MWE has a protective effect against liver injury in restraint-stressed mice. Abbreviations : MWE: Momordica charantia water extract; M. charantia: Momordica charantia L.; ROS: reactive oxygen species; NO: nitric oxide; iNOS: inducible nitric oxide synthase; IL-1β: interleukin-1 beta; TNF-α: tumor necrosis factor alpha; IL-6: interleukin 6; IFN-γ: interferon gamma; VC: vitamin C; ALT: alanine transaminase; AST: aspartate aminotransferase; GSH: glutathione; GSH-PX: glutathione peroxidase; MDA: malondialdehyde; BCA: bicinchoninic acid; TBARS: thiobarbituric acid reactive substances; Trolox: 6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8-tetramethylchroman-2-carboxylic acid; JC-B: Janus Green B; DW: dry weight; FC: Folin

  13. Purine 3':5'-cyclic nucleotides with the nucleobase in a syn orientation: cAMP, cGMP and cIMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Řlepokura, Katarzyna Anna

    2016-06-01

    Purine 3':5'-cyclic nucleotides are very well known for their role as the secondary messengers in hormone action and cellular signal transduction. Nonetheless, their solid-state conformational details still require investigation. Five crystals containing purine 3':5'-cyclic nucleotides have been obtained and structurally characterized, namely adenosine 3':5'-cyclic phosphate dihydrate, C10H12N5O6P·2H2O or cAMP·2H2O, (I), adenosine 3':5'-cyclic phosphate 0.3-hydrate, C10H12N5O6P·0.3H2O or cAMP·0.3H2O, (II), guanosine 3':5'-cyclic phosphate pentahydrate, C10H12N5O7P·5H2O or cGMP·5H2O, (III), sodium guanosine 3':5'-cyclic phosphate tetrahydrate, Na(+)·C10H11N5O7P(-)·4H2O or Na(cGMP)·4H2O, (IV), and sodium inosine 3':5'-cyclic phosphate tetrahydrate, Na(+)·C10H10N4O7P(-)·4H2O or Na(cIMP)·4H2O, (V). Most of the cyclic nucleotide zwitterions/anions [two from four cAMP present in total in (I) and (II), cGMP in (III), cGMP(-) in (IV) and cIMP(-) in (V)] are syn conformers about the N-glycosidic bond, and this nucleobase arrangement is accompanied by Crib-H...Npur hydrogen bonds (rib = ribose and pur = purine). The base orientation is tuned by the ribose pucker. An analysis of data obtained from the Cambridge Structural Database made in the context of syn-anti conformational preferences has revealed that among the syn conformers of various purine nucleotides, cyclic nucleotides and dinucleotides predominate significantly. The interactions stabilizing the syn conformation have been indicated. The inter-nucleotide contacts in (I)-(V) have been systematized in terms of the chemical groups involved. All five structures display three-dimensional hydrogen-bonded networks.

  14. The influence of Simvastatin and Korargin on the clinical course of coronary heart disease, body weight and distribution of adipose tissue in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Pogrebniak

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM is one of the most influential risk factors for the development of cardiovascular diseases. Incidence of coronary heart diseases (CHD and acute myocardial infarction in diabetic patients is much higher than in people without diabetes. Type 2 DM affects other risk factors of CHD due to the fact that, as a rule, it is accompanied by obesity, hypertension, hypertriglyceridemia and decrease of high density lipoproteins. Purpose of the investigation – to improve the efficiency of treatment of patients with CHD with type 2 DM based on the effect of Simvastatin and Korargin on it’s clinical course, body weight and the distribution of adipose tissue. Materials and methods of the investigation. The study involved 175 patients with CHD aged from 34 to 87, mean age was 61,0 ± 8,0 years, among whom there were 96 (54,9% men and 79 (45,1% women. All surveyed received conventional treatment. Depending on supplementary prescriptions patients were divided into eight groups: 1 group - 22 patients with CHD who were prescribed Simvastatin, 2 group - 20 patients with CHD who were prescribed Korargin, 3 group - 20 patients with coronary artery disease who were prescribed simultaneously both Simvastatin and Korarhin, 4 group - 20 patients with CHD with type 2 diabetes treated with Simvastatin, 5 group - 23 patients with CHD with type 2 diabetes who took Korargin, 6 group - 27 patients with CHD with type 2 diabetes, who were prescribed both Simvastatin and Korargin in addition to conventional treatments, 7 group - 20 patients with CHD who received only conventional treatments, 8 group - 23 patients with coronary artery disease combined with type 2 diabetes who received only conventional treatments. Simvastatin ("Vazostat-Health" FC "Health", Kharkiv was administered at a daily dose of 20 mg at night during 6 months, Korargin (JSC "Engineer", Uman - 0,1 g of L-arginine hydrochloride with 0.1 g of inosine – was administered at a dose of 3

  15. Lower frequency of the low activity adenosine deaminase allelic variant (ADA1*2 in schizophrenic patients Diminuição da frequência da variante alélica de baixa atividade da adenosina desaminase (ADA1*2 em pacientes esquizofrênicos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Pimentel Dutra

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Adenosine may play a role in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, since it modulates the release of several neurotransmitters such as glutamate, dopamine, serotonin and acetylcholine, decreases neuronal activity by pos-synaptic hyperpolarization and inhibits dopaminergic activity. Adenosine deaminase participates in purine metabolism by converting adenosine into inosine. The most frequent functional polymorphism of adenosine deaminase (22G→A (ADA1*2 exhibits 20-30% lower enzymatic activity in individuals with the G/A genotype than individuals with the G/G genotype. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ADA polymorphism 22G→A (ADA1*2 in schizophrenic patients and healthy controls. METHOD: The genotypes of the ADA 22G→A were identified with allele-specific PCR strategy in 152 schizophrenic patients and 111 healthy individuals. RESULTS: A significant decrease in the frequency of the G/A genotype was seen in schizophrenic patients (7/152 - 4.6% relative to controls (13/111 - 11.7%, p = 0.032, OR = 2.6. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that the G/A genotype associated with low adenosine deaminase activity and, supposingly, with higher adenosine levels is less frequent among schizophrenic patients.OBJETIVO: A adenosina pode ter um papel importante na fisiopatologia da esquizofrenia, uma vez que modula a liberação de vários neurotransmissores, tais como glutamato, dopamina, serotonina e acetilcolina, diminui a atividade neuronal por hiperpolarização pós-sináptica e inibe a atividade dopaminérgica. A adenosina desaminase participa do metabolismo das purinas pela conversão de adenosina em inosina. O mais frequente polimorfismo funcional da adenosina desaminase (22G →A (ADA1*2 exibe uma diminuição de 20-30% da atividade funcional em indivíduos com genótipo G/A quando comparados com indivíduos com o genótipo G/G. O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar o polimorfismo 22G→A (ADA1*2 em pacientes esquizofrênicos e em

  16. Compatibility of pantoprazole sodium for injection combined with eight common injections%注射用泮托拉唑钠与8种常用注射剂的配伍稳定性考察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许锦英; 孙华; 梁大虎; 殷勤; 盛雪鹤; 刘孟雪; 姚瑶; 周露露; 黄越

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the compatibility of pantoprazole combined with eight commonly administered injectables under ambient room temperature.METHODS The HPLC method for pantoprazole determination was established.Simulated Y-site compatibility evaluation was accomplished by mixing pantoprazole with an alternative intravenous medication (inosine injection,vitamin B6 injection,vitamin K1 injection,coenzyme A for injection,aminomethylbenzoic acid injection,ethamsylate injection,potassium magnesium aspartate injection and adenosine disodium triphosphate injection) in NS,and then the mixture was stored in a polypropylene syringe for 2 h.The concentration of pantoprazole,appearance,the number of insoluble particles and pH value of pantoprazole in admixtures were observed immediately and at 0.5,1 and 2 h.RESULTS The content of pantoprazole declined obviously in two hours after mixing with aminomethylbenzoic acid injection,etamsylate and vitamin B6 injection,respectively.CONCLUSION The pantoprazole injection is sensitive to pH value,and should not be administered concomitantly with aminomethylbenzoic acid injection,etamsylate or vitamin 6 injection.Furthermore,the pipeline should be cleaned when pantoprazole is sequential Y-site administered with any one of these products.%目的:考察室温条件下注射用泮托唑钠与8种临床常用药物的配伍稳定性.方法:建立了泮托拉唑钠高效液相含量测定方法,模拟临床应用,以0.9%的氯化钠溶液为溶媒,按比例分别将注射用泮托拉唑钠与肌苷注射液、维生素&注射液、维生素K1注射液、注射用辅酶A、氨苯甲酸注射液、酚磺乙胺注射液、门冬氨酸钾镁注射液、注射用ATP 8种临床常见药物混合,在混合后即刻、0.5,1,2h4个时间点考察泮托拉唑含量、外观、不溶性微粒、溶液pH值的变化.结果:泮托拉唑钠与氨苯甲酸、酚磺乙胺、维生素B6配伍后2h内含量明显下降.结论:泮托拉唑对pH敏感,注

  17. Presynaptic inhibition of spontaneous acetylcholine release induced by adenosine at the mouse neuromuscular junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lorenzo, Silvana; Veggetti, Mariela; Muchnik, Salomón; Losavio, Adriana

    2004-05-01

    inhibit the increases in mepp frequency evoked by 15 and 20 mm K(+). We demonstrated that, at high K(+) concentrations, endogenous AD occupies A1 receptors, impairing the action of CCPA, since incubation with 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX, an A(1) receptor antagonist) and adenosine deaminase (ADA), which degrades AD into the inactive metabolite inosine, increased mepp frequency compared with that obtained in 15 and 20 mm K(+) in the absence of the drugs. Moreover, CCPA was able to induce presynaptic inhibition in the presence of ADA. It is concluded that, at high K(+) concentrations, the activation of A(1) receptors by endogenous AD prevents excessive neurotransmitter release.

  18. Exploring metabolic pathway disruption in the subchronic phencyclidine model of schizophrenia with the Generalized Singular Value Decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morris Brian J

    2011-05-01

    Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG metabolite pathway database were altered in the PFC of PCP-treated rats. Several significant changes were discovered, notably: 1 neuroactive ligands active at glutamate and GABA receptors are disrupted in the PFC of PCP-treated animals, 2 glutamate dysfunction in these animals was not limited to compromised glutamatergic neurotransmission but also involves the disruption of metabolic pathways linked to glutamate; and 3 a specific series of purine reactions Xanthine ← Hypoxyanthine ↔ Inosine ← IMP → adenylosuccinate is also disrupted in the PFC of PCP-treated animals. Conclusions Network reordering via the GSVD provides a means to discover statistically validated differences in clustering between a pair of networks. In practice this analytical approach, when applied to metabolomic data, allows us to quantify the alterations in metabolic pathways between two experimental groups. With this new computational technique we identified metabolic pathway alterations that are consistent with known results. Furthermore, we discovered disruption in a novel series of purine reactions that may contribute to the PFC dysfunction and cognitive deficits seen in schizophrenia.