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Sample records for inorganic carbon isotope

  1. CO2-dependent carbon isotope fractionation in dinoflagellates relates to their inorganic carbon fluxes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoins, M.; Eberlein, T.; Van de Waal, D.B.; Sluijs, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/311474748; Reichart, G.-J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/165599081; Rost, B.

    2016-01-01

    Carbon isotope fractionation (εp) between the inorganic carbon source and organic matter has been proposed to be a function of pCO2. To understand the CO2-dependency of εp and species-specific differences therein, inorganic carbon fluxes in the four dinoflagellate species Alexandrium fundyense, Scri

  2. CO2-dependent carbon isotope fractionation in dinoflagellates relates to their inorganic carbon fluxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoins, Mirja; Eberlein, Tim; Van de Waal, Dedmer B; Sluijs, Appy; Reichart, Gert-Jan; Rost, Björn

    2016-08-01

    Carbon isotope fractionation (εp) between the inorganic carbon source and organic matter has been proposed to be a function of pCO2. To understand the CO2-dependency of εp and species-specific differences therein, inorganic carbon fluxes in the four dinoflagellate species Alexandrium fundyense, Scrippsiella trochoidea, Gonyaulax spinifera and Protoceratium reticulatum have been measured by means of membrane-inlet mass spectrometry. In-vivo assays were carried out at different CO2 concentrations, representing a range of pCO2 from 180 to 1200 μatm. The relative bicarbonate contribution (i.e. the ratio of bicarbonate uptake to total inorganic carbon uptake) and leakage (i.e. the ratio of CO2 efflux to total inorganic carbon uptake) varied from 0.2 to 0.5 and 0.4 to 0.7, respectively, and differed significantly between species. These ratios were fed into a single-compartment model, and εp values were calculated and compared to carbon isotope fractionation measured under the same conditions. For all investigated species, modeled and measured εp values were comparable (A. fundyense, S. trochoidea, P. reticulatum) and/or showed similar trends with pCO2 (A. fundyense, G. spinifera, P. reticulatum). Offsets are attributed to biases in inorganic flux measurements, an overestimated fractionation factor for the CO2-fixing enzyme RubisCO, or the fact that intracellular inorganic carbon fluxes were not taken into account in the model. This study demonstrates that CO2-dependency in εp can largely be explained by the inorganic carbon fluxes of the individual dinoflagellates.

  3. Carbon isotope fractionation of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) due to outgassing of carbon dioxide from a headwater stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel H. Doctor; Carol Kendall; Stephen D. Sebestyen; James B. Shanley; Nobuhito Ohte; Elizabeth W. Boyer

    2008-01-01

    The stable isotopic composition of dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13C-DIC) was investigated as a potential tracer of streamflow generation processes at the Sleepers River Research Watershed, Vermont, USA. Downstream sampling showed δ13C-DIC increased between 3-5% from the stream source to the outlet weir...

  4. On-site isotopic analysis of dissolved inorganic carbon using an isotope ratio infrared spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoltmann, Tim; Mandic, Magda; Stöbener, Nils; Wapelhorst, Eric; Aepfler, Rebecca; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Taubner, Heidi; Jost, Hj; Elvert, Marcus

    2016-04-01

    An Isotope Ratio Infrared Spectrometer (IRIS) has been adapted to perform measurements of δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in marine pore waters. The resulting prototype allowed highly automated analysis of δ13C isotopic ratios and CO2 concentration. We achieved a throughput of up to 70 samples per day with DIC contents as low as 1.7 μmol C. We achieved an internal precision of 0.066 ‰ and an external precision of 0.16 ‰, which is comparable to values given for Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometers (IRMS). The prototype instrument is field deployable, suitable for shipboard analysis of deep sea core pore waters. However, the validation of the prototype was centered around a field campaign in Eckernförde Bay, NW- Baltic Sea. As a proof of concept, a shallow site within an area of submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) and a site outside this area was investigated. We present profiles of δ13C of DIC over 50 cm exhibiting well understood methane turnover processes (anaerobic oxidation of methane). At the lowest point below the seafloor, microbial reduction of CO2 to CH4 dominates. 12CO2 is reduced preferentially over 13CO2, leading to more positive δ13C values in the remaining DIC pool; in layers closer to the surface, the oxidation of CH4 to CO2 becomes more prominent. Since the CH4 pool is enriched in 12C a shift to more negative δ13C can be observed in the DIC pool. In the upper 15 cm, the pore water DIC mixes with the sea water DIC, increasing δ13C again. Finally, we will present recent developments to further improve performance and future plans for deployments on research cruises.

  5. Fractionation between inorganic and organic carbon during the Lomagundi (2.22 2.1 Ga) carbon isotope excursion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekker, A.; Holmden, C.; Beukes, N. J.; Kenig, F.; Eglinton, B.; Patterson, W. P.

    2008-07-01

    The Lomagundi (2.22-2.1 Ga) positive carbon isotope excursion in shallow-marine sedimentary carbonates has been associated with the rise in atmospheric oxygen, but subsequent studies have demonstrated that the carbon isotope excursion was preceded by the rise in atmospheric oxygen. The amount of oxygen released to the exosphere during the Lomagundi excursion is constrained by the average global fractionation between inorganic and organic carbon, which is poorly characterized. Because dissolved inorganic and organic carbon reservoirs were arguably larger in the Paleoproterozoic ocean, at a time of lower solar luminosity and lower ocean redox state, decoupling between these two variables might be expected. We determined carbon isotope values of carbonate and organic matter in carbonates and shales of the Silverton Formation, South Africa and in the correlative Sengoma Argillite Formation, near the border in Botswana. These units were deposited between 2.22 and 2.06 Ga along the margin of the Kaapvaal Craton in an open-marine deltaic setting and experienced lower greenschist facies metamorphism. The prodelta to offshore marine shales are overlain by a subtidal carbonate sequence. Carbonates exhibit elevated 13C values ranging from 8.3 to 11.2‰ vs. VPDB consistent with deposition during the Lomagundi positive excursion. The total organic carbon (TOC) contents range from 0.01 to 0.6% and δ13C values range from - 24.8 to - 13.9‰. Thus, the isotopic fractionation between organic and carbonate carbon was on average 30.3 ± 2.8‰ ( n = 32) in the shallow-marine environment. The underlying Sengoma shales have highly variable TOC contents (0.14 to 21.94%) and δ13C values (- 33.7 to - 20.8‰) with an average of - 27.0 ± 3.0‰ ( n = 50). Considering that the shales were also deposited during the Lomagundi excursion, and taking δ13C values of the overlying carbonates as representative of the δ13C value of dissolved inorganic carbon during shale deposition, a carbon

  6. The impact of recycling of organic carbon on the stable carbon isotopic composition of dissolved inorganic carbon in a stratified marine system (Kyllaren fjord, Norway)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breugel, Y. van; Schouten, S.; Paetzel, M.; Nordeide, R.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.

    2005-01-01

    A negative carbon isotope shift in sedimentary organic carbon deposited in stratified marine and lacustrine systems has often been inferred to be a consequence of the process of recycling of respired and, therefore, 13C-depleted, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) formed from mineralization of descend

  7. Carbon isotopes of dissolved inorganic carbon reflect utilization of different carbon sources by microbial communities in two limestone aquifer assemblages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. E. Nowak

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Isotopes of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC are used to indicate both transit times and biogeochemical evolution of groundwaters. These signals can be complicated in carbonate aquifers, as both abiotic (i.e., carbonate equilibria and biotic factors influence the δ13C and 14C of DIC. We applied a novel graphical method for tracking changes in the δ13C and 14C of DIC in two distinct aquifer complexes identified in the Hainich Critical Zone Exploratory (CZE, a platform to study how water transport links surface and shallow groundwaters in limestone and marlstone rocks in central Germany. For more quantitative estimates of contributions of different biotic and abiotic carbon sources to the DIC pool, we used the NETPATH geochemical modeling program, which accounts for changes in dissolved ions in addition to C isotopes. Although water residence times in the Hainich CZE aquifers based on hydrogeology are relatively short (years or less, DIC isotopes in the shallow, mostly anoxic, aquifer assemblage (HTU were depleted in 14C compared to a deeper, oxic, aquifer complex (HTL. Carbon isotopes and chemical changes in the deeper HTL wells could be explained by interaction of recharge waters equilibrated with post-bomb 14C sources with carbonates. However, oxygen depletion and δ13C and 14C values of DIC below those expected from the processes of carbonate equilibrium alone indicate considerably different biogeochemical evolution of waters in the upper aquifer assemblage (HTU wells. Changes in 14C and 13C in the upper aquifer complexes result from a number of biotic and abiotic processes, including oxidation of 14C-depleted OM derived from recycled microbial carbon and sedimentary organic matter as well as water–rock interactions. The microbial pathways inferred from DIC isotope shifts and changes in water chemistry in the HTU wells were supported by comparison with in situ microbial community structure based on 16S rRNA analyses. Our findings

  8. Li isotopes in foraminifera: a new proxy for past ocean dissolved inorganic carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigier, N.; Rollion-Bard, C.; Erez, J.

    2009-12-01

    Past ocean pH and pCO2 are critical parameters for establishing relationships between Earth climate and carbon cycle. For the Miocene-Pleistocene period, two main proxies have been used: carbon isotopes of di-unsaturated alkenones extracted from sea cores, and boron isotope signatures of marine carbonates [1, 2]. Both techniques lead to selfconsistent palaeooceanic pH or pCO2 estimates, but are associated with large uncertainties. Moreover, the paleovariations calculated from boron isotope measurements are a matter of debate. Additional proxies are therefore needed. Based on an in-situ analytical technique recently developed [3], we analysed a series of foraminifera - Amphistegina - cultured under various conditions (in pH, T and Dissolved Inorganic Carbon). We show that the lithium isotope signature of the foraminifera correlates with the DIC (r2 = 0.93). Conversely, there is no dependency of Li isotope signature on pH or T. A simple model of biomineralization in which growth rate is a key parameter can fit the whole dataset, including published values for other foraminifera species [4, 5]. This strongly suggests that the DIC-δ7Li correlation highlighted by the cultured Amphistegina can also be applied to other species. These results, combined with the published oceanic Li and B isotope paleovariations [2, 4, 5], allow us to estimate the ocean DIC and pCO2 evolution for the past 18Ma. The similarity with the pCO2 curve given by carbon isotopes measured in di-unsaturated alkenones is striking. This supports the use of Li isotopes as a new proxy and adds support to the existing data. It also suggests, in contrast with the common view, a less significant role of river input on the variation of the ocean Li isotope composition, at least for the period considered. [1] Pagani et al. (2005) Science 309, 600-603. [2] Pearson & Palmer (2000) Nature 406, 695-699. [3] Vigier et al. (2007) G-cubed 8, Q01003 [4] Hall et al. (2005) Mar. Geology 217, 255-265 [5] Hathorne

  9. Dissolved inorganic carbon isotopic composition of the Gulf of Mexico deep-water masses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintanilla-Terminel, J. G.; Herguera, J. C.; Ferreira-Bartrina, V.; Hernández-Ayón, J. M.; Camacho-Ibar, V.

    2014-12-01

    This study provides new data for the establishment of a carbon biogeochemical dynamics baseline in the deep Gulf of Mexico (GM) based on carbon isotopes in dissolved inorganic carbon. Water samples from 40 deep-water stations south of 25˚N were collected during XIXIMI-2 cruise, July 2011, aboard BO/Justo Sierra. Vertical profiles of temperature, salinity and dissolved oxygen (DO) were further measured in each station. In the Stable Isotopes Laboratory at CICESE we determined the carbon isotopic composition of the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) (δ13CDIC). Remarkably, density, DO and δ13CCID profiles showed a clear difference between the Loop current and the deep-waters of the GM south of 25˚N. We found the following average δ13CCID values in the Loop current and in the deep-waters of the Gulf: subtropical underwater (SUW): 0.73±0.06‰ and 0.86±0.04‰; 18 degree water (18W): 0.76 ± 0.08‰ and 0.58± 0.06‰; North Atlantic central water (NACW): 0.77 ± 0.05‰ and 0.71 ± 0.09‰; South Atlantic central water (SACW): 0.80 ± 0.08‰ and 0.77 ± 0.07‰; Antartic intermediate water (AAIW): 1.00 ± 0.06‰ and 0.90 ± 0.08‰; North Atlantic deep water (NADW): 1.03 ± 0.06‰ and 1.01 ± 0.10‰. We will discuss how the biological component, δ13CCID-BIO, of subsurface water masses match very closely the apparent oxygen utilization relation described by Kroopnick, 1985, with the exception of SUW, and as a consequence the 18W is probably the water mass most affected by organic carbon remineralization processes in the GM south of 25˚N. We further show how these waters seem to store a larger proportion of anthropogenic carbon than the deeper water masses.

  10. Determination of the origin of dissolved inorganic carbon in groundwater around a reclaimed landfill in Otwock using stable carbon isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porowska, Dorota, E-mail: dorotap@uw.edu.pl

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Research showed the origin of DIC in the groundwater around a reclaimed landfill. • Carbon isotope was used to evaluate the contributions of carbon from different sources. • The leachate-contaminated water was isotopically distinct from the natural groundwater. • DIC in the natural groundwater comes from organic matter and dissolution of carbonates. • In the contaminated water, DIC comes from organic matter in the aquifer and landfill. - Abstract: Chemical and isotopic analyses of groundwater from piezometers located around a reclaimed landfill in Otwock (Poland) were performed in order to trace the origin of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in the groundwater. Due to differences in the isotopic composition of carbon from different sources, an analysis of stable carbon isotopes in the groundwater, together with the Keeling plot approach and a two-component mixing model allow us to evaluate the relative contributions of carbon from these sources in the groundwater. In the natural (background) groundwater, DIC concentrations and the isotopic composition of DIC (δ{sup 13}C{sub DIC}) comes from two sources: decomposition of organic matter and carbonate dissolution within the aquifer sediments, whereas in the leachate-contaminated groundwater, DIC concentrations and δ{sup 13}C{sub DIC} values depend on the degradation of organic matter within the aquifer sediments and biodegradation of organic matter stored in the landfill. From the mixing model, about 4–54% of the DIC pool is derived from organic matter degradation and 96–46% from carbonate dissolution in natural conditions. In the leachate-contaminated groundwater, about 20–53% of the DIC is derived from organic matter degradation of natural origin and 80–47% from biodegradation of organic matter stored in the landfill. Partial pressure of CO{sub 2} (P CO{sub 2}) was generally above the atmospheric, hence atmospheric CO{sub 2} as a source of carbon in DIC pool was negligible in the

  11. Carbon isotope fractionation of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) due to outgassing of carbon dioxide from a headwater stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doctor, D.H.; Kendall, C.; Sebestyen, S.D.; Shanley, J.B.; Ohte, N.; Boyer, E.W.

    2008-01-01

    The stable isotopic composition of dissolved inorganic carbon (??13C-DIC) was investigated as a potential tracer of streamflow generation processes at the Sleepers River Research Watershed, Vermont, USA. Downstream sampling showed ?? 13C-DIC increased between 3-5??? from the stream source to the outlet weir approximately 0??5 km downstream, concomitant with increasing pH and decreasing PCO2. An increase in ??13C-DIC of 2.4 ?? 0??1??? per log unit decrease of excess PCO2 (stream PCO2 normalized to atmospheric PCO2) was observed from downstream transect data collected during snowmelt. Isotopic fractionation of DIC due to CO2 outgassing rather than exchange with atmospheric CO2 may be the primary cause of increased ?? 13C-DIC values downstream when PCO2 of surface freshwater exceeds twice the atmospheric CO2 concentration. Although CO2 outgassing caused a general increase in stream ??13C-DIC values, points of localized groundwater seepage into the stream were identified by decreases in ??13C-DIC and increases in DIC concentration of the stream water superimposed upon the general downstream trend. In addition, comparison between snowmelt, early spring and summer seasons showed that DIC is flushed from shallow groundwater flowpaths during snowmelt and is replaced by a greater proportion of DIC derived from soil CO2 during the early spring growing season. Thus, in spite of effects from CO2 outgassing, ??13C of DIC can be a useful indicator of groundwater additions to headwater streams and a tracer of carbon dynamics in catchments. Copyright ?? 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Beyond temperature: Clumped isotope signatures in dissolved inorganic carbon species and the influence of solution chemistry on carbonate mineral composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripati, Aradhna K.; Hill, Pamela S.; Eagle, Robert A.; Mosenfelder, Jed L.; Tang, Jianwu; Schauble, Edwin A.; Eiler, John M.; Zeebe, Richard E.; Uchikawa, Joji; Coplen, Tyler B.; Ries, Justin B.; Henry, Drew

    2015-01-01

    “Clumped-isotope” thermometry is an emerging tool to probe the temperature history of surface and subsurface environments based on measurements of the proportion of 13C and 18O isotopes bound to each other within carbonate minerals in 13C18O16O22- groups (heavy isotope “clumps”). Although most clumped isotope geothermometry implicitly presumes carbonate crystals have attained lattice equilibrium (i.e., thermodynamic equilibrium for a mineral, which is independent of solution chemistry), several factors other than temperature, including dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) speciation may influence mineral isotopic signatures. Therefore we used a combination of approaches to understand the potential influence of different variables on the clumped isotope (and oxygen isotope) composition of minerals.We conducted witherite precipitation experiments at a single temperature and at varied pH to empirically determine 13C-18O bond ordering (Δ47) and δ18O of CO32- and HCO3- molecules at a 25 °C equilibrium. Ab initio cluster models based on density functional theory were used to predict equilibrium 13C-18O bond abundances and δ18O of different DIC species and minerals as a function of temperature. Experiments and theory indicate Δ47 and δ18O compositions of CO32- and HCO3- ions are significantly different from each other. Experiments constrain the Δ47-δ18O slope for a pH effect (0.011 ± 0.001; 12 ⩾ pH ⩾ 7). Rapidly-growing temperate corals exhibit disequilibrium mineral isotopic signatures with a Δ47-δ18O slope of 0.011 ± 0.003, consistent with a pH effect.Our theoretical calculations for carbonate minerals indicate equilibrium lattice calcite values for Δ47 and δ18O are intermediate between HCO3− and CO32−. We analyzed synthetic calcites grown at temperatures ranging from 0.5 to 50 °C with and without the enzyme carbonic anhydrase present. This enzyme catalyzes oxygen isotopic exchange between DIC species and is present in many

  13. Lower Triassic Inorganic Carbon Isotope Excursion in Chaohu, Anhui Province, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    This paper reports a Lower Triassic inorganic carbon isotope profile from the North Ping-dingshan Section in Chaohu, Anhui Province, China, which was situated in a deep part of the LowerYangtze carbonate ramp. The δ(13C) excursion shows two periods from the Permian-Triassic boundaryto the lower Spathian substage, corresponding to the ecosystem undergoing evolution and recovery afterthe end-Permian mass extinction and related events. The first period starts at the δ (13 C) depletioncaused by the mass extinction and evolves with a gradual δ(13C) increase resulting from the developmentof some disaster taxa during the Induan. The strong Smithian δ(13 C) depletion in the second periodmight be formed by the collapse of the disaster ecosystem and the biotic recovery occurred with the explo-sive increase of bioproductivity in the Spathian. Thus the δ(13C) excursion in the Lower Triassic expres-ses patterns of biotic evolution and recovery during the erratic ecosystem that followed the great end-Permian mass extinction.

  14. Predicting 13C-18O clumped isotope fractionation in dissolved inorganic carbon and rapidly precipitated carbonate minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, P. S.; Tripati, A. K.; Schauble, E. A.

    2012-12-01

    The occurrence of multiply substituted isotopologues in carbonates forms the basis for clumped isotope thermometry. It is important to understand how clumping may be affected by environmental factors under both equilibrium and disequilbrium conditions. "Clumping" of heavy isotopes into bonds with each other in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) species is of particular interest because natural carbonates that precipitate too rapidly to reach internal isotopic exchange equilibrium may instead inherit the clumping signature of DIC in the parent solution. DIC speciation is dependent on pH, suggesting that clumping signatures inherited by rapidly precipitated carbonate minerals could also be affected by pH. To better understand these disequilibrium clumped isotope signatures (and their effects on inferred temperatures of formation), we have developed theoretical models of the individual DIC species, composite DIC solutions, and bulk carbonate minerals. We used 4 different techniques for modelling the hydration of DIC: gas phase, implicit solvation, explicit solvation (ion with 3 water molecules) and supermolecular clusters (ion plus 21 to 32 water molecules with geometries generated by molecular dynamics). For each solvation technique, we performed sensitivity testing by combining different levels of theory (7 ab initio/hybrid methods, each with 5 different sizes of basis sets) to understand the limits of each technique. We looked at the degree of convergence with the most complex (and accurate) models in order to select the most reliable and efficient modelling methods. Overall, our models predict a difference between Δ47 ( HCO3-) and Δ47 (CO32-) > .025‰, enough to potentially perturb inferred formation temperatures by ≥ 5°C. This difference is fairly consistent at most levels of theory we tested. The models also predict that a carbonate mineral precipitating very rapidly (i.e., forming under isotopic disequilibrium conditions) in a DIC solution of low to

  15. A novel method for concurrent measurements of dissolved inorganic carbon concentration and its carbon isotope composition δ13C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, K.; Cai, W. J.; Kim-Hak, D.; Jonsson, B. F.

    2016-02-01

    The concentration of dissolved inorganic carbon ([DIC]) and its stable carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) in the surface ocean are key to studying the important processes in the carbon cycle, e.g., photosynthesis and respiration, calcification, water mass mixing, and, in particularly, the Suess effect as well as the penetration of anthropogenic carbon into the surface ocean and the subsequent ocean acidification. Real-time, shipboard measurements of these properties are highly desired. Here we present a new method that concurrently measures [DIC] and δ13C of DIC in the surface ocean. The method couples sample acidification and delivery techniques (Apollo Scitech) with a cavity ring-down spectrometer (CRDS, Picarro), and works automatically to analyzer samples at the throughput of 8 minutes/sample. In each sampling cycle, a syringe pump withdraws a fixed volume of phosphoric acid and seawater sample, and injects them slowly into a reaction chamber where they were mixed. In the meantime, the CO2 evolved from the acidified sample is purged by a CO2-free gas flow into a CRDS carbon isotope analyzer for measurements of the CO2 concentration and δ13C-CO2. The concurrent injection, acidification, and purging yield a broad, flat peak of CO2 which is precisely and frequently measured by the CRDS analyzer. [DIC] and δ13C can then be calculated by integrating the concentration and δ13C of the CO2 peak. The precision of the [DIC] and δ13C is automated to run continuously onboard a research vessel as well as discrete samples in a lab environment.

  16. Dissolved inorganic carbon and stable carbon isotopic evolution of neutral mine drainage interacting with atmospheric CO{sub 2(g)}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abongwa, Pride Tamasang, E-mail: abongwa@okstate.edu; Atekwana, Eliot Anong; Puckette, James

    2016-03-01

    We investigated the spatial variations in the concentrations of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), the stable carbon isotopic composition (δ{sup 13}C) of DIC and the δ{sup 13}C of carbonate precipitated from neutral mine drainage interacting with the atmospheric CO{sub 2(g)}. We assessed the chemical, DIC and δ{sup 13}C{sub DIC} evolution of the mine drainage and the δ{sup 13}C evolution of carbonate precipitates for a distance of 562 m from the end of an 8 km tunnel that drains a mine. Our results show that as the mine drainage interacts with atmospheric CO{sub 2(g)} the outgassing of CO{sub 2} due to the high initial partial pressure of CO{sub 2} (pCO{sub 2}) causes the DIC to evolve under kinetic conditions followed by equilibration and then under equilibrium conditions. The carbonate evolution was characterized by spatial increases in pH, decreasing concentrations of Ca{sup 2+} and DIC and by the precipitation of carbonate. The δ{sup 13}C{sub DIC} showed a larger enrichment from the tunnel exit to 38 m, moderate continuous enrichment to 318 m and almost no enrichment to 562 m. On the other hand, the δ{sup 13}C of the carbonate precipitates also showed large enrichment from the tunnel exit to 38 m, moderate enrichment to 318 m after which the δ{sup 13}C remained nearly constant. The enrichment in the δ{sup 13}C of the DIC and the carbonate precipitates from 0 to 38 m from kinetic fractionation caused by CO{sub 2(g)} outgassing was followed by a mix of kinetic fractionation and equilibrium fractionation controlled by carbon exchange between DIC and atmospheric CO{sub 2(g)} to 318 m and then by equilibrium fractionation from 318 to 562 m. From the carbonate evolution in this neutral mine drainage, we estimated that 20% of the carbon was lost via CO{sub 2} outgassing, 12% was sequestered in sediments in the drainage ponds from calcite precipitation and the remainder 68% was exported to the local stream. - Highlights: • We assess the δ{sup 13}C in a

  17. The role of extracellular carbonic anhydrase activity in inorganic carbon utilization of Phaeocystis globosa (Prymnesiophyceae) : A comparison with other marine algae using the isotopic disequilibrium technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elzenga, JTM; Prins, HBA; Stefels, J

    2000-01-01

    The utilization of inorganic carbon species by the marine microalga Phaeocystis globasa (Prymnesiophyceae) and several other algal species from different taxa, was investigated by determining the time course of C-14 incorporation in isotopic disequilibrium experiments. From these kinetic data, concl

  18. Carbonate concretions as a significant component of ancient marine carbon cycles: Insights from paired organic and inorganic carbon isotope analyses of a Cretaceous shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyd, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    Carbonate concretions often occur within fine-grained, organic-rich sedimentary rocks. This association reflects the common production of diagenetic minerals through biologic cycling of organic matter. Chemical analysis of carbonate concretions provides the rare opportunity to explore ancient shallow diagenetic environments, which are inherently transient due to progressive burial but are an integral component of the marine carbon cycle. The late Cretaceous Holz Shale (~80 Ma) contains abundant calcite concretions that exhibit textural and geochemical characteristics indicative of relatively shallow formation (i.e., near the sediment-water interface). Sampled concretions contain between 5.4 and 9.8 wt.% total inorganic carbon (TIC), or ~45 and 82 wt.% CaCO3, compared to host shale values which average ~1.5 wt.% TIC. Organic carbon isotope compositions (δ13Corg) are relatively constant in host and concretion samples ranging from ­-26.3 to -24.0‰ (VPDB). Carbonate carbon isotope compositions (δ13Ccarb) range from -22.5 to -3.4‰, indicating a significant but not entirely organic source of carbon. Concretions of the lower Holz Shale exhibit considerably elevated δ13Ccarb values averaging -4.8‰, whereas upper Holz Shale concretions express an average δ13Ccarb value of -17.0‰. If the remaining carbonate for lower Holz Shale concretions is sourced from marine fluids and/or dissolved marine carbonate minerals (e.g., shells), a simple mass balance indicates that ~28% of concretion carbon was sourced from organic matter and ~72% from late Cretaceous marine inorganic carbon (with δ13C ~ +2.5‰). Upper Holz Shale calculations indicate a ~73% contribution from organic matter and a ~27% contribution from inorganic carbon. When normalized for carbonate, organic contents within the concretions are ~2-13 wt.% enriched compared to host contents. This potentially reflects the protective nature of cementation that acts to limit permeability and chemical destruction of

  19. [Hydrochemistry and Dissolved Inorganic Carbon Stable Isotope of Shibing Dolomite Karst Area in Guizhou Province].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Shi-zhen; Lan, Jia-cheng; Yuan, Dao-xian; Wang, Yun; Yang, Long; Ao, Xiang-hong

    2015-06-01

    Totally 49 water samples were collected in Shibing Dolomite Karst World Natural Heritage Site in Guizhou Province to analyze the characteristics and controlling factors of both the surface and underground waters, as well as the features and their origins of the dissolved inorganic carbon isotope. It was found that the pH of the study area was neutral to alkaline with low concentrations of total dissolved solids. The cations were dominated by Ca2+, Mg2 and anions by HCO3-, featured by HCO3-Ca x Mg type water. The ratios of Cl-, NO3- and SO4(2-) in the allogenic water from the shale area in the northern catchment were higher than those in autogenic water from the dolomite karst area, so did the concentration of Si. The SIc and SId of the allogenic waters in the shale area were negative. After the waters entered into and flew by the dolomite karst area, both the SIc and SId increased to over 0. It could be told by the water chemistry that the hydrochemistry was little impacted by the rainfall and human activities. The Gibbs plot revealed that the chemical composition of the waters was mainly controlled by rock weathering. The δ(13)C(DIC) of the surface waters ranged from -8.27% to -11.55% per hundred, averaging -9.45% per hundredo, while that of the underground waters ranged from -10.57% per hundred to -15.59% per hundred, averaging -12.04% per hundred, which was lighter than that of surface water. For the distribution features, it was found the δ(13)C(DIC), of the upper reaches of branches of Shangmuhe River was lighter than that of the lower reach, while that of the main river Shangmuhe River was relatively complex. Based on the mass balance of stable isotopes and the δ(13)C(DIC), the ratio of the origin of DIC of the ground water was calculated. It was found that 51.2% was from soil CO2, and 48.8% was from the rock itself.

  20. Stable carbon isotopes of dissolved inorganic carbon for a zonal transect across the subpolar North Atlantic Ocean in summer 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, Matthew P.; Greatrix, Florence M.; Tynan, Eithne; Achterberg, Eric P.; Griffiths, Alex M.; Fry, Claudia H.; Garley, Rebecca; McDonald, Alison; Boyce, Adrian J.

    2016-06-01

    The stable carbon isotope composition of dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13CDIC) in seawater was measured in samples collected during June-July 2014 in the subpolar North Atlantic. Sample collection was carried out on the RRS James Clark Ross cruise JR302, part of the "Radiatively Active Gases from the North Atlantic Region and Climate Change" (RAGNARoCC) research programme. The observed δ13CDIC values for cruise JR302 fall in a range from -0.07 to +1.95 ‰, relative to the Vienna Pee Dee Belemnite standard. From duplicate samples collected during the cruise, the 1σ precision for the 341 results is 0.08 ‰, which is similar to our previous work and other studies of this kind. We also performed a cross-over analysis using nearby historical δ13CDIC data, which indicated that there were no significant systematic offsets between our measurements and previously published results. We also included seawater reference material (RM) produced by A. G. Dickson (Scripps Institution of Oceanography, USA) in every batch of analysis, enabling us to improve upon the calibration and quality-control procedures from a previous study. The δ13CDIC is consistent within each RM batch, although its value is not certified. We report δ13CDIC values of 1.15 ± 0.03 ‰ and 1.27 ± 0.05 ‰ for batches 141 and 144 respectively. Our JR302 δ13CDIC data can be used - along with measurements of other biogeochemical variables - to constrain the processes that control DIC in the interior ocean, in particular the oceanic uptake of anthropogenic carbon dioxide and the biological carbon pump. Our δ13CDIC results are available from the British Oceanographic Data Centre - doi:10.5285/22235f1a-b7f3-687f-e053-6c86abc0c8a6.

  1. Boron isotopic fractionation in laboratory inorganic carbonate precipitation: Evidence for the incorpora-tion of B(OH)3 into carbonate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A laboratory inorganic carbonate precipitation experiment at high pH of 8.96 to 9.34 was conducted, and the boron isotopic fractionations of the precipitated carbonate were measured. The data show that boron isotopic fractionation factors (αcarb-3) between carbonate and B(OH)3 in seawater range 0.937 and 0.965, with an average value of 0.953. Our results together with those reported by Sanyal and collabo-rators show that the αcarb-3 values between carbonate and B(OH)3 in solution are not constant but are negatively correlated with the pH of seawater. The measured boron isotopic compositions of carbonate precipitation (δ11Bcarb) do not exactly lie on the best-fit theoretical δ 11B4-pH curves and neither do they exactly parallel any theoretical δ 11B4-pH curves. Therefore, it is reasonable to argue that a changeable proportion of B(OH)3 with pH of seawater should also be incorporated into carbonate except for the dominant incorporation of B(OH)4- in carbonate . Hence, in the reconstruction of the paleo-pH of sea-water from boron isotopes in marine biogenic carbonates, the use of theoretical boron isotopic frac-tionation factor (α4-3) between B(OH)4- and B(OH)3 is not suitable. Instead, an empirical equation should be established.

  2. Dissolved inorganic carbon and its isotopic differentia-tion in cascade reservoirs in the Wujiang drainage basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU YuanXiu; LIU CongQiang; WANG FuShun; WANG BaoLi; LI Jun; LI SiLiang

    2008-01-01

    Three cascade reservoirs, built in different periods of time in the Wujiang drainage basin, were inves-tigated in this study. Samples were taken at the surface and also at 20, 40, 60, 80 m depths in front of the dams in April, July, October of 2006 and January of 2007. Chemical parameters were calculated and the concentrations of dissolved inorganic carbon [DIC] and its isotopic composition (δ13CDIC) were de-termined. In surface waters, the δ13CDIC values are high in summer and autumn and low in winter and spring, while the DIC concentrations are relatively low in summer and autumn and relatively high in winter and spring. In the water column, the DIC concentrations increase while δ13CDICvalues decrease with water depth. DIC in various reservoirs is significantly different in isotopic composition from that in natural rivers, but is close to that in natural lakes. In addition, in surface waters, the δ13CDIC values tend to become lower whereas the nutrition level tends to become higher with increasing age of the reser-voirs. The conclusion is that after dam blocking, changes took place in the hydrochemical properties of river water, and the impounding rivers developed toward lakes and swamps. In addition, differentiation in DIC isotopic composition may be used to some extent to trace the evolution process of a reservoir.

  3. [Impact of Rocky Desertification Treatment on Underground Water Chemistry and Dissolved Inorganic Carbon Isotope in Karst Areas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Shi-zhen; Xiong, Kang-ning; Lan, Jia-cheng; Zhang, Hui; Yang, Long

    2015-05-01

    Five springs representing different land-use types and different karst rocky desertification treatment models were chosen at the Huajiang Karst Rocky Desertification Treatment Demonstration Site in Guanling-Zhenfeng Counties in Guizhou, to analyze the features of underground water chemistry and dissolved inorganic carbon isotopes (δ13C(DIC)) and reveal the effect of rocky desertification treatment on karstification and water quality. It was found that, the underground water type of the research area was HCO3-Ca; the water quality of the springs which were relatively less affected by human activities including Shuijingwan Spring (SJW) , Gebei Spring (GB), and Maojiawan Spring (MJW) was better than those relatively more affected by human activities including Diaojing Spring (DJ) and Tanjiazhai Spring (TJZ) , the main ion concentrations and electrical conductivity of which were higher; pH, SIc and pCO2 were sensitive to land-use types and rocky desertification treatment, which could be shown by the higher pH and SIc and lower pCO2 in MJW than those in the other four springs; (Ca(2+) + Mg2+)/HCO(3-) of SJW, MJW and GB were nearly 1:1, dominated by carbonate rock weathering by carbon acid, while the (Ca(2+) + Mg2+) of DJ and TJZ was much higher than HCO3-, suggesting that sulfate and nitrate might also dissolve carbonate rock because of the agricultural activities; δ13C(DIC) was lighter in wet season because of the higher biological activities; the average δ13C(DIC) was in the order of DJ (-12.79 per thousand) < SJW (-12.48 per thousand) < GB (-10.76 per thousand)) < MJW (-10.30 per thousand) < TJZ (-6.70 per thousand), which demonstrated that δ13C(DIC) would be heavier after rocky desertification and lighter after the rocky desertification are treated and controlled.

  4. Variability in carbon isotope fractionation of trichloroethene during degradation by persulfate activated with zero-valent iron: Effects of inorganic anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yunde; Zhou, Aiguo; Gan, Yiqun; Li, Xiaoqian

    2016-04-01

    Stable carbon isotope analysis has the potential to be used for assessing the performance of in situ remediation of organic contaminants. Successful application of this isotope technique requires understanding the magnitude and variability in carbon isotope fractionation associated with the reactions under consideration. This study investigated the influence of inorganic anions (sulfate, bicarbonate, and chloride) on carbon isotope fractionation of trichloroethene (TCE) during its degradation by persulfate activated with zero-valent iron. The results demonstrated that the significant carbon isotope fractionation (enrichment factors ε ranging from -3.4±0.3 to -4.3±0.3‰) was independent on the zero-iron dosage, sulfate concentration, and bicarbonate concentration. However, the ε values (ranging from -7.0±0.4 to -13.6±1.2‰) were dependent on the chloride concentration, indicating that chloride could significantly affect carbon isotope fractionation during TCE degradation by persulfate activated with zero-valent iron. The dependence of ε values on chloride concentration, indicated that TCE degradation mechanisms may be different from the degradation mechanism caused by sulfate radical (SO4(-)). Ignoring the effect of chloride on ε value may cause numerous uncertainties in quantitative assessment of the performance of the in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO).

  5. Variability in carbon isotope fractionation of trichloroethene during degradation by persulfate activated with zero-valent iron: Effects of inorganic anions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yunde [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Zhou, Aiguo, E-mail: aiguozhou@cug.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Gan, Yiqun; Li, Xiaoqian [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2016-04-01

    Stable carbon isotope analysis has the potential to be used for assessing the performance of in situ remediation of organic contaminants. Successful application of this isotope technique requires understanding the magnitude and variability in carbon isotope fractionation associated with the reactions under consideration. This study investigated the influence of inorganic anions (sulfate, bicarbonate, and chloride) on carbon isotope fractionation of trichloroethene (TCE) during its degradation by persulfate activated with zero-valent iron. The results demonstrated that the significant carbon isotope fractionation (enrichment factors ε ranging from − 3.4 ± 0.3 to − 4.3 ± 0.3 ‰) was independent on the zero-iron dosage, sulfate concentration, and bicarbonate concentration. However, the ε values (ranging from − 7.0 ± 0.4 to − 13.6 ± 1.2 ‰) were dependent on the chloride concentration, indicating that chloride could significantly affect carbon isotope fractionation during TCE degradation by persulfate activated with zero-valent iron. The dependence of ε values on chloride concentration, indicated that TCE degradation mechanisms may be different from the degradation mechanism caused by sulfate radical (SO{sub 4}·{sup −}). Ignoring the effect of chloride on ε value may cause numerous uncertainties in quantitative assessment of the performance of the in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO). - Highlights: • Significant C isotope fractionation for TCE degradation by Fe{sup 0} activated persulfate. • The enrichment factors was independent of Fe{sup 0}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2−}, or HCO{sub 3}{sup −} concentration. • Cl{sup −} significantly influenced the carbon isotope fractionation.

  6. Ubiquitous dissolved inorganic carbon assimilation by marine bacteria in the Pacific Northwest coastal ocean as determined by stable isotope probing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne DeLorenzo

    Full Text Available In order to identify bacteria that assimilate dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC in the northeast Pacific Ocean, stable isotope probing (SIP experiments were conducted on water collected from 3 different sites off the Oregon and Washington coasts in May 2010, and one site off the Oregon Coast in September 2008 and March 2009. Samples were incubated in the dark with 2 mM (13C-NaHCO(3, doubling the average concentration of DIC typically found in the ocean. Our results revealed a surprising diversity of marine bacteria actively assimilating DIC in the dark within the Pacific Northwest coastal waters, indicating that DIC fixation is relevant for the metabolism of different marine bacterial lineages, including putatively heterotrophic taxa. Furthermore, dark DIC-assimilating assemblages were widespread among diverse bacterial classes. Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes dominated the active DIC-assimilating communities across the samples. Actinobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria, Planctomycetes, and Verrucomicrobia were also implicated in DIC assimilation. Alteromonadales and Oceanospirillales contributed significantly to the DIC-assimilating Gammaproteobacteria within May 2010 clone libraries. 16S rRNA gene sequences related to the sulfur-oxidizing symbionts Arctic96BD-19 were observed in all active DIC assimilating clone libraries. Among the Alphaproteobacteria, clones related to the ubiquitous SAR11 clade were found actively assimilating DIC in all samples. Although not a dominant contributor to our active clone libraries, Betaproteobacteria, when identified, were predominantly comprised of Burkholderia. DIC-assimilating bacteria among Deltaproteobacteria included members of the SAR324 cluster. Our research suggests that DIC assimilation is ubiquitous among many bacterial groups in the coastal waters of the Pacific Northwest marine environment and may represent a significant metabolic process.

  7. RIVERINE INORGANIC CARBON DYNAMICS: OVERVIEW AND PERSPECTIVE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO Guan-rong; GAO Quan-zhou

    2006-01-01

    Inorganic carbon, the great part of the riverine carbon exported to the ocean, plays an important role in the global carbon cycle and ultimately impacts the coupled carbon-climate system. An overview was made on both methods and results of the riverine inorganic carbon researches. In addition to routine in situ survey, measurement and calculation,the direct precipitation method and the gas evolution technique were commonly used to analyze dissolved inorganic carbon in natural water samples. Soil CO2, carbonate minerals and atmospheric CO2 incorporated into riverine inorganic carbon pool via different means, with bicarbonate ion being the dominant component. The concentration of inorganic carbon, the composition of carbon isotopes (δ13C and △14C), and their temporal or spatial variations in the streams were controlled by carbon input, output and changes of carbon biogeochemistry within the riverine system. More accurate flux estimation, better understanding of different influential processes, and quantitative determination of various inputs or outputs need to be well researched in future.

  8. Evidence for the Mechanism Behind the Biasing of Organic Matter's Isotopic Carbon Signal during Pre-preparation Removal of Inorganic Carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casford, J. S.; Brodie, C.; Casford, M. T.

    2012-12-01

    We investigate the potential mechanisms behind the known and significant biasing of the organic matter carbon (and nitrogen) isotopic signal during the pre-preparation removal of inorganic carbonates. This effect was quantified by Brodie et al (2012 Chemical Geology) and shown to be both significant and non-linear. Using a combination of IR-spectroscopy, 13C NMR and GC-MS, we compare before and after treatment samples of 2 known standards (an total organic plant sample BROC and a soil standard -SOILB) and one 'real' sediment core sample (from a Lake in southern China - TYC). These were subjected to the most commonly used pre-preparation acidification, using differing concentrations of HCL, to provide a first look at the potential mechanisms behind this bias. Provisional results suggest at least 3 factors in play during the pre-preparation; 1. The loss of n-alkanes compounds because of the acidification. 2. A potential increase in the proportion of Carbonyl groups 3. And an increase in clay mineral hydration (in TYC and possibly in Soil B). We also note a potential change in particle size distribution after treatment that may also effect the hominization of the samples. This provide the first clear evidence for the nature of the widely observed but poorly understood biasing effect

  9. Stable oxyten and carbon isotope study of recent sediments and cements, Lee Stocking island, Bahamas: Organic vs. inorganic precipitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falls, W.F.; Williams, D.F.; Kendall, C.G.St.C.; Dill, R.F. (Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia (USA))

    1990-05-01

    Stable isotope analyses of modern carbonates from the tidal inlet along the north end of Lee Stocking Island indicate a strong correlation of both carbon and oxygen isotope values with grain size. Carbonate samples used in this study include the soft, recently formed outer surface of several large columnar stromatolites, bedded muds from within the tidal channel, and marine hardgrounds from the shallow shoals adjacent to the channel. All samples are predominantly aragonite and were divided into mud-, silt-, and sand-size particles and bleached of organics prior to isotopic analysis. The range in isotopic values for all carbonate samples is 3.3 to 4.6 {per thousand} for {delta}{sup 13}C and {minus}0.3 to {minus}1.4{per thousand} for {delta}{sup 18}O. The {delta}{sup 18}O and {delta}{sup 13}C values of the mud-size aragonite from all of these samples are depleted relative to the silt- and sand-size ooids and peloids and have isotope values lighter than 1.4{per thousand} for {delta}{sup 13}C and 0.8{per thousand} for {delta}{sup 18}O. The {delta}{sup 13}C values for green calcerous algae from the restricted platform behind Lee Stocking are similar to values for the stromatolite mud. {delta}{sup 13}C values for the hardground and channel-based muds are intermediate between the {delta}{sup 13}C values for the calcareous algae, and coarse-grained sediment. These data suggest that the green calcareous algae which fluorish in the restricted platform, are a significant source of aragonite mud in and around the channel but are not the only source.

  10. Using isotopes of dissolved inorganic carbon species and water to separate sources of recharge in a cave spring, northwestern Arkansas, USA Blowing Spring Cave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knierim, Katherine Joy; Pollock, Erik; Hays, Phillip D.

    2013-01-01

    Blowing Spring Cave in northwestern Arkansas is representative of cave systems in the karst of the Ozark Plateaus, and stable isotopes of water (δ18O and δ2H) and inorganic carbon (δ13C) were used to quantify soil-water, bedrock-matrix water, and precipitation contributions to cave-spring flow during storm events to understand controls on cave water quality. Water samples from recharge-zone soils and the cave were collected from March to May 2012 to implement a multicomponent hydrograph separation approach using δ18O and δ2H of water and dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13C–DIC). During baseflow, median δ2H and δ18O compositions were –41.6‰ and –6.2‰ for soil water and were –37.2‰ and –5.9‰ for cave water, respectively. Median DIC concentrations for soil and cave waters were 1.8 mg/L and 25.0 mg/L, respectively, and median δ13C–DIC compositions were –19.9‰ and –14.3‰, respectively. During a March storm event, 12.2 cm of precipitation fell over 82 h and discharge increased from 0.01 to 0.59 m3/s. The isotopic composition of precipitation varied throughout the storm event because of rainout, a change of 50‰ and 10‰ for δ2H and δ18O was observed, respectively. Although, at the spring, δ2H and δ18O only changed by approximately 3‰ and 1‰, respectively. The isotopic compositions of precipitation and pre-event (i.e., soil and bedrock matrix) water were isotopically similar and the two-component hydrograph separation was inaccurate, either overestimating (>100%) or underestimating (<0%) the precipitation contribution to the spring. During the storm event, spring DIC and δ13C–DIC decreased to a minimum of 8.6 mg/L and –16.2‰, respectively. If the contribution from precipitation was assumed to be zero, soil water was found to contribute between 23 to 72% of the total volume of discharge. Although the assumption of negligible contributions from precipitation is unrealistic, especially in karst systems where rapid flow

  11. Evolution of chemical and isotopic composition of inorganic carbon in a complex semi-arid zone environment: Consequences for groundwater dating using radiocarbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, K. T.; Han, L. F.; Hollins, S. E.; Cendón, D. I.; Jacobsen, G. E.; Baker, A.

    2016-09-01

    Estimating groundwater age is important for any groundwater resource assessment and radiocarbon (14C) dating of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) can provide this information. In semi-arid zone (i.e. water-limited environments), there are a multitude of reasons why 14C dating of groundwater and traditional correction models may not be directly transferable. Some include; (1) the complex hydrological responses of these systems that lead to a mixture of different ages in the aquifer(s), (2) the varied sources, origins and ages of organic matter in the unsaturated zone and (3) high evaporation rates. These all influence the evolution of DIC and are not easily accounted for in traditional correction models. In this study, we determined carbon isotope data for; DIC in water, carbonate minerals in the sediments, sediment organic matter, soil gas CO2 from the unsaturated zone, and vegetation samples. The samples were collected after an extended drought, and again after a flood event, to capture the evolution of DIC after varying hydrological regimes. A graphical method (Han et al., 2012) was applied for interpretation of the carbon geochemical and isotopic data. Simple forward mass-balance modelling was carried out on key geochemical processes involving carbon and agreed well with observed data. High values of DIC and δ13CDIC, and low 14CDIC could not be explained by a simple carbonate mineral-CO2 gas dissolution process. Instead it is suggested that during extended drought, water-sediment interaction leads to ion exchange processes within the top ∼10-20 m of the aquifer which promotes greater calcite dissolution in saline groundwater. This process was found to contribute more than half of the DIC, which is from a mostly 'dead' carbon source. DIC is also influenced by carbon exchange between DIC in water and carbonate minerals found in the top 2 m of the unsaturated zone. This process occurs because of repeated dissolution/precipitation of carbonate that is dependent on

  12. Biogeochemical controls on Diel cycling of stable isotopes of dissolved O2 and dissolved inorganic carbon in the Big Hole River, Montana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Stephen R; Poulson, Simon R; Gammons, Christopher H; DeGrandpre, Michael D

    2005-09-15

    Rivers with high biological productivity typically show substantial increases in pH and dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration during the day and decreases at night, in response to changes in the relative rates of aquatic photosynthesis and respiration. These changes, coupled with temperature variations, may impart diel (24-h) fluctuations in the concentration of trace metals, nutrients, and other chemical species. A better understanding of diel processes in rivers is needed and will lead to improved methods of data collection for both monitoring and research purposes. Previous studies have used stable isotopes of dissolved oxygen (DO) and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) as tracers of geochemical and biological processes in streams, lakes, and marine systems. Although seasonal variation in 6180 of DO in rivers and lakes has been documented, no study has investigated diel changes in this parameter. Here, we demonstrate large (up to 13%o) cycles in delta18O-DO for two late summer sampling periods in the Big Hole River of southwest Montana and illustrate that these changes are correlated to variations in the DO concentration, the C-isotopic composition of DIC, and the primary productivity of the system. The magnitude of the diel cycle in delta18O-DO was greater in August versus September because of the longer photoperiod and warmer water temperatures. This study provides another biogeochemical tool for investigating the O2 and C budgets in rivers and may also be applicable to lake and groundwater systems.

  13. An Ultrahigh Precision, High-Frequency Dissolved Inorganic Carbon Analyzer Based on Dual Isotope Dilution and Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kuan; Cassar, Nicolas; Jonsson, Bror; Cai, Wei-jun; Bender, Michael L

    2015-07-21

    We present a novel method for continuous and automated shipboard measurements of dissolved inorganic carbon concentration ([DIC]) in surface water. The method is based on dual isotope dilution and cavity ring-down spectroscopy (DID-CRDS). In this method, seawater is continuously sampled and mixed with a flow of NaH(13)CO3 solution that is also enriched in deuterated water (the spike). The isotopic composition of CO2 (δ(13)C(spiked_sample)) derived from the DIC in the mixture, and the D/H ratio of the mixed water (δD(spiked_sample)), are measured by CRDS analyzers. The D/H of the water in the mixture allows accurate estimates of the mixing ratio of the sample and the spike. [DIC] of the sample is then calculated from the mixing ratio, [DI(13)C] of the spike, and δ(13)C(spiked_sample). In the laboratory, the precision of the method is test was conducted in the Delaware Bay and Estuary. For 2 min average [DIC], a precision of <0.03% was achieved. Measurements from the DID-CRDS showed good agreement with independent measurements of discrete samples using the well-established coulometric method (mean difference = -1.14 ± 1.68 μmol kg(-1)), and the nondispersive infrared(NDIR)-based methods (mean difference = -0.9 ± 4.73 μmol kg(-1)).

  14. Diel variations in stream chemistry and isotopic composition of dissolved inorganic carbon, upper Clark Fork River, Montana, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Stephen R.; Gammons, Christopher H.; Poulson, Simon R.; DeGrandpre, Michael D.

    2007-01-01

    Many rivers undergo diel (24-h) concentration fluctuations of pH, dissolved gases, trace metals, nutrients, and other chemical species. A study conducted in 1994 documented such behavior in the upper Clark Fork River, Montana, a stream whose headwaters have been severely impacted by historic metal mining, milling, and smelting. The purpose of the present investigation was to expand on these earlier findings by conducting simultaneous diel samplings at two sites on the upper Clark Fork River separated by 2.5 h of stream travel time. By monitoring two stations, it was possible to more closely examine the processes that control temporal and spatial gradients in stream chemistry. Another objective was to examine diel changes in the δ13C composition of dissolved inorganic C (DIC) and their relationship to biological activity in the stream. The most important findings of this study include: (1) concentrations of dissolved and particulate heavy metals increased during the night and decreased during the day, in agreement with previous work; (2) these changes were positively correlated to diel changes in pH, dissolved O2, and water temperature; (3) dissolved concentrations increased during the night at the lower site, but showed the opposite behavior at the upper site; and (4) diel changes in δ13C-DIC were noted at both sites, although the timing and magnitudes of the cycles differed. Hypotheses to explain the first two observations include: cyclic co-precipitation of divalent metals with carbonate minerals; pH- and temperature-dependent sorption of metal cations onto the streambed and suspended particles; or photosynthetically enhanced oxidation and removal of Fe and Mn oxides at biofilm surfaces during the daytime. The latter model explains the majority of the field observations, including night-time increases in particulate forms of Fe and other elements.

  15. Hydrology of the Poverty Bay flats aquifers, New Zealand: recharge mechanisms, evolution of the isotopic composition of dissolved inorganic carbon, and ground-water ages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, C. B.

    1994-06-01

    With the exception of water-bearing remnants of earlier fluvial gravels overlying basement, the sediments of the Poverty Bay flats have accumulated during the postglacial period of the past 14 000 years, and have been tilted and deformed by recent tectonism. A sequence of gravel aquifers, separated by poorly permeable silt layers, lies between surface and basement, which is at depths varying between 50 and 200 m. A shallow sand/silt aquifer is situated near the coast. This study applies evidence of chemical and isotopic properties of river and ground water to clarify the recharge mechanisms, chemical evolution and age of the ground water in the aquifers. Particular attention is paid to the evolution of dissolved inorganic carbon content, applying carbon-14 data measured by accelerator mass spectrometry. Most of the ground water is recharged from the Waipaoa River, which flows across the flats and discharges into Poverty Bay. The two deepest aquifers (Matokitoki and Makauri) are both tritium-free; the deeper Matokitoki Gravels yield water of age about 4300 years since recharge (possibly up to 1300 years greater), but the Makauri water is no older than 100-200 years, discharging slowly through overlying aquitards near the limit of closest approach to the present coast.

  16. Use of dissolved inorganic carbon isotopes to track photosynthesis, respiration, and nitrification along a 56 mile transect in the Sacramento River and San Francisco Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, S. R.; Kendall, C.; Peek, S.; Young, M. B.

    2013-12-01

    A decline in phytoplankton stocks in the San Francisco Bay and Delta is thought to contribute to the pelagic organism decline observed over the past two decades. One factor controlling phytoplankton growth rate is the availability of nutrients. Although there is an excess of nutrients in the Bay and Delta, the type and relative abundance of nutrients is critical to phytoplankton growth. To evaluate the response of phytoplankton to nutrient sources and to better understand phytoplankton dynamics downstream, we tested the hypothesis that the δ13C values of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) along with conventional water chemistry analyses will record events such as increased nitrification (related to the Sacramento River Wastewater Treatment Plant ammonium input) and algal blooms, and reflect the balance between photosynthesis and bacterial respiration. Multiple parameters affect [DIC] and its δ13C, including DIC sources, pH, and biological processes. Consumption of CO2 by phytoplankton during photosynthesis and by autotrophic bacteria during nitrification both result in increases in δ13C-DIC. However, photosynthesis and nitrification have very different relationships to chlorophyll and nutrient concentrations. The balance between heterotrophic bacterial respiration and photosynthesis should be reflected in trends in DIC, nutrient, and chlorophyll concentration, and δ13C-DIC. The δ13C of DIC should also be reflected in the δ13C of phytoplankton with approximately a 20 per mil fractionation. Significant deviation in the fractionation factor may indicate local variations in growth rate, nutrient availability, or speciation. Combined, these parameters should provide a gauge of the relative importance of the above mentioned processes. To test this hypothesis, we collected 19 water samples per cruise between July 2012 and July 2013 along a 56 mile transect between Rio Vista on the Sacramento River and San Francisco Bay near Angel Island during 8 cruises on the USGS RV

  17. Carbon isotope geochemistry and geobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmarais, D.

    1985-01-01

    Carbon isotope fractionation values were used to understand the history of the biosphere. For example, plankton analyses confirmed that marine extinctions at the end of the Cretaceous period were indeed severe (see Hsu's article in Sundquist and Broeker, 1984). Variations in the isotopic compositions of carbonates and evaporitic sulfates during the Paleozoic reflect the relative abundances of euxinic (anoxic) marine environments and organic deposits from terrestrial flora. The carbon isotopic composition of Precambrian sediments suggest that the enzyme ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase has existed for perhaps 3.5 billion years.

  18. Deciphering Carbon Isotope Excursions in Separated Biogenic and Diagenetic Carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermoso, M.; Minoletti, F.; Hesselbo, S.; Jenkyns, H.; Rickaby, R.; Diester-Haass, L.; Delsate, D.

    2008-12-01

    shift in the bulk carbonate record. Contrasts in the amplitude of the carbon-isotope excursion at the single-species level compared to inorganic calcite and organic subtrate, should improve our understanding of the evolution of the water column composition through these major C-cycling perturbation events, and how marine calcifiers have fedback during such events, and eventually contribute for better understanding ocean-climate dynamics through time and into the future. Minoletti, F., Hermoso, M. and Gressier, V. (accepted). Separation of sedimentary micron-sized particles for palaeoceanography and calcareous nannoplankton biogeochemistry. Nature protocols.

  19. 西江河口段溶解无机碳稳定同位素组成的时空变化%Stable isotopic composition of riverine dissolved inorganic carbon of the Xijiang River Inner Estuary

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    焦树林; 陶贞; 高全洲; 刘昆; 佘建伟; 丁健; 刘祖发

    2008-01-01

    For researching the spatio-temporal variation of the stable isotopic composition of the riverine dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), we had carried out a survey throughout the hydrologic year during which the δ13CCIC of the surface water and its physicochemical pa- rameter were examined along the Xijiang River Inner Estuarine waterway from September 2006 to June 2007. There was a striking seasonal variation on the average δ13CDIC, as the average δ13CDIC in summer (-13.91‰) or autumn (-13.09‰) was much less than those in spring (-11.71‰) or winter (-12.26‰). The riverine δ13CDIC was controlled by decomposed condition of the riverine organic matter linking the seasonal variation of the physicochemical parameter in the surface water according to the correlation analysis which indicated notable relations between δ13CDIC and water temperature (p = 0.000; r = -0.569) or between (δ13CDIC and oxide-reduction potential (p = 0.000; r = 0.646). The striking positive correlation between δ13CDIC and the sampling distance happened in the summer rainy season, while striking negative correlation happened in the spring dry season, indicating that river-sea interaction influenced water physicochemical parameters and controlled the riverine DIC property in the survey waterway. In view of the riverine δ13CDIC decreasing for the decomposition of the ter- restrial organic matter in the rainy season in summer and increasing for the briny invaded zone extending in the spring dry season along the waterway from the Makou gauging station to the Modaomen outlet, the δ13CDIC spatio-temporal variation was closely related to the geo- graphical environment of the Xijiang drainage basin.

  20. The separation of stable isotopes of carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oziashvili, E. D.; Egiazarov, A. S.

    1989-04-01

    The present state of work on the separation of carbon isotopes by diffusion, fractional distillation, chemical isotopic exchange, and the selective excitation and dissociation of molecules in electrical discharges or in the field of laser radiation has been examined. The characteristics of new laboratory and industrial assemblies for separating carbon isotopes have been described. Promising directions of study aimed at developing effective technological processes for separating carbon isotopes have been noted. The bibliography contains 148 references.

  1. Disequilibrium δ18O values in microbial carbonates as a tracer of metabolic production of dissolved inorganic carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaler, Caroline; Millo, Christian; Ader, Magali; Chaduteau, Carine; Guyot, François; Ménez, Bénédicte

    2017-02-01

    Carbon and oxygen stable isotope compositions of carbonates are widely used to retrieve paleoenvironmental information. However, bias may exist in such reconstructions as carbonate precipitation is often associated with biological activity. Several skeleton-forming eukaryotes have been shown to precipitate carbonates with significant offsets from isotopic equilibrium with water. Although poorly understood, the origin of these biologically-induced isotopic shifts in biogenic carbonates, commonly referred to as ;vital effects;, could be related to metabolic effects that may not be restricted to mineralizing eukaryotes. The aim of our study was to determine whether microbially-mediated carbonate precipitation can also produce offsets from equilibrium for oxygen isotopes. We present here δ18O values of calcium carbonates formed by the activity of Sporosarcina pasteurii, a carbonatogenic bacterium whose ureolytic activity produces ammonia (thus increasing pH) and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) that precipitates as solid carbonates in the presence of Ca2+. We show that the 1000 lnαCaCO3-H2O values for these bacterially-precipitated carbonates are up to 24.7‰ smaller than those expected for precipitation at isotopic equilibrium. A similar experiment run in the presence of carbonic anhydrase (an enzyme able to accelerate oxygen isotope equilibration between DIC and water) resulted in δ18O values of microbial carbonates in line with values expected at isotopic equilibrium with water. These results demonstrate for the first time that bacteria can induce calcium carbonate precipitation in strong oxygen isotope disequilibrium with water, similarly to what is observed for eukaryotes. This disequilibrium effect can be unambiguously ascribed to oxygen isotope disequilibrium between DIC and water inherited from the oxygen isotope composition of the ureolytically produced CO2, probably combined with a kinetic isotope effect during CO2 hydration/hydroxylation. The fact that

  2. Human health hazards of persistent inorganic and carbon nanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijnders, L.

    2012-01-01

    Persistent inorganic and carbon nanoparticles are increasingly engineered for applications and may also be present in conventional materials such as carbon black. Furthermore, they may originate from conventional non particulate materials by processes such as wear and tear. Persistent inorganic and

  3. Carbon dioxide removal with inorganic membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judkins, R.R.; Fain, D.E. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)

    1993-12-31

    The increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases, particularly carbon dioxide, in the atmosphere has sparked a great deal of interest in the removal of CO{sub 2} from flue gases of fossil fueled plants. Presently, several techniques for the removal of CO{sub 2} are considered to have potential, but are lacking in practicality. For example, amine scrubbing of flue gas streams is potential, but are lacking in practically. For example, amine scrubbing of flue gas streams is effective in removing CO{sub 2}, but costs are high; efficiency suffers; and other acid gases must be removed prior to amine stripping. Membrane systems for CO{sub 2} removal are held in high regard, and inorganic, particularly ceramic, membranes offer the potential for high temperature, thus energy saving, removal.

  4. Carbon isotope excursions across the Permian-Triassic boundary in the Meishan section, Zhejiang Province, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Both gradual and sharp decrease in organic and carbonate carbon isotope values were detected across the Permian-Triassic boundary in the Meishan section, Changxing, Zhejiang Province, China. The gradual decrease in organic carbon isotope values started at the bottom of Bed 23, coinciding with the strong oscillations of total organic carbon (TOC) contents, indicates increasing fluxes from carbonate to organic carbon reservoir during this interval. A 2.3‰ sharp drop of inorganic carbon isotope values occurred at the uppermost part of Bed 24e. A 3.7‰ sharp drop of organic carbon isotope values occurred in Bed 26. The dramatic drop of inorganic carbon isotope value of 8‰ reported previously is not confirmed from the unweathered carbonate samples in Bed 27. The large-scale fluctuation of organic carbon isotope values in the Yinkeng Formation reflects different extent of mixing of marine and terrestrial organic matters. The gradual depletion and subsequent sharp drop of carbon isotopes near the Permian-Triassic boundary might indicate complex causes of the end-Permian mass extinction.

  5. Understanding the Carbon Isotopic Signature in Complex Environmental Matrices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Natali

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Elemental and isotopic analyses of carbon in environmental matrices usually integrate multiple sources having distinct concentration (wt% and 13C/12C isotopic ratio. Interpretation necessarily needs the characterization of the diverse end-members that usually are constituted by carbonate, organic and elemental components. In this view, we developed a routine protocol based on the analytical coupling of elementary and isotopic compositions that is able to discriminate the inorganic (TIC and organic (TOC contributions to the total carbon (TC content. The procedure is only based on thermal destabilization of the different carbon species and has been successfully applied on different environmental matrices (rocks, soils, biological samples with a mean C elemental and isotopic recovery of 99% (SD = 3% and -0.3‰ (SD = 0.3‰, respectively. The thermal speciation lead us to define precise isotopic end-members whose are unaffected by any chemical treatment of the samples. The approach allows accurate mass balance calculation that represents a powerful tool to quantify the distinct carbon species.

  6. Modeling the carbon isotope composition of bivalve shells (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanek, C.

    2010-12-01

    The stable carbon isotope composition of bivalve shells is a valuable archive of paleobiological and paleoenvironmental information. Previous work has shown that the carbon isotope composition of the shell is related to the carbon isotope composition of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in the ambient water in which a bivalve lives, as well as metabolic carbon derived from bivalve respiration. The contribution of metabolic carbon varies among organisms, but it is generally thought to be relatively low (e.g., organism and high (>90%) in the shells from terrestrial organisms. Because metabolic carbon contains significantly more C-12 than DIC, negative excursions from the expected environmental (DIC) signal are interpreted to reflect an increased contribution of metabolic carbon in the shell. This observation contrasts sharply with modeled carbon isotope compositions for shell layers deposited from the inner extrapallial fluid (EPF). Previous studies have shown that growth lines within the inner shell layer of bivalves are produced during periods of anaerobiosis when acidic metabolic byproducts (e.g., succinic acid) are neutralized (or buffered) by shell dissolution. This requires the pH of EPF to decrease below ambient levels (~7.5) until a state of undersaturation is achieved that promotes shell dissolution. This condition may occur when aquatic bivalves are subjected to external stressors originating from ecological (predation) or environmental (exposure to atm; low dissolved oxygen; contaminant release) pressures; normal physiological processes will restore the pH of EPF when the pressure is removed. As a consequence of this process, a temporal window should also exist in EPF at relatively low pH where shell carbonate is deposited at a reduced saturation state and precipitation rate. For example, EPF chemistry should remain slightly supersaturated with respect to aragonite given a drop of one pH unit (6.5), but under closed conditions, equilibrium carbon isotope

  7. Gravimetric Determination of Inorganic Carbon in Calcareous Soils Using the Carbonate-Meter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organic carbon affects many important physical, chemical and microbiological soil properties. In calcareous soils, the inorganic carbon has to be measured and subtracted from the total carbon to obtain organic carbon. Our objective was to develop a gravimetric technique to quantify inorganic carbon ...

  8. Chromium isotope uptake in carbonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodler, Alexandra

    composition of contemporaneous seawater. Marine carbonates are ubiquitous throughout Earth’s rock record rendering them a particularly interesting archive for constraining past changes in ocean chemistry. This thesis includes an investigation of the fractionation behavior of Cr isotopesduring coprecipitation......Chromium (Cr) is a redox sensitive element potentially capable of tracing fine-scale fluctuations of the oxygenation of Earth’s early surface environments and seawater. The Cr isotope composition of carbonates could perhaps be used as paleo-redox proxy to elucidate changes in the geological past...... related to the rise of oxygen and the evolution of the biosphere. However, before the Cr isotopesystem can be applied to faithfully delineate paleo-environmental changes, careful assessment of the signal robustness and a thorough understanding of the Cr cycle in Earth system processes is necessary...

  9. Chromium isotope uptake in carbonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodler, Alexandra

    composition of contemporaneous seawater. Marine carbonates are ubiquitous throughout Earth’s rock record rendering them a particularly interesting archive for constraining past changes in ocean chemistry. This thesis includes an investigation of the fractionation behavior of Cr isotopesduring coprecipitation......Chromium (Cr) is a redox sensitive element potentially capable of tracing fine-scale fluctuations of the oxygenation of Earth’s early surface environments and seawater. The Cr isotope composition of carbonates could perhaps be used as paleo-redox proxy to elucidate changes in the geological past...... related to the rise of oxygen and the evolution of the biosphere. However, before the Cr isotopesystem can be applied to faithfully delineate paleo-environmental changes, careful assessment of the signal robustness and a thorough understanding of the Cr cycle in Earth system processes is necessary...

  10. Robust optical carbon dioxide isotope analyzer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Isotopic analysis of carbon dioxide is an important tool for characterization of the exchange and transformation of carbon between the biosphere and the atmosphere....

  11. STABLE CARBON ISOTOPES OF HCO//3 IN THE AQUIA AQUIFER, MARYLAND: EVIDENCE FOR AN ISOTOPICALLY HEAVY SOURCE OF CO//2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapelle, Francis H.; Knobel, LeRoy L.

    1985-01-01

    Identifying sources and sinks of dissolved inorganic carbon species is an important step in understanding the geochemistry of ground-water systems. This is particularly important for Atlantic Coastal Plain aquifers because bicarbonate (HCO//3** minus ) is frequently the major dissolved anion. The purpose of this paper is to document the stable carbon isotope composition of dissolved inorganic carbon in the Aquia aquifer, Maryland, and to use this data to help identify sources and sinks of dissolved HCO//3** minus . Subjects covered include hydrogeology, ground-water chemistry, sources and sinks, and others. Refs.

  12. Incorporation of inorganic carbon by Antarctic cryptoendolithic fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, R. J. Jr; Friedmann, E. I.

    1988-01-01

    Fungi isolated from the cryptoendolithic community of the Ross Desert are capable of fixing inorganic carbon. Results suggest that lichen mycobionts and parasymbionts are adapted to different water regimes in the cryptoendolithic environment.

  13. Carbon Isotope Fractionation In Biotic Vs. Abiotic Anaerobic Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebrehiwet, T. A.

    2005-12-01

    Dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria (DMRB) are thought to play an important role in the biogeochemical cycling of Fe, and nutrient elements such as C and P, in the anaerobic subsurface. The consumption of organic carbon sources (including contaminants) by these bacteria can significantly fractionate substrate C isotopes, however the effects of solution composition, electron acceptor, or electron donor on C isotopic fractionation by DMRB is at present poorly quantified. We have conducted experiments to compare the effects of bicarbonate (δ13C = -3‰) and phosphate buffers on carbon isotope fractionation by Shewanella putrefaciens strain 200R. The effects of dissolved carbonate and phosphate on δ13C values of dissolved inorganic C evolved during microbial reduction of ferric citrate (δ 13Cinitial = -25‰) were examined using sodium lactate (δ13Cinitial = -25‰) as electron donor under strict anaerobic conditions at neutral pH and 30°C, under dark and (fluorescent) light conditions. Our results suggest that bicarbonate may enhance the rate of Fe(III) reduction by S. putrefaciens, in comparison with media containing phosphate buffer but no added bicarbonate. Compared with phosphate buffered experiments, the presence of dissolved bicarbonate also resulted in a greater degree of C isotopic fractionation (ɛ=2-3‰ and ɛ=5-7‰, respectively). The effect of light on microbial Fe(III) reduction was negligible, however sterile controls showed a minor but significant quantity of carbon dioxide production in liquid media, most likely from photochemical decomposition of citrate. The abiotic experiments also showed measurable carbon isotope fractionation between the carbon dioxide produced and the organic carbon substrate which will be discussed.

  14. Application of stable carbon isotopes in long term mesocosm studies for carbon cycle investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Mario

    2016-04-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is an effective greenhouse gas. The Oceans absorb ca. 30% of the anthropogenic CO2 emissions and thereby partly attenuate deleterious climate effects. A consequence of the oceanic CO2 uptake is a decreased seawater pH and planktonic community shifts. The quantification of the anthropogenic perturbation was investigated through stable carbon isotope analysis in three "long term" mesocosm experiments (Sweden 2013, Gran Canaria 2014, Norway 2015) which reproduced near natural ecosystem conditions under both controlled and modified future CO2 level (up to 2000 ppm) scenarios. Parallel measurements of the stable isotope composition of dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13CDIC) dissolved organic carbon (δ13CDOC) and particulate carbon (δ13CTPC) both from the mesocosms water column and sediment traps showed similar trends in all the three experiments. A CO2 response was noticeable in the isotopic dataset, but increased CO2 levels had only a subtle effect on the concentrations of the dissolved and particulate organic carbon pool. Distinctive δ13C signatures of the particulate carbon pool both in the water column and the sediments were detectable for the different CO2 treatments and they were strongly correlated with the δ13CDIC signatures but not with the δ13CDOC pool. The validity of the isotopic data was verified by cross-analyses of multiple substances of known isotopic signatures on a GasBench, Elemental Analyser (EA) and on an in-house TOC-IRMS setup for the analysis of δ13CDIC, δ13CTPC and δ13CDOC, respectively. Results from these mesocosm experiments proved the stable carbon isotope approach to be an effective tool for quantifying the uptake and carbon transfer among the various compartments of the marine carbon system.

  15. Carbon isotopic fractionation in heterotrophic microbial metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, N.; Leu, A.; Munoz, E.; Olsen, J.; Kwong, E.; Des Marais, D.

    1985-01-01

    Differences in the natural-abundance carbon stable isotopic compositions between products from aerobic cultures of Escherichia coli K-12 were measured. Respired CO2 was 3.4 percent depleted in C-13 relative to the glucose used as the carbon source, whereas the acetate was 12.3 percent enriched in C-13. The acetate C-13 enrichment was solely in the carboxyl group. Even though the total cellular carbon was only 0.6 percent depleted in C-13, intracellular components exhibited a significant isotopic heterogeneity. The protein and lipid fractions were -1.1 and -2.7 percent, respectively. Aspartic and glutamic acids were -1.6 and +2.7 percent, respectively, yet citrate was isotopically identical to the glucose. Probable sites of carbon isotopic fractionation include the enzyme, phosphotransacetylase, and the Krebs cycle.

  16. Isotope engineering of carbon nanotube systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, F; Kramberger, Ch; Pfeiffer, R; Kuzmany, H; Zólyomi, V; Kürti, J; Singer, P M; Alloul, H

    2005-07-01

    The synthesis of a unique isotope engineered system, double-wall carbon nanotubes with natural carbon outer and highly 13C enriched inner walls, is reported from isotope enriched fullerenes encapsulated in single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). The material allows the observation of the D line of the highly defect-free inner tubes that can be related to a curvature induced enhancement of the electron-phonon coupling. Ab initio calculations explain the inhomogeneous broadening of inner tube Raman modes due to the distribution of different isotopes. Nuclear magnetic resonance shows a significant contrast of the isotope enriched inner SWCNTs compared to other carbon phases and provides a macroscopic measure of the inner tube mass content. The high curvature of the small diameter inner tubes manifests in an increased distribution of the chemical shift tensor components.

  17. Developing inorganic carbon-based radiocarbon chronologies for Holocene lake sediments in arid NW China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiawu; Ma, Xueyang; Qiang, Mingrui; Huang, Xiaozhong; Li, Shuang; Guo, Xiaoyan; Henderson, Andrew C. G.; Holmes, Jonathan A.; Chen, Fahu

    2016-07-01

    Inorganic carbonates are often used to establish radiocarbon (14C) chronologies for lake sediments when terrestrial plant remains (TPR) are rare or when bulk organic matter is insufficient for dating, a problem that is common for many lakes in arid regions. However, the reservoir effect (RE), as well as old carbon contributed from the lakes catchment make it difficult to establish reliable chronologies. Here we present a systematic study of inorganic 14C ages of two lake-sediment sequences, one from a small-enclosed saline lake - Lake Gahai in Qaidam Basin, and the other from a large freshwater lake - Lake Bosten in Xinjiang. Modern dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) of the lakes, paleo-lake sediments exposed in the catchment, and mollusk shells in core sediments from Lake Gahai were dated to assess the RE and the contribution of pre-aged carbon to the old ages in the cores. We propose a statistical regression to assess more than one RE for the 14C carbonate ages within our sedimentary sequences. Old radiocarbon ages contributed by detrital carbonates were assessed by comparing the ages of mollusk shells with those of carbonates at the same sediment depths. We established the RE of the authigenic component and assessed detrital old carbon contributions to our two sites, and this was used to correct the 14C ages. Based on this approach, we developed age models for both cores, and tested them using 210Pb ages in both cores and TPR-based 14C-ages recovered from Lake Bosten. We further tested our age models by comparing carbonate-based oxygen isotope (δ18O) records from both lakes to an independently-dated regional speleothem δ18O record. Our results suggest if sedimentary sequences are densely dated and the RE and the contribution of old carbon from detrital carbonates can be ascertained, robust chronological frameworks based on carbonate-based 14C determinations can be established.

  18. Isotopic fractionation during the uptake and elimination of inorganic mercury by a marine fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoyu; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2015-11-01

    This study investigated the mass dependent (MDF) and independent fractionation (MIF) of stable mercury isotopes in fish during the uptake and elimination of inorganic species. Mercury accumulation during the exposure led to re-equilibration of organ isotopic compositions with the external sources, and elimination terminated the equilibrating with isotope ratios moving back to the original values. Generally, the isotopic behaviors corresponded to the changes of Hg accumulation in the muscle and liver, causing by the internal transportation, organ redistribution, and mixing of different sources. A small degree of MDF caused by biotransformation of Hg in the liver was documented during the elimination, whereas MIF was not observed. The absence of MIF during geochemical and metabolic processes suggested that mercury isotopes can be used as source tracers. Additionally, fish liver is a more responsive organ than muscle to track Hg source when it is mainly composed of inorganic species.

  19. Contrasting modes of inorganic carbon acquisition amongst Symbiodinium (Dinophyceae) phylotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brading, Patrick; Warner, Mark E; Smith, David J; Suggett, David J

    2013-10-01

    Growing concerns over ocean acidification have highlighted the need to critically understand inorganic carbon acquisition and utilization in marine microalgae. Here, we contrast these characteristics for the first time between two genetically distinct dinoflagellate species of the genus Symbiodinium (phylotypes A13 and A20) that live in symbiosis with reef-forming corals. Both phylotypes were grown in continuous cultures under identical environmental conditions. Rubisco was measured using quantitative Western blots, and radioisotopic (14) C uptake was used to characterize light- and total carbon dioxide (TCO2 )-dependent carbon fixation, as well as inorganic carbon species preference and external carbonic anhydrase activity. A13 and A20 exhibited similar rates of carbon fixation despite cellular concentrations of Rubisco being approximately four-fold greater in A13. The uptake of CO2 over HCO3 - was found to support the majority of carbon fixation in both phylotypes. However, A20 was also able to indirectly utilize HCO3 - by first converting it to CO2 via external carbonic anhydrase. These results show that adaptive differences in inorganic carbon acquisition have evolved within the Symbiodinium genus, which thus carries fundamental implications as to how this functionally key genus will respond to ocean acidification, but could also represent a key trait factor that influences their productivity when in hospite of their coral hosts.

  20. Carbon isotope geochemistry in the Yalujiang estuary

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴莹; 张经

    2001-01-01

    The distribution of particulate organic carbon (POC) along the lower reaches is similar between the dry season and the flood season in the Yalujiang Estuary, North China. However, the values of particulate organic carbon of the upperstream in the dry season are one magnitude lower than the concentrations in the flood season. Stable carbon isotope ratios have been used to study the sources of particulate organic carbon in the Yalujiang Estuary. The isotopic composition of POC shows a range from -23.1‰ to -29.4‰ with a little seasonal variation. The isotopic evidence indicates that the POC in the Yalujiang Estuary is predominantly of terrestrial origin rather than a result of in situ plankton. The study of the ratio of POC: Chla shows that the turbidity maximum plays an important role in POC cycle in the Yalujiang Estuary. Organic detritus and soil erosion are the main contributions to POC in the turbidity maximum, especially in the flood season.

  1. Carbon isotope anomalies in carbonates of the Karelian series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iudovich, Ia. E.; Makarikhin, V. V.; Medvedev, P. V.; Sukhanov, N. V.

    1990-07-01

    Results are presented on carbon isotope distributions in carbonates of the Karelian complex. A highly anomalous isotopic composition was found in carbonate rocks aged from 2.6 to 1.9 b.y. In the stromatolitic carbonates of the Onega water table, delta-(C-13) reaches a value of +18 percent, while the shungite layer of the Zaonega horizon is characterized by a wide dispersion (from +7.9 to -11.8 percent). These data are in good agreement with the known geochemical boundary (about 2.2 b.y. ago) in the history of the earth.

  2. Bringing organic carbon isotopes and phytoliths to the table as additional constraints on paleoelevation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, N. D.; Cotton, J. M.; Hren, M. T.; Hyland, E. G.; Smith, S. Y.; Strömberg, C. A. E.

    2015-12-01

    A commonly used tool in paleotectonic and paleoaltimetry studies is the oxygen isotopic composition of authigenic carbonates formed that formed in lakes or soils, with both spatial (e.g., shoreline to mountain top) or temporally resolved records potentially providing constraints. However, in many cases there is a substantial spread in the oxygen isotope data for a given time period, often to the point of allowing for essentially any interpretation of the data depending upon how they have been used by the investigator. One potential way of distinguishing between different potential paleotectonic or paleoaltimetric interpretations is to use carbon isotope and plant microfossil (phytolith) analyses from the same paleosols to screen the oxygen isotope data by looking for evidence of evaporative enrichment. For example, if both inorganic (carbonate) and organic carbon isotopes are measured from the same paleosol, then in it possible to determine if the two isotope record equilibrium conditions or if they record disequilibrium driven by kinetic effects. In the former case, the oxygen isotope results can be considered reliable whereas in the latter case, the oxygen isotope results can be considered unreliable and could be culled from the interpretation. Similarly, because the distribution of C4 plants varies as a function of temperature and elevation, the presence/absence or abundance of C4 plant phytoliths, or of carbon isotope compositions that require a component of C4 vegetation can also be used to constrain paleoelevation by providing a maximum elevation constraint. Worked examples will include the late Miocene-Pliocene of Catamarca, Argentina, where phytoliths and organic carbon isotopes provide a maximum elevation constraint and can be used to demonstrate that oxygen isotopes do not provide a locally useful constraint on paleoelevation, and Eocene-Miocene of southwestern Montana where organic matter and phytoliths can be used to select between different potential

  3. Dynamic and transfert of carbon in Loire catchment using carbon isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coularis, Cindy; Fontugne, Michel; Tisnérat-Laborde, Nadine; Pastor, Lucie; Siclet, Françoise

    2014-05-01

    Rivers have a major role in carbon transfer between continent and ocean. The organic matter exported from land represents a major source of DOC and POC in oceans. The composition and reactivity of this matter will influence its behavior and fate within the coastal areas and continental shelf. It is thus important to characterize the exported matter and its temporal variability. Stable carbon isotope ratios (d13C) and 14C activity can provide unique information on carbon sources, turnover and exchange processes. We present here a study of the carbon cycle in the Loire River and its major tributaries by combining carbon isotopes measurements and classical biogeochemical parameters (DOC, POC, DIC, pH, Temperature, Alkalinity, pH, chlorophyll …). Three campaigns were performed in April, July and October 2013. The changes in 14C signature due to the controlled liquid release of five nuclear power plants are used to get additional information on the carbon dynamics within the river. First results show a conservative behavior of the organic carbon concentrations contrary to the inorganic carbon all along the Loire River. However, the reactivity of the organic matter varies with rivers catchments and seasons. An inventory of the distribution of the different carbon phases within the Loire River and its tributaries is presented.

  4. Exotic Structure of Carbon Isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, T; Hagino, K; Suzuki, Toshio; Sagawa, Hiroyuki; Hagino, Kouichi

    2002-01-01

    We studied firstly the ground state properties of C-isotopes using a deformed Hartree-Fock (HF)+ BCS model with Skyrme interactions. Shallow deformation minima are found in several neutron$-$rich C-isotopes. It is shown also that the deformation minima appear in both the oblate and the prolate sides in $^{17}$C and $^{19}$C having almost the same binding energies. Secondly, we carried out shell model calculations to study electromagnetic moments and electric dipole transitions of the C-isotopes. We point out the clear configuration dependence of the quadrupole and magnetic moments in the odd C-isotopes, which will be useful to find out the deformations and the spin-parities of the ground states of these nuclei. We studied electric dipole states of C-isotopes focusing on the interplay between low energy Pigmy strength and giant dipole resonances. Reasonable agreement is obtained with available experimental data for the photoreaction cross sections both in the low energy region below $\\hbar \\omega $=14 MeV and ...

  5. Decoupling of carbon isotope records between organic matter and carbonate prior to the Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event (Early Jurassic)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodin, Stephane; Kothe, Tim; Krencker, Francois-Nicolas; Suan, Guillaume; Heimhofer, Ulrich; Immenhauser, Adrian

    2014-05-01

    Across the Pliensbachian-Toarcian boundary (P-To, Early Jurassic), ca. 1 Myr before the Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event (T-OAE), an initial negative carbon isotope excursion has been documented in western Tethys sedimentary rocks. In carbonate, its amplitude (2-3 permil) is similar to the subsequent excursion recorded at the onset of the T-OAE. Being also associated with a rapid warming event, the significance of this first carbon isotope shift, in terms of paleoenvironmental interpretation and triggering mechanism, remains however elusive. Taking advantage of expanded and rather continuous sections in the High Atlas of Morocco, several high-resolution, paired organic-inorganic carbon isotope records have been obtained across the Upper Pliensbachian - Lower Toarcian interval. At the onset of the T-OAE, an abrupt 1-2 permil negative shift is recorded in both organic and inorganic phases, succeeded by a relatively longer term 1-2 permil negative trend and a final slow return to pre-excursion conditions. In accordance with previous interpretations, this pattern indicates a perturbation of the entire exogenic carbon isotope reservoir at the onset of the T-OAE by the sudden release of isotopically light carbon into the atmosphere. By contrast, there is no negative shift in carbon isotopes for the P-To event recorded in bulk organic matter of Morocco. Given the strong dominance of terrestrial particles in the bulk organic matter fraction, this absence indicates that massive input of 12C-rich carbon into the atmosphere is not likely to have happened during the P-To event. A pronounced (2 permil) and abrupt negative shift in carbon isotope is however recorded in the bulk carbonate phase. We suggest that this decoupling between organic and inorganic phase is due to changes in the nature of the bulk carbonate phase. Indeed, the negative shift occurs at the lithological transition between Pliensbachian-lowermost Toarcian limestone-marl alternations and the Lower Toarcian marl

  6. Carbon isotope fractionation by the marine ammonia-oxidizing archaeon Nitrosopumilus maritimus

    OpenAIRE

    Könneke, Martin; Lipp, Julius Sebastian; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) are abundant and widely distributed microorganisms in aquatic and terrestrial habitats. By catalyzing the first and rate limiting step in nitrification, these chemolithoautotrophs play a significant role in the global nitrogen cycle and contribute to primary production. Here, the carbon isotopic fractionation relative to inorganic carbon source was determined for bulk biomass, biphytanes and polar lipid bound sugars of a marine AOA pure culture. Bu...

  7. Compound specific isotopic fractionation patterns suggest different carbon metabolisms among Chloroflexus-like bacteria in hot spring microbial mats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Meer, M.T.J. van der; Schouten, S.; Leeuw, J.W. de; Ward, D.M.

    2003-01-01

    Stable carbon isotope fractionations between dissolved inorganic carbon and lipid biomarkers suggest photoautotrophy by Chloroflexus-like organisms in sulfidic and nonsulfidic Yellowstone hot springs. Where co-occurring, cyanobacteria appear to cross-feed Chloroflexus-like organisms supporting photo

  8. Soil Carbon: Compositional and Isotopic Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moran, James J.; Alexander, M. L.; Laskin, Alexander

    2016-11-01

    This is a short chapter to be included in the next edition of the Encyclopedia of Soil Science. The work here describes techniques being developed at PNNL for investigating organic carbon in soils. Techniques discussed include: laser ablation isotope ratio mass spectrometry, laser ablation aerosol mass spectrometry, and nanospray desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

  9. Carbon isotopes as indicators of peatland growth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alewell, Christine; Krüger, Jan Paul; von Sengbusch, Pascal; Szidat, Sönke; Leifeld, Jens

    2016-04-01

    As undisturbed and/or growing peatlands store considerable amounts of carbon and are unique in their biodiversity and species assemblage, the knowledge of the current status of peatlands (growing with carbon sequestration, stagnating or degrading with carbon emissions) is crucial for landscape management and nature conservation. However, monitoring of peatland status requires long term measurements and is only feasible with expert knowledge. The latter determination is increasingly impeded in a scientific world, where taxonomic expert knowledge and funding of long term monitoring is rare. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes depth profiles in peatland soils have been shown to be a useful tool to monitor the degradation of peatlands due to permafrost thawing in Northern Sweden (Alewell et al., 2011; Krüger et al., 2014), drainage in Southern Finland (Krüger et al., 2016) as well as land use intensification in Northern Germany (Krüger et al., 2015). Here, we tackle the questions if we are able to differentiate between growing and degrading peats with the use of a combination of carbon stable (δ13C) and radiogenic isotope data (14C) with peat stratification information (degree of humification and macroscopic plant remains). Results indicate that isotope data are a useful tool to approximate peatland status, but that expert taxonomic knowledge will be needed for the final conclusion on peatland growth. Thus, isotope tools might be used for landscape screening to pin point sites for detailed taxonomic monitoring. As the method remains qualitative future research at these sites will need to integrate quantitative approaches to determine carbon loss or gain (soil C balances by ash content or C accumulation methods by radiocarbon data; Krüger et al., 2016). Alewell, C., R. Giesler, J. Klaminder, J. Leifeld, and M. Rollog. 2011. Stable carbon isotopes as indicators for micro-geomorphic changes in palsa peats. Biogeosciences, 8, 1769-1778. Krüger, J. P., Leifeld, J

  10. Fractionation behavior of chromium isotopes during coprecipitation with calcium carbonate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodler, Alexandra; Sánchez-Pastor, Nuria; Fernández-Díaz, Lurdes;

    2015-01-01

    Interest in chromium (Cr) isotope incorporation into carbonates arises from the observation that Cr isotopic composition of carbonates could be used as a paleoclimate proxy to elucidate past fluctuations of oxygen contents in atmosphere and hydrosphere. The use of Cr isotopes to track paleoenviro......Interest in chromium (Cr) isotope incorporation into carbonates arises from the observation that Cr isotopic composition of carbonates could be used as a paleoclimate proxy to elucidate past fluctuations of oxygen contents in atmosphere and hydrosphere. The use of Cr isotopes to track...

  11. Carbon isotopes in biological carbonates: Respiration and photosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnaughey, Ted A.; Burdett, Jim; Whelan, Joseph F.; Paull, Charles K.

    1997-02-01

    Respired carbon dioxide is an important constituent in the carbonates of most air breathing animals but is much less important in the carbonates of most aquatic animals. This difference is illustrated using carbon isotope data from freshwater and terrestrial snails, ahermatypic corals, and chemoautotrophic and methanotrophic pelecypods. Literature data from fish otoliths and bird and mammal shell and bone carbonates are also considered. Environmental CO 2/O 2 ratios appear to be the major controlling variable. Atmospheric CO 2/O 2 ratios are about thirty times lower than in most natural waters, hence air breathing animals absorb less environmental CO 2 in the course of obtaining 0 2. Tissue CO 2 therefore, does not isotopically equilibrate with environmental CO 2 as thoroughly in air breathers as in aquatic animals, and this is reflected in skeletal carbonates. Animals having efficient oxygen transport systems, such as vertebrates, also accumulate more respired CO 2 in their tissues. Photosynthetic corals calcify mainly during the daytime when photosynthetic CO 2 uptake is several times faster than respiratory CO 2 release. Photosynthesis, therefore, affects skeletal δ13C more strongly than does respiration. Corals also illustrate how "metabolic" effects on skeletal isotopic composition can be estimated, despite the presence of much larger "kinetic" isotope effects.

  12. Tracing solid waste leachate in groundwater using δ13 C from dissolved inorganic carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haarstad, Ketil; Mæhlum, Trond

    2013-01-01

    Tracers can be used to monitor emissions of leachate from landfills in order to detect hydrological pathways and to evaluate environmental pollution. We investigated the stable carbon isotope ratio (δ(13)C-Σ CO (2)) in dissolved inorganic carbon and tritium ((3)H) in water, in addition to the tracers of pollution commonly found in relatively high concentrations in leachate, such as chloride (Cl), organic matter (COD), nitrogen (total and NH(4)-N), iron (Fe), electrical conductivity (EC) and pH. The sampling was performed at seven landfills in the south-eastern part of Norway during a period of 5 years. The objective was to evaluate the potential for tracing leachate in the environment with emphasis on groundwater pollution. By measuring the δ(13)C-Σ CO (2) in leachates, groundwaters and surface waters, the influence of leachate can be identified. The value of δ(13)C-Σ CO (2) varied from-5.5 to 25.9 ‰ in leachate, from-25.4 to 14.7 ‰ in groundwater and from-19.7 to-13.1 ‰ in creeks. A comparison of the carbon isotope ratio with COD, EC and the concentrations of total and NH (4)-N, Cl and Fe showed that δ(13)C-Σ CO (2) is a good tracer for leachate due to higher sensitivity compared to other parameters. The mean concentrations of all the studied parameters were higher in the leachate samples; however, only the carbon isotope ratio showed significant differences between all the groups with strong and middle pollution and samples with low pollution, showing that it can be used as a convenient tracer for leachate in groundwater and surface water. The carbon isotope ratio showed strong correlation between nitrogen, EC and bicarbonate, but not with pH. Tritium was only sporadically found in measureable concentrations and is not considered as a suitable tracer at the sampled locations.

  13. Role of inorganic carbon in lactic acid bacteria metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Arsène-Ploetze, Florence; Bringel, Françoise

    2004-01-01

    International audience; Capnophiles are bacteria stimulated by bicarbonate and CO$_2$, the two major forms of inorganic carbon (IC) in physiological neutral liquids. Capnophiles are often pathogenic heterotrophs found in IC-rich ecological niches such as human cavities. Like capnophiles, the growth of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) such as Lactobacillus plantarum and Enterococcus faecalis is stimulated by IC. CO$_2$ or HCO$^{-}_3$ are substrates in carbamoyl phosphate (CP) synthesis and other car...

  14. Carbon isotopic composition of individual Precambrian microfossils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, C H; Schopf, J W; McKeegan, K D; Coath, C D; Harrison, T M; Stetter, K O

    2000-08-01

    Ion microprobe measurements of carbon isotope ratios were made in 30 specimens representing six fossil genera of microorganisms petrified in stromatolitic chert from the approximately 850 Ma Bitter Springs Formation, Australia, and the approximately 2100 Ma Gunflint Formation, Canada. The delta 13C(PDB) values from individual microfossils of the Bitter Springs Formation ranged from -21.3 +/- 1.7% to -31.9 +/- 1.2% and the delta 13C(PDB) values from microfossils of the Gunflint Formation ranged from -32.4 +/- 0.7% to -45.4 +/- 1.2%. With the exception of two highly 13C-depleted Gunflint microfossils, the results generally yield values consistent with carbon fixation via either the Calvin cycle or the acetyl-CoA pathway. However, the isotopic results are not consistent with the degree of fractionation expected from either the 3-hydroxypropionate cycle or the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle, suggesting that the microfossils studied did not use either of these pathways for carbon fixation. The morphologies of the microfossils suggest an affinity to the cyanobacteria, and our carbon isotopic data are consistent with this assignment.

  15. Aerosol carbon isotope composition over Baltic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbaras, Andrius; Pabedinskas, Algirdas; Masalaite, Agne; Petelski, Tomasz; Gorokhova, Elena; Sapolaite, Justina; Ezerinskis, Zilvinas; Remeikis, Vidmantas

    2017-04-01

    Particulate carbonaceous matter is significant contributor to ambient particulate matter originating from intervening sources which contribution is difficult to quantify due to source diversity, chemical complexity and processes during atmospheric transport. Carbon isotope analysis can be extremely useful in source apportionment of organic matter due to the unique isotopic signatures associated with anthropocentric (fossil fuel), continental (terrestrial plants) and marine sources, and is particularly effective when these sources are mixed (Ceburnis et al., 2011;Ceburnis et al., 2016). We will present the isotope ratio measurement results of aerosol collected during the cruise in the Baltic Sea. Sampling campaign of PM10 and size segregated aerosol particles was performed on the R/V "Oceania" in October 2015. Air mass back trajectories were prevailing both from the continental and marine areas during the sampling period. The total carbon concentration varied from 1 µg/m3 to 8 µg/m3. Two end members (δ13C = -25‰ and δ13C = -28 ‰ ) were established from the total stable carbon isotope analysis in PM10 fraction. δ13C analysis in size segregated aerosol particles revealed δ13C values being highest in the 1 - 2.5 µm range (δ13C = -24.9 ‰ ) during continental transport, while lowest TC δ13C values (δ13C ≈ -27 ‰ ) were detected in the size range D50 dual carbon pools contributing to organic matter enrichment in marine aerosol, Scientific Reports, 6, 2016. Masalaite, A., Remeikis, V., Garbaras, A., Dudoitis, V., Ulevicius, V., and Ceburnis, D.: Elucidating carbonaceous aerosol sources by the stable carbon δ13C TC ratio in size-segregated particles, Atmospheric Research, 158, 1-12, 2015.

  16. Inorganic carbon cycle in soil-rock-groundwater system in karst and fissured aquifers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajda Koceli

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a systematic analysis of the isotopic composition of carbon (δ13CCaCO3 in carbonate rocks in central Slovenia, representing karst and fissured aquifers, and share of carbon contributions from carbonate dissolution and degradation of organic matter in aquifers, calculated from the mass balance equation. 59 samples of rocks (mainly dolomites from Upper Permian to Upper Triassic age were analyzed. Samples of carbonate rocks were pulverized and ground to fraction of 45 μm and for determination of δ13CCaCO3 analyzed with mass spectrometer for analyses of stable isotopes of light elements-IRMS. The same method was used for determination of isotopic composition of dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13CDIC in groundwater for 54 of 59 locations. Values of δ13CCaCO3 are in the range from -2.0 ‰ to +4.1 ‰, with an average δ13CCaCO3 value of +2.2 ‰. These values are typical for marine carbonates with δ13CCaCO3 around 0 ‰, although δ13CCaCO3 values differ between groups depending on the origin and age. Early diagenetic dolomites have relatively higher values of δ13CCaCO3 compared to other analyzed samples. The lowest values of δ13CCaCO3 were observed in Cordevolian and Bača dolomite, probably due to late diagenesis, during which meteoric water with lower isotopic carbon composition circulated in the process of sedimentation. Values of δ13CDIC range from -14.6 ‰ to -8.2 ‰. Higher δ13CDIC values (-8.2 ‰ indicate a low proportion of soil CO2 in the aquifer and rapid infiltration, while lower values (-14.6 ‰ indicate higher proportion of soil CO2 in the aquifer and slower infiltration. Calculated contributions of carbon from organic matter / dissolution of carbonates in the karstic and fissured aquifers s how a similar proportion (50 % : 50 %.

  17. The evolution of Carbon isotopes in calcite in the presence of cyanobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Christian; Mavromatis, Vasileios; Pokrovsky, Oleg S.; Oelkers, Eric H.

    2016-04-01

    Stable isotopic compositions in carbonates are widely used as indicators of environmental conditions prevailing during mineral formation. This reconstruction is substantially based on the assumption that there is no change in the mineral composition over geological time. However, recent experimental studies have shown that carbon and magnesium isotopes in hydrous Mg-carbonates undergo continuous re-equilibration with the ambient solution even after mineral precipitation stopped ([1] and [2], respectively). To verify whether this holds true for anhydrous Ca-bearing carbonates which readily form at earth's surface environments, a series of batch system calcite precipitation experiments were performed in the presence of actively growing cyanobacteria Synechococcus sp. The bacteria were grown at ambient temperature in a BG11 culture medium (SIGMA C3061) and continuous stirring, air-bubbling and illumination. Calcite precipitation was initiated by the addition of 8.5mM CaCl2 and 0-50 mM NaHCO3 or NaHCO3-Na2CO3 mixtures. The presence of cyanobacteria is on one hand promoting CaCO3 formation due to increasing pH resulting from photosynthesis. On the other hand, actively growing cyanobacteria drastically change carbon isotope signature of the aqueous fluid phase by preferably incorporating the lighter 12C isotope into biomass [1]. This study explores the effect of continuously changing carbon isotope compositions in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) on precipitated calcite which is in chemical equilibrium with the ambient fluid phase. [1] Mavromatis et al. (2015). The continuous re-equilibration of carbon isotope compositions of hydrous Mg-carbonates in the presence of cyanobacteria. Chem. Geol. 404, 41-51 [2] Mavromatis et al. (2012). Magnesium isotope fractionation during hydrous magnesium carbonate precipitation with and without cyanobacteria. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 76, 161-174

  18. Carbon isotopic evidence for microbial control of carbon supply to Orca Basin at the brine-seawater interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R. Shah

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Orca Basin, an intraslope basin on the Texas–Louisiana continental slope, hosts a hypersaline, anoxic brine in its lowermost 200 m. This brine contains a large reservoir of reduced and aged carbon, and appears to be stable at decadal time scales: concentrations and the isotopic composition of dissolved inorganic (DIC and organic carbon (DOC are similar to previous reports. Both DIC and DOC are more "aged" within the brine pool than in overlying water, and the isotopic contrast between brine carbon and seawater carbon is much greater for DIC than DOC. While the stable carbon isotopic composition of brine DIC points towards a combination of methane and organic carbon re-mineralization as its source, radiocarbon and box model results point to the brine interface as the major source region for DIC with oxidation of methane diffusing upwards from sediments supplying only limited DIC to the brine. This conclusion is consistent with previous studies reporting microbial activity focused at the seawater-brine interface. Isotopic similarities between DIC and DOC suggest a different relationship between these two carbon reservoirs than is typically observed in deep ocean basins. Radiocarbon values implicate the seawater-brine interface region as the likely source region for DOC as well as DIC. Further investigations of the seawater-brine interface are needed to advance our understanding of the specific microbial processes contributing to dissolved carbon storage in the Orca Basin brine.

  19. Carbon Isotope Chemistry in Molecular Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Amy N.; Willacy, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Few details of carbon isotope chemistry are known, especially the chemical processes that occur in astronomical environments like molecular clouds. Observational evidence shows that the C-12/C-13 abundance ratios vary due to the location of the C-13 atom within the molecular structure. The different abundances are a result of the diverse formation pathways that can occur. Modeling can be used to explore the production pathways of carbon molecules in an effort to understand and explain the chemical evolution of molecular clouds.

  20. Bony fish and their contribution to marine inorganic carbon cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salter, Michael; Perry, Chris; Wilson, Rod; Harborne, Alistair

    2016-04-01

    Conventional understanding of the marine inorganic carbon cycle holds that CaCO3 (mostly as low Mg-calcite and aragonite) precipitates in the upper reaches of the ocean and sinks to a point where it either dissolves or is deposited as sediment. Thus, it plays a key role controlling the distribution of DIC in the oceans and in regulating their capacity to absorb atmospheric CO2. However, several aspects of this cycle remain poorly understood and have long perplexed oceanographers, such as the positive alkalinity anomaly observed in the upper water column of many of the world's oceans, above the aragonite and calcite saturation horizons. This anomaly would be explained by extensive dissolution of a carbonate phase more soluble than low Mg-calcite or aragonite, but major sources for such phases remain elusive. Here we highlight marine bony fish as a potentially important primary source of this 'missing' high-solubility CaCO3. Precipitation of CaCO3 takes place within the intestines of all marine bony fish as part of their normal physiological functioning, and global production models suggest it could account for up to 45 % of total new marine CaCO3 production. Moreover, high Mg-calcite containing >25 % mol% MgCO3 - a more soluble phase than aragonite - is a major component of these precipitates. Thus, fish CaCO3 may at least partially explain the alkalinity anomaly in the upper water column. However, the issue is complicated by the fact that carbonate mineralogy actually varies among fish species, with high Mg-calcite (HMC), low Mg-calcite (LMC), aragonite, and amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) all being common products. Using data from 22 Caribbean fish species, we have generated a novel production model that resolves phase proportions. We evaluate the preservation/dissolution potential of these phases and consider potential implications for marine inorganic carbon cycling. In addition, we consider the dramatic changes in fish biomass structure that have resulted

  1. Epitaxial Relationships between Calcium Carbonate and Inorganic Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taewook Yang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The polymorph-selective crystallization of calcium carbonate has been studied in terms of epitaxial relationship between the inorganic substrates and the aragonite/calcite polymorphs with implication in bioinspired mineralization. EpiCalc software was employed to assess the previously published experimental results on two different groups of inorganic substrates: aragonitic carbonate crystals (SrCO3, PbCO3, and BaCO3 and a hexagonal crystal family (α-Al2O3, α-SiO2, and LiNbO3. The maximum size of the overlayer (aragonite or calcite was calculated for each substrate based on a threshold value of the dimensionless potential to estimate the relative nucleation preference of the polymorphs of calcium carbonate. The results were in good agreement with previous experimental observations, although stereochemical effects between the overlayer and substrate should be separately considered when existed. In assessing the polymorph-selective nucleation, the current method appeared to provide a better tool than the oversimplified mismatch parameters without invoking time-consuming molecular simulation.

  2. Photophysics of Carbon Nanotubes Interfaced with Organic and Inorganic Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Levitsky, Igor A; Karachevtsev, Victor A

    2012-01-01

    Photophysics of Carbon Nanotubes Interfaced with Organic and Inorganic Materials describes physical, optical and spectroscopic properties of the emerging class of nanocomposites formed from carbon nanotubes (CNTs)  interfacing with organic and inorganic materials. The three main chapters detail novel trends in  photophysics related to the interaction of  light with various carbon nanotube composites from relatively simple CNT/small molecule assemblies to complex hybrids such as CNT/Si and CNT/DNA nanostructures.   The latest experimental results are followed up with detailed discussions and scientific and technological perspectives to provide a through coverage of major topics including: ·   Light harvesting, energy conversion, photoinduced charge separation  and transport  in CNT based nanohybrids · CNT/polymer composites exhibiting photoactuation; and ·         Optical  spectroscopy  and structure of CNT/DNA complexes. Including original data and a short review of recent research, Phot...

  3. NOVEL INORGANIC MEMBRANES FOR HIGH TEMPERATURE CARBON DIOXIDE SEPARATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jerry Y.S. Lin

    2003-02-01

    We studied feasibility of two types of dense inorganic membranes which are fundamentally different from those porous inorganic membranes reported in the literature for separation of carbon dioxide from gas streams at high temperatures. The first is a symmetric, dense membrane made of Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} and the second is a dual-phase metal-carbonate membrane. We have identified a unique CO{sub 2} sorption/desorption mechanism on lithium zirconate. Considering the all obtained data, we proposed a double layer model to describe the CO{sub 2} sorption/desorption behavior of lithium zirconate. In the model, final product after CO{sub 2} sorption is a particle which consists of a ZrO{sub 2} core inside and a Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} shell. The understanding of CO{sub 2} sorption mechanisms suggests a means to improve CO{sub 2} sorption rate on this group of oxides. It also leads to the conclusion that lithium zirconate is not a suitable material for the proposed dense ceramic membrane for CO{sub 2} separation. Following the second concept of dense membrane for CO{sub 2} separation, we succeeded in preparing the hermetic (gas-tight) dense inorganic membrane consisting of a porous metal phase and a molten carbonate phase. The metal phase not only provides the mechanical support but also is electronically conducting, reducing the overall mass transfer resistance for CO{sub 2} permeation through the membrane. Permeation data showed that nitrogen or helium is not permeable through these membranes (only CO{sub 2}, with O{sub 2}, can permeate through the membrane based on the transport mechanism). This dual-phase membrane may offer promising properties for applications in membrane processes for separation of CO{sub 2} from flue (or coal gasification gas) at high temperatures (350-550 C).

  4. An unusual isotopic fractionation of boron in synthetic calcium carbonate precipitated from seawater and saline water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Yingkai; LI Shizhen; WEI Haizhen; SUN Aide; ZHOU Weijian; LIU Weiguo

    2006-01-01

    Inorganic calcium carbonate precipitation from natural seawater and saline water at various pH values was carried out experimentally. The results show the clear positive relationships between boron concentration and δ11B of inorganic calcium carbonate with the pH of natural seawater and saline water. However, the variations of boron isotopic fractionation between inorganic calcite and seawater/saline water with pH are inconsistent with the hypothesis that B(OH)4- is the dominant species incorporated into the biogenic calcite structure. The isotopic fractionation factors α Between synthetic calcium carbonate precipitate and parent solutions increase systematically as pH increases, from 0.9884 at pH 7.60 to 1.0072 at pH 8.60 for seawater and from 0.9826 at pH 7.60 to 1.0178 at pH 8.75 for saline water. An unusual boron isotopic fractionation factor of larger than 1 in synthetic calcium carbonate precipitated from seawater/saline water at higher pH is observed, which implies that a substantial amount of the isotopically heavier B(OH)3 species must be incorporated preferentially into synthetic inorganic carbonate. The results propose that the incorporation of B(OH)3 is attributed to the formation of Mg(OH)2 at higher pH of calcifying microenvironment during the synthetic calcium carbonate precipitation. The preliminary experiment of Mg(OH)2 precipitated from artificial seawater shows that heavier 11B is enriched in Mg(OH)2 precipitation, which suggests that isotopically heavier B(OH)3 species incorporated preferentially into Mg(OH)2 precipitation.This result cannot be applied to explain the boron isotopic fractionation of marine bio-carbonate because of the possibility that the unusual environment in this study appears in formation of marine bio-carbonate is infinitesimal. We, however, must pay more attention to this phenomenon observed in this study, which accidentally appears in especially natural environment.

  5. Photosynthesis and Calcification by Emiliania huxleyi (Prymnesiophyceae) as a Function of Inorganic Carbon Species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buitenhuis, Erik T.; Baar, Hein J.W. de; Veldhuis, Marcel J.W.

    1999-01-01

    To test the possibility of inorganic carbon limitation of the marine unicellular alga Emiliania huxleyi (Lohmann) Hay and Mohler, its carbon acquisition was measured as a function of the different chemical species of inorganic carbon present in the medium. Because these different species are interde

  6. The isotopic composition of dissolved inorganic nitrogen in hydrothermal vent fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, M. F.; Bourbonnais, A.; Butterfield, D. A.

    2006-12-01

    Hydrothermal vent systems at mid-ocean ridges are sites with rapid rates of biomass production, sustained by chemolithoautotrophic bacteria at the base of the vent community food chains. The exact metabolic pathways, in particular those that involve nitrogen (N), and the rates at which the metabolic reactions take place are poorly constrained. In previous studies, very low 15N/14N ratios have been attributed to strong N isotope fractionation during chemosynthetic assimilation of ammonium. However, actual data on the N isotopic composition of dissolved inorganic N in vent systems, which could provide coherent information on the sources of N during chemolithoautotrophic biosynthesis, do not exist. Furthermore, the fate of hydrothermally discharged ammonium as well as that of nitrate that is mixed in from the ocean water column have not been the focus of much attention. As a consequence, little is known about N-cycle reactions within hydrothermal vent systems. We will present nitrate isotope (15N/14N and 18O/16O) data from various sites at Axial Volcano on the Juan de Fuca ridge. Their integration with nitrate concentration data suggests non-conservative behavior of nitrate along temperature gradients. Highest N and O isotope ratios (7.6 permil and 21.0 permil, respectively) are found in average diffuse fluids (17°C). Elevated N and O isotope ratios were associated with decreased nitrate concentrations and indicate a nitrate consuming process that fractionates both N and O isotopes. The ratio of 15N versus 18O enrichment in residual nitrate is, however, not consistent with previous reports on nitrate N versus O isotope fractionation during denitrification in the suboxic ocean water column, implying anomalous N and O isotope fractionation during denitrification in hydrothermal vent fluids and/or the presence of additional microbially mediated N transformations that affect the N and O isotope composition of the nitrate pool in the Axial hydrothermal vent system in a

  7. Helium and carbon isotopes in Indian diamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiens, R.; Lal, D.; Craig, H.

    1990-09-01

    Helium and carbon isotope measurements in Indian diamonds (from Andhra Pradesh) were carried out using samples that included mined diamonds from primary kimberlite source rocks and alluvial diamonds from river gravel. The He and C isotope concentrations in diamonds from these two sources were compared, and the Indian diamonds were compared to those from other regions. Results indicate that most of the He-3 in the alluvial diamonds is of cosmogenic origin and that the alluvial diamonds may also have a significant He-4 component due to alpha particles implanted during storage in a secondary matrix. One diamond, a mined kimberlite specimen, was found to have the lowest He-4 content (0.018 microcc/g) so far recorded in diamonds.

  8. Investigations of the conversion of inorganic carbonates to methane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagadeesan, Dinesh; Eswaramoorthy, Muthusamy; Rao, C N R

    2009-01-01

    Inorganic carbonates, which occur abundantly on earth, constitute an inexpensive natural source of carbon. Therefore, the direct conversion of these carbonates into methane is of considerable importance. Thermal decomposition of transition metal carbonates with the composition MCa(CO(3))(2) (where M=Co, Ni, or Fe, and M/Ca is 1:1) and M(1)M(2)Ca(CO(3))(3) (where M(1)M(2)=CoNi, NiFe, or FeCo, and M(1)/M(2)/Ca is 1:1:2) shows that the reduced transition metals in combination with metal oxide nanoparticles (e.g., Co/CoO/CaO) act as catalysts for the conversion of CO(2) (produced from the carbonates) into methane. The favorable decomposition conditions include heating at 550 degrees C in an H(2) atmosphere for 5-6 h. These catalysts are found to be excellent for the methanation of CaCO(3), exhibiting high efficiency in the utilization of H(2) with 100 % conversion and 100 % selectivity. The best catalyst for conversion of CaCO(3) into CH(4) is Co/CoO/CaO. There are also indications that similar catalysts based on Fe may yield higher hydrocarbons.

  9. Molecular and carbon isotopic compositions of gas inclusions of deep carbonate rocks in the Tarim Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Shixin; WANG Xianbin; MENG Zifang; LI Yuan; Paul Farrimond; LI Liwu; DUAN Yi

    2004-01-01

    Gaseous components of gas inclusions in deep carbonate rocks (>5700 m) from the Tacan 1 well were analyzed by online mass spectrometry by means of either the stepwise heating technique or vacuum electromagnetism crushing. The carbon isotopic compositions of gases released by vacuum electromagnetism crushing were also measured. Although the molecular compositions of gas inclusions show differences between the two methods, the overall characteristics are that gas inclusions mainly contain CO2, whilst hydrocarbon gases, such as CH4, C2H6 and C3H8, are less abundant. The content of CO is higher in the stepwise heating experiment than that in the method of vacuum electromagnetism crushing, and there are only minor amounts of N2, H2 and O2 in gas inclusions. Methane δ13C values of gas inclusions in Lower Ordovician and Upper Cambrian rocks (from 5713.7 to 6422 m; -52‰-63‰) are similar to those of bacterial methane, but their chemical compositions do not exhibit the dry character in comparison with biogenic gases. These characteristics of deep gas inclusions may be related to the migration fractionation. Some deep natural gases with light carbon isotopic characteristics in the Tazhong Uplift may have a similar origin. The δ13C1 values of gas inclusions in Lower Cambrian rocks (7117-7124 m) are heavier (-39‰), consistent with highly mature natural gases. Carbon isotopic compositions of CO2 in the gas inclusions of deep carbonate rocks are similar (from -4‰ to -13‰) to those of deep natural gases, indicating predominantly an inorganic origin.

  10. Inorganic carbon cycling and biogeochemical processes in an Arctic inland sea (Hudson Bay)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, William J.; Thomas, Helmuth; Miller, Lisa A.; Granskog, Mats A.; Papakyriakou, Tim N.; Pengelly, Leah

    2016-08-01

    The distributions of carbonate system parameters in Hudson Bay, which not only receives nearly one-third of Canada's river discharge but is also subject to annual cycles of sea-ice formation and melt, indicate that the timing and magnitude of freshwater inputs play an important role in carbon biogeochemistry and acidification in this unique Arctic ecosystem. This study uses basin-wide measurements of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and total alkalinity (TA), as well as stable isotope tracers (δ18O and δ13CDIC), to provide a detailed assessment of carbon cycling processes within the bay. Surface distributions of carbonate parameters reveal the particular importance of freshwater inputs in the southern portion of the bay. Based on TA, we surmise that the deep waters in the Hudson Bay are largely of Pacific origin. Riverine TA end-members vary significantly both regionally and with small changes in near-surface depths, highlighting the importance of careful surface water sampling in highly stratified waters. In an along-shore transect, large increases in subsurface DIC are accompanied by equivalent decreases in δ13CDIC with no discernable change in TA, indicating a respiratory DIC production on the order of 100 µmol kg-1 DIC during deep water circulation around the bay.

  11. Research and application of method of oxygen isotope of inorganic phosphate in Beijing agricultural soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Liyan; Guo, Qingjun; Zhu, Yongguan; He, Huijun; Lang, Yunchao; Hu, Jian; Zhang, Han; Wei, Rongfei; Han, Xiaokun; Peters, Marc; Yang, Junxing

    2016-12-01

    Phosphorus (P) in agricultural ecosystems is an essential and limited element for plants and microorganisms. However, environmental problems caused by P accumulation as well as by P loss have become more and more serious. Oxygen isotopes of phosphate can trace the sources, migration, and transformation of P in agricultural soils. In order to use the isotopes of phosphate oxygen, appropriate extraction and purification methods for inorganic phosphate from soils are necessary. Here, we combined two different methods to analyze the oxygen isotopic composition of inorganic phosphate (δ(18)OP) from chemical fertilizers and different fractions (Milli-Q water, 0.5 mol L(-1) NaHCO3 (pH = 8.5), 0.1 mol L(-1) NaOH and 1 mol L(-1) HCl) of agricultural soils from the Beijing area. The δ(18)OP results of the water extracts and NaHCO3 extracts in most samples were close to the calculated equilibrium value. These phenomena can be explained by rapid P cycling in soils and the influence of chemical fertilizers. The δ(18)OP value of the water extracts and NaHCO3 extracts in some soil samples below the equilibrium value may be caused by the hydrolysis of organic P fractions mediated by extracellular enzymes. The δ(18)OP values of the NaOH extracts were above the calculated equilibrium value reflecting the balance state between microbial uptake of phosphate and the release of intracellular phosphate back to the soil. The HCl extracts with the lowest δ(18)OP values and highest phosphate concentrations indicated that the HCl fraction was affected by microbial activity. Hence, these δ(18)Op values likely reflected the oxygen isotopic values of the parent materials. The results suggested that phosphate oxygen isotope analyses could be an effective tool in order to trace phosphate sources, transformation processes, and its utilization by microorganisms in agricultural soils.

  12. Carbon isotope stratigraphy of an ancient (Ordovician) Bahamian-type carbonate platform: Implications for preservation of global seawater trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltzman, M.; Leslie, S. A.; Edwards, C. T.; Diamond, C. W.; Trigg, C. R.; Sedlacek, A. R.

    2013-12-01

    Carbon isotope stratigraphy has a unique role in the interpretation of Earth history as one of the few geochemical proxies that have been widely applied throughout the geologic time scale, from the Precambrian to the Recent, as both a global correlation tool and proxy for the carbon cycle. However, in addition to consideration of the role of diagenesis, numerous studies have raised awareness of the fact that C-isotope trends derived from ancient carbonate platforms may not be representative of dissolved inorganic carbon from a well-mixed global ocean reservoir. Furthermore, the larger carbon isotopic fractionation in the formation of aragonite versus calcite from seawater must be taken into account. All three of these variables (diagenesis, water mass residence time, % aragonite) may change in response to sea level, producing trends in C-isotopes on ancient carbonate platforms that are unrelated to the global carbon cycle. Global carbon cycle fluxes may also have a cause-effect relationship with sea level changes, further complicating interpretations of stratigraphic trends in carbon isotopes from ancient platform environments. Studies of C-isotopes in modern carbonate platform settings such as the Great Bahama Bank (GBB) provide important analogues in addressing whether or not ancient platforms are likely to preserve a record of carbon cycling in the global ocean. Swart et al. (2009) found that waters of the GBB had generally the same or elevated values (ranging from +0.5‰ to +2.5‰) compared to the global oceans, interpreted as reflecting differential photosynthetic fractionation and precipitation of calcium carbonate (which lowers pH and converts bicarbonate into 12-C enriched carbon dioxide, leaving residual bicarbonate heavier). Carbonate sediments of the GBB have elevated C-isotopes, not only because of the high C-isotope composition of the overlying waters, but also due to the greater fractionation associated with precipitation of aragonite versus calcite

  13. In situ spectrophotometric measurement of dissolved inorganic carbon in seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuewu; Byrne, Robert H; Adornato, Lori; Yates, Kimberly K; Kaltenbacher, Eric; Ding, Xiaoling; Yang, Bo

    2013-10-01

    Autonomous in situ sensors are needed to document the effects of today's rapid ocean uptake of atmospheric carbon dioxide (e.g., ocean acidification). General environmental conditions (e.g., biofouling, turbidity) and carbon-specific conditions (e.g., wide diel variations) present significant challenges to acquiring long-term measurements of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) with satisfactory accuracy and resolution. SEAS-DIC is a new in situ instrument designed to provide calibrated, high-frequency, long-term measurements of DIC in marine and fresh waters. Sample water is first acidified to convert all DIC to carbon dioxide (CO2). The sample and a known reagent solution are then equilibrated across a gas-permeable membrane. Spectrophotometric measurement of reagent pH can thereby determine the sample DIC over a wide dynamic range, with inherent calibration provided by the pH indicator's molecular characteristics. Field trials indicate that SEAS-DIC performs well in biofouling and turbid waters, with a DIC accuracy and precision of ∼2 μmol kg(-1) and a measurement rate of approximately once per minute. The acidic reagent protects the sensor cell from biofouling, and the gas-permeable membrane excludes particulates from the optical path. This instrument, the first spectrophotometric system capable of automated in situ DIC measurements, positions DIC to become a key parameter for in situ CO2-system characterizations.

  14. In situ spectrophotometric measurement of dissolved inorganic carbon in seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liua, Xuewu; Byrne, Robert H.; Adornato, Lori; Yates, Kimberly K.; Kaltenbacher, Eric; Ding, Xiaoling; Yang, Bo

    2013-01-01

    Autonomous in situ sensors are needed to document the effects of today’s rapid ocean uptake of atmospheric carbon dioxide (e.g., ocean acidification). General environmental conditions (e.g., biofouling, turbidity) and carbon-specific conditions (e.g., wide diel variations) present significant challenges to acquiring long-term measurements of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) with satisfactory accuracy and resolution. SEAS-DIC is a new in situ instrument designed to provide calibrated, high-frequency, long-term measurements of DIC in marine and fresh waters. Sample water is first acidified to convert all DIC to carbon dioxide (CO2). The sample and a known reagent solution are then equilibrated across a gas-permeable membrane. Spectrophotometric measurement of reagent pH can thereby determine the sample DIC over a wide dynamic range, with inherent calibration provided by the pH indicator’s molecular characteristics. Field trials indicate that SEAS-DIC performs well in biofouling and turbid waters, with a DIC accuracy and precision of ∼2 μmol kg–1 and a measurement rate of approximately once per minute. The acidic reagent protects the sensor cell from biofouling, and the gas-permeable membrane excludes particulates from the optical path. This instrument, the first spectrophotometric system capable of automated in situ DIC measurements, positions DIC to become a key parameter for in situ CO2-system characterizations.

  15. Carbon-isotopic analysis of dissolved acetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelwicks, J T; Hayes, J M

    1990-01-01

    Heating of dried, acetate-containing solids together with oxalic acid dihydrate conveniently releases acetic acid for purification by gas chromatography. For determination of the carbon-isotopic composition of total acetate, the acetate-containing zone of the chromatographic effluent can be routed directly to a combustion furnace coupled to a vacuum system allowing recovery, purification, and packaging of CO2 for mass-spectrometric analysis. For analysis of methyl carbon, acetic acid can be cryogenically trapped from the chromatographic effluent, then transferred to a tube containing excess NaOH. The tube is evacuated, sealed, and heated to 500 degrees C to produce methane by pyrolysis of sodium acetate. Subsequent combustion of the methane allows determination of the 13C content at the methyl position in the parent acetate. With typical blanks, the standard deviation of single analyses is less than 0.4% for acetate samples larger than 5 micromoles. A full treatment of uncertainties is outlined.

  16. Environmental effects on the stable carbon and oxygen isotopic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-08-16

    Aug 16, 2010 ... Key words: Oxygen isotopes, carbon isotopes, Porites coral, density bands, skeletal .... isotopic ratio of CO2 gas derived from the Pee Dee Belemnite (PDB) ... water samples, a 2.0 ml of the sample was taken into a syringe and.

  17. Organic chemistry of Murchison meteorite: Carbon isotopic fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, G. U.; Blair, N. E.; Desmarais, D. J.; Cronin, J. R.; Chang, S.

    1986-01-01

    The carbon isotopic composition of individual organic compounds of meteoritic origin remains unknown, as most reported carbon isotopic ratios are for bulk carbon or solvent extractable fractions. The researchers managed to determine the carbon isotopic ratios for individual hydrocarbons and monocarboxylic acids isolated from a Murchison sample by a freeze-thaw-ultrasonication technique. The abundances of monocarboxylic acids and saturated hydrocarbons decreased with increasing carbon number and the acids are more abundant than the hydrocarbon with the same carbon number. For both classes of compounds, the C-13 to C-12 ratios decreased with increasing carbon number in a roughly parallel manner, and each carboxylic acid exhibits a higher isotopic number than the hydrocarbon containing the same number of carbon atoms. These trends are consistent with a kinetically controlled synthesis of higher homologues for lower ones.

  18. Organic chemistry of Murchison meteorite: Carbon isotopic fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, G. U.; Blair, N. E.; Desmarais, D. J.; Cronin, J. R.; Chang, S.

    1986-01-01

    The carbon isotopic composition of individual organic compounds of meteoritic origin remains unknown, as most reported carbon isotopic ratios are for bulk carbon or solvent extractable fractions. The researchers managed to determine the carbon isotopic ratios for individual hydrocarbons and monocarboxylic acids isolated from a Murchison sample by a freeze-thaw-ultrasonication technique. The abundances of monocarboxylic acids and saturated hydrocarbons decreased with increasing carbon number and the acids are more abundant than the hydrocarbon with the same carbon number. For both classes of compounds, the C-13 to C-12 ratios decreased with increasing carbon number in a roughly parallel manner, and each carboxylic acid exhibits a higher isotopic number than the hydrocarbon containing the same number of carbon atoms. These trends are consistent with a kinetically controlled synthesis of higher homologues for lower ones.

  19. The Oxidant Budget of Dissolved Organic Carbon Driven Isotope Excursions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristow, T. F.; Kennedy, M. J.

    2008-12-01

    Negative carbon isotope values, falling below the mantle average of about -5 per mil, in carbonate phases of Ediacaran age sedimentary rocks are widely regarded as reflecting negative excursions in the carbon isotopic composition of seawater lasting millions of years. These isotopic signals form the basis of chemostratigraphic correlations between Ediacaran aged sections in different parts of the world, and have been used to track the oxidation of the biosphere. However, these isotopic values are difficult to accommodate within limits prescribed by the current understanding of the carbon cycle, and a hypothetical Precambrian ocean dissolved organic carbon (DOC) pool 100 to 1000 times the size of the modern provides a potential source of depleted carbon not considered in Phanerozoic carbon cycle budgets. We present box model results that show the remineralization of such a DOC pool to drive an isotope excursion of the magnitude observed in the geological record exhausts global budgets of free oxygen and sulfate in 800 k.y. These results are incompatible with the estimated duration of late Ediacaran isotope excursions of more than 10 m.y., as well as geochemical and biological indicators that oceanic sulfate and oxygen levels were maintained or even increased at the same time. Therefore the carbon isotope record is probably not a useful tool for monitoring oxygen levels in the atmosphere and ocean. Covariation between the carbon and oxygen isotope records is often observed during negative excursions and is indicative of local processes or diagenetic overprinting.

  20. Carbon isotope analysis in apple nectar beverages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Figueira

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were to use the isotope analysis method to quantify the carbon of C3 photosynthetic cycle in commercial apple nectars and to determine the legal limit to identify the beverages that do not conform to the safety standards established by the Brazilian Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Food Supply. These beverages (apple nectars were produced in the laboratory according to the Brazilian legislation. Adulterated nectars were also produced with an amount of pulp juice below the permitted threshold limit value. The δ13C values of the apple nectars and their fractions (pulp and purified sugar were measured to quantify the C3 source percentage. In order to demonstrate the existence of adulteration, the values found were compared to the limit values established by the Brazilian Law. All commercial apple nectars analyzed were within the legal limits, which enabled to identify the nectars that were in conformity with the Brazilian Law. The isotopic methodology developed proved efficient to quantify the carbon of C3 origin in commercial apple nectars.

  1. A Clumped Isotope Calibration for Lacustrine Carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsunaga, B. A.; Mering, J. A.; Petryshyn, V. A.; Dunbar, R. B.; Cohen, A. S.; Liu, X.; Kaufman, D. S.; Eagle, R.; Tripati, A.

    2014-12-01

    Our capacity to understand Earth's environmental history is highly dependent on the accuracy of past climate reconstructions. Unfortunately, many terrestrial proxies—tree rings, speleothems, leaf margin analyses, etc.—are influenced by the effects of both temperature and precipitation. Methods that can isolate the effects of temperature alone are needed, and clumped isotope thermometry has the potential to be a useful tool for determining terrestrial climates. Multiple studies have shown that the fraction of 13C—18O bonds in carbonates is inversely related to the temperature at which the rocks formed and may be a useful proxy for reconstructing temperatures on land. An in-depth survey of lacustrine carbonates, however, has not yet been published. Therefore we have been measuring the abundance of 13C18O16O in the CO2 produced by the dissolution of modern lake samples' carbonate minerals in phosphoric acid and comparing results to independently known estimates of lake water temperature and air temperature. Some of the sample types we have investigated include endogenic carbonates, freshwater gastropods, bivalves, microbialites, and ooids.

  2. Degradation changes stable carbon isotope depth profiles in palsa peatlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Krüger

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Palsa peatlands are a significant carbon pool in the global carbon cycle and are projected to change by global warming due to accelerated permafrost thaw. Our aim was to use stable carbon isotopes as indicators of palsa degradation. Depth profiles of stable carbon isotopes generally reflect organic matter dynamics in soils with an increase of δ13C values during aerobic decomposition and stable or decreasing δ13C values with depth during anaerobic decomposition. Stable carbon isotope depth profiles of undisturbed and degraded sites of hummocks as well as hollows at three palsa peatlands in northern Sweden were used to investigate the degradation processes. The depth patterns of stable isotopes clearly differ between intact and degraded hummocks at all sites. Erosion and cryoturbation at the degraded sites significantly changes the stable carbon isotope depth profiles. At the intact hummocks the uplifting of peat material by permafrost is indicated by a turning in the δ13C depth trend and this assessment is supported by a change in the C / N ratios. For hollows isotope patterns were less clear, but some hollows and degraded hollows in the palsa peatlands show differences in their stable carbon isotope depth profiles indicating enhanced degradation rates. We conclude that the degradation of palsa peatlands by accelerated permafrost thawing could be identified with stable carbon isotope depth profiles. At intact hummocks δ13C depth patterns display the uplifting of peat material by a change in peat decomposition processes.

  3. Phanerozoic and Neoproterozoic Negative Carbon Isotope Excursions, Diagenesis and Terrestrialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, K.; Kennedy, M. J.

    2008-12-01

    Comprehensive data sets of Phanerozoic and late Precambrian carbon isotope data derived from carbonate rocks show a similar positive relation when cross-plotted with oxygen isotope values. The range and slope between the time periods is identical and the processes responsible for the relation have been well documented in Quaternary sediments. These processes include the stabilization of isotope values to ambient meteoric water values during shallow burial and flushing of carbonate sediments. Both data sets show strongly depleted carbon (-9 per mil PDB) and oxygen isotope values that retain seemingly systematic stratigraphic patterns with the Quaternary and Phanerozoic examples that demonstrably record meteroric water values. Similar values and patterns in the Precambrian are interpreted as primary marine in origin with significant implications for an ocean carbon mass balance not possible in the Phanerozoic carbon cycle. A similar compilation of carbonates older than one billion years do not show a relation between carbon and oxygen isotopes, lacking the negative carbon values evident in the younger record. We hypothesize that this difference records the onset of significant organic carbon on the land surface and the alteration of meteoric waters toward Phanerozoic values. We demonstrate the meteoric affinities of Neoproterozoic carbonates containing prominent negative isotope excursions recorded in the Shuram and Wonoka Formations of Oman and South Australia commonly attributed to whole ocean isotope variation. The conspicuous absence of negative carbon isotope values with normal marine oxygenisotope values in the Phanerozoic and Neoproterozic identifies a consistent relation between these time intervals and suggests that, as well accepted in the Phanerozoic, negative carbon isotope excursions less than -3 per mil are not a record of marine processes, but rather the later terrestrial biotic influence on meteoric water values.

  4. Corals concentrate dissolved inorganic carbon to facilitate calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Nicola; Cohen, Itay; Finch, Adrian A; Erez, Jonathan; Tudhope, Alexander W

    2014-01-01

    The sources of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) used to produce scleractinian coral skeletons are not understood. Yet this knowledge is essential for understanding coral biomineralization and assessing the potential impacts of ocean acidification on coral reefs. Here we use skeletal boron geochemistry to reconstruct the DIC chemistry of the fluid used for coral calcification. We show that corals concentrate DIC at the calcification site substantially above seawater values and that bicarbonate contributes a significant amount of the DIC pool used to build the skeleton. Corals actively increase the pH of the calcification fluid, decreasing the proportion of DIC present as CO2 and creating a diffusion gradient favouring the transport of molecular CO2 from the overlying coral tissue into the calcification site. Coupling the increases in calcification fluid pH and [DIC] yields high calcification fluid [CO3(2-)] and induces high aragonite saturation states, favourable to the precipitation of the skeleton.

  5. Nordic Seas total dissolved inorganic carbon data in CARINA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Olsen

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Water column data of carbon and carbon relevant hydrographic and hydrochemical parameters from 188 previously non-publicly available cruises in the Arctic, Atlantic, and Southern Ocean have been retrieved and merged into a new database: CARINA (CARbon IN the Atlantic. The data have been subject to rigorous quality control (QC in order to ensure highest possible quality and consistency. The data for most of the parameters included were examined in order to quantify systematic biases in the reported values, i.e. secondary quality control. Significant biases have been corrected for in the data products, i.e. the three merged files with measured, calculated and interpolated values for each of the three CARINA regions; the Arctic Mediterranean Seas (AMS, the Atlantic (ATL and the Southern Ocean (SO. With the adjustments the CARINA database is consistent both internally as well as with GLODAP (Key et al., 2004 and is suitable for accurate assessments of, for example, oceanic carbon inventories and uptake rates and for model validation. The Arctic Mediterranean Seas includes the Arctic Ocean and the Nordic Seas, and the quality control was carried out separately in these two areas. This contribution presents an account of the quality control of the total dissolved inorganic carbon (TCO2 data from the Nordic Seas in CARINA. Out of the 35 cruises from the Nordic Seas included in CARINA, 25 had TCO2 data. The data from 7 of these were found to be of low quality and should not be used, thus the final CARINA data product contains TCO2 data from 18 cruises from the Nordic Seas. These data appear consistent to at least 4 μmol kg−1.

  6. Carbon isotope fractionation by anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria in euxinic Lake Cadagno.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posth, N R; Bristow, L A; Cox, R P; Habicht, K S; Danza, F; Tonolla, M; Frigaard, N-U; Canfield, D E

    2017-09-03

    Anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria utilize ancient metabolic pathways to link sulfur and iron metabolism to the reduction of CO2 . In meromictic Lake Cadagno, Switzerland, both purple sulfur (PSB) and green sulfur anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria (GSB) dominate the chemocline community and drive the sulfur cycle. PSB and GSB fix carbon utilizing different enzymatic pathways and these fractionate C-isotopes to different extents. Here, these differences in C-isotope fractionation are used to constrain the relative input of various anoxygenic phototrophs to the bulk community C-isotope signal in the chemocline. We sought to determine whether a distinct isotopic signature of GSB and PSB in the chemocline persists in the settling fraction and in the sediment. To answer these questions, we also sought investigated C-isotope fractionation in the water column, settling material, and sediment of Lake Cadagno, compared these values to C-isotope fractionation of isolated anoxygenic phototroph cultures, and took a mass balance approach to investigate relative contributions to the bulk fractionation signature. We found a large C-isotope fractionation between dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and particulate organic carbon (POC) in the Lake Cadagno chemocline. This large fractionation between the DIC and POC was also found in culture experiments carried out with anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria isolated from the lake. In the Lake Cadagno chemocline, anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria controlled the bulk C-isotope fractionation, but the influence of GSB and PSB differed with season. Furthermore, the contribution of PSB and GSB to bulk C-isotope fractionation in the chemocline could be traced in the settling fraction and in the sediment. Taken together with other studies, such as lipid biomarker analyzes and investigations of other stratified lakes, these results offer a firmer understanding of diagenetic influences on bacterial biomass. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Carbon Isotope Tracking of the Fluvial Carbon Cycles in two Southeast Asian Watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K.; Ishak, M.; Veizer, J.; Clark, I. D.

    2012-12-01

    Two rivers in Peninsular Malaysia, Langat and Kelantan, were sampled for dissolved organic and inorganic carbon (DOC/DIC) concentrations and stable carbon isotope data over the course of 20 months. Water samples were taken twice a month from three points along each river and from local groundwater reservoirs from May 2011 to December 2012. These were later analyzed for DIC/DOC concentration and d13C values. The data suggests that DOC and DIC in both basins are sourced primarily from biologically-respired carbon from a C3-vegetation dominated environment, with carbonate rock providing an additional input. Riverine PCO2 in Langat River, estimated from the DIC data, revealed over-pressurization of riverine CO2 relative to atmospheric levels during most periods of sampling, in some cases approaching 30 times that of the averaged global value of ~380 ppm. The Langat River degases CO2 during much of the year, and further calculations showed that the average annual efflux in the upstream sub-catchment of this river (~20 x 10^3 t C/yr) is comparable to the fluvial export of dissolved carbon (~12 x 10^3 t C/yr) and particulate organic carbon (~7 x 10^3 t C/yr), estimated from total suspended solid (TSS) and river flow data from the literature. However, the combined gas efflux and fluvial export of dissolved carbon only amount to roughly 6 % of total ecosystem uptake of CO2 within the sub-catchment (~600-700 x 10^3 t C/yr). The remainder of this carbon is mostly respired back into the atmosphere, although a minor portion may be stored within the watershed. These findings confirm the more complex role of rivers in the global carbon cycle, beyond that of a simple link between terrestrial and oceanic reservoirs.

  8. Influence of diagenesis on the stable isotopic composition of biogenic carbonates from the Gulf of Tehuantepec oxygen minimum zone

    OpenAIRE

    Blanchet, Cécile; Kasten, S.; Vidal, Laurence; Poulton, S.W.; Ganeshram, R.; Thouveny, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    International audience; In order to evaluate the influence of diagenetic and post-sampling processes on the stable oxygen and carbon isotope compositions of biogenic carbonates, we conducted a multiproxy study of organic-rich sediments from the eastern Pacific oxygen minimum zone. Core MD02-2520, which was retrieved from the Gulf of Tehuantepec (Mexico), has seasonal laminations and covers the last 40 kyr. Together with the presence of gypsum crystals and inorganic calcite aggregates, the occ...

  9. Coupled organic and inorganic carbon cycling in the deep subseafloor sediment of the northeastern Bering Sea Slope (IODP Exp. 323)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wehrmann, Laura M.; Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Schrum, Heather

    2011-01-01

    at water depths of 1008 to 3172 m. They are situated in the high productivity “Green Belt” region, with organic carbon burial rates typical of the high-productivity upwelling domains on western continental margins. The three sites show strong geochemical similarities. The downward sequence of microbially......) and between 300 and 400 mbsf. The SMTZ at the three sites is located between 6 and 9 mbsf. The upward methane fluxes into the SMTZ are similar to fluxes in SMTZs underlying high-productivity surface waters off Chile and Namibia. Our Bering Sea results show that intense organic carbon mineralization drives...... high ammonium and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) production rates (> 4.2 mmol m− 3 y− 1) in the uppermost 10 mbsf and strongly imprints on the stable carbon isotope composition of DIC, driving it to a minimum value of − 27‰ (VPDB) at the SMTZ. Pore-water calcium and magnesium profiles demonstrate...

  10. Photosynthetic use of inorganic carbon in deep-water kelps from the Strait of Gibraltar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Sánchez, María Jesús; Delgado-Huertas, Antonio; Fernández, José Antonio; Flores-Moya, Antonio

    2016-03-01

    Mechanisms of inorganic carbon assimilation were investigated in the four deep-water kelps inhabiting sea bottoms at the Strait of Gibraltar; these species are distributed at different depths (Saccorhiza polysiches at shallower waters, followed by Laminaria ochroleuca, then Phyllariopsis brevipes and, at the deepest bottoms, Phyllariopsis purpurascens). To elucidate the capacity to use HCO3(-) as a source of inorganic carbon for photosynthesis in the kelps, different experimental approaches were used. Specifically, we measured the irradiance-saturated gross photosynthetic rate versus pH at a constant dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentration of 2 mM, the irradiance-saturated apparent photosynthesis (APS) rate versus DIC, the total and the extracellular carbonic anhydrase (CAext), the observed and the theoretical photosynthetic rates supported by the spontaneous dehydration of HCO3(-) to CO2, and the δ(13)C signature in tissues of the algae. While S. polyschides and L. ochroleuca showed photosynthetic activity at pH 9.5 (around 1.0 µmol O2 m(-2) s(-1)), the activity was close to zero in both species of Phyllariopsis. The APS versus DIC was almost saturated for the DIC values of natural seawater (2 mM) in S. polyschides and L. ochroleuca, but the relationship was linear in P. brevipes and P. purpurascens. The four species showed total and CAext activities but the inhibition of the CAext originated the observed photosynthetic rates at pH 8.0 to be similar to the theoretical rates that could be supported by the spontaneous dehydration of HCO3(-). The isotopic (13)C signatures ranged from -17.40 ± 1.81 to -21.11 ± 1.73 ‰ in the four species. Additionally, the δ(13)C signature was also measured in the deep-water Laminaria rodriguezii growing at 60-80 m, showing even a more negative value of -26.49 ± 1.25 ‰. All these results suggest that the four kelps can use HCO3(-) as external carbon source for photosynthesis mainly by the action of external CAext, but

  11. Equilibrium Fe isotope fractionation between inorganic aqueous Fe(III) and the siderophore complex, Fe(III)-desferrioxamine B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dideriksen, Knud; Baker, Joel A.; Stipp, Susan Louise Svane

    2008-01-01

    be controlled by isotope fractionation between the free and complexed iron.We have determined the equilibrium Fe isotope fractionation induced by organic ligand activity in experiments with solutions having co-existing inorganic Fe(III) species and siderophore complexes, Fedesferrioxamine B (at pH 2). The two......In oxic oceans, most of the dissolved iron (Fe) exists as complexes with siderophore-like, strongly coordinating organic ligands. Thus, the isotope composition of the little amount of free inorganic Fe that is available for precipitation and preservation in the geological record may largely...... for the slower stage, indicating that approximately 40% reequilibration may take place during the separation of the two pools. To further test if the induced precipitation leads to experimental artefacts, the fractionation during precipitation of inorganic Fe was determined. Assuming a Rayleigh...

  12. Soil organic carbon dynamics under long-term fertilization in a black soil of China: Evidence from stable C isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Xiaolin; He, Ping; Zhu, Ping; Zhou, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Effects of different fertilizers on organic carbon (C) storage and turnover of soil fractions remains unclear. We combined soil fractionation with isotope analyses to examine soil organic carbon (SOC) dynamics after 25 years of fertilization. Five types of soil samples including the initial level (CK) and four fertilization treatments (inorganic nitrogen fertilizer, N; balanced inorganic fertilizer, NPK; inorganic fertilizer plus farmyard manure, MNPK; inorganic fertilizer plus corn straw residue, SNPK) were separated into four aggregate sizes (>2000 μm, 2000–250 μm, 250–53 μm, and 250 μm aggregates but reduced SOC storage in <250 μm aggregates due to SOC changes in LF and iPOM. PMID:26898121

  13. Novel Hydrophobic Pt/Inorganic Catalyst Used in Hydrogen Isotope Exchange Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JIA Qing-qing1;HU Shi-lin1;FENG Xiao-yan2;LIU Ya-ming1

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available To improve the performance of hydrophobic catalyst and extend its using range, this research adopted the porous columnar inorganic carriers (ø=5 mm to prepare the hydrophobic catalyst used in hydrogen isotopes exchange reaction, the hydrophilic carriers became hydrophobic with the nanostructured CeO2 coating and the catalyst were then fabricated by convenient impregnation method. The samples were characterized by XRD、SEM、EDX、XPS and CO adsorption. The catalytic activity were tested through catalytic exchange reaction between hydrogen and saturated water vapor to investigate the effect of micro structured CeO2 on the catalyst properties. It turned out that the nano-CeO2 coating could build favorable hydrophobic environment for the catalysts and had almost no influence on the pore structure properties of carriers. Although the hydrophobic coating would lead to the decrease of Pt particle dispersion and metallic Pt content, it could make the Pt particles mostly deposit on the surface layer of the catalysts, which would make more Pt particle participate in the reaction at the same time. The catalytic activity of the novel Pt/inorganic catalyst could reach to 80% of the mature Pt/organic catalyst. After being flushed by water for 12 weeks, the catalytic activity of Pt/inorganic catalyst decreased less than 5%. The novel hydrophobic catalyst with good activity and stability was practical and had great application prospects.

  14. Carbon isotope fractionation in protoplanetary disks

    CERN Document Server

    Woods, Paul M

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the gas-phase and grain-surface chemistry in the inner 30 AU of a typical protoplanetary disk using a new model which calculates the gas temperature by solving the gas heating and cooling balance and which has an improved treatment of the UV radiation field. We discuss inner-disk chemistry in general, obtaining excellent agreement with recent observations which have probed the material in the inner regions of protoplanetary disks. We also apply our model to study the isotopic fractionation of carbon. Results show that the fractionation ratio, 12C/13C, of the system varies with radius and height in the disk. Different behaviour is seen in the fractionation of different species. We compare our results with 12C/13C ratios in the Solar System comets, and find a stark contrast, indicative of reprocessing.

  15. 农业活动对表层岩溶泉溶解无机碳及稳定碳同位素的影响%Influence of Agricultural Activities on Dissolved Inorganic Carbon and Stable Isotopic of Epikarst Springs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张笑微; 周小萍; 徐尚全; 王鹏

    2013-01-01

    In this study, groundwater samples were collected from three epikarst springs, with same climatic and geological condition, but different agricultural activities. Impact of agriculture activities on karst process was explored by DIC and δ13CDIC values. The results showed that: Baishuwan spring which was not affected by agricultural activities had the highest DIC concentration332. 45 mg/L). The DIC concentration(235. 13 mg/L) of Lanhuagou spring was slightly lower, which was affected by agriculture activities. And Hougou spring had the lowest DIC concentration(203. 52 mg/L), owing to the most intense agriculture activities. Meanwhile, the δ13 CDIC value had an opposite trend with the intensity of agricultural activities: Baishuwan ( — 9. 84‰)carbon sink. Suffering the threat of global warming, to increase the carbon sink, karst area should be returned farmland to forest, in order to maintain a good ecological environment.%以农业活动强度不同的3个表层岩溶泉为研究对象,通过分析不同泉点溶解无机碳(DIC)及稳定碳同位素(δ13CDIC)的变化,探讨农业活动对岩溶作用的影响.结果表明,无农业活动影响下的柏树湾泉DIC浓度最高(332.45 mg/L),少量农业活动影响下的兰花沟泉DIC浓度次之(235.13 mg/L),农业活动影响强烈的后沟泉DIC浓度最低(203.52 mg/L);随农业活动强度增加,δ13 CDIC值呈现与之相反的趋势:柏树湾泉(-9.84

  16. Inorganic carbon dominates total dissolved carbon concentrations and fluxes in British rivers: Application of the THINCARB model - Thermodynamic modelling of inorganic carbon in freshwaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvie, Helen P; King, Stephen M; Neal, Colin

    2017-01-01

    River water-quality studies rarely measure dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) routinely, and there is a gap in our knowledge of the contributions of DIC to aquatic carbon fluxes and cycling processes. Here, we present the THINCARB model (THermodynamic modelling of INorganic CARBon), which uses widely-measured determinands (pH, alkalinity and temperature) to calculate DIC concentrations, speciation (bicarbonate, HCO3(-); carbonate, CO3(2-); and dissolved carbon dioxide, H2CO3(⁎)) and excess partial pressures of carbon dioxide (EpCO2) in freshwaters. If calcium concentration measurements are available, THINCARB also calculates calcite saturation. THINCARB was applied to the 39-year Harmonised Monitoring Scheme (HMS) dataset, encompassing all the major British rivers discharging to the coastal zone. Model outputs were combined with the HMS dissolved organic carbon (DOC) datasets, and with spatial land use, geology, digital elevation and hydrological datasets. We provide a first national-scale evaluation of: the spatial and temporal variability in DIC concentrations and fluxes in British rivers; the contributions of DIC and DOC to total dissolved carbon (TDC); and the contributions to DIC from HCO3(-) and CO3(2-) from weathering sources and H2CO3(⁎) from microbial respiration. DIC accounted for >50% of TDC concentrations in 87% of the HMS samples. In the seven largest British rivers, DIC accounted for an average of 80% of the TDC flux (ranging from 57% in the upland River Tay, to 91% in the lowland River Thames). DIC fluxes exceeded DOC fluxes, even under high-flow conditions, including in the Rivers Tay and Tweed, draining upland peaty catchments. Given that particulate organic carbon fluxes from UK rivers are consistently lower than DOC fluxes, DIC fluxes are therefore also the major source of total carbon fluxes to the coastal zone. These results demonstrate the importance of accounting for DIC concentrations and fluxes for quantifying carbon transfers from land

  17. Recent developments in inorganically filled carbon nanotubes: successes and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ujjal K Gautam, Pedro M F J Costa, Yoshio Bando, Xiaosheng Fang, Liang Li, Masataka Imura and Dmitri Golberg

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs are a unique class of nanomaterials that can be imagined as rolled graphene sheets. The inner hollow of a CNT provides an extremely small, one-dimensional space for storage of materials. In the last decade, enormous effort has been spent to produce filled CNTs that combine the properties of both the host CNT and the guest filling material. CNTs filled with various inorganic materials such as metals, alloys, semiconductors and insulators have been obtained using different synthesis approaches including capillary filling and chemical vapor deposition. Recently, several potential applications have emerged for these materials, such as the measurement of temperature at the nanoscale, nano-spot welding, and the storage and delivery of extremely small quantities of materials. A clear distinction between this class of materials and other nanostructures is the existence of an enormous interfacial area between the CNT and the filling matter. Theoretical investigations have shown that the lattice mismatch and strong exchange interaction of CNTs with the guest material across the interface should result in reordering of the guest crystal structure and passivation of the surface dangling bonds and thus yielding new and interesting physical properties. Despite preliminary successes, there remain many challenges in realizing applications of CNTs filled with inorganic materials, such as a comprehensive understanding of their growth and physical properties and control of their structural parameters. In this article, we overview research on filled CNT nanomaterials with special emphasis on recent progress and key achievements. We also discuss the future scope and the key challenges emerging out of a decade of intensive research on these fascinating materials.

  18. Stable Carbon Isotope Record in a Palau Sclerosponge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grottoli, A. G.

    2002-12-01

    The ratio of stable carbon isotopes (δ13C) deposited in the calcium carbonate skeleton of marine sclerosponges appears to record the carbon isotopic composition of seawater mixed-layer dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13CDIC). Thus the δ13C signature chronicled in sclerosponge skeletons offers a promising multi-century proxy record of seawater mixed-layer δ13CDIC throughout the tropics. Here, a high-resolution (0.1 mm) δ13C record for a 7.7 cm Acanthocheatetes wellsi sclerosponge from Palau (7N, 134W) is presented. At a published growth rate of 0.45 mm per year, this record spans ~s170 years beginning in July 2001 and going back to 1831. The δ13C values for a definitive 10-year A. wellsi record spanning 1989-1998 were similar to δ13C values here for the first 4.7 mm of the record providing supporting evidence for the growth rate. The sclerosponge δ13C shows a distinct Seuss Effect. At the time this abstract was submitted, the analysis of the first 16 mm of the sclerosponge revealed a significant decrease in δ13C with time [δ13C = 0.02 (distance) + 2.64, r2 = 0.73, p < 0.0001, where time is marked by distance in millimeters from the growing edge] corresponding to a decrease in δ13C of 0.076‰ per decade. For comparison, published low-frequency measurements in Australian, New Caledonian and Jamaican sclerosponges have yielded decreases in δ13C of ~s0.05 to 0.08 ‰ per decade over the past 40 years. Preliminary interpretation of the data indicates that the amount of atmospheric CO2 contributing to the seawater δ13CDIC at Palau is intermediate to Australia and Jamaica. In addition, visual examination of the δ13C record reveals regular fluctuation in δ13C that may correspond to annual variability in δ13CDIC. This research presents the first century or longer sclerosponge δ13C record from the northwester equatorial Pacific.

  19. Competition for inorganic carbon between oxygenic and anoxygenic phototrophs in a hypersaline microbial mat, Guerrero Negro, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finke, Niko; Hoehler, Tori M; Polerecky, Lubos; Buehring, Benjamin; Thamdrup, Bo

    2013-05-01

    While most oxygenic phototrophs harvest light only in the visible range (400-700 nm, VIS), anoxygenic phototrophs can harvest near infrared light (> 700 nm, NIR). To study interactions between the photosynthetic guilds we used microsensors to measure oxygen and gross oxygenic photosynthesis (gOP) in a hypersaline microbial mat under full (VIS + NIR) and VIS illumination. Under normal dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentrations (2 mM), volumetric rates of gOP were reduced up to 65% and areal rates by 16-31% at full compared with VIS illumination. This effect was enhanced (reduction up to 100% in volumetric, 50% in areal rates of gOP) when DIC was lowered to 1 mM, but diminished at 10 mM DIC or lowered pH. In conclusion, under full-light illumination anoxygenic phototrophs are able to reduce the activity of oxygenic phototrophs by efficiently competing for inorganic carbon within the highly oxygenated layer. Anoxygenic photosynthesis, calculated from the difference in gOP under full and VIS illumination, represented between 10% and 40% of the C-fixation. The DIC depletion in the euphotic zone as well as the significant C-fixation by anoxygenic phototrophs in the oxic layer influences the carbon isotopic composition of the mat, which needs to be taken into account when interpreting isotopic biosignals in geological records.

  20. Mass transfer and carbon isotope evolution in natural water systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigley, T.M.L.; Plummer, L.N.; Pearson, F.J.

    1978-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical treatment of the evolution of the carbon isotopes C13 and C14 in natural waters and in precipitates which derive from such waters. The effects of an arbitrary number of sources (such as dissolution of carbonate minerals and oxidation of organic material) and sinks (such as mineral precipitation, CO2 degassing and production of methane), and of equilibrium fractionation between solid, gas and aqueous phases are considered. The results are expressed as equations relating changes in isotopic composition to changes in conventional carbonate chemistry. One implication of the equations is that the isotopic composition of an aqueous phase may approach a limiting value whenever there are simultaneous inputs and outputs of carbonate. In order to unambiguously interpret isotopic data from carbonate precipitates and identify reactants and products in reacting natural waters, it is essential that isotopic changes are determined chiefly by reactant and product stoichiometry, independent of reaction path. We demonstrate that this is so by means of quantitative examples. The evolution equations are applied to: 1. (1) carbon-14 dating of groundwaters; 2. (2) interpretation of the isotopic composition of carbonate precipitates, carbonate cements and diagenetically altered carbonates; and 3. (3) the identification of chemical reaction stoichiometry. These applications are illustrated by examples which show the variation of ??C13 in solutions and in precipitates formed under a variety of conditions involving incongruent dissolution, CO2 degassing, methane production and mineral precipitation. ?? 1978.

  1. Strongly coupled inorganic-nano-carbon hybrid materials for energy storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hailiang; Dai, Hongjie

    2013-04-07

    The global shift of energy production from fossil fuels to renewable energy sources requires more efficient and reliable electrochemical energy storage devices. In particular, the development of electric or hydrogen powered vehicles calls for much-higher-performance batteries, supercapacitors and fuel cells than are currently available. In this review, we present an approach to synthesize electrochemical energy storage materials to form strongly coupled hybrids (SC-hybrids) of inorganic nanomaterials and novel graphitic nano-carbon materials such as carbon nanotubes and graphene, through nucleation and growth of nanoparticles at the functional groups of oxidized graphitic nano-carbon. We show that the inorganic-nano-carbon hybrid materials represent a new approach to synthesize electrode materials with higher electrochemical performance than traditional counterparts made by simple physical mixtures of electrochemically active inorganic particles and conducting carbon materials. The inorganic-nano-carbon hybrid materials are novel due to possible chemical bonding between inorganic nanoparticles and oxidized carbon, affording enhanced charge transport and increased rate capability of electrochemical materials without sacrificing specific capacity. Nano-carbon with various degrees of oxidation provides a novel substrate for nanoparticle nucleation and growth. The interactions between inorganic precursors and oxidized-carbon substrates provide a degree of control over the morphology, size and structure of the resulting inorganic nanoparticles. This paper reviews the recent development of inorganic-nano-carbon hybrid materials for electrochemical energy storage and conversion, including the preparation and functionalization of graphene sheets and carbon nanotubes to impart oxygen containing groups and defects, and methods of synthesis of nanoparticles of various morphologies on oxidized graphene and carbon nanotubes. We then review the applications of the SC

  2. Stable carbon and oxygen isotope study on benthic foraminifera: Implication for microhabitat preferences and interspecies correlation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ajoy K Bhaumik; Shiv Kumar; Shilpi Ray; G K Vishwakarma; Anil K Gupta; Pushpendra Kumar; Kalachand Sain

    2017-07-01

    Stable isotopes of benthic foraminifera have widely been applied in micropalaeontological research to understand vital effects in foraminifera. Isotopic fractionations are mainly controlled by ontogeny, bottom/pore water chemistry, habitat preference, kinetic effect and respiration. Discontinuous abundance of a species for isotopic analysis has forced us to select multiple species from down-core samples. Thus standardisation factors are required to convert isotopic values of one species with respect to other species. The present study is pursued on isotopic values of different pairs of benthic foraminifera from the Krishna–Godavari basin and Peru offshore to understand habitat-wise isotopic variation and estimation of isotopic correction factors for the paired species (Cibicides wuellerstorfi–Bulimina marginata, Ammonia spp.–Loxostomum amygdalaeformis and Bolivina seminuda–Nonionella auris). Infaunal species (B. marginata, Ammonia spp. and N. auris) show a lighter carbon isotopic excursion with respect to the epifaunal to shallow infaunal forms (C. wuellerstorfi, L. amygdalaeformis and B. seminuda). These lighter δ13C values are related to utilisation of CO2 produced by anaerobic remineralisation of organic matter. However, enrichment of δ18O for the deeper microhabitat (bearing lower pH and decreased CO32−) is only recorded in case of B. marginata. It is reverse in case of N. auris and related to utilisation of respiratory CO2 and internal dissolve inorganic carbon pool. Estimation of interspecies isotopic correction factors for the species pairs (δ13C of C. wuellerstorfi–B. marginata, L. amygdalaeformis–Ammonia spp., N. auris–B. seminuda) and δ18O of C. wuellerstorfi–B. marginata are statistically reliable and may be used in palaeoecological studies.

  3. Isotopic studies of Yucca Mountain soil fluids and carbonate pedogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McConnaughey, T.A.; Whelan, J.F.; Wickland, K.P.; Moscati, R.J.

    1994-12-31

    Secondary carbonates occurring within the soils, faults, and subsurface fractures of Yucca Mountain contain some of the best available records of paleoclimate and palehydrology for the potential radioactive waste repository site. This article discusses conceptual and analytical advances being made with regard to the interpretation of stable isotope data from pedogenic carbonates, specifically related to the {sup 13}C content of soil CO{sub 2}, CaCO{sub 3}, precipitation mechanisms, and isotopic fractionations between parent fluids and precipitating carbonates. The {sup 13}C content of soil carbon dioxide from Yucca Mountain and vicinity shows most of the usual patterns expected in such contexts: Decreasing {sup 13}C content with depth decreasing {sup 13}C with altitude and reduced {sup 13}C during spring. These patterns exist within the domain of a noisy data set; soil and vegetational heterogeneities, weather, and other factors apparently contribute to isotopic variability in the system. Several soil calcification mechanisms appear to be important, involving characteristic physical and chemical environments and isotopic fractionations. When CO{sub 2} loss from thin soil solutions is an important driving factor, carbonates may contain excess heavy isotopes, compared to equilibrium precipitation with soil fluids. When root calcification serves as a proton generator for plant absorption of soil nutrients, heavy isotope deficiencies are likely. Successive cycles of dissolution and reprecipitation mix and redistribute pedogenic carbonates, and tend to isotopically homogenize and equilibrate pedogenic carbonates with soil fluids.

  4. Intramolecular carbon isotope distribution of acetic acid in vinegar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Ryota; Yamada, Keita; Kikuchi, Makiko; Hirano, Satoshi; Yoshida, Naohiro

    2011-09-14

    Compound-specific carbon isotope analysis of acetic acid is useful for origin discrimination and quality control of vinegar. Intramolecular carbon isotope distributions, which are each carbon isotope ratios of the methyl and carboxyl carbons in the acetic acid molecule, may be required to obtain more detailed information to discriminate such origin. In this study, improved gas chromatography-pyrolysis-gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-Py-GC-C-IRMS) combined with headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) was used to measure the intramolecular carbon isotope distributions of acetic acid in 14 Japanese vinegars. The results demonstrated that the methyl carbons of acetic acid molecules in vinegars produced from plants were mostly isotopically depleted in (13)C relative to the carboxyl carbon. Moreover, isotopic differences (δ(13)C(carboxyl) - δ(13)C(methyl)) had a wide range from -0.3 to 18.2‰, and these values differed among botanical origins, C3, C4, and CAM plants.

  5. The isotope composition of inorganic germanium in seawater and deep sea sponges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillermic, Maxence; Lalonde, Stefan V.; Hendry, Katharine R.; Rouxel, Olivier J.

    2017-09-01

    Although dissolved concentrations of germanium (Ge) and silicon (Si) in modern seawater are tightly correlated, uncertainties still exist in the modern marine Ge cycle. Germanium stable isotope systematics in marine systems should provide additional constraints on marine Ge sources and sinks, however the low concentration of Ge in seawater presents an analytical challenge for isotopic measurement. Here, we present a new method of pre-concentration of inorganic Ge from seawater which was applied to measure three Ge isotope profiles in the Southern Ocean and deep seawater from the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. Germanium isotopic measurements were performed on Ge amounts as low as 2.6 ng using a double-spike approach and a hydride generation system coupled to a MC-ICP-MS. Germanium was co-precipitated with iron hydroxide and then purified through anion-exchange chromatography. Results for the deep (i.e. >1000 m depth) Pacific Ocean off Hawaii (nearby Loihi Seamount) and the deep Atlantic off Bermuda (BATS station) showed nearly identical δ74/70Ge values at 3.19 ± 0.31‰ (2SD, n = 9) and 2.93 ± 0.10‰ (2SD, n = 2), respectively. Vertical distributions of Ge concentration and isotope composition in the deep Southern Ocean for water depth > 1300 m yielded an average δ74/70Ge = 3.13 ± 0.25‰ (2SD, n = 14) and Ge/Si = 0.80 ± 0.09 μmol/mol (2SD, n = 12). Significant variations in δ74/70Ge, from 2.62 to 3.71‰, were measured in the first 1000 m in one station of the Southern Ocean near Sars Seamount in the Drake Passage, with the heaviest values measured in surface waters. Isotope fractionation by diatoms during opal biomineralization may explain the enrichment in heavy isotopes for both Ge and Si in surface seawater. However, examination of both oceanographic parameters and δ74/70Ge values suggest also that water mass mixing and potential contribution of shelf-derived Ge also could contribute to the variations. Combining these results with new Ge isotope data

  6. Clumped-isotope thermometry of magnesium carbonates in ultramafic rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    García del Real, Pablo; Maher, Kate; Kluge, Tobias; Bird, Dennis K.; Brown, Gordon E.; John, Cédric M.

    2016-11-01

    Magnesium carbonate minerals produced by reaction of H2O-CO2 with ultramafic rocks occur in a wide range of paragenetic and tectonic settings and can thus provide insights into a variety of geologic processes, including (1) deposition of ore-grade, massive-vein cryptocrystalline magnesite; (2) formation of hydrous magnesium carbonates in weathering environments; and (3) metamorphic carbonate alteration of ultramafic rocks. However, the application of traditional geochemical and isotopic methods to infer temperatures of mineralization, the nature of mineralizing fluids, and the mechanisms controlling the transformation of dissolved CO2 into magnesium carbonates in these settings is difficult because the fluids are usually not preserved. Clumped-isotope compositions of magnesium carbonates provide a means to determine primary mineralization or (re)equilibration temperature, which permits the reconstruction of geologic processes that govern magnesium carbonate formation. We first provide an evaluation of the acid fractionation correction for magnesium carbonates using synthetic magnesite and hydromagnesite, along with natural metamorphic magnesite and low-temperature hydromagnesite precipitated within a mine adit. We show that the acid fractionation correction for magnesium carbonates is virtually indistinguishable from other carbonate acid fractionation corrections given current mass spectrometer resolution and error. In addition, we employ carbonate clumped-isotope thermometry on natural magnesium carbonates from various geologic environments and tectonic settings. Cryptocrystalline magnesite vein deposits from California (Red Mountain magnesite mine), Austria (Kraubath locality), Turkey (Tutluca mine, Eskişehir district) and Iran (Derakht-Senjed deposit) exhibit broadly uniform Δ47 compositions that yield apparent clumped-isotope temperatures that average 23.7 ± 5.0 °C. Based on oxygen isotope thermometry, these clumped-isotope temperatures suggest

  7. Carbon isotopes of graphite: Implications on fluid history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.J. Luque

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Stable carbon isotope geochemistry provides important information for the recognition of fundamental isotope exchange processes related to the movement of carbon in the lithosphere and permits the elaboration of models for the global carbon cycle. Carbon isotope ratios in fluid-deposited graphite are powerful tools for unravelling the ultimate origin of carbon (organic matter, mantle, or carbonates and help to constrain the fluid history and the mechanisms involved in graphite deposition. Graphite precipitation in fluid-deposited occurrences results from CO2- and/or CH4-bearing aqueous fluids. Fluid flow can be considered as both a closed (without replenishment of the fluid or an open system (with renewal of the fluid by successive fluid batches. In closed systems, carbon isotope systematics in graphite is mainly governed by Rayleigh precipitation and/or by changes in temperature affecting the fractionation factor between fluid and graphite. Such processes result in zoned graphite crystals or in successive graphite generations showing, in both cases, isotopic variation towards progressive 13C or 12C enrichment (depending upon the dominant carbon phase in the fluid, CO2 or CH4, respectively. In open systems, in which carbon is episodically introduced along the fracture systems, the carbon systematics is more complex and individual graphite crystals may display oscillatory zoning because of Rayleigh precipitation or heterogeneous variations of δ13C values when mixing of fluids or changes in the composition of the fluids are the mechanisms responsible for graphite precipitation.

  8. Bioengineering aspects of inorganic carbon supply to mass algal cultures. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldman, J.C.

    1980-06-01

    The work included in this report is part of an ongoing study (currently funded by the Solar Energy Research Institute - Subcontract No. XR-9-8144-1) on the inorganic carbon requirements of microalgae under mass culture conditions and covers the period June 1, 1978 through May 31, 1979. It is divided into two parts appended herein. The first part is a literature review on the inorganic carbon chemical system in relation to algal growth requirements, and the second part deals with the kinetics of inorganic carbon-limited growth of two freshwater chlorophytes including the effect of carbon limitation on cellular chemical composition. Additional experiment research covered under this contract was reported in the Proceedings of the 3rd Annual Biomass Energy Systems Conferences, pp. 25-32, Bioengineering aspects of inorganic carbon supply to mass algal cultures. Report No. SERI/TP-33-285.

  9. Carbon Stable Isotope Analysis of Methylmercury Toxin in Biological Materials by Gas Chromatography Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masbou, Jeremy; Point, David; Guillou, Gaël; Sonke, Jeroen E; Lebreton, Benoit; Richard, Pierre

    2015-12-01

    A critical component of the biogeochemical cycle of mercury (Hg) is the transformation of inorganic Hg to neurotoxic monomethylmercury (CH3Hg). Humans are exposed to CH3Hg by consuming marine fish, yet the origin of CH3Hg in fish is a topic of debate. The carbon stable isotopic composition (δ(13)C) embedded in the methyl group of CH3Hg remains unexplored. This new isotopic information at the molecular level is thought to represent a new proxy to trace the carbon source at the origin of CH3Hg. Here, we present a compound-specific stable isotope analysis (CSIA) technique for the determination of the δ(13)C value of CH3Hg in biological samples by gas chromatography combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometry analysis (GC-C-IRMS). The method consists first of calibrating a CH3Hg standard solution for δ(13)C CSIA. This was achieved by comparing three independent approaches consisting of the derivatization and halogenation of the CH3Hg standard solution. The determination of δ(13)C(CH3Hg) values on natural biological samples was performed by combining a CH3Hg selective extraction, purification, and halogenation followed by GC-C-IRMS analysis. Reference δ(13)C values were established for a tuna fish certified material (ERM-CE464) originating from the Adriatic Sea (δ(13)C(CH3Hg) = -22.1 ± 1.5‰, ± 2 SD). This value is similar to the δ(13)C value of marine algal-derived particulate organic carbon (δ(13)CPOC = -21‰).

  10. Assessment of the processes controlling seasonal variations of dissolved inorganic carbon in the North Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bozec, Yann; Thomas, Helmuth; Schiettecatte, Laure-Sophie; Borges, Alberto V.; Elkalay, Khalid; Baar, Hein J.W. de

    2006-01-01

    We used a seasonal North Sea data set comprising dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2), and inorganic nutrients to assess the abiotic and biological processes governing the monthly variations of DIC. During winter, advection and air–sea exchange of CO2 control and increase

  11. Late Carboniferous to Late Permian carbon isotope stratigraphy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buggisch, Werner; Krainer, Karl; Schaffhauser, Maria

    2015-01-01

    An integrated study of the litho-, bio-, and isotope stratigraphy of carbonates in the Southern Alps was undertaken in order to better constrain δ13C variations during the Late Carboniferous to Late Permian. The presented high resolution isotope curves are based on 1299 δ13Ccarb and 396 δ13Corg a...

  12. BIODEGRADATION OF FLUORANTHENE AS MONITORED USING STABLE CARBON ISOTOPES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The measurement of stable isotope ratios of carbon (d13C values) was investigated as a viable technique to monitor the intrinsic bioremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Biometer-flask experiments were conducted in which the bacterium, Sphingomonas paucimobilis,...

  13. Stable carbon isotope ratios from archaeological charcoal as palaeoenvironmental indicators

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Hall, G

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The potential to provide environmental proxies using stable carbon isotopes from modern and archaeological charcoal is explored. Experiments on modern Podocarpus (Yellowwoods) show that δ13C values of stems, branches and charcoal preserve proxy...

  14. Electron–Rotor Interaction in Organic–Inorganic Lead Iodide Perovskites Discovered by Isotope Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Jue; Yang, Mengjin; Ma, Xiangchao; Schaller, Richard D.; Liu, Gang; Kong, Lingping; Yang, Ye; Beard, Matthew C.; Lesslie, Michael; Dai, Ying; Huang, Baibiao; Zhu, Kai; Xu, Tao

    2016-08-04

    We report on the carrier-rotor coupling effect in perovskite organic-inorganic hybrid lead iodide (CH3NH3PbI3) compounds discovered by isotope effects. Deuterated organic-inorganic perovskite compounds including CH3ND3PbI3, CD3NH3PbI3, and CD3ND3PbI3 were synthesized. Devices made from regular CH3NH3PbI3 and deuterated CH3ND3PbI3 exhibit comparable performance in band gap, current-voltage, carrier mobility, and power conversion efficiency. However, a time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) study reveals that CH3NH3PbI3 exhibits notably longer carrier lifetime than that of CH3ND3PbI3, in both thin-film and single-crystal formats. Furthermore, the comparison in carrier lifetime between CD3NH3PbI3 and CH3ND3PbI3 single crystals suggests that vibrational modes in methylammonium (MA+) have little impact on carrier lifetime. In contrast, the fully deuterated compound CD3ND3PbI3 reconfirmed the trend of decreasing carrier lifetime upon the increasing moment of inertia of cationic MA+. Polaron model elucidates the electron-rotor interaction.

  15. Inorganic membranes for carbon capture and power generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snider, Matthew T.

    Inorganic membranes are under consideration for cost-effective reductions of carbon emissions from coal-fired power plants, both in the capture of pollutants post-firing and in the direct electrochemical conversion of coal-derived fuels for improved plant efficiency. The suitability of inorganic membrane materials for these purposes stems as much from thermal and chemical stability in coal plant operating conditions as from high performance in gas separations and power generation. Hydrophilic, micro-porous zeolite membrane structures are attractive for separating CO2 from N2 in gaseous waste streams due to the attraction of CO2 to the membrane surface and micropore walls that gives the advantage to CO2 transport. Recent studies have indicated that retention of the templating agent used in zeolite synthesis can further block N2 from the micropore interior and significantly improve CO2/N2 selectivity. However, the role of the templating agent in micro-porous transport has not been well investigated. In this work, gas sorption studies were conducted by high-pressure thermo-gravimetric analysis on Zeolite Y membrane materials to quantify the effect of the templating agent on CO2, N2, and H2O adsorption/desorption, as well as to examine the effect of humidification on overall membrane performance. In equilibrium conditions, the N2 sorption enthalpy was nearly unchanged by the presence of the templating agent, but the N2 pore occupation was reduced ˜1000x. Thus, the steric nature of the blocking of N2 from the micropores by the templating agent was confirmed. CO2 and H2O sorption enthalpies were similarly unaffected by the templating agent, and the micropore occupations were only reduced as much as the void volume taken up by the templating agent. Thus, the steric blocking effect did not occur for molecules more strongly attracted to the micropore walls. Additionally, in time-transient measurements the CO 2 and H2O mobilities were significantly enhanced by the presence

  16. VIIRSN Level-3 Standard Mapped Image, Particulate Inorganic Carbon, Monthly, 4km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA CoastWatch distributes Particulate Inorganic Carbon data from ther NPP-Suomi spacecraft. Measurements are gathered by VIIRS instrument carried aboard the...

  17. VIIRSN Level-3 Standard Mapped Image, Particulate Inorganic Carbon, 8-Day, 4km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA CoastWatch distributes Particulate Inorganic Carbon data from the NPP-Suomi Spacecraft Measurements are gathered by the VIIRS instrument carried aboard the...

  18. Rapid Field Measurement of Dissolved Inorganic Carbon Based on CO{sub 2} Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VESPER, DJ, Edenborn, Harry

    2012-01-01

    Dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) is commonly measured in water and is an important parameter for understanding carbonate equilibrium, carbon cycling, and water-rock interaction. While accurate measurements can be made in the analytical laboratory, we have developed a rapid, portable technique that can be used to obtain accurate and precise data in the field as well.

  19. A simple, gravimetric method to quantify inorganic carbon in calcareous soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Total carbon (TC) in calcareous soils has two components: inorganic carbon (IC) as calcite and or dolomite and organic carbon (OC) in the soil organic matter. The IC must be measured and subtracted from TC to obtain OC. Our objective was to develop a simple gravimetric technique to quantify IC. Th...

  20. Equilibrium Fe isotope fractionation between inorganic aqueous Fe(III) and the siderophore complex, Fe(III)-desferrioxamine B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dideriksen, Knud; Baker, Joel A.; Stipp, Susan Louise Svane

    2008-01-01

    In oxic oceans, most of the dissolved iron (Fe) exists as complexes with siderophore-like, strongly coordinating organic ligands. Thus, the isotope composition of the little amount of free inorganic Fe that is available for precipitation and preservation in the geological record may largely...... differently complexed Fe(III) pools were separated by addition of Na2CO3, which led to immediate precipitation of the inorganic Fe without causing significant dissociation of Fe-desferrioxamine complexes. Experiments using enriched 57Fe tracer showed that isotopic equilibration between the 57Fe......(III)-bearing environments, such as soils and rivers, and may, for example, largely control the Fe isotope composition of marine Fe–Mn crusts....

  1. Isotopic analysis of dissolved organic carbon in produced water brines by wet chemical oxidation and cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Randal; Conaway, Christopher; Saad, Nabil; Kharaka, Yousif

    2013-04-01

    Identification of fluid migration and escape from intentionally altered subsurface geologic systems, such as in hydraulic fracturing, enhanced oil recovery, and carbon sequestration activities, is an important issue for environmental regulators based on the traction that the "fracking" process is gathering across the United States. Given diverse injected fluid compositions and the potential for toxic or regulated compounds to be released, one of the most important steps in the process is accurately identifying evidence of injected fluid escape during and after injection processes. An important tool in identifying differences between the natural groundwater and injected fluid is the isotopic composition of dissolved constituents including inorganic components such as Sr and carbon isotopes of the dissolved organic compounds. Since biological processes in the mesothermal subsurface can rapidly alter the organic composition of a fluid, stable carbon isotopes of the dissolved organic compounds (DOC) are an effective means to identify differences in the origin of two fluids, especially when coupled with inorganic compound analyses. The burgeoning field of cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) for isotopic analysis presents an opportunity to obtain rapid, reliable and cost-effective isotopic measurements of DOC in potentially affected groundwater for the identification of leakage or the improvement of hydrogeochemical pathway models. Here we adapt the use of the novel hyphenated TOC-CRDS carbon isotope analyzer for the analysis of DOC in produced water by wet oxidation and describe the methods to evaluate performance and obtain useful information at higher salinities. Our methods are applied to a specific field example in a CO2-enhanced EOR field in Cranfield, Mississippi (USA) as a means to demonstrate the ability to distinguish natural and injected DOC using the stable isotopic composition of the dissolved organic carbon when employing the novel TOC-CRDS instrumentation

  2. Isotopic fractionation of alkali earth metals during carbonate precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yotsuya, T.; Ohno, T.; Muramatsu, Y.; Shimoda, G.; Goto, K. T.

    2014-12-01

    The alkaline earth metals such as magnesium, calcium and strontium play an important role in a variety of geochemical and biological processes. The element ratios (Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca) in marine carbonates have been used as proxies for reconstruction of the past environment. Recently several studies suggested that the study for the isotopic fractionation of the alkaline earth metals in marine carbonates has a potentially significant influence in geochemical research fields (e.g. Eisenhauer et al., 2009). The aim of this study is to explore the influence of carbonate polymorphs (Calcite and Aragonite) and environmental factors (e.g., temperature, precipitation rate) on the level of isotopic fractionation of the alkaline earth metals. We also examined possible correlations between the level of isotopic fractionation of Ca and that of other alkaline earth metals during carbonate precipitation. In order to determine the isotope fractionation factor of Mg, Ca and Sr during carbonate precipitation, calcite and aragonite were synthesized from calcium bicarbonate solution in which the amount of magnesium was controlled based on Kitano method. Calcium carbonates were also prepared from the mixture of calcium chlorite and sodium hydrogen carbonate solutions. The isotope fractionation factors were measured by MC-ICPMS. Results suggested that the level of isotopic fractionation of Mg during carbonate precipitation was correlated with that of Sr and that the change of the carbonate crystal structure could make differences of isotopic fractionations of Mg and Ca, however no difference was found in the case of Sr. In this presentation, the possible mechanism will be discussed.

  3. Isotopic composition of inorganic mercury and methylmercury downstream of a historical gold mining region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Patrick M.; Blum, Joel D.; Singer, Michael B.; Marvin-DiPasquale, Mark C.; Tsui, Martin T.K.

    2016-01-01

    We measured total mercury (THg) and monomethyl mercury (MMHg) concentrations and mercury (Hg) isotopic compositions in sediment and aquatic organisms from the Yuba River (California, USA) to identify Hg sources and biogeochemical transformations downstream of a historical gold mining region. Sediment THg concentrations and δ202Hg decreased from the upper Yuba Fan to the lower Yuba Fan and the Feather River. These results are consistent with the release of Hg during gold mining followed by downstream mixing and dilution. The Hg isotopic composition of Yuba Fan sediment (δ202Hg = −0.38 ± 0.17‰ and Δ199Hg = 0.04 ± 0.03‰; mean ± 1 SD, n = 7) provides a fingerprint of inorganic Hg (IHg) that could be methylated locally or after transport downstream. The isotopic composition of MMHg in the Yuba River food web was estimated using biota with a range of %MMHg (the percent of THg present as MMHg) and compared to IHg in sediment, algae, and the food web. The estimated δ202Hg of MMHg prior to photodegradation (−1.29 to −1.07‰) was lower than that of IHg and we suggest this is due to mass-dependent fractionation (MDF) of up to −0.9‰ between IHg and MMHg. This result is in contrast to net positive MDF (+0.4 to +0.8‰) previously observed in lakes, estuaries, coastal oceans, and forests. We hypothesize that this unique relationship could be due to differences in the extent or pathway of biotic MMHg degradation in stream environments.

  4. Isotopic Composition of Inorganic Mercury and Methylmercury Downstream of a Historical Gold Mining Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Patrick M; Blum, Joel D; Singer, Michael Bliss; Marvin-DiPasquale, Mark; Tsui, Martin T K

    2016-02-16

    We measured total mercury (THg) and monomethyl mercury (MMHg) concentrations and mercury (Hg) isotopic compositions in sediment and aquatic organisms from the Yuba River (California, USA) to identify Hg sources and biogeochemical transformations downstream of a historical gold mining region. Sediment THg concentrations and δ(202)Hg decreased from the upper Yuba Fan to the lower Yuba Fan and the Feather River. These results are consistent with the release of Hg during gold mining followed by downstream mixing and dilution. The Hg isotopic composition of Yuba Fan sediment (δ(202)Hg = -0.38 ± 0.17‰ and Δ(199)Hg = 0.04 ± 0.03‰; mean ± 1 SD, n = 7) provides a fingerprint of inorganic Hg (IHg) that could be methylated locally or after transport downstream. The isotopic composition of MMHg in the Yuba River food web was estimated using biota with a range of %MMHg (the percent of THg present as MMHg) and compared to IHg in sediment, algae, and the food web. The estimated δ(202)Hg of MMHg prior to photodegradation (-1.29 to -1.07‰) was lower than that of IHg and we suggest this is due to mass-dependent fractionation (MDF) of up to -0.9‰ between IHg and MMHg. This result is in contrast to net positive MDF (+0.4 to +0.8‰) previously observed in lakes, estuaries, coastal oceans, and forests. We hypothesize that this unique relationship could be due to differences in the extent or pathway of biotic MMHg degradation in stream environments.

  5. An assessment of geochemical preparation methods prior to organic carbon concentration and carbon isotope ratio analyses of fine-grained sedimentary rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    KöNitzer, Sven F.; Leng, Melanie J.; Davies, Sarah J.; Stephenson, Michael H.

    2012-09-01

    This study summarizes organic carbon isotope (δ13C) and total organic carbon (TOC) data from a series of tests undertaken to provide an appropriate methodology for pre-analysis treatment of mudstones from an Upper Carboniferous sedimentary succession, in order to develop a consistent preparation procedure. The main treatments involved removing both inorganic carbonate and hydrocarbons (which might be extraneous) before δ13C and TOC analysis. The results show that decarbonating using hydrochloric acid causes significant reduction in δ13C and total carbon (TC) of the bulk material due to the removal of inorganic carbonate. These changes are most pronounced where soluble calcium carbonate (rather than Ca-Mg-Fe carbonate) is present. Deoiled samples show only slightly higher mean δ13C where visible bitumen was extracted from the bulk sample. Moreover, the isotopic signatures of the extracts are closely correlated to those of their respective bulk samples, suggesting that small yields of hydrocarbons were generated in situ with no isotopic fractionation. In addition, further δ13C and TC analyses were performed on samples where mixing of oil-based drilling mud with brecciated core material had been undertaken. Brecciated mudstone material did not display distinct isotopic signals compared to the surrounding fine-grained material. Overall we show that the most accurate assessment of bulk organic carbon isotopes and concentration in these samples can be achieved through decarbonating the material prior to measurement via the `rinse method'. However, our results support recent findings that pre-analysis acid treatments can cause variable and unpredictable errors in δ13C and TOC values. We believe that, despite these uncertainties, the findings presented here can be applied to paleoenvironmental studies on organic matter contained within sedimentary rocks over a range of geological ages and compositions.

  6. Oxygen isotope ratios of PO4: an inorganic indicator of enzymatic activity and P metabolism and a new biomarker in the search for life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, R E; Alt, J C; Martini, A M

    2001-02-27

    The distinctive relations between biological activity and isotopic effect recorded in biomarkers (e.g., carbon and sulfur isotope ratios) have allowed scientists to suggest that life originated on this planet nearly 3.8 billion years ago. The existence of life on other planets may be similarly identified by geochemical biomarkers, including the oxygen isotope ratio of phosphate (delta(18)O(p)) presented here. At low near-surface temperatures, the exchange of oxygen isotopes between phosphate and water requires enzymatic catalysis. Because enzymes are indicative of cellular activity, the demonstration of enzyme-catalyzed PO(4)-H(2)O exchange is indicative of the presence of life. Results of laboratory experiments are presented that clearly show that delta(18)O(P) values of inorganic phosphate can be used to detect enzymatic activity and microbial metabolism of phosphate. Applications of delta(18)O(p) as a biomarker are presented for two Earth environments relevant to the search for extraterrestrial life: a shallow groundwater reservoir and a marine hydrothermal vent system. With the development of in situ analytical techniques and future planned sample return strategies, delta(18)O(p) may provide an important biosignature of the presence of life in extraterrestrial systems such as that on Mars.

  7. The leaching of inorganic species from activated carbons produced from waste tyre rubber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Miguel, G; Fowler, G D; Sollars, C J

    2002-04-01

    Waste tyre rubber can be used as a precursor for the production of high quality activated carbons. However, there is concern that inorganic impurities present in the rubber feed may restrict their use in liquid phase applications with high purity requirements. This paper presents an investigation of the presence and the leaching of inorganic species from activated carbons derived from waste tyre rubber. For the purpose of this work, a number of carbons were produced, characterised for their BET surface area and analysed for their inorganic composition. Subsequently, a number of tests were performed to evaluate the leaching of different inorganic species into solution at various pH values and carbon doses. Results showed that rubber-derived carbons contained elevated concentrations of sulphur and zinc, as well as traces of other metals such as lead, cadmium, chromium and molybdenum. Inorganic levels were significantly affected by production conditions, particularly degree of carbon activation and the nature of the gasification agent. However, leaching tests showed that the availability of these species in neutral pH conditions was very limited. Results demonstrated that, when using carbons doses comparable to those employed in water treatment works, only sulphur levels exceeded, in some occasions, health based quality standards proposed for drinking water.

  8. Using water chemistry time series to model dissolved inorganic carbon dynamics in the western Amazon basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vihermaa, Leena; Waldron, Susan; Newton, Jason

    2013-04-01

    Two small streams (New Colpita and Main Trail) and two rivers (Tambopata and La Torre), in the Tambopata National Reserve, Madre de Dios, Peru, were sampled for water chemistry (conductivity, pH and dissolved oxygen) and hydrology (stage height and flow velocity). In the small streams water chemistry and hydrology variables were logged at 15 minute intervals from Feb 2011 to November 2012. Water samples were collected from all four channels during field campaigns spanning different seasons and targeting the hydrological extremes. All the samples were analysed for dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentration and δ13C (sample size ranging from 77 to 172 depending on the drainage system) and a smaller subset for dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and particulate organic carbon (POC) concentrations. Strong positive relationships were found between conductivity and both DIC concentration and δ13C in the New Colpita stream and the La Torre river. In Tambopata river the trends were less clear and in the Main Trail stream there was very little change in DIC and isotopic composition. The conductivity data was used to model continuous DIC time series for the New Colpita stream. The modelled DIC data agreed well with the measurements; the concordance correlation coefficients between predicted and measured data were 0.91 and 0.87 for mM-DIC and δ13C-DIC, respectively. The predictions of δ13C-DIC were improved when calendar month was included in the model, which indicates seasonal differences in the δ13C-DIC conductivity relationship. At present, continuous DIC sampling still requires expensive instrumentation. Therefore, modelling DIC from a proxy variable which can be monitored continuously with ease and at relatively low cost, such as conductivity, provides a powerful alternative method of DIC determination.

  9. Isotopic studies of Yucca Mountain soil fluids and carbonate pedogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McConnaughey, T.A.; Whelan, J.F.; Wickland, K.P.; Moscati, R.J. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Secondary carbonates occurring within the soils, faults, and subsurface fractures of Yucca Mountain contain some of the best available records of paleoclimate and paleohydrology for the potential radioactive waste repository site. This article discusses conceptual and analytical advances being made with regard to the interpretation of stable isotope data from pedogenic carbonates, specifically related to the {sup 13}C content of soil CO{sub 2}, CaCO{sub 3} precipitation mechanisms, and isotopic fractionations between parent fluids and precipitating carbonates. The {sup 13}C content of soil carbon dioxide from Yucca Mountain and vicinity shows most of the usual patterns expected in such contexts: decreasing {sup 13}C content with depth (due mainly to increased importance of respired CO{sub 2}), decreasing {sup 13}C with altitude (partially due to relatively more C-3 vegetation), and reduced {sup 13}C during spring (due again to higher rates of respiration, and reduced gas permeability of wet soils). These patterns exist within the domain of a noisy data set; soil and vegetational heterogeneities, weather, and other factors apparently contribute to isotopic variability in the system. Several soil calcification mechanisms appear to be important, involving characteristic physical and chemical environments and isotopic fractionations. When CO{sub 2} loss from thin soil solutions is an important driving factor, carbonates may contain excess heavy isotopes, compared to equilibrium precipitation with soil fluids. When root calcification serves as a proton generator for plant absorption of soil nutrients, heavy isotope deficiencies are likely. Successive cycles of dissolution and reprecipitation mix and redistribute pedogenic carbonates, and tend to isotopically homogenize and equilibrate pedogenic carbonates with soil fluids.

  10. Relationships between tree height and carbon isotope discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nate G. McDowell; Barbara J. Bond; Lee T. Dickman; Michael G. Ryan; David Whitehead

    2011-01-01

    Understanding how tree size impacts leaf- and crown-level gas exchange is essential to predicting forest yields and carbon and water budgets. The stable carbon isotope ratio of organic matter has been used to examine the relationship of gas exchange to tree size for a host of species because it carries a temporally integrated signature of foliar photosynthesis and...

  11. Mantle CO2 degassing through the Icelandic crust: Evidence from carbon isotopes in groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefánsson, Andri; Sveinbjörnsdóttir, Árný E.; Heinemeier, Jan; Arnórsson, Stefán; Kjartansdóttir, Ríkey; Kristmannsdóttir, Hrefna

    2016-10-01

    Carbon isotopes of groundwater in Iceland were studied in order to determine the source and reactions of carbon at divergent plate boundaries not associated with active volcanic systems. All the waters were of meteoric origin, with temperatures of 1-130 °C, pH of ∼4.5-10.5 and dissolved inorganic carbon (∑CO2) between 1.8 and 4100 ppm. The measured range of δ13CO2 and 14CO2 in these waters was large, -27.4 to +2.0‰ and 0.6-118 pMC, respectively. The sources and reactions of dissolved inorganic carbon were studied by comparing the measured chemical and isotope composition with those simulated using isotope geochemical models. Three major sources of CO2 were identified: (1) dissolution of partially degassed basaltic rocks formed at the surface or shallow depths, (2) atmospheric CO2 through air-water exchange at surface, and (3) input of gas at depth into the groundwater systems that has similar carbon and isotope composition as the pre-erupted melt of the upper mantle and lower crust beneath Iceland. In the groundwater systems the CO2 chemistry and isotope content are modified due to carbonate mineral precipitation and changes in aqueous species distribution upon progressive water-rock interaction; these changes needed to be quantified in order to reveal the various CO2 sources. The CO2 flux of the Icelandic crust was estimated to be ∼5-10 · 1010 mol/yr with as high as 50% of the flux not associated with active volcanic centers but placed off-axis where a significant proportion of the CO2 may originate from the mantle. The mantle input of the groundwater off-axis corresponds to CO2 partial pressures of ∼10-6-1 bar and to a mantle CO2 flux of <5 · 105 mol/km2/yr for most areas and up to 125 · 105 and 1600 · 105 for the Southern Lowlands and Snæfellsnes Peninsula, respectively. The CO2 flux from active volcanic geothermal systems in Iceland was estimated to be ∼500-3000 · 105 mol CO2/km2/yr, considerably greater than the highest values observed off-axis.

  12. Dissolved inorganic carbon speciation in aquatic environments and its application to monitor algal carbon uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yimin; Zhang, Liang; Xu, Changan; Vaidyanathan, Seetharaman

    2016-01-15

    Dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) speciation is an important parameter that enables chemical and ecological changes in aquatic environments, such as the aquatic environmental impact of increasing atmospheric CO2 levels, to be monitored. We have examined and developed a sensitive and cost-effective 'back-titration' method to determine the DIC species and abundance in aqueous environments that is more accurate and reproducible than existing methods and is applicable in a range of fresh, brackish and sea waters. We propose the use of pHHCO3 (bicarbonate-dominant pH) and pH3.5 as the titration end points in the back-titration technique to accurately determine carbonate alkalinity. The proposed method has a higher accuracy and precision than other modified Gran's methods that are currently in use. The detection limit was found to be ~5 μmol kg(-1) with an accuracy within 1% and a precision (CV) within 0.2% and 0.5% at high and low level of carbonates, respectively. This method was successfully applied to monitor DIC in the aqueous medium of Nannochlopsis salina cultivation separately carried out with NaHCO3 and CO2 as the respective inorganic carbon source. The cells were able to grow in the NaHCO3 medium with a similar growth curve to cells with 0.039% CO2 (air). Increases in CO2 level stimulated lipid accumulation by diverting the fixed carbon from protein to lipids. The increased concentration of gaseous CO2 and the accompanying lower pH appears to significantly inhibit the growth of algae despite the presence of HCO3(-) when 20% CO2 was employed.

  13. Calibration of the carbonate `clumped isotope' paleotemperature proxy using mollusc shells and benthic foraminiferal tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Came, R. E.; Curry, W. B.; Weidman, C. R.; Eiler, J. M.

    2007-12-01

    It has recently been shown that the carbonate `clumped isotope' thermometer can provide temperature constraints that depend only on the isotopic composition of carbonate (in particular, on the proportion of 13C and 18O that form bonds with each other), and that do not require assumptions about the isotopic composition of the water in which the carbonate formed (Ghosh et al., 2006). Furthermore, this novel method permits the calculation of seawater δ18O based on the clumped isotope temperature estimates and the simultaneously obtained δ18O of carbonate, thereby enabling the extraction of global ice volume estimates for both the recent and distant geologic past. Here we present clumped isotope analyses of several naturally occurring marine carbonates that calcified at known temperatures in the modern ocean. First, we analyzed benthic foraminiferal tests from six high-quality multicore tops collected in the Florida Strait, spanning a temperature range of 9.3-20.2 degrees C. Second, we analyzed shallow-water mollusc shells from a variety of different climate regimes, spanning a temperature range of 2.5-26.0 degrees C. We find that the calcitic foraminiferal species Cibicidoides spp. agrees well with the inorganic calcite precipitation experiments of Ghosh et al. (2006), while the aragonitic species Hoeglundina elegans is significantly offset. Similarly, clumped isotope results obtained from aragonitic mollusc shells also reveal an offset from the Ghosh et al. (2006) trend, although the offset observed in mollusc aragonite is quite different in nature from that observed in foraminiferal aragonite. Assuming our estimates of the growth temperatures of these naturally occurring organisms are correct, these results suggest that there are vital effects associated with the stable isotope compositions of the aragonite-precipitating organisms examined in this study; further work will be required to determine their cause. Nevertheless, the internal coherence of trends for

  14. Carbon isotopic study of individual alcohol compounds in modern sediments from Nansha Islands sea area, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段毅; 文启彬; 郑国东; 罗斌杰

    1997-01-01

    Carbon isotopic compositions of individual n-alkanols and sterols in modern sediments from the Nan-sha Islands sea area are measured after derivatization to trimethylsilyl ethers by the new isotopic analytical technique of GC/C/IRMS. The effects of the three added silyl carbon atoms in every alcohol molecule on these compound isotopic compositions and the characteristics of their carbon isotopic compositions are studied. Then their biological sources are discussed using their carbon isotopic compositions.

  15. Effects of organic matter on carbonate stable isotope ratios (δ13C, δ18O values)--implications for analyses of bulk sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehlerich, Markus; Baumer, Marlene; Lücke, Andreas; Mayr, Christoph

    2013-03-30

    Stable isotope ratio (δ(13)C, δ(18)O values) analyses of carbonates can be biased by CO(2) release from organic impurities. This is most critical for carbonate isotope analyses from bulk sediments containing comparably high amounts of organic matter (OM). Several methods have been developed to remove OM prior to analyses, but none of them can be universally applied. Moreover, pretreatment methods cause isotopic bias in themselves and should probably best be avoided. Thus, it is essential to have indicators for reliable isotope values of untreated carbonate-OM mixtures. Artificial mixtures of organic compounds with a standard carbonate were analyzed to investigate the bias on carbonate isotope ratios caused by OM in the sample. The total-inorganic-carbon to total-organic-carbon ratio (TIC/TOC) was used as a measure for the " organic impurity" of the sample. The target was to evaluate TIC/TOC as a measure for sample quality and to define TIC/TOC thresholds for reliable isotope measurements of mixtures between calcium carbonate and organic compounds. The effect of organic impurities on carbonate stable isotope values depended on the specific OM compound and the respective TIC/TOC ratio. Different CO(2) release rates were determined for the pure OM compounds. A sample TIC/TOC ratio ≥0.3 was found to be a threshold for reliable measurements of the isotope composition of calcium carbonate. Bulk carbonate analyses from carbonate-OM mixtures are reliable only if the TIC/TOC values do not fall below certain thresholds. This has implications for carbonate isotope studies from bulk sediments for which the TIC/TOC ratios should be considered as an easy-to-determine measure for sample-quality assessment. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Inorganic carbon and fossil organic carbon are source of bias for quantification of sequestered carbon in mine spoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vindušková, Olga; Frouz, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Carbon sequestration in mine soils has been studied as a possibility to mitigate the rising atmospheric CO2 levels and to improve mine soil quality (Vindu\\vsková and Frouz, 2013). Moreover, these soils offer an unique opportunity to study soil carbon dynamics using the chronosequence approach (using a set of sites of different age on similar parent material). However, quantification of sequestered carbon in mine soils is often complicated by fossil organic carbon (e.g., from coal or kerogen) or inorganic carbon present in the spoil. We present a methodology for quantification of both of these common constituents of mine soils. Our recommendations are based on experiments done on post-mining soils in Sokolov basin, Czech Republic. Here, fossil organic carbon is present mainly as kerogen Type I and II and represents 2-6 wt.% C in these soils. Inorganic carbon in these soils is present mainly as siderite (FeCO3), calcite (CaCO3), and dolomite (CaMg(CO3)2). All of these carbonates are often found in the overburden of coal seams thus being a common constituent of post-mining soils in the world. Vindu\\vsková O, Frouz J, 2013. Soil carbon accumulation after open-cast coal and oil shale mining in Northern Hemisphere: a quantitative review. ENVIRONMENTAL EARTH SCIENCES, 69: 1685-1698. Vindu\\vsková O, Dvořáček V, Prohasková A, Frouz J. 2014. Distinguishing recent and fossil organic matter - A critical step in evaluation of post-mining soil development - using near infrared spectroscopy. ECOLOGICAL ENGINEERING. 73: 643-648. Vindu\\vsková O, Sebag D, Cailleau G, Brus J, Frouz J. 2015. Methodological comparison for quantitative analysis of fossil and recently derived carbon in mine soils with high content of aliphatic kerogen. ORGANIC GEOCHEMISTRY, 89-90:14-22.

  17. Stable carbon isotope ratios of intact GDGTs indicate heterogeneous sources to marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Ann; Hurley, Sarah J.; Walter, Sunita R. Shah; Kusch, Stephanie; Lichtin, Samantha; Zhang, Yi Ge

    2016-05-01

    Thaumarchaeota, the major sources of marine glycerol dibiphytanyl glycerol tetraether lipids (GDGTs), are believed to fix the majority of their carbon directly from dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). The δ13C values of GDGTs (δ13CGDGT) may be powerful tools for reconstructing variations in the ocean carbon cycle, including paleoproductivity and water mass circulation, if they can be related to values of δ13CDIC. To date, isotope measurements primarily are made on the C40 biphytane skeletons of GDGTs, rather than on complete tetraether structures. This approach erases information revealed by the isotopic heterogeneity of GDGTs within a sample and may impart an isotopic fractionation associated with the ether cleavage. To circumvent these issues, we present δ13C values for GDGTs from twelve recent sediments representing ten continental margin locations. Samples are purified by orthogonal dimensions of HPLC, followed by measurement of δ13C values by Spooling Wire Microcombustion (SWiM)-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) with 1σ precision and accuracy of ±0.25‰. Using this approach, we confirm that GDGTs, generally around -19‰, are isotopically "heavy" compared to other marine lipids. However, measured δ13CGDGT values are inconsistent with predicted values based on the 13C content of DIC in the overlying water column and the previously-published biosynthetic isotope fractionation for a pure culture of an autotrophic marine thaumarchaeon. In some sediments, the isotopic composition of individual GDGTs differs, indicating multiple source inputs. The data appear to confirm that crenarchaeol primarily is a biomarker for Thaumarchaeota, but its δ13C values still cannot be explained solely by autotrophic carbon fixation. Overall the complexity of the results suggests that both organic carbon assimilation (ca. 25% of total carbon) and multiple source(s) of exogenous GDGTs (contributing generally <30% of input to sediments) are necessary to explain the observed

  18. Carbon isotope heterogeneities in deep Earth: Recycling of surface carbon or from core?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satish-Kumar, Madhusoodhan

    2017-04-01

    Subduction of crustal materials, mantle melting and upwelling of deep mantle, in addition to a potential source from the core, largely controls the Earth's deep carbon cycle. Large variations in carbon isotopic composition between different reservoirs have been used widely to differentiate the source of carbon and to understand the carbon inventories and its recycling processes. However, how far high-temperature and hign-pressure conditions can affect the carbon isotope distribution, is a question still unanswered to clearly address the deep carbon cycle. I present here a review on carbon isotope fractionation processes in deep Earth and critically evaluate whether we can easily differentiate between surface carbon and deep carbon based on isotope characteristics. Recent experimental carbon isotope fractionation studies in the Fe-C system suggests that light carbon is selectively partition into metallic core during early magma ocean environment (Satish-Kumar et al., 2011). Furthermore, carbonate melts can be a medium for efficient crystallisation of diamonds in Earth's mantle (Palyanov et al., 2013). Rayleigh fractionation modelling based on fractionation suggests that core can be a reservoir of 12C enriched carbon and can itself form a reservoir which can cause heterogeneity in mantle carbon (Wood et al., 2013). In addition, high pressure experiments in the carbon-saturated model harzburgite system (Enstatite-Magnesite-Olivine-Graphite), carbonated silicate melting resulted in 13C enrichment in the carbon dissolved in the silicate melt relative to elemental graphite (Mizutani et al., 2014). 13C enrichment in carbonate melt were further confirmed in experiments where redox melting between olivine and graphite produced a carbonate melt as well as carbonate reduction experiments to form graphite. A third factor, still unconquered is the effect of pressure on isotope fractionation process. Theoretical studies as well as preliminary experimental studies have suggested

  19. Mechanisms controlling the carbon stable isotope composition of phytoplankton in karst reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baoli Wang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In order to systematically understand the mechanisms controlling the carbon stable isotope composition of phytoplankton (δ13CPHYin freshwater ecosystems, seasonal changes in δ13CPHY and related environmental factors were determined in karst reservoirs from the Wujiang river basin, China. Substantial and systematic differences within seasons and reservoirs were observed for δ13CPHY, which ranged from -39.2‰ to -15.1‰. An increase in water temperature triggered fast growth of phytoplankton which assimilated more dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC, resulting in the increase of δ13CPHY, δ13CDIC and pH. When the concentration of dissolved carbon dioxide (CO2 was less than 10 mmol L–1, phytoplankton shifted to using HCO3– as a carbon source. This resulted in the sharp increase of δ13CPHY. The carbon stable isotope composition of phytoplankton tended to decrease with the increase of Bacillariophyta, which dominated in January and April, but tended to increase with the increase of Chlorophyta and Dinophyta, which dominated in July. Multiple regression equations suggested that the influence of biological factors such as taxonomic difference on δ13CPHY could be equal or more important than that of physical and chemical factors. Thus, the effect of taxonomic differences on δ13CPHY must be considered when explaining the δ13C of organic matter in lacustrine ecosystem.

  20. Inorganic carbon turnover caused by digestion of carbonate sands and metabolic activity of holothurians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Kenneth; Silverman, Jacob; Kravitz, Ben; Rivlin, Tanya; Schneider-Mor, Aya; Barbosa, Sergio; Byrne, Maria; Caldeira, Ken

    2013-11-01

    Recent measurements have shown that holothurians (sea cucumbers) may play an important role in the cycling of CaCO3 in tropical coral reef systems through ingestion and processing of carbonate sediment. In this report, we present estimates of inorganic carbon turnover rates determined from laboratory incubations of Holothuria atra, Holothuria leucospilota and Stichopus herrmanni. The pH values of the gut lumen ranged from 7.0 to 7.6 when digestive tracts were filled with sediment compared with 6.1-6.7 in animals with empty digestive tracts. Empty gut volume estimates for H. atra and S. herrmanni were 36 ± 4 mL and 151 ± 14 mL, respectively. Based on these measurements and the density and porosity of carbonate sediments of coral reefs, it is estimated that these species process 19 ± 2 kg and 80 ± 7 kg CaCO3 sand yr-1 per individual, respectively. The annual CaCO3 dissolution rates per H. atra and S. herrmanni individual are estimated to be 6.5 ± 1.9 g and 9.6 ± 1.4 g, respectively, suggesting that 0.05 ± 0.02% and 0.1 ± 0.02% of the CaCO3 processed through their gut annually is dissolved. During incubations the CaCO3 dissolution of the fecal casts was 0.07 ± 0.01%, 0.04 ± 0.01% and 0.21 ± 0.05% for H. atra, H. leucospilota and S. herrmanni, respectively. The CaCO3 saturation state in the incubation seawater decreased markedly due to a greater increase in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) relative to total alkalinity (AT) as a result of respiration by the animals. Our results support the hypothesis that deposit feeders such as sea cucumbers play an important ecological role in the coral reef CaCO3 cycle.

  1. Inorganic carbon fluxes across the vadose zone of planted and unplanted soil mesocosms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thaysen, Eike Marie; Jacques, D.; Jessen, S.

    2014-01-01

    The efflux of carbon dioxide (CO2) from soils influences atmospheric CO2 concentrations and thereby climate change. The partitioning of inorganic carbon (C) fluxes in the vadose zone between emission to the atmosphere and to the groundwater was investigated to reveal controlling underlying mechan...

  2. Combined effects of inorganic carbon and light on Phaeocystis globosa Scherffel (Prymnesiophyceae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogstraten, A.; Peters, M.; Timmermans, K. R.; de Baar, H. J. W.; Herndl, G.

    2012-01-01

    Phaeocystis globosa (Prymnesiophyceae) is an ecologically dominating phytoplankton species in many areas around the world. It plays an important role in both the global sulfur and carbon cycles, by the production of dimethylsulfide (DMS) and the drawdown of inorganic carbon. Phaeocystis globosa has

  3. Dynamics of organic and inorganic carbon across contiguous mangrove and seagrass systems (Gazi Bay, Kenya)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouillon, S.; Dehairs, F.; Velimirov, B.; Abril, G.; Borges, A.V.

    2007-01-01

    We report on the water column biogeochemistry in adjacent mangrove and seagrass systems in Gazi Bay (Kenya), with a focus on assessing the sources and cycling of organic and inorganic carbon. Mangrove and seagrass-derived material was found to be the dominant organic carbon sources in the water colu

  4. Inorganic carbon fluxes across the vadose zone of planted and unplanted soil mesocosms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thaysen, Eike Marie; Jacques, D.; Jessen, S.

    2014-01-01

    The efflux of carbon dioxide (CO2) from soils influences atmospheric CO2 concentrations and thereby climate change. The partitioning of inorganic carbon (C) fluxes in the vadose zone between emission to the atmosphere and to the groundwater was investigated to reveal controlling underlying mechan...

  5. Bioengineering Aspects of Inorganic Carbon Supply to Mass Algal Cultures: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldman, J. C.

    1981-04-01

    Regardless of the application, the basic biotechnology of large-scale outdoor cultures involves many common features, particularly in the requirement for adequate nutrients such as carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus to ensure that light is the sole limiting yield determinant. Whereas the required quantities of nitrogen and phosphorus are fairly simple, to estimate, those for inorganic carbon are far more complex.

  6. Carbon and oxygen isotope compositions of the carbonate facies in the Vindhyan Supergroup, central India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Banerjee; S K Bhattacharya; S Sarkar

    2006-02-01

    The Vindhyan sedimentary succession in central India spans a wide time bracket from the Paleopro- terozoic to the Neoproterozoic period.Chronostratigraphic significance of stable carbon and oxygen isotope ratios of the carbonate phase in Vindhyan sediments has been discussed in some recent studies.However,the subtle controls of facies variation,depositional setting and post-depositional diagenesis on stable isotope compositions are not yet clearly understood.The Vindhyan Super- group hosts four carbonate units,exhibiting a wide variability in depositional processes and paleogeography.A detailed facies-specific carbon and oxygen isotope study of the carbonate units was undertaken by us to investigate the effect of these processes and to identify the least altered isotope values.It is seen that both carbon and oxygen isotope compositions have been affected by early meteoric water diagenesis.The effect of diagenetic alteration is,however,more pronounced in case of oxygen isotopes than carbon isotopes.Stable isotope compositions remained insensitive to facies only when sediments accumulated in a shallow shelf setting without being exposed.Major alteration of original isotope ratios was observed in case of shallow marine carbonates,which became exposed to meteoric fluids during early diagenetic stage.Duration of exposure possibly determined the magnitude of alteration and shift from the original values.Moreover,dolomitization is found to be accompanied by appreciable alteration of isotope compositions in some of the carbonates.The present study suggests that variations in sediment depositional settings,in particular the possibility of subaerial exposure,need to be considered while extracting chronostratigraphic signi ficance from 13C data.

  7. Carbon and Oxygen Isotope Ratios in Rona Limestone, Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stela Cuna

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available The carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions of limestones provide criteria for the evaluation of the depositional environment. For Jurassic and younger samples, the best discrimination between marine and fresh-water limestones is given by Z parameter, calculated as a linear correlation between δ13C and δ18O (‰ PDB. Rona Limestone (Upper Paleocene - Lower Eocene, outcropping on a small area in NW Transylvania (Meseş area is a local lacustrine facies. There, it divides Jibou Formation into the Lower Red Member and the Upper Variegated Member, respectively. Recently, a sequence containing a marine nannoplankton assemblage was identified in the base of Rona deposits. The main goal of our study was to characterize, based on the isotopic record, the primary environment of formation of the deposit, as well as that in which some diagenetic processes (the formation of dolomite and of green clay around the siliceous chert nodules took place. Ten samples representing limestones, dolomitic limestone, marls and the green carbonate-rich clay were studied from petrographical and mineralogical points of view, and the carbon and oxygen isotopic ratios from the carbonate (calcite component were measured. In conclusion, it was found that the procedure of extraction of CO2 we used enabled the discrimination between the isotopic prints of calcite vs. dolomite. This pleads for considering our results as a primary isotopic pattern in the bulk rock. The oxygen and carbon isotope data indicate a fresh-water depositional environment with Z<120. The δ13C mean value (-4.96 ‰ PDB is, generally, representative for fresh-water carbonates of the Tertiary period. The same environment characterized also the formation of carbonates within the green clay.

  8. Oxygen isotopic composition of carbon dioxide in the middle atmosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Mao-Chang; Blake, Geoffrey A.; Lewis, Brenton R.; Yung, Yuk L.

    2007-01-01

    The isotopic composition of long-lived trace molecules provides a window into atmospheric transport and chemistry. Carbon dioxide is a particularly powerful tracer, because its abundance remains >100 parts per million by volume (ppmv) in the mesosphere. Here, we successfully reproduce the isotopic composition of CO2 in the middle atmosphere, which has not been previously reported. The mass-independent fractionation of oxygen in CO2 can be satisfactorily explained by the exchange reaction with...

  9. Chromium isotope fractionation during coprecipitation with calcium carbonate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodler, Alexandra; Sánchez-Pastor, Nuria; Fernández-Díaz, Lurdes

    The chromium (Cr) isotopic composition of carbonates can potentially be used as a paleoclimate proxy to elucidate past fluctuations of oxygen contents in atmosphere and hydrosphere. The use of Cr isotopes to track paleoenvironmental changes, for example related to the rise of oxygen during the Ar...... et al., 2007, Water Air Soil Poll. 179, 381-390. [2] Sánchez-Pastor et al., 2011, Cryst. Growth Des. 11, 3081-3089....

  10. Chromium Isotopes in Marine Carbonates - an Indicator for Climatic Change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frei, R.; Gaucher, C.

    2010-12-01

    Chromium (Cr) stable isotopes experience an increased interest as a tracer of Cr (VI) reduction in groundwater and thus showed their potential as a monitor of remediation of anthropogenic and natural contamination in water (Berna et al., 2009; Izbicki et al., 2008). Chromium stable isotopes in Fe-rich chemical sediments (BIFs and Fe-cherts) have recently also been used as a tracer for Earth's atmospheric oxygenation through time (Frei et al., 2009). We have applied the Cr isotope system to organic-rich carbonates from a late Ediacaran succession in Uruguay (Polanco Formation), from which we have previously analyzed BIFs with extremely fractionated (δ53Cr up to 5.0 ‰) Cr isotope signatures that are part of an underlying deep water clastic sediment (shale-dominated) sequence (Yerbal Formation) deposited in a glacio-marine environment (Gaucher et al.,2004). δ53Cr values of organic rich carbonates correlate with positive and negative carbon isotope excursions (δ13C PDB between -3 and +3 ‰) and with systematic changes in strontium isotope compositions, commonly interpreted as to reflect fluctuations in organic (photosynthetic algae) production related to fluctuations in atmospheric oxygen and weathering intensities, respectively. Slightly positively fractioned δ53Cr values (up to +0.25‰), paralleling positive (δ13C PDB and 87Sr/86Sr ratio excursions would thereby trace elevated atmospheric oxygen levels/pulses possibly related to glacier retreat/melting stages that caused bioproductivity to increase. While the causal link between these multiple isotopic tracers and the mechanisms of Cr stripping into carbonates has to be further investigated in detail, the first indications from this study point to a potentially promising use of stable Cr isotopes in organic-rich carbonates to monitor fluctuations of atmospheric oxygen, particularly over the Neoproterozoic and Phanerozoic ice age periods. E.C. Berna et al. (2010) Cr stable isotopes as indicators of Cr

  11. Stable carbon isotope ratios of ambient aromatic volatile organic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornilova, Anna; Huang, Lin; Saccon, Marina; Rudolph, Jochen

    2016-09-01

    Measurements of mixing ratios and stable carbon isotope ratios of aromatic volatile organic compounds (VOC) in the atmosphere were made in Toronto (Canada) in 2009 and 2010. Consistent with the kinetic isotope effect for reactions of aromatic VOC with the OH radical the observed stable carbon isotope ratios are on average significantly heavier than the isotope ratios of their emissions. The change of carbon isotope ratio between emission and observation is used to determine the extent of photochemical processing (photochemical age, ∫ [OH]dt) of the different VOC. It is found that ∫ [OH]dt of different VOC depends strongly on the VOC reactivity. This demonstrates that for this set of observations the assumption of a uniform ∫ [OH]dt for VOC with different reactivity is not justified and that the observed values for ∫ [OH]dt are the result of mixing of VOC from air masses with different values for ∫ [OH]dt. Based on comparison between carbon isotope ratios and VOC concentration ratios it is also found that the varying influence of sources with different VOC emission ratios has a larger impact on VOC concentration ratios than photochemical processing. It is concluded that for this data set the use of VOC concentration ratios to determine ∫ [OH]dt would result in values for ∫ [OH]dt inconsistent with carbon isotope ratios and that the concept of a uniform ∫ [OH]dt for an air mass has to be replaced by the concept of individual values of an average ∫ [OH]dt for VOC with different reactivity.

  12. Temperature dependence of carbon isotope fractionation in CAM plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deleens, E.; Treichel, I.; O' Leary, M.H.

    1985-09-01

    The carbon isotope fractionation associated with nocturnal malic acid synthesis in Kalanchoe daigremontiana and Bryophyllum tubiflorum was calculated from the isotopic composition of carbon-4 of malic acid, after appropriate corrections. In the lowest temperature treatment (17/sup 0/C nights, 23/sup 0/C days), the isotope fractionation for both plants is -4% per thousand (that is, malate is enriched in /sup 13/C relative to the atmosphere). For K. daigremontiana, the isotope fractionation decreases with increasing temperature, becoming approximately 0% per thousand at 27/sup 0/C/33/sup 0/C. Detailed analysis of temperature effects on the isotope fractionation indicates that stomatal aperture decreases with increasing temperature and carboxylation capacity increases. For B. tubiflorum, the temperature dependence of the isotope fractionation is smaller and is principally attributed to the normal temperature dependences of the rates of diffusion and carboxylation steps. The small change in the isotopic composition of remaining malic acid in both species which is observed during deacidification indicates that malate release, rather than decarboxylation, is rate limiting in the deacidification process. 28 references, 1 figure, 4 tables.

  13. Carbon isotope biogeochemistry of plant resins and derived hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, A.P.; Edwards, D.; Hope, J.M.; Boreham, C.J. [Australian Geological Survey Organisation, Canberra (Australia)] [and others

    1998-12-31

    Hydrocarbons derived from plant resins are major components of some terrigenous oils and bitumens. These compounds are structurally distinct and this makes then useful biomarkers applicable in petroleum exploration as well as sources of biogeochemical information about palaeoenvironment and palaeobotany. Although recent studies have elucidated the molecular structure of resinites, very little information has been available for the carbon isotope composition of resinites and no studies of resin-derived compounds in oils had been performed prior to the present study. Hence, carbon stable isotope analyses were carried out on a suite of modern and fossil resins of diverse origins, including compound specific isotope analysis of individual hydrocarbons produced during resin pyrolysis. Oils derived from resinite source organic matter were also analysed. The results showed that ``Class I`` resinites derived from gymnosperms were enriched in the heavy carbon isotope compared with those from angiosperms (``Class I`` resinites). Furthermore, both fossil resinites themselves and individual hydrocarbons derived from them were isotopically heavy compared with modern plant resins. The isotopic signatures of diterpanes and triterpanes in various early Tertiary oils from Australasia and Southeast Asia reflect their origins from gymnosperms and angiosperms, respectively. (author)

  14. Photosynthesis in estuarine intertidal microphytobenthos is limited by inorganic carbon availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Sónia; Cartaxana, Paulo; Máguas, Cristina; Marques da Silva, Jorge

    2016-04-01

    The effects of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) availability on photosynthesis were studied in two estuarine intertidal microphytobenthos (MPB) communities and in the model diatom species Phaeodactylum tricornutum. Kinetics of DIC acquisition, measured with a liquid-phase oxygen electrode, showed higher K(1/2)(DIC) (0.31 mM) and Vm (7.78 nmol min(-1) µg (Chl a)(-1)) for MPB suspensions than for P. tricornutum (K(1/2)(DIC) = 0.23 mM; Vm = 4.64 nmol min(-1) µg (Chl a)(-1)), suggesting the predominance of species with lower affinity for DIC and higher photosynthetic capacity in the MPB. The net photosynthetic rate of the MPB suspensions reached saturation at a DIC concentration of 1-1.5 mM. This range was lower than the concentrations found in the interstitial water of the top 5-mm sediment layer, suggesting no limitation of photosynthesis by DIC in the MPB communities. Accordingly, carbon isotope discrimination revealed a moderate activity of CO2-concentrating mechanisms in the MPB. However, addition of NaHCO3 to intact MPB biofilms caused a significant increase in the relative maximum photosynthetic electron transport rate (rETR max) measured by imaging pulse-amplitude modulated chlorophyll a fluorescence. These results suggest local depletion of DIC at the photic layer of the sediment (the first few hundred µm), where MPB cells accumulate during diurnal low tides. This work provides the first direct experimental evidence of DIC limitation of photosynthesis in highly productive intertidal MPB communities.

  15. Carbonate "clumped" isotope signatures in aragonitic scleractinian and calcitic gorgonian deep-sea corals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kimball

    2015-12-01

    between the corals of different mineralogy is in the same direction as published theoretical predictions for the offset between calcite and aragonite, although the magnitude of the offset is different. One possibility is that the deep-sea coral results reflect that crystals may attain nominal mineral equilibrium clumped isotope signatures only under conditions of extremely slow growth. In that case, a possible explanation for the attainment of disequilibrium bulk isotope signatures and equilibrium clumped isotope signatures by deep-sea corals is that extraordinarily slow growth rates can promote the occurrence of isotopic reordering in the interfacial region of growing crystals. We also cannot rule out a component of a biological "vital-effect" influencing clumped isotope signatures in one or both orders of coral. Based on published experimental data and theoretical calculations, these biological "vital" effects could arise from kinetic isotope effects due to the source of carbon used for calcification, temperature- and pH-dependent rates of CO2 hydration and/or hydroxylation, calcifying fluid pH, the activity of carbonic anhydrase, the residence time of dissolved inorganic carbon in the calcifying fluid, and calcification rate. A third possible explanation is the occurrence of variable acid digestion fractionation factors. Although a recent study has suggested that dolomite, calcite, and aragonite may have similar clumped isotope acid digestion fractionation factors, the influence of acid digestion kinetics on Δ47 is a subject that warrants further investigation.

  16. Carbonate "clumped" isotope signatures in aragonitic scleractinian and calcitic gorgonian deep-sea corals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimball, Justine; Eagle, Robert; Dunbar, Robert

    2016-12-01

    between the corals of different mineralogy is in the same direction as published theoretical predictions for the offset between calcite and aragonite although the magnitude of the offset is different. One possibility is that the deep-sea coral results reflect high-Mg and aragonite crystals attaining nominal mineral equilibrium clumped isotope signatures due to conditions of extremely slow growth. In that case, a possible explanation for the attainment of disequilibrium bulk isotope signatures and equilibrium clumped isotope signatures by deep-sea corals is that extraordinarily slow growth rates can promote the occurrence of isotopic reordering in the interfacial region of growing crystals. We also cannot rule out a component of a biological "vital effect" influencing clumped isotope signatures in one or both orders of coral. Based on published experimental data and theoretical calculations, these biological vital effects could arise from kinetic isotope effects due to the source of carbon used for calcification, temperature- and pH-dependent rates of CO2 hydration and/or hydroxylation, calcifying fluid pH, the activity of carbonic anhydrase, the residence time of dissolved inorganic carbon in the calcifying fluid, and calcification rate. A third possible explanation is the occurrence of variable acid digestion fractionation factors. Although a recent study has suggested that dolomite, calcite, and aragonite may have similar clumped isotope acid digestion fractionation factors, the influence of acid digestion kinetics on Δ47 is a subject that warrants further investigation.

  17. Inorganic Carbon Turnover caused by Digestion of Carbonate Sands and Metabolic Activity of Holothurians

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Kenneth; Silverman, Jacob; Kravitz, Benjamin S.; Rivlin, Tanya; Schneider-Mor, Aya; Barbosa, Sergio; Byrne, Maria; Caldeira, Ken

    2013-11-20

    Recent measurements have shown that holothurians (sea cucumbers) play an important role in the cycling of CaCO3 in tropical coral reef systems through ingestion and processing of carbonate sediment. In this study inorganic additional aspects of carbon turnover were determined in laboratory incubations of Holothuria atra, H. leucospilota and Stichopus herrmanni from One Tree Reef, Great Barrier Reef. The pH values of the gut lumen ranged from 6.1 to 6.7 in animals with empty digestive tracts as opposed to 7.0 to 7.6 when digestive tracts were filled with sediment. Empty gut volume estimates for H. atra and S. herrmanni were 36 ± 4 mL and 151 ± 14 mL, respectively. Based on these measurements it is estimated that these species process 19 ± 2kg and 80 ± 7kg CaCO3 sand yr-1 per individual, respectively. The annual dissolution rates of H. atra and S. herrmanni of 6.5±1.9g and 9.6±1.4g, respectively, suggest that 0.05±0.02% and 0.1±0.02% of the CaCO3 processed through their gut annually is dissolved. During the incubations the CaCO3 dissolution was 0.07±0.01%, 0.04±0.01% and 0.21±0.05% of the fecal casts for H. atra, H. leucospilota and S. herrmanni, respectively. The CaCO3 saturation state for both aragonite and calcite minerals during laboratory incubations decreased markedly due to a greater increase in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) relative to total alkalinity (AT) as a result of respiration by the animals. Our results support the hypothesis that deposit feeders such as sea cucumbers play an important ecological role in the coral reef CaCO3 cycle.

  18. BOREAS TE-5 Tree Ring and Carbon Isotope Ratio Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Curd, Shelaine (Editor); Ehleriinger, Jim; Brooks, J. Renee; Flanagan, Larry

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TE-5 team collected several data sets to investigate the vegetation-atmosphere CO2 and H2O exchange processes. These data include tree ring widths and cellulose carbon isotope data from coniferous trees collected at the BOREAS NSA and SSA in 1993 and 1994 by the BOREAS TE-5 team. Ring width data are provided for both Picea mariana and Pinus banksiana. The carbon isotope data are provided only for Pinus banksiana. The data are provided in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  19. Manure and fertilizer effects on organic and inorganic carbon losses and budget for an irrigated corn field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little is known about inorganic fertilizer or manure effects on organic carbon (OC) and inorganic C (IC) losses from a furrow irrigated field, particularly in the context of other system C gains or losses. In 2003 and 2004, we measured dissolved organic and inorganic C (DOC, DIC), particulate OC and...

  20. The indication of geothermal events by helium and carbon isotopes of hydrothermal fluids in south China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, Xumei; Wang, Yanxin; Yuan, Jianfei [National Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology and School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2013-07-01

    Helium and carbon isotopes are important indicators for identifying the origin of volatiles dissolved in groundwater. Four thermal springs and another twelve normal springs are hosted by local deep faults in south China, which are considered to have significant connection to deep geothermal activity. Between 4% and 6% mantle He in thermal springs reveals that significant mantle He migration in deep faults can bring a certain amount of energy, along with thermal volatiles, and contribute to thermal spring formation according to {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He. While δ{sup 13}C reveals that dissolved inorganic carbon in thermal springs is from rock metamorphism that occurred in certain deep crust as geothermal activity, which is potentially the main energy source of the thermal springs. (authors)

  1. Biological and land use controls on the isotopic composition of aquatic carbon in the Upper Mississippi River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Britta; Wickland, Kimberly P.; Aiken, George R.; Striegl, Rob

    2017-01-01

    Riverine ecosystems receive organic matter (OM) from terrestrial sources, internally produce new OM, and biogeochemically cycle and modify organic and inorganic carbon. Major gaps remain in the understanding of the relationships between carbon sources and processing in river systems. Here we synthesize isotopic, elemental, and molecular properties of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), particulate organic carbon (POC), and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in the Upper Mississippi River (UMR) system above Wabasha, MN, including the main stem Mississippi River and its four major tributaries (Minnesota, upper Mississippi, St. Croix, and Chippewa Rivers). Our goal was to elucidate how biological processing modifies the chemical and isotopic composition of aquatic carbon pools during transport downstream in a large river system with natural and man-made impoundments. Relationships between land cover and DOC carbon-isotope composition, absorbance, and hydrophobic acid content indicate that DOC retains terrestrial carbon source information, while the terrestrial POC signal is largely replaced by autochthonous organic matter, and DIC integrates the influence of in-stream photosynthesis and respiration of organic matter. The UMR is slightly heterotrophic throughout the year, but pools formed by low-head navigation dams and natural impoundments promote a shift towards autotrophic conditions, altering aquatic ecosystem dynamics and POC and DIC composition. Such changes likely occur in all major river systems affected by low-head dams and need to be incorporated into our understanding of inland water carbon dynamics and processes controlling CO2 emissions from rivers, as new navigation and flood control systems are planned for future river and water resources management.

  2. The clumped isotopic record of Neoproterozoic carbonates, Sultanate of Oman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, K. D.; Eiler, J. M.; Fischer, W. W.; Osburn, M. R.; Grotzinger, J. P.

    2011-12-01

    The Huqf Supergroup of the Sultanate of Oman records several important events in latest Precambrian time, including two glaciations in the Abu Mahara Group (ca. 725 - isotope excursion in the Nafun Group (ca. isotopic excursions, hypothesized to record perturbations of the surficial Earth carbon cycle or post-depositional diagenetic processes. Rigorous interpretation of these records requires a more thorough assessment of diagenetic processes. To better understand the significance and cause of these large amplitude isotopic excursions, we employed carbonate clumped isotope thermometry. This method allows us to estimate the absolute temperature of carbonate precipitation, including recrystallization, based on the temperature dependent abundance of carbonate ions containing both 13C and 18O. These estimates are accompanied by a measurement of carbonate δ18O, which in conjunction with temperature, can be used to calculate the oxygen isotopic composition of the fluid from which the carbonate precipitated. We analyzed stratigraphically constrained samples from a range of paleoenvironments with differing burial histories (1 - >10km maximum burial depth) to constrain the temperature and fluid composition of recrystallization. Clumped isotope temperatures from Huqf Supergroup samples range from 35-175°C. The isotopic composition of the fluid these rocks equilibrated with ranges from -3.7 to 15.7% VSMOW. This large range in temperature and fluid composition separates into distinct populations that differ systematically with independent constraints on petrography, stratigraphy and burial history. The data indicate the Abu Mahara, Nafun and Ara groups have unique diagenetic histories. In central Oman, the post-glacial Abu Mahara cap dolostone shows high temperature, rock buffered diagenesis (Tavg = 176°C; δ18Ofluid = 15% VSMOW), the Nafun Group generally experienced lower temperature, fluid buffered diagenesis (Tavg = 69°C; δ18Ofluid = 1% VSMOW) and the Ara Group

  3. Photosynthetic carbon isotope discrimination and its relationship to the carbon isotope signals of stem, soil and ecosystem respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingate, Lisa; Ogée, Jérôme; Burlett, Régis; Bosc, Alexandre; Devaux, Marion; Grace, John; Loustau, Denis; Gessler, Arthur

    2010-10-01

    • Photosynthetic carbon (C) isotope discrimination (Δ(Α)) labels photosynthates (δ(A) ) and atmospheric CO(2) (δ(a)) with variable C isotope compositions during fluctuating environmental conditions. In this context, the C isotope composition of respired CO(2) within ecosystems is often hypothesized to vary temporally with Δ(Α). • We investigated the relationship between Δ(Α) and the C isotope signals from stem (δ(W)), soil (δ(S)) and ecosystem (δ(E)) respired CO(2) to environmental fluctuations, using novel tuneable diode laser absorption spectrometer instrumentation in a mature maritime pine forest. • Broad seasonal changes in Δ(Α) were reflected in δ(W,) δ(S) and δ(E). However, respired CO(2) signals had smaller short-term variations than Δ(A) and were offset and delayed by 2-10 d, indicating fractionation and isotopic mixing in a large C pool. Variations in δ(S) did not follow Δ(A) at all times, especially during rainy periods and when there is a strong demand for C allocation above ground. • It is likely that future isotope-enabled vegetation models will need to develop transfer functions that can account for these phenomena in order to interpret and predict the isotopic impact of biosphere gas exchange on the C isotope composition of atmospheric CO(2).

  4. Laboratory investigation of inorganic carbon uptake by cryoconite debris from Werenskioldbreen, Svalbard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stibal, Marek; Tranter, Martyn

    2007-12-01

    Laboratory experiments were undertaken to determine the inorganic carbon uptake rate and the interactions between photosynthesis and water chemistry, particularly pH and nutrient concentrations, for cryoconite debris from Werenskioldbreen, a well-researched Svalbard glacier. Microorganisms in cryoconite debris took up inorganic carbon at rates between 0.6 and 15 μg C L-1 h-1 and fixed it as organic carbon. Cyanobacterial photosynthesis (75-93%) was the main process responsible for inorganic carbon fixation, while heterotrophic uptake (6-15%) only accounted for a minor part. The microbes in cryoconite debris were active shortly after melt and fixed carbon as long as there were favorable conditions. They were not truly psychrophilic: their physiological optimum temperature was higher than is prevalent in cryoconite holes. The pH was also a factor affecting photosynthesis in the cryoconite slurry. The highest dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) uptake rates per liter of slurry occurred at pH ˜7, and there was a significant correlation between the initial pH and DIC fixation on a per cell basis, showing increasing DIC uptake rates when pH increased from ˜5.5 to 9. Inorganic carbon fixation resulted in an increased pH in solution. However, the microbes were able to photosynthesize in a wide range of pH from ˜4 to ˜10. The average C:N:P molar ratios in solution were ˜350:75:1. Unlike nitrogen, phosphorus concentrations decreased with increasing carbon uptake, and when the rate approached ˜15 μg C L-1 h-1, all available dissolved phosphorus was utilized within 6 h. Hence phosphorus is probably biolimiting in this system.

  5. Interannual stability of organic to inorganic carbon production on a coral atoll

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatkowski, Lester; Albright, Rebecca; Hosfelt, Jessica; Nebuchina, Yana; Ninokawa, Aaron; Rivlin, Tanya; Sesboüé, Marine; Wolfe, Kennedy; Caldeira, Ken

    2016-04-01

    Ocean acidification has the potential to adversely affect marine calcifying organisms, with substantial ocean ecosystem impacts projected over the 21st century. Characterizing the in situ sensitivity of calcifying ecosystems to natural variability in carbonate chemistry may improve our understanding of the long-term impacts of ocean acidification. We explore the potential for intensive temporal sampling to isolate the influence of carbonate chemistry on community calcification rates of a coral reef and compare the ratio of organic to inorganic carbon production to previous studies at the same location. Even with intensive temporal sampling, community calcification displays only a weak dependence on carbonate chemistry variability. However, across three years of sampling, the ratio of organic to inorganic carbon production is highly consistent. Although further work is required to quantify the spatial variability associated with such ratios, this suggests that these measurements have the potential to indicate the response of coral reefs to ongoing disturbance, ocean acidification, and climate change.

  6. How the oxygen isotope ratio of rain water influences the isotope ratio of chicken eggshell carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Gregory; Grimes, Stephen

    2015-04-01

    The stable oxygen isotope ratio of chicken eggshell carbonate was analysed from chicken eggs laid under free range, and organic farming regimes from across the UK. The eggshell carbonate oxygen isotope data shows a clear depletion in delta18O distribution from the southwest to the northeast. Although consistently offset by around 1 permil, the same isotopic distribution as that seen in eggshell carbonate is observed in the delta18O ratio of rainfall and groundwater from across the UK. This distribution is related to the Rayleigh distillation of rainfall driven by westerly winds across the UK landmass. The clear relationship observed between eggshell delta18O values and that of rainwater presumably reflects the nature of free range chickens which must be drinking locally derived rainwater and supplementing their diet and water intake with locally derived food. These results suggest that the oxygen isotope value of chicken eggshells can be used as a forensic tool to identify the locality that free range and organic eggs were laid within the UK. Furthermore, if suitable material is preserved in the archaeological and geological record then such a relationship can potentially be used to establish the oxygen isotope value of rainwater from which ancient and / or ancestral birds lived.

  7. Martian carbon dioxide: Clues from isotopes in SNC meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, H. R.; Clayton, R. N.; Mayeda, T. K.; Jull, A. J. T.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Attempts to unravel the origin and evolution of the atmosphere and hydrosphere on Mars from isotopic data have been hampered by the impreciseness of the measurements made by the Viking Lander and by Earth-based telescopes. The SNC meteorites which are possibly pieces of the Martian surface offer a unique opportunity to obtain more precise estimates of the planet's volatile inventory and isotopic composition. Recently, we reported results on oxygen isotopes of water extracted by pyrolysis from samples of Shergotty, Zagami, Nakhla, Chassigny, Lafayette, and EETA-79001. Now we describe complementary results on the stable isotopic composition of carbon dioxide extracted simultaneously from those same samples. We will also report on C-14 abundances obtained by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) for some of these CO2 samples.

  8. The origin of carbon isotope vital effects in coccolith calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, H. L. O.; Bruggeman, J.; Hermoso, M.; Rickaby, R. E. M.

    2017-03-01

    Calcite microfossils are widely used to study climate and oceanography in Earth's geological past. Coccoliths, readily preserved calcite plates produced by a group of single-celled surface-ocean dwelling algae called coccolithophores, have formed a significant fraction of marine sediments since the Late Triassic. However, unlike the shells of foraminifera, their zooplankton counterparts, coccoliths remain underused in palaeo-reconstructions. Precipitated in an intracellular chemical and isotopic microenvironment, coccolith calcite exhibits large and enigmatic departures from the isotopic composition of abiogenic calcite, known as vital effects. Here we show that the calcification to carbon fixation ratio determines whether coccolith calcite is isotopically heavier or lighter than abiogenic calcite, and that the size of the deviation is determined by the degree of carbon utilization. We discuss the theoretical potential for, and current limitations of, coccolith-based CO2 paleobarometry, that may eventually facilitate use of the ubiquitous and geologically extensive sedimentary archive.

  9. The origin of carbon isotope vital effects in coccolith calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, H. L. O.; Bruggeman, J.; Hermoso, M.; Rickaby, R. E. M.

    2017-01-01

    Calcite microfossils are widely used to study climate and oceanography in Earth's geological past. Coccoliths, readily preserved calcite plates produced by a group of single-celled surface-ocean dwelling algae called coccolithophores, have formed a significant fraction of marine sediments since the Late Triassic. However, unlike the shells of foraminifera, their zooplankton counterparts, coccoliths remain underused in palaeo-reconstructions. Precipitated in an intracellular chemical and isotopic microenvironment, coccolith calcite exhibits large and enigmatic departures from the isotopic composition of abiogenic calcite, known as vital effects. Here we show that the calcification to carbon fixation ratio determines whether coccolith calcite is isotopically heavier or lighter than abiogenic calcite, and that the size of the deviation is determined by the degree of carbon utilization. We discuss the theoretical potential for, and current limitations of, coccolith-based CO2 paleobarometry, that may eventually facilitate use of the ubiquitous and geologically extensive sedimentary archive. PMID:28262764

  10. Long-term fertilization alters chemically-separated soil organic carbon pools: Based on stable C isotope analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Xiaolin; He, Ping; Cheng, Xiaoli; Zhou, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Quantification of dynamics of soil organic carbon (SOC) pools under the influence of long-term fertilization is essential for predicting carbon (C) sequestration. We combined soil chemical fractionation with stable C isotope analyses to investigate the C dynamics of the various SOC pools after 25 years of fertilization. Five types of soil samples (0–20, 20–40 cm) including the initial level (CK) and four fertilization treatments (inorganic nitrogen fertilizer, IN; balanced inorganic fertilizer, NPK; inorganic fertilizer plus farmyard manure, MNPK; inorganic fertilizer plus corn straw residue, SNPK) were separated into recalcitrant and labile fractions, and the fractions were analysed for C content, C:N ratios, δ13C values, soil C and N recalcitrance indexes (RIC and RIN). Chemical fractionation showed long-term MNPK fertilization strongly increased the SOC storage in both soil layers (0–20 cm = 1492.4 gC m2 and 20–40 cm = 1770.6 gC m2) because of enhanced recalcitrant C (RC) and labile C (LC). The 25 years of inorganic fertilizer treatment did not increase the SOC storage mainly because of the offsetting effects of enhanced RC and decreased LC, whereas no clear SOC increases under the SNPK fertilization resulted from the fast decay rates of soil C.

  11. Long-term fertilization alters chemically-separated soil organic carbon pools: Based on stable C isotope analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Xiaolin; He, Ping; Cheng, Xiaoli; Zhou, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Quantification of dynamics of soil organic carbon (SOC) pools under the influence of long-term fertilization is essential for predicting carbon (C) sequestration. We combined soil chemical fractionation with stable C isotope analyses to investigate the C dynamics of the various SOC pools after 25 years of fertilization. Five types of soil samples (0-20, 20-40 cm) including the initial level (CK) and four fertilization treatments (inorganic nitrogen fertilizer, IN; balanced inorganic fertilizer, NPK; inorganic fertilizer plus farmyard manure, MNPK; inorganic fertilizer plus corn straw residue, SNPK) were separated into recalcitrant and labile fractions, and the fractions were analysed for C content, C:N ratios, δ(13)C values, soil C and N recalcitrance indexes (RIC and RIN). Chemical fractionation showed long-term MNPK fertilization strongly increased the SOC storage in both soil layers (0-20 cm = 1492.4 gC m(2) and 20-40 cm = 1770.6 gC m(2)) because of enhanced recalcitrant C (RC) and labile C (LC). The 25 years of inorganic fertilizer treatment did not increase the SOC storage mainly because of the offsetting effects of enhanced RC and decreased LC, whereas no clear SOC increases under the SNPK fertilization resulted from the fast decay rates of soil C.

  12. On the isotopic composition of magmatic carbon in SNC meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, I. P.; Grady, M. M.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1992-01-01

    SNC meteorites are thought, from many lines of evidence, to come from Mars. A line of investigation which has been pursued in our laboratory over the years involves measurement of the stable isotopic composition of carbon, in its various forms, in SNC meteorites. In order to establish a firm basis for studying the isotopic systematics of carbon in the martian surface environment, it is first necessary to try and constrain the delta C-13 of bulk Mars. Taking all of the available information, it would seem that the delta C-13 of the Earth's mantle lies somewhere in the range of -5 to -7 percent. Preliminary assessment of magnetic carbon in SNC meteorites, would tend to suggest a delta C-13 of 20 to 30 percent, which is conspicuously different from that of the terrestrial mantle. It is not obvious why there should be such a difference between the two planets, although many explanations are possible. One of these possibilities, that previous delta C-13 measurements for magnetic carbon in SNC meteorites are in error to some degree, is being actively investigated. The most recent results seem to constrain the theta C-13 of the magnetic carbon in SNC meteorites to about -20 percent, which is not at odds with previous estimates. As such, it is considered that a detailed investigation of the carbon isotopic systematics of martian surface materials does have the necessary information with which to proceed.

  13. Measurements and interpretation of oxygen isotopes in stratospheric carbon dioxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mrozek, D.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/325800146

    2017-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is an important natural and anthropogenic greenhouse gas in Earth's atmosphere. Its atmospheric mole fraction has increased from about 280 ppm (parts per million) in the pre-industrial atmosphere to more than 400 ppm at present. Investigation of the stable isotopic composition

  14. The fixation of carbon dioxide in inorganic and organic chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aresta, M. (Universita degli Studi, Bari (Italy). Dispartimento di Chemica e Centro CNR-MISO)

    1993-01-01

    The recovery of carbon dioxide from concentrated sources is currently under evaluation as a technology for the control of the emission into the atmosphere. In order for this option to be operative it is necessary to define the fate of recovered carbon dioxide. Two ways forward are open: disposal in natural fields (oceans, aquifers, deep geological cavities); - utilisation (technological use or chemical conversion). The fixation in chemicals can contribute both to reduce the use of fossil carbon and to cut the emission of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. 6 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  15. Seasonal exports and drivers of dissolved inorganic and organic carbon, carbon dioxide, methane and δ(13)C signatures in a subtropical river network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Marnie L; Santos, Isaac R; Maher, Damien T

    2017-01-01

    Riverine systems act as important aquatic conduits for carbon transportation between atmospheric, terrestrial and oceanic pools, yet the magnitude of these exports remain poorly constrained. Interconnected creek and river sites (n=28) were sampled on a quarterly basis in three subcatchments of the subtropical Richmond River Catchment (Australia) to investigate spatial and temporal dynamics of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and carbon stable isotope ratios (δ(13)C). The study site is an area of high interest due to potential unconventional gas (coal seam gas or coal bed methane) development. DIC exports were driven by groundwater discharge with a small contribution by in situ DOC remineralization. The DIC exports showed seasonal differences ranging from 0.10 to 0.27mmolm(-2)catchmentd(-1) (annual average 0.17mmolm(-2)catchmentd(-1)) and peaked during winter when surface water discharge was highest. DOC exports (sourced from terrestrial organic matter) had an annual average 0.07mmolm(-2)catchmentd(-1) and were 1 to 2 orders of magnitude higher during winter compared to spring and summer. CO2 evasion rates (annual average of 347mmolm(-2)water aread(-1)) were ~2.5 fold higher during winter compared to spring. Methane was always supersaturated (0.19 to 62.13μM), resulting from groundwater discharge and stream-bed methanogenesis. Methane evasion was highly variable across the seasons with an annual average of 3.05mmolm(-2)water aread(-1). During drier conditions, stable isotopes implied enhanced CH4 oxidation. Overall, carbon losses from the catchment were dominated by CO2 evasion (60%) followed by DIC exports (30%), DOC exports (9%) and CH4 evasion (exports.

  16. Determining Carbon and Oxygen Stable Isotope Systematics in Brines at Elevated p/T Conditions to Enhance Monitoring of CO2 Induced Processes in Carbon Storage Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, V.; Myrttinen, A.; Mayer, B.; Barth, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    Stable carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) are a powerful tool for inferring carbon sources and mixing ratios of injected and baseline CO2 in storage reservoirs. Furthermore, CO2 releasing and consuming processes can be deduced if the isotopic compositions of end-members are known. At low CO2 pressures (pCO2), oxygen isotope ratios (δ18O) of CO2 usually assume the δ18O of the water plus a temperature-dependent isotope fractionation factor. However, at very high CO2 pressures as they occur in CO2 storage reservoirs, the δ18O of the injected CO2 may in fact change the δ18O of the reservoir brine. Hence, changing δ18O of brine constitutes an additional tracer for reservoir-internal carbon dynamics and allows the determination of the amount of free phase CO2 present in the reservoir (Johnson et al. 2011). Further systematic research to quantify carbon and oxygen isotope fractionation between the involved inorganic carbon species (CO2, H2CO3, HCO3-, CO32-, carbonate minerals) and kinetic and equilibrium isotope effects during gas-water-rock interactions is necessary because p/T conditions and salinities in CO2 storage reservoirs may exceed the boundary conditions of typical environmental isotope applications, thereby limiting the accuracy of stable isotope monitoring approaches in deep saline formations (Becker et al. 2011). In doing so, it is crucial to compare isotopic patterns observed in laboratory experiments with artificial brines to similar experiments with original fluids from representative field sites to account for reactions of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) with minor brine components. In the CO2ISO-LABEL project, funded by the German Ministry for Education and Research, multiple series of laboratory experiments are conducted to determine the influence of pressure, temperature and brine composition on the δ13C of DIC and the δ18O of brines in water-CO2-rock reactions with special focus placed on kinetics and stable oxygen and carbon isotope fractionation

  17. Linking calcification by exotic snails to stream inorganic carbon cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotchkiss, Erin R; Hall, Robert O

    2010-05-01

    Biotic calcification is rarely considered in freshwater C budgets, despite calculations suggesting that calcifying animals can alter inorganic C cycling. Most studies that have quantified biocalcification in aquatic ecosystems have not directly linked CO(2) fluxes from biocalcification with whole-ecosystem rates of inorganic C cycling. The freshwater snail, Melanoides tuberculata, has achieved a high abundance and 37.4 g biomass m(-2) after invading Kelly Warm Springs in Grand Teton National Park. This high biomass suggests that introduced populations of Melanoides may alter ecosystem processes. We measured Melanoides growth rates and biomass to calculate the production of biomass, shell mass, and CO(2). We compared Melanoides biomass and inorganic C production with ecosystem C pools and fluxes, as well as with published rates of CO(2) production by other calcifying organisms. Melanoides calcification in Kelly Warm Springs produced 12.1 mmol CO(2) m(-2) day(-1) during summer months. We measured high rates of gross primary productivity and respiration in Kelly Warm Springs (-378 and 533 mmol CO(2) m(-2) day(-1), respectively); CO(2) produced from biocalcification increased net CO(2) production in Kelly Warm Springs from 155 to 167 mmol CO(2) m(-2) day(-1). This rate of CO(2) production via biocalcification is within the published range of calcification by animals. But these CO(2) fluxes are small when compared to ecosystem C fluxes from stream metabolism. The influence of animals is relative to ecosystem processes, and should always be compared with ecosystem fluxes to quantify the importance of a specific animal in its environment.

  18. On-line technique for preparingand measuring stable carbon isotopeof total dissolved inorganic carbonin water samples ( d13CTDIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Inguaggiato

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available A fast and completely automated procedure is proposed for the preparation and determination of d13C of total inorganic carbon dissolved in water ( d13CTDIC. This method is based on the acidification of water samples transforming the whole dissolved inorganic carbon species into CO2. Water samples are directly injected by syringe into 5.9 ml vials with screw caps which have a pierciable rubber septum. An Analytical Precision «Carbonate Prep System» was used both to flush pure helium into the vials and to automatically dispense a fixed amount of H3PO4. Full-equilibrium conditions between produced CO2 and water are reached at a temperature of 70°C (± 0.1°C in less than 24 h. Carbon isotope ratios (13C/ 12C were measured on an AP 2003 continuous flow mass spectrometer, connected on-line with the injection system. The precision and reproducibility of the proposed method was tested both on aqueous standard solutions prepared using Na2CO3 with d13C=-10.78 per mil versus PDB (1 s= 0.08, n = 11, and at five different concentrations (2, 3, 4, 5 and 20 mmol/l and on more than thirty natural samples. Mean d13CTDIC on standard solution samples is ?10.89 < per mil versus PDB (1 s= 0.18, n = 50, thus revealing both a good analytical precision and reproducibility. A comparison between average d13CTDIC values on a quadruplicate set of natural samples and those obtained following the chemical and physical stripping method highlights a good agreement between the two analytical methods.

  19. Influence of diagenesis on the stable isotopic composition of biogenic carbonates from the Gulf of Tehuantepec oxygen minimum zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchet, C. L.; Kasten, S.; Vidal, L.; Poulton, S. W.; Ganeshram, R.; Thouveny, N.

    2012-04-01

    In order to evaluate the influence of diagenetic and post-sampling processes on the stable oxygen and carbon isotope compositions of biogenic carbonates, we conducted a multiproxy study of organic-rich sediments from the eastern Pacific oxygen minimum zone. Core MD02-2520, which was retrieved from the Gulf of Tehuantepec (Mexico), has seasonal laminations and covers the last 40 kyr. Together with the presence of gypsum crystals and inorganic calcite aggregates, the occurrence of large excursions in the stable oxygen and carbon isotope records of both planktonic and benthic foraminifera (as large as +3‰ in δ18O and -5‰ in δ13C) point to significant secondary transformations. Storage-related gypsum precipitation was ruled out since it implies sulfide reoxidation by oxygen that triggers biogenic calcite dissolution, which proved to be of minor importance here. Instead, precipitation of authigenic calcite during early diagenesis appears to be the most likely process responsible for the observed isotopic excursions. The δ13C composition for inorganic calcite aggregates (-5 to -7‰) suggests a major contribution from anaerobic oxidation of organic matter. The δ34S composition for gypsum crystals (-10 to +15‰) suggests a major contribution from anaerobic reoxidation of authigenic sulfides, potentially involving reactions with metal oxides and sulfur disproportionation. A minor part of the gypsum might possibly have formed as a result of local pore water salinity increases induced by gas hydrate formation.

  20. Stable isotope analysis of dissolved carbon species of Hot Lake, WA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, S.; Moran, J.; Cory, A. B.; Lindemann, S. R.; Fredrickson, J.

    2013-12-01

    Hot Lake is a hypersaline, meromictic lake in north-central Washington. The lake is epsomitic, with seasonably-variable salinity (.2 to 2 M magnesium sulfate) and produces carbonates and salt precipitates. The maximum depth of the lake is around 2.5 m, and below a thermocline there is intense solar heat retention in the monolimnion, often exceeding 50°C. Despite these extreme and variable conditions, a microbial mat of up to 1.5 cm thick thrives annually in Hot Lake. The mat is widespread throughout the lake at water depths (during our experiments) ranging from 60cm-140cm. It is comprised of a variety of cyanobacteria along with other autotrophic and heterotrophic bacteria. These populations are visibly stratified with four consistent laminae displaying differences in bacterial pigmentation. Many of the layers contain carbonate species, but the full relationship between the mat and the carbonate crystallization is not known. We are studying the microbial interactions and carbon cycling of the mat communities, using stable isotope analysis of the mat and the lake water, both in situ and ex situ. We are exploring the incorporation and movement of carbon in the mat, spatially and temporally, to understand the fixation mechanisms and metabolic processes at play in this environment. This was done primarily using stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The focus of this work is on the study and measurement of dissolved organic and inorganic carbon using a GasBench and IRMS setup, following methods adapted from Lang et al. (2012). To account for the unique chemistry of Hot Lake, trials on the effects of oxidation conditions and salinity were done on lab-synthesized samples to compare to Hot Lake results. The majority of lake water analyses were done in conjunction with a stable isotope probing (SIP) experiment, completed during two 24-hour periods at Hot Lake in June and July of 2013. The SIP experiments included ex situ incubations (in separate glass containers on the

  1. Modeling stable isotope and organic carbon in hillslope stormflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusek, Jaromir; Vogel, Tomas; Dohnal, Michal; Marx, Anne; Jankovec, Jakub; Sanda, Martin; Votrubova, Jana; Barth, Johannes A. C.; Cislerova, Milena

    2016-04-01

    Reliable prediction of water movement and fluxes of dissolved substances (such as stable isotopes and organic carbon) at both the hillslope and the catchment scales remains a challenge due to complex boundary conditions and soil spatial heterogeneity. In addition, microbially mediated transformations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) are known to affect balance of DOC in soils, hence the transformations need to be included in a conceptual model of a DOC transport. So far, only few studies utilized stable isotope information in modeling and even fewer linked dissolved carbon fluxes to mixing and/or transport models. In this study, stormflow dynamics of oxygen-18 isotope and dissolved organic carbon was analyzed using a physically based modeling approach. One-dimensional dual-continuum vertical flow and transport model, based on Richards and advection-dispersion equations, was used to simulate the subsurface transport processes in a forest soil during several observed rainfall-runoff episodes. The transport of heat in the soil profile was described by conduction-advection equation. Water flow and transport of solutes and heat were assumed to take place in two mutually communicating porous domains, the soil matrix and the network of preferential pathways. The rate of microbial transformations of DOC was assumed to depend on soil water content and soil temperature. Oxygen-18 and dissolved organic carbon concentrations were observed in soil pore water, hillslope stormflow (collected in the experimental hillslope trench), and stream discharge (at the catchment outlet). The modeling was used to analyze the transformation of input solute signals into output hillslope signals observed in the trench stormflow. Signatures of oxygen-18 isotope in hillslope stormflow as well as isotope concentration in soil pore water were predicted reasonably well. Due to complex nature of microbial transformations, prediction of DOC rate and transport was associated with a high uncertainty.

  2. Phase heterogeneity in carbonate production by marine fish influences their roles in sediment generation and the inorganic carbon cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salter, Michael A; Harborne, Alastair R; Perry, Chris T; Wilson, Rod W

    2017-04-10

    Marine teleost fish are important carbonate producers in neritic and oceanic settings. However, the fates of the diverse carbonate phases (i.e., mineral and amorphous forms of CaCO3) they produce, and their roles in sediment production and marine inorganic carbon cycling, remain poorly understood. Here we quantify the carbonate phases produced by 22 Bahamian fish species and integrate these data with regional fish biomass data from The Bahamas to generate a novel platform-scale production model that resolves these phases. Overall carbonate phase proportions, ordered by decreasing phase stability, are: ~20% calcite, ~6% aragonite, ~60% high-Mg calcite, and ~14% amorphous carbonate. We predict that these phases undergo differing fates, with at least ~14% (amorphous carbonate) likely dissolving rapidly. Results further indicate that fisheries exploitation in The Bahamas has potentially reduced fish carbonate production by up to 58% in certain habitats, whilst also driving a deviation from natural phase proportions. These findings have evident implications for understanding sedimentary processes in shallow warm-water carbonate provinces. We further speculate that marked phase heterogeneity may be a hitherto unrecognised feature of fish carbonates across a wide range of neritic and oceanic settings, with potentially major implications for understanding their role in global marine inorganic carbon cycling.

  3. Dual Carbon and Nitrogen isotope Analysis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    significance of mangrove detritus as a food source for shrimps. Methods ..... although they might show preference for animal food over .... the decomposition is fast, or there is a net export of litter. ... carbon signatures of consumers. Flemming et ...

  4. Fingerprints for main varieties of argentinean wines: terroir differentiation by inorganic, organic, and stable isotopic analyses coupled to chemometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Paola-Naranjo, Romina D; Baroni, Maria V; Podio, Natalia S; Rubinstein, Hector R; Fabani, Maria P; Badini, Raul G; Inga, Marcela; Ostera, Hector A; Cagnoni, Mariana; Gallegos, Ernesto; Gautier, Eduardo; Peral-Garcia, Pilar; Hoogewerff, Jurian; Wunderlin, Daniel A

    2011-07-27

    Our main goal was to investigate if robust chemical fingerprints could be developed for three Argentinean red wines based on organic, inorganic, and isotopic patterns, in relation to the regional soil composition. Soils and wines from three regions (Mendoza, San Juan, and Córdoba) and three varieties (Cabernet Sauvignon, Malbec, and Syrah) were collected. The phenolic profile was determined by HPLC-MS/MS and multielemental composition by ICP-MS; (87)Sr/(86)Sr and δ(13)C were determined by TIMS and IRMS, respectively. Chemometrics allowed robust differentiation between regions, wine varieties, and the same variety from different regions. Among phenolic compounds, resveratrol concentration was the most useful marker for wine differentiation, whereas Mg, K/Rb, Ca/Sr, and (87)Sr/(86)Sr were the main inorganic and isotopic parameters selected. Generalized Procrustes analysis (GPA) using two studied matrices (wine and soil) shows consensus between them and clear differences between studied areas. Finally, we applied a canonical correlation analysis, demonstrating significant correlation (r = 0.99; p soil and wine composition. To our knowledge this is the first report combining independent variables, constructing a fingerprint including elemental composition, isotopic, and polyphenol patterns to differentiate wines, matching part of this fingerprint with the soil provenance.

  5. Preliminary Nanosims Analysis of Carbon Isotope of Carbonates in Calcium-Aluminum-Rich Inclusions

    OpenAIRE

    Guan, Y.; Paque, J. M.; Burnett, D.S.; Eiler, J. M.

    2009-01-01

    Carbonate minerals observed in primitive meteorites are products of either terrestrial weathering or aqueous alteration in the early solar system. Most of the carbonate minerals in carbonaceous chondrites occur primarily as isolated grains in matrix, as crosscutting veins, or as replacement minerals in chondrules [e.g., 1, 2]. A few calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) have been reported containing carbonate minerals as well [2, 3]. The C and O isotopes of carbonates in c...

  6. Diffusive fractionation of carbon isotopes in γ-Fe: Experiment, models and implications for early solar system processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Thomas; Watson, E. Bruce; Trail, Dustin; Wiedenbeck, Michael; Van Orman, James; Hauri, Erik H.

    2014-02-01

    Carbon is an abundant element of planets and meteorites whose isotopes provide unique insights into both organic and inorganic geochemical processes. The identities of carbonaceous phases and their textural and isotopic characters shed light on dynamical processes in modern Earth systems and the evolution of the early solar system. In meteorites and their parent bodies, reduced carbon is often associated with Fe-Ni alloys, so knowledge of the mechanisms that fractionate C isotopes in such phases is crucial for deciphering the isotopic record of planetary materials. Here we present the results of a diffusion-couple experiment in which cylinders of polycrystalline Fe containing 11,500 and 150 μg/g of C were juxtaposed at 1273 K and 1.5 GPa for a duration of 36 min. Diffusion profiles of total C concentration and 13C/12C were measured by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). The elemental diffusivity extracted from the data is ˜3.0 × 10-11 m2 s-1, where 13C/12C was observed to change significantly along the diffusion profile, reflecting a higher diffusivity of 12C relative to 13C. The maximum isotopic fractionation along the diffusion profile is ˜30-40‰. The relative diffusivities (D) of the carbon isotopes can be related to their masses (M) by D/D=(C/M)β; the exponent β calculated from our data has a value of 0.225 ± 0.025. Similarly high β values for diffusion of other elements in metals have been taken as an indication of interstitial diffusion, so our results are consistent with C diffusion in Fe by an interstitial mechanism. The high β-value reported here means that significant fractionation of carbon isotopes in nature may arise via diffusion in Fe(-Ni) metal, which is an abundant component of planetary interiors and meteorites.

  7. Carbon isotope fluctuations in Precambrian carbonate sequences of several localities in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SIAL ALCIDES N.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon isotope fluctuations in Precambrian sedimentary carbonates between 2.8 Ga and 0.60 Ga in Brazil are examined in this study. The carbonate facies of the BIF of the 2.8 Ga-old Carajás Formation, state of Pará in northern Brazil, has rather homogeneous delta13C (-5 o/ooPDB, compatible with carbonatization of a silicate protolith by a CO2-rich fluid from mantle degassing. The Paleoproterozoic Gandarela Formation, state of Minas Gerais, displays a narrow delta13C variation (-1.5 to +0.5 o/oo compatible with carbon isotope signatures of carbonates deposited around 2.4 Ga worldwide. The Fecho do Funil Formation has probably recorded the Lomagundi delta13C positive anomaly (+6.4 to +7.1 o/ooPDB. The magnesite-bearing carbonates of the Orós mobile belt, state of Ceará, exhibit carbon isotope fluctuation within the range for carbonates deposited at 1.8 Ga. The C-isotope record of the Frecheirinha Formation, northwestern state of Ceará, shows negative delta13C values in its lower portion (-2 o/oo and positive values up section (+1 to +3 o/oo, which suggests this sequence is a cap carbonate deposited after a glacial event around 0.95 Ga. The Jacoca and Acauã sedimentary carbonate Formations, state of Sergipe, NE Brazil, show carbon isotope fluctuations very similar to each other (average around -5 o/oo, compatible with a deposition around 0.76 Ga. The younger Olho D'Água carbonate Formation, however, also in the state of Sergipe, displays negative delta13C values at the lower portion of the Formation, changing dramatically up section to positive values as high as +10 o/oo, a characteristic compatible with a Sturtian cap carbonate deposited around 0.69 Ga. On the light of the C isotope data discussed in this study, it seems that delta13C fluctuations in Paleoproterozoic carbonates in Brazil are within the range found globally for metasedimentary carbonates of this age. Carbon isotope data proved to be very useful in establishing relative

  8. Dynamics of dissolved inorganic carbon and aquatic metabolism in the Tana River basin, Kenya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamooh, F.; Borges, A.V.; Meysman, F.J.R.; Van Den Meersche, K.; Dehairs, F.; Merckx, R.; Bouillon, S.

    2013-01-01

    A basin-wide study was conducted in the Tana River basin (Kenya) in February 2008 (dry season), September–November 2009 (wet season) and June–July 2010 (end of the wet season) to assess the dynamics and sources of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) as well as to quantify CO2 fluxes, community respirat

  9. Characteristics of carbon and hydrogen isotopic compositions of light hydrocarbons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈平

    1995-01-01

    Light hydrocarbons named in the present paper refer to the natural gas-associated light oil and condensate 46 light oil and condensate samples from 11 oil-bearing basins of China were collected and their carbon and hydrogen isotopic compositions were analysed in terms of their total hydrocarbons, saturated hydrocarbons and a part of aromatic fractions, and gas-source materials and their sedimentary environments were discussed based on the above-mentioned data and the geological background of each area. From the view of carbon and hydrogen isotopic composition of total hydrocarbons and saturated hydrocarbons, it is revealed that the condensate related to coal-bearing strata is enriched in 13C and D while that related to the source material of type I-II is enriched in 12C. In general, the isotopic composition of carbon is mainly attributed to the inheriting effect of their source materials, whereas that of hydrogen principally reflects the correlationship between hydrogen isotopes and the sedimentary envi

  10. Clumped-isotope geochemistry of carbonates: A new tool for the reconstruction of temperature and oxygen isotope composition of seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernasconi, Stefano M., E-mail: Stefano.bernasconi@erdw.ethz.ch [Geological Institute, ETH Zuerich, Sonneggstrasse 5, 8092 Zuerich (Switzerland); Schmid, Thomas W.; Grauel, Anna-Lena [Geological Institute, ETH Zuerich, Sonneggstrasse 5, 8092 Zuerich (Switzerland); Mutterlose, Joerg [Institut fuer Geologie, Mineralogie und Geophysik, Ruhr Universitaet Bochum, Universitaetsstr. 150, 44801 Bochum (Germany)

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: > Clumped-isotope thermometry of carbonates is discussed. > Clumped isotopes of Belemnites show higher sea surface temperatures than commonly assumed for the lower Cretaceous. > The potential of clumped-isotope measurement on foraminifera is discussed. - Abstract: Clumped-isotope geochemistry deals with State of ordering of rare isotopes in molecules, in particular with their tendency to form bonds with other rare isotopes rather than with the most abundant ones. Among its possible applications, carbonate clumped-isotope thermometry is the one that has gained most attention because of the wide potential of applications in many disciplines of the earth sciences. In particular, it allows reconstructing the temperature of formation of carbonate minerals without knowledge of the isotopic composition of the water from which they were formed. In addition, the O isotope composition of the waters from which they were formed can be calculated using the {delta}{sup 18}O of the same carbonate sample. This feature offers new approaches in paleoclimatology for reconstructing past global geochemical cycles. In this contribution two applications of this method are presented. First the potential of a new analytical method of measurement of clumped isotopes on small samples of foraminifera, for high-resolution SST and seawater {delta}{sup 18}O reconstructions from marine sediments is shown. Furthermore the potential of clumped isotope analysis of belemnites, for reconstructing seawater {delta}{sup 18}O and temperatures in the Cretaceous is shown.

  11. Carbon isotope composition of the Lower Triassic marine carbonates, Lower Yangtze Region, South China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZUO; Jingxun; TONG; Jinnan; QIU; Haiou; ZHAO; Laishi

    2006-01-01

    Studies on three Lower Triassic sections located on the shallow water platform, the deep water slope and in the deep water basin in the Lower Yangtze Region, South China, show the similar trend of carbon isotope evolution. Biostratigraphic correlations among the Lower Triassic sections on the basis of standard conodont zones indicate that three negative shifts occurred in the Griesbachian, the Smithian and the late Spathian stages respectively, and one distinctly positive shift occurred in the early Spathian stage. Trend of carbon isotope evolution of the Lower Triassic reflects some significant changes in the global carbon cycle. Moreover, δ13C background values are intensively controlled by palaeogeographic environment. In general, δ13C values from deep-water slope carbonates are lighter than those from carbonate platform and heavier than those from deep-water basin carbonates. The positive carbon isotope excursion may be induced by a significant amount of organic carbon burial in marine sediments and increase in primary productivity. The large negative carbon isotope excursions during the Early Triassic in Lower Yangtze Region are interpreted to relate to volcano eruptions based on tuffaceous claystone interlayers observed near the Permian-Triassic boundary, the Induan- Olenekian boundary and the Lower Triassic-Middle Triassic boundary.

  12. Influence of form IA RubisCO and environmental dissolved inorganic carbon on the delta13C of the clam-chemoautotroph symbiosis Solemya velum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Kathleen M; Schwedock, Julie; Schrag, Daniel P; Cavanaugh, Colleen M

    2004-12-01

    Many nutritive symbioses between chemoautotrophic bacteria and invertebrates, such as Solemya velum, have delta(13)C values of approximately -30 to -35%, considerably more depleted than phytoplankton. Most of the chemoautotrophic symbionts fix carbon with a form IA ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (RubisCO). We hypothesized that this form of RubisCO discriminates against (13)CO(2) to a greater extent than other forms. Solemya velum symbiont RubisCO was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and characterized. Enzyme from this recombinant system fixed carbon most rapidly at pH 7.5 and 20-25 degrees C. Surprisingly, this RubisCO had an epsilon-value (proportional to the degree to which the enzyme discriminates against (13)CO(2)) of 24.4 per thousand, similar to form IB RubisCOs, and higher than form II RubisCOs. Samples of interstitial water from S. velum's habitat were collected to determine whether the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) could contribute to the negative delta(13)C values. Solemya velum habitat DIC was present at high concentrations (up to approximately 5 mM) and isotopically depleted, with delta(13)C values as low as approximately -6%. Thus environmental DIC, coupled with a high degree of isotopic fractionation by symbiont RubisCO likely contribute to the isotopically depleted delta(13)C values of S. velum biomass, highlighting the necessity of considering factors at all levels (from environmental to enzymatic) in interpreting stable isotope ratios.

  13. Carbon isotope geochemistry of the Santa Clara River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masiello, Caroline A.; Druffel, Ellen R. M.

    2001-06-01

    The Santa Clara River is a prototypical small mountainous river, with a headwater height greater than 1000 m and a basin area smaller than 10,000 m 2. Although individual small mountainous rivers export trivial amounts of sediment and carbon to the ocean, as a group these rivers may export a major fraction (as much as 50%) of the total global river sediment flux [Milliman and Syvitski, 1992], making their geochemistry relevant the study of the ocean's carbon cycle. In addition, many small rivers export sediment in a few high flux events, causing massive, sporadic discharge of carbon onto coastal shelves, discharge conditions very different from those of large rivers. This class of rivers is an end-member of the river-ocean carbon exchange system,. opposite the Earth's largest river, the Amazon. The carbon mass and isotopic properties of the Santa Clara River are significantly different from previously studied large rivers. During the 1997-1998 winter, all Santa Clara carbon pools were old, with flux-weighted average Δl4C values of-428±76‰ for particulate organic carbon, -73±31‰ for dissolved organic carbon, and-644±58‰ for black carbon. The age of exported carbon is primarily due to the deep erosion of old soils and not to inclusion of fossil fuel carbon. Additionally, the δ13C signatures of exported carbon pools were high relative to terrestrial carbon, bearing a signature quite similar to marine carbon (average particulate organic carbon (POC) δ13C = -22.2±0.8‰). The Santa Clara's estuary is small and drains onto the narrow eastern Pacific coastal margin, exporting this old soil organic matter directly into the ocean. If the Santa Clara export patterns are representative of this class of rivers, they may be a significant source of refractory terrestrial carbon to the ocean.

  14. Dissolved inorganic carbon and organic carbon in mires in the Forsmark area. A pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loefgren, Anders [EcoAnalytica, Haegersten (Sweden)

    2011-12-15

    Dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) are the large dissolved carbon pools in mires. They are both related to a number of factors such as groundwater flow, minerogenic influence and peat properties, which all are more or less related to peatland development stage. In a scenario of a release of radionuclides from an underground repository containing radioactive material, behaviour of these pools during the mire ontogeny will be of importance for the understanding of how C-14 will constitute a potential risk to humans and non-human biota. In this pilot study, DIC and DOC concentrations were investigated for three mires representing a potential sequence of peatland development in a coastal area at Forsmark in central Sweden characterized by land upheaval, a flat topography and calcareous content in the soil. The mires where chosen based on difference in height above the sea level, covering approximate 1000 years, and characteristics based on their vegetation. Water samples were collected during August from all three mires at two different depths in the anoxic layer of the mires, by extracting water from peat obtained with a peat corer. DIC concentrations where related to the age of the mires, with the lowest concentrations in the highest located mire. There was a positive correlation between pH and DIC, where the higher DIC concentrations were found in the 'richer' fens. DIC concentrations were also positively related to the conductivity within and between the mires, where conductivity would be a proxy for the dominating cation Ca{sup 2+} associated to the calcareous-influenced groundwater. DOC concentrations were highest in the oldest mire, but were similar in the younger mires. No patterns were found between DIC and DOC, and the peat bulk density. The report ends with suggestions on how a continued study could be improved.

  15. [Effect of inorganic carbon source on lipid production with autotrophic Chlorella vulgaris].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hongli; Gao, Zhen; Zhang, Qi; Huang, He; Ji, Xiaojun; Sun, Honglei; Dou, Chang

    2011-03-01

    We studied the effects of three inorganic carbon sources, Na2CO3, NaHCO3 and CO2, and their initial concentrations on lipid production of Chlorella vulgaris. Chlorella vulgaris could utilize Na2CO3, NaHCO3 and CO2 to produce lipids. After 10-day cultivation with each of the three inorganic carbon sources, lipid yield of Chlorella vulgaris reached its peak with the concentration increase of the inorganic carbon source, but dropped again by further increase of the concentration. The pH value of the culture medium for Chlorella vulgaris increased after the cultivation on inorganic carbon source. The optimal concentration of both Na2CO3 and NaHCO3 was 40 mmol/L, and their corresponding biomass dry weight was 0.52 g/L and 0.67 g/L with their corresponding lipid yield 0.19 g/L and 0.22 g/L. When the concentration of CO2 was 6%, Chlorella vulgaris grew the fastest and its biomass dry weight was 2.42 g/L with the highest lipid yield of 0.72 g/L. When the concentration of CO2 was too low, the supply of inorganic carbon was insufficient and lipid yield was low. A too high concentration of CO2 caused a low pH and lipid accumulation was inhibited. Na2CO3 and NaHCO3 were more favorable for Chlorella vulgaris to accumulate unsaturated fatty acids than that of CO2.

  16. Characteristics of Light-Dependent Inorganic Carbon Uptake by Isolated Spinach Chloroplasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicher, Richard C.

    1984-01-01

    The light-dependent accumulation of radioactively labeled inorganic carbon in isolated spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) chloroplasts was determined by silicone oil filtering centrifugation. Intact chloroplasts, dark-incubated 60 seconds at pH 7.6 and 23°C with 0.5 millimolar sodium bicarbonate, contained 0.5 to 1.0 millimolar internal inorganic carbon. The stromal pool of inorganic carbon increased 5- to 7-fold after 2 to 3 minutes of light. The saturated internal bicarbonate concentration of illuminated spinach chloroplasts was 10- to 20-fold greater than that of the external medium. This ratio decreased at lower temperatures and with increasing external bicarbonate. Over one-half the inorganic carbon found in intact spinach chloroplasts after 2 minutes of light was retained during a subsequent 3-minute dark incubation at 5°C. Calculations of light-induced stromal alkalization based on the uptake of radioactively labeled bicarbonate were 0.4 to 0.5 pH units less than measurements performed with [14C]dimethyloxazolidine-dione. About one-third of the binding sites on the enzyme ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase were radiolabeled when the enzyme was activated in situ and 14CO2 bound to the activator site was trapped in the presence of carboxypentitol bisphosphates. Deleting orthophosphate from the incubation medium eliminated inorganic carbon accumulation in the stroma. Thus, bicarbonate ion distribution across the chloroplast envelope was not strictly pH dependent as predicted by the Henderson-Hasselbach formula. This finding is potentially explained by the presence of bound CO2 in the chloroplast. PMID:16663542

  17. Impact of flood events on lacustrine carbonate isotope records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kämpf, Lucas; Plessen, Birgit; Lauterbach, Stefan; Nantke, Carla; Meyer, Hanno; Chapligin, Bernhard; Höllerer, Hannes; Brauer, Achim

    2016-04-01

    Stable oxygen (δ 18O) and carbon (δ 13C) isotope compositions of lacustrine carbonates are among the most frequently used proxies in palaeolimnological / -environmental studies. Stable isotope analyses are often carried out on bulk carbonate samples, which are prone to contamination with detrital carbonates, transported into the lake by runoff processes and carrying the isotopic signal of catchment rocks, thus hampering the interpretation of the data in terms of past climatic and/or environmental changes. Despite the awareness of a likely detrital bias, the degree of contamination in most cases remains unknown and discrete contaminated samples undetected due to a lack of methods to disentangle endogenic and detrital carbonates in sediment records. To address this issue and provide more comprehensive insights into effects of flood-related detrital input on the bulk carbonate isotopic composition, we conducted stable isotope measurements on sediments trapped on a 3-12 day basis over a three-year period (January 2011 to November 2013) at two locations in pre-Alpine Lake Mondsee, close to the inflow of the main tributary and in the deepest part of the lake basin. Lake Mondsee was chosen for the monitoring since the pelagic sediments are annually laminated consisting of couplets of light calcite layers and dark layers made up by a mixture of detrital clastic and organic matter. Maximum calcite flux rates >1.5 g m2 d-1 were trapped between May and September, indicating the seasonal endogenic precipitation of calcite crystals. The comparison of the δ 18O composition of trapped carbonates, rain and epilimnion lake water revealed equilibrium calcite precipitation, allowing us to infer purely endogenic δ 18O (-9 to -11.3‰ VPDB) and δ 13C values (-6 to -9‰ VPDB) throughout the summer season. The endogenic calcite precipitation was interrupted by 14 peaks in carbonate flux (4 to 175 g m2 d-1) triggered by runoff events of different magnitudes (10-110 m3 s-1 peak

  18. Enrichment of Inorganic Martian Dust Simulant with Carbon Component can Provoke Neurotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozdnyakova, Natalia; Pastukhov, Artem; Dudarenko, Marina; Borysov, Arsenii; Krisanova, Natalia; Nazarova, Anastasia; Borisova, Tatiana

    2017-02-01

    Carbon is the most abundant dust-forming element in the interstellar medium. Tremendous amount of meteorites containing plentiful carbon and carbon-enriched dust particles have reached the Earth daily. National Institute of Health panel accumulates evidences that nano-sized air pollution components may have a significant impact on the central nervous system (CNS) in health and disease. During inhalation, nano-/microsized particles are efficiently deposited in nasal, tracheobronchial, and alveolar regions and can be transported to the CNS. Based on above facts, here we present the study, the aims of which were: 1) to upgrade inorganic Martian dust simulant derived from volcanic ash (JSC-1a/JSC, ORBITEC Orbital Technologies Corporation, Madison, Wisconsin) by the addition of carbon components, that is, nanodiamonds and carbon dots; 2) to analyse acute effects of upgraded simulant on key characteristics of synaptic neurotransmission; and 3) to compare above effects with those of inorganic dust and carbon components per se. Acute administration of carbon-containing Martian dust analogues resulted in a significant decrease in transporter-mediated uptake of L-[14C]glutamate (the major excitatory neurotransmitter) and [3H]GABA (the main inhibitory neurotransmitter) by isolated rat brain nerve terminals. The extracellular level of both neurotransmitters increased in the presence of carbon-containing Martian dust analogues. These effects were associated with action of carbon components of upgraded Martian dust simulant, but not with its inorganic constituent. This fact indicates that carbon component of native Martian dust can have deleterious effects on extracellular glutamate and GABA homeostasis in the CNS, and so glutamate- and GABA-ergic neurotransmission disballansing exitation and inhibition.

  19. Apparent Disequilibrium of Inorganic and Organic Carbon Compounds in Serpentinizing Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, K.; Shock, E.

    2014-12-01

    During serpentinization of ultramafic rocks, ferrous iron in silicates is oxidized to ferric minerals and H2O is reduced to H2. This process is accompanied by the reduction of inorganic carbon, as observed in experiments and natural systems. To test the extent to which stable and metastable equilibria are reached among aqueous organic compounds during serpentinization, we sampled water and dissolved gases from circumneutral surface pools and hyperalkaline seeps in the Samail ophiolite in the Sultanate of Oman and analyzed for various carbon constituents, including dissolved inorganic carbon, dissolved organic carbon, methane, carbon monoxide, formate, acetate, and other small organic acid anions. Measurements of temperature, pH, dissolved H2, O2, major cations, major anions, and major and trace elements were also made. The aqueous composition of the analyzed samples was speciated based on ionic equilibrium interactions in order to obtain activities for inorganic carbon species, reduced carbon species, H2, and O2. The redox disequilibria among carbon species was then assessed using data and parameters for the revised HKF equations of state. This analysis demonstrates that the carbon species in this system are out of equilibrium with respect to one another in ways that cannot be compensated by altering the abundance of the other constituents within analytical uncertainties. Specifically, there is too much formate and too little methane relative to stable and metastable equilibria. This result implies the following: 1) Methane and formate equilibrated in separate parts of the system, given that no reasonable temperature, pressure, or composition changes satisfy equilibrium with their measured abundances. 2) Methane production is kinetically inhibited, as seen in experiments. 3) Microbial methane oxidation altered the abundance of methane and formate; methane oxidation to formate or carbonate is calculated to be extremely thermodynamically favorable in these fluids.

  20. Enrichment of Inorganic Martian Dust Simulant with Carbon Component can Provoke Neurotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozdnyakova, Natalia; Pastukhov, Artem; Dudarenko, Marina; Borysov, Arsenii; Krisanova, Natalia; Nazarova, Anastasia; Borisova, Tatiana

    2017-01-01

    Carbon is the most abundant dust-forming element in the interstellar medium. Tremendous amount of meteorites containing plentiful carbon and carbon-enriched dust particles have reached the Earth daily. National Institute of Health panel accumulates evidences that nano-sized air pollution components may have a significant impact on the central nervous system (CNS) in health and disease. During inhalation, nano-/microsized particles are efficiently deposited in nasal, tracheobronchial, and alveolar regions and can be transported to the CNS. Based on above facts, here we present the study, the aims of which were: 1) to upgrade inorganic Martian dust simulant derived from volcanic ash (JSC-1a/JSC, ORBITEC Orbital Technologies Corporation, Madison, Wisconsin) by the addition of carbon components, that is, nanodiamonds and carbon dots; 2) to analyse acute effects of upgraded simulant on key characteristics of synaptic neurotransmission; and 3) to compare above effects with those of inorganic dust and carbon components per se. Acute administration of carbon-containing Martian dust analogues resulted in a significant decrease in transporter-mediated uptake of L-[14C]glutamate (the major excitatory neurotransmitter) and [3H]GABA (the main inhibitory neurotransmitter) by isolated rat brain nerve terminals. The extracellular level of both neurotransmitters increased in the presence of carbon-containing Martian dust analogues. These effects were associated with action of carbon components of upgraded Martian dust simulant, but not with its inorganic constituent. This fact indicates that carbon component of native Martian dust can have deleterious effects on extracellular glutamate and GABA homeostasis in the CNS, and so glutamate- and GABA-ergic neurotransmission disballansing exitation and inhibition.

  1. Simultaneous tracing of carbon and nitrogen isotopes in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Roland; Jain, Mohit

    2016-05-24

    Stable isotope tracing is a powerful method for interrogating metabolic enzyme activities across the metabolic network of living cells. However, most studies of mammalian cells have used (13)C-labeled tracers only and focused on reactions in central carbon metabolism. Cellular metabolism, however, involves other biologically important elements, including nitrogen, hydrogen, oxygen, phosphate and sulfur. Tracing stable isotopes of such elements may help shed light on poorly understood metabolic pathways. Here, we demonstrate the use of high-resolution mass spectrometry to simultaneously trace carbon and nitrogen metabolism in human cells cultured with (13)C- and (15)N-labeled glucose and glutamine. To facilitate interpretation of the complex isotopomer data generated, we extend current methods for metabolic flux analysis to handle multivariate mass isotopomer distributions (MMIDs). We find that observed MMIDs are broadly consistent with known biochemical pathways. Whereas measured (13)C MIDs were informative for central carbon metabolism, (15)N isotopes provided evidence for nitrogen-carrying reactions in amino acid and nucleotide metabolism. This computational and experimental methodology expands the scope of metabolic flux analysis beyond carbon metabolism, and may prove important to understanding metabolic phenotypes in health and disease.

  2. Shear heating and clumped isotope reordering in carbonate faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siman-Tov, Shalev; Affek, Hagit P.; Matthews, Alan; Aharonov, Einat; Reches, Ze'ev

    2016-07-01

    Natural faults are expected to heat rapidly during seismic slip and to cool quite quickly after the slip event. Here we examine clumped isotope thermometry for its ability to identify such short duration elevated temperature events along frictionally heated carbonate faults. Our approach is based on measured Δ47 values that reflect the distribution of oxygen and carbon isotopes in the calcite lattice, measuring the abundance of 13Csbnd 18O bonds, which is affected by temperature. We examine three types of calcite rock samples: (1) crushed limestone grains that were rapidly heated and then cooled in static laboratory experiments, simulating the temperature cycle experienced by fault rock during an earthquake slip; (2) limestone samples that were experimentally sheared to simulate earthquake slip events; and (3) samples from Fault Mirrors (FMs) collected from principle slip surfaces of three natural carbonate faults. Extensive FM surfaces are believed to form during earthquake slip. Our experimental results show that Δ47 values decrease rapidly (in the course of seconds) with increasing temperature and shear velocity. On the other hand, carbonate shear zones from natural faults do not show such Δ47 decrease. We suggest that the Δ47 response may be controlled by nano-size grains, the high abundance of defects, and highly stressed/strained grain boundaries within the carbonate fault zone that can reduce the activation energy for diffusion, and thus lead to an increased rate of isotopic disordering during shear experiments. In our laboratory experiments the high stress and strain on grain contacts and the presence of nanograins thus allows for rapid disordering so that a change in Δ47 occurs in a very short and relatively low intensity heating events. In natural faults it may also lead to isotopic ordering after the cessation of frictional heating thus erasing the high temperature signature of Δ47.

  3. Carbon and Oxygen Isotope Stratigraphy of the Oxfordian Carbonate Rocks in Amu Darya Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rongcai Zheng; Yanghui Pan; Can Zhao; Lei Wu; Renjin Chen; Rui Yang

    2013-01-01

    Based on the detailed research on petrologic and geochemical characteristics of deposition and diagenesis of Oxfordian carbonate rocks in Amu Darya Basin,Turkmenistan,carbon and oxygen isotopes were analyzed.The results show that the paleoenvironmental evolution reflected by the samples with well-preserved original carbon isotopes coincides with the carbon-isotope stratigraphic carve and is almost consistent with the global sea-level curve,the Mid-Oxfordian wide transgression,and the positive carbon-isotope excursion event.The Mid-Oxfordian continuing transgression not only laid the foundation for the development of the Oxfordian reef and shoal reservoirs in Amu Darya Basin but also provided an example for the Oxfordian global transgression and the resulting development of reefs and banks and high-speed organic carbon burial events.The response of oxygen isotopes in diagenetic environment showed that micrite limestones and granular limestones underwent weak diagenetic alteration,and the samples largely retained the original seawater features.Dolomitization and the precipitation of hydrothermal calcites tilling solution vugs and fractures before hydrocarbon accumulation occurred in a closed diagenetic environment where the main controlling factor is the temperature,and the diagenetic fluids were from the deep hot brine.The chalkification of the limestones after hydrocarbon accumulation occurred in the oiltield water systems.

  4. A supercritical oxidation system for the determination of carbon isotope ratios in marine dissolved organic carbon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le Clercq, Martijn; Van der Plicht, Johannes; Meijer, Harro A.J.

    1998-01-01

    An analytical oxidation system employing supercritical oxidation has been developed. It is designed to measure concentration and the natural carbon isotope ratios (C-13, C-14) Of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and is especially suited for marine samples. The oxidation takes place in a ceramic tube a

  5. STABLE CARBON ISOTOPE ANALYSIS OF SUBFOSSIL WOOD FROM AUSTRIAN ALPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    KŁUSEK, MARZENA; PAWEŁCZYK, SŁAWOMIRA

    2015-01-01

    The presented studies were carried out in order to check the usefulness of subfossil wood for stable isotope analysis. The aim of research was also to define the optimal method of subfossil samples preparation. Subfossil samples used during the presented studies are a part of the multi-century dendrochronological scale. This chronology originates in an area situated around a small mountain lake — Schwarzersee, in Austria. The obtained results of stable carbon isotope measurements confirmed that the method of α-cellulose extraction by the application of acidic sodium chlorite and sodium hydroxide solutions removes resins and other mobile compounds from wood. Therefore, in the case of the analysed samples, the additional chemical process of extractives removing was found to be unnecessary. Studied wood samples contained an adequate proportion of α-cellulose similar to the values characteristic for the contemporary trees. This proved an adequate wood preservation which is essential for the conduction of isotopic research. PMID:26346297

  6. Boron isotope fractionation in magma via crustal carbonate dissolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deegan, Frances M; Troll, Valentin R; Whitehouse, Martin J; Jolis, Ester M; Freda, Carmela

    2016-08-04

    Carbon dioxide released by arc volcanoes is widely considered to originate from the mantle and from subducted sediments. Fluids released from upper arc carbonates, however, have recently been proposed to help modulate arc CO2 fluxes. Here we use boron as a tracer, which substitutes for carbon in limestone, to further investigate crustal carbonate degassing in volcanic arcs. We performed laboratory experiments replicating limestone assimilation into magma at crustal pressure-temperature conditions and analysed boron isotope ratios in the resulting experimental glasses. Limestone dissolution and assimilation generates CaO-enriched glass near the reaction site and a CO2-dominated vapour phase. The CaO-rich glasses have extremely low δ(11)B values down to -41.5‰, reflecting preferential partitioning of (10)B into the assimilating melt. Loss of (11)B from the reaction site occurs via the CO2 vapour phase generated during carbonate dissolution, which transports (11)B away from the reaction site as a boron-rich fluid phase. Our results demonstrate the efficacy of boron isotope fractionation during crustal carbonate assimilation and suggest that low δ(11)B melt values in arc magmas could flag shallow-level additions to the subduction cycle.

  7. Organic and inorganic carbon dynamics in a karst aquifer: Santa Fe River Sink-Rise system, north Florida, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jin; Zimmerman, Andrew R.; Moore, Paul J.; Martin, Jonathan B.

    2014-03-01

    Spatiotemporal variations in dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), major ions concentrations and other geochemical parameters including stable carbon isotopes of DIC (δ13CDIC), were measured in surface water and deep and shallow well water samples of the Santa Fe River Sink-Rise eogenetic karst system, north Florida, USA. Three end-member water sources were identified: one DOC-rich/DIC-poor/δ13CDIC-depleted, one DOC-poor/DIC-rich/δ13CDIC-enriched, and one enriched in major ions. Given their spatiotemporal distributions, they were presumed to represent soil water, upper aquifer groundwater, and deep aquifer water sources, respectively. Using assumed ratios of Na+, Cl, and SO42- for each end-member, a mixing model calculated the contribution of each water source to each sample. Then, chemical effects of biogeochemical reactions were calculated as the difference between those predicted by the mixing model and measured species concentrations. In general, carbonate mineral dissolution occurred throughout the Sink-Rise system, surface waters were net autotrophic and the subsurface was in metabolic balance, i.e., no net DOC or DIC production or consumption. However, there was evidence for chemolithoautotrophy, perhaps by hydrogen oxidizing microbes, at some deep aquifer sites. Mineralization of this autochthonous natural dissolved organic matter (NDOM) led to localized carbonate dissolution as did surface water-derived NDOM supplied to shallow well sites during the highest flow periods. This study demonstrates linkages between hydrology, abiotic and microbial processes and carbon dynamics and has important implications for groundwater quality, karst morphologic evolution, and hydrogeologic projects such as aquifer storage and recovery in karst systems.

  8. Effect of inorganic additives on the growth of silica-carbonate biomorphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakouzi, Elias; Rendina, Ryan; Palui, Goutam; Steinbock, Oliver

    2016-10-01

    Silica-barium carbonate biomorphs are complex precipitate microstructures that form by purely inorganic processes. They display life-like morphologies with smoothly curved surfaces that are not restricted to crystallographic symmetries. We investigate the morphogenetic influence of inorganic dopants that compete with the barium carbonate precipitation. Trace deposition of alkaline earth or transition metal additives causes significant changes to the crystal morphologies. In the case of Pb2+ and Ag+ ions, biomorph growth is disrupted by the formation of competing precipitates. Similarly, the addition of Ca2+, Mg2+, and Zn2+ induces the rapid crystallization of witherite or amorphous silica-carbonate aggregates at enhanced growth rates. By comparison, the addition of strontium ions results in the assembly of classic biomorphs such as cardioid sheets and helices. The procedures reported here exemplify the use of co-depositing agents to influence the compositional and crystallographic properties in a manner similar to magnesium-doped biogenic calcites.

  9. Dissolved Organic Carbon Cycling in Forested Watersheds: A Carbon Isotope Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiff, S. L.; Aravena, R.; Trumbore, S. E.; Dillon, P. J.

    1990-12-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is important in the acid-base chemistry of acid-sensitive freshwater systems; in the complexation, mobility, persistence, and toxicity of metals and other pollutants; and in lake carbon metabolism. Carbon isotopes (13C and 14C) are used to study the origin, transport, and fate of DOC in a softwater catchment in central Ontario. Precipitation, soil percolates, groundwaters, stream, beaver pond, and lake waters, and lake sediment pore water were characterized chemically and isotopically. In addition to total DOC, isotopic measurements were made on the humic and fulvic DOC fractions. The lake is a net sink for DOC. Δ14C results indicate that the turnover time of most of the DOC in streams, lakes, and wetlands is fast, less than 40 years, and on the same time scale as changes in acidic deposition. DOC in groundwaters is composed of older carbon than surface waters, indicating extensive cycling of DOC in the upper soil zone or aquifer.

  10. Patterns in Stable Isotope Values of Nitrogen and Carbon in ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stable isotope measurements of nitrogen and carbon (15N, 13ddC) are often used to characterize estuarine, nearshore, and open ocean ecosystems. Reliable information about the spatial distribution of base-level stable isotope values, often represented by primary producers, is critical to interpreting values in these ecosystems. While base-level isotope data are generally readily available for estuaries, nearshore coastal waters, and the open ocean, the continental shelf is less studied. To address this, and as a first step toward developing a surrogate for base-level isotopic signature in this region, we collected surface and deep water samples from the United States’ eastern continental shelf in the Western Atlantic Ocean, from the Gulf of Maine to Cape Hatteras, periodically between 2000 and 2013. During the study, particulate matter 15dN values ranged from 0.8 to 17.4‰, and 13dC values from −26.4 to −15.6‰over the region. We used spatial autocorrelation analysis and random forest modeling to examine the spatial trends and potential environmental drivers of the stable isotope values. We observed general trends toward lower values for both nitrogen and carbon isotopes at the seaward edge of the shelf. Conversely, higher 15dN and 13dC values were observed on the landward edge of the shelf, in particular in the southern portion of the sampling area. Across all sites, the magnitude of the difference between the 15dN of subsurface and surface particulate m

  11. Hydrology & isotope tools to quantify carbon sources and sinks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Johannes A. C.; Lischeid, Gunnar; Gessler, Arthur

    2010-05-01

    Vegetation is fundamental for carbon uptake and usually assumes the largest portion in the evapotranspiration term. While interception can be separated by mapping various plant types in a catchment, the water isotope method yields numbers for pure evaporation. The latter causes enrichment of the heavier isotope in the remaining water phase, while transpiration leaves the isotope signal of water unaltered over longer time periods. Evaporation can thus be quantified in an integral manner over large areas by measuring water stable isotopes at points of river discharge and by comparing them to incoming precipitation. This method has been applied on scales of several thousand square kilometres and its calibration on scales of few square kilometres will allow to better constrain uncertainties. This necessitates comparison with hydrometric methods of well-instrumented catchments in several climatic regimes. Innovative small-scale methods involve determination of effective rainfall by time series analyses of hydrological data. This in turn requires temporal resolution of daily to hourly values to apply methods such as runoff recession or principal component analyses. It is also known that continental water fluxes are related to carbon fluxes through photosynthesis that in turn recycles large amounts of water via transpiration. This is usually described by the water use efficiency (WUE) term that quantifies how many moles of water transpire to accumulate one mole of CO2. However, so far only few empirical numbers are available for the spatio-temporal variability in WUE of plants and plant communities and further field experiments combined with isoscape approaches are necessary to constrain this term on a regional scale and its dependencies on factors such as light, temperature, water availability, plant type and height. Combined data can then serve to determine catchment-wide carbon uptake via the transpiration rates. Carbon accumulation can also be determined with eddy

  12. How significant is submarine groundwater discharge and its associated dissolved inorganic carbon in a river-dominated shelf system?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. Liu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to assess the role of submarine groundwater discharge (SGD and its impact on the carbonate system on the northern South China Sea (NSCS shelf, we measured seawater concentrations of four radium isotopes 223,224,226,228Ra along with carbonate system parameters in June–July, 2008. Complementary groundwater sampling was conducted in coastal areas in December 2008 and October 2010 to constrain the groundwater end-members. The distribution of Ra isotopes in the NSCS was largely controlled by the Pearl River plume and coastal upwelling. Long-lived Ra isotopes (228Ra and 226Ra were enriched in the river plume but low in the offshore surface water and subsurface water/upwelling zone. In contrast, short-lived Ra isotopes (224Ra and 223Ra were elevated in the subsurface water/upwelling zone as well as in the river plume but depleted in the offshore surface water. In order to quantify SGD, we adopted two independent mathematical approaches. Using a three end-member mixing model with total alkalinity (TAlk and Ra isotopes, we derived a SGD flux into the NSCS shelf of 2.3–3.7 × 108 m3 day−1. Our second approach involved a simple mass balance of 228Ra and 226Ra and resulted in a first order but consistent SGD flux estimate of 2.2–3.7 × 108 m3 day−1. These fluxes were equivalent to 12–21 % of the Pearl River discharge, but the source of the SGD was mostly recirculated seawater. Despite the relatively small SGD volume flow compared to the river, the associated material fluxes were substantial given their elevated concentrations of dissolved inorganic solutes. In this case, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC flux through SGD was 153–347 × 109 mol yr−1, or ~23–53 % of the riverine DIC export flux. Our estimates of the groundwater-derived phosphate flux ranged 3–68 × 10

  13. Understanding on Soil Inorganic Carbon Transformation in North China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guitong; Yang, Lifang; Zhang, Chenglei; Zhang, Hongjie

    2015-04-01

    Soil total carbon balance in long-term fertilization field experiments in North China Plain. Four long-term fertilization experiments (20-30 years) were investigated on SOC in 40 cm, calcium carbonate and active carbonate (AC) in 180 or 100 cm soil profile, δ13C values of SOC and δ13C and δ18O values of carbonate in soil profile, particle distribution of SOC and SIC in main soil layers, and ratios of pedogenic carbonate (PC) in SIC and C3-SOC in SOC. The most important conclusion is that fertilization of more than 20 years can produce detectable impact on pool size, profile distribution, ratio of active component and PC of SIC, which make it clear that SIC pool must be considered in the proper evaluation of the response of soil carbon balance to human activities in arid and semi-arid region. Land use impact on soil total carbon pool in Inner Mongolia. With the data of the second survey of soils in Inner Mongolia and the 58 soil profile data from Wu-lan-cha-bu-meng and Xi-lin-hao-te, combining with the 13C and 18O techniques, SIC density and stock in Inner Mongolia is estimated. The main conclusion is that soils in inner Mongolia have the same level of SOC and SIC, with the density in 100cm pedons of 8.97 kg•m-2 and 8.61 kg•m-2, respectively. Meanwhile, the significantly positive relationship between SOC and SIC in A layer indicates co-sequestration of SOC and SIC exist. Evaluation of the methods for measuring CA enzyme activity in soil. In laboratory, method in literature to measure CA activity in soil sample was repeated, and found it was not valid indeed. The failure could not attribute to the disturbance of common ions like NO3-, SO42-, Ca2+, and Mg2+. The adsorption of CA to soil material was testified as the main reason for that failure. A series of extractants were tested but no one can extract the adsorbed CA and be used in measuring CA activity in soil sample. Carbonate transformation in field with straw returned and biochar added. In 2009, a field

  14. Descriptions of carbon isotopes within the energy density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ismail, Atef [Fundamental and Applied Sciences Department, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, 31750 Tronoh, Perak, Malaysia and Department of Physics, Al-Azhar University, 71524 Assiut (Egypt); Cheong, Lee Yen; Yahya, Noorhana [Fundamental and Applied Sciences Department, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, 31750 Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia); Tammam, M. [Department of Physics, Al-Azhar University, 71524 Assiut (Egypt)

    2014-10-24

    Within the energy density functional (EDF) theory, the structure properties of Carbon isotopes are systematically studied. The shell model calculations are done for both even-A and odd-A nuclei, to study the structure of rich-neutron Carbon isotopes. The EDF theory indicates the single-neutron halo structures in {sup 15}C, {sup 17}C and {sup 19}C, and the two-neutron halo structures in {sup 16}C and {sup 22}C nuclei. It is also found that close to the neutron drip-line, there exist amazing increase in the neutron radii and decrease on the binding energies BE, which are tightly related with the blocking effect and correspondingly the blocking effect plays a significant role in the shell model configurations.

  15. The use of carbon stable isotope ratios in drugs characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magdas, D. A., E-mail: gabriela.cristea@itim-cj.ro; Cristea, G., E-mail: gabriela.cristea@itim-cj.ro; Bot, A., E-mail: gabriela.cristea@itim-cj.ro; Mirel, V., E-mail: gabriela.cristea@itim-cj.ro [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath Str., 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2013-11-13

    Isotopic Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS) is an effective toll to be used for drug product authentication. The isotopic composition could be used to assist in the differentiation between batches of drugs and assist in the identification of counterfeit materials on the market. Only two factors affect the isotopic ratios in pharmaceutical components: the isotopic composition of the raw materials and the synthetic processes performed upon them. Counterfeiting of pharmaceutical drugs threatens consumer confidence in drug products companies' economical well-being. In this preliminary study, the analyzed samples consist in two types of commercially available analgesics, which were purchases from Romanian pharmacies. Differences in δ{sup 13}C between batches from −29.7 to −31.6% were observed, demonstrating that this method can be used to differentiate among individual drug batches and subsequently identify counterfeits on the market. On the other hand, carbon isotopic ratios differences among producers were recorded, the variations being between −31.3 to −34.9% for the same type of analgesic, but from different manufactures.

  16. Development of a Carbon Isotope-Based Tracer of Groundwater Fluxes into Estuaries and the Coastal Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCorkle, D. C.; Gramling, C. M.; Mulligan, A. E.; Woods, T. L.

    2001-05-01

    We will show how the carbon isotopic composition of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) - in particular, its radiocarbon content (Δ 14C) - can be used to quantify the contribution of confined groundwater flow to the total land-sea freshwater flux. The key observation underlying this approach is that groundwater in confined aquifers typically has a much lower radiocarbon content than surface fresh water (rivers and streams, and the water table groundwater that feeds them). We illustrate this method using chemical and isotopic data from Pages Creek and Futch Creek, two small estuaries on the Intracoastal Waterway near Wilmington, NC. Isotopic analyses of groundwater in coastal NC, of springs in Pages Creek and Futch Creek, and of the known DIC sources to these tidal creeks (sea water, stream water, and CO2 from salt marsh decomposition processes), show that confined aquifers are the only significant low-Δ 14C DIC source to these estuaries. Salinity data constrain the total freshwater fraction (surface water + artesian groundwater) of each estuarine sample, and the radiocarbon data are then used to estimate the fractional groundwater contribution to the Pages Creek and Futch Creek freshwater budgets. We will also present preliminary carbon isotopic results from a unique set of salty "groundwater" samples from shallow seafloor wells from the South Carolina continental shelf. These data suggest that sub-bottom recirculation of seawater may impart a low-Δ 14C signal to shelf waters in this region.

  17. Investigating controls on boron isotope ratios in shallow marine carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuang; Henehan, Michael J.; Hull, Pincelli M.; Reid, R. Pamela; Hardisty, Dalton S.; Hood, Ashleigh v. S.; Planavsky, Noah J.

    2017-01-01

    The boron isotope-pH proxy has been widely used to reconstruct past ocean pH values. In both planktic foraminifera and corals, species-specific calibrations are required in order to reconstruct absolute values of pH, due to the prevalence of so-called vital effects - physiological modification of the primary environmental signals by the calcifying organisms. Shallow marine abiotic carbonate (e.g. ooids and cements) could conceivably avoid any such calibration requirement, and therefore provide a potentially useful archive for reconstructions in deep (pre-Cenozoic) time. However, shallow marine abiotic carbonates could also be affected by local shifts in pH caused by microbial photosynthesis and respiration, something that has up to now not been fully tested. In this study, we present boron isotope measurements from shallow modern marine carbonates, from the Bahama Bank and Belize to investigate the potential of using shallow water carbonates as pH archives, and to explore the role of microbial processes in driving nominally 'abiogenic' carbonate deposition. For Bahama bank samples, our boron-based pH estimates derived from a range of carbonate types (i.e. ooids, peloids, hardground cements, carbonate mud, stromatolitic micrite and calcified filament micrite) are higher than the estimated modern mean-annual seawater pH values for this region. Furthermore, the majority (73%) of our marine carbonate-based pH estimates fall out of the range of the estimated pre-industrial seawater pH values for this region. In shallow sediment cores, we did not observe a correlation between measured pore water pH and boron-derived pH estimates, suggesting boron isotope variability is a depositional rather than early diagenetic signal. For Belize reef cements, conversely, the pH estimates are lower than likely in situ seawater pH at the time of cement formation. This study indicates the potential for complications when using shallow marine non-skeletal carbonates as marine pH archives

  18. Soil organic carbon dynamics under long-term fertilization in a black soil of China: Evidence from stable C isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Xiaolin; He, Ping; Zhu, Ping; Zhou, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Effects of different fertilizers on organic carbon (C) storage and turnover of soil fractions remains unclear. We combined soil fractionation with isotope analyses to examine soil organic carbon (SOC) dynamics after 25 years of fertilization. Five types of soil samples including the initial level (CK) and four fertilization treatments (inorganic nitrogen fertilizer, N; balanced inorganic fertilizer, NPK; inorganic fertilizer plus farmyard manure, MNPK; inorganic fertilizer plus corn straw residue, SNPK) were separated into four aggregate sizes (>2000 μm, 2000-250 μm, 250-53 μm, and organic matter (iPOM), and mineral-associated organic matter (mSOM). Physical fractionation showed the iPOM fraction of aggregates dominated C storage, averaging 76.87% of SOC storage. Overall, application of N and NPK fertilizers cannot significantly increase the SOC storage but enhanced C in mSOM of aggregates, whereas MNPK fertilizer resulted in the greatest amount of SOC storage (about 5221.5 g C m(2)) because of the enhanced SOC in LF, iPOM and mSOM of each aggregate. The SNPK fertilizer increased SOC storage in >250 μm aggregates but reduced SOC storage in <250 μm aggregates due to SOC changes in LF and iPOM.

  19. The effectiveness of using carbonate isotope measurements of body tissues to infer diet in human evolution: Evidence from wild western chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes verus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahy, Geraldine E; Boesch, Christophe; Hublin, Jean-Jacques; Richards, Michael P

    2015-11-01

    Changes in diet throughout hominin evolution have been linked with important evolutionary changes. Stable carbon isotope analysis of inorganic apatite carbonate is the main isotopic method used to reconstruct fossil hominin diets; to test its effectiveness as a paleodietary indicator we present bone and enamel carbonate carbon isotope data from a well-studied population of modern wild western chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes verus) of known sex and age from Taï, Cote d'Ivoire. We found a significant effect of age class on bone carbonate values, with adult chimpanzees being more (13)C- and (18)O-depleted compared to juveniles. Further, to investigate habitat effects, we compared our data to existing apatite data on eastern chimpanzees (P. troglodytes schweinfurthii) and found that the Taï chimpanzees are significantly more depleted in enamel δ(13)Cap and δ(18)Oap compared to their eastern counterparts. Our data are the first to present a range of tissue-specific isotope data from the same group of wild western chimpanzees and, as such, add new data to the growing number of modern non-human primate comparative isotope datasets providing valuable information for the interpretation of diet throughout hominin evolution. By comparing our data to published isotope data on fossil hominins we found that our modern chimpanzee bone and enamel data support hypotheses that the trend towards increased consumption of C4 foods after 4 Ma (millions of years ago) is unique to hominins.

  20. Environmental impact and magnitude of paleosol carbonate carbon isotope excursions marking five early Eocene hyperthermals in the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abels, H.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304848018; Lauretano, V.; van Yperen, Anna E.; Hopman, Tarek; Zachos, J.C.; Lourens, L.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/125023103; Gingerich, P.D.; Bowen, G.J.

    2016-01-01

    Transient greenhouse warming events in the Paleocene and Eocene were associated with the addition of isotopically light carbon to the exogenic atmosphere–ocean carbon system, leading to substantial environmental and biotic change. The magnitude of an accompanying carbon isotope excursion (CIE) can b

  1. Standardization and optimization of core sampling procedure for carbon isotope analysis in eucalyptus and variation in carbon isotope ratios across species and growth conditions

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Raju, M

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available and optimization of core sampling procedure for carbon isotope analysis in eucalyptus and variation in carbon isotope ratios across species and growth conditions Mohan Raju, B#; Nuveshen Naidoo*; Sheshshaayee, M. S; Verryn, S. D*; Kamalkannan, R^; Bindumadhava... isotope analysis in Eucalyptus. Methods Expt 1: * Cores were taken from periphery to pith in 5 year old trees of Eucalyptus * Five half sib families of Eucalyptus grandis & E. urophylla were used ? Cores were further subdivided into 5 fragments...

  2. Stable carbon, nitrogen and sulfur isotopes in non-carbonate fractions of cold-seep carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Dong; Peng, Yongbo; Peckmann, Jörn; Roberts, Harry; Chen, Duofu

    2017-04-01

    Sulfate-driven anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) supports chemosynthesis-based communities and limits the release of methane from marine sediments. This process promotes the formation of carbonates close to the seafloor along continental margins. The geochemical characteristics of the carbonate minerals of these rocks are increasingly understood, questions remain about the geochemical characteristics of the non-carbonate fractions. Here, we report stable carbon, nitrogen and sulfur isotope patterns in non-carbonate fractions of seep carbonates. The authigenic carbonates were collected from three modern seep provinces (Black Sea, Gulf of Mexico, and South China Sea) and three ancient seep deposits (Marmorito, northern Italy, Miocene; SR4 deposit of the Lincoln Creek Formation and Whiskey Creek, western Washington, USA, Eocene to Oligocene). The δ13C values of non-carbonate fractions range from ˜-25‰ to -80‰ VPDB. These values indicate that fossil methane mixed with varying amounts of pelagic organic matter is the dominant source of carbon in these fractions. The relatively small offset between the δ34S signatures of the non-carbonate fractions and the respective sulfide minerals suggests that locally produced hydrogen sulfide is the main source of sulfur in seep environments. The δ15N values of the non-carbonate fractions are generally lower than the corresponding values of deep-sea sediments, suggesting that organic nitrogen is mostly of a local origin. This study reveals the potential of using δ13C, δ15N, δ34S values to discern seep and non-seep deposits. In cases where δ13Ccarbonate values are only moderately low due to mixing processes and lipid biomarkers have been erased in the course of burial, it is difficult to trace back AOM owing to the lack of other records. This problem is even more pronounced when authigenic carbonate is not available in ancient seep environments. Acknowledgments: The authors thank BOEM and NOAA for their years' support

  3. C isotope fractionation during heterotrophic activity driven carbonate precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balci, Nurgul; Demirel, Cansu

    2016-04-01

    Stable carbon isotopic fractionation during carbonate precipitation induced by environmentally enriched heterotrophic halophilic microorganims was experimentally investigated under various salinity (% 4.5, %8, %15) conditions at 30 °C. Halophilic heterotrophic microorganims were enriched from a hypersaline Lake Acigöl located in SW Turkey (Balci et al.,2015) and later used for the precipitation experiments (solid and liquid medium). The carbonate precipitates had relatively high δ13C values (-4.3 to -16.9 ‰) compared to the δ13C values of the organic compounds that ranged from -27.5 to -25.4 ‰. At salinity of 4.5 % δ13C values of carbonate ranged from -4.9 ‰ to -10.9 ‰ with a 13C-enrichment factor of +20 to +16 ‰ higher than the δ13C values of the associated DOC (-27.5) . At salinity 8 % δ13C values of carbonate ranged from -16.3 ‰ to -11.7 ‰ with a 13C-enrichment factor of+11.3 to+15.9 ‰ higher than the δ13C values of the associated DOC. The respected values for 15 % salinity ranged from -12.3 ‰ to -9.7 ‰ with a 13C-enrichment factor of +15.2 to+16.8 ‰ higher than the δ13C values of the associated DOC. The carbonate precipitates produced in the solid medium are more enriched in 13C relative to liquid culture experiments. These results suggest that the carbon in the solid was derived from both the bacterial oxidation of organic compounds in the medium and from the atmospheric CO2. A solid medium used in the experiments may have suppressed convective and advective mass transport favouring diffusion-controlled system. This determination suggests that the rate and equilibration of CO2 exchange with the atmosphere is the major control on C isotope composition of carbonate minerals precipitated in the experiments. Key words: Lake Acıgöl, halophilic bacteria, carbonate biomineralization, C isotopes References Nurgul Balci, Meryem Menekşe, Nevin Gül Karagüler, M. Şeref Sönmez,Patrick Meister 2015.Reproducing authigenic carbonate

  4. Stable isotope (C, O) and monovalent cation fractionation upon synthesis of carbonate-bearing hydroxyl apatite (CHAP) via calcite transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böttcher, Michael E.; Schmiedinger, Iris; Wacker, Ulrike; Conrad, Anika C.; Grathoff, Georg; Schmidt, Burkhard; Bahlo, Rainer; Gehlken, Peer-L.; Fiebig, Jens

    2016-04-01

    Carbonate-bearing hydroxyl-apatite (CHAP) is of fundamental and applied interest to the (bio)geochemical, paleontological, medical and material science communities, since it forms the basic mineral phase in human and animal teeth and bones. In addition, it is found in non-biogenic phosphate deposits. The stable isotope and foreign element composition of biogenic CHAP is widely used to estimate the formation conditions. This requires careful experimental calibration under well-defined boundary conditions. Within the DFG project EXCALIBOR, synthesis of carbonate-bearing hydroxyapatite was conducted via the transformation of synthetic calcite powder in aqueous solution as a function of time, pH, and temperature using batch-type experiments. The aqueous solution was analyzed for the carbon isotope composition of dissolved inorganic carbonate (gas irmMS), the oxygen isotope composition of water (LCRDS), and the cationic composition. The solid was characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, micro Raman and FTIR spectroscopy, SEM-EDX, elemental analysis (EA, ICP-OES) and gas irmMS. Temperature was found to significantly impact the transformation rate of calcite to CHAP. Upon complete transformation, CHAP was found to contain up to 5% dwt carbonate, depending on the solution composition (e.g., pH), both incorporated on the A and B type position of the crystal lattice. The oxygen isotope fractionation between water and CHAP decreased with increasing temperature with a tentative slope shallower than those reported in the literature for apatite, calcite or aragonite. In addition, the presence of dissolved NH4+, K+ or Na+ in aqueous solution led to partial incorporation into the CHAP lattice. How these distortions of the crystal lattice may impact stable isotope discrimination is subject of future investigations.

  5. Microbial conversion of inorganic carbon to dimethyl sulfide in anoxic lake sediment (Plußsee, Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. S. Lin

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available In anoxic environments, volatile methylated sulfides like methanethiol (MT and dimethyl sulfide (DMS link the pools of inorganic and organic carbon with the sulfur cycle. However, direct formation of methylated sulfides from reduction of dissolved inorganic carbon has previously not been demonstrated. When studying the effect of temperature on hydrogenotrophic microbial activity, we observed formation of DMS in anoxic sediment of Lake Plußsee at 55 °C. Subsequent experiments strongly suggested that the formation of DMS involves fixation of bicarbonate via a reductive pathway in analogy to methanogenesis and engages methylation of MT. DMS formation was enhanced by addition of bicarbonate and further increased when both bicarbonate and H2 were supplemented. Inhibition of DMS formation by 2-bromoethanesulfonate points to the involvement of methanogens. Compared to the accumulation of DMS, MT showed the opposite trend but there was no apparent 1:1 stoichiometric ratio between both compounds. Both DMS and MT had negative δ13C values of −62‰ and −55‰, respectively. Labeling with NaH13CO3 showed more rapid incorporation of bicarbonate into DMS than into MT. The stable carbon isotopic evidence implies that bicarbonate was fixed via a reductive pathway of methanogenesis, and the generated methyl coenzyme M became the methyl donor for MT methylation. Neither DMS nor MT accumulation were stimulated by addition of the methyl-group donors methanol and syringic acid or by the methyl-group acceptor hydrogen sulphide. The source of MT was further investigated in a H235S labeling experiment, which demonstrated a microbially-mediated process of hydrogen sulfide methylation to MT that accounted for only <10% of the accumulation rates of DMS. Therefore, the major source of the 13C-depleted MT was neither bicarbonate nor methoxylated aromatic compounds. Other possibilities for

  6. Carbon and nitrogen isotope systematics in diamond: Different sensitivities to isotopic fractionation or a decoupled origin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogberg, K.; Stachel, T.; Stern, R. A.

    2016-11-01

    Using stable isotope data obtained on multiple aliquots of diamonds from worldwide sources, it has been argued that carbon and nitrogen in diamond are decoupled. Here we re-investigate the carbon-nitrogen relationship based on the most comprehensive microbeam data set to date of stable isotopes and nitrogen concentrations in diamonds (n = 94) from a single locality. Our diamond samples, derived from two kimberlites in the Chidliak Field (NE Canada), show large variability in δ13C (- 28.4 ‰ to - 1.1‰, mode at - 5.8‰), δ15N (- 5.8 to + 18.8‰, mode at - 3.0‰) and nitrogen contents ([N]; 3800 to less than 1 at.ppm). In combination, cathodoluminescence imaging and microbeam analyses reveal that the diamonds grew from multiple fluid pulses, with at least one major hiatus documented in some samples that was associated with a resorption event and an abrupt change from low δ13C and [N] to mantle-like δ13C and high [N]. Overall, δ13C appears to be uncorrelated to δ15N and [N] on both the inter- and intra-diamond levels. Co-variations of δ15N-log[N], however, result in at least two parallel, negatively correlated linear arrays, which are also present on the level of the individual diamonds falling on these two trends. These arrays emerge from the two principal data clusters, are characterized by slightly negative and slightly positive δ15N (about - 3 and + 2‰, respectively) and variable but overall high [N]. Using published values for the diamond-fluid nitrogen isotope fractionation factor and nitrogen partition coefficient, these trends are perfectly reproduced by a Rayleigh fractionation model. Overall, three key elements are identified in the formation of the diamond suite studied: (1.) a low δ13C and low [N] component that possibly is directly associated with an eclogitic diamond substrate or introduced during an early stage fluid event. (2.) Repeated influx of a variably nitrogen-rich mantle fluid (mildly negative δ13C and δ15N). (3.) In waning

  7. Diet control on carbon isotopic composition of land snail shell carbonate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU ZongXiu; GU ZhaoYan; WU NaiQin; XU Bing

    2007-01-01

    Carbon isotope compositions for both the carbonate shells and soft bodies (organic tissue) of living land snails collected mostly from the Loess Plateau, China have been measured. The result shows that δ13C values range from -13.1‰ to -4.3‰ for the aragonite shell samples and from -26.8‰ to -18.0‰ for the soft body samples. Although the shells are enriched in 13C relative to the bodies averagely by 14.2(±0.8)‰, the shell δ13Ca values are closely correlated to the body δ13Corg values, expressed as δ13Ca = 1.021 δ13Corg + 14.38 (R = 0.965; N = 31). This relationship indicates that δ13Ca is primarily a function of the isotopic composition of the snail diets since previous studies have proved that the snail body is the same as their food in carbon isotope composition. In other words, carbon isotope compo-sition of the carbonate shell can be used as a proxy to estimate the dietary 13C abundance of the land snails. The data also support that the 13C enrichment of the carbonate shells results mainly from the equilibrium fractionations between the metabolic CO2, HCO3- in the hemolymph and shell aragonite, and partially from kinetic fractionations when snail shells form during their activity.

  8. Organic carbon isotopes of the Sinian and Early Cambrian black shales on Yangtze Platform, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李任伟; 卢家烂; 张淑坤; 雷加锦

    1999-01-01

    Organic matter of the Sinian and early Cambrian black shales on the Yangtze Platform belongs to the light carbon group of isotopes with the δ13C values from - 27 % to -35 % , which are lower than those of the contemporaneously deposited carbonates and phosphorites. A carbon isotope-stratified paleooceanographic model caused by upwelling is proposed, which can be used not only to interpret the characteristics of organic carbon isotopic compositions of the black shales, but also to interpret the paleogeographic difference in the organic carbon isotope compositions of various types of sedimentary rocks.

  9. Sorption of inorganic salts on carbon nanomaterials and magnetite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Sh. T.; Troshkina, I. D.; Rakov, E. G.

    2016-11-01

    Magnetic composites based on graphene oxides and functionalized carbon nanotubes containing magnetite nanoparticles are synthesized. The dispersing ability of these composites in water at different pH values is studied. It is shown that the solubility of Fe3O4 composites is constant in the pH range of 3.5-10, though these composites are unstable at both lower and higher pH values. Magnetic sorbents for extracting Ce(NO3)3 and La(NO3)3 from solutions are tested. Dependences of the volume on the sorbent's composition, pH value, and salt concentration in the solution are found. Maximum sorption capacity in relation to Ce3+ and La3+ at pH 7.5 and 8.5 are found to be 1040 and 920 mg/g respectively.

  10. Photosynthetic fractionation of the stable isotopes of oxygen and carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guy, R.D. (Carnegie Institution of Washington, Stanford, CA (United States)); Fogel, M.L.; Berry, J.A. (Carnegie Inst. of Washington, Washington, DC (United States))

    1993-01-01

    Isotope discrimination during photosynthetic exchange of O[sub 2] and CO[sub 2] was measured using enzyme, thylakoid, and whole cell preparations. Evolved oxygen from isolated spinach thylakoids was isotopically identical (within analytical error) to its source water. Similar results were obtained with Anacystis nidulans Richter and Phaeodactylum tricornutum Bohlin cultures purged with helium. For consumptive reactions, discrimination ([triangle], where 1 + [triangle]/1000 equals the isotope effect, k[sup 16]/k[sup 18] or k[sup 12]/k[sup 13]) was determined by analysis of residual substrate (O[sub 2] or CO[sub 2]). The [triangle] for the Mehler reaction, mediated by ferredoxin or methylviologen, was 15.3[per thousand]. Oxygen isotope discrimination during oxygenation of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) catalyzed by RuBP carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) was 21.3[per thousand] and independent of enzyme source, unlike carbon isotope dicrimination: 30.3[per thousand] for spinach enzyme and 19.6 to 23[per thousand] for Rhodospirillum rubrum and A. nidulans enzymes, depending on reaction conditions. The [triangle] for O[sub 2] consumption catalyzed by glycolate oxidase was 22.7[per thousand]. Consistent with this, when Asparagus sprengeri Regel mesopyll cells approached the compensation point within a sealed vessel, the [delta][sup 18]O of dissolved O[sub 2] came to a steady-state value of about 21.5[per thousand] relative to the source water. The results provide improved estimates of discrimination factors in several reactions prominent in the global oxygen cycle and indicate that photorespiration plays a significant part in determining the isotopic composition of atmospheric oxygen. 47 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Allochthonous carbon hypothesis for bulk OM and n-alkane PETM carbon isotope discrepancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baczynski, A. A.; McInerney, F. A.; Wing, S. L.; Kraus, M. J.; Fricke, H. C.

    2011-12-01

    The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM), a period of abrupt, transient, and large-scale global warming fueled by a large release of isotopically light carbon, is a relevant analogue for episodes of rapid global warming and recovery. The PETM is recorded in pedogenic carbonate, bulk organic matter, and n-alkanes as a prominent negative carbon isotope excursion (CIE) in paleosols exposed in the Bighorn Basin, WY. Here we present a composite stable carbon isotope record from n-alkanes and dispersed soil organic δ13C records from five individual sections that span the PETM in the southeastern Bighorn Basin. Four sections are from a 10km transect in the Cabin Fork area and one section was collected at Sand Creek Divide. These five new dispersed organic carbon (DOC) isotope records are compared to the previously published Polecat Bench (Magioncalda et al. 2004) and Honeycombs (Yans et al. 2006) isotope records. The high-resolution n-alkane curve shows an abrupt, negative shift in δ13C values, an extended CIE body, and a rapid recovery to more positive δ13C values. Although the five DOC records show similarly abrupt negative shifts in δ13C values, the DOC CIEs are compressed, smaller in magnitude, and return to more positive δ13C values more gradually relative to the n-alkane record. Moreover, the stratigraphic thickness of the body of the excursion and the pattern of the recovery phase are not consistent among the five DOC records. We modeled predicted DOC δ13C values from the n-alkane record by applying enrichment factors based on modern plants to the n-alkane δ13C values. The anomaly, difference between the expected and observed DOC δ13C values, was calculated for the PETM records and compared to weight percent carbon and grain size. There is no correlation between pre- and post-PETM anomaly values and grain size or weight percent carbon. PETM anomaly values, however, do trend with both grain size and weight percent carbon. The largest PETM anomaly values

  12. Two decades of inorganic carbon dynamics along the Western Antarctic Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauri, C.; Doney, S. C.; Takahashi, T.; Erickson, M.; Jiang, G.; Ducklow, H. W.

    2015-05-01

    We present 20 years of seawater inorganic carbon measurements collected along the western shelf and slope of the Antarctic Peninsula. Water column observations from summertime cruises and seasonal surface underway pCO2 measurements provide unique insights into the spatial, seasonal and interannual variability of the dynamic system. The discrete measurements from depths > 2000 m align well with World Ocean Circulation Experiment observations across the time-series and underline the consistency of the data set. Analysis shows large spatial gradients in surface alkalinity and dissolved inorganic carbon content, with a concomitant wide range of Ωarag from values statistically significant increasing trend of up to 23 μatm per decade in fall and spring and a concomitant decreasing pH, pointing towards first signs of ocean acidification in the region. The combination of ongoing ocean acidification and freshwater input may soon provoke more unfavorable conditions than what the ecosystem experiences today.

  13. Two decades of inorganic carbon dynamics along the West Antarctic Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauri, C.; Doney, S. C.; Takahashi, T.; Erickson, M.; Jiang, G.; Ducklow, H. W.

    2015-11-01

    We present 20 years of seawater inorganic carbon measurements collected along the western shelf and slope of the Antarctic Peninsula. Water column observations from summertime cruises and seasonal surface underway pCO2 measurements provide unique insights into the spatial, seasonal, and interannual variability in this dynamic system. Discrete measurements from depths > 2000 m align well with World Ocean Circulation Experiment observations across the time series and underline the consistency of the data set. Surface total alkalinity and dissolved inorganic carbon data showed large spatial gradients, with a concomitant wide range of Ωarag (statistically significant long-term trends, the combination of on-going ocean acidification and freshwater input may soon induce more unfavorable conditions than the ecosystem experiences today.

  14. Calcium Carbonate Formation by Genetically Engineered Inorganic Binding Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gresswell, Carolyn Gayle

    Understanding how organisms are capable of forming (synthesize, crystallize, and organize) solid minerals into complex architectures has been a fundamental question of biomimetic materials chemistry and biomineralization for decades. This study utilizes short peptides selected using a cell surface display library for the specific polymorphs of calcium carbonate, i.e., aragonite and calcite, to identify two sets of sequences which can then be used to examine their effects in the formation, crystal structure, morphology of the CaCO3 minerals. A procedure of counter selection, along with fluorescence microscopy (FM) characterization, was adapted to insure that the sequences on the cells were specific to their respective substrate, i.e., aragonite or calcite. From the resulting two sets of sequences selected, five distinct strong binders were identified with a variety of biochemical characteristics and synthesized for further study. Protein derived peptides, using the known sequences of the proteins that are associated with calcite or aragonite, were also designed using a bioinformatics-based similarity analysis of the two sets of binders. In particular, an aragonite binding protein segment, AP7, a protein found in nacre, was chosen for this design and the resulting effects of the designed peptides and the AP7 were examined. Specifically, the binding affinities of the selected and the protein derived peptides off the cells were then tested using FM; these studies resulted in different binding characteristics of the synthesized and cellular bound peptides. Two of the peptides that displayed strong binding on the cells bound to neither of the CaCO 3 substrates and both the high and low similarity protein-derived peptides bound to both polymorphs. However, two of the peptides were found to only bind to their respective polymorph showing; these results are significant in that with this study it is demonstrated that the designed peptides based on experimental library

  15. Seagrass sediments as a global carbon sink: Isotopic constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Hilary; Beggins, Jeff; Duarte, Carlos M.; Fourqurean, James W.; Holmer, Marianne; Marbã, Núria; Middelburg, Jack J.

    2010-12-01

    Seagrass meadows are highly productive habitats found along many of the world's coastline, providing important services that support the overall functioning of the coastal zone. The organic carbon that accumulates in seagrass meadows is derived not only from seagrass production but from the trapping of other particles, as the seagrass canopies facilitate sedimentation and reduce resuspension. Here we provide a comprehensive synthesis of the available data to obtain a better understanding of the relative contribution of seagrass and other possible sources of organic matter that accumulate in the sediments of seagrass meadows. The data set includes 219 paired analyses of the carbon isotopic composition of seagrass leaves and sediments from 207 seagrass sites at 88 locations worldwide. Using a three source mixing model and literature values for putative sources, we calculate that the average proportional contribution of seagrass to the surface sediment organic carbon pool is ˜50%. When using the best available estimates of carbon burial rates in seagrass meadows, our data indicate that between 41 and 66 gC m-2 yr-1 originates from seagrass production. Using our global average for allochthonous carbon trapped in seagrass sediments together with a recent estimate of global average net community production, we estimate that carbon burial in seagrass meadows is between 48 and 112 Tg yr-1, showing that seagrass meadows are natural hot spots for carbon sequestration.

  16. Control strategies for laser separation of carbon isotopes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V Parthasarathy; A K Nayak; S K Sarkar

    2002-12-01

    Laser isotope separation (LIS) by infrared laser chemistry of polyatomic molecules has come a long way since its discovery. The last decade has seen considerable efforts in scaling up of the process for light elements like carbon, oxygen and silicon. These efforts aim at ways to improve both the enrichment factor and the throughput. The achievement is quite significant especially for carbon isotope separation wherein macroscopic operating scales have been realized. We report our studies on the IR laser chemistry of two promising systems, viz. neat CF2HCl and CF3Br/Cl2. We have investigated conditions for optimizing the dissociation yield and selectivity using natural samples containing 1.1 % C-13. We also highlight our current efforts for scaling up the process. These include the design aspects of a photochemical reactor with multipass refocusing Herriott optics for efficient photon utilization, development of a cryogenic distillation set up and a preparative gas chromatograph for large scale separation/collection of the isotopically enriched photoproduct in the post-irradiation stage.

  17. Storage/Turnover rate of inorganic carbon and its dissolvable part in the profile of saline/alkaline soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yugang; Wang, Zhongyuan; Li, Yan

    2013-01-01

    Soil inorganic carbon is the most common form of carbon in arid and semiarid regions, and has a very long turnover time. However, little is known about dissolved inorganic carbon storage and its turnover time in these soils. With 81 soil samples taken from 6 profiles in the southern Gurbantongute Desert, China, we investigated the soil inorganic carbon (SIC) and the soil dissolved inorganic carbon (SDIC) in whole profiles of saline and alkaline soils by analyzing their contents and ages with radiocarbon dating. The results showed that there is considerable SDIC content in SIC, and the variations of SDIC and SIC contents in the saline soil profile were much larger than that in the alkaline profile. SDIC storage accounted for more than 20% of SIC storage, indicating that more than 1/5 of the inorganic carbon in both saline and alkaline soil is not in non-leachable forms. Deep layer soil contains considerable inorganic carbon, with more than 80% of the soil carbon stored below 1 m, whether for SDIC or SIC. More importantly, SDIC ages were much younger than SIC in both saline soil and alkaline soil. The input rate of SDIC and SIC ranged from 7.58 to 29.54 g C m(-2) yr(-1) and 1.34 to 5.33 g C m(-2) yr(-1) respectively for saline soil, and from 1.43 to 4.9 g C m(-2) yr(-1) and 0.79 to 1.27 g C m(-2) yr(-1)respectively for alkaline soil. The comparison of SDIC and SIC residence time showed that using soil inorganic carbon to estimate soil carbon turnover would obscure an important fraction that contributes to the modern carbon cycle: namely the shorter residence and higher input rate of SDIC. This is especially true for SDIC in deep layers of the soil profile.

  18. Instrumentation and analytical methods in carbon balance studies - inorganic components in a marine environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skjelvan, I.; Johannessen, T.; Miller, L.; Stoll, M.

    1996-03-01

    This paper was read at the workshop ``The Norwegian Climate and Ozone Research Programme`` held on 11-12 March 1996. Substantial amounts of anthropogenic CO{sub 2} enters the atmosphere. The land biota acts as a sink for CO{sub 2}, with uncertain consequences. About 30% of the anthropogenic CO{sub 2} added to the atmosphere is absorbed by the ocean and how the ocean acts as a sink is central in understanding the carbon cycle. In their project the authors investigate the inorganic carbon in the ocean, especially total dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, and partial pressure of CO{sub 2} (pCO{sub 2}) in surface ocean and atmosphere. To determine total dissolved inorganic carbon, coulometric analysis is used in which an exact amount of sea water is acidified and the amount of carbon extracted is determined by a coulometer. Alkalinity is determined by potentiometric titration. In the pCO{sub 2} measurement, a small amount of air is circulated in a large amount of sea water and when after some time the amount of CO{sub 2} in the air reflects the CO{sub 2} concentration in the water, the pCO{sub 2} in the gas phase is determined by infra-red detection. The atmospheric pCO{sub 2} is also determined, and the difference between the two partial pressures gives information about source or sink activities. Total carbon and alkalinity measurements are done on discrete samples taken from all depths in the ocean, but for partial pressure detection an underway system is used, which determines the pCO{sub 2} in the surface ocean continuously

  19. Stable carbon isotopic composition of gasolines determined by isotope ratio monitoring gas chromatography mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smallwood, B.J.; Philp, R.P.; Allen, J.D. [University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States). School of Geology and Geophysics

    2002-07-01

    A large number of underground gasoline storage facilities in the United States continuously leak gasoline into the subsurface, which makes gasoline a major groundwater contaminant. Gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) are used currently to characterize contaminated groundwater and soils. Correlations of contaminants with suspected source(s) are extremely difficult by these techniques because many gasolines have similar hydrocarbon distributions. The present study applied the technique of isotope ratio monitoring gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (irmGC-MS) to 19 gasoline samples from different areas of the USA. This allows a much better correlation of gasoline contaminants to source. Data obtained indicate a wide range of {sup {delta}}{sup 13}C values for 16 ubiquitous compounds in the gasolines. The majority of samples could be distinguished from each other on the basis of {sup {delta}}{sup 13}C hydrocarbon composition. The oxygenated additive methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) was present in ten of the gasolines analyzed, and had a relatively narrow range of {sup {delta}}{sup 13}C values (-30.4 to -28.3 per mille). Preliminary investigations were also made to determine the extent of carbon isotopic fractionation after simple water washing and evaporation experiments. Results indicate that the majority of compounds did not undergo significant carbon isotopic fractionation as a result of these processes. (author)

  20. An analytical system for stable isotope analysis on carbon monoxide using continuous-flow isotope-ratio mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pathirana, S. L.; Van Der Veen, C.; Popa, M. E.; Röckmann, T.

    2015-01-01

    A fully automated system for the determination of δ13C and δ18O in atmospheric CO has been developed. CO is extracted from an air sample and converted into carbon dioxide (CO2) using the Schütze reagent. The isotopic composition is determined with an isotope-ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS) technique.

  1. A study on inorganic carbon components in the Andaman Sea during the post monsoon season

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarma, V.V.S.S.; Narvekar, P.V.

    moindre (environ 300 m) en mer d’Andaman, alors que les eaux plus profondes sont sous-saturées en calcite. © 2001 Ifremer/CNRS/IRD/Éditions scientifiques et médicales Elsevier SAS inorganic carbon / deep water / dissociation / Bay of Bengal / Andaman Sea... carbone inorganique / dissociation / eaux profondes / golfe du Bengale / mer d’Andaman *Correspondence and reprints: fax: +33 442 971 595. E-mail address: vsarma@darya.nio.org (V.V.S.S. SARMA). © 2001 Ifremer/CNRS/IRD/Éditions scientifiques et médicales...

  2. Soil Inorganic Nitrogen and Microbial biomass Carbon and Nitrogen Under Pine Plantations in Zhanggutai Sandy Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Zhan-Yuan; CHEN Fu-Sheng; ZENG De-Hui; ZHAO Qiong; CHEN Guang-Sheng

    2008-01-01

    The dynamics of soil inorganic nitrogen (NH+4-N and NO-3N) and microbial biomass carbon (Cmic) and nitrogen (Nmic) under 30-year-old fenced Pinus sylvestris L. var. mongolica Litvin (SF), unfenced P. sylvestris L. var. mongolica Litvin (SUF), and unfenced Pinus densiflora Siebold et Zucc. (DUF) plantations in the Zhanggutai sandy soil of China were studied during Apr. to Oct. 2004 by the in situ closed-top core incubation method. All mentioned C and N indices in each stand type fluctuated over time. The ranges of inorganic N, Cmic, and Nmic contents in the three stand types were 0.7-2.6, 40.0-128.9, and 5.4-15.2 μg g-1, respectively. The average contents of soil NH+4-N and Cmic under the three 30-year-old pine plantations were not different. However, soil NO-3-N and total inorganic N contents decreased in the order of SUF > SF > DUF, the Nmic content was in the order of SF = SUF > DUF, and the Cmic:Nmic ratio was in the order of SUF = DUF > SF. Seasonal variations were observed in soil inorganic N, microbial biomass, and plant growth. These seasonal variations had certain correlations with microbe and plant N use in the soil, and their competition for NH+4-N was mostly regulated by soil N availability. The influence of tree species on inorganic N and Nmic were mainly because of differences in litter quality. Lack of grazing decreased the Cmic:N ratio owing to decreased carbon output and increased the ability of soil to supply N. The soil N supply under the P. sylvestris var. mongolica plantation was lower than under the P. densiflora plantation.

  3. In situ Investigations of Organics, Isotopes, and Inorganic Volatiles in Gale Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaffy, Paul; Mars Science Laboratory Team, The Sample Analysis at Mars Team

    2016-10-01

    During its path toward and now onto the flanks of Mount Sharp in Gale crater the powerful set of instruments of the Curiosity rover have enabled a wide range of geological and geochemical studies. The focus of the Sample Analysis (SAM) at Mars Investigation is to conduct volatile and isotope measurements of both the atmosphere and drilled or scooped solids to help elucidate present and ancient environmental conditions and the global changes that have transformed Mars over time.Discoveries, to date, include:(1) definitive identification of an increasing number of S and Cl containing organic compounds in Gale crater samples,(2) transient spikes and season-length variations in atmospheric methane abundance,(3) the cosmic radiation exposure age of a mudstone using the spallogenic 3He and 21Ne and the neutron capture 36Ar isotopes,(4) the rock formation age in the same sample using the SAM 40Ar and the K abundance from the Alpha Particle Backscatter instrument,(5) constraints on atmospheric loss rates over geological time using the atmospheric 36Ar/38Ar ratio and isotopes of C and O in CO2,(6) D/H ratios locked into mudstone rocks more than 3 billion years ago,(7) perchlorates and a variety of other minerals contained in the ubiquitous amorphous fraction of solid samples, and(8) isotopic fractionation in the trace atmospheric Kr and Xe isotopes that allowed a first in situ comparison with martian gas trapped in meteorites.In this overview of our exploration of volatiles in Gale crater we will focus on organic compounds discovered to date, variations in the chemistry and isotopic composition of solid samples taken on the traverse to Mount Sharp, and on seasonal variations in isotopes and mixing ratios in the atmosphere.The results described have relied on significant contributions from many members of the MSL and SAM teams.

  4. CO2 perturbation experiments: similarities and differences between dissolved inorganic carbon and total alkalinity manipulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Riebesell

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2 through human activities and invasion of anthropogenic CO2 into the surface ocean alters the seawater carbonate chemistry, increasing CO2 and bicarbonate (HCO3 at the expense of carbonate ion (CO32− concentrations. This redistribution in the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC pool decreases pH and carbonate saturation state (Ω. Several of these components are considered potential key variables influencing calcium carbonate precipitation in marine calcifiers such as coccolithophores, foraminifera, corals, mollusks and echinoderms. In need for improved understanding of the sensitivities of marine organisms and ecosystems to CO2 induced ocean acidification (OA, experimental CO2 perturbation studies will continue to be a backbone in future OA research. This requires accurate carbonate system manipulations and well-controlled experimental setups. Here we describe and analyse the chemical changes involved in the two basic approaches for carbonate chemistry manipulation, i.e. changing DIC at constant total alkalinity (TA and changing TA at constant DIC. Furthermore, we briefly introduce several methods to experimentally manipulate DIC and TA. Finally, we examine responses obtained with both approaches using published results for the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi. We conclude that under most experimental conditions DIC or TA manipulations yield similar changes in all parameters of the carbonate system, which implies direct comparability of data obtained with the two basic approaches for CO2 perturbation.

  5. Isotopic composition of carbon and oxygen of carbonates of oil and gas-bearing deposits of Western Siberia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golyshev, S.I.; Cherepnin, A.V.; Rozhnev, A.N.

    1981-01-01

    There is measured the isotopic composition of carbon and oxygen in 129 samples of carbonates and carbonate cements of oil and gas-bearing Paleozoic and Mezozoic deposits of Western Siberia. The isotopic composition of samples of marine deposits varies from -1.2 to +6.1% for carbon and from 19.8 to 29.1% for oxygen and has a mean isotopic composition of 1.9 to 24.8%. Catagenetic processes lead to lightening of the isotopic composition of secondary carbonate on the average by 5% for carbon and 9% for oxygen. The most intense lightening of isotopic composition is observed in samples disposed near oil and gas deposits.

  6. About the possibility of creating a continuous range of standards with different isotopic composition of carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Sadykov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It is established that the carbon isotopic composition in the formation of calcium carbonate is changed depending on the magnetic field strength. The formation of calcium carbonate occurred due to the interaction of calcium hydroxide with atmospheric carbon dioxide. The profile of isotopic relations13C/12C of the newly formed calcium carbonate is approximated by the equation of the parabola for certain values of tension solenoidal magnetic field. The possibility of creating standards with a continuous series of values of the content of carbon stable isotopes based on the data suggested.

  7. Isotope composition of bicarbonate carbon in bed waters of oil and gas deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golyshev, S.I.; Cherepnin, A.V.; Ivanov, V.G.; Manylova, L.S.

    1981-01-01

    A study is made of the isotope composition of bicarbonate carbon in bed waters of the Jurassic water complex in southeast West Siberia. It has been established that waters of empty and transcontour structures have isotope composition of carbon 5/sup 0//oo, while in waters which contact the hydrocarbon formations, the isotope composition of carbon is lighter on the average by 5-8/sup 0//oo. The isotope composition of bicarbonate carbon in bed waters reflects both the conditions for primary sedimentation, and secondary processes associated with organic matter transformation.

  8. Does Ocean Color Data Assimilation Improve Estimates of Global Ocean Inorganic Carbon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Watson

    2012-01-01

    Ocean color data assimilation has been shown to dramatically improve chlorophyll abundances and distributions globally and regionally in the oceans. Chlorophyll is a proxy for phytoplankton biomass (which is explicitly defined in a model), and is related to the inorganic carbon cycle through the interactions of the organic carbon (particulate and dissolved) and through primary production where inorganic carbon is directly taken out of the system. Does ocean color data assimilation, whose effects on estimates of chlorophyll are demonstrable, trickle through the simulated ocean carbon system to produce improved estimates of inorganic carbon? Our emphasis here is dissolved inorganic carbon, pC02, and the air-sea flux. We use a sequential data assimilation method that assimilates chlorophyll directly and indirectly changes nutrient concentrations in a multi-variate approach. The results are decidedly mixed. Dissolved organic carbon estimates from the assimilation model are not meaningfully different from free-run, or unassimilated results, and comparisons with in situ data are similar. pC02 estimates are generally worse after data assimilation, with global estimates diverging 6.4% from in situ data, while free-run estimates are only 4.7% higher. Basin correlations are, however, slightly improved: r increase from 0.78 to 0.79, and slope closer to unity at 0.94 compared to 0.86. In contrast, air-sea flux of C02 is noticeably improved after data assimilation. Global differences decline from -0.635 mol/m2/y (stronger model sink from the atmosphere) to -0.202 mol/m2/y. Basin correlations are slightly improved from r=O.77 to r=0.78, with slope closer to unity (from 0.93 to 0.99). The Equatorial Atlantic appears as a slight sink in the free-run, but is correctly represented as a moderate source in the assimilation model. However, the assimilation model shows the Antarctic to be a source, rather than a modest sink and the North Indian basin is represented incorrectly as a sink

  9. How significant is submarine groundwater discharge and its associated dissolved inorganic carbon in a river-dominated shelf system-the northern South China Sea?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. Liu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to assess the role of submarine groundwater discharge (SGD and its impact on the carbonate system on the northern South China Sea (NSCS shelf, we measured seawater concentrations of four radium isotopes 223,224,226,228Ra along with carbon dioxide parameters in June–July, 2008. Complementary groundwater sampling was conducted in coastal areas in December 2008 and October 2010 to constrain the groundwater end-members. The distribution of Ra isotopes in the NSCS was largely controlled by the Pearl River plume and coastal upwelling. Long-lived Ra isotopes (228Ra and 226Ra were enriched in the river plume but low in the offshore surface water and subsurface water/upwelling zone. In contrast, short-lived Ra isotopes (224Ra and 223Ra were elevated in the subsurface water/upwelling zone as well as the river plume but depleted in the offshore surface water. In order to quantify SGD, we adopted two independent mathematical approaches. Using a three end-member mixing model with total alkalinity (TAlk and Ra isotopes, we derived a SGD flux into the NSCS shelf of 2.3–3.7 ×108 m3 d−1. Our second approach involved a simple mass balance of 228Ra and 226Ra and resulted in a first order but consistent SGD rate estimate of 2.8–4.5 × 108 m3 d−1. These fluxes were equivalent to 13–25 % of the Pearl River discharge, but the source of the SGD is mostly recirculated seawater. Despite the relatively small SGD volume flow compared to the river, the associated material fluxes were substantial given the elevated concentrations of dissolved inorganic solutes. In this case, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC flux through SGD was 266–520 × 109 mol yr−1, which was ~44–73 % of the riverine DIC export flux. Given our estimates of the groundwater-derived phosphate flux, SGD may be

  10. A global deglacial negative carbon isotope excursion in speleothem calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breecker, D.

    2015-12-01

    δ13C values of speleothem calcite decreased globally during the last deglaciation defining a carbon isotope excursion (CIE) despite relatively constant δ13C values of carbon in the ocean-atmosphere system. The magnitude of the CIE varied with latitude, increasing poleward from ~2‰ in the tropics to as much as 7‰ at high latitudes. This recent CIE provides an interesting comparison with CIEs observed in deep time. A substantial portion of this CIE can be explained by the increase in atmospheric pCO2 that accompanied deglaciation. The dependence of C3 plant δ13C values on atmospheric pCO2 predicts a 2‰ δ13C decrease driven by the deglacial pCO2 increase. I propose that this signal was transferred to caves and thus explains nearly 100% of the CIE magnitude observed in the tropics and no less than 30% at the highest latitudes in the compilation. An atmospheric pCO2 control on speleothem δ13C values, if real, will need to be corrected for using ice core data before δ13C records can be interpreted in a paleoclimate context. The decrease in the magnitude of the equilibrium calcite-CO2 carbon isotope fractionation factor explains a maximum of 1‰ of the CIE at the highest northern latitude in the compilation, which experienced the largest deglacial warming. Much of the residual extratropical CIE was likely driven by increasing belowground respiration rates, which were presumably pronounced at high latitudes as glacial retreat exposed fresh surfaces and/or vegetation density increased. The largest increases in belowground respiration would have therefore occurred at the highest latitudes, explaining the meridional trend. This work supports the notion that increases in atmospheric pCO2 and belowground respiration rates can result in large CIEs recorded in terrestrial carbonates, which, as previously suggested, may explain the magnitude of the PETM CIE as recorded by paleosol carbonates.

  11. Spatial Distribution of Lead Isotope Ratios and Inorganic Element Concentrations in Epiphytic Lichens from the Athabasca Oil Sands Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graney, J. R.; Landis, M. S.; Puckett, K.; Edgerton, E.; Krupa, S.; Percy, K.

    2013-12-01

    Coupled studies of inorganic element concentrations and lead (Pb) isotope ratios have been conducted on Hypogymnia physodes samples collected in the Athabasca Oil Sands Region (AOSR) in Alberta, Canada in 2002, 2008, and 2011. To investigate the spatial extent of air emissions, the lichens were collected from sites as far as 160 km from the mining and processing operations. 30 milligram sub-samples of the lichens were microwave digested, and the extracts were analyzed using DRC-ICPMS to determine elemental concentrations, and sector field ICPMS to measure Pb isotope ratios. Concentrations of elements in the lichens were found to reflect proximity to mining and oil processing sites as well as topography, ecosystem differences, and the metabolic biogeochemistry of the lichens. An exponential decrease in concentration of metals associated with fugitive dust (aluminum and others) versus distance from the mining sites, suggests elevated coarse particle emissions associated with mining operations. Near source concentrations of metals with an oil signature (vanadium and others) are less enhanced and more homogeneous than the metals in the fugitive dust, reflecting emission and deposition of smaller diameter particles at greater distances from oil processing sources. The mining and oil processing signatures are superimposed over elemental concentrations that reflect the nutrient needs of the lichens. These findings are being confirmed through ongoing studies using dichot samplers to collect coarse and fine particulate aerosol samples. The lichen samples collected beyond 50 km from the mining and processing sites cluster into a Pb isotope grouping with a 207Pb / 206Pb ratio of 0.8650 and a 208Pb / 206Pb ratio near 2.095. This grouping likely reflects the regional background Pb isotope ratio signature. 207Pb / 206Pb and 208Pb / 206Pb ratios decrease as one nears the mining and processing operations. This indicates that other Pb source(s), (e.g. Pb in the bitumen from the oil

  12. Carbon isotope excursions in paleosol carbonate marking five early Eocene hyperthermals in the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. A. Abels

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Transient greenhouse warming events in the Paleocene and Eocene were associated with the addition of isotopically-light carbon to the exogenic atmosphere–ocean carbon pool, leading to substantial environmental and biotic change. The magnitude of an accompanying carbon isotope excursion (CIE can be used to constrain both the sources and amounts of carbon released during an event, as well as to correlate marine and terrestrial records with high precision. The Paleocene Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM is well documented, but CIE records for the subsequent warming events are still rare especially from the terrestrial realm. Here, we provide new CIE records for two of the smaller hyperthermal events, I1 and I2, in paleosol carbonate, as well as two additional records of ETM2 and H2 in the Bighorn Basin. Stratigraphic comparison of this expanded, high-resolution terrestrial carbon isotope record to the deep-sea benthic foraminifera records from ODP Sites 1262 and 1263, Walvis Ridge, in the southern Atlantic Ocean corroborates that the Bighorn Basin fluvial sediments record global atmospheric change. The stratigraphic thicknesses of the eccentricity-driven hyperthermals in these archives are in line with precession-forcing of the 7 m thick fluvial overbank-avulsion sedimentary cycles. Using the CALMAG bulk oxide mean annual precipitation proxy, we reconstruct similar or slightly wetter than background soil moisture contents during the four younger hyperthermals, in contrast to drying observed during the PETM. Soil carbonate CIEs vary in magnitude proportionally with the marine CIEs for the four smaller early Eocene hyperthermals. This relationship breaks down for the PETM, with the soil carbonate CIE ~ 2–4‰ less than expected if all five linearly relate to marine CIEs. If the PETM CO2 forcing was similar but scaled to the younger hyperthermals, photosynthetic isotope fractionation or soil environmental factors are needed to explain this anomaly. We

  13. High resolution carbon isotope of Crassostrea cuttakensis: A proxy for seasonally varying carbon dynamics in a tropical delta-estuary system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreemany, Arpita

    2017-04-01

    The exponential increase in the atmospheric CO2 concentration and global temperature is becoming a major threat to the existence of the mankind. It has been proposed that the ˜2 ˚ C rise in the average global temperature may lead to a point of no-return where the balance between the climate and the ecosystem collapses. Therefore, detailed understanding of the major carbon reservoirs and their mutual interactions is needed for better future climate prediction. Among all the reservoirs, ocean holds ˜90 % of the exogenic carbon and promotes long term storage in sediments. However, the majority of the sedimentary carbon is of terrestrial origin and transported through rivers, which play an important role in carbon exchange between the atmosphere, terrestrial biosphere, and oceans. The transportation of organic carbon through river does not follow a simple conveyer belt model. Various organic and inorganic reactions (i.e., organic carbon degradation, inorganic carbon precipitation, primary production, community respiration) modify the state of the carbon to form a major sub-reservoir in the river, i.e., Dissolved Inorganic Carbon (DIC). So, identifying the source/s of the DIC is crucial to understand the carbon dynamics in the river. Stable carbon isotopic composition of the DIC (δ13CDIC) has long been extensively used to reveal the dominant source/s of the DIC. The majority of the large rivers, being situated in the tropical belts, show seasonal fluctuation in the DIC sources. However, seasonal sampling in the remotest reaches of these rivers hindered our thorough understanding of the seasonally varying source/s of DIC in these rivers. Many calcifying organisms precipitate their shell carbonate in equilibrium with water and hence likely to record the δ13CDICof ambient water in their shell. In this study, a living oyster (Crassostrea cuttakensis) was collected from Matla River, which is part of the Ganges Brahmaputra river delta system, and analyzed for its stable

  14. Spatial sensitivity of inorganic carbon to model setup: North Sea and Baltic Sea with ECOSMO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castano Primo, Rocio; Schrum, Corinna; Daewel, Ute

    2015-04-01

    In ocean biogeochemical models it is critical to capture the key processes adequately so they do not only reproduce the observations but that those processes are reproduced correctly. One key issue is the choice of parameters, which in most cases are estimates with large uncertainties. This can be the product of actual lack of detailed knowledge of the process, or the manner the processes are implemented, more or less complex. In addition, the model sensitivity is not necessarily homogenous across the spatial domain modelled, which adds another layer of complexity to biogeochemical modelling. In the particular case of the inorganic carbon cycle, there are several sets of carbonate constants that can be chosen. The calculated air-sea CO2 flux is largely dependent on the parametrization chosen. In addition, the different parametrizations all the underlying processes that in some way impact the carbon cycle beyond the carbonate dissociation and fluxes give results that can be significantly different. Examples of these processes are phytoplankton growth rates or remineralization rates. Despite their geographical proximity, the North and Baltic Seas exhibit very different dynamics. The North Sea receives important inflows of Atlantic waters, while the Baltic Sea is an almost enclosed system, with very little exchange from the North Sea. Wind, tides, and freshwater supply act very differently, but dominantly structure the ecosystem dynamics on spatial and temporal scales. The biological community is also different. Cyanobacteria, which are important due to their ability to fix atmospheric nitrogen, and they are only present in the Baltic Sea. These differentiating features have a strong impact in the biogeochemical cycles and ultimately shape the variations in the carbonate chemistry. Here the ECOSMO model was employed on the North Sea and Baltic Sea. The model is set so both are modelled at the same time, instead of having them run separately. ECOSMO is a 3-D coupled

  15. Sulfur Isotope Exchange between S-35 Labeled Inorganic Sulfur-Compounds in Anoxic Marine-Sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    FOSSING, H.; THODEANDERSEN, S.; JØRGENSEN, BB

    1992-01-01

    Isotope exchange reactions between S-35-labeled sulfur compounds were studied in anoxic estuarine sediment slurries at 21-degrees-C and pH 7.4-7.7. Two experiments labeled with radioactive elemental sulfur (S-35-degrees) and one labeled with radioactive sulfate ((SO42-)-S-35) were performed as time...

  16. One-Dimensional Organic-Inorganic Nanocomposite Synthesized with Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Templates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This study reports on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT as templates for the preparation of 1D porous organic-inorganic hybrid composites. The in situ deposited SWCNT were sputter coated with Sn metal and thermally oxidized in air to form a SnO2/SWCNT nanowire framework on SiO2/Si substrate. Poly(acrylic acid (PAA was coated onto this scaffold through UV light-induced radical polymerization, which resulted in the final formation of hybrid composites. The structures of hybrid composites were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. The results show that PAA was successfully coated and the structural advantage of nanowire was fairly maintained, which indicates that this framework is very stable for organic functionalization in solution. The simplicity of this method for the formation of porous organic-inorganic hybrid composites provides a potential application for nanoelectronic devices.

  17. Mantle Degassing and Diamond Genesis:A Carbon Isotope Perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑永飞

    1994-01-01

    The effect of Co2 and CH4 degassing from the mantle on the carbon isotopic composition of diamond has been quantitatively modeled in terms of the principles of Rayleigh distillation.Assuming the δ13 C value of -5‰ for the mantle,the outgassing of CO2 can result in the large negative δ13 C values of diamond,whereas the outgassing of CH4 can drive the δ13C values of diamond in the positive direction.The theoretical expectations can be used to explain the full range of δ13 C values from-34.4‰5 to+5‰ observed for natural diamonds.It is possible that diamond formation was triggered by the degassing of Co2 and/or CH4 from the mantle and the associated fractional crystallization of carbonate-bearing melt.

  18. Carbon isotopes and water use efficiency in C4 plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellsworth, Patrick Z; Cousins, Asaph B

    2016-06-01

    Drought is a major agricultural problem worldwide. Therefore, selection for increased water use efficiency (WUE) in food and biofuel crop species will be an important trait in plant breeding programs. The leaf carbon isotopic composition (δ(13)Cleaf) has been suggested to serve as a rapid and effective high throughput phenotyping method for WUE in both C3 and C4 species. This is because WUE, leaf carbon discrimination (Δ(13)Cleaf), and δ(13)Cleaf are correlated through their relationships with intercellular to ambient CO2 partial pressures (Ci/Ca). However, in C4 plants, changing environmental conditions may influence photosynthetic efficiency (bundle-sheath leakiness) and post-photosynthetic fractionation that will potentially alter the relationship between δ(13)Cleaf and Ci/Ca. Here we discuss how these factors influence the relationship between δ(13)Cleaf and WUE, and the potential of using δ(13)Cleaf as a meaningful proxy for WUE.

  19. Multidecadal accumulation of anthropogenic and remineralized dissolved inorganic carbon along the Extended Ellett Line in the northeast Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, Matthew P.; Griffiths, Alex M.; Achterberg, Eric P.; Holliday, N. Penny; Rérolle, Victoire M. C.; Menzel Barraqueta, Jan-Lukas; Couldrey, Matthew P.; Oliver, Kevin I. C.; Hartman, Susan E.; Esposito, Mario; Boyce, Adrian J.

    2016-02-01

    Marine carbonate chemistry measurements have been carried out annually since 2009 during UK research cruises along the Extended Ellett Line (EEL), a hydrographic transect in the northeast Atlantic Ocean. The EEL intersects several water masses that are key to the global thermohaline circulation, and therefore the cruises sample a region in which it is critical to monitor secular physical and biogeochemical changes. We have combined results from these EEL cruises with existing quality-controlled observational data syntheses to produce a hydrographic time series for the EEL from 1981 to 2013. This reveals multidecadal increases in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) throughout the water column, with a near-surface maximum rate of 1.80 ± 0.45 µmol kg-1 yr-1. Anthropogenic CO2 accumulation was assessed, using simultaneous changes in apparent oxygen utilization (AOU) and total alkalinity (TA) as proxies for the biogeochemical processes that influence DIC. The stable carbon isotope composition of DIC (δ13CDIC) was also determined and used as an independent test of our method. We calculated a volume-integrated anthropogenic CO2 accumulation rate of 2.8 ± 0.4 mg C m-3 yr-1 along the EEL, which is about double the global mean. The anthropogenic CO2 component accounts for only 31 ± 6% of the total DIC increase. The remainder is derived from increased organic matter remineralization, which we attribute to the lateral redistribution of water masses that accompanies subpolar gyre contraction. Output from a general circulation ecosystem model demonstrates that spatiotemporal heterogeneity in the observations has not significantly biased our multidecadal rate of change calculations and indicates that the EEL observations have been tracking distal changes in the surrounding North Atlantic and Nordic Seas.

  20. The thermal history of char as disclosed by carbon isotope ratios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egsgaard, Helge; Ambus, Per; Ahrenfeldt, Jesper

    pyrolysis and isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The results demonstrate that the temperature history of the char is reflected in the fine variation of carbon isotopes. The compound classes responsible for the variation were identified. Key words: Isotope ratio, flash pyrolysis, hot gas cleaning...

  1. The relationship between carbon and oxygen isotopic composition characteristics of carbonates in loess sediments and paleoclimate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李春园; 王先彬; 文启彬; 邵波

    1995-01-01

    Based on the carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions of carbonates in loess sediments meas-ured by the methods of stepwise heating and phosphoric acid decomposition from five pieces of samples ofpaleosol,loess and eolian sand,respectively,the distributive characteristics in different temperature steps andthe fractionation mechanisms of carbon and oxygen isotope and their relation to the paleoclirnate are discussed.The preliminary results show that,by means of stepwise heating,different carbon and oxygen isotopiccompositions are obtained in different temperature steps and carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions ofpaleosol,loess and eolian sand are in a different distributive pattern in the range of studied temperaturesteps.The results also show that the δ13C ratios in 700-800℃ are more sensitive tracers of paleoclimatethan those measured by the method of phosphoric acid decomposition.The susceptibility to climatic changesof δ18O ratios analysed by the method of phosphoric acid decomposition is higher than those analysed by themethod of stepwise heating,but the δ18O ratios measured by these two methods do not effectively reflect cli-matic changes.

  2. Abundances in red giant stars - Carbon and oxygen isotopes in carbon-rich molecular envelopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wannier, P. G.; Sahai, R.

    1987-01-01

    Millimeter-wave observations have been made of isotopically substituted CO toward the envelopes of 11 carbon-rich stars. In every case, C-13O was detected and model calculations were used to estimate the C-12/C-13 abundance ratio. C-17O was detected toward three, and possibly four, envelopes, with sensitive upper limits for two others. The CO-18 variant was detected in two envelopes. New results include determinations of oxygen isotopic ratios in the two carbon-rich protoplanetary nebulae CRL 26688 and CRL 618. As with other classes of red giant stars, the carbon-rich giants seem to be significantly, though variably, enriched in O-17. These results, in combination with observations in interstellar molecular clouds, indicate that current knowledge of stellar production of the CNO nuclides is far from satisfactory.

  3. Inorganic carbon fluxes across the vadose zone of planted and unplanted soil mesocosms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thaysen, Eike Marie; Jacques, D.; Jessen, S.;

    2014-01-01

    The efflux of carbon dioxide (CO2) from soils influences atmospheric CO2 concentrations and thereby climate change. The partitioning of inorganic carbon (C) fluxes in the vadose zone between emission to the atmosphere and to the groundwater was investigated to reveal controlling underlying...... at the mesocosm bottom. Carbon dioxide exchange between the soil surface and the atmosphere was measured at regular intervals. The soil diffusivity was determined from soil radon-222 (222Rn) emanation rates and soil air Rn concentration profiles and was used in conjunction with measured pCO(2) gradients...... percolation flux was more than one-third of the flux during growth. The R-s was controlled by production and diffusivity of CO2 in the soil. The DIC percolation flux was largely controlled by the pCO(2) and the drainage flux due to low solution pH. Modeling suggested that increasing soil alkalinity during...

  4. Switching predominance of organic versus inorganic carbon exports from an intermediate-size subarctic watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dornblaser, Mark M.; Striegl, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrologic exports of dissolved inorganic and organic carbon (DIC, DOC) reflect permafrost conditions in arctic and subarctic river basins. DIC yields in particular, increase with decreased permafrost extent. We investigated the influence of permafrost extent on DIC and DOC yield in a tributary of the Yukon River, where the upper watershed has continuous permafrost and the lower watershed has discontinuous permafrost. Our results indicate that DIC versus DOC predominance switches with interannual changes in water availability and flow routing in intermediate-size watersheds having mixed permafrost coverage. Large water yield and small concentrations from mountainous headwaters and small water yield and high concentrations from lowlands produced similar upstream and downstream carbon yields. However, DOC export exceeded DIC export during high-flow 2011 while DIC predominated during low-flow 2010. The majority of exported carbon derived from near-surface organic sources when landscapes were wet or frozen and from mineralized subsurface sources when infiltration increased.

  5. A systematic investigation of the preparation and properties of composite carbon molecular sieves containing inorganic oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Henry C.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this research is to define the methodology for the preparation and characterization of new carbon-based molecular sieves with composite structures. Carbon molecular sieves have found increasing application in the field of separation and purification of gases. These materials are relatively easy to prepare and their surfaces can be modified to some extent. It is expected that by combining inorganic oxides with the carbonaceous structure one can begin to design composite materials with a wider range of possible chemical and physical properties. In this way, the IOM-CMS materials may confer distinct advantages over pure carbon molecular sieves, not just for separation, but also for catalysis. The most recent results in the design and characterization of these IOM-CMS materials are reviewed and summarized. Directions for further research are also presented.

  6. Distribution of dissolved inorganic and organic carbon in the Eurasian Basin of the Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Leif G.; Olsson, Kristina; Skoog, Annelie

    Measurements of total carbonate (total inorganic carbon) and total organic carbon were carried out during the International Arctic Ocean Expedition 91 on three sections across the Nansen and Amundsen basins, and into the Makarov Basin. In the surface mixed layer a distinct front was observed to the north, identified by elevated total carbonate concentrations, reflecting the signature of Siberian river runoff. This front forms the southern border of the Siberian Branch of the Transpolar Drift, which is located over the northern part of the Nansen Basin, at the eastern part of the investigated area (about 30° E). To the west, the front is located over the tip of the Yermak Plateau, showing the very wide extent of the Transpolar Drift just north of the Fram Strait. Within the Siberian Branch, about 200 km north of the front, a maximum in the total organic carbon concentration may indicate a shorter residence time since the water left the river mouth, possibly related to a higher flow rate. At the tip of the Morris Jesup Plateau, clear signs of outflowing Canadian Basin waters are seen. In the surface layer, high total carbonate concentrations were present in the water of salinity 33.1, indicating upper halocline water. At intermediate depths (1500 - 2000 m), elevated total carbonate concentrations demonstrate the existence of the outflowing Canadian Basin intermediate water. Part of this outflowing water follows the continental slope to the south while part is injected into the Makarov Basin.

  7. Electrolytic aminated carbon materials for the electrocatalytic redox reactions of inorganic and organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashida, Eriko; Takahashi, Yuichi; Nishi, Hideki; Uchiyama, Shunichi

    2011-06-01

    Some kinds of amine groups can be introduced to the glassy carbon surface by the electrode oxidation of the carbon electrode surface in ammonium carbamate solution, and this amine groups modified electrode is named as an aminated glassy carbon electrode. The existences of not only primary amine but also secondary and tertially amines were confirmed by X ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The applications of the aminated carbon material for the electrocatalytic reductions of oxygen, hydrogen peroxide, and organic compounds such as quinones were carried out, and the effects of amination on the formation of electrocatalytic sites for many species were revealed. The electrocatalyzed cyclic voltammograms of metal ions and metal chelate compounds obtained by aminated glassy carbon electrodes are also discussed. Moreover, we intend to describe that the aminated carbon electrode can exhibit the large reduction waves of inorganic oxoacids such as N02- or bromide ion. The introduced functional groups containing nitrogen atom can change the distribution of the electron densities of the graphite carbon surface, and this specific electron distribution environment may generate the various electrocatalytic activities. Copyright © 2011 The Research Centre for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A lipidomic approach to understanding free fatty acid lipogenesis derived from dissolved inorganic carbon within cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon R Dunn

    Full Text Available The cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis is arguably one of the most important within the marine environment in that it is integral to the formation of coral reefs. However, the regulatory processes that perpetuate this symbiosis remain unresolved. It is essential to understand these processes, if we are to elucidate the mechanisms that support growth and resource accumulation by coral host, and conversely, recently observed reduction and/or mortality of corals in response to rapid environmental change. This study specifically focused on one area of metabolic activity within the symbiosis, that of free fatty acid synthesis within both the dinoflagellate symbionts and cnidarian host. The main model system used was Aiptasia pulchella and Symbiodinium sp. in combination with aposymbiotic A. pulchella, the symbiotic coral Acropora millepora system and dinoflagellate culture. Fatty acids (FAs were selected because of their multiple essential roles inclusive of energy storage (resource accumulation, membrane structure fluidity and cell signaling. The study addressed free FA lipogenesis by using a new method of enriched stable isotopic ((13C incorporation from dissolved inorganic carbon (DI(13C combined with HPLC-MS. FAs derived from DI(13C aligned with a mixture of known lipogenesis pathways with the addition of some unusual FAs. After 120 hr, (13C-enriched FA synthesis rates were attributed to only a complex integration of both n-3 and n-6 lipogenesis pathways within the dinoflagellate symbionts. Furthermore, there was no detectible evidence of symbiont derived enriched isotope fatty acids, catabolized (13C derivatives or DI(13C being directly utilized, in host late n-6 pathway long-chain FA lipogenesis. These findings do not align with a popular mutualistic translocation model with respect to the use of translocated symbiont photoassimilates in host long-chain FA lipogenesis, which has important connotations for linking nutrient sources with

  9. Oxygen Isotopic Composition of Carbon Dioxide in the Middle Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, M.; Blake, G. A.; Lewis, B. R.; Yung, Y. L.

    2005-12-01

    The isotopic composition of long-lived trace gases provides a window into atmospheric transport and chemistry. Carbon dioxide is a particularly powerful tracer, because its abundance remains >100 ppmv in the mesosphere. Current models consider O3 as the main source of O(1D) in the mesosphere, but we note that the photolysis of 16O17O and 16O18O by solar Lyman-α radiation yields O(1D) 10-100 times more enriched in 17O and 18O than that from ozone photodissociation. We therefore incorporate both photochemical sources into stratospheric and mesospheric chemical transport models that quantitatively predict the unusual enhancement of 17O in CO2 from the middle atmosphere. New laboratory and atmospheric measurements are proposed to test our model and validate the use of CO2 isotopic fractionation as a tracer of atmospheric chemical and dynamical processes. Once fully understood the `anomalous' oxygen signature in CO2 can be used in turn to study biogeochemical cycles, in particular to constrain the gross carbon fluxes between the atmosphere and terrestrial biosphere.

  10. Combined effects of inorganic carbon and light on Phaeocystis globosa Scherffel (Prymnesiophyceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. J. W. de Baar

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Phaeocystis globosa (Prymnesiophyceae is an ecologically dominating phytoplankton species in many areas around the world. It plays an important role in both the global sulfur and carbon cycles, by the production of dimethylsulfide (DMS and the drawdown of inorganic carbon. Phaeocystis globosa has a polymorphic life cycle and is considered to be a harmful algal bloom (HAB forming species. All these aspects make this an interesting species to study the effects of increasing carbon dioxide (CO2 concentrations, due to anthropogenic carbon emissions. Here, the combined effects of three different dissolved carbon dioxide concentrations (CO2(aq (low: 4 μmol kg−1, intermediate: 6–10 μmol kg−1 and high CO2(aq: 21–24 μmol kg−1 and two different light intensities (low light, suboptimal: 80 μmol photons m−2 s−1 and high light, light saturated: 240 μmol photons m−2 s−1 are reported. The experiments demonstrated that the specific growth rate of P. globosa in the high light cultures decreased with increasing CO2(aq from 1.4 to 1.1 d−1 in the low and high CO2 cultures, respectively. Concurrently, the photosynthetic efficiency (FV/FM increased with increasing CO2(aq from 0.56 to 0.66. The different light conditions affected photosynthetic efficiency and cellular chlorophyll a concentrations, both of which were lower in the high light cultures as compared to the low light cultures. These results suggest that in future inorganic carbon enriched oceans, P. globosa will become less competitive and feedback mechanisms to global change may decrease in strength.

  11. Tunable Diode Laser Measurements of Leaf-scale Carbon Isotope Discrimination and Ecosystem Respired Carbon and Oxygen Isotope Ratios in a Semi-arid Woodland

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, N.; Chris, B.; Hanson, D.; Kern, S.; Meyer, C.; Pockman, W.; Powers, H.

    2005-12-01

    We present results and speculative interpretation of leaf-level carbon isotope discrimination and ecosystem respired carbon and oxygen isotope ratios from a semi-arid, C3/C4 woodland located in northern New Mexico, USA. Overstory leaf area index (LAI) is dominated by live juniper (Juniperus monosperma) trees with an LAI value of approximately 1.0 m2 per m2 ground area, and has a seasonally dynamic understory of mixed C3 forbs and C4 grasses and cacti, with a maximum LAI of 0.30 m2 per m2 ground area. Ecosystem respired carbon isotope ratios showed values characteristic of C3 dominated photosynthesis (Keeling plot intercepts of -35 to -22 per mil). Seasonal variation was typical of that found in wetter, C3 dominated forests, as was the dependence on climate (e.g. relationships with vapor pressure deficit, soil water content, and canopy conductance). Leaf-level carbon isotope discrimination of the junipers, measured by coupling a Li-Cor 6400 photosynthesis system to the TDL, provided discrimination-Ci and discrimination-vpd relationships consistent with measured ecosystem respired carbon isotope ratios. The oxygen isotope ratio of ecosystem respiration was dependent on rain water isotope composition, but was correlated with soil water content during rain-free periods. The cumulative effect of vapor pressure deficit after a rain event was tightly correlated with the oxygen isotope ratio of ecosystem respiration, suggesting the primary drivers are evaporative enrichment of soil water and perhaps nocturnal leaf enrichment. Instrument precision for carbon and oxygen isotope ratios of carbon dioxide is 0.06 to 0.18 per mil; however, overall precision is somewhat lower due to pressure and sampling effects.

  12. Carbon allocation and carbon isotope fluxes in the plant-soil-atmosphere continuum: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brüggemann, N.; Gessler, A.; Kayler, Z.; Keel, S. G.; Badeck, F.; Barthel, M.; Boeckx, P.; Buchmann, N.; Brugnoli, E.; Esperschütz, J.; Gavrichkova, O.; Ghashghaie, J.; Gomez-Casanovas, N.; Keitel, C.; Knohl, A.; Kuptz, D.; Palacio, S.; Salmon, Y.; Uchida, Y.; Bahn, M.

    2011-11-01

    The terrestrial carbon (C) cycle has received increasing interest over the past few decades, however, there is still a lack of understanding of the fate of newly assimilated C allocated within plants and to the soil, stored within ecosystems and lost to the atmosphere. Stable carbon isotope studies can give novel insights into these issues. In this review we provide an overview of an emerging picture of plant-soil-atmosphere C fluxes, as based on C isotope studies, and identify processes determining related C isotope signatures. The first part of the review focuses on isotopic fractionation processes within plants during and after photosynthesis. The second major part elaborates on plant-internal and plant-rhizosphere C allocation patterns at different time scales (diel, seasonal, interannual), including the speed of C transfer and time lags in the coupling of assimilation and respiration, as well as the magnitude and controls of plant-soil C allocation and respiratory fluxes. Plant responses to changing environmental conditions, the functional relationship between the physiological and phenological status of plants and C transfer, and interactions between C, water and nutrient dynamics are discussed. The role of the C counterflow from the rhizosphere to the aboveground parts of the plants, e.g. via CO2 dissolved in the xylem water or as xylem-transported sugars, is highlighted. The third part is centered around belowground C turnover, focusing especially on above- and belowground litter inputs, soil organic matter formation and turnover, production and loss of dissolved organic C, soil respiration and CO2 fixation by soil microbes. Furthermore, plant controls on microbial communities and activity via exudates and litter production as well as microbial community effects on C mineralization are reviewed. A further part of the paper is dedicated to physical interactions between soil CO2 and the soil matrix, such as CO2 diffusion and dissolution processes within the

  13. Follow the Carbon: Isotopic Labeling Studies of Early Earth Aerosol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Raea K; Day, Douglas A; Jimenez, Jose L; Tolbert, Margaret A

    2016-11-01

    Despite the faint young Sun, early Earth might have been kept warm by an atmosphere containing the greenhouse gases CH4 and CO2 in mixing ratios higher than those found on Earth today. Laboratory and modeling studies suggest that an atmosphere containing these trace gases could lead to the formation of organic aerosol haze due to UV photochemistry. Chemical mechanisms proposed to explain haze formation rely on CH4 as the source of carbon and treat CO2 as a source of oxygen only, but this has not previously been verified experimentally. In the present work, we use isotopically labeled precursor gases and unit-mass resolution (UMR) and high-resolution (HR) aerosol mass spectrometry to examine the sources of carbon and oxygen to photochemical aerosol formed in a CH4/CO2/N2 atmosphere. UMR results suggest that CH4 contributes 70-100% of carbon in the aerosol, while HR results constrain the value from 94% to 100%. We also confirm that CO2 contributes approximately 10% of the total mass to the aerosol as oxygen. These results have implications for the geochemical interpretations of inclusions found in Archean rocks on Earth and for the astrobiological potential of other planetary atmospheres. Key Words: Atmosphere-Early Earth-Planetary atmospheres-Carbon dioxide-Methane. Astrobiology 16, 822-830.

  14. Mass spectrometric determination of the inorganic carbon species assimilated by photoautotrophic cells of Euphorbia characias L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebeille, F; Gans, P; Chagvardieff, P; Pean, M; Tapie, P; Thibault, P

    1988-09-05

    The chemical forms of inorganic carbon, CO2 or HCO3-, incorporated during photosynthesis in photoautotrophic Euphorbia characias cell suspension cultures were determined in experiments using 13CO2 and a mass spectrometry technique. From the equations of the CO2 hydration reaction, a kinetic model was first developed, and the effect of photosynthesis on the external CO2 concentration was simulated. It was predicted from this model that CO2 and HCO3- uptakes could be differentiated by recording only the CO2 variation rate in the external medium, successively in absence then in presence of an exogenous carbonic anhydrase activity. The results obtained with either CO2-grown or air-grown photoautotrophic cells were in good agreement with the model and demonstrated that CO2 was the sole species taken up during photosynthesis. In addition no accumulation of inorganic carbon within the cells was observed in the light. Similarly, in dark, CO2 was the only species released by respiration in the external medium.

  15. Ground-Water Temperature, Noble Gas, and Carbon Isotope Data from the Espanola Basin, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Andrew H.

    2009-01-01

    Ground-water samples were collected from 56 locations throughout the Espanola Basin and analyzed for general chemistry (major ions and trace elements), carbon isotopes (delta 13C and 14C activity) in dissolved inorganic carbon, noble gases (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe, and 3He/4He ratio), and tritium. Temperature profiles were measured at six locations in the southeastern part of the basin. Temperature profiles suggest that ground water generally becomes warmer with distance from the mountains and that most ground-water flow occurs at depths 50 years old, consistent with the 14C ages. Terrigenic He (Heterr) concentrations in ground water are high (log Delta Heterr of 2 to 5) throughout much of the basin. High Heterr concentrations are probably caused by in situ production in the Tesuque Formation from locally high concentrations of U-bearing minerals (Northeast zone only), or by upward diffusive/advective transport of crustal- and mantle-sourced He possibly enhanced by basement piercing faults, or by both. The 3He/4He ratio of Heterr (Rterr) is commonly high (Rterr/Ra of 0.3-2.0, where Ra is the 3He/4He ratio in air) suggesting that Espanola Basin ground water commonly contains mantle-sourced He. The 3He/4He ratio of Heterr is generally the highest in the western and southern parts of the basin, closest to the western border fault system and the Quaternary to Miocene volcanics of the Jemez Mountains and Cerros del Rio.

  16. Subsurface Monitor for Dissolved Inorganic Carbon at Geological Sequestration Site Phase 1 SBIR Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng Wu

    2012-08-03

    Phase I research of this SBIR contract has yielded anticipated results and enable us to develop a practical new instrument to measure the Dissolved Inorganic Carbons (DIC) as well as Supercritical (SC) CO2 in underground brine water at higher sensitivity, lower cost, higher frequency and longer period of time for the Monitoring, Verification & Accounting (MVA) of CO2 sequestration as well as Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR). We show that reduced cost and improved performance are possible; both future and emerging market exist for the proposed new instrument.

  17. Application of a Non-thermal Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet to the Decomposition of Salicylic Acid to Inorganic Carbon

    OpenAIRE

    Kuroda, Kosuke; Ishijima, Tatsuo; Kaga, Toshiki; Shiomomura, Kai; Ninomiya, Kazuaki; Takahashi, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    A non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet technique was applied to decompose salicylic acid to inorganic carbon. Excess hydroxyl radical, which has a high oxidation potential, decomposed salicylic acid within 10 min, and total organic carbon decreased to 20% after 30 min. © 2015 The Chemical Society of Japan.

  18. Integration of inorganic nanostructures with polydopamine-derived carbon: tunable morphologies and versatile applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Junhua; Seyed Shahabadi, Seyed Ismail; Lu, Xuehong

    2016-01-01

    Polydopamine (PDA), a mussel adhesive-inspired biomimetic polymer, has attracted tremendous attention owing to its extremely versatile adhesion properties, facile aqueous coating process, capability of self-assembly to form nanostructures, and abundant surface functional groups for secondary modification. PDA is also a fantastic carbon source because it gives nitrogen (N)-doped graphite-like carbon in high yield, and the carbonized PDA (C-PDA) thin coatings have similar properties to those of N-doped multilayered graphene, i.e., they exhibit high electrical conductivity, and good electrochemical and mechanical properties. In comparison with other carbon sources, an outstanding feature of PDA lies in its ease of integration with inorganic nanostructures and capability for easy tailoring the structure and morphology of the resultant composite nanostructures. In this article, different routes for the preparation of C-PDA-based composite nanostructures, such as carbon/metal oxide and carbon/Si hollow, mesoporous, core-shell, yolk-shell nanostructures, are introduced with typical examples. The structures, morphologies and properties of the C-PDA-based composite nanostructures are also reviewed, and their potential applications in various engineering fields, such as energy storage, solar water splitting, flexible electronics, catalysis, sensing and environmental engineering, are highlighted. Finally a future outlook for this fascinating composite-nanostructure enabler is also presented.

  19. Long-range transport of continentally-derived particulate carbon in the marine atmosphere: evidence from stable carbon isotope studies

    OpenAIRE

    Cachier, Héléne; BUAT-MÉNARD, PATRICK; Fontugne, Michel; Chesselet, Roger

    2011-01-01

    Since 1979, we have investigated marine and non-marine sources of particulate carbon in the marine atmosphere from measurements of carbon concentration and isotopic composition 13C/12C). Aerosol samples were collected, mostly during the Sea/Air Exchange (SEAREX) Program experiments, in the northern and southern hemispheres (Sargasso Sea, Enewetak Atoll, Peru upwelling, American Samoa, New Zealand, Amsterdam Island). The concentration and the isotopic composition of particulate carbon of marin...

  20. Carbon isotope composition of latex does not reflect temporal variations of photosynthetic carbon isotope discrimination in rubber trees (Hevea brasiliensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanpanon, Nicha; Kasemsap, Poonpipope; Thaler, Philippe; Kositsup, Boonthida; Gay, Frédéric; Lacote, Régis; Epron, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    Latex, the cytoplasm of laticiferous cells localized in the inner bark of rubber trees (Hevea brasiliensis Müll. Arg.), is collected by tapping the bark. Following tapping, latex flows out of the trunk and is regenerated, whereas in untapped trees, there is no natural exudation. It is still unknown whether the carbohydrates used for latex regeneration in tapped trees is coming from recent photosynthates or from stored carbohydrates, and in the former case, it is expected that latex carbon isotope composition of tapped trees will vary seasonally, whereas latex isotope composition of untapped trees will be more stable. Temporal variations of carbon isotope composition of trunk latex (δ(13)C-L), leaf soluble compounds (δ(13)C-S) and bulk leaf material (δ(13)C-B) collected from tapped and untapped 20-year-old trees were compared. A marked difference in δ(13)C-L was observed between tapped and untapped trees whatever the season. Trunk latex from tapped trees was more depleted (1.6‰ on average) with more variable δ(13)C values than those of untapped trees. δ(13)C-L was higher and more stable across seasons than δ(13)C-S and δ(13)C-B, with a maximum seasonal difference of 0.7‰ for tapped trees and 0.3‰ for untapped trees. δ(13)C-B was lower in tapped than in untapped trees, increasing from August (middle of the rainy season) to April (end of the dry season). Differences in δ(13)C-L and δ(13)C-B between tapped and untapped trees indicated that tapping affects the metabolism of both laticiferous cells and leaves. The lack of correlation between δ(13)C-L and δ(13)C-S suggests that recent photosynthates are mixed in the large pool of stored carbohydrates that are involved in latex regeneration after tapping.

  1. Temperature and Oxygen Isotope Composition of The Ediacaran Ocean: Constraints From Clumped Isotope Carbonate Thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifacie, M.; Eiler, J. M.; Fike, D. A.

    2008-12-01

    The temperature and chemical variations of the early oceans on Earth are highly debated, particularly for periods associated with significant evolutionary change and/or extinction. The temperature of past oceans has been estimated based on conventional carbonate-water and/or silicate-water stable oxygen isotope thermometry. Precambrian carbonates and silicates both exhibit a long-term secular trend of increasing δ18O values with decreasing age. This trend has been used to support two opposite - though related - interpretations: the Earth's oceans gradually cooled over the course of the Proterozoic eon, from a maximum of ~ 60-90°C at ~ 2.5Ga (and were, on average, relatively warm during much of the Paleozoic era) [1]. This interpretation has been supported by Si-isotope proxies and the thermal tolerances of proteins in various classes of microbial organisms [2-3]. Alternatively, the δ18O value of the oceans has gradually increased through time [4-5], and mean Earth surface temperatures varied over a narrow range similar to modern conditions. In other terms, one either assumes an ocean of constant δ18O and infers that climate varied dramatically, or vise versa. Finally, it is possible that post- depositional processes (e.g., diagenesis, burial metamorphism, weathering) has modified the δ18O values of all or most Precambrian sedimentary carbonates and silicates, overprinting any paleoclimatic variations. Carbonate 'clumped isotope' thermometry provides a new way to independently test these hypotheses because it allows one to determine the apparent growth temperatures of carbonate minerals based on their abundances of 13C-18O bonds, as reflected by the 'Δ47' value of CO2 extracted by phosphoric acid digestion [6]. This method is thermodynamically based and independent of the δ18O of water from which the carbonate grew. We will report the initial results of measurements of 'Δ47 for a suite of carbonates from the Sultanate of Oman. This Ediacaran age (~ 635 to

  2. Distribution of dissolved inorganic carbon and related parameters in the Thermaikos Gulf (Eastern Mediterranean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. KRASAKOPOULOU

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Data on the distribution of dissolved inorganic carbon (measured as TCO2 and related parameters in the Thermaikos Gulf were obtained during May 1997. High TCO2 concentrations were recorded close to the bottom, especially in the northern part of the gulf, as a result of organic matter remineralisation. The positive relatively good correlation between TCO2 and both apparent oxygen utilisation (AOU and phosphate at the last sampling depth confi rmed the regenerative origin of a large proportion of TCO2. The comparatively conservative behaviour of alkalinity, together with the relatively low value of the homogenous buffer factor β (β = ∂lnfCO2/∂lnTCO2 revealed that calcifi cation or carbonate dissolution takes place on a very small scale, simultaneously with the organic carbon production. The correlations between fCO2 and chlorophyll α, as well as AOU and the surface temperature, revealed that the carbon dioxide fi xation through the biological activity is the principal factor that modulates the variability of fCO2. A rough first estimate of the magnitude of the air-sea CO2 exchange and the potential role of the Thermaikos Gulf in the transfer of atmospheric CO2 was also obtained. The results showed that during May 1997, the Thermaikos Gulf acted as a weak sink for atmospheric CO2 at a rate of -0.60 - -1.43 mmol m-2 d-1, depending on which formula for the gas transfer velocity was used, and in accordance to recent reports regarding other temperate continental shelves. Extensive study of the dissolved inorganic carbon and related parameters, and continuous shipboard measurements of fCO2 a and fCO2 w during all seasons are necessary to safely quantify the role of the Thermaikos Gulf in the context of the coastal margins CO2 dynamics.

  3. Organic fraction of the total carbon burial flux deduced from carbon isotopes across the Permo-Triassic boundary at Meishan,Zhejiang Province,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Junhua; LUO Genming; BAI Xiao; TANG Xinyan

    2007-01-01

    By combining the carbon cycle model with the records of carbonate and organic (kerogen) carbon isotope,this paper presents the calculation of the fraction of organic carbon burial (forg) of beds 23-40 at the global boundary stratotype section and point (GSSP) of the Permian-Triassic boundary at Meishan,Zhejiang Province.The resulting calculation produces two episodes of forg maxima observed to occur at beds 23-24 and 27-29,which respectively corresponds to the two episodic anoxic events indicated by the flourish of green sulfur bacteria.Two episodic forg minima occurred at beds 25-26 and 32-34,generally coincident with the flourish of cyanobacteria (bed 26 and upper part of beds 29 to 34) as shown by the high value of 2-melthyhopnoanes.It appears that the forg is related to the redox conditions,with greater forg values observed under the reductive condition.The relationship between forg and the total organic carbon (TOC) content was complex.The forg value was low at some beds with a high TOC content (such as bed 26),while high observed at some beds with a low TOC content (e.g.bed 27).This association infers the important contribution of primary productivity to the TOC content.The original organic burial could be thus calculated through the configuration of the function of the primary productivity and forg,which can be used to correct the residual TOC measured today.This investigation indicates that compiling the organic-inorganic carbon isotopes with the carbon cycle model favors to understand the fraction of organic carbon burial,providing information for the reconstruction of the coupling among biota,environments and organic burial.

  4. Using Carbon Isotopes in Cenozoic Soil Carbonates to Quantify Primary Productivity from Mid-Latitude Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caves, J. K.; Kramer, S. H.; Ibarra, D. E.; Chamberlain, C. P.

    2015-12-01

    The carbon isotope composition of pedogenic carbonates (δ13Ccarb) from paleosols has been extensively used as a proxy to estimate atmospheric pCO2 over the Phanerozoic. However, a number of other factors - including the concentration of plant-respired CO2 and the isotopic composition of both atmospheric and plant-respired carbon - influence the δ13C of pedogenic carbonates. For example, δ13Ccarb records from the mid-latitudes in central Asia and western North America show increasing trends in δ13Ccarb despite decreasing pCO2 during the late Cenozoic, which suggests that other factors play an important role in determining the isotopic composition of pedogenic carbonates. Instead, we suggest that these records are primarily recording changes in primary productivity rather than changes in atmospheric pCO2 and therefore propose a novel use of paleosol carbonate records to understand paleo-ecosystem dynamics. Here, we compile existing paleosol carbonate records, and present three new records from Wyoming, to estimate soil respiration and primary productivity in western North America during the Paleogene and early Neogene. We observe both an overall increase in δ13Ccarb after the early Eocene, and spatially heterogeneous δ13Ccarb values across western US basins. We combine this δ13Ccarb data with compilations of atmospheric pCO2 to estimate soil respiration and plant productivity. The long-term increase in δ13Ccarb indicates a decrease in plant productivity as conditions became more arid across much of the western US, congruent with both records of regional uplift and of global cooling. Furthermore, significant spatial heterogeneity in δ13Ccarb indicates that regional factors, such as the presence of paleolakes and/or local paleotopography may have provided a second-order control on local and regional productivity. Thus, our results provide a first-order estimate linking changes in primary productivity with regional tectonics and global climatic change.

  5. Carbon isotope stratigraphy and palynology of an eastern Tethyan Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary section from Sumbar, Turkmenistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmour, I.; Pearce, C. A.; Jolley, D.; Sephton, M. A.; Widdowson, M.; Gilmour, M. A.

    2012-04-01

    A number of marine sequences across the K/Pg boundary have been identified that offer reasonably continuous records and relatively high sedimentation rates, most notably those near Tethyan continental margins. However, few Eastern Tethys K/Pg localities have been studied compared to the well-known North African and Southern European sites. Here we present a high-resolution stable carbon isotope and palynological record of a 2m thick section across the K/Pg boundary from the eastern Tethys at Sumbar in Turkmenistan (38°28'N, 56°14'E). The stratigraphy and inorganic geochemistry of the section used in this study, SM-4, has been described in detail by [1]. A moderately diverse series of palynofloras were recovered from the samples spanning the K/Pg boundary with a late Maastrichtian assemblage comparable to that described from Tunisia [2]. Above the K/Pg boundary a dinocyst assemblage dominated by Areoligera is observed, reinforcing the similarity with Tunisia, that we interpret as representing a marine transgression by eutrophic water masses with the levels of Areoligera decreasing up section with a decline in nutrient availability. Carbon isotope stratigraphy of bulk carbonate and bulk organic matter reveal correlated negative carbon isotope excursions (CIEs) across the K/Pg boundary. The extent of the CIE and the concomitant drop in carbonate content parallels that observed for bulk and fine fraction carbonate isotopic analyses from other K/Pg sections. The negative CIE of bulk organic matter is similar in magnitude to CIEs for organic matter that have been observed at only a few other marine K/Pg sections. In contrast, the marked CIE observed in bulk organic matter is not evident in the carbon isotopic compositions of algal lipids. We interpret this as a geochemical signature of post-K/Pg algal blooms. Recent analysis identified the K/Pg boundary in the Boltysh meteorite crater sediment fill and reported evidence of a marine incursion into the crater during the

  6. Stable Carbon and Oxygen Isotopes of Pedogenic Carbonates in Ustic Vertisols: Implications for Paleoenvironmental Change

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Cheng-Min; WANG Cheng-Shan; TANG Ya

    2005-01-01

    Pedogenic carbonates, found extensively in arid and semiarid regions, are important in revealing regional climatic and environmental changes as well as the carbon cycle. In addition, stable carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions of pedogenic carbonates have been used to rebuild paleoecology (biomass and vegetation) and to estimate paleotemperature and paleoprecipitation during past geological time. By utilizing the stable carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions (δ13C and δ18O) of secondary nodules in Ustic Vertisols, this study looked into the climatic and environmental changes in the dry valleys of the Yuanmou Basin, Yunnan Province, in southwestern China. The results showed that during the early Holocene, a warm-humid or hot-humid climate existed in the Yuanmou Basin, but since then fluctuations in climate have occurred, with a dry climate prevailing. A highly significant correlation (r = 0.92, n= 9) between δ13C and δ18O values of carbonates illustrated that there had been a continual shifting between cold-humid and warm-dry climates in southwestern China including the Yuanmou Basin since the early Holocene.

  7. Regional prediction of carbon isotopes in soil carbonates for Asian dust source tracer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bing; Cui, Xinjuan; Wang, Yaqiang

    2016-10-01

    Dust particles emitted from deserts and semi-arid lands in northern China cause particulate pollution that increases the burden of disease particularly for urban population in East Asia. The stable carbon isotopes (δ13C) of carbonates in soils and dust aerosols in northern China were investigated. We found that the δ13C of carbonates in surface soils in northern China showed clearly the negative correlation (R2 = 0.73) with Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI). Using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite-derived NDVI, we predicted the regional distribution of δ13C of soil carbonates in deserts, sandy lands, and steppe areas. The predictions show the mean δ13C of -0.4 ± 0.7‰ in soil carbonates in Taklimakan Desert and Gobi Deserts, and the isotope values decrease to -3.3 ± 1.1‰ in sandy lands. The increase in vegetation coverage depletes 13C in soil carbonates, thus the steppe areas are predicted by the lowest δ13C levels (-8.1 ± 1.7‰). The measurements of atmospheric dust samples at eight sites showed that the Asian dust sources were well assigned by the 13C mapping in surface soils. Predicting 13C in large geographical areas with fine resolution offers a cost-effective tracer to monitor dust emissions from sandy lands and steppe areas which show an increasing role in Asian dust loading driven by climate change and human activities.

  8. Cryogenic Calcite: A Morphologic and Isotopic Analog to the ALH84001 Carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niles, P. B.; Leshin, L. A.; Socki, R. A.; Guan, Y.; Ming, D. W.; Gibson, E. K.

    2004-01-01

    Martian meteorite ALH84001 carbonates preserve large and variable microscale isotopic compositions, which in some way reflect their formation environment. These measurements show large variations (>20%) in the carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions of the carbonates on a 10-20 micron scale that are correlated with chemical composition. However, the utilization of these data sets for interpreting the formation conditions of the carbonates is complex due to lack of suitable terrestrial analogs and the difficulty of modeling under non-equilibrium conditions. Thus, the mechanisms and processes are largely unknown that create and preserve large microscale isotopic variations in carbonate minerals. Experimental tests of the possible environments and mechanisms that lead to large microscale isotopic variations can help address these concerns. One possible mechanism for creating large carbon isotopic variations in carbonates involves the freezing of water. Carbonates precipitate during extensive CO2 degassing that occurs during the freezing process as the fluid s decreasing volume drives CO2 out. This rapid CO2 degassing results in a kinetic isotopic fractionation where the CO2 gas has a much lighter isotopic composition causing an enrichment of 13C in the remaining dissolved bicarbonate. This study seeks to determine the suitability of cryogenically formed carbonates as analogs to ALH84001 carbonates. Specifically, our objective is to determine how accurately models using equilibrium fractionation factors approximate the isotopic compositions of cryogenically precipitated carbonates. This includes determining the accuracy of applying equilibrium fractionation factors during a kinetic process, and determining how isotopic variations in the fluid are preserved in microscale variations in the precipitated carbonates.

  9. Nitrogen isotopic patterns of vegetation as affected by breeding activity of Black-tailed Gull (Larus crassiostris): A coupled analysis of feces, inorganic soil nitrogen and flora

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizota, C., E-mail: mizota@iwate-u.ac.jp [Iwate University, Ueda 3-18-8, Morioka, Iwate 020-8550 (Japan)

    2009-11-15

    Two currently breeding colonies (Matsushima Bay and Rishiri island; northern Japan) of predominant Black-tailed Gull (Larus crassiostris) were studied for N isotopic patterns of flora, which is affected by increased supply of inorganic soil N derived from the microbial transformation of feces. Coupled samples of feces, topsoil and flora were collected in early to mid July (2008), when input of fecal N onto soils was at its maximum. As bird migration and breeding continued, native Japanese red-pine (Pinus densiflora), junipers (Juniperus chinensis and Juniperus rigita; Matsushima Bay colony) and Sasa senanensis (Rishiri colony) declined, while ornithocoprophilus exotic plants succeeded. Among tree species on the islands, P. densiflora with ectomycorrizal colonization appears highly susceptible to elevated concentrations of NH{sub 4}-N in the topsoil. A mechanism for best explaining the plant succession associated with the breeding activity of Black-tailed Gull was evidenced by two parameters: first, concomitant elevation of N content in the flora and second, inorganic soil N content, along with changes in N isotopic composition ({delta}{sup 15}N). Earlier isotopic data on the foliar N affected by breeding activity were compiled and reviewed. Emphasis was put on isotopic information for inorganic N in soils that controls plant succession.

  10. Seasonal variation in stable carbon and nitrogen isotope values of bats reflect environmental baselines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana G Popa-Lisseanu

    Full Text Available The stable carbon and nitrogen isotope composition of animal tissues is commonly used to trace wildlife diets and analyze food chains. Changes in an animal's isotopic values over time are generally assumed to indicate diet shifts or, less frequently, physiological changes. Although plant isotopic values are known to correlate with climatic seasonality, only a few studies restricted to aquatic environments have investigated whether temporal isotopic variation in consumers may also reflect environmental baselines through trophic propagation. We modeled the monthly variation in carbon and nitrogen isotope values in whole blood of four insectivorous bat species occupying different foraging niches in southern Spain. We found a common pattern of isotopic variation independent of feeding habits, with an overall change as large as or larger than one trophic step. Physiological changes related to reproduction or to fat deposition prior to hibernation had no effect on isotopic variation, but juvenile bats had higher δ13C and δ15N values than adults. Aridity was the factor that best explained isotopic variation: bat blood became enriched in both 13C and 15N after hotter and/or drier periods. Our study is the first to show that consumers in terrestrial ecosystems reflect seasonal environmental dynamics in their isotope values. We highlight the danger of misinterpreting stable isotope data when not accounting for seasonal isotopic baselines in food web studies. Understanding how environmental seasonality is integrated in animals' isotope values will be crucial for developing reliable methods to use stable isotopes as dietary tracers.

  11. Phytoplankton response to whole lake inorganic N fertilization along a gradient in dissolved organic carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deininger, A; Faithfull, C-L; Bergström, A-K

    2017-01-31

    Global change has increased inorganic nitrogen (N) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC; i.e. 'browning') inputs to northern hemisphere boreal lakes. However, we do not know how phytoplankton in nutrient poor lake ecosystems of different DOC concentration respond to increased N availability. Here, we monitored changes in phytoplankton production, biomass and community composition in response to whole lake inorganic N fertilization in six boreal unproductive Swedish lakes divided into three lake pairs (control, N enriched) at three DOC levels (low, medium, high), with one reference year (2011) and two impact years (2012, 2013). We found that phytoplankton biomass and production decreased with DOC concentration before N fertilization. Further, phytoplankton community composition also differed with respect to DOC, with a dominance of non-flagellated autotrophs at low DOC towards an increasing dominance of flagellated autotrophs with increased lake DOC concentration. The N fertilization increased phytoplankton biomass and production in all lakes, but did not affect phytoplankton community composition. However, the net response in biomass and production to N fertilization declined with increasing DOC, implying that the lake DOC concentration is critical in order to infer phytoplankton responses to N fertilization, and that the system switches from being primarily nutrient limited to becoming increasingly light limited with increased DOC concentration. In conclusion, our results show that browning will reduce phytoplankton production and biomass and influence phytoplankton community composition, whereas increased inorganic N loadings from deposition, forestry or other land use will primarily enhance phytoplankton biomass and production. Together, any change in the landscape that enhances inorganic N availability will increase phytoplankton production and biomass, but the positive effects of N will be much weaker or even neutralized in browner lakes as caused by light

  12. Stable Isotope Studies of Crop Carbon and Water Relations: A Review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Cong-zhi; ZHANG Jia-bao; ZHAO Bing-zi; ZHANG Hui; HUANG Ping

    2009-01-01

    Crop carbon and water relations research is important in the studies of water saving agriculture,breeding program,and energy and material cycles in soil plant atmosphere continuum (SPAC).The purpose of this paper is to review the current state of knowledge on stable isotopes of carbon,oxygen,and hydrogen in the research of crop carbon and water relations,such as carbon isotope discrimination (△13C) during carbon fixation process by photosynthesis,application of △13C in crop water use efficiency (WUE) and breeding programs,oxygen isotope enrichment during leaf water transpiration,CO2 fixation by photosynthesis and release by respiration,application of hydrogen isotope composition (δD) and oxygen isotope composition (δ18O) for determination of water source used by a crop,stable isotope coupling Keeling plot for investigating the carbon and water flux in ecosystem,energy and material cycle in SPAC and correlative integrative models on stable isotope.These aspects contain most of the stable isotope researches on crop carbon and water relations which have been widely explored internationally while less referred in China.Based on the reviewed literatures,some needs for future research are suggested.

  13. The Stable and Radio- Carbon Isotopic Content of Labile and Refractory Carbon in Atmospheric Particulate Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNichol, A. P.; Rosenheim, B. E.; Gerlach, D. S.; Hayes, J. M.

    2006-12-01

    Studies of the isotopic content of atmospheric particulate matter are hampered by difficulties in chemically defining the pools of carbon and analytically isolating the different pools. We are conducting studies on reference materials and atmospheric aerosol samples to develop a method to measure stable and radio- carbon isotopes on the labile and refractory carbon. We are using a flow-through combustion system that allows us to combust, collect and measure the isotopic content of the gases produced at all stages of heating/oxidizing. We compare our results to those measured using a chemothermal oxidation method (CTO) (Gustafsson et al., 2001). In this method, refractory carbon is defined as the material remaining after pre- combusting a sample at 375°C in the presence of oxygen for 24 hours. The reference materials are diesel soot, apple leaves and a hybrid of the two (DiesApple), all from NIST. These provide carbon with two well-defined fractions -- the soot provides refractory carbon that is radiocarbon dead and the apple leaves provide organic carbon that is radiocarbon modern. Radiocarbon results from DiesApple indicate that the "refractory" carbon defined by the CTO method is actually a mixture of old and modern carbon that contains over 25% modern carbon. This suggests that charred material formed from the apples leaves during the pre-combustion step is contributing to the fraction we identify as refractory carbon. We are studying this by analyzing the individual materials and the mixture using our flow-through system. First results with this system indicate that the refractory fraction trapped from the DiesApple contains much less modern carbon than the CTO method, less than 7%. We will present detailed concentration and isotopic results of the generation of carbon dioxide during programmed combustion of each of the reference materials. We studied the radiocarbon content of both the total carbon (TC) and refractory carbon in the fine particulate matter (PM

  14. The magnesium isotope record of cave carbonate archives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Riechelmann

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Here we explore the potential of magnesium (δ26Mg isotope time-series data as continental climate proxies in speleothem calcite archives. For this purpose, a total of six Pleistocene and Holocene stalagmites from caves in Germany, Morocco and Peru and two flowstones from a cave in Austria were investigated. These caves represent the semi-arid to arid (Morocco, the warm-temperate (Germany, the equatorial-humid (Peru and the cold-humid (Austria climate zones. Changes in the calcite magnesium isotope signature with time are compared against carbon and oxygen isotope records from these speleothems. Similar to other proxies, the non-trivial interaction of a number of environmental, equilibrium and disequilibrium processes governs the δ26Mg fractionation in continental settings. These include the different sources of magnesium isotopes such as rainwater or snow as well as soil and host rock, soil zone biogenic activity, shifts in silicate versus carbonate weathering ratios and residence time of water in the soil and karst zone. Pleistocene stalagmites from Morocco show the lowest mean δ26Mg values (GDA: −4.26 ± 0.07‰ and HK3: −4.17 ± 0.15‰, and the data are well explained in terms of changes in aridity over time. The Pleistocene to Holocene stalagmites from Peru show the highest mean value of all stalagmites (NC-A and NC-B δ26Mg: −3.96 ± 0.04‰ but only minor variations in Mg-isotope composition, which is consistent with the rather stable equatorial climate at this site. Holocene stalagmites from Germany (AH-1 mean δ26Mg: −4.01 ± 0.07‰; BU 4 mean δ26Mg: −4.20 ± 0.10‰ suggest changes in outside air temperature was the principal driver rather than rainfall amount. The alpine Pleistocene flowstones from Austria (SPA 52: −3.00 ± 0.73‰; SPA 59: −3.70 ± 0.43‰ are affected by glacial versus interglacial climate change with outside air temperature

  15. The magnesium isotope record of cave carbonate archives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Riechelmann

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Here we explore the potential of time-series magnesium (δ26Mg isotope data as continental climate proxies in speleothem calcite archives. For this purpose, a total of six Pleistocene and Holocene stalagmites from caves in Germany, Morocco and Peru and two flowstones from a cave in Austria were investigated. These caves represent the semi-arid to arid (Morocco, the warm-temperate (Germany, the equatorial-humid (Peru and the cold-humid (Austria climate zones. Changes in the calcite magnesium isotope signature with time are placed against carbon and oxygen isotope records from these speleothems. Similar to other proxies, the non-trivial interaction of a number of environmental, equilibrium and non-equilibrium processes governs the δ26Mg fractionation in continental settings. These include the different sources of magnesium isotopes such as rain water or snow as well as soil and hostrock, soil zone biogenic activity, shifts in silicate versus carbonate weathering ratios and residence time of water in the soil and karst zone. Pleistocene stalagmites from Morocco show the lowest mean δ26Mg values (GDA: −4.26 ± 0.07 ‰ and HK3: −4.17 ± 0.15 ‰ and the data are well explained in terms of changes in aridity over time. The Pleistocene to Holocene stalagmites from Peru show the highest mean value (NC-A and NC-B δ26Mg: −3.96 ± 0.04 ‰ but only minor variations in Mg-isotope composition, which is in concert with the rather stable equatorial climate at this site. Holocene stalagmites from Germany (AH-1 mean δ26Mg: −4.01 ± 0.07 ‰; BU 4 mean δ26Mg: −4.20 ± 0.10 ‰ record changes in outside air temperature as driving factor rather than rainfall amount. The alpine Pleistocene flowstones from Austria (SPA 52: −3.00 ± 0.73 ‰; SPA 59: −3.70 ± 0.43 ‰ are affected by glacial versus interglacial climate change with outside air temperature affecting soil zone activity

  16. Clumped isotope calibration data for lacustrine carbonates: A progress report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripati, A.

    2015-12-01

    Our capacity to understand Earth's environmental history is highly dependent on the accuracy of reconstructions of past climates. Lake sediments provide important archives of terrestrial climate change, and represent an important tool for reconstructing paleohydrology, paleoclimate, paleoenvironment, and paleoaltimetry. Unfortunately, while multiple methods for constraining marine temperature exist, quantitative terrestrial proxies are scarcer - tree rings, speleothems, and leaf margin analyses have all been used with varying degrees of accuracy. Clumped isotope thermometry has the potential to be a useful instrument for determining terrestrial climates: multiple studies have shown the fraction of 13C—18O bonds in carbonates is inversely related to the temperature at which the rocks formed. We have been measuring the abundance of 13C18O16O in the CO2 produced by the dissolution of carbonate minerals in phosphoric acid in modern lake samples and comparing results to independently known estimates of lake water temperature. Here we discuss an extensive calibration dataset comprised of 132 analyses of 97 samples from 44 localities, including microbialites, tufas, and micrites endogenic carbonates, freshwater gastropods, bivalves, microbialites, and ooids.

  17. Effects of Vegetation Removal and Soil Disturbance on Soil Organic and Inorganic Carbon Dynamics in California Desert Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, A. C.; Allen, E. B.; Allen, M. F.; Hernandez, R. R.

    2015-12-01

    Solar energy developments are projected to be deployed over desert wildland areas with deep soil inorganic carbon (SIC) deposits, which often involves elimination of deep-rooted vegetation. This land cover change may systemically alter SIC pools since respired CO2 is the carbon (C) source during SIC formation. We sought to understand how removal of creosote bush scrub affects soil C pools. We hypothesized that vegetation is important for maintaining SIC and soil organic C (SOC) pools and that disturbance to the vegetation and soil will change CO2 flux with increased losses from SIC. Soils were collected from sites that had intact creosote bush scrub habitat adjacent to disturbed, bare areas where the native vegetation had been previously removed. Samples were taken from beneath shrub canopies and interspaces in intact areas, and from random points in the disturbed area. Soils were analyzed for SIC, SOC, microbial and labile C, and δ13C. Soils were also incubated to determine the potential CO2 flux from disturbed and undisturbed soils along with the sources of CO2. Three replicates per soil underwent a control and water addition treatment and flux and δ13C of CO2 were measured continuously. Control replicates yielded no significant CO2 flux. CO2 flux from watered soils was higher beneath shrub canopy (18.57µmol g soil-1 day-1±1.86) than the interspace soils (0.86 µmol g soil-1 day-1±0.17). Soils collected from bare areas had an intermediate flux (5.41 µmol g soil-1 day-1±2.68 and 3.68 µmol g soil-1 day-1±0.85, respectively) lying between shrub canopy and interspace soils. There was no significant difference between the δ13C values of CO2 from shrub canopy and interspace soils, both of which had a very low δ13C values (-22.60‰±0.64 and -23.88‰±0.89, respectively), resembling that of organic C. However, the isotopic values of CO2 from disturbed soils were significantly higher (-16.68‰±1.36 and -15.22‰±2.12, respectively) suggesting that these

  18. Measuring oxygen yields of a thermal conversion/elemental analyzer-isotope ratio mass spectrometer for organic and inorganic materials through injection of CO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xijie; Chen, Zhigang

    2014-12-01

    The thermal conversion/elemental analyzer-isotope ratio mass spectrometer (TC/EA-IRMS) is widely used to measure the δ(18) O value of various substances. A premise for accurate δ(18) O measurement is that the oxygen in the sample can be converted into carbon monoxide (CO) quantitatively or at least proportionally. Therefore, a precise method to determine the oxygen yield of TC/EA-IRMS measurements is needed. Most studies have used the CO peak area obtained from a known amount of a solid reference material (for example, benzoic acid) to calibrate the oxygen yield of the sample. Although it was assumed that the oxygen yield of the solid reference material is 100%, no direct evidence has been provided. As CO is the analyte gas for δ(18) O measurement by IRMS, in this study, we use a six-port valve to inject CO gas into the TC/EA. The CO is carried to the IRMS by the He carrier gas and the CO peak area is measured by the IRMS. The CO peak area thus obtained from a known amount of the injected CO is used to calibrate the oxygen yield of the sample. The oxygen yields of commonly used organic and inorganic reference materials such as benzoic acid (C6 H5 COOH), silver phosphate (Ag3 PO4 ), calcium carbonate (CaCO3 ) and silicon dioxide (SiO2 ) are investigated at different reactor temperatures and sample sizes. We obtained excellent linear correlation between the peak area for the injected CO and its oxygen atom amount. C6 H5 COOH has the highest oxygen yield, followed by Ag3 PO4 , CaCO3 and SiO2 . The oxygen yields of TC/EA-IRMS are less than 100% for both organic and inorganic substances, but the yields are relatively stable at the specified reactor temperature and for a given quantity of sample. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Multispectroscopic and Isotopic Ratio Analysis To Characterize the Inorganic Binder Used on Pompeian Pink and Purple Lake Pigments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcaida, Iker; Maguregui, Maite; Morillas, Héctor; García-Florentino, Cristina; Knuutinen, Ulla; Carrero, Jose Antonio; Fdez-Ortiz de Vallejuelo, Silvia; Pitarch Martı́, Africa; Castro, Kepa; Madariaga, Juan Manuel

    2016-06-21

    Because of the fact that pigments are not ubiquitous in the archeological record, the application of noninvasive analytical methods is a necessity. In this work, pink and purple lake pigments recovered from the excavations of the ancient city of Pompeii (Campania, Italy) and preserved in their original bowls at the Naples National Archaeological Museum (Italy) were analyzed to characterize the composition of their inorganic binders (mordants). In situ preliminary analyses using a hand-held energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer (HH-ED-XRF) allowed us to determine the use of an aluminosilicate enriched in Cu and Pb. Scanning electron microscopy coupled to energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDS) and benchtop ED-XRF analyses confirmed these results, while inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) allowed one to determine the concentration of major, minor, and trace elements. The use of other techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), and micro-Raman and infrared spectroscopies allowed one to characterize the pigments at the molecular level. The high concentration of Cu detected in the pigments (1228-12937 μg g(-1)) could be related to the addition of Cu salts to obtain the desired final hue. The concentrations of Pb (987-2083 μg g(-1)) was also remarkable. Lead isotopic ratio analysis ((206)Pb/(207)Pb) suggested a possible origin related to the leaching of the ancient lead pipes from Pompeii and the subsequent transfer to the buried pigments or to the inorganic binder. Molecular analysis also showed that the binder is composed of an allophane-like clay. Moreover, it was possible to determine that to obtain the final purple hue of a specific pigment, Pompeian blue pigment was also mixed into the dyed clay.

  20. Dissolved inorganic carbon enhanced growth, nutrient uptake, and lipid accumulation in wastewater grown microalgal biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesaano, Maureen; Gardner, Robert D; Moll, Karen; Lauchnor, Ellen; Gerlach, Robin; Peyton, Brent M; Sims, Ronald C

    2015-03-01

    Microalgal biofilms grown to evaluate potential nutrient removal options for wastewaters and feedstock for biofuels production were studied to determine the influence of bicarbonate amendment on their growth, nutrient uptake capacity, and lipid accumulation after nitrogen starvation. No significant differences in growth rates, nutrient removal, or lipid accumulation were observed in the algal biofilms with or without bicarbonate amendment. The biofilms possibly did not experience carbon-limited conditions because of the large reservoir of dissolved inorganic carbon in the medium. However, an increase in photosynthetic rates was observed in algal biofilms amended with bicarbonate. The influence of bicarbonate on photosynthetic and respiration rates was especially noticeable in biofilms that experienced nitrogen stress. Medium nitrogen depletion was not a suitable stimulant for lipid production in the algal biofilms and as such, focus should be directed toward optimizing growth and biomass productivities to compensate for the low lipid yields and increase nutrient uptake.

  1. Technical Note: Mesocosm approach to quantify dissolved inorganic carbon percolation fluxes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thaysen, Eike Marie; Jessen, S.; Ambus, Per;

    2014-01-01

    unplanted soil. Carbon dioxide partial pressure (pCO(2)), alkalinity, soil moisture and temperature were measured with depth and time, and DIC in the percolate was quantified using a sodium hydroxide trap. Results showed good reproducibility between two replicate mesocosms. The pCO(2) varied between 0......Dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) fluxes across the vadose zone are influenced by a complex interplay of biological, chemical and physical factors. A novel soil mesocosm system was evaluated as a tool for providing information on the mechanisms behind DIC percolation to the groundwater from.......2 and 1.1 %, and the alkalinity was 0.1-0.6 meq L-1. The measured cumulative effluent DIC flux over the 78-day experimental period was 185-196 mg L-1 m(-2) and in the same range as estimates derived from pCO(2) and alkalinity in samples extracted from the side of the mesocosm column and the drainage flux...

  2. Stable isotope composition of atmospheric carbon monoxide. A modelling study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gromov, Sergey S.

    2014-11-01

    This study aims at an improved understanding of the stable carbon and oxygen isotope composition of the carbon monoxide (CO) in the global atmosphere by means of numerical simulations. At first, a new kinetic chemistry tagging technique for the most complete parameterisation of isotope effects has been introduced into the Modular Earth Submodel System (MESSy) framework. Incorporated into the ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC) general circulation model, an explicit treatment of the isotope effects on the global scale is now possible. The expanded model system has been applied to simulate the chemical system containing up to five isotopologues of all carbon- and oxygen-bearing species, which ultimately determine the δ{sup 13}C, δ{sup 18}O and Δ{sup 17}O isotopic signatures of atmospheric CO. As model input, a new stable isotope-inclusive emission inventory for the relevant trace gases has been compiled. The uncertainties of the emission estimates and of the resulting simulated mixing and isotope ratios have been analysed. The simulated CO mixing and stable isotope ratios have been compared to in-situ measurements from ground-based observatories and from the civil-aircraft-mounted CARIBIC-1 measurement platform. The systematically underestimated {sup 13}CO/{sup 12}CO ratios of earlier, simplified modelling studies can now be partly explained. The EMAC simulations do not support the inferences of those studies, which suggest for CO a reduced input of the highly depleted in {sup 13}C methane oxidation source. In particular, a high average yield of 0.94 CO per reacted methane (CH{sub 4}) molecule is simulated in the troposphere, to a large extent due to the competition between the deposition and convective transport processes affecting the CH{sub 4} to CO reaction chain intermediates. None of the other factors, assumed or disregarded in previous studies, however hypothesised to have the potential in enriching tropospheric CO in {sup 13}C, were found significant

  3. Observation of Large Enhancement of Charge Exchange Cross Sections with Neutron-Rich Carbon Isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Tanihata, I; Kanungo, R; Ameil, F; Atkinson, J; Ayyad, Y; Cortina-Gil, D; Dillmann, I; Estradé, A; Evdokimov, A; Farinon, F; Geissel, H; Guastalla, G; Janik, R; Knoebel, R; Kurcewicz, J; Litvinov, Yu A; Marta, M; Mostazo, M; Mukha, I; Nociforo, C; Ong, H J; Pietri, S; Prochazka, A; Scheidenberger, C; Sitar, B; Strmen, P; Takechi, M; Tanaka, J; Toki, H; Vargas, J; Winfield, J S; Weick, H

    2015-01-01

    Production cross sections of nitrogen isotopes from high-energy carbon isotopes on hydrogen and carbon targets have been measured for the first time for a wide range of isotopes. The fragment separator FRS at GSI was used to deliver C isotope beams. The cross sections of the production of N isotopes were determined by charge measurements of forward going fragments. The cross sections show a rapid increase with the number of neutrons in the projectile. Since the production of nitrogen is mostly due to charge exchange reactions below the proton separation energies, the present data suggests a concentration of Gamow-Teller and Fermi transition strength at low excitation energies for neutron-rich isotopes. It was also observed that the cross sections were enhanced much more strongly for neutron rich isotopes in the C-target data.

  4. Inorganic carbon in a high latitude estuary-fjord system in Canada's eastern Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turk, D.; Bedard, J. M.; Burt, W. J.; Vagle, S.; Thomas, H.; Azetsu-Scott, K.; McGillis, W. R.; Iverson, S. J.; Wallace, D. W. R.

    2016-09-01

    Rapidly changing conditions in the Arctic can have a significant impact on biogeochemical cycles and can be particularly important in high latitude estuary-fjord systems with abundant and diverse freshwater sources. This study provides a first look into the inorganic carbon system and its relation to freshwater sources in Cumberland Sound in the east coast of Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada. These data contribute to the very limited set of inorganic carbon measurements in high latitude estuary-fjord systems. During the ice-free conditions in August 2011, the meteoric freshwater fractions (MW) in the upper 40 m ranged from 11 to 21% and no sea ice melt (SIM) was present in the Sound. Surface waters were undersaturated with pCO2 (260 and 300 μatm), and DIC and TA ranged between 1779 and 1966 μmol DIC kg-1, and 1922 and 2140 μmol TA kg-1, respectively. Aragonite saturation (ΩAr) state ranged from 1.9 in the surface to 1.4 in the subsurface waters. Data show decreasing TA and ΩAr with increasing MW fraction and suggest that Cumberland Sound waters would become aragonite undersaturated (ΩAr melt. In August 2012, MW fractions at the surface were between 8 and 11.5%, and SIM between 7 and 23%. Significant interannual variability of summertime SIM could potentially result in ΩAr undersaturation.

  5. Recently fixed carbon allocation in strawberry plants and concurrent inorganic nitrogen uptake through arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomè, Elisabetta; Tagliavini, Massimo; Scandellari, Francesca

    2015-05-01

    Most crop species form a symbiotic association with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, receiving plant photosynthate and exchanging nutrients from the soil. The plant carbon (C) allocation to AM fungi and the nitrogen feedback are rarely studied together. In this study, a dual (13)CO2 and (15)NH4(15)NO3 pulse labeling experiment was carried out to determine the allocation of recent photosynthates to mycorrhizal hyphae and the translocation of N absorbed by hyphae to strawberry plants. Plants were grown in pots in which a 50 μm mesh net allowed the physical separation of the mycorrhizal hyphae from the roots in one portion of the pot. An inorganic source of (15)N was added to the hyphal compartment at the same time of the (13)CO2 pulse labeling. One and seven days after pulse labeling, the plants were destructively harvested and the amount of the recently fixed carbon (C) and of the absorbed N was determined. (13)C allocated to belowground organs such as roots and mycorrhizal hyphae accounted for an average of 10%, with 4.3% allocated to mycorrhizal hyphae within the first 24h after the pulse labeling. Mycorrhizae absorbed labeled inorganic nitrogen, of which almost 23% was retained in the fungal mycelium. The N uptake was linearly correlated with the (13)C fixed by the plants suggesting a positive correlation between a plant photosynthetic rate and the hyphal absorption capacity.

  6. Inorganic carbon distribution and CO2 fluxes in a large European estuary (Tagus, Portugal).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, A P; Cabeçadas, G; Mateus, M D

    2017-08-07

    Ten field cruises were carried out in Tagus estuary from 1999 to 2007 to study the dynamics of the inorganic carbon system. Dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and total alkalinity (TA) increased with salinity. DIC and TA were generally conservative in the estuarine mixing zone (salinity > 10), while a complex distribution pattern was observed at the upper estuary. DIC values peaked 1786.9 ± 155.8 µmol kg(-1) at that segment. Estimated annual mean fluxes of DIC were 0.27 Tg C yr(-1) from the river to the estuary, and 0.37 Tg C yr(-1) from here to the coastal area. The Tagus estuary was always CO2 supersaturated, with partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) reaching 9160 µatm in the upper estuary. An average emission of 0.11 Tg C yr(-1) was estimated from the estuary to the atmosphere, corresponding to 23% of exported DIC. Only 8% of the riverine DIC was ventilated. The non-conservative behaviour of CO2 parameters in the estuary segment under freshwater influence was attributed to alternations in the relevance of riverine/terrestrial runoff, photosynthesis, aerobic respiration, organic matter mineralization and CaCO3 precipitation/dissolution.

  7. Natural vegetation restoration is more beneficial to soil surface organic and inorganic carbon sequestration than tree plantation on the Loess Plateau of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Zhao; Dong, Yunshe; Wang, Yunqiang; Wei, Xiaorong; Wang, Yafeng; Cui, Buli; Zhou, Weijian

    2014-07-01

    Natural vegetation restoration and tree plantation are the two most important measures for ecosystem restoration on the Loess Plateau of China. However, few studies have compared the effects of the two contrasting measures on soil organic and inorganic carbon (SOC and SIC) sequestration or have further used SOC and SIC isotopes to analyze the inherent sequestration mechanism. This study examined a pair of neighboring small watersheds with similar topographical and geological backgrounds. Since 1954, natural vegetation restoration has been conducted in one of these watersheds, and tree plantation has been conducted in the other. The two watersheds have now formed completely different landscapes (naturally restored grassland and artificial forestland). Differences in soil bulk density, SOC and SIC content and storage, and SOC and SIC δ(13)C values were investigated in the two ecosystems in the upper 1m of the soil. We found that SOC storage was higher in the grassland than in the forestland, with a difference of 14.90 Mg ha(-1). The vertical changes in the δ(13)CSOC value demonstrated that the two ecosystems have different mechanisms of soil surface organic carbon accumulation. The SIC storage in the grassland was lower than that in the forestland, with a difference of 38.99 Mg ha(-1). The δ(13)CSIC values indicated that the grassland generates more secondary carbonate than the forestland and that SIC was most likely transported to the rivers from the grassland as dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). The biogeochemical characteristics of the grassland were favorable for the formation of bicarbonate. Thus, more DIC derived from the dissolution of root and microbial respired CO2 into soil water could have been transported to the rivers through flood runoff. It is necessary to study further the transportation of DIC from the grassland because this process can produce a large potential carbon sink.

  8. Inorganic carbon fluxes across the vadose zone of planted and unplanted soil mesocosms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Thaysen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The efflux of carbon dioxide (CO2 from soils influences atmospheric CO2 concentrations and thereby climate change. The partitioning of inorganic carbon fluxes in the vadose zone between emission to the atmosphere and to the groundwater was investigated. Carbon dioxide partial pressure in the soil gas (pCO2, alkalinity, soil moisture and temperature were measured over depth and time in unplanted and planted (barley mesocosms. The dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC percolation flux was calculated from the pCO2, alkalinity and the water flux at the mesocosm bottom. Carbon dioxide exchange between the soil surface and the atmosphere was measured at regular intervals. The soil diffusivity was determined from soil radon-222 (222Rn emanation rates and soil air Rn concentration profiles, and was used in conjunction with measured pCO2 gradients to calculate the soil CO2 production. Carbon dioxide fluxes were modelled using the HP1 module of the Hydrus 1-D software. The average CO2 effluxes to the atmosphere from unplanted and planted mesocosm ecosystems during 78 days of experiment were 0.1 ± 0.07 and 4.9 ± 0.07 μmol carbon (C m−2 s−1, respectively, and largely exceeded the corresponding DIC percolation fluxes of 0.01 ± 0.004 and 0.06 ± 0.03 μmol C m−2 s−1. Post-harvest soil respiration (Rs was only 10% of the Rs during plant growth, while the post-harvest DIC percolation flux was more than one third of the flux during growth. The Rs was controlled by production and diffusivity of CO2 in the soil. The DIC percolation flux was largely controlled by the pCO2 and the drainage flux due to low solution pH. Plant biomass and soil pCO2 were high in the mesocosms as compared to a standard field situation. Our results indicate no change of the cropland C balance under elevated atmospheric CO2 in a warmer future climate, in which plant biomass and soil pCO2 are expected to increase.

  9. Carbon isotopic studies of individual lipids in organisms from the Nansha sea area, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN; Yi; SONG; Jinming; ZHANG; Hui

    2004-01-01

    Carbon isotopes of individual lipids in typical organisms from the Nansha sea area were measured by the GC-IRMS analytical technique. δ13C values of saturated fatty acids in different organisms examined are from -25.6‰ to -29.7‰ with the average values ranging from -26.4‰ to -28.2‰ and the variance range of 1.8‰ between different organisms is also observed.Unsaturated fatty acids have heavy carbon isotopic compositions and the mean differences of 2.9‰-6.8‰ compared to the same carbon number saturated fatty acids. δ13C values of n-alkanes range from -27.5‰ to -29.7‰ and their mean values, ranging from -28.6‰ to -28.9‰, are very close in different organisms. The mean difference in δ13C between the saturated fatty acids and n-alkanes is only 1.5‰, indicating that they have similar biosynthetic pathways. The carbon isotopic variations between the different carbon-number lipids are mostly within ±2.0‰, reflecting that they experienced a biosynthetic process of the carbon chain elongation. At the same time, the carbon isotopic genetic relationships between the biological and sedimentary lipids are established by comparative studies of carbon isotopic compositions of individual lipids in organisms and sediments from the Nansha sea area, which provides scientific basis for carbon isotopic applied research of individual lipids.

  10. Recognition of Early Eocene global carbon isotope excursions using lipids of marine Thaumarchaeota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoon, Petra L.; Heilmann-Clausen, Claus; Pagh Schultz, Bo; Sluijs, Appy; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Schouten, Stefan

    2013-07-01

    The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM; ˜56 Ma) and Eocene Thermal Maximum 2 (ETM2; ˜53 Ma) are geological short (CIE) and massive dissolution of deep sea carbonate. However, the magnitude of these CIEs vary with the type of fossil matter, i.e. multiple carbonate phases, bulk organic matter, and terrestrial and marine biomarker lipids, making it difficult to constrain the actual CIE in atmospheric and oceanic carbon pools. Here we analyzed the stable carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) of glycerol dibiphytanyl glycerol tetraether lipids (GDGTs) derived from marine Thaumarchaeota in sediments deposited during the PETM in the North Sea Basin and ETM2 in the Arctic Ocean. The δ13C values of these lipids are potentially directly recording variations in δ13C dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and can thus provide a record of marine δ13C DIC across both these Eocene carbon cycle perturbations. Reconstructed pre-CIE δ13CDIC values are slightly lower (0.5-1‰) than modern day values, possibly because Thaumarchaeotal lipids are not only derived from surface waters but also from 13C-depleted subsurface waters. Their values decrease by ˜3.6 (±0.3) ‰ and ˜2.5 (±0.7)‰ during the PETM and ETM2, respectively. The CIE in crenarchaeol for ETM2 is higher than that in marine calcite from other locations, possibly because of the admixture of deep water 13C-depleted CO2 generated by the euxinic conditions that developed occasionally during ETM2. However, the reconstructed PETM CIE lies close to the CIE inferred from marine calcite, suggesting that the δ13C record of crenarchaeol may document changes in marine DIC during the PETM in the North Sea Basin. The δ13C of thaumarchaeotal lipids may thus be a novel tool to reconstruct the δ13C of DIC in sediments that are devoid of carbonates, but relatively rich in organic matter, such as shallow marine coastal settings.

  11. Radionuclides, stable isotopes, inorganic constituents, and organic compounds in water from selected wells and springs from the southern boundary of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to the Hagerman Area, Idaho, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartholomay, R.C.; Edwards, D.D.; Campbell, L.J.

    1994-10-01

    The US Geological Survey and the Idaho Department of Water Resources, in response to a request from the US Department of Energy, sampled 19 sites as part of a long-term project to monitor water quality of the Snake River Plain aquifer from the southern boundary of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to the Hagerman area. Water samples were collected and analyzed for selected radionuclides, stable isotopes, inorganic constituents, and organic compounds. The samples were collected from seven irrigation wells, four domestic wells, two springs, one stock well, three dairy wells, one observation well, and one commercial well. Two quality assurance samples also were collected and analyzed. None of the radionuclide, inorganic constituent, or organic compound concentrations exceeded the established maximum contaminant levels for drinking water. Most of the radionuclide and inorganic constituent concentrations exceeded their respective reporting levels. All samples analyzed for surfactants and dissolved organic carbon had concentrations that equaled or exceeded their reporting levels. The ethylbenzene concentration in one water sample exceeded the reporting level.

  12. Carbon isotope discrimination as a tool to explore C4 photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Caemmerer, Susanne; Ghannoum, Oula; Pengelly, Jasper J L; Cousins, Asaph B

    2014-07-01

    Photosynthetic carbon isotope discrimination is a non-destructive tool for investigating C4 metabolism. Tuneable diode laser absorption spectroscopy provides new opportunities for making rapid, concurrent measurements of carbon isotope discrimination and CO2 assimilation over a range of environmental conditions, and this has facilitated the use of carbon isotope discrimination as a probe of C4 metabolism. In spite of the significant progress made in recent years, understanding how photosynthetic carbon isotope discrimination measured concurrently with gas exchange relates to carbon isotope composition of leaf and plant dry matter remains a challenge that requires resolution if this technique is to be successfully applied as a screening tool in crop breeding and phylogenetic research. In this review, we update our understanding of the factors and assumptions that underlie variations in photosynthetic carbon isotope discrimination in C4 leaves. Closing the main gaps in our understanding of carbon isotope discrimination during C4 photosynthesis may help advance research aimed at developing higher productivity and efficiency in key C4 food, feed, and biofuel crops.

  13. Soil organic carbon assessments in cropping systems using isotopic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín De Dios Herrero, Juan; Cruz Colazo, Juan; Guzman, María Laura; Saenz, Claudio; Sager, Ricardo; Sakadevan, Karuppan

    2016-04-01

    Introduction of improved farming practices are important to address the challenges of agricultural production, food security, climate change and resource use efficiency. The integration of livestock with crops provides many benefits including: (1) resource conservation, (2) ecosystem services, (3) soil quality improvements, and (4) risk reduction through diversification of enterprises. Integrated crop livestock systems (ICLS) with the combination of no-tillage and pastures are useful practices to enhance soil organic carbon (SOC) compared with continuous cropping systems (CCS). In this study, the SOC and its fractions in two cropping systems namely (1) ICLS, and (2) CCS were evaluated in Southern Santa Fe Province in Argentina, and the use of delta carbon-13 technique and soil physical fractionation were evaluated to identify sources of SOC in these systems. Two farms inside the same soil cartographic unit and landscape position in the region were compared. The ICLS farm produces lucerne (Medicago sativa Merrill) and oat (Avena sativa L.) grazed by cattle alternatively with grain summer crops sequence of soybean (Glicine max L.) and corn (Zea mays L.), and the farm under continuous cropping system (CCS) produces soybean and corn in a continuous sequence. The soil in the area is predominantly a Typic Hapludoll. Soil samples from 0-5 and 0-20 cm depths (n=4) after the harvest of grain crops were collected in each system and analyzed for total organic carbon (SOC, 0-2000 μm), particulate organic carbon (POC, 50-100 μm) and mineral organic carbon (MOC, <50 μm). Delta carbon-13 was determined by isotopic ratio mass spectrometry. In addition, a site with natural vegetation (reference site, REF) was also sampled for delta carbon-13 determination. ANOVA and Tukey statistical analysis were carried out for all data. The SOC was higher in ICLS than in CCS at both depths (20.8 vs 17.7 g kg-1 for 0-5 cm and 16.1 vs 12.7 g kg-1 at 0-20 cm, respectively, P<0.05). MOC was

  14. Dynamics of soil organic and inorganic carbon in the cropland of upper Yellow River Delta, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yang; Wang, Xiujun; Li, Xianglan; Wang, Jiaping; Xu, Minggang; Li, Dongwei

    2016-10-01

    Soil inorganic carbon (SIC) and organic carbon (SOC) are important carbon reservoirs in terrestrial ecosystems. However, little attention was paid to SIC dynamics in cropland. We conducted a survey in the upper Yellow River Delta of North China Plain. We collected 155 soil samples from 31 profiles, and measured SOC, SIC and soluble Ca2+ and Mg2+ contents. Our results showed that mean SOC content decreased from 9.30 g kg-1 near the surface to 2.36 g kg-1 in 80-100 cm whereas mean SIC content increased from 10.48 to 12.72 g kg-1. On average, SOC and SIC stocks over 0-100 cm were 5.73 kg C m-2 and 16.89 kg C m-2, respectively. There was a significantly positive correlation (r = 0.88, P carbon cycle of China’s semi-arid region.

  15. Inorganic carbon fluxes across the vadose zone of planted and unplanted soil mesocosms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaysen, E. M.; Jacques, D.; Jessen, S.; Andersen, C. E.; Laloy, E.; Ambus, P.; Postma, D.; Jakobsen, I.

    2014-12-01

    The efflux of carbon dioxide (CO2) from soils influences atmospheric CO2 concentrations and thereby climate change. The partitioning of inorganic carbon (C) fluxes in the vadose zone between emission to the atmosphere and to the groundwater was investigated to reveal controlling underlying mechanisms. Carbon dioxide partial pressure in the soil gas (pCO2), alkalinity, soil moisture and temperature were measured over depth and time in unplanted and planted (barley) mesocosms. The dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) percolation flux was calculated from the pCO2, alkalinity and the water flux at the mesocosm bottom. Carbon dioxide exchange between the soil surface and the atmosphere was measured at regular intervals. The soil diffusivity was determined from soil radon-222 (222Rn) emanation rates and soil air Rn concentration profiles and was used in conjunction with measured pCO2 gradients to calculate the soil CO2 production. Carbon dioxide fluxes were modeled using the HP1 module of the Hydrus 1-D software. The average CO2 effluxes to the atmosphere from unplanted and planted mesocosm ecosystems during 78 days of experiment were 0.1 ± 0.07 and 4.9 ± 0.07 μmol C m-2 s-1, respectively, and grossly exceeded the corresponding DIC percolation fluxes of 0.01 ± 0.004 and 0.06 ± 0.03 μmol C m-2 s-1. Plant biomass was high in the mesocosms as compared to a standard field situation. Post-harvest soil respiration (Rs) was only 10% of the Rs during plant growth, while the post-harvest DIC percolation flux was more than one-third of the flux during growth. The Rs was controlled by production and diffusivity of CO2 in the soil. The DIC percolation flux was largely controlled by the pCO2 and the drainage flux due to low solution pH. Modeling suggested that increasing soil alkalinity during plant growth was due to nutrient buffering during root nitrate uptake.

  16. Evidence from carbon isotope measurements for diverse origins of sedimentary hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, K. H.; Hayes, J. M.; Trendel, J. M.; Albrecht, P.

    1990-01-01

    The organic matter found in sedimentary rocks must derive from many sources; not only from ancient primary producers but also from consumers and secondary producers. In all of these organisms, isotope effects can affect the abundance and distribution of 13C in metabolites. Here, by using an improved form of a previously described technique in which the effluent of a gas chromatograph is continuously analysed isotopically, we report evidence of the diverse origins of sedimentary organic matter. The record of 13C abundances in sedimentary carbonate and total organic carbon can be interpreted in terms of variations in the global carbon cycle. Our results demonstrate, however, that isotope variations within sedimentary organic mixtures substantially exceed those observed between samples of total organic carbon. Resolution of isotope variations at the molecular level offers a new and convenient means of refining views both of localized palaeoenvironments and of control mechanisms within the global carbon cycle.

  17. Isotopic composition of Murchison organic compounds: Intramolecular carbon isotope fractionation of acetic acid. Simulation studies of cosmochemical organic syntheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, G. U.; Cronin, J. R.; Blair, N. E.; Desmarais, D. J.; Chang, S.

    1991-01-01

    Recently, in our laboratories, samples of Murchison acetic acid were decarboxylated successfully and the carbon isotopic composition was measured for the methane released by this procedure. These analyses showed significant differences in C-13/C-12 ratios for the methyl and carboxyl carbons of the acetic acid molecule, strongly suggesting that more than one carbon source may be involved in the synthesis of the Murchison organic compounds. On the basis of this finding, laboratory model systems simulating cosmochemical synthesis are being studied, especially those processes capable of involving two or more starting carbon sources.

  18. Carbon allocation and carbon isotope fluxes in the plant-soil-atmosphere continuum: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Brüggemann

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The terrestrial carbon (C cycle has received increasing interest over the past few decades, however, there is still a lack of understanding of the fate of newly assimilated C allocated within plants and to the soil, stored within ecosystems and lost to the atmosphere. Stable carbon isotope studies can give novel insights into these issues. In this review we provide an overview of an emerging picture of plant-soil-atmosphere C fluxes, as based on C isotope studies, and identify processes determining related C isotope signatures. The first part of the review focuses on isotopic fractionation processes within plants during and after photosynthesis. The second major part elaborates on plant-internal and plant-rhizosphere C allocation patterns at different time scales (diel, seasonal, interannual, including the speed of C transfer and time lags in the coupling of assimilation and respiration, as well as the magnitude and controls of plant-soil C allocation and respiratory fluxes. Plant responses to changing environmental conditions, the functional relationship between the physiological and phenological status of plants and C transfer, and interactions between C, water and nutrient dynamics are discussed. The role of the C counterflow from the rhizosphere to the aboveground parts of the plants, e.g. via CO2 dissolved in the xylem water or as xylem-transported sugars, is highlighted. The third part is centered around belowground C turnover, focusing especially on above- and belowground litter inputs, soil organic matter formation and turnover, production and loss of dissolved organic C, soil respiration and CO2 fixation by soil microbes. Furthermore, plant controls on microbial communities and activity via exudates and litter production as well as microbial community effects on C mineralization are reviewed. The last part of the paper is dedicated to physical interactions between soil CO2 and the soil matrix, such as CO

  19. Distribution and fractionation mechanism of stable carbon isotope of coalbed methane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN Shengfei; TANG Xiuyi; SONG Yan; WANG Hongyan

    2006-01-01

    The stable carbon isotope values of coalbed methane range widely,and also are generally lighter than that of gases in normal coal-formed gas fields with similar coal rank.There exists strong carbon isotope fractionation in coalbed methane and it makes the carbon isotope value lighter.The correlation between the carbon isotope value and Ro in coalbed methane is less obvious.The coaly source rock maturity cannot be judged by coalbed methane carbon isotope value.The carbon isotopes of coalbed methane become lighter in much different degree due to the hydrodynamics.The stronger the hydrodynamics is,the lighter the CBM carbon isotopic value becomes.Many previous investigations indicated that the desorption-diffusion effects make the carbon isotope value of coalbed methane lighter.However,the explanation has encountered many problems.The authors of this article suggest that the flowing groundwater dissolution to free methane in coal seams and the free methane exchange with absorbed one is the carbon isotope fractionation mechanism in coalbed methane.The flowing groundwater in coal can easily take more 13CH4 away from free gas and comparatively leave more 12CH4.This will make 12CH4 density in free gas comparatively higher than that in absorbed gas.The remaining 12CH4 in free gas then exchanges with the adsorbed methane in coal matrix.Some absorbed 13CH4 can be replaced and become free gas.Some free 12CH4 can be absorbed again into coal matrix and become absorbed gas.Part of the newly replaced 13CH4 in free gas will also be taken away by water,leaving preferentially more 12CH4.The remaining 12CH4 in free gas will exchange again with adsorbed methane in the coal matrix.These processes occur all the time.Through accumulative effect,the 12CH4 will be greatly concentrated in coal.Thus,the stable carbon isotope of coalbed methane becomes dramatically lighter.Through simulation experiment on water-dissolved methane,it had been proved that the flowing water could fractionate the

  20. Equations for lipid normalization of carbon stable isotope ratios in aquatic bird eggs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle H Elliott

    Full Text Available Stable isotope ratios are biogeochemical tracers that can be used to determine the source of nutrients and contaminants in avian eggs. However, the interpretation of stable carbon ratios in lipid-rich eggs is complicated because (13C is depleted in lipids. Variation in (13C abundance can therefore be obscured by variation in percent lipids. Past attempts to establish an algebraic equation to correct carbon isotope ratios for lipid content in eggs have been unsuccessful, possibly because they relied partly on data from coastal or migratory species that may obtain egg lipids from different habitats than egg protein. We measured carbon, nitrogen and sulphur stable isotope ratios in 175 eggs from eight species of aquatic birds. Carbon, nitrogen and sulphur isotopes were enriched in lipid-extracted egg samples compared with non extracted egg samples. A logarithmic equation using the C∶N ratio and carbon isotope ratio from the non extracted egg tissue calculated 90% of the lipid-extracted carbon isotope ratios within ±0.5‰. Calculating separate equations for eggs laid by species in different habitats (pelagic, offshore and terrestrial-influenced improved the fit. A logarithmic equation, rather than a linear equation as often used for muscle, was necessary to accurately correct for lipid content because the relatively high lipid content of eggs compared with muscle meant that a linear relationship did not accurately approximate the relationship between percent lipids and the C∶N ratio. Because lipid extraction alters sulphur and nitrogen isotope ratios (and cannot be corrected algebraically, we suggest that isotopic measurement on bulk tissue followed by algebraic lipid normalization of carbon stable isotope ratio is often a good solution for homogenated eggs, at least when it is not possible to complete separate chemical analyses for each isotope.

  1. Inorganic and black carbon aerosols in the Los Angeles Basin during CalNex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensberg, J. J.; Craven, J. S.; Metcalf, A. R.; Allan, J. D.; Angevine, W. M.; Bahreini, R.; Brioude, J.; Cai, C.; Coe, H.; Gouw, J. A.; Ellis, R. A.; Flynn, J. H.; Haman, C. L.; Hayes, P. L.; Jimenez, J. L.; Lefer, B. L.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Murphy, J. G.; Neuman, J. A.; Nowak, J. B.; Roberts, J. M.; Stutz, J.; Taylor, J. W.; Veres, P. R.; Walker, J. M.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2013-02-01

    We evaluate predictions from the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ version 4.7.1) model against a suite of airborne and ground-based meteorological measurements, gas- and aerosol-phase inorganic measurements, and black carbon (BC) measurements over Southern California during the CalNex field campaign in May/June 2010. Ground-based measurements are from the CalNex Pasadena ground site, and airborne measurements took place onboard the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Navy Twin Otter and the NOAA WP-3D aircraft. BC predictions are in general agreement with observations at the Pasadena ground site and onboard the WP-3D, but are consistently overpredicted when compared to Twin Otter measurements. Adjustments to predicted inorganic mass concentrations, based on predicted aerosol size distributions and the AMS transmission efficiency, are shown to be significant. Owing to recent shipping emission reductions, the dominant source of sulfate in the L.A. Basin may now be long-range transport. Sensitivity studies suggest that severely underestimated ammonia emissions, and not the exclusion of crustal species (Ca2 +, K+, and Mg2 +), are the single largest contributor to measurement/model disagreement in the eastern part of the L.A. Basin. Despite overstated NOx emissions, total nitrate concentrations are underpredicted, which suggests a missing source of HNO3 and/or overprediction of deposition rates. Adding gas-phase NH3 measurements and size-resolved measurements, up to 10 μm, of nitrate and various cations (e.g. Na+, Ca2 +, K+) to routine monitoring stations in the L.A. Basin would greatly facilitate interpreting day-to-day fluctuations in fine and coarse inorganic aerosol.

  2. Microbial methane from in situ biodegradation of coal and shale: A review and reevaluation of hydrogen and carbon isotope signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinson, David S.; Blair, Neal E.; Martini, Anna M.; Larter, Steve; Orem, William H.; McIntosh, Jennifer C.

    2017-01-01

    Stable carbon and hydrogen isotope signatures of methane, water, and inorganic carbon are widely utilized in natural gas systems for distinguishing microbial and thermogenic methane and for delineating methanogenic pathways (acetoclastic, hydrogenotrophic, and/or methylotrophic methanogenesis). Recent studies of coal and shale gas systems have characterized in situ microbial communities and provided stable isotope data (δD-CH4, δD-H2O, δ13C-CH4, and δ13C-CO2) from a wider range of environments than available previously. Here we review the principal biogenic methane-yielding pathways in coal beds and shales and the isotope effects imparted on methane, document the uncertainties and inconsistencies in established isotopic fingerprinting techniques, and identify the knowledge gaps in understanding the subsurface processes that govern H and C isotope signatures of biogenic methane. We also compare established isotopic interpretations with recent microbial community characterization techniques, which reveal additional inconsistencies in the interpretation of microbial metabolic pathways in coal beds and shales. Collectively, the re-assessed data show that widely-utilized isotopic fingerprinting techniques neglect important complications in coal beds and shales.Isotopic fingerprinting techniques that combine δ13C-CH4 with δD-CH4 and/or δ13C-CO2have significant limitations: (1) The consistent ~ 160‰ offset between δD-H2O and δD-CH4 could imply that hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis is the dominant metabolic pathway in microbial gas systems. However, hydrogen isotopes can equilibrate between methane precursors and coexisting water, yielding a similar apparent H isotope signal as hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis, regardless of the actual methane formation pathway. (2) Non-methanogenic processes such as sulfate reduction, Fe oxide reduction, inputs of thermogenic methane, anaerobic methane oxidation, and/or formation water interaction can cause the apparent carbon

  3. Environmental forcing of terrestrial carbon isotope excursion amplification across five Eocene hyperthermals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, G. J.; Abels, H.

    2015-12-01

    Abrupt changes in the isotope composition of exogenic carbon pools accompany many major episodes of global change in the geologic record. The global expression of this change in substrates that reflect multiple carbon pools provides important evidence that many events reflect persistent, global redistribution of carbon between reduced and oxidized stocks. As the diversity of records documenting any event grows, however, discrepancies in the expression of carbon isotope change among substrates are almost always revealed. These differences in magnitude, pace, and pattern of change can complicate interpretations of global carbon redistribution, but under ideal circumstances can also provide additional information on changes in specific environmental and biogeochemical systems that accompanied the global events. Here we evaluate possible environmental influences on new terrestrial records of the negative carbon isotope excursions (CIEs) associated with multiple hyperthermals of the Early Eocene, which show a common pattern of amplified carbon isotope change in terrestrial paleosol carbonate records relative to that recorded in marine substrates. Scaling relationships between climate and carbon-cycle proxies suggest that that the climatic (temperature) impact of each event scaled proportionally with the magnitude of its marine CIE, likely implying that all events involved release of reduced carbon with a similar isotopic composition. Amplification of the terrestrial CIEs, however, does not scale with event magnitude, being proportionally less for the first, largest event (the PETM). We conduct a sensitivity test of a coupled plant-soil carbon isotope model to identify conditions that could account for the observed CIE scaling. At least two possibilities consistent with independent lines of evidence emerge: first, varying effects of pCO2 change on photosynthetic carbon isotope discrimination under changing background pCO2, and second, contrasting changes in regional

  4. Mesozoic black shales, source mixing and carbon isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suan, Guillaume

    2016-04-01

    Over the last decades, considerable attention has been devoted to the paleoenvironmental and biogeochemical significance of Mesozoic black shales. Black shale-bearing successions indeed often display marked changes in the organic carbon isotope composition (δ13Corg), which have been commonly interpreted as evidence for dramatic perturbations of global carbon budgets and CO2 levels. Arguably the majority of these studies have discarded some more "local" explanations when interpreting δ13Corg profiles, most often because comparable profiles occur on geographically large and distant areas. Based on newly acquired data and selected examples from the literature, I will show that the changing contribution of organic components with distinct δ13C signatures exerts a major but overlooked influence of Mesozoic δ13Corg profiles. Such a bias occurs across a wide spectrum of sedimentological settings and ages, as shown by the good correlation between δ13Corg values and proxies of kerogen proportions (such as rock-eval, biomarker, palynofacies and palynological data) recorded in Mesozoic marginal to deep marine successions of Triassic, Jurassic and Cretaceous age. In most of these successions, labile, 12C-enriched amorphous organic matter of marine origin dominates strata deposited under anoxic conditions, while oxidation-resistant, 13C-rich terrestrial particles dominate strata deposited under well-oxygenated conditions. This influence is further illustrated by weathering profiles of Toarcian (Lower Jurassic) black shales from France, where weathered areas dominated by refractory organic matter show dramatic 13C-enrichment (and decreased total organic carbon and pyrite contents) compared to non-weathered portions of the same horizon. The implications of these results for chemostratigraphic correlations and pCO2 reconstructions of Mesozoic will be discussed, as well as strategies to overcome this major bias.

  5. Stable carbon isotopes in tree rings: the failure of uniformitarianism

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarroll, Danny

    2010-05-01

    When tree rings are used to reconstruct past climate we rely on the uniformitarian principle that ‘the present is the key to the past'. Relationships between measured parameters and climate that can be calibrated and verified over the instrumental period are assumed to be applicable at longer timescales. In the case of δ13C, however, the uniformitarian principle fails for two reasons. (1) The instrumental calibration period is also the period of anthropogenic increase in atmospheric CO2. δ13C is a function of the ratio of internal to ambient CO2, so maintaining constant δ13C over the industrial period requires an active plastic response, either restricting stomatal conductance or increasing assimilation rate. In some areas trees may have reached the limits of their plasticity so that over the last few decades δ13C values have been declining, independent of any changes in climate. If no correction is made, the recent response to climate will be a poor indicator of behaviour in the past. (2) Tree ring δ13C is often used to reconstruct past temperatures even though temperature rarely has a strong direct control over fractionation. The link is therefore via either sunshine or humidity, which over the calibration period may be very strongly correlated with temperature. Long isotope chronologies, when compared with independent evidence of past temperatures, however, can show periods of marked divergence. The strong covariance of temperature, sunshine and humidity over the last century may not have persisted over longer timescales with larger climatic perturbations. In the case of carbon isotopes the key to the past is not statistical inference based on recent behaviour, but a clear mechanistic understanding of the influence of climate and other factors on fractionation.

  6. Stable carbon isotope ratios of archaeal GDGTs in the marine water column and surface sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, A.; Hurley, S.; Close, H. G.; Jasper, C. E.

    2016-12-01

    Archaeal glycerol dibiphytanyl glycerol tetraether (GDGT) lipids are ubiquitous throughout the marine environment and are preserved in sediments and sedimentary rocks on million-year timescales. Variations in the number of ring-containing GDGT isomers in sediments correlate with differences in overlying sea surface temperatures, a relationship formalized in the TEX86 paleotemperature proxy. Ammonia-oxidizing Thaumarchaeota are believed to be the major sources of these GDGTs, implying that the greatest production and export of GDGTs from the water column should be associated with the maximum expression of ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) genes and maximum number of thaumarchaeal cells, both of which occur in the subsurface NO2- maximum near a depth of ca. 80-250 m. To examine the relationship between production and export of GDGTs from the water column, we measured the concentrations and δ13C values of GDGTs in suspended particulate matter (SPM) of the western South Atlantic Ocean and compared them to values from pure thaumarchaeal cultures and from available sediment core-tops from other locations. Thaumarchaeota are believed to fix the majority of their carbon directly from dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). However, both the SPM and core-top δ13C values in some cases are moderately more 13C-depleted than would be predicted based on the 13C content of local DIC and the previously-published biosynthetic isotope fractionation (ɛ). This indicates that the average metabolism of the planktonic archaeal community either is mixotrophic (≥ 25% organic carbon assimilation) or that the published ɛ value for the model organism Nitrosopumilus maritimus may not be representative of the total autotrophic community. In addition to this offset, δ13C values of GDGTs in SPM inversely mirror DIC profiles, with lowest values in the nitrite maximum and higher values in the deeper water column, similar to the overall trends for bulk SPM. Finally, while individual GDGTs in SPM samples

  7. An Empirical Riverine Carbon Budget for New Zealand: National scale estimate of organic and inorganic carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, D. T.; Baisden, W. T.; Davies-Colley, R.; Trustrum, N.

    2002-12-01

    New Zealand rivers contribute a large amount of sediment to the ocean, partially attributable to tectonic uplift combined with softer rocks under inappropriate land-use and high-frequency rain events. Preliminary calculations suggest that in NZ between 3-11 Mt carbon is transported annually through erosion, compared with about 8.5 Mt per yr released from fossil fuel burning. Therefore, if a large proportion of this erosional carbon is oxidized before sequestration in sedimentary basins, soil erosion may represent a major greenhouse contribution. Our current study aims to refine a national estimate of both particulate and dissolved organic carbon leaving New Zealand through rivers. We are also attempting to understand both the biochemical processing of organic matter in transit to the ocean, as well as the resulting evasional flux of CO2 to the atmosphere. Initial estimates of these fluxes based on measurements collected over a 12-month period from 50 rivers, as well as from a number of flood snapshots around the country, will be presented. Using surrogates such as spectrophotometric absorbance for DOC developed using this year's dataset, these measurements will be used to quantify the annual riverine flux of particulate and organic carbon from a 12-year record. Carbon fluxes from individual catchments will also be compared to landscape properties (soil parent material, slope, climate, and land-use patterns). The relationship between the solute flux from and landscape properties within a catchment is crucial to extending the estimates of carbon flux to ungauged catchments to estimate total carbon flux in river drainage from the NZ landmass.

  8. Carbon allocation and carbon isotope fluxes in the plant-soil-atmosphere continuum: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Brüggemann

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The terrestrial carbon (C cycle has received increasing interest over the past few decades, however, there is still a lack of understanding of the fate of newly assimilated C allocated within plants and to the soil, stored within ecosystems and lost to the atmosphere. Stable carbon isotope studies can give novel insights into these issues. In this review we provide an overview of an emerging picture of plant-soil-atmosphere C fluxes, as based on C isotope studies, and identify processes determining related C isotope signatures. The first part of the review focuses on isotopic fractionation processes within plants during and after photosynthesis. The second major part elaborates on plant-internal and plant-rhizosphere C allocation patterns at different time scales (diel, seasonal, interannual, including the speed of C transfer and time lags in the coupling of assimilation and respiration, as well as the magnitude and controls of plant-soil C allocation and respiratory fluxes. Plant responses to changing environmental conditions, the functional relationship between the physiological and phenological status of plants and C transfer, and interactions between C, water and nutrient dynamics are discussed. The role of the C counterflow from the rhizosphere to the aboveground parts of the plants, e.g. via CO2 dissolved in the xylem water or as xylem-transported sugars, is highlighted. The third part is centered around belowground C turnover, focusing especially on above- and belowground litter inputs, soil organic matter formation and turnover, production and loss of dissolved organic C, soil respiration and CO2 fixation by soil microbes. Furthermore, plant controls on microbial communities and activity via exudates and litter production as well as microbial community effects on C mineralization are reviewed. A further part of the paper is dedicated to physical interactions between soil CO2 and the soil matrix, such as

  9. Geochemistry and sedimentary environments Deep-water carbonate dissolution in the northern South China Sea during Marine Isotope Stage 3

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Na Wang; Bao-Qi Huang; He Li

    2016-01-01

    The production, transportation, deposition, and dissolution of carbonate profoundly form part of the global carbon cycle and affect the amount and distribution of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and alkalinity (ALK), which drive atmospheric CO2 changes during glacial/interglacial cycles. These processes may provide significant clues for better understanding of the mechanisms that control the global climate system. In this study, we calculate and analyze the foraminiferal dissolution index (FDX) and the fragmentation ratios of planktonic foraminifera for the 60-25 ka B.P. time-span, based on samples from Core 17924 and ODP Site 1144 in the northeastern South China Sea (SCS), so as to reconstruct the deep-water car-bonate dissolution during Marine Isotope Stage 3 (MIS 3). Our analysis shows that the dissolution of carbonate increases gradually in Core 17924, whereas it remains stable at ODP Site 1144. This difference is caused by the deep-sea carbonate ion concentration﹙[CO32-]﹚that affected the dissolution in Core 17924 where the depth of 3440 m is below the saturation horizon. However, the depth of ODP Site 1144 is 2037 m, which is above the lysocline where the water is always saturated with calcium carbonate; the dissolution is therefore less dependent of chemical changes of the seawater. The combined effect of the productivity and the deep-water chemical evolution may decrease deep-water [CO32-] and accelerate car-bonate dissolution. The fall of the sea-level increased the input of DIC and ALK to the deep ocean and deepened the carbonate saturation depth, which caused an increase of the deep-water [CO32-]. The elevated [CO32-] partially neutralized the reduced [CO32-] contributed by remineralization of organic matter and slowdown of thermohaline. These consequently are the fundamental reasons for the difference in dissolution rate between these two sites.

  10. A Test of Carbon and Oxygen Stable Isotope Ratio Process Models in Tree Rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roden, J. S.; Farquhar, G. D.

    2008-12-01

    Stable isotopes ratios of carbon and oxygen in tree ring cellulose have been used to infer environmental change. Process-based models have been developed to clarify the potential of historic tree ring records for meaningful paleoclimatic reconstructions. However, isotopic variation can be influenced by multiple environmental factors making simplistic interpretations problematic. Recently, the dual isotope approach, where the variation in one stable isotope ratio (e.g. oxygen) is used to constrain the interpretation of variation in another (e.g. carbon), has been shown to have the potential to de-convolute isotopic analysis. However, this approach requires further testing to determine its applicability for paleo-reconstructions using tree-ring time series. We present a study where the information needed to parameterize mechanistic models for both carbon and oxygen stable isotope ratios were collected in controlled environment chambers for two species (Pinus radiata and Eucalyptus globulus). The seedlings were exposed to treatments designed to modify leaf temperature, transpiration rates, stomatal conductance and photosynthetic capacity. Both species were grown for over 100 days under two humidity regimes that differed by 20%. Stomatal conductance was significantly different between species and for seedlings under drought conditions but not between other treatments or humidity regimes. The treatments produced large differences in transpiration rate and photosynthesis. Treatments that effected photosynthetic rates but not stomatal conductance influenced carbon isotope discrimination more than those that influenced primarily conductance. The various treatments produced a range in oxygen isotope ratios of 7 ‰. Process models predicted greater oxygen isotope enrichment in tree ring cellulose than observed. The oxygen isotope ratios of bulk leaf water were reasonably well predicted by current steady-state models. However, the fractional difference between models that

  11. Combination of carbon isotope ratio with hydrogen isotope ratio determinations in sports drug testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, Thomas; Emery, Caroline; Thomas, Andreas; Saugy, Martial; Thevis, Mario

    2013-06-01

    Carbon isotope ratio (CIR) analysis has been routinely and successfully applied to doping control analysis for many years to uncover the misuse of endogenous steroids such as testosterone. Over the years, several challenges and limitations of this approach became apparent, e.g., the influence of inadequate chromatographic separation on CIR values or the emergence of steroid preparations comprising identical CIRs as endogenous steroids. While the latter has been addressed recently by the implementation of hydrogen isotope ratios (HIR), an improved sample preparation for CIR avoiding co-eluting compounds is presented herein together with newly established reference values of those endogenous steroids being relevant for doping controls. From the fraction of glucuronidated steroids 5β-pregnane-3α,20α-diol, 5α-androst-16-en-3α-ol, 3α-Hydroxy-5β-androstane-11,17-dione, 3α-hydroxy-5α-androstan-17-one (ANDRO), 3α-hydroxy-5β-androstan-17-one (ETIO), 3β-hydroxy-androst-5-en-17-one (DHEA), 5α- and 5β-androstane-3α,17β-diol (5aDIOL and 5bDIOL), 17β-hydroxy-androst-4-en-3-one and 17α-hydroxy-androst-4-en-3-one were included. In addition, sulfate conjugates of ANDRO, ETIO, DHEA, 3β-hydroxy-5α-androstan-17-one plus 17α- and androst-5-ene-3β,17β-diol were considered and analyzed after acidic solvolysis. The results obtained for the reference population encompassing n = 67 males and females confirmed earlier findings regarding factors influencing endogenous CIR. Variations in sample preparation influenced CIR measurements especially for 5aDIOL and 5bDIOL, the most valuable steroidal analytes for the detection of testosterone misuse. Earlier investigations on the HIR of the same reference population enabled the evaluation of combined measurements of CIR and HIR and its usefulness regarding both steroid metabolism studies and doping control analysis. The combination of both stable isotopes would allow for lower reference limits providing the same statistical

  12. Sensitivity analysis and quantification of uncertainty for isotopic mixing relationships in carbon cycle research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zobitz, J. M.; Keener, J. P.; Bowling, D. R.

    2004-12-01

    Quantifying and understanding the uncertainty in isotopic mixing relationships is critical to isotopic applications in carbon cycle studies at all spatial and temporal scales. Studies associated with the North American Carbon Program will depend on stable isotope approaches and quantification of isotopic uncertainty. An important application of isotopic mixing relationships is determination of the isotopic content of large-scale respiration (δ 13CR) via an inverse relationship (a Keeling plot) between atmospheric CO2 concentrations ([CO2]) and carbon isotope ratios of CO2 (δ 13C). Alternatively, a linear relationship between [CO2] and the product of [CO2] and δ 13C (a Miller/Tans plot) can also be applied. We used an extensive dataset from the Niwot Ridge Ameriflux Site of [CO2] and δ 13C in forest air to examine contrasting approaches to determine δ 13CR and its uncertainty. These included Keeling plots, Miller/Tans plots, Model I, and Model II regressions Our analysis confirms previous observations that increasing the range of measurements ([CO2] range) reduces the uncertainty associated with δ 13CR. For carbon isotope studies, uncertainty in the isotopic measurements has a greater effect on the uncertainty of δ 13CR than the uncertainty in [CO2]. Reducing the uncertainty of isotopic measurements reduces the uncertainty of δ 13CR even when the [CO2] range of samples is small (13CR. We also find for carbon isotope studies no inherent advantage to using either a Keeling or a Miller/Tans approach to determine δ 13CR.

  13. [Correlation Among Soil Organic Carbon, Soil Inorganic Carbon and the Environmental Factors in a Typical Oasis in the Southern Edge of the Tarim Basin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Lu; Zhu, Mei-ling; Liu, Zeng-yuan; Zhang, Xue-ni; Xie, Li-na

    2016-04-15

    We analyzed the differentiation among the environmental factors and soil organic/inorganic carbon contents of irrigated desert soil, brown desert soil, saline soil and aeolian sandy soil by classical statistics methods, and studied the correlation between soil carbon contents and the environmental factor by redundancy analysis (RDA) in a typical oasis of Yutian in the southern edge of the Tarim Basin. The results showed that the average contents of soil organic carbon and soil inorganic carbon were 2.51 g · kg⁻¹ and 25.63 g · kg⁻¹ respectively. The soil organic carbon content of the irrigated desert soil was significantly higher than those of brown desert soil, saline soil and aeolian sandy soil, while the inorganic carbon content of aeolian sandy soil was significantly higher than those of other soil types. The soil moisture and nutrient content were the highest in the irrigated desert soil and the lowest in the aeolian sandy sail. All soil types had high degree of salinization except the irrigated desert soil. The RDA results showed that the impacts of environmental factors on soil carbon contents ranked in order of importance were total nitrogen > available phosphorus > soil moisture > ground water depth > available potassium > pH > total salt. The soil carbon contents correlated extremely significantly with total nitrogen, available phosphorus, soil moisture and ground water depth (P carbon contents and other environmental factors (P > 0.05).

  14. Inorganic-Organic Hybrid 18-Molybdodiphosphate Nanoparticles Bulk-modified Carbon Paste Electrode and Its Electrocatalysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG,Xiu-Li(王秀丽); KANG,Zhen-Hui(康振辉); WANG,En-Bo(王恩波); HU,Chang-Wen(胡长文)

    2002-01-01

    A kind of inorganic- organic hybrid 18-molybdodiphosphate nanoparticles ([(C4H9)4N]6P2Mo18O62 @4H2O) was firstly used as a bulk-modifier to fabricate a three-dimensional chemically modified carbon paste electrode (CPE) by direct mixing. The electrochemical behavior of the solid nanoparticles dispersed in the CPE in acidic aqueous solution was characterized by cyclic and square-wave voltammetry. The hybrid 18-molybdodiphosphate nanoparticles bulk-modified CPE (MNP-CPE) displayed a high electrocatalytic activity towards the reduction of nitrite,bromate and hydrogen peroxide. The remarkable advantages of the MNP-CPE over the traditional polyoxometalates-modified electrodes are their excellent reproducibility of surface-renewal and high stability owing to the insolubility of the hybrid 18-molybdodiphosphate nanoparticles.

  15. Inorganic arsenic speciation by differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry using thoria nanoparticles-carbon paste electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, F J; Vázquez, M D; Debán, L; Aller, A J

    2016-05-15

    Two novel thoria (ThO2) nanoparticles-carbon paste electrodes were used to evaluate an anodic stripping voltammetric method for the direct determination of arsenite and total inorganic arsenic (arsenite plus arsenate) in water samples. The effect of Ag((I)), Cu((II)), Hg((II)), Sb((III)) and Se((IV)) ions on the electrochemical response of arsenic was assayed. The developed electroanalytical method offers a rapid procedure with improved analytical characteristics including good repeatability (3.4%) at low As((III)) concentrations, high selectivity, lower detection limit (0.1 μg L(-1)) and high sensitivity (0.54 μA μg(-1) L). The analytical capability of the optimized method was demonstrated by the determination of arsenic in certified reference materials (trace elements in natural water, trace elements in water and coal fly ash).

  16. Organic and inorganic carbon in paddy soil as evaluated by mid-infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Du Changwen

    Full Text Available Paddy soils are classified as wetlands which play a vital role in climatic change and food production. Soil carbon (C, especially soil organic C (SOC, in paddy soils has been received considerable attention as of recent. However, considerably less attention has been given to soil inorganic carbon (SIC in paddy soils and the relationship between SOC and SIC at interface between soil and the atmosphere. The objective of this research was to investigate the utility of applying Fourier transform mid-infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy (FTIR-PAS to explore SOC and SIC present near the surface (0-10 µm of paddy soils. The FTIR-PAS spectra revealed an unique absorption region in the wavenumber range of 1,350-1,500 cm(-1 that was dominated by C-O (carbonate and C-H bending vibrations (organic materials, and these vibrations were used to represented SIC and SOC, respectively. A circular distribution between SIC and SOC on the surface of paddy soils was determined using principal component analysis (PCA, and the distribution showed no significant relationship with the age of paddy soil. However, SIC and SOC were negatively correlated, and higher SIC content was observed near the soil surface. This relationship suggests that SIC in soil surface plays important roles in the soil C dynamics.

  17. Photochemical production of dissolved inorganic carbon from suwannee river humic acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xuejun; LOU Tao; XIE Huixiang

    2009-01-01

    The photochemical mineralization of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) is a key process in carbon cycling. Using a Suntest CPS solar simulator, Suwannee River humic acid (SRHA) was photooxidated to examine the effects of O2 levels, the wavelength of incident light, and the concentration of Fe on the photoproduction of DIC. Increasing the O2 abundance enhanced photodegradation of SRHA. The rate of DIC photoproduction under air saturation in the first 24 h (4.40 μmol/(L h)) was increased by a factor of 1.56 under O2 saturation, but fell by only 36% under N2 saturation. To evaluate the relative importance of UV-B, UV-A, and visible radiation in the photodegradation, we examined the above process using Mylar-d films and UF-3 and UF-4 plexiglass filters. The results indicated that the UV-B, UV-A and visible wavelengths accounted for 31.8%, 32.6% and 25.6%, respectively, of DIC production with simulated sunlight irradiation. The above results also indicated that photoproduction of DIC could take place in natural water at depths greater than those that UV light can reach. When 20 μmol/L desferrioxamine mesylate (DFOM, a strong Fe complexing ligand) was added, the rate of DIC photoproduction fell to 55.6% that of the original SRHA samples with 5.46 μmol/L Fe.

  18. Organic and inorganic carbon in paddy soil as evaluated by mid-infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Changwen, Du; Jianmin, Zhou; Goyne, Keith W

    2012-01-01

    Paddy soils are classified as wetlands which play a vital role in climatic change and food production. Soil carbon (C), especially soil organic C (SOC), in paddy soils has been received considerable attention as of recent. However, considerably less attention has been given to soil inorganic carbon (SIC) in paddy soils and the relationship between SOC and SIC at interface between soil and the atmosphere. The objective of this research was to investigate the utility of applying Fourier transform mid-infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy (FTIR-PAS) to explore SOC and SIC present near the surface (0-10 µm) of paddy soils. The FTIR-PAS spectra revealed an unique absorption region in the wavenumber range of 1,350-1,500 cm(-1) that was dominated by C-O (carbonate) and C-H bending vibrations (organic materials), and these vibrations were used to represented SIC and SOC, respectively. A circular distribution between SIC and SOC on the surface of paddy soils was determined using principal component analysis (PCA), and the distribution showed no significant relationship with the age of paddy soil. However, SIC and SOC were negatively correlated, and higher SIC content was observed near the soil surface. This relationship suggests that SIC in soil surface plays important roles in the soil C dynamics.

  19. Mechanistic studies of sesquiterpene cyclases based on their carbon isotope ratios at natural abundance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Wenhua; Bartram, Stefan; Boland, Wilhelm

    2017-01-03

    During the process of terpene biosynthesis, C-C bond breaking and forming steps are subjected to kinetic carbon isotope effects, leading to distinct carbon isotopic signatures of the products. Accordingly, carbon isotopic signatures could be used to reveal the 'biosynthetic history' of the produced terpenoids. Five known sesquiterpene cyclases, regulating three different pathways, representing simple to complex biosynthetic sequences, were heterologously expressed and used for in vitro assays with farnesyl diphosphate as substrate. Compound specific isotope ratio mass spectrometry measurements of the enzyme substrate farnesyl diphosphate (FDP) and the products of all the five cyclases were performed. The calculated δ(13) C value for FDP, based on δ(13) C values and relative amounts of the products, was identical with its measured δ(13) C value, confirming the reliability of the approach and the precision of measurements. The different carbon isotope ratios of the products reflect the complexity of their structure and are correlated with the frequency of carbon-carbon bond forming and breaking steps on their individual biosynthetic pathways. Thus, the analysis of carbon isotopic signatures of terpenes at natural abundance can be used as a powerful tool in elucidation of associated biosynthetic mechanisms of terpene synthases and in future in vivo studies even without 'touching' the plant. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. A sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) mutant with altered carbon isotope ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizal, Govinda; Karki, Shanta; Thakur, Vivek; Wanchana, Samart; Alonso-Cantabrana, Hugo; Dionora, Jacque; Sheehy, John E; Furbank, Robert; von Caemmerer, Susanne; Quick, William Paul

    2017-01-01

    Recent efforts to engineer C4 photosynthetic traits into C3 plants such as rice demand an understanding of the genetic elements that enable C4 plants to outperform C3 plants. As a part of the C4 Rice Consortium's efforts to identify genes needed to support C4 photosynthesis, EMS mutagenized sorghum populations were generated and screened to identify genes that cause a loss of C4 function. Stable carbon isotope ratio (δ13C) of leaf dry matter has been used to distinguishspecies with C3 and C4 photosynthetic pathways. Here, we report the identification of a sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) mutant with a low δ13C characteristic. A mutant (named Mut33) with a pale phenotype and stunted growth was identified from an EMS treated sorghum M2 population. The stable carbon isotope analysis of the mutants showed a decrease of 13C uptake capacity. The noise of random mutation was reduced by crossing the mutant and its wildtype (WT). The back-cross (BC1F1) progenies were like the WT parent in terms of 13C values and plant phenotypes. All the BC1F2 plants with low δ13C died before they produced their 6th leaf. Gas exchange measurements of the low δ13C sorghum mutants showed a higher CO2 compensation point (25.24 μmol CO2.mol-1air) and the maximum rate of photosynthesis was less than 5μmol.m-2.s-1. To identify the genetic determinant of this trait, four DNA pools were isolated; two each from normal and low δ13C BC1F2 mutant plants. These were sequenced using an Illumina platform. Comparison of allele frequency of the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) between the pools with contrasting phenotype showed that a locus in Chromosome 10 between 57,941,104 and 59,985,708 bps had an allele frequency of 1. There were 211 mutations and 37 genes in the locus, out of which mutations in 9 genes showed non-synonymous changes. This finding is expected to contribute to future research on the identification of the causal factor differentiating C4 from C3 species that can be used in the

  1. Species-specific isotope tracers to study the accumulation and biotransformation of mixtures of inorganic and methyl mercury by the microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Andrea Garcia; Le Faucheur, Séverine; Monperrus, Mathilde; Amouroux, David; Slaveykova, Vera I

    2014-09-01

    The present study demonstrates that species-specific isotope tracing is an useful tool to precisely measure Hg accumulation and transformations capabilities of living organisms at concentrations naturally encountered in the environment. To that end, a phytoplanktonic green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Dangeard (Chlamydomonadales, Chlorophyceae) was exposed to mixtures of (199)-isotopically enriched inorganic mercury ((199)IHg) and of (201)-isotopically enriched monomethylmercury ((201)CH3Hg) at a concentration range between less than 1 pM to 4 nM. Additionally, one exposure concentration of both mercury species was also studied separately to evaluate possible interactive effects. No difference in the intracellular contents was observed for algae exposed to (199)IHg and (201)CH3Hg alone or in their mixture, suggesting similar accumulation capacity for both species at the studied concentrations. Demethylation of (201)CH3Hg was observed at the highest exposure concentrations, whereas no methylation was detected.

  2. Is my C isotope excursion global, local, or both? Insights from the Mg and Ca isotopic composition of primary, diagenetic, and authigenic carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, J. A.; Blättler, C. L.; Husson, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    The C isotopic composition of ancient limestones and dolomites is a widely used proxy for the global geochemical cycles of carbon and oxygen in the ocean-atmosphere system and a critical tool for chemostratigraphy in Precambrian rocks. Although relatively robust to diagenesis, the C isotopic composition of bulk carbonates can be reset when conditions favor high water-to-rock ratios or fluids with high C concentrations and distinct isotopic compositions. Authigenic carbonates and different pools of primary carbonate (e.g. calcite vs. aragonite) may also bias the C isotopic composition of bulk carbonates if they are both abundant and isotopically distinct. New approaches to quantifying contributions from diagenesis, authigenesis, and mixing of primary carbonates to the C isotopic composition of bulk sedimentary carbonates are needed. Here we present preliminary Mg and Ca isotope data sets of primary, diagenetic, and authigenic carbonates, both modern and ancient. We show that recrystallization, dolomitization, and authigenesis produce Mg and Ca isotope fingerprints that may be used to identify and characterize these processes in ancient carbonate sediments.

  3. Do stable carbon isotopes of brown coal woods record changes in Lower Miocene palaeoecology?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poole, I.J.; Dolezych, M.; Kool, J.; Burgh, J. van der; Bergen, P.F. van

    2006-01-01

    Stable carbon isotope ratios of fossil wood from the Miocene brown coal deposits in former East Germany are compared with palaeobotanical and sedimentological data to test the use of stable isotopes in determining palaeoenvironment. Significant differences in the chemical composition of samples from

  4. Non-destructive measurement of carbonic anhydrase activity and the oxygen isotope composition of soil water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sam; Sauze, Joana; Ogée, Jérôme; Wohl, Steven; Bosc, Alexandre; Wingate, Lisa

    2016-04-01

    Carbonic anhydrases are a group of metalloenzymes that catalyse the hydration of aqueous carbon dioxide (CO2). The expression of carbonic anhydrase by bacteria, archaea and eukarya has been linked to a variety of important biological processes including pH regulation, substrate supply and biomineralisation. As oxygen isotopes are exchanged between CO2 and water during hydration, the presence of carbonic anhydrase in plants and soil organisms also influences the oxygen isotope budget of atmospheric CO2. Leaf and soil water pools have distinct oxygen isotope compositions, owing to differences in pool sizes and evaporation rates, which are imparted on CO2during hydration. These differences in the isotopic signature of CO2 interacting with leaves and soil can be used to partition the contribution of photosynthesis and soil respiration to net terrestrial CO2 exchange. However, this relies on our knowledge of soil carbonic anhydrase activity and currently, the prevalence and function of these enzymes in soils is poorly understood. Isotopic approaches used to estimate soil carbonic anhydrase activity typically involve the inversion of models describing the oxygen isotope composition of CO2 fluxes to solve for the apparent, potentially catalysed, rate of oxygen exchange during hydration. This requires information about the composition of CO2 in isotopic equilibrium with soil water obtained from destructive, depth-resolved soil water sampling. This can represent a significant challenge in data collection given the considerable potential for spatial and temporal variability in the isotopic composition of soil water and limited a priori information with respect to the appropriate sampling resolution and depth. We investigated whether we could circumvent this requirement by constraining carbonic anhydrase activity and the composition of soil water in isotopic equilibrium with CO2 by solving simultaneously the mass balance for two soil CO2 steady states differing only in the

  5. Progress and challenges in using stable isotopes to trace plant carbon and water relations across scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Werner

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Stable isotope analysis is a powerful tool for assessing plant carbon and water relations and their impact on biogeochemical processes at different scales. Our process-based understanding of stable isotope signals, as well as technological developments, has progressed significantly, opening new frontiers in ecological and interdisciplinary research. This has promoted the broad utilisation of carbon, oxygen and hydrogen isotope applications to gain insight into plant carbon and water cycling and their interaction with the atmosphere and pedosphere. Here, we highlight specific areas of recent progress and new research challenges in plant carbon and water relations, using selected examples covering scales from the leaf to the regional scale. Further, we discuss strengths and limitations of recent technological developments and approaches and highlight new opportunities arising from unprecedented temporal and spatial resolution of stable isotope measurements.

  6. Seasonal Forcing of Summer Dissolved Inorganic Carbon and Chlorophyll a on the Western Shelf of the Antarctic Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-30

    region that plays an important role in the regional and global modulation of atmospheric CO2. Based on satellite‐derived sea ice data, wind and... warming (>0.5°C per decade) on Earth [Vaughan et al., 2003]. These air temperature trends have been accompanied by an abbreviated sea ice season...potential variations in seawater carbonate system are expected since phyto- plankton is a major biological factor modulating the amount of inorganic carbon

  7. The Carbon and Oxygen Stable Isotopic Composition of Cultured Benthic Foraminifera (Bulimina aculeata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCorkle, D. C.; Bernhard, J. M.; Hintz, C. J.; Blanks, J. K.; Ostermann, D. R.; Shaw, T. J.; Chandler, G. T.

    2002-12-01

    To study the controls on benthic foraminiferal shell chemistry, live benthic foraminifera were collected from a 750 m site on the North Carolina continental margin. Mono-specific (Bulimina aculeata) and multi-species (B. aculeata, Discorbinella berthelotti, Cibicidoides pachyderma, Lenticulina sp., Uvigerina peregrina, Hoeglundina elegans) cultures were maintained for 4.5 months in an environmental chamber. Experimental microcosms contained a 1 mm layer of trace-metal free silica substrate, and were continuously flushed with water from a 1600 L seawater reservoir with known, constant temperature, δ18O(w), carbonate system chemistry and trace element concentrations. Each microcosm was seeded with 80-100 living foraminifera; B. aculeata was the most successful species in these cultures, with each microcosm producing hundreds of juvenile B. aculeata. We determined the stable isotopic composition of the calcite from the cultured B. aculeata, and compared these δ13C and δ18O values with the water chemistry of the microcosms, and with the shell chemistry of "free-range" B. aculeata collected and preserved from two sites on the NC and SC margin. The foraminiferal δ18O values were close to the expected δ18O of equilibrium calcite for both cultured and field B. aculeata (δ18O offsets of -0.2 +/- 0.1 ‰ and 0.0 +/- 0.1 ‰ , respectively). The δ13C values of cultured B. aculeata were 0.7 +/- 0.2 ‰ lower than microcosm dissolved inorganic carbon, with some evidence of smaller 13C depletions in older juveniles (larger specimens). The foram-bottom water δ13C offsets were larger for the field specimens (-0.8 ‰ at a 200 m site, and -1.4 ‰ at the 750 m site). These results suggest that the δ13C values of B. aculeata include both "vital" effects (the offset observed in cultured specimens) and microhabitat effects (the additional offset observed in field specimens).

  8. Carbon stable isotope analysis of cereal remains as a way to reconstruct water availability: preliminary results

    OpenAIRE

    Flohr, Pascal; Muldner, Gundula; Jenkins, Emma

    2011-01-01

    Reconstructing past water availability, both as rainfall and irrigation, is important to answer questions about the way society reacts to climate and its changes and the role of irrigation in the development of social complexity. Carbon stable isotope analysis of archaeobotanical remains is a potentially valuable method for reconstructing water availability. To further define the relationship between water availability and plant carbon isotope composition and to set up baseline values for the...

  9. Model-based estimation of the global carbon budget and its uncertainty from carbon dioxide and carbon isotope records

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kheshgi, Haroon S. [Corporate Research Laboratories, Exxon Research and Engineering Company, Annandale, New Jersey (United States); Jain, Atul K. [Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Illinois, Urbana (United States); Wuebbles, Donald J. [Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Illinois, Urbana (United States)

    1999-12-27

    A global carbon cycle model is used to reconstruct the carbon budget, balancing emissions from fossil fuel and land use with carbon uptake by the oceans, and the terrestrial biosphere. We apply Bayesian statistics to estimate uncertainty of carbon uptake by the oceans and the terrestrial biosphere based on carbon dioxide and carbon isotope records, and prior information on model parameter probability distributions. This results in a quantitative reconstruction of past carbon budget and its uncertainty derived from an explicit choice of model, data-based constraints, and prior distribution of parameters. Our estimated ocean sink for the 1980s is 17{+-}7 Gt C (90% confidence interval) and is comparable to the estimate of 20{+-}8 Gt C given in the recent Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change assessment [Schimel et al., 1996]. Constraint choice is tested to determine which records have the most influence over estimates of the past carbon budget; records individually (e.g., bomb-radiocarbon inventory) have little effect since there are other records which form similar constraints. (c) 1999 American Geophysical Union.

  10. Carbon isotopic record from Upper Devonian carbonates at Dongcun in Guilin, southern China, supporting the world-wide pattern of carbon isotope excursions during Frasnian-Famennian transition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Two positive δ13C excursions are presented in records from the Frasnian-Famennian (F-F) marine carbonate sediments in Europe, America, Africa, and Australia, having been considered as a worldwide pattern, and attributed to enhanced organic carbon burial during the F-F biological mass extinction. However, this worldwide pattern has not been revealed from the well-deposited Late Devonian sequences in southern China. In this paper, a detailed investigation has been made on the Late Devonian section at Dongcun, Guilin, southern China to constrain perturbations in δ13C of carbonates in the F-F deposited sequence. The result from this section also indicates two positive δ13C excursions during the F-F transition. The first excursion with an amplitude of 1.5‰ occurred at the bottom of linguiformis Zone, later than the early excursion existing in the Late rhenana Zone of the Late Devonian profiles in other continents, especially, in central Europe. This difference has been expected to be a result as conodont Palmatolepis linguiformis occurred earlier in southern China than other sites. The second excursion with an amplitude of 2.1‰ is located at the F-F boundary, same as the records from other continents. This result strongly supports the view that two carbon isotope positive excursions during the F-F transition are common in carbonate sediments, resulting from worldwide increases of organic carbon burial intensity.

  11. Effects of carbonate leaching on foraminifer stable isotopes ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obrochta, S.; Yokoyama, Y.; Sakai, S.; Ishimura, T.

    2011-12-01

    Stable carbon and oxygen isotope ratios were measured on 125 individual epifaunal and infaunal benthic foraminifers from two discrete Holocene intervals in a shallow-water sediment core (~ 450 m) from the Timor Sea. Methane seeps are common in the area, resulting in significant precipitation of secondary calcite that is confirmed by SEM photomicrographs and has likely resulted in inconsistent downcore results. To assess the degree of removal of contaminants, individual Uvigerina peregrina were subjected to varying degrees of pretreatment prior to analysis. All foraminifers received standard cleaning with ethanol and brief sonication. A subset were further cleaned and sonicated in a dilute HCl solution (~ 0.003 M). Foraminifer tests were photographed using both reflected light and scanning electron microscopes during the course of treatment to monitor the changing degree of contaminant removal as increasingly aggressive cleaning methods were employed. Visible contamination remained on individuals not subjected to HCl treatment. The leached individuals exhibit a lower overall relative standard deviation and consistent results within morphotype groups. Based on these results, a 2% value is expected to be typical of the Holocene, though further downcore analyses are pending restoration of equipment adversely effected by the Eastern Japan 3/11 earthquake.

  12. Variation in the Carbon Isotope Compositions of Phytoliths Across a Climate Gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, E. A.; Longstaffe, F. J.

    2008-12-01

    The carbon isotope composition of plant organic matter within a single species may vary in response to changes in temperature, relative humidity, precipitation amount, altitude, nutrient availability, light levels and amount of canopy. All of these factors affect the rate of carbon assimilation during photosynthesis. Silica phytoliths, which form in the cells and intercellular spaces of terrestrial plants, occlude some of the plant's organic matrix. Carbon sequestered in phytoliths is protected from decay and may therefore be preserved in soils after most other plant material has decomposed. The carbon isotope composition of phytoliths may therefore have potential as an archive of climatic conditions during soil accumulation. In this study, the carbon isotope compositions of modern plant tissues and their phytoliths are compared for the C4 grass species Calamovilfa longifolia across the climate gradient of the North American prairies. The carbon isotope compositions of C. longifolia tissues ranged from -15 to -10 permil, with lower values being most typical of leaf tissues and with greater variability occurring in samples from lower latitudes. Carbonaceous compounds occluded in the phytoliths, by comparison, were depleted of carbon-13 by 5 to 15 permil relative to the tissues from the same plant. Understanding the causes of this offset, which is significantly larger and more variable than reported in previous studies, is necessary before the full potential of the carbon-isotope phytolith proxy can be realized.

  13. Intertidal salt marshes as an important source of inorganic carbon to the coastal ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaohui Aleck; Kroeger, Kevin D.; Ganju, Neil K.; Gonneea, Meagan; Chu, Sophie N.

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic tidal export of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) to the coastal ocean from highly productive intertidal marshes and its effects on seawater carbonate chemistry are thoroughly evaluated. The study uses a comprehensive approach by combining tidal water sampling of CO2parameters across seasons, continuous in situ measurements of biogeochemically-relevant parameters and water fluxes, with high-resolution modeling in an intertidal salt marsh of the U.S. northeast region. Salt marshes can acidify and alkalize tidal water by injecting CO2 (DIC) and total alkalinity (TA). DIC and TA generation may also be decoupled due to differential effects of marsh aerobic and anaerobic respiration on DIC and TA. As marsh DIC is added to tidal water, the buffering capacity first decreases to a minimum and then increases quickly. Large additions of marsh DIC can result in higher buffering capacity in ebbing tide than incoming tide. Alkalization of tidal water, which mostly occurs in the summer due to anaerobic respiration, can further modify buffering capacity. Marsh exports of DIC and alkalinity may have complex implications for the future, more acidified ocean. Marsh DIC export exhibits high variability over tidal and seasonal cycles, which is modulated by both marsh DIC generation and by water fluxes. The marsh DIC export of 414 g C m−2 yr−1, based on high-resolution measurements and modeling, is more than twice the previous estimates. It is a major term in the marsh carbon budget and translates to one of the largest carbon fluxes along the U.S. East Coast.

  14. The modeling of carbon isotope kinetics and its application to the evaluation of natural gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xianqing LI; Xianming XIAO; Yongchun TANG; Hui TIAN; Qiang ZHOU; Yunfeng YANG; Peng DONG; Yan WANG; Zhihong SONG

    2008-01-01

    The modeling of carbon isotope kinetics of natural gas is an issue driving pioneering research in the oil and gas geochemistry in China and internationally.Combined with the sedimentary burial history and basin geothermal history,the modeling of carbon isotope kinetics provides a new and effective means for the determination of the origin and accumulation history of natural gas pools.In this paper,we introduce the modeling of carbon isotope kinetics of natural gas formation and its applications to the assessment of natural gas maturity,the determination of the gas source,the history of gas accumulation,and the oil-gas ratio.It is shown that this approach is of great value for these applications.The carbon isotopic characteristics of natural gas are not only affected by the gas source and maturity of the source rock,but also are related to the accumulation condition and geothermal gradient in a basin.There are obvious differences in the characteristics of carbon isotope ratios between instantaneous gas and cumulative gas.Different basins have different kinetic models of carbon isotope fractionation,which depends on the gas source condition,the accumulation history and the sedimentary-tectonic history.Since the origin of natural gas in the superimposed basin in China is very complicated,and the natural gas pool is characterized by multiphase and variable gas-sources,this paper may provide a new perspective on the study and evaluation of natural gas.

  15. Dual-Carbon sources fuel the OCS deep-reef Community, a stable isotope investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulak, Kenneth J.; Berg, J.; Randall, Michael; Dennis, George D.; Brooks, R.A.

    2008-01-01

    The hypothesis that phytoplankton is the sole carbon source for the OCS deep-reef community (>60 m) was tested. Trophic structure for NE Gulf of Mexico deep reefs was analyzed via carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes. Carbon signatures for 114 entities (carbon sources, sediment, fishes, and invertebrates) supported surface phytoplankton as the primary fuel for the deep reef. However, a second carbon source, the macroalga Sargassum, with its epiphytic macroalgal associate, Cladophora liniformis, was also identified. Macroalgal carbon signatures were detected among 23 consumer entities. Most notably, macroalgae contributed 45 % of total carbon to the 13C isotopic spectrum of the particulate-feeding reef-crest gorgonian Nicella. The discontinuous spatial distribution of some sessile deep-reef invertebrates utilizing pelagic macroalgal carbon may be trophically tied to the contagious distribution of Sargassum biomass along major ocean surface features.

  16. PRODUCTION AND TRANSPORT OF CARBON DIOXIDE IN A CONTAMINATED VADOSE ZONE: A STABLE AND RADIOACTIVE CARBON ISOTOPE STUDY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Analyses of soil gas compositions and stable and radioactive carbon isotopes in the vadose zone above an alluvial aquifer were conducted at an organic solvent disposal site in southeast Phoenix, AZ. The study investigated the source and movement of carbon dioxide above a plume of...

  17. USE OF STABLE CARBON ISOTOPE RATIOS OF FATTY ACIDS TO EVALUATE MICROBIAL CARBON SOURCES IN TERRESTRIAL ENVIRONMENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    We use measurements of the concentration and stable carbon isotopic ratio (D 13C) of individual microbial phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) in soils as indicators of live microbial biomass levels and microbial carbon source. We found that intensive sugar cane cultivation leads to ...

  18. Carbon mass-balance modeling and carbon isotope exchange processes in the Curonian Lagoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barisevičiūtė, Rūta; Žilius, Mindaugas; Ertürk, Ali; Petkuvienė, Jolita

    2016-04-01

    The Curonian lagoon one of the largest coastal lagoons in Europe is located in the southeastern part of the Baltic Sea and lies along the Baltic coast of Lithuania and the Kaliningrad region of Russia. It is influenced by a discharge of the Nemunas and other smaller rivers and saline water of the Baltic Sea. The narrow (width 0.4 km, deep 8-14 m) Klaipėda Strait is the only way for fresh water run-off and brackish water intrusions. This research is focused on carbon isotope fractionations related with air - water exchange, primary production and organic carbon sedimentation, mineralization and uptake from both marine and terrestrial sources.

  19. Carbon isotopic characterization of formaldehyde emitted by vehicles in Guangzhou, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ping; Wen, Sheng; Liu, Yonglin; Bi, Xinhui; Chan, Lo Yin; Feng, Jialiang; Wang, Xinming; Sheng, Guoying; Fu, Jiamo

    2014-04-01

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) is the most abundant carbonyl compound in the atmosphere, and vehicle exhaust emission is one of its important anthropogenic sources. However, there is still uncertainty regarding HCHO flux from vehicle emission as well as from other sources. Herein, automobile source was characterized using HCHO carbon isotopic ratio to assess its contributions to atmospheric flux and demonstrate the complex production/consumption processes during combustion in engine cylinder and subsequent catalytic treatment of exhaust. Vehicle exhausts were sampled under different idling states and HCHO carbon isotopic ratios were measured by gas chromatograph-combustion-isotopic ratio mass spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS). The HCHO directly emitted from stand-alone engines (gasoline and diesel) running at different load was also sampled and measured. The HCHO carbon isotopic ratios were from -30.8 to -25.7‰ for gasoline engine, and from -26.2 to -20.7‰ for diesel engine, respectively. For diesel vehicle without catalytic converter, the HCHO carbon isotopic ratios were -22.1 ± 2.1‰, and for gasoline vehicle with catalytic converter, the ratios were -21.4 ± 0.7‰. Most of the HCHO carbon isotopic ratios were heavier than the fuel isotopic ratios (from -29 to -27‰). For gasoline vehicle, the isotopic fractionation (Δ13C) between HCHO and fuel isotopic ratios was 7.4 ± 0.7‰, which was higher than that of HCHO from stand-alone gasoline engine (Δ13Cmax = 2.7‰), suggesting additional consumption by the catalytic converter. For diesel vehicle without catalytic converter, Δ13C was 5.7 ± 2.0‰, similar to that of stand-alone diesel engine. In general, the carbon isotopic signatures of HCHO emitted from automobiles were not sensitive to idling states or to other vehicle parameters in our study condition. On comparing these HCHO carbon isotopic data with those of past studies, the atmospheric HCHO in a bus station in Guangzhou might mainly come from vehicle emission for

  20. Detection of oxygen isotopic anomaly in terrestrial atmospheric carbonates and its implications to Mars

    OpenAIRE

    Shaheen, R.; Abramian, A.; Horn, J.; Dominguez, G.; Sullivan, R; Thiemens, Mark H.

    2010-01-01

    The debate of life on Mars centers around the source of the globular, micrometer-sized mineral carbonates in the ALH84001 meteorite; consequently, the identification of Martian processes that form carbonates is critical. This paper reports a previously undescribed carbonate formation process that occurs on Earth and, likely, on Mars. We identified micrometer-sized carbonates in terrestrial aerosols that possess excess 17O (0.4–3.9‰). The unique O-isotopic composition mechanistically describes...

  1. Inorganic Carbon and pH in the Gulf of Mexico: Understanding the Deepwater Horizon Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, J.; Yvon-Lewis, S. A.; Bianchi, T. S.; Shields, M. R.; Du, M.

    2014-12-01

    The breakdown and respiration of oil compounds may contribute to the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) pool and thus ocean acidification. The Gulf of Mexico (GOM) has an abundance of natural seeps as well as numerous man-made structures that could provide a source of hydrocarbons to the water column. Samples of seawater were collected on the first GISR (Gulf Integrated Spill Research) cruise (G01) during the first week of July 2012. This cruise covered an area of ~1360 km2 roughly centered on the site of the Deepwater Horizon disaster. Alkalinity profiles for the southeastern most stations indicate lower (~100 μmol/kg) alkalinities at depth when compared to other stations sampled. This results in calculated pHs that are ~0.5 units lower at depth than they are at the other stations. Another group of stations show increased DIC concentrations on the order of 100-150 μmol/kg higher than average at depths at 800 m and 1200 m leading to calculated pHs about 0.2 to 0.4 below average for those depths in all of the stations sampled. These features may or may not be persistent in this region, and the elevated DIC concentrations may be related to organic matter (petroleum or other) oxidation. Samples were collected from this same region 2 years later (June 2014) and the persistence of these features will be discussed in the context of linkages with organic carbon respiration and low pHs.

  2. Inorganic carbon dynamics of melt pond-covered first year sea ice in the Canadian Arctic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geilfus, Nicolas-Xavier; Galley, R.J.; Crabeck, O.

    2014-01-01

    Melt pond formation is a common feature of the spring and summer Arctic sea ice. However, the role of the melt ponds formation and the impact of the sea ice melt on both the direction and size of CO2 flux between air and sea is still unknown. Here we describe the CO2-carbonate chemistry of melting...... sea ice, melt ponds and the underlying seawater associated with measurement of CO2 fluxes across first year landfast sea ice in the Resolute Passage, Nunavut, in June 2012. Early in the melt season, the increase of the ice temperature and the subsequent decrease of the bulk ice salinity promote...... a strong decrease of the total alkalinity (TA), total dissolved inorganic carbon (TCO2) and partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) within the bulk sea ice and the brine. Later on, melt pond formation affects both the bulk sea ice and the brine system. As melt ponds are formed from melted snow the in situ melt pond...

  3. Stable Isotope Measurements of Carbon Dioxide, Methane, and Hydrogen Sulfide Gas Using Frequency Modulation Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak-Lovato, K.

    2014-12-01

    Seepage from enhanced oil recovery, carbon storage, and natural gas sites can emit trace gases such as carbon dioxide, methane, and hydrogen sulfide. Trace gas emission at these locations demonstrate unique light stable isotope signatures that provide information to enable source identification of the material. Light stable isotope detection through surface monitoring, offers the ability to distinguish between trace gases emitted from sources such as, biological (fertilizers and wastes), mineral (coal or seams), or liquid organic systems (oil and gas reservoirs). To make light stable isotope measurements, we employ the ultra-sensitive technique, frequency modulation spectroscopy (FMS). FMS is an absorption technique with sensitivity enhancements approximately 100-1000x more than standard absorption spectroscopy with the advantage of providing stable isotope signature information. We have developed an integrated in situ (point source) system that measures carbon dioxide, methane and hydrogen sulfide with isotopic resolution and enhanced sensitivity. The in situ instrument involves the continuous collection of air and records the stable isotope ratio for the gas being detected. We have included in-line flask collection points to obtain gas samples for validation of isotopic concentrations using our in-house isotope ratio mass spectroscopy (IRMS). We present calibration curves for each species addressed above to demonstrate the sensitivity and accuracy of the system. We also show field deployment data demonstrating the capabilities of the system in making live dynamic measurements from an active source.

  4. Carbon and Oxygen Isotopic Ratios for Nearby Miras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkle, Kenneth H.; Lebzelter, Thomas; Straniero, Oscar

    2016-07-01

    Carbon and oxygen isotopic ratios are reported for a sample of 46 Mira and SRa-type variable asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. Vibration-rotation first and second-overtone CO lines in 1.5-2.5 μm spectra were measured to derive isotopic ratios for 12C/13C, 16O/17O, and 16O/18O. Comparisons with previous measurements for individual stars and with various samples of evolved stars, as available in the extant literature, are discussed. Models for solar composition AGB stars of different initial masses are used to interpret our results. We find that the majority of M-stars have main sequence masses ≤2 M ⊙ and have not experienced sizable third dredge-up (TDU) episodes. The progenitors of the four S-type stars in our sample are slightly more massive. Of the six C-stars in the sample three have clear evidence relating their origin to the occurrence of TDU. Comparisons with O-rich presolar grains from AGB stars that lived before the formation of the solar system reveal variations in the interstellar medium chemical composition. The present generation of low-mass AGB stars, as represented by our sample of long period variables (LPVs), shows a large spread of 16O/17O ratios, similar to that of group 1 presolar grains and in agreement with theoretical expectations for the composition of mass 1.2-2 M ⊙ stars after the first dredge-up. In contrast, the 16O/18O ratios of present-day LPVs are definitely smaller than those of group 1 grains. This is most probably a consequence of the the decrease with time of the 16O/18O ratio in the interstellar medium due to the chemical evolution of the Milky Way. One star in our sample has an O composition similar to that of group 2 presolar grains originating in an AGB star undergoing extra-mixing. This may indicate that the extra-mixing process is hampered at high metallicity, or, equivalently, favored at low metallicity. Similarly to O-rich grains, no star in our sample shows evidence of hot bottom burning, which is expected for

  5. Carbon-bearing iron phases and the carbon isotope composition of the deep Earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horita, Juske; Polyakov, Veniamin B

    2015-01-06

    The carbon budget and dynamics of the Earth's interior, including the core, are currently very poorly understood. Diamond-bearing, mantle-derived rocks show a very well defined peak at δ(13)C ≈ -5 ± 3‰ with a very broad distribution to lower values (∼-40‰). The processes that have produced the wide δ(13)C distributions to the observed low δ(13)C values in the deep Earth have been extensively debated, but few viable models have been proposed. Here, we present a model for understanding carbon isotope distributions within the deep Earth, involving Fe-C phases (Fe carbides and C dissolved in Fe-Ni metal). Our theoretical calculations show that Fe and Si carbides can be significantly depleted in (13)C relative to other C-bearing materials even at mantle temperatures. Thus, the redox freezing and melting cycles of lithosphere via subduction upwelling in the deep Earth that involve the Fe-C phases can readily produce diamond with the observed low δ(13)C values. The sharp contrast in the δ(13)C distributions of peridotitic and eclogitic diamonds may reflect differences in their carbon cycles, controlled by the evolution of geodynamical processes around 2.5-3 Ga. Our model also predicts that the core contains C with low δ(13)C values and that an average δ(13)C value of the bulk Earth could be much lower than ∼-5‰, consistent with those of chondrites and other planetary body. The heterogeneous and depleted δ(13)C values of the deep Earth have implications, not only for its accretion-differentiation history but also for carbon isotope biosignatures for early life on the Earth.

  6. Carbon Isotopes in Ocean and Land Carbon Cycle Models: Atmospheric Forcing Data and Applications for CMIP6 and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graven, H. D.; Allison, C. E.; Etheridge, D. M.; Hammer, S.; Keeling, R. F.; Krummel, P. B.; Langenfelds, R. L.; Levin, I.; Rubino, M.; Trudinger, C. M.; Vaughn, B. H.; White, J. W. C.

    2016-12-01

    The carbon isotopic composition of ocean and land carbon reservoirs is influenced by fossil fuel burning, carbon residence time, and fractionation associated with biological and physical processes. Additionally, 14C produced during nuclear weapons testing in the 1950s and 60s has enriched 14C/C ratios in decadally overturning reservoirs. Comparisons of simulated 14C and 13C dynamics between models and with observations can provide insights to key processes in the global carbon cycle including air-sea gas exchange, ocean mixing, terrestrial drought response, and vegetation and soil carbon turnover rates. However, the inclusion of carbon isotopes in large-scale model intercomparisons has so far been limited. One study, the Ocean Carbon Cycle Model Intercomparison Project 2 (OCMIP2), used simulations of ocean 14C to identify biases in model ocean circulation that affect simulated anthropogenic CO2 uptake and marine biogeochemistry. Within the context of CMIP6, we are working to advance the use of carbon isotopes for carbon cycle science, model evaluation and model intercomparison. The variables requested for DECK, OMIP and C4MIP simulations in CMIP6 include stocks and fluxes of 14C and 13C (for models that simulate 14C and 13C). We will present the historical and future atmospheric forcing datasets for Δ14C and δ13C in CO2 that we are making available to modeling groups as part of CMIP6. The historical data uses atmospheric measurements and ice core and tree ring records. For future atmospheric forcing, we use a simple carbon cycle model with CO2 emissions and atmospheric CO2 concentration for different scenarios from ScenarioMIP. We will also describe potential applications for carbon isotope simulations from CMIP6 or other modeling activities. In particular, we will present an evaluation of terrestrial carbon turnover with simulations of bomb-derived 14C inventories in simplified off-line models based on carbon stocks and fluxes in CMIP5 terrestrial models.

  7. High-temperature electrochemical synthesis of carbon-containing inorganic compounds under excessive carbon dioxide pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novoselova I.A.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Features of the electroreduction of carbon dioxide dissolved in the equimolar melt of sodium and potassium chlorides under excessive pressure of up to 1.7 MPa have been studied by cyclic voltametry over a wide polarization rate range. It has been found that the electrode process occurs in two stages at sweep rates of ≤0.1 V s-1, and its mechanism has been suggested. The cathodic product is polycrystalline graphite. Systems and conditions for producing two- and three-component refractory metal carbides using CO2 as a synthesis component have been selected.

  8. Detailed Carbon Isotopic Characterization of Aerosol-Derived Organic Carbon Deposited to two Temperate Watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozniak, A. S.; Bauer, J. E.; Keesee, E. E.; McNichol, A. P.; Xu, L.; Dickhut, R. M.

    2008-12-01

    Atmospheric deposition of carbonaceous aerosols can be a quantitatively significant flux in the carbon budgets of temperate watersheds. Characterizing the sources and fates of this material is therefore critical for assessing its role in carbon and organic matter cycling in these systems. Aerosol samples were collected in the Hudson and York River watersheds throughout 2006-2007 and analyzed for quantities and isotopic signatures (δ13C, Δ14C) of total and water-soluble organic carbon (TOC, WSOC, respectively). On average ~2.4 and 2.1 mg m-2 d-1 of aerosol TOC were deposited to the Hudson and York River watersheds, respectively, and nearly half of this material was water-soluble. δ13C analyses indicated that both the TOC and the WSOC were primarily terrestrial in nature. TOC Δ14C signatures covered a broad range for both watersheds, with calculated contributions from fossil sources (e.g., anthropogenic combustion of petroleum, coal, etc.) ranging from 0% for samples collected during the summer of 2007 to approximately 50% for samples collected in the winter of 2007. Aerosol-derived WSOC Δ14C values were less variable and were nearly always enriched in 14C with respect to the corresponding TOC, indicating that contemporary aerosol material tends to partition into the aqueous phase, while fossil-derived aerosol OC is more likely to remain insoluble. However, WSOC still often showed considerable contributions from fossil OC (up to 20%). Thus, some portion of the anthropogenic fossil-derived aerosol OC is relatively soluble and may be transported hydrologically through watersheds and aquatic systems. A subset of aerosol samples from each watershed was selected for more thorough isotopic analysis of operationally-defined components of the carbonaceous material. Isotopic signatures were obtained for TOC, WSOC, total solvent-extract, and the aliphatic, aromatic, and polar components. Isotopic information on these fractions allows us to determine which components

  9. A Novel Airborne Carbon Isotope Analyzer for Methane and Carbon Dioxide Source Fingerprinting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, E. S.; Huang, Y. W.; Owano, T. G.; Leifer, I.

    2014-12-01

    Recent field studies on major sources of the important greenhouse gas methane (CH4) indicate significant underestimation of methane release from fossil fuel industrial (FFI) and animal husbandry sources, among others. In addition, uncertainties still exist with respect to carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements, especially source fingerprinting. CO2 isotopic analysis provides a valuable in situ measurement approach to fingerprint CH4 and CO2as associated with combustion sources, leakage from geologic reservoirs, or biogenic sources. As a result, these measurements can characterize strong combustion source plumes, such as power plant emissions, and discriminate these emissions from other sources. As part of the COMEX (CO2 and MEthane eXperiment) campaign, a novel CO2 isotopic analyzer was installed and collected data aboard the CIRPAS Twin Otter aircraft. Developing methods to derive CH4 and CO2 budgets from remote sensing data is the goal of the summer 2014 COMEX campaign, which combines hyperspectral imaging (HSI) and non-imaging spectroscopy (NIS) with in situ airborne and surface data. COMEX leverages the synergy between high spatial resolution HSI and moderate spatial resolution NIS. The carbon dioxide isotope analyzer developed by Los Gatos Research (LGR) uses LGR's patented Off-Axis ICOS (Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy) technology and incorporates proprietary internal thermal control for high sensitivity and optimal instrument stability. This analyzer measures CO2 concentration as well as δ13C, δ18O, and δ17O from CO2 at natural abundance (100-3000 ppm). The laboratory accuracy is ±1.2 ppm (1σ) in CO2 from 370-1000 ppm, with a long-term (1000 s) precision of ±0.012 ppm. The long-term precision for both δ13C and δ18O is 0.04 ‰, and for δ17O is 0.06 ‰. The analyzer was field-tested as part of the COWGAS campaign, a pre-cursor campaign to COMEX in March 2014, where it successfully discriminated plumes related to combustion processes associated with

  10. Early Triassic fluctuations of the global carbon cycle: New evidence from paired carbon isotopes in the western USA basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caravaca, Gwénaël; Thomazo, Christophe; Vennin, Emmanuelle; Olivier, Nicolas; Cocquerez, Théophile; Escarguel, Gilles; Fara, Emmanuel; Jenks, James F.; Bylund, Kevin G.; Stephen, Daniel A.; Brayard, Arnaud

    2017-07-01

    In the aftermath of the catastrophic end-Permian mass extinction, the Early Triassic records recurrent perturbations in the carbon isotope signal, most notably during the Smithian and through the Smithian/Spathian Boundary (SSB; 1.5 myr after the Permian/Triassic boundary), which show some of the largest excursions of the Phanerozoic. The late Smithian also corresponds to major biotic turnovers and environmental changes, such as temperature fluctuations, that deeply impacted the recovery after the end-Permian mass extinction. Here we document the paired carbon isotope signal along with an analysis of the trace and major elements at the long-known Hot Springs section (southeastern Idaho, USA). This section records Early Triassic sediments from the Griesbachian-Dienerian up to the lower Spathian. We show that the organic and carbonate δ13C variations mirror the signals identified at a global scale. Particularly, the middle Smithian-SSB event represented by a negative-positive isotopic couplet is well identified and is not of diagenetic origin. We also document a positive excursion potentially corresponding to the Dienerian/Smithian Boundary. Observed Smithian-Spathian excursions are recorded similarly in both the organic and carbonate reservoirs, but the organic matter signal systematically shows unexpectedly dampened variations compared to its carbonate counterpart. Additionally, we show that variations in the net isotopic effect (i.e., Δ13C) probably resulted from a complex set of forcing parameters including either a mixing between terrestrial and marine organic matter depending on the evolution of the depositional setting, or variations in the biological fractionation. We establish that the Δ13C signal cannot be directly related to CO2-driven temperature variations at Hot Springs. Even though the carbon isotope signal mirrors the Early Triassic variations known at the global scale, the Hot Springs signal probably also reflects local influences on the carbon

  11. Effect of different vegetation cover on the vertical distribution of soil organic and inorganic carbon in the Zhifanggou Watershed on the loess plateau

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Wei; Zhang, Rui; Huang, Chuanqin; Wang, Baiqun; Cao, Hua; Koopal, Luuk K.; Tan, Wenfeng

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the carbon cycle of the terrestrial ecosystem and estimating the potential of carbon sequestration in soils requires adequate information on the relationship between soil organic carbon (SOC) and inorganic carbon (SIC). The vertical distribution and transformation of SOC and SIC und

  12. Inorganic/organic doped carbon aerogels as biosensing materials for the detection of hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Sheying; Li, Nan; Suo, Gaochao; Huang, Tinglin

    2013-12-17

    In this article, three different inorganic/organic doped carbon aerogel (CA) materials (Ni-CA, Pd-CA, and Ppy-CA) were, respectively, mixed with ionic liquid (IL) to form three stable composite films, which were used as enhanced elements for an integrated sensing platform to increase the surface area and to improve the electronic transmission rate. Subsequently, the effect of the materials performances such as adsorption, specific surface area and conductivity on electrochemistry for myoglobin (Mb) was discussed using N2 adsorption-desorption isotherm measurements, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Moreover, they could act as sensors toward the detection of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) with lower detection limits (1.68 μM, 1.02 μM, and 0.85 μM, for Ni-CA/IL/Mb-CPE, Pd-CA/IL/Mb-CPE, and Ppy-CA/IL/Mb-CPE, respectively) and smaller apparent Michaelis-Menten constants KM. The results indicated that the electroconductibility of the doped CA materials would become dominant, thus playing an important role in facilitating the electron transfer. Meanwhile, the synergetic effect with [BMIm]BF4 IL improved the capability of the composite inorganic/organic doped CA/IL matrix for protein immobilization. This work demonstrates the feasibility and the potential of a series of CA-based hybrid materials as biosensors, and further research and development are required to prepare other functional CAs and make them valuable for more extensive application in biosensing.

  13. The effects of combined application of inorganic Martian dust simulant and carbon dots on glutamate transport rat brain nerve terminals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisova, Tatiana; Krisanova, Natalia; Nazarova, Anastasiya; Borysov, Arseniy; Pastukhov, Artem; Pozdnyakova, Natalia; Dudarenko, Marina

    2016-07-01

    During inhalation, nano-/microsized particles are efficiently deposited in nasal, tracheobronchial, and alveolar regions and can be transported to the central nervous system (Oberdorster et al., 2004). Recently, the research team of this study found the minor fractions of nanoparticles with the size ~ 50 -60 nm in Lunar and Martian dust stimulants (JSC-1a and JSC, ORBITEC Orbital Technologies Corporation, Madison, Wisconsin), whereas the average size of the simulants was 1 mm and 4mm, respectively (Krisanova et al., 2013). Also, the research team of this study discovered new phenomenon - the neuromodulating and neurotoxic effect of carbon nano-sized particles - Carbon dots (C-dots), originated from ash of burned carbon-containing product (Borisova et al, 2015). The aims of this study was to analyse acute effects of upgraded stimulant of inorganic Martian dust derived from volcanic ash (JSC-1a/JSC, ORBITEC Orbital Technologies Corporation, Madison, Wisconsin) by the addition of carbon components, that is, carbon dots, on the key characteristic of synaptic neurotransmission. Acute administration of carbon-containing Martian dust analogue resulted in a significant decrease in transporter-mediated uptake of L-[14C]glutamate (the major excitatory neurotransmitter) by isolated rat brain nerve terminals. The ambient level of the neurotransmitter in the preparation of nerve terminals increased in the presence of carbon dot-contained Martian dust analogue. These effects were associated with action of carbon component of the upgraded Martian dust stimulant but not with its inorganic constituent.

  14. Growth versus metabolic tissue replacement in mouse tissues determined by stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macavoy, S. E.; Jamil, T.; Macko, S. A.; Arneson, L. S.

    2003-12-01

    Stable isotope analysis is becoming an extensively used tool in animal ecology. The isotopes most commonly used for analysis in terrestrial systems are those of carbon and nitrogen, due to differential carbon fractionation in C3 and C4 plants, and the approximately 3‰ enrichment in 15N per trophic level. Although isotope signatures in animal tissues presumably reflect the local food web, analysis is often complicated by differential nutrient routing and fractionation by tissues, and by the possibility that large organisms are not in isotopic equilibrium with the foods available in their immediate environment. Additionally, the rate at which organisms incorporate the isotope signature of a food through both growth and metabolic tissue replacement is largely unknown. In this study we have assessed the rate of carbon and nitrogen isotopic turnover in liver, muscle and blood in mice following a diet change. By determining growth rates, we were able to determine the proportion of tissue turnover caused by growth versus that caused by metabolic tissue replacement. Growth was found to account for approximately 10% of observed tissue turnover in sexually mature mice (Mus musculus). Blood carbon was found to have the shortest half-life (16.9 days), followed by muscle (24.7 days). Liver carbon turnover was not as well described by the exponential decay equations as other tissues. However, substantial liver carbon turnover was observed by the 28th day after diet switch. Surprisingly, these tissues primarily reflect the carbon signature of the protein, rather than carbohydrate, source in their diet. The nitrogen signature in all tissues was enriched by 3 - 5‰ over their dietary protein source, depending on tissue type, and the isotopic turnover rates were comparable to those observed in carbon.

  15. Variability in carbon and nitrogen isotope fractionation associated with bacterial hydrolysis of atrazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, A.; Penning, H.; Elsner, M.

    2009-04-01

    Even after legislative prohibition in 1991 by the European Union, the pesticide atrazine and its metabolites are still detected in surface and ground water frequently exceeding the permitted drinking water concentration limit of 0,1 g/L. Despite much recent research on atrazine, its risk assessment in the environment is still a major challenge because of the difficulty of establishing mass balances in the subsurface. To obtain a better insight into the fate of atrazine, we developed compound-specific stable isotope analysis (CSIA) for atrazine. CSIA has proven valuable for assessing organic contaminants in subsurface environments, on the one hand for source identification and on the other hand to trace (bio)chemical degradation reactions through isotope fractionation in the compounds. Such assessment is based on the Rayleigh equation and therein on the isotope enrichment factor ɛ, which must be determined experimentally beforehand. In ongoing work, we therefore measured carbon and nitrogen isotope fractionation associated with biotic hydrolsis of atrazine. C and N isotope enrichment factors were determined in resting cell experiments for Pseudomonas sp. ADP, Chelatobacter heintzii and Arthrobacter aurescens TC1, strains that hydrolyse atrazine in the initial transformation reaction. Carbon and nitrogen isotope enrichment factors were distinctly different between the bacterial strains. However, when plotting shifts in carbon isotope ratios versus shifts in nitrogen isotope ratios the slopes of the different degradation experiments coincided well. These results give evidence that all bacterial strains were carrying out the same initial biochemical degradation reaction, but that the associated isotope fractionation, as represented by the enrichment factors, was masked to a different extent owing to different rate determining steps prior to the isotopically sensitive bond cleavage (commitment to catalysis). Our study therefore illustrates the benefit of multi

  16. Carbon and hydrogen isotopic effects of stomatal density in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyejung; Feakins, Sarah J.; Sternberg, Leonel da S. L.

    2016-04-01

    Stomata are key gateways mediating carbon uptake and water loss from plants. Varied stomatal densities in fossil leaves raise the possibility that isotope effects associated with the openness of exchange may have mediated plant wax biomarker isotopic proxies for paleovegetation and paleoclimate in the geological record. Here we use Arabidopsis thaliana, a widely used model organism, to provide the first controlled tests of stomatal density on carbon and hydrogen isotopic compositions of cuticular waxes. Laboratory grown wildtype and mutants with suppressed and overexpressed stomatal densities allow us to directly test the isotope effects of stomatal densities independent of most other environmental or biological variables. Hydrogen isotope (D/H) measurements of both plant waters and plant wax n-alkanes allow us to directly constrain the isotopic effects of leaf water isotopic enrichment via transpiration and biosynthetic fractionations, which together determine the net fractionation between irrigation water and n-alkane hydrogen isotopic composition. We also measure carbon isotopic fractionations of n-alkanes and bulk leaf tissue associated with different stomatal densities. We find offsets of +15‰ for δD and -3‰ for δ13C for the overexpressed mutant compared to the suppressed mutant. Since the range of stomatal densities expressed is comparable to that found in extant plants and the Cenozoic fossil record, the results allow us to consider the magnitude of isotope effects that may be incurred by these plant adaptive responses. This study highlights the potential of genetic mutants to isolate individual isotope effects and add to our fundamental understanding of how genetics and physiology influence plant biochemicals including plant wax biomarkers.

  17. Zinc isotope evidence for a large-scale carbonated mantle beneath eastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sheng-Ao; Wang, Ze-Zhou; Li, Shu-Guang; Huang, Jian; Yang, Wei

    2016-06-01

    A large set of zinc (Zn) stable isotope data for continental basalts from eastern China were reported to investigate the application of Zn isotopes as a new tracer of deep carbonate cycling. All of the basalts with ages of 120 Ma basalts from eastern China (0.27 ± 0.06‰; 2sd). Given that Zn isotope fractionation during magmatic differentiation is limited (≤0.1‰), the elevated δ66Zn values reflect the involvement of isotopically heavy crustal materials (e.g., carbonates with an average δ66Zn of ∼0.91‰) in the mantle sources. SiO2 contents of the recycled Mg (Zn)-rich carbonates in the mantle beneath eastern China since the Late Mesozoic. Since Zn is a trace element in the mantle and Zn isotopic compositions of marine carbonates and the mantle differ markedly, we highlight Zn isotopes as a new and useful tool of tracing deep carbonate cycling in the Earth's mantle.

  18. The Origin of Carbon-bearing Volatiles in Surprise Valley Hot Springs in the Great Basin: Carbon Isotope and Water Chemistry Characterizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Q.; Socki, R.; Niles, P. B.; Romanek, C. S.; Datta, S.; Darnell, M.; Bissada, A. K.

    2013-12-01

    higher than the values measured at orifices (77.3 to 90.0 °C). CO2 and homologs of straight chain alkanes (C1-C5) were identified in gas samples. Carbon isotope values of alkanes increase with carbon numbers. The 13C fractionation between CO2 and dissolved inorganic carbon suggests they are out of carbon isotope equilibrium. The hypothesis regarding the formation of carbon-bearing compounds in SVHS may involve two processes: 1) Under high heat flow conditions caused by regional faulting and crustal extension, original high molecular weight organic compounds (kerogens) in clay-rich rocks decomposed to generate methane and other alkanes. 2) The SVHS area is associated with outflow structures, and distant from the heat source. Anaerobic oxidation of methane with sulfate at shallow depth (< 90 °C) is suggested as being responsible for the generation of CO2 in SVHS.

  19. The Origin of Carbon-bearing Volatiles in Surprise Valley Hot Springs in the Great Basin: Carbon Isotope and Water Chemistry Characterizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qi; Socki, Richard A.; Niles, Paul B.; Romanek, Christopher; Datta, Saugata; Darnell, Mike; Bissada, Adry K.

    2013-01-01

    estimated by both dissolved SiO2 and Na-K-Ca geothermometers are in the range of 125.0 to 135.4 C, and higher than the values measured at orifices (77.3 to 90.0 C). CO2 and homologs of straight chain alkanes (C1-C5) were identified in gas samples. Carbon isotope values of alkanes increase with carbon numbers. The C-13 fractionation between CO2 and dissolved inorganic carbon suggests they are out of carbon isotope equilibrium. The hypothesis regarding the formation of carbon-bearing compounds in SVHS may involve two processes: 1) Under high heat flow conditions which are caused by regional faulting and crustal extension, original high molecular weight organic compounds (kerogens) in clay-rich rocks decomposed to generate methane and other alkane homologs. 2) The SVHS area is associated with outflow structures, and distant from the heat source. Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) with sulfate at shallow depth (< 90 C) is suggested as being responsible for the generation of CO2 in SVHS.

  20. The Origin of Carbon-bearing Volatiles in Surprise Valley Hot Springs in the Great Basin: Carbon Isotope aud Water Chemistry Characterizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qi; Socki, Richard A.; Niles, Paul B.; Romanek, Christopher; Datta, Saugata; Darnell, Mike; Bissada, Adry K.

    2013-01-01

    by both dissolved SiO2 and Na-K-Ca geothermometers are in the range of 125.0 to 135.4 oC, and higher than the values measured at orifices (77.3 to 90.0 oC). CO2 and homologs of straight chain alkanes (C1-C5) were identified in gas samples. Carbon isotope values of alkanes increase with carbon numbers. The 13C fractionation between CO2 and dissolved inorganic carbon suggests they are out of carbon isotope equilibrium. The hypothesis regarding the formation of carbon-bearing compounds in SVHS may involve two processes: 1) Under high heat flow conditions which are caused by regional faulting and crustal extension, original high molecular weight organic compounds (kerogens) in clay-rich rocks decomposed to generate methane and other alkane homologs. 2) The SVHS area is associated with outflow structures, and distant from the heat source. Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) with sulfate at shallow depth (< 90 oC) is suggested as being responsible for the generation of CO2 in SVHS.

  1. Inorganic carbon time series at Ocean Weather Station M in the Norwegian Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Skjelvan

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Dissolved inorganic carbon (CT has been collected at Ocean Weather Station M (OWSM in the Norwegian Sea since 2001. Seasonal variations in CT are confined to the upper 50 m, where the biology is active, and below this layer no clear seasonal signal is seen. From winter to summer the surface CT concentration typical drops from 2140 to about 2040 μmol kg−1, while a deep water CT concentration of about 2163 μmol kg−1 is measured throughout the year. Observations show an annual increase in salinity normalized carbon concentration (nCT of 1.3±0.7 μmol kg−1 in the surface layer, which is equivalent to a pCO2 increase of 2.6±1.2 μatm yr−1, i.e. larger than the atmospheric increase in this area. Observations also show an annual increase in the deep water nCT of 0.57± 0.24 μmol kg−1, of which about a tenth is due to inflow of old Arctic water with larger amounts of remineralised matter. The remaining part has an anthropogenic origin and sources for this might be Greenland Sea surface water, Iceland Sea surface water, and/or recirculated Atlantic Water. By using an extended multi linear regression method (eMLR it is verified that anthropogenic carbon has entered the whole water column at OWSM.

  2. [Preliminary research on the feature of dissolved inorganic carbon in Wulixia Reservoir in summer, Guangxi, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wen; Pu, Jun-Bing; Yu, Shi; Zhang, Cheng; Au, Yik-Yu; Yuan, Dao-Xian; Yang, Hui; Tang, Wei

    2014-08-01

    To gain more knowledge on the transformation process of dissolved inorganic carbon in a karst reservoir, in situ monitoring, sampling and lab experiments of water columns were carried out at various sampling sites along the flow line in Wulixia Reservoir, Guangxi, China during early July, 2013. Results showed that: (1) The hydrochemical characteristics of study areas were controlled by the carbonate equilibrium system and the hydrochemical type of all water samples was HCO3-Ca + Mg. (2) The DIC concentration decreased gradually (DIC(Average) : from 1.03 to 0.78 mmol x L(-1)) and the delta13C(DIC) increased gradually (delta13C(DIC(Average) : from -10.21per thousand to -6.62 per thousand) from the reservoir end area to dam area. Meanwhile, with the depth increase in water column, the DIC concentration increased gradually (DIC(Average) : from 0.86 to 1.05 mmol x L(-1)) and the delta13C(DIC) decreased gradually (delta13C(DIC(Average) : from -7.88 per thousand to -13.39 per thousand) from the surface to the bottom of the reservoir. Possible reasons for these research results were found as follows: (1) Dissolution-precipitation process of carbonate substance could be inhibited by other processes such as biogeochemical processes, which played little role in delta13C(DIC) variations. (2) Thermal stratification existed in the study areas which could influence the distribution of DIC and delta13C(DIC) by affecting the distribution of plankton and its orientation and strength of metabolism process, and the extent of organic matter decomposition, and so on.

  3. Ionising radiation effect on the luminescence emission of inorganic and biogenic calcium carbonates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boronat, C. [CIEMAT, Av. Complutense 40, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Correcher, V., E-mail: v.correcher@ciemat.es [CIEMAT, Av. Complutense 40, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Virgos, M.D. [CIEMAT, Av. Complutense 40, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Garcia-Guinea, J. [CSIC, Museo Nacional Ciencias Naturales, José Gutiérrez Abascal 2, Madrid 28006 (Spain)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Aragonite and biogenic Ca-carbonates could be used as a TL dosimeters. • TL can be employed for retrospective dosimetry purposes. • Calcium carbonates show an acceptable ionizing radiation sensitivity. • The stability of the radiation–induced TL remains, at least, till 700 h. - Abstract: As known, the luminescence emission of mineral phases could be potentially employed for dosimetric purposes in the case of radiological terrorism or radiation accident where conventional monitoring is not available. In this sense, this paper reports on the thermo- (TL) and cathodoluminescence (CL) emission of both biogenic (common periwinkle – littorina littorera – shell made of calcite 90% and aragonite 10%) and inorganic (aragonite 100%) Ca-rich carbonates previously characterized by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Whereas the aragonite sample displays the main CL waveband peaked in the red region (linked to point defects), the more intense emission obtained from the common periwinkle shell appears at higher energies (mainly associated with structural defects). The UV-blue TL emission of the samples, regardless of the origin, displays (i) an acceptable ionizing radiation sensitivity, (ii) linear dose response in the range of interest (up to 8 Gy), (iii) reasonable stability of the TL signal after 700 h of storage with an initial decay of ca. 88% for the mineral sample and 60% for the biogenic sample and maintaining the stability from 150 h onwards. (iv) The tests of thermal stability of the TL emission performed in the range of 180–320 °C confirm a continuum in the trap system.

  4. Stable Isotopic Evidence for a Pedogenic Origin of Carbonates in Trench 14 near Yucca Mountain, Nevada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quade, J; Cerling, T E

    1990-12-14

    Layered carbonate and silica encrust fault fractures exposed in Trench 14 near Yucca Mountain, site of the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository in southern Nevada. Comparison of the stable carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions of the fracture carbonates with those of modern soil carbonates in the area shows that the fracture carbonates are pedogenic in origin and that they likely formed in the presence of vegetation and rainfall typical of a glacial climate. Their isotopic composition differs markedly from that of carbonate associated with nearby springs. The regional water table therefore remained below the level of Trench 14 during the time that the carbonates and silica precipitated, a period probably covering parts of at least the last 300,000 years.

  5. Carbon dioxide and helium dissolved gases in groundwater at central Tenerife Island, Canary Islands: chemical and isotopic characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrero-Diaz, Rayco; López, Dina; Perez, Nemesio M.; Custodio, Emilio; Sumino, Hirochika; Melián, Gladys V.; Padrón, Eleazar; Hernandez, Pedro A.; Calvo, David; Barrancos, José; Padilla, Germán; Sortino, Francesco

    2015-10-01

    Seismic-volcanic unrest was detected between 2004 and 2005 in the central and northwest zones of Tenerife Island (Canary Islands, Spain). With the aim of strengthening the program of geochemical and seismic-volcanic surveillance, a study of the origin, characteristics, and spatial distribution of dissolved carbon dioxide (CO2) and helium (He) gases in the volcanic aquifer of central Tenerife Island and around Teide volcano was carried out. This work also improves the hydrogeological and hydrogeochemical conceptual model of groundwater flow. Dissolved CO2 concentrations in sampled groundwater are several orders of magnitude higher than that of air-saturated water (ASW) suggesting a significant contribution of non-atmospheric CO2, mainly magmatic, confirmed through measurement of isotopic compositions (δ13CTDIC) and total dissolved inorganic carbon (TDIC) concentrations. A vertical stratification of dissolved CO2 and δ13CTDIC values was observed in the volcanic aquifer at the eastern region of Las Cañadas Caldera. Stratification seems to be controlled by both degree of magmatic CO2-water interaction and CO2 degassing and the original δ13Cco2(g) isotopic composition. The highest dissolved helium (4He) concentrations in groundwater seem to be related to radiogenic contributions resulting from water-rock interactions, and increase with residence time, instead of with endogenous magmatic inputs. Isotopic systematics show that the dissolved gases in groundwater of central Tenerife are variable mixtures of CO2-3He-rich fluids of volcanic-hydrothermal origin with both organic and atmospheric components. The results suggest that the eastern area of Las Cañadas Caldera, the South Volcanic Ridge, and the Teide summit cone are the areas most affected by degassing of the volcanic-hydrothermal system, and they are therefore the most suitable zones for future geochemical monitoring.

  6. Carbon Stable Isotopes as Indicators of Coastal Eutrophication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coastal ecologists and managers have frequently used nitrogen stable isotopes (δ15N) to trace and monitor anthropogenic nitrogen (N) in coastal ecosystems. However, the interpretation of δ15N data can often be challenging, if not confounding, as the isotope values fractionate su...

  7. Carbon Isotope Evidence for the Stepwise Oxidation of the Proterozoic Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    DesMarais, David J.; Strauss, Harald; Summons, Roger E.; Hayes, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    The oxidation of the Earth's crust and the increase in atmospheric oxygen early in Earth history have been linked to the accumulation of reduced carbon in sedimentary rocks. Trends in the carbon isotope composition of sedimentary organic carbon and carbonate show that during the Proterozoic aeon (2.5-0.54 Gyr ago) the organic carbon reservoir grew in size, relative to the carbonate reservoir. This increase, and the concomitant release of oxidizing power in the environment, occurred mostly during episodes of global rifting and orogeny.

  8. Differential Assimilation of Inorganic Carbon and Leucine by Prochlorococcus in the Oligotrophic North Pacific Subtropical Gyre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björkman, Karin M; Church, Matthew J; Doggett, Joseph K; Karl, David M

    2015-01-01

    The light effect on photoheterotrophic processes in Prochlorococcus, and primary and bacterial productivity in the oligotrophic North Pacific Subtropical Gyre was investigated using (14)C-bicarbonate and (3)H-leucine. Light and dark incubation experiments were conducted in situ throughout the euphotic zone (0-175 m) on nine expeditions to Station ALOHA over a 3-year period. Photosynthetrons were also used to elucidate rate responses in leucine and inorganic carbon assimilation as a function of light intensity. Taxonomic group and cell-specific rates were assessed using flow cytometric sorting. The light:dark assimilation rate ratios of leucine in the top 150 m were ∼7:1 for Prochlorococcus, whereas the light:dark ratios for the non-pigmented bacteria (NPB) were not significant different from 1:1. Prochlorococcus assimilated leucine in the dark at per cell rates similar to the NPB, with a contribution to the total community bacterial production, integrated over the euphotic zone, of approximately 20% in the dark and 60% in the light. Depth-resolved primary productivity and leucine incorporation showed that the ratio of Prochlorococcus leucine:primary production peaked at 100 m then declined steeply below the deep chlorophyll maximum (DCM). The photosynthetron experiments revealed that, for Prochlorococcus at the DCM, the saturating irradiance (E k) for leucine incorporation was reached at approximately half the light intensity required for light saturation of (14)C-bicarbonate assimilation. Additionally, high and low red fluorescing Prochlorococcus populations (HRF and LRF), co-occurring at the DCM, had similar E k values for their respective substrates, however, maximum assimilation rates, for both leucine and inorganic carbon, were two times greater for HRF cells. Our results show that Prochlorococcus contributes significantly to bacterial production estimates using (3)H-leucine, whether or not the incubations are conducted in the dark or light, and this should

  9. Structure of the carbon isotope excursion in a high-resolution lacustrine Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum record from central China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zuoling; Wang, Xu; Hu, Jianfang; Yang, Shiling; Zhu, Min; Dong, Xinxin; Tang, Zihua; Peng, Ping'an; Ding, Zhongli

    2014-12-01

    The carbon isotope excursion (CIE) associated with the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) has been recognized for the first time in the micritic carbonate, total organic carbon (TOC) and black carbon (BC) contained within the lacustrine sediments from the Nanyang Basin, central China. The remarkably large excursion (∼ - 6 ‰) in the δ13CTOC and δ13CBC values is possibly attributable to increased humidity and elevated pCO2 concentration. The ∼ - 4 ‰ CIE recorded in the δ13Ccalcite, reflecting the average isotope change of the watershed system, is consistent with that observed in planktonic foraminifera. This correspondence suggests that the true magnitude of the carbon isotope excursion in the ocean-atmosphere system is likely close to - 4 ‰. The ∼10 m excursion onset in our multi-proxy δ13C records demonstrates that the large input of 13C-depleted carbon into the ocean-atmosphere system was not geologically instantaneous. Despite difference and somewhat smoothness in detailed pattern of the CIE due to localized controls on different substrates, inorganic and organic δ13C data generally depict a gradual excursion onset at least over timescales of thousands of years. In addition, continental temperature reconstruction, based on the distribution of membrane lipids of bacteria, suggests a warming of ∼4 °C prior to the PETM and ∼7 °C increase in temperature during the PETM. The temperature data are overall similar in pattern and trend to the δ13C change across the PETM. These observations, combined with pre-CIE warming, are in line with the idea that 13C-depleted carbon release operated as a positive feedback to temperature, suggesting supply from one or more large organic carbon reservoirs on Earth's surface.

  10. Soil moisture effects on the carbon isotope composition of soil respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claire L. Phillips; Nick Nickerson; David Risk; Zachary E. Kayler; Chris Andersen; Alan Mix; Barbara J. Bond

    2010-01-01

    The carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) of recently assimilated plant carbon is known to depend on water-stress, caused either by low soil moisture or by low atmospheric humidity. Air humidity has also been shown to correlate with the δ13C of soil respiration, which suggests indirectly that recently fixed photosynthates...

  11. Chlorine and carbon isotope measurements can help assessing the effectivenes of a zero valent iron barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cretnik, S.; Audi, C.; Bernstein, A.; Palau, J.; Soler, A.; Elsner, M.

    2012-04-01

    Chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAH's) such as trichloroethene (TCE), cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) and vinylchloride (VC) are extensively used in industrial applications. One of the most promising remediation techniques for CAH's in groundwater is their removal via abiotic reductive dechlorination using Zero Valent Iron (ZVI). This is applied for the treatment of contaminated sites by installing permeable reactive barriers (PRB). In this study, isotope fractionation of chlorinated ethylenes in transformation by cast iron has been investigated, because such types of iron are commonly used in PRBs. Batch experiments have been carried out in closed flasks, containing cast iron with aqueous solutions of TCE, cDCE and VC. These substrates and their respective products have been monitored by headspace samplings for their concentration (by GC-FID) and isotope fractionation of carbon and chlorine (by GC-IRMS). A decreasing reactivity trend was observed when compounds contain less chlorine atoms, with differences in rate constants of about one order of magnitude between each of the substances TCE > cDCE > VC. This resulted in the accumulation of products with fewer chlorine atoms. Therefore a similar observation can be expected if degradation in the field is incomplete, for example in the case of aged or improperly designed PRB. Pronounced carbon and chlorine isotope fractionation was measured for each of the compounds, and characteristic dual isotope plots (C, Cl) were obtained for TCE and cDCE. These results may serve as an important reference for the interpretation of isotope data from field sites, since stable isotope fractionation is widely recognized as robust indicator for such pollutant transformations. However, carbon isotope fractionation in a given parent compound may be caused by either abiotic or biotic degradation. In the field, it can therefore be difficult to delineate the contribution of abiotic transformation by PRB in the presence of ongoing

  12. Provenance and weathering depth of carbonaceous gotland sandstone by use of carbon and oxygen isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Åberg, G.; Löfvendahl, R.; Stijfhoorn, D.; Råheim, A.

    Carbon and oxygen isotope ratios of carbonates (calcite) from different sites and stratigraphic levels of the Gotland sandstone show that it might be possible to fingerprint the different quarries. Preliminary tests of nine samples of Gotland sandstone from different buildings show that the laser microprobe is an excellent tool for estimating depth of weathering on this carbonaceous sandstone. Analyses perpendicular to the stone surface gave a similar trend for the carbon and oxygen isotope ratios, although changes go deeper with δ13C than δ18O. Depth of weathering is controlled by exposure, location, biologic overgrowth and salt efflorescence. The effect of earlier conservation treatment with linseed oil can also be traced.

  13. Seasonal variation in kangaroo tooth enamel oxygen and carbon isotopes in southern Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookman, Tom H.; Ambrose, Stanley H.

    2012-09-01

    Serial sampling of tooth enamel growth increments for carbon and oxygen isotopic analyses of Macropus (kangaroo) teeth was performed to assess the potential for reconstructing paleoseasonality. The carbon isotope composition of tooth enamel apatite carbonate reflects the proportional intake of C3 and C4 vegetation. The oxygen isotopic composition of enamel reflects that of ingested and metabolic water. Tooth enamel forms sequentially from the tip of the crown to the base, so dietary and environmental changes during the tooth's formation can be detected. δ13C and δ18O values were determined for a series of enamel samples drilled from the 3rd and 4th molars of kangaroos that were collected along a 900 km north-south transect in southern Australia. The serial sampling method did not yield pronounced seasonal isotopic variation patterns in Macropus enamel. The full extent of dietary isotopic variation may be obscured by attenuation of the isotopic signal during enamel mineralisation. Brachydont (low-crowned) Macropus teeth may be less sensitive to seasonal variation in isotopic composition due to time-averaging during mineralisation. However, geographic variations observed suggest that there may be potential for tracking latitudinal shifts in vegetation zones and seasonal environmental patterns in response to climate change.

  14. Trophic ecology of small yellow croaker (Larimichthys polyactis Bleeker): stable carbon and nitrogen isotope evidence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Weiwei; CHEN Xuezhong; JIANG Yazhou; LI Shengfa

    2011-01-01

    The trophic ecology of the small yellow croaker (Larimichthys polyactis) was studied using stable isotope analyses.Samples were collected from July to September 2009 and 34 individuals from eight sites were examined for stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes.Stable carbon isotope ratios (δ13C)ranged from -20.67 to -15.43,while stable nitrogen isotope ratios (δ15N) ranged 9.18-12.23.The relationship between δ13C and δ15N suggested high resource partitioning in the sampling area.Significant differences in stable isotope values among the eight sampling sites may be linked to environmental diversities involving various physical processes (such as ocean current,wind and tide) and different carbon sources.Furthermore,the stable isotope ratios may also explain the ontogenetic variability in diet and feeding,because δ13C and δ15N varied significantly with increasing body size.The findings are consistent with other studies on diet analyses in small yellow croaker.It was also demonstrated that stable isotope analysis could be used to estimate the trophic characters of small yellow croaker in feeding patterns and migrating habits.

  15. Carbon Isotopic Values of Individual N—Alkanes in Pyrolysates of Algae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周文; 吴庆余; 等

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the carbon isotopic values of individual n-alkanes in pyrolysates of algae,which are widely spread in marine and lacustrine environments.The carbon isotopic values of n-alkanes originated from different algal precursors vary greatly,and those of n-alka nes orginated from C.protothecoides,S.sp PCC 6803 and I.Galbana are even heavier than from higher plants,n-alkanes with different carbon numers derived from the sme organism may stem from different biomacromolecules.The dominant product nC31 diene yielded at 300℃ or lower temperature also is different from n-alkanes yielded at the same thermal evolution phase with respect to their origin.The catalysis of mineral components in limestone may lead to a lighter carbon isotope composition of n-alkanes.

  16. Carbon isotope anomaly in the major plant C1 pool and its global biogeochemical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Keppler

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We report that the most abundant C1 units of terrestrial plants, the methoxyl groups of pectin and lignin, have a unique carbon isotope signature exceptionally depleted in 13C. Plant-derived C1 volatile organic compounds (VOCs are also anomalously depleted in 13C compared with Cn+1 VOCs. The results confirm that the plant methoxyl pool is the predominant source of biospheric C1 compounds of plant origin such as methanol, chloromethane and bromomethane. Furthermore this pool, comprising ca 2.5% of carbon in plant biomass, could be an important substrate for methanogenesis and thus be envisaged as a possible source of isotopically light methane entering the atmosphere. Our findings have significant implications for the use of carbon isotope ratios in elucidation of global carbon cycling. Moreover methoxyl groups could act as markers for biological activity in organic matter of terrestrial and extraterrestrial origin.

  17. Linking carbon and water cycles using stable isotopes across scales: progress and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Werner

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Stable isotope analysis is a powerful tool for tracing biogeochemical processes in the carbon and water cycles. One particularly powerful approach is to employ multiple isotopes where the simultaneous assessment of the D/H,18O/16O and/or 13C/12C in different compounds provide a unique means to investigate the coupling of water and carbon fluxes at various temporal and spatial scales. Here, we present a research update on recent advances in our process-based understanding of the utilization of carbon, oxygen and hydrogen isotopes to lend insight into carbon and water cycling. We highlight recent technological developments and approaches, their strengths and methodological precautions with examples covering scales from minutes to centuries and from the leaf to the globe.

  18. Towards a better understanding of magnesium-isotope ratios from marine skeletal carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hippler, Dorothee; Buhl, Dieter; Witbaard, Rob; Richter, Detlev K.; Immenhauser, Adrian

    2009-10-01

    This study presents magnesium stable-isotope compositions of various biogenic carbonates of several marine calcifying organisms and an algae species, seawater samples collected from the western Dutch Wadden Sea, and reference materials. The aim of this study is to explore the influence of mineralogy, taxonomy and environmental factors (e.g., seawater isotopic composition, temperature, salinity) on magnesium-isotopic (δ 26Mg) ratios of skeletal carbonates. Using high-precision multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, we observed that the magnesium-isotopic composition of seawater from the semi-enclosed Dutch Wadden Sea is identical to that of open marine seawater. We further found that a considerable component of the observed variability in δ 26Mg values of marine skeletal carbonates can be attributed to differences in mineralogy. Furthermore, magnesium-isotope fractionation is species-dependent, with all skeletal carbonates being isotopically lighter than seawater. While δ 26Mg values of skeletal aragonite and high-magnesium calcite of coralline red algae indicate the absence or negligibility of metabolic influences, the δ 26Mg values of echinoids, brachiopods and bivalves likely result from a taxon-specific level of control on Mg-isotope incorporation during biocalcification. Moreover, no resolvable salinity and temperature effect were observed for coralline red algae and echinoids. In contrast, Mg-isotope data of bivalves yield ambiguous results, which require further validation. The data presented here, point to a limited use of Mg isotopes as temperature proxy, but highlight the method's potential as tracer of seawater chemistry through Earth's history.

  19. Highly Efficient Quantum Sieving in Porous Graphene-like Carbon Nitride for Light Isotopes Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yuanyuan; Li, Feng; Zhou, Hongcai; Zhao, Mingwen

    2016-01-01

    Light isotopes separation, such as 3He/4He, H2/D2, H2/T2, etc., is crucial for various advanced technologies including isotope labeling, nuclear weapons, cryogenics and power generation. However, their nearly identical chemical properties made the separation challenging. The low productivity of the present isotopes separation approaches hinders the relevant applications. An efficient membrane with high performance for isotopes separation is quite appealing. Based on first-principles calculations, we theoretically demonstrated that highly efficient light isotopes separation, such as 3He/4He, can be reached in a porous graphene-like carbon nitride material via quantum sieving effect. Under moderate tensile strain, the quantum sieving of the carbon nitride membrane can be effectively tuned in a continuous way, leading to a temperature window with high 3He/4He selectivity and permeance acceptable for efficient isotopes harvest in industrial application. This mechanism also holds for separation of other light isotopes, such as H2/D2, H2/T2. Such tunable quantum sieving opens a promising avenue for light isotopes separation for industrial application. PMID:26813491

  20. Significance of Carbon Isotopes in Carbonate Sequence Stratigraphy—As Exemplified by the Permian System in Southwest China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    覃建雄; 杨作升; 等

    1999-01-01

    Based on the research on sequence stratigraphy of the Permian in Southwest China,in conjunction with the carbon isotope data from the typical sections at Ganluo,Sichuan and Tianlin and Masan,Guangxi,the authors suggest that the genetic framework and internal architicture of different sequences possess quite different carbon isotopic characteristics.Therefore ,the following problems can be solved in terms of carbon isotopic values,evolutionary curve patterns and structures of carbonate sequences:(1) to determe the nature of sequence boundary surface and related geological events;(2) to recognize various kinds of sedimentary system tracts;(3) to discuss the internal architicture and genetic framework of the sequences and their evolution;(4) to subdivide and correlate sedimentary sequences on a regional or global scale; and (5)to enhance the resolution of sequence stratigraphic analysis.Stable carbon isotopes have proved themselves to be valid in sequence stratigraphic studies of carbonate rocks,as demonstrated by our results presented in this paper.

  1. Stable Carbon Isotope Ratios of Phenolic Compounds in Secondary Particulate Organic Matter Formed by Photooxidation of Toluene

    CERN Document Server

    Irei, Satoshi; Huang, Lin; Auld, Janeen; Collin, Fabrice; Hastie, Donald

    2014-01-01

    Compound-specific stable carbon isotope ratios for phenolic compounds in secondary particulate organic matter (POM) formed by photooxidation of toluene were studied. Secondary POM generated by photooxidation of toluene using a continuous-flow reactor and an 8 cubic meter indoor smog chamber was collected, and then extracted with acetonitrile. Eight phenolic compounds were identified in the extracts by a gas chromatograph coupled with a mass spectrometer, and their compound-specific stable carbon isotope ratios were determined by a gas chromatograph coupled with a combustion furnace followed by an isotope ratio mass spectrometer. The majority of the products, including methylnitrophenols and methylnitrocatechols, were isotopically depleted by 5 to 6 permil compared to the initial isotope ratio for toluene, whereas the isotope ratio for 4_nitrophenol remained the same as the initial isotope ratio for toluene. Based on the reaction mechanisms postulated in literature, stable carbon isotope ratios of these produc...

  2. Silicate or Carbonate Weathering: Fingerprinting Sources of Dissolved Inorganic Carbon Using δ13C in a Tropical River, Southern India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagat, H.; Ghosh, P.

    2015-12-01

    Rivers are an inherently vital resource for the development of any region and their importance is highlighted by the presence of many ancient human civilizations adjacent to river systems. δ13C - Si/HCO3 systematics has been applied to large south Indian rivers which drain the Deccan basaltic traps in order to quantify their relative contributions from silicate and carbonate weathering. This study investigates δ13C - Si/HCO3 systematics of the Cauvery River basin which flows through silicate lithology in the higher reaches and carbonate lithology with pedogenic and marine carbonates dominating the terrain in the lower reaches of the basin. The samples for the present study were collected at locations within the watershed during Pre-Monsoon and Monsoon Season 2014. The measurements of stable isotope ratios of δ13CDIC and were accomplished through a Thermo Scientific GasBench II interface connected to a MAT 253 IRMS. We captured a large spatial variation in δ13C and Si/HCO3 values during both seasons; Pre-Monsoon δ13C values ranges between -17.57‰ to -4.02‰ and during Monsoon it varies between -9.19‰ to +0.61‰. These results indicate a two end-member mixing component i.e. a silicate and a carbonate end member; governing the weathering interactions of the Cauvery River. Within the drainage basin, we identified silicate and carbonate dominating sources by using contributions of DIC and δ13C. Si/HCO3 values for Pre-Monsoon ranges between 0.028 - 0.67 and for Monsoon it varies between 0.073 - 0.80. Lighter δ13C composition was observed at sampling sites at higher altitude in contrast to sampling sites at flood plain which show relatively enriched δ13C which indicate mixing of soil derived CO2 with C4 plants. Result suggests dominance of carbonate weathering during the Monsoon Period, while silicate weathering is pronounced during Pre- Monsoon period.

  3. An automated method for 'clumped-isotope' measurements on small carbonate samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Thomas W; Bernasconi, Stefano M

    2010-07-30

    Clumped-isotope geochemistry deals with the state of ordering of rare isotopes in molecules, in particular with their tendency to form bonds with other rare isotopes rather than with the most abundant ones. Among its possible applications, carbonate clumped-isotope thermometry is the one that has gained most attention because of the wide potential of applications in many disciplines of earth sciences. Clumped-isotope thermometry allows reconstructing the temperature of formation of carbonate minerals without knowing the isotopic composition of the water from which they were formed. This feature enables new approaches in paleothermometry. The currently published method is, however, limited by sample weight requirements of 10-15 mg and because measurements are performed manually. In this paper we present a new method using an automated sample preparation device coupled to an isotope ratio mass spectrometer. The method is based on the repeated analysis (n = 6-8) of 200 microg aliquots of sample material and completely automated measurements. In addition, we propose to use precisely calibrated carbonates spanning a wide range in Delta(47) instead of heated gases to correct for isotope effects caused by the source of the mass spectrometer, following the principle of equal treatment of the samples and standards. We present data for international standards (NBS 19 and LSVEC) and different carbonates formed at temperatures exceeding 600 degrees C to show that precisions in the range of 10 to 15 ppm (1 SE) can be reached for repeated analyses of a single sample. Finally, we discuss and validate the correction procedure based on high-temperature carbonates instead of heated gases.

  4. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from time series and surface observations using Moored Autonomous Dissolved Inorganic Carbon (MADIC) System, Sunburst SAMI2 pH sensor, and other instruments from Kewalo Buoy near the coast of Honolulu, Hawaii from 2013-10-31 to 2014-06-15 (NCEI Accession 0132048)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To expand the number of tools available for autonomous carbonate system observations, we have developed a robust surface ocean dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC)...

  5. Biological and geochemical controls on diel dissolved inorganic carbon cycling in a low-order agricultural stream: Implications for reach scales and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, C.; Böhlke, J.K.

    2011-01-01

    Movement of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) through the hydrologic cycle is an important component of global carbon budgets, but there is considerable uncertainty about the controls of DIC transmission from landscapes to streams, and through river networks to the oceans. In this study, diel measurements of DIC, ??13C-DIC, dissolved oxygen (O2), ??18O-O2, alkalinity, pH, and other parameters were used to assess the relative magnitudes of biological and geochemical controls on DIC cycling and flux in a nutrient-rich, net autotrophic stream. Rates of photosynthesis (P), respiration (R), groundwater discharge, air-water exchange of CO2, and carbonate precipitation/dissolution were quantified through a time-stepping chemical/isotope (12C and 13C, 16O and 18O) mass balance model. Groundwater was the major source of DIC to the stream. Primary production and carbonate precipitation were equally important sinks for DIC removed from the water column. The stream was always super-saturated with respect to carbonate minerals, but carbonate precipitation occurred mainly during the day when P increased pH. We estimated more than half (possibly 90%) of the carbonate precipitated during the day was retained in the reach under steady baseflow conditions. The amount of DIC removed from the overlying water through carbonate precipitation was similar to the amount of DIC generated from R. Air-water exchange of CO2 was always from the stream to the atmosphere, but was the smallest component of the DIC budget. Overall, the in-stream DIC reactions reduced the amount of CO2 evasion and the downstream flux of groundwater-derived DIC by about half relative to a hypothetical scenario with groundwater discharge only. Other streams with similar characteristics are widely distributed in the major river basins of North America. Data from USGS water quality monitoring networks from the 1960s to the 1990s indicated that 40% of 652 stream monitoring stations in the contiguous USA were at or above

  6. Simulated In Situ Determination of Soil Profile Organic and Inorganic Carbon With LIBS and VisNIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bricklemyer, R. S.; Brown, D. J.; Clegg, S. M.; Barefield, J. E.

    2008-12-01

    There is growing need for rapid, accurate, and inexpensive methods to measure, and verify soil organic carbon (SOC) change for national greenhouse gas accounting and the development of a soil carbon trading market. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) and Visible and Near Infrared Spectroscopy (VisNIR) are complementary analytical techniques that have the potential to fill that need. The LIBS method provides precise elemental analysis of soils, but generally cannot distinguish between organic C and inorganic C. VisNIR has been established as a viable technique for measuring soil properties including SOC and inorganic carbon (IC). As part of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Regional Partnership, 240 intact core samples (3.8 x 50 cm) have been collected from six agricultural fields in north central Montana, USA. Each of these core samples were probed concurrently with LIBS and VisNIR at 2.5, 7.5, 12.5, 17.5, 22.5, 27.5, 35 and 45 cm (+/- 1.5 cm) depths. VisNIR measurements were taken using an Analytical Spectral Devices (ASD, Boulder, CO, USA) Agrispec spectrometer to determine the partition of SOC vs. IC in the samples. The LIBS scans were collected with the LANL LIBS Core Scanner Instrument which collected the entire 200 - 900 nm plasma emission including the 247.8 nm carbon emission line. This instrument also collected the emission from the elements typically found in inorganic carbon (Ca and Mg) and organic carbon (H, O, and N). Subsamples of soil (~ 4 g) were taken from interrogation points for laboratory determination of SOC and IC. Using this analytical data, we constructed several full spectrum multivariate VisNIR/LIBS calibration models for SOC and IC. These models were then applied to independent validation cores for model evaluation.

  7. Surface area dependence of calcium isotopic reequilibration in carbonates: Implications for isotopic signatures in the weathering zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, N. M.; Druhan, J. L.; Potrel, A.; Jacobson, A. D.

    2016-12-01

    The concept of dynamic equilibrium carries the implicit assumption of continued isotopic exchange between a mineral and the surrounding fluid. While this effect has received much attention in the marine paleoproxy literature, it has been relatively overlooked in application to the terrestrial environment. In weathering systems, a potential consequence is that rapid reequilibration may alter or erase isotopic signatures generated during secondary mineral formation. The extent and timescale over which isotopic signatures are reset in these hydrologic systems is unknown. Using reactive transport modeling, we show isotopic reequilibration under conditions reflecting terrestrial hydrologic settings to be significant and dependent on the reactive surface area of the solid. In particular, we suggest that the non-traditional stable isotopes commonly used in application to carbonates (e.g., Ca, Mg, Sr) are sensitive to these effects due to their rapid reaction rates. We aim to characterize the dependence of Ca isotopic reequilibration on surface area during calcite precipitation via batch experiments conducted at ambient temperature over 48-hour time periods. Calcite precipitation was performed in a closed batch reactor utilizing a controlled free-drift method. The batch reactors contained mixed supersaturated solutions of CaCl2 and NaHCO3 at an initial pH of 8.54. Precipitation was initiated by seed inoculation of calcite crystals with two distinct, pre-constrained surface areas. All experiments achieved the same final state of chemical equilibrium, but as expected, the fastest approach to equilibrium occurred for experiments employing calcite seeds with the highest surface area. This implies that differences in equilibrated Ca isotope ratios (δ44/40Ca) should reflect differences in surface area. This prediction is upheld by models of the experiments, indicating a measureable difference in δ44Ca during calcite precipitation where the higher surface area corresponds to

  8. Inorganic Nanoparticle-Modified Poly(Phenylene Sulphide/ Carbon Fiber Laminates: Thermomechanical Behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana M. Díez-Pascual

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Carbon fiber (CF-reinforced high-temperature thermoplastics such as poly(phenylene sulphide (PPS are widely used in structural composites for aerospace and automotive applications. The porosity of CF-reinforced polymers is a very important topic for practical applications since there is a direct correlation between void content and mechanical properties. In this study, inorganic fullerene-like tungsten disulphide (IF-WS2 lubricant nanoparticles were used to manufacture PPS/IF-WS2/CF laminates via melt-blending and hot-press processing, and the effect of IF-WS2 loading on the quality, thermal and mechanical behaviour of the hybrid composites was investigated. The addition of IF-WS2 improved fiber impregnation, resulting in lower degree of porosity and increased delamination resistance, compression and flexural properties; their reinforcement effect was greater at temperatures above the glass transition (Tg. IF-WS2 contents higher than 0.5 wt % increased Tg and the heat deflection temperature while reduced the coefficient of thermal expansion. The multiscale laminates exhibited higher ignition point and notably reduced peak heat release rate compared to PPS/CF. The coexistence of micro- and nano-scale fillers resulted in synergistic effects that enhanced the stiffness, strength, thermal conductivity and flame retardancy of the matrix. The results presented herein demonstrate that the IF-WS2 are very promising nanofillers to improve the thermomechanical properties of conventional thermoplastic/CF composites.

  9. Assessment of bacterial community structure in nitrifying biofilm under inorganic carbon-sufficient and -limited conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Hyokwan; Chung, Yun-Chul; Yang, Heejeong; Lee, Changsoo; Aryapratama, Rio; Yoo, Young J; Lee, Seockheon

    2015-01-01

    In this work, nitrification and changes in the composition of the total bacterial community under inorganic carbon (IC)-limited conditions, in a nitrifying moving bed biofilm reactor, was investigated. A culture-independent analysis of cloning and sequencing based on the 16S rRNA gene was applied to quantify the bacterial diversity and to determine bacterial taxonomic assignment. IC concentrations had significant effects on the stability of ammonia-oxidation as indicated by the reduction of the nitrogen conversion rate with high NH4(+)-N loadings. The predominance of Nitrosomonas europaea was maintained in spite of changes in the IC concentration. In contrast, heterotrophic bacterial species contributed to a high bacterial diversity, and to a dynamic shift in the bacterial community structure, under IC-limited conditions. In this study, individual functions of heterotrophic bacteria were estimated based on taxonomic information. Possible key roles of coexisting heterotrophic bacteria are the assimilation of organic compounds of extracellular polymeric substances produced by nitrifiers, and biofilm formation by providing a filamentous structure and aggregation properties.

  10. Ionising radiation effect on the luminescence emission of inorganic and biogenic calcium carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boronat, C.; Correcher, V.; Virgos, M. D.; Garcia-Guinea, J.

    2017-06-01

    As known, the luminescence emission of mineral phases could be potentially employed for dosimetric purposes in the case of radiological terrorism or radiation accident where conventional monitoring is not available. In this sense, this paper reports on the thermo- (TL) and cathodoluminescence (CL) emission of both biogenic (common periwinkle - littorina littorera - shell made of calcite 90% and aragonite 10%) and inorganic (aragonite 100%) Ca-rich carbonates previously characterized by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Whereas the aragonite sample displays the main CL waveband peaked in the red region (linked to point defects), the more intense emission obtained from the common periwinkle shell appears at higher energies (mainly associated with structural defects). The UV-blue TL emission of the samples, regardless of the origin, displays (i) an acceptable ionizing radiation sensitivity, (ii) linear dose response in the range of interest (up to 8 Gy), (iii) reasonable stability of the TL signal after 700 h of storage with an initial decay of ca. 88% for the mineral sample and 60% for the biogenic sample and maintaining the stability from 150 h onwards. (iv) The tests of thermal stability of the TL emission performed in the range of 180-320 °C confirm a continuum in the trap system.

  11. Consistency of TTO-NAS inorganic carbon data with modern measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanhua, Toste; Wallace, Douglas W. R.

    2005-07-01

    We compare alkalinity and total dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) measurements made during the Transient Tracers in the Ocean, North Atlantic Study (TTO-NAS) in 1981 with modern measurements from a TTO reoccupation cruise in 2004 (M60/5). We find that the TTO-NAS alkalinity values are 3.6 +/- 2.3 μmol kg-1 higher than modern alkalinity data tied to Certified Reference Materials. The TTO-NAS DIC values re-calculated from original alkalinity and discrete-pCO2 data using currently accepted constants are 3.8 μmol kg-1 higher than those reported in the revised TTO data set. This difference is reduced to 0.7 μmol kg-1 when our suggested correction to the TTO-NAS alkalinity is applied. These re-calculated DIC values are 2.4 μmol kg-1 too low relative to contemporaneous measurements made by the vacuum extraction/manometric Certified method. Application of this correction brings the TTO data into almost perfect agreement with modern measurements for slowly-ventilated deep water of the eastern Atlantic.

  12. Predicting Dissolved Inorganic Carbon in Photoautotrophic Microalgae Culture via the Nitrogen Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Binh T; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2015-08-18

    Dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and pH are key factors that control the growth rate of microalgae growing photoautotrophically. Being able to quantify how DIC and pH independently affect growth kinetics requires a means to control each parameter independently. In this study, we used the Proton Condition (PC) to develop means to control pH and DIC independently. Using the PC, we found that different N sources systematically affect the alkalinity and the DIC in distinct ways. With pH controlled at a fixed level by CO2 addition, using nitrate as the N source increased the alkalinity and DIC concentration in proportion to the increase in biomass concentration. In contrast, using ammonium caused the alkalinity and DIC to decline, while using ammonium nitrate left the DIC nearly unchanged. Experiments with a model photoautotroph cyanobacterium, Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, in batch experiments with modified BG-11 media and a pH-stat confirmed all of the DIC predictions of the PC-based model. Thus, this study provides a mechanistic basis for managing the DIC for photoautotrophic cultures through the N source. In particular, using ammonium nitrate makes it possible to control DIC and pH independently in a pH-stat.

  13. Effect of inorganic carbon on anaerobic ammonium oxidation enriched in sequencing batch reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liao Dexiang; Li Xiaoming; Yang Qi; Zeng Guangming; Guo Liang; Yue Xiu

    2008-01-01

    The present lab-scale research reveals the enrichment of anaerobic ammonium oxidation microorganism from methanogenic anaerobic granular sludge and the effect of inorganic carbon (sodium bicarbonate) on anaerobic ammonium oxidation. The enrichment of anammox bacteria was carried out in a 7.0-L SBR and the effect of bicarbonate on anammox was conducted in a 3.0-L SBR. Research results , especially the biomass, showed first signs of anammox activity after 54 d cultivation with synthetic wastewater, when the pH was controlled between 7.5 and 8.3, the temperature was 35℃. The anammox activity increased as the influent bicarbonate concentration increased from 1.0 to 1.5 g/L and then, was inhibited as the bicarbonate concentration approached 2.0 g/L. However, the activity could be restored by the reduction of bicarbonate concentration to 1.0 g/L, as shown by rapid conversion of ammonium, and nitrite and nitrate production with normal stoichiometry. The optimization of the bicarbonate concentration in the reactor could increase the anammox rate up to 66.4 mgN/(L·d).

  14. Integration of Metagenomic and Stable Carbon Isotope Evidence Reveals the Extent and Mechanisms of Carbon Dioxide Fixation in High-Temperature Microbial Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Ryan de Montmollin; Moran, James J; Jay, Zackary J; Beam, Jacob P; Whitmore, Laura M; Kozubal, Mark A; Kreuzer, Helen W; Inskeep, William P

    2017-01-01

    Although the biological fixation of CO2 by chemolithoautotrophs provides a diverse suite of organic compounds utilized by chemoorganoheterotrophs as a carbon and energy source, the relative amounts of autotrophic C in chemotrophic microbial communities are not well-established. The extent and mechanisms of CO2 fixation were evaluated across a comprehensive set of high-temperature, chemotrophic microbial communities in Yellowstone National Park by combining metagenomic and stable (13)C isotope analyses. Fifteen geothermal sites representing three distinct habitat types (iron-oxide mats, anoxic sulfur sediments, and filamentous "streamer" communities) were investigated. Genes of the 3-hydroxypropionate/4-hydroxybutyrate, dicarboxylate/4-hydroxybutyrate, and reverse tricarboxylic acid CO2 fixation pathways were identified in assembled genome sequence corresponding to the predominant Crenarchaeota and Aquificales observed across this habitat range. Stable (13)C analyses of dissolved inorganic and organic C (DIC, DOC), and possible landscape C sources were used to interpret the (13)C content of microbial community samples. Isotope mixing models showed that the minimum fractions of autotrophic C in microbial biomass were >50% in the majority of communities analyzed. The significance of CO2 as a C source in these communities provides a foundation for understanding community assembly and succession, and metabolic linkages among early-branching thermophilic autotrophs and heterotrophs.

  15. Stable carbon isotope ratios of ambient secondary organic aerosols in Toronto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saccon, M.; Kornilova, A.; Huang, L.; Moukhtar, S.; Rudolph, J.

    2015-09-01

    A method to quantify concentrations and stable carbon isotope ratios of secondary organic aerosols has been applied to study atmospheric nitrophenols in Toronto, Canada. The sampling of five nitrophenols, all with substantial secondary formation from the photooxidation of aromatic volatile organic compounds (VOCs), was conducted in the gas phase and particulate matter (PM) together and in PM alone. Their concentrations in the atmosphere are in the low ng m-3 range and, consequently, a large volume of air (> 1000 m3) is needed to analyze samples for stable carbon isotope ratios, resulting in sampling periods of typically 24 h. While this extended sampling period increases the representativeness of average values, it at the same time reduces possibilities to identify meteorological conditions or atmospheric pollution levels determining nitrophenol concentrations and isotope ratios. Average measured carbon isotope ratios of the different nitrophenols are between -34 and -33 ‰, which is well within the range predicted by mass balance. However, the observed carbon isotope ratios cover a range of nearly 9 ‰ and approximately 20 % of the isotope ratios of the products have isotope ratios lower than predicted from the kinetic isotope effect of the first step of the reaction mechanism and the isotope ratio of the precursor. This can be explained by isotope fractionation during reaction steps following the initial reaction of the precursor VOCs with the OH radical. Limited evidence for local production of nitrophenols is observed since sampling was done in the Toronto area, an urban center with significant anthropogenic emission sources. Strong evidence for significant local formation of nitrophenols is only found for samples collected in summer. On average, the difference in carbon isotope ratios between nitrophenols in the particle phase and in the gas phase is insignificant, but for a limited number of observations in summer, a substantial difference is observed. This

  16. Autotrophy of green non-sulphur bacteria in hot spring microbial mats: biological explanations for isotopically heavy organic carbon in the geological record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meer, M T; Schouten, S; de Leeuw, J W; Ward, D M

    2000-08-01

    Inferences about the evidence of life recorded in organic compounds within the Earth's ancient rocks have depended on 13C contents low enough to be characteristic of biological debris produced by the well-known CO2 fixation pathway, the Calvin cycle. 'Atypically' high values have been attributed to isotopic alteration of sedimentary organic carbon by thermal metamorphism. We examined the possibility that organic carbon characterized by a relatively high 13C content could have arisen biologically from recently discovered autotrophic pathways. We focused on the green non-sulphur bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus that uses the 3-hydroxypropionate pathway for inorganic