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Sample records for innovative competence-based assessments

  1. Facilitating Evaluations of Innovative, Competence-Based Assessments: Creating Understanding and Involving Multiple Stakeholders

    Gulikers, Judith T. M.; Baartman, Liesbeth K. J.; Biemans, Harm J. A.

    2010-01-01

    Schools are held more responsible for evaluating, quality assuring and improving their student assessments. Teachers' lack of understanding of new, competence-based assessments as well as the lack of key stakeholders' involvement, hamper effective and efficient self-evaluations by teachers of innovative, competence-based assessments (CBAs). While…

  2. Involving users in the refinement of the competency-based achievement system: an innovative approach to competency-based assessment.

    Ross, Shelley; Poth, Cheryl-Anne; Donoff, Michel G; Papile, Chiara; Humphries, Paul; Stasiuk, Samantha; Georgis, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Competency-based assessment innovations are being implemented to address concerns about the effectiveness of traditional approaches to medical training and the assessment of competence. Integrating intended users' perspectives during the piloting and refinement process of an innovation is necessary to ensure the innovation meets users' needs. Failure to do so results in no opportunity for users to influence the innovation, nor for developers to assess why an innovation works or does not work in different contexts. A qualitative participatory action research approach was used. Sixteen first-year residents participated in three focus groups and two interviews during piloting. Verbatim transcripts were analyzed individually and then across all transcripts using a constant comparison approach. The analysis revealed three key characteristics related to the impact on the residents' acceptance of the innovation as being a worthwhile investment of time and effort: access to frequent, timely, and specific feedback from preceptors. Findings were used to refine the innovation further. This study highlights the necessary conditions for assessing the success of implementation of educational innovations. Reciprocal communication between users and developers is vital. This reflects the approaches recommended in the Ottawa Consensus Statement on research in assessment published in Medical Teacher in March 2011.

  3. Considerations that will determine if competency-based assessment is a sustainable innovation.

    Dauphinee, W Dale; Boulet, John R; Norcini, John J

    2018-05-18

    Educational assessment for the health professions has seen a major attempt to introduce competency based frameworks. As high level policy developments, the changes were intended to improve outcomes by supporting learning and skills development. However, we argue that previous experiences with major innovations in assessment offer an important road map for developing and refining assessment innovations, including careful piloting and analyses of their measurement qualities and impacts. Based on the literature, numerous assessment workshops, personal interactions with potential users, and our 40 years of experience in implementing assessment change, we lament the lack of a coordinated approach to clarify and improve measurement qualities and functionality of competency based assessment (CBA). To address this worrisome situation, we offer two roadmaps to guide CBA's further development. Initially, reframe and address CBA as a measurement development opportunity. Secondly, using a roadmap adapted from the management literature on sustainable innovation, the medical assessment community needs to initiate an integrated plan to implement CBA as a sustainable innovation within existing educational programs and self-regulatory enterprises. Further examples of down-stream opportunities to refocus CBA at the implementation level within faculties and within the regulatory framework of the profession are offered. In closing, we challenge the broader assessment community in medicine to step forward and own the challenge and opportunities to reframe CBA as an innovation to improve the quality of the clinical educational experience. The goal is to optimize assessment in health education and ultimately improve the public's health.

  4. Facilitating evaluations of innovative, competence-based assessment: Creating understanding and involving multiple stakeholders

    Gulikers, J.T.M.; Baartman, L.K.J.; Biemans, H.

    2010-01-01

    Schools are held more responsible for evaluating, quality assuring and improving their student assessments. Teachers’ lack of understanding of new, competence-based assessments as well as the lack of key stakeholders’ involvement, hamper effective and efficient self-evaluations by teachers of

  5. Facilitating evaluations of innovative, competence-based assessments: creating understanding and involving multiple stakeholders.

    Gulikers, J.T.M.; Baartman, L.; Biemans, H.J.A.

    2010-01-01

    Schools are held more responsible for evaluating, quality assuring and improving their student assessments. Teachers’ lack of understanding of new, competence-based assessments as well as the lack of key stakeholders’ involvement, hamper effective and efficient self-evaluations by teachers of

  6. Competency Assessment Tool (CAT). The Evaluation of an Innovative Competency-Based Assessment Experience in Higher Education

    Ion, Georgeta; Cano, Elena; Cabrera, Nati

    2016-01-01

    This article examines an innovation in teaching-learning and assessment processes through the use of a platform called the Competency Assessment Tool (CAT). It allows for the tracking of student blogs with the objective of improving self-reflective processes and providing feedback. The experiment was carried out in six universities in Catalonia,…

  7. Competency Based Assessment in Fashion Design

    Russanti, Irma; Nurlaela, Lutfiyah; Basuki, Ismet; Munoto

    2018-04-01

    Professional certification is a form of stipulation on certain competency standards provided by one professional organization to the performance of a person through assessment. For that an assessment needs to be standardized so that there exists a general standardized scale to measure competence. In the professional certification of fashion design department, an instrument of competency based assessment is essential to be developed. The purpose of this review is to know the application of competency based assessment in the field of fashion design. The literature reviews were found by journal searching with keywords competency based assessment and fashion design in Google scholar, of which was gotten over 20 journals from 2006 to 2016. Afterwards, the search of the free-downloaded e-books in libgen was conducted under competency based assessment and fashion design, which is then found some related references. The obtained literatures were used to review the definition, approach, and implementation of competency based assessment in the field of fashion design. Results show that it is important to develop an assessment sheet in the field of fashion design covering garment, apparel and embroidery sectors by patterning the criteria of performers along with the qualifications.

  8. A Competence-Based Approach to Sustainable Innovation Teaching

    McAloone, Timothy Charles

    2007-01-01

    the object of a research exercise, to affect and observe various approaches to the teaching of design. Particular attention will be paid in this case to competencies, both initiated in the teaching and the evaluated in the students’ interpretation of the theoretical contents. The lessons learned from...... through educational curricula and research programmes. This paper presents an initiative from Denmark, showing new interpretations of industrial needs, research insights, educational ideas and identification of core innovative engineering competencies. The new Danish Master of Science engineering...... the first three years of this semester’s application and teaching to approximately 55 students per year are presented and discussed. After introducing the motivation and background for establishing the education programme, the consideration of competence-based education is described, in the context...

  9. Assessing Competency-Based Education and Training: A Literature Review.

    Toohey, Susan; And Others

    1995-01-01

    A literature review examined what aspects of performance should be assessed, what methods are appropriate, whether competency-based assessments should be graded, whether assessments should be done in the workplace or training institutions, and whose responsibility they are. Competence should be very broadly defined as both technical skills and as…

  10. PROBLEMS OF COMPETENCY-BASED ASSESSMENT OF APPLIED QUALIFICATIONS

    S. A. Efimova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The search of the unified tools of competences measurement of vocational training institutions graduates and identification of mechanisms of interrelation of these competences with requirements of professional standards imposed to workers of various levels are brought into focus in the context of formation of National system of qualifications of the Russian Federation, introduction of the Third-generation Federal State Educational Standards and transition of professional education to the modular, and competence-based model of the organization of training. The aim of the article is to justify the content, structure and technology of competency-based assessment, as a set of interrelated activities and regulated procedures performed on the basis of the standardized interdisciplinary evaluation materials. Methodology and research methods. The present investigation is based on systematic-activity and competency-based approaches, analysis, systematization, and generalization. Results. The place of competencies, as a part of educational outcomes of vocational education programs, is justified. Critical analysis of typical methodological solutions that are typical for the modern pedagogical practices of the competency-based assessment is performed. The content and organizational design of the process of competency-based assessment is described. Scientific novelty. The conceptual apparatus of competency-based assessment is supplemented with the «sub-competence» category - component of competence, which retains all of its properties due to human activities. Factors of objects choice and methods of assessment in identifying the professional competences are proved. Practical significance. Results of the study can be used by researchers involved with assessment procedures; methodologists and teachers of professional educational organizations, training institutes, independent centers of the qualifications evaluation for the organization of

  11. PLA Binaries in the Context of Competency-Based Assessment

    Popova, Viktoria; Clougherty, R. J., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the authors report that, as the importance of competency-based learning (CBL) in higher education discourse surges, it not only further validates prior learning assessment (PLA), but it demonstrates PLA's essential nature as an important framework for assessing learning that has been acquired outside of traditional academia.…

  12. Quality assessment in competency based physiotherapy education

    Brandt, Jørgen

    Purpose: To ensure a transparent and competency related assessment of physiotherapy education, in order to accomplish a close relationship between competencies at entry level to the profession and challenges in current and future health practice. Relevance: Perspectives and metods regarding...... rehabilitation and health promotion change with demografic evolvement, health politics and patterns of diseases. This calls for an ever ongoing improvement and adjustment of professional competencies being achieved during physiotherapy education. At the same time the education itself is an entity, comitted...... the relationship between learning outcome and demands for professional competencies in practice. This connection is evaluated through the behavior level. It covers newly graduated students perceptions of the degree to which they comply with expectations in physiotherapy practice.Further more the effect level...

  13. Core principles of assessment in competency-based medical education.

    Lockyer, Jocelyn; Carraccio, Carol; Chan, Ming-Ka; Hart, Danielle; Smee, Sydney; Touchie, Claire; Holmboe, Eric S; Frank, Jason R

    2017-06-01

    The meaningful assessment of competence is critical for the implementation of effective competency-based medical education (CBME). Timely ongoing assessments are needed along with comprehensive periodic reviews to ensure that trainees continue to progress. New approaches are needed to optimize the use of multiple assessors and assessments; to synthesize the data collected from multiple assessors and multiple types of assessments; to develop faculty competence in assessment; and to ensure that relationships between the givers and receivers of feedback are appropriate. This paper describes the core principles of assessment for learning and assessment of learning. It addresses several ways to ensure the effectiveness of assessment programs, including using the right combination of assessment methods and conducting careful assessor selection and training. It provides a reconceptualization of the role of psychometrics and articulates the importance of a group process in determining trainees' progress. In addition, it notes that, to reach its potential as a driver in trainee development, quality care, and patient safety, CBME requires effective information management and documentation as well as ongoing consideration of ways to improve the assessment system.

  14. Enhanced Requirements for Assessment in a Competency-Based, Time-Variable Medical Education System.

    Gruppen, Larry D; Ten Cate, Olle; Lingard, Lorelei A; Teunissen, Pim W; Kogan, Jennifer R

    2018-03-01

    Competency-based, time-variable medical education has reshaped the perceptions and practices of teachers, curriculum designers, faculty developers, clinician educators, and program administrators. This increasingly popular approach highlights the fact that learning among different individuals varies in duration, foundation, and goal. Time variability places particular demands on the assessment data that are so necessary for making decisions about learner progress. These decisions may be formative (e.g., feedback for improvement) or summative (e.g., decisions about advancing a student). This article identifies challenges to collecting assessment data and to making assessment decisions in a time-variable system. These challenges include managing assessment data, defining and making valid assessment decisions, innovating in assessment, and modeling the considerable complexity of assessment in real-world settings and richly interconnected social systems. There are hopeful signs of creativity in assessment both from researchers and practitioners, but the transition from a traditional to a competency-based medical education system will likely continue to create much controversy and offer opportunities for originality and innovation in assessment.

  15. Evaluating assessment quality in competence-based education: A qualitative comparison of two frameworks

    Baartman, Liesbeth; Bastiaens, Theo; Kirschner, Paul A.; Van der Vleuten, Cees

    2009-01-01

    Baartman, L. K. J., Bastiaens, T. J., Kirschner, P. A., & Van der Vleuten, C. P. M. (2007). Evaluation assessment quality in competence-based education: A qualitative comparison of two frameworks. Educational Research Review, 2, 114-129.

  16. Competency-based assessment in surgeon-performed head and neck ultrasonography

    Todsen, Tobias; Melchiors, Jacob; Charabi, Birgitte

    2017-01-01

    and to establish validity evidence for an objective structured assessment of ultrasound skills (OSAUS) used for competency-based assessment. STUDY DESIGN: A prospective experimental study. METHODS: Six otolaryngologists and 11 US novices were included in a standardized test setup for which they had to perform...... and the diagnostic accuracy was found (Spearman's ρ, 0.85; P competence with good reliability, significant discrimination between US competence levels, and a strong...... correlation of assessment score to diagnostic accuracy. An OSAUS pass/fail score was established and could be used for competence-based assessment in surgeon-performed HNUS. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: NA. Laryngoscope, 2017....

  17. Developing a Competency-Based Assessment Approach for Student Learning

    Dunning, Pamela T.

    2014-01-01

    Higher education accrediting bodies are increasing the emphasis on assessing student learning outcomes as opposed to teaching methodology. The purpose of this article is to describe the process used by Troy University's Master of Public Administration program to change their assessment approach from a course learning objective perspective to a…

  18. Assessment Criteria for Competency-Based Education: A Study in Nursing Education

    Fastré, Greet M. J.; van der Klink, Marcel R.; Amsing-Smit, Pauline; van Merriënboer, Jeroen J.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the effects of type of assessment criteria (performance-based vs. competency-based), the relevance of assessment criteria (relevant criteria vs. all criteria), and their interaction on secondary vocational education students' performance and assessment skills. Students on three programmes in the domain of nursing and care…

  19. Innovation Assessment

    Hasselbalch, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    Current regulatory approaches are ill-equipped to address the challenges of governing through periods of disruptive technological change. This article hones in on the use of assessment regimes at the level of the European Union, particularly in the work of the Commission, to argue for a missing...... I label innovation assessment, to steer polities through periods of disruptive technological change, during which innovations have taken concrete forms and are beginning to diffuse, but still exhibit much scope for rapid, unexpected change and alternative trajectories of development. By juxtaposing...

  20. A comprehensive clinical competency-based assessment in periodontics.

    Shiloah, J; Scarbecz, M; Bland, P S; Hottel, T L

    2017-05-01

    Traditional periodontics clinical examinations in dental education frequently assess a narrow set of clinical skills and do not adequately assess the ability of students to independently manage a periodontal patient. As an alternative, the authors developed a comprehensive periodontics competency case experience (CCCE) for senior dental students and surveyed students regarding their experience with the CCCE. Students challenging the CCCE must treat a patient with moderate periodontitis and must independently decide when a state of periodontal and oral health has been achieved. Students are also required to conduct an oral presentation to periodontology faculty. Dental students who completed the CCCE had a favourable impression of the experience, compared with the traditional clinical examinations taken in the junior year. The majority of students rated all the components of the CCCE as 'somewhat' or 'very helpful'. About 72.4% of students felt that being able to work independently on the examination was very helpful for learning about the clinical management of patients with periodontal disease, followed by 'simulation of care in private practice' (65.5%), and oral photography experience (55.2%). The greatest difficulty reported by students was finding an acceptable patient. About 62.1% of students rated 'finding the right patient' as very difficult. Students reported having to screen a mean of 5.9 patients (SD: 4.5) to find a qualified patient. The results of the survey will be useful in improving the examination as an assessment tool in periodontal therapy. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Student perceptions of assessment and student self-efficacy in competence-based education

    Dinther, van M.; Dochy, F.; Segers, M.; Braeken, J.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide insight into the interplay between student perceptions of competence-based assessment and student self-efficacy, and how this influences student learning outcomes. Results reveal that student perceptions of the form authenticity aspect and the quality

  2. The portfolio approach to competency-based assessment at the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine.

    Dannefer, Elaine F; Henson, Lindsey C

    2007-05-01

    Despite the rapid expansion of interest in competency-based assessment, few descriptions of assessment systems specifically designed for a competency-based curriculum have been reported. The purpose of this article is to describe the design of a portfolio approach to a comprehensive, competency-based assessment system that is fully integrated with the curriculum to foster an educational environment focused on learning. The educational design goal of the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University was to create an integrated educational program-curriculum and instructional methods, student assessment processes, and learning environment-to prepare medical students for success in careers as physician investigators. The first class in the five-year program matriculated in 2004. To graduate, a student must demonstrate mastery of nine competencies: research, medical knowledge, communication, professionalism, clinical skills, clinical reasoning, health care systems, personal development, and reflective practice. The portfolio provides a tool for collecting and managing multiple types of assessment evidence from multiple contexts and sources within the curriculum to document competence and promote reflective practice skills. This article describes how the portfolio was developed to provide both formative and summative assessment of student achievement in relation to the program's nine competencies.

  3. Competency-Based Faculty Development in Community-Engaged Scholarship: A Diffusion of Innovation Approach

    Jordan, Catherine; Doherty, William J.; Jones-Webb, Rhonda; Cook, Nancy; Dubrow, Gail; Mendenhall, Tai J.

    2012-01-01

    The authors utilized interviews, competency surveys, and document review to evaluate the effectiveness of a one-year, cohort-based faculty development pilot program, grounded in diffusion of innovations theory, and aimed at increasing competencies in community engagement and community-engaged scholarship. Five innovator participants designed the…

  4. Evolution dynamics modeling and simulation of logistics enterprise's core competence based on service innovation

    Yang, Bo; Tong, Yuting

    2017-04-01

    With the rapid development of economy, the development of logistics enterprises in China is also facing a huge challenge, especially the logistics enterprises generally lack of core competitiveness, and service innovation awareness is not strong. Scholars in the process of studying the core competitiveness of logistics enterprises are mainly from the perspective of static stability, not from the perspective of dynamic evolution to explore. So the author analyzes the influencing factors and the evolution process of the core competence of logistics enterprises, using the method of system dynamics to study the cause and effect of the evolution of the core competence of logistics enterprises, construct a system dynamics model of evolution of core competence logistics enterprises, which can be simulated by vensim PLE. The analysis for the effectiveness and sensitivity of simulation model indicates the model can be used as the fitting of the evolution process of the core competence of logistics enterprises and reveal the process and mechanism of the evolution of the core competence of logistics enterprises, and provide management strategies for improving the core competence of logistics enterprises. The construction and operation of computer simulation model offers a kind of effective method for studying the evolution of logistics enterprise core competence.

  5. Surgeons' attitude toward a competency-based training and assessment program: results of a multicenter survey.

    Hopmans, Cornelis J; den Hoed, Pieter T; Wallenburg, Iris; van der Laan, Lijkckle; van der Harst, Erwin; van der Elst, Maarten; Mannaerts, Guido H H; Dawson, Imro; van Lanschot, Jan J B; Ijzermans, Jan N M

    2013-01-01

    Currently, most surgical training programs are focused on the development and evaluation of professional competencies. Also in the Netherlands, competency-based training and assessment programs were introduced to restructure postgraduate medical training. The current surgical residency program is based on the Canadian Medical Education Directives for Specialists (CanMEDS) competencies and uses assessment tools to evaluate residents' competence progression. In this study, we examined the attitude of surgical residents and attending surgeons toward a competency-based training and assessment program used to restructure general surgical training in the Netherlands in 2009. In 2011, all residents (n = 51) and attending surgeons (n = 108) in 1 training region, consisting of 7 hospitals, were surveyed. Participants were asked to rate the importance of the CanMEDS competencies and the suitability of the adopted assessment tools. Items were rated on a 5-point Likert scale and considered relevant when at least 80% of the respondents rated an item with a score of 4 or 5 (indicating a positive attitude). Reliability was evaluated by calculating the Cronbach's α, and the Mann-Whitney test was applied to assess differences between groups. The response rate was 88% (n = 140). The CanMEDS framework demonstrated good reliability (Cronbach's α = 0.87). However, the importance of the competencies 'Manager' (78%) and 'Health Advocate' (70%) was undervalued. The assessment tools failed to achieve an acceptable reliability (Cronbach's α = 0.55), and individual tools were predominantly considered unsuitable for assessment. Exceptions were the tools 'in-training evaluation report' (91%) and 'objective structured assessment of technical skill' (82%). No significant differences were found between the residents and the attending surgeons. This study has demonstrated that, 2 years after the reform of the general surgical residency program, residents and attending surgeons in a large

  6. Beyond NAVMEC: competency-based veterinary education and assessment of the professional competencies.

    Hodgson, Jennifer L; Pelzer, Jacquelyn M; Inzana, Karen D

    2013-01-01

    The implementation of competency-based curricula within the health sciences has been an important paradigm shift over the past 30 years. As a result, one of the five strategic goals recommended by the North American Veterinary Medical Education Consortium (NAVMEC) report was to graduate career-ready veterinarians who are proficient in, and have the confidence to use, an agreed-upon set of core competencies. Of the nine competencies identified as essential for veterinary graduates, seven could be classified as professional or non-technical competencies: communication; collaboration; management (self, team, system); lifelong learning, scholarship, value of research; leadership; diversity and multicultural awareness; and adaptation to changing environments. Traditionally, the professional competencies have received less attention in veterinary curricula and their assessment is often sporadic or inconsistent. In contrast, the same or similar competencies are being increasingly recognized in other health professions as essential skills and abilities, and their assessment is being undertaken with enhanced scrutiny and critical appraisal. Several challenges have been associated with the assessment of professional competencies, including agreement as to their definition and therefore their evaluation, the fact that they are frequently complex and require multiple integrative assessments, and the ability and/or desire of faculty to teach and assess these competencies. To provide an improved context for assessment of the seven professional competencies identified in the NAVMEC report, this article describes a broad framework for their evaluation as well as specific examples of how these or similar competencies are currently being measured in medical and veterinary curricula.

  7. An Electronic Competency-Based Evaluation Tool for Assessing Humanitarian Competencies in a Simulated Exercise.

    Evans, Andrea B; Hulme, Jennifer M; Nugus, Peter; Cranmer, Hilarie H; Coutu, Melanie; Johnson, Kirsten

    2017-06-01

    The evaluation tool was first derived from the formerly Consortium of British Humanitarian Agencies' (CBHA; United Kingdom), now "Start Network's," Core Humanitarian Competency Framework and formatted in an electronic data capture tool that allowed for offline evaluation. During a 3-day humanitarian simulation event, participants in teams of eight to 10 were evaluated individually at multiple injects by trained evaluators. Participants were assessed on five competencies and a global rating scale. Participants evaluated both themselves and their team members using the same tool at the end of the simulation exercise (SimEx). All participants (63) were evaluated. A total of 1,008 individual evaluations were completed. There were 90 (9.0%) missing evaluations. All 63 participants also evaluated themselves and each of their teammates using the same tool. Self-evaluation scores were significantly lower than peer-evaluations, which were significantly lower than evaluators' assessments. Participants with a medical degree, and those with humanitarian work experience of one month or more, scored significantly higher on all competencies assessed by evaluators compared to other participants. Participants with prior humanitarian experience scored higher on competencies regarding operating safely and working effectively as a team member. This study presents a novel electronic evaluation tool to assess individual performance in five of six globally recognized humanitarian competency domains in a 3-day humanitarian SimEx. The evaluation tool provides a standardized approach to the assessment of humanitarian competencies that cannot be evaluated through knowledge-based testing in a classroom setting. When combined with testing knowledge-based competencies, this presents an approach to a comprehensive competency-based assessment that provides an objective measurement of competency with respect to the competencies listed in the Framework. There is an opportunity to advance the use of

  8. Workplace based assessment: a step to promote competency based postgraduate training.

    Singh, Tejinder; Modi, Jyoti Nath

    2013-06-08

    There has been an increasing emphasis on defining outcomes of medical education in terms of performance of trainees. This is a step beyond the description of outcomes in terms of competence that encompasses mostly potential abilities rather than the actual performance. The contextual adaptations and behavior judgments of the trainees are best assessed by a program of in-training assessment. Workplace based assessment (WPBA) is one of the modalities, which assesses the trainee in authentic settings. Though Postgraduate (PG) medical training in India is said to be competency-based, most institutions do not have any formative or in-training assessment program for the same. The two cardinal elements of WPBA are direct observation and conducted in work place in addition to provision of feedback to the trainee. The WPBA conforms to the highest (Level 4: Does) of Millers pyramid and also has the potential to assess at all four levels. Some of the tools used for WPBA are: Logbooks, Clinical Encounter Cards (CEC), mini-Clinical Evaluation Exercise (mini-CEX), Case based discussions, Direct Observation of Procedural Skills (DOPS), Multisource feedback (peers, co-workers, seniors, patients) etc. These can be documented in the form of a portfolio that provides a longitudinal view of experiences and progress of the trainee. The WPBA scores high on validity and educational impact by virtue of being based on direct observation in real situation and contextual feedback. The feasibility and acceptability is enhanced by making appropriate choices of tools, advance planning, building of mutual trust, and training of assessors. Given the established benefits of WPBA in shaping clinical learning, there is an imminent need for including this mode of assessment in our clinical training programs especially PG training.

  9. The false dichotomy of quality and quantity in the discourse around assessment in competency-based education.

    Ten Cate, Olle

    2015-08-01

    Competency-based medical education stresses the attainment of competencies rather than the completion of fixed time in rotations. This sometimes leads to the interpretation that quantitative features of a program are of less importance, such as procedures practiced and weeks or months spent in clinical practice. An educational philosophy like "We don't require numbers of procedures completed but focus on competencies" suggests a dichotomy of either competency-based or time and procedures based education. The author argues that this dichotomy is not useful, and may even compromise education, as long as valid assessment of all relevant competencies is not possible or feasible. Requiring quantities of experiences of learners is not in contrast with competency-based education.

  10. Assessment of a Competency-Based Undergraduate Course on Genetic and Genomics.

    Kronk, Rebecca; Colbert, Alison; Lengetti, Evelyn

    2017-08-24

    In response to new demands in the nursing profession, an innovative undergraduate genetics course was designed based on the Essential Nursing Competencies and Curricula Guidelines for Genetics and Genomics. Reflective journaling and storytelling were used as major pedagogies, alongside more traditional approaches. Thematic content analysis of student reflections revealed transformational learning as the major theme emerging from genomic and genetic knowledge acquisition. Quantitative analyses of precourse/postcourse student self-assessments of competencies revealed significant findings.

  11. La supuesta neutralidad de la evaluación por competencias The alleged neutrality of competence-based assessment

    Juan Carlos Revilla Castro

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available La gestión por competencias se ha convertido en los últimos treinta años en uno de los temas recurrentes cuando se habla de la gestión integral en las organizaciones del siglo xxi. Los cuatro pilares sobre los que descansa dicha gestión son la selección, la formación, la retribución y la evaluación. El objetivo del presente artículo es el análisis de uno de esos elementos clave: la evaluación por competencias. El punto de partida de esta investigación es la tendencia, en aumento, a valorar a los trabajadores tanto por sus cualificaciones como por sus actitudes, dos elementos centrales en la definición de competencia. A través del análisis de diferentes entrevistas a expertos y encargados de recursos humanos implicados en la gestión por competencias, se pretende visualizar las dificultades de encontrar elementos objetivos a los que atenerse a la hora de evaluar las competencias de los trabajadores.In the last 30 years competence-based management has become a recurring theme in the integral management of 21st-century institutions. The four pillars that support competence-based management are selection, training, remuneration and assessment. The aim of the present article is to analyse one of these key elements: competence-based assessment. The starting point of the study is the increasing tendency to assess employees on the basis not only of their qualifications but also of their attitudes, two elements that are fundamental to the definition of competence. By analyzing a variety of interviews with experts and people in charge of human resources involved in competence-based management, we aim to highlight how difficult it is to find objective elements on which to base an assessment of the competences of employees.

  12. Assessing Translator Education in the Light of Competency-Based Approaches: Dashboard Indicators and Stakeholders’ Sense-Making

    Sakwe George Mbotake

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of globalization and the increasing demands on the job market have induced many countries in the world to introduce reforms aimed at streamlining their higher education curricula. The demand for a more flexible workforce with high skills (competencies in problem solving, team work and project management has been on the rise in recent years and the incorporation of competency-based curriculum has emerged as a necessity in the higher education sector. However, in spite of the growing popularity for the need to prepare graduates for the workplace, the actual academic culture and formative processes are yet to be tailored to address these new exigencies. The aim of this paper is to analyze in what manner competence and competence-based learning are being currently implemented in the Advanced School of Translators and Interpreters (ASTI of the University of Buea in Cameroon. Competency dashboard indicators from best practice frameworks are used to assess stakeholders’ sense-making as levers for quality assessment in translation learning. An opinion survey of 60 trainee translators and 12 instructors helped to identify factors, instructional and otherwise which promote or inhibit the success of competence-based education. The study posits that systemic and environmental issues, as well as organizational, teaching and learning, assessment, and quality assurance issues are germane to the effective implementation of generic and specific competencies. The ensuing proposals advocate for a responsive translator training and education that is more personalized and adaptive to address higher education’s challenges of access, quality, and affordability for a diverse set of students.

  13. Assessment of Innovation Competency

    Nielsen, Jan Alexis

    2015-01-01

    competency, and communication competency) as well as assessment criteria for a number of skills relevant to these subcompetencies. These assessment criteria, it is argued, largely resonate with existing literature and they provide a detailed glimpse into how assessment of innovation competency could...... of the recorded talk in interaction that occurred in teacher group discussion sessions at 5 upper secondary schools. Based on the analysis, it was possible to extrapolate assessment criteria for 5 subcompetencies relevant to innovation (creative competency, collaboration competency, navigation competency, action...

  14. When should I attempt my centrally administered summative assessments in the RANZCP competency-based training program?

    Kealy-Bateman, Warren; Kotze, Beth; Lampe, Lisa

    2016-12-01

    To provide information relevant to decision-making around the timing of attempting the centrally administered summative assessments in the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists (RANZCP) 2012 Fellowship Program. We consider the new Competency-Based Fellowship Program of the RANZCP and its underlying philosophy, the trainee trajectory within the program and the role of the supervisor. The relationship between workplace-based and external assessments is discussed. The timing of attempting centrally administered summative assessments is considered within the pedagogical framework of medical competencies development. Although successful completion of all the centrally administered summative assessments requires demonstration of a junior consultant standard of competency, the timing at which this standard will most commonly be achieved is likely to vary from assessment to assessment. There are disadvantages attendant upon prematurely attempting assessments, and trainees are advised to carefully consider the requirements of each assessment and match this against their current level of knowledge and skills. Trainees and supervisors need to be clear about the competencies required for each of the external assessments and match this against the trainee's current competencies to assist in decision-making about the timing of assessments and planning for future learning. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2016.

  15. The contribution of assessment experiences to student teachers’ self-efficacy in competence-based education

    Prof. Dr. Mien Segers; Dr. Mart van Dinther; Prof. Dr. Filip Dochy

    2015-01-01

    Earlier research argues that educational programmes based on social cognitive theory are successful in improving students’ self-efficacy. Focusing on some formative assessment characteristics, this qualitative research intends to study in-depth how student teachers’ assessment experiences contribute

  16. Formative Competence-Based-Assessment through blogs. A project carried out in six Catalan universities

    Elena Cano Garcia

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Academic programs in Design have always faced the challenge of providing the best education in a sphere so changing as Design discipline itself. This is especially true within the current renewal of curricula derived from the implementation of the European Higher Education Area (EHEA and, to a much more general level, the adaptation of the discipline of Design to the new challenges posed by the Knowledge Society. In this context, we present the educational experience of a serious games design workshop, which has been conducted at the University of Barcelona's Design BA. This pedagogical activity emphazises on three aspects which we believe are fundamental to the current pedagogy of design: to give a more transverse view of this discipline; to value the role of Design as a means of innovation in today's Knowledge Society; and to rethink the social function of Design.

  17. PLA and CBE on the Competency Continuum: The Relationship between Prior Learning Assessment and Competency-Based Education

    Tate, Pamela; Klein-Collins, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Competency-based education (CBE) is the hot new thing in higher education. While forms of CBE have been around since the 1970s, there has been a surge of interest in CBE, with more than 600 postsecondary institutions now reporting that they are either offering competency-based degree programs or are planning to do so. Similarly, institutional…

  18. [Development of a portfolio for competency-based assessment in a clinical clerkship curriculum].

    Roh, HyeRin; Lee, Jong-Tae; Yoon, Yoo Sang; Rhee, Byoung Doo

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this report was to describe our experience in planning and developing a portfolio for a clinical clerkship curriculum. We have developed a portfolio for assessing student competency since 2007. During an annual workshop on clinical clerkship curricula, clerkship directors from five Paik hospitals of Inje University met to improve the assessment of the portfolio. We generated templates for students to record their activities and reflection and receive feedback. We uploaded these templates to our school's website for students to download freely. Annually, we have held a faculty development seminar and a workshop for portfolio assessment and feedback. Also, we established an orientation program on how to construct a learning portfolio for students. Future actions include creating a ubiquitous portfolio system, extending the portfolio to the entire curriculum, setting up an advisor system, and managing the quality of the portfolio. This study could be helpful for medical schools that plan to improve their portfolio assessment with an outcome-based approach.

  19. Implementation of Portfolio Assessment in a Competency-based Dental Hygiene Program.

    Gadbury-Amyot, Cynthia C.; Holt, Lorie P.; Overman, Pamela R.; Schmidt, Colleen R.

    2000-01-01

    Describes the implementation of a portfolio assessment program in the dental hygiene program at the University of Missouri School of Dentistry. Tables provide examples of program competencies and related portfolio entries, the complete scoring rubric for portfolios, and the student portfolio evaluation survey. Concludes that although portfolio…

  20. Design of a Competency-Based Assessment Model in the Field of Accounting

    Ciudad-Gómez, Adelaida; Valverde-Berrocoso, Jesús

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the phases involved in the design of a methodology to contribute both to the acquisition of competencies and to their assessment in the field of Financial Accounting, within the European Higher Education Area (EHEA) framework, which we call MANagement of COMpetence in the areas of Accounting (MANCOMA). Having selected and…

  1. Competency-based continuing professional development.

    Campbell, Craig; Silver, Ivan; Sherbino, Jonathan; Cate, Olle Ten; Holmboe, Eric S

    2010-01-01

    Competence is traditionally viewed as the attainment of a static set of attributes rather than a dynamic process in which physicians continuously use their practice experiences to "progress in competence" toward the attainment of expertise. A competency-based continuing professional development (CPD) model is premised on a set of learning competencies that include the ability to (a) use practice information to identify learning priorities and to develop and monitor CPD plans; (b) access information sources for innovations in development and new evidence that may potentially be integrated into practice; (c) establish a personal knowledge management system to store and retrieve evidence and to select and manage learning projects; (d) construct questions, search for evidence, and record and track conclusions for practice; and (e) use tools and processes to measure competence and performance and develop action plans to enhance practice. Competency-based CPD emphasizes self-directed learning processes and promotes the role of assessment as a professional expectation and obligation. Various approaches to defining general competencies for practice require the creation of specific performance metrics to be meaningful and relevant to the lifelong learning strategies of physicians. This paper describes the assumptions, advantages, and challenges of establishing a CPD system focused on competencies that improve physician performance and the quality and safety of patient care. Implications for competency-based CPD are discussed from an individual and organizational perspective, and a model to bridge the transition from residency to practice is explored.

  2. Competency-Based Assessment for Clinical Supervisors: Design-Based Research on a Web-Delivered Program

    Williams, Lauren Therese; Grealish, Laurie; Jamieson, Maggie

    2015-01-01

    Background Clinicians need to be supported by universities to use credible and defensible assessment practices during student placements. Web-based delivery of clinical education in student assessment offers professional development regardless of the geographical location of placement sites. Objective This paper explores the potential for a video-based constructivist Web-based program to support site supervisors in their assessments of student dietitians during clinical placements. Methods This project was undertaken as design-based research in two stages. Stage 1 describes the research consultation, development of the prototype, and formative feedback. In Stage 2, the program was pilot-tested and evaluated by a purposeful sample of nine clinical supervisors. Data generated as a result of user participation during the pilot test is reported. Users’ experiences with the program were also explored via interviews (six in a focus group and three individually). The interviews were transcribed verbatim and thematic analysis conducted from a pedagogical perspective using van Manen’s highlighting approach. Results This research succeeded in developing a Web-based program, “Feed our Future”, that increased supervisors’ confidence with their competency-based assessments of students on clinical placements. Three pedagogical themes emerged: constructivist design supports transformative Web-based learning; videos make abstract concepts tangible; and accessibility, usability, and pedagogy are interdependent. Conclusions Web-based programs, such as Feed our Future, offer a viable means for universities to support clinical supervisors in their assessment practices during clinical placements. A design-based research approach offers a practical process for such Web-based tool development, highlighting pedagogical barriers for planning purposes. PMID:25803172

  3. Assessing tomorrow's learners: in competency-based education only a radically different holistic method of assessment will work. Six things we could forget.

    Schuwirth, Lambert; Ash, Julie

    2013-07-01

    In this paper we are challenging six traditional notions about assessment that are unhelpful when designing 'assessment for learning'-programmes for competency-based education. We are arguing for the following: Reductionism is not the only way to assure rigour in high-stakes assessment; holistic judgements can be equally rigorous. Combining results of assessment parts only because they are of the same format (like different stations in an OSCE) is often not defensible; instead there must be a logically justifiable combination. Numbers describe the quality of the assessment. Therefore, manipulating the numbers is usually not the best way to improve its quality. Not every assessment moment needs to be a decision moment, disconnecting both makes combining summative and formative functions of assessment easier. Standardisation is not the only route to equity. Especially with diverse student groups tailoring is more equitable than standardisation. The most important element to standardise is the quality of the process and not the process itself. Finally, most assessment is too much focussed on detecting deficiencies and not on valuing individual student differences. In competency-based education--especially with a focus on learner orientation--this 'deficiency-model' is not as well aligned as a 'differences-model'.

  4. Toward competency-based curriculum: Application of workplace-based assessment tools in the National Saudi Arabian Anesthesia Training Program.

    Boker, Ama

    2016-01-01

    The anesthesia training program of the Saudi Commission for health specialties has introduced a developed competency-based anesthesia residency program starting from 2015 with the utilization of the workplace-based assessment (WBA) tools, namely mini-clinical exercises (mini-CEX), direct observation of procedural skills (DOPS), and case-based discussion (CBD). This work aimed to describe the process of development of anesthesia-specific list of mini-CEX, DOPS, and CBD tools within the Saudi Arabian Anesthesia Training Programs. To introduce the main concepts of formative WBA tools and to develop anesthesia-specific applications for each of the selected WBA tools, four 1-day workshops were held at the level of major training committees at eastern (Dammam), western (Jeddah), and central (Riyadh) regions in the Kingdom were conducted. Sixty-seven faculties participated in these workshops. After conduction of the four workshops, the anesthesia-specific applications setting of mini-CEX, DOPS, and CBD tools among the 5-year levels were fully described. The level of the appropriate consultation skills was divided according to the case complexity adopted from the American Society of Anesthesiologists physical classification for adult and obstetric and pediatric patient as well as the type of the targeted anesthetic procedure. WBA anesthesia-specific lists of mini-CEX, DOPS, and CBD forms were easily incorporated first into guidelines to help the first stage of implementation of formative assessment in the Saudi Arabian Anesthesia Residency Program, and this can be helpful to replicate such program within other various training programs in Saudi Arabia and abroad.

  5. Assessing Risk of Innovation

    Allgood, GO

    2001-01-01

    Today's manufacturing systems and equipment must perform at levels thought impossible a decade ago. Companies must push operations, quality, and efficiencies to unprecedented levels while holding down costs. In this new economy, companies must be concerned with market shares, equity growth, market saturation, and profit. U.S. manufacturing is no exception and is a prime example of businesses forced to adapt to constant and rapid changes in customer needs and product mixes, giving rise to the term ''Agile Manufacturing''. The survival and ultimate success of the American Manufacturing economy may depend upon its ability to create, innovate, and quickly assess the impact that new innovations will have on its business practices. Given the need for flexibility, companies need proven methods to predict and measure the impact that new technologies and strategies will have on overall plant performance from an enterprise perspective. The Value-Derivative Model provides a methodology and approach to assess such impacts in terms of energy savings, production increases, quality impacts, emission reduction, and maintenance and operating costs as they relate to enabling and emerging technologies. This is realized by calculating a set of first order sensitivity parameters obtained from expanding a Taylor Series about the system's operating point. These sensitivity parameters are invariant economic and operational indicators that quantify the impact of any proposed technology in terms of material throughput, efficiency, energy usage, environmental effects, and costs. These parameters also provide a mechanism to define metrics and performance measures that can be qualified in terms of real economic impact. Value-Derivative Analysis can be applied across all manufacturing and production segments of our economy and has found specific use in steel and textiles. Where economic models give the cost of conducting a business, Value-Derivative Analysis provides the cost to conduct

  6. The false dichotomy of quality and quantity in the discourse around assessment in competency-based education

    ten Cate, Olle

    Competency-based medical education stresses the attainment of competencies rather than the completion of fixed time in rotations. This sometimes leads to the interpretation that quantitative features of a program are of less importance, such as procedures practiced and weeks or months spent in

  7. The False Dichotomy of Quality and Quantity in the Discourse around Assessment in Competency-Based Education

    ten Cate, Olle

    2015-01-01

    Competency-based medical education stresses the attainment of competencies rather than the completion of fixed time in rotations. This sometimes leads to the interpretation that quantitative features of a program are of less importance, such as procedures practiced and weeks or months spent in clinical practice. An educational philosophy like…

  8. Competency-based training: who benefits?

    Brightwell, Alexandra; Grant, Janet

    2013-02-01

    Competency based training describes progression through training referenced to the demonstrated ability to perform certain tasks. In recent years, this has become the dominant curriculum model. We seek to examine who benefits from a competency based approach to medical education. For the regulators and service, the apparent advantage is in terms of apparent measurable accountability and flexibility. For assessors, the promise of competence based assessments in the workplace to provide a reliable and objective measurement of a trainee's performance has not been demonstrated in practice. For the doctor in training, there is very little evidence to show benefit from competency based training. Competency based training places emphasis on individual skills rather than overall learning experience thus risks diminishing the role of the trainee in the workplace. Any form of medical education that devalues workplace based learning will ultimately harm the profession and, in turn, patient care.

  9. Financing Competency Based Programs.

    Daniel, Annette

    Literature on the background, causes, and current prevalence of competency based programs is synthesized in this report. According to one analysis of the actual and probable costs of minimum competency testing, estimated costs for test development, test administration, bureaucratic structures, and remedial programs for students who cannot pass the…

  10. Strategies for increasing the feasibility of performance assessments during competency-based education: Subjective and objective evaluations correlate in the operating room.

    Szasz, Peter; Louridas, Marisa; Harris, Kenneth A; Grantcharov, Teodor P

    2017-08-01

    Competency-based education necessitates assessments that determine whether trainees have acquired specific competencies. The evidence on the ability of internal raters (staff surgeons) to provide accurate assessments is mixed; however, this has not yet been directly explored in the operating room. This study's objective is to compare the ratings given by internal raters vs an expert external rater (independent to the training process) in the operating room. Raters assessed general surgery residents during a laparoscopic cholecystectomy for their technical and nontechnical performance. Fifteen cases were observed. There was a moderately positive correlation (r s = .618, P = .014) for technical performance and a strong positive correlation (r s = .731, P = .002) for nontechnical performance. The internal raters were less stringent for technical (mean rank 3.33 vs 8.64, P = .007) and nontechnical (mean rank 3.83 vs 8.50, P = .01) performances. This study provides evidence to help operationalize competency-based assessments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. From Theory to Practice: Utilizing Competency-based Milestones to Assess Professional Growth and Development in the Foundational Science Blocks of a Pre-Clerkship Medical School Curriculum.

    Pettepher, Cathleen C; Lomis, Kimberly D; Osheroff, Neil

    2016-09-01

    Physicians-in-training require skills and attitudes beyond medical knowledge in order to mature into successful clinicians. However, because assessments in pre-clerkship curricula historically have focused almost exclusively on medical knowledge, faculty contributions to early student development often have been limited. To address this challenge and enhance student progress, we re-designed our pre-clerkship curriculum to include settings in which diverse facets of student performance could be observed and fostered. Concurrently, we transitioned to an assessment strategy focused on competency-based milestones. The implementation of this strategy has allowed pre-clerkship science faculty to provide early-stage students with rich holistic feedback designed to stimulate their professional growth.

  12. Business Curriculum and Assessment Reform in Hong Kong Schools: A Critical Review from a Competence-Based Perspective

    Yu, Christina Wai Mui

    2010-01-01

    From September 2009 onwards, a new business curriculum which focuses on three key business disciplines, namely management, accounting and finance, has been implemented in Hong Kong senior secondary schools. A new assessment guide has been also proposed in light of the new curriculum. Such business curriculum and assessment reform move in the…

  13. Investigating the Viability of a Competency-Based, Qualitative Laboratory Assessment Model in First-Year Undergraduate Chemistry

    Pullen, Reyne; Thickett, Stuart C.; Bissember, Alex C.

    2018-01-01

    In chemistry curricula, both the role of the laboratory program and the method of assessment used are subject to scrutiny and debate. The ability to identify clearly defined competencies for the chemistry laboratory program is crucial, given the numerous other disciplines that rely on foundation-level chemistry knowledge and practical skills. In…

  14. Conceptualization and Pilot Testing of a Core Competency-Based Training Workshop in Suicide Risk Assessment and Management: Notes From the Field.

    Cramer, Robert J; Bryson, Claire N; Eichorst, Morgam K; Keyes, Lee N; Ridge, Brittany E

    2017-03-01

    As professional psychology training programs and continuing education have moved toward competency based approaches, it has become equally important to develop uniform, evidence-based approaches for suicide risk assessment and management. The present article presents a workshop curriculum based on established core competencies in suicide risk assessment and management. Drawing on theories suicide risk formation, the workshop features an integration of didactic, process, and experiential components. We present pilot data from 2 small group workshops (n = 17): 1 from a clinical psychology doctoral program and 1 from a university counseling center. Workshop participation yielded increases in (a) the ability to recognize appropriate clinician responses to suicidal client statements, (b) self-perceptions of general capacity to interface with suicidal patients and mastery of the 10 core competencies, (c) factual knowledge concerning suicide risk assessment and management, and (d) the self-rated ability to assess and manage a suicidal patient. We discuss statistical and generalizability limitations as well as implications for future modification, implementation, and provision of this training method. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. When Failure Is Not An Option: Designing Competency-Based Pathways for Next Generation Learning

    Sturgis, Chris; Patrick, Susan

    2010-01-01

    This exploration into competency-based innovation at the school, district, and state levels suggests that competency-based pathways are a re-engineering of this nation's education system around learning--a re-engineering designed for success in which failure is no longer an option. Competency-based approaches build upon standards reforms, offering…

  16. Assessing construction innovation: theoretical and practical perspectives

    Peter Davis

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Innovation is key for productivity improvement and advancements in different sectors of the economy, including the construction sector.  The criticism of the slow pace of innovation in construction industry may be unwarranted, considering the structure of the industry and nature of the construction business.  The loosely coupled nature of firms, mostly Small and Medium Enterprises (SME’s, delivering ‘projects’ through partial engagement, together with the distinction between the project innovation and firm innovation makes it difficult to extract innovations in a meaningful way.  The problem also lies in conceptualising, defining, articulating and assessing innovation in construction.  The literature is replete with research into construction innovation, however, there is limited research into understanding how innovation is perceived and narrated in practice.  The paper aims to explore how innovation is assessed and narrated in construction, specifically analysing theory and practice perspectives.  A theoretical model was constructed from a structured literature review illustrating existing discourse and narratives of construction innovation assessment.  A qualitative analysis of ‘Professional Excellence in Building’ submission documents to the Australian Institute of Building was performed to identify the practice perspective of innovation.  The findings suggest that internal organizational and process innovation account for the majority of improvements identified.  Importantly a taxonomy of narrative is developed that articulates how the construction industry in Australia views industry innovation.

  17. Assessment of Innovation Effects of Mergers

    Kern, Benjamin René

    2015-01-01

    Summary of Doctoral Dissertation Assessment of Innovation Effects of Mergers The adequate consideration of innovation effects of mergers in merger review was, and still is, one of the most controversially discussed issues between antitrust scholars. In this connection the question has been raised whether the traditional categories in competition law are sufficiently suitable for dealing with innovation aspects or whether new ...

  18. Acceptability, Feasibility and Feedback Analysis of Perception for Objective Structured Practical Examination As an Assessment Tool in Undergraduate in Competency Based Medical Education

    Harsha V. Patil

    2016-04-01

    additional assessing tool in competency based medical education. We favor introduction of OSPE method of evaluation in our setup as it covers all domains and different aspects.

  19. ASSESSMENT OF QUALITY OF INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES

    Larisa Alexejevna Ismagilova; Nadegda Aleksandrovna Sukhova

    2016-01-01

    We consider the topical issue of implementation of innovative technologies in the aircraft engine building industry. In this industry, products with high reliability requirements are developed and mass-produced. These products combine the latest achievements of science and technology. To make a decision on implementation of innovative technologies, a comprehensive assessment is carried out. It affects the efficiency of the innovations realization. In connection with this, the assessment of qu...

  20. Technology Audit: Assessment of Innovative Portfolio

    Kurushina Viktoria

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the features of the technological audit performing in the companies of oil and gas sector of Russian economy. To measure the innovations quality level the scale was developed based on the Theory of Inventive Problem Solving and the theory of technological structures. Figures of the innovations quantity by levels, volume and quality of the innovative portfolio are offered for assessment the innovative portfolio quality. The method was tested on an example of oil and gas transporting enterprises. The results of the comparative analysis of innovative portfolio are shown.

  1. ASSESSMENT OF QUALITY OF INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES

    Larisa Alexejevna Ismagilova

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We consider the topical issue of implementation of innovative technologies in the aircraft engine building industry. In this industry, products with high reliability requirements are developed and mass-produced. These products combine the latest achievements of science and technology. To make a decision on implementation of innovative technologies, a comprehensive assessment is carried out. It affects the efficiency of the innovations realization. In connection with this, the assessment of quality of innovative technologies is a key aspect in the selection of technological processes for their implementation. Problems concerning assessment of the quality of new technologies and processes of production are considered in the suggested method with respect to new positions. The developed method of assessing the quality of innovative technologies stands out for formed system of the qualimetric characteristics ensuring the effectiveness, efficiency, adaptability of innovative technologies and processes. The feature of suggested system of assessment is that it is based on principles of matching and grouping of quality indicators of innovative technologies and the characteristics of technological processes. The indicators are assessed from the standpoint of feasibility, technologies competiveness and commercial demand of products. In this paper, we discuss the example of implementing the approach of assessing the quality of the innovative technology of high-tech products such as turbine aircraft engine.

  2. Qualitative assessment of innovations in healthcare provision

    Ghosh Amit K

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The triad of quality, innovation and economic restraint is as important in health care as it is in the business world. There are many proposals for the assessment of quality and of economic restraints in health care but only a few address assessment of innovations. We propose a strategy and new structures to standardize the description of health care innovations and to quantify them. Discussion Strategy and structure are based on the assumption that in the early phase of an innovation only data on the feasibility and possibly on the efficacy or effectiveness of an innovation can be expected. From the patient's perspective, benefit resulting from an innovation can be confirmed only in a later phase of development. Early indicators of patient's benefit will be surrogate parameters which correlate only weakly with the desired endpoints. After the innovation has been in use, there will be more evidence on correlations between surrogate parameters and the desired endpoints to provide evidence of the patient benefit. From an administrative perspective, this evidence can be considered in decisions about public financing. Different criteria are proposed for the assessment of innovations in prevention, diagnosis and therapy. For decisions on public financing a public fund for innovations may be helpful. Depending on the phase of innovation risk sharing models are proposed between manufacturers, private insurers and public funding. Summary Potential for patient benefit is always uncertain during early stages of innovations. This uncertainty decreases with increasing information on the effects of the innovation. Information about an innovation can be quantified, categorized and integrated into rational economic decisions.

  3. Impact assessment of agricultural innovations: a review

    Juan Carlos Barrientos-Fuentes

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The current conditions of the markets and favorable policies, as well as the progress of science and communications, are promoting further development and diffusion of agricultural innovations, which have effects on different areas of agrarian development. The objective of this paper is to present a review of characteristics of agricultural innovations and their diffusion, adoption and impacts, as well as an update of the types and methods of assessment. Agricultural innovations are not only new or improved products, they are also models and systems, and should have a positive social effect. Innovation areas in developing countries are more concentrated on production and distribution, whereas developed countries concentrate on offering inputs. Investments from the private sector in agricultural innovations are growing faster than those from the public sector. The adoption of innovations is medium-term, and usually less than 100%. The impact of innovations includes intermediate areas, such as institutional, political, scientific and productive areas. The economic efficiency of the investment in innovations is the most often mentioned purpose of impact assessments in the literature. The efficiency analysis (ex-post and its surplus approach is still the most used method for assessing impact of agricultural innovations. Nevertheless, other goals are becoming more important, such as food security, environmental protection and poverty reduction. Livelihood, comprehensive and multidimensional approaches go beyond the economic approach. Moreover, specific models with advantages of prognosis and improved precision are replacing or complementing the classic socio-economic approach

  4. Competency-based education in anesthesiology: history and challenges.

    Ebert, Thomas J; Fox, Chris A

    2014-01-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education is transitioning to a competency-based system with milestones to measure progress and define success of residents. The confines of the time-based residency will be relaxed. Curriculum must be redesigned and assessments will need to be precise and in-depth. Core anesthesiology faculty will be identified and will be the "trained observers" of the residents' progress. There will be logistic challenges requiring creative management by program directors. There may be residents who achieve "expert" status earlier than the required 36 months of clinical anesthesia education, whereas others may struggle to achieve acceptable status and will require additional education time. Faculty must accept both extremes without judgment. Innovative new educational opportunities will need to be created for fast learners. Finally, it will be important that residents embrace this change. This will require programs to clearly define the specific aims and measurement endpoints for advancement and success.

  5. Application of competency-based education in laparoscopic training.

    Xue, Dongbo; Bo, Hong; Zhang, Weihui; Zhao, Song; Meng, Xianzhi; Zhang, Donghua

    2015-01-01

    To induce competency-based education/developing a curriculum in the training of postgraduate students in laparoscopic surgery. This study selected postgraduate students before the implementation of competency-based education (n = 16) or after the implementation of competency-based education (n = 17). On the basis of the 5 competencies of patient care, medical knowledge, practice-based learning and improvement, interpersonal and communication skills, and professionalism, the research team created a developing a curriculum chart and specific improvement measures that were implemented in the competency-based education group. On the basis of the developing a curriculum chart, the assessment of the 5 comprehensive competencies using the 360° assessment method indicated that the competency-based education group's competencies were significantly improved compared with those of the traditional group (P The improvement in the comprehensive assessment was also significant compared with the traditional group (P The implementation of competency-based education/developing a curriculum teaching helps to improve the comprehensive competencies of postgraduate students and enables them to become qualified clinicians equipped to meet society's needs.

  6. When Success Is the Only Option: Designing Competency-Based Pathways for Next Generation Learning

    Sturgis, Chris; Patrick, Susan

    2010-01-01

    This exploration into competency-based innovation at the school, district, and state levels suggests that competency-based pathways are a re-engineering of this nation's education system around learning--a re-engineering designed for success in which failure is no longer viable. This discussion draws on interviews and site visits with innovators…

  7. Competency-based education and training in internal medicine.

    Weinberger, Steven E; Pereira, Anne G; Iobst, William F; Mechaber, Alex J; Bronze, Michael S

    2010-12-07

    Recent efforts to improve medical education include adopting a new framework based on 6 broad competencies defined by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. In this article, the Alliance for Academic Internal Medicine Education Redesign Task Force II examines the advantages and challenges of a competency-based educational framework for medical residents. Efforts to refine specific competencies by developing detailed milestones are described, and examples of training program initiatives using a competency-based approach are presented. Meeting the challenges of a competency-based framework and supporting these educational innovations require a robust faculty development program. Challenges to competency-based education include teaching and evaluating the competencies related to practice-based learning and improvement and systems-based practice, as well as implementing a flexible time frame to achieve competencies. However, the Alliance for Academic Internal Medicine Education Redesign Task Force II does not favor reducing internal medicine training to less than 36 months as part of competency-based education. Rather, the 36-month time frame should allow for remediation to address deficiencies in achieving competencies and for diverse enrichment experiences in such areas as quality of care and practice improvement for residents who have demonstrated skills in all required competencies.

  8. Competency Based Hospital Radiopharmacy Training

    2010-01-01

    Quality management systems in nuclear medicine are vital to a high level of nuclear medicine (NM) practice. Trained and competent staffs are essential for achieving high standards and growth in NM. One of the key bottlenecks for NM is the shortfall in human resources, especially of radiopharmacists. There is an acute shortage in most Member States and in some countries an absence of nationally registered pharmacists with radiopharmacy experience. Most nuclear medicine facilities operate their radiopharmacies (commonly referred to as the hot laboratories) with the support of technologists and radiographers. Recent surveys have found the level of training amongst technologists to be extremely variable. Most had little or no training in hot laboratory practices. The survey also indicated the poor state of hot laboratories in many countries. Basic quality systems in the hot laboratory could be improved significantly with better training. This competency-based education manual is designed with those radiopharmacy practitioners in mind. This competency-based trainer's manual provides trainers in each of the IAEA regions with the essentials of a training programme for all radiopharmacy practitioners. The competency-based training is a two week programme followed up with three months of practice achievements. The syllabus provides a standardized approach to lectures, practical sessions, and interactive workshops focusing on critical aspects of hot laboratory practices. The trainers, with the assistance of this manual, can deliver essential skills, competencies, and underpinning knowledge to operate safely and effectively in their hot laboratory. The course focuses on simple but practical steps that could be undertaken to improve staff performance. In addition, a basic framework of quality management principles related to radiopharmacy practices is also covered. Further, the syllabus can be adapted to the particular needs and characteristics of any training centre, country

  9. Innovative Tools to Assess Systems Thinking Ability

    2017-12-01

    addition to the six cognitive ability constructs, there are two motivational attributes that are highly relevant to systems thinking performance...roles of the habenular complex, the reward system , and the cingulate motor area revealed by functional magnetic resonance imaging. Journal of...Technical Report 1362 Innovative Tools to Assess Systems Thinking Ability Cory Adis Michelle Wisecarver Chelsey Raber Personnel

  10. Assessment of the innovative quality of agomelatine through the Innovation Assessment Algorithm

    Liliana Civalleri

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: the aim of this study was to assess the innovative quality of a medicine based on agomelatine, authorized by the European Commission through a centralized procedure on 19th February 2009 and distributed in Italy under the brands Valdoxan® and Thymanax®.Methodology: the degree of innovation of agomelatine was determined through the Innovation Assessment Algorithm (IAA, which considers the innovative quality of a medicine as a combination of multiple properties. The algorithm may be represented as a decision tree, with each branch corresponding to a property connected with innovation and having a fixed numerical value. The sum of these values establishes the degree of innovation of the medicine. The IAA is articulated in two phases: the first assesses the efficacy of the drug based on the clinical trials presented in support of the registration application (IAA-efficacy; the second reconsiders the degree of innovation on the basis of the efficacy and safety data resulting from clinical practice once the drug has been placed on the market (IAA-effectiveness.Results and conclusions: the score obtained for agomelatine was 592.73 in the efficacy phase and 291.3 in the effectiveness phase. The total score for the two phases was 884, which is equivalent to a good degree of innovation for the molecule

  11. Competency-based education: programme design and challenges to implementation.

    Gruppen, Larry D; Burkhardt, John C; Fitzgerald, James T; Funnell, Martha; Haftel, Hilary M; Lypson, Monica L; Mullan, Patricia B; Santen, Sally A; Sheets, Kent J; Stalburg, Caren M; Vasquez, John A

    2016-05-01

    Competency-based education (CBE) has been widely cited as an educational framework for medical students and residents, and provides a framework for designing educational programmes that reflect four critical features: a focus on outcomes, an emphasis on abilities, a reduction of emphasis on time-based training, and promotion of learner centredness. Each of these features has implications and potential challenges for implementing CBE. As an experiment in CBE programme design and implementation, the University of Michigan Master of Health Professions Education (UM-MHPE) degree programme was examined for lessons to be learned when putting CBE into practice. The UM-MHPE identifies 12 educational competencies and 20 educational entrustable professional activities (EPAs) that serve as the vehicle for both learning and assessment. The programme also defines distinct roles of faculty members as assessors, mentors and subject-matter experts focused on highly individualised learning plans adapted to each learner. Early experience with implementing the UM-MHPE indicates that EPAs and competencies can provide a viable alternative to traditional courses and a vehicle for rigorous assessment. A high level of individualisation is feasible but carries with it significant costs and makes intentional community building essential. Most significantly, abandoning a time-based framework is a difficult innovation to implement in a university structure that is predicated on time-based education. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Competency-Based Business Degree. Issue Brief

    Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges, 2014

    2014-01-01

    In January 2015, thirteen Washington community colleges launched an online, competency-based business transfer degree--the first in the state's community and technical college system. This issue brief provides answers to commonly asked questions about the new competency-based degree.

  13. Nurse Educator Pathway Project: a competency-based intersectoral curriculum.

    Young, Lynne; Frost, Linda J; Bigl, Julie; Clauson, Marion; McRae, Cora; Scarborough, Kathy S; Murphy, Sue; Jillings, Carol; Gillespie, Frank

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we begin by providing an overview of the Educator Pathway Project (EPP), an education infrastructure that was developed in response to emerging critical nursing workplace issues, and the related demand for enhanced workplace education. We then describe the EPP competency-based curriculum designed to prepare nurses as preceptors, mentors, and educators to lead learning with diverse learner groups. This competency-based curriculum was developed through a collaboration of nurse leaders across practice, academic, and union sectors and drew from a widely embraced curriculum development model (Iwasiw, Goldenberg, & Andrusyzyn, 2005). The goal of the curriculum was to prepare nurses through a four-level career pathway model that contextualized practice and education theory to various education-related roles and levels of experience within the practice setting. Over 1,100 nurses participated in this innovative intersectoral nursing initiative.

  14. Competitive Debate as Competency-Based Learning: Civic Engagement and Next-Generation Assessment in the Era of the Common Core Learning Standards

    McIntosh, Jonathan; Milam, Myra

    2016-01-01

    As the adoption and execution of the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) have steadily increased, the debate community is presented with an opportunity to be more forward thinking and sustainable through the translation to curriculum planning and next-generation assessment as a movement towards Performance-Based Assessments. This paper focuses on…

  15. IMPLEMENTING A VALUE ASSESSMENT TOOL FOR SERVICE INNOVATION IDEAS

    TOR HELGE AAS

    2010-01-01

    There has not been much discussion of how firms may assess the value of service innovation projects ex-ante in the extant research literature. This paper theoretically derives a value assessment tool for service innovation ideas called QSI (tool for pre-Qualification of Service Innovation projects). Thereafter QSI is implemented in three firms and it is explored to what degree the implementation improved managerial decision making on service innovation projects and investments. The findings i...

  16. Competency-Based Instruction for Marketing Students.

    Heath, Betty; Williams, Terry M.

    1982-01-01

    Which method of instruction is more effective for postsecondary students: competency-based or traditional? This study reveals that the effectiveness of one method over the other depends on work experience of the student. (Author)

  17. Guidelines for Developing Competency-Based Curriculum.

    Goodson, Ludy

    1979-01-01

    Presents guidelines for the development of competency-based curriculum formulated as a result of an automotive mechanics curriculum workshop. Listed are specific guidelines for content development, writing style, and illustration. (LRA)

  18. [Concept analysis "Competency-based education"].

    Loosli, Clarence

    2016-03-01

    Competency-based education (CBE) stands out at global level as the best educational practice. Indeed, CBE is supposed to improve the quality of care provided by newly graduated nurses. Yet, there is a dearth of knowledge in nursing literature regarding CBE concept's definition. CBE is implemented differently in each entity even inside the same discipline in a single country. What accounts for CBE in nursing education ? to clarify CBE concept meaning according to literature review in order to propose a definition. Wilson concept analysis method framed our literature review through two databases: CINHAL and ERIC. following the 11 Wilson techniques analysis, we identified CBE concept as a multidimensional concept clustering three dimensions : learning, teaching and assessment. nurses educators are accountable for providing performants newly graduated professional to the society. Schools should struggle for the visibility and the transparency of means they are using to accomplish their educational activities. This first attempt to understand CBE concept opens a matter of debate concerning further development and clarification of the concept. This first description of CBE concept is a step toward its identification and assessment.

  19. An assessment method for system innovation and transition (AMSIT)

    Bos, Marc W.; Hofman, Erwin; Kuhlmann, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    To address comprehensive system innovations that may occur in a future transition, a suitable ex ante assessment method is required. The technological innovation system approach is useful for the retrospective study of the conditions for success or failure of innovation trajectories, and the

  20. Assessment of innovative potential of the region

    A. S. Sazonova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of innovative-oriented processes of transformation of the Russian economy at the current stage of development requires the formation of regional innovation systems that predetermine the growing competitiveness of the national economy in the future. The optimal functioning of the innovation system of the region as the most important link in the national innovation system depends on the availability, condition and level of development of its innovative potential, which in turn determines the economic growth of not only a single region, but the country as a whole. The essence and structure of innovative potential of organizational systems are considered in the article. The main approaches to the definition of the concept of innovative potential and the definition of the content of the concept are analyzed. An approach to the formation of an integrated indicator is proposed. The integrated indicator of the region's innovative potential was calculated using the area diagram method. The values of the innovation potential for the regions of the Central Federal District were calculated and the ranking of the regions was performed in accordance with the final value. Conclusion. To build a model for innovative development of the region, it is necessary to analyze the components of the innovation potential, its evaluation, and a possible development forecast for the coming years. Voronezh, Tula and Kostroma and Belgorod regions have high rates for the Central Federal District. Ryazan, Smolensk and Kostroma oblasts have rather low indicators in comparison with other regions.

  1. Quality Management Plan for the Environmental Assessment and Innovation Division

    Quality management plan (QMP) which identifies the mission, roles, responsibilities of personnel with regard to quality assurance and quality management for the environmental assessment and innovation division.

  2. Innovative Assessment Paradigm to Enhance Student Learning in Engineering Education

    El-Maaddawy, Tamer

    2017-01-01

    Incorporation of student self-assessment (SSA) in engineering education offers opportunities to support and encourage learner-led-learning. This paper presents an innovative assessment paradigm that integrates formative, summative, and SSA to enhance student learning. The assessment innovation was implemented in a senior-level civil engineering…

  3. Assessment of logistic outsourcing of the innovatively-active enterprise

    E.A. Belovodskaya; D.A. Latunova

    2013-01-01

    Assessment of logistic outsourcing of the innovatively-active enterpriseThe aim of the article. The object of this article is a comparative analysis, systematization of assessment methods and methodological approach development to assess the logistics outsourcing assessment of the innovatively active enterprise. The results of the analysis. Due to our research, five approaches for outsourcing assessment were identified.The first approach suggests such way of outsourcing efficiency assessment:...

  4. Assessment and diffusion of medical innovations in France: an overview.

    Dubromel, Amélie; Geffroy, Loïc; Aulagner, Gilles; Dussart, Claude

    2018-01-01

    Background: In France, a significant part of health expenditure is publicly funding. This put a heavy burden on society. In an economic context requiring tight control of public spending, it seems relevant to control the diffusion of medical innovations. That is why health technology assessment is subject to an increasing interest at national level for management and approval decisions. This article provides an overview of the assessment and diffusion of medical innovation in France. Method: The data are extracted from French authorities or organisations websites and documents and from French legislative texts. In addition, regarding discussion, a search in MEDLINE database was carried out. Results: An overview of the assessment and diffusion of medical innovation in France is given by presenting the different types of medical innovations according to French health system definition (I); introducing French authorities participating to health technology assessment and describe assessment procedures of medical innovations (II); and giving details about market access process of innovative health product in France (III). Key opportunities and challenges of medical innovation assessment and diffusion in France are discussed at the end of this article. Conclusion: In France, medical innovation is considered as a crucial component for quality of care and performance of healthcare system. The aim of health technology assessment is to promote a secure and timely access to innovation for patients. Nevertheless, it appears necessary to improve regulatory mechanisms.

  5. ASSESSMENT OF HUMAN RESOURCES FOR REGIONAL INNOVATION ACTIVITY

    R. R. Lukyanova

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the issues of human resource development regarding an innovation activity. Concepts of labor and human resources have been surveyed. An integral index for assessment of human resources for regional innovation activity has been developed and assessment of the Russian regions has been made on the basis of it. Development tendencies of modern human resources for innovation activity in Russia have been revealed.

  6. Innovative technique for assessment of groundwater quality

    Ahmad, N.; Ahmad, M.; Sajjad, M.I.

    2001-07-01

    Groundwater quality of a part of Chaj Doab has been assessed with innovative techniques which are not reported in literature. The concept of triangular coordinates is modified by multi-rectangular ones for the classification of major cations and anions analysed in the ground water. A Multi-Rectangular Diagram (MRD) has been developed with the combination of rectangular coordinates by virtue of which milli-equivalent per liter percentages (meq/1%) of major cations and anions could be classified into different categories more efficiently as compared to classical trilinear diagrams. Both Piper diagram and MRD are used for the assessment of 259 data sets analysed from ground water of Chaj Doab area, Pakistan. The differentiated ground water types with MRD in the study area are calcium bicarbonate, magnesium bicarbonate, sodium bicarbonate and sodium sulfate. Sodium bicarbonate type emerges as the most abundant type of ground water in the study area. A map showing spatial variation of groundwater quality has been constructed with the help of MRD. This map shows that, in the vicinity of rivers Chenab and Jhelum, calcium bicarbonate type of waters occur while the central area is mainly covered by sodium bicarbonate dominant waters. Groundwaters near the upper Jhelum canal are dominant in sodium sulfate. An important relation between calcium and sodium is proposed which explains the movement history of groundwater in the aquifer. Hydrogeochemical processes have been evaluated with new methods. Ion exchange between calcium and sodium, precipitation of calcium bicarbonate and dissolution of rock forming minerals are the major delineated hydrogeochemical processes. (author)

  7. Origins of Competency-Based Training

    McCowan, Richard J.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the theories and social factors that contributed to the development of competency-based training (CBT). These include behaviorism (Edward L. Thorndike), scientific management (Frederick Taylor), progressive education (John Dewey), and derivative theories including operant conditioning (B.F. Skinner), objectives-based…

  8. Competency-based continuing professional development

    Campbell, Craig; Silver, Ivan; Sherbino, Jonathan; Ten Cate, Olle; Holmboe, Eric S.

    2010-01-01

    Competence is traditionally viewed as the attainment of a static set of attributes rather than a dynamic process in which physicians continuously use their practice experiences to "progress in competence'' toward the attainment of expertise. A competency-based continuing professional development

  9. Competency based ophthalmology training curriculum for ...

    Background: The establishment of a credible, defensible and acceptable “formal competency based ophthalmology training curriculum for undergraduate medical and dental students” is fundamental to program recognition, monitoring and evaluation. The University of Zimbabwe College of Health Sciences (UZ-CHS) has ...

  10. Assessment of Innovation and Performance in the Fruit Chain; The Innovation-Performance Matrix

    Trienekens, J.H.; Uffelen, van R.L.M.; Debaire, J.; Omta, S.W.F.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose - This paper aims to bridge the concepts of innovation and performance and to develop a framework to assess innovation and performance in food chains. Design/methodology/approach - Based on an extensive literature search the paper identifies critical success factors (CSFs) and related

  11. Innovative and Alternative Technology Assessment Manual

    None

    1980-02-01

    This four chapter, six appendix manual presents the procedures and methodology as well as the baseline costs and energy information necessary for the analysis and evaluation of innovative and alternative technology applications submitted for federal grant assistance under the innovative and alternative technology provisions of the Clean Water Act of 1977. The manual clarifies and interprets the intent of Congress and the Environmental Protection Agency in carrying out the mandates of the innovative and alternative provisions of the Clean Water Act of 1977. [DJE 2005

  12. ASSESSMENT BASIS OF INNOVATIVE DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY

    Alexander O. Bebris

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article provides a brief description of modern concept of strategic management and provides the effectiveness principles for the strategy of modern ventures innovative development. The article refers to the management of ventures strategic development.

  13. Innovation in pressure tube life assessment

    Guler, B.; Kalenchuk, D.; Celovsky, A.

    2003-01-01

    The hydrogen equivalent concentration and the rate of hydrogen ingress (in particular, deuterium) in pressure tubes are important parameters that must be assessed to determine the fitness-for-service of CANDU reactors. This paper presents the latest refinement in a process referred to as 'Pressure Tube Sampling', which is the only fully qualified and proven method that allows accurate determination of both the hydrogen equivalent concentration and the rate deuterium ingress without performing an expensive fuel channel removal. Pressure Tube Sampling has evolved over the past fifteen years during which over 2,300 samples have been obtained from CANDU reactors around the globe. In-reactor sampling is the standard method for determining the hydrogen equivalent concentrations and deuterium ingress rates in CANDU reactors. Over the past fifteen years, continual improvements in the Pressure Tube Sampling process have resulted in: the capability to obtain circumferential and axial samples, reduced 'on-face' time, reduced cost, reduced dose to workers, and improved analysis accuracy. Most recently, the new Multi-Head Sampling Tool (MHST) has been developed that continues this trend by using one tool to sample at all four axial pressure tube locations in a single visit to the fuel channel, thereby further improving efficiency. In 2001 October, the MHST was successfully deployed at Wolsong 1 by AECL for Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power. The tool was delivered using their Advanced Delivery Machine (ADM) and a total of sixteen samples were obtained from four channels. A significant saving in time was achieved with a rate of one channel (four samples) being sampled every 2 1/2 hours. For a typical 10-channel campaign, this could equate to a 2 to 3 days time/saving, which is significant in terms of outage schedule, cost, and worker dose. This paper provides a description of some of the latest innovations, with specific details on site application, performance, and end results

  14. Assessment of the impact of innovation processes: methodological approaches

    Demilkhanova B.A.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available in the article the prospects of development of innovative processes at a regional level the system of indicators of assessment effective components of innovation potential of the region. A conclusion about the predominance in the economy of the regions under study investment options for updating technology has been made based on the calculation and analysis of indicators of innovation investment in the fixed capital.

  15. All Hands on Deck: Ten Lessons from Early Adopters of Competency-Based Education

    Book, Patricia A.

    2014-01-01

    The perceived value of postsecondary education to economic competitiveness and individual success is driving innovation in higher education. Competency-based education (CBE) is the latest disruption that seeks to respond to the growing sense of national urgency to boost education attainment. The target audience generally includes those adult…

  16. CYBER FORENSICS COMPETENCY-BASED FRAMEWORK - AREVIEW

    Elfadil Sabeil; Azizah Bt Abdul Manaf; Zuraini Ismail; Mohamed Abas

    2011-01-01

    Lack of Cyber Forensics experts is a huge challenge facing the world today. It comes due to the fancy of Cyber Forensics training or education. The multidisciplinary nature of Cyber Forensics proliferates to diverse training programmes, from a handful day‟s workshop to Postgraduate in Cyber Forensics. Consequently, this paper concentrates on analyzing the Cyber Forensics training programmes in terms of Competency-Based Framework. The study proves that Cyber Forensics training or education h...

  17. Adopsi Model Competency Based Training dalam Kewirausahaan

    I Ketut Santra

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the research is improving the teaching method in entrepreneurship subject. This research adopted the competency based training (CBT) into the entrepreneurship. The major task in this research is formulated and designed the entrepreneurship competency. Entrepreneurship competency indicated by Personal, Strategic and Situational and Business competence. All of entrepreneurship competences are described into sub topic of competence. After designing and formulating the game and simulat...

  18. Bariatric surgery: assessing opportunities for value innovation.

    Tarantino, David P; Smith, Darlene B

    2005-03-01

    Obesity has been increasing over the past two decades, and the amount of medical and media attention given to bariatric surgery as a promising option for morbidly obese individuals is growing. The growth of bariatric surgery also has been attributed to improved surgical technique, the increase in surgeons trained in laparoscopic procedures, as well increased public awareness with celebrities having successfully undergone surgery. The number of surgeons and hospitals offering bariatric services is increasing. How then does a surgeon or a hospital develop a competitive strategy? The first step is to understand the health-care industry. The key forces are rivalry among present competitors, and the bargaining power of suppliers and buyers. While bariatric surgery currently is in a growth phase, time and competition will force practitioners to compete on the basis of price, unless they find true competitive advantage. Value innovation, is a means of creating new marketing space by looking across the conventionally defined boundaries of business--across substitute industries, across strategic groups, across buyer groups, across complementary product and service offerings, and across the functional-emotional orientation of an industry. One can compete by offering similar services focusing primarily on cost efficiencies as the key to profitability. Alternatively, one can break free from the pack by innovating and focusing on delivering superior value to the customer. As the market for bariatric surgery becomes increasingly overcrowded, profitable growth is not sustainable without developing a clear differential advantage in the market. Value innovation allows you to develop that advantage.

  19. Reaching an understanding innovations in how we view reading assessment

    Sabatini, John; O'Reilly, Tenaha

    2012-01-01

    Reaching an Understanding: Innovations in How We View Reading Assessment builds upon the editors previous book Measuring Up: Advances in How We Assess Reading Ability by representing some early attempts to apply theory to help guide the development of new assessments and measurement models.

  20. Assessing public leadership styles for innovation

    Ricard, Lykke Margot; Klijn, Erik Hans; Lewis, Jenny M.

    2017-01-01

    This article explores which leadership qualities public managers regard as important for public innovation. It is based on a survey of 365 senior public managers in Copenhagen, Rotterdam and Barcelona. Five perspectives on leadership were identified and tested using a number of items. Some...... of these proved to be more robust than others. Analysis of the three cities reveals a nuanced set of leadership styles, which include a transformational style, and one that is more dedicated to motivating employees, risk-taking and including others in decision-making. This suggests the need for more research...

  1. Competency-Based Education: A Framework for Measuring Quality Courses

    Krause, Jackie; Dias, Laura Portolese; Schedler, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The growth of competency-based education in an online environment requires the development and measurement of quality competency-based courses. While quality measures for online courses have been developed and standardized, they do not directly align with emerging best practices and principles in the design of quality competency-based online…

  2. Tactical medicine--competency-based guidelines.

    Schwartz, Richard Bruce; McManus, John G; Croushorn, John; Piazza, Gina; Coule, Phillip L; Gibbons, Mark; Bollard, Glenn; Ledrick, David; Vecchio, Paul; Lerner, E Brooke

    2011-01-01

    Tactical emergency medical support (TEMS) is a rapidly growing area within the field of prehospital medicine. As TEMS has grown, multiple training programs have emerged. A review of the existing programs demonstrated a lack of competency-based education. To develop educational competencies for TEMS as a first step toward enhancing accountability. As an initial attempt to establish accepted outcome-based competencies, the National Tactical Officers Association (NTOA) convened a working group of subject matter experts. This working group drafted a competency-based educational matrix consisting of 18 educational domains. Each domain included competencies for four educational target audiences (operator, medic, team commander, and medical director). The matrix was presented to the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) Tactical Emergency Medicine Section members. A modified Delphi technique was utilized for the NTOA and ACEP groups, which allowed for additional expert input and consensus development. The resultant matrix can serve as the basic educational standard around which TEMS training organizations can design programs of study for the four target audiences.

  3. Competency-Based Training and Simulation: Making a "Valid" Argument.

    Noureldin, Yasser A; Lee, Jason Y; McDougall, Elspeth M; Sweet, Robert M

    2018-02-01

    The use of simulation as an assessment tool is much more controversial than is its utility as an educational tool. However, without valid simulation-based assessment tools, the ability to objectively assess technical skill competencies in a competency-based medical education framework will remain challenging. The current literature in urologic simulation-based training and assessment uses a definition and framework of validity that is now outdated. This is probably due to the absence of awareness rather than an absence of comprehension. The following review article provides the urologic community an updated taxonomy on validity theory as it relates to simulation-based training and assessments and translates our simulation literature to date into this framework. While the old taxonomy considered validity as distinct subcategories and focused on the simulator itself, the modern taxonomy, for which we translate the literature evidence, considers validity as a unitary construct with a focus on interpretation of simulator data/scores.

  4. A single competency-based education and training and competency-based career framework for the Australian health workforce: discussing the potential value add

    Brownie, Sharon Mary; Thomas, Janelle

    2014-01-01

    This brief discusses the policy implications of a research study commissioned by Health Workforce Australia (HWA) within its health workforce innovation and reform work program. The project explored conceptually complex and operationally problematic concepts related to developing a whole-of-workforce competency-based education and training and competency-based career framework for the Australian health workforce and culminated with the production of three reports published by HWA. The project raised important queries as to whether such a concept is desirable, feasible or implementable – in short what is the potential value add and is it achievable? In setting the scene for discussion, the foundation of the project’s genesis and focus of the study are highlighted. A summary of key definitions related to competency-based education and training frameworks and competency-based career frameworks are provided to further readers’ commonality of understanding. The nature of the problem to be solved is explored and the potential value-add for the Australian health workforce and its key constituents proposed. The paper concludes by discussing relevance and feasibility issues within Australia’s current and changing healthcare context along with the essential steps and implementation realities that would need to be considered and actioned if whole-of-workforce frameworks were to be developed and implemented. PMID:25279384

  5. A Comparative Study of Competency-Based Courses Demonstrating a Potential Measure of Course Quality and Student Success

    Krause, Jackie; Dias, Laura Portolese; Schedler, Chris

    2015-01-01

    While competency-based education is growing, standardized tools for evaluating the unique characteristics of course design in this domain are still under development. This preliminary research study evaluated the effectiveness of a rubric developed for assessing course design of competency-based courses in an undergraduate Information Technology…

  6. Validation of a rubric to assess innovation competence

    Frances Watts

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the development and validation of rubrics, materials and situations for the assessment of innovation competence. Research was carried out to verify the viability of the first draft of the assessment criteria, which led to refinement of the criteria and proposals to enhance the ensuing validation process that will include students and raters of different language backgrounds.

  7. Project Spectrum: An Innovative Assessment Alternative.

    Krechevsky, Mara

    1991-01-01

    Project Spectrum attempts to reconceptualize the traditional linguistic and logical/mathematical bases of intelligence. Spectrum blurs the line between curriculum and assessment, embeds assessment in meaningful, real-world activities, uses "intelligence-fair" measures, emphasizes children's strengths, and recognizes the stylistic…

  8. Competency Based Hospital Radiopharmacy Training. Additional Information

    2010-01-01

    Quality management systems in nuclear medicine are vital to a high level of nuclear medicine (NM) practice. Trained and competent staffs are essential for achieving high standards and growth in NM. One of the key bottlenecks for NM is the shortfall in human resources, especially of radiopharmacists. There is an acute shortage in most Member States and in some countries an absence of nationally registered pharmacists with radiopharmacy experience. Most nuclear medicine facilities operate their radiopharmacies (commonly referred to as the hot laboratories) with the support of technologists and radiographers. Recent surveys have found the level of training amongst technologists to be extremely variable. Most had little or no training in hot laboratory practices. The survey also indicated the poor state of hot laboratories in many countries. Basic quality systems in the hot laboratory could be improved significantly with better training. This competency-based education manual is designed with those radiopharmacy practitioners in mind. This competency-based trainer's manual provides trainers in each of the IAEA regions with the essentials of a training programme for all radiopharmacy practitioners. The competency-based training is a two week programme followed up with three months of practice achievements. The syllabus provides a standardized approach to lectures, practical sessions, and interactive workshops focusing on critical aspects of hot laboratory practices. The trainers, with the assistance of this manual, can deliver essential skills, competencies, and underpinning knowledge to operate safely and effectively in their hot laboratory. The course focuses on simple but practical steps that could be undertaken to improve staff performance. In addition, a basic framework of quality management principles related to radiopharmacy practices is also covered. Further, the syllabus can be adapted to the particular needs and characteristics of any training centre, country

  9. The Innovation Network Scoreboard: Towards key Performance Indicators for the Assessment of Innovation Networks

    Kohl, Holger; Cap, Jan-Patrick; Blaich, Erik; von Raesfeld Meijer, Ariane M.; Dameri, R.P.; Garelli, R.; Resta, M.; Beltrametti, L.

    2015-01-01

    This work operationalizes a framework for the assessment of innovation networks. While a theoretical framework provides value to scholars, practitioners require concrete methods and indicators that they can apply to their projects. Scholars face the same demand when conducting empirical research.

  10. Adopsi Model Competency Based Training dalam Kewirausahaan

    I Ketut Santra

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research is improving the teaching method in entrepreneurship subject. This research adopted the competency based training (CBT into the entrepreneurship. The major task in this research is formulated and designed the entrepreneurship competency. Entrepreneurship competency indicated by Personal, Strategic and Situational and Business competence. All of entrepreneurship competences are described into sub topic of competence. After designing and formulating the game and simulation the research continuing to implement the competency based training in the real class. The time consumed to implementing the CBT one semester, starting on September 2006 to early February 2007. The lesson learnt from the implementation period, the CBT could improve the student competence in Personal, Situational Strategic and Business. The three of the competencies are important for the success entrepreneur. It is a sign of application of “Kurikulum Berbasis Kompetensi”. There are many evidences to describe the achievement of the CBT in entrepreneurship subject. Firstly, physically achievement, that all of the student’s business plan could became the real business. The evidences are presented by picture of the student’s real business. Secondly theoretically achievement, that the Personal, Situational Strategic and Business competence statistically have significant relation with Business Plan even Real Business quality. The effect of the Personal, Situational Strategic and Business competence to Business Plan quality is 84.4%. and, to the Real Business quality 77.2%. The statistic’s evidence suggests that the redesign of the entrepreneurship subject is the right way. The content of the entrepreneur competence (Personal, Situational and Strategic and Business competence have impact to the student to conduct and running for own business.

  11. The JMC Innovation Project: A Pivotal Moment for Journalism, Media and Communication Education: Assessing the State of Innovation

    Richards, Allan; Fitzpatrick, Kathy R.

    2018-01-01

    The JMC Innovation Project recently released its first report, "The 'New' JMC: Creating Cultures of Innovation in Schools of Journalism, Media and Communication," which assessed the scope and status of innovation in schools and colleges of journalism, media and communication (JMC), based on personal interviews with 70 deans and directors…

  12. Implementation of Competency-Based Pharmacy Education (CBPE

    Andries Koster

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Implementation of competency-based pharmacy education (CBPE is a time-consuming, complicated process, which requires agreement on the tasks of a pharmacist, commitment, institutional stability, and a goal-directed developmental perspective of all stakeholders involved. In this article the main steps in the development of a fully-developed competency-based pharmacy curriculum (bachelor, master are described and tips are given for a successful implementation. After the choice for entering into CBPE is made and a competency framework is adopted (step 1, intended learning outcomes are defined (step 2, followed by analyzing the required developmental trajectory (step 3 and the selection of appropriate assessment methods (step 4. Designing the teaching-learning environment involves the selection of learning activities, student experiences, and instructional methods (step 5. Finally, an iterative process of evaluation and adjustment of individual courses, and the curriculum as a whole, is entered (step 6. Successful implementation of CBPE requires a system of effective quality management and continuous professional development as a teacher. In this article suggestions for the organization of CBPE and references to more detailed literature are given, hoping to facilitate the implementation of CBPE.

  13. Animal reintroductions: an innovative assessment of survival

    Muths, Erin L.; Bailey, Larissa L.; Watry, Mary Kay

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative evaluations of reintroductions are infrequent and assessments of milestones reached before a project is completed, or abandoned due to lack of funding, are rare. However, such assessments, which are promoted in adaptive management frameworks, are critical. Quantification can provide defensible estimates of biological success, such as the number of survivors from a released cohort, with associated cost per animal. It is unlikely that the global issues of endangered wildlife and population declines will abate, therefore, assurance colonies and reintroductions are likely to become more common. If such endeavors are to be successful biologically or achieve adequate funding, implementation must be more rigorous and accountable. We use a novel application of a multistate, robust design capture-recapture model to estimate survival of reintroduced tadpoles through metamorphosis (i.e., the number of individuals emerging from the pond) and thereby provide a quantitative measure of effort and success for an "in progress" reintroduction of toads. Our data also suggest that tadpoles released at later developmental stages have an increased probability of survival and that eggs laid in the wild hatched at higher rates than eggs laid by captive toads. We illustrate how an interim assessment can identify problems, highlight successes, and provide information for use in adjusting the effort or implementing a Decision-Theoretic adaptive management strategy.

  14. Innovation

    EPA frames innovation as critical to the protection of human health and the environment through initiatives such as sustainable practices, innovative research, prize competitions, innovation awards, partnerships, and community activities.

  15. Pilot Test of an Innovative Interprofessional Education Assessment Strategy

    Emmert, Michelle Christine

    2011-01-01

    The primary goal of this study was to test an innovative way of assessing students' teamwork skills in a controlled environment. Twenty-four second year students from Western University of Health Sciences (WesternU) participated in the experimental group and 22 third year students from WesternU participated in the control group. Students in the…

  16. Students as Tour Guides: Innovation in Fieldwork Assessment

    Coe, Neil M.; Smyth, Fiona M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper introduces and details an innovative mode of fieldcourse assessment in which students take on the role of tour guides to offer their lecturer and peers a themed, theoretically informed journey through the urban landscape of Havana, Cuba. Informed by notions of student-centered learning and mobile methods, the tour offers an enjoyable,…

  17. Review of early assessment models of innovative medical technologies

    Fasterholdt, Iben; Krahn, Murray D; Kidholm, Kristian

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Hospitals increasingly make decisions regarding the early development of and investment in technologies, but a formal evaluation model for assisting hospitals early on in assessing the potential of innovative medical technologies is lacking. This article provides an overview of models...

  18. Education in Pediatrics Across the Continuum (EPAC): First Steps Toward Realizing the Dream of Competency-Based Education.

    Andrews, John S; Bale, James F; Soep, Jennifer B; Long, Michele; Carraccio, Carol; Englander, Robert; Powell, Deborah

    2018-03-01

    The Education in Pediatrics Across the Continuum (EPAC) Study Group is developing the first competency-based, time-variable progression from undergraduate medical education (UME) to graduate medical education (GME) in the history of medical education in the United States. EPAC, an innovation project sponsored by the Association of American Medical Colleges and supported by the Josiah Macy Jr. Foundation, was developed through a collaboration between five medical schools and multiple professional organizations with an interest in undergraduate and graduate medical education. The planning and implementation process demanded cooperatively addressing practical barriers such as education requirements for licensure and developing approaches to learner assessment that provided meaningful information about competency. Each participating school now has at least three cohorts of learners participating, and the program is transitioning its first cohort of students from UME to GME based on achievement of predetermined competencies that allow this transition. Members of the first cohort of learners in this program have begun their pediatric residency training at different times beginning in late 2016, confirming the feasibility of competency-based advancement from UME to GME in pediatrics. Although there is still much to learn about the outcomes of EPAC learners' professional development in residency training and beyond, EPAC has defined an operational approach to a different path through medical school and into residency training, based on the attainment of competence.

  19. Health technology assessment, value-based decision making, and innovation.

    Henshall, Chris; Schuller, Tara

    2013-10-01

    Identifying treatments that offer value and value for money is becoming increasingly important, with interest in how health technology assessment (HTA) and decision makers can take appropriate account of what is of value to patients and to society, and in the relationship between innovation and assessments of value. This study summarizes points from an Health Technology Assessment International (HTAi) Policy Forum discussion, drawing on presentations, discussions among attendees, and background papers. Various perspectives on value were considered; most place patient health at the core of value. Wider elements of value comprise other benefits for: patients; caregivers; the health and social care systems; and society. Most decision-making systems seek to take account of similar elements of value, although they are assessed and combined in different ways. Judgment in decisions remains important and cannot be replaced by mathematical approaches. There was discussion of the value of innovation and of the effects of value assessments on innovation. Discussion also included moving toward "progressive health system decision making," an ongoing process whereby evidence-based decisions on use would be made at various stages in the technology lifecycle. Five actions are identified: (i) development of a general framework for the definition and assessment of value; development by HTA/coverage bodies and regulators of (ii) disease-specific guidance and (iii) further joint scientific advice for industry on demonstrating value; (iv) development of a framework for progressive licensing, usage, and reimbursement; and (v) promoting work to better adapt HTA, coverage, and procurement approaches to medical devices.

  20. Identification and classification of behavioural indicators to assess innovation competence

    María Jose Pérez Peñalver

    2018-02-01

    Design/methodology/approach: A literature review was addressed by means of a search in Elsevier’s Scopus, Web of Science and Google Scholar. By applying inclusive and exclusive criteria, references were obtained with the search protocol. After filtering and scanning, there was a selection of references plus other articles added by the snowball effect. The final phase undertaken was the classification of the main indicators raised in the publications selected. Findings: Our main contribution was the identification of the behavioural indicators of innovators at the workplace and their classification in five dimensions. Practical implications: This research may yield some light on the assessment of innovative workplace performance of individuals in organisations, as well as on the development of the innovative competence of students in academic institutions as a challenge to meet the needs of both professionals and Higher Education institutions. Originality/value: Some authors have studied the characteristics of innovative people mainly focusing on cognitive abilities, personality, motivation and knowledge. We have sought to offer a better understanding of the phenomenon of individual innovation in organisations, through the analysis of behavioural indicators, an issue that has not been studied from this perspective previously.

  1. From Aggregation to Interpretation: How Assessors Judge Complex Data in a Competency-Based Portfolio

    Oudkerk Pool, Andrea; Govaerts, Marjan J. B.; Jaarsma, Debbie A. D. C.; Driessen, Erik W.

    2018-01-01

    While portfolios are increasingly used to assess competence, the validity of such portfolio-based assessments has hitherto remained unconfirmed. The purpose of the present research is therefore to further our understanding of how assessors form judgments when interpreting the complex data included in a competency-based portfolio. Eighteen…

  2. Assessment for learning in innovation and entrepreneurship education

    Rasmussen, Radmila M.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose This chapter exemplifies how assessment is performed in innovation and entrepreneurship (I&E) at the university education and how educators apply and view formative assessment as an important tool in enhancing students’ learning outcomes. Methodology/approach A case study methodology...... to conduct assessment that stimulates students learning in I&E-education. Originality/value Considering that the research on how assessment in I&E-education impacts students learning is limited, this study provides important contribution by identifying links between formative assessment types and enhancement...... responsible educators focusing on alignment between learning goals, assessment forms and criteria, and feedback. Findings The analysis shows that educators emphasize the importance of formative and learner-centered assessment forms alongside summative, credit-giving assessment. Educators experience...

  3. Competency-based education: a new model for teaching orthopaedics.

    Alman, Benjamin A; Ferguson, Peter; Kraemer, William; Nousiainen, Markku T; Reznick, Richard K

    2013-01-01

    The current methods used to train residents to become orthopaedic surgeons are based on tradition, not evidence-based models. Educators have only a limited ability to assess trainees for competency using validated tests in various domains. The reduction in resident work hours limits the time available for clinical training, which has resulted in some calls for lengthening the training process. Another approach to address limited training hours is to focus training in a program that allows residents to graduate from a rotation based on demonstrated competency rather than on time on a service. A pilot orthopaedic residency curriculum, which uses a competency-based framework of resident training and maximizes the use of available training hours, has been designed and is being implemented.

  4. A competency-based longitudinal core curriculum in medical neuroscience.

    Merlin, Lisa R; Horak, Holli A; Milligan, Tracey A; Kraakevik, Jeff A; Ali, Imran I

    2014-07-29

    Current medical educational theory encourages the development of competency-based curricula. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's 6 core competencies for resident education (medical knowledge, patient care, professionalism, interpersonal and communication skills, practice-based learning, and systems-based practice) have been embraced by medical schools as the building blocks necessary for becoming a competent licensed physician. Many medical schools are therefore changing their educational approach to an integrated model in which students demonstrate incremental acquisition and mastery of all competencies as they progress through medical school. Challenges to medical schools include integration of preclinical and clinical studies as well as development of learning objectives and assessment measures for each competency. The Undergraduate Education Subcommittee (UES) of the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) assembled a group of neuroscience educators to outline a longitudinal competency-based curriculum in medical neuroscience encompassing both preclinical and clinical coursework. In development of this curriculum, the committee reviewed United States Medical Licensing Examination content outlines, Liaison Committee on Medical Education requirements, prior AAN-mandated core curricula for basic neuroscience and clinical neurology, and survey responses from educators in US medical schools. The newly recommended curriculum provides an outline of learning objectives for each of the 6 competencies, listing each learning objective in active terms. Documentation of experiences is emphasized, and assessment measures are suggested to demonstrate adequate achievement in each competency. These guidelines, widely vetted and approved by the UES membership, aspire to be both useful as a stand-alone curriculum and also provide a framework for neuroscience educators who wish to develop a more detailed focus in certain areas of study. © 2014 American Academy

  5. Toward Sustainable Anticipatory Governance: Analyzing and Assessing Nanotechnology Innovation Processes

    Foley, Rider Williams

    Cities around the globe struggle with socio-economic disparities, resource inefficiency, environmental contamination, and quality-of-life challenges. Technological innovation, as one prominent approach to problem solving, promises to address these challenges; yet, introducing new technologies, such as nanotechnology, into society and cities has often resulted in negative consequences. Recent research has conceptually linked anticipatory governance and sustainability science: to understand the role of technology in complex problems our societies face; to anticipate negative consequences of technological innovation; and to promote long-term oriented and responsible governance of technologies. This dissertation advances this link conceptually and empirically, focusing on nanotechnology and urban sustainability challenges. The guiding question for this dissertation research is: How can nanotechnology be innovated and governed in responsible ways and with sustainable outcomes? The dissertation: analyzes the nanotechnology innovation process from an actor- and activities-oriented perspective (Chapter 2); assesses this innovation process from a comprehensive perspective on sustainable governance (Chapter 3); constructs a small set of future scenarios to consider future implications of different nanotechnology governance models (Chapter 4); and appraises the amenability of sustainability problems to nanotechnological interventions (Chapter 5). The four studies are based on data collected through literature review, document analysis, participant observation, interviews, workshops, and walking audits, as part of process analysis, scenario construction, and technology assessment. Research was conducted in collaboration with representatives from industry, government agencies, and civic organizations. The empirical parts of the four studies focus on Metropolitan Phoenix. Findings suggest that: predefined mandates and economic goals dominate the nanotechnology innovation process

  6. Competence-Based Education and the Limitations of Critique

    Edwards, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Drawing upon the work of Foucault and Latour, this article reflects on 25 years of critique of competence-based education and its continuing strength as a way of framing education and training. Using an example from England, it rehearses the argument from Foucault that, despite its student-centred discourse, competence-based education can be…

  7. Competence-based VET as seen by Dutch researchers

    Wesselink, R.; Biemans, H.J.A.; Mulder, M.; Elsen, van den E.

    2007-01-01

    The concept of competence is increasingly the basis for (re)designing VET. In competence-based VET academic disciplines are no longer starting points for curriculum development. Competence needed for working in practice, however, is. Competence-based learning is a dominant trend in VET in several

  8. Promoting and assessing creativity and innovation in physics undergraduates

    Kohl, Patrick B.; Kuo, H. Vincent; Kowalski, Susan; Kowalski, Frank

    2012-02-01

    Creative thought and the ability to innovate are critical skills in industrial and academic careers alike. There exist attempts to foster creative skills in the business world, but little such work has been documented in a physics context. In particular, there are few tools available for those who want to assess the creativity of their physics students, making it difficult to tell whether instruction is having any effect. In this paper, we outline a new elective course at the Colorado School of Mines in the physics department designed to develop creativity and innovation in physics majors. We present our efforts to assess this course formatively, using tablet PCs and InkSurvey software, and summatively using the discipline-independent Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking. We also describe early work towards developing a physics-specific instrument for measuring creativity.

  9. Innovation

    Nielsen, Janni; Yaganeh, Suzanne; Bloch Rasmussen, Leif

    2013-01-01

    This paper contributes to a theoretical discussion of creation of innovation with participants in, or outside, organisations. We address the creation of innovation with a complex theoretical understanding drawing on the Scandinavian and the Participatory Design tradition introducing two approaches...... to the processes of innovation. We ask if innovation can be initiated and enhanced looking at two collaborative approaches; participatory innovation (PIN) and cooperative innovation (COIN). We invite to dialogue and reflections on PIN’s conflict and creative frictions on one side and COIN’s complexity......, complementarity in diversity and the didactic scaffolding of the innovation process on the other side. Our contribution focuses on the methods and practices for facilitation of co-creating activities between different groups leading to cooperation, and innovation in thinking....

  10. Human capital, innovation, and climate policy: An integrated assessment

    Carraro, Carlo; De Cian, Enrica; Tavoni, Massimo

    2012-01-01

    This paper looks at the interplay between human capital and innovation in the presence of climate and educational policies. Using recent empirical estimates, human capital and general purpose R&D are introduced in an integrated assessment model that has been extensively applied to study the climate change mitigation. Our results suggest that climate policy stimulates general purpose as well as clean energy R&D but reduces the incentive to invest in human capital formation. Human capital incre...

  11. Acceptance of Competency-Based Workplace e-Learning Systems: Effects of Individual and Peer Learning Support

    Cheng, Bo; Wang, Minhong; Yang, Stephen J. H.; Kinshuk; Peng, Jun

    2011-01-01

    Current endeavors to integrate competency-based learning approaches with e-learning systems designed for delivery of training to adult learners in the workplace are growing. However, academic efforts in examining learners' perceptions of, and reactions toward, this technology-delivered pedagogical innovation are limited. Drawing together…

  12. Competency-Based Evaluation in Higher Education--Design and Use of Competence Rubrics by University Educators

    Velasco-Martínez, Leticia-Concepción; Tójar-Hurtado, Juan-Carlos

    2018-01-01

    Competency-based learning requires making changes in the higher education model in response to current socio-educational demands. Rubrics are an innovative educational tool for competence evaluation, for both students and educators. Ever since arriving at the university systems, the application of rubrics in evaluation programs has grown…

  13. Health technology assessment. Evaluation of biomedical innovative technologies.

    Turchetti, Giuseppe; Spadoni, Enza; Geisler, Eliezer Elie

    2010-01-01

    This article describes health technology assessment (HTA) as an evaluation tool that applies systematic methods of inquiry to the generation and use of health technologies and new products. The focus of this article is on the contributions of HTA to the management of the new product development effort in the biomedical organization. Critical success factors (CSFs) are listed, and their role in assessing success is defined and explained. One of the conclusions of this article is that HTA is a powerful tool for managers in the biomedical sector, allowing them to better manage their innovation effort in their continuing struggle for competitiveness and survival.

  14. Introducing competency-based postgraduate medical education in the Netherlands.

    Scheele, Fedde; Teunissen, Pim; Van Luijk, Scheltus; Heineman, Erik; Fluit, Lia; Mulder, Hanneke; Meininger, Abe; Wijnen-Meijer, Marjo; Glas, Gerrit; Sluiter, Henk; Hummel, Thalia

    2008-01-01

    Medical boards around the world face the challenge of creating competency-based postgraduate training programs. Recent legislation requires that all postgraduate medical training programmes in The Netherlands be reformed. In this article the Dutch Advisory Board for Postgraduate Curriculum Development shares some of their experiences with guiding the design of specialist training programs, based on the Canadian Medical Educational Directives for Specialists (CanMEDS). All twenty-seven Dutch Medical Specialty Societies take three steps in designing a curriculum. First they divide the entire content of a specialty into logical units, so-called 'themes'. The second step is discussing, for each theme, for which tasks trainees have to be instructed, guided, and assessed. Finally, for each task an assessment method is chosen to focus on a limited number of CanMEDS roles. This leads to a three step training cycle: (i) based on their in-training assessment and practices, trainees will gather evidence on their development in a portfolio; (ii) this evidence stimulates the trainee and the supervisor to regularly reflect on a trainee's global development regarding the CanMEDS roles as well as on the performance in specific tasks; (iii) a personal development plan structures future learning goals and strategies. The experiences in the Netherlands are in line with international developments in postgraduate medical education and with the literature on workplace-based teaching and learning.

  15. Carroll County Competency Based Teacher Certification Project. Librarian's Report.

    Coker, Homer; Coker, Joan G.

    Reference materials, slides, cassettes, books, pamphlets, materials from other states, and articles used in the Carroll County, Georgia, Competency Based Teacher Certification Project, 1973-74, are listed. Brief annotations are included for both the reference materials and articles. (MJM)

  16. Competency-Based, Time-Variable Education in the Health Professions: Crossroads.

    Lucey, Catherine R; Thibault, George E; Ten Cate, Olle

    2018-03-01

    Health care systems around the world are transforming to align with the needs of 21st-century patients and populations. Transformation must also occur in the educational systems that prepare the health professionals who deliver care, advance discovery, and educate the next generation of physicians in these evolving systems. Competency-based, time-variable education, a comprehensive educational strategy guided by the roles and responsibilities that health professionals must assume to meet the needs of contemporary patients and communities, has the potential to catalyze optimization of educational and health care delivery systems. By designing educational and assessment programs that require learners to meet specific competencies before transitioning between the stages of formal education and into practice, this framework assures the public that every physician is capable of providing high-quality care. By engaging learners as partners in assessment, competency-based, time-variable education prepares graduates for careers as lifelong learners. While the medical education community has embraced the notion of competencies as a guiding framework for educational institutions, the structure and conduct of formal educational programs remain more aligned with a time-based, competency-variable paradigm.The authors outline the rationale behind this recommended shift to a competency-based, time-variable education system. They then introduce the other articles included in this supplement to Academic Medicine, which summarize the history of, theories behind, examples demonstrating, and challenges associated with competency-based, time-variable education in the health professions.

  17. Innovators.

    NEA Today, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Describes various innovations that have been developed to enhance education. These innovations include: helping educators help at-risk students succeed; promoting high school journalism; ensuring quality online learning experiences; developing a student performing group that uses theater to address social issues; and having students design their…

  18. Organizational-economic maintenance of innovation activity in the region: comparative assessment

    Nadezhda Igorevna Antipina

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The article proposes the approach to evaluate the organizational-economic maintenance of innovation activity in the regions in quantitative and qualitative indicators, as well as the method to calculate the assessment of regulatory support of this activity. It justifies the author’s approach of comparative efficiency evaluation of innovation legislation and regions’ innovation development level. The article gives the qualitative estimation of regulatory support of innovation development in the regions that are innovation leaders. It singles out key directions to develop regulatory support of innovation activity, which encourage RF subjects’ innovation activity

  19. Performance evaluation of nursing students following competency-based education.

    Fan, Jun-Yu; Wang, Yu Hsin; Chao, Li Fen; Jane, Sui-Whi; Hsu, Li-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Competency-based education is known to improve the match between educational performance and employment opportunities. This study examined the effects of competency-based education on the learning outcomes of undergraduate nursing students. The study used a quasi-experimental design. A convenience sample of 312 second-year undergraduate nursing students from northern and southern Taiwan participated in the study. The experimental group (n=163) received competency-based education and the control group received traditional instruction (n=149) in a medical-surgical nursing course. Outcome measures included students' scores on the Objective Structured Clinical Examination, Self-Evaluated Core Competencies Scale, Metacognitive Inventory for Nursing Students questionnaire, and academic performance. Students who received competency-based education had significantly higher academic performance in the medical-surgical nursing course and practicum than did the control group. Required core competencies and metacognitive abilities improved significantly in the competency-based education group as compared to the control group after adjusting for covariates. Competency-based education is worth implementing and may close the gap between education and the ever-changing work environment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Assessing Farmer Innovations in Agroforestry in Eastern Zambia

    Katanga, R.; Kabwe, G.; Kuntashula, E.; Mafongoya, P. L.; Phiri, S.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes farmer innovations on improved fallows developed by researchers to replenish soil fertility. The reasons for the innovations and how these innovations are facilitating wide adoption of improved fallows are discussed. Research designed trial results to evaluate the ecological robustness of these innovations are also analyzed in…

  1. FORMING THE ASSESSMENT MECHANISM OF ENTERPRISES’ INNOVATIVE PROJECTS COMPETITIVENESS

    Ekaterina D. Kuzina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The author proposes a mechanism to estimate the competitiveness of enterprises’ innovative projects. The focus is on the criteria affected the competitiveness of innovative projects. The mechanism of calculating the relative market attractiveness and the relative innovative potential of enterprise to implement innovative project is shown.

  2. Review of early assessment models of innovative medical technologies.

    Fasterholdt, Iben; Krahn, Murray; Kidholm, Kristian; Yderstræde, Knud Bonnet; Pedersen, Kjeld Møller

    2017-08-01

    Hospitals increasingly make decisions regarding the early development of and investment in technologies, but a formal evaluation model for assisting hospitals early on in assessing the potential of innovative medical technologies is lacking. This article provides an overview of models for early assessment in different health organisations and discusses which models hold most promise for hospital decision makers. A scoping review of published studies between 1996 and 2015 was performed using nine databases. The following information was collected: decision context, decision problem, and a description of the early assessment model. 2362 articles were identified and 12 studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. An additional 12 studies were identified and included in the review by searching reference lists. The majority of the 24 early assessment studies were variants of traditional cost-effectiveness analysis. Around one fourth of the studies presented an evaluation model with a broader focus than cost-effectiveness. Uncertainty was mostly handled by simple sensitivity or scenario analysis. This review shows that evaluation models using known methods assessing cost-effectiveness are most prevalent in early assessment, but seems ill-suited for early assessment in hospitals. Four models provided some usable elements for the development of a hospital-based model. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Innovative Soil Management Practices (SMP) Assessment in Europe and China

    Barão, Lúcia

    2017-04-01

    The growing world population poses a major challenge to global agricultural food and feed production through the pressure to increase agricultural outputs either by increasing the land area dedicated to agriculture or by productivity increases. Whether in developed or developing regions, agricultural intensification based on conventional approaches has resulted in severe environmental impacts and innovative soil management practices are needed to halter ongoing soil degradation and promote sustainable land management capable to produce more from less. The iSQAPER project - Interactive Soil Quality Assessment in Europe and China for Agricultural Productivity and Environmental Resilience - aims to develop a Soil Quality app (SQAPP) linking soil and agricultural management practices to soil quality indicators. This easy friendly tool will provide a direct and convenient way to advise farmers and other suitable actors in this area, regarding the best management practices to be adopted in very specific and local conditions. In this particular study from iSQAPER, we aimed to identify the most promising innovative soil management practices (SMP) currently used and its geographical distribution along different pedo-climatic regions in Europe (Boreal, Atlantic, Mediterranean Temperate, Mediterranean Semi-Arid, Southern Sub-Continental and Northern Sub-Continental) and China (Middle Temperate, Warm temperate and Central Asia Tropical). So far we have identified 155 farms where innovative SMP's are used, distributed along 4 study site regions located in China (Qiyang, Suining, Zhifanggou and Gongzhuling) and 10 study site regions located in Europe (The Netherlands, France, Portugal, Spain, Greece, Slovenia, Hungary, Romania, Poland and Estonia) and covering the major pedo-climatic regions. From this identification we concluded that the most used innovative SMP's in the study site regions in Europe are Manuring & Composting (14%), Min-till (14%), Crop rotation (12

  4. An innovative road marking quality assessment mechanism using computer vision

    Kuo-Liang Lin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aesthetic quality acceptance for road marking works has been relied on subjective visual examination. Due to a lack of quantitative operation procedures, acceptance outcome can be biased and results in great quality variation. To improve aesthetic quality acceptance procedure of road marking, we develop an innovative road marking quality assessment mechanism, utilizing machine vision technologies. Using edge smoothness as a quantitative aesthetic indicator, the proposed prototype system first receives digital images of finished road marking surface and has the images processed and analyzed to capture the geometric characteristics of the marking. The geometric characteristics are then evaluated to determine the quality level of the finished work. System is demonstrated through two real cases to show how it works. In the end, a test comparing the assessment results between the proposed system and expert inspection is conducted to enhance the accountability of the proposed mechanism.

  5. Innovation

    In recent years ULA has emphasized advocacy, and contributed to progress towards new legislation (freedom of information, copyright, the ... East African Community e-government strategy) of importance to the library and ... Innovation Vol.

  6. Main Directions of Assessment of Innovation Development and Management of Innovations at Enterprises

    Harafonova Olha I.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The priority activity at an enterprise always is introduction of innovations, but organisation of introduction of innovations is not identified specifically. Under these conditions one of the main components of survival and development of domestic subjects of entrepreneurial activity is the capability to propose, develop, produce, market and promote goods with new consumer properties, which are oriented at satisfaction of existing consumer needs. Many factors influence successful realisation of innovations at an enterprise, including scientific and technical potential, production and technical base, main types of resources, large investments and the relevant management system. That is why there is a problem of correct correlation and use of these factors and also close interrelation through the system of management between innovation, production and marketing activity of the firm, which lead to a positive result of realisation of the innovation strategy. The article offers main directions of innovation development of enterprise organisation under modern conditions.

  7. PECULIARITIES OF ASSESSMENT AND RISK MANAGEMENT IN INNOVATIVE PROJECTS

    Victor V. Guzhov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The methodological and methodicalbases of risk management in innovativeprojects. Classification of risks. Types of risks depending on the stage of realizationof the innovative project. Investigated thefactors contributing to the emergence ofrisk situations. The basic techniques of risk management of innovation projects.Proposed criteria for the choice of the innovative project to implement in the realsector of the economy.

  8. Assessing innovation-related competences in the MaRIHE Program : Teacher and student perceptions

    Kopelyan, Sofya; Godonoga, Ana; Güney, Isil; Yasmin, Nowreen

    2016-01-01

    The paper aims at expanding the body of research on innovation pedagogy and competence assessment by exploring the teaching and learning of innovation-related competences in an Erasmus Mundus Master program in Research and Innovation in Higher Education (MaRIHE). It does so by comparing the results

  9. Adoption of Technological Innovations: A Case Study of the ASSESS Website

    Brooks, Sarah; Brown, Shane; Davis, Denny; LeBeau, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    In engineering education, assessment instruments are often developed to evaluate programs and projects. Unfortunately, these innovations are not always adopted by intended audiences. Rogers' Diffusion of Innovations (DI) Theory provides a framework to analyze characteristics of an innovation that will affect adoption. The Appraisal System for…

  10. Product creativity assessment of innovations: considering the creative process

    Valgeirsdóttir, Dagný; Onarheim, Balder; Gabrielsen, Gorm

    2015-01-01

    in creativity research, while the role of consumer’s knowledge of the creative process behind the product is fairly unexplored. In this paper, we present an empirical study investigating whether providing information about a complex development process could amplify consumer’s perception of product creativity......Creativity is a critical component that feeds into all stages of innovation and design processes by promoting inspiration, ideation, and implementation of ideas, revealing the need for thorough research to support design creativity. Assessment of product creativity is a reoccurring topic....... Does storytelling about the process contribute to amplifying creativity ratings? What form of storytelling is needed to make an impact? Results from 134 respondents showed a small but not significant amplifying effect from the additional process information; however, an important learning can be drawn...

  11. Taxonomy for competency-based dental curricula.

    Beltrán-Neira, Roberto J; Beltrán-Aguilar, Eugenio D

    2004-09-01

    The objective of this article is to propose a classification of dental competencies. Interest in dental competencies has grown consistently during the last three decades. However, the dental education literature suggests that the term "competency" is understood and used differently by dental schools around the world. The taxonomic classification of dental competencies we propose follows a systematic approach starting at the highest level of complexity, i.e., the professional profile the teaching institution envisions for its graduates, and following in a decreasing degree of complexity to competency function, task, step, movement, and moment. This taxonomy has proved to be useful for more than thirty years in the Dental School of the Peruvian University Cayetano Heredia. Graduates of this school are successful practitioners, teachers, and researchers in Peru and other countries. The classification proposed here should clarify terms, facilitate curriculum design and learning assessment, stimulate further discussion on the matter, and facilitate communication among the dental education establishment.

  12. Developing competence based qualification system in the nuclear energy sector

    Ceclan, Mihail

    2016-01-01

    The Institute for Energy and Transport of the Joint Research Centre, European Commission, developed a strategy and road map for ECVET implementation. The JRC road map for European Credit System for Vocational Education and Training (ECVET) implementation has reached the stage of Competence-Based Qualification System development. The Competence-Based Qualification System can help bridge the gap between Human Resources demand and supply in the nuclear market by structuring qualifications in small independent parts. This very specific ECVET feature of a qualification, facilitates the process of competences accumulation and the lifelong learning, mobility and flexible learning pathways. New developments are presented about the Competence-Based Qualification System development for the nuclear energy sector.

  13. Developing competence based qualification system in the nuclear energy sector

    Ceclan, Mihail [European Commission, Petten (Netherlands). Inst. for Energy and Transport

    2016-04-15

    The Institute for Energy and Transport of the Joint Research Centre, European Commission, developed a strategy and road map for ECVET implementation. The JRC road map for European Credit System for Vocational Education and Training (ECVET) implementation has reached the stage of Competence-Based Qualification System development. The Competence-Based Qualification System can help bridge the gap between Human Resources demand and supply in the nuclear market by structuring qualifications in small independent parts. This very specific ECVET feature of a qualification, facilitates the process of competences accumulation and the lifelong learning, mobility and flexible learning pathways. New developments are presented about the Competence-Based Qualification System development for the nuclear energy sector.

  14. Flexibility in competency-based workplace transition programs: an exploratory study of community child and family health nursing.

    Cusack, Lynette; Gilbert, Sandra; Fereday, Jennifer

    2013-03-01

    Successful transition to practice programs that use competency-based assessment require the involvement of all staff, especially those undertaking the preceptor role. Qualitative data were collected using interview methods. Participants were 14 newly employed nurses and 7 preceptors in the child and family community health service in South Australia. Participant narratives were recorded electronically, transcribed, and thematically analyzed using the paradigm of critical social science. Five themes were identified that describe enablers as well as barriers to applying a flexible transition to practice program using competency-based assessment. These included flexibility in the program design, flexibility on the part of preceptors, flexibility to enable recognition of previous learning, flexibility in the assessment of competencies, and flexibility in workload. To ensure successful application of a transition to practice program using competency-based assessment, preceptors must understand the flexible arrangements built into the program design and have the confidence and competence to apply them. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. STRUCTURE OF THE MARKET OF INNOVATIVE PRODUCTS: APPROACH TO ASSESSING THE IMPACT ON EFFICIENCY

    Anna Elagina

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The formation of innovation policy innovative economy is impossible without an understanding of the conceptual basis of the efficiency of production of innovative products. In particular, determination of the influence of market structure on the possibility of expanded reproduction of innovative products. The article is devoted to consideration of existing in this field of research and definition of the limits of quantitative assessment of the influence of defects of market structures on efficiency.

  16. Innovative Outcome Assessment in Graduate Business Education and Continuous Improvement

    Chattopadhyay Satya P.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The changed environment of global economy with painful austerity and restructuring measures causing severe economic dislocations in many diverse parts of the world have brought into focus the usefulness and value of management education in general and graduate management education in particular. The various accrediting bodies in America, Europe and Asia in recent years have shifted their emphasis to ensuring that learning outcomes of students in the program are tied to the goals and missions of the academic institution and meet the needs of the external partners of the academic enterprise that the students go on to serve. This has resulted in rapid advances in the field of innovative outcome assessment, and measurement of competency in performing higher order tasks as well as demonstration of traits related to successful transition into the business world and contribution to the success of the enterprise where the students are employed. The mere assessment/measurement of traits is not the end, but rather the first step in the cycle of continuous improvement in the tradition of the Plan-Do-Study-Act tradition of TQM. The goal is to identify shortcomings or opportunities for improvement via the assessment process and then to “close the loop” by introducing planned changes to improve system performance.

  17. Innovation

    The purpose of Innovation journal of appropriate librarianship and information work in Southern Africa is to publish material on libraries, information supply and other related matters in South and Southern Africa. Vol 45 (2012). DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Open Access DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Subscription or Fee Access ...

  18. Innovation

    Torfing, Jacob; Ricard, Lykke Margot

    2017-01-01

    Innovation i krydsfeltet mellem forskellige styringsparadigmer i offentlige organisationer. New Public Governance gør det muligt at skabe offentlig værdi på nye måder. Men NPG er ingen trylledrik, der fra den ene dag til den anden skaber balance mellem borgernes store forventninger og en trængt ø...

  19. Milestones and Millennials: A Perfect Pairing-Competency-Based Medical Education and the Learning Preferences of Generation Y.

    Desy, Janeve R; Reed, Darcy A; Wolanskyj, Alexandra P

    2017-02-01

    Millennials are quickly becoming the most prevalent generation of medical learners. These individuals have a unique outlook on education and have different preferences and expectations than their predecessors. As evidenced by its implementation by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education in the United States and the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons in Canada, competency based medical education is rapidly gaining international acceptance. Characteristics of competency based medical education can be perfectly paired with Millennial educational needs in several dimensions including educational expectations, the educational process, attention to emotional quotient and professionalism, assessment, feedback, and intended outcomes. We propose that with its attention to transparency, personalized learning, and frequent formative assessment, competency based medical education is an ideal fit for the Millennial generation as it realigns education and assessment with the needs of these 21st century learners. Copyright © 2016 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Developing Anticipatory Life Cycle Assessment Tools to Support Responsible Innovation

    Wender, Benjamin

    Several prominent research strategy organizations recommend applying life cycle assessment (LCA) early in the development of emerging technologies. For example, the US Environmental Protection Agency, the National Research Council, the Department of Energy, and the National Nanotechnology Initiative identify the potential for LCA to inform research and development (R&D) of photovoltaics and products containing engineered nanomaterials (ENMs). In this capacity, application of LCA to emerging technologies may contribute to the growing movement for responsible research and innovation (RRI). However, existing LCA practices are largely retrospective and ill-suited to support the objectives of RRI. For example, barriers related to data availability, rapid technology change, and isolation of environmental from technical research inhibit application of LCA to developing technologies. This dissertation focuses on development of anticipatory LCA tools that incorporate elements of technology forecasting, provide robust explorations of uncertainty, and engage diverse innovation actors in overcoming retrospective approaches to environmental assessment and improvement of emerging technologies. Chapter one contextualizes current LCA practices within the growing literature articulating RRI and identifies the optimal place in the stage gate innovation model to apply LCA. Chapter one concludes with a call to develop anticipatory LCA---building on the theory of anticipatory governance---as a series of methodological improvements that seek to align LCA practices with the objectives of RRI. Chapter two provides a framework for anticipatory LCA, identifies where research from multiple disciplines informs LCA practice, and builds off the recommendations presented in the preceding chapter. Chapter two focuses on crystalline and thin film photovoltaics (PV) to illustrate the novel framework, in part because PV is an environmentally motivated technology undergoing extensive R&D efforts and

  1. Drug delivery system innovation and Health Technology Assessment: Upgrading from Clinical to Technological Assessment.

    Panzitta, Michele; Bruno, Giorgio; Giovagnoli, Stefano; Mendicino, Francesca R; Ricci, Maurizio

    2015-11-30

    Health Technology Assessment (HTA) is a multidisciplinary health political instrument that evaluates the consequences, mainly clinical and economical, of a health care technology; the HTA aim is to produce and spread information on scientific and technological innovation for health political decision making process. Drug delivery systems (DDS), such as nanocarriers, are technologically complex but they have pivotal relevance in therapeutic innovation. The HTA process, as commonly applied to conventional drug evaluation, should upgrade to a full pharmaceutical assessment, considering the DDS complexity. This is useful to study more in depth the clinical outcome and to broaden its critical assessment toward pharmaceutical issues affecting the patient and not measured by the current clinical evidence approach. We draw out the expertise necessary to perform the pharmaceutical assessment and we propose a format to evaluate the DDS technological topics such as formulation and mechanism of action, physicochemical characteristics, manufacturing process. We integrated the above-mentioned three points in the Evidence Based Medicine approach, which is data source for any HTA process. In this regard, the introduction of a Pharmaceutics Expert figure in the HTA could be fundamental to grant a more detailed evaluation of medicine product characteristics and performances and to help optimizing DDS features to overcome R&D drawbacks. Some aspects of product development, such as manufacturing processes, should be part of the HTA as innovative manufacturing processes allow new products to reach more effectively patient bedside. HTA so upgraded may encourage resource allocating payers to invest in innovative technologies and providers to focus on innovative material properties and manufacturing processes, thus contributing to bring more medicines in therapy in a sustainable manner. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Assessing the performance of national innovation systems in Europe

    Edquist, C.; Zabala-Iturriagagoitia, J.M.

    2016-07-01

    To support the establishment of the European Innovation Union, the European Commission is using the Innovation Union Scoreboard (IUS). In this paper, the performance of EU28 national innovation systems are analyzed from an efficiency perspective by using exactly the same data as those provided by the IUS for years 2010-2015. This efficiency analysis was carried out using Data Envelopment Analysis. Our analysis demonstrates that the results based on efficiency measures reflect that in general terms innovation systems are widely underexploited in Europe and that there are important variances among territories. We have shown that many countries which devote fewer resources than the innovation leaders, achieve outstanding levels of efficiency and, contrary to what the IUS predicts, countries with consolidated innovation systems, do not show efficiency levels commensurate with their expected competitiveness. (Author)

  3. Innovation

    2012-01-01

    Présenté par FutuRIS, plate-forme prospective sur la recherche, l’innovation et la société animée par l’Association Nationale de la Recherche et de la Technologie, ce volume livre un panorama du système français de recherche et d’innovation dans son environnement européen. Sont abordés dans une première partie les champs décisionnels concernés, les politiques nationales menées en matière de R&D, les relations entre enseignement supérieur et recherche et l’Espace européen de la recherche à l’h...

  4. INNOVATION

    Helms, Niels Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Kravet om innovation og kreativitet er på flere måder en stor og en ny udfordring for voksenuddannelserne. Det udfordrer det didaktiske dilemma, det at vi skal gøres til kompetente og frie mennesker gennem pædagogiske handlinger, som netop pålægger os en ufrihed. – Men hvor denne ufrihed tidligere...... kunne begrundes med, at skolen eller uddannelsen vidste bedre, så er det ikke længere tilfældet. Skolen skal sørge for, at vi lærer noget – og ikke noget andet. Men det kan ikke længere med bestemthed afgøres, hvad det er vi skal lære i skolen, fordi det nye, det kreative og ikke mindst innovative...

  5. Innovative activity of high-technology companies as assessment and forecasting object

    A. E. Sklyarov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Innovation activities, as well as innovations, are closely related meanings, and like many others economical definitions, have a broad range of meanings. Main characteristics and attributes of innovation involves new or significantly improved product, that’s being used, or in other words, found its application, and innovative activities – activities focused on realization of innovations. In this article, innovations are mainly considered in terms of high-technology production, evidence from Russian space industry. There are 5 basic stages of lifecycle of innovative project in considered industry: initiation, development, realization, expansion, consumption. Practically, third or fourth, or even both of these stages, often missing because there is no need of them. R&D activities, or even further serial production, based on previous developments, is an innovation activity, because these activities are stages of innovative projects lifecycle itself. Then it seems legit, to draw a conclusion, that in terms of high-technology production, company’s primary activity equals innovative activity. Basic characteristics of innovative activity of high-technology companies as assessment and forecasting object involves high level of uncertainty at every stage of projects lifecycle, high dependency on funding level of this activity, and high level and erratic structure of risk. All the above mentioned, means that assessment and forecasting of innovative activity of high-technology companies, needs development of its own methodological tools for each industry.

  6. Tree Identification. Competency Based Teaching Materials in Horticulture.

    Legacy, Jim; And Others

    This competency-based curriculum unit on tree identification is one of five developed for classroom use in teaching the landscape/nursery area of horticulture. The three sections are each divided into teaching content (in a question-and-answer format) and student skills that outline steps and factors for consideration. Topics covered include…

  7. Student Material for Competency-Based Education Curriculum for Welding.

    Associated Educational Consultants, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA.

    This student welding competency-based education curriculum consists of six units dealing with general areas related to trade occupations and nine units covering specific aspects of working with welding equipment and performing welding operations. Topics covered in the first six units are welding opportunities, human relations, safety, basic…

  8. Competence-Based Education and Training– about Frequently Asked Questions

    Mulder, M.

    2012-01-01

    This article follows the author's previous piece on practical guidelines for the development of comprehensive competence-based education and training (Mulder, 2012). It is about the questions that have been and are still frequently asked in presentations, workshops and classes about the introduction

  9. Competence Models in Technology-enhanced Competence-based Learning

    Sampson, Demetrios; Fytros, Demetrios

    2008-01-01

    Please cite as: Sampson, D., & Fytros, D. (2008). Competence Models in Technology-enhanced Competence-based Learning. In H. H. Adelsberger, Kinshuk, J. M. Pawlowski & D. Sampson (Eds.), International Handbook on Information Technologies for Education and Training, 2nd Edition, Springer, June 2008

  10. Competence Based Educational Metadata for Supporting Lifelong Competence Development Programmes

    Sampson, Demetrios; Fytros, Demetrios

    2008-01-01

    Sampson, D., & Fytros, D. (2008). Competence Based Educational Metadata for Supporting Lifelong Competence Development Programmes. In P. Diaz, Kinshuk, I. Aedo & E. Mora (Eds.), Proceedings of the 8th IEEE International Conference on Advanced Learning Technologies (ICALT 2008), pp. 288-292. July,

  11. Discipline, Governmentality and 25 Years of Competency-Based Training

    Hodge, Steven; Harris, Roger

    2012-01-01

    Among the many critiques of competency-based approaches to education and training (CBT) is a strain which draws on Foucault's analysis of "disciplinary" power and knowledge. Foucault offered an interpretation of modern institutions, such as prisons, armies and schools, which revealed subtle mechanisms of surveillance and systems of…

  12. Competency Based Modular Experiments in Polymer Science and Technology.

    Pearce, Eli M; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Describes a competency-based, modular laboratory course emphasizing the synthesis and characterization of polymers and directed toward senior undergraduate and/or first-year graduate students in science and engineering. One module, free-radical polymerization kinetics by dilatometry, is included as a sample. (CS)

  13. Competency-Based Education and the World of Work.

    Huff, Sheila M.

    Some issues in connection with competency-based education (CBE) and the world of work discussed by the author include the relevance of CBE programs to work, the changing attitudes of students and young workers toward work, "credentialism" or the continual upgrading of educational requirements for employment, underemployment and CBE, and others.…

  14. Competency Based Curriculum for Clothing Services and Production Sewing.

    Blake, Charlotte

    Designed to meet individual needs and learning levels of high school and postsecondary students enrolled in vocational training for occupations in clothing services and production sewing, this competency-based curriculum teaches skills in alterations, dressmaking, and power sewing machine operations. Skills are organized into 13 units: Awareness…

  15. Competency-Based Education--What Is It?

    Turney, Mildred; And Others

    This task force report defines competency-based education (CBE) as a system of education designed to develop competencies in those who are products of the system. A distinction is made between CBE and performance based education (PBE) in this report. Although the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education Committee on Performance-Based…

  16. Health. Nevada Competency-Based Adult High School Diploma Project.

    Nevada Univ., Las Vegas. Coll. of Education.

    This document is one of ten curriculum guides developed by the Nevada Competency-Based Adult High School Diploma (CBAHSD) Project. This curriculum guide on health is divided into ten topics. The topics included are Nutrition, Reproduction, Menstruation, Contraception, Alcohol Abuse, Tobacco, Immunization, Disease, Accident Prevention, and…

  17. INPO JTA application: developing a competency-based training program

    Patrick, P.W.

    1985-01-01

    Developing a competency-based training program requires the support of a strong curriculum development program. The major thrust of Arkansas Power and Light Company's competency-based curriculum development program is the identification of competencies using position task analysis data, panels, and INPO JTA data. Eight steps in the curriculum development approach provide the logic and rationale of the process: (1) establish competencies, (2) conduct competency verification, (3) develop competency tests, (4) develop curriculum, (5) develop instructional media, (6) validate curriculum and conduct field testing, (7) perform training effectiveness evaluation, and (8) revise the curriculum as needed. The processes describe how INPO JTA's and NRC procedures are cross-referenced to show that standards and requirements imposed or sanctioned by NRC and INPO are met. The competency-based approach to curriculum and training development eliminates the traditional scatterload approach to training and focuses on training to the competency. The primary benefits of competency-based training include accountability, minimal job training to meet job or position requirements, and a process to document an individual's job proficiency

  18. Building a Competency-Based Curriculum in Social Work Education

    Bracy, Wanda

    2018-01-01

    The focus on competency in social work education makes the development of a competency-based curriculum critical. This article describes an approach to curriculum building taking into account the integration, coherency, and integrity of such a curriculum. A presentation of how performance outcomes are fundamental to the relationship between the…

  19. CNC Turning Technician. A Competency-Based Instructional System.

    Sloan, Kelly; Hilley, Robert

    This competency-based curriculum guide for instructing students in using computer numerically controlled (CNC) turning machines is one of a series of instructional guides for the machinist field developed in Oklahoma. Although developed jointly with Baxter Technologies Corporation and oriented toward the Baxter Vo-Tec 2000 Future Builder CNC…

  20. College for America: Student-Centered, Competency-Based Education

    Clerkin, Kris; Simon, Yvonne

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a new model of education that works with employers to help their employees gain the skills and credentials needed for promotions and career mobility. Southern New Hampshire University's College for America, a competency-based education model for working adults, increases their access to, and the convenience of higher…

  1. Employment Competence based Management to enhance Training Effectiveness

    Le Goff, Solenn; Ristol, Santi; Estévez, José Antonio

    2006-01-01

    Please, cite this publication as: Le Goff, S., Ristol, S., & Estévez, J.A. (2006). Employing Competence based Management to enhance Training Effectiveness. Proceedings of International Workshop in Learning Networks for Lifelong Competence Development, TENCompetence Conference. March 30th-31st,

  2. An assessment of EU-funded research projects: innovators and their innovative potential

    Nepelski, D.; Pesole, A.; Van Roy, V.; O’Neill, E.

    2016-07-01

    The European Commission's Framework Programme constitutes an important share in R&D expenditures in Europe. A number of FP7 projects certainly produce cutting-edge technologies and a significant percentage of these technologies could be commercialized. However, there is a general feeling that not all these technologies and innovations with commercial potential reach the market. The question is why? The Innovation Radar (IR) is a support initiative that focuses on the identification of high-potential innovations in the ICT FP7 projects and the key organization in delivering these innovations to the market. The current paper documents the details of the IR methodology and the results of its first application. (Author)

  3. The composite indicators used in assessing innovation at national level

    Daniela HINCU

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of present paper is to present some recent developments in constructing composite innovation (or even, science and technology S&T indicators on a national level. Measuring innovation at the national level is crucial in developing appropriate long term strategies for economic growth, because it is widely believed technological innovation is one of the main drivers of sustained economic-social welfare, if not the single most important driver of economic growth. Our purpose is to present a mapping exercise of metrics – based on composite indicators - found in the STI literature, pointing out those used in practice, with a view to corresponding values in the case of Romania. It has become standard practice to combine several indicators for science, technology, and innovation to form composite numbers. Composite indicators are increasingly being used to make cross-national comparisons of country performance in specified areas such as competitiveness, globalisation, innovation, etc.

  4. Early Learning Assessment Innovation in South Africa: A Locally Appropriate Monitoring Tool

    Dawes, Andrew; Biersteker, Linda; Girdwood, Elizabeth; Snelling, Matthew; Tredoux, C. G.

    2018-01-01

    In 2015, Innovation Edge commissioned the development of South Africa's first national-level preschool child assessment tool. The project's key innovations were that the tool should fairly assess children from across the cultural and socio-economic spectrum, be inexpensive in terms of equipment and administration costs, and be administered in…

  5. Competency-Based Blended Learning: Flipping Professional Practice Classes to Enhance Competence Development

    Mark Ragg

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In the past decade, health and human service educational programs have transitioned to competence-based outcomes to enhance the quality of graduating professionals. While such outcomes are a critical step in ensuring professional quality, they require curricular and pedagogical adjustments that do not fit easily within university environments. Technology has eased many problems of fit through the development of hybrid and flipped courses that allow on-campus time to be better focused on developing professional skills. This study explored the question: Can flipped delivery improve competence-based outcomes in social work practice classes? The study assessed pedagogical adjustments that integrated competence-based learning principles with flipped classroom delivery. Principles of organizing the class to maximize competence development are explored and illustrated. Improved competence development and student satisfaction were demonstrated in three flipped practice courses with a combined sample size of 269 Bachelor of Social Work (BSW and Masters of Social Work (MSW students. Researchers concluded that using flipped-classroom methods enhanced the students’ capacity to apply concepts and develop skills. In particular, the ability to receive and process feedback on applied skills was improved.

  6. A Critical Assessment of the Quality and Validity of Composite Indicators of Innovation

    Vértesy, D.

    2016-07-01

    While it is generally accepted that monitoring innovation system performance requires a set of indicators, there is a constant debate on whether and how composite indices can be used to summarize them. This paper enters this discussion by assessing the validity and quality of the most commonly used composite indicators of innovation. In our framework, the validity of an index relates to the link between component indicators or aggregates and to the aspect(s) of national systems of innovation they seek to measure, while the quality of an indicator relates to its statistical properties. To better understand validity, we discuss how the evolution of the national system of innovation concept and its use in policy has shifted demand from an advocacy to more analytical functions of composite indicators of innovation.We next examine selected composite indicators of innovation (the WIPO-INSEAD’s Global Innovation Indicator, the Summary Innovation Index and Innovation Output Indicator of the European Commission and the Fraunhofer Innovation Index) in different contexts of external and internal validity and conduct global sensitivity analyses on them. Our policy-relevant findings highlight the need for analytically stronger composites of a more limited set of indicators.We also found significant quality differences across the indices, as some included components which explain little or none of the variance in composite scores, and were more sensitive to modeling choices. The indices studied differed in how validly they represented various innovation system functions and types of innovation, and showed information relevant for a broader or a more limited set of stakeholders. We argue that further development of innovation indicators should put more emphasis on identifying tradeoffs within innovation policy, and unintended consequences of innovative activities. (Author)

  7. Competency-based medical education: the discourse of infallibility.

    Boyd, Victoria A; Whitehead, Cynthia R; Thille, Patricia; Ginsburg, Shiphra; Brydges, Ryan; Kuper, Ayelet

    2018-01-01

    Over the last two decades, competency-based frameworks have been internationally adopted as the primary educational approach in medicine. Yet competency-based medical education (CBME) remains contested in the academic literature. We look broadly at the nature of this debate to explore how it may shape scholars' understanding of CBME, and its implications for medical education research and practice. In doing so, we deconstruct unarticulated discourses and assumptions embedded in the CBME literature. We assembled an archive of literature focused on CBME. The archive dates from 1996, the publication year of the first CanMEDS Physician Competency Framework. We then conducted a Foucauldian critical discourse analysis (CDA) to delineate the dominant discourses underpinning the literature. CDA examines the intersections of language, social practices, knowledge and power relations to highlight how entrenched ways of thinking influence what can or cannot be said about a topic. Detractors of CBME have advanced an array of conceptual critiques. Proponents have often responded with a recurring discursive strategy that minimises these critiques and deflects attention from the underlying concept of the competency-based approach. As part of this process, conceptual concerns are reframed as two practical problems: implementation and interpretation. Yet the assertion that these are the construct's primary concerns was often unsupported by empirical evidence. These practices contribute to a discourse of infallibility of CBME. In uncovering the discourse of infallibility, we explore how it can silence critical voices and hinder a rigorous examination of the competency-based approach. These discursive practices strengthen CBME by constructing it as infallible in the literature. We propose re-approaching the dialogue surrounding CBME as a starting point for empirical investigation, driven by the aim to broaden scholars' understanding of its design, development and implementation in

  8. A Competence-Based Curriculum Design for Entrepreneurship Study Program

    Priska J.R. Siagian

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Indonesia is affected by global crisis. Increasing the number of entrepreneurs is one of many solutions to increase the economic growth in Indonesia. The number of entrepreneurs in Indonesia to leverage the economic growth is still limited. Entrepreneurs can be prepared through an Entrepreneurship Study Program. Entrepreneurship Study Program attempts to create qualified entrepreneurs who have relevant competences. In order to create a qualified entrepreneurs, the Entrepreneurial Studies Program requires a competency-based curriculum that will support the educational process and provide all the necessary to become future entrepreneurs who can survive through a global challenge. This research aims to design a competence-based curriculum for entrepreneurial study and uses Quality Function Deployment (QFD as the major tool to design the competence-based curriculum. From the QFD process, this research finds core and elective courses for the Entrepreneurship Study Program. The result shows the competences covered by the courses and sequence, credits, and teaching methods for each course. The competences prepared the potential entrepreneurs can be achieved through specific courses which can be acquired within 8 semesters.

  9. COMPETENCE-BASED APPROACH TO MODELLING STRUCTURES OF THE MAIN EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM

    V. A. Gerasimova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available By the analysis results of scientific works in the field of competence-based approach in education authors proved need of computer support of the planning and development stage of the main educational program, they developed the main educational program structure automatic formation model on the graphs basis, offered the integrated criterion of an discipline assessment and developed a strategic map of a discipline complex assessment. The executed theoretical researches are a basis for creation of the main educational program planning and development support automated system.

  10. Development of Competency-Based Articulated Automotive Program. Big Bend Community College and Area High Schools. Final Report.

    Buche, Fred; Cox, Charles

    A competency-based automotive mechanics curriculum was developed at Big Bend Community College (Washington) in order to provide the basis for an advanced placement procedure for high school graduates and experienced adults through a competency assessment. In order to create the curriculum, Big Bend Community College automotive mechanics…

  11. Learner-Centered SEM and Competency-Based Education: Exploring the Learning Frontier of Graduate Enrollment Futures

    Snowden, Monique L.

    2014-01-01

    In March 2013, the US Department of Education issued guidance to institutions on how to attain approval for competency-based programs under the current title IV, Higher Education Act (HEA) regulations on direct assessment programs. This article considers the graduate enrollment futures of colleges and universities that have chosen and will elect…

  12. A competency based selection procedure for Dutch postgraduate GP training: a pilot study on validity and reliability

    Vermeulen, M.I.; Tromp, F.; Zuithoff, N.P.; Pieters, R.H.; Damoiseaux, R.A.; Kuyvenhoven, M.M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Historically, semi-structured interviews (SSI) have been the core of the Dutch selection for postgraduate general practice (GP) training. This paper describes a pilot study on a newly designed competency-based selection procedure that assesses whether candidates have the

  13. Competency-Based Approaches: Linking Theory and Practice in Professional Education with Particular Reference to Health Education

    Gonczi, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Paul Hager and I worked on a large number of research projects and publications throughout the 1990s. The focus of this work was on developing a competency-based approach to professional education and assessment. I review this work and its impact over the years. Notwithstanding the fact that most professional associations today have a competency…

  14. Peer Assessment and Compliance Review (PACR) Innovative Strategies Report. California Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA) Programs

    Macro, Bronwen; Huang, Lee Ann

    2005-01-01

    This report focuses on the innovative strategies study component of the Peer Assessment and Compliance Review (PACR) project. California (Court Appointed Special Advocates) CASA programs have developed many innovative strategies to serve children in their communities. At each of the programs visited during the PACR project, the team identified at…

  15. THE RISKS’ ASSESSMENT IN INNOVATIVE PROJECTS BY THE METHOD OF VERIFIED EQUIVALENTS

    Анатолій Валентинович ШАХОВ

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the concept of "risk of innovation", identified the causes of the risk and the methods of eliminating of negative manifestations of the risk situations in innovative projects. The advantages and disadvantages of the method of correction of the discount rate and the method of equivalent annuities are considered. The methodical approach in assessing the expected effect of the innovative project based on the concept of probability-interval uncertainty is proposed in the article. It was established that the analyzed approaches can be used for the accounting of the risk of innovative projects. Project manager makes his choice using any method of risk assessment individually, depending on the extent and characteristics of the project, the degree of novelty and scale introduction of innovative products, the number of participants and the level of requirements of the foundation of project efficiency and other factors.

  16. How can we assess the value of complex medical innovations in practice?

    Abrishami, Payam; Boer, Albert; Horstman, Klasien

    2015-06-01

    Rapid proliferation of medical innovations in the face of demographic changes and scarce resources is demanding a value-conscious entry of medical innovations into health care systems. An inquiry into value gains significance during the early diffusion phase of an innovation and becomes indispensable as the complexity of an innovation increases. In this editorial, we argue that a value assessment must pay attention to the social processes shaping the innovation's adoption and use, in particular, to the "promises" of the technology and actual "practices" with it. Promises and practices represent real-world value as they account for both outcomes and costs in practice. A systematic exploration of these loci of value, using insights from constructive technology assessment, enables us to make well-informed decisions on complex medical technologies.

  17. Assessment of the Feasibility of Innovative Reusable Launchers

    Chiesa, S.; Corpino, S.; Viola, N.

    takes off like the Space Shuttle, this kind of reusable launch vehicles, called spaceplanes, should all be able to be maintained and operated from airports, thus making the launch and recovery phases easier and more affordable. Apart from being an innovative attempt to get access to space, spaceplanes look likely to revolutionize long distance plane travel, with travel times between any two cities connecting USA, Europe, Japan and Australia being only a few hours. SSTO winged vehicles may be at the margins of feasibility as a reusable SSTO design attempts to take two major steps at once: step one being a fully reusable vehicle and step two being a single-stage reusable vehicle. It is well known that the accomplishment of the SSTO vehicle requires a dramatic effort from the technological point of view even though the integration design appears to be quite easy. If compared to the SSTO, the TSTO reusable vehicle is less technically demanding as, for example, state-of-the-art engines can be used but the integration design is surely more complex. An optimum solution may be represented by the "one and a half" stage to orbit vehicle. In fact getting the "one and a half" reusable vehicle into orbit doesn't look impossible but it surely does look challenging. In this paper the study of the feasibility and the technological assessment of new space systems concepts are accomplished by: The work we are involved in is still under way but the first results we have had are encouraging.

  18. Sequential method for the assessment of innovations in computer assisted industrial processes

    Suarez Antola R.

    1995-01-01

    A sequential method for the assessment of innovations in industrial processes is proposed, using suitable combinations of mathematical modelling and numerical simulation of dynamics. Some advantages and limitations of the proposed method are discussed. tabs

  19. Teacher interpersonal behaviour and student motivation in competence-based vocational education : Evidence from Indonesia

    Misbah, Zainun; Gulikers, Judith; Maulana, Ridwan; Mulder, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Competence-based education requires changing teacher roles probably affecting teacher–student interactions and student motivation. This study examines how students (N = 1469) from competence-based and less-competence-based vocational schools perceive their teachers' interpersonal behaviour and its

  20. Identification and classification of behavioural indicators to assess innovation competence

    María Jose Pérez Peñalver; Lourdes E. Aznar Mas; Begoña Montero Fleta

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: Taking a literature review as a point of departure, the main aim of this paper was the identification of the behavioural indicators of innovators at the workplace, and their classification.  Design/methodology/approach: A literature review was addressed by means of a search in Elsevier’s Scopus, Web of Science and Google Scholar. By applying inclusive and exclusive criteria, references were obtained with the search protocol. After filtering and scanning, there was a selection of r...

  1. Simulation for Teaching Orthopaedic Residents in a Competency-based Curriculum: Do the Benefits Justify the Increased Costs?

    Nousiainen, Markku T; McQueen, Sydney A; Ferguson, Peter; Alman, Benjamin; Kraemer, William; Safir, Oleg; Reznick, Richard; Sonnadara, Ranil

    2016-04-01

    Although simulation-based training is becoming widespread in surgical education and research supports its use, one major limitation is cost. Until now, little has been published on the costs of simulation in residency training. At the University of Toronto, a novel competency-based curriculum in orthopaedic surgery has been implemented for training selected residents, which makes extensive use of simulation. Despite the benefits of this intensive approach to simulation, there is a need to consider its financial implications and demands on faculty time. This study presents a cost and faculty work-hours analysis of implementing simulation as a teaching and evaluation tool in the University of Toronto's novel competency-based curriculum program compared with the historic costs of using simulation in the residency training program. All invoices for simulation training were reviewed to determine the financial costs before and after implementation of the competency-based curriculum. Invoice items included costs for cadavers, artificial models, skills laboratory labor, associated materials, and standardized patients. Costs related to the surgical skills laboratory rental fees and orthopaedic implants were waived as a result of special arrangements with the skills laboratory and implant vendors. Although faculty time was not reimbursed, faculty hours dedicated to simulation were also evaluated. The academic year of 2008 to 2009 was chosen to represent an academic year that preceded the introduction of the competency-based curriculum. During this year, 12 residents used simulation for teaching. The academic year of 2010 to 2011 was chosen to represent an academic year when the competency-based curriculum training program was functioning parallel but separate from the regular stream of training. In this year, six residents used simulation for teaching and assessment. The academic year of 2012 to 2013 was chosen to represent an academic year when simulation was used equally

  2. Innovation and dynamic capabilities of the firm: Defining an assessment model

    André Cherubini Alves

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Innovation and dynamic capabilities have gained considerable attention in both academia and practice. While one of the oldest inquiries in economic and strategy literature involves understanding the features that drive business success and a firm’s perpetuity, the literature still lacks a comprehensive model of innovation and dynamic capabilities. This study presents a model that assesses firms’ innovation and dynamic capabilities perspectives based on four essential capabilities: development, operations, management, and transaction capabilities. Data from a survey of 1,107 Brazilian manufacturing firms were used for empirical testing and discussion of the dynamic capabilities framework. Regression and factor analyses validated the model; we discuss the results, contrasting with the dynamic capabilities’ framework. Operations Capability is the least dynamic of all capabilities, with the least influence on innovation. This reinforces the notion that operations capabilities as “ordinary capabilities,” whereas management, development, and transaction capabilities better explain firms’ dynamics and innovation.

  3. A Firm-Level Innovation Management Framework and Assessment Tool for Increasing Competitiveness

    Sorin Cohn

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Innovation depends on much more than just technology and R&D. It is a means to an end – competitive success and higher market value – and it needs to be managed strategically and methodically for tangible corporate performance where it matters: in the market. This article introduces a comprehensive corporate innovation management framework (v-CIM and a targeted competitiveness assessment tool (i-TCA. Properly used by corporate leaders, this framework and its associated tool enable innovation managers to decide on priorities for competitive development, adopt appropriate innovation strategies to meet corporate goals, monitor progress, make adjustments, and help create and maintain a culture of innovation that is aligned with business goals.

  4. Challenges in developing competency-based training curriculum for food safety regulators in India

    Anitha Thippaiah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The Food Safety and Standards Act have redefined the roles and responsibilities of food regulatory workforce and calls for highly skilled human resources as it involves complex management procedures. Aims: 1 Identify the competencies needed among the food regulatory workforce in India. 2 Develop a competency-based training curriculum for food safety regulators in the country. 3 Develop training materials for use to train the food regulatory workforce. Settings and Design: The Indian Institute of Public Health, Hyderabad, led the development of training curriculum on food safety with technical assistance from the Royal Society for Public Health, UK and the National Institute of Nutrition, India. The exercise was to facilitate the implementation of new Act by undertaking capacity building through a comprehensive training program. Materials and Methods: A competency-based training needs assessment was conducted before undertaking the development of the training materials. Results: The training program for Food Safety Officers was designed to comprise of five modules to include: Food science and technology, Food safety management systems, Food safety legislation, Enforcement of food safety regulations, and Administrative functions. Each module has a facilitator guide for the tutor and a handbook for the participant. Essentials of Food Hygiene-I (Basic level, II and III (Retail/ Catering/ Manufacturing were primarily designed for training of food handlers and are part of essential reading for food safety regulators. Conclusion: The Food Safety and Standards Act calls for highly skilled human resources as it involves complex management procedures. Despite having developed a comprehensive competency-based training curriculum by joint efforts by the local, national, and international agencies, implementation remains a challenge in resource-limited setting.

  5. The assessment of the training in innovative behavior

    Patricia Castro Espinoza

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The entrepreneurship is to take charge of a problem or anomaly detected in the environment to contribute to an ideal solution across a company that develops resources reproduced by the environment for the creative process of implementation of the idea and that benefits the quality of life of the community. When resources such as training, inclusive business opportunities, credit, information technology, others are reproduced in this environment ventures thrive activating its dynamic growth. A qualitative approach was used to identify categories with agents of public technical assistance to businesses and entrepreneurship in a context of inclusive, true and current research which emerged competenciesin forming innovative entrepreneurship in the business development centers and to support entrepreneurship (Albert-Gómez; 2007; Hernández; 2006. The training enables enterprises innovate their management skills as teamwork and management from the idea to the business plan; under legal and political body that promotes the endogenous development of the territory. The increasing flow of information forces retake both know how know-how; where the educational evaluation process is the core of learning for life (Castillo-Arredondo; Torres-González y Polanco- González; 2009; CabrerizoDiago; Rubio-Roldán y Castillo-Arredondo; 2008.

  6. Qualitative and quantitative feedback in the context of competency-based education.

    Tekian, Ara; Watling, Christopher J; Roberts, Trudie E; Steinert, Yvonne; Norcini, John

    2017-12-01

    Research indicates the importance and usefulness of feedback, yet with the shift of medical curricula toward competencies, feedback is not well understood in this context. This paper attempts to identify how feedback fits within a competency-based curriculum. After careful consideration of the literature, the following conclusions are drawn: (1) Because feedback is predicated on assessment, the assessment should be designed to optimize and prevent inaccuracies in feedback; (2) Giving qualitative feedback in the form of a conversation would lend credibility to the feedback, address emotional obstacles and create a context in which feedback is comfortable; (3) Quantitative feedback in the form of individualized data could fulfill the demand for more feedback, help students devise strategies on how to improve, allow students to compare themselves to their peers, recognizing that big data have limitations; and (4) Faculty development needs to incorporate and promote cultural and systems changes with regard to feedback. A better understanding of the role of feedback in competency-based education could result in more efficient learning for students.

  7. Competence-based demands made of senior physicians: an empirical study to evaluate leadership competencies.

    Lehr, Bosco; Ostermann, Herwig; Schubert, Harald

    2011-01-01

    As a result of more economising in German hospitals, changes evolve in organising the deployment of senior medical staff. New demands are made of senior hospital management. Leadership competencies in the training and development of physicians are of prime importance to the successful perception of managerial responsibilities. The present study investigates the actual and targeted demands of leadership made of senior medical staff in terms of how these demands are perceived. To this end, the demands of leadership were surveyed using a competence-based questionnaire and investigated with a view to potentials in professional development by way of example of the senior management of psychiatric hospitals in Germany. In all, the results show high ratings in personal performance, the greatest significance being attributed to value-oriented competence in the actual assessment of demands on leadership. Besides gender-specific differences in the actual assessments of single fields of competence, the greatest differences between the targeted and the actual demands are, in all, shown to be in the competencies of self-management and communication. Competence-based core areas in leadership can be demonstrated for the professional development of physicians and an adaptive mode of procedure deduced. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  8. Higher specialty training in genitourinary medicine: A curriculum competencies-based approach.

    Desai, Mitesh; Davies, Olubanke; Menon-Johansson, Anatole; Sethi, Gulshan Cindy

    2018-01-01

    Specialty trainees in genitourinary medicine (GUM) are required to attain competencies described in the GUM higher specialty training curriculum by the end of their training, but learning opportunities available may conflict with service delivery needs. In response to poor feedback on trainee satisfaction surveys, a four-year modular training programme was developed to achieve a curriculum competencies-based approach to training. We evaluated the clinical opportunities of the new programme to determine: (1) Whether opportunity cost of training to service delivery is justifiable; (2) Which competencies are inadequately addressed by direct clinical opportunities alone and (3) Trainee satisfaction. Local faculty and trainees assessed the 'usefulness' of the new modular programme to meet each curriculum competence. The annual General Medical Council (GMC) national training survey assessed trainee satisfaction. The clinical opportunities provided by the modular training programme were sufficiently useful for attaining many competencies. Trainee satisfaction as captured by the GMC survey improved from two reds pre- to nine greens post-intervention on a background of rising clinical activity in the department. The curriculum competencies-based approach to training offers an objective way to balance training with service provision and led to an improvement in GMC survey satisfaction.

  9. Ljubljana quality selection (LQS) - innovative case of restaurant assessment system

    Maja Uran Maravić; Daniela Gračan; Zrinka Zadel

    2014-01-01

    The purpose – The purpose of this paper is to briefly present the most well-known restaurant assessment systems where restaurant are assessed by experts. The aim is to highlight the strengths and weaknesses of each system. Design –The special focus is to give answers on questions: how are the restaurants assessed by experts, which are the elements and standards of assessment and whether they are consistent with the quality dimensions as advocated in the theory of service quality. Methodology ...

  10. Small Business Innovation Research, Post-Phase II Opportunity Assessment

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.

    2015-01-01

    This report outlines current Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Post-Phase II opportunity contract award results for the SBIR technology program from 2007 to 2011 for NASA's Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD), Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD), Science Mission Directorate (SMD), and Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD). The report provides guidelines for incorporating SBIR technology into NASA programs and projects and provides a quantitative overview of the post-Phase II award patterns that correspond with each mission directorate at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). In recent years, one of NASA's goals has been to not only transfer SBIR technologies to commercial industries, but to ensure that NASA mission directorates incorporate SBIR technologies into their program and project activities. Before incorporating technologies into MD programs, it is important to understand each mission directorate structure because each directorate has different objectives and needs. The directorate program structures follow.

  11. Towards a Competency-based Vision for Construction Safety Education

    Pedro, Akeem; Hai Chien, Pham; Park, Chan Sik

    2018-04-01

    Accidents still prevail in the construction industry, resulting in injuries and fatalities all over the world. Educational programs in construction should deliver safety knowledge and skills to students who will become responsible for ensuring safe construction work environments in the future. However, there is a gap between the competencies current pedagogical approaches target, and those required for safety in practice. This study contributes to addressing this issue in three steps. Firstly, a vision for competency-based construction safety education is conceived. Building upon this, a research scheme to achieve the vision is developed, and the first step of the scheme is initiated in this study. The critical competencies required for safety education are investigated through analyses of literature, and confirmed through surveys with construction and safety management professionals. Results from the study would be useful in establishing and orienting education programs towards current industry safety needs and requirements

  12. Competency-Based Postgraduate Medical Education: Past, Present and Future

    ten Cate, Olle

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Since the turn of the twenty-first century, competency-based medical education (CBME has become a dominant approach to postgraduate medical education in many countries. CBME has a history dating back half a century and is rooted in general educational approaches such as outcome-based education and mastery learning. Despite controversies around the terminology and the CBME approach, important national medical regulatory bodies in Canada, the United States, and other countries have embraced CBME. CBME can be characterized as having two distinct features: a focus on specific domains of competence, and a relative independence of time in training, making it an individualized approach that is particularly applicable in workplace training. It is not the length of training that determines a person’s readiness for unsupervised practice, but the attained competence or competencies. This shift in focus makes CBME different from traditional training. In this contribution, definitions of CBME and related concepts are detailed.

  13. Nuclear engineering education: A competence based approach to curricula development

    2014-01-01

    Maintaining nuclear competencies in the nuclear industry is a one of the most critical challenges in the near future. With the development of a number of nuclear engineering educational programmes in several States, this publication provides guidance to decision makers in Member States on a competence based approach to curricula development, presenting the established practices and associated requirements for educational programmes in this field. It is a consolidation of best practices that will ensure sustainable, effective nuclear engineering programmes, contributing to the safe, efficient and economic operation of nuclear power plants. The information presented is drawn from a variety of recognized nuclear engineering programmes around the world and contributes to the main areas that are needed to ensure a viable and robust nuclear industry

  14. Workshop : ACPSEM/ARPS competency based standards project

    Collins, L.

    1996-01-01

    The ACPSEM together with the Australian Radiation Protection Society has been working for nearly two years now on a competency based standards project for the professions of medical and health physicists. Competencies are being used increasingly in industry and the professions as a means of determining skill levels. For example, all the medical radiation technology streams have a CBS system in the final stages of development, and our engineering colleagues have completed theirs. Last year there was a draft document sent to all members asking for feedback. Following a vote of funding by both bodies, a project offect (Dr David Waggett) has been appointed, and has produced a very much improved set of competency standards covering all significant subspecialties in our profession. This workshop will detail the work done so far, and preview the draft document. A healthy discussion will be encouraged, as the project steering group will shortly be arranging the next steps in process. (author)

  15. Impact of a competency based curriculum on quality improvement among internal medicine residents.

    Fok, Mark C; Wong, Roger Y

    2014-11-28

    Teaching quality improvement (QI) principles during residency is an important component of promoting patient safety and improving quality of care. The literature on QI curricula for internal medicine residents is limited. We sought to evaluate the impact of a competency based curriculum on QI among internal medicine residents. This was a prospective, cohort study over four years (2007-2011) using pre-post curriculum comparison design in an internal medicine residency program in Canada. Overall 175 post-graduate year one internal medicine residents participated. A two-phase, competency based curriculum on QI was developed with didactic workshops and longitudinal, team-based QI projects. The main outcome measures included self-assessment, objective assessment using the Quality Improvement Knowledge Assessment Tool (QIKAT) scores to assess QI knowledge, and performance-based assessment via presentation of longitudinal QI projects. Overall 175 residents participated, with a response rate of 160/175 (91%) post-curriculum and 114/175 (65%) after conducting their longitudinal QI project. Residents' self-reported confidence in making changes to improve health increased and was sustained at twelve months post-curriculum. Self-assessment scores of QI skills improved significantly from pre-curriculum (53.4 to 69.2 percent post-curriculum [p-value 0.002]) and scores were sustained at twelve months after conducting their longitudinal QI projects (53.4 to 72.2 percent [p-value 0.005]). Objective scores using the QIKAT increased post-curriculum from 8.3 to 10.1 out of 15 (p-value for difference value for difference from pre-curriculum based assessment occurred via presentation of all projects at the annual QI Project Podium Presentation Day. The competency based curriculum on QI improved residents' QI knowledge and skills during residency training. Importantly, residents perceived that their QI knowledge improved after the curriculum and this also correlated to improved QIKAT

  16. Methods of assessing functioning of organizational and economic mechanism during innovation process implementation

    Blinkov Maksim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes methods of assessing the efficiency of organizational and economic mechanism of an industrial enterprise when implementing innovation processes. These methods allow continuous monitoring at all stages of innovation process implementation, lead to reduction in costs of innovation activity and enable maximum use of the creative potential of enterprise personnel. The significance and attractiveness of this method is ensured by the fact that it can be applied by industrial companies in any market fields regardless of the lifecycle stage applicable to the studied goods, company and/or innovative process because the composition and the number of specific indicators can be adjusted by the work group both before the study and in the course of the company’s innovative activities (at any stage of their implementation. The multi-sided approach proposed for assessing the efficiency of organizational and economic mechanism of the industrial enterprise when implementing innovation processes ensures full and accurate assessment of the impact of certain factors on the final result.

  17. Educating Higher Education Students for Innovative Economies: What International Data Tell Us

    Francesco Avvisati

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available As innovation increasingly fuels economic growth, higher education institutions and systems face the challenge of equipping students with the skills required by innovative economies. Using two international surveys of tertiary education graduates five years after their graduation, we show that the innovative, tertiary-educated workforce comprises a mix of graduates holding degrees from all disciplines. The contribution to innovation of different graduates varies by type of innovation. When they assess the strong and weak points of their university education, graduates give a mixed picture of the quality of the education they have received. We then link the propensity to participate in innovation to the relative emphasis on theory and practice in university programmes and conclude by highlighting the importance of a competence-based approach to curriculum and pedagogy

  18. Developing reflection on competence-based learning: the Russian experience with the Tuning approach

    Anna Serbati

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on the Tuning Russia project. It aims at providing an overview of the impact of the Tuning methodology and outcomes concerning University teaching, learning, and assessment activities. It identifies: the most relevant results and “lesson learnt” during the project; tools/concepts/experiences that involved teachers found most interesting; strengths and weaknesses; the usefulness of working with colleagues from different Russian universities; and the level of sharing of the Tuning methodology with other colleagues within participating Universities. The empirical data for the study were drawn from a qualitative questionnaire with open questions filled-in by the members of the subject area group “Social Work” involved in the Tuning Russia project. The respondents were six academic teachers from different Russian universities and two European Tuning experts. This reflection by academic teachers upon the initial implementation of the Tuning approach in Russia highlights the opportunities to explore methods of establishing and improving communities of practice in the field of competence-based higher education curriculum development. Results highlight the need to develop further work concerning both summative and formative evaluation in relation to competence-based curricula review in higher education

  19. Effectiveness of a Core-Competency-based Program on Residents' Learning and Experience.

    Charles, Lesley; Triscott, Jean; Dobbs, Bonnie; Tian, Peter George; Babenko, Oksana

    2016-06-01

    The Care of the Elderly (COE) Diploma Program is a six-to-twelve-month enhanced skills program taken after two years of core residency training in Family Medicine. In 2010, we developed and implemented a core-competency-based COE Diploma program (CC), in lieu of one based on learning objectives (LO). This study assessed the effectiveness of the core-competency-based program on residents' learning and their training experience as compared to residents trained using learning objectives. The data from the 2007-2013 COE residents were used in the study, with nine and eight residents trained in the LO and CC programs, respectively. Residents' learning was measured using preceptors' evaluations of residents' skills/abilities throughout the program (118 evaluations in total). Residents' rating of training experience was measured using the Graduate's Questionnaire which residents completed after graduation. For residents' learning, overall, there was no significant difference between the two programs. However, when examined as a function of the four CanMEDS roles, there were significant increases in the CC residents' scores for two of the CanMEDS roles: Communicator/Collaborator/Manager and Scholar compared to residents in the LO program. With respect to residents' training experience, seven out of ten program components were rated by the CC residents higher than by the LO residents. The implementation of a COE CC program appears to facilitate resident learning and training experience.

  20. Development and implementation of a competency-based clinical evaluation tool for midwifery education.

    Woeber, Kate

    2018-03-22

    The learning goals and evaluation strategies of competency-based midwifery programs must be explicit and well-defined. In the US, didactic learning is evaluated through a standardized certification examination, but standardized clinical competence evaluation is lacking. The Midwifery Competency Assessment Tool (MCAT) has been adapted from the International Confederation of Midwives' (ICM) "Essential Competencies" and from the American College of Nurse-Midwives' (ACNM) "Core Competencies", with student self-evaluation based on Benner's Novice-to-Expert theory. The MCAT allows for the measurement and monitoring of competence development in all domains of full-scope practice over the course of the midwifery program. Strengths of the MCAT are that it provides clear learning goals and performance evaluations for students, ensures and communicates content mapping across a curriculum, and highlights strengths and gaps in clinical opportunities at individual clinical sites and for entire programs. Challenges of the MCAT lie in balancing the number of competency items to be measured with the tedium of form completion, in ensuring the accuracy of student self-evaluation, and in determining "adequate" competence achievement when particular clinical opportunities are limited. Use of the MCAT with competency-based clinical education may facilitate a more standardized approach to clinical evaluation, as well as a more strategic approach to clinical site development and use. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Sustaining Innovation: Developing an Instructional Technology Assessment Process

    Carmo, Monica Cristina

    2013-01-01

    This case study developed an instructional technology assessment process for the Gevirtz Graduate School of Education (GGSE). The theoretical framework of Adelman and Taylor (2001) guided the development of this instructional technology assessment process and the tools to aid in its facilitation. GGSE faculty, staff, and graduate students…

  2. Dynamics of device innovation: implications for assessing value.

    Gelijns, Annetine C; Russo, Mark J; Hong, Kimberly N; Brown, Lawrence D; Ascheim, Deborah D; Moskowitz, Alan J

    2013-10-01

    In recent years, there has been growing interest in evaluating the health and economic impact of medical devices. Payers increasingly rely on cost-effectiveness analyses in making their coverage decisions, and are adopting value-based purchasing initiatives. These analytic approaches, however, have been shaped heavily by their use in the pharmaceutical realm, and are ill-adapted to the medical device context. This study focuses on the development and evaluation of left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) to highlight the unique challenges involved in the design and conduct of device trials compared with pharmaceuticals. Devices are moving targets characterized by a much higher degree of post-introduction innovation and "learning by using" than pharmaceuticals. The cost effectiveness ratio of left ventricular assist devices for destination therapy, for example, decreased from around $600,000 per life year saved based on results from the pivotal trial to around $100,000 within a relatively short time period. These dynamics pose fundamental challenges to the evaluation enterprise as well as the policy-making world, which this paper addresses.

  3. Innovative human health and ecological risk assessment techniques at Hanford

    Clarke, S.; Jones, K.; Goller, E.

    1993-01-01

    The open-quotes Hanford Site Baseline Risk Assessment Methodologyclose quotes (HSBRAM) was developed to enhance the preparation of risk assessments supporting the Hanford site cleanup mission. This methodology satisfies a Hanford federal facility agreement and consent order (tri-party agreement) milestone and is used to evaluate the risk to human health and the environment under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The methodology was prepared by the Hanford Risk Assessment Committee (RAC) consisting of tri-party representatives: the U.S. Department of Energy, the State of Washington Department of Ecology, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), with associated contractors. The risk assessment guidance provided by EPA is sufficiently general to permit tailoring of specific parameters to meet the risk assessment needs of individual sites. The RAC utilized EPA's Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund, (RAGS) as the cornerstone of the HSBRAM. The RAC added necessary Hanford-specific elements to construct a complete risk assessment guidance for utilization as an independent document. The HSBRAM is a living document because the RAC charter emphasizes the importance of continued methodology reevaluation. The HSBRAM also provides guidelines for the application of EPA's open-quotes Framework for Ecological Risk Assessmentclose quotes to Hanford-specific environmental baseline risk assessments by including endangered and threatened species in addition to sensitive habitats potentially associated with the Hanford site and guidance for selection of ecotoxicological data. Separate negotiations for the selection of risk parameters for each operable unit were avoided by defining parameters in the HSBRAM. There are 78 past-practice operable units at Hanford requiring risk assessments

  4. Educational research methods for researching innovations in teaching, learning and assessment: The nursing lecturer as researcher.

    Marks-Maran, Diane

    2015-11-01

    The author, who has had previous experience as a nurse researcher, has been engaged in helping nurse lecturers to undertake evaluation research studies into innovations in their teaching, learning and assessment methods. In order to undertake this work successfully, it was important to move from thinking like a nurse researcher to thinking like an educational researcher and developing the role of the nursing lecturer as researcher of their teaching. This article explores the difference between evaluation and evaluation research and argues for the need to use educational research methods when undertaking evaluation research into innovations in teaching, learning and assessment. A new model for educational evaluation research is presented together with two case examples of the model in use. The model has been tested on over 30 research studies into innovations in teaching, learning and assessment over the past 8 years. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A Measurement Framework for Team Level Assessment of Innovation Capability in Early Requirements Engineering

    Regnell, Björn; Höst, Martin; Nilsson, Fredrik; Bengtsson, Henrik

    When developing software-intensive products for a market-place it is important for a development organisation to create innovative features for coming releases in order to achieve advantage over competitors. This paper focuses on assessment of innovation capability at team level in relation to the requirements engineering that is taking place before the actual product development projects are decided, when new business models, technology opportunities and intellectual property rights are created and investigated through e.g. prototyping and concept development. The result is a measurement framework focusing on four areas: innovation elicitation, selection, impact and ways-of-working. For each area, candidate measurements were derived from interviews to be used as inspiration in the development of a tailored measurement program. The framework is based on interviews with participants of a software team with specific innovation responsibilities and validated through cross-case analysis and feedback from practitioners.

  6. Life Cycle Assessment as Entrepreneurial Tool for Business Management and Green Innovations

    Cassiano Moro Piekarski

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A transition for a green economy has encouraged companies to use new tools which promote internal corporate entrepreneurship, increase the competitiveness and achieve sustainable results. This article presented a theoretical discussion of how the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA can presents as an entrepreneurial tool for modern business management and green innovation. Studies of LCA were analyzed showing benefits and applications in the areas of strategic planning, production, process of development of products, search and development, social and environmental responsibility, and marketing. As for green innovations, there were analyzed studies of innovations in products, processes and services. The tool assists in making sustainable decisions, fortifies the management of the business processes, the management of operations and the promotion of greener innovations.

  7. From aggregation to interpretation: how assessors judge complex data in a competency-based portfolio.

    Oudkerk Pool, Andrea; Govaerts, Marjan J B; Jaarsma, Debbie A D C; Driessen, Erik W

    2018-05-01

    While portfolios are increasingly used to assess competence, the validity of such portfolio-based assessments has hitherto remained unconfirmed. The purpose of the present research is therefore to further our understanding of how assessors form judgments when interpreting the complex data included in a competency-based portfolio. Eighteen assessors appraised one of three competency-based mock portfolios while thinking aloud, before taking part in semi-structured interviews. A thematic analysis of the think-aloud protocols and interviews revealed that assessors reached judgments through a 3-phase cyclical cognitive process of acquiring, organizing, and integrating evidence. Upon conclusion of the first cycle, assessors reviewed the remaining portfolio evidence to look for confirming or disconfirming evidence. Assessors were inclined to stick to their initial judgments even when confronted with seemingly disconfirming evidence. Although assessors reached similar final (pass-fail) judgments of students' professional competence, they differed in their information-processing approaches and the reasoning behind their judgments. Differences sprung from assessors' divergent assessment beliefs, performance theories, and inferences about the student. Assessment beliefs refer to assessors' opinions about what kind of evidence gives the most valuable and trustworthy information about the student's competence, whereas assessors' performance theories concern their conceptualizations of what constitutes professional competence and competent performance. Even when using the same pieces of information, assessors furthermore differed with respect to inferences about the student as a person as well as a (future) professional. Our findings support the notion that assessors' reasoning in judgment and decision-making varies and is guided by their mental models of performance assessment, potentially impacting feedback and the credibility of decisions. Our findings also lend further

  8. Innovative Approaches to Increasing the Student Assessment Procedures Effectiveness

    Dorozhkin, Evgenij M.; Chelyshkova, Marina B.; Malygin, Alexey A.; Toymentseva, Irina A.; Anopchenko, Tatiana Y.

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of the investigated problem is determined by the need to improving the evaluation procedures in education and the student assessment in the age of the context of education widening, new modes of study developing (such as blending learning, e-learning, massive open online courses), immediate feedback necessity, reliable and valid…

  9. Sri Lanka's national assessment on innovation and intellectual property for access to medical products.

    Beneragama, Hemantha; Shridhar, Manisha; Ranasinghe, Thushara; Dissanayake, Vajira Hw

    2016-09-01

    In 2008, the Global strategy and plan of action on public health, innovation and intellectual property (GSPA-PHI) was launched by the World Health Organization, to stimulate fresh thinking on innovation in, and access to, medicines and to build sustainable research on diseases disproportionately affecting low- and middle-income countries. As part of the activities of the GSPA-PHI, Sri Lanka has been the first country to date to assess the national environment for medical technology and innovation. This year-long, multistakeholder, participative analysis facilitated identification of clear and implementable policy recommendations, for the government to increase its effectiveness in promoting innovation in health products through institutional development, investment and coordination among all areas relevant to public health. The assessment also highlighted areas for priority action, including closing the technology gap in development of health products, facilitating technology transfer, and building the health-research and allied workforces. The Sri Lankan experience will inform the ongoing independent external evaluation of the GSPA-PHI worldwide. The assessment process coincided with the passing of the National Medicines Regulatory Authority Act in 2015. In addition, there is growing recognition that regional cooperation will be critical to improving access to medical products in the future. Sri Lanka is therefore actively promoting cooperation to establish a regional regulatory affairs network. Lessons learnt from the Sri Lankan assessment may also benefit other countries embarking on a national GSPA-PHI assessment.

  10. COMPETENCY-BASED TRAINING IN NURSING: LIMITS AND POSSIBILITIES

    Silvia Franco da Rocha Tonhom

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective To analyze the possibilities and limits of competency-based training in nursing. Method An integrative review of the literature on the subject was carried out, and an analysis was made of the results of a survey evaluating a nursing course based on areas of competency. A dialog was then established between the review and the results of the research. Results On the question of which theoretical type of competency the articles from the literature relate to, there is a predominance of the constructivist perspective, followed by the functionalist approach and the dialog-based approach. In the dialog between the literature and the research, limits and possibilities were observed in the development of a training by areas of competency. Conclusion The dialog-based approach to competency is the proposition that most approximates to the profile defined by the National Curriculum Guidelines for training in nursing, and this was also identified in the evaluation survey that was studied. However, it is found that there are aspects on better work is needed, such as: partnership between school and the workplace, the role of the teacher, the role of the student, and the process of evaluation.

  11. Innovative real time simulation training and nuclear probabilistic risk assessment

    Reisinger, M.F.

    1991-01-01

    Operator errors have been an area of public concern for the safe operation of nuclear power plants since the TMI2 incident. Simply stated, nuclear plants are very complex systems and the public is skeptical of the operators' ability to comprehend and deal with the vast indications and complexities of potential nuclear power plant events. Prior to the TMI2 incident, operator errors and human factors were not included as contributing factors in the Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) studies of nuclear power plant accidents. More recent efforts in nuclear risk assessment have addressed some of the human factors affecting safe nuclear plant operations. One study found four major factors having significant impact on operator effectiveness. This paper discusses human factor PRAs, new applications in simulation training and the specific potential benefits from simulation in promoting safer operation of future power plants as well as current operating power plants

  12. ASSESSING THE PROLIFERATION RESISTANCE OF INNOVATIVE NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLES

    BARI, R.; ROGLANS, J.; DENNING, R.; MLADINEO, S.

    2003-01-01

    The National Nuclear Security Administration is developing methods for nonproliferation assessments to support the development and implementation of U.S. nonproliferation policy. This paper summarizes the key results of that effort. Proliferation resistance is the degree of difficulty that a nuclear material, facility, process, or activity poses to the acquisition of one or more nuclear weapons. A top-level measure of proliferation resistance for a fuel cycle system is developed here from a hierarchy of metrics. At the lowest level, intrinsic and extrinsic barriers to proliferation are defined. These barriers are recommended as a means to characterize the proliferation characteristics of a fuel cycle. Because of the complexity of nonproliferation assessments, the problem is decomposed into: metrics to be computed, barriers to proliferation, and a finite set of threats. The spectrum of potential threats of nuclear proliferation is complex and ranges from small terrorist cells to industrialized countries with advanced nuclear fuel cycles. Two general categories of methods have historically been used for nonproliferation assessments: attribute analysis and scenario analysis. In the former, attributes of the systems being evaluated (often fuel cycle systems) are identified that affect their proliferation potential. For a particular system under consideration, the attributes are weighted subjectively. In scenario analysis, hypothesized scenarios of pathways to proliferation are examined. The analyst models the process undertaken by the proliferant to overcome barriers to proliferation and estimates the likelihood of success in achieving a proliferation objective. An attribute analysis approach should be used at the conceptual design level in the selection of fuel cycles that will receive significant investment for development. In the development of a detailed facility design, a scenario approach should be undertaken to reduce the potential for design vulnerabilities

  13. Competency-based teacher training: A systematic revision of a proven programme in medical didactics.

    Griewatz, Jan; Simon, Melanie; Lammerding-Koeppel, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Competency-based medical education (CBME) requires factual knowledge to be practically applied together with skills and attitudes. With the National Competence-Based Learning Objectives for Undergraduate Medical Education (NKLM) representing a strong official demand for competence-orientation, it is generally important to explicitly outline its characteristics and review its realisation in teacher trainings. Further requirements are given by the core competencies for medical teachers (KLM). As an example the MQ programme ("Medizindidaktische Qualifikation") in Baden-Wuerttemberg, a long established and well-accepted training, has been critically revised on this basis, concerning its suitability for the demands of CBME, its needs for adjustment and the efforts to be undertaken for its implementation. Methods: In a systematic quality management process the MQ curriculum and its organisational framing were analysed and further developed in a step-wise comprehensive approach, using the six-step cycle by Kern. The procedures included a thorough needs assessment (e.g. literature research, programme mapping), strategic decisions on structure and content, piloting and evaluation. During the process essential elements of project and change management were considered. Results: The experiences of the MQ example revealed helpful information for key factors to be considered in the pending change process any training provider will be confronted with. Guiding questions were developed related to the process phases. Our analyses showed persistent key points of proven value as stable foundation for change, as well as components needing special consideration to foster competence-oriented aims and transfer into practice: reflection, feedback, application-oriented methods and transparent competence development. These aspects have to be consciously perceived and experienced by participants. Taking this into account, we re-designed the course evidence-based. Besides

  14. Using Action Research to Assess and Advocate for Innovative School Library Design

    Harper, Meghan; Deskins,Liz

    2015-01-01

    This article describes a collaborative project designed to use action research to assess and advocate for innovative design changes in a school library. The high school library was in its fifth year of service, and yet the layout of the library was not meeting the learning and technological needs of 21st-century high school students. The purpose…

  15. Enhancing innovation in agriculture at the policy level : The potential contribution of Technology Assessment

    Vanclay, Frank M.; Russell, A. Wendy; Kimber, Julie

    Technology Assessment (TA) is an applied process that considers the societal implications of technological change in order to influence policy to improve technology governance. TA has considerable potential to enhance innovation in agriculture and to assist agricultural industries in becoming more

  16. Innovations in education and approaches to assessment of regional educational systems

    Bauer, V. I.; Iljinyh, V. D.; Bazanov, A. V.; Kozin, E. S.

    2018-05-01

    The analysis of the latest innovations in the Russian education and trends in the development of educational regional systems is provided. Approaches to assessing the effectiveness of the operation of the company-university system are discussed by an example of motor engineering training for the oil and gas industry.

  17. Taking Risks with Their Hearts: Risk and Emotion in Innovative Forms of Assessment

    Leiman, Tania; Abery, Elizabeth; Willis, Eileen M.

    2015-01-01

    Research involving student and tutor responses to a "pedagogy of the heart" approach in a first year university health science topic revealed anxiety, insecurity and perceptions of unpredictability in relation to an innovative arts-based assignment designed to elicit and assess experiential or imaginal knowledge. Using the lens of…

  18. Competency-Based Teaching in Radiology - Implementation and Evaluation of Interactive Workstation-Based Learning to Apply NKLM-Based Content.

    Koestner, Wolfgang; Otten, Wiebke; Kaireit, Till; Wacker, Frank K; Dettmer, Sabine

    2017-11-01

    Purpose  New teaching formats are required to implement competency-based teaching in radiology teaching. Therefore, we have established and evaluated two practical competency-based radiological courses. Materials and Methods  The courses were held in a multimedia room with 25 computers and a professional DICOM viewer. Students were taught basic image analysis and presented clinical cases with a DICOM viewer under supervision of an instructor using desktop monitoring software. Two courses (elective course and obligatory course) were evaluated by the students (n = 160 and n = 100) and instructors (n = 9) using an anonymized online survey. Results  Courses were evaluated positively by the students and instructors. From the perspective of the students, the courses increased understanding of cross-sectional anatomy (elective/obligatory course: 97 %/95 %) and radiologic findings (97 %/99 %). Furthermore, the course increased the students' interest in radiology (61 %/65 %). The students considered this way of teaching to be relevant to their future occupation (92 % of students in the obligatory course). The higher incidence of teacher-student interaction and the possibility of independent image analysis were rated positively. The majority of instructors did not observe increased distractibility due to the computers (67 %) or notice worse preparation for MC tests (56 %). However, 56 % of instructors reported greater preparation effort. Conclusion  Practical competency-based radiological teaching using a DICOM viewer is a feasible innovative approach with high acceptance among students and instructors. It fosters competency-based learning as proposed by the model curriculum of the German Radiological Society (DRG) and the National Competency-based Catalogue of Learning Objectives for Undergraduate Medical Education (NKLM). Key Points   · Practical competency-based radiological teaching is highly accepted by students and instructors

  19. How to Assess Market Readiness for an Innovative Solution

    Hjorth, Sune Solberg; Brem, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    motivations and barriers when it comes to energy efficiency. Based on these findings, this paper argues that the biggest advancements are not to be made within the SMEs, but partly through the legislation that affects the financial benefits of energy improvement solutions, and through the marketing approach......The uptake of solutions that increase energy efficiency is significantly lower for small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). This is due to several barriers, among which legislation, motivation, finance and other resources play a large role. In this paper, we describe a framework of market...... readiness and use it to assess the asymmetry between existing solutions and opportunities in the market. The aim is to identify which steps can be taken in order to introduce more energy optimizations into SMEs, and who should be taking those steps. More specifically, we explore how four Danish SMEs...

  20. Ultrasonography for rheumatologists: the development of specific competency based educational outcomes.

    Brown, A K; O'Connor, P J; Roberts, T E; Wakefield, R J; Karim, Z; Emery, P

    2006-05-01

    A competency based approach to the education of rheumatologists in musculoskeletal ultrasonography (MSK US) ensures standards are documented, transparent, accountable, and defensible, with clear benefit to all stakeholders. Specific competency outcomes will facilitate informed development of a common curriculum and structured programme of training and assessment. To determine explicit competency based learning outcomes for rheumatologists undertaking MSK US. International experts in MSK US, satisfying specific selection criteria, were asked to define the minimum standards required by a rheumatologist to be judged competent in MSK US. They reviewed 115 MSK US skills, comprising bone and soft tissue pathology, in seven joints regions of the upper and lower limbs, and rated their relative importance according to specific criteria. These data are presented as specific educational outcomes within designated competency categories. 57 expert MSK US practitioners were identified and 35 took part in this study. Ten generic core competency outcomes were recognised including physics, anatomy, technique, and interpretation. Regarding specific regional competencies, 53% (61/115) were considered "must know" core learning outcomes, largely comprising inflammatory joint/tendon/bone pathology and guided procedures; 45% (52/115) were required at an intermediate/advanced level (18/115 "should know", 34/115 "could know"), and 2% (2/115) were deemed inappropriate/unnecessary for rheumatologist ultrasonographers. This is the first study to developing a competency model for the education of rheumatologists in MSK US based on the evidence of international experts. A specific set of learning outcomes has been defined, which will facilitate future informed education and practice development and provide a blueprint for a structured rheumatology MSK US curriculum and assessment process.

  1. A comparative assessment of the innovation potential of the Baltic Sea region countries

    Klemeshev Andrey

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This article offers a comparative assessment of the Baltic region countries on the basis of three groups of indicators — indicators of economic and research potential, indicators of dynamics of economic and research potential development, and indicators of economic and innovation potential of the states of the region. The author emphasises the need for Russia to cooperate with other countries of the region in the field of innovations as well as the possible role for the Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University in this process.

  2. Proposal of a Framework for Innovation Competencies Development and Assessment (FINCODA

    Juan A. Marin-Garcia

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article we propose a model of innovation competence of people, based on the existing literature to integrate and complement the existing models. The main contribution of this work consists in demonstrating the differences and similarities of current models and in providing a conceptual definition for each model element. In this way, both researchers and people in charge of Human Resources in companies can obtain a framework to design measuring instruments to assess the innovation competence, which can fulfil the twofold demand requirement of validity and reliability.

  3. Innovative technology for colostomy irrigation: assessing the impact on patients.

    Pace, S; Manuini, F; Maculotti, D

    2015-10-01

    The main purpose of the trial was to evaluate the opinions expressed by a sample of subjects with permanent colostomy, as a result of the use of a new device designed for the execution of transtomal intestinal irrigation; their feedback was analyzed in relation to the concept of Quality of Life. The device was tested on a sample of 14 colostomized patients (10 men and 4 women, aged between 42 and 77 years) who were used to perform intestinal irrigation procedures independently and routinely, with standard technique. After testing the new device, the patients included in the study were asked to fill out a questionnaire built ad hoc for their situation. The analysis of the data collected led to the following conclusions: 93% of the patients described the new irrigation method as simpler than the standard procedure; the majority of the patients assessed bowel emptying as good; 64% of patients reported excellent comfort experienced during the procedure; the presence of a regulator to adjust the instillation speed of water into the intestinal lumen was considered useful to control the flow of the incoming fluid The use of the device guaranteed: psychological tranquility, minimum manual intervention, full achievement of the expected results and decrease in the issues normally encountered with the standard irrigation method. The practical features of the new device ensure easy and straightforward carrying out of the procedure; this ease of use affects the stomized patient's everyday life by reducing the time of procedure completion, thus positively influencing the perception of the patients' Quality of Life.

  4. LCA as a Tool for Assessing Product and Process Oriented Eco-Innovations Undertaken by Enterprises

    Rybaczewska-Błażejowska Magdalena

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the application of life cycle assessment (LCA as an approach to foster the product and process oriented eco- innovation of enterprises, using the fruit and vegetable processing plant as an example. LCA, which is traditionally used to assess the impacts of a single product system on the environment, was applied in the enterprise context. This was made possible by forming an indicator describing the environmental profile of an enterprise, which is calculated by the sum of the multiplication of the environmental impact assessment (LCIA results for individual unit processes within a particular impact category and their weights reflecting the structure of production in an enterprise. In order to distinguish and indicate the direction in which an enterprise should undertake its eco-innovative actions (implementing eco-innovations within the product or production process the LCIA results are presented individually for products and production processes. The research was conducted in full compliance with the LCA methodology. LCA proved that the analysed enterprise has the largest negative impacts on the environment in the following impact categories: marine eco-toxicity, freshwater eco-toxicity, freshwater eutrophication, human toxicity and natural land transformation. They result primarily from the consumption of thermal and electric energy in the production processes. Therefore, to improve energy efficiency, the enterprise should take eco-innovative actions in the processes applied.

  5. Competence-Based Education and Training--About Frequently Asked Questions

    Mulder, Martin

    2012-01-01

    This article follows the author's previous piece on practical guidelines for the development of comprehensive competence-based education and training (Mulder, 2012). It is about the questions that have been and are still frequently asked in presentations, workshops and classes about the introduction of competence-based education. Here, the author…

  6. The Competency-Based Movement in Student Affairs: Implications for Curriculum and Professional Development

    Eaton, Paul William

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the limitations and possibilities of the emerging competency-based movement in student affairs. Using complexity theory and postmodern educational theory as guiding frameworks, examination of the competency-based movement will raise questions about overapplication of competencies in graduate preparation programs and…

  7. Competency-Based Education in Three Pilot Programs: Examining Implementation and Outcomes

    Steele, Jennifer L.; Lewis, Matthew W.; Santibanez, Lucrecia; Faxon-Mills, Susannah; Rudnick, Mollie; Stecher, Brian M.; Hamilton, Laura S.

    2014-01-01

    In 2011, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation created the Project Mastery grant program to support competency-based education initiatives in large school systems that serve a high proportion of disadvantaged youth. Competency-based education meets students where they are academically, provides students with opportunities for choice, and awards…

  8. Blending toward Competency. Early Patterns of Blended Learning and Competency-Based Education in New Hampshire

    Freeland, Julia

    2014-01-01

    As the education field strives to differentiate and personalize learning to cater to each student, two related movements are gaining attention: competency-based education and blended learning. In competency-based models, students advance on the basis of mastery, rather than according to the traditional methods of counting progress in terms of time…

  9. [Health technology assessment: a multidisciplinary approach for selecting innovations in the health service].

    Cavallo, Maria Caterina

    2013-01-01

    Technological evolution and the increasing requests of a more qualified health care have challenged politicians to evaluate the economical sustainability of proposed innovations. The objective of government health policies is to guarantee real advances in the quality of care to all citizens. Since 1965, independent research centers have analyzed this issue for the US Congress. In 1973, Congress endorsed the establishment of an Office of Technology Assessment (OTA) to discover the best strategies for evaluating such advances. OTA have proposed the following criteria to identify possible beneficial innovations to be introduced into routine health care: effectiveness, safeness, worth, costs, cost-effectiveness ratio and cost patient-benefit ratio. This review analyzes in detail the pathway that each medical innovation follows in order to identify which technological evolutions might prove to be truly beneficial and sustainable for the community.

  10. A Comparative Assessment of Wind Turbine Innovation and Diffusion Policies. Historical Case Studies of Energy Technology Innovation

    Neij, Lena; Andersen, Per Dannemand

    2012-01-01

    Wind turbines have become a mainstream technology, a first choice for many when investing in new electricity generation facilities. This comparative case study addresses how governmental policy has been formulated to support the wind turbine innovation and diffusion process. Three innovation stages...... and corresponding innovation strategies are identified. The first stage is the early movers of the 1970s and early 1980s, including pioneer countries such as Denmark, the United States, Germany, and the Netherlands. The second stage is the booming markets of the 1990s, guided by the successful Danish innovation...

  11. The transition to competency-based pediatric training in the United Arab Emirates.

    Ibrahim, Halah; Al Tatari, Hossam; Holmboe, Eric S

    2015-04-01

    Although competency-based medical education has become the standard for physician training in the West, many developing countries have not yet adopted competency-based training. In 2009 in the United Arab Emirates, the government regulatory and operational authorities for healthcare in Abu Dhabi mandated a wide-scale reform of the emirate's postgraduate residency programs to the competency-based framework of the newly formed Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-International (ACGME-I). This article briefly describes the rationale for competency-based medical education and provides an overview of the transition from traditional, time-based residency training to competency-based postgraduate medical education for the Pediatrics residency programs in Abu Dhabi. We will provide data on the initial impact of this transition on resident performance and patient outcomes in a Pediatrics residency program in an academic medical center in the United Arab Emirates.

  12. Competency-based education: the essential basis of pre-service education for the professional midwifery workforce.

    Fullerton, Judith T; Thompson, Joyce B; Johnson, Peter

    2013-10-01

    many articles published in the decade since promulgation of the Millennium Development Goals have acknowledged the distinct advantages to maternal and newborn health outcomes that can be achieved as a result of expanding access to skilled birth attendant (including midwifery) services. However, these advantages are often predicated on the assumption that the midwifery workforce shares a common definition and identity. Regrettably, a clear delineation of midwifery competencies is rarely addressed. A core set of midwifery competencies is essential to providing the high quality services that lead to the desirable health outcomes described in that body of research. Attribution of improved outcomes to access to midwifery cannot be made without a common understanding of a defined set of services provided to standard by the midwifery workforce across the inter-conceptional and childbearing time frame. The International Confederation of Midwives (ICM) has developed a clear list of competencies that delineate the domains of practice for the fully qualified, professional midwife. These domains frame the educational outcomes that must be conveyed within competency-based education programmes. this article explores the concept of competency-based education for midwives; first exploring the concept of competency itself, then providing examples of what is already known about competency-based approaches to curriculum design, teacher preparation, teacher support and assessment of student learning. These concepts are linked to the ICM competencies as the unifying construct for education of individuals who share a common definition and identity as midwives. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Building a competency-based workplace curriculum around entrustable professional activities: The case of physician assistant training.

    Mulder, Hanneke; Ten Cate, Olle; Daalder, Rieneke; Berkvens, Josephine

    2010-01-01

    Competency-based medical education (CBME) is increasingly dominating clinical training, but also poses questions as to its practical implementation. There is a need for practical guidelines to translate CBME to the clinical work floor. This article aims to provide a practical model, based on the concept of entrustable professional activities (EPAs) to make this translation, derived from curriculum building for physician assistants (PAs). For the training of PAs at the Utrecht University of Applied Sciences, a three-step model was developed to guide competency-based curriculum development, teaching and assessment. It includes specific guidelines for the identification, systematic description and planning of EPAs. The EPA concept appeared to be a useful tool to build competency-based clinical workplace curricula. Implementation of the curriculum requires use of trainee portfolios and progress interviews, statements of rewarded responsibility and training of supervisors. The individualised approach and flexibility that true CBME implies is brought into practice with this model. The model may also be transferred to other domains of clinical training, among which postgraduate training for medical specialties.

  14. The electronic residency application service application can predict accreditation council for graduate medical education competency-based surgical resident performance.

    Tolan, Amy M; Kaji, Amy H; Quach, Chi; Hines, O Joe; de Virgilio, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Program directors often struggle to determine which factors in the Electronic Residency Application Service (ERAS) application are important in the residency selection process. With the establishment of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) competencies, it would be important to know whether information available in the ERAS application can predict subsequent competency-based performance of general surgery residents. This study is a retrospective correlation of data points found in the ERAS application with core competency-based clinical rotation evaluations. ACGME competency-based evaluations as well as technical skills assessment from all rotations during residency were collected. The overall competency score was defined as an average of all 6 competencies and technical skills. A total of77 residents from two (one university and one community based university-affiliate) general surgery residency programs were included in the analysis. Receiving honors for many of the third year clerkships and AOA membership were associated with a number of the individual competencies. USMLE scores were predictive only of Medical Knowledge (p = 0.004). Factors associated with higher overall competency were female gender (p = 0.02), AOA (p = 0.06), overall number of honors received (p = 0.04), and honors in Ob/Gyn (p = 0.03) and Pediatrics (p = 0.05). Multivariable analysis showed honors in Ob/Gyn, female gender, older age, and total number of honors to be predictive of a number of individual core competencies. USMLE scores were only predictive of Medical Knowledge. The ERAS application is useful for predicting subsequent competency based performance in surgical residents. Receiving honors in the surgery clerkship, which has traditionally carried weight when evaluating a potential surgery resident, may not be as strong a predictor of future success. Copyright © 2010 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  15. Towards a more responsible sustainable innovation assessment and management culture in Europe

    Popper Rafael

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents new concepts and practical approaches resulting from the piloting of CASI-F - a common framework for the assessment and management of sustainable innovation (SI. Based on lessons learned from action research carried out in the context of the EU funded CASI project, the article focuses on the meta-analysis of 46 action roadmaps produced with 43 innovators supporting the practical application of CASI-F. The applied methodology helped to demonstrate that a multi-level and multi-actor advice approach promotes a shift towards improved understanding of innovations-related critical issues (barriers, drivers, opportunities and threats and stakeholders’ relations, as well as their management, thus promoting the sustainable resilience and transformation of socio-technical systems. This paper first reflects on how we arrived to managerial lessons from the actions roadmaps and how could these lessons be used to assess the current state of affairs and potential way forward for European initiatives and instruments promoting sustainable innovation.

  16. Life Cycle Assessment of Process Eco-Innovations in an SME Automotive Supply Network

    Alberto Simboli

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study presented in this article is to assess, from an environmental standpoint, a set of eco-innovations applied to the production process of an automotive component. The eco-innovations were developed by a supply network of small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs in the framework of a project named “Hi-reach”. The component considered is a motorcycle rear wheel spindle. The conventional version is obtained by machining a single forged steel part. The Hi-reach version is indeed manufactured by joining a shaft to a flange; in addition, conventional surface treatments are replaced by a plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD treatment and other machining steps are improved. This process was conceived with the aim of maintaining (or enhancing the technical performance of the spindle and reducing production costs. A Life Cycle Assessment (LCA was carried out to compare the two scenarios described. Those eco-innovations resulted in significant improvements of the environmental performance of the analysed component, ranging, on average, between 50% and 70% for the impact indicators considered. Our results also highlight the role of SMEs in promoting process eco-innovations and the increasing relevance of LCA as a tool to support decision making in manufacturing.

  17. [Hospital-based health technology assessment in France: how to proceed to evaluate innovative medical devices?].

    Martelli, N; van den Brink, H; Denies, F; Dervaux, B; Germe, A F; Prognon, P; Pineau, J

    2014-01-01

    Innovative medical devices offer solutions to medical problems and greatly improve patients' outcomes. Like National Health Technology Assessment (HTA) agencies, hospitals face numerous requests for innovative and costly medical devices. To help local decision-makers, different approaches of hospital-based HTA (HB-HTA) have been adopted worldwide. The objective of the present paper is to explore HB-HTA models for adopting innovative medical devices in France and elsewhere. Four different models have been conceptualized: "ambassador" model, "mini-HTA" model, "HTA unit" model and "internal committee". Apparently, "HTA unit" and "internal committee" (or a mixture of both models) are the prevailing HB-HTA models in France. Nevertheless, some weaknesses of these models have been pointed out in previous works. Only few examples involving hospital pharmacists have been found abroad, except in France and in Italy. Finally, the harmonization of the assessment of innovative medical devices in France needs a better understanding of HB-HTA practices. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Economical data on the value chain of the photovoltaic sector, and quantitative study of the economic impact of innovation. Assessment of the innovation impacts. Synthesis

    Blanc, Nicolas; Baggioni, Vincent; Durand, Yvonnick; Gaspard, Albane; Guillerminet, Marie-Laure; Marchal, David; Morlot, Rodolphe; Parrouffe, Jean-Michel; Varet, Anne; Ravel, Frederic; Equer, Bernard

    2012-10-01

    This synthesis reports a comprehensive study (October 2012) for ADEME, the French office for energy management and sustainable development, which presents an assessment of the potential impact of innovations in the field of photovoltaic components and systems. After a review of the photovoltaic industry and market in France and in the world, the production cost structure of a photovoltaic system is presented (module, assembly, installation). The impacts of innovations are then considered at the various stages of the chain value, from the material level (silicon, CdTe) to the installation level (ground based systems, roof installed, residential, etc.). Innovation impacts on the system production costs, on the electric power generation cost and on each market and sector (materials, wafers, cells, modules, systems, installation), are assessed. The potential impacts on job creations are also estimated. Assessment methodologies are systematically detailed

  19. RESULTS OF ANALYSIS OF BENCHMARKING METHODS OF INNOVATION SYSTEMS ASSESSMENT IN ACCORDANCE WITH AIMS OF SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT OF SOCIETY

    A. Vylegzhanina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we introduce results of comparative analysis of international ratings indexes of innovation systems for their compliance with purposes of sustainable development. Purpose of this research is defining requirements to benchmarking methods of assessing national or regional innovation systems and compare them basing on assumption, that innovation system is aligned with sustainable development concept. Analysis of goal sets and concepts, which underlie observed international composite innovation indexes, comparison of their metrics and calculation techniques, allowed us to reveal opportunities and limitations of using these methods in frames of sustainable development concept. We formulated targets of innovation development on the base of innovation priorities of sustainable socio-economic development. Using comparative analysis of indexes with these targets, we revealed two methods of assessing innovation systems, maximally connected with goals of sustainable development. Nevertheless, today no any benchmarking method, which meets need of innovation systems assessing in compliance with sustainable development concept to a sufficient extent. We suggested practical directions of developing methods, assessing innovation systems in compliance with goals of societal sustainable development.

  20. A Multimethodology Contractor Assessment Model for Facilitating Green Innovation: The View of Energy and Environmental Protection

    Sung-Lin Hsueh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The trends of the green supply chain are attributed to pressures from the environment and from customers. Green innovation is a practice for creating competitive advantage in sustainable development. To keep up with the changing business environment, the construction industry needs an appropriate assessment tool to examine the intrinsic and extrinsic effects regarding corporate competitive advantage. From the viewpoint of energy and environmental protection, this study combines four scientific methodologies to develop an assessment model for the green innovation of contractors. System dynamics can be used to estimate the future trends for the overall industrial structure and is useful in predicting competitive advantage in the industry. The analytic hierarchy process (AHP and utility theory focus on the customer’s attitude toward risk and are useful for comprehending changes in objective requirements in the environment. Fuzzy logic can simplify complicated intrinsic and extrinsic factors and express them with a number or ratio that is easy to understand. The proposed assessment model can be used as a reference to guide the government in examining the public constructions that qualified green contractors participate in. Additionally, the assessment model serves an indicator of relative competitiveness that can help the general contractor and subcontractor to evaluate themselves and further green innovations.

  1. A multimethodology contractor assessment model for facilitating green innovation: the view of energy and environmental protection.

    Hsueh, Sung-Lin; Yan, Min-Ren

    2013-01-01

    The trends of the green supply chain are attributed to pressures from the environment and from customers. Green innovation is a practice for creating competitive advantage in sustainable development. To keep up with the changing business environment, the construction industry needs an appropriate assessment tool to examine the intrinsic and extrinsic effects regarding corporate competitive advantage. From the viewpoint of energy and environmental protection, this study combines four scientific methodologies to develop an assessment model for the green innovation of contractors. System dynamics can be used to estimate the future trends for the overall industrial structure and is useful in predicting competitive advantage in the industry. The analytic hierarchy process (AHP) and utility theory focus on the customer's attitude toward risk and are useful for comprehending changes in objective requirements in the environment. Fuzzy logic can simplify complicated intrinsic and extrinsic factors and express them with a number or ratio that is easy to understand. The proposed assessment model can be used as a reference to guide the government in examining the public constructions that qualified green contractors participate in. Additionally, the assessment model serves an indicator of relative competitiveness that can help the general contractor and subcontractor to evaluate themselves and further green innovations.

  2. Socio-Environmental and Sustainability Assessment for Technology Innovations at Pectens Production in Brazil

    Márcio Ricardo Costa dos Santos

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a practical impact assessment method for the adoption of technology innovations at Pectens In vitro Fertilization Laboratory in Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil. To fulfill the system framework requirements, focused on reproductive and productive enterprises, field visits and interview with the laboratory executive director were carried out. Considering the pectens production activities, 24 socio-environmental indicators were developed and the impact indices were automatically calculated by the system’s spreadsheets. General performance index for the pectens reproduction activities indicated an important contribution of technological innovations for the sustainable production of the In vitro Fertilization Laboratory. The employed method was considered as appropriate for evaluations of sustainability at this agribusiness activity, dealing with indicators as tools in order to identify possible risks for negative impacts. Those indicators include aspects beyond those commonly presented by environmental impact assessments, and were capable to provide adequate management and sustainable development for the studied Organization.

  3. Dynamic value assessments in oncology supported by the PACE Continuous Innovation Indicators.

    Paddock, Silvia; Goodman, Clifford; Shortenhaus, Scott; Grainger, David; Zummo, Jacqueline; Thomas, Samuel

    2017-10-01

    Several recently developed frameworks aim to assess the value of cancer treatments, but the most appropriate metrics remain uncertain. We use data from the Patient Access to Cancer care Excellence Continuous Innovation Indicators to examine the relationship between hazard ratios (HRs) from clinical trials and dynamic therapeutic value accumulating over time. Our analysis shows that HRs from initial clinical trials poorly predict the eventual therapeutic value of cancer treatments. Relying strongly on HRs from registration trials to predict the long-term success of treatments leaves a lot of the variance unexplained. The Continuous Innovation Indicators offer a complementing, dynamic method to track the therapeutic value of cancer treatments and continuously update value assessments as additional evidence accumulates.

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF ASSESSMENT METHODS OF EFFECTIVENESS OF INNOVATIVE STAFF ACTIVITY MOTIVATIONAL MECHANISM

    Viktoriia Honchar

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the science work is to develop methods to assess the innovative activity of the personnel that will provide motivation for employees to be active in the direction of research and introduction of internal reserves for its improvement. Methods. In the study were used: system method and methods of logical analysis – to justify theoretical and practical recommendations on the development of conceptual bases of the formation of the motivational mechanism of personnel management, economic-mathematical modelling and forecasting methods – to assess the influence of motivation factors on the level of labour activity of the personnel. Results. In the work the notion “motivation”, considering the innovative changes of the modern economy, is clarified. In order to foster innovative activity in the enterprise it is proposed to improve organizational structure by controlling the center of innovation activity management, which includes economic, technical and social division. Proposed an establishment of the project teams under the terms of accounting costs, which contributes to more active workers’ involvement in the formation of innovative development plans. The main points that determine their effectiveness are: growth of volumes of output, diminution of expenses of materials and energy resources, timeliness and relevance to the product market, improvement of the quality of work performed. A profit, derived by project teams, is recommended to distribute on: increment of the payroll, innovative development, stimulation and motivation fund. The research of the activity of the enterprises showed that one of the effective methods to stimulate staff is a motivational system based on the use of KPI. Bonuses for the implemented project, which are adjusted to the output of the basic stage, or KPI project as a whole, fixed bonuses as a percentage of the profits, and bonuses in stages of the project are the forms of motivation of project teams

  5. Political innovations

    Sørensen, Eva

    2017-01-01

    are mainly interested in assessing and promoting innovations in public service delivery, but have paid little or no attention to the need for innovations in polity, politics and policy. This article develops a research agenda for studying innovations in political institutions, in the political process...... and in policy outputs. It proposes a number of research themes related to political innovations that call for scholarly attention, and identifies push and pull factors influencing the likelihood that these themes will be addressed in future research....

  6. Productivity in public welfare services is changing: the standpoint of strategic competence-based management.

    Ollila, Seija

    2013-01-01

    In Finland the municipal restructuring project was launched in 2005. Its goal is to create a system that ensures high-quality municipal welfare services for everyone, continuing into the future. The main focus of this research is to examine the tension between strategic competence-based management and productivity in public welfare services. The theoretical basis covers theories regarding strategic competence-based management and productivity. To guarantee services and quality it is important to strengthen the supply of employees, competence, development, leverage, and benefits in public organizations. Leadership has a significant role in strategic competence-based management.

  7. Competency-based evaluation tools for integrative medicine training in family medicine residency: a pilot study

    Schneider Craig

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As more integrative medicine educational content is integrated into conventional family medicine teaching, the need for effective evaluation strategies grows. Through the Integrative Family Medicine program, a six site pilot program of a four year residency training model combining integrative medicine and family medicine training, we have developed and tested a set of competency-based evaluation tools to assess residents' skills in integrative medicine history-taking and treatment planning. This paper presents the results from the implementation of direct observation and treatment plan evaluation tools, as well as the results of two Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs developed for the program. Methods The direct observation (DO and treatment plan (TP evaluation tools developed for the IFM program were implemented by faculty at each of the six sites during the PGY-4 year (n = 11 on DO and n = 8 on TP. The OSCE I was implemented first in 2005 (n = 6, revised and then implemented with a second class of IFM participants in 2006 (n = 7. OSCE II was implemented in fall 2005 with only one class of IFM participants (n = 6. Data from the initial implementation of these tools are described using descriptive statistics. Results Results from the implementation of these tools at the IFM sites suggest that we need more emphasis in our curriculum on incorporating spirituality into history-taking and treatment planning, and more training for IFM residents on effective assessment of readiness for change and strategies for delivering integrative medicine treatment recommendations. Focusing our OSCE assessment more narrowly on integrative medicine history-taking skills was much more effective in delineating strengths and weaknesses in our residents' performance than using the OSCE for both integrative and more basic communication competencies. Conclusion As these tools are refined further they will be of value both in improving

  8. An Analysis Of Tensile Test Results to Assess the Innovation Risk for an Additive Manufacturing Technology

    Adamczak Stanisław

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the innovation risk for an additive manufacturing process. The analysis was based on the results of static tensile tests obtained for specimens made of photocured resin. The assessment involved analyzing the measurement uncertainty by applying the FMEA method. The structure of the causes and effects of the discrepancies was illustrated using the Ishikawa diagram. The risk priority numbers were calculated. The uncertainty of the tensile test measurement was determined for three printing orientations. The results suggest that the material used to fabricate the tensile specimens shows clear anisotropy of the properties in relation to the printing direction.

  9. Psychological Assessment with the DSM-5 Alternative Model for Personality Disorders: Tradition and Innovation.

    Waugh, Mark H; Hopwood, Christopher J; Krueger, Robert F; Morey, Leslie C; Pincus, Aaron L; Wright, Aidan G C

    2017-04-01

    The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders Fifth Edition (DSM-5) Section III Alternative Model for Personality Disorders (AMPD; APA, 2013) represents an innovative system for simultaneous psychiatric classification and psychological assessment of personality disorders (PD). The AMPD combines major paradigms of personality assessment and provides an original, heuristic, flexible, and practical framework that enriches clinical thinking and practice. Origins, emerging research, and clinical application of the AMPD for diagnosis and psychological assessment are reviewed. The AMPD integrates assessment and research traditions, facilitates case conceptualization, is easy to learn and use, and assists in providing patient feedback. New as well as existing tests and psychometric methods may be used to operationalize the AMPD for clinical assessments.

  10. Potential for Integrating Diffusion of Innovation Principles into Life Cycle Assessment of Emerging Technologies.

    Sharp, Benjamin E; Miller, Shelie A

    2016-03-15

    Life cycle assessment (LCA) measures cradle-to-grave environmental impacts of a product. To assess impacts of an emerging technology, LCA should be coupled with additional methods that estimate how that technology might be deployed. The extent and manner that an emerging technology diffuses throughout a region shapes the magnitude and type of environmental impacts. Diffusion of innovation is an established field of research that analyzes the adoption of new innovations, and its principles can be used to construct scenario models that enhance LCA of emerging technologies. Integrating diffusion modeling techniques with an LCA of emerging technology can provide estimates for the extent of market penetration, the displacement of existing systems, and the rate of adoption. Two general perspectives of application are macro-level diffusion models that use a function of time to represent adoption, and microlevel diffusion models that simulate adoption through interactions of individuals. Incorporating diffusion of innovation concepts complement existing methods within LCA to inform proactive environmental management of emerging technologies.

  11. Technology and Innovation Management Indicators and Assessment Based on Government Performance

    Sanja Marinković

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Throughout large global databases, such as OECD, UNDP, ITU, Eurostat, World Bank, and Statistical offices of countries, there are many indicators that refer to Technology and Innovation Management (TIM performance of countries. However, a question arises of how to classify and systematically analyze these indicators in terms of measuring, monitoring and enhancing TIM performance at a national level. More specifically, in this paper we pose a question of how to assess the government performance in TIM, as one aspect of the Triple Helix model. Therefore, we use a model of thirty-nine indicators which are classified according to three main management functions: planning, organizing and control, observed as input, process and output, respectively. More importantly, we analyze the relations that exist between these three categories of indicators. Planning indicators are observed as the investments in technological and innovative activities; organizing indicators include the infrastructure, public administration efficiency and cooperation support, while control indicators refer to the national economy R&D, transfer effects and entrepreneurship outcomes. The model is tested for assessing and comparing government performance in TIM for three countries: Serbia, Croatia and Slovenia, for the time period 2007-2012. Finally, as a feedback in the model, we used scores of the countries according to the Global Innovation Index and the Global Competitiveness Index, to verify the results and provide the final conclusion.

  12. Does Competency-Based Education Have a Role in Academic Pharmacy in the United States?

    Medina, Melissa S.

    2017-01-01

    Competency-based Education (CBE) is an educational model that allows students to learn and demonstrate their abilities at their own pace. CBE is growing in popularity in undergraduate educational programs and its role in pharmacy education in the United States (US) is under review. In comparison, medical education is utilizing competency-based approaches (such as competencies and Entrustable Professional Activities) to ensure that students possess the required knowledge, skills, and attitudes prior to graduation or program completion. The concept of competency-based approaches is growing in use in pharmacy education in the US, but the future related to aspects of this concept (e.g., mandatory Entrustable Professional Activities) is not certain. A review of pharmacy education’s evolution in the US and a comparison of competency-related terms offers insight into the future use of competency-based approaches and CBE in pharmacy education in the US through the lens of benefits and challenges. PMID:28970425

  13. Teachers’ individual action theories about competence-based education: the value of the cognitive apprenticeship model

    Seezink, Audrey; Poell, Rob; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2009-01-01

    Seezink, A., Poell, R. F., & Kirschner, P. A. (2009). Teachers' individual action theories about competence-based education: The value of the cognitive apprenticeship model. Journal of Vocational Education & Training, 61, 203-215.

  14. Does Competency-Based Education Have a Role in Academic Pharmacy in the United States?

    Melissa S. Medina

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Competency-based Education (CBE is an educational model that allows students to learn and demonstrate their abilities at their own pace. CBE is growing in popularity in undergraduate educational programs and its role in pharmacy education in the United States (US is under review. In comparison, medical education is utilizing competency-based approaches (such as competencies and Entrustable Professional Activities to ensure that students possess the required knowledge, skills, and attitudes prior to graduation or program completion. The concept of competency-based approaches is growing in use in pharmacy education in the US, but the future related to aspects of this concept (e.g., mandatory Entrustable Professional Activities is not certain. A review of pharmacy education’s evolution in the US and a comparison of competency-related terms offers insight into the future use of competency-based approaches and CBE in pharmacy education in the US through the lens of benefits and challenges.

  15. Implementation of the development strategy of integrated structures on the basis of enterprise’s innovative activity assessment

    V. Yu. Padalkin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the importance of assessment of innovation activity of the organization as an instrument of realization of innovative scenario of development in the framework of the technological upgrading of enterprises of the Concern in order to ensure the production of innovative products based on advanced management technology and management information systems business processes and product quality. As a methodological framework for the assessment of innovative activity used group of economic indicators that determine the degree of security of the enterprise economic resources in innovation. The structure of innovative activities on types of completed technological, marketing and organizational innovations. Special attention is paid to the types of technological innovation: product and process. Noted that the JSC Sozvezdie has considerable labour resources, allowing to increase the share of process innovations aimed generally at reducing costs of production or transmission activities of products, services per unit of output, improved quality, production efficiency or transfer of already existing products in the organization, but can be used also for the production and transmission of technologically new or improved products, services cannot be produced or delivered using conventional production methods.On the basis of studies of innovative activity, the authors noted that a necessary condition for active implementation of innovations is technological modernization (technical upgrading as JSC Sozvezdie and the companies of the Group, contributing to the creation of production facilities to enable mass production of advanced weapons, military and special equipment in the framework of the SDO, as well as reconstruction, expansion and creation of production to the production of innovative civilian products.

  16. Multi-Cultural Competency-Based Vocational Curricula. Food Service. Multi-Cultural Competency-Based Vocational/Technical Curricula Series.

    Hepburn, Larry; Shin, Masako

    This document, one of eight in a multi-cultural competency-based vocational/technical curricula series, is on food service. This program is designed to run 24 weeks and cover 15 instructional areas: orientation, sanitation, management/planning, preparing food for cooking, preparing beverages, cooking eggs, cooking meat, cooking vegetables,…

  17. Multi-Cultural Competency-Based Vocational Curricula. Automotive Mechanics. Multi-Cultural Competency-Based Vocational/Technical Curricula Series.

    Hepburn, Larry; Shin, Masako

    This document, one of eight in a multi-cultural competency-based vocational/technical curricula series, is on automotive mechanics. This program is designed to run 36 weeks and cover 10 instructional areas: the engine; drive trains--rear ends/drive shafts/manual transmission; carburetor; emission; ignition/tune-up; charging and starting;…

  18. Competence, competency-based education, and undergraduate dental education: a discussion paper.

    Chuenjitwongsa, S; Oliver, R G; Bullock, A D

    2018-02-01

    The aim of undergraduate dental education is to provide competent dentists to serve societal needs and improve population oral healthcare. Competency-based education has influenced the development of dental education for decades but this term is problematic. This article explores components of competency-based undergraduate health professional education in order to help the dental profession have a better understanding of the context and purposes of undergraduate dental education. This is a discussion paper based on a wide reading of the literature on the education of health professionals with a specific focus on competency-based undergraduate education. Competence comprises an integration of knowledge, skills and attitudes indicating a capability to perform professional tasks safely and ethically. The process of becoming a competent practitioner is complex. Four characteristics of competency-based education are: curriculum components and content shaped by societal needs; focused on student-centred learning; learning achievement; and limited attention to time-based training and numerical targets. Alongside a competency-based approach, undergraduate dental education can be influenced by institutional features and external factors but these receive little consideration in the literature. Understanding competence, competency-based education, and institutional and external factors will help to improve educational quality, define roles and professional development for the dental educator, and inform further research. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. National assessment study in Armenia using innovative nuclear reactors and fuel cycles methodology for an innovative nuclear systems in a country with small grid

    Sargsyan, V.H.; Galstyan, A.A.; Gevorgyan, A.A.

    2010-01-01

    The International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO) was launched in November 2000 under the aegis of the IAEA. Phases 1A and IB (first Part) of the Project were dedicated to elaboration, testing and validation of the INPRO Methodology. At the Technical Meeting in Vienna (13-15 October 2004) Armenia has proposed an assessment using the INPRO Methodology for an Innovative Nuclear Energy System in a country with a small electrical grid. Such kind of study helps Armenia in analysis of Innovative Nuclear Energy System (INS), including fuel cycle options, as well as shows applicability of INPRO methodology for small countries, like Armenia. This study was based on the results given in [3] and [4], and also on the main objectives, declared by the Government of Armenia in the paper 'Energy Sector Development Strategies in the Context of Economic Development in Armenia'

  20. Assessing environmental performance in the European Union: Eco-innovation versus catching-up

    Beltrán-Esteve, Mercedes; Picazo-Tadeo, Andrés J.

    2017-01-01

    This paper assesses environmental performance in the European Union (EU) using Luenberger productivity indicators, directional distance functions and Data Envelopment Analysis techniques. It considers four indicators of the pressures exerted by economic activity on the environment: global warming, tropospheric ozone formation, acidification and particulate formation. The change in environmental performance from the early 2000s onwards is decomposed at the levels of country and environmental pressure, and as the result of eco-innovations and catching-up with the best available environmental technologies; furthermore, we distinguish between the periods of economic growth (2001–07) and severe crisis (2007–13). Our main finding is that environmental performance improved in both periods, mainly fuelled by advances in environmental technology. Accordingly, environmental policies aimed at boosting catching-up are highly recommended, particularly in the newer member states that joined the EU from 2004 onwards, which perform further away from their respective environmental technological frontiers. In addition, re-establishing the pre-crisis eco-innovation investment levels would also be highly advisable in order to return to the rates of environmental technical progress registered in the expansion period. - Highlights: • Environmental performance has noticeably improved in the EU since the 2000's. • Eco-innovations have bolstered progress in environmental performance. • Policies aimed at boosting catching-up are highly recommended in the EU.

  1. Global assessment of technological innovation for climate change adaptation and mitigation in developing world.

    Adenle, Ademola A; Azadi, Hossein; Arbiol, Joseph

    2015-09-15

    Concerns about mitigating and adapting to climate change resulted in renewing the incentive for agricultural research investments and developing further innovation priorities around the world particularly in developing countries. In the near future, development of new agricultural measures and proper diffusion of technologies will greatly influence the ability of farmers in adaptation and mitigation to climate change. Using bibliometric approaches through output of academic journal publications and patent-based data, we assess the impact of research and development (R&D) for new and existing technologies within the context of climate change mitigation and adaptation. We show that many developing countries invest limited resources for R&D in relevant technologies that have great potential for mitigation and adaption in agricultural production. We also discuss constraints including weak infrastructure, limited research capacity, lack of credit facilities and technology transfer that may hinder the application of innovation in tackling the challenges of climate change. A range of policy measures is also suggested to overcome identified constraints and to ensure that potentials of innovation for climate change mitigation and adaptation are realized. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Implementing competency-based medical education: What changes in curricular structure and processes are needed?

    Nousiainen, Markku T; Caverzagie, Kelly J; Ferguson, Peter C; Frank, Jason R

    2017-06-01

    Medical educators must prepare for a number of challenges when they decide to implement a competency-based curriculum. Many of these challenges will pertain to three key aspects of implementation: organizing the structural changes that will be necessary to deliver new curricula and methods of assessment; modifying the processes of teaching and evaluation; and helping to change the culture of education so that the CBME paradigm gains acceptance. This paper focuses on nine key considerations that will support positive change in first two of these areas. Key considerations include: ensuring that educational continuity exists amongst all levels of medical education, altering how time is used in medical education, involving CBME in human health resources planning, ensuring that competent doctors work in competent health care systems, ensuring that information technology supports CBME, ensuring that faculty development is supported, ensuring that the rights and responsibilities of the learner are appropriately balanced in the workplace, preparing for the costs of change, and having appropriate leadership in order to achieve success in implementation.

  3. Types of Feedback in Competency-Based Predoctoral Orthodontics: Effects on Students' Attitudes and Confidence.

    Lipp, Mitchell J; Cho, Kiyoung; Kim, Han Suk

    2017-05-01

    Feedback can exert a powerful influence on learning and achievement although its effect varies. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of three types of feedback on dental students' attitudes and confidence in a competency-based course in predoctoral orthodontics at New York University College of Dentistry. In 2013-14, all 253 third-year students in a course using test-enhanced instructional methods received written feedback on formative assessments. The type of feedback varied across three groups: pass/fail grades (PF) N=77, emoticons (EM) N=90, or written comments (WC) N=86. At the end of the course, students completed surveys that included four statements addressing their attitudes toward course instruction and confidence in their abilities. The survey response rate ranged from 75% to 100% among groups. The lowest response rate (75%) was in the PF group. In attitudes toward course instruction and confidence in their abilities, the WC group trended to more positive responses than the other groups, while the PF group trended to negative responses. On two of the four statements, the trend for the WC group was significant (95% CI). In both statements concerning attitudes toward instruction, the PF group trended to negative responses that were significant (95% CI). These results support the effectiveness of descriptive written comments over pass/fail grades or emoticons in improving dental students' confidence in their abilities and their attitudes toward instruction.

  4. Development of a Model Competency-Based Orientation Program

    1988-05-01

    identified by participants; 3) marketing the program is simplified because there is a target audience; 4) one assessment may yield several programs; 5) greater...content areas 7. and utilizing teaching-learning startegies that suit each nurse’s learning style and needs (O’Connor, 1986; Tobin et al., 1979

  5. Development and evaluation of a questionnaire to measure the perceived implementation of the mission statement of a competency based curriculum.

    Rotthoff, Thomas; Ostapczuk, Martin Stefan; de Bruin, Judith; Kröncke, Klaus-Dietrich; Decking, Ulrich; Schneider, Matthias; Ritz-Timme, Stefanie

    2012-11-07

    A mission statement (MS) sets out the long-term goals of an institution and is supposed to be suited for studying learning environments. Yet, hardly any study has tested this issue so far. The aim of the present study was the development and psychometric evaluation of an MS-Questionnaire (MSQ) focusing on explicit competencies. We investigated to what extent the MSQ captures the construct of learning environment and how well a faculty is following--in its perception--a competency orientation in a competency-based curriculum. A questionnaire was derived from the MS "teaching" (Medical Faculty, Heinrich-Heine University Düsseldorf) which was based on (inter-) nationally accepted goals and recommendations for a competency based medical education. The MSQ was administered together with the Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure (DREEM) to 1119 students and 258 teachers. Cronbach's alpha was used to analyze the internal consistency of the items. Explorative factor analyses were performed to analyze homogeneity of the items within subscales and factorial validity of the MSQ. Item discrimination was assessed by means of part-whole corrected discrimination indices, and convergent validity was analyzed with respect to DREEM. Demographic variations of the respondents were used to analyze the inter-group variations in their responses. Students and teachers perceived the MS implementation as "moderate" and on average, students differed significantly in their perception of the MS. They thought implementation of the MS was less successful than faculty did. Women had a more positive perception of educational climate than their male colleagues and clinical students perceived the implementation of the MS on all dimensions significantly worse than preclinical students. The psychometric properties of the MSQ were very satisfactory: Item discrimination was high. Similarly to DREEM, the MSQ was highly reliable among students (α = 0.92) and teachers (α = 0.93). In both groups

  6. Impact of competence-based training on employability of Technical and Vocational graduates in Ethiopia

    Birhane Sime Geressu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to critically examine the impact of competence based training on employability of technical and vocational college graduates in Ethiopia. Mixed methods of research design, predominantly concurrent nested strategy were employed to conduct the study. The study involved 162 instructors, 123 Level III automotive technology trainees, 87 department heads and 89 graduates, a total of 461 respondents as a sample. Moreover, 24 respondents (6 industry owners, 6 TVET college deans, 6 competence-based process owners and 6 industry trainers’ leaders were purposely selected for interview and focus group discussion. Under the study, the researcher used employability of graduates as dependent variable and competency based training as independent variable. Descriptive and inferential statistics were employed for data analysis. The study result showed that technical and vocational education and training (TVET colleges in Ethiopia have been performing below expectations in developing demand-based curriculum and implementing competence-based training in TVET colleges and industries. As a result, among the graduates nearly 50 percent are not employed in the past two years. Hence, it is recommended that constantly consulting and involving relevant stakeholders in setting study profile, identifying intended learning outcomes and strengthening competence based learning style are vital for graduates to demonstrate employability skill, knowledge and attitude into the job that consequentially lead to graduate employment.First published online: 30 November 2017

  7. Development of a Survey to Assess the Acceptability of an Innovative Contraception Practice among Rural Pharmacists

    Michael Wong

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Improved access to effective contraceptive methods is needed in Canada, particularly in rural areas, where unintended pregnancy rates are high and specific sexual health services may be further away. A rural pharmacist may be the most accessible health care professional. Pharmacy practice increasingly incorporates cognitive services. In Canada many provinces allow pharmacists to independently prescribe for some indications, but not for hormonal contraception. To assess the acceptability for the implementation of this innovative practice in Canada, we developed and piloted a survey instrument. We chose questions to address the components for adoption and change described in Rogers’ “diffusion of innovations” theory. The proposed instrument was iteratively reviewed by 12 experts, then focus group tested among eight pharmacists or students to improve the instrument for face validity, readability, consistency and relevancy to community pharmacists in the Canadian context. We then pilot tested the survey among urban and rural pharmacies. 4% of urban and 35% of rural pharmacies returned pilot surveys. Internal consistency on repeated re-phrased questions was high (Cronbach’s Alpha = 0.901. We present our process for the development of a survey instrument to assess the acceptability and feasibility among Canadian community pharmacists for the innovative practice of the independent prescribing of hormonal contraception.

  8. Evaluation of clinical teaching quality in competency-based residency training in Lithuania.

    Vaižgėlienė, Eglė; Padaiga, Žilvinas; Rastenytė, Daiva; Tamelis, Algimantas; Petrikonis, Kęstutis; Fluit, Cornelia

    2017-12-01

    In 2013, all residency programs at the Lithuanian University of Health Sciences were renewed into the competency-based medical education curriculum (CBME). In 2015, we implemented the validated EFFECT questionnaire together with the EFFECT-System for quality assessment of clinical teaching in residency training. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of characteristics of the resident (year of training) and clinical teacher (gender, age, and type of academic position) on teaching quality, as well as to assess areas for teaching quality improvement. Residents from 7 different residency study programs filled out 333 EFFECT questionnaires evaluating 146 clinical teachers. We received 143 self-evaluations of clinical teachers using the same questionnaire. Items were scored on a 6-point Likert scale. Main outcome measures were residents' mean overall (MOS), mean subdomain (MSS) and clinical teachers' self-evaluation scores. The overall comparisons of MOS and MSS across study groups and subgroups were done using Student's t test and ANOVA for trend. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was calculated in order to see how residents' evaluations match with self-evaluations for every particular teacher. To indicate areas for quality improvement items were analyzed subtracting their mean score from the respective (sub)domain score. MOS for domains of "role modeling", "task allocation", "feedback", "teaching methodology" and "assessment" valued by residents were significantly higher than those valued by teachers (Pevaluation questionnaires were rated significantly higher by residents in role modeling subdomains (Phigher than the female teachers (Phigher (Pevaluations of clinical teachers are influenced by teachers' age, gender, year of residency training, type of teachers' academic position and whether or not a clinical teacher performed self-evaluation. Development of CBME should be focused on the continuous evaluation of quality, clinical teachers

  9. Competence-based approach and the future sociohumanitarian education

    Bryzgalina Elena Vladimirovna

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The article traces the relationship between the understanding of the purposes of higher education and assessment of educational outcomes. Inclination of our country to the continental variant of understanding of the educational goals, when the main contracting authority is the state, leads to the existence of standards as an expression of the conventional expectations of society in relation to the formation of a certain level and profile. Borrowing competence model of standards related to the adoption of pragmatic approach to education in Russia as a way to increment of human capital.

  10. Physicians' strikes and the competing bases of physicians' moral obligations.

    MacDougall, D Robert

    2013-09-01

    Many authors have addressed the morality of physicians' strikes on the assumption that medical practice is morally different from other kinds of occupations. This article analyzes three prominent theoretical accounts that attempt to ground such special moral obligations for physicians--practice-based accounts, utilitarian accounts, and social contract accounts--and assesses their applicability to the problem of the morality of strikes. After critiquing these views, it offers a fourth view grounding special moral obligations in voluntary commitments, and explains why this is a preferable basis for understanding physicians' moral obligations in general and especially as pertaining to strikes.

  11. Validation of innovative technologies and strategies for regulatory safety assessment methods: challenges and opportunities.

    Stokes, William S; Wind, Marilyn

    2010-01-01

    Advances in science and innovative technologies are providing new opportunities to develop test methods and strategies that may improve safety assessments and reduce animal use for safety testing. These include high throughput screening and other approaches that can rapidly measure or predict various molecular, genetic, and cellular perturbations caused by test substances. Integrated testing and decision strategies that consider multiple types of information and data are also being developed. Prior to their use for regulatory decision-making, new methods and strategies must undergo appropriate validation studies to determine the extent that their use can provide equivalent or improved protection compared to existing methods and to determine the extent that reproducible results can be obtained in different laboratories. Comprehensive and optimal validation study designs are expected to expedite the validation and regulatory acceptance of new test methods and strategies that will support improved safety assessments and reduced animal use for regulatory testing.

  12. Competence-based approaches to professional training and activities

    Ryzhov, S.B.; Shcheglov, V.A.; Savenkov, A.M.; Puzanova, O.V.

    2010-01-01

    The authors say that the personnel training system for the nuclear industry must represent a successive transition from one activity to another: from purely training activities to professional training activities to purely professional activities. Components of knowledge management include storage, transfer and efficiency of knowledge use. The competence of a specialist is determined by a combination of cognitive, functional and value and ethics components. In order to assure that the internship program is clearly structured, it must be comprised of a set of training modules. The examples of probation training modules for scientific and design organizations are given. Problems of assessing the quality of training of young specialists and building general professional competence are also discussed [ru

  13. Approaches of eco-innovation: Uncertainty assessment and the integration of green technology foresight and life cycle assessment as a policy tool

    Borup, M.

    2005-01-01

    The perspective of eco-innovation is gaining increasing attention in European policy development as well as in a number of individual countries. As basis for this lies the acknowledgement that we on the one hand live in a technology andinnovation-oriented society and that some new technologies......-innovation in practice is made operational. A key issue in eco-innovation is to improveassessments and discussions of uncertainties and new environmental risks in connection with innovative technology developments. Approaches to this have as support for policy development processes been combined with environmentally...... oriented technologyforesight methods integrated with the perspective of life cycle assessments of new technologies. The paper describes a number of examples of these approaches and discusses further perspectives for an eco-innovation policy....

  14. Responsible research and innovation indicators for science education assessment: how to measure the impact?

    Heras, Maria; Ruiz-Mallén, Isabel

    2017-12-01

    The emerging paradigm of responsible research and innovation (RRI) in the European Commission policy discourse identifies science education as a key agenda for better equipping students with skills and knowledge to tackle complex societal challenges and foster active citizenship in democratic societies. The operationalisation of this broad approach in science education demands, however, the identification of assessment frameworks able to grasp the complexity of RRI process requirements and learning outcomes within science education practice. This article aims to shed light over the application of the RRI approach in science education by proposing a RRI-based analytical framework for science education assessment. We use such framework to review a sample of empirical studies of science education assessments and critically analyse it under the lenses of RRI criteria. As a result, we identify a set of 86 key RRI assessment indicators in science education related to RRI values, transversal competences and experiential and cognitive aspects of learning. We argue that looking at science education through the lenses of RRI can potentially contribute to the integration of metacognitive skills, emotional aspects and procedural dimensions within impact assessments so as to address the complexity of learning.

  15. [Design and implementation of a competency-based curriculum for medical education].

    Risco de Domínguez, Graciela

    2014-01-01

    Competency-based education is a form of designing, developing, delivering and documenting instruction based on a set of objectives and results that have been recommended for medical education. This article describes the steps in the process of designing and implementing a competency-based curriculum at a new medical school in a Peruvian university. We present the process followed including context analysis, mission design, the professional profile, the content and organization of the curriculum as well as the evaluation and resources for the training. Finally, issues and challenges faced, as well as lessons learned are summarized.

  16. Suggestions for a competency-based orientation for an orthopaedic unit.

    Bryant, G A

    1997-01-01

    Effective orientation programs should provide new RN and LPN employees with very specific performance expectations. Competency-based orientation provides such a structure. This approach not only decreases the orientee's anxiety, but it also acts as a basis for establishing competencies specific to that unit. Because the existing staff members are intimately involved in the process, socialization within the unit and cohesiveness of purpose are enhanced. Adult learning theory, educational principles, self-paced learning modules, and the use of preceptors and check-off lists are employed in this Competency-Based Orientation (CBO) program for an adult orthopaedic unit. Samples of various aspects of a CBO are included.

  17. Organizational Culture, Absorptive Capacity, Innovation Performace and Competitive Advantage: An Integrated Assessment in Indonesian Banking Industry

    Ahmad Adriansyah; Adi Zakaria Afiff

    2015-01-01

    The positive impact of absorptive capacity (ACAP) on innovation and the positive impact of innovation on competitive advantage have been proven in different research contexts. However, current knowledge on organizational culture that affects ACAP, innovation and competitive advantage as a whole, remains unclear. This article proposes a model to examine how organizational culture (developmental culture and rational culture) affects ACAP, innovation and competitive advantage, directly and indir...

  18. Assessment of two small-sized innovative nuclear reactors for electricity generation in Brazil using INPRO methodology

    Goncalves Filho, Orlando Joao Agostinho; Sefidvash, Farhang

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the main results of the assessment study of two small-sized innovative reactors for electricity generation in Brazil using the methodology developed under the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO), co-ordinated by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). INPRO was initiated in 2001 and has the main objective of helping to ensure that nuclear energy is available to contribute in a sustainable manner to the energy needs of the 21st century. Brazil joined the INPRO project since its beginning and in 2005 submitted a proposal for the assessment using INPRO methodology of two small-sized reactors (IRIS - International Reactor Innovative and Secure, and FBNR - Fixed Bed Nuclear Reactor) as potential components of an innovative nuclear energy system (INS) completed by a conventional open nuclear fuel cycle based on enriched uranium. The scope of this assessment study was restricted to the reactor component of the INS and to the methodology areas of economics and safety for IRIS, and proliferation resistance and safety for FBNR. The results indicate that both IRIS and FBNR innovative designs comply mostly with the basic principles of the areas assessed and have potential to comply with the remaining ones. (author)

  19. Hands in medicine: understanding the impact of competency-based education on the formation of medical students' identities in the United States.

    Gonsalves, Catherine; Zaidi, Zareen

    2016-01-01

    There have been critiques that competency training, which defines the roles of a physician by simple, discrete tasks or measurable competencies, can cause students to compartmentalize and focus mainly on being assessed without understanding how the interconnected competencies help shape their role as future physicians. Losing the meaning and interaction of competencies can result in a focus on 'doing the work of a physician' rather than identity formation and 'being a physician.' This study aims to understand how competency-based education impacts the development of a medical student's identity. Three ceramic models representing three core competencies 'medical knowledge,' 'patient care,' and 'professionalism' were used as sensitizing objects, while medical students reflected on the impact of competency-based education on identity formation. Qualitative analysis was used to identify common themes. Students across all four years of medical school related to the 'professionalism' competency domain (50%). They reflected that 'being an empathetic physician' was the most important competency. Overall, students agreed that competency-based education played a significant role in the formation of their identity. Some students reflected on having difficulty in visualizing the interconnectedness between competencies, while others did not. Students reported that the assessment structure deemphasized 'professionalism' as a competency. Students perceive 'professionalism' as a competency that impacts their identity formation in the social role of 'being a doctor,' albeit a competency they are less likely to be assessed on. High-stakes exams, including the United States Medical Licensing Exam clinical skills exam, promote this perception.

  20. Changes in Perceived Supervision Quality After Introduction of Competency-Based Orthopedic Residency Training: A National 6-Year Follow-Up Study.

    van Vendeloo, Stefan N; Brand, Paul L P; Kollen, Boudewijn J; Verheyen, Cees C P M

    2018-04-27

    To evaluate the perceived quality of the learning environment, before and after introduction of competency-based postgraduate orthopedic education. From 2009 to 2014, we conducted annual surveys among Dutch orthopedic residents. The validated Dutch Residency Educational Climate Test (D-RECT, 50 items on 11 subscales) was used to assess the quality of the learning environment. Scores range from 1 (poor) to 5 (excellent). Dynamic cohort follow-up study. All Dutch orthopedic residents were surveyed during annual compulsory courses. Over the 6-year period, 641 responses were obtained (response rate 92%). Scores for "supervision" (95% CI for difference 0.06-0.28, p = 0.002) and "coaching and assessment" (95% CI 0.11-0.35, p < 0.001) improved significantly after introduction of competency-based training. There was no significant change in score on the other subscales of the D-RECT. After the introduction of some of the core components of competency-based postgraduate orthopedic education the perceived quality of "supervision" and "coaching and assessment" improved significantly. Copyright © 2018 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Occupational Home Economics Education Series. Fabrics and Textiles Merchandising. Competency Based Teaching Module.

    Martin, Ruth

    This module, one of ten competency based modules developed for vocational home economics teachers, is based on a job cluster in fabric and textiles merchandising. It is designed for use with a variety of groups including grades 9-14 and adults. Focusing on the specific job title fabric and textiles salesperson, ten competencies and the student…

  2. Occupational Home Economics Education Series. Catering Services. Competency Based Teaching Module.

    Lowe, Phyllis; And Others

    This module, one of ten competency based modules developed for vocational home economics teachers, is based on a job cluster in the catering industry. It is designed for use with a variety of levels of learners (secondary, postsecondary, adult) in both school and non-school educational settings. Focusing on two levels of employment, food caterer…

  3. Developing a Competency-Based Curriculum for a Dental Hygiene Program.

    DeWald, Janice P.; McCann, Ann L.

    1999-01-01

    Describes the three-step process used to develop a competency-based curriculum at the Caruth School of Dental Hygiene (Texas A&M University). The process involved development of a competency document (detailing three domains, nine major competencies, and 54 supporting competencies), an evaluation plan, and a curriculum inventory which defined…

  4. Welding. COM-LINK. Competency Based Vocational Curricula with Basic Skills and Academic Linkages.

    Browning, Terry

    This competency-based module uses the Ocean County (New Jersey) Vocational-Technical Schools curriculum-infused model for infusing basic skills instruction into vocational education. The model demonstrates the relationship of vocational skills to communication, mathematics, and science. The document begins with a philosophy statement; preface; a…

  5. The Renewal of Competency-Based Education: A Review of the Literature

    Burnette, Diane M.

    2016-01-01

    Although competency-based education (CBE) has existed since the early 1970s adult-focused degree programs, interest in CBE has spiked in recent years due to the increased attention on higher education affordability and accountability. This article reviews the extant literature on CBE to address the following questions: (a) What are the definitions…

  6. Cogenerating a Competency-based HRM Degree: A Model and Some Lessons from Experience.

    Wooten, Kevin C.; Elden, Max

    2001-01-01

    A competency-based degree program in human resource management was co-generated by six groups of stakeholders who synthesized competency models using group decision support software. The program focuses on core human resource processes, general business management, strategic decision making and problem solving, change management, and personal…

  7. Competence-Based, Research-Related Lab Courses for Materials Modeling: The Case of Organic Photovoltaics

    Schellhammer, Karl Sebastian; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2017-01-01

    We are hereby presenting a didactic concept for an advanced lab course that focuses on the design of donor materials for organic solar cells. Its research-related and competence-based approach qualifies the students to independently and creatively apply computational methods and to profoundly and critically discuss the results obtained. The high…

  8. A Disciplinary Perspective of Competency-Based Training on the Acquisition of Employability Skills

    Boahin, Peter; Hofman, Adriaan

    2013-01-01

    In the changing global economy, employability skills increasingly are the focus of vocational education and training institutions. This paper explores the effect of academic disciplines, students' background characteristics and industry training on the acquisition of employability skills through competency-based training. A significant…

  9. A competence-based and multi-dimensional operationalization and measurement of employability.

    van der Heijde, C.M.; van der Heijden, B.I.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Employability is a critical requirement for enabling both sustained competitive advantage at the firm level and career success at the individual level. We propose a competence-based approach to employability derived from an expansion of the resource-based view of the firm. In this contribution, we

  10. A competence-based and multidimensional operationalization and measurement of employability

    van der Heijde, C.M.; van der Heijden, Beatrice

    2006-01-01

    Employability is a critical requirement for enabling both sustained competitive advantage at the firm level and career success at the individual level. We propose a competence-based approach to employability derived from an expansion of the resource-based view of the firm. In this contribution, we

  11. Competency Based Teaching of College Physics: The Philosophy and The Practice

    Rajapaksha, Ajith; Hirsch, Andrew S.

    2017-01-01

    The practice of learning physics contributes to the development of many transdisciplinary skills learners are able to exercise independent of the physics discipline. However, the standard practices of physics instruction do not explicitly include the monitoring or evaluation of these skills. In a competency-based (CB) learning model, the skills…

  12. Developing a Competency-Based Pan-European Accreditation Framework for Health Promotion

    Battel-Kirk, Barbara; Van der Zanden, Gerard; Schipperen, Marielle; Contu, Paolo; Gallardo, Carmen; Martinez, Ana; Garcia de Sola, Silvia; Sotgiu, Alessandra; Zaagsma, Miriam; Barry, Margaret M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The CompHP Pan-European Accreditation Framework for Health Promotion was developed as part of the CompHP Project that aimed to develop competency-based standards and an accreditation system for health promotion practice, education, and training in Europe. Method: A phased, multiple-method approach was employed to facilitate consensus…

  13. Entrepreneur Program. COM-LINK. Competency Based Vocational Curricula with Basic Skills and Academic Linkages.

    De Maria, Richard

    This competency-based module uses the Ocean County (New Jersey) Vocational-Technical Schools curriculum-infused model for infusing basic skills instruction into vocational education. The document consists of matrices that describe the relationship of vocational skills to basic communication, mathematics, and science skills within the entrepreneur…

  14. An Old Chestnut Revisited: Teachers' Opinions and Attitudes toward Grading within a Competency Based Training Framework

    Richards, James

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore teachers' opinions with regard to the value and process of grading within a competency based training (CBT) framework, following the introduction of a formalised grading system at a specialist Technical and Further Education centre for hospitality and tourism training The data were gathered using a 16-item…

  15. Design science research approach a way for implementing competence based internships

    Wouter van Rennes; Josephine Lappia

    2006-01-01

    Since 2000, all Dutch Universities of Professional Education are confronted with three major renewals. The first was the European agreement to implement the Bachelor-Master system in Higher Education. The second was the strong tendence to renew eduction towards Competence Based Education. The third

  16. Health Services: Clinical. Pharmacy Aide. Instructor's Manual. Competency-Based Education.

    Cave, Julie; And Others

    This instructor's manual consists of materials for use in presenting a course in the occupational area of pharmacy aide. Included in the first part of the guide are a program master sequence; a master listing of instructional materials, equipment, and supplies; an overview of the competency-based vocational education (CBVE) system; and guidelines…

  17. American Government. Nevada Competency-Based Adult High School Diploma Project.

    Nevada Univ., Las Vegas. Coll. of Education.

    This document is one of ten curriculum guides developed by the Nevada Competency-Based Adult High School Diploma (CBAHSD) Project. This curriculum guide on American government is divided into fourteen topics. The topics included are: definition of "State"; left to right political spectrum; Dictatorship vs. Democracy; Capitalism,…

  18. Competence-Based Blended Learning in Building Automation: Towards a EU Curriculum in "Domotica"

    Sommaruga, L.; De Angelis, E.

    2007-01-01

    A competence-based approach was applied to a blended learning on line distance training in the Euroinno EU project aimed at vocational training in building automation. The current paper describes the experience gathered during the learning process and the definition of the curriculum. A number of issues emerged during the sessions concerning…

  19. Teachers' Individual Action Theories about Competence-Based Education: The Value of the Cognitive Apprenticeship Model

    Seezink, Audrey; Poell, Rob F.; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2009-01-01

    Dutch prevocational secondary schools are reforming their educational programmes to make them more competence-based. This reform has substantial implications for the roles played by teachers. Yet, little empirical research has been conducted on teachers' processes of competence development in vocational settings. This study explores teachers'…

  20. Retailing. Instructor's Guide Sheets and Instructor's Package, Modules R 1-45. Competency-Based Education.

    Kentucky State Dept. of Education, Frankfort.

    This package contains instructor's guide sheets and student task assignment sheets for Modules R 1-45 of the competency-based curriculum in retailing developed for use in secondary and postsecondary schools in Kentucky. Some of the topics covered in the modules include the following: retailing--past, present, and future; retailing occupations;…

  1. Fashion Merchandising. COM-LINK. Competency Based Vocational Curricula with Basic Skills and Academic Linkages.

    Williams, Edwina

    This competency-based module uses the Ocean County (New Jersey) Vocational-Technical Schools curriculum-infused model for infusing basic skills instruction into vocational education. The model demonstrates the relationship of vocational skills to communication, mathematics, and science. The document begins with a philosophy statement; preface; a…

  2. Can Competency-Based Training Fly?: An Overview of Key Issues for "Ab Initio" Pilot Training

    Franks, Peter; Hay, Stephen; Mavin, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Competency-based training (CBT) for pilots was formally introduced in 1999 by the Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA) for training leading to the issue of aeroplane private and commercial pilot licences. This initiative followed the Australian government's introduction of CBT policy for vocational and workplace training in the late 1980's.…

  3. The Council of Regional Accrediting Commissions Framework for Competency-Based Education: A Grounded Theory Study

    Butland, Mark James

    2017-01-01

    Colleges facing pressures to increase student outcomes while reducing costs have shown an increasing interest in competency-based education (CBE) models. Regional accreditors created a joint policy on CBE evaluation. Two years later, through this grounded theory study, I sought to understand from experts the nature of this policy, its impact, and…

  4. Development of Articulated Competency-Based Curriculum in Automated Systems/Robotics Technology. Final Report.

    Luzerne County Community Coll., Nanticoke, PA.

    The project described in this report was conducted at the Community College of Luzerne County (Pennsylvania) to develop, in conjunction with area vocational-technical schools, the second year of a competency-based curriculum in automated systems/robotics technology. During the project, a task force of teachers from the area schools and the college…

  5. Teachers' individual action theories about competence-based education: the value of the cognitive apprenticeship model

    Prof. Dr. Paul A. Kirschner; Dr. Audrey Seezink; Prof. Dr. Rob F. Poell

    2009-01-01

    Dutch prevocational secondary schools are reforming their educational programmes to make them more competence-based. This reform has substantial implications for the roles played by teachers. Yet, little empirical research has been conducted on teachers' processes of competence development in

  6. The Domain Five Observation Instrument: A Competency-Based Coach Evaluation Tool

    Shangraw, Rebecca

    2017-01-01

    The Domain Five Observation Instrument (DFOI) is a competency-based observation instrument recommended for sport leaders or researchers who wish to evaluate coaches' instructional behaviors. The DFOI includes 10 behavior categories and four timed categories that encompass 34 observable instructional benchmarks outlined in domain five of the…

  7. Development of Articulated Competency-Based Curriculum in Laser/Electro-Optics Technology. Final Report.

    Luzerne County Community Coll., Nanticoke, PA.

    A project was conducted at the Community College of Luzerne County (Pennsylvania) to develop, in cooperation with area vocational-technical schools, the first year of a competency-based curriculum in laser/electro-optics technology. Existing programs were reviewed and private sector input was sought in developing the curriculum and identifying…

  8. Competency-Based Curriculum Guide for Laser Technology. September 1980-June 1981.

    Fioroni, John J.

    This document contains materials developed by a project to provide a competency-based curriculum guide for laser technology at the community college level. An abstract of the final report is included. Next, the 17 job competencies determined as necessary to meet the job description of laser technician are listed. A career ladder and qualifications…

  9. The Effect of Virtual versus Traditional Learning in Achieving Competency-Based Skills

    Mosalanejad, Leili; Shahsavari, Sakine; Sobhanian, Saeed; Dastpak, Mehdi

    2012-01-01

    Background: By rapid developing of the network technology, the internet-based learning methods are substituting the traditional classrooms making them expand to the virtual network learning environment. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of virtual systems on competency-based skills of first-year nursing students.…

  10. Building a Competency-Based Curriculum Architecture to Educate 21st-Century Business Practitioners

    Chyung, Seung Youn; Stepich, Donald; Cox, David

    2006-01-01

    Competency-based instruction can be applied to a military setting, an academic program, or a corporate environment with a focus on producing performance-based learning outcomes. In this article, the authors provide theoretical and practical information about underlying characteristics of competencies and explain how the Department of Instructional…

  11. Implementing Competency-Based Education: Challenges, Strategies, and a Decision-Making Framework

    Dragoo, Amie; Barrows, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The number of competency-based education (CBE) degree programs has increased rapidly over the past five years, yet there is little research on CBE program development. This study utilized conceptual models of higher education change and a qualitative methodology to analyze the strategies and challenges in implementing CBE business degree programs…

  12. Approaches for the Assessment of the Innovative Nuclear System of Ukraine on the Base of INPRO Methodology

    Afanas'ev, A.A.; Vlasenko, N.I.

    2007-01-01

    Approaches for the preliminary and comparative assessment of Innovative Nuclear System (INS) of Ukraine using INPRO methodology (IAEA TECDOC-1434) suggested for the period up to 2030, which must answer the comprehensive purpose of sustainable development, contribute to strengthening of the non-proliferation principles and solving an energy problems supply on national and regional levels are presented in the paper. Using assessment results of the INS based on evolutionary designs will allow Ukraine to build informative, methodological and technical basis for choice of the INS based on innovative design which could be offered for deployment in Ukraine after 1030

  13. Bio-mechanical assessment toward throwing and lifting process of i-LOCA (Innovative Lobster Catcher)

    Sudiarno, A.; Dewi, D. S.; Putri, M. A.

    2018-04-01

    Indonesia is the country rich in marine resource, one of which is lobster. East java, one of Indonesian province, especially in Region of Gresik and Lamogan, has very huge potential of lobster. Current condition shown that lobster catch by the fisherman mostly depend on lucky factor, which the lobster unintentionally trapped in fisherman’s fish net. By using this mechanism, the number of lobster catch cannot be optimum. Previous researches have produced two versions of i-LOCA, Innovative Lobster Catcher, a special tool for catching the lobster. Although produce more lobster catch, second version of i-LOCA still needs to be scrutinized, one of that is bio-mechanical assessment. The second version of i-LOCA still has no tool to ease throwing and lifting it into the sea. This condition cause Musculoskeletal Disorder (MSD) toward the fisherman. This research perform bio-mechanical assessment toward throwing and lifting process in order to suggest improvement for i-LOCA as the third version. Based on body moment calculation, we found that throwing and lifting process of third version of i-LOCA, each was 3 times and 2 times better than second version of i-LOCA. Meanwhile, Rapid Entire Body Assessment (REBA) score of throwing and lifting process for third version of i-LOCA can be reduced by 5 points compared to second version of i-LOCA.

  14. DEFORMATION FIELD OF COMPETENCE IN INNOVATIVE PROJECTS

    Сергей Дмитриевич БУШУЕВ

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of a competence-based approach in the programs of innovative development organizations is considered. An analysis of the latest achievements in the world and Ukraine in the field of application of the competency approach in the programs of organizational development is done. The principles of Bloom's taxonomy to generate fields of competence and expertise are given. The principle of the curvature of field of competencies in innovative projects and programs is formulated. Application of the model taking into account the deformation of the competencies of the field allows to increase the accuracy of the model and to determine the trajectory of development of competence of project managers, teams, and organizations. An example of an organization competency assessment based on IPMA Delta model is given. The successful implementation of innovative projects and programs provided by the creative use of competency approach. This approach can be used as a common language of communication, which brings together the organization and employees, tasks and performers. Thus the development of the organization and development of personnel takes place at the same time.

  15. Developing a competency-based medical education curriculum for the core basic medical sciences in an African Medical School

    Olopade FE

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Funmilayo Eniola Olopade,1 Oluwatosin Adekunle Adaramoye,2 Yinusa Raji,3 Abiodun Olubayo Fasola,4 Emiola Oluwabunmi Olapade-Olaopa5 1Department of Anatomy, 2Department of Biochemistry, 3Department of Physiology, 4Department of Oral Pathology, 5Department of Surgery, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria Abstract: The College of Medicine of the University of Ibadan recently revised its MBBS and BDS curricula to a competency-based medical education method of instruction. This paper reports the process of revising the methods of instruction and assessment in the core basic medical sciences directed at producing medical and dental graduates with a sound knowledge of the subjects sufficient for medical and dental practice and for future postgraduate efforts in the field or related disciplines. The health needs of the community and views of stakeholders in the Ibadan medical and dental schools were determined, and the “old” curriculum was reviewed. This process was directed at identifying the strengths and weaknesses of the old curricula and the newer competences required for modern-day medical/dental practice. The admission criteria and processes and the learning methods of the students were also studied. At the end of the review, an integrated, system-based, community-oriented, person-centered, and competency-driven curriculum was produced and approved for implementation. Four sets of students have been admitted into the curriculum. There have been challenges to the implementation process, but these have been overcome by continuous faculty development and reorientation programs for the nonteaching staff and students. Two sets of students have crossed over to the clinical school, and the consensus among the clinical teachers is that their knowledge and application of the basic medical sciences are satisfactory. The Ibadan medical and dental schools are implementing their competency-based medical education curricula

  16. Patterns of Innovation in Alzheimer's Disease Drug Development: A Strategic Assessment Based on Technological Maturity.

    Beierlein, Jennifer M; McNamee, Laura M; Walsh, Michael J; Ledley, Fred D

    2015-08-01

    This article examines the current status of translational science for Alzheimer's disease (AD) drug discovery by using an analytical model of technology maturation. Previous studies using this model have demonstrated that nascent scientific insights and inventions generate few successful leads or new products until achieving a requisite level of maturity. This article assessed whether recent failures and successes in AD research follow patterns of innovation observed in other sectors. The bibliometric-based Technology Innovation Maturation Evaluation model was used to quantify the characteristic S-curve of growth for AD-related technologies, including acetylcholinesterase, N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, B-amyloid, amyloid precursor protein, presenilin, amyloid precursor protein secretases, apolipoprotein E4, and transactive response DNA binding protein 43 kDa (TDP-43). This model quantifies the accumulation of knowledge as a metric for technological maturity, and it identifies the point of initiation of an exponential growth stage and the point at which growth slows as the technology is established. In contrast to the long-established acetylcholinesterase and NMDA receptor technologies, we found that amyloid-related technologies reached the established point only after 2000, and that the more recent technologies (eg, TDP-43) have not yet approached this point. The first approvals for new molecular entities targeting acetylcholinesterase and the NMDA receptor occurred an average of 22 years after the respective technologies were established, with only memantine (which was phenotypically discovered) entering clinical trials before this point. In contrast, the 6 lead compounds targeting the formation of amyloid plaques that failed in Phase III trials between 2009 and 2014 all entered clinical trials before the respective target technologies were established. This analysis suggests that AD drug discovery has followed a predictable pattern of innovation in which

  17. Organizational Culture, Absorptive Capacity, Innovation Performace and Competitive Advantage: An Integrated Assessment in Indonesian Banking Industry

    Ahmad Adriansyah

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The positive impact of absorptive capacity (ACAP on innovation and the positive impact of innovation on competitive advantage have been proven in different research contexts. However, current knowledge on organizational culture that affects ACAP, innovation and competitive advantage as a whole, remains unclear. This article proposes a model to examine how organizational culture (developmental culture and rational culture affects ACAP, innovation and competitive advantage, directly and indirectly as well.  Surveyed data (in Indonesian Banking Industry shows that both of organizational culture have a direct impact on ACAP. Only developmental culture has a direct impact on innovation. There is no culture type affects competitive advantage directly. In this research, culture affects competitive advantage through ACAP and innovation.    

  18. Developing a competency-based medical education curriculum for the core basic medical sciences in an African Medical School.

    Olopade, Funmilayo Eniola; Adaramoye, Oluwatosin Adekunle; Raji, Yinusa; Fasola, Abiodun Olubayo; Olapade-Olaopa, Emiola Oluwabunmi

    2016-01-01

    The College of Medicine of the University of Ibadan recently revised its MBBS and BDS curricula to a competency-based medical education method of instruction. This paper reports the process of revising the methods of instruction and assessment in the core basic medical sciences directed at producing medical and dental graduates with a sound knowledge of the subjects sufficient for medical and dental practice and for future postgraduate efforts in the field or related disciplines. The health needs of the community and views of stakeholders in the Ibadan medical and dental schools were determined, and the "old" curriculum was reviewed. This process was directed at identifying the strengths and weaknesses of the old curricula and the newer competences required for modern-day medical/dental practice. The admission criteria and processes and the learning methods of the students were also studied. At the end of the review, an integrated, system-based, community-oriented, person-centered, and competency-driven curriculum was produced and approved for implementation. Four sets of students have been admitted into the curriculum. There have been challenges to the implementation process, but these have been overcome by continuous faculty development and reorientation programs for the nonteaching staff and students. Two sets of students have crossed over to the clinical school, and the consensus among the clinical teachers is that their knowledge and application of the basic medical sciences are satisfactory. The Ibadan medical and dental schools are implementing their competency-based medical education curricula successfully. The modifications to the teaching and assessment of the core basic medical science subjects have resulted in improved learning and performance at the final examinations.

  19. Long-Term Assessment of an Innovative Mangrove Rehabilitation Project: Case Study on Carey Island, Malaysia

    Shervin Motamedi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Wave energy and storm surges threaten coastal ecology and nearshore infrastructures. Although coastal structures are conventionally constructed to dampen the wave energy, they introduce tremendous damage to the ecology of the coast. To minimize environmental impact, ecofriendly coastal protection schemes should be introduced. In this paper, we discuss an example of an innovative mangrove rehabilitation attempt to restore the endangered mangroves on Carey Island, Malaysia. A submerged detached breakwater system was constructed to dampen the energy of wave and trap the sediments behind the structure. Further, a large number of mangrove seedlings were planted using different techniques. Further, we assess the possibility of success for a future mangrove rehabilitation project at the site in the context of sedimentology, bathymetry, and hydrogeochemistry. The assessment showed an increase in the amount of silt and clay, and the seabed was noticeably elevated. The nutrient concentration, the pH value, and the salinity index demonstrate that the site is conducive in establishing mangrove seedlings. As a result, we conclude that the site is now ready for attempts to rehabilitate the lost mangrove forest.

  20. Long-Term Assessment of an Innovative Mangrove Rehabilitation Project: Case Study on Carey Island, Malaysia

    Motamedi, Shervin; Hashim, Roslan; Zakaria, Rozainah; Song, Ki-Il; Sofawi, Bakrin

    2014-01-01

    Wave energy and storm surges threaten coastal ecology and nearshore infrastructures. Although coastal structures are conventionally constructed to dampen the wave energy, they introduce tremendous damage to the ecology of the coast. To minimize environmental impact, ecofriendly coastal protection schemes should be introduced. In this paper, we discuss an example of an innovative mangrove rehabilitation attempt to restore the endangered mangroves on Carey Island, Malaysia. A submerged detached breakwater system was constructed to dampen the energy of wave and trap the sediments behind the structure. Further, a large number of mangrove seedlings were planted using different techniques. Further, we assess the possibility of success for a future mangrove rehabilitation project at the site in the context of sedimentology, bathymetry, and hydrogeochemistry. The assessment showed an increase in the amount of silt and clay, and the seabed was noticeably elevated. The nutrient concentration, the pH value, and the salinity index demonstrate that the site is conducive in establishing mangrove seedlings. As a result, we conclude that the site is now ready for attempts to rehabilitate the lost mangrove forest. PMID:25097894

  1. The development, implementation, and assessment of an innovative faculty mentoring leadership program.

    Tsen, Lawrence C; Borus, Jonathan F; Nadelson, Carol C; Seely, Ellen W; Haas, Audrey; Fuhlbrigge, Anne L

    2012-12-01

    Effective mentoring is an important component of academic success. Few programs exist to both improve the effectiveness of established mentors and cultivate a multispecialty mentoring community. In 2008, in response to a faculty survey on mentoring, leaders at Brigham and Women's Hospital developed the Faculty Mentoring Leadership Program as a peer learning experience for midcareer and senior faculty physician and scientist mentors to enhance their skills and leadership in mentoring and create a supportive community of mentors. A planning group representing key administrative, educational, clinical, and research mentorship constituencies designed the nine-month course.Participants met monthly for an hour and a half during lunchtime. Two cofacilitators engaged the diverse group of 16 participants in interactive discussions about cases based on the participants' experiences. While the cofacilitators discussed with the participants the dyadic mentor-mentee relationship, they specifically emphasized the value of engaging multiple mentors and establishing mentoring networks. In response to postsession and postcourse (both immediately and after six months) self-assessments, participants reported substantive gains in their mentoring confidence and effectiveness, experienced a renewed sense of enthusiasm for mentoring, and took initial steps to build a diverse network of mentoring relationships.In this article, the authors describe the rationale, design, implementation, assessment, and ongoing impact of this innovative faculty mentoring leadership program. They also share lessons learned for other institutions that are contemplating developing a similar faculty mentoring program.

  2. INFLATION OF THE COMPETENCE-BASED APPROACH IN THE RUSSIAN PEDAGOGICAL SCIENCE AND PRACTICAL TEACHING

    A. P. Usol'tsev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. In the last one and a half decades in Russian education competence-based approach has widely extended. Competence-based approach arose in the 1970s in the USA and gained development for the solution of problems of professional education. During mass realization of this approach in the system of the Russian education its idea began to be emasculated and turned into own contrast gradually. As a result, the advantages of the competence-based concept were leveled down, and it lost its practical importance.The aim of the present publication is to prepare the empirical bases of competence- based approach, to open an essence of its theoretical kernel – the term "competence", to define limits of its applicability and expediency of use.Methods. Competence-based approach is considered by the author according to the general methodological structure of the scientific theory. The analysis and synthesis of theses of normative documents (Federal State Educational Standards, contents of the scientific and methodical works and scientific publications devoted to the practical application of competence-based approach are performed.Results and scientific novelty. From critical positions various definitions of competence as a key concept of competence-based approach are analysed. The general scheme of formation of competence is presented. The need of accurate localization of its content which provides speed of achievement of the required results and a possibility of their diagnostics is emphasized. The framework of application of competence-based approach is designated: it is effective if trainees are trained for performance of unambiguously described, algorithmic professional functions; it is of little use for training of specialists whose future professional activity means a big share of a productive, creative component; it is irrational in school education which is aimed at the general development, but not at early narrow

  3. Lessons from the Social Innovation Fund: Supporting Evaluation to Assess Program Effectiveness and Build a Body of Research Evidence

    Zandniapour, Lily; Deterding, Nicole M.

    2018-01-01

    Tiered evidence initiatives are an important federal strategy to incentivize and accelerate the use of rigorous evidence in planning, implementing, and assessing social service investments. The Social Innovation Fund (SIF), a program of the Corporation for National and Community Service, adopted a public-private partnership approach to tiered…

  4. Food Safety Practices Assessment Tool: An Innovative Way to Test Food Safety Skills among Individuals with Special Needs

    Carbone, Elena T.; Scarpati, Stanley E.; Pivarnik, Lori F.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes an innovative assessment tool designed to evaluate the effectiveness of a food safety skills curriculum for learners receiving special education services. As schools respond to the increased demand for training students with special needs about food safety, the need for effective curricula and tools is also increasing. A…

  5. Navigating the Tensions of Innovative Assessment and Pedagogy in Higher Education

    Jennifer Lock

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Innovative practice in a classroom adds challenges and tensions to programs and institutional structures in higher education. With the recent emphasis on curricula reform, there is a great focus on assessment and pedagogical practices to support student learning. To illustrate the tensions arising from these efforts, we present four pedagogical and assessment innovation approaches using both Shulman’s (2005 Signature Pedagogies and Tatar’s (2007 Design Tensions frameworks. The four approaches include problem-based learning, game-based learning, case-based learning, and technology-enhanced learning. A narrative for each approach examines and addresses tensions using Shulman’s (2005 surface, deep and implicit structures. We argue that there is an interconnected complexity and conflicting visions among the micro- (e.g., classroom or practicum, meso- (e.g., program, and macro- (e.g., institution levels. We acknowledge that dynamic tensions continually exist and needs to be thoughtfully navigated in support of innovative assessment and pedagogies in higher education. Dans l’enseignement supérieur, les pratiques innovatrices en salle de classe ajoutent des défis et des tensions aux programmes et aux structures institutionnelles. Suite à l’importance accrue récemment attachée à la réforme des programmes d’études, l’accent est mis sur l’évaluation et les pratiques pédagogiques pour soutenir l’apprentissage des étudiants. Afin d’illustrer les tensions qui découlent de ces efforts, nous présentons quatre approches de pédagogie et d’évaluation innovatrices qui font appel à la fois aux cadres de Shulman, Signature Pedagogies (2005, et à ceux de Tatar, Design Tensions (2007. Les quatre approches comprennent l’apprentissage par problèmes, l’apprentissage fondé sur le jeu, l’apprentissage basé sur des cas et l’apprentissage amélioré par les technologies. Chaque approche est examinée et traite des tensions

  6. Enhancing Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) in Nigeria for Sustainable Development: Competency-Based Training (CBT) Approach

    Okoye, K. R. E.; Michael, Ofonmbuk Isaac

    2015-01-01

    This paper attempts to examine the concept of Competency-Based Training (CBT) as a veritable mode of delivery of Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) and at the same time highlights some of the strengths and weaknesses of implementing competency-base training. The characteristics, principles and benefits of CBT were also x-rayed.…

  7. Evaluating Program Effectiveness or, If the Program is Competency-Based, How Come the Evaluation Is Costing So Much?

    Scriven, Michael

    The concern with competency-based education is not whether it is any different from the more traditional approaches but whether it is worth the considerable effort it involves. There are several aspects of a competency-based program to be considered in its evaluation. The first is whether or not there is a justifiable need for the specified…

  8. Operationalizing RRI: Relational Quality Assessment & Management Model for Research and Innovation Networks (REQUANET)

    Barrenechea, J.; Ibarra, A

    2016-07-01

    The current European framework for research and innovation, Horizon 2020, is articulated through the Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI) approach, promoting new dynamics of science and society (Owen et al., 2012) that require guidance of scientific production and public policy with a focus on developing multi-agent, transdisciplinary, mission-oriented solutions for local and global challenges. (Author)

  9. An assessment of innovation in web marketing: Investigating American convention and visitor bureaus

    Zach, Florian; Xiang, Zheng; Fesenmaier, Daniel R.

    2007-01-01

    Innovation has become an increasingly important issue for tourism businesses. The goal of this study was to evaluate innovation in Web marketing by American convention and visitors bureaus and the contribution of website features to the overall success of their Web marketing programs. The results...

  10. Criteria to assess potential reverse innovations: opportunities for shared learning between high- and low-income countries.

    Bhattacharyya, Onil; Wu, Diane; Mossman, Kathryn; Hayden, Leigh; Gill, Pavan; Cheng, Yu-Ling; Daar, Abdallah; Soman, Dilip; Synowiec, Christina; Taylor, Andrea; Wong, Joseph; von Zedtwitz, Max; Zlotkin, Stanley; Mitchell, William; McGahan, Anita

    2017-01-25

    Low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) are developing novel approaches to healthcare that may be relevant to high-income countries (HICs). These include products, services, organizational processes, or policies that improve access, cost, or efficiency of healthcare. However, given the challenge of replication, it is difficult to identify innovations that could be successfully adapted to high-income settings. We present a set of criteria for evaluating the potential impact of LMIC innovations in HIC settings. An initial framework was drafted based on a literature review, and revised iteratively by applying it to LMIC examples from the Center for Health Market Innovations (CHMI) program database. The resulting criteria were then reviewed using a modified Delphi process by the Reverse Innovation Working Group, consisting of 31 experts in medicine, engineering, management and political science, as well as representatives from industry and government, all with an expressed interest in reverse innovation. The resulting 8 criteria are divided into two steps with a simple scoring system. First, innovations are assessed according to their success within the LMIC context according to metrics of improving accessibility, cost-effectiveness, scalability, and overall effectiveness. Next, they are scored for their potential for spread to HICs, according to their ability to address an HIC healthcare challenge, compatibility with infrastructure and regulatory requirements, degree of novelty, and degree of current collaboration with HICs. We use examples to illustrate where programs which appear initially promising may be unlikely to succeed in a HIC setting due to feasibility concerns. This study presents a framework for identifying reverse innovations that may be useful to policymakers and funding agencies interested in identifying novel approaches to addressing cost and access to care in HICs. We solicited expert feedback and consensus on an empirically-derived set of criteria

  11. Innovation in diagnostic imaging services: assessing the potential for value-based reimbursement.

    Garrison, Louis P; Bresnahan, Brian W; Higashi, Mitchell K; Hollingworth, William; Jarvik, Jeffrey G

    2011-09-01

    Innovation in the field of diagnostic imaging is based primarily on the availability of new and improved equipment that opens the door for new clinical applications. Payments for these imaging procedures are subject to complex Medicare price control schemes, affecting incentives for appropriate use and innovation. Achieving a "dynamically efficient" health care system-one that elicits a socially optimal amount of innovation-requires that innovators be rewarded in relation to the value they add and can demonstrate with evidence. The authors examine how and whether value-based reimbursement for diagnostic imaging services might better reward innovation explicitly for expected improvements in health and economic outcomes. Copyright © 2011 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Applying the competence-based approach to management in the aerospace industry

    Arpentieva Mariam

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Problems of management in aerospace manufacturing are similar to those we observe in other sectors, the main of which is the flattening of strategic management. The main reason lies in the attitude towards human resource of the organization. In the aerospace industry employs 250 thousand people, who need individual approach. The individual approach can offer competence-based approach to management. The purpose of the study is proof of the benefits of the competency approach to human resource management in context strategic management of the aerospace organization. To achieve this goal it is possible to obtain the method of comparative analysis. The article compares two approaches to personnel management. The transition to competence-based human resource management means (a a different understanding of the object of management; (b involvement in all functions of human resource management «knowledge – skills – abilities» of the employee; (c to change the approach to strategic management aerospace industry.

  13. A competency based selection procedure for Dutch postgraduate GP training: a pilot study on validity and reliability.

    Vermeulen, Margit I; Tromp, Fred; Zuithoff, Nicolaas P A; Pieters, Ron H M; Damoiseaux, Roger A M J; Kuyvenhoven, Marijke M

    2014-12-01

    Abstract Background: Historically, semi-structured interviews (SSI) have been the core of the Dutch selection for postgraduate general practice (GP) training. This paper describes a pilot study on a newly designed competency-based selection procedure that assesses whether candidates have the competencies that are required to complete GP training. The objective was to explore reliability and validity aspects of the instruments developed. The new selection procedure comprising the National GP Knowledge Test (LHK), a situational judgement tests (SJT), a patterned behaviour descriptive interview (PBDI) and a simulated encounter (SIM) was piloted alongside the current procedure. Forty-seven candidates volunteered in both procedures. Admission decision was based on the results of the current procedure. Study participants did hardly differ from the other candidates. The mean scores of the candidates on the LHK and SJT were 21.9 % (SD 8.7) and 83.8% (SD 3.1), respectively. The mean self-reported competency scores (PBDI) were higher than the observed competencies (SIM): 3.7(SD 0.5) and 2.9(SD 0.6), respectively. Content-related competencies showed low correlations with one another when measured with different instruments, whereas more diverse competencies measured by a single instrument showed strong to moderate correlations. Moreover, a moderate correlation between LHK and SJT was found. The internal consistencies (intraclass correlation, ICC) of LHK and SJT were poor while the ICC of PBDI and SIM showed acceptable levels of reliability. Findings on content validity and reliability of these new instruments are promising to realize a competency based procedure. Further development of the instruments and research on predictive validity should be pursued.

  14. Applying the competence-based approach to management in the aerospace industry

    Arpentieva Mariam; Duvalina Olga; Braitseva Svetlana; Gorelova Irina; Rozhnova Anna

    2018-01-01

    Problems of management in aerospace manufacturing are similar to those we observe in other sectors, the main of which is the flattening of strategic management. The main reason lies in the attitude towards human resource of the organization. In the aerospace industry employs 250 thousand people, who need individual approach. The individual approach can offer competence-based approach to management. The purpose of the study is proof of the benefits of the competency approach to human resource ...

  15. Innovative Models of Dental Care Delivery and Coverage: Patient-Centric Dental Benefits Based on Digital Oral Health Risk Assessment.

    Martin, John; Mills, Shannon; Foley, Mary E

    2018-04-01

    Innovative models of dental care delivery and coverage are emerging across oral health care systems causing changes to treatment and benefit plans. A novel addition to these models is digital risk assessment, which offers a promising new approach that incorporates the use of a cloud-based technology platform to assess an individual patient's risk for oral disease. Risk assessment changes treatment by including risk as a modifier of treatment and as a determinant of preventive services. Benefit plans are being developed to use risk assessment to predetermine preventive benefits for patients identified at elevated risk for oral disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Evaluation of competence-based teaching in higher education: From theory to practice.

    Bergsmann, Evelyn; Schultes, Marie-Therese; Winter, Petra; Schober, Barbara; Spiel, Christiane

    2015-10-01

    Competence-based teaching in higher education institutions and its evaluation have become a prevalent topic especially in the European Union. However, evaluation instruments are often limited, for example to single student competencies or specific elements of the teaching process. The present paper provides a more comprehensive evaluation concept that contributes to sustainable improvement of competence-based teaching in higher education institutions. The evaluation concept considers competence research developments as well as the participatory evaluation approach. The evaluation concept consists of three stages. The first stage evaluates whether the competencies students are supposed to acquire within the curriculum (ideal situation) are well defined. The second stage evaluates the teaching process and the competencies students have actually acquired (real situation). The third stage evaluates concrete aspects of the teaching process. Additionally, an implementation strategy is introduced to support the transfer from the theoretical evaluation concept to practice. The evaluation concept and its implementation strategy are designed for internal evaluations in higher education and primarily address higher education institutions that have already developed and conducted a competence-based curriculum. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Perspectives on competency-based medical education from the learning sciences.

    Swing, Susan R

    2010-01-01

    A central component of competency-based medical education is a framework of higher-order and more fundamental competencies whose purpose is to focus instruction and learning. In the language of the learning sciences, many of these competencies are complex cognitive-perceptual or cognitive-motor skills. Competency-based medical education has been criticized for being reductionistic, that is, for focusing on atomistic skills and failing to capture the essence of professional activities as manifested by complex, integrated capabilities. The value of identifying fundamental skill components is supported by theory and evidence from the learning sciences, however. Complex skills are constructed from fundamental, component skills. Proficient performance of the former is achieved as components are refined and integrated during repeated performance of the skill in a realistic context and as feedback on performance is provided. Competency-based medical education does not propose specific methods for teaching competencies. The learning and instructional sciences, however, posit a number of conditions for learning that support the acquisition of simple skills and their flexible integration into complex capabilities. Learners' motivation and self-regulation skills will also have an impact on the extent to which they engage in learning processes that result in the integration of knowledge and skills into complex competencies.

  18. Probabilistic risk assessment from potential exposures to the public applied for innovative nuclear installations

    Dvorzhak, Alla; Mora, Juan C.; Robles, Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    Potential exposures are those that may occur as a result of unanticipated operational performance or accidents. Potential exposure situations are probabilistic in nature because they depend on uncertain events such as equipment failure, operator errors or external initiators beyond the control of the operator. Consequently, there may exist a range of possible radiological impacts that need to be considered. In this paper a Level 3 Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) for a hypothetical scenario relevant to Innovative Nuclear Energy Systems (INS) was conducted using computer code MACCS (MELCOR Accident Consequence Code Systems). The acceptability of an INS was analyzed taking into account the general requirement that relocation or evacuation measures must not be necessary beyond the site boundary. In addition, deterministic modeling of the accident consequences for the critical meteorological conditions was carried out using the JRODOS decision support system (Real-time On-line Decision Support system for off-site emergency management in Europe). The approach used for dose and risk assessment from potential exposure of accidental releases and their comparison with acceptance criteria are presented. The methodology described can be used as input to the licensing procedure and engineering design considerations to help satisfy relevant health and environmental impact criteria for fission or fusion nuclear installations. - Highlights: • PSA Level-3 based on WinMACCS code is carried out for accidental release. • Family curves of percentiles for radiation exposure doses are constructed. • Risk indicators for potential exposure are defined. • Using of risk acceptance curve criteria is proposed for decision making process.

  19. Indicators to assess the environmental performances of an innovative subway station : example of Noisy-Champs

    Schertzer, D. J. M.; Charbonnier, L.; Versini, P. A.; Tchiguirinskaia, I.

    2017-12-01

    Noisy-Champs is a train station located in Noisy-le-Grand and Champs-sur-Marne, in the Paris urban area (France). Integrated into the Grand Paris Express project (huge development project to modernise the transport network around Paris), this station is going to be radically transformed and become a major hub. Designed by the architectural office Duthilleul, the new Noisy-Champs station aspires to be an example of an innovative and sustainable infrastructure. Its architectural precepts are indeed meant to improve its environmental performances, especially those related to storm water management, water consumption and users' thermal and hygrometric comfort. In order to assess and monitor these performances, objectives and associated indicators have been developed. They aim to be adapted for a specific infrastructure such as a public transport station. Analyses of pre-existing comfort simulations, blueprints and regulatory documents have led to identify the main issues for the Noisy-Champs station, focusing on its resilience to extreme events like droughts, heatwaves and heaxvy rainfalls. Both objectives and indicators have been proposed by studying the space-time variabilities of physical fluxes (heat, pollutants, radiation, wind and water) and passenger flows, and their interactions. Each indicator is linked to an environmental performance and has been determined after consultation of the different stakeholders involved in the rebuilding of the station. It results a monitoring program to assess the environmental performances of the station composed by both the indicators grid and their related objectives, and a measurement program detailing the nature and location of sensors, and the frequency of measurements.

  20. FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF INNOVATIVE CONDITION ASSESSMENT TECHNOLOGIES FOR WATER MAINS: ACOUSTIC PIPE WALL ASSESSMENT, INTERNAL INSPECTION, AND EXTERNAL INSPECTIONVOLUME 1: TECHNICAL REPORT AND VOLUME 2: APPENDICES

    Nine pipe wall integrity assessment technologies were demonstrated on a 76-year-old, 2,057-ft-long portion of a cement-lined, 24-in. cast iron water main in Louisville, KY. This activity was part of a series of field demonstrations of innovative leak detection/location and condi...

  1. A hybrid MCDM framework combined with DEMATEL-based ANP to evaluate enterprise technological innovation capabilities assessment

    Meng-Jong Kuan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The efficient evaluation of technological innovation capabilities of enterprises is an important factor to enhance competitiveness. This paper aims to assess and to rank technological innovation evaluation criteria in order to provide a practical insight of systematic analysis by gathering the qualified experts’ opinions combined with three methods of multi-criteria decision making approach. A framework is proposed and uses a novel hybrid multiple criteria decision-making (MCDM model to address the dependence relationships of criteria with the aid of the Decision-Making Trial and Evaluation Laboratory (DEMATEL, analytical network process (ANP and VIKOR (VlseKriterijumska Optimizacija I Kompromisno Resenje. The study reports that the interaction between criteria is essential and influences technological innovation capabilities; furthermore, this ranking development of technological innovation capabilities assessment is also one of key management tools for managements of other related high- tech enterprises. Managers can then judge the need to improve and determine which criteria provide the most effective direction towards improvement.

  2. SOFTWARE IMPLEMENTATION OF FORMING OF COLOR-BASED CARDS FOR ASSESSMENT OF EARLY STAGES INNOVATION PROJECTS

    Ekaterina I. Bragina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with functional program that allows to generate a visualrepresentation of the shareholder tothe innovative project early stage ofdevelopment, formed a color-based cards.

  3. Approaches to Innovation Process Assessment: Complex Results from an Exploratory Investigation

    Ondrej Zizlavsky

    2015-12-01

    companies is noted. Therefore, this paper is supposed to motivate researchers to conduct more large-scale studies in the area of innovative performance measurement systems and their implementation in different business sectors and areas.

  4. Innovation and practice on assessment of nuclear power engineering management procedures

    Li Shaogang; Sun Ying

    2011-01-01

    This article has introduced the innovative implementation method and process adopted by Shandong Nuclear Power Company in procedure management for AP1000 nuclear power project, summarized its effects, and also analyzed advantages and disadvantages of this management method. (authors)

  5. Towards integration of methodologies for assessing and promoting the societal embedding of energy innovations

    Verbong, G.; Mourik, R.; Raven, R.P.J.M.

    2006-10-01

    The necessity for system innovation is well acknowledged, but inducing system change proves to be very difficult. Three approaches have been developed for analysing and supporting radical innovations: Socrobust, Create Acceptance and Strategic Niche Management. This paper gives an overview of these complementary approaches and their theoretical background. The paper also identifies several potential contributions for social scientists to contribute to energy research and the implementation of more sustainable alternatives.

  6. How Do Enterprises Communicate Their Innovation Strategies? An Assessment and Comparison of Turkish Firms’ Website Statements

    A. Orcun SAKARYA

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Innovation strategy practices primarily aim to sustain competitive advantage and growth via new business models and added value. The goal of this study is to discover the extent of innovation statements communicated to stakeholders by Turkish firms listed in the second top 500 industrial enterprises ranking of Istanbul Chamber of Industry as of 2013 and 2014. To do this, topics closely related to innovation are examined via a comparative analysis of related website contents. The study includes four main parts. The first and second parts review the literature and theoretical background. The third part introduces the methodological framework of the paper including the profile of the firms under consideration and analytical procedures. Content analysis is used to group web-based information related to innovation and other notions. Groups include mission, vision and values, research and development ability, and innovation related topics which statement densities are discussed in the context of motivation for value creation. It has been deduced that the gradual increase in firms’ innovation awareness is also communicated to stakeholders especially in research and the context of development activities’. Finally this paper ends with a conclusion.

  7. Accounting for professionalism: an innovative point system to assess resident professionalism

    Gary L. Malakoff

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Professionalism is a core competency for residency required by the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education. We sought a means to objectively assess professionalism among internal medicine and transitional year residents. Innovation: We established a point system to document unprofessional behaviors demonstrated by internal medicine and transitional year residents along with opportunities to redeem such negative points by deliberate positive professional acts. The intent of the policy is to assist residents in becoming aware of what constitutes unprofessional behavior and to provide opportunities for remediation by accruing positive points. A committee of core faculty and department leadership including the program director and clinic nurse manager determines professionalism points assigned. Negative points might be awarded for tardiness to mandatory or volunteered for events without a valid excuse, late evaluations or other paperwork required by the department, non-attendance at meetings prepaid by the department, and inappropriate use of personal days or leave. Examples of actions through which positive points can be gained to erase negative points include delivery of a mentored pre-conference talk, noon conference, medical student case/shelf review session, or a written reflection. Results: Between 2009 and 2012, 83 residents have trained in our program. Seventeen categorical internal medicine and two transitional year residents have been assigned points. A total of 55 negative points have been assigned and 19 points have been remediated. There appears to be a trend of fewer negative points and more positive points being assigned over each of the past three academic years. Conclusion: Commitment to personal professional behavior is a lifelong process that residents must commit to during their training. A professionalism policy, which employs a point system, has been instituted in our programs and may be a novel tool to

  8. INFRASTRUCTURE OF INNOVATIVE ENTREPRENEURSHIP IN RUSSIA IN SCIENTIFIC AND EDUCATIONAL SPHERES: ASSESSMENT OF ITS CURRENT STATE

    Cheremisina T. P.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In the midst of the global financial crisis (2007-2009 World Economic Forum has recognized Russia's economy as being on the brink of innovative stage of development. Only in 2010, the negative impact of the crisis has manifested itself with a sharp drop in competitiveness of economy, especially in the areas where the innovative potential of the country was being formed. The domain of science and education form the infrastructure basis of innovative entrepreneurship, and in Russia, until recently, levels of these, though falling, were still recognized as high. Therefore, it is very important today to raise and strengthen the competitiveness of science and professional education, i.e. the sphere wherein the human capital necessary for innovation and for stimulation of innovative entrepreneurship, is formed. In 2010-2012, the Government of the Russian Federation implemented a program to stimulate innovative entrepreneurship based on accelerated infrastructure development in the spheres of science and education, and in 2013 began to reform science. Within the scope of this study are the 2007-2013 changes in the infrastructure of innovative entrepreneurship in scientific and educational spheres and their evaluation. The purpose of the study is to determine the most urgent and pressing issues requiring priority innovative solutions to increase the country's innovation potential. For evaluation, the methodology and tools used by the Global Competitiveness Index IEF are used. The choice of this methodology is justified not only by the close relationship between the respective competitiveness of the economies and their potentials for innovation, but also due to public confidence in this rating as a useful tool for analysts to identify the weaknesses in national competitiveness and to identify priority areas for action to improve it and to accelerate economic growth. The conclusions of the evaluation conducted in this study relate to inertia in scientific

  9. Assessing human health risks from pesticide use in conventional and innovative cropping systems with the BROWSE model.

    Lammoglia, Sabine-Karen; Kennedy, Marc C; Barriuso, Enrique; Alletto, Lionel; Justes, Eric; Munier-Jolain, Nicolas; Mamy, Laure

    2017-08-01

    Reducing the risks and impacts of pesticide use on human health and on the environment is one of the objectives of the European Commission Directive 2009/128/EC in the quest for a sustainable use of pesticides. This Directive, developed through European national plans such as Ecophyto plan in France, promotes the introduction of innovative cropping systems relying, for example, on integrated pest management. Risk assessment for human health of the overall pesticide use in these innovative systems is required before the introduction of those systems to avoid that an innovation becomes a new problem. The objectives of this work were to assess and to compare (1) the human exposure to pesticides used in conventional and innovative cropping systems designed to reduce pesticide needs, and (2) the corresponding risks for human health. Humans (operator and residents) exposure to pesticides and risks for human health were assessed for each pesticide with the BROWSE model. Then, a method was proposed to represent the overall risk due to all pesticides used in one system. This study considers 3 conventional and 9 associated innovative cropping systems, and 116 plant protection products containing 89 different active substances (i.e. pesticides). The modelling results obtained with BROWSE showed that innovative cropping systems such as low input or no herbicide systems would reduce the risk for human health in comparison to the corresponding conventional cropping systems. On the contrary, BROWSE showed that conservation tillage system would lead to unacceptable risks in the conditions of our study, because of a high number of pesticide applications, and especially of some herbicides. For residents, the dermal absorption was the main exposure route while ingestion was found to be negligible. For operators, inhalation was also a predominant route of exposure. In general, human exposure to pesticides and human health risks were found to be correlated to the treatment frequency

  10. Assessment of Progressive Product Innovation on Key Environmental Indicators: Pampers® Baby Wipes from 2007–2013

    Gert Van Hoof

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Companies are increasingly conducting life cycle assessments (LCA of their products to understand potential product impacts on the environment, prioritize areas of innovation to create more sustainable products, and determine valid claims. This case study shows the results of product innovation by comparing an older (2007 and new (2013 version of a common hygiene product in Europe and the U.S. The standard methodology follows the ISO 14040/44 Guidelines for LCA. Results are reported for the impact indicators with high relevance for the product category: primary energy, global warming, particulates, agricultural land occupation, fossil fuel depletion, and solid waste generation. Generally, raw material supply chains for product and packaging contribute most (up to 82% to the calculated environmental impact indicators. Improvements vs. the 2007 baby wipe range between 4% and 14% in Europe and between 15% and 36% in the U.S. The improvement is driven by a new substrate technology that provides more surface area for cleaning, which results in lower use of resources. This case study illustrates three key environmental drivers behind this innovation: the corporate focus on R&D capability to design for environmentally improved products, the increased interest from retailers and consumers requiring accurate and relevant information on the performance and sustainability of products, and the company’s interest in deeper technical understanding of contributions from upstream material and process innovations on a product’s environmental profile.

  11. Hands in medicine: understanding the impact of competency-based education on the formation of medical students’ identities in the United States

    2016-01-01

    Purpose There have been critiques that competency training, which defines the roles of a physician by simple, discrete tasks or measurable competencies, can cause students to compartmentalize and focus mainly on being assessed without understanding how the interconnected competencies help shape their role as future physicians. Losing the meaning and interaction of competencies can result in a focus on ‘doing the work of a physician’ rather than identity formation and ‘being a physician.’ This study aims to understand how competency-based education impacts the development of a medical student’s identity. Methods Three ceramic models representing three core competencies ‘medical knowledge,’ ‘patient care,’ and ‘professionalism’ were used as sensitizing objects, while medical students reflected on the impact of competency-based education on identity formation. Qualitative analysis was used to identify common themes. Results Students across all four years of medical school related to the ‘professionalism’ competency domain (50%). They reflected that ‘being an empathetic physician’ was the most important competency. Overall, students agreed that competency-based education played a significant role in the formation of their identity. Some students reflected on having difficulty in visualizing the interconnectedness between competencies, while others did not. Students reported that the assessment structure deemphasized ‘professionalism’ as a competency. Conclusion Students perceive ‘professionalism’ as a competency that impacts their identity formation in the social role of ‘being a doctor,’ albeit a competency they are less likely to be assessed on. High-stakes exams, including the United States Medical Licensing Exam clinical skills exam, promote this perception. PMID:27572244

  12. Hands in medicine: understanding the impact of competency-based education on the formation of medical students’ identities in the United States

    Catherine Gonsalves

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose There have been critiques that competency training, which defines the roles of a physician by simple, discrete tasks or measurable competencies, can cause students to compartmentalize and focus mainly on being assessed without understanding how the interconnected competencies help shape their role as future physicians. Losing the meaning and interaction of competencies can result in a focus on ‘doing the work of a physician’ rather than identity formation and ‘being a physician.’ This study aims to understand how competency-based education impacts the development of a medical student’s identity. Methods Three ceramic models representing three core competencies ‘medical knowledge,’ ‘patient care,’ and ‘professionalism’ were used as sensitizing objects, while medical students reflected on the impact of competency-based education on identity formation. Qualitative analysis was used to identify common themes. Results Students across all four years of medical school related to the ‘professionalism’ competency domain (50%. They reflected that ‘being an empathetic physician’ was the most important competency. Overall, students agreed that competency-based education played a significant role in the formation of their identity. Some students reflected on having difficulty in visualizing the interconnectedness between competencies, while others did not. Students reported that the assessment structure deemphasized ‘professionalism’ as a competency. Conclusion Students perceive ‘professionalism’ as a competency that impacts their identity formation in the social role of ‘being a doctor,’ albeit a competency they are less likely to be assessed on. High-stakes exams, including the United States Medical Licensing Exam clinical skills exam, promote this perception.

  13. The contested space: The impact of competency-based education and accreditation on dietetic practice in Australia.

    Ash, Susan; Palermo, Claire; Gallegos, Danielle

    2018-05-06

    Competency-based Education (CBE) has underpinned the education of dietitians in Australia since the first Competency Standards (CS) were published; however, little is known about how CBE has influenced dietetic practice. The aim of this paper is to explore how a CBE framework and the CS have influenced dietetic practice in Australia since 1990. A qualitative investigation explored concepts of dietetic practice. Data analysed were original interviews previously undertaken with recent graduate dietitians during 1991 (n = 26), 1998 (n = 23) and 2007 (n = 19) and seven guided discussions with dietitians and employers (n = 28) conducted in 2014 to identify themes. The DAA Competency Standards and Accreditation Manuals/Standards since 1990 were also analysed to triangulate the interview data and to investigate how the CS were interpreted. Themes identified from interviews included: (i) communicating for better care, (ii) scientific enquiry for effective practice, (iii) critical thinking and evidence-based practice and (iv) professionalism, which remained core to dietetic practice over time, but leadership, advocacy, business management and entrepreneurial skills have emerged more strongly as the scope of practice has diversified. The landscape in which dietitians' practice showed increasing complexity and clear boundaries separating professional roles were disappearing. The 2015 CS and the 2017 Accreditation Standards highlighted that competency remains a shifting construct and that professional behaviours change depending on economic and political reasons in the play of power. Accreditation policy and current standards have successfully maintained a standard of dietetic practice across a diverse country but have the potential to constrain innovation. © 2018 Dietitians Association of Australia.

  14. Evaluation of Teaching Performance: Considerations from the Competency-Based Approach

    Mario Rueda Beltrán

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The article gives an overview of the main arguments and characteristics attributed to the Competency-based Approach in education, so as to analyze the various definitions available and some of the proposals on the subject of teaching skills. Approaches and strategies are suggested for developing teacher-evaluation programs in the context of a generalized environment in the educational sector which is adopting the model of competencies for school reform, curriculum redesign, modifications in teaching strategies, and manners and functions of evaluation.

  15. Assessment Report on Innovative Rotor Blades (MAREWINT WP1,D1.3)

    McGugan, Malcolm; Leble, Vladimir; Pereira, Gilmar Ferreira

    The offshore wind energy industry faces many challenges in the short to medium term if it is to meet the ambitions of the global community for sustainable energy supply in the future. Not least among these challenges is the issue of rotor blades. Innovative design for “smart” rotor blades...... the innovative concept development for wind turbine blades. This covers models and experiments with damage measurement systems embedded within the composite material/structure and numerical methods investigating the effects of leading and trailing edge flaps on modifying the aerodynamic loads on the operating...... rotor....

  16. Developing a higher specialist training programme in renal medicine in the era of competence-based training.

    Kamesh, Lavanya; Clapham, Mike; Foggensteiner, Lukas

    2012-08-01

    Renal specialty medical training in the UK was reformed in August 2007, with an emphasis placed on competency-based training and the publication of a new curriculum and assessment blueprint. This model of training places additional time demands on both trainees and trainers, with implications for job planning and service delivery. We evaluated the resource requirements and impact on service delivery of implementing a high-quality training programme in renal medicine. Each trainee maintained a portfolio containing details of workplace-based assessments. The change in educational environment led to improved trainee satisfaction. The mean total consultant time involved in implementing the training programme was 0.7 programmed activities (PAs) per trainee per week in the first year, which decreased to 0.5 PAs per trainee per week in the second year. This pilot study indicates that it is possible to integrate successful and high-quality specialty training in a busy clinical environment. The model outlined could form a template for postgraduate specialist training delivery in a variety of medical specialties.

  17. Simulation training: a systematic review of simulation in arthroscopy and proposal of a new competency-based training framework.

    Tay, Charison; Khajuria, Ankur; Gupte, Chinmay

    2014-01-01

    Traditional orthopaedic training has followed an apprenticeship model whereby trainees enhance their skills by operating under guidance. However the introduction of limitations on training hours and shorter training programmes mean that alternative training strategies are required. To perform a literature review on simulation training in arthroscopy and devise a framework that structures different simulation techniques that could be used in arthroscopic training. A systematic search of Medline, Embase, Google Scholar and the Cochrane Databases were performed. Search terms included "virtual reality OR simulator OR simulation" and "arthroscopy OR arthroscopic". 14 studies evaluating simulators in knee, shoulder and hip arthroplasty were included. The majority of the studies demonstrated construct and transference validity but only one showed concurrent validity. More studies are required to assess its potential as a training and assessment tool, skills transference between simulators and to determine the extent of skills decay from prolonged delays in training. We also devised a "ladder of arthroscopic simulation" that provides a competency-based framework to implement different simulation strategies. The incorporation of simulation into an orthopaedic curriculum will depend on a coordinated approach between many bodies. But the successful integration of simulators in other areas of surgery supports a possible role for simulation in advancing orthopaedic education. Copyright © 2014 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Developing a Competence-Based Addiction Medicine Curriculum in Indonesia: The Training Needs Assessment

    Pinxten, W.J.L.; Jong, C.A.J. de; Hidayat, T.; Istiqomah, A.N.; Achmad, T.H.; Raya, R.P.; Norviatin, D.; Siregar, I.M.P.

    2011-01-01

    Indonesia has one of the fastest growing, injecting drugs user-driven, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemics in Asia. Coverage of needle and syringe programs (NSPs), opioid substitution therapy (OST), and antiretroviral treatment (ART) is increasing, but is still low, whereas professional

  19. Developing a Competence-Based Addiction Medicine Curriculum in Indonesia: The Training Needs Assessment

    Pinxten, W. J. L.; De Jong, C.; Hidayat, T.; Istiqomah, A. N.; Achmad, Y. M.; Raya, R. P.; Norviatin, D.; Siregar, I. M. P.

    2011-01-01

    Indonesia has one of the fastest growing, injecting drugs user-driven, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemics in Asia. Coverage of needle and syringe programs (NSPs), opioid substitution therapy (OST), and antiretroviral treatment (ART) is increasing, but is still low, whereas professional training in addiction medicine is not yet…

  20. Competency-based veterinary education - An integrative approach to learning and assessment in the clinical workplace

    Bok, G.J.

    2014-01-01

    When graduating from veterinary school, veterinary professionals must be ready to enter the complex veterinary profession. Therefore, one of the major responsibilities of any veterinary school is to develop training programmes that support students’ competency development on the trajectory from

  1. Assessment of Innovation Competency: A Thematic Analysis of Upper Secondary School Teachers' Talk

    Nielsen, Jan Alexis

    2015-01-01

    The author employed a 3-step qualitative research design with multiple instances of source validation to capture expert teachers' (n = 28) reflections on which manifest signs they would look for when they asses students' innovation competency. The author reports on the thematic analysis of the recorded talk in interaction that occurred in teacher…

  2. Assessing Public Leadership Styles for Innovation: A Comparison of Copenhagen, Rotterdam and Barcelona

    L.M. Ricard (Lykke Margot); E-H. Klijn (Erik-Hans); J.M. Lewis (Jenny M.); T. Ysa (Tamyko)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractThis article explores which leadership qualities public managers regard as important for public innovation. It is based on a survey of 365 senior public managers in Copenhagen, Rotterdam and Barcelona. Five perspectives on leadership were identified and tested using a number of items.

  3. The Use of Correspondence Analysis in Assessing the Antecedents of Innovativeness in Public Hospitals

    Jończyk Joanna Anna

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study presented in this article is to show correspondence analysis as a method useful in the diagnosis of coexistence of category variables in antecedents of innovativeness, with the positions of the respondents representing various medical professions in hospitals. Primary data obtained in the course of empirical research, carried out using a questionnaire study on a sample of 459 respondents representing 8 public hospitals in Poland, is used to this aim. To follow up on the achievements of the analysis, literature on the issue of innovativeness and its antecedents was also used. The results of the correspondence analysis allows one to confirm the thesis of the different opinions of doctors, nurses/midwives and managers regarding the level of significance of antecedents of innovativeness, where for doctors and managers in this context the most important is financial optimization, and for nurses the improvement of the quality of medical services. The results may provide an important clue to the chief executives of hospitals in the context of further changes and innovativeness necessary to achieve the desired efficiency of these organizations.

  4. Innovation and creativity versus control assessing the paradox in IT organizations

    Fischer, Sven; Boogaard, Martin; Huysman, Marleen; Nunamaker, Jay F.; Sprague, Ralph H.Jr.

    1994-01-01

    As a result of the increasingly more turbulent environment of today IT organizations face an important problem: on the one hand they have to control their activities, which requires a certain stability, on the other hand, they need to be creative and innovative, requiring a certain amount of

  5. Responsible Research and Innovation Indicators for Science Education Assessment: How to Measure the Impact?

    Heras, Maria; Ruiz-Mallén, Isabel

    2017-01-01

    The emerging paradigm of responsible research and innovation (RRI) in the European Commission policy discourse identifies science education as a key agenda for better equipping students with skills and knowledge to tackle complex societal challenges and foster active citizenship in democratic societies. The operationalisation of this broad…

  6. Assessing the Creativity & Innovation level of IT companies - The case of Denmark

    Vidal, Rene Victor Valqui; Sørensen, Lene Tolstrup; Holmetoft, U.

    2007-01-01

    Increasingly, the creativity and innovation potentials are becoming key factors for IT companies on an ever growing market. The Danish IT companies appear to have a strong base for competing with the rest of the world however it is clear that the companies have difficulties in managing their inno...

  7. Field Demonstration of Innovative Condition Assessment Technologies for Water Mains: Leak Detection and Location

    Three leak detection/location technologies were demonstrated on a 76-year-old, 2,057-ft-long portion of a cement-lined, 24-in. cast iron water main in Louisville, KY. This activity was part of a series of field demonstrations of innovative leak detection/location and condition a...

  8. Innovation strategies in a fruit growers association impacts assessment by using combined LCA and s-LCA methodologies.

    Tecco, Nadia; Baudino, Claudio; Girgenti, Vincenzo; Peano, Cristiana

    2016-10-15

    In the challenging world of territorial transformations within the agriculture, there is an increasing need for an integrated methodological framework of assessment that is able to reconcile the demand for solutions that are both economically sustainable and contribute to environmental and social improvement. This study aims to assess the introduction of innovation into agro-food systems by combining an environmental life cycle (LCA) assessment and a social life cycle assessment (s-LCA) to support the decision making process of a fruit growers co-op for the adoption of mulching and covering in raspberry farming. LCA and s-LCA have been applied independently under specific consistency requirements, selecting two scenarios to compare the impact with (1) and without (2) the innovation and then combined within a cause-effect chain. The interactions between the environment and socioeconomic components were considered within a nested frameset of business and territorial features. The total emissions from raspberry production in Scenario 1, according to the Global Warming Potential (GWP) Impact Category amounted to 2.2840kg of CO2 eq. In Scenario 2, the impact of production was associated with a GWP of 0.1682kg of CO2 eq. Social repercussions analysis from Scenario 1 compared to Scenario 2 indicate more satisfaction for working conditions and the management of climate risks. The mulching and covering, implemented within a given framework of farm activity, created conditions for the preservation of a model in which raspberry production contributes to landscape protection, the business sustainability of farms and the creation of employment. The combined use of the two methods contributes to the development of a strategy planning due to its ability to deliver, as well as specific analysis at a functional level, a wider framework for assessing the consistency of the impacts related to innovation in raspberry production. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Proposal for a Method for Business Model Performance Assessment: Toward an Experimentation Tool for Business Model Innovation

    Antonio Batocchio

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The representation of business models has been recently widespread, especially in the pursuit of innovation. However, defining a company’s business model is sometimes limited to discussion and debates. This study observes the need for performance measurement so that business models can be data-driven. To meet this goal, the work proposed as a hypothesis the creation of a method that combines the practices of the Balanced Scorecard with a method of business models representation – the Business Model Canvas. Such a combination was based on study of conceptual adaptation, resulting in an application roadmap. A case study application was performed to check the functionality of the proposition, focusing on startup organizations. It was concluded that based on the performance assessment of the business model it is possible to propose the search for change through experimentation, a path that can lead to business model innovation.

  10. A preliminary assessment of the potential for 'team science' in DOE Energy Innovation Hubs and Energy Frontier Research Centers

    Boardman, Craig; Ponomariov, Branco

    2011-01-01

    President Obama has called for the development of new energy technologies to address our national energy needs and restore US economic competitiveness. In response, the Department of Energy has established new R and D modalities for energy research and development designed to facilitate collaboration across disciplinary, institutional, and sectoral boundaries. In this research note, we provide a preliminary assessment of the potential for essential mechanisms for coordinated problem solving among diverse actors within two new modalities at the DOE: Energy Innovation Hubs and Energy Frontier Research Centers. - Highlights: → Energy Frontier Research Centers may lack the basic mechanisms for coordinating diverse actors. → Divergent goals across diverse actors may hinder coordination in Energy Innovation Hubs. → The implementation of these and similar energy policies require further investigation.

  11. Neoliberalism and the government of nursing through competency-based education.

    Foth, Thomas; Holmes, Dave

    2017-04-01

    Competency has become a key concept in education in general over the last four decades. This article examines the development of the competency-based movement with a particular focus on the significance it has had for nursing education. Our hypothesis is that the competency movement can only adequately be understood if it is analyzed in relation to the broad societal transformation of the last decades-often summarized under the catchword neoliberalism-and with it the emergence of managerial models for Human Resource Management (HRM) for the reorganization of social services. Classical professions, which were characterized under welfarism by an esoteric knowledge based on ethical norms, have now become marketable commodities that can be evaluated in the same way as other commodities. We want to underline that while this development is still under way, it is the concept of competency that was the decisive political instrument enabling this profound change. With the widespread implementation of competency-based education that now governs nursing knowledge, the development of a critical, oppositional perspective becomes more challenging, if not entirely impossible. We will be focusing primarily on nursing education in Canada, although we maintain that it has relevance for nursing internationally. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Facilitating students’ motivation and learning through competence-based didactic units

    Makovec-Radovan Danijela

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to examine the influence of the “Competence-based didactic units” in vocational education on students’ motivation and self-regulated learning. The sample consisted of 115 males and 133 females (n=250 who were attending secondary vocational or technical schools in Slovenia. The students were included in an experimental project that introduced a “competence- based didactic unit” (CBDU in vocational schools’ curricula. In our study, the introduction of the CBDU was used to measure changes in the motivational, cognitive, and metacognitive aspects of self-regulated learning and to examine how they were subsequently related to other students characteristists, such as gender, school performance and time spent on school work. The results show the importance of CBDUs, on the one hand, on motivational factors such as intrinsic goal orientation, task value, and self-efficacy, and, on the other hand, differences in gender and grade level. The findings are discussed in terms of how teaching strategies in vocational education can contribute to the development of individuals’ motivation.

  13. [Competency-based training and work world: from grading to employability].

    Estrada, John H M

    2012-06-01

    Considered as an element of business discourse, the competence-based education emerges associated with processes of productive restructuring influencing the economy since 1970. These processes arise as a consequence of the crisis of the accumulation model based on mass production and consumption following the principles of taylorism and fordism. In the last decades, the State has been unable to solve the periodic crisis that afflicts late capitalism. Because of this, the State moves away from its economic mission, promotes marketing mechanisms and, in the meantime, it tries to manage the motivational crisis of the population. This challenge forces the State to take interest in the vital world of individuals trying to solve the legitimacy crisis through educational reforms that affect the world of work. The relationship between the vertiginous changes of working world and a new educational formation is explicit. This educational formation must consider (at the same time) the management capacity, learning capacity, teamwork capacity and self-training. Based on this situation, there is a direct relationship between technologic advances, the structural crisis of capitalism and work organization. Besides, the "qualification" term is replaced with "competency-based education".

  14. Development of national competency-based learning objectives "Medical Informatics" for undergraduate medical education.

    Röhrig, R; Stausberg, J; Dugas, M

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this project is to develop a catalogue of competency-based learning objectives "Medical Informatics" for undergraduate medical education (abbreviated NKLM-MI in German). The development followed a multi-level annotation and consensus process. For each learning objective a reason why a physician needs this competence was required. In addition, each objective was categorized according to the competence context (A = covered by medical informatics, B = core subject of medical informatics, C = optional subject of medical informatics), the competence level (1 = referenced knowledge, 2 = applied knowledge, 3 = routine knowledge) and a CanMEDS competence role (medical expert, communicator, collaborator, manager, health advocate, professional, scholar). Overall 42 objectives in seven areas (medical documentation and information processing, medical classifications and terminologies, information systems in healthcare, health telematics and telemedicine, data protection and security, access to medical knowledge and medical signal-/image processing) were identified, defined and consented. With the NKLM-MI the competences in the field of medical informatics vital to a first year resident physician are identified, defined and operationalized. These competencies are consistent with the recommendations of the International Medical Informatics Association (IMIA). The NKLM-MI will be submitted to the National Competence-Based Learning Objectives for Undergraduate Medical Education. The next step is implementation of these objectives by the faculties.

  15. Multisensory innovation

    Brem, Alexander; Kampfer, Kristina; Ivens, Bjoern

    2017-01-01

    For many companies, differentiating their offerings from competitors' value propositions is becoming increasingly challenging. In order to formulate convincing value propositions, a holistic approach is required that takes human perception and sensation into consideration. This article assesses t...... and ultimately alters behavior and thus substantiates its role in multisensory innovation and product design....

  16. Sequential method for the assessment of innovations in computer assisted industrial processes; Metodo secuencial para evaluacion de innovaciones en procesos industriales asistido por computadora

    Suarez Antola, R [Universidad Catolica del Uruguay, Montevideo (Uruguay); Artucio, G [Ministerio de Industria Energia y Mineria. Direccion Nacional de Tecnologia Nuclear, Montevideo (Uruguay)

    1995-08-01

    A sequential method for the assessment of innovations in industrial processes is proposed, using suitable combinations of mathematical modelling and numerical simulation of dynamics. Some advantages and limitations of the proposed method are discussed. tabs.

  17. Use of Neural Networks in Risk Assessment and Optimization of Insurance Cover in Innovative Enterprises

    Pukała Ryszard

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The scientific objective of the paper is to present the findings of a study into the use of artificial neural networks in quantifying activity related risks of an innovative enterprise and to optimize its insurance cover in order to minimize the probable financial losses whenever they materialize. The Kohonen network involving the activation of 51 input variables was applied in the study. The outcomes of the stimulation for the given set of variables made it possible to determine the probability of a threat occurring in the classes. The results of the analysis were used to prepare an optimal insurance cover for the activities of the innovative company. The research findings are suitable for use in risk theory as well as in issues relating to entrepreneurship and insurance. The analytical device employed can also be put to practical use as a support tool in corporate risk management.

  18. How educational innovations and attention to competencies in postgraduate medical education relate to preparedness for practice : The key role of the learning environment

    Dijkstra, Ids S.; Pols, Jan; Remmelts, Pine; Rietzschel, Eric; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke; Brand, Paul L.P.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Many training programmes in postgraduate medical education (PGME) have introduced competency frameworks, but the effects of this change on preparedness for practice are unknown. Therefore, we explored how elements of competency-based programmes in PGME (educational innovations,

  19. Evaluation capacity assessment of the transport sector in South Africa: An innovative approach

    Basia D. Bless

    2017-05-01

    Conclusion: In this regard, the framework is recommended as an innovative tool to assist evaluation practitioners and scholars to better understand evaluation capacity constraints within a broader context that involves logistical, technical, contextual, social and political dimensions. It also offers an important insight on how these components interfaced to shape the organisational value system that impacts the use of evidence in the transport sector in South Africa.

  20. Innovator Organizations in New Drug Development: Assessing the Sustainability of the Biopharmaceutical Industry.

    Kinch, Michael S; Moore, Ryan

    2016-06-23

    The way new medicines are discovered and brought to market has fundamentally changed over the last 30 years. Our previous analysis showed that biotechnology companies had contributed significantly to the US Food and Drug Administration approval of new molecular entities up to the mid-1980s, when the trends started to decline. Although intriguing, the focus on biotechnology necessarily precluded the wider question of how the biopharmaceutical industry has been delivering on its goals to develop new drugs. Here, we present a comprehensive analysis of all biopharmaceutical innovators and uncover unexpected findings. The present biopharmaceutical industry grew steadily from 1800 to 1950 and then stagnated for two decades, before a burst of growth attributable to the biotechnology revolution took place; but consolidation has reduced the number of active and independent innovators to a level not experienced since 1945. The trajectories and trends we observe raise fundamental questions about biopharmaceutical innovators and the sustainability of the drug-development enterprise. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Building new competencies for new business creation based on breakthrough technological innovations

    Vanhaverbeke, W.P.M.; Kirschbaum, R.

    2003-01-01

    This paper focuses on the question how companies can build new capabilities or competencies based on discontinuous technological innovations? In particular, we analyze how corporate ventures are set up to develop and commercialize these radical innovations can play a crucial role in the process of

  2. Training of innovative engineers for problems of modernization of a domestic production

    Brusakova I.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The actual problem of training of innovative managers for problems of modernization of a domestic production is considered in research. Practice of application of innovative engineering in the sphere of modernization of industrial productions is studied. The perspective of an integrated approach to management of innovative processes is investigated, including competence-based approach to training of innovative managers and modern instruments of management of finance innovative business - processes. Authors offered new approaches to formation of innovative capacity of the domestic industrial enterprises. Different ways of innovation creation are discussing.

  3. Findings and recommendations of the competency based standards project for radiography

    Egan, Ingrid

    1993-01-01

    In February 1992, the National Office of Overseas Skills Recognition funded a $150,000 research project for the development of Competency Based Standards for the professions of Medical Radiation Science (MRS). The four professions of MRS are now considered to be: Radiography, Radiation Therapy, Nuclear Medicine Science and Sonography. The four national documents have aimed at describing the performances of the MRS practitioner at entry level to the profession. Findings from survey and interviews indicate that the existing structure of the undergraduate courses should be reviewed with emphasis on: problem solving skills, theater radiography, paediatric radiography, image interpretation or radiography pathology as well as venepuncture, if accepted nationally. . 5 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs

  4. Psychological first aid: a consensus-derived, empirically supported, competency-based training model.

    McCabe, O Lee; Everly, George S; Brown, Lisa M; Wendelboe, Aaron M; Abd Hamid, Nor Hashidah; Tallchief, Vicki L; Links, Jonathan M

    2014-04-01

    Surges in demand for professional mental health services occasioned by disasters represent a major public health challenge. To build response capacity, numerous psychological first aid (PFA) training models for professional and lay audiences have been developed that, although often concurring on broad intervention aims, have not systematically addressed pedagogical elements necessary for optimal learning or teaching. We describe a competency-based model of PFA training developed under the auspices of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Association of Schools of Public Health. We explain the approach used for developing and refining the competency set and summarize the observable knowledge, skills, and attitudes underlying the 6 core competency domains. We discuss the strategies for model dissemination, validation, and adoption in professional and lay communities.

  5. THE DEVELOPMENT OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE TEACHING (ELT COMPETENCY-BASED SYLLABUS IN SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL

    Besral Besral

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Although competency has long been the major concern in ELT either in the EFL or ESL contexts, the rise of competency-based syllabus launched by the Ministry of National Education (2006 brought about significant issue among the English teachers in the country. One of the crucial issues is that how to transfer the concepts of competences into the syllabus design.  Since a syllabus does not only contain a list of subject content, but also how curriculum planners (teachers reflect their understanding and belief about nature of language and of language teaching and learning, the ELT must be carried out to achieve communicative competence. Current investigation on the practices of ELT, however, indicates that English teachers are still walking in place, leaving the CC as a big slogan in their jobs.

  6. Effects of mobile and digital support for a structured, competency-based curriculum in neurosurgery residency education.

    Gonzalez, Nestor R; Dusick, Joshua R; Martin, Neil A

    2012-07-01

    Changes in neurosurgical practice and graduate medical education impose new challenges for training programs. We present our experience providing neurosurgical residents with digital and mobile educational resources in support of the departmental academic activities. A weekly mandatory conference program for all clinical residents based on the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education competencies, held in protected time, was introduced. Topics were taught through didactic sessions and case discussions. Faculty and residents prepare high-quality presentations, equivalent to peer-review leading papers or case reports. Presentations are videorecorded, stored in a digital library, and broadcasted through our Website and iTunes U. Residents received mobile tablet devices with remote access to the digital library, applications for document/video management, and interactive teaching tools. Residents responded to an anonymous survey, and performances on the Self-Assessment in Neurological Surgery examination before and after the intervention were compared. Ninety-two percent reported increased time used to study outside the hospital and attributed the habit change to the introduction of mobile devices; 67% used the electronic tablets as the primary tool to access the digital library, followed by 17% hospital computers, 8% home computers, and 8% personal laptops. Forty-two percent have submitted operative videos, cases, and documents to the library. One year after introducing the program, results of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons-Self-Assessment in Neurological Surgery examination showed a statistically significant improvement in global scoring and improvement in 16 of the 18 individual areas evaluated, 6 of which reached statistical significance. A structured, competency-based neurosurgical education program supported with digital and mobile resources improved reading habits among residents and performance on the Congress of Neurological Surgeons-Self-Assessment

  7. Dispatches from the front: emergency medicine teachers' perceptions of competency-based education.

    Bandiera, Glen; Lendrum, David

    2011-05-01

    Controversy exists regarding the applicability of competency-based education during clinical rotations in emergency medicine (EM). Little has been written about the perceptions of front-line teachers regarding one such competency-based education paradigm, the CanMEDS framework. We undertook to determine 1) what perceptions exist among front-line teachers at two academic health science emergency departments (EDs) regarding the use of the CanMEDS roles to frame what residents should learn on ED rotations and 2) how those same teachers envision practically incorporating the CanMEDS roles into feedback provided to residents. Teachers at two sites volunteered for a semistructured focus group study. Focus groups were moderated by an experienced qualitative researcher, and verbatim transcriptions were coded by two independent reviewers. The codes were merged into final themes. The final focus group was used to further explore issues raised and test assumptions made in the preceding groups. In five focus groups involving 21 participants, the Medical Expert and Professional roles were seen as most relevant to an EM rotation, whereas the Health Advocate, Manager, Scholar, and Collaborator roles were least relevant. On further exploration, however, faculty identified highly relevant components of each role that they could envision teaching in an ED. Participants also felt that the framework helped highlight the breadth of physician competencies and provided structure for teaching and feedback. EM faculty find the CanMEDS framework helpful for structuring teaching and learning and that many elements of the roles, when defined, are feasible to integrate into a clinical rotation.

  8. Performance Assessment of Passive Gaseous Provisions (PGAP). Report of the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO)

    2013-07-01

    The International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO) was launched in 2000 on the basis of IAEA General Conference resolution GC(44)/RES/21. INPRO helps to ensure the availability of sustainable nuclear energy in the 21st century and seeks to bring together all interested Member States - both technology holders and technology users - to consider joint actions to achieve desired innovations. To contribute to an international consensus on the definition of the reliability of passive systems that involve natural circulation, and on a methodology to assess this reliability, INPRO initiated a collaborative project on Performance Assessment of Passive Gaseous Provisions (PGAP) in 2007. Advanced nuclear reactor designs incorporate several passive systems in addition to active ones, not only to enhance the operational safety of the reactors but also to mitigate the consequences of a severe accident should one occur. However, the reliability of passive safety systems is crucial and must be assessed before they are used extensively in future nuclear power plants. Several physical parameters affect the performance of a passive safety system, and their values at the time of operation are a priori unknown. The functions of many passive systems are based on thermohydraulic principles, which until recently were considered as not being subject to any kind of failure. Hence, large and consistent efforts are required to quantify the reliability of such systems. Three participants from three INPRO Member States were involved in this collaborative project. Reliability methods for passive systems (RMPS) and assessment of passive system reliability (APSRA) methodologies were used by the participants to assess the performance and reliability of the passive decay heat removal system of the French gas cooled fast reactor design for station blackout and a loss of coolant accident combined with loss of off-site power, respectively. This publication presents the

  9. Innovative learning for innovation

    Dr.Ir. Hay Geraedts

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Innovation is crucial for companies who have to react to constantly changing markets. Several national and European research institutes stress the importance of developing innovation for small and medium size enterprises (SMEs). This was a trigger to design a minor on strategic

  10. Implementing and Innovating Marine Monitoring Approaches for Assessing Marine Environmental Status

    Danovaro, Roberto; Carugati, Laura; Berzano, Marco; Cahill, Abigail E.; Carvalho, Susana; Chenuil, Anne; Corinaldesi, Cinzia; Cristina, Sonia; David, Romain; Dell'Anno, Antonio; Dzhembekova, Nina; Garcé s, Esther; Gasol, Joseph M.; Goela, Priscila; Fé ral, Jean-Pierre; Ferrera, Isabel; Forster, Rodney M.; Kurekin, Andrey A.; Rastelli, Eugenio; Marinova, Veselka; Miller, Peter I.; Moncheva, Snejana; Newton, Alice; Pearman, John K.; Pitois, Sophie G.; Reñ é , Albert; Rodrí guez-Ezpeleta, Naiara; Saggiomo, Vincenzo; Simis, Stefan G. H.; Stefanova, Kremena; Wilson, Christian; Lo Martire, Marco; Greco, Silvestro; Cochrane, Sabine K. J.; Mangoni, Olga; Borja, Angel

    2016-01-01

    Marine environmental monitoring has tended to focus on site-specific methods of investigation. These traditional methods have low spatial and temporal resolution and are relatively labor intensive per unit area/time that they cover. To implement the Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD), European Member States are required to improve marine monitoring and design monitoring networks. This can be achieved by developing and testing innovative and cost-effective monitoring systems, as well as indicators of environmental status. Here, we present several recently developed methodologies and technologies to improve marine biodiversity indicators and monitoring methods. The innovative tools are discussed concerning the technologies presently utilized as well as the advantages and disadvantages of their use in routine monitoring. In particular, the present analysis focuses on: (i) molecular approaches, including microarray, Real Time quantitative PCR (qPCR), and metagenetic (metabarcoding) tools; (ii) optical (remote) sensing and acoustic methods; and (iii) in situ monitoring instruments. We also discuss their applications in marine monitoring within the MSFD through the analysis of case studies in order to evaluate their potential utilization in future routine marine monitoring. We show that these recently-developed technologies can present clear advantages in accuracy, efficiency and cost.

  11. Assessment of school wellness policies implementation by benchmarking against diffusion of innovation framework.

    Harriger, Dinah; Lu, Wenhua; McKyer, E Lisako J; Pruitt, Buzz E; Goodson, Patricia

    2014-04-01

    The School Wellness Policy (SWP) mandate marks one of the first innovative and extensive efforts of the US government to address the child obesity epidemic and the influence of the school environment on child health. However, no systematic review has been conducted to examine the implementation of the mandate. The study examines the literature on SWP implementation by using the Diffusion of Innovations Theory as a framework. Empirically based literature on SWP was systematically searched and analyzed. A theory-driven approach was used to categorize the articles by 4 diffusion stages: restructuring/redefining, clarifying, routinizing, and multiple stages. Twenty-one studies were identified, and 3 key characteristics of the reviewed literature were captured: (1) uniformity in methodology, (2) role of context in analyzing policy implementation, and (3) lack of information related to policy clarification. Over half of the studies were published by duplicate set of authors, and only 1 study employed a pure qualitative methodology. Only 2 articles include an explicit theoretical framework to study theory-driven constructs related to SWP implementation. Policy implementation research can inform the policy process. Therefore, it is essential that policy implementation is measured accurately. Failing to clearly define implementation constructs may result in misguided conclusion. © 2014, American School Health Association.

  12. Implementing and Innovating Marine Monitoring Approaches for Assessing Marine Environmental Status

    Danovaro, Roberto

    2016-11-23

    Marine environmental monitoring has tended to focus on site-specific methods of investigation. These traditional methods have low spatial and temporal resolution and are relatively labor intensive per unit area/time that they cover. To implement the Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD), European Member States are required to improve marine monitoring and design monitoring networks. This can be achieved by developing and testing innovative and cost-effective monitoring systems, as well as indicators of environmental status. Here, we present several recently developed methodologies and technologies to improve marine biodiversity indicators and monitoring methods. The innovative tools are discussed concerning the technologies presently utilized as well as the advantages and disadvantages of their use in routine monitoring. In particular, the present analysis focuses on: (i) molecular approaches, including microarray, Real Time quantitative PCR (qPCR), and metagenetic (metabarcoding) tools; (ii) optical (remote) sensing and acoustic methods; and (iii) in situ monitoring instruments. We also discuss their applications in marine monitoring within the MSFD through the analysis of case studies in order to evaluate their potential utilization in future routine marine monitoring. We show that these recently-developed technologies can present clear advantages in accuracy, efficiency and cost.

  13. Conceptualization of competency based curricula in pre-service nursing and midwifery education: A grounded theory approach.

    Muraraneza, Claudine; Mtshali, Gloria Ntombifikile

    2018-01-01

    In health professional education, the competency-based curriculum concept has been an important driver of reform in the training of competent graduates for the 21st century. In African countries, although there has been implementing it in pre-service nursing and midwifery education and the literature reports a lack of understanding of what is it on the part of the implementers. This article explores the meaning of competency based curriculum in pre-service nursing and midwifery education in Rwanda. A grounded theory approach, following Corbin and Strauss, was used. Following ethical clearance by the university ethical committee, data was collected from 17 participants through in-depth individual interviews of staff. Four categories emerged: (a) transformation, (b) tool for primary health care philosophy, (c) technological approach to education, (d) and modular system. Competency-based curriculum is confirmed as an appropriate educational tool in producing competent graduates for today and the future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Business interruption and loss of assets risk assessment in support of the design of an innovative concentrating solar power plant

    Amato, Andrea; Gallisto, Maurizio; Maccari, Augusto; Paganelli, Mauro; Compare, Michele; Zio, Enrico

    2011-01-01

    Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) plants are a promising technology of renewable energy production, as witnessed by the increasing public and private investments during the last decade. The assessment of the associated risks of business interruption (loss of production) and loss of assets due to the occurrence of undesired internal or external events, such as failures of components, unfavorable environmental conditions, etc., brings added values by informing design modifications and contributing to production assurance, for rational Company investments in these environmentally sustainable power plants. This work presents and applies a methodology for assessing the risks associated to a CSP of innovative design. The methodology is derived from traditional system risk analysis, specifically focused only on the economic consequences of the internal events of failure behavior of components. The innovation in the design considered is particularly aimed at augmenting the CSP intrinsic capability of being equipped with thermal storage systems by the introduction of a molten salt mixture as heat transfer fluid. This technology presents evident advantages in terms of system simplification and reduction of production costs but on the other hand introduces a risk factor with regards to the solidification of the salt mixture that occurs at about 240 C. (author)

  15. Lessons learned from a community-academic initiative: the development of a core competency-based training for community-academic initiative community health workers.

    Ruiz, Yumary; Matos, Sergio; Kapadia, Smiti; Islam, Nadia; Cusack, Arthur; Kwong, Sylvia; Trinh-Shevrin, Chau

    2012-12-01

    Despite the importance of community health workers (CHWs) in strategies to reduce health disparities and the call to enhance their roles in research, little information exists on how to prepare CHWs involved in community-academic initiatives (CAIs). Therefore, the New York University Prevention Research Center piloted a CAI-CHW training program. We applied a core competency framework to an existing CHW curriculum and bolstered the curriculum to include research-specific sessions. We employed diverse training methods, guided by adult learning principles and popular education philosophy. Evaluation instruments assessed changes related to confidence, intention to use learned skills, usefulness of sessions, and satisfaction with the training. Results demonstrated that a core competency-based training can successfully affect CHWs' perceived confidence and intentions to apply learned content, and can provide a larger social justice context of their role and work. This program demonstrates that a core competency-based framework coupled with CAI-research-specific skill sessions (1) provides skills that CAI-CHWs intend to use, (2) builds confidence, and (3) provides participants with a more contextualized view of client needs and CHW roles.

  16. The Methodical Bases of Assessment of Innovation Processes in the Sphere of Power Generation with Use of Opportunities of Cognitive Modeling

    Vikhlyaeva Nataliya V.

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the methodical bases of assessing the innovation processes of power generating companies with use of opportunities of cognitive modeling. It is specified that the method of cognitive modeling allows to remove contradictions concerning the interrelationship of the factors determining the innovation processes of the energy generating companies that usually arise when the results of research on the elements of the innovation system are being coordinated. Based on the arguments and practical examples, provided in the article, it was concluded that application of the method of cognitive modeling in the process of assessing the innovative capabilities of energy-generating companies is a sufficiently flexible and effective tool for supporting decision-making on strategic directions of their development.

  17. Expanding the Aperture of Psychological Assessment: Introduction to the Special Section on Innovative Clinical Assessment Technologies and Methods

    Trull, Timothy J.

    2007-01-01

    Contemporary psychological assessment is dominated by tried-and-true methods like clinical interviewing, self-report questionnaires, intellectual assessment, and behavioral observation. These approaches have served as the mainstays of psychological assessment for decades. To be sure, these methods have survived over the years because clinicians…

  18. Drivers of Innovation: From Motivation for Ideation to Assessments and Market Reception of New Product Proposals

    Frederiksen, Marianne Harbo

    empirisk undersøgelse i en stor, multinational virksomhed peger på fire faktorer som værende særligt vigtige i forhold til at få medarbejdere til at engagere sig i den type arbejde: følelsen af præstation opnået gennem det at bidrage, anerkendelse fra kollegaer og overordnede i form af feedback og...... ledelsesinitiativer kan påvirke medarbejdernes motivation for at engagere sig i online idéskabelse. Del II lægger ud med at diskutere og illustrere, hvad produktinnovation er og hvad det ikke er. Dette indbefatter en undersøgelse af, hvordan og om udbredte definitioner på innovation matcher virksomheders overordnede...

  19. Digital innovation through partnership between nature conservation organisations and academia: a qualitative impact assessment.

    Galán-Díaz, Carlos; Edwards, Peter; Nelson, John D; van der Wal, René

    2015-11-01

    Nature conservation organisations increasingly turn to new digital technologies to help deliver conservation objectives. This has led to collaborative forms of working with academia to spearhead digital innovation. Through in-depth interviews with three UK research-council-funded case studies, we show that by working with academics conservation organisations can receive positive and negative impacts, some of which cut across their operations. Positive impacts include new ways of engaging with audiences, improved data workflows, financial benefits, capacity building and the necessary digital infrastructure to help them influence policy. Negative impacts include the time and resources required to learn new skills and sustain new technologies, managing different organisational objectives and shifts in working practices as a result of the new technologies. Most importantly, collaboration with academics was shown to bring the opportunity of a profound change in perspectives on technologies with benefits to the partner organisations and individuals therein.

  20. A Mobile Framework for Competence Evaluation: Innovation Assessment Using Mobile Information Systems

    Marcos Ruano Mayoral

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The environment surrounding organizations is characterized by an increasing necessity of competent personnel but with finite competence level. From the scope of the management of those human resources, one of the most crucial aspects is to be able to measure the competence level of each professional as quickly and precisely as possible. This paper introduces a tool, based on HR-XML standard, to feed competence evaluation with data or evidences that help to fit performance evaluations to the actual performance of the employees. Mobility capabilities in performance evaluation, particularly in the innovation field, involve an inventive contribution to current Competence Management Systems that, due to their lack of flexibility, hinder the full development of the capability to include evidences wherever they may take place, whether it is at work, at client’s office or in a recruitment interview.

  1. Vaccination: Developing and implementing a competency-based-curriculum at the Medical Faculty of LMU Munich

    Vogel, B.

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: In Germany medical students should gain proficiency and specific skills in the vaccination field. Especially important is the efficient communication of scientific results about vaccinations to the community, in order to give professional counseling with a complete overview about therapeutic options.Aim of the project: The aim of this project is to set up a vaccination-related curriculum in the Medical Faculty at the Ludwig-Maximilians-University in Munich. The structure of the curriculum is based on the National catalogue for competency-based learning objectives in the field of vaccination (Nationaler Kompetenzbasierter Lernzielekatalog Medizin NKLM. Through this curriculum, the students will not only acquire the classical educational skills concerning vaccination in theory and practice, but they will also learn how to become independent in the decision-making process and counseling. Moreover, the students will become aware of consequences of action related to this specific topic.Methods: According to defined guidelines, an analysis was performed on courses, which are currently offered by the university. A separate analysis of the NKLM was carried out. Both analyses identified the active courses related to the topic of vaccination as well as the NKLM learning objectives. The match between the topics taught in current courses and the NKLM learning objectives identified gaps concerning the teaching of specific content. Courses were modified in order to implement the missing NKLM learning objectives.Results: These analyses identified 24 vaccination-related courses, which are currently taught at the University. Meanwhile, 35 learning objectives on vaccination were identified in the NKLM catalogue. Four of which were identified as not yet part of the teaching program. In summary, this interdisciplinary work enabled the development of a new vaccination-related curriculum, including 35 learning objectives, which are now implemented in

  2. Assessment of systems codes and their coupling with CFD codes in thermal–hydraulic applications to innovative reactors

    Bandini, G., E-mail: giacomino.bandini@enea.it [Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Sustainable Economic Development (ENEA) (Italy); Polidori, M. [Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Sustainable Economic Development (ENEA) (Italy); Gerschenfeld, A.; Pialla, D.; Li, S. [Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique (CEA) (France); Ma, W.M.; Kudinov, P.; Jeltsov, M.; Kööp, K. [Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) (Sweden); Huber, K.; Cheng, X.; Bruzzese, C.; Class, A.G.; Prill, D.P. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) (Germany); Papukchiev, A. [Gesellschaft für Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) (Germany); Geffray, C.; Macian-Juan, R. [Technische Universität München (TUM) (Germany); Maas, L. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN) (France)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • The assessment of RELAP5, TRACE and CATHARE system codes on integral experiments is presented. • Code benchmark of CATHARE, DYN2B, and ATHLET on PHENIX natural circulation experiment. • Grid-free pool modelling based on proper orthogonal decomposition for system codes is explained. • The code coupling methodologies are explained. • The coupling of several CFD/system codes is tested against integral experiments. - Abstract: The THINS project of the 7th Framework EU Program on nuclear fission safety is devoted to the investigation of crosscutting thermal–hydraulic issues for innovative nuclear systems. A significant effort in the project has been dedicated to the qualification and validation of system codes currently employed in thermal–hydraulic transient analysis for nuclear reactors. This assessment is based either on already available experimental data, or on the data provided by test campaigns carried out in the frame of THINS project activities. Data provided by TALL and CIRCE facilities were used in the assessment of system codes for HLM reactors, while the PHENIX ultimate natural circulation test was used as reference for a benchmark exercise among system codes for sodium-cooled reactor applications. In addition, a promising grid-free pool model based on proper orthogonal decomposition is proposed to overcome the limits shown by the thermal–hydraulic system codes in the simulation of pool-type systems. Furthermore, multi-scale system-CFD solutions have been developed and validated for innovative nuclear system applications. For this purpose, data from the PHENIX experiments have been used, and data are provided by the tests conducted with new configuration of the TALL-3D facility, which accommodates a 3D test section within the primary circuit. The TALL-3D measurements are currently used for the validation of the coupling between system and CFD codes.

  3. New technologies and surgical innovation: five years of a local health technology assessment program in a surgical department.

    Poulin, Paule; Austen, Lea; Kortbeek, John B; Lafrenière, René

    2012-06-01

    There is pressure for surgical departments to introduce new and innovative health technologies in an evidence-based manner while ensuring that they are safe and effective and can be managed with available resources. A local health technology assessment (HTA) program was developed to systematically integrate research evidence with local operational management information and to make recommendations for subsequent decision by the departmental executive committee about whether and under what conditions the technology will be used. The authors present a retrospective analysis of the outcomes of this program as used by the Department of Surgery & Surgical Services in the Calgary Health Region over a 5-year period from December 2005 to December 2010. Of the 68 technologies requested, 15 applications were incomplete and dropped, 12 were approved, 3 were approved for a single case on an urgent/emergent basis, 21 were approved for "clinical audit" for a restricted number of cases with outcomes review, 14 were approved for research use only, and 3 were referred to additional review bodies. Subsequent outcome reports resulted in at least 5 technologies being dropped for failure to perform. Decisions based on local HTA program recommendations were rarely "yes" or "no." Rather, many technologies were given restricted approval with full approval contingent on satisfying certain conditions such as clinical outcomes review, training protocol development, or funding. Thus, innovation could be supported while ensuring safety and effectiveness. This local HTA program can be adapted to a variety of settings and can help bridge the gap between evidence and practice.

  4. The Effect of Government Actions on Environmental Technology Innovation: Applications to the Integrated Assessment of Carbon Sequestration Technologies

    Rubin, E. S.; Hounshell, D. A.; Yeh, S.; Taylor, M.; Schrattenholzer, L.; Riahi, K.; Barreto, L.; Rao, S.

    2004-01-15

    This project seeks to improve the ability of integrated assessment models (IA) to incorporate changes in technology, especially environmental technologies, cost and performance over time. In this report, we present results of research that examines past experience in controlling other major power plant emissions that might serve as a reasonable guide to future rates of technological progress in carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) systems. In particular, we focus on U.S. and worldwide experience with sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) control technologies over the past 30 years, and derive empirical learning rates for these technologies. The patterns of technology innovation are captured by our analysis of patent activities and trends of cost reduction over time. Overall, we found learning rates of 11% for the capital costs of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system for SO{sub 2} control, and 13% for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems for NO{sub x} control. We explore the key factors responsible for the observed trends, especially the development of regulatory policies for SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} control, and their implications for environmental control technology innovation.

  5. Implementation of a competency-based medical education approach in public health and epidemiology training of medical students

    Rachel Dankner

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is increasing agreement among medical educators regarding the importance of improving the integration between public health and clinical education, understanding and implementation of epidemiological methods, and the ability to critically appraise medical literature. The Sackler School of Medicine at Tel-Aviv University revised its public health and preventive medicine curriculum, during 2013–2014, according to the competency-based medical education (CBME approach in training medical students. We describe the revised curriculum, which aimed to strengthen competencies in quantitative research methods, epidemiology, public health and preventive medicine, and health service organization and delivery. Methods We report the process undertaken to establish a relevant 6-year longitudinal curriculum and describe its contents, implementation, and continuous assessment and evaluation. Results Central competencies included: epidemiology and statistics for appraisal of the literature and implementation of research; the application of health promotion principles and health education strategies in disease prevention; the use of an evidence-based approach in clinical and public health decision making; the examination and analysis of disease trends at the population level; and knowledge of the structure of health systems and the role of the physician in these systems. Two new courses, in health promotion, and in public health, were added to the curriculum, and the courses in statistics and epidemiology were joined. Annual evaluation of each course results in continuous revisions of the syllabi as needed, while we continue to monitor the whole curriculum. Conclusions The described revision in a 6 year-medical school training curriculum addresses the currently identified needs in public health. Ongoing feedback from students, and re-evaluation of syllabus by courses teams are held annually. Analysis of student’s written feedbacks

  6. Simulation-Based Performance Assessment: An Innovative Approach to Exploring Understanding of Physical Science Concepts

    Gale, Jessica; Wind, Stefanie; Koval, Jayma; Dagosta, Joseph; Ryan, Mike; Usselman, Marion

    2016-01-01

    This paper illustrates the use of simulation-based performance assessment (PA) methodology in a recent study of eighth-grade students' understanding of physical science concepts. A set of four simulation-based PA tasks were iteratively developed to assess student understanding of an array of physical science concepts, including net force,…

  7. New Ways of Classroom Assessment. New Ways in TESOL Series II. Innovative Classroom Techniques.

    Brown, James Dean, Ed.

    Assessment activities for English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) instruction, contributed by classroom teachers, are organized according to the primary or predominant emphasis of the activity. Those in the first part of the book focus on alternative methods of assessment, including portfolios, journals, logs, and conferences. The second part discusses…

  8. Recreational Vehicle Maintenance and Repair. COM-LINK. Competency Based Vocational Curricula with Basic Skills and Academic Linkages.

    Felice, Michael

    This competency-based module uses the Ocean County (New Jersey) Vocational-Technical Schools curriculum-infused model for infusing basic skills instruction into vocational education. The model demonstrates the relationship of vocational skills to communication, mathematics, and science. The document begins with a philosophy statement; preface; a…

  9. A Competence-Based Science Learning Framework Illustrated through the Study of Natural Hazards and Disaster Risk Reduction

    Oyao, Sheila G.; Holbrook, Jack; Rannikmäe, Miia; Pagunsan, Marmon M.

    2015-01-01

    This article proposes a competence-based learning framework for science teaching, applied to the study of "big ideas", in this case to the study of natural hazards and disaster risk reduction (NH&DRR). The framework focuses on new visions of competence, placing emphasis on nurturing connectedness and behavioral actions toward…

  10. From the Analysis of Work-Processes to Designing Competence-Based Occupational Standards and Vocational Curricula

    Tutlys, Vidmantas; Spöttl, Georg

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to explore methodological and institutional challenges on application of the work-process analysis approach in the design and development of competence-based occupational standards for Lithuania. Design/methodology/approach: The theoretical analysis is based on the review of scientific literature and the analysis of…

  11. Goal, Objectives, and Responsibilities. Competency-Based Education (CBE): Pathways to College, Career, and Life Ready Graduates

    Iowa Department of Education, 2018

    2018-01-01

    In 2012 Senate File 2284 approved competency-based education (CBE). In 2013 House File 215 provided $100,000 to be used as grants to districts/schools participating in a collaborative effort toward CBE pathways for their students and a framework toward statewide implementation. The Iowa CBE Collaborative will engage in collaborative inquiry to…

  12. Building an Evaluation Framework for a Competency-Based Graduate Program at the University Of Southern Mississippi

    Gaudet, Cyndi H.; Annulis, Heather M.; Kmiec, John J., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes an ongoing project to build a comprehensive evaluation framework for the competency-based Master of Science in Workforce Training and Development (MSWTD) program at The University of Southern Mississippi (USM). First, it discusses some trends and issues in evaluating the performance of higher education programs in the United…

  13. Developing eLearning Technologies to Implement Competency Based Medical Education: Experiences from Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences

    Nagunwa, Thomas; Lwoga, Edda

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides the practical experience of developing an eLearning technology as a tool to implement Competency-based Medical Education (CBME) in Tanzania medical universities, with a specific focus on Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences. The paper provides a background to eLearning and the early attempt to adopt it in 2006 at…

  14. Development and Field Test of Competency Based Instructional Material for a Career Mobility Program for Licensed Practical Nurses. Final Report.

    Bergen Community Coll., Paramus, NJ.

    The Associate Degree Nursing Program at Bergen Community College developed and field tested competency-based instructional modules in a program designed to allow licensed practical nurses to qualify to take the certification examination for registered nurses after a year of study. Thirteen licensed practical nurses were enrolled in the first class…

  15. Automotive and Diesel Engine Rebuilding. COM-LINK. Competency Based Vocational Curricula with Basic Skills and Academic Linkages.

    Salvatore, Gerald

    This competency-based module uses the Ocean County (New Jersey) Vocational-Technical Schools curriculum-infused model for infusing basic skills instruction into vocational education. The model demonstrates the relationship of vocational skills to communication, mathematics, and science. The document begins with a philosophy statement; preface; a…

  16. Students' goal orientations, information processing strategies and knowledge development in competence-based pre-vocational secondary education

    Koopman, M.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, learning processes of students in competence-based Pre-Vocational Secondary Education (PVSE; in Dutch vmbo) were investigated. The study aimed at describing the relation between goal orientations, information processing strategies and the development of knowledge of these students.

  17. Competency-Based Education in Three Pilot Programs: What It Is, How It's Implemented, and How It's Working. Brief

    Steele, Jennifer L.; Lewis, Matthew W.; Santibanez, Lucrecia; Faxon-Mills, Susannah; Rudnick, Mollie; Stecher, Brian M.; Hamilton, Laura S.

    2014-01-01

    In 2011, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation extended grants to three educational organizations working to develop or enhance competency-based approaches in large, urbanized school systems. The grant initiative, called Project Mastery, funded the development of technology-enhanced tools, including curriculum materials and online learning…

  18. The Development of a Competency Based Food Preparations Curriculum for High School Special Needs Students in New Castle County, Delaware.

    Stewart, Richard Lee

    A competency-based culinary arts food preparation curriculum for Delaware high school students with special needs was developed during a project that included the following activities: review of the state's existing culinary arts curriculum for regular education students; incumbent worker survey administered to 24 restaurant…

  19. Students’ personal professional theories in competence-based vocational education: the construction of personal knowledge through internalisation and socialisation

    Schaap, Harmen; De Bruijn, Elly; Van der Schaaf, Marieke; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2009-01-01

    Schaap, H., De Bruijn, E., Van der Schaaf, M. F., & Kirschner, P. A. (2009). Students' personal professional theories in competence-based vocational education: the construction of personal knowledge through internalisation and socialisation. Journal of Vocational Education & Training, 61(4),

  20. Students' Personal Professional Theories in Competence-Based Vocational Education: The Construction of Personal Knowledge through Internalisation and Socialisation

    Schaap, H.; de Bruijn, E.; Van der Schaaf, M. F.; Kirschner, P. A.

    2009-01-01

    Competence-based vocational education is based on a constructivist learning paradigm, where the development of students' personal professional knowledge is emphasised. However, there is a lack of insight into how students construct their own professional knowledge and what the content and nature of personal professional knowledge is. This article…

  1. State Policies to Support Competency-Based Education for Overage, Under-Credited Students. Ask the CCRS Center

    Tomasello, Jenna; Brand, Betsy

    2016-01-01

    How can states ensure that students who are overage or under-credit (OA/UC) not only graduate high school but are prepared for college or the workforce? Competency-based education (CBE) is one emerging strategy for addressing the needs of at-risk youth. CBE can address the needs of at-risk students because it is personalized to individual…

  2. The Constraints of Ghanaian Polytechnics in Adopting Competency Based Training (CBT): The Case of a Pilot-Tested Programme

    Alhassan, Munkaila; Habib, Abdallah Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Polytechnics in Ghana view Competency Based Training (CBT) as a major intervention to the perennial constraints confronting its education and training. On the basis of this, and by government policy, a pilot programme of CBT was instituted in all the 10 polytechnics of Ghana, and was pilot tested in, at least, one department. Agricultural…

  3. Implementation of a competency-based residency curriculum : experiences from a resource-limited environment in the Caribbean

    Busari, Jamiu O.; Verhagen, Eduard A. A.; Muskiet, Fred D.; Duits, Ashley J.

    2008-01-01

    Background: The introduction of competency-based curricula in institutions situated in resource-limited environments is likely to pose new challenges for the implementation process. The St. Elisabeth Hospital (SEHOS) in Curacao, Dutch Caribbean, is affiliated to university teaching hospitals in the

  4. Assessing 15 proposals for promoting innovation and access to medicines globally.

    Hoffman, Steven J; So, Karen

    2014-01-01

    There is widespread recognition that the existing global systems for innovation and access to medicines need reform. Billions of people do not have access to the medicines they need, and market failures prevent new drugs from being developed for diseases that primarily affect the global poor. The World Health Organization's Consultative Expert Working Group on Research and Development: Financing and Coordination (CEWG) analyzed numerous proposals for reform. The aim of this article is to build on these previous inquiries. We conducted a structured analysis that grouped proposals into five broad opportunities for global policy reform to help researchers and decision makers to meaningfully evaluate each proposal in comparison with similar proposals. Proposals were also analyzed along three important dimensions-potential health impact, financial implications, and political feasibility-further facilitating the comparison and application of this information. Upon analysis, no one solution was deemed a panacea, as many (often competing) considerations need to be taken into account. However, some proposals, particularly product development partnership and prizes, appeared more promising and feasible at this time and deserve further attention. More research is needed into the effectiveness of these mechanisms and their transferability across jurisdictions. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Dynamical assessment for evolutions of Atomic-Multinology (AM) in technology innovation using social network theory

    Woo, Taeho

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The popularity of AM is analyzed by the social network theory. ► The graphical and colorful configurations are used for the meaning of the incident. ► The new industrial field is quantified by dynamical investigations. ► AM can be successfully used in nuclear industry for technology innovation. ► The method could be used for other industries. - Abstract: The technology evolution is investigated. The proposed Atomic Multinology (AM) is quantified by the dynamical method incorporated with Monte-Carlo method. There are three kinds of the technologies as the info-technology (IT), nano-technology (NT), and bio-technology (BT), which are applied to the nuclear technology. AM is initiated and modeled for the dynamic quantifications. The social network algorithm is used in the dynamical simulation for the management of the projects. The result shows that the successfulness of the AM increases, where the 60 years are the investigated period. The values of the dynamical simulation increase in later stage, which means that the technology is matured as time goes on.

  6. Competency-based medical education and continuing professional development: A conceptualization for change.

    Lockyer, Jocelyn; Bursey, Ford; Richardson, Denyse; Frank, Jason R; Snell, Linda; Campbell, Craig

    2017-06-01

    Competency-based medical education (CBME) is as important in continuing professional development (CPD) as at any other stage of a physician's career. Principles of CBME have the potential to revolutionize CPD. Transitioning to CBME-based CPD will require a cultural change to gain commitment from physicians, their employers and institutions, CPD providers, professional organizations, and medical regulators. It will require learning to be aligned with professional and workplace standards. Practitioners will need to develop the expertise to systematically examine their own clinical performance data, identify performance improvement opportunities and possibilities, and develop a plan to address areas of concern. Health care facilities and systems will need to produce data on a regular basis and to develop and train CPD educators who can work with physician groups. Stakeholders, such as medical regulatory authorities who are responsible for licensing physicians and other standard-setting bodies that credential and develop maintenance-of-certification systems, will need to change their paradigm of competency enhancement through CPD.

  7. A test of the California competency-based differentiated role model.

    Keating, Sarah B; Rutledge, Dana N; Sargent, Arlene; Walker, Polly

    2003-01-01

    To address the incongruence between the expectations of nursing service and education in California, the Education Industry Interface Task Force of the California Strategic Planning Committee for Nursing developed descriptions to assist employers and educators in clearly differentiating practice and educational competencies. The completion of the Competency-Based Role Differentiation Model resulted in the need to test the model for its utility in the service setting, in education, and for career planning for nurses. Three alpha demonstration sites were selected based on representative geographical regions of California. The sites were composed of tri-partnerships consisting of a medical center, an associate degree in nursing program, and a baccalaureate nursing program. Observers rated senior students and new graduates in medical-surgical units on their behaviors in teacher and leadership care provider and care coordinator roles. The alpha demonstration study results were as expected. That is, senior students practice predominantly at a novice level in teacher and management/leadership care provider functions and new graduates practice predominately at the competent level. New graduates are more likely to take on novice and competent care coordinator roles. The CBRDM may be useful for practice and education settings to evaluate student and nurse performance, to define role expectations, and to identify the preparation necessary for the roles. It is useful for all of nursing as it continues to define its levels of practice and their relationship to on-the-job performance, curriculum development, and carrier planning.

  8. Competency based teaching of college physics: The philosophy and the practice

    Rajapaksha, Ajith; Hirsch, Andrew S.

    2017-12-01

    The practice of learning physics contributes to the development of many transdisciplinary skills learners are able to exercise independent of the physics discipline. However, the standard practices of physics instruction do not explicitly include the monitoring or evaluation of these skills. In a competency-based (CB) learning model, the skills (competencies) are clearly defined and evaluated. We envisioned that a CB approach, where the underlying competencies are highlighted within the instructional process, would be more suitable to teaching physics to learners with diversified disciplinary interests. A model CB course curriculum was developed and practiced at Purdue University to teach introductory college physics to learners who were majoring in the technology disciplines. The experiment took place from the spring semester in 2015 until the spring semester in 2017. The practice provided a means to monitor and evaluate a set of developmental transdisciplinary competencies that underlie the learning of force and motion concepts in classical physics. Additionally, the CB practice contributed to produce substantial physics learning outcomes among learners who were underprepared to learn physics in college.

  9. Competency based teaching of college physics: The philosophy and the practice

    Ajith Rajapaksha

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The practice of learning physics contributes to the development of many transdisciplinary skills learners are able to exercise independent of the physics discipline. However, the standard practices of physics instruction do not explicitly include the monitoring or evaluation of these skills. In a competency-based (CB learning model, the skills (competencies are clearly defined and evaluated. We envisioned that a CB approach, where the underlying competencies are highlighted within the instructional process, would be more suitable to teaching physics to learners with diversified disciplinary interests. A model CB course curriculum was developed and practiced at Purdue University to teach introductory college physics to learners who were majoring in the technology disciplines. The experiment took place from the spring semester in 2015 until the spring semester in 2017. The practice provided a means to monitor and evaluate a set of developmental transdisciplinary competencies that underlie the learning of force and motion concepts in classical physics. Additionally, the CB practice contributed to produce substantial physics learning outcomes among learners who were underprepared to learn physics in college.

  10. Implementing competency based admissions at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine.

    Kerrigan, Noreen; Akabas, Myles H; Betzler, Thomas F; Castaldi, Maria; Kelly, Mary S; Levy, Adam S; Reichgott, Michael J; Ruberman, Louise; Dolan, Siobhan M

    2016-01-01

    The Albert Einstein College of Medicine (Einstein) was founded in 1955 during an era of limited access to medical school for women, racial minorities, and many religious and ethnic groups. Located in the Bronx, NY, Einstein seeks to educate physicians in an environment of state-of-the-art scientific inquiry while simultaneously fulfilling a deep commitment to serve its community by providing the highest quality clinical care. A founding principle of Einstein, the basis upon which Professor Einstein agreed to allow the use of his name, was that admission to the student body would be based entirely on merit. To accomplish this, Einstein has long used a 'holistic' approach to the evaluation of its applicants, actively seeking a diverse student body. More recently, in order to improve its ability to identify students with the potential to be outstanding physicians, who will both advance medical knowledge and serve the pressing health needs of a diverse community, the Committee on Admissions reexamined and restructured the requirements for admission. These have now been categorized as four 'Admissions Competencies' that an applicant must demonstrate. They include: 1) cocurricular activities and relevant experiences; 2) communication skills; 3) personal and professional development; and 4) knowledge. The purpose of this article is to describe the process that resulted in the introduction and implementation of this competency based approach to the admission process.

  11. Competency-based training model for human resource management and development in public sector

    Prabawati, I.; Meirinawati; AOktariyanda, T.

    2018-01-01

    Human Resources (HR) is a very important factor in an organization so that human resources are required to have the ability, skill or competence in order to be able to carry out the vision and mission of the organization. Competence includes a number of attributes attached to the individual which is a combination of knowledge, skills, and behaviors that can be used as a mean to improve performance. Concerned to the demands of human resources that should have the knowledge, skills or abilities, it is necessary to the development of human resources in public organizations. One form of human resource development is Competency-Based Training (CBT). CBT focuses on three issues, namely skills, competencies, and competency standard. There are 5 (five) strategies in the implementation of CBT, namely: organizational scanning, strategic planning, competency profiling, competency gap analysis, and competency development. Finally, through CBT the employees within the organization can reduce or eliminate the differences between existing performance with a potential performance that can improve the knowledge, expertise, and skills that are very supportive in achieving the vision and mission of the organization.

  12. Clinical reasoning in nursing, a think-aloud study using virtual patients - a base for an innovative assessment.

    Forsberg, Elenita; Ziegert, Kristina; Hult, Håkan; Fors, Uno

    2014-04-01

    In health-care education, it is important to assess the competencies that are essential for the professional role. To develop clinical reasoning skills is crucial for nursing practice and therefore an important learning outcome in nursing education programmes. Virtual patients (VPs) are interactive computer simulations of real-life clinical scenarios and have been suggested for use not only for learning, but also for assessment of clinical reasoning. The aim of this study was to investigate how experienced paediatric nurses reason regarding complex VP cases and how they make clinical decisions. The study was also aimed to give information about possible issues that should be assessed in clinical reasoning exams for post-graduate students in diploma specialist paediatric nursing education. The information from this study is believed to be of high value when developing scoring and grading models for a VP-based examination for the specialist diploma in paediatric nursing education. Using the think-aloud method, data were collected from 30 RNs working in Swedish paediatric departments, and child or school health-care centres. Content analysis was used to analyse the data. The results indicate that experienced nurses try to consolidate their hypotheses by seeing a pattern and judging the value of signs, symptoms, physical examinations, laboratory tests and radiology. They show high specific competence but earlier experience of similar cases was also of importance for the decision making. The nurses thought it was an innovative assessment focusing on clinical reasoning and clinical decision making. They thought it was an enjoyable way to be assessed and that all three main issues could be assessed using VPs. In conclusion, VPs seem to be a possible model for assessing the clinical reasoning process and clinical decision making, but how to score and grade such exams needs further research. © 2013.

  13. Seaweed as innovative feedstock for energy and feed – Evaluating the impacts through a Life Cycle Assessment

    Seghetta, Michele; Romeo, Daina; D'Este, Martina

    2017-01-01

    a comparative Life Cycle Assessment of five scenarios identifying the critical features affecting resource efficiency and environmental performance of the systems with the aim of providing decision support for the design of future industrial scale production processes. The results show that all scenarios......Offshore cultivation of seaweed provides an innovative feedstock for biobased products supporting blue growth in northern Europe. This paper analyzes two alternative exploitation pathways: energy and protein production. The first pathway is based on anaerobic digestion of seaweed which is converted...... into biogas, for production of electricity and heat, and digestate, used as fertilizer; the second pathway uses seaweed hydrolysate as a substrate for cultivation of heterotrophic microalgae. As a result the seaweed sugars are consumed while new proteins are produced enhancing the total output. We performed...

  14. A Hybrid Multi-Criteria Decision Model for Technological Innovation Capability Assessment: Research on Thai Automotive Parts Firms

    Sumrit Detcharat

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficient appraisal of technological innovation capabilities (TICs of enterprises is an important factor to enhance competitiveness. This study aims to evaluate and rank TICs evaluation criteria in order to provide a practical insight of systematic analysis by gathering the qualified experts’ opinions combined with three methods of multi-criteria decision making approach. Firstly, Fuzzy Delphi method is used to screen TICs evaluation criteria from the recent published researches. Secondly, the Analytic Hierarchy Process is utilized to compute the relative important weights. Lastly, the VIKOR method is used to rank the enterprises based on TICs evaluation criteria. An empirical study is applied for Thai automotive parts firms to illustrate the proposed methods. This study found that the interaction between criteria is essential and influences TICs; furthermore, this ranking development of TICs assessment is also one of key management tools to simply facilitate and offer a new mindset for managements of other related industries.

  15. EVALUATION AND PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT OF INNOVATIVE LOW-VOC CONTACT ADHESIVES IN WOOD LAMINATING OPERATIONS

    The report gives results of an evaluation and assessment of the perfor-mance, economics, and emission reduction potential upon application of low-volatile organic compound (VOC) waterborne contact adhesive formulations specifically ina manual laminating operation for assembling s...

  16. Process Skill Assessment Instrument: Innovation to measure student’s learning result holistically

    Azizah, K. N.; Ibrahim, M.; Widodo, W.

    2018-01-01

    Science process skills (SPS) are very important skills for students. However, the fact that SPS is not being main concern in the primary school learning is undeniable. This research aimed to develop a valid, practical, and effective assessment instrument to measure student’s SPS. Assessment instruments comprise of worksheet and test. This development research used one group pre-test post-test design. Data were obtained with validation, observation, and test method to investigate validity, practicality, and the effectivenss of the instruments. Results showed that the validity of assessment instruments is very valid, the reliability is categorized as reliable, student SPS activities have a high percentage, and there is significant improvement on student’s SPS score. It can be concluded that assessment instruments of SPS are valid, practical, and effective to be used to measure student’s SPS result.

  17. Nutrient removal using biosorption activated media: Preliminary biogeochemical assessment of an innovative stormwater infiltration basin

    O'Reilly, Andrew M.; Wanielista, Martin P.; Chang, Ni-Bin; Xuan, Zhemin; Harris, Willie G.

    2012-01-01

    Soil beneath a stormwater infiltration basin receiving runoff from a 23 ha predominantly residential watershed in north-central Florida, USA, was amended using biosorption activated media (BAM) to study the effectiveness of this technology in reducing inputs of nitrogen and phosphorus to groundwater. The functionalized soil amendment BAM consists of a 1.0:1.9:4.1 mixture (by volume) of tire crumb (to increase sorption capacity), silt and clay (to increase soil moisture retention), and sand (to promote sufficient infiltration), which was applied to develop an innovative stormwater infiltration basin utilizing nutrient reduction and flood control sub-basins. Comparison of nitrate/chloride (NO 3 − /Cl − ) ratios for the shallow groundwater indicates that prior to using BAM, NO 3 − concentrations were substantially influenced by nitrification or variations in NO 3 − input. In contrast, for the new basin utilizing BAM, NO 3 − /Cl − ratios indicate minor nitrification and NO 3 − losses with the exception of one summer sample that indicated a 45% loss. Biogeochemical indicators (denitrifier activity derived from real-time polymerase chain reaction and variations in major ions, nutrients, dissolved and soil gases, and stable isotopes) suggest that NO 3 − losses are primarily attributable to denitrification, whereas dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium is a minor process. Denitrification was likely occurring intermittently in anoxic microsites in the unsaturated zone, which was enhanced by the increased soil moisture within the BAM layer and resultant reductions in surface/subsurface oxygen exchange that produced conditions conducive to increased denitrifier activity. Concentrations of total dissolved phosphorus and orthophosphate (PO 4 3− ) were reduced by more than 70% in unsaturated zone soil water, with the largest decreases in the BAM layer where sorption was the most likely mechanism for removal. Post-BAM PO 4 3− /Cl − ratios for shallow

  18. Innovation af innovation

    Harste, Gorm

    2009-01-01

    , at innovation af innovationen forsøges gennemført på en måde, hvor tiden kræves at forholde sig til sin egen tidslighed i form af fremtid, nutid, fortid og ikke mindst i form af samtidighed. I tiden skal vi iagttage, hvordan vi iagttager tiden. Vi dobbelt-koder tiden på samme måde, som forskning forsker i...... organisationssystemerne. De to typer systemer kan noget helt bestemt med fænomenet tid. De kan synkronisere. Analyseres organisationssystemer ser vi, imidlertid at innovation kræver ro. Stærkt innovative systemer er militærsystemet og kunstsystemet, der også inddrages, og hvor vi ser paradokset mellem innovation og...... involution. Tid er med et medium og ikke et lufttomt rum. Tid er end ikke en gasart, men udgør et solidt fluidum, som samfundet bader i og flyder i, konstant i bevægelse. Reformer forudsætter former, og innovation forudsætter involution. Kun sådan muliggøres evolution....

  19. Avaliando Sistemas de Remumeração Baseados em Habilidades e Competências: a visão dos profissionais de gestão de pessoasAssessing Skills and Competency Based Pay Systems: the view of human resourcesEvaluando Sistemas de Remuneración Basados en Habilidades y Competencias: la visión de los profesionales de gestión de personas

    CARDOSO, Roberto Luiz

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available RESUMOO objetivo do presente artigo é aprofundar o conhecimento sobre sistemas de remuneração baseados em habilidades e competências implantados em empresas brasileiras, confrontando-os com os fundamentos apresentados na literatura pertinente e investigando-se a efetividade dos seus resultados. Para tanto, foi realizada uma pesquisa junto a sete empresas (São Paulo, Rio de Janeiro e Paraná, entrevistando-se os gerentes de Remuneração ou de Gestão de Pessoas sobre suas opiniões a respeito das principais dificuldades, objetivos iniciais, deficiências e fatores restritivos à adoção de sistemas de remuneração dessa natureza, configurando-se uma metodologia de casos múltiplos. Os resultados não só confirmam as principais recomendações teóricas e cuidados a serem observados na concepção e implantação desses sistemas, mas também apontaram para qual sentido os esforços de melhoria, aperfeiçoamento e ampliação devem se voltar, caso se deseje aumentar a eficácia dessa abordagem para a determinação da remuneração de profissionais detentores de conhecimento nas organizações.ABSTRACTTThis article is aimed at deepening the knowledge about skill and competence pay systems implemented by Brazilian organizations, comparing them to assumptions underlying current literature and looking for research findings about their effectiveness. A field research was conducted in seven major organizations (located at the states of Sao Paulo, Rio de Janeiro and Paraná in which Compensation or Human Resources managers were interviewed on their perceptions and opinions about the main difficulties, intended purposes, problems during implementation as well as barriers for the adoption of this kind of pay systems, characterizing a study methodology based on multiple cases. Results not only confirm major theoretical recommendations and key aspects to be observed during the creation and implementation of skills and competence based pay systems

  20. Patient-generated subjective global assessment: Innovation from paper to digital app

    Ottery, Faith D.; Kasenic, Suzanne; Sealy, Martine J.; DeBolt, Susan P.; Isenring, Elizabeth; Jager-Wittenaar, Harriët

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment (PG-SGA), including the PG-SGA Short Form (SF, aka ‘abridged’), was originally developed in the mid 1990’s as a scored, patient self-report, paperbased instrument and has been widely validated. The PG-SGA (SF) has been used for screening, assessment and monitoring, triageing for multimodal intervention and for evaluation of clinical and health economic outcomes. There have been ad hoc translations, often with permission of the origin...

  1. Orchestrating innovation

    Berkers, F.T.H.M.; Klein Woolthuis, R.J.A.; Boer, J. de

    2015-01-01

    Orchestrating Innovation increases the probability of success, minimizing the probability of failure of technological innovations by creating sustained societal and economic value. Orchestrating innovation propagates to take into account and actively involve all relevant stakeholders of the (future)

  2. Innovative Training for Occupational Health and Infection Control Workplace Assessment in Health Care

    O'Hara, Lyndsay; Bryce, Elizabeth Ann; Scharf, Sydney; Yassi, Annalee

    2012-01-01

    A user-friendly, high quality workplace assessment field guide and an accompanying worksheet are invaluable tools for recognizing hazards in the hospital environment. These tools ensure that both front line workers as well as health and safety and infection control professionals can systematically evaluate hazards and formulate recommendations.…

  3. Innovative probabilistic risk assessment applications: barrier impairments and fracture toughness. Panel Discussion

    Osterman, Michael; Root, Steven; Li, F.; Modarres, Mohammad; Reinhart, F. Mark; Bradley, Biff; Calhoun, David J.

    2001-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: New probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) applications promise to improve the overall safety and efficiency of nuclear plant operations. This discussion will explore the use of PRA in evaluating barrier integrity with respect to the consequences of natural phenomena such as tornadoes, floods, and harsh environments. Additionally, the session will explore proposals to improve fracture toughness techniques using PRA. (authors)

  4. Patient-generated subjective global assessment : innovation from paper to digital app

    Ottery, Faith D.; Isenring, Elizabeth; Kasenic, Suzanne; DeBolt, Susan P.; Sealy, Martine; Jager-Wittenaar, Harriët

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment (PG-SGA), including the PG-SGA Short Form (SF, aka ‘abridged’), was originally developed in the mid 1990’s as a scored, patient self-report, paperbased instrument and has been widely validated. The PG-SGA (SF) has been used for screening,

  5. Patient-generated subjective global assessment : Innovation from paper to digital app

    Faith D. Ottery; Suzanne Kasenic; Martine J. Sealy; Susan P. DeBolt; Elizabeth Isenring; Dr. Harriët Jager-Wittenaar

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment (PG-SGA), including the PG-SGA Short Form (SF, aka ‘abridged’), was originally developed in the mid 1990’s as a scored, patient self-report, paperbased instrument and has been widely validated. The PG-SGA (SF) has been used for screening,

  6. THE FLAG: A Web Resource of Innovative Assessment Tools for Faculty in College Science, Mathematics, Engineering, and Technology

    Zeilik, M.; Mathieu, R. D.; National InstituteScience Education; College Level-One Team

    2000-12-01

    Even the most dedicated college faculty often discover that their students fail to learn what was taught in their courses and that much of what students do learn is quickly forgotten after the final exam. To help college faculty improve student learning in college Science, Mathematics, Engineering and Technology (SMET), the College Level - One Team of the National Institute for Science Education has created the "FLAG" a Field-tested Learning Assessment Guide for SMET faculty. Developed with funding from the National Science Foundation, the FLAG presents in guidebook format a diverse and robust collection of field-tested classroom assessment techniques (CATs), with supporting information on how to apply them in the classroom. Faculty can download the tools and techniques from the website, which also provides a goals clarifier, an assessment primer, a searchable database, and links to additional resources. The CATs and tools have been reviewed by an expert editorial board and the NISE team. These assessment strategies can help faculty improve the learning environments in their SMET courses especially the crucial introductory courses that most strongly shape students' college learning experiences. In addition, the FLAG includes the web-based Student Assessment of Learning Gains. The SALG offers a convenient way to evaluate the impact of your courses on students. It is based on findings that students' estimates of what they gained are more reliable and informative than their observations of what they liked about the course or teacher. It offers accurate feedback on how well the different aspects of teaching helped the students to learn. Students complete the SALG online after a generic template has been modified to fit the learning objectives and activities of your course. The results are presented to the teacher as summary statistics automatically. The FLAG can be found at the NISE "Innovations in SMET Education" website at www.wcer.wisc.edu/nise/cl1

  7. An Innovation Systems Assessment of the Australian Biofuel Industry. Policy and Private Sector Implications

    Nielsen, Jason D.

    2006-07-15

    A strong biofuel industry in Australia has the potential to provide numerous benefits to the nation and its peoples. The benefits include; reduced emissions of greenhouse gases and harmful particulate matter, a boost to rural development goals, enhanced fuel security and a lower balance of payments. For biofuels to be seriously considered as alternatives to traditional petroleum based automotive fuels they must be economically viable. The findings from a series of Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics (ABARE) investigations suggest that ethanol and biodiesel production would be economically viable, in the Australian context, with oil prices in the range of 30-40 USD a barrel. Despite the price of oil being in or above this range for over two years a strong home grown biofuel industry has failed to develop in Australia. The purpose of this master's thesis therefore is to identify the critical issues facing biofuel industry development in Australian and to propose possible policy and private sector strategies for dealing with them. The analysis was done in the following three steps; the first was to map the development of the ethanol and biodiesel industries, the second was to analyse the performance of the industries overtime and the third was to identify the mechanisms which have either induced or blocked their growth. The strategies proposed by this thesis were derived from analysing the inducing and blocking mechanisms and the related issues. The innovation systems approach was chosen because of its ability to provide insights into key industry players, their network interactions and the institutional setup within which they work together to develop, diffuse and use their products. The data needed for the analysis stated above included information related to the development, diffusion and use of ethanol and biodiesel; that is, details about the industry actors and their activities, industry networks, product standards, excise arrangements

  8. An Innovation Systems Assessment of the Australian Biofuel Industry. Policy and Private Sector Implications

    Nielsen, Jason D

    2006-07-15

    A strong biofuel industry in Australia has the potential to provide numerous benefits to the nation and its peoples. The benefits include; reduced emissions of greenhouse gases and harmful particulate matter, a boost to rural development goals, enhanced fuel security and a lower balance of payments. For biofuels to be seriously considered as alternatives to traditional petroleum based automotive fuels they must be economically viable. The findings from a series of Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics (ABARE) investigations suggest that ethanol and biodiesel production would be economically viable, in the Australian context, with oil prices in the range of 30-40 USD a barrel. Despite the price of oil being in or above this range for over two years a strong home grown biofuel industry has failed to develop in Australia. The purpose of this master's thesis therefore is to identify the critical issues facing biofuel industry development in Australian and to propose possible policy and private sector strategies for dealing with them. The analysis was done in the following three steps; the first was to map the development of the ethanol and biodiesel industries, the second was to analyse the performance of the industries overtime and the third was to identify the mechanisms which have either induced or blocked their growth. The strategies proposed by this thesis were derived from analysing the inducing and blocking mechanisms and the related issues. The innovation systems approach was chosen because of its ability to provide insights into key industry players, their network interactions and the institutional setup within which they work together to develop, diffuse and use their products. The data needed for the analysis stated above included information related to the development, diffusion and use of ethanol and biodiesel; that is, details about the industry actors and their activities, industry networks, product standards, excise arrangements

  9. An Innovation Systems Assessment of the Australian Biofuel Industry. Policy and Private Sector Implications

    Nielsen, Jason D.

    2006-07-01

    A strong biofuel industry in Australia has the potential to provide numerous benefits to the nation and its peoples. The benefits include; reduced emissions of greenhouse gases and harmful particulate matter, a boost to rural development goals, enhanced fuel security and a lower balance of payments. For biofuels to be seriously considered as alternatives to traditional petroleum based automotive fuels they must be economically viable. The findings from a series of Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics (ABARE) investigations suggest that ethanol and biodiesel production would be economically viable, in the Australian context, with oil prices in the range of 30-40 USD a barrel. Despite the price of oil being in or above this range for over two years a strong home grown biofuel industry has failed to develop in Australia. The purpose of this master's thesis therefore is to identify the critical issues facing biofuel industry development in Australian and to propose possible policy and private sector strategies for dealing with them. The analysis was done in the following three steps; the first was to map the development of the ethanol and biodiesel industries, the second was to analyse the performance of the industries overtime and the third was to identify the mechanisms which have either induced or blocked their growth. The strategies proposed by this thesis were derived from analysing the inducing and blocking mechanisms and the related issues. The innovation systems approach was chosen because of its ability to provide insights into key industry players, their network interactions and the institutional setup within which they work together to develop, diffuse and use their products. The data needed for the analysis stated above included information related to the development, diffusion and use of ethanol and biodiesel; that is, details about the industry actors and their activities, industry networks, product standards, excise arrangements

  10. Academic Primer Series: Key Papers About Competency-Based Medical Education

    Robert Cooney

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Competency-based medical education (CBME presents a paradigm shift in medical training. This outcome-based education movement has triggered substantive changes across the globe. Since this transition is only beginning, many faculty members may not have experience with CBME nor a solid foundation in the grounding literature. We identify and summarize key papers to help faculty members learn more about CBME. Methods: Based on the online discussions of the 2016–2017 ALiEM Faculty Incubator program, a series of papers on the topic of CBME was developed. Augmenting this list with suggestions by a guest expert and by an open call on Twitter for other important papers, we were able to generate a list of 21 papers in total. Subsequently, we used a modified Delphi study methodology to narrow the list to key papers that describe the importance and significance for educators interested in learning about CBME. To determine the most impactful papers, the mixed junior and senior faculty authorship group used three-round voting methodology based upon the Delphi method. Results: Summaries of the five most highly rated papers on the topic of CBME, as determined by this modified Delphi approach, are presented in this paper. Major themes include a definition of core CBME themes, CBME principles to consider in the design of curricula, a history of the development of the CBME movement, and a rationale for changes to accreditation with CBME. The application of the study findings to junior faculty and faculty developers is discussed. Conclusion: We present five key papers on CBME that junior faculty members and faculty experts identified as essential to faculty development. These papers are a mix of foundational and explanatory papers that may provide a basis from which junior faculty members may build upon as they help to implement CBME programs.

  11. Academic Primer Series: Key Papers About Competency-Based Medical Education.

    Cooney, Robert; Chan, Teresa M; Gottlieb, Michael; Abraham, Michael; Alden, Sylvia; Mongelluzzo, Jillian; Pasirstein, Michael; Sherbino, Jonathan

    2017-06-01

    Competency-based medical education (CBME) presents a paradigm shift in medical training. This outcome-based education movement has triggered substantive changes across the globe. Since this transition is only beginning, many faculty members may not have experience with CBME nor a solid foundation in the grounding literature. We identify and summarize key papers to help faculty members learn more about CBME. Based on the online discussions of the 2016-2017 ALiEM Faculty Incubator program, a series of papers on the topic of CBME was developed. Augmenting this list with suggestions by a guest expert and by an open call on Twitter for other important papers, we were able to generate a list of 21 papers in total. Subsequently, we used a modified Delphi study methodology to narrow the list to key papers that describe the importance and significance for educators interested in learning about CBME. To determine the most impactful papers, the mixed junior and senior faculty authorship group used three-round voting methodology based upon the Delphi method. Summaries of the five most highly rated papers on the topic of CBME, as determined by this modified Delphi approach, are presented in this paper. Major themes include a definition of core CBME themes, CBME principles to consider in the design of curricula, a history of the development of the CBME movement, and a rationale for changes to accreditation with CBME. The application of the study findings to junior faculty and faculty developers is discussed. We present five key papers on CBME that junior faculty members and faculty experts identified as essential to faculty development. These papers are a mix of foundational and explanatory papers that may provide a basis from which junior faculty members may build upon as they help to implement CBME programs.

  12. Development of the competency-based medical curriculum for the new Augsburg University Medical School

    Härtl, Anja

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim: With the resolution from April 28, 2014, the Bavarian state government in Germany decided to found a new medical school at Augsburg University, thereby requiring the development of a competency-based medical curriculum.Methods: Two interdisciplinary groups developed a spiral curriculum (following Harden employing the model of Thumser-Dauth & Öchsner. The curriculum focuses on specifically defined competencies: medical expertise, independent scientific reasoning, argumentation and scholarship, as well as communication skills.Results: The spiral curriculum was developed as a hybrid curriculum. Its modular structure incorporates the mandatory subjects required by the German regulations for medical licensure (Approbationsordnung into organ- and system-centered blocks which are integrated both horizontally and vertically. Basic preclinical sciences are covered in the blocks “Movement,” “Balance” and “Contact.” The clinical sciences are organized according to six pillars (conservative medicine, surgical medicine, men’s-women’s-children’s medicine, the senses, the nervous system and the mind, and general medicine which students revisit three times each over the course of the program. A longitudinal clinical course incorporates interdisciplinary education. A particular focus is on scientific education encompassing a longitudinal course in the sciences (including interdisciplinary classes with other university departments, block practicums, and two scientific projects.Conclusion: It is not only the degree of integration und intensity of the Augsburg University undergraduate medical degree program, but also its targeted advancement of academic, social and communication skills that have not yet been realized to such an extent elsewhere in Germany. On July 8, 2016, the German Council of Science and Humanities unanimously gave this concept a positive evaluation. Future research will examine and evaluate the Augsburg medical curriculum

  13. From time-based to competency-based standards: core transitional competencies in plastic surgery.

    Lutz, Kristina; Yazdani, Arjang; Ross, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    Competency-based medical education is becoming increasingly prevalent and is likely to be mandated by the Royal College in the near future. The objective of this study was to define the core technical competencies that should be possessed by plastic surgery residents as they transition into their senior (presently postgraduate year 3) years of training. A list of potential core competencies was generated using a modified Delphi method that included the investigators and 6 experienced, academic plastic surgeons from across Canada and the United States. Generated items were divided into 7 domains: basic surgical skills, anesthesia, hand surgery, cutaneous surgery, esthetic surgery, breast surgery, and craniofacial surgery. Members of the Delphi group were asked to rank particular skills on a 4-point scale with anchored descriptors. Item reduction resulted in a survey consisting of 48 skills grouped into the aforementioned domains. This self-administered survey was distributed to all Canadian program directors (n = 11) via e-mail for validation and further item reduction. The response rate was 100% (11/11). Using the average rankings of program directors, 26 "core" skills were identified. There was agreement of core skills across all domains except for breast surgery and esthetic surgery. Of them, 7 skills were determined to be above the level of a trainee at this stage; a further 15 skills were agreed to be important, but not core, competencies. Overall, 26 competencies have been identified as "core" for plastic surgery residents to possess as they begin their senior, on-service years. The nature of these skills makes them suitable for teaching in a formal, simulated environment, which would ensure that all plastic surgery trainees are competent in these tasks as they transition to their senior years of residency. Copyright © 2014 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A consortium approach to competency-based undergraduate medical education in Uganda: process, opportunities and challenges.

    Kiguli, Sarah; Mubuuke, Roy; Baingana, Rhona; Kijjambu, Stephen; Maling, Samuel; Waako, Paul; Obua, Celestino; Ovuga, Emilio; Kaawa-Mafigiri, David; Nshaho, Jonathan; Kiguli-Malwadde, Elsie; Bollinger, Robert; Sewankambo, Nelson

    2014-01-01

    Uganda, like the rest of Africa, is faced with serious health challenges including human immunodeficiency virus infection/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS), other infectious diseases and increasing non-communicable diseases, yet it has a significant shortage of health workers. Even the few health workers available may lack desired competencies required to address current and future health challenges. Reducing Uganda's disease burden and addressing health challenges requires Ugandan medical schools to produce health workers with the necessary competencies. This study describes the process which a consortium of Ugandan medical schools and the Medical Education Partnership for Equitable Services to all Ugandans (MESAU) undertook to define the required competencies of graduating doctors in Uganda and implement competency-based medical education (CBME). A retrospective qualitative study was conducted in which document analysis was used to collect data employing pre-defined checklists, in a desktop or secondary review of various documents. These included reports of MESAU meetings and workshops, reports from individual institutions as well as medical undergraduate curricula of the different institutions. Thematic analysis was used to extract patterns from the collected data. MESAU initiated the process of developing competencies for medical graduates in 2011 using a participatory approach of all stakeholders. The process involved consultative deliberations to identify priority health needs of Uganda and develop competencies to address these needs. Nine competence domain areas were collaboratively identified and agreed upon, and competencies developed in these domains. Key successes from the process include institutional collaboration, faculty development in CBME and initiating the implementation of CBME. The consortium approach strengthened institutional collaboration that led to the development of common competencies desired of all medical graduates to

  15. Innovative Modelling Approach of Safety Culture Assessment in Nuclear Power Plant

    Ahn, N.

    2016-01-01

    A culture is commonly defined as the shared set of norms and values that govern appropriate individual behavior. Safety culture is the subset of organizational culture that reflects the general attitude and approaches to safety and risk management. While safety is sometimes narrowly defined in terms of human death and injury, we use a more inclusive definition that also considers mission loss as a safety problem and is thus applicable to nuclear power plants and missions. The recent accident reports and investigations of the nuclear power plant mission failures (i.e., TMI, Chernobyl, and Fukushima) point to safety cultural problems in nuclear power plants. Many assessment approaches have been developed by organizations such as IAEA and INPO based on the assessment of parameters at separate levels — individuals, groups, and organizations.

  16. Empowering Ghanaian Polytechnic Students through Entrepreneurship and Competency Based Education: A Case Study of Takoradi Polytechnic

    Gyan, Matthew Kweku; Attah, Emmanuel Yaw; Asare-Appiah, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The youth cannot be ignored in view of the vital roles they play in the socio-economic development of nations around the globe. Entrepreneurship education has been identified as one of the most innovative ways of arresting graduate unemployment around the globe. Youth unemployment has been on the increase in recent times partly due to traditional…

  17. Impact of Competency-Based and Target-Oriented Training on Employee Performance: A Case Study

    Arslan, Ridvan; Uzaslan, N. Tufan

    2017-01-01

    Some firms have applied different in-house training models to keep up with new technological innovations in their specific fields. This study investigated how a target-oriented in-house training programme should be developed and how it should be evaluated for effectiveness. The aim of the study was to develop, implement and evaluate a…

  18. Assessment of the Estonian Research Development Technology and Innovation Funding System

    Nedeva, Maria; Georghiou, Luke

    2003-01-01

    The objectives of the assessment of the RDTI funding system in Estonia as specified by the Terms of Reference are as follows: 1) to conduct a review of the current R&D funding system in Estonia; 2) to review the objectives of the Estonian R&D Strategy 2002-2006; 3) to review best practice in R&D funding elsewhere; and 4) to propose an efficient, transparent and accountable R&D funding system.

  19. Earwax metabolomics: An innovative pilot metabolic profiling study for assessing metabolic changes in ewes during periparturition period.

    Shokry, Engy; Pereira, Julião; Marques Júnior, Jair Gonzalez; da Cunha, Paulo Henrique Jorge; Noronha Filho, Antônio Dionísio Feitosa; da Silva, Jessica Alves; Fioravanti, Maria Clorinda Soares; de Oliveira, Anselmo Elcana; Antoniosi Filho, Nelson Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Important metabolic changes occur during transition period of late pregnancy and early lactation to meet increasing energy demands of the growing fetus and for milk production. The aim of this investigation is to present an innovative and non-invasive tool using ewe earwax sample analysis to assess the metabolic profile in ewes during late pregnancy and early lactation. In this work, earwax samples were collected from 28 healthy Brazilian Santa Inês ewes divided into 3 sub-groups: 9 non-pregnant ewes, 6 pregnant ewes in the last 30 days of gestation, and 13 lactating ewes ≤ 30 days postpartum. Then, a range of metabolites including volatile organic compounds (VOC), amino acids (AA), and minerals were profiled and quantified in the samples by applying headspace gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, high performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry, and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry, respectively. As evident in our results, significant changes were observed in the metabolite profile of earwax between the studied groups where a remarkable elevation was detected in the levels of non-esterified fatty acids, alcohols, ketones, and hydroxy urea in the VOC profile of samples obtained from pregnant and lactating ewes. Meanwhile, a significant decrease was detected in the levels of 9 minerals and 14 AA including essential AA (leucine, phenyl alanine, lysine, isoleucine, threonine, valine), conditionally essential AA (arginine, glycine, tyrosine, proline, serine), and a non-essential AA (alanine). Multivariate analysis using robust principal component analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis was successfully applied to discriminate the three study groups using the variations of metabolites in the two stress states (pregnancy and lactation) from the healthy non-stress condition. The innovative developed method was successful in evaluating pre- and post-parturient metabolic changes using earwax and can in the future be applied to

  20. Earwax metabolomics: An innovative pilot metabolic profiling study for assessing metabolic changes in ewes during periparturition period.

    Engy Shokry

    Full Text Available Important metabolic changes occur during transition period of late pregnancy and early lactation to meet increasing energy demands of the growing fetus and for milk production. The aim of this investigation is to present an innovative and non-invasive tool using ewe earwax sample analysis to assess the metabolic profile in ewes during late pregnancy and early lactation. In this work, earwax samples were collected from 28 healthy Brazilian Santa Inês ewes divided into 3 sub-groups: 9 non-pregnant ewes, 6 pregnant ewes in the last 30 days of gestation, and 13 lactating ewes ≤ 30 days postpartum. Then, a range of metabolites including volatile organic compounds (VOC, amino acids (AA, and minerals were profiled and quantified in the samples by applying headspace gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, high performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry, and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry, respectively. As evident in our results, significant changes were observed in the metabolite profile of earwax between the studied groups where a remarkable elevation was detected in the levels of non-esterified fatty acids, alcohols, ketones, and hydroxy urea in the VOC profile of samples obtained from pregnant and lactating ewes. Meanwhile, a significant decrease was detected in the levels of 9 minerals and 14 AA including essential AA (leucine, phenyl alanine, lysine, isoleucine, threonine, valine, conditionally essential AA (arginine, glycine, tyrosine, proline, serine, and a non-essential AA (alanine. Multivariate analysis using robust principal component analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis was successfully applied to discriminate the three study groups using the variations of metabolites in the two stress states (pregnancy and lactation from the healthy non-stress condition. The innovative developed method was successful in evaluating pre- and post-parturient metabolic changes using earwax and can in the future be

  1. OccIDEAS: An Innovative Tool to Assess Past Asbestos Exposure in the Australian Mesothelioma Registry

    Ewan MacFarlane

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Malignant mesothelioma is an uncommon but rapidly fatal disease for which the principal aetiological agent is exposure to asbestos. Mesothelioma is of particular significance in Australia where asbestos use was very widespread from the 1950s until the 1980s. Exposure to asbestos includes occupational exposure associated with working with asbestos or in workplaces where asbestos is used and also ‘take-home’ exposure of family members of asbestos exposed workers. Asbestos exposure may also be nonoccupational, occurring as a consequence of using asbestos products in non-occupational contexts and passive exposure is also possible, such as exposure to asbestos products in the built environment or proximity to an environmental source of exposure, for example an asbestos production plant. The extremely long latency period for this disease makes exposure assessment problematic in the context of a mesothelioma registry. OccIDEAS, a recently developed online tool for retrospective exposure assessment, has been adapted for use in the Australian Mesothelioma Registry (AMR to enable systematic retrospective exposure assessment of consenting cases. Twelve occupational questionnaire modules and one non-occupational module have been developed for the AMR, which form the basis of structured interviews using OccIDEAS, which also stores collected data and provides a framework for generating metrics of exposure.

  2. Curricular Innovation in the Surgery Clerkship: Can Assessment Methods Influence Development of Critical Thinking and Clinical Skills?

    McClintic, James A; Snyder, Clifford L; Brown, Kimberly M

    2018-03-12

    Although key clinical skills have been defined in the Core Entrustable Professional Activities, there is a need to improve medical school curricula with standardized training opportunities and assessments of these skills. Thus, we aimed to develop an innovative curriculum that emphasized critical thinking and clinical skills. We hypothesized that we would be able to observe measurable improvement on assessments of students' critical thinking and clinical skills after the implementation of the new curriculum. Prospective, Quasi-Experimental study with the use of historical controls. This study took place through the third-year surgical clerkship at the University of Texas Medical Branch at the Galveston, Houston, and Austin, Texas, locations. A total of 214 students taking the third-year surgical clerkship for the first time during the periods of interest were included. Although the students with traditional curriculum improved 9.5% on a short answer exam from preclerkship to postclerkship completion, the students with new curriculum improved by 40%. Students under the new curriculum performed significantly better on the Objective Structured Clinical Exam; however, their shelf scores were lower. Under this new curriculum and grading system, we demonstrated that students can be incentivized to improve critical thinking and clinical skills, but this needs to be balanced with knowledge-based incentives. Copyright © 2018 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Immersive virtual reality and environmental noise assessment: An innovative audio–visual approach

    Ruotolo, Francesco; Maffei, Luigi; Di Gabriele, Maria; Iachini, Tina; Masullo, Massimiliano; Ruggiero, Gennaro; Senese, Vincenzo Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Several international studies have shown that traffic noise has a negative impact on people's health and that people's annoyance does not depend only on noise energetic levels, but rather on multi-perceptual factors. The combination of virtual reality technology and audio rendering techniques allow us to experiment a new approach for environmental noise assessment that can help to investigate in advance the potential negative effects of noise associated with a specific project and that in turn can help designers to make educated decisions. In the present study, the audio–visual impact of a new motorway project on people has been assessed by means of immersive virtual reality technology. In particular, participants were exposed to 3D reconstructions of an actual landscape without the projected motorway (ante operam condition), and of the same landscape with the projected motorway (post operam condition). Furthermore, individuals' reactions to noise were assessed by means of objective cognitive measures (short term verbal memory and executive functions) and subjective evaluations (noise and visual annoyance). Overall, the results showed that the introduction of a projected motorway in the environment can have immediate detrimental effects of people's well-being depending on the distance from the noise source. In particular, noise due to the new infrastructure seems to exert a negative influence on short term verbal memory and to increase both visual and noise annoyance. The theoretical and practical implications of these findings are discussed. -- Highlights: ► Impact of traffic noise on people's well-being depends on multi-perceptual factors. ► A multisensory virtual reality technology is used to simulate a projected motorway. ► Effects on short-term memory and auditory and visual subjective annoyance were found. ► The closer the distance from the motorway the stronger was the effect. ► Multisensory virtual reality methodologies can be used to study

  4. Immersive virtual reality and environmental noise assessment: An innovative audio–visual approach

    Ruotolo, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.ruotolo@unina2.it [Laboratory of Cognitive Science and Immersive Virtual Reality, Department of Psychology, Second University of Naples, Viale Ellittico, 31, 81100, Caserta (Italy); Maffei, Luigi, E-mail: luigi.maffei@unina2.it [Department of Architecture and Industrial Design, Second University of Naples, Abazia di S. Lorenzo, 81031, Aversa (Italy); Di Gabriele, Maria, E-mail: maria.digabriele@unina2.it [Department of Architecture and Industrial Design, Second University of Naples, Abazia di S. Lorenzo, 81031, Aversa (Italy); Iachini, Tina, E-mail: santa.iachini@unina2.it [Laboratory of Cognitive Science and Immersive Virtual Reality, Department of Psychology, Second University of Naples, Viale Ellittico, 31, 81100, Caserta (Italy); Masullo, Massimiliano, E-mail: massimiliano.masullo@unina2.it [Department of Architecture and Industrial Design, Second University of Naples, Abazia di S. Lorenzo, 81031, Aversa (Italy); Ruggiero, Gennaro, E-mail: gennaro.ruggiero@unina2.it [Laboratory of Cognitive Science and Immersive Virtual Reality, Department of Psychology, Second University of Naples, Viale Ellittico, 31, 81100, Caserta (Italy); Senese, Vincenzo Paolo, E-mail: vincenzopaolo.senese@unina2.it [Laboratory of Cognitive Science and Immersive Virtual Reality, Department of Psychology, Second University of Naples, Viale Ellittico, 31, 81100, Caserta (Italy); Psychometric Laboratory, Department of Psychology, Second University of Naples, Viale Ellittico, 31, 81100, Caserta (Italy)

    2013-07-15

    Several international studies have shown that traffic noise has a negative impact on people's health and that people's annoyance does not depend only on noise energetic levels, but rather on multi-perceptual factors. The combination of virtual reality technology and audio rendering techniques allow us to experiment a new approach for environmental noise assessment that can help to investigate in advance the potential negative effects of noise associated with a specific project and that in turn can help designers to make educated decisions. In the present study, the audio–visual impact of a new motorway project on people has been assessed by means of immersive virtual reality technology. In particular, participants were exposed to 3D reconstructions of an actual landscape without the projected motorway (ante operam condition), and of the same landscape with the projected motorway (post operam condition). Furthermore, individuals' reactions to noise were assessed by means of objective cognitive measures (short term verbal memory and executive functions) and subjective evaluations (noise and visual annoyance). Overall, the results showed that the introduction of a projected motorway in the environment can have immediate detrimental effects of people's well-being depending on the distance from the noise source. In particular, noise due to the new infrastructure seems to exert a negative influence on short term verbal memory and to increase both visual and noise annoyance. The theoretical and practical implications of these findings are discussed. -- Highlights: ► Impact of traffic noise on people's well-being depends on multi-perceptual factors. ► A multisensory virtual reality technology is used to simulate a projected motorway. ► Effects on short-term memory and auditory and visual subjective annoyance were found. ► The closer the distance from the motorway the stronger was the effect. ► Multisensory virtual reality methodologies

  5. A digital platform as a facilitator for assessing innovation potential and creating business models: a case study from the i3 project

    Bellini Francesco

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Many ideas flow into the innovation funnel but only 1 out 3000 becomes a successful new product. There are many variables that interact in this complex process and investors decisions are often based on experience and feeling rather than a comprehensive evaluation of the social, economic and technological factors. The innovation potential, the innovator capability, the accessibility of the technology as well as the social acceptance and the chosen business model are the some of the critical factors of a successful innovation strategy. In the broad sense, a business model is the approach of doing business through which a company can sustain itself and generate profits in the long term. Digital platforms can help manage and facilitate the complexity of value propositions and provide an immediate feedback to the entrepreneur. Creating value is necessary, but not sufficient, for an organization to profit from its business model. It is important to see the whole picture of the business that is why the business models are so important for a good start of the business. However, innovation assessment and business model development sometimes are not an easy task and ICT can make this process easier. Then, the aim of this paper is to explore the role of digital platforms as facilitators for the techno-socio-economic impact assessment and the development of sustainable business models through the analysis of a case study from the EU Horizon 2020 “i3 project”.

  6. Efficiency assessment method of financial leasing as a factor of innovative development of a construction complex for a lessee in comparison with a credit

    Alekseeva Tat’yana Romanovna

    Full Text Available Modernization and innovative and technological rearmament of a construction complex is one of the priority problems of national economy development. Development and implementation of innovative technologies in the process of creating construction production will allow improving its quality, consumer characteristics, ensuring energy efficiency and ecological safety of buildings and constructions. One of problems of innovative development of a construction complex is the problem of financing of innovative activity. In our opinion leasing is one of effective ways of its solving. In the leasing transaction the owner of an asset temporarily transfers a right to use an asset to other party. The owner of an asset is a lessor. Other party is a lessee. The lessor makes a lease for a specified time in return for a periodic rental payments from the lessee. One of the advantages of leasing is that it provides alternative to ownership. Also lessees benefit from a number of tax advantages. Leasing has many other advantages. The assessment method of the efficiency of financial leasing as a factor of innovative development of a construction complex for a lessee enterprise in comparison with the credit is shown in article. As a result of scientific research we specified the criteria of this assessment.

  7. How excluding some benefits from value assessment of new drugs impacts innovation.

    Cook, Joseph P; Golec, Joseph

    2017-12-01

    Payers often assess the benefits of new drugs relative to costs for reimbursement purposes, but they frequently exclude some drugs' option-related benefits, reducing their reimbursement chances, and making them less attractive R&D investments. We develop and test a real options model of R&D investment that shows that excluding option-related benefits heightens drug developers' incentives to avoid high-risk (volatile) R&D investments and instead encourages them to focus on "safer" (positively skewed) investments. Our model and empirical results could partly explain the decline in the number of risky new molecular entities. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. An Assessment Tool applied to Manure Management Systems using Innovative Technologies

    Sørensen, Claus Aage Grøn; Jacobsen, B.H.; Sommer, Sven Gjedde

    2003-01-01

    of operational and cost-effective animal manure handling technologies. An assessment tool covering the whole chain of the manure handling system from the animal houses to the field has been developed. The tool enables a system-oriented evaluation of labour demand, machinery capacity and costs related......In Denmark, stringent new regulations, placing strict time limits on manure application and setting thresholds for nitrogen utilisation, have been imposed in order to increase the efficiency of uptake of plant nutrients from manure. An important factor in meeting these requirements is the use...

  9. Innovative Methodologies for 21st Century Learning, Teaching and Assessment: A Convenience Sampling Investigation into the Use of Social Media Technologies in Higher Education

    Kivunja, Charles

    2015-01-01

    The advent of the Web as a social technology has created opportunities for the creation of informal learning environments, which have potential for innovative methodologies in learning, teaching and assessment. However, as Wolfe (2001) admonishes, "contrary to the rhetoric of cheerleaders, the Web places greater demands on students than…

  10. Assessing the Impact of Research: A Case Study of the LSAY Research Innovation and Expansion Fund. Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth. Occasional Paper

    Hargreaves, Jo

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to apply the framework developed by the National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER) for measuring research impact to assess the outcomes of the research and activities funded under the Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth (LSAY) Research Innovation and Expansion Fund (RIEF). LSAY provides a rich…

  11. PHP47 - Early assessment of highly innovative medical technology: clinical and economical gains of point-of-care applications for measuring potassium concentrations

    van de Wetering, G.; Hummel, J. Marjan; van Montfort, Augustinus P.W.P.; Montfoort, A.; IJzerman, Maarten Joost

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Innovative point-of-care diagnostics are likely to be having a strong impact on health care. The aim of this study is to conduct an early assessment of point-of-care chips. These chips can detect many particles and, consequently, many product-market combinations can be developed. This

  12. User requirements for innovative nuclear reactors and fuel cycle technologies in the area of economics, environment, safety, waste management, proliferation resistance and cross cutting issues, and methodology for innovative technologies assessment

    Kupitz, Juergen; Depisch, Frank; Allan, Colin

    2003-01-01

    The IAEA General Conference in 2000 has invited ''all interested Member States to combine their efforts under the aegis of the Agency in considering the issues of the nuclear fuel cycle, in particular by examining innovative and proliferation-resistant nuclear technology''. In response to this invitation, the IAEA initiated an ''International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles'', INPRO. The overall objectives of INPRO is to help to ensure that nuclear energy is available to contribute in fulfilling in a sustainable manner energy needs in the 21st century, and to bring together all interested Member States, both technology holders and technology users, to consider jointly the international and national actions required to achieve desired innovations in nuclear reactors and fuel cycles that use sound and economically competitive technology. Phase-I of INPRO was initiated in May 2001. During Phase-I, work was subdivided in two sub phase: Phase 1A (finished in June 2003) and Phase 1B (started in June 2003). Phase 1A dealt with the definition of Basic Principles, User Requirements and Criteria, and the development of a methodology for the evaluation of innovative nuclear technologies. In Phase 1A, task groups for several areas were established: (a) Prospects and Potentials of Nuclear Power, (b) Economics; (c) Sustainability and Environment, (d) Safety of Nuclear Installations, (e) Waste Management, (f) Proliferation Resistance, (g) Crosscutting issues and (h) for the Methodology for Assessment. In Phase-IB evaluations of innovative nuclear energy technologies will be performed by Member States against the INPRO Basic Principles, User Requirements and Criteria. This paper summarizes the results achieved in the Phase 1A of INPRO and is a cooperative effort of the INPRO team, consisting of all INPRO cost free experts and task managers. (author)

  13. Changing the culture of medical training: An important step toward the implementation of competency-based medical education.

    Ferguson, Peter C; Caverzagie, Kelly J; Nousiainen, Markku T; Snell, Linda

    2017-06-01

    The current medical education system is steeped in tradition and has been shaped by many long-held beliefs and convictions about the essential components of training. The objective of this article is to propose initiatives to overcome biases against competency-based medical education (CBME) in the culture of medical education. At a retreat of the International Competency Based Medical Education (ICBME) Collaborators group, an intensive brainstorming session was held to determine potential barriers to adoption of CBME in the culture of medical education. This was supplemented with a review of the literature on the topic. There continues to exist significant key barriers to the widespread adoption of CBME. Change in educational culture must be embraced by all components of the medical education hierarchy. Research is essential to provide convincing evidence of the benefit of CBME. The widespread adoption of CBME will require a change in the professional, institutional, and organizational culture surrounding the training of medical professionals.

  14. Technology and Economic Assessment of Innovative Field Drainage Technologies in Denmark

    Gachango, Florence Gathoni

    Intensive agricultural production in most parts of the world especially in the more developed countries continues to mount pressure on water resources thereby threatening the quality of life in the aquatic ecosystems. With stringent standards such as those stipulated in the European Union Water...... Framework Directive (EU WFD), introduced to address the water quality problem the situation calls for solutions that would reconcile these two conflicting issues. “End-of-pipe” filter technologies that would disconnect agricultural drainage pathway before it gets to the aquatic environment have been...... proposed as appropriate solutions to this problem in the Danish context. The feasibility of these technologies with regards to their cost-effectiveness in nutrient mitigation, farmers’ adoption behavior, and environmental policy implementation is assessed in this thesis. The thesis comprises of four papers...

  15. Guidance for the application of an assessment methodology for innovative nuclear energy systems. INPRO manual - Physical protection. Vol. 6 of the final report of phase 1 of the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO)

    2008-11-01

    The International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO) was initiated in the year 2000, based on a resolution of the IAEA General Conference (GC(44)/RES/21). The main objectives of INPRO are (1) to help to ensure that nuclear energy is available to contribute in fulfilling energy needs in the 21st century in a sustainable manner, (2) to bring together both technology holders and technology users to consider jointly the international and national actions required to achieve desired innovations in nuclear reactors and fuel cycles; and (3) to create a forum to involve all relevant stakeholders that will have an impact on, draw from, and complement the activities of existing institutions, as well as ongoing initiatives at the national and international level. This document follows the guidelines of the INPRO report M ethodology for the assessment of innovative nuclear reactors and fuel cycles, Report of Phase 1B (first part) of the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO) , IAEA-TECDOC-1434 (2004), together with its previous report G uidance for the evaluation for innovative nuclear reactors and fuel cycles, Report of Phase 1A of the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO), IAEATECDOC-1362 (2003). This INPRO manual is comprised of an overview volume and eight additional volumes covering the areas of economics (Volume 2), infrastructure (Volume 3), waste management (Volume 4), proliferation resistance (Volume 5), physical protection (Volume 6), environment (Volume 7), safety of reactors (Volume 8), and safety of nuclear fuel cycle facilities (Volume 9). The INPRO Manual for the area of physical protection (Volume 6) provides guidance to the assessor of an INS (innovative nuclear energy system) under a physical protection regime in a country that is planning to install a nuclear power program (or maintaining or enlarging an existing one), and describes the application of the

  16. Life cycle assessment of innovative technology for energy production from automotive shredder residue.

    Rinaldi, Caterina; Masoni, Paolo; Salvati, Fabio; Tolve, Pietro

    2015-07-01

    Automotive Shredder Residue (ASR) is a problematic waste material remaining after shredding and recovery processes of end-of-life vehicles (ELVs). Its heterogeneous grain size and composition make difficult its recovery or disposal. Although ASR accounts for approximately 20% to 25% of the weight of an ELV, the European Union (EU)'s ELV Directive (2000/53/EC) requires that by 2015 a minimum 95% of the weight of an ELV must be reused or recovered, including a 10% weight energy recovery. The quantity of ASR is relevant: Approximately 2.4 million tons are generated in the EU each year and most of it is sent to landfills. This article describes a life cycle model of the "TEKNE-Fluff" process designed to make beneficial use of ASR that is based on the results of an experimental pilot plant for pyro-gasification, combustion, cogeneration, and emissions treatment of ASR. The goal of the research was the application of life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology to identify the environmental hot spots of the "TEKNE system" and use scenario analysis to check solutions to improve its environmental profile, supporting the design and industrialization process. The LCA was conducted based on data modeled from the experimental campaign. Moreover, different scenarios on shares of electricity and thermal energy produced by the cogeneration system and alternative treatment processes for the waste produced by the technology were compared. Despite the limitation of the research (results based on scaling up experimental data by modeling), impact assessment results are promising and sufficiently robust, as shown by Monte Carlo analysis. The TEKNE technology may become an interesting solution for the problem of ASR management: Besides representing an alternative to landfill disposal, the energy produced could avoid significant impacts on fossil resources depletion (a plant of 40,000 tons/y capacity could produce ∼ 147,000 GJ/yr, covering the annual need of ∼ 13,500 households). © 2015

  17. Orchestrating innovation

    Berkers, F.T.H.M.; Klein Woolthuis, R.J.A.; Boer, J. de

    2015-01-01

    Orchestrating Innovation increases the probability of success, minimizing the probability of failure of technological innovations by creating sustained societal and economic value. Orchestrating innovation propagates to take into account and actively involve all relevant stakeholders of the (future) ecosystem in which the innovation will, can or has to be adopted.

  18. Mindful innovation

    Olsen, Poul Bitsch

    2008-01-01

    Mindful innovation is an approach to innovation that pays attention to people's experience in an organization rather than to formal organization or social role.......Mindful innovation is an approach to innovation that pays attention to people's experience in an organization rather than to formal organization or social role....

  19. Innovative didaktik

    Lund, Birthe

    Innovative didaktik. This deals with innovative didaktik from at methodological point of view in three ways - how to define the concept, how to develop it and how analyse it. Issues analysed: How to create innovative students? How to create innovative learning envoriments? These are core question...... in "Projekt Innovativ didaktik". The hidden curriculum is to inspire students to develop entreprenuership and creativty....

  20. Licensed physicians – competent physicians?: The new German licensure law as a basis for competency-based curricula

    Öchsner, Wolfgang

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Competency-based curricula define their educational goals according to profession-specific roles and competencies. Thus, this type of curricula is outcome-oriented, in contrast to the traditional German curricula, which are mainly procedure-oriented. This study investigates the new licensure legislation in Germany, mandatory for all medical faculties, to see if it allows the development of competency-based curricula.Methods: For the first step we clustered all demands to roles. In step two we transformed the procedure-oriented demands into outcome-oriented competencies, according to the 6 roles found, pursuing strictly the wording of the law.Results: Although the principal goals in the new German licensure law are outcome-oriented, namely three abilities of a certified physician, still the majority of requirements and demands remain procedure-oriented. Clustering resulted in the following six roles: medical expert, health advocate, teamworker, manager, representative of the medical profession and, life-long learner. The relevant competencies for the six roles, we could derive from the standards set by the law.Conclusion: We were able to show that the new German licensure order comprises a useful framework for the development of outcome-oriented, competency-based curricula.