WorldWideScience

Sample records for innovation expectation potential

  1. Expectations and disappointments of industrial innovations

    CERN Document Server

    Halevi, Gideon

    2017-01-01

    The Integrated Manufacturing System (IMS), Group Technology, Numerical Control, and Computer Aided Design (CAD) were four outstanding innovations that were one-time milestones of scientific industrial management. This book describes the expectations and disappointments of the common pitfalls of these ingenious ideas, which leads to understanding of their gradual disappearing, and proposes a way to restore these methods for long term utility and value. The first three innovations dominated the industry till the mid-1970s. Surprisingly, the reason for them being replaced is the same: research of the “routine” was misleading regardless of its ingenuity. In the fourth case, CAD does not support CAPP (Computer Aided Process Planning) and thus Numerical Control could no longer support developments of a system such as a flexible and automated factory. However, they incorporate many features in a specific resource instead within a manufacturing system. CAD technology and machining centers remain remarkable as a s...

  2. Medtech: Potential for innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bestetti, Gilberto

    2009-10-17

    Switzerland, with its ETHZ and EPFL, universities, advanced technical colleges, the CSEM, the Empa and the Paul Scherrer Institute, possesses a complete chain of knowledge and interdisciplinary competence which ranks it among the worldwide leaders in medical technology. To ensure that a wider range of excellent research results are translated into marketable products and methods, the CTI Agency for the Promotion of Innovation launched the Medtech initiative, a success story.

  3. Assessment of innovative potential of the region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Sazonova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of innovative-oriented processes of transformation of the Russian economy at the current stage of development requires the formation of regional innovation systems that predetermine the growing competitiveness of the national economy in the future. The optimal functioning of the innovation system of the region as the most important link in the national innovation system depends on the availability, condition and level of development of its innovative potential, which in turn determines the economic growth of not only a single region, but the country as a whole. The essence and structure of innovative potential of organizational systems are considered in the article. The main approaches to the definition of the concept of innovative potential and the definition of the content of the concept are analyzed. An approach to the formation of an integrated indicator is proposed. The integrated indicator of the region's innovative potential was calculated using the area diagram method. The values of the innovation potential for the regions of the Central Federal District were calculated and the ranking of the regions was performed in accordance with the final value. Conclusion. To build a model for innovative development of the region, it is necessary to analyze the components of the innovation potential, its evaluation, and a possible development forecast for the coming years. Voronezh, Tula and Kostroma and Belgorod regions have high rates for the Central Federal District. Ryazan, Smolensk and Kostroma oblasts have rather low indicators in comparison with other regions.

  4. Challenge to innovative technologies and the expected market appeal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobita, Kenji; Nishio, Satoshi; Konishi, Satoshi; Tokimatsu, Koji; Hiwatari, Ryoji

    2005-01-01

    This section describes the future of fusion energy in terms of its impact on the global energy supply and global warming mitigation, the possible entry scenarios of fusion into future energy market, and innovative technologies for deploying and expanding fusion's share in the market. Section 5.1 shows that fusion energy can contribute to the stabilization of atmospheric CO 2 concentration if fusion is introduced into the future energy market at a competitive price. Considerations regarding fusion's entry scenarios into the energy market are presented in Sec. 5.2, suggesting that fusion should replace fossil energy sources and thus contribute to global warming mitigation. In this sense, first generation fusion power plants should be a viable energy source with global appeal and be so attractive as to employed in developing countries rather than in developed countries. Favorable factors lending to this purpose are fusion's stability as a power source, and its security, safety, and environmental friendliness as well as its cost-electricity. The requirements for core plasma to expand the share of fusion in the market in the latter half of this century are given in Sec. 5.3, pointing out the importance of high beta access with low aspect ratio and plasma profile control. From this same point of view, innovative fusion technologies worthy of further development are commented on in Sec. 5.4, addressing the high temperature blanket, hydrogen production, high temperature superconductors, and hot cell maintenance. (author)

  5. APPROXIMATING INNOVATION POTENTIAL WITH NEUROFUZZY ROBUST MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasa, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In a remarkably short time, economic globalisation has changed the world’s economic order, bringing new challenges and opportunities to SMEs. These processes pushed the need to measure innovation capability, which has become a crucial issue for today’s economic and political decision makers. Companies cannot compete in this new environment unless they become more innovative and respond more effectively to consumers’ needs and preferences – as mentioned in the EU’s innovation strategy. Decision makers cannot make accurate and efficient decisions without knowing the capability for innovation of companies in a sector or a region. This need is forcing economists to develop an integrated, unified and complete method of measuring, approximating and even forecasting the innovation performance not only on a macro but also a micro level. In this recent article a critical analysis of the literature on innovation potential approximation and prediction is given, showing their weaknesses and a possible alternative that eliminates the limitations and disadvantages of classical measuring and predictive methods.

  6. Experienced and potential medical tourists' service quality expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiry, Michael; Scott, Jeannie J; Vequist, David G

    2013-01-01

    The paper's aim is to compare experienced and potential US medical tourists' foreign health service-quality expectations. Data were collected via an online survey involving 1,588 US consumers engaging or expressing an interest in medical tourism. The sample included 219 experienced and 1,369 potential medical tourists. Respondents completed a SERVQUAL questionnaire. Mann-Whitney U-tests were used to determine significant differences between experienced and potential US medical tourists' service-quality expectations. For all five service-quality dimensions (tangibles, reliability, responsiveness, assurance and empathy) experienced medical tourists had significantly lower expectations than potential medical tourists. Experienced medical tourists also had significantly lower service-quality expectations than potential medical tourists for 11 individual SERVQUAL items. Results suggest using experience level to segment medical tourists. The study also has implications for managing medical tourist service-quality expectations at service delivery point and via external marketing communications. Managing medical tourists' service quality expectations is important since expectations can significantly influence choice processes, their experience and post-consumption behavior. This study is the first to compare experienced and potential US medical tourist service-quality expectations. The study establishes a foundation for future service-quality expectations research in the rapidly growing medical tourism industry.

  7. Synergizing expectation and execution for stroke communities of practice innovations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riopelle Richard J

    2010-06-01

    individuals into one of four mutually exclusive categories of information seeking; the e-health state of readiness, which covers ten domains of the readiness to change; and a community of practice evaluation survey. Summary This project is expected to enhance our understanding of collaborative work across disciplines and organisations in accelerating implementation of best practices along the continuum of care, and how e-technologies influence access, sharing, creation, and application of knowledge.

  8. Synergizing expectation and execution for stroke communities of practice innovations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    mutually exclusive categories of information seeking; the e-health state of readiness, which covers ten domains of the readiness to change; and a community of practice evaluation survey. Summary This project is expected to enhance our understanding of collaborative work across disciplines and organisations in accelerating implementation of best practices along the continuum of care, and how e-technologies influence access, sharing, creation, and application of knowledge. PMID:20529305

  9. The model of evaluation of innovative potential of enterprise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ганна Ігорівна Заднєпровська

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The basic components of the enterprise’s innovative potential evaluation process are investigated. It is offered the conceptual model of evaluation of the innovative potential that includes: subjects, objects, purpose, provision of information, principles, methods, criteria, indicators. It is noted that the innovative capacity characterizes the transition from the current to the strategic level of innovation potential and, thus, characterizes the composition of objects from position of user

  10. The Methodical Approaches to Activation of Innovative Potential of Enterprise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berveno Oksana V.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is aimed at developing theoretical provisions and practical recommendations on methods of management and activation of innovative potential of enterprises. Assessment of innovative potential of enterprise should be carried out from different positions, taking into consideration all external and internal possibilities of enterprise as to carrying out an innovation activity. The system of management of innovation activity and implementation of innovative potential at enterprise should be closely woven in the general management of the enterprise. Activation of innovative potential of enterprise foresees adoption of the whole system of strategic decisions, which are aimed at creation of the most favorable conditions for implementation of innovative potential with obtaining of planned results. The system of activization of innovative potential should develop a number of organizational decisions on interaction of elements of the most innovative potential in the process of innovation activity and cooperation of innovative potential with other subsystems of the enterprise. Results of these organizational decisions in many respects determine efficiency of innovation activity of the enterprise.

  11. INNOVATION POTENTIAL OF RUSSIAN NORTHERN REGIONS: DEVELOPMENT TRENDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.N. Berezikova

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available In the work for the first time a methodology of complex evaluation of innovation potentials of the regions is proposed. As a result the index of innovation potentials of Russian northern regions was determined, and on its basis all regions are referred to groups corresponding their innovation rating. A system of measures on stimulation of innovation activities in regions has been proposed

  12. The system of management of innovative potential of economic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostyshak Mikhail

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the research is to develop a mechanism for managing the innovative potential of a development organization, which is capable to ensure the transformation of real estate objects due to the changes in market needs. The main approaches to the development of innovative potential of economic systems are presented. Efficiency criteria of management of innovation potential of development organizations are formed. A model based on joint use of system and resource and potential approaches to the management of innovative potential of a development organization is formed. The analysis of modern tendencies of development of innovative potential of economic systems, based on rationalization of management of innovative potential of a development organization is conducted.

  13. Years of potential life lost and life expectancy in schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorthøj, Carsten; Stürup, Anne Emilie; McGrath, John J

    2017-01-01

    was least in the Asian study and greatest in Africa. The overall weighted average life expectancy was 64·7 years (95% CI 61·1-71·3), and was lower for men than women (59·9 years, 95% CI 55·5-64·3 vs 67·6 years, 63·1-72·1). Life expectancy was lowest in Asia and Africa. Timing of publication and risk of bias...... (Africa n=1, Asia n=1, Australia n=1, Europe n=7, and North America n=3) that involved up to 247 603 patients. Schizophrenia was associated with a weighted average of 14·5 years of potential life lost (95% CI 11·2-17·8), and was higher for men than women (15·9, 13·8-18·0 vs 13·6, 11·4-15·8). Loss...

  14. Expectations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    depend on the reader’s own experiences, individual feelings, personal associations or on conventions of reading, interpretive communities and cultural conditions? This volume brings together narrative theory, fictionality theory and speech act theory to address such questions of expectations...

  15. Reflexivity, Knowledge and the Management of Potential Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bordum, Anders

    2005-01-01

    In this article I will interpret John Deweys perspective on reflective thinking as if he were a philosopher of innovation management. From his pragmatist point of departure, the problems involved in knowledge-processes relevant to innovation are analysed and reconceptualised. On the basis...... of the analysis I attempt to identify some categories of general applicability when understanding, designing, and managing radical innovation processes. These categories are useful to conceptualise and talk about innovation, when knowledge is taken seriously, and when managing innovation is also understood...... as managing the production of new knowledge, that is of making the unjustified justified, and the unknown known. Keywords: Reflexivity, reflective thought, radical innovation, innovation management, potential innovation, Plato, John Dewey, epistemology, knowledge....

  16. How does Innovative Potential and Collaborative Capacity Contribute to a Firms Innovativeness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rai, Sudhanshu

    In this paper I ask the basic question highlighted in the title, how does innovative potential and collaborative capacity contribute to a firm’s innovativeness? To address this central question I draw on innovative potential and collaborative capacity as a dynamic notion evaluates the data from...... India. This paper tries to create a framework creating a sustainable environment for ICT Innovation. To do that I argue that innovative potential and collaborative capacity provide a constellation of inputs to the firm to address both internal and external challenges. For instance while innovative...... potential works at a project or an individual level while collaborative capacity is seen to work at a firm or perhaps at the inter firm level. This does not mean IP acts only at the locus stated. I conjecture that IP/CC interact with each other at defferent levels, where each takes turn in driving...

  17. The Entrepreneurial Context of Developing the Innovative Potential of Enterprise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vostriakova Valentyna Yu.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is concerned with influence of business component on the course of innovation processes at the enterprise from the perspective of transition from the linear to the non-linear innovative models. The author describes in detail the components and levels of the innovation spiral model of the company Ernst and Young, namely: innovative backgrounds and incentives, external stakeholders, stages and scopes of the innovation process at the enterprise as well as the resulting competitive advantages. The resource, structural-functional, behavioral, process, and integrated approaches to defining the innovative potential of enterprise have been considered. It is suggested to consider the innovation potential taking into account achievements of the resource theory, i.e., as a dynamic combination of resources, capacities and competencies in the innovation activity. Impact on innovation activity is considered through the prism of the innovation value chain model by M. Hansen and J. Birkinshaw. Peculiarities of transformation of innovative ideas into commercial results at every stage of the chain have been considered, taking into account the specific tasks and factors of influence.

  18. Expected brine movement at potential nuclear waste repository salt sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCauley, V.S.; Raines, G.E.

    1987-08-01

    The BRINEMIG brine migration code predicts rates and quantities of brine migration to a waste package emplaced in a high-level nuclear waste repository in salt. The BRINEMIG code is an explicit time-marching finite-difference code that solves a mass balance equation and uses the Jenks equation to predict velocities of brine migration. Predictions were made for the seven potentially acceptable salt sites under consideration as locations for the first US high-level nuclear waste repository. Predicted total quantities of accumulated brine were on the order of 1 m 3 brine per waste package or less. Less brine accumulation is expected at domal salt sites because of the lower initial moisture contents relative to bedded salt sites. Less total accumulation of brine is predicted for spent fuel than for commercial high-level waste because of the lower temperatures generated by spent fuel. 11 refs., 36 figs., 29 tabs

  19. PII- Potential Innovation Index: a Tool to Benchmark Innovation Capabilities in International Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Galvez

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Benchmarking has become a useful tool for companies, enabling better decision-making and improvement of internal practices towards world-class performance. Nevertheless, concerning SMEs’ innovation capabilities from traditional sectors, benchmarking applications have been scarce. This article uses a predefined metric named the “Potential Innovation Index (PII”, based on internal practices of the firms to compare innovation capabilities of two groups of similar SMEs from 2 different geographical, cultural and social contexts. Results were used to analyze similarities and differences, strengths and weaknesses of the groups. Obtained results confirm the difficulties to innovate of this type firms, no matters the sector or country, as over 55% of the companies studied were evaluated as having a low innovative performance. However, regarding the index’s constitutive practices, significant differences were found. Which leads to infer that innovation support strategies to enhance innovation must be adapted to the local context and culture.

  20. Do Mergers of Potentially Dominant firms foster Innovation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cefis, E.; Sabidussi, A.; Schenk, E.J.J.

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the effects of M&A on innovation in the specific context of potential or realized market dominance. Authorities are challenged by balancing both detrimental and beneficial effects of mergers on innovation, especially when a merger threatens to result in market dominance, while

  1. The potential for disruptive innovations in nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, F.P.

    2014-01-01

    The concept of 'disruptive innovation' is a management tool that provides a framework for understanding the structure and dynamics of technology markets, especially their sometimes acute response to innovation. The concept was used in a preliminary assessment of a number of energy technologies, including renewable energy technologies and energy storage, as well as nuclear technologies, as they interact in industry and the marketplace. The technologies were assessed and perspectives were provided on their current potential for innovation to disrupt the value networks behind electricity markets. The findings indicate that this concept may provide useful guidance for the planning of technology development. (author)

  2. The potential for disruptive innovations in nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, F.P., E-mail: fred.adams@cnl.ca [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-12-01

    The concept of 'disruptive innovation' is a management tool that provides a framework for understanding the structure and dynamics of technology markets, especially their sometimes acute response to innovation. The concept was used in a preliminary assessment of a number of energy technologies, including renewable energy technologies and energy storage, as well as nuclear technologies, as they interact in industry and the marketplace. The technologies were assessed and perspectives were provided on their current potential for innovation to disrupt the value networks behind electricity markets. The findings indicate that this concept may provide useful guidance for the planning of technology development. (author)

  3. An assessment of EU-funded research projects: innovators and their innovative potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nepelski, D.; Pesole, A.; Van Roy, V.; O’Neill, E.

    2016-07-01

    The European Commission's Framework Programme constitutes an important share in R&D expenditures in Europe. A number of FP7 projects certainly produce cutting-edge technologies and a significant percentage of these technologies could be commercialized. However, there is a general feeling that not all these technologies and innovations with commercial potential reach the market. The question is why? The Innovation Radar (IR) is a support initiative that focuses on the identification of high-potential innovations in the ICT FP7 projects and the key organization in delivering these innovations to the market. The current paper documents the details of the IR methodology and the results of its first application. (Author)

  4. Innovative reactor core: potentialities and design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artioli, C.; Petrovich, Carlo; Grasso, Giacomo

    2010-01-01

    Gen IV nuclear reactors are considered a very attractive answer for the demand of energy. Because public acceptance they have to fulfil very clearly the requirement of sustainable development. In this sense a reactor concept, having by itself a rather no significant interaction with the environment both on the front and back end ('adiabatic concept'), is vital. This goal in mind, a new way of designing such a core has to be assumed. The starting point must be the 'zero impact'. Therefore the core will be designed having as basic constraints: a) fed with only natural or depleted Uranium, and b) discharges only fission products. Meantime its potentiality as a net burner of Minor Actinide has to be carefully estimated. This activity, referred to the ELSY reactor, shows how to design such an 'adiabatic' core and states its reasonable capability of burning MA legacy in the order of 25-50 kg/GW e y. (authors)

  5. Expect With Me: development and evaluation design for an innovative model of group prenatal care to improve perinatal outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Shayna D; Lewis, Jessica B; Thomas, Jordan L; Grilo, Stephanie A; Ickovics, Jeannette R

    2017-05-18

    Despite biomedical advances and intervention efforts, rates of preterm birth and other adverse outcomes in the United States have remained relatively intransigent. Evidence suggests that group prenatal care can reduce these risks, with implications for maternal and child health as well as substantial cost savings. However, widespread dissemination presents challenges, in part because training and health systems have not been designed to deliver care in a group setting. This manuscript describes the design and evaluation of Expect With Me, an innovative model of group prenatal care with a strong integrated information technology (IT) platform designed to be scalable nationally. Expect With Me follows clinical guidelines from the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Expect With Me incorporates the best evidence-based features of existing models of group care with a novel integrated IT platform designed to improve patient engagement and support, enhance health behaviors and decision making, connect providers and patients, and improve health service delivery. A multisite prospective longitudinal cohort study is being conducted to examine the impact of Expect With Me on perinatal and postpartum outcomes, and to identify and address barriers to national scalability. Process and outcome evaluation will include quantitative and qualitative data collection at patient, provider, and organizational levels. Mixed-method data collection includes patient surveys, medical record reviews, patient focus groups; provider surveys, session evaluations, provider focus groups and in-depth interviews; an online tracking system; and clinical site visits. A two-to-one matched cohort of women receiving individual care from each site will provide a comparison group (n = 1,000 Expect With Me patients; n = 2,000 individual care patients) for outcome and cost analyses. By bundling prevention and care services into a high-touch, high-tech group prenatal care model

  6. Potentials and Challenges of Student Progress Portfolio Innovation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper aims at stimulating discussion on Students Progress Portfolio (SPP) Innovation in assessment. It analyses the potential and challenges of SPP as well as how it can be harnessed to improve assessment practices and its contribution to quality education. The paper is based on a recent qualitative research which ...

  7. Educational innovation, learning technologies and Virtual culture potential'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Riley

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Learning technologies are regularly associated with innovative teaching but will they contribute to profound innovations in education itself? This paper addresses the question by building upon Merlin.Donald's co-evolutionary theory of mind, cognition and culture. He claimed that the invention of technologies for storing and sharing external symbol systems, such as writing, gave rise to a 'theoretic culture' with rich symbolic representations and a resultant need for formal education. More recently, Shaffer and Kaput have claimed that the development of external and shared symbol-processing technologies is giving rise to an emerging 'virtual culture'. They argue that mathematics curricula are grounded in theoretic culture and should change to meet the novel demands of 'virtual culture' for symbol-processing and representational fluency. The generic character of their cultural claim is noted in this paper and it is suggested that equivalent pedagogic arguments are applicable across the educational spectrum. Hence, four general characteristics of virtual culture are proposed, against which applications of learning technologies can be evaluated for their innovative potential. Two illustrative uses of learning technologies are evaluated in terms of their 'virtual culture potential' and some anticipated questions about this approach are discussed towards the end of the paper.

  8. Buzz Factor or Innovation Potential: What Explains Cryptocurrencies’ Returns?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sha

    2017-01-01

    Cryptocurrencies have become increasingly popular since the introduction of bitcoin in 2009. In this paper, we identify factors associated with variations in cryptocurrencies’ market values. In the past, researchers argued that the “buzz” surrounding cryptocurrencies in online media explained their price variations. But this observation obfuscates the notion that cryptocurrencies, unlike fiat currencies, are technologies entailing a true innovation potential. By using, for the first time, a unique measure of innovation potential, we find that the latter is in fact the most important factor associated with increases in cryptocurrency returns. By contrast, we find that the buzz surrounding cryptocurrencies is negatively associated with returns after controlling for a variety of factors, such as supply growth and liquidity. Also interesting is our finding that a cryptocurrency’s association with fraudulent activity is not negatively associated with weekly returns—a result that further qualifies the media’s influence on cryptocurrencies. Finally, we find that an increase in supply is positively associated with weekly returns. Taken together, our findings show that cryptocurrencies do not behave like traditional currencies or commodities—unlike what most prior research has assumed—and depict an industry that is much more mature, and much less speculative, than has been implied by previous accounts. PMID:28085906

  9. Buzz Factor or Innovation Potential: What Explains Cryptocurrencies' Returns?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sha; Vergne, Jean-Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Cryptocurrencies have become increasingly popular since the introduction of bitcoin in 2009. In this paper, we identify factors associated with variations in cryptocurrencies' market values. In the past, researchers argued that the "buzz" surrounding cryptocurrencies in online media explained their price variations. But this observation obfuscates the notion that cryptocurrencies, unlike fiat currencies, are technologies entailing a true innovation potential. By using, for the first time, a unique measure of innovation potential, we find that the latter is in fact the most important factor associated with increases in cryptocurrency returns. By contrast, we find that the buzz surrounding cryptocurrencies is negatively associated with returns after controlling for a variety of factors, such as supply growth and liquidity. Also interesting is our finding that a cryptocurrency's association with fraudulent activity is not negatively associated with weekly returns-a result that further qualifies the media's influence on cryptocurrencies. Finally, we find that an increase in supply is positively associated with weekly returns. Taken together, our findings show that cryptocurrencies do not behave like traditional currencies or commodities-unlike what most prior research has assumed-and depict an industry that is much more mature, and much less speculative, than has been implied by previous accounts.

  10. Buzz Factor or Innovation Potential: What Explains Cryptocurrencies' Returns?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sha Wang

    Full Text Available Cryptocurrencies have become increasingly popular since the introduction of bitcoin in 2009. In this paper, we identify factors associated with variations in cryptocurrencies' market values. In the past, researchers argued that the "buzz" surrounding cryptocurrencies in online media explained their price variations. But this observation obfuscates the notion that cryptocurrencies, unlike fiat currencies, are technologies entailing a true innovation potential. By using, for the first time, a unique measure of innovation potential, we find that the latter is in fact the most important factor associated with increases in cryptocurrency returns. By contrast, we find that the buzz surrounding cryptocurrencies is negatively associated with returns after controlling for a variety of factors, such as supply growth and liquidity. Also interesting is our finding that a cryptocurrency's association with fraudulent activity is not negatively associated with weekly returns-a result that further qualifies the media's influence on cryptocurrencies. Finally, we find that an increase in supply is positively associated with weekly returns. Taken together, our findings show that cryptocurrencies do not behave like traditional currencies or commodities-unlike what most prior research has assumed-and depict an industry that is much more mature, and much less speculative, than has been implied by previous accounts.

  11. DEVELOPMENT OF INNOVATIVE LEADERSHIP POTENTIAL IN EDUCATION SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Y. Ogorodnikov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research is to reveal the educational formation mechanisms of manager personality, including the ability to operate the intellectual capital at all levels of activities, to disclose innovative competence in dealingwith special problems as the regulation of social and organizational processes, to apply knowledge on the management factors efficiency, human needs, attitudes, and modern management techniques. Methods. The research outcomes include the methods of social control organization in the innovation sphere, based on the design of the value system that integrates the intellectual activities of employees into a unified semantic informational space, which promotes the socio-cultural development of various social groups and institutions. Sociological methods of the expert survey in the form of in-depth interviews are applied as an empirical basis of the present study. Cognitive modeling method is used in the course of interpretation and data analysis. The author draws the conclusion using the method of dialectical opposition unity. Results. The research findings demonstrate the characteristics of managers who are good at effective mobilizing the intellectual resources while encouraging the staff members’ capabilities of self-development and self-training. The article deals with the integral indicators of management entity engagement including the arrangement of conditions and interaction system that sustain innovative values updating in some organizations in order to improve organization efficiency in accordance with the stated objectives.Scientific novelty. The author summarizes the theoretical basis of modern means and methods of social institutions management, including educational institutions. General management mechanisms of innovative leadership potential realization are presented in the form of the hierarchic unity. It is shown that intellectualcapital integration into innovative processes of an organization

  12. Unlocking the full potential of open innovation in the life sciences through a classification system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Niclas; Minssen, Timo

    2018-04-01

    A common understanding of expectations and requirements is critical for boosting research-driven business opportunities in open innovation (OI) settings. Transparent communication requires common definitions and standards for OI to align the expectations of both parties. Here, we suggest a five-level classification system for OI models, reflecting the degree of openness. The aim of this classification system is to reduce contract negotiation complexity and times between two parties looking to engage in OI. Systematizing definitions and contractual terms for OI in the life sciences helps to reduce entry barriers and boosts collaborative value generation. By providing a contractual framework with predefined rules, science will be allowed to move more freely, thus maximizing the potential of OI. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. The trade-off between expected risk and the potential for large accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niehaus, F.; de Leon, G.; Cullingford, M.

    1984-01-01

    This paper, by Niehaus, de Leon, and Cullingford, examines the relationship between expected risk and the potential for large accidents. Using historical data for airplane accidents from 19471980, the authors show that a reduction of the expected value of risk often results in an increase in the potential for catastrophe. Phrased differently, the authors suggest that there may be a nenessary trade-off between high-probability/low-consequence risk and low-probability/high-consequence risk. The implications of this study for energy systems, for oil and gas supply, and for nuclear systems are also given

  14. Selecting for Creativity and Innovation Potential: Implications for Practice in Healthcare Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Fiona; Zibarras, Lara Dawn

    2017-01-01

    The ability to innovate is an important requirement in many organisations. Despite this pressing need, few selection systems in healthcare focus on identifying the potential for creativity and innovation and so this area has been vastly under-researched. As a first step towards understanding how we might select for creativity and innovation, this…

  15. Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA frames innovation as critical to the protection of human health and the environment through initiatives such as sustainable practices, innovative research, prize competitions, innovation awards, partnerships, and community activities.

  16. Soundscape expectations of rural tourism: A comparison between Chinese and English potential tourists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xinxin; Kang, Jian; Zhu, Peisheng; Wang, Shiyuan

    2018-01-01

    A questionnaire survey was carried out for a comparative study between Chinese and English potential tourists to examine their soundscape expectation. The results show that while both groups prefer natural sounds most, compared to the English, the Chinese expect natural, livestock, melodic sounds more, and traffic and industrial sounds less. The sound categories related to the interactions between human activities and nature play a more dominant role for the English than the Chinese, in terms of preference of sound sources. On the expectation of a holistic soundscape, function is the most important aspect for the Chinese, while that for the English is sound characteristics; the expected psychological perception for the English is associated with emotional response rather than basic ecology consciousness, as for the Chinese.

  17. The Potential Role of Innovative Indian SMEs in Sustainable Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionica Oncioiu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available India has experienced a robust economic growth in the recent years, but with a trajectory which offers both positive and negative lessons on the business innovation faced by many countries in Asia and elsewhere in the developing world. This study sought to test the relationship between innovation, financial performance and economic growth. Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics on the factors that contribute to assuring the innovation of the processes involved in the financial performance and economic development in the rubber and plastic product sector in India. The results revealed that there is a positive relationship between innovation and economic growth, as well as between innovation and the financial performance of the company. Finally, the conclusion presents implications, limitations and directions for future research regarding the importance of innovation to the firm’s performance. A clear lesson from this study is that the future must include promoting Innovative Indian SMEs; in other words, business competitiveness depends on the creativity and innovativeness of its entrepreneurship.

  18. THE PROBLEMS OF DEVELOPMENT OF INDUSTRIAL ENTERPRISES’ INNOVATIVE POTENTIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alla Vasilevna Cherep

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In spite of the fact that works of many scientists are dedicated to researches of innovative strategies’ essence and issues of their formation, there has been no unanimous opinion on determination of the innovative strategy concept up to now. Some authors consider that “an innovative strategy is a plan, in the sense that it covers the entire length of a process, from researches, through production and sales to use, with basic points of "interference" and control being marked, rates of increase in a technological level and methods of finding intellectual labour products necessary for this purpose being determined”. Others understand the definition of an innovative strategy as "timely concentration of management efforts on mastering and using prospective accomplishments of scientific and technical development and timely supply of innovations dynamics with resources" [1, p. 112].DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-7-54

  19. STAKEHOLDERS’ OPINIONS AND EXPECTATIONS OF THE GLOBAL FUND AND THEIR POTENTIAL ECONOMIC IMPLICATIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galárraga, Omar; Bertozzi, Stefano M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To analyze stakeholder opinions and expectations of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria, and to discuss their potential economic and financial implications. Design The Global Fund commissioned an independent study, the “360° Stakeholder Assessment,” to canvas feedback on the organization’s reputation and performance with an on-line survey of 909 respondents representing major stakeholders worldwide. We created a proxy for expectations based on categorical responses for specific Global Fund attributes’ importance to the stakeholders, and current perceived performance. Methods Using multivariate regression, we analyzed 23 unfulfilled expectations related to: resource mobilization; impact measurement; harmonization and inclusion; effectiveness of the Global Fund partner environment; and portfolio characteristics. The independent variables are personal- and regional-level characteristics that affect expectations. Results The largest unfulfilled expectations relate to: mobilization of private sector resources; efficiency in disbursing funds; and assurance that people affected by the three diseases are reached. Stakeholders involved with the Fund through the Country Coordinating Mechanisms, those working in multilateral organizations, and persons living with HIV are more likely to have unfulfilled expectations. In contrast, higher levels of involvement with the Fund correlate with fulfilled expectations. Stakeholders living in sub-Saharan Africa were less likely to have their expectations met. Conclusions Stakeholders unfulfilled expectations result largely from factors external to them, but also from factors over which they have influence. In particular, attributes related to partnership score poorly even though stakeholders have influence in that area. Joint efforts to address perceived performance gaps may improve future performance, and positively influence investment levels and economic viability. PMID:18664957

  20. Illegal streaming as disruptive innovation : How the established companies within the television industry deal with potential disruptive innovations

    OpenAIRE

    Myhra, Cecilie Victoria

    2013-01-01

    This thesis was written to examine how the established companies within the television industry in Norway deal with potential disruptive innovations. In this case the disruptive innovation is illegal streaming of sports, series and movies. This is common among the younger population, which is not the incumbents’ main target. In that way, illegal streaming can grow without them knowing it, and in worst case eventually push them out of the market. Especially when the users can “save” 900 NOK on...

  1. The external expectations of potential real estate buyers in Slovenia and Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojan Grum

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents partial results of a survey being conducted in Slovenia and Japan. It seeks to determine the factors that have a decisive influence over potential real estate buyers when deciding to purchase. The article focuses on the role of potential buyers’ external expectations in relation to their various cultural identities. We follow the hypothesis that these differences in external expectations are statistically significant. The primary instrument for measuring participants’ expectations was a survey in which 1,270 people participated. We statistically analysed the results by conducting a one-way analysis of variance related to the participants’ various cultural identities. By analysing the results of the statistical analyses, we confirmed the hypothesis. It is evident from the results that Slovenian participants had lower expectations in terms of Slovenia’s legal, taxation and other regulatory measures in housing compared to Japanese participants. Considering that legislation represents the Slovenian government’s primary influence over the real estate market, the expectations of the participants in our survey show that Slovenian buyers’ confidence should be increased in this area.

  2. Potential years lost and life expectancy in adults with newly diagnosed epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granbichler, Claudia A; Zimmermann, Georg; Oberaigner, Willi; Kuchukhidze, Giorgi; Ndayisaba, Jean-Pierre; Taylor, Alexandra; Luef, Gerhard; Bathke, Arne C; Trinka, Eugen

    2017-11-01

    Studies using relative measures, such as standardized mortality ratios, have shown that patients with epilepsy have an increased mortality. Reports on more direct and absolute measure such as life expectancy are sparse. We report potential years lost and how life expectancy has changed over 40 years in a cohort of patients with newly diagnosed epilepsy. We analyzed life expectancy in a cohort of adult patients diagnosed with definite epilepsy between 1970 and 2010. Those with brain tumor as cause of epilepsy were excluded. By retrospective probabilistic record linkage, living or death status was derived from the national death registry. We estimated life expectancy by a Weibull regression model using gender, age at diagnosis, epilepsy etiology, and year of diagnosis as covariates at time of epilepsy diagnosis, and 5, 10, 15, and 20 years after diagnosis. Results were compared to the general population, and 95% confidence intervals are given. There were 249 deaths (105 women, age at death 19.0-104.0 years) in 1,112 patients (11,978.4 person-years, 474 women, 638 men). A substantial decrease in life expectancy was observed for only a few subgroups, strongly depending on epilepsy etiology and time of diagnosis: time of life lost was highest in patients with symptomatic epilepsy diagnosed between 1970 and 1980; the impact declined with increasing time from diagnosis. Over half of the analyzed subgroups did not differ significantly from the general population. This effect was reversed in the later decades, and life expectancy was prolonged in some subgroups, reaching a maximum in those with newly diagnosed idiopathic and cryptogenic epilepsy between 2001 and 2010. Life expectancy is reduced in symptomatic epilepsies. However, in other subgroups, a prolonged life expectancy was found, which has not been reported previously. Reasons may be manifold and call for further study. © 2017 The Authors. Epilepsia published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International

  3. Stimulating the Potential: Creative Performance and Communication in Innovation Teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kratzer, Jan; Leenders, R.Th.A.J.; Engelen, Jo M.L.

    2004-01-01

    Creativity is essential to successful new product development efforts. Teams constitute the organizing principle in most modern innovation activities. Although creativity research has revealed many factors influencing individual creativity, little is known about how team-level creativity is

  4. INNOVATION POTENTIAL: IMPACT ON THE NATIONAL ECONOMY’S COMPETITIVENESS OF THE EU DEVELOPED COUNTRIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iryna Lomachynska

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The success of the economy of each country is determined by its innovation development. The purpose of the paper is to investigate the essence of innovation potential and its role in providing the national economy’s competitiveness under the conditions of technological changes on the example of the European Union developed countries. The subject of research is the innovation potential of Austria and Germany. Methodology. The study is based on a comparative analysis of approaches to determination and evaluation of innovation potential in specialized economic literature. Analysis and synthesis and the system approach were used to outline the entity of innovation potential, to explore and structure its elements in the context of providing the national economy’s competitiveness. The quality and quantity analysis were used to discover general characteristics of the EU countries’ innovation development, special aspects of the national innovation systems of Austria and Germany, the role of innovation potential in the national economies competitiveness of these countries. The method of mathematical modelling in economics, in particular, regression analysis based on annual data for the period from 1995 to 2015, was applied to assess the impact of innovation potential on the Austria and Germany competitiveness. The absolute value of GDP and the share of export of goods and services in GDP are used as a dependent variable. Elements that characterize the country’s innovation potential were used as independent variables: the share of researchers in R&D of total population, the share of labour force with advanced education of total working-age population with advanced education, expenditure on tertiary education as a percentage of GDP, R&D expenditure as a percentage of GDP, patent applications as a percentage of total population. Results of the survey of theoretical works showed that the most multifaceted and comprehensive approach to determining the

  5. Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Janni; Yaganeh, Suzanne; Bloch Rasmussen, Leif

    2013-01-01

    This paper contributes to a theoretical discussion of creation of innovation with participants in, or outside, organisations. We address the creation of innovation with a complex theoretical understanding drawing on the Scandinavian and the Participatory Design tradition introducing two approaches...... to the processes of innovation. We ask if innovation can be initiated and enhanced looking at two collaborative approaches; participatory innovation (PIN) and cooperative innovation (COIN). We invite to dialogue and reflections on PIN’s conflict and creative frictions on one side and COIN’s complexity......, complementarity in diversity and the didactic scaffolding of the innovation process on the other side. Our contribution focuses on the methods and practices for facilitation of co-creating activities between different groups leading to cooperation, and innovation in thinking....

  6. Graduate radiographers' expectations for role development - The potential impact of misalignment of expectation and valence on staff retention and service provision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williamson, Keren [Department of Radiography, School of Healthcare Studies, Cardiff University, Heath Park, Cardiff CF14 4XN (United Kingdom)], E-mail: williamsonk2@cardiff.ac.uk; Mundy, Lynn A. [Department of Radiography, School of Healthcare Studies, Cardiff University, Heath Park, Cardiff CF14 4XN (United Kingdom)

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the role development expectations of graduate radiographers with a view to predicting the potential impact of a misalignment of these expectations and valence on service delivery and staff retention. A final year cohort of radiography students completed a questionnaire designed to explore topics associated with role development opportunities. Method: Structured questionnaires, in the Likert scale format, utilised 20 attitude questions constructed to elicit information in relation to 3 main themes of investigation; expectation, valence and knowledge. Results: All participants (n = 37) stated an expectation for role development opportunities with 97.3% (n = 36) indicating that these expectations would be realised within 5 years of graduation and 75.7% (n = 28) within 2 years of graduation. A significant correlation between expectation for role development and job satisfaction was seen (p < 0.05). 81.1% (n = 30) of participants stated turnover intentions in order to meet their expectations. Conclusion: There is an expectation for role development opportunities for new graduates with a valence noted of the intrinsic reward of meeting these expectations. Expectation and valence are seen to be intrinsically linked with job satisfaction suggesting that misalignment of these would have a potentially negative impact on motivation and retention of the future radiography workforce demonstrating a positive correlation with withdrawal behaviours, including turnover intentions. In a relatively small professional group such as radiography the phenomenon of group cohesion may be strong suggesting that withdrawal behaviours may manifest as 'resignation in post', impacting on the quality of care and service provision for patients.

  7. Graduate radiographers' expectations for role development - The potential impact of misalignment of expectation and valence on staff retention and service provision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, Keren; Mundy, Lynn A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the role development expectations of graduate radiographers with a view to predicting the potential impact of a misalignment of these expectations and valence on service delivery and staff retention. A final year cohort of radiography students completed a questionnaire designed to explore topics associated with role development opportunities. Method: Structured questionnaires, in the Likert scale format, utilised 20 attitude questions constructed to elicit information in relation to 3 main themes of investigation; expectation, valence and knowledge. Results: All participants (n = 37) stated an expectation for role development opportunities with 97.3% (n = 36) indicating that these expectations would be realised within 5 years of graduation and 75.7% (n = 28) within 2 years of graduation. A significant correlation between expectation for role development and job satisfaction was seen (p < 0.05). 81.1% (n = 30) of participants stated turnover intentions in order to meet their expectations. Conclusion: There is an expectation for role development opportunities for new graduates with a valence noted of the intrinsic reward of meeting these expectations. Expectation and valence are seen to be intrinsically linked with job satisfaction suggesting that misalignment of these would have a potentially negative impact on motivation and retention of the future radiography workforce demonstrating a positive correlation with withdrawal behaviours, including turnover intentions. In a relatively small professional group such as radiography the phenomenon of group cohesion may be strong suggesting that withdrawal behaviours may manifest as 'resignation in post', impacting on the quality of care and service provision for patients.

  8. Innovation in diagnostic imaging services: assessing the potential for value-based reimbursement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, Louis P; Bresnahan, Brian W; Higashi, Mitchell K; Hollingworth, William; Jarvik, Jeffrey G

    2011-09-01

    Innovation in the field of diagnostic imaging is based primarily on the availability of new and improved equipment that opens the door for new clinical applications. Payments for these imaging procedures are subject to complex Medicare price control schemes, affecting incentives for appropriate use and innovation. Achieving a "dynamically efficient" health care system-one that elicits a socially optimal amount of innovation-requires that innovators be rewarded in relation to the value they add and can demonstrate with evidence. The authors examine how and whether value-based reimbursement for diagnostic imaging services might better reward innovation explicitly for expected improvements in health and economic outcomes. Copyright © 2011 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Global biomass production potentials exceed expected future demand without the need for cropland expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauser, Wolfram; Klepper, Gernot; Zabel, Florian; Delzeit, Ruth; Hank, Tobias; Putzenlechner, Birgitta; Calzadilla, Alvaro

    2015-11-12

    Global biomass demand is expected to roughly double between 2005 and 2050. Current studies suggest that agricultural intensification through optimally managed crops on today's cropland alone is insufficient to satisfy future demand. In practice though, improving crop growth management through better technology and knowledge almost inevitably goes along with (1) improving farm management with increased cropping intensity and more annual harvests where feasible and (2) an economically more efficient spatial allocation of crops which maximizes farmers' profit. By explicitly considering these two factors we show that, without expansion of cropland, today's global biomass potentials substantially exceed previous estimates and even 2050s' demands. We attribute 39% increase in estimated global production potentials to increasing cropping intensities and 30% to the spatial reallocation of crops to their profit-maximizing locations. The additional potentials would make cropland expansion redundant. Their geographic distribution points at possible hotspots for future intensification.

  10. Innovative potential as element of competitive development of the enterprise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kruglova Olga Valentinovna

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Scientific approaches and the methodical tools, allowing to form the strategic capacity of the commercial organizations taking into account its innovative component which in turn allows to define possibilities of the company with an acceptable accuracy are considered, and in the subsequent to consider and use them when developing competitive strategy of the development. These calculations are approved at the enterprises of the Nizhny Novgorod Region and proved the practical and economic importance.

  11. Innovation and growth potentials of European regions: A meta-multi-criteria analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijkamp, P.; Zwetsloot, F.; van der Wal, S.

    2010-01-01

    Creative regions are nowadays seen as foci of innovation and growth and are hence regarded strategic areas in a fierce-and often global-competition. This paper aims at providing an operational assessment framework for evaluating the innovation potential of competing regions on the basis of

  12. Cutting through the Hype: Evaluating the Innovative Potential of New Educational Technologies through Business Model Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalman, Yoram M.

    2016-01-01

    In an era when novel educational technologies are constantly introduced to the marketplace, often accompanied by hyperbolic claims that these ground-breaking innovations will transform the educational landscape, decision makers in educational institutions need a methodological approach for examining the innovative potential of new educational…

  13. Do mergers of potentially dominant firms foster innovation? An empirical analysis for the manufacturing sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cefis, E.; Sabidussi, A.; Schenk, E.J.J

    We investigate the effects of M&A on innovation in the specific context of potential or realized market dominance. Authorities are challenged by balancing both detrimental and beneficial effects of mergers on innovation, especially when a merger threatens to result in market dominance, while firms

  14. The Potential for Innovation in the Swedish Food Sector

    OpenAIRE

    Beckeman, Märit

    2011-01-01

    The food sector in Sweden, comprised of retailers, food manufacturers and packaging suppliers, has been investigated, guided by two research questions: What does “innovation” mean to the different actors (i.e. is there a gap in opinions)? How is innovation performed and what are the key issues? But before this research of the present, the past was studied (the author’s licentiate) to identify and describe the factors and reasons behind the growing food sector in Sweden after World War II, par...

  15. Selecting for creativity and innovation potential: implications for practice in healthcare education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Fiona; Zibarras, Lara Dawn

    2017-05-01

    The ability to innovate is an important requirement in many organisations. Despite this pressing need, few selection systems in healthcare focus on identifying the potential for creativity and innovation and so this area has been vastly under-researched. As a first step towards understanding how we might select for creativity and innovation, this paper explores the use of a trait-based measure of creativity and innovation potential, and evaluates its efficacy for use in selection for healthcare education. This study uses a sample of 188 postgraduate physicians applying for education and training in UK General Practice. Participants completed two questionnaires (a trait-based measure of creativity and innovation, and a measure of the Big Five personality dimensions) and were also rated by assessors on creative problem solving measured during a selection centre. In exploring the construct validity of the trait-based measure of creativity and innovation, our research clarifies the associations between personality, and creativity and innovation. In particular, our study highlights the importance of motivation in the creativity and innovation process. Results also suggest that Openness to Experience is positively related to creativity and innovation whereas some aspects of Conscientiousness are negatively associated with creativity and innovation. Results broadly support the utility of using a trait-based measure of creativity and innovation in healthcare selection processes, although practically this may be best delivered as part of an interview process, rather than as a screening tool. Findings are discussed in relation to broader implications for placing more priority on creativity and innovation as selection criteria within healthcare education and training in future.

  16. An innovative liquid metal design with worldwide application potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinn, J.E.; Berglund, R.C.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports that the United States nuclear program has been faced with major political, economic and technical challenges in recent years. One US program element, the Liquid Metal Reactor, has addressed these challenges in a systematic, focused manner. The result is an innovative modular design incorporating safety features that utilize inherent characteristics. This Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR) is based on the PRISM concept, originated by the General Electric Company in 1981. This design should also be attractive in other developed countries that have deployed, and/or are deploying, nuclear power. The design's safety features can achieve neutronic shutdown and decay heat removal without relying on operator action or engineered active safety features. The ALMR utilizes many innovations including: a passive reactor vessel air cooling system for decay heat removal; the use of a sealed reactor assembly; seismic isolation; electromagnetic primary pumps; and an in-vessel fuel transfer machine. The US ALMR design incorporates a metal fuel core as its reference, however, the required safety performance can also be achieved with an oxide core having similar safety features. This flexibility is particularly important when addressing world wide ALMR applications. The reference ALMR reactor module, of which there are nine in a typical 1395 MW e plant, has a -6 meter by -20 meter vessel and a 471 MW thermal output, with a reactor outlet temperature of 485 degrees C and an overall conversion efficiency of 33%. This plant uses a saturated steam cycle and a non-safety grade secondary sodium system

  17. Innovators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    NEA Today, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Describes various innovations that have been developed to enhance education. These innovations include: helping educators help at-risk students succeed; promoting high school journalism; ensuring quality online learning experiences; developing a student performing group that uses theater to address social issues; and having students design their…

  18. Formation of the controlling mechanism in the management of innovative development of enterprise potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Андрій Анатолійович Пилипенко

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the guidelines for the formation of the controlling mechanism in the activation cycles of innovative activities and the formation of the development programs of the enterprise potential. It is offered understanding the development potential and proved grouping of controlled performance, taking into account the level of innovation ability of the enterprise. It is presented the strategic matrix of determining the composition of performance, determination of monitoring parameters and aspects of controlling mechanism

  19. The Potential Role of Social Innovation Financing in Career and Technical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overholster, George; Klein, Steven

    2015-01-01

    A new class of financial tools is being developed to promote human capital investments that benefit society. Social innovation financing (SIF) entails raising private capital to support promising social interventions, with the expectation that those providing the funding will eventually be repaid. Funds are allocated based on service providers'…

  20. Automatic temporal expectancy: a high-density event-related potential study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Mento

    Full Text Available How we compute time is not fully understood. Questions include whether an automatic brain mechanism is engaged in temporally regular environmental structure in order to anticipate events, and whether this can be dissociated from task-related processes, including response preparation, selection and execution. To investigate these issues, a passive temporal oddball task requiring neither time-based motor response nor explicit decision was specifically designed and delivered to participants during high-density, event-related potentials recording. Participants were presented with pairs of audiovisual stimuli (S1 and S2 interspersed with an Inter-Stimulus Interval (ISI that was manipulated according to an oddball probabilistic distribution. In the standard condition (70% of trials, the ISI lasted 1,500 ms, while in the two alternative, deviant conditions (15% each, it lasted 2,500 and 3,000 ms. The passive over-exposition to the standard ISI drove participants to automatically and progressively create an implicit temporal expectation of S2 onset, reflected by the time course of the Contingent Negative Variation response, which always peaked in correspondence to the point of S2 maximum expectation and afterwards inverted in polarity towards the baseline. Brain source analysis of S1- and ISI-related ERP activity revealed activation of sensorial cortical areas and the supplementary motor area (SMA, respectively. In particular, since the SMA time course synchronised with standard ISI, we suggest that this area is the major cortical generator of the temporal CNV reflecting an automatic, action-independent mechanism underlying temporal expectancy.

  1. The Problems of Realizing the Innovative Potential of Science and Mechanisms for their Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ianchenko Zinayida B.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article is revealing reasons for the low payoff of science in terms of the effectiveness of the research activity and demand for its results in economic spheres, identifying problems in the innovation activity of research institutions and reasons for their arising, searching for fundamental approaches to the development of a strategy and mechanisms for realization of the innovative potential of science to strengthen its position in the real sector. The study used general scientific methods, including: systems approach — to systematize the problems of the innovation activity of research institutions; methods of theoretical generalization — to study the theoretical principles of the scientific and innovation activity; methods of analysis and synthesis — to search for fundamental approaches to the development of mechanisms for realization of the innovative potential of science. The used concepts of scientific activity and innovations are generalized. The author’s definition of the term “innovation” is proposed. The main reasons of the minor impact of science on the economy are systematized, the mechanisms for their elimination are offered. Based on the comprehensive analysis of the reasons for losing by science its impact on the economy, the ways of realizing the innovative potential of science are improved. The results of the research can be used in reforming domestic scientific research institutions.

  2. Innovation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In recent years ULA has emphasized advocacy, and contributed to progress towards new legislation (freedom of information, copyright, the ... East African Community e-government strategy) of importance to the library and ... Innovation Vol.

  3. Transmutation potential of current and innovative nuclear power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slessarev, I.; Salvatores, M.; Uematsu, M.

    1993-01-01

    In the present paper we have investigated the transmutation potential of different nuclear systems from a physical point of view. Transuranium (TRU) elements have been considered, but also long lived fission products (LLFP). The potential for transmutation has to take into account not only the consumption of a specific nucleus (or of a specific 'family' of nuclei), but also the reproduction of other nuclei of higher masses. The present study allows an intercomparison taking into account both aspects. Technological, safety and design constraints were not considered at this stage. However strategic indications for future studies have been obtained. 3 refs., 3 tabs

  4. Development of innovative potential of the region as a way to increase Russian economy competitiveness in today's realities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamkova S. P.

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available the article explains the importance of the development of innovation as the economic competitiveness of regions of Russia. Considered term innovation potential of the region. The problems of development of innovative potential of the region and ways to solve them.

  5. INNOVATION POTENTIAL AS A DETERMINING FACTOR IN THE GROWTH OF COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGES BUILDING PRODUCTS

    OpenAIRE

    T. U. Levitsky; A. M. Esetova

    2014-01-01

    It is stipulated that the construction company, chosen the strategy of economic growth, should have some competitive advantages, determining opportunities for sustainable development and effective improving, and operational efficiency increase. One of the factors of the competitiveness increase of construction products is the innovative potential of construction industry. Methodical approaches to the evaluation of innovative capacity and its effect on the growth of competitive advantages have...

  6. INNOVATION POTENTIAL AS A DETERMINING FACTOR IN THE GROWTH OF COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGES BUILDING PRODUCTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. U. Levitsky

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It is stipulated that the construction company, chosen the strategy of economic growth, should have some competitive advantages, determining opportunities for sustainable development and effective improving, and operational efficiency increase. One of the factors of the competitiveness increase of construction products is the innovative potential of construction industry. Methodical approaches to the evaluation of innovative capacity and its effect on the growth of competitive advantages have been proposed. 

  7. Innovating the IPCC review process: The potential of young talent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veer, L.; Visser, H.; Petersen, A.C.; Janssen, P.H.M.

    2014-01-01

    There is significant potential in young talent for enhancing the credibility of the scientific assessments such as the IPCC’s by contributing to quality assurance and quality control. In this essay, we reflect on an experiment that was done by the Dutch government as part of its government review of

  8. Potential Students' Perceptions on Online Learning as Innovation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was conducted in consideration of increasing African education institutions' interest to offer online learning. The interest has been triggered by the great opportunities available with online education provision and contemporary global trends in such provision. An understanding of potential online students' ...

  9. A comparative assessment of the innovation potential of the Baltic Sea region countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klemeshev Andrey

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This article offers a comparative assessment of the Baltic region countries on the basis of three groups of indicators — indicators of economic and research potential, indicators of dynamics of economic and research potential development, and indicators of economic and innovation potential of the states of the region. The author emphasises the need for Russia to cooperate with other countries of the region in the field of innovations as well as the possible role for the Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University in this process.

  10. The formation and development of innovative potential of the company’s employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Kipervar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern economic development is possible on the basis of increase of efficiency of activity of enterprises, which is based on the rational use of the labor potential of employees. The current research is formulated and enriched the concept of labor potential, but there are still many unresolved theoretical and methodologically aspects related to the study of labor potential and its components, as they arise in connection with changes in the economy, the modern requirements to enterprises in the period of their innovative development. Innovative activities of enterprises should be based on the use of highly skilled, highly intelligent, high-performance staff able to generate, develop, apply new ideas, technologies and products. The requirements of the environment to stimulate enterprise in the formation of personnel, concerned in the results of the enterprise, upbeat and generating innovation. Particular attention should be given to the formation and development of innovative potential of employees as part of the labor potential, its planning, that will be reflected in improving the efficiency of the personnel and the efficiency of enterprises. It is necessary to further develop approaches to the formation and development of the capacity of workers in relation to the innovation component of labor potential, aimed at improving the competitiveness of enterprises. Results of the research outlined in this paper are aimed at deepening and broadening of theoretical bases in this area. The authors of the necessity of innovative development based on employee motivation structure and the level of their claims, professional, intellectual level, as well as realize their innovative potential. The necessity of its correction and give you strength-of planning in the direction of determining acceptable and normative values of the innovative potential of each category of workers, determination of deviations of actual values from the standard followed by the

  11. European veterinary public health specialization: post-graduate training and expectations of potential employers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Silvia; Dürr, Salome; Fahrion, Anna; Harisberger, Myriam; Papadopoulou, Christina; Zimmerli, Urs

    2013-01-01

    Residents of the European College of Veterinary Public Health (ECVPH) carried out a survey to explore the expectations and needs of potential employers of ECVPH diplomates and to assess the extent to which the ECVPH post-graduate training program meets those requirements. An online questionnaire was sent to 707 individuals working for universities, government organizations, and private companies active in the field of public health in 16 countries. Details on the structure and activities of the participants' organizations, their current knowledge of the ECVPH, and potential interest in employing veterinary public health (VPH) experts or hosting internships were collected. Participants were requested to rate 22 relevant competencies according to their importance for VPH professionals exiting the ECVPH training. A total of 138 completed questionnaires were included in the analysis. While generic skills such as "problem solving" and "broad horizon and inter-/multidisciplinary thinking" were consistently given high grades by all participants, the importance ascribed to more specialized skills was less homogeneous. The current ECVPH training more closely complies with the profile sought in academia, which may partly explain the lower employment rate of residents and diplomates within government and industry sectors. The study revealed a lack of awareness of the ECVPH among public health institutions and demonstrated the need for greater promotion of this veterinary specialization within Europe, both in terms of its training capacity and the professional skill-set of its diplomates. This study provides input for a critical revision of the ECVPH curriculum and the design of post-graduate training programs in VPH.

  12. Innovation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of Innovation journal of appropriate librarianship and information work in Southern Africa is to publish material on libraries, information supply and other related matters in South and Southern Africa. Vol 45 (2012). DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Open Access DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Subscription or Fee Access ...

  13. Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torfing, Jacob; Ricard, Lykke Margot

    2017-01-01

    Innovation i krydsfeltet mellem forskellige styringsparadigmer i offentlige organisationer. New Public Governance gør det muligt at skabe offentlig værdi på nye måder. Men NPG er ingen trylledrik, der fra den ene dag til den anden skaber balance mellem borgernes store forventninger og en trængt ø...

  14. How the Recession Affects the Expectations of Potential Acquirers of Real Estate Right in Deciding to Purchase Property?

    OpenAIRE

    Grum, Bojan; Grum, Darja Kobal

    2012-01-01

    The objective was to identify factors which are critical to potential acquirers of real estate right in deciding to purchase property. We analysed whether the recession is negatively associated with these expectations. The results of 1306 participant show that people generally expressed higher expectations in year 2009 than then in year 2011, as specially reflected by younger participants. Further analyses of the impact of statistically significant differences of potential acquirers of real e...

  15. Political Parties and Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bischoff, Carina Saxlund; Christiansen, Flemming Juul

    2017-01-01

    parties themselves as well their impact on potentially innovative public decisions. One major expectation is that hierarchical parties with centralized leadership make more efficient decisions but that sustainable innovation outcomes promoted by collaborative efforts are easier to obtain for decentralized...... political parties with participatory internal democratic processes....

  16. Innovation Inspired by Nature: Capabilities, Potentials and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2012-01-01

    Through evolution, nature came up with many effective solutions to its challenges and continually improving them. By mimicking, coping and being inspired, humans have been using Nature's solutions to address their own challenges. In recent years, the implementation of nature's capabilities has intensified with our growing understanding of the various biological and nastic mechanisms and processes. Successes include even the making of humanlike robots that perform such lifelike tasks as walking, talking, making eye-contact, interpreting speech and facial expressions, as well as many other humanlike functions. Generally, once humans are able to implement a function then, thru rapid advances in technology, capabilities are developed that can significantly exceed the original source of inspiration in Nature. Examples include flight where there is no species that can fly as high, carry so much mass, has so large dimensions and fly so fast, and operate at as such extreme conditions as our aircraft and other aerospace systems. However, using the capabilities of today's technology, there are many challenges that are not feasible to address in mimicking characteristics of species and plants. In this manuscript, state-of-the-art of biomimetic capabilities, potentials and challenges are reviewed.

  17. Innovation

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Présenté par FutuRIS, plate-forme prospective sur la recherche, l’innovation et la société animée par l’Association Nationale de la Recherche et de la Technologie, ce volume livre un panorama du système français de recherche et d’innovation dans son environnement européen. Sont abordés dans une première partie les champs décisionnels concernés, les politiques nationales menées en matière de R&D, les relations entre enseignement supérieur et recherche et l’Espace européen de la recherche à l’h...

  18. INNOVATION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helms, Niels Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Kravet om innovation og kreativitet er på flere måder en stor og en ny udfordring for voksenuddannelserne. Det udfordrer det didaktiske dilemma, det at vi skal gøres til kompetente og frie mennesker gennem pædagogiske handlinger, som netop pålægger os en ufrihed. – Men hvor denne ufrihed tidligere...... kunne begrundes med, at skolen eller uddannelsen vidste bedre, så er det ikke længere tilfældet. Skolen skal sørge for, at vi lærer noget – og ikke noget andet. Men det kan ikke længere med bestemthed afgøres, hvad det er vi skal lære i skolen, fordi det nye, det kreative og ikke mindst innovative...

  19. Russian Innovative Potential in the Conditions of Economic Sanctions: Reserves of Grown

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rustem M. Nureev

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes the impact of economic sanctions in general for innovative development of Russia, as well as individual sectors of oil, gas, financial and banking sector. It is shown that the ban on exports to the Russian oil and gas technology has led to the freezing of existing and refusal to enter into new projects. Increased production and export of US oil and gas have led to an increase in excess of the global scope of these types of raw materials and led to long-term downward trend in world energy prices. In recent years there has been a sharp decline in the net inflow of foreign direct investment in Russia, which exacerbates the problem of domestic sources of domestic innovation policy. The effect of sanctions on the development of the Russian economy as a whole and its individual regions is condifered. The paper describes the approaches to the definition of the innovation potential of the Russian region, identified several levels of manifestation of the region's potential and its characteristics, provides a definition of the region's innovation potential, discussed the factors influencing the development of the region's innovative capacity. The current state of the regional innovation system of the Russian Federation is analysed. The paper describes the main tasks of the Russian Federation Innovative Development Strategy for the period up to 2020. The degree of implementation of the Strategy, problems and prospects of realization of the basic provisions of the Strategy, the impact of the implementation of the Strategy on the Russian economy, its position in the index business are analysed in the paper.

  20. Science-based health innovation in Rwanda: unlocking the potential of a late bloomer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hughes Mike

    2010-12-01

    developing its health innovation system, mainly due to political goodwill. The areas of greatest potential for Rwanda are in traditional plant technologies. However, there is need for investments in domestic skill development as well as infrastructure that will enhance innovation. Of foremost importance is the establishment of a platform to link the various actors in the health innovation system.

  1. THEORETICAL AND PRACTICAL ASPECTS OF EXPLORATION THE INNOVATIVE ACTIVE ORGANIZATIONS’ POTENTIAL OF A BALANCED DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Khorev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary. The concept of "potential" put into practice as a method of study permits the uncertainty associated with the absence of any information about the conditions of functioning in the future. Critical importance is the study of the potential development of an economic entity. S.I. Ozhegov noted that development - natural process changes, the transition from one state to another, more perfect, the transition from an old qualitative state to a new, simple to complex, from lowest to highest. The essential content of balanced development potential based on study of the relationship concepts of «potential of the company», «the development of an economic entity», «balanced development» have been considered in the article. Particular attention is paid to the specifics of development of innovation-active organizations. Conclusion has been made that to the timely detection of potential balanced development need a comprehensive analysis of the conditions and factors functioning economic entity, which have been grouped into three groups: factors of macro, meso and micro level. A comprehensive study of the factors determining the future development of innovation-active enterprises has been conducted in the article. It is shown that the effectiveness of the balanced development of innovation-active organizations in general, and the object of research , in particular , is determined by such factors as the structure and needs of the market , the resource base of innovative development , effective management system development, innovation activity . The authors believe that the inclusion of the multifaceted impact of factors will allow innovative active organizations to build a control system which allows more accurately predict the perspective direction of their future development.

  2. "Maybe we should talk about it anyway": a qualitative study of understanding expectations and use of an established technology innovation in caring practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokke, Randi

    2017-09-15

    Technological innovations are strongly promoted to meet the demands posed by increased pressure on home care services and to assist ageing in place in western societies. Although heavily advocated as plug and play solutions, technologies have proven difficult and unpredictable when integrated into home care services. We need greater insight into what happens when technologies are integrated into caring practices. All technologies come with expectations as to their function. This study explores how actors who are involved with the social alarm, which is an established technology innovation, relate to, perceive and articulate these expectations of the technology in everyday living. The article presents results from a two-case study, using a triangulation of qualitative methods in order to gain an in-depth understanding of technology in use in home care services through "thick descriptions". The study was conducted in Norway and data were analysed using a stepwise deductive-inductive analysis. The empirical findings demonstrate that expectations regarding the social alarm, even though it represents a simple and well-established technology, are complex and multidimensional. The notion of script and domestication provided relevant tools for exploring these expectations and for understanding how actors interpret and adapt their practices of using the technology. This enabled a more comprehensive understanding of how technology opens up for different interpretations and puts values in play. This article suggests exploring technology in use as scripted in multidimensional script, and offers a frame for doing so. It also reveals how technology scripts and articulation prove important for understanding the complex reality when integrated into home care practices, thus identifying how using the technology leads to the taming and unleashing of both technology and actors. The study offers an increased understanding of how and why technology is unpredictable and works

  3. Potential Gains in Reproductive-Aged Life Expectancy by Eliminating Maternal Mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canudas-Romo, Vladimir; Liu, L; Zimmerman, L

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We assessed the change over time in the contribution of maternal mortality to a life expectancy calculated between ages 15 and 49, or Reproductive-Aged Life Expectancy (RALE). Our goal was to estimate the increase in RALE in developed countries over the twentieth century and the hypoth......Objective: We assessed the change over time in the contribution of maternal mortality to a life expectancy calculated between ages 15 and 49, or Reproductive-Aged Life Expectancy (RALE). Our goal was to estimate the increase in RALE in developed countries over the twentieth century....... Findings: In developed countries, five years in RALE were gained over the twentieth century, of which approximately 10%, or half a year, was attributable to reductions in maternal mortality. In sub-Saharan African countries, the possible achievable gains fluctuate between 0.24 and 1.47 years, or 6% and 44...

  4. THE ROLE OF THE INNOVATION POTENTIAL IN THE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM OF ECONOMIC SECURITY OF ENTERPRISES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. P. Anisimov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article explores the theoretical foundations of innovative potential of the enterprise and its role for sustainable development and economic security. The urgency of the problem of sustainable development innovative capacity, low level of theoretical and practical elaboration, poor methodological and conceptual basis for the development of economic security, increasing competitiveness and strengthening market situation of enterprises, determined the choice of the research topic. Scientific awareness of the key problems of the economy determined the significance of the research topic, the relevance of which is determined by the need for new theoretical concepts, methodological developments and practical recommendations on the role of innovation potential in the management system of economic security of enterprises. The system of economic security management is the basis of the successful functioning and development of enterprises. In market conditions, the economic security of organizations is directly outside-the implementation of innovations into the production process, which is an effective means of increasing competitiveness, improving the quality of products. The innovative capacity of enterprises consists of a unique ability to increase such components as material and investment, information, personnel that will help the organization to achieve new strategic goals. It should be noted that not all products are offered by organizations on the existing market, generates potential, but only one that is potentially profitable. That is, the products created on the basis of innovative technologies, from-while a high quality and should demand amongst consumers. Economic security policy is a system of views, different measures, methods of solutions, specific actions in the area of economic security, which determine the conditions for achieving business goals. Thus, the implemented security policy allocates the organization to carry out economic

  5. DO THE REGIONS OF ROMANIA HAVE POTENTIAL FOR SERVICE INNOVATION? THE CASE OF THE REGION OF BUCHAREST-ILFOV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IOSIF ALINA-ELENA

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper is focused on conducting an assessment on one particular region of Romania, namely the region of Bucharest-Ilfov, in relation to service innovation. The paper starts with an introductory section that reveals the region’s position in terms of competitiveness and innovation within the European Union. Afterwards, a short snapshot on innovation and service innovation is included, followed by a SWOT analysis of the Region of Bucharest-Ilfov. Both the socio-economic performance of the region and the regional performance in service innovation are analyzed. The paper ends with the conclusion section that includes an overview on the main characteristics of the region from the perspective of service innovation. The region of Bucharest-Ilfov is showing its performance in service innovation through various indicators, particularly by the share of employees in service innovation intensive industries and knowledge intensive service that overcome the EU average. Particularly, the enterprises from the Bucharest-Ilfov region are mostly encountered into the services sector, but they are at their beginnings in terms of service innovation. Moreover, most of the innovation comes from SMEs that tend to offer both product and process innovation. Consequently, service innovation in the region of Bucharest-Ilfov is mainly expected to be driven by the SMEs, but taking into account that big companies have their contribution too.

  6. Enhancing innovation in agriculture at the policy level : The potential contribution of Technology Assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanclay, Frank M.; Russell, A. Wendy; Kimber, Julie

    Technology Assessment (TA) is an applied process that considers the societal implications of technological change in order to influence policy to improve technology governance. TA has considerable potential to enhance innovation in agriculture and to assist agricultural industries in becoming more

  7. Potential stakeholders and perceived benefits of a Digital Health Innovation Ecosystem for the Namibian context

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Iyawa, GE

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the result of a study which aimed at identifying the potential stakeholders and perceived benefits of a digital health innovation ecosystem for the Namibian context as part of a larger study. Combining semi-structured interviews...

  8. Determining the directions of increasing the innovative potential of the region by developing innovative technologies and competences when preparing and implementing large investment projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timur V. Kramin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective to determine the directions of increasing the innovative potential of a region through the development of innovative technologies and competences in the process of preparation and implementation of large investment projects in the Republic of Tatarstan. Methods methodology of project management institutional approach. Results it is proved that the main largescale directions of innovative potential development in the Republic of Tatarstan as a result of preparation and implementing of Universiade 2013 in Kazan are knowledge management information technologies risk management. It is shown that in the framework of the considered innovative areas a complete system was formed of competences of employees and managers in the fields of education trade hospitality and service. Scientific novelty the key directions were defined of increasing the innovative potential of a region through the development of innovative technologies and competences in the process of preparation and implementation of large investment projects by the example of the World Summer Student Games in Kazan in 2013. Practical significance on the basis of specific examples the authors illustrate the practiceoriented mechanism of innovative potential development of a region as a result of implementation of large investment projects. nbsp

  9. A MULTI-OBJECTIVE APPROACH TO THE EVALUATION OF INNOVATIVE POTENTIAL OF THE TOURISM INDUSTRY ORGANIZATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tat’yana Pavlovna Levchenko

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Speaking about innovation in the tourism industry and hotel business, in particular, it usually means events of a systemic nature, with quality novelty, aimed at achieving positive changes, stable functioning and dynamic development. Along with general economic factors that determine the uneven demand for services of hospitality, it is explained by the sharp increase in dependence of their tourism and recreational opportunities from innovative potential (IP, capability of adapting to challenging competitive environment. The article considers a multi-objective approach to the study of the innovative potential of the tourism industry organizations. Its essence lies in the fact that the choice of the structural elements from the point of view of their value and importance (in any combination cannot be established a priori, without sufficient objective analysis on some of the more important criteria for achieving the goals. A diagnostic analysis and evaluation of the innovation potential of several hotel organizations from the standpoint of a multi-purpose approach is performed.

  10. Alternative outcomes create biased expectations regarding the received outcome: Evidence from event-related potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marciano, Déborah; Bentin, Shlomo; Deouell, Leon Y

    2018-05-01

    After choosing between uncertain options, one might get feedback on both the outcome of the chosen option and the outcome of the unchosen option (the alternative). Behavioral research has shown that in such cases people engage in outcome comparison, and that the alternative outcome influences the way one evaluates his own received outcome. Moreover, this influence differs whether one was responsible or not for the choice made. In two studies, we looked for the electrophysiological correlates of outcome comparison. Subjects chose one of two boxes shown on the screen, each box contained a gain or a loss. The alternative outcome was always revealed first, followed by the received outcome. In half of the trials the software picked one box instead of subjects. We tested whether the feedback-related negativity (FRN) and the P3 elicited by the received reflect outcome comparison. As expected, we found that the FRN and P3 were more positive when the received outcome was a gain (vs. a loss). The FRN and P3 were also sensitive to the value of the alternative outcome, but contrary to our predictions, they were more positive when the alternative outcome was a gain (vs. a loss). As the FRN and P3 are sensitive to expectations, we hypothesized that our findings might result from subjects' biased expectations: subjects might have wrongly believed that a good (bad) alternative outcome signaled a bad (good) received outcome. This hypothesis, coined as the Alternative Omen Effect, was confirmed in parallel in a series of behavioral experiments: people see an illusory negative correlation between the uncorrelated outcomes of choice options (reported in Marciano-Romm et al. (2016)). A challenge for future research will be to disentangle the effects of expectation from those of outcome comparison. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The human gut microbiome as source of innovation for health: Which physiological and therapeutic outcomes could we expect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doré, Joël; Multon, Marie-Christine; Béhier, Jehan-Michel

    2017-02-01

    microbiome knowledge and tools. The rationale for our working group has been structured around four domains of innovation that could derive from ongoing efforts in deciphering the interactions between human cells and intestinal microbiome as a central component of human health, namely: (1) development of stratification and monitoring tools; (2) identification of new target and drug discovery, as a part of our supra-genome; (4) exploitation of microbiota as a therapeutic target that can be modulated; (4) and finally as a source of live biotherapeutics and adjuvants. These four streams will exemplify how microbiota has changed the way we consider a wide range of chronic and incurable diseases and the consequences of long-lasting dysbiosis. In-depth microbiota analysis is opening one of the broadest fields of investigation for improving human and animal health and will be a source of major therapeutic innovations for tackling today's medical unmet needs. We thus propose a range of recommendations for basic researchers, care givers as well as for health authorities to gain reliability in microbiome analysis and accelerate discovery processes and their translation into applications for the benefits of the people. Finally, les Ateliers de Giens round table on microbiota benefited from the richness of the French ecosystem. France represents a center of excellence in the microbiota research field, with French institutions as Institut national de la recherche agronomique (INRA [Metagenopolis, Micalis]), Centre national de la recherché scientifique (CNRS), Unité de recherche sur les maladies infectieuses et tropicales émergentes (URMITE), Institut of Cardiometabolism and Nutrition (ICAN), Institut des maladies métaboliques et cardiovasculaires (I2MC), Institut national de la santé et de la recherche médicale (Inserm), Pasteur Institute and Gustave-Roussy being top-players for the number of publications. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  12. On the Expected Discounted Penalty Function for the Classical Risk Model with Potentially Delayed Claims and Random Incomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiming Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We focus on the expected discounted penalty function of a compound Poisson risk model with random incomes and potentially delayed claims. It is assumed that each main claim will produce a byclaim with a certain probability and the occurrence of the byclaim may be delayed depending on associated main claim amount. In addition, the premium number process is assumed as a Poisson process. We derive the integral equation satisfied by the expected discounted penalty function. Given that the premium size is exponentially distributed, the explicit expression for the Laplace transform of the expected discounted penalty function is derived. Finally, for the exponential claim sizes, we present the explicit formula for the expected discounted penalty function.

  13. Innovative potential of small and medium-sized enterprises in the Antofagasta-Chile region: an exploratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianni A. Romani Chocce

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is to analyze the innovative potential of Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs in the Region of Antofagasta - Chile. The paper makes a detailed bibliographic revision on regional innovation processes and presents the results of a questionnaire applied to SMEs, considered as innovative according to the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OCDE criteria. Although these results have to be carefully considered, due to the size of the sample it is possible to observe that there is an increasing awareness of the importance of innovation in the region while, at the same time, many obstacles to innovate are recognized.

  14. Disruptive innovation potential of the value propositions of 3D printing technology startups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Søren; Tanev, Stoyan; Hahn, Finn

    2014-01-01

    3D printing (or additive manufacturing) is a term used to describe the production of tangible products by using digitally controlled machine tools. The novelty of this manufacturing approach consists in the selective addition of materials layer-upon-layer, rather than through machining from solid...... material objects, moulding or casting. 3D printing (3DP) technologies have the potential to change the traditional manufacturing paradigm as well as to enable the emergence of new innovation practices based on mass customization, user design and distributed product innovation. As a result, 3DP...... potential of 3DP technology startups. The objective of this research is to empirically examine the existing business opportunities in the 3D printing technology sector. To meet this objective we have addressed two research questions: a) How do technology startups integrate new 3D printing technologies...

  15. The potential of workshops versus blogs for user involvement in service innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolaisen, Hanne Westh; Sørensen, Flemming; Scupola, Ada

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses different ways in which users may be involved in the ideation phase of service innovation and the results and limitations of such involvement. The study compares the use of a blog and two differently setup future workshops (one with users only and the other with a mix of us...... in ideation should be carefully selected and combined to achieve optimum benefits and avoid potential disadvantages....

  16. The emergence of business model for digital innovation projects without predetermined usage and market potential

    OpenAIRE

    Antonopoulou, Katerina; Nandhakumar, Joe; Begkos, Christos

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we explore the emergence of business model for digital innovation projects without predetermined usage and uncertain market potential. We studied a firm, which was producing and launching digital platforms for managing organizational operations. Drawing on a case study of developing this digital platform, we identified three recurring calculative and narrative practices: ideating; concocting; aligning. We argue that through these practices various epistemic objects (which we cal...

  17. Opportunities for Cancer-relevant Innovative Technologies with Transformative Potential | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) is seeking input from the community on identifying priorities with regards to supporting innovative technology development for cancer-relevant research. While the NCI provides support for technology development through a variety of mechanisms, it is important to understand whether or not these are sufficient for catalyzing and supporting the development of tools with significant potential for advancing important fields of cancer research or clinical care.

  18. Comparing oncology clinical programs by use of innovative designs and expected net present value optimization: Which adaptive approach leads to the best result?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parke, Tom; Marchenko, Olga; Anisimov, Vladimir; Ivanova, Anastasia; Jennison, Christopher; Perevozskaya, Inna; Song, Guochen

    2017-01-01

    Designing an oncology clinical program is more challenging than designing a single study. The standard approaches have been proven to be not very successful during the last decade; the failure rate of Phase 2 and Phase 3 trials in oncology remains high. Improving a development strategy by applying innovative statistical methods is one of the major objectives of a drug development process. The oncology sub-team on Adaptive Program under the Drug Information Association Adaptive Design Scientific Working Group (DIA ADSWG) evaluated hypothetical oncology programs with two competing treatments and published the work in the Therapeutic Innovation and Regulatory Science journal in January 2014. Five oncology development programs based on different Phase 2 designs, including adaptive designs and a standard two parallel arm Phase 3 design were simulated and compared in terms of the probability of clinical program success and expected net present value (eNPV). In this article, we consider eight Phase2/Phase3 development programs based on selected combinations of five Phase 2 study designs and three Phase 3 study designs. We again used the probability of program success and eNPV to compare simulated programs. For the development strategies, we considered that the eNPV showed robust improvement for each successive strategy, with the highest being for a three-arm response adaptive randomization design in Phase 2 and a group sequential design with 5 analyses in Phase 3.

  19. Expecting a boomtown? Exploring potential housing – related impacts of large scale resource developments in Darwin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gretchen Ennis

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Darwin is a city in the Northern Territory of Australia expecting a ‘boomtown’ scenario due to significant natural resource developments in the Greater Darwin area. The experience of ‘booming’ has a range of impacts upon communities. Housing is a key area of impact, particularly for the most vulnerable members of a population, who may not reap the benefits of the ‘boom’. In Darwin, new resource developments will begin in the context of record high house prices, high rents and high homelessness rates. This literature review explores what is known about the housing-related impacts of boomtowns and considers the likely housing-related impacts of a boomtown scenario in Darwin. While the city’s diverse economy and population size may provide some insulation from severe boomtown impacts, housing availability and affordability is likely to be negatively impacted. The implications of this for the most vulnerable members of the greater Darwin population require careful consideration.

  20. Synchronization in primate cerebellar granule cell layer local field potentials: Basic anisotropy and dynamic changes during active expectancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Courtemanche

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The cerebellar cortex is remarkable for its organizational regularity, out of which task-related neural networks should emerge. So, in Purkinje cells, both complex and simple spike network patterns are evident in sensorimotor behavior. However, task-related patterns of activity in the granule cell layer (GCL have been less studied. We recorded local field potential (LFP activity simultaneously in pairs of GCL sites in monkeys performing an active expectancy (lever-press task, in passive expectancy, and at rest. LFP sites were selected when they showed strong 10-25 Hz oscillations; pair orientation was in stereotaxic sagittal and coronal (mainly, and diagonal. As shown previously, LFP oscillations at each site were modulated during the lever-press task. Synchronization across LFP pairs showed an evident basic anisotropy at rest: sagittal pairs of LFPs were better synchronized (more than double the cross-correlation coefficients than coronal pairs, and more than diagonal pairs. On the other hand, this basic anisotropy was modifiable: during the active expectancy condition, where sagittal and coronal orientations were tested, synchronization of LFP pairs would increase just preceding movement, most notably for the coronal pairs. This lateral extension of synchronization was not observed in passive expectancy. The basic pattern of synchronization at rest, favoring sagittal synchrony, thus seemed to adapt in a dynamic fashion, potentially extending laterally to include more cerebellar cortex elements. This dynamic anisotropy in LFP synchronization could underlie GCL network organization in the context of sensorimotor tasks.

  1. Entrepreneurial potential in less innovative regions: the impact of social and cultural environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J. García-Rodríguez

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to analyze the role that the sociocultural, family and university environment play in the entrepreneurial intention of young people in a peripheral and less innovative region. Design/methodology/approach - The authors adopted the perspective of the theory of planned behavior and made an empirical study with a sample of 1,064 Spanish university students who voluntarily participated in the GUESSS Project answering an online questionnaire. A methodology based on structural equations was used employing the partial least squares structural equation modeling estimation technique. Findings - The results show that the university environment directly influences attitude, self-confidence and motivation, and indirectly the students’ entrepreneurial intention. The social context also exerts a weak direct influence on the perceived attitudes or desires toward the option to start a business and indirectly on the intention. Originality/value - The main contribution of this paper seems to confirm what previous literature highlighted in the terms of regional specificities on the link between innovation systems, the impact of entrepreneurial potential and economic development. In this sense, the university context can play an important role in generating improvements in the entrepreneurial intention’s antecedents of young people with greater potential for innovation in peripheral regions. Therefore, when it comes to defining policies to improve entrepreneurship in these regions, it seems that the establishment of entrepreneurship education and motivation programs in universities is a very effective tool to increase perceived attitude toward the option to start a new business.

  2. Understanding consumer motivations for interacting in online food communities – potential for innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Lina; Sørensen, Bjarne Taulo; Tudoran, Ana Alina

    This study contributes to the understanding of online user communities as a potential source of innovation. That would require an interest from users in interacting in such communities. In order to establish interaction, users must provide as well as consume information. However, depending...... on the innovation task, one may be more important than the other. It is therefore important to understand, how companies can increase user willingness to engage in these different interaction forms. This study investigates the influence of various motivation factors and user interests on intention to provide...... or consume information in online food communities. A survey was conducted among 1009 respondents followed by analysis based on Structural Equation Modelling. Results revealed the effect of motivation factors to be stronger than basic consumer interests indicating that companies can influence the intended...

  3. Market chances for innovative natural gas applications. The determination of market potential by means of a phase model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoelen, Q.E.J.J.M.; Klootwijk, M.

    2000-01-01

    Innovative applications of natural gas can increase the sale of natural gas, support energy companies in the development of commercial activities, and contribute to energy efficiency measures. The Dutch natural gas trading company Gasunie supports those developments by investigating the market potential of innovative gas appliances. Use is made of the so-called Phase Model for Market Introduction, developed by Kea Consult

  4. A Narrative Review of Potential Future Antidiabetic Drugs: Should We Expect More?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikara, Gaurav; Sharma, Pramod Kumar; Dwivedi, Pradeep; Charan, Jaykaran; Ambwani, Sneha; Singh, Surjit

    2018-04-01

    Prevalence of diabetes mellitus, a chronic metabolic disease characterized by hyperglycemia, is growing worldwide. The majority of the cases belong to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Globally, India ranks second in terms of diabetes prevalence among adults. Currently available classes of therapeutic agents are used alone or in combinations but seldom achieve treatment targets. Diverse pathophysiology and the need of therapeutic agents with more favourable pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamics profile make newer drug discoveries in the field of T2DM essential. A large number of molecules, some with novel mechanisms, are in pipeline. The essence of this review is to track and discuss these potential agents, based on their developmental stages, especially those in phase 3 or phase 2. Unique molecules are being developed for existing drug classes like insulins, DPP-4 inhibitors, GLP-1 analogues; and under newer classes like dual/pan PPAR agonists, dual SGLT1/SGLT2 inhibitors, glimins, anti-inflammatory agents, glucokinase activators, G-protein coupled receptor agonists, hybrid peptide agonists, apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT) inhibitors, glucagon receptor antagonists etc. The heterogeneous clinical presentation and therapeutic outcomes in phenotypically similar patients is a clue to think beyond the standard treatment strategy.

  5. Emotional expectations influence neural sensitivity to fearful faces in humans:An event-related potential study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The present study tested whether neural sensitivity to salient emotional facial expressions was influenced by emotional expectations induced by a cue that validly predicted the expression of a subsequently presented target face. Event-related potentials (ERPs) elicited by fearful and neutral faces were recorded while participants performed a gender discrimination task under cued (‘expected’) and uncued (‘unexpected’) conditions. The behavioral results revealed that accuracy was lower for fearful compared with neutral faces in the unexpected condition, while accuracy was similar for fearful and neutral faces in the expected condition. ERP data revealed increased amplitudes in the P2 component and 200–250 ms interval for unexpected fearful versus neutral faces. By contrast, ERP responses were similar for fearful and neutral faces in the expected condition. These findings indicate that human neural sensitivity to fearful faces is modulated by emotional expectations. Although the neural system is sensitive to unpredictable emotionally salient stimuli, sensitivity to salient stimuli is reduced when these stimuli are predictable.

  6. Implementing Innovations in Global Women's, Children's, and Adolescents' Health: Realizing the Potential for Implementation Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Herbert B; Haidar, Joumana; Fixsen, Dean; Ramaswamy, Rohit; Weiner, Bryan J; Leatherman, Sheila

    2018-03-01

    The launch of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals and the new Secretary General's Global Strategy for Women's, Children's, and Adolescents' Health are a window of opportunity for improving the health and well-being of women, children, and adolescents in the United States and around the world. Realizing the full potential of this historic moment will require that we improve our ability to successfully implement life-saving and life-enhancing innovations, particularly in low-resource settings. Implementation science, a new and rapidly evolving field that addresses the "how-to" component of providing sustainable quality services at scale, can make an important contribution on this front. A synthesis of the implementation science evidence indicates that three interrelated factors are required for successful, sustainable outcomes at scale: 1) effective innovations, 2) effective implementation, and 3) enabling contexts. Implementation science addresses the interaction among these factors to help make innovations more usable, to build ongoing capacity to assure the effective implementation of these innovations, and to ensure enabling contexts to sustain their full and effective use in practice. Improving access to quality services will require transforming health care systems and, therefore, much of the focus of implementation science in global health is on improving the ability of health systems to serve as enabling contexts. The field of implementation science is inherently interdisciplinary and academe will need to respond by facilitating collaboration among scientists from relevant disciplines, including evaluation, improvement, and systems sciences. Platforms and programs to facilitate collaborations among researchers, practitioners, policymakers, and funders are likewise essential.

  7. The potential of LCM to mainstream bottom-up eco-innovation and alternative thinking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Rosa, Michele; Ghose, Agneta

    2015-01-01

    . For this reason, under the LCM framework, a number of bottom-up eco innovations and non-traditional approaches can be categorized, arising often in difficult economic context. However, it is not because of LCM that alternative solutions were found in these cases, but due to necessity. The potential of LCM and its...... level. The first example is Can Decreix in Cerbere, a social experiment that intend to demonstrate how the entire society can be managed in an alternative way, cleaner and more equitable, consuming less and sharing more. Activities involve frugal technologies, agroecology, educational workshops...

  8. Towards realistic design of wind dams: An innovative approach to enhance wind potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajeddin, Alireza; Fazelpour, Farivar

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • An innovative methodology to increase the wind potential. • Introducing new generation of wind dams and underground wind farms. • Reducing the environmental impacts of employing conventional wind farms. • An efficient method to employ low wind speeds. - Abstract: In an attempt to discover alternative energy sources to fossil fuels which are being depleted on the increase, Renewable Energy Sources (RES) have gained considerable attention in recent years. RESs are also represented as clean sources; emitting comparatively lower Greenhouse Gases (GHGs) emissions; thus, they are climate friendly. Among RESs, wind energy is one of the most abundant and increasingly cost-competitive energy resources, and it is becoming the fastest growing source of electricity in the world. Regarding the improvement of wind power, one of the key aspects that must be considered is achieving enhanced reliability and efficiency at once. In this paper, we introduced and applied an innovative method to make wind dam which is a new approach to wind farms’ site selection for production of electricity. The proposed method enhances the wind potential by means of a natural or artificial barrier such as a hill, and is supported by analytical expressions and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models. A systematic case study has been designed at a site near the city of Tehran, Iran, and an analytical method has been applied that includes meteorological data analysis, CFD modeling along with energy power and economic assessment.

  9. Analysis of Potentials to Increase Iranian life Expectancy with Removing the Leading Causes of Mortality in 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Sasanipour

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Recent studies on Iranian mortality clearly underscore the role of cardiovascular diseases, unintentional injuries, and cancers as three leading causes of reduced life expectancy during the last three decades. The purpose of current study is to measure the effect of these causes on 2010 life table for Iran. Materials & Method:The number of registered death by age and sex and death distribution by cause for Iran in 2010 are obtained from death registration system operated by the Ministry of Health and to know more about the population at risk population forecast information of the Statistical Centre of Iran (SCI is used. The obtained data are analyzed using Multiple Decrement Life Table and Kitagava analysis method. Results: The results show that three leading causes of death are account for 13 years potential lost life of Iranian men and women. More detailed results indicate that cardiovascular diseases, cancers, and unintentional injuries play larger roles in this regard while men are more likely to die by unintentional injuries than women. Life expectancy of middle aged men are more affected by unintentional injuries while old aged women are more affected by cardiovascular diseases. Conclusion: Particular consideration of risk factors of cardiovascular diseases of both sexes and males death by unintentional injuries is of utmost importance in reducing mortality rate and increasing life expectancy as a result.

  10. Banking Umbilical Cord Blood (UCB) Stem Cells: Awareness, Attitude and Expectations of Potential Donors from One of the Largest Potential Repository (India).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Deeksha; Kaur, Simar; Kamath, Asha

    2016-01-01

    The concept of Umbilical Cord blood (UCB) stem cells is emerging as a non-invasive, efficacious alternative source of hematopoietic stem cells to treat a variety of blood and bone marrow diseases, blood cancers, metabolic disorders and immune deficiencies. Aim of the present study was to determine the level of awareness about banking UCB among pregnant women in India. We also assessed patient perception for banking of UCB and explored the patient expectations of banking UCB in future. This is the first study to assess current attitudes, in a sample population of potential donors from one of the largest potential UCB repository (India). Obtaining this information may help optimize recruitment efforts and improve patient education. Present explorative questionnaire based survey included 254 pregnant women in the final analysis. We established only 26.5% pregnant women in our study population knew what exactly is meant by UCB. A large proportion (55.1%) was undecided on whether they want to bank UCB or not. Women were more aware of the more advertised private cord blood banking compared to public banking. More than half of the pregnant women expected their obstetrician to inform them regarding UCB. One-third of the women in our population had undue expectations from banking of the UCB. Obstetricians should play a more active role in explaining the patients regarding pros and cons of UCB banking.

  11. Banking Umbilical Cord Blood (UCB Stem Cells: Awareness, Attitude and Expectations of Potential Donors from One of the Largest Potential Repository (India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deeksha Pandey

    Full Text Available The concept of Umbilical Cord blood (UCB stem cells is emerging as a non-invasive, efficacious alternative source of hematopoietic stem cells to treat a variety of blood and bone marrow diseases, blood cancers, metabolic disorders and immune deficiencies. Aim of the present study was to determine the level of awareness about banking UCB among pregnant women in India. We also assessed patient perception for banking of UCB and explored the patient expectations of banking UCB in future. This is the first study to assess current attitudes, in a sample population of potential donors from one of the largest potential UCB repository (India. Obtaining this information may help optimize recruitment efforts and improve patient education.Present explorative questionnaire based survey included 254 pregnant women in the final analysis.We established only 26.5% pregnant women in our study population knew what exactly is meant by UCB. A large proportion (55.1% was undecided on whether they want to bank UCB or not. Women were more aware of the more advertised private cord blood banking compared to public banking. More than half of the pregnant women expected their obstetrician to inform them regarding UCB. One-third of the women in our population had undue expectations from banking of the UCB.Obstetricians should play a more active role in explaining the patients regarding pros and cons of UCB banking.

  12. Unequal Expectations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlson, Kristian Bernt

    the role of causal inference in social science; and it discusses the potential of the findings of the dissertation to inform educational policy. In Chapters II and III, constituting the substantive contribution of the dissertation, I examine the process through which students form expectations...... of the relation between the self and educational prospects; evaluations that are socially bounded in that students take their family's social position into consideration when forming their educational expectations. One important consequence of this learning process is that equally talented students tend to make...... for their educational futures. Focusing on the causes rather than the consequences of educational expectations, I argue that students shape their expectations in response to the signals about their academic performance they receive from institutionalized performance indicators in schools. Chapter II considers...

  13. Maximizing potential: innovative collaborative strategies between one-stops and mental health systems of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeltzig, Heike; Timmons, Jaimie Ciulla; Marrone, Joe

    2008-01-01

    Barriers to seamless service delivery between workforce development and mental health systems of care have kept both entities from maximizing their potential in regards to employment for job seekers with mental illness who are capable of work and seeking employment. Using a multiple case study design, this study examined the nature of collaboration between workforce development and mental health systems to understand the policies and practices in place to assist individuals with mental illness to find and keep work. The paper presents innovative strategies that involved staff from both workforce development and mental health agencies. Findings from this research identified the following collaborative strategies: (a) the creation of liaison positions and collaborative teams; (b) staff training on mental health and workforce issues; and (c) multi-level involvement of individuals with mental illness. Implications for workforce professionals are offered as a way to stimulate implementation of such strategies.

  14. Noise and Fuel Burn Reduction Potential of an Innovative Subsonic Transport Configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yueping; Nickol, Craig L.; Thomas, Russell H.

    2014-01-01

    A study is presented for the noise and fuel burn reduction potential of an innovative double deck concept aircraft with two three-shaft direct-drive turbofan engines. The engines are mounted from the fuselage so that the engine inlet is over the main wing. It is shown that such an aircraft can achieve a cumulative Effective Perceived Noise Level (EPNL) about 28 dB below the current aircraft noise regulations of Stage 4. The combination of high bypass ratio engines and advanced wing design with laminar flow control technologies provide fuel burn reduction and low noise levels simultaneously. For example, the fuselage mounted engine position provides more than 4 EPNLdB of noise reduction by shielding the inlet radiated noise. To identify the potential effect of noise reduction technologies on this concept, parametric studies are presented to reveal the system level benefits of various emerging noise reduction concepts, for both engine and airframe noise reduction. These concepts are discussed both individually to show their respective incremental noise reduction potential and collectively to assess their aggregate effects on the total noise. Through these concepts approximately about 8 dB of additional noise reduction is possible, bringing the cumulative noise level of this aircraft to 36 EPNLdB below Stage 4, if the entire suite of noise reduction technologies would mature to practical application. In a final step, an estimate is made for this same aircraft concept but with higher bypass ratio, geared, turbofan engines. With this geared turbofan propulsion system, the noise is estimated to reach as low as 40-42 dB below Stage 4 with a fuel burn reduction of 43-47% below the 2005 best-in-class aircraft baseline. While just short of the NASA N+2 goals of 42 dB and 50% fuel burn reduction, for a 2025 in service timeframe, this assessment shows that this innovative concept warrants refined study. Furthermore, this design appears to be a viable potential future passenger

  15. Probabilistic risk assessment from potential exposures to the public applied for innovative nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dvorzhak, Alla; Mora, Juan C.; Robles, Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    Potential exposures are those that may occur as a result of unanticipated operational performance or accidents. Potential exposure situations are probabilistic in nature because they depend on uncertain events such as equipment failure, operator errors or external initiators beyond the control of the operator. Consequently, there may exist a range of possible radiological impacts that need to be considered. In this paper a Level 3 Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) for a hypothetical scenario relevant to Innovative Nuclear Energy Systems (INS) was conducted using computer code MACCS (MELCOR Accident Consequence Code Systems). The acceptability of an INS was analyzed taking into account the general requirement that relocation or evacuation measures must not be necessary beyond the site boundary. In addition, deterministic modeling of the accident consequences for the critical meteorological conditions was carried out using the JRODOS decision support system (Real-time On-line Decision Support system for off-site emergency management in Europe). The approach used for dose and risk assessment from potential exposure of accidental releases and their comparison with acceptance criteria are presented. The methodology described can be used as input to the licensing procedure and engineering design considerations to help satisfy relevant health and environmental impact criteria for fission or fusion nuclear installations. - Highlights: • PSA Level-3 based on WinMACCS code is carried out for accidental release. • Family curves of percentiles for radiation exposure doses are constructed. • Risk indicators for potential exposure are defined. • Using of risk acceptance curve criteria is proposed for decision making process.

  16. Strategic relationship between innovation development and management of human resources potential in the region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasiya Nikolaevna Kozitsina

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The modern concept for modernization of Russia’s economy, put forward by the federal executive authorities, provides for an innovation development model. It is believed that only innovation is able to solve many problems that the Russian economy faces, and first of all, the enhancement of its competitiveness. One of the problems of Russia’s innovation system consists in the lack of resources and in their inefficient use in certain directions of development of innovation activity: outdated production capacities and facilities and equipment at research organizations; ageing of staff; limited access to financial resources. The availability and condition of these resources, the opportunities for their usage – in other words, the choice of innovation development strategy, all these factors determine the effectiveness of innovation activity in the region. The article provides a classification of the region’s innovation strategies. Due to the fact that the most important factor in achieving innovation economic development is the improvement of the quality of human resources, the authors highlight the issue of strategic compliance between the innovation development of the region and human resources management. The authors define the strategy for innovative development of Krasnoyarsk Krai on the basis of the proposed methodology according to the methodology of strategic compliance; they also give recommendations on human resources management in the region. The authors use analytical and statistical methods of research, and they take into consideration relevant scientific publications of domestic and foreign scientists. The research findings can be applied in the implementation of the concept for innovation development of the region

  17. Ties with Potential: Social Network Structure and Innovative Climate in Dutch Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moolenaar, Nienke M.; Daly, Alan J.; Sleegers, Peter J. C.

    2011-01-01

    Background/Context: Similar to the United States, government efforts to improve education in the Netherlands are focused on innovation and the development of collaborative structures to support the generation of new knowledge. However, empirical evidence of the relationship between social linkages and innovation in education is scarce. Objective:…

  18. Wind Technology: A Framework for the Evaluation of Innovations¿ Impacts on the Diffusion Potential

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dinica, V.

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes a framework based on which innovations in wind power technologies can be evaluated from the standpoint of their contribution to diffusion expansion. The framework helps build up a missing link between the technical literature on innovations and policy-oriented contributions

  19. Criteria to assess potential reverse innovations: opportunities for shared learning between high- and low-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Onil; Wu, Diane; Mossman, Kathryn; Hayden, Leigh; Gill, Pavan; Cheng, Yu-Ling; Daar, Abdallah; Soman, Dilip; Synowiec, Christina; Taylor, Andrea; Wong, Joseph; von Zedtwitz, Max; Zlotkin, Stanley; Mitchell, William; McGahan, Anita

    2017-01-25

    Low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) are developing novel approaches to healthcare that may be relevant to high-income countries (HICs). These include products, services, organizational processes, or policies that improve access, cost, or efficiency of healthcare. However, given the challenge of replication, it is difficult to identify innovations that could be successfully adapted to high-income settings. We present a set of criteria for evaluating the potential impact of LMIC innovations in HIC settings. An initial framework was drafted based on a literature review, and revised iteratively by applying it to LMIC examples from the Center for Health Market Innovations (CHMI) program database. The resulting criteria were then reviewed using a modified Delphi process by the Reverse Innovation Working Group, consisting of 31 experts in medicine, engineering, management and political science, as well as representatives from industry and government, all with an expressed interest in reverse innovation. The resulting 8 criteria are divided into two steps with a simple scoring system. First, innovations are assessed according to their success within the LMIC context according to metrics of improving accessibility, cost-effectiveness, scalability, and overall effectiveness. Next, they are scored for their potential for spread to HICs, according to their ability to address an HIC healthcare challenge, compatibility with infrastructure and regulatory requirements, degree of novelty, and degree of current collaboration with HICs. We use examples to illustrate where programs which appear initially promising may be unlikely to succeed in a HIC setting due to feasibility concerns. This study presents a framework for identifying reverse innovations that may be useful to policymakers and funding agencies interested in identifying novel approaches to addressing cost and access to care in HICs. We solicited expert feedback and consensus on an empirically-derived set of criteria

  20. Beyond the adoption/ non-adoption dichotomy: the impact of innovation characteristics on potential adopters' transition through adoption process stages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agarwal, M.K.; Frambach, R.T.

    2002-01-01

    Research on innovation adoption has suffered from a bias towards understanding the factors that affect the dichotomous adoption/non-adoption decision.Much less attention is devoted to the question why potential adopters fail to progress to the adoption stage from earlier stages in the decision

  1. The potential contribution of disruptive low-carbon innovations to 1.5 °C climate mitigation

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, C.; Pettifor, H.; Cassar, E.; Kerr, L.; Wilson, M.

    2018-01-01

    This paper investigates the potential for consumer-facing innovations to contribute emission reductions for limiting warming to 1.5 °C. First, we show that global integrated assessment models which characterise transformation pathways consistent with 1.5 °C mitigation are limited in their ability to analyse the emergence of novelty in energy end-use. Second, we introduce concepts of disruptive innovation which can be usefully applied to the challenge of 1.5 °C mitigation. Disruptive low-carbo...

  2. Potential of EnMAP spaceborne imaging spectroscopy for the prediction of common surface soil properties and expected accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabrillat, Sabine; Foerster, Saskia; Steinberg, Andreas; Stevens, Antoine; Segl, Karl

    2016-04-01

    There is a renewed awareness of the finite nature of the world's soil resources, growing concern about soil security, and significant uncertainties about the carrying capacity of the planet. As a consequence, soil scientists are being challenged to provide regular assessments of soil conditions from local through to global scales. However, only a few countries have the necessary survey and monitoring programs to meet these new needs and existing global data sets are out-of-date. A particular issue is the clear demand for a new area-wide regional to global coverage with accurate, up-to-date, and spatially referenced soil information as expressed by the modeling scientific community, farmers and land users, and policy and decision makers. Soil spectroscopy from remote sensing observations based on studies from the laboratory scale to the airborne scale has been shown to be a proven method for the quantitative prediction of key soil surface properties in local areas for exposed soils in appropriate surface conditions such as low vegetation cover and low water content. With the upcoming launch of the next generation of hyperspectral satellite sensors in the next 3 to 5 years (EnMAP, HISUI, PRISMA, SHALOM), a great potential for the global mapping and monitoring of soil properties is appearing. Nevertheless, the capabilities to extend the soil properties current spectral modeling from local to regional scales are still to be demonstrated using robust methods. In particular, three central questions are at the forefront of research nowadays: a) methodological developments toward improved algorithms and operational tools for the extraction of soil properties, b) up scaling from the laboratory into space domain, and c) demonstration of the potential of upcoming satellite systems and expected accuracy of soil maps. In this study, airborne imaging spectroscopy data from several test sites are used to simulate EnMAP satellite images at 30 m scale. Then, different soil

  3. Trade Potential Determinants of the Adoption of Seed Yam Innovations in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moro Seidu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses the factors that influence the adoption of seed yam innovations in Kpandai District in Northern Ghana. In contrast to most empirical studies on innovation adoption in which a specific technology is analyzed, this study covers several seed yam technologies (such as minisett, milked seeds, small setts, traditional setts. The paper estimate a logit model with data from 510 sampled yam farm households. It was identified that households’ ability and willingness to address consumer complaints, export, and integration into market economy positively and significantly influence the adoption of seed yam innovation. However, farm size and cost of transportation significantly influences the adoption of seed yam innovation negatively. The results therefore call for policies aimed at ensuring means to promote integration of households into local and international markets by bridging the gap of trust between farmers and yam exporters or middlemen.

  4. Physical basics of endovenous laser treatment and potential of innovative developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sroka, R.; Esipova, A.; Schmedt, C. G.

    2017-04-01

    During the last decade, endoluminal laser treatment (ELT) has been rapidly developing. Protocols using radially emitting ELT fibres in combination with infrared laser light show clinical advantages over the bare-fibre technique and near infrared irradiation. Although the clinical response rate is high several side effects occurred. Innovative light application systems and feedback systems are therefore being under development to potentially improve the clinical situation. The irradiation patterns of bare fibres and radially emitting 1-ring and 2-ring fibres were measured using the goniometer technique. The device robustness, device handling and tissue effects were investigated using the established ox-foot-model. Furthermore, temperature measurements were performed either intraluminal within the irradiation field using a tiny temperature sensor and on the outer surface of the vessel wall by means of a thermocamera. All fibres showed sufficient mechanical and thermal robustness. The destruction threshold is far beyond the light powers employed during clinical application. The 1-ring fibre showed very high peak temperatures for a short time, while the 2-ring-fibre hold its somewhat lower maximum temperature for a longer time. Both forms of energy application resulted in the desired shrinkage and destruction effect. In this regard, the handling of the 2-ring fibre appears subjectively more convenient with reduced sticking-related problems. Acute tissue effects could be investigated to improve the understanding especially of the interaction between handling, maneuvers and tissue effects. The 2-ring radially emitting fibre in combination with IR laser light and specific application parameters showed improved handling and safety features.

  5. Potential and Pitfalls of Frugal Innovation in the Water Sector: Insights from Tanzania to Global Value Chains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Hyvärinen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Water is perhaps the most intertwined, and basic, resource on our planet. Nevertheless, billions face water-related challenges, varying from lack of water and sanitation services to hindrances on livelihoods and socio-economic activities. The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs recognize the broad role that water has for development, and also call for the private sector to participate in solving these numerous development challenges. This study looks into the potential of frugal innovations as a means for the private sector to engage in water-related development challenges. Our findings, based on a case study and literature review, indicate that frugal innovations have potential in this front due to their focus on affordable, no-frills solutions. However, we also recognize pitfalls related to frugal innovations in the water sector. Although the innovations would, in principle, be sustainable, deficiencies related to scale and institutional structures may emerge. These deficiencies are linked to the importance of water in a variety of processes, both natural and manmade, as well as to the complexity of global production-consumption value chains. Increasing the innovations’ sustainability impact requires broader acknowledgement of the underlying value chains and their diverse links with water. A holistic view on water can mitigate water-related business risks while increasing wellbeing on an individual level.

  6. How HE (Hydrogen Energy) Knowledge and Innovativeness Affect Potential Innovators' Acceptance and Opinions Regarding HE An example from UNIDO-ICHET Web-site Users

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mavis Tsai; Scott Warren; Reide Song; JingYi Gao

    2006-01-01

    According to innovation diffusion research, the innovators, opinion leaders, and diffusion agents play vital roles in promoting the acceptance of innovation. The purpose of this research is to investigate how HE innovators' knowledge affects their acceptance and opinions about HE and related products. The research method is an on-line survey and the sample is a voluntary sample. This survey successfully collected 1126 HE innovators' information. The researchers used SPSS statistics software to analyze the data and found the relationship between HE innovators' demographics, their knowledge about hydrogen energy, their innovativeness, and their familiarity with new energy technology with their acceptance and opinions about HE, and how they use the UNIDO-ICHET web-site. The researchers found HE knowledge could be used to predict new energy innovators' information resource usage, innovativeness, new energy product adoption and their opinions about HE. (authors)

  7. E-commerce settles for established payment systems: Limited market potential for innovative payment systems

    OpenAIRE

    Heng, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    Established payment systems play a dominant role also in B2C e-commerce. Innovative payment systems can only be a success here if they pay attention to the particular features of e-commerce, convey the worth of their value-adding unique selling proposition and enjoy the support of established e-shops or financial service providers. However, apart from rare cases the conventional payment systems leave little room for the innovative systems. This holds all the more since the conventional paymen...

  8. Open Innovation Drug Discovery (OIDD): a potential path to novel therapeutic chemical space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvim-Gaston, Maria; Grese, Timothy; Mahoui, Abdelaziz; Palkowitz, Alan D; Pineiro-Nunez, Marta; Watson, Ian

    2014-01-01

    The continued development of computational and synthetic methods has enabled the enumeration or preparation of a nearly endless universe of chemical structures. Nevertheless, the ability of this chemical universe to deliver small molecules that can both modulate biological targets and have drug-like physicochemical properties continues to be a topic of interest to the pharmaceutical industry and academic researchers alike. The chemical space described by public, commercial, in-house and virtual compound collections has been interrogated by multiple approaches including biochemical, cellular and virtual screening, diversity analysis, and in-silico profiling. However, current drugs and known chemical probes derived from these efforts are contained within a remarkably small volume of the predicted chemical space. Access to more diverse classes of chemical scaffolds that maintain the properties relevant for drug discovery is certainly needed to meet the increasing demands for pharmaceutical innovation. The Lilly Open Innovation Drug Discovery platform (OIDD) was designed to tackle barriers to innovation through the identification of novel molecules active in relevant disease biology models. In this article we will discuss several computational approaches towards describing novel, biologically active, drug-like chemical space and illustrate how the OIDD program may facilitate access to previously untapped molecules that may aid in the search for innovative pharmaceuticals.

  9. Ties with potential: Social network structure and innovative climate in Dutch schools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moolenaar, N.M.; Daly, A.J.; Sleegers, P.J.C.

    2011-01-01

    Background/Context: Similar to the United States, government efforts to improve education in the Netherlands are focused on innovation and the development of collaborative structures to support the generation of new knowledge. However, empirical evidence of the relationship between social linkages

  10. Discussing the Potential of Information and Communication Technologies’ Innovation for Environmental Problems in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura-Diana Radu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to identify the role and place of information and communication technology in Romania (ICT, the interest for innovation expressed in this field and the extent to which it relates to environment protection. The concern for the state of the ecosystem is growing, nevertheless it requires the active involvement in the innovation process so as to find solutions for the replacement of the old production techniques with new ones, environmentally friendly. ICTs in their spectacular evolution play a major role in this case. Frequently, they are present in all the production stages, from design to distribution of the final product. Starting from the above mentioned facts, the introduction of this paper presents the concept of green ICT and their implication in the economic and social development, as well as statistics data elaborated by international companies which are meant to increase their importance. In this section we include the objectives and prior work. We continued our research by presenting the way in which Romania gets involved in ICT innovation and environment technology, as green ICT stands at the junction between the two fields. The main conclusions and results are drawn in the end of the article. The value and implications of our research is in the area of green ICT innovation.

  11. Unlocking the full potential of Open Innovation in the Life Sciences through a classification system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Niclas; Minssen, Timo

    2018-01-01

    Open Innovation (OI) holds much promise as a new business model for collaborative value creation in life science. From a corporate perspective, benefits include faster access to new relevant technology; the opportunity for Biotechs and Small to Medium-sized Enterprises (SMEs) to explore new marke...

  12. Everyday physical activity in ambulatory heart transplant candidates: the role of expected health benefits, social support, and potential barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardt, Andreas; Weidner, Gerdi; Grassmann, Mariel; Spaderna, Heike

    2014-04-01

    Physical activity (PA) is recommended for stable patients with advanced heart failure (HF). We evaluated expected health benefits of PA and social support as facilitators of PA, and physical symptom distress and psychological distress (depression, anxiety) as barriers to PA. Additionally, we investigated if facilitators of PA are of particular importance for patients who report barriers. We analyzed data assessed at time of waitlisting in 231 ambulatory patients (53.4 ± 10.3 years, 18 % women) who were enrolled in the multisite Waiting for a New Heart Study in 1 Austrian and 16 German hospitals. Self-reported everyday PA scores (number of activities, duration of activities) was regressed on demographic characteristics and indicators of disease severity (ejection fraction, peak oxygen consumption), facilitators (expected health benefits of PA, perceived emotional support, perceived support for PA), and barriers to PA (physical symptom distress, psychological distress). Interaction terms of facilitators with barriers were also examined. PA was positively associated with higher peak oxygen consumption, validating self-reported PA. Regarding facilitators, expected health benefits of PA were independently associated with higher PA (p values barriers, depression tended to be associated with fewer activities (p = 0.068). However, in the presence of barriers (depression, physical symptoms), feeling supported for being physically active was positively associated with PA (p values < 0.05). Interventions to improve PA may benefit from strengthening positive expectations of health outcomes associated with everyday PA and fostering PA-specific social support for those distressed by HF symptoms or depression.

  13. A digital platform as a facilitator for assessing innovation potential and creating business models: a case study from the i3 project

    OpenAIRE

    Bellini Francesco; Dulskaia Iana

    2017-01-01

    Many ideas flow into the innovation funnel but only 1 out 3000 becomes a successful new product. There are many variables that interact in this complex process and investors decisions are often based on experience and feeling rather than a comprehensive evaluation of the social, economic and technological factors. The innovation potential, the innovator capability, the accessibility of the technology as well as the social acceptance and the chosen business model are the some of the critical f...

  14. Enterprises’ Growth Potential in the European Union: Implications for Research and Innovation Policy

    OpenAIRE

    MONCADA PATERNO' CASTELLO Pietro; CINCERA Michele

    2012-01-01

    One of the main objectives of the new European research and innovation policy agenda is to favour the positive demographics (creation and growth) of EU companies operating in new/knowledge-intensive industries, especially Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs). These companies play an important role in shaping the dynamism of the economy’s sectoral composition, favouring the transition towards more knowledge-intensive activities and in contributing to the overall economic growth objectives and m...

  15. Potential for Integrating Diffusion of Innovation Principles into Life Cycle Assessment of Emerging Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Benjamin E; Miller, Shelie A

    2016-03-15

    Life cycle assessment (LCA) measures cradle-to-grave environmental impacts of a product. To assess impacts of an emerging technology, LCA should be coupled with additional methods that estimate how that technology might be deployed. The extent and manner that an emerging technology diffuses throughout a region shapes the magnitude and type of environmental impacts. Diffusion of innovation is an established field of research that analyzes the adoption of new innovations, and its principles can be used to construct scenario models that enhance LCA of emerging technologies. Integrating diffusion modeling techniques with an LCA of emerging technology can provide estimates for the extent of market penetration, the displacement of existing systems, and the rate of adoption. Two general perspectives of application are macro-level diffusion models that use a function of time to represent adoption, and microlevel diffusion models that simulate adoption through interactions of individuals. Incorporating diffusion of innovation concepts complement existing methods within LCA to inform proactive environmental management of emerging technologies.

  16. The role of small and medium-sized high-tech enterprise in the formation of innovative potential of the Voronezh region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Shubina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In modern conditions the region's sustainable development and economic growth is largely determined by its ability to implement innovations. One of the determining factors of long-term economic development of the territories, to date, is innovation. A mechanism to give impetus to the innovative development of the regions is to create effective small and medium-sized innovative enterprises. Voronezh region, like many Russian regions, has considerable potential for innovation, but usually it is not used efficiently or not used at all. The article deals with the concept and the need to develop innovative entrepreneurship and the role of small and medium innovative enterprises in the formation of scientific and technical potential of the Voronezh region. The basic conditions and factors promoting and impeding the development of small and medium innovative businesses in the region, determined the willingness of subjects of innovation activity in the development, implementation and promotion of innovation in the region. The problems of development of small and medium-sized businesses at the regional level. The evaluation of actions to improve SMEs management programs in the region. Particular attention is given to the classification of small and medium-sized innovative business structures. In order to stimulate the development of small and medium-sized innovative business in the Voronezh region in the article suggests the implementation of a package of measures. The active use of innovation by small and medium-sized enterprises of the Voronezh area enhances their efficiency and competitiveness, creates new jobs, which ultimately has a positive effect on the region's economic development, the growth of the tax base, improving the quality of life of the population.

  17. A preliminary assessment of the potential for 'team science' in DOE Energy Innovation Hubs and Energy Frontier Research Centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boardman, Craig; Ponomariov, Branco

    2011-01-01

    President Obama has called for the development of new energy technologies to address our national energy needs and restore US economic competitiveness. In response, the Department of Energy has established new R and D modalities for energy research and development designed to facilitate collaboration across disciplinary, institutional, and sectoral boundaries. In this research note, we provide a preliminary assessment of the potential for essential mechanisms for coordinated problem solving among diverse actors within two new modalities at the DOE: Energy Innovation Hubs and Energy Frontier Research Centers. - Highlights: → Energy Frontier Research Centers may lack the basic mechanisms for coordinating diverse actors. → Divergent goals across diverse actors may hinder coordination in Energy Innovation Hubs. → The implementation of these and similar energy policies require further investigation.

  18. Innovative swine nutrition: some present and potential applications of latest scientific findings for safe pork production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Halas

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the biggest challenges facing animal agriculture in the 21st century is to produce safe and traceable foodstuffs of animal origin in sufficient volumes and quality besides the lowest possible load on the environment. A point to consider is how animal feeding and nutrition can contribute to the solution of this challenge. Another question is, that the results of which new scientific fields should be used in the area of innovation to achieve the desired product quality. The article answers these questions based on the latest data in the scientific literature and on the authors’ own research results. Having reviewed and processed the data, the authors drew the following conclusions: 1. The impact of climate changes on crop production and consequently on animal nutrition needs to be studied in comprehensive, systematic research programs, and based on their results animal feeding systems should be modified if necessary. 2. The role of molecular nutrition and the immunological role of nutrition for enhancing the efficiency of production will gain in importance. 3. The cooperation between nutritionists and geneticists needs to be strengthened in order to satisfy the nutrient requirements more accurately, and thus to improve the profitability of production. 4. New mathematical growth models, also incorporating the quality of animal products, need to be developed for better production estimates. 5. The integrated “from farm to fork” programs will be essential in the production of safe and high quality animal food products. Animal nutrition will play a key role in these product development and monitoring programs. 6. The production of environmentally friendly animal products will become a social imperative. Animal nutrition still has huge unexploited reserves in this field, for instance in the development of novel animal feeding systems and technologies. 7. T he practical implementation of precision nutrition can be of great help in achieving

  19. Reviewing the Nutrition and Health Claims Regulation (EC) No. 1924/2006: What do we know about its challenges and potential impact on innovation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bröring, Stefanie; Khedkar, Sukhada; Ciliberti, Stefano

    2017-02-01

    Health claims potentially represent an opportunity for firms to engage in product differentiation and thereby induce investment into R&D and innovation in the food sector. The Nutrition and Health Claims Regulation (EC) No. 1924/2006 (NHCR) aims at protecting and promoting innovation as one of its objectives. However, existing studies indicate that this regulation may create several challenges for innovation in the food sector. To this end, we review the challenges related to the NHCR (Article 13.1) and its impact on innovation. Extant literature suggests that companies face challenges related to changing list of ingredients, missing transparency, wording of claims, limited financial resources, limited R&D resources, switching product categories and abandoning the functional foods sector. Moreover, current studies imply that so far the NHCR (in specific Article 13.1) does not seem to encourage innovation in the EU food sector.

  20. Economic potential of energy-efficient retrofitting in the Swiss residential building sector: The effects of policy instruments and energy price expectations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amstalden, Roger W.; Kost, Michael; Nathani, Carsten; Imboden, Dieter M.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyse the profitability of energy-efficient retrofit investments in the Swiss residential building sector from the house owner's perspective. Different energy price expectations, policy instruments such as subsidies, income tax deduction and a carbon tax, as well as potential future cost degression of energy efficiency measures were taken into account. The discounted cash flow method was used for the investment analysis of different retrofit packages applied to a model building scheduled for renovation, i.e. a single-family house constructed between 1948 and 1975. The results show that present Swiss policy instruments push investments for energy-efficient retrofitting to profitability. Cost degression has a minor significance for investment profitability. However, the most relevant factor for the investment analysis is the expected energy price. Expecting a future fuel oil price at the level of 2005, efficiency investments are close to profitability even without policy support. If higher energy prices were expected, energy-efficient retrofitting would be an attractive investment opportunity

  1. Evolutionary Expectations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nash, Ulrik William

    2014-01-01

    , they are correlated among people who share environments because these individuals satisfice within their cognitive bounds by using cues in order of validity, as opposed to using cues arbitrarily. Any difference in expectations thereby arise from differences in cognitive ability, because two individuals with identical...... cognitive bounds will perceive business opportunities identically. In addition, because cues provide information about latent causal structures of the environment, changes in causality must be accompanied by changes in cognitive representations if adaptation is to be maintained. The concept of evolutionary......The concept of evolutionary expectations descends from cue learning psychology, synthesizing ideas on rational expectations with ideas on bounded rationality, to provide support for these ideas simultaneously. Evolutionary expectations are rational, but within cognitive bounds. Moreover...

  2. Innovative Basis of Research of Energy-Efficient Potential and Effectiveness of Renewable Energy Sources

    OpenAIRE

    Hasanov Seymur Latif oglu; Hasanov Elnur Latif oglu

    2018-01-01

    In recent years, countries of the world have been trying to attract new energy sources (wind, sun, biogas, waves, drainage, non-conventional energy sources such as hydroelectric power of small rivers) in their fuel-energy balance. Azerbaijan has renewable natural resources, favorable for its energy-efficient potential, according to the amount of sunny and windy days. In this article was given total information about renewable energy potential of Azerbaijan Republic. In this article we use inf...

  3. Chinese students' great expectations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thøgersen, Stig

    2013-01-01

    The article focuses on Chinese students' hopes and expectations before leaving to study abroad. The national political environment for their decision to go abroad is shaped by an official narrative of China's transition to a more creative and innovative economy. Students draw on this narrative to...... system, they think of themselves as having a role in the transformation of Chinese attitudes to education and parent-child relations....

  4. Leveraging Digital Innovation in Healthcare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, Carol V.; Jensen, Tina Blegind; Aanestad, Margun

    2014-01-01

    Harnessing digital innovations for healthcare delivery has raised high expectations as well as major concerns. Several countries across the globe have made progress in achieving three common goals of lower costs, higher quality, and increased patient access to healthcare services through...... investments in digital infrastructures. New technologies are leveraged to achieve widespread 24x7 disease management, patients’ wellbeing, home-based healthcare and other patient-centric service innovations. Yet, digital innovations in healthcare face barriers in terms of standardization, data privacy...... landscapes in selected countries. Then panelists with expertise in digital data streams, cloud, and mobile computing will present concrete examples of healthcare service innovations that have the potential to address one or more of the global goals. ECIS attendees are invited to join a debate about...

  5. The effects of constant and alternating temperatures on the reproductive potential, life span, and life expectancy of Anastrepha fraterculus (Wiedemann (Dipteria: Tephritidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. CARDOSO

    Full Text Available Ovarian development, oviposition, larval eclosion, ornithine decarboxylase (ODC activity, ovarian, testis and ejaculatory apodeme measurements (length, width, and area, and the number of spermatozoa of Anastrepha fraterculus (Wiedemann were analyzed at alternating (20º/6ºC and 20º/13°C and constant (6°C; 25°C temperatures. Life span and life expectancy were also analyzed for both genders. All the results suggest that temperature, especially alternating temperatures, increase not only male and female reproductive potential but also their life span and life expectancy. These changes can be a powerful strategy triggered by A. fraterculus as a means to survive the stressful temperature conditions found in winter in the apple production region in Brazil, enabling this species to increase its population density and cause apple damage when spring begins.

  6. The effects of constant and alternating temperatures on the reproductive potential, life span, and life expectancy of Anastrepha fraterculus (Wiedemann (Dipteria: Tephritidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CARDOSO V. V.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian development, oviposition, larval eclosion, ornithine decarboxylase (ODC activity, ovarian, testis and ejaculatory apodeme measurements (length, width, and area, and the number of spermatozoa of Anastrepha fraterculus (Wiedemann were analyzed at alternating (20masculine/6masculineC and 20masculine/13degreesC and constant (6degreesC; 25degreesC temperatures. Life span and life expectancy were also analyzed for both genders. All the results suggest that temperature, especially alternating temperatures, increase not only male and female reproductive potential but also their life span and life expectancy. These changes can be a powerful strategy triggered by A. fraterculus as a means to survive the stressful temperature conditions found in winter in the apple production region in Brazil, enabling this species to increase its population density and cause apple damage when spring begins.

  7. MAPPING INNOVATION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Christian Langhoff; Koch, Christian

    2011-01-01

    By adopting a theoretical framework from strategic niche management research (SNM) this paper presents an analysis of the innovation system of the Danish Construction industry. Theories within SNM look upon innovation in a sector as a socio-technical phenomenon and identifies three levels of socio......-technical interaction within which sectorial innovation can be explained. The analysis shows a multifaceted landscape of innovation around an existing regime, built in the existing ways of working and developing over generations. The regime is challenged from various niches and the sociotechnical landscape through...... trends as globalization. Three niches (Lean Construction, BIM and System Deliveries) are subject to a detailed analysis showing partly incompatible rationales and various degrees of innovation potential. The paper further discusses how existing policymaking operates in a number of tensions one being...

  8. Responsible innovation

    CERN Document Server

    De Woot, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Economic development is rooted in disruption, not in equilibrium. And a powerful engine of economic development is innovation; but is this innovation always for the common good? The dark side of the extraordinary dynamism of innovation lies precisely in its destructive power. If simply left to market forces, it could lead to social chaos and great human suffering. To face the challenges of our time, we must create the proper climate and culture to develop strong entrepreneurial drive. But, more than ever, we must give this entrepreneurial drive its ethical and societal dimensions. Responsible innovation means a more voluntary orientation towards the great problems of the 21st century, e.g. depletion of the planet's resources, rising inequality, and new scientific developments potentially threatening freedom, democracy and human integrity. We need to transform our ceaseless creativity into real progress for humankind. In this respect, the rapid development of social innovation opens the door for new methods an...

  9. Fly ashes from coal and petroleum coke combustion: current and innovative potential applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Aixa; Navia, Rodrigo; Moreno, Natalia

    2009-12-01

    Coal fly ashes (CFA) are generated in large amounts worldwide. Current combustion technologies allow the burning of fuels with high sulfur content such as petroleum coke, generating non-CFA, such as petroleum coke fly ash (PCFA), mainly from fluidized bed combustion processes. The disposal of CFA and PCFA fly ashes can have severe impacts in the environment such as a potential groundwater contamination by the leaching of heavy metals and/or particulate matter emissions; making it necessary to treat or reuse them. At present CFA are utilized in several applications fields such as cement and concrete production, agriculture and soil stabilization. However, their reuse is restricted by the quality parameters of the end-product or requirements defined by the production process. Therefore, secondary material markets can use a limited amount of CFA, which implies the necessity of new markets for the unused CFA. Some potential future utilization options reviewed herein are zeolite synthesis and valuable metals extraction. In comparison to CFA, PCFA are characterized by a high Ca content, suggesting a possible use as neutralizers of acid wastewaters from mining operations, opening a new potential application area for PCFA that could solve contamination problems in emergent and mining countries such as Chile. However, this potential application may be limited by PCFA heavy metals leaching, mainly V and Ni, which are present in PCFA in high concentrations.

  10. A framework for analysing innovation in the food sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunert, Klaus G.; Harmsen, Hanne; Meulenberg, Matthias

    , and chains. Companies within an industry also exhibit certain patterns of innovative activities over time. 5. The size of the company may have an impact on its innovativeness, but the relationships is not clear, arguments being raised for a higher degree of innovativeness of both small and large companies...... is regarded as the detection and fulfilment of unfilled needs and wants of potential customers, presupposing a market orientation of the innovative company. In the food sector, the interaction of R& market orientation can be expected to be a major determinant of innovation and innovativeness. 2. A product...... acceptance of fulfilment of company goals. Companies can differ in their degree of innovativeness, depending on the number and success of their innovations. 3. There is no clear-cut evidence on the relationship between the extent of R&D activities and business performance, neither in general nor in the food...

  11. Women's expectations and experiences of rupture of membranes and views of the potential use of reagent pads for detecting amniotic fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiby, Helen; Borrelli, Sara; Hughes, Anita J

    2017-12-01

    To explore first-time mothers' expectations and experiences regarding rupture of membranes at term and their views on the potential use of reagent pads that detect amniotic fluid. There is little information available on women's experiences of spontaneous rupture of membranes, or interest in using methods to confirm rupture of membranes (e.g. reagent pads). Descriptive qualitative study, using focus groups and telephone interviews with women during pregnancy and after the birth of their first baby. Thematic analysis was undertaken to analyse women's responses. Ethics committee approval was obtained. Twenty-five women participated in the study of whom 13 contributed both during pregnancy and postpartum between October 2015-March 2016. Three overarching themes were identified from the data from women's expectations and experiences: uncertainty in how, when and where membranes may rupture; information which was felt to be limited and confirmation of rupture of membranes. The potential use of reagent pads met with varied responses. Women were interested in having facts and figures regarding rupture of membranes, such as characteristics of liquor; volume and probability of membranes rupturing spontaneously at term. Use of a pad as a means of confirmation was viewed as helpful, although the potential for increasing anxiety was raised. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Assessing the Potential Impacts of Innovative New Policy Proposals on Poverty in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Wimer

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This article provides estimates of the potential anti-­poverty impacts of eight proposals presented in this double issue of RSF. Using the 2016 Annual Social and Economic Supplement to the Current Population Survey and the Census Bureau and Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Supplemental Poverty Measure, we first discuss the simulation approach taken for each proposal and then provide a consistent set of poverty estimates across proposals that include reductions in the poverty and deep poverty rates and the poverty gap; demographic differences; and net direct government costs. Anti-­poverty impacts are largest for the most costly proposals, but less costly and more targeted proposals still have substantial potential impacts for key subgroups.

  13. Great Expectations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dickens, Charles

    2005-01-01

    One of Dickens's most renowned and enjoyable novels, Great Expectations tells the story of Pip, an orphan boy who wishes to transcend his humble origins and finds himself unexpectedly given the opportunity to live a life of wealth and respectability. Over the course of the tale, in which Pip

  14. Open innovation with an effective open innovation team.

    OpenAIRE

    Vanvoorden, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    This master's thesis explores how open innovation teams can successfully support open innovation inside of an organisation. Open innovation is a paradigm introduced by Henry Chesbrough (2003) a decade ago. It expands the innovation potential of organisations by opening them up to new ways of working with external partners. To implement open innovation, many companies rely on a small group of managers named open innovation teams. Although open innovation teams can potentially be vital for impl...

  15. Introduction of an Evaluation Tool to Predict the Probability of Success of Companies: The Innovativeness, Capabilities and Potential Model (ICP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Lewrick

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Successful innovation requires management and in this paper a model to help manage the innovation process is presented. This model can be used to audit the management capability to innovate and to monitor how sales increase is related to innovativeness. The model was developed from a study of companies in the high technology cluster around Munich and validated using statistical procedures. The model was found to be effective at predicting the success or otherwise of the innovation strategy pursued by the company. The use of this model and how it can be used to identify areas for improvement are documented in this paper.

  16. Participatory Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buur, Jacob; Matthews, Ben

    In this paper we discuss the potential for Participatory Design (PD) to make a fundamental contribution to the business-oriented field of user-driven innovation, taking note of where we find PD can best benefit from interaction with this other field. We examine some of the challenges that must...... be addressed if PD is to contribute to innovation processes in companies. We conclude by presenting a research agenda comprising of six promising topics to shape a new discipline of Participatory Innovation....

  17. Price expectations and petroleum development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollio, G.; Marian, W.S.

    1991-01-01

    In the first section of this paper, the authors present a highly stylized model of the world oil market that explicitly incorporates both expectative and financial effects. The model generates the extremely interesting result that actual future price outcomes are inversely related to prevailing price expectations, owing to fluctuation in the level and timing of industry investment expenditure. Given the importance of price expectations, it is surprising that the topic has received such scant attention. The authors therefore present in the second section of selective survey of the various measures that have been proposed and used in the literature, as well as an assessment of the value of potentially new indices and market prices for existing hydrocarbon reserves, for example. In the final section of the paper, we discuss the extent to which financial innovation, in the form of commodity-linked products-such as swaps, caps, collars, and so forth-are transforming the oil market, enabling all market segments to manage price uncertainty far more effectively than was ever possible in the past

  18. Electric Potential and Electric Field Imaging with Dynamic Applications: 2017 Research Award Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generazio, Ed

    2017-01-01

    The technology and methods for remote quantitative imaging of electrostatic potentials and electrostatic fields in and around objects and in free space is presented. Electric field imaging (EFI) technology may be applied to characterize intrinsic or existing electric potentials and electric fields, or an externally generated electrostatic field may be used for illuminating volumes to be inspected with EFI. The baseline sensor technology (e-Sensor) and its construction, optional electric field generation (quasi-static generator), and current e- Sensor enhancements (ephemeral e-Sensor) are discussed. Critical design elements of current linear and real-time two-dimensional (2D) measurement systems are highlighted, and the development of a three dimensional (3D) EFI system is presented. Demonstrations for structural, electronic, human, and memory applications are shown. Recent work demonstrates that phonons may be used to create and annihilate electric dipoles within structures. Phonon induced dipoles are ephemeral and their polarization, strength, and location may be quantitatively characterized by EFI providing a new subsurface Phonon-EFI imaging technology. Initial results from real-time imaging of combustion and ion flow, and their measurement complications, will be discussed. These new EFI capabilities are demonstrated to characterize electric charge distribution creating a new field of study embracing areas of interest including electrostatic discharge (ESD) mitigation, crime scene forensics, design and materials selection for advanced sensors, combustion science, on-orbit space potential, container inspection, remote characterization of electronic circuits and level of activation, dielectric morphology of structures, tether integrity, organic molecular memory, atmospheric science, and medical diagnostic and treatment efficacy applications such as cardiac polarization wave propagation and electromyography imaging.

  19. Unlocking the potential of established products: toward new incentives rewarding innovation in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayroles, Gabrielle; Frybourg, Sandrine; Gabriel, Sylvie; Kornfeld, Åsa; Antoñanzas-Villar, Fernando; Espín, Jaime; Jommi, Claudio; Martini, Nello; de Pouvourville, Gérard; Tolley, Keith; Wasem, Jürgen; Toumi, Mondher

    2017-01-01

    Background : Many established products (EPs - marketed for eight years or more) are widely used off-label despite little evidence on benefit-risk ratio. This exposes patients to risks related to safety and lack of efficacy, and healthcare providers to liability. Introducing new indications for EPs may represent a high societal value; however, manufacturers rarely invest in R&D for EPs. The objective of this research was to describe incentives and disincentives for developing new indications for EPs in Europe and to investigate consequences of current policies. Methods : Targeted literature search and expert panel meetings. Results : Within the current European-level and national-level regulatory framework there are limited incentives for development of new indications with EPs. Extension of indication normally does not allow the price to be increased or maintained, the market protection period to be extended, or exclusion from a reference price system. New indication frequently triggers re-evaluation, resulting in price erosion, regardless of the level of added value with the new indication. In consequence, manufacturers are more prone to undertake R&D efforts at early to mid-stage of product life cycle rather than with EPs, or to invest in new chemical entities, even in therapeutic areas with broad off-label use. This represents a potentially missed opportunity as developing new indications for EPs offers an alternative to off-label use or lengthy and expensive R&D for new therapies, opens new opportunities for potentially cost-effective treatment alternatives, as well as greater equity in patients' access to treatment options. Conclusion : There are potential benefits from the development of new indications for EPs that are currently not being realized due to a lack of regulatory and pricing incentives in Europe. Incentives for orphan or paediatric drugs have proven to be effective in promoting R&D. Similarly, incentives to promote R&D in EPs should be developed

  20. Alternative future energy pathways: Assessment of the potential of innovative decentralised energy systems in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chmutina, Ksenia; Goodier, Chris I.

    2014-01-01

    In order to meet its 2050 target of 80% carbon emissions reduction, the UK is facing a challenge of restructuring its energy system, possibly by introducing more decentralised energy (DE) systems. Following semi-structured interviews, four exemplar international cases have been critiqued in order to investigate the variety and interrelationship of the drivers and barriers involved during their implementation, and then compared with the barriers and drivers that can potentially affect the implementation of similar projects in the UK context. The impacts of the barriers on the outcomes of these projects were evaluated, and recommendations were presented on overcoming these barriers if replicating similar projects in the UK context. Governance drivers play the most significant role, whereas financial drivers (commonly believed to be crucial), are deemed to play a lesser role. Social, governance and financial barriers rather than technological barriers constitute the central problem areas for the increased adoption of DE. The drivers and barriers experienced in the international cases were similar to those anticipated in the UK. The case studies present a high potential for replication and scaling up in the UK context and demonstrate that the increased implementation of DE systems could also enhance social and governance benefits. - Highlights: • This paper examines four international urban decentralised energy initiatives. • Drivers and barriers are found to be highly diverse but similar to the ones in the UK. • Governance drivers play the most significant role. • Increased implementation of DE systems can enhance social and governance benefits

  1. Development and characterization of hyaluronic acid-lysine nanoparticles with potential as innovative dermal filling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaqueline Carneiro

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Skin aging causes changes such as wrinkles and flaccidity leading to a large demand for aesthetic procedures, including dermal filling. A key agent in dermal filling is hyaluronic acid (HA, which is a naturally occurring glycosaminoglycan. However, it is a hydrophilic macromolecule that experiences great difficulty in crossing the skin barrier causing most commercial formulations containing it to be injectable, which in turn brings risks since they involve an invasive technique. In that sense, the aim of this study was to develop and characterize nanoparticles obtained from ionic interaction between HA and lysine (Lys for use as a potential agent of dermal filling for topical application, increasing and improving its applicability and safety. To this end, nanoparticles were obtained by dripping of Lys over HA under magnetic stirring. A nanometric size was confirmed and a suitable surface charge was obtained by zeta potential. Nanoparticles were almost spherical in shape with a smooth surface. Interaction between raw materials for preparing nanoparticles was studied by FTIR and NMR spectroscopy and an ionic interaction was confirmed. These physicochemical features suggest that obtained nanoparticles can be further used as a topical dermal filling.

  2. Unlocking the potential of established products: toward new incentives rewarding innovation in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayroles, Gabrielle; Frybourg, Sandrine; Gabriel, Sylvie; Kornfeld, Åsa; Antoñanzas-Villar, Fernando; Espín, Jaime; Jommi, Claudio; Martini, Nello; de Pouvourville, Gérard; Tolley, Keith; Wasem, Jürgen; Toumi, Mondher

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Many established products (EPs – marketed for eight years or more) are widely used off-label despite little evidence on benefit–risk ratio. This exposes patients to risks related to safety and lack of efficacy, and healthcare providers to liability. Introducing new indications for EPs may represent a high societal value; however, manufacturers rarely invest in R&D for EPs. The objective of this research was to describe incentives and disincentives for developing new indications for EPs in Europe and to investigate consequences of current policies. Methods: Targeted literature search and expert panel meetings. Results: Within the current European-level and national-level regulatory framework there are limited incentives for development of new indications with EPs. Extension of indication normally does not allow the price to be increased or maintained, the market protection period to be extended, or exclusion from a reference price system. New indication frequently triggers re-evaluation, resulting in price erosion, regardless of the level of added value with the new indication. In consequence, manufacturers are more prone to undertake R&D efforts at early to mid-stage of product life cycle rather than with EPs, or to invest in new chemical entities, even in therapeutic areas with broad off-label use. This represents a potentially missed opportunity as developing new indications for EPs offers an alternative to off-label use or lengthy and expensive R&D for new therapies, opens new opportunities for potentially cost-effective treatment alternatives, as well as greater equity in patients’ access to treatment options. Conclusion: There are potential benefits from the development of new indications for EPs that are currently not being realized due to a lack of regulatory and pricing incentives in Europe. Incentives for orphan or paediatric drugs have proven to be effective in promoting R&D. Similarly, incentives to promote R&D in EPs should

  3. Experiments expectations

    OpenAIRE

    Gorini, B; Meschi, E

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the expectations and the constraints of the experiments relatively to the commissioning procedure and the running conditions for the 2015 data taking period. The views about the various beam parameters for the p-p period, like beam energy, maximum pileup, bunch spacing and luminosity limitation in IP2 and IP8, are discussed. The goals and the constraints of the 2015 physics program are also presented, including the heavy ions period as well as the special...

  4. Making Collaborative Innovation Accountable

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eva

    The public sector is increasingly expected to be innovative, but the prize for a more innovative public sector might be that it becomes difficult to hold public authorities to account for their actions. The article explores the tensions between innovative and accountable governance, describes...... the foundation for these tensions in different accountability models, and suggest directions to take in analyzing the accountability of collaborative innovation processes....

  5. The Potential of the Bio-economy: From Photosynthesis to Industry, from Innovation to Market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, Claude

    2016-01-01

    Growing awareness of resource exhaustion and of the consequences, particularly for the climate, of our modes of consumption and production has helped remind humanity that we live in a finite world and that to make too many demands on our ecosystem is to run the risk of reaching a point of no return. To change everyone's styles of production and consumption in ail countries by the end of the century is without doubt too ambitious an aim, but it is worth putting it forward and trying to equip ourselves with the tools to achieve it. The bio-economy or 'green carbon' economy is one of those tools, as Claude Roy shows in this article. It consists in exploiting the fruits of plant photosynthesis not merely for foodstuffs, but also for materials, chemical bases, fertilizers, energy etc. Claude Roy outlines the main characteristics of the bio-economy, particularly in France, the economic sectors it covers and their potential, particularly in terms of employment. First and foremost, he shows how it could contribute to meeting the major challenges of our world, whose finite nature we are rediscovering today. Energy conservation, a renewables- based economy and carbon sequestration -three possible 'emergency exits' at the heart of the bio-economy, so long as human beings can commit to developing their agricultural crops and forests. (author)

  6. Development of unutilized biomass potentials in forestry and landscape conservation. Logistical challenges and potential uses of innovative telematics technologies and services

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erhardt, I; Waesche, M [Fraunhofer Institute for Factory Operation and Automation IFF, Magdeburg (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    Among other things, the heterogeneity of the types, quantities and numbers of potential sources and sinks as well as the means of transportation used continue to make it difficult to describe as a whole logistics processes for developing raw material in forest and field, especially for the wood processing industry, or for recovering renewable energies. Conventional methods of logistics controlling and measurement only capture these processes incompletely and partially. Innovative developments in the field of mobile information technologies are opening tremendous potentials for improving logistics processes. Taking into account the multitude of national and international standards and guidelines in this field, catchphrases such as location based services or LBS and radio frequency identification or RFID already stand for effective and practicable solutions in traditional fields of application for logistics. Building upon RFID and telematic trends and applications in classical fields of logistics, this paper presents current successes and addresses further needs in the forestry and wood processing industries as well as related sectors. The following theses are put forth for discussion: The use of RFID and telematics must guarantee a quantifiable benefit for everyone involved in a process. The development of a broader range of solutions customized for individual cases and preconfigured will help the technology to a breakthrough more than striving for the universal solution will. Standardization is a fundamental prerequisite to user acceptance in general and investment protection, particularly for smaller enterprises. (orig.)

  7. Innovation in drought risk management: exploring the potential of weather index insurance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias, E.; Baez, K.

    2012-04-01

    Many family farming and indigenous communities depend on grazing livestock activities and are particularly prone to drought risks. Vulnerability to drought limits the ability of these households to exit poverty and in many cases leads to environmental degradation. It is well known that uninsured exposure exacerbates income inequality in farming systems and eventually results in welfare losses for rural families. The advantages of farmers who have access to financial tools have been widely acknowledged. However, high administrative costs of traditional insurance hinder small farmers' access to risk management tools. One of the main problems in insurance design relates to the lack of quality data to estimate the risk premium. In rural areas where there are no historical records of farm production data on adverse events such as drought. New technologies such as remote sensing help to overcome this problem and generate information from these areas that otherwise would be impossible or too expensive to obtain. In this paper, we use a satellite based vegetation index (NDVI) and develop a stochastic model to analyse the potential of index insurance to address the risk of drought in Chilean grazing lands. Our results suggest that contract design is a key issue to improve the correlation of the index with individual farm losses, thus reducing basis risk. In particular, we find that the definition of homogeneous areas and the selection of the triggering index threshold are critical issues and show the incidence of different contract designs on (i) the probability that the farmer experience losses but does not receive compensation (false negative) and (ii) the probability that the index triggers compensation but the farmer does not experience drought losses (false negative). Both aspects are key issues to offer the farmer an adequate protection against droughts and guarantee the affordability of the risk premium.

  8. Upcrowding energy co-operatives - Evaluating the potential of crowdfunding for business model innovation of energy co-operatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilger, Mathias Georg; Jovanović, Tanja; Voigt, Kai-Ingo

    2017-08-01

    Practice and theory have proven the relevance of energy co-operatives for civic participation in the energy turnaround. However, due to a still low awareness and changing regulation, there seems an unexploited potential of utilizing the legal form 'co-operative' in this context. The aim of this study is therefore to investigate the crowdfunding implementation in the business model of energy co-operatives in order to cope with the mentioned challenges. Based on a theoretical framework, we derive a Business Model Innovation (BMI) through crowdfunding including synergies and differences. A qualitative study design, particularly a multiple-case study of energy co-operatives, was chosen to prove the BMI and to reveal barriers. The results show that although most co-operatives are not familiar with crowdfunding, there is strong potential in opening up predominantly local structures to a broader group of members. Building on this, equity-based crowdfunding is revealed to be suitable for energy co-operatives as BMI and to accompany other challenges in the same way. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Pheromone dispensers, including organic polymer fibers, described in the crop protection literature: comparison of their innovation potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummel, Hans E; Langner, S S; Eisinger, M-T

    2013-01-01

    Pheromone dispensers, although known in a variety of different designs, are one of the few remaining technical bottlenecks along the way to a sustainable pheromone based strategy in integrated pest management (IPM). Mating disruption with synthetic pheromones is a viable pest management approach. Suitable pheromone dispensers for these mating disruption schemes, however, are lagging behind the general availability of pheromones. Specifically, there is a need for matching the properties of the synthetic pheromones, the release rates suitable for certain insect species, and the environmental requirements of specific crop management. The "ideal" dispenser should release pheromones at a constant but pre-adjustable rate, should be mechanically applicable, completely biodegradable and thus save the costs for recovering spent dispensers. These should be made from renewable, cheap organic material, be economically inexpensive, and be toxicologically and eco-toxicologically inert to provide satisfactory solutions for the needs of practicing growers. In favourable cases, they will be economically competitive with conventional pesticide treatments and by far superior in terms of environmental and eco-toxicological suitability. In the course of the last 40 years, mating disruption, a non-toxicological approach, provided proof for its potential in dozens of pest insects of various orders and families. Applications for IPM in many countries of the industrialized and developing world have been reported. While some dispensers have reached wide circulation, only few of the key performing parameters fit the above requirements ideally and must be approximated with some sacrifice in performance. A fair comparison of the innovation potential of currently available pheromone dispensers is attempted. The authors advance here the use of innovative electrospun organic fibers with dimensions in the "meso" (high nano- to low micrometer) region. Due to their unique multitude of adjustable

  10. MAPPING INNOVATION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Christian Langhoff; Koch, Christian

    2011-01-01

    By adopting a theoretical framework from strategic niche management research (SNM) this paper presents an analysis of the innovation system of the Danish Construction industry. The analysis shows a multifaceted landscape of innovation around an existing regime, built around existing ways of working...... and developed over generations. The regime is challenged from various niches and the socio-technical landscape through trends as globalization. Three niches (Lean Construction, BIM and System Deliveries) are subject to a detailed analysis showing partly incompatible rationales and various degrees of innovation...... potential. The paper further discusses how existing policymaking operates in a number of tensions one being between government and governance. Based on the concepts from SNM the paper introduces an innovation map in order to support the development of meta-governance policymaking. By mapping some...

  11. Drug-using and nonusing women: potential for child abuse, child-rearing attitudes, social support, and affection for expected baby.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams-Petersen, M G; Myers, B J; Degen, H M; Knisely, J S; Elswick, R K; Schnoll, S S

    1994-10-01

    Eighty pregnant women (25 substance using, 55 nonusing) from an American prenatal clinic serving lower-income to working-class women responded to questionnaire measures of child-rearing attitudes. The drug users' primary substance of misuse was cocaine (68%), alcohol (16%), amphetamines (12%), or sedatives (4%); polydrug use was documented for 80% of the women. The two (user and nonuser) groups were not different on demographic (age, race, marital status, education, SES, source of income) or obstetrical factors (number of pregnancies, number of children). Drug-using women scored significantly higher on a measure of child abuse potential; more than half scored in the range of clinical criterion for extreme risk. As their babies were not yet born, no actual physical abuse was documented, only a higher potential for abuse. The subgroup who were both drug users and had lower social support scored higher on child abuse potential than all other subgroups. The drug users also had lower self-esteem scores than the nonusers. The two groups did not differ on measures of overall social support, authoritarian/democratic child-rearing beliefs, or affection for the expected baby.

  12. Embarking on the social innovation journey: A systematic review regarding the potential of co-creation with citizens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.H. Voorberg (William); V.J.J.M. Bekkers (Victor); L.G. Tummers (Lars)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractand especially social innovation is a ‘magic concept’ that during the last years has been embraced as a promising reform strategy for the public sector. It is argued that it is important for social innovation that it is being co-created with citizens. However, to date there are no

  13. Innovation Policy Development and the Emergence of New Innovation Paradigms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanev, Stoyan; Knudsen, Mette Præst; Bisgaard, Tanja

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the present article is to discuss innovation policy issues related to three emerging innovation paradigms: user-driven innovation, open innovation, and value cocreation. It provides a summary of insights based on innovation policy practices and challenges in Denmark. The choice...... of Danish innovation policy practices is not accidental. In 2008 Denmark implemented 40 different national innovation programs by allocating about 400 million euros. Since the three emerging paradigms have become globally relevant, the discussion of Danish policy development challenges and practices...... is expected to be insightful for innovation experts from other developed countries that are currently dealing with the adoption of these paradigms....

  14. Sustainable Innovation: A Competitive Advantage for Innovation Ecosystems

    OpenAIRE

    Oksanen, Kaisa; Hautamäki, Antti

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we elaborate the emerging concept of sustainable innovation and analyze the relevance of innovation as a means to solve wicked problems and enhancing sustainable well-being. We also examine the changing conditions for innovation creation: building global knowledge hubs and local innovation ecosystems. As a result, the drivers of innovation and opportunities to utilize the untapped innovation potential of people outside traditional innovation contexts are expand...

  15. Qualitative assessment of innovations in healthcare provision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghosh Amit K

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The triad of quality, innovation and economic restraint is as important in health care as it is in the business world. There are many proposals for the assessment of quality and of economic restraints in health care but only a few address assessment of innovations. We propose a strategy and new structures to standardize the description of health care innovations and to quantify them. Discussion Strategy and structure are based on the assumption that in the early phase of an innovation only data on the feasibility and possibly on the efficacy or effectiveness of an innovation can be expected. From the patient's perspective, benefit resulting from an innovation can be confirmed only in a later phase of development. Early indicators of patient's benefit will be surrogate parameters which correlate only weakly with the desired endpoints. After the innovation has been in use, there will be more evidence on correlations between surrogate parameters and the desired endpoints to provide evidence of the patient benefit. From an administrative perspective, this evidence can be considered in decisions about public financing. Different criteria are proposed for the assessment of innovations in prevention, diagnosis and therapy. For decisions on public financing a public fund for innovations may be helpful. Depending on the phase of innovation risk sharing models are proposed between manufacturers, private insurers and public funding. Summary Potential for patient benefit is always uncertain during early stages of innovations. This uncertainty decreases with increasing information on the effects of the innovation. Information about an innovation can be quantified, categorized and integrated into rational economic decisions.

  16. NASA Johnson Space Center Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Successes, Infusion and Commercializations and Potential International Partnering Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packard, Kathryn; Goodman, Doug; Whittington, James

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program has served as a beneficial funding vehicle to both US small technology businesses and the Federal Agencies that participate in the program. This paper, to the extent possible, while observing Intellectual Property (IP) laws, will discuss the many SBIR and STTR (SBIR Technology Transfer) successes in the recent history of the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC). Many of the participants of the International Conference on Environmental Systems (ICES) have based their research and papers on technologies that were made possible by SBIR/STTR awards and post award funding. Many SBIR/STTR successes have flown on Space Shuttle missions, Space X Dragons, and other spacecraft. SBIR/STTR technologies are currently infused on the International Space Station (ISS) and satellites, one of which was a NASA/JAXA (Japanese Space Agency) joint venture. Many of these companies have commercialized their technologies and grown as businesses while helping the economy through the creation of new jobs. In addition, this paper will explore the opportunity for international partnership with US SBIR/STTR companies as up to 49% of the makeup of the company is not required to be American owned. Although this paper will deal with technical achievements, it does not purport to be technical in nature. It will address the many requests for information on successes and opportunities within NASA SBIR and the virtually untapped potential of international partnering.

  17. Insight about Norwegian Millennials and Blood Donation - A qualitative Study on Experiences, Expectations and Perceptions that identify potential Areas of Improvement and Innovation

    OpenAIRE

    Fredriksen, Hilde Vestby

    2017-01-01

    Norway needs more blood donors to increase the preparedness. With the decreasing number of blood donors, the preparedness situation is put in danger if catastrophes or epidemics should occur. Research about how blood donation should be organized exists, but often lack user-centricity when approaching the problem. This thesis offers an exploratory and problem identifying contribution to this problem. A qualitative and user-centred approach was taken, where 18 young adults who both are an...

  18. Community expectations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraemer, L.

    2004-01-01

    Historically, the relationship between the nuclear generator and the local community has been one of stability and co-operation. However in more recent times (2000-2003) the nuclear landscape has had several major issues that directly effect the local nuclear host communities. - The associations mandate is to be supportive of the nuclear industry through ongoing dialogue, mutual cooperation and education, - To strengthen community representation with the nuclear industry and politically through networking with other nuclear host communities. As a result of these issues, the Mayors of a number of communities started having informal meetings to discuss the issues at hand and how they effect their constituents. These meetings led to the official formation of the CANHC with representation from: In Canada it is almost impossible to discuss decommissioning and dismantling of Nuclear Facilities without also discussing Nuclear Waste disposal for reasons that I will soon make clear. Also I would like to briefly touch on how and why expectation of communities may differ by geography and circumstance. (author)

  19. A digital platform as a facilitator for assessing innovation potential and creating business models: a case study from the i3 project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bellini Francesco

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Many ideas flow into the innovation funnel but only 1 out 3000 becomes a successful new product. There are many variables that interact in this complex process and investors decisions are often based on experience and feeling rather than a comprehensive evaluation of the social, economic and technological factors. The innovation potential, the innovator capability, the accessibility of the technology as well as the social acceptance and the chosen business model are the some of the critical factors of a successful innovation strategy. In the broad sense, a business model is the approach of doing business through which a company can sustain itself and generate profits in the long term. Digital platforms can help manage and facilitate the complexity of value propositions and provide an immediate feedback to the entrepreneur. Creating value is necessary, but not sufficient, for an organization to profit from its business model. It is important to see the whole picture of the business that is why the business models are so important for a good start of the business. However, innovation assessment and business model development sometimes are not an easy task and ICT can make this process easier. Then, the aim of this paper is to explore the role of digital platforms as facilitators for the techno-socio-economic impact assessment and the development of sustainable business models through the analysis of a case study from the EU Horizon 2020 “i3 project”.

  20. Expectation-maximization of the potential of mean force and diffusion coefficient in Langevin dynamics from single molecule FRET data photon by photon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Kevin R; Yang, Haw; Chu, Jhih-Wei

    2013-12-12

    The dynamics of a protein along a well-defined coordinate can be formally projected onto the form of an overdamped Lagevin equation. Here, we present a comprehensive statistical-learning framework for simultaneously quantifying the deterministic force (the potential of mean force, PMF) and the stochastic force (characterized by the diffusion coefficient, D) from single-molecule Förster-type resonance energy transfer (smFRET) experiments. The likelihood functional of the Langevin parameters, PMF and D, is expressed by a path integral of the latent smFRET distance that follows Langevin dynamics and realized by the donor and the acceptor photon emissions. The solution is made possible by an eigen decomposition of the time-symmetrized form of the corresponding Fokker-Planck equation coupled with photon statistics. To extract the Langevin parameters from photon arrival time data, we advance the expectation-maximization algorithm in statistical learning, originally developed for and mostly used in discrete-state systems, to a general form in the continuous space that allows for a variational calculus on the continuous PMF function. We also introduce the regularization of the solution space in this Bayesian inference based on a maximum trajectory-entropy principle. We use a highly nontrivial example with realistically simulated smFRET data to illustrate the application of this new method.

  1. Strengthening Industrial Ecology’s Links with Business Studies: Insights and Potential Contributions from the Innovation and Business Models Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Sharpe

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The declining availability of natural resources and the environmental impacts of continued extraction of primary resources for production activities have forced greater focus on waste streams and recycling activities. Industrial ecology as a field of practice and theory has been closely related to sustainability issues, yet despite the development of much theory and specific tools and methodologies, the link between natural, industrial and economic systems is not convincing. Not only that, the need for delivering sustainable production and consumption practices is increasing, which is demanding new solutions to existing problems, particularly around the degree of novelty. The interaction of industrial ecology with business studies and industrial investment decision-making remains under-developed, and this is likely impacting on the adoption of more sustainable and resource-efficient practices. As such, this paper uses a constructive approach and explores how two areas of the literature can support the development of the industrial ecology field into strategic business practice: firstly, the innovation literature, particularly the emerging work on open innovation and sustainable innovation as a model to understand radical innovation processes and the creation and maintenance of networked systems of firms; secondly, the closely related area of business model (BM innovation, specifically the emerging typologies of sustainable BMs and how these typologies can be developed and used as a route to positioning recycling activities at the strategic management level of the firm.

  2. Medical innovation laws: an unnecessary innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Bernadette

    2016-06-01

    Objective This paper aims to demonstrate that any suggestion that there is a need for specific innovation laws is flawed. Innovation is central to good medical practice and is adequately supported by current law. Methods The paper reviews the nature of medical innovation and outlines recent attempts in the UK to introduce specific laws aimed at 'encouraging' and 'supporting' innovation. The current legal framework is outlined and the role of the law in relation to medical innovation explored. Results The analysis demonstrates the cyclic relationship between medical advancement and the law and concludes that there is no requirement for specific innovation laws. Conclusions The law not only supports innovation and development in medical treatment but encourages it as central to a functioning medical system. There is no need to introduce specific laws aimed at medical innovation; to do so represents an unnecessary legal innovation and serves to complicate matters. What is known about the topic? Over recent months, there has been a great deal of discussion surrounding the law in the context of medical innovation. This was driven by the attempts in the UK to introduce specific laws in the Medical Innovation Bill. The general subject matter - negligence and the expected standard of care in the provision of treatment - is very well understood, but not in cases where the treatment can be described as innovative. The general rhetoric in both the UK and Australia around the Medical Innovation Bill demonstrates a lack of understanding of the position of the law with regards to innovative treatment. What does this paper add? This paper adds clarity to the debate. It presents the law and explains the manner in which the law can operate around innovative treatment. The paper asserts that medical innovation is both supported and encouraged by existing legal principles. What are the implications for practitioners? The paper presents an argument that can guide the policy position

  3. The fast neutrons reactors, the sodium, the fuel cycle: evaluation of the knowledge, innovation potential and forecast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreau, J.

    2002-01-01

    This document presents the study, the design and the construction of fast neutrons reactors, cooled with sodium. From this evaluation, it details the innovation possibilities of this sector in the sustainable development context of the nuclear energy. Chapter one presents the physical and physico-chemical properties of the sodium. Chapter two analyzes the properties of the fast cores and the sodium advantages. Chapter three analyzes the great contribution of the EFR project. Chapter four takes stock on the innovation possibilities. And before the conclusion, chapter five shows that the fast neutrons reactors allow the electric power production in agreement with a sustainable development. (A.L.B.)

  4. Beyond Extinction: Prolonged Conditioning and Repeated Threat Exposure Abolish Contextual Renewal of Fear-Potentiated Startle Discrimination but Leave Expectancy Ratings Intact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leer, Arne; Haesen, Kim; Vervliet, Bram

    2018-01-01

    Extinction treatments decrease fear via repeated exposures to the conditioned stimulus (CS) and are associated with a return of fear. Alternatively, fear can be reduced via reductions in the perceived intensity of the unconditioned stimulus (US), e.g., through repeated exposures to the US. Promisingly, the few available studies show that repeated US exposures outperform standard extinction. US exposure treatments can decrease fear via two routes: (1) by weakening the CS-US association (extinction-like mechanism), and/or (2) by weakening the subjective US aversiveness (habituation-like mechanism). The current study further investigated the conditions under which US exposure treatment may reduce renewal, by adding a group in which CS-US pairings continued following fear acquisition. During acquisition, participants learned that one of two visual stimuli (CS+/CS-) predicted the occurrence of an aversive electrocutaneous stimulus (US). Next, the background context changed and participants received one of three interventions: repeated CS exposures, (2) repeated US exposures, or (3) continued CS-US pairings. Following repeated CS exposures, test presentations of the CSs in the original conditioning context revealed intact CS+/CS- differentiation in the fear-potentiated startle reflex, while the differentiation was abolished in the other two groups. Differential US expectancy ratings, on the other hand, were intact in all groups. Skin conductance data were inconclusive because standard context renewal following CS exposures did not occur. Unexpectedly, there was no evidence for a habituation-like process having taken place during US exposures or continued CS-US pairings. The results provide further evidence that US exposures outperform the standard extinction treatment and show that effects are similar when US exposures are part of CS-US pairings.

  5. Innovative learning for innovation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr.Ir. Hay Geraedts

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Innovation is crucial for companies who have to react to constantly changing markets. Several national and European research institutes stress the importance of developing innovation for small and medium size enterprises (SMEs). This was a trigger to design a minor on strategic

  6. Fashion retail innovation: about context, antecedents and outcome in technological change projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tambo, Torben

    2015-01-01

    Fashion retail is recognised for its strong capabilities in product innovation, while also having the potential to improve the governance of technology-based process innovation. This chapter proposes a model perspective in management of technology and innovation, including special requirements...... of fashion retailing. In particular, this chapter discusses the context of fashion retailing understood as product and brand-based characteristics. A case study-based methodology is then used to guide an analysis of antecedents and (expected) outcome of fashion retail innovation. IT-based innovation...... dominates, but innovation is suggested to include a broader scope of technologies. Contrary to innovation maturity models, this chapter proposes to consider innovation as a continuous refinement between dynamic capabilities and absorptive capacity where technologies must be adapted to the special...

  7. Innovation Motivation and Artistic Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joy, Stephen P.

    2005-01-01

    Innovation motivation is a social learning model of originality comprising two variables: the need to be different and innovation expectancy. This study examined their contribution to artistic creativity in a sample of undergraduates. Participants completed measures of both innovation motivation variables as well as intelligence, adjustment, and…

  8. Innovation Leadership in Danish SMEs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdullah, Maizura Ailin; Lindgren, Peter

    2008-01-01

    to reflect upon today's developments in innovation.  For this, we propose SMEs to "lead" innovation, i.e. innovation leadership, in order to succeed in today's volatile business environment.  Innovation leadership is a strategic way of thinking and practice innovation that is applicable to all organizations......, but especially in SMEs. This is because SMEs are flexible, lightly-structured and thus can adapt to the requirements of the innovation leadership model. Unfortunately SMEs also lack multiple resources that are needed in order to lead innovation. This paper discusses the potential of innovation leadership in SMEs...

  9. A preliminary assessment of the potential for 'team science' in DOE Energy Innovation Hubs and Energy Frontier Research Centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boardman, Craig, E-mail: boardman.10@osu.edu [John Glenn School of Public Affairs, Ohio State University (United States); Ponomariov, Branco, E-mail: branco.ponomariov@utsa.edu [Department of Public Administration, University of Texas at San Antonio (United States)

    2011-06-15

    President Obama has called for the development of new energy technologies to address our national energy needs and restore US economic competitiveness. In response, the Department of Energy has established new R and D modalities for energy research and development designed to facilitate collaboration across disciplinary, institutional, and sectoral boundaries. In this research note, we provide a preliminary assessment of the potential for essential mechanisms for coordinated problem solving among diverse actors within two new modalities at the DOE: Energy Innovation Hubs and Energy Frontier Research Centers. - Highlights: > Energy Frontier Research Centers may lack the basic mechanisms for coordinating diverse actors. > Divergent goals across diverse actors may hinder coordination in Energy Innovation Hubs. > The implementation of these and similar energy policies require further investigation.

  10. Where are All the Female Innovators? Nurses as Innovators in a Public Sector Innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Nählinder

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The field of innovation does not see the innovator and is therefore gender-blind. Still, there is an implicit understanding of who is innovative, and this understanding includes gender and profession of the innovator. The female nurse is not seen as innovative and few innovation policies target her. The lack of innovativeness is due to many factors and two of these are tested empirically in this article: that women work in professions which are not associated with innovation and that women lack confidence to carry out innovative work. The empirical investigation presents evidence in line with both hypothesis and also notes that men and women ends their innovative efforts for different reasons. Therefore, innovation policy targeting these groups mobilises otherwise dormant potential innovators.

  11. INNOVATION PROCESS IN OPEN CAPITAL BRAZILIAN COMPANIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Floriani

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to identify the innovation process used by the open capital Brazilian companies and establish a ranking of the potentially innovative ones. For this, a questionnaire was sent to 484 companies with shares traded in Bovespa, receiving a response from 22. The innovation process is based on the model of Barrett and Sexton (2006. A summary of the results is presented below. (i Organizational Capabilities – 95.5% answered that they have incentives for innovation activities and 68.2% reported having procedures for all services. The leadership has a facilitator role encouraging the initiative (86.4% and promotes the maintenance of the group relationship (72.7%. Value risk taking, even through failures and prioritize the learning and experimenting new ideas. (ii Background of the innovation – reveals aspects of the capacity (internal or (external. Of the respondents, 59.1% developed internal activities of continuing P & D. Training to innovate is present in a continuous or occasional basis in 81.8% of the companies. The respondents characterize the economic environment as dynamic and the majority purchased software and equipments. In only 12 opportunities was a reference to obtaining patents as innovation protection measure. (iii Focus of innovation – the majority of the companies mentioned process or product innovation. Rewards are offered when the objectives are met and it is brought to attention when this does not occur. (iv Highlighted performance – the innovations achieved the expectations and created effects. The relevant benefits noticed were: improvement in quality of goods and services, increase of market share, increase of goods and services, and increase of productive capacity.

  12. The Feedback-Related Negativity and the P300 Brain Potential Are Sensitive to Price Expectation Violations in a Virtual Shopping Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Alexandre; Buratto, Luciano G; Goto, Nobuhiko; Brotherhood, Emilie V

    A large body of evidence shows that buying behaviour is strongly determined by consumers' price expectations and the extent to which real prices violate these expectations. Despite the importance of this phenomenon, little is known regarding its neural mechanisms. Here we show that two patterns of electrical brain activity known to index prediction errors-the Feedback-Related Negativity (FRN) and the feedback-related P300 -were sensitive to price offers that were cheaper than participants' expectations. In addition, we also found that FRN amplitude time-locked to price offers predicted whether a product would be subsequently purchased or not, and further analyses suggest that this result was driven by the sensitivity of the FRN to positive price expectation violations. This finding strongly suggests that ensembles of neurons coding positive prediction errors play a critical role in real-life consumer behaviour. Further, these findings indicate that theoretical models based on the notion of prediction error, such as the Reinforcement Learning Theory, can provide a neurobiologically grounded account of consumer behavior.

  13. The Feedback-Related Negativity and the P300 Brain Potential Are Sensitive to Price Expectation Violations in a Virtual Shopping Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Alexandre; Buratto, Luciano G.; Goto, Nobuhiko; Brotherhood, Emilie V.

    2016-01-01

    A large body of evidence shows that buying behaviour is strongly determined by consumers’ price expectations and the extent to which real prices violate these expectations. Despite the importance of this phenomenon, little is known regarding its neural mechanisms. Here we show that two patterns of electrical brain activity known to index prediction errors–the Feedback-Related Negativity (FRN) and the feedback-related P300 –were sensitive to price offers that were cheaper than participants’ expectations. In addition, we also found that FRN amplitude time-locked to price offers predicted whether a product would be subsequently purchased or not, and further analyses suggest that this result was driven by the sensitivity of the FRN to positive price expectation violations. This finding strongly suggests that ensembles of neurons coding positive prediction errors play a critical role in real-life consumer behaviour. Further, these findings indicate that theoretical models based on the notion of prediction error, such as the Reinforcement Learning Theory, can provide a neurobiologically grounded account of consumer behavior. PMID:27658301

  14. Revolution of Innovation Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This edited volume explores how the rapid development of business model innovation changes innovation management at an international level. It discusses the next phases in its development, and the impact that this could have on the field. The authors identify and examine recent trends which have...... the potential to disrupt the traditional way of managing innovation, notably in terms of creativity, product development, and process change. In line with the constant globalization of innovation, the second volume of Revolution of Innovation Management offers a variety of international perspective...

  15. Understanding the impact of socioeconomic differences in breast cancer survival in England and Wales: avoidable deaths and potential gain in expectation of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, M J; Andersson, T M-L; Møller, H; Lambert, P C

    2015-02-01

    Socioeconomic differences in cancer patient survival are known to exist for women diagnosed with breast cancer. Standard metrics tend not to place great emphasis on evaluating the actual impact of these differences. We used two alternative, but related, methods of reporting the impact of socioeconomic differences for breast cancer patients in England and Wales. We calculated the average gain in life years for each patient should socioeconomic differences in relative survival be removed and show how this is related to the number of all-cause deaths that could be postponed by removing socioeconomic differences in cancer patient survival. Our results indicate that deprivation differences for women with breast cancer exist and result in women from more deprived areas losing a larger proportion of their life due to a diagnosis of cancer. We also estimate that on average 1.1 years could be gained for a 60 year old breast cancer patient in the most deprived group by improving their relative survival to match the least deprived group. However, our results also show that deprivation differences in general survival have a large impact on life expectancy; showing that over two-thirds of the gap in differential life expectancy is explained by differences in other-cause survival. Socioeconomic differences in relative survival have an impact on life expectancy for patients and result in higher early mortality for more deprived patients. However, differences in general survival across socioeconomic groups explain a larger proportion of the deprivation gap in life expectancy for breast cancer patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Innovation af innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harste, Gorm

    2009-01-01

    , at innovation af innovationen forsøges gennemført på en måde, hvor tiden kræves at forholde sig til sin egen tidslighed i form af fremtid, nutid, fortid og ikke mindst i form af samtidighed. I tiden skal vi iagttage, hvordan vi iagttager tiden. Vi dobbelt-koder tiden på samme måde, som forskning forsker i...... organisationssystemerne. De to typer systemer kan noget helt bestemt med fænomenet tid. De kan synkronisere. Analyseres organisationssystemer ser vi, imidlertid at innovation kræver ro. Stærkt innovative systemer er militærsystemet og kunstsystemet, der også inddrages, og hvor vi ser paradokset mellem innovation og...... involution. Tid er med et medium og ikke et lufttomt rum. Tid er end ikke en gasart, men udgør et solidt fluidum, som samfundet bader i og flyder i, konstant i bevægelse. Reformer forudsætter former, og innovation forudsætter involution. Kun sådan muliggøres evolution....

  17. Strengthening regional innovation through network-based innovation brokering

    OpenAIRE

    Svare, Helge; Gausdal, Anne Haugen

    2015-01-01

    The primary objective of this paper is to demonstrate how regional innovation system theory may be translated into manageable micro-level methods with the potential for strengthening the productive dynamics of a regional innovation system. The paper meets this objective by presenting network-based innovation brokering (NBIB), a practical method designed using insights from regional innovation system theory and trust theory. Five cases from two Norwegian regional innovation networks show that ...

  18. Logistic innovations in transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirosław Antonowicz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The article discusses the issue of logistic innovations in transport. The essentials of logistic innovations in transport together with some examples of specific innovations are presented. The role of the client's needs in transport innovations is indicated. The most vital postulates affecting the innovativeness of shipping companies and derived from the author's experience as well as scholarly publications, are time, safety, reliability as well as comprehensiveness of service offer. Following the analysis of the issue, and on the grounds of Kaizen's and Lean's method, the concept of continuous innovations is suggested as very useful for the development of transport. The potential of clusters as the source of logistic innovations in transport is emphasised. Methods: The discussion of the issue was preceded by the author's analysis of written sources on innovativeness, the evaluation of ratings of innovativeness as well as the analysis of rewarded innovative solutions in transport subsequent to the businesses participation in the programme of innovative solutions in transport. The role of innovation practical business operations is argued following the analysis of some strategic documents such as: 2011 White Paper and the Strategy for the Development of Transport by 2020 adopted by the Polish government in 2013. Aim: The aim of the article is to present the role and significance of the issue of logistic innovations in transport and to cite instances of practical solutions implemented by shipping companies, the solutions which resulted in measurable effects. Following the author's observation of the instances of innovative solutions as well as his analysis of the ratings of innovativeness, the article aims to present the conclusions as for the specific kinds of activities which are indispensable to foster innovativeness in transport. Conclusions: The conclusions derived from the author's analyses and observations show that logistic

  19. Orchestrating innovation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkers, F.T.H.M.; Klein Woolthuis, R.J.A.; Boer, J. de

    2015-01-01

    Orchestrating Innovation increases the probability of success, minimizing the probability of failure of technological innovations by creating sustained societal and economic value. Orchestrating innovation propagates to take into account and actively involve all relevant stakeholders of the (future)

  20. Innovation in Photovoltaic Science, Engineering, and Policy: A Potential Trillion-Dollar Global Industry for Sustainable Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Cheng

    The solar photovoltaic (PV) technology was an expensive niche energy source only for satellite applications, hallmarked by the Bell Lab's launch of the Telstar satellite with PV cells in 1962. Over the past decades, the accumulation of vast amount of effort across various disciplines in science, engineering, and policy has enabled the phenomenal growth of the solar PV industry into a global enterprise with about 140 gigawatt (GW) of cumulative installations by the end of 2013. Further cost reduction through innovation holds the promise in deploying terawatt (TW)-scale solar PV systems globally in both developed and developing countries, meeting growing energy demand and mitigating climate change. Chapter 1 presents a big picture view of the unsustainable path, heavily relying on fossil fuels, in the current global energy landscape. The main body of the dissertation examines the solar PV technology from a holistic and interdisciplinary perspective: from the basic research, to innovations in manufacturing and installing PV modules, to the driving energy policies. Chapter 2 offers a fundamental understanding of the PV technology and a review on recent scientific advances in improving PV efficiency (W/m 2). Chapter 3 reviews the state-of-the-art process flow in manufacturing commercial PV modules. In the context of pursuing further reduction in manufacturing cost (/m2), the thin Si film concept and its recent research effort are reviewed. Aiming to explore novel ways to produce high-quality seed crystals for thin Si film deposition, the key findings of the laser crystallization experiment is presented in Chapter 4. The fundamental thermophysics of nucleation and crystal growth is first reviewed, which highlights the importance of temperature evolution and heat transport in modelling the ultrafast laser crystallization process. Laser crystallization of a range of Si nanostructures are then carried out to study the nucleation and crystal growth behavior under some novel

  1. Psychosocial job conditions, fear avoidance beliefs and expected return to work following acute coronary syndrome: a cross-sectional study of fear-avoidance as a potential mediator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderberg, Mia; Rosengren, Annika; Gustavsson, Sara; Schiöler, Linus; Härenstam, Annika; Torén, Kjell

    2015-12-21

    Despite improvements in treatment, acute coronary syndrome remains a substantial cause for prolonged sick absences and premature retirement. Knowledge regarding what benefits return to work is limited, especially the effect of psychological processes and psychosocial work factors. The purposes of this cross-sectional study were two-fold: to examine associations between adverse psychosocial job conditions and fear-avoidance beliefs towards work, and to determine whether such beliefs mediated the relationship between work conditions and expected return to work in acute coronary syndrome survivors. Study inclusion criteria: acute myocardial infarction or unstable angina diagnosis, below 65 years of age, being a resident in the West county of Sweden and currently working. In all, 509 individuals (21.8 % women) accepted study participation and for whom all data of study interest were available for analysis. Psychosocial work variables; job demand-control and effort-reward imbalance, were assessed with standard questionnaire batteries. Linear regression models were used to investigate relationships between psychosocial factors and fear-avoidance, and to evaluate mediator effects for fear-avoidance. Both total sample and gender stratified analyses were calculated. Fear-avoidance beliefs about work were associated to psychosocial job environments characterized by high strain (β 1.4; CI 1.2-1.6), active and passive work and high effort-reward imbalance (β 0.6; CI 0.5-0.7). Further, such beliefs also mediated the relationship between adverse work conditions and expected time for return to work. However, these results were only observed in total sample analyses or among or male participants. For women only high strain was linked to fear-avoidance, and these relationships became non-significant when entering chosen confounders. This cross-sectional study showed that acute coronary syndrome survivors, who laboured under adverse psychosocial work conditions, held fear

  2. Expectations for a scientific collaboratory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnenwald, Diane H.

    2003-01-01

    In the past decade, a number of scientific collaboratories have emerged, yet adoption of scientific collaboratories remains limited. Meeting expectations is one factor that influences adoption of innovations, including scientific collaboratories. This paper investigates expectations scientists have...... with respect to scientific collaboratories. Interviews were conducted with 17 scientists who work in a variety of settings and have a range of experience conducting and managing scientific research. Results indicate that scientists expect a collaboratory to: support their strategic plans; facilitate management...... of the scientific process; have a positive or neutral impact on scientific outcomes; provide advantages and disadvantages for scientific task execution; and provide personal conveniences when collaborating across distances. These results both confirm existing knowledge and raise new issues for the design...

  3. Innovation for Sustainable Tourism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Jack; Edwards, D; Forde, P

    Innovation is the key to responding to the future challenges that confront all sectors of society and the economy, and especially in tourism. Within tourism, there are numerous corporations and destinations around the world that are responding to the ecological, social and economic challenges...... for an integrated overview of the drivers, barriers, processes and networks for innovation. The cases have been prepared for use in research and teaching of innovation, and the analysis and case notes are both designed to facilitate discussion and further investigation of innovation, not only in tourism......, but in other economic sectors as well. Being an online publication, it is expected that updates in successive editions of this first book will add further to the description and analysis of innovation for sustainable tourism and hence provide a resource for those seeking to enhance the teaching, research...

  4. Innovation in City Governments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lewis, Jenny M; Ricard, Lykke Margot; Klijn, Erik Hans

    Innovation has become an important focus for governments around the world over the last decade, with greater pressure on governments to do more with less, and expanding community expectations. Some are now calling this ‘social innovation’ – innovation that is related to creating new services...... that have value for stakeholders (such as citizens) in terms of the social and political outcomes they produce. Innovation in City Governments: Structures, Networks, and Leadership establishes an analytical framework of innovation capacity based on three dimensions: Structure - national governance...... project in Copenhagen, Barcelona and Rotterdam. The book provides major new insights on how structures, networks and leadership in city governments shape the social innovation capacity of cities. It provides ground-breaking analyses of how governance structures and local socio-economic challenges...

  5. Orchestrating innovation

    OpenAIRE

    Berkers, F.T.H.M.; Klein Woolthuis, R.J.A.; Boer, J. de

    2015-01-01

    Orchestrating Innovation increases the probability of success, minimizing the probability of failure of technological innovations by creating sustained societal and economic value. Orchestrating innovation propagates to take into account and actively involve all relevant stakeholders of the (future) ecosystem in which the innovation will, can or has to be adopted.

  6. Mindful innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Poul Bitsch

    2008-01-01

    Mindful innovation is an approach to innovation that pays attention to people's experience in an organization rather than to formal organization or social role.......Mindful innovation is an approach to innovation that pays attention to people's experience in an organization rather than to formal organization or social role....

  7. Innovative didaktik

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Birthe

    Innovative didaktik. This deals with innovative didaktik from at methodological point of view in three ways - how to define the concept, how to develop it and how analyse it. Issues analysed: How to create innovative students? How to create innovative learning envoriments? These are core question...... in "Projekt Innovativ didaktik". The hidden curriculum is to inspire students to develop entreprenuership and creativty....

  8. The potential of the innovative SeMPAC process for enhancing the removal of recalcitrant organic micropollutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarino, T., E-mail: teresa.alvarino@usc.es [Department of Chemical Engineering, Institute of Technology, University of Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Komesli, O. [Ataturk University, Department of Environmental Engineering, 25250 Erzurum (Turkey); Middle East Technical University, Department of Environmental Engineering, 06531 Ankara (Turkey); Suarez, S., E-mail: sonia.suarez@usc.es [Department of Chemical Engineering, Institute of Technology, University of Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Lema, J.M., E-mail: juan.lema@usc.es [Department of Chemical Engineering, Institute of Technology, University of Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Omil, F., E-mail: francisco.omil@usc.es [Department of Chemical Engineering, Institute of Technology, University of Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    2016-05-05

    Highlights: • Complete OMPs mass balance in a combined system biological treatment plus PAC. • Improvement of the denitrification after PAC addition. • Enhancement of OMPs biotransformation after PAC addition. • Relation between hydrophobicity (log D) and sorption onto the PAC. • Progressive saturation of the activated carbon in the solid phase with the time. - Abstract: SeMPAC is an innovative process based on a membrane sequential batch reactor to which powdered activated carbon (PAC) is directly added. It was developed with the aim of obtaining a high quality effluent in terms of conventional pollutants and organic micropollutants (OMPs). High COD removal and nitrification efficiencies (>95%) were obtained already during the operation without PAC, although denitrification was enhanced by PAC addition. OMPs were followed in the solid and liquid matrixes so that biotransformation, sorption onto the sludge and adsorption onto the PAC could be assessed. Recalcitrant compounds, such as carbamazepine and diazepam, were readily removed only after PAC addition (>99%). Progressive saturation of PAC was observed, with increasing concentrations of OMPs in the solid phase. Removal efficiencies for recalcitrant compounds were used as indicators for new additions of PAC. An improvement in the moderately biodegradable OMPs removal was observed after PAC addition (e.g. fluoxetine, trimethoprim) which was attributed to the biofilm that grew onto the sorbent, as well as to adsorption onto PAC.

  9. Characterizing the intrinsic bioremediation potential of 1,4-dioxane and trichloroethene using innovative environmental diagnostic tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Sheau-Yun Dora; Mora, Rebecca; Diguiseppi, William H; Davis, Greg; Sublette, Kerry; Gedalanga, Phillip; Mahendra, Shaily

    2012-09-01

    An intrinsic biodegradation study involving the design and implementation of innovative environmental diagnostic tools was conducted to evaluate whether monitored natural attenuation (MNA) could be considered as part of the remedial strategy to treat an aerobic aquifer contaminated with 1,4-dioxane and trichloroethene (TCE). In this study, advanced molecular biological and stable isotopic tools were applied to confirm in situ intrinsic biodegradation of 1,4-dioxane and TCE. Analyses of Bio-Trap® samplers and groundwater samples collected from monitoring wells verified the abundance of bacteria and enzymes capable of aerobically degrading TCE and 1,4-dioxane. Furthermore, phospholipid fatty acid analysis with stable isotope probes (PLFA-SIP) of the microbial community validated the ability for microbial degradation of TCE and 1,4-dioxane. Compound specific isotope analysis (CSIA) of groundwater samples for TCE resulted in δ(13)C values that indicated likely biodegradation of TCE in three of the four monitoring wells sampled. Results of the MNA evaluation showed that enzymes capable of aerobically degrading TCE and 1,4-dioxane were present, abundant, and active in the aquifer. Taken together, these results provide direct evidence of the occurrence of TCE and 1,4-dioxane biodegradation at the study site, supporting the selection of MNA as part of the final remedy at some point in the future.

  10. Agreeing on expectations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christian; Bentsen, Martin Juul

    Commitment and trust are often mentioned as important aspects of creating a perception of reliability between counterparts. In the context of university-industry collaborations (UICs), agreeing on ambitions and expectations are adamant to achieving outcomes that are equally valuable to all parties...... involved. Despite this, our initial probing indicated that such covenants rarely exist. As such, this paper draws on project management theory and proposes the possibility of structuring assessments of potential partners before university-industry collaborations are brought to life. Our analysis suggests...

  11. Products, practices and processes: exploring the innovation potential for low-carbon housing refurbishment among small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in the UK construction industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Killip, Gavin

    2013-01-01

    Scenario-based studies agree that the technical potential for CO 2 emissions reduction from the housing stock is large. This paper explores how a market might be developed for the refurbishment activities assumed in these scenarios, taking the existing market for repair, maintenance and improvement (RMI) as its starting point. Interviews with 16 small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in the construction industry reveal the interdependence of products, practices and processes in housing renovation activities. Conservative practice as well as innovation can be understood as the outcome of multi-lateral influences on firms from other firms, clients, the material buildings and products in their working lives, and from regulations and regulators. Contractors' openness to innovation is contingent on an informal approach to risk assessment, taking account of cost, time efficiency, client demands, and installer confidence in the reliability of the resulting work. The implications of the research are discussed in relation to the need for new practices and processes on refurbishment projects, raising questions for future research on key questions of quality assurance, performance over time, the application of standards, and vocational training. -- Highlights: •Repair, maintenance and improvement works are triggers for low-carbon refurbishment. •Millions of property owners and small firms make for fragmented decision-making. •Actor-Network Theory is used to frame decision-making processes for refurbishment. •Small builders can be innovative if clients allow time and money for experimentation. •Energy policy for existing homes needs to engage with the construction sector

  12. Task toward a Realization of Commercial Tokamak Fusion Plants in 2050 -The Role of ITER and the Succeeding Developments- 5.Challenge to Innovative Technologies and the Expected Market Appeal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobita, Kenji; Konishi, Satoshi; Tokimatsu, Koji; Nishio, Satoshi; Hiwatari, Ryoji

    This section describes the future of fusion energy in terms of its impact on the global energy supply and global warming mitigation, the possible entry scenarios of fusion into future energy market, and innovative technologies for deploying and expanding fusion's share in the market. Section 5.1 shows that fusion energy can contribute to the stabilization of atmospheric CO2 concentration if fusion is introduced into the future energy market at a competitive price. Considerations regarding fusion's entry scenarios into the energy market are presented in Sec. 5.2, suggesting that fusion should replace fossil energy sources and thus contribute to global warming mitigation. In this sense, first generation fusion power plants should be a viable energy source with global appeal and be so attractive as to be employed in developing countries rather than in developed countries. Favorable factors lending to this purpose are fusion's stability as a power source, and its security, safety, and environmental frendliness as well as its cost-of-electricity. The requirements for core plasma to expand the share of fusion in the market in the latter half of this century are given in Sec.5.3, pointing out the importance of high beta access with low aspect ratio and plasma profile control. From this same point of view, innovative fusion technologies worthy of further development are commented on in Sec. 5.4, addressing the high temperature blanket, hydrogen production, high temperature superconductors, and hot cell maintenance.

  13. Drivers for Welfare Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wegener, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Innovation has become a key goal towards which teaching and workplace learning needs to be directed. Now perceived as germane and even necessary in almost all kinds of welfare work, the innovation potential in everyday practices and ways of allowing for employer creativity have become a highly...... on the empirical material, the paper proposes a ‘driver’ model for context sensitive research of innovation in welfare workplaces. The model involves three elements which can be regarded as drivers for innovation: i) craft (i.e. professional skills and knowledge), ii) levers (i.e. experiments and adjustment...

  14. Everyday-Oriented Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munnecke, Max

    The exploration of radical innovation has long been regarded as fundamental to business growth. In the 21st century, modern organisations increasingly seek to combine business innovation with the broader goal to confront social and environmental challenges. Vision projects are related phenomena...... which explore and map radical innovation opportunities within everyday activities. The aim of a vision project is to produce an innovation map that can empower an organisation to navigate between potential innovation opportunities and pro‐actively confront modern challenges for the benefit of people......, business, and society. The study addresses the concern that vision projects do not produce sufficient navigational innovation maps, and seeks to improve their quality by modelling a new methodological framework. The study was conducted as a series of four research cycles which modelled and experimented...

  15. Measuring Manufacturing Innovativeness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blichfeldt, Henrik; Knudsen, Mette Præst

    2017-01-01

    Globalization and customization increases the pressure on manufacturing companies, and the ability to provide innovativeness is a potential source of competitive advantage. This paper positions the manufacturing entity in the innovation process, and investigates the relation between innovation vers...... technology and organizational concepts. Based on Danish survey data from the European Manufacturing Survey (EMS-2015) this paper finds that there is a relation between innovative companies, and their level of technology and use of organizational concepts. Technology and organizational concepts act...... as manufacturing levers to support the manufacturing and production system to provide innovativeness. The managerial implication lies in building manufacturing capabilities to support the innovative process, by standardization, optimization and creating stability in combination with automation and advanced...

  16. Interactive Methods for Teaching Action Potentials, an Example of Teaching Innovation from Neuroscience Postdoctoral Fellows in the Fellowships in Research and Science Teaching (FIRST) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keen-Rhinehart, E.; Eisen, A.; Eaton, D.; McCormack, K.

    2009-01-01

    Acquiring a faculty position in academia is extremely competitive and now typically requires more than just solid research skills and knowledge of one’s field. Recruiting institutions currently desire new faculty that can teach effectively, but few postdoctoral positions provide any training in teaching methods. Fellowships in Research and Science Teaching (FIRST) is a successful postdoctoral training program funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) providing training in both research and teaching methodology. The FIRST program provides fellows with outstanding interdisciplinary biomedical research training in fields such as neuroscience. The postdoctoral research experience is integrated with a teaching program which includes a How to Teach course, instruction in classroom technology and course development and mentored teaching. During their mentored teaching experiences, fellows are encouraged to explore innovative teaching methodologies and to perform science teaching research to improve classroom learning. FIRST fellows teaching neuroscience to undergraduates have observed that many of these students have difficulty with the topic of neuroscience. Therefore, we investigated the effects of interactive teaching methods for this topic. We tested two interactive teaching methodologies to determine if they would improve learning and retention of this information when compared with standard lectures. The interactive methods for teaching action potentials increased understanding and retention. Therefore, FIRST provides excellent teaching training, partly by enhancing the ability of fellows to integrate innovative teaching methods into their instruction. This training in turn provides fellows that matriculate from this program more of the characteristics that hiring institutions desire in their new faculty. PMID:23493377

  17. Innovations in retail business models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sorescu, A.; Frambach, R.T.; Singh, J.; Rangaswamy, A.; Bridges, C.

    2011-01-01

    A retail business model articulates how a retailer creates value for its customers and appropriates value from the markets. Innovations in business models are increasingly critical for building sustainable advantage in a marketplace defined by unrelenting change, escalating customer expectations,

  18. Dynamics Of Innovation Diffusion With Two Step Decision Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szymczyk Michał

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the dynamics of innovation diffusion among heterogeneous consumers. We assume that customers’ decision making process is divided into two steps: testing the innovation and later potential adopting. Such a model setup is designed to imitate the mobile applications market. An innovation provider, to some extent, can control the innovation diffusion by two parameters: product quality and marketing activity. Using the multi-agent approach we identify factors influencing the saturation level and the speed of innovation adaptation in the artificial population. The results show that the expected level of innovation adoption among customer’s friends and relative product quality and marketing campaign intensity are crucial factors explaining them. It has to be stressed that the product quality is more important for innovation saturation level and marketing campaign has bigger influence on the speed of diffusion. The topology of social network between customers is found important, but within investigated parameter range it has lover impact on innovation diffusion dynamics than the above mentioned factors

  19. Science Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA provides innovative research activities that help transform the protection of human health and the environment with high-risk, high-reward Pathfinder Innovation Projects, the P3 student competition, and low-cost air monitoring.

  20. Technology Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA produces innovative technologies and facilitates their creation in line with the Agency mission to create products such as the stormwater calculator, remote sensing, innovation clusters, and low-cost air sensors.

  1. Innovation in the Elementary Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Geoffrey A.; Jones, Matthew D.

    2018-01-01

    In this article, the authors outline an innovation curriculum that can be taught to elementary-aged students to expand their creative and innovative abilities and potential. The curriculum focuses on divergent and convergent thinking principles embedded in a hands-on learning pedagogy. The curriculum framework is based on an innovation model known…

  2. Innovativeness in production systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blichfeldt, Henrik; Knudsen, Mette Præst

    Alignment of market demand and manufacturing capabilities are directly linked to the potential competitive advantage. Pressure for manufacturing companies to customize increase the need for productions systems to handle innovations, especially in SMEs. The paper claims that innovativeness has...... a positive influence of the ability of the manufacturing system to provide specific capabilities that enables the entire production system to positively influence the competitiveness. A comparative case study of three SMEs shows that competitive advantages are obtained through innovative technologies......, but revealed also automation potential in data and information management to be more responsive and cost-effective....

  3. Potential microbial impact on transuranic wastes under conditions expected in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Annual report, October 1, 1978-September 30, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnhart, B.J.; Campbell, E.W.; Martinez, E.; Caldwell, D.E.; Hallett, R.

    1980-07-01

    Previous results were confirmed showing elevated frequencies of radiation-resistant bacteria in microorganisms isolated from shallow transuranic (TRU) burial soil that exhibits nanocurie levels of beta and gamma radioactivity. Research to determine whether plutonium could be methylated by the microbially produced methyl donor, methylcobalamine, was terminated when literature and consulting radiochemists confirmed that other alkylated transuranic elements are extremely short-lived in the presence of oxygen. Emphasis was placed on investigation of the dissolution of plutonium dioxide by complex formation between plutonium and a polyhydroxamate chelate similar to that produced by microorganisms. New chromatographic and spectrophotometric evidence supports previous results showing enhanced dissolution of alpha radioactivity when 239 Pu dioxide was mixed with the chelate Desferol. Microbial degradation studies of citrate, ethylenediamine tetraacetate (EDTA), and nitrilo triacetate (NTA) chelates of europium are in progress. Current results are summarized. All of the chelates were found to degrade. The average half-life for citrate, NTA, and EDTA was 3.2, 8.0, and 28 years, respectively. Microbial CO 2 generation is also in progress in 72 tests on several waste matrices under potential WIPP isolation conditions. The mean rate of gas generation was 5.97 μg CO 2 /g waste/day. Increasing temperature increased rates of microbial gas generation across treatments of brine, varying water content, nutrient additions, and anaerobic conditions. No microbial growth was detected in experiments to enumerate and identify the microorganisms in rocksalt cores from the proposed WIPP site. This report contains the year's research results and recommendations derived for the design of safe storage of TRU wastes under geologic repository conditions

  4. A Multi-Parametric Device with Innovative Solid Electrodes for Long-Term Monitoring of pH, Redox-Potential and Conductivity in a Nuclear Waste Repository

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan Daoudi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We present an innovative electrochemical probe for the monitoring of pH, redox potential and conductivity in near-field rocks of deep geological radioactive waste repositories. The probe is composed of a monocrystalline antimony electrode for pH sensing, four AgCl/Ag-based reference or Cl− selective electrodes, one Ag2S/Ag-based reference or S2− selective electrode, as well as four platinum electrodes, a gold electrode and a glassy-carbon electrode for redox potential measurements. Galvanostatic electrochemistry impedance spectroscopy using AgCl/Ag-based and platinum electrodes measure conductivity. The use of such a multi-parameter probe provides redundant information, based as it is on the simultaneous behaviour under identical conditions of different electrodes of the same material, as well as on that of electrodes made of different materials. This identifies the changes in physical and chemical parameters in a solution, as well as the redox reactions controlling the measured potential, both in the solution and/or at the electrode/solution interface. Understanding the electrochemical behaviour of selected materials thus is a key point of our research, as provides the basis for constructing the abacuses needed for developing robust and reliable field sensors.

  5. A Multi-Parametric Device with Innovative Solid Electrodes for Long-Term Monitoring of pH, Redox-Potential and Conductivity in a Nuclear Waste Repository.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daoudi, Jordan; Betelu, Stephanie; Tzedakis, Theodore; Bertrand, Johan; Ignatiadis, Ioannis

    2017-06-13

    We present an innovative electrochemical probe for the monitoring of pH, redox potential and conductivity in near-field rocks of deep geological radioactive waste repositories. The probe is composed of a monocrystalline antimony electrode for pH sensing, four AgCl/Ag-based reference or Cl - selective electrodes, one Ag₂S/Ag-based reference or S 2- selective electrode, as well as four platinum electrodes, a gold electrode and a glassy-carbon electrode for redox potential measurements. Galvanostatic electrochemistry impedance spectroscopy using AgCl/Ag-based and platinum electrodes measure conductivity. The use of such a multi-parameter probe provides redundant information, based as it is on the simultaneous behaviour under identical conditions of different electrodes of the same material, as well as on that of electrodes made of different materials. This identifies the changes in physical and chemical parameters in a solution, as well as the redox reactions controlling the measured potential, both in the solution and/or at the electrode/solution interface. Understanding the electrochemical behaviour of selected materials thus is a key point of our research, as provides the basis for constructing the abacuses needed for developing robust and reliable field sensors.

  6. Political innovations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eva

    2017-01-01

    are mainly interested in assessing and promoting innovations in public service delivery, but have paid little or no attention to the need for innovations in polity, politics and policy. This article develops a research agenda for studying innovations in political institutions, in the political process...... and in policy outputs. It proposes a number of research themes related to political innovations that call for scholarly attention, and identifies push and pull factors influencing the likelihood that these themes will be addressed in future research....

  7. Innovating information-delivery for potential clinical trials participants. What do patients want from multi-media resources?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shneerson, Catherine; Windle, Richard; Cox, Karen

    2013-01-01

    To discover whether the provision of clinical trials information via a multi-media platform could better meet the needs, preferences and practices of potential cancer trial participants. A mixed qualitative and quantitative questionnaire was delivered to 72 participants from cancer support groups to elicit views on the provision and design features of multimedia resources in delivering clinical trials information. Perceived lack of information is an expressed barrier to clinical trials participation. Multimedia resources were viewed positively as a way to address this barrier by most potential clinical trials participants; in particular by helping to align information to individual needs, promote active engagement with information, and by allowing more control of the learning experience. Whilst text remained the most valued attribute of any resource, other highly rated attributes included the resource being simple to use, easily accessible, having a clear focus, incorporating examples and visual aids, and being interactive. Provision of support for the learning resource was also rated highly. As in other areas, such as education, multimedia resources may enhance the delivery and acceptance of information regarding clinical trials. Better alignment of information may have a positive impact on recruitment and retention into clinical trials. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Free Global Dsm Assessment on Large Scale Areas Exploiting the Potentialities of the Innovative Google Earth Engine Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascetti, A.; Di Rita, M.; Ravanelli, R.; Amicuzi, M.; Esposito, S.; Crespi, M.

    2017-05-01

    The high-performance cloud-computing platform Google Earth Engine has been developed for global-scale analysis based on the Earth observation data. In particular, in this work, the geometric accuracy of the two most used nearly-global free DSMs (SRTM and ASTER) has been evaluated on the territories of four American States (Colorado, Michigan, Nevada, Utah) and one Italian Region (Trentino Alto- Adige, Northern Italy) exploiting the potentiality of this platform. These are large areas characterized by different terrain morphology, land covers and slopes. The assessment has been performed using two different reference DSMs: the USGS National Elevation Dataset (NED) and a LiDAR acquisition. The DSMs accuracy has been evaluated through computation of standard statistic parameters, both at global scale (considering the whole State/Region) and in function of the terrain morphology using several slope classes. The geometric accuracy in terms of Standard deviation and NMAD, for SRTM range from 2-3 meters in the first slope class to about 45 meters in the last one, whereas for ASTER, the values range from 5-6 to 30 meters. In general, the performed analysis shows a better accuracy for the SRTM in the flat areas whereas the ASTER GDEM is more reliable in the steep areas, where the slopes increase. These preliminary results highlight the GEE potentialities to perform DSM assessment on a global scale.

  9. FREE GLOBAL DSM ASSESSMENT ON LARGE SCALE AREAS EXPLOITING THE POTENTIALITIES OF THE INNOVATIVE GOOGLE EARTH ENGINE PLATFORM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Nascetti

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The high-performance cloud-computing platform Google Earth Engine has been developed for global-scale analysis based on the Earth observation data. In particular, in this work, the geometric accuracy of the two most used nearly-global free DSMs (SRTM and ASTER has been evaluated on the territories of four American States (Colorado, Michigan, Nevada, Utah and one Italian Region (Trentino Alto- Adige, Northern Italy exploiting the potentiality of this platform. These are large areas characterized by different terrain morphology, land covers and slopes. The assessment has been performed using two different reference DSMs: the USGS National Elevation Dataset (NED and a LiDAR acquisition. The DSMs accuracy has been evaluated through computation of standard statistic parameters, both at global scale (considering the whole State/Region and in function of the terrain morphology using several slope classes. The geometric accuracy in terms of Standard deviation and NMAD, for SRTM range from 2-3 meters in the first slope class to about 45 meters in the last one, whereas for ASTER, the values range from 5-6 to 30 meters. In general, the performed analysis shows a better accuracy for the SRTM in the flat areas whereas the ASTER GDEM is more reliable in the steep areas, where the slopes increase. These preliminary results highlight the GEE potentialities to perform DSM assessment on a global scale.

  10. Service innovation in China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slepniov, Dmitrij; Jin, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Purpose – The aim of this paper is to advance our understanding of service innovation in China and to identify the major drivers and impediments for manufacturing companies pushing into services in China. Design/methodology/approach – By employing an in-depth longitudinal case of a Chinese company...... Chinese cities. Both internal and external factors played a significant role in influencing the development and implementation of service innovation in the case. The paper details and discusses the factors that affect service innovation in China. Research Limitations – The study is exposed...... in informing our expectations about the push of many Chinese manufacturing companies into services. The paper provides insights into the development and diffusion of service innovation in many fast transforming industrial companies in China. Lessons for other developing countries can also be drawn from...

  11. Innovation hubs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O´Hara, J.; Hansen, Poul H. Kyvsgård; Turner, N.

    2008-01-01

    "Whilst ‘incremental innovation' is an imperative for the short-to-medium term success of a company, there is also a need for companies to engage in innovation activity that goes beyond the incremental in order to guarantee long-term success. However, such ‘radical innovation' (RI) poses new chal...

  12. Brugerdreven innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helms, Niels Henrik; Larsen, Lasse Juel

    2007-01-01

    På et generelt plan er vores afsæt et opgør med traditionelle modeller for kreativitet og innovation. Artiklen mener, at brugerdreven innovation ikke bare en god idé, men en beskrivelse af, hvordan innovation finder sted. Vores afsæt er interaktionsdesign, hvor vi bygger på den antagelse...

  13. UK innovation systems for new and renewable energy technologies: drivers, barriers and systems failures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foxon, T.J.; Gross, R.; Chase, A.; Howes, J.; Arnall, A.; Anderson, D.

    2005-01-01

    A better understanding of the systemic processes by which innovation occurs is useful, both conceptually and to inform policy-making in support of innovation in more sustainable technologies. This paper analyses current innovation systems in the UK for a range of new and renewable energy technologies, and generates policy recommendations for improving the effectiveness of these innovation systems. Although incentives are in place in the UK to encourage innovation in these technologies, system failures - or 'gaps' - are identified in moving technologies along the innovation chain, preventing their successful commercialisation. Sustained investment will be needed for these technologies to achieve their potential. It is argued that a stable and consistent policy framework is required to help create the conditions for this. In particular, such a framework should be aimed at improving risk/reward ratios for demonstration and pre-commercial stage technologies. This would enhance positive expectations, stimulate learning effects leading to cost reductions, and increase the likelihood of successful commercialisation

  14. The Potential of Non-Formal Laboratory Environments for Innovating the Chemistry Curriculum and Promoting Secondary School Level Students Education for Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Garner

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Developing skills and attitudes among students in terms of Education for Sustainable Development (ESD requires that educators address issues of sustainability in both formal and non-formal education. However, up to now, ESD seems to have been insufficiently implemented in secondary science education in many countries in general, and in high school chemistry learning in particular. A lack of suitable experiments, coupled with missing teaching and learning materials and insufficient teacher professional development have been identified as the reasons for this gap. This paper describes a project of innovation and research in the field of ESD for secondary school chemistry education. Within the project, both half- and full-day learning environments have been developed for non-formal, laboratory-based learning of secondary level students at the university. The research-based development focuses on teaching-learning modules which link formal and non-formal learning. The pedagogy employed is both learner-centered and inquiry-based. All the modules focus on sustainability issues in chemistry-related contexts. Data was collected by questionnaires from teachers and students both prior to and after the visit of the non-formal learning environment. Likert-items were analyzed statistically and the evaluation of the open-ended questions was done by Qualitative Content Analysis. An overview of the project, a case from the non-formal laboratory setting, and findings from accompanying research and evaluation are discussed in this paper. Potential impacts on teacher professional development and curriculum innovation are also outlined.

  15. Fifty Years of Technological Innovation: Potential and Limitations of Current Technologies in Abdominal Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attenberger, Ulrike I; Morelli, John; Budjan, Johannes; Henzler, Thomas; Sourbron, Steven; Bock, Michael; Riffel, Philipp; Hernando, Diego; Ong, Melissa M; Schoenberg, Stefan O

    2015-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an important modality for the diagnosis of intra-abdominal pathology. Hardware and pulse sequence developments have made it possible to derive not only morphologic but also functional information related to organ perfusion (dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI), oxygen saturation (blood oxygen level dependent), tissue cellularity (diffusion-weighted imaging), and tissue composition (spectroscopy). These techniques enable a more specific assessment of pathologic lesions and organ functionality. Magnetic resonance imaging has thus transitioned from a purely morphologic examination to a modality from which image-based disease biomarkers can be derived. This fits well with several emerging trends in radiology, such as the need to accurately assess response to costly treatment strategies and the need to improve lesion characterization to potentially avoid biopsy. Meanwhile, the cost-effectiveness, availability, and robustness of computed tomography (CT) ensure its place as the current workhorse for clinical imaging. Although the lower soft tissue contrast of CT relative to MRI is a long-standing limitation, other disadvantages such as ionizing radiation exposure have become a matter of public concern. Nevertheless, recent technical developments such as dual-energy CT or dynamic volume perfusion CT also provide more functional imaging beyond morphology.The aim of this article was to review and discuss the most important recent technical developments in abdominal MRI and state-of-the-art CT, with an eye toward the future, providing examples of their clinical utility for the evaluation of hepatic and renal pathologies.

  16. Development and use of innovative approaches to waste management and environmental restoration: Potential liability and its implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owens, W.L.

    1990-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has established as its goal to have all of its facilities cleaned up and in compliance with all applicable environmental laws by the year 2019. As part of its plan to achieve that goal, DOE created, in November 1989, an Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) and, within EM, an Office of Technology Development (OTD). Since the achievement of DOE's long-term objective in the area of waste management and environmental restoration is not possible utilizing only existing technology, the importance of OTD's mission is clear. A question has been raised regarding the nature of the potential liability associated with development, testing, and use of new technologies for waste management and environmental restoration; and the impact it may have on the ability or willingness of other parties to participate in DOE's technology development program. This report is intended to provide at least a preliminary answer to the question. Given the range of activities involved in the technology development process, there are many circumstances that could result in liability. Therefore, the discussion here is somewhat general. It may, however, provide a base for more detailed analysis, at a later time, of liability issues raised by specific circumstances.

  17. Development and use of innovative approaches to waste management and environmental restoration: Potential liability and its implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owens, W.L.

    1990-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has established as its goal to have all of its facilities cleaned up and in compliance with all applicable environmental laws by the year 2019. As part of its plan to achieve that goal, DOE created, in November 1989, an Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) and, within EM, an Office of Technology Development (OTD). Since the achievement of DOE`s long-term objective in the area of waste management and environmental restoration is not possible utilizing only existing technology, the importance of OTD`s mission is clear. A question has been raised regarding the nature of the potential liability associated with development, testing, and use of new technologies for waste management and environmental restoration; and the impact it may have on the ability or willingness of other parties to participate in DOE`s technology development program. This report is intended to provide at least a preliminary answer to the question. Given the range of activities involved in the technology development process, there are many circumstances that could result in liability. Therefore, the discussion here is somewhat general. It may, however, provide a base for more detailed analysis, at a later time, of liability issues raised by specific circumstances.

  18. Innovation environments and innovation capacity in the public sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lewis, Jenny; Ricard, Lykke Margot; Klijn, Erik-Hans

    Social innovation in the public sector has become an important focus for governments around the world over the last decade, as they try to solve intractable policy problems. The pressure on governments to do more with less in response to shrinking budgets and expanding community expectations...... and obligations has increased attention on how the public sector manages change and innovation. This heightened focus has created a need to understand the social innovation capacity of public sector environments. Work package 1of the LIPSE project on social innovation, examined this for four municipalities...

  19. Framing Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haase, Louise Møller; Laursen, Linda Nhu

    2017-01-01

    Designing a remarkable product innovation is a difficult challenge, which businesses today continuously are striving to tackle. This challenge is particularly present in the early phase of innovation, where the main product concept and frames of the innovation is determined. As a main challenge...... in the early phase is the reasoning process; innovation team are faced with open- ended ill-defines problems, where they need to make decisions about an unknown future having only incomplete, ambiguous and contradicting insights available. We study the reasoning of experts, how they frame to make sense of all...... the insights and create a basis for decision making in relation to a new project. Based on case studies of five innovative products from various industries, we suggest a Product Reasoning Model for understanding reasoning and envisioning of new product innovations in the early phases of innovation....

  20. Combined Photoemission Spectroscopy and Electrochemical Study of a Mixture of (Oxy)carbides as Potential Innovative Supports and Electrocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvillo, Laura; Valero-Vidal, Carlos; Agnoli, Stefano; Sezen, Hikmet; Rüdiger, Celine; Kunze-Liebhäuser, Julia; Granozzi, Gaetano

    2016-08-03

    Active and stable non-noble metal materials, able to substitute Pt as catalyst or to reduce the Pt amount, are vitally important for the extended commercialization of energy conversion technologies, such as fuel cells and electrolyzers. Here, we report a fundamental study of nonstoichiometric tungsten carbide (WxC) and its interaction with titanium oxycarbide (TiOxCy) under electrochemical working conditions. In particular, the electrochemical activity and stability of the WxC/TiOxCy system toward the ethanol electrooxidation reaction (EOR) and hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) are investigated. The chemical changes caused by the applied potential are established by combining photoemission spectroscopy and electrochemistry. WxC is not active toward the ethanol electrooxidation reaction at room temperature but it is highly stable under these conditions thanks to the formation of a passive thin film on the surface, consisting mainly of WO2 and W2O5, which prevents the full oxidation of WxC. In addition, WxC is able to adsorb ethanol, forming ethoxy groups on the surface, which constitutes the first step for the ethanol oxidation. The interaction between WxC and TiOxCy plays an important role in the electrochemical stability of WxC since specific orientations of the substrate are able to stabilize WxC and prevent its corrosion. The beneficial interaction with the substrate and the specific surface chemistry makes tungsten carbide a good electrocatalyst support or cocatalyst for direct ethanol fuel cells. However, WxC is active toward the HER and chemically stable under hydrogen reduction conditions, since no changes in the chemical composition or dissolution of the film are observed. This makes tungsten carbide a good candidate as electrocatalyst support or cocatalyst for the electrochemical production of hydrogen.

  1. Innovative Therapeutic Potential of Cannabinoid Receptors as Targets in Alzheimer's disease and Less Well-Known Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paez, Juan A; Campillo, Nuria E

    2018-02-25

    The discovery of cannabinoid receptors at the beginning of the 1990s, CB1 being cloned in 1990 and CB2 cloned in 1993, and the availability of selective and potent cannabimimetics could only be justified by the existence of endogenous ligands that are capable of binding to them. Thus, the characterisation and cloning of the first cannabinoid receptor (CB1) led to the isolation and characterisation of the first endocannabinoid, arachidonoylethanolamide (AEA), two years later and the subsequent identification of a family of lipid transmitters known as the fatty acid ester 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG). The endogenous cannabinoid system is a complex signalling system that comprises transmembrane endocannabinoid receptors, their endogenous ligands (the endocannabinoids), the specific uptake mechanisms and the enzymatic systems related to their biosynthesis and degradation. The endocannabinoid system has been implicated in a wide diversity of biological processes, in both the central and peripheral nervous systems, including memory, learning, neuronal development, stress and emotions, food intake, energy regulation, peripheral metabolism, and the regulation of hormonal balance through the endocrine system. In this context, this article will review the current knowledge of the therapeutic potential of cannabinoid receptor as a target in Alzheimer's disease and other less well-known diseases that include, among others, multiple sclerosis, bone metabolism, and Fragile X syndrome. The therapeutic applications will be addressed through the study of cannabinoid agonists acting as single drugs and multi-target drugs highlighting the CB2 receptor agonist. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  2. Framing Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haase, Louise Møller; Laursen, Linda Nhu

    2017-01-01

    Designing a remarkable product innovation is a difficult challenge, which businesses today continuously are striving to tackle. This challenge is particularly present in the early phase of innovation, where the main product concept and frames of the innovation is determined. As a main challenge...... in the early phase is the reasoning process; innovation team are faced with open-ended ill-defines problems, where they need to make decisions about an unknown future having only incomplete, ambiguous and contradicting insights available. We study the reasoning of experts, how they frame to make sense of all...... the insights and create a basis for decision making in relation to a new project. Based on case studies of five innovative products from various industries, we suggest a Product Reasoning Model for understanding reasoning and envisioning of new product innovations in the early phases...

  3. Online Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vujovic, Sladjana; Ulhøi, John Parm

    2008-01-01

      Purpose - The aim of this paper is to investigate the role of online networking during the innovation process, including its role(s) in communication, cooperation and coordination. The paper neither implicitly assumes that online computer-based networking is a prerequisite for the innovation...... process nor denies the possibility that innovation can emerge and successfully survive without it. It merely presupposes that, in cases of innovation where information and communication technologies play a substantial role, non-proprietarity may offer an interesting alternative to innovations based...... on proprietary knowledge. Design/methodology/approach - The paper borrows from the theory of communities-of-practice, which takes into account social relations, contacts, and the transfer and incorporation of knowledge. Open source innovation is not the exclusive preserve of computer nerds, but also has...

  4. Sensitive innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Katia Dupret

    Present paper discusses sources of innovation as heterogenic and at times intangible processes. Arguing for heterogeneity and intangibility as sources of innovation originates from a theoretical reading in STS and ANT studies (e.g. Callon 1986, Latour 1996, Mol 2002, Pols 2005) and from field work...... in the area of mental health (Dupret Søndergaard 2009, 2010). The concept of sensitive innovation is developed to capture and conceptualise exactly those heterogenic and intangible processes. Sensitive innovation is therefore primarily a way to understand innovative sources that can be......, but are not necessarily, recognized and acknowledged as such in the outer organisational culture or by management. The added value that qualifies these processes to be defined as “innovative” are thus argued for along different lines than in more traditional innovation studies (e.g. studies that build on the classic...

  5. Expecting the unexpected

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mcneill, Ilona M.; Dunlop, Patrick D.; Heath, Jonathan B.

    2013-01-01

    People who live in wildfire-prone communities tend to form their own hazard-related expectations, which may influence their willingness to prepare for a fire. Past research has already identified two important expectancy-based factors associated with people's intentions to prepare for a natural......) and measured actual rather than intended preparedness. In addition, we tested the relation between preparedness and two additional threat-related expectations: the expectation that one can rely on an official warning and the expectation of encountering obstacles (e.g., the loss of utilities) during a fire...

  6. Financing Innovation

    OpenAIRE

    William R. Kerr; Ramana Nanda

    2014-01-01

    We review the recent literature on the financing of innovation, inclusive of large companies and new startups. This research strand has been very active over the past five years, generating important new findings, questioning some long-held beliefs, and creating its own puzzles. Our review outlines the growing body of work that documents a role for debt financing related to innovation. We highlight the new literature on learning and experimentation across multi-stage innovation projects and h...

  7. Impact of measurement and evaluation on innovation level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Henning Sejer; Gertsen, Frank; Goduscheit, René Chester

    This article explores the situation in which an innovation project fails to achieve its full potential because the goal is lowered during the process. When the gap between measured/perceived progress and goals/aspirations of an innovation project becomes too large, the goals will be lowered...... and opportunities will be lost. The hypothetical explanation suggested here, is that the progress is often perceived to be linear whereas the actual progress is often exponential and that this makes the gap between actual achievement and expected progress much larger. The hypothesis is explored by means of a single...

  8. Neural correlates of rhythmic expectancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodore P. Zanto

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Temporal expectancy is thought to play a fundamental role in the perception of rhythm. This review summarizes recent studies that investigated rhythmic expectancy by recording neuroelectric activity with high temporal resolution during the presentation of rhythmic patterns. Prior event-related brain potential (ERP studies have uncovered auditory evoked responses that reflect detection of onsets, offsets, sustains,and abrupt changes in acoustic properties such as frequency, intensity, and spectrum, in addition to indexing higher-order processes such as auditory sensory memory and the violation of expectancy. In our studies of rhythmic expectancy, we measured emitted responses - a type of ERP that occurs when an expected event is omitted from a regular series of stimulus events - in simple rhythms with temporal structures typical of music. Our observations suggest that middle-latency gamma band (20-60 Hz activity (GBA plays an essential role in auditory rhythm processing. Evoked (phase-locked GBA occurs in the presence of physically presented auditory events and reflects the degree of accent. Induced (non-phase-locked GBA reflects temporally precise expectancies for strongly and weakly accented events in sound patterns. Thus far, these findings support theories of rhythm perception that posit temporal expectancies generated by active neural processes.

  9. Best Practice Life Expectancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Medford, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    been reported previously by various authors. Though remarkable, this is simply an empirical observation. Objective: We examine best-practice life expectancy more formally by using extreme value theory. Methods: Extreme value distributions are fit to the time series (1900 to 2012) of maximum life......Background: Whereas the rise in human life expectancy has been extensively studied, the evolution of maximum life expectancies, i.e., the rise in best-practice life expectancy in a group of populations, has not been examined to the same extent. The linear rise in best-practice life expectancy has...... expectancies at birth and age 65, for both sexes, using data from the Human Mortality Database and the United Nations. Conclusions: Generalized extreme value distributions offer a theoretically justified way to model best-practice life expectancies. Using this framework one can straightforwardly obtain...

  10. Supplier Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søberg, Peder Veng; Notman, Dorian Mark; Wæhrens, Brian Vejrum

    2017-01-01

    The prevailing research in supplier innovation has been conceptual or based on small data sets. The analysis of a large data set gives a clearer perspective on the actual type and degree of involvement of suppliers in the customer’s innovation process. The supplier perspective of the research...... counterbalances the customer bias that exists in the prevailing literature in this area. Similarly, the issue of the benefit of supplier involvement in the innovation/NPD process can be better understood. Manufacturing suppliers benefit financially from their involvement in the innovation/NPD process of their key...

  11. Responsive Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Carsten

    Although the importance of stakeholder networks has been recognized in recent years, a non-teleological model that incorporates their collective sensing into innovation processes has so far not been developed. Hence, this paper argues that traditional linear and sequential innovation models...... are insufficient in hypercompetitive environments. Instead, it is proposed that companies should ground their innovation processes in the collective sensing of frontline-employees and customers that operate around the organizational periphery. This frames the concept of responsive innovation, where key...... stakeholders engaged in the organization’s ongoing business activities collectively identify issues that central managers subsequently can resolve....

  12. Innovation @ NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Juan A.

    2014-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the activities National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is doing to encourage innovation across the agency. All information provided is available publicly.

  13. Mapping your innovation strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Scott D; Eyring, Matt; Gibson, Lib

    2006-05-01

    In the complex sport of American football, teams rely on playbooks as thick as the Manhattan phone directory. But when it comes to creating innovative growth businesses-which is at least as complicated as professional football--most companies have not developed detailed game plans. Indeed, many managers have concluded that a fog enshrouds the world of innovation, obscuring high-potential opportunities. The authors believe that companies can penetrate that fog by developing growth strategies based on disruptive innovations, as defined by Clayton Christensen. Such innovations conform to a pattern: They offer an entirely new solution; they perform adequately along traditional dimensions and much better along other dimensions that matter more to target customers; and they are not initially appealing to powerful incumbents. Companies can develop customized checklists, or playbooks, by combining this basic pattern with analysis of major innovations in their markets. The key early on is to focus not on detailed financial estimates--which will always guide companies toward the markets most hostile to disruptive innovations--but on how well the innovation fits the pattern of success. It's also crucial to encourage flexibility: Companies must be willing to kill projects that are going nowhere, exempt innovations from standard development processes, and avoid burdening project teams with extra financing, which can keep them heading in the wrong direction. Companies can create competitive advantage by becoming champions at defining the pattern of successful innovations and executing against it. But as that pattern becomes obvious--and others emerge-building a sustainable advantage on innovation competencies will again prove elusive.

  14. From "farm to fork" strawberry system: current realities and potential innovative scenarios from life cycle assessment of non-renewable energy use and green house gas emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girgenti, Vincenzo; Peano, Cristiana; Baudino, Claudio; Tecco, Nadia

    2014-03-01

    In this study, we analysed the environmental profile of the strawberry industry in Northern Italy. The analysis was conducted using two scenarios as reference systems: strawberry crops grown in unheated plastic tunnels using currently existing cultivation techniques, post-harvest management practices and consumption patterns (scenario 1) and the same strawberry cultivation chain in which some of the materials used were replaced with bio-based materials (scenario 2). In numerous studies, biodegradable polymers have been shown to be environmentally friendly, thus potentially reducing environmental impacts. These materials can be recycled into carbon dioxide and water through composting. Many materials, such as Mater-BI® and PLA®, are also derived from renewable resources. The methodology chosen for the environmental analysis was a life cycle assessment (LCA) based on a consequential approach developed to assess a product's overall environmental impact from the production system to its usage and disposal. In the field stage, a traditional mulching film (non-biodegradable) could be replaced with a biodegradable product. This change would result in waste production of 0 kg/ha for the bio-based product compared to 260 kg/ha of waste for polyethylene (PE). In the post-harvest stage, the issue addressed was the use and disposal of packaging materials. The innovative scenario evaluated herein pertains to the use of new packaging materials that increase the shelf life of strawberries, thereby decreasing product losses while increasing waste management efficiency at the level of a distribution platform and/or sales outlet. In the event of product deterioration or non-sale of the product, the packaging and its contents could be collected together as organic waste without any additional processes because the packaging is compostable according to EN13432. Scenario 2 would achieve reductions of 20% in the global warming potential and non-renewable energy impact categories

  15. Innovation process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolodovski, A.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose of this report: This report was prepared for RISO team involved in design of the innovation system Report provides innovation methodology to establish common understanding of the process concepts and related terminology The report does not includeRISO- or Denmark-specific cultural, econom...

  16. Informal Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, Mia Rosa Koss; Hartmann, Rasmus Koss

    Informal innovation, defined as the development and putting-into-use of novel solutions by non-R&D employees without prior formal approval from or subsequent revealing to superiors, has been recurrently observed in organizational research. But even as it is increasingly recognized that R&D is not......Informal innovation, defined as the development and putting-into-use of novel solutions by non-R&D employees without prior formal approval from or subsequent revealing to superiors, has been recurrently observed in organizational research. But even as it is increasingly recognized that R......&D is not the only plausible source of innovation inside organizations, informal innovation has yet to be systematically explored or theorized. We propose a theory of informal innovation based on analyses of prior literature and mixed-method, multi-site studies of innovation at the working level of two extreme......-case organizations. We propose that informal innovation occurs as 1) employees personally experience problems that they believe are not recognized or prioritized by superiors; 2) some employees are able to develop solutions, essentially at no cost; 3) innovators face no benefits from revealing to superiors, but can...

  17. Open innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogers, Marcel; Chesbrough, Henry; Moedas, Carlos

    2018-01-01

    Open innovation is now a widely used concept in academia, business, and policy making. This article describes the state of open innovation at the intersection of research, practice, and policy. It discusses some key trends (e.g., digital transformation), challenges (e.g., uncertainty...

  18. Managing Innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Ronald V.

    The management of innovation in instruction in English as a second language can benefit from the experience and techniques of management in the world of commerce as well as from theories and procedures in education. A systematic approach to the management of innovation emphasizes the importance of clearly defined objectives, evaluation that…

  19. Accidental Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Austin, Robert D.; Devin, Lee; Sullivan, Erin E.

    2012-01-01

    Historical accounts of human achievement suggest that accidents can play an important role in innovation. In this paper, we seek to contribute to an understanding of how digital systems might support valuable unpredictability in innovation processes by examining how innovators who obtain value from...... they incorporate accidents into their deliberate processes and arranged surroundings. By comparing makers working in varied conditions, we identify specific factors (e.g., technologies, characteristics of technologies) that appear to support accidental innovation. We show that makers in certain specified...... conditions not only remain open to accident but also intentionally design their processes and surroundings to invite and exploit valuable accidents. Based on these findings, we offer advice for the design of digital systems to support innovation processes that can access valuable unpredictability....

  20. Collaborative innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torfing, Jacob; Sørensen, Eva; Hartley, Jean

    2013-01-01

    , which emphasizes market competition; the neo-Weberian state, which emphasizes organizational entrepreneurship; and collaborative governance, which emphasizes multiactor engagement across organizations in the private, public, and nonprofit sectors. The authors conclude that the choice of strategies......-driven private sector is more innovative than the public sector by showing that both sectors have a number of drivers of as well as barriers to innovation, some of which are similar, while others are sector specific. The article then systematically analyzes three strategies for innovation: New Public Management......There are growing pressures for the public sector to be more innovative but considerable disagreement about how to achieve it. This article uses institutional and organizational analysis to compare three major public innovation strategies. The article confronts the myth that the market...

  1. Determining health expectancies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Robine, Jean-Marie

    2003-01-01

    ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jean-Marie Robine 9 1 Increase in Life Expectancy and Concentration of Ages at Death . . . . France Mesle´ and Jacques Vallin 13 2 Compression of Morbidity...

  2. Performance appraisal of expectations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russkikh G.A.

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available this article provides basic concepts for teachers to estimate and reach planned students’ expectations, describes functions and elements of expectations; nature of external and internal estimate, technology to estimate the results, gives recommendations how to create diagnostic assignments.

  3. Spiking the expectancy profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Niels Chr.; Loui, Psyche; Vuust, Peter

    Melodic expectations are generated with different degrees of certainty. Given distributions of expectedness ratings for multiple continuations of each context, as obtained with the probe-tone paradigm, this certainty can be quantified in terms of Shannon entropy. Because expectations arise from s...

  4. Innovation and network collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kesting, Peter; Müller, Sabine; Jørgensen, Frances

    2011-01-01

    Research suggests that small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) can benefit from network collaboration by enhancing opportunities for innovation. Managing the necessary collaboration to benefit from network participation may however be particularly challenging for SMEs due to their size...... and their inherent shortage of resources. In this paper, we propose that human resource management (HRM) practices may provide a means by which SMEs can increase their innovation capacity through network collaboration. Following a brief presentation of the relevant literature on networks, and innovation in networks...... in particular, and HRM, we analyse and evaluate the potential applicability of existing models for supporting innovation in SMEs participating in networks. Finally, we propose several lines of inquiry arising from our analysis that provide directions for future research....

  5. Nuclear innovation in Saskatchewan: innovation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, N.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes nuclear innovation in Saskatchewan. The first stage is the Canadian Institute for Science and Innovation Policy (CSIP) and how you have a successful discussion about a technically complex issue, understand what information people need in order to have an informed discussion, understand how to convey that information to those people in a constructive way.

  6. Participatory Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buur, Jacob; Matthews, Ben

    2008-01-01

    An increasing number of corporations engage with users in co-innovation of products and services. But there are a number of competing perspectives on how best to integrate these understandings into existing corporate innovation development processes. This paper maps out three of the dominant appr...... the challenges such an approach sets to innovation management, and discuss research directions we see as fundamental to the development of the field of user-driven innovation. Udgivelsesdato: September......An increasing number of corporations engage with users in co-innovation of products and services. But there are a number of competing perspectives on how best to integrate these understandings into existing corporate innovation development processes. This paper maps out three of the dominant...... approaches, compares them in terms of goals, methods and basic philosophy, and shows how they may beneficially enrich one another. We will present an industrial innovation case that has been instrumental to the development of what we have termed ‘Participatory Innovation’. Based on this we will list...

  7. Social Innovation : Driving Forces of Social Innovation in MNC

    OpenAIRE

    Tam, Hoising; Osadcha, Liudmyla

    2017-01-01

    Multinational Corporations (MNCs) currently face not only a dynamic business environment and challenging profit target, but also increased expectations from the public to take responsibility for addressing social, economic, and environmental issues. There is a tendency that the leading companies in the global market, especially MNCs, put more effort to the Social Innovation (SI). This study is to investigate what drives the MNCs to be involved in social innovation. In order to find out the re...

  8. Design & Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boelskifte, Per; Jørgensen, Ulrik

    2005-01-01

    The new design and innovation programme at DTU is challenging some of the standard concepts dominating most engineering educations. The programme, its background, context and basic educational ideas are presented and discussed in this paper. To build competences that match the need for innovative...... and design oriented engineers in industry and society has turned out to challenge a number of the standard – and often taken for granted – concepts in engineering education still dominated world wide by rather strict norms and concepts of learning that do not challenge the students creativity and innovative...

  9. Innovation Awards

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA promotes environmental stewardship by recognizing innovators in schools, communities and businesses in categories such as environmental education, green chemistry, smart growth, green power, and reducing air pollution and climate change impacts.

  10. Improving Design with Open Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, John K.; Gasparin, Marta; Varnes, Claus

    2013-01-01

    of the best practices for open innovation. However, projects were not equally successful. The outcome seems to be highly influenced by the type of collaborative arrangements used and their application. In particular, the analysis indicates that organizational factors seem to be indicative but not sufficient...... in open innovation need both a broad knowledge of the various potential elements of an open innovation effort and a flexible attitude toward their application. INSET: Summary of Projects....

  11. Separations innovative concepts: Project summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, V.E. (ed.)

    1988-05-01

    This project summary includes the results of 10 innovations that were funded under the US Department's Innovative Concept Programs. The concepts address innovations that can substantially reduce the energy used in industrial separations. Each paper describes the proposed concept, and discusses the concept's potential energy savings, market applications, technical feasibility, prior work and state of the art, and future development needs.

  12. Leadership Innovations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-04-01

    leadership " and " leadership in innovation." 3 THEORY , AS AN INSTRUMENT OF ANALYSIS FOR INNOVATION IN LEADERSHIP There are many...attributes of a leader.𔃺 Attempts to define leadership usually contrast it with "followship", management ," or sometimes - with ’beadship."’" These...plausible theory . - . . . -. - -- Nevertheless, some authors consider, and I agree, that there is no true leadership theory because existing

  13. Life expectancy and education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Casper Worm; Strulik, Holger

    2017-01-01

    , we find that US states with higher mortality rates from cardiovascular disease prior to the 1970s experienced greater increases in adult life expectancy and higher education enrollment. Our estimates suggest that a one-standard deviation higher treatment intensity is associated with an increase...... in adult life expectancy of 0.37 years and 0.07–0.15 more years of higher education....

  14. Expected Classification Accuracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence M. Rudner

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Every time we make a classification based on a test score, we should expect some number..of misclassifications. Some examinees whose true ability is within a score range will have..observed scores outside of that range. A procedure for providing a classification table of..true and expected scores is developed for polytomously scored items under item response..theory and applied to state assessment data. A simplified procedure for estimating the..table entries is also presented.

  15. Expected utility without utility

    OpenAIRE

    Castagnoli, E.; Licalzi, M.

    1996-01-01

    This paper advances an interpretation of Von Neumann–Morgenstern’s expected utility model for preferences over lotteries which does not require the notion of a cardinal utility over prizes and can be phrased entirely in the language of probability. According to it, the expected utility of a lottery can be read as the probability that this lottery outperforms another given independent lottery. The implications of this interpretation for some topics and models in decision theory are considered....

  16. Regional Innovation Policies in MERCOSUR : Obstacles and ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ... review existing regional cooperation initiatives, identify sectors with strong potential for regional cooperation, review other experiences in regional cooperation for innovation (European Union - EU, North American Free Trade Agreement - NAFTA), and propose institutional arrangements for promoting innovation among ...

  17. Conflict in Relationships and Perceived Support in Innovative Work Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battistelli, Adalgisa; Picci, Patrizia; Odoardi, Carlo

    In recent years, the idea that innovation is one of the determining factors in the efficacy and survival of organizations has been strongly consolidated. Individuals and groups within the various organizations undertake specific creative activities with the express intention of deriving direct benefits from the changes with regard to the generational phase of ideas. Innovative Work Behavior (IWB) is a complex behavioral pattern which consists of a set of three different tasks, namely, idea generation, idea promotion and idea realization. Considering the scant attention that has been paid to date to the potentially different role of antecedent factors in the various phases of innovative behavior, the aim of the present work was to examine the combined conflicting and supportive roles on innovation within the three stages of IWB. The results obtained from a sample of 110 Public Elementary School teachers confirm, as expected, that in the realization phase there are a positive influence from conflicting and supportive roles on innovation and a positive influence from support for innovation also in the phase of idea promotion; whereas, unexpectedly, a positive influence from conflicting is exercised in the phases of idea generation.

  18. The Global Potential for Drastic Reduction of Greenhouse Gas Emissions. On the interaction between technological innovation, sustainable growth and lifestyle development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruggink, J.J.C. [ECN Policy Studies, Petten (Netherlands)

    2000-03-01

    Technological innovation is often viewed as the key to drastic reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, and rightly so. In fact there are already a number of technologies on the shelf that could fix global warming problems in no time. The trouble is that few people in the developing world can afford them or that few people in the developed world find them acceptable. Most people are simply too poor or too critical. So what are the decisive fault lines that should distinguish a climate-friendly next century from a climate-hostile past? First, only a more equal world will make drastic reduction of greenhouse gas emissions affordable. Secondly, mankind will have to accept that in addition to technological innovation, drastic reduction of greenhouse gas emissions depends on lifestyle innovation.

  19. Policy Innovation in Innovation Policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borras, Susana

    During the past two decades Europe has experienced important changes and transformations in the way in which governments approach the issue of science, technology and innovation, and their relation to economic growth and competitiveness. This has to do with the European Union level as well...... as with national and sub-national governments in Europe, all of them introducing interesting novelties in their innovation policy. These changes refer to different aspects of policy, mainly the content of policy initiatives towards science, technology and innovation; the instruments governments are using...... at the EU level, and mentions similar trends taking place at national and sub-national levels. The questions that guide the contents here are essentially three, namely, what are the main traits of innovation policies in Europe since the 1990s and how have the EU and different national governments approached...

  20. FRANCHISE EXPECTATIONS: CASE OF KAZAKHSTAN

    OpenAIRE

    Raissa Kaziyeva

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the article is to provide a critical review of franchising development in Kazakhstan by focusing on the relationship between the franchisor and the franchisee. We have conducted extensive research and communicated with lots of potential and existing Kazakhstani franchisors and franchisees, operating since 2003. Our findings show that the process of signing franchising agreements is quite challenging in Kazakhstan.  Thorough investigation of the differences between expectations ...

  1. Sex and life expectancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifarth, Joshua E; McGowan, Cheri L; Milne, Kevin J

    2012-12-01

    A sexual dimorphism in human life expectancy has existed in almost every country for as long as records have been kept. Although human life expectancy has increased each year, females still live longer, on average, than males. Undoubtedly, the reasons for the sex gap in life expectancy are multifaceted, and it has been discussed from both sociological and biological perspectives. However, even if biological factors make up only a small percentage of the determinants of the sex difference in this phenomenon, parity in average life expectancy should not be anticipated. The aim of this review is to highlight biological mechanisms that may underlie the sexual dimorphism in life expectancy. Using PubMed, ISI Web of Knowledge, and Google Scholar, as well as cited and citing reference histories of articles through August 2012, English-language articles were identified, read, and synthesized into categories that could account for biological sex differences in human life expectancy. The examination of biological mechanisms accounting for the female-based advantage in human life expectancy has been an active area of inquiry; however, it is still difficult to prove the relative importance of any 1 factor. Nonetheless, biological differences between the sexes do exist and include differences in genetic and physiological factors such as progressive skewing of X chromosome inactivation, telomere attrition, mitochondrial inheritance, hormonal and cellular responses to stress, immune function, and metabolic substrate handling among others. These factors may account for at least a part of the female advantage in human life expectancy. Despite noted gaps in sex equality, higher body fat percentages and lower physical activity levels globally at all ages, a sex-based gap in life expectancy exists in nearly every country for which data exist. There are several biological mechanisms that may contribute to explaining why females live longer than men on average, but the complexity of the

  2. Anomalous vacuum expectation values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, H.

    1986-01-01

    The anomalous vacuum expectation value is defined as the expectation value of a quantity that vanishes by means of the field equations. Although this value is expected to vanish in quantum systems, regularization in general produces a finite value of this quantity. Calculation of this anomalous vacuum expectation value can be carried out in the general framework of field theory. The result is derived by subtraction of divergences and by zeta-function regularization. Various anomalies are included in these anomalous vacuum expectation values. This method is useful for deriving not only the conformal, chiral, and gravitational anomalies but also the supercurrent anomaly. The supercurrent anomaly is obtained in the case of N = 1 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory in four, six, and ten dimensions. The original form of the energy-momentum tensor and the supercurrent have anomalies in their conservation laws. But the modification of these quantities to be equivalent to the original one on-shell causes no anomaly in their conservation laws and gives rise to anomalous traces

  3. Discovery and Innovation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Discovery and Innovation is a journal of the African Academy of Sciences (AAS) ... World (TWAS) meant to focus attention on science and technology in Africa and the ... of Non-wood Forest Products: Potential Impacts and Challenges in Africa ...

  4. Growing Through Innovation Replicability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hsuan, Juliana; Lévesque, Moren

    2012-01-01

    of growth policies. We use a utility function that considers proxies for both growth and failure potential to uncover the role played in selecting these policies by the economic environment of the targeted market for expansion. Our analysis further reveals the importance of the innovation...

  5. Measuring innovative work behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, J.; den Hartog, D.

    2010-01-01

    Both scientists and practitioners emphasize the importance of innovative work behaviour (IWB) of individual employees for organizational success, but the measurement of IWB is still at an evolutionary stage. This article is concerned with developed a measure of IWB with four potential dimensions:

  6. Formation flying as an innovative air transportation system for long-haul commercial flight : A focus on operational feasibility and potential gain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herinckx, L.E.; Gutleb, T.L.M.; Van Nunen, R.; Van Rompuy, E.; Bos, D.A.; Dijkers, H.P.A.; De Wit, J.; Radfar, H.; Sahin, S.E.; Beelarts van Blokland, W.W.A.

    2011-01-01

    Formation flying is introduced as a new and innovative air transportation system for long-haul commercial flight. With this paper the operational feasibility of formation flying is addressed, both from a market demand and economic, as well as an air traffic control perspective. Preliminary results

  7. Performance expectation plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray, P.E.

    1998-09-04

    This document outlines the significant accomplishments of fiscal year 1998 for the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) team. Opportunities for improvement to better meet some performance expectations have been identified. The PHMC has performed at an excellent level in administration of leadership, planning, and technical direction. The contractor has met and made notable improvement of attaining customer satisfaction in mission execution. This document includes the team`s recommendation that the PHMC TWRS Performance Expectation Plan evaluation rating for fiscal year 1998 be an Excellent.

  8. The Qualitative Expectations Hypothesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydman, Roman; Johansen, Søren; Rahbek, Anders

    2017-01-01

    We introduce the Qualitative Expectations Hypothesis (QEH) as a new approach to modeling macroeconomic and financial outcomes. Building on John Muth's seminal insight underpinning the Rational Expectations Hypothesis (REH), QEH represents the market's forecasts to be consistent with the predictions...... of an economistís model. However, by assuming that outcomes lie within stochastic intervals, QEH, unlike REH, recognizes the ambiguity faced by an economist and market participants alike. Moreover, QEH leaves the model open to ambiguity by not specifying a mechanism determining specific values that outcomes take...

  9. The Qualitative Expectations Hypothesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydman, Roman; Johansen, Søren; Rahbek, Anders

    We introduce the Qualitative Expectations Hypothesis (QEH) as a new approach to modeling macroeconomic and financial outcomes. Building on John Muth's seminal insight underpinning the Rational Expectations Hypothesis (REH), QEH represents the market's forecasts to be consistent with the predictions...... of an economist's model. However, by assuming that outcomes lie within stochastic intervals, QEH, unlike REH, recognizes the ambiguity faced by an economist and market participants alike. Moreover, QEH leaves the model open to ambiguity by not specifying a mechanism determining specific values that outcomes take...

  10. Open innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    West, Joel; Bogers, Marcel

    2017-01-01

    Interest in open innovation (OI) as a field of research has grown exponentially since the phrase was coined by Chesbrough in his 2003 book, with numerous articles, special issues, books, and conference sessions. Various reviews of the literature have summarized prior work, offered new frameworks......, and identified opportunities for future research. Here we summarize these opportunities, which include more research on outbound OI, the role of open innovation in services, and network forms of collaboration such as consortia, communities, ecosystems, and platforms. Research should also examine the use of OI...... by small, new, and not-for-profit organizations, as well as the linkage of individual actions and motivations to open innovation. Other opportunities include better measuring the costs, benefits, antecedents, mediators and moderators of the effects of OI on performance, and understanding why and how OI...

  11. Everyday Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippke, Lena; Wegener, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore how vocational teachers’ everyday practices can constitute innovative learning spaces that help students to experience engagement and commitment towards education and thus increase their possibilities for completing their studies despite notable...... difficulties. Design/methodology/approach – Based on two ethnographic field studies, we analyse vocational teaching situations in which teachers and students engage in daily remaking of the vocational educational training practice. It is argued that these everyday situations can be understood as innovative....... Practical implications – Based on the analysis, we argue that students’ engagement in education can be enhanced by transforming the educational settings on various parameters such as buildings, artefacts, emotions and experiences. Thus, innovation should be recognised as emerging everyday activities...

  12. Reconsidering Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaaben, Nana Katrine

    Innovation og reformer er på dagsordenen allevegne, ikke mindst i politiske forsøg på at reorganisere den offentlige sektor for at få velfærdssamfundet til at kunne overleve økonomisk tumult og dystre fremtidsprognoser. Dette papir undersøger, hvordan klassiske antropologiske teorier og debatter om...... forandring og myter kan hjælpe os med at genoverveje teoretiske forståelser af innovation i organisatoriske studier. I særlig grad sættes der fokus på de implikationer som vores "innovationsmyte" kan have for offentligt ansatte og værdsættelsen af deres arbejde. Analysens argument er, at innovation ikke skal...

  13. Innovation Assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselbalch, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    Current regulatory approaches are ill-equipped to address the challenges of governing through periods of disruptive technological change. This article hones in on the use of assessment regimes at the level of the European Union, particularly in the work of the Commission, to argue for a missing...... I label innovation assessment, to steer polities through periods of disruptive technological change, during which innovations have taken concrete forms and are beginning to diffuse, but still exhibit much scope for rapid, unexpected change and alternative trajectories of development. By juxtaposing...

  14. Nuclear Innovation Workshops Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, John Howard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Allen, Todd Randall [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hildebrandt, Philip Clay [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Baker, Suzanne Hobbs [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The Nuclear Innovation Workshops were held at six locations across the United States on March 3-5, 2015. The data collected during these workshops has been analyzed and sorted to bring out consistent themes toward enhancing innovation in nuclear energy. These themes include development of a test bed and demonstration platform, improved regulatory processes, improved communications, and increased public-private partnerships. This report contains a discussion of the workshops and resulting themes. Actionable steps are suggested at the end of the report. This revision has a small amount of the data in Appendix C removed in order to avoid potential confusion.

  15. Behavior, Expectations and Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Jr, Murray; Rashotte, Lisa Slattery

    2010-01-01

    We predict effects of behavior patterns and status on performance expectations and group inequality using an integrated theory developed by Fisek, Berger and Norman (1991). We next test those predictions using new experimental techniques we developed to control behavior patterns as independent variables. In a 10-condition experiment, predictions…

  16. Life Expectancy in 2040

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canudas-Romo, Vladimir; DuGoff, Eva H; Wu, Albert W.

    2016-01-01

    We use expert clinical and public health opinion to estimate likely changes in the prevention and treatment of important disease conditions and how they will affect future life expectancy. Focus groups were held including clinical and public health faculty with expertise in the six leading causes...

  17. Innovative work behaviour: Investigating the nature and facilitation of vocational teachers‘ contributions to innovation development

    OpenAIRE

    Messmann, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this thesis was to contribute to an understanding of the nature and facilitation of vocational teachers’ innovative work behaviour as a key element for the development of innovations in vocational colleges. Innovative work behaviour encompasses all physical and cognitive work activities employees carry out in their work context, either solitarily or in a social setting, to accomplish a set of tasks required for the development of an innovation. Innovations are new and potentially ...

  18. Policies to Promote User Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Peter; Hartmann, Rasmus Koss

    and benefits of such policies. As a first empirical step to understanding such policies, this paper reports on the results of providing hospital clinicians with access to ‘makerspaces’, i.e. staffed facilities with prototyping tools and the expertise in using them. Findings suggest that almost all innovations...... developed in the makerspaces are user innovations; that the potential returns from the first 56 innovations developed in the makerspaces are 30-80 times the required investment; and that most of the innovations would not have been developed without access to makerspaces. Yet owing to lack of diffusion, only...... a limited share of potential returns is realized. This suggests that provision of makerspaces, at least in healthcare contexts, is a tremendously effective form of user-supporting innovation policy both from an organizational and societal perspective, but also that it might need to be supplemented...

  19. Problems of regional innovation strategy forming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. M. Golova

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The author considered problems and contradictions of modern innovation policy in Russia. It is shown, that at present time regions are removed from management of science-technical complex and spatial priorities are not produced. It is a serious factor of risk for conservation perspectives of innovation development for Russia. With taking into account of world experience main districts of rise effects regional police were formulated. It is underlined, that creation conditions for transformation of regional authorities in active subjects of innovation policy is necessary condition for building vital innovation system. It is shown, that state innovation policy must be constructed at combination of next principles: a support science-technical potential of regions — generators of innovation and creation conditions for its realization; b using of innovations for evening-out disproportions of social-economic development between regions; c widening powers and financial possibilities of regions at management of innovation climate. Methodical approaches for making effective mechanisms of management of innovation processes of territory are opened. Typology of Russian regions with high and middle degree of innovation climate is proposed, which takes level of science and innovation potential of territory and also degree of comfort of social-economic conditions for development of innovation activity are offered. Peculiarities of innovation strategy for different types of regions are defined. This typology may be used for substantiation spatial priorities of innovation strategy of Russia.

  20. Employee-driven innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kesting, Peter; Ulhøi, John Parm

    2015-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to outline the “grand structure” of the phenomenon in order to identify both the underlying processes and core drivers of employee-driven innovation (EDI). Design/methodology/approach – This is a conceptual paper. It particularly applies the insights...... of contemporary research on routine and organizational decision making to the specific case of EDI. Findings – The main result of the paper is that, from a theoretical point of view, it makes perfect sense to involve ordinary employees in innovation decisions. However, it is also outlined that naıve or ungoverned...... participation is counterproductive, and that it is quite difficult to realize the hidden potential in a supportive way. Research limitations/implications – The main implication is that basic mechanisms for employee participation also apply to innovation decisions, although often in a different way. However...

  1. Business Model Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahrensbach Rasmussen, Klement

    The topics of business model innovation (BMI) and organizational design have potentially important links. And yet, there has been little cross-fertilization of ideas between the two fields. The purpose of this thesis is to fill that gap by proposing and developing an organizational view of BMI...... that focuses on the missing links between business model innovation and organizational design theory. Guided by the research question—what is the role of organizational design in the process of business model innovation?—the thesis not only investigates how BMI activity unfolds, but also looks at the different...... roles of the firm’s organizational design and where the activity takes place. Moreover, this research provides ample detail on how organizational complementarities emerge or vanish as a result of the fit or misfit between business model elements and design choices. To drive home these important points...

  2. Multisensory innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brem, Alexander; Kampfer, Kristina; Ivens, Bjoern

    2017-01-01

    For many companies, differentiating their offerings from competitors' value propositions is becoming increasingly challenging. In order to formulate convincing value propositions, a holistic approach is required that takes human perception and sensation into consideration. This article assesses t...... and ultimately alters behavior and thus substantiates its role in multisensory innovation and product design....

  3. Innovations (INNO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The annual report of the working group on innovations (INNO) deals with the projects carried out by the participating institutes and laboratories in the two fields of 1) application of non-nuclear methods and 2) non-nuclear research and development. (HK) [de

  4. Effektiv innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Katia Dupret; Brandi, Ulrik

    2011-01-01

    Er det vækst og udvikling eller åbenhed, videnudvikling, netværk, leg og innovation? Eller er det prisregulering, tilpasning og stærk styring, som skal gøre universiteterne til førende drivkræfter for dansk vækst?...

  5. Software Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Jeremy

      Innovation is the forgotten key to modern systems development - the element that defines the enterprising engineer, the thriving software firm and the cutting edge software application.  Traditional forms of technical education pay little attention to creativity - often encouraging overly...

  6. To Infinity and Beyond – Are Innovation Contests at Austrian Technical Colleges the Right Tool to Stimulate the Creative and Technical Potential of the Country?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axel Zafoschnig

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, creativity as it is applied for finding new technologies and making new inventions, is characterised by new unorthodox aspects of and approaches to problem solving. At the same time, innovation uses new scientific, technical and cultural elements to sustainably change the social structure of society. However, creative and innovative ideas are not affluent or ever-lasting resources. They need to be stimulated, elicited and put into realisation. This has to be done through expensive research and development cam-paigns, but may also be achieved at a lower level, namely, for example, at Austrian Technical Colleges. There, students are often encouraged to submit their diploma thesis projects in national and regional competitions and have recently proved to be very successful.

  7. Incumbent innovation and entry by spinoff

    OpenAIRE

    Falck, Oliver; Heblich, Stephan

    2008-01-01

    This paper takes a different perspective toward the escape entry incentive of incumbent firms to innovate. New entrants spawned from incumbents are not necessarily a threat; they can complement incumbents' production by commercializing knowledge incumbents are not willing or able to exploit. Accordingly, incumbent innovation determines exploitable knowledge externalities for spinoffs while, at the same time, spinoffs are expected to influence incumbent innovation. To overcome this problem of ...

  8. Collaborative Innovation in the Public Sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agger, Annika; Hedensted Lund, Dorthe

    2017-01-01

    Collaborative innovation in the public sector is increasingly used as a strategy for balancing citizens’ rising expectations for public services with limited public resources. This article suggests that public polices construct citizens as clients, consumers, or coproducers and thereby encourage...

  9. Industrialized Innovation: The Connection of Science & Technology Innovation with Industrial Innovation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yinxing Hong; Yao Lu; Jianghuai Zheng

    2017-01-01

    In light of the relationship and the current disconnection between science & technology (S&T) innovation and industrial innovation in China,it is necessary to put forward and emphasize the concept of industrialized innovation.Industrialized innovation is the bridge and intermediation between S&T innovation and industrial innovation,which is not only a concept,but also a mechanism and combination force.There are two ways to achieve industrialized innovation:through industry-university-research coordination and through technology entrepreneurship.The meaning of industry-university-research coordination is not about coordination among industry,university and research sectors in an institutional sense;rather it is about the coordination of the functions of cultivation and development in new industries,new technologies,and new talents of industrialized innovation.The incentive mechanism for industrialized innovation should motivate not only innovation but also coordination.Technology entrepreneurship is the industrialization of new technology through business start-ups,which occurs beyond the stage of incubation and development of new technology.The capital of technology entrepreneurship is the set consisting of knowledge capital manifested through technological innovation,human capital manifested through entrepreneurs,and physical capital in the form of venture capital.While physical capital is indispensable,knowledge capital and human capital play the decisive role in technology entrepreneurship.The industrialization of technological innovation involves two requirements:one is to enable the new technology industry to achieve a large scale rapidly,and the other is to fully realize the potential value of the new technology.Both requirements are reliant on effective innovation in business models.

  10. Balanced Innovation Management

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    King, David R

    2007-01-01

    The Department of Defense has demonstrated success in managing innovation. The military's approach to innovation management extends beyond traditional distinctions between internal and external innovation modes...

  11. Spiking the expectancy profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Niels Chr.; Loui, Psyche; Vuust, Peter

    Melodic expectations have long been quantified using expectedness ratings. Motivated by statistical learning and sharper key profiles in musicians, we model musical learning as a process of reducing the relative entropy between listeners' prior expectancy profiles and probability distributions...... of a given musical style or of stimuli used in short-term experiments. Five previous probe-tone experiments with musicians and non-musicians are revisited. Exp. 1-2 used jazz, classical and hymn melodies. Exp. 3-5 collected ratings before and after exposure to 5, 15 or 400 novel melodies generated from...... a finite-state grammar using the Bohlen-Pierce scale. We find group differences in entropy corresponding to degree and relevance of musical training and within-participant decreases after short-term exposure. Thus, whereas inexperienced listeners make high-entropy predictions by default, statistical...

  12. Determinants of IT-Related Innovation Acceptance and Use Behavior: Theoretical Integration of Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology and Entrepreneurial Potential Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedigheh Moghavvemi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose – a great number of models investigate individual intention towards adopting and using information technology. However, the complex link between intention and behavior suggests that it may require more scrutiny (intention behavior gap. The link between the intention and behavior is most likely influenced by a number of factors, some controllable, others uncontrollable; therefore, external factors are likely to play a significant role. However, IS literature on the subject is extremely lacking. One of the popular theories in this context is the UTAUT model, which has certain limitations, especially when it concerns intention behavior gaps. Research on the entrepreneurship context identified precipitating events as a promising candidate to overcome such limitations. To address the gap in the UTAUT and improve the model, it is reviewed and empirically compared to the Entrepreneurial Potential Model (EPM in order to allow us to develop a new model that integrates elements from the two models in order to capture the different factors of IT adoption behavior.Methodology – a longitudinal survey approach is appropriate for this study, since this research design allows the researcher to test the overall fit of the integrative TADU model. The longitudinal study is appropriate to test the relationship between intention and use behavior and the effect of precipitating events on the time that intention is formed and behavior is performed. This is an ongoing research, and at this stage, the authors are mainly developing a theoretical argument and methodology that is currently in the process of being tested.Results – the new model mitigates the limitations arising from the UTAUT, particularly its predictive ability, and it also reduces the ‘distal nature’ between intention and use behavior.Study limitation – the paper represents work in progress and may some researcher criticize it in term of the predicted results.Practical significance

  13. Expectancy Theory Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-08-01

    accomplish the task, (2) the instrumentality of task performance for job outcomes, and (3) the instrumentality of outcomes for need satisfaction . We...in this discussion: effort, performance , outcomes, and needs. In order to present briefly the conventional approach to the Vroom models, another...Presumably, this is the final event in the sequence of effort, performance , outcome, and need satisfaction . The actual research reported in expectancy

  14. Expectations from the child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdal Atabek

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Transition from agricultural society to industry society, from industrial society to science society has taken place. In all these societies, expectations from children also vary. In the agricultural community, human labor is based on arm power. For this reason, expectation from children is to increase work power. Having more children is the basis for the expectations in this community to see that the boy is valuable because he has increased his work power. In the industrial society, the power of the arm changed its place with the machine power. The knowledgeable person is not a family grown-up but a foreman. Childhood was distinguished during this period. It has been investigated that the child has a separate development.  In the information society, communication and information has never been as fast as it is in this period.  The widespread use of the Internet, and the use of social networks such as Facebook and Twitter are in this period. In this society, families are panicked to prepare a future in their own heads for their children. Because the parents thought of their children, they decided about the child's life instead of the child making these decisions. This has had a negative impact on children's sense of autonomy and their ability to take responsibility. To change this, parents should train their children in auto control and develop children's impulse control skills. The children should be able to understand their emotions and make decisions by reasoning and reasoning.

  15. Is Radical Innovation Management Misunderstood?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Jimmi Normann; Gertsen, Frank

    2015-01-01

    This paper poses a critical view on radical innovation (RI) management research and practice. The study investigates how expected RI performance influences firms’ under- standing of their RI capability. RI performance is often based on output measures such as market shares or fiscal return...

  16. Indigenous Technological Innovation : Capability and ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ... as determined by a Steering Committee of experts drawn from government agencies, universities and research institutions all over the country. It is expected to generate a body of evidence that will aid Chinese policymakers to develop and implement effective policies for enhancing indigenous innovations in the west.

  17. Innovative safety ideas for fusion experimental machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brereton, S.J.; Gouge, M.; Piet, S.J.; Merrill, B.J.; Holland, D.F.; Sze, D.K.

    1990-01-01

    Throughout the early stages of design of fusion experimental devices, such as ITER, safety experts have worked with designers to incorporate safety features into the design. Recent efforts have focused on passive safety features. Although designs of near-term fusion machines may appear consistent with expected regulatory requirements, the safety characteristics can potentially be more attractive. Here, a variety of suggestions that appear promising in terms of improving safety are given. These include new concepts, innovative technologies, further support of past concepts, and possible modification to operating scenarios. Some technical discussion on the feasibility of the proposals is provided. The ideas are generally conceptual at this stage and require further assessment and development work. However, each has the potential for enhancing the safety of experimental devices. 33 refs., 6 figs., 9 tabs

  18. Managing collaborative innovation in public bureaucracies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agger, Annika; Sørensen, Eva

    2018-01-01

    Public planners are increasingly recruited to manage collaborative innovation processes, but there is hardly any research on how they deal with the tensions they encounter in managing collaborative innovation in the institutional context of a public bureaucracy. Drawing on emerging theories...... of collaborative planning, network management and public innovation, the article develops a taxonomy of tasks related to managing collaborative innovation, identifies potential tensions between these tasks and the institutional logic of public bureaucracies and investigates how these tensions are experienced...

  19. Venture Capitalists in Systems of Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Kasper B.; Vintergaard, Christian

    regional innovation systems.In attempt to locate and determine the potentials and importance of the venture capitalists in the innovationsystem a two-dimensional taxonomy is constructed and used to illuminate their role and position. Thetaxonomy gains insights through theoretical reasoning and the possible...... initiatives to be taken to raise venture capitalists to a more direct and formal role in the contextof systems of innovation.Key words: Venture capital, innovation systems, innovation....

  20. Expected Term Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buraschi, Andrea; Piatti, Ilaria; Whelan, Paul

    We construct and study the cross-sectional properties of survey-based bond risk premia and compare them to their traditional statistical counterparts. We document large heterogeneity in skill, identify top forecasters, and learn about the importance of subjective risk premia in long-term bonds...... dynamics. The consensus is not a sufficient statistics of the cross-section of expectations and we propose an alternative real-time aggregate measure of risk premia consistent with Friedmans market selection hypothesis. We then use this measure to evaluate structural models and find support...

  1. Referral expectations of radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, W.L.; Altmaier, E.; Berberoglu, L.; Morris, K.

    1989-01-01

    The expectation of the referring physician are key to developing a successful practice in radiology. Structured interviews with 17 clinicians in both community care and academic practice documented that accuracy of the radiologic report was the single most important factor in clinician satisfaction. Data intercorrelation showed that accuracy of report correlated with frequency of referral (r = .49). Overall satisfaction of the referring physician with radiology correlated with accuracy (r = .69), patient satisfaction (r = .36), and efficiency in archiving (r = .42). These data may be weighted by departmental managers to allocate resources for improving referring physician satisfaction

  2. Managing innovation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanston, J.H.

    1988-01-01

    The author addresses the skepticism about high Tc applications. According to the analysis presented, superconductivity research is following a standard model for technological break throughs. This model, which describe the innovation process from theory through widespread adoption, is presented and superconductivity's place therein is discussed. Business opportunities in superconductivity are described and the competition between the U.S. and Japan in the development of the high T c applications is addressed

  3. Patterns of Frugal Innovation in Healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hareem Arshad

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Frugal innovations have the potential to offer simple and cost-effective solutions to the healthcare challenges of the world. However, despite the potential for frugal innovations in healthcare, this context has been rarely studied. The objective of this article is to shed some light on patterns of frugal innovations in healthcare and thereby contribute to the literature. With this aim, we conducted a comprehensive literature review and searched for innovations that were labelled as frugal and were related to healthcare. This led us to a sample of 50 frugal innovations in the healthcare sector. For each of the 50 selected examples, we examined various characteristics of the innovation, such as the country of origin, first launch market, type of innovator, type of innovation, type of care, and geographic diffusion. Our findings show that most of the frugal innovations originated in the United States, followed by India. The most frequent first launch market was India. In terms of types of innovators, academia seemed to be the strongest driver. Most frugal innovations are product innovations in the fields of neonatology and general practice. In this article, we expand on these findings and examine the relationships between individual variables to reveal further insights. Finally, we offer conclusions, an outlook for frugal innovation in the healthcare sector, and future research questions.

  4. Innovations in urban agriculture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schans, van der J.W.; Renting, Henk; Veenhuizen, Van René

    2014-01-01

    This issuehighlights innovations in urban agriculture. Innovation and the various forms of innovations are of particular importance because urban agriculture is adapted to specific urban challenges and opportunities. Innovation is taking place continuously, exploring the multiple fundions of urban

  5. Innovation and Entrepreneurship | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innovation and Entrepreneurship Innovation and Entrepreneurship Connect Contact us for more Innovation and Entrepreneurship Center helps connect emerging clean energy businesses with the financial , and pilot opportunities. Read more Events Innovation and entrepreneurship events like the upcoming

  6. Achieving Performance in an Organization through Marketing Innovation

    OpenAIRE

    Andreea Maier; Diana Nicoară; Dorin Maier; Maria-Mihaela Suărăsan; Alexandra Anastasiu

    2013-01-01

    Innovation is becoming more and more important in modern society. There are a lot of researches on different kinds of innovation but marketing innovation is one kind of innovation that has not been studied frequently before. Marketing innovation is defined as a new way in which companies can market themselves to potential or existing customers. The study shows some key elements for marketing innovation that are worth paying attention to when implementing marketing inno...

  7. Innovation patterns in sustainable tourism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjalager, Anne Mette

    1997-01-01

    to the environment. The following types of innovation can be distinguished: product innovations, classical process innovations, process innovations in information handling, management innovations and institutional innovations. The article concludes that innovations are predominantly launched as part of defensive...

  8. Canadian cardiac surgeons' perspectives on biomedical innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyman, Gretchen; Tucker, Joseph E L; Cimini, Massimo; Narine, Kishan; Fedak, Paul W M

    2012-01-01

    Barriers to successful innovation can be identified and potentially addressed by exploring the perspectives of key stakeholders in the innovation process. Cardiac surgeons in Canada were surveyed for personal perspectives on biomedical innovation. Quantitative data was obtained by questionnaire and qualitative data via interviews with selected survey participants. Surgeons were asked to self-identify into 1 of 3 categories: "innovator," "early adopter," or "late adopter," and data were compared between groups. Most surgeons viewed innovation favourably and this effect was consistent irrespective of perceived level of innovativeness. Key barriers to the innovation pathway were identified: (1) support from colleagues and institutions; (2) Canada's health system; (3) sufficient investment capital; and (4) the culture of innovation within the local environment. Knowledge of the innovation process was perceived differently based on self-reported innovativeness. The majority of surgeons did not perceive themselves as having the necessary knowledge and skills to effectively translate innovative ideas to clinical practice. In general, responses indicate support for implementation of leadership and training programs focusing on the innovation process in an effort to prepare surgeons and enhance their ability to successfully innovate and translate new therapies. The perspectives of cardiac surgeons provide an intriguing portal into the challenges and opportunities for healthcare innovation in Canada. Copyright © 2012 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Innovation Concepts in Healthcare

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2010-01-01

    AbstractDemographic change and advances in medical science pose increased challenges to healthcare systems globally: The economic basis is aging and thus health is becoming more and more a productivity factor. At the same time, with today’s new communication possibilities the demand and expectations of effective medical treatment have been increased. This presentation will illustrate the need for the “industrialization” of healthcare in order to achieve highest results at limited budgets. Thereby, industrialization is not meaning the medical treatment based on the assembly line approach. Rather it is to recognize the cost of medical care as an investment with respective expectations on the return of the investment. Innovations in imaging and pharmaceutical products as well as in processes - that lead to similar medical results, but with lower efforts - are keys in such scenarios.BiographyProf. Dr. Hermann Requardt, 54, is a member of the Managing Board of Siemens AG and Chief Executive Officer of the He...

  10. Probability via expectation

    CERN Document Server

    Whittle, Peter

    1992-01-01

    This book is a complete revision of the earlier work Probability which ap­ peared in 1970. While revised so radically and incorporating so much new material as to amount to a new text, it preserves both the aim and the approach of the original. That aim was stated as the provision of a 'first text in probability, de­ manding a reasonable but not extensive knowledge of mathematics, and taking the reader to what one might describe as a good intermediate level'. In doing so it attempted to break away from stereotyped applications, and consider applications of a more novel and significant character. The particular novelty of the approach was that expectation was taken as the prime concept, and the concept of expectation axiomatized rather than that of a probability measure. In the preface to the original text of 1970 (reproduced below, together with that to the Russian edition of 1982) I listed what I saw as the advantages of the approach in as unlaboured a fashion as I could. I also took the view that the text...

  11. Gender Roles and Expectations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana A. Eisenchlas

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available One consequence of the advent of cyber communication is that increasing numbers of people go online to ask for, obtain, and presumably act upon advice dispensed by unknown peers. Just as advice seekers may not have access to information about the identities, ideologies, and other personal characteristics of advice givers, advice givers are equally ignorant about their interlocutors except for the bits of demographic information that the latter may offer freely. In the present study, that information concerns sex. As the sex of the advice seeker may be the only, or the predominant, contextual variable at hand, it is expected that that identifier will guide advice givers in formulating their advice. The aim of this project is to investigate whether and how the sex of advice givers and receivers affects the type of advice, through the empirical analysis of a corpus of web-based Spanish language forums on personal relationship difficulties. The data revealed that, in the absence of individuating information beyond that implicit in the advice request, internalized gender expectations along the lines of agency and communality are the sources from which advice givers draw to guide their counsel. This is despite the trend in discursive practices used in formulating advice, suggesting greater language convergence across sexes.

  12. ATLAS: Exceeding all expectations

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    “One year ago it would have been impossible for us to guess that the machine and the experiments could achieve so much so quickly”, says Fabiola Gianotti, ATLAS spokesperson. The whole chain – from collision to data analysis – has worked remarkably well in ATLAS.   The first LHC proton run undoubtedly exceeded expectations for the ATLAS experiment. “ATLAS has worked very well since the beginning. Its overall data-taking efficiency is greater than 90%”, says Fabiola Gianotti. “The quality and maturity of the reconstruction and simulation software turned out to be better than we expected for this initial stage of the experiment. The Grid is a great success, and right from the beginning it has allowed members of the collaboration all over the world to participate in the data analysis in an effective and timely manner, and to deliver physics results very quickly”. In just a few months of data taking, ATLAS has observed t...

  13. The myths of innovation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Berkun, Scott

    2007-01-01

    ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Chapter 2 We understand the history of innovation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Chapter 3 There is a method for innovation...

  14. Incumbent Participation in Open Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørding Olsen, Anders

    Recent years have seen an increasing shift towards open innovation approaches across a wide range of types and sizes of companies, as well as a surge in the interest from academics into the topic. Accessing knowledge and resources otherwise unavailable through interactions with external partners...... is generally regarded as highly valuable to the development and commercialization of innovations. However, this paper explores a potential dark side of open innovation. Based on well-establish theory, differences between the interests of incumbents and SMEs are hypothesized to influence the future survival...... and performance of the SME partners. Findings support the hypothesis that open innovation engagement with incumbents has a negative impact on future survival and performance, moderated by radicalness and technological maturity. This elaborates on open innovation by increased understanding of drawbacks...

  15. Energy providers: customer expectations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pridham, N.F.

    1997-01-01

    The deregulation of the gas and electric power industries, and how it will impact on customer service and pricing rates was discussed. This paper described the present situation, reviewed core competencies, and outlined future expectations. The bottom line is that major energy consumers are very conscious of energy costs and go to great lengths to keep them under control. At the same time, solutions proposed to reduce energy costs must benefit all classes of consumers, be they industrial, commercial, institutional or residential. Deregulation and competition at an accelerated pace is the most likely answer. This may be forced by external forces such as foreign energy providers who are eager to enter the Canadian energy market. It is also likely that the competition and convergence between gas and electricity is just the beginning, and may well be overshadowed by other deregulated industries as they determine their core competencies

  16. Customer experiences and expectations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morton, C. R.

    1997-01-01

    Customer experiences and expectations from competition and cogeneration in the power industry were reviewed by Charles Morton, Director of Energy at CPC International, by describing Casco's decision to get into cogeneration in the early 1990s in three small corn milling plants in Cardinal, London and Port Colborne, Ontario, mainly as result of the threat of a 40 per cent increase in power prices. He stressed that cost competitiveness of cogeneration is entirely site-specific, but it is generally more attractive in larger facilities that operate 24 hours a day, where grid power is expensive or unreliable. Because it is reliable, cogeneration holds out the prospect of increased production-up time, as well as offering a hedge against higher energy costs, reducing the company's variable costs when incoming revenues fall short of costs, and providing an additional tool in head-to-head competition

  17. Exploring the Communicative Dimensions of Knowledge-Intensive Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porup Thomasen, Ulf

    into their communicative micro-foundations. It emphasizes the narrative of a particularly significant and constitutive discrepancy between innovation project teams with an innovation process design aligned with complexity-focused knowledge communication principles and a core business with a set of strategic expectations...... aligned with reductionist knowledge transfer principles. In short, it challenges the validity of reductionist approaches to knowledge-intensive innovation....

  18. Privacy and Innovation

    OpenAIRE

    Avi Goldfarb; Catherine Tucker

    2011-01-01

    Information and communication technology now enables firms to collect detailed and potentially intrusive data about their customers both easily and cheaply. This means that privacy concerns are no longer limited to government surveillance and public figures' private lives. The empirical literature on privacy regulation shows that privacy regulation may affect the extent and direction of data-based innovation. We also show that the impact of privacy regulation can be extremely heterogeneous. T...

  19. Taxation, innovation, and entrepreneurship

    OpenAIRE

    Gersbach, Hans; Schetter, Ulrich; Schneider, Maik T.

    2014-01-01

    We explore optimal and politically feasible growth policies in the form of basic research investments and taxation. Basic research is a public good that benefits innovating entrepreneurs, but its provision and financing also affect the entire economy -- in particular, occupational choices of potential entrepreneurs, wages, dividends, and aggregate output. We show that the impact of basic research on the general economy rationalizes a taxation pecking order to finance basic research. More spec...

  20. Workplace innovation, social innovation and social quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oeij, P.R.A.; Dhondt, S.; Korver, T.

    2011-01-01

    Social innovation is becoming a core value of the EU flagship initiative Innovation Union, but it is not clearly demarcated as it covers a wide field of topics. To understand social innovation within European policymaking a brief outline is given of EC policy developments on innovation and on

  1. Innovation in the ‘Public Sector’

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perry, Kevin

    Governments around the world advance innovation as a significant means to improving public services (Walker, 2006:311). Within this discussion the word innovation seems to be used habitually by policy makers where there are high expectations in relation to reviving, boosting and renewing the flag......Governments around the world advance innovation as a significant means to improving public services (Walker, 2006:311). Within this discussion the word innovation seems to be used habitually by policy makers where there are high expectations in relation to reviving, boosting and renewing...... the flagging economies and the public sector services. Within this context, innovation in the public sector is recognized as a vital factor in meeting the challenges of globalization and demographic changes, and simultaneously sustaining a high level of public services to citizens and businesses. However...

  2. Open innovations, innovation communities and firm's innovative activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Getejanc Vesna

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The open innovation paradigm emphasizes the fact that firms can improve their performance by opening their business models and reduce their R&D costs by effective incorporation of external knowledge. In other words, companies are able to capture value through knowledge that exists outside the boundaries of their organization. The shift from closed to open model of innovation has imposed the necessity to adopt more open approach to innovation within traditional academic view of business strategy. The adoption of this innovative approach is emphasized even more, by the necessity for stronger connection and cooperation among the participants of the innovation process. Free will and collaboration are the main characteristics of open source software, which is recognized in literature as the role model of open innovation and is a rapidly growing method of technology development. Furthermore, innovative communities represent a great opportunity for improvement of the companies' innovation activities, since they have become an important source for identifying the needs and problems of the users. Their development has been fostered by information technologies and recent social changes in user behavior. Recognizing and better understanding the motivation of the members of the innovation communities that guide them to participate in the process of idea generation, can have significant influence on their incorporation within the innovation process. Equally important is to define the incentives that are suited for stimulating and fostering innovative user activities. Taking this topic in consideration, the purpose of this article is to address the following questions: In what way does the collaboration in open source software projects have positive effect on companies' innovation performance? What are the innovation communities and how can companies establish successful interaction with them? Why does the interaction with innovation communities lead to

  3. Macro Expectations, Aggregate Uncertainty, and Expected Term Premia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dick, Christian D.; Schmeling, Maik; Schrimpf, Andreas

    Based on individual expectations from the Survey of Professional Forecasters, we construct a realtime proxy for expected term premium changes on long-term bonds. We empirically investigate the relation of these bond term premium expectations with expectations about key macroeconomic variables as ...

  4. A comparative study of expectant parents ' childbirth expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Bi-Chin; Gau, Meei-Ling; Wu, Shian-Feng; Kuo, Bih-Jaw; Lee, Tsorng-Yeh

    2004-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand childbirth expectations and differences in childbirth expectations among expectant parents. For convenience sampling, 200 couples willing to participate in this study were chosen from two hospitals in central Taiwan. Inclusion criteria were at least 36 weeks of gestation, aged 18 and above, no prenatal complications, and willing to consent to participate in this study. Instruments used to collect data included basic demographic data and the Childbirth Expectations Questionnaire. Findings of the study revealed that (1) five factors were identified by expectant parents regarding childbirth expectations including the caregiving environment, expectation of labor pain, spousal support, control and participation, and medical and nursing support; (2) no general differences were identified in the childbirth expectations between expectant fathers and expectant mothers; and (3) expectant fathers with a higher socioeconomic status and who had received prenatal (childbirth) education had higher childbirth expectations, whereas mothers displayed no differences in demographic characteristics. The study results may help clinical healthcare providers better understand differences in expectations during labor and birth and childbirth expectations by expectant parents in order to improve the medical and nursing system and promote positive childbirth experiences and satisfaction for expectant parents.

  5. Innovative instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    At this year's particle physics conference at Brighton, a parallel session was given over to instrumentation and detector development. While this work is vital to the health of research and its continued progress, its share of prime international conference time is limited. Instrumentation can be innovative three times — first when a new idea is outlined, secondly when it is shown to be feasible, and finally when it becomes productive in a real experiment, amassing useful data rather than operational experience. Hyams' examples showed that it can take a long time for a new idea to filter through these successive stages, if it ever makes it at all

  6. Innovative instrumentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1983-11-15

    At this year's particle physics conference at Brighton, a parallel session was given over to instrumentation and detector development. While this work is vital to the health of research and its continued progress, its share of prime international conference time is limited. Instrumentation can be innovative three times — first when a new idea is outlined, secondly when it is shown to be feasible, and finally when it becomes productive in a real experiment, amassing useful data rather than operational experience. Hyams' examples showed that it can take a long time for a new idea to filter through these successive stages, if it ever makes it at all.

  7. Modelling of Innovation Diffusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arkadiusz Kijek

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the publication of the Bass model in 1969, research on the modelling of the diffusion of innovation resulted in a vast body of scientific literature consisting of articles, books, and studies of real-world applications of this model. The main objective of the diffusion model is to describe a pattern of spread of innovation among potential adopters in terms of a mathematical function of time. This paper assesses the state-of-the-art in mathematical models of innovation diffusion and procedures for estimating their parameters. Moreover, theoretical issues related to the models presented are supplemented with empirical research. The purpose of the research is to explore the extent to which the diffusion of broadband Internet users in 29 OECD countries can be adequately described by three diffusion models, i.e. the Bass model, logistic model and dynamic model. The results of this research are ambiguous and do not indicate which model best describes the diffusion pattern of broadband Internet users but in terms of the results presented, in most cases the dynamic model is inappropriate for describing the diffusion pattern. Issues related to the further development of innovation diffusion models are discussed and some recommendations are given. (original abstract

  8. Aspects that boost innovative potential of textile and apparel industry in flanders district of creativity: inspirations for the design of policies in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavio da Silveira Bruno

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This work aims to identify aspects of the creative economy in the region of Flanders that influence the performance of the textile and apparel value chain in order to contribute to the design of policies that can enhance the entrepreneurial creativity of this sector in Brazil. Interviews and observations were conducted during a prospective mission to the region of Flanders. Information collected was then confronted with selected theoretical and technical literature that analyze regional economies based on creative industries. Although the results reveal no evidence of an explicit coordination of the value network resulting from specific policies designed to add value to Belgian textile and apparel products, they suggest that the performance of key public and private institutions associated with broader initiatives to stimulate Research and Development in the sector in Europe, promoted by EURATEX, supports creativity for innovation and are essential foundations for the development of creative entrepreneurs.

  9. Technological Innovations in Forensic Genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wienroth, Matthias; Morling, Niels; Williams, Robin

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the nature of four waves of technological innovations in forensic genetics alongside the social, legal and ethical aspect of these innovations. It emphasises the way in which technological advances and their socio-legal frameworks are co-produced, shaping technology...... expectations, social identities, and legal institutions. It also considers how imagined and actual uses of forensic genetic technologies are entangled with assertions about social order, affirmations of common values and civil rights, and promises about security and justice. Our comments seek to encourage...

  10. Policies to promote user innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Peter O.; Hartmann, Rasmus Koss

    2018-01-01

    of such policies. It is also not clear whether there is a problem for user-directed policy to solve, or what that problem is. As a first empirical step to answering these questions, we report the results of providing hospital clinicians with access to ‘makerspaces’, i.e. staffed facilities with prototyping tools...... and the expertise in using them. Findings suggest that almost all innovations developed in the makerspaces are user innovations; that the potential returns from the innovations developed in the makerspaces’ first year of operation are more than tenfold the required investment; and that most of the innovations would...... not have been developed without access to makerspaces. Due to lack of diffusion, only a limited share of potential returns is realized. This suggests not only that there are problems of non-development and under-development that policy can solve and that doing so supports social welfare. It also suggests...

  11. Football refereeing: Identifying innovative methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza MohammadKazemi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to identify the potentials innovation in football industry. Data were collected from 10 national and international referees, assistant referees and referees’ supervisors in Iran. In this study, technological innovations are identified that assist better refereeing performances. The analysis revealed a significant relationship between using new technologies and referees ‘performance. The results indicate that elite referees, assistant referees and supervisors agreed to use new technological innovations during the game. According to their comments, this kind of technology causes the referees’ performance development.

  12. Expectations from ethics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleming, P.

    2008-01-01

    Prof. Patricia Fleming, centred her presentation on ethical expectations in regulating safety for future generations. The challenge is to find a just solution, one that provides for a defensible approach to inter-generational equity. The question on equity is about whether we are permitted to treat generations differently and to still meet the demands of justice. And the question must be asked regarding these differences: 'in what ways do they make a moral difference?' She asked the question regarding the exact meaning of the ethical principle 'Radioactive waste shall be managed in such a way that predicted impacts on the health of future generations will not be greater than relevant levels of impact that are acceptable today'. Some countries have proposed different standards for different time periods, either implicitly or explicitly. In doing so, have they preserved our standards of justice or have they abandoned them? Prof. Fleming identified six points to provide with some moral maps which might be used to negotiate our way to a just solution to the disposal of nuclear waste. (author)

  13. Match your innovation strategy to your innovation ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adner, Ron

    2006-04-01

    High-definition televisions should, by now, be a huge success. Philips, Sony, and Thompson invested billions of dollars to develop TV sets with astonishing picture quality. From a technology perspective, they've succeeded: Console manufacturers have been ready for the mass market since the early 1990s. Yet the category has been an unmitigated failure, not because of deficiencies, but because critical complements such as studio production equipment were not developed or adopted in time. Under-performing complements have left console producers in the position of offering a Ferrari in a world without gasoline or highways--an admirable engineering feat, but not one that creates value for customers. The HDTV story exemplifies the promise and peril of innovation ecosystems--the collaborative arrangements through which firms combine their individual offers into a coherent, customer-facing solution. When they work, innovation ecosystems allow companies to create value that no one firm could have created alone. The benefits of these systems are real. But for many organizations the attempt at ecosystem innovation has been a costly failure. This is because, along with new opportunities, innovation ecosystems also present a new set of risks that can brutally derail a firm's best efforts. Innovation ecosystems are characterized by three fundamental types of risk: initiative risks--the familiar uncertainties of managing a project; interdependence risks--the uncertainties of coordinating with complementary innovators; and integration risks--the uncertainties presented by the adoption process across the value chain. Firms that assess ecosystem risks holistically and systematically will be able to establish more realistic expectations, develop a more refined set of environmental contingencies, and arrive at a more robust innovation strategy. Collectively, these actions will lead to more effective implementation and more profitable innovation.

  14. Approaching Service Innovation Patterns

    OpenAIRE

    Andrea NAGY

    2013-01-01

    The present paper aims at analyzing the types of innovation in the field of services. First, the concept of innovation is defined and second, field literature is reviewed from the perspective of service innovation. The main types of innovation are identified based on several attempts at defining innovation, the most notable being Schumpeter’s. Thus, it is possible to approach concepts such as product and process innovation, incremental and radical innovation. Another aim has been to regard se...

  15. KEY TENDENCIES IN SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL (INNOVATIVE ACTIVITIES OF RUSSIAN INDUSTRIAL COMPANIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. B. Dobrova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article off ers the analysis of expenditures on technological innovation in Russia and abroad. The author outlines the main reasons of the low level of technological development of Russian industrial companies. A number of organizational and economic measures to create conditions for technological development of the Russian economy are considered. In recent years, there was an essential increase in output of innovative products, works and services that coincided with the increased ratio of volumes of technological innovations to their costs. However, the expected decrease of this ratio in the coming years may cause slower growth of volumes of innovative production that requires drastic measures, especially aimed at restricting key factors impeding innovative activities. These factors include lack of own funds, high cost of innovations, lack of fi nancial support from the state, high economic risk and low innovative potential of the organization.

  16. Classification of innovations: approaches and consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub Tabas

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, innovations are perceived as a life blood of businesses. The inevitable fact is that even if the innovations have a potential to transform the companies or all the industries, the innovations are high risky. Even though, the second fact is that in order to companies’ development and their survival on the markets, the innovations have become the necessity. In the theory, it is rather difficult to find a comprehensive definition of innovation, and to settle down a general definition of innovation becomes more and more difficult with the growing number of domains where the innovations, or possible innovations start to appear in a form of added value to something that already exist. Definition of innovation has come through a long process of development; from early definition of Schumpeter who has connected innovation especially with changes in products or production processes, to recent definitions based on the added value for a society. One of possible approaches to define the content of innovation is to base the definition on classification of innovation. In the article, the authors provide the analysis of existing classifications of innovations in order to find, respectively in order to define the general content of innovation that would confirm (or reject their definition of innovation derived in the frame of their previous work where they state that innovation is a change that leads to gaining profit for an individual, for business entity, or for society, while the profit is not only the accounting one, but it is the economic profit.The article is based especially on the secondary research while the authors employ the method of analysis with the aim to confront various classification-based definitions of innovation. Then the methods used are especially comparison, analysis and synthesis.

  17. FORMING THE ASSESSMENT MECHANISM OF ENTERPRISES’ INNOVATIVE PROJECTS COMPETITIVENESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina D. Kuzina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The author proposes a mechanism to estimate the competitiveness of enterprises’ innovative projects. The focus is on the criteria affected the competitiveness of innovative projects. The mechanism of calculating the relative market attractiveness and the relative innovative potential of enterprise to implement innovative project is shown.

  18. Expectations from Society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blowers, A.

    2008-01-01

    Prof. A. Blowers observed that the social context within which radioactive waste management is considered has evolved over time. The early period where radioactive waste was a non-issue was succeeded by a period of intense conflict over solutions. The contemporary context is more consensual, in which solutions are sought that are both technically sound and socially acceptable. Among the major issues is that of inter-generational equity embraced in the question: how long can or should our responsibility to the future extend? He pointed out the differences in timescales. On the one hand, geo-scientific timescales are very long term, emphasizing the issue of how far into the future it is possible to make predictions about repository safety. By contrast, socio cultural timescales are much shorter, focusing on the foreseeable future of one or two generations and raising the issue of how far into the future we should be concerned. He listed. the primary expectations from society which are: safety and security to alleviate undue burdens to future generations and flexibility in order to enable the future generations to have a stake in decision making. The need to reconcile the two had led to a contemporary emphasis on phased geological disposal incorporating retrievability. However, the long timescales for implementation of disposal provided for sufficient flexibility without the need for retrievability. Future generations would inevitably have sold stake in decision making. Prof. A.. Blowers pointed out that society is also concerned with participation in decision making for implementation. The key elements for success are: openness and transparency, staged process, participation, partnership, benefits to enhance the well being of communities and a democratic framework for decision making, including the ratification of key decisions and the right for communities to withdraw from the process up to a predetermined point. This approach for decision making may also have

  19. Expected years ever married

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryohei Mogi

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the second half of the 20th century, remarkable marriage changes were seen: a great proportion of never married population, high average age at first marriage, and large variance in first marriage timing. Although it is theoretically possible to separate these three elements, disentangling them analytically remains a challenge. Objective: This study's goal is to answer the following questions: Which of the three effects, nonmarriage, delayed marriage, or expansion, has the most impact on nuptiality changes? How does the most influential factor differ by time periods, birth cohorts, and countries? Methods: To quantify nuptiality changes over time, we define the measure 'expected years ever married' (EYEM. We illustrate the use of EYEM, looking at time trends in 15 countries (six countries for cohort analysis and decompose these trends into three components: scale (the changes in the proportion of never married - nonmarriage, location (the changes in timing of first marriage - delayed marriage, and variance (the changes in the standard deviation of first marriage age - expansion. We used population counts by sex, age, and marital status from national statistical offices and the United Nations database. Results: Results show that delayed marriage is the most influential factor on period EYEM's changes, while nonmarriage has recently begun to contribute to the change in North and West Europe and Canada. Period and cohort analysis complement each other. Conclusions: This study introduces a new index of nuptiality and decomposes its change into the contribution of three components: scale, location, and variance. The decomposition steps presented here offer an open possibility for more elaborate parametric marriage models.

  20. Innovative Pedagogy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    and educational changes might challenge or facilitate learning for students and educators. Besides its relevance within the education sector, the content presented here can be applied in non-formal learning environments, such as museums, cultural institutions, as well as other educational settings where emotions......The main purpose of this book is to take a closer look at how students and teachers in educational institutions apply the innovative, the playful and the emotional and creative dimensions of learning. With this contribution, the authors aim at reaching an international audience of educators......-cultural perspective that looks at interactions among individuals; the creation and recreation of the self and others; and the study of collaboration, change processes and aesthetic and creative learning. This anthology offers original empirical documentation and theoretical reflections on how pedagogical...

  1. Innovators Intent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granados, Maria Luisa; Rai, Sudhanshu

    With this paper we want to explore further the innovators intent, where social enterprises use imaginative ways to take advantage of information technology to create, share and manage the knowledge pool of their small enterprise. We draw on several perspectives on how information processing needs...... are addressed, as well as the manner in which IT enables and facilitates sense-making. Studies exploring the role of IT in organisations abound, however our focus is not large organisations but small social enterprises (SEs) and how they use IT to further their business objectives. Hence there is still a lack......, and less the collaborative work and communication among enterprise members. However, it was established that SEs were using different technologies, such as, cloud solutions and web 2.0 tools to manage informally their knowledge. The possible impediments for SEs to support themselves more on IT solutions...

  2. Funding innovation

    CERN Multimedia

    Marina Giampietro

    2012-01-01

    For the first time, six knowledge and technology transfer activities are set to benefit from a dedicated fund made available by the Knowledge Transfer group. This initiative cements CERN’s commitment to sharing its technological knowledge and expertise with society.   GEM detectors for flame detection and early earthquake prediction, radio-frequency absorbers for energy recovery, and exotic radioisotopes for medical applications are among the projects funded by the recently introduced KT Fund. “CERN’s scientific programme generates a considerable amount of intellectual property, a natural driver for innovation,” explains Giovanni Anelli, Head of the Knowledge Transfer Group. “Very often, though, financial support is needed to bring the newly-born technologies a step further and make them ready for transfer to other research institutes or to companies.” This is where the KT fund comes into play. It provides vital support in the early sta...

  3. Designing collaborative policy innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agger, Annika; Sørensen, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Recent approaches to enhancing public innovation suffer from two shortcomings: They overemphasize competition as a driver of innovation and overlook the fact that public sector innovation involves policy innovation as well as service innovation. Drawing on governance research and innovation theory......, the chapter investigates the extent to which and how collaboration between politicians and relevant stakeholders can spur the formulation, implementation and diffusion of new innovative policies. A case study of a process of collaborative policy innovation in a Danish municipality shows that collaborative...... policy arenas do contribute to policy innovation but also that the degree to which they do so depends on the institutional design of these arenas....

  4. Innovation agenda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    2008-01-01

    Retooling the global economy for a low-carbon and environmentally responsible future must begin immediately - and a major new United States initiative in this area is vital. The recent downturn in the economy makes this change all the more necessary: energy efficiency and renewable energy can be an engine of dramatic new economic growth and job creation. It will be up to the incoming president to marshal public and industry sentiment behind such a reinvestment in our future. We are at last seeing a global explosion of financial and political interest in energy, focused largely - but, ominously, not exclusively - on clean energy, since, in addition, to solar, wind and other low-carbon sources, investments in some of the most CO 2 -intensive sources are also on the rise. Innovation is the life-blood of economic growth and renewal. It has been known for decades that the bulk of new growth results from the invention, and re-invention, of new scientific and technological opportunities. Over 50 years ago Economics Nobel Laureate Robert Solow concluded that over 90 per cent of new economic growth results from public and private sector investments in innovation. Yet energy is very short of investment in research and development (R and D) despite arguably now posing our top environmental and geopolitical security threat. Total investment on R and D in the U.S. as a whole stands at roughly three per cent of the U.S. gross domestic product, but, for energy, it is proportionally only about one-tenth of that level. By contrast, research and development investments in the medical and biotechnology field are roughly 15 per cent of sales - almost a staggering 40 times more than for energy. This argues that, at minimum, energy R and D should be increased to the three per cent national average

  5. Expectations from implementers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biurrun, E.; Zuidema, P.

    2008-01-01

    Enrique Biurrun (DBE) presented the expectations from the implementer. He explained that the implementer needs a framework to successfully develop a repository which means the definition of requirements and guidance (for repository system development, analysis, licences, etc.) as well as the decision-making process (stepwise approach, roles of different players, etc.). He also needs a reasonable stability of the regulatory system. The regulatory framework should be developed in a clear, reasonable and consistent manner. In the context of the long duration of the project (100 years) there will be technological progress. In that context E. Biurrun asked what is the meaning of best practice. How can one deal with judgmental issues in a step-wise approach? Regulatory criteria and guidance must deal with the repository system for which an iterative process is necessary where dialogue is needed with the regulator despite the need to maintain his independence. The safety case, which is a periodic documentation of the status of the project, must provide a synthesis of the underlying scientific understanding and evidence and becomes part of the design process through feedback. E. Biurrun pointed out that safety is not calculated or assessed, but designed and built into the repository system (by geological and engineered barriers). He stressed the importance of the operational aspects since the implementer has to build and operate the repository safely. He asked the question: is it 'Ethical' to buy 'peace of mind' of some stakeholders with casualties of the implementer's staff because of mining accidents if the repository is left open during a phase of reversibility. The implementer needs dependable criteria, legal security and investment security. He interpreted the 'Precautionary principle' as meaning 'do it now'. Long-lasting solutions are very uncertain. Will we heave the money and the technology to do it later? He made some reflections regarding the ethical need to

  6. Scenarios for Development of Scientific and Innovative Potential of Ukraine under Conditions of a New Industrial Revolution and Association with the EU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matyushenko Igor Yu.

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of the scenario simulation of scientific and innovative development of Ukraine to determine the appropriate method of its management under conditions of a new industrial revolution and association with the EU. It is shown that the best scenario that in the long run provides a significant improvement in the results of scientific and technological development is a scenario of increasing the level of R&D expenditures to the EU target figure amounting to 4% of GDP. But this scenario is unlikely. It is found that the optimal level of expenditures can be considered as 2.5% of GDP, which can be achieved in the medium term; in this case raising the level of expenditures to 1.7-2% of GDP gives certain results but does not produce sufficient resources for a long-term development. It is proved that in order to achieve significant results in scientific and technological development, the increase in expenditures on R&D should be accompanied by forming clusters, increasing the level of protection of investors, providing development of high-tech industries and employment in this sphere, as well as facilitating the access to ICTs. It is found that a prerequisite for an effective scientific and technological development is stimulation of the population interest in obtaining high-quality professional education, including through the promotion by employers.

  7. Let’s Take it to the Clouds: The Potential of Educational Innovations, Including Blended Learning, for Capacity Building in Developing Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Marrinan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In modern decentralised health systems, district and local managers are increasingly responsible for financing, managing, and delivering healthcare. However, their lack of adequate skills and competencies are a critical barrier to improved performance of health systems. Given the financial and human resource, constraints of relying on traditional face-to-face training to upskill a large and dispersed number of health managers, governments, and donors must look to exploit advances in the education sector. In recent years, education providers around the world have been experimenting with blended learning; that is, amalgamating traditional face-to-face education with web-based learning to reduce costs and enrol larger numbers of students. Access to improved information and communication technology (ICT has been the major catalyst for such pedagogical innovations. We argue that with many developing countries already improving their ICT systems, the question is not whether but how to employ technology to facilitate the continuous professional development of district and local health managers in decentralised settings.

  8. Cross-sector Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Würtz Jessen, Søren; Linnet, Andreas; Tscherning, Rasmus Wiinstedt

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this handbook is to help improve your opportunities for getting started on innovative and business development projects that reach beyond your own sector, commonly known as ’Cross-sector innovation’, or ’Cross innovation’ for short. We believe that there is a need for an easily read...... innovation handbook that can reach out to all sectors and potential partners whose point of departure, language use and understanding of customers is often very different to that of businesses. These differences constitute a resource for business development. If exploited they can lead to new ways of doing...... things and help us breakaway from the lull of the modes of expression and methods ‘customarily’ employed in business development. The handbook focuses on the interaction of “traditional’ businesses and sectors that belong to those known as the creative and the experience industries, i.e. designers...

  9. Experience Innovation in Tourism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Friis; Sørensen, Flemming

    2017-01-01

    This paper discusses how front-line employees can play an important role in innovation processes that lead tourism companies from service production to experience creation. The increasing focus on experiential value by customers in general (Sundbo and Sørensen, 2013) puts pressure on service...... companies to move from functional service production to creating experiences (Pine and Gilmore, 2013). This is also the case in tourism companies. In tourism, most encounters between employees and tourists operate on a service logic (Sørensen and Jensen, 2015). Thus, we suggest there is a value potential...... in developing such encounters into experience encounters focusing on the co-creation of experiential value. While frontline employees are central for service quality they are mostly not included in systematised innovation processes in tourism companies. These companies are often hierarchically organised...

  10. Evolution of non-expected utility preferences

    CERN Document Server

    Widekind, Sven von; Fandel, G

    2008-01-01

    The theory on the evolution of preferences deals with the endogenous formation of preference relations in strategic situations. It is related to the field of evolutionary game theory. In this book we analyze the role and the influence of general, possibly non-expected utility preferences in such an evolutionary setup. In particular, we demonstrate that preferences which diverge from von Neumann-Morgenstern expected utility may potentially prove to be successful under evolutionary pressures.

  11. Employee-driven Innovation in Welfare Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Wihlman

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing interest in both employee-driven innovation (EDI and innovation in welfare services, but a lack of empirical studies addressing innovation from the employee perspective. Accordingly, this study was designed to contribute with well-grounded empirical knowledge, aiming to explore the barriers to and opportunities for participation in innovation experienced by employees of the Swedish welfare services. In order to reach the aim, a qualitative thematic analysis of 27 semi-structured interviews with employees in four municipalities was performed. The study identified three main themes, with a great impact on the innovative performance of the studied organizations: support, including leadership and innovation processes; development, including creativity and learning; and organizational culture, which includes attitudes and communication, all essential ingredients in EDI. Experienced barriers for innovation were unclear or non-existing innovation processes with ambiguous goals, insufficient learning, and deficient organizational slack, thus creating a tension between day-to-day work and innovation and hindering reflection and exploration. Attitudes of colleagues and lack of communication were also barriers to implementing innovation, suggesting the need for better management support for a communicative and open culture. Opportunities were found, including commitment to innovation and willingness to try new ideas, but the employees must be given the mandate and sufficient time to develop the potential that emerges from continuous learning, time for reflection, and user dialogue. The conclusion was that incremental innovations existed, but the full potential of these did not benefit the entire organization due to inadequate communication and lack of innovation processes. The study improves our understanding of how employees regard their involvement in innovation. It also discusses how to make better use of employees’ resources in

  12. Social gradient in life expectancy and health expectancy in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Andersen, Otto; Kjøller, Mette

    2004-01-01

    Health status of a population can be evaluated by health expectancy expressed as average lifetime in various states of health. The purpose of the study was to compare health expectancy in population groups at high, medium and low educational levels.......Health status of a population can be evaluated by health expectancy expressed as average lifetime in various states of health. The purpose of the study was to compare health expectancy in population groups at high, medium and low educational levels....

  13. Innovation Dialectics: An Extended Process Perspective on Innovation in Services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nardelli, Giulia

    2017-01-01

    Services are characterised by the involvement of customers and other interest groups in the innovation process. The aim of this study is to understand how and why, in the service context, tensions and potential conflicts between heterogeneous interest groups unfold during processes of innovation....... The empirical field in which the investigation was set is facility services, a type of business-to-business support services. The findings were extracted from a longitudinal, in-depth case study of a Danish, multi-national organisation over 13 years, complemented with an explorative study in the Danish facility...... service context. The findings suggest that tensions and conflicts between heterogeneous interest groups are an intrinsic element of innovation processes in services, and that emphasising them might actually support a clearer understanding of processes of innovation in services. The outcome of the analysis...

  14. Young children's tool innovation across culture: Affordance visibility matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neldner, Karri; Mushin, Ilana; Nielsen, Mark

    2017-11-01

    Young children typically demonstrate low rates of tool innovation. However, previous studies have limited children's performance by presenting tools with opaque affordances. In an attempt to scaffold children's understanding of what constitutes an appropriate tool within an innovation task we compared tools in which the focal affordance was visible to those in which it was opaque. To evaluate possible cultural specificity, data collection was undertaken in a Western urban population and a remote Indigenous community. As expected affordance visibility altered innovation rates: young children were more likely to innovate on a tool that had visible affordances than one with concealed affordances. Furthermore, innovation rates were higher than those reported in previous innovation studies. Cultural background did not affect children's rates of tool innovation. It is suggested that new methods for testing tool innovation in children must be developed in order to broaden our knowledge of young children's tool innovation capabilities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. STIMULATING INNOVATIONS AND PERFORMANCE OF COMPANIES IN BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrijana Ostojić Mihić

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper explores the perception of innovations and importance of innovativeness, determines innovation potential and links the application of innovations in companies to the material stimulation of employees. The aim of the paper is to provide information on encouraging and developing the culture of innovations and on strengthening the awareness of the importance of material motivation for the creation of innovations. The paper presents an overview of the existing findings on the company’s innovation potential and the possibility to encourage innovations by means of the selected tools and techniques of human resource management. The contribution of the paper is based on the empirical research of a representative sample of 250 medium-size and large companies in Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH using the methodology of the Croatian Coefficient of Innovativeness (HKI, whereby special attention is given to the observation of the possible link between stimulating employees to innovate and accomplishing the company’s selected performance.

  16. Organizing Systemic Innovation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.P.H. Jaspers (Ferdinand)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractSystemic innovation refers to product development activities that involve the change of multiple interdependent components. Unlike autonomous innovation, which refers to components that change independently, systemic innovation is for many firms the norm rather than the exception. This

  17. Innovation in Your Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA has many innovation programs that can help the public bring innovative solutions to their local areas by reducing waste, engaging students to contribute innovative ideas, and helping businesses implement sustainable practices.

  18. Creativity and group innovation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijstad, B.A.; de Dreu, C.K.W.

    2002-01-01

    Comments on M. West's article regarding the validity of an integrative model of creativity and innovation implementation in work groups. Variables affecting the level of team innovation; Relationship between predictors and team innovation; Promotion of constructive conflict.

  19. Innovative uses of technology in online midwifery education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbour, Megan W; Nypaver, Cynthia F; Wika, Judith C

    2015-01-01

    Women's health care in the United States is at a critical juncture. There is increased demand for primary care providers, including women's health specialists such as certified nurse-midwives/certified midwives, women's health nurse practitioners, and obstetrician-gynecologists, yet shortages in numbers of these providers are expected. This deficit in the number of women's health care providers could have adverse consequences for women and their newborns when women have to travel long distances to access maternity health care. Online education using innovative technologies and evidence-based teaching and learning strategies have the potential to increase the number of health care providers in several disciplines, including midwifery. This article reviews 3 innovative uses of online platforms for midwifery education: virtual classrooms, unfolding case studies, and online return demonstrations of clinical skills. These examples of innovative teaching strategies can promote critical and creative thinking and enhance competence in skills. Their use in online education can help enhance the student experience. More students, including those who live in rural and underserved regions and who otherwise might be unable to attend a traditional onsite campus, are provided the opportunity to complete quality midwifery education through online programs, which in turn may help expand the women's health care provider workforce. This article is part of a special series of articles that address midwifery innovations in clinical practice, education, interprofessional collaboration, health policy, and global health. © 2015 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  20. More Innovations from Lessons Learned

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Thomas Bøtker

    2007-01-01

    As the Danish Army is facing (1) new and diverse tasks, (2) a high level of change in these tasks, and (3) a high pace of new technologies, the Army is required to become a highly innovative organization. This is further substantiated by the fact that, unlike the old enemy, the new enemies have...... a much higher potential for innovation and thereby changing the rules of the game. Therefore the current situation demands of the Army that it becomes as innovative as possible. At universities, for decades, scholars/researchers have focused on research on strategy in competitive environments, and one...... of the resulting streams of literature, on evolutionary theory, is used in this article to provide some answers to how the Army can become more innovative. The identified strategies are: (1) creating a corporate culture that provides a wider variation of ideas and knowledge, (2) creating mechanisms that will allow...

  1. Workplace innovation and social innovation : an introduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jürgen Howaldt; Dr. Ben Fruytier; Peter R.A. Oeij; Steven Dhondt

    2016-01-01

    This is the introduction to the special issue of World Review of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sustainable Development (WREMSD) dedicated to workplace innovation and social innovation related to work and organisation. As technological and business model innovations alone are not sufficient to

  2. Workplace innovation and social innovation: an introduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Howaldt, J.; Oeij, P.R.A.; Dhondt, S.; Fruytier, B.

    2016-01-01

    This is the introduction to this special issue of World Review of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sustainable Development (WREMSD) dedicated to workplace innovation and social innovation related to work and organisation. As technological and business model innovations alone are not sufficient to

  3. Speeding Up Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Flemming; Mattsson, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Minimisation of time-to-market strategies can provide companies with a competitive advantage in dynamic and competitive environments. Using parallel innovation processes has been emphasised as one strategy to speed up innovation processes and consequently minimise the time-to-market of innovations....... Much innovation today takes place in open structures in which networks play an important role. However, little is known about how innovation networks can facilitate parallel innovation processes. This paper discusses how innovation network structures develop and support exploration and exploitation...... of the network facilitate the parallel innovation process but also how such processes place new requirements on such networks and their management....

  4. Innovation and Demand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Esben Sloth

    2007-01-01

    the demand-side of markets in the simplest possible way. This strategy has allowed a gradual increase in the sophistication of supply-side aspects of economic evolution, but the one-sided focus on supply is facing diminishing returns. Therefore, demand-side aspects of economic evolution have in recent years...... received increased attention. The present paper argues that the new emphasis on demand-side factors is quite crucial for a deepened understanding of economic evolution. The major reasons are the following: First, demand represents the core force of selection that gives direction to the evolutionary process....... Second, firms' innovative activities relate, directly or indirectly, to the structure of expected and actual demand. Third, the demand side represents the most obvious way of turning to the much-needed analysis of macro-evolutionary change of the economic system....

  5. Innovative approaches in European sustainable consumption policies: assessing the potential of various instruments for sustainable consumption practises and greening of the market (ASCEE)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rubik, F.; Scholl, G.; Biedenkopf, K.; Kalimo, H.; Mohaupt, F.; Söebech, Ó.; Stø, E.; Strandbakken, P.; Turnheim, B.

    2009-01-01

    The report summarises the outcomes of the project "Assessing the potential of various instruments for sustainable consumption practices and greening of the market" (ASCEE). The scope of the ASCEE project was to consider the latest trends in policies supporting sustainable consumption and production

  6. Scenarios and innovative systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-11-01

    The purpose of this workshop is to present to the GEDEON community the scenarios for the deployment of innovative nuclear solutions. Both steady state situations and possible transitions from the present to new reactors and fuel cycles are considered. Innovative systems that satisfy improved natural resource utilization and waste minimization criteria will be described as well as the R and D orientations of various partners. This document brings together the transparencies of 17 communications given at this workshop: general policy for transmutation and partitioning; Amster: a molten salt reactor (MSR) concept; MSR capabilities; potentials and capabilities of accelerator driven systems (ADS); ADS demonstrator interest as an experimental facility; innovative systems: gas coolant technologies; Pu management in EPR; scenarios with thorium fuel; scenarios at the equilibrium state; scenarios for transition; partitioning and specific conditioning; management of separated radio-toxic elements; European programs; DOE/AAA (Advanced Accelerator Applications) program; OECD scenario studies; CEA research programs and orientations; partitioning and transmutation: an industrial point of view. (J.S.)

  7. Patient (customer) expectations in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostan, Sedat; Acuner, Taner; Yilmaz, Gökhan

    2007-06-01

    The expectations of patient are one of the determining factors of healthcare service. The purpose of this study is to measure the Patients' Expectations, based on Patient's Rights. This study was done with Likert-Survey in Trabzon population. The analyses showed that the level of the expectations of the patient was high on the factor of receiving information and at an acceptable level on the other factors. Statistical meaningfulness was determined between age, sex, education, health insurance, and the income of the family and the expectations of the patients (pstudy, the current legal regulations have higher standards than the expectations of the patients. The reason that the satisfaction of the patients high level is interpreted due to the fact that the level of the expectation is low. It is suggested that the educational and public awareness studies on the patients' rights must be done in order to increase the expectations of the patients.

  8. Biomaterials innovation bundling technologies and life

    CERN Document Server

    Styhre, A

    2014-01-01

    Rapid advances in the life sciences means that there is now a far more detailed understanding of biological systems on the cellular, molecular and genetic levels. Sited at the intersection between the life sciences, the engineering sciences and the design sciences, innovations in the biomaterials industry are expected to garner increasing attention and play a key role in future development. This book examines the biomaterials innovations taking place in corporations and in academic research settings today.

  9. Making technological innovation work for sustainable development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anadon, Laura Diaz; Chan, Gabriel; Harley, Alicia G; Matus, Kira; Moon, Suerie; Murthy, Sharmila L; Clark, William C

    2016-08-30

    This paper presents insights and action proposals to better harness technological innovation for sustainable development. We begin with three key insights from scholarship and practice. First, technological innovation processes do not follow a set sequence but rather emerge from complex adaptive systems involving many actors and institutions operating simultaneously from local to global scales. Barriers arise at all stages of innovation, from the invention of a technology through its selection, production, adaptation, adoption, and retirement. Second, learning from past efforts to mobilize innovation for sustainable development can be greatly improved through structured cross-sectoral comparisons that recognize the socio-technical nature of innovation systems. Third, current institutions (rules, norms, and incentives) shaping technological innovation are often not aligned toward the goals of sustainable development because impoverished, marginalized, and unborn populations too often lack the economic and political power to shape innovation systems to meet their needs. However, these institutions can be reformed, and many actors have the power to do so through research, advocacy, training, convening, policymaking, and financing. We conclude with three practice-oriented recommendations to further realize the potential of innovation for sustainable development: (i) channels for regularized learning across domains of practice should be established; (ii) measures that systematically take into account the interests of underserved populations throughout the innovation process should be developed; and (iii) institutions should be reformed to reorient innovation systems toward sustainable development and ensure that all innovation stages and scales are considered at the outset.

  10. Making technological innovation work for sustainable development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anadon, Laura Diaz; Harley, Alicia G.; Matus, Kira; Moon, Suerie; Murthy, Sharmila L.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents insights and action proposals to better harness technological innovation for sustainable development. We begin with three key insights from scholarship and practice. First, technological innovation processes do not follow a set sequence but rather emerge from complex adaptive systems involving many actors and institutions operating simultaneously from local to global scales. Barriers arise at all stages of innovation, from the invention of a technology through its selection, production, adaptation, adoption, and retirement. Second, learning from past efforts to mobilize innovation for sustainable development can be greatly improved through structured cross-sectoral comparisons that recognize the socio-technical nature of innovation systems. Third, current institutions (rules, norms, and incentives) shaping technological innovation are often not aligned toward the goals of sustainable development because impoverished, marginalized, and unborn populations too often lack the economic and political power to shape innovation systems to meet their needs. However, these institutions can be reformed, and many actors have the power to do so through research, advocacy, training, convening, policymaking, and financing. We conclude with three practice-oriented recommendations to further realize the potential of innovation for sustainable development: (i) channels for regularized learning across domains of practice should be established; (ii) measures that systematically take into account the interests of underserved populations throughout the innovation process should be developed; and (iii) institutions should be reformed to reorient innovation systems toward sustainable development and ensure that all innovation stages and scales are considered at the outset. PMID:27519800

  11. Computational Science and Innovation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dean, David Jarvis

    2011-01-01

    Simulations - utilizing computers to solve complicated science and engineering problems - are a key ingredient of modern science. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is a world leader in the development of high-performance computing (HPC), the development of applied math and algorithms that utilize the full potential of HPC platforms, and the application of computing to science and engineering problems. An interesting general question is whether the DOE can strategically utilize its capability in simulations to advance innovation more broadly. In this article, I will argue that this is certainly possible.

  12. Brand management of licensed innovation X

    OpenAIRE

    Hämäläinen, Tommy

    2016-01-01

    European start-up company has patented a packaging innovation concept for a certain the food product. The manufacturing and productization of the innovation will be licensed internationally for several participants. The Case Company is therefore interested to know what kind of opportunities and requirements potentially simultaneous strategic partnerships with licensees would mean for the brand of the innovation in theory and practice. The purpose of this thesis was to evaluate the current...

  13. Macro Expectations, Aggregate Uncertainty, and Expected Term Premia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dick, Christian D.; Schmeling, Maik; Schrimpf, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    as well as aggregate macroeconomic uncertainty at the level of individual forecasters. We find that expected term premia are (i) time-varying and reasonably persistent, (ii) strongly related to expectations about future output growth, and (iii) positively affected by uncertainty about future output growth...... and in ation rates. Expectations about real macroeconomic variables seem to matter more than expectations about nominal factors. Additional findings on term structure factors suggest that the level and slope factor capture information related to uncertainty about real and nominal macroeconomic prospects...

  14. Building innovative and creative character through mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suyitno, Hardi; Suyitno, Amin

    2018-03-01

    21st century is predicted as the century with rapid development in all aspects of life. People require creative and innovative character to exist. Specifically, mathematics has been given to students from the kindergarten until the middle school. Thus, building character through mathematics should begin since the early age. The problem is how to build creative and innovative character through mathematics education? The goal expected from this question is to build innovative and creative characters to face the challenges of the 21st century. This article discusses the values of mathematics, the values in mathematics education, innovative and creative character, and the integration of these values in teaching mathematics that support the innovative and creative character building, and applying the values in structurely programmed, measurable, and applicable learning activities.

  15. ENERGY MANAGEMENT INNOVATION IN THE US SKI INDUSTRY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ski areas represent a unique opportunity to develop innovative energy management practices in an industrial setting. Through a unique synergy of onsite generation, preferably by renewable sources and innovative technologies, and the energy storage potential of exis...

  16. Motivational Antecedents of Individual Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picci, Patrizia; Battistelli, Adalgisa

    The current work seeks to focus on the innovative work behavior and, in particular, on the stage of idea generation. An important factor that stimulates the individual to carry out the various emergent processes of change and innovation within the organization is known as intrinsic motivation, but under certain conditions, the presence of different forms of extrinsic motivation, as external regulation, introjection, identification and integration, positively influences innovative behavior at work, specifically the creative stage of the process. Starting from this evidence, the organizational environment could be capable of stimulating or indeed inhibiting potential creativity and innovation of individuals. About 100 individuals employees of a local government health department in Central Italy were given an explicit questionnaire. The results show that among external factors that effect the individual such as control, rewards and recognition for work well done, controlled motivation influences overall innovative behavior whereas autonomous motivation plays a significant role in the specific behavior of idea generation. At the same time, it must also be acknowledged that a clearly articulated task which allows an individual to identify with said task, seems to favor overall innovative behavior, whilst a task which allows a fair degree of autonomy influences the behavior of generating ideas.

  17. User Innovation Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kanstrup, Anne Marie; Bertelsen, Pernille

    User Innovation Management (UIM) is a method for fo-opereation with users in innovation projects. The UIM method emphasizes the practice of a participatorty attitude.......User Innovation Management (UIM) is a method for fo-opereation with users in innovation projects. The UIM method emphasizes the practice of a participatorty attitude....

  18. Education and Social Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Palle

    The working paper is an attempt to structure the issue of education and social innovation and indicate topics that can be investigated further. Three aspects are outlined, the contribution of social innovation in educational provision, the educative dimension of social innovation and the issue...... of education for social innovation....

  19. Innovation and collective entrepreneurship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spear, Roger

    2012-01-01

    different perspectives on innovation and social innovation and the dynamic interaction through collective entrepreneurship in the the social and solidarity economy; bringing out process and outcome dimensions of innovation. And it will develop an understanding of the drivers and barriers to innovation...

  20. Entrepreneurship, Innovation and Institutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stam, E.; Nooteboom, B.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the nature of entrepreneurship and its relation to innovation along a cycle in which exploration and exploration follow upon each other. We place the roles of entrepreneurship in innovation policy within this cycle of innovation. Different types of innovation along the cycle of

  1. Differentiating innovation priorities among stakeholder in hospital care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambooij, Mattijs S; Hummel, Marjan J

    2013-08-16

    Decisions to adopt a particular innovation may vary between stakeholders because individual stakeholders may disagree on the costs and benefits involved. This may translate to disagreement between stakeholders on priorities in the implementation process, possibly explaining the slow diffusion of innovations in health care. In this study, we explore the differences in stakeholder preferences for innovations, and quantify the difference in stakeholder priorities regarding costs and benefits. The decision support technique called the analytic hierarchy process was used to quantify the preferences of stakeholders for nine information technology (IT) innovations in hospital care. The selection of the innovations was based on a literature review and expert judgments. Decision criteria related to the costs and benefits of the innovations were defined. These criteria were improvement in efficiency, health gains, satisfaction with care process, and investments required. Stakeholders judged the importance of the decision criteria and subsequently prioritized the selected IT innovations according to their expectations of how well the innovations would perform for these decision criteria. The stakeholder groups (patients, nurses, physicians, managers, health care insurers, and policy makers) had different preference structures for the innovations selected. For instance, self-tests were one of the innovations most preferred by health care insurers and managers, owing to their expected positive impacts on efficiency and health gains. However, physicians, nurses and patients strongly doubted the health gains of self-tests, and accordingly ranked self-tests as the least-preferred innovation. The various stakeholder groups had different expectations of the value of the nine IT innovations. The differences are likely due to perceived stakeholder benefits of each innovation, and less to the costs to individual stakeholder groups. This study provides a first exploratory quantitative

  2. A REVIEW OF TOURISM AND HOSPITALITY INNOVATION RESEARCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NAGY Andrea

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Innovation plays a vital role in a company’s development and in helping it keep up with new technologies and customers’ highest expectations. A large number of publications on tourism innovation reflect the interest of many authors in this topic. In the past few years several authors have approached tourism innovation, developed models of innovation in tourism, analyzed innovation types or the factors that influence innovation in this field. The purpose of this paper is to review the existing literature on tourism innovation and to identify the main research tendencies in this area of interest. Therefore, we searched for keywords like “tourism innovation”, “hospitality innovation” or “service innovation” in several databases such as Science Direct, Emerald, Sage Publications and The Center for Hospitality Research of Cornell University. Because this study focuses on tourism and hospitality innovation, there were analyzed 17 research papers regarding these aspects. Relevant findings such as factors that influence innovation in tourism and hospitality (hotels’ size, category and chain structure, introduction of ICTs, employee involvement and commitment, customer or guest requests etc., types of innovation implemented in this area and correlations between innovations’ success and hotel performance were highlighted.

  3. [European innovation partnership on active and healthy aging: moving from policy to action].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Lizana, Francisca

    2013-01-01

    Demographic change and aging are a common challenge in Europe. The rising number of elderly people will need support at home, and will consume more healthcare services, putting further pressure on the welfare system. Collaborative, integrated and people-centered care provision, whether in hospitals, homes or in the community, is a way forward to sustainable and efficient care systems. Innovative treatments to address chronic diseases and the functional decline of older people will enable them to live longer in better health and with a better quality of life. To fully unleash the potential of aging in the European Union, the European Commission -within its Innovation Union policy- launched the first European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (EIP AHA). Promoting engagement and partnerships among all stakeholders in the healthcare chain is essential. This article describes the theoretical foundations, the development and expectations of the initiative, and its first actions. Copyright © 2012 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. Innovation Across the Supply Chain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Druehl, Cheryl; Carrillo, Janice; Hsuan, Juliana

    Innovation is an integral part of every firm’s ongoing operations. Beyond product innovation, supply chain innovations offer a unique source of competitive advantage. We synthesize recent research on innovation in the supply chain, specifically, innovative supply chain processes...

  5. Sources of Information as Determinants of Product and Process Innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Jaime; Salazar, Idana; Vargas, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we use a panel of manufacturing firms in Spain to examine the extent to which they use internal and external sources of information (customers, suppliers, competitors, consultants and universities) to generate product and process innovation. Our results show that, although internal sources are influential, external sources of information are key to achieve innovation performance. These results are in line with the open innovation literature because they show that firms that are opening up their innovation process and that use different information sources have a greater capacity to generate innovations. We also find that the importance of external sources of information varies depending on the type of innovation (product or process) considered. To generate process innovation, firms mainly rely on suppliers while, to generate product innovation, the main contribution is from customers. The potential simultaneity between product and process innovation is also taken into consideration. We find that the generation of both types of innovation is not independent.

  6. Sources of Information as Determinants of Product and Process Innovation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Gómez

    Full Text Available In this paper we use a panel of manufacturing firms in Spain to examine the extent to which they use internal and external sources of information (customers, suppliers, competitors, consultants and universities to generate product and process innovation. Our results show that, although internal sources are influential, external sources of information are key to achieve innovation performance. These results are in line with the open innovation literature because they show that firms that are opening up their innovation process and that use different information sources have a greater capacity to generate innovations. We also find that the importance of external sources of information varies depending on the type of innovation (product or process considered. To generate process innovation, firms mainly rely on suppliers while, to generate product innovation, the main contribution is from customers. The potential simultaneity between product and process innovation is also taken into consideration. We find that the generation of both types of innovation is not independent.

  7. Sources of Information as Determinants of Product and Process Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we use a panel of manufacturing firms in Spain to examine the extent to which they use internal and external sources of information (customers, suppliers, competitors, consultants and universities) to generate product and process innovation. Our results show that, although internal sources are influential, external sources of information are key to achieve innovation performance. These results are in line with the open innovation literature because they show that firms that are opening up their innovation process and that use different information sources have a greater capacity to generate innovations. We also find that the importance of external sources of information varies depending on the type of innovation (product or process) considered. To generate process innovation, firms mainly rely on suppliers while, to generate product innovation, the main contribution is from customers. The potential simultaneity between product and process innovation is also taken into consideration. We find that the generation of both types of innovation is not independent. PMID:27035456

  8. Heterogeneous inflation expectations and learning

    OpenAIRE

    Madeira, Carlos; Zafar, Basit

    2012-01-01

    Using the panel component of the Michigan Survey of Consumers, we estimate a learning model of inflation expectations, allowing for heterogeneous use of both private information and lifetime inflation experience. “Life-experience inflation” has a significant impact on individual expectations, but only for one-year-ahead inflation. Public information is substantially more relevant for longer-horizon expectations. Even controlling for life-experience inflation and public information, idiosyncra...

  9. Expectations on Track? High School Tracking and Adolescent Educational Expectations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlson, Kristian Bernt

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the role of adaptation in expectation formation processes by analyzing how educational tracking in high schools affects adolescents' educational expectations. I argue that adolescents view track placement as a signal about their academic abilities and respond to it in terms...... of modifying their educational expectations. Applying a difference-in-differences approach to the National Educational Longitudinal Study of 1988, I find that being placed in an advanced or honors class in high school positively affects adolescents’ expectations, particularly if placement is consistent across...... subjects and if placement contradicts tracking experiences in middle school. My findings support the hypothesis that adolescents adapt their educational expectations to ability signals sent by schools....

  10. A systematic approach to organizational expectations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGarry, M.; Hill, T.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes a new approach to human performance management that we at OHN are testing. We believe that our attainment of nuclear excellence has been limited by an over-emphasis on the technological component of improvement as compared to the human contribution factor. To achieve legitimate success in technological innovation, we feel that it must be coupled with innovation in human performance management. Our attempts to do so involve: developing Nuclear Excellence right into the job; regularly measuring job behaviours as an assessment of the effectiveness of our system; and establishing close internal partnerships to facilitate this system of human performance management. Explicit definition and measurement of job behaviour are dominant elements in our process. We employed the following steps to achieve an acceptable, measurable job analysis: Reviewed internal and international criteria to define a set of expected behaviours; attained management consensus about the meaning and links to the workplace of these behaviours; solicited feedback from those who perform these behaviours; created a computer-based survey to collect information on actual conditions and likely root causes; and defined the strategic information that the survey would deliver. As well, the links between this process and other Human Resources functions were identified for future investigation. 3 figs

  11. Is Poland an Innovative Country?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chybowska, Dorota; Chybowski, Leszek; Souchkov, Valeri

    2018-03-01

    The potential for innovativeness is difficult to measure, though many have attempted to do so. In order to look at Poland's innovation potential, its current position and its opportunity to grow, compared with developing and developed countries, this study analysed the patent statistics of the Polish and European Patent Offices. Poland has been a member of the European Union for over a decade now. Therefore, we took into consideration the statistics for patent applications and grants for the last decade, up to the first quarter of 2016. The questions we wanted to answer concerned not only the technology fields that Poland patented its inventions in, but also the types of patent grantees and applicants. In order to determine why Poland is still considered to be only a moderate innovator by the Innovation Union Scoreboard, we also gathered information on Polish inventors abroad in 2015 and the first quarter of 2016, to see their number, technology fields, and types of patent grantees. Finally, we attempted to identify the main barriers that seem to inhibit Polish technology and innovation growth, despite significantly growing R&D intensities (up from 0.56 GDP and EUR 1,139 M in 2004 to 0.94 GDP and EUR 3,864 M in 2014).

  12. Innovative Conference Curriculum: Maximizing Learning and Professionalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyland, Nancy; Kranzow, Jeannine

    2012-01-01

    This action research study evaluated the potential of an innovative curriculum to move 73 graduate students toward professional development. The curriculum was grounded in the professional conference and utilized the motivation and expertise of conference presenters. This innovation required students to be more independent, act as a critical…

  13. Frugal innovation-past, present, and future

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brem, Alexander; Agarwal, Nivedita

    2017-01-01

    Over the last two decades, frugal innovations have garnered the attention ofmanagement scholars due to their high economic potential and rapidly growing adoption in businesses (George et al., 2012; Nakata & Weidner, 2012; Zeschky et al., 2011). This concept of frugal innovation has come a long wa...

  14. Diagnosing risks in product-innovation projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halman, Johannes I.M.; Keizer, J.A.

    A new method of diagnosing risks in product-innovation projects is introduced in the paper. The method is an improvement on existing risk methods used on product-innovation projects, such as potential problem analysis and failure mode and effects analysis. Technological, organizational and

  15. Diagnosing risks in product-innovation projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halman, J.I.M.; Keizer, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    A new method of diagnosing risks in product-innovation projects is introduced in the paper. The method is an improvement on existing risk methods used on product-innovation projects, such as potential problem analysis and failure mode and effects analysis. Technological, organizational and

  16. Innovation, Learning Organizations and Industrial Relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundvall, Bengt-Åke; Peter Nielsen, Peter

    and indirect participation much more frequently than the rest. As more sectors become exposed to the need to engage in incremental product and service innovation the economic potential of diffusing good practices in terms of organization and participation is growing and needs to be reflected in firm strategies...... and public policies aiming at promoting innovation and knowledge creation....

  17. Surgical innovations in canine gonadectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Goethem, Bart

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis some recent technological developments in human surgery are evaluated for their potential use in veterinary medicine by introducing them as surgical innovations for canine gonadectomy. Barbed sutures achieve wound apposition without surgical knot tying and thus avoid knot-associated

  18. Sustainability and Cities as Systems of Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnson, Bjørn; Lehmann, Martin

    Cities often constitute relevant environments for interactive learning and innovation potentially capable of tackling sustainability problems. In this paper we ask if the concept of systems of innovation can increase our understanding of city dynamics and help promoting the sustainable development...... of cities. Through a combination of the innovation system approach and the perspective of creative cities, we argue that a slightly modified concept – sustainable city systems of innovation – may be helpful in this context. To underline this, we discuss certain ‘city-traits’ of sustainability and conclude...

  19. Fertility expectations and residential mobility in Britain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Ermisch

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is plausible that people take into account anticipated changes in family size in choosing where to live. But estimation of the impact of anticipated events on current transitions in an event history framework is challenging because expectations must be measured in some way and, like indicators of past childbearing, expected future childbearing may be endogenous with respect to housing decisions. Objective: The objective of the study is to estimate how expected changes in family size affect residential movement in Great Britain in a way which addresses these challenges. Methods: We use longitudinal data from a mature 18-wave panel survey, the British Household Panel Survey, which incorporates a direct measure of fertility expectations. The statistical methods allow for the potential endogeneity of expectations in our estimation and testing framework. Results: We produce evidence consistent with the idea that past childbearing mainly affects residential mobility through expectations of future childbearing, not directly through the number of children in the household. But there is heterogeneity in response. In particular, fertility expectations have a much greater effect on mobility among women who face lower costs of mobility, such as private tenants. Conclusions: Our estimates indicate that expecting to have a(nother child in the future increases the probability of moving by about 0.036 on average, relative to an average mobility rate of 0.14 per annum in our sample. Contribution: Our contribution is to incorporate anticipation of future events into an empirical model of residential mobility. We also shed light on how childbearing affects mobility.

  20. Expectation-based intelligent control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zak, Michail

    2006-01-01

    New dynamics paradigms-negative diffusion and terminal attractors-are introduced to control noise and chaos. The applied control forces are composed of expectations governed by the associated Fokker-Planck and Liouville equations. The approach is expanded to a general concept of intelligent control via expectations. Relevance to control in livings is emphasized and illustrated by neural nets with mirror neurons

  1. Decomposing change in life expectancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaupel, James W.; Canudas Romo, Vladimir

    2003-01-01

    We extend Nathan Keyfitz's research on continuous change in life expectancy over time by presenting and proving a new formula for decomposing such change. The formula separates change in life expectancy over time into two terms. The first term captures the general effect of reduction in death rates...... in Sweden and Japan....

  2. Sibling Status Effects: Adult Expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskett, Linda Musun

    1985-01-01

    This study attempted to determine what expectations or beliefs adults might hold about a child based on his or her sibling status alone. Ratings on 50 adjective pairs for each of three sibling status types, only, oldest, and youngest child, were assessed in relation to adult expectations, birth order, and parental status of rater. (Author/DST)

  3. Innovation Types and Talent Management for Innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan A. Marin-Garcia

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Companies need to become innovative and in order to do so, they must learn how to be able to manage the talent of their workforce In this working paper we have reviewed the literature concerning the concept of innovation as a key for the challenge for change in companies to establish a synthesis and a classification of the types of innovation required. We propose a number of competencies needed by the different staff members (support, technicians, managers, etc as well, so that they can succeed in being innovative in different ways.

  4. Innovative Work Behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihl-Thingvad, Signe; Klausen, Kurt Klaudi

    work behaviour of the employees in a particular empirical setting. Innovative work behaviour has become an important concept in the literature on innovation. Theories on managing change and innovation in public service organizations would suggest that managers have several possibilities when ensuring...... the implementation of innovation. There is, however, still a gap (both empirical and theoretical) in the literature on how managers can contribute to and strengthen the employees’ innovative work behaviour in public service organizations. Therefore, we focus on the following research questions. Which management...... strategies are public managers using in order to create more innovative work behaviour? How do public managers create an innovative climate in the organization which affects the innovative work behaviour positively? In this paper we examine the implementation of innovation in a large Danish municipality...

  5. Disruptive Innovation in Numerical Hydrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waltz, Jacob I. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-09-06

    We propose the research and development of a high-fidelity hydrodynamic algorithm for tetrahedral meshes that will lead to a disruptive innovation in the numerical modeling of Laboratory problems. Our proposed innovation has the potential to reduce turnaround time by orders of magnitude relative to Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) codes; reduce simulation setup costs by millions of dollars per year; and effectively leverage Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) and future Exascale computing hardware. If successful, this work will lead to a dramatic leap forward in the Laboratory's quest for a predictive simulation capability.

  6. Balancing Absorptive Capacity and Inbound Open Innovation for Sustained Innovative Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bongsun, Kim; Kim, Eonsoo; Foss, Nicolai Juul

    2016-01-01

    How can a firm develop new ideas and turn them into profitable innovations on a sustained basis? We address this fundamental issue in a novel way by developing an integrative framework of absorptive capacity (AC) and inbound open innovation that is rooted in the attention-based view of the firm. We...... specifically address why a balance between open and closed innovation is important from the perspective of absorptive capacity, and show how it may be brought about. Pursuing either open or closed inbound innovation alone may result in an imbalance between potential AC and realized AC as well as inward......-looking AC and outward-looking AC, which will hinder innovative performance.We argue that practicing open and closed inbound innovation repeatedly and alternately by switching organizational attentions, and thus developing the associated AC, can facilitate balancing absorptive capacity and lead to innovative...

  7. JPL Innovation Foundry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, Brent; McCleese, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Space science missions are increasingly challenged today: in ambition, by increasingly sophisticated hypotheses tested; in development, by the increasing complexity of advanced technologies; in budgeting, by the decline of flagship-class mission opportunities; in management, by expectations for breakthrough science despite a risk-averse programmatic climate; and in planning, by increasing competition for scarce resources. How are the space-science missions of tomorrow being formulated? The paper describes the JPL Innovation Foundry, created in 2011, to respond to this evolving context. The Foundry integrates methods, tools, and experts that span the mission concept lifecycle. Grounded in JPL's heritage of missions, flight instruments, mission proposals, and concept innovation, the Foundry seeks to provide continuity of support and cost-effective, on-call access to the right domain experts at the right time, as science definition teams and Principal Investigators mature mission ideas from "cocktail napkin" to PDR. The Foundry blends JPL capabilities in proposal development and concurrent engineering, including Team X, with new approaches for open-ended concept exploration in earlier, cost-constrained phases, and with ongoing research and technology projects. It applies complexity and cost models, projectformulation lessons learned, and strategy analyses appropriate to each level of concept maturity. The Foundry is organizationally integrated with JPL formulation program offices; staffed by JPL's line organizations for engineering, science, and costing; and overseen by senior Laboratory leaders to assure experienced coordination and review. Incubation of each concept is tailored depending on its maturity and proposal history, and its highest leverage modeling and analysis needs.

  8. JPL Innovation Foundry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, Brent; McCleese, Daniel

    2013-08-01

    Space science missions are increasingly challenged today: in ambition, by increasingly sophisticated hypotheses tested; in development, by the increasing complexity of advanced technologies; in budgeting, by the decline of flagship-class mission opportunities; in management, by expectations for breakthrough science despite a risk-averse programmatic climate; and in planning, by increasing competition for scarce resources. How are the space-science missions of tomorrow being formulated? The paper describes the JPL Innovation Foundry, created in 2011, to respond to this evolving context. The Foundry integrates methods, tools, and experts that span the mission concept lifecycle. Grounded in JPL's heritage of missions, flight instruments, mission proposals, and concept innovation, the Foundry seeks to provide continuity of support and cost-effective, on-call access to the right domain experts at the right time, as science definition teams and Principal Investigators mature mission ideas from "cocktail napkin" to PDR. The Foundry blends JPL capabilities in proposal development and concurrent engineering, including Team X, with new approaches for open-ended concept exploration in earlier, cost-constrained phases, and with ongoing research and technology projects. It applies complexity and cost models, project-formulation lessons learned, and strategy analyses appropriate to each level of concept maturity. The Foundry is organizationally integrated with JPL formulation program offices; staffed by JPL's line organizations for engineering, science, and costing; and overseen by senior Laboratory leaders to assure experienced coordination and review. Incubation of each concept is tailored depending on its maturity and proposal history, and its highest-leverage modeling and analysis needs.

  9. Purchasing and Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanghøj, Astrid; Mols, Niels Peter

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we develop a number of hypotheses relating four purchasing capabilities to two measures of purchasings contribution to innovation. The hypotheses are tested with data collected through a websurvey completed by 321 purchasing professionals in Danish production companies. Our results...... show that integrative, relational, innovative,and intelligence capabilities are positively related to innovation. However, relational capabilities are not found to have significant effect on purchasings contribution to supply and practice innovation, i.e. new markets, new suppliers, and new purchasing...... practices. The relationship between intelligence capabilities and purchasings contribution to product and production innovations depends on the level of innovation capabilities....

  10. Triggering system innovation in agricultural innovation systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turner, James A.; Williams, Tracy; Nicholas, Graeme; Foote, Jeff; Rijswijk, Kelly; Barnard, Tim; Beechener, Sam; Horita, Akiko

    2017-01-01

    This article describes a process for stimulating engagement among change agents to develop a shared understanding of systemic problems in the agricultural innovation system (AIS), challenge prevalent institutional logics and identify actions they might undertake to stimulate system innovation.

  11. Organising for innovation in regional innovation systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brink, Tove

    2017-01-01

    The research in this paper reveals how organising the innovation ecosystem can enable the achievement of the aim for innovation and competiveness. The research was conducted from June 2014 to May 2015 using a qualitative deductive approach among operation & maintenance (O&M) actors in offshore wind...

  12. Producing Innovations : Determinants of Innovativity and Efficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, J.W.B.; van Lamoen, R.C.R.; Sanders, M.W.J.L.

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter, we investigate the knowledge production function, using the Community Innovation Survey, an unbalanced firm-level panel data set collected in the Netherlands between 1994 and 2004. This database allows us to span the entire innovation process from initial resources committed (R&D

  13. Recent innovations in IFR safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wade, D.C.

    1994-01-01

    Recent progress in IFR safety research suggests potential for two extensions of passive features to improve the robustness of safety response. This report provides a discussion of these recent innovations

  14. SECURITIES MARKET AS AN INDICATOR OF INNOVATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor M. Askinadze

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a potential possibility to use stock market Indices as an indicator of emerging innovative economy. The focal point is the significance of taking into account the stock market Indices’ dynamics and volatility.

  15. SECURITIES MARKET AS AN INDICATOR OF INNOVATION

    OpenAIRE

    Victor M. Askinadze

    2014-01-01

    The article presents a potential possibility to use stock market Indices as an indicator of emerging innovative economy. The focal point is the significance of taking into account the stock market Indices’ dynamics and volatility.

  16. Small Firm Internationalization, Innovation, and Growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boermans, M.A.; Roelfsema, H.J.

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies the effect of internationalization on innovation and firm performance (employment growth and sales growth) taking the interdependencies among the variables into account. Given the potential endogeneity, this study uses theory-driven instrumental variables and structural equation

  17. Promoting entrepreneurship and innovation in Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leendert de Bell

    2012-01-01

    The potential contribution of entrepreneurship to economic development has been widely acknowledged . Entrepreneurs do not only create employment, productivity, competition and economic growth, but also accelerate the generation, dissemination and application of innovative ideas, through developing

  18. Innovation in education, ICT and pioneer teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Bocconi

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Reflections on the role of "pioneer teachers" as a potential key figure in the innovation process of the school, with particular reference to the European Framework Programme project Ulearn eLearning.

  19. Artificial Intelligence and Public Healthcare Service Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Tara Qian; Medaglia, Rony

    Public healthcare ecosystems are complex networks of diverse actors that are subject to pressures to innovate, also a result of technological advancements. Artificial Intelligence (AI), in particular, has the potential to transform the way hospitals, doctors, patients, government agencies...

  20. German innovation initiative for nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieke, Volker; Bachmann, Gerd

    2004-10-01

    In many areas of nanotechnology, Germany can count on a good knowledge basis due to its diverse activities in nanosciences. This knowledge basis, when paired with the production and sales structures needed for implementation and the internationally renowned German talent for system integration, should consequently lead to success in the marketplace. And this is exactly the field of application for the innovation initiative "Nanotechnologie erobert Märkte" (nanotechnology conquers markets) and for the new BMBF strategy in support of nanotechnology. Until now, aspects of nanotechnology have been advanced within the confines of their respective technical subject areas. However, the primary aim of incorporating them into an overall national strategy is to build on Germany's well-developed and internationally competitive research in science and technology to tap the potential of Germany's important industrial sectors for the application of nanotechnology through joint research projects (leading-edge innovations) that strategically target the value-added chain. This development is to be supported by government education policy to remedy a threatening shortage of skilled professionals. To realize that goal, forward-looking political policymaking must become oriented to a uniform concept of innovation, one that takes into consideration all facets of new technological advances that can contribute to a new culture of innovation in Germany. And that includes education and research policy as well as a climate that encourages and supports innovation in science, business and society.

  1. German innovation initiative for nanotechnology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieke, Volker; Bachmann, Gerd

    2004-01-01

    In many areas of nanotechnology, Germany can count on a good knowledge basis due to its diverse activities in nanosciences. This knowledge basis, when paired with the production and sales structures needed for implementation and the internationally renowned German talent for system integration, should consequently lead to success in the marketplace. And this is exactly the field of application for the innovation initiative 'Nanotechnologie erobert Maerkte' (nanotechnology conquers markets) and for the new BMBF strategy in support of nanotechnology. Until now, aspects of nanotechnology have been advanced within the confines of their respective technical subject areas. However, the primary aim of incorporating them into an overall national strategy is to build on Germany's well-developed and internationally competitive research in science and technology to tap the potential of Germany's important industrial sectors for the application of nanotechnology through joint research projects (leading-edge innovations) that strategically target the value-added chain. This development is to be supported by government education policy to remedy a threatening shortage of skilled professionals. To realize that goal, forward-looking political policymaking must become oriented to a uniform concept of innovation, one that takes into consideration all facets of new technological advances that can contribute to a new culture of innovation in Germany. And that includes education and research policy as well as a climate that encourages and supports innovation in science, business and society

  2. Environment based innovation: policy questions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Rui Silva

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Natural resources and physical cultural resources, referred to in this paper as “Environmental Resources”, can be important assets for regional competitiveness and innovation. In recent years, these types of assets have been increasingly taken into consideration in the design and implementation of regional development strategies, as a consequence of their potential role as a source of differentiation and of new competitive advantages. However, in contrast to environmental policies, which usually focus on the protection of the environment, innovation policies and their instruments are largely shaped by, and geared towards, knowledge-based innovation.In this paper, we discuss the role played by environmental resources in the context of regional innovation policies. We begin by discussing the relationship between environmental resources and regional development, and by emphasizing some contrasting views with regard to the function of environmental resources in regional development. Then, we address the relationship between regional competitive advantages and innovation strategies. The specific issues and problems that arise whenever the aim is to attain competitive advantages through the valorisation of environmental resources constitute the core of section III. In that section, we highlight the specific characteristics of environmental resources and we discuss the applicability of the “natural resource curse” argument to the dynamics based on the valorisation of environmental resources. The reasons that justify public interventionas well as the difficulties concerning the adequate level of intervention (local / regional / national are also examined. The paper ends with some conclusions and policy implications.

  3. Global Health Innovation Technology Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly Harding

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Chronic technology and business process disparities between High Income, Low Middle Income and Low Income (HIC, LMIC, LIC research collaborators directly prevent the growth of sustainable Global Health innova‐ tion for infectious and rare diseases. There is a need for an Open Source-Open Science Architecture Framework to bridge this divide. We are proposing such a framework for consideration by the Global Health community, by utiliz‐ ing a hybrid approach of integrating agnostic Open Source technology and healthcare interoperability standards and Total Quality Management principles. We will validate this architecture framework through our programme called Project Orchid. Project Orchid is a conceptual Clinical Intelligence Exchange and Virtual Innovation platform utilizing this approach to support clinical innovation efforts for multi-national collaboration that can be locally sustainable for LIC and LMIC research cohorts. The goal is to enable LIC and LMIC research organizations to acceler‐ ate their clinical trial process maturity in the field of drug discovery, population health innovation initiatives and public domain knowledge networks. When sponsored, this concept will be tested by 12 confirmed clinical research and public health organizations in six countries. The potential impact of this platform is reduced drug discovery and public health innovation lag time and improved clinical trial interventions, due to reliable clinical intelligence and bio-surveillance across all phases of the clinical innovation process.

  4. Dialysis centers - what to expect

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... kidneys - dialysis centers; Dialysis - what to expect; Renal replacement therapy - dialysis centers; End-stage renal disease - dialysis ... to a tube that connects to the dialysis machine. Your blood will flow through the tube, into ...

  5. Life expectancy in bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Vedel; Vradi, Eleni; Andersen, Per Kragh

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Life expectancy in patients with bipolar disorder has been reported to be decreased by 11 to 20 years. These calculations are based on data for individuals at the age of 15 years. However, this may be misleading for patients with bipolar disorder in general as most patients have a later...... onset of illness. The aim of the present study was to calculate the remaining life expectancy for patients of different ages with a diagnosis of bipolar disorder. METHODS: Using nationwide registers of all inpatient and outpatient contacts to all psychiatric hospitals in Denmark from 1970 to 2012 we...... remaining life expectancy in bipolar disorder and that of the general population decreased with age, indicating that patients with bipolar disorder start losing life-years during early and mid-adulthood. CONCLUSIONS: Life expectancy in bipolar disorder is decreased substantially, but less so than previously...

  6. FastStats: Life Expectancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What's this? Submit What's this? Submit Button NCHS Home ... expectancy at birth, at 65, and 75 years of age by sex, race and Hispanic origin Health, United States 2016, table 15 [PDF – 9.8 MB] Life ...

  7. Physical activity extends life expectancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leisure-time physical activity is associated with longer life expectancy, even at relatively low levels of activity and regardless of body weight, according to a study by a team of researchers led by the NCI.

  8. Innovating innovation Policy. Rethinking green innovation policy in evolutionary perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arentsen, Maarten J.; Dinica, V.; Marquart, N.E.

    1999-01-01

    Advanced environmental standards such as sustainability require substantial improvements in the environmental performances of present technologies. Governments are faced with the challenge to design green innovation policies able to support producers and users of technologies to comply with such

  9. Subjective expected utility without preferences

    OpenAIRE

    Bouyssou , Denis; Marchant , Thierry

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes a theory of subjective expected utility based on primitives only involving the fact that an act can be judged either "attractive" or "unattractive". We give conditions implying that there are a utility function on the set of consequences and a probability distribution on the set of states such that attractive acts have a subjective expected utility above some threshold. The numerical representation that is obtained has strong uniqueness properties.

  10. Innovations, status, and networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Wang (Pengfei)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractTo obtain and maintain competitive advantage, firms need to implement appropriate innovation strategies (i.e. exploration or exploitation) and acquire status in external networks. In this dissertation, I investigate how innovation strategy, status, and network structure jointly

  11. Detecting Social Innovation agency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pel, Bonno; Dorland, Jens; Wittmayer, Julia

    2017-01-01

    Considering that it is important for the social innovation research field to confront its methodological challenges, this contribution addresses the challenge of choosing appropriate units of analysis. In processes of transformative social innovation, the agency is distributed and therefore...

  12. Innovation and STEM Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Julia Link

    2015-01-01

    How do schools with a focus on science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fit in with state goals to increase innovation and to boost the economy? This article briefly discusses how educators can encourage creativity and innovation.

  13. Pathfinder Innovation Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Pathfinder program supports high-risk, high-reward research ideas with funding and staff time. The goal is to feed a culture of innovation in the Agency and integrate innovative ideas in EPA research programs.

  14. Management Innovation Capabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harder, Mie

    Management innovation is the implementation of a new management practice, process, technique or structure that significantly alters the way the work of management is performed. This paper presents a typology categorizing management innovation along two dimensions; radicalness and complexity. Then...

  15. Roadmap for Inclusive Innovation

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — The Roadmap for Inclusive Innovation data set shares the status of action items under the Roadmap for Inclusive Innovation. Each action or project has been assigned...

  16. Diversity and Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Christian Richter; Timmermans, Bram; Kristinsson, Kári

    2007-01-01

    Denne metoderapport udgør og beskriver den kvantitative analyse, som er grundlaget for kapitel 6 og appendiks 2 i Forsknings- og Innovationsstyrelsens rapport om Innovation og mangfoldighed - Ny viden og erfaringer med medarbejderdreven innovation...

  17. [Medical doctors driving technological innovation: questions about and innovation management approaches to incentive structures for lead users].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnet-Joschko, Sabine; Kientzler, Fionn

    2010-01-01

    Management science defines user-generated innovations as open innovation and lead user innovation. The medical technology industry finds user-generated innovations profitable and even indispensable. Innovative medical doctors as lead users need medical technology innovations in order to improve patient care. Their motivation to innovate is mostly intrinsic. But innovations may also involve extrinsic motivators such as gain in reputation or monetary incentives. Medical doctors' innovative activities often take place in hospitals and are thus embedded into the hospital's organisational setting. Hospitals find it difficult to gain short-term profits from in-house generated innovations and sometimes hesitate to support them. Strategic investment in medical doctors' innovative activities may be profitable for hospitals in the long run if innovations provide first-mover competitive advantages. Industry co-operations with innovative medical doctors offer chances but also bear potential risks. Innovative ideas generated by expert users may result in even higher complexity of medical devices; this could cause mistakes when applied by less specialised users and thus affect patient safety. Innovations that yield benefits for patients, medical doctors, hospitals and the medical technology industry can be advanced by offering adequate support for knowledge transfer and co-operation models.

  18. Innovating for sustainability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The theme of the articles is innovating for sustainability. Empirically the articles shows how enterprises makes environmental innovations related to their processes and products within the organic dairy industry, the fish processing industry and the car industry.......The theme of the articles is innovating for sustainability. Empirically the articles shows how enterprises makes environmental innovations related to their processes and products within the organic dairy industry, the fish processing industry and the car industry....

  19. Inside Real Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    investors, innovators and people in corporations , universities and government. This breakthrough book gives a ground-floor view of the innovation...investors, innovators and people in corporations , universities and government. INSIDE REAL INNOVATION - How the Right Approach Can Move Ideas from R...shop phenomenon, pioneered by Starbucks and others, was based not on selling coffee but on giving the patrons a congenial setting.) At any rate

  20. Bureaucracy and Innovation Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, Mia Koss; Koss Hartmann, Rasmus

    , but by problematizing the relationship directly. Inspired by prior ethnographic studies of coercive bureaucracies and theories of secrecy and hiding behavior, we propose that coercive bureaucracies do not necessarily impede innovation, but rather create the appearance of doing so. Coercive bureaucracies create......, supplemented by innovation histories, surveys and expert evaluations. This argument implies that future research examines more deeply the organizational processes and practices by which innovation might occur even in coercive bureaucracies. Further, it encourages innovation research methods that rely less...

  1. Innovation at DARPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Distribution Statement A: Approved for Public Release, Distribution Unlimited Innovation at DARPA July 2016 1 Distribution...Statement A: Approved for Public Release, Distribution Unlimited Innovation at DARPA A Long History of Innovation DARPA, the Defense Advanced Research...guided work that has “changed the world"—a phrase frequently heard at DARPA to ensure a focus on transformative innovation as opposed to incremental

  2. Innovation without Design?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinheiro-Croisel, Rebecca; Hernes, Tor

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores innovation and social behaviourist theory in relation to sustainable urban projects in the highly institutionalized public sector (towns). Using empirical data from France, we examine the dynamics of a design process in which unexpected practices generated innovative urban...... into a movement of collective action, which presupposed the acquisition of a new identity. Ultimately, our objective is to combine social behaviourist theory and innovation theory and to facilitate innovative design in urban projects....

  3. Strategy of technical innovation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ga Jong

    1990-12-01

    This book deals with policy of scientific technique and technical innovation such as research for development and types of technical innovation, historical development and process of technical innovation, economic growth, technology change and investment for research and development, structure and form of technical transfer with the meaning process, from, structure and theory, economic growth and investment of research and development with experiential analysis and case study on strategy of technical innovation in electron and fine chemical industry.

  4. Social Innovation Europe: Country Summary: Poland. Social Innovation in Poland

    OpenAIRE

    Klimczuk, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    The history of social innovation in country, challenges being addressed by social innovation. the key actors, who is promoting social innovation. A few of the key projects that illustrate social innovation.

  5. Branching innovation, recombinant innovation, and endogenous technological transitions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frenken, K.; Izquierdo, L.; Zeppini, P.

    2012-01-01

    We propose a model of technological transitions based on two different types of innovations. Branching innovations refer to technological improvements along a particular path, while recombinant innovations represent fusions of multiple paths. Recombinant innovations create "short-cuts" which reduce

  6. ROMANIA: MANY ENTREPRENEURS BUT FEW INNOVATORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Badulescu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Entrepreneurship is considered an essential element for the development and prosperity of contemporary economies. The already known traits: creating jobs, boosting growth, revenues to the state budget, are supplemented by vitality and adaptability, and not least, a capacity for innovation. Thus, innovation became one of the most important factors in the companies’ activity. However, innovation doesn’t only mean new products and services. It is closely related to the capacity of entrepreneurs and managers to apply new business models, embedding an organizational culture capable to identify how new ideas could be converted into value for business and society. Innovation supports the efforts of ambitious entrepreneurs to pursue their objectives and stimulate other potential entrepreneurs to enter into businesses. Innovation generates, directly and indirectly, positive effects not only within a company but also within the national economy, as a whole. Despite this empirical evidence, the link between entrepreneurship and innovation is difficult to describe, to introduce it in strong theoretical models, in order to substantiate viable political programs. First, only a relatively small part of entrepreneurs really innovate. Secondly, researchers reveal deep, but subtle, ties between the entrepreneurs’ profile, availability for innovation and effects on states’ competitiveness and prosperity. Finally, the number (or proportion of entrepreneurs isn’t the most relevant, but their availability to innovate, the type of innovation chosen and, especially, how entrepreneurial organizations stimulate innovative initiatives among their employees (intrapreneurship. From this point of view, Romania's situation is difficult and challenging. The importance and size of the sector, entrepreneurial motivations, or the share of early stage innovative entrepreneurs indicate an average position at a global or European Union (EU level. However, Romania is a

  7. 10 rules for managing global innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Keeley; Doz, Yves L

    2012-10-01

    More and more companies recognize that their dispersed, global operations are a treasure trove of ideas and capabilities for innovation. But it's proving harder than expected to unearth those ideas or exploit those capabilities. Part of the problem is that companies manage global innovation the same way they manage traditional, single-location projects. Single-location projects draw on a large reservoir of tacit knowledge, shared context, and trust that global projects lack. The management challenge, therefore, is to replicate the positive aspects of colocation while harnessing the opportunities of dispersion. In this article, Insead's Wilson and Doz draw on research into global strategy and innovation to present a set of guidelines for setting up and managing global innovation. They explore in detail the challenges that make global projects inherently different and show how these can be overcome by applying superior project management skills across teams, fostering a strong collaborative culture, and using a robust array of communications tools.

  8. Emissions trading and innovation in the German electricity industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cames, Martin

    2010-07-01

    One major objective of the introduction of emissions trading in the European Union was to promote innovation towards mitigating climate change. Focusing on the German electricity industry, the extent to which this objective has been achieved up to now and how the design of the trading scheme could be improved towards achieving the intended objective shall be analyzed in this thesis. These questions are tackled in the thesis from a theoretical and an empirical perspective. The theoretical analysis was largely based on neoclassical environmental economics by using an algebraic model which allowed for comparison of the relevant companies' profits under various configurations of the analyzed design options. The empirical analysis was grounded on two surveys of the electricity industry - one before the start of emissions trading, the other after two and a half years of experience - which enabled identification of the concrete changes in the companies' perceptions and attitudes towards innovation due to the introduction of emissions trading. The analysis reveals some indications that the instrument has basically functioned as originally intended although it has certainly not yet developed its full potential in terms of promoting innovation towards a more climate friendly electricity system. From an environmental innovation perspective the following improvements are essential: (1) Closure provisions should be abolished as soon as possible because they basically extend the lifetime of old installations and thus rather delay innovation. (2) Fuel-specific allocation to new entrants should also be abandoned since it eliminates - at least partly - the incentives to shift investments towards technologies which use more carbon friendly fuels such as natural gas or biomass. (3) Introducing full auctioning for the electricity industry would remedy both of the above-mentioned weaknesses and at the same time eliminate the windfall profit generated by free allocation of allowances

  9. Emissions trading and innovation in the German electricity industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cames, Martin

    2010-07-01

    One major objective of the introduction of emissions trading in the European Union was to promote innovation towards mitigating climate change. Focusing on the German electricity industry, the extent to which this objective has been achieved up to now and how the design of the trading scheme could be improved towards achieving the intended objective shall be analyzed in this thesis. These questions are tackled in the thesis from a theoretical and an empirical perspective. The theoretical analysis was largely based on neoclassical environmental economics by using an algebraic model which allowed for comparison of the relevant companies' profits under various configurations of the analyzed design options. The empirical analysis was grounded on two surveys of the electricity industry - one before the start of emissions trading, the other after two and a half years of experience - which enabled identification of the concrete changes in the companies' perceptions and attitudes towards innovation due to the introduction of emissions trading. The analysis reveals some indications that the instrument has basically functioned as originally intended although it has certainly not yet developed its full potential in terms of promoting innovation towards a more climate friendly electricity system. From an environmental innovation perspective the following improvements are essential: (1) Closure provisions should be abolished as soon as possible because they basically extend the lifetime of old installations and thus rather delay innovation. (2) Fuel-specific allocation to new entrants should also be abandoned since it eliminates - at least partly - the incentives to shift investments towards technologies which use more carbon friendly fuels such as natural gas or biomass. (3) Introducing full auctioning for the electricity industry would remedy both of the above-mentioned weaknesses and at the same time eliminate the windfall profit generated by free allocation of

  10. The objective of this program is to develop innovative DNA detection technologies to achieve fast microbial community assessment. The specific approaches are (1) to develop inexpensive and reliable sequence-proof hybridization DNA detection technology (2) to develop quantitative DNA hybridization technology for microbial community assessment and (3) to study the microbes which have demonstrated the potential to have nuclear waste bioremediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Chung H.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this program is to develop innovative DNA detection technologies to achieve fast microbial community assessment. The specific approaches are (1) to develop inexpensive and reliable sequence-proof hybridization DNA detection technology (2) to develop quantitative DNA hybridization technology for microbial community assessment and (3) to study the microbes which have demonstrated the potential to have nuclear waste bioremediation

  11. The Exploration of Design Driven Innovation as a Dynamic Capability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philips Kembaren

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Innovation enables companies to attain consistent organic growth that brings benefits to stakeholders. Designthinking approach in innovation has been emergent to be an alternative to technological development path inorder to generate competitive and successful product or service in the market place. Design driven innovationcombines functional and semantic dimensions of products or services in the marketplace. Previous researchhas recently revealed practices of design driven innovation in various industries. However, little is known tothe extent that companies in Indonesia practicing design driven innovation. A theoretical framework withperspective from dynamic capability theoretical lens and guided by Dubin’s theory building methodology isproposed to explain the constructs and role of design in the process of innovation. The research is expected tocontribute a new construct to the existing framework, namely construct that related to how we could assessthe value of the design-driven innovation output, perceived by the costumers.Keywords: design driven innovation, dynamic capabilities, theory building

  12. China's Innovation Paradox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    China aims to become an innovation-led nation by 2020, but its leadership is generally sceptical--and oftentimes hostile--to the market forces, open exchange of ideas, and creative destruction that have unlocked innovation in other countries. Instead, Beijing hopes to promote innovation in China through a massive expansion in higher education,…

  13. Technical innovation and management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Yang Cheol

    1982-08-15

    This book gives explanations of the conception of technical innovation, development plan in Korea, connection between technology and a growth factor in national income, problem of technical innovation in developing country, analysis on cooperation between a developed country and a developing country, evaluation and strategy of technical development in Korea, technical innovation of industry, management of technical industry, analysis of special condition in Korea.

  14. Technical innovation and management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Yang Cheol

    1982-08-01

    This book gives explanations of the conception of technical innovation, development plan in Korea, connection between technology and a growth factor in national income, problem of technical innovation in developing country, analysis on cooperation between a developed country and a developing country, evaluation and strategy of technical development in Korea, technical innovation of industry, management of technical industry, analysis of special condition in Korea.

  15. Business Model Innovation Leadership

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgren, Peter

    2012-01-01

    When SME´s practice business model (BM) innovation (BMI), leading strategically BMs through the innovation process can be the difference between success and failure to a BM. Business Model Innovation Leadership (BMIL) is however extremely complex to carry out especially to small and medium size...

  16. Innovate or Die.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jagersma, P.K.

    2003-01-01

    Concentrates on innovation as an under-exploited path to success in the business community, though reckons becoming innovative is not easy. Suggests innovative companies have a number of common characteristics, which are ten strategies to be implemented to create success, these are listed in full.

  17. Adoption of Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This edited volume brings together academics from both innovation and marketing fields to explore the additional value for companies that can be generated with the innovations in marketing and the marketing of innovations. If ideas need to reach the marketplace, then marketing strategies, concept...

  18. Innovation and Outdoor Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beames, Simon

    2017-01-01

    Within our fast-paced, fluid society, it is arguable that outdoor education needs to be innovative to play a useful role in young people's overall educational enterprise. A critical view, however, would suggest that we must beware of accepting technological innovation for its own sake. Innovations (or improvements) in education can take the form…

  19. Complexities in innovation management in companies from the European industry. A path model of innovation project performance determinants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tepic, M.; Kemp, R.G.M.; Omta, S.W.F.; Fortuin, F.T.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to provide an integrated framework of complex relations among innovation characteristics, organizational capabilities, innovation potential and innovation performance. Design/methodology/approach – The model is tested using partial least squares (PLS) modeling

  20. Innovative Railway Stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzepnicka, Sylwia; Załuski, Daniel

    2017-10-01

    In relation to modern demographic trends, evolving technologies and environment-friendly solutions increases the potential of rail considered as sustainable form of public transport. Contemporary tendencies of designing railway stations in Europe are focused on lowering energy consumption and reducing carbon emission. The main goal of the designers is to create a friendly and intuitive space for its users and at the same time a building that uses renewable energy sources and minimizes negative impact on the environment by the increase of biologically active areas, reuse of rainwater and greywater, innovative heating and cooling solutions and reduction of energy losses. The optimisation of a life circle in railway architecture introduces new approach to passenger service. Examples mentioned in the content of this article help to synthesize changes in approach to the design within the context of sustainability.

  1. Results of measurement procedure of innovation maturity of business

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Kozlova

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article the basic approaches of innovation maturity of business has been applied. The realization procedure of innovation maturity as an example of organizations of Perm’s region has been call attention. The preliminary potential assessments of perception of plans innovations will give optimize selection innovative strategy for organization and increase the effectiveness of business for microeconomics and region’s level.

  2. The methodological features of managing the value of companies introducing "green" innovations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kharin Alexander

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Although it is a common assumption that innovations are one of the most important factors of economic development, there is a need to review some provisions of innovation methodology so that new fundamental values are taken into account more fully. Most recent business models are based on the depletion of natural environment, whose potential has been almost exhausted. It is necessary to introduce new ideas that are of use for society and create values for companies. One way of achieving this goal is “green” (environmental innovations. The next decade is expected to see a rapid growth in environmental innovations. Their organization and management will require modern — and adequate to the objectives set —technologies. One of those is the quest for value methodology. To date, the quest for value methodology has given rise to several conceptual approaches, which can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of environmental innovations. This article discusses the advantages and disadvantages of major approaches. The author comes to a conclusion that that the modern theory and practice of corporate finance still lacks a generally accepted approach to assessing the value of companies that explicitly takes into account the impact of environmental factors on the cost. The article outlines the basic theoretical frameworks for the formation of such approach.

  3. Innovative heat exchangers

    CERN Document Server

    Scholl, Stephan

    2018-01-01

    This accessible book presents unconventional technologies in heat exchanger design that have the capacity to provide solutions to major concerns within the process and power-generating industries. Demonstrating the advantages and limits of these innovative heat exchangers, it also discusses micro- and nanostructure surfaces and micro-scale equipment, and introduces pillow-plate, helical and expanded metal baffle concepts. It offers step-by-step worked examples, which provide instructions for developing an initial configuration and are supported by clear, detailed drawings and pictures. Various types of heat exchangers are available, and they are widely used in all fields of industry for cooling or heating purposes, including in combustion engines. The market in 2012 was estimated to be U$ 42.7 billion and the global demand for heat exchangers is experiencing an annual growth of about 7.8 %. The market value is expected to reach U$ 57.9 billion in 2016, and approach U$ 78.16 billion in 2020. Providing a valua...

  4. Broken Expectations: Violation of Expectancies, Not Novelty, Captures Auditory Attention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vachon, Francois; Hughes, Robert W.; Jones, Dylan M.

    2012-01-01

    The role of memory in behavioral distraction by auditory attentional capture was investigated: We examined whether capture is a product of the novelty of the capturing event (i.e., the absence of a recent memory for the event) or its violation of learned expectancies on the basis of a memory for an event structure. Attentional capture--indicated…

  5. Stimulation of innovation in the course of decommissioning and dismantling of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bach, F.W.

    1996-01-01

    For the last 30 years, national and international projects have been performed for development and testing of dismantling and cutting technology, covering theoretical experiments as well as laboratory work and applications in pilot projects. An aspect of major interest of the scientific and technical studies was the adjustment of conventional thermal, mechanical, hydraulic and (electro)chemical cutting processes to the specific requirements posed by nuclear facilities. At first sight, one would not expect much innovative potential in the field of cutting technology alone, except for, perhaps, process optimizations such as extensions of dwell times or process stability. However, the intelligent application of available cutting techniques and tools or instruments, leading in their proper combinations to novel techniques and experience, is an interesting challenge to scientists and engineers and hold a wide range of innovative potential. The paper presents some cutting techniques of particular interest in this context. (orig./DG)

  6. Key Trends and Problems of Regional Innovation Systems' Development in Poland and Ukraine

    OpenAIRE

    Oleksandr Fedirko

    2014-01-01

    This article is devoted to comparative study of regional innovation development in Poland and Ukraine. Innovation potential and performance of Ukrainian regions assessment is grounded on the regional innovation systems approach, employing selected indicators of the EU regional innovation evaluation criteria. Key trends and problematic issues of regional innovation development are captured through a number of methods: comparative analysis, calculating variation of regional innovation capacity ...

  7. Revolution of Innovation Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    management such as user innovation, crowd sourcing and crowd funding, as well as social media. In line with the constant globalization of innovation, the first volume of Revolution of Innovation Management offers a variety of international perspectives on these topics with illustrations and analysis coming......This edited collection explores how digitalization is changing the management of innovation, and the subsequent implications for the next phases in its development. The authors identify and examine relevant phenomena which are related to the ongoing digital breakthrough in the context of innovation...

  8. Revolution of Innovation Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viardot, Eric

    This edited collection explores how digitalization is changing the management of innovation, and the subsequent implications for the next phases in its development. The authors identify and examine relevant phenomena which are related to the ongoing digital breakthrough in the context of innovation...... management such as user innovation, crowd sourcing and crowd funding, as well as social media. In line with the constant globalization of innovation, the first volume of Revolution of Innovation Management offers a variety of international perspectives on these topics with illustrations and analysis coming...

  9. Frugal innovation process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hossain, Mokter; Levänen, Jarkko; Lindeman, Sara

    2017-01-01

    and another developed by an individual from the Gujarat, India. Using effectuation theory we find that there are some distinct differences between two categories regarding finance, access to science and technology, the motivation of innovators, options they have, actions they take, etc....... processes. Second, we show how individuals have very different understandings of frugal innovations as well as capacities and resources needed for the development of frugal innovations. Two prominent frugal innovation cases are used in this study. One innovation was developed by individuals from the USA...

  10. Business Model Innovation Leadership

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgren, Peter; Rasmussen, Ole Horn

    2012-01-01

    Leading business model (BM) strategizing through “the field of innovation” has not yet been covered in business model and innovation leadership literature. This is a bit peculiar considering that there has been an increased focus on BM innovation (BMI) by academics and industry since 2011......”. This emphasizes the importance of questioning. How is BM innovation leadership (BMIL) carried out in companies related to various BM(s) and BMI tasks and throughout their business model innovation process? And, how can innovation leadership be related to BMI? A framework model for BMIL based on case research...

  11. Organising to Enable Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brink, Tove

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this conceptual paper is to reveal how organising can enable innovation across organisational layers and organisational units. This approach calls for a cross-disciplinary literature review. The aim is to provide an integrated understanding of innovation in an organisational approach....... The findings reveal a continous organising process between individual/ team creativity and organisational structures/control to enable innovation at firm level. Organising provides a dynamic approach and contains the integrated reconstruction of creativity, structures and boundaries for enhanced balance...... of explorative and exploitative learning in uncertain environments. Shedding light on the cross-disciplinary theories to organise innovation provides a contribution at the firm level to enable innovation....

  12. Innovation policies for tourism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjalager, Anne-Mette

    2012-01-01

    The nature, extent, and implications of innovation in tourism are increasingly investigated in academic research, but the policies that affect these transformations in the industry and at tourism destinations are not equally well conceptualised theoretically or analysed empirically. The purpose...... of this article is, in an analysis of the literature, to interpret the rationale behind innovation policy, and to explain the persisting challenges related to acquisition of an informed foundation for policies based upon quantitative and qualitative inquiries. Observed in a historical perspective, innovation...... framework of policy instruments for innovation in tourism. New generations of policies instigate a mainstreaming of the innovation agenda in ways that proceed beyond the traditional policy concepts....

  13. Consumer's inflation expectations in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Ormonde Teixeira

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper investigates what are the main components of consumer's inflation expectations. We combine the FGV's Consumer Survey with the indices of inflation (IPCA and government regulated prices, professional forecasts disclosed in the Focus report, and media data which we crawl from one of the biggest and most important Brazilian newspapers, Folha de São Paulo, to determine what factors are responsible for and improve consumer's forecast accuracy. We found gender, age and city of residence as major elements when analyzing micro-data. Aggregate data shows the past inflation as an important trigger in the formation of consumers' expectations and professional forecasts as negligible. Moreover, the media plays a significant role, accounting not only for the expectations' formation but for a better understanding of actual inflation as well.

  14. Test expectancy affects metacomprehension accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiede, Keith W; Wiley, Jennifer; Griffin, Thomas D

    2011-06-01

    Theory suggests that the accuracy of metacognitive monitoring is affected by the cues used to judge learning. Researchers have improved monitoring accuracy by directing attention to more appropriate cues; however, this is the first study to more directly point students to more appropriate cues using instructions regarding tests and practice tests. The purpose of the present study was to examine whether the accuracy metacognitive monitoring was affected by the nature of the test expected. Students (N= 59) were randomly assigned to one of two test expectancy groups (memory vs. inference). Then after reading texts, judging learning, completed both memory and inference tests. Test performance and monitoring accuracy were superior when students received the kind of test they had been led to expect rather than the unexpected test. Tests influence students' perceptions of what constitutes learning. Our findings suggest that this could affect how students prepare for tests and how they monitoring their own learning. ©2010 The British Psychological Society.

  15. Designing Users/Designing Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The paper addresses issues of user conceptualisation and representation in the processes of designing and innovating artifacts and use-practices. It is informed by early as well as more recent insights from technology studies within the new sociology of technology (e.g. Akrich 1995, Bijker & Law...... and competencies. Characteristic of these projects are the interplay between the social and the technical dimensions in the process of product development, and the students are expected to apply socio-technical methodologies in their strategies. The students’ need to inform the design through iteratively...... themes ranging from user-oriented design to product redesign and workspace design, etc. It is expected that some of the insights gained from these projects may be related outside of the immediate context of the classroom, to inform the notion of competencies in engineering design and sociotechnical...

  16. Marketing Innovations in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljiljana Božić

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to analyze the introduction of marketing innovations by companies in Croatia. This study provides an insight into the innovativeness with regard to the introduction of marketing innovations. It explores the presence of marketing innovations in general and the introduction of four types of marketing innovation (significant changes to the aesthetic design or packaging, new media or techniques for product promotion, new methods for product placement or sales channels and new methods of pricing goods or services. The changes in all four elements of the marketing mix are described. The paper also explores the extent to which the introduction of marketing innovation is related to the companies that introduce other types of innovations.

  17. Innovation in Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir-Codrin Ionescu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Innovation is an integrating part of the re-vitalization plan of EU economy and it is one of the seven initiatives comprised in the 2020 Europe Strategy. The European Union supports through active policies the creative-innovative processes, as illustrated by the Cohesion Policy Program for 2007-2013 and by the ”Horizon 2020” Program for Research and Innovation. The present paper presents, from an organizational perspective, relevant aspects related to the question of innovation and innovation management, while pointing out the most important internal and external factors that favour the introduction of innovation into the sphere of processes that are run by organizations, as well as into the sphere of products and services provided by organizations. At the same time, the paper briefly presents the essential attributes of organizations which obtain competitive sustainable advantages through innovation.

  18. Innovation Production Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamam N. Guseinova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is dedicated to the study of the models of production of innovations at enterprise and state levels. The shift towards a new technology wave induces a change in systems of division of labour as well as establishment of new forms of cooperation that are reflected both in theory and practice of innovation policy and management. Within the scope of the research question we have studied different generation of innovation process, starting with simple linear models - "technology push" and "market pull" - and ending with a complex integrated model of open innovations. There are two organizational models of innovation production at the enterprise level: start-ups in the early stages of their development and ambidextrous organizations. The former are prone to linear models of innovation process, while the latter create innovation within more sophisticated inclusive processes. Companies that effectuate reciprocal ambidexterity stand out from all the rest, since together with start-ups, research and development centres, elements of innovation infrastructure and other economic agents operating in the same value chain they constitute the core of most advanced forms of national innovation systems, namely Triple Helix and Quadruple Helix systems. National innovation systems - models of innovation production at the state level - evolve into systems with a more profound division of labour that enable "line production" of innovations. These tendencies are closely related to the advent and development of the concept of serial entrepreneurship that transforms entrepreneurship into a new type of profession. International experience proves this concept to be efficient in various parts of the world. Nevertheless, the use of above mentioned models and concepts in national innovation system should be justified by socioeconomic conditions of economic regions, since they determine the efficiency of implementation of certain innovation processes and

  19. Managing Innovation in Academic Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Miriam A.

    1979-01-01

    Explores key issues related to innovation in academic libraries--performance gaps, incentives to innovate, nature of innovation, barriers and constraints, impact of innovation, and implementation of innovative strategies--and concludes that innovation requires a conducive climate, capital investment, and a leadership that is enthusiastic and…

  20. Public Procurement of Innovation as Endogenous

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rolfstam, Max

    Public procurement used as an innovation policy instrument has attracted attention the last decade. It has been argued that public procurement can be used to stimulate innovation from the demand-side. This paper problematizes ‘demand’ understood as a problem defined by a public procurer given...... to potential suppliers to solve. By drawing on a cross-case analysis of two similar projects the paper attempts to explicate an understanding of the role of public procurement of innovation not primarily as a ‘demand-side innovation instrument’, as such thinking might run the risk of ignoring important...... underlying mechanisms critical for success. Instead the paper views public procurement of innovation as an instrument of endogenous- exogenous knowledge conversion....