WorldWideScience

Sample records for inlet gas velocity

  1. Tangential inlet supersonic separators: a novel apparatus for gas purification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wen, Chuang; Walther, Jens Honore; Yang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    A novel supersonic separator with a tangential inlet is designed to remove the condensable components from gas mixtures. The dynamic parameters of natural gas in the supersonic separation process are numerically calculated using the Reynolds stress turbulence model with the Peng-Robinson real gas...... be generated by the tangential inlet, and it increases to the maximum of 200 m/s at the nozzle throat due to decrease of the nozzle area of the converging part. The tangential velocity can maintain the value of about 160 m/s at the nozzle exit, and correspondingly generates the centrifugal acceleration of 3...

  2. Numerical study to invistigate the effect of inlet gas velocity and Reynolds number on bubble formation in a viscous liquid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Islam Tariqul

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bubble formation dynamics has great value in mineral recovery and the oil industry. In this paper, a single bubble formation process through an orifice in a rectangle domain is modelled to study the bubble formation characteristics using the volume of fluid (VOF with the continuum surface force (CSF method. The effect of gas inlet velocities, Ug ~ 0.1 - 0.3 m/s on bubble formation stages (i.e., expansion, elongation and pinch off, bubble contact angle, dynamics and static pressure, bubble departure diameter etc. was investigated through an orifice diameter of 1 mm. The method was also used to study the effect of Reynolds number, Reμ ~ 1.32 - 120 on bubble formation when all other parameters were kept constant. It is found that a high inlet gas velocity accelerated the reducing of the bubble contact angle from an obtuse angle to an acute angle and the faster development of hemispherical shape of the bubble. It is also found that an increasing of Reynolds number caused speeding up of the bubble pinch-off and formed a smaller bubble neck height due to stronger vortex ring around the bubble neck.

  3. Numerical Analysis of Inlet Gas-Mixture Flow Rate Effects on Carbon Nanotube Growth Rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Zahed

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The growth rate and uniformity of Carbon Nano Tubes (CNTs based on Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD technique is investigated by using a numerical model. In this reactor, inlet gas mixture, including xylene as carbon source and mixture of argon and hydrogen as  carrier gas enters into a horizontal CVD reactor at atmospheric pressure. Based on the gas phase and surface reactions, released carbon atoms are grown as CNTs on the iron catalysts at the reactor hot walls. The effect of inlet gas-mixture flow rate, on CNTs growth rate and its uniformity is discussed. In addition the velocity and temperature profile and also species concentrations throughout the reactor are presented.

  4. Prediction of the Inlet Nozzle Velocity Profiles for the CANDU-6 Moderator Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Churl; Park, Joo Hwan

    2006-01-01

    For the moderator analysis of the CANDU reactors in Korea, predicting local moderator subcooling in the Calandria vessels is one of the main concerns for the estimation of heat sink capability of moderator under LOCA transients. The moderator circulation pattern is determined by the combined forces of the inlet jet momentum and the buoyancy flow. Even though the inlet boundary condition plays an important role in determining the moderator circulations, no measured data of detailed inlet velocity profiles is available. The purpose of this study is to produce the velocity profiles at the inlet nozzles by a CFD simulation. To produce the velocity vector fields at the inlet nozzle surfaces, the internal flows in the nozzle assembly were simulated by using a commercial CFD code, CFX-5.7. In the reference, the analytical capability of CFX-5.7 had been estimated by a validation of the CFD code against available experimental data for separate flow phenomena. Various turbulence models and grid spacing had been also tested. In the following section, the interface treatment between the computational domains would be explained. In section 3, the inlet nozzle flow through the CANDU moderator nozzle assembly was predicted by using the obtained technology of the CFD simulation

  5. Effect of Gas Velocity on the Dust Sediment Layer in the Coupled Field of Corona Plasma and Cyclone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Mingshan; Ma Chaochen; Li Minghua; Danish, S N

    2006-01-01

    A dust sediment layer was found on the outer tube wall when the ESCP (electrostatic centrifugal precipitator) trapped diesel particulates or ganister sand. The Compton back scatter method was used to measure the sediment thickness during the experiment. The effect of the inlet gas velocity on the dust sediment layer was investigated. PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry) was used to measure the velocity field between the inner barb tube wall and the outer tube wall. Experiments showed that the thickness of the sediment increased with time, and the sediment layer at the lower end was much thicker than that at the upper end. The agglomeration on the outer tube wall could be removed when the inlet gas velocity was increased to a certain value

  6. Problems in creation of modern air inlet filters of power gas turbine plants in Russia and methods of their solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhaylov, V. E.; Khomenok, L. A.; Sherapov, V. V.

    2016-08-01

    The main problems in creation and operation of modern air inlet paths of gas turbine plants installed as part of combined-cycle plants in Russia are presented. It is noted that design features of air inlet filters shall be formed at the stage of the technical assignment not only considering the requirements of gas turbine plant manufacturer but also climatic conditions, local atmospheric air dustiness, and a number of other factors. The recommendations on completing of filtration system for air inlet filter of power gas turbine plants depending on the facility location are given, specific defects in design and experience in operation of imported air inlet paths are analyzed, and influence of cycle air preparation quality for gas turbine plant on value of operating expenses and cost of repair works is noted. Air treatment equipment of various manufacturers, influence of aerodynamic characteristics on operation of air inlet filters, features of filtration system operation, anti-icing system, weather canopies, and other elements of air inlet paths are considered. It is shown that nonuniformity of air flow velocity fields in clean air chamber has a negative effect on capacity and aerodynamic resistance of air inlet filter. Besides, the necessity in installation of a sufficient number of differential pressure transmitters allowing controlling state of each treatment stage not being limited to one measurement of total differential pressure in the filtration system is noted in the article. According to the results of the analysis trends and methods for modernization of available equipment for air inlet path, the importance of creation and implementation of new technologies for manufacturing of filtering elements on sites of Russia within the limits of import substitution are given, and measures on reliability improvement and energy efficiency for air inlet filter are considered.

  7. New piezo driven gas inlet valve for fusion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usselmann, E.; Hemmerich, J.L.; How, J.; Holland, D.; Orchard, J.; Winkel, T.; Schargitz, U.; Pocheim, N.

    1989-01-01

    The gas inlet valves used at the JET experiment are described and their performances are discussed. A new gas-valve development suitable to replace the existing valves at JET and for future use in large fusion experiments is presented. The new valve is equipped with a piezo-electric translator and has a dosing range of 0-800 mbarls -1 for D 2 . The operating mode of the valve is fail-safe closed with a leak-rate of ≤ 10 -9 mbarls -1 . The design, the test results and throughput values in dependence of filling pressure and control voltage are presented and experiences with the prototype valve as a new gas inlet valve for the JET operation are described

  8. Evaluation of effect of inlet distortion on aerodynamic performance of helium gas compressor for gas turbine high temperature reactor (GTHTR300). Contract research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takada, Shoji; Takizuka, Takakazu; Yan, Xing; Kurokouchi, Naohiro; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko

    2006-02-01

    Because the main pipe is connected perpendicular to the flow direction inside the distributing header in the inlet casing of the helium gas compressor design of GTHTR300, the main flow flowing into the header tends to separate from the header wall and to cause reverse flow, which increases flow resistance in the header. This phenomenon increases the total pressure loss in the header and inlet distortion, which is considered to deteriorate the aerodynamic performance of the compressor. Tests were carried out to evaluate the effects of inlet distortion on aerodynamic performance of compressor by using a 1/3-scale helium gas compressor model by varying a level of inlet distortion. Flow was injected from the wall of header to make circumferential velocities uniform before and after the reverse flow region to dissipate the separation and reverse flow. At the design point, inlet distortion was reduced by 2-3% by injection, which resulted in increasing adiabatic efficiency of blade section by 0.5%. A modified flow rate at surge point was lowered from 10.0 kg/s to 9.6 kg/s. At the same time, pressure loss of the inlet casing was reduced by 3-5 kPa, which is equivalent to adiabatic efficiency improvement around 0.8%. By setting orifice at the inlet of the inlet casing, the level of inlet distortion became 3% higher and the adiabatic efficiency of blade section became 1% higher at the design point. The modified flow rate at surge point increased from 10.6 to 10.9 kg/s. A new correlation between inlet distortion and adiabatic efficiency of blade section at the rated flow rate was derived based on compressor-in-parallel model and fitted to the test results. An overall adiabatic efficiency of full-scale compressor was predicted 90.2% based on the test results of efficiency and Reynolds number correlation, which was close to 89.7% that was predicted by test calibrated design through-flow code. (author)

  9. 30 CFR 77.303 - Hot gas inlet chamber dropout doors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Section 77.303 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS, SURFACE COAL MINES AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND... employ a hot gas inlet chamber shall be equipped with drop-out doors at the bottom of the inlet chamber...

  10. Thermodynamic assessment of impact of inlet air cooling techniques on gas turbine and combined cycle performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohapatra, Alok Ku; Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    The article is focused on the comparison of impact of two different methods of inlet air cooling (vapor compression and vapor absorption cooling) integrated to a cooled gas turbine based combined cycle plant. Air-film cooling has been adopted as the cooling technique for gas turbine blades. A parametric study of the effect of compressor pressure ratio, compressor inlet temperature (T i , C ), turbine inlet temperature (T i , T ), ambient relative humidity and ambient temperature on performance parameters of plant has been carried out. Optimum T i , T corresponding to maximum plant efficiency of combined cycle increases by 100 °C due to the integration of inlet air cooling. It has been observed that vapor compression cooling improves the efficiency of gas turbine cycle by 4.88% and work output by 14.77%. In case of vapor absorption cooling an improvement of 17.2% in gas cycle work output and 9.47% in gas cycle efficiency has been observed. For combined cycle configuration, however, vapor compression cooling should be preferred over absorption cooling in terms of higher plant performance. The optimum value of compressor inlet temperature has been observed to be 20 °C for the chosen set of conditions for both the inlet air cooling schemes. - Highlights: • Inlet air cooling improves performance of cooled gas turbine based combined cycle. • Vapor compression inlet air cooling is superior to vapor absorption inlet cooling. • For every turbine inlet temperature, there exists an optimum pressure ratio. • The optimum compressor inlet temperature is found to be 293 K

  11. Influence of inlet velocity of air and solid particle feed rate on holdup mass and heat transfer characteristics in cyclone heat exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mothilal, T.; Pitchandi, K.

    2015-01-01

    Present work elaborates the effect of inlet velocity of air and solid particle feed rate on holdup mass and heat transfer characteristics in a cyclone heat exchanger. The RNG k-ε turbulence model was adopted for modeling high turbulence flow and Discrete phase model (DPM) to track solid particles in a cyclone heat exchanger by ANSYS FLUENT software. The effect of inlet air velocity (5 to 25 m/s) and inlet solid particle feed rate of (0.2 to 2.5 g/s) at different particle diameter (300 to 500 μm) on holdup mass and heat transfer rate in cyclone heat exchanger was studied at air inlet temperature of 473 K. Results show that holdup mass and heat transfer rate increase with increase in inlet air velocity and inlet solid particle feed rate. Influence of solid particle feed rate on holdup mass has more significance. Experimental setup was built for high efficiency cyclone. Good agreement was found between experimental and simulation pressure drop. Empirical correlation was derived for dimensionless holdup mass and Nusselt number based on CFD data by regression technique. Correlation predicts dimensional holdup mass with +5% to -8% errors of experimental data and Nusselt number with +9% to -3%

  12. Influence of inlet velocity of air and solid particle feed rate on holdup mass and heat transfer characteristics in cyclone heat exchanger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mothilal, T. [T. J. S. Engineering College, Gummidipoond (India); Pitchandi, K. [Sri Venkateswara College of Engineering, Sriperumbudur (India)

    2015-10-15

    Present work elaborates the effect of inlet velocity of air and solid particle feed rate on holdup mass and heat transfer characteristics in a cyclone heat exchanger. The RNG k-ε turbulence model was adopted for modeling high turbulence flow and Discrete phase model (DPM) to track solid particles in a cyclone heat exchanger by ANSYS FLUENT software. The effect of inlet air velocity (5 to 25 m/s) and inlet solid particle feed rate of (0.2 to 2.5 g/s) at different particle diameter (300 to 500 μm) on holdup mass and heat transfer rate in cyclone heat exchanger was studied at air inlet temperature of 473 K. Results show that holdup mass and heat transfer rate increase with increase in inlet air velocity and inlet solid particle feed rate. Influence of solid particle feed rate on holdup mass has more significance. Experimental setup was built for high efficiency cyclone. Good agreement was found between experimental and simulation pressure drop. Empirical correlation was derived for dimensionless holdup mass and Nusselt number based on CFD data by regression technique. Correlation predicts dimensional holdup mass with +5% to -8% errors of experimental data and Nusselt number with +9% to -3%.

  13. Effect of inlet and outlet flow conditions on natural gas parameters in supersonic separation process.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Yang

    Full Text Available A supersonic separator has been introduced to remove water vapour from natural gas. The mechanisms of the upstream and downstream influences are not well understood for various flow conditions from the wellhead and the back pipelines. We used a computational model to investigate the effect of the inlet and outlet flow conditions on the supersonic separation process. We found that the shock wave was sensitive to the inlet or back pressure compared to the inlet temperature. The shock position shifted forward with a higher inlet or back pressure. It indicated that an increasing inlet pressure declined the pressure recovery capacity. Furthermore, the shock wave moved out of the diffuser when the ratio of the back pressure to the inlet one was greater than 0.75, in which the state of the low pressure and temperature was destroyed, resulting in the re-evaporation of the condensed liquids. Natural gas would be the subsonic flows in the whole supersonic separator, if the mass flow rate was less than the design value, and it could not reach the low pressure and temperature for the condensation and separation of the water vapor. These results suggested a guidance mechanism for natural gas supersonic separation in various flow conditions.

  14. Velocity profile of water vapor inside a cavity with two axial inlets and two outlets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guadarrama-Cetina, José; Ruiz Chavarría, Gerardo

    2014-03-01

    To study the dynamics of Breath Figure phenomenon, a control of both the rate of flow and temperature of water vapor is required. The experimental setup widely used is a non hermetically closed chamber with cylindrical geometry and axial inlets and outlets. In this work we present measurements in a cylindrical chamber with diameter 10 cm and 1.5 cm height, keeping a constant temperature (10 °C). We are focused in the velocity field when a gradient of the temperatures is produced between the base plate and the vapor. With a flux of water vapor of 250 mil/min at room temperature (21 °C), the Reynolds number measured in one inlet is 755. Otherwise, the temperatures of water vapor varies from 21 to 40 °C. The velocity profile is obtained by hot wire anemometry. We identify the stagnations and the possibly instabilities regions for an empty plate and with a well defined shape obstacle as a fashion sample. Facultad de Ciencias, UNAM.

  15. A Microchannel Inlet to Reduce High-Velocity Impact Fragmentation of Molecules in Orbital and Fly-by Mass Spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Brandon; Anupriya, Anupriya; Sevy, Eric; Austin, Daniel E.

    2017-10-01

    Closed source neutral mass spectrometers are often used on flyby missions to characterize the molecular components of planetary exospheres. In a typical closed source, neutrals are thermalized as they deflect off the walls within a spherical antechamber prior to ionization and mass analysis. However, the high kinetic energy of each molecule as it impacts the chamber can lead to fragmentation before the ionization region is reached. Due to this fragmentation, the original composition of the molecule can be altered, leading to ambiguous identification.Even knowing the fragmentation pathways that occur may not allow deconvolution of data to give the correct composition. Only stable, volatile fragments will be observed in the subsequent mass spectrometer and different organic compounds likely give similar fragmentation products. Simply detecting these products will not lead to unambiguous identication of the precursor molecules. Here, we present a hardware solution to this problem—an inlet that reduces the fragmentation of molecules that impact at high velocities.We present a microchannel inlet that reduces the impact fragmentation by allowing the molecules to dissipate kinetic energy faster than their respective dissociation lifetimes. Preliminary calculations indicate that impact-induced fragmentation will be reduced up to three orders of magnitude compared with conventional closed sources by using this inlet. The benefits of such an inlet apply to any orbital or flyby velocity. The microchannel inlet enables detection of semi-volatile molecules that were previously undetectable due to impact fragmentation.

  16. Investigation on inlet recirculation characteristics of double suction centrifugal compressor with unsymmetrical inlet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ce; Wang, Yingjun; Lao, Dazhong; Tong, Ding; Wei, Longyu; Liu, Yixiong

    2016-08-01

    The inlet recirculation characteristics of double suction centrifugal compressor with unsymmetrical inlet structures were studied in numerical method, mainly focused on three issues including the amounts and differences of the inlet recirculation in different working conditions, the circumferential non-uniform distributions of the inlet recirculation, the recirculation velocity distributions of the upstream slot of the rear impeller. The results show that there are some differences between the recirculation of the front impeller and that of the rear impeller in whole working conditions. In design speed, the recirculation flow rate of the rear impeller is larger than that of the front impeller in the large flow range, but in the small flow range, the recirculation flow rate of the rear impeller is smaller than that of the front impeller. In different working conditions, the recirculation velocity distributions of the front and rear impeller are non-uniform along the circumferential direction and their non-uniform extents are quite different. The circumferential non-uniform extent of the recirculation velocity varies with the working conditions change. The circumferential non-uniform extent of the recirculation velocity of front impeller and its distribution are determined by the static pressure distribution of the front impeller, but that of the rear impeller is decided by the coupling effects of the inlet flow distortion of the rear impeller, the circumferential unsymmetrical distribution of the upstream slot and the asymmetric structure of the volute. In the design flow and small flow conditions, the recirculation velocities at different circumferential positions of the mean line of the upstream slot cross-section of the rear impeller are quite different, and the recirculation velocities distribution forms at both sides of the mean line are different. The recirculation velocity distributions in the cross-section of the upstream slot depend on the static pressure

  17. Experimental investigation on effect of inlet velocity ratios for 3-D temperature fluctuation caused by coaxial-jet flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Qiong; Lu Daogang; Zhang Pan; Shi Wenbo; Tian Lu

    2012-01-01

    An experiment was performed to study the effect of inlet velocity ratios for 3-D temperature fluctuation caused by coaxial-jet flows based on the 3-D temperature and 2-D velocity fields. The experiment results show that the mixing behavior is completed at the bottom of test section in R<1 condition. The averaged temperatures at the bottom of the flow field are asymmetric in Rinlet velocity ratios, the gradients of cold fluid temperatures decrease in height direction, while those of hot fluid temperatures increase. In R>1 condition, the intensities of temperature fluctuations are less than those in R≤1 conditions. The strong temperature fluctuations occur in the regions between the hot and cold flow, as well as between the hot flow and environmental flow in this case. The frequencies of temperature fluctuations are less than 7 Hz. (authors)

  18. Gas-liquid two-phase flows in double inlet cyclones for natural gas separation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Yan; Wang, Shuli; Wen, Chuang

    2017-01-01

    The gas-liquid two-phase flow within a double inlet cyclone for natural gasseparation was numerically simulated using the discrete phase model. The numericalapproach was validated with the experimental data, and the comparison resultsagreed well with each other. The simulation results showed...... that the strong swirlingflow produced a high centrifugal force to remove the particles from the gas mixture.The larger particles moved downward on the internal surface and were removeddue to the outer vortex near the wall. Most of the tiny particles went into the innervortex zones and escaped from the up...

  19. Particle deposition in a realistic geometry of the human conducting airways: Effects of inlet velocity profile, inhalation flowrate and electrostatic charge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koullapis, P. G.; Kassinos, S. C.; Bivolarova, Mariya Petrova

    2016-01-01

    of inlet flow conditions, particle size, electrostatic charge, and flowrate. While most computer simulations assume a uniform velocity at the mouth inlet, we found that using a more realistic inlet profile based on Laser Doppler Anemometry measurements resulted in enhanced deposition, mostly on the tongue...... between particle size, electrostatic charge, and flowrate. Our results suggest that in silico models should be customized for specific applications, ensuring all relevant physical effects are accounted for in a self-consistent fashion....

  20. Numerical Study on Shape of Liquid Inlet for Venturi Scrubber in Self-Priming Mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. W.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, W. S. [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    In this study, the simulation was developed for different design of liquid inlet to improve injection in submerged self-priming mode venturi scrubber. 1. A hole type is easy to discharged gas from liquid inlet for submerged self-priming mode. 2. A spit type, the liquid is injected into venturi scrubber for all gas volume rate in submerged self-priming mode. 3. A spit type is better than a hole type on improving injection of liquid inlet for submerged self-priming mode in venturi scrubber.The gas accelerate in convergent segment and reach maximum velocity at throat. The liquid is injected into venturi scrubber depends on static pressure difference between outside and inside of the venturi throat, then liquid is atomized into fine droplet when it contacts with high speed airflow. Aerosol removal occur in the diverging section as the inlet gas stream mixes with the fog of tiny liquid droplets. Many studies dealing with the non-submerged selfpriming venturi scrubber. In a non-submerged condition, outlet nozzle of venturi scrubber is not immersed in water pool of a tank whereas in a submerged condition, the outlet of a venturi scrubber is immersed in water pool. The scrubbing liquid is supplied by water reservoir surrounding the throat and is drawn in due to a pressure difference between the outside and the inside of the venturi throat that arises out of the hydrostatic pressure of the liquid and static pressure of the flowing gas. The performance of a venturi scrubber is improved with high gas velocities and high liquid flow rate. Therefore, it is important to study the liquid fraction in venturi scrubber operated at different condition. The venturi scrubber is used to a submerged self-priming mode because the system operates in a passive mode in CFVS. The present study focuses on the liquid flow characteristics for various shapes of liquid inlet in submerged self-priming venturi scrubber.

  1. Numerical Study on Shape of Liquid Inlet for Venturi Scrubber in Self-Priming Mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J. W.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, W. S.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the simulation was developed for different design of liquid inlet to improve injection in submerged self-priming mode venturi scrubber. 1. A hole type is easy to discharged gas from liquid inlet for submerged self-priming mode. 2. A spit type, the liquid is injected into venturi scrubber for all gas volume rate in submerged self-priming mode. 3. A spit type is better than a hole type on improving injection of liquid inlet for submerged self-priming mode in venturi scrubber.The gas accelerate in convergent segment and reach maximum velocity at throat. The liquid is injected into venturi scrubber depends on static pressure difference between outside and inside of the venturi throat, then liquid is atomized into fine droplet when it contacts with high speed airflow. Aerosol removal occur in the diverging section as the inlet gas stream mixes with the fog of tiny liquid droplets. Many studies dealing with the non-submerged selfpriming venturi scrubber. In a non-submerged condition, outlet nozzle of venturi scrubber is not immersed in water pool of a tank whereas in a submerged condition, the outlet of a venturi scrubber is immersed in water pool. The scrubbing liquid is supplied by water reservoir surrounding the throat and is drawn in due to a pressure difference between the outside and the inside of the venturi throat that arises out of the hydrostatic pressure of the liquid and static pressure of the flowing gas. The performance of a venturi scrubber is improved with high gas velocities and high liquid flow rate. Therefore, it is important to study the liquid fraction in venturi scrubber operated at different condition. The venturi scrubber is used to a submerged self-priming mode because the system operates in a passive mode in CFVS. The present study focuses on the liquid flow characteristics for various shapes of liquid inlet in submerged self-priming venturi scrubber.

  2. Tidal asymmetries of velocity and stratification over a bathymetric depression in a tropical inlet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterhouse, Amy F.; Valle-Levinson, Arnoldo; Morales Pérez, Rubén A.

    2012-10-01

    Observations of current velocity, sea surface elevation and vertical profiles of density were obtained in a tropical inlet to determine the effect of a bathymetric depression (hollow) on the tidal flows. Surveys measuring velocity profiles were conducted over a diurnal tidal cycle with mixed spring tides during dry and wet seasons. Depth-averaged tidal velocities during ebb and flood tides behaved according to Bernoulli dynamics, as expected. The dynamic balance of depth-averaged quantities in the along-channel direction was governed by along-channel advection and pressure gradients with baroclinic pressure gradients only being important during the wet season. The vertical structure of the along-channel flow during flood tides exhibited a mid-depth maximum with lateral shear enhanced during the dry season as a result of decreased vertical stratification. During ebb tides, along-channel velocities in the vicinity of the hollow were vertically sheared with a weak return flow at depth due to choking of the flow on the seaward slope of the hollow. The potential energy anomaly, a measure of the amount of energy required to fully mix the water column, showed two peaks in stratification associated with ebb tide and a third peak occurring at the beginning of flood. After the first mid-ebb peak in stratification, ebb flows were constricted on the seaward slope of the hollow resulting in a bottom return flow. The sinking of surface waters and enhanced mixing on the seaward slope of the hollow reduced the potential energy anomaly after maximum ebb. The third peak in stratification during early flood occurred as a result of denser water entering the inlet at mid-depth. This dense water mixed with ambient deep waters increasing the stratification. Lateral shear in the along-channel flow across the hollow allowed trapping of less dense water in the surface layers further increasing stratification.

  3. Influence of gas inlet angle on the mixing process in a Venturi mixer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romańczyk Mathias

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper numerical analysis were performed to investigate the influence of gas inlet angle on mixing process in a Venturi mixer. Performance of an industrial gas engine depends significantly on the quality of mixing air and fuel; therefore, on the homogeneity of the mixture. In addition, there must be a suitable, adapted to the current load of fuel, air ratio. Responsible for this fact, among others, is the mixer located before entering the combustion chamber of the engine. Incorrect mixture proportion can lead to unstable operation of the engine, as well as higher emissions going beyond current environmental standards in the European Union. To validate the simulation the Air-Fuel Ratio (AFR was mathematically calculated for the air-fuel mixture of lean combustion gas engine. In this study, an open source three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD modelling software OpenFOAM has been used, to investigate and analyse the influence of different gas inlet angles on mixer characteristics and their performances. Attention was focused on the air-fuel ratio changes, pressure loss, as well as improvement of the mixing quality in the Venturi mixer.

  4. Effect of inlet temperature on the performance of a catalytic reactor. [air pollution control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, D. N.

    1978-01-01

    A 12 cm diameter by 15 cm long catalytic reactor was tested with No. 2 diesel fuel in a combustion test rig at inlet temperatures of 700, 800, 900, and 1000 K. Other test conditions included pressures of 3 and 6 x 10 to the 5th power Pa, reference velocities of 10, 15, and 20 m/s, and adiabatic combustion temperatures in the range 1100 to 1400 K. The combustion efficiency was calculated from measurements of carbon monoxide and unburned hydrocarbon emissions. Nitrogen oxide emissions and reactor pressure drop were also measured. At a reference velocity of 10 m/s, the CO and unburned hydrocarbons emissions, and, therefore, the combustion efficiency, were independent of inlet temperature. At an inlet temperature of 1000 K, they were independent of reference velocity. Nitrogen oxides emissions resulted from conversion of the small amount (135 ppm) of fuel-bound nitrogen in the fuel. Up to 90 percent conversion was observed with no apparent effect of any of the test variables. For typical gas turbine operating conditions, all three pollutants were below levels which would permit the most stringent proposed automotive emissions standards to be met.

  5. Experimental study of gas entrainment from surface swirl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moudjed, B., E-mail: brahim.moudjed@cea.fr; Excoffon, J.; Riva, R.; Rossi, L., E-mail: lionel.rossi@cea.fr

    2016-12-15

    Gas entrainment from surface swirls is characterized using water experiments. A free surface shear flow is generated in an open channel flow. A suction nozzle is set at the bottom of the test section to induce a downward flow and provoke gas entrainment. An important originality of these experiments is the possibility to change the inlet condition so as to generate different turbulent shear flows. This is done by adding obstacles of different sizes and shapes at the end of a flat plate separating the inlet flow from a “stagnant” water area. Velocity fields and profiles, measured with the PIV technique, are provided both to describe the inlet conditions corresponding to various geometries and flow rates, and to characterize the temporal average shear flow generated within the centre part of the channel. Gas entrainment mappings are established from direct observations of the different flow configurations. These new results show that the threshold for the suction velocities required to entrain gas are similar for the configurations with small obstacles and the flat plate configuration triggering a standard shear flow. Increasing the size of the obstacles promotes gas entrainment and reduces the threshold values of the suction velocity to trigger gas entrainment. Shadowgraphy with image processing is used to present new results characterizing the geometrical properties of surface swirls and the quantity of gas entrained. Inlet configurations with obstacles generate larger surface swirls which move upstream from the suction nozzle centre whereas they are situated downstream with the flat plate configuration. Moreover, dimensionless power laws are found to be good approximations for the surface swirl width and the quantity of gas entrained. In addition to provide new insights about gas entrainment in analytical configurations relevant to Sodium cooled fast nuclear reactor, these results should provide different test cases for the validation of MCFD codes.

  6. A Computational and Experimental Study of Coflow Laminar Methane/Air Diffusion Flames: Effects of Fuel Dilution, Inlet Velocity, and Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, S.; Ma, B.; Bennett, B. A. V.; Giassi, D.; Stocker, D. P.; Takahashi, F.; Long, M. B.; Smooke, M. D.

    2014-01-01

    The influences of fuel dilution, inlet velocity, and gravity on the shape and structure of laminar coflow CH4-air diffusion flames were investigated computationally and experimentally. A series of nitrogen-diluted flames measured in the Structure and Liftoff in Combustion Experiment (SLICE) on board the International Space Station was assessed numerically under microgravity (mu g) and normal gravity (1g) conditions with CH4 mole fraction ranging from 0.4 to 1.0 and average inlet velocity ranging from 23 to 90 cm/s. Computationally, the MC-Smooth vorticity-velocity formulation was employed to describe the reactive gaseous mixture, and soot evolution was modeled by sectional aerosol equations. The governing equations and boundary conditions were discretized on a two-dimensional computational domain by finite differences, and the resulting set of fully coupled, strongly nonlinear equations was solved simultaneously at all points using a damped, modified Newton's method. Experimentally, flame shape and soot temperature were determined by flame emission images recorded by a digital color camera. Very good agreement between computation and measurement was obtained, and the conclusions were as follows. (1) Buoyant and nonbuoyant luminous flame lengths are proportional to the mass flow rate of the fuel mixture; computed and measured nonbuoyant flames are noticeably longer than their 1g counterparts; the effect of fuel dilution on flame shape (i.e., flame length and flame radius) is negligible when the flame shape is normalized by the methane flow rate. (2) Buoyancy-induced reduction of the flame radius through radially inward convection near the flame front is demonstrated. (3) Buoyant and nonbuoyant flame structure is mainly controlled by the fuel mass flow rate, and the effects from fuel dilution and inlet velocity are secondary.

  7. Effects of inlet distortion on gas turbine combustion chamber exit temperature profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqsood, Omar Shahzada

    Damage to a nozzle guide vane or blade, caused by non-uniform temperature distributions at the combustion chamber exit, is deleterious to turbine performance and can lead to expensive and time consuming overhaul and repair. A test rig was designed and constructed for the Allison 250-C20B combustion chamber to investigate the effects of inlet air distortion on the combustion chamber's exit temperature fields. The rig made use of the engine's diffuser tubes, combustion case, combustion liner, and first stage nozzle guide vane shield. Rig operating conditions simulated engine cruise conditions, matching the quasi-non-dimensional Mach number, equivalence ratio and Sauter mean diameter. The combustion chamber was tested with an even distribution of inlet air and a 4% difference in airflow at either side. An even distribution of inlet air to the combustion chamber did not create a uniform temperature profile and varying the inlet distribution of air exacerbated the profile's non-uniformity. The design of the combustion liner promoted the formation of an oval-shaped toroidal vortex inside the chamber, creating localized hot and cool sections separated by 90° that appeared in the exhaust. Uneven inlet air distributions skewed the oval vortex, increasing the temperature of the hot section nearest the side with the most mass flow rate and decreasing the temperature of the hot section on the opposite side. Keywords: Allison 250, Combustion, Dual-Entry, Exit Temperature Profile, Gas Turbine, Pattern Factor, Reverse Flow.

  8. Investigation of the Flow Rate Effect Upstream of the Constant-Geometry Throttle on the Gas Mass Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. M. Timofeev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The turbulent-flow throttles are used in pneumatic systems and gas-supply ones to restrict or measure gas mass flow. It is customary to install the throttles in joints of pipelines (in teejoints and cross tees or in joints of pipelines with pneumatic automation devices Presently, in designing the pneumatic systems and gas-supply ones a gas mass flow through a throttle is calculated by a known equation derived from the Saint-Venant-Vantсel formula for the adiabatic flow of ideal gas through a nozzle from an unrestrictedly high capacity tank. Neglect of gas velocity at the throttle inlet is one of the assumptions taken in the development of the above equation. As may be seen in practice, in actual systems the diameters of the throttle and the pipe wherein it is mounted can be commensurable. Neglect of the inlet velocity therewith can result in an error when determining the required throttle diameter in design calculation and a flow rate in checking calculation, as well as when measuring a flow rate in the course of the test. The theoretical study has revealed that the flow velocity at the throttle inlet is responsible for two parameter values: the outlet flow velocity and the critical pressure ratio, which in turn determine the gas mass flow value. To calculate the gas mass flow, the dependencies are given in the paper, which allow taking into account the flow rate at the throttle inlet. The analysis of obtained dependencies has revealed that the degree of influence of inlet flow rate upon the mass flow is defined by two parameters: pressure ratio at the throttle and open area ratio of the throttle and the pipe wherein it is mounted. An analytical investigation has been pursued to evaluate the extent to which the gas mass flow through the throttle is affected by the inlet flow rate. The findings of the investigation and the indications for using the present dependencies are given in this paper. By and large the investigation allowed the

  9. Detonation velocity in poorly mixed gas mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokhorov, E. S.

    2017-10-01

    The technique for computation of the average velocity of plane detonation wave front in poorly mixed mixture of gaseous hydrocarbon fuel and oxygen is proposed. Here it is assumed that along the direction of detonation propagation the chemical composition of the mixture has periodic fluctuations caused, for example, by layered stratification of gas charge. The technique is based on the analysis of functional dependence of ideal (Chapman-Jouget) detonation velocity on mole fraction (with respect to molar concentration) of the fuel. It is shown that the average velocity of detonation can be significantly (by more than 10%) less than the velocity of ideal detonation. The dependence that permits to estimate the degree of mixing of gas mixture basing on the measurements of average detonation velocity is established.

  10. Study on restriction method for end-wall boundary layer thickness in axial helium gas compressor for gas turbine high temperature gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takada, Shoji; Takizuka, Takakazu; Yan, Xing; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko; Inagaki, Yoshiyuki

    2009-01-01

    Aerodynamic performance test was carried out using a 1/3 scale, 4-stage model of the helium gas compressor to investigate an effect of end-wall over-camber to prevent decrease of axial velocity in the end-wall boundary layer. The model compressor consists of a rotor, 500 mm in diameter, which is driven by an electric motor at a rotational speed of 10800 rpm. The rotor blade span of the first stage is 34 mm. The test was carried out under the condition that the helium gas pressure of 0.88 MPa, temperature of 30degC, and mass flow rate of 12.47 kg/s at the inlet. A 3-dimensional aerodynamic code, which was verified using the test data, showed that axial velocity was lowered by using a blade which increased the inlet blade angle around the end-wall region of the casing side in comparison with that using the original design blade, because the inlet flow angle mismatched with the inlet blade angle of the rotor blade, as opposed to the prediction by a conventional air compressor design method. The overall adiabatic efficiency of the full scale 20-stage helium gas compressor was predicted 89.7% from the Reynolds number dependency of the test data by using the original design blade. (author)

  11. The effect of inlet conditions on lean premixed gas turbine combustor performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilayanur, Suresh Ravi

    The combustion community is today faced with the goal to reduce NOx at high efficiencies. This requirement has directed attention to the manner by which air and fuel are treated prior to and at the combustor inlet. This dissertation is directed to establishing the role of combustor inlet conditions on combustor performance, and to deriving an understanding of the relationship between inlet conditions and combustion performance. To investigate the complex effect of inlet parameters on combustor performance, (1) a test facility was designed and constructed, (2) hardware was designed and fabricated, (3) a statistically based technique was designed and applied, and (4) detailed in-situ measurements were acquired. Atmospheric tests were performed at conditions representative of industrial combustors: 670 K inlet preheat and an equivalence ratio of 0.47, and make the study immediately relevant to the combustion community. The effects of premixing length, fuel distribution, swirl angle, swirl vane thickness and swirl solidity were investigated. The detailed in-situ measurements were performed to form the database necessary to study the responsible mechanisms. A host of conventional and advanced diagnostics were used for the investigation. In situ measurements included the mapping of the thermal and velocity fields of the combustor, obtaining species concentrations inside the combustor, and quantifying the fuel-air mixing entering the combustor. Acoustic behavior of the combustor was studied, including the application of high speed videography. The results reveal that the principal statistically significant effect on NOx production is the inlet fuel distribution, and the principal statistically significant effect on CO production is the swirl strength. Elevated levels of NOx emission result when the fuel is weighted to the centerline. Eddies shedding off the swirler hub ignite as discrete packets, and due to the elevated concentrations of fuel, reach higher temperatures

  12. High Velocity Gas Gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    A video tape related to orbital debris research is presented. The video tape covers the process of loading a High Velocity Gas Gun and firing it into a mounted metal plate. The process is then repeated in slow motion.

  13. Gross Mal distribution Identification and Effect of Inlet Distributor on the Phase Holdup in a Trickle Bed Reactor Using Gamma-Ray Densitometry (GRD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Fitri Abdul Rahman; Alexander, V.; Al-Dahhan, M.

    2016-01-01

    Local liquid and gas mal distribution and their holdups in a packed column are difficult to identify due to multiphase properties and other design factors. Good liquid and gas flow distribution important to determine to get high performance of Trickle Bed Reactor (TBR). Gross mal distribution indicates some faulty or bad flow distribution of liquid and gas. In this work, gross mal distribution of phases has been identified using Gamma Ray Densitometry (GRD) technique with three types of inlet distributors (single inlet towards the wall, single inlet at the center, and proper shower) by measuring line average diameter profile of phases (Liquid, Gas, and Solids) holdups. Gamma-ray densitometry is a non-invasive technique which can be implemented at the laboratory, pilot plant, and industrial scales reactors. Experiments were performed on 0.14 m diameter reactor made of Plexiglas filled with 0.003 m glass bead which acts as the solid. The superficial velocities for both gas and liquid were in the range 0.03 m/s to 0.27 m/s and 0.004 m/s to 0.014 m/s respectively. Proper shower distributor showed early liquid spreading than compared with other distributors. The effect of superficial gas velocity on liquid spread was seen to be non-significant, and liquid distribution is found to be almost uniform at the center region of the catalyst bed. (author)

  14. U.S. Geological Survey 2011 assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources of the Cook Inlet region, south-central Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Richard G.; Pierce, Brenda S.; Houseknecht, David W.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has completed an assessment of the volumes of undiscovered, technically recoverable oil and gas resources in conventional and continuous accumulations in Cook Inlet. The assessment used a geology-based methodology and results from new scientific research by the USGS and the State of Alaska, Department of Natural Resources, Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys and Division of Oil and Gas (DOG). In the Cook Inlet region, the USGS estimates mean undiscovered volumes of nearly 600 million barrels of oil, about 19 trillion cubic feet of gas, and about 46 million barrels of natural gas liquids.

  15. Temperature and velocity field of coolant at inlet to WWER-440 core - evaluation of experimental data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jirous, F.; Klik, F.; Janeba, B.; Daliba, J.; Delis, J.

    1989-01-01

    Experimentally determined were coolant temperature and velocity fields at the inlet of the WWER-440 reactor core. The accuracy estimate is presented of temperature measurements and the relation is given for determining the resulting measurement error. An estimate is also made of the accuracy of solution of the system of equations for determining coefficients B kn using the method of the least square fit. Coefficients B kn represent the relative contribution of the mass flow of the k-th fuel assembly from the n-th loop and allow the calculation of coolant temperatures at the inlet of the k-th fuel assembly, when coolant temperatures in loops at reactor inlet are known. A comparison is made of the results of measurements on a hydrodynamic model of a WWER-440 reactor with results of measurements made at unit 4 of the Dukovany nuclear power plant. Full agreement was found for 32 model measurements and 6 reactor measurements. It may be assumed that the results of other model measurements obtained for other operating variants will also apply for an actual reactor. Their applicability may, however, only be confirmed by repeating the experiment on other WWER-440 reactors. (Z.M.). 5 figs., 7 refs

  16. Correlations of drift velocity for gas-liquid two-phase flow in rod bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kataoka, Isao; Matsuura, Keizo; Serizawa, Akimi

    2004-01-01

    A new correlation was developed for the drift velocity for low inlet liquid flux in rod bundle. Based on authors' previous analysis of drift velocity for large diameter pipe, an analysis was made on the drift velocity in rod bundle. It is assumed that the large bubble of which size is several subchannel diameter behaves as slug bubble. Under this assumption, it becomes very important how to define equivalent diameter for rod bundle. In view of physical consideration of slug bubble behavior and previous analysis, an equivalent diameter based on the wetted perimeter was found to be most appropriate. Using this equivalent diameter, experimental data of drift velocity in rod bundle were correlated with dimensional analysis. It was found out that for small diameter (dimensionless diameter less than 48) drift velocity increased with square root of diameter which is same dependency of ordinary slug flow correlation. For larger diameter (dimensionless diameter is more than 48), drift velocity is almost constant and same as that of dimensionless diameter of 48. The physical meaning of this result was considered to be the instability of interface of large slug bubble. The density ratio between gas and liquid and viscosity of liquid phase were found to be the main parameters which affect the drift velocity. This is physically reasonable because density ratio is related to the buoyancy force and liquid viscosity is related to shear force near solid wall. The experimental data were correlated by density ratio and dimensionless liquid viscosity. The obtained dimensionless correlation for the drift velocity in rod bundle successfully correlated experimental data for various rod bundles (equivalent diameters), pressures, liquid fluxes etc. It is also consistent with the drift flux correlation for round tube. (author)

  17. Impact of inlet fogging and fuels on power and efficiency of gas turbine plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basha Mehaboob

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A computational study to assess the performance of different gas turbine power plant configurations is presented in this paper. The work includes the effect of humidity, ambient inlet air temperature and types of fuels on gas turbine plant configurations with and without fogger unit. Investigation also covers economic analysis and effect of fuels on emissions. GT frames of various sizes/ratings are being used in gas turbine power plants in Saudi Arabia. 20 MWe GE 5271RA, 40 MWe GE-6561B and 70 MWe GE-6101FA frames are selected for the present study. Fogger units with maximum mass flow rate of 2 kg/s are considered for the present analysis. Reverse Osmosis unit of capacity 4 kg/s supplies required water to the fogger units. GT PRO software has been used for carrying out the analysis including; net plant output and net efficiency, break even electricity price and break even fuel LHV price etc., for a given location of Saudi Arabia. The relative humidity and temperature have been varied from 30 to 45 % and from 80 to 100° F, respectively. Fuels considered in the study are natural gas, diesel and heavy bunker oil. Simulated gas turbine plant output from GT PRO has been validated against an existing gas turbine plant output. It has been observed that the simulated plant output is less than the existing gas turbine plant output by 5%. Results show that variation of humidity does not affect the gas turbine performance appreciably for all types of fuels. For a decrease of inlet air temperature by 10 °F, net plant output and efficiency have been found to increase by 5 and 2 %, respectively for all fuels, for GT only situation. However, for GT with Fogger scenario, for a decrease of inlet air temperature by 10 °F, net plant output and efficiency have been found to further increase by 3.2 and 1.2 %, respectively for all fuels. For all GT frames with fogger, the net plant output and efficiency are relatively higher as compared to GT only case for all

  18. The effect of geometry and operation conditions on the performance of a gas-liquid cylindrical cyclone separator with new structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Qing; Zhang, Chi; Xu, Bo; Chen, Jiangping

    2013-07-01

    The hydrodynamic flow behavior, effects of geometry and working conditions of a gas-liquid cylindrical cyclone separator with a new structure are investigated by computational fluid dynamic and experiment. Gas liquid cylindrical cyclone separator is widely used in oil industry, refrigeration system because of its simple structure, high separating efficiency, little maintenance and no moving parts nor internal devices. In this work, a gas liquid cylindrical cyclone separator with new structure used before evaporator in refrigeration system can remove the vapor from the mixture and make evaporator compact by improving its heat exchange efficiency with the lower inlet quality. It also decreases evaporator pressure drop and reduces compressor work. The two pipes are placed symmetrically which makes each of them can be treated as inlet. It means when the fluids flow reverse, the separator performance will not be influence. Four samples with different geometry parameters are tested by experiment with different inlet quality (0.18-0.33), inlet mass flow rate (65-100kg/h). Compared with the experimental data, CFD simulation results show a good agreement. Eulerian multiphase model and Reynolds Stress Turbulence model are applied in the CFD simulation and obtained the inner flow field such as phase path lines, tangential velocity profiles and pressure and volume of fraction distribution contours. The separator body diameter (24, 36, 48mm) and inlet diameter (3.84, 4.8, 5.76mm) decide the maximum tangential velocity which results in the centrifugal force. The tangential velocity profiles are simulated and compared among different models. The higher tangential velocity makes higher quality of gas outlet but high pressure drop at the same time. Decreasing the inlet diameter increases quality of gas outlet pipe and pressure drop. High gas outlet quality is cost at high pressure drop. Increasing of separator diameter makes gas outlet quality increase first and then decrease but

  19. Reflooding Experiment on BETA Test Loop: The Effects of Inlet Temperature on the Rewetting Velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khairul H; Anhar R Antariksawan; Edy Sumarno; Kiswanta; Giarno; Joko P; Ismu Handoyo

    2003-01-01

    Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) on Nuclear Reactor Plant is an important topic because this condition is a severe accident that can be postulated. The phenomenon of LOCA on Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) can be divided in three stages, e.g.: blowdown, refill and reflood. In the view of Emergency Coolant System evaluation, the reflood is the most important stage. In this stage, an injection of emergency water coolant must be done in a way that the core can be flooded and the overheating can be avoid. The experiment of rewetting on BETA Test Loop had been conducted. The experiment using one heated rod of the test section to study effects of inlet temperature on the wetting velocity. Results of the series of experiments on 2,5 lt/min flow rate and variable of temperature : 28 o C, 38 o C, 50 o C, 58 o C it was noticed that for 58 o C inlet temperature of test section and 572 o C rod temperature the rewetting phenomenon has been observed. The time of refill was 32.81 sec and time of rewetting was 42.87 sec. (author)

  20. DEM-CFD simulation of purge gas flow in a solid breeder pebble bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hao [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230027 (China); Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Li, Zhenghong [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230027 (China); Guo, Haibing [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Ye, Minyou [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230027 (China); Huang, Hongwen, E-mail: inpclane@sina.com [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2016-12-15

    Solid tritium breeding blanket applying pebble bed concept is promising for fusion reactors. Tritium bred in the pebble bed is purged out by inert gas. The flow characteristics of the purge gas are important for the tritium transport from the solid breeder materials. In this study, a randomly packed pebble bed was generated by Discrete Element Method (DEM) and verified by radial porosity distribution. The flow parameters of the purge gas in channels were solved by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) method. The results show that the normalized velocity magnitudes have the same damped oscillating patterns with radial porosity distribution. Besides, the bypass flow near the wall cannot be ignored in this model, and it has a slight increase with inlet velocity. Furthermore, higher purging efficiency becomes with higher inlet velocity and especially higher in near wall region.

  1. Performance modeling of industrial gas turbines with inlet air filtration system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel O. Effiom

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The effect of inlet air filtration on the performance of two industrial gas turbines (GT is presented. Two GTs were modeled similar to GE LM2500+ and Alstom GT13 E2-2012, using TURBOMATCH and chosen to operate at environmental conditions of Usan offshore oilfield and Maiduguri dessert in Nigeria. The inlet pressure recovered (Precov from the selected filters used in Usan offshore, and Maiduguri ranged between 98.36≤Precov≤99.51% and 98.67≤Precov≤99.56% respectively. At reduced inlet Precov by 98.36% (1.66 kPa and, at a temperature above 15 °C (ISA, a reduction of 16.9%, and 7.3% of power output and efficiency was obtained using GT13 E2-2012, while a decrease of 14.8% and 4.7% exist for power output and efficiency with GE LM2500+. In addition, a reduction in mass flow rate of air and fuel under the same condition was between 4.3≤mair≤10.6% and 10.4≤mfuel≤11.5% for GT13 E2-2012 and GE LM2500+, correspondingly. However, the GE LM2500+ was more predisposed to intake pressure drops since it functioned at a higher overall pressure ratio. The results obtained were found worthwhile and could be the basis for filter selection and efficient compressor housing design in the locations concerned.

  2. Simultaneous high-speed gas property measurements at the exhaust gas recirculation cooler exit and at the turbocharger inlet of a multicylinder diesel engine using diode-laser-absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jatana, Gurneesh S; Magee, Mark; Fain, David; Naik, Sameer V; Shaver, Gregory M; Lucht, Robert P

    2015-02-10

    A diode-laser-absorption-spectroscopy-based sensor system was used to perform high-speed (100 Hz to 5 kHz) measurements of gas properties (temperature, pressure, and H(2)O vapor concentration) at the turbocharger inlet and at the exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) cooler exit of a diesel engine. An earlier version of this system was previously used for high-speed measurements of gas temperature and H(2)O vapor concentration in the intake manifold of the diesel engine. A 1387.2 N m tunable distributed feedback diode laser was used to scan across multiple H(2)O absorption transitions, and the direct absorption signal was recorded using a high-speed data acquisition system. Compact optical connectors were designed to conduct simultaneous measurements in the intake manifold, the EGR cooler exit, and the turbocharger inlet of the engine. For measurements at the turbocharger inlet, these custom optical connectors survived gas temperatures as high as 800 K using a simple and passive arrangement in which the temperature-sensitive components were protected from high temperatures using ceramic insulators. This arrangement reduced system cost and complexity by eliminating the need for any active water or oil cooling. Diode-laser measurements performed during steady-state engine operation were within 5% of the thermocouple and pressure sensor measurements, and within 10% of the H(2)O concentration values derived from the CO(2) gas analyzer measurements. Measurements were also performed in the engine during transient events. In one such transient event, where a step change in fueling was introduced, the diode-laser sensor was able to capture the 30 ms change in the gas properties; the thermocouple, on the other hand, required 7.4 s to accurately reflect the change in gas conditions, while the gas analyzer required nearly 600 ms. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first implementation of such a simple and passive arrangement of high-temperature optical connectors as well

  3. Numerical investigation of gas separation in T-junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pao, William; Hashim, Fakhruldin M.; Ming, Low Huei

    2015-05-01

    T-junctions are commonly used in distributing two-phase flow by piping networks especially in oil and gas industries. Understanding the behavior of two-phase flow through a T-junction is very important as it has significant effect on the operation, maintenance and efficiency of the components downstream from the junction. The objective of this paper is to determine the effect of ratio of side arm to main arm diameters, initial inlet gas saturation and gas density variation on passive separation performance in T-junction. Via computational fluid dynamics tool, preliminary investigation found that separation efficiency is proportional to diameter ratio in between 0.5-0.75. Beyond diameter ratio 0.75, there is a flattening of separation efficiency. The change of fraction of gas taken off is inversely proportional to initial inlet gas saturation and the trend is almost inversely linear for diameter ratio 0.5. Beyond that, the relationship between initial inlet gas saturation and separation efficiency exhibits mild non-linearity behavior. For diameter ratios 0.75-1.0, the fraction of gas taken off is almost similar as far as the initial gas saturation is concerned. Gas density affects phase separation efficiency when the initial gas saturation is low. Interestingly, the effects of the inlet flow velocity and gravity distribution is almost negligible relative to the mass split ratio, side to main arm diameter ratio, initial gas saturation and density differential.

  4. The critical ionization velocity mechnism for the case of gas mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raadu, M.A.

    1982-08-01

    The theory of the critical ionization velocity mechnisms is discussed. In the case of gas mixture the critical velocity is expected to depend on the ionization cross sections. An analytic approximation is introduced which can be used to set limits on a generalized expression for the critical velocity of gas mixtures. (Author)

  5. Characterization of the pneumatic behavior of a novel spouted bed apparatus with two adjustable gas inlets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gryczka, O.; Heinrich, S.; Miteva, V.; Deen, N.G.; Kuipers, J.A.M.; Jacob, M.; Morl, L.

    2008-01-01

    Recently the importance of spouted bed technology has significantly increased in the context of drying processes as well as granulation, agglomeration or coating processes. Within this work the fluid dynamics of a novel spouted bed plant with two adjustable gas inlets is investigated. By analysis of

  6. A membrane inlet mass spectrometry system for noble gases at natural abundances in gas and water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Ate; Singleton, Michael J; Hillegonds, Darren J; Velsko, Carol A; Moran, Jean E; Esser, Bradley K

    2013-11-15

    Noble gases dissolved in groundwater can reveal paleotemperatures, recharge conditions, and precise travel times. The collection and analysis of noble gas samples are cumbersome, involving noble gas purification, cryogenic separation and static mass spectrometry. A quicker and more efficient sample analysis method is required for introduced tracer studies and laboratory experiments. A Noble Gas Membrane Inlet Mass Spectrometry (NG-MIMS) system was developed to measure noble gases at natural abundances in gas and water samples. The NG-MIMS system consists of a membrane inlet, a dry-ice water trap, a carbon-dioxide trap, two getters, a gate valve, a turbomolecular pump and a quadrupole mass spectrometer equipped with an electron multiplier. Noble gases isotopes (4)He, (22)Ne, (38)Ar, (84)Kr and (132)Xe are measured every 10 s. The NG-MIMS system can reproduce measurements made on a traditional noble gas mass spectrometer system with precisions of 2%, 8%, 1%, 1% and 3% for He, Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe, respectively. Noble gas concentrations measured in an artificial recharge pond were used to monitor an introduced xenon tracer and to reconstruct temperature variations to within 2 °C. Additional experiments demonstrated the capability to measure noble gases in gas and in water samples, in real time. The NG-MIMS system is capable of providing analyses sufficiently accurate and precise for introduced noble gas tracers at managed aquifer recharge facilities, groundwater fingerprinting based on excess air and noble gas recharge temperature, and field and laboratory studies investigating ebullition and diffusive exchange. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. The universal sound velocity formula for the strongly interacting unitary Fermi gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Ke; Chen Ji-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    Due to the scale invariance, the thermodynamic laws of strongly interacting limit unitary Fermi gas can be similar to those of non-interacting ideal gas. For example, the virial theorem between pressure and energy density of the ideal gas P = 2E/3V is still satisfied by the unitary Fermi gas. This paper analyses the sound velocity of unitary Fermi gases with the quasi-linear approximation. For comparison, the sound velocities for the ideal Boltzmann, Bose and Fermi gas are also given. Quite interestingly, the sound velocity formula for the ideal non-interacting gas is found to be satisfied by the unitary Fermi gas in different temperature regions. (general)

  8. Exergy, Economic and Environmental Analyses of Gas Turbine Inlet Air Cooling with a Heat Pump Using a Novel System Configuration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Majdi Yazdi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Gas turbines incur a loss of output power during hot seasons due to high ambient air temperatures, and input air cooling systems are often used to partly offset this problem. Here, results are reported for an investigation of the utilization of a heat pump to cool the inlet air of a gas turbine compressor. The analyses are carried out for two climates: the city of Yazd, Iran, which has a hot, arid climate, and Tehran, Iran, which has a temperate climate. The heat pump input power is obtained from the gas turbine. The following parameters are determined, with and without the heat pump: net output power, first and second law efficiencies, quantities and costs of environmental pollutants, entropy generation and power generation. The results suggest that, by using the air-inlet cooling system, the mean output power increases during hot seasons by 11.5% and 10% for Yazd and Tehran, respectively, and that the costs of power generation (including pollution costs decrease by 11% and 10% for Yazd and Tehran, respectively. Also, the rate of generation of pollutants such as NOx and CO decrease by about 10% for Yazd and 35% for Tehran, while the average annual entropy generation rate increases by 9% for Yazd and 7% for Tehran, through air-inlet cooling. The average increase of the system first law efficiency is 2% and of the system second law efficiency is 1.5% with the inlet-air cooling system.

  9. Gas-rise velocities during kicks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, D.B. (Sedco Forex (FR))

    1991-12-01

    This paper reports on experiments to examine gas migration rates in drilling muds that were performed in a 15-m-long, 200-mm-ID inclinable flow loop where air injection simulates gas entry during a kick. These tests were conducted using a xanthum gum (a common polymer used in drilling fluids) solution to simulate drilling muds as the liquid phase and air as the gas phase. This work represents a significant extension of existing correlations for gas/liquid flows in large pipe diameters with non- Newtonian fluids. Bubbles rise faster in drilling muds than in water despite the increased viscosity. This surprising result is caused by the change in the flow regime, with large slug-type bubbles forming at lower void fractions. The gas velocity is independent of void fraction, thus simplifying flow modeling. Results show that a gas influx will rise faster in a well than previously believed. This has major implications for kick simulation, with gas arriving at the surface earlier than would be expected and the gas outflow rate being higher than would have been predicted. A model of the two-phase gas flow in drilling mud, including the results of this work, has been incorporated into the joint Schlumberger Cambridge Research (SCR)/BP Intl. kick model.

  10. Performance and economic enhancement of cogeneration gas turbines through compressor inlet air cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delucia, M.; Bronconi, R.; Carnevale, E.

    1994-04-01

    Gas turbine air cooling systems serve to raise performance to peak power levels during the hot months when high atmospheric temperatures cause reductions in net power output. This work describes the technical and economic advantages of providing a compressor inlet air cooling system to increase the gas turbine's power rating and reduce its heat rate. The pros and cons of state-of-the-art cooling technologies, i.e., absorption and compression refrigeration, with and without thermal energy storage, were examined in order to select the most suitable cooling solution. Heavy-duty gas turbine cogeneration systems with and without absorption units were modeled, as well as various industrial sectors, i.e., paper and pulp, pharmaceuticals, food processing, textiles, tanning, and building materials. The ambient temperature variations were modeled so the effects of climate could be accounted for in the simulation. The results validated the advantages of gas turbine cogeneration with absorption air cooling as compared to other systems without air cooling.

  11. Dissolved atmospheric gas in xylem sap measured with membrane inlet mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, H Jochen; Espino, Susana; Visser, Ate; Esser, Bradley K

    2016-04-01

    A new method is described for measuring dissolved gas concentrations in small volumes of xylem sap using membrane inlet mass spectrometry. The technique can be used to determine concentrations of atmospheric gases, such as argon, as reported here, or for any dissolved gases and their isotopes for a variety of applications, such as rapid detection of trace gases from groundwater only hours after they were taken up by trees and rooting depth estimation. Atmospheric gas content in xylem sap directly affects the conditions and mechanisms that allow for gas removal from xylem embolisms, because gas can dissolve into saturated or supersaturated sap only under gas pressure that is above atmospheric pressure. The method was tested for red trumpet vine, Distictis buccinatoria (Bignoniaceae), by measuring atmospheric gas concentrations in sap collected at times of minimum and maximum daily temperature and during temperature increase and decline. Mean argon concentration in xylem sap did not differ significantly from saturation levels for the temperature and pressure conditions at any time of collection, but more than 40% of all samples were supersaturated, especially during the warm parts of day. There was no significant diurnal pattern, due to high variability between samples. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. The sound velocity in an equilibrium hadron gas

    OpenAIRE

    Prorok, Dariusz; Turko, Ludwik

    2001-01-01

    We calculate the velocity of sound in an ideal gas of massive hadrons with non-vanishing baryon number. The gas is in thermal and chemical equilibrium. Also we show that the temperature dependence $T(\\tau) \\cong T_{0} \\cdot ({\\tau_{0} \\over \\tau})^{c_{s}^{2}}$ is approximately valid, when the gas expands longitudinally according to the Bjorken law.

  13. Feasibility analysis of gas turbine inlet air cooling by means of liquid nitrogen evaporation for IGCC power augmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morini, Mirko; Pinelli, Michele; Spina, Pier Ruggero; Vaccari, Anna; Venturini, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Integrated Gasification Combined Cycles (IGCC) are energy systems mainly composed of a gasifier and a combined cycle power plant. Since the gasification process usually requires oxygen as the oxidant, an Air Separation Unit (ASU) is also part of the plant. In this paper, a system for power augmentation in IGCC is evaluated. The system is based on gas turbine inlet air cooling by means of liquid nitrogen spray. In fact, nitrogen is a product of the ASU, but is not always exploited. In the proposed plant, the nitrogen is first liquefied to be used for inlet air cooling or stored for later use. This system is not characterized by the limits of water evaporative cooling systems (the lower temperature is limited by air saturation) and refrigeration cooling (the effectiveness is limited by the pressure drop in the heat exchanger). A thermodynamic model of the system is built by using a commercial code for energy conversion system simulation. A sensitivity analysis on the main parameters is presented. Finally the model is used to study the capabilities of the system by imposing the real temperature profiles of different sites for a whole year and by comparing to traditional inlet air cooling strategies. - Highlights: • Gas turbine inlet air cooling by means of liquid nitrogen spray. • Humidity condensation may form a fog which provides further power augmentation. • High peak and off peak electric energy price ratios make the system profitable

  14. Effects of superficial gas velocity and fluid property on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the present study, the influence of superficial gas velocity and fluid properties on gas holdup and liquid circulation velocity in a three-phase external loop airlift column using polystyrene (0.0036 m diameter and 1025.55 kg/m3 density) and nylon-6 (0.0035 m diameter and 1084.24 kg/m3 density) particles with aqueous ...

  15. Energy Demodulation Algorithm for Flow Velocity Measurement of Oil-Gas-Water Three-Phase Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingwei Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Flow velocity measurement was an important research of oil-gas-water three-phase flow parameter measurements. In order to satisfy the increasing demands for flow detection technology, the paper presented a gas-liquid phase flow velocity measurement method which was based on energy demodulation algorithm combing with time delay estimation technology. First, a gas-liquid phase separation method of oil-gas-water three-phase flow based on energy demodulation algorithm and blind signal separation technology was proposed. The separation of oil-gas-water three-phase signals which were sampled by conductance sensor performed well, so the gas-phase signal and the liquid-phase signal were obtained. Second, we used the time delay estimation technology to get the delay time of gas-phase signals and liquid-phase signals, respectively, and the gas-phase velocity and the liquid-phase velocity were derived. At last, the experiment was performed at oil-gas-water three-phase flow loop, and the results indicated that the measurement errors met the need of velocity measurement. So it provided a feasible method for gas-liquid phase velocity measurement of the oil-gas-water three-phase flow.

  16. Integration of steam injection and inlet air cooling for a gas turbine generation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, F.J.; Chiou, J.S.

    2004-01-01

    The temperature of exhaust gases from simple cycle gas turbine generation sets (GENSETs) is usually very high (around 500 deg. C), and a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) is often used to recover the energy from the exhaust gases and generate steam. The generated steams can be either used for many useful processes (heating, drying, separation etc.) or used back in the power generation system for enhancing power generation capacity and efficiency. Two well-proven techniques, namely steam injection gas turbine (STIG) and inlet air cooling (IAC) are very effective features that can use the generated steam to improve the power generation capacity and efficiency. Since the energy level of the generated steam needed for steam injection is different from that needed by an absorption chiller to cool the inlet air, a proper arrangement is required to implement both the STIG and the IAC features into the simple cycle GENSET. In this study, a computer code was developed to simulate a Tai power's Frame 7B simple cycle GENSET. Under the condition of local summer weather, the benefits obtained from the system implementing both STIG and IAC features are more than a 70% boost in power and 20.4% improvement in heat rate

  17. Relation between plasma plume density and gas flow velocity in atmospheric pressure plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yambe, Kiyoyuki; Taka, Shogo; Ogura, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    We have studied atmospheric pressure plasma generated using a quartz tube, helium gas, and copper foil electrode by applying RF high voltage. The atmospheric pressure plasma in the form of a bullet is released as a plume into the atmosphere. To study the properties of the plasma plume, the plasma plume current is estimated from the difference in currents on the circuit, and the drift velocity is measured using a photodetector. The relation of the plasma plume density n plu , which is estimated from the current and the drift velocity, and the gas flow velocity v gas is examined. It is found that the dependence of the density on the gas flow velocity has relations of n plu ∝ log(v gas ). However, the plasma plume density in the laminar flow is higher than that in the turbulent flow. Consequently, in the laminar flow, the density increases with increasing the gas flow velocity

  18. Effects of inlet/outlet configurations on the electrostatic capture of airborne nanoparticles and viruses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Jaesung; Akin, Demir; Bashir, Rashid

    2008-01-01

    Motivated by capture and detection of airborne biological agents in real time with a cantilever biosensor without introducing the agents into liquids, we present the effects of inlet/outlet configurations of a homemade particle collector on the electrostatic capture of airborne 100 nm diameter nanoparticles under swirling gas flows. This particle collector has three different inlet/outlet configurations: forward inlet/outlet (FO), backward inlet/outlet (BO) and straight inlet/outlet (SO) configurations. We also present the electrostatic capture of Vaccinia viruses using the same particle collector and compare these virus measurements with the nanoparticle cases. The most particles were collected in the FO configuration. The numbers of particles captured in the BO and SO configurations were close within their standard deviations. For all the three configurations tested, the number of particles captured in the center electrode C was much smaller than those captured in the other electrodes at a flow rate of 1.1 l min −1 and an applied potential of 2 kV. Using a commercial CFD code FLUENT, we also simulated the effects of the three inlet/outlet configurations on the particle capture in terms of particle trajectories, velocities and travel times. This simulation was in a good agreement with measurements that the FO configuration is the most favorable to particle capture among the tested configurations at a flow rate of 1.1 l min −1 . The effects of particle diameters on the capture will also be discussed. This collector can be used for real-time monitoring of bioaerosols along with cantilever biosensors

  19. Thermodynamic assessment of power requirements and impact of different gas-turbine inlet air cooling techniques at two different locations in Oman

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawoud, B.; Zurigat, Y.H.; Bortmany, J.

    2005-01-01

    Gas-turbine inlet air cooling has been considered for boosting the power output during hot seasons. In this paper, the power requirements of several inlet air cooling techniques for gas-turbine power plants in two locations; namely, Marmul and Fahud, in Oman have been evaluated using typical meteorological year (TMY) data. The considered techniques are evaporative cooling, fogging cooling, absorption cooling using both LiBr-H 2 O and aqua-ammonia, and vapour-compression cooling systems. For evaporative cooling, an 88% approach to the wet-bulb temperature has been considered, compared with a 98% approach for fogging cooling. A design compressor inlet air temperature of 14 deg C has been assigned to LiBr-water chilling systems. For both aqua-ammonia absorption and vapour-compression refrigerating systems, a design compressor inlet air temperature of 8 deg C has been selected to avoid the formation of ice fragments as the air is drawn into the mouth of the compressor. These technologies have been compared with respect to their effectiveness in power boosting of small-size gas-turbine power plants used in two oil fields at Marmul and Fahud in the Sultanate of Oman. Fogging cooling is accompanied with 11.4% more electrical energy in comparison with evaporative cooling in both locations. The LiBr-H 2 O cooling offers 40% and 55% more energy than fogging cooling at Fahud and Marmul, respectively. Applying aqua-ammonia-water and vapour-compression cooling, a further annual energy production enhancement of 39% and 46% is expected in comparison with LiBr-H 2 O cooling at Fahud and Marmul, respectively

  20. Velocity measurements in a rigid ceramic filter in a parallel-flow arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Hajeri, M.H.; Aroussi, A.; Witry, A.

    2002-01-01

    Rigid ceramic filters have been developed for cleaning the hot combustion gas streams upstream of the turbine in a combined cycle power plant. To obtain continues operation a periodic cleaning is necessary and the cleaning efficiency depends on the distribution of the filtration cake. Consequently uniform particle deposition on the filter element surface is desired. The flow around three filter elements in cross flow is investigated computationally using the commercial code FLUENT. Three filter elements are placed in a two-dimensional rectangle duct with fixed face velocity and varying the velocity ratio between the approach and face velocity. Particle trajectories are obtained for a number of particle diameters and different inlet (approach) velocity to face filtration velocity ratios to investigate the behavior of particles around the filter element. (author)

  1. Improvement of Estimation method for two-phase flow in a large-diameter pipe. Pt. 4. Effect of the inlet boundary condition of the upward flow section on flow characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoneda, Kimitoshi; Okawa, Tomio; Zhou, Shirong

    1999-01-01

    In nuclear power plants, many large-diameter pipes are subject to gas-liquid two-phase flow. For rational design and performance estimation, the flow in the pipes should be predicted accurately. With the correlation used at present, however, the flow analysis can not reach desirable precision. This is partly due to the lack of understanding of the two-phase flow characteristics in large-diameter pipes. Therefore, steam-water two-phase flow in a vertical pipe (155 mm i.d.) was investigated empirically. Lateral distribution data of phase volume fraction, gas velocity and bubble diameter were obtained. The effects of the inlet boundary condition were also observed. The drift velocity in the developing region was considerably affected by the inlet boundary condition. By deriving the correlation of mean bubble diameter as a function of void fraction and pressure, the empirical data was predicted with high accuracy compared with the existing correlation used in best-estimate codes of nuclear reactor safety analysis. (author)

  2. Video imaging measurement of interfacial wave velocity in air-water flow through a horizontal elbow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Wazzan, Amir; Than, Cheok F.; Moghavvemi, Mahmoud; Yew, Chia W.

    2001-10-01

    Two-phase flow in pipelines containing elbows represents a common situation in the oil and gas industries. This study deals with the stratified flow regime between the gas and liquid phase through an elbow. It is of interest to study the change in wave characteristics by measuring the wave velocity and wavelength at the inlet and outlet of the elbow. The experiments were performed under concurrent air-water stratified flow in a horizontal transparent polycarbonate pipe of 0.05m diameter and superficial air and water velocities up to 8.97 and 0.0778 m/s respectively. A non-intrusive video imaging technique was applied to capture the waves. For image analysis, a frame by frame direct overlapping method was used to detect for pulsating flow and a pixel shifting method based on the detection of minimum values in the overlap function was used to determine wave velocity and wavelength. Under superficial gas velocity of less than 4.44 m/s, the results suggest a regular pulsating outflow produced by the elbow. At higher gas velocities, more random pulsation was found and the emergence of localized interfacial waves was detected. Wave velocities measured by this technique were found to produce satisfactory agreement with direct measurements.

  3. Effects space velocity and gas velocity on DeNOx catalyst with HC reductant; HC tenka NOx kangen shokubai no kukan sokudo oyobi gas ryusoku no eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niimura, K.; Tsujimura, K.

    1995-04-20

    Discussions were given on the hydrocarbon added reduction catalyst method to reduce NOx in diesel engine exhaust gas. An experiment was carried out with actual exhaust gas from a diesel engine by using a copper ion exchanged zeolite catalyst that has been coated on a honeycomb type substrate, and using propylene as a reductant. When the catalyst volume was changed with the exhaust gas space velocity kept constant, the NOx conversion ratio decreased as the catalyst length is decreased, and the activity shifted to the lower temperature side. The NOx reduction efficiency increased if the faster the gas flow velocity. On the other hand, if the gas flow velocity is slow, the NOx reduction can be carried out with relatively small amount of the reductant. When the catalyst volume was changed with the passing gas amount kept constant, the NOx conversion ratio decreased largely if the catalyst length is decreased. Further, the NOx reduction characteristics shift to the higher temperature side. In the catalyst length direction, the NOx reduction activity shows a relatively uniform action. However, a detailed observation reveals that the reaction heat in the catalyst is transmitted to the wake improving the activity, hence the further down the flow, the NOx conversion ratio gets higher in efficiency. 5 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. MAGNETIZED GAS IN THE SMITH HIGH VELOCITY CLOUD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, Alex S.; McClure-Griffiths, Naomi M.; Mao, S. A.; Benjamin, Robert A.; Lockman, Felix J.

    2013-01-01

    We report the first detection of magnetic fields associated with the Smith High Velocity Cloud. We use a catalog of Faraday rotation measures toward extragalactic radio sources behind the Smith Cloud, new H I observations from the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope, and a spectroscopic map of Hα from the Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper Northern Sky Survey. There are enhancements in rotation measure (RM) of ≈100 rad m –2 which are generally well correlated with decelerated Hα emission. We estimate a lower limit on the line-of-sight component of the field of ≈8 μG along a decelerated filament; this is a lower limit due to our assumptions about the geometry. No RM excess is evident in sightlines dominated by H I or Hα at the velocity of the Smith Cloud. The smooth Hα morphology of the emission at the Smith Cloud velocity suggests photoionization by the Galactic ionizing radiation field as the dominant ionization mechanism, while the filamentary morphology and high (≈1 Rayleigh) Hα intensity of the lower-velocity magnetized ionized gas suggests an ionization process associated with shocks due to interaction with the Galactic interstellar medium. The presence of the magnetic field may contribute to the survival of high velocity clouds like the Smith Cloud as they move from the Galactic halo to the disk. We expect these data to provide a test for magnetohydrodynamic simulations of infalling gas

  5. Multiple inert gas elimination technique by micropore membrane inlet mass spectrometry--a comparison with reference gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kretzschmar, Moritz; Schilling, Thomas; Vogt, Andreas; Rothen, Hans Ulrich; Borges, João Batista; Hachenberg, Thomas; Larsson, Anders; Baumgardner, James E; Hedenstierna, Göran

    2013-10-15

    The mismatching of alveolar ventilation and perfusion (VA/Q) is the major determinant of impaired gas exchange. The gold standard for measuring VA/Q distributions is based on measurements of the elimination and retention of infused inert gases. Conventional multiple inert gas elimination technique (MIGET) uses gas chromatography (GC) to measure the inert gas partial pressures, which requires tonometry of blood samples with a gas that can then be injected into the chromatograph. The method is laborious and requires meticulous care. A new technique based on micropore membrane inlet mass spectrometry (MMIMS) facilitates the handling of blood and gas samples and provides nearly real-time analysis. In this study we compared MIGET by GC and MMIMS in 10 piglets: 1) 3 with healthy lungs; 2) 4 with oleic acid injury; and 3) 3 with isolated left lower lobe ventilation. The different protocols ensured a large range of normal and abnormal VA/Q distributions. Eight inert gases (SF6, krypton, ethane, cyclopropane, desflurane, enflurane, diethyl ether, and acetone) were infused; six of these gases were measured with MMIMS, and six were measured with GC. We found close agreement of retention and excretion of the gases and the constructed VA/Q distributions between GC and MMIMS, and predicted PaO2 from both methods compared well with measured PaO2. VA/Q by GC produced more widely dispersed modes than MMIMS, explained in part by differences in the algorithms used to calculate VA/Q distributions. In conclusion, MMIMS enables faster measurement of VA/Q, is less demanding than GC, and produces comparable results.

  6. Gas and particle velocity measurements in an induction plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesinski, J.; Gagne, R.; Boulos, M.I.

    1981-08-01

    Laser doppler anemometry was used for the measurements of the plasma and particle velocity profiles in the coil region of an inductively coupled plasma. Results are reported for a 50 mm ID induction torch operated at atmospheric pressure with argon as the plasma gas. The oscillator frequency was 3 MHz and the power in the coil was varied between 4.6 and 10.5 kW. The gas velocity measurements were made using a fine carbon powder as a tracer (dp approx. = 1 μm). Measurements were also made with larger silicon particles (dp = 33 μm and sigma = 13 μm) centrally injected in the plasma under different operating conditions

  7. Gas density fluctuations in the Perseus Cluster: clumping factor and velocity power spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuravleva, I.; Churazov, E.; Arevalo, P.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Allen, S. W.; Fabian, A. C.; Forman, W. R.; Sanders, J. S.; Simionescu, A.; Sunyaev, R.; Vikhlinin, A.; Werner, N.

    2015-05-20

    X-ray surface brightness fluctuations in the core of the Perseus Cluster are analysed, using deep observations with the Chandra observatory. The amplitude of gas density fluctuations on different scales is measured in a set of radial annuli. It varies from 7 to 12 per cent on scales of ~10–30 kpc within radii of 30–220 kpc from the cluster centre. Using a statistical linear relation between the observed amplitude of density fluctuations and predicted velocity, the characteristic velocity of gas motions on each scale is calculated. The typical amplitudes of the velocity outside the central 30 kpc region are 90–140 km s-1 on ~20–30 kpc scales and 70–100 km s-1 on smaller scales ~7–10 kpc. The velocity power spectrum (PS) is consistent with cascade of turbulence and its slope is in a broad agreement with the slope for canonical Kolmogorov turbulence. The gas clumping factor estimated from the PS of the density fluctuations is lower than 7–8 per cent for radii ~30–220 kpc from the centre, leading to a density bias of less than 3–4 per cent in the cluster core. Uncertainties of the analysis are examined and discussed. Future measurements of the gas velocities with the Astro-H, Athena and Smart-X observatories will directly measure the gas density–velocity perturbation relation and further reduce systematic uncertainties in this analysis.

  8. Improved gas distributor for coating HTGR fuel particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lackey, W.J.; Stinton, D.P.; Sease, J.D.

    1977-01-01

    The important criteria to be considered in design of the gas distributor are: (1) The distributor should ideally spread or disperse the gas over the full area of the coating chamber to maximize the particle gas contact area and thereby increase both particle circulation and the percentage of the input gas that ends up as coating. (2) The gas should not heat up during its passage through the distributor. Otherwise the gas would partially decompose prematurely, causing excessive coating deposition within or on the distributor. (3) The distributor should be designed to minimize accidental drainage of particles from the furnace and blowover of particles into the effluent system. (4) The distributor should be capable of depositing both carbon and SiC coatings of high quality as regards to density, preferred orientation, permeability, defective fraction, and other product attributes. (5) The distributor should be amenable to use with large particle charges and short turnaround times and be simple, inexpensive, and reliable. We have devised a simple distributor that incorporates the five criteria listed above. The new design is termed a blind-hole frit. All the gas passes through the thinned blind-hole regions, and thus the gas velocity is considerably higher than for a flat frit of uniform thickness. Because of its high velocity, the gas does not have time to reach a high enough temperature to cause deposition within the frit. Also most of the resistance to gas flow is provided by the porous distributor and not by the particle bed; therefore, localized variations of the quantity of particles above any particular gas inlet do not significantly alter the flow rate through that inlet

  9. Measurement of pressure distributions and velocity fields of water jet intake flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Eun Ho; Yoon, Sang Youl; Kwon, Seong Hoon; Chun, Ho Hwan; Kim, Mun Chan; Kim, Kyung Chun

    2002-01-01

    Waterjet propulsion system can avoid cavitation problem which is being arised conventional propeller propulsion system. The main issue of designing waterjet system is the boundary layer separation at ramp and lib of water inlet. The flow characteristics are highly depended on Jet to Velocity Ratio(JVR) as well as the intake geometry. The present study is conducted in a wind tunnel to provide accurate pressure destribution at the inlet wall and velocity field of the inlet and exit planes. Particle image velocimetry technique is used to obtain detail velocity fields. Pressure distributions and velocity field are discussed with accelerating and deaccelerating flow zones and the effect of JVR

  10. Theoretical analysis of stack gas emission velocity measurement by optical scintillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yang; Dong Feng-Zhong; Ni Zhi-Bo; Pang Tao; Zeng Zong-Yong; Wu Bian; Zhang Zhi-Rong

    2014-01-01

    Theoretical analysis for an online measurement of the stack gas flow velocity based on the optical scintillation method with a structure of two parallel optical paths is performed. The causes of optical scintillation in a stack are first introduced. Then, the principle of flow velocity measurement and its mathematical expression based on cross correlation of the optical scintillation are presented. The field test results show that the flow velocity measured by the proposed technique in this article is consistent with the value tested by the Pitot tube. It verifies the effectiveness of this method. Finally, by use of the structure function of logarithmic light intensity fluctuations, the theoretical explanation of optical scintillation spectral characteristic in low frequency is given. The analysis of the optical scintillation spectrum provides the basis for the measurement of the stack gas flow velocity and particle concentration simultaneously. (general)

  11. Dryout characteristics and flow behavior of gas-water two-phase flow through U-shaped and inverted U-shaped bends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takemura, T.; Roko, K.; Shiraha, M.; Midoriyama, S.

    1986-01-01

    Experimental results are presented on the flow behavior, pressure drop characteristics, and dryout characteristics by joule heating for the gas-water flow through U-shaped and inverted U-shaped tubes invertical plane. The height of the vertical straight section of the test tube is 4100 mm, and two bend radii, 116 mm and 435 mm, are chosen for the experiments. The test tubes used are of transparent acrylic resin for the flow behavior test, and of stainless steel for the other tests, inside diameter being 18 mm for the former and 18.5 mm for the latter. Flow patterns in the vertical upflow and downflow sections are shown on the diagram of the superficial gas velocity versus liquid velocity. Further, the flow behavior in the bend section is made clear in relation to flow rates of gas and liquid. The pressure drop between inlet and outlet of the test tube for the made clear in relation to flow rates of gas and liquid. The pressure drop between inlet and outlet of the test tube for the two-phase flow is shown in comparison with that for the single-phase flow of water. The threshold conditions of dryout in the bend section by joule heatig are shown on the diagram of the superficial gas velocity versus liquid velocity. The location of the dryout in the bend section is also clarified. (orig.)

  12. Measurement of laminar burning velocities and Markstein lengths of diluted hydrogen-enriched natural gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, Haiyan; Jiao, Qi; Huang, Zuohua; Jiang, Deming [State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Flow in Power Engineering, School of Energy and Power Eng., Xi' an Jiaotong University (China)

    2009-01-15

    The laminar flame characteristics of natural gas-hydrogen-air-diluent gas (nitrogen/CO{sub 2}) mixtures were studied in a constant volume combustion bomb at various diluent ratios, hydrogen fractions and equivalence ratios. Both unstretched laminar burning velocity and Markstein length were obtained. The results showed that hydrogen fraction, diluent ratio and equivalence ratio have combined influence on laminar burning velocity and flame instability. The unstretched laminar burning velocity is reduced at a rate that is increased with the increase of the diluent ratio. The reduction effect of CO{sub 2} diluent gas is stronger than that of nitrogen diluent gas. Hydrogen-enriched natural gas with high hydrogen fraction can tolerate more diluent gas than that with low hydrogen fraction. Markstein length can either increase or decrease with the increase of the diluent ratio, depending on the hydrogen fraction of the fuel. (author)

  13. Velocity slip and translational nonequilibrium of ternary gas mixtures in free jet expansions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cattolica, R.J.; Gallagher, R.J.; Anderson, J.B.; Talbot, L.

    1977-05-01

    An aerodynamic isotope separation technique based on the velocity slip between gases in a rarefied flow has been proposed. To evaluate the efficiency of this separation technique, the velocity and translational temperature of the individual species in binary and ternary gas mixtures of argon and neon in helium have been studied in a low density hypersonic free jet. The velocity and temperature of the gas were determined from the Doppler shift and broadening of the fluorescence excited by an electron beam. Velocity slip and translational nonequilibrium were observed over a range of source pressures. A separation factor based on the velocity slip and temperatures was also determined. A comparison of the velocity slip, temperatures, and separation factor with the results of a Monte Carlo simulation of the flow field is presented

  14. Effect of blade sweep on inlet flow in axial compressor cascades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Chang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents comparative numerical studies to investigate the effects of blade sweep on inlet flow in axial compressor cascades. A series of swept and straight cascades was modeled in order to obtain a general understanding of the inlet flow field that is induced by sweep. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD package was used to simulate the cascades and obtain the required three-dimensional (3D flow parameters. A circumferentially averaged method was introduced which provided the circumferential fluctuation (CF terms in the momentum equation. A program for data reduction was conducted to obtain a circumferentially averaged flow field. The influences of the inlet flow fields of the cascades were studied and spanwise distributions of each term in the momentum equation were analyzed. The results indicate that blade sweep does affect inlet radial equilibrium. The characteristic of radial fluid transfer is changed and thus influencing the axial velocity distributions. The inlet flow field varies mainly due to the combined effect of the radial pressure gradient and the CF component. The axial velocity varies consistently with the incidence variation induced by the sweep, as observed in the previous literature. In addition, factors that might influence the radial equilibrium such as blade camber angles, solidity and the effect of the distance from the leading edge are also taken into consideration and comparatively analyzed.

  15. Cook Inlet Planning Area oil and gas lease sale 149: Final environmental impact statement. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This environmental impact statement (EIS) discusses a proposed oil and gas lease sale in the Cook Inlet Planning Area, analyzes its potential effects on the environment, describes alternatives, presents major issues determined through the scoping process and staff analyses, and evaluates potential mitigating measures. Descriptions of the (1) leasing and scoping process are given in Section 1, (2) alternatives and mitigating measures in Section 2, and (3) description of the environment in Section 3. The potential effects of the lease sale are analyzed in Section 4. Alternative 1, the proposed action, is based on offering for lease 402 blocks (approximately 0.8 million hectares--1.98 million acres) in lower Cook Inlet that range from about 5 to 50 kilometers (3 to 25 mi) offshore. Alterative 2 (No Lease Sale) would cancel the proposed lease sale tentatively scheduled for April 1996. Alternative 2 (Delay the Sale) would delay the proposed sale for 2 years. Alternatives 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9 would defer from leasing areas adjacent to the lower Cook Inlet and northwestern Shelikof Strait: the size of areas deferred ranges from about 5 to 45% of the area proposed for Alternative 1. After a thorough review, the Secretary of the Interior will decide which alternative or combination of alternatives will be included in the Notice of Sale

  16. Effect of Inlet Velocity on Heat Transfer Process in a Novel Photo-Fermentation Biohydrogen Production Bioreactor using Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiping Zhang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Temperature is one of the most important parameters in biohydrogen production by way of photo-fermentation. Enzymatic hydrolysate of corncob powder was utilized as a substrate. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD modeling was conducted to simulate the temperature distribution in an up-flow baffle photo-bioreactor (UBPB. Commercial software, GAMBIT, was utilized to mesh the photobioreactor geometry, while the software FLUENT was adopted to simulate the heat transfer in the photo-fermentation process. The inlet velocity had a marked impact on heat transfer; the most optimum velocity value was 0.0036 m•s-1 because it had the smallest temperature fluctuation and the most uniform temperature distribution. When the velocity decreased from 0.0036 m•s-1 to 0.0009 m•s-1, more heat was accumulated. The results obtained from the established model were consistent to the actual situation by comparing the simulation values and experimental values. The hydrogen production simulation verified that the novel UBPB was suitable for biohydrogen production by photosynthetic bacteria because of its uniform temperature and lighting distribution, with the serpentine flow pattern also providing mixing without additional energy input, thus enhancing the mass transfer and biohydrogen yield.

  17. Velocity Dispersion of Ionized Gas and Multiple Supernova Explosions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasiliev E. O.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We use 3D numerical simulations to study the evolution of the Hα intensity and velocity dispersion for single and multiple supernova (SN explosions. We find that the IHα– σ diagram obtained for simulated gas flows is similar in shape to that observed in dwarf galaxies. We conclude that colliding SN shells with significant difference in age are responsible for high velocity dispersion that reaches up to ≳ 100 km s−1. Such a high velocity dispersion could be hardly obtained for a single SN remnant. Peaks of velocity dispersion in the IHα– σ diagram may correspond to several isolated or merged SN remnants with moderately different ages. Degrading the spatial resolution in the Hα intensity and velocity dispersion maps makes the simulated IHα– σ diagrams close to those observed in dwarf galaxies not only in shape, but also quantitatively.

  18. Numerical calculation of velocity distribution near a vertical flat plate immersed in bubble flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Akihiro; Nakamura, Hajime; Horihata, Hideyuki; Hiraoka, Setsuro; Aragaki, Tsutomu; Yamada, Ikuho; Isoda, Shinji.

    1992-01-01

    Liquid and gas velocity distributions for bubble flow near a vertical flat plate were calculated numerically by using the SIMPLER method, where the flow was assumed to be laminar, two-dimensional, and at steady state. The two-fluid flow model was used in the numerical analysis. To calculate the drag force on a small bubble, Stokes' law for a rigid sphere is applicable. The dimensionless velocity distributions which were arranged with characteristic boundary layer thickness and maximum liquid velocity were adjusted with a single line and their forms were similar to that for single-phase wall-jet flow. The average wall shear stress derived from the velocity gradient at the plate wall was strongly affected by bubble diameter but not by inlet liquid velocity. The present dimensionless velocity distributions obtained numerically agreed well with previous experimental results, and the proposed numerical algorithm was validated. (author)

  19. Spatial heterogeneity of biofouling under different cross-flow velocities in reverse osmosis membrane systems

    KAUST Repository

    Farhat, Nadia; Staal, M.; Bucs, Szilard; Van Loosdrecht, M.C.M.; Vrouwenvelder, Johannes S.

    2016-01-01

    the spatial heterogeneity of biofilm development over the membrane fouling simulator (MFS) length (inlet and outlet part) at three different cross-flow velocities (0.08, 0.12 and 0.16 m/s). The MFS contained sheets of membrane and feed spacer and simulatedComparison of the inlet and outlet position of the MFS showed a more (i) heterogeneous biofilm distribution and a (ii) higher biological activity at the inlet side (first 2.5 cm) for all cross-flow velocities. The lowest cross-flow velocity had

  20. Modeling of flowing gas diode pumped alkali lasers: dependence of the operation on the gas velocity and on the nature of the buffer gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmashenko, B D; Rosenwaks, S

    2012-09-01

    A simple, semi-analytical model of flowing gas diode pumped alkali lasers (DPALs) is presented. The model takes into account the rise of temperature in the lasing medium with increasing pump power, resulting in decreasing pump absorption and slope efficiency. The model predicts the dependence of power on the flow velocity in flowing gas DPALs and checks the effect of using a buffer gas with high molar heat capacity and large relaxation rate constant between the 2P3/2 and 2P1/2 fine-structure levels of the alkali atom. It is found that the power strongly increases with flow velocity and that by replacing, e.g., ethane by propane as a buffer gas the power may be further increased by up to 30%. Eight kilowatt is achievable for 20 kW pump at flow velocity of 20  m/s.

  1. Velocity slip of gas mixtures in free jet expansions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cattolica, R.J.; Talbot, L.; Coe, D.

    1976-11-01

    Velocity slip in gas mixtures of argon and helium in axisymmetric free jet expansions has been measured using a grating monochromator together with a computer-controlled Fabry-Perot interferometer to observe the fluorescence excited by an electron beam. The Doppler shift between the fluorescence observed parallel and perpendicular to the centerline of the free jet was used to measure the mean velocity of a particular species along the jet centerline, employing the 4880 A line for argon and the 5016 A line for helium. By alternately tracking the parallel and perpendicular fluorescence, the Doppler shift due to the mean velocity was measured directly with an accuracy of 1 percent. Flow field surveys have been made in the initial acceleration region where the flow becomes hypersonic and in the far field region. The differences between argon and helium mean velocities (velocity slip) are in good agreement with molecular beam data and show a correlation with an inverse Knudsen number

  2. Large Eddy Simulation and the effect of the turbulent inlet conditions in the mixing Tee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ndombo, Jean-Marc; Howard, Richard J.A.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → LES of Tee junctions can easily reproduce the bulk flow. → The presence or absence of a turbulent inlet condition has an affect on the wall heat transfer. → The maximum heat transfer moves 1 cm and reduces by 10% when a turbulent inlet is used. - Abstract: Thermal fatigue in Pressurized Water Reactor plants has been found to be very acute in some hot/cold Tee junction mixing zones. Large Eddy Simulation (LES) can be used to capture the unsteadiness which is responsible for the large mechanical stresses associated with thermal fatigue. Here one LES subgrid model is studied, namely the Dynamic Smagorinsky model. This paper has two goals. The first is to demonstrate some results obtained using the EDF R and D Code Saturne applied to the Vattenfall Tee junction benchmark (version 2006) and the second is to look at the effect of including synthetic turbulence at the Tee junction pipe inlets. The last goal is the main topic of this paper. The Synthetic Eddy Method is used to create the turbulent inlet conditions and is applied to two kinds of grids. One contains six million cells and the other ten million. The addition of turbulence at the inlet does not seem to have much effect on the bulk flow and all computations are in good agreement with the experimental data. However, the inlet turbulence does have an effect on the near wall flow. All cases show that the wall temperature fluctuation and the wall temperature/velocity correlation are not the same when a turbulent inlet condition is used. Inclusion of the turbulent inlet condition moves the downstream location of the maximum temperature/velocity correlation by 1 cm and reduces its magnitude by 10%. This result is very important because the temperature/velocity correlation is closely related to the turbulent heat transfer in the flow, which is in turn responsible for the mechanical stresses on the structure. Finally we have studied in detail the influence of the turbulent inlet condition just

  3. The effects of inlet temperature and turbulence characteristics on the flow development inside a gas turbine exhaust diffuser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomela, Christian Loangola

    The overall industrial gas turbine efficiency is known to be influenced by the pressure recovery in the exhaust system. The design and, subsequently, the performance of an industrial gas turbine exhaust diffuser largely depend on its inflow conditions dictated by the turbine last stage exit flow state and the restraints of the diffuser internal geometry. Recent advances in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) tools and the availability of computer hardware at an affordable cost made the virtual tool a very attractive one for the analysis of fluid flow through devices like a diffuser. In this backdrop, CFD analyses of a typical industrial gas turbine hybrid exhaust diffuser, consisting of an annular diffuser followed by a conical portion, have been carried out with the purpose of improving the performance of these thermal devices using an open-source CFD code "OpenFOAM". The first phase in the research involved the validation of the CFD approach using OpenFOAM by comparing CFD results against published benchmark experimental data. The numerical results closely captured the flow reversal and the separated boundary layer at the shroud wall where a steep velocity gradient has been observed. The standard k --epsilon turbulence model slightly over-predicted the mean velocity profile in the casing boundary layer while slightly under-predicted it in the reversed flow region. A reliable prediction of flow characteristics in this region is very important as the presence of the annular diffuser inclined wall has the most dominant effect on the downstream flow development. The core flow region and the presence of the hub wall have only a minor influence as reported by earlier experimental studies. Additional simulations were carried out in the second phase to test the veracity of other turbulence models; these include RNG k--epsilon, the SST k--o, and the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence models. It was found that a high resolution case with 47.5 million cells using the SST k

  4. Cook Inlet Planning Area oil and gas lease sale 149: Final environmental impact statement. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This environmental impact statement discusses a proposed oil and gas lease sale in the Cook Inlet Planning Area, analyzes its potential effects on the environment, describes alternatives, presents major issues determined through the scoping process and staff analyses, and evaluates potential mitigating measures. During the Draft Environmental Impact Statement comment period, written statements and oral testimonies were provided by various governmental agencies, organizations, businesses, and individuals. This report contains a review and analysis of comments received on the above issues. Appendices are included which contain resource estimates and various issues relating to oil spills

  5. CFD study of the minimum bubbling velocity of Geldart A particles in gas-fluidized beds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Junwu; Hoef, van der M.A.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2010-01-01

    The minimum bubbling velocity, which demarcates the homogeneous and heterogeneous fluidization regimes, plays a pivotal role in gas fluidization of Geldart A particles. We systematically study the effect of gas and particle properties on the minimum bubbling velocity of Geldart A particles in

  6. Evaluation of catalytic combustion of actual coal-derived gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanton, J. C.; Shisler, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    The combustion characteristics of a Pt-Pl catalytic reactor burning coal-derived, low-Btu gas were investigated. A large matrix of test conditions was explored involving variations in fuel/air inlet temperature and velocity, reactor pressure, and combustor exit temperature. Other data recorded included fuel gas composition, reactor temperatures, and exhaust emissions. Operating experience with the reactor was satisfactory. Combustion efficiencies were quite high (over 95 percent) over most of the operating range. Emissions of NOx were quite high (up to 500 ppm V and greater), owing to the high ammonia content of the fuel gas.

  7. Velocities of gas and plasmas from real time holographic interferograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deason, V.A.; Reynolds, L.D.; McIlwain, M.E.

    1985-01-01

    A truly noninvasive measurement technique for plasma velocity has not been demonstrated. Plasma velocities have been inferred using laser Doppler anemometry or photographic analysis of the position of smoke or small particles. This paper describes an alternate method based on the refractive index change created in a plasma by a gaseous probe material injected into the plasma. This disturbance of the refractive index can be monitored using interferometry. A multipass real time holographic interferometry system was used to follow the changes of the interferometric pattern, and the data was recorded using high speed cinematography. A transparent model of an industrial plasma torch was employed in these studies, and a number of different types of trace gas materials were used to track the plasma flow. Using a combination of multipass interferometry and a laser line absorbing gas, sufficient interferometric sensitivity was obtained to determine plasma velocities in the 100 m/s range. Based on these results, a working plasma torch was constructed. Further studies are planned using this torch and actual plasmas

  8. Measurement of Gas Velocities in the Presence of Solids in the Riser of a Cold Flow Circulating Fluidized Bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spenik, J.; Ludlow, J.C.; Compston, R.; Breault, R.W.

    2007-01-01

    The local gas velocity and the intensity of the gas turbulence in a gas/solid flow are a required measurement in validating the gas and solids flow structure predicted by computational fluid dynamic (CFD) models in fluid bed and transport reactors. The high concentration and velocities of solids, however, make the use of traditional gas velocity measurement devices such as pitot tubes, hot wire anemometers and other such devices difficult. A method of determining these velocities has been devised at the National Energy Technology Laboratory employing tracer gas. The technique developed measures the time average local axial velocity gas component of a gas/solid flow using an injected tracer gas which induces changes in the heat transfer characteristics of the gas mixture. A small amount of helium is injected upstream a known distance from a self-heated thermistor. The thermistor, protected from the solids by means of a filter, is exposed to gases that are continuously extracted from the flow. Changes in the convective heat transfer characteristics of the gas are indicated by voltage variations across a Wheatstone bridge. When pulsed injections of helium are introduced to the riser flow the change in convective heat transfer coefficient of the gas can be rapidly and accurately determined with this instrument. By knowing the separation distance between the helium injection point and the thermistor extraction location as well as the time delay between injection and detection, the gas velocity can easily be calculated. Variations in the measured gas velocities also allow the turbulence intensity of the gas to be estimated

  9. GAS METERING PUMP

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, C.M.

    1957-12-31

    A liquid piston gas pump is described, capable of pumping minute amounts of gas in accurately measurable quantities. The pump consists of a flanged cylindrical regulating chamber and a mercury filled bellows. Sealed to the ABSTRACTS regulating chamber is a value and having a gas inlet and outlet, the inlet being connected by a helical channel to the bellows. A gravity check valve is in the gas outlet, so the gas passes through the inlet and the helical channel to the bellows where the pumping action as well as the metering is accomplished by the actuation of the mercury filled bellows. The gas then flows through the check valve and outlet to any associated apparatus.

  10. Hydromagnetic Rayleigh endash Taylor instability in high-velocity gas-puff implosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roderick, N.F.; Peterkin, R.E. Jr.; Hussey, T.W.; Spielman, R.B.; Douglas, M.R.; Deeney, C.

    1998-01-01

    Experiments using the Saturn pulsed power generator have produced high-velocity z-pinch plasma implosions with velocities over 100 cm/μs using both annular and uniform-fill gas injection initial conditions. Both types of implosion show evidence of the hydromagnetic Rayleigh endash Taylor instability with the uniform-fill plasmas producing a more spatially uniform pinch. Two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations including unsteady flow of gas from a nozzle into the diode region have been used to investigate these implosions. The instability develops from the nonuniform gas flow field that forms as the gas expands from the injection nozzle. Instability growth is limited to the narrow unstable region of the current sheath. For the annular puff the unstable region breaks through the inner edge of the annulus increasing nonlinear growth as mass ejected from the bubble regions is not replenished by accretion. This higher growth leads to bubble thinning and disruption producing greater nonuniformity at pinch for the annular puff. The uniform puff provides gas to replenish bubble mass loss until just before pinch resulting in less bubble thinning and a more uniform pinch. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  11. Cross contamination in dual inlet isotope ratio mass spectrometers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, H.A.J.; Neubert, R.E.M.; Visser, G.H.

    2000-01-01

    Since the early days of geochemical isotope ratio mass spectrometry there has always been the problem of cross contamination, i.e. the contamination of the sample gas with traces of reference gas land vice versa) in a dual inlet system and the analyzer itself. This was attributable to valve leakages

  12. Steady and Unsteady Velocity Measurements in a Small Turbocharger Turbine with Computational Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamanis, N.; Palfreyman, D.; Arcoumanis, C.; Martinez-Botas, R. F.

    2006-07-01

    The detailed flow characteristics of three high-pressure-ratio mixed-flow turbines were investigated under both steady and pulsating flow conditions. Two rotors featured a constant inlet blade angle, one with 12 blades and the second with 10. The third rotor was shorter and had a nominally constant incidence angle. The rotors find application on an automotive high-speed large commercial diesel turbocharger. The steady flow entering and exiting the blades has been quantified by a laser Doppler velocimetry system. The measurements were performed at a plane 3.0-mm ahead of the rotor leading edge and 9.5-mm downstream the rotor trailing edge. The turbine test conditions corresponded to the peak efficiency point at two rotational speeds, 29,400 and 41,300-rpm. The results were resolved in a blade-to-blade sense to examine fully the nature of the flow at turbocharger representative conditions. A correlation between the combined effects of incidence and exit flow angle with the isentropic efficiency has been verified. Regarding pulsating flow, the velocity data and their corresponding instantaneous velocity triangles were resolved in a blade-to-blade sense to understand better the complex phenomenon. The results highlighted the potential of a nominally constant incidence design to absorb better the inadequacy of the volute to discharge the exhaust gas uniformly along the blade leading edge. A double vortex rotating in a clockwise sense propagated on the plane normal to the meridional direction. This should be attributed to the effect of the passing blade that was acting as a blockage to the flow. The phenomenon was more pronounced near the suction and pressure surfaces of the blade, but diminished at the mid-passage region where the flow exhibited its best level of guidance. The full mixed flow turbine stage under transient conditions was modelled firstly with a 'steady' inlet and secondly with a 'pulsating' inlet boundary condition. In both cases comparison was made to

  13. Application of microturbines to control emissions from associated gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Darren D.

    2013-04-16

    A system for controlling the emission of associated gas produced from a reservoir. In an embodiment, the system comprises a gas compressor including a gas inlet in fluid communication with an associated gas source and a gas outlet. The gas compressor adjusts the pressure of the associated gas to produce a pressure-regulated associated gas. In addition, the system comprises a gas cleaner including a gas inlet in fluid communication with the outlet of the gas compressor, a fuel gas outlet, and a waste product outlet. The gas cleaner separates at least a portion of the sulfur and the water from the associated gas to produce a fuel gas. Further, the system comprises a gas turbine including a fuel gas inlet in fluid communication with the fuel gas outlet of the gas cleaner and an air inlet. Still further, the system comprises a choke in fluid communication with the air inlet.

  14. Two-branch Gas Experiments for Hot Gas Mixing of HTR-PM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Yangping; Hao Pengefei; He Heng; Li Fu; Shi Lei

    2014-01-01

    A model experiment is proposed to investigate the hot gas mixing efficiency of HTR-PM reactor outlet. The test facility is introduced which is set at a scale of 1:2.5 comparing with the design of thermal mixing structure at HTR-PM reactor outlet. The test facility using air as its flow media includes inlet pipe system, electric heaters, main body of test facility, hot gas duct, exhaust pipe system and I&C system. Two-branch gas experiments are conducted on the test facility and the values of thermal-fluid parameters are collected and analyzed which include the temperature, pressure and velocity of the flow as well as the temperature of the tube wall. The analysis result shows the mixing efficiency is higher than the requirement of thermal mixing by steam generator even with conservative assumption which indicates that the design of hog gas mixing structure of HTR-PM fulfills the requirement for thermal mixing at two-branch working conditions. (author)

  15. Flow distribution in the inlet plenum of steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khadamakar, H.P.; Patwardhan, A.W.; Padmakumar, G.; Vaidyanathan, G.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Various flow distribution devices have been studied to make the flow distribution uniform in axial as well as tangential direction. → Experiments were performed using Ultrasonic Velocity Profiler (UVP) and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). → CFD modeling has been carried out to give more insights. → Various flow distribution devices have been compared. - Abstract: The flow distribution in a 1/5th and 1/8th scale models of inlet plenum of steam generator (SG) has been studied by a combination of experiments and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations. The distribution of liquid sodium in the inlet plenum of the SG strongly affects the thermal as well as mechanical performance of the steam generator. Various flow distribution devices have been used to make the flow distribution uniform in axial as well as tangential direction in the window region. Experiments have been conducted to measure the radial velocity distribution using Ultrasonic Velocity Profiler (UVP) and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) under a variety of conditions. CFD modeling has been carried out for various configurations to give more insight into the flow distribution phenomena. The various flow distribution devices have been compared on the basis of a non-uniformity index parameter.

  16. Dual-mode nonlinear instability analysis of a confined planar liquid sheet sandwiched between two gas streams of unequal velocities and prediction of droplet size and velocity distribution using maximum entropy formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Debayan; Nath, Sujit; Bhanja, Dipankar

    2018-04-01

    Twin fluid atomizers utilize the kinetic energy of high speed gases to disintegrate a liquid sheet into fine uniform droplets. Quite often, the gas streams are injected at unequal velocities to enhance the aerodynamic interaction between the liquid sheet and surrounding atmosphere. In order to improve the mixing characteristics, practical atomizers confine the gas flows within ducts. Though the liquid sheet coming out of an injector is usually annular in shape, it can be considered to be planar as the mean radius of curvature is much larger than the sheet thickness. There are numerous studies on breakup of the planar liquid sheet, but none of them considered the simultaneous effects of confinement and unequal gas velocities on the spray characteristics. The present study performs a nonlinear temporal analysis of instabilities in the planar liquid sheet, produced by two co-flowing gas streams moving with unequal velocities within two solid walls. The results show that the para-sinuous mode dominates the breakup process at all flow conditions over the para-varicose mode of breakup. The sheet pattern is strongly influenced by gas velocities, particularly for the para-varicose mode. Spray characteristics are influenced by both gas velocity and proximity to the confining wall, but the former has a much more pronounced effect on droplet size. An increase in the difference between gas velocities at two interfaces drastically shifts the droplet size distribution toward finer droplets. Moreover, asymmetry in gas phase velocities affects the droplet velocity distribution more, only at low liquid Weber numbers for the input conditions chosen in the present study.

  17. Experimental study on effects of inlet boundary layer thickness and boundary layer fence in a turbine cascade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jun, Y. M.; Chung, J. T.

    2000-01-01

    The working fluid from the combustor to the turbine stage of a gas turbine makes various boundary layer thickness. Since the inlet boundary layer thickness is one of the important factors that affect the turbine efficiency, It is necessary to investigate secondary flow and loss with various boundary layer thickness conditions. In the present study, the effect of various inlet boundary layer thickness on secondary flow and loss and the proper height of the boundary layer fences for various boundary layer thickness were investigated. Measurements of secondary flow velocity and total pressure loss within and downstream of the passage were taken under 5 boundary layer thickness conditions, 16, 36, 52, 69, 110mm. It was found that total pressure loss and secondary flow areas were increased with increase of thickness but they were maintained almost at the same position. At the following research about the boundary layer fences, 1/6, 1/3, 1/2 of each inlet boundary layer thickness and 12mm were used as the fence heights. As a result, it was observed that the proper height of the fences was generally constant since the passage vortex remained almost at the same position. Therefore once the geometry of a cascade is decided, the location of the passage vortex and the proper fence height are appeared to be determined at the same time. When the inlet boundary layer thickness is relatively small, the loss caused by the proper fence becomes bigger than end wall loss so that it dominates secondary loss. In these cases the proper fence height is decided not by the cascade geometry but by the inlet boundary layer thickness as previous investigations

  18. Renormalization of Fermi Velocity in a Composite Two Dimensional Electron Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weger, M.; Burlachkov, L.

    We calculate the self-energy Σ(k, ω) of an electron gas with a Coulomb interaction in a composite 2D system, consisting of metallic layers of thickness d ≳ a0, where a0 = ħ2ɛ1/me2 is the Bohr radius, separated by layers with a dielectric constant ɛ2 and a lattice constant c perpendicular to the planes. The behavior of the electron gas is determined by the dimensionless parameters kFa0 and kFc ɛ2/ɛ1. We find that when ɛ2/ɛ1 is large (≈5 or more), the velocity v(k) becomes strongly k-dependent near kF, and v(kF) is enhanced by a factor of 5-10. This behavior is similar to the one found by Lindhard in 1954 for an unscreened electron gas; however here we take screening into account. The peak in v(k) is very sharp (δk/kF is a few percent) and becomes sharper as ɛ2/ɛ1 increases. This velocity renormalization has dramatic effects on the transport properties; the conductivity at low T increases like the square of the velocity renormalization and the resistivity due to elastic scattering becomes temperature dependent, increasing approximately linearly with T. For scattering by phonons, ρ ∝ T2. Preliminary measurements suggest an increase in vk in YBCO very close to kF.

  19. Carbon isotope evidence for the latitudinal distribution and wind speed dependence of the air-sea gas transfer velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakauer, Nir Y.

    2006-01-01

    The air-sea gas transfer velocity is an important determinant of the exchange of gases, including CO 2 , between the atmosphere and ocean, but the magnitude of the transfer velocity and what factors control it remains poorly known. Here, we use oceanic and atmospheric observations of 14 C and 13 C to constrain the global mean gas transfer velocity as well as the exponent of its wind speed dependence, utilizing the distinct signatures left by the air-sea exchange of 14 CO 2 and 13 CO 2 . While the atmosphere and ocean inventories of 14 CO 2 and 13 CO 2 constrain the mean gas transfer velocity, the latitudinal pattern in the atmospheric and oceanic 14 C and 13 C distributions contain information about the wind speed dependence. We computed the uptake of bomb 14 C by the ocean for different transfer velocity patterns using pulse response functions from an ocean general circulation model, and evaluated the match between the predicted bomb 14 C concentrations and observationally based estimates for the 1970s-1990s. Using a wind speed climatology based on satellite measurements, we solved either for the best-fit global relationship between gas exchange and mean wind speed or for the mean gas transfer velocity over each of 11 ocean regions. We also compared the predicted consequences of different gas exchange relationships on the rate of change and interhemisphere gradient of 14 C in atmospheric CO 2 with tree-ring and atmospheric measurements. Our results suggest that globally, the dependence of the air-sea gas transfer velocity on wind speed is close to linear, with an exponent of 0.5 ± 0.4, and that the global mean gas transfer velocity at a Schmidt number of 660 is 20 ± 3 cm/hr, similar to the results of previous analyses. We find that the air-sea flux of 13 C estimated from atmosphere and ocean observations also suggests a lower than quadratic dependence of gas exchange on wind speed

  20. Swozzle based burner tube premixer including inlet air conditioner for low emissions combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuthill, Richard Sterling; Bechtel, II, William Theodore; Benoit, Jeffrey Arthur; Black, Stephen Hugh; Bland, Robert James; DeLeonardo, Guy Wayne; Meyer, Stefan Martin; Taura, Joseph Charles; Battaglioli, John Luigi

    2002-01-01

    A burner for use in a combustion system of a heavy-duty industrial gas turbine includes a fuel/air premixer having an air inlet, a fuel inlet, and an annular mixing passage. The fuel/air premixer mixes fuel and air into a uniform mixture for injection into a combustor reaction zone. The burner also includes an inlet flow conditioner disposed at the air inlet of the fuel/air premixer for controlling a radial and circumferential distribution of incoming air. The pattern of perforations in the inlet flow conditioner is designed such that a uniform air flow distribution is produced at the swirler inlet annulus in both the radial and circumference directions. The premixer includes a swozzle assembly having a series of preferably air foil shaped turning vanes that impart swirl to the airflow entering via the inlet flow conditioner. Each air foil contains internal fuel flow passages that introduce natural gas fuel into the air stream via fuel metering holes that pass through the walls of the air foil shaped turning vanes. By injecting fuel in this manner, an aerodynamically clean flow field is maintained throughout the premixer. By injecting fuel via two separate passages, the fuel/air mixture strength distribution can be controlled in the radial direction to obtain optimum radial concentration profiles for control of emissions, lean blow outs, and combustion driven dynamic pressure activity as machine and combustor load are varied.

  1. Influence of current velocity and wind speed on air-water gas exchange in a mangrove estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, David T.; Coffineau, Nathalie; Hickman, Benjamin; Chow, Nicholas; Koffman, Tobias; Schlosser, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge of air-water gas transfer velocities and water residence times is necessary to study the fate of mangrove derived carbon exported into surrounding estuaries and ultimately to determine carbon balances in mangrove ecosystems. For the first time, the 3He/SF6 dual tracer technique, which has been proven to be a powerful tool to determine gas transfer velocities in the ocean, is applied to Shark River, an estuary situated in the largest contiguous mangrove forest in North America. The mean gas transfer velocity was 3.3 ± 0.2 cm h-1 during the experiment, with a water residence time of 16.5 ± 2.0 days. We propose a gas exchange parameterization that takes into account the major sources of turbulence in the estuary (i.e., bottom generated shear and wind stress).

  2. Characteristics of gas-liquid dynamics in operation of oil fields producing non-Newtonian crude oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirzadzhanzade, A Kh; Khasaev, A M; Gurbanov, R S; Akhmedov, Z M

    1968-08-01

    Experimental studies have shown that crude oils from Azerbaidzhan, Uzbekistan, Tataria, Kazakhstan and other areas have anomalous properties under reservoir conditions. Such crude oils are non-Newtonian and (1) obey Darcys Law at low velocities; (2) obey an exponential law at higher velocities; and (3) obey a modified Darcys Law at most velocities. A discussion is given of (1) flow of non-Newtonian crude oils together with gas or water; (2) flow of non-Newtonian crude oils in well tubing; (3) behavior of wells producing non-Newtonian crude oils; and (4) pumping of non-Newtonian oils in wells. Experiments have shown that a visco-plastic liquid does not fill pump inlets completely; as the diameter of the pump inlet decreases so also does the degree of liquid filling. A statistical analysis of production data from 160 fields with Newtonian oil and 129 fields with non- Newtonian oil has shown that much higher production is obtained from fields with Newtonian crude oils.

  3. Tidal and subtidal exchange flows at an inlet of the Wadden Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle-Levinson, Arnoldo; Stanev, Emil; Badewien, Thomas H.

    2018-03-01

    Observations of underway velocity profiles during complete spring and neap tidal cycles were used to determine whether the spatial structures of tidal and subtidal flows at a tidal inlet in a multiple-inlet embayment are consistent with those observed at single-inlet embayments. Measurements were obtained at the Otzumer Balje, one of the multiple inlets among the East Frisian Islands of the Wadden Sea. The 1.5 km-wide inlet displayed a bathymetric profile consisting of a channel ∼15 m deep flanked by tide observations spanned 36 h in the period May 11-12, 2011, while spring tide measurements exceeded 48 h from May 17 to May 19, 2011. Analysis of observations indicate that frictional effects from bathymetry molded tidal flows. Spatial distributions of semidiurnal tidal current amplitude and phase conform to those predicted by an analytical model for a basin with one inlet. Maximum semidiurnal flows appear at the surface in the channel, furthest away from bottom friction effects. Therefore, Otzumer Balje displays tidal hydrodynamics that are independent of the other inlets of the embayment. Subtidal exchange flows are laterally sheared, with residual inflow in the channel combined with outflow over shoals. The spatial distribution of these residual flows follow theoretical expectations of tidally driven flows interacting with bathymetry. Such distribution is similar to the tidal residual circulation at other inlets with only one communication to the ocean, suggesting that at subtidal scales the Otzumer Balje responds to tidal forcing independently of the other inlets.

  4. Performance of the University of Denver Low Turbulence, Airborne Aerosol Inlet in ACE-Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafleur, B.; Wilson, J. C.; Seebaugh, W. R.; Gesler, D.; Hilbert, H.; Mullen, J.; Reeves, J. M.

    2002-12-01

    The University of Denver Low Turbulence Inlet (DULTI) was flown on the NCAR C-130 in ACE-Asia. This inlet delivered large sample flows at velocities of a few meters per second at the exit of the inlet. This flow was slowed from the true air speed of the aircraft (100 to 150 m/s) to a few meters per second in a short diffuser with porous walls. The flow in the diffusing section was laminar. The automatic control system kept the inlet operating at near isokinetic intake velocities and in laminar flow for nearly all the flight time. The DULTI permits super micron particles to be sampled and delivered with high efficiency to the interior of the aircraft where they can be measured or collected. Because most of the air entering the inlet is removed through the porous medium, the sample flow experiences inertial enhancements. Because these enhancements occur in laminar flow, they are calculable using FLUENT. Enhancement factors are defined as the ratio of the number of particles of a given size per unit mass of air in the sample to the number of particles of that size per unit mass of air in the ambient. Experimenters divide measured mixing ratios of the aerosol by the enhancement factor to get the ambient mixing ratio of the particles. The diffuser used in ACE-Asia differed from that used in PELTI (2000), TexAQS2000 (2000) and ITCT (2002). In this poster, the flow parameters measured in the inlet in flight are compared with those calculated from FLUENT. And enhancement factors are presented for flight conditions. The enhancement factors are found to depend upon the Stokes number of particles in the entrance to the inlet and the ratio of the mass flow rate of air removed by suction to the mass flow rate delivered as sample.

  5. Measurements of gas velocity in supersonic flow using a laser beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Airoldi, V.J.T.; Santos, R. dos

    1982-01-01

    A study of measurements of supersonic velocities in a wind tunnel using a laser beam was performed. Techniques using lasers are most suitable because they do not disturb the gas flow. This work presents the technique entitled as fringe technique. It works using interference patterns due to two perpendicular laser beams crossing the sample (i.e. the gas flow). Experimental results are compared with other usual techniques. (R.S.)

  6. Inlet Geomorphology Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    APR 2015 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2015 to 00-00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Inlet Geomorphology Evolution 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...Std Z39-18 Coastal Inlets Research Program Inlet Geomorphology Evolution The Inlet Geomorphology Evolution work unit of the CIRP evaluates

  7. Measurements of the drift velocity using a small gas chamber for monitoring of the CMS muon system

    CERN Document Server

    Frangenheim, J

    This diploma thesis presents measurements of the drift velocity of electrons in gas. A small gas detector (VDC1 ) is used. This chamber is intended for measurement and monitoring of the drift velocity in the gas of the muon chambers of the gas detector system in the barrel area of the CMS-detector2 at the European Research Center for Particle Physics CERN near Geneva. The drift velocity is, together with the drift time, a key parameter for measurements with drift chambers. The aim of this thesis is to perform test measurements to determine parameters of the chamber and also to estimate systematic errors. Beside the drift velocity, further parameters of the gas like the pressure and the temperature are measured and accounted for. For the further work with the VDCs, analysis software has been created which is used for the analysis of the measurements. Parallel to this work, necessary improvements, e.g. for the high voltage robustness, were also implemented and tested. In addition, studies and test measurements ...

  8. Comparative study of the discrete velocity and lattice Boltzmann methods for rarefied gas flows through irregular channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Wei; Lindsay, Scott; Liu, Haihu; Wu, Lei

    2017-08-01

    Rooted from the gas kinetics, the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is a powerful tool in modeling hydrodynamics. In the past decade, it has been extended to simulate rarefied gas flows beyond the Navier-Stokes level, either by using the high-order Gauss-Hermite quadrature, or by introducing the relaxation time that is a function of the gas-wall distance. While the former method, with a limited number of discrete velocities (e.g., D2Q36), is accurate up to the early transition flow regime, the latter method (especially the multiple relaxation time (MRT) LBM), with the same discrete velocities as those used in simulating hydrodynamics (i.e., D2Q9), is accurate up to the free-molecular flow regime in the planar Poiseuille flow. This is quite astonishing in the sense that less discrete velocities are more accurate. In this paper, by solving the Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook kinetic equation accurately via the discrete velocity method, we find that the high-order Gauss-Hermite quadrature cannot describe the large variation in the velocity distribution function when the rarefaction effect is strong, but the MRT-LBM can capture the flow velocity well because it is equivalent to solving the Navier-Stokes equations with an effective shear viscosity. Since the MRT-LBM has only been validated in simple channel flows, and for complex geometries it is difficult to find the effective viscosity, it is necessary to assess its performance for the simulation of rarefied gas flows. Our numerical simulations based on the accurate discrete velocity method suggest that the accuracy of the MRT-LBM is reduced significantly in the simulation of rarefied gas flows through the rough surface and porous media. Our simulation results could serve as benchmarking cases for future development of the LBM for modeling and simulation of rarefied gas flows in complex geometries.

  9. Comparative study of the discrete velocity and lattice Boltzmann methods for rarefied gas flows through irregular channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Wei; Lindsay, Scott; Liu, Haihu; Wu, Lei

    2017-08-01

    Rooted from the gas kinetics, the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is a powerful tool in modeling hydrodynamics. In the past decade, it has been extended to simulate rarefied gas flows beyond the Navier-Stokes level, either by using the high-order Gauss-Hermite quadrature, or by introducing the relaxation time that is a function of the gas-wall distance. While the former method, with a limited number of discrete velocities (e.g., D2Q36), is accurate up to the early transition flow regime, the latter method (especially the multiple relaxation time (MRT) LBM), with the same discrete velocities as those used in simulating hydrodynamics (i.e., D2Q9), is accurate up to the free-molecular flow regime in the planar Poiseuille flow. This is quite astonishing in the sense that less discrete velocities are more accurate. In this paper, by solving the Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook kinetic equation accurately via the discrete velocity method, we find that the high-order Gauss-Hermite quadrature cannot describe the large variation in the velocity distribution function when the rarefaction effect is strong, but the MRT-LBM can capture the flow velocity well because it is equivalent to solving the Navier-Stokes equations with an effective shear viscosity. Since the MRT-LBM has only been validated in simple channel flows, and for complex geometries it is difficult to find the effective viscosity, it is necessary to assess its performance for the simulation of rarefied gas flows. Our numerical simulations based on the accurate discrete velocity method suggest that the accuracy of the MRT-LBM is reduced significantly in the simulation of rarefied gas flows through the rough surface and porous media. Our simulation results could serve as benchmarking cases for future development of the LBM for modeling and simulation of rarefied gas flows in complex geometries.

  10. A numerical scheme to calculate temperature and salinity dependent air-water transfer velocities for any gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, M. T.

    2010-02-01

    The transfer velocity determines the rate of exchange of a gas across the air-water interface for a given deviation from Henry's law equilibrium between the two phases. In the thin film model of gas exchange, which is commonly used for calculating gas exchange rates from measured concentrations of trace gases in the atmosphere and ocean/freshwaters, the overall transfer is controlled by diffusion-mediated films on either side of the air-water interface. Calculating the total transfer velocity (i.e. including the influence from both molecular layers) requires the Henry's law constant and the Schmidt number of the gas in question, the latter being the ratio of the viscosity of the medium and the molecular diffusivity of the gas in the medium. All of these properties are both temperature and (on the water side) salinity dependent and extensive calculation is required to estimate these properties where not otherwise available. The aim of this work is to standardize the application of the thin film approach to flux calculation from measured and modelled data, to improve comparability, and to provide a numerical framework into which future parameter improvements can be integrated. A detailed numerical scheme is presented for the calculation of the gas and liquid phase transfer velocities (ka and kw respectively) and the total transfer velocity, K. The scheme requires only basic physical chemistry data for any gas of interest and calculates K over the full range of temperatures, salinities and wind-speeds observed in and over the ocean. Improved relationships for the wind-speed dependence of ka and for the salinity-dependence of the gas solubility (Henry's law) are derived. Comparison with alternative schemes and methods for calculating air-sea flux parameters shows good agreement in general but significant improvements under certain conditions. The scheme is provided as a downloadable program in the supplementary material, along with input files containing molecular

  11. The Prescribed Velocity Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm

    The- velocity level in a room ventilated by jet ventilation is strongly influenced by the supply conditions. The momentum flow in the supply jets controls the air movement in the room and, therefore, it is very important that the inlet conditions and the numerical method can generate a satisfactory...

  12. A CFD Study on Inlet Plenum Flow Field of Pebble Bed Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Min Hwan; Lee, Won Jae; Chang, Jong Hwa

    2005-01-01

    High temperature gas cooled reactor, largely divided into two types of PBR (Pebble Bed Reactor) and PMR (Prismatic Modular Reactor), has becomes great interest of researchers in connection with the hydrogen production. KAERI has started a project to develop the gas cooled reactor for the hydrogen production and has been doing in-depth study for selecting the reactor type between PBR and PMR. As a part of the study, PBMR (Pebble Bed Modular Reactor) was selected as a reference PBR reactor for the CFD analysis and the flow field of its inlet plenum was simulated with computational fluid dynamics program CFX5. Due to asymmetrical arrangement of pipes to the inlet plenum, non-uniform flow distribution has been expected to occur, giving rise to non-uniform power distribution at the core. Flow fields of different arrangement of inlet pipes were also investigated, as one of measures to reduce the non-uniformity

  13. Validation of helium inlet design for ITER toroidal field coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyer, C.; Seo, K.; Hamada, K.; Foussat, A.; Le Rest, M.; Mitchell, N.; Decool, P.; Savary, F.; Sgobba, S.; Weiss, K.P.

    2014-01-01

    The ITER organization has performed design and its validation tests on a helium inlet structure for the ITER Toroidal Field (TF) coil under collaboration with CERN, KIT, and CEA Cadarache. Detailed structural analysis was performed in order to optimize the weld shape. A fatigue resistant design on the fillet weld between the shell covers and the jacket is an important point on the helium inlet structure. A weld filler material was selected based on tensile test at liquid helium temperature after Nb 3 Sn reaction heat treatment. To validate the design of the weld joint, fatigue tests at 7 K were performed using heat-treated butt weld samples. A pressure drop measurement of a helium inlet mock-up was performed by using nitrogen gas at room temperature in order to confirm uniform flow distribution and pressure drop characteristic. These tests have validated the helium inlet design. Based on the validation, Japanese and European Union domestic agencies, which have responsibilities of the TF coil procurement, are preparing the helium inlet mock-up for a qualification test. (authors)

  14. Forced and self-excited oscillations in a natural gas fired lean premixed combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Daesik; Park, Sung Wook

    2010-11-15

    An experimental study of the flame response in a premixed gas turbine combustor has been conducted at room temperature and under atmospheric pressure inlet conditions using natural gas. The fuel is premixed with the air upstream of a choked inlet to avoid equivalence ratio fluctuations. Therefore the observed flame response is only the result of the imposed velocity fluctuations, which are produced using a variable-speed siren. Also, a variable length combustor is designed for investigating characteristics of self-excited instabilities. Measurements are made of the velocity fluctuation in the mixing section using hot wire anemometry and of the heat release fluctuation in the combustor using chemiluminescence emission. The results are analyzed to determine the phase and gain of the flame transfer function. The results show that the gain of flame transfer function is closely associated both with inlet flow forcing conditions such as frequency and amplitude of modulation as well as the operating conditions such as equivalence ratio. In order to predict the operating conditions where the combustor goes stable or unstable at given combustor and nozzle designs, time-lag analysis was tried using convection time delay measured from the phase information of the transfer function. The model prediction was in very good agreement with the self-excited instability measurement. However, spatial heat release distribution became more significant in long flames than in short flames and also had an important influence on the system damping procedure. (author)

  15. The velocity of missiles generated by the disintegration of gas-pressurized vessels and pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, M.R.

    1984-01-01

    A theoretical model is developed to describe the velocity of fragments generated when a gas-pressurized vessel disintegrates. The predictions are compared with new and existing experimental data for spherical and cylindrical vessels and are shown to be an improvement over the widely used empirical correlation developed by Moore. It is also shown that, by an appropriate definition of the energy available for doing work on the fragments, the velocity of the fragments from the disintegration of a section of gas pipeline may be predicted by the same model

  16. The velocity of missiles generated by the disintegration of gas-pressurised vessels and pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, M.R.

    1983-03-01

    A theoretical model is developed to describe the velocity of fragments generated when a gas-pressurised vessel disintegrates. The predictions are compared with new and existing experimental data for spherical and cylindrical vessels and are shown to be an improvement over the widely used empirical correlation developed by Moore. It is also shown that, by an appropriate definition of the energy available for doing work on the fragments, the velocity of the fragments from the disintegration of a section of gas pipeline may be predicted by the same model. (author)

  17. Prediction of critical transport velocity for preventing sand deposition in gas-oil multiphase production and well systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bello, O.O.; Reinicke, K.M. [Technische Univ. Clausthal, Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany). Inst. of Petroleum Engineering; Teodoriu, C. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Petroleum Engineering

    2008-10-23

    The critical transport velocity is one of the key parameters for gas-oil-sand multiphase production and well system design and safe operation. Existing American Petroleum Institute Recommended Practice 14E (API RP 14E) for the sizing of multiphase flow systems suggests an equation to calculate threshold transport velocity. This equation only considers mixture density and does not account for factors such as fluid properties, gas-liquid flow patterns, sand loading, sand particle size, size distributions, shape factor and density. This work presents an improved computational methodology, which can be applied to estimate the critical transport velocity required to ensure efficient performance of gas-oil-sand multiphase production and well systems. The improved method is based on the modelling of three-phase gas-oil-sand pipe flow physics from first principle. Computations of the critical transport velocities show reasonable agreement with values calculated from mechanistic model (Danielson, 2007) for a relatively wide range of design and operating conditions. Compared with the mechanistic model (Danielson, 2007), the present method has no imposed limitations to the range of applicability. It is also takes into adequate account the effects of operating pressure, flow geometry, sand particle size, size distribution and shape factor, which have considerable influence on the critical transport velocity in gas-oil-sand multiphase production and well systems. (orig.)

  18. Coastal Inlet Model Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Coastal Inlet Model Facility, as part of the Coastal Inlets Research Program (CIRP), is an idealized inlet dedicated to the study of coastal inlets and equipped...

  19. Validation of Helium Inlet Design for ITER Toroidal Field Coil

    CERN Document Server

    Boyer, C; Hamada, K; Foussat, A; Le Rest, M; Mitchell, N; Decool, P; Savary, F; Sgobba, S; Weiss, K-P

    2014-01-01

    The ITER organization has performed design and its validation tests on a helium inlet structure for the ITER Toroidal Field (TF) coil under collaboration with CERN, KIT, and CEA-Cadarache. Detailed structural analysis was performed in order to optimize the weld shape. A fatigue resistant design on the fillet weld between the shell covers and the jacket is an important point on the helium inlet structure. A weld filler material was selected based on tensile test at liquid helium temperature after Nb$_{3}$Sn reaction heat treatment. To validate the design of the weld joint, fatigue tests at 7 K were performed using heat-treated butt weld samples. A pressure drop measurement of a helium inlet mock-up was performed by using nitrogen gas at room temperature in order to confirm uniform flow distribution and pressure drop characteristic. These tests have validated the helium inlet design. Based on the validation, Japanese and European Union domestic agencies, which have responsibilities of the TF coil procurement, a...

  20. A numerical scheme to calculate temperature and salinity dependent air-water transfer velocities for any gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. T. Johnson

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The ocean-atmosphere flux of a gas can be calculated from its measured or estimated concentration gradient across the air-sea interface and the transfer velocity (a term representing the conductivity of the layers either side of the interface with respect to the gas of interest. Traditionally the transfer velocity has been estimated from empirical relationships with wind speed, and then scaled by the Schmidt number of the gas being transferred. Complex, physically based models of transfer velocity (based on more physical forcings than wind speed alone, such as the NOAA COARE algorithm, have more recently been applied to well-studied gases such as carbon dioxide and DMS (although many studies still use the simpler approach for these gases, but there is a lack of validation of such schemes for other, more poorly studied gases. The aim of this paper is to provide a flexible numerical scheme which will allow the estimation of transfer velocity for any gas as a function of wind speed, temperature and salinity, given data on the solubility and liquid molar volume of the particular gas. New and existing parameterizations (including a novel empirical parameterization of the salinity-dependence of Henry's law solubility are brought together into a scheme implemented as a modular, extensible program in the R computing environment which is available in the supplementary online material accompanying this paper; along with input files containing solubility and structural data for ~90 gases of general interest, enabling the calculation of their total transfer velocities and component parameters. Comparison of the scheme presented here with alternative schemes and methods for calculating air-sea flux parameters shows good agreement in general. It is intended that the various components of this numerical scheme should be applied only in the absence of experimental data providing robust values for parameters for a particular gas of interest.

  1. A numerical scheme to calculate temperature and salinity dependent air-water transfer velocities for any gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, M. T.

    2010-10-01

    The ocean-atmosphere flux of a gas can be calculated from its measured or estimated concentration gradient across the air-sea interface and the transfer velocity (a term representing the conductivity of the layers either side of the interface with respect to the gas of interest). Traditionally the transfer velocity has been estimated from empirical relationships with wind speed, and then scaled by the Schmidt number of the gas being transferred. Complex, physically based models of transfer velocity (based on more physical forcings than wind speed alone), such as the NOAA COARE algorithm, have more recently been applied to well-studied gases such as carbon dioxide and DMS (although many studies still use the simpler approach for these gases), but there is a lack of validation of such schemes for other, more poorly studied gases. The aim of this paper is to provide a flexible numerical scheme which will allow the estimation of transfer velocity for any gas as a function of wind speed, temperature and salinity, given data on the solubility and liquid molar volume of the particular gas. New and existing parameterizations (including a novel empirical parameterization of the salinity-dependence of Henry's law solubility) are brought together into a scheme implemented as a modular, extensible program in the R computing environment which is available in the supplementary online material accompanying this paper; along with input files containing solubility and structural data for ~90 gases of general interest, enabling the calculation of their total transfer velocities and component parameters. Comparison of the scheme presented here with alternative schemes and methods for calculating air-sea flux parameters shows good agreement in general. It is intended that the various components of this numerical scheme should be applied only in the absence of experimental data providing robust values for parameters for a particular gas of interest.

  2. The effect of inlet distorted flow on steady and unsteady performance of a centrifugal compressor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jae Hyoung; Kang, Shin Hyoung

    2005-01-01

    Effects of inlet distorted flow on performance, stall and surge are experimentally investigated for a high-speed centrifugal compressor. Tested results for the distorted inlet flow cases are compared with the result of the undistorted one. The performance of compressor is slightly deteriorated due to the inlet distortion. The inlet distortion does not affect the number of stall cell and the propagation velocity. It also does not change stall inception flow rate. However, as the distortion increases, stall starts at the higher flow rate for low speed at the lower flow rate for high speed. For 50,000 rpm stall occurs as the flow rate decreases, however disappears for the smaller flow rate. This is due to the interaction of surge and stall. After the stall and surge interact, the number of stall cell decreases

  3. Influence of the altitude on the burning velocity of the natural gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arrieta, Andres Amell; Garcia Posada, Jorge Mario; Quilindo Valencia, Arvey; Henao Vallejo, Diego Alberto

    2004-01-01

    By the increasing use of natural gas in cities of Latin America located to high altitude, is necessary to study the effect of the altitude on the combustion, for example the burning velocity. This work is an experimental study of as it changes to the burning velocity with the altitude, being made test in sites with altitude of 40, 550, 1.020, 1.550, 2.040 and 2.550 meters. The result was that the variations are slight

  4. Long-term evolution of sand waves in the Marsdiep inlet. II: Relation to hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buijsman, Maarten C.; Ridderinkhof, Herman

    2008-05-01

    A discussion is presented about the mechanisms that govern the spatial and seasonal variability in sand-wave height and migration speed in the 4 km wide Marsdiep tidal inlet, the Netherlands. Since 1998, current velocities and water depths have been recorded with an ADCP that is mounted under the ferry 'Schulpengat'. In this paper, the current measurements were used to explain the sand-wave observations presented in Buijsman and Ridderinkhof [this issue. Long-term evolution of sand waves in the Marsdiep inlet. I: high-resolution observations. Continental Shelf Research, doi: 10.1016/j.csr.2007.10.011]. Across nearly the entire inlet, the sand waves migrate in the flood direction. In the flood-dominated southern part of the inlet, the 'measured' (i.e. based on sand-wave shape and migration speed) and predicted bedload transport agree in direction, magnitude, and trends, whereas in the ebb-dominated northern part the predicted bedload and suspended load transport is opposite to the sand-wave migration. In the southern part, 55% of the bedload transport is due to tidal asymmetries and 45% due to residual currents. In addition to the well-known tidal asymmetries, asymmetries that arise from the interaction of M2 and its overtides with S2 and its compound tides are also important. It is hypothesised that in the northern part of the inlet the advection of suspended sand and lag effects govern the sand-wave migration. The relative importance of suspended load transport also explains why the sand waves have smaller lee-slope angles, are smaller, more rounded, and more three-dimensional in the northern half of the inlet. The sand waves in this part of the inlet feature the largest seasonal variability in height and migration speed. This seasonal variability may be attributed to the tides or a seasonal fluctuation in fall velocity. In both cases sediment transport is enhanced in winter, increasing sand-wave migration and decreasing sand-wave height. The influence of storms

  5. Observations of high-velocity molecular gas near Herbig-Haro objects: HH 24--27 and HH 1--2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snell, R.L.; Edwards, S.

    1982-01-01

    High-velocity CO has been detected in the vicinity of the Herbig-Haro objects HH 24--27. These observations indicate that there are two sources of high-velocity outflow; one centered on an infrared source near HH 26, and the second centered roughly 2' south of HH 24. The redshifted and blueshifted wings in both sources are spatially separated suggesting that the high-velocity gas is due to energetic bipolar outflow from young stars embedded in the molecular cloud. The association of Herbig-Haro objects with regions of high-velocity gas suggests a common origin for both in the interaction of a stellar wind with the ambient molecular cloud. The mass loss rates implied by our observations, assuming that the rate of mass loss has been constant throughout the dynamical lifetime of the bipolar lobes, are roughly 10 -6 M/sub sun/ yr -1 for both sources. We have also searched for high-velocity gas near HH 1--2 but found no evidence for mass outflow in this region

  6. Magnetic resonance velocity imaging of liquid and gas two-phase flow in packed beds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankey, M H; Holland, D J; Sederman, A J; Gladden, L F

    2009-02-01

    Single-phase liquid flow in porous media such as bead packs and model fixed bed reactors has been well studied by MRI. To some extent this early work represents the necessary preliminary research to address the more challenging problem of two-phase flow of gas and liquid within these systems. In this paper, we present images of both the gas and liquid velocities during stable liquid-gas flow of water and SF(6) within a packing of 5mm spheres contained within columns of diameter 40 and 27 mm; images being acquired using (1)H and (19)F observation for the water and SF(6), respectively. Liquid and gas flow rates calculated from the velocity images are in agreement with macroscopic flow rate measurements to within 7% and 5%, respectively. In addition to the information obtained directly from these images, the ability to measure liquid and gas flow fields within the same sample environment will enable us to explore the validity of assumptions used in numerical modelling of two-phase flows.

  7. A simple measuring technique of surface flow velocity to analyze the behavior of velocity fields in hydraulic engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellez, Jackson; Gomez, Manuel; Russo, Beniamino; Redondo, Jose M.

    2015-04-01

    An important achievement in hydraulic engineering is the proposal and development of new techniques for the measurement of field velocities in hydraulic problems. The technological advances in digital cameras with high resolution and high speed found in the market, and the advances in digital image processing techniques now provides a tremendous potential to measure and study the behavior of the water surface flows. This technique was applied at the Laboratory of Hydraulics at the Technical University of Catalonia - Barcelona Tech to study the 2D velocity fields in the vicinity of a grate inlet. We used a platform to test grate inlets capacity with dimensions of 5.5 m long and 4 m wide allowing a zone of useful study of 5.5m x 3m, where the width is similar of the urban road lane. The platform allows you to modify the longitudinal slopes from 0% to 10% and transversal slope from 0% to 4%. Flow rates can arrive to 200 l/s. In addition a high resolution camera with 1280 x 1024 pixels resolution with maximum speed of 488 frames per second was used. A novel technique using particle image velocimetry to measure surface flow velocities has been developed and validated with the experimental data from the grate inlets capacity. In this case, the proposed methodology can become a useful tools to understand the velocity fields of the flow approaching the inlet where the traditional measuring equipment have serious problems and limitations. References DigiFlow User Guide. (2012), (June). Russo, B., Gómez, M., & Tellez, J. (2013). Methodology to Estimate the Hydraulic Efficiency of Nontested Continuous Transverse Grates. Journal of Irrigation and Drainage Engineering, 139(10), 864-871. doi:10.1061/(ASCE)IR.1943-4774.0000625 Teresa Vila (1), Jackson Tellez (1), Jesus Maria Sanchez (2), Laura Sotillos (1), Margarita Diez (3, 1), and J., & (1), M. R. (2014). Diffusion in fractal wakes and convective thermoelectric flows. Geophysical Research Abstracts - EGU General Assembly 2014

  8. Optimization of inlet plenum of A PBMR using surrogate modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang-Moon; Kim, Kwang-Yong

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of present work is to optimize the design of inlet plenum of PBMR type gas cooled nuclear reactor numerically using a combining of three-dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) analysis and surrogate modeling technique. Shear stress transport (SST) turbulence model is used as a turbulence closure. Three geometric design variables are selected, namely, rising channel diameter to plenum height ratio, aspect ratio of the plenum cross section, and inlet port angle. The objective function is defined as a linear combination of uniformity of three-dimensional flow distribution term and pressure drop in the inlet plenum and rising channels of PBMR term with a weighting factor. Twenty design points are selected using Latin-hypercube method of design of experiment and objective function values are obtained at each design point using RANS solver. (author)

  9. Performance prediction and flow field calculation for airfoil fan with impeller inlet clearance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Shin Hyoung; Cao, Renjing; Zhang, Yangjun

    2000-01-01

    The performance prediction of an airfoil fan using a commercial code, STAR/CD, is verified by comparing the calculated results with measured performance data and velocity fields of an airfoil fan. The effects of inlet tip clearance on performance are investigated. The calculations overestimate the pressure rise performance by about 10-25 percent. However, the performance reduction due to tip clearance is well predicted by numerical simulations. Main source of performance decrease is not only the slip factor but also impeller efficiency. The reduction in performance is 12-16 percent for 1 percent gap of the diameter. The calculated reductions in impeller efficiency and slip factor are also linearly proportional to the gap size. The span-wise distributions of phase averaged velocity and pressure at the impeller exit are strongly influenced by the radial gap size. The radial component of velocity and the flow angle increase over the passage as the gap increases. The slip factor decreases and the loss increases with the gap size. The high velocity of leakage jet affects the impeller inlet and passage flows. With a larger clearance, the main stream moves to the impeller hub side and high loss region extends from the shroud to the hub

  10. The influence of gas phase velocity fluctuations on primary atomization and droplet deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourmatzis, A.; Masri, A. R.

    2014-02-01

    The effects of grid-generated velocity fluctuations on the primary atomization and subsequent droplet deformation of a range of laminar liquid jets are examined using microscopic high-speed backlit imaging of the break-up zone and laser Doppler anemometry of the gas phase separately. This is done for fixed gas mean flow conditions in a miniature wind tunnel experiment utilizing a selection of fuels, turbulence-generating grids and two syringe sizes. The constant mean flow allows for an isolated study of velocity fluctuation effects on primary atomization in a close approximation to homogeneous decaying turbulence. The qualitative morphology of the primary break-up region is examined over a range of turbulence intensities, and spectral analysis is performed in order to ascertain the break-up frequency which, for a case of no grid, compares well with the existing literature. The addition of velocity fluctuations tends to randomize the break-up process. Slightly downstream of the break-up region, image processing is conducted in order to extract a number of metrics, which do not depend on droplet sphericity, and these include droplet aspect ratio and orientation, the latter quantity being somewhat unconventional in spray characterization. A turbulent Weber number which takes into account gas phase fluctuations is utilized to characterize the resulting droplet shapes, in addition to a mean Weber number . Above a a clear positive relationship exists between the mean aspect ratio of droplets and the turbulent Weber number where is varied by altering all relevant variables including the velocity root mean square, the initial droplet diameter, the surface tension and the density.

  11. Parametric simulation on enhancement of the Regenerative Gas Turbine performance by effect of Inlet Air Cooling system and Steam Injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aadel Abdulrazzaq Alkumait

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Iraq being one of the developing countries of the world considers energy efficiency and the impact of its generation on the environment an imperative process in improvement of its power generation policies. Iraq bearing high temperatures all year long results in reduction of air density, therefore, Inlet air Cooling and Steam Injection Gas Turbines are a striking addition to the regenerative gas turbines. Regenerating Gas turbines tend to have a high back work ratio and a high exhaust temperature, thus, it leads to a low efficiency in power generation in hotter climate. Moreover, STIG and IAC through fog cooling have known to be the best retrofitting methods available in the industry which improve the efficiency of generation from 30.5 to 43% and increase the power output from 22MW to 33.5MW as the outcomes of computer simulations reveal. Additionally, this happens without bringing about much extensive change to original features of the power generation cycle. Furthermore, STIG and spray coolers have also resulted in power boosting and exceeding generation efficiency of gas turbine power plant.

  12. Aero-Thermo-Structural Analysis of Inlet for Rocket Based Combined Cycle Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivakumar, K. N.; Challa, Preeti; Sree, Dave; Reddy, Dhanireddy R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    NASA has been developing advanced space transportation concepts and technologies to make access to space less costly. One such concept is the reusable vehicles with short turn-around times. The NASA Glenn Research Center's concept vehicle is the Trailblazer powered by a rocket-based combined cycle (RBCC) engine. Inlet is one of the most important components of the RBCC engine. This paper presents fluid flow, thermal, and structural analysis of the inlet for Mach 6 free stream velocity for fully supersonic and supercritical with backpressure conditions. The results concluded that the fully supersonic condition was the most severe case and the largest stresses occur in the ceramic matrix composite layer of the inlet cowl. The maximum tensile and the compressive stresses were at least 3.8 and 3.4, respectively, times less than the associated material strength.

  13. Automatic discrimination of bubbles and slugs in two-phase gas-liquid flow and measurement of the respective velocities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitremann, J.M.; Guilpin, C.; Postaire, J.

    1976-01-01

    The measurement of the interface velocity in a two-phase gas-liquid flow is a difficult problem, owing to the dispersion of the velocity components of individual bubbles, gas-slugs, droplets, waves, etc. An entirely automatic method is presented, it gives the velocity of slugs and bubbles independently, by discrimination of local phase probe signals into a 'slug' signal and a 'bubble' signal feeding a shape-recognition program. Both discriminated void fractions are also calculated by the apparatus [fr

  14. Effects of reaction temperature and inlet oxidizing gas flow rate on IG-110 graphite oxidation used in HTR-PM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Ximing; Dong Yujie; Zhou Yangping; Shi Lei; Sun Yuliang; Zhang Zuoyi; Li Zhengcao

    2017-01-01

    The oxidation behavior of a selected nuclear graphite (IG-110) used in Pebble-bed Module High Temperature gas-cooled Reactor was investigated under the condition of air ingress accident. The oblate rectangular specimen was oxidized by oxidant gas with oxygen mole fraction of 20% and flow rates of 125–500 ml/min at temperature of 400–1200°C. Experiment results indicate that the oxidation behavior can also be classified into three regimes according to temperature. The regime I at 400–550°C has lower apparent activation energies of 75.57–138.59 kJ/mol when the gas flow rate is 125–500 ml/min. In the regime II at 600–900°C, the oxidation rate restricted by the oxygen supply to graphite is almost stable with the increase of temperature. In the regime III above 900°C, the oxidation rate increases obviously with the increase of temperature.With the increase of inlet gas flow from 125 to 500 ml/min, the apparent activation energy in regime I is increased and the stableness of oxidation rate in regime II is reduced. (author)

  15. High velocity molecular gas near Herbig-Haro objects HH 7--11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snell, R.L.; Edwards, S.

    1981-01-01

    Observations of the J = 2-1 and J = 1-0 transitions of 12 CO and 13 CO reveal the presence of high velocity molecular gas associated with a low luminosity infrared source in the vicinity of the Herbig-Haro objects HH 7--11. The blueshifted and redshifted wings show peak intensities spatially separated by 1X5 (0.2 pc), suggesting an energetic bipolar outflow of gas from a young low mass star. The mass loss rate implied by these observations is 8 x 10 -6 M/sub sun/ yr -1

  16. Stability aspects of plasmas penetrated by neutral gas with respect to velocity driven modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohlsson, D.

    1978-08-01

    A study of the stability properties of dense partially ionized plasmas immersed in strong magnetic fields with respect to velocity driven modes are presented. First we consider modes driven by mass motion perpendicular to the lines of force and the unperturbed density and temperature gradients. The presence of a third fluid, neutral gas, gives under certain conditions rise to unstable modes. This type of instability arises independently or whether the applied electric field transverse to the lines of force, driving the mass motion, being parallel or antiparallel to the unperturbed density and temperature gradient. The presence of neutral gas also corresponds to stabilizing effects which, in certain parameter regions, result in a quenching of this instability. It is shown that modes driven by velocity shear perpendicular to the lines of force are effectively stabilized by viscous and resistive effects. These effects are in certain parameter ranges strongly enhanced on account of plasma-neutral gas interaction effects. In collisionless plasmas, modes driven by velocity shear parallel to the lines of force are stabilized by compressibility effects parallel to the magnetic field and by finite Larmor radius effects. (author)

  17. The impact of inlet angle and outlet angle of guide vane on pump in reversal based hydraulic turbine performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, F X; Yang, J H; Wang, X H; Zhang, R H; Li, C E

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, in order to research the impact of inlet angle and outlet angle of guide vane on hydraulic turbine performance, a centrifugal pump in reversal is adopted as turbine. A numerical simulation method is adopted for researching outer performance and flow field of turbine. The results show: inlet angle has a crucial role to turbine, to the same flow, there is a noticeable decline for the efficiency and head of turbine with the inlet angle increases. At the best efficiency point(EFP),to a same inlet angle, when the inlet angle greater than inlet angle, velocity circulation in guide vane outlet decreases, which lead the efficiency of turbine to reduce, Contrarily, the efficiency rises. With the increase of inlet angle and outlet angle, the EFP moves to the big flow area and the uniformity of pressure distribution becomes worse. The paper indicates that the inlet angle and outlet angle have great impact on the turbine performance, and the best combination exists for the inlet angle and outlet angle of the guide vane.

  18. Correlation between centre offsets and gas velocity dispersion of galaxy clusters in cosmological simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming-Hua; Zhu, Weishan; Zhao, Dong

    2018-05-01

    The gas is the dominant component of baryonic matter in most galaxy groups and clusters. The spatial offsets of gas centre from the halo centre could be an indicator of the dynamical state of cluster. Knowledge of such offsets is important for estimate the uncertainties when using clusters as cosmological probes. In this paper, we study the centre offsets roff between the gas and that of all the matter within halo systems in ΛCDM cosmological hydrodynamic simulations. We focus on two kinds of centre offsets: one is the three-dimensional PB offsets between the gravitational potential minimum of the entire halo and the barycentre of the ICM, and the other is the two-dimensional PX offsets between the potential minimum of the halo and the iterative centroid of the projected synthetic X-ray emission of the halo. Haloes at higher redshifts tend to have larger values of rescaled offsets roff/r200 and larger gas velocity dispersion σ v^gas/σ _{200}. For both types of offsets, we find that the correlation between the rescaled centre offsets roff/r200 and the rescaled 3D gas velocity dispersion, σ _v^gas/σ _{200} can be approximately described by a quadratic function as r_{off}/r_{200} ∝ (σ v^gas/σ _{200} - k_2)2. A Bayesian analysis with MCMC method is employed to estimate the model parameters. Dependence of the correlation relation on redshifts and the gas mass fraction are also investigated.

  19. INLET STRATIFICATION DEVICE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2006-01-01

    An inlet stratification device (5) for a circuit circulating a fluid through a tank (1 ) and for providing and maintaining stratification of the fluid in the tank (1 ). The stratification de- vice (5) is arranged vertically in the tank (1) and comprises an inlet pipe (6) being at least partially...... formed of a flexible porous material and having an inlet (19) and outlets formed of the pores of the porous material. The stratification device (5) further comprises at least one outer pipe (7) surrounding the inlet pipe (6) in spaced relationship thereto and being at least partially formed of a porous...

  20. Regional versus detailed velocity analysis to quantify hydrate and free gas in marine sediments : the south Shetland margin case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tinivella, U.; Loreto, M.F.; Accaino, F. [Inst. Nazionale di Oceanografia di Geofisica Sperimentale, Trieste (Italy)

    2008-07-01

    The presence of gas hydrate and free gas within marine sediments, deposited along the South Shetland margin, offshore the Antarctic Peninsula, was confirmed by low and high resolution geophysical data, acquired during three research cruises in 1989-1990. Seismic data analysis has demonstrated the presence of a bottom simulating reflector that is very strong and continuous in the eastern part of the margin. This seismic dataset was used in the past to extract detailed velocity information of the shallow structures by using traditional tomographic inversion and jointly tomographic inversion and pre-stack depth migration tool. This paper presented a method to obtain a regional seismic velocity field and information about hydrate and free gas presence in the marine sediments, by using an improved method of the standard analysis of the pre-stack depth migration output. The velocity field was obtained with a layer stripping approach and tomographic inversion of the reflections observed in common image gathering. The paper presented the seismic data and regional and detailed velocity analysis. The results of residual semblance analyses were also presented. Gas phase concentrations were then discussed. The velocity analysis revealed the presence of three main layers characterizing the first kilometer of sediments below the sea floor. In addition, velocity models and related gas-phase sections showed that gas was concentrated in different parts of the profile than where the hydrate was concentrated. This observation confirmed that geological structures and sedimentary processes controlled the gas and hydrate distribution, as observed along other margins. 7 refs., 5 figs.

  1. Geologic framework and petroleum systems of Cook Inlet basin, south-central Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    LePain, D.L.; Stanley, R.G.; Helmold, K.P.; Shellenbaum, D.P.; Stone, D.M.; Hite, D.M.

    2013-01-01

    This report provides a comprehensive overview of the stratigraphy, structure, tectonics, and petroleum systems of the Cook Inlet basin, an important oil- and gas-producing region in south-central Alaska.

  2. An evaluation of gas transfer velocity parameterizations during natural convection using DNS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredriksson, Sam T.; Arneborg, Lars; Nilsson, Hâkan; Zhang, Qi; Handler, Robert A.

    2016-02-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of free surface flows driven by natural convection are used to evaluate different methods of estimating air-water gas exchange at no-wind conditions. These methods estimate the transfer velocity as a function of either the horizontal flow divergence at the surface, the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation beneath the surface, the heat flux through the surface, or the wind speed above the surface. The gas transfer is modeled via a passive scalar. The Schmidt number dependence is studied for Schmidt numbers of 7, 150 and 600. The methods using divergence, dissipation and heat flux estimate the transfer velocity well for a range of varying surface heat flux values, and domain depths. The two evaluated empirical methods using wind (in the limit of no wind) give reasonable estimates of the transfer velocity, depending however on the surface heat flux and surfactant saturation. The transfer velocity is shown to be well represented by the expression, ks=A |Bν|1/4 Sc-n, where A is a constant, B is the buoyancy flux, ν is the kinematic viscosity, Sc is the Schmidt number, and the exponent n depends on the water surface characteristics. The results suggest that A=0.39 and n≈1/2 and n≈2/3 for slip and no-slip boundary conditions at the surface, respectively. It is further shown that slip and no-slip boundary conditions predict the heat transfer velocity corresponding to the limits of clean and highly surfactant contaminated surfaces, respectively. This article was corrected on 22 MAR 2016. See the end of the full text for details.

  3. The influence of liquid-gas velocity ratio on the noise of the cooling tower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bin; Liu, Xuanzuo; Chen, Chi; Zhao, Zhouli; Song, Jinchun

    2018-05-01

    The noise from the cooling tower has a great influence on psychological performance of human beings. The cooling tower noise mainly consists of fan noise, falling water noise and mechanical noise. This thesis used DES turbulence model with FH-W model to simulate the flow and sound pressure field in cooling tower based on CFD software FLUENT and analyzed the influence of different kinds noise, which affected by diverse factors, on the cooling tower noise. It can be concluded that the addition of cooling water can reduce the turbulence and vortex noise of the rotor fluid field in the cooling tower at some extent, but increase the impact noise of the liquid-gas two phase. In general, the cooling tower noise decreases with the velocity ratio of liquid to gas increasing, and reaches the lowest when the velocity ratio of liquid to gas is close to l.

  4. Fuel bundle impact velocities due to reverse flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahba, N.N.; Locke, K.E.

    1996-01-01

    If a break should occur in the inlet feeder or inlet header of a CANDU reactor, the rapid depressurization will cause the channel flow(s) to reverse. Depending on the gap between the upstream bundle and shield plug, the string of bundles will accelerate in the reverse direction and impact with the upstream shield plug. The reverse flow impact velocities have been calculated for various operating states for the Bruce NGS A reactors. The sensitivity to several analysis assumptions has been determined. (author)

  5. Surface shear stress dependence of gas transfer velocity parameterizations using DNS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredriksson, S. T.; Arneborg, L.; Nilsson, H.; Handler, R. A.

    2016-10-01

    Air-water gas-exchange is studied in direct numerical simulations (DNS) of free-surface flows driven by natural convection and weak winds. The wind is modeled as a constant surface-shear-stress and the gas-transfer is modeled via a passive scalar. The simulations are characterized via a Richardson number Ri=Bν/u*4 where B, ν, and u* are the buoyancy flux, kinematic viscosity, and friction velocity respectively. The simulations comprise 0Ric or kg=AShearu*Sc-n, Ri

  6. Observation and modeling of the evolution of an ephemeral storm-induced inlet: Pea Island Breach, North Carolina, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasquez Montoya, Liliana; Sciaudone, Elizabeth J.; Mitasova, Helena; Overton, Margery F.

    2018-03-01

    The Outer Banks of North Carolina is a wave-dominated barrier island system that has experienced the opening and closure of numerous inlets in the last four centuries. The most recent of those inlets formed after the breaching of Pea Island during Hurricane Irene in 2011. The Pea Island Breach experienced a rapid evolution including episodic curvature of the main channel, rotation of the ebb channel, shoaling, widening by Hurricane Sandy in 2012, and finally closing before the summer of 2013. Studying the life cycle of Pea Island Breach contributes to understanding the behavior of ephemeral inlets in breaching-prone regions. This topic has gained relevance due to rising sea levels, a phenomenon that increases the chances of ephemeral inlet formation during extreme events. This study explores the spatiotemporal effects of tides, waves, and storms on flow velocities and morphology of the breach by means of remotely sensed data, geospatial metrics, and a numerical model. The combined use of observations and results from modeling experiments allowed building a conceptual model to explain the life cycle of Pea Island Breach. Wave seasonality dominated the morphological evolution of the inlet by controlling the magnitude and direction of the longshore current that continuously built transient spits at both sides of the breach. Sensitivity analysis to external forcings indicates that ocean waves can modify water levels and velocities in the back barrier. Sound-side storm surge regulates overall growth rate, duration, and decay of peak water levels entering the inlet during extreme events.

  7. Characteristics Air Flow in Room Chamber Test Refrigerator Household Energy Consumption with Inlet Flow Variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susanto, Edy; Idrus Alhamid, M.; Nasruddin; Budihardjo

    2018-03-01

    Room Chamber is the most important in making a good Testing Laboratory. In this study, the 2-D modeling conducted to assess the effect placed the inlet on designing a test chamber room energy consumption of household refrigerators. Where the geometry room chamber is rectangular and approaching the enclosure conditions. Inlet varied over the side parallel to the outlet and compared to the inlet where the bottom is made. The purpose of this study was to determine and define the characteristics of the airflow in the room chamber using CFD simulation. CFD method is used to obtain flow characteristics in detail, in the form of vector flow velocity and temperature distribution inside the chamber room. The result found that the position of the inlet parallel to the outlet causes air flow cannot move freely to the side of the floor, even flow of air moves up toward the outlet. While by making the inlet is below, the air can move freely from the bottom up to the side of the chamber room wall as well as to help uniform flow.

  8. Statistics of surface divergence and their relation to air-water gas transfer velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, William E.; Liang, Hanzhuang; Zappa, Christopher J.; Loewen, Mark R.; Mukto, Moniz A.; Litchendorf, Trina M.; Jessup, Andrew T.

    2012-05-01

    Air-sea gas fluxes are generally defined in terms of the air/water concentration difference of the gas and the gas transfer velocity,kL. Because it is difficult to measure kLin the ocean, it is often parameterized using more easily measured physical properties. Surface divergence theory suggests that infrared (IR) images of the water surface, which contain information concerning the movement of water very near the air-water interface, might be used to estimatekL. Therefore, a series of experiments testing whether IR imagery could provide a convenient means for estimating the surface divergence applicable to air-sea exchange were conducted in a synthetic jet array tank embedded in a wind tunnel. Gas transfer velocities were measured as a function of wind stress and mechanically generated turbulence; laser-induced fluorescence was used to measure the concentration of carbon dioxide in the top 300 μm of the water surface; IR imagery was used to measure the spatial and temporal distribution of the aqueous skin temperature; and particle image velocimetry was used to measure turbulence at a depth of 1 cm below the air-water interface. It is shown that an estimate of the surface divergence for both wind-shear driven turbulence and mechanically generated turbulence can be derived from the surface skin temperature. The estimates derived from the IR images are compared to velocity field divergences measured by the PIV and to independent estimates of the divergence made using the laser-induced fluorescence data. Divergence is shown to scale withkLvalues measured using gaseous tracers as predicted by conceptual models for both wind-driven and mechanically generated turbulence.

  9. Parametric Simulation on Enhancement of the Regenerative Gas Turbine Performance by Effect of Inlet Air Cooling System and Steam Injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aadel A. Alkumait

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Aadel Abdulrazzaq Alkumait/Tikrit Journal of Engineering Sciences 22(1 (201538-44Iraq being one of the developing countries of the world considers energy efficiency and the impact of its generation on the environment an imperative process in improvement of its power generation policies. Iraq bearing high temperatures all year long results in reduction of air density, therefore, Inlet air Cooling and Steam Injection Gas Turbines are a striking addition to the regenerative gas turbines. Regenerating Gas turbines tend to have a high back work ratio and a high exhaust temperature, thus, it leads to a low efficiency in power generation in hotter climate. Moreover, STIG and IAC through fog cooling have known to be the best retrofitting methods available in the industry which improve the efficiency of generation from 30.5 to 43% and increase the power output from 22MW to 33.5MW as the outcomes of computer simulations reveal. Additionally, this happens without bringing about much extensive change to original features of the power generation cycle. Furthermore, STIG and spray coolers have also resulted in power boosting and exceeding generation efficiency of gas turbine power plant.

  10. Gas Velocities Reveal Newly Born Planets in a Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2018-06-01

    Occasionally, science comes together beautifully for a discovery and sometimes this happens for more than one team at once! Today we explore how two independent collaborations of scientists simultaneously found the very first kinematic evidence for young planets forming in a protoplanetary disk. Though they explored the same disk, the two teams in fact discovered different planets.Evidence for PlanetsALMAs view of the dust in the protoplanetary disk surrounding the young star HD 163296. Todays studies explore not the dust, but the gas of this disk. [ALMA (ESO/NAOJ/NRAO); A. Isella; B. Saxton (NRAO/AUI/NSF)]Over the past three decades, weve detected around 4,000 fully formed exoplanets. Much more elusive, however, are the young planets still in the early stages of formation; only a handful of these have been discovered. More observations of early-stage exoplanets are needed in order to understand how these worlds are born in dusty protoplanetary-disk environments, how they grow their atmospheres, and how they evolve.Recent observations by the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) have produced stunning images of protoplanetary disks. The unprecedented resolution of these images reveals substructure in the form of gaps and rings, hinting at the presence of planets that orbit within the disk and clear out their paths as they move. But there are also non-planet mechanisms that could produce such substructure, like grain growth around ice lines, or hydrodynamic instabilities in the disk.How can we definitively determine whether there are nascent planets embedded in these disks? Direct direction of a point source in a dust gap would be a strong confirmation, but now we have the next best thing: kinematic evidence for planets, from the motion of a disks gas.Observations of carbon monoxide line emission at +1km/s from the systemic velocity (left) vs. the outcome of a computer simulation (right) in the Pinte et al. study. A visible kink occurs in the flow

  11. A simple measurement method of molecular relaxation in a gas by reconstructing acoustic velocity dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ming; Liu, Tingting; Zhang, Xiangqun; Li, Caiyun

    2018-01-01

    Recently, a decomposition method of acoustic relaxation absorption spectra was used to capture the entire molecular multimode relaxation process of gas. In this method, the acoustic attenuation and phase velocity were measured jointly based on the relaxation absorption spectra. However, fast and accurate measurements of the acoustic attenuation remain challenging. In this paper, we present a method of capturing the molecular relaxation process by only measuring acoustic velocity, without the necessity of obtaining acoustic absorption. The method is based on the fact that the frequency-dependent velocity dispersion of a multi-relaxation process in a gas is the serial connection of the dispersions of interior single-relaxation processes. Thus, one can capture the relaxation times and relaxation strengths of N decomposed single-relaxation dispersions to reconstruct the entire multi-relaxation dispersion using the measurements of acoustic velocity at 2N  +  1 frequencies. The reconstructed dispersion spectra are in good agreement with experimental data for various gases and mixtures. The simulations also demonstrate the robustness of our reconstructive method.

  12. Influences of flow loss and inlet distortions from radial inlets on the performances of centrifugal compressor stages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Feng Hui; Mao, Yi Jun; Tan, Ji Jian

    2016-01-01

    Radial inlets are typical upstream components of multistage centrifugal compressors. Unlike axial inlets, radial inlets generate additional flow loss and introduce flow distortions at impeller inlets. Such distortions negatively affect the aerodynamic performance of compressor stages. In this study, industrial centrifugal compressor stages with different radial inlets are investigated via numerical simulations. Two reference models were built, simulated, and compared with each original compressor stage to analyze the respective and coupling influences of flow loss and inlet distortions caused by radial inlets on the performances of the compressor stage and downstream components. Flow loss and inlet distortions are validated as the main factors through which radial inlets negatively affect compressor performance. Results indicate that flow loss inside radial inlets decreases the performance of the whole compressor stage but exerts minimal effect on downstream components. By contrast, inlet distortions induced by radial inlets negatively influence the performance of the whole compressor stage and exert significant effects on downstream components. Therefore, when optimizing radial inlets, the reduction of inlet distortions might be more effective than the reduction of flow loss. This research provides references and suggestions for the design and improvement of radial inlets

  13. Influences of flow loss and inlet distortions from radial inlets on the performances of centrifugal compressor stages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Feng Hui; Mao, Yi Jun [School of Energy and Power Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an (China); Tan, Ji Jian [Dept. of Research and Development, Shenyang Blower Works Group Co., Ltd., Shenyang (China)

    2016-11-15

    Radial inlets are typical upstream components of multistage centrifugal compressors. Unlike axial inlets, radial inlets generate additional flow loss and introduce flow distortions at impeller inlets. Such distortions negatively affect the aerodynamic performance of compressor stages. In this study, industrial centrifugal compressor stages with different radial inlets are investigated via numerical simulations. Two reference models were built, simulated, and compared with each original compressor stage to analyze the respective and coupling influences of flow loss and inlet distortions caused by radial inlets on the performances of the compressor stage and downstream components. Flow loss and inlet distortions are validated as the main factors through which radial inlets negatively affect compressor performance. Results indicate that flow loss inside radial inlets decreases the performance of the whole compressor stage but exerts minimal effect on downstream components. By contrast, inlet distortions induced by radial inlets negatively influence the performance of the whole compressor stage and exert significant effects on downstream components. Therefore, when optimizing radial inlets, the reduction of inlet distortions might be more effective than the reduction of flow loss. This research provides references and suggestions for the design and improvement of radial inlets.

  14. Effect of Gas- and Liquid-injection Methods on Formation of Bubble and Liquid Slug at Merging Micro T-junction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jun Kyoung [Kyungnam Univ., Changwon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Chi Young [Pukyong Nat’l Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    In the present experimental study, the effect of gas- and liquid-injected methods on the formation of bubble and liquid slug at the merging micro T-junction of a square microchannel with dimensions 600 μm × 600 μm was investigated. Nitrogen and water were used as test fluids. The superficial velocities of the liquid and gas were in the range of 0.05 - 1 m/s, and 0.1 - 1 m/s, respectively, where the Taylor flow was observed. The bubble length, liquid slug length, bubble velocity, and bubble generation frequency were measured by analyzing the images captured using a high-speed camera. Under similar inlet superficial velocity conditions, in the case of gas injection to the main channel at the merging T-junction (T{sub g}as-liquid), the lengths of the bubble and liquid slug were longer, and the bubble generation frequency was lower than in the case of liquid injection to the main channel at the merging T-junction (T{sub l}iquid-gas). On the other hand, in both cases, the bubble velocity was almost the same. The previous correlation proposed using experimental data for T{sub l}iquid-gas had predicted the present experimental data of bubble length, bubble velocity, liquid slug length, and bubble generation frequency for T{sub g}as-liquid to be ~24%, ~9%, ~39%, ~55%, respectively.

  15. Inlet Geomorphology Evolution Work Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-30

    Coastal Inlets Research Program Inlet Geomorphology Evolution Work Unit The Inlet Geomorphology Evolution work unit of the CIRP develops methods...morphologic response. Presently, the primary tool of the Inlet Geomorphology Evolution work unit is the Sediment Mobility Tool (SMT), which allows the user

  16. Surface Tension Flows inside Surfactant-Added Poly(dimethylsiloxane Microstructures with Velocity-Dependent Contact Angles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyh Jian Chen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Filling of liquid samples is realized in a microfluidic device with applications including analytical systems, biomedical devices, and systems for fundamental research. The filling of a disk-shaped polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS microchamber by liquid is analyzed with reference to microstructures with inlets and outlets. The microstructures are fabricated using a PDMS molding process with an SU-8 mold. During the filling, the motion of the gas-liquid interface is determined by the competition among inertia, adhesion, and surface tension. A single ramp model with velocity-dependent contact angles is implemented for the accurate calculation of surface tension forces in a three-dimensional volume-of-fluid based model. The effects of the parameters of this functional form are investigated. The influences of non-dimensional parameters, such as the Reynolds number and the Weber number, both determined by the inlet velocity, on the flow characteristics are also examined. An oxygen-plasma-treated PDMS substrate is utilized, and the microstructure is modified to be hydrophilic. Flow experiments are conducted into both hydrophilic and hydrophobic PDMS microstructures. Under a hydrophobic wall condition, numerical simulations with imposed boundary conditions of static and dynamic contact angles can successfully predict the moving of the meniscus compared with experimental measurements. However, for a hydrophilic wall, accurate agreement between numerical and experimental results is obvious as the dynamic contact angles were implemented.

  17. Endwall Treatment and Method for Gas Turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathaway, Michael D. (Inventor); Strazisar, Anthony J. (Inventor); Suder, Kenneth L. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    An endwall treatment for a gas turbine engine having at least one rotor blade extending from a rotatable hub and a casing circumferentially surrounding the rotor and the hub, the endwall treatment including, an inlet formed in an endwall of the gas turbine engine adapted to ingest fluid from a region of a higher-pressure fluid, an outlet formed in the endwall and located in a region of lower pressure than the inlet, wherein the inlet and the outlet are in a fluid communication with each other, the outlet being adapted to inject the fluid from the inlet in the region of lower pressure, and wherein the outlet is at least partially circumferentially offset relative to the inlet.

  18. Effect of inlet conditions for numerical modelling of the urban boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnatowska, Renata

    2018-01-01

    The paper presents the numerical results obtained with the use of the ANSYS FLUENT commercial code for analysing the flow structure around two rectangular inline surface-mounted bluff bodies immersed in a boundary layer. The effects of the inflow boundary layer for the accuracy of the numerical modelling of the flow field around a simple system of objects are described. The analysis was performed for two concepts. In the former case, the inlet velocity profile was defined using the power law, whereas the kinetic and dissipation energy was defined from the equations according to Richards and Hoxey [1]. In the latter case, the inlet conditions were calculated for the flow over the rough area composed of the rectangular components.

  19. Electron drift velocities of Ar-CO2-CF4 gas mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markeloff, R.

    1994-11-01

    The muon spectrometer for the D0 experiment at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory uses proportional drift tubes filled with an Ar-CO 2 -CF 4 gas mixture. Measurements of drift velocity as a function of electric field magnitude for 90%-5%-5% and 90%-4%-6% Ar-CO 2 -CF 4 mixtures are presented, and our operational experiences with these gases at D0 is discussed

  20. Study on the design of inlet and exhaust system of a stationary internal combustion engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kesgin, Ugur

    2005-01-01

    The design and operational variables of inlet and exhaust systems are decisive to determine overall engine performance. The best engine overall performance can be obtained by proper design of the engine inlet and exhaust systems and by matching the correct turbocharger to the engine. This paper presents the results of investigations to design the inlet and exhaust systems of a stationary natural gas engine family. To do this, a computational model is verified in which zero dimensional phenomena within the cylinder and one dimensional phenomena in the engine inlet and exhaust systems are used. Using this engine model, the effects of the parameters of the inlet and exhaust systems on the engine performance are obtained. In particular, the following parameters are chosen: valve timing, valve diameter, valve lift profiles, diameter of the exhaust manifold, inlet and exhaust pipe lengths, and geometry of pipe junctions. Proper sizing of the inlet and exhaust pipe systems is achieved very precisely by these investigations. Also, valve timing is tuned by using the results obtained in this study. In general, a very high improvement potential for the engines studied here is presented

  1. Water droplet deformation under the motion in gas area with subsonic velocities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuibin Pavel A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The experimental investigation of water droplet deformation (characteristic dimensions 3 ÷ 6 mm when moving through the gas area (air with 1÷ 5 m/s velocities was carried out. The high-speed (delay time between the frames is less than 100 ns tools of cross-correlation videorecording were used. A cyclic change nature of the droplet shapes (from close to spherical to conditionally ellipsoidal was found. The characteristic times of “deformation cycles” and the maximal deviations of droplet dimensions relative to initial dimensions were determined. The influence of droplet velocities and its dimensions on the deformation characteristics was determined.

  2. Dimethylether: a low velocity, low diffusion drift chamber gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villa, F.

    1983-01-01

    There are two main motivations to look for a low electron mobility gas: the first is that a low drift velocity relaxes the need to measure drift times with nanosecond (or even subnanosecond) precision; the second is that (in an ideal drift geometry), the capability of resolving two closely spaced tracks depends upon the ratio of electron mobility to ion mobility μ/sub e//μ/sub i/. Since μ/sub i/ is rather constant, the way to separate two tracks is to slow down the electrons. Many other properties are required besides low mobility and low drifting electron temperature: the gas should have a large (> 10 3 ) stable gain; it must be chemically stable and not oxic; it should not attack materials commonly used to fabricate drift chambers, etc. With these requirements in mind, we have tried a few promising (on paper) gases, either pure or in admixture with Argon. One of the gases examined, dimethylether [(CH 3 ) 2 )], has shown interesting characteristics

  3. Analyses of Current And Wave Forces on Velocity Caps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Erik Damgaard; Buhrkall, Jeppe; Eskesen, Mark C. D.

    2015-01-01

    Velocity caps are often used in connection with for instance offshore intake sea water for the use of for cooling water for power plants or as a source for desalinization plants. The intakes can also be used for river intakes. The velocity cap is placed on top of a vertical pipe. The vertical pipe......) this paper investigates the current and wave forces on the velocity cap and the vertical cylinder. The Morison’s force model was used in the analyses of the extracted force time series in from the CFD model. Further the distribution of the inlet velocities around the velocity cap was also analyzed in detail...

  4. Wave Attenuation and Gas Exchange Velocity in Marginal Sea Ice Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigdeli, A.; Hara, T.; Loose, B.; Nguyen, A. T.

    2018-03-01

    The gas transfer velocity in marginal sea ice zones exerts a strong control on the input of anthropogenic gases into the ocean interior. In this study, a sea state-dependent gas exchange parametric model is developed based on the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate. The model is tuned to match the conventional gas exchange parametrization in fetch-unlimited, fully developed seas. Next, fetch limitation is introduced in the model and results are compared to fetch limited experiments in lakes, showing that the model captures the effects of finite fetch on gas exchange with good fidelity. Having validated the results in fetch limited waters such as lakes, the model is next applied in sea ice zones using an empirical relation between the sea ice cover and the effective fetch, while accounting for the sea ice motion effect that is unique to sea ice zones. The model results compare favorably with the available field measurements. Applying this parametric model to a regional Arctic numerical model, it is shown that, under the present conditions, gas flux into the Arctic Ocean may be overestimated by 10% if a conventional parameterization is used.

  5. Geomorphic Analysis of Mattituck Inlet and Goldsmith Inlet, Long Island, New York

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Morgan, Michael J; Kraus, Nicholas C; McDonald, Jodi M

    2005-01-01

    This study of Mattituck Inlet and Goldsmith Inlet, Long Island, NY, covers the historic and geomorphic background, literature, field measurements, numerical modeling of tidal circulation, and analysis...

  6. Self-determined shapes and velocities of giant near-zero drag gas cavities

    KAUST Repository

    Vakarelski, Ivan Uriev

    2017-09-09

    Minimizing the retarding force on a solid moving in liquid is the canonical problem in the quest for energy saving by friction and drag reduction. For an ideal object that cannot sustain any shear stress on its surface, theory predicts that drag force will fall to zero as its speed becomes large. However, experimental verification of this prediction has been challenging. We report the construction of a class of self-determined streamlined structures with this free-slip surface, made up of a teardrop-shaped giant gas cavity that completely encloses a metal sphere. This stable gas cavity is formed around the sphere as it plunges at a sufficiently high speed into the liquid in a deep tank, provided that the sphere is either heated initially to above the Leidenfrost temperature of the liquid or rendered superhydrophobic in water at room temperature. These sphere-in-cavity structures have residual drag coefficients that are typically less than Embedded Image those of solid objects of the same dimensions, which indicates that they experienced very small drag forces. The self-determined shapes of the gas cavities are shown to be consistent with the Bernoulli equation of potential flow applied on the cavity surface. The cavity fall velocity is not arbitrary but is uniquely predicted by the sphere density and cavity volume, so larger cavities have higher characteristic velocities.

  7. Effect of geometric parameters of liquid-gas separator units on phase separation performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mo, Songping; Chen, Xueqing; Chen, Ying [Guangdong University of Technology, Seoul (China); Yang, Zhen [Tsinghua University, Beijing (China)

    2015-07-15

    Five liquid-gas separator units were designed and constructed based on a new concept of a validated high-performance condenser. Each separator unit consists of two united T-junctions and an apertured baffle. The separator units have different header diameters or different baffles with different diameters of the liquid-gas separation hole. The phase separation characteristics of the units were investigated at inlet air superficial velocities from 1.0m/s to 33.0m/s and water superficial velocities from 0.0015 m/s to 0..50 m/s. The experimental results showed that the liquid height, liquid flow rate through the separation hole, and liquid separation efficiency increased with increased header diameter and decreased diameter of the separation hole. The geometric structures of the separator units affected the phase separation characteristics by influencing the liquid height in the header and the liquid flow rate through the separation hole.

  8. Velocity limitations in coaxial plasma gun experiments with gas mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axnaes, I.

    1976-04-01

    The velocity limitations found in many crossed field plasma experiments with neutral gas present are studied for binary mixtures of H 2 , He, N 2 O 2 , Ne and Ar. The apparatus used is a coaxial plasma gun with an azimuthal magnetic bias field. The discharge parameters are chosen so that the plasma is weakly ionized. In some of the mixtures it is found that one of the components tends to dominate in the sense that only a small amount (regarding volume) of that component is needed for the discharge to adopt a limiting velocity close to that for the pure component. Thus in a mixture between a heavy and a light component having nearly equal ionization potentials the heavy component dominates. Also if there is a considerable difference in ionization potential between the components, the component with the lowest ionization potential tends to dominate. (author)

  9. A study on flow development in an APU-style inlet and its effect on centrifugal compressor performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Fangyuan

    The objectives of this research were to investigate the flow development inside an APU-style inlet and its effect on centrifugal compressor performance. The motivation arises from the increased applications of gas turbine engines installed with APU-style inlets such as unmanned aerial vehicles, auxiliary power units, and helicopters. The inlet swirl distortion created from these complicated inlet systems has become a major performance and operability concern. To improve the integration between the APU-style inlet and gas turbine engines, better understanding of the flow field in the APU-style inlet and its effect on gas turbine is necessary. A research facility for the purpose of performing an experimental investigation of the flow field inside an APU-style inlet was developed. A subcritical air ejector is used to continuously flow the inlet at desired corrected mass flow rates. The facility is capable of flowing the APU inlet over a wide range of corrected mass flow rate that matches the same Mach numbers as engine operating conditions. Additionally, improvement in the system operational steadiness was achieved by tuning the pressure controller using a PID control method and utilizing multi-layer screens downstream of the APU inlet. Less than 1% relative unsteadiness was achieved for full range operation. The flow field inside the rectangular-sectioned 90? bend of the APU-style inlet was measured using a 3-Component LDV system. The structures for both primary flow and the secondary flow inside the bend were resolved. Additionally, the effect of upstream geometry on the flow development in the downstream bend was also investigated. Furthermore, a Single Stage Centrifugal Compressor research facility was developed at Purdue University in collaboration with Honeywell to operate the APU-style inlet at engine conditions with a compressor. To operate the facility, extensive infrastructure for facility health monitoring and performance control (including lubrication

  10. Studying the instantaneous velocity field in gas-sheared liquid films in a horizontal duct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasques, Joao; Tokarev, Mikhail; Cherdantsev, Andrey; Hann, David; Hewakandamby, Buddhika; Azzopardi, Barry

    2016-11-01

    In annular flow, the experimental validation of the basic assumptions on the liquid velocity profile is vital for developing theoretical models of the flow. However, the study of local velocity of liquid in gas-sheared films has proven to be a challenging task due to the highly curved and disturbed moving interface of the phases, small scale of the area of interrogation, high velocity gradients and irregular character of the flow. This study reports on different optical configurations and interface-tracking methods employed in a horizontal duct in order to obtain high-resolution particle image velocimetry (PIV) data in such types of complex flows. The experimental envelope includes successful measurements in 2D and 3D waves regimes, up to the disturbance wave regime. Preliminary data show the presence of complex structures in the liquid phase, which includes re-circulation areas below the liquid interface due to the gas-shearing action, together with non-uniform transverse movements of the liquid phase close to the wall due to the presence of 3D waves at the interface. With the aid of the moving interface-tracking, PIV, time-resolved particle-tracking velocimetry and vorticity measurements were performed.

  11. Jet Engine Fan Response to Inlet Distortions Generated by Ingesting Boundary Layer Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliani, James Edward

    Future civil transport designs may incorporate engines integrated into the body of the aircraft to take advantage of efficiency increases due to weight and drag reduction. Additional increases in engine efficiency are predicted if the inlets ingest the lower momentum boundary layer flow that develops along the surface of the aircraft. Previous studies have shown, however, that the efficiency benefits of Boundary Layer Ingesting (BLI) inlets are very sensitive to the magnitude of fan and duct losses, and blade structural response to the non-uniform flow field that results from a BLI inlet has not been studied in-depth. This project represents an effort to extend the modeling capabilities of TURBO, an existing rotating turbomachinery unsteady analysis code, to include the ability to solve the external and internal flow fields of a BLI inlet. The TURBO code has been a successful tool in evaluating fan response to flow distortions for traditional engine/inlet integrations. Extending TURBO to simulate the external and inlet flow field upstream of the fan will allow accurate pressure distortions that result from BLI inlet configurations to be computed and used to analyze fan aerodynamics and structural response. To validate the modifications for the BLI inlet flow field, an experimental NASA project to study flush-mounted S-duct inlets with large amounts of boundary layer ingestion was modeled. Results for the flow upstream and in the inlet are presented and compared to experimental data for several high Reynolds number flows to validate the modifications to the solver. Once the inlet modifications were validated, a hypothetical compressor fan was connected to the inlet, matching the inlet operating conditions so that the effect on the distortion could be evaluated. Although the total pressure distortion upstream of the fan was symmetrical for this geometry, the pressure rise generated by the fan blades was not, because of the velocity non-uniformity of the distortion

  12. Inlet-engine matching for SCAR including application of a bicone variable geometry inlet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserbauer, J. F.; Gerstenmaier, W. H.

    1978-01-01

    Airflow characteristics of variable cycle engines (VCE) designed for Mach 2.32 can have transonic airflow requirements as high as 1.6 times the cruise airflow. This is a formidable requirement for conventional, high performance, axisymmetric, translating centerbody mixed compression inlets. An alternate inlet is defined, where the second cone of a two cone center body collapses to the initial cone angle to provide a large off-design airflow capability, and incorporates modest centerbody translation to minimize spillage drag. Estimates of transonic spillage drag are competitive with those of conventional translating centerbody inlets. The inlet's cruise performance exhibits very low bleed requirements with good recovery and high angle of attack capability.

  13. An experimental study of the velocity-forced flame response of a lean-premixed multi-nozzle can combustor for gas turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szedlmayer, Michael Thomas

    The velocity forced flame response of a multi-nozzle, lean-premixed, swirl-stabilized, turbulent combustor was investigated at atmospheric pressure. The purpose of this study was to analyze the mechanisms that allowed velocity fluctuations to cause fluctuations in the rate of heat release in a gas turbine combustor experiencing combustion instability. Controlled velocity fluctuations were introduced to the combustor by a rotating siren device which periodically allowed the air-natural gas mixture to flow. The velocity fluctuation entering the combustor was measured using the two-microphone method. The resulting heat release rate fluctuation was measured using CH* chemiluminescence. The global response of the flame was quantified using the flame transfer function with the velocity fluctuation as the input and the heat release rate fluctuation as the output. Velocity fluctuation amplitude was initially maintained at 5% of the inlet velocity in order to remain in the linear response regime. Flame transfer function measurements were acquired at a wide range of operating conditions and forcing frequencies. The selected range corresponds to the conditions and instability frequencies typical of real gas turbine combustors. Multi-nozzle flame transfer functions were found to bear a qualitative similarity to the single-nozzle flame transfer functions in the literature. The flame transfer function gain exhibited alternating minima and maxima while the phase decreased linearly with increasing forcing frequency. Several normalization techniques were applied to all flame transfer function data in an attempt to collapse the data into a single curve. The best collapse was found to occur using a Strouhal number which was the ratio of the characteristic flame length to the wavelength of the forced disturbance. Critical values of Strouhal number are used to predict the shedding of vortical structures in shear layers. Because of the collapse observed when the flame transfer functions

  14. A Novel Method for Determining the Gas Transfer Velocity of Carbon Dioxide in Streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, M. J.; Johnson, M. S.

    2016-12-01

    Characterization of the global carbon cycle relies on the accurate quantification of carbon fluxes into and out of natural and human-dominated ecosystems. Among these fluxes, carbon dioxide (CO2) evasion from surface water has received increasing attention in recent years. However, limitations of current methods, including determination of the gas transfer velocity (k), compromise our ability to evaluate the significance of CO2 fluxes between freshwater systems and the atmosphere. We developed an automated method to determine gas transfer velocities of CO2 (kCO2), and tested it under a range of flow conditions for a first-order stream of a headwater catchment in southwestern British Columbia, Canada. Our method uses continuous in situ measurements of CO2 concentrations using two non-dispersive infrared (NDIR) sensors enclosed in water impermeable, gas permeable membranes (Johnson et al., 2010) downstream from a gas diffuser. CO2 was injected into the stream at regular intervals via a compressed gas tank connected to the diffuser. CO2 injections were controlled by a datalogger at fixed time intervals and in response to storm-induced changes in streamflow. Following the injection, differences in CO2 concentrations at known distances downstream from the diffuser relative to pre-injection baseline levels allowed us to calculate kCO2. Here we present relationships between kCO2 and hydro-geomorphologic (flow velocity, streambed slope, stream width, stream depth), atmospheric (wind speed and direction), and water quality (stream temperature, pH, electrical conductivity) variables. This method has advantages of being automatable and field-deployable, and it does not require supplemental gas chromatography, as is the case for propane injections typically used to determine k. The dataset presented suggests the potential role of this method to further elucidate the role that CO2 fluxes from headwater streams play in the global carbon cycle. Johnson, M. S., Billett, M. F

  15. Apparatus and method for maintaining multi-component sample gas constituents in vapor phase during sample extraction and cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, Larry Gordon; Farthing, William Earl; Irvin, James Hodges; Snyder, Todd Robert

    2010-05-11

    A dilution apparatus for diluting a gas sample. The apparatus includes a sample gas conduit having a sample gas inlet end and a diluted sample gas outlet end, and a sample gas flow restricting orifice disposed proximate the sample gas inlet end connected with the sample gas conduit and providing fluid communication between the exterior and the interior of the sample gas conduit. A diluted sample gas conduit is provided within the sample gas conduit having a mixing end with a mixing space inlet opening disposed proximate the sample gas inlet end, thereby forming an annular space between the sample gas conduit and the diluted sample gas conduit. The mixing end of the diluted sample gas conduit is disposed at a distance from the sample gas flow restricting orifice. A dilution gas source connected with the sample gas inlet end of the sample gas conduit is provided for introducing a dilution gas into the annular space, and a filter is provided for filtering the sample gas. The apparatus is particularly suited for diluting heated sample gases containing one or more condensable components.

  16. Numerical analysis of stratification and destratification processes in a tidally energetic inlet with an ebb tidal delta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Purkiani, K.; Becherer, J.; Flöser, G.; Gräwe, U.; Mohrholz, V.; Schuttelaars, H.M.; Burchard, H.

    2015-01-01

    Stratification and destratification processes in a tidally energetic, weakly stratified inlet in the Wadden Sea (south eastern North Sea) are investigated in this modeling study. Observations of current velocity and vertical density structure show strain-induced periodic stratification for the

  17. Feed gas contaminant control in ion transport membrane systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carolan, Michael Francis [Allentown, PA; Minford, Eric [Laurys Station, PA; Waldron, William Emil [Whitehall, PA

    2009-07-07

    Ion transport membrane oxidation system comprising an enclosure having an interior and an interior surface, inlet piping having an internal surface and adapted to introduce a heated feed gas into the interior of the enclosure, and outlet piping adapted to withdraw a product gas from the interior of the enclosure; one or more planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the enclosure, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide material; and a preheater adapted to heat a feed gas to provide the heated feed gas to the inlet piping, wherein the preheater comprises an interior surface. Any of the interior surfaces of the enclosure, the inlet piping, and the preheater may be lined with a copper-containing metal lining. Alternatively, any of the interior surfaces of the inlet piping and the preheater may be lined with a copper-containing metal lining and the enclosure may comprise copper.

  18. The Impact of Variable Inlet Mixture Stratification on Flame Topology and Emissions Performance of a Premixer/Swirl Burner Configuration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Koutmos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The work presents the assessment of a low emissions premixer/swirl burner configuration utilizing lean stratified fuel preparation. An axisymmetric, single- or double-cavity premixer, formed along one, two, or three concentric disks promotes propane-air premixing and supplies the combustion zone at the afterbody disk recirculation with a radial equivalence ratio gradient. The burner assemblies are operated with a swirl co-flow to study the interaction of the recirculating stratified flame with the surrounding swirl. A number of lean and ultra-lean flames operated either with a plane disk stabilizer or with one or two premixing cavity arrangements were evaluated over a range of inlet mixture conditions. The influence of the variation of the imposed swirl was studied for constant fuel injections. Measurements of turbulent velocities, temperatures, OH* chemiluminescence and gas analysis provided information on the performance of each burner set up. Comparisons with Large Eddy Simulations, performed with an 11-step global chemistry, illustrated the flame front interaction with the vortex formation region under the influence of the variable inlet mixture stratifications. The combined effort contributed to the identification of optimum configurations in terms of fuel consumption and pollutants emissions and to the delineation of important controlling parameters and limiting fuel-air mixing conditions.

  19. Inlet design for high-speed propfans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, B. H., Jr.; Hinson, B. L.

    1982-01-01

    A two-part study was performed to design inlets for high-speed propfan installation. The first part was a parametric study to select promising inlet concepts. A wide range of inlet geometries was examined and evaluated - primarily on the basis of cruise thrust and fuel burn performance. Two inlet concepts were than chosen for more detailed design studies - one apropriate to offset engine/gearbox arrangements and the other to in-line arrangements. In the second part of this study, inlet design points were chosen to optimize the net installed thrust, and detailed design of the two inlet configurations was performed. An analytical methodology was developed to account for propfan slipstream effects, transonic flow efects, and three-dimensional geometry effects. Using this methodology, low drag cowls were designed for the two inlets.

  20. Fluctuating ideal-gas lattice Boltzmann method with fluctuation dissipation theorem for nonvanishing velocities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaehler, G; Wagner, A J

    2013-06-01

    Current implementations of fluctuating ideal-gas descriptions with the lattice Boltzmann methods are based on a fluctuation dissipation theorem, which, while greatly simplifying the implementation, strictly holds only for zero mean velocity and small fluctuations. We show how to derive the fluctuation dissipation theorem for all k, which was done only for k=0 in previous derivations. The consistent derivation requires, in principle, locally velocity-dependent multirelaxation time transforms. Such an implementation is computationally prohibitively expensive but, with a small computational trick, it is feasible to reproduce the correct FDT without overhead in computation time. It is then shown that the previous standard implementations perform poorly for non vanishing mean velocity as indicated by violations of Galilean invariance of measured structure factors. Results obtained with the method introduced here show a significant reduction of the Galilean invariance violations.

  1. High Pressure Atmospheric Sampling Inlet System for Venus or the Gas Giants, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Thorleaf Research, Inc. proposes to develop a miniaturized high pressure atmospheric sampling inlet system for sample acquisition in extreme planetary environments,...

  2. Gas-hydrate concentration estimated from P- and S-wave velocities at the Mallik 2L-38 research well, Mackenzie Delta, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcione, José M.; Gei, Davide

    2004-05-01

    We estimate the concentration of gas hydrate at the Mallik 2L-38 research site using P- and S-wave velocities obtained from well logging and vertical seismic profiles (VSP). The theoretical velocities are obtained from a generalization of Gassmann's modulus to three phases (rock frame, gas hydrate and fluid). The dry-rock moduli are estimated from the log profiles, in sections where the rock is assumed to be fully saturated with water. We obtain hydrate concentrations up to 75%, average values of 37% and 21% from the VSP P- and S-wave velocities, respectively, and 60% and 57% from the sonic-log P- and S-wave velocities, respectively. The above averages are similar to estimations obtained from hydrate dissociation modeling and Archie methods. The estimations based on the P-wave velocities are more reliable than those based on the S-wave velocities.

  3. Visualization of velocity field and phase distribution in gas-liquid two-phase flow by NMR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, G.; Monji, H.; Obata, J.

    2004-01-01

    NMR imaging has been applied in the field of fluid mechanics, mainly single phase flow, to visualize the instantaneous flow velocity field. In the present study, NMR imaging was used to visualize simultaneously both the instantaneous phase structure and velocity field of gas-liquid two-phase flow. Two methods of NMR imaging were applied. One is useful to visualize both the one component of liquid velocity and the phase distribution. This method was applied to horizontal two-phase flow and a bubble rising in stagnant oil. It was successful in obtaining some pictures of velocity field and phase distribution on the cross section of the pipe. The other is used to visualize a two-dimensional velocity field. This method was applied to a bubble rising in a stagnant water. The velocity field was visualized after and before the passage of a bubble at the measuring cross section. Furthermore, the distribution of liquid velocity was obtained. (author)

  4. Methanotrophic community dynamics in a seasonally anoxic fjord: Saanich Inlet, British Columbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Torres-Beltrán

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Marine oxygen minimum zones (OMZs play disproportionate roles in nutrient and climate active trace gas cycling including nitrous oxide and methane, in the ocean. OMZs are currently expanding due to climate change making it increasingly important to identify microbial controls on trace gas cycling at the individual, population and community levels. Here we present a two-year survey of the microbial community along seasonal redox gradients in Saanich Inlet focused on identifying microbial agents driving methane oxidation. Although methanotrophs were rare, we identified three uncultivated groups affiliated with particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO encoding phylogenetic groups (OPU, and methanotrophic symbionts as primary drivers of methane oxidation in Saanich Inlet. Distribution and activity patterns for these three groups were consistent with niche partitioning that became increasingly resolved during water column stratification. Moreover co-occurrence analysis combined with multi-level indicator species analysis revealed significant correlations between operational taxonomic units affiliated with Methylophaga, Methylophilales, SAR324, Verrucomicrobia, and Planctomycetes with OPUs and methanotrophic symbiont groups. Taken together these observations shed new light on the composition, dynamics, and potential interspecific interactions of microbes associated with CH4 cycling in the Saanich Inlet water column, provide a baseline for comparison between coastal and open ocean OMZs and support the potential role of OPUs, and methanotrophic symbiont groups as a widely distributed pelagic sink for CH4 along continental margins.

  5. Impact of the use of a hybrid turbine inlet air cooling system in arid climates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Ansary, Hany A.; Orfi, Jamel A.; Ali, Mohamed E.

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Cooling the air entering the compressor section of a gas turbine is a proven method of increasing turbine power output, especially during peak summer demand, and it is increasingly being used in powerplants worldwide. Two turbine inlet air cooling (TIAC) systems are widely used: evaporative cooling and mechanical chilling. In this work, the prospects of using a hybrid turbine inlet air cooling (TIAC) system are investigated. The hybrid system consists of mechanical chilling followed by evaporative cooling. Such a system is capable of achieving a significant reduction in inlet air temperature that satisfies desired power output levels, while consuming less power than conventional mechanical chilling and less water than conventional evaporative cooling, thus combining the benefits of both approaches. Two hybrid system configurations are studied. In the first configuration, the first stage of the system uses water-cooled chillers that are coupled with dry coolers such that the condenser cooling water remains in a closed loop. In the second configuration, the first stage of the system uses water-cooled chillers but with conventional cooling towers. An assessment of the performance and economics of those two configurations is made by comparing them to conventional mechanical chilling and using realistic data. It was found that the TIAC systems are capable of boosting the power output of the gas turbine by 10% or more (of the power output of the ISO conditions). The cost operation analysis shows clearly the hybrid TIAC method with wet cooling has the advantage over the other methods and It would be profitable to install it in the new gas turbine power plants. The figure below shows a comparison of the water consumption for the three different cases. - Highlights: • New hybrid system for the turbine inlet air cooling is studied. • Hybrid system of mechanical chilling followed by evaporative cooling is used. • Hybrid turbine inlet air cooling

  6. The effect of inlet conditions on the air side hydraulic resistance and flow maldistribution in industrial air heaters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann-Vocke, Jonas, E-mail: jh63@waikato.ac.nz [University of Waikato, Energy Research Group, School of Science and Engineering, Private Bag 3105, Hamilton 3240 (New Zealand); Neale, James, E-mail: jamesn@waikato.ac.nz [University of Waikato, Energy Research Group, School of Science and Engineering, Private Bag 3105, Hamilton 3240 (New Zealand); Walmsley, Michael, E-mail: walmsley@waikato.ac.nz [University of Waikato, Department of Engineering, School of Science and Engineering, Private Bag 3105, Hamilton 3240 (New Zealand)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: > Measured the effects of air heater inlet header geometry on hydraulic performance. > Measured the effects of inlet header flow maldistribution on hydraulic performance. > Inlet header flow maldistribution increases air heater system hydraulic resistance. - Abstract: Experimental system hydraulic resistance measurements on a scale air heater unit have highlighted the excessive hydraulic resistance of typical industry configurations. Both poor header inlet conditions and large header expansion angles are shown to contribute to system hydraulic resistance magnitudes 20-100% higher than suitable benchmark cases. Typical centrifugal fan system efficiencies well under 80% multiply the system resistance effects resulting in larger fan power penalties. Velocity profile measurements taken upstream and downstream of the test heat exchanger under flow maldistribution conditions provide insight into the flow maldistribution spreading caused by the heat exchanger resistance. The anisotropic resistance of the plate fin-and-tube heat exchanger is shown to result in resistance induced flow dispersion being concentrated in the axis parallel to the plate fins.

  7. The effect of inlet conditions on the air side hydraulic resistance and flow maldistribution in industrial air heaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann-Vocke, Jonas; Neale, James; Walmsley, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Measured the effects of air heater inlet header geometry on hydraulic performance. → Measured the effects of inlet header flow maldistribution on hydraulic performance. → Inlet header flow maldistribution increases air heater system hydraulic resistance. - Abstract: Experimental system hydraulic resistance measurements on a scale air heater unit have highlighted the excessive hydraulic resistance of typical industry configurations. Both poor header inlet conditions and large header expansion angles are shown to contribute to system hydraulic resistance magnitudes 20-100% higher than suitable benchmark cases. Typical centrifugal fan system efficiencies well under 80% multiply the system resistance effects resulting in larger fan power penalties. Velocity profile measurements taken upstream and downstream of the test heat exchanger under flow maldistribution conditions provide insight into the flow maldistribution spreading caused by the heat exchanger resistance. The anisotropic resistance of the plate fin-and-tube heat exchanger is shown to result in resistance induced flow dispersion being concentrated in the axis parallel to the plate fins.

  8. On linear relationship between shock velocity and particle velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dandache, H.

    1986-11-01

    We attempt to derive the linear relationship between shock velocity U s and particle velocity U p from thermodynamic considerations, taking into account an ideal gas equation of state and a Mie-Grueneisen equation of state for solids. 23 refs

  9. Method and system for purification of gas streams for solid oxide cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    of: - providing at least one scrubber in the gas stream at the inlet side of the first electrode of the solid oxide cell; and/or providing at least one scrubber in the gas stream at the inlet side of the second electrode of the solid oxide cell; and - purifying the gas streams towards the first...... and second electrode; wherein the at least one scrubber in the gas stream at the inlet side of the first electrode and/or the at least one scrubber in the gas stream at the inlet side of the second electrode comprises a material suitable as an electrolyte material and a material suitable as an electrode...... material, and wherein the material suitable as an electrolyte material and a material suitable as an electrode material form triple phase boundaries similar to or identical to the triple phase boundaries of the electrode for which the gas stream is purified with the at least one scrubber....

  10. On which timescales do gas transfer velocities control North Atlantic CO2 flux variability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couldrey, Matthew P.; Oliver, Kevin I. C.; Yool, Andrew; Halloran, Paul R.; Achterberg, Eric P.

    2016-05-01

    The North Atlantic is an important basin for the global ocean's uptake of anthropogenic and natural carbon dioxide (CO2), but the mechanisms controlling this carbon flux are not fully understood. The air-sea flux of CO2, F, is the product of a gas transfer velocity, k, the air-sea CO2 concentration gradient, ΔpCO2, and the temperature- and salinity-dependent solubility coefficient, α. k is difficult to constrain, representing the dominant uncertainty in F on short (instantaneous to interannual) timescales. Previous work shows that in the North Atlantic, ΔpCO2 and k both contribute significantly to interannual F variability but that k is unimportant for multidecadal variability. On some timescale between interannual and multidecadal, gas transfer velocity variability and its associated uncertainty become negligible. Here we quantify this critical timescale for the first time. Using an ocean model, we determine the importance of k, ΔpCO2, and α on a range of timescales. On interannual and shorter timescales, both ΔpCO2 and k are important controls on F. In contrast, pentadal to multidecadal North Atlantic flux variability is driven almost entirely by ΔpCO2; k contributes less than 25%. Finally, we explore how accurately one can estimate North Atlantic F without a knowledge of nonseasonal k variability, finding it possible for interannual and longer timescales. These findings suggest that continued efforts to better constrain gas transfer velocities are necessary to quantify interannual variability in the North Atlantic carbon sink. However, uncertainty in k variability is unlikely to limit the accuracy of estimates of longer-term flux variability.

  11. The analysis of coolant-velocity distribution in plat-typed fuel element using CFD method for RSG-GAS research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhammad Subekti; Darwis Isnaini; Endiah Puji Hastuti

    2013-01-01

    The measurement experiment for coolant-velocity distribution in the subchannel of fuel element of RSG-GAS research reactor is difficult to be carried out due to too narrow channel and subchannel placed inside the fuel element. Hence, the calculation is required to predict the coolant-velocity distribution inside subchannel to confirm that the handle presence does not ruin the velocity distribution into every subchannel. This calculation utilizes CFD method, which respect to 3-dimension interior. Moreover, the calculation of coolant-velocity distribution inside subchannel was not ever carried out. The research object is to investigate the distribution of coolant-velocity in plat-typed fuel element using 3-dimension CFD method for RSG-GAS research reactor. This research is required as a part of the development of thermalhydraulic design of fuel element for innovative research reactor as well. The modeling uses ½ model in Gambit software and calculation uses turbulence equation in FLUENT 6.3 software. Calculation result of 3D coolant-velocity in subchannel using CFD method is lower about 4.06 % than 1D calculation result due to 1D calculation obeys handle availability. (author)

  12. The effect of non-condensable gas on direct contact condensation of steam/air mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H. C.; Park, S. K.; Kim, M. H.

    1998-01-01

    To investigate the effects of noncondensable gas on the direct contact film condensation of vapor mixture, a series of experiments has been carried out. The rectangular duct inclined 87.deg. to the horizontal plane was used for this experiment. The average heat transfer coefficient of the steam-air mixture was obtained at the atmospheric pressure with four main parameters, air-mass fraction, vapor velocity, film Reynolds number,and the degree of water film subcooling having an influence on the condensation heat transfer coefficient. With the analysis on 88 cases of experiments, a correlation of the average Nusselt number for direct contact film condensation of steam-air mixture at a vertical wall proposed as functions of film Reynolds number, mixture Reynolds number, air mass fraction, and Jacob number. The average heat transfer coefficient for steam-air mixture condensation decreased significantly while air mass fraction increases with the same inlet mixture velocity and inlet film temperature. The average heat transfer coefficients also decreased with the degree of film subcooling increasing and were scarcely affected by film Reynolds number below the mixture Reynolds number about 30,000

  13. A method for measuring the electron drift velocity in working gas using a Frisch-grid ionization chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, Huaiyong; Wang, Zhimin; Zhang, Luyu; Chen, Jinxiang; Zhang, Guohui, E-mail: guohuizhang@pku.edu.cn

    2016-12-21

    A method for measuring the electron drift velocity in working gas is proposed. Based on the cathode and the anode signal waveforms of the Frisch-grid ionization chamber, the electron drift velocity is extracted. With this method, the electron drift velocities in Ar + 10% CH{sub 4}, Ar + 3.5% CO{sub 2} and Kr + 2.7% CO{sub 2} gases have been measured and the results are compared with the existing measurements and the simulating results. Using this method, the electron drift velocity can be monitored throughout the experiment of charged particle without bothering the measurement of other parameters, such as the energy and orientation.

  14. Integral Engine Inlet Particle Separator. Volume 2. Design Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-08-01

    herein will be used in the design of integral inlet particle separators for future Army aircraft gas turbine engines. Apprupriate technical personnel...into the comprensor at some future date. 5. A typical scavenge vane design Js; shown in Figures 85 and 86. The important features of the scavenge...service passageweys, for cooling of oil, and for directing sand and air into the scroll. Orientetion of the vanes is set by collection efficiency

  15. Thermal–economic–environmental analysis and multi-objective optimization of an ice thermal energy storage system for gas turbine cycle inlet air cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirazi, Ali; Najafi, Behzad; Aminyavari, Mehdi; Rinaldi, Fabio; Taylor, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a mathematical model of an ice thermal energy storage (ITES) system for gas turbine cycle inlet air cooling is developed and thermal, economic, and environmental (emissions cost) analyses have been applied to the model. While taking into account conflicting thermodynamic and economic objective functions, a multi-objective genetic algorithm is employed to obtain the optimal design parameters of the plant. Exergetic efficiency is chosen as the thermodynamic objective while the total cost rate of the system including the capital and operational costs of the plant and the social cost of emissions, is considered as the economic objective. Performing the optimization procedure, a set of optimal solutions, called a Pareto front, is obtained. The final optimal design point is determined using TOPSIS decision-making method. This optimum solution results in the exergetic efficiency of 34.06% and the total cost of 28.7 million US$ y −1 . Furthermore, the results demonstrate that inlet air cooling using an ITES system leads to 11.63% and 3.59% improvement in the output power and exergetic efficiency of the plant, respectively. The extra cost associated with using the ITES system is paid back in 4.72 years with the income received from selling the augmented power. - Highlights: • Mathematical model of an ITES system for a GT cycle inlet air cooling is developed. • Exergetic, economic and environmental analyses were performed on the developed model. • Exergy efficiency and total cost rate were considered as the objective functions. • The total cost rate involves the capital, maintenance, operational and emissions costs. • Multi-objective optimization was applied to obtain the Pareto front

  16. Characterisation and airborne deployment of a new counterflow virtual impactor inlet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Shingler

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A new counterflow virtual impactor (CVI inlet is introduced with details of its design, laboratory characterisation tests and deployment on an aircraft during the 2011 Eastern Pacific Emitted Aerosol Cloud Experiment (E-PEACE. The CVI inlet addresses three key issues in previous designs; in particular, the inlet operates with: (i negligible organic contamination; (ii a significant sample flow rate to downstream instruments (∼15 l min−1 that reduces the need for dilution; and (iii a high level of accessibility to the probe interior for cleaning. Wind tunnel experiments characterised the cut size of sampled droplets and the particle size-dependent transmission efficiency in various parts of the probe. For a range of counter-flow rates and air velocities, the measured cut size was between 8.7–13.1 μm. The mean percentage error between cut size measurements and predictions from aerodynamic drag theory is 1.7%. The CVI was deployed on the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS Twin Otter for thirty flights during E-PEACE to study aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions off the central coast of California in July and August 2011. Results are reported to assess the performance of the inlet including comparisons of particle number concentration downstream of the CVI and cloud drop number concentration measured by two independent aircraft probes. Measurements downstream of the CVI are also examined from one representative case flight coordinated with shipboard-emitted smoke that was intercepted in cloud by the Twin Otter.

  17. Development of high velocity gas gun with a new trigger system-numerical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husin, Z.; Homma, H.

    2018-02-01

    In development of high performance armor vests, we need to carry out well controlled experiments using bullet speed of more than 900 m/sec. After reviewing trigger systems used for high velocity gas guns, this research intends to develop a new trigger system, which can realize precise and reproducible impact tests at impact velocity of more than 900 m/sec. A new trigger system developed here is called a projectile trap. A projectile trap is placed between a reservoir and a barrel. A projectile trap has two functions of a sealing disk and triggering. Polyamidimide is selected for the trap material and dimensions of the projectile trap are determined by numerical analysis for several levels of launching pressure to change the projectile velocity. Numerical analysis results show that projectile trap designed here can operate reasonably and stresses caused during launching operation are less than material strength. It means a projectile trap can be reused for the next shooting.

  18. The development of advanced gas cooled reactor iodine adsorber systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meddings, P.

    1986-01-01

    Advanced Gas Cooled Reactors (AGRs) are provided with plants to process the carbon dioxide coolant prior to its discharge to atmosphere. Included in these are beds of granular activated charcoal, contained within a suitable pressure vessel, through which the high pressure carbon dioxide is passed for the purpose of retaining iodine and iodine-containing compounds. Carry-over carbon dust from the adsorption beds was identified during active in-situ commissioning testing, radio-iodine being transported with the particulate material due to gross disturbance of the adsorber carbon bed and displacement of the vessel internals. The methods used to identify the causes of the problems and find solutions are described. A development programme for the Heysham-2 and Torness reactors iodine adsorber units was set up to identify a method of de-dusting granular charcoal and develop it for full-scale use, of assess the effect under conditions of high gas density of approach velocity on charcoal fines production and to establish the pressure drop characteristics of a packed granular bed and to develop an effective design of inlet gas diffuser manifold to ensure an acceptable velocity distribution. This has involved the construction of a small scale high pressure carbon dioxide rig and development of an air flow model. This work is described. (UK)

  19. Understanding processes controlling sediment transports at the mouth of a highly energetic inlet system (San Francisco Bay, CA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Edwin P.L.; Hansen, Jeff E.; Barnard, P.L.; Jaffee, B.E.; Schoellhamer, D.H.

    2013-01-01

    San Francisco Bay is one of the largest estuaries along the U.S. West Coast and is linked to the Pacific Ocean through the Golden Gate, a 100 m deep bedrock inlet. A coupled wave, flow and sediment transport model is used to quantify the sediment linkages between San Francisco Bay, the Golden Gate, and the adjacent open coast. Flow and sediment transport processes are investigated using an ensemble average of 24 climatologically derived wave cases and a 24.8 h representative tidal cycle. The model simulations show that within the inlet, flow and sediment transport is tidally dominated and driven by asymmetry of the ebb and flood tides. Peak ebb velocities exceed the peak flood velocities in the narrow Golden Gate channel as a result of flow convergence and acceleration. Persistent flow and sediment gyres at the headland tips are formed that limit sediment transfer from the ebb-tidal delta to the inlet and into the bay. The residual transport pattern in the inlet is dominated by a lateral segregation with a large ebb-dominant sediment transport (and flow) prevailing along the deeper north side of the Golden Gate channel, and smaller flood dominant transports along the shallow southern margin. The seaward edge of the ebb-tidal delta largely corresponds to the seaward extent of strong tidal flows. On the ebb-tidal delta, both waves and tidal forcing govern flow and sediment transport. Wave focusing by the ebb-tidal delta leads to strong patterns of sediment convergence and divergence along the adjacent Ocean Beach.

  20. Flow control in axial fan inlet guide vanes by synthetic jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wurst P.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Tested high pressure axial flow fan with hub/tip ratio of 0.70 and external diameter of 600 mm consisted of inlet guide vanes (IGV, rotor and stator blade rows. Fan peripheral velocity was 47 m/s. Air volume flow rate was changed by turning of rear part of the inlet guide vanes. At turning of 20 deg the flow was separated on the IGV profiles. The synthetic jets were introduced through radial holes in machine casing in the location before flow separation origin. Synthetic jet actuator was designed with the use of a speaker by UT AVCR. Its membrane had diameter of 63 mm. Excitation frequency was chosen in the range of 500 Hz – 700 Hz. Synthetic jets favourably influenced separated flow on the vane profiles in the distance of (5 – 12 mm from the casing surface. The reduction of flow separation area caused in the region near the casing the decrease of the profile loss coefficient approximately by 20%.

  1. Flow control in axial fan inlet guide vanes by synthetic jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyrus, V.; Trávníček, Z.; Wurst, P.; Kordík, J.

    2013-04-01

    Tested high pressure axial flow fan with hub/tip ratio of 0.70 and external diameter of 600 mm consisted of inlet guide vanes (IGV), rotor and stator blade rows. Fan peripheral velocity was 47 m/s. Air volume flow rate was changed by turning of rear part of the inlet guide vanes. At turning of 20 deg the flow was separated on the IGV profiles. The synthetic jets were introduced through radial holes in machine casing in the location before flow separation origin. Synthetic jet actuator was designed with the use of a speaker by UT AVCR. Its membrane had diameter of 63 mm. Excitation frequency was chosen in the range of 500 Hz - 700 Hz. Synthetic jets favourably influenced separated flow on the vane profiles in the distance of (5 - 12) mm from the casing surface. The reduction of flow separation area caused in the region near the casing the decrease of the profile loss coefficient approximately by 20%.

  2. Characterize the hydraulic behaviour of grate inlet in urban drainage to prevent the urban's flooding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellez Alvarez, Jackson David; Gomez, Manuel; Russo, Beniamino; Redondo, Jose M.

    2016-04-01

    One of the most important problems that have some cities is the urban floods because of poor drainage design. Therefore the systems the drainage do not have the capacity of capture the flow of discharge generated in a rain event and insert it into the drainage network. Even though the two problems that have caught the main attention are the evaluation of the volumes falling in the river basin because extreme rainfall events often lead to urban pluvial flooding being a hydrologic problem and the hydraulic design of the sewer network being a hydraulic problem to limiting capacity of the drainage system, there is an intermediate step between these two processes that is necessary to solve that is the hydraulic behavior of the grate inlet. We need to collect the runoff produced on the city surface and to introduce it in the sewer network. Normally foundry companies provide complete information about drainage grate structural capacity but provide nothing about their hydraulic capacity. This fact can be seen because at the moment does not exist any official regulation at national or international level in this field. It's obvious that, nowadays, there is a great gap in this field at the legislative level owing to the complexity of this field and the modernity of the urban hydrology as science [1]. In essence, we shows the relevance to know the inlet hydraulic interception capacity because surface drainage requires a satisfactory knowledge on storm frequency, gutter flow and above all inlet capacity. In addition, we development an important achievement is the invention and development of techniques for measurement of field velocities in hydraulics engineering applications. Hence knowledge the technological advances in digital cameras with high resolution and high speed found in the environmental, and the advances in image processing techniques, therefore now is a tremendous potential to obtain of behavior of the water surface flow [2]. A novel technique using particle

  3. Numerical simulation of hypersonic inlet flows with equilibrium or finite rate chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Sheng-Tao; Hsieh, Kwang-Chung; Shuen, Jian-Shun; Mcbride, Bonnie J.

    1988-01-01

    An efficient numerical program incorporated with comprehensive high temperature gas property models has been developed to simulate hypersonic inlet flows. The computer program employs an implicit lower-upper time marching scheme to solve the two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations with variable thermodynamic and transport properties. Both finite-rate and local-equilibrium approaches are adopted in the chemical reaction model for dissociation and ionization of the inlet air. In the finite rate approach, eleven species equations coupled with fluid dynamic equations are solved simultaneously. In the local-equilibrium approach, instead of solving species equations, an efficient chemical equilibrium package has been developed and incorporated into the flow code to obtain chemical compositions directly. Gas properties for the reaction products species are calculated by methods of statistical mechanics and fit to a polynomial form for C(p). In the present study, since the chemical reaction time is comparable to the flow residence time, the local-equilibrium model underpredicts the temperature in the shock layer. Significant differences of predicted chemical compositions in shock layer between finite rate and local-equilibrium approaches have been observed.

  4. The boundary condition for vertical velocity and its interdependence with surface gas exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Andrew S.

    2017-07-01

    The law of conservation of linear momentum is applied to surface gas exchanges, employing scale analysis to diagnose the vertical velocity (w) in the boundary layer. Net upward momentum in the surface layer is forced by evaporation (E) and defines non-zero vertical motion, with a magnitude defined by the ratio of E to the air density, as w = E/ρ. This is true even right down at the surface where the boundary condition is w|0 = E/ρ|0 (where w|0 and ρ|0 represent the vertical velocity and density of air at the surface). This Stefan flow velocity implies upward transport of a non-diffusive nature that is a general feature of the troposphere but is of particular importance at the surface, where it assists molecular diffusion with upward gas migration (of H2O, for example) but opposes that of downward-diffusing species like CO2 during daytime. The definition of flux-gradient relationships (eddy diffusivities) requires rectification to exclude non-diffusive transport, which does not depend on scalar gradients. At the microscopic scale, the role of non-diffusive transport in the process of evaporation from inside a narrow tube - with vapour transport into an overlying, horizontal airstream - was described long ago in classical mechanics and is routinely accounted for by chemical engineers, but has been neglected by scientists studying stomatal conductance. Correctly accounting for non-diffusive transport through stomata, which can appreciably reduce net CO2 transport and marginally boost that of water vapour, should improve characterisations of ecosystem and plant functioning.

  5. A Study of the Influence of Gas Channel Parameters on HT-PEM Fuel Cell Performance Using FEM Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionescu Viorel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFC are highly efficient power generators, achieving up to 50–60% conversion efficiency, even in sizes of a few kilowatts. Comsol Multiphysics, a commercial solver based on the Finite Element Method (FEM was used for developing a three dimensional model of a high temperature PEMFC that can deal with both anode and cathode flow field for examining the micro flow channel with electrochemical reaction. Cathode gas flow velocity influence on the cell performance was investigated at first. Polarization curves for three different channel widths (0.8, 1.6 and 2.4 mm and three different channel depths (1, 2 and 3 mm were computed at a cathode inlet flow velocity of 0.06 m/s. Oxygen molar concentration at cathode catalyst layer-GDL channel interface and local current density variation along the cell length were also studied for specific gas channel geometries.

  6. A Tale of Two Inlets: Tidal Currents at Two Adjacent Inlets in the Indian River Lagoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, B. M.; Weaver, R. J.

    2012-12-01

    The tidal currents and hydrography at two adjacent inlets of the Indian River Lagoon estuary (Florida) were recently measured using a personal watercraft-based coastal profiling system. Although the two inlets—Sebastian Inlet and Port Canaveral Inlet—are separated by only 60 km, their characteristics and dynamics are quite unique. While Sebastian Inlet is a shallow (~4 m), curved inlet with a free connection to the estuary, Port Canaveral Inlet is dominated by a deep (~13 m), straight ship channel and has limited connectivity to the Banana River through a sector gate lock. Underway measurements of tidal currents were obtained using a bottom tracking acoustic Doppler current profiler; vertical casts of hydrography were obtained with a conductivity-temperature-depth profiling instrument; and continuous underway measurements of surface water hydrography were made using a Portable SeaKeeper system. Survey transects were performed to elucidate the along-channel variability of tidal flows, which appears to be significant in the presence of channel curvature. Ebb and flood tidal currents in Sebastian Inlet routinely exceeded 2.5 m/s from the surface to the bed, and an appreciable phase lag exists between tidal stage and current magnitude. The tidal currents at Port Canaveral Inlet were much smaller (~0.2 m/s) and appeared to be sensitive to meteorological forcing during the study period. Although the lagoon has free connections to the ocean 145 km to the north and 45 km to the south, Sebastian Inlet likely drains much of the lagoon to its north, an area of ~550 sq. km.

  7. Method and system for purification of gas/liquid streams for fuel cells or electrolysis cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    at least one scrubber in the gas/liquid stream at the inlet side of the first electrode of the fuel cell or electrolysis cell; and/or providing at least one scrubber in the gas/liquid stream at the inlet side of the second electrode of the fuel cell or electrolysis cell; and - purifying the gas....../liquid streams towards the first and second electrode; wherein the at least one scrubber in the gas/liquid stream at the inlet side of the first electrode and/or the at least one scrubber in the gas/liquid stream at the inlet side of the second electrode comprises a material suitable as an electrolyte material...... with the at least one scrubber, with the proviso that the fuel cell or electrolysis cell is not a solid oxide cell....

  8. Effects of Gravity and Inlet/Outlet Location on a Two-Phase Cocurrent Imbibition in Porous Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. F. El-Amin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We introduce 2D numerical investigations of the problem of gravity and inlet/outlet location effects of water-oil two-phase cocurrent imbibition in a porous medium. Three different cases of side-, top-, and bottom-inlet location are considered. Two-dimensional computations are carried out using the finite element method. Intensive comparisons are done between considering and neglecting gravity effect on water saturation, pressures of water and oil as well as water velocity. Results are introduced either in curves or as 2D visualization graphs. The results indicate that the buoyancy effects due to gravity force take place depending on inlet location. So, the buoyancy force in the momentum equations of the co-current imbibition model cannot be neglected as done by several previous studies. Also, we note that the 2D zero gravity model has a uniform flow and may be represented as 1D flow unlike the 2D nonzero gravity model showing a nonuniform flow.

  9. Effects of gravity and inlet/outlet location on a two-phase cocurrent imbibition in porous media

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed

    2011-01-01

    We introduce 2D numerical investigations of the problem of gravity and inlet/outlet location effects of water-oil two-phase cocurrent imbibition in a porous medium. Three different cases of side-, top-, and bottom-inlet location are considered. Two-dimensional computations are carried out using the finite element method. Intensive comparisons are done between considering and neglecting gravity effect on water saturation, pressures of water and oil as well as water velocity. Results are introduced either in curves or as 2D visualization graphs. The results indicate that the buoyancy effects due to gravity force take place depending on inlet location. So, the buoyancy force in the momentum equations of the co-current imbibition model cannot be neglected as done by several previous studies. Also, we note that the 2D zero gravity model has a uniform flow and may be represented as 1D flow unlike the 2D nonzero gravity model showing a nonuniform flow. Copyright 2011 M. F. El-Amin and Shuyu Sun.

  10. Integral Field Spectroscopy of Markarian 273: Mapping High-Velocity Gas Flows and an Off-Nucleus Seyfert 2 Nebula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colina; Arribas; Borne

    1999-12-10

    Integral field optical spectroscopy with the INTEGRAL fiber-based system is used to map the extended ionized regions and gas flows in Mrk 273, one of the closest ultraluminous infrared galaxies. The Hbeta and [O iii] lambda5007 maps show the presence of two distinct regions separated by 4&arcsec; (3.1 kpc) along position angle (P.A.) 240 degrees. The northeastern region coincides with the optical nucleus of the galaxy and shows the spectral characteristics of LINERs. The southwestern region is dominated by [O iii] emission and is classified as a Seyfert 2. Therefore, in the optical, Mrk 273 is an ultraluminous infrared galaxy with a LINER nucleus and an extended off-nucleus Seyfert 2 nebula. The kinematics of the [O iii] ionized gas shows (1) the presence of highly disturbed gas in the regions around the LINER nucleus, (2) a high-velocity gas flow with a peak-to-peak amplitude of 2.4x103 km s-1, and (3) quiescent gas in the outer regions (at 3 kpc). We hypothesize that the high-velocity flow is the starburst-driven superwind generated in an optically obscured nuclear starburst and that the quiescent gas is directly ionized by a nuclear source, similar to the ionization cones typically seen in Seyfert galaxies.

  11. JET ENGINE INLET DISTORTION SCREEN AND DESCRIPTOR EVALUATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Pečinka

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Total pressure distortion is one of the three basic flow distortions (total pressure, total temperature and swirl distortion that might appear at the inlet of a gas turbine engine (GTE during operation. Different numerical parameters are used for assessing the total pressure distortion intensity and extent. These summary descriptors are based on the distribution of total pressure in the aerodynamic interface plane. There are two descriptors largely spread around the world, however, three or four others are still in use and can be found in current references. The staff at the University of Defence decided to compare the most common descriptors using basic flow distortion patterns in order to select the most appropriate descriptor for future department research. The most common descriptors were identified based on their prevalence in widely accessible publications. The construction and use of these descriptors are reviewed in the paper. Subsequently, they are applied to radial, angular, and combined distortion patterns of different intensities and with varied mass flow rates. The tests were performed on a specially designed test bench using an electrically driven standalone industrial centrifugal compressor, sucking air through the inlet of a TJ100 small turbojet engine. Distortion screens were placed into the inlet channel to create the desired total pressure distortions. Of the three basic distortions, only the total pressure distortion descriptors were evaluated. However, both total and static pressures were collected using a multi probe rotational measurement system.

  12. Investigating the effect of gas flow rate, inlet ozone concentration and relative humidity on the efficacy of catalytic ozonation process in the removal of xylene from waste airstream

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.R. MokaramI

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and aimsThe catalytic ozonation is an efficient process for the degradation of volatile organic compounds from contaminated air stream. This study was aimed at investigating the efficacy of catalytic ozonation process in removal of xylene from the polluted air stream andthe influence of retention time (gas flow rate, inlet ozone dose and relative humidity on this performanceMethodsthe catalytic ozonation of xylene was conducted using a bench scale set-up consisted of a syringe pump,an air pump, an ozone generator, and a glass reactor packed with activated carbon. Several experimental run was defined to investigate the influence of the selectedoperational variables.ResultsThe results indicated that the efficiency of catalytic ozonation was greater than that of single adsorption in removal of xylene under similar inlet concentration and relative humidity. We found a significant catalytic effect for activated carbon when used in combination with ozonation process, leading to improvement of xylene removal percentage. In addition, the elimination capacity of the system improved with the increase of inlet ozone dose as well as gas flow rate. The relative humidity showed a positive effect of the xylene removal at the range of 5 to 50%, while the higher humidity (more than 50% resulted in reduction of the performance.ConclusionThe findings of the present work revealed that the catalytic ozonation process can be an efficient technique for treating the air streams containing industrial concentrations of xylene. Furthermore, there is a practical potential to retrofit the present adsorption systems intothe catalytic ozonation simply by coupling them with the ozonation system. the catalytic ozonation of xylene was conducted using a bench scale set-up consisted of a syringe pump,an air pump, an ozone generator, and a glass reactor packed with activated carbon. Several experimental run was defined to investigate the influence of the selected

  13. Variable geometry for supersonic mixed-compression inlets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, N. E.; Latham, E. A.; Smeltzer, D. B.

    1974-01-01

    Study of two-dimensional and axisymmetric supersonic mixed-compression inlet systems has shown that the geometry of both systems can be varied to provide adequate transonic airflow to satisfy the airflow demand of most jet engines. Collapsing geometry systems for both types of inlet systems provide a generous amount of transonic airflow for any design Mach number inlet system. However, the mechanical practicality of collapsing centerbodies for axisymmetric inlet systems is doubtful. Therefore, translating centerbody axisymmetric inlets with auxiliary airflow systems to augment the transonic airflow capability are an attractive alternative. Estimates show that the capture mass-flow ratio at Mach number 1.0 can be increased approximately 0.20 for a very short axisymmetric inlet system designed for Mach number 2.37. With this increase in mass-flow ratio, even variable-cycle engine transonic airflow demand can be matched without oversizing the inlet at the design Mach number.

  14. Prediction of Mass Flow Rate in Supersonic Natural Gas Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Chuang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The mass flow rate of natural gas through the supersonic separator was numerically calculated by various cubic equations of state. The numerical results show that the compressibility factor and specific heat ratio for ideal gas law diverge remarkably from real gas models at a high inlet pressure. Simultaneously, the deviation of mass flow calculated by the ideal and real gas models reaches over 10 %. The difference increases with the lower of the inlet temperature regardless of the inlet pressure. A higher back pressure results in an earlier location of the shock wave. The pressure ratio of 0.72 is the first threshold to get the separator work normally. The second threshold is 0.95, in which case the whole flow is subsonic and cannot reach the choked state. The shock position moves upstream with the real gas model compared to the ideal gas law in the cyclonic separation section.

  15. Response of partially premixed flames to acoustic velocity and equivalence ratio perturbations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, K.T.; Lee, J.G.; Quay, B.D.; Santavicca, D.A. [Center for Advanced Power Generation, Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA (United States)

    2010-09-15

    This article describes an experimental investigation of the forced response of a swirl-stabilized partially premixed flame when it is subjected to acoustic velocity and equivalence ratio fluctuations. The flame's response is analyzed using phase-resolved CH{sup *} chemiluminescence images and flame transfer function (FTF) measurements, and compared with the response of a perfectly premixed flame under acoustic perturbations. The nonlinear response of the partially premixed flame is manifested by a partial extinction of the reaction zone, leading to rapid reduction of flame surface area. This nonlinearity, however, is observed only when the phase difference between the acoustic velocity and the equivalence ratio at the combustor inlet is close to zero. The condition, {delta}{phi}{sub {phi}}'-V'{approx}0 , indicates that reactant mixtures with high equivalence ratio impinge on the flame front with high velocity, inducing large fluctuations of the rate of heat release. It is found that the phase difference between the acoustic velocity and equivalence ratio nonuniformities is a key parameter governing the linear/nonlinear response of a partially premixed flame, and it is a function of modulation frequency, inlet velocity, fuel injection location, and fuel injector impedance. The results presented in this article will provide insight into the response of a partially premixed flame, which has not been well explored to date. (author)

  16. Effect of flow velocity and temperature on ignition characteristics in laser ignition of natural gas and air mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, J.; Riley, M. J. W.; Borman, A.; Dowding, C.; Kirk, A.; Bickerton, R.

    2015-03-01

    Laser induced spark ignition offers the potential for greater reliability and consistency in ignition of lean air/fuel mixtures. This increased reliability is essential for the application of gas turbines as primary or secondary reserve energy sources in smart grid systems, enabling the integration of renewable energy sources whose output is prone to fluctuation over time. This work details a study into the effect of flow velocity and temperature on minimum ignition energies in laser-induced spark ignition in an atmospheric combustion test rig, representative of a sub 15 MW industrial gas turbine (Siemens Industrial Turbomachinery Ltd., Lincoln, UK). Determination of minimum ignition energies required for a range of temperatures and flow velocities is essential for establishing an operating window in which laser-induced spark ignition can operate under realistic, engine-like start conditions. Ignition of a natural gas and air mixture at atmospheric pressure was conducted using a laser ignition system utilizing a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser source operating at 532 nm wavelength and 4 ns pulse length. Analysis of the influence of flow velocity and temperature on ignition characteristics is presented in terms of required photon flux density, a useful parameter to consider during the development laser ignition systems.

  17. A Radiative Transfer Modeling Methodology in Gas-Liquid Multiphase Flow Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gautham Krishnamoorthy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A methodology for performing radiative transfer calculations in computational fluid dynamic simulations of gas-liquid multiphase flows is presented. By considering an externally irradiated bubble column photoreactor as our model system, the bubble scattering coefficients were determined through add-on functions by employing as inputs the bubble volume fractions, number densities, and the fractional contribution of each bubble size to the bubble volume from four different multiphase modeling options. The scattering coefficient profiles resulting from the models were significantly different from one another and aligned closely with their predicted gas-phase volume fraction distributions. The impacts of the multiphase modeling option, initial bubble diameter, and gas flow rates on the radiation distribution patterns within the reactor were also examined. An increase in air inlet velocities resulted in an increase in the fraction of larger sized bubbles and their contribution to the scattering coefficient. However, the initial bubble sizes were found to have the strongest impact on the radiation field.

  18. Effect of temperature change at inlet of engine on the corrected performance of turbofan engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozu, Masao; Yajima, Satoshi [Defence Agency, Tokyo, JapanIshikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1989-06-10

    Theoretical consideration on the effect of inlet temperature change of engine on the engine performance was conducted, and soundness of the result was appreciated by applying it to the experimental result of turbofan engine. As the theoretical consideration, premises of Buckingham's fundamental theorem was corrected by Reynolds Number and by the consideration on the effect of inlet temperature on gas constant and specific heat ratio. By using the result, correction factors were calculated from the experimental result of an actual turbo-fan engine. The correction factors were applied to the other engine test result and confirmed satisfactory soundness. 4 refs., 11 figs.

  19. Effect of wind waves on air-sea gas exchange: proposal of an overall CO2 transfer velocity formula as a function of breaking-wave parameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, D.; Suzuki, Y.; Komori, S.

    2003-01-01

    A new formula for gas transfer velocity as a function of the breaking-wave parameter is proposed based on correlating gas transfer with whitecap coverage. The new formula for gas transfer across an air-sea interface depends not only on wind speed but also on wind-wave state. At the same wind speed, a higher gas transfer velocity will be obtained for a more developed wind-sea, which is represented by a smaller spectral peak frequency of wind waves. We suggest that the large uncertainties in the traditional relationship of gas transfer velocity with wind speed be ascribed to the neglect of the effect of wind waves. The breaking-wave parameter can be regarded as a Reynolds number that characterizes the intensity of turbulence associated with wind waves in the downward-bursting boundary layer (DBBL). DBBL provides an effective way to exchange gas across the air-sea interface, which might be related to the surface renewal

  20. The boundary condition for vertical velocity and its interdependence with surface gas exchange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Kowalski

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The law of conservation of linear momentum is applied to surface gas exchanges, employing scale analysis to diagnose the vertical velocity (w in the boundary layer. Net upward momentum in the surface layer is forced by evaporation (E and defines non-zero vertical motion, with a magnitude defined by the ratio of E to the air density, as w = E/ρ. This is true even right down at the surface where the boundary condition is w|0 = E/ρ|0 (where w|0 and ρ|0 represent the vertical velocity and density of air at the surface. This Stefan flow velocity implies upward transport of a non-diffusive nature that is a general feature of the troposphere but is of particular importance at the surface, where it assists molecular diffusion with upward gas migration (of H2O, for example but opposes that of downward-diffusing species like CO2 during daytime. The definition of flux–gradient relationships (eddy diffusivities requires rectification to exclude non-diffusive transport, which does not depend on scalar gradients. At the microscopic scale, the role of non-diffusive transport in the process of evaporation from inside a narrow tube – with vapour transport into an overlying, horizontal airstream – was described long ago in classical mechanics and is routinely accounted for by chemical engineers, but has been neglected by scientists studying stomatal conductance. Correctly accounting for non-diffusive transport through stomata, which can appreciably reduce net CO2 transport and marginally boost that of water vapour, should improve characterisations of ecosystem and plant functioning.

  1. Gas separating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gollan, A.

    1988-03-29

    Feed gas is directed tangentially along the non-skin surface of gas separation membrane modules comprising a cylindrical bundle of parallel contiguous hollow fibers supported to allow feed gas to flow from an inlet at one end of a cylindrical housing through the bores of the bundled fibers to an outlet at the other end while a component of the feed gas permeates through the fibers, each having the skin side on the outside, through a permeate outlet in the cylindrical casing. 3 figs.

  2. 33 CFR 165.1709 - Security Zones: Liquefied Natural Gas Tanker Transits and Operations at Phillips Petroleum LNG...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Gas Tanker Transits and Operations at Phillips Petroleum LNG Pier, Cook Inlet, AK. 165.1709 Section...: Liquefied Natural Gas Tanker Transits and Operations at Phillips Petroleum LNG Pier, Cook Inlet, AK. (a... and outbound transits through Cook Inlet, Alaska between the Phillips Petroleum LNG Pier, 60°40′43″ N...

  3. Effect of Coulomb friction on orientational correlation and velocity distribution functions in a sheared dilute granular gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayen, Bishakhdatta; Alam, Meheboob

    2011-08-01

    From particle simulations of a sheared frictional granular gas, we show that the Coulomb friction can have dramatic effects on orientational correlation as well as on both the translational and angular velocity distribution functions even in the Boltzmann (dilute) limit. The dependence of orientational correlation on friction coefficient (μ) is found to be nonmonotonic, and the Coulomb friction plays a dual role of enhancing or diminishing the orientational correlation, depending on the value of the tangential restitution coefficient (which characterizes the roughness of particles). From the sticking limit (i.e., with no sliding contact) of rough particles, decreasing the Coulomb friction is found to reduce the density and spatial velocity correlations which, together with diminished orientational correlation for small enough μ, are responsible for the transition from non-gaussian to gaussian distribution functions in the double limit of small friction (μ→0) and nearly elastic particles (e→1). This double limit in fact corresponds to perfectly smooth particles, and hence the maxwellian (gaussian) is indeed a solution of the Boltzmann equation for a frictional granular gas in the limit of elastic collisions and zero Coulomb friction at any roughness. The high-velocity tails of both distribution functions seem to follow stretched exponentials even in the presence of Coulomb friction, and the related velocity exponents deviate strongly from a gaussian with increasing friction.

  4. Shinnecock Inlet, New York, Site Investigation Report 3, Selected Field Data Report for 1997, 1998, 1999 Velocity and Sediment Surveys

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pratt, Thad

    2001-01-01

    .... This fieldwork included ADCP current measurements and sediment sampling in the inlet channel, the Atlantic Ocean encompassing the ebb shoal, and Shinnecock Bay including the navigation channels and flood shoal...

  5. Chronostratigraphic Analysis of Geomorphic Features within the Former Sinepuxent Inlet: A Wave-Dominated Tidal Inlet along Assateague Island, MD, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seminack, C.; McBride, R.; Petruny, L. M.

    2017-12-01

    The former Sinepuxent Inlet, located along the mixed-energy, wave-dominated Assateague Island, MD-VA, USA, contains some of the most robust recurved-spit ridges along the span of the barrier island. In addition, this former tidal inlet exhibits a poorly developed flood-tidal delta containing at least two sets of curvilinear ridges known as "washarounds". Historical maps and nautical charts indicate that the former Sinepuxent Inlet was open from 1755 to 1832. However, previous studies conducted at the former Sinepuxent Inlet hypothesized that the site was exposed to episodic breaching events because of the extensive width of the former inlet throat, constrained by the northern and southern recurved-spit ridges. A total of 16 sediment cores, 10 optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) samples, and three 14C samples (mixed benthic foraminifera and eastern mud snail [Ilyanassa obsolete]) were collected from the former Sinepuxent Inlet to place morphostratigraphic units into a chronological context. Six OSL samples were collected from the northern and southern recurved-spit ridges at mean sea level (MSL) to constrain genesis ages. Southern recurved-spit ages varied more than their northern counterparts, ranging from 1640 to 1990 AD. The northern recurved-spit ridges varied in age from 1770 to 1900 AD. Two OSL samples collected from flood-tidal delta ridges yielded ages from 1680 to 2000 AD. In addition, two 14C samples collected at 128 and 101 cm below MSL within the inlet throat yielded ages between 1720 and post-1950 AD. Ultimately, these dates overlap with the inlet activity phase as indicated in historical documents. Conversely, two OSL samples (155 and 201 cm below MSL) and one 14C sample (134 cm below MSL) collected from the inlet throat returned ages between 760 and 1465 AD. The contrast in ages between the older inlet throat and subaerial ridge samples supports the hypothesis that the former Sinepuxent Inlet was reactivated numerous times. Thus, the three age

  6. Effects of lower plenum flow structure on core inlet flow of ABWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Shun; Abe, Yutaka; Kaneko, Akiko; Watanabe, Fumitoshi; Tezuka, Kenichi

    2010-01-01

    The evaluation of coolant flow structure at a lower plenum of an advanced boiling water reactor (ABWR) in which there are many structures is very important in order to improve generating power. Although the simulation results by CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) codes can predict such complicated flow in the lower plenum, it is required to establish the database of flow structure in lower plenum of ABWR experimentally for the benchmark of the CFD codes. In the model of the lower plenum, we measured velocity profiles with LDV and PIV. And differential pressure of constructed model is measured with differential pressure instrument. It was identified that the velocity and differential pressure profiles also showed the tendency to be flat in the core inlet. Moreover, vortexes were observed around side entry orifice by PIV measurement. (author)

  7. Development of a thermodynamic low order model for a twin screw expander with emphasis on pulsations in the inlet pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papes, Iva; Degroote, Joris; Vierendeels, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A multi-chamber model is developed from the mass and energy conservation laws. • To better predict inlet pipe pulsations a 3D inlet pipe model is coupled to it. • Flow coefficients are derived from 3D CFD calculations. • Maximal deviation between the full CFD and the presented model is around 5%. • This model is a good compromise between accuracy and computational resources. - Abstract: A twin screw expander is a positive displacement machine used in various applications of waste heat recovery. The performance of this machine is influenced by internal leakages, gas pulsations formed in the inlet pipe and the properties of the refrigerant. In this paper a multi-chamber mathematical model of a twin screw expander is presented to predict its performance. From the mass and energy conservation laws, differential equations are derived which are then solved together with the appropriate Equation of State (EoS) in the instantaneous control volumes. In order to calculate the mass flow rates through leakage paths more accurately, flow coefficients used in the converging nozzle model were derived from 3D Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) calculation. Due to high gas pulsation levels at the inlet port, a coupling with a 3D CFD inlet pipe model is introduced in order to better predict throttling losses. The maximal deviation between predictions by the developed model and 3D CFD calculations of the complete machine is around 5% for the mass flow rate and the power output.

  8. Numerical study on coolant flow distribution at the core inlet for an integral pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Lin; Peng, Min Jun; Xia, Genglei; Lv, Xing; Li, Ren [Fundamental Science on Nuclear Safety and Simulation Technology Laboratory, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin (China)

    2017-02-15

    When an integral pressurized water reactor is operated under low power conditions, once-through steam generator group operation strategy is applied. However, group operation strategy will cause nonuniform coolant flow distribution at the core inlet and lower plenum. To help coolant flow mix more uniformly, a flow mixing chamber (FMC) has been designed. In this paper, computational fluid dynamics methods have been used to investigate the coolant distribution by the effect of FMC. Velocity and temperature characteristics under different low power conditions and optimized FMC configuration have been analyzed. The results illustrate that the FMC can help improve the nonuniform coolant temperature distribution at the core inlet effectively; at the same time, the FMC will induce more resistance in the downcomer and lower plenum.

  9. Inlet-engine matching for SCAR including application of a bicone variable geometry inlet. [Supersonic Cruise Aircraft Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserbauer, J. F.; Gerstenmaier, W. H.

    1978-01-01

    Airflow characteristics of variable cycle engines (VCE) designed for Mach 2.32 can have transonic airflow requirements as high as 1.6 times the cruise airflow. This is a formidable requirement for conventional, high performance, axisymmetric, translating centerbody mixed compression inlets. An alternate inlet is defined where the second cone of a two cone centerbody collapses to the initial cone angle to provide a large off-design airflow capability, and incorporates modest centerbody translation to minimize spillage drag. Estimates of transonic spillage drag are competitive with those of conventional translating centerbody inlets. The inlet's cruise performance exhibits very low bleed requirements with good recovery and high angle of attack capability.

  10. Velocity and pressure measurements in guide vane clearance gap of a low specific speed Francis turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapa, B. S.; Dahlhaug, O. G.; Thapa, B.

    2016-11-01

    In Francis turbine, a small clearance gap between the guide vanes and the cover plates is usually required to pivot guide vanes as a part of governing system. Deflection of cover plates and erosion of mating surfaces causes this gap to increase from its design value. The clearance gap induces the secondary flow in the distributor system. This effects the main flow at the runner inlet, which causes losses in efficiency and instability. A guide vane cascade of a low specific speed Francis turbine has been developed for experimental investigations. The test setup is able to produce similar velocity distributions at the runner inlet as that of a reference prototype turbine. The setup is designed for particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements from the position of stay vane outlet to the position of runner inlet. In this study, velocity and pressure measurements are conducted with 2 mm clearance gap on one side of guide vane. Leakage flow is observed and measured together with pressure measurements. It is concluded that the leakage flow behaves as a jet and mixes with the main flow in cross-wise direction and forms a vortex filament. This causes non-uniform inlet flow conditions at runner blades.

  11. [Removal of toluene from waste gas by honeycomb adsorption rotor with modified 13X molecular sieves].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jia-De; Zheng, Liang-Wei; Zhu, Run-Ye; Yu, Yun-Feng

    2013-12-01

    The removal of toluene from waste gas by Honeycomb Adsorption Rotor with modified 13X molecular sieves was systematically investigated. The effects of the rotor operating parameters and the feed gas parameters on the adsorption efficiency were clarified. The experimental results indicated that the honeycomb adsorption rotor had a good humidity resistance. The removal efficiency of honeycomb adsorption rotor achieved the maximal value with optimal rotor speed and optimal generation air temperature. Moreover, for an appropriate flow rate ratio the removal efficiency and energy consumption should be taken into account. When the recommended operating parameters were regeneration air temperature of 180 degrees C, rotor speed of 2.8-5 r x h(-1), flow rate ratio of 8-12, the removal efficiency kept over 90% for the toluene gas with concentration of 100 mg x m(-3) and inlet velocity of 2 m x s(-1). The research provided design experience and operating parameters for industrial application of honeycomb adsorption rotor. It showed that lower empty bed velocity, faster rotor speed and higher temperature were necessary to purify organic waste gases of higher concentrations.

  12. DEPOSITION OF FISSION PRODUCTS FROM HELIUM GAS FLOWING AT HIGH VELOCITIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abriss, A.; Ewing, R. A.; Sunderman, D. N.

    1963-11-15

    From American Nuclear Society Meeting, New York, Nov. 1963. Out-of- pile experiments simulating gas cooled reactor flow and temperature conditions were made to correlate by both empirical and theoretical considerations such parameters as Reynolds numbers, velocity, surface conditions, materials of construction, geometry, particulate matter, and fission product diffusion coefficients. It was concluded that all regions of flow disturbance are areas of buildup of activity. No selectivity in deposition among the elements studied, with the exception of I, Te, and Cs, was found. Relative abundances to each other of less volatile isotopes remained constant throughout any particular experiment. Data are tabulated. (P.C.H.)

  13. Coastal inlets and tidal basins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vriend, H.J.; Dronkers, J.; Stive, M.J.F.; Van Dongeren, A.; Wang, J.H.

    2002-01-01

    lecture note: Tidal inlets and their associated basins (lagoons) are a common feature of lowland coasts all around the world. A significant part ofthe world's coastlines is formed by barrier island coasts, and most other tidal coasts are interrupted by estuaries and lagoon inlets. These tidal

  14. Diversion cross-flow mixing at the inlet of a simulated rod bundle using a gamma camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedaghat, A.; Macduff, R.; Castellana, F.

    1986-01-01

    The prediction of diversion cross-flow and turbulent mixing interests reactor vendors and nuclear fuel suppliers because of the effect on critical heat flux. In single-phase flow with uniform inlet conditions, flow diversion occurs primarily near the inlet. Prior work by Bowring and Levy and Lahey estimated diversion length by comparing the axial pressure differential at the channel exit using isokinetic (natural flow split) and nonisokinetic (forced flow split) sampling and by using a mathematical model. The present work, sponsored by Exxon Nuclear Company, Inc., represents the first study in which flow distribution and diversion cross flow were investigated at the inlet of a clean geometry. The parameters investigated were diversion length and the effective cross-flow velocity was determined by analysis. The results of this work were compared to theoretical values predicted by the COBRA IIIC subchannel computer code. The difference between experimental data and COBRA IIIC suggests that a more comprehensive transverse momentum balance is desired as mass flux ratios become large. The inclusion of transverse inertia and acceleration terms in the transverse momentum balance become important

  15. Rotor boundary layer development with inlet guide vane (IGV) wake impingement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Lichao; Zou, Tengda; Zhu, Yiding; Lee, Cunbiao

    2018-04-01

    This paper examines the transition process in a boundary layer on a rotor blade under the impingement of an inlet guide vane wake. The effects of wake strengths and the reduced frequency on the unsteady boundary layer development on a low-speed axial compressor were investigated using particle image velocimetry. The measurements were carried out at two reduced frequencies (fr = fIGVS0/U2i, fr = 1.35, and fr = 0.675) with the Reynolds number, based on the blade chord and the isentropic inlet velocity, being 97 500. At fr = 1.35, the flow separated at the trailing edge when the wake strength was weak. However, the separation was almost totally suppressed as the wake strength increased. For the stronger wake, both the wake's high turbulence and the negative jet behavior of the wake dominated the interaction between the unsteady wake and the separated boundary layer on the suction surface of the airfoil. The boundary layer displacement thickened first due to the negative jet effect. Then, as the disturbances developed underneath the wake, the boundary layer thickness reduced gradually. The high disturbance region convected downstream at a fraction of the free-stream velocity and spread in the streamwise direction. The separation on the suction surface was suppressed until the next wake's arrival. Because of the long recovery time at fr = 0.675, the boundary layer thickened gradually as the wake convected further downstream and finally separated due to the adverse pressure gradient. The different boundary layer states in turn affected the development of disturbances.

  16. Automation Activator of Hydrogen Gas Inlet Valve on Reduction Furnace ME-11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Achmad Suntoro

    2007-01-01

    Operational of hydrogen inlet valve of the reduction furnace ME-11 was actuated manually by furnace operator if all its requirements have been fulfilled. Automation of the valve has been constructed as an additional option of the furnace operating system, in which any interruption by the existing manual system by the operator is still valid even though the automatic option is being used. This paper describes the information concerning the automation construction and its logical status of control in the form of its finite state machine. This automation system has been tested successfully. (author)

  17. Amount of gas hydrate estimated from compressional- and shear-wave velocities at the JAPEX/JNOC/GSC Mallik 2L-38 gas hydrate research well

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M.W.

    1999-01-01

    The amount of in situ gas hydrate concentrated in the sediment pore space at the JAPEX/JNOC/GSC Mallik 2L-38 gas hydrate research well was estimated by using compressional-wave (P-wave) and shear-wave (S-wave) downhole log measurements. A weighted equation developed for relating the amount of gas hydrate concentrated in the pore space of unconsolidated sediments to the increase of seismic velocities was applied to the acoustic logs with porosities derived from the formation density log. A weight of 1.56 (W=1.56) and the exponent of 1 (n=1) provided consistent estimates of gas hydrate concentration from the S-wave and the P-wave logs. Gas hydrate concentration is as much as 80% in the pore spaces, and the average gas hydrate concentration within the gas-hydrate-bearing section from 897 m to 1110 m (excluding zones where there is no gas hydrate) was calculated at 39.0% when using P-wave data and 37.8% when using S-wave data.

  18. Reconstruction of paleo-inlet dynamics using sedimentologic analyses, geomorphic features, and benthic foraminiferal assemblages: former ephemeral inlets of Cedar Island, Virginia, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, R.; Wood, E. T.

    2017-12-01

    Cedar Island, VA is a low-profile, washover-dominated barrier island that has breached at least three times in the past sixty years. Cedar Island Inlet, a former wave-dominated tidal inlet, was open for the following time periods: 1) 1956-1962, 2) 1992-1997, and 3) 1998-2007. Air photos, satellite imagery, and geomorphic features (i.e., relict flood tidal deltas, recurved-spit ridges) record the spatial and temporal extent of the three ephemeral inlets. Based on three sediment vibracores, benthic foraminiferal and sedimentologic analyses offer high resolution insights of inlet dynamics and lifecycle evolution. Four foraminiferal biofacies are completely dominated by Elphidium excavatum (54-100%) and contain unique assemblages of accessory species based on cluster analyses: tidal inlet floor (low abundance estuarine and shelf species; 23% Haynesina germanica); flood tidal delta/inlet fill (high abundance estuarine and shelf species; 2% Buccella frigida, 2% Ammonia parkinsoniana, and 2% Haynesina germanica); high-energy inlet fill (low abundance, low diversity shelf species; 9% Elphidium gunteri); and washover/beach/aeolian (low abundance, predominantly shelf species; 3% Buccella frigida and 3% Ammonia parkinsoniana). The estuarine biofacies is barren of all foraminifera. Grain size trends indicate a first order coarsening-upward succession with second order coarsening- and fining-upwards packages in inlet throat deposits, while a first order fining-upward succession is observed in flood tidal delta deposits with two second order coarsening-upward packages in the proximal flood tidal delta. Contrary to typical wave-dominated tidal inlets that open, migrate laterally in the direction of net longshore transport, and close, the 1998-2007 tidal inlet, and possibly the 1956-1962 inlet, migrated laterally and rotated, whereas the 1992-1997 inlet remained stationary and did not rotate. In the vicinity of the vibracores, preserved deposits are attributed to the 1956-1962 and

  19. Exergy analysis of a gas-hydrate cool storage system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bi, Yuehong; Liu, Xiao; Jiang, Minghe

    2014-01-01

    Based on exergy analysis of charging and discharging processes in a gas-hydrate cool storage system, the formulas for exergy efficiency at the sensible heat transfer stage and the phase change stage corresponding to gas-hydrate charging and discharging processes are obtained. Furthermore, the overall exergy efficiency expressions of charging, discharging processes and the thermodynamic cycle of the gas-hydrate cool storage system are obtained. By using the above expressions, the effects of number of transfer units, the inlet temperatures of the cooling medium and the heating medium on exergy efficiencies of the gas-hydrate cool storage system are emphatically analyzed. The research results can be directly used to evaluate the performance of gas-hydrate cool storage systems and design more efficient energy systems by reducing the sources of inefficiency in gas-hydrate cool storage systems. - Highlights: • Formulas for exergy efficiency at four stages are obtained. • Exergy efficiency expressions of two processes and one cycle are obtained. • Three mainly influencing factors on exergy efficiencies are analyzed. • With increasing the inlet temperature of cooling medium, exergy efficiency increases. • With decreasing the inlet temperature of heating medium, exergy efficiency increases

  20. Experimental research on velocity distribution in narrow slots of plane type reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qu Xinxing; Zhang Youjie; Jia Haijun; Jiang Shengyao; Bo Hanliang; Min Gang

    2003-01-01

    The experimental research on velocity distribution in multiple parallel narrow channels formed by fuel plane of assembly is carried out under various Re and the water without ions as fluid in testing loop. The experimental results show that under various Re within a channel the velocity in the middle area is high and the velocity in the edge of channel decreases rapidly to zero, and the velocity is symmetrically distributed along the central line, thus the velocity distribution within a channel is like a trapezium. While in parallel channels the velocity of the middle channel is low and the velocity of the channel close to the edge is high, it is supposed to be caused by the inlet structure of channels, this concave distribution is a disadvantage to the even distribution of reactor flux

  1. Uniform and non-uniform inlet temperature of a vertical hot water jet injected into a rectangular tank

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed; Sun, Shuyu

    2010-01-01

    In most of real-world applications, such as the case of heat stores, inlet is not kept at a constant temperature but it may vary with time during charging process. In this paper, a vertical water jet injected into a rectangular storage tank is measured experimentally and simulated numerically. Two cases of study are considered; one is a hot water jet with uniform inlet temperature (UIT) injected into a cold water tank, and the other is a cold water jet with non-uniform inlet temperature (NUIT) injected into a hot water tank. Three different temperature differences and three different flow rates are studied for the hot water jet with UIT which is injected into a cold water tank. Also, three different initial temperatures with constant flow rate as well as three different flow rates with constant initial temperature are considered for the cold jet with NUIT which is injected into a hot water tank. Turbulence intensity at the inlet as well as Reynolds number for the NUIT cases are therefore functions of inlet temperature and time. Both experimental measurements and numerical calculations are carried out for the same measured flow and thermal conditions. The realizable k-ε model is used for modeling the turbulent flow. Numerical solutions are obtained for unsteady flow while pressure, velocity, temperature and turbulence distributions inside the water tank are analyzed. The simulated results are compared to the measured results, and they show a good agreement at low temperatures. © 2010 IEEE.

  2. Uniform and non-uniform inlet temperature of a vertical hot water jet injected into a rectangular tank

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed

    2010-12-01

    In most of real-world applications, such as the case of heat stores, inlet is not kept at a constant temperature but it may vary with time during charging process. In this paper, a vertical water jet injected into a rectangular storage tank is measured experimentally and simulated numerically. Two cases of study are considered; one is a hot water jet with uniform inlet temperature (UIT) injected into a cold water tank, and the other is a cold water jet with non-uniform inlet temperature (NUIT) injected into a hot water tank. Three different temperature differences and three different flow rates are studied for the hot water jet with UIT which is injected into a cold water tank. Also, three different initial temperatures with constant flow rate as well as three different flow rates with constant initial temperature are considered for the cold jet with NUIT which is injected into a hot water tank. Turbulence intensity at the inlet as well as Reynolds number for the NUIT cases are therefore functions of inlet temperature and time. Both experimental measurements and numerical calculations are carried out for the same measured flow and thermal conditions. The realizable k-ε model is used for modeling the turbulent flow. Numerical solutions are obtained for unsteady flow while pressure, velocity, temperature and turbulence distributions inside the water tank are analyzed. The simulated results are compared to the measured results, and they show a good agreement at low temperatures. © 2010 IEEE.

  3. Survey of high-velocity molecular gas in the vicinity of Herbig-Haro objects. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, S.; Snell, R.L.

    1983-01-01

    A survey of high-velocity molecular gas toward 49 Herbig-Haro objects is presented. Observations of the 12 CO J = 1-0 transition obtained with the 14 m telescope of the Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory reveal three new spatially extended high-velocity molecular outflows. One is in the NGC 1333 region near HH 12, and two are in the NGC 7129 region, the first near LkHα 234 and the second near a far-infrared source. The relationship between optical Herbin-Haro emission knots and large-scale motions of the ambient molecular material is investigated, and the properties of high-velocity molecular outflows in the vicinity of Herbig-Haro objects are discussed. Of 11 energetic outflows in the vicinity of Herbig-Haro objects, eight are found in four pairs separated by 0.2-1.0 pc. We estimate that energetic outflows characterized by mass loss rates > or =10 -7 M/sub sun/ yr -1 occur for at least 10 4 yr once in the lifetime of all stars with masses greater than 1M/sub sun/

  4. Plugging of feed inlet tube upstands with Ni/Ti shape memory alloy plugs - Heysham 1 power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathews, A.J.

    1988-01-01

    The paper contains a description of a new approach for Plugging feed inlet tubes of Gas-Cooled Reactors. Instead of utilizing the original explosive method plugging by fitting a shape memory alloy plug into the upstand is being described. (author)

  5. Velocity statistics for interacting edge dislocations in one dimension from Dyson's Coulomb gas model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafarpour, Farshid; Angheluta, Luiza; Goldenfeld, Nigel

    2013-10-01

    The dynamics of edge dislocations with parallel Burgers vectors, moving in the same slip plane, is mapped onto Dyson's model of a two-dimensional Coulomb gas confined in one dimension. We show that the tail distribution of the velocity of dislocations is power law in form, as a consequence of the pair interaction of nearest neighbors in one dimension. In two dimensions, we show the presence of a pairing phase transition in a system of interacting dislocations with parallel Burgers vectors. The scaling exponent of the velocity distribution at effective temperatures well below this pairing transition temperature can be derived from the nearest-neighbor interaction, while near the transition temperature, the distribution deviates from the form predicted by the nearest-neighbor interaction, suggesting the presence of collective effects.

  6. Direct Analysis of Organic Compounds in Liquid Using a Miniature Photoionization Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer with Pulsed Carrier-Gas Capillary Inlet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xinqiong; Yu, Quan; Zhang, Qian; Ni, Kai; Qian, Xiang; Tang, Fei; Wang, Xiaohao

    2017-08-01

    A miniature ion trap mass spectrometer with capillary direct sampling and vacuum ultraviolet photoionization source was developed to conduct trace analysis of organic compounds in liquids. Self-aspiration sampling is available where the samples are drawn into the vacuum chamber through a capillary with an extremely low flow rate (less than 1 μL/min), which minimizes sample consumption in each analysis to tens of micrograms. A pulsed gas-assisted inlet was designed and optimized to promote sample transmission in the tube and facilitate the cooling of ions, thereby improving instrument sensitivity. A limit of detection of 2 ppb could be achieved for 2,4-dimethylaniline in a methanol solution. The sampling system described in the present study is specifically suitable for a miniature photoionization ion trap mass spectrometer that can perform rapid and online analysis for liquid samples. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  7. Performance study for inlet installations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingaman, Donald C.

    1992-01-01

    A conceptual design trade study was conducted by McDonnell Aircraft Company (MCAIR) and NASA LARC PAB to determine the impact of inlet design features incorporated for reduced detectability on inlet performance, weight, and cost, for both fighter and attack-type aircraft. Quality Function Deployment (QFD) techniques were used to prioritize trade study issues, and select 'best' air induction system configurations for each of two notional aircraft, the Multi-Role Fighter (MRF) and the Advanced Medium Attack (AMA) bomber. Database deficiencies discovered in the trade study process were identified, and technology roadmaps were developed to address these deficiencies. Finally, two high speed inlet wind tunnel model concepts were developed for follow-on wind tunnel investigations.

  8. Numerical analysis of performance of steam reformer of methane reforming hydrogen production system connected with high-temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Huaqiang; Jiang Shengyao; Zhang Youjie

    2007-01-01

    Methane conversion rate and hydrogen output are important performance indexes of the steam reformer. The paper presents numerical analysis of performance of the reformer connected with high-temperature gas-cooled reactor HTR-10. Setting helium inlet flow rate fixed, performance of the reformer was examined with different helium inlet temperature, pressure, different process gas temperature, pressure, flow rate, and different steam to carbon ratio. As the range concerned, helium inlet temperature has remarkable influence on the performance, and helium inlet temperature, process gas temperature and pressure have little influence on the performance, and improving process gas flow rate, methane conversion rate decreases and hydrogen output increases, however improving steam to carbon ratio has reverse influence on the performance. (authors)

  9. Mean ascending velocity of powder entrained by gas in a packed bed; Juten sonai ni okeru kiryu ni dohansareru funtai no heikin josho sokudo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ariyama, T; Sato, M; Asakawa, Y [NKK Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-01-20

    For the purpose of clarifying the behavior of fine particles entrained by upward gas in the packed bed like in a blast furnace, the mean ascending velocity of powder in the packed bed was measured by the residence time distribution of the tracer powder. According the results, it was found that the measured velocity was lower than the values predicted by the successive collision model of fine particles. The difference is considered to be caused by the stagnant zone of fine particles on the packed materials, and this behavior was confirmed by the observation in the two dimensional experimental apparatus. Namely, the dynamic hold-up of powder in the packed bed was composed of the particles entrained by the upward gas and the stagnant particles on the packed material, and the latter part was successively renewed by the powder carried by gas. Then, on the basis of the above results, the relation between stagnant time and local ascending velocity were experimentally correlated with solid-gas loading ratio, and it was found that there exists a certain relation among them. The model proposed by these experiments enabled to calculate the mean ascending velocity of powder in the packed bed. 6 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Phase velocity enhancement of linear explosive shock tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loiseau, Jason; Serge, Matthew; Szirti, Daniel; Higgins, Andrew; Tanguay, Vincent

    2011-06-01

    Strong, high density shocks can be generated by sequentially detonating a hollow cylinder of explosives surrounding a thin-walled, pressurized tube. Implosion of the tube results in a pinch that travels at the detonation velocity of the explosive and acts like a piston to drive a shock into the gas ahead of it. In order to increase the maximum shock velocities that can be obtained, a phase velocity generator can be used to drag an oblique detonation wave along the gas tube at a velocity much higher than the base detonation velocity of the explosive. Since yielding and failure of the gas tube is the primary limitation of these devices, it is desirable to retain the dynamic confinement effects of a heavy-walled tamper without interfering with operation of the phase velocity generator. This was accomplished by cutting a slit into the tamper and introducing a phased detonation wave such that it asymmetrically wraps around the gas tube. This type of configuration has been previously experimentally verified to produce very strong shocks but the post-shock pressure and shock velocity limits have not been investigated. This study measured the shock trajectory for various fill pressures and phase velocities to ascertain the limiting effects of tube yield, detonation obliquity and pinch aspect ratio.

  11. Thermocapillary and shear driven flows in gas/liquid system in annular duct

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaponenko, Yu; Shevtsova, V; Nepomnyashchy, A

    2011-01-01

    We report the results of numerical study of two-phase flows in annulus for different aspect ratios obtained in the frame of the JEREMI experiment preparation. The geometry of the physical problem is a cylindrical and non-deformable liquid bridge concentrically surrounded by an annular gas channel under conditions of zero gravity. Thermocapillary (Marangoni) convection in liquid bridge of Pr = 68 is analyzed in the case when the interface is subjected to an axial gas stream. The gas flow is counter-directed with respect to the Marangoni flow. The inlet gas velocity U 0 g , temperature difference ΔT between end rods of the liquid bridge and aspect ratio are the control parameters of the system. In the case when the gas stream comes from the cold side, it cools down the interface to a temperature lower than that of the liquid beneath, and in a certain region of the parameter space that cooling causes instability due to a temperature difference in the direction, perpendicular to the interface. The present study is focused on the influence of the aspect ratio on the existence and characteristic features of the oscillatory regime.

  12. MHD free convection flow of a visco-elastic (Kuvshiniski type dusty gas through a semi infinite plate moving with velocity decreasing exponentially with time and radiative heat transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Om Prakash

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The present paper is concerned with the study of MHD free convective flow of a visco-elastic (Kuvshinski type dusty gas through a porous medium induced by the motion of a semi-infinite flat plate under the influence of radiative heat transfer moving with velocity decreasing exponentially with time. The expressions for velocity distribution of a dusty gas and dust particles, concentration profile and temperature field are obtained. The effect of Schmidt number (Sc, Magnetic field parameter (M and Radiation parameter (N on velocity distribution of dusty gas and dust particles, concentration and temperature distribution are discussed graphically.

  13. Thermodynamic analysis of turbine blade cooling on the performance of gas turbine cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarabchi, K.; Shokri, M.

    2002-01-01

    Turbine inlet temperature strongly affects gas turbine performance. Today blade cooling technologies facilitate the use of higher inlet temperatures. Of course blade cooling causes some thermodynamic penalties that destroys to some extent the positive effect of higher inlet temperatures. This research aims to model and evaluate the performance of gas turbine cycle with air cooled turbine. In this study internal and transpiration cooling methods has been investigated and the penalties as the result of gas flow friction, cooling air throttling, mixing of cooling air flow with hot gas flow, and irreversible heat transfer have been considered. In addition, it is attempted to consider any factor influencing actual conditions of system in the analysis. It is concluded that penalties due to blade cooling decrease as permissible temperature of the blade surface increases. Also it is observed that transpiration method leads to better performance of gas turbine comparing to internal cooling method

  14. Cooling system at the compressors air inlet of the gas turbines from the Tula`s combined cycle central; Sistema de enfriamiento en la succion del compresor de las turbinas de gas de la central de ciclo combinado de Tula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez F, Oscar [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Tula (Mexico); Romero Paredes, Hernando; Vargas, Martin; Gomez, Jose Francisco [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Mexico, D. F. (Mexico)

    1996-12-31

    It has been formerly evaluated that it is possible to enhance notably the electric power generation in gas turbine power plants by cooling the air at the compressor inlet. It has been pointed out that provided a source of waste heat is available it can be very attractive the use of absorption refrigeration systems. In this paper the technical and the economical benefits of bringing the air inlet temperature down 8 Celsius degrees of the four gas turbines of the Combined Cycle Central of Tula, in the State of Hidalgo (combined cycle central-Tula) are evaluated. The results show that it is possible to achieve an efficiency enhancement of at least 1%, and that in very warm days up to 48 additional Megawatts can be generated, or about 10% of the installed capacity. The final economic result is very encouraging and an annual economical benefit in the order of 50 million pesos can be obtained and the refrigeration units can be amortized in approximately one year. [Espanol] Se ha evaluado anteriormente que es posible mejorar notablemente la capacidad de generacion electrica en plantas que utilizan turbinas de gas, mediante el enfriamiento del aire de succion del compresor. Se ha senalado que en la medida en que se encuentre disponible una fuente termica de desecho puede ser muy atractivo el uso de sistemas de refrigeracion por absorcion. En el presente trabajo se evaluan los beneficios tecnicos y economicos que puede tener el llevar el aire de succion hasta una temperatura de 8 grados Celsius, de las cuatro unidades de gas de la Central de Ciclo Combinado de Tula, Hidalgo (CCC-Tula). Los resultados muestran que es posible alcanzar un aumento en la eficiencia de al menos 1% y que se pueden generar, en dias muy calurosos, hasta 48 MW extras, equivalente al 10% de la capacidad instalada. El resultado economico final es muy alentador y puede llegar a tenerse un beneficio economico del orden de los 50 millones de pesos anuales y las unidades de refrigeracion podran pagarse en

  15. Cooling system at the compressors air inlet of the gas turbines from the Tula`s combined cycle central; Sistema de enfriamiento en la succion del compresor de las turbinas de gas de la central de ciclo combinado de Tula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez F, Oscar [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Tula (Mexico); Romero Paredes, Hernando; Vargas, Martin; Gomez, Jose Francisco [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Mexico, D. F. (Mexico)

    1997-12-31

    It has been formerly evaluated that it is possible to enhance notably the electric power generation in gas turbine power plants by cooling the air at the compressor inlet. It has been pointed out that provided a source of waste heat is available it can be very attractive the use of absorption refrigeration systems. In this paper the technical and the economical benefits of bringing the air inlet temperature down 8 Celsius degrees of the four gas turbines of the Combined Cycle Central of Tula, in the State of Hidalgo (combined cycle central-Tula) are evaluated. The results show that it is possible to achieve an efficiency enhancement of at least 1%, and that in very warm days up to 48 additional Megawatts can be generated, or about 10% of the installed capacity. The final economic result is very encouraging and an annual economical benefit in the order of 50 million pesos can be obtained and the refrigeration units can be amortized in approximately one year. [Espanol] Se ha evaluado anteriormente que es posible mejorar notablemente la capacidad de generacion electrica en plantas que utilizan turbinas de gas, mediante el enfriamiento del aire de succion del compresor. Se ha senalado que en la medida en que se encuentre disponible una fuente termica de desecho puede ser muy atractivo el uso de sistemas de refrigeracion por absorcion. En el presente trabajo se evaluan los beneficios tecnicos y economicos que puede tener el llevar el aire de succion hasta una temperatura de 8 grados Celsius, de las cuatro unidades de gas de la Central de Ciclo Combinado de Tula, Hidalgo (CCC-Tula). Los resultados muestran que es posible alcanzar un aumento en la eficiencia de al menos 1% y que se pueden generar, en dias muy calurosos, hasta 48 MW extras, equivalente al 10% de la capacidad instalada. El resultado economico final es muy alentador y puede llegar a tenerse un beneficio economico del orden de los 50 millones de pesos anuales y las unidades de refrigeracion podran pagarse en

  16. Sediment Budget Analysis; Masonboro Inlet, North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-15

    ER D C/ CH L TR -1 7- 13 Regional Sediment Management (RSM) Program Sediment Budget Analysis; Masonboro Inlet, North Carolina Co as ta...ERDC/CHL TR-17-13 August 2017 Sediment Budget Analysis; Masonboro Inlet, North Carolina Kevin B. Conner U.S. Army Engineer District, Wilmington P...Engineers Washington, DC 20314-1000 Under Project 454632, “Sediment Budget Analysis, Masonboro Inlet, NC” ERDC/CHL TR-17-13 ii Abstract A

  17. Use of a Tantalum Liner to Reduce Bore Erosion and Increase Muzzle Velocity in Two-Stage Light Gas Guns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanoff, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Muzzle velocities and gun erosion predicted by earlier numerical simulations of two stage light gas guns with steel gun tubes were in good agreement with experimental values. In a subsequent study, simulations of high performance shots were repeated with rhenium (Re) gun tubes. Large increases in muzzle velocity (2 - 4 km/sec) were predicted for Re tubes. In addition, the hydrogen-produced gun tube erosion was, in general, predicted to be zero with Re tubes. Tantalum (Ta) has some mechanical properties superior to those of Re. Tantalum has a lower modulus of elasticity than Re for better force transmission from the refractory metal liner to an underlying thick wall steel tube. Tantalum also has greater ductility than Re for better survivability during severe stress/strain cycles. Also, tantalum has been used as a coating or liner in military powder guns with encouraging results. Tantalum has, however, somewhat inferior thermal properties to those of rhenium, with a lower melting point and lower density and thermal conductivity. The present study was undertaken to see to what degree the muzzle velocity gains of rhenium gun tubes (over steel tubes) could be achieved with tantalum gun tubes. Nine high performance shots were modeled with a new version of our CFD gun code for steel, rhenium and tantalum gun tubes. For all except the highest velocity shot, the results with Ta tubes were nearly identical with those for Re tubes. Even for the highest velocity shot, the muzzle velocity gain over a steel tube using Ta was 82% of the gain obtained using Re. Thus, the somewhat inferior thermal properties of Ta (when compared to those of Re) translate into only very slightly poorer overall muzzle velocity performance. When this fact is combined with the superior mechanical properties of Ta and the encouraging performance of Ta liners/coatings in military powder guns, tantalum is to be preferred over Re as a liner/coating material for two stage light gas guns to increase muzzle

  18. Effect of inlet fuel type on the degradation of Ni/YSZ anode of solid oxide fuel cell by carbon deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suttichai Assabumrungrat

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available According to the high operating temperature of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC (700-1100ºC, it is known that some hydrocarbon fuels can be directly used as inlet fuel instead of hydrogen by feeding straight to the anode. This operation is called a direct internal reforming SOFC (DIR-SOFC. However, the major difficulty of this operation is the possible degradation of anode by the carbon deposition, as the carbon species are easily formed. In the present work, the effect of inlet fuel (i.e. H2, synthesis gas (H2+CO, CH4, CH4+H2O, CH3OH+H2O, and C2H5OH+H2O on the degradation of nickel cermet (Ni/YSZ, which is the most common anode material of SOFC, was studied.It was found from the work that hydrogen and synthesis gas (CO+H2 are proper to be used as direct inlet fuels for DIR-SOFC with Ni/YSZ anode, since the carbon formation on Ni/YSZ occurred in the small quantity. The mixture of methane and steam (CH4+H2O can also be used as the inlet feed, but the H2O/CH4 ratio plays an important role. In contrast, pure methane (CH4, methanol with steam (CH3OH+H2O and ethanol with steam (C2H5OH+H2O are not suitable for using as direct inlet fuel for DIR-SOFC with Ni/YSZ anode even the higher H2O/CH3OH and H2O/C2H5OH ratios were applied.

  19. Hypersonic Combustor Model Inlet CFD Simulations and Experimental Comparisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatapathy, E.; TokarcikPolsky, S.; Deiwert, G. S.; Edwards, Thomas A. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Numerous two-and three-dimensional computational simulations were performed for the inlet associated with the combustor model for the hypersonic propulsion experiment in the NASA Ames 16-Inch Shock Tunnel. The inlet was designed to produce a combustor-inlet flow that is nearly two-dimensional and of sufficient mass flow rate for large scale combustor testing. The three-dimensional simulations demonstrated that the inlet design met all the design objectives and that the inlet produced a very nearly two-dimensional combustor inflow profile. Numerous two-dimensional simulations were performed with various levels of approximations such as in the choice of chemical and physical models, as well as numerical approximations. Parametric studies were conducted to better understand and to characterize the inlet flow. Results from the two-and three-dimensional simulations were used to predict the mass flux entering the combustor and a mass flux correlation as a function of facility stagnation pressure was developed. Surface heat flux and pressure measurements were compared with the computed results and good agreement was found. The computational simulations helped determine the inlet low characteristics in the high enthalpy environment, the important parameters that affect the combustor-inlet flow, and the sensitivity of the inlet flow to various modeling assumptions.

  20. Experimental and numerical study on inlet and outlet conditions of a bulb turbine with considering free surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Y P; Liao, W L; Feng, H D; Ruan, H; Luo, X Q

    2012-01-01

    For a bulb turbine, it has a low head and a big runner diameter, and the free surface influences the flow at the inlet and outlet of the turbine, which bring many problems such as vibration, cracks and cavitation to the turbine. Therefore, it is difficult to get the precise internal flow characteristics through a numerical simulation with conventional ideal flow conditions. In this paper, both numerical and experimental methods are adopted to investigate the flow characteristics at the inlet and outlet of the bulb turbine with considering free surface. Firstly, experimental and numerical studies in a low head pressure pipeline are conducted, and the corresponding boundary condition according with reality is obtained through the comparison between the model test result and the CFD simulation result. Then, through an analysis of the velocity and pressure fields at the inlet of the bulb turbine at different heads, the flow characteristics and rules at the entrance of the bulb turbine have been revealed with considering free surface; Finally, the performance predictions for a bulb turbine have been conducted by using the obtained flow rules at the inlet as the boundary condition of a turbine, and the causes that lead to non-uniform forces on blades, cavitation and vibration have been illustrated in this paper, which also provide a theory basis for an accurate numerical simulation and optimization design of a bulb turbine.

  1. Wet gas sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welker, T.F.

    1997-07-01

    The quality of gas has changed drastically in the past few years. Most gas is wet with hydrocarbons, water, and heavier contaminants that tend to condense if not handled properly. If a gas stream is contaminated with condensables, the sampling of that stream must be done in a manner that will ensure all of the components in the stream are introduced into the sample container as the composite. The sampling and handling of wet gas is extremely difficult under ideal conditions. There are no ideal conditions in the real world. The problems related to offshore operations and other wet gas systems, as well as the transportation of the sample, are additional problems that must be overcome if the analysis is to mean anything to the producer and gatherer. The sampling of wet gas systems is decidedly more difficult than sampling conventional dry gas systems. Wet gas systems were generally going to result in the measurement of one heating value at the inlet of the pipe and a drastic reduction in the heating value of the gas at the outlet end of the system. This is caused by the fallout or accumulation of the heavier products that, at the inlet, may be in the vapor state in the pipeline; hence, the high gravity and high BTU. But, in fact, because of pressure and temperature variances, these liquids condense and form a liquid that is actually running down the pipe as a stream or is accumulated in drips to be blown from the system. (author)

  2. Carbon Dioxide Washout Testing Using Various Inlet Vent Configurations in the Mark-III Space Suit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korona, F. Adam; Norcross, Jason; Conger, Bruce; Navarro, Moses

    2014-01-01

    Requirements for using a space suit during ground testing include providing adequate carbon dioxide (CO2) washout for the suited subject. Acute CO2 exposure can lead to symptoms including headache, dyspnea, lethargy, and eventually unconsciousness or even death. Symptoms depend on several factors including inspired partial pressure of CO2 (ppCO2), duration of exposure, metabolic rate of the subject, and physiological differences between subjects. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis has predicted that the configuration of the suit inlet vent has a significant effect on oronasal CO2 concentrations. The main objective of this test was to characterize inspired oronasal ppCO2 for a variety of inlet vent configurations in the Mark-III suit across a range of workload and flow rates. Data and trends observed during testing along with refined CFD models will be used to help design an inlet vent configuration for the Z-2 space suit. The testing methodology used in this test builds upon past CO2 washout testing performed on the Z-1 suit, Rear Entry I-Suit, and the Enhanced Mobility Advanced Crew Escape Suit. Three subjects performed two test sessions each in the Mark-III suit to allow for comparison between tests. Six different helmet inlet vent configurations were evaluated during each test session. Suit pressure was maintained at 4.3 psid. Suited test subjects walked on a treadmill to generate metabolic workloads of approximately 2000 and 3000 BTU/hr. Supply airflow rates of 6 and 4 actual cubic feet per minute were tested at each workload. Subjects wore an oronasal mask with an open port in front of the mouth and were allowed to breathe freely. Oronasal ppCO2 was monitored real-time via gas analyzers with sampling tubes connected to the oronasal mask. Metabolic rate was calculated from the CO2 production measured by an additional gas analyzer at the air outlet from the suit. Real-time metabolic rate measurements were used to adjust the treadmill workload to meet

  3. Development of an Experimental Data Base to Validate Compressor-Face Boundary Conditions Used in Unsteady Inlet Flow Computations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajben, Miklos; Freund, Donald D.

    1998-01-01

    The ability to predict the dynamics of integrated inlet/compressor systems is an important part of designing high-speed propulsion systems. The boundaries of the performance envelope are often defined by undesirable transient phenomena in the inlet (unstart, buzz, etc.) in response to disturbances originated either in the engine or in the atmosphere. Stability margins used to compensate for the inability to accurately predict such processes lead to weight and performance penalties, which translate into a reduction in vehicle range. The prediction of transients in an inlet/compressor system requires either the coupling of two complex, unsteady codes (one for the inlet and one for the engine) or else a reliable characterization of the inlet/compressor interface, by specifying a boundary condition. In the context of engineering development programs, only the second option is viable economically. Computations of unsteady inlet flows invariably rely on simple compressor-face boundary conditions (CFBC's). Currently, customary conditions include choked flow, constant static pressure, constant axial velocity, constant Mach number or constant mass flow per unit area. These conditions are straightforward extensions of practices that are valid for and work well with steady inlet flows. Unfortunately, it is not at all likely that any flow property would stay constant during a complex system transient. At the start of this effort, no experimental observation existed that could be used to formulate of verify any of the CFBC'S. This lack of hard information represented a risk for a development program that has been recognized to be unacceptably large. The goal of the present effort was to generate such data. Disturbances reaching the compressor face in flight may have complex spatial structures and temporal histories. Small amplitude disturbances may be decomposed into acoustic, vorticity and entropy contributions that are uncoupled if the undisturbed flow is uniform. This study

  4. Transport of temperature-velocity covariance in gas-solid flow and its relation to the axial dispersion coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Shankar; Sun, Bo

    2015-11-01

    The presence of solid particles in a steady laminar flow generates velocity fluctuations with respect to the mean fluid velocity that are termed pseudo-turbulence. The level of these pseudo-turbulent velocity fluctuations has been characterized in statistically homogeneous fixed particle assemblies and freely evolving suspensions using particle-resolved direct numerical simulation (PR-DNS) by Mehrabadi et al. (JFM, 2015), and it is found to be a significant contribution to the total kinetic energy associated with the flow. The correlation of these velocity fluctuations with temperature (or a passive scalar) generates a flux term that appears in the transport equation for the average fluid temperature (or average scalar concentration). The magnitude of this transport of temperature-velocity covariance is quantified using PR-DNS of thermally fully developed flow past a statistically homogeneous fixed assembly of particles, and the budget of the average fluid temperature equation is presented. The relation of this transport term to the axial dispersion coefficient (Brenner, Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. A, 1980) is established. The simulation results are then interpreted in the context of our understanding of axial dispersion in gas-solid flow. NSF CBET 1336941.

  5. Drift velocity studies at a time projection chamber for various water contents in the gas mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoever, F.W.

    2007-03-01

    For the answer of different open questions in high energy physics the construction of a linear e + e - collider with a c. m. energy of up to one TeV is prepared. With this is connected a comprehensive development on detectors, which must satisfy the requirements of the planned experiments. For the track chamber a TPC is considered. Hereby it deals with a gas-based concept, which has already been proved in past experiments and which is at time further developed by means of test chambers. The composition of the gas mixtureplays hereby an important role. Impurities of the gas mixture, especially by oxygen and water from the ambient air are a fact, which occurs every time in the development phase and can scarcely be avoided. From this arose the motivation to study directly the effects of this impurities. The object of the present thesis are correlations between drift velocity and water content in the chamber gas of a TPC

  6. Wave-driven fluxes through New River Inlet, NC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wargula, A.; Raubenheimer, B.; Elgar, S.

    2012-12-01

    The importance of wave forcing to inlet circulation is examined using observations of waves, water levels, and currents collected in and near New River Inlet, NC during April and May, 2012. A boat-mounted system was used to measure current profiles along transects across the inlet mouth during three 14-hr periods, providing information on cross-inlet current structure, as well as discharge. Additionally, an array of 13 colocated pressure gages and profilers were deployed along 2 km of the inlet channel (5 to 10 m water depths) and ebb shoal channel (2 to 3 m water depths) and 19 colocated pressure gages and acoustic Doppler velocimeters were deployed across and offshore of the ebb shoal (1 to 5 m water depths) (Figure 1). The inlet is well mixed and tidal currents ranged from +/- 1.5 m/s, maximum discharge rates at peak ebb and flood were about 700 to 900 m3/s, offshore significant wave heights Hsig were 0.5 to 2.5 m, and wind speeds ranged from 0 to 14 m/s. Time-integrated residual discharge over semi-diurnal tidal cycles with similar ranges was ebb dominant during calm conditions (May 11, net out-of-inlet discharge ~ 55 m3, Hsig ~ 0.5 m, NW winds ~ 3 m/s) and flood dominant during stormier conditions (May 14, net into-inlet discharge ~ 15 m3, Hsig ~ 1.2 m, S winds ~ 6.5 m/s). Low-pass filtered in situ profiler data suggest wave-forcing affects the fluxes into and out of the inlet. The observations will be used to examine the momentum balance governing the temporal and cross-inlet (channel vs. shoal) variation of these fluxes, as well as the effect of waves on ebb and flood flow dominance. Funding provided by the Office of Naval Research and a National Security Science and Engineering Faculty Fellowship.; Figure 1: Google Earth image of New River Inlet, NC. Colors are depth contours (scale on the right, units are m relative to mean sea level) and symbols are locations of colocated current meters and pressure gages.

  7. Engine with pulse-suppressed dedicated exhaust gas recirculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, Edward J.; Baker, Rodney E.

    2016-06-07

    An engine assembly includes an intake assembly, a spark-ignited internal combustion engine, and an exhaust assembly. The intake assembly includes a charge air cooler disposed between an exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) mixer and a backpressure valve. The charge air cooler has both an inlet and an outlet, and the back pressure valve is configured to maintain a minimum pressure difference between the inlet of the charge air cooler and an outlet of the backpressure valve. A dedicated exhaust gas recirculation system is provided in fluid communication with at least one cylinder and with the EGR mixer. The dedicated exhaust gas recirculation system is configured to route all of the exhaust gas from the at least one cylinder to the EGR mixer for recirculation back to the engine.

  8. Unstart Coupling Mechanism Analysis of Multiple-Modules Hypersonic Inlet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jichao Hu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The combination of multiplemodules in parallel manner is an important way to achieve the much higher thrust of scramjet engine. For the multiple-modules scramjet engine, when inlet unstarted oscillatory flow appears in a single-module engine due to high backpressure, how to interact with each module by massflow spillage, and whether inlet unstart occurs in other modules are important issues. The unstarted flowfield and coupling characteristic for a three-module hypersonic inlet caused by center module II and side module III were, conducted respectively. The results indicate that the other two hypersonic inlets are forced into unstarted flow when unstarted phenomenon appears on a single-module hypersonic inlet due to high backpressure, and the reversed flow in the isolator dominates the formation, expansion, shrinkage, and disappearance of the vortexes, and thus, it is the major factor of unstart coupling of multiple-modules hypersonic inlet. The coupling effect among multiple modules makes hypersonic inlet be more likely unstarted.

  9. Unstart coupling mechanism analysis of multiple-modules hypersonic inlet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jichao; Chang, Juntao; Wang, Lei; Cao, Shibin; Bao, Wen

    2013-01-01

    The combination of multiplemodules in parallel manner is an important way to achieve the much higher thrust of scramjet engine. For the multiple-modules scramjet engine, when inlet unstarted oscillatory flow appears in a single-module engine due to high backpressure, how to interact with each module by massflow spillage, and whether inlet unstart occurs in other modules are important issues. The unstarted flowfield and coupling characteristic for a three-module hypersonic inlet caused by center module II and side module III were, conducted respectively. The results indicate that the other two hypersonic inlets are forced into unstarted flow when unstarted phenomenon appears on a single-module hypersonic inlet due to high backpressure, and the reversed flow in the isolator dominates the formation, expansion, shrinkage, and disappearance of the vortexes, and thus, it is the major factor of unstart coupling of multiple-modules hypersonic inlet. The coupling effect among multiple modules makes hypersonic inlet be more likely unstarted.

  10. Film cooling effects on the tip flow characteristics of a gas turbine blade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available An experimental investigation of the tip flow characteristics between a gas turbine blade tip and the shroud was conducted by a pressure-test system and a particle image velocimetry (PIV system. A three-times scaled profile of the GE-E3 blade with five film cooling holes was used as specimen. The effects on flow characteristics by the rim width and the groove depth of the squealer tip were revealed. The rim widths were (a 0.9%, (b 2.1%, and (c 3.0% of the axial chord, and the groove depths were (a 2.8%, (b 4.8%, and (c 10% of the blade span. Several pressure taps on the top plate above the blades were connected to pressure gauges. By a CCD camera the PIV system recorded the velocity field around the leading edge zone including the five cooling holes. The flow distributions both in the tip clearance and in the passage were revealed, and the influence of the inlet velocity was determined. In this work, the tip flow characteristics with and without film cooling were investigated. The effects of different global blowing ratios of M=0.5, 1.0, 1.3 and 2.5 were established. It was found that decreasing the rim width resulted in a lower mass flow rate of the leakage flow, and the pressure distributions from the leading edge to the trailing edge showed a linearly increasing trend. It was also found that if the inlet velocity was less than 1.5 m/s, the flow field in the passage far away from the suction side appeared as a stagnation zone.

  11. CFD Models of a Serpentine Inlet, Fan, and Nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chima, R. V.; Arend, D. J.; Castner, R. S.; Slater, J. W.; Truax, P. P.

    2010-01-01

    Several computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes were used to analyze the Versatile Integrated Inlet Propulsion Aerodynamics Rig (VIIPAR) located at NASA Glenn Research Center. The rig consists of a serpentine inlet, a rake assembly, inlet guide vanes, a 12-in. diameter tip-turbine driven fan stage, exit rakes or probes, and an exhaust nozzle with a translating centerbody. The analyses were done to develop computational capabilities for modeling inlet/fan interaction and to help interpret experimental data. Three-dimensional Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) calculations of the fan stage were used to predict the operating line of the stage, the effects of leakage from the turbine stream, and the effects of inlet guide vane (IGV) setting angle. Coupled axisymmetric calculations of a bellmouth, fan, and nozzle were used to develop techniques for coupling codes together and to investigate possible effects of the nozzle on the fan. RANS calculations of the serpentine inlet were coupled to Euler calculations of the fan to investigate the complete inlet/fan system. Computed wall static pressures along the inlet centerline agreed reasonably well with experimental data but computed total pressures at the aerodynamic interface plane (AIP) showed significant differences from the data. Inlet distortion was shown to reduce the fan corrected flow and pressure ratio, and was not completely eliminated by passage through the fan

  12. Gas absorption technique by half-dry method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakago, K; Haseba, S

    1974-11-19

    The removal or recovery of nitrogen oxides and sulfur oxides by chemisorption using sodium chlorite or sodium hypochlorite solutions is described. The sorption tower consists of a packed layer of porous carrier such as alumina, silica gel or zeolite, gas inlet and outlet valves, inlet and outlet valves connected to the reaction solution tank, an inlet valve from the regeneration solution tank, and an outlet valve to a separatory device where reaction products, unreacted reaction solution, and regeneration solution are separated and returned to corresponding tanks. The carrier is immersed in a reaction solution, and excessive reaction solution is drained back to the tank. Then the gas valves are opened for chemisorption removal of NOx and SOx. Finally, the reaction product on the carrier is removed with the regeneration solution. More than two towers are placed in a series for more complete removal of the designated gases.

  13. Experimental results showing the internal three-component velocity field and outlet temperature contours for a model gas turbine combustor

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Meyers, BC

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available by the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Inc. All rights reserved ISABE-2011-1129 EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS SHOWING THE INTERNAL THREE-COMPONENT VELOCITY FIELD AND OUTLET TEMPERATURE CONTOURS FOR A MODEL GAS TURBINE COMBUSTOR BC Meyers*, GC... identifier c Position identifier F Fuel i Index L (Combustor) Liner OP Orifice plate Introduction There are often inconsistencies when comparing experimental and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations for gas turbine combustors [1...

  14. ASSESSING CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS ON THE STABILITY OF SMALL TIDAL INLETS: Part 2- DATA RICH ENVIRONMENTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong, Trang Minh; Ranasinghe, Roshanka; Thatcher, Marcus; Mahanama, Sarith; Wang, Zheng Bing; Dissanayake, Pushpa Kumara; Hemer, Mark; Luijendijk, Arjen; Bamunawala, Janaka; Roelvink, Dano; Walstra, Dirkjan

    2018-01-01

    Climate change (CC) is likely to affect the thousands of bar-built or barrier estuaries (here referred to as Small tidal inlets - STIs) around the world. Any such CC impacts on the stability of STIs, which governs the dynamics of STIs as well as that of the inlet-adjacent coastline, can result in significant socio-economic consequences due to the heavy human utilisation of these systems and their surrounds. This article demonstrates the application of a process based snap-shot modelling approach, using the coastal morphodynamic model Delft3D , to 3 case study sites representing the 3 main STI types; Permanently open, locationally stable inlets (Type 1), Permanently open, alongshore migrating inlets (Type 2) and Seasonally/Intermittently open, locationally stable inlets (Type 3). The 3 case study sites (Negombo lagoon - Type 1, Kalutara lagoon - Type 2, and Maha Oya river - Type 3) are all located along the southwest coast of Sri Lanka. After successful hydrodynamic and morphodynamic model validation at the 3 case study sites, CC impact assessment are undertaken for a high end greenhouse gas emission scenario. Future CC modified wave and riverflow conditions are derived from a regional scale application of spectral wave models (WaveWatch III and SWAN) and catchment scale applications of a hydrologic model (CLSM) respectively, both of which are forced with IPCC Global Climate Model output dynamically downscaled to ~ 50 km resolution over the study area with the stretched grid Conformal Cubic Atmospheric Model CCAM. Results show that while all 3 case study STIs will experience significant CC driven variations in their level of stability, none of them will change Type by the year 2100. Specifically, the level of stability of the Type 1 inlet will decrease from 'Good' to 'Fair to poor' by 2100, while the level of (locational) stability of the Type 2 inlet will also decrease with a doubling of the annual migration distance. Conversely, the stability of the Type 3 inlet

  15. Dopant-assisted negative photoionization Ion mobility spectrometry coupled with on-line cooling inlet for real-time monitoring H2S concentration in sewer gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Liying; Jiang, Dandan; Wang, Zhenxin; Hua, Lei; Li, Haiyang

    2016-06-01

    Malodorous hydrogen sulfide (H2S) gas often exists in the sewer system and associates with the problems of releasing the dangerous odor to the atmosphere and causing sewer pipe to be corroded. A simple method is in demand for real-time measuring H2S level in the sewer gas. In this paper, an innovated method based on dopant-assisted negative photoionization ion mobility spectrometry (DANP-IMS) with on-line semiconductor cooling inlet was put forward and successfully applied for the real-time measurement of H2S in sewer gas. The influence of moisture was effectively reduced via an on-line cooling method and a non-equilibrium dilution with drift gas. The limits of quantitation for the H2S in ≥60% relative humidity air could be obtained at ≤79.0ng L(-1) with linear ranges of 129-2064ng L(-1). The H2S concentration in a sewer manhole was successfully determined while its product ions were identified by an ion-mobility time-of-fight mass spectrometry. Finally, the correlation between sewer H2S concentration and the daily routines and habits of residents was investigated through hourly or real-time monitoring the variation of sewer H2S in manholes, indicating the power of this DANP-IMS method in assessing the H2S concentration in sewer system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Study on Combustion Oscillation of Premixed Flame with Pilot Fuel at Elevated Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsuka, Masaya; Yoshida, Shohei; Hirata, Yoshitaka; Kobayashi, Nariyoshi

    Acoustically-coupled combustion oscillation is studied for premixed flame with pilot fuel to be used in gas turbine combustors. Premixed gas is passed through swirl vanes and burnt with the centrally injected pilot fuel. The dependencies of pressure, fuel to air ratio, premixed fuel rate, inlet velocity and air temperature on the combustion oscillation are investigated. Two kinds of oscillation modes of ˜100Hz and ˜350Hz are activated according to inlet velocities. Fluctuating pressures are amplified when the premixed fuel rate is over ˜80% at elevated pressures. The fluctuating pressure peak moves to a higher premixed fuel ratio region with increased pressure or fuel to air ratio for the Helmholz type mode. Combustion oscillation occurs when the pilot fuel velocity is changed proportionally with the flame length.

  17. Performance analysis and optimization of power plants with gas turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besharati-Givi, Maryam

    The gas turbine is one of the most important applications for power generation. The purpose of this research is performance analysis and optimization of power plants by using different design systems at different operation conditions. In this research, accurate efficiency calculation and finding optimum values of efficiency for design of chiller inlet cooling and blade cooled gas turbine are investigated. This research shows how it is possible to find the optimum design for different operation conditions, like ambient temperature, relative humidity, turbine inlet temperature, and compressor pressure ratio. The simulated designs include the chiller, with varied COP and fogging cooling for a compressor. In addition, the overall thermal efficiency is improved by adding some design systems like reheat and regenerative heating. The other goal of this research focuses on the blade-cooled gas turbine for higher turbine inlet temperature, and consequently, higher efficiency. New film cooling equations, along with changing film cooling effectiveness for optimum cooling air requirement at the first-stage blades, and an internal and trailing edge cooling for the second stage, are innovated for optimal efficiency calculation. This research sets the groundwork for using the optimum value of efficiency calculation, while using inlet cooling and blade cooling designs. In the final step, the designed systems in the gas cycles are combined with a steam cycle for performance improvement.

  18. Laminar burning velocity and Markstein length of nitrogen diluted natural gas/hydrogen/air mixtures at normal, reduced and elevated pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, Haiyan [State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Flow in Power Engineering, School of Energy and Power Eng., Xi' an Jiaotong University (China); Institute of High Performance Computing, A-star (Singapore); Ji, Min; Jiao, Qi; Huang, Qian; Huang, Zuohua [State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Flow in Power Engineering, School of Energy and Power Eng., Xi' an Jiaotong University (China)

    2009-04-15

    Flame propagation of premixed nitrogen diluted natural gas/hydrogen/air mixtures was studied in a constant volume combustion bomb under various initial pressures. Laminar burning velocities and Markstein lengths were obtained for the diluted stoichiometric fuel/air mixtures with different hydrogen fractions and diluent ratios under various initial pressures. The results showed that both unstretched flame speed and unstretched burning velocity are reduced with the increase in initial pressure (except when the hydrogen fraction is 80%) as well as diluent ratio. The velocity reduction rate due to diluent addition is determined mainly by hydrogen fraction and diluent ratio, and the effect of initial pressure is negligible. Flame stability was studied by analyzing Markstein length. It was found that the increase of initial pressure and hydrogen fraction decreases flame stability and the flame tends to be more stable with the addition of diluent gas. Generally speaking, Markstein length of a fuel with low hydrogen fraction is more sensitive to the change of initial pressure than that of a one with high hydrogen fraction. (author)

  19. Effect of gas quantity on two-phase flow characteristics of a mixed-flow pump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Fu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The inlet gas quantity has a great influence on the performance and inner flow characteristics of a mixed-flow pump. In this article, both numerical and experimental methods are used to carry out this research work. The effects under the steady gas volume fraction state and the transient gas quantity variation process on the mixed-flow pump are investigated and compared in detail. It could be concluded that the head of the mixed-flow pump shows slight decline at the low gas volume fraction state, while it decreases sharply at the high gas volume fraction state and then decreases with the increasing gas quantity. There is an obvious asymmetric blade vapor density on the blade suction side under each cavitation state. The cavities can be weakened obviously by increasing the inlet gas volume fraction within a certain range. It has little influence on the internal unsteady flow of the mixed-flow pump when the gas volume fraction is less than 10%, but the pump starts to operate with a great unsteady characteristic when the inlet gas volume fraction increases to 15%.

  20. On which timescales do gas transfer velocities control North Atlantic CO2 flux variability?

    OpenAIRE

    Couldrey, Matthew; Oliver, Kevin; Yool, Andrew; Halloran, Paul; Achterberg, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The North Atlantic is an important basin for the global ocean's uptake of anthropogenic and natural carbon dioxide (CO2), but the mechanisms controlling this carbon flux are not fully understood. The air-sea flux of CO2, F, is the product of a gas transfer velocity, k, the air-sea CO2 concentration gradient, ΔpCO2, and the temperature and salinity-dependent solubility coefficient, α. k is difficult to constrain, representing the dominant uncertainty in F on short (instantaneous to interannual...

  1. Brazos Santiago Inlet, Texas, Shoaling Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-01

    Development Center 3909 Halls Ferry Road Vicksburg, MS 39180-6199 Final report Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Prepared...focus of this study was to understand the shoaling process in the BSI and to suggest sand management alternatives to reduce inlet maintenance ...Santiago Inlet Entrance Channel maintenance dredging quantities (normal distribution). ........................................................ 20

  2. The analog of Blanc's law for drift velocities of electrons in gas mixtures in weakly ionized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiflikian, R.V.

    1995-01-01

    The analog of Blanc's law for drift velocities of electrons in multicomponent gas mixtures in weakly ionized spatially homogeneous low-temperature plasma is derived. The obtained approximate-analytical expressions are valid for average electron energy in the 1--5 eV range typical for plasma conditions of low-pressure direct current (DC) discharges. The accuracy of these formulas is ±5%. The analytical criterion of the negative differential conductivity (NDC) of electrons in binary mixtures of gases is obtained. NDC of electrons is predicted in He:Kr and He:Xe rare gas mixtures. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  3. Inlet Trade Study for a Low-Boom Aircraft Demonstrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Christopher M.; Slater, John W.; Rallabhandi, Sriram K.

    2016-01-01

    Propulsion integration for low-boom supersonic aircraft requires careful inlet selection, placement, and tailoring to achieve acceptable propulsive and aerodynamic performance, without compromising vehicle sonic boom loudness levels. In this investigation, an inward-turning streamline-traced and axisymmetric spike inlet are designed and independently installed on a conceptual low-boom supersonic demonstrator aircraft. The airframe was pre-shaped to achieve a target ground under-track loudness of 76.4 PLdB at cruise using an adjoint-based design optimization process. Aircraft and inlet performance characteristics were obtained by solution of the steady-state Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. Isolated cruise inlet performance including total pressure recovery and distortion were computed and compared against installed inlet performance metrics. Evaluation of vehicle near-field pressure signatures, along with under- and off-track propagated loudness levels is also reported. Results indicate the integrated axisymmetric spike design offers higher inlet pressure recovery, lower fan distortion, and reduced sonic boom. The vehicle with streamline-traced inlet exhibits lower external wave drag, which translates to a higher lift-to-drag ratio and increased range capability.

  4. Optimization of fog inlet air cooling system for combined cycle power plants using genetic algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehyaei, Mehdi A.; Tahani, Mojtaba; Ahmadi, Pouria; Esfandiari, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    In this research paper, a comprehensive thermodynamic modeling of a combined cycle power plant is first conducted and the effects of gas turbine inlet fogging system on the first and second law efficiencies and net power outputs of combined cycle power plants are investigated. The combined cycle power plant (CCPP) considered for this study consist of a double pressure heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) to utilize the energy of exhaust leaving the gas turbine and produce superheated steam to generate electricity in the Rankine cycle. In order to enhance understanding of this research and come up with optimum performance assessment of the plant, a complete optimization is using a genetic algorithm conducted. In order to achieve this goal, a new objective function is defined for the system optimization including social cost of air pollution for the power generation systems. The objective function is based on the first law efficiency, energy cost and the external social cost of air pollution for an operational system. It is concluded that using inlet air cooling system for the CCPP system and its optimization results in an increase in the average output power, first and second law efficiencies by 17.24%, 3.6% and 3.5%, respectively, for three warm months of year. - Highlights: • To model the combined cycle power plant equipped with fog inlet air cooling method. • To conduct both exergy and economic analyses for better understanding. • To conduct a complete optimization using a genetic algorithm to determine the optimal design parameters of the system

  5. Performance of an Otto cycle motor with natural gas direct injection; Desempenho de um motor ciclo Otto com injecao direta de gas natural

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbosa, Cleiton Rubens Formiga

    1997-07-01

    A Otto cycle engine with natural gas direct injection, during the inlet stroke, was submitted to runs with full power in a Foucaut dynamometer. The results obtained show a increase in the volumetric efficiency of the engine with natural gas direct injection when compared with natural gas injection applied in the inlet manifold, upstream of the throttle butterfly. In the conversion to natural gas direct injection, the technical characteristics were not changed. A kit for natural gas direct injection, with electronic management was located on the cylinder head of the test engine. Maintaining the pressure constant in the natural gas fuel line, using a reduction valve, the mass of fuel injected into the cylinder was regulated, varying the opening time of the solenoid valve fuel injector. Engine performance data is compared, emphasizing the factors that contribute to this increase in relative volumetric efficiency. Modifications are made to maximize the power of the engine with natural gas direct injection. (author)

  6. Observations of inner shelf cross-shore surface material transport adjacent to a coastal inlet in the northern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Mathias K.; MacMahan, Jamie; Reniers, Ad; Özgökmen, Tamay M.; Woodall, Kate; Haus, Brian

    2017-04-01

    Motivated by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, the Surfzone and Coastal Oil Pathways Experiment obtained Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) Eulerian and GPS-drifter based Lagrangian "surface" (Mexico to describe the influence of small-scale river plumes on surface material transport pathways in the nearshore. Lagrangian paths are qualitatively similar to surface pathlines derived from non-traditional, near-surface ADCP velocities, but both differ significantly from depth-averaged subsurface pathlines. Near-surface currents are linearly correlated with wind velocities (r =0.76 in the alongshore and r =0.85 in the cross-shore) at the 95% confidence level, and are 4-7 times larger than theoretical estimates of wind and wave-driven surface flow in an un-stratified water column. Differences in near-surface flow are attributed to the presence of a buoyant river plume forced by winds from passing extratropical storms. Plume boundary fronts induce a horizontal velocity gradient where drifters deployed outside of the plume in oceanic water routinely converge, slow, and are re-directed. When the plume flows west parallel to the beach, the seaward plume boundary front acts as a coastal barrier that prevents 100% of oceanic drifters from beaching within 27 km of the inlet. As a result, small-scale, wind-driven river plumes in the northern Gulf of Mexico act as coastal barriers that prevent offshore surface pollution from washing ashore west of river inlets.

  7. Evolution and Impacts of a New Inlet Formed in Fire Island National Park by Superstorm Sandy (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flood, R. D.; Flagg, C. N.; Goff, J. A.; Austin, J. A.; Schwab, W. C.; Denny, J. F.; Christensen, B. A.; Browne, C. M.; Saustrup, S.

    2013-12-01

    Superstorm Sandy impacted the New York / New Jersey area on October 29, 2012 and brought a storm surge of 1.5 to 2.5 m and waves with a significant wave height of 9.5 m to the south shore of Long Island, New York. The storm cut three inlets across Fire Island barrier islands. Two of the inlets were closed mechanically, but the third inlet, cut through a wilderness area of the Fire Island National Seashore, remains open and provides a rare opportunity to study the evolution and dynamics of an unmanaged inlet. This new inlet formed where Fire Island is narrow and is near the site of an earlier inlet that closed in 1825. Great South Bay (GSB) is located between Fire Island and the Long Island mainland. The salinity in GSB increased by 5 salinity units following the breach and has remained high. GSB has had chronic water quality issues associated with a high population density that may be moderated by flow related to the new inlet. Water flow through the new inlet is controlled by the difference between offshore tide and GSB tide, but GSB tide does not appear to have been altered by flow through the inlet. This is different from the traditional view of inlet dynamics where a balance is sought between channel cross-sectional area, tidal prism (which together give channel velocity) and longshore sediment transport. At SoMAS we have been monitoring the evolution of the new inlet since its formation. We have conducted overflights at 1 to 3 week intervals to track the changing inlet geometry and the location of flood-tidal and ebb-tidal deltas. We have also done small-boat bathymetric surveys of the channel itself every 3 to 5 weeks to track the shape and cross-sectional area of the channel. The channel was quite small shortly after the breach with a depth of about 2 m. The channel grew fast as it cut into underlying fine-grain sediments, reaching a depth of over 6 m following several late winter storms. The inlet channel initially migrated quickly to the west, but its

  8. P-Wave and S-Wave Velocity Structure of Submarine Landslide Associated With Gas Hydrate Layer on Frontal Ridge of Northern Cascadia Margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, T.; Lu, H.; Yelisetti, S.; Spence, G.

    2015-12-01

    The submarine landslide associated with gas hydrate is a potential risk for environment and engineering projects, and thus from long time ago it has been a hot topic of hydrate research. The study target is Slipstream submarine landslide, one of the slope failures observed on the frontal ridges of the Northern Cascadia accretionary margin off Vancouver Island. The previous studies indicated a possible connection between this submarine landslide feature and gas hydrate, whose occurrence is indicated by a prominent bottom-simulating reflector (BSR), at a depth of ~265-275 m beneath the seafloor (mbsf). The OBS (Ocean Bottom Seismometer) data collected during SeaJade (Seafloor Earthquake Array - Japan Canada Cascadia Experiment) project were used to derive the subseafloor velocity structure for both P- and S-wave using travel times picked from refraction and reflection events. The P-wave velocity structure above the BSR showed anomalous high velocities of about 2.0 km/s at shallow depths of 100 mbsf, closely matching the estimated depth of the glide plane (100 ± 10 m). Forward modelling of S-waves was carried out using the data from the OBS horizontal components. The S-wave velocities, interpreted in conjunction with the P-wave results, provide the key constraints on the gas hydrate distribution within the pores. The hydrate distribution in the pores is important for determining concentrations, and also for determining the frame strength which is critical for controlling slope stability of steep frontal ridges. The increase in S-wave velocity suggests that the hydrate is distributed as part of the load-bearing matrix to increase the rigidity of the sediment.

  9. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of the Tracer Gas Methodology in the Case of a Naturally Cross-Ventilated Building

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolopoulos, Nikos; Nikolopoulos, Aristeidis; Larsen, Tine Steen

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents the investigation of a naturally cross – ventilated building using both experimental and numerical methods with the parameters being the free-stream and the incidence angle of the wind to the openings of the building. The experimental methodology calculates the air change rate......, focusing on the time dependent character of the induced flow field. The numerical results are compared with corresponding experimental data for the three aforementioned experimental methodologies in the case of a full scale building inside a wind-tunnel. The numerical investigation reveals that for large...... based either on measurements of the inlet velocity profile, the outlet velocity profile or the descending rate of the tracer gas concentration using the decay method. The numerical investigation is based on the solution of the governing Navier-Stokes equations in their full three dimensional expression...

  10. Economical analysis of the spray drying process by pre-dehumidification of the inlet air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madeira, A.N.; Camargo, J.R. [University of Taubate (UNITAU), SP (Brazil). Mechanical Engineering Dept.

    2009-07-01

    Spray drying is a dehumidification process by atomization in a closed chamber that aims to remove moisture of a product by heat and mass transfer from the product's contained water to the air that, in this process is previously heated. This paper presents a case study for an industry that produces food ingredients. The current process applied in the product to heat the air can uses one of these two systems: a direct heating process that burns liquid petroleum gas in contact with the inlet air or indirect heating that uses a heat exchanger which heat the air. This heating system consumes 90% of the total process energy. However, this inlet air can reach the dehumidifier with high moisture from the atmosphere condition requesting, in this case, more energy consumption according to the year's seasons. This paper promotes a utilization study of the current process through the installation of a pre-dehumidification device of the inlet air and shows a study to three different dehumidification systems that means by refrigeration, adsorption and actual comparing their performance in an energetic and economical point of view. The goals of this study are to analyze the capacity of moisture removing of each removing device, the influence of moisture variation of the inlet air in the process as well as the economic impact of each device in the global system. It concludes that the utilization of dehumidification devices can eliminate the heating system reducing this way the energy consumption. Moreover it promotes the increasing of moisture gradient between the inlet air and the product optimizing the drying process and increasing the global energy efficiency in the global system. Choosing the most appropriate system for the pre-dehumidification device depends on the desired initial and final moisture content of the product, but applying pre-dehumidifiers at the inlet air promotes an energetic optimization in the spray drying process. (author)

  11. Numerical prediction of a draft tube flow taking into account uncertain inlet conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brugiere, O; Balarac, G; Corre, C; Metais, O; Flores, E; Pleroy

    2012-01-01

    The swirling turbulent flow in a hydroturbine draft tube is computed with a non-intrusive uncertainty quantification (UQ) method coupled to Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) modelling in order to take into account in the numerical prediction the physical uncertainties existing on the inlet flow conditions. The proposed approach yields not only mean velocity fields to be compared with measured profiles, as is customary in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) practice, but also variance of these quantities from which error bars can be deduced on the computed profiles, thus making more significant the comparison between experiment and computation.

  12. Numerical prediction of a draft tube flow taking into account uncertain inlet conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugiere, O.; Balarac, G.; Corre, C.; Metais, O.; Flores, E.; Pleroy

    2012-11-01

    The swirling turbulent flow in a hydroturbine draft tube is computed with a non-intrusive uncertainty quantification (UQ) method coupled to Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) modelling in order to take into account in the numerical prediction the physical uncertainties existing on the inlet flow conditions. The proposed approach yields not only mean velocity fields to be compared with measured profiles, as is customary in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) practice, but also variance of these quantities from which error bars can be deduced on the computed profiles, thus making more significant the comparison between experiment and computation.

  13. Silicon Microleaks for Inlets of Mass Spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harpold, Dan; Hasso, Niemann; Jamieson, Brian G.; Lynch, Bernard A.

    2009-01-01

    Microleaks for inlets of mass spectrometers used to analyze atmospheric gases can be fabricated in silicon wafers by means of photolithography, etching, and other techniques that are commonly used in the manufacture of integrated circuits and microelectromechanical systems. The microleaks serve to limit the flows of the gases into the mass-spectrometer vacuums to specified very small flow rates consistent with the capacities of the spectrometer vacuum pumps. There is a need to be able to precisely tailor the dimensions of each microleak so as to tailor its conductance to a precise low value. (As used here, "conductance" signifies the ratio between the rate of flow in the leak and the pressure drop from the upstream to the downstream end of the leak.) To date, microleaks have been made, variously, of crimped metal tubes, pulled glass tubes, or frits. Crimped-metal and pulled-glass-tube microleaks cannot readily be fabricated repeatably to precise dimensions and are susceptible to clogging with droplets or particles. Frits tend to be differentially chemically reactive with various gas constituents and, hence, to distort the gas mixtures to be analyzed. The present approach involving microfabrication in silicon largely overcomes the disadvantages of the prior approaches.

  14. Effects of inlet boundary conditions, on the computed flow in the Turbine-99 draft tube, using OpenFOAM and CFX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, H.; Cervantes, M. J.

    2012-11-01

    The flow in the Turbine-99 Kaplan draft tube was thoroughly investigated at three workshops (1999, 2001, 2005), which aimed at determining the state of the art of draft tube simulations. The flow is challenging due to the different flow phenomena appearing simultaneously such as unsteadiness, separation, swirl, turbulence, and a strong adverse pressure gradient. The geometry and the experimentally determined inlet boundary conditions were provided to the Turbine-99 workshop participants. At the final workshop, angular resolved inlet velocity boundary conditions were provided. The rotating non-axi-symmetry of the inlet flow due to the runner blades was thus included. The effect of the rotating angular resolution was however not fully investigated at that workshop. The first purpose of this work is to further investigate this effect. Several different inlet boundary conditions are applied - the angular resolved experimental data distributed at the Turbine-99 workshop, the angular resolved results of a runner simulation with interpolated values using different resolution in the tangential and radial directions, and an axi-symmetric variant of the same numerical data. The second purpose of this work is to compare the results from the OpenFOAM and CFX CFD codes, using as similar settings as possible. The present results suggest that the experimental angular inlet boundary conditions proposed to the workshop are not adequate to simulate accurately the flow in the T-99 draft tube. The reason for this is that the experimental phase-averaged data has some important differences compared to the previously measured time-averaged data. Using the interpolated data from the runner simulation as inlet boundary condition however gives good results as long as the resolution of that data is sufficient. It is shown that the difference between the results using the angular-resolved and the corresponding symmetric inlet data is very small, suggesting that the importance of the angular

  15. Effects of inlet boundary conditions, on the computed flow in the Turbine-99 draft tube, using OpenFOAM and CFX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, H; Cervantes, M J

    2012-01-01

    The flow in the Turbine-99 Kaplan draft tube was thoroughly investigated at three workshops (1999, 2001, 2005), which aimed at determining the state of the art of draft tube simulations. The flow is challenging due to the different flow phenomena appearing simultaneously such as unsteadiness, separation, swirl, turbulence, and a strong adverse pressure gradient. The geometry and the experimentally determined inlet boundary conditions were provided to the Turbine-99 workshop participants. At the final workshop, angular resolved inlet velocity boundary conditions were provided. The rotating non-axi-symmetry of the inlet flow due to the runner blades was thus included. The effect of the rotating angular resolution was however not fully investigated at that workshop. The first purpose of this work is to further investigate this effect. Several different inlet boundary conditions are applied – the angular resolved experimental data distributed at the Turbine-99 workshop, the angular resolved results of a runner simulation with interpolated values using different resolution in the tangential and radial directions, and an axi-symmetric variant of the same numerical data. The second purpose of this work is to compare the results from the OpenFOAM and CFX CFD codes, using as similar settings as possible. The present results suggest that the experimental angular inlet boundary conditions proposed to the workshop are not adequate to simulate accurately the flow in the T-99 draft tube. The reason for this is that the experimental phase-averaged data has some important differences compared to the previously measured time-averaged data. Using the interpolated data from the runner simulation as inlet boundary condition however gives good results as long as the resolution of that data is sufficient. It is shown that the difference between the results using the angular-resolved and the corresponding symmetric inlet data is very small, suggesting that the importance of the angular

  16. Reconstruction of core inlet temperature distribution by cold leg temperature measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saarinen, S.; Antila, M.

    2010-01-01

    The reduced core of Loviisa NPP contains 33 thermocouple measurements measuring the core inlet temperature. Currently, these thermocouple measurements are not used in determining the inlet temperature distribution. The average of cold leg temperature measurements is used as inlet temperature for each fuel assembly. In practice, the inlet temperature distribution is not constant. Thus, using a constant inlet temperature distribution induces asymmetries in the measured core power distribution. Using a more realistic inlet temperature distribution would help us to reduce virtual asymmetries of the core power distribution and increase the thermal margins of the core. The thermocouples at the inlet cannot be used directly to measure the inlet temperature accurately because the calibration of the thermocouples that is done at hot zero power conditions is no longer valid at full power, when there is temperature change across the core region. This is due to the effect of neutron irradiation on the Seebeck coefficient of the thermocouple wires. Therefore, we investigate in this paper a method to determine the inlet temperature distribution based on the cold leg temperature measurements. With this method we rely on the assumption that although the core inlet thermocouple measurements do not measure the absolute temperature accurately they do measure temperature changes with sufficient accuracy particularly in big disturbances. During the yearly testing of steam generator safety valves we observe a large temperature increase up to 12 degrees in the cold leg temperature. The change in the temperature of one of the cold legs causes a local disturbance in the core inlet temperature distribution. Using the temperature changes observed in the inlet thermocouple measurements we are able to fit six core inlet temperature response functions, one for each cold leg. The value of a function at an assembly inlet is determined only by the corresponding cold leg temperature disturbance

  17. Experimental Investigation of a Large-Scale Low-Boom Inlet Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirt, Stefanie M.; Chima, Rodrick V.; Vyas, Manan A.; Wayman, Thomas R.; Conners, Timothy R.; Reger, Robert W.

    2011-01-01

    A large-scale low-boom inlet concept was tested in the NASA Glenn Research Center 8- x 6- foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel. The purpose of this test was to assess inlet performance, stability and operability at various Mach numbers and angles of attack. During this effort, two models were tested: a dual stream inlet designed to mimic potential aircraft flight hardware integrating a high-flow bypass stream; and a single stream inlet designed to study a configuration with a zero-degree external cowl angle and to permit surface visualization of the vortex generator flow on the internal centerbody surface. During the course of the test, the low-boom inlet concept was demonstrated to have high recovery, excellent buzz margin, and high operability. This paper will provide an overview of the setup, show a brief comparison of the dual stream and single stream inlet results, and examine the dual stream inlet characteristics.

  18. Visualization and measurement of liquid velocity field of gas-liquid metal two-phase flow using neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Yasushi; Suzuki, Tohru; Matsubayashi, Masahito

    2000-01-01

    In a core melt accident of a fast breeder reactor, a possibility of re-criticality is anticipated in the molten fuel-steel mixture pool. One of the mechanisms to suppress the re-criticality is the boiling of steel in the molten fuel-steel mixture pool because of the negative void reactivity effect. To evaluate the reactivity change due to boiling, it is necessary to know the characteristics of gas-liquid two-phase flow in the molten fuel-steel mixture pool. For this purpose, boiling bubbles in a molten fuel-steel mixture pool were simulated by adiabatic gas bubbles in a liquid metal pool to study the basic characteristics of gas-liquid metal two-phase mixture. Visualization of the two-phase mixture and measurements of liquid phase velocity and void fraction were conducted by using neutron radiography and image processing techniques. From these measurements, the basic characteristics of gas-liquid metal two-phase mixture were clarified. (author)

  19. Measurements of turbulence in a microscale multi-inlet vortex nanoprecipitation reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Yanxiang; Cheng, Janine Chungyin; Fox, Rodney O; Olsen, Michael G

    2013-01-01

    The microscale multi-inlet vortex reactor (MIVR) is designed for use in Flash NanoPrecipitation (FNP), a promising technique for producing nanoparticles within small particle size distribution. Fluid mixing is crucial in the FNP process, and due to mixing’s strong dependence upon fluid kinematics, investigating velocity and turbulence within the reactor is crucial to optimizing reactor design. To this end, microscopic particle image velocimetry has been used to investigate flow within the MIVR. Three Reynolds numbers are studied, namely, Re j = 53, 93 and 240. At Re j = 53, the flow is laminar and steady. Due to the strong viscous effects at this Reynolds number, distinct flow patterns are observed at different distances from the reactor top and bottom walls. The viscous effects also retard the tangential motions within the reactor, resulting in a weaker vortex than appears at the higher Reynolds numbers. As the Reynolds number is increased to 93, the flow becomes more homogeneous over the depth of the reactor due to weaker viscous effects, yet the flow is still steady. The diminishing effects of viscosity also result in a stronger vortex. At the highest Reynolds number investigated, the flow is turbulent. Turbulent statistics including tangential and radial velocity fluctuations and Reynolds shear stresses are analyzed for this case in addition to the mean velocity field. The tangential motions of the flow are strongest at Re j = 240. Both the tangential and radial velocity fluctuations increase as the flow spirals toward the center of the reactor. The magnitudes of the tangential and radial velocity fluctuations are similar, suggesting that the turbulence is locally isotropic. (paper)

  20. Numerical simulation of a cyclone used as an inlet device of a gravitational separator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moraes, Carlos Alberto Capela [Centro de Pesquisas da PETROBRAS (CENPES), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Gerencia de Tecnologia de Processamento Primario], E-mail: capela@petrobras.com.br; Oliveira Junior, Joao Americo Aguirre; Almeida, Lucilla Coelho de [Engineering Simulation and Scientific Software (ESSS), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)], E-mails: joao.aguirre@esss.com.br, lucilla@esss.com.br

    2011-04-15

    This study presents the numerical simulation of the flow inside a gravitational separator to evaluate the influence of each internal device in the separation efficiency. In this first stage, the cyclone - located at the vessel entrance, known as the primary separation - internal flow is investigated. The flow inside cyclones presents rather complex and challenging characteristics, such as: streamlines with high curvature, intense force fields, interaction between primary and secondary flows and anisotropic turbulence. A three-dimensional fluid dynamics study is presented of a gas-liquid two-phase flow in a cyclone. The two-phase flow was modeled using an Eulerian, isothermal approach. The main conclusion of these simulations is the phase separation inside the proposed initial design does not occur by centrifugal effect, as an internal rotating flow is not established, due to an ineffective inlet design. Based on the lack of this expected centrifugal field for a cyclone, it can be concluded that the device does not behave as such. As a result, the device efficiency is limited and possibly small droplets will be carried by the gas stream. Therefore, changes to the cyclone inlet geometry were proposed to better achieve the cyclone effect to increase the separation efficiency. (author)

  1. Air extraction in gas turbines burning coal-derived gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Tah-teh; Agrawal, A.K.; Kapat, J.S.

    1993-11-01

    In the first phase of this contracted research, a comprehensive investigation was performed. Principally, the effort was directed to identify the technical barriers which might exist in integrating the air-blown coal gasification process with a hot gas cleanup scheme and the state-of-the-art, US made, heavy-frame gas turbine. The guiding rule of the integration is to keep the compressor and the expander unchanged if possible. Because of the low-heat content of coal gas and of the need to accommodate air extraction, the combustor and perhaps, the flow region between the compressor exit and the expander inlet might need to be modified. In selecting a compressed air extraction scheme, one must consider how the scheme affects the air supply to the hot section of the turbine and the total pressure loss in the flow region. Air extraction must preserve effective cooling of the hot components, such as the transition pieces. It must also ensure proper air/fuel mixing in the combustor, hence the combustor exit pattern factor. The overall thermal efficiency of the power plant can be increased by minimizing the total pressure loss in the diffusers associated with the air extraction. Therefore, a study of airflow in the pre- and dump-diffusers with and without air extraction would provide information crucial to attaining high-thermal efficiency and to preventing hot spots. The research group at Clemson University suggested using a Griffith diffuser for the prediffuser and extracting air from the diffuser inlet. The present research establishes that the analytically identified problems in the impingement cooling flow are factual. This phase of the contracted research substantiates experimentally the advantage of using the Griffith diffuser with air extraction at the diffuser inlet.

  2. Flow Simulation of Supersonic Inlet with Bypass Annular Duct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, HyoungJin; Kumano, Takayasu; Liou, Meng-Sing; Povinelli, Louis A.; Conners, Timothy R.

    2011-01-01

    A relaxed isentropic compression supersonic inlet is a new concept that produces smaller cowl drag than a conventional inlet, but incurs lower total pressure recovery and increased flow distortion in the (radially) outer flowpath. A supersonic inlet comprising a bypass annulus to the relaxed isentropic compression inlet dumps out airflow of low quality through the bypass duct. A reliable computational fluid dynamics solution can provide considerable useful information to ascertain quantitatively relative merits of the concept, and further provide a basis for optimizing the design. For a fast and reliable performance evaluation of the inlet performance, an equivalent axisymmetric model whose area changes accounts for geometric and physical (blockage) effects resulting from the original complex three-dimensional configuration is proposed. In addition, full three-dimensional calculations are conducted for studying flow phenomena and verifying the validity of the equivalent model. The inlet-engine coupling is carried out by embedding numerical propulsion system simulation engine data into the flow solver for interactive boundary conditions at the engine fan face and exhaust plane. It was found that the blockage resulting from complex three-dimensional geometries in the bypass duct causes significant degradation of inlet performance by pushing the terminal normal shock upstream.

  3. Gas/liquid separator for BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soma, Naoshi; Akimoto, Seiichi; Yokoyama, Iwao.

    1993-01-01

    A two phase gas/liquid flow generated at a heating portion of a nuclear reactor is swirled by inlet vanes. The phase gas/liquid flow uprises as a vortex flow in a vortex cylinder, and a liquid phase of a high density gathers at the outer circumference of the vortex cylinder. The liquid phase gathered at the outer circumference is collected at the inlet of a discharge flow channel which protrude into the vortex cylinder and in a three-step structure, and introduced into a recycling liquid phase passing through the discharge flow channel for liquid phase. There is provided a structure that separated liquid collected at the lowermost state in the inlet of the three-step discharge flow channel inlet descends in the discharge flow channel, then uprises in an uprising flow channel and is introduced into the recycling liquid phase by way of a discharge flow channel exit. The height of the discharge flow channel exit is determined equal to that of a liquid level of the recycling liquid phase during rated operation of the reactor. Accordingly, even in a case where the liquid level in the recycling liquid phase is lowered, the liquid level of the uprising flow channel is kept equal to that during rated operation. (I.N.)

  4. Laminar Flame Velocity and Temperature Exponent of Diluted DME-Air Mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseer Mohammed, Abdul; Anwar, Muzammil; Juhany, Khalid A.; Mohammad, Akram

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, the laminar flame velocity and temperature exponent diluted dimethyl ether (DME) air mixtures are reported. Laminar premixed mixture of DME-air with volumetric dilutions of carbon dioxides (CO2) and nitrogen (N2) are considered. Experiments were conducted using a preheated mesoscale high aspect-ratio diverging channel with inlet dimensions of 25 mm × 2 mm. In this method, flame velocities are extracted from planar flames that were stabilized near adiabatic conditions inside the channel. The flame velocities are then plotted against the ratio of mixture temperature and the initial reference temperature. A non-linear power law regression is observed suitable. This regression analysis gives the laminar flame velocity at the initial reference temperature and temperature exponent. Decrease in the laminar flame velocity and increase in temperature exponent is observed for CO2 and N2 diluted mixtures. The addition of CO2 has profound influence when compared to N2 addition on both flame velocity and temperature exponent. Numerical prediction of the similar mixture using a detailed reaction mechanism is obtained. The computational mechanism predicts higher magnitudes for laminar flame velocity and smaller magnitudes of temperature exponent compared to experimental data.

  5. Inlet effects on vertical-downward air–water two-phase flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiao, Shouxu; Mena, Daniel; Kim, Seungjin, E-mail: skim@psu.edu

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Inlet effects on two-phase flow parameters in vertical-downward flow are studied. • Flow regimes in the vertical-downward two-phase flow are defined. • Vertical-downward flow regime maps for three inlet configurations are developed. • Frictional pressure loss analysis for three different inlets is performed. • Database of local two-phase flow parameters for each inlet configuration. - Abstract: This paper focuses on investigating the geometric effects of inlets on global and local two-phase flow parameters in vertical-downward air–water two-phase flow. Flow visualization, frictional pressure loss analysis, and local experiments are performed in a test facility constructed from 50.8 mm inner diameter acrylic pipes. Three types of inlets of interest are studied: (1) two-phase flow injector without a flow straightener (Type A), (2) two-phase flow injector with a flow straightener (Type B), and (3) injection through a horizontal-to-vertical-downward 90° vertical elbow (Type C). A detailed flow visualization study is performed to characterize flow regimes including bubbly, slug, churn-turbulent, and annular flow. Flow regime maps for each inlet are developed and compared to identify the effects of each inlet. Frictional pressure loss analysis shows that the Lockhart–Martinelli method is capable of correlating the frictional loss data acquired for Type B and Type C inlets with a coefficient value of C = 25, but additional data may be needed to model the Type A inlet. Local two-phase flow parameters measured by a four-sensor conductivity probe in four bubbly and near bubbly flow conditions are analyzed. It is observed that vertical-downward two-phase flow has a characteristic center-peaked void profile as opposed to a wall-peaked profile as seen in vertical-upward flow. Furthermore, it is shown that the Type A inlet results in the most pronounced center-peaked void fraction profile, due to the coring phenomenon. Type B and Type C inlets

  6. Trigeneration scheme for a natural gas liquids extraction plant in the Middle East

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eveloy, Valérie; Rodgers, Peter; Popli, Sahil

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Trigeneration scheme tailored to natural gas liquids extraction plant. • High ambient temperature and RH conditions in the Persian Gulf. • Absorption refrigeration powered by gas turbine (GT) exhaust gas waste heat. • GT compressor inlet air- and process gas cooling, process gas heating. • Significant OPEX and primary energy savings, favorable payback period and net present value. - Abstract: Natural gas processing plants in the Persian Gulf face extreme climatic conditions that constrain their gas turbine (GT) power generation and cooling capacities. However, due to a past history of low hydrocarbon prices, such plants have not fully exploited their waste heat recovery potential to date. The techno-economic performance of a combined cooling, heating and power (CCHP) scheme designed to enhance the energy efficiency of a major natural gas liquids extraction plant in the Persian Gulf is assessed. The trigeneration scheme utilizes double-effect water–lithium bromide absorption refrigeration powered by steam generated from GT exhaust gas waste heat to provide both GT compressor inlet air- and process gas cooling. Part of the generated steam is also used for process gas heating. Thermodynamic modeling reveals that recovery of 82 MW of GT waste heat would provide additional cooling and heating capacities of 75 MW and 24 MW to the plant, respectively, thereby permitting elimination of a 28 MW GT, and existing cooling and heating equipment. GT compressor inlet air cooling alone yields approximately 151 GW h of additional electric power annually, highlighting the effectiveness of absorption refrigeration in meeting compressor inlet air cooling loads throughout the year in the Gulf climate. The overall net annual operating expenditure savings contributed by the CCHP system would average approximately 14.6 million US$ over its lifespan, which corresponds to average yearly savings of 190 MMSCM of natural gas. The CCHP scheme economic payback period is

  7. Coolant inlet device for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Hiroshi; Abe, Yasuhiro; Iwabuchi, Toshihiko; Yamamoto, Kenji.

    1969-01-01

    Herein disclosed is a coolant inlet device for liquid-metal cooled reactors which employs a coolant distributor serving also as a supporting means for the reactor core. The distributor is mounted within the reactor vessel so as to slide horizontally on supporting lugs, and is further slidably connected via a junction pipe to a coolant inlet conduit protruding through the floor of the vessel. The distributor is adapted to uniformly disperse the highly pressured coolant over the reactor core so as to reduce the stresses sustained by the reactor vessel as well as the supporting lugs. Moreover, the slidable nature of the distributor allows thermal shock and excessive coolant pressures to be prevented or alleviated, factors which posed major difficulties in conventional coolant inlet devices. (Owens, K. J.)

  8. An Investigation of the Drag and Pressure Recovery of a Submerged Inlet and a Nose Inlet in the Transonic Flight Range with Free-fall Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selna, James; Schlaff, Bernard A

    1951-01-01

    The drag and pressure recovery of an NACA submerged-inlet model and an NACA series I nose-inlet model were investigated in the transonic flight range. The tests were conducted over a mass-flow-ratio range of 0.4 to 0.8 and a Mach number range of about 0.8 to 1.10 employing large-scale recoverable free-fall models. The results indicate that the Mach number of drag divergence of the inlet models was about the same as that of a basic model without inlets. The external drag coefficients of the nose-inlet model were less than those of the submerged-inlet model throughout the test range. The difference in drag coefficient based on the maximum cross-sectional area of the models was about 0.02 at supersonic speeds and about 0.015 at subsonic speeds. For a hypothetical airplane with a ratio of maximum fuselage cross-sectional area to wing area of 0.06, the difference in airplane drag coefficient would be relatively small, about 0.0012 at supersonic speeds and about 0.0009 at subsonic speeds. Additional drag comparisons between the two inlet models are made considering inlet incremental and additive drag.

  9. Effect of water injection on nitric oxide emissions of a gas turbine combustor burning natural gas fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchionna, N. R.; Diehl, L. A.; Trout, A. M.

    1973-01-01

    The effect of direct water injection on the exhaust gas emissions of a turbojet combustor burning natural gas fuel was investigated. The results are compared with the results from similar tests using ASTM Jet-A fuel. Increasing water injection decreased the emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NOX) and increased the emissions of carbon monoxide and unburned hydrocarbons. The greatest percentage decrease in NOX with increasing water injection was at the lowest inlet-air temperature tested. The effect of increasing inlet-air temperature was to decrease the effect of the water injection. The reduction in NOX due to water injection was almost identical to the results obtained with Jet-A fuel. However, the emission indices of unburned hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, and percentage nitric oxide in NOX were not.

  10. Inlet Diameter and Flow Volume Effects on Separation and Energy Efficiency of Hydrocyclones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erikli, Ş.; Olcay, A. B.

    2015-08-01

    This study investigates hydrocyclone performance of an oil injected screw compressor. Especially, the oil separation efficiency of a screw compressor plays a significant role for air quality and non-stop working hour of compressors has become an important issue when the efficiency in energy is considered. In this study, two separation efficiency parameters were selected to be hydrocyclone inlet diameter and flow volume height between oil reservoir surface and top of the hydrocyclone. Nine different cases were studied in which cyclone inlet diameter and flow volume height between oil reservoir surface and top were investigated in regards to separation and energy performance aspects and the effect of the parameters on the general performance appears to be causing powerful influence. Flow inside the hydrocyclone geometry was modelled by Reynolds Stress Model (RSM) and hydro particles were tracked by Discrete Phase Model (DPM). Besides, particle break up was modelled by the Taylor Analogy Breakup (TAB) model. The reversed vortex generation was observed at different planes. The upper limit of the inlet diameter of the cyclone yields the centrifugal force on particles to decrease while the flow becomes slower; and the larger diameter implies slower flow. On the contrary, the lower limit is increment in speed causes breakup problems that the particle diameters become smaller; consequently, it is harder to separate them from gas.

  11. Estimation of roughness lengths and flow separation over compound bedforms in a natural-tidal inlet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lefebvre, Alice; Ernstsen, Verner Brandbyge; Winter, Christian

    2013-01-01

    was found to underestimate the length of the flow separation zone of the primary bedforms. A better estimation of the presence and shape of the flow separation zone over complex bedforms in a tidal environment still needs to be determined; in particular the relationship between flow separation zone......The hydraulic effect of asymmetric compound bedforms on tidal currents was assessed from field measurements of flow velocity in the Knudedyb tidal inlet, Denmark. Large asymmetric bedforms with smaller superimposed ones are a common feature of sandy shallow water environments and are known to act...... as hydraulic roughness elements in dependence with flow direction. The presence of a flow separation zone on the bedform lee was estimated through analysis of the measured velocity directions and the calculation of the flow separation line. The Law of the Wall was used to calculate roughness lengths and shear...

  12. Experimental and numerical investigations of microwave return loss of aircraft inlets with low-pressure plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yachun; He, Xiang; Chen, Jianping; Chen, Hongqing; Chen, Li; Zhang, Hongchao; Ni, Xiaowu; Lu, Jian; Shen, Zhonghua

    2018-03-01

    The relationships between return losses of the cylindrical inlet and plasma discharge parameters are investigated experimentally and numerically. The return losses are measured using a high dynamic range measurement system and simulated by COMSOL Multiphysics when the frequency band of the microwaves is in the range 1-4 GHz. The profiles of the plasma density are estimated using Epstein and Bessel functions. Results show that the incident microwaves can be absorbed by plasma efficaciously. The maximal return loss can reach -13.84 dB when the microwave frequency is 2.3 GHz. The increase of applied power implies augmentation of the return loss, which behaves conversely for gas pressure. The experimental and numerical results display reasonable agreement on return loss, suggesting that the use of plasma is effective in the radar cross section reduction of aircraft inlets.

  13. Oregon inlet: Hydrodynamics, volumetric flux and implications for larval fish transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, C.R. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Silver Springs, MD (United States); Pietrafesa, L.J. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Department of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences

    1997-05-01

    The temporal response of Oregon Inlet currents to atmospheric forcing and sea level fluctuations is analyzed using time and frequency domain analysis. Temporally persistent and spatially extensive ebb and flood events are identified using data sets from both within and outside of Oregon Inlet. Prism estimates are made to generate a time series of volumetric flux of water transported through the inlet. Water masses flooding into the Pamlico Sound via Oregon Inlet are identified in temperature (T) and salinity (S) space to determine their source of origin. Correlations are examined between the atmospheric wind field, the main axial slope of the inlet`s water level, inlet flow and T, S properties. Synoptic scale atmospheric wind events are found to dramatically and directly affect the transport of water towards (away from) the inlet on the ocean side, in concert with the contemporaneous transport away from (towards) the inlet on the estuary side, and a subsequent flooding into (out of) the estuary via Oregon Inlet. Thus, while astronomical tidal flooding and ebbing events are shown to be one-sided as coastal waters either set-up or set-down, synoptic scale wind events are shown to be manifested as a two-sided in-phase response set-up and set-down inside and outside the inlet, and thus are extremely effective in driving currents through the inlet. These subinertial frequency flood events are believed to be essential for both the recruitment and subsequent retention of estuarine dependent larval fish from the coastal ocean into Pamlico Sound. Year class strength of these finish may be determined annually by the relative strength and timing of these climatological wind events.

  14. SDSS IV MaNGA—Rotation Velocity Lags in the Extraplanar Ionized Gas from MaNGA Observations of Edge-on Galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bizyaev, D.; Pan, K.; Brinkmann, J. [Apache Point Observatory and New Mexico State University, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States); Walterbos, R. A. M. [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States); Yoachim, P. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Riffel, R. A. [Departamento de Física, CCNE, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Av. Roraima, 1000-97105-900, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Fernández-Trincado, J. G. [Institut Utinam, CNRS UMR 6213, Université de Franche-Comté, OSU THETA Franche-Comté-Bourgogne, Observatoire de Besançon, BP 1615, F-25010 Besançon Cedex (France); Diamond-Stanic, A. M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Jones, A. [Max-Planck Institute for Astrophysics, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str 1, Garching, D-85748 (Germany); Thomas, D. [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Dennis Sciama Building, Portsmouth PO1 3FX (United Kingdom); Cleary, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg Center, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2017-04-20

    We present a study of the kinematics of the extraplanar ionized gas around several dozen galaxies observed by the Mapping of Nearby Galaxies at the Apache Point Observatory (MaNGA) survey. We considered a sample of 67 edge-on galaxies out of more than 1400 extragalactic targets observed by MaNGA, in which we found 25 galaxies (or 37%) with regular lagging of the rotation curve at large distances from the galactic midplane. We model the observed H α emission velocity fields in the galaxies, taking projection effects and a simple model for the dust extinction into account. We show that the vertical lag of the rotation curve is necessary in the modeling, and estimate the lag amplitude in the galaxies. We find no correlation between the lag and the star formation rate in the galaxies. At the same time, we report a correlation between the lag and the galactic stellar mass, central stellar velocity dispersion, and axial ratio of the light distribution. These correlations suggest a possible higher ratio of infalling-to-local gas in early-type disk galaxies or a connection between lags and the possible presence of hot gaseous halos, which may be more prevalent in more massive galaxies. These results again demonstrate that observations of extraplanar gas can serve as a potential probe for accretion of gas.

  15. SDSS IV MaNGA—Rotation Velocity Lags in the Extraplanar Ionized Gas from MaNGA Observations of Edge-on Galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bizyaev, D.; Pan, K.; Brinkmann, J.; Walterbos, R. A. M.; Yoachim, P.; Riffel, R. A.; Fernández-Trincado, J. G.; Diamond-Stanic, A. M.; Jones, A.; Thomas, D.; Cleary, J.

    2017-01-01

    We present a study of the kinematics of the extraplanar ionized gas around several dozen galaxies observed by the Mapping of Nearby Galaxies at the Apache Point Observatory (MaNGA) survey. We considered a sample of 67 edge-on galaxies out of more than 1400 extragalactic targets observed by MaNGA, in which we found 25 galaxies (or 37%) with regular lagging of the rotation curve at large distances from the galactic midplane. We model the observed H α emission velocity fields in the galaxies, taking projection effects and a simple model for the dust extinction into account. We show that the vertical lag of the rotation curve is necessary in the modeling, and estimate the lag amplitude in the galaxies. We find no correlation between the lag and the star formation rate in the galaxies. At the same time, we report a correlation between the lag and the galactic stellar mass, central stellar velocity dispersion, and axial ratio of the light distribution. These correlations suggest a possible higher ratio of infalling-to-local gas in early-type disk galaxies or a connection between lags and the possible presence of hot gaseous halos, which may be more prevalent in more massive galaxies. These results again demonstrate that observations of extraplanar gas can serve as a potential probe for accretion of gas.

  16. SDSS IV MaNGA—Rotation Velocity Lags in the Extraplanar Ionized Gas from MaNGA Observations of Edge-on Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizyaev, D.; Walterbos, R. A. M.; Yoachim, P.; Riffel, R. A.; Fernández-Trincado, J. G.; Pan, K.; Diamond-Stanic, A. M.; Jones, A.; Thomas, D.; Cleary, J.; Brinkmann, J.

    2017-04-01

    We present a study of the kinematics of the extraplanar ionized gas around several dozen galaxies observed by the Mapping of Nearby Galaxies at the Apache Point Observatory (MaNGA) survey. We considered a sample of 67 edge-on galaxies out of more than 1400 extragalactic targets observed by MaNGA, in which we found 25 galaxies (or 37%) with regular lagging of the rotation curve at large distances from the galactic midplane. We model the observed Hα emission velocity fields in the galaxies, taking projection effects and a simple model for the dust extinction into account. We show that the vertical lag of the rotation curve is necessary in the modeling, and estimate the lag amplitude in the galaxies. We find no correlation between the lag and the star formation rate in the galaxies. At the same time, we report a correlation between the lag and the galactic stellar mass, central stellar velocity dispersion, and axial ratio of the light distribution. These correlations suggest a possible higher ratio of infalling-to-local gas in early-type disk galaxies or a connection between lags and the possible presence of hot gaseous halos, which may be more prevalent in more massive galaxies. These results again demonstrate that observations of extraplanar gas can serve as a potential probe for accretion of gas.

  17. Experimental Study of Natural Gas Temperature Effects on the Flame Luminosity and No Emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Javadi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The flame radiation enhancement in gas-fired furnaces significantly improves the thermal efficiency without significantly affecting the NOx emissions. In this paper, the effects of inlet natural gas preheating on the flame luminosity, overall boiler efficiency, and NO emission in a 120 kW boiler have been investigated experimentally. Flame radiation is measured by use of laboratory pyranometer with photovoltaic sensor. A Testo350XL gas analyzer is also used for measuring the temperature and combustion species. The fuel is preheated from the room temperature to 350°C. The experimental measurements show that the preheating of natural gas up to about 240°C has no considerable effect on the flame luminosity. The results show that increasing the inlet gas temperature from 240°C, abruptly increases the flame luminosity. This luminosity increase enhances the boiler efficiency and also causes significant reduction in flame temperature and NO emission. The results show that increasing the inlet gas temperature from 240°C to 300°C increases the flame luminous radiation by 60% and boiler efficiency by 20%; while the maximum flame temperature and the boiler NO emission show a 10% and 8% decrease respectively.

  18. Status of the variable diameter centerbody inlet program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, John D.; Linne, A. A.

    1992-01-01

    The Variable Diameter Centerbody (VDC) inlet is an ongoing research program at LeRC. The VDC inlet is a mixed compression, axisymmetric inlet that has potential application on the next generation supersonic transport. This inlet was identified as one of the most promising axisymmetric concepts for supersonic cruise aircraft during the SCAR program in the late 1970's. Some of its features include high recovery, low bleed, good angle-of-attack tolerance, and excellent engine airflow matching. These features were demonstrated at LeRC in the past by the design and testing of fixed hardware models. A current test program in the LeRC 10' x 10' Supersonic Wind Tunnel (SWT) will attempt to duplicate these features on model hardware that actually incorporates a flight-like variable diameter centerbody mechanism.

  19. Simulation of a gas jet entering the secondary side of a steam generator during a SGTR sequence: Validation of a FLUENT 6.2 Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez del Pra, C. Lopez, E-mail: Claudia.lopez@ciemat.e [Unit of Nuclear Safety Research, CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Velasco, F.J.S.; Herranz, L.E. [Unit of Nuclear Safety Research, CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain)

    2010-09-15

    This paper summarizes the major insights gained as a result of gas jets entering a tube bundle from either a guillotine or a fish-mouth breach of a steam generator tube. This scenario is highly relevant in nuclear safety since it determines the potential retention of radioactive particles during risk-dominant sequences, the so-called Steam Generator Tube Rupture (SGTR) sequences. The scenario has been modeled with the FLUENT 6.2 code and its predictions have been proven to be grid independent and consistent with the experimental data available. The topology of the jets and the influence of the inlet mass flow rate (from 75 to 250 kg/h) have been studied in terms of velocity profiles. The results show that the breach shape heavily determines the jet topology. Both jets initially describe a quasi-parabolic trajectory, which is affected by the presence of the tubes. A guillotine breach generates a jet with azimuthal symmetry, which vanishes for the fish-mouth breach configuration. In this case, jet expands azimuthally in a pseudo-triangular way with a small angle. This fact diminishes the momentum loss across the bundle, so that for the same inlet mass flow rate the fish-mouth jet penetration is higher than the guillotine one. The normalized maximum radial and axial velocities of the jet from the guillotine breach are found to be self-similar with respect to inlet mass flow rate along the tube row position and axial distance to the breach, respectively. However, in absolute terms higher penetrations are found at higher mass flow rates.

  20. Jet Inlet Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-08

    AFRL-RW-EG-TR-2014-044 Jet Inlet Efficiency Nigel Plumb Taylor Sykes-Green Keith Williams John Wohleber Munitions Aerodynamics Sciences...CONTRACT NUMBER N/A 5b. GRANT NUMBER N/A 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER N/A 6. AUTHOR(S) Nigel Plumb Taylor Sykes-Green Keith Williams John

  1. Numerical simulation of flow and melting characteristics of seawater-ice crystals two-phase flow in inlet straight pipe of shell and tube heat exchanger of polar ship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Li; Huang, Chang-Xu; Huang, Zhen-Fei; Sun, Qiang; Li, Jie

    2018-05-01

    The ice crystal particles are easy to enter into the seawater cooling system of polar ship together with seawater when it sails in the Arctic. They are easy to accumulate in the pipeline, causing serious blockage of the cooling pipe. In this study, the flow and melting characteristics of ice particles-seawater two-phase flow in inlet straight pipe of shell-and-tube heat exchanger were numerically simulated by using Eulerian-Eulerian two-fluid model coupled with the interphase heat and mass transfer model. The influences of inlet ice packing factor, ice crystal particle diameter, and inlet velocity on the distribution and melting characteristics of ice crystals were investigated. The degree of asymmetry of the distribution of ice crystals in the cross section decreases gradually when the IPF changes from 5 to 15%. The volume fractions of ice crystals near the top of the outlet cross section are 19.59, 19.51, and 22.24% respectively for ice packing factor of 5, 10 and 15%. When the particle diameter is 0.5 mm, the ice crystals are gradually stratified during the flow process. With particle diameters of 1.0 and 2.0 mm, the region with the highest volume fraction of ice crystals is a small circle and the contours in the cloud map are compact. The greater the inlet flow velocity, the less stratified the ice crystals and the more obvious the turbulence on the outlet cross section. The average volume fraction of ice crystals along the flow direction is firstly rapidly reduced and then stabilized after 300 mm.

  2. Optimization of the velocity of air providing dynamic containment at openings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laborde, J.C.; Berne, P.; Dupoux, N.

    1992-01-01

    The handling of toxic, radioactive or dangerous substances in industry of research laboratories necessitates the use of techniques for protecting the workers involved. The risks arise from these substances being airborne particles and from their transfer, essentially through turbulent diffusion. One way of limiting this risk is to employ the principle of dynamic containment, whereby a particular direction of air flow is imposed at inlets and outlets in order to prevent the back flow of the pollutant to areas where it may be breathed by the operators. The air velocity normally used to prevent back flow of pollutant is 0.5 m.s. The 'Service d'Etudes et de Recherches en Aerocontamination et en Confinement' (SERAC) has begun an evaluation of the effect of a reduction in air inlet velocity on the risk of pollutant back diffusion. This should lead to energy savings through the use of a minimum air flow rate concomitant with appropriate protection. The paper gives the results obtained with openings of different geometries and shapes. It is also proposed a simulation of this phenomenon using a calculation code of air flow in a ventilated room (the TRIO code), so that the results may be compared with the experimental data. (author). 5 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab

  3. Impact of wind velocity on the performance of the RVACS decay heat removal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tzanos, C.P.

    1997-01-01

    The impact of wind velocity on the performance of the reactor vessel auxiliary cooling system (RVACS) of an advanced liquid-metal reactor design is analyzed, and design modifications that mitigate adverse wind effects are investigated. In the reference design, the reactor is served by four communicating RVACS stacks, and each stack has two air inlets. In this two-inlet stack design, winds blowing in a direction 90 deg from the axis formed by the two stack inlets result in pressure distributions around the stacks that drastically change the desired airflow pattern in the RVACS. This leads to significantly elevated RVACS air temperatures and significant azimuthal guard vessel temperature variations. For example, a 27 m/s (60 mph) wind leads to an air temperature at the exit of the RVACS heated section that is ∼115 C higher than that under no-wind conditions. The addition of two more inlets per stack, one inlet per stack side, significantly improves RVACS performance. The air temperature at the exit of the heated RVACS section is significantly reduced below that of the two-inlet design, and this temperature decreases as the wind speed increases. An increase in wind speed from 3 to 27 m/s leads to an air temperature change from 186 to 165 C. The azimuthal temperature variation is also improved. At the top of the guard vessel, this variation is reduced from 62.5 to 8.5 C at the low wind speed of 3 m/s and from 85.0 to 30.5 C at the high wind speed of 27 m/s

  4. Design of Single Stage Axial Turbine with Constant Nozzle Angle Blading for Small Turbojet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putra Adnan, F.; Hartono, Firman

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, an aerodynamic design of a single stage gas generator axial turbine for small turbojet engine is explained. As per design requirement, the turbine should be able to deliver power output of 155 kW at 0.8139 kg/s gas mass flow, inlet total temperature of 1200 K and inlet total pressure of 335330 Pa. The design phase consist of several steps, i.e.: determination of velocity triangles in 2D plane, 2D blading design and 3D flow analysis at design point using Computational Fluid Dynamics method. In the determination of velocity triangles, two conditions are applied: zero inlet swirl (i.e. the gas flow enter the turbine at axial direction) and constant nozzle angle design (i.e. the inlet and outlet angle of the nozzle blade are constant from root to tip). The 2D approach in cascade plane is used to specify airfoil type at root, mean and tip of the blade based on inlet and outlet flow conditions. The 3D approach is done by simulating the turbine in full configuration to evaluate the overall performance of the turbine. The observed parameters including axial gap, stagger angle, and tip clearance affect its output power. Based on analysis results, axial gap and stagger angle are positively correlated with output power up to a certain point at which the power decreases. Tip clearance, however, gives inversely correlation with output power.

  5. Design of a Two-Stage Light Gas Gun for Muzzle Velocities of 10 - 11 kms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanoff, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Space debris poses a major risk to spacecraft. In low earth orbit, impact velocities can be 10 11 kms and as high as 15 kms. For debris shield design, it would be desirable to be able to launch controlled shape projectiles to these velocities. The design of the proposed 10 11 kmsec gun uses, as a starting point, the Ames 1.280.22 two stage gun, which has achieved muzzle velocities of 10 11.3 kmsec. That gun is scaled up to a 0.3125 launch tube diameter. The gun is then optimized with respect to maximum pressures by varying the pump tube length to diameter ratio (LD), the piston mass and the hydrogen pressure. A pump tube LD of 36.4 is selected giving the best overall performance. Piezometric ratios for the optimized guns are found to be 2.3, much more favorable than for more traditional two stage light gas guns, which range from 4 to 6. The maximum powder chamber pressures are 20 to 30 ksi. To reduce maximum pressures, the desirable range of the included angle of the cone of the high pressure coupling is found to be 7.3 to 14.6 degrees. Lowering the break valve rupture pressure is found to lower the maximum projectile base pressure, but to raise the maximum gun pressure. For the optimized gun with a pump tube LD of 36.4, increasing the muzzle velocity by decreasing the projectile mass and increasing the powder loads is studied. It appears that saboted spheres could be launched to 10.25 and possibly as high as 10.7 10.8 kmsec, and that disc-like plastic models could be launched to 11.05 kms. The use of a tantalum liner to greatly reduce bore erosion and increase muzzle velocity is discussed. With a tantalum liner, CFD code calculations predict muzzle velocities as high as 12 to 13 kms.

  6. 36 CFR 13.320 - Preference to Cook Inlet Region, Incorporated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Region, Incorporated. 13.320 Section 13.320 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE... to Cook Inlet Region, Incorporated. (a) The Cook Inlet Region, Incorporated (CIRI), in cooperation with village corporations within the Cook Inlet region when appropriate, will have a right of first...

  7. Ni/YSZ electrode degradation studied by impedance spectroscopy: Effects of gas cleaning and current density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauch, Anne; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2010-01-01

    Anode supported (Ni/YSZ–YSZ–LSM/YSZ) solid oxide fuel cells were tested and the degradation over time was monitored and analyzed by impedance spectroscopy. Test conditions were chosen to focus on the anode degradation and all tests were operated at 750 °C. O2 was supplied to the cathode...... and the anode inlet gas mixture had a high p(H2O)/p(H2) ratio of 0.4/0.6. Commercially available gasses were applied. Cells were tested over a few hundred hours applying varying current densities (OCV, 0.75 A/cm2 and 1 A/cm2). To investigate the effects of possible impurities in the inlet gas stream...... on the anode degradation, tests were set-up both with and without gas cleaning. Gas cleaning was done by passing the H2 over porous nickel at room temperature. It was found that cleaning of the inlet H2 gas more than halved the anode degradation under current load. For tests at OCV the increase in the Ni...

  8. Simultaneous mass detection for direct inlet mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, R.L.

    1979-05-01

    The evolution of analytical techniques for application in trace analysis has led to interest in practical methods for real-time monitoring. Direct inlet mass spectrometry (DIMS) has been the subject of considerable activity in recent years. A DIMS instrument is described which consists of an inlet system designed to permit particles entrained in the inlet air stream to strike a hot, oxidized rhenium filament which serves as a surface ionization source. A mass analyzer and detection system then permits identification of the elemental composition of particulates which strike the filament

  9. Development of a natural gas stratified charge rotary engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sierens, R.; Verdonck, W.

    1985-01-01

    A water model has been used to determine the positions of separate inlet ports for a natural gas, stratified charge rotary engine. The flow inside the combustion chamber (mainly during the induction period) has been registered by a film camera. From these tests the best locations of the inlet ports have been obtained, a prototype of this engine has been built by Audi NSU and tested in the laboratories of the university of Gent. The results of these tests, for different stratification configurations, are given. These results are comparable with the best results obtained by Audi NSU for a homogeneous natural gas rotary engine.

  10. SDSS-IV MaNGA: What Shapes the Distribution of Metals in Galaxies? Exploring the Roles of the Local Gas Fraction and Escape Velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera-Ballesteros, J. K.; Heckman, T.; Sánchez, S. F.; Zakamska, N. L.; Cleary, J.; Zhu, G.; Brinkmann, J.; Drory, N.; THE MaNGA TEAM

    2018-01-01

    We determine the local metallicity of the ionized gas for more than 9.2 × 105 star-forming regions (spaxels) located in 1023 nearby galaxies included in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-IV MaNGA integral field spectroscopy unit survey. We use the dust extinction derived from the Balmer decrement and the stellar template fitting in each spaxel to estimate the local gas and stellar mass densities, respectively. We also use the measured rotation curves to determine the local escape velocity (V esc). We then analyze the relationships between the local metallicity and both the local gas fraction (μ) and V esc. We find that metallicity decreases with both increasing μ and decreasing V esc. By examining the residuals in these relations we show that the gas fraction plays a more primary role in the local chemical enrichment than does V esc. We show that the gas-regulator model of chemical evolution provides a reasonable explanation of the metallicity on local scales. The best-fit parameters for this model are consistent with the metal loss caused by momentum-driven galactic outflows. We also argue that both the gas fraction and the local escape velocity are connected to the local stellar surface density, which in turn is a tracer of the epoch at which the dominant local stellar population formed.

  11. Numerical investigation on the combustion characteristics of methane/air in a micro-combustor with a hollow hemispherical bluff body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Li; Zhu, Junchen; Yan, Yunfei; Guo, Hongliang; Yang, Zhongqing

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A micro-combustor with a hollow hemisphere bluff body is developed. • Blow-off limit of reactor is expanded 2.5 times by the hollow hemisphere bluff body. • Methane conversion rate of combustor sharply increases at the location of bluff body. • Methane conversion rate is mainly affected by equivalence ratio and inlet velocity. • Recirculation zone expands blow-off limit and increases methane conversion rate. - Abstract: The combustion characteristics of methane in a cube micro-combustor with a hollow hemispherical bluff body were numerically investigated. The blow-off limit, recirculation zone length and methane conversion rate were examined. The results illustrate that the blow-off limit of the micro-combustor with a hollow hemispherical bluff body is 2.5 times higher than that without bluff body, which are 24.5 m/s and 9.5 m/s at the same equivalence ratio (ϕ = 1), respectively. With the use of hollow hemispherical bluff body, methane conversion sharply increases from 0.24% to 17.95% at 3 mm along the inlet-flow direction, where is the location of bluff-body, which is not affected by equivalence ratio and inlet velocity. The recirculation zone size has determined influence on residence time of the mixture gas, which increases with the increase of inlet velocity. Methane conversion rate is determined by equivalence ratio and inlet velocity. Methane conversion rate firstly increases and then decreases when the equivalence ratio and inlet velocity increase, reaching the maximum value (97.84%) at ϕ = 1 and 0.02 m/s. Methane conversion rate sharply increases from 45% to 97.84% when the inlet velocity increases from 0.008 m/s to 0.02 m/s

  12. Auxiliary Heat Exchanger Flow Distribution Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaufman, J.S.; Bressler, M.M.

    1983-01-01

    The Auxiliary Heat Exchanger Flow Distribution Test was the first part of a test program to develop a water-cooled (tube-side), compact heat exchanger for removing heat from the circulating gas in a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR). Measurements of velocity and pressure were made with various shell side inlet and outlet configurations. A flow configuration was developed which provides acceptable velocity distribution throughout the heat exchanger without adding excessive pressure drop

  13. The critical ionization velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raadu, M.A.

    1980-06-01

    The critical ionization velocity effect was first proposed in the context of space plasmas. This effect occurs for a neutral gas moving through a magnetized plasma and leads to rapid ionization and braking of the relative motion when a marginal velocity, 'the critical velocity', is exceeded. Laboratory experiments have clearly established the significance of the critical velocity and have provided evidence for an underlying mechanism which relies on the combined action of electron impact ionization and a collective plasma interaction heating electrons. There is experimental support for such a mechanism based on the heating of electrons by the modified two-stream instability as part of a feedback process. Several applications to space plasmas have been proposed and the possibility of space experiments has been discussed. (author)

  14. Hydrodynamic and thermal mechanisms of filtration combustion inclinational instability based on non-uniform distribution of initial preheating temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yongfang; Shi, Junrui; Xu, Youning; Ma, Rui

    2018-03-01

    Filtration combustion (FC) is one style of porous media combustion with inert matrix, in which the combustion wave front propagates, only downstream or reciprocally. In this paper, we investigate the FC flame front inclinational instability of lean methane/air mixtures flowing through a packed bed as a combustion wave front perturbation of the initial preheating temperature non-uniformity is assumed. The predicted results show that the growth rate of the flame front inclinational angle is proportional to the magnitude of the initial preheating temperature difference. Additionally, depending on gas inlet gas velocity and equivalence ratio, it is demonstrated that increase of gas inlet gas velocity accelerates the FC wave front deformation, and the inclinational instability evolves faster at lower equivalence ratio. The development of the flame front inclinational angle may be regarded as a two-staged evolution, which includes rapid increase, and approaching maximum value of inclinational angle due to the quasi-steady condition of the combustion system. The hydrodynamic and thermal mechanisms of the FC inclinational instability are analyzed. Consequently, the local propagation velocity of the FC wave front is non-uniform to result in the development of inclinational angle at the first stage of rapid increase.

  15. Toluene removal in a biofilm reactor for waste gas treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, A.R.; Arvin, E.

    1997-01-01

    A lab-scale trickling filter for treatment of toluene-containing waste gas was investigated. The filter performance was investigated for various loads of toluene. Two levels of the gas flow were examined, 322 m d(-1) and 707 m d(-1). The gas inlet concentrations were varied in the range from 0...

  16. Modelling Particulate Removal in Tubular Wet Electrostatic Precipitators Using a Modified Drift Flux Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Ramechecandane

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Tubular electrostatic precipitators (ESP have been used in a number of chemical processing industries. The tubular ESPs have many advantages over conventional plate-plate and wire-plate ESPs. The present study is concerned with the numerical modeling of particulate removal in a tubular wet single-stage electrostatic precipitator (wESP. The geometric parameters of a model wESP and the corresponding inlet gas velocities for the wESP are chosen from available experimental data. In addition to the RNG k - ε model for the mean turbulent flow field inside the wESP, the Poisson equation for the electric field, the charge continuity equation and the concentration equation are solved sequentially to obtain a full-fledged solution to the problem under investigation. The proposed drift flux model is implemented in the opensource CFD code OpenFOAM®. The paper discusses the influence of the number of charges acquired by the particles and the corresponding inlet gas velocities on particle concentration distribution within the wESP. Two representative cases with monodispersed particles of 1 μm and 10 μm diameter are considered for the numerical analysis. It is seen from the present analysis that the number of units of charge on particles, the particle size and the inlet gas velocities play a vital role in determining the efficiency of electrostatic precipitation.

  17. Numerical Simulation of Boundary Layer Ingesting (BLI) Inlet-Fan Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliani, James; Chen, Jen-Ping; Beach, Timothy; Bakhle, Milind

    2014-01-01

    Future civil transport designs may incorporate engine inlets integrated into the body of the aircraft to take advantage of efficiency increases due to weight and drag reduction. Additional increases in engine efficiency are predicted if the inlet ingests the lower momentum boundary layer flow. Previous studies have shown, however, that efficiency benefits of Boundary Layer Ingesting (BLI) ingestion are very sensitive to the magnitude of fan and duct losses, and blade structural response to the non-uniform flow field that results from a BLI inlet has not been studied in-depth. This paper presents an effort to extend the modeling capabilities of an existing rotating turbomachinery unsteady analysis code to include the ability to solve the external and internal flow fields of a BLI inlet. The TURBO code has been a successful tool in evaluating fan response to flow distortions for traditional engine/inlet integrations, such as the development of rotating stall and inlet distortion through compressor stages. This paper describes the first phase of an effort to extend the TURBO model to calculate the external and inlet flowfield upstream of fan so that accurate pressure distortions that result from BLI configurations can be computed and used to analyze fan aerodynamics and structural response. To validate the TURBO program modifications for the BLI flowfield, experimental test data obtained by NASA for a flushmounted S-duct with large amounts of boundary layer ingestion was modeled. Results for the flow upstream and in the inlet are presented and compared to experimental data for several high Reynolds number flows to validate the modifications to the solver. Quantitative data is presented that indicates good predictive capability of the model in the upstream flow. A representative fan is attached to the inlet and results are presented for the coupled inlet/fan model. The impact on the total pressure distortion at the AIP after the fan is attached is examined.

  18. Measurement of thermal plasma jet temperature and velocity by laser light lineshape analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snyder, S.C.; Reynolds, L.D.

    1991-01-01

    Two important parameters of thermal plasma jets are kinetic or gas temperatures and flow velocity. Gas temperatures have been traditionally measured using emission spectroscopy, but this method depends on either the generally unrealistic assumption of the existence of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) within the plasma, or the use of various non-LTE or partial LTE models to relate the intensity of the emission lines to the gas temperature. Plasma jet velocities have been measured using laser Doppler velocimetry on particles injected into the plasma. However, this method is intrusive and it is not known how well the particle velocities represent the gas velocity. Recently, plasma jet velocities have been measured from the Doppler shift of laser light scattered by the plasma. In this case, the Doppler shift was determined from the difference in the transmission profile of a high resolution monochromator between red shifted and blue shifted scattered light. A direct approach to measuring localized temperatures and velocities is afforded by high resolution scattered light lineshape measurements. The linewidth of laser light scattered by atoms and ions can be related to the kinetic temperature without LTE assumptions, while a shift in the peak position relative to the incident laser lineshape yields the gas velocity. We report in this paper work underway to measure gas temperatures and velocities in an argon thermal plasma jet using high resolution lineshape analysis of scattered laser light

  19. Removal of 14C from nitrogen annulus gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheh, C.H.

    1985-01-01

    A dry, ambient temperature process using Ca(OH) 2 as the sorbent to remove 14 CO 2 from moderator cover gas was further developed to remove 14 C from the extremely dry nitrogen annulus gas. Thermal gravimetric analysis was carried out to study the thermal stability of Ca(OH) 2 and the CO 2 -Ca(OH) 2 reaction at elevated temperatures under extremely low humidity conditions. Results shows that to achieve high utilization and avoid decomposition of Ca(OH) 2 , humidification of the annulus gas was necessary at high or low temperatures. Results of the bench scale (1-10 L/min) oxidizer study showed that, with 0.5% Pd or alumina as the catalyst, it was possible to achieve complete oxidation of CO and over 80% oxidation of CH 4 with 1% hydrogen in the nitrogen. The gas superficial velocity should be less than or equal to30 cm/s and the residence time greater than or equal to0.5 s. A pilot scale (up to 160 L/min) system including a catalytic oxidizer, a humidifier/demister, a Ca(OH) 2 reactor, a condenser/demister and regenerable molecular sieve dryers, was assembled and tested with simulated nitrogen annulus gas. Results showed that complete oxidation of the CO and 60-100% oxidation of the CH 4 with 0.5% H 2 in the simulated gas were achieved in the pilot plant. The CO 2 concentration was reduced from 30-60 μL/L at the inlet of the Ca(OH) 2 reactor to 1 μL/L or less at the outlet. After modifications of the dryer to overcome the problems encountered, the simulated annulus gas was dried to 0 C dew point before recirculation. Equipment specifications and operating conditions of a 14 C removal system for nitrogen annulus gas are summarized

  20. Continuous high-frequency dissolved O2/Ar measurements by equilibrator inlet mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassar, Nicolas; Barnett, Bruce A; Bender, Michael L; Kaiser, Jan; Hamme, Roberta C; Tilbrook, Bronte

    2009-03-01

    The oxygen (O(2)) concentration in the surface ocean is influenced by biological and physical processes. With concurrent measurements of argon (Ar), which has similar solubility properties as oxygen, we can remove the physical contribution to O(2) supersaturation and determine the biological oxygen supersaturation. Biological O(2) supersaturation in the surface ocean reflects the net metabolic balance between photosynthesis and respiration, i.e., the net community productivity (NCP). We present a new method for continuous shipboard measurements of O(2)/Ar by equilibrator inlet mass spectrometry (EIMS). From these measurements and an appropriate gas exchange parametrization, NCP can be estimated at high spatial and temporal resolution. In the EIMS configuration, seawater from the ship's continuous intake flows through a cartridge enclosing a gas-permeable microporous membrane contactor. Gases in the headspace of the cartridge equilibrate with dissolved gases in the flowing seawater. A fused-silica capillary continuously samples headspace gases, and the O(2)/Ar ratio is measured by mass spectrometry. The ion current measurements on the mass spectrometer reflect the partial pressures of dissolved gases in the water flowing through the equilibrator. Calibration of the O(2)/Ar ion current ratio (32/40) is performed automatically every 2 h by sampling ambient air through a second capillary. A conceptual model demonstrates that the ratio of gases reaching the mass spectrometer is dependent on several parameters, such as the differences in molecular diffusivities and solubilities of the gases. Laboratory experiments and field observations performed by EIMS are discussed. We also present preliminary evidence that other gas measurements, such as N(2)/Ar and pCO(2) measurements, may potentially be performed with EIMS. Finally, we compare the characteristics of the EIMS with the previously described membrane inlet mass spectrometry (MIMS) approach.

  1. Gas sampling method for determining pollutant concentrations in the flame zone of two swirl-can combustor modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duerr, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    A gas sampling probe and traversing mechanism were developed to obtain detailed measurements of gaseous pollutant concentrations in the primary and mixing regions of combustors in order to better understand how pollutants are formed. The gas sampling probe was actuated by a three-degree-of-freedom traversing mechanism and the samples obtained were analyzed by an on-line gas analysis system. The pollutants in the flame zone of two different swirl-can combustor modules were measured at an inlet-air temperature of 590 K, pressure of 6 atmospheres, and reference velocities of 23 and 30 meters per second at a fuel-air ratio of 0.02. Typical results show large spatial gradients in the gaseous pollutant concentration close to the swirl-can module. Average concentrations of unburned hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide decrease rapidly in the downstream wake regions of each module. By careful and detailed probing, the effect of various module design features on pollutant formation can be assessed. The techniques presently developed seem adequate to obtain the desired information.

  2. Evolution of the structure of a gas-liquid two-phase flow in a large vertical pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horst-Michael Prasser; Matthias Beyer; Helmar Carl; Sabine Gregor; Dirk Lucas; Peter Schuetz; Frank-Peter Weiss

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Experimental results on the evolution of the radial gas fraction profiles, gas velocity profiles and bubble size distributions in a gas-liquid two-phase flow along a large vertical pipe of 194 mm inner diameter are presented. The tests were performed at the TOPFLOW facility in Rossendorf, where two wire-mesh sensors were used to measure sequences of two-dimensional distributions of local instantaneous gas fraction within the complete pipe cross-section with a lateral resolution of 3 mm and a sampling frequency of 2500 Hz. This data is the basis for a fast flow visualization and for the calculation of the mentioned profiles. The gas fraction profiles were obtained by averaging the sequences over time, velocities were measured by cross-correlation of the signals of the two sensors, which were located on a short (63 mm) distance behind each other. The high resolution of the mesh sensors allows to identify regions of connected measuring points in the data array, which are filled with the gas phase. This method was used to obtain the bubble size distributions. In the experiments, the superficial velocities ranged from 0.04 to 8 m/s for the gas phase and from 0.04 to 1.6 m/s for the liquid. In this way, the experiments cover the range from bubbly to churn turbulent flow regimes. The evolution of the flow structure was studied by varying the distance between the gas injection and the sensor position. This distance was changed by the help of a so-called variable gas injection set-up. It consists of 6 gas injection units, each of them equipped with three rings of orifices in the pipe wall for the gas injection. These rings are fed with the gas phase from ring chambers, which can be individually controlled by valves. The middle ring has orifices of 4 mm diameter, while the upper and the lower rings have nozzles of 1 mm diameter. In this way, 18 different inlet lengths and two different gas injection geometries can be chosen. The latter

  3. Drift velocity monitoring of the CMS muon drift chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Sonnenschein, Lars

    2010-01-01

    The drift velocity in drift tubes of the CMS muon chambers is a key parameter for the muon track reconstruction and trigger. It needs to be monitored precisely in order to detect any deviation from its nominal value. A change in absolute pressure, a variation of the gas admixture or a contamination of the chamber gas by air affect the drift velocity. Furthermore the temperature and magnetic field influence its value. First data, taken with a dedicated Velocity Drift Chamber (VDC) built by RWTH Aachen IIIA are presented.

  4. Measurement of gas flow velocities by laser-induced gratings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemmerling, B; Stampanoni-Panariello, A [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Kozlov, A D.N. [General Physics Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1999-08-01

    Time resolved light scattering from laser-induced electrostrictive gratings was used for the determination of flow velocities in air at room temperature. By measuring the velocity profile across the width of a slit nozzle we demonstrated the high spatial resolution (about 200 mm) of this novel technique. (author) 3 figs., 1 ref.

  5. Classification of tidal inlets along the Central east coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Reddy, N.A.; Vikas, M.; Rao, S.; JayaKumar S.

    ) as long as the alongshore sediment bypasses the tidal inlet. Classification of coastal systems in a broader view is necessary for the management of tidal inlets. There are several methods to classify tidal inlets based on different perspectives namely geo...

  6. Exploiting LSPIV to assess debris-flow velocities in the field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theule, Joshua I.; Crema, Stefano; Marchi, Lorenzo; Cavalli, Marco; Comiti, Francesco

    2018-01-01

    The assessment of flow velocity has a central role in quantitative analysis of debris flows, both for the characterization of the phenomenology of these processes and for the assessment of related hazards. Large-scale particle image velocimetry (LSPIV) can contribute to the assessment of surface velocity of debris flows, provided that the specific features of these processes (e.g. fast stage variations and particles up to boulder size on the flow surface) are taken into account. Three debris-flow events, each of them consisting of several surges featuring different sediment concentrations, flow stages, and velocities, have been analysed at the inlet of a sediment trap in a stream in the eastern Italian Alps (Gadria Creek). Free software has been employed for preliminary treatment (orthorectification and format conversion) of video-recorded images as well as for LSPIV application. Results show that LSPIV velocities are consistent with manual measurements of the orthorectified imagery and with front velocity measured from the hydrographs in a channel recorded approximately 70 m upstream of the sediment trap. Horizontal turbulence, computed as the standard deviation of the flow directions at a given cross section for a given surge, proved to be correlated with surface velocity and with visually estimated sediment concentration. The study demonstrates the effectiveness of LSPIV in the assessment of surface velocity of debris flows and permit the most crucial aspects to be identified in order to improve the accuracy of debris-flow velocity measurements.

  7. U-Pb zircon age for a volcanic suite in the Rankin Inlet Group, Rankin Inlet map area, District of Keewatin, Northwest Territories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tella, S.; Roddick, J.C.; VanBreemen, O.

    1996-01-01

    U-Pb zircon analyses from a felsic band within dominantly mafic volcanics of the Rankin Inlet Group yields a U-Pb upper concordia intercept age of 2663 ± 3 Ma. These supracrustals at Rankin Inlet appear to be 15-20 Ma younger than volcanics of the Kaminak Group in the Tavani area, 70 km to the southwest. The 2.68-2.66 Ga volcanism in the Tavani and Rankin Inlet areas coincided with the last stage of the main phase of magmatism in the Slave Structural Province. (author). 16 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs

  8. U-Pb zircon age for a volcanic suite in the Rankin Inlet Group, Rankin Inlet map area, District of Keewatin, Northwest Territories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tella, S; Roddick, J C; VanBreemen, O [Geological Survey of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    1997-12-31

    U-Pb zircon analyses from a felsic band within dominantly mafic volcanics of the Rankin Inlet Group yields a U-Pb upper concordia intercept age of 2663 {+-} 3 Ma. These supracrustals at Rankin Inlet appear to be 15-20 Ma younger than volcanics of the Kaminak Group in the Tavani area, 70 km to the southwest. The 2.68-2.66 Ga volcanism in the Tavani and Rankin Inlet areas coincided with the last stage of the main phase of magmatism in the Slave Structural Province. (author). 16 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs.

  9. Inverted annular flow experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Jarlais, G.; Ishii, M.

    1985-04-01

    Steady-state inverted annular flow of Freon 113 in up flow was established in a transparent test section. Using a special inlet configuration consisting of long aspect-ratio liquid nozzles coaxially centered within a heated quartz tube, idealized inverted annular flow initial geometry (cylindrical liquid core surrounded by coaxial annulus of gas) could be established. Inlet liquid and gas flowrates, liquid subcooling, and gas density (using various gas species) were measured and varied systematically. The hydrodynamic behavior of the liquid core, and the subsequent downstream break-up of this core into slugs, ligaments and/or droplets of various sizes, was observed. In general, for low inlet liquid velocities it was observed that after the initial formation of roll waves on the liquid core surface, an agitated region of high surface area, with attendant high momentum and energy transfers, occurs. This agitated region appears to propagate downsteam in a quasi-periodic pattern. Increased inlet liquid flow rates, and high gas annulus flow rates tend to diminish the significance of this agitated region. Observed inverted annular flow (and subsequent downstream flow pattern) hydrodynamic behavior is reported, and comparisons are drawn to data generated by previous experimenters studying post-CHF flow

  10. Experimental Research on Optimizing Inlet Airflow of Wet Cooling Towers under Crosswind Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, You Liang; Shi, Yong Feng; Hao, Jian Gang; Chang, Hao; Sun, Feng Zhong

    2018-01-01

    A new approach of installing air deflectors around tower inlet circumferentially was proposed to optimize the inlet airflow and reduce the adverse effect of crosswinds on the thermal performance of natural draft wet cooling towers (NDWCT). And inlet airflow uniformity coefficient was defined to analyze the uniformity of circumferential inlet airflow quantitatively. Then the effect of air deflectors on the NDWCT performance was investigated experimentally. By contrast between inlet air flow rate and cooling efficiency, it has been found that crosswinds not only decrease the inlet air flow rate, but also reduce the uniformity of inlet airflow, which reduce NDWCT performance jointly. After installing air deflectors, the inlet air flow rate and uniformity coefficient increase, the uniformity of heat and mass transfer increases correspondingly, which improve the cooling performance. In addition, analysis on Lewis factor demonstrates that the inlet airflow optimization has more enhancement of heat transfer than mass transfer, but leads to more water evaporation loss.

  11. Effect of inlet straighteners on centrifugal fan performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayomi, N.N.; Abdel Hafiz, A. [Faculty of Engineering, Mataria, Helwan University, 11718 Masaken, El-Helmia, Cairo (Egypt); Osman, A.M. [Faculty of Engineering, Shoubra, Zagazig University, Cairo (Egypt)

    2006-11-15

    The use of straighteners in the inlet duct of centrifugal fans is suggested for eliminating any inlet distortion. An experimental investigation was performed to study the effect of inlet straighteners on the performance characteristics of centrifugal fans. Two types of straighteners were used, circular tubes and zigzag cross section, with different lengths. Circular tubes with different diameters have been investigated. The study was conducted on three types of fans, namely radial, backward with exit blade angles 60{sup o} and 75{sup o} and forward with 105{sup o} and 120{sup o}. The results confirm that the inlet straighteners exhibit different effects on the fan performance for the different blade angles. Accordingly, the results indicate the selection of long circular tube straighteners with large diameter for radial blades, long zigzag type for backward 60{sup o} blade angle and short zigzag type for backward 75{sup o} blade angle. Generally, good improvements in efficiency are observed for radial and backward blades on account of a slight drop in static head. In addition, an increase in the flow margin up to 12% and a decrease in the noise level from 3 to 5dB are indicated compared to the free inlet condition. On the contrary, unfavorable influences are exerted on the forward fan performance. (author)

  12. CFD application to supersonic/hypersonic inlet airframe integration. [computational fluid dynamics (CFD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Thomas J.

    1988-01-01

    Supersonic external compression inlets are introduced, and the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes and tests needed to study flow associated with these inlets are outlined. Normal shock wave turbulent boundary layer interaction is discussed. Boundary layer control is considered. Glancing sidewall shock interaction is treated. The CFD validation of hypersonic inlet configurations is explained. Scramjet inlet modules are shown.

  13. Dynamics of the inlet system of a four-stroke engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boden, R H; Schecter, Harry

    1944-01-01

    Tests were run on a single-cylinder and a multicylinder four-stroke engine in order to determine the effect of the dynamics of the inlet system upon indicated mean effective pressure. Tests on the single-cylinder engine were made at various speeds, inlet valve timings, and inlet pipe lengths. These tests indicated that the indicated mean effective pressure could be raised considerably at any one speed by the use of a suitably long inlet pipe. Tests at other speeds with this length of pipe showed higher indicated mean effective pressure than with a very short pipe, although not so high as could be obtained with the pipe length adjusted for each speed. A general relation was discovered between optimum time of inlet valve closing and pipe length; namely, that longer pipes require later inlet valve closing in order to be fully effective. Tests were also made on three cylinders connected to a single pipe. With this arrangement, increased volumetric efficiency at low speed was obtainable by using a long pipe, but only with a sacrifice of volumetric efficiency at high speed. Volumetric efficiency at high speed was progressively lower as the pipe length was increased.

  14. The Scale Effects of Engineered Inlets in Urban Hydrologic Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevade, L.; Montalto, F. A.

    2017-12-01

    Runoff from urban surfaces is typically captured by engineered inlets for conveyance to receiving water bodies or treatment plants. Normative hydrologic and hydraulic (H&H) modeling tools generally assume 100% efficient inlets, though observations by the authors suggest this assumption is invalid. The discrepancy is key since the more efficiently the inlet, the more linearly hydrologic processes scale with catchment area. Using several years of remote sensing, the observed efficiencies of urban green infrastructure (GI) facility inlets in New York City are presented, as a function of the morphological and climatological properties of their catchments and events. The rainfall-runoff response is modeled with EPA to assess the degree of inaccuracy that the assumption of efficient inlets introduces in block and neighborhood-scale simulations. Next, an algorithm is presented that incorporates inlet efficiency into SWMM and the improved predictive skill evaluated using Nash-Sutcliffe and root-mean-square error (RMSE). The results are used to evaluate the extent to which decentralized green stormwater management facilities positioned at the low points of urban catchments ought to be designed with larger capacities than their counterparts located further upslope.

  15. Potential of flow pre-whirl at the compressor inlet of automotive engine turbochargers to enlarge surge margin and overcome packaging limitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galindo, J.; Serrano, J.R.; Margot, X.; Tiseira, A.; Schorn, N.; Kindl, H.

    2007-01-01

    Due to the packaging constraints to which turbocharged engines are submitted in passenger cars, the inlet duct of the centrifugal compressor often requires a 90 o bend. The compressor inlet perpendicular to its axis disturbs the flow and reduces the compressor performance. This paper presents an interesting solution based on a specifically designed inlet swirl-generator device (SGD) that palliates these negative effects. In addition, the SGD can be used to extend the surge margin of the compressor if the position of the SGD blades is modified in function of the reciprocating engine operation conditions. The paper describes how the swirl level and the pressure losses generated by the device have been characterized in a continuous flow test rig. After this the SGD plus a centrifugal compressor from a turbocharger unit have been tested in a specific turbocharger test bench. The results obtained show the influence of the SGD blades position on the compressor performance. In order to better understand the influence of the SGD on the turbocharger behaviour, the flow velocity triangles near the inducer have been reconstructed using an approach based on CFD calculations

  16. Gas fired advanced turbine system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecren, R. T.; White, D. J.

    The basic concept thus derived from the Ericsson cycle is an intercooled, recuperated, and reheated gas turbine. Theoretical performance analyses, however, showed that reheat at high turbine rotor inlet temperatures (TRIT) did not provide significant efficiency gains and that the 50 percent efficiency goal could be met without reheat. Based upon these findings, the engine concept adopted as a starting point for the gas-fired advanced turbine system is an intercooled, recuperated (ICR) gas turbine. It was found that, at inlet temperatures greater than 2450 F, the thermal efficiency could be maintained above 50%, provided that the turbine cooling flows could be reduced to 7% of the main air flow or lower. This dual and conflicting requirement of increased temperatures and reduced cooling will probably force the abandonment of traditional air cooled turbine parts. Thus, the use of either ceramic materials or non-air cooling fluids has to be considered for the turbine nozzle guide vanes and turbine blades. The use of ceramic components for the proposed engine system is generally preferred because of the potential growth to higher temperatures that is available with such materials.

  17. Membrane Inlet Mass Spectrometry for Homeland Security and Forensic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannoukos, Stamatios; Brkić, Boris; Taylor, Stephen; France, Neil

    2015-02-01

    A man-portable membrane inlet mass spectrometer has been built and tested to detect and monitor characteristic odors emitted from the human body and also from threat substances. In each case, a heated membrane sampling probe was used. During human scent monitoring experiments, data were obtained for inorganic gases and volatile organic compounds emitted from human breath and sweat in a confined space. Volatile emissions were detected from the human body at low ppb concentrations. Experiments with compounds associated with narcotics, explosives, and chemical warfare agents were conducted for a range of membrane types. Test compounds included methyl benzoate (odor signature of cocaine), piperidine (precursor in clandestine phencyclidine manufacturing processes), 2-nitrotoluene (breakdown product of TNT), cyclohexanone (volatile signature of plastic explosives), dimethyl methylphosphonate (used in sarin and soman nerve agent production), and 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (simulant compound for sulfur mustard gas). Gas phase calibration experiments were performed allowing sub-ppb LOD to be established. The results showed excellent linearity versus concentration and rapid membrane response times.

  18. A test device for premixed gas turbine combustion oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richards, G.A.; Gemmen, R.S.; Yip, M.J.

    1996-03-01

    This report discusses design and operation of a single-nozzle test combustor for studying lean, premixed combustion oscillations from gas turbine fuel nozzles. It was used to study oscillations from a prototype fuel nozzle that produced oscillations during testing in a commercial engine. Similar, but not identical, oscillations were recorded in the test device. Basic requirements of the device design were that the flame geometry be maintained and acoustic losses be minimized; this was achieved by using a Helmholtz resonator as the combustor geometry. Surprisingly, the combustor oscillated strongly at several frequencies, without modification of the resonator. Brief survey of operating conditions suggests that it may be helpful to characterize oscillating behavior in terms of reference velocity and inlet air temperature with the rig backpressure playing a smaller role. The preliminary results do not guarantee that the single-nozzle test device will reproduce arbitrary oscillations that occur on a complete engine test. Nozzle/nozzle interactions may complicate the response, and oscillations controlled by acoustic velocities transverse to the nozzle axis may not be reproduced in a test device that relies on a bulk Helmholtz mode. Nevertheless, some oscillations can be reproduced, and the single-nozzle test device allows both active and passive control strategies to be tested relatively inexpensively.

  19. Turbulence measurements in the inlet plane of a centrifugal compressor vaneless diffuser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinarbasi, Ali

    2009-01-01

    Detailed flow measurements at the inlet of a centrifugal compressor vaneless diffuser are presented. The mean 3-d velocities and six Reynolds stress components tensor are used to determine the turbulence production terms which lead to total pressure loss. High levels of turbulence kinetic energy were observed in both the blade and passage wakes, but these were only associated with high Reynolds stresses in the blade wakes. For this reason the blade wakes mixed out rapidly, whereas the passage wake maintained its size, but was redistributed across the full length of the shroud wall. Peak levels of Reynolds stress occurred in regions of high velocity shear and streamline curvature which would tend to destabilize the shear gradient. Four regions in the flow are identified as potential sources of loss - the blade wake, the shear layers between passage wake and jet, the thickened hub boundary layer and the interaction region between the secondary flow within the blade wake and the passage vortex. The blade wakes generate most turbulence, with smaller contributions from the hub boundary layer and secondary flows, but no significant contribution is apparent from the passage wake shear layers.

  20. Wall modeled large eddy simulations of complex high Reynolds number flows with synthetic inlet turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patil, Sunil; Tafti, Danesh

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Large eddy simulation. ► Wall layer modeling. ► Synthetic inlet turbulence. ► Swirl flows. - Abstract: Large eddy simulations of complex high Reynolds number flows are carried out with the near wall region being modeled with a zonal two layer model. A novel formulation for solving the turbulent boundary layer equation for the effective tangential velocity in a generalized co-ordinate system is presented and applied in the near wall zonal treatment. This formulation reduces the computational time in the inner layer significantly compared to the conventional two layer formulations present in the literature and is most suitable for complex geometries involving body fitted structured and unstructured meshes. The cost effectiveness and accuracy of the proposed wall model, used with the synthetic eddy method (SEM) to generate inlet turbulence, is investigated in turbulent channel flow, flow over a backward facing step, and confined swirling flows at moderately high Reynolds numbers. Predictions are compared with available DNS, experimental LDV data, as well as wall resolved LES. In all cases, there is at least an order of magnitude reduction in computational cost with no significant loss in prediction accuracy.

  1. 40 CFR 81.54 - Cook Inlet Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Regions § 81.54 Cook Inlet Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Cook Inlet Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Alaska) consists of the territorial area encompassed by the boundaries... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cook Inlet Intrastate Air Quality...

  2. The NASA Ames Hypersonic Combustor-Model Inlet CFD Simulations and Experimental Comparisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatapathy, E.; Tokarcik-Polsky, S.; Deiwert, G. S.; Edwards, Thomas A. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Computations have been performed on a three-dimensional inlet associated with the NASA Ames combustor model for the hypersonic propulsion experiment in the 16-inch shock tunnel. The 3-dimensional inlet was designed to have the combustor inlet flow nearly two-dimensional and of sufficient mass flow necessary for combustion. The 16-inch shock tunnel experiment is a short duration test with test time of the order of milliseconds. The flow through the inlet is in chemical non-equilibrium. Two test entries have been completed and limited experimental results for the inlet region of the combustor-model are available. A number of CFD simulations, with various levels of simplifications such as 2-D simulations, 3-D simulations with and without chemical reactions, simulations with and without turbulent conditions, etc., have been performed. These simulations have helped determine the model inlet flow characteristics and the important factors that affect the combustor inlet flow and the sensitivity of the flow field to these simplifications. In the proposed paper, CFD modeling of the hypersonic inlet, results from the simulations and comparison with available experimental results will be presented.

  3. On-line mass spectrometry measurement of fission gas release from nuclear fuel submitted to thermal transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guigues, E.; Janulyte, A.; Zerega, Y.; Pontillon, Y.

    2013-06-01

    The work presented in this paper has been performed in the framework of a joint research program between Aix-Marseille University and CEA Cadarache. The aim is to develop a mass spectrometer (MS) device for the MERARG facility. MERARG is devoted to the study of fission gas release measurement, from nuclear fuels submitted to annealing tests in high activity laboratory such as LECA-STAR, thanks to gamma spectrometry. The mass spectrometer will then extend the measurement capability from the γ-emitters gases to all the gases involved in the release in order to have a better understanding of the fission gas release dynamics from fuel during thermal transients. Furthermore, the mass spectrometer instrument combines the capabilities and performances of both on-line (for release kinetic) and off-line implementations (for delayed accurate analysis of capacities containing total release gas). The paper deals with two main axes: (1) the modelling of gas sampling inlet device and its performance and (2) the first MS qualification/calibration results. The inlet device samples the gas and also adapts the pressure between MERARG sweeping line at 1.2 bar and mass spectrometer chamber at high vacuum. It is a two-stage device comprising a capillary at inlet, an intermediate vacuum chamber, a molecular leak inlet and a two-stage pumping device. Pressure drops, conductance and throughputs are estimated both for mass spectrometer operation and for exhaust gas recovery. Possible gas segregation is also estimated and device modification is proposed to attain a more accurate calibration. First experimental results obtained from a standard gas bottle show that the quantitative analysis at a few ppm level can be achieved for all isotopes of Kr and Xe, as well as masses 2 and 4 u. (authors)

  4. Transmission geometry laserspray ionization vacuum using an atmospheric pressure inlet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutomski, Corinne A; El-Baba, Tarick J; Inutan, Ellen D; Manly, Cory D; Wager-Miller, James; Mackie, Ken; Trimpin, Sarah

    2014-07-01

    This represents the first report of laserspray ionization vacuum (LSIV) with operation directly from atmospheric pressure for use in mass spectrometry. Two different types of electrospray ionization source inlets were converted to LSIV sources by equipping the entrance of the atmospheric pressure inlet aperture with a customized cone that is sealed with a removable glass plate holding the matrix/analyte sample. A laser aligned in transmission geometry (at 180° relative to the inlet) ablates the matrix/analyte sample deposited on the vacuum side of the glass slide. Laser ablation from vacuum requires lower inlet temperature relative to laser ablation at atmospheric pressure. However, higher inlet temperature is required for high-mass analytes, for example, α-chymotrypsinogen (25.6 kDa). Labile compounds such as gangliosides and cardiolipins are detected in the negative ion mode directly from mouse brain tissue as intact doubly deprotonated ions. Multiple charging enhances the ion mobility spectrometry separation of ions derived from complex tissue samples.

  5. Boundary conditions for free surface inlet and outlet problems

    KAUST Repository

    Taroni, M.; Breward, C. J. W.; Howell, P. D.; Oliver, J. M.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate and compare the boundary conditions that are to be applied to free-surface problems involving inlet and outlets of Newtonian fluid, typically found in coating processes. The flux of fluid is a priori known at an inlet, but unknown

  6. Combustion Characteristics for Turbulent Prevaporized Premixed Flame Using Commercial Light Diesel and Kerosene Fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed S. Shehata

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental study has been carried out for investigating fuel type, fuel blends, equivalence ratio, Reynolds number, inlet mixture temperature, and holes diameter of perforated plate affecting combustion process for turbulent prevaporized premixed air flames for different operating conditions. CO2, CO, H2, N2, C3H8, C2H6, C2H4, flame temperature, and gas flow velocity are measured along flame axis for different operating conditions. Gas chromatographic (GC and CO/CO2 infrared gas analyzer are used for measuring different species. Temperature is measured using thermocouple technique. Gas flow velocity is measured using pitot tube technique. The effect of kerosene percentage on concentration, flame temperature, and gas flow velocity is not linearly dependent. Correlations for adiabatic flame temperature for diesel and kerosene-air flames are obtained as function of mixture strength, fuel type, and inlet mixture temperature. Effect of equivalence ratio on combustion process for light diesel-air flame is greater than for kerosene-air flame. Flame temperature increases with increased Reynolds number for different operating conditions. Effect of Reynolds number on combustion process for light diesel flame is greater than for kerosene flame and also for rich flame is greater than for lean flame. The present work contributes to design and development of lean prevaporized premixed (LPP gas turbine combustors.

  7. Evaluation and compensation of steady gas flow force on the high-pressure electro-pneumatic servo valve direct-driven by voice coil motor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Baoren; Gao, Longlong; Yang, Gang

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► A novel energy saving high-pressure electro-pneumatic servo valve is presented. ► An evaluated method for steady gas flow forces on pneumatic valves is proposed. ► Gas jet angles at the orifices for the valve are larger than 69° commonly used. ► The steady gas flow force is strongly nonlinear with valve opening. ► The steady gas flow force is compensated and the aim at energy saving is realized. - Abstract: A novel voice coil motor (VCM) direct drive single stage high-pressure pneumatic servo valve is designed, and then the steady gas flow force acting on the spool of the servo valve is investigated by numerical simulation and experimental methods in this paper. At present, many studies about flow force are concentrated mainly on hydraulic valves, but rarely on pneumatic valves. However, the velocity of gas is up to sonic when high-pressure gas flows through the servo valve orifice. And therefore, the steady gas flow force, generated by high pressure and high speed gas flow, cannot be neglected and is an important disturbance for the VCM direct-drive single stage high-pressure pneumatic servo valve. Consequently, the numerical simulation with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is adopted to analyze the flow filed, jet angles, and steady gas flow forces for the servo valve with different valve openings and inlet pressures. The experimental study is performed to evaluate and confirm the numerical analysis. Then the compensated approach is proposed to reduce the steady gas flow force for the servo valve, changing the angle of non-metering port designed in the valve sleeve to the spool axis. The results demonstrate that the presented numerical analysis method is validated, the gas jet angle for the servo valve orifice is more than 69° and varies with different spool openings, and the steady gas flow force is nonlinear with valve opening and linear with inlet pressure when the outlet boundary is atmospheric pressure. Moreover, the steady gas

  8. Inlet Flow Control and Prediction Technologies for Embedded Propulsion Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Michelle L.; Mackie, Scott A.; Gissen, Abe; Vukasinovic, Bojan; Lakebrink, Matthew T.; Glezer, Ari; Mani, Mori; Mace, James L.

    2011-01-01

    Fail-safe, hybrid, flow control (HFC) is a promising technology for meeting high-speed cruise efficiency, low-noise signature, and reduced fuel-burn goals for future, Hybrid-Wing-Body (HWB) aircraft with embedded engines. This report details the development of HFC technology that enables improved inlet performance in HWB vehicles with highly integrated inlets and embedded engines without adversely affecting vehicle performance. In addition, new test techniques for evaluating Boundary-Layer-Ingesting (BLI)-inlet flow-control technologies developed and demonstrated through this program are documented, including the ability to generate a BLI-like inlet-entrance flow in a direct-connect, wind-tunnel facility, as well as, the use of D-optimal, statistically designed experiments to optimize test efficiency and enable interpretation of results. Validated improvements in numerical analysis tools and methods accomplished through this program are also documented, including Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes CFD simulations of steady-state flow physics for baseline, BLI-inlet diffuser flow, as well as, that created by flow-control devices. Finally, numerical methods were employed in a ground-breaking attempt to directly simulate dynamic distortion. The advances in inlet technologies and prediction tools will help to meet and exceed "N+2" project goals for future HWB aircraft.

  9. Numerical Investigations of the Influencing Factors on a Rotary Regenerator-Type Catalytic Combustion Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenkun Sang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Ultra-low calorific value gas (ULCVG not only poses a problem for environmental pollution, but also createsa waste of energy resources if not utilized. A novel reactor, a rotary regenerator-type catalytic combustion reactor (RRCCR, which integrates the functions of a regenerator and combustor into one component, is proposed for the elimination and utilization of ULCVG. Compared to reversal-flow reactor, the operation of the RRCCR is achieved by incremental rotation rather than by valve control, and it has many outstanding characteristics, such as a compact structure, flexible application, and limited energy for circulation. Due to the effects of the variation of the gas flow and concentration on the performance of the reactor, different inlet velocities and concentrations are analyzed by numerical investigations. The results reveal that the two factors have a major impact on the performance of the reactor. The performance of the reactor is more sensitive to the increase of velocity and the decrease of methane concentration. When the inlet concentration (2%vol. is reduced by 50%, to maintain the methane conversion over 90%, the inlet velocity can be reduced by more than three times. Finally, the highly-efficient and stable operating envelope of the reactor is drawn.

  10. Calculation of external-internal flow fields for mixed-compression inlets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chyu, W. J.; Kawamura, T.; Bencze, D. P.

    1987-01-01

    Supersonic inlet flows with mixed external-internal compressions were computed using a combined implicit-explicit (Beam-Warming-Steger/MacCormack) method for solving the three-dimensional unsteady, compressible Navier-Stokes equations in conservation form. Numerical calculations were made of various flows related to such inlet operations as the shock-wave intersections, subsonic spillage around the cowl lip, and inlet started versus unstarted conditions. Some of the computed results were compared with wind tunnel data.

  11. Full Scale Measurements and CFD Simulations of Diffuse Ceiling Inlet for Ventilation and Cooling of Densely Occupied Rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikeska, Tomás; Fan, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    Spaces with high occupant densities result in high heat gains and need for relatively high air change rate.By means of traditional mechanical ventilation diffusers it becomes a challenge to supply large amountsof fresh air into the space without creating a local discomfort for occupants. One...... comfort numerically. Results of our investigations have shown that diffuse ceiling inlet is a suitable solution for the spaceswith high density occupancy. The results have shown that transient calculations using Large Eddy Simulation models can predict well temperatures and velocity magnitude of air flow...

  12. Evaluation of PM-10 commercial inlets for new surveillance air sampler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langer, G.

    1986-01-01

    The inlet for the present Rock Flats Plant surveillance sampler does not meet the new but still tentative PM-10 (<10-μm particle mass) criterion for sampling the hazardous fraction of airborne dust. Since this criterion relates mainly to non-radioactive emissions, DOE and EPA are presently in the process of promulgating emission guidelines specifically for non-reactor DOE nuclear facilities. The authors present approach is to select a commercial inlet and modify its, if necessary, to meet the PM-10 criterion, keeping in mind that they may have to recover the dust collected in the inlet. There is no EPA-approved PM-10 inlet design; instead, EPA issued a performance specification. As a nuclear operation, Rocky Flats has to sample continuously to ensure no period remains unmonitored, instead of every sixth day, as set forth by EPA for non-nuclear installations. During this study period, the authors developed an inlet evaluation methodology to meet the above, anticipated EPA requirements. Also, they started testing two potential inlets. 6 references, 2 figures, 1 table

  13. Effects of Loading Rate on Gas Seepage and Temperature in Coal and Its Potential for Coal-Gas Disaster Early-Warning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Zhang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The seepage velocity and temperature externally manifest the changing structure, gas desorption and energy release that occurs in coal containing gas failure under loading. By using the system of coal containing gas failure under loading, this paper studies the law of seepage velocity and temperature under different loading rates and at 1.0 MPa confining pressure and 0.5 MPa gas pressure, and combined the on-site results of gas pressure and temperature. The results show that the stress directly affects the seepage velocity and temperature of coal containing gas, and the pressure and content of gas have the most sensitivity to mining stress. Although the temperature is not sensitive to mining stress, it has great correlation with mining stress. Seepage velocity has the characteristic of critically slowing down under loading. This is demonstrated by the variance increasing before the main failure of the samples. Therefore, the variance of seepage velocity with time and temperature can provide an early warning for coal containing gas failing and gas disasters in a coal mine.

  14. Shock velocity in weakly ionized nitrogen, air, and argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siefert, Nicholas S.

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this research was to determine the principal mechanism(s) for the shock velocity increase in weakly ionized gases. This paper reports experimental data on the propagation of spark-generated shock waves (1< Mach<3) into weakly ionized nitrogen, air, and argon glow discharges (1 < p<20 Torr). In order to distinguish between effects due solely to the presence of electrons and effects due to heating of the background gas via elastic collisions with electrons, the weakly ionized discharge was pulsed on/off. Laser deflection methods determined the shock velocity, and the electron number density was collected using a microwave hairpin resonator. In the afterglow of nitrogen, air, and argon discharges, the shock velocity first decreased, not at the characteristic time for electrons to diffuse to the walls, but rather at the characteristic time for the centerline gas temperature to equilibrate with the wall temperature. These data support the conclusion that the principal mechanism for the increase in shock velocity in weakly ionized gases is thermal heating of the neutral gas species via elastic collisions with electrons

  15. The Spanwise Distribution of Losses in Prismatic Turbine Cascade with Non-Uniform Inlet Velocity Profile

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fürst, J.; Luxa, Martin; Šimurda, David

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 2 (2014), s. 135-141 ISSN 1802-1484 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP101/10/1329 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : prismatic turbine cascade * losses * velocity profile Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics http://www.engineeringmechanics.cz/obsahy.html?R=21&C=2

  16. Identifying the morphologies of gas hydrate distribution using P-wave velocity and density: a test from the GMGS2 expedition in the South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tao; Liu, Xuewei

    2018-06-01

    Pore-filling and fracture-filling are two basic distribution morphologies of gas hydrates in nature. A clear knowledge of gas hydrate morphology is important for better resource evaluation and exploitation. Improper exploitation may cause seafloor instability and exacerbate the greenhouse effect. To identify the gas hydrate morphologies in sediments, we made a thorough analysis of the characteristics of gas hydrate bearing sediments (GHBS) based on rock physics modeling. With the accumulation of gas hydrate in sediments, both the velocities of two types of GHBS increase, and their densities decrease. Therefore, these two morphologies cannot be differentiated only by velocity or density. After a series of tests, we found the attribute ρ {{V}{{P}}}0.5 as a function of hydrate concentration show opposite trends for these two morphologies due to their different formation mechanisms. The morphology of gas hydrate can thus be identified by comparing the measured ρ {{V}{{P}}}0.5 with its background value, which means the ρ {{V}{{P}}}0.5 of the hydrate-free sediments. In 2013, China’s second gas hydrate expedition was conducted by Guangzhou Marine Geologic Survey to explore gas hydrate resources in the northern South China Sea, and both two hydrate morphologies were recovered. We applied this method to three sites, which include two pore-filling and three fracture-filling hydrate layers. The data points, that agree with the actual situations, account for 72% and 82% of the total for the two pore-filling hydrate layers, respectively, and 86%, 74%, and 69% for the three fracture-filling hydrate layers, respectively.

  17. Organics Verification Study for Sinclair and Dyes Inlets, Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohn, Nancy P.; Brandenberger, Jill M.; Niewolny, Laurie A.; Johnston, Robert K.

    2006-09-28

    Sinclair and Dyes Inlets near Bremerton, Washington, are on the State of Washington 1998 303(d) list of impaired waters because of fecal coliform contamination in marine water, metals in sediment and fish tissue, and organics in sediment and fish tissue. Because significant cleanup and source control activities have been conducted in the inlets since the data supporting the 1998 303(d) listings were collected, two verification studies were performed to address the 303(d) segments that were listed for metal and organic contaminants in marine sediment. The Metals Verification Study (MVS) was conducted in 2003; the final report, Metals Verification Study for Sinclair and Dyes Inlets, Washington, was published in March 2004 (Kohn et al. 2004). This report describes the Organics Verification Study that was conducted in 2005. The study approach was similar to the MVS in that many surface sediment samples were screened for the major classes of organic contaminants, and then the screening results and other available data were used to select a subset of samples for quantitative chemical analysis. Because the MVS was designed to obtain representative data on concentrations of contaminants in surface sediment throughout Sinclair Inlet, Dyes Inlet, Port Orchard Passage, and Rich Passage, aliquots of the 160 MVS sediment samples were used in the analysis for the Organics Verification Study. However, unlike metals screening methods, organics screening methods are not specific to individual organic compounds, and are not available for some target organics. Therefore, only the quantitative analytical results were used in the organics verification evaluation. The results of the Organics Verification Study showed that sediment quality outside of Sinclair Inlet is unlikely to be impaired because of organic contaminants. Similar to the results for metals, in Sinclair Inlet, the distribution of residual organic contaminants is generally limited to nearshore areas already within the

  18. Method and apparatus for preventing overspeed in a gas turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, William E.

    1976-01-01

    A method and apparatus for preventing overspeed in a gas turbine in response to the rapid loss of applied load is disclosed. The method involves diverting gas from the inlet of the turbine, bypassing the same around the turbine and thereafter injecting the diverted gas at the turbine exit in a direction toward or opposing the flow of gas through the turbine. The injected gas is mixed with the gas exiting the turbine to thereby minimize the thermal shock upon equipment downstream of the turbine exit.

  19. Impeller inlet geometry effect on performance improvement for centrifugal pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Xianwu; Zhang, Yao; Peng, Junqi; Xu, Hongyuan; Yu, Weiping

    2008-01-01

    This research treats the effect of impeller inlet geometry on performance improvement for a boiler feed pump, who is a centrifugal pump having specific speed of 183 m.m 3 min -1 .min -1 and close type impeller with exit diameter of 450 mm. The hydraulic performance and cavitation performance of the pump have been tested experimentally. In order to improve the pump, five impellers have been considered by extending the blade leading edge or applying much larger blade angle at impeller inlet compared with the original impeller. The 3-D turbulent flow inside those pumps has been analyzed basing on RNG k-ε turbulence model and VOF cavitation model. It is noted that the numerical results are fairly good compared with the experiments. Based on the experimental test and numerical simulation, the following conclusions can be drawn: (1) Impeller inlet geometry has important influence on performance improvement in the case of centrifugal pump. Favorite effects on performance improvement have been achieved by both extending the blade leading edge and applying much larger blade angle at impeller inlet: (2) It is suspected that the extended leading edge have favorite effect for improving hydraulic performance, and the much larger blade angle at impeller inlet have favorite effect for improving cavitation performance for the test pump: (3) Uniform flow upstream of impeller inlet is helpful for improving cavitation performance of the pump

  20. Effect of a dual inlet channel on cell loading in microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Hoyoung; Kim, Kisoo; Lee, Won Gu

    2014-11-01

    Unwanted sedimentation and attachment of a number of cells onto the bottom channel often occur on relatively large-scale inlets of conventional microfluidic channels as a result of gravity and fluid shear. Phenomena such as sedimentation have become recognized problems that can be overcome by performing microfluidic experiments properly, such as by calculating a meaningful output efficiency with respect to real input. Here, we present a dual-inlet design method for reducing cell loss at the inlet of channels by adding a new " upstream inlet " to a single main inlet design. The simple addition of an upstream inlet can create a vertically layered sheath flow prior to the main inlet for cell loading. The bottom layer flow plays a critical role in preventing the cells from attaching to the bottom of the channel entrance, resulting in a low possibility of cell sedimentation at the main channel entrance. To provide proof-of-concept validation, we applied our design to a microfabricated flow cytometer system (μFCS) and compared the cell counting efficiency of the proposed μFCS with that of the previous single-inlet μFCS and conventional FCS. We used human white blood cells and fluorescent microspheres to quantitatively evaluate the rate of cell sedimentation in the main inlet and to measure fluorescence sensitivity at the detection zone of the flow cytometer microchip. Generating a sheath flow as the bottom layer was meaningfully used to reduce the depth of field as well as the relative deviation of targets in the z-direction (compared to the x-y flow plane), leading to an increased counting sensitivity of fluorescent detection signals. Counting results using fluorescent microspheres showed both a 40% reduction in the rate of sedimentation and a 2-fold higher sensitivity in comparison with the single-inlet μFCS. The results of CD4(+) T-cell counting also showed that the proposed design results in a 25% decrease in the rate of cell sedimentation and a 28% increase in

  1. Background-Oriented Schlieren used in a hypersonic inlet test at NASA GRC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clem, Michelle; Woike, Mark; Saunders, John

    2016-01-01

    Background Oriented Schlieren (BOS) is a derivative of the classical schlieren technology, which is used to visualize density gradients, such as shock wave structures in a wind tunnel. Changes in refractive index resulting from density gradients cause light rays to bend, resulting in apparent motion of a random background pattern. The apparent motion of the pattern is determined using cross-correlation algorithms (between no-flow and with-flow image pairs) producing a schlieren-like image. One advantage of BOS is its simplified setup which enables a larger field-of-view (FOV) than traditional schlieren systems. In the present study, BOS was implemented into the Combined Cycle Engine Large-Scale Inlet Mode Transition Experiment (CCE LIMX) in the 10x10 Supersonic Wind Tunnel at NASA Glenn Research Center. The model hardware for the CCE LIMX accommodates a fully integrated turbine based combined cycle propulsion system. To date, inlet mode transition between turbine and ramjet operation has been successfully demonstrated. High-speed BOS was used to visualize the behavior of the flow structures shock waves during unsteady inlet unstarts, a phenomenon known as buzz. Transient video images of inlet buzz were recorded for both the ramjet flow path (high speed inlet) and turbine flow path (low speed inlet). To understand the stability limits of the inlet, operation was pushed to the point of unstart and buzz. BOS was implemented in order to view both inlets simultaneously, since the required FOV was beyond the capability of the current traditional schlieren system. An example of BOS data (Images 1-6) capturing inlet buzz are presented.

  2. 33 CFR 110.170 - Lockwoods Folly Inlet, N.C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lockwoods Folly Inlet, N.C. 110.170 Section 110.170 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.170 Lockwoods Folly Inlet, N.C. (a) Explosives...

  3. Long time durability tests of fabric inlet stratification pipes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Elsa; Furbo, Simon

    2008-01-01

    and that this destroys the capability of building up thermal stratification for the fabric inlet stratification pipe. The results also show that although dirt, algae etc. are deposited in the fabric pipes in the space heating tank, the capability of the fabric inlet stratifiers to build up thermal stratification...

  4. Modelling Morphological Response of Large Tidal Inlet Systems to Sea Level Rise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dissanayake, P.K.

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation qualitatively investigates the morphodynamic response of a large inlet system to IPCC projected relative sea level rise (RSLR). Adopted numerical approach (Delft3D) used a highly schematised model domain analogous to the Ameland inlet in the Dutch Wadden Sea. Predicted inlet

  5. PIV Measurements of Gas Flow Fields from Burning End

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yifei; Wu, Junzhang; Zeng, Jingsong; Tang, Darong; Du, Liang

    2017-12-01

    To study the influence of cigarette gas on the environment, it is necessary to know the cigarette gas flow fields from burning end. By using PIV technique, in order to reveal velocity characteristics of gas flow fields, the velocities of cigarette gas flow fields was analyzed with different stepping motor frequencies corresponding to suction pressures, and the trend of velocity has been given with image fitting. The results shows that the velocities of the burning end increased with suction pressures; Between velocities of the burning end and suction pressures, the relations present polynomial rule; The cigarette gas diffusion in combustion process is faster than in the smoldering process.

  6. Studi Numerik Karakterisasi Aliran 3 Dimensi Multifase (Gas-Solid Pada Gravity Settling Chamber Dengan Variasi Kecepatan Inlet Dan Diameter Partikel Pada Aliran Dilute Phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adi Mochammad Isa’i

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Kegiatan  pemilahan pada aktivitas produksi merupakan salah satu kegiatan yang banyak dilakukan pada dunia industri. Penggunaan gravity settling chamber merupakan teknologi pemilahan partikel yang paling sedehana dan murah. Maka dalam perancangan suatu gravity settling chamber perlu diketahui parameter yang mempengaruhi kinerja dari alat tersebut. Analisa karakteristik aliran pada gravity settling chamber dilakukan dengan metode simulasi numerik menggunakan persamaan Eularian-Lagrangian. Sebuah aliran multifase udara  dan partikel abu terbang batu bara (fly ashberdiameter 100 μm mengalir melalui sebuah  gravity settling chamber dengan variasi diameter hidrolis saluran inlet sebesar 1/3 1/5 dan 1/7  kali dari diameter hidrolis  ruang pengendap dengan laju kapasitas aliran yang sama . Selain divariasikan kecepatan inlet aliran, juga dilakukan variasi distribusi diameter dengan ukuran partikel kurang dari 50 μm, ukuran 50 -100 μm dan ukuran 100-200 μm.  Hasil yang didapatkan dari penelitian ini adalah semakin kecil ukuran diameter partikel maka akan efisiensi partikel yang ditangkap oleh gravity settling chamber semakin rendah. Ukuran partikel tidak berpengaruh terhadap posisi jatuh dari partikel tersebut. Semakin besar kecepatan inlet tidak memiliki hubungan dengan efisiensi penangkapan partikel. Pressure drop yang terjadi akan semakin besar sebanding dengan rasio perbandingan diameter hidrolis inlet dan ruang pengendapan, serta jumlah dan posisi secondary flow berperan signifikan pada efisiensi penangkapan partikel.

  7. Thermal particle image velocity estimation of fire plume flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiangyang Zhou; Lulu Sun; Shankar Mahalingam; David R. Weise

    2003-01-01

    For the purpose of studying wildfire spread in living vegetation such as chaparral in California, a thermal particle image velocity (TPIV) algorithm for nonintrusively measuring flame gas velocities through thermal infrared (IR) imagery was developed. By tracing thermal particles in successive digital IR images, the TPIV algorithm can estimate the velocity field in a...

  8. Flow Control in a Compact Inlet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccaro, John C.

    2011-12-01

    An experimental investigation of flow control, via various control jets actuators, was undertaken to eliminate separation and secondary flows in a compact inlet. The compact inlet studied was highly aggressive with a length-to-diameter ratio of 1.5. A brand new facility was designed and built to enable various actuation methodologies as well as multiple measurement techniques. Techniques included static surface pressure, total pressure, and stereoscopic particle image velocimetry. Experimental data were supplemented with numerical simulations courtesy of Prof. Kenneth Jansen, Dr. Onkar Sahni, and Yi Chen. The baseline flow field was found to be dominated by two massive separations and secondary flow structures. These secondary structures were present at the aerodynamic interface plane in the form of two counter-rotating vortices inducing upwash along centerline. A dominant shedding frequency of 350 Hz was measured both at the aerodynamic interface plane and along the lower surface of the inlet. Flow control experiments started utilizing a pair of control jets placed in streamwise locations where flow was found to separate. Tests were performed for a range of inlet Mach numbers from 0.2 to 0.44. Steady and unsteady static pressure measurements along the upper and lower walls of the duct were performed for various combinations of actuation. The parameters that were tested include the control jets momentum coefficient, their blowing ratio, the actuation frequency, as well as different combinations of jets. It was shown that using mass flux ratio as a criterion to define flow control is not sufficient, and one needs to provide both the momentum coefficient and the blowing ratio to quantify the flow control performance. A detailed study was undertaken on controlling the upstream separation point for an inlet Mach number of 0.44. Similar to the baseline flow field, the flow field associated with the activation of a two-dimensional control jet actuator was dominated by

  9. Effect of the inlet throttling on the thermal-hydraulic instability of the natural circulation BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuya, Masahiro; Inada, Fumio; Yoneda, Kimitoshi

    1997-01-01

    Although it is well-established that inlet restriction has a stabilizing for forced circulation BWR, the effect of inlet on the thermal-hydraulic stability of natural circulation BWR remains unknown since increasing inlet restriction affect thermal-hydraulic stability due to reduction of the recirculation flow rate. Therefore experiments have been conducted to investigate the effect of inlet restriction on the thermal-hydraulic stability. A test facility used in this experiments was designed and constructed to have non-dimensional values which are nearly equal to those of natural circulation BWR. Experimental results showed that driving force of the natural circulation was described as a function of heat flux and inlet subcooling independent of inlet restriction. Stability maps in reference to the channel inlet subcooling, heat flux were presented for various inlet restriction which were carried out by an analysis based on the homogeneous flow various using this function. Instability region during the inlet subcooling shifted to the higher inlet subcooling with increasing inlet restriction and became larger with increasing heat flux. (author)

  10. Velocity Profile measurements in two-phase flow using multi-wave sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biddinika, M. K.; Ito, D.; Takahashi, H.; Kikura, H.; Aritomi, M.

    2009-02-01

    Two-phase flow has been recognized as one of the most important phenomena in fluid dynamics. In addition, gas-liquid two-phase flow appears in various industrial fields such as chemical industries and power generations. In order to clarify the flow structure, some flow parameters have been measured by using many effective measurement techniques. The velocity profile as one of the important flow parameter, has been measured by using ultrasonic velocity profile (UVP) technique. This technique can measure velocity distributions along a measuring line, which is a beam formed by pulse ultrasounds. Furthermore, a multi-wave sensor can measure the velocity profiles of both gas and liquid phase using UVP method. In this study, two types of multi-wave sensors are used. A sensor has cylindrical shape, and another one has square shape. The piezoelectric elements of each sensor have basic frequencies of 8 MHz for liquid phase and 2 MHz for gas phase, separately. The velocity profiles of air-water bubbly flow in a vertical rectangular channel were measured by using these multi-wave sensors, and the validation of the measuring accuracy was performed by the comparison between the velocity profiles measured by two multi-wave sensors.

  11. Velocity Profile measurements in two-phase flow using multi-wave sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biddinika, M K; Ito, D; Takahashi, H; Kikura, H; Aritomi, M

    2009-01-01

    Two-phase flow has been recognized as one of the most important phenomena in fluid dynamics. In addition, gas-liquid two-phase flow appears in various industrial fields such as chemical industries and power generations. In order to clarify the flow structure, some flow parameters have been measured by using many effective measurement techniques. The velocity profile as one of the important flow parameter, has been measured by using ultrasonic velocity profile (UVP) technique. This technique can measure velocity distributions along a measuring line, which is a beam formed by pulse ultrasounds. Furthermore, a multi-wave sensor can measure the velocity profiles of both gas and liquid phase using UVP method. In this study, two types of multi-wave sensors are used. A sensor has cylindrical shape, and another one has square shape. The piezoelectric elements of each sensor have basic frequencies of 8 MHz for liquid phase and 2 MHz for gas phase, separately. The velocity profiles of air-water bubbly flow in a vertical rectangular channel were measured by using these multi-wave sensors, and the validation of the measuring accuracy was performed by the comparison between the velocity profiles measured by two multi-wave sensors.

  12. Should we attempt global (inlet engine airframe) control design?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlin, C. M.

    1980-01-01

    The feasibility of multivariable design of the entire airplane control system is briefly addressed. An intermediate step in that direction is to design a control for an inlet engine augmentor system by using multivariable techniques. The supersonic cruise large scale inlet research program is described which will provide an opportunity to develop, integrate, and wind tunnel test a control for a mixed compression inlet and variable cycle engine. The integrated propulsion airframe control program is also discussed which will introduce the problem of implementing MVC within a distributed processing avionics architecture, requiring real time decomposition of the global design into independent modules in response to hardware communication failures.

  13. Numerical and experimental investigation on effects of inlet humidity and fuel flow rate and oxidant on the performance on polymer fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takalloo, Pourya Karimi; Nia, Ehsan Shabahang; Ghazikhani, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The impact of alteration in humidification on performance of fuel cell. • The impact of variation of temperature on performance of fuel cell. • The effects of using pure oxygen on the polarity curve are studied. • Fuel cell has been investigated both experimentally and numerically. - Abstract: Considering the importance of water management in a fuel cell and in order to increase the rate of the electro-chemical process in fuel cells with polymer membrane, it is required to optimize the humidity and inlet flow rates on anode and cathode sides. In this study, the impact of alteration in humidification and inlet flow rates on performance improvements for polymer membrane fuel cells is investigated both experimentally and numerically. To obtain the objective, employing the results from experiments and simulations, polarity curve and power density are produced and further used to conduct the desired investigations. In addition, through the conducted simulations the effects of using pure oxygen in the cathode side and inlet gas temperatures on the polarity curve is studied. The results demonstrate that an increase in humidity of the inlet gases will lead to performance amelioration in the cell, due to reduction in ionic resistance at the membrane. Furthermore, with the aforementioned increment; molar fractions of hydrogen and oxygen are decreased through the channel which results in produced water increment. Amplification in inlet flow rates to a certain level will improve the penetration possibility for gaseous forms leading to betterment of the cell performance in this specified range. Performance improvements with inlet gases temperature increment conclude other results of this study.

  14. The Influences of Time and Velocity of Inert Gas on the Quality of theProcessing Product of Graphite Matrix on the Baking Step

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imam-Dahroni; Dwi-Herwidhi; NS, Kasilani

    2000-01-01

    The research of the synthesis of matrix graphite on the step of bakingprocess was conducted, by focusing on the influence of time and velocityvariables of the inert gas. The investigation on baking times ranging from 5minutes to 55 minutes and by varying the velocity of inert gas from 0.30l/minute to 3.60 l/minute, resulted the product of different matrix.Optimizing at the time of operation and the flow rate of argon gas indicatedthat the baking time for 30 minutes and by the flow rate of argon gas of 2.60l/minute resulted best matrix graphite that has a hardness value of 11kg/mm 2 of hardness and the ductility of 1800 Newton. (author)

  15. On plasma-neutral gas interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkataramani, N.; Mattoo, S.K.

    1980-01-01

    The importance of plasma-neutral gas interaction layer has been emphasized by pointing out its application to a wide variety of physical phenomena. The interaction of a magnetised plasma stream penetrating a neutral gas cloud is discussed in the light of Alfven's critical velocity and Varma's threshold velocity on the ionising interaction. Interaction of a moving magnetised plasma with a stationary neutral gas has been studied and described. The device comprises of a plasma gun and an interaction region where neutral gas cloud is injected. The interaction region is provided with a transverse magnetic field of upto 1000 G. Several diagnostics deployed at the interaction region to make measurements on the macroscopic parameters of plasma and neutral gas are described. The parameters of discharge circuits are measured with high current and voltage probes. An interaction between a magnetised plasma stream and a neutral gas cloud is demonstrated. It is shown that this interaction does not have Varma's threshold on their relative velocity. The Alfven's critical velocity phenomenon is shown to depend on the integrated column neutral gas density that a plasma stream encounters while penetrating through it and not on the neutral gas density in the range of 10 17 -10 21 m -3 . (auth.)

  16. Energy efficient air inlet humidity control; Energiezuinige inblaasvochtregeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gielen, J.H. [C Point, DLV Plant, Horst (Netherlands)

    2005-03-15

    This project report describes the results of research conducted on the control of the inlet, humidification and dehumidification, based on the air inlet humidity rate. The project was carried out at a mushroom cultivation business in Heijen, the Netherlands [Dutch] Deze projectrapportage geeft de resultaten van het onderzoek naar het regelen van de luchtklep, bevochtiging en ontvochtiging, op basis van het inblaasvochtgehalte. Het project werd uitgevoerd op een champignonkwekerij in Heijen.

  17. Two-component HLMC-gas flow instability and inhomogeneity phenomena in open-pool reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sergey I Shcherbakov

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Consideration is being given to two-component gas-liquid flows with inhomogeneous gas content. The inhomogeneity of gas content over flow space can be caused by local mixing of gas and liquid, gas injection, gas-containing liquid jet penetration into the bulk of liquid without gas. The paper presents the computational results obtained using the direct non-stationary calculation with the TURBO-FLOW computer code. The results refer to flows near the liquid level, flows in downcomer gaps, collectors, elements with varying geometry (jet outlet into space, flow turn) for the pool-type reactors and experimental models. The following processes have been shown and discussed: formation of new liquid levels, entrainment of gas from the level, change in density composition of gas, flow stratification, effect of gas emergence rate and density convection on flow pattern. At gas phase transfer by liquid, two phenomena governing this transfer proceed: gas slip in liquid and density convection of non-uniformly aerated liquid. In horizontal flows, a vertical stratification of gas content always occurs. If the flow changes its direction to an upward one (collector at core inlet), the gas content maximum would be observed in channels nearest to the inlet. At the liquid level, the processes of gas separation from liquid and gas entrainment take place. The separation is a self-sustained process due to circulations arising near the level. The rate of gas entrainment is proportional to the rate of overflow and inversely proportional to the height of liquid level. At the downcomer region in case of its expansion, there occurs the instability of flow resulting in formation of liquid level and falling jet. The level is lower the more the gas content at inlet. The accumulation of gas occurs at sharp turns, encumbered regions (tube bundle), at all regions with upper (ceiling) constraints of flow. The flow instability being often observed in gas-liquid flows

  18. Annual survey on the natural gas market: results for 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadin, Didier; Moreau, Sylvain

    2015-02-01

    Illustrated by graphs and tables, this publication presents and discusses data regarding the French natural gas market in 2013: origin of the consumed gas and share of the national production, evolution of the inlet-outlet ratio for gas-pipe and gas harbour terminals in France, adjustment of resources to demand in terms of jobs, production, imports and storage, evolution of stored quantities, evolution of consumption, evolution of consumption per sector since 2007, regional supplies in 2012 and 2013

  19. Interactions Between Wetlands and Tidal Inlets

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sanchez, Alejandro

    2008-01-01

    This Coastal and Hydraulics Engineering Technical Note (CHETN) presents numerical simulations investigating how the loss of wetlands in estuaries modifies tidal processes in inlet navigation channels...

  20. Impeller inlet geometry effect on performance improvement for centrifugal pumps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Xianwu; Zhang, Yao; Peng, Junqi; Xu, Hongyuan [Tsinghua University, Beijing (China); Yu, Weiping [Zhejiang Pump Works, Zhejiang (China)

    2008-10-15

    This research treats the effect of impeller inlet geometry on performance improvement for a boiler feed pump, who is a centrifugal pump having specific speed of 183 m.m{sup 3}min{sup -1}.min{sup -1} and close type impeller with exit diameter of 450 mm. The hydraulic performance and cavitation performance of the pump have been tested experimentally. In order to improve the pump, five impellers have been considered by extending the blade leading edge or applying much larger blade angle at impeller inlet compared with the original impeller. The 3-D turbulent flow inside those pumps has been analyzed basing on RNG k-{epsilon} turbulence model and VOF cavitation model. It is noted that the numerical results are fairly good compared with the experiments. Based on the experimental test and numerical simulation, the following conclusions can be drawn: (1) Impeller inlet geometry has important influence on performance improvement in the case of centrifugal pump. Favorite effects on performance improvement have been achieved by both extending the blade leading edge and applying much larger blade angle at impeller inlet: (2) It is suspected that the extended leading edge have favorite effect for improving hydraulic performance, and the much larger blade angle at impeller inlet have favorite effect for improving cavitation performance for the test pump: (3) Uniform flow upstream of impeller inlet is helpful for improving cavitation performance of the pump

  1. Physics of Acoustic Radiation from Jet Engine Inlets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Christopher K. W.; Parrish, Sarah A.; Envia, Edmane; Chien, Eugene W.

    2012-01-01

    Numerical simulations of acoustic radiation from a jet engine inlet are performed using advanced computational aeroacoustics (CAA) algorithms and high-quality numerical boundary treatments. As a model of modern commercial jet engine inlets, the inlet geometry of the NASA Source Diagnostic Test (SDT) is used. Fan noise consists of tones and broadband sound. This investigation considers the radiation of tones associated with upstream propagating duct modes. The primary objective is to identify the dominant physical processes that determine the directivity of the radiated sound. Two such processes have been identified. They are acoustic diffraction and refraction. Diffraction is the natural tendency for an acoustic wave to follow a curved solid surface as it propagates. Refraction is the turning of the direction of propagation of sound waves by mean flow gradients. Parametric studies on the changes in the directivity of radiated sound due to variations in forward flight Mach number and duct mode frequency, azimuthal mode number, and radial mode number are carried out. It is found there is a significant difference in directivity for the radiation of the same duct mode from an engine inlet when operating in static condition and in forward flight. It will be shown that the large change in directivity is the result of the combined effects of diffraction and refraction.

  2. Evaluation of magnetic resonance imaging in thoracic inlet tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, Eiro (Kobe Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1993-06-01

    To evaluate the detectability of tumor invasion to the thoracic inlet, MRI was performed in 57 patients with thoracic inlet tumor, and the diagnostic accuracy of MRI was compared with that of CT concerning the utility for thoracic inlet lesions. And we assessed abnormal findings in comparison with surgical or autopsy findings. In the local extent of the tumor, the accuracy for tumor invasion to the vessels such as subclavian artery and vein was 94.9% for MRI, and 83.5% for CT, and to the brachial plexus was 95.0% for MRI, and 60.0% for CT. MRI was superior to CT, but MRI was equivalent to CT with regard to invasion to the base of the neck, lateral chest wall, ribs, and vertebral bodies. However on MRI, it is easier to understand the longitudinal tumor extent than on CT. CT has superior spatial resolusion but CT has also disadvantages, such as streak artifact caused by shoulder joints, resulting in image degradation. In contrast, MRI has inherent advantages, and multiple images which facilitate the relationship between tumor and normal structures. Coronal and sagittal MR images facilitated three-dimensional observation of tumor of invasion in the thoracic inlet. Furthermore to improve image quality of MRI for the thoracic inlet, we newly devised a high molecular polyester shell for fixing a surface coil. On the high resolution MR (HR-MR) imaging using our shell, normal lymph nodes, muscles, blood vessels and the branches of the branchial plexus were clearly visualized in detail. Our shell was simple to process and facilitated immobilization of a surface coil. HR-MR technique produces images of high resolution after simple preparation. In conclusion, MRI was very useful for detecting lesions of the thoracic inlet and in deciding surgical indication and the planning for radiotherapy. (author).

  3. Control Volume Analysis of Boundary Layer Ingesting Propulsion Systems With or Without Shock Wave Ahead of the Inlet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Dae; Felder, James L.

    2011-01-01

    The performance benefit of boundary layer or wake ingestion on marine and air vehicles has been well documented and explored. In this article, a quasi-one-dimensional boundary layer ingestion (BLI) benefit analysis for subsonic and transonic propulsion systems is performed using a control volume of a ducted propulsion system that ingests the boundary layer developed by the external airframe surface. To illustrate the BLI benefit, a relationship between the amount of BLI and the net thrust is established and analyzed for two propulsor types. One propulsor is an electric fan, and the other is a pure turbojet. These engines can be modeled as a turbofan with an infinite bypass ratio for the electric fan, and with a zero bypass ratio for the pure turbojet. The analysis considers two flow processes: a boundary layer being ingested by an aircraft inlet and a shock wave sitting in front of the inlet. Though the two processes are completely unrelated, both represent a loss of total pressure and velocity. In real applications, it is possible to have both processes occurring in front of the inlet of a transonic vehicle. Preliminary analysis indicates that the electrically driven propulsion system benefits most from the boundary layer ingestion and the presence of transonic shock waves, whereas the benefit for the turbojet engine is near zero or negative depending on the amount of total temperature rise across the engine.

  4. Velocity field measurement in micro-bubble emission boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Daisuke; Saito, Yasushi; Natazuka, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Liquid inlet behavior to a heat surface in micro-bubble emission boiling (MEB) was investigated by flow measurement using particle image velocimetry (PIV). Subcooled pool boiling experiments under atmospheric pressure were carried out using a heat surface with a diameter of 10 mm. An upper end of a heater block made of copper was used as the heat surface. Working fluid was the deionized water and the subcooling was varied from 40 K to 70 K. Three K-type thermocouples were installed in the copper block to measure the temperature gradient, and the heat flux and wall superheat were estimated from these temperature data to make a boiling curve. The flow visualization around the heat surface was carried out using a high-speed video camera and a light sheet. The microbubbles generated in the MEB were used as tracer particles and the velocity field was obtained by PIV analysis of the acquired image sequence. As a result, the higher heat fluxes than the critical heat flux could be obtained in the MEB region. In addition, the distribution characteristics of the velocity in MEB region were studied using the PIV results and the location of the stagnation point in the velocity fields was discussed. (author)

  5. Can barrier islands survive sea level rise? Tidal inlets versus storm overwash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nienhuis, J.; Lorenzo-Trueba, J.

    2017-12-01

    Barrier island response to sea level rise depends on their ability to transgress and move sediment to the back barrier, either through flood-tidal delta deposition or via storm overwash. Our understanding of these processes over decadal to centennial timescales, however, is limited and poorly constrained. We have developed a new barrier inlet environment (BRIE) model to better understand the interplay between tidal dynamics, overwash fluxes, and sea-level rise on barrier evolution. The BRIE model combines existing overwash and shoreface formulations [Lorenzo-Trueba and Ashton, 2014] with alongshore sediment transport, inlet stability [Escoffier, 1940], inlet migration and flood-tidal delta deposition [Nienhuis and Ashton, 2016]. Within BRIE, inlets can open, close, migrate, merge with other inlets, and build flood-tidal delta deposits. The model accounts for feedbacks between overwash and inlets through their mutual dependence on barrier geometry. Model results suggest that when flood-tidal delta deposition is sufficiently large, barriers require less storm overwash to transgress and aggrade during sea level rise. In particular in micro-tidal environments with asymmetric wave climates and high alongshore sediment transport, tidal inlets are effective in depositing flood-tidal deltas and constitute the majority of the transgressive sediment flux. Additionally, we show that artificial inlet stabilization (via jetty construction or maintenance dredging) can make barrier islands more vulnerable to sea level rise. Escoffier, F. F. (1940), The Stability of Tidal Inlets, Shore and Beach, 8(4), 114-115. Lorenzo-Trueba, J., and A. D. Ashton (2014), Rollover, drowning, and discontinuous retreat: Distinct modes of barrier response to sea-level rise arising from a simple morphodynamic model, J. Geophys. Res. Earth Surf., 119(4), 779-801, doi:10.1002/2013JF002941. Nienhuis, J. H., and A. D. Ashton (2016), Mechanics and rates of tidal inlet migration: Modeling and application to

  6. Location and extent of Tertiary structures in Cook Inlet Basin, Alaska, and mantle dynamics that focus deformation and subsidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeussler, Peter J.; Saltus, Richard W.

    2011-01-01

    This report is a new compilation of the location and extent of folds and faults in Cook Inlet Basin, Alaska. Data sources are previously published maps, well locations, and seismic-reflection data. We also utilize interpretation of new aeromagnetic data and some proprietary seismic-reflection data. Some structures are remarkably well displayed on frequency-filtered aeromagnetic maps, which are a useful tool for constraining the length of some structures. Most anticlines in and around the basin have at least shows of oil or gas, and some structures are considered to be seismically active. The new map better displays the pattern of faulting and folding. Deformation is greatest in upper Cook Inlet, where structures are oriented slightly counterclockwise of the basin bounding faults. The north ends of these structures bend to the northeast, which gives a pattern consistent with right-transpressional deformation.

  7. Phosphorus mass balance in a highly eutrophic semi-enclosed inlet near a big metropolis: a small inlet can contribute towards particulate organic matter production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asaoka, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Tamiji

    2011-01-01

    Terrigenous loading into enclosed water bodies has been blamed for eutrophic conditions marked by massive algal growth and subsequent hypoxia due to decomposition of dead algal cells. This study aims to describe the eutrophication and hypoxia processes in a semi-enclosed water body lying near a big metropolis. Phosphorus mass balance in a small inlet, Ohko Inlet, located at the head of Hiroshima Bay, Japan, was quantified using a numerical model. Dissolved inorganic phosphorous inflow from Kaita Bay next to the inlet was five times higher than that from terrigenous load, which may cause an enhancement of primary production. Therefore, it was concluded that not only the reduction of material load from the land and the suppression of benthic flux are needed, but also reducing the inflow of high phosphorus and oxygen depleted water from Kaita Bay will form a collective alternative measure to remediate the environmental condition of the inlet. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Blade bowing effects on radial equilibrium of inlet flow in axial compressor cascades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han XU

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The circumferentially averaged equation of the inlet flow radial equilibrium in axial compressor was deduced. It indicates that the blade inlet radial pressure gradient is closely related to the radial component of the circumferential fluctuation (CF source item. Several simplified cascades with/without aerodynamic loading were numerically studied to investigate the effects of blade bowing on the inlet flow radial equilibrium. A data reduction program was conducted to obtain the CF source from three-dimensional (3D simulation results. Flow parameters at the passage inlet were focused on and each term in the radial equilibrium equation was discussed quantitatively. Results indicate that the inviscid blade force is the inducement of the inlet CF due to geometrical asymmetry. Blade bowing induces variation of the inlet CF, thus changes the radial pressure gradient and leads to flow migration before leading edge (LE in the cascades. Positive bowing drives the inlet flow to migrate from end walls to mid-span and negative bowing turns it to the reverse direction to build a new equilibrium. In addition, comparative studies indicate that the inlet Mach number and blade loading can efficiently impact the effectiveness of blade bowing on radial equilibrium in compressor design.

  9. Study the velocity and pressure exerted in front of the filter surface in the kitchen hood system by using ANSYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmuin, Norzelawati; Pairan, M. Rasidi; Isa, Norasikin Mat; Sies, Farid

    2017-04-01

    Commercial kitchen hood ventilation system is a device used to capture and filtered the plumes from cooking activities in the kitchen area. Nowadays, it is very popular in the industrial sector such as restaurant and hotel to provide hygiene food. This study focused at the KSA filter part which installed in the kitchen hood system, the purpose of this study is to identify the critical region which indicated by observing the velocity and pressure of plumes exerted at of KSA filter. It is important to know the critical location of the KSA filter in order to install the nozzle which will helps increase the filtration effectiveness. The ANSYS 16.1 (FLUENT) software as a tool used to simulate the kitchen hood systems which consist of KSA filter. The commercial kitchen hood system model has a dimension 700 mm width, 1600 mm length and 555 mm height. The system has two inlets and one outlet. The velocity of the plumes is set to be 0.235m/s and the velocity of the inlet capture jet is set to be 1.078m/s. The KSA filter is placed 45 degree from the y axis. The result shows the plumes has more tendency flowing pass through at the bottom part of KSA filter.

  10. Propagation velocity of an avalanche along the anode wire in a Geiger-Mueller counter filled with Q-gas at 1 ATM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Kazunori; Sanada, Junpei

    1990-01-01

    Simple methods were applied to investigate the characteristics of a Geiger-Mueller counter with Q-gas flowing at 1 atm. The propagation velocity of the photon-aided avalanche along the anode wire depends linearly on the strength of the electric field in the counter. Its fluctuation (FWHM) as a function of distance between the source position and the end point is discussed. (orig.)

  11. Sound Velocity in Soap Foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Gong-Tao; Lü Yong-Jun; Liu Peng-Fei; Li Yi-Ning; Shi Qing-Fan

    2012-01-01

    The velocity of sound in soap foams at high gas volume fractions is experimentally studied by using the time difference method. It is found that the sound velocities increase with increasing bubble diameter, and asymptotically approach to the value in air when the diameter is larger than 12.5 mm. We propose a simple theoretical model for the sound propagation in a disordered foam. In this model, the attenuation of a sound wave due to the scattering of the bubble wall is equivalently described as the effect of an additional length. This simplicity reasonably reproduces the sound velocity in foams and the predicted results are in good agreement with the experiments. Further measurements indicate that the increase of frequency markedly slows down the sound velocity, whereas the latter does not display a strong dependence on the solution concentration

  12. Use of argon to measure gas exchange in turbulent mountain streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Robert O., Jr.; Madinger, Hilary L.

    2018-05-01

    Gas exchange is a parameter needed in stream metabolism and trace gas emissions models. One way to estimate gas exchange is via measuring the decline of added tracer gases such as sulfur hexafluoride (SF6). Estimates of oxygen (O2) gas exchange derived from SF6 additions require scaling via Schmidt number (Sc) ratio, but this scaling is uncertain under conditions of high gas exchange via bubbles because scaling depends on gas solubility as well as Sc. Because argon (Ar) and O2 have nearly identical Schmidt numbers and solubility, Ar may be a useful tracer gas for estimating stream O2 exchange. Here we compared rates of gas exchange measured via Ar and SF6 for turbulent mountain streams in Wyoming, USA. We measured Ar as the ratio of Ar : N2 using a membrane inlet mass spectrometer (MIMS). Normalizing to N2 confers higher precision than simply measuring [Ar] alone. We consistently enriched streams with Ar from 1 to 18 % of ambient Ar concentration and could estimate gas exchange rate using an exponential decline model. The mean ratio of gas exchange of Ar relative to SF6 was 1.8 (credible interval 1.1 to 2.5) compared to the theoretical estimate 1.35, showing that using SF6 would have underestimated exchange of Ar. Steep streams (slopes 11-12 %) had high rates of gas exchange velocity normalized to Sc = 600 (k600, 57-210 m d-1), and slope strongly predicted variation in k600 among all streams. We suggest that Ar is a useful tracer because it is easily measured, requires no scaling assumptions to estimate rates of O2 exchange, and is not an intense greenhouse gas as is SF6. We caution that scaling from rates of either Ar or SF6 gas exchange to CO2 is uncertain due to solubility effects in conditions of bubble-mediated gas transfer.

  13. Air–Sea CO2 Gas Transfer Velocity in a Shallow Estuary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørk, Eva Thorborg; Sørensen, Lise Lotte; Jensen, Bjarne

    2014-01-01

    The air–sea transfer velocity of CO2(kCO2) was investigated in a shallow estuary in March to July 2012, using eddy-covariance measurements of CO2 fluxes and measured air–sea CO2 partial-pressure differences. A data evaluation method that eliminates data by nine rejection criteria in order......, the transfer velocity in the shallow water estuary was lower than in other coastal waters, possibly a symptom of low tidal amplitude leading to low intensity water turbulence. High transfer velocities were recorded above wind speeds of 5 m s−1 , believed to be caused by early-breaking waves and the large fetch...... (6.5 km) of the estuary. These findings indicate that turbulence in both air and water influences the transfer velocity....

  14. High-efficiency condenser of steam from a steam-gas mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milman, O. O.; Krylov, V. S.; Ptakhin, A. V.; Kondratev, A. V.; Yankov, G. G.

    2017-12-01

    The design of a module for a high-efficiency condenser of steam with a high content (up to 15%) of noncondensable gases (NCGs) with a nearly constant steam-gas mixture (SGM) velocity during the condensation of steam has been developed. This module provides the possibility to estimate the operational efficiency of six condenser zones during the motion of steam from the inlet to the SGM suction point. Some results of the experimental tests of the pilot high-efficiency condenser module are presented. The dependence of the average heat transfer coefficient k¯ on the volumetric NCG concentration v¯ has been derived. It is shown that the high-efficiency condenser module can provide a moderate decrease in k¯ from 4400-4600 to 2600-2800 W/(m2 K) at v¯ ≈ 0.5-9.0%. The heat transfer coefficient distribution over different module zones at a heat duty close to its nominal value has been obtained. From this distribution, it can be seen that the average heat transfer coefficient decreases to 2600 W/(m2 K) at an NCG concentration v¯ = 7.5%, but the first condenser sections ( 1- 3) retain high values of k¯ at a level of no lower than 3200 W/(m2 K), and the last sections operate less well, having k¯ at a level of 1700 W/(m2 K). The dependence of the average heat transfer coefficient on the water velocity in condenser tubes has been obtained at a nearly nominal duty such that the extrapolation of this dependence to the water velocity of 2 m/s may be expected to give k¯ = 5000 W/(m2 K) for relatively pure steam, but an increase in k¯ at v¯ = 8% will be smaller. The effect of the gas removal device characteristic on the operation of the high-efficiency condenser module is described. The design developed for the steam condenser of a gas-turbine plant with a power of 25 MW, a steam flow rate of 40.2 t/h, and a CO2 concentration of up to 12% with consideration for the results of performed studies is presented.

  15. Continuous measurements of in-bore projectile velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asay, J.R.; Konrad, C.H.; Hall, C.A.; Shahinpoor, M.

    1989-01-01

    The application of velocity interferometry to the continuous measurement of in-bore projectile velocity in a small-bore three-stage railgun is described. These measurements are useful for determining projectile acceleration and for evaluating gun performance. The launcher employed in these studies consists of a two-stage light gas gun used to inject projectiles into a railgun for additional acceleration. Results obtained for projectile velocities to 7.4 km/s with the two-stage injector are reported and potential improvements for railgun applications are discussed

  16. Gas dynamics in the inner few AU around the Herbig B[e] star MWC297. Indications of a disk wind from kinematic modeling and velocity-resolved interferometric imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hone, Edward; Kraus, Stefan; Kreplin, Alexander; Hofmann, Karl-Heinz; Weigelt, Gerd; Harries, Tim; Kluska, Jacques

    2017-10-01

    Aims: Circumstellar accretion disks and outflows play an important role in star formation. By studying the continuum and Brγ-emitting region of the Herbig B[e] star MWC297 with high-spectral and high-spatial resolution we aim to gain insight into the wind-launching mechanisms in young stars. Methods: We present near-infrared AMBER (R = 12 000) and CRIRES (R = 100 000) observations of the Herbig B[e] star MWC297 in the hydrogen Brγ-line. Using the VLTI unit telescopes, we obtained a uv-coverage suitable for aperture synthesis imaging. We interpret our velocity-resolved images as well as the derived two-dimensional photocenter displacement vectors, and fit kinematic models to our visibility and phase data in order to constrain the gas velocity field on sub-AU scales. Results: The measured continuum visibilities constrain the orientation of the near-infrared-emitting dust disk, where we determine that the disk major axis is oriented along a position angle of 99.6 ± 4.8°. The near-infrared continuum emission is 3.6 × more compact than the expected dust-sublimation radius, possibly indicating the presence of highly refractory dust grains or optically thick gas emission in the inner disk. Our velocity-resolved channel maps and moment maps reveal the motion of the Brγ-emitting gas in six velocity channels, marking the first time that kinematic effects in the sub-AU inner regions of a protoplanetary disk could be directly imaged. We find a rotation-dominated velocity field, where the blue- and red-shifted emissions are displaced along a position angle of 24° ± 3° and the approaching part of the disk is offset west of the star. The visibility drop in the line as well as the strong non-zero phase signals can be modeled reasonably well assuming a Keplerian velocity field, although this model is not able to explain the 3σ difference that we measure between the position angle of the line photocenters and the position angle of the dust disk. We find that the fit can be

  17. Gas converter. Gaswandler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisenmann, A

    1984-09-27

    A gas converter is proposed for carbonisation gas containing hydrocarbons, consisting of a bricked shaft, which has a free combustion chamber and a solid bed of bulk grainy material with partly burnt hot carbonisation gases flowing through it as the lower boundary of this combustion chamber, in the upper part of which a hot reaction zone at about 1000 to 1200/sup 0/C is formed and which has a cracked gas extraction below the solid bed and an ash outlet. The solid bed is arranged at an angle to the vertical. The shaft has a solid material outlet for the bed material no longer capable of taking part in the reaction on the wall going obliquely downwards and a solid material inlet for new bulk bed material on the opposite wall going obliquely upwards.

  18. Axial and radial velocities in the creeping flow in a pipe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuykov Andrey L'vovich

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to analytical study of transformation fields of axial and radial velocities in uneven steady creeping flow of a Newtonian fluid in the initial portion of the cylindrical channel. It is shown that the velocity field of the flow is two-dimensional and determined by the stream function. The article is a continuation of a series of papers, where normalized analytic functions of radial axial distributions in uneven steady creeping flow in a cylindrical tube with azimuthal vorticity and stream function were obtained. There is Poiseuille profile for the axial velocity in the uniform motion of a fluid at an infinite distance from the entrance of the pipe (at x = ∞, here taken equal to zero radial velocity. There is uniform distribution of the axial velocity in the cross section at the tube inlet at x = 0, at which the axial velocity is constant along the current radius. Due to the axial symmetry of the flow on the axis of the pipe (at r = 0, the radial velocities and the partial derivative of the axial velocity along the radius, corresponding to the condition of the soft function extremum, are equal to zero. The authors stated vanishing of the velocity of the fluid on the walls of the pipe (at r = R , where R - radius of the tube due to its viscous sticking and tightness of the walls. The condition of conservation of volume flow along the tube was also accepted. All the solutions are obtained in the form of the Fourier - Bessel. It is shown that the hydraulic losses at uniform creeping flow of a Newtonian fluid correspond to Poiseuille - Hagen formula.

  19. Comparative study during condensation of R152 a and R134 a with presence of non-condensable gas inside a vertical tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charef, Adil; Feddaoui, M'barek; Najim, Monssif; Meftah, Hicham

    2018-04-01

    A computational study of the liquid film condensation from vapour-gas mixtures of HFC refrigerants inside a vertical tube is performed. The external wall of the tube is subjected to constant temperature. The model uses an implicit finite difference method to solve the governing equations for the liquid film and gas flow together including the boundary and interfacial matching conditions. Parametric computations were realised to examine the effects of inlet Reynolds number, tube length, and inlet temperature of the gas mixtures on the condensation mechanism. A comparative study between the results obtained for studied R152 a and R134 a with presence of non-condensable gas is made. The predicted results indicate that the condensation of R152 a-air corresponds to a higher accumulated condensation m c d and local heat transfer coefficient h T when compared to R134 a-air in the same conditions. Increasing the inlet Reynolds number or the tube length improve the condensation. Additionally, lower non-condensable gas in R152 a - a i r substantially enhances the heat and mass exchanges.

  20. Large-eddy simulations of velocity and temperature fluctuations in hot and cold fluids mixing in a tee junction with an upstream straight or elbow main pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, T.; Attinger, D.; Liu, S.M.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Temperature and velocity fluctuations in a tee junction are predicted using LES. • The numerical results are in good agreement with the experimental data. • Upstream elbow pipe has significant influence on those fluctuations. -- Abstract: Thermal striping resulting in thermal fatigue is an important safety issue for nuclear power plants. In this work, temperature and velocity fluctuations in hot and cold fluids mixing in a tee junction with the main pipe connected either to an upstream straight or elbow pipe have been numerically predicted using large-eddy simulations (LES) on the FLUENT platform with the assumption of fully-developed velocity at both main and branch pipe inlets. The numerical results for the case with an upstream straight pipe were found to be in reasonable agreement with the available experimental data. The reason for the small discrepancy between the numerical results and experimental data can be attributed to the turbulence velocity being 10% of the fully-developed velocity at the main and branch pipe inlets in the LES calculations, while in the experiments the turbulence velocity was about 10% of the average velocity upstream of the tee junction. The simulated normalized mean and root-mean square (RMS) temperatures and the velocities at both straight and elbow tees were then compared, as well as the power spectrum densities (PSD) of the temperature fluctuations. The elbow pipe upstream of the main pipe has a significant influence on the mixing, resulting in increased temperature and velocity fluctuations. The flow pattern of the elbow tee deviates from the wall jet due to the secondary flow in the upstream elbow pipe

  1. Gas Kinematics in GRB Host Galaxies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arabsalmani, Maryam

    towards a relation between gas kinematics and mass. This also provides information on how the metallicities measured from absorption and emission methods differ from each other. Finally, in a direct study I show that gas velocity widths in both phases can be used as a proxy of stellar mass...... that their interstellar media imprint on the GRBs’ spectra. Hence they are invaluable tools to probe the star formation history of the Universe back to the earliest cosmic epochs. To this end, it is essential to achieve a comprehensive picture of the interplay between star formation and its fuel, neutral gas, in GRB...... simultaneously with a high velocity resolution. For the large GRB sample, I find the spatially averaged velocity to correlate with metallicity in both gas phases. This is an indicator of a mass-metallicity relation. Moreover, the velocity widths in the two gas phases correlate with each other which too points...

  2. Air/fuel supply system for use in a gas turbine engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Timothy A; Schilp, Reinhard; Gambacorta, Domenico

    2014-06-17

    A fuel injector for use in a gas turbine engine combustor assembly. The fuel injector includes a main body and a fuel supply structure. The main body has an inlet end and an outlet end and defines a longitudinal axis extending between the outlet and inlet ends. The main body comprises a plurality of air/fuel passages extending therethrough, each air/fuel passage including an inlet that receives air from a source of air and an outlet. The fuel supply structure communicates with and supplies fuel to the air/fuel passages for providing an air/fuel mixture within each air/fuel passage. The air/fuel mixtures exit the main body through respective air/fuel passage outlets.

  3. Study on Droplet Size and Velocity Distributions of a Pressure Swirl Atomizer Based on the Maximum Entropy Formalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Yan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A predictive model for droplet size and velocity distributions of a pressure swirl atomizer has been proposed based on the maximum entropy formalism (MEF. The constraint conditions of the MEF model include the conservation laws of mass, momentum, and energy. The effects of liquid swirling strength, Weber number, gas-to-liquid axial velocity ratio and gas-to-liquid density ratio on the droplet size and velocity distributions of a pressure swirl atomizer are investigated. Results show that model based on maximum entropy formalism works well to predict droplet size and velocity distributions under different spray conditions. Liquid swirling strength, Weber number, gas-to-liquid axial velocity ratio and gas-to-liquid density ratio have different effects on droplet size and velocity distributions of a pressure swirl atomizer.

  4. Long-time tails of the velocity autocorrelation function in 2D and 3D lattice gas cellular automata: a test of mode-coupling theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoef, M.A. van der; Frenkel, D.

    1990-01-01

    We report simulations of the velocity autocorrelation function (VACF) of a tagged particle in two- and three-dimensional lattice-gas cellular automata, using a new technique that is about a million times more efficient than the conventional techniques. The simulations clearly show the algebraic

  5. Unsteady flow characteristic analysis of turbine based combined cycle (TBCC inlet mode transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Liu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A turbine based combined cycle (TBCC propulsion system uses a turbine-based engine to accelerate the vehicle from takeoff to the mode transition flight condition, at which point, the propulsion system performs a “mode transition” from the turbine to ramjet engine. Smooth inlet mode transition is accomplished when flow is diverted from one flowpath to the other, without experiencing unstart or buzz. The smooth inlet mode transition is a complex unsteady process and it is one of the enabling technologies for combined cycle engine to become a functional reality. In order to unveil the unsteady process of inlet mode transition, the research of over/under TBCC inlet mode transition was conducted through a numerical simulation. It shows that during the mode transition the terminal shock oscillates in the inlet. During the process of inlet mode transition mass flow rate and Mach number of turbojet flowpath reduce with oscillation. While in ramjet flowpath the flow field is non-uniform at the beginning of inlet mode transition. The speed of mode transition and the operation states of the turbojet and ramjet engines will affect the motion of terminal shock. The result obtained in present paper can help us realize the unsteady flow characteristic during the mode transition and provide some suggestions for TBCC inlet mode transition based on the smooth transition of thrust.

  6. Inlet effect induced ''upstream'' critical heat flux in smooth tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitto, J.B. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    An unusual form of ''upstream'' critical heat flux (CHF) has been observed and directly linked to the inlet flow pattern during an experimental study of high pressure (17 - 20 MPa) water flowing through a vertical 38.1 mm ID smooth bore tube with uniform axial and nonuniform circumferential heating. These upstream CHF data were characterized by temperature excursions which initially occurred at a relatively fixed axial location in the middle of the test section while the outlet and inlet heated lengths experienced no change. A rifled tube inlet flow conditioner could be substituted for a smooth tube section to generate the desired swirling inlet flow pattern. The upstream CHF data were found to match data from a uniformly heated smooth bore tube when the comparison was made using the peak local heat flux. The mechanism proposed to account for the upstream CHF observations involves the destructive interference between the decaying swirl flow and the secondary circumferential liquid flow field resulting from the one-sided heating

  7. Accurate Recovery of H i Velocity Dispersion from Radio Interferometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ianjamasimanana, R. [Max-Planck Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117, Heidelberg (Germany); Blok, W. J. G. de [Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy (ASTRON), Postbus 2, 7990 AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Heald, George H., E-mail: roger@mpia.de, E-mail: blok@astron.nl, E-mail: George.Heald@csiro.au [Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, University of Groningen, P.O. Box 800, 9700 AV, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2017-05-01

    Gas velocity dispersion measures the amount of disordered motion of a rotating disk. Accurate estimates of this parameter are of the utmost importance because the parameter is directly linked to disk stability and star formation. A global measure of the gas velocity dispersion can be inferred from the width of the atomic hydrogen (H i) 21 cm line. We explore how several systematic effects involved in the production of H i cubes affect the estimate of H i velocity dispersion. We do so by comparing the H i velocity dispersion derived from different types of data cubes provided by The H i Nearby Galaxy Survey. We find that residual-scaled cubes best recover the H i velocity dispersion, independent of the weighting scheme used and for a large range of signal-to-noise ratio. For H i observations, where the dirty beam is substantially different from a Gaussian, the velocity dispersion values are overestimated unless the cubes are cleaned close to (e.g., ∼1.5 times) the noise level.

  8. Molecular Rayleigh Scattering Diagnostic for Dynamic Temperature, Velocity, and Density Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielke, Amy R.; Elam, Kristie A.; Sung, Chi-Jen

    2006-01-01

    A molecular Rayleigh scattering technique is developed to measure dynamic gas temperature, velocity, and density in unseeded turbulent flows at sampling rates up to 16 kHz. A high power CW laser beam is focused at a point in an air jet plume and Rayleigh scattered light is collected and spectrally resolved. The spectrum of the light, which contains information about the temperature and velocity of the flow, is analyzed using a Fabry-Perot interferometer. The circular interference fringe pattern is divided into four concentric regions and sampled at 1 and 16 kHz using photon counting electronics. Monitoring the relative change in intensity within each region allows for measurement of gas temperature and velocity. Independently monitoring the total scattered light intensity provides a measure of gas density. A low speed heated jet is used to validate the measurement of temperature fluctuations and an acoustically excited nozzle flow is studied to validate velocity fluctuation measurements. Power spectral density calculations of the property fluctuations, as well as mean and fluctuating quantities are presented. Temperature fluctuation results are compared with constant current anemometry measurements and velocity fluctuation results are compared with constant temperature anemometry measurements at the same locations.

  9. Critical flashing flows in nozzles with subcooled inlet conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abuaf, N.; Jones, O.C. Jr.; Wu, B.J.C.

    1983-01-01

    Examination of a large number of experiments dealing with flashing flows in converging and converging-diverging nozzles reveals that knowledge of the flashing inception point is the key to the prediction of critical flow rates. An extension of the static flashing inception correlation of Jones [16] and Alamgir and Lienhard [17] to flowing systems has allowed the determination of the location of flashing inception in nozzle flows with subcooled inlet conditions. It is shown that in all the experiments examined with subcooled inlet regardless of the degree of inlet subcooling, flashing inception invariably occurred very close to the throat. A correlation is given to predict flashing inception in both pipes and nozzles which matches all data available, but is lacking verification in intermediate nozzle geometries where turbulence may be important. A consequence of this behavior is that the critical mass flux may be correlated to the pressure difference between the nozzle inlet and flashing inception, through a single phase liquid discharge coefficient and an accurate prediction of the flashing inception pressure at the throat. Comparison with the available experiments indicate that the predicted mass fluxes are within 5 percent of the measurements

  10. Predictive models of circulating fluidized bed combustors: SO[sub 2] sorption in the CFB loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gidaspow, D.; Therdthianwong, A. (Illinois Inst. of Tech., Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1993-02-01

    The overall objective of this investigation is to develop experimentally verified models for circulating fluidized bed (CFB) combustors. Sorption of S0[sub 2] with calcined limestone was studied in a PYROFLOW type CFB loop at conditions approximating those found in a CFB combustor. Initially the CFB loop contained 150 micron CaO particles of a density of 3.3 g/cm[sup 3] and air at 1143[degrees]K and 3.25 atm. Atzero time, air containing 600 ppm SO[sub 2], was introduced into the riser bottom at 1143[degrees]K. The effect of gas velocity, sorbent inventory and inlet pressure on the sorption of SO[sub 2], were studied isothermally by running our hydrodynamic code with the S0[sub 2] sorption conservation of species equation. At a velocity of 5m/sec., reported to be a typical velocity by PYROPOWER, there is reasonably good S0[sub 2] removal. At 10 m/sec the S0[sub 2] removal is poor. The best SO[sub 2], removal is for a velocity of 5 m/s and a high bed inventory, initial bed height, H = 9m. Most of the S0[sub 2] is removed in the first two meters of the reactor. However, the S0[sub 2] removal is not complete at the bed outlet. This is due to mixing. At the left wall of the reactor (wall opposite the solids inlet) the S0[sub 2] removal was poor due to gas bypassing caused by the asymmetrical solids inlet. Simulation of the PYROPOWER loop with a symmetrical inlet gave us an order of magnitude improvement over the conventional PYROPOWER system. These results demonstrate the practical utility of the predictive model that we have developed over the last three years.

  11. Predictive models of circulating fluidized bed combustors: SO{sub 2} sorption in the CFB loop. Fourteenth technical progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gidaspow, D.; Therdthianwong, A. [Illinois Inst. of Tech., Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1993-02-01

    The overall objective of this investigation is to develop experimentally verified models for circulating fluidized bed (CFB) combustors. Sorption of S0{sub 2} with calcined limestone was studied in a PYROFLOW type CFB loop at conditions approximating those found in a CFB combustor. Initially the CFB loop contained 150 micron CaO particles of a density of 3.3 g/cm{sup 3} and air at 1143{degrees}K and 3.25 atm. Atzero time, air containing 600 ppm SO{sub 2}, was introduced into the riser bottom at 1143{degrees}K. The effect of gas velocity, sorbent inventory and inlet pressure on the sorption of SO{sub 2}, were studied isothermally by running our hydrodynamic code with the S0{sub 2} sorption conservation of species equation. At a velocity of 5m/sec., reported to be a typical velocity by PYROPOWER, there is reasonably good S0{sub 2} removal. At 10 m/sec the S0{sub 2} removal is poor. The best SO{sub 2}, removal is for a velocity of 5 m/s and a high bed inventory, initial bed height, H = 9m. Most of the S0{sub 2} is removed in the first two meters of the reactor. However, the S0{sub 2} removal is not complete at the bed outlet. This is due to mixing. At the left wall of the reactor (wall opposite the solids inlet) the S0{sub 2} removal was poor due to gas bypassing caused by the asymmetrical solids inlet. Simulation of the PYROPOWER loop with a symmetrical inlet gave us an order of magnitude improvement over the conventional PYROPOWER system. These results demonstrate the practical utility of the predictive model that we have developed over the last three years.

  12. Characterization of unconventional gas play in the lower Beluga

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorney, David [Marathon Oil Company (United States); Jetubu, Segun; Li, Weidong; Del Cairo, Rolando; Woods, James; Manuel, Ela [Baker Hughes (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Since the 1950's, the Cook Inlet basin, situated in Alaska, has been an important oil and gas provider to the state; the Beluga formation, located within the Cook Inlet basin, is an unconventional gas play. NMR measurements have been conducted in the Beluga formation and results were found to differ from the conventional predicted pressure and temperature model. The aim of this paper is to provide insights and results on the use of NMR in unconventional low pressure hydrocarbon formations. Experiments were carried out in the reservoir sands of Ninilchik at depths of 1500 to 3200 feet. Results showed that there is a need for combined petrophysics and petrofacies interpretation and that uncertainty can be lowered using MagTrak NMR data. This paper provided useful information on the use of NMR in unconventional low pressure hydrocarbon formations.

  13. Friends of hot Jupiters. I. A radial velocity search for massive, long-period companions to close-in gas giant planets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knutson, Heather A.; Ngo, Henry; Johnson, John Asher [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Fulton, Benjamin J.; Howard, Andrew W. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI (United States); Montet, Benjamin T.; Kao, Melodie; Hinkley, Sasha; Morton, Timothy D.; Muirhead, Philip S. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, MC 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Crepp, Justin R. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN (United States); Bakos, Gaspar Á. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ (United States); Batygin, Konstantin, E-mail: hknutson@caltech.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2014-04-20

    In this paper we search for distant massive companions to known transiting gas giant planets that may have influenced the dynamical evolution of these systems. We present new radial velocity observations for a sample of 51 planets obtained using the Keck HIRES instrument, and find statistically significant accelerations in fifteen systems. Six of these systems have no previously reported accelerations in the published literature: HAT-P-10, HAT-P-22, HAT-P-29, HAT-P-32, WASP-10, and XO-2. We combine our radial velocity fits with Keck NIRC2 adaptive optics (AO) imaging data to place constraints on the allowed masses and orbital periods of the companions responsible for the detected accelerations. The estimated masses of the companions range between 1-500 M {sub Jup}, with orbital semi-major axes typically between 1-75 AU. A significant majority of the companions detected by our survey are constrained to have minimum masses comparable to or larger than those of the transiting planets in these systems, making them candidates for influencing the orbital evolution of the inner gas giant. We estimate a total occurrence rate of 51% ± 10% for companions with masses between 1-13 M {sub Jup} and orbital semi-major axes between 1-20 AU in our sample. We find no statistically significant difference between the frequency of companions to transiting planets with misaligned or eccentric orbits and those with well-aligned, circular orbits. We combine our expanded sample of radial velocity measurements with constraints from transit and secondary eclipse observations to provide improved measurements of the physical and orbital characteristics of all of the planets included in our survey.

  14. Classifier utility modeling and analysis of hypersonic inlet start/unstart considering training data costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Juntao; Hu, Qinghua; Yu, Daren; Bao, Wen

    2011-11-01

    Start/unstart detection is one of the most important issues of hypersonic inlets and is also the foundation of protection control of scramjet. The inlet start/unstart detection can be attributed to a standard pattern classification problem, and the training sample costs have to be considered for the classifier modeling as the CFD numerical simulations and wind tunnel experiments of hypersonic inlets both cost time and money. To solve this problem, the CFD simulation of inlet is studied at first step, and the simulation results could provide the training data for pattern classification of hypersonic inlet start/unstart. Then the classifier modeling technology and maximum classifier utility theories are introduced to analyze the effect of training data cost on classifier utility. In conclusion, it is useful to introduce support vector machine algorithms to acquire the classifier model of hypersonic inlet start/unstart, and the minimum total cost of hypersonic inlet start/unstart classifier can be obtained by the maximum classifier utility theories.

  15. A life-cycle model for wave-dominated tidal inlets along passive margin coasts of North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seminack, Christopher T.; McBride, Randolph A.

    2018-03-01

    A regional overview of 107 wave-dominated tidal inlets along the U.S. Atlantic coast, U.S. Gulf of Mexico coast, and Canadian Gulf of St. Lawrence coast yielded a generalized wave-dominated tidal inlet life-cycle model that recognized the rotational nature of tidal inlets. Tidal inlets are influenced by concurrently acting processes transpiring over two timescales: short-term, event-driven processes and long-term, evolutionary processes. Wave-dominated tidal inlets are classified into three rotational categories based on net longshore sediment transport direction and rotation direction along the landward (back-barrier) portion of the inlet channel: downdrift channel rotation, updrift channel rotation, or little-to-no channel rotation. Lateral shifting of the flood-tidal delta depocenter in response to available estuarine accommodation space appears to control inlet channel rotation. Flood-tidal delta deposits fill accommodation space locally within the estuary (i.e., creating bathymetric highs), causing the tidal-inlet channel to rotate. External influences, such as fluvial discharge, pre-existing back-barrier channels, and impeding salt marsh will also influence inlet-channel rotation. Storm events may rejuvenate the tidal inlet by scouring sediment within the flood-tidal delta, increasing local accommodation space. Wave-dominated tidal inlets are generally unstable and tend to open, concurrently migrate laterally and rotate, infill, and close. Channel rotation is a primary reason for wave-dominated tidal inlet closure. During rotation, the inlet channel lengthens and hydraulic efficiency decreases, thus causing tidal prism to decrease. Tidal prism, estuarine accommodation space, and sediment supply to the flood-tidal delta are the primary variables responsible for tidal inlet rotation. Stability of wave-dominated tidal inlets is further explained by: stability (S) = tidal prism (Ω) + estuarine accommodation space (V) - volume of annual sediment supply (Mt

  16. Seasonal behaviour of tidal inlets in a tropical monsoon area

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lam, N.T.; Stive, M.J.F.; Verhagen, H.J.; Wang, Z.B.

    2008-01-01

    Morphodynamics of a tidal inlet system on a micro-tidal coast in a tropical monsoon influenced region is modelled and discussed. Influences of river flow and wave climate on the inlet morphology are investigated with the aid of process-based state-of-the-art numerical models. Seasonal and episodic

  17. Impact of inlet coherent motions on compressor performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forlese, Jacopo; Spoleti, Giovanni

    2017-08-01

    Automotive engine induction systems may be characterized by significant flow angularity and total pressure distortion at the compressor inlet. The impact of the swirl on compressor performance should be quantified to guide the design of the induction systems. In diesel engines, the presence of a valve for flow reduction and control of low pressure EGR recirculation could generate coherent motion and influence the performance of the compressor. Starting from experimental map, the compressor speed-lines have been simulated using a 3D CFD commercial code imposing different concept motion at the inlet. The swirl intensity, the direction and the number of vortices have been imposed in order to taking into account some combinations. Finally, a merit function has been defined to evaluate the performance of the compressor with the defined swirl concepts. The aim of the current work is to obtain an indication on the effect of a swirling motion at the compressor inlet on the engine performance and provide a guideline to the induction system design.

  18. Influence of thermophoresis on particle removal in a moving granular bed filter and heat exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudnick, S.N.; First, M.W.; Price, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    Bench-scale investigations were made to determine the influence of thermophoresis on particle removal in a moving granular bed filter. A continuous flow of 2-mm diameter ceramic granules at ambient temperature entered the top of the filter and moved slowly downward under the influence of gravity countercurrent to the gas stream. At an inlet gas temperature of 240 0 C, gas mass velocity of 0.12 kg/(s.m 2 ), and granule velocities up to 0.015 cm/s, clean bed collection efficiency for a submicrometer sodium chloride aerosol was found to increase the more the gas was cooled, indicating that thermophoretic forces were playing a measurable role in particle collection

  19. Neutron stars velocities and magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paret, Daryel Manreza; Martinez, A. Perez; Ayala, Alejandro.; Piccinelli, G.; Sanchez, A.

    2018-01-01

    We study a model that explain neutron stars velocities due to the anisotropic emission of neutrinos. Strong magnetic fields present in neutron stars are the source of the anisotropy in the system. To compute the velocity of the neutron star we model its core as composed by strange quark matter and analice the properties of a magnetized quark gas at finite temperature and density. Specifically we have obtained the electron polarization and the specific heat of magnetized fermions as a functions of the temperature, chemical potential and magnetic field which allow us to study the velocity of the neutron star as a function of these parameters.

  20. Euler Calculations at Off-Design Conditions for an Inlet of Inward Turning RBCC-SSTO Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takashima, N.; Kothari, A. P.

    1998-01-01

    The inviscid performance of an inward turning inlet design is calculated computationally for the first time. Hypersonic vehicle designs based on the inward turning inlets have been shown analytically to have increased effective specific impulse and lower heat load than comparably designed vehicles with two-dimensional inlets. The inward turning inlets are designed inversely from inviscid stream surfaces of known flow fields. The computational study is performed on a Mach 12 inlet design to validate the performance predicted by the design code (HAVDAC) and calculate its off-design Mach number performance. The three-dimensional Euler equations are solved for Mach 4, 8, and 12 using a software package called SAM, which consists of an unstructured mesh generator (SAMmesh), a three-dimensional unstructured mesh flow solver (SAMcfd), and a CAD-based software (SAMcad). The computed momentum averaged inlet throat pressure is within 6% of the design inlet throat pressure. The mass-flux at the inlet throat is also within 7 % of the value predicted by the design code thereby validating the accuracy of the design code. The off-design Mach number results show that flow spillage is minimal, and the variation in the mass capture ratio with Mach number is comparable to an ideal 2-D inlet. The results from the inviscid flow calculations of a Mach 12 inward turning inlet indicate that the inlet design has very good on and off-design performance which makes it a promising design candidate for future air-breathing hypersonic vehicles.

  1. Combustion measurements in an industrial gas-fired flat-glass furnace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newbold, J; Webb, B W; McQuay, M Q [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States). Mechanical Engineering Dept.; Huber, A M [Ford Motor Co., Glass Div., Dearborn, MI (United States)

    1997-06-01

    Profiles of velocity, species concentration (O{sub 2}, CO and CO{sub 2}), wall incident radiative heat flux and temperature are reported in the combustion space of a regenerative, side-port, 550t/day, gas-fired flat-glass furnace. A region exists of fast-moving gases near the glass, with axial velocity components exceeding 20 m s{sup -1}, and a large recirculation zone near the crown. Temperatures as high as 1985 K in the flame and as low as 1750 K in the recirculation zone are reported. A region of intense reaction is observed near the glass, with large concentration gradients and incomplete combustion even in the tail of the flame. Local incident radiant fluxes on the crown were nearly uniform spatially at a level of 680 kW m{sup -2}. In the portnecks, flat inlet velocity profiles were measured with a magnitude of approximately 11 m s{sup -1}. Significant variations were observed in the exhaust profiles of most measured variables. Large errors in exhaust mass balance suggest a complex, three-dimensional flow with recirculation zones along the side walls of the portnecks. A nominal preheat air temperature of 1420 k and a variation of exhaust temperatures between 1630 K and 1835 K were noted. O{sub 2} concentrations as high as 8.4% were measured at the exit, suggesting a bypass of oxygen-rich flow around the flame. CO{sub 2} concentrations were the highest near the batch, where the glass reactions are the most intense. (Author)

  2. General Investigation of Tidal Inlets: Stability of Selected United States Tidal Inlets

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-09-01

    characteristics in relation to the variability of the hydr; aulic parameters. An inlet can fall into any of four "stability" classes 48 Orientation Parameter 80...nlot he ~ :Ke(: t 93. If a fairly straight coast with uniform offshore slopes and a regionally homogeneous wave climate is considered, a reasonable...expectation is LhaL the longshore transport quantities and directions are homogeneous. Given a long-term variability in wave climate , a corresponding

  3. Selective catalytic reduction converter design: The effect of ammonia nonuniformity at inlet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paramadayalan, Thiyagarajan; Pant, Atul

    2013-01-01

    A three-dimensional CFD model of SCR converter with detailed chemistry is developed. The model is used to study the effects of radial variation in inlet ammonia profile on SCR emission performance at different temperatures. The model shows that radial variation in inlet ammonia concentration affects the SCR performance in the operating range of 200-400 .deg. C. In automotive SCR systems, ammonia is non-uniformly distributed due to evaporation/reaction of injected urea, and using a 1D model or a 3D model with flat ammonia profile at inlet for these conditions can result in erroneous emission prediction. The 3D SCR model is also used to study the effect of converter design parameters like inlet cone angle and monolith cell density on the SCR performance for a non-uniform ammonia concentration profile at the inlet. The performance of SCR is evaluated using DeNO x efficiency and ammonia slip

  4. Research of the Aerodynamic Parameters in a Special Cyclone with Secondary Inlets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandras Chlebnikovas

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Special cyclone – gas treatment device which can be applied to remove the fine particulate matter bigger than 2 micrometres from aggressive gas flow at a temperature of 50–145 °C and a relative humidity of more than 95% and can be achieved the cleaning efficiency over 90%. Cyclone work is based on centrifugal forces and the resulting additional filtration process operation. Cyclone structure equipped with primary and secondary gas flow inflows through which gas dispersed flow is supplied parallel to all channels of the cyclone. Analysed modified multi-channel cyclone can be effectively treated from fine particulate matter, during the cleaning of aggressive gas flow an adhesion/cohesion phenomena could be reduced. Research of aerodynamic parameters it’s the first step of studies to determine the optimal case, at the average gas flow velocity in cyclone channels were 8, 12 and 16 m/s, the gas flow dynamics dependencies into cyclone were determined.

  5. CFD analysis of flow distribution at the core inlet of SMART

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Youngmin, E-mail: ybae@kaeri.re.kr [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 150 Deokjin-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young In; Park, Cheon Tae [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 150 Deokjin-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ► Core inlet flow distribution of system-integrated modular advanced reactor (SMART) is numerically investigated. ► Effects of mesh resolution, turbulence model, Reynolds number, and inflow condition are examined. ► Numerical results show that lower core support plate effectively distributes the flow at the core inlet of SMART. -- Abstract: This study numerically investigates the flow distribution at the core inlet region of the system-integrated modular advanced reactor (SMART). The single-phase turbulent flow is computed by the commercial CFD code, Fluent 12.0 on the computational domain consisting of three main parts: fuel assemblies, a lower core support plate, and a flow skirt. Simulations are carried out with different mesh resolutions, turbulence models, and upstream boundary conditions. The CFD results show that the flow distribution at the core inlet is almost identical for the two Reynolds numbers and turbulence models tested here, and the effect of mesh refinement on the flow distribution at the core inlet is negligible. It is also found that under a uniform upstream boundary condition, the maximum difference in mass flow rate between the fuel assemblies is less than 2%, while it slightly increases to 2.3% under a non-uniform condition. These results consequently indicate that the present design of the lower core support plate effectively distributes the flow at the core inlet of SMART, even when the flow discharged from the upstream has a certain degree of non-uniformity.

  6. Vortex Generators in a Two-Dimensional, External-Compression Supersonic Inlet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baydar, Ezgihan; Lu, Frank K.; Slater, John W.

    2016-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics simulations are performed as part of a process to design a vortex generator array for a two-dimensional inlet for Mach 1.6. The objective is to improve total pressure recovery a on at the engine face of the inlet. Both vane-type and ramp-type vortex generators are examined.

  7. Parametric Data from a Wind Tunnel Test on a Rocket-Based Combined-Cycle Engine Inlet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Rene; Trefny, Charles J.; Thomas, Scott R.; Bulman, Mel J.

    2001-01-01

    A 40-percent scale model of the inlet to a rocket-based combined-cycle (RBCC) engine was tested in the NASA Glenn Research Center 1- by 1-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel (SWT). The full-scale RBCC engine is scheduled for test in the Hypersonic Tunnel Facility (HTF) at NASA Glenn's Plum Brook Station at Mach 5 and 6. This engine will incorporate the configuration of this inlet model which achieved the best performance during the present experiment. The inlet test was conducted at Mach numbers of 4.0, 5.0, 5.5, and 6.0. The fixed-geometry inlet consists of an 8 deg.. forebody compression plate, boundary layer diverter, and two compressive struts located within 2 parallel sidewalls. These struts extend through the inlet, dividing the flowpath into three channels. Test parameters investigated included strut geometry, boundary layer ingestion, and Reynolds number (Re). Inlet axial pressure distributions and cross-sectional Pitot-pressure surveys at the base of the struts were measured at varying back-pressures. Inlet performance and starting data are presented. The inlet chosen for the RBCC engine self-started at all Mach numbers from 4 to 6. Pitot-pressure contours showed large flow nonuniformity on the body-side of the inlet. The inlet provided adequate pressure recovery and flow quality for the RBCC cycle even with the flow separation.

  8. CASCADER: An M-chain gas-phase radionuclide transport and fate model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindstrom, F.T.; Cawlfield, D.E.; Emer, D.F.; Shott, G.J.; Donahue, M.E.

    1993-02-01

    Chemicals and radionuclides move either in the gas-phase, liquid-phase, or both phases in soils. They may be acted upon by either biological or abiotic processes through advection and diffusion. Furthermore, parent and daughter radionuclides may decay as they are transported in the soil. CASCADER is a gas-phase, one-space dimensional transport and fate model for M-chain radionuclides in very dry homogeneous or heterogeneous soil. This model contains barometric pressure-induced advection and diffusion together with linear irreversible and linear reversible sorption for each radionuclide. The advection velocity is derived from an embedded air-pumping submodel. The air-pumping submodel is based on an assumption of isothermal conditions, which is driven by barometric pressure. CASCADER allows the concentration of source radionuclides to decay via the classical Bateman chain of simple, first-order kinetic processes. The transported radionuclides also decay via first-order processes while in the soil. A mass conserving, flux-type inlet and exit set of boundary conditions are used. The user must supply the initial distribution for the parent radionuclide in the soil. The initial daughter distribution is found using equilibrium rules. The model is user friendly as it uses a prompt-driven, free-form input. The code is ANSI standard Fortran 77

  9. CASCADER: An m-chain gas-phase radionuclide transport and fate model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindstrom, F.T.; Cawlfield, D.E.; Emer, D.F.; Shott, G.J.; Donahue, M.E.

    1992-06-01

    Chemicals and radionuclides move either in the gas-phase, liquid-phase, or both phases in soils. They may be acted upon by either biological or abiotic processes as they are advected and/or dispersed. Furthermore, parent and daughter radionuclides may decay as they are transported in the soil. CASCADER is a gas-phase, one space dimensional transport and fate model for an m-chain of radionuclides in very dry soil. This model contains barometric pressure-induced advection and diffusion together with linear irreversible and linear reversible sorption for each radionuclide. The advocation velocity is derived from an embedded air-pumping submodel. The airpumping submodel is based on an assumption of isothermal conditions and is barometric pressure driven. CASCADER allows the concentration of source radionuclides to decay via the classical Bateman chain of simple, first-order kinetic processes. The transported radionuclides also decay via first-order processes while in the soil. A mass conserving, flux-type inlet and exit set of boundary conditions is used. The user must supply the initial distribution for the parent radionuclide in the soil. The initial daughter distribution is found using equilibrium rules. The model is user friendly as it uses a prompt-driven, free-form input. The code is ANSI standard Fortran 77

  10. Comparison of the Viscous Liquids Spraying by the OIG and the Oil Configurations of an Effervescent Atomizer at Low Inlet Pressures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mlkvik Marek

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work we studied the influence of the fluid injection configuration (OIG: outside-in-gas, OIL: outside-in-liquid on the internal flows and external sprays parameters. We sprayed the viscous aqueous maltodextrin solutions (μ = 60 mPa·s at a constant inlet pressure of the gas and the gas to the liquid mass flow ratio (GLR within the range 2.5 to 20%. We found that the fluids injection has a crucial influence on the internal flows. The internal flows patterns for the OIG atomizer were the slug flows, the internal flow of the OIL device was annular which led to the significant improvement of the spray quality: Smaller droplets, faster atomization, fewer pulsations.

  11. Design of a reactor inlet temperature controller for EBR-2 using state feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilim, R.B.; Planchon, H.P.

    1990-01-01

    A new reactor inlet temperature controller for pool type liquid-metal reactors has been developed and will be tested in EBR-II. The controller makes use of modern control techniques to take into account stratification and mixing in the cold pool during normal operation. Secondary flowrate is varied so that the reactor inlet temperature tracks a setpoint while reactor outlet temperature, primary flowrate and secondary cold leg temperature are treated as exogenous disturbances and are free to vary. A disturbance rejection technique minimizes the effect of these disturbances on inlet temperature. A linear quadratic regulator improves inlet temperature response. Tests in EBR-II will provide experimental data for assessing the performance improvements that modern control can produce over the existing EBR-II analog inlet temperature controller. 10 refs., 8 figs

  12. Phycocyanin stability in microcapsules processed by spray drying method using different inlet temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purnamayati, L.; Dewi, EN; Kurniasih, R. A.

    2018-02-01

    Phycocyanin is natural blue colorant which easily damages by heat. The inlet temperature of spray dryer is an important parameter representing the feature of the microcapsules.The aim of this study was to investigate the phycocyanin stability of microcapsules made from Spirulina sp with maltodextrin and κ-Carrageenan as the coating material, processed by spray drying method in different inlet temperature. Microcapsules were processed in three various inlet temperaturei.e. 90°C, 110°C, and 130°C, respectively. The results indicated that phycocyanin microcapsule with 90°C of inlet temperature produced the highest moisture content, phycocyanin concentration and encapsulation efficiency of 3,5%, 1,729% and 29,623%, respectively. On the other hand, the highest encapsulation yield was produced by 130°C of theinlet temperature of 29,48% and not significantly different with 110°C. The results of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) showed that phycocyanin microcapsules with 110°C of inlet temperature produced the most rounded shape. To sum up, 110°C was the best inlet temperature to phycocyanin microencapsulation by the spray dryer.

  13. Apparatus and method for treating pollutants in a gas using hydrogen peroxide and UV light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Charles David (Inventor); Clausen, Christian Anthony (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An apparatus for treating pollutants in a gas may include a source of hydrogen peroxide, and a treatment injector for creating and injecting dissociated hydrogen peroxide into the flow of gas. The treatment injector may further include an injector housing having an inlet, an outlet, and a hollow interior extending therebetween. The inlet may be connected in fluid communication with the source of hydrogen peroxide so that hydrogen peroxide flows through the hollow interior and toward the outlet. At least one ultraviolet (UV) lamp may be positioned within the hollow interior of the injector housing. The at least one UV lamp may dissociate the hydrogen peroxide flowing through the tube. The dissociated hydrogen peroxide may be injected into the flow of gas from the outlet for treating pollutants, such as nitrogen oxides.

  14. Effect of inlet cone pipe angle in catalytic converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amira Zainal, Nurul; Farhain Azmi, Ezzatul; Arifin Samad, Mohd

    2018-03-01

    The catalytic converter shows significant consequence to improve the performance of the vehicle start from it launched into production. Nowadays, the geometric design of the catalytic converter has become critical to avoid the behavior of backpressure in the exhaust system. The backpressure essentially reduced the performance of vehicles and increased the fuel consumption gradually. Consequently, this study aims to design various models of catalytic converter and optimize the volume of fluid flow inside the catalytic converter by changing the inlet cone pipe angles. Three different geometry angles of the inlet cone pipe of the catalytic converter were assessed. The model is simulated in Solidworks software to determine the optimum geometric design of the catalytic converter. The result showed that by decreasing the divergence angle of inlet cone pipe will upsurge the performance of the catalytic converter.

  15. The Tracer Gas Method of Determining the Charging Efficiency of Two-stroke-cycle Diesel Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweitzer, P H; Deluca, Frank, Jr

    1942-01-01

    A convenient method has been developed for determining the scavenging efficiency or the charging efficiency of two-stroke-cycle engines. The method consists of introducing a suitable tracer gas into the inlet air of the running engine and measuring chemically its concentration both in the inlet and exhaust gas. Monomethylamine CH(sub 3)NH(sub 2) was found suitable for the purpose as it burns almost completely during combustion, whereas the "short-circuited" portion does not burn at all and can be determined quantitatively in the exhaust. The method was tested both on four-stroke and on two-stroke engines and is considered accurate within 1 percent.

  16. Coupled Analysis of an Inlet and Fan for a Quiet Supersonic Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chima, Rodrick V.; Conners, Timothy R.; Wayman, Thomas R.

    2010-01-01

    A computational analysis of a Gulfstream isentropic external compression supersonic inlet coupled to a Rolls-Royce fan has been completed. The inlet was designed for a small, low sonic boom supersonic vehicle with a design cruise condition of M = 1.6 at 45,000 ft. The inlet design included an annular bypass duct that routed flow subsonically around an engine-mounted gearbox and diverted flow with high shock losses away from the fan tip. Two Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes codes were used for the analysis: an axisymmetric code called AVCS for the inlet and a three dimensional (3-D) code called SWIFT for the fan. The codes were coupled at a mixing plane boundary using a separate code for data exchange. The codes were used to determine the performance of the inlet/fan system at the design point and to predict the performance and operability of the system over the flight profile. At the design point the core inlet had a recovery of 96 percent, and the fan operated near its peak efficiency and pressure ratio. A large hub radial distortion generated in the inlet was not eliminated by the fan and could pose a challenge for subsequent booster stages. The system operated stably at all points along the flight profile. Reduced stall margin was seen at low altitude and Mach number where flow separated on the interior lips of the cowl and bypass ducts. The coupled analysis gave consistent solutions at all points on the flight profile that would be difficult or impossible to predict by analysis of isolated components.

  17. Coupled Analysis of an Inlet and Fan for a Quiet Supersonic Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chima, Rodrick V.; Conners, Timothy R.; Wayman, Thomas R.

    2009-01-01

    A computational analysis of a Gulfstream isentropic external compression supersonic inlet coupled to a Rolls-Royce fan was completed. The inlet was designed for a small, low sonic boom supersonic vehicle with a design cruise condition of M = 1.6 at 45,000 feet. The inlet design included an annular bypass duct that routed flow subsonically around an engine-mounted gearbox and diverted flow with high shock losses away from the fan tip. Two Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes codes were used for the analysis: an axisymmetric code called AVCS for the inlet and a 3-D code called SWIFT for the fan. The codes were coupled at a mixing plane boundary using a separate code for data exchange. The codes were used to determine the performance of the inlet/fan system at the design point and to predict the performance and operability of the system over the flight profile. At the design point the core inlet had a recovery of 96 percent, and the fan operated near its peak efficiency and pressure ratio. A large hub radial distortion generated in the inlet was not eliminated by the fan and could pose a challenge for subsequent booster stages. The system operated stably at all points along the flight profile. Reduced stall margin was seen at low altitude and Mach number where flow separated on the interior lips of the cowl and bypass ducts. The coupled analysis gave consistent solutions at all points on the flight profile that would be difficult or impossible to predict by analysis of isolated components.

  18. Experiment with CFD in the power industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somogyi, M.; Davidson, T.E. [HRL Technology Pty. Ltd., Mulgrave, Vic. (Australia)

    1997-07-01

    Several recent examples of successful applications of CFD modelling are described to demonstrate the benefits that can be realised when this technique is used to optimise processes of fluid flow, heat transfer, combustion and particle tracking. Examples include: velocity distribution in inlet ducts of precipitators; mixing of hot and cold gas streams; flow and temperature transients in a cooling pond; and simulation of gas combustors. 11 figs.

  19. Mass independent kinetic energy reducing inlet system for vacuum environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Peter T. A. [Knoxville, TN

    2010-12-14

    A particle inlet system comprises a first chamber having a limiting orifice for an incoming gas stream and a micrometer controlled expansion slit. Lateral components of the momentum of the particles are substantially cancelled due to symmetry of the configuration once the laminar flow converges at the expansion slit. The particles and flow into a second chamber, which is maintained at a lower pressure than the first chamber, and then moves into a third chamber including multipole guides for electromagnetically confining the particle. The vertical momentum of the particles descending through the center of the third chamber is minimized as an upward stream of gases reduces the downward momentum of the particles. The translational kinetic energy of the particles is near-zero irrespective of the mass of the particles at an exit opening of the third chamber, which may be advantageously employed to provide enhanced mass resolution in mass spectrometry.

  20. Fluid Properties Measurements Using Wavelength Modulation Spectroscopy with First Harmonic Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shin-Juh (Inventor); Silver, Joel A. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An apparatus and method for monitoring gas velocity, temperature, and pressure in combustion systems and flow devices, in particular at inlets and isolators of scramjet engines. The invention employs wavelength modulation spectroscopy with first harmonic detection and without the need to scan the full absorption spectra.

  1. A comparison between EGR and lean-burn strategies employed in a natural gas SI engine using a two-zone combustion model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibrahim, Amr; Bari, Saiful [Sustainable Energy Centre, School of Advanced Manufacturing and Mechanical Engineering, Univ. of South Australia, Mawson Lakes SA 5095 (Australia)

    2009-12-15

    Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) strategy has been recently employed in natural gas SI engines as an alternative to lean burn technique in order to satisfy the increasingly stringent emission standards. However, the effect of EGR on some of engine performance parameters compared to lean burn is not yet quite certain. In the current study, the effect of both EGR and lean burn on natural gas SI engine performance was compared at similar operating conditions. This was achieved numerically by developing a computer simulation of the four-stroke spark-ignition natural gas engine. A two-zone combustion model was developed to simulate the in-cylinder conditions during combustion. A kinetic model based on the extended Zeldovich mechanism was also developed in order to predict NO emission. The combustion model was validated using experimental data and a good agreement between the results was found. It was demonstrated that adding EGR to the stoichiometric inlet charge at constant inlet pressure of 130 kPa decreased power more rapidly than excess air; however, the power loss was recovered by increasing the inlet pressure from 130 kPa at zero dilution to 150 kPa at 20% EGR dilution. The engine fuel consumption increased by 10% when 20% EGR dilution was added at inlet pressure of 150 kPa compared to using 20% air dilution at 130 kPa. However, it was found that EGR dilution strategy is capable of producing extremely lower NO emission than lean burn technique. NO emission was reduced by about 70% when the inlet charge was diluted at a rate of 20% using EGR instead of excess air. (author)

  2. A comparison between EGR and lean-burn strategies employed in a natural gas SI engine using a two-zone combustion model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, Amr; Bari, Saiful

    2009-01-01

    Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) strategy has been recently employed in natural gas SI engines as an alternative to lean burn technique in order to satisfy the increasingly stringent emission standards. However, the effect of EGR on some of engine performance parameters compared to lean burn is not yet quite certain. In the current study, the effect of both EGR and lean burn on natural gas SI engine performance was compared at similar operating conditions. This was achieved numerically by developing a computer simulation of the four-stroke spark-ignition natural gas engine. A two-zone combustion model was developed to simulate the in-cylinder conditions during combustion. A kinetic model based on the extended Zeldovich mechanism was also developed in order to predict NO emission. The combustion model was validated using experimental data and a good agreement between the results was found. It was demonstrated that adding EGR to the stoichiometric inlet charge at constant inlet pressure of 130 kPa decreased power more rapidly than excess air; however, the power loss was recovered by increasing the inlet pressure from 130 kPa at zero dilution to 150 kPa at 20% EGR dilution. The engine fuel consumption increased by 10% when 20% EGR dilution was added at inlet pressure of 150 kPa compared to using 20% air dilution at 130 kPa. However, it was found that EGR dilution strategy is capable of producing extremely lower NO emission than lean burn technique. NO emission was reduced by about 70% when the inlet charge was diluted at a rate of 20% using EGR instead of excess air.

  3. Evaluation of PM-10 commercial inlets for new surveillance air sampler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langer, G.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to adapt an existing sampling inlet or develop a new one to collect airborne dust particles <10-μm aerodynamic equivalent diameter. These inlets are necessary to meet new EPA and DOE guidelines for surveillance of nuclear facilities

  4. The influence of slip velocity and temperature on permeability during and after high-velocity fault slip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanikawa, W.; Mukoyoshi, H.; Tadai, O.; Hirose, T.; Lin, W.

    2011-12-01

    Fluid transport properties in fault zones play an important role in dynamic processes during large earthquakes. If the permeability in a fault zone is low, high pore-fluid pressures caused by thermal pressurization (Sibson, 1973) or shear-induced compaction (Blanpied et al., 1992) can lead to an apparent reduction of fault strength. Changes in porosity and permeability of fault rocks within a fault zone during earthquakes and the subsequent progressive recovery of these properties may have a large influence on earthquake recurrence (Sleep and Blanpied, 1992). A rotary shear apparatus was used to investigate changes of fluid transport properties in a fault zone by real-time measurement of gas flow rates during and after shearing of hollow sandstone and granite cylinders at various slip rates. Our apparatus measures permeability parallel to the slip plane in both the slip zone and wall rocks. In all cases, permeability decreased rapidly with an increase of friction, but recovered soon after slip, reaching a steady state within several tens of minutes. The rate of reduction of permeability increased with increasing slip velocity. Permeability did not recover to pre-slip levels after low-velocity tests but recovered to exceed them after high-velocity tests. Frictional heating of gases at the slip surface increased gas viscosity, which increased gas flow rate to produce an apparent permeability increase. The irreversible permeability changes of the low-velocity tests were caused by gouge formation due to wearing and smoothing of the slip surface. The increase of permeability after high-velocity tests was caused by mesoscale fracturing in response to rapid temperature rise. Changes of pore fluid viscosity contributed more to changes of flow rate than did permeability changes caused by shear deformation, although test results from different rocks and pore fluids might be different. References Blanpied, M.L., Lockner, D.A., Byerlee, J.D., 1992. An earthquake mechanism

  5. Gas Chromatographic-Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Essential Oil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To analyze the essential oil composition of the flower of Jasminum officinale L. var. grandifloroum L. (Jasminum grandiflorum) by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Methods: The optimum GC-MS conditions used for the analysis were 250 oC inlet temperature, 150 oC MSD detector temperature, ...

  6. Performance and Adaptive Surge-Preventing Acceleration Prediction of a Turboshaft Engine under Inlet Flow Distortion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cao Dalu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The intention of this paper is to research the inlet flow distortion influence on overall performance of turboshaft engine and put forward a method called Distortion Factor Item (DFI to improve the fuel supply plan for surge-preventing acceleration when turboshaft engine suddenly encounters inlet flow distortion. Based on the parallel compressor theory, steady-state and transition-state numerical simulation model of turboshaft engine with sub-compressor model were established for researching the influence of inlet flow distortion on turboshaft engine. This paper made a detailed analysis on the compressor operation from the aspects of performance and stability, and then analyzed the overall performance and dynamic response of the whole engine under inlet flow distortion. Improved fuel supply plan with DFI method was applied to control the acceleration process adaptively when encountering different inlet flow distortion. Several simulation examples about extreme natural environments were calculated to testify DFI method’s environmental applicability. The result shows that the inlet flow distortion reduces the air inflow and decreases the surge margin of compressor, and increase the engine exhaust loss. Encountering inlet flow distortion has many adverse influences such as sudden rotor acceleration, turbine inlet temperature rise and power output reduction. By using improved fuel supply plan with DFI, turboshaft engine above-idle acceleration can avoid surge effectively under inlet flow distortion with environmental applicability.

  7. Experimental study of slight temperature rise combustion in trapped vortex combustors for gas turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, R.C.; Fan, W.J.; Xing, F.; Song, S.W.; Shi, Q.; Tian, G.H.; Tan, W.L.

    2015-01-01

    Interstage turbine combustion used for improving efficiency of gas turbine was a new type of combustion mode. Operating conditions and technical requirements for this type of combustor were different from those of traditional combustor. It was expected to achieve engineering application in both ground-based and aviation gas turbine in the near future. In this study, a number of modifications in a base design were applied and examined experimentally. The trapped-vortex combustion technology was adopted for flame stability under high velocity conditions, and the preheating-fuel injection technology was used to improve the atomization and evaporation performance of liquid fuel. The experimental results indicated that stable and efficient combustion with slight temperature-rise can be achieved under the high velocity conditions of combustor inlet. Under all experimental conditions, the excess air coefficients of ignition and lean blow-out were larger than 7 and 20, respectively; pollutant emission index of NO x and the maximum wall temperature were below 2.5 g/(kg fuel) and 1050 K, respectively. Moreover, the effects of fuel injection and overall configuration on the combustion characteristics were analyzed in detail. The number increase, area increase and depth increase of fuel injectors had different influences on the stability, combustion characteristic and temperature distribution. - Highlights: • The combustion mode of slight temperature-rise (200 K) was achieved. • Effect of fuel and air injection on stability characteristic was investigated. • Impact of overall configuration on combustion performance was analyzed. • The feasibility of scheme was determined.

  8. Effective ionization coefficients, electron drift velocities, and limiting breakdown fields for gas mixtures of possible interest to particle detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datskos, P.G.

    1991-01-01

    We have measured the gas-density, N, normalized effective ionization coefficient, bar a/N, and the electron drift velocity, w, as a function of the density-reduced electric field, E/N, and obtained the limiting, (E/N) lim , value of E/N for the unitary gases Ar, CO 2 , and CF 4 , the binary gas mixtures CO 2 :Ar (20: 80), CO 2 :CH 4 (20:80), and CF 4 :Ar (20:80), and the ternary gas mixtures CO 2 :CF 4 :Ar (10:10:80) and H 2 O: CF 4 :Ar (2:18:80). Addition of the strongly electron thermalizing gas CO 2 or H 2 O to the binary mixture CF 4 :Ar (1)''cools'' the mixture (i.e., lowers the electron energies), (2) has only a small effect on the magnitude of w(E/N) in the E/N range employed in the particle detectors, and (3) increases bar a/N for E/N ≥ 50 x 10 -17 V cm 2 . The increase in bar a/N, even though the electron energies are lower in the ternary mixture, is due to the Penning ionization of CO 2 (or H 2 O) in collisions with excited Ar* atoms. The ternary mixtures -- being fast, cool, and efficient -- have potential for advanced gas-filled particle detectors such as those for the SCC muon chambers. 17 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  9. Estimating pore-space gas hydrate saturations from well log acoustic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myung W.; Waite, William F.

    2008-07-01

    Relating pore-space gas hydrate saturation to sonic velocity data is important for remotely estimating gas hydrate concentration in sediment. In the present study, sonic velocities of gas hydrate-bearing sands are modeled using a three-phase Biot-type theory in which sand, gas hydrate, and pore fluid form three homogeneous, interwoven frameworks. This theory is developed using well log compressional and shear wave velocity data from the Mallik 5L-38 permafrost gas hydrate research well in Canada and applied to well log data from hydrate-bearing sands in the Alaskan permafrost, Gulf of Mexico, and northern Cascadia margin. Velocity-based gas hydrate saturation estimates are in good agreement with Nuclear Magneto Resonance and resistivity log estimates over the complete range of observed gas hydrate saturations.

  10. Microjet flow control in an ultra-compact serpentine inlet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da Xingya

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Microjets are used to control the internal flow to improve the performance of an ultra-compact serpentine inlet. A highly offset serpentine inlet with length-to-diameter ratio of 2.5 is designed and static tests are conducted to analyze the internal flow characteristics in terms of pressure recovery, distortion and flow separation. Flow separation is encountered in the second S-turn, and two strong counter-rotating vortices are formed at the aerodynamic interface plane (AIP face which occupy a quarter of the outlet area and result in severe pressure loss and distortion. A flow control model employing a row of microjets in the second turn is designed based on the internal flow characteristics and simplified CFD simulations. Flow control tests are conducted to verify the control effectiveness and understand the characteristics as a function of inlet throat Mach number, injection mass flow ratio, jet Mach number and momentum coefficient. At all test Mach numbers, microjet flow control (MFC effectively improves the recovery and reduces the distortion intensity. Between inlet throat Mach number 0.2 and 0.5, the strong flow separation in the second S-turn is suppressed at an optimum jet flow ratio of less than 0.65%, resulting in a maximum improvement of 4% for pressure recovery coefficient and a maximum decrease of 75% for circumferential distortion intensity at cruise. However, in order to suppress the flow separation, the injection rate should retain in an effective range. When the injection rate is higher than this range, the flow is degraded and the distortion contour is changed from 90° circumferential distortion pattern to 180° circumferential distortion pattern. Detailed data analysis shows that this optimum flow ratio depends on inlet throat Mach number and the momentum coefficient affects the control effectiveness in a dual stepping manner.

  11. One-loop fluctuation-dissipation formula for bubble-wall velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, P.

    1993-01-01

    The limiting bubble wall velocity during a first-order electroweak phase transition is of interest in scenarios for electroweak baryogenesis. Khlebnikov has recently proposed an interesting method for computing this velocity based on the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. It is demonstrated that at one-loop order this method is identical to simple, earlier techniques for computing the wall velocity based on computing the friction from particles reflecting off or transmitting through the wall in the ideal gas limit

  12. One-loop fluctuation-dissipation formula for bubble-wall velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, P.

    1993-01-01

    The limiting bubble-wall velocity during a first-order electroweak phase transition is of interest in scenarios for electroweak baryogenesis. Khlebnikov has recently proposed an interesting method for computing this velocity based on the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. I demonstrate that at one-loop order this method is identical to simple, earlier techniques for computing the wall velocity based on computing the friction from particles reflecting off or transmitting through the wall in the ideal gas (''thin-wall'') limit

  13. Stability analysis for tidal inlets of Thuan An and Tu Hien using Escoffier diagram

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lam, N.T.; Verhagen, H.J.; Van der Wegen, M.

    2004-01-01

    Stability analysis of tidal inlets is very important in providing knowledge on the behaviour of tidal inlet and lagoon systems. The analysis results can help to plan and manage the system effectively as well as to provide information for stability design of the inlets. This paper presents a method

  14. Effect of turbulent model closure and type of inlet boundary condition on a Large Eddy Simulation of a non-reacting jet with co-flow stream

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payri, Raul; López, J. Javier; Martí-Aldaraví, Pedro; Giraldo, Jhoan S.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • LES in a non-reacting jet with co-flow is performed with OpenFoam. • Smagorinsky (SMAG) and One Equation Eddy (OEE) approaches are compared. • A turbulent pipe is used to generate and map coherent inlet turbulence structure. • Fluctuating inlet boundary condition requires much less computational cost. - Abstract: In this paper, the behavior and turbulence structure of a non-reacting jet with a co-flow stream is described by means of Large Eddy Simulations (LES) carried out with the computational tool OpenFoam. In order to study the influence of the sub-grid scale (SGS) model on the main flow statistics, Smagorinsky (SMAG) and One Equation Eddy (OEE) approaches are used to model the smallest scales involved in the turbulence of the jet. The impact of cell size and turbulent inlet boundary condition in resulting velocity profiles is analyzed as well. Four different tasks have been performed to accomplish these objectives. Firstly, the simulation of a turbulent pipe, which is necessary to generate and map coherent turbulence structure into the inlet of the non-reacting jet domain. Secondly, a structured mesh based on hexahedrons has been built for the jet and its co-flow. The third task consists on performing four different simulations. In those, mapping statistics from the turbulent pipe is compared with the use of fluctuating inlet boundary condition available in OpenFoam; OEE and SMAG approaches are contrasted; and the effect of changing cell size is investigated. Finally, as forth task, the obtained results are compared with experimental data. As main conclusions of this comparison, it has been proved that the fluctuating boundary condition requires much less computational cost, but some inaccuracies were found close to the nozzle. Also, both SGS models are capable to simulate this kind of jets with a co-flow stream with exactitude.

  15. Analysis of ways to control the supply of the blast, and their impact on gas-dynamic processes in the blast furnace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Віктор Петрович Кравченко

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the analysis of two methods of control over hot blast supply into a blast furnace with constant pressure and constant amount (consumption. The analysis of these two methods was performed with the aim of determining their influence upon changes in gas pressure in the blast furnace top. The blast furnace was considered as a unity of vessels (furnace hearth, the top and gas-dynamic resistance (a column of charge materials. A differential equation was obtained, with regard to the dynamic balance of gas flow at the inlet and outlet of the top; the equation relates the pressure and gas consumption at the top to the pressure and hot blast consumption at the inlet and outlet of the furnace and to the resistance of the column of charge materials. The column of charge materials is considered as n-th number of channels through which gas flow inside the furnace moves and which resist to the flow. By the analysis of this equation at steady state (automatic stabilization of gas pressure in the top, the conditions were obtained to be satisfied with the specified value of gas pressure in the top. This value is equal to a half of the sum of the value of hot blast pressure at the inlet into the furnace and the value of pressure inside the collector of blast furnace gas. This conclusion is verified by the operation practice of blast furnaces in Ukraine. While analyzing the second method of controlling the supply of blast supply-stabilization of consumption (amount of hot blast supplied into the furnace it has been shown that the method could be realized in condition of stabilization of the amount of blast furnace gas, going out of the furnace. As the resistance of the column of charge materials constantly changes it is necessary to change the hot blast pressure in order to ensure the constant amount of blast, supplied into the furnace. It is often connected with possible substantial pressure fluctuations of hot blast at the inlet of the

  16. Improved Hypersonic Inlet Performance Using Validated Strut Compression Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulman, M. J.; Stout, P. W.; Fernandez, R.

    1997-01-01

    Aerojet is currently executing two Strutjet propulsion contracts: one a Rocket Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) engine for a NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Advanced Reusable Transportation Technology (ARTT) program, the second a Dual Mode Ram/Scramjet engine for a USAF Wright Laboratories Storable Fuel Scramjet Flow Path Concepts program. The engines employed in both programs operate at supersonic and low hypersonic speeds and use inlets employing forebody external and sidewall compression. Aerojet has developed and validated a successful design methodology applicable to these inlet types. Design features include an integrated vehicle forebody, external side compression struts, strut sidewall and throat bleed, a throat shock trap, and variable geometry internal contraction. Computation Fluid Dynamic (CFD) predictions and test data show these inlets allow substantially increased flow turning angles over other designs. These increased flow turning angles allow shorter and lighter engines than current designs, which in turn enables higher performing vehicles with broad operating characteristics. This paper describes the designs of two different inlets evaluated by the NASA-MSFC and USAF programs, discusses the results of wind tunnel tests performed by NASA-Lewis Research Center, and provides correlations of test data with CFD predictions. Parameters of interest include low Mach number starting capability, start sensitivity as a function of back pressure at various contraction ratios, flow turning angles, strut and throat bleed effects, and pressure recovery at various Mach numbers.

  17. PRESENT-DAY GALACTIC EVOLUTION: LOW-METALLICITY, WARM, IONIZED GAS INFLOW ASSOCIATED WITH HIGH-VELOCITY CLOUD COMPLEX A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barger, K. A.; Haffner, L. M.; Wakker, B. P.; Hill, Alex S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Madsen, G. J. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Duncan, A. K., E-mail: kbarger@astro.wisc.edu, E-mail: haffner@astro.wisc.edu, E-mail: Alex.Hill@csiro.au, E-mail: wakker@astro.wisc.edu, E-mail: greg.madsen@sydney.edu.au [Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology, Terre Haute, IN 47803 (United States)

    2012-12-20

    The high-velocity cloud Complex A is a probe of the physical conditions in the Galactic halo. The kinematics, morphology, distance, and metallicity of Complex A indicate that it represents new material that is accreting onto the Galaxy. We present Wisconsin H{alpha} Mapper kinematically resolved observations of Complex A over the velocity range of -250 to -50 km s{sup -1} in the local standard of rest reference frame. These observations include the first full H{alpha} intensity map of Complex A across (l, b) = (124 Degree-Sign , 18 Degree-Sign ) to (171 Degree-Sign , 53 Degree-Sign ) and deep targeted observations in H{alpha}, [S II] {lambda}6716, [N II] {lambda}6584, and [O I] {lambda}6300 toward regions with high H I column densities, background quasars, and stars. The H{alpha} data imply that the masses of neutral and ionized material in the cloud are similar, both being greater than 10{sup 6} M{sub Sun }. We find that the Bland-Hawthorn and Maloney model for the intensity of the ionizing radiation near the Milky Way is consistent with the known distance of the high-latitude part of Complex A and an assumed cloud geometry that puts the lower-latitude parts of the cloud at a distance of 7-8 kpc. This compatibility implies a 5% ionizing photon escape fraction from the Galactic disk. We also provide the nitrogen and sulfur upper abundance solutions for a series of temperatures, metallicities, and cloud configurations for purely photoionized gas; these solutions are consistent with the sub-solar abundances found by previous studies, especially for temperatures above 10{sup 4} K or for gas with a high fraction of singly ionized nitrogen and sulfur.

  18. A condensation experiment in the accumulated conditions of noncondensable gas in a vertical tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kwon Yeong; Kim, Moo Hwan

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: It has been well known that the presence of noncondensable gases in vapors can greatly inhibit the condensation process. Many analytical and experimental studies were conducted to investigate the effect of noncondensable gases on steam condensation for both stagnant and forced-convective situations either over a plate or outside a horizontal tube. Recently, several researches have been performed for the condensation in the presence of noncondensable gases taken place inside the vertical tube in order to give the information to design the passive containment cooling system (PCCS) in Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR). Generally, the experimental results showed that the heat transfer coefficient depends on inlet noncondensable gas mass fraction, inlet saturated steam temperature related with system pressure and inlet mixture Reynolds number. This research was performed for the System-integrated Modular Advanced ReacTor-Pilot (SMART-P), in which the remaining heat is removed from the core passively by Passive Residual Heat Removal System (PRHRS) condenser in a period of serious accident. The PRHRS is separated from working fluid loop, and pressurized by a nitrogen gas during the normal operation of SMART-P. But when the PRHRS starts operating, the nitrogen gas acts as a noncondensable gas and affects the heat transfer characteristics of the PRHRS. The experimental conditions of this study were almost similar with those of previous researches except the noncondensable gas was accumulated and remained inside the vertical tube. In the previous researches, the noncondensable gas was flowing with constant flow rate. Because of the condensate inside condenser tube, the accumulation of noncondensable gas could be developed inside the vertical tube. At steady-state condition the local temperatures and system pressure were measured to obtain heat transfer characteristics. This study also gave the information about the distribution of the

  19. Geometry of tidal inlet systems : A key factor for the net sediment transport in tidal inlets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ridderinkhof, W.; de Swart, H. E.; van der Vegt, M.; Alebregtse, N. C.; Hoekstra, P.

    2014-01-01

    The net transport of sediment between the back-barrier basin and the sea is an important process for determining the stability of tidal inlet systems. Earlier studies showed that in a short basin, tidal flats favor peak ebb-currents stronger than peak flood currents, implying export of coarse

  20. Void fraction and interfacial velocity in gas-liquid upward two-phase flow across tube bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueno, T.; Tomomatsu, K.; Takamatsu, H.; Nishikawa, H.

    1997-01-01

    Tube failures due to flow-induced vibration are a major problem in heat exchangers and many studies on the problem of such vibration have been carried out so far. Most studies however, have not focused on two-phase flow behavior in tube bundles, but have concentrated mainly on tube vibration behavior like fluid damping, fluid elastic instability and so on. Such studies are not satisfactory for understanding the design of heat exchangers. Tube vibration behavior is very complicated, especially in the case of gas-liquid two-phase flow, so it is necessary to investigate two-phase flow behavior as well as vibration behavior before designing heat exchangers. This paper outlines the main parameters that characterize two-phase behavior, such as void fraction and interfacial velocity. The two-phase flow analyzed here is gas-liquid upward flow across a horizontal tube bundle. The fluids tested were HCFC-123 and steam-water. HCFC-123 stands for Hydrochlorofluorocarbon. Its chemical formula is CHCl 2 CF 3 , which has liquid and gas densities of 1335 and 23.9 kg/m 3 at a pressure of 0.40 MPa and 1252 and 45.7 kg/m 3 at a pressure of 0.76 MPa. The same model tube bundle was used in the two tests covered in this paper, to examine the similarity law of two-phase flow behavior in tube bundles using HCFC-123 and steam-water two-phase flow. We also show numerical simulation results for the two fluid models in this paper. We do not deal with vibration behavior and the relationship between vibration behavior and two-phase flow behavior. (author)

  1. The Integration Of Process Heat Applications To High Temperature Gas Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKellar, Michael G.

    2011-01-01

    A high temperature gas reactor, HTGR, can produce industrial process steam, high-temperature heat-transfer gases, and/or electricity. In conventional industrial processes, these products are generated by the combustion of fossil fuels such as coal and natural gas, resulting in significant emissions of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide. Heat or electricity produced in an HTGR could be used to supply process heat or electricity to conventional processes without generating any greenhouse gases. Process heat from a reactor needs to be transported by a gas to the industrial process. Two such gases were considered in this study: helium and steam. For this analysis, it was assumed that steam was delivered at 17 MPa and 540 C and helium was delivered at 7 MPa and at a variety of temperatures. The temperature of the gas returning from the industrial process and going to the HTGR must be within certain temperature ranges to maintain the correct reactor inlet temperature for a particular reactor outlet temperature. The returning gas may be below the reactor inlet temperature, ROT, but not above. The optimal return temperature produces the maximum process heat gas flow rate. For steam, the delivered pressure sets an optimal reactor outlet temperature based on the condensation temperature of the steam. ROTs greater than 769.7 C produce no additional advantage for the production of steam.

  2. Experimental Investigation of a Forward Swept Rotor in a Multistage Fan with Inlet Distortion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aspi R. Wadia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies of transonic swept rotors in single stage fans have demonstrated the potential of significant improvements in both efficiency and stall margin with forward swept blading. This paper extends the assessment of the payoff derived from forward sweep to multistage configurations. The experimental investigation compare two builds of an advanced two-stage fan configuration tested alternately with a radial and a forward swept stage 1 blade. In the two-stage evaluations, the testing was extended to include the effect on inlet flow distortion. While the common second stage among the two builds prevented the overall fan from showing clean inlet performance and stability benefits with the forward swept rotor 1, this configuration did demonstrate superior front stage efficiency and tolerance to inlet distortion. Having obtained already low distortion sensitivity with the radial rotor 1 configuration relative to current production military fan standards, the sensitivity to inlet distortion was halved with the forward swept rotor 1 configuration. In the case of the 180-degree one-per-rev distortion pattern, the two-stage configuration was evaluated both with and without inlet guide vanes (IGVs. The presence of the inlet guide vanes had a profound impact in lowering the two-stage fan's sensitivity with inlet distortion.

  3. Conical Probe Calibration and Wind Tunnel Data Analysis of the Channeled Centerbody Inlet Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Samson Siu

    2011-01-01

    For a multi-hole test probe undergoing wind tunnel tests, the resulting data needs to be analyzed for any significant trends. These trends include relating the pressure distributions, the geometric orientation, and the local velocity vector to one another. However, experimental runs always involve some sort of error. As a result, a calibration procedure is required to compensate for this error. For this case, it is the misalignment bias angles resulting from the distortion associated with the angularity of the test probe or the local velocity vector. Through a series of calibration steps presented here, the angular biases are determined and removed from the data sets. By removing the misalignment, smoother pressure distributions contribute to more accurate experimental results, which in turn could be then compared to theoretical and actual in-flight results to derive any similarities. Error analyses will also be performed to verify the accuracy of the calibration error reduction. The resulting calibrated data will be implemented into an in-flight RTF script that will output critical flight parameters during future CCIE experimental test runs. All of these tasks are associated with and in contribution to NASA Dryden Flight Research Center s F-15B Research Testbed s Small Business Innovation Research of the Channeled Centerbody Inlet Experiment.

  4. Adaptive unstructured simulations of diaphragm rupture and perforation opening to start hypersonic air inlets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timofeev, E.V.; Tahir, R.B.; Voinovich, P.A.; Moelder, S.

    2004-01-01

    The concept of 'twin' grid nodes is discussed in the context of unstructured, adaptive meshes that are suitable for highly unsteady flows. The concept is applicable to internal boundary contours (within the computational domain) where the boundary conditions may need to be changed dynamically; for instance, an impermeable solid wall segment can be redefined as a fully permeable invisible boundary segment during the course of the simulation. This can be used to simulate unsteady gas flows with internal boundaries where the flow conditions may change rapidly and drastically. As a demonstration, the idea is applied to study the starting process in hypersonic air inlets by rupturing a diaphragm or by opening wall-perforations. (author)

  5. Boundary conditions for free surface inlet and outlet problems

    KAUST Repository

    Taroni, M.

    2012-08-10

    We investigate and compare the boundary conditions that are to be applied to free-surface problems involving inlet and outlets of Newtonian fluid, typically found in coating processes. The flux of fluid is a priori known at an inlet, but unknown at an outlet, where it is governed by the local behaviour near the film-forming meniscus. In the limit of vanishing capillary number Ca it is well known that the flux scales with Ca 2/3, but this classical result is non-uniform as the contact angle approaches π. By examining this limit we find a solution that is uniformly valid for all contact angles. Furthermore, by considering the far-field behaviour of the free surface we show that there exists a critical capillary number above which the problem at an inlet becomes over-determined. The implications of this result for the modelling of coating flows are discussed. © 2012 Cambridge University Press.

  6. Depletion of elements in shock-driven gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gondhalekar, P.M.

    1985-01-01

    The depletion of elements in shocked gas in supernova remnants and in interstellar bubbles is examined. It is shown that elements are depleted in varying degrees in gas filaments shocked to velocities up to 200 km s -1 and that large differences in depletions are observed in gas filaments shocked to similar velocities. In the shocked gas the depletion of an element appears to be correlated with the electron density (or the neutral gas density) in the filaments. This correlation, if confirmed, is similar to the correlation between depletion and mean density of gas in the clouds in interstellar space. (author)

  7. Influence of inlet water on the biotic and abiotic variables in a fish pond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. H. Sipaúba-Tavares

    Full Text Available Abstract The effects of treated and untreated water inlets with macrophytes on the improvement of water quality and zooplankton community were evaluated in a fish pond with continuous water flow. Water and zooplankton samples were retrieved at four sites during nine months. There were differences (p<0.01 between inlet water from fish pond and inlet water from canal with macrophytes, featuring higher concentrations of nutrient load, mainly TAN and TP in the former. The inlet water from fish pond contained a higher number of abundant species (9 species, whilst the water supply from the canal with macrophytes had a greater richness (31 species of zooplankton species. Results showed that inlet water without macrophytes directly affected the characteristics of the water column and the dominance of zooplankton species such as Thermocyclops decipiens, and greater abundance of Rotifera species. Since aquatic plants in the inlet water of fish pond analyzed showed lower allochthonous material loads from the previous fish pond, the management adopted with macrophytes may be applied to avoid eutrophication risks, common in farm ponds.

  8. Investigation of Unsteady Flow Interaction Between an Ultra-Compact Inlet and a Transonic Fan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hah, Chunill; Rabe, Douglas; Scribben, Angie

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, unsteady flow interaction between an ultra-compact inlet and a transonic fan stage is investigated. Future combat aircraft require ultra-compact inlet ducts as part of an integrated, advanced propulsion system to improve air vehicle capability and effectiveness to meet future mission needs. The main purpose of the study is to advance the current understanding of the flow interaction between two different ultra-compact inlets and a transonic fan for future design applications. Both URANS and LES approaches are used to calculate the unsteady flow field and are compared with the available measured data. The present study indicates that stall inception is mildly affected by the distortion pattern generated by the inlet with the current test set-up. The numerical study indicates that the inlet distortion pattern decays significantly before it reaches the fan face for the current configuration. Numerical results with a shorter distance between the inlet and fan show that counter-rotating vortices near the rotor tip due to the serpentine diffuser affects fan characteristics significantly.

  9. Ultrasonic velocity measurements in expanded liquid mercury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, K.; Inutake, M.; Fujiwaka, S.

    1977-10-01

    In this paper we present the first results of the sound velocity measurements in expanded liquid mercury. The measurements were made at temperatures up to 1600 0 C and pressures up to 1700 kg/cm 2 by means of an ultrasonic pulse transmission/echo technique which was newly developed for such high temperature/pressure condition. When the density is larger than 9 g/cm 3 , the observed sound velocity decreases linearly with decreasing density. At densities smaller than 9 g/cm 3 , the linear dependence on the density is no longer observed. The observed sound velocity approaches a minimum near the liquid-gas critical point (rho sub(cr) asymptotically equals 5.5 g/cm 3 ). The existing theories for sound velocity in liquid metals fail to explain the observed results. (auth.)