WorldWideScience

Sample records for injury imaging findings

  1. Aftermath of Ankle Inversion Injuries: Spectrum of MR Imaging Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehan, Timothy M; Martinez-Salazar, Edgar Leonardo; Torriani, Martin

    2017-02-01

    Acute and chronic ankle inversion injuries are a common source of pain and a diagnostic challenge. Several studies have shown a variety of injury patterns after inversion injury both in acute and chronic settings. Although traditional assessment with clinical examination and radiographs is generally accepted for inversion injuries, MR imaging is a useful tool to detect occult injuries and in patients with chronic symptoms. This article examines a range of MR imaging findings that may be present in patients with lateral ankle pain following an acute or chronic inversion injury. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Imaging findings in diffuse axonal injury after closed head trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parizel, P.M.; Oezsarlak, Oe.; Goethem, J.W. van; Hauwe, L. van den; Schepper, A.M. de [Department of Radiology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Antwerpen (University of Antwerp), Edegem (Belgium); Dillen, C.; Cosyns, P. [Department of Psychiatry, Universitair Ziekenhuis Antwerpen (University of Antwerp), Edegem (Belgium); Verlooy, J. [Department of Neurosurgery, Universitair Ziekenhuis Antwerpen (University of Antwerp), Edegem (Belgium)

    1998-07-01

    Even in patients with closed head trauma, brain parenchyma can be severely injured due to disruption of axonal fibers by shearing forces during acceleration, deceleration, and rotation of the head. In this article we review the spectrum of imaging findings in patients with diffuse axonal injuries (DAI) after closed head trauma. Knowledge of the location and imaging characteristics of DAI is important to radiologists for detection and diagnosis. Common locations of DAI include: cerebral hemispheric gray-white matter interface and subcortical white matter, body and splenium of corpus callosum, basal ganglia, dorsolateral aspect of brainstem, and cerebellum. In the acute phase, CT may show punctate hemorrhages. The true extent of brain involvement is better appreciated with MR imaging, because both hemorrhagic and non-hemorrhagic lesions (gliotic scars) can be detected. The MR appearance of DAI lesions depends on several factors, including age of injury, presence of hemorrhage or blood-breakdown products (e. g., hemosiderin), and type of sequence used. Technical aspects in MR imaging of these patients are discussed. Non-hemorrhagic lesions can be detected with fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR), proton-density-, or T2-weighted images, whereas gradient echo sequences with long TE increase the visibility of old hemorrhagic lesions. (orig.) With 12 figs., 12 refs.

  3. Brachialis periosteal avulsion injury: case report with magnetic resonance imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lam, Justin Chak Yiu; Lee, Ka Lok Ryan; Griffith, James F.

    2016-01-01

    Brachialis periosteal avulsion injury is an uncommon injury occurring in young children. The injury may be misinterpreted or overlooked because of misleading or subtle radiological findings. A case of 7-year-old child with post-traumatic elbow pain and subtle findings on elbow radiography is presented. The injury was initially misinterpreted as an avulsion fracture of the medial epicondyle. Following radiological review, a diagnosis of brachialis periosteal avulsion injury was made. The radiographic and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of this injury are presented to stress the value of comparing the radiographic findings with previous imaging and to increase awareness of this uncommon injury. (orig.)

  4. Brachialis periosteal avulsion injury: case report with magnetic resonance imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, Justin Chak Yiu; Lee, Ka Lok Ryan; Griffith, James F. [Prince of Wales Hospital, Department of Imaging and Interventional Radiology, Shatin, N.T (China)

    2016-11-15

    Brachialis periosteal avulsion injury is an uncommon injury occurring in young children. The injury may be misinterpreted or overlooked because of misleading or subtle radiological findings. A case of 7-year-old child with post-traumatic elbow pain and subtle findings on elbow radiography is presented. The injury was initially misinterpreted as an avulsion fracture of the medial epicondyle. Following radiological review, a diagnosis of brachialis periosteal avulsion injury was made. The radiographic and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of this injury are presented to stress the value of comparing the radiographic findings with previous imaging and to increase awareness of this uncommon injury. (orig.)

  5. Imaging in blunt cardiac injury: Computed tomographic findings in cardiac contusion and associated injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Mark M; Raptis, Demetrios A; Cummings, Kristopher W; Mellnick, Vincent M; Bhalla, Sanjeev; Schuerer, Douglas J; Raptis, Constantine A

    2016-05-01

    Blunt cardiac injury (BCI) may manifest as cardiac contusion or, more rarely, as pericardial or myocardial rupture. Computed tomography (CT) is performed in the vast majority of blunt trauma patients, but the imaging features of cardiac contusion are not well described. To evaluate CT findings and associated injuries in patients with clinically diagnosed BCI. We identified 42 patients with blunt cardiac injury from our institution's electronic medical record. Clinical parameters, echocardiography results, and laboratory tests were recorded. Two blinded reviewers analyzed chest CTs performed in these patients for myocardial hypoenhancement and associated injuries. CT findings of severe thoracic trauma are commonly present in patients with severe BCI; 82% of patients with ECG, cardiac enzyme, and echocardiographic evidence of BCI had abnormalities of the heart or pericardium on CT; 73% had anterior rib fractures, and 64% had pulmonary contusions. Sternal fractures were only seen in 36% of such patients. However, myocardial hypoenhancement on CT is poorly sensitive for those patients with cardiac contusion: 0% of right ventricular contusions and 22% of left ventricular contusions seen on echocardiography were identified on CT. CT signs of severe thoracic trauma are frequently present in patients with severe BCI and should be regarded as indirect evidence of potential BCI. Direct CT findings of myocardial contusion, i.e. myocardial hypoenhancement, are poorly sensitive and should not be used as a screening tool. However, some left ventricular contusions can be seen on CT, and these patients could undergo echocardiography or cardiac MRI to evaluate for wall motion abnormalities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Aetiology and Imaging Findings in Traumatic Spine Injury among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    35.6%), followed by dislocation (18.4%). The most frequent spine level involved was lumbar spine (37.9%). Paraplegia (33.3%) and quadriplegia (10.3%) were the common clinical presentations. Fifty six percent of patients had associated injuries ...

  7. Distal humeral physeal injuries in child abuse: MR imaging and ultrasonography findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nimkin, K. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Massachusetts, Medical Center, Worcester, MA (United States); Kleinman, P.K. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Massachusetts, Medical Center, Worcester, MA (United States); Teeger, S. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Massachusetts, Medical Center, Worcester, MA (United States); Spevak, M.R. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Massachusetts, Medical Center, Worcester, MA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Distal humeral physeal injuries, in particular, fracture-separation of the distal humeral epiphysis, can be seen in abused infants. Detection of physeal injury in an infant of toddler may indicate the possibility of unsuspected abuse, particularly when an appropriate history explaining the circumstance of the fracture is lacking. In addition, the extent of injury can be difficult to characterize on plain radiographs. Ultrasonography (US) and MR imaging (MRI) may be of value in diagnosis and may obviate the need for intraoperative arthrography. We present MRI findings in three abused children with distal humeral physeal injuries. Sonographic correlation is also presented in one case. (orig.)

  8. Distal humeral physeal injuries in child abuse: MR imaging and ultrasonography findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nimkin, K.; Kleinman, P.K.; Teeger, S.; Spevak, M.R.

    1995-01-01

    Distal humeral physeal injuries, in particular, fracture-separation of the distal humeral epiphysis, can be seen in abused infants. Detection of physeal injury in an infant of toddler may indicate the possibility of unsuspected abuse, particularly when an appropriate history explaining the circumstance of the fracture is lacking. In addition, the extent of injury can be difficult to characterize on plain radiographs. Ultrasonography (US) and MR imaging (MRI) may be of value in diagnosis and may obviate the need for intraoperative arthrography. We present MRI findings in three abused children with distal humeral physeal injuries. Sonographic correlation is also presented in one case. (orig.)

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of injuries to the calf muscle complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koulouris, George [NYU Medical Centre Hospital for Joint Diseases, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Ting, Amy Y.I.; Jhamb, Ashu [Alfred Hospital, Department of Radiology, Prahran, Victoria (Australia); Connell, David [Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital, Department of Radiology, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Kavanagh, Eoin C. [University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Department of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2007-10-15

    The objective was to describe the imaging findings following acute injury to the calf musculature. We retrospectively reviewed 59 MR examinations in patients who sustained injuries to the calf muscle from April 2001 to September 2004 (48 men, 11 women), with an average age of 31 and 47 years respectively (range in men 20-53; range in women 33-63). Attention was directed to the frequency of muscle involvement, the location of the injury within the musculotendinous unit and the extent of the injury. A total of 79 separate sites of strain injury were identified (39 solitary, 20 dual). Of the 39 isolated strains, injury to the gastrocnemius was most common (19 out of 39; 48.7%), preferentially involving the medial head in 18 cases and the lateral head in 1 case. The soleus was also commonly involved (18 out of 39; 46.2%), with 2 cases (5.1%) of distal avulsions of the plantaris. Of the 20 dual injuries, a combination of gastrocnemius injury with soleus injury was the most frequent finding (12 out of 20; 60%). Dual injuries of both heads of the gastrocnemius muscles were demonstrated in 4 cases (20%), with the soleus and tibialis posterior injured in 3 cases (15%). A combination of soleus and flexor hallucis longus injury was seen in 1 case (5%). This retrospective study utilizing MRI demonstrates that the medial head of the gastrocnemius is the most commonly injured muscle of the calf, closely followed by the soleus, the latter finding rarely reported in the sonographic literature. Dual injuries of the calf muscle complex occur much more commonly than previously reported and may be of prognostic significance. (orig.)

  10. The Glenoid Labral Articular Teardrop Lesion: A Chondrolabral Injury With Distinct Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederman, Evan S; Flores, Stephen; Stevens, Christopher; Richardson, Damien; Lund, Pamela

    2018-02-01

    Evaluation and description of a pathognomonic lesion identified on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of a chondrolabral injury of the glenohumeral joint. Patients were prospectively identified at the time of MRI by a characteristic teardrop appearance of a pedicled displaced chondrolabral flap in the axillary recess on coronal imaging and retrospectively reviewed. In a sample of 36 patients, there were 30 males (83%), and the average age was 27 years (14-75 years). Twenty-four (67%) were noted to have sustained an instability episode or had findings of instability on physical examination; 19 patients (53%) were playing a sport at the time of injury. The characteristic teardrop lesion measured 3.36 mm (1-9 mm) in the coronal plane, 6.98 mm (2-20 mm) sagittal and 11.78 mm (1-25 mm) longitudinal. The lesion was located in the anterior inferior quadrant of the glenoid. The glenoid labral articular teardrop (GLAT) lesion represents a pathognomonic lesion in the spectrum of chondral labral injury, indicating articular cartilage damage to the glenoid. Level IV, therapeutic case series. Copyright © 2017 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. MR imaging of the combined anterior and posterior cruciate ligament tears: focussing on the ratterns of injuries and associated findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Seon Young; Choi, Chang Lak; Park, Dal Soo; Park, Eun Hee; Lee, Sang Ho; Song, Mun Kab; Lee, Kwang Won [Eulji Medical College, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Soon Tae [Chungnam National Univ. College of Medicine, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-09-01

    To evaluate the patterns of injuries and frequency of associated findings on MR imaging in patients with both anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and posterior cruciate ligament (PCL)tears;to compare the associated findings, as seen on MR imaging, in cases with both ACL and PCL tears with those with ACL or PCL tears. Ten patients with compbined ACL and PCL tears, 16 with ACL tears and 18 with PCL tears, all confirmed by arthroscopy or open surgery, were involved in this study. To identify the associated knee injuries, MR images were retrospectively evaluated. In ten patients with combined ACL and PCL tears, open surgery led to the identification of six complete ACL tears (60%), four partial ACL tears (40%), eitht complete PCL tears (80%) and two partial PCL tears (20%). Injuries associated with these combined tears, and revealed by MR imaging, comprised six medial collateral ligament injuries (60%), six lateral collateral ligament jnjuries (60%), five medial meniscal injuries (50%), three lateral meniscal injuries (30%), nine bony injuries (90%), two posterior capsular injuries (20%), and three popliteus muscle injuries (30%). The frequency of popliteus muscle injury was significantly different (p<0.05, Fisher's exact test) between the group with both ACL and PCL tears and that with ACL or PCL tears. Associated findings in patients with combined ACL and PCL tears are more frequent than in those with ACL or PCL tears. In cases involving combined ACL and PCL tears, associated findings-as seen on MR images-should thus be carefully examined.

  12. Hamstring injury in AFL footballers - the prognostic value and nature of MR imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slavotinek, J.; Fon, G.T.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The aim of this study was to examine relationships between MR parameters of hamstring injury and the amount of time lost from competition in Australian Rules footballers. Thirty seven footballers with suspected hamstring injury underwent T1 and inversion recovery T2 turbo spin-echo sequences in axial and sagittal planes. Presence and dimension of abnormal focal intramuscular and / or extramuscular T2 hyperintensity was independently recorded by two radiologists and the percentage abnormal cross sectional muscle area and abnormal muscle volume were measured from T2-weighted images depicting extent of muscle injury. MR detected hamstring muscle and linear extramuscle T2 hyperintensity in 30 (81%) and 25 (68%) of 37 athletes respectively, the long head of biceps being the dominant site of injury in 21 cases.There was a relationship between days lost from competition and percentage abnormal muscle area (r = 0.63, p 0.001) and volume of muscle affected (r = 0.46, p 0.01) with only a trend for linear extramuscular T2 hyperintensity (r = 0.33, p = 0.12) being demonstrated. Hamstring injury most frequently involved the long head of biceps femoris and recovery time was related to MR measurements such as the percentage of abnormal muscle area and volume of muscle injury. Copyright (2002) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  13. Intra-epiphyseal stress injury of the proximal tibial epiphysis: Preliminary experience of magnetic resonance imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tony, G., E-mail: drgtony@gmail.com [Stafford General Hospital, Weston Road, Stafford, Staffordshire ST16 3SA (United Kingdom); Charran, A., E-mail: amandacharran@yahoo.com [Hillingdon Hospital, Pield Heath Rd, Uxbridge, Middlesex UB8 3NN (United Kingdom); Tins, B., E-mail: bernhard.tins@rjah.nhs.uk [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt, Orthopaedic Hospital, Oswestry, Shropshire SY10 7 AG (United Kingdom); Lalam, R., E-mail: radhesh.lalam@rjah.nhs.uk [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt, Orthopaedic Hospital, Oswestry, Shropshire SY10 7 AG (United Kingdom); Tyrrell, P.N.M., E-mail: prudencia.tyrrell@rjah.nhs.uk [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt, Orthopaedic Hospital, Oswestry, Shropshire SY10 7 AG (United Kingdom); Singh, J., E-mail: jaspreet.singh@rjah.nhs.uk [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt, Orthopaedic Hospital, Oswestry, Shropshire SY10 7 AG (United Kingdom); Cool, P., E-mail: paul.cool@rjah.nhs.uk [Orthopaedic Oncology, Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt, Orthopaedic Hospital, Oswestry, Shropshire SY10 7 AG (United Kingdom); Kiely, N., E-mail: nigel.kiely@rjah.nhs.uk [Paediatric Orthopaedics, Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt, Orthopaedic Hospital, Oswestry, Shropshire SY10 7 AG (United Kingdom); Cassar-Pullicino, V.N., E-mail: Victor.Pullicino@rjah.nhs.uk [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt, Orthopaedic Hospital, Oswestry, Shropshire SY10 7 AG (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Purely intra-epiphyseal stress injuries of the proximal tibial epiphysis are described for the first time. • The variation in the MRI findings of these injuries depending on the stage of maturation is demonstrated. • We postulate a patho-mechanism to explain the variations in site and appearance of stress injuries in this region. - Abstract: Stress induced injuries affecting the physeal plate or cortical bone in children and adolescents, especially young athletes, have been well described. However, there are no reports in the current English language literature of stress injury affecting the incompletely ossified epiphyseal cartilage. We present four cases of stress related change to the proximal tibial epiphysis (PTE) along with their respective magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearances ranging from subtle oedema signal to a pseudo-tumour like appearance within the epiphyseal cartilage. The site and pattern of intra-epiphyseal injury is determined by the type of tissue that is affected, the maturity of the skeleton and the type of forces that are transmitted through the tissue. We demonstrate how an awareness of the morphological spectrum of MRI appearances in intra-epiphyseal stress injury and the ability to identify concomitant signs of stress in other nearby structures can help reduce misdiagnosis, avoid invasive diagnostic procedures like bone biopsy and reassure patients and their families.

  14. MR findings of brainstem injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Man Soo; Hwang, Woo Cheol; Park, Choong Ki [Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Dae Chul [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang Joon [Dankook University of College of Medicine, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-02-15

    To analyze the characteristics of traumatic brainstem injury by CT and MR. CT and MR studies of 10 patients with traumatic brainstem lesion in MR were retrospectively reviewed, particularly attended to location, signal intensity and associated lesions. CT failed to depict 8 of 10 brainstem lesions. All lesions were detected in MR images with T2-weighted images showing higher detection rate (n = 10) (100%) than T1-weighted images (n = 3) (30%) or CT (n = 2) (20%). The brainstem lesions located in the dorsolateral aspects of the rostral brainstem (mid brain and upper pons) in 7 (70%) cases, in ventral aspects of rostral brain in 2 (20%) cases and in median portion of pons in 1 (10%) case. Corpus callosal (n = 5), lobar white matter (n = 5) diffuse axonal injury, and 2 hemorrhagic lesions in basal ganglia were the associated findings. MR imaging is more helpful than CT in the detection of brainstem injury, especially T2 weighted images. Primary brainstem lesions were typically located in the dorsolateral aspect of rostral brainstem (midbrain and upper pons). Corpus callosum and white matter lesions were frequently associated.

  15. Study of correlation between clinical, magnetic resonance imaging, and arthroscopic findings in meniscal and anterior cruciate ligament injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhash R Puri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Approx. 28% of patients presents to orthopedic OPD with complaints of knee pain. Common medical complications include an unstable knee, chronic knee pain, and post traumatic arthritis. Aim: To study the correlation between clinical, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, and arthroscopic findings in knee injuries. Materials and Methods: About 30 cases with history of rotational injury having knee pain and recurrent swelling were subjected to study. Results: MRI had better sensitivity (0.95 vs. 0.85 and specificity (1.0 vs. 0.5 in comparison with clinical examination for medial meniscus. In lateral meniscus injury (sensitivity 0.65 vs. 0.61 and specificity 0.95 vs. 0.92 and in ACL injury (Sensitivity 0.77 vs. 0.8 and specificity 1.0 vs. 0.96 the sensitivity and specificity of MRI versus clinical examination showed minimal difference. Conclusion: Our conclusion is that carefully performed clinical examination can give equal or better diagnosis of meniscal and ACL injuries in comparison with MRI scan. MRI may be used as an additional tool for diagnosis.

  16. Diagnosis of knee injuries: comparison of the physical examination and magnetic resonance imaging with the findings from arthroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilton Orlando Júnior

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVES: To ascertain the sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and concordance of the physical examination (PE and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in comparison with arthroscopy, in diagnosing knee injuries. METHODS: Prospective study on 72 patients, with evaluation and comparison of PE, MRI and arthroscopic findings, to determine the concordance, accuracy, sensitivity and specificity. RESULTS: PE showed sensitivity of 75.00%, specificity of 62.50% and accuracy of 69.44% for medial meniscal (MM lesions, while it showed sensitivity of 47.82%, specificity of 93.87% and accuracy of 79.16% for lateral meniscal (LM lesions. For anterior cruciate ligament (ACL injuries, PE showed sensitivity of 88.67%, specificity of 94.73% and accuracy of 90.27%. For MM lesions, MRI showed sensitivity of 92.50%, specificity of 62.50% and accuracy of 69.44%, while for LM injuries, it showed sensitivity of 65.00%, specificity of 88.46% and accuracy of 81.94%. For ACL injuries, MRI showed sensitivity of 86.79%, specificity of 73.68% and accuracy of 83.33%. For ACL injuries, the best concordance was with PE, while for MM and LM lesions, it was with MRI ( p < 0.001. CONCLUSIONS: Meniscal and ligament injuries can be diagnosed through careful physical examination, while requests for MRI are reserved for complex or doubtful cases. PE and MRI used together have high sensitivity for ACL and MM lesions, while for LM lesions the specificity is higher. Level of evidence II - Development of diagnostic criteria on consecutive patients (with universally applied reference "gold" standard.

  17. Acute inversion injury of the ankle without radiological abnormalities: assessment with high-field MR imaging and correlation of findings with clinical outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langner, Inga; Frank, Matthias; Hinz, Peter; Ekkernkamp, Axel [Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-University Greifswald, Department of Trauma and Orthopedic Surgery, Emergency Department, Greifswald (Germany); Kuehn, Jens Peter; Hosten, Norbert; Langner, Soenke [Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-University Greifswald, Institute for Diagnostic Radiology and Neuroradiology, Greifswald (Germany)

    2011-04-15

    Acute inversion injuries of the ankle are the most common sports accidents, accounting for approximately 10% of emergency room admissions. In up to 85%, an injury of the lateral collateral ligaments is observed. Classically, the assessment of these injuries has relied on clinical examination and radiographs, including stress views. The aim of our study was to correlate prospectively the findings of high-field 3 T MRI in acute ankle distortion with clinical outcome. During a 6-month period, 38 patients were prospectively included. MRI was performed within 48 h of trauma and clinical examination using a protocol consisting of axial T2-weighted and coronal and sagittal T1-weighted images and a sagittal proton density (PDw) sequence. Each ligament injury was graded on a three-point scale. Functional outcome was evaluated using the AOFAS ankle-hindfoot scale. In 24/38 patients (63.12%), ligament injury was observed. In 22/24 cases, this was an injury of the lateral ligaments and in 2/24 cases of the medial ligaments. Injury of the syndesmosis occurred in three patients, a bone bruise in four, and an osteochondral lesion in three cases. Patients with an injury of two or more ligaments or a bone bruise had a lower AOFAS score and returned to sports activities and full weight-bearing later (P < 0.01). MR imaging at 3 Tesla is an independent predictor for clinical outcome. Therefore MRI may be beneficial in those cases where the findings influence further treatment. (orig.)

  18. Acute inversion injury of the ankle without radiological abnormalities: assessment with high-field MR imaging and correlation of findings with clinical outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langner, Inga; Frank, Matthias; Hinz, Peter; Ekkernkamp, Axel; Kuehn, Jens Peter; Hosten, Norbert; Langner, Soenke

    2011-01-01

    Acute inversion injuries of the ankle are the most common sports accidents, accounting for approximately 10% of emergency room admissions. In up to 85%, an injury of the lateral collateral ligaments is observed. Classically, the assessment of these injuries has relied on clinical examination and radiographs, including stress views. The aim of our study was to correlate prospectively the findings of high-field 3 T MRI in acute ankle distortion with clinical outcome. During a 6-month period, 38 patients were prospectively included. MRI was performed within 48 h of trauma and clinical examination using a protocol consisting of axial T2-weighted and coronal and sagittal T1-weighted images and a sagittal proton density (PDw) sequence. Each ligament injury was graded on a three-point scale. Functional outcome was evaluated using the AOFAS ankle-hindfoot scale. In 24/38 patients (63.12%), ligament injury was observed. In 22/24 cases, this was an injury of the lateral ligaments and in 2/24 cases of the medial ligaments. Injury of the syndesmosis occurred in three patients, a bone bruise in four, and an osteochondral lesion in three cases. Patients with an injury of two or more ligaments or a bone bruise had a lower AOFAS score and returned to sports activities and full weight-bearing later (P < 0.01). MR imaging at 3 Tesla is an independent predictor for clinical outcome. Therefore MRI may be beneficial in those cases where the findings influence further treatment. (orig.)

  19. Calcaneal tendon: imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montandon, Cristiano; Fonseca, Cristiano Rezio; Montandon Junior, Marcelo Eustaquio; Lobo, Leonardo Valadares; Ribeiro, Flavia Aparecida de Souza; Teixeira, Kim-Ir-Sen Santos

    2003-01-01

    We reviewed the radiological and clinical features of 23 patients with calcaneal tendon diseases, who were submitted to ultrasound or magnetic resonance imaging. The objective of this study was to characterize the lesions for a precise diagnosis of calcaneal tendon injuries. A wide range of calcaneal tendon diseases include degenerative lesions, inflammation of the peritendinous tissue such as peritendinitis and bursitis, and rupture. Imaging methods are essential in the diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of calcaneal tendon diseases. (author)

  20. Intrathoracic gossypiboma: imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosalen Junior, Roberto Antonio; Bosi, Thiago Carneiro da Cunha; Souza, Luis Ronan Marquez Ferreira de; Andrade, Fernando Coelho Goulart de; Candido, Daniela; Lopes, Gesner Pereira; Melo, Ana Lucia Kefalas Oliveira; Fatureto, Marcelo Cunha

    2006-01-01

    The authors report three cases of intrathoracic foreign body that is defined as a cotton matrix mass, mostly retained surgical sponge, a rare complication of a thoracic surgery. The patients were evaluated by chest radiography and computed tomography with the imaging findings confirmed after thoracotomy and anatomopathological study. The mainly imaging findings consisted of intrathoracic masses in patients with previous thoracic surgery that return to hospital with lower respiratory tract symptoms in different period after surgery procedure. The three cases were related with a brief review of the literature. (author)

  1. Cardiac Injuries: A Review of Multidetector Computed Tomography Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxi, Ameya Jagdish; Restrepo, Carlos; Mumbower, Amy; McCarthy, Michael; Rashmi, Katre

    2015-01-01

    Trauma is the leading cause of death in United States in the younger population. Cardiac trauma is common following blunt chest injuries and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. This study discusses various multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) findings of cardiac trauma. Cardiac injuries are broadly categorized into the most commonly occurring blunt cardiac injury and the less commonly occurring penetrating injury. Signs and symptoms of cardiac injury can be masked by the associated injuries. Each imaging modality including chest radiographs, echocardiography, magnetic resonance imaging and MDCT has role in evaluating these patients. However, MDCT is noninvasive; universally available and has a high spatial, contrast, and temporal resolution. It is a one stop shop to diagnose and evaluate complications of cardiac injury. MDCT is an imaging modality of choice to evaluate patients with cardiac injuries especially the injuries capable of causing hemodynamic instability. PMID:26839855

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in bipartite medial cuneiform – a potential pitfall in diagnosis of midfoot injuries: a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elias Ilan

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The bipartite medial cuneiform is an uncommon developmental osseous variant in the midfoot. To our knowledge, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI characteristics of a non-symptomatic bipartite medial cuneiform have not been described in the orthopaedic literature. It is important for orthopaedic foot and ankle surgeons, musculoskeletal radiologists, and for podiatrists to identify this osseous variant as it may be mistakenly diagnosed as a fracture or not recognized as a source of non-traumatic or traumatic foot pain, which may sometimes even require surgical treatment. Case presentations In this report, we describe the characteristics of three cases of bipartite medial cuneiform on Magnetic Resonance Imaging and contrast its appearance to that of a medial cuneiform fracture. Conclusion A bipartite medial cuneiform is a rare developmental anomaly of the midfoot and may be the source of midfoot pain. Knowledge about its characteristic appearance on magnetic resonance imaging is important because it is a potential pitfall in diagnosis of midfoot injuries.

  3. Dynamic ultrasound evaluation of the syndesmosis ligamentous complex and clear space in acute ankle injury, compared to magnetic resonance imaging and surgical findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantelle van Niekerk

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Syndesmosis injuries are often more serious than an injury to the lateral ligament complex of the ankle, with double the recovery time, chronic discomfort and joint instability. Although magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is considered as the best imaging modality to assess the integrity of the syndesmotic ligamentous complex and clear space, a dynamic ultrasound evaluation may provide an alternative imaging option worthy of exploring. Aim: The aim of this article is to compare the sensitivity and specificity of musculoskeletal ultrasound and MRI, in the diagnosis of syndesmosis pathology, with surgical findings as the reference point. Method: MRI was performed on 114 participants presenting with pain over the lateral aspect of the ankle after injury. This was followed by a dynamic ultrasound examination during which the anterior tibiofibular ligament (ATiFL was assessed for continuity, contour and haematoma. The tibiofibular clear space was measured with the ankle in a neutral position, followed by internal and external rotation. Results: The Fisher’s exact test was used to determine non-random associations between variables and compute statistical significance (p < 0.05. Ultrasound achieved a sensitivity of 86.3%, specificity of 97% with a false-positive rate of 3%. The sensitivity of MRI is similar to that of ultrasound (86% with a specificity of 100%. Conclusion: Although both imaging tests performed very well, MRI was slightly better at excluding pathology while both tests performed equally in demonstrating pathology. As a simple, inexpensive and reproducible test, dynamic ultrasound can thus be considered as an alternative to MRI in acute ankle pathology.

  4. Analysis of risk factor of unfavorable outcome in patients with diffuse brain injury from clinical, CT and magnetic resonance imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishizaka, Hideo; Goto, Tadateru; Osada, Takahiro; Shiramizu, Hideki; Shibata, Masayoshi; Matsumae, Mitsunori

    2010-01-01

    We performed a statistical investigation of poor outcome factors for diffuse brain injury using the state of consciousness, age, gender, pupil abnormality, CT, and MRI findings upon arrival of diffuse brain injury patients to the hospital. We studied 93 diffuse brain injury patients but excluded those with multiple trauma of AIS 3 or above, those who tested positive for alcohol at the time of arrival at the hospital, and those who also exhibited a focal brain injury. Based on clinical findings made at the time patients arrived at the hospital, being older than 65 years of age, Glasgow coma scale (GCS) 7 and below, and having abnormal light reflexes were poor outcome factors. Regarding CT findings, being unable to see the suprasellar cistern, poor visualization of the ambient cistern, and subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) on the brain surface were poor outcome factors. Regarding MRI findings, the presence of basal ganglia injury and brainstem injury were poor outcome factors. Based on a stepwise logistic regression analysis of all poor outcome factors, it was revealed that being older than 65 years of age, having light reflex abnormalities, and the existence of brainstem injuries are all poor outcome factors, independent of each other. In addition, regarding injuries to the brain stem, midbrain injuries were the most prevalent and lateral injuries of the midbrain was the most prevalent poor outcome factor. However, in cases of injury to the brainstem only, recovery was good. (author)

  5. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) findings in adult civilian, military, and sport-related mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI): a systematic critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asken, Breton Michael; DeKosky, Steven T; Clugston, James R; Jaffee, Michael S; Bauer, Russell M

    2018-04-01

    This review seeks to summarize diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies that have evaluated structural changes attributed to the mechanisms of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) in adult civilian, military, and athlete populations. Articles from 2002 to 2016 were retrieved from PubMed/MEDLINE, EBSCOhost, and Google Scholar, using a Boolean search string containing the following terms: "diffusion tensor imaging", "diffusion imaging", "DTI", "white matter", "concussion", "mild traumatic brain injury", "mTBI", "traumatic brain injury", and "TBI". We added studies not identified by this method that were found via manually-searched reference lists. We identified 86 eligible studies from English-language journals using, adult, human samples. Studies were evaluated based on duration between injury and DTI assessment, categorized as acute, subacute/chronic, remote mTBI, and repetitive brain trauma considerations. Since changes in brain structure after mTBI can also be affected by other co-occurring medical and demographic factors, we also briefly review DTI studies that have addressed socioeconomic status factors (SES), major depressive disorder (MDD), and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The review describes population-specific risks and the complications of clinical versus pathophysiological outcomes of mTBI. We had anticipated that the distinct population groups (civilian, military, and athlete) would require separate consideration, and various aspects of the study characteristics supported this. In general, study results suggested widespread but inconsistent differences in white matter diffusion metrics (primarily fractional anisotropy [FA], mean diffusivity [MD], radial diffusivity [RD], and axial diffusivity [AD]) following mTBI/concussion. Inspection of study designs and results revealed potential explanations for discrepant DTI findings, such as control group variability, analytic techniques, the manner in which regional differences were reported, and

  6. MR imaging for blunt pancreatic injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Lin [Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of North Sichuan Medical College, Nanchong, Sichuan 637000 (China); Zhang Xiaoming, E-mail: cjr.zhxm@vip.163.co [Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of North Sichuan Medical College, Nanchong, Sichuan 637000 (China); Xu Xiaoxue; Tang Wei; Xiao Bo; Zeng Nanlin [Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of North Sichuan Medical College, Nanchong, Sichuan 637000 (China)

    2010-08-15

    Objective: To study the MR imaging features of blunt pancreatic injury. Materials and methods: Nine patients with pancreatic injury related to blunt abdominal trauma confirmed by surgery performed MR imaging. Two abdominal radiologists conducted a review of the MR images to assess pancreatic parenchymal and pancreatic duct injury, and associated complications. Result: Diagnostic quality MR images were obtained in each of the nine patients. In the nine patients, pancreatic fracture, laceration and contusion were depicted on MR imaging in five, one and three patients, respectively. There were six patients with pancreatic duct disruption, eight patients with peripancreatic fluid collections, and four patients with peripancreatic pseudocyst or hematoma, respectively. All of the MR imaging findings was corresponded to surgical findings. Conclusion: MR imaging is an effective method to detect blunt pancreatic injury and may provide information to guide management decisions.

  7. Infrared Imaging for Battle Injuries

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Katz, Laurence M

    2008-01-01

    .... The specific aims are to determine the efficacy of passive JR imaging in diagnosis of life-threatening pneumothoraces and related pulmonary injuries, and of limb-threatening traumatic injuries...

  8. MR findings of knee injuries in skiing: relation with the mechanism of injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyo Jeong; Jung, Seung Mun; Shin, Myung Jin; Kwon, Soon Tae

    1995-01-01

    To evaluate the MR findings of knee injuries in skiing and to explain the mechanism of injury with MR findings. We reviewed MR findings of 18 patients with history of knee injuries in skiing. The MR images were evaluated retrospectively to identify the ligament injuries, bone lesions and meniscal injuries. Ligament injuries were seen in 16 patients, bone contusions in 16 patients, meniscal lesions in two patients. The most common group of injury was anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and medial collateral ligament (MCL) injuries with bone contusion on posterior lip of the lateral tibial plateau (LTP). The second common group of injury was isolated ACL injury with bone contusions on the lateral femoral condyle (LFC) and posterior lip of the LTP. We considered that the mechanism of injury of the former group may be correlated with the valgus torque with secondary anterior displacement of the tibia and the latter group may be correlated with the pivot shift phenomenon. MR may play an important role in the diagnosis of knee injuries in skiing and its findings may explain the mechanism of injury

  9. MR imaging of rectus femoris origin injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouellette, Hugue; Thomas, Bijoy J.; Nelson, Erik; Torriani, Martin

    2006-01-01

    To describe the MR imaging findings of acute and chronic rectus femoris origin (RFO) injuries. A retrospective review of pelvic and hip MR imaging procedures was performed over a 4-year period for detection of cases with injuries to the RFO. Subjects were classified as having either acute or chronic symptoms. MR imaging studies, radiographs, CT scans, radiology reports, medical records, and operative notes were reviewed. Imaging analysis was directed to assess injuries affecting the direct and indirect heads of the RFO. Concurrent osseous, cartilaginous and musculotendinous injuries were tabulated. The incidence of RFO injuries on MR imaging was 0.5% (17/3160). With the exception of one case of anterior inferior iliac spine apophysis avulsion and partial tear of the direct head of RFO, all subjects had indirect head of RFO injuries (acute injury 8/9, chronic injury 8/8). Partial tear of the direct head of RFO was less frequently seen (acute injury 3/9, chronic injury 2/8). Partial tears of the conjoint tendon were least frequent (acute 1/9, chronic 2/8). No full-thickness tears of the RFO were noted. Associated labral tears were seen in only one case, with no other concomitant abnormality of the articular cartilage or surrounding soft tissues. All RFO injuries were treated non-operatively. Injuries of the RFO are uncommon on MR examinations of pelvis/hips and may occur in a sequence progressing from indirect head injury to involvement of direct head and conjoint tendon in more severe cases. (orig.)

  10. MR imaging in cervical hyperextension injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, S.J.; Teresi, L.M.; Bradley, W.G. Jr.; Ziemba, M.R.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on cervical hyperextension injuries that are common and often show minimal radiographic abnormalities, even with severe or unstable lesions. MR images and clinical records of 14 patients scanned within 4 months of hyperextension cervical injuries were reviewed. Clinical, radiographic, and MR findings were correlated. Nine patients had acceleration hyperextension whiplash injuries, four with acute cervical disk herniations developing radiculopathy after several weeks. Five patients injured by direct frontal head trauma presented with myelopathy and had MR evidence of cord injury, and four had acute disk herniation

  11. MR imaging of acute cervical spine injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyu Hwa; Lee, Jung Hyung; Joo, Yang Goo [School of Medicine, Keimyung University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-01-15

    To describe magnetic resonance (MR) findings of the patients with acute cervical spinal injury and to assess the usefulness of the MR imagings. We retrospectively reviewed the MR images of 32 patients with acute cervical spinal injury. MR images were obtained with a 2.0 T superconductive MR imaging units (Spectro-20000, Gold-Star, Seoul), using spin-echo and gradient-echo technique. Most of patients were in their 3rd-4th decades and motor vehicle accident was the most frequent cause of acute cervical trauma. We assessed the MR findings with respect to the spinal cord, ligaments, paravertebral soft tissues, intervertebral disk, and bony spine. Spinal cord injury was the most common (65%), where cord swelling, edema, and/or hematoma were demonstrated most frequently at C5-6 level. Traumatic intervertebral disk herniations were the second most common (62.5%) and frequently occurred at the lower cervical levels, mostly at C5-6. Paravertebral soft tissue injury, vertebral body fracture, bone marrow edema and displacement were also well shown on MR images. MR imaging appears to be essential for the evaluation of traumatic disk herniations, spinal cord abnormalities, and injury of paravertebral soft tissue in the acute injury of the cervical spine.

  12. MR imaging of acute cervical spine injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyu Hwa; Lee, Jung Hyung; Joo, Yang Goo

    1995-01-01

    To describe magnetic resonance (MR) findings of the patients with acute cervical spinal injury and to assess the usefulness of the MR imagings. We retrospectively reviewed the MR images of 32 patients with acute cervical spinal injury. MR images were obtained with a 2.0 T superconductive MR imaging units (Spectro-20000, Gold-Star, Seoul), using spin-echo and gradient-echo technique. Most of patients were in their 3rd-4th decades and motor vehicle accident was the most frequent cause of acute cervical trauma. We assessed the MR findings with respect to the spinal cord, ligaments, paravertebral soft tissues, intervertebral disk, and bony spine. Spinal cord injury was the most common (65%), where cord swelling, edema, and/or hematoma were demonstrated most frequently at C5-6 level. Traumatic intervertebral disk herniations were the second most common (62.5%) and frequently occurred at the lower cervical levels, mostly at C5-6. Paravertebral soft tissue injury, vertebral body fracture, bone marrow edema and displacement were also well shown on MR images. MR imaging appears to be essential for the evaluation of traumatic disk herniations, spinal cord abnormalities, and injury of paravertebral soft tissue in the acute injury of the cervical spine

  13. Imaging of muscle injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Khoury, G.Y. [Iowa Univ., Iowa City, IA (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Brandser, E.A. [Iowa Univ., Iowa City, IA (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Kathol, M.H. [Iowa Univ., Iowa City, IA (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Tearse, D.S. [Iowa Univ., Iowa City, IA (United States). Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery; Callaghan, J.J. [Iowa Univ., Iowa City, IA (United States). Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery

    1996-01-01

    Although skeletal muscle is the single largest tissue in the body, there is little written about it in the radiologic literature. Indirect muscle injuries, also called strains or tears, are common in athletics, and knowing the morphology and physiology of the muscle-tendon unit is the key to the understanding of these injuries. Eccentric muscle activation produces more tension within the muscle tan when it is activated concentrically, making it more susceptible to tearing. Injuries involving the muscle belly tend to occur near the myotendinous junction. In adolescents, the weakest link in the muscle-tendon-bone complex is the apophysis. Traditionally, plain radiography has been the main diagnostic modality for evaluation of these injuries; however, with the advent of MRI it has become much easier to diagnose injuries primarily affecting the soft tissues. This article reviews the anatomy and physiology of the muscle-tendon unit as they relate to indirect muscle injuries. Examples of common muscle injuries are illustrated. (orig.)

  14. Sports injury of the spine: imaging diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kainberger, F.; Weidekamm, C.; Matzner, M.; Trieb, K.

    2006-01-01

    Sports injuries, especially those due to trend sports, and overuse resulting from monotonous repetitive movement patterns may cause various spinal abnormalities. Indications for diagnostic imaging should be established more readily in this group of young patients than in adults, as there is a higher probability to find morphologic abnormalities. This diagnostic strategy should also be applied for MRI and CT investigations. Image findings should be interpreted with view on kinetic chains related to distinct sporting activities. (orig.)

  15. Imaging of orthopedic sports injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanhoenacker, F.M.; Gielen, J.L.; Maas, M.

    2007-01-01

    This volume provides an updated review of imaging abnormalities in orthopedic sports injuries. The first part of the book contains background information on relevant basic science and general imaging principles in sports traumatology. The second part comprises a topographic discussion of sports injuries. Each chapter highlights the merit of different imaging techniques, focused on a specific clinical problem. In the third part, natural history, monitoring and follow-up by imaging are discussed. This well-illustrated book will be of value for musculoskeletal radiologists, orthopedic surgeons, sports physicians and everyone else involved in sports medicine. (orig.)

  16. Imaging findings in acute calcific prevertebral tendinitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grassi, Caio Giometti; Diniz, Fabio de Vilhena; Garcia, Marcio Ricardo Taveira; Gomes, Regina Lucia Elia; Daniel, Mauro Miguel; Funari, Marcelo Buarque de Gusmao

    2011-01-01

    Acute calcific prevertebral tendinitis is a benign and rare condition that presents calcification of the superior oblique fibers of longus colli muscle with local inflammatory reaction. Such condition is one of the less common presentations of calcium hydroxyapatite deposition disease. Clinical signs are usually acute neck pain and odynophagia, and it may be misdiagnosed as retropharyngeal abscess, spondylodiscitis or traumatic injury. The imaging findings in calcific prevertebral tendinitis are pathognomonic. The knowledge of such findings is extremely important to avoid unnecessary interventions in a patient presenting a condition with a good response to conservative treatment. (author)

  17. Imaging findings in acute calcific prevertebral tendinitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grassi, Caio Giometti; Diniz, Fabio de Vilhena; Garcia, Marcio Ricardo Taveira; Gomes, Regina Lucia Elia; Daniel, Mauro Miguel; Funari, Marcelo Buarque de Gusmao [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein (HIAE), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Imaging Dept.

    2011-09-15

    Acute calcific prevertebral tendinitis is a benign and rare condition that presents calcification of the superior oblique fibers of longus colli muscle with local inflammatory reaction. Such condition is one of the less common presentations of calcium hydroxyapatite deposition disease. Clinical signs are usually acute neck pain and odynophagia, and it may be misdiagnosed as retropharyngeal abscess, spondylodiscitis or traumatic injury. The imaging findings in calcific prevertebral tendinitis are pathognomonic. The knowledge of such findings is extremely important to avoid unnecessary interventions in a patient presenting a condition with a good response to conservative treatment. (author)

  18. Accuracy of MRI findings in chronic lateral ankle ligament injury: Comparison with surgical findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, H.-J. [Department of Radiology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiology, Kangwon National University, School of Medicine, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Cha, S.-D. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Myongji Hospital, Kwandong University, College of Medicine, Koyang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, S.S. [Department of Radiology, Kangwon National University, School of Medicine, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Rho, M.-H., E-mail: parkhiji@kangwon.ac.kr [Department of Radiology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kwag, H.-J. [Department of Radiology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, N.-H. [Department of Radiology, Myongji Hospital, Kwandong University, College of Medicine, Koyang (Korea, Republic of); Lee, S.-Y. [Department of Radiology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-04-15

    Aim: To evaluate the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in chronic lateral ankle ligament injury in comparison with that of surgical findings. Materials and methods: Forty-eight cases (25 men, 23 women, mean age 36 years) of clinically suspected chronic ankle ligament injury underwent MRI studies and surgery. Sagittal, coronal, and axial, T1-weighted, spin-echo, proton density and T2-weighted, fast spin-echo images with fat saturation were obtained in all patients. MRI examinations were read in consensus by two fellowship-trained academic musculoskeletal radiologists who evaluated the lateral ankle ligaments, including the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) and calcaneofibular ligament (CFL) without clinical information. The results of the MRI studies were then compared with the surgical findings. Results: The MRI findings of ATFL injury showed a sensitivity of detection of complete tears of 75% and specificity of 86%. The sensitivity of detection of partial tears was 75% and the specificity was 78%. The sensitivity of detection of sprains was 44% and the specificity was 88%. Regarding the MRI findings of CFL injury, the sensitivity of detection of complete tears was 50% and the specificity was 98%. The sensitivity of detection of partial tear was 83% and the specificity was 93%. The sensitivity of detection of sprains was 100% and the specificity was 90%. Regarding the ATFL, the accuracies of detection were 88, 58, 77, and 85% for no injury, sprain, partial tear, and complete tear, respectively, and for the CFL the accuracies of detection were 90, 90, 92, and 96% for no injury, sprain, partial tear, and complete tear, respectively. Conclusions: The diagnosis of a complete tear of the ATFL on MRI is more sensitive than the diagnosis of a complete tear of the CFL. MRI findings of CFL injury are diagnostically specific but are not sensitive. However, only normal findings and complete tears were statistically significant between ATFL and CFL (p

  19. Accuracy of MRI findings in chronic lateral ankle ligament injury: Comparison with surgical findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, H.-J.; Cha, S.-D.; Kim, S.S.; Rho, M.-H.; Kwag, H.-J.; Park, N.-H.; Lee, S.-Y.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in chronic lateral ankle ligament injury in comparison with that of surgical findings. Materials and methods: Forty-eight cases (25 men, 23 women, mean age 36 years) of clinically suspected chronic ankle ligament injury underwent MRI studies and surgery. Sagittal, coronal, and axial, T1-weighted, spin-echo, proton density and T2-weighted, fast spin-echo images with fat saturation were obtained in all patients. MRI examinations were read in consensus by two fellowship-trained academic musculoskeletal radiologists who evaluated the lateral ankle ligaments, including the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) and calcaneofibular ligament (CFL) without clinical information. The results of the MRI studies were then compared with the surgical findings. Results: The MRI findings of ATFL injury showed a sensitivity of detection of complete tears of 75% and specificity of 86%. The sensitivity of detection of partial tears was 75% and the specificity was 78%. The sensitivity of detection of sprains was 44% and the specificity was 88%. Regarding the MRI findings of CFL injury, the sensitivity of detection of complete tears was 50% and the specificity was 98%. The sensitivity of detection of partial tear was 83% and the specificity was 93%. The sensitivity of detection of sprains was 100% and the specificity was 90%. Regarding the ATFL, the accuracies of detection were 88, 58, 77, and 85% for no injury, sprain, partial tear, and complete tear, respectively, and for the CFL the accuracies of detection were 90, 90, 92, and 96% for no injury, sprain, partial tear, and complete tear, respectively. Conclusions: The diagnosis of a complete tear of the ATFL on MRI is more sensitive than the diagnosis of a complete tear of the CFL. MRI findings of CFL injury are diagnostically specific but are not sensitive. However, only normal findings and complete tears were statistically significant between ATFL and CFL (p

  20. Traumatic injuries: imaging of spinal injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imhof, H.; Fuchsjaeger, M. [Department of Osteology, Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, Wien (Austria)

    2002-06-01

    Severe (high-energy) spinal injuries are common sequelae of acute traumas. The task of radiology is to establish the radiological diagnosis, classify it, judge stability and instability and lead further radiological evaluation in cases of non-agreement between the radiological diagnosis and the clinical (neurological) findings. While skeletal abnormalities are best diagnosed with spiral CT and to a lesser degree with plain-film radiographs, soft tissue lesions, such as cord injuries or ligament ruptures, are best outlined with emergency MRI. The classification of fractures depends on fracture (trauma)-biomechanics and location. All these efforts are necessary to get the best clinical outcome for the patient. (orig.)

  1. Traumatic injuries: imaging of head injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besenski, N.

    2002-01-01

    Due to the forces of acceleration, linear translation, as well as rotational and angular acceleration, the brain undergoes deformation and distortion depending on the site of impact of traumatizing force direction, severity of the traumatizing force, and tissue resistance of the brain. Linear translation of accereration in a closed-head injury can run along the shorter diameter of the skull in latero-lateral direction causing mostly extra-axial lesions (subdural hematoma,epidural hematoma, subarachnoidal hemorrhage) or quite pronounced coup and countercoup contusions. Contusions are considerably less frequently present in medial or paramedial centroaxial blows (fronto-occipital or occipito-frontal). The centroaxial blows produce a different pattern of lesions mostly in the deep structures, causing in some cases a special category of the brain injury, the diffuse axonal injury (DAI). The brain stem can also be damaged, but it is damaged more often in patients who have suffered centroaxial traumatic force direction. Computed tomography and MRI are the most common techniques in patients who have suffered brain injury. Computed tomography is currently the first imaging technique to be used after head injury, in those settings where CT is available. Using CT, scalp, bone, extra-axial hematomas, and parenchymal injury can be demonstrated. Computed tomography is rapid and easily performed also in monitored patients. It is the most relevant imaging procedure for surgical lesions. Computed tomography is a suitable method to follow the dynamics of lesion development giving an insight into the corresponding pathological development of the brain injury. Magnetic resonance imaging is more sensitive for all posttraumatic lesions except skull fractures and subarachnoidal hemorrhage, but scanning time is longer, and the problem with the monitoring of patients outside the MRI field is present. If CT does not demonstrate pathology as can adequately be explained to account for

  2. Traumatic injuries: imaging of head injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besenski, N

    2002-06-01

    Due to the forces of acceleration, linear translation, as well as rotational and angular acceleration, the brain undergoes deformation and distortion depending on the site of impact of traumatizing force direction, severity of the traumatizing force, and tissue resistance of the brain. Linear translation of accereration in a closed-head injury can run along the shorter diameter of the skull in latero-lateral direction causing mostly extra-axial lesions (subdural hematoma,epidural hematoma, subarachnoidal hemorrhage) or quite pronounced coup and countercoup contusions. Contusions are considerably less frequently present in medial or paramedial centroaxial blows (fronto-occipital or occipito-frontal). The centroaxial blows produce a different pattern of lesions mostly in the deep structures, causing in some cases a special category of the brain injury, the diffuse axonal injury (DAI). The brain stem can also be damaged, but it is damaged more often in patients who have suffered centroaxial traumatic force direction. Computed tomography and MRI are the most common techniques in patients who have suffered brain injury. Computed tomography is currently the first imaging technique to be used after head injury, in those settings where CT is available. Using CT, scalp, bone, extra-axial hematomas, and parenchymal injury can be demonstrated. Computed tomography is rapid and easily performed also in monitored patients. It is the most relevant imaging procedure for surgical lesions. Computed tomography is a suitable method to follow the dynamics of lesion development giving an insight into the corresponding pathological development of the brain injury. Magnetic resonance imaging is more sensitive for all posttraumatic lesions except skull fractures and subarachnoidal hemorrhage, but scanning time is longer, and the problem with the monitoring of patients outside the MRI field is present. If CT does not demonstrate pathology as can adequately be explained to account for

  3. Traumatic injuries: imaging of head injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besenski, N. [Croatian Institute for Brain Research, Zagreb (Croatia)

    2002-06-01

    Due to the forces of acceleration, linear translation, as well as rotational and angular acceleration, the brain undergoes deformation and distortion depending on the site of impact of traumatizing force direction, severity of the traumatizing force, and tissue resistance of the brain. Linear translation of accereration in a closed-head injury can run along the shorter diameter of the skull in latero-lateral direction causing mostly extra-axial lesions (subdural hematoma,epidural hematoma, subarachnoidal hemorrhage) or quite pronounced coup and countercoup contusions. Contusions are considerably less frequently present in medial or paramedial centroaxial blows (fronto-occipital or occipito-frontal). The centroaxial blows produce a different pattern of lesions mostly in the deep structures, causing in some cases a special category of the brain injury, the diffuse axonal injury (DAI). The brain stem can also be damaged, but it is damaged more often in patients who have suffered centroaxial traumatic force direction. Computed tomography and MRI are the most common techniques in patients who have suffered brain injury. Computed tomography is currently the first imaging technique to be used after head injury, in those settings where CT is available. Using CT, scalp, bone, extra-axial hematomas, and parenchymal injury can be demonstrated. Computed tomography is rapid and easily performed also in monitored patients. It is the most relevant imaging procedure for surgical lesions. Computed tomography is a suitable method to follow the dynamics of lesion development giving an insight into the corresponding pathological development of the brain injury. Magnetic resonance imaging is more sensitive for all posttraumatic lesions except skull fractures and subarachnoidal hemorrhage, but scanning time is longer, and the problem with the monitoring of patients outside the MRI field is present. If CT does not demonstrate pathology as can adequately be explained to account for

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of traumatic cervical injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juhng, S. K.; Lee, K. S.; Sohn, K. J.; Choi, S. S.; Won, J. J.

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of cevical injuries. MRI studies of 34 patients with cervical spinal injuries were analyzed retrospectively. All MRI scans were obtained with an 1.0T superconductive MRI scanner (Siemens Magnetom 42SPE) and their findings were analyzed regarding the spinal cord, bony spine, ligaments, and intervertebral disks. A variety of abnormal findings were detected: 25 cord abnormalities including cord compression (15 cases), cord edema (4 cases), syringomyelia (4 cases), myelomalacia (1 case), and hemorrhagic contusion (1 case), 18 ligamentous injuries, 22 disk herniations (9 post-traumatic, 13 chronic degenerative), 11 spine fractures, and 4 subluxations. MRI is useful in evaluating the spinal cord itself, in depicting ligamentous injuries, in establishing the presence of disc herniation, and in assessing the alignment of cervical spine

  5. The imaging of stab injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vries, Coert S. de; Africa, Mogoeemang; Gebremariam, Fekade A.; Rensburg, J. Janse van; Otto, Susan F.; Potgieter, Henrik F. (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Univ. of the Free State and Academic Health Complex, Free State Province Dept. of Health, Bloemfontein (South Africa)), e-mail: devriesc.md@ufs.ac.za

    2010-01-15

    In the trauma unit of the Bloemfontein Academic Complex, the total number of stab wounds seen represents approximately 70.5% of penetrating injuries, which is 6.4% of 5004 trauma cases seen in a period of 1 year. The other cases are gunshot wounds and pedestrian or motor vehicle accidents. Specific guidelines and protocols are followed for penetrating trauma management. All imaging modalities are utilized, with chest radiography the mainstay of thoracic imaging in patients having sustained sharp penetrating chest injuries. Computed tomography (CT) is being used more frequently as the primary imaging modality in the evaluation of hemodynamically stable patients with penetrating injuries. The improved speed of data acquisition and superior image reconstruction of multidetector CT (MDCT) has further driven this change in imaging approach. Although digital subtraction angiography (DSA) has been the reference standard for the diagnosis of traumatic vascular injuries, it is giving way to faster, less invasive, and less personnel-intensive imaging techniques, e.g., MDCT angiography. Given the fact that we work in an academic environment and that we have a dedicated interventional unit, arteriography is still frequently performed and still has its place as the 'gold standard' in the diagnosis of vascular injuries. Penetrating chest injuries suspected of traversing the mediastinum or extending near the posterior mediastinal structures dictate esophageal and tracheal evaluation. Although radiology has a role to play, direct visualization (esophagoscopy, bronchoscopy) remains the most reliable method of excluding injuries to these structures. Transthoracic ultrasound (echocardiography) has become indispensable in helping to evaluate injuries to the heart and the ascending and descending aortas. More recent work has demonstrated that ultrasonography can also be used to detect hemothoraces and pneumothoraces with accuracy

  6. Athletic pubalgia and the "sports hernia": MR imaging findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoga, Adam C; Kavanagh, Eoin C; Omar, Imran M; Morrison, William B; Koulouris, George; Lopez, Hector; Chaabra, Avneesh; Domesek, John; Meyers, William C

    2008-06-01

    To retrospectively determine the sensitivity and specificity of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings in patients with clinical athletic pubalgia, with either surgical or physical examination findings as the reference standard. Institutional review board approval was granted for this HIPAA-compliant study, and informed consent was waived. MR imaging studies in 141 patients (134 male patients, seven female patients; mean age, 30.1 years; range, 17-71 years) who had been referred to a subspecialist because of groin pain were reviewed for findings including hernia, pubic bone marrow edema, secondary cleft sign, and rectus abdominis and adductor tendon injury. MR imaging findings were compared with surgical findings for 102 patients, physical examination findings for all 141 patients, and MR imaging findings in an asymptomatic control group of 25 men (mean age, 29.8 years; range, 18-39 years). Sensitivity and specificity of MR imaging for rectus abdominis and adductor tendon injury were determined by using a chi(2) analysis, and significance of the findings was analyzed with an unpaired Student t test. Disease patterns seen at MR imaging were compared with those reported in the surgical and sports medicine literature. One hundred thirty-eight (98%) of 141 patients had findings at MR imaging that could cause groin pain. Compared with surgery, MR imaging had a sensitivity and specificity, respectively, of 68% and 100% for rectus abdominis tendon injury and 86% and 89% for adductor tendon injury. Injury in each of these structures was significantly more common in the patient group than in the control group (P pubalgia, including rectus abdominis insertional injury, thigh adductor injury, and articular diseases at the pubic symphysis (osteitis pubis). (c) RSNA, 2008.

  7. Imaging findings of Paragonimus westermani

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shambhu Kumar Sah

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: The imaging findings of P. westermani is so diverse and non-specific due to its complex life cycle and several life stages during infestation of human; however, common features include nodule, GGO, worm cyst, migration track, pleural effusion, pleural thickening on chest CT scan; patchy low or mixed density lesions on brain CT scan; ring enhancing lesion on brain MRI scan; conglomerated small cystic or serpentine lesions and migration track in liver and spleen on abdominal CT scan. The characteristic imaging features of paragonimiasis are worm cyst and migration track.

  8. Post-therapeutic imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollice, Saverio, E-mail: saveriopollice@hotmail.it [Department of Radiology and Neuroradiology, “L. Bonomo Hospital”, 76123 Andria, BT (Italy); Muto, Mario, E-mail: mutomar@tiscali.it [Department of Neuroradiology, “Cardarelli Hospital”, Naples (Italy); Scarabino, Tommaso, E-mail: tscarabino@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology and Neuroradiology, “L. Bonomo Hospital”, 76123 Andria, BT (Italy)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • This study is the result of collaboration between neuroradiologists and neurosurgeons. • Comparison between neuroimaging techniques to better evaluate the complications after treatment of the spin. • Evaluation of the imaging features of complications and definition of follow-up. - Abstract: Any surgical approach modifies the normal anatomical and functional arrangement of the segmental spine which is aimed, therefore image interpretation cannot ignore a correct set of knowledge in the field of anatomy, pathophysiology, drug compliance, interventional radiology and surgery. Neuroradiological imaging has an important role before surgery to direct the surgeon or interventional radiologist during the operation, both in post-surgery, where imaging examination can rightly evaluate properties and effects of the treatment and can detect potential complications as infections, abscess, bleeding, exuberant scar, mobilization and rupture of devices. The available methods of imaging are the X-rays (XR) made at least in two projections, Computed Tomography (CT) with MPR (multiplanar) and VR (volume rendering) reconstruction, and Magnetic Resonance (MR), often performed before and after contrast media injection. Imaging assessment of spine after surgery is complex and depends upon several factors, including surgical procedures and disease for which it was performed; biomechanical of the underlying cortical and cancellous bone findings; conditions of muscles, intervertebral disk and ligaments; time since surgery procedures; duration and nature of the post-surgical syndrome. Depending upon several factors, one or a combination of complementary imaging modalities (X-rays, Computed Tomography, Magnetic Resonance) may be required to evaluate effectiveness of the treatment; to demonstrate any clinically relevant abnormality at the treated region and adjacent structures (complications such as inflammation, abscesses, bleeding and misplacement of the device); to

  9. The unique features of traumatic brain injury in children. Review of the characteristics of the pediatric skull and brain, mechanisms of trauma, patterns of injury, complications and their imaging findings--part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Pedro S; Poretti, Andrea; Meoded, Avner; Tekes, Aylin; Huisman, Thierry A G M

    2012-04-01

    Traumatic head/brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of death and life-long disability in children. The biomechanical properties of the child's brain and skull, the size of the child, the age-specific activity pattern, and higher degree of brain plasticity result in a unique distribution, degree, and quality of TBI compared to adult TBI. A detailed knowledge about the various types of primary and secondary pediatric head injuries is essential to better identify and understand pediatric TBI. The goals of this review article are (1) to discuss the unique epidemiology, mechanisms, and characteristics of TBI in children, and (2) to review the anatomical and functional imaging techniques that can be used to study common and rare pediatric traumatic brain injuries and their complications. Copyright © 2012 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  10. Imaging of sports injuries in children and adolescents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raissaki, Maria; Apostolaki, Eleni; Karantanas, Apostolos H.

    2007-01-01

    Sports injuries may be unique in childhood and adolescence due to the inherent weakness of the growing skeleton at specific sites, mainly the cartilaginous parts. Many injuries are predictable based on the known mechanism of injury encountered in certain sports. There are two distinct patterns of injury in sports; acute and chronic or overuse. Imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis and management of these entities. Radiologists should be familiar with the advantages and limitations of the various imaging modalities when evaluating the injured young athlete. The present review focuses on the radiological findings and appropriate imaging approach in injuries that are typically or most commonly encountered in the skeletally immature athletes

  11. Imaging of sports injuries in children and adolescents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raissaki, Maria [Department of Radiology, Heraklion University Hospital, University of Crete, Stavrakia, Heraklion 711 10 (Greece); Apostolaki, Eleni [Department of Radiology, Heraklion University Hospital, University of Crete, Stavrakia, Heraklion 711 10 (Greece); Karantanas, Apostolos H. [Department of Radiology, Heraklion University Hospital, University of Crete, Stavrakia, Heraklion 711 10 (Greece)]. E-mail: apolsen@yahoo.com

    2007-04-15

    Sports injuries may be unique in childhood and adolescence due to the inherent weakness of the growing skeleton at specific sites, mainly the cartilaginous parts. Many injuries are predictable based on the known mechanism of injury encountered in certain sports. There are two distinct patterns of injury in sports; acute and chronic or overuse. Imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis and management of these entities. Radiologists should be familiar with the advantages and limitations of the various imaging modalities when evaluating the injured young athlete. The present review focuses on the radiological findings and appropriate imaging approach in injuries that are typically or most commonly encountered in the skeletally immature athletes.

  12. Perinatal Hypoxic-Ischemic brain injury; MR findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Dong Woo; Seo, Chang Hye [Inje University Pusan Paik Hospital, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-09-15

    To characterize the MR findings of hypoxic-ischemic brain injury and to assess the value of the MR imaging. SE T1-, T2-weighted, and IR brain MR images of 44 infants and children with the past history of perinatal hypoxic insults were reviewed. Abnormal brain MR findings of 8 patients with birth history of prematurity and 36 patients with birth history of full-term/posterm including 7 with severe anoxic insult history, were compared in regard to the location and the character of the lesions. MRI demonstrated the followings; (1)abnormal signal intensity lesions of subcortical and/or deep cerebral white matter, cortex, and deep gray matter, (2)atrophy of the cerebral white matter, cortex and corpus callosum, with/without ventriculomegaly, and (3)delay in myelination. Periventricular and deep white matter lesions were demonstrated in the prematurity, the deep white matter lesions and/ or subcortical white matter lesions in the term/post-term, and deep gray matter lesions in the 7 patients with severe anoxic insults history. MR imaging was useful in the diagnosis of the hypoxic-ischemic brain injury, and the white and gray matter lesions were correlated with the time of the injury and the severity of hypoxic insult.

  13. Symmetric imaging findings in neuroradiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zlatareva, D.

    2015-01-01

    Full text: Learning objectives: to make a list of diseases and syndromes which manifest as bilateral symmetric findings on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging; to discuss the clinical and radiological differential diagnosis for these diseases; to explain which of these conditions necessitates urgent therapy and when additional studies and laboratory can precise diagnosis. There is symmetry in human body and quite often we compare the affected side to the normal one but in neuroradiology we might have bilateral findings which affected pair structures or corresponding anatomic areas. It is very rare when clinical data prompt diagnosis. Usually clinicians suspect such an involvement but Ct and MRI can reveal symmetric changes and are one of the leading diagnostic tool. The most common location of bilateral findings is basal ganglia and thalamus. There are a number of diseases affecting these structures symmetrically: metabolic and systemic diseases, intoxication, neurodegeneration and vascular conditions, toxoplasmosis, tumors and some infections. Malformations of cortical development and especially bilateral perisylvian polymicrogyria requires not only exact report on the most affected parts but in some cases genetic tests or combination with other clinical symptoms. In the case of herpes simplex encephalitis bilateral temporal involvement is common and this finding very often prompt therapy even before laboratory results. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PReS) and some forms of hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy can lead to symmetric changes. In these acute conditions MR plays a crucial role not only in diagnosis but also in monitoring of the therapeutic effect. Patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 or type 2 can demonstrate bilateral optic glioma combined with spinal neurofibroma and bilateral acoustic schwanoma respectively. Mirror-image aneurysm affecting both internal carotid or middle cerebral arteries is an example of symmetry in

  14. MR imaging of posttraumatic spinal ligament injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pathria, M.N.; Emery, S.; Masaryk, T.J.; Wilber, R.G.; Bohlman, H.

    1988-01-01

    The accuracy of MR imaging in the detection of ligamentous injury was evaluated in 29 patients (24 male, five female) with spinal injury resulting in fractures (n=27), evidence of instability (n=11), or neurologic deficit (n=2). MR examinations were performed acutely (average, 7.5 days posttrauma) with T1- and T2-weighted imaging and were blindly evaluated. Subsequently, plain films (n=27), tomograms (n=10), and CT scans (n=22) were evaluated. Eighteen patients underwent surgery. Fourteen patients had torn ligaments as indicated by clinical and surgical findings. MR imaging demonstrated ligament damage in 13. One case imaged 40 days following trauma was not detected. No patients with intact ligaments had evidence of ligamentous damage on MR images. MR imaging demonstrated retropulsed fractures in six patients in whom the posterior longitudinal ligament was intact but displaced from the vertebra. MR imaging was more reliable than radiography and CT for detection of ligamentous injury, and T2- weighted sequences are essential in such cases

  15. Apophysitis of the lower limbs: imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbosa, Priscila Rodrigues; Santos, Durval C. Barros; Longo, Carlos Henrique; Luna, Rodrigo de Castro; Kim, Nelson Ji Tae; Rosemberg, Laercio A.; Funari, Marcelo Gusmao Buarque

    2005-01-01

    Apophyses are secondary ossification centers that appear during growth. These ossification centers are under traction forces because of insertion of muscles and ligaments. When traction stress become greater in magnitude and frequency irritation of physis (growth plate) may occur resulting in apophysitis. Apophysitis injuries typically occur in active adolescents and usually presents as peri-articular pain associated with growth, skeletal immaturity, repetitive microtrauma and muscle-tendon imbalance. The most common types of apophysitis of the include Osgood-Schlatter disease (tibial tuberosity), apophysitis of the hip (iliac crest, ischial tuberosity), Sever's disease (posterior calcaneus), Sindig-Larsen-Johansson syndrome (inferior patella), and Iselin's disease (fifth metarsal base). The aim of this study was to show the main magnetic resonance imaging and X-rays findings in patients with these diseases and to discuss the frequent differential diagnosis. (author)

  16. Diagnostic imaging of sport related musculoskeletal system injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, Artur da Rocha Correa; Schivartche, Vivian

    1998-01-01

    The authors review the literature about musculoskeletal injuries related to sports, emphasizing the main findings with different imaging methods. They also present the specific characteristics of each method. (author)

  17. Skeletal imaging of child abuse (non-accidental injury)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Offiah, Amaka; van Rijn, Rick R.; Perez-Rossello, Jeanette Mercedes; Kleinman, Paul K.

    2009-01-01

    In recent years there has been a worldwide increased awareness that children are physically abused by their carers. Radiologists play a vital role in the detection of inflicted injuries. This article reviews the skeletal imaging findings seen in child abuse

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in anterolateral impingement of the ankle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, L.K. III.; Cooperman, A.E.; Helms, C.A.; Speer, K.P.

    2000-01-01

    Objective. To demonstrate the MR imaging findings of anterolateral impingement (ALI) of the ankle.Design and patients. Nine patients with a history of ankle inversion injury and chronic lateral ankle pain were imaged with MR imaging, and the findings correlated with the results of arthroscopy. Three additional patients with clinically suspected ALI of the ankle were also included. Ankle MR imaging studies from 20 control patients in whom ALI was not suspected clinically were examined for similar findings to the patient group.Results. MR imaging findings in the patients with ALI included a soft tissue signal mass in the anterolateral gutter of the ankle in 12 of 12 (100%) cases, corresponding to the synovial hypertrophy and soft tissue mass found at arthroscopy in the nine patients who underwent arthroscopy. Disruption, attenuation, or marked thickening of the anterior talofibular ligament was seen in all cases. Additional findings included signs of synovial hypertrophy elsewhere in the tibiotalar joint in seven of 12 patients (58%) and bony and cartilaginous injuries to the tibiotalar joint in five of 12 (42%). None of the control patients demonstrated MR imaging evidence of a soft tissue mass in the anterolateral gutter.Conclusions. ALI of the ankle is a common cause for chronic lateral ankle pain. It has been well described in the orthopedic literature but its imaging findings have not been clearly elucidated. The MR imaging findings, along with the appropriate clinical history, can be used to direct arthroscopic examination and subsequent debridement. (orig.)

  19. Brain Imaging and Behavioral Outcome in Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigler, Erin D.

    1996-01-01

    This review explores the cellular pathology associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and its relation to neurobehavioral outcomes, the relationship of brain imaging findings to underlying pathology, brain imaging techniques, various image analysis procedures and how they relate to neuropsychological testing, and the importance of brain imaging…

  20. Alpine ski bindings and injuries. Current findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natri, A; Beynnon, B D; Ettlinger, C F; Johnson, R J; Shealy, J E

    1999-07-01

    In spite of the fact that the overall incidence of alpine ski injuries has decreased during the last 25 years, the incidence of serious knee sprains usually involving the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) has risen dramatically since the late 1970s. This trend runs counter to a dramatic reduction in lower leg injuries that began in the early 1970s and to date has lowered the risk of injury below the knee by almost 90%. One of the primary design objectives of modern ski boots and bindings has been to protect the skier from tibia and ankle fractures. So, in that sense, they have done an excellent job. However, despite advances in equipment design, modern ski bindings have not protected the knee from serious ligament trauma. At the present time, we are unaware of any binding design, settings or function that can protect both the knee and lower extremities from serious ligament sprains. No innovative change in binding design appears to be on the horizon that has the potential to reduce the risk of these severe knee injuries. Indeed, only 1 study has demonstrated a means to help reduce this risk of serious knee sprains, and this study involved education of skiers, not ski equipment. Despite the inability of bindings to reduce the risk of severe knee injuries there can be no doubt that improvement in ski bindings has been the most important factor in the marked reduction in incidence of lower leg and ankle injuries during the last 25 years. The authors strongly endorse the application of present International Standards Organisation (ISO) and American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards concerning mounting, setting and maintaining modern 'state of the art' bindings.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging in diffuse brain injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokota, Hiroyuki; Yasuda, Kazuhiro; Mashiko, Kunihiro; Henmi, Hiroshi; Otsuka, Toshibumi; Kobayashi, Shiro; Nakazawa, Shozo

    1992-01-01

    Forty cases diagnosed as diffuse brain injury (DBI) were studied by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed within 3 days after injury. These cases were divided into two groups, which were the concussion group and diffuse axonal injury (DAI) group established by Gennarelli. There were no findings on computerized tomography (CT) in the concussion group except for two cases which had a brain edema or subarachnoid hemorrhage. But on MRI, high intensity areas on T2 weighted imaging were demonstrated in the cerebral white matter in this group. Many lesions in this group were thought to be edemas of the cerebral white matter, because of the fact that on serial MRI, they were isointense. In mild types of DAI, the lesions on MRI were located only in the cerebral white matter, whereas, in the severe types of DAI, lesions were located in the basal ganglia, the corpus callosum, the dorsal part of the brain stem as well as in the cerebral white matter. As for CT findings, parenchymal lesions were not visualized especially in mild DAI. Our results suggested that the lesions in cerebral concussion were edemas in cerebral white matter. In mild DAI they were non-hemorrhagic contusion; and in severe DAI they were hemorrhagic contusions in the cerebral white matter, the basal ganglia, the corpus callosum or the dorsal part of the brain stem. (author)

  2. Liver injury in invasive aspergillus. Echographic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otero Fernandez, R.; Garcia Revillo, J.; Paez Moreno, J.; Zurera Tendero, L.J.

    1994-01-01

    Aspergillus is the second most common mycoses in immuno compromised patients. The invasive form is associated with a mortality of approximately 100%. We present a case of invasive aspergillus in a heart transplant recipient in whom ultrasound disclosed the presence of liver injury which was later confirmed by necropsy. We review the available literature. (Author) 15 refs

  3. MR imaging of alar and transverse atlantal ligament injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Echigoya, Naoki; Harata, Seiko; Ueyama, Kazumasa (Hirosaki Univ., Aomori (Japan). School of Medicine); Nakano, Keisuke

    1992-06-01

    Autopsy findings of ligaments of the upper cervical spine were compared with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. Ligaments were clearly shown as hypointensity on T1-weighted images and proton density images. Transverse images were useful in diagnosing alar and transverse atlantal ligament injuries. When there is a bilateral difference in the alar ligaments, ruptured ligament is suspected. Transverse ligament rupture was shown on interrupted hypointensity and as hyperintensity. MRI was capable of diagnosing alar ligament rupture in 8 of 11 patients, and transverse ligament rupture in all 3 patients. In 2 patients having Jefferson's fracture and injuried atlanoaxial subluxation encountered in the clinical practice, transverse ligament rupture was similarly observed as that in autopsy cases on MR images. Hyperintensity in the transverse ligament rupture area was seen even one year after injury. Injured transverse ligament was seen as swollen hyperintensity on sagittal images; and the hyperintensity was gradually decreased with the process of healing. (N.K.).

  4. MR imaging of medial collateral ligament injury and associated internal knee joint injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Chae Ha; Lee, Sun Kyoung; Lim, Dong Hun; Kim, Young Sook; Byun, Ju Nam; Kim, Young Chul; Oh, Jae Hee [Chosun Univ. College of Medicine, GwangJu (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-11-01

    To assess the value of MR imaging in the diagnosis of medial collateral ligament injury of the knee, we used MR imaging to evaluate the characteristic findings in MCL tears and the frequency of associated knee joint injury. We retrospectively reviewed 26 patients within four weeks of MCL injury, analysed MR findings and correlated them with surgical findings. We evaluated discontinuity, heterogeneous signal intensity of MCL, thin band- like low signal intensity at MCL, facial edema, loss of clear demarcation of adjacent fat also combined bone injury, meniscus injury and other ligament injury. Complete MCL tears were present in 14 patients and partial tears in 12. Complete tears showed discontinuity of MCL, fascial edema and loss of clear demarcation from adjacent fat in 11 patients(79%);proximal MCL tears are more common than distal tears. Partial tears showed thin band-like low signal intensity within MCL, fascial edema and loss of clear demarcation from adjacent fat in seven patients (58%);all patient s with MCL injury showed fascial edema;in 12 patients there was loss of clear demarcation from adjacent fat. We could not, however, distinguish between complete tears and partial tears when MCL showed heterogeneous high signal intensity. Combined bone injury in MCL tears was found in eight patients(62%);the most common sites of this were the lateral femoral condyle and lateral tibial plateau. There was associated injury involving other ligaments(ACL:50%;PCL:27%). Combined meniscus injury in MCL tears was present in 17 patients and the most common meniscus site(50%) is the posterior horn of the medial meniscus. Complete MCL tears showed discontinuity of MCL and partial tears showed a thin band-like low signal intensity within MCL. All patients with MCL injury showed fascial edema, and loss of clear demarcation from adjacent fat. Various other injuries combine with MCL tears. MR imaging is therefore useful in the evaluation of medial collateral ligament injury and

  5. The dysmorphic lung: imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mata, J.M.; Caceres, J.

    1996-01-01

    Congenital lung malformations are not infrequent and can be discovered in adults. It is, therefore, necessary to know their radiological manifestations in order to avoid diagnostic errors. We classify the congenital lung malformations in two main groups: dysmorphic lung and focal pulmonary malformations. We review the radiological spectrum of dysmorphic lung, based on a classification that emphasises the pulmonary abnormality, adding variants when diaphragmatic or venous abnormalities are present. In our opinion this approach allows for a rational use of advanced imaging techniques (CT, MRI). (orig.). With 13 figs

  6. Imaging findings of anterior hip dislocations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfeifer, Kyle [Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Department of Radiology, St. Louis, MO (United States); Leslie, Michael [Yale School of Medicine, Department of Orthopedics and Rehabilitation, New Haven, CT (United States); Menn, Kirsten; Haims, Andrew [Yale University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, New Haven, CT (United States)

    2017-06-15

    Anterior hip dislocations are rare orthopedic emergencies resulting from high-energy trauma and have unique imaging characteristics on radiography, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Imaging findings on CT and MRI allow for the prompt recognition and classification of anterior hip dislocations, which guides patient management and reduces complications. The purpose of this article is to review imaging findings of anterior hip dislocations, specifically focusing on CT and MRI. (orig.)

  7. Imaging findings of anterior hip dislocations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfeifer, Kyle; Leslie, Michael; Menn, Kirsten; Haims, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Anterior hip dislocations are rare orthopedic emergencies resulting from high-energy trauma and have unique imaging characteristics on radiography, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Imaging findings on CT and MRI allow for the prompt recognition and classification of anterior hip dislocations, which guides patient management and reduces complications. The purpose of this article is to review imaging findings of anterior hip dislocations, specifically focusing on CT and MRI. (orig.)

  8. MR imaging and spinal cord injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azar-Kia, B.; Fine, M.; Naheedy, M.; Elias, D.

    1987-01-01

    MR imaging has significantly improved diagnostic capability of spinal cord injuries. Other available diagnostic modalities such as plain films, myelography, CT, and post-CT myelography have failed to consistently show the secific evidence of spinal cord injuries and their true extent. The authors are presenting our experiences with MR imaging in spinal column injury. They have found MR imaging to be the procedure of choice for prognostic evaluation of spinal cord trauma. They are showing examples of recent and old spinal cord injury such as hematomyelia, myelomalacia, transection, spinal cord edema, and cavitation

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of spinal cord injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakudo, Miyuki; Inoue, Yuichi; Fukuda, Teruo

    1988-01-01

    Forty-three MR examinations of 30 patients with spinal cord injuries were retrospectively reviewed to evaluate MR findings of the injured cord and to correlate them with the time interval from the day of spinal cord injury. There were 18 cysts, 8 ''myelomalacias'', 2 cord atrophies, one intramedullary hematoma and two transections. In one patient, ''myelomalacia'' became a cyst on the follow-up study. Large cysts of more than 6 vertebral segments were found in 7 patients, all of whom had had trauma more than 5 years prior to examination. Small cysts of less than half a vertebral height were seen in 5 patients, all of whom were studied 3 to 6 months after the injury. Intermediate cysts were seen in 7 patients who had sustained trauma more than a year before. In a majority (13/14 scans) of ''myelomalacia'', the time interval from injury until examination was only 2 weeks to 6 months. Of the 14 patients who showed post-traumatic progressive myelopathy, seven had large cysts. It is known that intramedullary hematoma becomes a cyst, and that post-traumatic myelomalacia probably results in a cyst in animal studies. Our clinical study seems to support a strong causal relation between myelomalacia and post-traumatic cysts. Since post-traumatic progressive myelopathy with a cyst is surgically treatable, follow-up MR imaging is preferable in cases with myelomalacia. (author)

  10. MR imaging for detection of trampoline injuries in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauth, E; Jaeger, H; Luckey, P; Beer, M

    2017-01-18

    The recreational use of trampolines is an increasingly popular activity among children and adolescents. Several studies reported about radiological findings in trampoline related injuries in children. The following publication presents our experience with MRI for detection of trampoline injuries in children. 20 children (mean 9.2 years, range: 4-15 years) who had undergone an MRI study for detection of suspected trampoline injuries within one year were included. 9/20 (45%) children had a radiograph as the first imaging modality in conjunction with primary care. In 11/20 (55%) children MR imaging was performed as the first modality. MR imaging was performed on two 1.5 T scanners with 60 and 70 cm bore design respectively without sedation. In 9/20 (45%) children the injury mechanism was a collision with another child. 7/20 (35%) children experienced leg pain several hours to one day after using the trampoline without acute accident and 4/20 (20%) children described a fall from the trampoline to the ground. All plain radiographs were performed in facilities outside the study centre and all were classified as having no pathological findings. In contrast, MR imaging detected injuries in 15/20 (75%) children. Lower extremity injuries were the most common findings, observed in 12/15 (80%) children. Amongst these, injuries of the ankle and foot were diagnosed in 7/15 (47%) patients. Fractures of the proximal tibial metaphysis were observed in 3/15 children. One child had developed a thoracic vertebral fracture. The two remaining children experienced injuries to the sacrum and a soft tissue injury of the thumb respectively. Seven children described clinical symptoms without an overt accident. Here, fractures of the proximal tibia were observed in 2 children, a hip joint effusion in another 2, and an injury of the ankle and foot in 1 child. There were no associated spinal cord injuries, no fracture dislocations, no vascular injuries and no head and neck injuries. In the

  11. MR imaging of posterior cruciate ligament injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Nobuyuki [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Hospital; Niitsu, Mamoru; Itai, Yuji; Sato, Motohiro; Kujiraoka, Yuka; Ikeda, Kotaro; Kanamori, Akihiro

    2001-07-01

    Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injuries are less frequent than anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries, but are presumably more common than once thought. Thirty-nine patients with PCL injuries identified on MR images were studied. The criteria for PCL injury were complete tear, partial tear, and avulsion fracture. The approximate site of a partial tear was categorized as proximal, midsubstance, distal, or combination. Fourteen patients (35.9%) had complete tears of the PCL, 21 patients (53.8%) had partial tears, and four patients (10.3%) had avulsion fractures. A total of 12 patients (30.7%) had isolated PCL injuries, while the remaining 27 patients demonstrated evidence of other coexistent knee injuries, such as meniscal tears and ligamentous injuries. Of coexistent knee injuries, meniscal tears (18 patients, 46.2%) were most often seen. (author)

  12. Correlation of Imaging Findings with Pathologic Findings of Sclerosing Adenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Bo Bae; Shu, Kwang Sun

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the mammographic and sonographic findings of pure sclerosing adenosis. We retrospectively reviewed the mammographic and sonographic findings in 40 cases of pure sclerosing adenosis confirmed by core needle biopsy (n = 23), vacuum-assisted biopsy (n = 7), excision biopsy (n = 9), and lumpectomy (n = 1) from January 2002 to March 2010. All imaging findings were analyzed according to the American College of Radiology (ACR) breast imaging reporting and data system (BI-RADS). Radiologic features were correlated with pathologic findings. Although most mammograms showed negative findings (57%), calcification was the most common abnormal finding of sclerosing adenosis. On sonography, the most common finding was a circumscribed oval hypoechoic mass without posterior features (78%). Most masses showed BI-RADS category 3, (75%, 27/36). Five cases showed categories 4 or 5 (14%, 5/36). Most mammographic and sonographic findings of sclerosing adenosis are non-specific and non-pathognomonic, even though sometimes sclerosing adenosis can be radiologically or histopathologically confused with malignancy

  13. Correlation of Imaging Findings with Pathologic Findings of Sclerosing Adenosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Bo Bae; Shu, Kwang Sun [Chungnam National University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the mammographic and sonographic findings of pure sclerosing adenosis. We retrospectively reviewed the mammographic and sonographic findings in 40 cases of pure sclerosing adenosis confirmed by core needle biopsy (n = 23), vacuum-assisted biopsy (n = 7), excision biopsy (n = 9), and lumpectomy (n = 1) from January 2002 to March 2010. All imaging findings were analyzed according to the American College of Radiology (ACR) breast imaging reporting and data system (BI-RADS). Radiologic features were correlated with pathologic findings. Although most mammograms showed negative findings (57%), calcification was the most common abnormal finding of sclerosing adenosis. On sonography, the most common finding was a circumscribed oval hypoechoic mass without posterior features (78%). Most masses showed BI-RADS category 3, (75%, 27/36). Five cases showed categories 4 or 5 (14%, 5/36). Most mammographic and sonographic findings of sclerosing adenosis are non-specific and non-pathognomonic, even though sometimes sclerosing adenosis can be radiologically or histopathologically confused with malignancy

  14. The subscapularis: anatomy, injury, and imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morag, Yoav; Jamadar, David A.; Dong, Qian; Jacobson, Jon A. [University of Michigan, Department of Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Miller, Bruce [University of Michigan, Department of Orthopaedics, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2011-03-15

    The subscapularis is the largest and most powerful of the rotator cuff muscles and fulfills an important role in glenohumeral movement and stability. The spectrum and implications of subscapularis muscle or tendon injury differ from injury to other rotator cuff components because of its unique structure and function. Diagnosing subscapularis injury is clinically difficult and assessment of subscapularis integrity may be limited during arthroscopy or open surgery. Diagnostic imaging plays an important part in diagnosing and evaluating the extent of subscapularis injury. The radiologist should be aware of the anatomy of the subscapularis, the variations in muscle or tendon injury, and the potential implications for treatment and prognosis. (orig.)

  15. Findings from the preparticipation athletic examination and athletic injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuRant, R H; Pendergrast, R A; Seymore, C; Gaillard, G; Donner, J

    1992-01-01

    This study investigated the relationships between the findings from a standardized preparticipation athletic examination, the sport played, and athletic injuries requiring treatment by a physician and/or requiring the athlete to miss one or more games. Of public high school students receiving a preparticipation athletic examination during the 1989-1990 academic year, 674 (56%) either completed a telephone interview or returned a mailed questionnaire at the end of the academic year. The sample consisted of 408 (60.5%) blacks and 243 (36.1%) whites; 470 (69.7%) of the subjects were males. The subjects ranged in age from 13 to 20 years (mean +/- SD, 16.1 +/- 1.2 years), and participated in at least 10 school sports. Injuries were reported by 29.5% of the athletes. The highest proportion of athletes injured occurred among male football (36.3%), female basketball (33.3%), male baseball (19.4%), male soccer (17.2%), and female track and field (15.8%) participants. Responses by the athletes and their parents on the standardized health history were significantly associated with injuries in several specific areas. Knee injuries were associated with previous knee injuries, knee surgery, and history of injuries requiring medical treatment. Ankle injuries were associated with previous ankle injuries and previous injuries requiring medical treatment. Both arm and other leg injuries were associated with previous fractures. Male athletes with either abnormal knee or ankle findings from the physical examination were more likely to injure the knee or ankle, respectively. However, the sensitivities and positive predictive values of these relationships are weak. These data suggest that the preparticipation athletic examination may not predict certain athletic injuries and that additional prevention efforts for specific body areas of injury are needed in certain sports.

  16. Imaging of Muscle Injuries in Sports Medicine: Sports Imaging Series

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guermazi, Ali; Roemer, Frank W.; Robinson, Philip; Tol, Johannes L.; Regatte, Ravindar R.; Crema, Michel D.

    2017-01-01

    In sports-related muscle injuries, the main goal of the sports medicine physician is to return the athlete to competition-balanced against the need to prevent the injury from worsening or recurring. Prognosis based on the available clinical and imaging information is crucial. Imaging is crucial to

  17. Abdominal imaging findings in gastrointestinal basidiobolomycosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flicek, Kristina T; Vikram, Holenarasipur R; De Petris, Giovanni D; Johnson, C Daniel

    2015-02-01

    To describe the abdominal imaging findings of patients with gastrointestinal Basidiobolus ranarum infection. A literature search was performed to compile the abdominal imaging findings of all reported worldwide cases of gastrointestinal basidiobolomycosis (GIB). In addition, a retrospective review at our institution was performed to identify GIB cases that had imaging findings. A radiologist aware of the diagnosis reviewed the imaging findings in detail. Additional information was obtained from the medical records. A total of 73 GIB cases have been published in the medical literature. The most common abdominal imaging findings were masses in the colon, the liver, or multiple sites and bowel wall thickening. Initially, many patients were considered to have either a neoplasm or Crohn disease. We identified 7 proven cases of GIB at our institution, of which 4 had imaging studies (4 computed tomography [CT] examinations, 4 abdominal radiographs, and an upper gastrointestinal study). Imaging studies showed abnormalities in all 4 cases. Three-fourths of our study patients had an abdominal mass at CT. Two of 3 masses involved the kidneys and included urinary obstruction. All masses showed an inflammatory component with adjacent soft tissue stranding, with or without abscess formation. Radiologists should consider GIB when a patient from an arid climate presents with abdominal pain, weight loss, and an inflammatory abdominal mass on CT. Abdominal masses of the colon or liver, bowel wall thickening, and abscesses are the most common imaging findings.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of acute spinal-cord injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Hideki; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Yamada, Takahisa; Iwata, Kinjiro; Okumura, Terufumi; Hoshino, Daisaku.

    1992-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides a noninvasive and very important method of investigating spinal-cord injuries. By means of MRI we examined 36 patients with spinal injuries, 34 of them in the acute stage. 19 cases had complete spinal-cord injury with paraplegia, while 17 cases had incomplete spinal-cord injury. MRI showed the injured spinal-cord in the acute stage to be partially swollen, with a high signal intensity in the T 2 -weighted images. In the chronic stage, the injured cord may show atrophic changes with a post-traumatic cavity or myelomalacia, which appears as a high-signal-intensity lesion in the T 2 -weighted images and as a low-signal intensity in the T 1 -weighted images. The cases with complete spinal injuries showed a high signal intensity at the wide level, and these prognoses were poor. The cases with incomplete injuries showed normal findings or a high-signal-intensity spot. In the Gd-DTPA enhanced images, the injured cords were enhanced very well in the subchronic stage. MRI is thus found to be useful in the diagnosis of spinal injuries; it also demonstrates a potential for predicting the neurological prognosis. (author)

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of equine solar penetration wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Junco, Carolina I Urraca; Mair, Tim S; Powell, Sarah E; Milner, Peter I; Font, Alex F; Schwarz, Tobias; Weaver, Martin P

    2012-01-01

    The magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features, signalment, clinical history and outcome of 55 horses with a penetrating sole injury were evaluated. Our aim was to describe MR imaging findings within the hoof capsule, assess the utility of the technique and give recommendations for the optimal MR imaging protocol to evaluate such injuries. Data from five equine hospitals were analyzed retrospectively. The tract was more likely to be visualized in animals scanned within the first week postinjury. There was no significant predisposition based on breed, age, or gender. T2*W transverse sequences were the most useful for assessment of solar penetrations due to their orientation perpendicular to the deep digital flexor tendon, the reduced scanning time, and the T2* capability of enhancing magnetic susceptibility caused by hemorrhage.

  20. Imaging findings of mimickers of hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae Kyoung Kim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Radiological imaging plays a crucial role in the diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC as the noninvasive diagnosis of HCC in high-risk patients by typical imaging findings alone is widely adopted in major practice guidelines for HCC. While imaging techniques have markedly improved in detecting small liver lesions, they often detect incidental benign liver lesions and non-hepatocellular malignancy that can be misdiagnosed as HCC. The most common mimicker of HCC in cirrhotic liver is nontumorous arterioportal shunts that are seen as focal hypervascular liver lesions on dynamic contrast-enhanced cross-sectional imaging. Rapidly enhancing hemangiomas can be easily misdiagnosed as HCC especially on MR imaging with liver-specific contrast agent. Focal inflammatory liver lesions mimic HCC by demonstrating arterial-phase hypervascularity and subsequent washout on dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging. It is important to recognize the suggestive imaging findings for intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (CC as the management of CC is largely different from that of HCC. There are other benign mimickers of HCC such as angiomyolipomas and focal nodular hyperplasia-like nodules. Recognition of their typical imaging findings can reduce false-positive HCC diagnosis.

  1. MR imaging findings of trigger thumb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Eric Y.; Chen, Karen C.; Chung, Christine B. [VA San Diego Healthcare System, Radiology Service, San Diego, CA (United States); University of California, San Diego Medical Center, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Trigger finger (or trigger thumb), also known as sclerosing tenosynovitis, is a common clinical diagnosis that rarely presents for imaging. Because of this selection bias, many radiologists may not be familiar with the process. Furthermore, patients who do present for imaging frequently have misleading examination indications. To our knowledge, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings of trigger thumb have not been previously reported in the literature. In this article, we review the entity of trigger thumb, the anatomy involved, and associated imaging findings, which include flexor pollicis longus tendinosis with a distinct nodule, A1 pulley thickening, and tenosynovitis. In addition, in some cases, an abnormal Av pulley is apparent. In the rare cases of trigger finger that present for MR imaging, accurate diagnosis by the radiologist can allow initiation of treatment and avoid further unnecessary workup. (orig.)

  2. MR imaging findings of trigger thumb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Eric Y.; Chen, Karen C.; Chung, Christine B.

    2015-01-01

    Trigger finger (or trigger thumb), also known as sclerosing tenosynovitis, is a common clinical diagnosis that rarely presents for imaging. Because of this selection bias, many radiologists may not be familiar with the process. Furthermore, patients who do present for imaging frequently have misleading examination indications. To our knowledge, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings of trigger thumb have not been previously reported in the literature. In this article, we review the entity of trigger thumb, the anatomy involved, and associated imaging findings, which include flexor pollicis longus tendinosis with a distinct nodule, A1 pulley thickening, and tenosynovitis. In addition, in some cases, an abnormal Av pulley is apparent. In the rare cases of trigger finger that present for MR imaging, accurate diagnosis by the radiologist can allow initiation of treatment and avoid further unnecessary workup. (orig.)

  3. Imaging of cervical spine injuries of childhood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khanna, Geetika; El-Khoury, Georges Y. [University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Department of Radiology, 3951 JPP, Iowa, IA (United States)

    2007-06-15

    Cervical spine injuries of children, though rare, have a high morbidity and mortality. The pediatric cervical spine is anatomically and biomechanically different from that of adults. Hence, the type, level and outcome of cervical spine injuries in children are different from those seen in adults. Normal developmental variants seen in children can make evaluation of the pediatric cervical spine challenging. This article reviews the epidemiology of pediatric cervical spine trauma, normal variants seen in children and specific injuries that are more common in the pediatric population. We also propose an evidence-based imaging protocol to avoid unnecessary imaging studies and minimize radiation exposure in children. (orig.)

  4. Imaging Atlantooccipital and Atlantoaxial Traumatic Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havrda, Jonathan B; Paterson, Elizabeth

    2017-09-01

    Cervical spine injuries, specifically the atlantooccipital joint and atlantoaxial joint, often involve the spinal canal or large blood vessels that supply blood to the brain. Patient handling, transport, and positioning for imaging plays an important role in diagnosis, treatment, and patient prognosis. This article discusses cervical spine anatomy, specific traumatic spinal injuries, and radiography's role in treating these injuries. Treatment options and imaging before and after treatment also are discussed, and a description of dose reduction techniques is included. ©2017 American Society of Radiologic Technologists.

  5. Finding of CT and clinical in paraquat poisoning pulmonary injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Zaifang; Li Hongbing; Cheng Shoulin; Li Qixiang; Huang Zhen; Zeng Jianguo

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the CT features of pulmonary injury in paraquat poisoning. Methods: The chest CT image of lung injury in 6 cases of paraquat poisoning were analyzed retrospectively. According to different period of poisoning, the 6 cases were divided into 3 types:the early stage of poisoning (within 2 d), the middle stage of poisoning (3-14 d), the late stage of poisoning (>14 d). A comparison between CT signs and the pathological features of patients was made. Results: Among this 6 cases, 3 cases died, 2 cases pulmonary fibrosis was noted, 1 cases recovered. According to different period of poisoning, the 6 cases were divided into 3 stages: in the early stage of poisoning (within 2 d), 3 cases of all patients showed nothing remarkable, 2 cases showed ground-glass opacity, 1 case showed fuzzy lung-marking.In the middle stage of poisoning (3-14 d), all 6 cases showed ground-glass opacity, mosaic attenuation; 6 cases showed pulmonary consolidation; 4 cases showed subpleural lines; 4 cases showed bronchiectasis; 2 cases showed mid-lower pleural effusion. In the late stage of poisoning (>14 d), 4 cases showed pulmonary consolidation and pulmonary fibrosis, 3 cases showed ground-glass opacity and mosaic attenuation, 1 case showed mid-lower pleural effusion; 1 case showed mediastinal emphysema. Conclusion: The clinical pathology process of paraquat poisoning was in line with CT finding which was related with clinical stage and was helpful for clinical assessment of paraquat poisoning promptly and to guide the clinical treatment. (authors)

  6. Computed tomographic findings of liver injury in adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Deok Gi; Lee, Hyeon Kyeong; Lee, Won Jae; Oh, Yeon Hee; Lee, Sung Hee; Yun, Jee Yeong; Lee, Tae Woo; Lee, Sung Woo; Park, Soo Soung

    1994-01-01

    We studied to compare computed tomographic(CT) findings of liver injury with management method in adults and, moreover, to present the CT basis for the management. We retrospectively reviewed CT scans of 43 adults diagnosed as liver injury during a 66 month period. Thirty-eight patients were hemodynamically stable. Thirty-two of them were managed conservatively, whereas six managed operatively. Five unstable patients underwent emergency operation. We classified CT findings according to the severity of liver injuries(ie, hematoma, laceration, and periportal tracking) and hemoperitoneum, ranging from grade 1 to 5 and from 0 to 3 +. respectively. Thus, we compared the CT classifications with their management(ie, operation rate), especially hemodynamically stable patients. Operation rates of all patients and hemodynamically stable patients were 26% and 16%, respectively. Operation rate at each grade of liver injury was low, especially in hemodynamically stable, despite relatively high operation rate in grade 4. Operation rate of 3+ homoperitoneum was 100%, including hemodynamically stable patients, in contrast to otherwise low operation rate of others. Most liver injury in adults, including grade 4, were managed conservatively, especially hemodynamically stable. Though large amount of hemoperitoneum(ie, 3+) required operation, most hemooperitoeum were managed conservatively. Thus, CT findings of liver injury is helpful in the decision for the management method

  7. Diagnostic imaging of injuries and overuse in soccer players

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonge, M.C. de; Maas, M.; Kuijk, C. van

    2002-01-01

    Soccer is one of the most popular sports worldwide. There is a high incidence of injuries in soccer in which several intrinsic and extrinsic factors play a part. Most injuries are minor, self-limiting and do not need extensive medical treatment or imaging. Imaging can be required for several reasons e.g. when the clinical findings are doubtful, to replace arthroscopy (i. e. of the knee) or for prognostic reasons. All imaging modalities available to the radiologist can be used but MRI is the most valuable imaging modality with its superior contrast resolution and multiplanar capabilities. Basically, injuries in the soccer player can occur anywhere in the body like in every sport. The lower extremities, more specific the knee and ankle, are however the most injured parts. (orig.) [de

  8. Gymnastics injuries and imaging in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, Marc S.

    2009-01-01

    Injuries of children participating in gymnastics are seen less often than in more popular sports. Patterns of injury are predictable based upon sex, age and level of intensity of training and competition. More injuries are seen in girls than in boys, and the great majority of early adolescents who compete have wrist pain. Some otherwise quiescent congenital spine anomalies may be uncovered by the stress of gymnastics maneuvers and present with low back pain. In addition to diagnosis of injuries, imaging can be used to guide analgesic and anti-inflammatory therapy in some injured athletes. Parents whose children wish to participate in gymnastics should understand that fewer injuries occur in the child enjoying recreational gymnastics than in competing gymnasts. More gymnastics injuries are found in very competitive athletes training at higher levels. (orig.)

  9. Gymnastics injuries and imaging in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, Marc S. [Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2009-12-15

    Injuries of children participating in gymnastics are seen less often than in more popular sports. Patterns of injury are predictable based upon sex, age and level of intensity of training and competition. More injuries are seen in girls than in boys, and the great majority of early adolescents who compete have wrist pain. Some otherwise quiescent congenital spine anomalies may be uncovered by the stress of gymnastics maneuvers and present with low back pain. In addition to diagnosis of injuries, imaging can be used to guide analgesic and anti-inflammatory therapy in some injured athletes. Parents whose children wish to participate in gymnastics should understand that fewer injuries occur in the child enjoying recreational gymnastics than in competing gymnasts. More gymnastics injuries are found in very competitive athletes training at higher levels. (orig.)

  10. MR imaging findings of hypertrophic olivary degeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Do Joong; Jeon, Pyung; Kim, Dong Ik [Yonsei Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-06-01

    To describe the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings of hypertrophic olivary degeneration (HOD) MR images of seven patients with HOD were retrospectively reviewed. Two were women and five were men, and they were aged between 48 and 65 (mean 58) years. Imaging examinations were performed with a 1.5-T unit, and the findings were used to evaluate the size and signal intensity of olivary lesions. The time interval from hemorrhagic ictus to MR imaging was between two and 30 months. Follow-up examinations were performed in two patients. All four patients with hemorrhages involving the central tegmental tract in the pons or midbrain showed ipsilateral HOD. Among these four, bilateral HOD was seen in one patient with hemorrhage involving the bilateral central tegmental tract, and in another with tegmental hemorrhage extending to the ipsilateral superior cerebellar peduncle. One patient with cerebellar hemorrhage involving the dentate nucleus had contralateral HOD. Two patients with multiple hemorrhages involving both the pons and cerebellum showed bilateral HOD. Axial MR images showed mild enlargement of the involved olivary mucleus, with high signal intensity on both proton density and T2 weighted images. There was no apparent enhancement on postcontrast T1-weighted images. MR imaging can clearly distinguish secondary olivary degeneration from underlying pathology involving the central tegmental tract in the pons or midbrain and cerebellum. These olivary abnormalities should not, however, be mistaken for primary medullary lesions.

  11. MR imaging findings of hypertrophic olivary degeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Do Joong; Jeon, Pyung; Kim, Dong Ik

    1997-01-01

    To describe the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings of hypertrophic olivary degeneration (HOD) MR images of seven patients with HOD were retrospectively reviewed. Two were women and five were men, and they were aged between 48 and 65 (mean 58) years. Imaging examinations were performed with a 1.5-T unit, and the findings were used to evaluate the size and signal intensity of olivary lesions. The time interval from hemorrhagic ictus to MR imaging was between two and 30 months. Follow-up examinations were performed in two patients. All four patients with hemorrhages involving the central tegmental tract in the pons or midbrain showed ipsilateral HOD. Among these four, bilateral HOD was seen in one patient with hemorrhage involving the bilateral central tegmental tract, and in another with tegmental hemorrhage extending to the ipsilateral superior cerebellar peduncle. One patient with cerebellar hemorrhage involving the dentate nucleus had contralateral HOD. Two patients with multiple hemorrhages involving both the pons and cerebellum showed bilateral HOD. Axial MR images showed mild enlargement of the involved olivary mucleus, with high signal intensity on both proton density and T2 weighted images. There was no apparent enhancement on postcontrast T1-weighted images. MR imaging can clearly distinguish secondary olivary degeneration from underlying pathology involving the central tegmental tract in the pons or midbrain and cerebellum. These olivary abnormalities should not, however, be mistaken for primary medullary lesions

  12. Imaging of Muscle Injuries in Sports Medicine: Sports Imaging Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guermazi, Ali; Roemer, Frank W; Robinson, Philip; Tol, Johannes L; Regatte, Ravindar R; Crema, Michel D

    2017-03-01

    In sports-related muscle injuries, the main goal of the sports medicine physician is to return the athlete to competition-balanced against the need to prevent the injury from worsening or recurring. Prognosis based on the available clinical and imaging information is crucial. Imaging is crucial to confirm and assess the extent of sports-related muscle injuries and may help to guide management, which directly affects the prognosis. This is especially important when the diagnosis or grade of injury is unclear, when recovery is taking longer than expected, and when interventional or surgical management may be necessary. Several imaging techniques are widely available, with ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging currently the most frequently applied in sports medicine. This state of the art review will discuss the main imaging modalities for the assessment of sports-related muscle injuries, including advanced imaging techniques, with the focus on the clinical relevance of imaging features of muscle injuries. © RSNA, 2017 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  13. Utility of MR imaging in pediatric spinal cord injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felsberg, G.J.; Tien, R.D.; Osumi, A.K.; Cardenas, C.A.

    1995-01-01

    We evaluated the utility of MR imaging in pediatric patients with acute and subacute spinal cord injuries. MR imaging of 22 pediatric patients with suspected traumatic spinal cord injuries was reviewed. MR findings were correlated with physical examination and compared to available radiographs and CT examinations performed at time of presentation. Twelve patients had abnormalities on MR imaging. Seven had spinal cord contusions; five contusions were hemorrhagic. Five of seven patients with cord contusion had normal radiographs and CT exams. Six patients with normal radiographs and CT examinations had abnormal MR studies revealing cord contusion, ligamentous injury, disc herniation, and epidural hematoma. MR is useful in initial evaluation of pediatric patients with spinal cord injuries and in prognosis of future neurologic function. In the setting of spinal cord symptomatology and negative radiographic studies, MR imaging should be performed. Surgically correctable causes of cord compression demonstrated by MR imaging include disc herniation, epidural hematoma, and retropulsed fracture fragments. The entity of spinal cord injury without radiographic abnormality is a diagnosis of exclusion which should only be made after radiologic investigation with radiographs, high-resolution thin-section CT, and MR imaging. (orig.)

  14. Traumatic spinal cord injury in MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bronarski, J.; Wozniak, E.

    1993-01-01

    Spinal cord injuries in tetraplegics were briefly discussed on the basis of MR imaging. It was found that severe cervical spine trauma usually results in concussion - the complete transection of the cord is rare. A case of 19 years old male with total cord transection confirmed by MR imaging is described. (author)

  15. Abdominal vascular syndromes: characteristic imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardarelli-Leite, Leandro; Velloni, Fernanda Garozzo; Salvadori, Priscila Silveira; Lemos, Marcelo Delboni; D' Ippolito, Giuseppe, E-mail: leandrocleite@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (EPM/UNIFESP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Mediciana. Departmento de Diagnostico por Imagem

    2016-07-15

    Abdominal vascular syndromes are rare diseases. Although such syndromes vary widely in terms of symptoms and etiologies, certain imaging findings are characteristic. Depending on their etiology, they can be categorized as congenital - including blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome, Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome, and hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome) - compressive - including 'nutcracker' syndrome, median arcuate ligament syndrome, Cockett syndrome (also known as May-Thurner syndrome), and superior mesenteric artery syndrome. In this article, we aimed to illustrate imaging findings that are characteristic of these syndromes, through studies conducted at our institution, as well as to perform a brief review of the literature on this topic. (author)

  16. Abdominal vascular syndromes: characteristic imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardarelli-Leite, Leandro; Velloni, Fernanda Garozzo; Salvadori, Priscila Silveira; Lemos, Marcelo Delboni; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal vascular syndromes are rare diseases. Although such syndromes vary widely in terms of symptoms and etiologies, certain imaging findings are characteristic. Depending on their etiology, they can be categorized as congenital - including blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome, Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome, and hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome) - compressive - including 'nutcracker' syndrome, median arcuate ligament syndrome, Cockett syndrome (also known as May-Thurner syndrome), and superior mesenteric artery syndrome. In this article, we aimed to illustrate imaging findings that are characteristic of these syndromes, through studies conducted at our institution, as well as to perform a brief review of the literature on this topic. (author)

  17. MR imaging of the knee: Comparison with autopsy findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schouman-Claeys, E.; D'Anthouard-de-Vrain-Court, F.

    1987-01-01

    Twenty-five knees of fresh frozen cadavers were studied by MR imaging using a 0.5-T system, with 6-mm thick contiguous sagittal and coronal high-resolution images in T1-weighted spin-echo sequences. A blind image analysis was performed by two independent radiologists, and results were compared with the anatomic findings carried out by an experienced orthopedic surgeon. As previously demonstrated by in vivo studies, MR imaging is an accurate method of evaluating meniscal injury and hyaline cartilage defects. However, pitfalls in interpretation may occur in some small or peripheral meniscal lesions and in small cartilage defects. Anterior cruciate ligament analysis is often difficult on sagittal planes

  18. Skeletal imaging of child abuse (non-accidental injury)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Offiah, Amaka [Great Ormond Street Hospital, Radiology Department, London (United Kingdom); Rijn, Rick R. van [Academic Medical Centre Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam Zuid-Oost (Netherlands); Perez-Rossello, Jeanette Mercedes; Kleinman, Paul K. [Children' s Hospital Boston, Radiology Department, Boston, MA (United States)

    2009-05-15

    In recent years there has been a worldwide increased awareness that children are physically abused by their carers. Radiologists play a vital role in the detection of inflicted injuries. This article reviews the skeletal imaging findings seen in child abuse. (orig.)

  19. Skeletal imaging of child abuse (non-accidental injury)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Offiah, Amaka; Rijn, Rick R. van; Perez-Rossello, Jeanette Mercedes; Kleinman, Paul K.

    2009-01-01

    In recent years there has been a worldwide increased awareness that children are physically abused by their carers. Radiologists play a vital role in the detection of inflicted injuries. This article reviews the skeletal imaging findings seen in child abuse. (orig.)

  20. Imaging Findings of Fibrous Hamartoma of Infancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rho, Byung Hak; Lee, Hee Jung; Kwon, Sun Young [Dongsan Medical Center, Keimyung University College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-09-15

    We wanted to evaluate the imaging findings of fibrous hamartoma of infancy (FHI). We retrospectively reviewed the clinical presentation and the sonographic (n = 5) and CT (n = 3) findings of 5 cases of surgically/pathologically confirmed FHI. The sonographic findings were evaluated according to the location, size, internal echogenicity and vascularity. The CT findings were evaluated according to the attenuation of the mass on both the pre- (n = 3) and postcontrast (n = 2) scans. The image findings were correlated with the pathologic findings. The mean age was 14.8 months (range, 7 months - 3 years). The location of lesions was all in the fatty layer of the back (n = 4) and upper arm (n = 1). All the lesions demonstrated-hypertrichosis on the overlying skin. The lesions measured 31.2 mm in the longest diameter (range: 18 mm - 50 mm). The sonographic findings were purely solid, heterogeneously hyperechoic and hypovacular for all the cases. The internal architecture revealed a 'layering' appearance (n = 3). The CT findings demonstrated isoattenuation, as compared to the adjacent muscle on both the pre- and postcontrast CT scans. The pathologic correlation demonstrated a characteristic 'organoid' mixture of fibrous, mucoid and fatty tissues in all cases. The diagnosis of FHI can be suggested by the sonographic findings of a superficially located, heterogeneous solid mass with a 'layering' appearance in the fatty layer of the back or arms of infants with local hypertrochosis on the overlying skin.

  1. Imaging findings in pediatric adrenocortical carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, J.; Ribeiro, R.C.; Fletcher, B.D.

    2000-01-01

    Background. Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC), a tumor that is rare among children, causes clinically evident hormonal disturbances. Imaging methods are used to stage disease and to plan surgical resection. Objective. To describe the findings of the various imaging methods used to evaluate ACC. Materials and methods. We reviewed the records of ten consecutive patients (mean age, 8.1 years) who presented from 1987 to 1998 with ACC. All patients underwent computed tomography (CT) scanning; five underwent magnetic resonance (MR) imaging; four underwent ultrasonography (US); and eight underwent radionuclide bone scans. Results. Seven patients presented with signs of hormonally functional tumors. Typical imaging findings consisted of a large, well-defined suprarenal tumor, containing calcifications (seven patients) with a thin capsule and central necrosis or hemorrhage (six patients). The inferior vena cava (IVC) was compressed by tumor in three patients, and ultrasonography demonstrated invasion of the IVC wall in one of these. Three patients' bone scans showed that the primary tumor took up radioactive tracer. Spread to lungs or liver or both was demonstrated in six patients. Conclusions. CT, US and MR imaging are effective methods of imaging the primary tumor. Chest CT and bone scintigraphy should be performed to detect metastases. The presence of a thin tumor capsule, a stellate central zone of necrosis, and evidence of hormonal function help distinguish ACC from neuroblastoma. (orig.)

  2. Correlation of magnetic resonance imaging findings with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Correlation of magnetic resonance imaging findings with arthroscopy in the evaluation of rotator cuff pathology. ... Methods: Using the University of Nairobi and Kenyatta National Hospital Ethics Committee approved protocol medical records of thirty four randomly selected consecutive patients with shoulder pain were ...

  3. Descriptive epidemiology of injury cases: findings from a pilot injury surveillance system in Abu Dhabi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M Hafizur; Allen, Katharine A; Hyder, Adnan A

    2016-01-01

    Considering the high burden of injuries, the Health Authority-Abu Dhabi developed a draft electronic and paper-based injury and poisoning notification system (IPNS) to generate better data on the nature and severity of injuries. The pilot testing and evaluation of IPNS was conducted with the specific objectives to (1) identify the characteristics of injury cases, (2) explore potential risk factors, (3) illustrate the nature and type of data, and (4) the working mechanism of data collection. Data were collected from selected hospitals on patient demographics, injury information and clinical assessment. Descriptive, bivariate and multivariate analyses were conducted. Of 4226 injury cases, nearly three-fourths were male, majority were non-UAE nationals, and the mean age was 21.9. Multivariate findings suggested that compared to UAE nationals, non-UAE nationals were 27% more likely to experience fatal, severe or moderate injuries (p = 0.01). Individuals with health insurance were 31% less likely to suffer a fatal, severe or moderate injury compared to those having no health insurance (p Abu Dhabi, and provides initial information on characteristics and injury risk factors that will help identify the need for evidence-based intervention for injury prevention and control.

  4. Imaging of hamstring injuries: therapeutic implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koulouris, George; Connell, David

    2006-01-01

    Though recent research into the diagnosis and management of hamstring disorders has resulted in early and accurate recognition of injury, hamstring strain remains the most common form of muscle injury in the active population. With prompt recognition of hamstring strain, an appropriate rest and rehabilitation routine may be devised by the sports clinician in the hope of avoiding future and possibly more debilitating injury. As such, imaging has played a pivotal role in assisting athletes, both elite and recreational, in returning to activity expeditiously. (orig.)

  5. Imaging of hamstring injuries: therapeutic implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koulouris, George [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Division of Musculoskeletal Imaging and General Diagnostic Imaging, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Connell, David [Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-15

    Though recent research into the diagnosis and management of hamstring disorders has resulted in early and accurate recognition of injury, hamstring strain remains the most common form of muscle injury in the active population. With prompt recognition of hamstring strain, an appropriate rest and rehabilitation routine may be devised by the sports clinician in the hope of avoiding future and possibly more debilitating injury. As such, imaging has played a pivotal role in assisting athletes, both elite and recreational, in returning to activity expeditiously. (orig.)

  6. Imaging the cervical spine following rugby related injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, J.J.W.

    2016-01-01

    Rugby Union and Rugby League are popular sports with high participation across the world. The high impact nature of the sport results in a high proportion of injuries. Rugby has an association with cervical spine injury which has potentially catastrophic consequences for the patient. Anecdotal evidence suggests that radiographers find it challenging to visualise the cervicothoracic junction on the lateral supine cervical spine projection in broad shouldered athletes. This paper intends to analyse the risk factors for cervical spine injuries in rugby and discuss the imaging strategy in respect to radiography and CT scanning in high risk patient groups such as rugby players who are suspected of suffering a cervical spine injury. - Highlights: • Rugby as a participation sport represents a risk of cervical spine injury. • Conventional radiography lacks sensitivity in identifying cervical spine injury. • The body habitus of rugby players makes the imaging of the cervicothoracic junction challenging. • CT scanning should replace radiography in the event of serious suspicion of cervical spine injury. • The notion of CT being a high dose modality should be questioned.

  7. [Imaging findings of cristal deposit disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschmann, Anna; Studler, Ueli

    2016-01-01

    Cristal deposit disorders are characterised by cristal deposits in hyaline and fibrocartilage, in synovium, capsule, ligaments and tendons and periarticular soft tissue. Calciumpyrophosphatedihydrate (CPPD), hydroxyapatite (calcific tendinitis) and uric acid arthropathies are the most common cristal deposit diseases. Radiography is still the number one image modality for initial imaging and the identification of cristal-induced inflammatory arthropathies. Differentiation between the entities of cristal deposit arthropathies can be challenging. Clincial and radiological findings may overlap in different cristal deposit arthropathies, owing a certain diagnosis difficult.

  8. Trampoline related injuries in children: risk factors and radiographic findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimek, Peter Michael; Juen, David; Stranzinger, Enno; Wolf, Rainer; Slongo, Theddy

    2013-05-01

    Backyard trampolines are immensely popular among children, but are associated with an increase of trampoline-related injuries. The aim of this study was to evaluate radiographs of children with trampoline related injuries and to determine the risk factors. Between 2003 and 2009, 286 children under the age of 16 with backyard trampoline injuries were included in the study. The number of injuries increased from 13 patients in 2003 to 86 in 2009. The median age of the 286 patients was 7 years (range: 1-15 years). Totally 140 (49%) patients were males, and 146 (51%) females. Medical records and all available diagnostic imaging were reviewed. A questionnaire was sent to the parents to evaluate the circumstances of each injury, the type of trampoline, the protection equipment and the experience of the children using the trampoline. The study was approved by the Institutional Ethics Committee of the University Hospital of Bern. The questionnaires and radiographs of the 104 patients were available for evaluation. A fracture was sustained in 51 of the 104 patients. More than 75% of all patients sustaining injuries and in 90% of patients with fractures were jumping on the trampoline with other children at the time of the accident. The most common fractures were supracondylar humeral fractures (29%) and forearm fractures (25%). Fractures of the proximal tibia occurred especially in younger children between 2-5 years of age. Children younger than 5 years old are at risk for specific proximal tibia fractures ("Trampoline Fracture"). A child jumping simultaneously with other children has a higher risk of suffering from a fracture.

  9. Synovial chondromatosis of the shoulder: imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terazaki, Carlos Renato Ticianelli; Trippia, Carlos Henrique; Caboclo, Maria Fernanda Sales Ferreira; Medaglia, Carla Regina Miranda

    2014-01-01

    Synovial chondromatosis is a benign condition characterized by synovial proliferation and metaplasia, with development of cartilaginous or osteocartilaginous nodules within a joint, bursa or tendon sheath. In the shoulder, synovial osteochondromatosis may occur within the glenohumeral joint and its recesses (including the tendon sheath of the biceps long head), and in the subacromial-deltoid bursa. Such condition can be identified either by radiography, ultrasonography or magnetic resonance imaging, showing typical features according to each method. Radiography commonly shows ring-shaped calcified cartilages and periarticular soft tissues swelling with erosion of joint margins. Ultrasonography demonstrates hypoechogenic cartilaginous nodules with progressive increase in echogenicity as they become calcified, with development of posterior acoustic shadow in case of ossification. Besides identifying cartilaginous nodules, magnetic resonance imaging can also demonstrate the degree of synovial proliferation. The present study is aimed at describing the imaging findings of this entity in the shoulder. (author)

  10. Synovial chondromatosis of the shoulder: imaging findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Renato Ticianelli Terazaki

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Synovial chondromatosis is a benign condition characterized by synovial proliferation and metaplasia, with development of cartilaginous or osteocartilaginous nodules within a joint, bursa or tendon sheath. In the shoulder, synovial osteochondromatosis may occur within the glenohumeral joint and its recesses (including the tendon sheath of the biceps long head, and in the subacromial-deltoid bursa. Such condition can be identified either by radiography, ultrasonography or magnetic resonance imaging, showing typical features according to each method. Radiography commonly shows ring-shaped calcified cartilages and periarticular soft tissues swelling with erosion of joint margins. Ultrasonography demonstrates hypoechogenic cartilaginous nodules with progressive increase in echogenicity as they become calcified, with development of posterior acoustic shadow in case of ossification. Besides identifying cartilaginous nodules, magnetic resonance imaging can also demonstrate the degree of synovial proliferation. The present study is aimed at describing the imaging findings of this entity in the shoulder.

  11. MR imaging findings in patients with epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honghan, Gong; Hiraishi, Kumiko; Matsuoka, Takae

    1994-01-01

    We retrospectively examined the MR imaging (MRI) findings in 144 patients with epilepsy (31 with temporal lobe epilepsy and 113 with other epilepsies). 110 cases (76.4%) showed abnormal findings such as spotty lesions in white matter, hippocampal atrophy and/or signal change, ventricular dilatation and/or deformity, developmental lesions, brain tumors and so on. Hippocampal atrophy and/or signal change was shown in 74.1% of temporal lobe epilepsy, a remarkably high percentage (p<0.01) compared with the other types of epilepsies (18.1%). This finding means that hippocampal lesions may play a large part in the cause of temporal lobe epilepsy. Investigation of the relationship between clinical term and abnormal findings revealed that the longer the clinical term, the large the number of hippocampal lesions, regardless of whether it is temporal lobe epilepsy or not. Thus hippocampal lesions may occur as a result of hypoxia accompanied with seizure. Therefore we recommend horizontal and/or vertical sections of hippocampus in MR imaging of all patients with epilepsy. Even though MR finding may reflect some secondary lesions, MRI will shed some light on the proper understanding of epilepsy. (author)

  12. Radiological imaging of sports injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masciocchi, C.

    1998-01-01

    Sports medicine is acquiring an important role owing to the increasing number of sports-active people and professional athletes. Accurate diagnosis of the different pathological conditions is therefore of fundamental importance. This book provides an overview of the most frequently observed conditions and correlates them with sports activities, as well as documenting relatively unknown lesions of increasing significance. Diagnostic techniques are described and compared, and their roles defined; interpretative pitfalls ar highlighted. All of the contributing authors have distinguished themselves in the field and have a deep knowledge of the problem involved in the diagnosis and classification of sports injuries. (orig.)

  13. Imaging findings in renal hydatid disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas-Serrano, B.; Ferreiro-Argueelles, C.; Rodriguez-Romero, R.; Marcos del Rio, N.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this work is to describe the image findings of renal hydatid disease, especially on MR. Four cases of echinococcal involvement of the kidney were retrospectively reviewed. All patients had intravenous urography (IVU) and US performed. Computed tomography examination was available in three patients and MR in two cases. Intravenous urography demonstrated communication of the cyst to the collecting system in one case. Ultrasound revealed multicystic appearance in three cases and unilocular in one case. Computed tomography demonstrated unilocular thick-walled or multilocular cysts with well-defined walls, calcified in one case. In multilocular cysts the CT densities of the fluid of daughter cysts was significantly lower than the fluid of mother cysts. This typical appearance was present in three of our cases. The presence of a hypointense rim and a multicystic appearance were distinctive in MR imaging. The combined findings of these different imaging modalities aid greatly in establishing the correct diagnosis. Magnetic resonance imaging is of value in determining the presence of a characteristic rim and enables the evaluation of anatomical relationships. (orig.)

  14. Angiomatoid fibrous histiocytoma: novel MR imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, Salutario J.; Vinson, Emily N. [Duke University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Durham, NC (United States); Moreno, Courtney Coursey [Emory University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Atlanta, GA (United States); Dodd, Leslie G. [University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Brigman, Brian E. [Duke University Medical Center, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Durham, NC (United States)

    2016-05-15

    To describe novel MR imaging features, and clinical characteristics of soft tissue angiomatoid fibrous histiocytoma (AFH) at presentation, local recurrence, and metastases. We described the MRI findings of six cases of histologically proven AFH. Pathologic findings, clinical presentation, and outcome were reviewed. Lesions were primarily cystic. At initial presentation, tumors were surrounded by low signal intensity fibrous pseudocapsule. High signal intensity consistent with the lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate was seen in T2-weighted and post-contrast images as a rim over the hypointense pseudocapsule (double rim sign). High signal intensity infiltrating tumoral cords extended into adjacent tissues, through pseudocapsular defects on T2-weighted and post-contrast images. The cystic component and tumor cell nodularity were demonstrated at post-contrast images. Clinically, lesions were often thought to be benign, underwent marginal resection, developed local recurrence, and one developed second recurrence consisting of metastases. Recurrent tumors appeared as multiple masses, misinterpreted as post-surgical changes. An intramuscular recurrence demonstrated double rim and infiltrating margin. A predominantly well-circumscribed, primarily cystic mass with double-rim and marginal infiltration on MRI suggests the possibility of AFH, in particular in child or young adult. Inclusion of these novel observations in AFH differential diagnosis may have a significant impact on treatment and prevention of recurrence. (orig.)

  15. Imaging findings in external snapping hip syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnamurthy, Ganesh; Connolly, Bairbre L. [The Hospital for Sick Children, Image Guided Therapy, Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto (Canada); Narayanan, Unni [The Hospital for Sick Children, Pediatric Orthopedic Surgery, Toronto (Canada); Babyn, Paul S. [The Hospital for Sick Children, Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto (Canada)

    2007-12-15

    We describe a case of external snapping hip diagnosed by dynamic sonography. The case prompted us to retrospectively review the imaging findings of children who clinically had presented with snapping hip. From this review we identified the features on MRI and CT of either thickening of the iliotibial band or thickening of the anterior edge of the gluteus maximus muscle as the cause of snapping and atrophy of the bulk of gluteus maximus muscle as an important secondary sign associated with snapping. (orig.)

  16. Lobar agenesis of the liver: imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Min; Kim, So Sun; Huh, Jin Do; Joh, Young Duk; Kim, Sun Hee

    1994-01-01

    Congenital lobar agenesis of the liver is a rare anomaly. We report five cases (three cases of right lobar agenesis and two cases of left lobar agenesis) and discuss the radiologic findings of this congenital anomaly. Between July, 1992 and February, 1993, three cases of right lobar agenesis and two cases of left lobar agenesis of the liver were diagnosed by means of computed tomography(CT) and/or sonography. MR imaging was performed in two patients, cholangiography in two, and digital subtraction angiography in one. The main findings of right lobar agenesis of the liver were nonvisualization of the right portal vein and absence of liver tissue to the right of gallbladder. The findings of left lobar agenesis were nonvisualization of left portal vein, absence of liver tissue to the left of the gallbladder, and absence of ligamentum teres. The ancillary findings of the lobar agenesis was visualization of less than three hepatic veins. It is important to consider lobar agenesis of the liver in differential diagnosis when imaging studies reveal abnormal portal vein branches, unusual position of gallbladder, absence of ligamentum teres, and visualization of less than three hepatic veins

  17. Ultrasound findings in injuries of dorsal extensor hood: Correlation with MR and follow-up findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kichouh, Mimoun; De Maeseneer, Michel; Jager, Tjeerd; Marcelis, Stefaan; Van Hedent, Eddy; Van Roy, Peter; De Mey, Johan

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to use ultrasound to examine the dorsal hood in nine patients with a clinical suspicion of dorsal hood injuries. Material and methods: Clinical and imaging files from interesting case logbooks of nine patients were reviewed. Ultrasound was performed by one of the three radiologists experienced in musculoskeletal ultrasound. The examinations were also performed in flexion and in flexion with resistance. MR correlation was obtained in six patients. One patient underwent surgery. To obtain anatomical correlation of the normal dorsal hood 2 embalmed hand specimens were dissected. Results: The sagittal bands were easily depicted in the transverse plane on ultrasound images and presented as hypoechoic bands on both sides of the extensor communis tendons. Injuries of the sagittal bands were seen on ultrasound as hypoechoic thickening of the sagittal bands at the side of the extensor tendons. The normal shape of the sagittal bands was also no longer recognizable. Subluxations or dislocations of the extensor tendons were also seen. When the injuries were located in the fibrous slips between the extensor indicis and the extensor communis of the second finger, subluxations with an increased distance between these 2 tendons were seen, especially in flexion, or in flexion with resistance. Conclusion: Ultrasound is a valuable tool for the assessment of the injuries of the dorsal hood and is an easily available method for the diagnosis of the fine soft tissue components of the dorsal hood region.

  18. Penile epithelioid sarcoma: MR imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirikci, A.; Bayram, M.; Demirci, M. [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Gaziantep University, Kolejtepe, Gaziantep (Turkey); Bakir, K. [Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Gaziantep University, Kolejtepe, Gaziantep (Turkey); Sarica, K. [Department of Urology, Faculty of Medicine, Gaziantep University, Kolejtepe, Gaziantep (Turkey)

    1999-10-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging findings of a 38-year-old man with epithelioid sarcoma of the penis is presented. It started as a firm, painless and slowly growing nodule at the base of his penis 6 months previously which caused pain radiating to the testis during coitus. It has been well known that sarcomas may well mimic reactive processes. Initial presentation of epithelioid sarcoma may provoke considerable diagnostic difficulty, and its differentiation from benign lesions, such as Peyronie`s disease and chronic inflammation, may be a clinical problem. In our present report the MR findings are compared with those of the epithelioid sarcomas of various locations reported in the literature and differential diagnosis of the entity is discussed. To our knowledge, this is the first report regarding the MR findings of the epithelioid sarcoma of penis. (orig.) With 3 figs., 16 refs.

  19. Penile epithelioid sarcoma: MR imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sirikci, A.; Bayram, M.; Demirci, M.; Bakir, K.; Sarica, K.

    1999-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging findings of a 38-year-old man with epithelioid sarcoma of the penis is presented. It started as a firm, painless and slowly growing nodule at the base of his penis 6 months previously which caused pain radiating to the testis during coitus. It has been well known that sarcomas may well mimic reactive processes. Initial presentation of epithelioid sarcoma may provoke considerable diagnostic difficulty, and its differentiation from benign lesions, such as Peyronie's disease and chronic inflammation, may be a clinical problem. In our present report the MR findings are compared with those of the epithelioid sarcomas of various locations reported in the literature and differential diagnosis of the entity is discussed. To our knowledge, this is the first report regarding the MR findings of the epithelioid sarcoma of penis. (orig.)

  20. MR imaging findings in neurofibromatosis type 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egelhoff, J.; Bates, D.; Ross, J.S.; Rothmer, A.D.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on neurofibromatosis 2(NF-2) (bilateral neurofibromatosis) that is an entity distinct from NF-1 (von Recklinghausen disease). While cranial MR findings have been described in these groups, there are no reports of the spinal findings in NF-2 separate from NF-1. Spinal MR findings in six NF-2 and six NF-1 patients were retrospectively reviewed. Sagittal T1-weighted images were obtained of the cervical (n = 10), thoracic (n = 9), and lumbar spine (n = 8) before and after administration of Gd-DTPA (0.1 mmol/kg). All NF-2 patients had enhancing intradural, extramedullary lesions (n = 5-35), consistent with neurofibromas or meningiomas. Three of six patients had enhancing intramedullary (IM) lesions, two of which were surgically confirmed as ependymomas

  1. Imaging findings in congenital hepatic fibrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akhan, Okan [Department of Radiology, Hacettepe University, School of Medicine, 06100 Ankara (Turkey)]. E-mail: akhano@tr.net; Karaosmanoglu, Ali Devrim [Department of Radiology, Hacettepe University, School of Medicine, 06100 Ankara (Turkey); Ergen, Bilge [Department of Radiology, Hacettepe University, School of Medicine, 06100 Ankara (Turkey)

    2007-01-15

    Congenital hepatic fibrosis (CHF) is a rare congenital multisystemic disorder, mostly inherited in autosomal recessive fashion, primarily affecting renal and hepatobiliary systems. Main underlying process of the disease is the malformation of the ductal plate, the embryological precursor of the biliary system, and secondary biliary strictures and periportal fibrosis ultimately leading to portal hypertension. The natural course of the disease is highly variable ranging from minimally symptomatic disease to true cirrhosis of the liver. However, in most patients the most common manifestations of the diseases that are related to portal hypertension, particularly splenomegaly and bleeding varices. Many other disease processes may co-exist with the disease including Caroli's disease, choledochal cysts and autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) reflecting the mulstisystemic nature of the disease. The associating biliary ductal disease led the authors to think that all these entities are a continuum and different reflections of the same underlying pathophysiological process. Although, conventional method of diagnosis of CHF is the liver biopsy the advent of imaging technologies and modalities, today, may permit the correct diagnosis in a non-invasive manner. Characteristic imaging features are generally present and recognition of these findings may obviate liver biopsy while preserving the diagnostic accuracy. In this article, it is aimed to increase the awareness of the practising radiologists to the imaging findings of this uncommon clinical disorder and trail the blaze for future articles relating to this issue.

  2. Imaging findings in fetal diaphragmatic abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alamo, Leonor; Gudinchet, Francois [University Hospital Center of Lausanne, Unit of Radiopediatrics, Department of Radiology, Lausanne (Switzerland); Meuli, Reto [University Hospital Center of Lausanne, Department of Radiology, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2015-12-15

    Imaging plays a key role in the detection of a diaphragmatic pathology in utero. US is the screening method, but MRI is increasingly performed. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia is by far the most often diagnosed diaphragmatic pathology, but unilateral or bilateral eventration or paralysis can also be identified. Extralobar pulmonary sequestration can be located in the diaphragm and, exceptionally, diaphragmatic tumors or secondary infiltration of the diaphragm from tumors originating from an adjacent organ have been observed in utero. Congenital abnormalities of the diaphragm impair normal lung development. Prenatal imaging provides a detailed anatomical evaluation of the fetus and allows volumetric lung measurements. The comparison of these data with those from normal fetuses at the same gestational age provides information about the severity of pulmonary hypoplasia and improves predictions about the fetus's outcome. This information can help doctors and families to make decisions about management during pregnancy and after birth. We describe a wide spectrum of congenital pathologies of the diaphragm and analyze their embryological basis. Moreover, we describe their prenatal imaging findings with emphasis on MR studies, discuss their differential diagnosis and evaluate the limits of imaging methods in predicting postnatal outcome. (orig.)

  3. Child abuse. Diagnostic imaging of skeletal injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stenzel, Martin; Mentzel, Hans-Joachim

    2012-01-01

    Diagnostic imaging, besides medical history and clinical examination, is a major component in assessment of cases of suspected physical child abuse. Performance of proper imaging technique, and knowledge of specific injury patterns is required for accurate image interpretation by the radiologist, and serves protection of the child in case of proven abuse. On the other side, it is essential to protect the family in unjustified accusations. The reader will be familiarised with essentials of the topic 'Physical child abuse', in order to be able to correctly assess quality, completeness, and results of X-ray films. Moreover, opportunities and limitations of alternative diagnostic modalities will be discussed. (orig.)

  4. Hamstring injuries: anatomy, imaging, and intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linklater, James M; Hamilton, Bruce; Carmichael, James; Orchard, John; Wood, David G

    2010-06-01

    Injury to the hamstring muscle complex (HMC) is extremely common in the athletic community. Anatomical and functional aspects of the HMC predispose it to injury, including the fact that the muscles cross two joints and undergo eccentric contraction during the gait cycle. Injury most commonly occurs at the muscle tendon junction but may occur anywhere between the origin and insertion. Complete hamstring avulsions require early surgical repair. The principal indication for imaging is in a triage role to rule out or confirm proximal hamstring avulsion. Acute onset and chronic posterior thigh and buttock pain may relate to pathology at the hamstring origin or muscle tendon junction that can be readily defined on magnetic resonance imaging or, less frequently, ultrasound. Some cases of buttock and thigh pain may relate to spinal pathology. In the elite athlete there is an increasing emphasis on optimizing the rehabilitation process after hamstring injury, to minimize the absence from sports and improve the final outcome. Imaging has a role in confirming the site of injury and characterizing its extent, providing some prognostic information and helping plan treatment. There is increasing interest in the use of growth factors to accelerate healing after muscle and tendon injury. Animal studies have demonstrated clear benefits in terms of accelerated healing. There are various methods of delivery of the growth factors, all involving the release of growth factors from platelets. These include plasma rich in platelets and autologous blood. Clinical studies in humans are very limited at this stage but are promising. At present the World Anti-Doping Authority bans the intramuscular administration of these agents. Other percutaneous injection therapies include the use of Actovegin and Traumeel S and antifibrotic agents.

  5. Diffusion tensor imaging in spinal cord injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamble, Ravindra B; Venkataramana, Neelam K; Naik, Arun L; Rao, Shailesh V

    2011-01-01

    To assess the feasibility of spinal tractography in patients of spinal cord injury vs a control group and to compare fractional anisotropy (FA) values between the groups. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was performed in the spinal cord of 29 patients (18 patients and 11 controls). DTI was done in the cervical region if the cord injury was at the dorsal or lumbar region and in the conus region if cord injury was in the cervical or dorsal region. FA was calculated for the patients and the controls and the values were compared. The mean FA value was 0.550±0.09 in the control group and 0.367±0.14 in the patients; this difference was statistically significant (P=0.001). Spinal tractography is a feasible technique to assess the extent of spinal cord injury by FA, which is reduced in patients of spinal cord injury, suggesting possible Wallerian degeneration. In future, this technique may become a useful tool for assessing cord injury patients after stem cell therapy, with improvement in FA values indicating axonal regeneration

  6. Imaging findings of femoroacetabular impingement syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beall, Douglas P.; Sweet, Clifford F.; Martin, Hal D.; Lastine, Craig L.; Grayson, David E.; Ly, Justin Q.; Fish, Jon R.

    2005-01-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement syndrome (FAI) is a pathologic entity which can lead to chronic symptoms of pain, reduced range of motion in flexion and internal rotation, and has been shown to correlate with degenerative arthritis of the hip. History, physical examination, and supportive radiographic findings such as evidence of articular cartilage damage, acetabular labral tearing, and early-onset degenerative changes can help physicians diagnose this entity. Several pathologic changes of the femur and acetabulum are known to predispose patients to develop FAI and recognition of these findings can ultimately lead to therapeutic interventions. The two basic mechanisms of impingement - cam impingement and pincer impingement - are based on the type of anatomic anomaly contributing to the impingement process. These changes can be found on conventional radiography, MR imaging, and CT examinations. However, the radiographic findings of this entity are not widely discussed and recognized by physicians. In this paper, we will introduce these risk factors, the proposed supportive imaging criteria, and the ultimate interventions that can help alleviate patients' symptoms. (orig.)

  7. Imaging findings of femoroacetabular impingement syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beall, Douglas P.; Sweet, Clifford F.; Martin, Hal D.; Lastine, Craig L.; Grayson, David E.; Ly, Justin Q.; Fish, Jon R. [University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Department of Radiologal Sciences, Oklahoma City (United States)

    2005-11-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement syndrome (FAI) is a pathologic entity which can lead to chronic symptoms of pain, reduced range of motion in flexion and internal rotation, and has been shown to correlate with degenerative arthritis of the hip. History, physical examination, and supportive radiographic findings such as evidence of articular cartilage damage, acetabular labral tearing, and early-onset degenerative changes can help physicians diagnose this entity. Several pathologic changes of the femur and acetabulum are known to predispose patients to develop FAI and recognition of these findings can ultimately lead to therapeutic interventions. The two basic mechanisms of impingement - cam impingement and pincer impingement - are based on the type of anatomic anomaly contributing to the impingement process. These changes can be found on conventional radiography, MR imaging, and CT examinations. However, the radiographic findings of this entity are not widely discussed and recognized by physicians. In this paper, we will introduce these risk factors, the proposed supportive imaging criteria, and the ultimate interventions that can help alleviate patients' symptoms. (orig.)

  8. Traumatic cervical root injury: Diagnostic value of MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seon Kyu; Chang, Kee Hyun; Han, Moon Hee; Kim, Ho Chul; Kim, Jea Seung; Cha, Sang Hoon

    1993-01-01

    Although superior soft tissue contrast and direct multiplanar imaging capability of MRI are well recognized, myelography has been the imaging modality of choice in evaluation cervical root injury. We assessed the role of MRI and compared its diagnostic accuracy with myelography in the evaluation of cervical root injury. MR imagings of cervical root injury in ten patients (55 roots) were retrospectively reviewed. In 26 explored roots (6 patients). MR findings were compared with myelography and surgical results. In 29 roots (8 patients), which were confirmed by myelography or exploration, the MR findings were focal extradural CSF collections (pseudomeningocele) in 21/29 (72.4%, 8 patients), thickening of extradural roots in 4/29 (13.6%, 5 patients), and thickening of dura in 12/29 (41.4%, 6 patients) roots. T2-weighted axial image was superior to T1-weighted and protein-density- weighted images for delineation root avulsion. The sensitivity and specificity of MRI were 72.7% and 93.3% respectively, while those of myelography were 83% and 90%. Overall diagnostic accuracy of MRI and myelography were comparable (84.6% vs 87.5%). In conclusion, myelography is still considered as the modality of choice in the preoperative evaluation of the cervical root avulsion because of its higher sensitivity. MRI, however, may obviate the myelography with some technical refinements

  9. Judge of surgical indication for blunt injuries of liver and spleen by CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Takao; Yokoyama, Toshimitsu; Suga, Hiroyasu; Deguchi, Yoshizumi; Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Muraoka, Ryusuke; Ishikawa, Masatake; Suzuki, Tadashi.

    1997-01-01

    Recent studies have elucidated that the findings of injuries of parenchimatous organs such as liver and spleen by computed tomography (CT) are consistent with those by surgical operation. But it is still unclear whether CT findings can determine operative indication for blunt injuries of liver and spleen. We performed a retrospective study on 35 lesions of blunt injuries of liver and spleen in 33 cases for blunt injuries of liver and spleen at our hospitals to examine whether CT findings can determine the severity of damage and surgical indication for the injuries, and the following results were obtained. Based on CT findings, the presence of injury was confirmed in all cases except for one lesion. Comparison of CT findings and operative or laparoscopic findings in 12 cases undergoing operation or laparoscopy for liver/spleen injury revealed that the findings of each method were almost the same with few exceptions. When liver/spleen injuries were classified according to the Japanese Association for the Surgery of Trauma (JAST) Classification of injury of liver and spleen, cases with emergency operation had severe injury of Type IIIb for the liver and Type IIIb or higher for the spleen, while conservative treatment was possible for injury cases of Type IIIa or lower of the liver and spleen. From these results, the JAST Classification of these injuries based upon CT imaging was found to be a suitable method for selecting an appropriate treatment for blund injury of liver and spleen. (author)

  10. Judge of surgical indication for blunt injuries of liver and spleen by CT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakagawa, Takao; Yokoyama, Toshimitsu; Suga, Hiroyasu; Deguchi, Yoshizumi; Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Muraoka, Ryusuke [Fukui Medical School (Japan); Ishikawa, Masatake; Suzuki, Tadashi

    1997-10-01

    Recent studies have elucidated that the findings of injuries of parenchimatous organs such as liver and spleen by computed tomography (CT) are consistent with those by surgical operation. But it is still unclear whether CT findings can determine operative indication for blunt injuries of liver and spleen. We performed a retrospective study on 35 lesions of blunt injuries of liver and spleen in 33 cases for blunt injuries of liver and spleen at our hospitals to examine whether CT findings can determine the severity of damage and surgical indication for the injuries, and the following results were obtained. Based on CT findings, the presence of injury was confirmed in all cases except for one lesion. Comparison of CT findings and operative or laparoscopic findings in 12 cases undergoing operation or laparoscopy for liver/spleen injury revealed that the findings of each method were almost the same with few exceptions. When liver/spleen injuries were classified according to the Japanese Association for the Surgery of Trauma (JAST) Classification of injury of liver and spleen, cases with emergency operation had severe injury of Type IIIb for the liver and Type IIIb or higher for the spleen, while conservative treatment was possible for injury cases of Type IIIa or lower of the liver and spleen. From these results, the JAST Classification of these injuries based upon CT imaging was found to be a suitable method for selecting an appropriate treatment for blund injury of liver and spleen. (author)

  11. Imaging findings of Kaposiform Hemangioendothelioma in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Young Jin [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Young Hun, E-mail: iater@snu.ac.kr [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cheon, Jung-Eun; Kim, Woo Sun; Kim, In-One [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Ji Eun [Department of Radiology, Graduate School, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yu Jin [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    Purpose: Kaposiform hemangioendothelioma (KHE) is a rare, aggressive vascular tumor that typically occurs during infancy or early childhood. Though several case reports have discussed the imaging findings of KHE, larger comprehensive studies are lacking. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the imaging findings of KHE in children. Materials and methods: A total of twelve cases of pathologically proven KHE were collected by searching our institution’s pathology database for children diagnosed between January 2004 and April 2016 (6 male, 6 female; median age: 3 months; age range 7 days − 18 years). CT (n = 7) and MRI (n = 9) findings were retrospectively evaluated. The location, morphology, enhancement, and growth pattern were analyzed. Results: KHEs involved various locations: superficial or deep soft tissue of the extremities (n = 4); abdomen (n = 3; 2 cases, pancreas; 1 case, small bowel), neck and mediastinum (n = 1); chest wall, diaphragm, and pericardium (n = 1); abdominal wall (n = 1); and head (IAC, CP angle) (n = 2). Eight of 10 cases (80%) with CT/MR findings were locally invasive and involved two or more adjacent organs. Three cases presented as well-defined solid masses, and seven were associated with infiltrative lesions of the surrounding areas with (n = 4) or without definite solid regions (n = 3). In nine patients with MRI, all KHEs were heterogeneous and hyperintense to muscles on T2-weighted images (T2WI), while four KHEs consisted of some regions that were nearly isointense to muscle. Eight of the 10 cases with imaging exhibited heterogeneous intense enhancement, while only one demonstrated mild enhancement. Signal voids (n = 2), engorged vessels (n = 1), calcification (n = 3), hemorrhage (n = 1), or bone changes (n = 4) were infrequently observed. Four patients (33%) had Kasabach-Merritt phenomenon, and recurrence was observed in two cases. Conclusion: KHEs occurred in various locations, affected mostly infants, and generally exhibited

  12. Imaging findings of neonatal adrenal disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Hye Kyung; Han, Bo Kyung; Lee, Min Hee

    1999-01-01

    In newborn infants, normal adrenal glands are characterized by a relatively thin echogenic center surrounded by a thick, hypoechoic cortical rim as seen on ultrasound (US). Various disorders involving the neonatal adrenal gland include adrenal hemorrhage, hyperplasia, cyst, Wolman's disease, and congenital neuroblastoma. Adrenal hemorrhage is the most common cause of an adrenal mass in the neonate, though differentiation between adrenal hemorrhage and neuroblastoma is in many cases difficult. We describe characteristic US, CT and MR imaging findings in neonates with various adrenal disorders

  13. Imaging findings of neonatal adrenal disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Hye Kyung; Han, Bo Kyung; Lee, Min Hee [Sungkyunkwan Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-01-01

    In newborn infants, normal adrenal glands are characterized by a relatively thin echogenic center surrounded by a thick, hypoechoic cortical rim as seen on ultrasound (US). Various disorders involving the neonatal adrenal gland include adrenal hemorrhage, hyperplasia, cyst, Wolman's disease, and congenital neuroblastoma. Adrenal hemorrhage is the most common cause of an adrenal mass in the neonate, though differentiation between adrenal hemorrhage and neuroblastoma is in many cases difficult. We describe characteristic US, CT and MR imaging findings in neonates with various adrenal disorders.

  14. Evaluation of anterior talofibular ligament injury with stress radiography, ultrasonography and MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oae, Kazunori; Uchio, Yuji; Takao, Masato; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the efficacy of stress radiography (stress X-P), ultrasonography (US), and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the detection of the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) injury. Thirty-four patients with ankle sprain were involved. In all patients, Stress X-P, US, MR imaging, and arthroscopy were performed. The arthroscopic results were considered to be the gold standard. The imaging results were compared with the arthroscopic results, and the accuracy calculated. Arthroscopic findings showed ATFL injury in 30 out of 34 cases. The diagnosis of ATFL injury with stress X-P, US, MR imaging were made with an accuracy of 67, 91 and 97%. US and MR imaging demonstrated the same location of the injury as arthroscopy in 63 and 93%. We have clarified the diagnostic value of stress X-P, US, and MR imaging in diagnosis of ATFL injury. We obtained satisfactory results with US and MR imaging. (orig.)

  15. Evaluation of anterior talofibular ligament injury with stress radiography, ultrasonography and MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oae, Kazunori; Uchio, Yuji [Shimane University School of Medicine, Department of Orthopaedics, Shimane, Izumo (Japan); Takao, Masato [Teikyo University, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Tokyo, Itabashi-ku (Japan); Ochi, Mitsuo [Hiroshima University, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Hiroshima, Minami-ku (Japan)

    2010-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the efficacy of stress radiography (stress X-P), ultrasonography (US), and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the detection of the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) injury. Thirty-four patients with ankle sprain were involved. In all patients, Stress X-P, US, MR imaging, and arthroscopy were performed. The arthroscopic results were considered to be the gold standard. The imaging results were compared with the arthroscopic results, and the accuracy calculated. Arthroscopic findings showed ATFL injury in 30 out of 34 cases. The diagnosis of ATFL injury with stress X-P, US, MR imaging were made with an accuracy of 67, 91 and 97%. US and MR imaging demonstrated the same location of the injury as arthroscopy in 63 and 93%. We have clarified the diagnostic value of stress X-P, US, and MR imaging in diagnosis of ATFL injury. We obtained satisfactory results with US and MR imaging. (orig.)

  16. Imaging findings in idiopathic pelvic fibrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiesner, W.; Bongartz, G. [Inst. of Diagnostic Radiology University Hospital Basel (Switzerland); Stoffel, F. [Inst. of Urology, University Hospital Basel (Switzerland)

    2001-04-01

    Two patients presented with ureteric obstruction, and voiding symptoms and constipation, respectively, and were examined by means of intravenous urography and computed tomography. One patient was additionally examined by means of MR tomography. After CT (performed in both patients) and MRT (performed in one patient) had shown a diffuse, contrast-enhancing, infiltrating process in the small pelvis with infiltration of adjacent organs and vessels, surgical biopsy proved the diagnosis of idopathic pelvic fibrosis. Extension of retroperitoneal fibrosis below the pelvic rim is very rare. Clinical symptoms of pelvic fibrosis are variable and imaging findings may lead to a broad list of differential diagnoses. We present two patients with idiopathic pelvic fibrosis and discuss radiological findings and differential diagnoses of this rare disease. (orig.)

  17. MR imaging of stable posttraumatic spinal cord injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braun, I.F.; Hoffman, J.C. Jr.; Murphy, C.; Davis, P.C.

    1986-01-01

    Posttraumatic spinal cord cysts have been thought to be infrequent sequelae of spinal trauma. To evaluate the incidence of spinal cord abnormalities in patients who have previously sustained cord trauma, the authors studied the incidence of these changes in clinically stable patients following injury. Twenty-five patients with a history of previous cord injury and stable neurologic status volunteered for MR imaging studies. Studies performed using a 0.5-T and 1.5-T unit revealed focal kinking of the cord at the trauma site as well as intramedullary hypointense areas on T1-weighted images in most volunteers. There was close clinical correlation between MR imaging findings and experimental pathologic data, which suggests that these lesions are much more prevalent than once thought

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in adnexial torsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trindade, Ronald Meira Castro; Quadros, Marianne Siquara de [Hospital Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Ensino e Pesquisa], e-mail: rtrindade@einstein.br; Baroni, Ronaldo Hueb; Rosemberg, Michelle; Racy, Marcelo de Castro Jorge; Tachibana, Adriano [Hospital Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Funari, Marcelo Buarque de Gusmao [Hospital Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Imaging Service

    2010-01-15

    Adnexial torsion is an unusual event, but a major cause of abdominal pain in women. It is often associated with ovarian tumor or cyst, but can occur in normal ovaries, especially in children. The twisting of adnexial structures may involve the ovary or tube, but frequently affects both. In most cases, it is unilateral, with slight predilection for the right size. In imaging findings, increased ovarian volume and adnexial masses are observed, with reduced or absent vascularisation. In cases of undiagnosed or untreated complete twist, hemorrhagic necrosis may occur leading to complications; in that, peritonitis is the most frequent. Early diagnosis helps preventing irreversible damage with conservative treatment, thereby saving the ovary. Limitations in performing physical examination, possible inconclusive results in ultrasound and exposure to radiation in computed tomography makes magnetic resonance imaging a valuable tool in emergency assessment of gynecological diseases. The objective of this study was to report two confirmed cases of adnexial twist, emphasizing the contribution of magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of this condition. (author)

  19. MR imaging in meniscus injury of knee joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Kil Sun; Kang, Heung Sik; Han, Moon Hee; Han, Man Chung; Kim, Chu Wan; Seong, Sang Cheol

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and arthroscopic findings of thirty two patients with clinically suspected meniscal tears were correlated to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of MRI in meniscal injury. We grouped MRI findings as normal (Group 1), suspicious tear (Group 2), definite tear (Group 3) based on the morphologic appearance of intrameniscal signal and its relationship to the articular surface. In group 1, thrifty eight of 41 menisci were found at arthroscopy to be normal. Five of 7 menisci in group 2 and all mensci of group 3 were found at arthroscopy to be torn. If group 2 and 3 are considered consistent with meniscal tears, sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of MRI are 91.3%, 92.5% and 92.2% respectively. This results indicate that MRI is capable of demonstrating meniscal tears with high degree of accuracy. We believe MRI is the imaging technique of choice in evaluating meniscal injuries

  20. MR imaging in meniscus injury of knee joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Kil Sun; Kang, Heung Sik; Han, Moon Hee; Han, Man Chung; Kim, Chu Wan; Seong, Sang Cheol [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1989-12-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and arthroscopic findings of thirty two patients with clinically suspected meniscal tears were correlated to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of MRI in meniscal injury. We grouped MRI findings as normal (Group 1), suspicious tear (Group 2), definite tear (Group 3) based on the morphologic appearance of intrameniscal signal and its relationship to the articular surface. In group 1, thrifty eight of 41 menisci were found at arthroscopy to be normal. Five of 7 menisci in group 2 and all mensci of group 3 were found at arthroscopy to be torn. If group 2 and 3 are considered consistent with meniscal tears, sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of MRI are 91.3%, 92.5% and 92.2% respectively. This results indicate that MRI is capable of demonstrating meniscal tears with high degree of accuracy. We believe MRI is the imaging technique of choice in evaluating meniscal injuries.

  1. Neuropsychological and neuroimaging findings in traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Brenner, Lisa A.

    2011-01-01

    Advances in imaging technology, coupled with military personnel returning home from Iraq and Afghanistan with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and/or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), have increased interest in the neuropsychology and neurobiology of these two conditions. There has been a particular focus on differential diagnosis. This paper provides an overviev of findings regarding the neuropsychological and neurobiological underpinnings of TBI andfor PTSD. A specific focus is on assessme...

  2. Imaging of American football injuries in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podberesky, Daniel J; Unsell, Bryan J; Anton, Christopher G

    2009-12-01

    It is estimated that 3.2 million children ages 6 to 14 years participated in organized youth football in the United States in 2007. Approximately 240,000 children play football in the nation's largest youth football organization, with tackle divisions starting at age 5 years. The number of children playing unsupervised football is much higher, and the overall number of children participating in American football is increasing. Sports are the leading cause of injury-related emergency room visits for teenagers, and football is a leading precipitating athletic activity for these visits. Football is also the most hazardous organized sports in the United States. Though most pediatric football-related injuries are minor, such as abrasions, sprains, and strains of the extremities, football accounts for more major and catastrophic injuries than any other sport. Given football's popularity with children in the United States, combined with the high rate of injury associated with participation in this activity, radiologists should be familiar with the imaging features and injury patterns seen in this patient population.

  3. Imaging of American football injuries in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podberesky, Daniel J.; Anton, Christopher G.; Unsell, Bryan J.

    2009-01-01

    It is estimated that 3.2 million children ages 6 to 14 years participated in organized youth football in the United States in 2007. Approximately 240,000 children play football in the nation's largest youth football organization, with tackle divisions starting at age 5 years. The number of children playing unsupervised football is much higher, and the overall number of children participating in American football is increasing. Sports are the leading cause of injury-related emergency room visits for teenagers, and football is a leading precipitating athletic activity for these visits. Football is also the most hazardous organized sports in the United States. Though most pediatric football-related injuries are minor, such as abrasions, sprains, and strains of the extremities, football accounts for more major and catastrophic injuries than any other sport. Given football's popularity with children in the United States, combined with the high rate of injury associated with participation in this activity, radiologists should be familiar with the imaging features and injury patterns seen in this patient population. (orig.)

  4. Imaging of American football injuries in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podberesky, Daniel J.; Anton, Christopher G. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Unsell, Bryan J. [Wilford Hall Medical Center, Lackland Air Force Base, Department of Radiology, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2009-12-15

    It is estimated that 3.2 million children ages 6 to 14 years participated in organized youth football in the United States in 2007. Approximately 240,000 children play football in the nation's largest youth football organization, with tackle divisions starting at age 5 years. The number of children playing unsupervised football is much higher, and the overall number of children participating in American football is increasing. Sports are the leading cause of injury-related emergency room visits for teenagers, and football is a leading precipitating athletic activity for these visits. Football is also the most hazardous organized sports in the United States. Though most pediatric football-related injuries are minor, such as abrasions, sprains, and strains of the extremities, football accounts for more major and catastrophic injuries than any other sport. Given football's popularity with children in the United States, combined with the high rate of injury associated with participation in this activity, radiologists should be familiar with the imaging features and injury patterns seen in this patient population. (orig.)

  5. Urinalysis findings and urinary kidney injury biomarker concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadkarni, Girish N; Coca, Steven G; Meisner, Allison; Patel, Shanti; Kerr, Kathleen F; Patel, Uptal D; Koyner, Jay L; Garg, Amit X; Philbrook, Heather Thiessen; Edelstein, Charles L; Shlipak, Michael; El-Khoury, Joe; Parikh, Chirag R

    2017-07-06

    Urinary biomarkers of kidney injury are presumed to reflect renal tubular damage. However, their concentrations may be influenced by other factors, such as hematuria or pyuria. We sought to examine what non-injury related urinalysis factors are associated with urinary biomarker levels. We examined 714 adults who underwent cardiac surgery in the TRIBE-AKI cohort that did not experience post-operative clinical AKI (patients with serum creatinine change of ≥ 20% were excluded). We examined the association between urinalysis findings and the pre- and first post-operative urinary concentrations of 4 urinary biomarkers: neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), interleukin-18 (IL-18), kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), and liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP). The presence of leukocyte esterase and nitrites on urinalysis was associated with increased urinary NGAL (R 2 0.16, p < 0.001 and R 2 0.07, p < 0.001, respectively) in pre-operative samples. Hematuria was associated with increased levels of all 4 biomarkers, with a much stronger association seen in post-operative samples (R 2 between 0.02 and 0.21). Dipstick proteinuria concentrations correlated with levels of all 4 urinary biomarkers in pre-operative and post-operative samples (R 2 between 0.113 and 0.194 in pre-operative and between 0.122 and 0.322 in post-operative samples). Adjusting the AUC of post-operative AKI for dipstick proteinuria lowered the AUC for all 4 biomarkers at the pre-operative time point and for 2 of the 4 biomarkers at the post-operative time point. Several factors available through urine dipstick testing are associated with increased urinary biomarker concentrations that are independent of clinical kidney injury. Future studies should explore the impact of these factors on the prognostic and diagnostic performance of these AKI biomarkers.

  6. Automated measurement of pressure injury through image processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Mathews, Carol

    2017-11-01

    To develop an image processing algorithm to automatically measure pressure injuries using electronic pressure injury images stored in nursing documentation. Photographing pressure injuries and storing the images in the electronic health record is standard practice in many hospitals. However, the manual measurement of pressure injury is time-consuming, challenging and subject to intra/inter-reader variability with complexities of the pressure injury and the clinical environment. A cross-sectional algorithm development study. A set of 32 pressure injury images were obtained from a western Pennsylvania hospital. First, we transformed the images from an RGB (i.e. red, green and blue) colour space to a YC b C r colour space to eliminate inferences from varying light conditions and skin colours. Second, a probability map, generated by a skin colour Gaussian model, guided the pressure injury segmentation process using the Support Vector Machine classifier. Third, after segmentation, the reference ruler - included in each of the images - enabled perspective transformation and determination of pressure injury size. Finally, two nurses independently measured those 32 pressure injury images, and intraclass correlation coefficient was calculated. An image processing algorithm was developed to automatically measure the size of pressure injuries. Both inter- and intra-rater analysis achieved good level reliability. Validation of the size measurement of the pressure injury (1) demonstrates that our image processing algorithm is a reliable approach to monitoring pressure injury progress through clinical pressure injury images and (2) offers new insight to pressure injury evaluation and documentation. Once our algorithm is further developed, clinicians can be provided with an objective, reliable and efficient computational tool for segmentation and measurement of pressure injuries. With this, clinicians will be able to more effectively monitor the healing process of pressure

  7. CT findings of traumatic primary brain-stem injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosaka, Yasuaki; Hatashita, Shizuo; Bandou, Kuniaki; Ueki, Yasuyuki; Abe, Kouzou; Koga, Nobunori; Sugimura, Jun; Sakakibara, Tokiwa; Takagi, Suguru

    1984-01-01

    A series of 27 consecutive patients with traumatic primary brain stem injuries was studied. They were diagnosed by means of clinical signs, neurological examination, and computerized tomography (CT). The CT findings of the brain-stem lesions were classified into 4 types: Type H, spotty, high-density; Type H and L, high- and low-densities; Type L, low-density; Type I, isodensity. The Glasgow coma scale (GCS), neurological findings on admission, CT findings (findings in the brain stem, obliteration of perimesencephalic cistern (PMC), and other findings), and the Glasgow outcome scale (GOS) were examined. In the 9 cases of Type H, there was a correlation between the GCS and the GOS, and the spotty, high-density lesions were localized mainly in the dorsal and/or ventral midbrain parenchyma, but these lesions did not show focal signs and symptoms. Without an obliteration of the PMC, Type-H patients did not always have a bad outcome. In the 4 cases of Type H and L, the 2 cases of Type L, and the 12 cases of Type I, there was an obliteration of the PMC. All of the these cases had a bad outcome (1 case of moderate disability, 3 cases of severe disability, and 14 cases of death). The mechanism producing a spotty, high-density area was discussed. The weaker impact (than the other types) and individual anatomical differences weresupposed to make for a spotty, high-density are in the brain stem. (author)

  8. Meniscal injuries: Detection using MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reicher, M.A.; Hartzman, S.; Duckwiler, G.R.; Bassett, L.W.; Anderson, L.J.; Gold, R.H.

    1986-06-01

    Both retrospective and blinded analyses of thin-section, high-resolution magnetic resonance (MR) images of the knee joint, produced using a sole-noid surface coil, indicate that MR imaging is an effective technique for evaluating meniscal injuries. Images of 49 patients were evaluated, and the results were correlated with those of subsequent arthroscopy. A grading scale was developed to rate the index of suspicion of a meniscal tear based on the MR images. Overall, approximately 80% of menisci rated grade 4 (definite tear) or 3 (probable tear) were found to have corresponding tears at arthroscopy. In many other patients with a grade 4 or 3 meniscus in whom a corresponding tear was not found arthroscopically, meniscal tears at other sites or other abnormalities were correctly diagnosed using MR. A majority of the false-positive MR images involved the posterior horns of the menisci, the sites of most false-negative arthroscopic diagnoses. The predictive value of a negative MR image was almost 100%. Even in patients with moderate-to-large effusions, the menisci were accurately evaluated. The results imply that MR imaging is useful in the preoperative evaluation of suspected meniscal tears.

  9. Meniscal injuries: Detection using MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reicher, M.A.; Hartzman, S.; Duckwiler, G.R.; Bassett, L.W.; Anderson, L.J.; Gold, R.H.

    1986-01-01

    Both retrospective and blinded analyses of thin-section, high-resolution magnetic resonance (MR) images of the knee joint, produced using a sole-noid surface coil, indicate that MR imaging is an effective technique for evaluating meniscal injuries. Images of 49 patients were evaluated, and the results were correlated with those of subsequent arthroscopy. A grading scale was developed to rate the index of suspicion of a meniscal tear based on the MR images. Overall, approximately 80% of menisci rated grade 4 (definite tear) or 3 (probable tear) were found to have corresponding tears at arthroscopy. In many other patients with a grade 4 or 3 meniscus in whom a corresponding tear was not found arthroscopically, meniscal tears at other sites or other abnormalities were correctly diagnosed using MR. A majority of the false-positive MR images involved the posterior horns of the menisci, the sites of most false-negative arthroscopic diagnoses. The predictive value of a negative MR image was almost 100%. Even in patients with moderate-to-large effusions, the menisci were accurately evaluated. The results imply that MR imaging is useful in the preoperative evaluation of suspected meniscal tears

  10. MR imaging of a diffuse axonal injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Yukiya; Okamoto, Hisayo; Mitsushima, Minoru; Hori, Tomokatsu; Sasaki, Mamoru; Teraoka, Akira.

    1989-01-01

    Six patients who had been diagnosed as having so-called a 'Diffuse Axonal Injury (DAI)' were examined by means of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (Yokogawa Resona 0.5T and Shimadzu SMT 50A). MRI revealed clear evidence of injured white matter in these patients, while X-ray CT scanning could not demonstrate such lesions definitely. The patients consisted of three adults and three adolescents. They had been injured by traffic accidents or falls. Every patient had lost consciousness immediately, and their coma had continued for at least two weeks after the trauma. X-ray CT scanning demonstrated no complicated lesion, such as intracranial hematoma or brain edema, resulting in increased intracranial pressure and cerebral herniation. In all of the patients, injuries of the deep white matter (corpus callosum, upper pons, or internal capsule, for example) were clearly found by T 2 -weighted imaging. Because these lesions had characteristic features in their localation, as has been described by Adams et al. these patients were diagnosed as having DAI. Also, it was interesting that the focal neurological deficits of these patients correlated well with the local injuries of the white matter. The three young patients recovered to various degrees, but the three adults passed into a vegetative state. The prognosis of the patients seemed to be determined by their age. Because the clinical diagnosis of DAI is controversial, the use of MRI will help in its clinical diagnosis and analysis. (author)

  11. MR imaging of a diffuse axonal injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Yukiya; Okamoto, Hisayo; Mitsushima, Minoru; Hori, Tomokatsu (Tottori Univ., Yonago (Japan). School of Medicine); Sasaki, Mamoru; Teraoka, Akira

    1989-04-01

    Six patients who had been diagnosed as having so-called a 'Diffuse Axonal Injury (DAI)' were examined by means of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (Yokogawa Resona 0.5T and Shimadzu SMT 50A). MRI revealed clear evidence of injured white matter in these patients, while X-ray CT scanning could not demonstrate such lesions definitely. The patients consisted of three adults and three adolescents. They had been injured by traffic accidents or falls. Every patient had lost consciousness immediately, and their coma had continued for at least two weeks after the trauma. X-ray CT scanning demonstrated no complicated lesion, such as intracranial hematoma or brain edema, resulting in increased intracranial pressure and cerebral herniation. In all of the patients, injuries of the deep white matter (corpus callosum, upper pons, or internal capsule, for example) were clearly found by T{sub 2}-weighted imaging. Because these lesions had characteristic features in their localation, as has been described by Adams et al. these patients were diagnosed as having DAI. Also, it was interesting that the focal neurological deficits of these patients correlated well with the local injuries of the white matter. The three young patients recovered to various degrees, but the three adults passed into a vegetative state. The prognosis of the patients seemed to be determined by their age. Because the clinical diagnosis of DAI is controversial, the use of MRI will help in its clinical diagnosis and analysis. (author).

  12. Traumatic injuries: imaging of abdominal and pelvic injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weishaupt, Dominik; Grozaj, Ana M.; Willmann, Juergen K.; Roos, Justus E.; Hilfiker, Paul R.; Marincek, Borut

    2002-01-01

    The availability of new imaging modalities has altered the diagnostic approach to patients with abdominal and pelvic trauma. Computed tomography and ultrasound have largely replaced diagnostic peritoneal lavage. Ultrasound is used in most trauma centers as the initial imaging technique for the detection of hemoperitoneum and helps to determine the need for emergency laparotomy. Computed tomography allows for an accurate diagnosis of a wide range of traumatic abdominal and pelvic conditions. The speed of single-detector helical and multi-detector row CT (MDCT) permits a rapid CT examination of the seriously ill patient in the emergency room. In particular, the technology of MDCT permits multiple, sequential CT scans to be quickly obtained in the same patient, which is a great advance in the rapid assessment of the multiple-injured patient. The evolving concepts in trauma care promoting non-operative management of liver and splenic injuries creates the need for follow-up cross-sectional imaging studies in these patients. Computed tomography and, less frequently, MR or ultrasound, are used for this purpose. (orig.)

  13. Ultrasound imaging of sports-related musculoskeletal injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craig, J.G.; Holsbeek, M.T. van; Gauthier, T.P.; Cook, W.J.

    2006-01-01

    Sports-related injuries of the musculoskeletal system affect millions of individuals every year. Integrating high-frequency Tissue Harmonic Imaging ultrasound with MRI and CT gives the greatest opportunity for diagnosing specific injuries. (orig.)

  14. MR imaging findings of high-voltage electrical burns in the upper extremities: correlation with angiographic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Gyung Kyu; Kang, Ik Won; Hwang, Dae Hyun; Min, Seon Jung; Han, You Mi (Dept. of Radiology, Hallym Univ. College of Medicine, Hangang Sacred Heart Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)); Suh, Kyung Jin (Dept. of Radiology, Dongguk Univ. College of Medicine, Gyeongju Hospital, Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of)), email: kyungjin.suh@gmail.com; Choi, Min Ho (Dept. of Internal Medicine, Hallym Univ. College of Medicine, Hangang Sacred Heart Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of))

    2011-02-15

    Background: A high-voltage electrical burn is often associated with deep muscle injuries. Hidden, undetected deep muscle injuries have a tendency for progressive tissue necrosis, and this can lead to major amputations or sepsis. MRI has excellent soft tissue contrast and it may aid in differentiating the areas of viable deep muscle from the areas of non-viable deep muscle. Purpose: To describe the MR imaging findings of a high-voltage electrical burn in the upper extremity with emphasis on the usefulness of the gadolinium-enhanced MRI and to compare the MR imaging findings with angiography. Material and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the imaging studies of six patients with high-voltage electrical burns who underwent both MRI and angiography at the burn center of our hospital from January 2005 to December 2009. The imaging features were evaluated for the involved locations, the MR signal intensity of the affected muscles, the MR enhancement pattern, the involved arteries and the angiographic findings (classified as normal, sluggish flow, stenosis or occlusion) of the angiography of the upper extremity. We assessed the relationship between the MR imaging findings and the angiographic findings. Results: The signal intensities of affected muscles were isointense or of slightly high signal intensity as compared with the adjacent unaffected skeletal muscle on the T1-weighted MR images. Affected muscles showed heterogenous high signal intensity relative to the adjacent unaffected skeletal muscle on the T2- weighted images. The gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted images showed diffuse inhomogeneous enhancement or peripheral rim enhancement of the affected muscles. The angiographic findings of the arterial injuries showed complete occlusion in three patients, severe stenosis in two patients and sluggish flow in one patient. Of these, the five patients with complete occlusion or severe stenosis on angiography showed non-perfused and non-viable areas of edematous muscle on

  15. Imaging findings of global choroidal hemangioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Rongxian; Zou Mingshun; Li Yichen

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To describe CT and MRI findings of the global choroidal hemangioma, and to investigate their value in the diagnosis and differentiation. Methods: Nine choroidal hemangioma patients proven by surgical pathology (n = 3) or clinic information (n = 6) were analyzed. CT scan was performed in 6 cases and MRI in 4 cases. All cases were examined by ultrasound and 3 with fundus fluorescein angiography (FFA). Results: Two cases showed slight or crescent-like thickening and iso-density with respect to the global wall on CT scan. 5 cases on enhanced CT showed a flat or shuttle-shaped homogeneous mass with marked enhancement. MRI (n = 3) revealed high signal intensity on T 1 WI and low signal intensity on T 2 WI with respect to the vitreous. 1 small tumor was found clearly by postcontrast fat suppressed T 1 WI. Ultrasound showed homogeneous mass (n = 1) and inhomogeneous mass (n = 8), with retinal detachment in all cases. Conclusion: CT + MRI + ultrasound can get most of the diagnostic imaging data for choroidal hemangioma. MRI was superior to CT and ultrasound in the diagnosis of choroidal hemangioma and differential diagnosis from other malignant tumors

  16. Computed tomographic findings of radiation-induced acute adrenal injury with associated radiation nephropathy: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schieda, Nicola; Ramchandani, Parvati; Siegelman, Evan S

    2013-01-01

    Radiation nephropathy was first recognized in 1906. The kidney is a radiosensitive organ with a tolerance dose (5% complications in 5 years) of 20 Gray. The imaging findings of acute and chronic radiation induced renal injury are previously described. Radiation-induced adrenal injury, to our knowledge, has not been described in the literature. Unlike the kidneys and other upper abdominal organs, the adrenal glands are traditionally thought to be radio-resistant, protected from radiation-induced injury by proximity to adjacent organs and by the adrenal medulla which reportedly has increased radio-resistance. We present the computed tomographic imaging findings of a patient with acute radiation induced adrenal injury which resulted in adrenal insufficiency following radiotherapy of an adjacent thecal metastasis

  17. US of acute scrotal trauma: optimal technique, imaging findings, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deurdulian, Corinne; Mittelstaedt, Carol A; Chong, Wui K; Fielding, Julia R

    2007-01-01

    The primary causes of scrotal trauma are blunt, penetrating, degloving, and electrical burn injuries to scrotal contents. Knowledge of the scrotal anatomy and appropriate imaging techniques are key for accurate evaluation of scrotal injuries. Ultrasonography (US) is the first-line imaging modality to help guide therapy for scrotal trauma, except in degloving injury, which results in scrotal skin avulsion. Blunt injury (eg, from an athletic accident or motor vehicle collision) is the most common cause of scrotal trauma, followed by penetrating injury from gunshot or other assault. Trauma often may result in hematoma, hydrocele, hematocele, testicular fracture, or testicular rupture. The timely diagnosis of rupture, based on a US finding of discontinuity of the echogenic tunica albuginea, is critical because emergent surgery results in salvage of the testis in 80%-90% of rupture cases. The radiologist should be familiar also with other nuances associated with penetrating trauma, iatrogenic and postoperative complications, and electrical injury. Color flow and duplex Doppler imaging are highly useful techniques not only for assessing testicular viability and perfusion but also for evaluating associated vascular injuries such as pseudoaneurysms. A thorough familiarity with the US findings of scrotal trauma helps facilitate appropriate management. Supplemental material available at radiographics.rsnajnls.org/cgi/content/full/27/2/357/DC1. (c) RSNA, 2007.

  18. Imaging findings in craniofacial childhood rhabdomyosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freling, Nicole J.M.; Rijn, Rick R. van; Merks, Johannes H.M.; Saeed, Peerooz; Balm, Alfons J.M.; Bras, Johannes; Pieters, Bradley R.; Adam, Judit A.

    2010-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is the commonest paediatric soft-tissue sarcoma constituting 3-5% of all malignancies in childhood. RMS has a predilection for the head and neck area and tumours in this location account for 40% of all childhood RMS cases. In this review we address the clinical and imaging presentations of craniofacial RMS, discuss the most appropriate imaging techniques, present characteristic imaging features and offer an overview of differential diagnostic considerations. Post-treatment changes will be briefly addressed. (orig.)

  19. Don't Forget the Abdominal Wall: Imaging Spectrum of Abdominal Wall Injuries after Nonpenetrating Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matalon, Shanna A; Askari, Reza; Gates, Jonathan D; Patel, Ketan; Sodickson, Aaron D; Khurana, Bharti

    2017-01-01

    Abdominal wall injuries occur in nearly one of 10 patients coming to the emergency department after nonpenetrating trauma. Injuries range from minor, such as abdominal wall contusion, to severe, such as abdominal wall rupture with evisceration of abdominal contents. Examples of specific injuries that can be detected at cross-sectional imaging include abdominal muscle strain, tear, or hematoma, including rectus sheath hematoma (RSH); traumatic abdominal wall hernia (TAWH); and Morel-Lavallée lesion (MLL) (closed degloving injury). These injuries are often overlooked clinically because of (a) a lack of findings at physical examination or (b) distraction by more-severe associated injuries. However, these injuries are important to detect because they are highly associated with potentially grave visceral and vascular injuries, such as aortic injury, and because their detection can lead to the diagnosis of these more clinically important grave traumatic injuries. Failure to make a timely diagnosis can result in delayed complications, such as bowel hernia with potential for obstruction or strangulation, or misdiagnosis of an abdominal wall neoplasm. Groin injuries, such as athletic pubalgia, and inferior costochondral injuries should also be considered in patients with abdominal pain after nonpenetrating trauma, because these conditions may manifest with referred abdominal pain and are often included within the field of view at cross-sectional abdominal imaging. Radiologists must recognize and report acute abdominal wall injuries and their associated intra-abdominal pathologic conditions to allow appropriate and timely treatment. © RSNA, 2017.

  20. MR Imaging findings of avulsion fracture of the tibial spine of the knee, focusing of cruciate ligament tear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang Won; Hong, Hoon Pyo; Ryu, Kyung Nam [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jin, Wook [Gachon Medical School Gil Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-04-01

    To determine the presence of cruciate ligament tears following avulsion injuries involving the ACL and PCL, and to correlate the findings with those of surgery. Between March 1997 and May 2002, avulsion injury involving the ACL and PCL was diagnosed in 19 patients. Ten of these [8 males and 2 females aged 10-51 (avergae, 27.7) years] were included in this study. We assessed the presence of cruciate ligament tears at MR imaging, correlating the findings with those of surgery. Associated intra-articular injuries, treatment methods and follow-up results were also evaluated. Among seven patients with ACL avulsion injury, this was assessed at MR imaging as complete tear (n=1), partial tear (n=5), or intact (n=1), while all MR images of PCL avulsion injury (n=3) showed that this was partial teat. All imaging findings corresponded with the surgical findings. In four patients there was associated knee injury involving, respectively, teats of the medial meniscus, lateral meniscus, PCL and MCL, and popliteal ligament. Our findings showed that with one exception, patients with avulsion injury of the ACL or PCL had suffered either a partial or complete tear. MR imaging may be useful in the diagnosis of tears of the cruciate ligament which have not been noticed at surgery or arthroscopy in avulsion injuries involving the ACL and PCL.

  1. Role of imaging in penetrating and blunt traumatic injury to the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Co, Steven J; Yong-Hing, Charlotte J; Galea-Soler, Sandro; Ruzsics, Balazs; Schoepf, U Joseph; Ajlan, Amr; Aljan, Amr; Farand, Paul; Nicolaou, Savvas

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac injury due to blunt or penetrating chest trauma is common and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Understanding the mechanisms, types, and complications of cardiac injuries and the roles of various imaging modalities in characterizing them is important for appropriate diagnosis and treatment. These injuries have not been well documented at imaging, but there are now fast and accurate methods for evaluating the heart and associated mediastinal structures. The authors review the broad spectrum of injuries that can result from blunt or penetrating trauma to the chest, as well as the imaging modalities commonly used in the acute trauma setting for evaluation of the heart and mediastinal structures. A pictorial review of both common and, to date, rarely documented cardiac injuries imaged with a variety of modalities is also presented. While many imaging modalities are available, the authors demonstrate the value of multidetector computed tomography (CT) for the initial evaluation of patients with blunt or penetrating chest trauma. With the advent of multidetector CT, imaging of cardiac injury has increased and accurate identification of these rare but potentially lethal injuries has become paramount for improving survival. Selection of the most appropriate modality for evaluation and recognition of the imaging findings in cardiac injuries in the acute trauma setting is important to expedite treatment and improve survival.

  2. [MR imaging of flexor tendon and pulley system of the fingers: normal anatomy and injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, R J; Zhan, H L; Liu, Y; Zhang, H; Qian, Z H; Ye, W; Li, Y X

    2017-09-05

    Objective: To explore the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of the anatomy and injuries of flexor tendon and pulley system of the fingers. Methods: Clinical and imaging data of 20 healthy volunteers without injuries and 36 patients from Beijing Jishuitan Hospital with flexor tendon and pulley system injuries in the fingers between March 2013 and March 2016 were retrospectively analyzed. All subjects underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination. The MRI findings of patients were compared with healthy volunteers. In addition, imaging findings of patients were compared with the surgical results and confirmed by double-blinded method. Results: Twenty volunteers without flexor tendon and pulley system injures showed homogeneous hypointensity on both T1-weighted and Proton Density-weighted images with fat saturation (PD-FS). There were 36 patients with finger injures, including 21 cases of flexor tendon injury, 10 cases of pulley system injury, 5 cases of compound injury, which demonstrated unclear signal, discontinuity on T1-weighted images and heterogeneously increased signal intensity of the involved structures on PD-FS images. Edema was detected in the soft tissues surrounding the injured sites. Conclusions: MRI is an accurate method for evaluation of the anatomy and pathologic conditions of flexor tendon and pulley system of the fingers and a useful tool for diagnosis and treatment of flexor tendon and pulley system injuries.

  3. Intramedullary fat globules related to bone trauma: a new MR imaging finding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Adelaine; Grando, Higor; Fliszar, Evelyne; Pathria, Mini; Resnick, Donald [UCSD Radiology, Musculoskeletal Division, San Diego, CA (United States); Chang, Eric Y. [UCSD Radiology, Musculoskeletal Division, San Diego, CA (United States); VA San Diego Healthcare System, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2014-12-15

    The purpose of this study is to describe intraosseous fat globules related to bone trauma that are detectable with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), to define the relationship of this finding to fracture and bone contusion, to establish the frequency and associated findings. A proposed pathogenesis is presented. We retrospectively reviewed 419 knee MRI examinations in patients with a history of recent injury and MRI findings of fracture or bone contusion. As a control population, 268 knee MRI examinations in patients without MRI findings of recent bone injury were also reviewed. Eight of 419 (1.9 %) patients with acute or subacute knee injury with positive findings of osseous trauma on MRI demonstrated intraosseous fat globules. The mean age of patients with fat globules was greater than that of those without fat globules, and the finding was more commonly seen in women. Fat globules were hyperintense to the normal fatty marrow present elsewhere in the bone on TI-weighted imaging and had a surrounding halo of high signal intensity on fluid-sensitive imaging. Intramedullary fat globules related to bone injury visible on MRI are thought to be due to coalesced fat released by the necrosis of fatty marrow cells. The pathogenesis is supported by histologic studies of fat globules related to osteomyelitis, bone contusions and fractures. As the medullary cavity of long bones in older patients contains more fat than hematopoetic bone marrow, it is likely that this finding is more common with advancing age. (orig.)

  4. Athletic pubalgia and "sports hernia": optimal MR imaging technique and findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Imran M; Zoga, Adam C; Kavanagh, Eoin C; Koulouris, George; Bergin, Diane; Gopez, Angela G; Morrison, William B; Meyers, William C

    2008-01-01

    Groin injuries are common in athletes who participate in sports that require twisting at the waist, sudden and sharp changes in direction, and side-to-side ambulation. Such injuries frequently lead to debilitating pain and lost playing time, and they may be difficult to diagnose. Diagnostic confusion often arises from the complex anatomy and biomechanics of the pubic symphysis region, the large number of potential sources of groin pain, and the similarity of symptoms in athletes with different types or sites of injury. Many athletes with a diagnosis of "sports hernia" or "athletic pubalgia" have a spectrum of related pathologic conditions resulting from musculotendinous injuries and subsequent instability of the pubic symphysis without any finding of inguinal hernia at physical examination. The actual causal mechanisms of athletic pubalgia are poorly understood, and imaging studies have been deemed inadequate or unhelpful for clarification. However, a large-field-of-view magnetic resonance (MR) imaging survey of the pelvis, combined with high-resolution MR imaging of the pubic symphysis, is an excellent means of assessing various causes of athletic pubalgia, providing information about the location of injury, and delineating the severity of disease. Familiarity with the pubic anatomy and with MR imaging findings in athletic pubalgia and in other confounding causes of groin pain allows accurate imaging-based diagnoses and helps in planning treatment that targets specific pathologic conditions. (c) RSNA, 2008.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of experimental spinal cord injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Tsutomu; Kumano, Kouichi; Kadoya, Satoru

    1989-01-01

    Correlation between pathological findings and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of experimental cord injury were investigated. Cord injuries were made on ten Wistar rats weighing 80-170 gm by epidural compression of the thoracic cord with a Biemer cerebral vascular clip for 5-20 seconds. Several hours after the procedure animals were examined by spin echo axial MR images with a pulse sequence of TR/TE=1000/36 msec. MR studies were repeated on 4 animals 3-7 days after the initial examination. Immediately after the latest MRI examination animals were sacrificed and fixed with 10% formalin. Three micron thickness paraffin sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin were evaluated under a microscope. The pathological finding was hemorrhagic necrosis with edema of various severity depending on duration of clip application. The hemorrhagic necrosis was observed either unilaterally or bilaterally to the cord. MR findings of the cord were of high intensity in five animals which were severely injured, while central low intensity of the injured cord appeared in three mildly injured animals. Of the remaining two animals which had mild injury, one showed unilateral high intensity, while no definitive change was demonstrated in the other. The high intensity in the MRI suggested edema associated with hemorrhagic necrosis rather than hemorrhage. The central low intensity appearing in the mildly injured cord might be hemorrhage in the gray matter. It is concluded that MRI was useful to diagnose not only the level and severity but also the pathological process in the injured cord, and thus to estimate the prognosis of the cord injuries. (author)

  6. Day of Injury CT and Late MRI Findings: Cognitive Outcome in a Pediatric Sample with Complicated Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jantz, Paul B; Farrer, Thomas J.; Abildskov, Tracy J.; Dennis, Maureen; Gerhardt, Cynthia A.; Rubin, Kenneth H.; Stancin, Terry; Taylor, H. Gerry; Vannatta, Kathryn; Yeates, Keith Owen

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Complicated mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) or cmTBI is based on the presence of visibly identifiable brain pathology on the day-of-injury computed tomography (CT) scan. In a pediatric sample the relation of DOI CT to late MRI findings and neuropsychological outcome was examined. Methods MRI (> 12 months) was obtained in pediatric cmTBI patients and a sample of orthopedically injured (OI) children. Those children with positive imaging findings (MRI+) were quantitatively compared to those without (MRI-) or with the OI sample. Groups were also compared in neurocognitive outcome from WASI subtests and the WISC-IV Processing Speed Index (PSI), along with the Test of Everyday Attention for Children (TEA-Ch) and a parent-rated behavioral functioning measure (ABAS-II). Results Despite the MRI+ group having significantly more DOI CT findings than the MRI-group, no quantitative differences were found. WASI Vocabulary and Matrix Reasoning scores were significantly lower, but not PSI, TEA-Ch or ABAS-II scores. MRI+ and MRI-groups did not differ on these measures. Conclusions Heterogeneity in the occurrence of MRI-identified focal pathology was not associated with uniform changes in quantitative analyses of brain structure in cmTBI. Increased number of DOI CT abnormalities was associated with lowered neuropsychological performance. PMID:26186038

  7. Cystourethrographic findings of the lower urinary tract injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, H. S.; Bae, W. K.; Cho, O. K.

    1981-01-01

    During the period of 4 years from July, 1976 to June 1980 the radiological and clinical evaluation had been made on 102 patients suffered from lower urinary tract injuries which were confirmed by the radiological examination and operation. The results were as follows: 1. Age distribution of the total 102 patients (87 males and 15 females) was broad from 4 to 72 years. And most of the patient were in the age group of 20 to 49 years. 2. The most common cause of injury was traffic accident (67.6%), next blunt trauma, saddle injury, fall down respectively. 3. 46 patients of bladder injury were as follows: intraperitoneal rupture in 17, extraperitoneal rupture in 12, and contusion in 14. 4. 74 patients of urethral injury were as follows: membranous portion in 37, bulbous portion in 31, prostatic portion in 3, and penile portion in 2. Most of the cases showed extravasation of contrast media. 12 cases showed extravasation with venous intravasation. 5. Contusion or extraperitoneal rupture of the bladder, membranous urethral injury, and concommitent bladder and urethral ruptures were frequently associated with pelvic bone fracture. Intraperitoneal ruptures of the bladder and solitary ruptures of the bulbous urethra were infrequently associated with pelvic bone fracture. 6. Late sequelae of the lower urinary tract injury were stricture, fistula and stone formation

  8. Hepatic hemangiosarcoma: imaging findings and differential diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rademaker, J.; Galanski, M. [Department of Radiology I, Medical School Hannover (Germany); Widjaja, A. [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Medical School Hannover (Germany)

    2000-01-01

    Primary hepatic angiosarcoma is a rare mesenchymal tumor of the liver that usually presents with nonspecific symptoms in elderly men. We present four cases of hepatic hemangiosarcoma and discuss the imaging characteristics of this entity. Our series shows that this tumor is not uncommon in younger patients with no associated risk factors such as previous exposure to thorotrast or vinyl chloride. Our experiences on a limited number of patients suggests that the combined use of angiography and dual-phase helical CT provides a better identification of the tumor and its complications. Analysis of imaging studies in patients with hepatic hemangiosarcoma reveals hypervascular lesions. Common complications were portal vein thrombosis, Budd-Chiari syndrome, as well as arterio-venous or arterio-portal shunts. Due to the vascularity of the tumor, percutaneous liver biopsy is hazardous. (orig.)

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in tuberculous meningoencephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pui, M.H.; Memon, W.A. [Aga Khan Univ. Hospital, Dept. of Radiology, Karachi (Pakistan)

    2001-02-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for distinguishing tuberculosis from other types of meningoencephalitis. MRIs of 100 patients with tuberculous (50), pyogenic (33), viral (14), or fungal (3) meningoencephalitis were analyzed independently by 2 radiologists. Number, size, location, signal characteristics, surrounding edema, and contrast enhancement pattern of nodular lesions; location and pattern of meningeal enhancement; extent of infarct or encephalitis and hydrocephalus were evaluated. Contrast-enhancing nodular lesions were detected in patients with tuberculous (43 of 50 patients), pyogenic (9 of 33), and fungal (3 of 3) infections. No nodules were detected in patients with viral meningoencephalitis. Using the criteria of 1 or more solid rim or homogeneously enhancing nodules smaller than 2 cm, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for diagnosing tuberculous meningitis were 86.0%, 90.0% and 88.0%, respectively. Magnetic resonance imaging is useful in distinguishing tuberculous from pyogenic, viral and fungal meningoencephalitis. (author)

  10. Polyorchidism: Sonographic and Magnetic Resonance Image Findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oner, A. Y.; Sahin, C.; Pocan, S.; Kizilkaya, E.

    2005-01-01

    Polyorchidism is a rare congenital anomaly frequently associated with maldescent testis, hernia, and torsion. Reports in the literature show an increased risk of testicular malignancy in the presence of polyorchidism. This entity has characteristic sonographic features and the diagnosis is often made on the basis of sonography. Magnetic resonance imaging might also be used for the diagnosis, but is more helpful in cases associated with cryptorchism or neoplasia. A conservative approach is the treatment of choice in uncomplicated cases

  11. Polyorchidism: Sonographic and Magnetic Resonance Image Findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oner, A. Y.; Sahin, C.; Pocan, S.; Kizilkaya, E. [Gazi Univ. School of Medicine, Ankara (Turkey). Dept. of Radiology

    2005-11-01

    Polyorchidism is a rare congenital anomaly frequently associated with maldescent testis, hernia, and torsion. Reports in the literature show an increased risk of testicular malignancy in the presence of polyorchidism. This entity has characteristic sonographic features and the diagnosis is often made on the basis of sonography. Magnetic resonance imaging might also be used for the diagnosis, but is more helpful in cases associated with cryptorchism or neoplasia. A conservative approach is the treatment of choice in uncomplicated cases.

  12. Anterolateral ankle impingement: findings and diagnostic accuracy with ultrasound imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarthy, C.L.; Wilson, D.J. [Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Radiology, Oxford (United Kingdom); Coltman, T.P. [Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2008-03-15

    The objective was to evaluate the findings and diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound in antero-lateral ankle impingement (ALI) with clinical and arthroscopic correlation. Seventeen elite footballers with chronic ankle pain were referred for ultrasound with a clinical diagnosis of ALI (n = 8) or a control condition (n = 9; lateral mechanical instability, osteochondral defect, intra-articular bodies and osteoarthritis). Ultrasound examination included the antero-lateral gutter for abnormal synovial tissue (synovitic lesion), lateral ligament integrity, tibiotalar joint and osseous spurs of the distal tibia and talus. Ultrasound findings were correlated with subsequent arthroscopic appearance. Ultrasound examination detected a synovitic mass in the antero-lateral gutter in all 8 footballers with clinical ALI (100%) and in 2 patients with a control diagnosis (22%). Arthroscopic correlation of antero-lateral synovitis and fibrosis was present in all 10 cases (100%). The synovitic lesion was seen at ultrasound as a nodular soft tissue mass of mixed echogenicity within the antero-lateral gutter, which extruded anteriorly with manual compression of the distal fibula against the tibia. Increased blood supply was detected using power Doppler imaging in only 1 patient. The synovitic lesion measured >10 mm in its maximum dimension in 7 footballers with clinical ALI and <10 mm in the control group. Additional ultrasound findings in patients with abnormal antero-lateral synovial tissue included an anterior talofibular ligament injury in all patients (n = 10), a tibiotalar joint effusion (n = 6) and osseous spurs (n = 4). Antero-lateral synovitic tissue was accurately identified at ultrasound in the absence of an effusion (n = 4). No synovitic lesion was detected at ultrasound or arthroscopy in the remaining 7 patients with a control diagnosis. Ultrasound is accurate in detecting synovitic lesions within the antero-lateral gutter, demonstrating associated ligamentous injuries and in

  13. Anterolateral ankle impingement: findings and diagnostic accuracy with ultrasound imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, C.L.; Wilson, D.J.; Coltman, T.P.

    2008-01-01

    The objective was to evaluate the findings and diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound in antero-lateral ankle impingement (ALI) with clinical and arthroscopic correlation. Seventeen elite footballers with chronic ankle pain were referred for ultrasound with a clinical diagnosis of ALI (n = 8) or a control condition (n = 9; lateral mechanical instability, osteochondral defect, intra-articular bodies and osteoarthritis). Ultrasound examination included the antero-lateral gutter for abnormal synovial tissue (synovitic lesion), lateral ligament integrity, tibiotalar joint and osseous spurs of the distal tibia and talus. Ultrasound findings were correlated with subsequent arthroscopic appearance. Ultrasound examination detected a synovitic mass in the antero-lateral gutter in all 8 footballers with clinical ALI (100%) and in 2 patients with a control diagnosis (22%). Arthroscopic correlation of antero-lateral synovitis and fibrosis was present in all 10 cases (100%). The synovitic lesion was seen at ultrasound as a nodular soft tissue mass of mixed echogenicity within the antero-lateral gutter, which extruded anteriorly with manual compression of the distal fibula against the tibia. Increased blood supply was detected using power Doppler imaging in only 1 patient. The synovitic lesion measured >10 mm in its maximum dimension in 7 footballers with clinical ALI and <10 mm in the control group. Additional ultrasound findings in patients with abnormal antero-lateral synovial tissue included an anterior talofibular ligament injury in all patients (n = 10), a tibiotalar joint effusion (n = 6) and osseous spurs (n = 4). Antero-lateral synovitic tissue was accurately identified at ultrasound in the absence of an effusion (n = 4). No synovitic lesion was detected at ultrasound or arthroscopy in the remaining 7 patients with a control diagnosis. Ultrasound is accurate in detecting synovitic lesions within the antero-lateral gutter, demonstrating associated ligamentous injuries and in

  14. Calcaneal tendon: imaging findings; Tendao calcaneo: avaliacao por imagem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montandon, Cristiano; Fonseca, Cristiano Rezio; Montandon Junior, Marcelo Eustaquio [Colegio Brasileiro de Radiologia e Diagnostico por Imagem, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: crismontandon@hotmail.com; Lobo, Leonardo Valadares; Ribeiro, Flavia Aparecida de Souza; Teixeira, Kim-Ir-Sen Santos [Goias Univ., Goiania, GO (Brazil). Hospital de Clinicas. Dept. de Diagnostico por Imagem e Anatomia Patologica

    2003-12-01

    We reviewed the radiological and clinical features of 23 patients with calcaneal tendon diseases, who were submitted to ultrasound or magnetic resonance imaging. The objective of this study was to characterize the lesions for a precise diagnosis of calcaneal tendon injuries. A wide range of calcaneal tendon diseases include degenerative lesions, inflammation of the peritendinous tissue such as peritendinitis and bursitis, and rupture. Imaging methods are essential in the diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of calcaneal tendon diseases. (author)

  15. Incidental Cardiac Findings on Thoracic Imaging.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kok, Hong Kuan

    2013-02-07

    The cardiac structures are well seen on nongated thoracic computed tomography studies in the investigation and follow-up of cardiopulmonary disease. A wide variety of findings can be incidentally picked up on careful evaluation of the pericardium, cardiac chambers, valves, and great vessels. Some of these findings may represent benign variants, whereas others may have more profound clinical importance. Furthermore, the expansion of interventional and surgical practice has led to the development and placement of new cardiac stents, implantable pacemaker devices, and prosthetic valves with which the practicing radiologist should be familiar. We present a collection of common incidental cardiac findings that can be readily identified on thoracic computed tomography studies and briefly discuss their clinical relevance.

  16. Ivory vertebra: imaging findings in different diagnoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Andreas Braun

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Low back pain is often managed at all levels of healthcare. In general, diagnostic investigation begins with radiography of the lumbar spine. In addition to the most common findings, radiologists can identify increased density of a vertebral body, referred to as ivory vertebra. The objective of this study was to describe the main diseases that can present with this radiologic sign, such as Hodgkin lymphoma, Paget's disease, metastatic prostate cancer, breast cancer, and osteomyelitis. It is extremely important that radiologists be aware of this finding in order to inform the requesting physician of the possible etiologies, given that it can be the initial radiologic presentation for these diseases.

  17. Ivory vertebra: imaging findings in different diagnoses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, Richard Andreas; Goldman, Suzan Menasce; Fernandes, Eloy de Avila [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (EPM/UNIFESP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Medicina; Milito, Carlos Felipe do Rego Barros, E-mail: braunrich@gmail.com [Universidade de Sao Paulo (InRad/HC/FM/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Hospital das Clinicas. Institutlo de Radiologia

    2016-03-15

    Low back pain is often managed at all levels of health care. In general, diagnostic investigation begins with radiography of the lumbar spine. In addition to the most common findings, radiologists can identify increased density of a vertebral body, referred to as ivory vertebra. The objective of this study was to describe the main diseases that can present with this radiologic sign, such as Hodgkin lymphoma, Paget's disease, metastatic prostate cancer, breast cancer, and osteomyelitis. It is extremely important that radiologists be aware of this finding in order to inform the requesting physician of the possible etiologies, given that it can be the initial radiologic presentation for these diseases. (author)

  18. Imaging findings in congenital cranial dysinnervation disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Rafael Martins; Amaral, Lazaro L F; Gonçalves, Marcus V M; Lin, Katia

    2011-12-01

    In 2002, the term congenital cranial dysinnervation disorders (CCDDs) was proposed to group heterogeneous syndromes with congenital abnormalities of ocular muscle and facial innervations. The concept of neurogenic etiology has been supported by discovery of genes that are essential to the normal development of brainstem, cranial nerves, and their axonal connections. The CCDDs include Duane retraction syndrome, congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles, Möbius syndrome, horizontal gaze palsy with progressive scoliosis, the human homeobox-related disorders, pontine cap tegmental dysplasia, and an expanding list. The purpose of this review was to update the imaging features, as well as clinical and genetic information, regarding cases of CCDDs.

  19. Acute and subacute chemical-induced lung injuries: HRCT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akira, Masanori, E-mail: Akira@kch.hosp.go.jp [Department of Radiology, National Hospital Organization Kinki-Chuo Chest Medical Center, 1180 Nagasone-cho, Kita-ku, Sakai City, Osaka 591-8555 (Japan); Suganuma, Narufumi [Department of Environmental Medicine, Kochi Medical School (Japan)

    2014-08-15

    Lung injury caused by chemicals includes bronchitis, bronchiolitis, chemical pneumonitis, pulmonary edema, acute respiratory distress syndrome, organizing pneumonia, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, acute eosinophilic pneumonia, and sarcoid-like granulomatous lung disease. Each chemical induces variable pathophysiology and the situation resembles to the drug induced lung disease. The HRCT features are variable and nonspecific, however HRCT may be useful in the evaluation of the lung injuries and so we should know about HRCT features of lung parenchymal abnormalities caused by chemicals.

  20. Computed tomographic findings of splenic injury and correlation with treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Jin; Koh, Joo Yaul; Kim, Myung Soon; Hong, In Soo; Cho, Whi Youl; Sung, Ki Joon

    1990-01-01

    According to recently reported classification, 46 patients with blunt splenic trauma were evaluate preoperatively with computed tomography(CT). Injures were graded I through IV and describe as capsular or subcapsular disruptions without parenchymal injury(3 patients); capsular and parenchymal injuries(23 patients); injuries involving hilum(3 patients); and fragmentation(17 patients). Nineteen patients were managed conservatively and 27 patients were managed surgically. Twelve patients(47%) out of those with Type I or Type II were managed surgically including five hemodynamically unstable patients and seven hemodynamically stable patients with associated injuries and unknown surgical criteria. On the other hand hemodynamically stable patients(25%) out of those with Type III or Type IV were managed surgically. The amount of hemoperitoneum was graded into small, moderate and large; small in three patients, moderate in 39 patients, and large in two patients. The amount of hemoperitoneum in patients with conservative treatment was moderate in 16 patients and large in one patient. And the amount of hemoperitoneum in patients with operative treatment was small in three patients, moderate in 23 patients and large in one patient. We concluded that CT was accurate method of determining the extent of splenic injury and evaluation of hemoperitoneum, but treatment choice should be based on the hemodynamic status of patients rather than the type of injury or the amount of hemoperitoneum by CT

  1. Serotonin: imaging findings in eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailer, Ursula F; Kaye, Walter H

    2011-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) are disorders characterized by aberrant patterns of feeding behavior, weight regulation, and disturbances in attitudes and perceptions toward body weight and shape. Several lines of evidence nominate disturbances of serotonin (5-HT) pathways as playing a role in the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of AN and BN. For example, 5-HT pathways are known to contribute to the modulation of a range of behaviors commonly seen in individuals with AN and BN. New technology using brain imaging with radioligands offers the potential for understanding previously inaccessible brain 5-HT neurotransmitter function and its dynamic relationship with human behaviors. Recent studies using positron emission tomography and single photon emission computed tomography with 5-HT-specific radioligands have consistently shown 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(2A) receptor and 5-HT transporter alterations in AN and BN in cortical and limbic structures, which may be related to anxiety, behavioral inhibition, and body image distortions. These disturbances are present when subjects are ill and persist after recovery, suggesting that these may be traits that are independent of the state of the illness. Effective treatments for AN and BN have been elusive. A better understanding of neurobiology is likely to be important for developing specific and more powerful therapies for these often chronic and deadly disorders.

  2. MR imaging findings in cesarean scar pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xiangqun; Xu Yikai; Luo Xiaoqin

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To analyze MRI findings of cesarean scar pregnancy (CSP). Methods: The MR findings in 18 patients who were diagnosed as CSP by surgery from March 2010 to November 2011 were retrospectively analyzed, and comparison was made between the MRI findings and surgical results. Results: All Gestational sacs (18) were clearly detected by MRI. Among the 18 cases,gestational sac presented as cystic mass with smooth margin located within the scar of uterine wall at the lower anterior uterus in 16 cases. In 2 of the 16 cases, gestational sac was found within the myometrium, whereas in the remaining 14 cases, gestational sac was found partially within the myometrium with extension into the uterine cavity. The anterior wall of isthmus uteri became thinner. In the remaining 2 of the 18 cases, gestational sac presented as irregular, multilobolated mass, growing deep into the myometrium as well as into the uterine cavity. On T 2 WI, the mass showed heterogeneous signal intensity. A small amount of hemorrhage within the mass and uterine cavity could be seen on T 1 WI. An enhancing solid component with a heterogeneous mass could be seen. All gestational sacs in 18 cases were located at or adjacent to the previous cesarean scar. In the area of cesarean scar,the signal of the uterine wall was disconnected, with focal indentation or thinning and the previous cesarean scar exhibited hypointensity on both T 1 WI and T 2 WI. Conclusion: CSP has its unique findings on MRI, these specific features can provide useful information in the management of CSP. (authors)

  3. Internal auditory canal (IAC) stenosis: imaging Findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz Jimenez, Johanna; Roa, Jose Luis; Figuero A, Ramon E

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) findings in a patient with a diagnosis of internal auditory canal (IAC) stenosis. To describe the embryological development of the IAC structures and the natural history of IAC stenosis. Methods: A 4 year old girl presents with sensorineural hearing loss and bilateral recurrent otitis media. The temporal bone CT shows diminished left IAC diameter (less than 2 mm), right IAC absence and normal inner ear structures. These findings are pathognomonic for left IAC stenosis. The MR findings include left IAC stenosis and IAC neural structures absence secondary to aplasia of the vestibulocochlear nerve on each IAC . Results: Hypoplasia/aplasia of the vestibulocochlear nerve in association with IAC stenosis is an important consideration in the differential diagnosis of sensorineural hearing loss, as it is a relative contraindication for cochlear implant placement. Conclusions: IAC stenosis and vestibulocochlear nerve hypoplasia/aplasia must be excluded as an etiology of sensorineural hearing loss. The diagnosis can be made by CT and MR.

  4. Neuropsychological and neuroimaging findings in traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Lisa A

    2011-01-01

    Advances in imaging technology, coupled with military personnel returning home from Iraq and Afghanistan with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and/or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), have increased interest in the neuropsychology and neurobiology of these two conditions. There has been a particular focus on differential diagnosis. This paper provides an overview of findings regarding the neuropsychological and neurobiological underpinnings of TBI and for PTSD. A specific focus is on assessment using neuropsychological measures and imaging techniques. Challenges associated with the assessment of individuals with one or both conditions are also discussed. Although use of neuropsychological and neuroimaging test results may assist with diagnosis and treatment planning, further work is needed to identify objective biomarkers for each condition. Such advances would be expected to facilitate differential diagnosis and implementation of best treatment practices.

  5. Clinical utility of MR FLAIR imaging for head injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashikaga, Ryuichiro

    1996-01-01

    To study the utility of fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) MR images in the evaluation of traumatic head injury, 56 patients with traumatic head injuries were examined with long TR/TE spin-echo (SE) sequences and FLAIR sequences. In 40 of them, long TR/short TE images were added to those sequences. Careful readings of MR images were done by two well-trained neuroradiologists. The chi-square test was used for statistical evaluation of our results. The relative sensitivities of FLAIR images were significantly better than those of long TR/TE, long TR/short TE images for the detection of diffuse axonal injury (p<0.01), cortical contusion (p<0.01), and subdural hematoma (p<0.01 for long TR/TE, p<0.05 for long TR/short TE). The number of cases of epidural hematoma and brainstem injury was too small for statistical significance to be determined. In 9 patients with corpus callosum injuries. FLAIR images demonstrated the lesions as abnormally high signal intensity in the septum pellucidum and fornix. Only sagittal FLAIR images could definitely discriminate the traumatic lesions of the fornix from the surrounding CSF. In addition, FLAIR images could easily discriminate DAI of the corpus callosum from CSF of the cavum velli interpositi. MR FLAIR images were found to be useful for detecting traumatic head injuries. (author)

  6. Clinical utility of MR FLAIR imaging for head injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashikaga, Ryuichiro [Kinki Univ., Osaka-Sayama, Osaka (Japan). School of Medicine

    1996-12-01

    To study the utility of fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) MR images in the evaluation of traumatic head injury, 56 patients with traumatic head injuries were examined with long TR/TE spin-echo (SE) sequences and FLAIR sequences. In 40 of them, long TR/short TE images were added to those sequences. Careful readings of MR images were done by two well-trained neuroradiologists. The chi-square test was used for statistical evaluation of our results. The relative sensitivities of FLAIR images were significantly better than those of long TR/TE, long TR/short TE images for the detection of diffuse axonal injury (p<0.01), cortical contusion (p<0.01), and subdural hematoma (p<0.01 for long TR/TE, p<0.05 for long TR/short TE). The number of cases of epidural hematoma and brainstem injury was too small for statistical significance to be determined. In 9 patients with corpus callosum injuries. FLAIR images demonstrated the lesions as abnormally high signal intensity in the septum pellucidum and fornix. Only sagittal FLAIR images could definitely discriminate the traumatic lesions of the fornix from the surrounding CSF. In addition, FLAIR images could easily discriminate DAI of the corpus callosum from CSF of the cavum velli interpositi. MR FLAIR images were found to be useful for detecting traumatic head injuries. (author)

  7. Internal derangement of the knee after ipsilateral femoral shaft fracture: MR imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blacksin, M.F.; Zurlo, J.V. [Department of Radiology, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Newark, NJ (United States); Levy, A.S. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, University Hospital, Newark, NJ 07103-2426 (United States)

    1998-08-01

    Objective. This study uses magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to delineate the types and frequencies of injuries seen in the knee after ipsilateral femoral shaft fracture. We also compare the results of the orthopedic knee examination with the MR findings. Design and patients. MR imaging of the ipsilateral knee was performed on 34 patients with closed femoral shaft fractures. Indications for knee MR imaging included knee pain at the time of fracture, soft tissue swelling or an effusion of the knee, or a positive knee examination under anesthesia. The patients had a mean age of 27 years and all were stabilized with intramedullary nails. Imaging was performed a mean time of 2.5 days after surgery. All patients had knee examinations done under anesthesia, and the MR results were compiled and compared with the clinical examinations. Results. Ninety-seven percent of patients demonstrated knee effusions. Twenty-seven percent of patients demonstrated meniscal tears, with the posterior horn of the medial meniscus most frequently torn. The medial collateral ligament was the most frequent site of ligamentous injury (38%) followed by the posterior cruciate ligament (21%). Fifty percent of patients had injuries of the extensor mechanism. Bone bruises were noted in 32% of patients. Articular cartilage injuries were confined to the patella in four cases. One occult tibial plateau fracture and one meniscocapsular separation were seen. Conclusions. There is a common incidence of both ligamentous and meniscal injury to the knee after ipsilateral femoral shaft fracture. MR imaging can be useful in assessing the extent of injury, and may reveal findings unsuspected after clinical examination of the knee. (orig.) With 4 figs., 2 tabs., 13 refs.

  8. Internal derangement of the knee after ipsilateral femoral shaft fracture: MR imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blacksin, M.F.; Zurlo, J.V.; Levy, A.S.

    1998-01-01

    Objective. This study uses magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to delineate the types and frequencies of injuries seen in the knee after ipsilateral femoral shaft fracture. We also compare the results of the orthopedic knee examination with the MR findings. Design and patients. MR imaging of the ipsilateral knee was performed on 34 patients with closed femoral shaft fractures. Indications for knee MR imaging included knee pain at the time of fracture, soft tissue swelling or an effusion of the knee, or a positive knee examination under anesthesia. The patients had a mean age of 27 years and all were stabilized with intramedullary nails. Imaging was performed a mean time of 2.5 days after surgery. All patients had knee examinations done under anesthesia, and the MR results were compiled and compared with the clinical examinations. Results. Ninety-seven percent of patients demonstrated knee effusions. Twenty-seven percent of patients demonstrated meniscal tears, with the posterior horn of the medial meniscus most frequently torn. The medial collateral ligament was the most frequent site of ligamentous injury (38%) followed by the posterior cruciate ligament (21%). Fifty percent of patients had injuries of the extensor mechanism. Bone bruises were noted in 32% of patients. Articular cartilage injuries were confined to the patella in four cases. One occult tibial plateau fracture and one meniscocapsular separation were seen. Conclusions. There is a common incidence of both ligamentous and meniscal injury to the knee after ipsilateral femoral shaft fracture. MR imaging can be useful in assessing the extent of injury, and may reveal findings unsuspected after clinical examination of the knee. (orig.)

  9. Phyllodes tumor: diagnostic imaging and histopathology findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venter, Alina Cristiana; Roşca, Elena; Daina, Lucia Georgeta; Muţiu, Gabriela; Pirte, Adriana Nicoleta; Rahotă, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Phyllodes tumors are rare breast tumors, accounting for less than 1% of all primary tumors of the breast. Histologically, phyllodes tumors can be divided into benign (60%), borderline (20%) and malignant (20%). The mammography examination was performed by means of a digital mammography system Giotto 3D Images; the ultrasound examination was performed through a GE Logiq P6 device and histological confirmation was possible after surgery or following the histological biopsy. We grouped the nine patients who presented clinically palpable nodules into two groups, namely: the six patients presenting histological benign results into Group I, and Group II where we included those with borderline and malignant histological results. Mammography performed in 77.7% revealed a well-circumscribed round or oval opacity or with contour lobules. Ultrasound examination was performed in all patients. Mammography and ultrasound have limitation in differentiating between benign lesion and phyllodes tumor. In the nine analyzed cases, mammographic and ultrasound examinations did not allow the differentiation into the three groups of phyllodes tumor. Histopathological examination is considered the golden standard for their diagnosis. Correlations between mammographic and microscopic aspects were inconclusive for determining the degree of differentiation, ultrasound changes could be correlated with the histopathological aspects.

  10. Crohn's disease lymphadenopathy: MR imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gourtsoyianni, Sofia; Papanikolaou, Nickolas; Amanakis, Emmanouil; Bourikas, Leonidas; Roussomoustakaki, Maria; Grammatikakis, John; Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To assess mesenteric lymph nodes in patients with different Crohn's disease subtypes identified on MR Enteroclysis. Materials and methods: Thirty-four patients, categorized into three different Crohn's disease subgroups, underwent MR Enteroclysis. A high resolution coronal true FISP sequence with fat saturation was applied to assess mesenteric lymph node anatomic distribution, size and shape. Their enhancement ratio (ER) was calculated by dividing signal intensity of each node to signal intensity of nearby vessel on T1 weighted FLASH images, acquired 75 s after intravenous administration of gadolinium. A one-way analysis of variance statistical test was applied to investigate any significant differences regarding mean ER among different disease subgroups. Results: Two hundred and eighty-three mesenteric lymph nodes were assessed, 231 in patients with active inflammatory (AI) disease, 36 in patients with fibrostenotic (FS) and 16 in patients with fistulizing/perforating (FP) disease. Maximum and minimum diameters were 3.2 and 0.3 cm, respectively. 75% of the lymph nodes presented with an oval shape. The majority were identified as being ileocolic (34%) and paracolic (31%). AI subgroup lymph nodes presented with the highest mean ER (0.783 ± 0.17) followed by FP (0.706 ± 0.1) and FS subgroup (0.652 ± 0.17) lymph nodes. The differences in mean values of ER of mesenteric lymph nodes between AI and FS subtypes were statistically significant (p < 0.0001), while mean ER between nodes of FP and the other two subtypes did not present statistically significant differences. Conclusion: ER of mesenteric lymph nodes identified on MR Enteroclysis may vary across different subtypes of Crohn's disease. Such differences may be valuable in clinical practice.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of fresh traumatic injuries of the knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishibashi, Koji; Ojima, Tadao; Sato, Katsumi; Sato, Tetsuro; Komatsu, Tetsuro; Nobuta, Shingo; Inoue, Hisayoshi; Onuma, Hidezi; Murakami, Tadashi (Tohoku Rosai Hospital, Sendai (Japan))

    1993-11-01

    Taking advantages of its water density delineation, MR studies were carried out in 22 patients having traumatic hemarthrosis of the knee within 3 days of the incidents. Because of swelling and severe pain, exact physical examination of an injured knee is very difficult. However, MR imaging is a non-invasive examination that would facilitate morphological diagnosis of soft tissue injuries such as meniscal tears, ligamental tears, and even fracture. In the present studies, MRI findings were compared with those from arthroscopic investigations and MR reimaging more than one month later. The results were confirming most of the MRI findings. Seventeen cases of tears of the anterior cruciate ligaments, 1 case of tear to posterior cruciate ligaments, 2 cases of tear of medial collateral ligaments, 2 cases of tear of lateral collateral ligaments, 4 cases of tears of meniscal and 6 of fractures. False MRI findings were encountered in only two cases: normal cruciate ligament surrounded with hemarthrosis caused by the tear of anterior cruciate ligament, and the tear of the posteior horn of the lateral meniscus musked by hematoma in the burusa of the popliteus tendon. We concluded that MRI can definitely contribute to clinical diagnosis and treatment planning of fresh traumatic knee injuries buried in hemarthrosis. (author).

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of fresh traumatic injuries of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishibashi, Koji; Ojima, Tadao; Sato, Katsumi; Sato, Tetsuro; Komatsu, Tetsuro; Nobuta, Shingo; Inoue, Hisayoshi; Onuma, Hidezi; Murakami, Tadashi

    1993-01-01

    Taking advantages of its water density delineation, MR studies were carried out in 22 patients having traumatic hemarthrosis of the knee within 3 days of the incidents. Because of swelling and severe pain, exact physical examination of an injured knee is very difficult. However, MR imaging is a non-invasive examination that would facilitate morphological diagnosis of soft tissue injuries such as meniscal tears, ligamental tears, and even fracture. In the present studies, MRI findings were compared with those from arthroscopic investigations and MR reimaging more than one month later. The results were confirming most of the MRI findings. Seventeen cases of tears of the anterior cruciate ligaments, 1 case of tear to posterior cruciate ligaments, 2 cases of tear of medial collateral ligaments, 2 cases of tear of lateral collateral ligaments, 4 cases of tears of meniscal and 6 of fractures. False MRI findings were encountered in only two cases: normal cruciate ligament surrounded with hemarthrosis caused by the tear of anterior cruciate ligament, and the tear of the posteior horn of the lateral meniscus musked by hematoma in the burusa of the popliteus tendon. We concluded that MRI can definitely contribute to clinical diagnosis and treatment planning of fresh traumatic knee injuries buried in hemarthrosis. (author)

  13. Advances in Imaging and Management Trends of Traumatic Aortic Injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagpal, Prashant, E-mail: drprashantnagpal@gmail.com, E-mail: Prashant-nagpal@uiowa.edu; Mullan, Brian F. [University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Department of Radiology (United States); Sen, Indrani [Mayo Clinic, Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery (United States); Saboo, Sachin S. [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Department of Radiology (United States); Khandelwal, Ashish [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2017-05-15

    Acute traumatic aortic injury (ATAI) is a life-threatening injury. CT is the imaging tool of choice, and the knowledge of direct and indirect signs of injury, grading system, and current management protocol helps the emergency radiologist to better identify and classify the injury and provide additional details that can impact management options. Newer dual-source CT technology with ultrafast acquisition speed has also influenced the appropriate protocol for imaging in patients with suspected ATAI. This review highlights the imaging protocol in patients with blunt trauma, CT appearance and grading systems of ATAI, management options, and the role of the multidisciplinary team in the management of these patients. We also briefly review the current literature on the definition, treatment, and follow-up protocol in patients with minimal aortic injury.

  14. Advances in Imaging and Management Trends of Traumatic Aortic Injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagpal, Prashant; Mullan, Brian F.; Sen, Indrani; Saboo, Sachin S.; Khandelwal, Ashish

    2017-01-01

    Acute traumatic aortic injury (ATAI) is a life-threatening injury. CT is the imaging tool of choice, and the knowledge of direct and indirect signs of injury, grading system, and current management protocol helps the emergency radiologist to better identify and classify the injury and provide additional details that can impact management options. Newer dual-source CT technology with ultrafast acquisition speed has also influenced the appropriate protocol for imaging in patients with suspected ATAI. This review highlights the imaging protocol in patients with blunt trauma, CT appearance and grading systems of ATAI, management options, and the role of the multidisciplinary team in the management of these patients. We also briefly review the current literature on the definition, treatment, and follow-up protocol in patients with minimal aortic injury.

  15. Role of Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Diffuse Axonal Injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ezaki, Y.; Tsutsumi, K.; Morikawa, M.; Nagata, I. [Nagasaki Univ., Graduate School of Medicine (Japan). Depts. of Neurosurgery and Radiology

    2006-09-15

    Purpose: To determine whether the signal changes on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), including fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR), T2*-weighted gradient echo (GE) imaging, and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in diffuse axonal injury (DAI) patients correlate with the clinical outcome. Material and Methods: We diagnosed patients with DAI based on the following criteria: 1) a loss of consciousness from the time of injury that persisted beyond 6 h; 2) no apparent hemorrhagic contusion on computed tomography (CT); 3) the presence of white matter injury on MRI. Twenty-one DAI patients were analyzed (19 M, 2 F, mean age 34 years) with MRI (FLAIR, T2*-weighted GE imaging, and DWI). Results: 325 abnormalities were detected by MRI within a week after injury. The T2*-weighted GE imaging was significantly more sensitive than FLAIR and DWI in diagnosing DAI. DWI detected only 32% of all lesions, but could depict additional shearing injuries not visible on either T2*-weighted GE imaging or FLAIR. The mean number of lesions in brainstem detected by DWI in the favorable group (good recovery/moderately disabled) was significantly smaller than in the unfavorable group (severely disabled/vegetative survival/death). This trend was not observed on the T2*-weighted GE imaging and FLAIR findings. Conclusion: DWI cannot detect all DAI-related lesions, but is a potentially useful imaging modality for both diagnosing and assessing patients with DAI.

  16. Thoracic cage injury imaging in rugby players | de Villiers | SA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rugby players often sustain high-impact collisions and are therefore at risk of significant traumatic thoracic injuries. Injury to the thoracic cage may be associated with potentially life-threatening sequelae. Player management is often based on the accuracy of the imaging report. The author suggests a combination of ...

  17. Finding effective biomarkers for pediatric traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olena Y Glushakova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As traumatic brain injury (TBI continues to affect children and young adults worldwide, research on reliable biomarkers grows as a possible aid in determining the severity of injury. However, many studies have revealed that diverse biomarkers such as S100B and myelin basic protein (MBP have many limitations, such as their elevated normative concentrations in young children. Therefore, the results of these studies have yet to be translated to clinical applications. However, despite the setbacks of research into S100B and MBP, investigators continue to research viable biomarkers, notably glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP and ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1, as possible aids in medical decision making. Studies have revealed that GFAP and UCH-L1 actually are better predictors of injury progression than the before-mentioned biomarkers S100B and MBP. In addition, UCH-L1 has demonstrated an ability to detect injury while CT is negative, suggesting an ability to detect acute intracranial lesions. Here, we evaluate research testing levels of GFAP and UCH-L1 on children diagnosed with TBI and compare our results to those of other tested biomarkers. In a recent study done by Hayes et al., GFAP and UCH-L1 demonstrated the potential to recognize children with the possibility of poor outcome, allowing for more specialized treatments with clinical and laboratory applications. Although studies on GFAP and UCH-L1 have for the most part warranted positive results, further studies will be needed to confirm their role as reliable markers for pediatric TBI.

  18. Knee dislocations: a magnetic resonance imaging study correlated with clinical and operative findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bui, Kimmie L.; Ilaslan, Hakan; Sundaram, Murali; Parker, Richard D.

    2008-01-01

    Our objectives were to determine retrospectively the prevalence, patients' demographics, mechanism of injury, combination of torn ligaments, associated intra-articular and extra-articular injuries, fractures, bone bruises, femoral-tibial alignment and neurovascular complications of knee dislocations as evaluated by magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. From 17,698 consecutive knee examinations by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) over a 6-year period, 20 patients with knee dislocations were identified. The medical records of these patients were subsequently reviewed for relevant clinical history, management and operative findings. The prevalence of knee dislocations was 0.11% [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.06-0.16]. There were 16 male patients and four female patients, with ages ranging from 15 years to 76 years (mean 31 years). Fifteen patients had low-velocity injuries (75%), of which 11 were amateur sports related and four were from falls. Four patients (20%) had suffered high-velocity trauma (motor vehicle accidents). One patient had no history available. Anatomic alignment was present at imaging in 16 patients (80%). Eighteen patients had three-ligament tears, two had four-ligament tears. The four-ligament tears occurred with low-velocity injuries. The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) were torn in every patient; the lateral collateral ligament (LCL) was torn in 50%, and the medial collateral ligament (MCL) in 60%. Intra-articular injuries included meniscal tears (five in four patients), fractures (eight in seven patients), bone bruises (15 patients), and patellar retinaculum tears (eight partial, two complete). The most common extra-articular injury was a complete biceps femoris tendon tear (five, 25%). There were two popliteal tendon tears and one iliotibial band tear. One patient had received a vascular injury following a motor vehicle accident (MVA) and had been treated prior to undergoing MRI. Bone bruises (unrelated to

  19. Knee dislocations: a magnetic resonance imaging study correlated with clinical and operative findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bui, Kimmie L. [Cleveland Clinic, Department of Radiology, Cleveland, OH (United States); Cleveland Clinic, Department of Radiology, HB6, Cleveland, OH (United States); Ilaslan, Hakan; Sundaram, Murali [Cleveland Clinic, Department of Radiology, Cleveland, OH (United States); Parker, Richard D. [Cleveland Clinic, Department of Orthopaedics, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2008-07-15

    Our objectives were to determine retrospectively the prevalence, patients' demographics, mechanism of injury, combination of torn ligaments, associated intra-articular and extra-articular injuries, fractures, bone bruises, femoral-tibial alignment and neurovascular complications of knee dislocations as evaluated by magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. From 17,698 consecutive knee examinations by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) over a 6-year period, 20 patients with knee dislocations were identified. The medical records of these patients were subsequently reviewed for relevant clinical history, management and operative findings. The prevalence of knee dislocations was 0.11% [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.06-0.16]. There were 16 male patients and four female patients, with ages ranging from 15 years to 76 years (mean 31 years). Fifteen patients had low-velocity injuries (75%), of which 11 were amateur sports related and four were from falls. Four patients (20%) had suffered high-velocity trauma (motor vehicle accidents). One patient had no history available. Anatomic alignment was present at imaging in 16 patients (80%). Eighteen patients had three-ligament tears, two had four-ligament tears. The four-ligament tears occurred with low-velocity injuries. The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) were torn in every patient; the lateral collateral ligament (LCL) was torn in 50%, and the medial collateral ligament (MCL) in 60%. Intra-articular injuries included meniscal tears (five in four patients), fractures (eight in seven patients), bone bruises (15 patients), and patellar retinaculum tears (eight partial, two complete). The most common extra-articular injury was a complete biceps femoris tendon tear (five, 25%). There were two popliteal tendon tears and one iliotibial band tear. One patient had received a vascular injury following a motor vehicle accident (MVA) and had been treated prior to undergoing MRI. Bone bruises

  20. The Role of Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Athletic Pubalgia and Core Muscle Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coker, Dana J; Zoga, Adam C

    2015-08-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become the standard of care imaging modality for a difficult, often misunderstood spectrum of musculoskeletal injury termed athletic pubalgia or core muscle injury. Armed with a dedicated noncontrast athletic pubalgia protocol and a late model phased array receiver coil, the musculoskeletal imager can play a great role in effective diagnosis and treatment planning for lesions, including osteitis pubis, midline pubic plate lesions, and rectus abdominis/adductor aponeurosis injury. Beyond these established patterns of MRI findings, there are many confounders and contributing pathologies about the pelvis in patients with activity related groin pain, including internal and periarticular derangements of the hip. The MRI is ideally suited to delineate the extent of expected injury and to identify the unexpected visceral and musculoskeletal lesions.

  1. Arcuate sign of posterolateral knee injuries: anatomic, radiographic, and MR imaging data related to patterns of injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Josephine; Trudell, Debra; Resnick, Donald L. [Department of Radiology, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, University of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Papakonstantinou, Olympia [Department of Radiology, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, University of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Department of Radiology/MRI Unit, University Hospital of Heraklion (Greece); Brookenthal, Keith R. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2003-11-01

    The ''arcuate sign'' is considered a pathognomonic sign for injuries of the posterolateral (PL) corner of the knee. The purpose of our study was to identify different patterns of injury to the fibular head that may associate with injuries to specific ligaments and tendons of the PL corner of the knee. The anatomic relations between the insertions of fibular collateral ligament (FCL), biceps femoris tendon (BFT), popliteofibular ligament (PFL), and arcuate ligament in normal cadaveric knees were also investigated. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed in two cadaveric knees which subsequently were dissected. Radiopaque markers were placed upon the fibular insertions of the FCL, BFT, PFL, and arcuate ligament in the dissected knees, and knee radiographs were then obtained. Twelve patients with radiographic or MR imaging evidence of isolated injury to the PL corner of the knee were retrospectively reviewed, with regard to avulsion fractures and marrow edema in the fibular head and the integrity of the ligaments of the PL corner of the knee. The PFL and arcuate ligament were seen to attach directly to the posterior and medial aspect of the styloid process of the fibular head. The FCL and BFT attached as a conjoined structure on the lateral aspect of the fibular head lateral, anterior and inferior to the attachment site of the PFL and arcuate ligament. Injury to the arcuate ligament or PFL was diagnosed in 8 patients who presented with a small avulsion fracture of the styloid process of the fibula (n=2), bone marrow edema in the medial aspect of the fibular head (n=3), or both (n=3). In 4 patients with injury to the conjoined tendon or FCL, a larger avulsion fragment and more diffuse proximal fibular edema were seen. Radiographic and MR imaging findings in injuries of the posterolateral corner of the knee may suggest injury to specific structures inserting in the fibular head. (orig.)

  2. Diagnostic imaging of ankle syndesmosis injuries: A general review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellett, John J; Lovell, Gregory A; Eriksen, David A; Sampson, Matthew J

    2018-02-05

    Literature on the various techniques for imaging injuries to the ankle syndesmosis to determine the most appropriate imaging modality for diagnosing syndesmosis ligament disruption and instability was reviewed using the following data sources: Pubmed, Google scholar, SportsDiscus, E-journals and PLOSone. Search terms used were: syndesmosis paired with injury, imaging, radiology, X-ray, stress X-ray, arthrography, ultrasound, nuclear medicine scan, CT scan, MRI and arthroscopy. Articles were selected by reading abstracts and the full article if indicated. Further articles were derived from the references of the primary articles. Plain x-rays of the ankle will detect approximately half on AP view to two-thirds on mortise view of syndesmosis injuries. Syndesmosis injuries frequently occur in association with tibial or fibular fractures. Intra-operative stress radiography failed to detect approximately half of instabilities confirmed at arthroscopy. The current benchmark imaging techniques to diagnose syndesmosis injury and diastasis are arthroscopy and high-power (3T) MRI. Ultrasound is a promising, developing, cost-effective imaging technique which is yet to reach its full diagnostic potential. CT and nuclear medicine scans have limited roles. MRI (3T) scanning in the plane of the syndesmotic ligaments is the investigation of choice to detect ankle syndesmosis injuries. In the presence of associated injuries requiring surgery, arthroscopic viewing with stress examination is the diagnostic benchmark when available. © 2018 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  3. 4.7-T diffusion tensor imaging of acute traumatic peripheral nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Richard B; Kelm, Nathaniel D; Riley, D Colton; Sexton, Kevin W; Pollins, Alonda C; Shack, R Bruce; Dortch, Richard D; Nanney, Lillian B; Does, Mark D; Thayer, Wesley P

    2015-09-01

    Diagnosis and management of peripheral nerve injury is complicated by the inability to assess microstructural features of injured nerve fibers via clinical examination and electrophysiology. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has been shown to accurately detect nerve injury and regeneration in crush models of peripheral nerve injury, but no prior studies have been conducted on nerve transection, a surgical emergency that can lead to permanent weakness or paralysis. Acute sciatic nerve injuries were performed microsurgically to produce multiple grades of nerve transection in rats that were harvested 1 hour after surgery. High-resolution diffusion tensor images from ex vivo sciatic nerves were obtained using diffusion-weighted spin-echo acquisitions at 4.7 T. Fractional anisotropy was significantly reduced at the injury sites of transected rats compared with sham rats. Additionally, minor eigenvalues and radial diffusivity were profoundly elevated at all injury sites and were negatively correlated to the degree of injury. Diffusion tensor tractography showed discontinuities at all injury sites and significantly reduced continuous tract counts. These findings demonstrate that high-resolution DTI is a promising tool for acute diagnosis and grading of traumatic peripheral nerve injuries.

  4. 4.7-T diffusion tensor imaging of acute traumatic peripheral nerve injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Richard B.; Kelm, Nathaniel D.; Riley, D. Colton; Sexton, Kevin W.; Pollins, Alonda C.; Shack, R. Bruce; Dortch, Richard D.; Nanney, Lillian B.; Does, Mark D.; Thayer, Wesley P.

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosis and management of peripheral nerve injury is complicated by the inability to assess microstructural features of injured nerve fibers via clinical examination and electrophysiology. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has been shown to accurately detect nerve injury and regeneration in crush models of peripheral nerve injury, but no prior studies have been conducted on nerve transection, a surgical emergency that can lead to permanent weakness or paralysis. Acute sciatic nerve injuries were performed microsurgically to produce multiple grades of nerve transection in rats that were harvested 1 hour after surgery. High-resolution diffusion tensor images from ex vivo sciatic nerves were obtained using diffusion-weighted spin-echo acquisitions at 4.7 T. Fractional anisotropy was significantly reduced at the injury sites of transected rats compared with sham rats. Additionally, minor eigenvalues and radial diffusivity were profoundly elevated at all injury sites and were negatively correlated to the degree of injury. Diffusion tensor tractography showed discontinuities at all injury sites and significantly reduced continuous tract counts. These findings demonstrate that high-resolution DTI is a promising tool for acute diagnosis and grading of traumatic peripheral nerve injuries. PMID:26323827

  5. Whiplash Injuries Can be Visible by Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bengt H Johansson

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Whiplash trauma can result in injuries that are difficult to diagnose. Diagnosis is particularly difficult in injuries to the upper segments of the cervical spine (craniocervical joint [CCJ] complex. Studies indicate that injuries in that region may be responsible for the cervicoencephalic syndrome, as evidenced by headache, balance problems, vertigo, dizziness, eye problems, tinnitus, poor concentration, sensitivity to light and pronounced fatigue. Consequently, diagnosis of lesions in the CCJ region is important. Functional magnetic resonance imaging is a radiological technique that can visualize injuries of the ligaments and the joint capsules, and accompanying pathological movement patterns.

  6. Cervical spine injury in the elderly: imaging features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehara, S. [Dept. of Radiology, Iwate Medical University School of Medicine, Morioka (Japan); Shimamura, Tadashi [Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, Iwate Medical University School of Medicine, Morioka (Japan)

    2001-01-01

    An increase in the elderly population has resulted in an increased incidence of cervical spine injury in this group. No specific type of cervical spine trauma is seen in the elderly, although dens fractures are reported to be common. Hyperextension injuries due to falling and the resultant central cord syndrome in the mid and lower cervical segments due to decreased elasticity as a result of spondylosis may be also characteristic. The imaging features of cervical spine injury are often modified by associated spondylosis deformans, DISH and other systemic disorders. The value of MR imaging in such cases is emphasized. (orig.)

  7. Common injuries related to weightlifting: MR imaging perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Joseph S; Habib, Paula A

    2005-12-01

    Weightlifting has evolved to become a ubiquitous form of exercise. Resistance training has been shown to have beneficial effects on both muscle and osseous maintenance and development. Competitive weightlifting sports continue to enjoy tremendous popularity, with participants striving to establish new standards in performance and more demanding personal goals. Thus, it is not surprising that we have also seen an increase in injuries related to weightlifting. Many of these injuries are radiographically occult and are best suited for evaluation by magnetic resonance (MR) imaging because many involve the soft tissues. In this article, we discuss some of the factors that contribute to these injuries and address the mechanisms of injury and the MR imaging manifestations of the more common injuries.

  8. MR images of thymoma and their correlation with pathologic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, Masahiro; Kusumoto, Masahiko; Kono, Michio

    1996-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of MR imaging for diagnosing thymomas and differentiating non-invasive from invasive thymomas, MRI was performed in twenty-five patients with thymoma and the MR appearance was compared with the pathological findings. The MR appearance of thymomas corresponded well with the pathological findings: intratumoral linear septae of low signal intensity were fibrous septae and nodular images were lobules with tumor cells, necrosis or hemorrhage. Coronal and sagittal images provided additional useful information concerning tumor extent. Invasive thymomas tend to have irregular margins, larger size, more cranio-caudal extent and internodular differences in signal intensity (IDSI) on MR images than noninvasive thymomas. Among them, IDSI is the best differential diagnostic finding to determine invasiveness. Gd-DTPA enhanced MRI in thymomas showed intratumoral linear septae and necrotic lesions more clearly than the plain T1-weighted image. (author)

  9. MR images of thymoma and their correlation with pathologic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endo, Masahiro; Kusumoto, Masahiko; Kono, Michio [Kobe Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1996-02-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of MR imaging for diagnosing thymomas and differentiating non-invasive from invasive thymomas, MRI was performed in twenty-five patients with thymoma and the MR appearance was compared with the pathological findings. The MR appearance of thymomas corresponded well with the pathological findings: intratumoral linear septae of low signal intensity were fibrous septae and nodular images were lobules with tumor cells, necrosis or hemorrhage. Coronal and sagittal images provided additional useful information concerning tumor extent. Invasive thymomas tend to have irregular margins, larger size, more cranio-caudal extent and internodular differences in signal intensity (IDSI) on MR images than noninvasive thymomas. Among them, IDSI is the best differential diagnostic finding to determine invasiveness. Gd-DTPA enhanced MRI in thymomas showed intratumoral linear septae and necrotic lesions more clearly than the plain T1-weighted image. (author).

  10. Dorsal defect on a multi-partite patella: imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mellado, J.M.; Salvado, E.; Ramos, A.; Camins, A.; Sauri, A. [Institut de Diagnostic per la Imatge, Centre de Ressonancia Magnetica, Hospital Joan XXIII, Tarragona (Spain)

    2001-07-01

    Coincidence of dorsal defect on a multipartite patella constitutes a rare cause of anterior knee pain in the first decades of life. Imaging findings of this uncommon symptomatic skeletal variant are discussed, with emphasis on MR features. (orig.)

  11. Imaging of sports-related hip and groin injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lischuk, Andrew W; Dorantes, Thomas M; Wong, William; Haims, Andrew H

    2010-05-01

    A normally functioning hip joint is imperative for athletes who use their lower extremities with running, jumping, or kicking activities. Sports-related injuries of the hip and groin are far less frequent than injuries to the more distal aspect of the extremity, accounting for less than 10% of lower extremity injuries. Despite the lower incidence, hip and groin injuries can lead to significant clinical and diagnostic challenges related to the complex anatomy and biomechanical considerations of this region. Loads up to 8 times normal body weight have been documented in the joint in common daily activities, such as jogging, with significantly greater force expected during competitive athletics. Additionally, treatment for hip and groin injuries can obviate the participation of medical and surgical specialties, with a multidisciplinary approach frequently required. Delay in diagnosis and triage of these injuries may cause loss of time from competition and, potentially, early onset of degenerative changes. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the hip has proven to be the gold standard for the diagnosis of sports-related hip and groin injuries in the setting of negative radiographs. With its exquisite soft tissue contrast, multiplanar capabilities, and lack of ionizing radiation, MRI is unmatched in the noninvasive diagnosis of intra-articular and extra-articular pathology, as well as intraosseous processes. This review focuses on MRI of common athletic injuries of the hip and groin, including acetabular labral tears, femoral acetabular impingement syndrome, muscle injuries around the hip and groin (including athletic pubalgia), and athletic osseous injuries.

  12. Imaging of spinal injury in abusive head trauma: a retrospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhary, Arabinda K. [Nemours A.I. DuPont Children Hospital, Department of Radiology, Wilmington, DE (United States); Ishak, Ramsay; Zacharia, Thomas T. [Hershey Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Hershey, PA (United States); Dias, Mark S. [Hershey Medical Center, Department of Neurosurgery, Hershey, PA (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Spinal imaging has been a neglected part of abusive head trauma (AHT) imaging. As most of the radiographs and CT spine are negative in AHT in infants, the cervical spine is assumed to be normal. There is increasing evidence in the role of injury to brainstem and cervical cord in the pathogenesis of AHT. In addition, in courts of law, there is fierce debate about AHT, its mimics and other disparate nontraumatic diagnoses explaining the neuroradiological and skeletal findings. However, this discussion ignores the evidence and significance of spinal injury. We sought to study the cervical spine in an AHT cohort to understand the true prevalence of spinal injuries in AHT and contrast it with cohorts of accidental and nontraumatic groups to give the clinicians a robust diagnostic tool in evaluating AHT. The purpose of this study is to compare the relative incidence of spinal ligamentous and soft-tissue abnormalities on spinal MRI among three groups of children ages < 48 months: (1) those with AHT, (2) those with accidental trauma, and (3) those with nontraumatic conditions. This comparative study included 183 children who underwent spine MRI: 67 with AHT, 46 with accidental trauma and a clinical suspicion of spinal injury, and 70 with nontraumatic conditions. Clinical and radiographic findings were collected in all cases and were analyzed retrospectively to identify MRI evidence of traumatic spinal injuries. The incidence of spinal injuries among the three groups was compared. The incidence of spinal ligamentous injuries was calculated for those with and without radiographic evidence of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. All comparisons were performed using Fisher exact test with P < 0.05 considered statistically significant. Cervical spine ligamentous injuries (predominantly the nuchal, atlanto-occipital and atlanto-axial ligaments) were present in 78% of the AHT group, 46% of the accidental trauma group and 1% of the nontraumatic group; all of these differences were

  13. Imaging of spinal injury in abusive head trauma: a retrospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choudhary, Arabinda K.; Ishak, Ramsay; Zacharia, Thomas T.; Dias, Mark S.

    2014-01-01

    Spinal imaging has been a neglected part of abusive head trauma (AHT) imaging. As most of the radiographs and CT spine are negative in AHT in infants, the cervical spine is assumed to be normal. There is increasing evidence in the role of injury to brainstem and cervical cord in the pathogenesis of AHT. In addition, in courts of law, there is fierce debate about AHT, its mimics and other disparate nontraumatic diagnoses explaining the neuroradiological and skeletal findings. However, this discussion ignores the evidence and significance of spinal injury. We sought to study the cervical spine in an AHT cohort to understand the true prevalence of spinal injuries in AHT and contrast it with cohorts of accidental and nontraumatic groups to give the clinicians a robust diagnostic tool in evaluating AHT. The purpose of this study is to compare the relative incidence of spinal ligamentous and soft-tissue abnormalities on spinal MRI among three groups of children ages < 48 months: (1) those with AHT, (2) those with accidental trauma, and (3) those with nontraumatic conditions. This comparative study included 183 children who underwent spine MRI: 67 with AHT, 46 with accidental trauma and a clinical suspicion of spinal injury, and 70 with nontraumatic conditions. Clinical and radiographic findings were collected in all cases and were analyzed retrospectively to identify MRI evidence of traumatic spinal injuries. The incidence of spinal injuries among the three groups was compared. The incidence of spinal ligamentous injuries was calculated for those with and without radiographic evidence of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. All comparisons were performed using Fisher exact test with P < 0.05 considered statistically significant. Cervical spine ligamentous injuries (predominantly the nuchal, atlanto-occipital and atlanto-axial ligaments) were present in 78% of the AHT group, 46% of the accidental trauma group and 1% of the nontraumatic group; all of these differences were

  14. 5-Year imaging sequelae of concussive blast injury and relation to early clinical outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine L. Mac Donald

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Current imaging diagnostic techniques are often insensitive to the underlying pathological changes following mild traumatic brain injury (TBI or concussion so much so that the explicit definition of these uncomplicated mild brain injuries includes the absence of radiological findings. In the US military, this is complicated by the natural tendency of service members to down play symptoms for fear of removal from their unit particularly in combat making it challenging for clinicians to definitively diagnose and determine course of treatment. Questions remain regarding the long-term impact of these war-time brain injuries. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the long-term imaging sequelae of blast concussion in active-duty US military and leverage previous longitudinal data collected in these same patients to identify predictors of sustained DTI signal change indicative of chronic neurodegeneration. In total, 50 blast TBI and 44 combat-deployed controls were evaluated at this 5-year follow up by advanced neuroimaging techniques including diffusion tensor imaging and quantitative volumetry. While cross-sectional analysis of regions of white matter on DTI images did not reveal significant differences across groups after statistical correction, an approach flexible to the heterogeneity of brain injury at the single-subject level identified 74% of the concussive blast TBI cohort to have reductions in fractional anisotropy indicative of chronic brain injury. Logistic regression leveraging clinical and demographic data collected in the acute/sub-acute and 1-year follow up to determine predictors of these long-term imaging changes determined that brain injury diagnosis, older age, verbal memory and verbal fluency best predicted the presence of DTI abnormalities 5 years post injury with an AUC of 0.78 indicating good prediction strength. These results provide supporting evidence for the evolution not resolution of this brain injury

  15. Multimodal imaging findings in retinal deep capillary ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Suqin; Wang, Fenghua; Pang, Claudine E; Yannuzzi, Lawrence A; Freund, K Bailey

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate the multimodal imaging findings in retinal deep capillary ischemia (DCI). This was a retrospective review of 5 eyes of 4 patients with sudden onset of paracentral scotomas caused by DCI. Multimodal imaging techniques, including color and red-free photographs, near-infrared reflectance, fluorescein angiography, and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, were performed in all eyes, and the findings were correlated with microperimetry in two eyes. Imaging findings in DCI were compared with those of a cotton wool spot caused by superficial capillary ischemia (SCI). Unlike SCI, the imaging findings in DCI were subtler during both the acute and chronic phase, but specific optical coherence tomographic findings could readily differentiate these entities. Acute SCI showed inner retinal whitening, edema, and increased reflectivity, whereas acute DCI showed increased reflectivity of middle retinal layers. Chronic DCI showed retinal thinning with middle layer atrophy, whereas chronic SCI showed inner layer atrophy. In one patient, microperimetry showed a paracentral dense scotoma that corresponded well to the optical coherence tomographic findings. Deep capillary ischemia may represent a nonspecific finding of retinal ischemia and produces characteristic changes within the middle retinal layers, analogous to a deep cotton wool spot, but with distinct features differing from the superficial cotton wool spot which is seen in SCI. Among the various multimodal imaging techniques, optical coherence tomography seemed to be the most sensitive and specific technique in detecting DCI in both the acute and chronic phases.

  16. Functional Imaging of Autonomic Regulation: Methods and Key Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul M Macey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Central nervous system processing of autonomic function involves a network of regions throughout the brain which can be visualized and measured with neuroimaging techniques, notably functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. The development of fMRI procedures has both confirmed and extended earlier findings from animal models, and human stroke and lesion studies. Assessments with fMRI can elucidate interactions between different central sites in regulating normal autonomic patterning, and demonstrate how disturbed systems can interact to produce aberrant regulation during autonomic challenges. Understanding autonomic dysfunction in various illnesses reveals mechanisms that potentially lead to interventions in the impairments. The objectives here are to: 1 describe the fMRI neuroimaging methodology for assessment of autonomic neural control, 2 outline the widespread, lateralized distribution of function in autonomic sites in the normal brain which includes structures from the neocortex through the medulla and cerebellum, 3 illustrate the importance of the time course of neural changes when coordinating responses, and how those patterns are impacted in conditions of sleep-disordered breathing, and 4 highlight opportunities for future research studies with emerging methodologies. Methodological considerations specific to autonomic testing include timing of challenges relative to the underlying fMRI signal, spatial resolution sufficient to identify autonomic brainstem nuclei, blood pressure and blood oxygenation influences on the fMRI signal, and the sustained timing, often measured in minutes of challenge periods and recovery. Key findings include the lateralized nature of autonomic organization, which is reminiscent of asymmetric motor, sensory and language pathways. Testing brain function during autonomic challenges demonstrate closely-integrated timing of responses in connected brain areas during autonomic challenges, and the involvement with

  17. Imaging Findings of Complex Fibroadenoma of the Breast: Correlation with Pathologic Findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, Sun Kyoung; Choi, Bo Bae; Kim, Kyung Hee [Chungnam National University Hospital College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    The imaging findings of complex fibroadenoma have been rarely reported even though the risk of developing breast carcinoma in a patient with complex fibroadenoma is higher than that for a patient with simple fibroadenoma. We reviewed the imaging features and pathologic findings of complex fibroadenomas. Between April 2003 and April 2010, the mammographic and sonographic findings of five patients with complex fibroadenomas were retrospectively reviewed according to the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BIRADS). The pathologic findings were retrospectively reviewed for all 5 patients. The mammography findings showed masses (3 cases) and asymmetry (1 case). On ultrasonography, complex echo patterns were noted in all the patients, and all the lesions were assigned to BI-RADS category 4, suspicious for abnormality. The complex echoic patterns showed two types: 1) a mixture of a heterogeneous hypoechoic central portion and a fuzzy hyperechoic peripheral area in 2 cases, 2) a mixture of tiny anechoic and hypoehoic lesions in 3 cases. Multiple cystic changes were noted in all the cases on the pathologic analysis. Complex fibroadenomas showed different ultrasonographic findings from simple fibroadenomas such as two types of complex echo patterns, even though the other findings were similar to those of simple fibroadenoma. Cystic changes were noted in all the cases on the pathologic analysis. Awareness of these imaging findings will help us to properly diagnose complex fibroadenoma

  18. Imaging Findings of Complex Fibroadenoma of the Breast: Correlation with Pathologic Findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, Sun Kyoung; Choi, Bo Bae; Kim, Kyung Hee

    2010-01-01

    The imaging findings of complex fibroadenoma have been rarely reported even though the risk of developing breast carcinoma in a patient with complex fibroadenoma is higher than that for a patient with simple fibroadenoma. We reviewed the imaging features and pathologic findings of complex fibroadenomas. Between April 2003 and April 2010, the mammographic and sonographic findings of five patients with complex fibroadenomas were retrospectively reviewed according to the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BIRADS). The pathologic findings were retrospectively reviewed for all 5 patients. The mammography findings showed masses (3 cases) and asymmetry (1 case). On ultrasonography, complex echo patterns were noted in all the patients, and all the lesions were assigned to BI-RADS category 4, suspicious for abnormality. The complex echoic patterns showed two types: 1) a mixture of a heterogeneous hypoechoic central portion and a fuzzy hyperechoic peripheral area in 2 cases, 2) a mixture of tiny anechoic and hypoehoic lesions in 3 cases. Multiple cystic changes were noted in all the cases on the pathologic analysis. Complex fibroadenomas showed different ultrasonographic findings from simple fibroadenomas such as two types of complex echo patterns, even though the other findings were similar to those of simple fibroadenoma. Cystic changes were noted in all the cases on the pathologic analysis. Awareness of these imaging findings will help us to properly diagnose complex fibroadenoma

  19. Primary bacterial peritonitis in otherwise healthy children: imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dann, Phoebe H.; Amodio, John B.; Rivera, Rafael; Fefferman, Nancy R. [New York University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, New York (United States)

    2005-02-01

    We report the imaging findings of two recent cases of primary bacterial peritonitis in otherwise healthy children with a clinical presentation mimicking acute appendicitis. Primary bacterial peritonitis is rare in the absence of underlying systemic disease. Although it has been described in the pediatric literature, the imaging findings have not been described in the radiological literature to the best of our knowledge. With imaging playing an increasing role in the evaluation of appendicitis in children, it is important for the radiologist to be familiar with this inflammatory process. (orig.)

  20. Nuclear medicine and radiologic imaging in sports injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glaudermans, Andor W.J.M.; Gielen, Jan L.M.A.; Antwerp Univ. Hospital, Edegem; Antwerp Univ. Hospital, Edegem; Zwerver, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    This comprehensive book describes in detail how nuclear medicine and radiology can meet the needs of the sports medicine physician by assisting in precise diagnosis, clarification of pathophysiology, imaging of treatment outcome and monitoring of rehabilitation. Individual sections focus on nuclear medicine and radiologic imaging of injuries to the head and face, spine, chest, shoulder, elbow and forearm, wrist and hand, pelvic region, knee, lower leg, ankle and foot. The pathophysiology of sports injuries frequently encountered in different regions of the body is described from the perspective of each specialty, and the potential diagnostic and management benefits offered by the new hybrid imaging modalities - SPECT/CT, PET/CT, and PET/MRI - are explained. In addition, a range of basic and general issues are addressed, including imaging of the injuries characteristic of specific sports. It is hoped that this book will promote interdisciplinary awareness and communication and improve the management of injured recreational or elite athletes.

  1. Nuclear medicine and radiologic imaging in sports injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glaudermans, Andor W.J.M. [Groningen Univ. (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O. [Groningen Univ. (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; Ghent Univ. (Belgium); Gielen, Jan L.M.A. [Antwerp Univ. Hospital, Edegem (Belgium). Dept. of Radiology; Antwerp Univ. Hospital, Edegem (Belgium). Dept. of Sports Medicine; Antwerp Univ. Hospital, Edegem (Belgium). Dept. of Medicine; Zwerver, Johannes (ed.) [Groningen Univ. (Netherlands). Center for Sports Medicine

    2015-10-01

    This comprehensive book describes in detail how nuclear medicine and radiology can meet the needs of the sports medicine physician by assisting in precise diagnosis, clarification of pathophysiology, imaging of treatment outcome and monitoring of rehabilitation. Individual sections focus on nuclear medicine and radiologic imaging of injuries to the head and face, spine, chest, shoulder, elbow and forearm, wrist and hand, pelvic region, knee, lower leg, ankle and foot. The pathophysiology of sports injuries frequently encountered in different regions of the body is described from the perspective of each specialty, and the potential diagnostic and management benefits offered by the new hybrid imaging modalities - SPECT/CT, PET/CT, and PET/MRI - are explained. In addition, a range of basic and general issues are addressed, including imaging of the injuries characteristic of specific sports. It is hoped that this book will promote interdisciplinary awareness and communication and improve the management of injured recreational or elite athletes.

  2. Evaluation of Tl-201 SPECT imaging findings in prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinem Ozyurt

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To compare with histopathological findings the findings of prostate cancer imaging by SPECT method using Tl-201 as a tumor seeking agent. Methods: The study comprised 59 patients (age range 51-79 years, mean age 65.3 ± 6.8 years who were planned to have transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS-guided biopsies due to suspicion of prostate cancer between April 2011 and September 2011. Early planar, late planar and SPECT images were obtained for all patients. Scintigraphic evaluation was made in relation to uptake presence and patterns in the visual assessment and to Tumor/Background (T/Bg ratios for both planar and SPECT images in the quantitative assessment. Histopathological findings were compatible with benign etiology in 36 (61% patients and malign etiology in 23 (39% patients. Additionally, comparisons were made to evaluate the relationships between uptake patterns,total PSA values and Gleason scores. Results: A statistically significant difference was found between the benign and malignant groups in terms of uptake in planar and SPECT images and T/Bg ratios and PSA values. No statistically significant difference was found between uptake patterns of planar and SPECT images and Gleason scores in the malignant group. Conclusions: SPECT images were superior to planar images in the comparative assessment. Tl-201 SPECT imaging can provide an additional contribution to clinical practice in the diagnosis of prostate cancer and it can be used in selected patients.

  3. Presurgical mapping with magnetic source imaging. Comparisons with intraoperative findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, T.P.L.; Ferrari, P.; Perry, D.; Rowley, H.A.; Berger, M.S.

    2000-01-01

    We compare noninvasive preoperative mapping with magnetic source imaging to intraoperative cortical stimulation mapping. These techniques were directly compared in 17 patients who underwent preoperative and postoperative somatosensory mapping of a total of 22 comparable anatomic sites (digits, face). Our findings are presented in the context of previous studies that used magnetic source imaging and functional magnetic resonance imaging as noninvasive surrogates of intraoperative mapping for the identification of sensorimotor and language-specific brain functional centers in patients with brain tumors. We found that magnetic source imaging results were reasonably concordant with intraoperative mapping findings in over 90% of cases, and that concordance could be defined as 'good' in 77% of cases. Magnetic source imaging therefore provides a viable, if coarse, identification of somatosensory areas and, consequently, can guide and reduce the time taken for intraoperative mapping procedures. (author)

  4. Presurgical mapping with magnetic source imaging. Comparisons with intraoperative findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, T.P.L.; Ferrari, P.; Perry, D.; Rowley, H.A.; Berger, M.S. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2000-07-01

    We compare noninvasive preoperative mapping with magnetic source imaging to intraoperative cortical stimulation mapping. These techniques were directly compared in 17 patients who underwent preoperative and postoperative somatosensory mapping of a total of 22 comparable anatomic sites (digits, face). Our findings are presented in the context of previous studies that used magnetic source imaging and functional magnetic resonance imaging as noninvasive surrogates of intraoperative mapping for the identification of sensorimotor and language-specific brain functional centers in patients with brain tumors. We found that magnetic source imaging results were reasonably concordant with intraoperative mapping findings in over 90% of cases, and that concordance could be defined as 'good' in 77% of cases. Magnetic source imaging therefore provides a viable, if coarse, identification of somatosensory areas and, consequently, can guide and reduce the time taken for intraoperative mapping procedures. (author)

  5. Relationship between Northwick Park neck pain questionnaire and cervical spine MR imaging findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arana, Estanislao; Martí-Bonmatí, Luis; Montijano, Ruben; Bautista, Daniel; Molla, Enrique; Costa, Salvador

    2006-08-01

    The study was aimed at determining the association between the self-report of pain and disability by means of Northwick neck pain questionnaire (NPQ) and cervical spine MR imaging findings. A random sample of 251 patients, 132 men and 119 women aged 43+/-13 years, submitted with neck pain were investigated. Patients with previous discitis, surgery, neoplasm or hospitalized for cervical spine trauma were excluded. All patients completed the NPQ and were studied with sagittal gradient-echo T1 and turbo spin-echo T2, axial gradient-echo T2* and heavily T2 weighted MR myelographic weighted images. MR images of the two most affected disc levels were read, offering an MR imaging score from 0 to 30. There was no statistically significant correlation between NPQ and MR imaging scores. From the NPQ items, only difficulty in sleeping and numbness were related to the MR imaging score. Disc extrusion was the only MR finding almost significantly associated with NPQ (P=0.054). Neck injury did not increase NPQ scores. In patients with neck pain, NPQ scores do not correlate with MR imaging findings. NPQ and cervical spine MR imaging show different facets of the multidimensional complex of neck pain.

  6. Diagnostic criteria for cutaneous injuries in child abuse: classification, findings, and interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsokos, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Physical abuse of children has many manifestations. Depending on the type of force involved, specific injury patterns are produced on the body of the child, the morphology and localization of which are forensically relevant in terms of diagnostic classification as child abuse. Typical patterned bruising includes, for example, tramline bruises resulting from blows with oblong, stick-like objects. In addition to rounded or one-sided horseshoe-shaped bite injuries, injuries of different ages, clustered injuries (e.g., three or more individual injuries in the same body region), and thermal injuries are typical results of abuse. Abusive scalds are usually characterized by a symmetrical impression and localization with sharp delineation of the scald wound edges, in contrast to accidental scalding injuries with radiating splash patterns ending in tapered points. The coloration of a hematoma can help indicate the time when the injury occurred. Lack of a coherent and comprehensible explanation for accidental injury constitutes grounds for suspecting abuse. Suspicions should be raised in cases of a delayed visit to a doctor, waiting for an unusually long period before summoning emergency medical help for serious injuries to a child, and when differing versions of a purported accident are provided. Documentation of the findings is highly relevant in later reviews of the diagnosis, for instance, when new relevant facts and investigative results come to light in subsequent criminal proceedings.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of spinal cord injury in chronic stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobimatsu, Haruki; Nihei, Ryuichi; Kimura, Tetsuhiko; Yano, Hideo; Touyama, Tetsuo; Tobimatsu, Yoshiko; Suyama, Naoto; Yoshino, Yasumasa

    1991-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images of a total of 195 patients with cervical (125) or thoracic (70) spinal cord injury were reviewed. The imaging studies of the spinal cord lesions were correlated with clinical manifestations. Sequential MR imaging revealed hypointensity on T1-weighted images (T1WI) and hyperintensity on T2-weighted images (T2WI) in all patients, except for five patients showing no signal changes and two showing isointensity, suggesting gliosis, myelomalacia, and syringomyelia. Spinal cord lesions were classified into four types: small lesions, large lesions, complete transverse, and longitudinal rupture. These lesions were well correlated with the severity of injury and paralysis. Complete paralysis was frequently associated with enlarged, complete transverse for cervical spinal cord injury, and longitudinal ruptured or thinned complete transverse for thoracic spinal cord injury. The height of paralysis was well in agreement with that of lesions. For incomplete paralysis, localized lesions were seen within the spinal cord, coinciding with the paralysis or severity. Traumatic syringomyelia was seen in 17 patients (8.7%)-- for the cervical site (10 patients, 8%) and the thoracic site (7 patients, 10%). When homogeneous and marginally clear hypointensity is shown on T1-weighted images and vacuolated hyperintensity is shown on T2-weighted images, in addition to lesions spreading two or more cords or 1.5 or more cords above the nervous root level of paralysis, traumatic syringomyelia is strongly suspected, requiring the follow up observation. (N.K.)

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of acute spinal cord injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadoya, S.; Nakamura, T.; Kobayashi, S.; Yamamoto, I.

    1987-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging of acute spinal cord injury is described. The traumatized cord segment was clearly shown as a hyperintensity in a T2-weighted image whereas it appeared as an isointensity in a moderately T1-weighted image. This different sensitivity may result from parenchymal hemorrhagic tissue and edematous changes due to direct trauma. Hyperintense tissue was also seen in the retro-pharyngeal and -tracheal spaces. (orig.)

  9. The value of 'binder-off' imaging to identify occult and unexpected pelvic ring injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagg, James A C; Acharya, Mehool R; Chesser, Tim J S; Ward, Anthony J

    2018-02-01

    To determine the effectiveness of 'binder-off' plain pelvic radiographs in the assessment of pelvic ring injuries. All patients requiring operative intervention at our tertiary referral pelvic unit/major trauma centre for high-energy pelvic injuries between April 2012 and December 2014 were retrospectively identified. Pre-operative pelvic imaging with and without pelvic binder was reviewed with respect to fracture pattern and pelvic stability. The frequency with which the imaging without pelvic binder changed the opinion of the pelvic stability and need for operative intervention, when compared with the computed tomography (CT) scans and anteroposterior (AP) radiographs with the binder on, was assessed. Seventy-three percent (71 of 97) of patients had initial imaging with a pelvic binder in situ. Of these, 76% (54 of 71) went on to have 'binder-off' imaging. Seven percent (4 of 54) of patients had unexpected unstable pelvic ring injuries identified on 'binder-off' imaging that were not identified on CT imaging in binder. Trauma CT imaging of the pelvis with a pelvic binder in place is inadequate at excluding unstable pelvic ring injuries, and, based on the original findings in this paper, we recommend additional plain film 'binder-off' radiographs, when there is any clinical concern. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. An analysis of the correlation between CT images and clinical findings in spinal trauma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turek, T.; Sasiadek, M.; Sasiadek, M.

    2004-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is an accurate and safe method of diagnostic imaging in spinal trauma patients. The purpose of the study was to analyze correlations between CT appearance of spine injuries and clinical findings. CT was performed in 193 patients after spinal trauma. In 166 cases (86%) neurological disturbances were present, including 77 (39.9%) patients with signs of spinal cord injury, and 48 (24.9%) with radicular symptoms. Correlations between the clinical findings and the results of CT examinations were analyzed. CT revealed pathological changes in 156 patients (80.8 %). Fractures were found in 128 (66.3%) cases, facet joint injuries in 57 (29.5%), and intervertebral disc lesions in 24 (12.4%) patients. Statistical analysis showed a significant correlation between local pain, as well as minor and transient neurological signs, and normal CT appearance (p<0.05). In patients with radicular symptoms there were positive correlations with intervertebral disc injuries (p<0.001) and degenerative stenosis (p<0.05), while negative correlations with facet joint injuries (p<0.001) and normal CT appearance (p<0.05). Symptoms of spinal cord injury correlated positively with facet joint injuries (p<0.001) while negatively with normal CT appearance and intervertebral disc injuries (p<0.05). Consciousness disturbances correlated positively with brain injuries (p<0.001) and normal CT appearance of the spine (p<0.05), while negatively with the spinal fractures (p<0.05). There is a high correlation between CT results and severity of neurological state of spinal trauma patients. CT should be performed in patients with signs of spinal cord injury as well as in adult patients with radicular symptoms in lumbar spine region. Patients with local pain and minor or transient neurological disturbances should not be examined by CT. There are also no indications to simultaneous CT study of the head and the spine in unconscious patients, unless the kind of trauma, clinical findings or

  11. Diffusion tensor MR imaging in spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'souza, Maria M; Choudhary, Ajay; Poonia, Mahesh; Kumar, Pawan; Khushu, Subash

    2017-04-01

    The ability of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to complement conventional MR imaging by diagnosing subtle injuries to the spinal cord is a subject of intense research. We attempted to study change in the DTI indices, namely fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) after traumatic cervical spinal cord injury and compared these with corresponding data from a control group of individuals with no injury. The correlation of these quantitative indices to the neurological profile of the patients was assessed. 20 cases of acute cervical trauma and 30 age and sex matched healthy controls were enrolled. Scoring of extent of clinical severity was done based on the Frankel grading system. MRI was performed on a 3T system. Following the qualitative tractographic evaluation of white matter tracts, quantitative datametrics were calculated. In patients, the Mean FA value at the level of injury (0.43+/-0.08) was less than in controls (0.62+/-0.06), which was statistically significant (p value injury (1.30+/-0.24) in cases was higher than in controls (1.07+/-0.12, p value injury (r value=0.86). Negative correlation was found between clinical grade and Mean MD at the level of injury (r value=-0.38) which was however statistically not significant. Quantitative DTI indices are a useful parameter for detection of spinal cord injury. FA value was significantly decreased while MD value was significantly increased at the level of injury in cases as compared to controls. Further, FA showed significant correlation with clinical grade. DTI could thus serve as a reliable objective imaging tool for assessment of white matter integrity and prognostication of functional outcome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Ultrasound appearance of radiation-induced hepatic injury. Correlation with computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garra, B.S.; Shawker, T.H.; Chang, R.; Kaplan, K.; White, R.D.

    1988-01-01

    The ultrasound findings in three cases of radiation-induced hepatic injury are described and compared with computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings. Fatty infiltration of the liver was present in two of the cases in which concurrent chemotherapy was being administered. On ultrasound B-scans, the regions of radiation injury were hypoechoic relative to the remainder of the liver. This finding was more obvious in the patients with fatty livers. CT scans on the patients with fatty infiltrated livers showed higher attenuation in the irradiated region than in unexposed liver. In the patient where no fatty infiltration was present, the radiated section of liver had lower attenuation consistent with previous reports. Magnetic resonance imaging showed decreased signal in the exposed areas on T1 weighted images

  13. Clinical and imaging findings in spinal cord arteriovenous malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sang Heum; Kim, Dong Ik; Yoon, Pyeong Ho; Jeon, Pyoung; Ihn, Yeon Kwon

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the findings of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and selective spinal angiography of spinal cord arteriovenous malformations (SCAVMs) and to investigate the correlation of these findings with the development of clinical symptoms. In 16 patients diagnosed as suffering from SCAVMs, MR imaging and selective spinal angiograms were retrospectively analyzed and correlated with clinical symptoms. Clinical data were reviewed, especially concerning the mode of onset of clinical symptoms, and MR images of SCAVMs were evaluated with regard to the following parameters: spinal cord swelling with T2 hyperintensity, cord atrophy, intramedullary hemorrhage, and contrast enhancement of the spinal cord. Selective spinal angiographic findings of SCAVMs were also evaluated in terms of the following , parameters: type of SCAVM, presence of aneurysms, and patterns of venous drainage. Imaging findings were also correlated with the development of clinical symptoms. Systematic evaluation of the findings of MR imaging and angiography provides detailed information on the type of AVM and status of the spinal cord parenchyma, and this can be correlated with clinical manifestations of SCAVM. In patients suffering from this condition, spinal cord dysfunction due to venous congestion appears to be the main cause of clinical symptoms. (author). 18 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs

  14. Nuclear imaging of hepatic impact injury on rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Rongbing; Wen Jianliang; Tang Weijia; Ma Xiaolin

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect and clinic application value of nuclear imaging on hepatic impact experiment. Methods: Experimental rabbits were impact injured on liver with BIM-IV bio-impact machine. Liver imaging was performed with sodium phytate labeled by 99m Tc. Liver blood pool imaging was performed with labeled red blood cells. The results of imaging were similar with the results of anatomy. Results: There were significant difference between normal liver and injured liver. Radio diminution and defect were showed on injured liver areas in labeled hepatic cells. Many types of abnormal radioactivity distribution were observed in liver pool imaging. The results of liver imaging and liver blood pool imaging were corresponded to the results of anatomy. Conclusion: Changes of hepatic cell structures and function after injury could be showed by nuclear imaging. Nuclear imaging was valuable in determining injured liver position or injured degree

  15. Local complications of hydatid disease involving thoracic cavity: Imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turgut, A.T. [Department of Radiology, Ankara Training and Research Hospital, Ankara (Turkey)], E-mail: ahmettuncayturgut@yahoo.com; Altinok, T. [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Meram Faculty of Medicine, Selcuk University, Konya (Turkey); Topcu, S. [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Kocaeli University, Izmit (Turkey); Kosar, U. [Department of Radiology, Ankara Training and Research Hospital, Ankara (Turkey)

    2009-04-15

    Hydatid disease, a worldwide zoonosis, is caused by the larval stage of the Echinococcus tapeworm. Although it can involve almost every organ of the body, lung involvement follows in frequency the hepatic infestation in adults and is the predominating site in children. Radiologically, hydatidosis usually demonstrates typical findings, but many patients are at risk of developing various complications of hydatid disease with atypical imaging findings and these are rarely described in the literature. In this pictorial review, the imaging features of local complications of hydatid disease involving the thorax including intrapulmonary or pleural rupture, infection of the ruptured cysts, reactions of the adjacent tissues, thoracic wall invasion and iatrogenic involvement of pleura are described. Additionally, imaging characteristics of transdiaphragmatic thoracic involvement of hepatic hydatid disease are presented. To prevent the development of subsequent catastrophic results, all radiologists need to be aware of the atypical imaging appearances of complications of pulmonary hydatid disease.

  16. [Concordance between preoperatory diagnosis and arthroscopy findings of meniscal lesions associated to anterior cruciate ligament injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montiel-Jarquín, A; Barragán-Hervella, R; López-Cázares, G; Lima-Ramírez, P; Lázaro-Michaca, G; Vallecillo-Velázquez, H; Sánchez-Durán, M; Medina-Escobedo, C; Villatoro-Martínez, A

    2015-01-01

    Ligament injuries of the knee joint are common during the second and third decades of life, clinical and radiological diagnosis presents difficulties since the surgical findings may differ significantly. The objective is to determine correlation between clinical-radiologic and arthroscopic diagnosis in patients with injury of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and meniscal lesions. Cross-sectional study held in 29 patients with ACL injury associated to meniscal lesions treated arthroscopically. Variables were age, gender, affected side, preoperative and postoperative diagnosis, type and location of meniscal injury; descriptive statistics and Cohen Kappa for concordance were used. There were 29 patients, 23 (79.3%) men and 6 (20.7%) women, mean age 39.04 (15-50) ± 13.19 years; right side was affected in 69% and left in 31%; 19% had not meniscal lesion, 17.2% had injury in anterior horn, 10.3% in posterior horn and 6.9% in the body. The concordance between preoperative and artroscopic diagnosis was: Kappa 0.2; intraboservador was Kappa 1.0; between suspected meniscal injury and arthroscopic findings was: Kappa 0.2. The concordance between the clinical-radiological and arthroscopic diagnosis in patients with ACL injuries and meniscal injury associated is low, which has to be considered in the initial review and the arthroscopic treatment of patients.

  17. Molecular Imaging in Stem Cell Therapy for Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahuan Song

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury (SCI is a serious disease of the center nervous system (CNS. It is a devastating injury with sudden loss of motor, sensory, and autonomic function distal to the level of trauma and produces great personal and societal costs. Currently, there are no remarkable effective therapies for the treatment of SCI. Compared to traditional treatment methods, stem cell transplantation therapy holds potential for repair and functional plasticity after SCI. However, the mechanism of stem cell therapy for SCI remains largely unknown and obscure partly due to the lack of efficient stem cell trafficking methods. Molecular imaging technology including positron emission tomography (PET, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, optical imaging (i.e., bioluminescence imaging (BLI gives the hope to complete the knowledge concerning basic stem cell biology survival, migration, differentiation, and integration in real time when transplanted into damaged spinal cord. In this paper, we mainly review the molecular imaging technology in stem cell therapy for SCI.

  18. MR imaging of post-traumatic articular cartilage injuries confined to the femoral trochlea Arthroscopic correlation and clinical significance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huegli, Rolf W. E-mail: rhuegli@uhbs.ch; Moelleken, Sonja M.C.; Stork, Alexander; Bonel, Harald M.; Bredella, Miriam A.; Meckel, Stephan; Genant, Harry K.; Tirman, Phillip F.J

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To assess and describe post-traumatic articular cartilage injuries isolated to the trochlear groove and provide insight into potential mechanism of injury. Materials and methods: We retrospectively evaluated MR imaging findings of all knee MRIs performed at our institution over the last 2 years (2450). Thirty patients met the criteria of a cartilage injury confined to the trochlear groove. In 15 cases, which were included in our study, arthroscopic correlation was available. Each plane was evaluated and graded for the presence and appearance of articular cartilage defects using a standard arthroscopic grading scheme adapted to MR imaging. Any additional pathological derangement was documented and information about the mechanism of injury was retrieved by chart review. Results: In all cases the cartilaginous injury was well demonstrated on MRI. In 13 patients additional pathological findings could be observed. The most frequently associated injury was a meniscal tear in nine patients. In eight cases, the arthroscopic grading of the trochlear injury matched exactly with the MRI findings. In the remaining seven cases, the discrepancy between MRI and arthroscopy was never higher than one grade. In 13 out of 15 of patients trauma mechanism could be evaluated. Twelve patients suffered an indirect twisting injury and one suffered a direct trauma to their knee. Conclusion: The findings of this study demonstrate that MR imaging allows reliable grading of isolated injury to the trochlear groove cartilage and assists in directing surgical diagnosis and treatment. These injuries may be the only hyaline cartilage injury in the knee and meniscal tears are a frequently associated finding. Therefore, it is important to search specifically for cartilage injuries of the trochlear groove in patients with anterior knee pain, even if other coexistent pathology could potentially explain the patient's symptoms.

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings of Ovarian Stromal Hyperthecosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, S.; Tahara, T.; Kaminou, T.; Ogawa, T. (Div. of Radiology, Dept. of Pathophysiological and Therapeutic Science, Jikei Univ. School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)); Kiyokawa, T. (Dept. of Pathology, Jikei Univ. School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)); Tsukihara, S. (Dept. of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori Univ., Yonago (Japan)); Senda, T. (Dept. of Radiology, Tottori Pref. Kousei Hospital, Kurayoshi (Japan))

    2009-10-15

    Ovarian stromal hyperthecosis is characterized by diffuse distribution of luteinized stromal cells accompanied by varying degrees of stromal hyperplasia. We report a case of ovarian stromal hyperthecosis with particular regard to magnetic resonance (MR)-pathologic correlation. At initial MR imaging, the central areas of the bilateral ovarian masses showed hypointensity on T1-weighted images and hyperintensity on T2-weighted images, while the peripheries of the bilateral masses showed isointensity to myometrium on T1-weighted images and heterogeneous signal intensities on T2-weighted images. At 15 days after the initial MR imaging examination, a second MR imaging demonstrated shrinkage of the bilateral ovarian masses. Change in the peripheries to predominantly isointensity to myometrium on the T2-weighted images was also observed. The patient underwent bilateral oophorectomy. Microscopic examination revealed scattered nests of lutein cells on a background of densely proliferated ovarian stroma with minimal collagen production in both ovaries. Edema was occasionally seen in the outer portion but was marked in the central zone of the ovaries, particularly on the left. The final pathologic diagnosis was stromal hyperthecosis. With regard to MR-pathologic correlation, the MR findings in the peripheries of the bilateral masses (isointensity relative to myometrium on both T1- and T2-weighted imaging) showed the characteristics of stromal hyperthecosis.

  20. Pediatric renal leukemia: spectrum of CT imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilmes, Melissa A. [University of Michigan Health System, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Section of Pediatric Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Vanderbilt University Children' s Hospital, Section of Pediatric Radiology, Nashville, TN (United States); Dillman, Jonathan R. [University of Michigan Health System, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Section of Pediatric Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); University of Michigan Health System, Department of Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Mody, Rajen J. [University of Michigan Health System, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Division of Pediatric Hematology-Oncology and Bone Marrow Transplantation, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Strouse, Peter J. [University of Michigan Health System, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Section of Pediatric Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2008-04-15

    The kidneys are a site of extramedullary leukemic disease that can be readily detected by CT. To demonstrate the spectrum of CT findings in children with renal leukemic involvement. Twelve children were identified retrospectively as having renal leukemic involvement by contrast-enhanced CT of the abdomen. Contrast-enhanced CT images through the kidneys of each patient were reviewed by two pediatric radiologists. Pertinent imaging findings and renal lengths were documented. The electronic medical record was accessed to obtain relevant clinical and pathologic information. Five patients with renal leukemic involvement presented with multiple bilateral low-attenuation masses, while three patients demonstrated large areas of wedge-shaped and geographic low attenuation. Four other patients presented with unique imaging findings, including a solitary unilateral low-attenuation mass, solitary bilateral low-attenuation masses, multiple bilateral low-attenuation masses including unilateral large conglomerate masses, and bilateral areas of ill-defined parenchymal low attenuation. Two patients showed unilateral nephromegaly, while eight other patients showed bilateral nephromegaly. Two patients had normal size kidneys. Two patients had elevated serum creatinine concentrations at the time of imaging. Renal leukemic involvement in children can present with a variety of CT imaging findings. Focal renal abnormalities as well as nephromegaly are frequently observed. Most commonly, renal leukemic involvement does not appear to impair renal function. (orig.)

  1. Pediatric renal leukemia: spectrum of CT imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilmes, Melissa A.; Dillman, Jonathan R.; Mody, Rajen J.; Strouse, Peter J.

    2008-01-01

    The kidneys are a site of extramedullary leukemic disease that can be readily detected by CT. To demonstrate the spectrum of CT findings in children with renal leukemic involvement. Twelve children were identified retrospectively as having renal leukemic involvement by contrast-enhanced CT of the abdomen. Contrast-enhanced CT images through the kidneys of each patient were reviewed by two pediatric radiologists. Pertinent imaging findings and renal lengths were documented. The electronic medical record was accessed to obtain relevant clinical and pathologic information. Five patients with renal leukemic involvement presented with multiple bilateral low-attenuation masses, while three patients demonstrated large areas of wedge-shaped and geographic low attenuation. Four other patients presented with unique imaging findings, including a solitary unilateral low-attenuation mass, solitary bilateral low-attenuation masses, multiple bilateral low-attenuation masses including unilateral large conglomerate masses, and bilateral areas of ill-defined parenchymal low attenuation. Two patients showed unilateral nephromegaly, while eight other patients showed bilateral nephromegaly. Two patients had normal size kidneys. Two patients had elevated serum creatinine concentrations at the time of imaging. Renal leukemic involvement in children can present with a variety of CT imaging findings. Focal renal abnormalities as well as nephromegaly are frequently observed. Most commonly, renal leukemic involvement does not appear to impair renal function. (orig.)

  2. Alveolar echinococcosis of the liver. Findings of magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayasaka, Kazumasa; Tanaka, Yoshiaki; Okuhata, Yoshitaka; Yoshinobu, Takashi; Takemoto, Akiko; Himi, Kazuhisa; Mutoh, Haruomi [Nihon Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine; Shuke, Noriyuki; Aburano, Tamio

    1995-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the findings of MR imaging obtained in patients with Echinococcus multilocularis involving the liver. For 10 patients with alveolar echinococcosis of the liver, the MR findings were compared with the histopathologic findings after biopsy or surgery. Conventional T1-weighted spin echo, T2-weighted spin echo and T1-weighted spin echo after Gd-DTPA were employed. The signal from the lesions of alveolar liver echinococcosis on T1-weighted images was hypointense in 16 of 23 lesions (69.6%), hyperintense in 4 (17.4%), and isointense in 3 (13.0%). The signal from the lesions on T2-weighted images was hyperintense in 20 lesions (87.0%), hypointense in 2 (8.7%), and isointense in one (4.3%). On using Gd-DTPA, 7 of 21 lesions (33.3%) were observed with rim enhancement, and 14 lesions (66.7%) were non-enhanced. We describe our clinical experience together with the various findings of MR imaging as observed in the patients with alveolar echinococcosis of the liver. MR imaging excels in visualizing a low-intensity rim and small cystic foci, with liquefaction necrotic foci displaying a variety of signal intensities. After Gd-DTPA administration, the surrounding inflammatory granulomatous foci could be more clearly visualized. (author).

  3. MR imaging findings of patients with mesial temporal sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Jung; Kim, Sun Yong; Suh, Jung Ho [School of Medicine, Ajou University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-06-01

    To evaluate the MR imaging findings of patients with mesial temporal sclerosis. We retrospectively reviewed the MR imaging findings of 116 patients diagnosed by MRI as suffering from mesial temporal sclerosis. In 18 of these, the condition was also histologically proven. Among the 116 patients, volume loss of the hippocampus was found in 95 (81.9%) and signal changes of the hippocampus in 53 (45.7%). Decreased signal intensity in the hippocampus on T1-weighted images was found in 13 (11.2%) and increased signal on T2-weighted images in 50 (43.1%). Signal abnormality in the hippocampus on both T1- and T2-weighted images was found in ten, and associated extrahippocampal abnormalities, as follows, in 20 (17.2%): atrophy of fornix (n=3D10), atrophy of the mammillary body (n=3D8), atrophy of the amygdala (n=3D10), atrophy or increased T2 signal intensity of the anterior thalamic nuclei (n=3D2), atrophy of the cingulate gyrus (n=3D2), atrophy or increased signal intensity of the anterior temporal lobe (n=3D8), and cerebral hemiatrophy (n=3D4). A high T2 signal and atrophy of the hippocampus are the most common and important MRI findings of mesial temporal sclerosis. Other abnormal findings, if any, which may be found in extrahippocampal structures such as the fornix, mammillary body and temporal lobe, should, however, also be carefully observed. (author)

  4. MR imaging observations in head injury and their importance in understanding the pathophysiology of head trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossman, R.I.; Atlas, S.W.; Hackney, D.B.; Goldberg, H.J.; Gomori, J.M.; Zimmerman, R.A.; Bilaniuk, L.T.; Alves, W.M.; Gennarelli, T.A.

    1988-01-01

    Forty-five patients were imaged with a General Electric 1.5-T Signa MR imager following significant head injury. Seventeen of them had acute head injury (within 10 days of trauma). In none of the acute cases, despite significant alterations in the level of consciousness, was there diffuse cerebral edema (diffuse high intensity on long repetition time [TR], long echo time [TE] images). CT and MR imaging, in some cases, demonstrated what was interpreted as a diffusely swollen brain with loss of normal sulci. These findings suggest that increased blood volume with concomitant loss of cerebral autoregulation, rather than vasogenic edema, is responsible for the diffusely swollen brain imaged with CT or MR. Treatment based on these MR findings should be aimed at decreasing the cerebral blood volume rather than treating of nonexistent diffuse cerebral edema. In 13 patients with longitudinal MR images, improvement was noted in some patients in initially diagnosed diffuse axonal injury (DAI). The focal regions of high intensity on long TR, long TE representing the DAI reverted to isointensity on subsequent images

  5. Imaging findings of upper abdominal involvement by acute megakaryoblastic leukaemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amemiya, Shiori; Akahane, Masaaki; Ohtomo, Kuni [University of Tokyo, Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Takita, Junko; Igarashi, Takashi [University of Tokyo, Department of Paediatrics, Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)

    2008-04-15

    Acute megakaryoblastic leukaemia (AMKL), a relatively rare type of acute myeloid leukaemia, is characterized by frequent involvement of the liver, spleen and lymph nodes in addition to myelofibrosis in children. Diagnosis is difficult both clinically and pathologically, and the hepatic or lymph node involvement is not uncommonly misinterpreted as solid tumour. We report the imaging findings of upper abdominal involvement by AMKL in an infant. The hepatic lesion, initially suspected to be hepatoblastoma, showed a distinctive appearance on MRI suggesting its infiltrative nature. With the association of splenic lesion and lymphadenopathy, the imaging findings were considered indicative of a haematological disorder. (orig.)

  6. Imaging of hand injuries. Anatomic and radiodiagnostic considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitt, Rainer

    2011-01-01

    Imaging recommendations for assessing injuries of the forearm, wrist, metacarpus and the digits are given with respect to anatomic considerations. Furthermore, dedicated algorithms of advanced imaging are introduced with radiography as the primary diagnostic tool. High-resolution CT is used for detecting and staging the complex fractures of the radius and the wrist, whereas contrast-enhanced MRI serves for depicting the injured soft tissues. At the wrist, tears of the intrinsic ligaments and the TFCC are assessed with high accuracy when applying MR arthrography or CT arthrography. Dedicated radiologic tools as well as comprehensive reports are suggested in the management of the various hand injuries. (orig.)

  7. Chronic MR imaging changes in experimental spinal cord injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hackney, D.B.; Asato, R.; Finkelstein, S.D.; Markowitz, R.S.; Black, P.

    1987-01-01

    MR imaging was performed on excised spinal cords of Sprague-Dawley rats subjected to weight drop injury (modified Allen technique). Animals were killed 3 hours, 24 hours, and 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28 days after injury. The length of the resulting lesion was measured on sagittal long repetition time/long echo time images by an investigator who was unaware of the results of functional evaluation. Lesion length was correlated with a combined behavioral score representing a battery of eight tests of sensory and motor function performed just before death. There was a statistically significant correlation between lesion length and the combined behavior score

  8. Imaging findings in 11 cats with feline dysautonomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novellas, Rosa; Simpson, Kerry E; Gunn-Moore, Danièlle A; Hammond, Gawain J C

    2010-08-01

    Dysautonomia is caused by degeneration of the autonomic ganglia. Failure of the autonomic system affecting the gastrointestinal and urinary tracts can cause oesophageal distension and/or dysfunction, gastric and bowel distension and hypomotility, and urinary bladder distension. The aim of this retrospective study was to describe diagnostic imaging findings in cats with dysautonomia. Common findings were megaoesophagus and/or oesophageal dysfunction, gastric distension and signs of intestinal ileus. Associated aspiration pneumonia and megacolon appeared less commonly. Although diagnostic imaging findings are not specific for this disease, if findings in multiple systems are detected, along with consistent clinical signs and neurological deficits, dysautonomia should be considered among the differential diagnosis. Copyright 2010 ISFM and AAFP. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Imaging findings of liposuction with an emphasis on postsurgical complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, Je Sung; Chung, Sung Phil; Kim, Myeong Jin [Dept. of mergency Medicine, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Yong Eun; Baek, Song Ee [Dept. of Radiology, Severance Hospital, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Liposuction is one of the most frequently performed cosmetic surgeries worldwide for reshaping the body contour. Although liposuction is minimally invasive and relatively safe, it is a surgical procedure, and it carries the risk of major and minor complications. These complications vary from postoperative nausea to life-threatening events. Common complications include infection, abdominal wall injury, bowel herniation, bleeding, haematoma, seroma, and lymphoedema. Life-threatening complications such as necrotizing fasciitis, deep vein thrombosis, and pulmonary embolism have also been reported. In this paper, we provide a brief introduction to liposuction with the related anatomy and present computed tomography and ultrasonography findings of a wide spectrum of postoperative complications associated with liposuction.

  10. Imaging findings of liposuction with an emphasis on postsurgical complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, Je Sung; Chung, Sung Phil; Kim, Myeong Jin; Chung, Yong Eun; Baek, Song Ee

    2015-01-01

    Liposuction is one of the most frequently performed cosmetic surgeries worldwide for reshaping the body contour. Although liposuction is minimally invasive and relatively safe, it is a surgical procedure, and it carries the risk of major and minor complications. These complications vary from postoperative nausea to life-threatening events. Common complications include infection, abdominal wall injury, bowel herniation, bleeding, haematoma, seroma, and lymphoedema. Life-threatening complications such as necrotizing fasciitis, deep vein thrombosis, and pulmonary embolism have also been reported. In this paper, we provide a brief introduction to liposuction with the related anatomy and present computed tomography and ultrasonography findings of a wide spectrum of postoperative complications associated with liposuction

  11. CT and MR imaging findings of xanthogranulomatous cholecystitis: correlation with pathologic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shuto, R.; Kiyosue, H.; Komatsu, E.; Matsumoto, S.; Mori, H. [Oita Medical Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Radiology; Kawano, K. [Oita Medical Univ. (Japan). Dept. of First Surgery; Kondo, Y.; Yokoyama, S. [Oita Medical Univ. (Japan). Dept. of First Pathology

    2004-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate CT and MRI findings in xanthogranulomatous cholecystitis (XGC) and to correlate the imaging findings with various pathologic parameters. The study included 13 patients with histopathologically confirmed XGC. The CT (n=13) and MRI (n=5) obtained in these patients were evaluated retrospectively. On CT, low-attenuation areas in the wall of XGC correlated with foam and inflammatory cells or necrosis and/or abscess in XGC. Areas of iso- to slightly high signal intensity on T2-weighted images, showing slight enhancement at early phase and strong enhancement at last phase on dynamic study, corresponded with areas of abundant xanthogranulomas. Areas with very high signal intensity on T2-weighted images without enhancement corresponded with necrosis and/or abscesses. Luminal surface enhancement (LSE) of gallbladder wall represented preservation of the epithelial layer. The early-enhanced areas of the liver bed on dynamic CT and MR images corresponded with accumulation of inflammatory cells and abundant fibrosis. Our results indicate that CT and MRI findings correlate well with the histopathologic findings of XGC.

  12. Imaging findings of neonatal herpes simplex virus type 2 encephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vossough, Arastoo; Zimmerman, Robert A.; Bilaniuk, Larissa T.; Schwartz, Erin M. [University of Pennsylvania, Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2008-04-15

    The CT, MR, and diffusion-weighted initial and follow-up imaging findings in neonatal herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) encephalitis were assessed. The clinical, laboratory and imaging findings in 12 patients (eight girls and four boys) with proven neonatal HSV-2 encephalitis with follow-up were retrospectively reviewed. Patterns of brain involvement and distribution of lesions were studied and the contribution of diffusion-weighted imaging to the imaging diagnosis of this disease was explored. A total of 24 CT and 22 MRI studies were performed with a mean follow-up time of 38 months. Neonatal HSV-2 encephalitis can be multifocal or limited to only the temporal lobes, brainstem, or cerebellum. The deep gray matter structures were involved in 57% of patients, and hemorrhage was seen in more than half of the patients. CT images were normal or showed mild abnormalities in the early stages of the disease. Conventional MR images may be normal in the early stages of the disease. Lesions were initially seen only by diffusion-weighted imaging in 20% of the patients and this modality showed a substantially more extensive disease distribution in an additional 50% of patients. In 40% of patients, watershed distribution ischemic changes were observed in addition to areas of presumed direct herpetic necrosis. Neonatal HSV-2 encephalitis has a variable imaging appearance. Diffusion-weighted MRI is an important adjunct in the imaging evaluation of this disease. Watershed distribution ischemia in areas remote from the primary herpetic lesions may be seen. (orig.)

  13. MR imaging findings in patients with secondary intracranial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohr, A C; Riedel, C; Fruehauf, M-C; van Baalen, A; Bartsch, T; Hedderich, J; Alfke, K; Doerner, L; Jansen, O

    2011-01-01

    IH can alter the configuration of anatomic structures of the central nervous system. We determined the sensitivity and specificity of MR imaging to detect these changes in patients with secondary IH. Patients (n = 36) with IH were prospectively investigated with MR imaging and were matched to 36 controls. MR images were evaluated for elongation and edema of the optic nerves, protrusion of the optic disc, flattening of the posterior sclera, height of the pituitary gland, and width of the optic nerve sheath. On MRV, we recorded venous sinus abnormalities and measured the luminal width of the superior ophthalmic veins. A grading score was introduced to define cranial venous outflow obstruction. Cranial venous outflow obstruction and ONS hydrops were the most valid signs indicating IH with a sensitivity of 94% and 92% and a specificity of 100% and 89%, respectively. Sensitivities and specificities were 56% and 97% for reduced pituitary height, 64% and 78% for flattening of the posterior sclera, 31% and 97% for widening of the superior ophthalmic veins, 33% and 100% for optic disc protrusion, 14% and 100% for optic nerve edema, and 6% and 100% for elongation of the optic nerve. At least 2 MR imaging findings could be demonstrated in each patient but in none of the controls. The number of positive MR imaging findings correlated with CSF pressure (r = 0.62, P = .01). The combination of cranial and orbital MR imaging and MRV can be highly sensitive and specific in the diagnosis of patients with IH.

  14. Clinically relevant magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Shoulder pain is the most common and well-documented site of musculoskeletal pain in elite swimmers. Structural abnormalities on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of elite swimmers' symptomatic shoulders are common. Little has been documented about the association between MRI findings in the ...

  15. Imaging findings in right-sided diverticulitis in a child

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogue, Conor O.; Mann, Erika H. [University of Toronto, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada)

    2008-10-15

    We report the imaging findings in a case of acute right-sided diverticulitis in a 13-year-old boy. Based on this diagnosis the patient was successfully treated conservatively with intravenous antibiotics. This entity should be considered in patients with right lower quadrant pain and a sonographically normal appendix, particularly in those of Asian or Pacific descent. (orig.)

  16. Imaging findings in right-sided diverticulitis in a child

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogue, Conor O.; Mann, Erika H.

    2008-01-01

    We report the imaging findings in a case of acute right-sided diverticulitis in a 13-year-old boy. Based on this diagnosis the patient was successfully treated conservatively with intravenous antibiotics. This entity should be considered in patients with right lower quadrant pain and a sonographically normal appendix, particularly in those of Asian or Pacific descent. (orig.)

  17. MR imaging finding of xanthogranulomatous cholecystitis: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang Gyee; Kang, Heoung Keun; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Cho, Yong Ho; Jang, Nam Kyu [Chonnam Univ. Medical School, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-07-01

    We describe a case of xanthogranulomatous cholecystitis in which there was close correlation between MR and histopathological finding and review the previous literature. On both T1- and T2-weighted MR images, multiple gallstones and diffuse wall thickening of the gallbladder were seen, with multiple hyperintense intramural nodules. The nodules were pathologically confirmed as xanthogranuloma.

  18. Retroperitoneal schwannoma: diagnostic imaging findings in 5 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baltazar, Alberto; Santamarina, Mario; Scalise, Gabriela; Ponce de Leon, Valeria; Bello, Lorena

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the different imaging findings (US, CT and MRI) in retroperitoneal schwannoma. Materials and methods: 5 patients (3 male and 2 females) with a diagnosis of retroperitoneal schwannoma were retrospectively evaluated. Ages ranged from 33 to 63 years (means 54 years). The images (US, CT and MR) were analyzed and correlated to histopathologic results. Results: The most frequent clinical finding was abdominal pain (60%). A presumptive diagnosis prior to surgery was suggested in 3/5 cases that had well-defined masses with a predominant cystic appearance. All patients underwent surgery with tumoral resection. Only 2 patients (40%) had recurrence within a three years period of follow-up. Conclusion: Retroperitoneal schwannoma is an infrequent tumor. In our series, no pathognomotic features were observed on US, CT or MRI. However, 3/5 tumors showed high signal intensity on T2-weighted images due to cystic areas. (author)

  19. Indications of laparoscopic cholecystectomy based on preoperative imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakizaka, Yoshitaka; Sano, Syuichi; Nakanishi, Yoshimi; Koike, Yoshinobu; Ozaki, Susumu; Iwanaga, Rikizo; Uchino, Junichi.

    1994-01-01

    We studied the indications for laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) and values of preoperative imaging findings in 82 patients who underwent preoperative imaging diagnostic tests (abdominal echogram, abdominal CAT scan, ERCP). We analyzed mainly patients who were considered to be indicated for LC but whose gallbladders could be removed by open laparotomy, or whose gallbladders were removed by open laparotomy but were considered indicated for LC from retrospective study. We found the following results. LC could be easily performed in patients with a history of severe acute cholecystitis if they had no findings of a thickened wall or negative gallbladder signs. Abdominal echogram and CAT scan were the best preoperative imaging tests for determining the gallbladder's state, especially for obstruction of the cystic duct. These results are important today when the operative indications of LC are extremely indefinite because of the accumulation of operative experience and technological improvements. (author)

  20. Cerebellopontine angle lipomas: magnetic resonance imaging findings in two cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, Rafael S.; Domingues, Romeu C.; Gasparetto, Emerson L.

    2009-01-01

    Vestibular schwannomas and meningiomas are the most common lesions of the cerebellopontine angle (CPA), accounting for approximately 85-90% of the tumors seen in this location. Lipomas are rare at this topography, representing about 0.15% of the CPA lesions. These tumors are mal developmental masses that arise from abnormal differentiation of the meninx primitive. Clinically, CPA lipomas can cause slowly progressive neurological symptoms and signs affecting cranial nerves or brain stem. Because these lesions usually are strongly attached to the surrounding structures, any surgical attempts of complete resection can result in neural or vascular damage, reinforcing the importance of the pre-operative imaging diagnosis. Although the CT findings of CPA lipomas can be typical, the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, especially the fat suppression sequences, had improved the identification of these lesions. We aimed to report two patients with a CPA lipoma, emphasizing the MR imaging findings. (author)

  1. Cerebellopontine angle lipomas: magnetic resonance imaging findings in two cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Rafael S. [Clinica de Diagnostico por Imagem Multi-Imagem, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Radiologia; Brito, Cecilia Castelo Branco [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina; Carvalho, Gustavo A. [Clinica Bambina, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Neurocirurgia; Hospital Silvestre, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Domingues, Romeu C. [Clinicas CDPI e Multi-Imagem, Rio de Janeiro RJ (Brazil); Gasparetto, Emerson L. [Clinicas CDPI e Multi-Imagem, Rio de Janeiro RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Vestibular schwannomas and meningiomas are the most common lesions of the cerebellopontine angle (CPA), accounting for approximately 85-90% of the tumors seen in this location. Lipomas are rare at this topography, representing about 0.15% of the CPA lesions. These tumors are mal developmental masses that arise from abnormal differentiation of the meninx primitive. Clinically, CPA lipomas can cause slowly progressive neurological symptoms and signs affecting cranial nerves or brain stem. Because these lesions usually are strongly attached to the surrounding structures, any surgical attempts of complete resection can result in neural or vascular damage, reinforcing the importance of the pre-operative imaging diagnosis. Although the CT findings of CPA lipomas can be typical, the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, especially the fat suppression sequences, had improved the identification of these lesions. We aimed to report two patients with a CPA lipoma, emphasizing the MR imaging findings. (author)

  2. Hippocampal sclerosis: correlation of MR imaging findings with surgical outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yoon Hee; Chang, Kee Hyun; Kim, Kyung Won; Han, Moon Hee; Park, Sung Ho; Nam, Hyun Woo; Choi, Kyu Ho; Cho, Woo Ho

    2001-01-01

    Atrophy and a high T2 signal of the hippocampus are known to be the principal MR imaging findings of hippocampal sclerosis. The purpose of this study was to determine whether or not individual MRI findings correlate with surgical outcome in patients with this condition. Preoperative MR imaging findings in 57 consecutive patients with pathologically-proven hippocampal sclerosis who underwent anterior temporal lobectomy and were followed-up for 24 months or more were retrospectively reviewed, and the results were compared with the postsurgical outcome (Engel classification). The MR images included routine sagittal T1-weighted and axial T2-weighted spin-echo images, and oblique coronal T1-weighted 3D gradient-echo and T2-weighted 2D fast spin-echo images obtained on either a 1.5 T or 1.0 T unit. The images were visually evaluated by two neuroradiologists blinded to the outcome; their focus was the presence or absence of atrophy and a high T2 hippocampal signal. Hippocampal atrophy was seen in 96% of cases (55/57) [100% (53/53) of the good outcome group (Engel class I and II), and 50% (2/4) of the poor outcome group (class III and IV)]. A high T2 hippocampal signal was seen in 61% of cases (35/57) [62% (33/53) of the good outcome group and 50% (2/4) of the poor outcome group]. All 35 patients with a high T2 signal had hippocampal atrophy. 'Normal' hippocampus, as revealed by MR imaging, occurred in 4% of patients (2/57), both of whom showed a poor outcome (Engel class III). The presence or absence of hippocampal atrophy correlated well with surgical outcome (p 0.05). Compared with a high T2 hippocampal signal, hippocampal atrophy is more common and correlates better with surgical outcome. For the prediction of this, it thus appears to be the more useful indicator

  3. First in vivo traumatic brain injury imaging via magnetic particle imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orendorff, Ryan; Peck, Austin J.; Zheng, Bo; Shirazi, Shawn N.; Ferguson, R. Matthew; Khandhar, Amit P.; Kemp, Scott J.; Goodwill, Patrick; Krishnan, Kannan M.; Brooks, George A.; Kaufer, Daniela; Conolly, Steven

    2017-05-01

    Emergency room visits due to traumatic brain injury (TBI) is common, but classifying the severity of the injury remains an open challenge. Some subjective methods such as the Glasgow Coma Scale attempt to classify traumatic brain injuries, as well as some imaging based modalities such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. However, to date it is still difficult to detect and monitor mild to moderate injuries. In this report, we demonstrate that the magnetic particle imaging (MPI) modality can be applied to imaging TBI events with excellent contrast. MPI can monitor injected iron nanoparticles over long time scales without signal loss, allowing researchers and clinicians to monitor the change in blood pools as the wound heals.

  4. [Classification and imaging diagnosis of Lisfranc joint injuries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Y; Hu, D J; Yao, W W; Li, M

    2016-07-05

    To accelerate the detection rate and accuracy of diagnosis in damage imaging of Lisfranc joint through research on the information of X-ray, CT, and MR imaging of tarsometatarsus joint (also called Lisfranc joint) damage. A total of 153 cases of tarsometratisus damage or Lisfranc ligamentous injury patients were chosen during November 2012 to November 2015. Lisfranc injuries were classified according to the Myerson fracture displacements classification and Nunley-Vertullo low-grade injury classification. All the treatment data was performed using SPSS 17.0 software. For Myerson fracture displacements, there were 16 cases in Myerson Ⅰ type (homolateral complete), 100 cases in Myerson Ⅱ type (homolateral incomplete), and 5 cases in Myerson Ⅲ type (divergent). For the low-grade injury, there were 7 cases, 24 cases, and 1 case in Nunley-Vertullo Ⅰ, Ⅱ, Ⅲ type respectively. The probability was 14.9% (18/121) for patients that the initial survey found negative by X-ray imaging diagnosis and was confirmed by subsequent CT or MRI. It was found that the distance between the base of first (M1) and second (M2) metatarsus which was larger than 2 mm was 69.4%(84/121)from the X-ray imaging; there were small chip fractures between the base of M1 and M2 was 47.1% (57/121), and 71.2% (37/52)of small chip fractures in the inside of base of M2 from CT. On MRI, ligament disruption showed the discontinue or normal signal disappearing, and there were 15 cases in the complete disruption condition. It should be suggested to take a CT or MRI check for the patients who have highly suspicious Lisfranc injure and the X-ray imaging diagnosis was negative, since there is a certain rate of missed diagnosis for the Lisfranc injure using X-ray imaging. For children and teenagers, the sports injuries and joint strain are common style, such as the injuries caused by jump from higher platform, football/skateboarding injures, etc. If the distance between the base of M1 and M2 is larger than

  5. Imaging of acute cervical spine injuries: review and outlook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tins, B.J. [Department of Radiology, Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic Hospital, Oswestry (United Kingdom); Cassar-Pullicino, V.N. [Department of Radiology, Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic Hospital, Oswestry (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: Victor.Pullicino@rjah.nhs.uk

    2004-10-01

    Advances in imaging technology have been successfully applied in the emergency trauma setting with great benefit providing early, accurate and efficient diagnoses. Gaps in the knowledge of imaging acute spinal injury remain, despite a vast wealth of useful research and publications on the role of CT and MRI. This article reviews in a balanced manner the main questions that still face the attending radiologist by embracing the current and evolving concepts to help define and provide answers to the following; Imaging techniques - strengths and weaknesses; what are the implications of a missed cervical spine injury?; who should be imaged?; how should they be imaged?; spinal immobilisation - help or hazard?; residual open questions; what does all this mean?; and what are the implications for the radiologist? Although there are many helpful guidelines, the residual gaps in the knowledge base result in incomplete answers to the questions posed. The identification of these gaps in knowledge however should act as the initiating stimulus for further research. All too often there is a danger that the performance and productivity of the imaging modalities is the main research focus and not enough attention is given to the two fundamental prerequisites to the assessment of any imaging technology - the clinical selection criteria for imaging and the level of expertise of the appropriate clinician interpreting the images.

  6. Segmentation of knee injury swelling on infrared images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puentes, John; Langet, Hélène; Herry, Christophe; Frize, Monique

    2011-03-01

    Interpretation of medical infrared images is complex due to thermal noise, absence of texture, and small temperature differences in pathological zones. Acute inflammatory response is a characteristic symptom of some knee injuries like anterior cruciate ligament sprains, muscle or tendons strains, and meniscus tear. Whereas artificial coloring of the original grey level images may allow to visually assess the extent inflammation in the area, their automated segmentation remains a challenging problem. This paper presents a hybrid segmentation algorithm to evaluate the extent of inflammation after knee injury, in terms of temperature variations and surface shape. It is based on the intersection of rapid color segmentation and homogeneous region segmentation, to which a Laplacian of a Gaussian filter is applied. While rapid color segmentation enables to properly detect the observed core of swollen area, homogeneous region segmentation identifies possible inflammation zones, combining homogeneous grey level and hue area segmentation. The hybrid segmentation algorithm compares the potential inflammation regions partially detected by each method to identify overlapping areas. Noise filtering and edge segmentation are then applied to common zones in order to segment the swelling surfaces of the injury. Experimental results on images of a patient with anterior cruciate ligament sprain show the improved performance of the hybrid algorithm with respect to its separated components. The main contribution of this work is a meaningful automatic segmentation of abnormal skin temperature variations on infrared thermography images of knee injury swelling.

  7. Imaging findings of biliary and nonbiliary complications following laparoscopic surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jin-Young; Kim, Joo Hee; Lim, Joon Seok; Oh, Young Taik; Kim, Ki Whang [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Yonsei University College of Medicine, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Seoul (Korea); Kim, Myeong-Jin [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Yonsei University College of Medicine, Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Science, Seoul (Korea); Yonsei University College of Medicine, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Seoul (Korea); Yonsei University College of Medicine, Institute of Gastroenterology, Seoul (Korea); Park, Mi-Suk [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Seoul (Korea)

    2006-09-15

    Laparoscopic techniques are evolving for a wide range of surgical procedures although they were initially confined to cholecystectomy and exploratory laparoscopy. Recently, surgical procedures performed with a laparoscope include splenectomy, adrenalectomy, gastrectomy, and myomectomy. In this article, we review the spectrum of complications and illustrate imaging features of biliary and nonbiliary complications after various laparoscopic surgeries. Biliary complications following laparoscopic cholecystectomy include bile ductal obstruction, bile leak with bile duct injury, dropped stones in the peritoneal cavity, retained CBD stone, and port-site metastasis. Nonbiliary complications are anastomotic leakage after partial gastrectomy, gangrenous cholecystitis after gastrectomy, hematoma at the anastomotic site following gastrectomy, gastric infarction after gastrectomy, port-site metastasis after gastrectomy, hematoma after splenectomy, renal infarction after adrenalectomy, and active bleeding after myomectomy of the uterus. (orig.)

  8. The effect of brain tomography findings on mortality in sniper shot head injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can, Çağdaş; Bolatkale, M; Sarıhan, A; Savran, Y; Acara, A Ç; Bulut, M

    2017-06-01

    Penetrating gunshot head injuries have a poor prognosis and require prompt care. Brain CT is a routine component of the standard evaluation of head wounds and suspected brain injury. We aimed to investigate the effect of brain CT findings on mortality in gunshot head injury patients who were admitted to our emergency department (ED) from the Syrian Civil War. The study group comprised patients who were admitted to the ED with gunshot brain injury. Patients' GCS scores, prehospital intubations and brain CT findings were examined. 104 patients were included (92% male, mean age 25 years). Pneumocephalus, midline shift, penetrating head injury, patients with GCS scores ≤6 and patients who had to be intubated in the prehospital period were associated with higher mortality (p<0.05). The results of this study demonstrated that pneumocephalus, midline shift, a penetrating head injury, GCS scores ≤6 and prehospital intubation are associated with high mortality, whereas patients with temporal bone fracture, perforating or single cerebral lobe head injury had a higher survival rates. The temporal bone has a relatively thin and smooth shape compared with the other skull bones so a bullet is less fragmented when it has penetrated the temporal bone, which could be a reason for the reduced cavitation effect. In perforating head injury, the bullet makes a second hole and so will have deposited less energy than a retained bullet with a consequent reduction in intracranial injury and mortality. Further studies are required to reach definitive conclusions. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  9. Noncardiac findings on cardiac CT. Part II: spectrum of imaging findings.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Killeen, Ronan P

    2012-02-01

    Cardiac computed tomography (CT) has evolved into an effective imaging technique for the evaluation of coronary artery disease in selected patients. Two distinct advantages over other noninvasive cardiac imaging methods include its ability to directly evaluate the coronary arteries and to provide a unique opportunity to evaluate for alternative diagnoses by assessing the extracardiac structures, such as the lungs and mediastinum, particularly in patients presenting with the chief symptom of acute chest pain. Some centers reconstruct a small field of view (FOV) cropped around the heart but a full FOV (from skin to skin in the area irradiated) is obtainable in the raw data of every scan so that clinically relevant noncardiac findings are identifiable. Debate in the scientific community has centered on the necessity for this large FOV. A review of noncardiac structures provides the opportunity to make alternative diagnoses that may account for the patient\\'s presentation or to detect important but clinically silent problems such as lung cancer. Critics argue that the yield of biopsy-proven cancers is low and that the follow-up of incidental noncardiac findings is expensive, resulting in increased radiation exposure and possibly unnecessary further testing. In this 2-part review we outline the issues surrounding the concept of the noncardiac read, looking for noncardiac findings on cardiac CT. Part I focused on the pros and cons for and against the practice of identifying noncardiac findings on cardiac CT. Part II illustrates the imaging spectrum of cardiac CT appearances of benign and malignant noncardiac pathology.

  10. Radiographic findings in late-presenting congenital diaphragmatic hernia: helpful imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muzzafar, Sofia; Swischuk, Leonard E.; Jadhav, Siddharth P. [University of Texas Medical Branch, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Galveston, TX (United States)

    2012-03-15

    Imaging findings in delayed presentation of congenital diaphragmatic hernia can be confusing and misleading, resulting in a delay in diagnosis. To evaluate the often puzzling plain film findings of late-presenting CDH in an effort to determine whether any of the findings could be helpful in arriving at an early diagnosis. We reviewed and documented the plain film findings and clinical data in eight patients seen during the last 20 years with late-presenting CDH. IRB exempt status was obtained in this study. There were five boys and three girls. The age range was 4 months to 12 years with a mean of 2.4 years. Five children presented with acute respiratory problems while three presented with acute abdominal pain. Two children presented with both respiratory and abdominal findings and one also presented with hematemesis. Two children had radiographic findings that were not difficult to analyze while the remaining six had findings that posed initial diagnostic problems. Although not common, late-presenting CDH can result in confusing plain film radiographic findings and a delay in diagnosis. We found that the most important finding in analyzing these radiographs is in evaluating the location and position of the gastric bubble with the more common left-side hernias. (orig.)

  11. MR imaging and clinical findings of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sam Soo [Seoul City Boramae Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Moon Hee; Kim, Hyun Beom [College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [and others

    2000-01-01

    To describe the MR imaging and clinical findings of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma. The MR and clinical findings in six patients (M:F=3D4:2;adult:child=3D3:3) with spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma were reviewed. Five patients without any predisposing factor which might cause the condition and one with acute myelogenous leukemia were included. Emergency surgery was performed in two patients, and the other four were managed conservatively. The epidural lesion involved between three and seven vertebrae (mean:4.5), and relative to the spinal cord was located in the posterior-lateral (n=3D4), anterior (n=3D1), or right lateral (n=3D1) area. The hematoma was isointense (n=3D1) or hyperintense (n=3D5) with spinal cord on T1-weighted images, and hypointense (n=3D2) or hyperintense (n=3D4) on T2-weighted images. It was completely absorbed in four of five patients who underwent follow-up MR imaging, but not changed in one. The clinical outcome of these patients was complete recovery (n=3D4), spastic cerebral palsy (n=3D1), or unknown (n=3D1). Because of the lesion's characteristic signal intensity; MR imaging is very useful in the diagnosis and evaluation of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma. (author)

  12. Imaging findings of adiposis dolorosa vs. massive localized lymphedema

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petscavage-Thomas, Jonelle M.; Bernard, Stephanie A.; Bennett, Jennifer [Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Department of Radiology, H066, 500 University Drive, P.O. Box 850, Hershey, PA (United States); Walker, Eric A. [Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Department of Radiology, H066, 500 University Drive, P.O. Box 850, Hershey, PA (United States); Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Adiposis dolorosa (Dercum's disease) is a condition of benign, painful subcutaneous lipomatous lesions associated with weakness, endocrine and lipid abnormalities, and mental disturbances. There is little information documenting the cross-sectional imaging findings that differentiate it from lipomatous and neoplastic soft tissue masses, or massive localized lymphedema. The purpose of this study was to provide a radiological case series of adiposis dolorosa. A 10-year retrospective review of the picture archiving and communications system was performed. Two musculoskeletal radiologists reviewed images to confirm and document imaging features, location, size, and patient demographics. Medical records were reviewed to characterize patients into three groups: one group met at least three of the four criteria of Dercum's syndrome, the second group met less than three criteria, and the third group had clinical diagnosis of cellulitis of the lower extremity. Seventeen cases (25 masses) of adiposis dolorosa were found, nine cases of which met at least three criteria of Dercum's syndrome. All cases in the first two groups demonstrated skin thickening and lymphedema of subcutaneous fat, which was fluid attenuation on CT and low or intermediate T1-weighted and high STIR/T2-weighted MR signal. Two cases with pathology showed mild fatty infiltration with fibrous septa, and the third case showed massive localized lymphedema. The third group of ten cellulitis patients demonstrated non-mass-like subcutaneous edema with similar CT attenuation and MR signal characteristics to the first two groups, but differed by the presence of post-contrast enhancement and non-mass-like appearance in 90 %. Imaging findings of adiposis dolorosa and massive localized lymphedema overlap, as do the symptoms and pathological features. Due to the mass-like engorgement of the soft tissues and pain, patients will often undergo imaging to exclude neoplasm or infection. Knowledge of these

  13. Complicated giant polycystic ovary mimicking tumor: MR imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oeztoprak, Ibrahim; Eqilmez, Hulusi; Oeztoprak, Bilge; Guemues, Cesur

    2007-01-01

    A previously healthy 14-year-old girl presented with a 1-year history of abdominal pain that had worsened during the past 4 days. She had a right lower abdominal mass that was initially diagnosed as an ovarian tumor. MR imaging revealed a unilaterally enlarged and partially torted left polycystic ovary. Polycystic ovary is a common cause of increased ovarian volume in women of reproductive age. It is characterized by numerous small peripherally located follicles and increased stroma. It may mimic a neoplasm and lead to difficulties in diagnosis. In this case report, we discuss the unusual MR imaging findings and the pitfalls in diagnosis. (orig.)

  14. Complicated giant polycystic ovary mimicking tumor: MR imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oeztoprak, Ibrahim; Eqilmez, Hulusi; Oeztoprak, Bilge; Guemues, Cesur [Cumhuriyet University, Radiology Department, Faculty of Medicine, AD Sivas (Turkey)

    2007-02-15

    A previously healthy 14-year-old girl presented with a 1-year history of abdominal pain that had worsened during the past 4 days. She had a right lower abdominal mass that was initially diagnosed as an ovarian tumor. MR imaging revealed a unilaterally enlarged and partially torted left polycystic ovary. Polycystic ovary is a common cause of increased ovarian volume in women of reproductive age. It is characterized by numerous small peripherally located follicles and increased stroma. It may mimic a neoplasm and lead to difficulties in diagnosis. In this case report, we discuss the unusual MR imaging findings and the pitfalls in diagnosis. (orig.)

  15. Primary osteosarcoma of the breast: pathological and imaging findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Délio Marques Conde

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY Primary osteosarcoma of the breast (POB is an extremely rare and aggressive tumor. Differential diagnosis of POB includes osteosarcoma of the chest wall and metaplastic breast carcinoma. Imaging tests that exclude the existence of a direct connection between the tumor and chest wall, as well as histopathological and immunohistochemical studies that rule out the presence of an epithelial component are required for the diagnosis of POB. We report a case of a 69-year old woman with POB. Imaging and pathological findings are presented. Therapeutic approach is discussed in the light of current knowledge, including potential complications.

  16. MR imaging findings in transient osteoporosis of the hip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malizos, Konstantinos N. E-mail: kmalizos@otenet.gr; Zibis, Aristidis H.; Dailiana, Zoe; Hantes, Michael; Karahalios, Theophilos; Karantanas, Apostolos H

    2004-06-01

    Purpose: The authors sought to describe the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings including perfusion imaging, in association with the course of acute bone marrow oedema syndrome (aBMEs), in a group of patients with acute hip pain and a final diagnosis of transient osteoporosis of the hip (TOH). Materials and methods: From 217 patients referred with a probable diagnosis of avascular necrosis (AVN) of the femoral head, we identified 42 patients who had clinical and radiographic findings not relevant to AVN. MR imaging examinations were performed on a 1.0T scanner. Perfusion imaging was performed in 20 patients. The bone marrow oedema (BME) was classified in four stages. In addition, the presence or absence of oedema in the subchondral area and the presence of other subchondral lesions were recorded. Acetabular bone marrow was also assessed for the presence of oedema. The quantitative measurements included: maximum size of the effusion, percentage of enhancement (PE) and time of peak enhancement of abnormal marrow compared to the first pass, on the perfusion images. Results: Osteopenia was present on plain radiographs in 87% of cases. The most common pattern of BME was extending to the femoral head and neck. Acetabulum was involved in 16.6%. In 22.6% the BME spared the subchondral region of the femoral head. There were two cases (4.7%) with subchondral changes. A joint effusion was noted in 33 of the 42 patients. On perfusion imaging, a delayed peak enhancement was noted in 20 patients between 40 and 65 s after the first pass of contrast. No patient had any evidence of femoral head collapse or change in sphericity on follow-up MRI. None of the patients developed avascular necrosis in a time frame of 18 months from the onset of the acute hip pain. Conclusion: The aBMEs MR imaging pattern varies and is most commonly appearing on X-rays as osteopenia. Absence of subcondral lesions, delayed peak enhancement of the abnormal marrow on perfusion images, and sparing of

  17. Arteriographic and MR Imaging Findings of a High-Voltage Electrical Burn in the Upper Extremity: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Mi Nyong; Lee, Gyung Kyu; Kang, Ik Won; Hwang, Dae Hyun; Lee, Eil Seong; Min, Seon Jung; Chun, Wook [Hallym University College of Medicine, Hangang Sacred Heart Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Kyung Jin [Dongguk University College of Medicine, Gyeongju Hospital, Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-08-15

    An electrical injury is defined as sequelae caused by accidental contact with human-made or generated electrical power. A high-voltage electrical burn can cause many complications of numerous body systems within an individual's body, including the cardiac, respiratory, musculoskeletal, and central nervous systems. The radiologic features of this rare and sometimes life-threatening injury have occasionally been described in the literature. However, to the best of our knowledge, there have been no reports in Korea on the arteriographic and MR imaging findings of high-voltage electrical burn involving the body's upper extremity. In this article, we describe the imaging findings of a case involving a high-voltage electrical burn in the upper extremity, with an emphasis on the arteriographic and MR imaging findings and a review of the literature.

  18. Bone marrow MR imaging findings in disuse osteoporosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, Marcelo R. de [Hospital Mae de Deus, Porto Alegre (Brazil); Wesselly, Michelle; Chung, Christine B.; Resnick, Donald [University of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2011-05-15

    To demonstrate MR imaging findings in the cortical and trabecular bone as well as marrow changes in patients with disuse osteoporosis (DO). Sixteen patients (14 men, 2 women, aged 27-86 years) with clinical and radiographic evidence of DO of a lower limb joint (10 knees, 6 ankles) with MR examination of the same joint performed within a 1-month period were selected, as well as 16 healthy volunteers (7 men, 9 women, aged 25-75 years, 10 knees and 6 ankles). MR imaging findings of the bone marrow were analyzed by 2 musculoskeletal radiologists in consensus regarding: diffuse or focal signal alteration, reinforcement of vertical or longitudinal trabecular lines, and presence of abnormal vascularization. All patients (100%,16/16) with DO presented MR imaging abnormalities of the bone marrow, such as: accentuation of vertical trabecular lines (50%, 8/16), presence of subchondral lobules of fat (37.5%, 6/16), presence of horizontal trabecular lines (31%, 5/16), prominence of bone vessels (25%, 4/16), and presence of dotted areas of high signal intensity on T2-weighted fat-suppressed sequences (12.5%, 2/16). Such MR findings did not appear in the control individuals. There are several MR imaging findings in bones with DO that range from accentuation of vertical and horizontal marrow lines, presence of subchondral lobules of fat, prominent bone vascularization and the presence of dotted foci of high signal intensity on T2-weighted fat-suppressed sequences. Recognition of these signs may prove helpful in the identification of DO as well as distinguishing these findings from other entities. (orig.)

  19. The spectrum of benign esophageal lesions: imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Kyung Mi; Lee, Kyung Soo; Lee, Soon Jin; Kim, Eun A; Kim, Tae Sung; Han, Dae Hee; Shim, Young Mog [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-09-01

    Benign esophageal lesions occur in various diseases. Barium studies are useful for the evaluation of mucosal surface lesions but provide little information about the extramucosal extent of disease. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, on the other hand, permit the assessment of wall thickness, mediastinal involvement, adjacent lymphadenopathy, and distant spread. In diseases such as fibrovascular polyps, duplication cysts, scleroderma, trauma, caustic esophagitis, hiatal hernia, esophageal diverticulum, achalasia, and paraesophageal varices, the findings of imaging studies are specific, obviating the need for further invasive diagnostic work-up. The advent of helical computed tomography and its volume data set allows the acquisition of multiplanar images, and magnetic resonance imaging is useful both for this and for tissue characterization. Thus, multiplanar cross-sectional imaging further extends the role of imaging modalities to the evaluation of benign esophageal lesions. Through an awareness of the multiplanar cross-sectional appearances of various benign esophageal lesions, the radiologist can play an important role in the detection, diagnosis, further diagnostic planning, and treatment of the diseases in which they occur.

  20. Managing the stigma: Exploring body image experiences and self-presentation among people with spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, K Alysse; Gammage, Kimberley L; van Ingen, Cathy; Ditor, David S

    2016-01-01

    Using modified constructivist grounded theory, the purpose of this study was to explore body image experiences in people with spinal cord injury. Nine participants (five women, four men) varying in age (21–63 years), type of injury (C3-T7; complete and incomplete), and years post-injury (4–36 years) took part in semi-structured in-depth interviews. The following main categories were found: appearance, weight concerns, negative functional features, impact of others, body disconnection, hygiene and incontinence, and self-presentation. Findings have implications for the health and well-being of those living with a spinal cord injury. PMID:28070405

  1. Managing the stigma: Exploring body image experiences and self-presentation among people with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, K Alysse; Gammage, Kimberley L; van Ingen, Cathy; Ditor, David S

    2016-01-01

    Using modified constructivist grounded theory, the purpose of this study was to explore body image experiences in people with spinal cord injury. Nine participants (five women, four men) varying in age (21-63 years), type of injury (C3-T7; complete and incomplete), and years post-injury (4-36 years) took part in semi-structured in-depth interviews. The following main categories were found: appearance, weight concerns, negative functional features, impact of others, body disconnection, hygiene and incontinence, and self-presentation. Findings have implications for the health and well-being of those living with a spinal cord injury.

  2. Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MR imaging findings of hepatocellular adenoma: correlation with pathological findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takara, Kenichi; Saito, Kazuhiro; Kusama, Hiroshi; Tsuchida, Akihiko; Aoki, Tatsuya; Nagao, Toshitaka; Imai, Yasuharu; Taira, Junichi; Moriyasu, Fuminori; Tokuuye, Koichi

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of a 28-year-old woman with hepatocellular adenoma and correlate findings of pathology and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with gadolinium ethoxybenzyl diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-EOB-DTPA) enhancement. In the hepatobiliary phase, the peripheral region of the tumor that corresponded with proliferating hepatocytes with steatosis showed slight hypointensity compared with the surrounding liver parenchyma, and the central region of the tumor that corresponded with cellular areas showed isointensity.

  3. Imaging of Athletic Injuries of Knee Ligaments and Menisci: Sports Imaging Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naraghi, Ali M; White, Lawrence M

    2016-10-01

    Acute knee injuries are a common source of morbidity in athletes and if overlooked may result in chronic functional impairment. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the knee has become the most commonly performed musculoskeletal MR examination and is an indispensable tool in the appropriate management of the injured athlete. Meniscal and ligamentous tearing are the most frequent indications for surgical intervention in sports injuries and an understanding of the anatomy, biomechanics, mechanisms of injury, and patterns of injury are all critical to accurate diagnosis and appropriate management. These will be discussed in reference to meniscal tears and injuries of the cruciate ligaments as well as injuries of the posterolateral and posteromedial corners of the knee. (©) RSNA, 2016.

  4. Palmer Classification and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings of Ulnocarpal Impingement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersoy, Hale; Pomeranz, Stephen J

    2015-01-01

    Ulnocarpal impaction (UCI) syndrome is a well-recognized and relatively frequent cause of ulnar-sided wrist pain and limitation of motion. In the setting of negative or questionable negative radiographs and a strong clinical suspicion for UCI, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is helpful in detecting occult disease. Current MRI technology is capable of providing high-spatial-resolution images on multiple planes while manipulating contrast to highlight different tissue types. However, imaging of the triangular fibrocartilage complex has been challenging because of the small and complex components of this structure. In this article, the stages of UCI are discussed with illustrations of the spectrum of MRI findings using Palmer classification as a guideline.

  5. Detection of meniscal injuries using MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lotysch, M.; Mink, J.H.; Levy, T.; Schwartz, A.; Crues, J.V. III.

    1986-01-01

    Eighty-six knees studied by MR imaging were treated operatively and the surgical-radiologic conditions were reviewed using the following grading system of meniscal signal: grade 1, globular signal within the meniscus that does not involve an articular margin; grade 2, linear signal within the meniscus that does not extend to an articular surface; grade 3, linear or globular signal extending to an articular surface. This grading system was applied to evaluate 86 knees (172 menisci). Eleven menisci had been treated operatively at an earlier period and were excluded. Of 92 grade 1 or 2 menisci, 88 were normal at surgery. Of 69 grade 3 minisci, lesions were associated with meniscal tears in 68 at surgery. MR imaging is an accurate method of evaluating meniscal surgery

  6. Metastatic meningioma: positron emission tomography CT imaging findings.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brennan, C

    2010-12-01

    The imaging findings of a case of metastasing meningioma are described. The case illustrates a number of rare and interesting features. The patient presented with haemoptysis 22 years after the initial resection of an intracranial meningioma. CT demonstrated heterogeneous masses with avid peripheral enhancement without central enhancement. Blood supply to the larger lesion was partially from small feeding vessels from the inferior pulmonary vein. These findings correlate with a previously published case in which there was avid uptake of fluoro-18-deoxyglucose peripherally with lesser uptake centrally. The diagnosis of metastasing meningioma was confirmed on percutaneous lung tissue biopsy.

  7. International urinary tract imaging basic spinal cord injury data set

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, F; Craggs, M; Kennelly, M

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To create an International Urinary Tract Imaging Basic Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Data Set within the framework of the International SCI Data Sets. SETTING: An international working group. METHODS: The draft of the Data Set was developed by a working group comprising members appointed...... by the Neurourology Committee of the International Continence Society, the European Association of Urology, the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA), the International Spinal Cord Society (ISCoS) and a representative of the Executive Committee of the International SCI Standards and Data Sets. The final version...

  8. Multimodality imaging findings of massive ovarian edema in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahmoush, Hisham [Stanford University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology Division, Stanford, CA (United States); Anupindi, Sudha A.; Chauvin, Nancy A. [University of Pennsylvania, The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Pawel, Bruce R. [University of Pennsylvania, The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2017-05-15

    Massive ovarian edema is a rare benign condition that predominantly affects childbearing women as well as preadolescent girls. It is thought to result from intermittent or partial torsion of the ovary compromising the venous and lymphatic drainage but with preserved arterial supply. The clinical features of massive ovarian edema are nonspecific and can simulate tumors, leading to unnecessary oophorectomy. To demonstrate imaging features that should alert radiologists to consider the diagnosis of massive ovarian edema preoperatively so that fertility-sparing surgery may be considered. We identified five girls diagnosed with massive ovarian edema at pathology. Presenting symptoms, sidedness, imaging appearance, preoperative diagnosis, and operative and histopathological findings were reviewed. Age range was 9.6-14.3 years (mean age: 12.5 years). Common imaging findings included ovarian enlargement with edema of the stroma, peripherally placed follicles, isointense signal on T1-W MRI and markedly hyperintense signal on T2-W MRI, preservation of color Doppler flow by US, and CT Hounsfield units below 40. The uterus was deviated to the affected side in all patients. Two of the five patients had small to moderate amounts of free pelvic fluid. Mean ovarian volume on imaging was 560 mL (range: 108-1,361 mL). While the clinical presentation of massive ovarian edema is nonspecific, an enlarged ovary with stromal edema, peripherally placed follicles and preservation of blood flow may be suggestive and wedge biopsy should be considered intraoperatively to avoid unnecessary removal of the ovary. (orig.)

  9. Endometriosis of the liver: Findings in imaging diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakanishi, K.; Bohndorf, K.; Lindemann, F.; Leipprand, E.

    1994-01-01

    Endometriosis of the liver is an extremely rare disease. To our knowledge, no more than three such cases were so far mentioned in the relevant literature. Moreover, we understand that nmr findings to prove the presence of hepatic endometriosis have not yet been described. We consider nmr imaging to be a suitable tool to establish a presumptive, if not firm, diagnosis of hepatic endometriosis. A sign strongly suggestive of the disorder is the irregular pattern of blood constituents of different ages that can invariably be visualized using this method. Due to the great amounts of free methaemoglobin found in subacute haemorrhages in increase insignal intensity can be observed for T 1 -weighted and T 2 -weighted SE sequences. The residues of former bleedings into the stroma, which are histologically confirmed by haemosiderin deposits, account for the greatly diminished signal intensity in T 1 -weighted images. An unusual finding here was the comparatively high signal intensity observed for T 2 -weighted images in those areas, where signals were practically absent in T 1 -weighted images. In our opinion, this can be explained by scattered subacute bleedings, which are probably too small in amount to produce signals in T 1 -weighted pictures. (orig./MG) [de

  10. Imaging of athletic pubalgia and core muscle injuries: clinical and therapeutic correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palisch, Andrew; Zoga, Adam C; Meyers, William C

    2013-07-01

    Athletes frequently injure their hips and core muscles. Accurate diagnosis and proper treatment of groin pain in the athlete can be tricky, frequently posing vexing problem for trainers and physicians. Clinical presentations of the various hip problems overlap with respect to history and physical examination. This article reviews clinical presentations and magnetic resonance imaging findings specific to the various causes of groin pain in the athlete. The focus is on the core muscle injuries (athletic pubalgia or "sports hernia"). The goal is to raise awareness about the variety of injuries that occur and therapeutic options. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Pulmonary fungal infection: Imaging findings in immunocompetent and immunocompromised patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chong, Semin; Lee, Kyung Soo; Yi, Chin A; Chung, Myung Jin; Kim, Tae Sung; Han, Joungho

    2006-01-01

    Histoplasmosis is the most common endemic mycosis in North America, and is followed by coccidioidomycosis and blastomycosis. Although the majority of these infections in immunocompetent persons are self-limited, some patients can develop severe pneumonitis or various forms of chronic pulmonary infection. Cryptococcoci, Aspergillus, Candidas, and Mucorals are ubiquitous organisms, which may affect immunocompromised patients. Specific imaging findings can be expected, depending on the organisms involved, underlying patients' conditions (immune status), and specific situations after immune depleting procedures

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings of Different Polymicrogyria Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkan Gokce

    2012-09-01

    Conclusion: As one of the most common types of developmental cortical malformations, polymicrogyria can be seen in patients who are presented with clinical findings, such as epilepsy, mental motor retardation and spasticity and polymicrogyria may present in very different types. MRI is an effective imaging technique in patients presenting with cortical developmental malformations such as polymicrogyria [J Contemp Med 2012; 2(3.000: 151-157

  13. INTRACRANIAL HYDATID DISEASE: IMAGING FINDINGS OF A RARE DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    idil Gunes Tatar

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Hydatid disease is caused by the larval stage of the parasite Echinococcus granulosus. It is mainly endemic in North African and Mediterranean countries. The disease usually manifests in liver and lungs although involvement of other organs are also seen. In this rare case intracranial hydatid disease in a 9-year-old female patient is presented with Magnetic Resonance Imaging findings. [J Contemp Med 2014; 4(2.000: 103-105

  14. Cranial imaging findings in neurobrucellosis: results of Istanbul-3 study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdem, Hakan; Senbayrak, Seniha; Meriç, Kaan; Batirel, Ayşe; Karahocagil, Mustafa Kasım; Hasbun, Rodrigo; Sengoz, Gonul; Karsen, Hasan; Kaya, Selçuk; Inal, Ayşe Seza; Pekok, Abdullah Umut; Celen, Mustafa Kemal; Deniz, Secil; Ulug, Mehmet; Demirdal, Tuna; Namiduru, Mustafa; Tekin, Recep; Guven, Tumer; Parlak, Emine; Bolukcu, Sibel; Avci, Meltem; Sipahi, Oguz Reşat; Ozturk-Engin, Derya; Yaşar, Kadriye; Pehlivanoglu, Filiz; Yilmaz, Emel; Ates-Guler, Selma; Mutlu-Yilmaz, Esmeray; Tosun, Selma; Sirmatel, Fatma; Sahin-Horasan, Elif; Akbulut, Ayhan; Oztoprak, Nefise; Cag, Yasemin; Kadanali, Ayten; Turgut, Huseyin; Baran, Ali Irfan; Gul, Hanefi Cem; Sunnetcioglu, Mahmut; Haykir-Solay, Asli; Denk, Affan; Inan, Asuman; Ayaz, Celal; Ulcay, Asim; Kose, Sukran; Agalar, Canan; Elaldi, Nazif

    2016-10-01

    Neuroimaging abnormalities in central nervous system (CNS) brucellosis are not well documented. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of imaging abnormalities in neurobrucellosis and to identify factors associated with leptomeningeal and basal enhancement, which frequently results in unfavorable outcomes. Istanbul-3 study evaluated 263 adult patients with CNS brucellosis from 26 referral centers and reviewed their 242 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and 226 computerized tomography (CT) scans of the brain. A normal CT or MRI scan was seen in 143 of 263 patients (54.3 %). Abnormal imaging findings were grouped into the following four categories: (a) inflammatory findings: leptomeningeal involvements (44), basal meningeal enhancements (30), cranial nerve involvements (14), spinal nerve roots enhancement (8), brain abscesses (7), granulomas (6), and arachnoiditis (4). (b) White-matter involvement: white-matter involvement (32) with or without demyelinating lesions (7). (c) Vascular involvement: vascular involvement (42) mostly with chronic cerebral ischemic changes (37). (d) Hydrocephalus/cerebral edema: hydrocephalus (20) and brain edema (40). On multivariate logistic regression analysis duration of symptoms since the onset (OR 1.007; 95 % CI 1-28, p = 0.01), polyneuropathy and radiculopathy (OR 5.4; 95 % CI 1.002-1.013, p = 0.044), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)/serum glucose rate (OR 0.001; 95 % CI 000-0.067, p = 0.001), and CSF protein (OR 2.5; 95 % CI 2.3-2.7, p = 0.0001) were associated with diffuse inflammation. In this study, 45 % of neurobrucellosis patients had abnormal neuroimaging findings. The duration of symptoms, polyneuropathy and radiculopathy, high CSF protein level, and low CSF/serum glucose rate were associated with inflammatory findings on imaging analyses.

  15. [Craniocerebral trauma: magnetic resonance imaging of diffuse axonal injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallouhi, A

    2014-09-01

    Acceleration-deceleration rotational brain trauma is a common cause of disability or death in young adults and often leads to a focal destruction of axons. The resulting pathology, axonal shear injury is referred to as diffuse axonal injury (DAI). The DAI-associated lesions occur bilaterally, are widely dispersed and have been observed in the surface and deep white matter. They are found near to and far from the impact site. When DAI is clinically suspected, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the method of choice for further clarification, especially in patients where cranial computed tomography (CT) is inconspicuous. To investigate the presence of DAI after traumatic brain injury (TBI), a multimodal MRI approach is applied including the common structural and also functional imaging sequences. For structural MRI, fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) weighted and susceptibility contrast imaging (SWI) are the sequences mainly used. The SWI technique is extremely sensitive to blood breakdown products, which appear as small signal voids at three locations, at the gray-white interface, in the corpus callosum and in the brain stem. Functional MRI comprises a group of constantly developing techniques that have great potential in optimal evaluation of the white matter in patients after craniocerebral trauma. These imaging techniques allow the visualization of changes associated with shear injuries, such as functional impairment of axons and decreased blood flow and abnormal metabolic activity of the brain parts affected. The multimodal MRI approach in patients with DAI results in a more detailed and differentiated representation of the underlying pathophysiological changes of the injured nerve tracts and helps to improve the diagnostic and prognostic accuracy of MRI. When DAI is suspected multimodal MRI should be performed as soon as possible after craniocerebral injury.

  16. Imaging findings of intravascular papillary endothelial hyperplasia presenting in extremities: correlation with pathological findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sun Joo; Choo, Hye Jung; Park, Ji Sung; Park, Yeong-Mi; Eun, Choong Ki [Pusan Paik Hospital, Department of Radiology, College of Medicine, Inje University, Pusan (Korea); Hong, Sung Hwan [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Hwang, Ji Young [Ewha Womans University, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea); Lee, In Sook [Pusan National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Pusan (Korea); Lee, Jongmin [Kyungpook National University, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea); Jung, Soo-Jin [Pusan Paik Hospital, Department of Pathology, College of Medicine, Inje University, Pusan (Korea)

    2010-08-15

    To describe magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound (US) findings of intravascular papillary endothelial hyperplasia (IPEH) arising in extremities. Six patients with IPEH confirmed by surgical resection were reviewed retrospectively. Before resection, 3 patients underwent both MRI and US and 3 patients underwent only MRI. Two radiologists retrospectively reviewed MR/US imaging results and correlated them with pathological features. The 6 IPEHs were diagnosed as 4 mixed forms and 2 pure forms. The pre-existing pathology of four mixed forms was intramuscular or intermuscular hemangioma. By MRI, the mixed form of IPEH (n = 4) revealed iso- to slightly high signal intensity containing nodule-like foci of high signal intensity on T1-weighted images (T1WI) and high signal intensity-containing nodule-like foci of low signal intensity on T2-weighted images (T2WI). The pure form of IPEH (n = 2) showed homogeneous iso- signal intensity on T1WI and high and low signal intensity containing nodule-like foci of low signal intensity on T2WI. On gadolinium-enhanced fat-suppressed T1WI, 50% of cases (n = 3: mixed forms) revealed peripheral, septal, and central enhancement. The other IPEHs (n = 3: 1 mixed and 2 pure forms) showed peripheral and septal enhancement or only peripheral enhancement. By US, two mixed forms of IPEH showed well-defined hypoechoic masses containing hyperechoic septa and central portion with vascularities. One pure form of IPEH was a homogeneous hypoechoic mass with septal and peripheral vascularities on color Doppler imaging. The foci of high signal intensity on T1WI, foci of low signal intensity on T2WI, and non-enhancing portions on MRI and the hypoechoic portion on US were histopathologically correlated with thrombi and the peripheral/septal or central enhancing areas on MRI, hyperechoic septa and the central portion on US, and septal/central or peripheral vascularities on color Doppler imaging corresponded to hypertrophic papillary epithelium and

  17. Evaluation of knee meniscal injuries using panoramic MR images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriwaki, Toru

    2004-01-01

    At many institutions, sagittal and coronal slice magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is routinely used for knee examinations. Recently, MRI diagnosis for knee meniscal injuries has spread remarkably, and the diagnostic value of the procedure is almost established. We made panoramic images by reconstructing 3D data images along the form of the meniscus using curved cuts and multiplanar reconstruction (MPR). We assessed the usefulness of the panoramic images for evaluating meniscal injuries in 34 patients who had arthroscopic surgery after the MRI. MRI data were acquired in the axial plane using a double echo steady state (DESS). The presence of 30 meniscal tears, 5 anterior cruciate ligament tears, 2 posterior cruciate ligament tears, and 1 medial collateral ligament tear were confirmed by the arthroscopic surgery. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for medial meniscus was 100, 95 and 97% respectively, and for lateral meniscus was 93, 95 and 97% respectively. The meniscal tears were visible on the panoramic images, which showed the entire meniscus from the anterior to the posterior segment, so that the anatomical locations of the tear were indicated distinctly. Furthermore, the posterior segment was shown in detail on the panoramic images better than on the conventional plane images. (author)

  18. The impact of anal sphincter injury on perceived body image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iles, David; Khan, Rabia; Naidoo, Kristina; Kearney, Rohna; Myers, Jenny; Reid, Fiona

    2017-05-01

    Obstetric anal sphincter injury is common but the effect on body image is unreported. The aim of this study was to explore patient perceived changes in body image and other psychological aspects in women attending a perineal follow-up clinic. This retrospective study analysed women's responses to a self-reported questionnaire. Consecutive women with anal sphincter injury who attended a United Kingdom Maternity Hospital perineal follow-up clinic between January 1999 and January 2012 were identified and the records obtained and reviewed. Multivariate regression analyses were performed to examine variables influencing self-reported change in body image. Questionnaires and operation notes were analysed from 422 women who attended at a median of four months after delivery. 222 (53%) reported a change in body image with 80 (19%) reporting lower self-esteem and 75 (18%) a change in their personality due to the change in body image. 248 (59%) perceived an anatomical change due to the delivery. Factors associated with increased likelihood of reporting a change in body image were reporting a perceived change in anatomy due to the delivery, adjusted OR 6.11 (3.56-10.49), anal incontinence, OR 1.97 (1.16-3.36), and delivery by forceps, OR 2.59 (1.23-5.43). This is the first study to quantify body image changes in women after anal sphincter injury sustained in childbirth. These were found to be very common, affecting up to 50% of women. The study has several limitations but it does highlight the significant psychosocial problems of negative self-esteem and personality changes associated with a perceived change in body image that has not previously been reported. It also outlines the further research questions that need to be addressed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Round pneumonia: imaging findings in a large series of children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yong-Woo; Donnelly, Lane F.

    2007-01-01

    Although round pneumonia is a well-known clinical entity, there have been no large case reviews, with most knowledge based on case reports and small series from the 1960s and 1970s. To review the imaging findings of a large series of children with round pneumonia. A retrospective review of radiographic and CT findings in all children reported to have round pneumonia at a large children's hospital from 2000 to 2006 was performed. Children with underlying medical conditions were excluded. Epidemiologic characteristics, radiographic and CT findings, and follow-up imaging were reviewed. The review identified 109 children (mean age 5 years, range 4 months to 19 years). Round pneumonias tended to be solitary 98% (107/109), have well-defined borders 70% (77/109), and be posteriorly located 83% (91/109), with the following lobar distribution: left lower lobe (36), right lower lobe (33), right upper lobe (28), left upper lobe (7), right middle lobe (4), and lingula (2). Round pneumonia tended to resolve on follow-up imaging (95%, 41/43) as compared to progression to lobar pneumonia (4.6%, 2/43). Three patients (2.6%, 3/112) originally suspected to have round pneumonia were later shown to have other diagnoses: cavitary necrosis in pneumonia (two) or pleural pseudocyst (one). Round pneumonia occurs in young children (mean age 5 years), tends to be a solitary lesion, and is most commonly posteriorly located. Misdiagnosis of other pathology as round pneumonia is uncommon. (orig.)

  20. Radiologic findings of hemophilic arthropathy of the knee : Focusing on MR imaging and plain radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byung Jin; Choi, Jae Young; Cha, Sung Suk; Eun, Choong Kie; Park, Dong Woo

    1996-01-01

    To evaluate the characteristic MR findings of hemophilic arthropathy of the knee. Seven keens in six patients with hemophilia (five hemophilia A and one hemophilia B) were retrospectively studied with MR images and plain radiographs. Patients were aged between 2 and 20 years (mean, 11) and all had a clinical history of repeated hemarthrosis. MR images of the knee were analyzed with respect to intra- and extra-articular hemorrhage, the state of synovial tissue, articular cartilage, bone, menisci, and ligaments. Synovial hypertrophy and articular cartilage destruction were revealed in all seven knees ; pannus was found in four, and was seen as low signal intensity on T1-weighted image and high signal intensity on T2-weighted images. All five instances of synovial hypertrophy and pannus were enhanced. Joint effusion, presented in five of seven knees, demonstrated slightly low signal intensity on T1-weighted image and high signal intensity on T2-weighted images, and was associated with peripheral low signal intensity of hemosiderin. Subchondral and marginal erosion was seen in six cases, patellar deformity in three, meniscal damage in four and cruciate ligament damage in one case. MR is superior to radiography in demonstrating chronic repeated hemarthrosis (manifested as thick intra-articular effusion), hemosidering, synovial hypertrophy, erosion or destruction of articular cartilage and bone, and meniscal or cruciate ligament injury of hemophilic arthropathy of the knee. MR is therefore thought to be a useful imaging study for accurate evaluation of hemophilic arthropathy of the knee

  1. Radiologic findings of hemophilic arthropathy of the knee : Focusing on MR imaging and plain radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byung Jin; Choi, Jae Young; Cha, Sung Suk; Eun, Choong Kie [Inje Univ., College of Medicine, Pusan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Dong Woo [Hanyang Univ., College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-01

    To evaluate the characteristic MR findings of hemophilic arthropathy of the knee. Seven keens in six patients with hemophilia (five hemophilia A and one hemophilia B) were retrospectively studied with MR images and plain radiographs. Patients were aged between 2 and 20 years (mean, 11) and all had a clinical history of repeated hemarthrosis. MR images of the knee were analyzed with respect to intra- and extra-articular hemorrhage, the state of synovial tissue, articular cartilage, bone, menisci, and ligaments. Synovial hypertrophy and articular cartilage destruction were revealed in all seven knees ; pannus was found in four, and was seen as low signal intensity on T1-weighted image and high signal intensity on T2-weighted images. All five instances of synovial hypertrophy and pannus were enhanced. Joint effusion, presented in five of seven knees, demonstrated slightly low signal intensity on T1-weighted image and high signal intensity on T2-weighted images, and was associated with peripheral low signal intensity of hemosiderin. Subchondral and marginal erosion was seen in six cases, patellar deformity in three, meniscal damage in four and cruciate ligament damage in one case. MR is superior to radiography in demonstrating chronic repeated hemarthrosis (manifested as thick intra-articular effusion), hemosidering, synovial hypertrophy, erosion or destruction of articular cartilage and bone, and meniscal or cruciate ligament injury of hemophilic arthropathy of the knee. MR is therefore thought to be a useful imaging study for accurate evaluation of hemophilic arthropathy of the knee.

  2. Imaging findings of synovitis-acne-pustulosis-hyperostosis-osteomyelitis syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Jun; Gong Wuxian; Liu Licheng; Xu Aide; Wang Shishan

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To explore the imaging characteristics of SAPHO syndrome in 11 cases. Methods: Clinical features and imaging findings from 11 patients (6 male, 5 female, 28 to 68 years old) with SAPHO syndrome were analyzed retrospectively Including DR in 9 cases, CT in 10 cases, MRI and radioisotope scanning in 3 cases. Results: Multi-bones of anterior chest wall disorders were shown in 9 cases on DR images including superior sternum, anterior first rib and clavicle hyperostosis. Bony fusion and bony bridge were also seen in these cases. Hyperostosis osteosclerosis, bone destruction and bony fusion of sternoclavicular articulation and first rib were shown on CT images in 9 cases. Osteosclerosis of the joint between manubrium and midsternum was seen in 1 case on CT image. The sign of flying sea gull was seen in 2 cases on axial anterior chest wall CT images. The disorders of anterior chest wall were bilateral in 8 cases and unilateral in 2 cases. Sacroiliitis and osteomyelitis of ilium were found accompanied in 1 case. Osteomyelitis of thoracic vertebrae were found in 2 cases, while sclerosing osteitis of lumbar vertebrae and osteoarthritis of bilateral hands were observed respectively in 1 case. The thicken soft tissue surround clavicle head, thoracic vertebra disease with long T 1 , jumbly T 2 and high fat suppression signal, long T 1 and short T 2 signal under sacroiliac joint were shown on MRI. Radioisotope scanning displayed higher radioactive uptake of radionuclides, with T shape in sternoclavicular area in 3 cases. Conclusions: Multi-bones of anterior chest wall involvement was the common imaging characteristics in 11 patients. Sacroiliitis, osteomyelitis of' vertebrae and ilium, sclerosing osteitis, ostearthritis of hand could be seen in some cases. (authors)

  3. Reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome in children; MR imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Kwon; Kim, Yong Sun; Kwon, Soon Hak

    2001-01-01

    To find out the characteristic MR findings of reversible posterior leukoen-cephalopathy syndrome (RPLS) due to various causes in chldren. Eigh children with RPLS underwent MR imaging, and the findings were retrospectively analyzed. All eight were acutely hypertensive at the time of a neurotoxic episode. Three had intra-abdominal tumors (one adrenal pheochromo-cytoma, one para-aortic paraganglioma and one para-aortic ganglioneuroma encasing the left renal artery): three were being treated with cyclosporine: one was being treated with steroid: and one had hemolytric uremic syndrome. Initial cranial MR images were analyzed with particular emphasis on the distribution of the lesions. To assess possible sequelae, follow-up MR images were obtained in seven patients at least one week after the treatment of hypertension. Four underwent proton MR spectroscopy. Characteristic distribution of lesions in the occipital and posterior parietal lobes was identified in all cases regardless of the causes of RPLS. The cerebellum, basal ganglia, anterior parietal, and frontal lobe were involved in four, two, one, and one case, respectively. Cortical gray matter involvement was predominant in six and subcortical white matter involvement predominated in two patients. The distribution of lesions was bilateral and asymmetric. Gyriform enhancement was identified in six cases, and small hemorrhage was noted in one. In seven patients, the clinical and MR findings improved without sequelae on follow-up study. In one, proton MR spectroscopy demonstrated a high lactate peak at the time of the neurologic event. Nearnormal spectra were noted in three children who underwent proton MR spectroscopy after recovery. The MR findings of RPLS are characteristic in that lesions are distributed in the posterior region of the brain and they are reversible on follow-up study. In children with RPLS due to unknown causes, the possibility of intra-abdominal tumors should also be consiodered

  4. Respiratory syncytial virus-related encephalitis: magnetic resonance imaging findings with diffusion-weighted study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Arim; Suh, Sang-il; Seol, Hae-Young [Korea University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Korea University Guro Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Son, Gyu-Ri; Lee, Nam-Joon [Korea University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Korea University Anam Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Young Hen; Seo, Hyung Suk [Korea University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Korea University Ansan Hospital, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Eun, Baik-Lin [Korea University College of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Korea University Guro Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-15

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a common pathogen causing acute respiratory infection in children. Herein, we describe the incidence and clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of RSV-related encephalitis, a major neurological complication of RSV infection. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records and imaging findings of the patients over the past 7 years who are admitted to our medical center and are tested positive for RSV-RNA by reverse transcriptase PCR. In total, 3,856 patients were diagnosed with RSV bronchiolitis, and 28 of them underwent brain MRI for the evaluation of neurologic symptoms; 8 of these 28 patients had positive imaging findings. Five of these 8 patients were excluded because of non-RSV-related pathologies, such as subdural hemorrhage, brain volume loss due to status epilepticus, periventricular leukomalacia, preexisting ventriculomegaly, and hypoxic brain injury. The incidence of RSV-related encephalitis was as follows: 3/3,856 (0.08 %) of the patients are positive for RSV RNA, 3/28 (10.7 %) of the patient underwent brain MRI for neurological symptom, and 3/8 (37.5 %) of patients revealed abnormal MR findings. The imaging findings were suggestive of patterns of rhombenmesencephalitis, encephalitis with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, and limbic encephalitis. They demonstrated no diffusion abnormality on diffusion-weighted image and symptom improvement on the follow-up study. Encephalitis with RSV bronchiolitis occurs rarely. However, on brain MRI performed upon suspicion of neurologic involvement, RSV encephalitis is not infrequently observed among the abnormal MR findings and may mimic other viral and limbic encephalitis. Physicians should be aware of this entity to ensure proper diagnosis and neurologic care of RSV-positive patients. (orig.)

  5. State-of-the-art ultrasonographic findings in lower extremity sports injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzue, Naoto; Matsuura, Tetsuya; Iwame, Toshiyuki; Higashino, Kosaku; Sakai, Toshinori; Hamada, Daisuke; Goto, Tomohiro; Takata, Yoichiro; Nishisho, Toshihiko; Goda, Yuichiro; Tsutsui, Takahiko; Tonogai, Ichiro; Miyagi, Ryo; Abe, Mitsunobu; Morimoto, Masatoshi; Mineta, Kazuaki; Kimura, Tetsuya; Nitta, Akihiro; Higuchi, Tadahiro; Hama, Shingo; C Jha, Subash; Takahashi, Rui; Fukuta, Shoji; Sairyo, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Athletes sometimes experience overuse injuries. To diagnose these injuries, ultrasonography is often more useful than plain radiography, computed tomography (CT), or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Ultrasonography can show both bone and soft tissue from various angles as needed, providing great detail in many cases. In conditions such as osteochondrosis or enthesopathies such as Osgood-Schlatter disease, Sinding-Larsen-Johansson disease, bipartite patella, osteochondritis dissecans of the knee, painful accessory navicular,and jumper's knee, ultrasonography can reveal certain types of bony irregularities or neovascularization of the surrounding tissue. In patients of enthesopathy, ultrasonography can show the degenerative changes at the insertion of the tendon. Given its usefulness in treatment, ultrasonography is expected to become essential in the management of overuse injuries affecting the lower limb in athletes. J. Med. Invest. 62: 109-113, August, 2015.

  6. MR imaging findings of ring apophyseal fractures in lumbar vertebrae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Yong Soo; Kwon, Soon Tae; Song, Chang Joon; Lee, Young Hwan; Kim, Hyoung Seob; Lee, Hwan Do; Cho, June Sik; Ahn, Jae Sung; Lee, June Kyu [Chungnam National Univ. College of Medicine, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-01

    To assess the location and associated findings of fractures of the posterior lumbar vertebral ring apophysis as seen on MRI We retrospectively evaluated MR findings in 77 patients (86 lesions) with lumbar apophyseal ring fractures. Their age ranged from ten to 67 (mean 33-1) years. To confirm the presence of verterbral ring fractures, CT was performed in 29 patients (31 lesions) within two weeks of MR imaging. Open laminectomy was performed in ten patients, percutaneous automated nucleotomy in three, and LASER operation in four. The most common location of fractures was the superior margin of L5 (36 lesions 41.9%), next was superior margin of S1 (21 lesions, 24.4%). On CT, a bony fragment was seen in 28 patients (30 lesions); the positive predictive value of MR was 99.7%. Multiple lesions were seen in nine patients. Associated disc herniation and bulging were noted in 64 (74.4%) and 15 lesions (17.4%), respectively, and a high signal intensity rim aound the bony fragment on T1 weighted image was noted in 33 (38.4%). Other associated findings were spondylolysis in eight patients, retrolisthesis in five, and spondylolisthesis in three. Operative outcomes were variable. The results of open laminectomy were better than those of percutaneous automated laminectomy or LASER operation. In patients with lumbar apophyseal ring fractures, their exact location and associated findings could be evalvated by MRI, which was therefore useful in the planning of appropriate surgery.

  7. MR imaging findings of ring apophyseal fractures in lumbar vertebrae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Yong Soo; Kwon, Soon Tae; Song, Chang Joon; Lee, Young Hwan; Kim, Hyoung Seob; Lee, Hwan Do; Cho, June Sik; Ahn, Jae Sung; Lee, June Kyu

    1997-01-01

    To assess the location and associated findings of fractures of the posterior lumbar vertebral ring apophysis as seen on MRI We retrospectively evaluated MR findings in 77 patients (86 lesions) with lumbar apophyseal ring fractures. Their age ranged from ten to 67 (mean 33-1) years. To confirm the presence of verterbral ring fractures, CT was performed in 29 patients (31 lesions) within two weeks of MR imaging. Open laminectomy was performed in ten patients, percutaneous automated nucleotomy in three, and LASER operation in four. The most common location of fractures was the superior margin of L5 (36 lesions 41.9%), next was superior margin of S1 (21 lesions, 24.4%). On CT, a bony fragment was seen in 28 patients (30 lesions); the positive predictive value of MR was 99.7%. Multiple lesions were seen in nine patients. Associated disc herniation and bulging were noted in 64 (74.4%) and 15 lesions (17.4%), respectively, and a high signal intensity rim aound the bony fragment on T1 weighted image was noted in 33 (38.4%). Other associated findings were spondylolysis in eight patients, retrolisthesis in five, and spondylolisthesis in three. Operative outcomes were variable. The results of open laminectomy were better than those of percutaneous automated laminectomy or LASER operation. In patients with lumbar apophyseal ring fractures, their exact location and associated findings could be evalvated by MRI, which was therefore useful in the planning of appropriate surgery

  8. INTRACRANIAL MENINGIOMAS - MR IMAGING FINDINGS IN 30 CASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonthu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To present the magnetic resonance imaging findings of 30 cases of intracranial meningiomas diagnosed in a single institute. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI with contrast is the modality of choice for diagnosis of meningiomas. Objective of this study was to describe typical and atypical locations and findings of intracranial meningiomas on magnetic resonance imaging. MATERIALS AND METHODS This study was conducted at Department of Radiology, Government General Hospital, Kakinada from January 2013 to August 2014 over a period of 20 months. 30 patients of intracranial meningiomas of 15-75 years’ age group were studied. RESULTS A higher incidence noted in females. Most of the tumours are solitary. The most common sites of occurrence are the cerebral convexities, parasagittal location/falx, posterior fossa, sphenoid ridge, olfactory groove. Majority were typical (WHO grade 1 in 96.6%, only 3.4% were atypical (WHO grade 2. Most of the tumours showed low signal on T1- (60% and high signal on T2- (68% and FLAIR (69% weighted images. Also, the lesions showed heterogeneous signal on T1 (60%, T2 (68% and FLAIR (64% sequences. After contrast administration, 67% of the tumours presented intense and 33% showed moderate and heterogenous enhancement. The most common sites of occurrence are the cerebral convexities, parasagittal location/falx, posterior fossa, sphenoid ridge, olfactory groove and others accounting for 33.3%, 20%, 20%, 10%, 6.7%, 10% respectively. Areas of vasogenic oedema around the tumours were seen in 33% of the cases. Twenty percent of the cases showed bone infiltration, and the dural tail sign was seen in 56% of the tumours. CONCLUSION The diagnosis of meningioma is usually straightforward except when it presents in unusual locations and with atypical imaging characteristics. MRI is the modality of choice for diagnosis as well as for predicting the success of its complete removal.

  9. Infantile fibrosarcoma: Magnetic resonance imaging findings in six cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canale, Sandra [Department of Radiology, Institut Gustave-Roussy, 39 rue Camille Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif (France)], E-mail: canalesandra@yahoo.com; Vanel, Daniel [Department of Radiology, Institut Gustave-Roussy, 39 rue Camille Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif (France); Istituti Ortopedici Rizzoli, 1/10 via di Barbiano, 40136 Bologna (Italy); Couanet, Dominique [Department of Radiology, Institut Gustave-Roussy, 39 rue Camille Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif (France); Patte, Catherine [Department of Pediatrics, Institut Gustave-Roussy, 39 rue Camille Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif (France); Caramella, Caroline; Dromain, Clarisse [Department of Radiology, Institut Gustave-Roussy, 39 rue Camille Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif (France)

    2009-10-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively review magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features in a series of six infantile fibrosarcomas to find out if MR can suggest this unusual diagnosis and to highlight the value of MR during and following treatment. Materials and methods: The records of six cases of histologically proven infantile fibrosarcoma were retrieved from the files of our cancer center. All imaging data available were consensually reviewed by two radiologists. Results: There were five females and one male (age range at diagnosis, 0-12 months; mean, 6 months). The most common finding was a well-circumscribed single mass in five patients (83%). All tumors had arisen on limbs; at their proximal or distal extremity or at the root of the limb. The masses were 9 cm large in mean diameter. The initial tumor signal was isointense to muscle on T1-weighted and hyperintense on T2-weighted sequences. All masses were well circumscribed and half of them contained internal fibrous septa. The internal signal was homogeneous in three patients and heterogeneous in the three others. An intense enhancement was seen in all three contrast-enhanced exams available; heterogeneous in two cases and homogeneous in one. Osseous erosion was observed in only one patient who was the only one with distant metastasis. After treatment (chemotherapy and very limited surgery), tumors had totally disappeared, leaving muscle fat infiltration in two patients and subcutaneous fat hypertrophy in one patient. Conclusion: Although imaging findings are not specific of infantile fibrosarcoma, this diagnosis could be suggested when MR imaging depicts a large well-circumscribed mass arising in a limb at birth or during the neonatal period. This mass is sometimes heterogeneous and septate and exhibits an isointense T1- and hyperintense T2-weighted signals and strong enhancement. MR is also the technique of choice for follow-up during treatment which consists nowadays almost exclusively in chemotherapy.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of paracoccidioidomycosis in the musculoskeletal system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savarese, Leonor G; Monsignore, Lucas M; de Andrade Hernandes, Mateus; Martinez, Roberto; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello H

    2015-10-01

    To describe magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in musculoskeletal paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM). Retrospective case series study after IRB approval. Two musculoskeletal radiologists reviewed in consensus the MRI findings of 11 patients with microbiologically and/or pathologically proven osteoarticular PCM. The MRI evaluation included discrimination of abnormalities in joints, bones and soft tissues. Mean age of patients was 29 years (10-55 years), eight men and three women. Musculoskeletal involvement was the only or the primary presentation of the disease in seven patients (63%). Osteomyelitis was the most common presentation, with seven cases (63%). Primary arthritis was found in one patient (9%). Isolated extra-articular soft tissue PCM was found in three patients: myositis (2) and subcutaneous infection (1). All cases showed regions with signal intensity higher than or similar to the signal of muscle on T1-weighted images. Penumbra sign was present in five cases (45%). T2-weighted images showed reactive soft tissue oedema in eight cases (72%). Post-gadolinium images showed peripheral (8/9) or heterogeneous (1/9) enhancement. Synovial enhancement was present in all cases of joint involvement (6/6). Lipomatosis arborescens was documented in one case of chronic knee involvement. To our knowledge, this is the first case series describing MRI findings of musculoskeletal PCM. Musculoskeletal involvement was the primary presentation of the disease in most cases, and therefore, neoplasms were initially in the differential diagnosis. Osteomyelitis was the most common presentation, often with secondary involvement of joint and or soft tissue. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. The relation between fornix injury and memory impairment in patients with diffuse axonal injury: a diffusion tensor imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Min Cheol; Kim, Seong Ho; Kim, Oh Lyong; Bai, Dai Seg; Jang, Sung Ho

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about the relation between fornix injury and memory impairment in diffuse axonal injury (DAI). In the current study, we attempted to investigate fornix injury in patients with memory impairment following DAI, using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Nine patients with DAI and nine age-and sex-matched control subjects were recruited. The DTIs were acquired using a sensitivity-encoding head coil on a 1.5 T. Five regions of interest (ROI) were drawn manually on a color fractional anisotropy (FA) map: two ROIs for each column, one ROI for the body, and two ROIs for each crus. The FA and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) were measured in each of the ROIs. Cognitive function was evaluated using the Memory Assessment Scale, Wechsler Intelligence Scale, and Mini-Mental State Exam. In the DAI group, the FA value in the fornix body was significantly decreased compared with that of the control group. In contrast, we did not find significant differences in the column and crus of the fornix. Among all of the cognitive function scales, only the Memory Assessment Scale scores were significantly correlated with the FA values of the fornix body in the DAI group. We found that memory impairment in patients with DAI is closely related to neuronal injury of the fornix body among the three fornix regions that we assessed. DTI could be useful in the evaluation of patients with memory impairment following DAI.

  12. Associations Between Spondyloarthritis Features and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnbak, Bodil; Grethe Jurik, Anne; Hørslev-Petersen, Kim

    2016-01-01

    were 1) to estimate the prevalence of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and clinical features included in the ASAS criteria for SpA and 2) to explore the associations between MRI findings and clinical features. METHODS: We included patients ages 18-40 years with persistent low back pain who had...... been referred to the Spine Centre of Southern Denmark. We collected information on clinical features (including HLA-B27 and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein) and MRI findings in the spine and sacroiliac (SI) joints. RESULTS: Of 1,020 included patients, 537 (53%) had at least 1 of the clinical...... features included in the ASAS criteria for SpA. Three clinical features were common-inflammatory back pain according to the ASAS criteria, a good response to nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and family history of SpA. The prevalence of these features ranged from 15% to 17%. Sacroiliitis on MRI...

  13. Deltoid ligament in acute ankle injury: MR imaging analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Min Sun; Choi, Yun Sun; Kim, Yun Jung; Jung, Yoon Young; Kim, Jin Su; Young, Ki Won

    2014-01-01

    To identify the pattern of deltoid ligament injury after acute ankle injury and the relationship between ankle fracture and deltoid ligament tear by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Thirty-six patients (32 male, and 4 female; mean age, 29.8 years) with acute deltoid ligament injury who had undergone MRI participated in this study. The deltoid ligament was classified as having 3 superficial and 2 deep components. An image analysis included the integrity and tear site of the deltoid ligament, and other associated injuries. Association between ankle fracture and deltoid ligament tear was assessed using Fisher's exact test (P < 0.05). Of the 36 patients, 21 (58.3 %) had tears in the superficial and deep deltoid ligaments, 6 (16.7 %) in the superficial ligaments only, and 4 (11.1 %) in the deep ligaments only. The most common tear site of the three components of the superficial deltoid and deep anterior tibiotalar ligaments was their proximal attachments (94 % and 91.7 % respectively), and that of the deep posterior tibiotalar ligament (pTTL) was its distal attachment (82.6 %). The common associated injuries were ankle fracture (63.9 %), syndesmosis tear (55.6 %), and lateral collateral ligament complex tear (44.4 %). All the components of the deltoid ligament were frequently torn in patients with ankle fractures (tibionavicular ligament, P = 0.009). The observed injury pattern of the deltoid ligament was complex and frequently associated with concomitant ankle pathology. The most common tear site of the superficial deltoid ligament was the medial malleolar attachment, whereas that of the deep pTTL was near its medial talar insertion. (orig.)

  14. Deltoid ligament in acute ankle injury: MR imaging analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Min Sun; Choi, Yun Sun; Kim, Yun Jung; Jung, Yoon Young [Eulji University, Department of Radiology, Eulji Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin Su; Young, Ki Won [Eulji University, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Eulji Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    To identify the pattern of deltoid ligament injury after acute ankle injury and the relationship between ankle fracture and deltoid ligament tear by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Thirty-six patients (32 male, and 4 female; mean age, 29.8 years) with acute deltoid ligament injury who had undergone MRI participated in this study. The deltoid ligament was classified as having 3 superficial and 2 deep components. An image analysis included the integrity and tear site of the deltoid ligament, and other associated injuries. Association between ankle fracture and deltoid ligament tear was assessed using Fisher's exact test (P < 0.05). Of the 36 patients, 21 (58.3 %) had tears in the superficial and deep deltoid ligaments, 6 (16.7 %) in the superficial ligaments only, and 4 (11.1 %) in the deep ligaments only. The most common tear site of the three components of the superficial deltoid and deep anterior tibiotalar ligaments was their proximal attachments (94 % and 91.7 % respectively), and that of the deep posterior tibiotalar ligament (pTTL) was its distal attachment (82.6 %). The common associated injuries were ankle fracture (63.9 %), syndesmosis tear (55.6 %), and lateral collateral ligament complex tear (44.4 %). All the components of the deltoid ligament were frequently torn in patients with ankle fractures (tibionavicular ligament, P = 0.009). The observed injury pattern of the deltoid ligament was complex and frequently associated with concomitant ankle pathology. The most common tear site of the superficial deltoid ligament was the medial malleolar attachment, whereas that of the deep pTTL was near its medial talar insertion. (orig.)

  15. Mutiple sclerosios of the spinal cord: MR imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Hoon; Chang, Kee Hyun; Kim, Sam Soo; Park, Byung Kwan; Seong, Chang Kyu; Han, Moon Hee; Cho, Yong Jin; Jeon, Beom Seok

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate the MR appearance of multiple sclerosis in the spinal cord. Between January 1990 and December 1996, we retrospectively analyzed 27 spinal MR images of 18 patients in whom-on the basis of Poser's diagnostic critera-multiple sclerosis of the spinal cord had been diagnosed. Eleven patients were men and seven were women, and they were aged between 18 and 58(mean, 37) years. Using T1-weighted sagittal(n=3D27), T2-weighted axial(n=3D26) and sagittal(n=3D27), and contrast enhanced T1-weighted(n=3D14) images, lesions were analyzed for multiplicity, location, length, cross-sectional area and location, cord size, and enhancement pattern. Brain MR images(n=3D15) were also evaluated. In 14 of 18 patients, a solitary lesion was seen on initial MR imaging. Four of the 14 had double lesions, and on follow-up MR imaging at 2-5 months, five were seen to have double lesions. Eleven lesions were found in the cervical cord, and 12 in the thoracic cord, two were in the cervicothoracic and two in the thoracolumbar region. The length of 12 lesions was less than two vertebral heights, while 15 extended for more than two vertebral heights. Six lesions occupied less than 50% of the cross-sectional area of the cord and the other 20 occupied more than 50% of this area. Cord size was enlarged in 17 cases, unchanged in eight, and atrophic in two. Eight lesions in 14 patients who underwent enhanced MR imaging showed focal contrast enhancement; there was patchy enhacement in two, nodular enhancement in two, and linear enhancement in four. Among 15 MR images of the brain, high-signal intensity lesions, compatible with multiple sclerosis, were demonstrated in seven cases. Multiple sclerosis plaques in the spinal cord frequently extend for more than two vertebral body heights of either the cervical or thoracic level, occupy more than 50% of the cross-sectional area and manifest as enlarged cord. But the MR imaging findings, however, are nonspecific. Abnormalities were seen in

  16. Pulmonary MALT lymphoma: imaging findings in 24 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, L.J. [Dept. of Radiology, Royal Hospital Haslar, Hampshire (United Kingdom); Padley, S.P.G. [Dept. of Radiology, Royal Brompton Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Wotherspoon, A.C. [Dept. of Histopathology, Royal Marsden Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Nicholson, A.G. [Dept. of Histopathology, Royal Brompton Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2000-12-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the imaging features of pulmonary mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. The chest radiographs (n = 18) and CT scans (n = 17) of 24 patients (18 men and 6 women) aged 27-78 years (mean = 56 years), with a known diagnosis of pulmonary MALT lymphoma, were retrospectively reviewed by two radiologists and the imaging findings are described. Six of the 24 patients had a history of an autoimmune disorder and 1 patient had acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Multiple pulmonary lesions were identified in 19 of 24 patients (79 %) and solitary lesions in 4 of 24 patients (17 %). Diffuse pulmonary infiltration was present in 1 patient. Lesions included masses or mass-like areas of consolidation (n = 21) and pulmonary nodules (n = 18). Associated findings were air bronchograms, airway dilatation, a positive angiogram sign and a halo of ground-glass shadowing at lesion margins. Peribronchovascular thickening was also observed, as were hilar or mediastinal lymph node enlargement and pleural effusions or thickening. Although rare, the diagnosis of pulmonary MALT lymphoma should be considered in patients with the imaging features described, particularly when in association with an indolent clinical course or a history of autoimmune disease. (orig.)

  17. Quantitative analysis of histopathological findings using image processing software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horai, Yasushi; Kakimoto, Tetsuhiro; Takemoto, Kana; Tanaka, Masaharu

    2017-10-01

    In evaluating pathological changes in drug efficacy and toxicity studies, morphometric analysis can be quite robust. In this experiment, we examined whether morphometric changes of major pathological findings in various tissue specimens stained with hematoxylin and eosin could be recognized and quantified using image processing software. Using Tissue Studio, hypertrophy of hepatocytes and adrenocortical cells could be quantified based on the method of a previous report, but the regions of red pulp, white pulp, and marginal zones in the spleen could not be recognized when using one setting condition. Using Image-Pro Plus, lipid-derived vacuoles in the liver and mucin-derived vacuoles in the intestinal mucosa could be quantified using two criteria (area and/or roundness). Vacuoles derived from phospholipid could not be quantified when small lipid deposition coexisted in the liver and adrenal cortex. Mononuclear inflammatory cell infiltration in the liver could be quantified to some extent, except for specimens with many clustered infiltrating cells. Adipocyte size and the mean linear intercept could be quantified easily and efficiently using morphological processing and the macro tool equipped in Image-Pro Plus. These methodologies are expected to form a base system that can recognize morphometric features and analyze quantitatively pathological findings through the use of information technology.

  18. Finding of region of interest in radioisotope scintigraphy's images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glazs, A.; Lubans, A.

    2003-01-01

    The paper is about some problems, which arise, when physicians try to make diagnosis, using information from pictures, which are obtained at radioisotope scintigraphy. The algorithm of obtaining pictures' sets (called GFR) is described in this paper. The possible mistakes in diagnosis are also described. One reason of the mistakes is wrong detection the investigated organ's location. The new method is suggested for detection of organ's location in radioisotope scintigraphy's images' sets. Using of dynamic curves of pixels' intensities is suggested for solving of this problem. It is shown, why using of maximums of such curves is impossible for finding of the investigated organ's location in radioisotope scintigraphy's images sets. The using of integral expression is suggested to solve the problem. The suggested method allows finding and selecting of investigated organ's location in image's sequences (correction is not available in the existing methods). The results of using this method are present. The method can work fully automatically or with manual setting of threshold. (authors)

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of knee injuries in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, S.J. [Royal Liverpool Children`s NHS Trust, Alder Hey, Eaton Road, Liverpool L12 2AP (United Kingdom)

    1997-10-01

    The appearances of knee injuries on MR imaging are less well documented in children than adults. Some patterns of injury are shared by both groups of patients, e. g. meniscal damage. The frequency of specific injuries may differ, e. g. anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear. Congenital abnormality, coexistent pathology and previous treatment of the knee appear to be associated with meniscal problems. Discoid menisci are seen most frequently in children and have unique features on MR scans. Cruciate ligament tears are difficult to diagnose in the smallest children. The ACL may not be identified due to its small size. Normal bone marrow signal may be confused with marrow infiltration or bone microfracture. Radiographically occult fractures around the knee appear to be strongly associated with ligamentous injury as in adult patients. Osteochondral fractures, osteochondral lesions and articular cartilage damage are revealed on MR scans, but their long-term effects are uncertain. It is possible to diagnose a range of knee injuries on MR scans in children. The biggest diagnostic challenge is in pre-school children. (orig.). With 9 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of knee injuries in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, S.J.

    1997-01-01

    The appearances of knee injuries on MR imaging are less well documented in children than adults. Some patterns of injury are shared by both groups of patients, e. g. meniscal damage. The frequency of specific injuries may differ, e. g. anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear. Congenital abnormality, coexistent pathology and previous treatment of the knee appear to be associated with meniscal problems. Discoid menisci are seen most frequently in children and have unique features on MR scans. Cruciate ligament tears are difficult to diagnose in the smallest children. The ACL may not be identified due to its small size. Normal bone marrow signal may be confused with marrow infiltration or bone microfracture. Radiographically occult fractures around the knee appear to be strongly associated with ligamentous injury as in adult patients. Osteochondral fractures, osteochondral lesions and articular cartilage damage are revealed on MR scans, but their long-term effects are uncertain. It is possible to diagnose a range of knee injuries on MR scans in children. The biggest diagnostic challenge is in pre-school children. (orig.). With 9 figs., 1 tab

  1. Occipital condyle fracture and ligament injury: imaging by CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloom, A.I.; Neeman, Z.; Floman, Y.; Gomori, J.; Bar-Ziv, J.

    1996-01-01

    The true incidence of fracture of the occipital condyles is unknown. It may be associated with instability at the craniocervical joint. CT is the modality of choice for the demonstration of these fractures, but its use for imaging of the associated ligament injury has not been reported. In order to demonstrate normal anatomy, occipital condyle fracture and ligament injury, and to estimate the incidence of this lesion, 21 children and young adults with high-energy blunt craniocervical injury were examined prospectively. Thin-slice, axial, contiguous, CT was performed from the base of C2 to above the foramen magnum. Bone and soft tissue windows and coronal, sagittal, and curvilinear 2D reconstructions were performed. Five occipital condyle fractures were identified in four patients (19 %), with demonstration of alar ligament injury in two cases and local hematoma in one. In four, artifacts or rotation precluded assessment of ligaments. In all remaining cases normal bone and ligament anatomy was demonstrated. Fracture of the occipital condyles following craniocervical injury is not uncommon in children and young adults. Normal bone and ligament anatomy and pathology can be safely and clearly demonstrated in seriously injured patients and others using this CT technique. Increased awareness of this entity and a low threshold for performing CT should avoid the potentially serious consequences of a missed diagnosis. (orig.). With 8 figs., 2 tabs

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of developmental venous anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gökçe, E; Acu, B; Beyhan, M; Celikyay, F; Celikyay, R

    2014-06-01

    This study evaluated morphological features of developmental venous anomalies (DVAs) based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. The study also evaluated the factors affecting the visibility of DVAs on MRI. We reviewed contrast-enhanced MRIs of 75 patients with DVA. The images were selected from 1,165 consecutive cranial MRIs. The images were examined for the DVA location, the number of collecting veins, the collecting vein diameter, drainage veins and sinuses, any accompanying parenchymal abnormalities or lesions, and the DVA visibility on MRI. DVAs prevalence was determined as 6.4 %. A total of 88 DVAs were observed. Single DVAs were observed in 65 patients, two were observed in 7 patients and three were observed in 3 patients. The DVA caputs had deep localization most frequently in 54.5 % of patients. A total of 98 collecting veins were identified, with a single vein identified in 80 DVAs. A statistically significant difference (p = 0.000) was found in the diameter of the collecting veins between DVAs that were the visible and nonvisible on noncontrast MRI. Most frequently, a single DVA was observed in the patients. A DVA caput could be located in the deep, subcortical, juxtacortical or deep + subcortical and juxtacortical + subcortical regions. Increasing collecting vein diameter increased visibility on noncontrast MRI, and small DVAs could be overlooked, even with contrast-enhanced MRI series if the images were not examined carefully.

  3. Imaging findings and significance of deep neck space infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuang Qixin; Gu Yifeng; Du Lianjun; Zhu Lili; Pan Yuping; Li Minghua; Yang Shixun; Shang Kezhong; Yin Shankai

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study the imaging appearance of deep neck space cellulitis and abscess and to evaluate the diagnostic criteria of deep neck space infection. Methods: CT and MRI findings of 28 cases with deep neck space infection proved by clinical manifestation and pathology were analyzed, including 11 cases of retropharyngeal space, 5 cases of parapharyngeal space infection, 4 cases of masticator space infection, and 8 cases of multi-space infection. Results: CT and MRI could display the swelling of the soft tissues and displacement, reduction, or disappearance of lipoid space in the cellulitis. In inflammatory tissues, MRI imaging demonstrated hypointense or isointense signal on T 1 WI, and hyperintense signal changes on T 2 WI. In abscess, CT could display hypodensity in the center and boundary enhancement of the abscess. MRI could display obvious hyperintense signal on T 2 WI and boundary enhancement. Conclusion: CT and MRI could provide useful information for deep neck space cellulitis and abscess

  4. Imaging findings of mediastinal tuberculous lymphadenopathy in AIDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Dawei; Yuan Chunwang; Zhang Lijie; Jin Erhu; Ma Daqing

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate X-ray, CT and MRI features of mediastinal tuberculosis in AIDS. Methods: Images (including X-ray; CT and MRI) of 9 patients with AIDS associated hilar and mediastinal lymphonode tuberculosis were analysed retrospectively. All the cases were performed with chest X-ray and CT scan, of which 5 with enhanced CT scan and 1 with MRI. Results: In the hilar and mediastinal lymphonode tuberculosis complicated by AIDS, the enlarged lymph nodes were mostly located in region 7 (100%, 9/9), 77.8% cases (7/9) were in 4R and 55.6% (5/9) were in 2R. Conclusion: The imaging findings of hilar and mediastinal lymphonode tuberculosis in AIDS is characterized by the enlarged lymphnodes that can fuse together and encroach on the tissues outside the lymph nodes. CT and MRI scans are extraordinarily helpful to the diagnosis of such diseases. (authors)

  5. Whirling sign : an imaging finding indicating ovarian torsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, Jang Gyu; Kim, Young Hwa; Kim, Hyun Jung; Chang, Yu Jin; Kim, Young Tong; Cho, Won Soo; Bae, Won Kyung; Kim, Il Young

    1997-01-01

    To present a diagnostic sign on MRI and US in patients with ovarian torsion. We present characteristic imaging findings in eight patients with surgically-proven ovarian torsion. MRI was performed in four patients, CT in six and US in all patients;the procedures including eight transabdominal US (TAS) and three transvaginal US (TVS). In each study, imaging findings were analyzed for the appearance of twisted pedicle and the presence of a 'whirling sign'. The pedicle which indicates ovarian torsion was detected on MRI in all 4 patients, on TAS in 4/7, on TVS in 3/3, and on CT in 4/6. A specific 'whirling sign' was detected on MRI in 2/4 patients, on TAS in 2/4, and on TVS in all three. On CT a 'whirling sign' was not detected. The 'whirling sign' on both MRI and US is a characteristic finding of ovarian torsion;in a patient with adnexal mass and complaining of lower abdominal pain, the presence of this sign is very useful for the diagnosis of ovarian torsion

  6. Imaging findings of pulmonary vascular disorders in portal hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagasawa, Kenichi; Takahashi, Koji; Furuse, Makoto

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate and compare the imaging findings of hepatopulmonary syndrome and portopulmonary hypertension. We retrospectively reviewed the imaging findings of five patients with hepatopulmonary syndrome and four patients with portopulmonary hypertension. We evaluated chest radiographs, chest and abdominal computed tomography (CT) scans, 99m Tc-macroaggregated albumin (MAA) lung perfusion scans, and pulmonary angiograms. In patients with hepatopulmonary syndrome, the presence of peripheral pulmonary vascular dilatation was detected by chest radiograph, chest CT scan, and pulmonary angiogram, especially the basilar segment. 99m Tc-MAA lung perfusion scan showed extrapulmonary tracer distribution (brain, thyroid, and kidney), which revealed pulmonary right-left shunting. In patients with portopulmonary hypertension, chest radiographs and chest CT scans showed the classic findings of primary pulmonary hypertension. In patients with both disorders, extrahepatic features of portal hypertension including ascites, splenomegaly, and portosystemic collateral vessels were seen on abdominal CT. In conclusion, chest radiographs and CT in hepatopulmonary syndrome usually showed peripheral pulmonary vascular dilatation, whereas those in portopulmonary hypertension showed central pulmonary artery dilatation. The extrahepatic features of portal hypertension might be helpful for the diagnosis of both disorders. (author)

  7. Imaging findings and referral outcomes of rapid assessment stroke clinics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widjaja, E.; Manuel, D.; Hodgson, T.J.; Connolly, D.J.A.; Coley, S.C.; Romanowski, C.A.J.; Gaines, P.; Cleveland, T.; Thomas, S.; Griffiths, P.D.; Doyle, C.; Venables, G.S.

    2005-01-01

    AIM: A rapid assessment stroke clinic (RASC) was established to provide a rapid diagnostic service to individuals with suspected transient cerebral or ocular ischaemia or recovered non-hospitalized strokes. In this report we review imaging findings and clinical outcomes of patients proceeding to the carotid surgery programme. METHODS: Between October 2000 and December 2002, 1339 people attended the RASC. The findings of head CT and carotid Doppler ultrasound of the 1320 patients who underwent brain and carotid imaging were reviewed, and the number subsequently proceeding to carotid angiography and intervention was reported. RESULTS: CT head scans were normal in 57% of cases; 38% demonstrated ischaemia or infarction; and 3% yielded incidental or other significant findings not related to ischaemia. On screening with carotid Doppler ultrasound, 7.5% showed greater than 50% stenosis on the symptomatic side. A total of 83 patients (6.2%) proceeded to cerebral angiography and 65 (4.8%) underwent carotid endarterectomy or endovascular repair. CONCLUSION: Rapid-access neurovascular clinics are efficient in selecting patients for carotid intervention, but this is at a cost and the number of potential strokes prevented is small. Alternative management pathways based on immediate medical treatment need to be evaluated

  8. Diagnosis of cutaneous thermal burn injuries by multispectral imaging analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anselmo, V. J.; Zawacki, B. E.

    1978-01-01

    Special photographic or television image analysis is shown to be a potentially useful technique to assist the physician in the early diagnosis of thermal burn injury. A background on the medical and physiological problems of burns is presented. The proposed methodology for burns diagnosis from both the theoretical and clinical points of view is discussed. The television/computer system constructed to accomplish this analysis is described, and the clinical results are discussed.

  9. MR imaging and radiography of patients with cervical hyperextension-flexion injuries after car accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borchgrevink, G.E. [The Emergency Clinic, Trondheim Univ. Hospital (Norway); Smevik, O. [MR-Centre Medical Section, Trondheim Univ. Hospital (Norway); Nordby, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Trondheim Univ. Hospital (Norway); Rinck, P.A. [MR-Centre Medical Section, Trondheim Univ. Hospital (Norway); Stiles, T.C. [Dept. of Psychiatry and Behavioural Medicine, Trondheim Univ. (Norway); Lereim, I. [The Emergency Clinic, Trondheim Univ. Hospital (Norway)

    1995-07-01

    Fifty-two patients underwent MR imaging and conventional radiography of the neck within 4 days after a hyperextension-flexion injury. The patients also had follow-up investigations during the first 2 years. The images did not reveal any serious lesions in any of them. Based on the main MR and radiographical findings the patients were divided into 4 groups; no findings, posture abnormalities, spondylosis and disc pathology (from MR images) or reduced intervertebral space (from the radiographs). The outcomes of the different groups were compared with reference to neck stiffness, neck pain and headache during a 2-year follow-up period. The patient groups did not correspond completely when diagnosed from MR imaging and radiography. However, patients with pre-existing spondylosis had more symptoms when examined by both modalities. Based on the radiographs, the group with posture abnormalities had significant fewer symptoms than the other groups. (orig.).

  10. Prognosis of head injury. In relation to age, CT findings and the GCS on admission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Satoshi; Kamei, Ichiro; Ooiwa, Yoshitsugu; Hyotani, Genhachi; Yabumoto, Michio; Kuriyama, Tsuyoshi [Japanese Red Cross Society, Wakayama (Japan). Wakayama Medical Center; Kakishita, Koji; Inui, Yoshiro

    1996-02-01

    We have carried out a retrospective study of head injury patients to determine the factors that predict their outcomes. The subjects consisted of 74 head injury patients (Glasgow Coma Scale: 3-12) treated at our hospital from January, 1989 to March, 1994. Age, CT findings and the GCS on admission were investigated as outcome-predicting factors. CT findings were classified according to the TCDB (Traumatic Coma Data Bank) and the outcomes were evaluated using the Glasgow Outcome Scale 3 months after the head injury. In our study, the factors indicated favorable outcomes were as follows; age younger than 50 years old, GCS higher than 6, appearance of the basal cisterns on CT scan, existence of removable acute epidural hematoma. In contrast, the factors that indicated unfavorable outcomes were as follows; disappearance of the basal cisterns on CT scan, existence of apparent acute subdural hematoma and/or intracranial hematoma associated with cerebral contusion. Based on these findings, we can more accurately estimate the prognosis of head injury. (author)

  11. Epithelioid sarcoma: clinical, MR imaging and pathologic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanna, S.L.; Kaste, S.; Jenkins, J.J.; Hewan-Lowe, K.; Spence, J.V.; Gupta, M.; Monson, D.; Fletcher, B.D.

    2002-01-01

    Objective. To report and describe the MR imaging features of eight new cases of this rare soft tissue sarcoma and correlate them with the clinical and histologic findings.Design and patients. Retrospective analysis was carried out for the MR imaging characteristics and histologic findings of eight patients with pathologically proven epithelioid sarcoma and the literature was reviewed. Findings were correlated in each case with the patient's clinical presentation and eventual outcome.Results. The patients, whose primary tumors ranged from 2.5 cm to 19 cm in maximum dimension, were 1 to 90 years of age. Tumors involved the extremities (n=5), the scalp (n=2) and the paraspinal muscles (n=1). Five tumors presented as well-defined, frequently painful, deeply situated masses and three as subcutaneous nodules or cutaneous ulcers with no palpable mass. Four patients had associated regional lymphadenopathy and one had distant metastases at diagnosis. MR imaging showed tumor infiltration of adjacent tissues in seven patients. Signal characteristics reflected varying degrees of cellularity, and the presence of necrosis, hemorrhage, fibrosis, hyalinization and inflammation. Bone marrow involvement was demonstrated in one patient. Clinical outcomes were generally poor.Conclusions. Epithelioid sarcoma is an aggressive soft tissue sarcoma with a varied clinical presentation, growth pattern, MR signal characteristics and histologic picture. The tumor favors the distal extremities and is commonly infiltrative and accompanied by enlarged regional lymph nodes. This neoplasm may present as an intramuscular mass but should also be suspected in patients with ulcerating cutaneous nodules with or without regional lymphadenopathy. (orig.)

  12. Missed pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma: Assessment of early imaging findings on prediagnostic magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Kyung Mi; Kim, Seong Hyun, E-mail: sh6453.kim@samsung.com; Kim, Young Kon; Song, Kyoung Doo; Lee, Soon Jin; Choi, Dongil

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • MR imaging was superior to CT for the detection of early PDAC. • A focal lesion with no MPD interruption is common MR finding of early PDAC. • A mean volume doubling time of early PDAC was about five months. - Abstract: Objective: To investigate the early imaging findings and growth rate of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), and to assess whether MR imaging detects early PDAC better than CT. Materials and methods: The institutional review board approved this retrospective study and waived the requirement for informed consent. Twenty-two patients were included, and two radiologists, by consensus, assessed the presence of focal lesions, interruption of the main pancreatic duct (MPD), MPD dilatation, and pancreatitis, volume doubling time (VDT) of PDAC on prediagnostic MR imaging. Two other observers independently reviewed three image sets (CT images, unenhanced MR images, and unenhanced and contrast-enhanced MR images) for the detection of early PDAC. Paired Wilcoxon signed rank test and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis were used for statistical analyses. Results: In 20 (90.9%) patients, prediagnostic MR exams showed abnormality, and all of them showed focal lesions on the first abnormal prediagnostic MR exams. Thirteen lesions (65%) showed no MPD interruption and one lesion (5%) was accompanied by pancreatitis. The mean VDT of PDAC was 151.7 days (range, 18.3–417.8 days). Diagnostic performance of unenhanced MR images (Az, 0.971–0.989) and combined unenhanced and contrast-enhanced MR images (Az, 0.956–0.963) was significantly better than that of CT images (Az, 0.565–0.583; p < 0.01) for both observers, Conclusion: The most common early imaging finding of PDAC on prediagnostic MR exams was a focal lesion with no MPD interruption with a mean volume doubling time of five months. MR imaging was superior to CT for the detection of early PDAC.

  13. Imaging findings of perforative appendicitis: a pictorial review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopkins, K.L.; Patrick, L.E.; Ball, T.I. [Dept. of Radiology, Children' s Healthcare of Atlanta, Egleston, GA (United States)

    2001-03-01

    Appendicitis is common in children. Early diagnosis depends on recognition of characteristic signs and symptoms: right lower quadrant or periumbilical pain, localized tenderness, fever, and leukocytosis. Because these classic features may be difficult to elicit or masked by other complaints, the incidence of perforative appendicitis in children is high. This paper reviews the imaging sequelae with emphasis on CT and sonography findings. Areas of focus include abdominopelvic abscess, peritonitis, pyelephlebitis, pyelethrombosis, and hepatic abscess. Secondary involvement of the urinary and gastrointestinal tracts is also discussed. (orig.)

  14. Primary hyperoxaluria: spectrum of clinical and imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strauss, Sara B.; Levin, Terry L. [Children' s Hospital of Montefiore Medical Center, Division of Pediatric Radiology, Department of Radiology, Bronx, NY (United States); Waltuch, Temima; Kaskel, Frederick [Children' s Hospital at Montefiore Medical Center, Division of Pediatric Nephrology, Bronx, NY (United States); Bivin, William [Allegheny General Hospital, Department of Pathology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2017-01-15

    Primary hyperoxaluria is a rare autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism with three known subtypes. In primary hyperoxaluria type 1, the most common of the subtypes, a deficiency in the hepatic enzymes responsible for the metabolism of glycoxylate to glycine, leads to excessive levels of glyoxylate, which is converted to oxalate. The resultant elevation in serum and urinary oxalate that characterizes primary hyperoxaluria leads to calcium oxalate crystal deposition in multiple organ systems (oxalosis). We review the genetics, pathogenesis, variable clinical presentation and course of this disease as well as its treatment. Emphasis is placed on the characteristic imaging findings before and after definitive treatment with combined liver and renal transplantation. (orig.)

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging and radiographic findings of seal finger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marjelund, S.; Tikkakoski, T.; Isokangas, M.; Raeisaenen, S.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and radiographic findings of five patients with seal finger. Material and Methods: The MR images and radiographs of five patients with seal finger were retrospectively evaluated. MRI was performed on four patients in the subacute phase, and follow-up imaging was done on one of them at 5 months. One patient had MRI only at a later stage 5 years after onset. Radiographs were taken three times in the subacute phase and once at a later stage. One patient had had seal finger in another finger previously. Results: Short-tau inversion-recovery (STIR) sequence showed extensive subcutaneous soft tissue edema in all four patients in the subacute phase and tenosynovitis of the flexion tendons in two cases. Three patients had edema in 2-3 phalanges, and effusion in the distal interphalangeal (DIP) joint was seen in one case. At the later stage, no signal pathology in soft tissues or bones was seen in STIR images. In the subacute phase, radiographs showed digital soft-tissue swelling in three patients, and one patient had a narrowed DIP joint, periarticular osteoporosis, and a periosteal reaction. At the later stage, flexion contracture of the finger was seen. Conclusion: In addition to soft-tissue infection, seal finger causes bone marrow edema, tenosynovitis, and effusion in the interphalangeal joints visible as increased signal intensity in STIR images. Radiographs reveal periarticular osteoporosis with loss of cartilage in the subacute phase and flexion contracture at the later stage. MRI (STIR) allows more precise delineation of the inflammatory process compared to radiography

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging and radiographic findings of seal finger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marjelund, S.; Tikkakoski, T.; Isokangas, M.; Raeisaenen, S. [Oulu Univ. Hospital (Finland). Dept. of Radiology

    2006-12-15

    Purpose: To describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and radiographic findings of five patients with seal finger. Material and Methods: The MR images and radiographs of five patients with seal finger were retrospectively evaluated. MRI was performed on four patients in the subacute phase, and follow-up imaging was done on one of them at 5 months. One patient had MRI only at a later stage 5 years after onset. Radiographs were taken three times in the subacute phase and once at a later stage. One patient had had seal finger in another finger previously. Results: Short-tau inversion-recovery (STIR) sequence showed extensive subcutaneous soft tissue edema in all four patients in the subacute phase and tenosynovitis of the flexion tendons in two cases. Three patients had edema in 2-3 phalanges, and effusion in the distal interphalangeal (DIP) joint was seen in one case. At the later stage, no signal pathology in soft tissues or bones was seen in STIR images. In the subacute phase, radiographs showed digital soft-tissue swelling in three patients, and one patient had a narrowed DIP joint, periarticular osteoporosis, and a periosteal reaction. At the later stage, flexion contracture of the finger was seen. Conclusion: In addition to soft-tissue infection, seal finger causes bone marrow edema, tenosynovitis, and effusion in the interphalangeal joints visible as increased signal intensity in STIR images. Radiographs reveal periarticular osteoporosis with loss of cartilage in the subacute phase and flexion contracture at the later stage. MRI (STIR) allows more precise delineation of the inflammatory process compared to radiography.

  17. Brain magnetic resonance imaging findings in relapsing neuromyelitis optica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera-Gómez, José A; Quevedo-Sotolongo, L; González-Quevedo, A; Lima, S; Real-González, Y; Cristófol-Corominas, M; Romero-García, K; Ugarte-Sánchez, C; Jordán-González, J; de la Nuez, J E González; Lahera, J García; Tellez, R; Pedroso-Ibañez, I; Roca, R Rodríguez; Cabrera-Núñez, A Y

    2007-03-01

    Some studies showed abnormalities in brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of relapsing neuromyelitis optica (R-NMO) from 12 to 46%. These abnormalities are described as compatible/non-compatible with multiple sclerosis (MS). To describe the abnormal brain MRI lesions in R-NMO with imaging studies conducted with more sensitive white matter change techniques. Thirty patients with R-NMO were selected. All MRI brain studies were performed with a 1.5-T Siemens MRI system according to the Standardized MR Imaging Protocol for Multiple Sclerosis from the Consortium of MS Centers Consensus Guidelines. Brain MRI images were evaluated in 29 R-NMO cases because in one case the MRI images were not appropriate for the study. Of these 29 brain MRI studies, 19 cases (65.5%) had at least one or more lesions (1-57) and 10 were negative (34.4%). Brain MRI findings in 19 cases were characterized in T2/fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) by the presence of subcortical/deep white matter lesions in 16 (84.2%) cases (1-50), most of them 3 mm, were observed in 4 (21.05%) cases without cerebellar involvement. T1 studies demonstrated absence of hypointense regions. Optic nerve enhancement was observed in 6/19 patients (31.5%). None of the brain MRI abnormalities observed were compatible with Barkhof et al. criteria of MS. This study, based on a Cuban patient population, with long duration of disease, good sample size and detailed characterization by MRI, demonstrated the brain MRI pattern of R-NMO patients, which is different from MS.

  18. Predictive Factors of Gastrointestinal Caustic Injury According to Clinical and Endoscopic Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherie Quingking

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ingestion of caustic substances is the main reason for referral to Philippines National Poison Management and Control Center among other causes of acute poisoning. Rapid assessment of severity of injury is important for treatment and prognosis of these cases. This study was aimed to investigate the correlation of clinical factors with severity of gastrointestinal (GI mucosal injury. Methods: In this retrospective study, a total of 105 patients were included. Patients were categorized into two groups including 35 patients with low grade and 70 patients with high grade GI injury to compare the predictive value of clinical findings. Results: Mean (SD age of patients was 27 (10 and 47% of patients were male. Oral burns (P

  19. Imaging findings of bronchial atresia in fetuses, neonates and infants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alamo, Leonor; Meuli, Reto [University Hospital of Lausanne (CHUV) and University of Lausanne (UNIL), Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Lausanne (Switzerland); Vial, Yvan [University Hospital of Lausanne (CHUV) and University of Lausanne (UNIL), Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Lausanne (Switzerland); Gengler, Carole [University Hospital of Lausanne (CHUV) and University of Lausanne (UNIL), Department of Pathology, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2016-03-15

    Congenital lung malformations are increasingly detected before birth. However, bronchial atresia is rarely identified in utero and not always recognized in neonates. There are two types of atresia: (1) proximal, located at the level of the mainstem or the proximal lobar bronchi, which is extremely rare and usually lethal during pregnancy, causing a tremendous volume increase of the distal involved lung with secondary hypoplasia of the normal lung, and (2) peripheral, located at the segmental/subsegmental bronchial level, which may present as an isolated lesion or as part of a complex congenital malformation. Prenatal findings are mostly nonspecific. Postnatal exams show overinflated lung areas and focal bronchial dilations. The typical fluid-filled bronchoceles are not always observed in neonates but develop progressively in the first months of life. This pictorial essay describes the spectrum of imaging findings of bronchial atresia in fetuses, neonates and infants. (orig.)

  20. Imaging findings in primary intracranial atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parmar, Hemant; Shroff, Manohar [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); Hawkins, Cynthia [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Neuropathology, Toronto, ON (Canada); Bouffet, Eric [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Neuro-Oncology, Toronto, ON (Canada); Rutka, James [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Neurosurgery, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2006-02-01

    Intracranial atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors (AT/RT) are rare and extremely aggressive neoplasms seen primarily in childhood. Imaging features are often considered non-specific. However, correct diagnosis of AT/RT is important because these tumors have a markedly different clinical prognosis and require more aggressive therapy. To determine the imaging features of AT/RT. We retrospectively analyzed imaging findings in 11 patients with primary intracranial AT/RT presenting over a period of 5 years. CT (n=11), MR (n=7), clinical (n=11) and pathological (n=11) features were evaluated. FISH analysis showing monosomy of chromosome 22 (absence of bcr 22q11 locus) was available for three patients. Immunohistochemical staining for INI-1 (BAF47) was performed on all tumors. There were 11 patients, 6 boys and 5 girls. The age of presentation varied from 1 month to 15 years (average age 3 years 8 months). Six tumors were located in the posterior fossa and five in the supratentorial compartment. The tumors showed a hyperdense solid component (64%) that showed moderate to marked enhancement with contrast medium. On MR imaging, the predominant signal pattern was isointensity on T1-weighted images (57%) and T2 shortening with heterogeneity on T2-weighted images (86%). All tumors were large in size (average 4.2 x 3.7 cm), and there was a tendency for calcification (36%), hemorrhage (46%), necrosis (46%) and perifocal edema (100%). There was also a high tendency for subarachnoid dissemination, with five patients (46%) demonstrating brain and/or spinal metastasis. At follow-up (n=7), six patients showed local recurrence. At the time of recurrence, all these patients showed extensive leptomeningeal spread of the disease in both intracranial and intraspinal compartments. There are no specific imaging features for intracranial AT/RT. But a high tendency toward large size, a hyperdense solid component on CT scan with calcification, hemorrhage, necrosis and subarachnoid spread suggest

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging findings compared with histological findings of the labrum in hip osteoarthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanezaki, Shiho; Nakamura, Shigeru; Matsushita, Takashi [Teikyo University School of Medicine, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Yamamoto, Asako; Osawa, Marie [Teikyo University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2015-06-01

    Patients with disorders such as acetabular dysplasia or femoroacetabular impingement are at risk of developing hip osteoartbritis. Assessment of the cartilage and labrum in the hip joint based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been challenging because of the low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) due to its deep location, ball and socket structure, and small volume of those structures compared with the whole joint size. To achieve better imaging assessment, direct MR. arthrography (d-MRA) and other techniques such as T2* mapping, T2 mapping, Tlrho, and delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI (dGEMRIC) have been developed along with the increasing use of high-field MRI. In patients with no apparent osteoarthritic changes such as joint space narrowing or osteophyte and subchondral cyst formation on radiographs, these techniques can detect early cartilage or labral damage. A recently developed semiquantitative MRI-based scoring system for hip osteoarthritis includes evaluation of the labrum, and its application as a potential therapeutic monitoring tool is anticipated. The labrum shows pathological changes such as macroscopic hypertrophy and histological degeneration in hip osteoartbritis, but the pathological background is not well understood when evaluated by MRI. Kubo et al. compared radial MRI findings with histological changes of the labrum in ll hips with osteoarthritis using 1.5-T MRJ and found that fibrous separation and mucoid deposition occurred in the labrum with a ''diffuse high signal'' or ''obscure'' pattern. However, to the best of our knowledge, no studies have demonstrated a correlation between MRI fmdings and histological evidence of the severity of degeneration of the labrum. We hypothesized that radially reconstructed images of the acetabular labrum acquired by 3-T MRI can depict degenerative changes of the labrum. In this study, we sought to determine the correlation between MRI and histological findings of the

  2. Diagnostic Value of Early Magnetic Resonance Imaging After Acute Lateral Ankle Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jason R; Dunn, Karl W; Ciliberti, Louis J; Eldridge, Stephanie W; Reed, Lauren D

    We report a retrospective study of 171 consecutive patients with a lateral ankle sprain. All the patients with direct or blunt force trauma were excluded. Within 21 days of injury, 115 (67.25%) patients had undergone magnetic resonance imaging to evaluate for more serious or significant injuries. The average patient age was 44.09 years. Of the 115 patients, 75 (65.23%) had findings noted to be "significant." MRI can serve as a valuable and underused tool in the evaluation of acute lateral ankle injuries. The underuse of MRI might explain the high degree of variability in patients recovering from a lateral ankle sprain. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Sequential variation in brain functional magnetic resonance imaging after peripheral nerve injury: A rat study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishi, Okihiro; Ikoma, Kazuya; Oda, Ryo; Yamazaki, Tetsuro; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Yamada, Shunji; Tanaka, Masaki; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2018-03-07

    Although treatment protocols are available, patients experience both acute neuropathic pain and chronic neuropathic pain, hyperalgesia, and allodynia after peripheral nerve injury. The purpose of this study was to identify the brain regions activated after peripheral nerve injury using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) sequentially and assess the relevance of the imaging results using histological findings. To model peripheral nerve injury in male Sprague-Dawley rats, the right sciatic nerve was crushed using an aneurysm clip, under general anesthesia. We used a 7.04T MRI system. T 2 * weighted image, coronal slice, repetition time, 7 ms; echo time, 3.3 ms; field of view, 30 mm × 30 mm; pixel matrix, 64 × 64 by zero-filling; slice thickness, 2 mm; numbers of slices, 9; numbers of average, 2; and flip angle, 8°. fMR images were acquired during electrical stimulation to the rat's foot sole; after 90 min, c-Fos immunohistochemical staining of the brain was performed in rats with induced peripheral nerve injury for 3, 6, and 9 weeks. Data were pre-processed by realignment in the Statistical Parametric Mapping 8 software. A General Linear Model first level analysis was used to obtain T-values. One week after the injury, significant changes were detected in the cingulate cortex, insular cortex, amygdala, and basal ganglia; at 6 weeks, the brain regions with significant changes in signal density were contracted; at 9 weeks, the amygdala and hippocampus showed activation. Histological findings of the rat brain supported the fMRI findings. We detected sequential activation in the rat brain using fMRI after sciatic nerve injury. Many brain regions were activated during the acute stage of peripheral nerve injury. Conversely, during the chronic stage, activation of the amygdala and hippocampus may be related to chronic-stage hyperalgesia, allodynia, and chronic neuropathic pain. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Imaging findings of Hoffa's fat pad herniation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chauvin, Nancy A.; Khwaja, Asef [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Epelman, Monica [Nemours Children' s Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Orlando, FL (United States); Callahan, Michael J. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston Children' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-04-15

    We report the radiologic findings of herniation of Hoffa's fat pad through a defect in the lateral patellar retinaculum in young children who presented with painless masses visible by ultrasound (US) only with flexion of the knee. Six children, between the ages of 1-8 years, presented with an anterolateral knee mass that was not tender and was only seen and palpable with knee flexion. An US was performed in all patients, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 2 patients and knee radiographs in 1 patient. US imaging displayed focal herniation of Hoffa's fat pad within the infrapatellar region through a defect of the lateral retinaculum, visible only during dynamic imaging when the knee was in flexion. MRI performed in knee extension did not demonstrate a mass; however, it revealed a focal defect in the lateral retinaculum in the region of the abnormality. Radiographs were normal. Focal herniation of Hoffa's fat pad is an uncommon cause of an anterolateral knee mass in young children. When a knee mass is only identified in flexion, focal fat herniation through a defect in the retinaculum should be suspected and a dynamic US should be performed. (orig.)

  5. Primary colorectal lymphoma: spectrum of imaging findings with pathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyun Ju; Han, Joon Koo; Kim, Tae Kyoung; Kim, Young Hoon; Kim, Ah Young; Kim, Kyoung Won; Choi, Ja Young; Choi, Byung Ihn

    2002-01-01

    Primary colorectal lymphoma is a very uncommon disease; therefore, it has received little attention in the radiology literature. Moreover, imaging features of newly described pathologic subtypes have not been reported such as low-grade B-cell lymphoma arising from mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue and peripheral T-cell lymphoma that involves colorectal area. We retrospectively reviewed double-contrast barium enema and CT scans in the patients with primary colorectal lymphoma. In this article the radiologic appearances of primary colorectal lymphoma are categorized into focal lesion and diffuse lesion. Focal lesion includes polypoid mass, circumferential infiltration with smooth mucosal surface, circumferential infiltration with extensive ulceration, cavitary mass, mucosal nodularity, and mucosal fold thickening. Diffuse lesion includes diffuse ulcerative lesion and diffuse nodular lesion. Peripheral T-cell lymphomas that involve the colon manifested as either a diffuse or focal segmental lesion and showed extensive mucosal ulceration. These findings are similar to those of Crohn's disease or tuberculous colitis and are different from those of previously reported colorectal lymphoma. Low-grade B-cell lymphoma arising from mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue manifest as multiple mucosal nodularity. The imaging features of primary colorectal lymphoma are quite variable and overlap with other colonic pathology; however, it is important for radiologists to know the imaging features of primary colorectal lymphoma with their pathologic correlation. (orig.)

  6. Radiation myelopathy in over-irradiated patients: MR imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfonso, E.R.; Gregorio, M.A. de; Mateo, P.; Esco, R.; Bascon, N.; Morales, F.; Bellosta, R.; Lopez, P.; Gimeno, M.; Roca, M.; Villavieja, J.L.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this work is to report the MRI findings in patients with radiation myelopathy due to accidental local over-irradiation syndrome. Eight patients (seven males and one female) were suffering from over-irradiation syndrome as a result of treatments from a malfunctioning linear electron accelerator. The mean accidental estimated dose was 136 Gy delivered to the ''open-neck'' (seven cases) and to the thoracic wall (one case), during a mean of 5.4 sessions (range 1-9 sessions). Paresthesia and weakness in the upper extremities were the earliest symptoms (87.5 %), with evolution to paralysis in all patients. No patient is alive (mean survival time 64 days). In all cases MRI was negative for neurologic lesions in the acute phase (< 90 days from irradiation; Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scoring system). Late signs of radiation myelitis manifested as high-intensity signals on T2-weighted images in three patients, and as Gd-DTPA enhancement of T1-weighted images in one case. Autopsies performed on four patients who died in acute phase showed morphologic alterations in white matter: edema in 75 %, and necrosis and glial reaction as well as obliterative vasculitis in all cases. In cases of over-irradiation, MRI may be normal in acute phase even if the patients have severe neurologic deficit, as positive MRI findings appear only in delayed radiation myelitis. (orig.). With 3 figs., 2 tabs

  7. MR imaging in severe upper cervical spinal cord injury in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, H.J.; Steele, N.; Tilton, A.; Bodin, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper demonstrates that MR imaging of the cervical spine in patients with upper cervical spinal cord injury can accurately define the extent of cord injury for prognostic and rehabilitative purpose. Seven patients, ages newborn to 11 y, had acute upper cervical spinal cord injury and required continuous respiratory assistance. All patients had cervical spine radiography initially, but the extent of injuries precluded transport for early MR imaging. One or more MR imaging studies were done when the acute injury phase subsided. Manual ventilatory support by Ambu bag with oxygen was combined with careful respiratory and cardiac monitoring during imaging

  8. Imaging findings of primary synovial sarcoma of the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guan Yubao; Chen Ling; Zeng Qingsi; Zheng Xiaotao; Chen Huai; Zhang Chaoliang; Cen Renli; Gu Yingying

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the imaging characteristics of primary pulmonary synovial sarcoma and improve its diagnosis and differential diagnosis. Methods: The clinical, imaging and pathology findings of 5 patients were retrospectively analyzed. All 5 patients received X-ray and CT scan, 1 case had MRI and PET-CT examination. SYT-SSX fusion gene was analyzed in 4 patients using reverse transcriptase- polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results: All the 5 patients had solid mass in the lungs and their diameter were 5.3 to 15.7 cm. One was associated with pneumothorax and the others were with moderate pleural effusion. Peripheral tumors, which showed clear margin partly with inhomogeneous density, was found in CT scan. On the contrast-enhanced CT scan, 3 cases were inhomogeneous enhancement and 2 were circular enhancement. Pleural invasion or conglutination was detected in 5 patients. No hilar or mediastinal lymph nodes metastasis were seen in all eases. MRI showed intermediate signal on T 1 WI and heterogeneous on T 2 WI of one case with right upper lobe lesion and showed thick mural enhancement after Gadolinium enhancement. The adjacent chest wall, rib thoracic vertebra, vertebral canal and thoracic cord were invaded. PET-CT showed increased uptake of FDG (SUV=12.3) in tumors. The immunohistochemical examination of Vim, CK and EMA were positive and SYT-SSX gene was detected in 4 patients. Conclusions: There are some relatively specific imaging findings of primary pulmonary synovial sarcoma. However it is necessary for diagnosing the disease to combine pathology, immunohistochemistry and SYT-SSX gene detection. (authors)

  9. Diagnostic imaging of sport related musculoskeletal system injuries; Diagnostico por imagem nas lesoes do sistema musculo-esqueletico relacionadas ao esporte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Artur da Rocha Correa; Schivartche, Vivian [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Diagnostico por Imagem

    1998-07-01

    The authors review the literature about musculoskeletal injuries related to sports, emphasizing the main findings with different imaging methods. They also present the specific characteristics of each method. (author) 34 refs., 9 figs.

  10. Intention tremor after head injury. Clinical features and computed tomographic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwadate, Yasuo; Saeki, Naokatsu; Namba, Hiroki; Odaki, Masaru; Oka, Nobuo.

    1989-02-01

    Eight cases of intention tremor as a late complication of head injury were investigated. The patients ranged in age from 3 to 24 years. All received severe head injuries and lapsed into coma immediately afterward (Glasgow Coma Scale scores /le/8). Six patients exhibited decerebration or decortication. Hemiparesis was present in six cases and oculomotor nerve palsy in four. In the chronic stage, all patients displayed some degree of impairment of higher cortical function and five had dysarthria and/or ataxia. Initial computed tomography (CT) scans within 3 hours after the injury were obtained in five cases, of which four showed a hemorrhagic lesion in the midbrain or its surroundings. Other CT findings were diffuse cerebral swelling (four cases), intraventricular hemorrhage (three), and multiple hemorrhagic lesions (two). In the chronic stage, generalized cortical atrophy or ventricular enlargement was noted in five cases. These clinical features and CT findings indicate diffuse brain damage as well as midbrain damage and may reflect shearing injury. (author).

  11. Clinical Utility of '99mTc-HMPAO Brain SPECT Findings in Chronic Head Injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Jin ll; Chung, Tae Sub; Suh, Jung Ho; Kim, Dong Ik; Lee, Jong Doo; Park, Chang Yoon; Kim, Young Soo

    1992-01-01

    Minima deterioration of cerebral perfusion or microanatomical changes were undetectable on conventional Brain CT or MRI. So evaluation of focal functional changes of the brain parenchyme is essential in chronic head injury patients, who did not show focal anatomical changes on these radiological studies. However, the patients who had longstanding neurologic sequelae following head injury, there had been no available imaging modalities for evaluating these patients precisely. Therefore we tried to detect the focal functional changes on the brain parenchyme using 99m Tc-HMPAO Brain SPECT on the patients of chronic head injuries. Twenty three patients who had suffered from headache, memory dysfunction, personality change and insomnia lasting more than six months following head injury were included in our cases, which showed no anatomical abnormalities on Brain CT or MRI. At first they underwent psychological test whether the symptoms were organic or not. Also we were able to evaluate the cerebral perfusion changes with 99m Tc-HMPAO Brain SPECT in 22 patients among the 23, which five patients were focal and 17 patients were nonfocally diffuse perfusion changes. Thus we can predict the perfusion changes such as local vascular deterioration or functional defects using 99m Tc-HMPAO Brain SPECT in the patients who had suffered from post-traumatic sequelae, which changes were undetectable on Brain CT or MRI.

  12. MRI of the hand and wrist joint of climbers. Imaging of lesions and overstrain injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuck, A.; Hochholzer, T.; Keinath, C.

    1992-01-01

    The hands and wrists of 20 top-level rock climbers with sports injuries and overstress abnormalities were compared with the hands and wrists of 10 normal volunteers. They were all studied with MR imaging at 1.5 T. The imaging protocol included spin-echo and gradient-echo sequences with 1- to 5-mm-thick contiguous slices in the axial, coronal and/or sagittal planes, depending on the location and nature of the suspected injury. Typical hand and wrist lesions depicted with MRI in climbers consisted of annular ligament tears, lesions of the flexor tendons, tenosynovitis, ganglion cysts, joint effusion and functional carpal tunnel syndrome. The MRI findings on these abnormalities were compared to normal findings and those with ultrasound and plain films. In addition, hypertrophic changes in the muscles, tendons, ligaments, and bones of top-level rock climbers were assessed morphometrically. MRI proved to be the superior imaging modality in the diagnosis of sports injuries and overstress abnormalities of the hand the wrist in rock-climbing athletes. (orig.) [de

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in mild and moderate head injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokota, Hiroyuki; Nakazawa, Shozo; Okada, Takurou; Kobayashi, Shiro; Yajima, Kouzo (Nippon Medical School, Tokyo (Japan)); Tsuji, Yukihide

    1991-02-01

    One hundred and fifty-nine patients admitted for mild or moderate head injuries were studied in order to establish the advantage of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) over computerized tomography (CT) in the acute stage. One hundred and twenty-three lesions were demonstrated by MRI in 106 patients. In contrast, CT demonstrated only 74 lesions in 76 patients. The advantage of MRI over CT in the imaging of these lesions was remarkable in cases of basal skull fractures or lesions in the cerebral parenchyma, especially in case of non-hemorrhagic contusions or focal brain edemas. MRI was superior to CT in demonstrating these lesions in 64 patients of our series. However, in 6 cases of subarachnoid hemorrhage located in the Sylvian fissure, CT was superior to MRI. It was thought that lesions were less commonly demonstrated by CT in cases of mild or moderate head injuries. However, many lesions were confirmed by MRI in these cases. MRI was thus found to be far superior to CT in demonstrating intracranial lesions in mild or moderate head injuries. (author).

  14. Memory deficits due to brain injury: unique PET findings and dream alterations

    OpenAIRE

    Nishida, Masaki; Nariai, Tadashi; Hiura, Mikio; Ishii, Kenji; Nishikawa, Toru

    2011-01-01

    The authors herein report the case of a young male with memory deficits due to a traumatic head injury, who presented with sleep-related symptoms such as hypersomnia and dream alterations. Although MRI and polysomnography showed no abnormalities, 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and 11C flumazenil (FMZ)-PET revealed findings consistent with cerebral damage to the affected temporal region. The memory deficit of the patient gradually improved in parallel with the re...

  15. Imaging findings in children with proliferative disorders following multivisceral transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hryhorczuk, Anastasia L.; Kim, Heung Bae; Harris, Marian H.; Vargas, Sara O.; Zurakowski, David; Lee, Edward Y.

    2015-01-01

    Multivisceral transplantation represents an important treatment option for children with intestinal failure. The attendant immunosuppression can lead to a spectrum of cellular proliferations including benign and malignant smooth muscle tumors and lymphoproliferative disorders, many related to cellular dysregulation from Epstein-Barr virus infection. The purpose of this study is to investigate the rates of post-transplantation proliferative disorders among children with multivisceral transplantation and to characterize the imaging and pathological features of these disorders. We identified all consecutive children who underwent multivisceral transplant from August 2004 to October 2011 with at least 27 months of clinical and imaging follow-up. We reviewed medical records to determine the underlying causes of the multivisceral transplant, age at transplantation, onset of neoplasm development, and outcome. Two pediatric radiologists reviewed all imaging studies independently and diagnosis of disease was made by consensus interpretation. Pathological specimens were reviewed for histopathological findings of post-transplantation neoplasm in this pediatric patient population. The study population consisted of 14 consecutive pediatric patients (7 boys and 7 girls; mean age 26 months, range 4-113 months). Of these 14 children, 4 (29%) developed histologically confirmed post-transplant neoplasms at a mean time of 2.4 years after multivisceral transplantation. Types of neoplasms included post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) in three (21%) and Epstein-Barr-virus-associated smooth muscle tumor in two (14%). (One child developed both neoplasms following transplantation). Both children with smooth muscle tumor associated with Epstein-Barr virus presented with characteristic hypointense solid masses with peripheral rim enhancement on cross-sectional imaging studies. The mortality rate of children who developed post-transplant neoplasms was higher than that of those

  16. Imaging findings in children with proliferative disorders following multivisceral transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hryhorczuk, Anastasia L. [Tufts Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Kim, Heung Bae [Boston Children' s Hospital, Department of Surgery, Boston, MA (United States); Harris, Marian H.; Vargas, Sara O. [Boston Children' s Hospital, Department of Pathology, Boston, MA (United States); Zurakowski, David [Boston Children' s Hospital, Department of Biostatistics, Boston, MA (United States); Lee, Edward Y. [Boston Children' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Departments of Radiology and Medicine, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Multivisceral transplantation represents an important treatment option for children with intestinal failure. The attendant immunosuppression can lead to a spectrum of cellular proliferations including benign and malignant smooth muscle tumors and lymphoproliferative disorders, many related to cellular dysregulation from Epstein-Barr virus infection. The purpose of this study is to investigate the rates of post-transplantation proliferative disorders among children with multivisceral transplantation and to characterize the imaging and pathological features of these disorders. We identified all consecutive children who underwent multivisceral transplant from August 2004 to October 2011 with at least 27 months of clinical and imaging follow-up. We reviewed medical records to determine the underlying causes of the multivisceral transplant, age at transplantation, onset of neoplasm development, and outcome. Two pediatric radiologists reviewed all imaging studies independently and diagnosis of disease was made by consensus interpretation. Pathological specimens were reviewed for histopathological findings of post-transplantation neoplasm in this pediatric patient population. The study population consisted of 14 consecutive pediatric patients (7 boys and 7 girls; mean age 26 months, range 4-113 months). Of these 14 children, 4 (29%) developed histologically confirmed post-transplant neoplasms at a mean time of 2.4 years after multivisceral transplantation. Types of neoplasms included post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) in three (21%) and Epstein-Barr-virus-associated smooth muscle tumor in two (14%). (One child developed both neoplasms following transplantation). Both children with smooth muscle tumor associated with Epstein-Barr virus presented with characteristic hypointense solid masses with peripheral rim enhancement on cross-sectional imaging studies. The mortality rate of children who developed post-transplant neoplasms was higher than that of those

  17. Diagnostic Accuracy of Clinical Examination and Imaging Findings for Identifying Subacromial Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadogan, Angela; McNair, Peter J; Laslett, Mark; Hing, Wayne A

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis of subacromial pathology is limited by the poor accuracy of clinical tests for specific pathologies. The aim of this study was to estimate the diagnostic accuracy of clinical examination and imaging features for identifying subacromial pain (SAP) defined by a positive response to diagnostic injection, and to evaluate the influence of imaging findings on the clinical diagnosis of SAP. In a prospective, diagnostic accuracy design, 208 consecutive patients presenting to their primary healthcare practitioner for the first time with a new episode of shoulder pain were recruited. All participants underwent a standardized clinical examination, shoulder x-ray series and diagnostic ultrasound scan. Results were compared with the response to a diagnostic block of xylocaineTM injected into the SAB under ultrasound guidance using ≥80% post-injection reduction in pain intensity as the positive anaesthetic response (PAR) criterion. Diagnostic accuracy statistics were calculated for combinations of clinical and imaging variables demonstrating the highest likelihood of a PAR. A PAR was reported by 34% of participants. In participants with no loss of passive external rotation, combinations of three clinical variables (anterior shoulder pain, strain injury, absence of symptoms at end-range external rotation (in abduction)) demonstrated 100% specificity for a PAR when all three were positive (LR+ infinity; 95%CI 2.9, infinity). A full-thickness supraspinatus tear on ultrasound increased the likelihood of a PAR irrespective of age (specificity 98% (95%CI 94, 100); LR+ 6.2; 95% CI 1.5, 25.7)). Imaging did not improve the ability to rule-out a PAR. Combinations of clinical examination findings and a full-thickness supraspinatus tear on ultrasound scan can help confirm, but not exclude, the presence of subacromial pain. Other imaging findings were of limited value for diagnosing SAP.

  18. Images of God used by self-injurious burn patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossoehme, D H; Springer, L S

    1999-08-01

    Suicide by burning and other forms of self-injurious behaviors which involve burning are sometimes considered to have religious overtones. The ritual death of widows upon their husband's funeral pyre is closely associated with Hindu beliefs. Buddhists have used self-immolation as a form of protest. The Judaeo-Christian traditions have imagery of fire as cleansing and purifying; there is also secular imagery associating fire with images of condemnation and evil. Previous studies have described religiosity as a common theme among survivors. The present study describes the ways in which persons who inflicted self-injurious behaviors through burning, including attempted suicide, imagine the Divinity and use religious language to give meaning to their experience.

  19. Post-traumatic and stress-induced osteolysis of the distal clavicle: MR imaging findings in 17 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puente, R. de la; Boutin, R.D.; Theodorou, D.J.; Hooper, A.; Resnick, D.; Schweitzer, M.

    1999-01-01

    Objective. To describe the MR imaging findings in patients with osteolysis of the distal clavicle and to compare the MR imaging appearance of clavicular osteolysis following acute injury with that related to chronic stress. Design and patients. MR imaging examinations were reviewed in 17 patients (14 men, 3 women; ages 16-55 years) with the diagnosis of post-traumatic or stress-induced osteolysis of the clavicle. A history of a single direct injury was present in seven patients and a history of weight-lifting, participation in sports, or repetitive microtrauma was present in 10 patients. Results. MR imaging showed edema in the distal clavicle in 17 patients and, of these, eight also had edema in the acromion. The edema was most evident in STIR and fat-suppressed T2-weighted pulse sequences. Other findings about the acromioclavicular (AC) joint were prominence of the joint capsule in 14, joint fluid in eight, cortical irregularity in 12, and bone fragmentation in six patients. No differences in the MR imaging features of post-traumatic and stress-induced osteolysis of the distal clavicle were observed. Conclusion. Post-traumatic and stress-induced osteolysis of the distal clavicle have similar appearances on MR imaging, the most common and conspicuous MR imaging feature being increased T2 signal intensity in the distal clavicle. (orig.)

  20. Imaging findings of juvenile xanthogranuloma of the penis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradford, Ray K. [Penn State College of Medicine, Hershey, PA (United States); Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, PA (United States); Choudhary, Arabinda K. [Hershey Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Hershey, PA (United States)

    2009-02-15

    Juvenile xanthogranuloma (JXG) is a rare benign self-limiting lesion presenting in early childhood. It is the commonest variant of non-Langerhans cell histiocytosis and usually presents as a cutaneous mass. It might have a systemic component and also might be associated with other conditions, notably neurofibromatosis and juvenile chronic myelogenous leukemia. Penile masses are unusual in childhood and we describe a case of JXG involving the penis. Although four cases of JXG of the penis have been reported in the literature, this is the first with imaging of the penile lesion. We discuss the clinical and radiological findings, differential diagnosis and management of these cases. High awareness of these lesions in the differential diagnosis of penile masses presenting in early childhood is important to avoid potentially unnecessary ablative genital surgery. Careful assessment should also be made for any systemic involvement and for associated pathologies. (orig.)

  1. Imaging findings of juvenile xanthogranuloma of the penis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradford, Ray K.; Choudhary, Arabinda K.

    2009-01-01

    Juvenile xanthogranuloma (JXG) is a rare benign self-limiting lesion presenting in early childhood. It is the commonest variant of non-Langerhans cell histiocytosis and usually presents as a cutaneous mass. It might have a systemic component and also might be associated with other conditions, notably neurofibromatosis and juvenile chronic myelogenous leukemia. Penile masses are unusual in childhood and we describe a case of JXG involving the penis. Although four cases of JXG of the penis have been reported in the literature, this is the first with imaging of the penile lesion. We discuss the clinical and radiological findings, differential diagnosis and management of these cases. High awareness of these lesions in the differential diagnosis of penile masses presenting in early childhood is important to avoid potentially unnecessary ablative genital surgery. Careful assessment should also be made for any systemic involvement and for associated pathologies. (orig.)

  2. Imaging findings of primary immunoglobulin G4-related cervical lymphadenopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawaguchi, Masaya; Kato, Hiroki; Goshima, Satoshi; Matsuo, Masayuki [Gifu University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Gifu (Japan); Kito, Yusuke [Gifu University School of Medicine, Department of Pathology and Translational Research, Gifu (Japan); Mizuta, Keisuke; Aoki, Mitsuhiro [Gifu University School of Medicine, Department of Otolaryngology, Gifu (Japan); Kato, Keizo [Gifu University School of Medicine, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Sciences, Gifu (Japan)

    2017-11-15

    The purpose of the present study was to assess imaging findings of primary immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4)-related cervical lymphadenopathy. Five consecutive patients with clinically, serologically, and histopathologically confirmed primary IgG4-related cervical lymphadenopathy without any other organ involvement were included. All patients underwent contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT), and four underwent {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET)/CT. We retrospectively reviewed the images and assessed the number, size, location, central necrosis, perinodal infiltration, penetrating vessels, and maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmax) of the enlarged cervical nodes. Thirteen enlarged cervical nodes measuring larger than 10 mm in minimum diameter were identified. The maximum and minimum diameter of enlarged nodes ranged from 1.2 to 3.2 cm (median, 1.8 cm) and from 1.0 to 1.9 cm (median, 1.2 cm), respectively. Lymphadenopathy was unilateral in all patients, and eight enlarged nodes were located at level IB (62%), one at level II (8%), three at level IV (23%), and one at level V (8%). Central necrosis was not seen in any nodes. Perinodal infiltration was seen in only one node (8%), and penetrating vessels were seen in seven nodes (54%). The median SUVmax of nine nodes was 4.45 (range, 2.08-12.44). Eight enlarged nodes (62%) were located in the submandibular region. Central necrosis was not observed in any nodes and perinodal infiltration was observed in one node (8%). (orig.)

  3. Craniocervical artery dissection: MR imaging and MR angiographic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oelerich, M.; Schuierer, G.; Stoegbauer, F.; Kurlemann, G.; Schul, C.

    1999-01-01

    Dissection of the carotid and vertebral arteries is a not so uncommon cause of stroke and has to be considered as a differential diagnosis especially in younger patients. Therapeutic and prognostic implications are different from those in extracranial atherosclerotic disease. Dissection results from hemorrhage into the vessel wall usually between the layers of the media. Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) depicts the resulting luminal compromise that may reveal some typical, but not specific, findings. The same is true for non-invasive angiographic techniques such as time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and computed tomography angiography (CTA), which have shown accurate results compared with DSA. The main advantage of these techniques is the direct visualization of the vessel wall confirming the intramural hematoma. This is achieved best with MR imaging due to the high signal of blood degradation products on T1- and T2-weighted images. Therefore, MRI in combination with MRA is presently the method of choice for initial diagnosis and follow-up of craniocervical artery dissection (CCAD). In some questionable cases, CTA is a non-invasive alternative that is independent of flow phenomena. (orig.)

  4. Craniocervical artery dissection: MR imaging and MR angiographic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oelerich, M.; Schuierer, G. [Institute of Clinical Radiology, University of Muenster (Germany); Stoegbauer, F. [Department of Neurology, University of Muenster (Germany); Kurlemann, G. [Department of Pediatric Neurology, University of Muenster (Germany); Schul, C. [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Muenster (Germany)

    1999-09-01

    Dissection of the carotid and vertebral arteries is a not so uncommon cause of stroke and has to be considered as a differential diagnosis especially in younger patients. Therapeutic and prognostic implications are different from those in extracranial atherosclerotic disease. Dissection results from hemorrhage into the vessel wall usually between the layers of the media. Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) depicts the resulting luminal compromise that may reveal some typical, but not specific, findings. The same is true for non-invasive angiographic techniques such as time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and computed tomography angiography (CTA), which have shown accurate results compared with DSA. The main advantage of these techniques is the direct visualization of the vessel wall confirming the intramural hematoma. This is achieved best with MR imaging due to the high signal of blood degradation products on T1- and T2-weighted images. Therefore, MRI in combination with MRA is presently the method of choice for initial diagnosis and follow-up of craniocervical artery dissection (CCAD). In some questionable cases, CTA is a non-invasive alternative that is independent of flow phenomena. (orig.) With 6 figs., 2 tabs., 33 refs.

  5. Memory deficits due to brain injury: unique PET findings and dream alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Masaki; Nariai, Tadashi; Hiura, Mikio; Ishii, Kenji; Nishikawa, Toru

    2011-12-01

    The authors herein report the case of a young male with memory deficits due to a traumatic head injury, who presented with sleep-related symptoms such as hypersomnia and dream alterations. Although MRI and polysomnography showed no abnormalities, (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and (11)C flumazenil (FMZ)-PET revealed findings consistent with cerebral damage to the affected temporal region. The memory deficit of the patient gradually improved in parallel with the relief of the sleep-related symptoms. FDG-PET showed considerable improvement in glucose metabolism when he had recovered, however, evidence of neural loss remained in the FMZ-PET findings.

  6. Ganglia of the tarsal sinus: MR imaging features and clinical findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, Jan S.; Müller, Dirk; Sauerschnig, Martin; Imhoff, Andreas B.; Rechl, H.; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Woertler, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze MR imaging and clinical findings associated with ganglia of the tarsal sinus. Materials and methods: In a record search, ganglia of the tarsal sinus were retrospectively identified in 26 patients (mean age 48 ± 16 years), who underwent MR imaging for chronic ankle pain. Images were reviewed by two radiologists in consensus for size and location of ganglia, lesions of ligaments of the ankle and the tarsal sinus, tendon abnormalities, osteoarthritis, osseous erosions and bone marrow abnormalities. Medical records were reviewed for patient history and clinical findings. Results: Ganglia were associated with the interosseus ligament in 81%, the cervical ligament in 31% and the retinacula in 46% of cases. Signal alterations suggesting degeneration were found in 85%, 50% and 63% in case of the interosseus ligament, the cervical ligament and the retinacula, respectively. Scarring of the anterior talofibular ligament and the fibulocalcaneal ligament was found in 68% and 72% of the patients, respectively, while only 27% of the patients recalled ankle sprains. Ganglia at the retinacula were highly associated with synovitis and tendinosis of the posterior tibial tendon (p < 0.05). Conclusion: All patients with ganglia in the tarsal sinus presented with another pathology at the ankle, suggesting that degeneration of the tarsal sinus may be a secondary phenomenon, due to pathologic biomechanics at another site of the hind foot. Thus, in patients with degenerative changes of the tarsal sinus, one should be alerted and search for underlying pathology, which may be injury of the lateral collateral ligaments in up to 70%.

  7. NMR imaging of the head-neck region. Topography of function - clinical findings - imaging and spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogl, T.J.

    1991-01-01

    The book on nmr imaging in the head-neck region offers, on a total of 221 pages, 344 detailed representations with 141 figures and 44 tables. It provides information as to the relevant topography of function, presents clinical findings, explains imaging characteristics and also takes account of spectroscopic procedures. The multifarious methods of investigation are described and discussed in connection with the differential diagnoses. A score of suitable diagnostic measures is assigned to each region of examination. The method's value is assessed against that of other imaging techniques. (orig.) [de

  8. MR imaging findings of medial tibial crest friction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klontzas, Michail E., E-mail: miklontzas@gmail.com; Akoumianakis, Ioannis D., E-mail: ioannis.akoumianakis@gmail.com; Vagios, Ilias, E-mail: iliasvagios@gmail.com; Karantanas, Apostolos H., E-mail: akarantanas@gmail.com

    2013-11-01

    Objective: Medial tibial condyle bone marrow edema (BME), associated with soft tissue edema (STe) surrounding the medial collateral ligament, was incidentally observed in MRI examinations of young and athletic individuals. The aim of the present study was to 1. Prospectively investigate the association between these findings and coexistence of localized pain, and 2. Explore the possible contribution of the tibial morphology to its pathogenesis. Methods: The medial tibial condyle crest was evaluated in 632 knee MRI examinations. The angle and depth were measured by two separate evaluators. The presence of STe and BME was recorded. A third evaluator blindly assessed the presence of pain at this site. Results: BME associated with STe was found in 24 patients (with no history of previous trauma, osteoarthritis, tumor or pes anserine bursitis). The mean crest angle was 151.3° (95%CI 147.4–155.3°) compared to 159.4° (95%CI 158.8–160°) in controls (Mann–Whitney test, P < 0.0001). MRI findings were highly predictive of localized pain (sensitivity 92% specificity 99%, Fisher's exact test, P < 0.0001). Conclusion: Friction at the medial tibial condyle crest is a painful syndrome. MRI is a highly specific and sensitive imaging modality for its diagnosis.

  9. MR imaging findings of medial tibial crest friction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klontzas, Michail E.; Akoumianakis, Ioannis D.; Vagios, Ilias; Karantanas, Apostolos H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Medial tibial condyle bone marrow edema (BME), associated with soft tissue edema (STe) surrounding the medial collateral ligament, was incidentally observed in MRI examinations of young and athletic individuals. The aim of the present study was to 1. Prospectively investigate the association between these findings and coexistence of localized pain, and 2. Explore the possible contribution of the tibial morphology to its pathogenesis. Methods: The medial tibial condyle crest was evaluated in 632 knee MRI examinations. The angle and depth were measured by two separate evaluators. The presence of STe and BME was recorded. A third evaluator blindly assessed the presence of pain at this site. Results: BME associated with STe was found in 24 patients (with no history of previous trauma, osteoarthritis, tumor or pes anserine bursitis). The mean crest angle was 151.3° (95%CI 147.4–155.3°) compared to 159.4° (95%CI 158.8–160°) in controls (Mann–Whitney test, P < 0.0001). MRI findings were highly predictive of localized pain (sensitivity 92% specificity 99%, Fisher's exact test, P < 0.0001). Conclusion: Friction at the medial tibial condyle crest is a painful syndrome. MRI is a highly specific and sensitive imaging modality for its diagnosis

  10. Retropharyngeal Tendinitis: Radiographic and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelineck, J.; Salomonsen, M.; Hviid, C. [Aarhus Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Radiology

    2006-10-15

    Purpose: To describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in retropharyngeal tendinitis. Material and methods: Within 1 year, four patients presenting with symptoms of retropharyngeal tendinitis were examined by radiography and MRI. Results: On MRI and radiographs, all patients had characteristic soft-tissue swellings and calcifications related to the tendon of the longus colli muscle situated inferior to the anterior arc of C1. MRI showed well-defined edema, with high signal in the retropharyngeal tissue anterior to C1-C5 on short T1 inversion recovery (STIR) sequences, low signal on T1-weighted sequences, and low signal in the calcification on both sequences. In addition, three patients had high signal intensity changes on STIR sequences in the atlantoaxial joint situated posterior to the anterior arc of C1. Conclusion: MRI is a sensitive and accurate method in the diagnosis of retropharyngeal tendinitis. A new finding in this condition is an effusion or synovitis in the anterior atlantoaxial joint. MRI is a valuable tool in differentiating retropharyngeal tendinitis from other diagnoses such as retropharyngeal abscess, pyogenic spondylitis, and spondyloarthropathy.

  11. Imaging findings and therapeutic alternatives for peripheral vascular malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monsignore, Lucas Moretti; Nakiri, Guilherme Seizem; Santos, Daniela dos; Abud, Thiago Giansante; Abud, Daniel Giansante

    2010-01-01

    Peripheral vascular malformations represent a spectrum of lesions that appear through the lifetime and can be found in the whole body. Such lesions are uncommon and are frequently confounded with infantile hemangioma, a common benign neoplastic lesion. In the presence of such lesions, the correlation between the clinical and radiological findings is extremely important to achieve a correct diagnosis, which will guide the best therapeutic approach. The most recent classifications for peripheral vascular malformations are based on the blood flow (low or high) and on the main vascular components (arterial, capillary, lymphatic or venous). Peripheral vascular malformations represent a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge, and complementary methods such as computed tomography, Doppler ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging, in association with clinical findings can provide information regarding blood flow characteristics and lesions extent. Arteriography and venography confirm the diagnosis, evaluate the lesions extent and guide the therapeutic decision making. Generally, low flow vascular malformations are percutaneously treated with sclerosing agents injection, while in high flow lesions the approach is endovascular, with permanent liquid or solid embolization agents. (author)

  12. Clinicopathology and imaging findings of primary pulmonary sarcomatoid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Zhaojian; Pang Minxia; Yang Xinguo; Wu Qisong; Li Hongfu; Li Xingong; Kou Rugang; Wang Xiaofei

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical pathological features and imaging findings of primary pulmonary sarcomatoid carcinoma. Methods: Fifteen patients with a pathologically verified primary pulmonary sarcomatoid carcinoma were reviewed retrospectively. Fourteen patients had CT examinations and 10 of them had contrast-enhanced CT scan. Nine patients had chest plain films. Results; Of 15 patients, 14 were peripheral and 1 was central, diameters ranging from 2.5 cm to 9.5 cm. Five located in the upper, 3 in the middle and 4 in the lower lobe of the right lung. The other 3 located in the upper left lobe. All cases presented with a spheroid solid lung mass on chest plain film and CT examinations. Three had irregular eccentric cavities. Six were well demarcated, 2 were ill defined, 4 were lobulated and 3 were speculated. The central case had obstructive pneumonia and showed ill defined. Ten showed irregular peripheral heterogeneous contrast enhancement. The center part of the tumor showed no enhancement or inhomogeneous enhancement. Seven had thoracic wall or pleural invasion, 4 had hilar or mediastinal lymphopathy and 2 had metastasis. Histopathologically, 8 were pleomorphic carcinoma, 2 were spindle cell carcinoma, 3 were giant cell carcinoma and 3 were pulmonary blastomas. Conclusion: The X-ray and CT findings of the primary pulmonary sarcomatoid carcinoma are not specific. The clinicopathologic features were the evidence of diagnosis. (authors)

  13. Body Image in Patients With Spinal Cord Injury During Inpatient Rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Diemen, Tijn; van Leeuwen, Christel; van Nes, Ilse; Geertzen, Jan; Post, Marcel

    Objectives: (1) To investigate the course of body image in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) during their first inpatient rehabilitation stay; and (2) to explore the association between demographic and injury-related variables and body image and the association between body image and

  14. Correlation of Computed Tomography findings with Glasgow Coma Scale in patients with acute traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SK Sah

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To correlate Computed Tomography (CT findings with Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS in patients with acute traumatic brain injury attending in Chitwan Medical College teaching hospital Chitwan, Nepal. MATERIALS AND METHODS A cross-sectional study was performed among 50 patients of acute (less than24 hours cases of craniocerebral trauma over a period of four months. The patient’s level of consciousness (GCS was determined and a brain CT scan without contrast media was performed. A sixth generation General Electric (GE CT scan was utilized and 5mm and 10mm sections were obtained for infratentorial and supratentorial parts respectively. RESULT The age range of the patients was 1 to 75 years (mean age 35.6± 21.516 years and male: female ratio was 3.1:1. The most common causes of head injury were road traffic accident (RTA (60%, fall injury (20%, physical assault (12% and pedestrian injuries (8%. The distribution of patients in accordance with consciousness level was found to be 54% with mild TBI (GCS score 12 to 14, 28% with moderate TBI (GCS score 11 to 8 and 18% with severe TBI (GCS score less than 7. The presence of mixed lesions and midline shift regardless of the underlying lesion on CT scan was accompanied by lower GCS. CONCLUSION The presence of mixed lesions and midline shift regardless of the underlying lesion on CT scan were accompanied with lower GCS. Patients having single lesion had more GCS level than mixed level and mid line shift type of injury.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jcmsn.v10i2.12947 Journal of College of Medical Sciences-Nepal, 2014, Vol.10(2; 4-9

  15. Hepatic trauma: CT findings and considerations based on our experience in emergency diagnostic imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romano, Luigia; Giovine, Sabrina; Guidi, Guido; Tortora, Giovanni; Cinque, Teresa; Romano, Stefania E-mail: stefromano@libero.it

    2004-04-01

    Abdominal blunt trauma represents the main cause of death in people of age less than 40 years; the liver injury occurs frequently, with an incidence varying from 3 to 10%. Isolated hepatic lesions are rare and in 77-90% of cases, lesions of other organs and viscera are involved. Right hepatic lobe is a frequent site of injury, because it is the more voluminous portion of liver parenchyma; posterior superior hepatic segments are proximal to fixed anatomical structures such as ribs and spine that may have an important role in determining of the lesion. The coronal ligaments' insertion in this parenchymal region augments the effect of acceleration-deceleration mechanism. Associated lesions usually are homolateral costal fractures, laceration or contusion of the inferior right pulmonary lobe, haemothorax, pneumothorax, renal and/or adrenal lesions. Traumatic lesions of left hepatic lobe are rare and usually associated with direct impact on the superior abdomen, such as in car-crash when the wheel causes a compressive effect on thorax and abdomen. Associated lesions to left hepatic lobe injuries correlated to this mechanism are: sternal fractures, pancreatic, myocardial, gastrointestinal tract injuries. Lesions of the caudal lobe are extremely rare, usually not isolated and noted with other large parenchymal lesions. The Institution of Specialized Trauma Centers and the technical progress in imaging methodology developed in the last years a great reduction of mortality. New diagnostic methodologies allow a reduction of negatives laparotomies and allow the possibility of conservative treatment of numerous traumatic lesions; however, therapy depends from imaging findings and clinical conditions of the patient. Computed tomography (CT) certainly presents a large impact on diagnosis and management of patients with lesions from blunt abdominal traumas. It is important to establish a prognostic criteria allowing decisions for conservative or surgical treatment; CT

  16. Hepatic trauma: CT findings and considerations based on our experience in emergency diagnostic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romano, Luigia; Giovine, Sabrina; Guidi, Guido; Tortora, Giovanni; Cinque, Teresa; Romano, Stefania

    2004-01-01

    Abdominal blunt trauma represents the main cause of death in people of age less than 40 years; the liver injury occurs frequently, with an incidence varying from 3 to 10%. Isolated hepatic lesions are rare and in 77-90% of cases, lesions of other organs and viscera are involved. Right hepatic lobe is a frequent site of injury, because it is the more voluminous portion of liver parenchyma; posterior superior hepatic segments are proximal to fixed anatomical structures such as ribs and spine that may have an important role in determining of the lesion. The coronal ligaments' insertion in this parenchymal region augments the effect of acceleration-deceleration mechanism. Associated lesions usually are homolateral costal fractures, laceration or contusion of the inferior right pulmonary lobe, haemothorax, pneumothorax, renal and/or adrenal lesions. Traumatic lesions of left hepatic lobe are rare and usually associated with direct impact on the superior abdomen, such as in car-crash when the wheel causes a compressive effect on thorax and abdomen. Associated lesions to left hepatic lobe injuries correlated to this mechanism are: sternal fractures, pancreatic, myocardial, gastrointestinal tract injuries. Lesions of the caudal lobe are extremely rare, usually not isolated and noted with other large parenchymal lesions. The Institution of Specialized Trauma Centers and the technical progress in imaging methodology developed in the last years a great reduction of mortality. New diagnostic methodologies allow a reduction of negatives laparotomies and allow the possibility of conservative treatment of numerous traumatic lesions; however, therapy depends from imaging findings and clinical conditions of the patient. Computed tomography (CT) certainly presents a large impact on diagnosis and management of patients with lesions from blunt abdominal traumas. It is important to establish a prognostic criteria allowing decisions for conservative or surgical treatment; CT findings

  17. The correlation of neurophysiological findings with clinical and functional status in patients following traumatic nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şahin, F; Atalay, N Ş; Akkaya, N; Ercidoğan, Ö; Başakçi, B; Kuran, B

    2014-02-01

    In this study, we aimed to determine whether there is a correlation between the electrodiagnostic findings and the functional status, muscle strength and sensibility in patients with traumatic nerve injury to the wrists. We assessed 50 patients at a mean of 11.6 months (SD 5.85) (range 6-25) after nerve injury. Sensibility was assessed by monofilament testing. Motor function was evaluated by assessing the manual muscle grade of the abductor pollicis brevis and abductor digiti minimi muscles. Function was evaluated by the Sollerman Hand Function Test. The amplitudes of the compound muscle action potential and the sensory nerve action potential were determined by electroneuromyography. While the compound muscle action potential and sensory nerve action potential amplitudes had significant correlation with muscle grade and Semmes Weinstein Monofilament tests, there was no correlation with the functional scores.

  18. Imaging findings of pulsatile tinnitus caused by sigmoid sinus abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Xihong; Wang Zhenchang; Gong Shusheng; Xia Yin; Wang Zhengyu; Yang Bentao; Yan Fei; Li Jing; Xian Junfang; Chen Guangli

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To study a rare CT finding of pulsatile tinnitus (PT) caused by sigmoid sinus abnormalities. Methods: The imaging data of PT caused by sigmoid sinus abnormalities were analyzed retrospectively in 15 patients (15 female). The median age was 45 years (24 to 63 years). The duration of persistence pulsatile tinnitus was from 0.5 year to 36.0 years (median time, 2.0 years). The tinnitus was at left side in 5 patients and right side in 10 patients. Fifteen patients underwent HRCT of the temporal bone. Of them, 12 patients underwent cerebral CT angiography and CT venogram (CTA/CTV), and 9 patients underwent cerebral digital subtraction angiography (DSA). Nine patients underwent transmastoid reconstruction surgery of the sigmoid sinus. Of them, the tinnitus was at left side in 2 patients and right side in 7 patients. Paired rank sum test was used to compare the cross-sectional area of the sigmoid sinus of the tinnitus side and normal side.Results: On HRCT, foca bony coarse defect is shown in the anterior sigmoid wall in 11 patients and anterolateral sigmoid wall in 4 patients. On CTA/CTV, the sigmoid sinus focally protuded into the adjacent mastoid air cells and formed diverticulum in 10 patients. The pulsatile tinnitus disappeared immediately after transmastoid reconstruction surgery of the sigmoid sinus in all 9 patients. The cross-sectional area of the sigmoid sinus of the tinnitus side was 100.6 (41.5-96.2)mm 2 , it was 77.0 (92.1-122.4)mm 2 in the nonmal side (Z=2.158, P=0.031). Conclusion: Focal bony defect of the sigmoid wall with sigmoid sinus diverticula is one of the causes which lead to pulsatile tinnitus, which can be easily identified by imaging examination. (authors)

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of acute trauma of the cervical spine: spectrum of findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forster, B.B.; Koopmans, R.A. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). Faculty of Medicine

    1995-06-01

    The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) spectrum of acute injury to the cervical spine was illustrated in this pictorial essay. The appearance of the traumatized cord was discussed, including intramedullary hemorrhage, and the causes of spinal cord compression, such as disk herniation, epidural hematoma, fracture, dislocation and underlying spinal stenosis. The ability of MRI to directly reveal the severity of cord injury and simultaneously indicate the cause of cord compression proved particularly useful in the management of incomplete injury, for which surgical intervention may prevent further deterioration. The protocol for MRI of cervical spinal trauma included sagittal T1-weighted and T2-weighted conventional spin-echo sequences. In addition, transverse T2-weighted gradient-echo images were obtained. MRI`s ability to directly reveal the extent of cord injury was said to be a powerful tool in the management of incomplete injuries where further deterioration could be prevented by timely surgical intervention. 7 refs., 12 figs.

  20. Cost-appropriateness of whole body vs limited bone imaging for suspected focal sports injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagle, C.E.

    1986-07-01

    Bone imaging has been recognized as a useful diagnostic tool in detecting the presence of focal musculoskeletal injury when radiographs are normal. A retrospective review of bone images in a small number of amateur athletes indicates that secondary injuries were commonly detected at sites different from the site of musculoskeletal pain being evaluated for injury. While a larger study will be necessary to confirm the data, this review suggests that it is medically justified and cost-appropriate to perform imaging of the entire skeleton as opposed to imaging limited to the anatomic site of pain and suspected injury.

  1. Healthcare reform for imagers: finding a way forward now.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Pamela S; Picard, Michael H

    2013-03-01

    The changing healthcare environment presents many challenges to cardiovascular imagers. This perspective paper uses current trends to propose strategies that cardiovascular imagers can follow to lead in managing change and developing the imaging laboratory of the future. In the area of quality, imagers are encouraged to follow guidelines and standards, implement structured reporting and laboratory databases, adopt ongoing quality improvement programs, and use benchmarks to confirm imaging quality. In the area of access, imagers are encouraged to enhance availability of testing, focus on patient and referring physician value and satisfaction, collaboratively implement new technologies and uses of imaging, integrate health information technology in the laboratory, and work toward the appropriate inclusion of imaging in new healthcare delivery models. In the area of cost, imagers are encouraged to minimize laboratory operating expenses without compromising quality, and to take an active role in care redesign initiatives to ensure that imaging is utilized appropriately and at proper time intervals. Imagers are also encouraged to learn leadership and management skills, undertake strategic planning exercises, and build strong, collaborative teams. Although it is difficult to predict the future of cardiovascular imaging delivery, a reasonable sense of the likely direction of many changes and careful attention to the fundamentals of good health care (quality, access, and cost) can help imagers to thrive now and in the future. Copyright © 2013 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Apophysitis of the lower limbs: imaging findings; Apofisites dos membros inferiores: aspectos de imagem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbosa, Priscila Rodrigues; Santos, Durval C. Barros; Longo, Carlos Henrique; Luna, Rodrigo de Castro; Kim, Nelson Ji Tae; Rosemberg, Laercio A.; Funari, Marcelo Gusmao Buarque [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Imagem]. E-mail: pill-rb@uol.com.br

    2005-07-01

    Apophyses are secondary ossification centers that appear during growth. These ossification centers are under traction forces because of insertion of muscles and ligaments. When traction stress become greater in magnitude and frequency irritation of physis (growth plate) may occur resulting in apophysitis. Apophysitis injuries typically occur in active adolescents and usually presents as peri-articular pain associated with growth, skeletal immaturity, repetitive microtrauma and muscle-tendon imbalance. The most common types of apophysitis of the include Osgood-Schlatter disease (tibial tuberosity), apophysitis of the hip (iliac crest, ischial tuberosity), Sever's disease (posterior calcaneus), Sindig-Larsen-Johansson syndrome (inferior patella), and Iselin's disease (fifth metarsal base). The aim of this study was to show the main magnetic resonance imaging and X-rays findings in patients with these diseases and to discuss the frequent differential diagnosis. (author)

  3. Spontaneous and traumatic hepatic rupture: imaging findings and minimally invasive treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palacio, Glaucia Andrade e Silva; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2003-01-01

    Spontaneous hepatic bleeding is a rare condition. Our aim was to describe the imaging findings and minimally invasive treatment using transcatheter arterial embolization in patients with spontaneous and traumatic hepatic rupture. Three patients presented acute hemoperitoneum dur to hepatic rupture caused by spontaneous rupture of hepatocellular carcinoma, HELLP syndrome and a blunt hepatic trauma. The patients were submitted to ultrasound and computed tomography of the abdomen and subsequently treated by transcatheter arterial embolization. All patients underwent helical computed tomography before and after treatments. Computed tomography played an important role in the evaluation and follow-up in the therapeutic intervention. Different types of liver injuries were identified. Transcatheter arterial embolization blocked arterial hemorrhage in the patients who were hemodynamically unstable. The conclusion was: transcatheter arterial embolization is an effective and well-tolerated treatment method for the management of hepatic rupture and computed tomography is an excellent method for the diagnosis and follow-up of these patients. (author)

  4. Primary epiploic appendagitis: Clinic and radiologic imaging findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Koplay

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Primary epiploic appendagitis (PEA is arare and self-limiting disease that can mimicking acuteapendicitis and diverticulitis because of the clinical symptoms.The present retrospective study was discussed toclinical and radiologic characteristics of PEA.Methods: We reviewed the clinical, laboratory and computedtomography (CT findings of 10 patients with PEAbetween August 2010 and December 2012.Results: Ten patients (1 female and 9 males were diagnosedwith PEA. The average age was 37.1 (15-63years. Abdominal pain was localized to the right (2 cases,20% or left (7 cases, 70% lower quadrants and generalized(1 cases, 10%. All patients were afebrile. Only twopatients showed leukocytosis. There were gastrointestinalsymptoms such as nausea (3 patients and vomiting(1patient. In all cases, a pericolic fatty mass with a hyperattenuated ring was observed on CT. All of the patientswere treated symptomatic.Conlusion: In patients have atypical symptoms and laboratoryvalues with abdominal pain (especially left lowerabdominal pain, PEA should be considered in differentialdiagnosis. For correct diagnosis and avoid unnecessarysurgery, CT must be used in diagnosis because imagingfindings characteristic of the disease.Key words: Primary epiploic appendagitis, imaging, CT

  5. Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... injury. Read Issue Emily Scott, Biochemist Hooked on Heme Emily Scott's research on a family of enzymes ... and Biochemistry Enzymes, Molecular Probes, Metabolic Engineering, Glycobiology, Synthesis, Natural Products, Chemical Reactions Computers in Biology Bioinformatics, ...

  6. A profile of Injury in Fiji: findings from a population-based injury surveillance system (TRIP-10

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wainiqolo Iris

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over 90% of injury deaths occur in low-and middle-income countries. However, the epidemiological profile of injuries in Pacific Islands has received little attention. We used a population-based-trauma registry to investigate the characteristics of all injuries in Viti Levu, Fiji. Method The Fiji Injury Surveillance in Hospitals (FISH database prospectively collected data on all injury-related deaths and primary admissions to hospital (≥12 hours stay in Viti Levu during 12 months commencing October 2005. Results The 2167 injury-related deaths and hospitalisations corresponded to an annual incidence rate of 333 per 100,000, with males accounting for twice as many cases as females. Almost 80% of injuries involved people aged less than 45 years, and 74% were deemed unintentional. There were 244 fatalities (71% died before admission and 1994 hospitalisations corresponding to crude annual rates of 37.5 per 100,000 and 306 per 100,000 respectively. The leading cause of fatal injury was road traffic injury (29% and the equivalent for injury admissions was falls (30%. The commonest type of injury resulting in death and admission to hospital was asphyxia and fractures respectively. Alcohol use was documented as a contributing factor in 13% of deaths and 12% of admissions. In general, indigenous Fijians had higher rates of injury admission, especially for interpersonal violence, while those of Indian ethnicity had higher rates of fatality, especially from suicide. Conclusions Injury is an important public health problem that disproportionately affects young males in Fiji, with a high proportion of deaths prior to hospital presentation. This study highlights key areas requiring priority attention to reduce the burden of potentially life-threatening injuries in Fiji.

  7. A profile of injury in Fiji: findings from a population-based injury surveillance system (TRIP-10).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wainiqolo, Iris; Kafoa, Berlin; Kool, Bridget; Herman, Josephine; McCaig, Eddie; Ameratunga, Shanthi

    2012-12-12

    Over 90% of injury deaths occur in low-and middle-income countries. However, the epidemiological profile of injuries in Pacific Islands has received little attention. We used a population-based-trauma registry to investigate the characteristics of all injuries in Viti Levu, Fiji. The Fiji Injury Surveillance in Hospitals (FISH) database prospectively collected data on all injury-related deaths and primary admissions to hospital (≥ 12 hours stay) in Viti Levu during 12 months commencing October 2005. The 2167 injury-related deaths and hospitalisations corresponded to an annual incidence rate of 333 per 100,000, with males accounting for twice as many cases as females. Almost 80% of injuries involved people aged less than 45 years, and 74% were deemed unintentional. There were 244 fatalities (71% died before admission) and 1994 hospitalisations corresponding to crude annual rates of 37.5 per 100,000 and 306 per 100,000 respectively. The leading cause of fatal injury was road traffic injury (29%) and the equivalent for injury admissions was falls (30%). The commonest type of injury resulting in death and admission to hospital was asphyxia and fractures respectively. Alcohol use was documented as a contributing factor in 13% of deaths and 12% of admissions. In general, indigenous Fijians had higher rates of injury admission, especially for interpersonal violence, while those of Indian ethnicity had higher rates of fatality, especially from suicide. Injury is an important public health problem that disproportionately affects young males in Fiji, with a high proportion of deaths prior to hospital presentation. This study highlights key areas requiring priority attention to reduce the burden of potentially life-threatening injuries in Fiji.

  8. Incidental enchondromas at knee magnetic resonance imaging: intraobserver and interobserver agreement and prevalence of imaging findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Akemi Nakamura

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate intra- and interobserver agreement in the identification of incidental enchondromas at knee magnetic resonance imaging, and to assess the prevalence of imaging findings. Materials and Methods Retrospective study reviewing 326 knee magnetic resonance images acquired in the period between November 2009 and September 2010. The images were independently and blindly analyzed by two specialists in musculoskeletal radiology, with the objective of identifying incidental enchondromas, presence of foci with signal similar to bone marrow and foci of signal absence suggestive of calcifications within the enchondromas. Inter- and intraobserver agreements were analyzed. Results Eleven lesions compatible with enchondromas (3.3% were identified. The interobserver agreement for the presence of enchondroma was high. Prevalence of foci of bone marrow signal inside the enchondromas was of 54.55%, and foci suggestive of calcification corresponded to 36.36%. The intraobserver agreement for foci of bone marrow signal in enchondromas was perfect, and interobserver agreement was high. Conclusion The prevalence of incidental enchondromas in the current study was compatible with data in the literature. Excellent agreement was observed in the identification of enchondromas and in the assessment of imaging findings. A higher prevalence of fat signal foci was observed as compared with signal absence suggestive of calcifications.

  9. Multiphoton imaging for assessing renal disposition in acute kidney injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Liang, Xiaowen; Wang, Haolu; Roberts, Darren M.; Roberts, Michael S.

    2016-11-01

    Estimation of renal function and drug renal disposition in acute kidney injury (AKI), is important for appropriate dosing of drugs and adjustment of therapeutic strategies, but is challenging due to fluctuations in kidney function. Multiphoton microscopy has been shown to be a useful tool in studying drug disposition in liver and can reflect dynamic changes of liver function. We extend this imaging technique to investigate glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and tubular transporter functional change in various animal models of AKI, which mimic a broad range of causes of AKI such as hypoxia (renal ischemia- reperfusion), therapeutic drugs (e.g. cisplatin), rhabdomyolysis (e.g. glycerol-induced) and sepsis (e.g. LPSinduced). The MPM images revealed acute injury of tubular cells as indicated by reduced autofluorescence and cellular vacuolation in AKI groups compared to control group. In control animal, systemically injected FITC-labelled inulin was rapidly cleared from glomerulus, while the clearance of FITC-inulin was significantly delayed in most of animals in AKI group, which may reflect the reduced GFR in AKI. Following intravenous injection, rhodamine 123, a fluorescent substrate of p-glycoprotein (one of tubular transporter), was excreted into urine in proximal tubule via p-glycoprotein; in response to AKI, rhodamine 123 was retained in tubular cells as revealed by slower decay of fluorescence intensity, indicating P-gp transporter dysfunction in AKI. Thus, real-time changes in GFR and transporter function can be imaged in rodent kidney with AKI using multiphoton excitation of exogenously injected fluorescent markers.

  10. Current contribution of diffusion tensor imaging in the evaluation of diffuse axonal injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daphine Centola Grassi

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Traumatic brain injury (TBI is the number one cause of death and morbidity among young adults. Moreover, survivors are frequently left with functional disabilities during the most productive years of their lives. One main aspect of TBI pathology is diffuse axonal injury, which is increasingly recognized due to its presence in 40% to 50% of all cases that require hospital admission. Diffuse axonal injury is defined as widespread axonal damage and is characterized by complete axotomy and secondary reactions due to overall axonopathy. These changes can be seen in neuroimaging studies as hemorrhagic focal areas and diffuse edema. However, the diffuse axonal injury findings are frequently under-recognized in conventional neuroimaging studies. In such scenarios, diffuse tensor imaging (DTI plays an important role because it provides further information on white matter integrity that is not obtained with standard magnetic resonance imaging sequences. Extensive reviews concerning the physics of DTI and its use in the context of TBI patients have been published, but these issues are still hazy for many allied-health professionals. Herein, we aim to review the current contribution of diverse state-of-the-art DTI analytical methods to the understanding of diffuse axonal injury pathophysiology and prognosis, to serve as a quick reference for those interested in planning new studies and who are involved in the care of TBI victims. For this purpose, a comprehensive search in Pubmed was performed using the following keywords: “traumatic brain injury”, “diffuse axonal injury”, and “diffusion tensor imaging”.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of traumatic injury to the craniovertebral junction: a case-based review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Anil K; Miller, Brandon A; Holland, Christopher M; Fountain, Arthur J; Pradilla, Gustavo; Ahmad, Faiz U

    2015-04-01

    The craniovertebral junction (CVJ) is unique in the spinal column regarding the degree of multiplanar mobility allowed by its bony articulations. A network of ligamentous attachments provides stability to this junction. Although ligamentous injury can be inferred on CT scans through the utilization of craniometric measurements, the disruption of these ligaments can only be visualized directly with MRI. Here, the authors review the current literature on MRI evaluation of the CVJ following trauma and present several illustrative cases to highlight the utility and limitations of craniometric measures in the context of ligamentous injury at the CVJ. A retrospective case review was conducted to identify patients with cervical spine trauma who underwent cervical MRI and subsequently required occipitocervical or atlantoaxial fusion. Craniometric measurements were performed on the CT images in these cases. An extensive PubMed/MEDLINE literature search was conducted to identify publications regarding the use of MRI in the evaluation of patients with CVJ trauma. The authors identified 8 cases in which cervical MRI was performed prior to operative stabilization of the CVJ. Craniometric measures did not reliably rule out ligamentous injury, and there was significant heterogeneity in the reliability of different craniometric measurements. A review of the literature revealed several case series and descriptive studies addressing MRI in CVJ trauma. Three papers reported the inadequacy of the historical Traynelis system for identifying atlantooccipital dislocation and presented 3 alternative classification schemes with emphasis on MRI findings. Recognition of ligamentous instability at the CVJ is critical in directing clinical decision making regarding surgical stabilization. Craniometric measures appear unreliable, and CT alone is unable to provide direct visualization of ligamentous injury. Therefore, while the decision to obtain MR images in CVJ trauma is largely based on

  12. A comparison between clinical assessment and magnetic resonance imaging of acute hamstring injuries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneider-Kolsky, Michal E.; Hoving, Jan Lucas; Warren, Price; Connell, David A.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Physicians evaluating hamstring strains in professional football players are increasingly turning to magnetic resonance imaging to support the clinical diagnosis and management of the injury. However, little information is available to assess how magnetic resonance imaging compares with

  13. Deltoid ligament and tibiofibular syndesmosis injury in chronic lateral ankle instability: Magnetic resonance imaging evaluation at 3T and comparison with arthroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Ka Young; Choi, Yun Sun; Lee, Seok Hoon; Kim, Jin Su; Young, Ki Won; Jeong, Min Sun; Kim, Dae Jung

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of deltoid ligament and distal tibiofibular syndesmosis injury on 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with chronic lateral ankle instability (CLAI). Fifty patients (mean age, 35 years) who had undergone preoperative 3T MRI and surgical treatment for CLAI were enrolled. The prevalence of deltoid ligament and syndesmosis injury were assessed. The complexity of lateral collateral ligament complex (LCLC) injury was correlated with prevalence of deltoid or syndesmosis injuries. The diagnostic accuracy of ankle ligament imaging at 3T MRI was analyzed using arthroscopy as a reference standard. On MRI, deltoid ligament injury was identified in 18 (36%) patients as follows: superficial ligament alone, 9 (50%); deep ligament alone 2 (11%); and both ligaments 7 (39%). Syndesmosis abnormality was found in 21 (42%) patients as follows: anterior inferior tibiofibular ligament (AITFL) alone, 19 (90%); and AITFL and interosseous ligament, 2 (10%). There was no correlation between LCLC injury complexity and the prevalence of an accompanying deltoid or syndesmosis injury on both MRI and arthroscopic findings. MRI sensitivity and specificity for detection of deltoid ligament injury were 84% and 93.5%, and those for detection of syndesmosis injury were 91% and 100%, respectively. Deltoid ligament or syndesmosis injuries were common in patients undergoing surgery for CLAI, regardless of the LCLC injury complexity. 3T MRI is helpful for the detection of all types of ankle ligament injury. Therefore, careful interpretation of pre-operative MRI is essential

  14. Deltoid ligament and tibiofibular syndesmosis injury in chronic lateral ankle instability: Magnetic resonance imaging evaluation at 3T and comparison with arthroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Ka Young; Choi, Yun Sun; Lee, Seok Hoon; Kim, Jin Su; Young, Ki Won; Jeong, Min Sun; Kim, Dae Jung [Eulji Hospital, Eulji University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    To evaluate the prevalence of deltoid ligament and distal tibiofibular syndesmosis injury on 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with chronic lateral ankle instability (CLAI). Fifty patients (mean age, 35 years) who had undergone preoperative 3T MRI and surgical treatment for CLAI were enrolled. The prevalence of deltoid ligament and syndesmosis injury were assessed. The complexity of lateral collateral ligament complex (LCLC) injury was correlated with prevalence of deltoid or syndesmosis injuries. The diagnostic accuracy of ankle ligament imaging at 3T MRI was analyzed using arthroscopy as a reference standard. On MRI, deltoid ligament injury was identified in 18 (36%) patients as follows: superficial ligament alone, 9 (50%); deep ligament alone 2 (11%); and both ligaments 7 (39%). Syndesmosis abnormality was found in 21 (42%) patients as follows: anterior inferior tibiofibular ligament (AITFL) alone, 19 (90%); and AITFL and interosseous ligament, 2 (10%). There was no correlation between LCLC injury complexity and the prevalence of an accompanying deltoid or syndesmosis injury on both MRI and arthroscopic findings. MRI sensitivity and specificity for detection of deltoid ligament injury were 84% and 93.5%, and those for detection of syndesmosis injury were 91% and 100%, respectively. Deltoid ligament or syndesmosis injuries were common in patients undergoing surgery for CLAI, regardless of the LCLC injury complexity. 3T MRI is helpful for the detection of all types of ankle ligament injury. Therefore, careful interpretation of pre-operative MRI is essential.

  15. Deltoid Ligament and Tibiofibular Syndesmosis Injury in Chronic Lateral Ankle Instability: Magnetic Resonance Imaging Evaluation at 3T and Comparison with Arthroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Ka-Young; Choi, Yun Sun; Lee, Seok Hoon; Kim, Jin Su; Young, Ki Won; Jeong, Min-Sun; Kim, Dae-Jung

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of deltoid ligament and distal tibiofibular syndesmosis injury on 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with chronic lateral ankle instability (CLAI). Fifty patients (mean age, 35 years) who had undergone preoperative 3T MRI and surgical treatment for CLAI were enrolled. The prevalence of deltoid ligament and syndesmosis injury were assessed. The complexity of lateral collateral ligament complex (LCLC) injury was correlated with prevalence of deltoid or syndesmosis injuries. The diagnostic accuracy of ankle ligament imaging at 3T MRI was analyzed using arthroscopy as a reference standard. On MRI, deltoid ligament injury was identified in 18 (36%) patients as follows: superficial ligament alone, 9 (50%); deep ligament alone 2 (11%); and both ligaments 7 (39%). Syndesmosis abnormality was found in 21 (42%) patients as follows: anterior inferior tibiofibular ligament (AITFL) alone, 19 (90%); and AITFL and interosseous ligament, 2 (10%). There was no correlation between LCLC injury complexity and the prevalence of an accompanying deltoid or syndesmosis injury on both MRI and arthroscopic findings. MRI sensitivity and specificity for detection of deltoid ligament injury were 84% and 93.5%, and those for detection of syndesmosis injury were 91% and 100%, respectively. Deltoid ligament or syndesmosis injuries were common in patients undergoing surgery for CLAI, regardless of the LCLC injury complexity. 3T MRI is helpful for the detection of all types of ankle ligament injury. Therefore, careful interpretation of pre-operative MRI is essential.

  16. Morbidity associated with golf-related injuries among children: findings from a pediatric trauma center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Melissa A; Mertz, Kristen J; Gaines, Barbara; Zuckerbraun, Noel S

    2011-01-01

    To describe injuries due to golf-related activities among pediatric patients requiring hospital admission. We conducted a retrospective analysis of all sports-related injuries from 2000 to 2006 using a level 1 trauma center database. Of 1005 children admitted with sports-related injuries, 60 (6%) had golf-related injuries. The mean injury severity score was significantly higher for golf-related injuries (11.0) than that for all other sports-related injuries (6.8). Most golf-related injuries occurred in children younger than 12 years (80%), at home (48%), and by a strike from a club (57%) and resulted in trauma to the head or neck (68%). Golf-related injuries, although an infrequent cause of sports-related injuries, have the potential to result in severe injuries, especially in younger children. Preventive efforts should target use of golf clubs by younger children in the home setting.

  17. Avulsion fractures of the anterior inferior iliac spine: spectrum of imaging findings; Avulsao da espinha iliaca antero-inferior: espectro dos achados de imagem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Joao Luiz [Hospital Santa Lucia, Brasilia, DF (Brazil). Dept. de Ressonancia Magnetica; Viana, Sergio Lopes; Mendonca, Jose Luiz Furtado de; Freitas, Flavia Mendes Oliveira; Lima, Gylse-Anne de Souza; Vila, Ana Fabiola da; Ribeiro, Nelmar [Clinica Radiologica Vila Rica, Brasilia, DF (Brazil). Dept. de Ressonancia Magnetica]. E-mail: radiolog@uol.com.br

    2005-07-15

    Avulsive injuries of the pelvic aphophyses are relatively common among 13-18 year old athletes, particularly among soccer players in Brazil. Diagnosis is made upon clinical and imaging findings. These lesions show three distinct phases: acute, repair and consolidation phases. Although acute and consolidation phases usually represent no diagnostic challenge, the repair phase may appear as an aggressive process on diagnostic images simulating neoplasic lesions. In this paper, the authors present the imaging findings of patients with avulsion of the anterior inferior iliac spine on plain radiographs, computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, emphasizing the typical features of the three evolutive phases of these lesions. (author)

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging and cell-based neurorestorative therapy after brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quan Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Restorative cell-based therapies for experimental brain injury, such as stroke and traumatic brain injury, substantially improve functional outcome. We discuss and review state of the art magnetic resonance imaging methodologies and their applications related to cell-based treatment after brain injury. We focus on the potential of magnetic resonance imaging technique and its associated challenges to obtain useful new information related to cell migration, distribution, and quantitation, as well as vascular and neuronal remodeling in response to cell-based therapy after brain injury. The noninvasive nature of imaging might more readily help with translation of cell-based therapy from the laboratory to the clinic.

  19. Imaging characteristics of hepatocellular adenoma compared with pathologic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Jing; Zhao Xinming; Ouyang Han; Huang Wenting; Zhou Chunwu

    2012-01-01

    -intense signal on the T 1 WI and hyper-intense signal on the T 2 WI with fat suppression sequences. There were 3 patients with an atypical adenoma type. One patient appeared uniform hypo-density on the non-enhanced CT and hyper-density on the hepatic arterial-dominant phase and became iso-dense on the portal venous phase. On the delay phase, it was slightly hyper-dense. Two out of the three lesions showed isointense and one hypo-intense signal on the in-phase T 1 WI, and hypo-intense, hyper-intense, and iso-intense signal on the T 2 WI with fat suppression sequences,respectively. Two patients examined on all phases of post-contrast MRI scans. The result was similar to the CT findings. Conclusion: The imaging features of hepatocellular adenoma are closely associated with pathological characteristics. (authors)

  20. Clinical findings versus imaging studies in the diagnosis of infantile ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis is the most common surgical cause of vomiting in early infancy and can be diagnosed clinically or by imaging studies. Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of clinical examination compared with ultrasound and upper gastrointestinal contrast imaging ...

  1. Imaging of the late sequelae of spinal cord injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodley, R.

    1994-01-01

    With an increasing ability to diagnose and treat the neurological complications, surveillance of the state of the spinal cord has now assumed great importance. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), or computerized tomography (CT) with myelography if MRI is contra-indicated is the method of choice and can demonstrate the pathology with great clarity. In most patients, midline sagittal T1W images are sufficient for screening purposes and for monitoring the success of treatment. Operative, imaging and postmortem studies have shown that the two main changes that occur are: (a) atrophic and (b) cystic - the microcystic and myxoid gel changes of myelomalacia, focal cysts and the larger, more expansive, syringomyelia. As yet, there is no standardization of terminology to describe the various pathological and radiological states. This is critical as only one condition, syringomyelia, is currently amenable to definitive surgery and without conformity, comparisons of incidence in different populations and assessment of the results of surgery are impossible. The published small studies of predominantly symptomatic patients at varying stages of chronicity give differing incidences of changes. Preliminary results of a surveillance MRI study of the spinal cord changes in 153 patients who had had a spinal cord injury over 20 years previously are presented. Altrophy was present in 62%, myelomalacia in 54%, syringomyelia in 22%, focal cysts in 9% and disruption in 7%. (orig./VHE) [de

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging in perinatal brain injury: clinical presentation, lesions and outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutherford, Mary; Ward, Phil; Allsop, Joanna; Counsell, Serena [Imperial College London, Hammersmith Hospital, Robert Steiner MR Unit, Imaging Sciences Department, Clinical Sciences Centre, London (United Kingdom); Srinivasan, Latha; Dyet, Leigh; Cowan, Frances [Imperial College, Hammersmith Hospital, Department of Paediatrics, Imaging Sciences Department, Clinical Sciences Centre, London (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-15

    Neonatal MR imaging is invaluable in assessing the term born neonate who presents with an encephalopathy. Successful imaging requires adaptations to both the hardware and the sequences used for adults. The perinatal and postnatal details often predict the pattern of lesions sustained and are essential for correct interpretation of the imaging findings, but additional or alternative diagnoses in infants with apparent hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy should always be considered. Perinatally acquired lesions are usually at their most obvious between 1 and 2 weeks of age. Very early imaging (<3 days) may be useful to make management decisions in ventilated neonates, but abnormalities may be subtle at that stage. Diffusion-weighted imaging is clinically useful for the early identification of ischaemic white matter in the neonatal brain but is less reliable in detecting lesions within the basal ganglia and thalami. The pattern of lesions seen on MRI can predict neurodevelopmental outcome. Additional useful information may be obtained by advanced techniques such as MR angiography, venography and perfusion-weighted imaging. Serial imaging with quantification of both structure size and tissue damage provides invaluable insights into perinatal brain injury. (orig.)

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging in perinatal brain injury: clinical presentation, lesions and outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutherford, Mary; Ward, Phil; Allsop, Joanna; Counsell, Serena; Srinivasan, Latha; Dyet, Leigh; Cowan, Frances

    2006-01-01

    Neonatal MR imaging is invaluable in assessing the term born neonate who presents with an encephalopathy. Successful imaging requires adaptations to both the hardware and the sequences used for adults. The perinatal and postnatal details often predict the pattern of lesions sustained and are essential for correct interpretation of the imaging findings, but additional or alternative diagnoses in infants with apparent hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy should always be considered. Perinatally acquired lesions are usually at their most obvious between 1 and 2 weeks of age. Very early imaging (<3 days) may be useful to make management decisions in ventilated neonates, but abnormalities may be subtle at that stage. Diffusion-weighted imaging is clinically useful for the early identification of ischaemic white matter in the neonatal brain but is less reliable in detecting lesions within the basal ganglia and thalami. The pattern of lesions seen on MRI can predict neurodevelopmental outcome. Additional useful information may be obtained by advanced techniques such as MR angiography, venography and perfusion-weighted imaging. Serial imaging with quantification of both structure size and tissue damage provides invaluable insights into perinatal brain injury. (orig.)

  4. Comparison of brain perfusion SPECT abnormalities with anatomical imaging in mild traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Asadi

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Trauma is the most common cause of morbidity and mortality in industrialized countries and also in Iran. Anatomical imaging (AI CT and MRI is helpful in the diagnosis of acute traumatic complications however it is not efficient in the diagnosis of disabling injury syndrome. In contrast, brain perfusion SPECT (Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography can be more useful for evaluation of microvascular structure. This study was designed to compare these two diagnostic methods. Methods: A total of 50 patients who had been suffering from traumatic brain injury for more than 1 year, and were followed as mild traumatic brain injury group according to “the Brain Injury Interdisciplinary Special Interest Group of the Ameri can Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine” criteria, were examined by brain perfusion SPECT and AI. The common anatomical classification of the lobes of brain was used. Results: The male to female ratio was 3:2. The mean age was 32.32±11.8 years and mean post-traumatic time was 1.48±0.65 years. The most common symptoms were headache (60%, agusia (36% and anosmia (32%. Among 400 examined brain lobes in this study, brain perfusion SPECT revealed remarkable abnormality in 76 lobes (19%, but AI determined abnormalities in 38 lobes (9.5% therefore, SPECT was twice sensitive than AI in mild traumatic brain injury (P<0.001. The correlation between SPECT and AI findings was 84%. SPECT was more sensitive than AI in demonstrating brain abnormalities in frontal lobe it was more obvious in the male group however, there was no significant difference between more and less than 30 years old groups. Conclusion: According to the findings of this study, we recommend using brain perfusion SPECT for all patients with chronic complications of head trauma, particularly those who have signs and symptoms of hypofrontalism, even though with some abnormalities in AI.

  5. Altered consciousness following head injury in advanced renal failure: Find the culprit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun-Lin Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Conscious change following head injury needs a scrutiny of the "nontraumatic" cause to avoid inappropriate management and catastrophic complication. We described an 81-year-old diabetic woman with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD (estimated glomerular filtration rate: 6 ml/min/1.73 m 2 re-presented to Emergency Department with altered mentality and generalized muscular hypotonia 2 days after falling with a head injury. Her initial mentality was alert, and computed tomography of the brain was negative for organic lesions; she has been given oral baclofen 10 mg daily to control her associated spastic back pain. The repeated laboratory and imaging studies were still unrevealing. Her serum baclofen concentration was markedly elevated (1437 ng/ml. With emergent hemodialysis for two sessions, complete elimination of serum baclofen concentration was accompanied by full recovery of her consciousness. Nontraumatic causes, especially drug-induced neurotoxicity, must be kept in mind in traumatic patients with CKD and unexplained neurological feature.

  6. Liver trauma from penetrating injuries. Miscellanea, personal series, clinical and CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salzano, A.; Nocera, V.; De Rosa, A.; Vigliotti, A.; Rossi, E.; Carbone, M.; Gatta, G.

    2000-01-01

    Penetrating liver wounds are related to many causes and rank second after blunt abdominal and liver trauma. In this report are examined the clinical and radiological findings of personal series of patients with penetrating trauma, especially by firearms and stab and cut wounds. It will also tried to define the diagnostic workup of these traumas, which is especially based on CT signs of liver damage and associated changes and which is of basic importance for following treatment, both surgical or conservative. In the last seven years it was retrospectively reviewed 31 cases of penetrating liver trauma. The patients were 19 men and 12 women, ranging in age 18 to 73 (mean 42), with penetrating liver injuries from firearms (16 patients) and stab (9 cases) wounds; 6 patients had injuries from different cases. Abdominal CT was carried out in emergency with the CT Angiography (CTA) technique in all patients. In the patients with suspected chest and abdomen involvement CT was performed from the mid-chest for accurate assessment of diaphragm and lung bases and to exclude associated pleuropulmonary damage. Penetrating liver wounds were caused by firearms in 70% of cases, by stabbing in 12% and, in the extant 18%, by other cases such as home accidents, road and work traumas, and liver biopsy. In this series, the liver was most frequently involved, especially by firearms wounds; in the 16 cases the most frequent injuries were hemorrhagic tears. It was found bullets in the liver in 6 cases. In one case of home accident the patient wounded himself while slicing bread with a long knife, which cut into the anterior abdominal wall and tore the anterior liver capsule, as seen at CTA. Penetrating wounds to liver and abdomen are less frequent than those to the chest. In the past decade the use of CT has changed the diagnostic and therapeutic approach to such injuries completely, decreasing the resort to explorative laparotomy and hepatorrhaphy. Indeed, CT provides a clear picture of

  7. MR imaging of central nervous system birth injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heier, L.A.; Zimmerman, R.D.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on head injuries due to birth trauma that have been evaluated with plain radiography, US, and CT. In the past, patient monitoring and transportation difficulties for a neonate have limited the use of MR. Does MR provide more information that would assist the management and prognostic assessment of these patients? An MR examination was requested on all neonates born or transferred to our institution with a documented traumatic delivery. CT and MR studies were compared for seven patients, including three cases of difficult forceps delivery, one case of double footling breech with forceps head extraction, two cases of shoulder dystocias, and one case of vacuum extraction. CT caused underestimation of subdural hematomas and contusions in three of five patients with this injury. The appreciation of a large subdural hematoma at MR resulted in surgical intervention. Both unsuspected cervical cord contusion and complete cord transection were identified on sagittal head MR images. Four of four skull fractures identified at CT were not seen at MR

  8. Malignant peritoneal mesothelioma in two pediatric patients: MR imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haliloglu, M.; Hoffer, F.A.; Fletcher, B.D.

    2000-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma is a rare tumor in childhood. We present two cases of malignant peritoneal mesothelioma in which contrast-enhanced, fat-saturated magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was used advantageously to detect peritoneal tumor involvement. (orig.)

  9. Malignant peritoneal mesothelioma in two pediatric patients: MR imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haliloglu, M. [Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, St. Memphis, TN (United States); Hoffer, F.A. [Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, St. Memphis, TN (United States); Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Tennessee, Memphis, TN (United States); Fletcher, B.D. [Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, St. Memphis, TN (United States); Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Tennessee, Memphis, TN (United States); Dept. of Pediatrics, Univ. of Tennessee, Memphis (United States)

    2000-04-01

    Malignant mesothelioma is a rare tumor in childhood. We present two cases of malignant peritoneal mesothelioma in which contrast-enhanced, fat-saturated magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was used advantageously to detect peritoneal tumor involvement. (orig.)

  10. Lymphoma of uterine cervix: magnetic resonance imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanaan, Daniel; Constantino, Carolina Pesce Lamas; Souza, Rodrigo Canellas de, E-mail: daniel.kanaan@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil); Parente, Daniella Braz [Instituto D' Or de Pesquisa e Ensino, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-05-15

    Lymphoma of the cervix is a rare disease. About 1.0% to 1.5% of extranodal lymphomas originates in the female genital tract. The clinical presentation of this condition is nonspecific and magnetic resonance imaging is important for diagnostic elucidation. The present report describes the case of a 80-year-old patient with lumbar pain, whose magnetic resonance imaging showed a large uterine mass. The final diagnosis was lymphoma. (author)

  11. Image-based segmentation for characterization and quantitative analysis of the spinal cord injuries by using diffusion patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannula, Markus; Olubamiji, Adeola; Kunttu, Iivari; Dastidar, Prasun; Soimakallio, Seppo; Öhman, Juha; Hyttinen, Jari

    2011-03-01

    In medical imaging, magnetic resonance imaging sequences are able to provide information of the damaged brain structure and the neuronal connections. The sequences can be analyzed to form 3D models of the geometry and further including functional information of the neurons of the specific brain area to develop functional models. Modeling offers a tool which can be used for the modeling of brain trauma from images of the patients and thus information to tailor the properties of the transplanted cells. In this paper, we present image-based methods for the analysis of human spinal cord injuries. In this effort, we use three dimensional diffusion tensor imaging, which is an effective method for analyzing the response of the water molecules. This way, our idea is to study how the injury affects on the tissues and how this can be made visible in the imaging. In this paper, we present here a study of spinal cord analysis to two subjects, one healthy volunteer and one spinal cord injury patient. We have done segmentations and volumetric analysis for detection of anatomical differences. The functional differences are analyzed by using diffusion tensor imaging. The obtained results show that this kind of analysis is capable of finding differences in spinal cords anatomy and function.

  12. Review of MRI Technique and imaging findings in athletic pubalgia and the “sports hernia”

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullens, Frank E.; Zoga, Adam C.; Morrison, William B.; Meyers, William C.

    2012-01-01

    The clinical syndrome of athletic pubalgia has prematurely ended many promising athletic careers, has made many active, fitness conscious adults more sedentary, and has served as a diagnostic and therapeutic conundrum for innumerable trainers and physicians worldwide for decades. This diagnosis actually arises from one or more lesions within a spectrum of musculoskeletal and visceral injuries. In recent years, MRI has helped define many of these syndromes, and has proven to be both sensitive and specific for numerous potential causes of athletic pubalgia. This text will provide a comprehensive, up to date review of expected and sometimes unexpected MRI findings in the setting of athletic pubalgia, and will delineate an imaging algorithm and MRI protocol to help guide radiologists and other clinicians dealing with refractory, activity related groin pain in an otherwise young, healthy patient. There is still more to be learned about prevention and treatment plans for athletic pubalgia lesions, but accurate diagnosis should be much less nebulous and difficult with the use of MRI as a primary imaging modality.

  13. Review of MRI Technique and imaging findings in athletic pubalgia and the “sports hernia”

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullens, Frank E. [Department of Radiology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Zoga, Adam C., E-mail: Adam.zoga@jefferson.edu [Department of Radiology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Morrison, William B. [Department of Radiology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Meyers, William C. [Chairman of Surgery, Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2012-12-15

    The clinical syndrome of athletic pubalgia has prematurely ended many promising athletic careers, has made many active, fitness conscious adults more sedentary, and has served as a diagnostic and therapeutic conundrum for innumerable trainers and physicians worldwide for decades. This diagnosis actually arises from one or more lesions within a spectrum of musculoskeletal and visceral injuries. In recent years, MRI has helped define many of these syndromes, and has proven to be both sensitive and specific for numerous potential causes of athletic pubalgia. This text will provide a comprehensive, up to date review of expected and sometimes unexpected MRI findings in the setting of athletic pubalgia, and will delineate an imaging algorithm and MRI protocol to help guide radiologists and other clinicians dealing with refractory, activity related groin pain in an otherwise young, healthy patient. There is still more to be learned about prevention and treatment plans for athletic pubalgia lesions, but accurate diagnosis should be much less nebulous and difficult with the use of MRI as a primary imaging modality.

  14. Review of MRI technique and imaging findings in athletic pubalgia and the "sports hernia".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullens, Frank E; Zoga, Adam C; Morrison, William B; Meyers, William C

    2012-12-01

    The clinical syndrome of athletic pubalgia has prematurely ended many promising athletic careers, has made many active, fitness conscious adults more sedentary, and has served as a diagnostic and therapeutic conundrum for innumerable trainers and physicians worldwide for decades. This diagnosis actually arises from one or more lesions within a spectrum of musculoskeletal and visceral injuries. In recent years, MRI has helped define many of these syndromes, and has proven to be both sensitive and specific for numerous potential causes of athletic pubalgia. This text will provide a comprehensive, up to date review of expected and sometimes unexpected MRI findings in the setting of athletic pubalgia, and will delineate an imaging algorithm and MRI protocol to help guide radiologists and other clinicians dealing with refractory, activity related groin pain in an otherwise young, healthy patient. There is still more to be learned about prevention and treatment plans for athletic pubalgia lesions, but accurate diagnosis should be much less nebulous and difficult with the use of MRI as a primary imaging modality. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY AND AUTOPSY FINDINGS IN TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyatha

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Diagnosis, treatment and outcome vary significantly by the mechanism, severity and the morphology of underlying injury. CT (Computed Tomography scan is said to reveal promptly, accurately and noninvasively the intracranial and parenchymal abnormalities in acute cranio-cerebral trauma. The information in the literature regarding the short comings of routine CT scan in picking up of lesions in TBI (Traumatic brain injury is limited. The present study is undertaken to correlate the CT scan and autopsy findings in TBI. 50 cases of TBI from a period Dec 2012 to May 2014 brought for autopsy at a Government Medical College were studied and analysed. The study showed that the sensitivity of CT for Subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH with respect to various regions of brain ranged from 8.3% to 22.9%. Sensitivity of CT for intra Ventricular haemorrhage was only 27.3% and of Subdural haemorrhage (SDH was also low (50%. Sensitivity of CT for the detection of IVH was 27.3% and specificity 94.9%. For Intra parenchymal haemorrhage the specificity was 98% and sensitivity range from 40 to 66.7%. Haemorrhagic contusions showed overall sensitivity of 42.9% and specificity 72.4%. Brain stem contusions were detected in 14% of cases where as PM examination revealed it in 46% of cases. Sensitivity of CT for brain oedema, herniation and midline shift were poor.

  16. Plasma aldosterone and CT findings in head injury, especially in acute subdural hematoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Hideaki

    1988-12-01

    As we have already reported, an increase in the plasma aldosterone level was regulary found after severe head injury. And the values of plasma aldosterone in unconscious patients with increased intracranial pressure were significantly higher than those in patients without unconsciousness. Thus, plasma aldosterone in acute phase of head injury seems to be a sensitive index of increased intracranial pressure. In the present study, we measured plasma aldosterone levels in three groups ; subdural hematoma with mid-line shift (group A), cerebral contusion without mid-line shift (group B) and cerebral conceussion (group C). In group A, the peak value of aldosterone was markedly high (283.9 +- 142.5). In B, the peak value (143.7 +- 27.8) was higher than in C (116.3 +- 35.0). And, correlation between the serum aldosterone levels and CT findings, especially the mid-line shift was found. As a conclusion, the serum levels of aldosterone seems to be associated with intracranial pressure.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging findings after rectus femoris transfer surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gold, Garry E. [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Asakawa, Deanna S.; Blemker, Silvia S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Delp, Scott L. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2004-01-01

    We describe the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging appearance of the knee flexor and extensor tendons after bilateral rectus femoris transfer and hamstring lengthening surgery in five patients (10 limbs) with cerebral palsy. Three-dimensional models of the path of the transferred tendon were constructed in all cases. MR images of the transferred and lengthened tendons were examined and compared with images from ten non-surgical subjects. The models showed that the path of the transferred rectus femoris tendon had a marked angular deviation near the transfer site in all cases. MR imaging demonstrated irregular areas of low signal intensity near the transferred rectus femoris and around the hamstrings in all subjects. Eight of the ten post-surgical limbs showed evidence of fluid near or around the transferred or lengthened tendons. This was not observed in the non-surgical subjects. Thus, MR imaging of patients with cerebral palsy after rectus femoris transfer and hamstring-lengthening surgery shows evidence of signal intensity and contour changes, even several years after surgery. (orig.)

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of ankle ligaments and tendon injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breitenseher, M.; Trattnig, S.; Kukla, C.; Daebler, C.; Helbich, T.; Haller, J.; Imhof, H.

    1995-01-01

    Today MRI allows evaluation of the integrity of injured ankle ligaments. The major difficulty in MRI is inconsistency in visualization by inadequate appreciation of the three-dimensional orientation of each ankle ligament. Using this technique, 52 patients with sprained ankles underwent MRI. The integrity of rupture of the collateral lateral ligaments was obtained in all 52 ankles. Full-lenght visualization is essential for evaluation of the ankle ligaments with MRI. In these 52 patients the angle of tilt on the stress X-ray was compared with the rate of MRI findings showing an injury affecting two ligaments. We found that none of the patients in whom the angle of lateral tilt was less than 5 had rupture of two laterial ligaments, while 32% of patients with angles of tilt of 6-14 and 42% of those with angles of tilt over 15 on stress X-ray had two ruptured lateral ligaments. The advantages of MRI are that it offers the best visualization of the extent of the tendon lesion. MRI, however, seems to be superior to US in detecting and quantifying lesions of the Achilles tendon. Therefore, MRI may be indicated in particularly difficult cases of tendons injuries in the foot. (orig.) [de

  19. Value of ultrasonography for detecting chronic injury of the lateral ligaments of the ankle joint compared with ultrasonography findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Y; Cai, Y; Wang, Y

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of ultrasonography in the diagnosis of chronic lateral ankle ligament injury. A total of 120 ankles in 120 patients with a clinical suspicion of chronic ankle ligament injury were examined by ultrasonography by using a 5- to 17-MHz linear array transducer before surgery. The results of ultrasonography were compared with the operative findings. There were 18 sprains and 24 partial and 52 complete tears of the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL); 26 sprains, 27 partial and 12 complete tears of the calcaneofibular ligament (CFL); and 1 complete tear of the posterior talofibular ligament (PTFL) at arthroscopy and operation. Compared with operative findings, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of ultrasonography were 98.9%, 96.2% and 84.2%, respectively, for injury of the ATFL and 93.8%, 90.9% and 83.3%, respectively, for injury of the CFL. The PTFL tear was identified by ultrasonography. The accuracy of identification between acute-on-chronic and subacute-chronic patients did not differ. The accuracies of diagnosing three grades of ATFL injuries were almost the same as those of diagnosing CFL injuries. Ultrasonography provides useful information for the evaluation of patients presenting with chronic pain after ankle sprain. Intraoperative findings are the reference standard. We demonstrated that ultrasonography was highly sensitive and specific in detecting chronic lateral ligments injury of the ankle joint.

  20. Restoration of strength despite low stress and abnormal imaging after Achilles injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trudel, Guy; Doherty, Geoffrey P; Koike, Yoichi; Ramachandran, Nanthan; Lecompte, Martin; Dinh, Laurent; Uhthoff, Hans K

    2009-11-01

    To determine the usefulness of clinical imaging in predicting the mechanical properties of rabbit Achilles tendons after acute injury. We created a 2 x 7-mm full-thickness central tendon defect in one Achilles tendon of healthy rabbits. Rabbits in groups of 10 were killed immediately and 4 and 8 wk after surgery (n = 30). We then performed magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, ultrasonography (US), bone mineral densitometry (BMD), and mechanical testing to failure using a dual-cryofixation assembly on experimental and contralateral tendons. The main outcome measures included tendon dimensions, optical density (OD) of T1-weighted, proton density (PD), and T2-weighted MR sequences, US focal abnormalities, BMD of the calcaneus, and stress and peak load to failure. On MR imaging and US, all dimensions of the injured tendons after 2 wk and more were greater than those of the contralateral tendons (P tendons at both 4 wk (39 +/- 9 vs 77 +/- 16 N x mm(-2)) and 8 wk (58 +/- 6 vs 94 +/- 26 N x mm(-2); P tendons, higher T1-weighted OD correlated with lower peak load (r = -0.46; P tendon of lower stress. These findings support progressive physical loading 4 wk after an Achilles tendon injury. T1-weighted OD constituted a marker of tendon mechanical recovery.

  1. Stress injuries of the pars interarticularis: Radiologic classification and indications for radionuclide imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennell, R.; Maurer, A.R.; Bonakdarpour, A.

    1984-01-01

    Lumbar spine radiographs and radionuclide images were compared and correlated with clinical histories of 20 athletes with low back pain. Radiographs were classified as: Normal (Type 0); showing a healing stress fracture (an irregular lucent line) with sclerosis (Type I); as an evolving or healed stress injury with either sclerosis, narrowing, or demineralization (Type II); and as a chronic fracture showing a large lucency with well-defined margins classically referred to as spondylolysis (Type III). Patients were grouped clinically on the basis of their pain: acute onset (Group A, n = 7), acute superimposed on chronic (Group B, n = 9), and chronic pain without an acute event (Group C, n = 4). Radiographic abnormalities were present in 95% (19/20) of the patients and radionuclide studies were positive in 60% (12/20). Scintigraphy was positive most often with Type I pars abnormalities (77%, 10/13) and negative most often with Type III abnormalities (91%, 11/12). Of all positive scintigraphy 12/14 (86%) were in pts in Groups A and B (acute symptoms). The authors' findings support theories that radiographic pars abnormalities exist which correspond to stages in the healing of stress induced fractures. With acute symptoms radionuclide imaging need not be obtained if a Type I radiographic abnormality is seen. Radionuclide imaging is indicated with either Type 0, II or III radiographs to confirm or rule out recent stress injury.

  2. Stress injuries of the pars interarticularis: Radiologic classification and indications for radionuclide imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennell, R.; Maurer, A.R.; Bonakdarpour, A.

    1984-01-01

    Lumbar spine radiographs and radionuclide images were compared and correlated with clinical histories of 20 athletes with low back pain. Radiographs were classified as: Normal (Type 0); showing a healing stress fracture (an irregular lucent line) with sclerosis (Type I); as an evolving or healed stress injury with either sclerosis, narrowing, or demineralization (Type II); and as a chronic fracture showing a large lucency with well-defined margins classically referred to as spondylolysis (Type III). Patients were grouped clinically on the basis of their pain: acute onset (Group A, n = 7), acute superimposed on chronic (Group B, n = 9), and chronic pain without an acute event (Group C, n = 4). Radiographic abnormalities were present in 95% (19/20) of the patients and radionuclide studies were positive in 60% (12/20). Scintigraphy was positive most often with Type I pars abnormalities (77%, 10/13) and negative most often with Type III abnormalities (91%, 11/12). Of all positive scintigraphy 12/14 (86%) were in pts in Groups A and B (acute symptoms). The authors' findings support theories that radiographic pars abnormalities exist which correspond to stages in the healing of stress induced fractures. With acute symptoms radionuclide imaging need not be obtained if a Type I radiographic abnormality is seen. Radionuclide imaging is indicated with either Type 0, II or III radiographs to confirm or rule out recent stress injury

  3. Imagenologia do quadril Imaging findings of the hip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romeu Côrtes Domingues

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Os autores apresentam os métodos de imagem no estudo do quadril, dando ênfase à ressonância magnética, mostrando a alta eficácia deste método no diagnóstico das principais patologias osteoarticulares e musculotendíneas.The authors review the imaging methods for the study of the hip, emphasazing the magnetic resonance imaging, and show the efficacy of this method in the diagnosis of the main osteoarticular and musculotendinous diseases.

  4. Autoimmune pancreatitis associated with primary sclerosing cholangitis: MR imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eerens, I.; Vanbeckevoort, D.; Van Hoe, L. [University Hospital, Leuven (Belgium). Dept. of Radiology; Vansteenbergen, W. [Dept. of Hepatology, University Hospitals KU, Leuven (Belgium)

    2001-08-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis is a relatively rare type of chronic pancreatitis that may be associated with other autoimmune disorders. The imaging features of this entity may be misleading and suggest the presence of a malignant tumour. We present a case in which MR imaging allowed us to diagnose autoimmune pancreatitis associated with primary sclerosing cholangitis, which is another autoimmune-related disease. Typical MR characteristics of autoimmune pancreatitis include focal or diffuse enlargement of the pancreas, the absence of parenchymal atrophy and significant dilation proximal to the site of stenosis, the absence of peripancreatic spread, the clear demarcation of the lesion and the presence of a peripancreatic rim. (orig.)

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of cervical cord injury and its correlation with the patient's outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panggabean, F.; Nakamura, Tsutomu

    1991-01-01

    Thirty four patients with cervical cord injuries were studied by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with reference to neurological deficits. Studies in the acute or subacute stage were made in 25 patients, of whom 17 patients were studied consecutively up to the chronic stage. Chronic studies were made in 26 patients. In acute or subacute MRI studies 12 patients had an intramedullary high signal intensity (HSI) in the traumatized area on T2-weighted image (T2-WI). In consecutive studies HSI appeared persistently up to the chronic stage in four patients, and a low signal intensity (LSI) appeared a few months after the injury at T1-WI, to this point disclosing the area of iso-signal intensity. The HSI in the remaining eight patients disappeared at least in three months. The former MRI findings might suggest the development of myelomalacia from acute hemorrhagic necrosis while the latter might be edema of the traumatized spinal cord. Nine patients of chronic MRI studies showed myelomalacia in six, syringomyelia in two, and transection of the spinal cord in one patient respectively. Significant correlations between MRI findings and neurological deficits in acute and chronic stage were present. It was concluded that those who had no intramedullary abnormality in MRI showed less severe neurological deficits and better outcomes, while those who had intramedullary abnormality in MRI showed severe neurological deficits and poor outcomes. (author)

  6. Clinical Utility of Diffusion Tensor Imaging and Fibre Tractography for Evaluating Diffuse Axonal Injury with Hemiparesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Sugiyama

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although diffuse axonal injury (DAI frequently manifests as cognitive and/or motor disorders, abnormal brain findings are generally undetected by conventional imaging techniques. Here we report the case of a patient with DAI and hemiparesis. Although conventional MRI revealed no abnormalities, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI and fibre tractography (FT revealed the lesion speculated to be responsible for hemiparesis. A 37-year-old woman fell down the stairs, sustaining a traumatic injury to the head. Subsequently, she presented with mild cognitive disorders and left hemiparesis. DTI fractional anisotropy revealed changes in the right cerebral peduncle, the right posterior limb of the internal capsule, and the right corona radiata when compared with the corresponding structures observed on the patient’s left side and in healthy controls. On FT evaluation, the right corticospinal tract (CST was poorly visualised as compared with the left CST as well as the CST in healthy controls. These findings were considered as evidence that the patient’s left hemiparesis stemmed from DAI-induced axonal damage in the right CST. Thus, DTI and FT represent useful techniques for the evaluation of patients with DAI and motor disorders.

  7. Feasibility of Diffusion Tensor Imaging for Assessing Functional Recovery in Rats with Olfactory Ensheathing Cell Transplantation After Contusive Spinal Cord Injury (SCI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Mengchao; Gao, Zhengchao; Li, Xiaohui; Zhao, Feng; Guo, Lei; Liu, Jiantao; He, Xijing

    2017-06-17

    BACKGROUND Olfactory ensheathing cell transplantation is a promising treatment for spinal cord injury. Diffusion tensor imaging has been applied to assess various kinds of spinal cord injury. However, it has rarely been used to evaluate the beneficial effects of olfactory ensheathing cell transplantation. This study aimed to explore the feasibility of diffusion tensor imaging in the evaluation of functional recovery in rats with olfactory ensheathing cell transplantation after contusive spinal cord injury. MATERIAL AND METHODS Immunofluorescence staining was performed to determine the purity of olfactory ensheathing cells. Rats received cell transplantation at week 1 after injury. Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan score was used to assess the functional recovery. Magnetic resonance imaging was applied weekly, including diffusion tensor imaging. Diffusion tensor tractography was reconstructed to visualize the repair process. RESULTS The results showed that olfactory ensheathing cell transplantation increased the functional and histological recovery and restrained the secondary injury process after the initial spinal cord injury. The fractional anisotropy values in rats with cell transplantation were significantly higher than those in the control group, while the apparent diffusion coefficient values were significantly lower. Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan score was positively and linearly correlated with fractional anisotropy value, and it was negatively and linearly correlated with apparent diffusion coefficient value. CONCLUSIONS These findings suggest that diffusion tensor imaging parameters are sensitive biomarker indices for olfactory ensheathing cell transplantation interventions, and diffusion tensor imaging scan can reflect the functional recovery promoted by the olfactory ensheathing cell transplantation after contusive spinal cord injury.

  8. Radial nerve injuries from gunshot wounds and other trauma: comparison of electrodiagnostic findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ying; Chiou-Tan, Faye Y

    2002-03-01

    To identify the difference and similarity of radial nerve injury in gunshot wounds compared to blunt trauma with regard to level of injury, completeness of injury, and other associated nerve injury. This study was a retrospective review of electrophysiologic data performed in an electromyographic laboratory of a county hospital. A total of 67 consecutive patients had gunshot wounds or other trauma to the radial nerve during a 7-yr period (1992-1998). Forty patients met the criteria for this study. The radial nerve injury was categorized according to the level of involvement and completeness of injury. The relationship between the etiology, level of injury, completeness of injury, and other associated nerve injury was analyzed via Fisher's exact test. There was no difference in the level of radial nerve injury, completeness of nerve injury, and associated nerve involvement between gunshot wound cases and blunt trauma cases. In contrast to the upper and lower extremity traumatic plexopathy in which differences were seen, our study showed that gunshot wound-induced radial nerve injury is similar to injury induced by other trauma in the factors measured.

  9. Brain MR imaging finding in patients with central vertigo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Chun Keun; Kim, Sang Joon; Kim, You Me; Cha, Min Jung; Lee, Young Seok; Kim, Jae Il; Lee, Geun Ho; Rhee, Chung Koo; Park, Hyun Min

    1998-01-01

    To investigate brain lesions and their locations in patients with central vertigo, as seen on MR imaging. We retrospectively reviewed MR images of 85 patients with central type vertigo diagnosed on the basis of clinical symptoms and vestibular function test(VFT), and analyzed lesions fand their locations. Those located along the known central vestibular pathway were included in our study. In 29 of 85 patients(34%), lesions considered to be associated with central vertigo were detected on MR imaging. These included infarction(18 patients), hemorrhage(5), tumor(2), cavernous angioma(1), cerebellopontine angle cyst(1), tuberous sclerosis(1) and olivopontocerebellar atrophy (1);they were located in the parietal lobe(6 patients), the lateral medulla(5), the pons(5), the middle cerebellar peduncle(4), the corona radiata(3), and the cerebellar vermis(3). Thirty-eight cases showed high signal intensity lesions in deep cerebral matter, the basal ganglia, and pons but these were considered to be unrelated to central vertigo. MR imaging could be a useful tool for the evaluation of patients with central vertigo.=20

  10. Clinical findings versus imaging studies in the diagnosis of infantile ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of clinical examination compared with ultrasound and upper .... patients, and increased muscle diameter of more than. 14mm in 54 (90%) patients with both longitudinal and transverse images. A barium study was performed in all patients and different signs were ...

  11. Clinical findings versus imaging studies in the diagnosis of infantile ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and upper gastrointestinal contrast imaging in the diagnosis of infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis. ... Keywords: abdominal ultrasound, barium meal, infant, pyloric stenosis. Department of aSurgery and bPathology, ... The availability of ultrasonography and barium studies, however, has raised a question on the best.

  12. Imaging findings of unusual intra- and extrahepatic portosystemic collaterals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, K. [Department of Radiology, Yamaguchi University School of Medicine, Yamaguchi (Japan)], E-mail: itokatsu@med.kawasaki-m.ac.jp; Fujita, T.; Shimizu, A.; Sasaki, K.; Tanabe, M.; Matsunaga, N. [Department of Radiology, Yamaguchi University School of Medicine, Yamaguchi (Japan)

    2009-02-15

    We describe unusual portosystemic shunts demonstrated using computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), including gallbladder varices, aberrant left gastric vein to left portal vein collaterals, intrahepatic and transhepatic portosystemic venous shunt, and mesenteric varices. Familiarity with the CT and MRI features of unusual portosystemic shunts will help in making the correct diagnosis for affected patients.

  13. White matter and reading deficits after pediatric traumatic brain injury: A diffusion tensor imaging study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad Parker Johnson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric traumatic brain injury often results in significant long-term deficits in mastery of reading ability. This study aimed to identify white matter pathways that, when damaged, predicted reading deficits in children. Based on the dual-route model of word reading, we predicted that integrity of the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus would be related to performance in sight word identification while integrity of the superior longitudinal fasciculus would be related to performance in phonemic decoding. Reading fluency and comprehension were hypothesized to relate to the superior longitudinal fasciculus, inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, and cingulum bundle. The connectivity of white matter pathways was used to predict reading deficits in children aged 6 to 16 years with traumatic brain injury (n = 29 and those with orthopedic injury (n = 27 using tract-based spatial statistics. Results showed that children with traumatic brain injury and reduced microstructural integrity of the superior longitudinal fasciculus demonstrated reduced word-reading ability on sight word and phonemic decoding tasks. Additionally, children with traumatic brain injury and microstructural changes involving the cingulum bundle demonstrated reduced reading fluency. Results support the association of a dorsal pathway via the superior longitudinal fasciculus with both sight word reading and phonemic decoding. No association was identified between the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus and sight word reading or phonemic decoding. Reading fluency was associated with the integrity of the cingulum bundle. These findings support dissociable pathways predicting word reading and fluency using Diffusion Tensor Imaging and provide additional information for developing models of acquired reading deficits by specifying areas of brain damage which may predict reading deficits following recovery from the acute phase of TBI.

  14. White matter and reading deficits after pediatric traumatic brain injury: A diffusion tensor imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Chad Parker; Juranek, Jenifer; Swank, Paul R; Kramer, Larry; Cox, Charles S; Ewing-Cobbs, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric traumatic brain injury often results in significant long-term deficits in mastery of reading ability. This study aimed to identify white matter pathways that, when damaged, predicted reading deficits in children. Based on the dual-route model of word reading, we predicted that integrity of the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus would be related to performance in sight word identification while integrity of the superior longitudinal fasciculus would be related to performance in phonemic decoding. Reading fluency and comprehension were hypothesized to relate to the superior longitudinal fasciculus, inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, and cingulum bundle. The connectivity of white matter pathways was used to predict reading deficits in children aged 6 to 16 years with traumatic brain injury (n = 29) and those with orthopedic injury (n = 27) using tract-based spatial statistics. Results showed that children with traumatic brain injury and reduced microstructural integrity of the superior longitudinal fasciculus demonstrated reduced word-reading ability on sight word and phonemic decoding tasks. Additionally, children with traumatic brain injury and microstructural changes involving the cingulum bundle demonstrated reduced reading fluency. Results support the association of a dorsal pathway via the superior longitudinal fasciculus with both sight word reading and phonemic decoding. No association was identified between the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus and sight word reading or phonemic decoding. Reading fluency was associated with the integrity of the cingulum bundle. These findings support dissociable pathways predicting word reading and fluency using Diffusion Tensor Imaging and provide additional information for developing models of acquired reading deficits by specifying areas of brain damage which may predict reading deficits following recovery from the acute phase of TBI.

  15. Athletic injuries of the extensor carpi ulnaris subsheath: MRI findings and utility of gadolinium-enhanced fat-saturated T1-weighted sequences with wrist pronation and supination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeantroux, Jeremy; Guerini, Henri; Drape, Jean-Luc [Universite Paris Descartes, Department of Radiology B, Hopital Cochin, AP-HP, Paris (France); Becce, Fabio [Universite Paris Descartes, Department of Radiology B, Hopital Cochin, AP-HP, Paris (France); University of Lausanne, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne (Switzerland); Montalvan, Bernard [French Tennis Federation, Paris (France); Viet, Dominique Le [Hand Institute, Clinique Jouvenet, Paris (France)

    2011-01-15

    To report the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in athletic injuries of the extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) subsheath, assessing the utility of gadolinium-enhanced (Gd) fat-saturated (FS) T1-weighted sequences with wrist pronation and supination. Sixteen patients (13 male, three female; mean age 30.3 years) with athletic injuries of the ECU subsheath sustained between January 2003 and June 2009 were included in this retrospective study. Initial and follow-up 1.5-T wrist MRIs were performed with transverse T1-weighted and STIR sequences in pronation, and Gd FS T1-weighted sequences with wrist pronation and supination. Two radiologists assessed the type of injury (A to C), ECU tendon stability, associated lesions and rated pulse sequences using a three-point scale: 1 = poor, 2 = good and 3 = excellent. Gd-enhanced FS T1-weighted transverse sequences in supination (2.63) and pronation (2.56) were most valuable, compared with STIR (2.19) and T1-weighted (1.94). Nine type A, one type B and six type C injuries were found. There were trends towards diminution in size, signal intensity and enhancement of associated pouches on follow-up MRI and tendon stabilisation within the ulnar groove. Gd-enhanced FS T1-weighted sequences with wrist pronation and supination are most valuable in assessing and follow-up athletic injuries of the ECU subsheath on 1.5-T MRI. (orig.)

  16. Variants and pitfalls in MR imaging of foot and ankle injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Mohamad Isham Bin; Chew, Kian Ming; Peh, Wilfred C G

    2014-02-01

    Foot and ankle injuries are very common, particularly among young active athletic individuals. MR imaging has become one of the modalities of choice in the assessment of foot and ankle injuries. Accurate interpretation of MR images and diagnosis of pathology requires familiarity with normal anatomical variants and common diagnostic pitfalls. This article describes the common anatomical variants and technical pitfalls in MR imaging of the foot and ankle. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  17. Traumatic Brain Injury Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging Research Roadmap Development Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    optical imaging methods, PET/SPECT with radioisotope agents, and other technologies are less generally available or have known limitations. No “one...Brain Injury D-MRI Research Roadmap Development Project. Product Line Review (PLR) meeting, Medical Imaging Technologies. 12 June 2012. 11. Xia...meeting, Medical Imaging Technologies. Presentation slides. 12 June 2012. 1 Product Line Traumatic Brain Injury Diffusion Magnetic Resonance

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging research progress on brain functional reorganization after peripheral nerve injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Weiwei; Liu Hanqiu

    2013-01-01

    In the recent years, with the development of functional magnetic resonance imaging technology the brain plasticity and functional reorganization are hot topics in the central nervous system imaging studies. Brain functional reorganization and rehabilitation after peripheral nerve injury may have certain regularity. In this paper, the progress of brain functional magnetic resonance imaging technology and its applications in the world wide clinical and experimental researches of the brain functional reorganization after peripheral nerve injury is are reviewed. (authors)

  19. Lower motor neuron findings after upper motor neuron injury: Insights from postoperative supplementary motor area syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey E Florman

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Hypertonia and hypereflexia are classically described responses to upper motor neuron injury. However, acute hypotonia and areflexia with motor deficit are hallmark findings after many central nervous system insults such as acute stroke and spinal shock. Historic theories to explain these contradictory findings have implicated a number of potential mechanisms mostly relying on the loss of descending corticospinal input as the underlying etiology. Unfortunately, these simple descriptions consistently fail to adequately explain the pathophysiology and connectivity leading to acute hyporeflexia and delayed hypereflexia that result from such insult. This article highlights the common observation of acute hyporeflexia after central nervous system insults and explores the underlying anatomy and physiology. Further, evidence for the underlying connectivity is presented and implicates the dominant role of supraspinal inhibitory influence originating in the supplementary motor area descending through the corticospinal tracts. Unlike traditional explanations, this theory more adequately explains the findings of postoperative supplementary motor area syndrome in which hyporeflexive motor deficit is observed acutely in the face of intact primary motor cortex connections to the spinal cord. Further, the proposed connectivity can be generalized to help explain other insults including stroke, atonic seizures, and spinal shock.

  20. Role of SPECT imaging in symptomatic posterior element lumbar stress injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debnath U

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Diagnosis of stress injuries of spine is very difficult with conventional radiography. Methods : In a observational study, 132 subjects were recruited (between 8 and 38 years of age, who had lumbar spondylolysis or posterior element stress injuries. All these patients underwent clinical examination followed by plain X-rays, planar bone scintigraphy and SPECT (single photon emission computerised tomography. SPECT scans can identify the posterior element lumbar stress injuries earlier than other imaging modalities. As the lesions evolve and the completed spondylolysis becomes chronic, the SPECT scans tend to revert to normal even though healing of the defect has not occurred. The aim of the study was to determine the time lag after which SPECT imaging tends to be negative. We divided the patients into two groups, one SPECT positive group and the other SPECT negative group. Pre treatment background variables such as age, gender, back pain in extension or flexion, sporting activities, time of onset of symptoms, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI were used in a univariate logistic regression model to find the strong predictors of positive SPECT imaging results. Determinants of positivity versus negativity of SPECT were identified by discriminant analysis using multivariate logistic regression. Results : Seventy nine patients had positive SPECT scans whereas 53 patients had negative SPECT scans. Bilateral increased uptake was more common than unilateral uptake. Increased uptake at the L5 lumbar spine was more common (70% in SPECT positive group. Low back pain in extension was significantly more common in SPECT positive subjects. Active sporting individuals had higher probability of having a positive SPECT scan. The mean time lag from the onset of low back pain to SPECT imaging was 7 months in SPECT positive group and 25 months in the SPECT negative group. Multivariate analysis predicted that there is a significant difference in positivity of

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of meniscal and anterior cruciate ligament injuries of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreitner, K.F.; Herrig, A.; Grebe, P.; Runkel, M.; Regentrop, H.J.

    1998-01-01

    To categorise discrepancies in findings of the menisci and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) between arthroscopy and MRI. Materials and methods: The MRIs of 236 patients were retrospectively analysed by an experienced radiologist without knowledge of clinical and/for operative findings. Discrepancies in arthroscopic findings were reevaluated together with the arthroscopist to determine their cause of error. Results: The diagnostic accuracies for injuries of the medial and lateral meniscus and the ACL were 92.4%, 92.4%, and 94.1%. respectively. For the menisci, causes for discrepancies in findings (n=31) were: overinterpretation of central signal intensities with contact to the meniscal surface but without disturbance of the meniscal contour as a tear (n=12), insufficient arthroscopie evaluation of the knee joint (n=11), overlooked tears on MR imaging (n=6), misinterpretation of normal anatomic structures (n=1), ''magic angle'' phenomenon (n=1), and missed tears at MRI (n=1). Causes for discrepancies for the ACL (n=18) were: nearly complete versus complete rupture either at MRI or arthroscopy and vice versa (n=9), insufficient arthroscopic evaluation (n=6), insufficient MRI technique (n=2), and overlooked tear on MR imaging (n=1). Conclusions: Discrepant findings between MRI and arthroscopy may be also due to an insufficient arthroscopic evaluation in clinical routine. The close cooperation between surgeons and radiologists improves the understanding of the methods of each other. (orig.) [de

  2. Advanced Neuromonitoring and Imaging in Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart H. Friess

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available While the cornerstone of monitoring following severe pediatric traumatic brain injury is serial neurologic examinations, vital signs, and intracranial pressure monitoring, additional techniques may provide useful insight into early detection of evolving brain injury. This paper provides an overview of recent advances in neuromonitoring, neuroimaging, and biomarker analysis of pediatric patients following traumatic brain injury.

  3. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of mild head injury - is it appropriate to classify patients with glasgow coma scale score of 13 to 15 as 'mild injury'?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchino, Y.; Saeki, N.; Yamaura, A.; Okimura, Y.; Tanaka, M.

    2001-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study is to examine the relation between Glasgow coma scale (GCS) score and findings on computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of patients with mild head injury presenting GCS Scores between 13 and 15. Methods. Data were collected from all consecutive patients with mild head injury who were referred to our hospital between July 1 and October 31, 1999. All patients were recommended to undergo CT and MR imaging examinations. Patients younger than 14 years of age were excluded. Results. Ninety patients were recruited into this study. CT scans were obtained in 88 patients and MR imaging were obtained in 65 patients. Of those 90 patients, 2 patients scored 13 points, 5 scored 14 points and 83 (92.2 %) 15 points. Patients with GCS score of 13 points demonstrated parenchymal lesions an both CT and MR imaging. Those with 14 points revealed absence of parenchymal abnormality an CT, but presence of parenchymal lesions an MR imaging. Patients in advanced age (chi square test, p < 0.0001), and those with amnesia (p = 0005, not significant), although scoring 15 points, revealed a tendency to abnormal intracranial lesions on CT scans. Conclusion. It is doubtful whether patients with GCS score 13 should be included in the mild head injury category, due to obvious brain damage on CT scans. MR imaging should be performed on patients with GCS score 14, since the parenchymal lesions are not clearly demonstrated an CT scans. Even if patients scored GCS 15, patients which amnesia or of advanced age should undergo CT scans at minimum, and MR imaging when available. (author)

  4. Clinical, imaging and cystometric findings of voiding dysfunction in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichim, Gabriela; Fufezan, Otilia; Farcău, Mihaela; Asăvoaie, Carmen; Pop, Daniela; Staticescu, Sorana; Nanulescu, Mircea Victor

    2011-12-01

    The AIM of the study was to validate some of the imaging criteria for voiding dysfunction in children. The study included a number of 55 children with voiding dysfunction symptoms. They were investigated clinically as well as through imaging techniques: renourinary ultrasound, voiding cystourethrography and cystometry. The most common symptoms were urgency (87.3%), increased frequency (81.8%), and daytime urinary incontinence (76.3%). Ultrasound scans detected a reduced bladder capacity in 65.5% patients. The voiding cystourethrography detected bladder trabeculations (58.2%) and spinning top urethra (63.6%). Cystometric recordings indicated overactive bladder in 70.9% patients. Reduced bladder capacity detected by ultrasound associated with trabeculated bladder and spinning top urethra detected by voiding cystourethrography in a patient with specific symptoms may suggest an overactive bladder. In CONCLUSION, voiding dysfunction in child can be diagnosed by minimal or non-invasive methods.

  5. Injuries of the lateral collateral ligaments of the ankle: assessment with MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreitner, K.F.; Ferber, A.; Grebe, P.; Thelen, M. [Department of Radiology, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (Germany); Runkel, M. [Department of Traumatologic and Reconstructive Surgery, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (Germany); Berger, S. [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (Germany)

    1999-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of MRI to display injuries of the lateral collateral ligamentous complex in patients with an acute ankle distorsion trauma. The MR examinations of 36 patients with ankle pain after ankle distorsion were evaluated retrospectively without knowledge of clinical history, outcome and/or operative findings. The examinations were performed on a 1.5-T whole-body imager using a flexible surface coil. The signs for ligamentous abnormality were as follows: complete or partial discontinuity, increased signal within, and irregularity and waviness of the ligament. The results were compared with operative findings in 18 patients with subsequent surgical repair. Eighteen patients with conservative therapy had a follow-up MR examination after 3 months. There was 1 sprain, 3 partial and 32 complete tears of the anterior talofibular ligament, and 5 sprains, 5 partial, and 7 complete tears of the calcaneofibular ligament. There were no lesions of the posterior talofibular ligament. Compared with surgery, MRI demonstrated in 18 of 18 cases the exact extent of anterior talofibular ligament injuries and underestimated the extent in 2 of 8 cases of calcaneofibular ligament injury. In patients with follow-up MRI after conservative therapy, a thickened band-like structure was found along the course of the injured ligament in 17 of 18 cases. The absence of ligament repair after conservative treatment was confirmed during operative revision in one case. The MRI technique allows for grading of the extent of injury of the lateral collateral ligamentous complex after acute ankle strain. It seems to be suitable for monitoring the healing process after conservative-functional treatment of ligament tears. (orig.) With 5 figs., 2 tabs., 26 refs.

  6. Injuries of the lateral collateral ligaments of the ankle: assessment with MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreitner, K.F.; Ferber, A.; Grebe, P.; Thelen, M.; Runkel, M.; Berger, S.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of MRI to display injuries of the lateral collateral ligamentous complex in patients with an acute ankle distorsion trauma. The MR examinations of 36 patients with ankle pain after ankle distorsion were evaluated retrospectively without knowledge of clinical history, outcome and/or operative findings. The examinations were performed on a 1.5-T whole-body imager using a flexible surface coil. The signs for ligamentous abnormality were as follows: complete or partial discontinuity, increased signal within, and irregularity and waviness of the ligament. The results were compared with operative findings in 18 patients with subsequent surgical repair. Eighteen patients with conservative therapy had a follow-up MR examination after 3 months. There was 1 sprain, 3 partial and 32 complete tears of the anterior talofibular ligament, and 5 sprains, 5 partial, and 7 complete tears of the calcaneofibular ligament. There were no lesions of the posterior talofibular ligament. Compared with surgery, MRI demonstrated in 18 of 18 cases the exact extent of anterior talofibular ligament injuries and underestimated the extent in 2 of 8 cases of calcaneofibular ligament injury. In patients with follow-up MRI after conservative therapy, a thickened band-like structure was found along the course of the injured ligament in 17 of 18 cases. The absence of ligament repair after conservative treatment was confirmed during operative revision in one case. The MRI technique allows for grading of the extent of injury of the lateral collateral ligamentous complex after acute ankle strain. It seems to be suitable for monitoring the healing process after conservative-functional treatment of ligament tears. (orig.)

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings of Early Spondylodiscitis: Interpretive Challenges and Atypical Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, Jeong A; Lee, In Sook; Suh, Hie Bum; Song, You Seon; Song, Jong Woon

    2016-01-01

    MR findings of early infectious spondylodiscitis are non-specific and may be confused with those of other conditions. Therefore, it is important to recognize early MR signs of conditions, such as inappreciable cortical changes in endplates, confusing marrow signal intensities of vertebral bodies, and inflammatory changes in paraspinal soft tissues, and subligamentous and epidural spaces. In addition, appreciation of direct inoculation, such as in iatrogenic spondylodiscitis may be important, because the proportion of patients who have undergone recent spine surgery or a spinal procedure is increasing. In this review, the authors focus on the MR findings of early spondylodiscitis, atypical findings of iatrogenic infection, and the differentiation between spondylodiscitis and other disease entities mimicking infection.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of early spondylodisctis: interpretive challenges and atypical findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeom, Jeong A; Lee, In Sook; Suh, Hie Bum; Song, You Seon [Pusan National University School of Medicine, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of); Song, Jong Woon [Dept. of Radiology, Inje University Haeundae Paik Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    MR findings of early infectious spondylodiscitis are non-specific and may be confused with those of other conditions. Therefore, it is important to recognize early MR signs of conditions, such as inappreciable cortical changes in endplates, confusing marrow signal intensities of vertebral bodies, and inflammatory changes in paraspinal soft tissues, and subligamentous and epidural spaces. In addition, appreciation of direct inoculation, such as in iatrogenic spondylodiscitis may be important, because the proportion of patients who have undergone recent spine surgery or a spinal procedure is increasing. In this review, the authors focus on the MR findings of early spondylodiscitis, atypical findings of iatrogenic infection, and the differentiation between spondylodiscitis and other disease entities mimicking infection.

  9. Elastofibroma dorsi: magnetic resonance imaging findings in two cases

    OpenAIRE

    KARAGÜLLE, A. Tuba; ERDEN, M.İlhan; ERDEN, Ayşe; KARADAĞ, Demet

    2002-01-01

    Elastofibroma dorsi is a pseudotumoral mass of unknown pathogenesis that is usually seen in elderly patients. We report two cases of histologically proven elastofibroma dorsi, each presenting with painful periscapular masses. Magnetic resonance imagingshowed periscapular tumoral mass with low to intermediate signal intensity with interspersed areas of high signal intensity on both T1 and T2 weighted images. After I.V. administration of gadopentate dimeglumine, these lesions demonstrated mild ...

  10. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging findings in carbon monoxide poisoning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teksam, M.; Casey, S.O.; Michel, E.; Liu, H.; Truwit, C.L.

    2002-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) of two patients with carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning demonstrated white matter and cortical hyperintensities. In one patient, the changes on the FLAIR sequence were more subtle than those on DWI. The DWI abnormality in this patient represented true restriction. In the second patient, repeated exposure to CO caused restricted diffusion. DWI may be helpful for earlier identification of the changes of acute CO poisoning. (orig.)

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in the painful adult coccyx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maigne, Jean-Yves; Pigeau, Isabelle; Roger, Bernard

    2012-10-01

    Imaging of the painful coccyx currently relies on standard and dynamic radiography. There are no literature data on MRI of the coccyx. This examination could provide information on the cause of pain. 172 patients with severe chronic coccydynia underwent MRI and dynamic radiography of the coccyx. Disc abnormalities (seen in 70 patients) were related to either the presence of intradiscal liquid effusion (17/70), or abnormality of the endplates similar to Modic 1 changes (38/70), or uncertain abnormalities (15/70). Abnormalities of the tip of the coccyx (seen in 41 patients) were located in the surrounding soft tissues: venous dilatations (18/41), soft tissue inflammation (13/41) and ambiguous images (9/41). Vertebral bone oedema was observed in five cases and a benign tumour was observed once. The type of imaging feature depend broadly on the mobility of the coccyx: the 105 cases with a mobile coccyx mainly presented abnormal features mainly in a disc (63 cases vs. 4 cases for the tip), whereas the 67 patients with a rigid coccyx mainly showed abnormal features at the tip (37 cases vs. 7 for the joints, p coccyx when dynamic radiography fails to reveal clearly a pathological lesion (i.e., normal or slightly increased mobility of the coccyx or a rigid coccyx lacking a spicule).

  12. MR imaging finding of synovial sarcoma: emphasis on signal characteristics on T2-weighted images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyoung Won; Jung, Hye Weon; Cho, So Yeon; Han, Moon Hee; Im, Jung Gi; Chang, Kee Hyun; Kang, Heung Sik [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Coll. of Medicine

    1998-01-01

    To determine the MR imaging findings of synovial sarcoma, with emphasis on the signal characteristics of pathologically correlated T2-weighted images. Necrosis, cystic change or hemorrhage was suggested in 11 cases, ten of which showed triple signal intensity, and in all cases, was pathologically confirmed. Fluid-fluid levels were found in three cases and internal septa in ten. In four cases, maximum diameter was less than 5 cm, and in nine, was greater than this. No mass was detected in one case. The tumor was located in the low extremity(n=9), pelvic girdle and hip joint area(n=2), scapular (n=1), shoulder joint area(n=1), and scalp(n=1). Eleven cases showed a relatively well-defined margin and nine showed lobulation. Except in the area of necrosis and cystic change, the pattern of contrast enhancement was diffuse and inhomogeneous. Bony invasion was detected in two cases, neurovascular encasement in four, calcification in four, and joint capsule invasion in four. On T2-weighted images, synovial sarcoma frequently showed triple signal intensity and internal septa with fluid-fluid levels: this was induced by cystic changes due to necrosis and hemorrhage. (author). 13 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Marie-4: A High-Recall, Self-Improving Web Crawler That Finds Images Using Captions

    OpenAIRE

    Rowe, Neil C.

    2002-01-01

    Marie-4, a Web crawler and caption filter, searches the Web to find image captions and the associated image objects. It uses a broad set of criteria to yield higher recall than competing systems, which generally focus on high precision.

  14. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: Magnetic resonance imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puvaneswary, M.; Floate, D. [John Hunter Hospital, NewCastle, NSW (Australia). Departments of Medical Imaging and Neurology; Harper, C. [Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, NSW (Australia). Department of Neuropathology

    1999-02-01

    Rapidly progressive dementia in an adult with findings of bilateral, symmetric high signal intensity on T2-weighted sequences and normal findings on T1-weighted sequences predominantly in the deep grey matter is suggestive of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). The peripheral cortex may be involved, as it was in the present case. The absence of subcortical periventricular white matter high signal intensity suggests that symmetric high signal intensities within the basal ganglia and cortical grey matter are more likely to be due to a degenerative process rather than due to ischaemia, infection or tumour. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd 17 refs., 6 figs.

  15. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: Magnetic resonance imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puvaneswary, M.; Floate, D.; Harper, C.

    1999-01-01

    Rapidly progressive dementia in an adult with findings of bilateral, symmetric high signal intensity on T2-weighted sequences and normal findings on T1-weighted sequences predominantly in the deep grey matter is suggestive of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). The peripheral cortex may be involved, as it was in the present case. The absence of subcortical periventricular white matter high signal intensity suggests that symmetric high signal intensities within the basal ganglia and cortical grey matter are more likely to be due to a degenerative process rather than due to ischaemia, infection or tumour. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  16. MR IMAGING OF ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT INJURIES- A TERTIARY HOSPITAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. L. N. Moorthy

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The aim of the study is to evaluate the diagnostic value of MRI in the diagnosis of acute and chronic anterior cruciate ligament tears. MATERIALS AND METHODS A retrospective analysis of MRI findings in 331 patients with knee joint injuries was done in a period of 18 months. MRI examination was performed on 1.5 T applying standard protocols (FSE proton density sagittal, SE coronal T2 fat suppression sequence, SE proton density axial with fat suppression. All patients had preliminary plain radiographs of knee joints also. Arthroscopy correlation was done in patients who have significant tears. RESULTS We reviewed the various imaging features of ACL tears on MRI examination and their significance with clinical correlation. Out of 331 cases, 122 (36.8% have varying types of ACL injuries. CONCLUSION ACL injuries are more common in males in the present study with peak age incidence of 20-30 years. Cases of ACL tears-36.8% (122 out of 331. Sex ratio=M:F=308:23=13.4:1.

  17. Raman-based imaging uncovers the effects of alginate hydrogel implants in spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, Roberta; Tamosaityte, Sandra; Koch, Maria; Sitoci-Ficici, Kerim H.; Later, Robert; Uckermann, Ortrud; Beiermeister, Rudolf; Gelinsky, Michael; Schackert, Gabriele; Kirsch, Matthias; Koch, Edmund; Steiner, Gerald

    2015-07-01

    The treatment of spinal cord injury by using implants that provide a permissive environment for axonal growth is in the focus of the research for regenerative therapies. Here, Raman-based label-free techniques were applied for the characterization of morphochemical properties of surgically induced spinal cord injury in the rat that received an implant of soft unfunctionalized alginate hydrogel. Raman microspectroscopy followed by chemometrics allowed mapping the different degenerative areas, while multimodal multiphoton microscopy (e.g. the combination of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), endogenous two-photon fluorescence and second harmonic generation on the same platform) enabled to address the morphochemistry of the tissue at cellular level. The regions of injury, characterized by demyelination and scarring, were retrieved and the distribution of key tissue components was evaluated by Raman mapping. The alginate hydrogel was detected in the lesion up to six months after implantation and had positive effects on the nervous tissue. For instance, multimodal multiphoton microscopy complemented the results of Raman mapping, providing the micromorphology of lipid-rich tissue structures by CARS and enabling to discern lipid-rich regions that contained myelinated axons from degenerative regions characterized by myelin fragmentation and presence of foam cells. These findings demonstrate that Raman-based imaging methods provide useful information for the evaluation of alginate implant effects and have therefore the potential to contribute to new strategies for monitoring degenerative and regenerative processes induced in SCI, thereby improving the effectiveness of therapies.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of HTLV-I-associated myelopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, Yoshitaka; Une, Humiho; Osame, Mitsuhiro

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain was evaluated in 12 HAM (HTLV-I-associated myelopathy) patients (4 males and 8 females, mean age of 54 yrs) and compaired with 36 non-HAM controls (16 males and 20 females mean age of 52yrs). MRI of the brain was performed using a 0.5 Tesla superconducting unit. Imaging in all patients was done with the long spin echo (TR=2,000msec, TE=100msec) sequences, and 10mm contiguous axial slices of the entire brain were obtained in all cases. Except for two cases, MRI of the brain was abnormal in 10 (83%) HAM patients, while in controls, 18 (50%) cases were abnormal. The abnormalities were high intensity lesions through SE 2000/100 sequences (T 2 weighted image), and consisted of small isolated hemisphere lesions in 9 patients, periventricular changes in 9 patients, bilateral thalamic lesions in 2 patients and pontine lesions in 3 patients. We found that the factor of age was very important. In patients with ages below 59 yrs, 6 of 8 HAM patients (75%) had abnormalities, while in control cases, 6 of 23 (23%) had abnormalities in periventricular area. And in isolated hemisphere, 6 of 8 HAM patients (75%) had abnormalities, while in control cases, 3 of 23 (13%) had abnormalities. On the other hand, in patients with ages over 60 yrs, 3 of 4 (75%) HAM patients had abnormalities in periventricular area, while in controls, 10 of 13 cases (77%) had abnormalities, and in isolated hemisphere, 3 of 4 (75%) HAM patients had abnormalities, and in controls, 10 of 13 cases (77%) had abnormalities. Our data suggest that HAM patients with ages below 59 years will show a greater percentage of abnormalities than controls. (author)

  19. Cervical spine and crystal-associated diseases: imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feydy, Antoine; Chevrot, Alain; Drape, Jean-Luc [Hopital Cochin, Service de Radiologie B, Paris Cedex 14 (France); Liote, Frederic [Hopital Lariboisiere, Federation de Rhumatologie, Paris (France); Carlier, Robert [Hopital Raymond Poincare, Radiologie, Garches (France)

    2006-02-01

    The cervical spine may be specifically involved in crystal-associated arthropathies. In this article, we focus on the three common crystals and diseases: hydroxyapatite crystal deposition disease, calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) deposition disease, and monosodium urate crystals (gout). The cervical involvement in crystal-associated diseases may provoke a misleading clinical presentation with acute neck pain, fever, or neurological symptoms. Imaging allows an accurate diagnosis in typical cases with calcific deposits and destructive lesions of the discs and joints. Most of the cases are related to CPPD or hydroxyapatite crystal deposition; gout is much less common. (orig.)

  20. Unexpected Cardiac Computed Tomography Findings in Patients With Postoperative Myocardial Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grobben, Remco B; van Waes, Judith A R; Leiner, Tim; Peelen, Linda M; de Borst, Gert Jan; Vogely, Henri C; Grobbee, Diederick E; Doevendans, Pieter A; van Klei, Wilton A; Nathoe, Hendrik M

    2018-05-01

    Postoperative myocardial injury (PMI) is a strong predictor of mortality after noncardiac surgery. PMI is believed to be attributable to coronary artery disease (CAD), yet its etiology is largely unclear. We aimed to quantify the prevalence of significant CAD in patients with and without PMI using coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA). This prospective cohort study included patients of 60 years or older without a history of cardiac disease and with and without PMI after intermediate- to high-risk noncardiac surgery. PMI was defined as any serum troponin I level ≥60 ng/L on the first 3 postoperative days. Main exclusion criteria were known cardiac disease and postoperative ischemic symptoms or electrocardiography abnormalities. Noninvasive imaging consisted of a postoperative CCTA. Main outcome was CAD defined as >50% coronary stenosis on CCTA. The analysis included 66 patients. Median peak troponin levels in the PMI (n = 46) and control group (n = 20) were 150 (interquartile range, 120-298) vs 15 (interquartile range, 10-31) ng/L (P PMI (50%) vs 3 without PMI (15%; relative risk, 3.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.1-9.8). Remarkably, pulmonary embolism was present in 15 patients with PMI (33%) versus in 4 without PMI (20%; relative risk, 1.6; 95% confidence interval, 0.6-4.3). None of the patients died within 30 days. In patients without a history of cardiac disease, PMI after noncardiac surgery was associated with CAD. In addition, a clinically silent pulmonary embolism was found in one-third of patients with PMI. This urges further research to improve clinical workup using imaging and may have important clinical implications.

  1. CASE REPORT Imaging findings in an infant with congenital pul ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Congenital venolobar syndrome (CVLS) is a rare complex malformation that includes hypoplasia of the lung, partial anomalous pulmonary venous drainage and, in a quarter of patients, associated cardiac anomalies. We present the chest radiograph and multidetector. CT findings in a case of congenital venolobar ...

  2. Evolution of the CT imaging findings of accessory spleen infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendi, Resham; Abramson, Lisa P.; Pillai, Srikumar B.; Rigsby, Cynthia K.

    2006-01-01

    We report the case of a 12-year-old girl presenting with multiple episodes of left upper-quadrant pain caused by torsion of an accessory spleen. We present the CT findings of progression of accessory spleen infarction over the course of 7 days. (orig.)

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in Childhood Period Nasopharynx Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aktas, Elif; Sahin, Burcu; Ciledag, Nazan; Arda, Kemal Niyazi; Caglar, Emrah; Ilhan, Inci Ergurhan

    2015-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma is a rarely seen tumor in childhood. It is mostly detected late as the clinical features are similar to other childhood tumors which affect the nasopharynx and adenoidal hypertrophy. Therefore, the radiological features of childhood tumors of the nasopharynx must be well known. The aim of this study was to investigate the contribution of MR imaging features of childhood nasopharynx cancer. The study included 10 nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients under the age of 18 years who presented at hospital between February 2008 and March 2014 and who had tissue diagnosis and MRI of the nasopharynx region. The MRI scans were evaluated by two radiologists. Loco-regional spread, asymmetry, signal intensity of the tumors, and lymph nodes were evaluated. In all the patients there was a mass which narrowed the nasopharynx. In all cases, unilateral mastoid opacification was observed. In 9 cases (90%), parapharyngeal extension was found. In 8 cases (80%), the mass showed an extension into the nasal cavity or oropharynx. In 5 cases (50%), there was an involvement of the skull base. In 3 patients (30%), an extension to the masticator space and pterygopalatine fossa was found. There were enlarged cervical lymph nodes bilaterally in 10 cases (100%). In 4 cases (40%), a lateral retropharyngeal lymph node was detected. Childhood nasopharyngeal cancers are often diagnosed at an advanced stage. MR imaging can be helpful in diagnosis and differential diagnosis of childhood nasopharynx cancer from other diseases of the nasopharynx

  4. Repfinder: Finding approximately repeated scene elements for image editing

    KAUST Repository

    Cheng, Ming-Ming

    2010-07-26

    Repeated elements are ubiquitous and abundant in both manmade and natural scenes. Editing such images while preserving the repetitions and their relations is nontrivial due to overlap, missing parts, deformation across instances, illumination variation, etc. Manually enforcing such relations is laborious and error-prone. We propose a novel framework where user scribbles are used to guide detection and extraction of such repeated elements. Our detection process, which is based on a novel boundary band method, robustly extracts the repetitions along with their deformations. The algorithm only considers the shape of the elements, and ignores similarity based on color, texture, etc. We then use topological sorting to establish a partial dep