WorldWideScience

Sample records for injured brain roles

  1. Antecedent control in the treatment of brain-injured clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zencius, A H; Wesolowski, M D; Burke, W H; McQuade, P

    1989-01-01

    Three brain-injured clients failed to respond significantly to consequence management programmes designed to increase attendance, use of a cane, and to reduce unauthorized breaks. When antecedent stimulus control procedures were applied, attendance and use of a cane increased and unauthorized breaks decreased. The study shows that antecedent control may be the treatment of choice when treating brain-injured clients with memory loss.

  2. Assistive technologies for brain-injured gamers

    OpenAIRE

    Colman, Jason; Gnanayutham, Paul

    2013-01-01

    This chapter surveys assistive technologies which make video games more accessible for people who have an acquired brain injury (ABI). As medical care improves, an increasing number of people survive ABI. Video games have been shown to provide therapeutic benefits in many medical contexts, and rehabilitation for ABI survivors has been shown to be facilitated by playing some types of video game. Therefore, technologies which improve the accessibility of games have the potential to bring a form...

  3. Explain the 'unexplainable': A qualitative enquiry of the representations of the caregivers of brain-injured people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huet, Magali; Dany, Lionel; Apostolidis, Thémistoklis

    2016-04-01

    The aim of our research is to highlight the role of social representations of the traumatic brain-injured person in the adjustments made by caregivers in building and maintaining quality of care. Twenty-three semi-structured interviews were conducted with nursing assistants and medico-psychological assistants, working in a long-term care facility. The interviews were the subject of a thematic content analysis. The analysis shows the role of representations of the traumatic brain-injured person in the way caregivers explain behaviours and situations and in the orientation of their professional practices. In explaining the inexplicable, caregivers establish a more human relationship through individualized care.

  4. A model to predict progression in brain-injured patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tommasino, N; Forteza, D; Godino, M; Mizraji, R; Alvarez, I

    2014-11-01

    The study of brain death (BD) epidemiology and the acute brain injury (ABI) progression profile is important to improve public health programs, organ procurement strategies, and intensive care unit (ICU) protocols. The purpose of this study was to analyze the ABI progression profile among patients admitted to ICUs with a Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) ≤8, as well as establishing a prediction model of probability of death and BD. This was a retrospective analysis of prospective data that included all brain-injured patients with GCS ≤8 admitted to a total of four public and private ICUs in Uruguay (N = 1447). The independent predictor factors of death and BD were studied using logistic regression analysis. A hierarchical model consisting of 2 nested logit regression models was then created. With these models, the probabilities of death, BD, and death by cardiorespiratory arrest were analyzed. In the first regression, we observed that as the GCS decreased and age increased, the probability of death rose. Each additional year of age increased the probability of death by 0.014. In the second model, however, BD risk decreased with each year of age. The presence of swelling, mass effect, and/or space-occupying lesion increased BD risk for the same given GCS. In the presence of injuries compatible with intracranial hypertension, age behaved as a protective factor that reduced the probability of BD. Based on the analysis of the local epidemiology, a model to predict the probability of death and BD can be developed. The organ potential donation of a country, region, or hospital can be predicted on the basis of this model, customizing it to each specific situation.

  5. Social reintegration of traumatic brain-injured: the French experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truelle, J-L; Wild, K Von; Onillon, M; Montreuil, M

    2010-01-01

    Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) may lead to specific handicap, often hidden, mainly due to cognitive and behavioural sequelae. Social re-entry is a long-term, fluctuant and precarious process. The French experience will be illustrated by 6 initiatives answering to 6 challenges to do with TBI specificities:1. bridging the gap, between initial rehabilitation and community re-entry, via transitional units dealing with assessment, retraining, social/vocational orientation and follow-up. Today, there are 30 such units based on multidisciplinary teams.2. assessing recovery by TBI-specific and validated evaluation tools: EBIS holistic document, BNI Screening of higher cerebral functions, Glasgow outcome extended, and QOLIBRI, a TBI-specific quality of life tool.3. promoting specific re-entry programmes founded on limited medication, ecological neuro-psychological rehabilitation, exchange groups and workshops, violence prevention, continuity of care, environmental structuration, and "resocialisation".4. taking into account the "head injured family"5. facilitating recovery after sports-related concussion6. facing medico-legal consequences and compensation: In that perspective, we developed guidelines for TBI-specific expert appraisal, including mandatory neuro-psychological assessment, family interview and an annual forum gathering lawyers and health professionals.

  6. Proximal and distal effects of play on child compliance with a brain-injured parent.

    OpenAIRE

    Ducharme, J M; Rushford, N

    2001-01-01

    Individuals with brain injury may experience severe cognitive and other impairments. For brain-injured parents, such deficits may be associated with child behavior problems, including noncompliance. We assessed the effects of a play period conducted by a brain-injured father on the compliance of his son, who had become uncooperative with his father after the injury. The child consistently demonstrated improved compliance during proximal and distal compliance sessions that followed father-son ...

  7. Cerebral Glucose Metabolism and Sedation in Brain-injured Patients: A Microdialysis Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertle, Daniel N; Santos, Edgar; Hagenston, Anna M; Jungk, Christine; Haux, Daniel; Unterberg, Andreas W; Sakowitz, Oliver W

    2015-07-01

    Disturbed brain metabolism is a signature of primary damage and/or precipitates secondary injury processes after severe brain injury. Sedatives and analgesics target electrophysiological functioning and are as such well-known modulators of brain energy metabolism. Still unclear, however, is how sedatives impact glucose metabolism and whether they differentially influence brain metabolism in normally active, healthy brain and critically impaired, injured brain. We therefore examined and compared the effects of anesthetic drugs under both critical (1 mmol/L) extracellular brain glucose levels. We performed an explorative, retrospective analysis of anesthetic drug administration and brain glucose concentrations, obtained by bedside microdialysis, in 19 brain-injured patients. Our investigations revealed an inverse linear correlation between brain glucose and both the concentration of extracellular glutamate (Pearson r=-0.58, P=0.01) and the lactate/glucose ratio (Pearson r=-0.55, P=0.01). For noncritical brain glucose levels, we observed a positive linear correlation between midazolam dose and brain glucose (Pbrain glucose levels, extracellular brain glucose was unaffected by any type of sedative. These findings suggest that the use of anesthetic drugs may be of limited value in attempts to influence brain glucose metabolism in injured brain tissue.

  8. Role of T2 weighted magnetic resonance image in chronic phase of head injured patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uzura, Masahiko; Taguchi, Yoshio; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Chiba, Syunmei; Matsuzawa, Motoshi

    2002-01-01

    In neuroimaging studies of head injury, addition of echo planar imaging (EPI) T2-weighted images (WI) to routine MR images has been useful in demonstrating small hemorrhagic lesions as magnetic susceptibility artifacts (MSAs). MSAs are often found in the acute or subacute phases of head injured patients with diffuse axonal injury. We studied MSAs in follow-up MR images of patients with diffuse brain injury and discuss the role of EPI T2-WI in patients with chronic phase of head injured patients. This series consisted of 20 patients with diffuse brain injury diagnosed clinically. Their head CT findings were classified into Diffuse Injury I or II according to the CT classification of Marshall et al. All patients underwent long-term follow-up MR examinations. MR findings in chronic phase were divided into three categories in terms of MSAs: group A, MSAs remaining even after disappearance of small traumatic lesions in both T2-WI and fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images (11 cases); group B, MSA (s) that disappeared in association with disappearance of small traumatic lesions (4 cases); and group C, MSAs that remained but could not be differentiated from non-traumatic lesions such as hemorrhagic lacunae or cavernoma (5 cases). Adding EPI T2-WI to routine MR images can provide useful information in visualizing old traumatic lesions of the brain in patients with diffuse brain injury even if no neuroimaging studies in acute or subacute phase. (author)

  9. Facial Expression Recognition for Traumatic Brain Injured Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ilyas, Chaudhary Muhammad Aqdus; Nasrollahi, Kamal; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the issues associated with facial expression recognition of Traumatic Brain Insured (TBI) patients in a realistic scenario. These patients have restricted or limited muscle movements with reduced facial expressions along with non-cooperative behavior, impaired reason...

  10. Neuroimaging of the Injured Pediatric Brain: Methods and New Lessons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Emily L; Babikian, Talin; Giza, Christopher C; Thompson, Paul M; Asarnow, Robert F

    2018-02-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a significant public health problem in the United States, especially for children and adolescents. Current epidemiological data estimate over 600,000 patients younger than 20 years are treated for TBI in emergency rooms annually. While many patients experience a full recovery, for others there can be long-lasting cognitive, neurological, psychological, and behavioral disruptions. TBI in youth can disrupt ongoing brain development and create added family stress during a formative period. The neuroimaging methods used to assess brain injury improve each year, providing researchers a more detailed characterization of the injury and recovery process. In this review, we cover current imaging methods used to quantify brain disruption post-injury, including structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), diffusion MRI, functional MRI, resting state fMRI, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), with brief coverage of other methods, including electroencephalography (EEG), single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and positron emission tomography (PET). We include studies focusing on pediatric moderate-severe TBI from 2 months post-injury and beyond. While the morbidity of pediatric TBI is considerable, continuing advances in imaging methods have the potential to identify new treatment targets that can lead to significant improvements in outcome.

  11. Emotional Labour of Caregivers Confronted With Aggressive Brain-injured Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huet, Magali; Dany, Lionel; Apostolidis, Thémistoklis

    2018-06-01

    Aggressive behaviours are common with people who have suffered brain injuries and induce difficult emotions among certified nursing assistants and medical-psychological assistants who take care of them. These caregivers carry out emotional labour whose content and strategies are little known. The study explores the emotional labour of certified nursing assistants and medical-psychological assistants faced with the aggressive behaviours of brain-injured patients. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 37 caregivers. Interviews were analysed via a thematic content analysis. The analysis shows that the emotional labour of caregivers varies in accordance with the state of "consciousness" or "non-consciousness" that they attribute to the brain-injured patient with regard to this aggressive behaviour. This is a deep acting strategy. Moreover, caregivers shut off their emotions in order not to transmit them to the patient. This surface acting has the first objective for the caregiver of maintaining control of the situation and a second objective of protecting the patient emotionally and therefore of being perceived as a "good" caregiver. Emotional labour also meets a need to preserve the professional self-image and professional status negatively affected in the interaction with the aggressive brain-injured patient. Our study specifies the different strategies of the emotional labour of caregivers and their circumstances of use when they are confronted with aggressive behaviour by brain-injured patients. Targeted support for this emotional labour, such as training and practical analysis, is essential for the development of care practices promoting a caring relationship. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A novel strategy to activate cytoprotective genes in the injured brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Jing; Redell, John B.; Moore, Anthony N.; Dash, Pramod K.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → A strategy to increase cytoprotective gene expression in injured tissue is outlined. → A peptide containing a DEETGE motif can increase Nrf2 responsive genes in vivo. → Gene expression in injured brains requires a calpain cleavage site. → This peptide decreases BBB compromise when infused pre- or post-brain injury. → Cleavage sites for disease-specific proteases could be used to treat that condition. -- Abstract: The transcription factor nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) regulates the expression of multiple cytoprotective genes that have been shown to offer protection in response to a number of insults. The present study describes a novel strategy to increase expression of Nrf2-responsive genes in brain injured mice. Under normal conditions, the adapter protein Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) binds to Nrf2 and promotes its proteosomal degradation in the cytoplasm. The amino acid sequence DEETGE, located at amino acid 77-82 of Nrf2, is critical for Nrf2-Keap1 interaction, and synthetic peptides containing this sequence can be used to disrupt the complex in vitro. We observed that intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) infusion of a peptide containing the DEETGE sequence along with the cell transduction domain of the HIV-TAT protein (TAT-DEETGE) into brain-injured mice did not increase the mRNA levels for Nrf2-driven genes. However, when a calpain cleavage sequence was introduced between the TAT sequence and the DEETGE sequence, the new peptide (TAT-CAL-DEETGE) increased the mRNA levels of these genes. Increased gene expression was not observed when the TAT-CAL-DEETGE peptide was injected into uninjured animals. Furthermore, injection of TAT-CAL-DEETGE peptides before or after brain injury reduced blood-brain barrier compromise, a prominent secondary pathology that negatively influences outcome. The present strategy to increase Nrf2-responsive gene expression can be adapted to treat other insults or diseases based on their

  13. Neural stem cells in the ischemic and injured brain: endogenous and transplanted.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jing; Liu, Baohua; Song, Lei; Lu, Lei; Xu, Haitao; Gu, Yue

    2012-12-01

    Neural stem cells functions as the pool of new neurons in adult brain, and plays important roles in normal brain function. Additionally, this pool reacts to brain ischemia, hemorrhage, trauma and many kinds of diseases, serving as endogenous repair mechanisms. The present manuscript discussed the responses of adult neurogenesis to brain ischemia and other insults, then the potential of neural stem cell transplantation therapy to treat such brain injury conditions.

  14. Improving the Work Potential of Brain-Injured Adolescents and Young Adults: A Model for Evaluation and Individualized Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deaton, Ann V.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    A work program is described that was designed for the brain-injured population. The program addresses cognitive abilities that may be affected by brain injury (orientation, attention, memory, sequencing and problem solving) and possible socioemotional changes (disinhibition, anger control, frustration tolerance, and emotional ability). Case…

  15. Improving working memory performance in brain-injured patients using hypnotic suggestion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindeløv, Jonas K.; Overgaard, Rikke; Overgaard, Morten

    2017-01-01

    be effectively restored by suggesting to hypnotized patients that they have regained their pre-injury level of working memory functioning. Following four 1-h sessions, 27 patients had a medium-sized improvement relative to 22 active controls (Bayes factors of 342 and 37.5 on the two aggregate outcome measures...... group was crossed over to the working memory suggestion and showed superior improvement. By the end of the study, both groups reached a performance level at or above the healthy population mean with standardized mean differences between 1.55 and 2.03 relative to the passive control group. We conclude...... that, if framed correctly, hypnotic suggestion can effectively improve working memory following acquired brain injury. The speed and consistency with which this improvement occurred, indicate that there may be a residual capacity for normal information processing in the injured brain....

  16. Action and object processing in brain-injured speakers of Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arévalo, Analia L; Lu, Ching-Ching; Huang, Lydia B-Y; Bates, Elizabeth A; Dronkers, Nina F

    2011-11-01

    To see whether action and object processing across different tasks and modalities differs in brain-injured speakers of Chinese with varying fluency and lesion locations within the left hemisphere. Words and pictures representing actions and objects were presented to a group of 33 participants whose native and/or dominant language was Mandarin Chinese: 23 patients with left-hemisphere lesions due to stroke and 10 language-, age- and education-matched healthy control participants. A set of 120 stimulus items was presented to each participant in three different forms: as black and white line drawings (for picture-naming), as written words (for reading) and as aurally presented words (for word repetition). Patients were divided into groups for two separate analyses: Analysis 1 divided and compared patients based on fluency (Fluent vs. Nonfluent) and Analysis 2 compared patients based on lesion location (Anterior vs. Posterior). Both analyses yielded similar results: Fluent, Nonfluent, Anterior, and Posterior patients all produced significantly more errors when processing action (M = 0.73, SD = 0.45) relative to object (M = 0.79, SD = 0.41) stimuli, and this effect was strongest in the picture-naming task. As in our previous study with English-speaking participants using the same experimental design (Arévalo et al., 2007, Arévalo, Moineau, Saygin, Ludy, & Bates, 2005), we did not find evidence for a double-dissociation in action and object processing between groups with different lesion and fluency profiles. These combined data bring us closer to a more informed view of action/object processing in the brain in both healthy and brain-injured individuals.

  17. Injured pedestrians in Cape Town - the role of alcohol

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pedestrians and attempt to define the role which alcohol plays in this ... Forensic Chemistry Laboratory, Department of National Health, Cape. Town. J. Monis .... Short term « 8 wks). 80. 40.8. 47. 39.2. 33. 43.4. Long tenn (;;. 8 wks). 54 27.6.

  18. Nonhemorrhagic brain lesions detected by magnetic resonance imaging in closed head injured patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, Yoshihiro; Hiraide, Atsushi; Yoshioka, Toshiji; Sugimoto, Tadashi; Ichimura, Teruhisa; Saito, Akira; Ohno, Yoshioki.

    1990-01-01

    This study evaluated the diagnostic usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 83 closed head injured patients in whom CT failed to detect focal intra or extraaxial hematoma and/or apparent brain contusion. The patients were divided into three groups on the basis of unconsciousness duration: Group 1 comprised 50 patients diagnosed as having classical cerebral concussion; group 2 comprised 19 patients who presented to the hospital with 6-hr unconsciousness and was recovered within a week; and group 3 comprised 14 patients whose unconsciousness persisted for a week or more. There was no CT evidence of abnormal findings for group 1; and intraventricular hemorrhage and subarachnoid hemorrhage were visualized on CT in 26% and 16%, respectively, for group 2 and 71% and 14% for group 3. Intraaxial nonhemorrhagic lesions were detected on T2-weighted MRI. According to high signal intensity, diffuse axonal injury and cortical contusion could be distinguished; i.e., in the former the corpus callosum, basal ganglia, or brain stem showed a high signal intensity, and in the latter the frontal, temporal, or parietal lobe adjacent to the skull showed a low signal intensity. T2-weighted MRI revealed cortical contusion in 6% for group 1, 37% for group 2, and 14% for group 3; and diffuse axonal injury in 42% for group 2 and 79% for group 3. For 62 patients with normal CT findings, diffuse axonal injury was detected in 88%. There was a good correlation between intraventricular hemorrhage on CT and diffuse axonal injury on MRI. In conclusion, T2-weighted MRI was significantly superior to CT in detecting nonhemorrhagic lesions, and it was of great help for predicting neurologic recovery in closed head injured patients without apparent focal lesions on CT. (N.K.)

  19. Low-doses of cisplatin injure hippocampal synapses: a mechanism for 'chemo' brain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andres, Adrienne L; Gong, Xing; Di, Kaijun; Bota, Daniela A

    2014-05-01

    Chemotherapy-related cognitive deficits are a major neurological problem, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. The death of neural stem/precursor cell (NSC) by cisplatin has been reported as a potential cause, but this requires high doses of chemotherapeutic agents. Cisplatin is frequently used in modern oncology, and it achieves high concentrations in the patient's brain. Here we report that exposure to low concentrations of cisplatin (0.1μM) causes the loss of dendritic spines and synapses within 30min. Longer exposures injured dendritic branches and reduced dendritic complexity. At this low concentration, cisplatin did not affect NSC viability nor provoke apoptosis. However, higher cisplatin levels (1μM) led to the rapid loss of synapses and dendritic disintegration, and neuronal-but not NSC-apoptosis. In-vivo treatment with cisplatin at clinically relevant doses also caused a reduction of dendritic branches and decreased spine density in CA1 and CA3 hippocampal neurons. An acute increase in cell death was measured in the CA1 and CA3 neurons, as well as in the NSC population located in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus in the cisplatin treated animals. The density of dendritic spines is related to the degree of neuronal connectivity and function, and pathological changes in spine number or structure have significant consequences for brain function. Therefore, this synapse and dendritic damage might contribute to the cognitive impairment observed after cisplatin treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Monitoring the injured brain: registered, patient specific atlas models to improve accuracy of recovered brain saturation values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, Michael; Belli, Antonio; Davies, David; Lucas, Samuel J. E.; Su, Zhangjie; Dehghani, Hamid

    2015-07-01

    The subject of superficial contamination and signal origins remains a widely debated topic in the field of Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS), yet the concept of using the technology to monitor an injured brain, in a clinical setting, poses additional challenges concerning the quantitative accuracy of recovered parameters. Using high density diffuse optical tomography probes, quantitatively accurate parameters from different layers (skin, bone and brain) can be recovered from subject specific reconstruction models. This study assesses the use of registered atlas models for situations where subject specific models are not available. Data simulated from subject specific models were reconstructed using the 8 registered atlas models implementing a regional (layered) parameter recovery in NIRFAST. A 3-region recovery based on the atlas model yielded recovered brain saturation values which were accurate to within 4.6% (percentage error) of the simulated values, validating the technique. The recovered saturations in the superficial regions were not quantitatively accurate. These findings highlight differences in superficial (skin and bone) layer thickness between the subject and atlas models. This layer thickness mismatch was propagated through the reconstruction process decreasing the parameter accuracy.

  1. Irradiation-injured brain tissues can self-renew in the absence of the pivotal tumor suppressor p53 in the medaka (Oryzias latipes) embryo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuda, Takako; Nagata, Kento; Igarashi, Kento; Watanabe-Asaka, Tomomi; Oda, Shoji; Mitani, Hiroshi; Kimori, Yoshitaka

    2016-01-01

    The tumor suppressor protein, p53, plays pivotal roles in regulating apoptosis and proliferation in the embryonic and adult central nervous system (CNS) following neuronal injuries such as those induced by ionizing radiation. There is increasing evidence that p53 negatively regulates the self-renewal of neural stem cells in the adult murine brain; however, it is still unknown whether p53 is essential for self-renewal in the injured developing CNS. Previously, we demonstrated that the numbers of apoptotic cells in medaka (Oryzias latipes) embryos decreased in the absence of p53 at 12-24 h after irradiation with 10-Gy gamma rays. Here, we used histology to examine the later morphological development of the irradiated medaka brain. In p53-deficient larvae, the embryonic brain possessed similar vacuoles in the brain and retina, although the vacuoles were much smaller and fewer than those found in wild-type embryos. At the time of hatching (6 days after irradiation), no brain abnormality was observed. In contrast, severe disorganized neuronal arrangements were still present in the brain of irradiated wild-type embryos. Our present results demonstrated that self-renewal of the brain tissue completed faster in the absence of p53 than wild type at the time of hatching because p53 reduces the acute severe neural apoptosis induced by irradiation, suggesting that p53 is not essential for tissue self-renewal in developing brain. (author)

  2. Recovery of injured Broca's portion of arcuate fasciculus in the dominant hemisphere in a patient with traumatic brain injury

    OpenAIRE

    Jang, Sung Ho; Ha, Ji Wan; Kim, Hyun Young; Seo, You Sung

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Recovery of injured AF in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) has not been reported. In this study, we report on a patient with TBI who recovered from an injury to Broca's portion of AF in the dominant hemisphere, diagnosed by diffusion tensor tractography (DTT). Patient concerns: A 28-year-old right-handed male patient suffered head trauma resulting from sliding while riding a motorcycle. Diagnoses: He was diagnosed with a traumatic contusional hemorrhage in the le...

  3. The role of resilience in the recovery of the burn-injured patient: an integrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kornhaber R

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available R Kornhaber,1 H Bridgman,2 L McLean,3–6 J Vandervord7 1School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health, University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS, 2Centre for Rural Health, School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health, University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS, 3Brain and Mind Centre, 4Westmead Psychotherapy Program, Discipline of Psychiatry, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, 5Sydney West and Greater Southern Psychiatry Training Network, Cumberland Hospital, Western Sydney Local Health District, Sydney, NSW, 6Consultation-Liaison Psychiatry, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, NSW, 7Severe Burns Injury Unit, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, NSW, Australia Abstract: Severe burn injuries are catastrophic life events resulting in significant physical and psychological effects. With long periods of hospitalization and rehabilitation, burn survivors encounter many issues, including an altered body image and loss of function and independence that subsequently influence quality of life and the family unit. Consequently, resilience has been identified as a fundamental concept that facilitates the adaptability required to navigate the lengthy and complex recovery process. However, over time, the notion of resilience has shifted from a static, innate trait to a fluid and multidimensional concept. Here, we review the evidence surrounding the role of resilience in the recovery of burn injury. This integrative review was based on a systematic search of five electronic databases. Of the 89 articles identified, ten primary research papers met the inclusion criteria. Three key themes were identified encompassing relational strengths, positive coping, and the resistance to trauma symptoms that are fundamental constructs associated with developing and sustaining resilience that resonate with the broader literature on burn recovery. However, limited evidence is currently available within the burns context. While resilience appears to be a vital

  4. Microdialysate concentration changes do not provide sufficient information to evaluate metabolic effects of lactate supplementation in brain-injured patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dienel, G. A.; Rothman, D. L.; Nordström, Carl-Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral microdialysis is a widely used clinical tool for monitoring extracellular concentrations of selected metabolites after brain injury and to guide neurocritical care. Extracellular glucose levels and lactate/pyruvate ratios have high diagnostic value because they can detect hypoglycemia an....... In such cases, lactate will not be metabolizable and lactate flooding may be harmful. More rigorous approaches are required to evaluate metabolic and physiological effects of administration of hypertonic sodium lactate to brain-injured patients.......Cerebral microdialysis is a widely used clinical tool for monitoring extracellular concentrations of selected metabolites after brain injury and to guide neurocritical care. Extracellular glucose levels and lactate/pyruvate ratios have high diagnostic value because they can detect hypoglycemia...... and deficits in oxidative metabolism, respectively. In addition, patterns of metabolite concentrations can distinguish between ischemia and mitochondrial dysfunction, and are helpful to choose and evaluate therapy. Increased intracranial pressure can be life-threatening after brain injury, and hypertonic...

  5. A comparison of aphasic and non-brain-injured adults on a dichotic CV-syllable listening task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanks, J; Ryan, W

    1976-06-01

    A dichotic CV-syllable listening task was administered to a group of eleven non-brain-injured adults and to a group of eleven adult aphasics. The results of this study may be summarized as follows: 1)The group of non-brain-injured adults showed a slight right ear advantage for dichotically presented CV-syllables. 2)In comparison with the control group the asphasic group showed a bilateral deficit in response to the dichotic CV-syllables, superimposed on a non-significant right ear advantage. 3) The asphasic group demonstrated a great deal of intersubject variability on the dichotic task with six aphasics showing a right ear preference for the stimuli. The non-brain-injured subjects performed more homogeneously on the task. 4) The two subgroups of aphasics, a right ear advantage group and a left ear advantage group, performed significantly different on the dichotic listening task. 5) Single correct data analysis proved valuable by deleting accuracy of report for an examination of trials in which there was true competition for the single left hemispheric speech processor. These results were analyzed in terms of a functional model of auditory processing. In view of this model, the bilateral deficit in dichotic performance of the asphasic group was accounted for by the presence of a lesion within the dominant left hemisphere, where the speech signals from both ears converge for final processing. The right ear advantage shown by one asphasic subgroup was explained by a lesion interfering with the corpus callosal pathways from the left hemisphere; the left ear advantage observed within the other subgroup was explained by a lesion in the area of the auditory processor of the left hemisphere.

  6. Human umbilical cord blood-derived stem cells and brain-derived neurotrophic factor protect injured optic nerve: viscoelasticity characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-man Lv

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The optic nerve is a viscoelastic solid-like biomaterial. Its normal stress relaxation and creep properties enable the nerve to resist constant strain and protect it from injury. We hypothesized that stress relaxation and creep properties of the optic nerve change after injury. More-over, human brain-derived neurotrophic factor or umbilical cord blood-derived stem cells may restore these changes to normal. To validate this hypothesis, a rabbit model of optic nerve injury was established using a clamp approach. At 7 days after injury, the vitreous body re-ceived a one-time injection of 50 µg human brain-derived neurotrophic factor or 1 × 106 human umbilical cord blood-derived stem cells. At 30 days after injury, stress relaxation and creep properties of the optic nerve that received treatment had recovered greatly, with patho-logical changes in the injured optic nerve also noticeably improved. These results suggest that human brain-derived neurotrophic factor or umbilical cord blood-derived stem cell intervention promotes viscoelasticity recovery of injured optic nerves, and thereby contributes to nerve recovery.

  7. Recovery of injured Broca's portion of arcuate fasciculus in the dominant hemisphere in a patient with traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Sung Ho; Ha, Ji Wan; Kim, Hyun Young; Seo, You Sung

    2017-12-01

    Recovery of injured AF in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) has not been reported. In this study, we report on a patient with TBI who recovered from an injury to Broca's portion of AF in the dominant hemisphere, diagnosed by diffusion tensor tractography (DTT). A 28-year-old right-handed male patient suffered head trauma resulting from sliding while riding a motorcycle. He was diagnosed with a traumatic contusional hemorrhage in the left frontal lobe, subarachnoid hemorrhage, and subdural hemorrhage in the left fronto-temporal lobe. He underwent craniectomy on the left fronto-temporal area, and hematoma removal for the subdural hemorrhage in the neurosurgery department of a university hospital. Two weeks after the injury, he was transferred to the rehabilitation department of another university hospital. He showed severe aphasia and brain MRI showed leukomalactic lesion in the left frontal lobe. The result WAB for the patient showed severe aphasia, with an aphasia quotient of 45.3 percentile. However, his aphasia improved rapidly by 9 months with an aphasia quotient at the 100.0 percentile. 2-week DTT detected discontinuity in the subcortical white matter at the branch to Broca's area of left AF. By contrast, on 9-month DTT, the discontinued portion of left AF was elongated to the left Broca's area. Recovery of injured Broca's portion of AF in the dominant hemisphere along with excellent improvement of aphasia was demonstrated in a patient with TBI. This study has important implications in brain rehabilitation because the mechanism of recovery from aphasia following TBI has not been elucidated. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. When thoughts become action: an fMRI paradigm to study volitional brain activity in non-communicative brain injured patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boly, M; Coleman, M R; Davis, M H; Hampshire, A; Bor, D; Moonen, G; Maquet, P A; Pickard, J D; Laureys, S; Owen, A M

    2007-07-01

    The assessment of voluntary behavior in non-communicative brain injured patients is often challenging due to the existence of profound motor impairment. In the absence of a full understanding of the neural correlates of consciousness, even a normal activation in response to passive sensory stimulation cannot be considered as proof of the presence of awareness in these patients. In contrast, predicted activation in response to the instruction to perform a mental imagery task would provide evidence of voluntary task-dependent brain activity, and hence of consciousness, in non-communicative patients. However, no data yet exist to indicate which imagery instructions would yield reliable single subject activation. The aim of the present study was to establish such a paradigm in healthy volunteers. Two exploratory experiments evaluated the reproducibility of individual brain activation elicited by four distinct mental imagery tasks. The two most robust mental imagery tasks were found to be spatial navigation and motor imagery. In a third experiment, where these two tasks were directly compared, differentiation of each task from one another and from rest periods was assessed blindly using a priori criteria and was correct for every volunteer. The spatial navigation and motor imagery tasks described here permit the identification of volitional brain activation at the single subject level, without a motor response. Volunteer as well as patient data [Owen, A.M., Coleman, M.R., Boly, M., Davis, M.H., Laureys, S., Pickard J.D., 2006. Detecting awareness in the vegetative state. Science 313, 1402] strongly suggest that this paradigm may provide a method for assessing the presence of volitional brain activity, and thus of consciousness, in non-communicative brain-injured patients.

  9. Postmortem magnetic resonance images of the injured brain: effective evidence in the courtroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, L S

    1991-09-01

    Magnetic resonance images (MRI) of the whole, formalin-fixed brain produce details of pathologic changes deep within brain substance not apparent on external examination. Photographs of these radiographic images present pathologic features in a black-and-white, 2-dimensional format which has proven particularly effective in court before judge and jury. This pathologist has noted acceptance of such photographs in explaining to jurors the details of his testimony in selected cases where brain trauma resulted in a wrongful death. Penetrating missile wounds and blunt impact injuries are particularly well documented by this method.

  10. Educational Implications of Psychopathology for Brain-Injured Children; Lesley College Annual Graduate Symposium (3rd, Cambridge, Massachusetts, May 13, 1967).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gertz, Boris, Ed.

    The symposium report includes the text of an illustrated lecture given by William M. Cruickshank on "Psychopathology and Implications for Educating Brain-Injured Children." Considered in the lecture are hyperactivity, the needs of hyperative children, and educational setting and curriculum. Panel reactions are provided by E.F. Rabe, a pediatric…

  11. Detection of spreading depolarization with intraparenchymal electrodes in the injured human brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeffcote, Toby; Hinzman, Jason M; Jewell, Sharon L

    2014-01-01

    be detected using intra-cortical electrodes, opening the way for electrode insertion via burr hole. METHODS: Animal work was carried out on adult Sprague-Dawley rats in a laboratory setting to investigate the feasibility of recording depolarization events. Subsequently, 8 human patients requiring craniotomy...... for craniotomy. The method provides a new investigative tool for the evaluation of the contribution of these events to secondary brain injury in human patients.......BACKGROUND: Spreading depolarization events following ischemic and traumatic brain injury are associated with poor patient outcome. Currently, monitoring these events is limited to patients in whom subdural electrodes can be placed at open craniotomy. This study examined whether these events can...

  12. [Development of an integrative cognitive rehabilitation program for brain injured patients in the post-acute stage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hyun Soo; Kim, Young Ran; Seo, Wha Sook; Seo, Yeon Ok

    2005-04-01

    This study was conducted to develop a comprehensive cognitive rehabilitation program that can be easily applied to brain injured patients by family members or nurses in community or hospital settings. A Systemic literature review design was used. Thirty-three related studies were reviewed. Based on the results of the literature review, the training tasks for attention were designated to enhancing 4 hierarchical areas, i.e., focused, selective, alternating, and divided attention. On the other hand, the memory rehabilitation tasks mainly consisted of mnemonic skills, such as the association method which helps patients memorize given information by linking together common attributes, the visual imagery method, and self-instruction method. The problem solving rehabilitation program included a task of games or plays which stimulated the patients' curiosity and interest. The training tasks for problem solving were to encourage the process of deriving reasonable solutions for a problematic situation resembling real problems that the patients were faced with in their everyday life. It is expected that the cognitive rehabilitation program developed from this study could help patients having difficulty in their every day life, due to a reduced cognitive ability resulting from brain injury, to effectively adapt to every day life.

  13. Bexarotene reduces blood-brain barrier permeability in cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injured rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Xu

    Full Text Available Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 over-expression disrupts the blood-brain barrier (BBB in the ischemic brain. The retinoid X receptor agonist bexarotene suppresses MMP-9 expression in endothelial cells and displays neuroprotective effects. Therefore, we hypothesized that bexarotene may have a beneficial effect on I/R-induced BBB dysfunction.A total of 180 rats were randomized into three groups (n = 60 each: (i a sham-operation group, (ii a cerebral ischemia-reperfusion (I/R group, and (iii an I/R+bexarotene group. Brain water content was measured by the dry wet weight method. BBB permeability was analyzed by Evans Blue staining and the magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent Omniscan. MMP-9 mRNA expression, protein expression, and activity were assessed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and gelatin zymography, respectively. Apolipoprotein E (apoE, claudin-5, and occludin expression were analyzed by Western blotting.After 24 h, 48 h, and 72 h post-I/R, several effects were observed with bexarotene administration: (i brain water content and BBB permeability were significantly reduced; (ii MMP-9 mRNA and protein expression as well as activity were significantly decreased; (iii claudin-5 and occludin expression were significantly increased; and (iv apoE expression was significantly increased.Bexarotene decreases BBB permeability in rats with cerebral I/R injury. This effect may be due in part to bexarotene's upregulation of apoE expression, which has been previously shown to reduce BBB permeability through suppressing MMP-9-mediated degradation of the tight junction proteins claudin-5 and occludin. This work offers insight to aid future development of therapeutic agents for cerebral I/R injury in human patients.

  14. Rebuilding the injured brain: use of MRS in clinical regenerative medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zare, Alina; Weiss, Michael; Gader, Paul

    2011-03-01

    Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy (HIE) is the brain manifestation of systemic asphyxia that occurs in 20 out of 1000 births. HIE triggers an immediate neuronal and glial injury leading to necrosis secondary to cellular edema and lysis. Because of this destructive neuronal injury, up to 25% of neonates exhibit severe permanent neuropsychological handicaps in the form of cerebral palsy, with or without associated mental retardation, learning disabilities, or epilepsy. Due to the devastating consequences of HIE, much research has focused on interrupting the cascade of events triggered by HIE. To date, none of these therapies, with the exception of hypothermia, have been successful in the clinical environment. Even in the case of hypothermia, only neonates with mild to moderate HIE respond to therapy. Stem cell therapy offers an attractive potential treatment for HIE. The ability to replace necrotic cells with functional cells could limit the degree of long-term neurological deficits. The neonatal brain offers a unique milieu for stem cell therapy due to its overall plasticity and the continued division of cells in the sub-ventricular zones. New powerful imaging tools allow researchers to track stem cells in vivo post-transplant, as shown in Figure 1. However, neuroimaging still leaves numerous questions unresolved: How can we identify stem cells without using tracking agents, what cells types are destroyed in the brain post injury? What is the final phenotypic fate of transplanted cells? Are the transplanted cells still viable? Do the transplanted cells spare endogenous neuronal tissue? We hypothesize that magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), a broadly used clinical technique that can be performed at the time of a standard MRI scan, can provide answers to these questions when coupled with advanced computational approaches. MRS is widely available clinically, and is a relative measure of different metabolites within the sampled area. These measures are presented as a

  15. Who benefits? Outcome following a coping skills group intervention for traumatically brain injured individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anson, Katie; Ponsford, Jennie

    2006-01-01

    To investigate the variables associated with positive psychological outcome following a group intervention for 33 individuals with traumatic brain injury. Evaluation study which used multiple regression analysis to examine the variables associated with change in psychological adjustment following a 10-session cognitive behaviour therapy-based group. The predictor variables were age at injury, time since injury, injury severity, self-awareness, pre-morbid intellectual function, memory function, executive function and level of depression and anxiety prior to intervention. The predictor variables contributed a significant proportion of the variance in percentage change in depression. The major finding was that better outcomes following intervention were associated with greater self-awareness of injury-related deficits. The present study identified a number of variables that were associated with improvement in depression following psychological intervention and may assist future treatment resources to be directed most effectively.

  16. Role of biomechanics in the understanding of normal, injured, and healing ligaments and tendons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Ho-Joong

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ligaments and tendons are soft connective tissues which serve essential roles for biomechanical function of the musculoskeletal system by stabilizing and guiding the motion of diarthrodial joints. Nevertheless, these tissues are frequently injured due to repetition and overuse as well as quick cutting motions that involve acceleration and deceleration. These injuries often upset this balance between mobility and stability of the joint which causes damage to other soft tissues manifested as pain and other morbidity, such as osteoarthritis. The healing of ligament and tendon injuries varies from tissue to tissue. Tendinopathies are ubiquitous and can take up to 12 months for the pain to subside before one could return to normal activity. A ruptured medial collateral ligament (MCL can generally heal spontaneously; however, its remodeling process takes years and its biomechanical properties remain inferior when compared to the normal MCL. It is also known that a midsubstance anterior cruciate ligament (ACL tear has limited healing capability, and reconstruction by soft tissue grafts has been regularly performed to regain knee function. However, long term follow-up studies have revealed that 20–25% of patients experience unsatisfactory results. Thus, a better understanding of the function of ligaments and tendons, together with knowledge on their healing potential, may help investigators to develop novel strategies to accelerate and improve the healing process of ligaments and tendons. With thousands of new papers published in the last ten years that involve biomechanics of ligaments and tendons, there is an increasing appreciation of this subject area. Such attention has positively impacted clinical practice. On the other hand, biomechanical data are complex in nature, and there is a danger of misinterpreting them. Thus, in these review, we will provide the readers with a brief overview of ligaments and tendons and refer them to

  17. Role of biomechanics in the understanding of normal, injured, and healing ligaments and tendons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Ho-Joong; Fisher, Matthew B; Woo, Savio L-Y

    2009-01-01

    Ligaments and tendons are soft connective tissues which serve essential roles for biomechanical function of the musculoskeletal system by stabilizing and guiding the motion of diarthrodial joints. Nevertheless, these tissues are frequently injured due to repetition and overuse as well as quick cutting motions that involve acceleration and deceleration. These injuries often upset this balance between mobility and stability of the joint which causes damage to other soft tissues manifested as pain and other morbidity, such as osteoarthritis. The healing of ligament and tendon injuries varies from tissue to tissue. Tendinopathies are ubiquitous and can take up to 12 months for the pain to subside before one could return to normal activity. A ruptured medial collateral ligament (MCL) can generally heal spontaneously; however, its remodeling process takes years and its biomechanical properties remain inferior when compared to the normal MCL. It is also known that a midsubstance anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear has limited healing capability, and reconstruction by soft tissue grafts has been regularly performed to regain knee function. However, long term follow-up studies have revealed that 20–25% of patients experience unsatisfactory results. Thus, a better understanding of the function of ligaments and tendons, together with knowledge on their healing potential, may help investigators to develop novel strategies to accelerate and improve the healing process of ligaments and tendons. With thousands of new papers published in the last ten years that involve biomechanics of ligaments and tendons, there is an increasing appreciation of this subject area. Such attention has positively impacted clinical practice. On the other hand, biomechanical data are complex in nature, and there is a danger of misinterpreting them. Thus, in these review, we will provide the readers with a brief overview of ligaments and tendons and refer them to appropriate methodologies used to

  18. The iconic memory skills of brain injury survivors and non-brain injured controls after visual scanning training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, J T; Browning, R T; Vantrease, C M; Bittle, S T

    1994-01-01

    Previous research suggests that traumatic brain injury (TBI) results in impairment of iconic memory abilities.We would like to acknowledge the contribution of Jeffrey D. Vantrease, who wrote the software program for the Iconic Memory procedure and measurement. This raises serious implications for brain injury rehabilitation. Most cognitive rehabilitation programs do not include iconic memory training. Instead it is common for cognitive rehabilitation programs to focus on attention and concentration skills, memory skills, and visual scanning skills.This study compared the iconic memory skills of brain-injury survivors and control subjects who all reached criterion levels of visual scanning skills. This involved previous training for the brain-injury survivors using popular visual scanning programs that allowed them to visually scan with response time and accuracy within normal limits. Control subjects required only minimal training to reach normal limits criteria. This comparison allows for the dissociation of visual scanning skills and iconic memory skills.The results are discussed in terms of their implications for cognitive rehabilitation and the relationship between visual scanning training and iconic memory skills.

  19. The evaluation of behavioural changes in brain-injured patients: SOFMER recommendations for clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prouteau, A; Stéfan, A; Wiart, L; Mazaux, J M

    2016-02-01

    Behavioural changes are the main cause of difficulties in interpersonal relationships and social integration among traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients. The Société française de médecine physique et réadaptation (SOFMER) decided to develop recommendations for the treatment and care provision for these problem under the auspices of the French health authority, the Haute Autorité de la santé (HAS). Assessment of behaviour is essential to describe, understand and define situations, assess any change and suggest lines for intervention. The relationship of these behavioural changes with the brain lesion is likewise of crucial importance in legal and forensic expertise. Using a literature review and expert opinions, the aim was to define the optimal conditions for the collection of data on behavioural changes in individuals having sustained brain trauma, to identify the situations in which they arise, to review the instruments available, and to suggest lines of intervention. A literature search identified 981 articles, among which 122 on the target subject were selected and analysed in detail and confronted with the experience of professionals and user representatives. A first draft of the recommendations was produced by the working group, and then submitted to a review group for opinions and complements. The literature on this subject is heterogeneous, and presents low levels of evidence. No article enabled the development of recommendations above the "expert opinion" level. After prior clarification of the aims of the evaluation, it is recommended first to carefully describe the changes in behaviour, from patient and third-person narratives, and where possible from direct observations. The information enabling the description of the phenomena occurring should be collected by different individuals (multi-source evaluation): the patient, his or her close circle, and professionals with different training backgrounds (multidisciplinary evaluation). The analysis of

  20. Prospective Study on Noninvasive Assessment of Intracranial Pressure in Traumatic Brain-Injured Patients: Comparison of Four Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardim, Danilo; Robba, Chiara; Donnelly, Joseph; Bohdanowicz, Michal; Schmidt, Bernhard; Damian, Maxwell; Varsos, Georgios V; Liu, Xiuyun; Cabeleira, Manuel; Frigieri, Gustavo; Cabella, Brenno; Smielewski, Peter; Mascarenhas, Sergio; Czosnyka, Marek

    2016-04-15

    Elevation of intracranial pressure (ICP) may occur in many diseases, and therefore the ability to measure it noninvasively would be useful. Flow velocity signals from transcranial Doppler (TCD) have been used to estimate ICP; however, the relative accuracy of these methods is unclear. This study aimed to compare four previously described TCD-based methods with directly measured ICP in a prospective cohort of traumatic brain-injured patients. Noninvasive ICP (nICP) was obtained using the following methods: 1) a mathematical "black-box" model based on interaction between TCD and arterial blood pressure (nICP_BB); 2) based on diastolic flow velocity (nICP_FVd); 3) based on critical closing pressure (nICP_CrCP); and 4) based on TCD-derived pulsatility index (nICP_PI). In time domain, for recordings including spontaneous changes in ICP greater than 7 mm Hg, nICP_PI showed the best correlation with measured ICP (R = 0.61). Considering every TCD recording as an independent event, nICP_BB generally showed to be the best estimator of measured ICP (R = 0.39; p area under the curve [AUC] = 0.66; p AUC (0.70; p AUC = 0.64; p > 0.05). nICP_PI was not related to measured ICP using any of the above statistical indicators. We also introduced a new estimator (nICP_Av) based on the average of three methods (nICP_BB, nICP_FVd, and nICP_CrCP), which overall presented improved statistical indicators (R = 0.47; p AUC = 0.73; p < 0.05). nICP_PI appeared to reflect changes in ICP in time most accurately. nICP_BB was the best estimator for ICP "as a number." nICP_Av demonstrated to improve the accuracy of measured ICP estimation.

  1. Role of surgery in brain metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laghari, Altaf Ali; Ahmed, Syed Ijlal; Shamim, Muhammad Shahzad

    2017-08-01

    Brain metastases remain the commonest type of brain tumour, being four times more common than primary brain tumours. Although surgical intervention may be recommended for one of various reasons in the management of these tumours, including but not limited to conformation of diagnosis, relief of mass effect, improvement of neurological status and prolongation of survival, the guidelines for management of brain metastases remain largely subjective and therefore controversial. Herein the authors have attempted to review some of the existing evidence on role of surgery in the management of brain metastases and have presented their selected guidelines for the readers.

  2. Structural and metabolic changes in the traumatically injured rat brain. High-resolution in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 7 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jing; Zhao, Can; Rao, Jia-Sheng; Yang, Fei-Xiang; Yang, Zhao-Yang; Wang, Zhan-Jing; Lei, Jian-Feng; Li, Xiao-Guang

    2017-01-01

    The understanding of microstructural and metabolic changes in the post-traumatic brain injury is the key to brain damage suppression and repair in clinics. Ten female Wistar rats were traumatically injured in the brain CA1 region and above the cortex. Next, diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DTI) and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 1 H MRS) were used to analyze the microstructural and metabolic changes in the brain within the following 2 weeks. Anisotropy fraction (FA) and axial diffusivity (AD) of the corpus callosum (CC) began to decrease significantly at day 1, whereas radial diffusivity (RD) significantly increased immediately after injury, reflecting the loss of white matter integrity. Compared with day 3, RD decreased significantly at day 7, implicating the angioedema reduction. In the hippocampus, FA significantly increased at day 7; the choline-containing compounds (Cho) and myo-inositol (MI) remarkably increased at day 7 compared with those at day 3, indicating the proliferation of astrocytes and radial glial cells after day 7. No significant differences between DTI and 1 H MRS parameters were observed between day 1 and day 3. Day 1-3 after traumatic brain injury (TBI) may serve as a relatively appropriate time window for treatment planning and the following nerve repair. (orig.)

  3. Structural and metabolic changes in the traumatically injured rat brain. High-resolution in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 7 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jing; Zhao, Can; Rao, Jia-Sheng [Beihang University, Beijing Key Laboratory for Biomaterials and Neural Regeneration, School of Biological Science and Medical Engineering, Beijing (China); Yang, Fei-Xiang; Yang, Zhao-Yang [Capital Medical University, Department of Neurobiology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Beijing (China); Wang, Zhan-Jing; Lei, Jian-Feng [Capital Medical University, Medical Experiment and Test Center, Beijing (China); Li, Xiao-Guang [Beihang University, Beijing Key Laboratory for Biomaterials and Neural Regeneration, School of Biological Science and Medical Engineering, Beijing (China); Capital Medical University, Department of Neurobiology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Beijing (China)

    2017-12-15

    The understanding of microstructural and metabolic changes in the post-traumatic brain injury is the key to brain damage suppression and repair in clinics. Ten female Wistar rats were traumatically injured in the brain CA1 region and above the cortex. Next, diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DTI) and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H MRS) were used to analyze the microstructural and metabolic changes in the brain within the following 2 weeks. Anisotropy fraction (FA) and axial diffusivity (AD) of the corpus callosum (CC) began to decrease significantly at day 1, whereas radial diffusivity (RD) significantly increased immediately after injury, reflecting the loss of white matter integrity. Compared with day 3, RD decreased significantly at day 7, implicating the angioedema reduction. In the hippocampus, FA significantly increased at day 7; the choline-containing compounds (Cho) and myo-inositol (MI) remarkably increased at day 7 compared with those at day 3, indicating the proliferation of astrocytes and radial glial cells after day 7. No significant differences between DTI and {sup 1}H MRS parameters were observed between day 1 and day 3. Day 1-3 after traumatic brain injury (TBI) may serve as a relatively appropriate time window for treatment planning and the following nerve repair. (orig.)

  4. Experienced emotional burden in caregivers: psychometric properties of the Involvement Evaluation Questionnaire in caregivers of brain injured patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurtsen, Gert J.; Meijer, Ron; van Heugten, Caroline M.; Martina, Juan D.; Geurts, Alexander C. H.

    2010-01-01

    To examine the psychometric properties (internal consistency, discriminant validity, and responsiveness) of the Involvement Evaluation Questionnaire for Brain Injury measuring emotional burden in caregivers of patients with chronic acquired brain injury. Inception cohort study. Caregivers of chronic

  5. Experienced emotional burden in caregivers: psychometric properties of the Involvement Evaluation Questionnaire in caregivers of brain injured patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurtsen, G.J.; Meijer, R.; Heugten, C.M. van; Martina, J.D.; Geurts, A.C.H.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the psychometric properties (internal consistency, discriminant validity, and responsiveness) of the Involvement Evaluation Questionnaire for Brain Injury measuring emotional burden in caregivers of patients with chronic acquired brain injury. DESIGN: Inception cohort study.

  6. The role of chemotherapy in brain metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohori, Hisatsugu; Takahashi, Shin; Ishioka, Chikashi

    2007-01-01

    Brain metastases are the most common intracranial tumors and their incidence is increasing. Untreated brain metastases have a very poor prognosis with a median survival of 1-2 months. Despite the use of surgery and radiotherapy including whole-brain radiation and stereotactic radiosurgery to locally control brain metastases, survival times for those patients has not improved. Although chemotherapy plays a limited role in the treatment of brain metastases, metastases from lung or breast cancer are often well-controlled by chemotherapy. Accumulating evidence suggest that brain metastases are equally sensitive to chemotherapy as are metastases elsewhere in the body in particular chemotherapy-naive cases. Finally, since nearly a half of patients with brain metastases die from progression of systemic disease, control of systemic disease as well as intracranial disease are both important. (author)

  7. The Ror1 receptor tyrosine kinase plays a critical role in regulating satellite cell proliferation during regeneration of injured muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamizaki, Koki; Doi, Ryosuke; Hayashi, Makoto; Saji, Takeshi; Kanagawa, Motoi; Toda, Tatsushi; Fukada, So-Ichiro; Ho, Hsin-Yi Henry; Greenberg, Michael Eldon; Endo, Mitsuharu; Minami, Yasuhiro

    2017-09-22

    The Ror family receptor tyrosine kinases, Ror1 and Ror2, play important roles in regulating developmental morphogenesis and tissue- and organogenesis, but their roles in tissue regeneration in adult animals remain largely unknown. In this study, we examined the expression and function of Ror1 and Ror2 during skeletal muscle regeneration. Using an in vivo skeletal muscle injury model, we show that expression of Ror1 and Ror2 in skeletal muscles is induced transiently by the inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α and IL-1β, after injury and that inhibition of TNF-α and IL-1β by neutralizing antibodies suppresses expression of Ror1 and Ror2 in injured muscles. Importantly, expression of Ror1 , but not Ror2 , was induced primarily in Pax7-positive satellite cells (SCs) after muscle injury, and administration of neutralizing antibodies decreased the proportion of Pax7-positive proliferative SCs after muscle injury. We also found that stimulation of a mouse myogenic cell line, C2C12 cells, with TNF-α or IL-1β induced expression of Ror1 via NF-κB activation and that suppressed expression of Ror1 inhibited their proliferative responses in SCs. Intriguingly, SC-specific depletion of Ror1 decreased the number of Pax7-positive SCs after muscle injury. Collectively, these findings indicate for the first time that Ror1 has a critical role in regulating SC proliferation during skeletal muscle regeneration. We conclude that Ror1 might be a suitable target in the development of diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to manage muscular disorders. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Recovery of an injured cingulum concurrent with improvement of short-term memory in a patient with mild traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Sung Ho; Kim, Seong Ho; Seo, Jeong Pyo

    2018-01-01

    We reported on a patient with mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) who showed recovery of an injured cingulum concurrent with improvement of short-term memory, which was demonstrated on follow-up diffusion tensor tractography (DTT). A 55-year-old male patient suffered head trauma resulting from falling from approximately 2 m while working at a construction site. The patient showed mild memory impairment (especially short-term memory impairment) at 3 months after onset: Memory Assessment Scale (global memory: 95 (37%ile), short-term memory: 75 (5%ile), verbal memory: 80 (9%ile) and visual memory: 112 (79%ile)). By contrast, at 2 years after onset, his mild memory impairment had improved to a normal state: Memory Assessment Scale (global memory: 104 (61%ile), short-term memory: 95 (37%ile), verbal memory: 101 (53%ile) and visual memory: 106 (66%ile)). On 3-month DTT, discontinuation of the right anterior cingulum was observed over the genu of the corpus callosum, while on 2-year DTT, the discontinued right anterior cingulum was elongated to the right basal forebrain. In conclusion, recovery of an injured cingulum concurrent with improvement of short-term memory was demonstrated in a patient with mild TBI.

  9. The Role of Oxidative Stress in Severity of Obstructive Pulmonary Complications in Sputum of Sulfur Mustard-Injured Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Heydari

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sulfur mustard (SM is a strong bifunctional alkylating agent that causes delayed complications in organs such as lung. Oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis and progression of many pulmonary diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the oxidative stress in sputum of SM exposed patients with mild, moderate and severe pulmonary dysfunction and assessing their relationship with pulmonary function. Methods: In this cross–sectional study, oxidative stress biomarkers in sputum were examined on 26 patients with SM-induced bronchiolitis obliterans (9 mild, 14 moderate and 3 severe and 12 matched healthy controls referred to Baqiyatallah Hospital, Tehran between October 2015 and April 2016. Results: Sputum superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione S-transferase activities and malondialdehyde level in moderate and severe groups were significantly higher than in the control group (P=0.002, P=0.004, P=0.014 and P=0.009, respectively. Glutathione (GSH level in moderate (22.29%, P=0.025 and severe (45.07%, P=0.004 groups were significantly lower than the control. A decreased in GSH level in severe (41.7% groups was observed as compared with the mild group. Pearson analysis revealed strong correlations between disease severity and oxidative stress biomarkers in sputum of patients with moderate and severe injuries. Conclusions: Oxidative stress is involved in the pathogenesis of patients with moderate and severe pulmonary dysfunction following SM exposure. The presence of enhanced oxidative stress relates to the decline lung function and the progression of the disease. Sputum induction in SM-injured patients can be used to the assessment of the antioxidant status of bronchial secretions.

  10. The ethical and legal aspects of palliative sedation in severely brain-injured patients: a French perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puybasset Louis

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract To fulfill their crucial duty of relieving suffering in their patients, physicians may have to administer palliative sedation when they implement treatment-limitation decisions such as the withdrawal of life-supporting interventions in patients with poor prognosis chronic severe brain injury. The issue of palliative sedation deserves particular attention in adults with serious brain injuries and in neonates with severe and irreversible brain lesions, who are unable to express pain or to state their wishes. In France, treatment limitation decisions for these patients are left to the physicians. Treatment-limitation decisions are made collegially, based on the presence of irreversible brain lesions responsible for chronic severe disorders of consciousness. Before these decisions are implemented, they are communicated to the relatives. Because the presence and severity of pain cannot be assessed in these patients, palliative analgesia and/or sedation should be administered. However, palliative sedation is a complex strategy that requires safeguards to prevent a drift toward hastening death or performing covert euthanasia. In addition to the law on patients' rights at the end of life passed in France on April 22, 2005, a recent revision of Article 37 of the French code of medical ethics both acknowledges that treatment-limitation decisions and palliative sedation may be required in patients with severe brain injuries and provides legal and ethical safeguards against a shift towards euthanasia. This legislation may hold value as a model for other countries where euthanasia is illegal and for countries such as Belgium and Netherlands where euthanasia is legal but not allowed in patients incapable of asking for euthanasia but in whom a treatment limitation decision has been made.

  11. The ethical and legal aspects of palliative sedation in severely brain-injured patients: a French perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    To fulfill their crucial duty of relieving suffering in their patients, physicians may have to administer palliative sedation when they implement treatment-limitation decisions such as the withdrawal of life-supporting interventions in patients with poor prognosis chronic severe brain injury. The issue of palliative sedation deserves particular attention in adults with serious brain injuries and in neonates with severe and irreversible brain lesions, who are unable to express pain or to state their wishes. In France, treatment limitation decisions for these patients are left to the physicians. Treatment-limitation decisions are made collegially, based on the presence of irreversible brain lesions responsible for chronic severe disorders of consciousness. Before these decisions are implemented, they are communicated to the relatives. Because the presence and severity of pain cannot be assessed in these patients, palliative analgesia and/or sedation should be administered. However, palliative sedation is a complex strategy that requires safeguards to prevent a drift toward hastening death or performing covert euthanasia. In addition to the law on patients' rights at the end of life passed in France on April 22, 2005, a recent revision of Article 37 of the French code of medical ethics both acknowledges that treatment-limitation decisions and palliative sedation may be required in patients with severe brain injuries and provides legal and ethical safeguards against a shift towards euthanasia. This legislation may hold value as a model for other countries where euthanasia is illegal and for countries such as Belgium and Netherlands where euthanasia is legal but not allowed in patients incapable of asking for euthanasia but in whom a treatment limitation decision has been made. PMID:21303504

  12. The ethical and legal aspects of palliative sedation in severely brain-injured patients: a French perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Antoine; Claudot, Frédérique; Audibert, Gérard; Mertes, Paul-Michel; Puybasset, Louis

    2011-02-08

    To fulfill their crucial duty of relieving suffering in their patients, physicians may have to administer palliative sedation when they implement treatment-limitation decisions such as the withdrawal of life-supporting interventions in patients with poor prognosis chronic severe brain injury. The issue of palliative sedation deserves particular attention in adults with serious brain injuries and in neonates with severe and irreversible brain lesions, who are unable to express pain or to state their wishes. In France, treatment limitation decisions for these patients are left to the physicians. Treatment-limitation decisions are made collegially, based on the presence of irreversible brain lesions responsible for chronic severe disorders of consciousness. Before these decisions are implemented, they are communicated to the relatives. Because the presence and severity of pain cannot be assessed in these patients, palliative analgesia and/or sedation should be administered. However, palliative sedation is a complex strategy that requires safeguards to prevent a drift toward hastening death or performing covert euthanasia. In addition to the law on patients' rights at the end of life passed in France on April 22, 2005, a recent revision of Article 37 of the French code of medical ethics both acknowledges that treatment-limitation decisions and palliative sedation may be required in patients with severe brain injuries and provides legal and ethical safeguards against a shift towards euthanasia. This legislation may hold value as a model for other countries where euthanasia is illegal and for countries such as Belgium and Netherlands where euthanasia is legal but not allowed in patients incapable of asking for euthanasia but in whom a treatment limitation decision has been made.

  13. Regional pressure and temperature variations across the injured human brain: comparisons between paired intraparenchymal and ventricular measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, Charmaine; Shen, Liang

    2015-06-23

    Intraparenchymal, multimodality sensors are commonly used in the management of patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). The 'gold standard', based on accuracy, reliability and cost for intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring is within the cerebral ventricle (external strain gauge). There are no standards yet for intracerebral temperature monitoring and little is known of temperature differences between brain tissue and ventricle. The aim of the study therefore was to determine pressure and temperature differences at intraparenchymal and ventricular sites during five days of continuous neuromonitoring. Patients with severe TBI requiring emergency surgery. patients who required ICP monitoring were eligible for recruitment. Two intracerebral probe types were used: a) intraventricular, dual parameter sensor (measuring pressure, temperature) with inbuilt catheter for CSF drainage: b) multiparameter intraparenchymal sensor measuring pressure, temperature and oxygen partial pressure. All sensors were inserted during surgery and under aseptic conditions. Seventeen patients, 12 undergoing neurosurgery (decompressive craniectomy n = 8, craniotomy n = 4) aged 21-78 years were studied. Agreement of measures for 9540 brain tissue-ventricular temperature 'pairs' and 10,291 brain tissue-ventricular pressure 'pairs' were determined using mixed model to compare mean temperature and pressure for longitudinal data. There was no significant overall difference for mean temperature (p = 0.92) or mean pressure readings (p = 0.379) between tissue and ventricular sites. With 95.8 % of paired temperature readings within 2SD (-0.4 to 0.4 °C) differences in temperature between brain tissue and ventricle were clinically insignificant. For pressure, 93.5 % of readings pairs fell within the 2SD range (-9.4756 to 7.8112 mmHg). However, for individual patients, agreement for mean tissue-ventricular pressure differences was poor on occasions. There is good overall agreement between paired

  14. ‘Studying Injured Minds’ - The Vietnam Head Injury Study and 40 years of brain injury research

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    Vanessa eRaymont

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The study of those who have sustained traumatic brain injuries (TBI during military conflicts has greatly facilitated research in the fields of neuropsychology, neurosurgery, psychiatry, neurology and neuroimaging. The Vietnam Head Injury Study (VHIS is a prospective, long-term follow-up study of a cohort of 1,221 Vietnam veterans with mostly penetrating brain injuries, which has stretched over more than 40 years. The scope of this study, both in terms of the types of injury and fields of examination, has been extremely broad. It has been instrumental in extending the field of TBI research and in exposing pressing medical and social issues that affect those who suffer such injuries. This review summarizes the history of conflict-related TBI research and the VHIS to date, as well as the vast range of important findings the VHIS has established.

  15. How to Train an Injured Brain? A Pilot Feasibility Study of Home-Based Computerized Cognitive Training.

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    Verhelst, Helena; Vander Linden, Catharine; Vingerhoets, Guy; Caeyenberghs, Karen

    2017-02-01

    Computerized cognitive training programs have previously shown to be effective in improving cognitive abilities in patients suffering from traumatic brain injury (TBI). These studies often focused on a single cognitive function or required expensive hardware, making it difficult to be used in a home-based environment. This pilot feasibility study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of a newly developed, home-based, computerized cognitive training program for adolescents who suffered from TBI. Additionally, feasibility of study design, procedures, and measurements were examined. Case series, longitudinal, pilot, feasibility intervention study with one baseline and two follow-up assessments. Nine feasibility outcome measures and criteria for success were defined, including accessibility, training motivation/user experience, technical smoothness, training compliance, participation willingness, participation rates, loss to follow-up, assessment timescale, and assessment procedures. Five adolescent patients (four boys, mean age = 16 years 7 months, standard deviation = 9 months) with moderate to severe TBI in the chronic stage were recruited and received 8 weeks of cognitive training with BrainGames. Effect sizes (Cohen's d) were calculated to determine possible training-related effects. The new cognitive training intervention, BrainGames, and study design and procedures proved to be feasible; all nine feasibility outcome criteria were met during this pilot feasibility study. Estimates of effect sizes showed small to very large effects on cognitive measures and questionnaires, which were retained after 6 months. Our pilot study shows that a longitudinal intervention study comprising our novel, computerized cognitive training program and two follow-up assessments is feasible in adolescents suffering from TBI in the chronic stage. Future studies with larger sample sizes will evaluate training-related effects on cognitive functions and underlying brain structures.

  16. Identification of Potentially Neuroprotective Genes Upregulated by Neurotrophin Treatment of CA3 Neurons in the Injured Brain

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    Malik, Saafan Z.; Motamedi, Shahab; Royo, Nicolas C.; LeBold, David

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Specific neurotrophic factors mediate histological and/or functional improvement in animal models of traumatic brain injury (TBI). In previous work, several lines of evidence indicated that the mammalian neurotrophin NT-4/5 is neuroprotective for hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons after experimental TBI. We hypothesized that NT-4/5 neuroprotection is mediated by changes in the expression of specific sets of genes, and that NT-4/5-regulated genes are potential therapeutic targets for blocking delayed neuronal death after TBI. In this study, we performed transcription profiling analysis of CA3 neurons to identify genes regulated by lateral fluid percussion injury, or by treatment with the trkB ligands NT-4/5 or brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). The results indicate extensive overlap between genes upregulated by neurotrophins and genes upregulated by injury, suggesting that the mechanism behind neurotrophin neuroprotection may mimic the brain's endogenous protective response. A subset of genes selected for further study in vitro exhibited neuroprotection against glutamate excitotoxicity. The neuroprotective genes identified in this study were upregulated at 30 h post-injury, and are thus expected to act during a clinically useful time frame of hours to days after injury. Modulation of these factors and pathways by genetic manipulation or small molecules may confer hippocampal neuroprotection in vivo in preclinical models of TBI. PMID:21083427

  17. [The psychopathology of the unawareness of cognitive impairments and behavioral limitations in traumatic brain-injured patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppenheim-Gluckman, H; Fayol, P; de Collasson, P; Dumond, J J; Azouvi, P

    2003-02-01

    To explore the unawareness of cognitive impairments and behavioral limitations using a psychopathological approach. Fifteen patients with chronic severe TBI. Outpatient TBI rehabilitation programs in three different centers. Case reports. The data from semi-structured interviews with the patients and their families, at least six months after the accident, were compared with data supplied by the Patient Competency Rating Scale (PCRS) and the Neurobehavioral Rating Scale-Revised (NRS-R). Nine patients demonstrated unawareness of their limitations according to the PCRS (Group I), whereas six did not (Group II). Psychic phenomena specific to patients of group I were found. Some of these were specific to brain injury, such as the lack of representation of cognitive impairments and behavioral limitations or the difficulty to integrate the brain-injury into one's psychic space. Others were not specific to brain injury such as mourning process difficulties, personality characteristics, defense mechanisms. Several psychic phenomena coexisted in the same patient. This study shows the complexity of unawareness of cognitive impairments and behavioral limitations and makes future clinical and theoretical definition indispensable.

  18. Training-induced improvements in postural control are accompanied by alterations in cerebellar white matter in brain injured patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Drijkoningen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated whether balance control in young TBI patients can be promoted by an 8-week balance training program and whether this is associated with neuroplastic alterations in brain structure. The cerebellum and cerebellar peduncles were selected as regions of interest because of their importance in postural control as well as their vulnerability to brain injury. Young patients with moderate to severe TBI and typically developing (TD subjects participated in balance training using PC-based portable balancers with storage of training data and real-time visual feedback. An additional control group of TD subjects did not attend balance training. Mean diffusivity and fractional anisotropy were determined with diffusion MRI scans and were acquired before, during (4 weeks and at completion of training (8 weeks together with balance assessments on the EquiTest® System (NeuroCom which included the Sensory Organization Test, Rhythmic Weight Shift and Limits of Stability protocols. Following training, TBI patients showed significant improvements on all EquiTest protocols, as well as a significant increase in mean diffusivity in the inferior cerebellar peduncle. Moreover, in both training groups, diffusion metrics in the cerebellum and/or cerebellar peduncles at baseline were predictive of the amount of performance increase after training. Finally, amount of training-induced improvement on the Rhythmic Weight Shift test in TBI patients was positively correlated with amount of change in fractional anisotropy in the inferior cerebellar peduncle. This suggests that training-induced plastic changes in balance control are associated with alterations in the cerebellar white matter microstructure in TBI patients.

  19. Training-induced improvements in postural control are accompanied by alterations in cerebellar white matter in brain injured patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drijkoningen, David; Caeyenberghs, Karen; Leunissen, Inge; Vander Linden, Catharine; Leemans, Alexander; Sunaert, Stefan; Duysens, Jacques; Swinnen, Stephan P

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether balance control in young TBI patients can be promoted by an 8-week balance training program and whether this is associated with neuroplastic alterations in brain structure. The cerebellum and cerebellar peduncles were selected as regions of interest because of their importance in postural control as well as their vulnerability to brain injury. Young patients with moderate to severe TBI and typically developing (TD) subjects participated in balance training using PC-based portable balancers with storage of training data and real-time visual feedback. An additional control group of TD subjects did not attend balance training. Mean diffusivity and fractional anisotropy were determined with diffusion MRI scans and were acquired before, during (4 weeks) and at completion of training (8 weeks) together with balance assessments on the EquiTest® System (NeuroCom) which included the Sensory Organization Test, Rhythmic Weight Shift and Limits of Stability protocols. Following training, TBI patients showed significant improvements on all EquiTest protocols, as well as a significant increase in mean diffusivity in the inferior cerebellar peduncle. Moreover, in both training groups, diffusion metrics in the cerebellum and/or cerebellar peduncles at baseline were predictive of the amount of performance increase after training. Finally, amount of training-induced improvement on the Rhythmic Weight Shift test in TBI patients was positively correlated with amount of change in fractional anisotropy in the inferior cerebellar peduncle. This suggests that training-induced plastic changes in balance control are associated with alterations in the cerebellar white matter microstructure in TBI patients.

  20. [Decision making and executive function in severe traumatic brain injured patients: validation of a decision-making task and correlated features].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiederkehr, S; Barat, M; Dehail, P; de Sèze, M; Lozes-Boudillon, S; Giroire, J-M

    2005-02-01

    At the chronic stage, severe traumatic brain injured (TBI) patients experience difficulty in making decisions. Several studies have demonstrated the involvement of the prefrontal cortex, in particular the orbitofrontal region, in decision-making. The aim of the present study was to validate a decision-making task in this population and to ascertain whether the components of their dysexecutive syndrome may affect their decision-making and lead to difficulties for social rehabilitation. Fifteen TBI patients and 15 controlled subjects matched for age, sex and years of education were assessed by a battery of executive tests (GREFEX) and by the gambling task (GT). The TBI subjects performed significantly worse than the controlled group in five out of six GREFEX tests. The TBI choices are significantly more disadvantageous than the choices of the control group when considering the three last blocks of 20 cards of the GT. The GT total score correlated significantly with execution time of the Stroop interference condition and the Trail Making Task B, as well as with the two measures (correct sequence span and number of crossed boxes) of the double condition of Baddeley's task. We postulate that executive functioning (supervisory attentional system) influence performance in the gambling task through mechanisms of inhibitory control, divided attention and working memory. Thus, this task seems to be determined by multiple factors; the process of decision-making may depend on frontal integrity.

  1. Brain aromatase: roles in reproduction and neuroprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roselli, Charles F

    2007-01-01

    It is well established that aromatization constitutes an essential part of testosterone's signaling pathway in brain and that estrogen metabolites, often together with testosterone, organize and activate masculine neural circuits. This paper summarizes the current understanding regarding the distribution, regulation and function of brain aromatase in mammals. Data from our laboratory are presented that highlight the important function of aromatase in the regulation of androgen feedback sensitivity in non-human primates and the possible role that aromatase plays in determining the brain structure and sexual partner preferences of rams. In addition, new data is presented indicating that the capacity for aromatization in cortical astrocytes is associated with cell survival and may be important for neuroprotection. It is anticipated that a better appreciation of the physiological and pathophysiological functions of aromatase will lead to important clinical insights.

  2. Training driving ability in a traumatic brain-injured individual using a driving simulator: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imhoff S

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Sarah Imhoff,1,2 Martin Lavallière,3,4 Mathieu Germain-Robitaille,5 Normand Teasdale,5–7 Philippe Fait,1,2,8 1Department of Human Kinetics, 2Research Group on Neuromusculoskeletal Dysfunctions (GRAN, Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières, Trois-Rivières, QC, Canada; 3Massachusetts Institute of Technology AgeLab, Cambridge, MA, USA; 4Department of Health Sciences, Program of Kinesiology, Université du Québec à Chicoutimi, Chicoutimi, 5Faculté de Médecine, Département de Kinésiologie, 6Groupe de recherche en analyse du mouvement et ergonomie, Université Laval, 7CHU de Québec – Université Laval, Centre d’excellence sur le vieillissement de Québec, 8Research Center in Neuropsychology and Cognition (CERNEC, Montréal, QC, Canada Background: Traumatic brain injury (TBI causes functional deficits that may significantly interfere with numerous activities of daily living such as driving. We report the case of a 20-year-old woman having lost her driver’s license after sustaining a moderate TBI.Objective: We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of an in-simulator training program with automated feedback on driving performance in a TBI individual.Methods: The participant underwent an initial and a final in-simulator driving assessment and 11 in-simulator training sessions with driving-specific automated feedbacks. Driving performance (simulation duration, speed regulation and lateral positioning was measured in the driving simulator.Results: Speeding duration decreased during training sessions from 1.50 ± 0.80 min (4.16 ± 2.22% to 0.45 ± 0.15 min (0.44 ± 0.42% but returned to initial duration after removal of feedbacks for the final assessment. Proper lateral positioning improved with training and was maintained at the final assessment. Time spent in an incorrect lateral position decreased from 18.85 min (53.61% in the initial assessment to 1.51 min (4.64% on the final assessment.Conclusion: Driving simulators represent an

  3. Role of palliative radiotherapy in brain metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh S Bilimagga

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Brain metastases are a common manifestation of systemic cancer and exceed primary brain tumors in number and are a significant cause of neurologic problems. They affect 20-40% of all cancer patients. Aggressive management of brain metastases is effective in both symptom palliation and prolonging the life. Radiotherapy has a major role to play in the management of brain metastases. AIM: The aim of the study was to know the outcome of palliative radiotherapy in symptomatic brain metastases in terms of improvement in their performance status. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective study of 63 patients diagnosed to have brain metastases and treated with palliative whole brain radiotherapy to a dose of 30 Gy in 10 fractions over two weeks between June 1998 and June 2007. Diagnosis was done in most of the cases with computed tomography scan and in a few with magnetic resonance imaging. Improvement in presenting symptoms has been assessed in terms of improvement in their performance status by using the ECOG scale. Results: Fifty-four patients completed the planned treatment. Eight patients received concurrent Temozolamide; 88% of patients had symptom relief at one month follow-up; 39/54 patients had a follow-up of just one to three months. Hence survival could not be assessed in this study. Conclusion: External beam radiotherapy in the dose of 30 Gy over two weeks achieved good palliation in terms improvement in their performance status in 88% of patients. Addition of concurrent and adjuvant Timozolamide may improve the results.

  4. Effectiveness of a Very Early Stepping Verticalization Protocol in Severe Acquired Brain Injured Patients: A Randomized Pilot Study in ICU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazzitta, Giuseppe; Zivi, Ilaria; Valsecchi, Roberto; Bonini, Sara; Maffia, Sara; Molatore, Katia; Sebastianelli, Luca; Zarucchi, Alessio; Matteri, Diana; Ercoli, Giuseppe; Maestri, Roberto; Saltuari, Leopold

    2016-01-01

    Verticalization was reported to improve the level of arousal and awareness in patients with severe acquired brain injury (ABI) and to be safe in ICU. We evaluated the effectiveness of a very early stepping verticalization protocol on their functional and neurological outcome. Consecutive patients with Vegetative State or Minimally Conscious State were enrolled in ICU on the third day after an ABI. They were randomized to undergo conventional physiotherapy alone or associated to fifteen 30-minute sessions of verticalization, using a tilt table with robotic stepping device. Once stabilized, patients were transferred to our Neurorehabilitation unit for an individualized treatment. Outcome measures (Glasgow Coma Scale, Coma Recovery Scale revised -CRSr-, Disability Rating Scale-DRS- and Levels of Cognitive Functioning) were assessed on the third day from the injury (T0), at ICU discharge (T1) and at Rehab discharge (T2). Between- and within-group comparisons were performed by the Mann-Whitney U test and Wilcoxon signed-rank test, respectively. Of the 40 patients enrolled, 31 completed the study without adverse events (15 in the verticalization group and 16 in the conventional physiotherapy). Early verticalization started 12.4±7.3 (mean±SD) days after ABI. The length of stay in ICU was longer for the verticalization group (38.8 ± 15.7 vs 25.1 ± 11.2 days, p = 0.01), while the total length of stay (ICU+Neurorehabilitation) was not significantly different (153.2 ± 59.6 vs 134.0 ± 61.0 days, p = 0.41). All outcome measures significantly improved in both groups after the overall period (T2 vs T0, pverticalization protocol, started since the acute stages, improves the short-term and long-term functional and neurological outcome of ABI patients. clinicaltrials.gov NCT02828371.

  5. [Roles of Aquaporins in Brain Disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasui, Masato

    2015-06-01

    Aquaporin (AQP) is a water channel protein that is expressed in the cell membranes. AQPs are related to several kinds of human diseases such as cataract. In the mammalian central nervous system (CNS), AQP4 is specifically expressed in the astrocyte membranes lining the perivascular and periventricular structures. AQP4 plays a role in the development of brain edema associated with certain brain disorders. Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is a demyelinating disorder, and patients with NMO develop autoimmune antibodies against AQP4 in their serum. Therefore, AQP4 is involved in NMO pathogenesis. A new concept referred to as "glymphatic pathway" has been recently proposed to explain the lymphatic system in the CNS. Dysfunction of the "glymphatic pathway" may cause several neurodegenerative diseases and mood disorders. Importantly, AQP4 may play a role in the "glymphatic pathway". Further investigation of AQP4 in CNS disorders is necessary, and a new drug against AQP4 is expected.

  6. Effectiveness of a Very Early Stepping Verticalization Protocol in Severe Acquired Brain Injured Patients: A Randomized Pilot Study in ICU.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Frazzitta

    Full Text Available Verticalization was reported to improve the level of arousal and awareness in patients with severe acquired brain injury (ABI and to be safe in ICU. We evaluated the effectiveness of a very early stepping verticalization protocol on their functional and neurological outcome.Consecutive patients with Vegetative State or Minimally Conscious State were enrolled in ICU on the third day after an ABI. They were randomized to undergo conventional physiotherapy alone or associated to fifteen 30-minute sessions of verticalization, using a tilt table with robotic stepping device. Once stabilized, patients were transferred to our Neurorehabilitation unit for an individualized treatment. Outcome measures (Glasgow Coma Scale, Coma Recovery Scale revised -CRSr-, Disability Rating Scale-DRS- and Levels of Cognitive Functioning were assessed on the third day from the injury (T0, at ICU discharge (T1 and at Rehab discharge (T2. Between- and within-group comparisons were performed by the Mann-Whitney U test and Wilcoxon signed-rank test, respectively.Of the 40 patients enrolled, 31 completed the study without adverse events (15 in the verticalization group and 16 in the conventional physiotherapy. Early verticalization started 12.4±7.3 (mean±SD days after ABI. The length of stay in ICU was longer for the verticalization group (38.8 ± 15.7 vs 25.1 ± 11.2 days, p = 0.01, while the total length of stay (ICU+Neurorehabilitation was not significantly different (153.2 ± 59.6 vs 134.0 ± 61.0 days, p = 0.41. All outcome measures significantly improved in both groups after the overall period (T2 vs T0, p<0.001 all, as well as after ICU stay (T1 vs T0, p<0.004 all and after Neurorehabilitation (T2 vs T1, p<0.004 all. The improvement was significantly better in the experimental group for CRSr (T2-T0 p = 0.033, T1-T0 p = 0.006 and (borderline for DRS (T2-T0 p = 0.040, T1-T0 p = 0.058.A stepping verticalization protocol, started since the acute stages, improves the

  7. Effectiveness of a Very Early Stepping Verticalization Protocol in Severe Acquired Brain Injured Patients: A Randomized Pilot Study in ICU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonini, Sara; Maffia, Sara; Molatore, Katia; Sebastianelli, Luca; Zarucchi, Alessio; Matteri, Diana; Ercoli, Giuseppe; Maestri, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective Verticalization was reported to improve the level of arousal and awareness in patients with severe acquired brain injury (ABI) and to be safe in ICU. We evaluated the effectiveness of a very early stepping verticalization protocol on their functional and neurological outcome. Methods Consecutive patients with Vegetative State or Minimally Conscious State were enrolled in ICU on the third day after an ABI. They were randomized to undergo conventional physiotherapy alone or associated to fifteen 30-minute sessions of verticalization, using a tilt table with robotic stepping device. Once stabilized, patients were transferred to our Neurorehabilitation unit for an individualized treatment. Outcome measures (Glasgow Coma Scale, Coma Recovery Scale revised -CRSr-, Disability Rating Scale–DRS- and Levels of Cognitive Functioning) were assessed on the third day from the injury (T0), at ICU discharge (T1) and at Rehab discharge (T2). Between- and within-group comparisons were performed by the Mann-Whitney U test and Wilcoxon signed-rank test, respectively. Results Of the 40 patients enrolled, 31 completed the study without adverse events (15 in the verticalization group and 16 in the conventional physiotherapy). Early verticalization started 12.4±7.3 (mean±SD) days after ABI. The length of stay in ICU was longer for the verticalization group (38.8 ± 15.7 vs 25.1 ± 11.2 days, p = 0.01), while the total length of stay (ICU+Neurorehabilitation) was not significantly different (153.2 ± 59.6 vs 134.0 ± 61.0 days, p = 0.41). All outcome measures significantly improved in both groups after the overall period (T2 vs T0, p<0.001 all), as well as after ICU stay (T1 vs T0, p<0.004 all) and after Neurorehabilitation (T2 vs T1, p<0.004 all). The improvement was significantly better in the experimental group for CRSr (T2-T0 p = 0.033, T1-T0 p = 0.006) and (borderline) for DRS (T2-T0 p = 0.040, T1-T0 p = 0.058). Conclusions A stepping verticalization

  8. Effects of radiochemical impurities on measurements of transfer constants for [14C]sucrose permeation of normal and injured blood-brain barrier of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, E; Foster, D O; Mills, P A

    1998-01-01

    Radiolabeled sucrose is often used to assess blood-brain barrier (BBB) injury in the rat, but published transfer constants (K[i]s) for sucrose permeation of the intact BBB (control K[i]s) are highly discrepant. A potential problem with the commonly used tracer, [14C(U)]sucrose, is radiolytic generation, preuse, of radiocontaminants that might readily penetrate the BBB. How such contaminants might affect measurements of sucrose K(i)s was examined for both the intact and the ischemically injured BBB. Three stocks of [14C(U)]sucrose were studied: newly purchased ("new"), 4-year-old, and 7-year-old. A high purity (99.9%) "new" and a 2-year-old stock of [3H(fructose-1)]sucrose were also tested. Pentobarbital-anesthetized male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected i.v. with each tracer separately (six to eight rats) and K(i)s in five brain regions were measured by the multiple-time graphical method. The "new" 14C-, "new" 3H-, and 2-year-old 3H-sucrose yielded comparable K(i)s , ranging from 1.2 +/- 0.1 to 2.4 +/- 0.3 nl x g(-1) x s(-1) (mean +/- SE) across the regions. The two old stocks of 14C-sucrose yielded significantly higher regional K(i)s : 5.1-6.3 (4-year-old) and 8.4-9.7 (7-year-old). Thin-layer chromatography of the three 14C-tracers revealed that each contained radioimpurities (ca. 2% in both the "new" and 4-year-old, and 9% in the 7-year-old), but that the old stocks contained larger amounts of relatively mobile (more lipophilic) impurities, which can be suspected as the main cause of the elevated K(i)s obtained. Additional rats were subjected to 10 min of cerebral ischemia, which effects a delayed BBB injury, and 6 h later the "new" 3H- and the 4-year-old 14C-sucrose were injected together. The K(i)s for both tracers were elevated by like, absolute amounts (deltaK[i]s), but by very different percentages, over their disparate baseline values in uninjured rats (for striatum and hippocampus, the most injured regions, deltaK(i)s were 3.9 to 4.4 nl x g[-1] x s[-1

  9. Expert medical testimony for your injured patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Gerald J

    2013-10-01

    Many injured patients sustain some type of loss. If someone else is responsible for the injury, the injured patient can pursue compensation for this loss. In the course of treating an injured patient, you may be asked to participate in the legal process to resolve such claims. The basic components of a personal injury claim are reviewed. An overview of the legal process will help clarify your role in the legal process. Enhanced understanding will allow you to provide important medical testimony for your injured patient.

  10. Role of Melatonin in Traumatic Brain Injury and Spinal Cord Injury

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    Mehar Naseem

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain and spinal cord are implicated in incidences of two of the most severe injuries of central nervous system (CNS. Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a devastating neurological deficit involving primary and secondary injury cascades. The primary and secondary mechanisms include complex consequences of activation of proinflammatory cytokines, cerebral edema, upregulation of NF-κβ, disruption of blood-brain barrier (BBB, and oxidative stress. Spinal cord injury (SCI includes primary and secondary injury cascades. Primary injury leads to secondary injury in which generation of free radicals and oxidative or nitrative damage play an important pathophysiological role. The indoleamine melatonin is a hormone secreted or synthesized by pineal gland in the brain which helps to regulate sleep and wake cycle. Melatonin has been shown to be a versatile hormone having antioxidative, antiapoptotic, neuroprotective, and anti-inflammatory properties. It has a special characteristic of crossing BBB. Melatonin has neuroprotective role in the injured part of the CNS after TBI and SCI. A number of studies have successfully shown its therapeutic value as a neuroprotective agent in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. Here in this review we have compiled the literature supporting consequences of CNS injuries, TBI and SCI, and the protective role of melatonin in it.

  11. Neuroanatomical substrates of action perception and understanding: an anatomic likelihood estimation meta-analysis of lesion-symptom mapping studies in brain injured patients.

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    Cosimo eUrgesi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Several neurophysiologic and neuroimaging studies suggested that motor and perceptual systems are tightly linked along a continuum rather than providing segregated mechanisms supporting different functions. Using correlational approaches, these studies demonstrated that action observation activates not only visual but also motor brain regions. On the other hand, brain stimulation and brain lesion evidence allows tackling the critical question of whether our action representations are necessary to perceive and understand others’ actions. In particular, recent neuropsychological studies have shown that patients with temporal, parietal and frontal lesions exhibit a number of possible deficits in the visual perception and the understanding of others’ actions. The specific anatomical substrates of such neuropsychological deficits however are still a matter of debate. Here we review the existing literature on this issue and perform an anatomic likelihood estimation meta-analysis of studies using lesion-symptom mapping methods on the causal relation between brain lesions and non-linguistic action perception and understanding deficits. The meta-analysis encompassed data from 361 patients tested in 11 studies and identified regions in the inferior frontal cortex, the inferior parietal cortex and the middle/superior temporal cortex, whose damage is consistently associated with poor performance in action perception and understanding tasks across studies. Interestingly, these areas correspond to the three nodes of the action observation network that are strongly activated in response to visual action perception in neuroimaging research and that have been targeted in previous brain stimulation studies. Thus, brain lesion mapping research provides converging causal evidence that premotor, parietal and temporal regions play a crucial role in action recognition and understanding.

  12. Driving difficulties of brain-injured drivers in reaction to high-crash-risk simulated road events: a question of impaired divided attention?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyr, Andrée-Ann; Stinchcombe, Arne; Gagnon, Sylvain; Marshall, Shawn; Hing, Malcolm Man-Son; Finestone, Hillel

    2009-05-01

    This study examined the role of impaired divided attention and speed of processing in traumatic brain injury (TBI) drivers in high-crash-risk simulated road events. A total of 17 TBI drivers and 16 healthy participants were exposed to four challenging simulated roadway events to which behavioral reactions were recorded. Participants were also asked to perform a dual task during portions of the driving task, and TBI individuals were administered standard measures of divided attention and reaction time. Results indicated that the TBI group crashed significantly more than controls (p < .05) and that dual-task performance correlated significantly with crash rate (r = .58, p = .05).

  13. The Indispensable Roles of Microglia and Astrocytes during Brain Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reemst, K.; Noctor, S.C.; Lucassen, P.J.; Hol, E.M.

    2016-01-01

    Glia are essential for brain functioning during development and in the adult brain. Here, we discuss the various roles of both microglia and astrocytes, and their interactions during brain development. Although both cells are fundamentally different in origin and function, they often affect the same

  14. The indispensable roles of microglia and astrocytes during brain development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reemst, Kitty; Noctor, Stephen C.; Lucassen, Paul J.; Hol, Elly M.

    2016-01-01

    Glia are essential for brain functioning during development and in the adult brain. Here, we discuss the various roles of both microglia and astrocytes, and their interactions during brain development. Although both cells are fundamentally different in origin and function, they often affect the same

  15. Electroacupuncture ameliorates post-stroke learning and memory through minimizing ultrastructural brain damage and inhibiting the expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injured rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ruhui; Yu, Kunqiang; Li, Xiaojie; Tao, Jing; Lin, Yukun; Zhao, Congkuai; Li, Chunyan; Chen, Li-Dian

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential neuroprotective effects of electroacupuncture (EA) in the treatment of cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury, and to elucidate the association between this neuroprotective effect and brain ultrastructure and expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)‑2 and 9. Rats underwent focal cerebral I/R injury by arterial ligation and received in vivo therapeutic EA at the Baihui (DU20) and Shenting (DU24) acupoints. The therapeutic efficacy was then evaluated following the surgery. The results of the current study demonstrated that EA treatment significantly ameliorated neurological deficits and reduced cerebral infarct volume compared with I/R injured rats. Furthermore, EA improved the learning and memory ability of rats following I/R injury, inhibited blood brain barrier breakdown and reduced neuronal damage in the ischemic penumbra. Furthermore, EA attenuated ultrastructural changes in the brain tissue following ischemia and inhibited MMP‑2/MMP‑9 expression in cerebral I/R injured rats. The results suggest that EA ameliorates anatomical deterioration, and learning and memory deficits in rats with cerebral I/R injury.

  16. The stem cell secretome and its role in brain repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drago, Denise; Cossetti, Chiara; Iraci, Nunzio; Gaude, Edoardo; Musco, Giovanna; Bachi, Angela; Pluchino, Stefano

    2013-12-01

    Compelling evidence exists that non-haematopoietic stem cells, including mesenchymal (MSCs) and neural/progenitor stem cells (NPCs), exert a substantial beneficial and therapeutic effect after transplantation in experimental central nervous system (CNS) disease models through the secretion of immune modulatory or neurotrophic paracrine factors. This paracrine hypothesis has inspired an alternative outlook on the use of stem cells in regenerative neurology. In this paradigm, significant repair of the injured brain may be achieved by injecting the biologics secreted by stem cells (secretome), rather than implanting stem cells themselves for direct cell replacement. The stem cell secretome (SCS) includes cytokines, chemokines and growth factors, and has gained increasing attention in recent years because of its multiple implications for the repair, restoration or regeneration of injured tissues. Thanks to recent improvements in SCS profiling and manipulation, investigators are now inspired to harness the SCS as a novel alternative therapeutic option that might ensure more efficient outcomes than current stem cell-based therapies for CNS repair. This review discusses the most recent identification of MSC- and NPC-secreted factors, including those that are trafficked within extracellular membrane vesicles (EVs), and reflects on their potential effects on brain repair. It also examines some of the most convincing advances in molecular profiling that have enabled mapping of the SCS. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.. All rights reserved.

  17. Sugar for the brain: the role of glucose in physiological and pathological brain function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mergenthaler, Philipp; Lindauer, Ute; Dienel, Gerald A; Meisel, Andreas

    2013-10-01

    The mammalian brain depends upon glucose as its main source of energy, and tight regulation of glucose metabolism is critical for brain physiology. Consistent with its critical role for physiological brain function, disruption of normal glucose metabolism as well as its interdependence with cell death pathways forms the pathophysiological basis for many brain disorders. Here, we review recent advances in understanding how glucose metabolism sustains basic brain physiology. We synthesize these findings to form a comprehensive picture of the cooperation required between different systems and cell types, and the specific breakdowns in this cooperation that lead to disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. “Nobody's ever asked me what it's like”: The role of family networks in the transitions of injured soldiers engaging with higher education.

    OpenAIRE

    Lambert-Heggs, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    An increasing number of injured service personnel returning from active combat duty will not be redeployed and many of them face discharge from military service. A number of these men and women have sustained life-threatening injuries which may, if the individual survives, result in reduced physical and mental health functioning. This research is focused on the transitions and processes that injured personnel go through when contemplating a new career through engagement with a higher educatio...

  19. The post-therapeutic effect of rapamycin in mild traumatic brain-injured rats ensuing in the upregulation of autophagy and mitophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Changxing; Hu, Zhiying; Zou, Yang; Xiang, Mingjun; Jiang, Yuting; Botchway, Benson O A; Huo, Xue; Du, Xiaoxue; Fang, Marong

    2017-09-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), common in juveniles, has been reported to be caused by sports-related concussion. Many young children may suffer from post-concussion syndrome. mTBI, in early stages of life, could play a part in neuron apoptosis and degeneration, cognitive and motor coordination impairment, as well as dementia. Our study was aimed at further investigating the post-therapeutic efficacy of rapamycin in the recuperation of mTBI while at the same time investigating the metamorphosis in both autophagy and mitophagy in mTBI. We created a weight-drop rat mTBI model with the administration of rapamycin at 4 h after every mTBI. Behavioral tests of beam walking and open field task indicated the expected improvement of cognitive and motor coordination functions. Both Western blot and immunofluorescence examinations revealed increased Beclin-1 and PINK1 in the treated rats as well as reduction of caspase-3 and cytochrome C (Cyt C). More so, the TUNEL staining evidenced curtailment of apoptotic cells following treatment with rapamycin. The upregulation of Beclin-1 and PINK1 and the downregulation of caspase-3 and Cyt C extrapolate that rapamycin plays neuroprotective as well as anti-apoptotic role via interposition of both autophagy and mitophagy. © 2017 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  20. Role of the Blood-Brain Barrier in the Formation of Brain Metastases

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    István A. Krizbai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The majority of brain metastases originate from lung cancer, breast cancer and malignant melanoma. In order to reach the brain, parenchyma metastatic cells have to transmigrate through the endothelial cell layer of brain capillaries, which forms the morphological basis of the blood-brain barrier (BBB. The BBB has a dual role in brain metastasis formation: it forms a tight barrier protecting the central nervous system from entering cancer cells, but it is also actively involved in protecting metastatic cells during extravasation and proliferation in the brain. The mechanisms of interaction of cancer cells and cerebral endothelial cells are largely uncharacterized. Here, we provide a comprehensive review on our current knowledge about the role of junctional and adhesion molecules, soluble factors, proteolytic enzymes and signaling pathways mediating the attachment of tumor cells to brain endothelial cells and the transendothelial migration of metastatic cells. Since brain metastases represent a great therapeutic challenge, it is indispensable to understand the mechanisms of the interaction of tumor cells with the BBB in order to find targets of prevention of brain metastasis formation.

  1. A starring role for microglia in brain sex differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Kathryn M; McCarthy, Margaret M

    2015-06-01

    Microglia, the resident innate immune cells in the brain, have long been understood to be crucial to maintenance in the nervous system, by clearing debris, monitoring for infiltration of infectious agents, and mediating the brain's inflammatory and repair response to traumatic injury, stroke, or neurodegeneration. A wave of new research has shown that microglia are also active players in many basic processes in the healthy brain, including cell proliferation, synaptic connectivity, and physiology. Microglia, both in their capacity as phagocytic cells and via secretion of many neuroactive molecules, including cytokines and growth factors, play a central role in early brain development, including sexual differentiation of the brain. In this review, we present the vast roles microglia play in normal brain development and how perturbations in the normal neuroimmune environment during development may contribute to the etiology of brain-based disorders. There are notable differences between microglia and neuroimmune signaling in the male and female brain throughout the life span, and these differences may contribute to the vast differences in the incidence of neuropsychiatric and neurological disorders between males and females. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. Role of Brain Inflammation in Epileptogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Jieun; Koh, Sookyong

    2008-01-01

    Inflammation is known to participate in the mediation of a growing number of acute and chronic neurological disorders. Even so, the involvement of inflammation in the pathogenesis of epilepsy and seizure-induced brain damage has only recently been appreciated. Inflammatory processes, including activation of microglia and astrocytes and production of proinflammatory cytokines and related molecules, have been described in human epilepsy patients as well as in experimental models of epilepsy. Fo...

  3. Prehospital resuscitation with hypertonic saline-dextran modulates inflammatory, coagulation and endothelial activation marker profiles in severe traumatic brain injured patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morrison Laurie J

    2010-01-01

    levels approaching control values. Admission concentrations of endothelial-derived sVCAM-1 and sE-selectin were generally reduced in HSD patients. Circulating sL-selectin levels were significantly elevated at 12 and 48, but not 24 h post-resuscitation with HSD. TNF-α and IL-10 levels were elevated above control throughout the study period in all patients, but were reduced in HSD patients. Plasma sTF and D-D levels were also significantly lower in HSD patients, whereas sTM levels remained at control levels. Conclusions These findings support an important modulatory role of HSD resuscitation in attenuating the upregulation of leukocyte/endothelial cell proinflammatory/prothrombotic mediators, which may help ameliorate secondary brain injury after TBI. Trial registration NCT00878631.

  4. Role of physical and mental training in brain network configuration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip P. Foster

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Continuous remodeling of proteins of excitatory neurons is fine-tuning the scaling and strength of excitatory synapses up or down via regulation of intra-cellular metabolic and regulatory networks of the genome-transcriptome-proteome interface. Alzheimer's disease is a model of energy cost-driven small-world network disorder as the network global efficiency is impaired by the deposition of an informed agent, the amyloid-β, selectively targeting high-degree nodes. In schizophrenia, the interconnectivity and density of rich-club networks are significantly reduced. Training-induced homeostatic synaptogenesis-enhancement produces a reconfiguration of brain networks into greater small-worldness. Creation of synaptic connections in a macro-network, and, at the intra-cellular scale, micro-networks regulate the physiological mechanisms for the preferential attachment of synapses. The strongest molecular relationship of exercise and functional connectivity was identified for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF. The allele variant, rs7294919, also shows a powerful relationship with the hippocampal volume. How the brain achieves this unique quest of reconfiguration remains a puzzle. What are the underlying mechanisms of synaptogenesis promoting communications brain ↔ muscle and brainbrain in such trainings? What is the respective role of independent mental, physical or combined-mental-physical trainings? Physical practice seems to be playing an instrumental role in the cognitive enhancement (brain ↔ muscle com.. However, mental training, meditation or virtual reality (films, games require only minimal motor activity and cardio-respiratory stimulation. Therefore, other potential paths (brainbrain com. molding brain networks are nonetheless essential. Patients with motor neuron disease/injury (e.g. amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, traumatism also achieve successful cognitive enhancement albeit they may only elicit mental practice

  5. Organisation and functional role of the brain angiotensin system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Llorens-Cortes

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available The discovery that all components of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS are present in the brain led investigators to postulate the existence of a local brain RAS. Supporting this, angiotensin immunoreactive neurones have been visualised in the brain. Two major pathways were described: a forebrain pathway which connects circumventricular organs to the median preoptic nucleus, paraventricular and supraoptic nuclei, and a second pathway connecting the hypothalamus to the medulla oblongata. Blood-brain-barrier deficient circumventricular organs are rich in angiotensin II (Ang II receptors. By activating these receptors, circulating Ang II may act on central cardiovascular centres via angiotensinergic neurones, providing a link between peripheral and central Ang II systems. Among the effector peptides of the brain RAS, Ang II and angiotensin III (Ang III have the same affinity for type 1 and type 2 Ang II receptors. When injected into the brain, both peptides increase blood pressure (BP, water intake and pituitary hormone release and may modify learning and memory. Since Ang II is converted in vivo to Ang III, the nature of the true effector is unknown. This review summarises new insights into the predominant role of brain Ang III in the control of BP and underlines the fact that brain aminopeptidase A, the enzyme forming central Ang III, could constitute a putative central therapeutic target for the treatment of hypertension.

  6. Brain disorders and the biological role of music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Camilla N; Downey, Laura E; Warren, Jason D

    2015-03-01

    Despite its evident universality and high social value, the ultimate biological role of music and its connection to brain disorders remain poorly understood. Recent findings from basic neuroscience have shed fresh light on these old problems. New insights provided by clinical neuroscience concerning the effects of brain disorders promise to be particularly valuable in uncovering the underlying cognitive and neural architecture of music and for assessing candidate accounts of the biological role of music. Here we advance a new model of the biological role of music in human evolution and the link to brain disorders, drawing on diverse lines of evidence derived from comparative ethology, cognitive neuropsychology and neuroimaging studies in the normal and the disordered brain. We propose that music evolved from the call signals of our hominid ancestors as a means mentally to rehearse and predict potentially costly, affectively laden social routines in surrogate, coded, low-cost form: essentially, a mechanism for transforming emotional mental states efficiently and adaptively into social signals. This biological role of music has its legacy today in the disordered processing of music and mental states that characterizes certain developmental and acquired clinical syndromes of brain network disintegration. © The Author (2014). Published by Oxford University Press.

  7. Role of brain SPECT in epilepsy exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biraben, A.; Bernard, AM.

    1996-01-01

    The management of epileptic patients is currently developing in relation with the introduction of video EEG and the opening of medical centers dedicated to epilepsy. The role of SPECT is now well established to assess the temporal and spatial dynamic phenomena during seizures. Ictal SPECT has technical and organisational requirements but is a very sensitive method, which appears to be superior to other available imaging techniques. (author)

  8. Role of physical and mental training in brain network configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Philip P

    2015-01-01

    It is hypothesized that the topology of brain networks is constructed by connecting nodes which may be continuously remodeled by appropriate training. Efficiency of physical and/or mental training on the brain relies on the flexibility of networks' architecture molded by local remodeling of proteins and synapses of excitatory neurons producing transformations in network topology. Continuous remodeling of proteins of excitatory neurons is fine-tuning the scaling and strength of excitatory synapses up or down via regulation of intra-cellular metabolic and regulatory networks of the genome-transcriptome-proteome interface. Alzheimer's disease is a model of "energy cost-driven small-world network disorder" with dysfunction of high-energy cost wiring as the network global efficiency is impaired by the deposition of an informed agent, the amyloid-β, selectively targeting high-degree nodes. In schizophrenia, the interconnectivity and density of rich-club networks are significantly reduced. Training-induced homeostatic synaptogenesis-enhancement, presumably via reconfiguration of brain networks into greater small-worldness, appears essential in learning, memory, and executive functions. A macroscopic cartography of creation-removal of synaptic connections in a macro-network, and at the intra-cellular scale, micro-networks regulate the physiological mechanisms for the preferential attachment of synapses. The strongest molecular relationship of exercise and functional connectivity was identified for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). The allele variant, rs7294919, also shows a powerful relationship with the hippocampal volume. How the brain achieves this unique quest of reconfiguration remains a puzzle. What are the underlying mechanisms of synaptogenesis promoting communications brain ↔ muscle and brainbrain in such trainings? What is the respective role of independent mental, physical, or combined-mental-physical trainings? Physical practice seems to be

  9. Traumatic brain injury and post-acute decline: what role does environmental enrichment play? A scoping review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana eFrasca

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. While a number of studies provide evidence of neural and cognitive decline in traumatic brain injury (TBI survivors during the post-acute stages of injury, there is a dearth of research on the possible mechanisms underlying this decline. The purposes of this paper, therefore, are to (1 examine evidence that environmental enrichment (EE can influence long-term outcome following TBI, and (2 examine the nature of post-acute environments, whether they vary in degree of EE, and what impact these variations have on outcomes.Methods. We conducted a scoping review to identify studies on EE in animals and humans, and post-discharge experiences that relate to barriers to recovery.Results. Ninety-six articles that met inclusion criteria demonstrated the benefits of EE on brain and behaviour in healthy and brain-injured animals and humans. Nineteen papers on post-discharge experiences provided evidence that variables such as insurance coverage, financial and social support, home therapy, and transition from hospital to home, also play a vital role in regaining independence. Conclusion. There is evidence to suggest that lack of EE, whether from lack of resources or limited ability to engage in such environments, may play a role in post-recovery cognitive and neural decline. Maximizing EE in the post-acute stages of TBI may improve long-term outcomes for the individual, their family and society.

  10. Concomitant Use of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation and Computer-Assisted Training for the Rehabilitation of Attention in Traumatic Brain Injured Patients: Behavioral and Neuroimaging Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacco, Katiuscia; Galetto, Valentina; Dimitri, Danilo; Geda, Elisabetta; Perotti, Francesca; Zettin, Marina; Geminiani, Giuliano C

    2016-01-01

    Divided attention (DA), the ability to distribute cognitive resources among two or more simultaneous tasks, may be severely compromised after traumatic brain injury (TBI), resulting in problems with numerous activities involved with daily living. So far, no research has investigated whether the use of non-invasive brain stimulation associated with neuropsychological rehabilitation might contribute to the recovery of such cognitive function. The main purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of 10 transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) sessions combined with computer-assisted training; it also intended to explore the neural modifications induced by the treatment. Thirty-two patients with severe TBI participated in the study: 16 were part of the experimental group, and 16 part of the control group. The treatment included 20' of tDCS, administered twice a day for 5 days. The electrodes were placed on the dorso-lateral prefrontal cortex. Their location varied across patients and it depended on each participant's specific area of damage. The control group received sham tDCS. After each tDCS session, the patient received computer-assisted cognitive training on DA for 40'. The results showed that the experimental group significantly improved in DA performance between pre- and post-treatment, showing faster reaction times (RTs), and fewer omissions. No improvement was detected between the baseline assessment (i.e., 1 month before treatment) and the pre-training assessment, or within the control group. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data, obtained on the experimental group during a DA task, showed post-treatment lower cerebral activations in the right superior temporal gyrus (BA 42), right and left middle frontal gyrus (BA 6), right postcentral gyrus (BA 3) and left inferior frontal gyrus (BA 9). We interpreted such neural changes as normalization of previously abnormal hyperactivations.

  11. Concomitant use of transcranial Direct Current Stimulation and computer-assisted training for the rehabilitation of attention in traumatic brain injured patients: behavioral and neuroimaging results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katiuscia eSacco

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Divided attention, the ability to distribute cognitive resources among two or more simultaneous tasks, may be severely compromised after traumatic brain injury (TBI, resulting in problems with numerous activities involved with daily living. So far, no research has investigated whether the use of non-invasive brain stimulation associated with neuropsychological rehabilitation might contribute to the recovery of such cognitive function. The main purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of 10 tDCS sessions combined with computer-assisted training; it also intended to explore the neural modifications induced by the treatment. Thirty-two patients with severe TBI participated in the study: sixteen were part of the experimental group, and sixteen part of the control group. The treatment included 20’ of tDCS, administered twice a day for 5 days. The electrodes were placed on the dorso-lateral prefrontal cortex. Their location varied across patients and it depended on each participant’s specific area of damage. The control group received sham tDCS. After each tDCS session, the patient received computer-assisted cognitive training on divided attention for 40’. The results showed that the experimental group significantly improved in divided attention performance between pre- and post-treatment, showing faster reaction times, and fewer omissions. No improvement was detected between the baseline assessment (i.e., one month before treatment and the pre-training assessment, or within the control group. Functional magnetic resonance imaging data, obtained on the experimental group during a divided attention task, showed post-treatment lower cerebral activations in the right superior temporal gyrus (BA 42, right and left middle frontal gyrus (BA 6, right postcentral gyrus (BA 3 and left inferior frontal gyrus (BA 9. We interpreted such neural changes as normalization of previously abnormal hyperactivations.

  12. The multiple roles of Fatty Acid Handling Proteins in brain

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    Valentine SF Moullé

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Lipids are essential components of a living organism as energy source but also as constituent of the membrane lipid bilayer. In addition fatty acid (FA derivatives interact with many signaling pathways. FAs have amphipathic properties and therefore require being associated to protein for both transport and intracellular trafficking. Here we will focus on several fatty acid handling proteins, among which the fatty acid translocase/CD36 (FAT/CD36, members of fatty acid transport proteins (FATPs, and lipid chaperones fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs. A decade of extensive studies has helped decipher the mechanism of action of these proteins in peripheral tissue with high lipid metabolism. However, considerably less information is available regarding their role in the brain, despite the high lipid content of this tissue. This review will primarily focus on the recent studies that have highlighted the crucial role of lipid handling proteins in brain FA transport, neuronal differentiation and development, cognitive processes and brain diseases. Finally a special focus will be made on the recent studies that have revealed the role of FAT/CD36 in brain lipid sensing and nervous control of energy balance.

  13. Molecular dialogues between the ischemic brain and the peripheral immune system: Dualistic roles in injury and repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Chengrui; Shi, Yejie; Li, Peiying; Hu, Xiaoming; Gan, Yu; Stetler, Ruth A.; Leak, Rehana K.; Gao, Yanqin; Sun, Bao-Liang; Zheng, Ping; Chen, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Immune and inflammatory responses actively modulate the pathophysiological processes of acute brain injuries such as stroke. Soon after the onset of stroke, signals such as brain-derived antigens, danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), cytokines, and chemokines are released from the injured brain into the systemic circulation. The injured brain also communicates with peripheral organs through the parasympathetic and sympathetic branches of the autonomic nervous system. Many of these diverse signals not only activate resident immune cells in the brain, but also trigger robust immune responses in the periphery. Peripheral immune cells then migrate toward the site of injury and release additional cytokines, chemokines, and other molecules, causing further disruptive or protective effects in the ischemic brain. Bidirectional communication between the injured brain and the peripheral immune system is now known to regulate the progression of stroke pathology as well as tissue repair. In the end, this exquisitely coordinated crosstalk helps determine the fate of animals after stroke. This article reviews the literature on ischemic brain-derived signals through which peripheral immune responses are triggered, and the potential impact of these peripheral responses on brain injury and repair. Pharmacological strategies and cell-based therapies that target the dialogue between the brain and peripheral immune system show promise as potential novel treatments for stroke. PMID:24374228

  14. Molecular dialogs between the ischemic brain and the peripheral immune system: dualistic roles in injury and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Chengrui; Shi, Yejie; Li, Peiying; Hu, Xiaoming; Gan, Yu; Stetler, Ruth A; Leak, Rehana K; Gao, Yanqin; Sun, Bao-Liang; Zheng, Ping; Chen, Jun

    2014-04-01

    Immune and inflammatory responses actively modulate the pathophysiological processes of acute brain injuries such as stroke. Soon after the onset of stroke, signals such as brain-derived antigens, danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), cytokines, and chemokines are released from the injured brain into the systemic circulation. The injured brain also communicates with peripheral organs through the parasympathetic and sympathetic branches of the autonomic nervous system. Many of these diverse signals not only activate resident immune cells in the brain, but also trigger robust immune responses in the periphery. Peripheral immune cells then migrate toward the site of injury and release additional cytokines, chemokines, and other molecules, causing further disruptive or protective effects in the ischemic brain. Bidirectional communication between the injured brain and the peripheral immune system is now known to regulate the progression of stroke pathology as well as tissue repair. In the end, this exquisitely coordinated crosstalk helps determine the fate of animals after stroke. This article reviews the literature on ischemic brain-derived signals through which peripheral immune responses are triggered, and the potential impact of these peripheral responses on brain injury and repair. Pharmacological strategies and cell-based therapies that target the dialog between the brain and peripheral immune system show promise as potential novel treatments for stroke. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Measuring cognitive assessment and intervention burden in patients with acquired brain injured:  Development of the ”How Much is Too Much” questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Tomaszczyk

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To design and preliminarily test a questionnaire intended to measure patient treatment burden resulting from participation in cognitive assessments and interventions. Methods: An expert consensus process was used to develop the concept of patient treatment burden and to determine the first set of questionnaire items and administration protocol. The pilot questionnaire was administered to 20 patients with mild to severe acquired brain injuries on completion of a 2-h or longer neuropsychological assessment. Following preliminary testing, the questionnaire was revised and re-evaluated by a second expert panel and content validity was assessed. Results: Burden was defined as psychologically and/or physically aversive symptoms in response to cognitive assessment or intervention. The first questionnaire contained 21 items assigned to 3 categories: physical, cognitive, and emotional. Eighty-five percent of patients endorsed symptom level increases, with “tired/fatigued” the most frequently endorsed item (80% of patients. Instructions and test items were easily understood, and the questionnaire was quick to administer. Content validity ratio (CVR of the revised questionnaire yielded 23 acceptable items and a subset met the highest CVR threshold (>0.78. Conclusion: This patient-reported outcome will ultimately help patients give voice to aversive experiences, and help clinicians and researchers to monitor and adapt assessments/treatments appropriately. Future steps in development are described.

  16. Love and load--the lived experience of the mother-child relationship among young adult traumatic brain-injured survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Hsueh-Fen S; Stuifbergen, Alexa K

    2004-04-01

    This study aims to describe the meaning of the experience of the relationship between young adult traumatic brain injury (TBI) survivors and their mothers using a phenomenological approach. Informants included 9 males and 3 females who were at least 2 years post-TBI, and their mothers, who were their primary caregivers after the injury. TBI informants were 18 to 25 years of age, had motor vehicle accident-induced injury, experienced post-traumatic amnesia longer than 24 hours, and were able to participate in a verbal interview. In addition, all informants currently were living with their mothers, who also participated in this study. Survivors acquired the sense of being abnormal from various sources, including social pressures, dynamics within the family, and intrapersonal changes. Mothers adopted both positive and negative actions during the period of uncertainty and often struggled to balance protecting their children and letting them become independent. They also struggled to maintain harmonious relationships with people both inside and outside of the family. Sometimes, survivors' parents marital relationships were at risk. Health professionals should design more appropriate long-term community interventions to help TBI survivors and their families decrease the burden of injury and the resulting stress, increase survivors' self-esteem, and improve quality of life of both survivors and their families, serving as a foundation for further TBI care.

  17. Drowning stars: reassessing the role of astrocytes in brain edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrane, Alexander S; Rangroo Thrane, Vinita; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2014-11-01

    Edema formation frequently complicates brain infarction, tumors, and trauma. Despite the significant mortality of this condition, current treatment options are often ineffective or incompletely understood. Recent studies have revealed the existence of a brain-wide paravascular pathway for cerebrospinal (CSF) and interstitial fluid (ISF) exchange. The current review critically examines the contribution of this 'glymphatic' system to the main types of brain edema. We propose that in cytotoxic edema, energy depletion enhances glymphatic CSF influx, whilst suppressing ISF efflux. We also argue that paravascular inflammation or 'paravasculitis' plays a critical role in vasogenic edema. Finally, recent advances in diagnostic imaging of glymphatic function may hold the key to defining the edema profile of individual patients, and thus enable more targeted therapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The role of insulin receptor signaling in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plum, Leona; Schubert, Markus; Brüning, Jens C

    2005-03-01

    The insulin receptor (IR) is expressed in various regions of the developing and adult brain, and its functions have become the focus of recent research. Insulin enters the central nervous system (CNS) through the blood-brain barrier by receptor-mediated transport to regulate food intake, sympathetic activity and peripheral insulin action through the inhibition of hepatic gluconeogenesis and reproductive endocrinology. On a molecular level, some of the effects of insulin converge with those of the leptin signaling machinery at the point of activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), resulting in the regulation of ATP-dependent potassium channels. Furthermore, insulin inhibits neuronal apoptosis via activation of protein kinase B in vitro, and it regulates phosphorylation of tau, metabolism of the amyloid precursor protein and clearance of beta-amyloid from the brain in vivo. These findings indicate that neuronal IR signaling has a direct role in the link between energy homeostasis, reproduction and the development of neurodegenerative diseases.

  19. Developmental origins of brain disorders: roles for dopamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelli M Money

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Neurotransmitters and neuromodulators, such as dopamine, participate in a wide range of behavioral and cognitive functions in the adult brain, including movement, cognition, and reward. Dopamine-mediated signaling plays a fundamental neurodevelopmental role in forebrain differentiation and circuit formation. These developmental effects, such as modulation of neuronal migration and dendritic growth, occur before synaptogenesis and demonstrate novel roles for dopaminergic signaling beyond neuromodulation at the synapse. Pharmacologic and genetic disruptions demonstrate that these effects are brain region- and receptor subtype-specific. For example, the striatum and frontal cortex exhibit abnormal neuronal structure and function following prenatal disruption of dopamine receptor signaling. Alterations in these processes are implicated in the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric disorders, and emerging studies of neurodevelopmental disruptions may shed light on the pathophysiology of abnormal neuronal circuitry in neuropsychiatric disorders.

  20. Link for Injured Kids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Marizen; Toussaint, Maisha; Woods-Jaeger, Briana; Harland, Karisa; Wetjen, Kristel; Wilgenbusch, Tammy; Pitcher, Graeme; Jennissen, Charles

    2017-01-01

    Objective Injury, the most common type of pediatric trauma, can lead to a number of adverse psychosocial outcomes, including posttraumatic stress disorder. Currently, few evidence-based parent programs exist to support children hospitalized after a traumatic injury. Using methods in evaluation and intervention research, we completed a formative research study to develop a new program of psychological first aid, Link for Injured Kids, aimed to educate parents in supporting their children after a severe traumatic injury. Methods Using qualitative methods, we held focus groups with parents and pediatric trauma providers of children hospitalized at a Level I Children's Hospital because of an injury in 2012. We asked focus group participants to describe reactions to trauma and review drafts of our intervention materials. Results Health professionals and caregivers reported a broad spectrum of emotional responses by their children or patients; however, difficulties were experienced during recovery at home and upon returning to school. All parents and health professionals recommended that interventions be offered to parents either in the emergency department or close to discharge among admissions. Conclusions Results from this study strongly indicate a need for posttrauma interventions, particularly in rural settings, to support families of children to address the psychosocial outcomes in the aftermath of an injury. Findings presented here describe the process of intervention development that responds to the needs of an affected population. PMID:26428077

  1. The role of mitochondrial ROS in the aging brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanatos, Rhoda; Sanz, Alberto

    2018-03-01

    The brain is the most complex human organ, consuming more energy than any other tissue in proportion to its size. It relies heavily on mitochondria to produce energy and is made up of mitotic and postmitotic cells that need to closely coordinate their metabolism to maintain essential bodily functions. During aging, damaged mitochondria that produce less ATP and more reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulate. The current consensus is that ROS cause oxidative stress, damaging mitochondria and resulting in an energetic crisis that triggers neurodegenerative diseases and accelerates aging. However, in model organisms, increasing mitochondrial ROS (mtROS) in the brain extends lifespan, suggesting that ROS may participate in signaling that protects the brain. Here, we summarize the mechanisms by which mtROS are produced at the molecular level, how different brain cells and regions produce different amounts of mtROS, and how mtROS levels change during aging. Finally, we critically discuss the possible roles of ROS in aging as signaling molecules and damaging agents, addressing whether age-associated increases in mtROS are a cause or a consequence of aging. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  2. Short-term low-frequency electrical stimulation enhanced remyelination of injured peripheral nerves by inducing the promyelination effect of brain-derived neurotrophic factor on Schwann cell polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Lidan; Xia, Rong; Ding, Wenlong

    2010-09-01

    Electrical stimulation (ES) has been found to aid repair of nerve injuries and have been shown to increase and direct neurite outgrowth during stimulation. However, the effect of ES on peripheral remyelination after nerve damage has been investigated less well, and the mechanism underlying its action remains unclear. In the present study, the crush-injured sciatic nerves in rats were subjected to 1 hr of continuous ES (20 Hz, 100 microsec, 3 V). Electron microscopy and nerve morphometry were performed to investigate the extent of regenerated nerve myelination. The expression profiles of P0, Par-3, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the injuried sciatic nerves and in the dorsal root ganglion neuron/Schwann cell cocultures were examined by Western blotting. Par-3 localization in the sciatic nerves was determined by immunohistochemistry to demonstrate Schwann cell polarization during myelination. We reported that 20-Hz ES increased the number of myelinated fibers and the thickness myelin sheath at 4 and 8 weeks postinjury. P0 level in the ES-treated groups, both in vitro and in vivo, was enhanced compared with the controls. The earlier peak of Par-3 in the ES-treated groups indicated an earlier initiation of Schwann cell myelination. Additionally, ES significantly elevated BDNF expression in nerve tissues and in cocultures. ES on the site of nerve injury potentiates axonal regrowth and myelin maturation during peripheral nerve regeneration. Furthermore, the therapeutic actions of ES on myelination are mediated via enhanced BDNF signals, which drive the promyelination effect on Schwann cells at the onset of myelination.

  3. The Role of Brain-Reactive Autoantibodies in Brain Pathology and Cognitive Impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Mader

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Antibodies to different brain proteins have been recently found to be associated with an increasing number of different autoimmune diseases. They need to penetrate the blood–brain barrier (BBB in order to bind antigens within the central nervous system (CNS. They can target either neuronal or non-neuronal antigen and result in damage either by themselves or in synergy with other inflammatory mediators. Antibodies can lead to acute brain pathology, which may be reversible; alternatively, they may trigger irreversible damage that persists even though the antibodies are no longer present. In this review, we will describe two different autoimmune conditions and the role of their antibodies in causing brain pathology. In systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, patients can have double stranded DNA antibodies that cross react with the neuronal N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR, which have been recently linked to neurocognitive dysfunction. In neuromyelitis optica (NMO, antibodies to astrocytic aquaporin-4 (AQP4 are diagnostic of disease. There is emerging evidence that pathogenic T cells also play an important role for the disease pathogenesis in NMO since they infiltrate in the CNS. In order to enable appropriate and less invasive treatment for antibody-mediated diseases, we need to understand the mechanisms of antibody-mediated pathology, the acute and chronic effects of antibody exposure, if the antibodies are produced intrathecally or systemically, their target antigen, and what triggers their production. Emerging data also show that in utero exposure to some brain-reactive antibodies, such as those found in SLE, can cause neurodevelopmental impairment since they can penetrate the embryonic BBB. If the antibody exposure occurs at a critical time of development, this can result in irreversible damage of the offspring that persists throughout adulthood.

  4. Lesion Size Is Exacerbated in Hypoxic Rats Whereas Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1 Alpha and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Increase in Injured Normoxic Rats: A Prospective Cohort Study of Secondary Hypoxia in Focal Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thelin, Eric Peter; Frostell, Arvid; Mulder, Jan; Mitsios, Nicholas; Damberg, Peter; Aski, Sahar Nikkhou; Risling, Mårten; Svensson, Mikael; Morganti-Kossmann, Maria Cristina; Bellander, Bo-Michael

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia following traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a severe insult shown to exacerbate the pathophysiology, resulting in worse outcome. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a hypoxic insult in a focal TBI model by monitoring brain edema, lesion volume, serum biomarker levels, immune cell infiltration, as well as the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Female Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 73, including sham and naive) were used. The rats were intubated and mechanically ventilated. A controlled cortical impact device created a 3-mm deep lesion in the right parietal hemisphere. Post-injury, rats inhaled either normoxic (22% O2) or hypoxic (11% O2) mixtures for 30 min. The rats were sacrificed at 1, 3, 7, 14, and 28 days post-injury. Serum was collected for S100B measurements using ELISA. Ex vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed to determine lesion size and edema volume. Immunofluorescence was employed to analyze neuronal death, changes in cerebral macrophage- and neutrophil infiltration, microglia proliferation, apoptosis, complement activation (C5b9), IgG extravasation, HIF-1α, and VEGF. The hypoxic group had significantly increased blood levels of lactate and decreased pO2 (p hypoxic animals (p hypoxic group at 1 day after trauma (p = 0.0868). No differences were observed between the groups in cytotoxic and vascular edema, IgG extravasation, neutrophils and macrophage aggregation, microglia proliferation, or C5b-9 expression. Hypoxia following focal TBI exacerbated the lesion size and neuronal loss. Moreover, there was a tendency to higher levels of S100B in the hypoxic group early after injury, indicating a potential validity as a biomarker of injury severity. In the normoxic group, the expression of HIF-1α and VEGF was found elevated, possibly indicative of neuro-protective responses occurring in this less severely injured group. Further studies are

  5. Pathways for insulin access to the brain: the role of the microvascular endothelial cell

    OpenAIRE

    Meijer, Rick I.; Gray, Sarah M.; Aylor, Kevin W.; Barrett, Eugene J.

    2016-01-01

    New understanding of the directional flow of subarachnoid cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) through the Virchow-Robin space (VRS) to brain parenchyma, coupled with the demonstration here of rapid, insulin receptor-dependent trapping of plasma insulin by the brain microvasculature, underscores the direct role of insulin's blood-brain barrier transit to insulin delivery to the brain.

  6. Role of sound stimulation in reprogramming brain connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhury, Sraboni; Nag, Tapas C; Jain, Suman; Wadhwa, Shashi

    2013-09-01

    Sensory stimulation has a critical role to play in the development of an individual. Environmental factors tend to modify the inputs received by the sensory pathway. The developing brain is most vulnerable to these alterations and interacts with the environment to modify its neural circuitry. In addition to other sensory stimuli, auditory stimulation can also act as external stimuli to provide enrichment during the perinatal period. There is evidence that suggests that enriched environment in the form of auditory stimulation can play a substantial role in modulating plasticity during the prenatal period. This review focuses on the emerging role of prenatal auditory stimulation in the development of higher brain functions such as learning and memory in birds and mammals. The molecular mechanisms of various changes in the hippocampus following sound stimulation to effect neurogenesis, learning and memory are described. Sound stimulation can also modify neural connectivity in the early postnatal life to enhance higher cognitive function or even repair the secondary damages in various neurological and psychiatric disorders. Thus, it becomes imperative to examine in detail the possible ameliorating effects of prenatal sound stimulation in existing animal models of various psychiatric disorders, such as autism.

  7. Bacoside A: Role in Cigarette Smoking Induced Changes in Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Vani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cigarette smoking (CS is a major health hazard that exerts diverse physiologic and biochemical effects mediated by the components present and generated during smoking. Recent experimental studies have shown predisposition to several biological consequences from both active and passive cigarette smoke exposure. In particular, passive smoking is linked to a number of adverse health effects which are equally harmful as active smoking. A pragmatic approach should be considered for designing a pharmacological intervention to combat the adverse effects of passive smoking. This review describes the results from a controlled experimental condition, testing the effect of bacoside A (BA on the causal role of passive/secondhand smoke exposure that caused pathological and neurological changes in rat brain. Chronic exposure to cigarette smoke induced significant changes in rat brain histologically and at the neurotransmitter level, lipid peroxidation states, mitochondrial functions, membrane alterations, and apoptotic damage in rat brain. Bacoside A is a neuroactive agent isolated from Bacopa monnieri. As a neuroactive agent, BA was effective in combating these changes. Future research should examine the effects of BA at molecular level and assess its functional effects on neurobiological and behavioral processes associated with passive smoke.

  8. Sirtuins and Their Roles in Brain Aging and Neurodegenerative Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jęśko, Henryk; Wencel, Przemysław; Strosznajder, Robert P; Strosznajder, Joanna B

    2017-03-01

    Sirtuins (SIRT1-SIRT7) are unique histone deacetylases (HDACs) whose activity depends on NAD + levels and thus on the cellular metabolic status. SIRTs regulate energy metabolism and mitochondrial function. They orchestrate the stress response and damage repair. Through these functions sirtuins modulate the course of aging and affect neurodegenerative diseases. SIRTSs interact with multiple signaling proteins, transcription factors (TFs) and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) another class of NAD + -dependent post-translational protein modifiers. The cross-talk between SIRTs TFs and PARPs is a highly promising research target in a number of brain pathologies. This review describes updated results on sirtuins in brain aging/neurodegeneration. It focuses on SIRT1 but also on the roles of mitochondrial SIRTs (SIRT3, 4, 5) and on SIRT6 and SIRT2 localized in the nucleus and in cytosol, respectively. The involvement of SIRTs in regulation of insulin-like growth factor signaling in the brain during aging and in Alzheimer's disease was also focused. Moreover, we analyze the mechanism(s) and potential significance of interactions between SIRTs and several TFs in the regulation of cell survival and death. A critical view is given on the application of SIRT activators/modulators in therapy of neurodegenerative diseases.

  9. Coagulopathy: Its Pathophysiology and Treatment in the Injured Patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-30

    death. In fact, in their series, 77% of brain-injured patients who died had a coagulopathy at the time of hospital admission.8 Similarly, Faringer et...coagulation process. Arch Surg 1996;131:923–927. 9. Faringer PD, Mullins RJ, Johnson RL, Trunkey DD. Blood component supplementation during massive

  10. Effective protection of rabbits' explosive brain injury through blocking ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The gap junction plays an important role in spreading of apoptotic and necrotic signals from injured and stressed cells to the neighboring viable cells. The present study was performed to investigate the important role of gap junction communication on rabbits' explosive brain injury. Methods: Explosion of paper ...

  11. Redefining the role of metallothionein within the injured brain: extracellular metallothioneins play an important role in the astrocyte-neuron response to injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chung, Roger S; Penkowa, Milena; Dittmann, Justin

    2008-01-01

    for the first time the transfer of MT from astrocytes to neurons over a specific time course in vitro. Finally, we show that MT is rapidly internalized via the cell bodies of retinal ganglion cells in vivo and is a powerful promoter of axonal regeneration through the inhibitory environment of the completely...

  12. Role of miRNA-9 in Brain Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balachandar Radhakrishnan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a class of small regulatory RNAs involved in gene regulation. The regulation is effected by either translational inhibition or transcriptional silencing. In vertebrates, the importance of miRNA in development was discovered from mice and zebrafish dicer knockouts. The miRNA-9 (miR-9 is one of the most highly expressed miRNAs in the early and adult vertebrate brain. It has diverse functions within the developing vertebrate brain. In this article, the role of miR-9 in the developing forebrain (telencephalon and diencephalon, midbrain, hindbrain, and spinal cord of vertebrate species is highlighted. In the forebrain, miR-9 is necessary for the proper development of dorsoventral telencephalon by targeting marker genes expressed in the telencephalon. It regulates proliferation in telencephalon by regulating Foxg1, Pax6, Gsh2 , and Meis2 genes. The feedback loop regulation between miR-9 and Nr2e1/Tlx helps in neuronal migration and differentiation. Targeting Foxp1 and Foxp2 , and Map1b by miR-9 regulates the radial migration of neurons and axonal development. In the organizers, miR-9 is inversely regulated by hairy1 and Fgf8 to maintain zona limitans interthalamica and midbrain-hindbrain boundary (MHB. It maintains the MHB by inhibiting Fgf signaling genes and is involved in the neurogenesis of the midbrain-hindbrain by regulating Her genes. In the hindbrain, miR-9 modulates progenitor proliferation and differentiation by regulating Her genes and Elav3. In the spinal cord, miR-9 modulates the regulation of Foxp1 and Onecut1 for motor neuron development. In the forebrain, midbrain, and hindbrain, miR-9 is necessary for proper neuronal progenitor maintenance, neurogenesis, and differentiation. In vertebrate brain development, miR-9 is involved in regulating several region-specific genes in a spatiotemporal pattern.

  13. Inflaming the diseased brain: a role for tainted melanins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeitner, T M; Kalogiannis, M; Patrick, P A; Gomolin, I; Palaia, T; Ragolia, L; Brand, D; Delikatny, E J

    2015-05-01

    Inflammation plays a crucial role in neurodegenerative diseases, but the irritants responsible for this response remain largely unknown. This report addressed the hypothesis that hypochlorous acid reacts with dopamine to produce melanic precipitates that promote cerebral inflammation. Spectrophotometric studies demonstrated that nM amounts of HOCl and dopamine react within seconds. A second-order rate constant for the reaction of HOCl and dopamine of 2.5 × 10(4)M(-1)s(-1) was obtained by measuring loss of dopaminergic fluorescence due to HOCl. Gravimetric measurements, electron microscopy, elemental analysis, and a novel use of flow cytometry confirmed that the major product of this reaction is a precipitate with an average diameter of 1.5 μm. Flow cytometry was also used to demonstrate the preferential reaction of HOCl with dopamine rather than albumin. Engulfment of the chlorodopamine particulates by phagocytes in vitro caused these cells to release TNFα and die. Intrastriatal administration of 10(6) particles also increased the content of TNFα in the brain and led to a 50% loss of the dopaminergic neurons in the nigra. These studies indicate that HOCl and dopamine react quickly and preferentially with each other to produce particles that promote inflammation and neuronal death in the brain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Role of the Brain's Reward Circuitry in Depression: Transcriptional Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestler, Eric J

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence supports an important role for the brain's reward circuitry in controlling mood under normal conditions and contributing importantly to the pathophysiology and symptomatology of a range of mood disorders, such as depression. Here we focus on the nucleus accumbens (NAc), a critical component of the brain's reward circuitry, in depression and other stress-related disorders. The prominence of anhedonia, reduced motivation, and decreased energy level in most individuals with depression supports the involvement of the NAc in these conditions. We concentrate on several transcription factors (CREB, ΔFosB, SRF, NFκB, and β-catenin), which are altered in the NAc in rodent depression models--and in some cases in the NAc of depressed humans, and which produce robust depression- or antidepressant-like effects when manipulated in the NAc in animal models. These studies of the NAc have established novel approaches toward modeling key symptoms of depression in animals and could enable the development of antidepressant medications with fundamentally new mechanisms of action. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Understanding the Role of Neuroscience in Brain Based Products: A Guide for Educators and Consumers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylvan, Lesley J.; Christodoulou, Joanna A.

    2010-01-01

    The term "brain" based is often used to describe learning theories, principles, and products. Although there have been calls urging educators to be cautious in interpreting and using such material, consumers may find it challenging to understand the role of the brain and to discriminate among brain based products to determine which would be…

  16. Differential role of tumor necrosis factor receptors in mouse brain inflammatory responses in cryolesion brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quintana, Albert; Giralt, Mercedes; Rojas, Santiago

    2005-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is one of the mediators dramatically increased after traumatic brain injury that leads to the activation, proliferation, and hypertrophy of mononuclear, phagocytic cells and gliosis. Eventually, TNF-alpha can induce both apoptosis and necrosis via intracell......Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is one of the mediators dramatically increased after traumatic brain injury that leads to the activation, proliferation, and hypertrophy of mononuclear, phagocytic cells and gliosis. Eventually, TNF-alpha can induce both apoptosis and necrosis via...... intracellular signaling. This cytokine exerts its functions via interaction with two receptors: type-1 receptor (TNFR1) and type-2 receptor (TNFR2). In this work, the inflammatory response after a freeze injury (cryolesion) in the cortex was studied in wild-type (WT) animals and in mice lacking TNFR1 (TNFR1 KO...... signaling also affected the expression of apoptosis/cell death-related genes (Fas, Rip, p53), matrix metalloproteinases (MMP3, MMP9, MMP12), and their inhibitors (TIMP1), suggesting a role of TNFR1 in extracellular matrix remodeling after injury. However, GDNF, NGF, and BDNF expression were not affected...

  17. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor: role in depression and suicide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogesh Dwivedi

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Yogesh DwivediPsychiatric Institute, Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USAAbstract: Depression and suicidal behavior have recently been shown to be associated with disturbances in structural and synaptic plasticity. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, one of the major neurotrophic factors, plays an important role in the maintenance and survival of neurons and in synaptic plasticity. Several lines of evidence suggest that BDNF is involved in depression, such that the expression of BDNF is decreased in depressed patients. In addition, antidepressants up-regulate the expression of BDNF. This has led to the proposal of the “neurotrophin hypothesis of depression”. Increasing evidence demonstrates that suicidal behavior is also associated with lower expression of BDNF, which may be independent from depression. Recent genetic studies also support a link of BDNF to depression/suicidal behavior. Not only BDNF, but abnormalities in its cognate receptor tropomycin receptor kinase B (TrkB and its splice variant (TrkB.T1 have also been reported in depressed/suicidal patients. It has been suggested that epigenetic modulation of the Bdnf and Trkb genes may contribute to their altered expression and functioning. More recently, impairment in the functioning of pan75 neurotrophin receptor has been reported in suicide brain specimens. pan75 neurotrophin receptor is a low-affinity neurotrophin receptor that, when expressed in conjunction with low availability of neurotropins/Trks, induces apoptosis. Overall, these studies suggest the possibility that BDNF and its mediated signaling may participate in the pathophysiology of depression and suicidal behavior. This review focuses on the critical evidence demonstrating the involvement of BDNF in depression and suicide.Keywords: BDNF, neurotrophins, p75NTR, Trk receptor, depression, antidepressants, suicide, genetics, epigenetics

  18. The Neurological Wake-up Test—A Role in Neurocritical Care Monitoring of Traumatic Brain Injury Patients?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niklas Marklund

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The most fundamental clinical monitoring tool in traumatic brain injury (TBI patients is the repeated clinical examination. In the severe TBI patient treated by continuous sedation in a neurocritical care (NCC unit, sedation interruption is required to enable a clinical evaluation (named the neurological wake-up test; NWT assessing the level of consciousness, pupillary diameter and reactivity to light, and presence of focal neurological deficits. There is a basic conflict regarding the NWT in the NCC setting; can the clinical information obtained by the NWT justify the risk of inducing a stress response in a severe TBI patient? Furthermore, in the presence of advanced multimodal monitoring and neuroimaging, is the NWT necessary to identify important clinical alterations? In studies of severe TBI patients, the NWT was consistently shown to induce a stress reaction including brief increases in intracranial pressure (ICP and changes in cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP. However, it has not been established whether these short-lived ICP and CPP changes are detrimental to the injured brain. Daily interruption of sedation is associated with a reduced ventilator time, shorter hospital stay and reduced mortality in many studies of general intensive care unit patients, although such clinical benefits have not been firmly established in TBI. To date, there is no consensus on the use of the NWT among NCC units and systematic studies are scarce. Thus, additional studies evaluating the role of the NWT in clinical decision-making are needed. Multimodal NCC monitoring may be an adjunct in assessing in which TBI patients the NWT can be safely performed. At present, the NWT remains the golden standard for clinical monitoring and detection of neurological changes in NCC and could be considered in TBI patients with stable baseline ICP and CPP readings. The focus of the present review is an overview of the existing literature on the role of the NWT as a clinical

  19. Role of Non-neuronal Cells in Tauopathies After Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0422 TITLE: Role of Nonneuronal Cells in Tauopathies After Brain Injury PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Sally A. Frautschy...AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Role of Non-neuronal Cells in Tauopathies After Brain Injury 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0422 5c. PROGRAM...traumatic brain injury (TBI), specific inflammatory factors (complement proteins) elevated during long asymptomatic prodromal period are responsible

  20. Developmental thyroid hormone insufficiency and brain development: A role for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)?*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyroid hormones (TH) are essential for normal brain development. Even subclinical hypothyroidism experienced in utero can result in neuropsychological deficits in children despite normal thyroid status at birth. Neurotrophins have been implicated in a host of brain cellular func...

  1. HYSTOMORPHOLOGIC CHANGES IN INJURED MENISCI IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. B. Bogatov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the work was studying histological changes in the injured menisci in children. The histological evaluation of injured menisci received during arthroscopy was performed. The prescription of injury varied from several days till 3 years. It was shown that injured fragment of the meniscus is viable up to 3 months since trauma. It was also obvious that active migration of the meniscus cells occur in the injured fragment and microvessels are seen in 50% of the meniscus tissues.

  2. Role of brain hemispheric dominance in anticipatory postural control strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cioncoloni, David; Rosignoli, Deborah; Feurra, Matteo; Rossi, Simone; Bonifazi, Marco; Rossi, Alessandro; Mazzocchio, Riccardo

    2016-07-01

    Most of the cerebral functions are asymmetrically represented in the two hemispheres. Moreover, dexterity and coordination of the distal segment of the dominant limbs depend on cortico-motor lateralization. In this study, we investigated whether postural control may be also considered a lateralized hemispheric brain function. To this aim, 15 young subjects were tested in standing position by measuring center of pressure (COP) shifts along the anteroposterior axis (COP-Y) during dynamic posturography before and after continuous Theta Burst Stimulation (cTBS) intervention applied to the dominant or non-dominant M1 hand area as well as to the vertex. We show that when subjects were expecting a forward platform translation, the COP-Y was positioned significantly backward or forward after dominant or non-dominant M1 stimulation, respectively. We postulate that cTBS applied on M1 may have disrupted the functional connectivity between intra- and interhemispheric areas implicated in the anticipatory control of postural stability. This study suggests a functional asymmetry between the two homologous primary motor areas, with the dominant hemisphere playing a critical role in the selection of the appropriate postural control strategy.

  3. Lung cancer brain metastases – the role of neurosurgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Aleshin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is mostly common occurring oncological disease in the developed countries. Currently lung cancers are subdivided into nonsmall-cell (adenocarcinoma, large-cell, squamous cell and small-cell. The difference in the clinical and morphological picture leads to the necessity of choosing therapeutic approaches to patients of various groups.Lung cancer should be referred to encephalotropic diseases since metastatic lesion of the central nervous system is sufficiently common complication. Successes of complex treatment of primary tumor result in increase of total longlivety currently ther is ageing of patients suffering lung cancer. These factors increase the risk of metastatic lesions of the brain.Interest to the problem of neurosurgical treatment of patients suffering lung cancer is determined by frequency of lesion, varicosity of morphological variants of the disease, requiring various algorithms of treatment and diagnosis.The main role of neurosurgical intervention in cerebral metastases of lung cancer consist in creation of the paled of carrying out combined therapy. Ideally, a neurosurgical operation should be carried out with clearcut observance of oncological principles of ablasty.Adequate comprehensive approach to treatment or patients with cerebral metastases of various forms of lung cancer with the developed of optimal tactics of and stages of treatment would make it possible to increase duration and quality of life of patients.

  4. Organisation and functional role of the brain angiotensin system

    OpenAIRE

    Catherine Llorens-Cortes; Frederic AO Mendelsohn

    2002-01-01

    The discovery that all components of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) are present in the brain led investigators to postulate the existence of a local brain RAS. Supporting this, angiotensin immunoreactive neurones have been visualised in the brain. Two major pathways were described: a forebrain pathway which connects circumventricular organs to the median preoptic nucleus, paraventricular and supraoptic nuclei, and a second pathway connecting the hypothalamus to the medulla oblongata. Bloo...

  5. Seizures and the Role of Anticonvulsants After Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Lara L; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; Vespa, Paul M

    2016-10-01

    Posttraumatic seizures are a common complication of traumatic brain injury. Posttraumatic epilepsy accounts for 20% of symptomatic epilepsy in the general population and 5% of all epilepsy. Early posttraumatic seizures occur in more than 20% of patients in the intensive care unit and are associated with secondary brain injury and worse patient outcomes. Most posttraumatic seizures are nonconvulsive and therefore continuous electroencephalography monitoring should be the standard of care for patients with moderate or severe brain injury. The literature shows that posttraumatic seizures result in secondary brain injury caused by increased intracranial pressure, cerebral edema and metabolic crisis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Emerging role of the brain in the homeostatic regulation of energy and glucose metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Eun; Song, Do Kyeong; Kim, Min-Seon

    2016-03-11

    Accumulated evidence from genetic animal models suggests that the brain, particularly the hypothalamus, has a key role in the homeostatic regulation of energy and glucose metabolism. The brain integrates multiple metabolic inputs from the periphery through nutrients, gut-derived satiety signals and adiposity-related hormones. The brain modulates various aspects of metabolism, such as food intake, energy expenditure, insulin secretion, hepatic glucose production and glucose/fatty acid metabolism in adipose tissue and skeletal muscle. Highly coordinated interactions between the brain and peripheral metabolic organs are critical for the maintenance of energy and glucose homeostasis. Defective crosstalk between the brain and peripheral organs contributes to the development of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Here we comprehensively review the above topics, discussing the main findings related to the role of the brain in the homeostatic regulation of energy and glucose metabolism.

  7. Role of bromocriptine in multi-spectral manifestations of traumatic brain injury

    OpenAIRE

    Munakomi, Sunil; Bhattarai, Binod; Mohan Kumar, Bijoy

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Despite the prevalence and cost of traumatic brain injury related disabilities, there is paucity in the literature on modern approaches to pharmacotherapy. Medications may promote recovery by enhancing some neurological functions without impacting others. Herein we discussed the role of bromocriptine in neurorehabilitation for patients with traumatic brain injury. Methods: A cohort comprising of 36 selective nonsurgical cases of traumatic brain injury in minimally conscious state ...

  8. Recovery of an injured fornix in a stroke patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Sang Seok; Jang, Sung Ho

    2013-11-01

    Knowledge about recovery of an injured fornix following brain injury is limited. We describe here a patient who showed recovery of an injured fornix following stroke. A 57-year-old female patient underwent coiling for a ruptured anterior communicating cerebral artery aneurysm, and conservative management for subarachnoid and intraventricular haemorrhage. The patient showed severe cognitive impairment 6 weeks after onset. However, her cognition showed continuous improvement with time; based on the Mini-Mental State Examination and the Memory Assessment Scale, her cognition was within the normal range 7 months after onset. Findings from diffusion tensor tractography at 6 weeks and 7 months showed discontinuations in both columns of the fornix. The proximal portion of both crus also showed discontinuation on diffusion tensor tractography at 6 weeks and 7 months; however, on 7-month diffusion tensor tractography, the end of the fornical body was shown to be connected to the splenium of the corpus callosum and then branched to the right medial temporal lobe and right thalamus. The unusual neural connection between the injured fornix and the thalamus appears to be a recovery phenomenon, which allows the injured fornix and the medial temporal lobe to obtain cholinergic innervation from cholinergic nuclei in the brainstem rather than from cholinergic nuclei in the basal forebrain.

  9. Role of the brain in the regulation process of urination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. B. Berdichevskiy

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of positron emission tomography of the brain with glucose isotope 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose in healthy men and women during the period of accumulation and emptying of the bladder revealed no gender-specific brain activity. The men and women during the accumulation and storage of urine occurs at a standard activity of the brain with the dominance of the left hemisphere. Zone hyperactivity of the brain during this period is the region of the back of the cingulate gyrus.During urination in both men and women have the increased activity of the cortex of the brain. Preserved the dominance of the left hemisphere. Hyperactivity zone of the brain during this period is the region of the anterior cingulate gyrus.Thus, the cortical control of the act of accumulation and bladder emptying in healthy people in our studies did not reveal gender differences. However, security features neurohumoral response of spinal centers and peripheral neuroregulation function of the lower urinary tract, may have a man and a woman significant differences.

  10. The role of image registration in brain mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toga, A.W.; Thompson, P.M.

    2008-01-01

    Image registration is a key step in a great variety of biomedical imaging applications. It provides the ability to geometrically align one dataset with another, and is a prerequisite for all imaging applications that compare datasets across subjects, imaging modalities, or across time. Registration algorithms also enable the pooling and comparison of experimental findings across laboratories, the construction of population-based brain atlases, and the creation of systems to detect group patterns in structural and functional imaging data. We review the major types of registration approaches used in brain imaging today. We focus on their conceptual basis, the underlying mathematics, and their strengths and weaknesses in different contexts. We describe the major goals of registration, including data fusion, quantification of change, automated image segmentation and labeling, shape measurement, and pathology detection. We indicate that registration algorithms have great potential when used in conjunction with a digital brain atlas, which acts as a reference system in which brain images can be compared for statistical analysis. The resulting armory of registration approaches is fundamental to medical image analysis, and in a brain mapping context provides a means to elucidate clinical, demographic, or functional trends in the anatomy or physiology of the brain. PMID:19890483

  11. The role and dynamics of β-catenin in precondition induced neuroprotection after traumatic brain injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gali Umschweif

    Full Text Available Preconditioning via heat acclimation (34°C 30 d results in neuroprotection from traumatic brain injury due to constitutive as well as dynamic changes triggered by the trauma. Among these changes is Akt phosphorylation, which decreases apoptosis and induces HIF1α. In the present study we investigated the Akt downstream GSK3β/β-catenin pathway and focused on post injury alternations of β catenin and its impact on the cellular response in preconditioned heat acclimated mice. We found that the reduction in motor disability is accompanied with attenuation of depressive like behavior in heat acclimated mice that correlates with the GSK3β phosphorylation state. Concomitantly, a robust β catenin phosphorylation is not followed by its degradation, or by reduced nuclear accumulation. Enhanced tyrosine phosphorylation of β catenin in the injured area weakens the β catenin-N cadherin complex. Membrane β catenin is transiently reduced in heat acclimated mice and its recovery 7 days post TBI is accompanied by induction of the synaptic marker synaptophysin. We suggest a set of cellular events following traumatic brain injury in heat acclimated mice that causes β catenin to participate in cell-cell adhesion alternations rather than in Wnt signaling. These events may contribute to synaptogenesis and the improved motor and cognitive abilities seen heat acclimated mice after traumatic brain injury.

  12. A critical role for astrocytes in hypercapnic vasodilation in brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howarth, C; Sutherland, B A; Choi, H B

    2017-01-01

    increases in astrocyte calcium signaling which in turn stimulates COX-1 activity and generates downstream PgE2 production. We demonstrate that astrocyte calcium-evoked production of the vasodilator, PgE2, is critically dependent on brain levels of the antioxidant, glutathione. These data suggest a novel......Cerebral blood flow (CBF) is controlled by arterial blood pressure, arterial CO2, arterial O2, and brain activity and is largely constant in the awake state. Although small changes in arterial CO2 are particularly potent to change CBF (1 mmHg variation in arterial CO2 changes CBF by 3...... in brain slices with in vivo work in rats and C57Bl/6J mice to examine the hemodynamic responses to CO2 and somatosensory stimulation before and after inhibition of astrocytic glutathione and PgE2 synthesis. We demonstrate that hypercapnia (increased CO2) evokes an increase in astrocyte [Ca(2+)]i...

  13. The role of brain SPECT in children with epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xingdang; Liu Yongchang; Lin Xiangtong

    1996-01-01

    The rCBF brain SPECT with 99m Tc-HMPAO was performed in 15 children with interictal epilepsy, and some cases were compared with EEG, X-ray CT and MRI. The results showed that the positive rate of SPECT was the highest (93.33%,), then the EEG (92.31%), and the CT and MRI were the lowest (66.67% and 75%). This study indicated that brain SPECT was an effective method for diagnosis and foci localization in epileptic children, and also was useful to the study of prognosis and relationship between changes of rCBF and progress in clinical pictures

  14. A role for sex and a common HFE gene variant in brain iron uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duck, Kari A; Neely, Elizabeth B; Simpson, Ian A; Connor, James R

    2018-03-01

    HFE (high iron) is an essential protein for regulating iron transport into cells. Mutations of the HFE gene result in loss of this regulation causing accumulation of iron within the cell. The mutated protein has been found increasingly in numerous neurodegenerative disorders in which increased levels of iron in the brain are reported. Additionally, evidence that these mutations are associated with elevated brain iron challenges the paradigm that the brain is protected by the blood-brain barrier. While much has been studied regarding the role of HFE in cellular iron uptake, it has remained unclear what role the protein plays in the transport of iron into the brain. We investigated regulation of iron transport into the brain using a mouse model with a mutation in the HFE gene. We demonstrated that the rate of radiolabeled iron ( 59 Fe) uptake was similar between the two genotypes despite higher brain iron concentrations in the mutant. However, there were significant differences in iron uptake between males and females regardless of genotype. These data indicate that brain iron status is consistently maintained and tightly regulated at the level of the blood-brain barrier.

  15. Role of sound stimulation in reprogramming brain connectivity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-07-17

    Jul 17, 2013 ... higher brain functions such as learning and memory in birds and mammals. ... Sound at an optimum level for a short period may act as an auditory stimulus to ... This could lead to long-term plasticity, which allows fine tuning to ...

  16. The Role of Microglial Subsets in Regulating Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-01

    oil. White scale bars represent a 10 lm distance. For histology, mice were killed and subjected to cardiac perfusion. Harvested brains and spinal cord...isolating ventral midbrain neurons, and we thank Dr Daniel Cua and Dr Barbara Shaikh (Schering- Plough , Palo Alto, CA, USA) and Dr Monica Carson (UC

  17. The role of whole brain radiotherapy and stereotactic radiosurgery on brain metastases from renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goyal, Lav K.; Suh, John H.; Reddy, Chandana A.; Barnett, Gene H.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: We reviewed our experience with patients who have undergone stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for brain metastases secondary to renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Analysis was performed to determine the survival, local control, distant brain failure (DBF), and then to define which tumors may not require upfront whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT). Methods and Materials: Twenty-nine patients with 66 tumors underwent SRS from 1991 to 1998. Median follow-up from time of brain metastases diagnoses relative to each tumor was 12.5 months and 6.8 months from the time of SRS. Median SRS dose was 1,800 cGy to the 60% isodose line. Three patients had undergone SRS for previously treated tumors. Results: Median survival time from diagnosis was 10.0 months. Overall survival was not affected by age, addition of WBRT, number of lesions, tumor volume, or the presence of systemic disease. Of the 23 patients with follow-up neuroimaging, 4 of 47 (9%) tumors recurred. The addition of WBRT did not improve local control. Of the 13 patients who presented with a single lesion, 3 went on to develop DBF (23%), while 6 of the 10 patients who presented with multiple metastases developed DBF (60%). Conclusion: Patients with brain metastases secondary to RCC treated by SRS alone have excellent local control. The decision of whether or not to add WBRT to SRS should depend on whether the patient has a high likelihood of developing DBF. Our study suggests that patients who present with multiple brain lesions may be more likely to benefit from the addition of WBRT because they appear to be more than twice as likely to develop DBF as compared to patients with a single lesion

  18. The Role of Glucose Transporters in Brain Disease: Diabetes and Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Kaushik; DeSilva, Shanal; Abbruscato, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The occurrence of altered brain glucose metabolism has long been suggested in both diabetes and Alzheimer’s diseases. However, the preceding mechanism to altered glucose metabolism has not been well understood. Glucose enters the brain via glucose transporters primarily present at the blood-brain barrier. Any changes in glucose transporter function and expression dramatically affects brain glucose homeostasis and function. In the brains of both diabetic and Alzheimer’s disease patients, changes in glucose transporter function and expression have been observed, but a possible link between the altered glucose transporter function and disease progress is missing. Future recognition of the role of new glucose transporter isoforms in the brain may provide a better understanding of brain glucose metabolism in normal and disease states. Elucidation of clinical pathological mechanisms related to glucose transport and metabolism may provide common links to the etiology of these two diseases. Considering these facts, in this review we provide a current understanding of the vital roles of a variety of glucose transporters in the normal, diabetic and Alzheimer’s disease brain. PMID:23202918

  19. Role of adhesion molecules and inflammation in Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus infected mouse brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honnold Shelley P

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuroinvasion of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV and subsequent initiation of inflammation in the brain plays a crucial role in the outcome of VEEV infection in mice. Adhesion molecules expressed on microvascular endothelial cells in the brain have been implicated in the modulation of the blood brain barrier (BBB and inflammation in brain but their role in VEEV pathogenesis is not very well understood. In this study, we evaluated the expression of extracellular matrix and adhesion molecules genes in the brain of VEEV infected mice. Findings Several cell to cell adhesion molecules and extracellular matrix protein genes such as ICAM-1, VCAM-1, CD44, Cadherins, integrins, MMPs and Timp1 were differentially regulated post-VEEV infection. ICAM-1 knock-out (IKO mice infected with VEEV had markedly reduced inflammation in the brain and demonstrated a delay in the onset of clinical symptoms of disease. A differential regulation of inflammatory genes was observed in the IKO mice brain compared to their WT counterparts. Conclusions These results improve our present understanding of VEEV induced inflammation in mouse brain.

  20. Revisiting nicotine's role in the ageing brain and cognitive impairment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majdi, Alireza; Kamari, Farzin; Vafaee, Manouchehr Seyedi

    2017-01-01

    Brain ageing is a complex process which in its pathologic form is associated with learning and memory dysfunction or cognitive impairment. During ageing, changes in cholinergic innervations and reduced acetylcholinergic tonus may trigger a series of molecular pathways participating in oxidative...... in optimum therapeutic effects without imparting abuse potential or toxicity. Overall, this review aims to compile the previous and most recent data on nicotine and its effects on cognition-related mechanisms and age-related cognitive impairment....

  1. Role of neuroinflammation in ischemic stroke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui Liu; Meng-Xian Pan; Jun-Chun Tang; Ya Zhang; Hua-Bao Liao; Yang Zhuang; Dan Zhao; Qi Wan

    2017-01-01

    Ischemic stroke causes the depletion of energy and induce excitotoxicity and neuroinflammation in the brain that results from thrombotic blockage. Neuroinflammation occurs initially depending on activated resident microglia that has the same function as the macrophage. Activated microglia participates in the neuroinflammatory process by phagocytosing the injured brain cells and producing the pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators. In this review, the authors present an overview of the role of microglia in mediating neuroinflammation in ischemic stroke.

  2. The Extreme Male Brain Theory and Gender Role Behaviour in Persons with an Autism Spectrum Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauder, J. E. A.; Cornet, L. J. M.; Ponds, R. W. H. M.

    2011-01-01

    According to the Extreme Male Brain theory persons with autism possess masculinised cognitive traits. In this study masculinisation of gender role behaviour is evaluated in 25 persons with an autism spectrum condition (ASC) and matched controls with gender role behaviour as part of a shortened version of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality…

  3. Occupational wellbeing--management of injured workers with psychosocial barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, Peter

    2006-12-01

    Although most injured workers return to work with minimal intervention, approximately 20% show levels of distress and disability beyond that expected for the injury. The level of morale in a workplace seems to play a major role in this. Workers who experience positive emotions leading to increased morale are more likely to be resilient following injury. It is important for general practitioners to recognise the nonclinical factors that exert a significant influence over employee wellbeing and return to work outcomes. Some management strategies are presented. General practitioners who work collaboratively with all major stakeholders, who identify and manage psychosocial barriers early, who take an active role in promoting positive expectations, and who focus on the immediate problem rather than its industrial associations will achieve better outcomes for their injured patients.

  4. Possible role of Toxoplasma gondii in brain cancer through modulation of host microRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thirugnanam Sivasakthivel

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The obligate intracellular protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii infects humans and other warm-blooded animals and establishes a chronic infection in the central nervous system after invasion. Studies showing a positive correlation between anti-Toxoplasma antibodies and incidences of brain cancer have led to the notion that Toxoplasma infections increase the risk of brain cancer. However, molecular events involved in Toxoplasma induced brain cancers are not well understood. Presentation of the hypothesis Toxoplasma gains control of host cell functions including proliferation and apoptosis by channelizing parasite proteins into the cell cytoplasm and some of the proteins are targeted to the host nucleus. Recent studies have shown that Toxoplasma is capable of manipulating host micro RNAs (miRNAs, which play a central role in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Therefore, we hypothesize that Toxoplasma promotes brain carcinogenesis by altering the host miRNAome using parasitic proteins and/or miRNAs. Testing the hypothesis The miRNA expression profiles of brain cancer specimens obtained from patients infected with Toxoplasma could be analyzed and compared with that of normal tissues as well as brain cancer tissues from Toxoplasma uninfected individuals to identify dysregulated miRNAs in Toxoplasma-driven brain cancer cells. Identified miRNAs will be further confirmed by studying cancer related miRNA profiles of the different types of brain cells before and after Toxoplasma infection using cell lines and experimental animals. Expected outcome The miRNAs specifically associated with brain cancers that are caused by Toxoplasma infection will be identified. Implications of the hypothesis Toxoplasma infection may promote initiation and progression of cancer by modifying the miRNAome in brain cells. If this hypothesis is true, the outcome of this research would lead to the development of novel biomarkers and

  5. Revisiting nicotine's role in the ageing brain and cognitive impairment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majdi, Alireza; Kamari, Farzin; Vafaee, Manouchehr Seyedi

    2017-01-01

    stress, excitotoxicity, amyloid-β toxicity, apoptosis, neuroinflammation, and perturb neurotrophic factors in the brain. Nicotine is an exogenous agonist of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and acts as a pharmacological chaperone in the regulation of nAChR expression, potentially intervening...... in age-related changes in diverse molecular pathways leading to pathology. Although nicotine has therapeutic potential, paradoxical effects have been reported, possibly due to its inverted U-shape dose-response effects or pharmacokinetic factors. Additionally, nicotine administration should result...... in optimum therapeutic effects without imparting abuse potential or toxicity. Overall, this review aims to compile the previous and most recent data on nicotine and its effects on cognition-related mechanisms and age-related cognitive impairment....

  6. Role of synchronized oscillatory brain activity for human pain perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauck, Michael; Lorenz, Jürgen; Engel, Andreas K

    2008-01-01

    The understanding of cortical pain processing in humans has significantly improved since the development of modern neuroimaging techniques. Non-invasive electrophysiological approaches such as electro- and magnetoencephalography have proven to be helpful tools for the real-time investigation of neuronal signals and synchronous communication between cortical areas. In particular, time-frequency decomposition of signals recorded with these techniques seems to be a promising approach because different pain-related oscillatory changes can be observed within different frequency bands, which are likely to be linked to specific sensory and motor functions. In this review we discuss the latest evidence on pain-induced time-frequency signals and propose that changes in oscillatory activity reflect an essential communication mechanism in the brain that is modulated during pain processing. The importance of synchronization processes for normal and pathological pain processing, such as chronic pain states, is discussed.

  7. Can PRP effectively treat injured tendons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, James H-C

    2014-01-01

    PRP is widely used to treat tendon and other tissue injuries in orthopaedics and sports medicine; however, the efficacy of PRP treatment on injured tendons is highly controversial. In this commentary, I reason that there are many PRP- and patient-related factors that influence the outcomes of PRP treatment on injured tendons. Therefore, more basic science studies are needed to understand the mechanism of PRP on injured tendons. Finally, I suggest that better understanding of the PRP action mechanism will lead to better use of PRP for the effective treatment of tendon injuries in clinics.

  8. The Role of P-Glycoprotein in Transport of Danshensu across the Blood-Brain Barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng-Fei Yu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Danshensu (3-(3, 4-dihydroxyphenyl lactic acid, a water-soluble active component isolated from the root of Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge, is widely used for the treatment of cerebrovascular diseases. The present study aims to investigate the role of P-glycoprotein in transport of Danshensu across the blood-brain barrier. Sprague-Dawley rats were pretreated with verapamil at a dose of 20 mg kg−1 (verapamil group or the same volume of normal saline (control group. Ninety minutes later, the animals were administrated with Danshensu (15 mg kg−1 by intravenous injection. At 15 min, 30 min, and 60 min after Danshensu administration, the levels of Danshensu in the blood and brain were detected by high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS. The results showed that Danshensu concentrations in the brain of the rats pretreated with verapamil were significantly increased. In addition, the brain-plasma ratios of the group pretreated with verapamil were much higher than that of the control group. There was no difference in Danshensu level in plasma between the verapamil group and control group. The findings indicated that Danshensu can pass the blood-brain barrier, and P-glycoprotein plays an important role in Danshensu transportation in brain.

  9. Role of Estrogen and Other Sex Hormones in Brain Aging. Neuroprotection and DNA Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zárate, Sandra; Stevnsner, Tinna; Gredilla, Ricardo

    2017-01-01

    Aging is an inevitable biological process characterized by a progressive decline in physiological function and increased susceptibility to disease. The detrimental effects of aging are observed in all tissues, the brain being the most important one due to its main role in the homeostasis of the organism. As our knowledge about the underlying mechanisms of brain aging increases, potential approaches to preserve brain function rise significantly. Accumulating evidence suggests that loss of genomic maintenance may contribute to aging, especially in the central nervous system (CNS) owing to its low DNA repair capacity. Sex hormones, particularly estrogens, possess potent antioxidant properties and play important roles in maintaining normal reproductive and non-reproductive functions. They exert neuroprotective actions and their loss during aging and natural or surgical menopause is associated with mitochondrial dysfunction, neuroinflammation, synaptic decline, cognitive impairment and increased risk of age-related disorders. Moreover, loss of sex hormones has been suggested to promote an accelerated aging phenotype eventually leading to the development of brain hypometabolism, a feature often observed in menopausal women and prodromal Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Although data on the relation between sex hormones and DNA repair mechanisms in the brain is still limited, various investigations have linked sex hormone levels with different DNA repair enzymes. Here, we review estrogen anti-aging and neuroprotective mechanisms, which are currently an area of intense study, together with the effect they may have on the DNA repair capacity in the brain. PMID:29311911

  10. Role of Estrogen and Other Sex Hormones in Brain Aging. Neuroprotection and DNA Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Zárate

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Aging is an inevitable biological process characterized by a progressive decline in physiological function and increased susceptibility to disease. The detrimental effects of aging are observed in all tissues, the brain being the most important one due to its main role in the homeostasis of the organism. As our knowledge about the underlying mechanisms of brain aging increases, potential approaches to preserve brain function rise significantly. Accumulating evidence suggests that loss of genomic maintenance may contribute to aging, especially in the central nervous system (CNS owing to its low DNA repair capacity. Sex hormones, particularly estrogens, possess potent antioxidant properties and play important roles in maintaining normal reproductive and non-reproductive functions. They exert neuroprotective actions and their loss during aging and natural or surgical menopause is associated with mitochondrial dysfunction, neuroinflammation, synaptic decline, cognitive impairment and increased risk of age-related disorders. Moreover, loss of sex hormones has been suggested to promote an accelerated aging phenotype eventually leading to the development of brain hypometabolism, a feature often observed in menopausal women and prodromal Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Although data on the relation between sex hormones and DNA repair mechanisms in the brain is still limited, various investigations have linked sex hormone levels with different DNA repair enzymes. Here, we review estrogen anti-aging and neuroprotective mechanisms, which are currently an area of intense study, together with the effect they may have on the DNA repair capacity in the brain.

  11. How air pollution alters brain development: the role of neuroinflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brockmeyer Sam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present review synthesizes lines of emerging evidence showing how several samples of children populations living in large cities around the world suffer to some degree neural, behavioral and cognitive changes associated with air pollution exposure. The breakdown of natural barriers warding against the entry of toxic particles, including the nasal, gut and lung epithelial barriers, as well as widespread breakdown of the blood-brain barrier facilitatethe passage of airborne pollutants into the body of young urban residents. Extensive neuroinflammation contributes to cell loss within the central nervous system, and likely is a crucial mechanism by which cognitive deficits may arise. Although subtle, neurocognitive effects of air pollution are substantial, apparent across all populations, and potentially clinically relevant as early evidence of evolving neurodegenerative changes. The diffuse nature of the neuroinflammation risk suggests an integrated neuroscientific approach incorporating current clinical, cognitive, neurophysiological, radiological and epidemiologic research. Neuropediatric air pollution research requires extensive multidisciplinary collaborations to accomplish the goal of protecting exposed children through multidimensional interventions having both broad impact and reach. While intervening by improving environmental quality at a global scale is imperative, we also need to devise efficient strategies on how the neurocognitive effects on local pediatric populations should be monitored.

  12. Combining stereotactic radiosurgery and systemic therapy for brain metastases: a potential role for temozolomide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardee, Matthew E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Formenti, Silvia C., E-mail: silvia.formenti@nyumc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Department of Medical Oncology, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2012-08-09

    Brain metastases are unfortunately very common in the natural history of many solid tumors and remain a life-threatening condition, associated with a dismal prognosis, despite many clinical trials aimed at improving outcomes. Radiation therapy options for brain metastases include whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). SRS avoids the potential toxicities of WBRT and is associated with excellent local control (LC) rates. However, distant intracranial failure following SRS remains a problem, suggesting that untreated intracranial micrometastatic disease is responsible for failure of treatment. The oral alkylating agent temozolomide (TMZ), which has demonstrated efficacy in primary malignant central nervous system tumors such as glioblastoma, has been used in early phase trials in the treatment of established brain metastases. Although results of these studies in established, macroscopic metastatic disease have been modest at best, there is clinical and preclinical data to suggest that TMZ is more efficacious at treating and controlling clinically undetectable intracranial micrometastatic disease. We review the available data for the primary management of brain metastases with SRS, as well as the use of TMZ in treating established brain metastases and undetectable micrometastatic disease, and suggest the role for a clinical trial with the aims of treating macroscopically visible brain metastases with SRS combined with TMZ to address microscopic, undetectable disease.

  13. The role of CT simulation in whole-brain irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gripp, Stephan; Doeker, Rolf; Glag, Michael; Vogelsang, Petra; Bannach, Burckhardt; Doll, Thorsten; Muskalla, Klaus; Schmitt, Gerd

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Evidence is growing that incorrect field-shaping is a major cause of treatment failure in whole-brain irradiation (WBI). To evaluate the potential benefits of CT simulation in WBI we compared field-shaping based on 3D CT simulation to conventional 2D simulation. Methods: CT head scans were obtained from 20 patients. Conventional 2D planning was imitated by drawing the block contours on digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRR) by four radiotherapists. Critical parts of the target and the eye lenses were subsequently marked and planning was repeated using 3D information ('3D planning'). The results of both methods were compared by evaluation of the minimal distance from the field edge according to each site. Results: In conventional planning using DRR, major geographic mismatches (< -3 mm) occurred in the subfrontal region and both eye lenses with 1% each location. Minor mismatches (-3 to 0 mm) predominantly occurred in the contralateral lens (21%), ipsilateral lens (10%), and subfrontal region (9%). Close margins (0-5 mm) were most frequently noted at the contralateral lens (49%), ipsilateral lens (35%), and the subfrontal region (28%). When 3D planning was used, mismatches were not found. However, close margins were inevitable at the ipsilateral lens (5%), subfrontal region (30%), and contralateral lens (70%). Conclusions: CT simulation in WBI is significantly superior to conventional simulation with respect to complete coverage of the target volume and protection of the eye lenses. The narrow passage between the ocular lenses and lamina cribrosa represents a serious limitation. These patients are safely identified with CT simulation and can be referred for modified irradiation techniques

  14. Injured athletes' perceptions about social support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Damien; Shannon, Vanessa R

    2011-11-01

    According to the buffering hypothesis, social support moderates the harmful effects of stress and, in turn, indirectly affects injured athletes' health and well-being. Previous research suggests that perceptions of social support influence athletes' psychological reactions, as well as their rehabilitation adherence, but additional research in this area is warranted. To examine injured athletes' perceptions regarding satisfaction, availability, and contribution for each of the 8 types of social support. Descriptive. Mid-Atlantic Division II and III institutions. 49 injured athletes. Social support was assessed using a modified version of the Social Support Survey. Injured athletes were significantly more satisfied with social support provided by athletic trainers (ATCs) than that provided by coaches and teammates. In addition, injured athletes reported that social support provided by ATCs contributed significantly more to their overall well-being. Athletes reported several significant differences regarding satisfaction and contribution to well-being among the 8 different types of social support. Injury, an unavoidable part of sport, is often accompanied by negative psychological reactions. This reaction may have a negative influence on an athlete's experience of injury and rehabilitation. Findings suggest that perceptions of social support provided by ATCs have the greatest influence on injured athletes' rehabilitation and well-being.

  15. Healing or harming? Healthcare provider interactions with injured workers and insurers in workers' compensation systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgour, Elizabeth; Kosny, Agnieszka; McKenzie, Donna; Collie, Alex

    2015-03-01

    Healthcare providers (HCPs) are influential in the injured worker's recovery process and fulfil many roles in the delivery of health services. Interactions between HCPs and insurers can also affect injured workers' engagement in rehabilitation and subsequently their recovery and return to work. Consideration of the injured workers' perceptions and experiences as consumers of medical and compensation services can provide vital information about the quality, efficacy and impact of such systems. The aim of this systematic review was to identify and synthesize published qualitative research that focused on the interactions between injured workers, HCPs and insurers in workers' compensation systems in order to identify processes or interactions which impact injured worker recovery. A search of six electronic databases for literature published between 1985 and 2012 revealed 1,006 articles. Screening for relevance identified 27 studies which were assessed for quality against set criteria. A final 13 articles of medium and high quality were retained for data extraction. Findings were synthesized using a meta-ethnographic approach. Injured workers reported that HCPs could play both healing and harming roles in their recovery. Supportive patient-centred interaction with HCPs is important for injured workers. Difficult interactions between HCPs and insurers were highlighted in themes of adversarial relations and organisational pressures. Insurer and compensation system processes exerted an influence on the therapeutic relationship. Recommendations to improve relationships included streamlining administrative demands and increasing education and communication between the parties. Injured workers with long term complex injuries experience difficulties with healthcare in the workers' compensation context. Changes in insurer administrative demands and compensation processes could increase HCP participation and job satisfaction. This in turn may improve injured worker recovery

  16. The role of p97 in iron metabolism in human brain glioma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Chunlin; Chen Guiwen; Qian Zhongming

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the role of p97 (melanotransferrin) in iron uptake in human brain glioma cells . Methods: Human brain glioma cell lines, GBM and BT325 were incubated in the medium containing 59 Fe-Citrate. The cells were treated with phosphatidylinositol-phospholipase C (PI-PLC) and pronase. The iron uptake of the cells was expressed as relative iron uptake level according to the cpm measured by the gamma scintillation counter. Results: 59 Fe uptake of the cells was significantly declined with the certain concentration of PI-PCL. 59 Fe uptake of the cells treated with pronase tended to coincide with that of the cells treated without pronase in the increasing concentration of PI-PLC. Conclusion: p97 expresses a high level and plays an important role in iron uptake in human brain glioma cells

  17. Brain Energy and Oxygen Metabolism: Emerging Role in Normal Function and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle E. Watts

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic metabolic changes occurring in neurons are critically important in directing brain plasticity and cognitive function. In other tissue types, disruptions to metabolism and the resultant changes in cellular oxidative state, such as increased reactive oxygen species (ROS or induction of hypoxia, are associated with cellular stress. In the brain however, where drastic metabolic shifts occur to support physiological processes, subsequent changes to cellular oxidative state and induction of transcriptional sensors of oxidative stress likely play a significant role in regulating physiological neuronal function. Understanding the role of metabolism and metabolically-regulated genes in neuronal function will be critical in elucidating how cognitive functions are disrupted in pathological conditions where neuronal metabolism is affected. Here, we discuss known mechanisms regulating neuronal metabolism as well as the role of hypoxia and oxidative stress during normal and disrupted neuronal function. We also summarize recent studies implicating a role for metabolism in regulating neuronal plasticity as an emerging neuroscience paradigm.

  18. The role of chemotherapy in the treatment of patients with brain metastases from solid tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walbert, T.; Gilbert, M.R.

    2009-01-01

    Brain metastases are the most frequent cancer in the central nervous system, being ten times more common than primary brain tumors. Patients generally have a poor outcome with a median survival of 4 months after diagnosis of the metastases. Therapeutic options include surgery, stereotactic, radiosurgery, whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT), and chemotherapy. Patients with a limited number of brain metastases and well-controlled systemic cancer benefit from brain metastases-specific therapies, including surgery, radiosurgery, and conventional radiation. The role of chemotherapy for brain metastases remains limited. There is concern about drug delivery because of the blood-brain barrier. However, higher response rates are noted with initial therapies, suggesting that part of the poor response rate may be related to the late onset of brain metastases and the use of second- and third-line regimens. Recent studies have demonstrated objective responses with systemic therapy in a variety of cancer types, especially when combined with WBRT. Individual therapeutic strategies for central nervous system metastases must be chosen based on performance status, the extent of intracranial disease, and the chemosensitivity of the underlying tumor, as well as the control of the systemic cancer. In this article we review important prognostic factors and challenges in using chemotherapy. We specifically review recent advances in the treatment of brain metastases from breast and lung cancer as well as melanoma. Future treatment advances will require a multidisciplinary approach integrating surgical, radiation, and chemotherapeutic options to improve neurological function and quality of life, rather than just focusing on survival endpoints. (author)

  19. Traumatic Brain Injury: Exploring the Role of Cooperative Extension in Kansas Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellers, Debra M.; Garcia, Jane Mertz

    2012-01-01

    TBI"options" helps survivors of traumatic brain injury and their families identify, locate, and contact helpful organizations in their local communities to promote successful living. This article discusses the role of county agents in the program and the support offered by community partners. Results of pre- and post-surveys for both…

  20. The Effect of Mercury Vapor and the Role of Green Tea Extract on Brain Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhona Afriza

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Mercury is a wellknown toxic metal that is capable to induce free radical-induced oxidative stress. It can cause human disease including brain disorders. Objective: To identify the effect of mercury vapor inhalation on brain cells and the role of green tea extract (Camellia sinensis as antioxidant on the brain cells exposed to mercury. Methods: Fourty-eight male Mus musculus were divided into 8 groups, which were given treatment for 3 and 6 weeks. Group A did not receive any treatment and served as a negative control. Group B was a positive control exposed to Mercury. Group C was exposed to Mercury and treated with 26μg/g green tea extract. Group D was exposed to mercury and treated with 52μg/g green tea extract. All animals in the Group B, C, D were exposed to mercury through inhalation for 4 hours daily. The effect of mercury on the brain cells were examined histopathologically. Results: The numbers of necrotic cells counted in the green tea-treated mice group were significantly lower than those untreated group (p<0,05. Conclusion: Mercury vapor inhalation may cause necrosis on brain cells. Administration of green tea extract as an antioxidant reduced the amount of mercury-induced necrotic brain cells in mice.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v20i2.151

  1. Roles and regulation of brain glutamate transporters in normal and pathological brain function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Shea, R.D.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Glutamate (Glu) is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian CNS. Synaptically released Glu acts on both ionotropic (iGluR) and metabotropic receptors, and excessive iGluR activation results in neuronal death (termed excitotoxicity). Removal of Glu from the synapse is thus critical for normal transmission and to prevent excitotoxicity, and is performed exclusively by a family of excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs, also known as glutamate transporters). Disregulation of Glu transport may contribute to the pathogenesis of many neurodegenerative conditions, and altered expression or function of EAATs has been identified in a number of these pathologies. These studies investigated the functional and pathological effects of EAAT inhibitors in vitro, and developed a novel screening assay for compounds with activity at EAATs. Astrocytic EAATs are responsible for the majority of Glu uptake in brain, so preparations containing both astrocytes and neurones are required to analyse the contribution of EAATs to neuroprotection. Organotypic hippocampal cultures (OHCs), which exhibit many of the features of the intact CNS, were prepared from 11-14 day old Sprague Dawley rats (anaesthetised with halothane). Hippocampal slices (350 μm thick) were maintained on culture well inserts in chemically defined medium. After 2 weeks, cultures were treated with EAAT inhibitors for 3-7 days in the presence or absence of 300 μM Glu. Treatment with most EAAT inhibitors resulted in cell death that was proportional to the Glu concentration in the medium. In contrast, (2S,3S,4R)-2-(carboxycyclopropyl)glycine (L-CCG-III), a competitive substrate at EAATs (and possibly an antagonist at the kainate subtype of iGluR), appeared to be neuroprotective: increased Glu was not toxic in the presence of this drug. These results demonstrate the sensitivity of OHCs to inhibition of Glu uptake, highlighting the importance of EAATs in preventing excitotoxicity. Since modulation of

  2. Role of brain orexin in the pathophysiology of functional gastrointestinal disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Toshikatsu; Nozu, Tsukasa

    2011-04-01

    Orexins are neuropeptides that are localized in neurons within the lateral hypothalamic area and regulate feeding behavior. The lateral hypothalamic area plays an important role in not only feeding but the central regulation of other functions including gut physiology. Accumulating evidence have shown that orexins acts in the brain to regulate a wide variety of body functions including gastrointestinal functions. The purpose of this review is to summarize relevant findings on brain orexins and a digestive system, and discuss the pathophysiological roles of the peptides with special reference to functional gastrointestinal disorders. Exogenously administered orexin or endogenously released orexin in the brain potently stimulates gastric acid secretion in pylorus-ligated conscious rats. The vagal cholinergic pathway is involved in the orexin-induced stimulation of acid secretion, suggesting that orexin-containing neurons in lateral hypothalamic area activates neurons in the dorsal motor nucleus in medulla oblongata, followed by increasing vagal outflow, thereby stimulating gastric acid secretion. In addition, brain orexin stimulates gastric motility, pancreatic secretion and induce gastroprotective action. On the other hand, brain orexin is involved in a number of physiological functions other than gut physiology, such as control of sleep/awake cycle and anti-depressive action in addition to increase in appetite. From these evidence, we would like to make a hypothesis that decreased orexin signaling in the brain may play a role in the pathophysiology in a part of patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders who are frequently accompanied with appetite loss, sleep disturbance, depressive state and the inhibition of gut function. © 2011 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  3. Fasting and Fast Food Diet Play an Opposite Role in Mice Brain Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castrogiovanni, Paola; Li Volti, Giovanni; Sanfilippo, Cristina; Tibullo, Daniele; Galvano, Fabio; Vecchio, Michele; Avola, Roberto; Barbagallo, Ignazio; Malaguarnera, Lucia; Castorina, Sergio; Musumeci, Giuseppe; Imbesi, Rosa; Di Rosa, Michelino

    2018-01-20

    Fasting may be exploited as a possible strategy for prevention and treatment of several diseases such as diabetes, obesity, and aging. On the other hand, high-fat diet (HFD) represents a risk factor for several diseases and increased mortality. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of fasting on mouse brain aging transcriptome and how HFD regulates such pathways. We used the NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database, in order to identify suitable microarray datasets comparing mouse brain transcriptome under fasting or HFD vs aged mouse brain transcriptome. Three microarray datasets were selected for this study, GSE24504, GSE6285, and GSE8150, and the principal molecular mechanisms involved in this process were evaluated. This analysis showed that, regardless of fasting duration, mouse brain significantly expressed 21 and 30 upregulated and downregulated genes, respectively. The involved biological processes were related to cell cycle arrest, cell death inhibition, and regulation of cellular metabolism. Comparing mouse brain transcriptome under fasting and aged conditions, we found out that the number of genes in common increased with the duration of fasting (222 genes), peaking at 72 h. In addition, mouse brain transcriptome under HFD resembles for the 30% the one of the aged mice. Furthermore, several molecular processes were found to be shared between HFD and aging. In conclusion, we suggest that fasting and HFD play an opposite role in brain transcriptome of aged mice. Therefore, an intermittent diet could represent a possible clinical strategy to counteract aging, loss of memory, and neuroinflammation. Furthermore, low-fat diet leads to the inactivation of brain degenerative processes triggered by aging.

  4. A novel microglial subset plays a key role in myelinogenesis in developing brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wlodarczyk, Agnieszka; Holtman, Inge; Krueger, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Microglia are resident macrophages of the central nervous system that contribute to homeostasis and neuroinflammation. Although known to play an important role in brain development, their exact function has not been fully described. Here we show that in contrast to healthy adult and inflammation......-activated cells, neonatal microglia show a unique myelinogenic and neurogenic phenotype. A CD11c+ microglial subset that predominates in primary myelinating areas of the developing brain expresses genes for neuronal and glial survival, migration and differentiation. These cells are the major source of insulin...

  5. Nonmechanical Roles of Dystrophin and Associated Proteins in Exercise, Neuromuscular Junctions, and Brains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bailey Nichols

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC is an important structural unit in skeletal muscle that connects the cytoskeleton (f-actin of a muscle fiber to the extracellular matrix (ECM. Several muscular dystrophies, such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy, Becker muscular dystrophy, congenital muscular dystrophies (dystroglycanopathies, and limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (sarcoglycanopathies, are caused by mutations in the different DGC components. Although many early studies indicated DGC plays a crucial mechanical role in maintaining the structural integrity of skeletal muscle, recent studies identified novel roles of DGC. Beyond a mechanical role, these DGC members play important signaling roles and act as a scaffold for various signaling pathways. For example, neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS, which is localized at the muscle membrane by DGC members (dystrophin and syntrophins, plays an important role in the regulation of the blood flow during exercise. DGC also plays important roles at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ and in the brain. In this review, we will focus on recently identified roles of DGC particularly in exercise and the brain.

  6. [Brain repair after ischemic stroke: role of neurotransmitters in post-ischemic neurogenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Mendoza, Eduardo; Bellver-Landete, Víctor; González, María Pilar; Merino, José Joaquín; Martínez-Murillo, Ricardo; Oset-Gasque, María Jesús

    2012-11-01

    Brain ischemia and reperfusion produce alterations in the microenvironment of the parenchyma, including ATP depletion, ionic homeostasis alterations, inflammation, release of multiple cytokines and abnormal release of neurotransmitters. As a consequence, the induction of proliferation and migration of neural stem cells towards the peri-infarct region occurs. The success of new neurorestorative treatments for damaged brain implies the need to know, with greater accuracy, the mechanisms in charge of regulating adult neurogenesis, both under physiological and pathological conditions. Recent evidence demonstrates that many neurotransmitters, glutamate in particular, control the subventricular zone, thus being part of the complex signalling network that influences the production of new neurons. Neurotransmitters provide a link between brain activity and subventricular zone neurogenesis. Therefore, a deeper knowledge of the role of neurotransmitters systems, such as glutamate and its transporters, in adult neurogenesis, may provide a valuable tool to be used as a neurorestorative therapy in this pathology.

  7. The SAMP8 mouse for investigating memory and the role of insulin in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhea, Elizabeth M; Banks, William A

    2017-08-01

    SAMP8 mice exhibit changes that commonly occur with normal aging late in life, but do so at a much earlier age. These changes include impairments in learning and memory as early as 8months of age and so the SAMP8 is a useful model to investigate those age-related brain changes that may affect cognition. As brain insulin signaling and memory decline with aging, the SAMP8 model is useful for investigating these changes and interventions that might prevent the decline. This review will summarize the SAMP8 mouse model, highlight changes in brain insulin signaling and its role in memory, and discuss intranasal insulin delivery in investigating effects on insulin metabolism and memory in the SAMP8 mice. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. The role of brain barriers in fluid movement in the CNS: is there a 'glymphatic' system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, N Joan; Pizzo, Michelle E; Preston, Jane E; Janigro, Damir; Thorne, Robert G

    2018-03-01

    Brain fluids are rigidly regulated to provide stable environments for neuronal function, e.g., low K + , Ca 2+ , and protein to optimise signalling and minimise neurotoxicity. At the same time, neuronal and astroglial waste must be promptly removed. The interstitial fluid (ISF) of the brain tissue and the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) bathing the CNS are integral to this homeostasis and the idea of a glia-lymph or 'glymphatic' system for waste clearance from brain has developed over the last 5 years. This links bulk (convective) flow of CSF into brain along the outside of penetrating arteries, glia-mediated convective transport of fluid and solutes through the brain extracellular space (ECS) involving the aquaporin-4 (AQP4) water channel, and finally delivery of fluid to venules for clearance along peri-venous spaces. However, recent evidence favours important amendments to the 'glymphatic' hypothesis, particularly concerning the role of glia and transfer of solutes within the ECS. This review discusses studies which question the role of AQP4 in ISF flow and the lack of evidence for its ability to transport solutes; summarizes attributes of brain ECS that strongly favour the diffusion of small and large molecules without ISF flow; discusses work on hydraulic conductivity and the nature of the extracellular matrix which may impede fluid movement; and reconsiders the roles of the perivascular space (PVS) in CSF-ISF exchange and drainage. We also consider the extent to which CSF-ISF exchange is possible and desirable, the impact of neuropathology on fluid drainage, and why using CSF as a proxy measure of brain components or drug delivery is problematic. We propose that new work and key historical studies both support the concept of a perivascular fluid system, whereby CSF enters the brain via PVS convective flow or dispersion along larger caliber arteries/arterioles, diffusion predominantly regulates CSF/ISF exchange at the level of the neurovascular unit associated with

  9. Endovascular transplantation of stem cells to the injured rat CNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundberg, Johan; Soederman, Mikael; Andersson, Tommy; Holmin, Staffan; Le Blanc, Katarina

    2009-01-01

    Transplantation procedures using intraparenchymal injection of stem cells result in tissue injury in addition to associated surgical risks. Intravenous injection of mesenchymal stem cells gives engraftment to lesions, but the method has low efficiency and specificity. In traumatic brain injuries (TBI), there is a transient breakdown of the blood-brain barrier and an inflammatory response, which increase migration of cells from blood to parenchyma. The aim of this investigation was to analyze the effect of intra-arterial administration on cellular engraftment. Experimental TBI was produced in a rat model. Endovascular technique was used to administer human mesenchymal stem cells in the ipsilateral internal carotid artery. Evaluation of engraftment and side effects were performed by immunohistochemical analysis of the brain and several other organs. The results were compared to intravenous administration of stem cells. Intra-arterial transplantion of mesenchymal stem cells resulted in central nervous system (CNS) engraftment without thromboembolic ischemia. We observed a significantly higher number of transplanted cells in the injured hemisphere after intra-arterial compared to intravenous administration both 1 day (p<0.01) and 5 days (p<0.05) after the transplantation. Some cells were also detected in the spleen but not in the other organs analyzed. Selective intra-arterial administration of mesenchymal stem cells to the injured CNS is a minimally invasive method for transplantation. The method is significantly more efficient than the intravenous route and causes no side effects in the current model. The technique can potentially be used for repeated transplantation to the CNS after TBI and in other diseases. (orig.)

  10. Endovascular transplantation of stem cells to the injured rat CNS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundberg, Johan; Soederman, Mikael; Andersson, Tommy; Holmin, Staffan [Karolinska University Hospital, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Department of Neuroradiology, Stockholm (Sweden); Le Blanc, Katarina [Karolinska University Hospital, Department of Stem Cell Research, Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Immunology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2009-10-15

    Transplantation procedures using intraparenchymal injection of stem cells result in tissue injury in addition to associated surgical risks. Intravenous injection of mesenchymal stem cells gives engraftment to lesions, but the method has low efficiency and specificity. In traumatic brain injuries (TBI), there is a transient breakdown of the blood-brain barrier and an inflammatory response, which increase migration of cells from blood to parenchyma. The aim of this investigation was to analyze the effect of intra-arterial administration on cellular engraftment. Experimental TBI was produced in a rat model. Endovascular technique was used to administer human mesenchymal stem cells in the ipsilateral internal carotid artery. Evaluation of engraftment and side effects were performed by immunohistochemical analysis of the brain and several other organs. The results were compared to intravenous administration of stem cells. Intra-arterial transplantion of mesenchymal stem cells resulted in central nervous system (CNS) engraftment without thromboembolic ischemia. We observed a significantly higher number of transplanted cells in the injured hemisphere after intra-arterial compared to intravenous administration both 1 day (p<0.01) and 5 days (p<0.05) after the transplantation. Some cells were also detected in the spleen but not in the other organs analyzed. Selective intra-arterial administration of mesenchymal stem cells to the injured CNS is a minimally invasive method for transplantation. The method is significantly more efficient than the intravenous route and causes no side effects in the current model. The technique can potentially be used for repeated transplantation to the CNS after TBI and in other diseases. (orig.)

  11. Adenovirus vector-mediated ex vivo gene transfer of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) tohuman umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UCB-MSCs) promotescrush-injured rat sciatic nerve regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hei, Wei-Hong; Almansoori, Akram A; Sung, Mi-Ae; Ju, Kyung-Won; Seo, Nari; Lee, Sung-Ho; Kim, Bong-Ju; Kim, Soung-Min; Jahng, Jeong Won; He, Hong; Lee, Jong-Ho

    2017-03-16

    This study was designed toinvestigate the efficacy of adenovirus vector-mediated brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) ex vivo gene transfer to human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UCB-MSCs) in a rat sciatic nerve crush injury model. BDNF protein and mRNA expression after infection was checked through an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Male Sprague-Dawley rats (200-250g, 6 weeks old) were distributed into threegroups (n=20 each): the control group, UCB-MSC group, and BDNF-adenovirus infected UCB-MSC (BDNF-Ad+UCB-MSC) group. UCB-MSCs (1×10 6 cells/10μl/rat) or BDNF-Ad+UCB-MSCs (1×10 6 cells/10μl/rat)were transplantedinto the rats at the crush site immediately after sciatic nerve injury. Cell tracking was done with PKH26-labeled UCB-MSCs and BDNF-Ad+UCB-MSCs (1×10 6 cells/10μl/rat). The rats were monitored for 4 weeks post-surgery. Results showed that expression of BDNF at both the protein and mRNA levels was higher inthe BDNF-Ad+UCB-MSC group compared to theUCB-MSC group in vitro.Moreover, BDNF mRNA expression was higher in both UCB-MSC group and BDNF-Ad+ UCB-MSC group compared tothe control group, and BDNF mRNA expression in theBDNF-Ad+UCB-MSC group was higher than inboth other groups 5days after surgeryin vivo. Labeled neurons in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG), axon counts, axon density, and sciatic function index were significantly increased in the UCB-MSC and BDNF-Ad+ UCB-MSCgroupscompared to the controlgroup four weeksaftercell transplantation. Importantly,the BDNF-Ad+UCB-MSCgroup exhibited more peripheral nerve regeneration than the other two groups.Our results indicate thatboth UCB-MSCs and BDNF-Ad+UCB-MSCscan improve rat sciatic nerve regeneration, with BDNF-Ad+UCB-MSCsshowing a greater effectthan UCB-MSCs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Correlations Between Personality and Brain Structure: A Crucial Role of Gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nostro, Alessandra D; Müller, Veronika I; Reid, Andrew T; Eickhoff, Simon B

    2017-07-01

    Previous studies have shown that males and females differ in personality and gender differences have also been reported in brain structure. However, effects of gender on this "personality-brain" relationship are yet unknown. We therefore investigated if the neural correlates of personality differ between males and females. Whole brain voxel-based morphometry was used to investigate the influence of gender on associations between NEO FFI personality traits and gray matter volume (GMV) in a matched sample of 182 males and 182 females. In order to assess associations independent of and dependent on gender, personality-GMV relationships were tested across the entire sample and separately for males and females. There were no significant correlations between any personality scale and GMV in the analyses across the entire sample. In contrast, significant associations with GMV were detected for neuroticism, extraversion, and conscientiousness only in males. Interestingly, GMV in left precuneus/parieto-occipital sulcus correlated with all 3 traits. Thus, our results indicate that brain structure-personality relationships are highly dependent on gender, which might be attributable to hormonal interplays or differences in brain organization between males and females. Our results thus provide possible neural substrates of personality-behavior relationships and underline the important role of gender in these associations. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Brain Stimulation and the Role of the Right Hemisphere in Aphasia Recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkeltaub, Peter E

    2015-11-01

    Aphasia is a common consequence of left hemisphere stroke and causes a disabling loss of language and communication ability. Current treatments for aphasia are inadequate, leaving a majority of aphasia sufferers with ongoing communication difficulties for the rest of their lives. In the past decade, two forms of noninvasive brain stimulation, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and transcranial direct current stimulation, have emerged as promising new treatments for aphasia. The most common brain stimulation protocols attempt to inhibit the intact right hemisphere based on the hypothesis that maladaptive activity in the right hemisphere limits language recovery in the left. There is now sufficient evidence to demonstrate that this approach, at least for repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, improves specific language abilities in aphasia. However, the biological mechanisms that produce these behavioral improvements remain poorly understood. Taken in the context of the larger neurobiological literature on aphasia recovery, the role of the right hemisphere in aphasia recovery remains unclear. Additional research is needed to understand biological mechanisms of recovery, in order to optimize brain stimulation treatments for aphasia. This article summarizes the current evidence on noninvasive brain stimulation methods for aphasia and the neuroscientific considerations surrounding treatments using right hemisphere inhibition. Suggestions are provided for further investigation and for clinicians whose patients ask about brain stimulation treatments for aphasia.

  14. Possible Role of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) in Autism Spectrum Disorder: Current Status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halepoto, D. M.; Bashir, S.; AL-Ayadhi, L.

    2014-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a member of the neurotrophin family of survival-promoting molecules, plays a vital role in the growth, development, maintenance, and function of several neuronal systems. The purpose of this review is to document the support for the involvement of this molecule in the maintenance of normal cognitive, emotional functioning, and to outline recent developments in the content of Autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Current and future treatment development can be guided by developing understanding of this molecules actions in the brain and the ways the expression of BDNF can be planned. Over the years, research findings suggested a critical role played by BDNF in the development of autism including increased serum concentrations of BDNF in children with autism and identification of different forms of BDNF in families of autistic individuals. (author)

  15. Possible Role of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) in Autism Spectrum Disorder: Current Status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halepoto, D. M.; Bashir, S.; AL-Ayadhi, L. [King Saud Univ., Riyadh (Saudi Arabia). Dept. of Physiology

    2014-04-15

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a member of the neurotrophin family of survival-promoting molecules, plays a vital role in the growth, development, maintenance, and function of several neuronal systems. The purpose of this review is to document the support for the involvement of this molecule in the maintenance of normal cognitive, emotional functioning, and to outline recent developments in the content of Autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Current and future treatment development can be guided by developing understanding of this molecules actions in the brain and the ways the expression of BDNF can be planned. Over the years, research findings suggested a critical role played by BDNF in the development of autism including increased serum concentrations of BDNF in children with autism and identification of different forms of BDNF in families of autistic individuals. (author)

  16. Lymphocytes Contribute to the Pathophysiology of Neonatal Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arshed Nazmi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundPeriventricular leukomalacia (PVL is the most common form of preterm brain injury affecting the cerebral white matter. This type of injury involves a multiphase process and is induced by many factors, including hypoxia–ischemia (HI and infection. Previous studies have suggested that lymphocytes play a significant role in the pathogenesis of brain injury, and the aim of this study was to determine the contribution of lymphocyte subsets to preterm brain injury.MethodsImmunohistochemistry on brain sections from neonatal mice was performed to evaluate the extent of brain injury in wild-type and T cell and B cell-deficient neonatal mice (Rag1−/− mice using a mouse model of HI-induced preterm brain injury. Flow cytometry was performed to determine the presence of different types of immune cells in mouse brains following HI. In addition, immunostaining for CD3 T cells and CD20 B cells was performed on postmortem preterm human infant brains with PVL.ResultsMature lymphocyte-deficient Rag1−/− mice showed protection from white matter loss compared to wild type mice as indicated by myelin basic protein immunostaining of mouse brains. CD3+ T cells and CD20+ B cells were observed in the postmortem preterm infant brains with PVL. Flow cytometry analysis of mouse brains after HI-induced injury showed increased frequency of CD3+ T, αβT and B cells at 7 days after HI in the ipsilateral (injured hemisphere compared to the contralateral (control, uninjured hemisphere.ConclusionLymphocytes were found in the injured brain after injury in both mice and humans, and lack of mature lymphocytes protected neonatal mice from HI-induced brain white matter injury. This finding provides insight into the pathology of perinatal brain injury and suggests new avenues for the development of therapeutic strategies.

  17. Dissecting the Roles of Brain Injury and Combat-Related Stress in Post-Traumatic Headache

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Dissecting the Roles of Brain Injury and Combat-Related Stress in Post- Traumatic Headache 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0366 5c...consequences of TBI is post-traumatic headache (PTH). Because both TBI and stress could contribute to PTH, we examine them together and separately...significant stress . Both TBI and stress are risk factors for chronic headache . They may contribute separate or overlapping mechanisms, and treatment can be

  18. Role of 99mTc labelled GHA in post treatment evaluation of brain tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choudhury, P.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: Biochemical investigations have a major role to play in the management of primary brain tumours. It is well known that major biochemical changes occur during cancerous transformation including changes in the energy metabolism of the cell. Changes take place in terms of utilization of glucose and other substrates, protein synthesis and expression of antigens and receptors. Changes also take place in disruption of transport mechanisms across cell membranes and other physiological boundaries like blood brain barrier. In the management of primary brain tumours positron emitting tracers have an undisputed role and the role of cationic tracers like Thallium-201, 99m-Tc MIBI and 99m-Tc tetrofosmin has been cited as an alternative to positron tracers in neuro oncology. It must be borne in mind that the cationic tracers are expensive to procure and facilities for positron emission tomography are not available in most of the developing countries. Tc-99m GHA Brain Imaging: Keeping in view the above, a cheaper alternative for PET radio tracers was evaluated. We have so far conducted more than 100 brain SPECT studies, using Tc-99m Glucoheptonic acid (GHA), in 60 patients of brain tumour, both at the time of their diagnosis, as well as after treatment during the follow-up period. Tc-99m Glucoheptonic acid (GHA) is a chemical glucose analogue. Avid concentration of the radiopharmaceutical was noted in viable tumor tissue in the SPECT images done one hour after injection of 740 MBq of 99m-Tc GHA. This was subsequently confirmed by histopathological examination in patients undergoing re-surgery for residual disease or follow up and clinical correlation in patients under remission. Avid tracer concentration was also well demonstrated in recurrent disease (proven by clinical examination, histopathology and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). No significant tracer uptake was seen in areas of radiation induced necrosis. Non-specific uptake in the tumor bed was

  19. Role of the Prostaglandin E2 EP1 Receptor in Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glushakov, Alexander V.; Fazal, Jawad A.; Narumiya, Shuh; Doré, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    Brain injuries promote upregulation of so-called proinflammatory prostaglandins, notably prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), leading to overactivation of a class of its cognate G-protein-coupled receptors, including EP1, which is considered a promising target for treatment of ischemic stroke. However, the role of the EP1 receptor is complex and depends on the type of brain injury. This study is focused on the investigation of the role of the EP1 receptor in a controlled cortical impact (CCI) model, a preclinical model of traumatic brain injury (TBI). The therapeutic effects of post-treatments with a widely studied EP1 receptor antagonist, SC-51089, were examined in wildtype and EP1 receptor knockout C57BL/6 mice. Neurological deficit scores (NDS) were assessed 24 and 48 h following CCI or sham surgery, and brain immunohistochemical pathology was assessed 48 h after surgery. In wildtype mice, CCI resulted in an obvious cortical lesion and localized hippocampal edema with an associated significant increase in NDS compared to sham-operated animals. Post-treatments with the selective EP1 receptor antagonist SC-51089 or genetic knockout of EP1 receptor had no significant effects on cortical lesions and hippocampal swelling or on the NDS 24 and 48 h after CCI. Immunohistochemistry studies revealed CCI-induced gliosis and microglial activation in selected ipsilateral brain regions that were not affected by SC-51089 or in the EP1 receptor-deleted mice. This study provides further clarification on the respective contribution of the EP1 receptor in TBI and suggests that, under this experimental paradigm, the EP1 receptor would have limited effects in modulating acute neurological and anatomical pathologies following contusive brain trauma. Findings from this protocol, in combination with previous studies demonstrating differential roles of EP1 receptor in ischemic, neurotoxic, and hemorrhagic conditions, provide scientific background and further clarification of potential therapeutic

  20. Deep brain stimulation results in local glutamate and adenosine release: investigation into the role of astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawfik, Vivianne L; Chang, Su-Youne; Hitti, Frederick L; Roberts, David W; Leiter, James C; Jovanovic, Svetlana; Lee, Kendall H

    2010-08-01

    Several neurological disorders are treated with deep brain stimulation; however, the mechanism underlying its ability to abolish oscillatory phenomena associated with diseases as diverse as Parkinson's disease and epilepsy remain largely unknown. To investigate the role of specific neurotransmitters in deep brain stimulation and determine the role of non-neuronal cells in its mechanism of action. We used the ferret thalamic slice preparation in vitro, which exhibits spontaneous spindle oscillations, to determine the effect of high-frequency stimulation on neurotransmitter release. We then performed experiments using an in vitro astrocyte culture to investigate the role of glial transmitter release in high-frequency stimulation-mediated abolishment of spindle oscillations. In this series of experiments, we demonstrated that glutamate and adenosine release in ferret slices was able to abolish spontaneous spindle oscillations. The glutamate release was still evoked in the presence of the Na channel blocker tetrodotoxin, but was eliminated with the vesicular H-ATPase inhibitor bafilomycin and the calcium chelator 2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)-ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid tetrakis acetoxymethyl ester. Furthermore, electrical stimulation of purified primary astrocytic cultures was able to evoke intracellular calcium transients and glutamate release, and bath application of 2-bis (2-aminophenoxy)-ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid tetrakis acetoxymethyl ester inhibited glutamate release in this setting. Vesicular astrocytic neurotransmitter release may be an important mechanism by which deep brain stimulation is able to achieve clinical benefits.

  1. Neuroprotective Role of Nerve Growth Factor in Hypoxic-Ischemic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Chiaretti

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxic-ischemic brain injuries (HIBI in childhood are frequently associated with poor clinical and neurological outcome. Unfortunately, there is currently no effective therapy to restore neuronal loss and to determine substantial clinical improvement. Several neurotrophins, such as Nerve Growth Factor (NGF, Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF, and Glial Derived Neurotrophic Factor (GDNF, play a key role in the development, differentiation, and survival of the neurons of the peripheral and central nervous system. Experimental animal studies demonstrated their neuroprotective role in HIBI, while only a few studies examined the neuroprotective mechanisms in patients with severe HIBI. We report two cases of children with HIBI and prolonged comatose state who showed a significant improvement after intraventricular NGF administration characterized by amelioration of electroencephalogram (EEG and cerebral perfusion at single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT. The improvement in motor and cognitive functions of these children could be related to the neuroprotective role exerted by NGF in residual viable cholinergic neurons, leading to the restoration of neuronal networks in the damaged brain.

  2. The role of whole-body computed tomography in the diagnosis of thoracic injuries in severely injured patients - a retrospective multi-centre study based on the trauma registry of the German trauma society (TraumaRegister DGU®).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Patricia; Kulla, Martin; Kerwagen, Fabian; Lefering, Rolf; Friemert, Benedikt; Palm, Hans-Georg

    2017-08-15

    Thoracic injuries are a leading cause of death in polytrauma patients. Early diagnosis and treatment are of paramount importance. Whole-body computed tomography (WBCT) has largely replaced traditional imaging techniques such as conventional radiographs and focused computed tomography (CT) as diagnostic tools in severely injured patients. It is still unclear whether WBCT has led to higher rates of diagnosis of thoracic injuries and thus to a change in outcomes. In a retrospective study based on the trauma registry of the German Trauma Society (TraumaRegister DGU ® ), we analysed data from 16,545 patients who underwent treatment in 59 hospitals between 2002 and 2012 (ISS ≥ 9). The 3 years preceding and the 3 years following the introduction of WBCT as a standard imaging modality for the investigation of severely injured patients were assessed for every hospital. Accordingly, patients were assigned to either the pre-WBCT or the WBCT group. We compared the numbers of thoracic injuries and the outcomes of patients before and after the routine use of WBCT. A total of 13,564 patients (pre-WBCT: n = 5005, WBCT: n = 8559) were included. Relevant thoracic injuries were detected in 47.8%. There were no major differences between the patient groups in injury severity (pre-WBCT: median ISS 21; WBCT: median ISS 22), injury patterns and demographics. After the introduction of WBCT, only minor changes were observed regarding the rates of most thoracic injuries. Clinically relevant injuries were pulmonary contusions (pre-WBCT: 18.5%; WBCT: 28.7%), injuries to the lung parenchyma (pre-WBCT: 12.6%; WBCT: 5.9%), multiple rib fractures (pre-WBCT: 10.6%; WBCT: 21.6%), and pneumothoraces (pre-WBCT: 17.3%; WBCT: 21.6%). The length of stay in the intensive care unit (pre-WBCT: 10.8 days; WBCT: 9.7 days) and in hospital (pre-WBCT: 26.2 days; WBCT: 23.3 days) decreased. There was no difference in overall mortality (pre-WBCT: 15.5%; WBCT: 15.6%). The routine use of WBCT in the

  3. Nursing care of the thermally injured patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfving, U

    1980-01-01

    Team work is required in the treatment of the thermally injured patient--nursing staff being part of the team. The nurses are with the patient for 24 hours a day and they have to understand the objectives of all other members of the team involved in the treatment as well as thoroughly mastering their own work. For the nursing staff the care of the thermally injured patient is a challenge. The work demands strong motivation and interest--it includes at times painful treatment, isolation and also constant alertness. It is important that the nursing staff is given continuous training so that they are able to give the required care efficiently and to keep up active interest. Practical work is the best way of getting aquainted with the complex forms of treatment of the thermally injured patient. It also lessens the fear of a badly burned patient. Nursing care of the thermally injured patient consists of good basic care, local attention and active observation. The basic care consists of basic hygiene, diet, observation of the patient's psychological condition, giving emotional support, encouraging initiative physiotherapy and postural treatment.

  4. Neurosteroid Transport in the Brain: Role of ABC and SLC Transporters

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    Markus Grube

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Neurosteroids, comprising pregnane, androstane, and sulfated steroids can alter neuronal excitability through interaction with ligand-gated ion channels and other receptors and have therefore a therapeutic potential in several brain disorders. They can be formed in brain cells or are synthesized by an endocrine gland and reach the brain by penetrating the blood–brain barrier (BBB. Especially sulfated steroids such as pregnenolone sulfate (PregS and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS depend on transporter proteins to cross membranes. In this review, we discuss the involvement of ATP-binding cassette (ABC- and solute carrier (SLC-type membrane proteins in the transport of these compounds at the BBB and in the choroid plexus (CP, but also in the secretion from neurons and glial cells. Among the ABC transporters, especially BCRP (ABCG2 and several MRP/ABCC subfamily members (MRP1, MRP4, MRP8 are expressed in the brain and known to efflux conjugated steroids. Furthermore, several SLC transporters have been shown to mediate cellular uptake of steroid sulfates. These include members of the OATP/SLCO subfamily, namely OATP1A2 and OATP2B1, as well as OAT3 (SLC22A3, which have been reported to be expressed at the BBB, in the CP and in part in neurons. Furthermore, a role of the organic solute transporter OSTα-OSTβ (SLC51A/B in brain DHEAS/PregS homeostasis has been proposed. This transporter was reported to be localized especially in steroidogenic cells of the cerebellum and hippocampus. To date, the impact of transporters on neurosteroid homeostasis is still poorly understood. Further insights are desirable also with regard to the therapeutic potential of these compounds.

  5. Pivotal role of anterior cingulate cortex in working memory after traumatic brain injury in youth

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    Fabienne eCazalis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this fMRI study, the functions of the Anterior Cingulate Cortex were studied in a group of adolescents who had sustained a moderate to severe Traumatic Brain Injury. A spatial working memory task with varying working memory loads, representing experimental conditions of increasing difficulty, was administered.In a cross-sectional comparison between the patients and a matched control group, patients performed worse than Controls, showing longer reaction times and lower response accuracy on the spatial working memory task. Brain imaging findings suggest a possible double-dissociation: activity of the Anterior Cingulate Cortex in the Traumatic Brain Injury group, but not in the Control group, was associated with task difficulty; conversely, activity of the left Sensorimotor Cortex in the Control group, but not in the TBI group, was correlated with task difficulty.In addition to the main cross-sectional study, a longitudinal study of a group of adolescent patients with moderate to severe Traumatic Brain Injury was done using fMRI and the same spatial working memory task. The patient group was studied at two time points: one time point during the post-acute phase and one time point 12 months later, during the chronic phase. Results indicated that patients' behavioral performance improved over time, suggesting cognitive recovery. Brain imaging findings suggest that, over this 12 month period, patients recruited less of the Anterior Cingulate Cortex and more of the left Sensorimotor Cortex in response to increasing task difficulty.The role of Anterior Cingulate Cortex in executive functions following a moderate to severe brain injury in adolescence is discussed within the context of conflicting models of the Anterior Cingulate Cortex functions in the existing literature.

  6. Distal axotomy enhances retrograde presynaptic excitability onto injured pyramidal neurons via trans-synaptic signaling.

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    Nagendran, Tharkika; Larsen, Rylan S; Bigler, Rebecca L; Frost, Shawn B; Philpot, Benjamin D; Nudo, Randolph J; Taylor, Anne Marion

    2017-09-20

    Injury of CNS nerve tracts remodels circuitry through dendritic spine loss and hyper-excitability, thus influencing recovery. Due to the complexity of the CNS, a mechanistic understanding of injury-induced synaptic remodeling remains unclear. Using microfluidic chambers to separate and injure distal axons, we show that axotomy causes retrograde dendritic spine loss at directly injured pyramidal neurons followed by retrograde presynaptic hyper-excitability. These remodeling events require activity at the site of injury, axon-to-soma signaling, and transcription. Similarly, directly injured corticospinal neurons in vivo also exhibit a specific increase in spiking following axon injury. Axotomy-induced hyper-excitability of cultured neurons coincides with elimination of inhibitory inputs onto injured neurons, including those formed onto dendritic spines. Netrin-1 downregulation occurs following axon injury and exogenous netrin-1 applied after injury normalizes spine density, presynaptic excitability, and inhibitory inputs at injured neurons. Our findings show that intrinsic signaling within damaged neurons regulates synaptic remodeling and involves netrin-1 signaling.Spinal cord injury can induce synaptic reorganization and remodeling in the brain. Here the authors study how severed distal axons signal back to the cell body to induce hyperexcitability, loss of inhibition and enhanced presynaptic release through netrin-1.

  7. The role of Tc-99m HMPAO brain perfusion SPECT in the psychiatric disability evaluation of patients with chronic traumatic brain injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    So, Young [Nuclear Medicne, Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kang Wook; Lee, Sun Woo; Ghi, Lek Sung; Song, Chang June [College of Medicine, Chungnam National Univ., Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-08-01

    We studied whether brain perfusion SPECT is useful in the psychiatric disability evaluation of patients with chronic traumatic brain injury (TBI). Sixty-nine patients (M:F=58:11, age 39 {+-} 14 years) who underwent Tc-99m HMPAO brain SPECT, brain MRI and neuropsychological (NP) tests during hospitalization in psychiatric wards for the psychiatric disability evaluation were included; the severity of injury was mild in 31, moderate in 17 and severe in 21. SPECT, MRI, NP tests were performed 6 {approx} 61 months (mean 23 months) post-injury. Diagnostic accuracy of SPECT and MRI to show hypoperfusion or abnormal signal intensity in patients with cognitive impairment represented by NP test results were compared. Forty-two patients were considered to have cognitive impairment on NP tests and 27 not. Brain SPECT showed 71% sensitivity and 85% specificity, while brain MRI showed 62% sensitivity and 93% specificity (p>0.05, McNemar test). SPECT found more cortical lesions and MRI was superior in detecting white matter lesions. sensitivity and specificity of 31 mild TBI patients were 45%, 90% for SPECT and 27%, 100% for MRI (p>0.05, McNemar test). Among 41 patients with normal brain MRI, SEPCT showed 63% sensitivity (50% for mild TBI) and 88% specificity (85% for malingerers). Brain SPECT has a supplementary role to neuropsychological tests in the psychiatric disability evaluation of chronic TBI patients by detecting more cortical lesions than MRI.

  8. The role of Tc-99m HMPAO brain perfusion SPECT in the psychiatric disability evaluation of patients with chronic traumatic brain injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    So, Young; Lee, Kang Wook; Lee, Sun Woo; Ghi, Lek Sung; Song, Chang June

    2002-01-01

    We studied whether brain perfusion SPECT is useful in the psychiatric disability evaluation of patients with chronic traumatic brain injury (TBI). Sixty-nine patients (M:F=58:11, age 39 ± 14 years) who underwent Tc-99m HMPAO brain SPECT, brain MRI and neuropsychological (NP) tests during hospitalization in psychiatric wards for the psychiatric disability evaluation were included; the severity of injury was mild in 31, moderate in 17 and severe in 21. SPECT, MRI, NP tests were performed 6 ∼ 61 months (mean 23 months) post-injury. Diagnostic accuracy of SPECT and MRI to show hypoperfusion or abnormal signal intensity in patients with cognitive impairment represented by NP test results were compared. Forty-two patients were considered to have cognitive impairment on NP tests and 27 not. Brain SPECT showed 71% sensitivity and 85% specificity, while brain MRI showed 62% sensitivity and 93% specificity (p>0.05, McNemar test). SPECT found more cortical lesions and MRI was superior in detecting white matter lesions. sensitivity and specificity of 31 mild TBI patients were 45%, 90% for SPECT and 27%, 100% for MRI (p>0.05, McNemar test). Among 41 patients with normal brain MRI, SEPCT showed 63% sensitivity (50% for mild TBI) and 88% specificity (85% for malingerers). Brain SPECT has a supplementary role to neuropsychological tests in the psychiatric disability evaluation of chronic TBI patients by detecting more cortical lesions than MRI

  9. Role of DHA in aging-related changes in mouse brain synaptic plasma membrane proteome.

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    Sidhu, Vishaldeep K; Huang, Bill X; Desai, Abhishek; Kevala, Karl; Kim, Hee-Yong

    2016-05-01

    Aging has been related to diminished cognitive function, which could be a result of ineffective synaptic function. We have previously shown that synaptic plasma membrane proteins supporting synaptic integrity and neurotransmission were downregulated in docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)-deprived brains, suggesting an important role of DHA in synaptic function. In this study, we demonstrate aging-induced synaptic proteome changes and DHA-dependent mitigation of such changes using mass spectrometry-based protein quantitation combined with western blot or messenger RNA analysis. We found significant reduction of 15 synaptic plasma membrane proteins in aging brains including fodrin-α, synaptopodin, postsynaptic density protein 95, synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2B, synaptosomal-associated protein 25, synaptosomal-associated protein-α, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit epsilon-2 precursor, AMPA2, AP2, VGluT1, munc18-1, dynamin-1, vesicle-associated membrane protein 2, rab3A, and EAAT1, most of which are involved in synaptic transmission. Notably, the first 9 proteins were further reduced when brain DHA was depleted by diet, indicating that DHA plays an important role in sustaining these synaptic proteins downregulated during aging. Reduction of 2 of these proteins was reversed by raising the brain DHA level by supplementing aged animals with an omega-3 fatty acid sufficient diet for 2 months. The recognition memory compromised in DHA-depleted animals was also improved. Our results suggest a potential role of DHA in alleviating aging-associated cognitive decline by offsetting the loss of neurotransmission-regulating synaptic proteins involved in synaptic function. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. THE ROLE OF MULTIDRUG RESISTANCE ASSOCIATED PROTEIN (MRP) IN THE BLOOD-BRAIN BARRIER AND OPIOID ANALGESIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Wendy; Pasternak, Gavril W.

    2013-01-01

    The blood brain barrier protects the brain from circulating compounds and drugs. The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter P-glycoprotein (Pgp) is involved with the barrier, both preventing the influx of agent from the blood into the brain and facilitating the efflux of compounds from the brain into the blood, raising the possibility of a similar role for other transporters. Multidrug resistance associated protein (MRP), a 190 kDa protein similar to Pgp is also ABC transport that has been implicated in the blood brain barrier. The current study explores its role in opioid action. Immunohistochemically, it is localized in the choroid plexus in ratsand can be selectively downregulated by antisense treatment at both the level of mRNA, as shown by RT-PCR, and protein, as demonstrated immunohistochemically. Behaviorally, downregulation of MRP significantly enhances the analgesic potency of systemic morphine in MRP knockout mice and in antisense-treated rats by lowering the blood brain barrier. Following intracerebroventricular administration, a number of compounds, including some opioids, are rapidly secreted from the brain into the blood where they contribute to the overall analgesic effects by activating peripheral systems. MRP plays a role in this efflux. Downregulating MRP expression leads to a corresponding decrease in the transport and a diminished analgesic response from opioids administered intracerebroventricularly. Thus, the transporter protein MRP plays a role in maintaining the blood-brain barrier and modulates the activity of opioids. PMID:23508590

  11. Role of infectious agents in the carcinogenesis of brain and head and neck cancers

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    Alibek Kenneth

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This review concentrates on tumours that are anatomically localised in head and neck regions. Brain cancers and head and neck cancers together account for more than 873,000 cases annually worldwide, with an increasing incidence each year. With poor survival rates at late stages, brain and head and neck cancers represent serious conditions. Carcinogenesis is a multi-step process and the role of infectious agents in this progression has not been fully identified. A major problem with such research is that the role of many infectious agents may be underestimated due to the lack of or inconsistency in experimental data obtained globally. In the case of brain cancer, no infection has been accepted as directly oncogenic, although a number of viruses and parasites are associated with the malignancy. Our analysis of the literature showed the presence of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV in distinct types of brain tumour, namely glioblastoma multiforme (GBM and medulloblastoma. In particular, there are reports of viral protein in up to 100% of GBM specimens. Several epidemiological studies reported associations of brain cancer and toxoplasmosis seropositivity. In head and neck cancers, there is a distinct correlation between Epstein-Barr virus (EBV and nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC. Considering that almost every undifferentiated NPC is EBV-positive, virus titer levels can be measured to screen high-risk populations. In addition there is an apparent association between human papilloma virus (HPV and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC; specifically, 26% of HNSCCs are positive for HPV. HPV type 16 was the most common type detected in HNSCCs (90% and its dominance is even greater than that reported in cervical carcinoma. Although there are many studies showing an association of infectious agents with cancer, with various levels of involvement and either a direct or indirect causative effect, there is a scarcity of articles covering the role of

  12. Masculine role adherence and outcomes among men with traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schopp, Laura H; Good, Glenn E; Barker, Katharine B; Mazurek, Micah O; Hathaway, Stefani L

    2006-10-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a significant health problem disproportionately affecting men and is often associated with changes in masculine role functioning in life domains such as vocational functioning, sexual and inter-personal functioning and personal independence. These changes could have serious implications for men's adjustment following injury. The aim of this study was to examine the relations among traditional masculine role adherence, psychosocial adjustment and rehabilitation outcomes in men with TBI. A correlational design was chosen to examine the relations among variables. Spearman correlations and Wilcoxon Rank Sum tests were used to examine relationships between masculine role variables and outcome variables. The study included 33 men with TBI who had been discharged from inpatient rehabilitation within 5 years. Participants completed surveys on traditional masculine gender role adherence and gender role conflict and additional data, including measures of functional outcome, life satisfaction, psychosocial outcomes and earnings, were obtained through the TBI Model System longitudinal data collection system. The results revealed significant associations between masculine role adherence and satisfaction with life, follow-up earnings and FIM change from admission to discharge. In the current study, particular masculine role variables corresponded to different functional and psychological outcomes. Understanding these differences provides new directions for treatment and offers important information about aspects of traditional masculine roles that may enhance or hinder adjustment to injury.

  13. The role of stereotactic radiation therapy in the management of children with brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lew, C M; LaVally, B

    1995-10-01

    Conventional radiation therapy plays an important role in the management of intracranial tumors in children. For certain tumors radiation therapy serves as the primary mode of treatment, and for others it plays an adjuvant role with surgery and/or chemotherapy. Improvements in long-term survival rates have focused attention on the long-term sequelae of brain tumors and their treatment, and the sequelae, in turn, have become important targets for clinical investigation. Long-term side effects of particular concern in children include cranial nerve damage, memory and intellectual deficits, pituitary-hypothalamic dysfunction, demyelinization of brain tissue, and secondary malignancies. A new form of radiation therapy, stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT), merges the technologies of stereotactic surgery and conventional fractionated radiotherapy. The intent is to deliver maximum tumoricidal doses to the target while limiting the dose to normal surrounding brain tissue. The key feature of SRT is a noninvasive, relocatable immobilization system to assure accurate and reproducible positioning during planning and treatment. The headframes used for children have been modified to address their specific needs. The complexities of this process require careful preparation of patients and their families and the participation of many disciplines. Long-term follow-up will be essential to evaluate the effectiveness of this innovative treatment.

  14. Role of Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 in Radiation-Induced Brain Injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, K.-L.; Tu Ba; Li Yuqing; Wong, C. Shun

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the role of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in the pathogenesis of brain injury after irradiation (IR). Methods and Materials: We assessed the expression of ICAM-1 in mouse brain after cranial IR and determined the histopathologic and behavioral changes in mice that were either wildtype (+/+) or knockout (-/-) of the ICAM-1 gene after IR. Results: There was an early dose-dependent increase in ICAM-1 mRNA and protein expression after IR. Increased ICAM-1 immunoreactivity was observed in endothelia and glia of ICAM-1+/+ mice up to 8 months after IR. ICAM-1-/- mice showed no expression. ICAM-1+/+ and ICAM-1-/- mice showed similar vascular abnormalities at 2 months after 10-17 Gy, and there was evidence for demyelination and inhibition of hippocampal neurogenesis at 8 months after 10 Gy. After 10 Gy, irradiated ICAM-1+/+ and ICAM-1-/- mice showed similar behavioral changes at 2-6 months in open field, light-dark chamber, and T-maze compared with age-matched genotype controls. Conclusion: There is early and late upregulation of ICAM-1 in the vasculature and glia of mouse brain after IR. ICAM-1, however, does not have a causative role in the histopathologic injury and behavioral dysfunction after moderate single doses of cranial IR.

  15. Relating Education, Brain Structure, and Cognition: The Role of Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors

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    Moyra E. Mortby

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The protective effect of education on cognitive and brain health is well established. While the direct effects of individual cardiovascular disease (CVD risk factors (i.e., hypertension, smoking, diabetes, and obesity on cerebral structure have been investigated, little is understood about the possible interaction between the protective effect of education and the deleterious effects of CVD risk factors in predicting brain ageing and cognition. Using data from the PATH Through Life study (N=266, we investigated the protective effect of education on cerebral structure and function and tested a possible mediating role of CVD risk factors. Higher education was associated with larger regional grey/white matter volumes in the prefrontal cortex in men only. The association between education and cognition was mediated by brain volumes but only for grey matter and only in relation to information processing speed. CVD risk factors did not mediate the association between regional volumes and cognition. This study provides additional evidence in support for a protective effect of education on cerebral structures and cognition. However, it does not provide support for a mediating role of CVD risk factors in these associations.

  16. Use of a special airbed for transporting injured persons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hacker, R

    1981-04-01

    A description is given of a special airbed for the purpose of transporting injured persons, especially those with injuries to the spinal column. This special airbed moulds itself to the shape of the injured party. (In German)

  17. Role of Intravenous Levetiracetam in Seizure Prophylaxis of Severe Traumatic Brain Injury Patients

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    BATOOL F. KIRMANI

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI can cause seizures and the development of epilepsy. The incidence of seizures varies from 21% in patients with severe brain injuries to 50% in patients with war-related penetrating TBI. In the acute and sub-acute periods following injury, seizures can lead to increased intracranial pressure and cerebral edema, further complicating TBI management. Anticonvulsants should be used for seizure prophylaxis and treatment. Phenytoin is the most widely prescribed anticonvulsant in these patients. Intravenous levetiracetam, made available in 2006, is now being considered as an alternative to phenytoin in acute care settings. When compared with phenytoin, levetiracetam has fewer side-effects and drug-drug interactions. In the following, the role of levetiracetam in TBI care and the supporting evidence is discussed.

  18. Role of Sex Hormones on Brain Mitochondrial Function, with Special Reference to Aging and Neurodegenerative Diseases

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    Pauline Gaignard

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondria have a fundamental role in both cellular energy supply and oxidative stress regulation and are target of the effects of sex steroids, particularly the neuroprotective ones. Aging is associated with a decline in the levels of different steroid hormones, and this decrease may underline some neural dysfunctions. Besides, modifications in mitochondrial functions associated with aging processes are also well documented. In this review, we will discuss studies that describe the modifications of brain mitochondrial function and of steroid levels associated with physiological aging and with neurodegenerative diseases. A special emphasis will be placed on describing and discussing our recent findings concerning the concomitant study of mitochondrial function (oxidative phosphorylation, oxidative stress and brain steroid levels in both young (3-month-old and aged (20-month-old male and female mice.

  19. Role of the ubiquitin-proteasome system in brain ischemia: friend or foe?

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    Caldeira, Margarida V; Salazar, Ivan L; Curcio, Michele; Canzoniero, Lorella M T; Duarte, Carlos B

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is a catalytic machinery that targets numerous cellular proteins for degradation, thus being essential to control a wide range of basic cellular processes and cell survival. Degradation of intracellular proteins via the UPS is a tightly regulated process initiated by tagging a target protein with a specific ubiquitin chain. Neurons are particularly vulnerable to any change in protein composition, and therefore the UPS is a key regulator of neuronal physiology. Alterations in UPS activity may induce pathological responses, ultimately leading to neuronal cell death. Brain ischemia triggers a complex series of biochemical and molecular mechanisms, such as an inflammatory response, an exacerbated production of misfolded and oxidized proteins, due to oxidative stress, and the breakdown of cellular integrity mainly mediated by excitotoxic glutamatergic signaling. Brain ischemia also damages protein degradation pathways which, together with the overproduction of damaged proteins and consequent upregulation of ubiquitin-conjugated proteins, contribute to the accumulation of ubiquitin-containing proteinaceous deposits. Despite recent advances, the factors leading to deposition of such aggregates after cerebral ischemic injury remain poorly understood. This review discusses the current knowledge on the role of the UPS in brain function and the molecular mechanisms contributing to UPS dysfunction in brain ischemia with consequent accumulation of ubiquitin-containing proteins. Chemical inhibitors of the proteasome and small molecule inhibitors of deubiquitinating enzymes, which promote the degradation of proteins by the proteasome, were both shown to provide neuroprotection in brain ischemia, and this apparent contradiction is also discussed in this review. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Role of KCNMA1 gene in breast cancer invasion and metastasis to brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaitan, Divya; Sankpal, Umesh T; Weksler, Babette; Meister, Edward A; Romero, Ignacio A; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Ningaraj, Nagendra S

    2009-01-01

    The prognosis for patients with breast tumor metastases to brain is extremely poor. Identification of prognostic molecular markers of the metastatic process is critical for designing therapeutic modalities for reducing the occurrence of metastasis. Although ubiquitously present in most human organs, large-conductance calcium- and voltage-activated potassium channel (BK Ca ) channels are significantly upregulated in breast cancer cells. In this study we investigated the role of KCNMA1 gene that encodes for the pore-forming α-subunit of BK Ca channels in breast cancer metastasis and invasion. We performed Global exon array to study the expression of KCNMA1 in metastatic breast cancer to brain, compared its expression in primary breast cancer and breast cancers metastatic to other organs, and validated the findings by RT-PCR. Immunohistochemistry was performed to study the expression and localization of BK Ca channel protein in primary and metastatic breast cancer tissues and breast cancer cell lines. We performed matrigel invasion, transendothelial migration and membrane potential assays in established lines of normal breast cells (MCF-10A), non-metastatic breast cancer (MCF-7), non-brain metastatic breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231), and brain-specific metastatic breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-361) to study whether BK Ca channel inhibition attenuates breast tumor invasion and metastasis using KCNMA1 knockdown with siRNA and biochemical inhibition with Iberiotoxin (IBTX). The Global exon array and RT-PCR showed higher KCNMA1 expression in metastatic breast cancer in brain compared to metastatic breast cancers in other organs. Our results clearly show that metastatic breast cancer cells exhibit increased BK Ca channel activity, leading to greater invasiveness and transendothelial migration, both of which could be attenuated by blocking KCNMA1. Determining the relative abundance of BK Ca channel expression in breast cancer metastatic to brain and the mechanism of its

  1. Role of KCNMA1 gene in breast cancer invasion and metastasis to brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Couraud Pierre-Olivier

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prognosis for patients with breast tumor metastases to brain is extremely poor. Identification of prognostic molecular markers of the metastatic process is critical for designing therapeutic modalities for reducing the occurrence of metastasis. Although ubiquitously present in most human organs, large-conductance calcium- and voltage-activated potassium channel (BKCa channels are significantly upregulated in breast cancer cells. In this study we investigated the role of KCNMA1 gene that encodes for the pore-forming α-subunit of BKCa channels in breast cancer metastasis and invasion. Methods We performed Global exon array to study the expression of KCNMA1 in metastatic breast cancer to brain, compared its expression in primary breast cancer and breast cancers metastatic to other organs, and validated the findings by RT-PCR. Immunohistochemistry was performed to study the expression and localization of BKCa channel protein in primary and metastatic breast cancer tissues and breast cancer cell lines. We performed matrigel invasion, transendothelial migration and membrane potential assays in established lines of normal breast cells (MCF-10A, non-metastatic breast cancer (MCF-7, non-brain metastatic breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231, and brain-specific metastatic breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-361 to study whether BKCa channel inhibition attenuates breast tumor invasion and metastasis using KCNMA1 knockdown with siRNA and biochemical inhibition with Iberiotoxin (IBTX. Results The Global exon array and RT-PCR showed higher KCNMA1 expression in metastatic breast cancer in brain compared to metastatic breast cancers in other organs. Our results clearly show that metastatic breast cancer cells exhibit increased BKCa channel activity, leading to greater invasiveness and transendothelial migration, both of which could be attenuated by blocking KCNMA1. Conclusion Determining the relative abundance of BKCa channel expression in breast

  2. What Should Be the Roles of Conscious States and Brain States in Theories of Mental Activity?**

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulany, Donelson E.

    2011-01-01

    Answers to the title’s question have been influenced by a history in which an early science of consciousness was rejected by behaviourists on the argument that this entails commitment to ontological dualism and “free will” in the sense of indeterminism. This is, however, a confusion of theoretical assertions with metaphysical assertions. Nevertheless, a legacy within computational and information-processing views of mind rejects or de-emphasises a role for consciousness. This paper sketches a mentalistic metatheory in which conscious states are the sole carriers of symbolic representations, and thus have a central role in the explanation of mental activity and action-while specifying determinism and materialism as useful working assumptions. A mentalistic theory of causal learning, experimentally examined with phenomenal reports, is followed by examination of these questions: Are there common roles for phenomenal reports and brain imaging? Is there defensible evidence for unconscious brain states carrying symbolic representations? Are there interesting dissociations within consciousness? PMID:21694964

  3. The roles of the amygdala in the affective regulation of body, brain, and behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirolli, Marco; Mannella, Francesco; Baldassarre, Gianluca

    2010-09-01

    Despite the great amount of knowledge produced by the neuroscientific literature on affective phenomena, current models tackling non-cognitive aspects of behaviour are often bio-inspired but rarely bio-constrained. This paper presents a theoretical account of affective systems centred on the amygdala (Amg). This account aims to furnish a general framework and specific pathways to implement models that are more closely related to biological evidence. The Amg, which receives input from brain areas encoding internal states, innately relevant stimuli, and innately neutral stimuli, plays a fundamental role in the motivational and emotional processes of organisms. This role is based on the fact that Amg implements the two associative processes at the core of Pavlovian learning (conditioned stimulus (CS)-unconditioned stimulus (US) and CS-unconditioned response (UR) associations), and that it has the capacity of modulating these associations on the basis of internal states. These functionalities allow the Amg to play an important role in the regulation of the three fundamental classes of affective responses (namely, the regulation of body states, the regulation of brain states via neuromodulators, and the triggering of a number of basic behaviours fundamental for adaptation) and in the regulation of three high-level cognitive processes (namely, the affective labelling of memories, the production of goal-directed behaviours, and the performance of planning and complex decision-making). Our analysis is conducted within a methodological approach that stresses the importance of understanding the brain within an evolutionary/adaptive framework and with the aim of isolating general principles that can potentially account for the wider possible empirical evidence in a coherent fashion.

  4. Beneficial Roles of Emotion in Decision Making: Functional Association of Brain and Body

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    Hideki Ohira

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Though traditional microeconomics has supposed that human decisions are based on logical and exact computation of cost-benefit balances or efficacies, studies in behavioral economics have shown that humans sometimes make seemingly irrational decisions driven by emotions. In our everyday situations, factors related to decisions are complex and which alternative will be the most beneficial is uncertain. In such cases, emotions have been thought adaptive because they can quickly reduce negative alternatives and facilitate fast and effective decision making. Some theorists argued that one of important sources of such emotional drives affecting decision making is bodily responses that are represented in brain regions (Craig, 2009; Damasio, 1994. In this article, empirical evidence for the functional associations of the brain and body accompanying decision making will be shown as follows. (1 Heart rate responses and concentration of inflammatory cytokine (IL-6 can predict acceptance or rejection of an unfair offer in an economical negotiation game, the Ultimatum Game. Activation of the anterior insula mediates relationship between bodily states and decision making. (2 Sympathetic responses reflected by secretion of adrenaline are represented in brain regions such as the midbrain, anterior cingulate cortex, and anterior insula, and furthermore can determine exploration of decision making in a situation where an action-outcome contingency is stochastic and unstable. These findings suggest beneficial roles of emotion and bodily responses in decision making.

  5. The UDP-glucuronosyltransferases of the blood-brain barrier: their role in drug metabolism and detoxication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed eOuzzine

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs form a multigenic family of membrane-bound enzymes expressed in various tissues, including brain. They catalyze the formation of β-Dglucuronides from structurally unrelated substances (drugs, other xenobiotics, as well as endogenous compounds by the linkage of glucuronic acid from the high energy donor, UDP-αD-glucuronic acid. In brain, UGTs actively participate to the overall protection of the tissue against the intrusion of potentially harmful lipophilic substances that are metabolized as hydrophilic glucuronides. These metabolites are generally inactive, except for important pharmacologically glucuronides such as morphine-6-glucuronide. UGTs are mainly expressed in endothelial cells and astrocytes of the blood brain barrier. They are also associated to brain interfaces devoid of blood-brain barrier, such as circumventricular organ, pineal gland, pituitary gland and neuro-olfactory tissues. Beside their key-role as a detoxication barrier, UGTs play a role in the steady-state of endogenous compounds, like steroids or dopamine that participate to the function of the brain. UGT isoforms of family 1A, 2A, 2B and 3A are expressed in brain tissues to various levels and are known to present distinct but overlapping substrate specificity. The importance of these enzyme species with regard to the formation of toxic, pharmacologically or physiologically relevant glucuronides in the brain will be discussed.

  6. Role of 18F-FDG PET/CT in primary brain lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de-Bonilla-Damiá, Á; Fernández-López, R; Capote-Huelva, F J; de la Cruz-Vicente, F; Egea-Guerrero, J J; Borrego-Dorado, I

    To study the usefulness of 18 F-FDG PET/CT in the initial evaluation and in the response assessment in primary brain lymphoma. A retrospective analysis was carried out on 18 patients diagnosed with primary brain lymphoma, a histological subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, on whom an initial 18 F-FDG PET/CT and MRI was performed, with 7 of the cases being analysed after the completion of treatment in order to assess response and clinical follow up. Initial 18 F-FDG PET/CT showed 26 hypermetabolic foci, whereas 46 lesions were detected by MRI. The average SUV maximum of the lesions was 17.56 with T/N 3.55. The concordance of both tests for identifying the same number of lesions was moderate, obtaining a kappa index of 0.395 (P<.001). In the evaluation of treatment, MRI identified 16 lesions compared to 7 pathological accumulations observed by 18 F-FDG PET/CT. The concordance of both tests to assess type of response to treatment was moderate (kappa index 0.41) (P=.04). In both the initial evaluation and the assessment of the response to treatment, PET/CT led to a change strategy in 22% of patients who had lesions outside the cerebral parenchyma. MRI appears to be the method of choice for detecting brain disease in patients with primary brain lymphoma, whereas 18 F-FDG PET/CT seems to play a relevant role in the assessment of extra-cerebral disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  7. Multifunctional roles of enolase in Alzheimer's disease brain: beyond altered glucose metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterfield, D Allan; Lange, Miranda L Bader

    2009-11-01

    Enolase enzymes are abundantly expressed, cytosolic carbon-oxygen lyases known for their role in glucose metabolism. Recently, enolase has been shown to possess a variety of different regulatory functions, beyond glycolysis and gluconeogenesis, associated with hypoxia, ischemia, and Alzheimer's disease (AD). AD is an age-associated neurodegenerative disorder characterized pathologically by elevated oxidative stress and subsequent damage to proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids, appearance of neurofibrillary tangles and senile plaques, and loss of synapse and neuronal cells. It is unclear if development of a hypometabolic environment is a consequence of or contributes to AD pathology, as there is not only a significant decline in brain glucose levels in AD, but also there is an increase in proteomics identified oxidatively modified glycolytic enzymes that are rendered inactive, including enolase. Previously, our laboratory identified alpha-enolase as one the most frequently up-regulated and oxidatively modified proteins in amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI), early-onset AD, and AD. However, the glycolytic conversion of 2-phosphoglycerate to phosphoenolpyruvate catalyzed by enolase does not directly produce ATP or NADH; therefore it is surprising that, among all glycolytic enzymes, alpha-enolase was one of only two glycolytic enzymes consistently up-regulated from MCI to AD. These findings suggest enolase is involved with more than glucose metabolism in AD brain, but may possess other functions, normally necessary to preserve brain function. This review examines potential altered function(s) of brain enolase in MCI, early-onset AD, and AD, alterations that may contribute to the biochemical, pathological, clinical characteristics, and progression of this dementing disorder.

  8. Diagnostic radiology on multiple injured patients: interdisciplinary management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linsenmaier, U.; Pfeifer, K.J.; Kanz, K.G.; Mutschler, W.

    2001-01-01

    The presence of a radiologist within the admitting area of an emergency department and his capability as a member of the trauma team have a major impact on the role of diagnostic radiology in trauma care. The knowledge of clinical decision criteria, algorithms, and standards of patient care are essential for the acceptance within a trauma team. We present an interdisciplinary management concept of diagnostic radiology for trauma patients, which comprises basic diagnosis, organ diagnosis, radiological ABC, and algorithms of early clinical care. It is the result of a prospective study comprising over 2000 documented multiple injured patients. The radiologist on a trauma team should support trauma surgery and anesthesia in diagnostic and clinical work-up. The radiological ABC provides a structured approach for diagnostic imaging in all steps of the early clinical care of the multiple injured patient. Radiological ABC requires a reevaluation in cases of equivocal findings or difficulties in the clinical course. Direct communication of radiological findings with the trauma team enables quick clinical decisions. In addition, the radiologist can priority-oriented influence the therapy by using interventional procedures. The clinical radiologist is an active member of the interdisciplinary trauma team, not only providing diagnostic imaging but also participating in clinical decisions. (orig.) [de

  9. An Evolutionarily Conserved Role of Presenilin in Neuronal Protection in the Aging Drosophila Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jongkyun; Shin, Sarah; Perrimon, Norbert; Shen, Jie

    2017-07-01

    Mutations in the Presenilin genes are the major genetic cause of Alzheimer's disease. Presenilin and Nicastrin are essential components of γ-secretase, a multi-subunit protease that cleaves Type I transmembrane proteins. Genetic studies in mice previously demonstrated that conditional inactivation of Presenilin or Nicastrin in excitatory neurons of the postnatal forebrain results in memory deficits, synaptic impairment, and age-dependent neurodegeneration. The roles of Drosophila Presenilin ( Psn ) and Nicastrin ( Nct ) in the adult fly brain, however, are unknown. To knockdown (KD) Psn or Nct selectively in neurons of the adult brain, we generated multiple shRNA lines. Using a ubiquitous driver, these shRNA lines resulted in 80-90% reduction of mRNA and pupal lethality-a phenotype that is shared with Psn and Nct mutants carrying nonsense mutations. Furthermore, expression of these shRNAs in the wing disc caused notching wing phenotypes, which are also shared with Psn and Nct mutants. Similar to Nct , neuron-specific Psn KD using two independent shRNA lines led to early mortality and rough eye phenotypes, which were rescued by a fly Psn transgene. Interestingly, conditional KD (cKD) of Psn or Nct in adult neurons using the elav-Gal4 and tubulin-Gal80 ts system caused shortened lifespan, climbing defects, increases in apoptosis, and age-dependent neurodegeneration. Together, these findings demonstrate that, similar to their mammalian counterparts, Drosophila Psn and Nct are required for neuronal survival during aging and normal lifespan, highlighting an evolutionarily conserved role of Presenilin in neuronal protection in the aging brain. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  10. Role of scintigraphy and computer-assisted tomography in brain examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akerman, M.; Oproiu, A.; Comoy, C.; Guiot, G.

    1981-01-01

    To assess the role of computer-assisted tomography (CAT) and scintigraphy in brain exploration, the authors analysed: (1) the diagnostic effectiveness of the two methods in 300 patients examined over a period of seven months; (2) the role assigned to each investigation in 169 patients operated on for intracranial lesion during the same period. The isotopic brain examination always included an initial angiographic study after the intravenous injection of a technetium compound. Study of the circulation of the cerebrospinal fluid was made with 111 In-DTPA. The detection efficiency of CAT is higher than for scintigraphy in expansive processes, whereas, conversely, in cerebrovascular accidents of ischaemic origin, isotope angiography coupled with static imaging enables one to gain more information on cerebral perfusion than CAT. Similarly, when studying the cerebrospinal fluid, scintigraphy provides a greater amount of specific data on the mechanisms governing hydrocephalus, the mode of operation of a shunt, or the site of a cerebrospinal fluid fistula. Within a neurosurgical context, CAT by and large takes precedence in brain examination, but the investigation is usually accompanied by scintigraphy or a conventional neuroradiological examination. Scintigraphy was performed on 66% of the patients, whereas for neuroradiological examination the figure was 44%. Most of the scintigraphy came after CAT so as to obtain additional diagnostic information on the vascularization, the nature and, on occasion, the exact location of the lesion revealed by CAT. In more than one case out of two, scintigraphy provides enough additional information for one to avoid neuroradiological examination, which is more 'aggressive' and more dangerous. Hence scintigraphy represents an effective complement to CAT and can compete with the conventional neuroradiological technique. (author)

  11. Maladaptation of cerebral perfusion in the spinal cord injured individuals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Ihn Ho; Chun, Kyung A.; Lee, Hyoung Woo; Ahn, Sang Ho; Hayashida, Kohei [National Cardiovascular Center, Osaka (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the tilt-induced alteration of cerebral perfusion of spinal cord injured individuals. Supine and upright sitting brain SPECT was performed using a 1-day protocol with {sup 99m}Tc-ethylcysteinate dimer (ECD) in 11 SCI individuals (mean age, 32.6 y), with lesions between C3 and T4, ad 5 AB individuals (mean age, 31.4 y). The patients rested on a wheelchair in the supine position. Then, they sat up and, at the same time 555MBq of ECD was injected. The upright SPECT was done. Finally, 740MBq of ECD was injected and supine SPECT was performed again. The SPECT data were acquired with dual head gamma camera (E-cam, Siemens). For semiquantitative analysis, 14 ROIs were drawn on the brain. In the SCI individuals, the radiotracer uptake in the frontal, temporal and parietal areas were significantly decreased in the upright SPECT. No postural changes was evident in the occipital lobe, basal ganglia and thalamus in the SCI individuals. In the AB individuals, there were no such changes on the upright SPECT. Postural cerebral hypoperfusion in the frontal, temporal and parietal areas in the SCI individuals might relate to maladaptation of the vascular response during the upright position.

  12. The Role of the Brain's Endocannabinoid System in Pain and Its Modulation by Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Louise; Roche, Michelle; Finn, David P

    2015-01-01

    Stress has a complex, bidirectional modulatory influence on pain. Stress may either reduce (stress-induced analgesia) or exacerbate (stress-induced hyperalgesia) pain depending on the nature, duration, and intensity of the stressor. The endogenous cannabinoid (endocannabinoid) system is present throughout the neuroanatomical pathways that mediate and modulate responses to painful stimuli. The specific role of the endocannabinoid system in the brain in pain and the modulation of pain by stress is reviewed herein. We first provide a brief overview of the endocannabinoid system, followed by a review of the evidence that the brain's endocannabinoid system modulates pain. We provide a comprehensive evaluation of the role of the endocannabinoid system supraspinally, and particularly in the rostral ventromedial medulla, periaqueductal gray, amygdala, and prefrontal cortex, in pain, stress-induced analgesia, and stress-induced hyperalgesia. Increased understanding of endocannabinoid-mediated regulation of pain and its modulation by stress will inform the development of novel therapeutic approaches for pain and its comorbidity with stress-related disorders. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. What Is the Relationship of Fear Avoidance to Physical Function and Pain Intensity in Injured Athletes?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fischerauer, Stefan F.; Talaei-Khoei, Mojtaba; Bexkens, Rens; Ring, David C.; Oh, Luke S.; Vranceanu, Ana-Maria

    2018-01-01

    Fear avoidance can play a prominent role in maladaptive responses to an injury. In injured athletes, such pain-related fear or fear avoidance behavior may have a substantial influence on the recovery process. Specifically, it may explain why some are able to reach their preinjury abilities, whereas

  14. DO GENERAL MEDICAL PRACTITIONERS EXAMINE INJURED RUNNERS?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Videbæk, Solvej; Jensen, A V; Rasmussen, S

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: General Medical Practitioners (GMP) in Denmark perform clinical examinations of patients with musculoskeletal pain. However, the prevalence proportion of examinations caused by running-related injuries remains unknown. PURPOSE: The primary purpose of the present study was to estimate...... the prevalence proportion of consultations in general medical practice caused by running-related injuries. The secondary purpose was to estimate the prevalence proportion of injured runners, who consult their GMP, that are referred to additional examinations or treatments. STUDY DESIGN: A survey-based study...

  15. The role of crossmodal interaction in psychological and brain organization of mathematical abilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikita A. Khokhlov

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes the work of Russian and foreign scholars devoted to the role of cross analyzer cooperation in developing and implementing mathematical abilities.Crossmodal interaction is considered as an additional category of neuropsychological analysis that allows to extend the existing ideas about the psychological structure and brain providing the mathematical ability. There are data that confirm the relevance of studying the interaction of the senses. Many of the research on this issue are carried out using the synesthesia which is considered a rare phenomenon. However, both Russian and foreign works suggest that the interaction of analyzers is not characteristic only to those whose brain is synesthetic. The joint work of the senses is characteristic of every person since his/her childhood, and is an obligatory condition for cognitive processes. Cross analyzer synthesis is assumed to play an important role in producing spatial representations and the ability to intuitively perceive the notion of quantity (evolutionary foundations of mathematical ability. On the brain level, these processes are provided primarily by functioning of parietal and tertiary cortical areas located at the junctionof cortical analyzer areas and also temporal areas that border on the parahippocampal brain area. When dealing with school mathematics the structure of mathematical abilities is changing due to verbal and symbolic representations of numerical coding. Dealing with symbols opens up new opportunities, but it also narrows the spectrum of modalities involved in doing mathematical sums. Thus, the ability to re-encode information from one modality to another after school mathematics is perceived has an impact on the efficacy of mathematical activity. Doing mathematical sums is accompanied by crossmodal interaction that occurs on the unconscious level. Some problem conditions may be efficiently processed in one modality, others may be solved in other modality

  16. Curcumin plays neuroprotective roles against traumatic brain injury partly via Nrf2 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Wenwen; Yang, Bei; Wang, Linlin; Li, Bingxuan; Guo, Xiangshen; Zhang, Miao; Jiang, Zhenfei; Fu, Jingqi; Pi, Jingbo; Guan, Dawei; Zhao, Rui

    2018-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI), which leads to high mortality and morbidity, is a prominent public health problem worldwide with no effective treatment. Curcumin has been shown to be beneficial for neuroprotection in vivo and in vitro, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. This study determined whether the neuroprotective role of curcumin in mouse TBI is dependent on the NF-E2-related factor (Nrf2) pathway. The Feeney weight-drop contusion model was used to mimic TBI. Curcumin was administered intraperitoneally 15 min after TBI induction, and brains were collected at 24 h after TBI. The levels of Nrf2 and its downstream genes (Hmox-1, Nqo1, Gclm, and Gclc) were detected by Western blot and qRT-PCR at 24 h after TBI. In addition, edema, oxidative damage, cell apoptosis and inflammatory reactions were evaluated in wild type (WT) and Nrf2-knockout (Nrf2-KO) mice to explore the role of Nrf2 signaling after curcumin treatment. In wild type mice, curcumin treatment resulted in reduced ipsilateral cortex injury, neutrophil infiltration, and microglia activation, improving neuron survival against TBI-induced apoptosis and degeneration. These effects were accompanied by increased expression and nuclear translocation of Nrf2, and enhanced expression of antioxidant enzymes. However, Nrf2 deletion attenuated the neuroprotective effects of curcumin in Nrf2-KO mice after TBI. These findings demonstrated that curcumin effects on TBI are associated with the activation the Nrf2 pathway, providing novel insights into the neuroprotective role of Nrf2 and the potential therapeutic use of curcumin for TBI. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Inhibitory Effect on Cerebral Inflammatory Response following Traumatic Brain Injury in Rats: A Potential Neuroprotective Mechanism of N-Acetylcysteine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Chen

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Although N-acetylcysteine (NAC has been shown to be neuroprotective for traumatic brain injury (TBI, the mechanisms for this beneficial effect are still poorly understood. Cerebral inflammation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of secondary brain injury after TBI. However, it has not been investigated whether NAC modulates TBI-induced cerebral inflammatory response. In this work, we investigated the effect of NAC administration on cortical expressions of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB and inflammatory proteins such as interleukin-1β (IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, interleukin-6 (IL-6, and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 after TBI. As a result, we found that NF-κB, proinflammatory cytokines, and ICAM-1 were increased in all injured animals. In animals given NAC post-TBI, NF-κB, IL-1β, TNF-α, and ICAM-1 were decreased in comparison to vehicle-treated animals. Measures of IL-6 showed no change after NAC treatment. NAC administration reduced brain edema, BBB permeability, and apoptotic index in the injured brain. The results suggest that post-TBI NAC administration may attenuate inflammatory response in the injured rat brain, and this may be one mechanism by which NAC ameliorates secondary brain damage following TBI.

  18. Child passengers injured in motor vehicle crashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Eduardo; Kelley-Baker, Tara

    2015-02-01

    During 2010, 171,000 children aged 0-14 were injured in motor vehicle crashes. Despite the severity of the problem, research has been limited, and most of what we know about these children emanates from fatal crash databases. Using information from the General Estimates System, this effort examines the occurrence of non-fatal crashes among children aged 0-14 over the last decade. We found that about 1% of the non-injured children in the file had been driven by a driver who was positive for alcohol. This percentage climbed to about 2% among children who had suffered injuries. Compared with the proportion of alcohol-positive drivers at the time of the crash, the proportion of drivers who sped or failed to obey a traffic signal was significantly higher. The finding that drinking and driving with children did not decrease over time questions the adequacy of the extant child endangerment laws. Copyright © 2014 National Safety Council and Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The Role of Glucose Transporters in Brain Disease: Diabetes and Alzheimer’s Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Kaushik; DeSilva, Shanal; Abbruscato, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The occurrence of altered brain glucose metabolism has long been suggested in both diabetes and Alzheimer’s diseases. However, the preceding mechanism to altered glucose metabolism has not been well understood. Glucose enters the brain via glucose transporters primarily present at the blood-brain barrier. Any changes in glucose transporter function and expression dramatically affects brain glucose homeostasis and function. In the brains of both diabetic and Alzheimer’s dis...

  20. Functional brain imaging in the dementias: role in early detection, differential diagnosis, and longitudinal studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devous, M.D. Sr. [Nuclear Medicine Center and Department of Radiology, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd., Dallas, TX (United States)

    2002-12-01

    This review considers the role of functional brain imaging techniques in the dementias. The substantial assistance that especially single-photon emission tomography and positron emission tomography can play in the initial diagnosis of dementia and in the differential diagnosis of the specific dementing disorder is discussed. These techniques alone essentially match the sensitivity and specificity of clinical diagnoses in distinguishing Alzheimer's dementia (AD) from age-matched controls, from frontal lobe dementia and vascular dementia, and even from Lewy body dementia. Newer analytic techniques such as voxel-based correlational analyses and discriminant function analyses enhance the power of such differential diagnoses. Functional brain imaging techniques can also significantly assist in patient screening for clinical trials. The correlation of the observed deficits with specific patterns of cognitive abnormalities permits enhanced patient management and treatment planning and improved longitudinal assessment of outcome. It is also noteworthy that the classic abnormalities of temporoparietal and posterior cingulate hypoperfusion or hypometabolism appear to be present prior to symptom onset. These abnormalities predict progression to AD in the presence of the earliest of symptoms, and are present even in cognitively normal but at-risk subjects, with a severity proportional to the risk status. Even greater predictive ability for progression to AD is obtained by combining measures of perfusion or metabolism with risk factors, tau protein levels, hippocampal N-Acetyl aspartate concentrations, or hippocampal volume measures. (orig.)

  1. Functional brain imaging in the dementias: role in early detection, differential diagnosis, and longitudinal studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devous, M.D. Sr.

    2002-01-01

    This review considers the role of functional brain imaging techniques in the dementias. The substantial assistance that especially single-photon emission tomography and positron emission tomography can play in the initial diagnosis of dementia and in the differential diagnosis of the specific dementing disorder is discussed. These techniques alone essentially match the sensitivity and specificity of clinical diagnoses in distinguishing Alzheimer's dementia (AD) from age-matched controls, from frontal lobe dementia and vascular dementia, and even from Lewy body dementia. Newer analytic techniques such as voxel-based correlational analyses and discriminant function analyses enhance the power of such differential diagnoses. Functional brain imaging techniques can also significantly assist in patient screening for clinical trials. The correlation of the observed deficits with specific patterns of cognitive abnormalities permits enhanced patient management and treatment planning and improved longitudinal assessment of outcome. It is also noteworthy that the classic abnormalities of temporoparietal and posterior cingulate hypoperfusion or hypometabolism appear to be present prior to symptom onset. These abnormalities predict progression to AD in the presence of the earliest of symptoms, and are present even in cognitively normal but at-risk subjects, with a severity proportional to the risk status. Even greater predictive ability for progression to AD is obtained by combining measures of perfusion or metabolism with risk factors, tau protein levels, hippocampal N-Acetyl aspartate concentrations, or hippocampal volume measures. (orig.)

  2. Testosterone in the brain: neuroimaging findings and the potential role for neuropsychopharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höfer, Peter; Lanzenberger, Rupert; Kasper, Siegfried

    2013-02-01

    Testosterone plays a substantial role in a number of physiological processes in the brain. It is able to modulate the expression of certain genes by binding to androgen receptors. Acting via neurotransmitter receptors, testosterone shows the potential to mediate a non-genomic so-called "neuroactive effect". Various neurotransmitter systems are also influenced by the aromatized form of testosterone, estradiol. The following article summarizes the findings of preclinical and clinical neuroimaging studies including structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI/fMRI), voxel based morphometry (VBM), as well as pharmacological fMRI (phfMRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) regarding the effects of testosterone on the human brain. The impact of testosterone on the pathogenesis of psychiatric disorders and on sex-related prevalence differences have been supported by a wide range of clinical studies. An antidepressant effect of testosterone can be implicitly explained by its effects on the limbic system--especially amygdala, a major target in the treatment of depression--solidly demonstrated by a large body of neuroimaging findings. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  3. Nutrition in brain development and aging: role of essential fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uauy, Ricardo; Dangour, Alan D

    2006-05-01

    The essential fatty acids (EFAs), particularly the n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPs), are important for brain development during both the fetal and postnatal period. They are also increasingly seen to be of value in limiting the cognitive decline during aging. EFA deficiency was first shown over 75 years ago, but the more subtle effects of the n-3 fatty acids in terms of skin changes, a poor response to linoleic acid supplementation, abnormal visual function, and peripheral neuropathy were only discovered later. Both n-3 and n-6 LCPs play important roles in neuronal growth, development of synaptic processing of neural cell interaction, and expression of genes regulating cell differentiation and growth. The fetus and placenta are dependent on maternal EFA supply for their growth and development, with docosahexaenomic acid (DHA)-supplemented infants showing significantly greater mental and psychomotor development scores (breast-fed children do even better). Dietary DHA is needed for the optimum functional maturation of the retina and visual cortex, with visual acuity and mental development seemingly improved by extra DHA. Aging is also associated with decreased brain levels of DHA: fish consumption is associated with decreased risk of dementia and Alzheimer's disease, and the reported daily use of fish-oil supplements has been linked to improved cognitive function scores, but confirmation of these effects is needed.

  4. Role of morphine preconditioning and nitric oxide following brain ischemia reperfusion injury in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maedeh Arabian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Morphine dependence (MD potently protects heart against ischemia reperfusion (IR injury through specific signaling mechanisms, which are different from the pathways involved in acute morphine treatment or classical preconditioning. Since opioid receptor density changes post cerebral ischemia strongly correlated with brain histological damage, in the present study, we tried to elucidate the possible role of opioid receptors in IR injury among morphine-dependent mice. Materials and Methods: Accordingly, incremental doses (10 mg/kg/day to 30 mg/kg/day of morphine sulphate were subcutaneously administered for 5 days before global brain ischemia induction through bilateral common carotid artery occlusion. Animals were received naloxone (5 mg/kg or L-NAME (20 mg/kg 30 min after the last morphine dose. Twenty four hr after the ischemia induction, Retention trial of passive avoidance test and western blot analysis were done. histological analysis (TUNEL and NISSL staining performed 72 hr after ischemia. Results: MD improved post ischemia memory performance (P

  5. [The role of neurologists in deep brain stimulation for Parkinson disease: a neurosurgical perspective].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umemura, Atsushi

    2012-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been accepted as an effective treatment for medically refractory Parkinson disease (PD). Appropriate patient selection, safe and precise surgery, and proper postoperative adjustment of stimulation and medication, are essential for the success of DBS. Patient selection is the most important role for the neurologist in DBS treatment. Neurologists treating PD should understand the correct indications and contraindications for DBS, and introduce it in a timely manner to patients who can be expected to benefit substantially from it. For long term treatment of PD, ideally the neurologist in charge of the patient should adjust both the stimulation parameters and medication. Neurologists engaged in this treatment should also have a comprehensive understanding of the probable complications and how to avoid them.

  6. Role of the brain stem in tibial inhibition of the micturition reflex in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferroni, Matthew C; Slater, Rick C; Shen, Bing; Xiao, Zhiying; Wang, Jicheng; Lee, Andy; Roppolo, James R; de Groat, William C; Tai, Changfeng

    2015-08-01

    This study examined the role of the brain stem in inhibition of bladder reflexes induced by tibial nerve stimulation (TNS) in α-chloralose-anesthetized decerebrate cats. Repeated cystometrograms (CMGs) were performed by infusing saline or 0.25% acetic acid (AA) to elicit normal or overactive bladder reflexes, respectively. TNS (5 or 30 Hz) at three times the threshold (3T) intensity for inducing toe movement was applied for 30 min between CMGs to induce post-TNS inhibition or applied during the CMGs to induce acute TNS inhibition. Inhibition was evident as an increase in bladder capacity without a change in amplitude of bladder contractions. TNS applied for 30 min between saline CMGs elicited prolonged (>2 h) poststimulation inhibition that significantly (P reflexes but are not involved in inhibition of normal bladder reflexes. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  7. Critical role of NADPH oxidase in neuronal oxidative damage and microglia activation following traumatic brain injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quan-Guang Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Oxidative stress is known to play an important role in the pathology of traumatic brain injury. Mitochondria are thought to be the major source of the damaging reactive oxygen species (ROS following TBI. However, recent work has revealed that the membrane, via the enzyme NADPH oxidase can also generate the superoxide radical (O(2(-, and thereby potentially contribute to the oxidative stress following TBI. The current study thus addressed the potential role of NADPH oxidase in TBI. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The results revealed that NADPH oxidase activity in the cerebral cortex and hippocampal CA1 region increases rapidly following controlled cortical impact in male mice, with an early peak at 1 h, followed by a secondary peak from 24-96 h after TBI. In situ localization using oxidized hydroethidine and the neuronal marker, NeuN, revealed that the O(2(- induction occurred in neurons at 1 h after TBI. Pre- or post-treatment with the NADPH oxidase inhibitor, apocynin markedly inhibited microglial activation and oxidative stress damage. Apocynin also attenuated TBI-induction of the Alzheimer's disease proteins β-amyloid and amyloid precursor protein. Finally, both pre- and post-treatment of apocynin was also shown to induce significant neuroprotection against TBI. In addition, a NOX2-specific inhibitor, gp91ds-tat was also shown to exert neuroprotection against TBI. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: As a whole, the study demonstrates that NADPH oxidase activity and superoxide production exhibit a biphasic elevation in the hippocampus and cortex following TBI, which contributes significantly to the pathology of TBI via mediation of oxidative stress damage, microglial activation, and AD protein induction in the brain following TBI.

  8. Biallelic UFM1 and UFC1 mutations expand the essential role of ufmylation in brain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahorski, Michael S; Maddirevula, Sateesh; Ishimura, Ryosuke; Alsahli, Saud; Brady, Angela F; Begemann, Anaïs; Mizushima, Tsunehiro; Guzmán-Vega, Francisco J; Obata, Miki; Ichimura, Yoshinobu; Alsaif, Hessa S; Anazi, Shams; Ibrahim, Niema; Abdulwahab, Firdous; Hashem, Mais; Monies, Dorota; Abouelhoda, Mohamed; Meyer, Brian F; Alfadhel, Majid; Eyaid, Wafa; Zweier, Markus; Steindl, Katharina; Rauch, Anita; Arold, Stefan T; Woods, C Geoffrey; Komatsu, Masaaki; Alkuraya, Fowzan S

    2018-06-02

    The post-translational modification of proteins through the addition of UFM1, also known as ufmylation, plays a critical developmental role as revealed by studies in animal models. The recent finding that biallelic mutations in UBA5 (the E1-like enzyme for ufmylation) cause severe early-onset encephalopathy with progressive microcephaly implicates ufmylation in human brain development. More recently, a homozygous UFM1 variant was proposed as a candidate aetiology of severe early-onset encephalopathy with progressive microcephaly. Here, we establish a locus for severe early-onset encephalopathy with progressive microcephaly based on two families, and map the phenotype to a novel homozygous UFM1 mutation. This mutation has a significantly diminished capacity to form thioester intermediates with UBA5 and with UFC1 (the E2-like enzyme for ufmylation), with resulting impaired ufmylation of cellular proteins. Remarkably, in four additional families where eight children have severe early-onset encephalopathy with progressive microcephaly, we identified two biallelic UFC1 mutations, which impair UFM1-UFC1 intermediate formation with resulting widespread reduction of cellular ufmylation, a pattern similar to that observed with UFM1 mutation. The striking resemblance between UFM1- and UFC1-related clinical phenotype and biochemical derangements strongly argues for an essential role for ufmylation in human brain development. The hypomorphic nature of UFM1 and UFC1 mutations and the conspicuous depletion of biallelic null mutations in the components of this pathway in human genome databases suggest that it is necessary for embryonic survival, which is consistent with the embryonic lethal nature of knockout models for the orthologous genes.

  9. A Case of Successful Simultaneous Pancreas-Kidney Transplantation Using the Injured Pancreas Graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyagi, S; Shimizu, K; Miyazawa, K; Nakanishi, W; Hara, Y; Tokodai, K; Nakanishi, C; Satomi, S; Goto, M; Unno, M; Kamei, T

    2017-12-01

    Graft injuries sometimes occur and may cause complications such as the leakage of pancreatic secretions, which is often lethal. We report our experience of a case of successful simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation using injured pancreas graft. The recipient was a 57-year-old woman with type 1 diabetes mellitus, and the donor was a 30-year-old man with a brain injury. In the donation, the pancreas parenchyma, splenic artery, and gastroduodenal artery were injured iatrogenically. We therefore reconstructed these arteries using vessel grafts and then performed simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation. Five days after transplantation, we noted a high titer of amylase in the ascites; therefore, we performed an urgent laparotomy. The origin of the amylase was the injured pancreatic parenchyma, and continued washing and drainage were carried out. We reconstructed the duodenojejunostomy using the Roux-en-Y technique to separate the passage of food from the pancreas graft to prevent injury to other organs due to exposure to pancreatic secretions. Thereafter, we inserted a decompression tube into the anastomosis thorough the blind end of the jejunum. Finally, we inserted 3 drainage tubes for lavage. Following this procedure, the patient recovered gradually and no longer required hemodialysis and insulin therapy. She was discharged from our hospital 56 days after transplantation. The restoration of the injured graft was possible by management of pancreatic secretions and use of the donor's vessel grafts. Shortage of donors is a problem throughout the world; thus, it is important to use injured grafts for transplantation if possible. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Influence of Tryptophan and Serotonin on Mood and Cognition with a Possible Role of the Gut-Brain Axis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Trisha A.; Nguyen, Jason C. D.; Polglaze, Kate E.; Bertrand, Paul P.

    2016-01-01

    The serotonergic system forms a diffuse network within the central nervous system and plays a significant role in the regulation of mood and cognition. Manipulation of tryptophan levels, acutely or chronically, by depletion or supplementation, is an experimental procedure for modifying peripheral and central serotonin levels. These studies have allowed us to establish the role of serotonin in higher order brain function in both preclinical and clinical situations and have precipitated the finding that low brain serotonin levels are associated with poor memory and depressed mood. The gut-brain axis is a bi-directional system between the brain and gastrointestinal tract, linking emotional and cognitive centres of the brain with peripheral functioning of the digestive tract. An influence of gut microbiota on behaviour is becoming increasingly evident, as is the extension to tryptophan and serotonin, producing a possibility that alterations in the gut may be important in the pathophysiology of human central nervous system disorders. In this review we will discuss the effect of manipulating tryptophan on mood and cognition, and discuss a possible influence of the gut-brain axis. PMID:26805875

  11. The role of stereotactic radiation therapy and whole-brain radiotherapy in the treatment of multiple brain metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xiujun; Xiao Jianping; Li Xiangpan; Jiang Xuesong; Zhang Ye; Xu Yingjie; Dai Jianrong; Li Yexiong

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To summarize the results of stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT) with or without whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) in the treatment of multiple brain metastasis. Methods: From May 1995 to April 2010, totally 98 newly diagnosed multiple (2 - 13 lesions) brain metastases patients were treated in our centre. Forty-four patients were treated with SRT alone and 54 with SRT + WBRT. Dose fractionation schemes were 15 -26 Gy in 1 fraction or 24.0 -52.5 Gy in 2 - 15 fractions with 3.5 - 12.0 Gy per fraction, depending on the tumor volume, location, and history of prior irradiation. Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards regression analyses were used for survival analysis. The median age of the whole group was 55 years. The survival time was calculated from the date of radiation treatment to the day of death by any cause. Results: The median follow-up time for the whole group was 12 months, and the follow-up rate was 100%. The median overall survival time was 13.5 months for the whole group, there was no difference between SRT alone group and SRT + WBRT group (13.0 months vs. 13.5 months, χ 2 =0.31, P =0.578). The Karnofsky Performance Score (KPS) at the time of treatment (χ 2 =6.25, P =0.012), the interval between the diagnosis of the primary tumor and brain metastases (χ 2 =7.34, P =0.025) and the status of extracranial metastases (χ 2 =4.20, P =0.040) were independent prognosis factors for survival in multivariate analyses. Conclusions: Stereotactic radiation therapy is an effective and alternative treatment choice for multiple brain metastases. (authors)

  12. The potential of neural transplantation for brain repair and regeneration following traumatic brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Sun

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury is a major health problem worldwide. Currently, there is no effective treatment to improve neural structural repair and functional recovery of patients in the clinic. Cell transplantation is a potential strategy to repair and regenerate the injured brain. This review article summarized recent de-velopment in cell transplantation studies for post-traumatic brain injury brain repair with varying types of cell sources. It also discussed the potential of neural transplantation to repair/promote recovery of the injured brain following traumatic brain injury.

  13. Do general medical practitioners examine injured runners?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Solvej Videbæk; Jensen, A V; Rasmussen, Sten

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: General Medical Practitioners (GMP) in Denmark perform clinical examinations of patients with musculoskeletal pain. However, the prevalence proportion of examinations caused by running-related injuries remains unknown. PURPOSE: The primary purpose of the present study was to estimate...... the prevalence proportion of consultations in general medical practice caused by running-related injuries. The secondary purpose was to estimate the prevalence proportion of injured runners, who consult their GMP, that are referred to additional examinations or treatments. STUDY DESIGN: A survey-based study....... METHODS: An online survey was distributed in October and November 2015 to more than 370 GMPs in Denmark and completed by 27. RESULTS: The median prevalence proportion of consultations caused by running-related injuries in the prior two weeks was 0.80% [25th percentile = 0.00%; 75th percentile = 1...

  14. Recent Advances on the Role of Neurogenesis in the Adult Brain: Therapeutic Potential in Parkinson's and Alzheimer's Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radad, Khaled; Moldzio, Rudolf; Al-Shraim, Mubarak; Kranner, Barbara; Krewenka, Christopher; Rausch, Wolf-Dieter

    2017-01-01

    Generation of nascent functional neurons from neural stem cells in the adult brain has recently become largely accepted by the neuroscience community. In adult mammals including humans, the process of neurogenesis has been well documented in two brain regions; the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles and the subgranular zone in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. Some evidence has indicated neurogenesis in other regions of the adult mammalian brain such as the neocortex, cerebellum, striatum, amygdala and hypothalamus. These discoveries question a long standing dogma on nervous system regeneration and provide medical science with potential new strategies to harness the process of neurogenesis for treating neurological disabilities and neurodegenerative diseases. In this current review, we address the most recent advances on the role of neurogenesis in the adult brain and therapeutic potential in the two most common neurodegenerative disorders, Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  15. Evaluation of role of brain SPECT in diagnosis of post stroke dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yousepour, G.; Alavi, M.

    2003-01-01

    Post stroke dementia is one of the most common complications of stroke that is preventable and relatively treatable too. The purpose of the study is comparison between the positive findings in the brain CT scan and brain perfusion SPECT. 15 patients who were complicated by dementia after cerebrovascular accident and also 5 patients as a control group enrolled in this study. Brain CT scan and brain SPECT were performed during at most one week after stroke. Abnormal findings in both brain CT scan and SPECT were seen in 46% of patients. Brain CT scan disclosed more abnormal findings compared to brain SPECT (33.3%). While brain SPECT findings were more information than brain CT scan (20%) this study is indicating that brain CT scan and the brain SPECT concomitantly for each other in better diagnosis of post stroke dementia. We did not find any specific diagnostic pattern in brain SPECT of patients suffering from post stroke dementia. The low quality of brain SPECT in spite of uniformity of gamma camera may be suggestive of low quality of Iran produced ECD kit that needs further evaluation

  16. The role of glutamine transport in metabolism in the brain cortical tissue slice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hare, N.; Bubb, W.A.; Rae, C.; Broeer, S.

    2001-01-01

    The widely accepted 'glutamate/glutamine cycle' holds that glutamate released as a neurotransmitter in the brain is taken up by surrounding astrocytes, converted to neuro-inactive glutamine and transported back to neurons for reconversion to glutamate. Little, however, is known about the role of glutamine transport in this process. The situation is complicated by the fact that glutamine is transported by a variety of general amino-acid transporters of low specificity. The role of these transporters in flux of glutamine through the glutamate/glutamine cycle was investigated by 13 C NMR monitoring of the flux of C from [3- 13 C]L-lactate in guinea pig cortical tissue slices in the presence of competitive inhibitors of the A-type(α-(methylamino)isobutyrate; MeAIB) and N-type (histidine) transporters. The presence of each inhibitor (10 mM) produced no significant decrease in total metabolite pool size but resulted in a significant decrease in flux of [ 13 C] into the neurotransmitters glutamate and GABA and also into glutamine and alanine. The factional enrichment of glutamate and GABA was also significantly lower. By contrast there was no effect on the amount of [ 13 C] incorporated into aspartate isotopomers which may represent a predominantly astrocyte-labelled pool. These results are consistent with involvement of glutamine transporters in the recycling of synaptic glutamate by demonstrating partial blockage of incorporation of [ 13 C] label into neuronal metabolites

  17. Systems Information Therapy and the central role of the brain in allostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foletti, Alberto; Grimaldi, Settimio

    2011-12-01

    This work arose from the necessity to up date and clarify some basic concepts in contemporary medical practice such as those of health, disease, therapy and prevention. According to this perspective the work starts with a general epistemological review and goes on with an epistemological revision of biology and medicine. The concept of adaptation and the central role of the brain is then analysed and stated as the base to next consideration and deepening from a biophysical perspective. Physio-pathology of adaptation is assumed as a key concept in the definition and in the understanding of health and disease. A huge amount of endogenous and external stimuli has to be processed and response to them may lead to increase, stability or decrease of coherence in agreement with Frohlich's pioneering ideas. In this framework, the concept of stress, allostasis and allostatic load are outlined. Allostasis is defined as the capability of keeping stability through dynamic changes. A particular attention is paid to the emerging paradigms in biology and medicine especially those of system biology and system medicine trying to integrate the concept of complexity and hierarchical organization of the information flow in living organisms and in humans. In this framework biophysical signalling could play a significant role in modulating endogenous dynamics and in mediating external interactions. Additionally biophysical mechanisms could be involved in biological systems inner communication and could be responsible for the maintenance of systems inner coherence. The integration of the biophysical paradigm into contemporary medical practice is leading from one side to a better understanding of many pathways in physiopathology and from the other side to some new effective clinical applications. System Information Therapy is, for instance, is rising as a suitable and coherent tool in the application of thise concept being able to restore the self regulation and self regeneration

  18. Role of mTORC1 Controlling Proteostasis after Brain Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria J. Perez-Alvarez

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Intense efforts are being undertaken to understand the pathophysiological mechanisms triggered after brain ischemia and to develop effective pharmacological treatments. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are complex and not completely understood. One of the main problems is the fact that the ischemic damage is time-dependent and ranges from negligible to massive, involving different cell types such as neurons, astrocytes, microglia, endothelial cells, and some blood-derived cells (neutrophils, lymphocytes, etc.. Thus, approaching such a complicated cellular response generates a more complex combination of molecular mechanisms, in which cell death, cellular damage, stress and repair are intermixed. For this reason, animal and cellular model systems are needed in order to dissect and clarify which molecular mechanisms have to be promoted and/or blocked. Brain ischemia may be analyzed from two different perspectives: that of oxygen deprivation (hypoxic damage per se and that of deprivation of glucose/serum factors. For investigations of ischemic stroke, middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO is the preferred in vivo model, and uses two different approaches: transient (tMCAO, where reperfusion is permitted; or permanent (pMCAO. As a complement to this model, many laboratories expose different primary cortical neuron or neuronal cell lines to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD. This ex vivo model permits the analysis of the impact of hypoxic damage and the specific response of different cell types implicated in vivo, such as neurons, glia or endothelial cells. Using in vivo and neuronal OGD models, it was recently established that mTORC1 (mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex-1, a protein complex downstream of PI3K-Akt pathway, is one of the players deregulated after ischemia and OGD. In addition, neuroprotective intervention either by estradiol or by specific AT2R agonists shows an important regulatory role for the mTORC1 activity, for

  19. The role of shear stress in Blood-Brain Barrier endothelial physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puvenna Vikram

    2011-05-01

    the expression levels of tight junction proteins. In addition, regulatory enzymes of the Krebb's cycle (aerobic glucose metabolism were also upregulated. Furthermore, the expression pattern of key protein regulators of the cell cycle and parallel gene array data supported a cell proliferation inhibitory role for SS. Conclusions Genomic and proteomic analyses are currently used to examine BBB function in healthy and diseased brain and characterize this dynamic interface. In this study we showed that SS plays a key role in promoting the differentiation of vascular endothelial cells into a truly BBB phenotype. SS affected multiple aspect of the endothelial physiology spanning from tight junctions formation to cell division as well as the expression of multidrug resistance transporters. BBB dysfunction has been observed in many neurological diseases, but the causes are generally unknown. Our study provides essential insights to understand the role played by SS in the BBB formation and maintenance.

  20. Systems Information Therapy and the central role of the brain in allostasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foletti, Alberto; Grimaldi, Settimio

    2011-01-01

    This work arose from the necessity to up date and clarify some basic concepts in contemporary medical practice such as those of health, disease, therapy and prevention. According to this perspective the work starts with a general epistemological review and goes on with an epistemological revision of biology and medicine. The concept of adaptation and the central role of the brain is then analysed and stated as the base to next consideration and deepening from a biophysical perspective. Physio-pathology of adaptation is assumed as a key concept in the definition and in the understanding of health and disease. A huge amount of endogenous and external stimuli has to be processed and response to them may lead to increase, stability or decrease of coherence in agreement with Frohlich's pioneering ideas. In this framework, the concept of stress, allostasis and allostatic load are outlined. Allostasis is defined as the capability of keeping stability through dynamic changes. A particular attention is paid to the emerging paradigms in biology and medicine especially those of system biology and system medicine trying to integrate the concept of complexity and hierarchical organization of the information flow in living organisms and in humans. In this framework biophysical signalling could play a significant role in modulating endogenous dynamics and in mediating external interactions. Additionally biophysical mechanisms could be involved in biological systems inner communication and could be responsible for the maintenance of systems inner coherence. The integration of the biophysical paradigm into contemporary medical practice is leading from one side to a better understanding of many pathways in physiopathology and from the other side to some new effective clinical applications. System Information Therapy is, for instance, is rising as a suitable and coherent tool in the application of thise concept being able to restore the self regulation and self regeneration

  1. Postoperative Stereotactic Radiosurgery Without Whole-Brain Radiation Therapy for Brain Metastases: Potential Role of Preoperative Tumor Size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartford, Alan C.; Paravati, Anthony J.; Spire, William J.; Li, Zhongze; Jarvis, Lesley A.; Fadul, Camilo E.; Rhodes, C. Harker; Erkmen, Kadir; Friedman, Jonathan; Gladstone, David J.; Hug, Eugen B.; Roberts, David W.; Simmons, Nathan E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy following resection of a brain metastasis increases the probability of disease control at the surgical site. We analyzed our experience with postoperative stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) as an alternative to whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT), with an emphasis on identifying factors that might predict intracranial disease control and overall survival (OS). Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed all patients through December 2008, who, after surgical resection, underwent SRS to the tumor bed, deferring WBRT. Multiple factors were analyzed for time to intracranial recurrence (ICR), whether local recurrence (LR) at the surgical bed or “distant” recurrence (DR) in the brain, for time to WBRT, and for OS. Results: A total of 49 lesions in 47 patients were treated with postoperative SRS. With median follow-up of 9.3 months (range, 1.1-61.4 months), local control rates at the resection cavity were 85.5% at 1 year and 66.9% at 2 years. OS rates at 1 and 2 years were 52.5% and 31.7%, respectively. On univariate analysis (preoperative) tumors larger than 3.0 cm exhibited a significantly shorter time to LR. At a cutoff of 2.0 cm, larger tumors resulted in significantly shorter times not only for LR but also for DR, ICR, and salvage WBRT. While multivariate Cox regressions showed preoperative size to be significant for times to DR, ICR, and WBRT, in similar multivariate analysis for OS, only the graded prognostic assessment proved to be significant. However, the number of intracranial metastases at presentation was not significantly associated with OS nor with other outcome variables. Conclusions: Larger tumor size was associated with shorter time to recurrence and with shorter time to salvage WBRT; however, larger tumors were not associated with decrements in OS, suggesting successful salvage. SRS to the tumor bed without WBRT is an effective treatment for resected brain metastases, achieving local control particularly for tumors up to

  2. Reward mechanisms in the brain and their role in dependence : evidence from neurophysiological and neuroimaging studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin-Soelch, C; Leenders, KL; Chevalley, AF; Missimer, J; Kunig, G; Magyar, S; Mino, A; Schultz, W

    2001-01-01

    This article reviews neuronal activity related to reward processing in primate and human brains. In the primate brain, neurophysiological methods provide a differentiated view of reward processing in a limited number of brain structures. Dopamine neurons respond to unpredictable rewards and produce

  3. The Michelin Red Guide of the Brain: role of Dopamine in Goal-oriented Navigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aude eRetailleau

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Spatial learning has been recognized over the years to be under the control of the hippocampus and related temporal lobe structures. Hippocampal damage often causes severe impairments in the ability to learn and remember a location in space defined by distal visual cues. Such cognitive disabilities are found in Parkinsonian patients. We recently investigated the role of dopamine in navigation in the 6-OHDA rat, a model of Parkinson's disease (PD commonly used to investigate the pathophysiology of dopamine depletion (Retailleau et al., 2013. We demonstrated that DA is essential to spatial learning as its depletion results in spatial impairments. Our results showed that the behavioral effect of DA depletion is correlated with modification of the neural encoding of spatial features and decision making processes in hippocampus. However, the origin of these alterations in the neural processing of the spatial information needs to be clarified. It could result from a local effect: dopamine depletion disturbs directly the processing of relevant spatial information at hippocampal level. Alternatively, it could result from a more distributed network effect: dopamine depletion elsewhere in the brain (entorhinal cortex, striatum, etc… modifies the way hippocampus processes spatial information. Recent experimental evidence in rodents, demonstrated indeed, that other brain areas are involved in the acquisition of spatial information. Amongst these, the cortex - basal ganglia loop is known to be involved in reinforcement learning and has been identified as an important contributor to spatial learning. In particular, it has been shown that altered activity of the basal ganglia striatal complex can impair the ability to perform spatial learning tasks. The present review provides a glimpse of the findings obtained over the past decade that support a dialog between these two structures during spatial learning under DA control.

  4. Role of Sertraline in insomnia associated with post traumatic brain injury (TBI depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ansari Ahmed

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a major cause of disability (1, 2. Sleep disturbances, such as insomnia, are very common following traumatic brain injury and have been reported in frequencies from 40% (3 to as high as 84% (4. Sleep disruption can be related to the TBI itself but may also be secondary to neuropsychiatric (e.g., depression or neuromuscular (e.g., pain conditions associated with TBI or to the pharmacological management of the injury and its consequences. Post-TBI insomnia has been associated with numerous negative outcomes including daytime fatigue, tiredness, difficulty functioning: impaired performance at work, memory problems, mood problems, greater functional disability, reduced participation in activities of daily living, less social and recreational activity, less employment potential, increased caregiver burden, greater sexual dysfunction, and also lower ratings of health, poor subjective wellbeing. These negative consequences can hamper the person’s reintegration into the community, adjustment after injury, and overall QOL. (5 The connection between depression and insomnia has not been investigated within the post TBI population to a great extent. For the general population, clinically significant insomnia is often associated with the presence of an emotional disorder (6. Fichtenberg et al. (2002 (7, in his study established that the strongest relationship with the diagnosis of insomnia belonged to depression. Given the high prevalence of depression during the first 2 years following TBI (8, a link between depression and insomnia among TBI patients makes innate sense. The present study aims at assessing role of sertralline in post TBI insomnia associated with depression.

  5. Role of hormonal factor in development of primary and secondary tumorous process in the brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. I. Kit

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Causes of the development onset of primary malignant cerebral neoplasms have not yet been determined. Not excluded is a possibility of unfavorable effect of the environment, genetic abnormalities, changes alterations in the hormonal background as well as metabolism, ionizing radiation: possible is also the role of viral infections and injuries. One of the main most severest complications of malignant tumors remain are metastatic lesions of the central nervous system whose proportion increases as with the patients’ longlivity. Cerebral metastases of malignant tumors are encountered more often than primary neoplasms of the central nervous system. The brain is not only a hormone-dependent organ the effect of sex hormones as early the embryonic state conditions normal development of the body as a whole and controls the sex related differentiation. It is known that neurons and glyocites like gonads and adrenal glands are able to produce steroid hormones. The enzymes responsible for the synthesis of neurosteroids were detected in the brain tissue in the embryonic period of the development. The human brain is not only a hormone-dependent organ effect influence of sex hormones as early as in the embrional state conditiones normal development of the body as a whole and controls sexual gender differentiation. It is known that neurons and glyocytes like gonads and adrenal glands are able to produce steroid hormones. Enzymes responsible for synthesis of neurosteroids were revealed in cerebral tissue both in during the embryonic period of the development and in adult condition. Besides there are have been obtained large amount of data on the presence in the cerebral cells of receptors to steroidal hormones. In various periods of life the influence effect exerted by steroids on nervous cells can change the morphofunctional state of the brain and manifests as altering myelinization, neuronal growth, and differentiation of nerve cells

  6. Neuroenergetic Response to Prolonged Cerebral Glucose Depletion after Severe Brain Injury and the Role of Lactate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patet, Camille; Quintard, Hervé; Suys, Tamarah; Bloch, Jocelyne; Daniel, Roy T; Pellerin, Luc; Magistretti, Pierre J; Oddo, Mauro

    2015-10-15

    Lactate may represent a supplemental fuel for the brain. We examined cerebral lactate metabolism during prolonged brain glucose depletion (GD) in acute brain injury (ABI) patients monitored with cerebral microdialysis (CMD). Sixty episodes of GD (defined as spontaneous decreases of CMD glucose from normal to low [brain oxygen and blood lactate remained normal. Dynamics of lactate and glucose supply during GD were further studied by analyzing the relationships between blood and CMD samples. There was a strong correlation between blood and brain lactate when LPR was normal (r = 0.56; p 25. The correlation between blood and brain glucose also decreased from r = 0.62 to r = 0.45. These findings in ABI patients suggest increased cerebral lactate delivery in the absence of brain hypoxia when glucose availability is limited and support the concept that lactate acts as alternative fuel.

  7. Efflux of drugs and solutes from brain: the interactive roles of diffusional transcapillary transport, bulk flow and capillary transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groothuis, Dennis R; Vavra, Michael W; Schlageter, Kurt E; Kang, Eric W-Y; Itskovich, Andrea C; Hertzler, Shannon; Allen, Cathleen V; Lipton, Howard L

    2007-01-01

    We examined the roles of diffusion, convection and capillary transporters in solute removal from extracellular space (ECS) of the brain. Radiolabeled solutes (eight with passive distribution and four with capillary or cell transporters) were injected into the brains of rats (n=497) and multiple-time point experiments measured the amount remaining in brain as a function of time. For passively distributed compounds, there was a relationship between lipid:water solubility and total brain efflux:diffusional efflux, which dominated when k(p), the transcapillary efflux rate constant, was >10(0) h(-1); when 10(-1)transporters. The total efflux rate constant, k(eff), was the sum of a passive component (k(p)=0.0018 h(-1)), a convective component (k(csf)=0.2 h(-1)), and a variable, concentration-dependent component (k(x)=0 to 0.45 h(-1)). Compounds with cell membrane transporters had longer clearance half times as did an oligonucleotide, which interacted with cell surface receptors. Manipulation of physiologic state (n=35) did not affect efflux, but sucrose efflux half time was longer with pentobarbital anesthesia (24 h) than with no anesthesia or ketamine-xylazine anesthesia (2 to 3 h). These results show that solute clearance from normal brain ECS may involve multiple physiologic pathways, may be affected by anesthesia, and suggests that convection-mediated efflux may be manipulated to increase or decrease drug clearance from brain.

  8. Chemotherapy in the management of brain metastases: the emerging role of fotemustine for patients with melanoma and NSCLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addeo, Raffaele; Zappavigna, Silvia; Luce, Amalia; Facchini, Sergio; Caraglia, Michele

    2013-09-01

    An estimated 20 - 40% of cancer patients will develop brain metastases that are the most common intracranial tumors in adults. Patients with cerebral metastases represent a variegate group where selection of the most appropriate treatment depends on many patient- and disease-related factors. The impact of therapeutic option on overall survival is lacking and it is important to consider quality of life (QOL) when treating patients with brain metastases. A considerable proportion of patients are treated with palliative approaches such as whole-brain radiotherapy. The role of chemotherapy was limited in the past. Recently, several chemotherapeutic agents have been identified as potentially useful. This article examines the pharmacokinetics, efficacy and safety and tolerability of fotemustine (FTM) for the management of patients with cerebral metastasis from melanoma and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). FTM is a third-generation nitrosourea that has proved its efficacy on brain metastases of melanoma and showed promising results for the treatment of brain metastasis of NSCLC because of its ability to pass the blood-brain barrier.

  9. Divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) in the brain: implications for a role in iron transport at the blood-brain barrier, and neuronal and glial pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skjørringe, Tina; Burkhart, Annette; Johnsen, Kasper Bendix; Moos, Torben

    2015-01-01

    Iron is required in a variety of essential processes in the body. In this review, we focus on iron transport in the brain and the role of the divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) vital for iron uptake in most cells. DMT1 locates to cellular membranes and endosomal membranes, where it is a key player in non-transferrin bound iron uptake and transferrin-bound iron uptake, respectively. Four isoforms of DMT1 exist, and their respective characteristics involve a complex cell-specific regulatory machinery all controlling iron transport across these membranes. This complexity reflects the fine balance required in iron homeostasis, as this metal is indispensable in many cell functions but highly toxic when appearing in excess. DMT1 expression in the brain is prominent in neurons. Of serious dispute is the expression of DMT1 in non-neuronal cells. Recent studies imply that DMT1 does exist in endosomes of brain capillary endothelial cells denoting the blood-brain barrier. This supports existing evidence that iron uptake at the BBB occurs by means of transferrin-receptor mediated endocytosis followed by detachment of iron from transferrin inside the acidic compartment of the endosome and DMT1-mediated pumping iron into the cytosol. The subsequent iron transport across the abluminal membrane into the brain likely occurs by ferroportin. The virtual absent expression of transferrin receptors and DMT1 in glial cells, i.e., astrocytes, microglia and oligodendrocytes, suggest that the steady state uptake of iron in glia is much lower than in neurons and/or other mechanisms for iron uptake in these cell types prevail.

  10. Aluminium and Gamma Irradiation Induced Oxidative Damage in Brain Tissue of Male Rats - Protective Role of Ferulic Acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansour, S.Z.; Hanafi, N.; Noaman, E.

    2011-01-01

    The current study was carried out to investigate the potential role of ferulic acid (FA) against Aluminium chloride (AlCl 3 ), γ- radiation either alone or combination induced oxidative stress in brain tissue of Wistar rats. The period of the experiment was eight weeks. Animals were administrated by aluminium chloride at a dose of 8.5 mg/kg/day and exposed to a single dose (4 Gy) of γ-radiation. FA was administered orally (50 mg/Kg body weight)/day. Histopathological observations and myeloid protein distribution were recorded in brain tissue. Induction of oxidative stress was recorded after all exposures. Brain tissue of AlCl 3 and γ- irradiation treatments either alone or combined revealed many altered changes and myeloid protein distribution. Also a decrease in serotonin concentration was recorded. An increase in Malonaldialdahyde (MDA) and acetylcholinesterase activity and percentage of saturated fatty acids in plasma and brain tissue was recorded. Reduced glutathione (GSH), catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD) in blood and brain showed a significant decrease. Treatment of AlCl 3 loaded animals by FA showed simple atrophy as shrunken morphology saw in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and a decrease in myeloid protein deposition. FA treatment of AlCl 3 loaded or irradiated animals represented a significant increase in serotonin concentration and ameliorated affects on oxidative stress markers, acetylcholinesterase activity and percentage of saturated fatty acids in plasma and brain tissue. In conclusion FA has a role in reducing the oxidative stress of AlCl 3 and γ- irradiation on brain tissue of rats

  11. Health status recovery at one year in children injured in a road accident: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batailler, Pierre; Hours, Martine; Maza, Maud; Charnay, Pierrette; Tardy, Hélène; Tournier, Charlène; Javouhey, Etienne

    2014-10-01

    Despite the frequency of traumatic injuries due to road accidents and potential importance of identifying children at risk of impaired recovery one year after a road accident, there is a lack of data on long-term recovery of health status, except in children with severe traumatic brain injury. The aim of the present study was to evaluate predictive factors of recovery in children one year after road traffic injuries. The prospective cohort study was composed of children aged road accident. Recovery of health status one year after the accident and information concerning quality of life and the consequences of the accident for the child or family 1 year after the accident were collected by questionnaire, usually completed by the parents. Victims were in majority male (64.6%) and had mild or moderate injuries (81.9% with Maximum Abbreviated Injury Scale (M-AIS) accident, 75.0% of the mild-to-moderate and 34.8% of the severe cases estimated health status as fully recovered. After adjustment, severity score (M-AIS≥3) and lower limb injury (AIS>1) were associated with incomplete recovery of health status: weighted odds ratio (ORw), 4.3 [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.3-14.6] and ORw, 6.5 [95% CI, 1.9-21.7], respectively. Recovery status correlated significantly with quality of life physical scores (r=0.46), especially body pain (r=0.48) and role/social-physical (r=0.50) and, to a lesser extent, quality of life psychosocial scores (r=0.21). In a cohort of children injured in a road accident, those with high injury severity score and those with lower limb injuries are less likely to recover full health status by 1 year. Impaired health status was associated with a lower physical quality of life score at 1 year. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Role of Nitric Oxide in Radioinduced Effects in Developing Brain Cortex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robello, E

    2001-01-01

    different from controls neither.Although these results suggest it might be possible that NOS mRNAs do not vary after irradiation, more experiments ought to be made in order to find conclusive data. All in all, in spite of NO may increase the number of frees radicals and ROS determining a very important cellular injury trough oxidative stress in several systems, NO may play a completely different role in developing neurones.It could be mainly by mediating neuroprotective effects trough avoiding lipid peroxidation in vivo, due to that it cannot be detected any alteration neither in ascorbyl radical/ascorbic acid ratio nor in lipid radicals content in developing rat brain.Moreover, it has been shown that apoptosis rate goes down in cultures which have been exposed to ionising radiation in the presence of NO donors. And, finally, it can be concluded that the increase in NO concentration may be determined by an enhancement in NOS activity, trough a post-transcriptional or post-translational modification or by NO releasing from an intracellular or extracellular compartment

  13. Cystatin C Has a Dual Role in Post-Traumatic Brain Injury Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Martinez-Vargas

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Cathepsin B is one of the major lysosomal cysteine proteases involved in neuronal protein catabolism. This cathepsin is released after traumatic injury and increases neuronal death; however, release of cystatin C, a cathepsin inhibitor, appears to be a self-protective brain response. Here we describe the effect of cystatin C intracerebroventricular administration in rats prior to inducing a traumatic brain injury. We observed that cystatin C injection caused a dual response in post-traumatic brain injury recovery: higher doses (350 fmoles increased bleeding and mortality, whereas lower doses (3.5 to 35 fmoles decreased bleeding, neuronal damage and mortality. We also analyzed the expression of cathepsin B and cystatin C in the brains of control rats and of rats after a traumatic brain injury. Cathepsin B was detected in the brain stem, cerebellum, hippocampus and cerebral cortex of control rats. Cystatin C was localized to the choroid plexus, brain stem and cerebellum of control rats. Twenty-four hours after traumatic brain injury, we observed changes in both the expression and localization of both proteins in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and brain stem. An early increase and intralysosomal expression of cystatin C after brain injury was associated with reduced neuronal damage.

  14. Regulation of brain tumor dispersal by NKCC1 through a novel role in focal adhesion regulation.

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    Tomas Garzon-Muvdi

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma (GB is a highly invasive and lethal brain tumor due to its universal recurrence. Although it has been suggested that the electroneutral Na(+-K(+-Cl(- cotransporter 1 (NKCC1 can play a role in glioma cell migration, the precise mechanism by which this ion transporter contributes to GB aggressiveness remains poorly understood. Here, we focused on the role of NKCC1 in the invasion of human primary glioma cells in vitro and in vivo. NKCC1 expression levels were significantly higher in GB and anaplastic astrocytoma tissues than in grade II glioma and normal cortex. Pharmacological inhibition and shRNA-mediated knockdown of NKCC1 expression led to decreased cell migration and invasion in vitro and in vivo. Surprisingly, knockdown of NKCC1 in glioma cells resulted in the formation of significantly larger focal adhesions and cell traction forces that were approximately 40% lower than control cells. Epidermal growth factor (EGF, which promotes migration of glioma cells, increased the phosphorylation of NKCC1 through a PI3K-dependant mechanism. This finding is potentially related to WNK kinases. Taken together, our findings suggest that NKCC1 modulates migration of glioma cells by two distinct mechanisms: (1 through the regulation of focal adhesion dynamics and cell contractility and (2 through regulation of cell volume through ion transport. Due to the ubiquitous expression of NKCC1 in mammalian tissues, its regulation by WNK kinases may serve as new therapeutic targets for GB aggressiveness and can be exploited by other highly invasive neoplasms.

  15. The emerging role of m-TOR up-regulation in brain Astrocytoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryskalin, Larisa; Limanaqi, Fiona; Biagioni, Francesca; Frati, Alessandro; Esposito, Vincenzo; Calierno, Maria Teresa; Lenzi, Paola; Fornai, Francesco

    2017-05-01

    The present manuscript is an overview of various effects of mTOR up-regulation in astrocytoma with an emphasis on its deleterious effects on the proliferation of Glioblastoma Multiforme. The manuscript reports consistent evidence indicating the occurrence of mTOR up-regulation both in experimental and human astrocytoma. The grading of human astrocytoma is discussed in relationship with mTOR up-regulation. In the second part of the manuscript, the biochemical pathways under the influence of mTOR are translated to cell phenotypes which are generated by mTOR up-regulation and reverted by its inhibition. A special section is dedicated to the prominent role of autophagy in mediating the effects of mTOR in glioblastoma. In detail, autophagy inhibition produced by mTOR up-regulation determines the fate of cancer stem cells. On the other hand, biochemical findings disclose the remarkable effects of autophagy activators as powerful inducers of cell differentiation with a strong prevalence towards neuronal phenotypes. Thus, mTOR modulation acts on the neurobiology of glioblastoma just like it operates in vivo at the level of brain stem cell niches by altering autophagy-dependent cell differentiation. In the light of such a critical role of autophagy we analyzed the ubiquitin proteasome system. The merging between autophagy and proteasome generates a novel organelle, named autophagoproteasome which is strongly induced by mTOR inhibitors in glioblastoma cells. Remarkably, when mTOR is maximally inhibited the proteasome component selectively moves within autophagy vacuoles, thus making the proteasome activity dependent on the entry within autophagy compartment.

  16. Role of Stress-Related Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) in the Rat Submandibular Gland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukinoki, Keiichi; Saruta, Juri

    2012-01-01

    The nerve growth factor (NGF) family comprises NGF, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophins (NTs)-3, -4/5, -6 and -7, all of which are collectively referred to as neurotrophins. However, the expression of neurotrophins other than NGF in the salivary gland has not been described in detail. Through interaction with the TrkB receptor, BDNF plays an important role in long-term potentiation. We found that BDNF expression increased within submandibular gland tissue in response to stress, suggesting that the salivary glands are sensitive to stress. In addition, stress caused increases in plasma BDNF derived from the submandibular gland and in TrkB receptor mRNA in the adrenal medulla. Plasma BDNF might activate TrkB receptors in the adrenal medulla during acute stress. The salivary glands are likely to influence not only oral health, but also systemic organs. This review addressed the relationship between hormone-like effects and stress-related BDNF expression in the rat submandibular gland

  17. Exploring the role of brain oscillations in speech perception in noise: Intelligibility of isochronously retimed speech

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Aubanel

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A growing body of evidence shows that brain oscillations track speech. This mechanism is thought to maximise processing efficiency by allocating resources to important speech information, effectively parsing speech into units of appropriate granularity for further decoding. However, some aspects of this mechanism remain unclear. First, while periodicity is an intrinsic property of this physiological mechanism, speech is only quasi-periodic, so it is not clear whether periodicity would present an advantage in processing. Second, it is still a matter of debate which aspect of speech triggers or maintains cortical entrainment, from bottom-up cues such as fluctuations of the amplitude envelope of speech to higher level linguistic cues such as syntactic structure. We present data from a behavioural experiment assessing the effect of isochronous retiming of speech on speech perception in noise. Two types of anchor points were defined for retiming speech, namely syllable onsets and amplitude envelope peaks. For each anchor point type, retiming was implemented at two hierarchical levels, a slow time scale around 2.5 Hz and a fast time scale around 4 Hz. Results show that while any temporal distortion resulted in reduced speech intelligibility, isochronous speech anchored to P-centers (approximated by stressed syllable vowel onsets was significantly more intelligible than a matched anisochronous retiming, suggesting a facilitative role of periodicity defined on linguistically motivated units in processing speech in noise.

  18. On the role of cost-sensitive learning in multi-class brain-computer interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devlaminck, Dieter; Waegeman, Willem; Wyns, Bart; Otte, Georges; Santens, Patrick

    2010-06-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) present an alternative way of communication for people with severe disabilities. One of the shortcomings in current BCI systems, recently put forward in the fourth BCI competition, is the asynchronous detection of motor imagery versus resting state. We investigated this extension to the three-class case, in which the resting state is considered virtually lying between two motor classes, resulting in a large penalty when one motor task is misclassified into the other motor class. We particularly focus on the behavior of different machine-learning techniques and on the role of multi-class cost-sensitive learning in such a context. To this end, four different kernel methods are empirically compared, namely pairwise multi-class support vector machines (SVMs), two cost-sensitive multi-class SVMs and kernel-based ordinal regression. The experimental results illustrate that ordinal regression performs better than the other three approaches when a cost-sensitive performance measure such as the mean-squared error is considered. By contrast, multi-class cost-sensitive learning enables us to control the number of large errors made between two motor tasks.

  19. Aluminum access to the brain: A role for transferrin and its receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roskams, A.J.; Connor, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    The toxicity of aluminum in plant and animal cell biology is well established, although poorly understood. Several recent studies have identified aluminum as a potential, although highly controversial, contributory factor in the pathology of Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and dialysis dementia. For example, aluminum has been found in high concentrations in senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, which occur in the brains of subjects with Alzheimer's disease. However, a mechanism for the entry of aluminum (Al 3+ ) into the cells of the central nervous system (CNS) has yet to be found. Here the authors describe a possible route of entry for aluminum into the cells of the CNS via the same high-affinity receptor-ligand system that has been postulated for iron (Fe 3 ) aluminum is able to gain access to the central nervous system under normal physiological conditions. Furthermore, these data suggest that the interaction between transferrin and its receptor may function as a general metal ion regulatory system in the CNS, extending beyond its postulated role in iron regulation

  20. Physiological and Pathological Roles of CaMKII-PP1 Signaling in the Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norifumi Shioda

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII, a multifunctional serine (Ser/threonine (Thr protein kinase, regulates diverse activities related to Ca2+-mediated neuronal plasticity in the brain, including synaptic activity and gene expression. Among its regulators, protein phosphatase-1 (PP1, a Ser/Thr phosphatase, appears to be critical in controlling CaMKII-dependent neuronal signaling. In postsynaptic densities (PSDs, CaMKII is required for hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP, a cellular process correlated with learning and memory. In response to Ca2+ elevation during hippocampal LTP induction, CaMKIIα, an isoform that translocates from the cytosol to PSDs, is activated through autophosphorylation at Thr286, generating autonomous kinase activity and a prolonged Ca2+/CaM-bound state. Moreover, PP1 inhibition enhances Thr286 autophosphorylation of CaMKIIα during LTP induction. By contrast, CaMKII nuclear import is regulated by Ser332 phosphorylation state. CaMKIIδ3, a nuclear isoform, is dephosphorylated at Ser332 by PP1, promoting its nuclear translocation, where it regulates transcription. In this review, we summarize physio-pathological roles of CaMKII/PP1 signaling in neurons. CaMKII and PP1 crosstalk and regulation of gene expression is important for neuronal plasticity as well as survival and/or differentiation.

  1. Brain rust: recent discoveries on the role of oxidative stress in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Diêgo Madureira; Ferreira Lima, Rute Maria; El-Bachá, Ramon Santos

    2012-05-01

    Oxidative stress (OS) and damages due to excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) are common causes of injuries to cells and organisms. The prevalence of neurodegenerative diseases (ND) increases with aging and much of the research involving ROS and OS has emerged from works in this field. This text reviews some recent published articles about the role of OS in ND. Since there are many reviews in this field, the focus was centered in articles published recently. The Scientific Journals Directory supported by the Brazilian Ministry of Education Office for the Coordination of Higher Educational Personnel Improvement (CAPES) was used to search, download, and review articles. The search engine looked for the terms 'oxidative stress AND neurodegenerative diseases AND nutrition' in 10 different scientific collections. Biochemical markers for ND lack sensitivity or specificity for diagnosis or for tracking response to therapy today. OS has an intimate connection with ND, albeit low levels of ROS seem to protect the brain. Deleterious changes in mitochondria, OS, calcium, glucocorticoids, inflammation, trace metals, insulin, cell cycle, protein aggregation, and hundreds to thousands of genes occur in ND. The interaction of genes with their environment, may explain ND. Although OS has received much attention over the years, which increased the number of scientific works on antioxidant interventions, no one knows how to stop or delay ND at present. Interventions in vitro, in vivo, and in humans will continue to contribute for a better understanding of these pathologies.

  2. Childhood acute disseminated encephalomyelitis: the role of brain and spinal cord MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khong, Pek-Lan; Cheng, Pui-Wai; Chan, Fu-Luk; Ho, Hok-Kung; Wong, Virginia C.N.; Goh, Winnie

    2002-01-01

    Background. It is recognised that the clinical and radiological spectrum of childhood acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) is wide. Objective. To determine whether initial MRI features are predictive of clinical outcome and to determine the role of MRI in the management of ADEM. Materials and methods. The MRI scans of ten consecutive children (eight boys, two girls), clinically and radiologically diagnosed to have ADEM, were retrospectively reviewed. Follow-up MRI was available for eight patients. Results. Lesions ranged from small and punctate (<1 cm) to moderate sized and confluent (4-5 cm) to diffuse and extensive. Spinal cord lesions, seen in five of seven children, were contiguous or segmental. Seven children (70%) made good clinical recovery while three children (30%) remained severely handicapped. There was no correlation between the site, extent and pattern of involvement and clinical outcome. However, the evolution of MRI findings on follow-up correlated well with the subsequent clinical course and outcome. Conclusions. Although the extent and site of lesions on initial MRI scans are not predictive of clinical outcome, early MRI of the brain and spine is useful in aiding clinical diagnosis, and subsequent follow-up MRI is helpful in monitoring disease progression. (orig.)

  3. The role of thyroid hormones in regulating of fatty acid spectrum of brain lipids: ontogenetic aspect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodynskiy A.G.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In experiments on rats of three age groups the role of thyroid hormones in the regulation of fatty acid spectrum of cortical and hippocampus lipids was studied. It was found that on the background of decreased thyroid status content of polyunsaturated fractions of free fatty acids, significantly changed depending on the age of the animals. In particular, in juvenile rats hypothyroidism was accompanied by a decrease almost twice the number of pentacodan acid decreased lipids viscosity in neurocortex. In old rats reduce of pentacodan acid in the cortex (38% was supplemented by significant (77% decrease in linoleic and linolenic acids. Unlike the two age groups deficiency of thyroid hormones in young animals caused accumulation of free polyunsatarated fatty acids (C18: 2.3 in the cerebral cortex by 74%, which may be associated with a decrease of this fraction in fatty acid spectrum of lipids and increase of viscosity properties of the membranes. These restruc­turing may be associated with modulation of synaptic transmission of specific neurotransmitter systems in the brain.

  4. Potential roles of cell-derived microparticles in ischemic brain disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horstman, Lawrence L; Jy, Wenche; Bidot, Carlos J; Nordberg, Mary L; Minagar, Alireza; Alexander, J Steven; Kelley, Roger E; Ahn, Yeon S

    2009-10-01

    The objective of this study is to review the role of cell-derived microparticles in ischemic cerebrovascular diseases. An extensive PubMed search of literature pertaining to this study was performed in April 2009 using specific keyword search terms related to cell-derived microparticles and ischemic stroke. Some references are not cited here as it is not possible to be all inclusive or due to space limitation. Cell-derived microparticles are small membranous vesicles released from the plasma membranes of platelets, leukocytes, red cells and endothelial cells in response to diverse biochemical agents or mechanical stresses. They are the main carriers of circulating tissue factor, the principal initiator of intravascular thrombosis, and are implicated in a variety of thrombotic and inflammatory disorders. This review outlines evidence suggesting that cell-derived microparticles are involved predominantly with microvascular, as opposed to macrovascular, thrombosis. More specifically, cell-derived microparticles may substantially contribute to ischemic brain disease in several settings, as well as to neuroinflammatory conditions. If further work confirms this hypothesis, novel therapeutic strategies for minimizing cell-derived microparticles-mediated ischemia are available or can be developed, as discussed.

  5. GHSR deficiency suppresses neointimal formation in injured mouse arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jing; Zhang, Man; Wang, Mo; Wang, Zhipeng; Liu, Yahan; Zhang, Weizhen; Wang, Nanping

    2016-01-01

    Growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR) is involved in appetite regulation and energy homeostasis. In the present study, we examined the role of GHSR in neointimal formation following vascular injury. In the mouse model of femoral artery wire injury, we found that vessel intima-to-media ratio was significantly reduced in GHSR deficiency (GHSR −/− ) mice compared with that in wild-type mice. Immunohistochemical staining showed that the smooth muscle cell (SMCs) in the neointima were significantly decreased in the injured arteries of GHSR −/− mice which was associated with decreased SMC proliferation and migration. Furthermore, immunoblotting demonstrated that, in cultured rat aortic SMCs, small interfering RNA-mediated GHSR knockdown suppressed the activation of Akt and ERK1/2 signaling pathway. These findings suggested a novel role of GHSR in neointimal formation likely via promoting the proliferation and migration of SMCs involving Akt and ERK1/2 signaling. Therefore, GHSR may be a potential therapeutic target in restenosis and vascular remodeling. - Highlights: • GHSR deficiency inhibits neointimal formation after vascular injury. • GHSR deficiency suppresses SMCs numbers in vivo. • Knockdown GHSR represses SMCs proliferation and migration in vitro. • Knockdown GHSR inhibited Akt and ERK1/2 phosphorylation in SMCs.

  6. Oxygen - a limiting factor for brain recovery

    OpenAIRE

    Hadanny, Amir; Efrati, Shai

    2015-01-01

    Effective brain metabolism is highly dependent on a narrow therapeutic window of oxygen. In major insults to the brain (e.g., intracerebral hemorrhage), a slight decrease in oxygen supply, as occurs in a hypobaric environment at high altitude, has devastating effects on the injured brain tissue. Conversely, increasing brain oxygenation, by the use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy, can improve brain metabolism and its dependent regenerative processes.

  7. The role of positron emission tomography in neuropharmacology in the living human brain and drug development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanai, Kazuhiko

    1999-01-01

    Neuroimaging is a powerful and innovative tool for studying the pathology of psychiatric and neurological diseases and, more recently, for studying the drugs used in their treatment. Technological advances in imaging have made it possible to noninvasively extract information from the human brain regarding a drug's mechanism and site of action. Until now, our understanding of human brain pharmacology has depended primarily on indirect assessments or models derived from animal studies. However, the advent of multiple techniques for human brain imaging allows researchers to focus directly on human pharmacology and brain function. In this review article, our PET studies on the histaminergic neuron system were presented as an example. We have developed and used the PET techniques for 10 years in order to examine the H 1 receptors in the living human brain. This review outlines available PET techniques and examine how these various methods have already been applied to the drug development process and neuropharmacology in the living human brain. (author)

  8. Evolutionarily Conserved Roles for Blood-Brain Barrier Xenobiotic Transporters in Endogenous Steroid Partitioning and Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha J. Hindle

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Central nervous system (CNS chemical protection depends upon discrete control of small-molecule access by the blood-brain barrier (BBB. Curiously, some drugs cause CNS side-effects despite negligible transit past the BBB. To investigate this phenomenon, we asked whether the highly BBB-enriched drug efflux transporter MDR1 has dual functions in controlling drug and endogenous molecule CNS homeostasis. If this is true, then brain-impermeable drugs could induce behavioral changes by affecting brain levels of endogenous molecules. Using computational, genetic, and pharmacologic approaches across diverse organisms, we demonstrate that BBB-localized efflux transporters are critical for regulating brain levels of endogenous steroids and steroid-regulated behaviors (sleep in Drosophila and anxiety in mice. Furthermore, we show that MDR1-interacting drugs are associated with anxiety-related behaviors in humans. We propose a general mechanism for common behavioral side effects of prescription drugs: pharmacologically challenging BBB efflux transporters disrupts brain levels of endogenous substrates and implicates the BBB in behavioral regulation. : Hindle et al. shed light on the curious finding that some drugs cause behavioral side-effects despite negligible access into the brain. These authors propose a unifying hypothesis that links blood-brain barrier drug transporter function and brain access of circulating steroids to common CNS adverse drug responses. Keywords: drug side effect mechanisms, central nervous system, blood brain barrier, behavior, toxicology, drug transporters, endobiotics, steroid hormones

  9. The nature and impact of stigma towards injured workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsh, Bonnie; Slack, Tesha; King, Carole Anne

    2012-06-01

    Many injured workers experience high levels of stigma and discrimination, which compound their physical injuries and cause social and psychological harm. Despite a growing awareness of the prevalence of such stigma, there is little research that focuses on the sources, nature and consequences of stigma with respect to the lives of injured workers. The purpose of this paper is to advance knowledge related to stigma towards injured workers, specifically to explain the nature and processes of stigma and their influence on injured workers' lives. Using a constructivist grounded theory approach, data from focus groups (n = 28 participants) and individual interviews (n = 18) were analyzed to discern how stigma is exhibited and perpetuated, and its impact on the lives of injured workers. The study culminated in a preliminary theoretical framework that delineates the key components of the manifestations and impacts of stigma that includes stereotypes, unethical practices and maltreatment negatively affecting work, relationships and the mental health of injured workers. The development of sound conceptualizations in this area can advance our understanding of stigma processes and provide a framework for anti-stigma efforts. The findings have implications for public education, workplace interventions and services for injured workers.

  10. Evaluation of socioeconomic factors in injured children at Mousavi and Valiasr hospitals of Zanjan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Hasaniha

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Injury is one of the causes of morbidity and mortality that deprives the injured individuals of a normal life but also imposes high emotional and financial costs for the patients and their family. This study was done in order to determine the socioeconomic factors in injured children at Mousavi and Valiasr hospitals of Zanjan.Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study 650 injured children under 15 who referred to Mousavi and Valiasr hospitals of zanjan were randomly selected. Using a questionnaire, information on demographic and socioeconomic factors including sex, age, and type of injury, parents' age, occupation and salary were gathered. Data was analyzed using measure of central tendency, frequency tables and Chi-Square Test.Results: From 650 injured children, %61.5 were boys and %38.5 were girls. The mean (SD age of these children was 7.8 (4.3. Three hundred eighty five of the children (%59.2 were urban and 265 (%40.8 were rural. Most of injured children had a father who was worker or a mother who was housewife. The level of education of parents was low in most cases. Furthermore, the frequency of injuries in children had a significant association with family income and socioeconomic factors.Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that carrying out prevention programs for students and parents, especially families of low socioeconomic status has a major role in reducing injury risk factors from the children's living environment.  

  11. Role of Fish Oil against Physiological Disturbances in Rats Brain Induced by Sodium Fluoride and/or Gamma Rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Said, U.Z.; El-Tahawy, N.A.; Ibrahim, F.R.; Kamal, G.M.; EL-Sayed, T.M.

    2015-01-01

    The impacts of environmental and occupational exposure to ionizing radiation and to long-term intake of high levels of fluoride have caused health problems and increasingly alarming in recent years. Fish oil omega-3 (polyunsaturated fatty acids essential fatty acids) is found in the highest concentrations in fish oil, claim a plethora of health benefits. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the role of fish oil rich in omega-3 fatty acids on sodium fluoride (NaF) and or gamma (γ) rays in inducing neurological and biochemical disturbances in rat’s brain cerebral hemispheres. The results revealed that whole body exposure to γ- radiation at 6 Gy applied as fractionated doses (1.5 Gy x 4 times) and/or chronic receipt of NaF solution (0.13 mg/Kg/day) for a period of 28 days, significantly increased brain fluoride and calcium content, decreased level of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and induced brain oxidative stress which led to neurotransmitters dysfunction. Supplementation of treated rats with fish oil, via gavages, at a dose of 400 mg/kg body wt has significantly modulated oxidative stress and neurotransmitters alterations. It could be concluded that EPA and DHA, found in fish oil, could possibly protect brain from damaging free radicals and consequently minimize the severity of brain biochemical disturbances

  12. Towards understanding the role of insulin in the brain: lessons from insulin-related signaling systems in the vertebrate brain.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, A.B.; van Kesteren, R.E.; Li, K.W.; van Minnen, J.; Spijker, S.; van Heerikhuizen, H.; Geraerts, W.P.M.

    1998-01-01

    Insulin is a molecule that has played a key role in several of the most important landmarks in medical and biological research. It is one of the most extensively studied protein hormones, and its structure and function have been elucidated in many vertebrate species, ranging from man to hagfish and

  13. Towards understanding the role of insulin in the brain: lessons from insulin-related signaling systems in the invertebrate brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, A.B.; van Kesteren, R.E.; Li, K.W.; van Heerikhuizen, H.; van Minnen, J.; Spijker, S.; Geraerts, W.P.M.

    1998-01-01

    Insulin is a molecule that has played a key role in several of the most important landmarks in medical and biological research. It is one of the most extensively studied protein hormones, and its structure and function have been elucidated in many vertebrate species, ranging from man to hagfish and

  14. Socialization of prosocial behavior: Gender differences in the mediating role of child brain volume

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Kok (Renske); P.J. Prinzie (Peter); M.J. Bakermans-Kranenburg (Marian); F.C. Verhulst (Frank); T.J.H. White (Tonya); H.W. Tiemeier (Henning); M.H. van IJzendoorn (Rien)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractEvidence has been accumulating for the impact of normal variation in caregiving quality on brain morphology in children, but the question remains whether differences in brain volume related to early caregiving translate to behavioral implications. In this longitudinal population-based

  15. The glia doctrine: addressing the role of glial cells in healthy brain ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagelhus, Erlend A; Amiry-Moghaddam, Mahmood; Bergersen, Linda H; Bjaalie, Jan G; Eriksson, Jens; Gundersen, Vidar; Leergaard, Trygve B; Morth, J Preben; Storm-Mathisen, Jon; Torp, Reidun; Walhovd, Kristine B; Tønjum, Tone

    2013-10-01

    Glial cells in their plurality pervade the human brain and impact on brain structure and function. A principal component of the emerging glial doctrine is the hypothesis that astrocytes, the most abundant type of glial cells, trigger major molecular processes leading to brain ageing. Astrocyte biology has been examined using molecular, biochemical and structural methods, as well as 3D brain imaging in live animals and humans. Exosomes are extracelluar membrane vesicles that facilitate communication between glia, and have significant potential for biomarker discovery and drug delivery. Polymorphisms in DNA repair genes may indirectly influence the structure and function of membrane proteins expressed in glial cells and predispose specific cell subgroups to degeneration. Physical exercise may reduce or retard age-related brain deterioration by a mechanism involving neuro-glial processes. It is most likely that additional information about the distribution, structure and function of glial cells will yield novel insight into human brain ageing. Systematic studies of glia and their functions are expected to eventually lead to earlier detection of ageing-related brain dysfunction and to interventions that could delay, reduce or prevent brain dysfunction. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Radiography of the acutely injured shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neep, M.J.; Aziz, A.

    2011-01-01

    Routine radiological examination of the acute shoulder has been unchanged in radiology departments for many years. At UCLH (University College London Hospitals, UK) this examination consists of two projections, an AP (antero-posterior) and an LS (lateral scapula). Following a review of the related literature and the possible advantages of an axial style projection, a study was performed to evaluate whether a new projection named modified trauma axial (MTA) shoulder projection could replace the existing LS projection in the routine examination of the acute shoulder. A retrospective analysis of 244 acute shoulder examinations over a 5-month period was performed. AP, LS and MTA projections were taken with paired AP and LS, and AP and MTA radiographs were reported separately. 97 traumatic abnormalities were reported using AP and MTA whilst only 64 abnormalities were reported using AP and LS views. The MTA projection demonstrated it was significant for evaluating articular surfaces of the humeral head and glenoid, defects in the humeral head, greater tuberosity fractures, glenoid fractures and fractures of the acromion. It was established that if the LS projection was replaced with the MTA view no traumatic pathologies would have been overlooked and in fact there was a 52% increase in traumatic abnormalities detected. Use of a chi-squared test demonstrated a highly significant difference in the number of traumatic abnormalities detected between the two pairs of projection combinations (p = 0.0004). Based on this study and the examined literature the routine examination of the acutely injured shoulder is recommended to include the AP and MTA projections only.

  17. Gastrin-releasing peptide receptors in the central nervous system: role in brain function and as a drug target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael eRoesler

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Neuropeptides acting on specific cell membrane receptors of the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR superfamily regulate a range of important aspects of nervous and neuroendocrine function. Gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP is a mammalian neuropeptide that binds to the GRP receptor (GRPR, BB2. Increasing evidence indicates that GRPR-mediated signaling in the central nervous system (CNS plays an important role in regulating brain function, including aspects related to emotional responses, social interaction, memory, and feeding behavior. In addition, some alterations in GRP or GRPR expression or function have been described in patients with neurodegenerative, neurodevelopmental, and psychiatric disorders, as well as in brain tumors. Findings from preclinical models are consistent with the view that the GRPR might play a role in brain disorders, and raise the possibility that GRPR agonists might ameliorate cognitive and social deficits associated with neurological diseases, while antagonists may reduce anxiety and inhibit the growth of some types of brain cancer. Further preclinical and translational studies evaluating the potential therapeutic effects of GRPR ligands are warranted.

  18. Preclinical Models of Traumatic Brain Injury: Emerging Role of Glutamate in the Pathophysiology of Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darik A. O’Neil

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available More than 10 million people worldwide incur a traumatic brain injury (TBI each year, with two million cases occurring in the United States. TBI survivors exhibit long-lasting cognitive and affective sequelae that are associated with reduced quality of life and work productivity, as well as mental and emotional disturbances. While TBI-related disabilities often manifest physically and conspicuously, TBI has been linked with a “silent epidemic” of psychological disorders, including major depressive disorder (MDD. The prevalence of MDD post-insult is approximately 50% within the 1st year. Furthermore, given they are often under-reported when mild, TBIs could be a significant overall cause of MDD in the United States. The emergence of MDD post-TBI may be rooted in widespread disturbances in the modulatory role of glutamate, such that glutamatergic signaling becomes excessive and deleterious to neuronal integrity, as reported in both clinical and preclinical studies. Following this acute glutamatergic storm, regulators of glutamatergic function undergo various manipulations, which include, but are not limited to, alterations in glutamatergic subunit composition, release, and reuptake. This review will characterize the glutamatergic functional and signaling changes that emerge and persist following experimental TBI, utilizing evidence from clinical, molecular, and rodent behavioral investigations. Special care will be taken to speculate on how these manipulations may correlate with the development of MDD following injury in the clinic, as well as pharmacotherapies to date. Indisputably, TBI is a significant healthcare issue that warrants discovery and subsequent refinement of therapeutic strategies to improve neurobehavioral recovery and mental health.

  19. Nutrition and brain aging: role of fatty acids with an epidemiological perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samieri Cécilia

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In the absence of identified etiologic treatment for dementia, the potential preventive role of nutrition may offer an interesting perspective. The objective of the thesis of C. Samieri was to study the association between nutrition and brain aging in 1,796 subjects, aged 65 y or older, from the Bordeaux sample of the Three-City study, with a particular emphasis on fatty acids. Considering the multidimensional nature of nutritional data, several complementary strategies were used. At the global diet level, dietary patterns actually observed in the population were identified by exploratory methods. Older subjects with a ‘‘healthy’’ pattern, who consumed more than 3.5 weekly servings of fish in men and more than 6 daily servings of fruits and vegetables in women, showed a better cognitive and psychological health. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet, measured according to a score-based confirmatory method, was associated with slower global cognitive decline after 5 y of follow-up. At the nutrient biomarker level, higher plasma eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, a long-chain omega-3 fatty acid, was associated with a decreased dementia risk, and the omega-6-to-omega-3 fatty acids ratio to an increased risk, particularly in depressed subjects. EPA was also related to slower working memory decline in depressed subjects or in carriers of the e4 allele of the ApoE gene. Docosahexaenoic acid was related to slower working memory decline only in ApoE4 carriers. Overall, this work suggests a positive impact of a healthy diet rich in fruits and vegetables and fish, and notably the Mediterranean diet, on cognition in older subjects. Long-chain n-3 PUFA, in particular EPA, may be key protective nutrients against risk of dementia and cognitive decline.

  20. Targeting the ecology within: The role of the gut-brain axis and human microbiota in drug addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skosnik, Patrick D; Cortes-Briones, Jose A

    2016-08-01

    Despite major advances in our understanding of the brain using traditional neuroscience, reliable and efficacious treatments for drug addiction have remained elusive. Hence, the time has come to utilize novel approaches, particularly those drawing upon contemporary advances in fields outside of established neuroscience and psychiatry. Put another way, the time has come for a paradigm shift in the addiction sciences. Apropos, a revolution in the area of human health is underway, which is occurring at the nexus between enteric microbiology and neuroscience. It has become increasingly clear that the human microbiota (the vast ecology of bacteria residing within the human organism), plays an important role in health and disease. This is not surprising, as it has been estimated that bacteria living in the human body (approximately 1kg of mass, roughly equivalent to that of the human brain) outnumber human cells 10 to 1. While advances in the understanding of the role of microbiota in other areas of human health have yielded intriguing results (e.g., Clostridium difficile, irritable bowel syndrome, autism, etc.), to date, no systematic programs of research have examined the role of microbiota in drug addiction. The current hypothesis, therefore, is that gut dysbiosis plays a key role in addictive disorders. In the context of this hypothesis, this paper provides a rationale for future research to target the "gut-brain axis" in addiction. A brief background of the gut-brain axis is provided, along with a series of hypothesis-driven ideas outlining potential treatments for addiction via manipulations of the "ecology within." Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Two-Person Neuroscience and Naturalistic Social Communication: The Role of Language and Linguistic Variables in Brain-Coupling Research

    OpenAIRE

    García, Adolfo M.; Ibáñez, Agustín

    2014-01-01

    Social cognitive neuroscience (SCN) seeks to understand the brain mechanisms through which we comprehend others’ emotions and intentions in order to react accordingly. For decades, SCN has explored relevant domains by exposing individual participants to predesigned stimuli and asking them to judge their social (e.g., emotional) content. Subjects are thus reduced to detached observers of situations that they play no active role in. However, the core of our social experience is construed throug...

  2. Role of dexmedetomidine in stress control in traumatic brain injury and its influence on neuroendocrine system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-shen LUO

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the role of dexmedetomidine in stress control in moderate and severe traumatic brain injury (TBI and its influence on neuroendocrine system. Methods Ninety moderate or severe TBI patients (GCS 6-13 were admitted to ICU from May 2009 to January 2012, and they were divided into three groups according to the order of admission. Patients in group A (n=32 received 0.5-1.0μg/kg dexmedetomidine within 30min, maintained with 0.2-0.6μg/(kg.h dexmedetomidine for 24h, and morphine was administered by intravenous injection when necessary; patients in group B (n=31 received a 0.5-2.0mg/kg loading dose of propofol within 10min, maintained with 1.0-3.0mg/(kg.h for 72h, and morphine was administered by intravenous injection when necessary; patients in group C (n=27 received an intramuscular injection of pethidine or other optional drugs as control. A comprehensive evaluation was performed using Riker sedation-agitation scale combined with physiological and physical response indicators. The blood pressure, heart rate, respiration, tidal volume, arterial blood gas, plasma cortisol, plasma β-endorphin (β-EP, peripheral WBC count and blood glucose were measured and compared in 3 groups. Results The sedation rate of single-drug (i.e., without morphine administration in groups A, B and C was 86.7%, 80.6% and 77.8% respectively, and no significant difference was found among 3 groups (P>0.05. The mean arterial blood pressure at 30 min after administration was lower than that before administration in group A (P0.05. The WBC count and plasma cortisol level at 24h after treatment were lower than those before administration of the drugs in group A (P0.05. Conclusions Dexmedetomidine could alleviate the stress as a result of moderate and severe TBI, and its anti-stress and sedative effects were similar to those of propofol, but it is necessary to monitor the blood pressure. β-EP may play a coordinating role in the early stage of effect

  3. Glutathione in the human brain: Review of its roles and measurement by magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rae, Caroline D; Williams, Stephen R

    2017-07-15

    We review the transport, synthesis and catabolism of glutathione in the brain as well as its compartmentation and biochemistry in different brain cells. The major reactions involving glutathione are reviewed and the factors limiting its availability in brain cells are discussed. We also describe and critique current methods for measuring glutathione in the human brain using magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and review the literature on glutathione measurements in healthy brains and in neurological, psychiatric, neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental conditions In summary: Healthy human brain glutathione concentration is ∼1-2 mM, but it varies by brain region, with evidence of gender differences and age effects; in neurological disease glutathione appears reduced in multiple sclerosis, motor neurone disease and epilepsy, while being increased in meningiomas; in psychiatric disease the picture is complex and confounded by methodological differences, regional effects, length of disease and drug-treatment. Both increases and decreases in glutathione have been reported in depression and schizophrenia. In Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment there is evidence for a decrease in glutathione compared to age-matched healthy controls. Improved methods to measure glutathione in vivo will provide better precision in glutathione determination and help resolve the complex biochemistry of this molecule in health and disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Steroid Transport, Local Synthesis, and Signaling within the Brain: Roles in Neurogenesis, Neuroprotection, and Sexual Behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Diotel

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Sex steroid hormones are synthesized from cholesterol and exert pleiotropic effects notably in the central nervous system. Pioneering studies from Baulieu and colleagues have suggested that steroids are also locally-synthesized in the brain. Such steroids, called neurosteroids, can rapidly modulate neuronal excitability and functions, brain plasticity, and behavior. Accumulating data obtained on a wide variety of species demonstrate that neurosteroidogenesis is an evolutionary conserved feature across fish, birds, and mammals. In this review, we will first document neurosteroidogenesis and steroid signaling for estrogens, progestagens, and androgens in the brain of teleost fish, birds, and mammals. We will next consider the effects of sex steroids in homeostatic and regenerative neurogenesis, in neuroprotection, and in sexual behaviors. In a last part, we will discuss the transport of steroids and lipoproteins from the periphery within the brain (and vice-versa and document their effects on the blood-brain barrier (BBB permeability and on neuroprotection. We will emphasize the potential interaction between lipoproteins and sex steroids, addressing the beneficial effects of steroids and lipoproteins, particularly HDL-cholesterol, against the breakdown of the BBB reported to occur during brain ischemic stroke. We will consequently highlight the potential anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, and neuroprotective properties of sex steroid and lipoproteins, these latest improving cholesterol and steroid ester transport within the brain after insults.

  5. Perspectives from the symposium: The role of nutrition in infant and toddler brain and behavioral development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales, Francisco J; Zeisel, Steven H

    2008-06-01

    This symposium examined current trends in neuroscience and developmental psychology as they apply to assessing the effects of nutrients on brain and behavioral development of 0-6-year-olds. Although the spectrum of nutrients with brain effects has not changed much in the last 25 years, there has been an explosion in new knowledge about the genetics, structure and function of the brain. This has helped to link the brain mechanistic pathway by which these nutrients act with cognitive functions. A clear example of this is linking of brain structural changes due to hypoglycemia versus hyperglycemia with cognitive functions by using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to assess changes in brain-region volumes in combination with cognitive test of intelligence, memory and processing speed. Another example is the use of event-related potential (ERP) studies to show that infants of diabetic mothers have impairments in memory from birth through 8 months of age that are consistent with alterations in mechanistic pathways of memory observed in animal models of perinatal iron deficiency. However, gaps remain in the understanding of how nutrients and neurotrophic factors interact with each other in optimizing brain development and function.

  6. Brain Mapping of Ghrelin O-Acyltransferase in Goldfish (Carassius Auratus): Novel Roles for the Ghrelinergic System in Fish?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Ayelén M; Sánchez-Bretaño, Aída; Delgado, María J; Valenciano, Ana I

    2016-06-01

    Ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT) is the enzyme responsible for acylation of ghrelin, a gut-brain hormone with important roles in many physiological functions in vertebrates. Many aspects of GOAT remain to be elucidated, especially in fish, and particularly its anatomical distribution within the different brain areas has never been reported to date. The present study aimed to characterize the brain mapping of GOAT using RT-qPCR and immunohistochemistry in a teleost, the goldfish (Carassius auratus). Results show that goat transcripts are expressed in different brain areas of the goldfish, with the highest levels in the vagal lobe. Using immunohistochemistry, we also report the presence of GOAT immunoreactive cells in different encephalic areas, including the telencephalon, some hypothalamic nuclei, pineal gland, optic tectum and cerebellum, although they are especially abundant in the hindbrain. Particularly, an important signal is observed in the vagal lobe and some fiber tracts of the brainstem, such as the medial longitudinal fasciculus, Mauthneri fasciculus, secondary gustatory tract and spinothalamic tract. Most of the forebrain areas where GOAT is detected, particularly the hypothalamic nuclei, also express the ghs-r1a ghrelin receptor and other appetite-regulating hormones (e.g., orexin and NPY), supporting the role of ghrelin as a modulator of food intake and energy balance in fish. Present results are the first report on the presence of GOAT in the brain using imaging techniques. The high presence of GOAT in the hindbrain is a novelty, and point to possible new functions for the ghrelinergic system in fish. Anat Rec, 299:748-758, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Current status and future role of brain PET/MRI in clinical and research settings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner, P.; Barthel, H.; Sabri, O. [University Hospital Leipzig, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Drzezga, A. [University Hospital Cologne, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Koeln (Germany)

    2015-01-09

    Hybrid PET/MRI systematically offers a complementary combination of two modalities that has often proven itself superior to the single modality approach in the diagnostic work-up of many neurological and psychiatric diseases. Emerging PET tracers, technical advances in multiparametric MRI and obvious workflow advantages may lead to a significant improvement in the diagnosis of dementia disorders, neurooncological diseases, epilepsy and neurovascular diseases using PET/MRI. Moreover, simultaneous PET/MRI is well suited to complex studies of brain function in which fast fluctuations of brain signals (e.g. related to task processing or in response to pharmacological interventions) need to be monitored on multiple levels. Initial simultaneous studies have already demonstrated that these complementary measures of brain function can provide new insights into the functional and structural organization of the brain. (orig.)

  8. Current status and future role of brain PET/MRI in clinical and research settings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, P.; Barthel, H.; Sabri, O.; Drzezga, A.

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid PET/MRI systematically offers a complementary combination of two modalities that has often proven itself superior to the single modality approach in the diagnostic work-up of many neurological and psychiatric diseases. Emerging PET tracers, technical advances in multiparametric MRI and obvious workflow advantages may lead to a significant improvement in the diagnosis of dementia disorders, neurooncological diseases, epilepsy and neurovascular diseases using PET/MRI. Moreover, simultaneous PET/MRI is well suited to complex studies of brain function in which fast fluctuations of brain signals (e.g. related to task processing or in response to pharmacological interventions) need to be monitored on multiple levels. Initial simultaneous studies have already demonstrated that these complementary measures of brain function can provide new insights into the functional and structural organization of the brain. (orig.)

  9. Brain perivascular macrophages: characterization and functional roles in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraco, Giuseppe; Park, Laibaik; Anrather, Josef; Iadecola, Costantino

    2017-11-01

    Perivascular macrophages (PVM) are a distinct population of resident brain macrophages characterized by a close association with the cerebral vasculature. PVM migrate from the yolk sac into the brain early in development and, like microglia, are likely to be a self-renewing cell population that, in the normal state, is not replenished by circulating monocytes. Increasing evidence implicates PVM in several disease processes, ranging from brain infections and immune activation to regulation of the hypothalamic-adrenal axis and neurovascular-neurocognitive dysfunction in the setting of hypertension, Alzheimer disease pathology, or obesity. These effects involve crosstalk between PVM and cerebral endothelial cells, interaction with circulating immune cells, and/or production of reactive oxygen species. Overall, the available evidence supports the idea that PVM are a key component of the brain-resident immune system with broad implications for the pathogenesis of major brain diseases. A better understanding of the biology and pathobiology of PVM may lead to new insights and therapeutic strategies for a wide variety of brain diseases.

  10. Unraveling the multiscale structural organization and connectivity of the human brain: the role of diffusion MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo eBastiani

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The structural architecture and the anatomical connectivity of the human brain show different organizational principles at distinct spatial scales. Histological staining and light microscopy techniques have been widely used in classical neuroanatomical studies to unravel brain organization. Using such techniques is a laborious task performed on 2-dimensional histological sections by skilled anatomists possibly aided by semi-automated algorithms. With the recent advent of modern magnetic resonance imaging (MRI contrast mechanisms, cortical layers and columns can now be reliably identified and their structural properties quantified post mortem. These developments are allowing the investigation of neuroanatomical features of the brain at a spatial resolution that could be interfaced with that of histology. Diffusion MRI and tractography techniques, in particular, have been used to probe the architecture of both white and gray matter in three dimensions. Combined with mathematical network analysis, these techniques are increasingly influential in the investigation of the macro-, meso- and microscopic organization of brain connectivity and anatomy, both in vivo and ex vivo. Diffusion MRI-based techniques in combination with histology approaches can therefore support the endeavor of creating multimodal atlases that take into account the different spatial scales or levels on which the brain is organized. The aim of this review is to illustrate and discuss the structural architecture and the anatomical connectivity of the human brain at different spatial scales and how recently developed diffusion MRI techniques can help investigate these.

  11. The role of positron emission tomography in neuropharmacology in the living human brain and drug development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanai, Kazuhiko [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). School of Medicine

    1999-09-01

    Neuroimaging is a powerful and innovative tool for studying the pathology of psychiatric and neurological diseases and, more recently, for studying the drugs used in their treatment. Technological advances in imaging have made it possible to noninvasively extract information from the human brain regarding a drug's mechanism and site of action. Until now, our understanding of human brain pharmacology has depended primarily on indirect assessments or models derived from animal studies. However, the advent of multiple techniques for human brain imaging allows researchers to focus directly on human pharmacology and brain function. In this review article, our PET studies on the histaminergic neuron system were presented as an example. We have developed and used the PET techniques for 10 years in order to examine the H{sub 1} receptors in the living human brain. This review outlines available PET techniques and examine how these various methods have already been applied to the drug development process and neuropharmacology in the living human brain. (author)

  12. Pivotal Role of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Secreted by Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Severe Intraventricular Hemorrhage in Newborn Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, So Yoon; Chang, Yun Sil; Sung, Dong Kyung; Sung, Se In; Ahn, Jee-Yin; Park, Won Soon

    2017-01-24

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplantation protects against neonatal severe intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH)-induced brain injury by a paracrine rather than regenerative mechanism; however, the paracrine factors involved and their roles have not yet been delineated. This study aimed to identify the paracrine mediator(s) and to determine their role in mediating the therapeutic effects of MSCs in severe IVH. We first identified significant upregulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in MSCs compared with fibroblasts, in both DNA and antibody microarrays, after thrombin exposure. We then knocked down BDNF in MSCs by transfection with small interfering (si)RNA specific for human BDNF. The therapeutic effects of MSCs with or without BDNF knockdown were evaluated in vitro in rat neuronal cells challenged with thrombin, and in vivo in newborn Sprague-Dawley rats by injecting 200 μl of blood on postnatal day 4 (P4), and transplanting MSCs (1 × 105 cells) intraventricularly on P6. siRNA-induced BDNF knockdown abolished the in vitro benefits of MSCs on thrombin-induced neuronal cell death. BDNF knockdown also abolished the in vivo protective effects against severe IVH-induced brain injuries such as the attenuation of posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus, impaired behavioral test performance, increased astrogliosis, increased number of TUNEL cells, ED-1+ cells, and inflammatory cytokines, and reduced myelin basic protein expression. Our data indicate that BDNF secreted by transplanted MSCs is one of the critical paracrine factors that play a seminal role in attenuating severe IVH-induced brain injuries in newborn rats.

  13. THE ROLE OF ANDROGENS AND ESTROGENS IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF BRAIN AND PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM: APPROACHES TO DEVELOPING ANIMAL MODELS FOR SEXUALLY DIMORPHIC BEHAVIORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation provides an overview of research on the effects of hormonally active chemicals on sexual differentiation of the brain including (a) research on the role of androgens and estrogens in the development of the brain and peripheral nervous system, (b) approaches to d...

  14. [Description of the severely injured in the DRG system: is treatment of the severely injured still affordable?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahlke, L; Lefering, R; Siebert, H; Windolf, J; Roeder, N; Franz, D

    2013-11-01

    Due to the heterogeneity of severely injured patients (multiple trauma) it is difficult to assign them to homogeneic diagnosis-related groups (DRG). In recent years this has led to a systematic underfunding in the German reimbursement system (G-DRG) for cases of multiply injured patients. This project aimed to improve the reimbursement by modifying the case allocation algorithms of multiply injured patients within the G-DRG system. A retrospective analysis of standardized G-DRG data according to §21 of the Hospital Reimbursement Act (§ 21 KHEntgG) including case-related cost data from 3,362 critically injured patients from 2007 and 2008 from 10 university hospitals and 7 large municipal hospitals was carried out. For 1,241 cases complementary detailed information was available from the trauma registry of the German Trauma Society to monitor the case allocation of multiply injured patients within the G-DRG system. Analysis of coding and grouping, performance of case allocation and the homogeneity of costs in the G-DRG versions 2008-2012 was carried out. The results showed systematic underfunding of trauma patients in the G-DRG version 2008 but adequate cost covering in the majority of cases with the G-DRG versions 2011 and 2012. Cost coverage was foundfor multiply injured patients from the clinical viewpoint who were identified as multiple trauma by the G-DRG system. Some of the overfunded trauma patients had high intensive care costs. Also there was underfunding for multiple injured patients not identified as such in the G-DRG system. Specific modifications of the G-DRG allocation structures could increase the appropriateness of reimbursement of multiply injured patients. Data-based analysis is an essential prerequisite for a constructive development of the G-DRG system and a necessary tool for the active participation of medical specialist societies.

  15. Symptom severity and life satisfaction in brain injury: The mediating role of disability acceptance and social self-efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditchman, Nicole; Sung, Connie; Easton, Amanda B; Johnson, Kristina S; Batchos, Elisabeth

    2017-01-01

    Although the negative impact of symptom severity on subjective well-being outcomes has been established among individuals with brain injury, the mediating and protective role that positive human traits might have on this relationship has not been adequately explored. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of social self-efficacy and disability acceptance on the relationship between symptom severity and life satisfaction among individuals with brain injury. Hierarchical regression analysis and correlation techniques were used to test a hypothesized dual-mediation model of life satisfaction in a sample of 105 adults with acquired brain injury. Results indicated that social self-efficacy and disability acceptance fully mediated the relationship between symptom severity and life satisfaction, lending support for a dual-mediation model with disability acceptance being the strongest contributor. These findings suggest there may be considerable value for rehabilitation providers to develop strengths-based service strategies and/or specialized intervention programs that focus on capitalizing these positive human traits to promote life satisfaction and well-being for clients with brain injury. Implications for clinical practice and future research direction are also discussed.

  16. Mapping the human brain during a specific Vojta's tactile input: the ipsilateral putamen's role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Esteban, Ismael; Calvo-Lobo, Cesar; Ríos-Lago, Marcos; Álvarez-Linera, Juan; Muñoz-García, Daniel; Rodríguez-Sanz, David

    2018-03-01

    A century of research in human brain parcellation has demonstrated that different brain areas are associated with functional tasks. New neuroscientist perspectives to achieve the parcellation of the human brain have been developed to know the brain areas activation and its relationship with different stimuli. This descriptive study aimed to compare brain regions activation by specific tactile input (STI) stimuli according to the Vojta protocol (STI-group) to a non-STI stimulation (non-STI-group). An exploratory functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study was performed. The 2 groups of participants were passively stimulated by an expert physical therapist using the same paradigm structure, although differing in the place of stimulation. The stimulation was presented to participants using a block design in all cases. A sample of 16 healthy participants, 5 men and 11 women, with mean age 31.31 ± 8.13 years was recruited. Indeed, 12 participants were allocated in the STI-group and 4 participants in the non-STI-group. fMRI was used to map the human brain in vivo while these tactile stimuli were being applied. Data were analyzed using a general linear model in SPM12 implemented in MATLAB. Differences between groups showed a greater activation in the right cortical areas (temporal and frontal lobes), subcortical regions (thalamus, brainstem, and basal nuclei), and in the cerebellum (anterior lobe). STI-group had specific difference brain activation areas, such as the ipsilateral putamen. Future studies should study clinical implications in neurorehabilitation patients.

  17. The role of MRI and CT of the brain in first episodes of psychosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khandanpour, N.; Hoggard, N.; Connolly, D.J.A.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To investigate whether imaging is associated with early detection of the organic causes of the first episode of psychosis (FEP). Materials and methods: Individuals with FEP but no neurological signs referred to a tertiary centre for cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT) were reviewed retrospectively. Two groups were evaluated with either CT or MRI; the two groups were independent and no individual underwent both CT and MRI. Results: One hundred and twelve consecutive cerebral MRI and 204 consecutive CT examinations were identified. Three (2.7%) individuals had brain lesions [brain tumour and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) encephalopathy] potentially accountable for the psychosis at MRI. Seventy patients (62.5%) had incidental brain lesions, such as cerebral atrophy, small vessel ischaemic changes, unruptured Circle of Willis aneurysm, cavernoma, and arachnoid cysts at MRI. Three patients (1.5%) had focal brain lesions (primary or secondary tumours) potentially accountable for the psychosis at CT. One hundred and thirty-three patients (65.2%) had incidental brain lesions unrelated to the psychosis on CT scan. There was no significant difference between MRI and CT imaging in detecting organic disease potentially responsible for FEP (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Routine MRI or CT imaging of the brain is unlikely to reveal disease leading to a significant change in management. MRI was comparable with CT in terms of diagnosis of both pathological and incidental cerebral lesions. Therefore, routine brain structural imaging of FEP in patients without focal neurology may not be routinely required and if imaging is requested then CT may function equally as well as MRI as the first-line investigation

  18. Role of mitochondrial calcium uptake homeostasis in resting state fMRI brain networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannurpatti, Sridhar S; Sanganahalli, Basavaraju G; Herman, Peter; Hyder, Fahmeed

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake influences both brain energy metabolism and neural signaling. Given that brain mitochondrial organelles are distributed in relation to vascular density, which varies considerably across brain regions, we hypothesized different physiological impacts of mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake across brain regions. We tested the hypothesis by monitoring brain "intrinsic activity" derived from the resting state functional MRI (fMRI) blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) fluctuations in different functional networks spanning the somatosensory cortex, caudate putamen, hippocampus and thalamus, in normal and perturbed mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake states. In anesthetized rats at 11.7 T, mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake was inhibited or enhanced respectively by treatments with Ru360 or kaempferol. Surprisingly, mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake inhibition by Ru360 and enhancement by kaempferol led to similar dose-dependent decreases in brain-wide intrinsic activities in both the frequency domain (spectral amplitude) and temporal domain (resting state functional connectivity; RSFC). The fact that there were similar dose-dependent decreases in the frequency and temporal domains of the resting state fMRI-BOLD fluctuations during mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake inhibition or enhancement indicated that mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake and its homeostasis may strongly influence the brain's functional organization at rest. Interestingly, the resting state fMRI-derived intrinsic activities in the caudate putamen and thalamic regions saturated much faster with increasing dosage of either drug treatment than the drug-induced trends observed in cortical and hippocampal regions. Regional differences in how the spectral amplitude and RSFC changed with treatment indicate distinct mitochondrion-mediated spontaneous neuronal activity coupling within the various RSFC networks determined by resting state fMRI. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Neural Responses to Injury: Prevention, Protection and Repair; Volume 7: Role Growth Factors and Cell Signaling in the Response of Brain and Retina to Injury

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bazan, Nicolas

    1996-01-01

    ...: Prevention, Protection, and Repair, Subproject: Role of Growth Factors and Cell Signaling in the Response of Brain and Retina to Injury, are as follows: Species Rat(Albino Wistar), Number Allowed...

  20. Protective role of Scoparia dulcis plant extract on brain antioxidant status and lipidperoxidation in STZ diabetic male Wistar rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latha Muniappan

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of aqueous extract of Scoparia dulcis on the occurrence of oxidative stress in the brain of rats during diabetes by measuring the extent of oxidative damage as well as the status of the antioxidant defense system. Methods Aqueous extract of Scoparia dulcis plant was administered orally (200 mg/kg body weight and the effect of extract on blood glucose, plasma insulin and the levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS, hydroperoxides, superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, glutathione peroxidase (GPx, glutathione-S-transferase (GST and reduced glutathione (GSH were estimated in streptozotocin (STZ induced diabetic rats. Glibenclamide was used as standard reference drug. Results A significant increase in the activities of plasma insulin, superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione-S-transferase and reduced glutathione was observed in brain on treatment with 200 mg/kg body weight of Scoparia dulcis plant extract (SPEt and glibenclamide for 6 weeks. Both the treated groups showed significant decrease in TBARS and hydroperoxides formation in brain, suggesting its role in protection against lipidperoxidation induced membrane damage. Conclusions Since the study of induction of the antioxidant enzymes is considered to be a reliable marker for evaluating the antiperoxidative efficacy of the medicinal plant, these findings suggest a possible antiperoxidative role for Scoparia dulcis plant extract. Hence, in addition to antidiabetic effect, Scoparia dulcis possess antioxidant potential that may be used for therapeutic purposes.

  1. Protective role of Scoparia dulcis plant extract on brain antioxidant status and lipidperoxidation in STZ diabetic male Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pari, Leelavinothan; Latha, Muniappan

    2004-11-02

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of aqueous extract of Scoparia dulcis on the occurrence of oxidative stress in the brain of rats during diabetes by measuring the extent of oxidative damage as well as the status of the antioxidant defense system. Aqueous extract of Scoparia dulcis plant was administered orally (200 mg/kg body weight) and the effect of extract on blood glucose, plasma insulin and the levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), hydroperoxides, superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and reduced glutathione (GSH) were estimated in streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic rats. Glibenclamide was used as standard reference drug. A significant increase in the activities of plasma insulin, superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione-S-transferase and reduced glutathione was observed in brain on treatment with 200 mg/kg body weight of Scoparia dulcis plant extract (SPEt) and glibenclamide for 6 weeks. Both the treated groups showed significant decrease in TBARS and hydroperoxides formation in brain, suggesting its role in protection against lipidperoxidation induced membrane damage. Since the study of induction of the antioxidant enzymes is considered to be a reliable marker for evaluating the antiperoxidative efficacy of the medicinal plant, these findings suggest a possible antiperoxidative role for Scoparia dulcis plant extract. Hence, in addition to antidiabetic effect, Scoparia dulcis possess antioxidant potential that may be used for therapeutic purposes.

  2. Epigenetic mechanisms and associated brain circuits in the regulation of positive emotions: A role for transposable elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudi, Simona; Guffanti, Guia; Fallon, James; Macciardi, Fabio

    2016-10-15

    Epigenetic programming and reprogramming are at the heart of cellular differentiation and represent developmental and evolutionary mechanisms in both germline and somatic cell lines. Only about 2% of our genome is composed of protein-coding genes, while the remaining 98%, once considered "junk" DNA, codes for regulatory/epigenetic elements that control how genes are expressed in different tissues and across time from conception to death. While we already know that epigenetic mechanisms are at play in cancer development and in regulating metabolism (cellular and whole body), the role of epigenetics in the developing prenatal and postnatal brain, and in maintaining a proper brain activity throughout the various stages of life, in addition to having played a critical role in human evolution, is a relatively new domain of knowledge. Here we present the current state-of-the-art techniques and results of these studies within the domain of emotions, and then speculate on how genomic and epigenetic mechanisms can modify and potentially alter our emotional (limbic) brain and affect our social interactions. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2944-2954, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Pathways for insulin access to the brain: the role of the microvascular endothelial cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijer, Rick I; Gray, Sarah M; Aylor, Kevin W; Barrett, Eugene J

    2016-11-01

    Insulin affects multiple important central nervous system (CNS) functions including memory and appetite, yet the pathway(s) by which insulin reaches brain interstitial fluid (bISF) has not been clarified. Recent studies demonstrate that to reach bISF, subarachnoid cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) courses through the Virchow-Robin space (VRS) which sheaths penetrating pial vessels down to the capillary level. Whether insulin predominantly enters the VRS and bISF by local transport through the blood-brain barrier, or by being secreted into the CSF by the choroid plexus, is unknown. We injected 125 I-TyrA14-insulin or regular insulin intravenously and compared the rates of insulin reaching subarachnoid CSF with its plasma clearance by brain tissue samples (an index of microvascular endothelial cell binding/uptake/transport). The latter process was more than 40-fold more rapid. We then showed that selective insulin receptor blockade or 4 wk of high-fat feeding each inhibited microvascular brain 125 I-TyrA14-insulin clearance. We further confirmed that 125 I-TyrA14-insulin was internalized by brain microvascular endothelial cells, indicating that the in vivo tissue association reflected cellular transport, not simply microvascular tracer binding. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Thyroid hormone’s role in regulating brain glucose metabolism and potentially modulating hippocampal cognitive processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahagirdar, V; McNay, EC

    2012-01-01

    Cognitive performance is dependent on adequate glucose supply to the brain. Insulin, which regulates systemic glucose metabolism, has been recently shown both to regulate hippocampal metabolism and to be a mandatory component of hippocampally-mediated cognitive performance. Thyroid hormones (TH) regulate systemic glucose metabolism and may also be involved in regulation of brain glucose metabolism. Here we review potential mechanisms for such regulation. Importantly, TH imbalance is often encountered in combination with metabolic disorders, such as diabetes, and may cause additional metabolic dysregulation and hence worsening of disease states. TH’s potential as a regulator of brain glucose metabolism is heightened by interactions with insulin signaling, but there have been relatively few studies on this topic or on the actions of TH in a mature brain. This review discusses evidence for mechanistic links between TH, insulin, cognitive function, and brain glucose metabolism, and suggests that TH is a good candidate to be a modulator of memory processes, likely at least in part by modulation of central insulin signaling and glucose metabolism. PMID:22437199

  5. Role of Prion Replication in the Strain-dependent Brain Regional Distribution of Prions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ping Ping; Morales, Rodrigo; Duran-Aniotz, Claudia; Moreno-Gonzalez, Ines; Khan, Uffaf; Soto, Claudio

    2016-06-10

    One intriguing feature of prion diseases is their strain variation. Prion strains are differentiated by the clinical consequences they generate in the host, their biochemical properties, and their potential to infect other animal species. The selective targeting of these agents to specific brain structures have been extensively used to characterize prion strains. However, the molecular basis dictating strain-specific neurotropism are still elusive. In this study, isolated brain structures from animals infected with four hamster prion strains (HY, DY, 139H, and SSLOW) were analyzed for their content of protease-resistant PrP(Sc) Our data show that these strains have different profiles of PrP deposition along the brain. These patterns of accumulation, which were independent of regional PrP(C) production, were not reproduced by in vitro replication when different brain regions were used as substrate for the misfolding-amplification reaction. On the contrary, our results show that in vitro replication efficiency depended exclusively on the amount of PrP(C) present in each part of the brain. Our results suggest that the variable regional distribution of PrP(Sc) in distinct strains is not determined by differences on prion formation, but on other factors or cellular pathways. Our findings may contribute to understand the molecular mechanisms of prion pathogenesis and strain diversity. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Evolutionarily Conserved Roles for Blood-Brain Barrier Xenobiotic Transporters in Endogenous Steroid Partitioning and Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindle, Samantha J; Munji, Roeben N; Dolghih, Elena; Gaskins, Garrett; Orng, Souvinh; Ishimoto, Hiroshi; Soung, Allison; DeSalvo, Michael; Kitamoto, Toshihiro; Keiser, Michael J; Jacobson, Matthew P; Daneman, Richard; Bainton, Roland J

    2017-10-31

    Central nervous system (CNS) chemical protection depends upon discrete control of small-molecule access by the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Curiously, some drugs cause CNS side-effects despite negligible transit past the BBB. To investigate this phenomenon, we asked whether the highly BBB-enriched drug efflux transporter MDR1 has dual functions in controlling drug and endogenous molecule CNS homeostasis. If this is true, then brain-impermeable drugs could induce behavioral changes by affecting brain levels of endogenous molecules. Using computational, genetic, and pharmacologic approaches across diverse organisms, we demonstrate that BBB-localized efflux transporters are critical for regulating brain levels of endogenous steroids and steroid-regulated behaviors (sleep in Drosophila and anxiety in mice). Furthermore, we show that MDR1-interacting drugs are associated with anxiety-related behaviors in humans. We propose a general mechanism for common behavioral side effects of prescription drugs: pharmacologically challenging BBB efflux transporters disrupts brain levels of endogenous substrates and implicates the BBB in behavioral regulation. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Development of Brain EEG Connectivity across Early Childhood: Does Sleep Play a Role?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique K. LeBourgeois

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Sleep has beneficial effects on brain function and learning, which are reflected in plastic changes in the cortex. Early childhood is a time of rapid maturation in fundamental skills—e.g., language, cognitive control, working memory—that are predictive of future functioning. Little is currently known about the interactions between sleep and brain maturation during this developmental period. We propose coherent electroencephalogram (EEG activity during sleep may provide unique insight into maturational processes of functional brain connectivity. Longitudinal sleep EEG assessments were performed in eight healthy subjects at ages 2, 3 and 5 years. Sleep EEG coherence increased across development in a region- and frequency-specific manner. Moreover, although connectivity primarily decreased intra-hemispherically across a night of sleep, an inter-hemispheric overnight increase occurred in the frequency range of slow waves (0.8–2 Hz, theta (4.8–7.8 Hz and sleep spindles (10–14 Hz, with connectivity changes of up to 20% across a night of sleep. These findings indicate sleep EEG coherence reflects processes of brain maturation—i.e., programmed unfolding of neuronal networks—and moreover, sleep-related alterations of brain connectivity during the sensitive maturational window of early childhood.

  8. Microdialysis Monitoring in Clinical Traumatic Brain Injury and Its Role in Neuroprotective Drug Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thelin, Eric Peter; Carpenter, Keri L H; Hutchinson, Peter J; Helmy, Adel

    2017-03-01

    Injuries to the central nervous system continue to be vast contributors to morbidity and mortality; specifically, traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the most common cause of death during the first four decades of life. Several modalities are used to monitor patients suffering from TBI in order to prevent detrimental secondary injuries. The microdialysis (MD) technique, introduced during the 1990s, presents the treating physician with a robust monitoring tool for brain chemistry in addition to conventional intracranial pressure monitoring. Nevertheless, some limitations remain, such as limited spatial resolution. Moreover, while there have been several attempts to develop new potential pharmacological therapies in TBI, there are currently no available drugs which have shown clinical efficacy that targets the underlying pathophysiology, despite various trials investigating a plethora of pharmaceuticals. Specifically in the brain, MD is able to demonstrate penetration of the drug through the blood-brain barrier into the brain extracellular space at potential site of action. In addition, the downstream effects of drug action can be monitored directly. In the future, clinical MD, together with other monitoring modalities, can identify specific pathological substrates which require tailored treatment strategies for patients suffering from TBI.

  9. The relationship of Chlamydophila pneumoniae with schizophrenia: The role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) in this relationship

    OpenAIRE

    Kalayci, Fatma; Ozdemir, Armagan; Saribas, Suat; Yuksel, Pelin; Ergin, Sevgi; Mert Kuskucu, Ali; Aksoy Poyraz, Cana; Balcioglu, Ibrahim; Alpay, Nihat; Kurt, Aykut; Sezgin, Zeynep; Tufan Kocak, Banu; Sucu Icel, Rana; Can, Gunay; Bahar Tokman, Hrisi

    2017-01-01

    Several pathogens have been suspected of playing a role in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Chronic inflammation has been proposed to occur as a result of persistent infection caused by Chlamydophila pneumoniae cells that reside in brain endothelial cells for many years. It was recently hypothesized that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) may play prominent roles in the development of schizophrenia. NT-3 and BDNF levels have been suggested to change in respon...

  10. Receiver operating characteristic analysis and its potential role in evaluating the effect of head movement in PET of the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, H.; Clarke, G.H.; Lombardo, P.; McKay, W.J.; Austin and Repatriation Medical Centre, Heidelberg, VIC

    1999-01-01

    Full text: We outline an example of receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis in the assessment of image quality. ROC analysis is a measure of image quality that accounts for the consequences of the decision and the role of the observer. Kim and Haynie (Nuclear Diagnostic Imaging: Practical Clinical Applications. Melbourne: Macmillan, 1987) describe ROC analysis as an 'objective approach to the evaluation of diagnostic decision making'. ROC analysis is an ideal technique for evaluating images of a Hoffman brain phantom obtained using positron emission tomography. Images have been acquired with the phantom in different positions. The position of the phantom and the time the phantom remained in each position was based on the measurements of head movement during simulated brain imaging (Patterson et al., Technologists Symposium, ANZSNM, 1998). This study was undertaken to explore the potential of ROC analysis in determining the effect of movement on the ability to detect lesions of various sizes

  11. Cerebral Metabolism and the Role of Glucose Control in Acute Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buitrago Blanco, Manuel M; Prashant, Giyarpuram N; Vespa, Paul M

    2016-10-01

    This article reviews key concepts of cerebral glucose metabolism, neurologic outcomes in clinical trials, the biology of the neurovascular unit and its involvement in secondary brain injury after traumatic brain insults, and current scientific and clinical data that demonstrate a better understanding of the biology of metabolic dysfunction in the brain, a concept now known as cerebral metabolic energy crisis. The use of neuromonitoring techniques to better understand the pathophysiology of the metabolic crisis is reviewed and a model that summarizes the triphasic view of cerebral metabolic disturbance supported by existing scientific data is outlined. The evidence is summarized and a template for future research provided. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Emerging role of functional brain MRI in low-grade glioma surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friismose, Ancuta; Traise, Peter; Markovic, Ljubo

    Learning objectives 1. To describe the use of functional MRI (fMRI) in cranial surgery planning for patients with low-grade gliomas (LGG). 2. To show the increasing importance of fMRI in the clinical setting. Background LGG include brain tumors classified by the World Health Organization as grade I...... be used to map eloquent cortex areas, thus minimizing postoperative deficits and improving surgical performance. Findings and procedure details Patients diagnosed with low-grade gliomas located in eloquent brain areas undergo fMRI prior to surgery. The exams are performed on a 3T MR system (Achieva TX....... Language comprehension and visual tasks can be added to visualize Wernicke’s area or the visual cortex. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is used to map nerve tract course relative to the tumour. Conclusion FMRI has proven its clinical utility in locating eloquent brain areas with relation to tumor site...

  13. Role of cerebral blood volume changes in brain specific-gravity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picozzi, P.; Todd, N.V.; Crockard, A.H.

    1985-01-01

    Cerebral blood volume (CBV) was calculated in gerbils from specific-gravity (SG) changes between normal and saline-perfused brains. Furthermore, changes in CBV were investigated during ischemia using carbon-14-labeled dextran (MW 70,000) as an intravascular marker. Both data were used to evaluate the possible error due to a change in CBV on the measurement of ischemic brain edema by the SG method. The methodological error found was 0.0004 for a 100% CBV change. This error is insignificant, being less than the standard deviation in the SG measured for the gerbil cortex. Thus, CBV changes are not responsible for the SG variations observed during the first phase of ischemia. These variations are better explained as an increase of brain water content during ischemia

  14. The Presenting Feature and Role of General Practitioners and Non-neurosurgeon Physicians in Recognizing Pediatric Brain Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wihasto Suryaningtyas

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To determine the presenting features and role of non-neurosurgeon physician in recognizing the signs and symptoms of brain tumours in children. METHOD: Medical records of 31 pediatric brain tumor patients treated in Department of Neurosurgery, Soetomo General Hospital, Airlangga University Faculty of Medicine, Surabaya from August 2005 to September 2006 were reviewed. RESULTS: Thirty five percents f parents went to pediatrician as their first contact physician, 25% to general practitioner, 20% neurologist, 20% to neurosurgeon. Neurosurgeon was the second and third contact physician receiving refferal from non-neurosurgeon physician. The most common symptoms were headache (71%, vomiting (61%, motor weakness (48%, visual disturbance (45%, decrease level of consciousness (45% and seizures (38%, unsteadiness (35%. The most common symptoms that led the parents to find medical help at any time were motor disturbance (48%, vomiting (48%, visual disturbance (45%, unsteadiness (35%, decrease level of consciousness (32%, seizures (32%, headache (32%. All patients had neurological signs at diagnosis; 58% had papilloedema, 48% cranial nerve abnormalities, 35% cerebellar signs, 32% motor disturbance, 29% a reduced level of consciousness, 12% cranial enlargement. Duration of symptoms at admission was 1 months (32%, 2 months (42%, 3-6 months (19%, more than 6 months (7%. A short symptom interval was significantly associated with high grade tumours and patient age 3 years or younger. CONCLUSION: The symptoms and signs are often nonspecific, mimicking more common diseases. Therefore, the possibility of a brain neoplasm should always be considered, it materializes very rarely. Benign neurologic symptoms such as headache, which last for 2 months or more, should indicate the need of additional studies. Our results higlighted the neurologic impairments which might facilitate early recognition of a brain neoplasm. Neurologic problems as the only symptom of brain

  15. The role of glycogen, glucose and lactate in neuronal activity during hypoxia in the hooded seal (Cystophora cristata) brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czech-Damal, N U; Geiseler, S J; Hoff, M L M; Schliep, R; Ramirez, J-M; Folkow, L P; Burmester, T

    2014-09-05

    The brains of diving mammals are repeatedly exposed to hypoxic conditions during diving. Brain neurons of the hooded seal (Cystophora cristata) have been shown to be more hypoxia tolerant than those of mice, but the underlying mechanisms are not clear. Here we investigated the roles of different metabolic substrates for maintenance of neuronal activity and integrity, by comparing the in vitro spontaneous neuronal activity of brain slices from layer V of the visual cortex of hooded seals with those in mice (Mus musculus). Studies were conducted by manipulating the composition of the artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF), containing either 10 mM glucose, or 20 mM lactate, or no external carbohydrate supply (aglycemia). Normoxic, hypoxic and ischemic conditions were applied. The lack of glucose or the application of lactate in the aCSF containing no glucose had little effect on the neuronal activity of seal neurons in either normoxia or hypoxia, while neurons from mice survived in hypoxia only few minutes regardless of the composition of the aCSF. We propose that seal neurons have higher intrinsic energy stores. Indeed, we found about three times higher glycogen stores in the seal brain (∼4.1 ng per μg total protein in the seal cerebrum) than in the mouse brain. Notably, in aCSF containing no glucose, seal neurons can tolerate 20 mM lactate while in mouse neuronal activity vanished after few minutes even in normoxia. This can be considered as an adaptation to long dives, during which lactate accumulates in the blood. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Fetal liver blood flow distribution: role in human developmental strategy to prioritize fat deposition versus brain development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith M Godfrey

    Full Text Available Among primates, human neonates have the largest brains but also the highest proportion of body fat. If placental nutrient supply is limited, the fetus faces a dilemma: should resources be allocated to brain growth, or to fat deposition for use as a potential postnatal energy reserve? We hypothesised that resolving this dilemma operates at the level of umbilical blood distribution entering the fetal liver. In 381 uncomplicated pregnancies in third trimester, we measured blood flow perfusing the fetal liver, or bypassing it via the ductus venosus to supply the brain and heart using ultrasound techniques. Across the range of fetal growth and independent of the mother's adiposity and parity, greater liver blood flow was associated with greater offspring fat mass measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, both in the infant at birth (r = 0.43, P<0.001 and at age 4 years (r = 0.16, P = 0.02. In contrast, smaller placentas less able to meet fetal demand for essential nutrients were associated with a brain-sparing flow pattern (r = 0.17, p = 0.02. This flow pattern was also associated with a higher degree of shunting through ductus venosus (P = 0.04. We propose that humans evolved a developmental strategy to prioritize nutrient allocation for prenatal fat deposition when the supply of conditionally essential nutrients requiring hepatic inter-conversion is limited, switching resource allocation to favour the brain if the supply of essential nutrients is limited. Facilitated placental transfer mechanisms for glucose and other nutrients evolved in environments less affluent than those now prevalent in developed populations, and we propose that in circumstances of maternal adiposity and nutrient excess these mechanisms now also lead to prenatal fat deposition. Prenatal developmental influences play important roles in the human propensity to deposit fat.

  17. The role of group brain checkups using magnetic resonance imaging in pre-elderly with hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanai-Iwai, Eri; Ogawa, Fumiaki; Nakagawa, Masanori; Nishimura, Tsunehiko; Matsubara, Hiroaki; Naruse, Shoji

    2006-01-01

    Care of elderly people is an important socio-economical issue for industrial nations. Stroke is the leading cause of elderly care and its major risk facters are silent brain infarcts and metabolic disorders such as hypertension. Recent progress in brain imaging techniques has enabled early detection of cerebrovascular disease. However, brain imaging of numerous patients is not feasible because the test is time consuming and costly. Furthermore, the epidemiology of silent cerebrovascular disease in hypertensive elderly people is not well-known. Thus, the present study aims to establish whether group brain check-up is effective and to assess the incidence of silent cerebrovascular disease in pre-elderly individuals with hypertension. We randomly enrolled 224 participants, aged 50- to 65-years-old, with hypertension detected during routine medical check-ups. All participants were free of neurological symptoms, or dementia as determined by the Mini Mental Status Examination. MRI was carried out by the simplified method of fast spin echo (FSE)-T2-weighted image (T2WI) and 3D-time of flight (TOF) MRA with Toshiba VISART1.5T, and diagnosed by 3 radiologists. Each imaging test required only 10 minutes and the cost was reduced to about 40-80% number of the usual cost for brain MRIs. The detection rate of abnormal findings was 77.6% (n=174) and that of cerebrovascular changes was 70.1% (n=159; 102 lacunae, 64 intracranial artery stenosis, and 27 cerebral aneurysm), which was much higher than previously reported in a study of random participants. In addition, follow-up questionnaires after the brain check-ups revealed that 86% of participants improved their awareness about health-related life-style. These findings indicate that the pre-elderly population with hypertension is at high-risk for silent cerebrovascular disease, and mass screening of this group using our simplified MRI may be an effective medical health strategy in aging society. (author)

  18. The Emerging Role of Tractography in Deep Brain Stimulation: Basic Principles and Current Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson B. Rodrigues

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI is an MRI-based technique that delineates white matter tracts in the brain by tracking the diffusion of water in neural tissue. This methodology, known as “tractography”, has been extensively applied in clinical neuroscience to explore nervous system architecture and diseases. More recently, tractography has been used to assist with neurosurgical targeting in functional neurosurgery. This review provides an overview of DTI principles, and discusses current applications of tractography for improving and helping develop novel deep brain stimulation (DBS targets.

  19. The physiological role of the brain GLP-1 system in stress

    OpenAIRE

    Holt, M. K.; Trapp, S.

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) within the brain is a potent regulator of food intake and most studies have investigated the anorexic effects of central GLP-1. A range of brain regions have now been found to be involved in GLP-1 mediated anorexia, including some which are not traditionally associated with appetite regulation. However, a change in food intake can be indicative of not only reduced energy demand, but also changes in the organism's motivation to eat following stressful stimuli. I...

  20. Brain metastasis from hepatocellular carcinoma: the role of surgery as a prognostic factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Moon-Soo; Moon, Kyung-Sub; Lee, Kyung-Hwa; Cho, Sung-Bum; Lim, Sa-Hoe; Jang, Woo-Youl; Jung, Tae-Young; Kim, In-Young; Jung, Shin

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of brain metastasis from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is expected to increase as a result of prolonged survival due to the recent advances in HCC treatment. However, there is no definite treatment strategy for brain metastasis from HCC mainly due to its rarity and dismal prognosis. To provide helpful recommendations in treatment of brain metastasis from HCC, the authors aimed to identify prognostic factors that influence survival rates with a review of the recently published data. Thirty-three cases of brain metastasis, whose incidence was 0.65%, were selected from a total of 5015 HCC patients and reviewed retrospectively in terms of clinical and radiological features. Median overall survival time after diagnosis of brain metastasis was 10.4 weeks (95% confidence interval [CI], 5.1-15.7 weeks) with 1-, 6- and 12-month survival rates, of 79%, 24% and 6%, respectively. Median survival of the patients treated with surgical resection or surgical resection followed by whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) (25.3 weeks; range, 15.8-34.8 weeks) was longer than that of the patients treated with gamma knife surgery (GKS), WBRT, or GKS followed by WBRT (10.4 weeks; range, 7.5-13.3 weeks) as well as that of patients treated with only steroids (1 week; range, 0.0-3.3 weeks) (p < 0.001). Child-Pugh’s classification A group had a longer median survival time than Child-Pugh’s classification B or C group (14.4 weeks vs 8.4 weeks, p = 0.038). RPA class I & II group had also a longer median survival time than RPA class III group did (13.4 weeks vs 2.4 weeks, p = 0.001). Surgical resection (hazard ratio [HR] 0.23, 95% CI 0.08-0.66, p = 0.006) and good liver function at the time of brain metastasis (HR 0.25, 95% CI 0.09-0.69, p = 0.007) were found to be the powerful prognostic factors for favorable survival in the multivariate analysis. In addition, presence of intratumoral hemorrhage was a statistically significant prognostic factor for survival. Although HCC

  1. The role in thanatogenesis of generalized brain edema in ischemic cerebral infarction (computer-morphometric research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Dyadyk

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the results of computer-morphometric study of perivascular and pericellular free (oedematous spaces in brain cortex at death from the ischemic cerebral infarction and from reasons unconnected directly with cerebral pathology. It was revealed, that the mean area of perivascular spaces (vasogenic edema index at brain infarction in 13 times exceeds such at extracerebral pathology, and mean area of pericellular spaces (cytotoxic edema index – almost in 12 times, but also it substantially differs on the degree of variation (in 2,5 times higher, than area of perivascular spaces.

  2. A role for the serotonin reuptake transporter in the brain and intestinal features of autism spectrum disorders and developmental antidepressant exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Kara Gross

    2017-10-01

    Many disease conditions considered CNS-predominant harbor significant intestinal comorbidities. Serotonin (5-HT) and the serotonin reuptake transporter (SERT) have increasingly been shown to play important roles in both brain and intestinal development and long-term function. 5-HT and SERT may thus modulate critical functions in the development and perpetuation of brain-gut axis disease. We discuss the potential roles of 5-HT and SERT in the brain and intestinal manifestations of autism spectrum disorders and developmental antidepressant exposure. The potential therapeutic value of 5-HT 4 modulation in the subsequent treatment of these conditions is also addressed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. [The role of nutritional factors on the structure and function of the brain: an update on dietary requirements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourre, J-M

    2004-09-01

    The brain is an organ elaborated and functioning from substances present in the diet. Dietary regulation of blood glucose level (via ingestion of food with a low glycemic index ensuring a low insulin level) improves the quality and duration of intellectual performance, if only because at rest the adult brain consumes 50 p. 100 of dietary carbohydrates, 80 p. 100 of them for energy purposes. The nature of the amino acid composition of dietary proteins contributes to good cerebral function; tryptophan plays a special role. Many indispensable amino acids present in dietary proteins help to elaborate neurotransmitters and neuromodulators. Omega-3 fatty acids provided the first coherent experimental demonstration of the effect of dietary nutrients on the structure and function of the brain. First it was shown that the differentiation and functioning of cultured brain cells requires omega-3 fatty acids. It was then demonstrated that alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) deficiency alters the course of brain development, perturbs the composition and physicochemical properties of brain cell membranes, neurones, oligodendrocytes, and astrocytes (ALA). This leads to physicochemical modifications, induces biochemical and physiological perturbations, and results in neurosensory and behavioral upset. Consequently, the nature of polyunsaturated fatty acids (in particular omega-3) present in formula milks for infants (premature and term) conditions the visual and cerebral abilities, including intellectual abilities. Moreover, dietary omega-3 fatty acids are certainly involved in the prevention of some aspects of cardiovascular disease (including at the level of cerebral vascularization), and in some neuropsychiatric disorders, particularly depression, as well as in dementia, notably Alzheimer's disease. Their deficiency can prevent the satisfactory renewal of membranes and thus accelerate cerebral aging. Iron is necessary to ensure oxygenation, to produce energy in the cerebral parenchyma

  4. The role of diffusion tensor imaging in brain tumor surgery : A review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Potgieser, Adriaan R. E.; Wagemakers, Michiel; van Hulzen, Arjen L. J.; de Jong, Bauke M.; Hoving, Eelco W.; Groen, Rob J. M.

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is a recent technique that utilizes diffusion of water molecules to make assumptions about white matter tract architecture of the brain. Early on, neurosurgeons recognized its potential value in neurosurgical planning, as it is the only technique that offers the

  5. The role of human endogenous retroviruses in brain development and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortelmans, Kristien; Wang-Johanning, Feng; Johanning, Gary L

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous retroviral sequences are spread throughout the genome of all humans, and make up about 8% of the genome. Despite their prevalence, the function of human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) in humans is largely unknown. In this review we focus on the brain, and evaluate studies in animal models that address mechanisms of endogenous retrovirus activation in the brain and central nervous system (CNS). One such study in mice found that TRIM28, a protein critical for mouse early development, regulates transcription and silencing of endogenous retroviruses in neural progenitor cells. Another intriguing finding in human brain cells and mouse models was that endogenous retrovirus HERV-K appears to be protective against neurotoxins. We also report on studies that associate HERVs with human diseases of the brain and CNS. There is little doubt of an association between HERVs and a number of CNS diseases. However, a cause and effect relationship between HERVs and these diseases has not yet been established. © 2016 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Role of bromocriptine in multi-spectral manifestations of traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Munakomi

    2017-04-01

    Conclusion: Bromocriptine improves neurological sequelae of traumatic brain injury as well as the overall outcome in the patients. If medication is given to promote recovery and treat its associated disabilities, clinicians should thoroughly outline the goals and closely monitor adverse effects.

  7. The Blood Brain Barrier and its Role in Alzheimer's Therapy: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakki, Satya Lavanya; Senthil, V; Yasam, Venkata Ramesh; Chandrasekar, M J N; Vijayaraghavan, C

    2018-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most frequent age related neurodegenerative disorder. It represents 70% of all dementia. Millions of people have been affected by AD worldwide. It is a complex illness characterized pathologically by accumulation of protein aggregates of amyloid and neurofibrillary tangles containing hyperphosphorylated neuronal tau protein. AD requires drugs that can circumvent the blood-brain barrier (BBB) which is not a simple physical barrier between blood and brain, but acts as an iron curtain, allowing only selective molecules to enter the brain. Unfortunately, this dynamic barrier restricts transport of drugs to the brain; due to which, currently very few drugs are available for AD treatment. The present review focuses mainly on strategies used for administration of drug to the CNS by-passing BBB for the treatment of AD. Many studies have proved to be effective in overcoming BBB and targeting drugs to CNS by using different strategies. Here we have discussed some of the most important drug permeability and drug targeting approaches. In conclusion, concentrating solely in development of drug discovery programs is not enough but it is important to maintain balance between the drug discovery and drug delivery systems that are more specific and effective in targeting CNS of AD patients. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  8. Role of voltage-gated L-type Ca2+ channel isoforms for brain function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striessnig, J; Koschak, A; Sinnegger-Brauns, M J; Hetzenauer, A; Nguyen, N K; Busquet, P; Pelster, G; Singewald, N

    2006-11-01

    Voltage-gated LTCCs (L-type Ca2+ channels) are established drug targets for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. LTCCs are also expressed outside the cardiovascular system. In the brain, LTCCs control synaptic plasticity in neurons, and DHP (dihydropyridine) LTCC blockers such as nifedipine modulate brain function (such as fear memory extinction and depression-like behaviour). Voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels Cav1 .2 and Cav1.3 are the predominant brain LTCCs. As DHPs and other classes of organic LTCC blockers inhibit both isoforms, their pharmacological distinction is impossible and their individual contributions to defined brain functions remain largely unknown. Here, we summarize our recent experiments with two genetically modified mouse strains, which we generated to explore the individual biophysical features of Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 LTCCs and to determine their relative contributions to various physiological peripheral and neuronal functions. The results described here also allow predictions about the pharmacotherapeutic potential of isoform-selective LTCC modulators.

  9. Windows on the brain: the emerging role of atlases and databases in neuroscience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Essen, David C.; VanEssen, D. C. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Brain atlases and associated databases have great potential as gateways for navigating, accessing, and visualizing a wide range of neuroscientific data. Recent progress towards realizing this potential includes the establishment of probabilistic atlases, surface-based atlases and associated databases, combined with improvements in visualization capabilities and internet access.

  10. Emerging role of brain metastases in the prognosis of breast cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hambrecht A

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Amanda Hambrecht1,2, Rahul Jandial2, Josh Neman21Department of Biology, University of Southern California; 2Department of Neurosurgery, Beckman Research Institute, City of Hope National Cancer Center, CA, USAAbstract: Cancer starts with one rogue cell. Through mutations and genomic alterations, the cell acquires specific and stem cell-like characteristics necessary for invasion of a distant organ and ultimately metastasis. Metastatic brain cancer is a particularly formidable disease because of its poor prognosis and the highly resistant nature of the tumor to chemotherapy. Although several types of primary tumors have a tendency to metastasize to the brain, the incidence of brain metastases has increased dramatically in some subsets of breast cancer patients. Several conventional treatments are available, but success is limited and often short-lived. Given that no standard treatment options exist, there is a significant need to investigate the biology of these clinically recalcitrant tumors. Keywords: metastasis, breast cancer, blood-brain barrier, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, mesenchymal-epithelial transition

  11. New neurons in the adult brain : The role of sleep and consequences of sleep loss

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meerlo, Peter; Mistiberger, Ralph E.; Jacobs, Barry L.; Heller, H. Craig; McGinty, Dennis; Mistlberger, Ralph E.

    2009-01-01

    Research over the last few decades has firmly established that new neurons are generated in selected areas of the adult mammalian brain, particularly the dentate gyrus of the hippocampal formation and the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles. The function of adult-born neurons is still a

  12. Resilience in mathematics after early brain injury: The roles of parental input and early plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana E. Glenn

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Children with early focal unilateral brain injury show remarkable plasticity in language development. However, little is known about how early brain injury influences mathematical learning. Here, we examine early number understanding, comparing cardinal number knowledge of typically developing children (TD and children with pre- and perinatal lesions (BI between 42 and 50 months of age. We also examine how this knowledge relates to the number words children hear from their primary caregivers early in life. We find that children with BI, are, on average, slightly behind TD children in both cardinal number knowledge and later mathematical performance, and show slightly slower learning rates than TD children in cardinal number knowledge during the preschool years. We also find that parents’ “number talk” to their toddlers predicts later mathematical ability for both TD children and children with BI. These findings suggest a relatively optimistic story in which neural plasticity is at play in children’s mathematical development following early brain injury. Further, the effects of early number input suggest that intervening to enrich the number talk that children with BI hear during the preschool years could narrow the math achievement gap. Keywords: Plasticity, Early unilateral brain injury, Mathematical skill, Cardinality, Parent input

  13. Spreading depolarisations and outcome after traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartings, Jed A; Bullock, M Ross; Okonkwo, David O

    2011-01-01

    Pathological waves of spreading mass neuronal depolarisation arise repeatedly in injured, but potentially salvageable, grey matter in 50-60% of patients after traumatic brain injury (TBI). We aimed to ascertain whether spreading depolarisations are independently associated with unfavourable...

  14. Expression and role of 5-HT7 receptor in brain and intestine in rats with irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Bai-cang; Dong, Lei; Wang, Yan; Wang, Sheng-hao; Cao, Ming-bo

    2007-12-05

    The 5-hydroxytryptamine7 receptor (5-HT(7) receptor, 5-HT(7)R) plays an important role in the regulation of smooth muscle relaxation and visceral sensation and might be involved in the pathogenesis of the gastrointestinal dyskinesia, abdominal pain and visceral paresthesia in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The aim of this study was to investigate the role of the 5-HT(7) receptor in the pathogenesis of IBS. A rat model of irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhea (IBS-D) was established by colonic instillation of acetic acid and restraint stress. A rat model with irritable bowel syndrome with constipation (IBS-C) was established by stomach irrigated with 0 - 4 degrees C cool water daily for 14 days. The content and distribution of 5-HT in the brain and gut were examined by immunohistochemistry and the mRNA expression of the 5-HT(7) receptor was determined by fluorescent quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The accumulation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) in all the same tissues was measured by radioimmunity. The models of IBS were reliable by identification. The immunohistochemistry results showed that there were significantly more 5-HT positive cells in the IBS-D group than in the control group in the hippocampus, hypothalamus, jejunum, ileum, proximate colon and distal colon (P intestine is related to the IBS pathogenesis. The up-regulated expression of the 5-HT(7) receptor in the brain and colon might play an important role in the pathogenesis of IBS-C.

  15. The role of choline (Cho) in the diagnostics and differentiation of brain tumours with HMRS technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobiecka, B.; Urbanik, A.

    2009-01-01

    Background: The aim of the research was a comprehensive analysis of Cho concentration and Cho/Cr, NAA/Cho, NAA/Cho+Cr ratios for the purposes of the diagnostics and differentiation of brain tumours (the type of the pathological lesion in patients with brain tumours) with the use of HMRS technique. Material/Methods: The HMRS examinations were performed with the use of the MRI Signa Excite 1.5 T system, in PRESS technique (TR = 1500 ms, TE = 35 ms) and involved 100 patients with brain tumours (age range: 18 to 81 yrs, mean age 50.61). Spectra were taken from three different locations: tumour centre, the tumour edge and contralateral unchanged cerebral tissue. All patients underwent surgery followed by histopathological analysis, on the basis of which two groups were separated (benign tumours, malignant tumours - 50 cases each). Additionally, 30 healthy volunteers in the age of 20 to 79 years (mean age 40.8) were examined. Results: The comparison of the examined patients with the control group revealed significantly higher Cho concentrations in patients with brain tumours. The analysis of Cho concentration was also performed with consideration of the age factor (under and over 60 years of age). Significantly lower mean Cho concentrations were discovered in a group of patients under 60 years of age. The analysis of Cho concentrations and Cho/Cr ratios reveled statistical significance for two factors: voxel location factor and the type of the pathological lesion. The average of Cho concentration and Cho/Cr ratios were higher in the group of patients with malignant tumours. The highest Cho concentrations and Cho/Cr ratios were observed in the tumour centre. The relative NAA/Cho and NAA/Cho+Cr ratios were statistically significant when taking into consideration the voxel location factor only. The results received from contralateral normal cerebral tissue (the internal model) were compared with control group (the external model). Mean values of Cho concentration were

  16. Centralized rehabilitation after servere traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, Aase Worså; Liebach, Annette; Nordenbo, Annette Mosbæk

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To present results from the first 3 years of centralized subacute rehabilitation after very severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), and to compare results of centralized versus decentralized rehabilitation. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Prospectively, the most severely injured group of adults from...... post-trauma was 0.29, and at 1 year 0.055 per 100,000 population. By comparison of 39 patients from the centralized unit injured in 2000-2003 with 21 patients injured in 1982, 1987 or 1992 and with similar PTA- and age distributions and male/female ratio, Glasgow Outcome Scale score at discharge...

  17. Roles of inflammation and apoptosis in experimental brain death-induced right ventricular failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belhaj, Asmae; Dewachter, Laurence; Rorive, Sandrine; Remmelink, Myriam; Weynand, Birgit; Melot, Christian; Galanti, Laurence; Hupkens, Emeline; Sprockeels, Thomas; Dewachter, Céline; Creteur, Jacques; McEntee, Kathleen; Naeije, Robert; Rondelet, Benoît

    2016-12-01

    Right ventricular (RV) dysfunction remains the leading cause of early death after cardiac transplantation. Methylprednisolone is used to improve graft quality; however, evidence for that remains empirical. We sought to determine whether methylprednisolone, acting on inflammation and apoptosis, might prevent brain death-induced RV dysfunction. After randomization to placebo (n = 11) or to methylprednisolone (n = 8; 15 mg/kg), 19 pigs were assigned to a brain-death procedure. The animals underwent hemodynamic evaluation at 1 and 5 hours after Cushing reflex (i.e., hypertension and bradycardia). The animals euthanized, and myocardial tissue was sampled. This was repeated in a control group (n = 8). At 5 hours after the Cushing reflex, brain death resulted in increased pulmonary artery pressure (27 ± 2 vs 18 ± 1 mm Hg) and in a 30% decreased ratio of end-systolic to pulmonary arterial elastances (Ees/Ea). Cardiac output and right atrial pressure did not change. This was prevented by methylprednisolone. Brain death-induced RV dysfunction was associated with increased RV expression of heme oxygenase-1, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IL-1 receptor-like (ST)-2, signal transducer and activator of transcription-3, intercellular adhesion molecules-1 and -2, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, and neutrophil infiltration, whereas IL-33 expression decreased. RV apoptosis was confirmed by terminal deoxynucleotide transferase-mediated deoxy uridine triphosphate nick-end labeling staining. Methylprednisolone pre-treatment prevented RV-arterial uncoupling and decreased RV expression of TNF-α, IL-1 receptor-like-2, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, and neutrophil infiltration. RV Ees/Ea was inversely correlated to RV TNF-α and IL-6 expression. Brain death-induced RV dysfunction is associated with RV activation of inflammation and apoptosis and is partly limited by methylprednisolone. Copyright © 2016

  18. Effect of Tiaoxin Recipe (调心方) on Spatial Memory and Energy Metabolism of Oxidation Injured Alzheimer's Disease Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱宏; 金国琴; 赵伟康; 张学礼

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To observe the effect of Tiaoxin Recipe (TXR) on the spatial memory, brain mitochondrial energy metabolism of oxidation injured Alzheimer's disease (AD) rats, and to explore the mechanism of TXR in treating AD. Methods: Eighty-eight SD rats were randomly divided into five groups (normal group, operative group, "AD" model group,TXR group and Aricept group). An oxygen free radical generation system (dihydroxy fumaric acid-trichloroferric-adenosine diphosphate, DHF-FeCl3-ADP) was used to create oxidation injured rat models mimic to AD; spatial learning and memory impairment (Morris water maze method), the activity of Succinate-oxidase, NADH-oxidase, CytC-oxidase (Clark oxygen electrode method) and the expression of cytochrome oxidase (CO)ⅡmRNA (in situ hybridization method) were observed. Results: Compared with the normal group, the spatial memory, activity of CytC-oxidase and COⅡmRNA expression of oxidation injured "AD" rats were obviously decreased; TXR, however, could improve these functions in "AD" rat models obviously. Conclusion: The mechanism of the action of TXR in treating AD was partly related to its effect on anti-oxidation which could improve brain mitochondrial energy metabolism.

  19. The Role of Free Radicals in the Aging Brain and Parkinson’s Disease: Convergence and Parallelism

    OpenAIRE

    Dong-Kug Choi; In Su Kim; Sushruta Koppula; Byung-Wook Kim; Sandeep Vasant More; Hyung-Woo Lim; Hemant Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Free radical production and their targeted action on biomolecules have roles in aging and age-related disorders such as Parkinson’s disease (PD). There is an age-associated increase in oxidative damage to the brain, and aging is considered a risk factor for PD. Dopaminergic neurons show linear fallout of 5–10% per decade with aging; however, the rate and intensity of neuronal loss in patients with PD is more marked than that of aging. Here, we enumerate the common link between aging and PD at...

  20. Self-identification with another person's face: the time relevant role of multimodal brain areas in the enfacement illusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bufalari, Ilaria; Porciello, Giuseppina; Sperduti, Marco; Minio-Paluello, Ilaria

    2015-04-01

    The illusory subjective experience of looking at one's own face while in fact looking at another person's face can surprisingly be induced by simple synchronized visuotactile stimulation of the two faces. A recent study (Apps MA, Tajadura-Jiménez A, Sereno M, Blanke O, Tsakiris M. Cereb Cortex. First published August 20, 2013; doi:10.1093/cercor/bht199) investigated for the first time the role of visual unimodal and temporoparietal multimodal brain areas in the enfacement illusion and suggested a model in which multisensory mechanisms are crucial to construct and update self-face representation. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  1. Valsartan attenuates intimal hyperplasia in balloon-injured rat aortic arteries through modulating the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2-angiotensin-(1-7)-Mas receptor axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yonghong; Cai, Shanglang; Wang, Qixin; Zhou, Jingwei; Hou, Bo; Yu, Haichu; Ge, Zhiming; Guan, Renyan; Liu, Xu

    2016-05-15

    The role of the Mas receptor in the activity of valsartan against intimal hyperplasia is unclear. Herein, we investigated the role of the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2)-angiotensin-(1-7)-Mas receptor axis on the activity of valsartan against intimal hyperplasiain balloon-injured rat aortic arteries. Wistar rats were randomized equally into the sham control group, injured group, and injured plus valsartan (20 mg/kg/d)-treated group. Valsartan significantly attenuated the vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and intimal and medial thickening on days 14 and 28 after injury. The angiotensin-(1-7) levels as well as ACE2 and Mas receptor mRNA/protein expression were significantly decreased in the injured rats, compared to the uninjured rats; meanwhile, the angiotensin II level as well as the ACE and AT1 receptor mRNA/protein expression were increased (all P valsartan significantly increased the angiotensin-(1-7) levels as well as ACE2 and Mas receptor mRNA/protein expression but decreased the angiotensin II level, ACE and AT1 receptor mRNA/protein expression, as well as the p-ERK protein expression, compared to the injured group (all P valsartan attenuates neointimal hyperplasiain balloon-injured rat aortic arteries through activation of the ACE2-angiotensin-(1-7)-Mas axis as well as inhibition of the ACE-angiotensin II-AT1 and p-ERK pathways. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Electrical stimulation promotes regeneration of injured oculomotor nerves in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Du

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Functional recovery after oculomotor nerve injury is very poor. Electrical stimulation has been shown to promote regeneration of injured nerves. We hypothesized that electrical stimulation would improve the functional recovery of injured oculomotor nerves. Oculomotor nerve injury models were created by crushing the right oculomotor nerves of adult dogs. Stimulating electrodes were positioned in both proximal and distal locations of the lesion, and non-continuous rectangular, biphasic current pulses (0.7 V, 5 Hz were administered 1 hour daily for 2 consecutive weeks. Analysis of the results showed that electrophysiological and morphological recovery of the injured oculomotor nerve was enhanced, indicating that electrical stimulation improved neural regeneration. Thus, this therapy has the potential to promote the recovery of oculomotor nerve dysfunction.

  3. Naftidrofuryl affects neurite regeneration by injured adult auditory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, P P; Staecker, H; Moonen, G; van de Water, T R

    1993-07-01

    Afferent auditory neurons are essential for the transmission of auditory information from Corti's organ to the central auditory pathway. Auditory neurons are very sensitive to acute insult and have a limited ability to regenerate injured neuronal processes. Therefore, these neurons appear to be a limiting factor in restoration of hearing function following an injury to the peripheral auditory receptor. In a previous study nerve growth factor (NGF) was shown to stimulate neurite repair but not survival of injured auditory neurons. In this study, we have demonstrated a neuritogenesis promoting effect of naftidrofuryl in an vitro model for injury to adult auditory neurons, i.e. dissociated cell cultures of adult rat spiral ganglia. Conversely, naftidrofuryl did not have any demonstrable survival promoting effect on these in vitro preparations of injured auditory neurons. The potential uses of this drug as a therapeutic agent in acute diseases of the inner ear are discussed in the light of these observations.

  4. Health and Occupational Outcomes Among Injured, Nonstandard Shift Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Imelda S; Smith, Peter M; Mustard, Cameron A; Gignac, Monique A M

    2015-11-01

    This study compares health and occupational outcomes following a work-related injury for nonstandard and day-shift workers. National Population Health Survey data were used to explore outcomes 2 years post-work injury. Retrospective-matched cohort analyses examined main effects and interactions of shift schedule and work injury with changes in health, shift schedule, and labor force status. Models were adjusted for respondent characteristics, baseline health status, and occupational strength requirements. Injured nonstandard shift workers reported lower health utility index scores, compared with uninjured and injured daytime workers and uninjured nonstandard-shift workers. No significant interactions between shift and injury were found with schedule change and leaving the labor force. Injured nonstandard-shift workers are as likely to remain employed as other groups, but may be vulnerable in terms of diminished health.

  5. Family members facilitating community re-integration and return to productivity following traumatic brain injury - motivations, roles and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Alicia; Lin, Jenny; Stergiou-Kita, Mary

    2016-01-01

    This study explores the experiences of family members in supporting community re-integration and return to productive occupations of the traumatic brain injury (TBI) survivor in order to: (i) describe family members' supportive roles, (ii) determine challenges family members experience in supporting the TBI survivor; and (iii) identify supports that family members require to maintain and enhance their roles. This qualitative descriptive study involved 14 interviews with immediate family members of TBI survivors. Data was analyzed using thematic analysis. Family members expressed strong motivation and engaged in six key roles to support TBI survivors: researcher, case manager, advocate, coach, activities of daily living (ADL)/instrumental ADLs and emotional supporter. Personal and family stressors and challenges navigating the health care system were perceived as challenges in meeting demands of their supportive roles. Stigma also presented a barrier to successful community and vocational re-integration. Subsequently, family members desired more education related to the functional implications of TBI, to be connected to health care and community resources, and sought a greater family-centred care approach. Family members require on-going counseling and community supports to prevent burnout and allow for their continued engagement in their supportive roles. Further education on how to navigate the health care system, access community programs and rights to workplace accommodation is also warranted. Family members are strongly motivated to support survivors' return to productive occupation following a traumatic brain injury, but require counseling and community support to enable their on-going engagement and prevent burnout. Family members can be further empowered through the implementation of family-centred care. Family members requested further education on the long-term functional implications of TBI, how to navigate the health care system, how to access community

  6. NNZ-2566 treatment inhibits neuroinflammation and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression induced by experimental penetrating ballistic-like brain injury in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tortella Frank C

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inflammatory cytokines play a crucial role in the pathophysiology of traumatic brain injury (TBI, exerting either deleterious effects on the progression of tissue damage or beneficial roles during recovery and repair. NNZ-2566, a synthetic analogue of the neuroprotective tripeptide Glypromate®, has been shown to be neuroprotective in animal models of brain injury. The goal of this study was to determine the effects of NNZ-2566 on inflammatory cytokine expression and neuroinflammation induced by penetrating ballistic-like brain injury (PBBI in rats. Methods NNZ-2566 or vehicle (saline was administered intravenously as a bolus injection (10 mg/kg at 30 min post-injury, immediately followed by a continuous infusion of NNZ-2566 (3 mg/kg/h, or equal volume of vehicle, for various durations. Inflammatory cytokine gene expression from the brain tissue of rats exposed to PBBI was evaluated using microarray, quantitative real time PCR (QRT-PCR, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA array. Histopathology of the injured brains was examined using hematoxylin and eosin (H&E and immunocytochemistry of inflammatory cytokine IL-1β. Results NNZ-2566 treatment significantly reduced injury-mediated up-regulation of IL-1β, TNF-α, E-selectin and IL-6 mRNA during the acute injury phase. ELISA cytokine array showed that NZ-2566 treatment significantly reduced levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, TNF-α and IFN-γ in the injured brain, but did not affect anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-6 levels. Conclusion Collectively, these results suggest that the neuroprotective effects of NNZ-2566 may, in part, be functionally attributed to the compound's ability to modulate expression of multiple neuroinflammatory mediators in the injured brain.

  7. Anxiety-related behavior in hyperhomocysteinemia induced by methionine nutritional overload in rats: role of the brain oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrncic, Dragan; Mikić, Jelena; Rasic-Markovic, Aleksandra; Velimirović, Milica; Stojković, Tihomir; Obrenović, Radmila; Rankov-Petrović, Bojana; Šušić, Veselinka; Djuric, Dragan; Petronijević, Nataša; Stanojlovic, Olivera

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a methionine-enriched diet on anxiety-related behavior in rats and to determine the role of the brain oxidative status in these alterations. Adult male Wistar rats were fed from the 30th to 60th postnatal day with standard or methionine-enriched diet (double content comparing with standard diet: 7.7 g/kg). Rats were tested in open field and light-dark tests and afterwards oxidative status in the different brain regions were determined. Hyperhomocysteinemia induced by methionine-enriched diet in this study decreased the number of rearings, as well as the time that these animals spent in the center of the open field, but increased index of thigmotaxy. Oxidative status was selectively altered in the examined regions. Lipid peroxidation was significantly increased in the cortex and nc. caudatus of rats developing hyperhomocysteinemia, but unaltered in the hippocampus and thalamus. Based on the results of this research, it could be concluded that hyperhomocysteinemia induced by methionine nutritional overload increased anxiety-related behavior in rats. These proanxiogenic effects could be, at least in part, a consequence of oxidative stress in the rat brain.

  8. Optimism and the brain: trait optimism mediates the protective role of the orbitofrontal cortex gray matter volume against anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolcos, Sanda; Hu, Yifan; Iordan, Alexandru D; Moore, Matthew; Dolcos, Florin

    2016-02-01

    Converging evidence identifies trait optimism and the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) as personality and brain factors influencing anxiety, but the nature of their relationships remains unclear. Here, the mechanisms underlying the protective role of trait optimism and of increased OFC volume against symptoms of anxiety were investigated in 61 healthy subjects, who completed measures of trait optimism and anxiety, and underwent structural scanning using magnetic resonance imaging. First, the OFC gray matter volume (GMV) was associated with increased optimism, which in turn was associated with reduced anxiety. Second, trait optimism mediated the relation between the left OFC volume and anxiety, thus demonstrating that increased GMV in this brain region protects against symptoms of anxiety through increased optimism. These results provide novel evidence about the brain-personality mechanisms protecting against anxiety symptoms in healthy functioning, and identify potential targets for preventive and therapeutic interventions aimed at reducing susceptibility and increasing resilience against emotional disturbances. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Role of the catechol group in the antioxidant and neuroprotective effects of virgin olive oil components in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Cruz, J P; Ruiz-Moreno, M I; Guerrero, A; López-Villodres, J A; Reyes, J J; Espartero, J L; Labajos, M T; González-Correa, J A

    2015-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the role of the catechol group in the antioxidant and neuroprotective effects of minor components of virgin olive oil in rat brain tissue. Hydroxytyrosol ethyl ether (HT, 2 OH), tyrosol ethyl ether (Ty, 1 OH) and 3,4-di-ortho-methylidene-hydroxytyrosol ethyl ether (MET, no OH) were compared. Oxidative stress was induced with ferrous salts (lipid peroxidation induction), diethylmaleate (depletion of glutathione) and hypoxia-reoxygenation in brain slices. Lipid peroxidation was inhibited in direct proportion to the number of OH groups: HT>Ty>MET. Exposure to HT led to partial recovery of the glutathione system after chemical inhibition or hypoxia-reoxygenation. All three compounds inhibited cell death in hypoxia-reoxygenation experiments (HT≥Ty>MET). Peroxynitrite formation (3-nitrotyrosine) and inflammatory mediators (prostaglandin E2 and interleukin 1ß) were inhibited by all three compounds. In conclusion, the presence of OH groups in the molecule of these phenolic compounds from virgin olive oil is a determinant factor in their antioxidant effect in brain tissue, but this antioxidant effect is not the only explanation for their neuroprotective effect. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Role of Positive Parenting in the Association Between Neighborhood Social Disadvantage and Brain Development Across Adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittle, Sarah; Vijayakumar, Nandita; Simmons, Julian G; Dennison, Meg; Schwartz, Orli; Pantelis, Christos; Sheeber, Lisa; Byrne, Michelle L; Allen, Nicholas B

    2017-08-01

    The negative effects of socioeconomic disadvantage on lifelong functioning are pronounced, with some evidence suggesting that these effects are mediated by changes in brain development. To our knowledge, no research has investigated whether parenting might buffer these negative effects. To establish whether positive parenting behaviors moderate the effects of socioeconomic disadvantage on brain development and adaptive functioning in adolescents. In this longitudinal study of adolescents from schools in Melbourne, Australia, data were collected at 3 assessments between 2004 and 2012. Data were analyzed between August 2016 and April 2017. Both family (parental income-to-needs, occupation, and education level) and neighborhood measures of socioeconomic disadvantage were assessed. Positive maternal parenting behaviors were observed during interactions in early adolescence. Structural magnetic resonance imaging scans at 3 times (early, middle, and late adolescence) from ages 11 to 20 years. Global and academic functioning was assessed during late adolescence. We used linear mixed models to examine the effect of family and neighborhood socioeconomic disadvantage as well as the moderating effect of positive parenting on adolescent brain development. We used mediation models to examine whether brain developmental trajectories predicted functional outcomes during late adolescence. Of the included 166 adolescents, 86 (51.8%) were male. We found that neighborhood, but not family, socioeconomic disadvantage was associated with altered brain development from early (mean [SD] age, 12.79 [0.425] years) to late (mean [SD] age, 19.08 [0.460] years) adolescence, predominantly in the temporal lobes (temporal cortex: random field theory corrected; left amygdala: B, -0.237; P development of dorsal frontal and lateral orbitofrontal cortices as well as the effects of family disadvantage on the development of the amygdala (occupation: B, 0.382; P = .004; income-to-needs: B, 27

  11. Comparison of postural stability between injured and uninjured ballet dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Cheng-Feng; Lee, I-Jung; Liao, Jung-Hsien; Wu, Hong-Wen; Su, Fong-Chin

    2011-06-01

    Ballet movements require a limited base of support; thus, ballet dancers require a high level of postural control. However, postural stability in ballet dancers is still unclear and needs to be understood. To evaluate ballet dancers' postural stability in performing single-leg standing, the en pointe task, and the first and fifth positions and to determine differences in task performance among healthy nondancers, healthy dancers, and dancers with ankle sprains. Controlled laboratory study. Injured dancers, uninjured dancers, and nondancers were recruited for this study (N = 33 age-matched participants; n= 11 per group). The tasks tested were single-leg standing with eyes open and closed, first position, fifth position, and en pointe. Center of pressure parameters were calculated from the ground-reaction force collected with 1 force plate. Analysis of variance was used to assess the differences of center of pressure parameters among 3 groups in single-leg standing; independent t test was used to examine the differences of center of pressure parameters between injured and uninjured dancers. During single-leg standing, injured dancers had significantly greater maximum displacement in the medial-lateral direction and total trajectory of center of pressure, compared with the uninjured dancers and nondancers. During the first and fifth positions, the injured dancers demonstrated significantly greater standard deviation of center of pressure position in the medial-lateral and anterior-posterior directions, compared with the uninjured dancers. During en pointe, the injured dancers had significantly greater maximum displacement in the medial-lateral direction and the anterior-posterior direction, compared with the uninjured dancers. The injured and uninjured dancers demonstrated differences in postural stability in the medial-lateral direction during single-leg standing and the ballet postures. Although the injured dancers received ballet training, their postural stability

  12. Lipopolysaccharide-induced blood-brain barrier disruption: roles of cyclooxygenase, oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, and elements of the neurovascular unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, William A; Gray, Alicia M; Erickson, Michelle A; Salameh, Therese S; Damodarasamy, Mamatha; Sheibani, Nader; Meabon, James S; Wing, Emily E; Morofuji, Yoichi; Cook, David G; Reed, May J

    2015-11-25

    Disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) occurs in many diseases and is often mediated by inflammatory and neuroimmune mechanisms. Inflammation is well established as a cause of BBB disruption, but many mechanistic questions remain. We used lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to induce inflammation and BBB disruption in mice. BBB disruption was measured using (14)C-sucrose and radioactively labeled albumin. Brain cytokine responses were measured using multiplex technology and dependence on cyclooxygenase (COX) and oxidative stress determined by treatments with indomethacin and N-acetylcysteine. Astrocyte and microglia/macrophage responses were measured using brain immunohistochemistry. In vitro studies used Transwell cultures of primary brain endothelial cells co- or tri-cultured with astrocytes and pericytes to measure effects of LPS on transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER), cellular distribution of tight junction proteins, and permeability to (14)C-sucrose and radioactive albumin. In comparison to LPS-induced weight loss, the BBB was relatively resistant to LPS-induced disruption. Disruption occurred only with the highest dose of LPS and was most evident in the frontal cortex, thalamus, pons-medulla, and cerebellum with no disruption in the hypothalamus. The in vitro and in vivo patterns of LPS-induced disruption as measured with (14)C-sucrose, radioactive albumin, and TEER suggested involvement of both paracellular and transcytotic pathways. Disruption as measured with albumin and (14)C-sucrose, but not TEER, was blocked by indomethacin. N-acetylcysteine did not affect disruption. In vivo, the measures of neuroinflammation induced by LPS were mainly not reversed by indomethacin. In vitro, the effects on LPS and indomethacin were not altered when brain endothelial cells (BECs) were cultured with astrocytes or pericytes. The BBB is relatively resistant to LPS-induced disruption with some brain regions more vulnerable than others. LPS-induced disruption appears is

  13. Role of Omega 3 Fatty Acids Against Ehrlich Ascites Carcinoma-Induced Hepatic and Brain Dysfunctions in Gamma Irradiated Mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Gharib, M.M.M.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is a deadly disease that has touched the lives of many people in the world today. Omega 3 essential fatty acids (ω-3 FAs); found in high concentrations in fish oil, claim a plethora of health benefits. The present study aimed to evaluate the role of ω-3 FAs supplementation either alone or combined with fractionated γ-radiation exposure against Ehrlich solid tumor-induced inflammation, oxidative stress, biochemical alterations and histopathological changes in the liver, brain and tumor tissues of Albino mice. ω-3 FAs were orally administered via gavages to mice for a period of 30 consecutive days at a dose of 300 mg/kg body weight. On the 7th day of experiment, mice were subcutaneously transplanted in the neck region with 0.2 ml of Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells for solid tumor induction and on the 17th and 25th days, mice were exposed to a fractionated whole body γ-radiation (0.5 Gy/week for two weeks). The results of the present work showed that Ehrlich carcinoma (EC) and/or γ-irradiation led to systemic inflammation (elevated TNF-α, TLC and CRP levels), hepatic oxidative stress (elevated TBARs level, decreased GSH, GSH-Px, CAT and SOD levels) and biochemical alterations in liver (elevated AST, ALT, ALP and LDH activities) and brain (dopamine, EP,NE and serotonin levels) tissues. On the other hand, ω-3 FAs supplementation to the experimentally irradiated EC-bearing mice, significantly reduced tumor size, depressed the concentrations of inflammatory markers, reduced oxidative stress and also ameliorated the biochemical alterations in liver and brain tissues. Histopathological examinations showed that treatment with ω-3 FAs recorded great destruction of tumor tissue, great disappearance of metastatic EC cells from the liver tissue and normal appearance in cerebrum and cerebellum of brain tissue layers in EC-bearing mice. Combined treatment of EC-bearing mice with ω-3 FAs and γ-irradiation showed necrotic cells and remnant tumor cells in tumor

  14. Coagulopathy and transfusion requirements in war related penetrating traumatic brain injury. A single centre study in a French role 3 medical treatment facility in Afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordes, J; Joubert, C; Esnault, P; Montcriol, A; Nguyen, C; Meaudre, E; Dulou, R; Dagain, A

    2017-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury associated coagulopathy is frequent, either in isolated traumatic brain injury in civilian practice and in combat traumatic brain injury. In war zone, it is a matter of concern because head and neck are the second most frequent site of wartime casualty burden. Data focusing on transfusion requirements in patients with war related TBI coagulopathy are limited. A descriptive analysis was conducted of 77 penetrating traumatic brain injuries referred to a French role 3 medical treatment facility in Kabul, Afghanistan, deployed on the Kabul International Airport (KaIA), over a 30 months period. On 77 patients, 23 died during the prehospital phase and were not included in the study. Severe traumatic brain injury represented 50% of patients. Explosions were the most common injury mechanism. Extracranial injuries were present in 72% of patients. Traumatic brain injury coagulopathy was diagnosed in 67% of patients at role 3 admission. Red blood cell units (RBCu) were transfused in 39 (72%) patients, French lyophilized plasma (FLYP) in 41 (76%), and fresh whole blood (FWB) in 17 (31%). The results of this study support previous observations of coagulopathy as a frequent complication of traumatic brain injury. The majority of patients with war related penetrating traumatic brain injury presented with extracranial lesions. Most of them required a high level of transfusion capacity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Auditory Brain Stem Processing in Reptiles and Amphibians: Roles of Coupled Ears

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willis, Katie L.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob; Carr, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Comparative approaches to the auditory system have yielded great insight into the evolution of sound localization circuits, particularly within the nonmammalian tetrapods. The fossil record demonstrates multiple appearances of tympanic hearing, and examination of the auditory brain stem of various...... groups can reveal the organizing effects of the ear across taxa. If the peripheral structures have a strongly organizing influence on the neural structures, then homologous neural structures should be observed only in groups with a homologous tympanic ear. Therefore, the central auditory systems...... of anurans (frogs), reptiles (including birds), and mammals should all be more similar within each group than among the groups. Although there is large variation in the peripheral auditory system, there is evidence that auditory brain stem nuclei in tetrapods are homologous and have similar functions among...

  16. Nanoparticle technology for treatment of Parkinson's disease: the role of surface phenomena in reaching the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyva-Gómez, Gerardo; Cortés, Hernán; Magaña, Jonathan J; Leyva-García, Norberto; Quintanar-Guerrero, David; Florán, Benjamín

    2015-07-01

    The absence of a definitive treatment for Parkinson's disease has driven the emerging investigation in the search for novel therapeutic alternatives. At present, the formulation of different drugs on nanoparticles has represented several advantages over conventional treatments. This type of multifunctional carrier, owing to its size and composition, has different interactions in biological systems that can lead to a decrease in ability to cross the blood-brain barrier. Therefore, this review focuses on the latest advances in obtaining nanoparticles for Parkinson's disease and provides an overview of technical aspects in the design of brain drug delivery of nanoparticles and an analysis of surface phenomena, a key aspect in the development of functional nanoparticles for Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Methyl mercury uptake across bovine brain capillary endothelial cells in vitro: The role of amino acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aschner, M.; Clarkson, T.W.

    1989-01-01

    Previous studies in the rat in vivo have demonstrated that co-injection of methyl mercury (MeHg) with L-cysteine into the common carotid artery enhances brain Hg levels folowing a single capillary pass through the CNS vasculature. In order to elucidate the relationship between MeHg transport and the neutral amino acid transport carrier system, regulatory aspects of MeHg transport across the bovine blood-brain barrier were investigated in isolated brain microvessel preparations. Following 1 hour co-incubations of 203 Hg-MeHgCl with 0.1 mM L-cysteine at 37 deg. C, 203 Hg uptake by suspended microvessels was significantly increased (P 203 Hg was abolished by co-incubations of microvessels with 0.1 mM L-cysteine-L-methionine, or 0.1 mM L-cysteine plus AT-125 (alpha S, 5S)-alpha-amino-3-chloro-4,5-dihydro-5-isoxazolacetic acid), an irreversible inhibitor of gamma-glutamyl-transpeptidase. One hr co-incubations of bovine capilaries with 203 Hg-MeHgCl and 0.1 mM D-cysteine at 37 deg. C or 0.1 mM L-cysteine at 0 deg. did not increase rat of 203 Hg uptake compared with controls. These results indicate that L-cysteine enhances the rate of capillary MeHg uptake. The accumulation of 203 Hg in the bovine microvessels appears to be a carrier-mediated process. It is inhibited by L-methionin, a competitive substrate for neutral amino acid transport, and by AT-125. Capillary uptake of 203 Hg is stereospecific to the L-enantiomorph of cystine, suggesting selective uptake of MeHg across the blood-brain barrier. The data emphasize the relationship between the L-enantiomorph neutral amino acid carrier system and MeHg transport across the capillaries. (author)

  18. Brain responses to repeated visual experience among low and high sensation seekers: role of boredom susceptibility

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Yang; Lianekhammy, Joann; Lawson, Adam; Guo, Chunyan; ynam, Donald; Joseph, Jane E.; Gold, Brian T.; Kelly, Thomas H.

    2009-01-01

    To better understand individual differences in sensation seeking and its components, including boredom susceptibility and experience seeking, we examined brain responses of high and low sensation seekers during repeated visual experience. Individuals scoring in the top and bottom quartiles from a college-aged population on the Brief Sensation-Seeking Scale (BSSS) participated in an event-related potentials (ERPs) experiment. Line drawings of common objects were randomly intermixed and present...

  19. Antioxidant Role of Pomegranates on Liver and Brain Tissues of Rats Exposed to an Organophosphorus Insecticide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd Elmonem, H.A.

    2014-01-01

    Toxicities of organophosphorus insecticides cause oxidative damage on many organs such as the liver and brain due to generation of reactive oxygen species. Pomegranate is among the richest fruit in poly - phenols. The aim of this study was to compare between the antioxidant strength of pomegranate juice (PJ) and pomegranate molasses (PM) and their effects on alanine transferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and total protein (TP) in liver and levels of malondialdehyde (MAD), reduced glutathione (GSH) and nitric oxide (NO) in rat liver and brain tissues exposed to 1/10 LD 50 diazinon (DI). Six groups each of 6 male albino rats were used comprising control, DI, PJ, PM, PJ + DI and PM + DI for 15 days. The activities of ALT, AST, and TP concentration in liver have been increased due to treatment of rats with DI. These increases restored to normalcy when rats were supplemented with PJ or PM with DI. The results demonstrate that treatment with DI induced significant increase in MDA and NO concentrations and significant decrease in GSH levels of liver and brain tissues. The administration of PJ or PM along with DI significant decrease in MDA and NO levels and significant increase in GSH level compared to DI-group. The present study suggest that PJ or PM has a potential protective effect as it can elevate antioxidant defense system, lessens induced oxidative dam - ages and protect the brain and liver tissue against DI-induced toxicity. In addition, comaring PJ with PM it was noticed that PJ had higher antioxidant activity as evidenced by increased GSH content and decreased NO level in the liver by greater extend than PM.

  20. Protective role of Cynodon dactylon in ameliorating the aluminium-induced neurotoxicity in rat brain regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumathi, Thangarajan; Shobana, Chandrasekar; Kumari, Balasubramanian Rathina; Nandhini, Devarajulu Nisha

    2011-12-01

    Cynodon dactylon (Poaceae) is a creeping grass used as a traditional ayurvedic medicine in India. Aluminium-induced neurotoxicity is well known and different salts of aluminium have been reported to accelerate damage to biomolecules like lipids, proteins and nucleic acids. The objective of the present study was to investigate whether the aqueous extract of C. dactylon (AECD) could potentially prevent aluminium-induced neurotoxicity in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum of the rat brain. Male albino rats were administered with AlCl(3) at a dose of 4.2 mg/kg/day i.p. for 4 weeks. Experimental rats were given C. dactylon extract in two different doses of 300 mg and 750 mg/keg/day orally 1 h prior to the AlCl(3) administration for 4 weeks. At the end of the experiments, antioxidant status and activities of ATPases in cerebral cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum of rat brain were measured. Aluminium administration significantly decreased the level of GSH and the activities of SOD, GPx, GST, Na(+)/K(+) ATPase, and Mg(2+) ATPase and increased the level of lipid peroxidation (LPO) in all the brain regions when compared with control rats. Pre-treatment with AECD at a dose of 750 mg/kg b.w increased the antioxidant status and activities of membrane-bound enzymes (Na(+)/K(+) ATPase and Mg(2+) ATPase) and also decreased the level of LPO significantly, when compared with aluminium-induced rats. The results of this study indicated that AECD has potential to protect the various brain regions from aluminium-induced neurotoxicity.

  1. Recruitment of neutrophils across the blood-brain barrier: the role of posttraumatic hepatic ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mantovani Mario

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To study the effects of total hepatic ischemia, and reperfusion on the accumulation of neutrophils in the brain of rats submitted to normovolemic conditions as well as to controlled hemorrhagic shock state. METHODS: Thirty two adult male Wistar rats, were divided into four groups: the Control group, was submitted to the standard procedures for a period of 60 min of observation; Shock group, was submitted to controlled hemorrhagic shock (mean arterial blood pressure=40mmHg, 20min followed by volemic resuscitation (lactated Ringer's solution + blood, 3:1 and reperfusion for 60min; Pringle group, was submitted to total hepatic ischemia for 15min and reperfusion for 60min. The total group was submitted to controlled hemorrhagic shock for 20min followed by volemic resuscitation (lactated Ringer's solution + blood, 3:1, total hepatic ischemia for 15min and reperfusion for 60min. Measurements of serum lactate and base excess were used to characterize the hemorrhagic shock state with low tissue perfusion. The counting of neutrophils on the brain was performed after the euthanasia of animals. RESULTS: The values for the counting of neutrophils on the brain indicate that did not occur difference among studied groups (p=0.196 (Control 0.12± 0.11, Shock 0.12± 0.13, Pringle 0.02± 0.04, Total 0.14± 0.16. CONCLUSION: Hemorrhagic shock associated to total hepatic ischemia for 15 minutes, followed by 60 minutes of reperfusion, did not causes significant neutrophils accumulation in the brain of rats.

  2. Refining the Role of 5-HT in Postnatal Development of Brain Circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Teissier

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Changing serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT brain levels during critical periods in development has long-lasting effects on brain function, particularly on later anxiety/depression-related behaviors in adulthood. A large part of the known developmental effects of 5-HT occur during critical periods of postnatal life, when activity-dependent mechanisms remodel neural circuits. This was first demonstrated for the maturation of sensory brain maps in the barrel cortex and the visual system. More recently this has been extended to the 5-HT raphe circuits themselves and to limbic circuits. Recent studies overviewed here used new genetic models in mice and rats and combined physiological and structural approaches to provide new insights on the cellular and molecular mechanisms controlled by 5-HT during late stages of neural circuit maturation in the raphe projections, the somatosensory cortex and the visual system. Similar mechanisms appear to be also involved in the maturation of limbic circuits such as prefrontal circuits. The latter are of particular relevance to understand the impact of transient 5-HT dysfunction during postnatal life on psychiatric illnesses and emotional disorders in adult life.

  3. Resilience in mathematics after early brain injury: The roles of parental input and early plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Dana E; Demir-Lira, Özlem Ece; Gibson, Dominic J; Congdon, Eliza L; Levine, Susan C

    2018-04-01

    Children with early focal unilateral brain injury show remarkable plasticity in language development. However, little is known about how early brain injury influences mathematical learning. Here, we examine early number understanding, comparing cardinal number knowledge of typically developing children (TD) and children with pre- and perinatal lesions (BI) between 42 and 50 months of age. We also examine how this knowledge relates to the number words children hear from their primary caregivers early in life. We find that children with BI, are, on average, slightly behind TD children in both cardinal number knowledge and later mathematical performance, and show slightly slower learning rates than TD children in cardinal number knowledge during the preschool years. We also find that parents' "number talk" to their toddlers predicts later mathematical ability for both TD children and children with BI. These findings suggest a relatively optimistic story in which neural plasticity is at play in children's mathematical development following early brain injury. Further, the effects of early number input suggest that intervening to enrich the number talk that children with BI hear during the preschool years could narrow the math achievement gap. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. The Role of Intrinsic Brain Functional Connectivity in Vulnerability and Resilience to Bipolar Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucet, Gaelle E; Bassett, Danielle S; Yao, Nailin; Glahn, David C; Frangou, Sophia

    2017-12-01

    Bipolar disorder is a heritable disorder characterized by mood dysregulation associated with brain functional dysconnectivity. Previous research has focused on the detection of risk- and disease-associated dysconnectivity in individuals with bipolar disorder and their first-degree relatives. The present study seeks to identify adaptive brain connectivity features associated with resilience, defined here as avoidance of illness or delayed illness onset in unaffected siblings of patients with bipolar disorder. Graph theoretical methods were used to examine global and regional brain network topology in head-motion-corrected resting-state functional MRI data acquired from 78 patients with bipolar disorder, 64 unaffected siblings, and 41 healthy volunteers. Global network properties were preserved in patients and their siblings while both groups showed reductions in the cohesiveness of the sensorimotor network. In the patient group, these sensorimotor network abnormalities were coupled with reduced integration of core default mode network regions in the ventromedial cortex and hippocampus. Conversely, integration of the default mode network was increased in the sibling group compared with both the patient group and the healthy volunteer group. The authors found that trait-related vulnerability to bipolar disorder was associated with reduced resting-state cohesiveness of the sensorimotor network in patients with bipolar disorder. However, integration of the default mode network emerged as a key feature differentiating disease expression and resilience between the patients and their siblings. This is indicative of the presence of neural mechanisms that may promote resilience, or at least delay illness onset.

  5. The role of brain peptides in the reproduction of blue gourami males (Trichogaster trichopterus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Gal; Degani, Gad

    2013-10-01

    In all vertebrates, reproduction and growth are closely linked and both are controlled by complex hormonal interactions at the brain-pituitary level. In this study, we focused on the reciprocal interactions between brain peptides that regulate growth and reproductive functions in a teleostei fish (blue gourami Trichogaster trichopterus). An increase in gonadotropin-releasing hormone 1 (GnRH1) gene expression was detected during ontogeny, and this peptide increased growth hormone (GH) and β follicle-stimulating hormone (βFSH) gene expression in pituitary cell culture. However, although no change in gonadotropin-releasing hormone 2 (GnRH2) gene expression during the reproductive cycle or sexual behavior was detected, a stimulatory effect of this peptide on β gonadotropins (βGtH) gene expression was observed. In addition, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide 38 (PACAP-38) inhibited GnRH-analog-induced βFSH gene expression, and co-treatment of cells with GnRH-analog and PACAP-38 inhibited GnRH-analog-stimulatory and PACAP-38-inhibitory effects on GH gene expression. These findings together with previous studies were used to create a model summarizing the mechanism of brain peptides (GnRH, PACAP and its related peptide) and the relationship to reproduction and growth through pituitary hormone gene expression during ontogenesis and reproductive stages in blue gourami. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. DNA damage in the oligodendrocyte lineage and its role in brain aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Kai-Hei; Herrup, Karl

    2017-01-01

    Myelination is a recent evolutionary addition that significantly enhances the speed of transmission in the neural network. Even slight defects in myelin integrity impair performance and enhance the risk of neurological disorders. Indeed, myelin degeneration is an early and well-recognized neuropathology that is age associated, but appears before cognitive decline. Myelin is only formed by fully differentiated oligodendrocytes, but the entire oligodendrocyte lineage are clear targets of the altered chemistry of the aging brain. As in neurons, unrepaired DNA damage accumulates in the postmitotic oligodendrocyte genome during normal aging, and indeed may be one of the upstream causes of cellular aging - a fact well illustrated by myelin co-morbidity in premature aging syndromes arising from deficits in DNA repair enzymes. The clinical and experimental evidence from Alzheimer's disease, progeroid syndromes, ataxia-telangiectasia and other conditions strongly suggest that oligodendrocytes may in fact be uniquely vulnerable to oxidative DNA damage. If this damage remains unrepaired, as is increasingly true in the aging brain, myelin gene transcription and oligodendrocyte differentiation is impaired. Delineating the relationships between early myelin loss and DNA damage in brain aging will offer an additional dimension outside the neurocentric view of neurodegenerative disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Role of the blood–brain barrier in the evolution of feeding and cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, William A

    2012-01-01

    The blood–brain barrier (BBB) regulates the blood-to-brain passage of gastrointestinal hormones, thus informing the brain about feeding and nutritional status. Disruption of this communication results in dysregulation of feeding and body weight control. Leptin, which crosses the BBB to inform the CNS about adiposity, provides an example. Impaired leptin transport, especially coupled with central resistance, results in obesity. Various substances/conditions regulate leptin BBB transport. For example, triglycerides inhibit leptin transport. This may represent an evolutionary adaptation in that hypertriglyceridemia occurs during starvation. Inhibition of leptin, an anorectic, during starvation could have survival advantages. The large number of other substances that influence feeding is explained by the complexity of feeding. This complexity includes cognitive aspects; animals in the wild are faced with cost/benefit analyses to feed in the safest, most economical way. This cognitive aspect partially explains why so many feeding substances affect neurogenesis, neuroprotection, and cognition. The relation between triglycerides and cognition may be partially mediated through triglyceride's ability to regulate the BBB transport of cognitively active gastrointestinal hormones such as leptin, insulin, and ghrelin. PMID:22612379

  8. Role of the blood-brain barrier in the evolution of feeding and cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, William A

    2012-08-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) regulates the blood-to-brain passage of gastrointestinal hormones, thus informing the brain about feeding and nutritional status. Disruption of this communication results in dysregulation of feeding and body weight control. Leptin, which crosses the BBB to inform the CNS about adiposity, provides an example. Impaired leptin transport, especially coupled with central resistance, results in obesity. Various substances/conditions regulate leptin BBB transport. For example, triglycerides inhibit leptin transport. This may represent an evolutionary adaptation in that hypertriglyceridemia occurs during starvation. Inhibition of leptin, an anorectic, during starvation could have survival advantages. The large number of other substances that influence feeding is explained by the complexity of feeding. This complexity includes cognitive aspects; animals in the wild are faced with cost/benefit analyses to feed in the safest, most economical way. This cognitive aspect partially explains why so many feeding substances affect neurogenesis, neuroprotection, and cognition. The relation between triglycerides and cognition may be partially mediated through triglyceride's ability to regulate the BBB transport of cognitively active gastrointestinal hormones such as leptin, insulin, and ghrelin. © 2012 New York Academy of Sciences.

  9. Trajectories of life satisfaction after traumatic brain injury: Influence of life roles, age, cognitive disability, and depressive symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juengst, Shannon B; Adams, Leah M; Bogner, Jennifer A; Arenth, Patricia M; O'Neil-Pirozzi, Therese M; Dreer, Laura E; Hart, Tessa; Bergquist, Thomas F; Bombardier, Charles H; Dijkers, Marcel P; Wagner, Amy K

    2015-11-01

    (a) Identify life satisfaction trajectories after moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI); (b) establish a predictive model for these trajectories across the first 5 years postinjury; and (c) describe differences in these life satisfaction trajectory groups, focusing on age, depressive symptoms, disability, and participation in specific life roles. Analysis of the longitudinal TBI Model Systems National Database was performed on data collected prospectively at 1-, 2-, and 5-years post-TBI. Participants (n = 3,012) had a moderate to severe TBI and were 16 years old and older. Four life satisfaction trajectories were identified across the first 5 years postinjury, including: stable satisfaction, initial satisfaction declining, initial dissatisfaction improving, and stable dissatisfaction. Age, depressive symptoms, cognitive disability, and life role participation as a worker, leisure participant, and/ or religious participant at 1-year postinjury significantly predicted trajectory group membership. Life role participation and depressive symptoms were strong predictors of life satisfaction trajectories across the first 5 years post-TBI. The previously documented loss of life roles and prevalence of depression after a moderate to severe TBI make this a vulnerable population for whom low or declining life satisfaction is a particularly high risk. Examining individual life role participation may help to identify relevant foci for community-based rehabilitation interventions or supports. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. Roles of unsaturated fatty acids (especially omega-3 fatty acids) in the brain at various ages and during ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourre, J M

    2004-01-01

    Among various organs, in the brain, the fatty acids most extensively studied are omega-3 fatty acids. Alpha-linolenic acid (18:3omega3) deficiency alters the structure and function of membranes and induces minor cerebral dysfunctions, as demonstrated in animal models and subsequently in human infants. Even though the brain is materially an organ like any other, that is to say elaborated from substances present in the diet (sometimes exclusively), for long it was not accepted that food can have an influence on brain structure, and thus on its function. Lipids, and especially omega-3 fatty acids, provided the first coherent experimental demonstration of the effect of diet (nutrients) on the structure and function of the brain. In fact the brain, after adipose tissue, is the organ richest in lipids, whose only role is to participate in membrane structure. First it was shown that the differentiation and functioning of cultured brain cells requires not only alpha-linolenic acid (the major component of the omega-3, omega3 family), but also the very long omega-3 and omega-6 carbon chains (1). It was then demonstrated that alpha-linolenic acid deficiency alters the course of brain development, perturbs the composition and physicochemical properties of brain cell membranes, neurones, oligodendrocytes, and astrocytes (2). This leads to physicochemical modifications, induces biochemical and physiological perturbations, and results in neurosensory and behavioural upset (3). Consequently, the nature of polyunsaturated fatty acids (in particular omega-3) present in formula milks for infants (premature and term) conditions the visual and cerebral abilities, including intellectual. Moreover, dietary omega-3 fatty acids are certainly involved in the prevention of some aspects of cardiovascular disease (including at the level of cerebral vascularization), and in some neuropsychiatric disorders, particularly depression, as well as in dementia, notably Alzheimer's disease. Recent

  11. ROLE OF BRAIN-DERIVED NEUROTROPHIC FACTOR (BDNF IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF COGNTIVE DYSFUNCTION IN PATIENTS WITH TYPE 2 DIABETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Vladimirovna Gatskikh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the heavy progressive vascular complications of type 2 diabetes is a central nervous system, manifesting cognitive dysfunction due to metabolic changes. Goal. Defining the role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF in the diagnosis of cognitive dysfunction in patients with type 2 diabetes. Materials and methods. The study involved 83 patients with type 2 diabetes at the age of 40 - 70 years. Complex examination included clinical and laboratory examination, neuropsychological testing. To screen for cognitive impairment used the Montreal Cognitive Assessment Scale (MOS test. To identify early markers of cognitive impairment was determined the level of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF. Results. The study found a negative correlation between the level of BDNF and the HbA1c (r = - 0,494, p = 0.01, fasting glucose (r = - 0,499, p = 0.01, and a positive relationship between the level of BDNF and cognitive function in patients with type 2 diabetes. Conclusion. In patients with type 2 diabetes revealed cognitive dysfunction in the form of reduced memory, attention, optical-dimensional activity that correlated with chronic hyperglycemia. The role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF in the complex diagnosis of cognitive dysfunction in patients with type 2 diabetes. With an increase in HbA1c in patients with type 2 diabetes reduces the level of BDNF in the blood plasma, and a decline in cognitive function. Recommended use of BDNF as an additional marker of cognitive dysfunction in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  12. The role of multidrug resistance protein (MRP-1) as an active efflux transporter on blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingineni, Karthik; Belekar, Vilas; Tangadpalliwar, Sujit R; Garg, Prabha

    2017-05-01

    Drugs acting on central nervous system (CNS) may take longer duration to reach the market as these compounds have a higher attrition rate in clinical trials due to the complexity of the brain, side effects, and poor blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability compared to non-CNS-acting compounds. The roles of active efflux transporters with BBB are still unclear. The aim of the present work was to develop a predictive model for BBB permeability that includes the MRP-1 transporter, which is considered as an active efflux transporter. A support vector machine model was developed for the classification of MRP-1 substrates and non-substrates, which was validated with an external data set and Y-randomization method. An artificial neural network model has been developed to evaluate the role of MRP-1 on BBB permeation. A total of nine descriptors were selected, which included molecular weight, topological polar surface area, ClogP, number of hydrogen bond donors, number of hydrogen bond acceptors, number of rotatable bonds, P-gp, BCRP, and MRP-1 substrate probabilities for model development. We identified 5 molecules that fulfilled all criteria required for passive permeation of BBB, but they all have a low logBB value, which suggested that the molecules were effluxed by the MRP-1 transporter.

  13. Inhibition of 2-arachydonoylgycerol degradation attenuates orofacial neuropathic pain in trigeminal nerve-injured mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamimura, Rantaro; Hossain, Mohammad Z; Unno, Shumpei; Ando, Hiroshi; Masuda, Yuji; Takahashi, Kojiro; Otake, Masanori; Saito, Isao; Kitagawa, Junichi

    2018-03-24

    Current therapeutics are not effective for orofacial neuropathic pain, and better options are needed. The present study used inferior orbital nerve (ION)-injured mice to investigate the effect of inhibiting monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL), an enzyme that degrades the major endocannabinoid 2-arachydonoylgycerol (2-AG) in orofacial neuropathic pain. The head-withdrawal threshold to mechanical stimulation of the whisker pad was reduced on days 3, 5, and 7 after ION injury. Injection of JZL184, a selective inhibitor of MAGL, on day 7 after ION injury attenuated the reduction in head-withdrawal threshold at 2 h after administration. Moreover, the numbers of MAGL-immunoreactive neurons in the trigeminal subnucleus caudalis (Vc) and upper cervical spinal cord (C1-C2) were significantly greater in ION-injured mice than in sham-operated mice but were reduced after administration of JZL184. The increase in MAGL immunoreactivity suggests that increased 2-AG production is followed by rapid enzymatic degradation of 2-AG. JZL184 inhibited this degradation and thus increased 2-AG concentration in the brain, particularly in the Vc and C1-C2 regions, thus attenuating pain. Our findings suggest that inhibition of 2-AG degradation by MAGL inhibitors is a promising therapeutic option for treatment of orofacial neuropathic pain.

  14. In-hospital mortality pattern of severely injured children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Do, Hien Quoc; Steinmetz, Jacob; Rasmussen, Lars S

    2012-01-01

    the mortality pattern of severely injured children admitted to a Danish level I trauma centre. METHODS: We included trauma patients aged 15 years or less, who subsequent a trauma team activation were admitted during the 9-year period 1999-2007. Data were collected prospectively for subjects who had a length...

  15. Effect of sildenafil on erectile dysfunction in spinal Cord injured ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of sildenafil on erectile dysfunction in spinal Cord injured patients. ... Trauma was the etiology in 87.5% of the cases (44% were road accidents). 12/16 patients were paraplegics (10 above ... in SCI patients. This approach is compatible with the efforts to improve the quality of life and rehabilitation of these patients.

  16. The acutely ACL injured knee assessed by MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frobell, R B; Roos, H P; Roos, E M

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To map by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and quantitative MRI (qMRI) concomitant fractures and meniscal injuries, and location and volume of traumatic bone marrow lesions (BMLs) in the acutely anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injured knee. To relate BML location and volume to cortic...

  17. Replantation and revascularization vs. amputation in injured digits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulders, Marjolein A. M.; Neuhaus, Valentin; Becker, Stéphanie J. E.; Lee, Sang-Gil; Ring, David C.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze factors associated with the decision to replant or revascularize rather than amputate an injured digit as well as factors associated with successful replantation or revascularization. We reviewed 315 complete and subtotal amputations at or proximal to the

  18. Long-term functional health status of severely injured patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holtslag, H. R.; Post, M. W.; Lindeman, E.; Van der Werken, Chr.

    Background: Studies of the consequences of major trauma have traditionally focused on mortality rates. The aims of this study were, firstly, to investigate the long-term functional health status in a large, unselected group of severely injured patients and to compare this with normative data, and

  19. Oxygen--a limiting factor for brain recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadanny, Amir; Efrati, Shai

    2015-09-01

    Effective brain metabolism is highly dependent on a narrow therapeutic window of oxygen. In major insults to the brain (e.g., intracerebral hemorrhage), a slight decrease in oxygen supply, as occurs in a hypobaric environment at high altitude, has devastating effects on the injured brain tissue. Conversely, increasing brain oxygenation, by the use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy, can improve brain metabolism and its dependent regenerative processes.

  20. Tobacco Smoke Exposure Impairs Brain Insulin/IGF Signaling: Potential Co-Factor Role in Neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deochand, Chetram; Tong, Ming; Agarwal, Amit R; Cadenas, Enrique; de la Monte, Suzanne M

    2016-01-01

    Human studies suggest tobacco smoking is a risk factor for cognitive impairment and neurodegeneration, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, experimental data linking tobacco smoke exposures to underlying mediators of neurodegeneration, including impairments in brain insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling in AD are lacking. This study tests the hypothesis that cigarette smoke (CS) exposures can impair brain insulin/IGF signaling and alter expression of AD-associated proteins. Adult male A/J mice were exposed to air for 8 weeks (A8), CS for 4 or 8 weeks (CS4, CS8), or CS8 followed by 2 weeks recovery (CS8+R). Gene expression was measured by qRT-PCR analysis and proteins were measured by multiplex bead-based or direct binding duplex ELISAs. CS exposure effects on insulin/IGF and insulin receptor substrate (IRS) proteins and phosphorylated proteins were striking compared with the mRNA. The main consequences of CS4 or CS8 exposures were to significantly reduce insulin R, IGF-1R, IRS-1, and tyrosine phosphorylated insulin R and IGF-1R proteins. Paradoxically, these effects were even greater in the CS8+R group. In addition, relative levels of S312-IRS-1, which inhibits downstream signaling, were increased in the CS4, CS8, and CS8+R groups. Correspondingly, CS and CS8+R exposures inhibited expression of proteins and phosphoproteins required for signaling through Akt, PRAS40, and/or p70S6K, increased AβPP-Aβ, and reduced ASPH protein, which is a target of insulin/IGF-1 signaling. Secondhand CS exposures caused molecular and biochemical abnormalities in brain that overlap with the findings in AD, and many of these effects were sustained or worsened despite short-term CS withdrawal.

  1. Histone deacetylases exert class specific roles in conditioning the brain and heart against acute ischemic injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sverre Erik Aune

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Ischemia-reperfusion (IR injury comprises a significant portion of morbidity and mortality from heart and brain diseases worldwide. This enduring clinical problem has inspired myriad reports in the scientific literature of experimental interventions seeking to elucidate the pathology of IR injury. Elective cardiac surgery presents perhaps the most viable scenario for protecting the heart and brain from IR injury, due to the opportunity to condition the organs prior to insult. The physiological parameters for the preconditioning of vital organs prior to insult through mechanical and pharmacologic maneuvers have been heavily examined. These investigations have revealed new insights into how preconditioning alters cellular responses to IR injury. However, the promise of preconditioning remains unfulfilled at the clinical level, and research seeking to implicate cell signals essential to this protection continues. Recent discoveries in molecular biology have revealed that gene expression can be controlled through posttranslational modifications, without altering the chemical structure of the genetic code. In this scenario, gene expression is repressed by enzymes that cause chromatin compaction through catalytic removal of acetyl moieties from lysine residues on histones. These enzymes, called histone deacetylases (HDACs, can be inhibited pharmacologically, leading to the de-repression of protective genes. The discovery that HDACs can also alter the function of non-histone proteins through posttranslational deacetylation has expanded the potential impact of HDAC inhibitors for the treatment of human disease. HDAC inhibitors have been applied in a very small number of experimental models of IR. However, the scientific literature contains an increasing number of reports demonstrating that HDACs converge on preconditioning signals in the cell. This review will describe the influence of HDACs on major preconditioning signaling pathways in the heart and

  2. The role of melatonin on brain iron homeostasis and its relation to Parkinson’s Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Lai, Hien Tet

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson’s Disease (PD) is the second most common neurological disorder after Alzheimer’s Disease. The disease will manifest with the loss of up to 70% of the dopaminergic neurons in the Substantia Nigra (SN) region and it mainly affects the elderly. One of the common pathological hallmarks for PD is the excessive iron accumulation within the SN region of the brain. However, the pathogenesis for of the excessive iron levels accumulation in the SN is unclear. The increase in intracellular oxi...

  3. Role of Measurement of the Maximum Intimal-Medial Thickness in the Brain Health Examination Program

    OpenAIRE

    上山, 憲司; 中川原, 譲二; 武田, 利兵衛; 中村, 博彦

    2005-01-01

    The maximum intimal-medial thickness (Max-IMT) of the carotid artery wall (Max-IMT) was measured by ultrasonography in 1,932 people checked in the brain health examination program in our hospital. We studied relationship Max-IMT and age, systolic blood pressure, presence of asymptomatic cerebral infarction. Five hundreds seventy-two people (29.9%) had atherosclerotic thickness of Max-IMT that was more than 1.1 mm. Normal Max-IMT that less than 1.0 mm was observed in 1,360 people (70.1%). More...

  4. Fatigue in multiple sclerosis: neural correlates and the role of non-invasive brain stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moussa A. Chalah

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic progressive inflammatory disease of the central nervous system and the major cause of non-traumatic disability in young adults. Fatigue is a frequent symptom reported by the majority of MS patients during their disease course and drastically af-fects their quality of life. Despite its significant prevalence and impact, the underlying patho-physiological mechanisms are not well elucidated. MS fatigue is still considered the result of multifactorial and complex constellations, and is commonly classified into primary fatigue related to the pathological changes of the disease itself, and secondary fatigue attributed to mimicking symptoms, comorbid sleep and mood disorders, and medications side effects. Data from neuroimaging, neurophysiology, neuroendocrine and neuroimmune studies have raised hypotheses regarding the origin of this symptom, some of which have succeeded in identifying an association between MS fatigue and structural or functional abnormalities within various brain networks. Hence, the aim of this work is to reappraise the neural correlates of MS fatigue and to discuss the rationale for the emergent use of noninvasive brain stimulation (NIBS techniques as potential treatments. This will include a presentation of the various NIBS modalities and a proposition of their potential mechanisms of action in this context. Specific issues related to the value of transcranial direct current stimulation will be addressed.

  5. Effects of hypoglycaemia on neuronal metabolism in the adult brain: role of alternative substrates to glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Ana I

    2013-07-01

    Hypoglycaemia is characterized by decreased blood glucose levels and is associated with different pathologies (e.g. diabetes, inborn errors of metabolism). Depending on its severity, it might affect cognitive functions, including impaired judgment and decreased memory capacity, which have been linked to alterations of brain energy metabolism. Glucose is the major cerebral energy substrate in the adult brain and supports the complex metabolic interactions between neurons and astrocytes, which are essential for synaptic activity. Therefore, hypoglycaemia disturbs cerebral metabolism and, consequently, neuronal function. Despite the high vulnerability of neurons to hypoglycaemia, important neurochemical changes enabling these cells to prolong their resistance to hypoglycaemia have been described. This review aims at providing an overview over the main metabolic effects of hypoglycaemia on neurons, covering in vitro and in vivo findings. Recent studies provided evidence that non-glucose substrates including pyruvate, glycogen, ketone bodies, glutamate, glutamine, and aspartate, are metabolized by neurons in the absence of glucose and contribute to prolong neuronal function and delay ATP depletion during hypoglycaemia. One of the pathways likely implicated in the process is the pyruvate recycling pathway, which allows for the full oxidation of glutamate and glutamine. The operation of this pathway in neurons, particularly after hypoglycaemia, has been re-confirmed recently using metabolic modelling tools (i.e. Metabolic Flux Analysis), which allow for a detailed investigation of cellular metabolism in cultured cells. Overall, the knowledge summarized herein might be used for the development of potential therapies targeting neuronal protection in patients vulnerable to hypoglycaemic episodes.

  6. Role of brain iron accumulation in cognitive dysfunction: evidence from animal models and human studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Nadja; Figueiredo, Luciana Silva; de Lima, Maria Noêmia Martins

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decades, studies from our laboratory and other groups using animal models have shown that iron overload, resulting in iron accumulation in the brain, produces significant cognitive deficits. Iron accumulation in the hippocampus and the basal ganglia has been related to impairments in spatial memory, aversive memory, and recognition memory in rodents. These results are corroborated by studies showing that the administration of iron chelators attenuates cognitive deficits in a variety of animal models of cognitive dysfunction, including aging and Alzheimer's disease models. Remarkably, recent human studies using magnetic resonance image techniques have also shown a consistent correlation between cognitive dysfunction and iron deposition, mostly in the hippocampus, cortical areas, and basal ganglia. These findings may have relevant implications in the light of the knowledge that iron accumulates in brain regions of patients suffering from neurodegenerative diseases. A better understanding of the functional consequences of iron dysregulation in aging and neurological diseases may help to identify novel targets for treating memory problems that afflict a growing aging population.

  7. Shaping the aging brain: Role of auditory input patterns in the emergence of auditory cortical impairments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brishna Soraya Kamal

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Age-related impairments in the primary auditory cortex (A1 include poor tuning selectivity, neural desynchronization and degraded responses to low-probability sounds. These changes have been largely attributed to reduced inhibition in the aged brain, and are thought to contribute to substantial hearing impairment in both humans and animals. Since many of these changes can be partially reversed with auditory training, it has been speculated that they might not be purely degenerative, but might rather represent negative plastic adjustments to noisy or distorted auditory signals reaching the brain. To test this hypothesis, we examined the impact of exposing young adult rats to 8 weeks of low-grade broadband noise on several aspects of A1 function and structure. We then characterized the same A1 elements in aging rats for comparison. We found that the impact of noise exposure on A1 tuning selectivity, temporal processing of auditory signal and responses to oddball tones was almost indistinguishable from the effect of natural aging. Moreover, noise exposure resulted in a reduction in the population of parvalbumin inhibitory interneurons and cortical myelin as previously documented in the aged group. Most of these changes reversed after returning the rats to a quiet environment. These results support the hypothesis that age-related changes in A1 have a strong activity-dependent component and indicate that the presence or absence of clear auditory input patterns might be a key factor in sustaining adult A1 function.

  8. Brain imaging and electrophysiology biomarkers: is there a role in poverty and education outcome research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlakis, Alexandra E; Noble, Kimberly; Pavlakis, Steven G; Ali, Noorjahan; Frank, Yitzchak

    2015-04-01

    Prekindergarten educational interventions represent a popular approach to improving educational outcomes, especially in children from poor households. Children from lower socioeconomic groups are at increased risk for delays in cognitive development that are important for school success. These delays, which may stem from stress associated with poverty, often develop before kindergarten. Early interventions have been proposed, but there is a need for more information on effectiveness. By assessing socioeconomic differences in brain structure and function, we may better be able to track the neurobiologic basis underlying children's cognitive improvement. We conducted a review of the neuroimaging and electrophysiology literature to evaluate what is known about differences in brain structure and function as assessed by magnetic resonance imaging and electrophysiology and evoked response potentials among children from poor and nonpoor households. Differences in lower socioeconomic groups were found in functional magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, and volumetric magnetic resonance imaging as well as electroencephalography and evoked response potentials compared with higher socioeconomic groups. The findings suggest a number of neurobiologic correlates for cognitive delays in children who are poor. Given this, we speculate that magnetic resonance imaging and electrophysiology parameters might be useful as biomarkers, after more research, for establishing the effectiveness of specific prekindergarten educational interventions. At the very least, we suggest that to level the playing field in educational outcomes, it may be helpful to foster communication and collaboration among all professionals involved in the care and education of children. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Nitric Oxide Inactivation Mechanisms in the Brain: Role in Bioenergetics and Neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo M. Santos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last decades nitric oxide (•NO has emerged as a critical physiological signaling molecule in mammalian tissues, notably in the brain. •NO may modify the activity of regulatory proteins via direct reaction with the heme moiety, or indirectly, via S-nitrosylation of thiol groups or nitration of tyrosine residues. However, a conceptual understanding of how •NO bioactivity is carried out in biological systems is hampered by the lack of knowledge on its dynamics in vivo. Key questions still lacking concrete and definitive answers include those related with quantitative issues of its concentration dynamics and diffusion, summarized in the how much, how long, and how far trilogy. For instance, a major problem is the lack of knowledge of what constitutes a physiological •NO concentration and what constitutes a pathological one and how is •NO concentration regulated. The ambient •NO concentration reflects the balance between the rate of synthesis and the rate of breakdown. Much has been learnt about the mechanism of •NO synthesis, but the inactivation pathways of •NO has been almost completely ignored. We have recently addressed these issues in vivo on basis of microelectrode technology that allows a fine-tuned spatial and temporal measurement •NO concentration dynamics in the brain.

  10. The role of right frontal brain regions in integration of spatial relation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jiahui; Cao, Bihua; Cao, Yunfei; Gao, Heming; Li, Fuhong

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies have explored the neural mechanisms of spatial reasoning on a two-dimensional (2D) plane; however, it remains unclear how spatial reasoning is conducted in a three-dimensional (3D) condition. In the present study, we presented 3D geometric objects to 16 adult participants, and asked them to process the spatial relationship between different corners of the geometric objects. In premise-1, the first two corners of a geometric shape (e.g., A vs. B) were displayed. In premise-2, the second and third corners (e.g., B vs. C) were displayed. After integrating the two premises, participants were required to infer the spatial relationship between the first and the third corners (e.g., A and C). Finally, the participants were presented with a conclusion object, and they were required to judge whether the conclusion was true or false based on their inference. The event-related potential evoked by premise-2 revealed that (1) compared with 2D spatial reasoning, 3D reasoning elicited a smaller P3b component, and (2) in the right frontal areas, increased negativities were found in the 3D condition during the N400 and late negative components (LNC). These findings imply that higher brain activity in the right frontal brain regions were related with the integration and maintenance of spatial information in working memory for reasoning. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Predict or classify: The deceptive role of time-locking in brain signal classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusconi, Marco; Valleriani, Angelo

    2016-06-01

    Several experimental studies claim to be able to predict the outcome of simple decisions from brain signals measured before subjects are aware of their decision. Often, these studies use multivariate pattern recognition methods with the underlying assumption that the ability to classify the brain signal is equivalent to predict the decision itself. Here we show instead that it is possible to correctly classify a signal even if it does not contain any predictive information about the decision. We first define a simple stochastic model that mimics the random decision process between two equivalent alternatives, and generate a large number of independent trials that contain no choice-predictive information. The trials are first time-locked to the time point of the final event and then classified using standard machine-learning techniques. The resulting classification accuracy is above chance level long before the time point of time-locking. We then analyze the same trials using information theory. We demonstrate that the high classification accuracy is a consequence of time-locking and that its time behavior is simply related to the large relaxation time of the process. We conclude that when time-locking is a crucial step in the analysis of neural activity patterns, both the emergence and the timing of the classification accuracy are affected by structural properties of the network that generates the signal.

  12. Effect of naloxone hydrochloride on c-fos protein expression in brain and plasma beta-endorphin level in rats with diffuse brain injury and secondary brain insult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-jie JING

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective To observe the changes of c-fos protein expression in brain and beta-endorphin (β-EP level in blood plasma in rats with diffuse brain injury (DBI and secondary brain insult (SBI after intraperitoneal injection of naloxone hydrochloride, and explore the role of c-fos andβ-EP in development of SBI in rats. Methods Seventy health male SD rats were enrolled in the present study and randomly divided into group A (intraperitoneally injected with 0.9% saline after DBI and SBI model was reproduced, group B (injected intraperitoneally with 1.0mg/kg naloxone hydrochloride after DBI and SBI model was reproduced, and group C (intraperitoneally injected with 1.0mg/kg naloxone hydrochloride after DBI and before SBI model was reproduced. The animals were sacrificed 3, 24 and 48 hours after injury, and the number of c-fos positive cells in brain and content of β-EP in blood plasma were determined by immunohistochemistry and radioimmunoassay respectively, the water content and number of injured neurons in brain tissue were measured by pathomorphological observation of the brain tissue. Results No significant difference was observed between group B and C for all the detection parameters. In group B and C, the water content in brain tissue at 3h and 24h was found to be decreased, while the number of injured neurons at 24h and 48h increased, number of c-fos positive cells in brain at 3h, 24h and 48h decreased, and content of β-EP in blood plasma at 3h and 24h decreased when compared with group A(P < 0.05. Conclusion Naloxone hydrochloride could decrease the c-fos expression in brain and β-EP level in blood plasma, alleviate the nerve injury, and protect neural function. The therapeutic effect of naloxone administered either after DBI and SBI or after DBI and before SBI was similar.

  13. Evaluation of the thin agar layer method for the recovery of pressure-injured and heat-injured Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavieri, Nicolas A; Sebranek, Joseph G; Cordray, Joseph C; Dickson, James S; Jung, Stephanie; Manu, David K; Mendonça, Aubrey F; Brehm-Stecher, Byron F; Stock, Joseph; Stalder, Kenneth J

    2014-05-01

    A sublethally injured bacterial cell has been defined as a cell that survives a stress such as heating, freezing, acid treatment, or other antimicrobial intervention but can repair the cellular damage exerted by the stressor and later regain its original ability to grow. Consequently, sublethally injured cells are not likely to be included in conventional enumeration procedures, which could result in unrealistically low counts unless efforts are made to encourage recovery of the injured cells before enumeration. The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of the thin agar layer (TAL) method for the recovery of pressure-injured and heat-injured Listeria monocytogenes in a tryptic soy broth with 0.6% yeast extract system. Pressure injury consisted of treatment of a culture of mixed L. monocytogenes strains with high hydrostatic pressure at 400 or 600 MPa for 1 s, 2 min, 4 min, or 6 min at a process temperature of 12±2 °C. Heat injury consisted of treatment of a culture of mixed L. monocytogenes strains at 60±1 °C for 3, 6, or 9 min. Growth media were tryptic soy agar (TSA) with 0.6% yeast extract, modified Oxford medium (MOX), and TAL, which consisted of a 7-ml layer of TSA overlaid onto solidified MOX. Counts of viable L. monocytogenes on TAL were higher than those on MOX in the heat-injury experiment but not in the pressure-injury experiment. Therefore, the effectiveness of the TAL method may be specific to the type of injury applied to the microorganism and should be investigated in a variety of cellular injury scenarios.

  14. Discovery of methylfarnesoate as the annelid brain hormone reveals an ancient role of sesquiterpenoids in reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, Sven; Krauditsch, Christian; Frühauf, Peter; Gerner, Christopher; Raible, Florian

    2016-11-29

    Animals require molecular signals to determine when to divert resources from somatic functions to reproduction. This decision is vital in animals that reproduce in an all-or-nothing mode, such as bristle worms: females committed to reproduction spend roughly half their body mass for yolk and egg production; following mass spawning, the parents die. An enigmatic brain hormone activity suppresses reproduction. We now identify this hormone as the sesquiterpenoid methylfarnesoate. Methylfarnesoate suppresses transcript levels of the yolk precursor Vitellogenin both in cell culture and in vivo , directly inhibiting a central energy-costly step of reproductive maturation. We reveal that contrary to common assumptions, sesquiterpenoids are ancient animal hormones present in marine and terrestrial lophotrochozoans. In turn, insecticides targeting this pathway suppress vitellogenesis in cultured worm cells. These findings challenge current views of animal hormone evolution, and indicate that non-target species and marine ecosystems are susceptible to commonly used insect larvicides.

  15. The role of marshall and rotterdam score in predicting 30-day outcome of traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siahaan, A. M. P.; Akbar, T. Y. M.; Nasution, M. D.

    2018-03-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains one of the leading causes of mortality and morbidity, especially in the young population. To predict the outcome of TBI, Marshall, and Rotterdam–CT Scan based scoring was mostly used. As many studies showed conflicting results regarding of the usage of both scoring, this study aims to determine the correlation between Rotterdam and Marshall scoring system with outcome in 30 days and found correlation among them. In 120 subjects with TBI that admitted to Adam Malik General Hospital, we found a significant association of both scorings with the 30-day Glasgow Outcome Score. Therefore, we recommend the use of Marshall and Rotterdam CT Score in initial assessment as a good predictor for patients with TBI.

  16. Assessment of fitness to drive after acquired brain injury: The role of neuropsychological tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meng, Annette

    It is a well established fact that Acquired Brain Injury (ABI) can affect fitness to drive. Some cognitive functions have been emphasized as particular important when driving e.g. attention, reaction time, visual perception, and executive functioning. Research attempts have been made in order...... to identify a neuropsychological test battery to predict driving ability. However, there is no consensus as to which test such a test battery should consist of. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between some neuropsychological test results and the results of an on-road test.......g. WCST will not predict the driving ability of this group. This illustrates that many things can affect the predictive value a neuropsychological test and the belief that neuropsychological testing on its own cannot predict fitness to drive. As findings in the field of driving assessment of older people...

  17. Brain Circuits of Methamphetamine Place Reinforcement Learning: The Role of the Hippocampus-VTA Loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keleta, Yonas B; Martinez, Joe L

    2012-03-01

    The reinforcing effects of addictive drugs including methamphetamine (METH) involve the midbrain ventral tegmental area (VTA). VTA is primary source of dopamine (DA) to the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and the ventral hippocampus (VHC). These three brain regions are functionally connected through the hippocampal-VTA loop that includes two main neural pathways: the bottom-up pathway and the top-down pathway. In this paper, we take the view that addiction is a learning process. Therefore, we tested the involvement of the hippocampus in reinforcement learning by studying conditioned place preference (CPP) learning by sequentially conditioning each of the three nuclei in either the bottom-up order of conditioning; VTA, then VHC, finally NAc, or the top-down order; VHC, then VTA, finally NAc. Following habituation, the rats underwent experimental modules consisting of two conditioning trials each followed by immediate testing (test 1 and test 2) and two additional tests 24 h (test 3) and/or 1 week following conditioning (test 4). The module was repeated three times for each nucleus. The results showed that METH, but not Ringer's, produced positive CPP following conditioning each brain area in the bottom-up order. In the top-down order, METH, but not Ringer's, produced either an aversive CPP or no learning effect following conditioning each nucleus of interest. In addition, METH place aversion was antagonized by coadministration of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist MK801, suggesting that the aversion learning was an NMDA receptor activation-dependent process. We conclude that the hippocampus is a critical structure in the reward circuit and hence suggest that the development of target-specific therapeutics for the control of addiction emphasizes on the hippocampus-VTA top-down connection.

  18. Role of testosterone and Y chromosome genes for the masculinization of the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savic, Ivanka; Frisen, Louise; Manzouri, Amirhossein; Nordenstrom, Anna; Lindén Hirschberg, Angelica

    2017-04-01

    Women with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS) have a male (46,XY) karyotype but no functional androgen receptors. Their condition, therefore, offers a unique model for studying testosterone effects on cerebral sex dimorphism. We present MRI data from 16 women with CAIS and 32 male (46,XY) and 32 female (46,XX) controls. FreeSurfer software was employed to measure cortical thickness and subcortical structural volumes. Axonal connections, indexed by fractional anisotropy, (FA) were measured with diffusion tensor imaging, and functional connectivity with resting state fMRI. Compared to men, CAIS women displayed a "female" pattern by having thicker parietal and occipital cortices, lower FA values in the right corticospinal, superior and inferior longitudinal tracts, and corpus callosum. Their functional connectivity from the amygdala to the medial prefrontal cortex, was stronger and amygdala-connections to the motor cortex weaker than in control men. CAIS and control women also showed stronger posterior cingulate and precuneus connections in the default mode network. Thickness of the motor cortex, the caudate volume, and the FA in the callosal body followed, however, a "male" pattern. Altogether, these data suggest that testosterone modulates the microstructure of somatosensory and visual cortices and their axonal connections to the frontal cortex. Testosterone also influenced functional connections from the amygdala, whereas the motor cortex could, in agreement with our previous reports, be moderated by processes linked to X-chromosome gene dosage. These data raise the question about other genetic factors masculinizing the human brain than the SRY gene and testosterone. Hum Brain Mapp 38:1801-1814, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Polymorphonuclear neutrophil in brain parenchyma after experimental intracerebral hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiurong; Sun, Guanghua; Zhang, Han; Ting, Shun-Ming; Song, Shen; Gonzales, Nicole; Aronowski, Jaroslaw

    2014-10-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) infiltration into brain parenchyma after cerebrovascular accidents is viewed as a key component of secondary brain injury. Interestingly, a recent study of ischemic stroke suggests that after ischemic stroke, PMNs do not enter brain parenchyma and as such may cause no harm to the brain. Thus, the present study was designed to determine PMNs' behavior after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Using the autologous blood injection model of ICH in rats and immunohistochemistry for PMNs and vascular components, we evaluated the temporal and spatial PMNs distribution in the ICH-affected brain. We found that, similar to ischemia, there is a robust increase in presence of PMNs in the ICH-injured tissue that lasts for at least 1 to 2 weeks. However, in contrast to what was suggested for ischemia, besides PMNs that stay in association with the vasculature, after ICH, we found abundance of intraparenchymal PMNs (with no obvious association with vessels) in the ICH core and hematoma border, especially between 1 and 7 days after the ictus. Interestingly, the increased presence of intraparenchymal PMNs after ICH coincided with the massive loss of microvascular integrity, suggesting vascular disruption as a potential cause of PMNs presence in the brain parenchyma. Our study indicates that in contrast to ischemic stroke, after ICH, PMNs target not only vascular compartment but also brain parenchyma in the affected brain. As such, it is possible that the pathogenic role and therapeutic implications of targeting PMNs after ICH could be different from these after ischemic stroke. Our work suggests the needs for more studies addressing the role of PMNs in ICH.

  20. The Role of Insulin, Insulin Growth Factor, and Insulin-Degrading Enzyme in Brain Aging and Alzheimer's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Messier, Claude; Teutenberg, Kevin

    2005-01-01

    Most brain insulin comes from the pancreas and is taken up by the brain by what appears to be a receptor-based carrier. Type 2 diabetes animal models associated with insulin resistance show reduced insulin brain uptake and content. Recent data point to changes in the insulin receptor cascade in obesity-related insulin resistance, suggesting that brain insulin receptors also become less sensitive to insulin, which could reduce synaptic plasticity. Insulin transport to the brain is reduced in a...

  1. Supporting students with brain tumors in obtaining school intervention services: the clinician's role from an educator's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandinette, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    With an increase in the number of pediatric patients surviving the diagnosis and treatment of brain tumors, many children are returning to school with an alteration in their physical, cognitive, and social-emotional functioning and thus requiring school intervention or services. Physicians and clinicians in hospital and rehabilitation settings serving this population can play a key role in communicating the medical and functional needs these children present as a result of diagnosis and treatment as they transition to an educational setting. Medical and allied health personnel can best support successful school transition when they are aware of the information schools require in order to open the door for students to easily access the interventions, supports, and services available through 504 Accommodation Plans and special education supports and services under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. Clear communication between medical and school personnel is vital in improving educational, social, and vocational outcomes for students with brain tumors. A streamlined approach to accomplish this task is offered for consideration.

  2. [Brain metastasis from breast cancer: who?, when? and special considerations about the role of technology in neurosurgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutertre, Guillaume; Pouit, Bruno

    2011-04-01

    Questions about both the place and the role of surgery on brain metastasis from breast cancer are arising more and more frequently in practice due to the increase of brain metastasis in patients suffering from a form of cancer recognized as one of the most recurrent cancers in adults but also one of the most sensitive to general treatments of the systemic disease. With improvements in anaesthesia, in surgical instruments, and in global care, neurosurgery has taken advantage of new techniques such as pre- and even per-operative imagery and also neuronavigation. These techniques enable radical and effective surgical intervention with a high level of safety for the patient, making neurosurgery perfectly competitive with other therapeutic modalities, particularly on functional grounds. As for symptomatic treatments or other anti-metastasis treatments, most situations allow a reflection on the global therapeutic strategy which can be adapted to individual cases depending on the patient's general prognosis. In developing this global therapeutic strategy, surgical treatment is still as relevant as ever.

  3. A tubulin alpha 8 mouse knockout model indicates a likely role in spermatogenesis but not in brain development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine P Diggle

    Full Text Available Tubulin alpha 8 (Tuba8 is the most divergent member of the highly conserved alpha tubulin family, and uniquely lacks two key post-translational modification sites. It is abundantly expressed in testis and muscle, with lower levels in the brain. We previously identified homozygous hypomorphic TUBA8 mutations in human subjects with a polymicrogyria (PMG syndrome, suggesting its involvement in development of the cerebral cortex. We have now generated and characterized a Tuba8 knockout mouse model. Homozygous mice were confirmed to lack Tuba8 protein in the testis, but did not display PMG and appeared to be neurologically normal. In response to this finding, we re-analyzed the human PMG subjects using whole exome sequencing. This resulted in identification of an additional homozygous loss-of-function mutation in SNAP29, suggesting that SNAP29 deficiency, rather than TUBA8 deficiency, may underlie most or all of the neurodevelopmental anomalies in these subjects. Nonetheless, in the mouse brain, Tuba8 specifically localised to the cerebellar Purkinje cells, suggesting that the human mutations may affect or modify motor control. In the testis, Tuba8 localisation was cell-type specific. It was restricted to spermiogenesis with a strong acrosomal localization that was gradually replaced by cytoplasmic distribution and was absent from spermatozoa. Although the knockout mice were fertile, the localisation pattern indicated that Tuba8 may have a role in spermatid development during spermatogenesis, rather than as a component of the mature microtubule-rich flagellum itself.

  4. The Role of Medical Imaging in the Recharacterization of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Using Youth Sports as a Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talavage, Thomas M; Nauman, Eric A; Leverenz, Larry J

    2015-01-01

    The short- and long-term impact of mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an increasingly vital concern for both military and civilian personnel. Such injuries produce significant social and financial burdens and necessitate improved diagnostic and treatment methods. Recent integration of neuroimaging and biomechanical studies in youth collision-sport athletes has revealed that significant alterations in brain structure and function occur even in the absence of traditional clinical markers of "concussion." While task performance is maintained, athletes exposed to repetitive head accelerations exhibit structural changes to the underlying white matter, altered glial cell metabolism, aberrant vascular response, and marked changes in functional network behavior. Moreover, these changes accumulate with accrued years of exposure, suggesting a cumulative trauma mechanism that may culminate in categorization as "concussion" and long-term neurological deficits. The goal of this review is to elucidate the role of medical imaging in recharacterizing TBI, as a whole, to better identify at-risk individuals and improve the development of preventative and interventional approaches.

  5. The role of the blood–brain barrier in the development and treatment of migraine and other pain disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    DosSantos, Marcos F.; Holanda-Afonso, Rosenilde C.; Lima, Rodrigo L.; DaSilva, Alexandre F.; Moura-Neto, Vivaldo

    2014-01-01

    The function of the blood–brain barrier (BBB) related to chronic pain has been explored for its classical role in regulating the transcellular and paracellular transport, thus controlling the flow of drugs that act at the central nervous system, such as opioid analgesics (e.g., morphine) and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Nonetheless, recent studies have raised the possibility that changes in the BBB permeability might be associated with chronic pain. For instance, changes in the relative amounts of occludin isoforms, resulting in significant increases in the BBB permeability, have been demonstrated after inflammatory hyperalgesia. Furthermore, inflammatory pain produces structural changes in the P-glycoprotein, the major efflux transporter at the BBB. One possible explanation for these findings is the action of substances typically released at the site of peripheral injuries that could lead to changes in the brain endothelial permeability, including substance P, calcitonin gene-related peptide, and interleukin-1 beta. Interestingly, inflammatory pain also results in microglial activation, which potentiates the BBB damage. In fact, astrocytes and microglia play a critical role in maintaining the BBB integrity and the activation of those cells is considered a key mechanism underlying chronic pain. Despite the recent advances in the understanding of BBB function in pain development as well as its interference in the efficacy of analgesic drugs, there remain unknowns regarding the molecular mechanisms involved in this process. In this review, we explore the connection between the BBB as well as the blood–spinal cord barrier and blood–nerve barrier, and pain, focusing on cellular and molecular mechanisms of BBB permeabilization induced by inflammatory or neuropathic pain and migraine. PMID:25339863

  6. The role of the blood-brain barrier in the development and treatment of migraine and other pain disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Fabio DosSantos

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The function of the blood-brain barrier (BBB related to chronic pain has been explored by its classical role in regulating the transcellular and paracellular transport, thus controlling the flow of drugs that act at the central nervous system, such as the opioid analgesics (e.g., morphine and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs. Nonetheless, recent studies have raised the possibility that changes in the BBB permeability might be associated with chronic pain. For instance, changes in the relative amounts of occludin isoforms, resulting in significant increases in the BBB permeability, have been demonstrated after inflammatory hyperalgesia. Furthermore, inflammatory pain produces structural changes in the P-glycoprotein (P-gp, the major efflux transporter at the BBB. One possible explanation for these findings is the action of substances typically released at the site of peripheral injuries that could lead to changes in the brain endothelial permeability, including: substance P, calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP and IL- 1β. Interestingly, inflammatory pain also results in microglial activation, which potentiates the BBB damage. In fact, astrocytes and microglia play a critical role in maintaining the BBB integrity and the activation of those cells is considered a key mechanism underlying chronic pain. Despite the recent advances in the understanding of BBB function in pain development as well as its interference in the efficacy of analgesic drugs, there remain unknowns regarding the molecular mechanisms involved in this process. In this review, we explore the connection between the BBB as well as the blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB and blood-nerve barrier (BNB and pain, focusing on cellular and molecular mechanisms of BBB permeabilization induced by inflammatory or neuropathic pain and migraine.

  7. Caring for the injured child in settings of limited resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Jacob

    2016-02-01

    Children represent the most vulnerable members of our global society, a truth that is magnified when they are physically wounded. In much of the developed world, society has responded by offering protection in the form of law, injury prevention guidelines, and effective trauma systems to provide care for the injured child. Much of our world, though, remains afflicted by poverty and a lack of protective measures. As the globe becomes smaller by way of ease of travel and technology, surgeons are increasingly able to meet these children where they live and in doing so offer their hands and voices to care and protect these young ones. This article is intended as an overview of current issues in pediatric trauma care in the developing world as well as to offer some tips for the volunteer surgeon who may be involved in the care of the injured child in a setting of limited resource availability. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Characterization of high hydrostatic pressure-injured Bacillus subtilis cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaoka, Takashi; Kimura, Keitarou; Morimatsu, Kazuya; Yamamoto, Kazutaka

    2017-06-01

    High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) affects various cellular processes. Using a sporulation-deficient Bacillus subtilis strain, we characterized the properties of vegetative cells subjected to HHP. When stationary-phase cells were exposed to 250 MPa of HHP for 10 min at 25 °C, approximately 50% of cells were viable, although they exhibited a prolonged growth lag. The HHP-injured cells autolyzed in the presence of NaCl or KCl (at concentrations ≥100 mM). Superoxide dismutase slightly protected the viability of HHP-treated cells, whereas vegetative catalases had no effect. Thus, unlike HHP-injured Escherichia coli, oxidative stress only slightly affected vegetative B. subtilis subjected to HHP.

  9. Development of a CPM Machine for Injured Fingers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yili; Zhang, Fuxiang; Ma, Xin; Meng, Qinggang

    2005-01-01

    Human fingers are easy to be injured. A CPM machine is a mechanism based on the rehabilitation theory of continuous passive motion (CPM). To develop a CPM machine for the clinic application in the rehabilitation of injured fingers is a significant task. Therefore, based on the theories of evidence based medicine (EBM) and CPM, we've developed a set of biomimetic mechanism after modeling the motions of fingers and analyzing its kinematics and dynamics analysis. We also design an embedded operating system based on ARM (a kind of 32-bit RISC microprocessor). The equipment can achieve the precise control of moving scope of fingers, finger's force and speed. It can serves as a rational checking method and a way of assessment for functional rehabilitation of human hands. Now, the first prototype has been finished and will start the clinical testing in Harbin Medical University shortly.

  10. Brain Activity in Fairness Consideration during Asset Distribution: Does the Initial Ownership Play a Role?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yin; Hu, Jie; van Dijk, Eric; Leliveld, Marijke C.; Zhou, Xiaolin

    2012-01-01

    Previous behavioral studies have shown that initial ownership influences individuals’ fairness consideration and other-regarding behavior. However, it is not entirely clear whether initial ownership influences the brain activity when a recipient evaluates the fairness of asset distribution. In this study, we randomly assigned the bargaining property (monetary reward) to either the allocator or the recipient in the ultimatum game and let participants of the study, acting as recipients, receive either disadvantageous unequal, equal, or advantageous unequal offers from allocators while the event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded. Behavioral results showed that participants were more likely to reject disadvantageous unequal and equal offers when they initially owned the property as compared to when they did not. The two types of unequal offers evoked more negative going ERPs (the MFN) than the equal offers in an early time window and the differences were not modulated by the initial ownership. In a late time window, however, the P300 responses to division schemes were affected not only by the type of unequal offers but also by whom the property was initially assigned to. These findings suggest that while the MFN may function as a general mechanism that evaluates whether the offer is consistent or inconsistent with the equity rule, the P300 is sensitive to top-down controlled processes, into which factors related to the allocation of attentional resources, including initial ownership and personal interests, come to play. PMID:22761850

  11. The role of abnormalities in the corpus callosum in social cognition deficits after Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Skye; Rushby, Jacqueline A; Dalton, Katie I; Allen, Samantha K; Parks, Nicklas

    2018-08-01

    The corpus callosum (CC) is vulnerable to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Social cognition requires integration of non-verbal and verbal information in order to understand social behaviour and may be compromised if the CC is damaged. 17 adults with severe, chronic TBI and 17 control participants underwent structural MRI and Diffusion Tensor Imaging. A region of interest analysis examined fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) across regions of the CC. Performance on The Awareness of Social Inference Test (TASIT): part 1 (emotion recognition) and parts 2 and 3 (social inference), was examined in relation to FA and MD. Across participants, higher genu FA values were related to higher TASIT part 3 scores. Increased splenium FA was associated with better performance for TASIT parts 1-3. There was no association between DTI values and TASIT in the controls alone. In the TBI group, FA of the genu and splenium was correlated with TASIT part 3. The pattern of performance was similar when controlling for non-social cognitive ability. In conclusion, social information is complex and multi-modal requiring inter-hemispheric connection. People with TBI, regardless of focal grey matter injury, may lose social cognitive ability due to trauma related changes to the corpus callosum.

  12. Image quality in CT perfusion imaging of the brain. The role of iodine concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenig, Matthias; Bueltmann, Eva; Bode-Schnurbus, Lucas; Koenen, Dirk; Mielke, Eckhart; Heuser, Lothar [Knappschaftskrankenhaus Langendreer, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Ruhr-University Bochum, Bochum (Germany)

    2007-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of various iodine contrast concentrations on image quality in computed tomography (CT) perfusion studies. Twenty-one patients with suspicion of cerebral ischemia underwent perfusion CT using two different iodine contrast concentrations: 11 patients received iomeprol 300 (iodine concentration: 300 mg/ml) while ten received the same volume of iomeprol 400 (iodine concentration: 400 mg/ml). Scan parameters were kept constant for both groups. Maps of cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), and time to peak (TTP) were calculated from two adjacent slices. Quantitative comparisons were based on measurements of the maximum enhancement [Hounsfield units (HU)] and signal-to-noise index (SNI) on CBF, CBV, and TTP images. Determinations of grey-to-white-matter delineation for each iodine concentration were performed by two blinded readers. Only data from the non-ischemic hemispheres were considered. Both maximum enhancement and SNI values were higher after iomeprol 400, resulting in significantly better image quality in areas of low perfusion. No noteworthy differences were found for normal values of CBF, CBV, and TTP. Qualitative assessment of grey/white matter contrast on CBF and CBV maps revealed better performance for iomeprol 400. For brain perfusion studies, highly concentrated contrast media such as iomeprol 400 is superior to iomeprol 300. (orig.)

  13. Role of CB1 cannabinoid receptors on GABAergic neurons in brain aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albayram, Onder; Alferink, Judith; Pitsch, Julika; Piyanova, Anastasia; Neitzert, Kim; Poppensieker, Karola; Mauer, Daniela; Michel, Kerstin; Legler, Anne; Becker, Albert; Monory, Krisztina; Lutz, Beat; Zimmer, Andreas; Bilkei-Gorzo, Andras

    2011-07-05

    Brain aging is associated with cognitive decline that is accompanied by progressive neuroinflammatory changes. The endocannabinoid system (ECS) is involved in the regulation of glial activity and influences the progression of age-related learning and memory deficits. Mice lacking the Cnr1 gene (Cnr1(-/-)), which encodes the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1), showed an accelerated age-dependent deficit in spatial learning accompanied by a loss of principal neurons in the hippocampus. The age-dependent decrease in neuronal numbers in Cnr1(-/-) mice was not related to decreased neurogenesis or to epileptic seizures. However, enhanced neuroinflammation characterized by an increased density of astrocytes and activated microglia as well as an enhanced expression of the inflammatory cytokine IL-6 during aging was present in the hippocampus of Cnr1(-/-) mice. The ongoing process of pyramidal cell degeneration and neuroinflammation can exacerbate each other and both contribute to the cognitive deficits. Deletion of CB1 receptors from the forebrain GABAergic, but not from the glutamatergic neurons, led to a similar neuronal loss and increased neuroinflammation in the hippocampus as observed in animals lacking CB1 receptors in all cells. Our results suggest that CB1 receptor activity on hippocampal GABAergic neurons protects against age-dependent cognitive decline by reducing pyramidal cell degeneration and neuroinflammation.

  14. mTOR signaling and its roles in normal and abnormal brain development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuyuki eTakei

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Target of rapamycin (TOR was first identified in yeast as a target molecule of rapamycin, an anti-fugal and immunosuppressant macrolide compound. In mammals, its orthologue is called mTOR (mammalian TOR. mTOR is a serine/threonine kinase that converges different extracellular stimuli, such as nutrients and growth factors, and diverges into several biochemical reactions, including translation, autophagy, transcription, and lipid synthesis among others. These biochemical reactions govern cell growth and cause cells to attain an anabolic state. Thus, the disruption of mTOR signaling is implicated in a wide array of diseases such as cancer, diabetes, and obesity. In the central nervous system (CNS, the mTOR signaling cascade is activated by nutrients, neurotrophic factors, and neurotransmitters that enhances protein (and possibly lipid synthesis and suppresses autophagy. These processes contribute to normal neuronal growth by promoting their differentiation, neurite elongation and branching, and synaptic formation during development. Therefore, disruption of mTOR signaling may cause neuronal degeneration and abnormal neural development. While reduced mTOR signaling is associated with neurodegeneration, excess activation of mTOR signaling causes abnormal development of neurons and glia, leading to brain malformation. In this review, we first introduce the current state of molecular knowledge of mTOR complexes and signaling in general. We then describe mTOR activation in neurons, which leads to translational enhancement, and finally discuss the link between mTOR and normal/abnormal neuronal growth during development.

  15. The potential role of brain asymmetry in the development of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: a hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niesluchowski, W; Dabrowska, A; Kedzior, K; Zagrajek, T

    1999-10-01

    The size asymmetry of cerebral hemispheres may predispose to head tilt and asymmetric blocking of the zygapophysial joints, potentially leading to the development of compensatory curvatures in the lower segments of the spine. To analyze the effects of spinal manipulation, maintained by an exercise program, on the progression of idiopathic adolescent scoliosis in 2 children aged 6 and 10. The scoliosis found was 16 and 60 degrees. For diagnosis and monitoring of therapy, we recorded qualitative parameters of shoulder asymmetry, axillary line asymmetry, and scapular angle position. Manual treatment consisted of the examinations of all sliding motion in zygapophysial joints and both sacroiliac joints and removing the limitations of the sliding motions according to the method of Karel Lewit. The treatment procedure consisted of 3 or 4 manipulations within 17 months and an exercise program. The manipulation effects were maintained by the exercise program. The exercises were done in 2 or 3 sessions weekly for a year. In both patients we observed that scoliosis decompensation was successfully stopped and the effects of the correction persisted for 10 years. Brain and head asymmetry may be only a transient state, predisposing to asymmetric blocking at the atlanto-occipital level. Removal of blocking may prevent curve progression in children who had adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. The manipulative therapy may also have a promising effect on retarding curve progression when used in skeletally immature patient.

  16. Psychiatric morbidity among physically injured Syrian refugees in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Nuaimi, Saleem; Aldandashi, Samer; Easa, Abdul Kadir Saed; Saqqur, Maher

    2018-01-01

    To the best of our knowledge, the mental health status of physically injured Syrian refugees has not yet been investigated. The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of psychiatric morbidity among physically injured Syrian refugees in Turkey receiving treatment at the main rehabilitation centre near the Syrian border. This is a cross sectional study. Information was collected from consenting injured Syrian refugees at Dar-el-Shefa'a Hospital in Reyhanlı (Turkey) during a one week period in December 2012 and another one week period in August 2013. A clinical psychiatric interview was conducted to determine a diagnosis according to the diagnostic criteria of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) IV-TR. A total of 40 refugees consented and completed a clinical psychiatric interview. All refugees in this study did not have a significant past psychiatric history. The most prevalent current diagnosis was major depressive disorder (22.5%), adjustment disorder (20%), and post-traumatic stress disorder (15%). Five (12.5%) patients had no evidence of a psychiatric disorder. The prevalence of psychiatric morbidity among injured Syrian refugees in our study was extremely high. This may help guide the treatment and management of this select population. This study had a low number of participants. The method of assessment was not standardized with a validated tool. This study may help guide the treatment and management of this select population, both in neighbouring countries and as resettled refugees in Western host countries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Solute transport across the articular surface of injured cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Hooi Chuan; Moeini, Mohammad; Quinn, Thomas M

    2013-07-15

    Solute transport through extracellular matrix (ECM) is important to physiology and contrast agent-based clinical imaging of articular cartilage. Mechanical injury is likely to have important effects on solute transport since it involves alteration of ECM structure. Therefore it is of interest to characterize effects of mechanical injury on solute transport in cartilage. Using cartilage explants injured by an established mechanical compression protocol, effective partition coefficients and diffusivities of solutes for transport across the articular surface were measured. A range of fluorescent solutes (fluorescein isothiocyanate, 4 and 40kDa dextrans, insulin, and chondroitin sulfate) and an X-ray contrast agent (sodium iodide) were used. Mechanical injury was associated with a significant increase in effective diffusivity versus uninjured explants for all solutes studied. On the other hand, mechanical injury had no effects on effective partition coefficients for most solutes tested, except for 40kDa dextran and chondroitin sulfate where small but significant changes in effective partition coefficient were observed in injured explants. Findings highlight enhanced diffusive transport across the articular surface of injured cartilage, which may have important implications for injury and repair situations. Results also support development of non-equilibrium methods for identification of focal cartilage lesions by contrast agent-based clinical imaging. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Understanding contextual influences of community reintegration among injured servicemembers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Brent L; McGuire, Francis A; Linder, Sandra M; Britt, Thomas W

    2015-01-01

    As part of a larger mixed-methods research project investigating the influence of contextual factors on community reintegration (CR), this qualitative study sought to understand the subjective experiences of injured servicemembers and their perception of how contextual factors influenced their CR. More specifically, this article addresses how the influences of contextual factors differ between injured servicemembers with different levels of CR. Using a phenomenological framework, semistructured interviews were conducted with nine injured, community-dwelling servicemembers with low, moderate, and high levels of CR (three per category). Participants provided in-depth descriptions of the contextual barriers and facilitators of CR. Thematic analysis indicated the importance of social support and personal factors (e.g., self-efficacy, personal motivation) as the primary means for being reintegrated into their homes and communities. Other themes indicated factors that had an indirect but important influence on CR, including adapted sports, recreation, and other social programs; rehabilitation programs and therapists; school, work, and volunteering; and organizations and policies in developing social supports and personal factors. Comparisons between servicemembers indicated participants with low CR described many more contextual barriers and far fewer contextual facilitators to reintegration than those with high CR. Those with moderate CR were unique in that they described many facilitators and barriers to reintegration.

  19. Acute Chemical Incidents With Injured First Responders, 2002-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnikova, Natalia; Wu, Jennifer; Yang, Alice; Orr, Maureen

    2018-04-01

    IntroductionFirst responders, including firefighters, police officers, emergency medical services, and company emergency response team members, have dangerous jobs that can bring them in contact with hazardous chemicals among other dangers. Limited information is available on responder injuries that occur during hazardous chemical incidents. We analyzed 2002-2012 data on acute chemical incidents with injured responders from 2 Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry chemical incident surveillance programs. To learn more about such injuries, we performed descriptive analysis and looked for trends. The percentage of responders among all injured people in chemical incidents has not changed over the years. Firefighters were the most frequently injured group of responders, followed by police officers. Respiratory system problems were the most often reported injury, and the respiratory irritants, ammonia, methamphetamine-related chemicals, and carbon monoxide were the chemicals more often associated with injuries. Most of the incidents with responder injuries were caused by human error or equipment failure. Firefighters wore personal protective equipment (PPE) most frequently and police officers did so rarely. Police officers' injuries were mostly associated with exposure to ammonia and methamphetamine-related chemicals. Most responders did not receive basic awareness-level hazardous material training. All responders should have at least basic awareness-level hazardous material training to recognize and avoid exposure. Research on improving firefighter PPE should continue. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2018;12:211-221).

  20. Profile of patients with brain tumors and the role of nursing care

    OpenAIRE

    Magalhães, Kênia Cristina Soares Fonseca de; Vaz, Josiane Pinto Moreira; Gontijo, Pollyana Anicio Magalhaes; Carvalho, Gervásio Teles Cardoso de; Christo, Paulo Pereira; Simões, Renata Toscano; Silva, Karla Rona da

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to describe the profile of 200 patients with central nervous system tumors (CNST), and the role of the nursing care. Method: prospective, quantitative and descriptive analysis of medical records of 200 patients with TSNC. Results: a total of 61% of our patients had benign CNST and 39% had malignant tumors. The extent of patient dependence, according to the Karnofsky Performance Status scale, was significantly greater for patients with malignant CNST (p < .05), indicatin...

  1. The digital brain switch: managing rapid transitions between role identities in a digital world

    OpenAIRE

    Symon, Gillian; Chamakiotis, Petros; Whiting, Rebecca; Roby, Helen; Whittle, Jon; Chong, Ming Ki; Ang, Chee Siang; Rashid, Umar

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present initial findings from an EPSRC-sponsored multi-disciplinary research project investigating how digital technologies and social media affect role transitions across work-life domains. The research uses an innovative combination of visual diaries and narrative interviews to capture micro-transitions (‘switches’) and explore these with participants in the context of their overall lives. Findings from a pilot study with academics are reported here in terms of: emergent d...

  2. Role of the left frontal aslant tract in stuttering: a brain stimulation and tractographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemerdere, Rahsan; de Champfleur, Nicolas Menjot; Deverdun, Jérémy; Cochereau, Jérôme; Moritz-Gasser, Sylvie; Herbet, Guillaume; Duffau, Hugues

    2016-01-01

    The neural correlates of stuttering are to date incompletely understood. Although the possible involvement of the basal ganglia, the cerebellum and certain parts of the cerebral cortex in this speech disorder has previously been reported, there are still not many studies investigating the role of white matter fibers in stuttering. Axonal stimulation during awake surgery provides a unique opportunity to study the functional role of structural connectivity. Here, our goal was to investigate the white matter tracts implicated in stuttering, by combining direct electrostimulation mapping and postoperative tractography imaging, with a special focus on the left frontal aslant tract. Eight patients with no preoperative stuttering underwent awake surgery for a left frontal low-grade glioma. Intraoperative cortical and axonal electrical mapping was used to interfere in speech processing and subsequently provoke stuttering. We further assessed the relationship between the subcortical sites leading to stuttering and the spatial course of the frontal aslant tract. All patients experienced intraoperative stuttering during axonal electrostimulation. On postsurgical tractographies, the subcortical distribution of stimulated sites matched the topographical position of the left frontal aslant tract. This white matter pathway was preserved during surgery, and no patients had postoperative stuttering. For the first time to our knowledge, by using direct axonal stimulation combined with postoperative tractography, we provide original data supporting a pivotal role of the left frontal aslant tract in stuttering. We propose that this speech disorder could be the result of a disconnection within a large-scale cortico-subcortical circuit subserving speech motor control.

  3. A perspective on the future role of brain pet imaging in exercise science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boecker, Henning; Drzezga, Alexander

    2016-05-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) bears a unique potential for examining the effects of physical exercise (acute or chronic) within the central nervous system in vivo, including cerebral metabolism, neuroreceptor occupancy, and neurotransmission. However, application of Neuro-PET in human exercise science is as yet surprisingly sparse. To date the field has been dominated by non-invasive neuroelectrical techniques (EEG, MEG) and structural/functional magnetic resonance imaging (sMRI/fMRI). Despite PET having certain inherent disadvantages, in particular radiation exposure and high costs limiting applicability at large scale, certain research questions in human exercise science can exclusively be addressed with PET: The "metabolic trapping" properties of (18)F-FDG PET as the most commonly used PET-tracer allow examining the neuronal mechanisms underlying various forms of acute exercise in a rather unconstrained manner, i.e. under realistic training scenarios outside the scanner environment. Beyond acute effects, (18)F-FDG PET measurements under resting conditions have a strong prospective for unraveling the influence of regular physical activity on neuronal integrity and potentially neuroprotective mechanisms in vivo, which is of special interest for aging and dementia research. Quantification of cerebral glucose metabolism may allow determining the metabolic effects of exercise interventions in the entire human brain and relating the regional cerebral rate of glucose metabolism (rCMRglc) with behavioral, neuropsychological, and physiological measures. Apart from FDG-PET, particularly interesting applications comprise PET ligand studies that focus on dopaminergic and opioidergic neurotransmission, both key transmitter systems for exercise-related psychophysiological effects, including mood changes, reward processing, antinociception, and in its most extreme form 'exercise dependence'. PET ligand displacement approaches even allow quantifying specific endogenous

  4. Fear learning alterations after traumatic brain injury and their role in development of posttraumatic stress symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Daniel E; Acheson, Dean T; Geyer, Mark A; Nievergelt, Caroline M; Baker, Dewleen G; Risbrough, Victoria B

    2017-08-01

    It is unknown how traumatic brain injury (TBI) increases risk for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). One potential mechanism is via alteration of fear-learning processes that could affect responses to trauma memories and cues. We utilized a prospective, longitudinal design to determine if TBI is associated with altered fear learning and extinction, and if fear processing mediates effects of TBI on PTSD symptom change. Eight hundred fifty two active-duty Marines and Navy Corpsmen were assessed before and after deployment. Assessments included TBI history, PTSD symptoms, combat trauma and deployment stress, and a fear-potentiated startle task of fear acquisition and extinction. Startle response and self-reported expectancy and anxiety served as measures of fear conditioning, and PTSD symptoms were measured with the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale. Individuals endorsing "multiple hit" exposure (both deployment TBI and a prior TBI) showed the strongest fear acquisition and highest fear expression compared to groups without multiple hits. Extinction did not differ across groups. Endorsing a deployment TBI was associated with higher anxiety to the fear cue compared to those without deployment TBI. The association of deployment TBI with increased postdeployment PTSD symptoms was mediated by postdeployment fear expression when recent prior-TBI exposure was included as a moderator. TBI associations with increased response to threat cues and PTSD symptoms remained when controlling for deployment trauma and postdeployment PTSD diagnosis. Deployment TBI, and multiple-hit TBI in particular, are associated with increases in conditioned fear learning and expression that may contribute to risk for developing PTSD symptoms. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Does linguistic input play the same role in language learning for children with and without early brain injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Meredith L; Levine, Susan C; Fisher, Joan A; Goldin-Meadow, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Children with unilateral pre- or perinatal brain injury (BI) show remarkable plasticity for language learning. Previous work highlights the important role that lesion characteristics play in explaining individual variation in plasticity in the language development of children with BI. The current study examines whether the linguistic input that children with BI receive from their caregivers also contributes to this early plasticity, and whether linguistic input plays a similar role in children with BI as it does in typically developing (TD) children. Growth in vocabulary and syntactic production is modeled for 80 children (53 TD, 27 BI) between 14 and 46 months. Findings indicate that caregiver input is an equally potent predictor of vocabulary growth in children with BI and in TD children. In contrast, input is a more potent predictor of syntactic growth for children with BI than for TD children. Controlling for input, lesion characteristics (lesion size, type, seizure history) also affect the language trajectories of children with BI. Thus, findings illustrate how both variability in the environment (linguistic input) and variability in the organism (lesion characteristics) work together to contribute to plasticity in language learning.

  6. Role of brain natriuretic peptide as a novel prognostic biomarker in acute ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bindu Menon

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: We investigated to study the prognostic importance of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP in ischemic stroke. Materials and Methods: We prospectively enrolled 100 patients with acute ischemic stroke and measured plasma BNP levels and compared with age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Risk factors, biochemical parameters, lipid profile, carotid and vertebral Doppler, imaging, and cardiac evaluation were done. Stroke severity was assessed by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS score on admission and functional disability by Barthel Index (BI at 3 months. Ischemic stroke subtype was classified according to the Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project (OCSP. Data were entered in MS Excel, and appropriate statistical analysis was done using the SPSS software version 21.0. A P = 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: Mean age of patients was 55.17 ± 11.37 years with a male:female ratio 3:1. OCSP showed total anterior circulation infarct (TACI 35, partial anterior circulation infarct 9, lacunar infarct 12, and posterior circulation infarct 44. NIHSS on admission was average 10 ± 7 and BI was 57 ± 30. BNP in patients (435 ng/ml was very high as compared to controls (<60 ng/ml (P < 0.001. There was a positive correlation between age and BNP (R2 = 0.34; P < 0.00; NIHSS and BNP (R2 = 0.255; P < 0.01, negative correlation between BI and BNP (R2 = −0.064; P < 0.01. Mean BNP levels across the OCSP showed higher values in TACI (F = 4.609 P = 0.005. Regression analysis showed that BNP can predict BI which was statistically significant. Conclusion: Plasma BNP levels was significantly elevated in patients with ischemic stroke. Our study concludes that high BNP levels are seen in large anterior circulation stroke and is a predictor for the poor functional outcome at 3 months. Determination of BNP levels as a biomarker could be helpful in predicting the outcome in stroke patients.

  7. Recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus-Mediated microRNA Delivery into the Postnatal Mouse Brain Reveals a Role for miR-134 in Dendritogenesis in Vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mette; Larsen, Lars A; Kauppinen, Sakari

    2010-01-01

    delivery of microRNAs in vivo by use of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV). rAAV-mediated overexpression of miR-134 in neurons of the postnatal mouse brain provided evidence for a negative role of miR-134 in dendritic arborization of cortical layer V pyramidal neurons in vivo, thereby confirming...

  8. The essential role of AMPA receptor GluR2 subunit RNA editing in the normal and diseased brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Lorraine Wright

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available AMPA receptors are comprised of different combinations of GluR1-GluR4 (also known as GluA1-GluA4 and GluR-A to GluR-D subunits. The GluR2 subunit is subject to Q/R site RNA editing by the ADAR2 enzyme, which converts a codon for glutamine (Q, present in the GluR2 gene, to a codon for arginine (R found in the mRNA. AMPA receptors are calcium (Ca2+-permeable if they contain the unedited GluR2(Q subunit or if they lack the GluR2 subunit. While most AMPA receptors in the brain contain the edited GluR2(R subunit and are therefore Ca2+-impermeable, recent evidence suggests that Ca2+-permeable GluR2-lacking AMPA receptors are important in synaptic plasticity and learning. However, the presence of Ca2+-permeable AMPA receptors containing unedited GluR2 leads to excitotoxic cell loss. Recent studies have indicated that RNA editing of GluR2 is deregulated in diseases, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, as well in acute neurodegenerative conditions, such as ischemia. More recently, studies have investigated the regulation of RNA editing and possible causes for its deregulation during disease. In this review, we will explore the role of GluR2 RNA editing in the healthy and diseased brain and outline new insights into the mechanisms that control this process.

  9. Managing brain extracellular K+ during neuronal activity: The physiological role of the Na+/K+-ATPase subunit isoforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Roland eLarsen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available AbstractDuring neuronal activity in the brain, extracellular K+ rises and is subsequently removed to prevent a widespread depolarization. One of the key players in regulating extracellular K+ is the Na+/K+-ATPase, although the relative involvement and physiological impact of the different subunit isoform compositions of the Na+/K+-ATPase remain unresolved. The various cell types in the brain serve a certain temporal contribution in the face of network activity; astrocytes respond directly to the immediate release of K+ from neurons, whereas the neurons themselves become the primary K+ absorbers as activity ends. The kinetic characteristics of the catalytic α subunit isoforms of the Na+/K+-ATPase are, partly, determined by the accessory β subunit with which they combine. The isoform combinations expressed by astrocytes and neurons, respectively, appear to be in line with the kinetic characteristics required to fulfill their distinct physiological roles in clearance of K+ from the extracellular space in the face of neuronal activity.Understanding the nature, impact and effects of the various Na+/K+-ATPase isoform combinations in K+ management in the central nervous system might reveal insights into pathological conditions such as epilepsy, migraine, and spreading depolarization following cerebral ischemia. In addition, particular neurological diseases occur as a result of mutations in the α2- (familial hemiplegic migraine type 2 and α3 isoforms (rapid-onset dystonia parkinsonism/alternating hemiplegia of childhood. This review addresses aspects of the Na+/K+-ATPase in the regulation of extracellular K+ in the central nervous system as well as the related pathophysiology. Understanding the physiological setting in non-pathological tissue would provide a better understanding of the pathological events occurring during disease.

  10. Profile of patients with brain tumors and the role of nursing care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kênia Cristina Soares Fonseca de Magalhães

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to describe the profile of 200 patients with central nervous system tumors (CNST, and the role of the nursing care. Method: prospective, quantitative and descriptive analysis of medical records of 200 patients with TSNC. Results: a total of 61% of our patients had benign CNST and 39% had malignant tumors. The extent of patient dependence, according to the Karnofsky Performance Status scale, was significantly greater for patients with malignant CNST (p < .05, indicating that these patients needed more support with their activities of daily living. Conclusion: patients with CNST need specialized care, with specific guidance regarding their disease and aspects of daily living after treatment. Thus, the nurse can function as a key element for the effectiveness of care provided to patients and family members with the aim of enhancing the quality of life of all those affected, directly or indirectly, by the disease.

  11. Roles for the pro-neurotrophin receptor sortilin in neuronal development, aging and brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansen, Pernille; Giehl, Klaus; Nyengaard, Jens R

    2007-01-01

    Neurotrophins are essential for development and maintenance of the vertebrate nervous system. Paradoxically, although mature neurotrophins promote neuronal survival by binding to tropomyosin receptor kinases and p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75(NTR)), pro-neurotrophins induce apoptosis in cultured......)/sortilin receptor complex to neuronal viability. In the developing retina, Sortilin 1 (Sort1)(-/-) mice showed reduced neuronal apoptosis that was indistinguishable from that observed in p75(NTR)-deficient (Ngfr(-/-)) mice. To our surprise, although sortilin deficiency did not affect developmentally regulated...... apoptosis of sympathetic neurons, it did prevent their age-dependent degeneration. Furthermore, in an injury protocol, lesioned corticospinal neurons in Sort1(-/-) mice were protected from death. Thus, the sortilin pathway has distinct roles in pro-neurotrophin-induced apoptotic signaling in pathological...

  12. Metabolic crisis in severely head-injured patients: is ischemia just the tip of the iceberg?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carre, Emilie; Ogier, Michael; Boret, Henry; Montcriol, Ambroise; Bourdon, Lionel; Jean-Jacques, Risso

    2013-10-11

    Ischemia and metabolic crisis are frequent post-traumatic secondary brain insults that negatively influence outcome. Clinicians commonly mix up these two types of insults, mainly because high lactate/pyruvate ratio (LPR) is the common marker for both ischemia and metabolic crisis. However, LPR elevations during ischemia and metabolic crisis reflect two different energetic imbalances: ischemia (Type 1 LPR elevations with low oxygenation) is characterized by a drastic deprivation of energetic substrates, whereas metabolic crisis (Type 2 LPR elevations with normal or high oxygenation) is associated with profound mitochondrial dysfunction but normal supply of energetic substrates. The discrimination between ischemia and metabolic crisis is crucial because conventional recommendations against ischemia may be detrimental for patients with metabolic crisis. Multimodal monitoring, including microdialysis and brain tissue oxygen monitoring, allows such discrimination, but these techniques are not easily accessible to all head-injured patients. Thus, a new "gold standard" and adapted medical education are required to optimize the management of patients with metabolic crisis.

  13. Metabolic crisis in severely head-injured patients: is ischemia just the tip of the iceberg?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie eCarre

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Ischemia and metabolic crisis are frequent post-traumatic secondary brain insults that negatively influence outcome. Clinicians commonly mix up these two types of insults, mainly because high lactate/pyruvate ratio (LPR is the common marker for both ischemia and metabolic crisis. However, LPR elevations during ischemia and metabolic crisis reflect two different energetic imbalances: ischemia (Type 1 LPR elevations with low oxygenation is characterized by a drastic deprivation of energetic substrates, whereas metabolic crisis (Type 2 LPR elevations with normal or high oxygenation is associated with profound mitochondrial dysfunction but normal supply of energetic substrates. The discrimination between ischemia and metabolic crisis is crucial because conventional recommendations against ischemia may be detrimental for patients with metabolic crisis. Multimodal monitoring, including microdialysis and brain tissue oxygen monitoring, allows such discrimination, but these techniques are not easily accessible to all head-injured patients. Thus, a new gold standard and adapted medical education are required to optimize the management of patients with metabolic crisis.

  14. Residual cognitive disability after completion of inpatient rehabilitation among injured children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zonfrillo, Mark R; Durbin, Dennis R; Winston, Flaura K; Zhang, Xuemei; Stineman, Margaret G

    2014-01-01

    To determine the prevalence and nature of residual cognitive disability after inpatient rehabilitation for children aged 7-18 years with traumatic injuries. This retrospective cohort study included children aged 7-18 years in the Uniform Data System for Medical Rehabilitation who underwent inpatient rehabilitation for traumatic injuries in 523 facilities from 2002-2011. Traumatic injuries were identified by standardized Medicare Inpatient Rehabilitation Facility-Patient Assessment Instrument codes. Cognitive outcomes were measured by the Functional Independence Measure instrument. A validated, categorical staging system derived from responses to the items in the cognitive domain of the functional independence measure was used and consisted of clinically relevant levels of cognitive achievement from stage 1 (total cognitive disability) to stage 7 (completely independent cognitive function). There were 13,798 injured children who completed inpatient rehabilitation during the 10-year period. On admission to inpatient rehabilitation, patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) had more cognitive disability (median stage 2) than those with spinal cord injury or other injuries (median stage 5). Cognitive functioning improved for all patients, but children with TBI still tended to have significant residual cognitive disability (median stage on discharge, 4). Injured children gained cognitive functionality throughout inpatient rehabilitation. Those with TBI had more severe cognitive disability on admission and more residual disability on discharge. This is important not only for patient and family expectation setting but also for resource and service planning, as discharge from inpatient rehabilitation is a critical milestone for reintegration into society for children with serious injury. Copyright © 2014 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The brain as a "hyper-network": the key role of neural networks as main producers of the integrated brain actions especially via the "broadcasted" neuroconnectomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnati, Luigi F; Marcoli, Manuela; Maura, Guido; Woods, Amina; Guidolin, Diego

    2018-06-01

    Investigations of brain complex integrative actions should consider beside neural networks, glial, extracellular molecular, and fluid channels networks. The present paper proposes that all these networks are assembled into the brain hyper-network that has as fundamental components, the tetra-partite synapses, formed by neural, glial, and extracellular molecular networks. Furthermore, peri-synaptic astrocytic processes by modulating the perviousness of extracellular fluid channels control the signals impinging on the tetra-partite synapses. It has also been surmised that global signalling via astrocytes networks and highly pervasive signals, such as electromagnetic fields (EMFs), allow the appropriate integration of the various networks especially at crucial nodes level, the tetra-partite synapses. As a matter of fact, it has been shown that astrocytes can form gap-junction-coupled syncytia allowing intercellular communication characterised by a rapid and possibly long-distance transfer of signals. As far as the EMFs are concerned, the concept of broadcasted neuroconnectomics (BNC) has been introduced to describe highly pervasive signals involved in resetting the information handling of brain networks at various miniaturisation levels. In other words, BNC creates, thanks to the EMFs, generated especially by neurons, different assemblages among the various networks forming the brain hyper-network. Thus, it is surmised that neuronal networks are the "core components" of the brain hyper-network that has as special "nodes" the multi-facet tetra-partite synapses. Furthermore, it is suggested that investigations on the functional plasticity of multi-partite synapses in response to BNC can be the background for a new understanding and perhaps a new modelling of brain morpho-functional organisation and integrative actions.

  16. Unique roles of SPET brain imaging in clinical and research studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seibyl, J.; Jennings, D.; Tabamo, R.; Marek, K.

    2005-01-01

    The increasing availability of PET imaging in Nuclear medicine expands the armamentarium of clinical and research tools for improving diagnosis and treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders. Nonetheless, the role of SPEC imaging remains critical to both research and clinical practice. The development of rational strategies for guiding the selection of imaging modalities flows from primarily the nature of the clinical or research question and the availability of appropriate radiopharmaceuticals. There has been extensive SPECT and PET work in Parkinson's disease (PD) which highlights the value of both these scintigraphic modalities. Three main areas of interest in PD include imaging for improving diagnostic accuracy, for monitoring the progression of disease, and for assessing the therapeutic efficacy of drugs with neoroprotective potential. The demands of the clinical or research question posed to imaging dictates the selection of radiotracer and imaging modality. Diagnosis of PD represents the easiest challenge with many imaging bio markers showing high sensitivity for detecting abnormal reduction of dopaminergic function based on qualitative review of images. On the other hand, using imaging to evaluate treatments which purportedly slow the rate of disease progression, indicated by the reduction of the rate of loss in a quantitative imaging signal in patients studied over time, represents the most rigorous requirement of the imaging measure. In each of these applications presynaptic markers of dopaminergic function using SPECT and PET have been extremely valuable. Review of neuroimaging studies of PD provides a useful example of optimized approaches to clinical and research studies in neuropsychiatric disorders

  17. Role of Sirt1 during the ageing process: relevance to protection of synapses in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoy, Juan A; Zolezzi, Juan M; Braidy, Nady; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2014-12-01

    Ageing is a stochastic process associated with a progressive decline in physiological functions which predispose to the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases. The intrinsic complexity of ageing remains a significant challenge to understand the cause of this natural phenomenon. At the molecular level, ageing is thought to be characterized by the accumulation of chronic oxidative damage to lipids, proteins and nucleic acids caused by free radicals. Increased oxidative stress and misfolded protein formations, combined with impaired compensatory mechanisms, may promote neurodegenerative disorders with age. Nutritional modulation through calorie restriction has been shown to be effective as an anti-ageing factor, promoting longevity and protecting against neurodegenerative pathology in yeast, nematodes and murine models. Calorie restriction increases the intracellular levels of the essential pyridine nucleotide, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)), a co-substrate for the sirtuin 1 (Sirt1, silent mating-type information regulator 2 homolog 1) activity and a cofactor for oxidative phosphorylation and ATP synthesis. Promotion of intracellular NAD(+) anabolism is speculated to induce neuroprotective effects against amyloid-β-peptide (Aβ) toxicity in some models for Alzheimer's disease (AD). The NAD(+)-dependent histone deacetylase, Sirt1, has been implicated in the ageing process. Sirt1 serves as a deacetylase for numerous proteins involved in several cellular pathways, including stress response and apoptosis, and plays a protective role in neurodegenerative disorders, such as AD.

  18. Brain activation during fast driving in a driving simulator: the role of the lateral prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäncke, Lutz; Brunner, Béatrice; Esslen, Michaela

    2008-07-16

    Little is currently known about the neural underpinnings of the cognitive control of driving behavior in realistic situations and of the driver's speeding behavior in particular. In this study, participants drove in realistic scenarios presented in a high-end driving simulator. Scalp-recorded EEG oscillations in the alpha-band (8-13 Hz) with a 30-electrode montage were recorded while the participants drove under different conditions: (i) excessively fast (Fast), (ii) in a controlled manner at a safe speed (Correct), and (iii) impatiently in the context of testing traffic conditions (Impatient). Intracerebral sources of alpha-band activation were estimated using low resolution electrical tomography. Given that previous studies have shown a strong negative correlation between the Bold response in the frontal cortex and the alpha-band power, we used alpha-band-related activity as an estimation of frontal activation. Statistical analysis revealed more alpha-band-related activity (i.e. less neuronal activation) in the right lateral prefrontal cortex, including the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, during fast driving. Those participants who speeded most and exhibited greater risk-taking behavior demonstrated stronger alpha-related activity (i.e. less neuronal activation) in the left anterior lateral prefrontal cortex. These findings are discussed in the context of current theories about the role of the lateral prefrontal cortex in controlling risk-taking behavior, task switching, and multitasking.

  19. β1 integrin signaling promotes neuronal migration along vascular scaffolds in the post-stroke brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teppei Fujioka

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral ischemic stroke is a main cause of chronic disability. However, there is currently no effective treatment to promote recovery from stroke-induced neurological symptoms. Recent studies suggest that after stroke, immature neurons, referred to as neuroblasts, generated in a neurogenic niche, the ventricular-subventricular zone, migrate toward the injured area, where they differentiate into mature neurons. Interventions that increase the number of neuroblasts distributed at and around the lesion facilitate neuronal repair in rodent models for ischemic stroke, suggesting that promoting neuroblast migration in the post-stroke brain could improve efficient neuronal regeneration. To move toward the lesion, neuroblasts form chain-like aggregates and migrate along blood vessels, which are thought to increase their migration efficiency. However, the molecular mechanisms regulating these migration processes are largely unknown. Here we studied the role of β1-class integrins, transmembrane receptors for extracellular matrix proteins, in these migrating neuroblasts. We found that the neuroblast chain formation and blood vessel-guided migration critically depend on β1 integrin signaling. β1 integrin facilitated the adhesion of neuroblasts to laminin and the efficient translocation of their soma during migration. Moreover, artificial laminin-containing scaffolds promoted neuroblast chain formation and migration toward the injured area. These data suggest that laminin signaling via β1 integrin supports vasculature-guided neuronal migration to efficiently supply neuroblasts to injured areas. This study also highlights the importance of vascular scaffolds for cell migration in development and regeneration.

  20. The role of biomarkers and MEG-based imaging markers in the diagnosis of post-traumatic stress disorder and blast-induced mild traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Mingxiong; Risling, Mårten; Baker, Dewleen G

    2016-01-01

    Pervasive use of improvised explosive devices (IEDs), rocket-propelled grenades, and land mines in the recent conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan has brought traumatic brain injury (TBI) and its impact on health outcomes into public awareness. Blast injuries have been deemed signature wounds of these wars. War-related TBI is not new, having become prevalent during WWI and remaining medically relevant in WWII and beyond. Medicine's past attempts to accurately diagnose and disentangle the pathophysiology of war-related TBI parallels current lines of inquiry and highlights limitations in methodology and attribution of symptom etiology, be it organic, psychological, or behavioral. New approaches and biomarkers are needed. Serological biomarkers and biomarkers of injury obtained with imaging techniques represent cornerstones in the translation between experimental data and clinical observations. Experimental models for blast related TBI and PTSD can generate critical data on injury threshold, for example for white matter injury from acceleration. Carefully verified and validated models can be evaluated with gene expression arrays and proteomics to identify new candidates for serological biomarkers. Such models can also be analyzed with diffusion MRI and microscopy in order to identify criteria for detection of diffuse white matter injuries, such as DAI (diffuse axonal injury). The experimental models can also be analyzed with focus on injury outcome in brain stem regions, such as locus coeruleus or nucleus raphe magnus that can be involved in response to anxiety changes. Mild (and some moderate) TBI can be difficult to diagnose because the injuries are often not detectable on conventional MRI or CT. There is accumulating evidence that injured brain tissues in TBI patients generate abnormal low-frequency magnetic activity (ALFMA, peaked at 1-4Hz) that can be measured and localized by magnetoencephalography (MEG). MEG imaging detects TBI abnormalities at the rates of 87

  1. Alexithymia, impulsiveness, and psychopathology in nonsuicidal self-injured adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gatta M

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Michela Gatta,1 Francesco Dal Santo,1 Alessio Rago,1 Andrea Spoto,2 Pier Antonio Battistella1 1Childhood Adolescence Family Unit, Ulss 16 – Padua University, 2Department of General Psychology, Padua University, Padova, Italy Introduction: Nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI is a multifaceted phenomenon and a major health issue among adolescents. A better understanding of self-injury comorbidities is crucial to improve our ability to assess, treat, and prevent NSSI.Purpose: This study aimed at analyzing some of the psychobehavioral correlates of NSSI: psychological problems, alexithymia, impulsiveness, and sociorelational aspects.Patients and methods: This was a case–control study. The clinical sample (n=33 included adolescents attending our unit for NSSI and other issues; the controls (n=79 were high-school students. Data were collected using six questionnaires: Youth Self-Report, Barratt’s Impulsiveness Scale, Toronto Alexithymia Scale, Children’s Depression Inventory, Symptom Checklist-90-R, and Child Behavior Checklist.Results: Cases scored significantly higher in all questionnaires. Habitual self-injurers scored higher on impulsiveness and alexithymia. The gesture’s repetition seems relevant to the global clinical picture: habitual self-injurers appear more likely to seek help from the sociosanitary services. We found a difference between the self-injurers’ and their parents’ awareness of the disorder.Conclusion: Habitual self-injurers show signs of having difficulty with assessing the consequences of their actions (nonplanning impulsiveness and the inability to manage their feelings. Given the significantly higher scores found for cases than for controls on all the psychopathological scales, NSSI can be seen as a cross-category psychiatric disorder, supporting the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders decision to include it as a pathological entity in its own right. Keywords: NSSI, self-cutting, psychiatric

  2. Environmental Enrichment, Performance, and Brain Injury in Male and Female Rats

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Elliott, Brenda M

    2004-01-01

    ...) and physical enrichment (PE) on the cognitive performance of neurologically intact and brain-injured rats and to determine if there are gender differences in these effects. Measures of basic (i.e...

  3. Behavior Management for Children and Adolescents with Acquired Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slifer, Keith J.; Amari, Adrianna

    2009-01-01

    Behavioral problems such as disinhibition, irritability, restlessness, distractibility, and aggression are common after acquired brain injury (ABI). The persistence and severity of these problems impair the brain-injured individual's reintegration into family, school, and community life. Since the early 1980s, behavior analysis and therapy have…

  4. Astrocyte oxidative metabolism and metabolite trafficking after fluid percussion brain injury in adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartnik-Olson, Brenda L; Oyoyo, Udochukwu; Hovda, David A; Sutton, Richard L

    2010-12-01

    Despite various lines of evidence pointing to the compartmentation of metabolism within the brain, few studies have reported the effect of a traumatic brain injury (TBI) on neuronal and astrocyte compartments and/or metabolic trafficking between these cells. In this study we used ex vivo ¹³C NMR spectroscopy following an infusion of [1-¹³C] glucose and [1,2-¹³C₂] acetate to study oxidative metabolism in neurons and astrocytes of sham-operated and fluid percussion brain injured (FPI) rats at 1, 5, and 14 days post-surgery. FPI resulted in a decrease in the ¹³C glucose enrichment of glutamate in neurons in the injured hemisphere at day 1. In contrast, enrichment of glutamine in astrocytes from acetate was not significantly decreased at day 1. At day 5 the ¹³C enrichment of glutamate and glutamine from glucose in the injured hemisphere of FPI rats did not differ from sham levels, but glutamine derived from acetate metabolism in astrocytes was significantly increased. The ¹³C glucose enrichment of the C3 position of glutamate (C3) in neurons was significantly decreased ipsilateral to FPI at day 14, whereas the enrichment of glutamine in astrocytes had returned to sham levels at this time point. These findings indicate that the oxidative metabolism of glucose is reduced to a greater extent in neurons compared to astrocytes following a FPI. The increased utilization of acetate to synthesize glutamine, and the acetate enrichment of glutamate via the glutamate-glutamine cycle, suggests an integral protective role for astrocytes in maintaining metabolic function following TBI-induced impairments in glucose metabolism.

  5. Bromodeoxyuridine and methylazoxymethanol exposure during brain development affects behavior in rats : consideration for a role of nerve growth factor and brain derived neurotrophic factor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fiore, M; Aloe, L; Westenbroek, C; Amendola, T; Antonelli, A; Korf, J

    2001-01-01

    Rats prenatally exposed to the neurotoxins methylazoxymethanol (MAM) or 5-Bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) are used as animal models of brain maldevelopment. We administered in rats MAM (20 mg/kg), or BrdU (100 mg/kg) or both at gestational day 11. Locomotion was not affected by any prenatal treatment

  6. Sodium Channel Voltage-Gated Beta 2 Plays a Vital Role in Brain Aging Associated with Synaptic Plasticity and Expression of COX5A and FGF-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    XiYang, Yan-Bin; Wang, You-Cui; Zhao, Ya; Ru, Jin; Lu, Bing-Tuan; Zhang, Yue-Ning; Wang, Nai-Chao; Hu, Wei-Yan; Liu, Jia; Yang, Jin-Wei; Wang, Zhao-Jun; Hao, Chun-Guang; Feng, Zhong-Tang; Xiao, Zhi-Cheng; Dong, Wei; Quan, Xiong-Zhi; Zhang, Lian-Feng; Wang, Ting-Hua

    2016-03-01

    The role of sodium channel voltage-gated beta 2 (SCN2B) in brain aging is largely unknown. The present study was therefore designed to determine the role of SCN2B in brain aging by using the senescence-accelerated mice prone 8 (SAMP8), a brain senescence-accelerated animal model, together with the SCN2B transgenic mice. The results showed that SAMP8 exhibited impaired learning and memory functions, assessed by the Morris water maze test, as early as 8 months of age. The messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expressions of SCN2B were also upregulated in the prefrontal cortex at this age. Treatment with traditional Chinese anti-aging medicine Xueshuangtong (Panax notoginseng saponins, PNS) significantly reversed the SCN2B expressions in the prefrontal cortex, resulting in improved learning and memory. Moreover, SCN2B knockdown transgenic mice were generated and bred to determine the roles of SCN2B in brain senescence. A reduction in the SCN2B level by 60.68% resulted in improvement in the hippocampus-dependent spatial recognition memory and long-term potential (LTP) slope of field excitatory postsynaptic potential (fEPSP), followed by an upregulation of COX5A mRNA levels and downregulation of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) mRNA expression. Together, the present findings indicated that SCN2B could play an important role in the aging-related cognitive deterioration, which is associated with the regulations of COX5A and FGF-2. These findings could provide the potential strategy of candidate target to develop antisenescence drugs for the treatment of brain aging.

  7. The role of brain/behavioural systems in prediction of quality of life and coping strategies in cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shala Jangi Goujeh Biglou

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: It seems that individual differences in personality characteristics are implicated in the incidence and progress of physical diseases and socio-psychological consequences. However, there are a few studies about the role of personality in the prediction of socio-psychological consequences of cancer. The aim of this research was to survey the role of personality in the prediction of socio-psychosocial factors: quality of life and coping strategies. Methods: This research was a descriptive-correlational study in which the sample included fifty cancer patients who were selected through convenience sampling method. To assess the personality differences, quality of life and coping strategies, the Carver and White (1994 BIS/BAS Scales, SF-12 Health Survey and Coping Inventory for Stressful Situation (CISS were used, respectively. The data were analysed by SPSS software using Pearson correlation coefficient and stepwise regression. Results: The findings showed that Both BIS and BAS systems could predict the quality of life (P<0.001, BIS system could explain the emotion-oriented coping strategy (P<0.05 and avoidance-oriented coping stratesy (P<0.01 and BAS system could explain the problem-oriented coping strategy (P<0.001. Conclusion: The findings of this study showed that brain/behavioural systems can predict the quality of life and coping strategies in cancer patients. The identification of these systems in cancer patients can help recognize the persons that are under the risk of poor quality of life or have a higher chance of using inconsistent coping strategies, and execute preventive measures about them.

  8. Role of Serum Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor and Central N-Acetylaspartate for Clinical Response under Antidepressive Pharmacotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Nase

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The predictive therapeutic value of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and its changes associated with the use of specific antidepressants are still unclear. In this study, we examined BDNF as a peripheral and NAA as a central biomarker over the time course of antidepressant treatment to specify both of their roles in the response to the medication and clinical outcome. Methods: We examined serum BDNF (ELISA kit in a sample of 76 (47 female and 29 male depressed patients in a naturalistic setting. BDNF was assessed before medication and subsequently after two, four and six weeks of antidepressant treatment. Additionally, in fifteen patients, N-acetylaspartate (NAA was measured in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC with magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS. Over a time course of six weeks BDNF and NAA were also examined in a group of 41 healthy controls. Results: We found significant lower serum BDNF concentrations in depressed patients compared to the sample of healthy volunteers before and after medication. BDNF and clinical symptoms decreased significantly in the patients over the time course of antidepressant treatment. Serum BDNF levels at baseline predicted the symptom outcome after eight weeks. Specifically, responders and remitters had lower serum BDNF at baseline than the nonresponders and nonremitters. NAA was slightly decreased but not significantly lower in depressed patients when compared with healthy controls. During treatment period, NAA showed a tendency to increase. Limitations: A relative high drop-out rate and possibly, a suboptimal observation period for BDNF. Conclusion: Our data confirm serum BDNF as a biomarker of depression with a possible role in response prediction. However, our findings argue against serum BDNF increase being a prerequisite to depressive symptom reduction.

  9. Effect of Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR in Increasing Pain Tolerance and Improving the Mental Health of Injured Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warhel Asim Mohammed

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Literature indicates that injured athletes face both physical and psychological distress after they have been injured. In this study, a Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR was utilised as an intervention for use during the period of recovery with injured athletes and, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first study using MBSR as an intervention for this purpose.Objective: The aim of this research was to investigate the role of MBSR practise in reducing the perception of pain and decreasing anxiety/stress, as well as increasing pain tolerance and mindfulness. An additional aim was to increase positive mood and decrease negative mood in injured athletes.Methods: The participants comprised of twenty athletes (male = 14; female = 6; age range = 21–36 years who had severe injuries, preventing their participation in sport for more than 3 months. Prior to their injury, the participants had trained regularly with their University teams and participated in official university championships. Both groups followed their normal physiotherapy treatment, but in addition, the intervention group practised mindfulness meditation for 8 weeks (one 90-min session/week. A Cold Pressor Test (CPT was used to assess pain tolerance. In contrast, the perception of pain was measured using a Visual Analogue Scale. Other measurements used were the Mindful Attention Awareness Scale (MAAS, Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS, and Profile of Mood States (POMS.Results: Our results demonstrated an increase in pain tolerance for the intervention group and an increase in mindful awareness for injured athletes. Moreover, our findings observed a promising change in positive mood for both groups. Regarding the Stress/Anxiety scores, our findings showed a notable decrease across sessions; however, no significant changes were observed in other main and interaction effects in both groups.Conclusion: Injured athletes can benefit from using mindfulness as part of the

  10. Role of Department of Defense Policies in Identifying Traumatic Brain Injuries Among Deployed US Service Members, 2001-2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agimi, Yll; Regasa, Lemma Ebssa; Ivins, Brian; Malik, Saafan; Helmick, Katherine; Marion, Donald

    2018-05-01

    To examine the role of Department of Defense policies in identifying theater-sustained traumatic brain injuries (TBIs). We conducted a retrospective study of 48 172 US military service members who sustained their first lifetime TBIs between 2001 and 2016 while deployed to Afghanistan or Iraq. We used multivariable negative binomial models to examine the changes in TBI incidence rates following the introduction of Department of Defense policies. Two Army policies encouraging TBI reporting were associated with an increase of 251% and 97% in TBIs identified following their implementation, respectively. Among airmen, the introduction of TBI-specific screening questions to the Post-Deployment Health Assessment was associated with a 78% increase in reported TBIs. The 2010 Department of Defense Directive Type Memorandum 09-033 was associated with another increase of 80% in the likelihood of being identified with a TBI among soldiers, a 51% increase among sailors, and a 124% increase among Marines. Department of Defense and service-specific policies introduced between 2006 and 2013 significantly increased the number of battlefield TBIs identified, successfully improving the longstanding problem of underreporting of TBIs.

  11. Elevated risk of type 2 diabetes for development of Alzheimer disease: a key role for oxidative stress in brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterfield, D Allan; Di Domenico, Fabio; Barone, Eugenio

    2014-09-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia among the elderly and is characterized by progressive loss of memory and cognition. Epidemiological data show that the incidence of AD increases with age and doubles every 5 years after 65 years of age. From a neuropathological point of view, amyloid-β-peptide (Aβ) leads to senile plaques, which, together with hyperphosphorylated tau-based neurofibrillary tangles and synapse loss, are the principal pathological hallmarks of AD. Aβ is associated with the formation of reactive oxygen (ROS) and nitrogen (RNS) species, and induces calcium-dependent excitotoxicity, impairment of cellular respiration, and alteration of synaptic functions associated with learning and memory. Oxidative stress was found to be associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), which (i) represents another prevalent disease associated with obesity and often aging, and (ii) is considered to be a risk factor for AD development. T2DM is characterized by high blood glucose levels resulting from increased hepatic glucose production, impaired insulin production and peripheral insulin resistance, which close resemble to the brain insulin resistance observed in AD patients. Furthermore, growing evidence suggests that oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in the development of insulin resistance and vice versa. This review article provides molecular aspects and the pharmacological approaches from both preclinical and clinical data interpreted from the point of view of oxidative stress with the aim of highlighting progresses in this field. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The Role of Free Radicals in the Aging Brain and Parkinson’s Disease: Convergence and Parallelism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Kug Choi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Free radical production and their targeted action on biomolecules have roles in aging and age-related disorders such as Parkinson’s disease (PD. There is an age-associated increase in oxidative damage to the brain, and aging is considered a risk factor for PD. Dopaminergic neurons show linear fallout of 5–10% per decade with aging; however, the rate and intensity of neuronal loss in patients with PD is more marked than that of aging. Here, we enumerate the common link between aging and PD at the cellular level with special reference to oxidative damage caused by free radicals. Oxidative damage includes mitochondrial dysfunction, dopamine auto-oxidation, α-synuclein aggregation, glial cell activation, alterations in calcium signaling, and excess free iron. Moreover, neurons encounter more oxidative stress as a counteracting mechanism with advancing age does not function properly. Alterations in transcriptional activity of various pathways, including nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2, glycogen synthase kinase 3β, mitogen activated protein kinase, nuclear factor kappa B, and reduced activity of superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione with aging might be correlated with the increased incidence of PD.

  13. Centralized rehabilitation after servere traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, Aase Worså; Liebach, Annette; Nordenbo, Annette Mosbæk

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To present results from the first 3 years of centralized subacute rehabilitation after very severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), and to compare results of centralized versus decentralized rehabilitation. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Prospectively, the most severely injured group of adults fr...

  14. Decompressive craniectomy following brain injury: factors important ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-01-07

    Jan 7, 2010 ... Background: Decompressive craniectomy (DC) is often performed as an empirical lifesaving measure to protect the injured brain from the damaging effects of propagating oedema and intracranial hypertension. However, there are no clearly defined indications or specified guidelines for patient selection for ...

  15. Sialic acid accelerates the electrophoretic velocity of injured dorsal root ganglion neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-xu Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral nerve injury has been shown to result in ectopic spontaneous discharges on soma and injured sites of sensory neurons, thereby inducing neuropathic pain. With the increase of membrane proteins on soma and injured site neurons, the negatively charged sialic acids bind to the external domains of membrane proteins, resulting in an increase of this charge. We therefore speculate that the electrophoretic velocity of injured neurons may be faster than non-injured neurons. The present study established rat models of neuropathic pain via chronic constriction injury. Results of the cell electrophoresis test revealed that the electrophoretic velocity of injured neuronal cells was faster than that of non-injured (control cells. We then treated cells with divalent cations of Ca 2+ and organic compounds with positive charges, polylysine to counteract the negatively charged sialic acids, or neuraminidase to specifically remove sialic acids from the membrane surface of injured neurons. All three treatments significantly reduced the electrophoretic velocity of injured neuronal cells. These findings suggest that enhanced sialic acids on injured neurons may accelerate the electrophoretic velocity of injured neurons.

  16. Optimization of the standards clinico-neurology and beam diagnostics of an easy brain injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vakulenko, I.P.; Semisalov, S.Ya.; Sajko, D.Yu.

    2003-01-01

    16825 cases of a brain injury (BI) at the persons are investigated is more senior than 14 years. Axial computer topography (ACT) at concussion of a head brain was made 1/3 injureds. The careful analysis clinico-neuralgic symptoms allows to optimize purpose the ACT at easy BI, that not only improves quality of diagnostics, but in the certain degree normalizes beam loading on the injureds

  17. Reconstruction of Injured Carotid Artery in a Comatose Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arben Zenelaj

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A man 30 years old,was brought to the emergency department after being injured on the left side of the neck area.Massive bleeding from the wound caused by glass was observed.The patient was in cerebral coma and hemorrahagic shock.The eye pupils remained isochoric during and after the operation.He was taken immediately at the surgery room.The bleeding was stopped by using external compression.Exposure of the left neck blood vessels was carried out.The left common carotid artery and internal jugular vein was revealed.A provisory Pruitt-Inahara shunt was put in the common carotid artery,while teh injured vein was ligated.The suture of the left common carotid artery using Prolen 6-0 completed the procedure.After the surgery the patient was transferred to the intensive care unit.About two hours later he woke up,conscious.The left thoracic drainage because of the hemothorax was applied in the second postoperative day.The patient was lively and discharged from the hospitall in the 14-th postoperative day.The right facial paresis and mild left side hemiparesis persisted.Two months after the event no residual neurologic deficits were observed. [Cukurova Med J 2014; 39(3.000: 598-601

  18. Lactate storm marks cerebral metabolism following brain trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lama, Sanju; Auer, Roland N; Tyson, Randy; Gallagher, Clare N; Tomanek, Boguslaw; Sutherland, Garnette R

    2014-07-18

    Brain metabolism is thought to be maintained by neuronal-glial metabolic coupling. Glia take up glutamate from the synaptic cleft for conversion into glutamine, triggering glial glycolysis and lactate production. This lactate is shuttled into neurons and further metabolized. The origin and role of lactate in severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains controversial. Using a modified weight drop model of severe TBI and magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy with infusion of (13)C-labeled glucose, lactate, and acetate, the present study investigated the possibility that neuronal-glial metabolism is uncoupled following severe TBI. Histopathology of the model showed severe brain injury with subarachnoid and hemorrhage together with glial cell activation and positive staining for Tau at 90 min post-trauma. High resolution MR spectroscopy of brain metabolites revealed significant labeling of lactate at C-3 and C-2 irrespective of the infused substrates. Increased (13)C-labeled lactate in all study groups in the absence of ischemia implied activated astrocytic glycolysis and production of lactate with failure of neuronal uptake (i.e. a loss of glial sensing for glutamate). The early increase in extracellular lactate in severe TBI with the injured neurons rendered unable to pick it up probably contributes to a rapid progression toward irreversible injury and pan-necrosis. Hence, a method to detect and scavenge the excess extracellular lactate on site or early following severe TBI may be a potential primary therapeutic measure. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Ang-(1-7) exerts protective role in blood-brain barrier damage by the balance of TIMP-1/MMP-9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jitao; Zhao, Duo; Wu, Shuang; Wang, Dan

    2015-02-05

    Cerebrovascular disease (CVD) ranks as the top three health risks, specially cerebral ischemia characterized with the damage of blood-brain barrier (BBB). The angiotensin Ang-(1-7) was proven to have a protective effect on cerebrovascular diseases. However, its role on blood-brain barrier and the underlying molecular mechanism remains unclear. In this study, Ang-(1-7) significantly relieved damage of ischemia reperfusion injury on blood-brain barrier in cerebral ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI) rats. Furthermore, its treatment attenuated BBB permeability and brain edema. Similarly, Ang-(1-7) also decreased the barrier permeability of brain endothelial cell line RBE4. Further analysis showed that Ang-(1-7) could effectively restore tight junction protein (claudin-5 and zonula occludens ZO-1) expression levels both in IRI-rats and hypoxia-induced RBE4 cells. Furthermore, Ang-(1-7) stimulation down-regulated hypoxia-induced matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) levels, whose silencing with (matrix metalloproteinase-9 hemopexin domain) MMP9-PEX inhibitor significantly increased the expression of claudin-5 and ZO-1. Further mechanism analysis demonstrated that Ang-(1-7) might junction protein levels by tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP1)-MMP9 pathway, because Ang-(1-7) enhanced TIMP1 expression, whose silencing obviously attenuated the inhibitor effect of Ang-(1-7) on MMP-9 levels and decreased Ang-(1-7)-triggered increase in claudin-5 and ZO-1. Together, this study demonstrated a protective role of Ang-(1-7) in IRI-induced blood-brain barrier damage by TIMP1-MMP9-regulated tight junction protein expression. Accordingly, Ang-(1-7) may become a promising therapeutic agent against IRI and its complications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Respiratory mechanics in brain injury: A review

    OpenAIRE

    Koutsoukou, Antonia; Katsiari, Maria; Orfanos, Stylianos E; Kotanidou, Anastasia; Daganou, Maria; Kyriakopoulou, Magdalini; Koulouris, Nikolaos G; Rovina, Nikoletta

    2016-01-01

    Several clinical and experimental studies have shown that lung injury occurs shortly after brain damage. The responsible mechanisms involve neurogenic pulmonary edema, inflammation, the harmful action of neurotransmitters, or autonomic system dysfunction. Mechanical ventilation, an essential component of life support in brain-damaged patients (BD), may be an additional traumatic factor to the already injured or susceptible to injury lungs of these patients thus worsening lung injury, in case ...

  1. Stromal Derived Factor-1/CXCR4 Axis Involved in Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Recruitment to Injured Liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuai Xiao Ling

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanism of bone marrow mesenchymal stromal stem cells (BMSCs mobilization and migration to the liver was poorly understood. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1 participates in BMSCs homing and migration into injury organs. We try to investigate the role of SDF-1 signaling in BMSCs migration towards injured liver. The expression of CXCR4 in BMSCs at mRNA level and protein level was confirmed by RT-PCR, flow cytometry, and immunocytochemistry. The SDF-1 or liver lysates induced BMSCs migration was detected by transwell inserts. CXCR4 antagonist, AMD3100, and anti-CXCR4 antibody were used to inhibit the migration. The Sprague-Dawley rat liver injury model was established by intraperitoneal injection of thioacetamide. The concentration of SDF-1 increased as modeling time extended, which was determined by ELISA method. The Dir-labeled BMSCs were injected into the liver of the rats through portal vein. The cell migration in the liver was tracked by in vivo imaging system and the fluorescent intensity was measured. In vivo, BMSCs migrated into injured liver which was partially blocked by AMD3100 or anti-CXCR4 antibody. Taken together, the results demonstrated that the migration of BMSCs was regulated by SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling which involved in BMSCs recruitment to injured liver.

  2. The Relationship between Perceived Sleep Quality, Polysomnographic Measures and Depressive Symptoms in Chemically-Injured Veterans: A Pilot Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davood Moshkani Farahani

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Sleep complaints are common among Iranian chemically-injured veterans. The growing body of research has investigated (in equalities between such subjective complaints and objective sleep records. Moreover, sleep complaints are associated with depressive symptoms. Depressive symptoms, also, have been frequently reported in chemically-injured veterans. Therefore, the purpose of this pilot study was to investigate the relationship between perceived sleep quality, polysomnographic measures and depressive symptoms in Iranian veterans with chemical injuries.In this pilot study, 35 Iranian veterans with chemical injuries complaining of a sleep problem were selected. Initially, participants were evaluated via all-night polysomnography, then, they completed the research questionnaires. Collected data were analyzed using Pearson correlation coefficients.Data analyses showed that there was no significant correlation between many of self-reposted variables and polysomnogaphic recordings, however, remarkable relationships were found between the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and the Beck Depression Inventory scores.The findings indicated that sleep complaints of chemically-injured veterans are not equivalent to objective sleep disturbances, however, these complaints are largely associated with level of depression. This study emphasizes the important role of mood in sleep evaluation. Further, the findings suggest using a combination of both subjective and objective measures for accurate assessment of sleep quality in Iranian veterans with chemical injuries (i.e., multimethod approach.

  3. The Relationship between Perceived Sleep Quality, Polysomnographic Measures and Depressive Symptoms in Chemically-Injured Veterans: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshkani Farahani, Davood; Tavallaie, Abbas; Vahedi, Ensieh; Rezaiemaram, Peyman; Naderi, Zohreh; Talaie, Akram

    2014-07-01

    Sleep complaints are common among Iranian chemically-injured veterans. The growing body of research has investigated (in) equalities between such subjective complaints and objective sleep records. Moreover, sleep complaints are associated with depressive symptoms. Depressive symptoms, also, have been frequently reported in chemically-injured veterans. Therefore, the purpose of this pilot study was to investigate the relationship between perceived sleep quality, polysomnographic measures and depressive symptoms in Iranian veterans with chemical injuries. In this pilot study, 35 Iranian veterans with chemical injuries complaining of a sleep problem were selected. Initially, participants were evaluated via all-night polysomnography, then, they completed the research questionnaires. Collected data were analyzed using Pearson correlation coefficients. Data analyses showed that there was no significant correlation between many of self-reposted variables and polysomnogaphic recordings, however, remarkable relationships were found between the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and the Beck Depression Inventory scores. The findings indicated that sleep complaints of chemically-injured veterans are not equivalent to objective sleep disturbances, however, these complaints are largely associated with level of depression. This study emphasizes the important role of mood in sleep evaluation. Further, the findings suggest using a combination of both subjective and objective measures for accurate assessment of sleep quality in Iranian veterans with chemical injuries (i.e., multimethod approach).

  4. Alleviating gender role strain in adult men with traumatic brain injury: an evaluation of a set of guidelines for occupational therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutman, S A

    1999-01-01

    A set of guidelines to assist men with traumatic brain injury (TBI) to alleviate gender role strain was assessed to determine its effectiveness and acceptability to participants. Four adult male participants with TBI received the intervention (the set of guidelines) for 4 months. The intervention consisted of rebuilding self-identified gendered social roles and activities. Focused interviews and participant observation were used to determine whether gender role strain changed after intervention. The participants reported that the intervention enabled them to (a) enhance their gender role satisfaction through newly rebuilt roles and activities, (b) attain certain long-held personal goals, (c) feel more like members of society, (d) perceive a greater congruency between their internal self-images and external postinjury roles, (e) learn more about personal skills and values as men, (f) feel more comfortable using help-seeking behaviors, (g) feel a sense of shared experience and affinity, (h) feel more understood and accepted, and (i) contribute to others through community member roles. The set of guidelines for alleviating gender role strain was effective in assisting these participants to enhance their gender role satisfaction through rebuilding desired male-gendered social roles and activities. Dating, courtship, extended family member, community member, friend, and mentor-protege roles, lost as a result of TBI, were rebuilt through gender-neutral activities that facilitated a sense of volitional control, competency, and normalcy. Nonetheless, the men continued to lack desired rites of passage leading from male adolescence to adulthood.

  5. Increased CD147 (EMMPRIN) expression in the rat brain following traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ming; Li, Hong; Shang, Yanguo; Zhou, Ziwei; Zhang, Jianning

    2014-10-17

    The extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN), or CD147, has been known to play a key regulatory role in vascular permeability and leukocyte activation by inducing the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). The effects of traumatic brain injury on the expression of EMMPRIN remain poorly understood. In this study, we investigated changes in EMMPRIN expression in a rat model of fluid percussion injury (FPI) and examined the potential association between EMMPRIN and MMP-9 expression. Adult male rats were subjected to FPI. EMMPRIN expression was markedly up-regulated in the brain tissue surrounding the injured region 6-48 h after TBI, as measured by immunoblot and immunohistochemistry. EMMPRIN expression was localized to inflammatory cells. The increase in EMMPRIN expression was temporally correlated with an increase in MMP-9 levels. These data demonstrate, for the first time, changes in CD147 and MMP-9 expression following TBI. These data also suggest that CD147 and MMP-9 may play a role in vascular injuries after TBI. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. A pilot study on the operationalization of the Model of Occupational Self Efficacy: A model for the reintegration of persons with brain injuries to their worker roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soeker, Shaheed

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury causes functional limitations that can cause people to struggle to reintegrate in the workplace despite participating in work rehabilitation programmes. The aim of the study was to explore, and describe the experiences of individuals with Traumatic Brain Injury regarding returning to work through the use of the model of occupational self-efficacy. In the study 10 individuals who were diagnosed with a mild to moderate brain injury participated in the study. The research study was positioned within the qualitative paradigm specifically utilizing case study methodology. In order to gather data from the participants, individual interviews and participant observation techniques were used. Two themes emerged from the findings of the study theme one reflected the barriers related to the use of the model (i.e. Theme one: Effective participation in the model is affected by financial assistance). The second theme related to the enabling factors related to the use of the model (i.e. Theme two: A sense of normality). The findings of this study indicated that the Model of Occupational Self Efficacy (MOS) is a useful model to use in retraining the work skills of individual's who sustained a traumatic brain injury. The participants in this study could maintain employment in the open labour market for a period of at least 12 months and it improved their ability to accept their brain injury as well as adapt to their worker roles. The MOS also provides a framework for facilitating community integration.

  7. Brain Death in Islamic Jurisprudence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Nikzad

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: In today's world, Islamic jurisprudence encounters  new issues. One of the areas where jurisprudence gets involved is the issues concerned with brain death, whether brain death in jurisprudence and Islamic law is considered the end of life. In this study, brain death was discussed from the Shiite jurisprudence perspective and also the opinions of the specialists are taken into account. METHODS: This study is designed based on library collection and review of the literature in the field of brain death. Also, Quranic verses, hadiths and fatwas (religious opinions of the scholars are used. Some of the articles which were centered around Islamic jurisprudence, particularly Shiite jurisprudence that explain and deal with brain death were given special consideration. FINDINGS: Brain death from religious and jurisprudence perspective is considered the termination of life and removing the vital organs from the body is not viewed as committing manslaughter. A person with brain death is not a normally known injured man who is still alive. The brain death patinets have no life and getting rid of the body does not constitute a case of manslaughter. Amputation of the organs of brain death patients for donation and transplantation amounts to the amputation of a dead body. If the life of a Muslim is subject to transplant of organs from the body of a brain death patient, it will be permissible. CONCLUSION: In principle, if the life of a Muslim entails transplant of organs of brain death patients, it will be permissible 

  8. Blood borne hormones in a cross-talk between peripheral and brain mechanisms regulating blood pressure, the role of circumventricular organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ufnal, Marcin; Skrzypecki, Janusz

    2014-04-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that blood borne hormones modulate brain mechanisms regulating blood pressure. This appears to be mediated by the circumventricular organs which are located in the walls of the brain ventricular system and lack the blood-brain barrier. Recent evidence shows that neurons of the circumventricular organs express receptors for the majority of cardiovascular hormones. Intracerebroventricular infusions of hormones and their antagonists is one approach to evaluate the influence of blood borne hormones on the neural mechanisms regulating arterial blood pressure. Interestingly, there is no clear correlation between peripheral and central effects of cardiovascular hormones. For example, angiotensin II increases blood pressure acting peripherally and centrally, whereas peripherally acting pressor catecholamines decrease blood pressure when infused intracerebroventricularly. The physiological role of such dual hemodynamic responses has not yet been clarified. In the paper we review studies on hemodynamic effects of catecholamines, neuropeptide Y, angiotensin II, aldosterone, natriuretic peptides, endothelins, histamine and bradykinin in the context of their role in a cross-talk between peripheral and brain mechanisms involved in the regulation of arterial blood pressure. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Brain glycogen and its role in supporting glutamate and GABA homeostasis in a type 2 diabetes rat model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sickmann, Helle Mark; Waagepetersen, Helle S.; Schousboe, Arne

    2012-01-01

    -(13)C]glucose was used to monitor metabolism. Brain levels of (13)C labeling in glucose, lactate, alanine, glutamate, GABA, glutamine and aspartate were determined. Our results show that inhibition of brain glycogen metabolism reduced the amounts of glutamate in both the control and type 2 diabetes......The number of people suffering from diabetes is hastily increasing and the condition is associated with altered brain glucose homeostasis. Brain glycogen is located in astrocytes and being a carbohydrate reservoir it contributes to glucose homeostasis. Furthermore, glycogen has been indicated...... to be important for proper neurotransmission under normal conditions. Previous findings from our laboratory suggested that glucose metabolism was reduced in type 2 diabetes, and thus we wanted to investigate more specifically how brain glycogen metabolism contributes to maintain energy status in the type 2...

  10. Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumors 1 is a versatile mucin-like molecule likely to play a differential role in digestive tract cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollenhauer, J; Herbertz, S; Helmke, B

    2001-01-01

    Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumors 1 (DMBT1) has been proposed as a candidate tumor suppressor gene for brain, lung, and digestive tract cancer. In particular, alterations of the gene and/or a loss of expression have been observed in gastric, colorectal, and esophageal carcinomas. Initial evidence...... has accumulated that DMBT1 may represent a multifunctional protein. Because the consequences of a loss of DMBT1 function may be different depending on its original function in a particular tissue, we wondered if it is appropriate to assume a uniform role for DMBT1 in digestive tract carcinomas. We...... hypothesized that a systematic characterization of DMBT1 in the human alimentary tract would be useful to improve the understanding of this molecule and its role in digestive tract carcinomas. Our data indicate that the expression pattern and subcellular distribution of DMBT1 in the human alimentary tract...

  11. Role of diffusion-weighted echo-planar MRI in distinguishing between brain abscess and tumour: a preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noguchi, K.; Watanabe, N.; Nagayoshi, T.; Kanazawa, T.; Toyoshima, S.; Shimizu, M.; Seto, H.

    1999-01-01

    Our purpose was to evaluate diffusion-weighted (DW) echo-planar MRI in differentiating between brain abscess and tumour. We examined two patients with surgically confirmed pyogenic brain abscess and 18 with metastatic brain tumours or high-grade glioma, using a 1.5 T system. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of each necrotic or solid contrast-enhancing lesion was measured with two different b values (20 and 1200 s/mm 2 ). All capsule-stage brain abscesses (4 lesions) and zones of cerebritis (2 lesions) were identified on high-b-value DWI as markedly high-signal areas of decreased ADC (range, 0.58-0.70 [(10-3 mm 2 /s; mean, 0.63)]). All cystic or necrotic portions of brain tumours (14 lesions) were identified on high-b-value DWI as low-signal areas of increased ADC (range, 2.20-3.20 [(10-3 mm 2 /s; mean, 2.70)]). Solid, contrast-enhancing portions of brain tumours (19 lesions) were identified on high-b-value DWI as high-signal areas of sightly decreased or increased ADC (range, 0.77-1.29 [(10-3 mm 2 /s; mean, 0.94)]). Our preliminary results indicate that DW echo-planar MRI be used for distinguishing between brain abscess and tumour. (orig.) (orig.)

  12. Camptocormia and deep brain stimulation: The interesting overlapping etiologies and the therapeutic role of subthalamic nucleus-deep brain stimulation in Parkinson disease with camptocormia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekmekci, Hakan; Kaptan, Hulagu

    2016-01-01

    Camptocormia is known as "bent spine syndrome" and defined as a forward hyperflexion. The most common etiologic factor is related with the movement disorders, mainly in Parkinson's disease (PD). We present the case of a 51-year-old woman who has been followed with PD for the last 10 years, and also under the therapy for PD. An unappreciated correlation low back pain with camptocormia developed. She underwent deep brain stimulation (DBS) in the subthalamic nucleus bilaterally and improved her bending posture. The relationship between the DBS and camptocormia is discussed in this unique condition.

  13. Effects of hypertonic dextrose on injured rat skeletal muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunduracioglu, Burak; Ulkar, Bulent; Sabuncuoglu, Bizden T; Can, Belgin; Bayrakci, Kenan

    2006-04-01

    Histological examination of proliferative therapy effects on the healing process of muscular injury. We performed this study between March and August 2002 at Ankara University, School of Medicine, Laboratory of Animal Experiments, Ankara, Turkey. We used an experimental animal model by conducting a standardized cut injury of the gastrocnemius muscle in 30 adult male albino rats, which we divided into 2 groups; proliferative therapy group and control group. We evaluated the injured rat muscles by light microscopy on the fifth, eight, and twelfth day of injury. The muscular regeneration process began at day 5 in both the control and proliferative therapy groups. The proliferative therapy group revealed a prominent inflammatory reaction, fibroblast migration, and necrosis with accompanying regeneration and excessive connective tissue formation. We cannot consider proliferative therapy an appropriate treatment modality for muscular injuries, unless there is evidence of normal muscle physiology and biomechanics post traumatically.

  14. Can injured adult CNS axons regenerate by recapitulating development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, Brett J; Bradke, Frank

    2017-10-01

    In the adult mammalian central nervous system (CNS), neurons typically fail to regenerate their axons after injury. During development, by contrast, neurons extend axons effectively. A variety of intracellular mechanisms mediate this difference, including changes in gene expression, the ability to form a growth cone, differences in mitochondrial function/axonal transport and the efficacy of synaptic transmission. In turn, these intracellular processes are linked to extracellular differences between the developing and adult CNS. During development, the extracellular environment directs axon growth and circuit formation. In adulthood, by contrast, extracellular factors, such as myelin and the extracellular matrix, restrict axon growth. Here, we discuss whet