WorldWideScience

Sample records for initiated accident experiments

  1. Transient debris freezing and potential wall melting during a severe reactivity initiated accident experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Genk, M.S.; Moore, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    It is important to light water reactor (LWR) safety analysis to understand the transient freezing of molten core debris on cold structures following a hypothetical core meltdown accident. The purpose of this paper is to (a) present the results of a severe reactivity initiated accident (RIA) in-pile experiment with regard to molten debris distribution and freezing following test fuel rod failure, (b) analyze the transient freezing of molten debris (primarily a mixture of UO/sub 2/ fuel and Zircaloy cladding) deposited on the inner surface of the test shroud wall upon rod failure, and (c) assess the potential for wall melting upon being contacted by the molten debris. 26 refs

  2. Analysis of molten fuel-coolant interaction during a reactivity-initiated accident experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Genk, M.S.; Hobbins, R.R.

    1981-01-01

    The results of a reactivity-initiated accident experiment, designated RIA-ST-4, are discussed and analyzed with regard to molten fuel-coolant interaction (MFCI). In this experiment, extensive amounts of molten UO 2 fuel and zircaloy cladding were produced and fragmented upon mixing with the coolant. Coolant pressurization up to 35 MPa and coolant overheating in excess of 940 K occurred after fuel rod failure. The initial coolant conditions were similar to those in boiling water reactors during a hot startup (that is, coolant pressure of 6.45 MPa, coolant temperature of 538 K, and coolant flow rate of 85 cm 3 /s). It is concluded that the high coolant pressure recorded in the RIA-ST-4 experiment was caused by an energetic MFCI and was not due to gas release from the test rod at failure, Zr/water reaction, or to UO 2 fuel vapor pressure. The high coolant temperature indicated the presence of superheated steam, which may have formed during the expansion of the working fluid back to the initial coolant pressure; yet, the thermal-to-mechanical energy conversion ratio is estimated to be only 0.3%

  3. Catheter closure of patent foramen ovale in patients with cryptogenic cerebrovascular accidents: initial experiences in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kijima, Yasufumi; Akagi, Teiji; Nakagawa, Koji; Taniguchi, Manabu; Ueoka, Akira; Deguchi, Kentaro; Toh, Norihisa; Oe, Hiroki; Kusano, Kengo; Sano, Shunji; Ito, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Although numerous studies have shown an association between a patent foramen ovale (PFO) and cryptogenic cerebrovascular accidents (CVA), there has been no definitive control study that demonstrated the benefit of percutaneous device closure of a PFO compared to medical therapy in patients with CVA. Additionally, few clinical data exist for Japanese patients in this field. We demonstrate the initial experiences in catheter closure of a PFO as secondary prevention of CVA in Japan. Catheter closure of a PFO was attempted in 7 patients who were diagnosed with cryptogenic CVA. Mean age at the procedure was 54 ± 19 years. The presence of spontaneous interatrial right-to-left shunts was demonstrated by transesophageal contrast echocardiography without Valsalva maneuver in all of the patients. Amplatzer Cribriform device (n = 4) or Amplatzer PFO Occluder (n = 3) was used for the procedure and was successfully deployed. Device-related complications were not observed at the time of the procedure or during the follow-up period (mean period of 16 ± 9 months). Catheter closure of a PFO could be safely performed with Amplatzer Cribriform or Amplatzer PFO Occluder. This procedure may contribute to prevention of recurrent cryptogenic CVA in Japanese patients.

  4. Modelling Reactivity-Initiated-Accident Experiments With Falcon And SCANAIR: A Comparison Exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romano, A.; Wallin, H.; Zimmermann, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    A critical assessment is made of the state-of-the-art fuel performance code FALCON in the context of selected Reactivity Initiated Accident (RIA) experiments from the CABRI REP Na series, and contrasts its predictions against those of the extensively benchmarked SCANAIR (Version 3.2) code. The thermal fields in the fuel and cladding, the clad mechanical deformation, and the Fission Gas Release (FGR) are adopted as 'Figures of Merit' by which to judge code performance. Particular attention is paid to the importance of fission-gas-induced clad deformation (which is modelled in SCANAIR, but not in FALCON), relative to that driven by the fuel thermal expansion (which is modelled by both codes). The thermal fields calculated by the codes are in good agreement with each other, especially during the initial stages of the transients --- the adiabatic phase. Larger discrepancies are observed at later times, and are due to the different models applied to calculate the gap conductance. FALCON predicts clad permanent deformations at the end of the transients with a maximum deviation from the experimental measurements of about 20%. Generally, the code always tends to underpredict the measurements. SCANAIR performs similarly, but grossly overpredicts the permanent clad strain for the case involving a very energetic pulse. The fission-gas-driven clad deformation is only relevant for very fast pulse energy injection cases, which are not prototypical of the RIA transients expected in PWRs. The FGR models in FALCON do not capture the mechanism of 'burst-release' in the RIA transients, having been developed for steady-state irradiation conditions. This also explains why they performed poorly when applied to the fast-transient cases analyzed here. In contrast, the FGR results from SCANAIR are in satisfactory agreement with the experimental results. (author)

  5. Experiment data report for Test RIA 1-2 (Reactivity Initiated Accident Test Series)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmermann, C.L.; White, C.E.; Evans, R.P.

    1979-06-01

    Recorded test data are presented for the second of six planned tests in the Reactivity Initiated Accident (RIA) Test Series I, Test RIA 1-2. This test, conducted at the Power Burst Facility, had the following objectives: (1) characterize the response of preirradiated fuel rods during an RIA event conducted at boiling water reactor hot-startup conditions; and (2) evaluate the effect of rod internal pressure on preirradiated fuel rod response during an RIA event. The data from Test RIA 1-2 are graphed in engineering units and have been appraised for quality and validity. These uninterpreted data are presented for use in the nuclear fuel behavior research field before detailed analysis and interpretation have been completed

  6. In-pile observations of fuel and clad relocation during LMFBR initiation phase accident experiments - the STAR experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, S.A.; Schumacher, G.; Henkel, P.R.; Royl, P.

    1987-01-01

    A series of seven in-pile experiments (the STAR experiments) were performed in which clad motion and fuel dispersal were observed in small pin bundles with high-speed cinematography. The experimental heating conditions reproduced a range of Loss of Flow (LOF) accident scenarios for the lead subassemblies in LMFBRs. The experiments show strong tendencies for limited clad motion in multiple pin bundles, early fuel disruption and dispersal (prior to fuel melting) in moderate power transients having simultaneous clad melting and fuel disruption. The more recent experiments indicate a possibility of steel vapor driven fuel dispersal after fuel breakup and intimate fuel/steel mixing. (author)

  7. BISON Modeling of Reactivity-Initiated Accident Experiments in a Static Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Folsom, Charles P.; Jensen, Colby B.; Williamson, Richard L.; Woolstenhulme, Nicolas E.; Ban, Heng; Wachs, Daniel M.

    2016-09-01

    In conjunction with the restart of the TREAT reactor and the design of test vehicles, modeling and simulation efforts are being used to model the response of Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) concepts under reactivity insertion accident (RIA) conditions. The purpose of this work is to model a baseline case of a 10 cm long UO2-Zircaloy fuel rodlet using BISON and RELAP5 over a range of energy depositions and with varying reactor power pulse widths. The results show the effect of varying the pulse width and energy deposition on both thermal and mechanical parameters that are important for predicting failure of the fuel rodlet. The combined BISON/RELAP5 model captures coupled thermal and mechanical effects on the fuel-to-cladding gap conductance, cladding-to-coolant heat transfer coefficient and water temperature and pressure that would not be capable in each code individually. These combined effects allow for a more accurate modeling of the thermal and mechanical response in the fuel rodlet and thermal-hydraulics of the test vehicle.

  8. TIARA: treatment initiatives after radiological accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menetrier, F.; Berard, Ph.; Joussineau, S.; Stradling, N.; Hodgson, A.; List, V.; Morcillo, M.A.; Paile, W.; Holt, D.C.B.; Eriksson, T.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the objectives, and reviews the progress, of the European project 'Treatment Initiatives After Radiological Accidents' (TIARA). TIARA forms part of the 'Preparatory Action for Security Research' (PASR) launched by the European Commission in 2004. The Preparatory Action is intended to reach preliminary conclusions on the needs for the security of EU citizens. It prepared a comprehensive Security Research Programme as part of the Commission's Seventh Framework Programme proposal, which was adopted in 2006 and launched in 2007. The principal purpose of TIARA is to constitute a European network that will participate in facilitating the management of a crisis in the event of the malevolent dispersal of radionuclides into the public environment. (authors)

  9. Learning from nuclear accident experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaurio, J.K.

    1984-01-01

    Statistical procedures are developed to estimate accident occurrence rates from historical event records, to predict future rates and trends, and to estimate the accuracy of the rate estimates and predictions. Maximum likelihood estimation is applied to several learning models, and results are compared to earlier graphical and analytical estimates. The models are based on (1) the cumulative number of operating years, (2) the cumulative number of plants built, and (3) accidents (explicitly), with the accident rate distinctly different before and after an accident. The statistical accuracies of the parameters estimated are obtained in analytical form using the Fisher information matrix. Using data on core damage accidents in electricity producing plants, it is estimated that the probability for a plant to have a serious flaw has decreased from 0.1 to 0.01 during the developmental phase of the nuclear industry. At the same time the equivalent frequency of accidents has decreased from 0.04 per reactor year to 0.0004 per reactor year, partly due to the increasing population of plants. 10 references, 7 figures, 2 tables

  10. Computer Based Road Accident Reconstruction Experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Batista

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Since road accident analyses and reconstructions are increasinglybased on specific computer software for simulationof vehicle d1iving dynamics and collision dynamics, and forsimulation of a set of trial runs from which the model that bestdescribes a real event can be selected, the paper presents anoverview of some computer software and methods available toaccident reconstruction experts. Besides being time-saving,when properly used such computer software can provide moreauthentic and more trustworthy accident reconstruction, thereforepractical experiences while using computer software toolsfor road accident reconstruction obtained in the TransportSafety Laboratory at the Faculty for Maritime Studies andTransport of the University of Ljubljana are presented and discussed.This paper addresses also software technology for extractingmaximum information from the accident photo-documentationto support accident reconstruction based on the simulationsoftware, as well as the field work of reconstruction expertsor police on the road accident scene defined by this technology.

  11. Medical experience: Chernobyl and other accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Densow, D.; Kindler, H.; Fliedner, T.M.

    2000-01-01

    A radiation accident can be defined as an involuntary relevant exposure of man to ionising radiation or radioactive material. Provided one of the ensuing criteria is met with at least one person involved in an excursion of ionising radiation and or radioactive material, the respective incident can be considered a radiation accident in accordance with ICRP, NCRP (US), and WHO: ≥0.25 Sv total body irradiation with lesions of the rapidly dividing tissues; ≥6 Sv cutaneous and local irradiation; ≥0.4 Sv local irradiation of other organ systems through external sources; incorporation equal to or in excess of more than half of the maximum permissible organ burden; and medical accidents meeting one of the above criteria. Several actions have been taken to categorise radiation accidents in order to learn from previous accidents in terms of both managerial and medical experience. For this presentation three approaches will be discussed concerning their relevance to the individual treatment and risk management. This will be obtained by applying three classification schemes to all known radiation accidents: 1. classification with respect to the accident mechanism, 2. classification concerning the radiation injury, and 3. classification concerning the extent of the accident. In a fourth chapter the efficacy of bone marrow transplantation will briefly be commented on based on the accumulated experience of about 400 radiation accidents world-wide. (author)

  12. How the radiological accident of Goiania was initially determined

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, W.M.

    2000-01-01

    Mainly the initial actions adopted to minimise the consequences of radiological accident involving the public are very important for bringing the situation to the normality. In this work the author presents a short history about the radiological accident with a 137 Cs source occurred in the city of Goiania, Brazil in 1987 as well as the actions adopted by him during the first hours after the detection of the accident. (author)

  13. Medical aid in the initial period of radiation accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selidovkin, G.D.

    1995-01-01

    The main tasks of medical arrangements on the initial stage of rendering aid after radiation accident are the prime medical classification of the injured persons among the personnel of the plant and population, and realization of measures to avoid the increase of doses. The volume of medical aid depends on the type of accident, on the after-accident radiation situation, on the influence of hazardous factors, on the number of people involved in accident situation and the spectrum of sanitary losses, etc., which is to be predicted in advance and to be taken into consideration when rendering aid. The proper and sufficient aid on the initial stage will build the foundation of the ultimate efficiency of medical aid after radiation accident. 14 refs

  14. Simulation of severe accidents in COTELS experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasilev, Yu.S.; Zhdanov, V.S.; Kolodeshnikov, A.A.; Kadyrov, Kh. G.; Turkebaev, T.E.; Tsaj, K.V.; Suslov, E.E.

    1999-01-01

    At present, the issue of atomic reactor operation safety is of a great attention. It is evident that the accident accompanied with a core materials melting is an improbable event. To fully assess a hazard of a reactor use and enhance its safety, it is necessary to predict a possible accident progress and specify possible consequences of severe accidents and eliminating measures. In COTELS experiments, aimed at investigation of interaction of corium with concrete and water, the corium s imulator m elt is discharged on the concrete. The concrete erosion parameters, composition and rate of aerosol and gas escaping are recorded. The solidified melt and concrete fragments structure is studied after the testing, using the X-ray diffractometer DRON-3. This paper gives consideration to possible mechanisms of formation of uranium-containing and other phases of products of interaction of the corium melt with concrete and water

  15. Third IAEA nuclear accident intercomparison experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miric, I; Ubovic, Z

    1974-05-15

    The purpose of this report is to present the results of the International Atomic Energy Agency intercomparison experiments held at the 'Boris Kidric' Institute, Vinca, in May 1973. The experiments are parts of a multilaboratory intercomparison programme sponsored by the IAEA for the evaluation of nuclear accident dosimetry systems and eventually recommendation of dosimetry systems that will provide adequate informations in the event of a criticality accident. The previous two studies were held at the Valduc Centre near Dijon (France) in June 1970 and at the ORNL in Oak Ridge (USA), in May 1971. Parts of the intercomparison studies were coordination meetings. The topics and conclusions of the Third coordination meeting are given in the Chairman's Report of F.F. Haywood. This paper will deal, therefore, only with data concerning the Third intercomparison experiments in which the RB reactor at Vinca was used as a source of mixed radiation. (author)

  16. Third IAEA nuclear accident intercomparison experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miric, I.; Ubovic, Z.

    1974-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to present the results of the International Atomic Energy Agency intercomparison experiments held at the 'Boris Kidric' Institute, Vinca, in May 1973. The experiments are parts of a multilaboratory intercomparison programme sponsored by the IAEA for the evaluation of nuclear accident dosimetry systems and eventually recommendation of dosimetry systems that will provide adequate informations in the event of a criticality accident. The previous two studies were held at the Valduc Centre near Dijon (France) in June 1970 and at the ORNL in Oak Ridge (USA), in May 1971. Parts of the intercomparison studies were coordination meetings. The topics and conclusions of the Third coordination meeting are given in the Chairman's Report of F.F. Haywood. This paper will deal, therefore, only with data concerning the Third intercomparison experiments in which the RB reactor at Vinca was used as a source of mixed radiation. (author)

  17. A methodology for analyzing precursors to earthquake-initiated and fire-initiated accident sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budnitz, R.J.; Lambert, H.E.; Apostolakis, G.

    1998-04-01

    This report covers work to develop a methodology for analyzing precursors to both earthquake-initiated and fire-initiated accidents at commercial nuclear power plants. Currently, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission sponsors a large ongoing project, the Accident Sequence Precursor project, to analyze the safety significance of other types of accident precursors, such as those arising from internally-initiated transients and pipe breaks, but earthquakes and fires are not within the current scope. The results of this project are that: (1) an overall step-by-step methodology has been developed for precursors to both fire-initiated and seismic-initiated potential accidents; (2) some stylized case-study examples are provided to demonstrate how the fully-developed methodology works in practice, and (3) a generic seismic-fragility date base for equipment is provided for use in seismic-precursors analyses. 44 refs., 23 figs., 16 tabs

  18. Nuclear Fuel Behaviour during Reactivity Initiated Accidents. Workshop Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    A reactivity initiated accident (RIA) is a nuclear reactor accident that involves an unwanted increase in fission rate and reactor power. The power increase may damage the reactor core. The main objective of the workshop was to review the current status of the experimental and analytical studies of the fuel behavior during the RIA transients in PWR and BWR reactors and the acceptance criteria for RIA in use and under consideration. The workshop was organized in an opening session and 5 technical sessions: 1) Recent experimental results and experimental techniques used; 2) Modelling and Data Interpretation; 3) Code Assessment; 4) RIA Core Analysis and 5) Revision and application of safety criteria

  19. ATHLET validation using accident management experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teschendorff, V.; Glaeser, H.; Steinhoff, F. [Gasellschaft fuer Anlagen - und Reaktorsicherheit (GSR) mbH, Garching (Germany)

    1995-09-01

    The computer code ATHLET is being developed as an advanced best-estimate code for the simulation of leaks and transients in PWRs and BWRs including beyond design basis accidents. The code has features that are of special interest for applications to small leaks and transients with accident management, e.g. initialisation by a steady-state calculation, full-range drift-flux model, and dynamic mixture level tracking. The General Control Simulation Module of ATHLET is a flexible tool for the simulation of the balance-of-plant and control systems including the various operator actions in the course of accident sequences with AM measures. The systematic validation of ATHLET is based on a well balanced set of integral and separate effect tests derived from the CSNI proposal emphasising, however, the German combined ECC injection system which was investigated in the UPTF, PKL and LOBI test facilities. PKL-III test B 2.1 simulates a cool-down procedure during an emergency power case with three steam generators isolated. Natural circulation under these conditions was investigated in detail in a pressure range of 4 to 2 MPa. The transient was calculated over 22000 s with complicated boundary conditions including manual control actions. The calculations demonstrations the capability to model the following processes successfully: (1) variation of the natural circulation caused by steam generator isolation, (2) vapour formation in the U-tubes of the isolated steam generators, (3) break-down of circulation in the loop containing the isolated steam generator following controlled cool-down of the secondary side, (4) accumulation of vapour in the pressure vessel dome. One conclusion with respect to the suitability of experiments simulating AM procedures for code validation purposes is that complete documentation of control actions during the experiment must be available. Special attention should be given to the documentation of operator actions in the course of the experiment.

  20. Treatment initiatives after radiological accidents: TIARA first step

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menetrier, F.; Berard, P.; Joussineau, S.; Stradling, N.; Hodgson, V.; List, MA.; Morcillo, W.; Paile, D.; Holt, T.; Eriksson

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: T.I.A.R.A. [Treatment Initiatives After Radiological Accidents] project is a consortium of 8 European partners. This project is part of the Preparatory Action on Security Research recently launched by the European Commission. The Preparatory Action is intended to reach preliminary conclusions on the needs for the security of European Union citizens before the launch of the Security Research Programme in 2007. The principal purpose of T.I.A.R.A. is to constitute a European network which will participate in enhancing the management of a crisis in the hypothesis of a malevolent dispersal of radionuclides in a public place. The main concern is to identify and define effective medical treatments for internal radioactive contamination. A preview of the state of treatment of contamination by radionuclides (especially actinides) in Europe highlights the following points: a decrease in the number of physicians with experience of treatment, a need for generalised agreement on treatment decisions and protocols, unanticipated operational issues and research into new treatments. If treatment is to be effective then several factors must be addressed and these include: firstly, the availability of effective specific treatment for the radionuclides involved, their rapid transport to and distribution of the drugs at the place of the malevolent dispersal and the easy administration of the drug even if numerous people are contaminated. The objectives of T.I.A.R.A. are threefold. First to provide straightforward guidance on dose assessment and efficacy of treatment which is readily understood by health physicists and physicians who do not have detailed knowledge and experience in radiological protection matters. Second, to foresee the operational needs for treating persons when there are mass casualties. Third, to monitor scientific and technological development on research into new treatments. Progress in all these aspects of the project will be

  1. INDUSTRIAL/MILITARY ACTIVITY-INITIATED ACCIDENT SCREENING ANALYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.A. Kalinich

    1999-09-27

    Impacts due to nearby installations and operations were determined in the Preliminary MGDS Hazards Analysis (CRWMS M&O 1996) to be potentially applicable to the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain. This determination was conservatively based on limited knowledge of the potential activities ongoing on or off the Nevada Test Site (NTS). It is intended that the Industrial/Military Activity-Initiated Accident Screening Analysis provided herein will meet the requirements of the ''Standard Review Plan for the Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants'' (NRC 1987) in establishing whether this external event can be screened from further consideration or must be included as a design basis event (DBE) in the development of accident scenarios for the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). This analysis only considers issues related to preclosure radiological safety. Issues important to waste isolation as related to impact from nearby installations will be covered in the MGR performance assessment.

  2. Professional experience and traffic accidents/near-miss accidents among truck drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girotto, Edmarlon; Andrade, Selma Maffei de; González, Alberto Durán; Mesas, Arthur Eumann

    2016-10-01

    To investigate the relationship between the time working as a truck driver and the report of involvement in traffic accidents or near-miss accidents. A cross-sectional study was performed with truck drivers transporting products from the Brazilian grain harvest to the Port of Paranaguá, Paraná, Brazil. The drivers were interviewed regarding sociodemographic characteristics, working conditions, behavior in traffic and involvement in accidents or near-miss accidents in the previous 12 months. Subsequently, the participants answered a self-applied questionnaire on substance use. The time of professional experience as drivers was categorized in tertiles. Statistical analyses were performed through the construction of models adjusted by multinomial regression to assess the relationship between the length of experience as a truck driver and the involvement in accidents or near-miss accidents. This study included 665 male drivers with an average age of 42.2 (±11.1) years. Among them, 7.2% and 41.7% of the drivers reported involvement in accidents and near-miss accidents, respectively. In fully adjusted analysis, the 3rd tertile of professional experience (>22years) was shown to be inversely associated with involvement in accidents (odds ratio [OR] 0.29; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.16-0.52) and near-miss accidents (OR 0.17; 95% CI 0.05-0.53). The 2nd tertile of professional experience (11-22 years) was inversely associated with involvement in accidents (OR 0.63; 95% CI 0.40-0.98). An evident relationship was observed between longer professional experience and a reduction in reporting involvement in accidents and near-miss accidents, regardless of age, substance use, working conditions and behavior in traffic. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Initial Egyptian ECMO experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akram Abdelbary

    2016-04-01

    Results: A total of twelve patients received ECMO between January 2014 and June 2015. The mean age was 35.9 years. (range 13–65 years, 8 males, with VV ECMO in 10 patients, and VA ECMO in 2 patients. Out of ten patients of VV ECMO, one had H1N1 pneumonia, one had advanced vasculitic lung, four had bacterial pneumonia, two traumatic lung contusions and one with organophosphorus poisoning, and one undiagnosed etiology leading to severe ARDS. Lung injury score range was 3–3.8, PaO2/FiO2 (20–76 mechanical ventilation duration before ECMO 1–14 days, Femoro-jugular cannulation in 7 patients and femoro-femoral in 2 patients and femoro-subclavian in 1 patient; all patients were initially sedated and paralyzed for (2–4 days and ventilated on pressure controlled ventilation with Pmax of 25 cm H2O and PEEP of 10 cm H2O. In VA ECMO patients were cannulated percutaneously using femoro-femoral approach. One patient showed no neurologic recovery and died after 24 h, the other had CABG on ECMO however the heart didn’t recover and died after 9 days. Heparin intravenous infusion was used initially in all patients and changed to Bivalirudin in 2 patients due to possible HIT. Pump flow ranged from 2.6 to 6.5 L/min. Average support time was 12 days (range 2–24 days. Seven patients (63.3% were successfully separated from ECMO and survived to hospital discharge. Hospital length of stay ranged from 3 to 42 days, tracheostomy was done percutaneously in 5 patients and surgically in 3. Gastrointestinal bleeding occurred in 6 patients, VAP in 7 patients, neurologic complications in 1 patient with complete recovery, cardiac arrhythmias in 3 patients, pneumothorax in 9 patients, and deep venous thrombosis in 2 patients.

  4. Reactivity initiated accidents and loss of shutdown - 20 years later

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luxat, J.C.

    2007-01-01

    A review of the safety of Ontario's nuclear power reactors was conducted in 1987 after the Chernobyl accident. As part of this review an analysis was performed of a Loss of Coolant Accident in a Pickering A unit with coincident failure to shutdown. This analysis showed that the power excursion was halted by channel and calandria vessel failures leading to moderator fluid displacement. The containment structure did not fail and, at worst might suffer minor cracking at the top of the dome of the reactor building. Overall the dose consequences of such an accident were no worse than the limiting design basis dual failure event. In the intervening twenty years following this analysis, Significant experimental information has been obtained that relates to power pulse behaviour. This information, together with conservatisms in he original analysis, are reviewed and assessed in this paper. In addition, the issue of reactivity initiated events in other reactor types is reviewed to identify the reactor design characteristics that are of importance in these events. Contrary to popular belief the existence of positive coolant void reactivity is not as significant a factor as it is sometimes stated to be. On balance, with appropriate design measures, no one reactor type can be claimed to be 'more safe' than another. The underlying basis for this statement is articulated in this paper. (author)

  5. Return on experience on nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barre, Bertrand

    2015-09-01

    After a presentation of the International Nuclear and radiological Events Scale (INES scale), of its levels and criteria, this article proposes brief recalls of some nuclear accidents which occurred in nuclear reactors: Chalk River in Canada (1952), Windscale in England (1957), the universal Canadian reactor (NRU in 1958), the SL1 reactor of the Idaho National Laboratory in the USA (1961), the Swiss Lucens reactor (1969), Saint-Laurent des Eaux in France (1969 and 1980). More detailed descriptions are then given for the Three Mile Island accident in 1979, the Chernobyl accident in 1986, and the Fukushima accident in 2011. The main causes of these accidents are identified: loss of control of chain reaction, cooling defect on a stopped reactor, cooling defect on an operated reactor. Some lessons are drawn from these facts, and some characteristics of the EPR are outlined with respect with problems encountered in these accidents

  6. Chernobyl NPP accident. Overcoming experience. Acquired lessons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nosovskij, A.V.; Vasil'chenko, V.N.; Klyuchnikov, A.A.; Prister, B.S.

    2006-01-01

    This book is devoted to the 20 anniversary of accident on the Chernobyl NPP unit 4. History of construction, causes of the accident and its consequences, actions for its mitigation are described. Modern situation with Chernobyl NPP decommissioning and transferring of 'Ukryttya' shelter into ecologically safe system are mentioned. The future of Chernobyl site and exclusion zone was discussed

  7. Study on light water reactor fuel behavior under reactivity initiated accident condition in TREAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnishi, Nobuaki; Ishijima, Kiyomi; Ochiai, Masaaki; Tanzawa, Sadamitsu; Uemura, Mutsumi

    1981-05-01

    This report reviews the results of the fuel failure experiments performed in TREAT in the U.S.A. simulating Reactivity Initiated Accidents. One of the main purposes of the TREAT experiments is the study of the fuel failure behavior, and the other is the study of the molten fuel-water coolant interaction and the consequent hydrogen behavior. This report mainly shows the results of the TREAT experiments studying the fuel failure behavior in Light Water Reactor, and then it describes the fuel failure threshold and the fuel failure mechanism, considering the results of the photographic experiments of the fuel failure behavior with transparent capsules. (author)

  8. EXPERIENCES WITH IDEA PROMOTING INITIATIVES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gish, Liv

    2011-01-01

    In new product development a central activity is to provide new ideas. Over the last decades experiences with stimulating employee creativity and establishing idea promoting initiatives have been made in industrial practice. Such initiatives are often labeled Idea Management – a research field...... with a growing interest. In this paper I examine three different idea promoting initiatives carried out in Grundfos, a leading pump manufacturer. In the analysis I address what understandings of idea work are inscribed in the initiatives and what role these initiatives play in the organization with respect...... understandings of idea work are inscribed in the idea promoting initiatives as they to some degree have to fit with the understandings embedded in practice in order to work....

  9. Computer code calculations of the TMI-2 accident: initial and boundary conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behling, S.R.

    1985-05-01

    Initial and boundary conditions during the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) accident are described and detailed. A brief description of the TMI-2 plant configuration is given. Important contributions to the progression of the accident in the reactor coolant system are discussed. Sufficient information is provided to allow calculation of the TMI-2 accident with computer codes

  10. A second simulated criticality accident dosimetry experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, N

    1973-01-01

    This experiment was undertaken to facilitate training in criticality dose assessment by UKAEA and BNFL establishments with potential criticality hazards. Personal dosemeters, coins, samples of hair, etc. supplied by the seven participating establishments were attached to a man-phantom filled with a solution of sodium nitrate (simulating 'body-sodium'), and exposed to a burst of radiation from the AWRE pulsed reactor VIPER. The neutron and photon doses were each several hundred rads. Participants made two sets of dose assessments. The first, made solely from the evidence of their routine dosemeters the activation of body-sodium and standard monitoring data, simulated the initial dose assessment that would be made before the circumstances of a real incident were established. The second was made when the position and orientation of the phantom relative to the reactor and the shielding (20 cm of copper) between the reactor core and the phantom were disclosed. Neutron and photon dose assessments for comparison wit...

  11. Global process industry initiatives to reduce major accident hazards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitblado, Robin [DNV Energy Houston, TX (United States). SHE Risk Management; Pontes, Jose [DNV Energy Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Americas Region; Oliveira, Luiz [DNV Energy Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    Since 2000, disasters at Texas City, Toulouse, Antwerp, Buncefield, P-36 and several near total loss events offshore in Norway have highlighted that major accident process safety is still a serious issue. Hopes that Process Safety Management or Safety Case regulations would solve these issues have not proven true. The Baker Panel recommended to BP several actions mainly around leadership, incentives, metrics, safety culture and more effective implementation of PSM systems. In Europe, an approach built around mechanical integrity and safety barriers, especially relating to technical safety systems, is being widely adopted. DNV has carried out a global survey of process industry initiatives, by interview and by literature review, for both upstream and downstream activities, to identify what the industry itself is planning to implement to enhance process safety in the next 5 - 10 years. This shows that an approach combining Baker Panel and EU barrier approaches and some nuclear industry real-time risk management approaches might be the best means to achieve a factor of 3-4 improvement in process safety. (author)

  12. Applicability of modified burst test data to reactivity initiated accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yueh, K., E-mail: yuehky@hotmail.com

    2017-05-15

    A comprehensive irradiated cladding mechanical property dataset was generated by a recently developed modified burst test (MBT) under reactivity initiated accident (RIA) loading conditions [1,2]. The test data contains a wide range of test conditions that could bridge the gap between fast transient test reactor data (short pulse and/or low temperature) and prototypical commercial reactor conditions. This paper documents an evaluation performed to demonstrate the applicability of the MBT data to fuel cladding performance under RIA conditions. The current effort includes a comparison of calculated fuel cladding failure/burst strain for tests conducted at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency's (JAEA) Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) to the MBT dataset, and an evaluation of potential mechanisms on how some NSRR tests survived beyond the cladding loading capacity. A simple shell model, coupled with temperature output from the Falcon fuel performance code, was used to calculate the fuel pellet thermal expansion of NSRR tests at the point of failure. The calculated fuel pellet thermal expansion correlates well directly with the MBT data at similar loading conditions. A 3-dimensional (3D) finite element analysis (FEA) model was used to evaluate fuel movement potential during a RIA. The evaluation indicates fuel relocation into the pellet chamfer and later into the dish is possible once a temperature threshold is reached before cladding failure and thus could significantly increase the fuel rod energy absorption capacity in a RIA event.

  13. Aircraft accident investigation: the decision-making in initial action scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreto, Marcia M; Ribeiro, Selma L O

    2012-01-01

    In the complex aeronautical environment, the efforts in terms of operational safety involve the adoption of proactive and reactive measures. The process of investigation begins right after the occurrence of the aeronautical accident, through the initial action. Thus, it is in the crisis scenario, that the person responsible for the initial action makes decisions and gathers the necessary information for the subsequent phases of the investigation process. Within this scenario, which is a natural environment, researches have shown the fragility of rational models of decision making. The theoretical perspective of naturalistic decision making constitutes a breakthrough in the understanding of decision problems demanded by real world. The proposal of this study was to verify if the initial action, after the occurrence of an accident, and the decision-making strategies, used by the investigators responsible for this activity, are characteristic of the naturalistic decision making theoretical approach. To attend the proposed objective a descriptive research was undertaken with a sample of professionals that work in this activity. The data collected through individual interviews were analyzed and the results demonstrated that the initial action environment, which includes restricted time, dynamic conditions, the presence of multiple actors, stress and insufficient information is characteristic of the naturalistic decision making. They also demonstrated that, when the investigators make their decisions, they use their experience and the mental simulation, intuition, improvisation, metaphors and analogues cases, as strategies, all of them related to the naturalistic approach of decision making, in order to satisfy the needs of the situation and reach the objectives of the initial action in the accident scenario.

  14. Experience with first aid in radiation sources accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klener, V.

    1979-01-01

    More than 20 years of experience at the Radiation Hygiene Centre of the Prague Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology with prevention of accidents involving sources of radiation and the Centre's participation in providing medical aid in such accidents are described. A list is given of major types of accidents over the past decade. Prevalent were accidents involving sealed gamma sources, resulting in excessive local irradiation with serious skin damage or injury to some of the deeper structures of the hands, requiring plastic operation. Chromosomal picture investigation allows the estimation of the equivalent body dose which only reached higher values in a single case recorded (1.5 Gy = 150 rad). Organisational measures are described for emergencies and the task is shown by radiation hygiene departments attached to regional hygiene stations. The present system is capable of providing adequate, prompt and effective assistance. (author)

  15. Experiments and analyses on melt jet impingement during severe accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sehgal, B.R.; Green, J.A.; Dinh, T.N.; Dong, W.

    1997-01-01

    Relocation of melt from the core region, during a nuclear reactor severe accident, presents the potential for erosion of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) wall as a result of melt jet impingement. The extent of vessel erosion will depend upon a variety of parameters, including jet diameter, velocity, composition, superheat, angle of inclination, and the presence of an overlying water or melt pool. Experiments have been conducted at the Royal Institute of Technology Division of Nuclear Power Safety (RIT/NPS) which employ a variety of melt and pressure vessel simulant materials, such as water, salt-ice, Cerrobend alloy and molten salt. These experiments have revealed that the erosion depth of the vessel simulant in the jet stagnation zone can be adequately predicted by the Saito correlation, which is based on turbulent heat transfer, while initial erosion rates are seen to be in line with the laminar-stagnation-zone model. A transition between the laminar and turbulent regimes was realized in most cases and is attributed to the roughness of the surface in the eroded cavity formed

  16. LWR aerosol containment experiments (LACE) program and initial test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhlestein, L.D.; Hilliard, R.K.; Bloom, G.R.; McCormack, J.D.; Rahn, F.J.

    1985-01-01

    The LWR aerosol containment experiments (LACE) program is described. The LACE program is being performed at the Hanford Engineer Development Laboratory (operated by Westinghouse Hanford Company) and the initial tests are sponsored by EPRI. The objectives of the LACE program are: to demonstrate, at large-scale, inherent radioactive aerosol retention behavior for postulated high consequence LWR accident situations; and to provide a data base to be used for aerosol behavior . Test results from the first phase of the LACE program are presented and discussed. Three large-scale scoping tests, simulating a containment bypass accident sequence, demonstrated the extent of agglomeration and deposition of aerosols occurring in the pipe pathway and vented auxiliary building under realistic accident conditions. Parameters varied during the scoping tests were aerosol type and steam condensation

  17. Influence of initial conditions on rod behaviour during boiling crisis phase following a reactivity initiated accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgenthum, V.; Sugiyama, T.

    2010-01-01

    In the frame of their research programs on high burn-up fuel safety, the French Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) and the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) performed a large set of tests devoted to the study of PWR fuel rod behavior during Reactivity Initiated Accident (RIA) respectively in the CABRI reactor and in the NSRR reactor. The reactor test conditions are different in terms of coolant nature, temperature and pressure. In the CABRI reactor, tests were performed until now with sodium coolant at 280 Celsius degrees and 3 bar. In the NSRR reactor most of the tests were performed with stagnant water at 20 C. degrees and atmospheric pressure but recently a new high temperature high pressure capsule has been developed which allows to performed tests at up to 280 Celsius degrees and 70 bar. The paper discusses the influence of test conditions on rod behaviour during boiling phase, based on tests results and SCANAIR code calculations. The study shows that when the boiling crisis is reached, the initial inner and outer rod pressure have an essential impact on the clad straining and possible ballooning. The analysis of the different test conditions makes it possible to discriminate the influence of initial conditions on the different phases of the transient and is useful for modelling and code development. (authors)

  18. Cavity Heating Experiments Supporting Shuttle Columbia Accident Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everhart, Joel L.; Berger, Karen T.; Bey, Kim S.; Merski, N. Ronald; Wood, William A.

    2011-01-01

    The two-color thermographic phosphor method has been used to map the local heating augmentation of scaled idealized cavities at conditions simulating the windward surface of the Shuttle Orbiter Columbia during flight STS-107. Two experiments initiated in support of the Columbia Accident Investigation were conducted in the Langley 20-Inch Mach 6 Tunnel. Generally, the first test series evaluated open (length-to-depth less than 10) rectangular cavity geometries proposed as possible damage scenarios resulting from foam and ice impact during launch at several discrete locations on the vehicle windward surface, though some closed (length-to-depth greater than 13) geometries were briefly examined. The second test series was designed to parametrically evaluate heating augmentation in closed rectangular cavities. The tests were conducted under laminar cavity entry conditions over a range of local boundary layer edge-flow parameters typical of re-entry. Cavity design parameters were developed using laminar computational predictions, while the experimental boundary layer state conditions were inferred from the heating measurements. An analysis of the aeroheating caused by cavities allowed exclusion of non-breeching damage from the possible loss scenarios being considered during the investigation.

  19. Upgrading the safety toolkit: Initiatives of the accident analysis subgroup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Kula, K.R.; Chung, D.Y.

    1999-01-01

    Since its inception, the Accident Analysis Subgroup (AAS) of the Energy Facility Contractors Group (EFCOG) has been a leading organization promoting development and application of appropriate methodologies for safety analysis of US Department of Energy (DOE) installations. The AAS, one of seven chartered by the EFCOG Safety Analysis Working Group, has performed an oversight function and provided direction to several technical groups. These efforts have been instrumental toward formal evaluation of computer models, improving the pedigree on high-use computer models, and development of the user-friendly Accident Analysis Guidebook (AAG). All of these improvements have improved the analytical toolkit for best complying with DOE orders and standards shaping safety analysis reports (SARs) and related documentation. Major support for these objectives has been through DOE/DP-45

  20. First days of the Chernobyl accident. Private experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpan, Nikolay

    2013-01-01

    Ex-deputy chief engineer of Chernobyl NPP described the time-series personal experience of the fourth unit accident on 26 April, 1986. He was informed the accident at home at 4 o'clock. He came to the plant at 7 o'clock. He and other newcomers were no informed about what happened at the plant and about details of the accident from top manager of the plant. He gathered important information about the accident from people that were eyewitness of the accident and recorded their evidences. He reported to head engineer and his deputy that solution of boron acid could be brought into reactor for suppression of the chain reaction. Director of NPP asked authorities to bring boron acid to the plant, but the boron acid was not received before the chain reaction. The critical state began approximately 20 in the evening. After 4 hours of the critical state exposition dose rate of gamma radiation was ten times from 20 R/h in the morning and middle of day to 200 R/h. He consider as the first fault of the Governmental Commission was the absence of efforts for bringing boron to gorges of fuel and to shaft of reactor. The second fault was that protective countermeasures for city population protection were not undertaken. The authorities of Chernobyl began to wait for decisions of higher authorities. This means that responsibility was moved to them. (N.T)

  1. Initial VHTR accident scenario classification: models and data.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilim, R. B.; Feldman, E. E.; Pointer, W. D.; Wei, T. Y. C.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2005-09-30

    Nuclear systems codes are being prepared for use as computational tools for conducting performance/safety analyses of the Very High Temperature Reactor. The thermal-hydraulic codes are RELAP5/ATHENA for one-dimensional systems modeling and FLUENT and/or Star-CD for three-dimensional modeling. We describe a formal qualification framework, the development of Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs), the initial filtering of the experiment databases, and a preliminary screening of these codes for use in the performance/safety analyses. In the second year of this project we focused on development of PIRTS. Two events that result in maximum fuel and vessel temperatures, the Pressurized Conduction Cooldown (PCC) event and the Depressurized Conduction Cooldown (DCC) event, were selected for PIRT generation. A third event that may result in significant thermal stresses, the Load Change event, is also selected for PIRT generation. Gas reactor design experience and engineering judgment were used to identify the important phenomena in the primary system for these events. Sensitivity calculations performed with the RELAP5 code were used as an aid to rank the phenomena in order of importance with respect to the approach of plant response to safety limits. The overall code qualification methodology was illustrated by focusing on the Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS). The mixed convection mode of heat transfer and pressure drop is identified as an important phenomenon for Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS) operation. Scaling studies showed that the mixed convection mode is likely to occur in the RCCS air duct during normal operation and during conduction cooldown events. The RELAP5/ATHENA code was found to not adequately treat the mixed convection regime. Readying the code will require adding models for the turbulent mixed convection regime while possibly performing new experiments for the laminar mixed convection regime. Candidate correlations for the turbulent

  2. Feedback from practical experience with large sodium fire accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luster, V.P.; Freudenstein, K.F.

    1996-01-01

    The paper reviews the important feedback from the practical experience from two large sodium fires; the first at ALMERIA in Spain and the second in the Na laboratories at Bensberg, Germany. One of the most important sodium fire accidents was the ALMERIA spray fire accident. The origin of this accident was the repair of a valve when about 14 t of sodium was spilled in the plant room over a period of 1/2 hour. The event has been reported (IAEA/IWGFR meeting in 1988) and this presentation gives a short review of important feedback. The Almeria accident was one of the reasons that from that time spray fires had to be taken into account in the safety analyses of nuclear power plants. Due to the fact that spray fire codes were not available in a sufficiently validated state, safety analyses were provisionally based on the feedback from sodium fire tests and also from the Almeria accident itself. The behaviour of spray fires showed that severe destruction, up to melting of metallic structures may occur, but even with a large spray fire is limited roughly within the spray fire zone itself. This could be subsequently be predicted by codes like NABRAND in Germany and FEUMIX in France. Almeria accident has accelerated R and D and code development with respect to spray fires. As example for a code validation some figures are given for the NABRAND code. Another large sodium fire accident happened in 1992 in the test facility at Bensberg in Germany (ILONA). This accident occurred during preheating of a sodium filled vessel which was provisionally installed in the basement of the ILONA test facility at Bensberg. Due to failure of a pressure relief valve the pressure in the vessel increased. As a consequence the plug in a dip tube for draining the vessel failed and about 4,5 t of sodium leaked slowly from the vessel. The plant room was not cladded with steel liners or collecting pans (it was not designed for permanent sodium plant operation). So leaking sodium came directly in

  3. The Youth and Experience of Traffic Accidents (Grounded Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayyed-Muhammad-Hossein Javadi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Traffic accidents are among major causes of death all over the world. In Iran, it has become a social problem, with lots of people involved in; and the youth include the most victims of traffic accidents. Objectives: The main objective of this research is to review the experience of the youth (18–24 years old in Tehran, Iran with traffic accidents, and to develop a model to specify the factors. Methods: This study is based on Grounded Theory, in which a sample group of 50 young people, 18–24 years old, in Tehran, Iran, were selected and interviewed, using stratified purposive and snowball sampling method. Data is mainly collected by interviewing the youth in 7 key topics. To analyze the data, Grounded Theory is used through production of themes, components and concepts. Results: There are 11 general components for traffic accidents according to the ideas of the youth which will come in 3 categories including: individual factors (emotions, sensory-motor skills, and physical-mental health; environmental factors (road and traffic problems, a companion, using cellphone, or front individual, including carless drivers or passersby; and underlying factors (gender, legal and cultural infrastructures. And finally, the core category of carelessness, which is the leading cause in traffic accidents.    Conclusion: The findings indicate that a chain of various factors may cause traffic accidents with lots of devastating consequences. It is therefore necessary to modify driving culture, to internalize the attitude of caution, to use polyhedral strategies, and to apply them all correctly.

  4. Summary of treat experiments on oxide core-disruptive accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickerman, C.E.; Rothman, A.B.; Klickman, A.E.; Spencer, B.W.; DeVolpi, A.

    1979-02-01

    A program of transient in-reactor experiments is being conducted by Argonne National Laboratory in the Transient Reactor Test (TREAT) facility to guide and support analyses of hypothetical core-disruptive accidents (HCDA) in liquid-metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR). Test results provide data needed to establish the response of LMFBR cores to hypothetical accidents producing fuel failure, coolant boiling, and the movement of coolant, molten fuel, and molten cladding. These data include margins to fuel failure, the modes of failure and movements, and evidence for identification of the mechanisms which determine the failure and movements. A key element in the program is the fast-neutron hodoscope, which detects fuel movement as a function of time during experiments

  5. Consequences and countermeasures in a nuclear power accident: Chernobyl experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirichenko, Vladimir A; Kirichenko, Alexander V; Werts, Day E

    2012-09-01

    Despite the tragic accidents in Fukushima and Chernobyl, the nuclear power industry will continue to contribute to the production of electric energy worldwide until there are efficient and sustainable alternative sources of energy. The Chernobyl nuclear accident, which occurred 26 years ago in the former Soviet Union, released an immense amount of radioactivity over vast territories of Belarus, Ukraine, and the Russian Federation, extending into northern Europe, and became the most severe accident in the history of the nuclear industry. This disaster was a result of numerous factors including inadequate nuclear power plant design, human errors, and violation of safety measures. The lessons learned from nuclear accidents will continue to strengthen the safety design of new reactor installations, but with more than 400 active nuclear power stations worldwide and 104 reactors in the Unites States, it is essential to reassess fundamental issues related to the Chernobyl experience as it continues to evolve. This article summarizes early and late events of the incident, the impact on thyroid health, and attempts to reduce agricultural radioactive contamination.

  6. Experience from the nuclear accident in Chernobyl. [Norway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-01-01

    On 27 May 1986, the Norwegian government appointed an inter-ministerial committee of senior officials to prepare a report on experiences in connection with the Chernobyl accident. The present first part of the committee's report describes how the discharges spread from the reactor to Scandinavia and the situation as regards contamination in different parts of Norway. The report also deals with the emergency response, the basis for decisions and countermeasures, and countermeasures and action levels used.

  7. To improve nuclear plant safety by learning from accident's experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Hidezo; Kida, Masanori; Kato, Hiroyuki; Hara, Shin-ichi

    1994-01-01

    The ultimate goal of this study is to produce an expert system that enables the experience (records and information) gained from accidents to be put to use towards improving nuclear plant safety. A number of examples have been investigated, both domestic and overseas, in which experience gained from accidents was utilized by utilities in managing and operating their nuclear power stations to improve safety. The result of investigation has been used to create a general 'basic flow' to make the best use of experience. The ultimate goal is achieved by carrying out this 'basic flow' with artificial intelligence (AI). To do this, it is necessary (1) to apply language analysis to process the source information (primary data base; domestic and overseas accident's reports) into the secondary data base, and (2) to establish an expert system for selecting (screening) significant events from the secondary data base. In the processing described in item (1), a multi-lingual thesaurus for nuclear-related terms become necessary because the source information (primary data bases) itself is multi-lingual. In the work described in item (2), the utilization of probabilistic safety assessment (PSA), for example, is a candidate method for judging the significance of events. Achieving the goal thus requires developing various new techniques. As the first step of the above long-term study project, this report proposes the 'basic flow' and presents the concept of how the nuclear-related AI can be used to carry out this 'basic flow'. (author)

  8. Energy efficiency initiatives: Indian experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dey, Dipankar [ICFAI Business School, Kolkata, (IBS-K) (India)

    2007-07-01

    India, with a population of over 1.10 billion is one of the fastest growing economies of the world. As domestic sources of different conventional commercial energy are drying up, dependence on foreign energy sources is increasing. There exists a huge potential for saving energy in India. After the first 'oil shock' (1973), the government of India realized the need for conservation of energy and a 'Petroleum Conservation Action Group' was formed in 1976. Since then many initiatives aiming at energy conservation and improving energy efficiency, have been undertaken (the establishment of Petroleum Conservation Research Association in 1978; the notification of Eco labelling scheme in 1991; the formation of Bureau of Energy Efficiency in 2002). But no such initiative was successful. In this paper an attempt has been made to analyze the changing importance of energy conservation/efficiency measures which have been initiated in India between 1970 and 2005.The present study tries to analyze the limitations and the reasons of failure of those initiatives. The probable reasons are: fuel pricing mechanism (including subsidies), political factors, corruption and unethical practices, influence of oil and related industry lobbies - both internal and external, the economic situation and the prolonged protection of domestic industries. Further, as India is opening its economy, the study explores the opportunities that the globally competitive market would offer to improve the overall energy efficiency of the economy. The study suggests that the Bureau of Energy Efficiency (BEE) - the newly formed nodal agency for improving energy efficiency of the economy may be made an autonomous institution where intervention from the politicians would be very low. For proper implementation of different initiatives to improve energy efficiency, BEE should involve more the civil societies (NGO) from the inception to the implementation stage of the programs. The paper also

  9. Initial basis for agronomic countermeasure selection following a nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonetto, Juan P.; Kunst, Juan J.; Bruno, Hector; Jordan, Osvaldo; Hernandez, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    During the recovery stage, following a nuclear accident, application of agricultural countermeasures will be relevant to the minimization of the radiation induced detriment due to ingestion of locally produced contaminated foodstuff, as long as the magnitude of the averted dose is sufficient to justify their implementation. Nuclear emergency planning in Argentina currently holds food ban as the accepted countermeasure, at least until other measures are taken. Though it may ensure no residual collective dose, food ban may also imply very high costs, compared to other alternatives, specially due to the need of disposing off perishable food such as milk. Therefore, an exhaustive evaluation of all the alternatives, considering both quantitative and qualitative factors is still needed to identify optimal countermeasure strategies, bearing in mind also that decisions made during the early phase of an emergency will affect the fate of the measures to be taken later. As a first step in this direction, a basic quantitative decision-aiding technique, the cost-benefit analysis, is carried out for comparison of countermeasures related to Cesium contaminated cow-milk which are considered feasible for implementation in Argentina. Countermeasures total costs are estimated from various local sources, while their effectiveness are adopted from international bibliography. At this stage, a simple theoretical example considering milk contamination in the surroundings of the Embalse Nuclear Power Plant is used for a generic analysis, since actual collective doses and costs can only be calculated for a specific modelled scenario. (author)

  10. Initial Basis for Agronomic Countermeasure Selection Following a Nuclear Accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonetto, J.P.; Kunst, J.J.; Bruno, H.A.; Jordan, O.D.; Hernandez, D.G.

    2011-01-01

    During the recovery stage, following a nuclear accident, application of agricultural countermeasures will be relevant to the minimization of the radiation induced detriment due to ingestion of locally produced contaminated foodstuff, as long as the magnitude of the averted dose is sufficient to justify their implementation. Nuclear emergency planning in Argentina currently holds food ban as the accepted countermeasure, at least until other measures are taken. Though it may ensure no residual collective dose, food ban may also imply very high costs, compared to other alternatives, specially due to the need of disposing off perishable food such as milk. Therefore, an exhaustive evaluation of all the alternatives, considering both quantitative and qualitative factors is still needed to identify optimal countermeasure strategies, bearing in mind also that decisions made during the early phase of an emergency will affect the fate of the measures to be taken later. As a first step in this direction, a basic quantitative decis sion-aiding technique, the cost-benefit analysis, is carried out for comparison of countermeasures related to Cesium contaminated cow-milk which are considered feasible for implementation in Argentina. Countermeasures total costs are estimated from various local sources, while their effectiveness are adopted from international bibliography. At this stage, a simple theoretical example considering milk contamination in the surroundings of the Embalse Nuclear Power Plant is used for a generic analysis, since actual collective doses and costs can only be calculated for a specific modelled scenario. (authors)

  11. Radiation protection survey of research and development activities initiated after the Chernobyl accident. Review report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkart, W.

    1989-01-01

    The compilation of research and development activities in the various fields of radiation protection in OECD Member countries which have been undertaken or planned specifically to address open questions arising from the Chernobyl reactor accident experience shows a potential for international cooperative arrangements and/or coordination between national programmes. Both the preliminary review of the answers, which only cover a part of the relevant activities in OECD Member countries, and a computerized literature search indicate that the multidisciplinarity of the research area under consideration will call for special efforts to efficiently implement new models and new quantitative findings from the different fields of activity to provide an improved basis for emergency management and risk assessment. Further improvements could also be achieved by efforts to initiate new activities to close gaps in the programmes under way, to enhance international cooperation, and to coordinate the evaluation of the results. This preliminary review of the answers of 17 Member countries to the questionnaire on research and development activities initiated after the Chernobyl accident is not sufficient as a basis for a balanced decision on those research areas most in need for international cooperation and coordination. It may however serve as a guide for the exploration of the potential for international cooperative arrangements and/or coordination between national programmes by the CRPPH. Even at this preliminary stage, several specific activities are proposed to the NEA/OECD by Member countries. Whole body counting and the intercomparison of national data bases on the behaviour of radionuclides in the environment did attract most calls for international cooperation sponsored by the NEA

  12. The experiences of research reactor accident to safety improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiranto, S.

    1999-01-01

    The safety of reactor operation is the main factor in order that the nuclear technology development program can be held according the expected target. Several experience with research reactor incidents must be learned and understood by the nuclear program personnel, especially for operators and supervisors of RSG-GA. Siwabessy. From the incident experience of research reactor in the world, which mentioned in the book 'Experience with research reactor incidents' by IAEA, 1995, was concluded that the main cause of research reactor accidents is understandless about the safety culture by the nuclear installation personnel. With learn, understand and compare between this experiences and the condition of RSG GA Siwabessy is expended the operators and supervisors more attention about the safety culture, so that RSG GA Siwabessy can be operated successfull, safely according the expected target

  13. Fukushima, one year later. Initial analyses of the accident and its consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The earthquake of magnitude 9 of March 11, 2011 with an epicenter 80 km east of the Japanese island of Honshu, and the subsequent tsunami, severely affected the region of Tohoku, with major consequences for its population and infrastructure. Devastating the site of the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant, these natural events were the cause of the core meltdowns of three nuclear reactors and the loss of cooling of several spent fuel pools. Explosions also occurred in reactor buildings 1 through 4 due to hydrogen produced during fuel degradation. Very significant radioactive releases into the environment took place. The accident was classified level 7 on the International Nuclear Event Scale (INES). This report provides an assessment and perspective on the information gathered by IRSN during the first twelve months following the disaster in an effort to understand the condition of the installations, evaluate the releases and analyze and evaluate the consequences of the accident on workers and the impact on the population and the environment. On the basis of available information, the report provides an initial analysis of the chain of events. It should be noted that a year after the accident, the full sequence of events is still not understood. Operating experience feedback from the 1979 Three Mile Island accident in the United States, in which reactor core damage was not confirmed until 1986, suggests that it may be several years before a detailed scenario can be constructed of the accident that led to radioactive releases. It will require access to the damaged installations. The situation at the site remains dangerous (reactor pressure vessels and containments are not leak-tight, diffuse releases, etc.). If it has significantly improved as a result of the significant resources deployed by the Tokyo Electro Power Company (TEPCO) to regain control of the installations, this effort must continue over the long term to begin evacuation of fuel from pools (in two

  14. Behavior of irradiated ATR/MOX fuel under reactivity initiated accident conditions (Joint research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasajima, Hideo; Fuketa, Toyoshi; Nakamura, Takehiko; Nakamura, Jinichi; Uetsuka, Hiroshi

    2000-03-01

    Pulse irradiation experiments with irradiated ATR/MOX fuel rods of 20 MWd/kgHM were conducted at the NSRR in JAERI to study the transient behavior of MOX fuel rod under reactivity initiated accident conditions. Four pulse irradiation experiments were performed with peak fuel enthalpy ranging from 335 J/g to 586 J/g, resulted in no failure of fuel rods. Deformation of the fuel rods due to PCMI occurred in the experiments with peak fuel enthalpy above 500 J/g. Significant fission gas release up to 20% was measured by rod puncture measurement. The generation of fine radial cracks in pellet periphery, micro-cracks and boundary separation over the entire region of pellet were observed. These microstructure changes might contribute to the swelling of fuel pellets during the pulse irradiation. This could cause the large radial deformation of fuel rod and high fission gas release when the pulse irradiation conducted at relatively high peak fuel enthalpy. In addition, fine grain structures around the plutonium spot and cauliflower structure in cavity of the plutonium spot were observed in the outer region of the fuel pellet. (author)

  15. Experiments on the lower plenum response during a severe accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henry, Robert E.; Hammersley, Robert J.; Klopp, George T.; Merilo, Mati

    2004-01-01

    Severe accident evaluations for nuclear reactors consider the response when the core materials have been overheated sufficient to melt and change geometry. One possible consequence of this is that molten core debris could drain into the lower plenum, as occurred in the TMI-2 accident. Given this state, several physical processes need to be analyzed, i.e. the extent of debris particulation and cooling, the potential for thermal attack of lower plenum structures, the thermal transient of the RPV and the potential for external cooling of the RPV lower head. These are important and complex processes, the evaluations of which need to be guided by well founded experiments. To support the development of the MAAP codes, recent experiments have been performed on specific issues such as: 1. the response of lower head penetrations submerged in a high temperature melt, 2. the net steam generation rate when molten debris drains into the lower plenum, 3. the formation of a contact resistance when molten debris drains through water and contacts the RPV wall and 4. the potential for external cooling of the RPV lower head. This paper discusses these experiments and their results. More importantly, it discusses how these are used in formulating models to represent the lower plenum response in the MAAP codes. (author)

  16. Use of accident experience in developing criteria for teleoperator equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallario, E.J.; Selby, J.M.

    1985-10-01

    The 1961 SL-1 reactor accident in Idaho and the Recuplex accident at Hanford are reviewed to identify problems common to emergency situations, lessons learned from accidents, criteria for emergency equipment, and recommendations for using robotics to solve problems during emergencies. Teleoperator equipment could be used to assess the extent of the damage and the condition of the reactor, retrieve dosimeters, evacuate and treat accident victims, clean up debris and decontaminate accident areas. 2 refs., 9 figs

  17. CATHARE Assessment of PACTEL LOCA Experiments with Accident Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luben Sabotinov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes the analysis results of three PACTEL experiments, carried out with the advanced thermal-hydraulic system computer CATHARE 2 code as a part of the second work package WP2 (analytical work of the EC project “Improved Accident Management of VVER nuclear power plants” (IMPAM-VVER. The three LOCA experiments, conducted on the Finnish test facility PACTEL (VVER-440 model, represent 7.4% cold leg breaks with combination of secondary bleed and primary bleed and feed and different actuation modes of the passive safety injection. The code was used for both defining and analyzing the experiments, and to assess its capabilities in predicting the associated complex VVER-related phenomena. The code results are in reasonable agreement with the measurements, and the important physical phenomena are well predicted, although still further improvement and validation might be necessary.

  18. Visual observations of fuel disruption in in-pile LMFBR accident experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, S.A.; Mast, P.K.

    1982-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has been investigating initiation phase phenomena in a series of Fuel Disruption (FD) experiments since 1977. In this program high speed cinematography is used to observe fuel disruption in in-pile experiments that simulate loss of flow accidents. Thus, these experiments provide high resolution measurements of initial fuel and clad motion with prototypic materials and prototypic heating conditions. The main objective of the FD experiment is to determine the timing (relative to fuel temperature) and the mode of fuel disruption under LOF heating conditions. Observed modes of disruption include fuel swelling, solid state breakup, cracking, ejection of a molten fuel jet, slumping, and rapid expansion of small particles. Because the temperature and character of the fuel at disruption are known, disruption can be correlated with the mechanisms driving the disruption such as fuel vapor pressure, molten fuel expansion, fission gases, and impurity gases

  19. Ruthenium transport experiments in air ingress accident conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teemu, Karkele; Ulrika, Backman; Ari, Auvinen; Unto, Tapper; Jorma, Jokiniemi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Fine Particles (Finland); Riitta, Zilliacus; Maija, Lipponen; Tommi, Kekki [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Accident Management (Finland); Jorma, Jokiniemi [Kuopio Univ., Dept. of Environmental Sciences, Fine Particle and Aerosol Technology Lab. (Finland)

    2007-07-01

    In this study the release, transport and speciation of ruthenium in conditions simulating an air ingress accident was studied. Ruthenium dioxide was exposed to oxidising environment at high temperature (1100-1700 K) in a tubular flow furnace. At these conditions volatile ruthenium species were formed. A large fraction of the released ruthenium was deposited in the tube as RuO{sub 2}. Depending on the experimental conditions 1-26 wt% of the released ruthenium was trapped in the outlet filter as RuO{sub 2} particles. In stainless steel tube 0-8.8 wt% of the released ruthenium reached the trapping bottle as gaseous RuO{sub 4}. A few experiments were carried out, in which revaporization of ruthenium deposited on the tube walls was studied. In these experiments, oxidation of RuO{sub 2} took place at a lower temperature. During revaporization experiments 35-65 % of ruthenium was transported as gaseous RuO{sub 4}. In order to close mass balance and achieve better time resolution 4 experiments were carried out using a radioactive tracer. In these experiments ruthenium profiles were measured. These experiments showed that the most important retention mechanism was decomposition of gaseous RuO{sub 3} into RuO{sub 2} as the temperature of the furnace was decreasing. In these experiments the transport rate of gaseous ruthenium was decreasing while the release rate was constant.

  20. Radiation damage to the thyroid and metabolic changes in cattle in the initial and remote period after the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iljazov, R.G.; Yunousova, R.M.

    1997-01-01

    The initial period after the Chernobyl accident was the most dangerous for animals kept in the zone of radioactive contamination. Dose burdens from I-isotopes on the thyroid gland of cattle in the initial period after the accident contributed significantly into the alteration of the hormonal status, physiological state and productive, qualities of cattle on farms of the Gomel area of Belarus

  1. Return to Experience and Initial Wage Level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Kenneth Lykke; Vejlin, Rune Majlund

    This paper estimates the relationship between initial wage and return to experience. We use a Mincer-like wage model to nonparametrically estimate this relationship allowing for an unobservable individual permanent effect in wages and unobservable individual return to experience. The relationship...

  2. Return to experience and initial wage level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, K.L.; Vejlin, R.

    2014-01-01

    This paper estimates the relationship between initial wage and return to experience. We use a Mincer-like wage model to non-parametrically estimate this relationship allowing for an unobservable individual permanent effect in wages and unobservable individual return to experience. The relationshi...

  3. Evaluation of Melt Behavior with initial Melt Velocity under SFR Severe Accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, Hyo; Bang, In Cheol [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Jerng, Dong Wook [Chung-Ang Univ, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In the current Korean sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) program, early dispersion of the molten metallic fuel within a subchannel is suggested as one of the inherent safety strategies for the initiating phase of hypothetical core disruptive accident (HCDA). The safety strategy provides negative reactivity driven by the melt dispersal, so it could reduce the possibility of the recriticality event under a severe triple or more fault scenario for SFR. Since the behavior of the melt dispersion is unpredictable, it depends on the accident condition, particularly core region. While the voided coolant channel region is usually developed in the inner core, the unvoided coolant channel region is formed in the outer core. It is important to confirm the fuel dispersion with the core region, but there are not sufficient existing studies for them. From the existing studies, the coolant vapor pressure is considered as one of driving force to move the melt towards outside of the core. There is a complexity of the phenomena during intermixing of the melt with the coolant after the horizontal melt injections. It is too difficult to understand the several combined mechanisms related to the melt dispersion and the fragmentation. Thus, it could be worthwhile to study the horizontal melt injections at lower temperature as a preliminary study in order to identify the melt dispersion phenomena. For this reason, it is required to clarify whether the coolant vapor pressure is the driving force of the melt dispersion with the core region. The specific conditions to be well dispersed for the molten metallic fuel were discussed in the experiments with the simulant materials. The each melt behavior was compared to evaluate the melt dispersion under the coolant void condition and the boiling condition. As the results, the following results are remarked: 1. The upward melt dispersion did not occur for a given melt and coolant temperature in the nonboiling range. Over current range of conditions

  4. Evaluation of Melt Behavior with initial Melt Velocity under SFR Severe Accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heo, Hyo; Bang, In Cheol; Jerng, Dong Wook

    2015-01-01

    In the current Korean sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) program, early dispersion of the molten metallic fuel within a subchannel is suggested as one of the inherent safety strategies for the initiating phase of hypothetical core disruptive accident (HCDA). The safety strategy provides negative reactivity driven by the melt dispersal, so it could reduce the possibility of the recriticality event under a severe triple or more fault scenario for SFR. Since the behavior of the melt dispersion is unpredictable, it depends on the accident condition, particularly core region. While the voided coolant channel region is usually developed in the inner core, the unvoided coolant channel region is formed in the outer core. It is important to confirm the fuel dispersion with the core region, but there are not sufficient existing studies for them. From the existing studies, the coolant vapor pressure is considered as one of driving force to move the melt towards outside of the core. There is a complexity of the phenomena during intermixing of the melt with the coolant after the horizontal melt injections. It is too difficult to understand the several combined mechanisms related to the melt dispersion and the fragmentation. Thus, it could be worthwhile to study the horizontal melt injections at lower temperature as a preliminary study in order to identify the melt dispersion phenomena. For this reason, it is required to clarify whether the coolant vapor pressure is the driving force of the melt dispersion with the core region. The specific conditions to be well dispersed for the molten metallic fuel were discussed in the experiments with the simulant materials. The each melt behavior was compared to evaluate the melt dispersion under the coolant void condition and the boiling condition. As the results, the following results are remarked: 1. The upward melt dispersion did not occur for a given melt and coolant temperature in the nonboiling range. Over current range of conditions

  5. Initial conditions of radiative shock experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuranz, C. C.; Drake, R. P.; Krauland, C. M.; Marion, D. C.; Grosskopf, M. J.; Rutter, E.; Torralva, B.; Holloway, J. P.; Bingham, D.; Goh, J.; Boehly, T. R.; Sorce, A. T.

    2013-01-01

    We performed experiments at the Omega Laser Facility to characterize the initial, laser-driven state of a radiative shock experiment. These experiments aimed to measure the shock breakout time from a thin, laser-irradiated Be disk. The data are then used to inform a range of valid model parameters, such as electron flux limiter and polytropic γ, used when simulating radiative shock experiments using radiation hydrodynamics codes. The characterization experiment and the radiative shock experiment use a laser irradiance of ∼7 × 10 14 W cm −2 to launch a shock in the Be disk. A velocity interferometer and a streaked optical pyrometer were used to infer the amount of time for the shock to move through the Be disk. The experimental results were compared with simulation results from the Hyades code, which can be used to model the initial conditions of a radiative shock system using the CRASH code

  6. Investigation of alpha experiment by severe accident analysis code SAMPSON

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baglietto, Emilio; Ninokata, Hisashi; Naitoh, Masanori

    2006-01-01

    The severe accident analysis code SAMPSON is adopted in this work to evaluate its capability of reproducing the complex gap cooling phenomenon. The ALPHA experiment is adopted for validation, where molten aluminum oxide (Al 2 O 3 ) produced by a thermite reaction is poured into a water filled hemispherical vessel at the ambient pressure of approximately 1.3 MPa. The spreading and cooling of the debris that has relocated into the pressure vessel lower plenum are simulated, including the analysis of the RPV failure. The model included in the core to mimic the water penetration inside the gap is evaluated and improvements are proposed. The importance of the introduction of some mechanistic approach to describe the gap formation and evolution is underlined, where the results show its necessity in order to correctly reproduce the experimental trends. (author)

  7. Melt Fragmentation Characteristics of Metal Fuel with Melt Injection Mass during Initiating Phase of SFR Severe Accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, Hyo; Lee, Min Ho; Bang, In Cheol [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Jerng, Dong Wook [Chung-Ang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The PGSFR has adopted the metal fuel for its inherent safety under severe accident conditions. However, this fuel type is not demonstrated clearly yet under the such severe accident conditions. Additional experiments for examining these issues should be performed to support its licensing activities. Under initiating phase of hypothetic core disruptive accident (HCDA) conditions, the molten metal could be better dispersed and fragmented into the coolant channel than in the case of using oxide fuel. This safety strategy provides negative reactivity driven by a good dispersion of melt. If the coolant channel does not sufficient coolability, the severe recriticality would occur within the core region. Thus, it is important to examine the extent of melt fragmentation. The fragmentation behaviors of melt are closely related to a formation of debris shape. Once the debris shape is formed through the fragmentation process, its coolability is determined by the porosity or thermal conductivity of the melt. There were very limited studies for transient irradiation experiments of the metal fuel. These studies were performed by Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT) M series tests in U.S. The TREAT M series tests provided basic information of metal fuel performance under transient conditions. The effect of melt injection mass was evaluated in terms of the fragmentation behaviors of melt. These behaviors seemed to be similar between single-pin and multi-pins failure condition. However, the more melt was agglomerated in case of multi-pins failure.

  8. Effect of Strathclyde police initiative "Operation Blade" on accident and emergency attendances due to assault.

    OpenAIRE

    Bleetman, A; Perry, C H; Crawford, R; Swann, I J

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review assault victim attendance at the accident and emergency department of Glasgow Royal Infirmary before and after a police initiative to curb knife carrying and tackle violent assaults ("Operation Blade"). METHODS: Assault victim attendance was reviewed for the month before the implementation of Operation Blade and for one month a year later. The number of victims requiring treatment in the resuscitation room for stab wounds before, during, and after Operation Blade was also...

  9. Preliminary Analysis of Severe Accident Progression Initiated from Small Break LOCA of a SMART Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Young Ho; Park, Jong Hwa; Kim, Dong Ha; Cho, Seong Won

    2010-01-01

    SMART (System integrated Modular Advanced ReacTor), is under the development at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). SMART is an integral type pressurized water reactor which contains a pressurizer, 4 reactor coolant pumps (RCPs), and 8 steam generator cassettes(S/Gs) in a single reactor vessel. This reactor has substantially enhanced its safety with an integral layout of its major components, 4 trains of safety injection systems (SISs), and an adoption of 4 trains of passive residual heat removal systems (PRHRS) instead of an active auxiliary feedwater system . The thermal power is 330 MWth. During the conceptual design stage, a preliminary PSA was performed. PSA results identified that a small break loss of coolant accident (SLOCA) with all safety injections unavailable is one of important severe core damage sequences. Clear understanding of this sequence helps in the developing accident mitigation strategies. MIDAS/SMR computer code is used to simulate the severe accident progression initiated from a small break LOCA in SMART reactor. This code has capability to model a helical steam generator which is adopted in SMART reactor. The important accident progression results for SMART reactor are then compared with the typical pressurized water reactor (PWR) result

  10. Experiments on the behaviour of ruthenium in air ingress accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaerkelae, T.; Backman, Ul; Auvinen, A.; Zilliacus, R.; Lipponen, M.; Kekki, T.; Tapper, U.; Jokiniemi, J.

    2007-03-01

    During routine nuclear reactor operation, ruthenium will accumulate in the fuel in relatively high concentrations. In a severe accident in a nuclear power plant it is possible that air gets into contact with the reactor core. In this case ruthenium may oxidise and form volatile ruthenium species, RuO3 and RuO4, which can be transported into the containment. In order to estimate the amount of gaseous ruthenium species, it is of interest to know, how they are formed and how they behave. In our experiments the formation and transport of volatile ruthenium oxides was studied by exposing RuO2 powder to diverse oxidising atmospheres at a relatively high temperature. Transport of gaseous RuO4 was further investigated by injecting it into the facility in similar conditions. Upon cooling of the gas flow RuO2 aerosol particles were formed in the system. They were removed from the gas stream with plane filters. Gaseous ruthenium species were trapped in 1M NaOH-water solution, which is capable of trapping RuO4 totally. Ruthenium in the solution was filtered for analysis. The determination of ruthenium both in aerosol and in liquid filters was made using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). In order to close the mass balance and to achieve better time resolution seven experiment were carried out using radioactive tracer. In this report, the facility for the ruthenium behaviour study and results from experiments are presented. Preliminary conclusions from the experiments are reported as well. Final conclusions will be made after modelling of the facility is completed in a continuation work of this study. (au)

  11. Experiments on the behaviour of ruthenium in air ingress accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaerkelae, T.; Backman, Ul; Auvinen, A.; Zilliacus, R.; Lipponen, M.; Kekki, T.; Tapper, U.; Jokiniemi, J. [Technical Research Centre of Finland VTT (Finland)

    2007-03-15

    During routine nuclear reactor operation, ruthenium will accumulate in the fuel in relatively high concentrations. In a severe accident in a nuclear power plant it is possible that air gets into contact with the reactor core. In this case ruthenium may oxidise and form volatile ruthenium species, RuO3 and RuO4, which can be transported into the containment. In order to estimate the amount of gaseous ruthenium species, it is of interest to know, how they are formed and how they behave. In our experiments the formation and transport of volatile ruthenium oxides was studied by exposing RuO2 powder to diverse oxidising atmospheres at a relatively high temperature. Transport of gaseous RuO4 was further investigated by injecting it into the facility in similar conditions. Upon cooling of the gas flow RuO2 aerosol particles were formed in the system. They were removed from the gas stream with plane filters. Gaseous ruthenium species were trapped in 1M NaOH-water solution, which is capable of trapping RuO4 totally. Ruthenium in the solution was filtered for analysis. The determination of ruthenium both in aerosol and in liquid filters was made using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). In order to close the mass balance and to achieve better time resolution seven experiment were carried out using radioactive tracer. In this report, the facility for the ruthenium behaviour study and results from experiments are presented. Preliminary conclusions from the experiments are reported as well. Final conclusions will be made after modelling of the facility is completed in a continuation work of this study. (au)

  12. Initial state radiation experiment at MAMI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihovilovič, M.; Merkel, H. [Institut für Kernphysik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, Johann-Joachim-Becher-Weg 45, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Collaboration: A1-Collaboration

    2013-11-07

    In an attempt to contribute further insight into the discrepancy between the Lamb shift and elastic scattering determinations of the proton charge radius, a new experiment at MAMI is underway, aimed at measuring proton form-factors at very low momentum transfers by using a new technique based on initial state radiation. This paper reports on first findings of the pilot measurement performed in 2010, whose main goal was to check the feasibility of the proposed experiment and to recognize and overcome potential obstacles before running the full experiment in 2013.

  13. Initiating events of accidents in the practice of oil well logging in Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alles Leal, A.; Perez Reyes, Y.; Dumenigo Gonzalez, C.

    2013-01-01

    The oil well logging is an extremely important activity within the oil industry, but in turn, brings risks that occasionally result in damage to health, the environment and economic losses. In this context, risk analysis has become an important tool to control them through their prediction and the study of the factors that determine them, enabling substantiated decisions to, first, foresee accidents and, secondly, to minimize their consequences. This paper proposes the elaboration of a list of initiating events of accidents in the practice of oil well logging which is one of the most important aspects for further evaluation of radiation safety of this practice. For its determination the technique employed to identify risks was 'Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA)' by applying it to the different stages and processes of practice. (Author)

  14. A consistent approach to assess safety criteria for reactivity initiated accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sartoris, C.; Taisne, A.; Petit, M.; Barre, F.; Marchand, O.

    2010-01-01

    In the context of more and more demanding reactor managements, the fuel assembly discharge burn-up increases and raises the question of the current safety criteria relevance. In order to assess new safety criteria for reactivity initiated accidents, the IRSN is developing a consistent and original approach to assess safety. This approach is based on: -A thorough understanding of the physical mechanisms involved in each phase (PCMI and post-boiling phases) of the RIA, supported by the interpretation of the experimental database. This experimental data is constituted of global test outcomes, such as CABRI or Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) experiments, and analytical program outcomes, such as PATRICIA tests, intending to understand some particular physical phenomena; -The development of computing codes, modelling the physical phenomena. The physical phenomena observed during the tests mentioned above were modelled in the SCANAIR code. SCANAIR is a thermal-mechanical code calculating fuel and clad temperatures and strains during RIA. The CLARIS module is used as a post-calculation tool to evaluate the clad failure risk based on critical flaw depth. These computing codes were validated by global and analytical tests results; -The development of a methodology. The first step of this methodology is the identification of all the parameters affecting the hydride rim depth. Besides, an envelope curve resulting from burst tests giving the hydride rim depth versus oxidation thickness is defined. After that, the critical flaw depth for a given energy pulse is calculated then compared to the hydride rim depth. This methodology results in an energy or enthalpy limit versus burn-up. This approach is planned to be followed for each phase of the RIA. An example of application is presented to evaluate a PCMI limit for a zircaloy-4 cladding UO 2 rod at Hot Zero Power.

  15. Behavior of small-sized BWR fuel under reactivity initiated accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagisawa, Kazuaki; Fujishiro, Toshio; Horiki, Oichiro; Chen Dianshan; Takeuchi, Kiyoshi.

    1992-01-01

    The present work was performed on this small-sized BWR fuel, where Zr liner and rod prepressurization were taken as experimental parameters. Experiment was done under simulated reactivity initiated accident (RIA) conditions at Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) belonged to Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). Major remarks obtained are as follows: (1) Three different types of the fuel rods consisted of (a) Zr lined/pressurized (0.65MPa), (b) Zr lined/non-pressurized and (c) non-Zr lined/pressurized (o.65MPa) were used, respectively. Failure thresholds of these were not less than that (260 cal/g·fuel) described in Japanese RIA Licensing Guideline. Small-sized BWR and conventional 8 x 8 BWR fuels were considered to be in almost the same level in failure threshold. Failure modes of the three were (a) cladding melt/brittle, (b) cladding melt/brittle and (c) rupture by large ballooning, respectively. (2) The magnitude of pressure pulse at fuel fragmentation was also studied by lined/pressurized and non-lined/pressurized fuels. Above the energy deposition of 370 cal/g·fuel, mechanical energy (or pressure) was found to be released from these fragmented fuels. No measurable difference was, however, observed between the tested fuels and NSRR standard (and conventional 8 x 8 BWR) fuels. (3) It is worthy of mentioning that Zr liner tended to prevent the cladding from large ballooning. Non-lined/pressurized fuel tended to cause wrinkle deformation at cladding. Hence, cladding external was notched much by the wrinkles. (4) Time to fuel failure measured from the tested BWR fuels (pressurization < 0.6MPA) was longer than that measured from PWR fuels (pressurization < 3.2MPa). The magnitude of the former was of the order of 3 ∼ 6s, while that of the latter was < 1s. (J.P.N.)

  16. Consequences of radioactive fallout - Experience acquired from the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutzko Alexandre

    1997-01-01

    The paper presents considerations on the nature of protection measures which were taken following the Chernobyl accident. Six methods used in Belarus aiming at reducing the radionuclide concentration in soils are listed which resulted in a reduction by a factor of 1.5 to 2 of the contamination levels in different agricultural products after 1986. A table is given showing the continuous decrease between 1986 and 1991 in the amount of sold meat and milk on market having doses exceeding the admissible values. In 1994 an increase in the ratio of contaminated products is explained as being due to investment reduction and to augmentation of transfer coefficients produced by an extremely hot summer. In conclusion it is stressed that lifting and removing the superficial layers of contaminated soils proved to be an inefficient method of decontaminating vast areas. Certain lands will not be cultivated for long as no protective action can be conducted to get them returned to agriculture. If one forgives for an instant the natural decay it seems that never one can get rid of the radioactivity. An artificial reduction methods should be supported by an international experience in the field

  17. Radiation protection issues on preparedness and response for a severe nuclear accident: experiences of the Fukushima accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homma, T; Takahara, S; Kimura, M; Kinase, S

    2015-06-01

    Radiation protection issues on preparedness and response for a severe nuclear accident are discussed in this paper based on the experiences following the accident at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. The criteria for use in nuclear emergencies in the Japanese emergency preparedness guide were based on the recommendations of International Commission of Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publications 60 and 63. Although the decision-making process for implementing protective actions relied heavily on computer-based predictive models prior to the accident, urgent protective actions, such as evacuation and sheltering, were implemented effectively based on the plant conditions. As there were no recommendations and criteria for long-term protective actions in the emergency preparedness guide, the recommendations of ICRP Publications 103, 109, and 111 were taken into consideration in determining the temporary relocation of inhabitants of heavily contaminated areas. These recommendations were very useful in deciding the emergency protective actions to take in the early stages of the Fukushima accident. However, some suggestions have been made for improving emergency preparedness and response in the early stages of a severe nuclear accident. © The Chartered Institution of Building Services Engineers 2014.

  18. Preliminary results from initial in-pile debris bed experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivard, J.B.

    1977-01-01

    An accident in a liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) in which molten core material is suddenly quenched with subcooled liquid sodium could result in extensive fragmentation and dispersal of fuel as subcritical beds of frozen particulate debris within the reactor vessel. Since this debris will continue to generate power due to decay of retained fission products, containment of the debris is threatened if the generated heat is not removed. Therefore, the initial safety question is the capacity which debris beds may have for transfer of the decay heat to overlying liquid sodium by natural processes--i.e., without the aid of forced circulation of the coolant. Up to the present time, all experiments on debris bed behavior either have used substitute materials (e.g., sand and water) or have employed actual materials, but atypical heating methods. Increased confidence in the applicability of debris bed simulations is afforded if the heat is generated within the fuel component of the appropriate fast reactor materials. The initial series of in-pile tests reported on herein constitutes the first experiments in which the internal heating mode has been produced in particulate oxide fuel immersed in liquid sodium. Fission heating of the fully-enriched UO 2 in the experiment while it is contained within Sandia Laboratories Annular Core Pulse Reactor (ACPR), operating in its steady-state mode, approximates the decay heating of debris. Preliminary results are discussed

  19. Interview-survey of farmers. Experiences after the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlen, G.

    1994-01-01

    71 farm households in contaminated areas of Sweden were interviewed at visits to farms, where measurements of the contamination of pastures and fields had been made. The aim of the survey was to find out what remedial actions had been taken by the farmers, what their appreciation of the information from authorities was, how the Chernobyl accident had affected their situation, and if they were prepared to take similar actions in case of a new accident. 15 refs

  20. Aspects of using a best-estimate approach for VVER safety analysis in reactivity initiated accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ovdiienko, Iurii; Bilodid, Yevgen; Ieremenko, Maksym [State Scientific and Technical Centre on Nuclear and Radiation, Safety (SSTC N and RS), Kyiv (Ukraine); Loetsch, Thomas [TUEV SUED Industrie Service GmbH, Energie und Systeme, Muenchen (Germany)

    2016-09-15

    At present time, Ukraine faces the problem of small margins of acceptance criteria in connection with the implementation of a conservative approach for safety evaluations. The problem is particularly topical conducting feasibility analysis of power up-rating for Ukrainian nuclear power plants. Such situation requires the implementation of a best-estimate approach on the basis of an uncertainty analysis. For some kind of accidents, such as loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA), the best estimate approach is, more or less, developed and established. However, for reactivity initiated accident (RIA) analysis an application of best estimate method could be problematical. A regulatory document in Ukraine defines a nomenclature of neutronics calculations and so called ''generic safety parameters'' which should be used as boundary conditions for all VVER-1000 (V-320) reactors in RIA analysis. In this paper the ideas of uncertainty evaluations of generic safety parameters in RIA analysis in connection with the use of the 3D neutron kinetic code DYN3D and the GRS SUSA approach are presented.

  1. Dutch in-depth accident investigation: first experiences and analysis results for motorcycles and mopeds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooi, H.G.; Galliano, F.

    2001-01-01

    In September 1999 the Dutch Accident Research Team (DART) within TNO Automotive started with the in-depth investigation of traffic accidents. In this paper, the methodology, working procedures and experiences of the team are described and explained in detail. Furthermore, an elaborate description of

  2. Truck Drivers' Experiences and Perspectives Regarding Factors Influencing Traffic Accidents: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi Moonaghi, Hossein; Ranjbar, Hossein; Heydari, Abbas; Scurlock-Evans, Laura

    2015-08-01

    Traffic accidents are a major public health problem, leading to death and disability. Although pertinent studies have been conducted, little data are available in Iran. This study explored the experiences of truck drivers and their perspectives regarding factors contributing to traffic accidents. Eighteen truck drivers, purposively sampled, participated in semi-structured interviews. Data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. A main theme, lack of ability to control stress, emerged as a factor influencing the incidence of traffic accidents. This main theme was found to have three subthemes: poor organization of the job, lack of workplace facilities and proper equipment, and unsupportive environment. Although several factors were found to contribute to traffic accidents, their effects were not independent, and all were considered significant. Identifying factors that contribute to traffic accidents requires a systematic and holistic approach. Findings could be used by the transportation industry and community health centers to prevent traffic accidents. © 2015 The Author(s).

  3. Initial deuterium pellet experiments on FTU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snipes, J.A.

    1993-01-01

    Initial experiments have been performed with the Single Pellet INjector (SPIN) on FTU. SPIN is a two-stage cryogenic deuterium pellet injector capable of injection,a pellets with velocities up to 2.5 km/s. The nominal pellet mass for these experiments was approximately 1 x 10 20 atoms. These initial pellet experiments concentrated on studying pellet penetration under a variety of plasma conditions to compare with code predictions and to examine toroidal particle transport. The principal diagnostics used were two fast (∼1 μsec) photomultiplier tubes at nearly opposite toroidal locations with H α (D α ) interference filters (λ = 656 nm), a microwave cavity for pellet mass and velocity, a vertical array of soft x ray diodes without filters looking down onto the pellet, a DCN interferometer for electron density profiles, and a Michelson ECE system for electron temperature profiles. The time integral of the absolutely calibrated fast H α signal appears to give reasonable agreement with the expected pellet mass. Toroidal transport of deuterium ions from the pellet to nearly the opposite side of the tokamak agrees with calculated thermal deuterium velocities near the plasma edge. Comparison of the experimental results with code calculations using the Neutral Gas Shielding model show good agreement for the post-pellet electron temperature and density profiles and the H α profiles in some cases. Calculated penetration distances agree within 20%

  4. Revisiting the Goiania Accident: Medical and Dosimetric Experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, A.R.; Valverde, C.E.; Brandao Mello, N.J.L.; Almeida, C.E.V.

    1998-01-01

    Retrospective dosimetry can be accomplished by means of a physical reconstruction using mathematical or anthropomorphic phantoms or biological or clinical indicators. Biological dosimetry, based on biochemical, cytological and cytogenetic indicators, reduces the uncertainties in dose estimation. Micronuclei, PCC and FISH are techniques now available to radiobiologists and radiation specialists, which will complement the role played by conventional cytogenetics. After the Chernobyl accident, reliance was on various bioclinical dosemeters, such as the onset of vomiting, lymphocytes and neutrophils and biochemical indicators. The onset of prodromal manifestations, haematological behaviour and other indicators presented by eight caesium patients were analysed and correlated with the biological dosimetry performed immediately after the accident. Clinical and haematological indicators matched to a good extent with the cytogenetic dosimetry performed in Brazil and the USA. It was concluded that in an accident involving the public, retrospective dosimetry could be helpful in aiding dose estimation and also in validating dosimetry established by conventional physical and biological techniques. (author)

  5. Radioactive waste management after NPP accident: Post-Chernobyl experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhalevich, A.; Grebenkov, A.

    2000-01-01

    As a result of the Chernobyl NPP accident a very large amount of so-called 'Chernobyl waste' were generated in the territory of Belarus, which was contaminated much more than all other countries. These wastes relate mainly to two following categories: low-level waste (LLW) and new one 'Conventionally Radioactive Waste' (CRW). Neither regulations nor technology and equipment were sufficiently developed for such an amount and kind of waste before the accident. It required proper decisions in respect of regulations, treatment, transportation, disposal of waste, etc. (author)

  6. Pilot Domain Task Experience in Night Fatal Helicopter Emergency Medical Service Accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aherne, Bryan B; Zhang, Chrystal; Newman, David G

    2016-06-01

    In the United States, accident and fatality rates in helicopter emergency medical service (HEMS) operations increase significantly under nighttime environmentally hazardous operational conditions. Other studies have found pilots' total flight hours unrelated to HEMS accident outcomes. Many factors affect pilots' decision making, including their experience. This study seeks to investigate whether pilot domain task experience (DTE) in HEMS plays a role against likelihood of accidents at night when hazardous operational conditions are entered. There were 32 flights with single pilot nighttime fatal HEMS accidents between 1995 and 2013 with findings of controlled flight into terrain (CFIT) and loss of control (LCTRL) due to spatial disorientation (SD) identified. The HEMS DTE of the pilots were compared with industry survey data. Of the pilots, 56% had ≤2 yr of HEMS experience and 9% had >10 yr of HEMS experience. There were 21 (66%) accidents that occurred in non-visual flight rules (VFR) conditions despite all flights being required to be conducted under VFR. There was a statistically significant increase in accident rates in pilots with pilots with >10 yr HEMS DTE. HEMS DTE plays a preventive role against the likelihood of a night operational accident. Pilots with limited HEMS DTE are more likely to make a poor assessment of hazardous conditions at night, and this will place HEMS flight crew at high risk in the VFR night domain.

  7. Management of a radiological emergency. Experience feedback and post-accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubiau, Ph.

    2007-01-01

    In France, the organization of crisis situations and the management of radiological emergency situations are regularly tested through simulation exercises for a continuous improvement. Past severe accidents represent experience feedback resources of prime importance which have led to deep changes in crisis organizations. However, the management of the post-accident phase is still the object of considerations and reflections between the public authorities and the intervening parties. This document presents, first, the nuclear crisis exercises organized in France, then, the experience feedback of past accidents and exercises, and finally, the main aspects to consider for the post-accident management of such events: 1 - Crisis exercises: objectives, types (local, national and international exercises), principles and progress, limits; 2 - Experience feedback: real crises (major accidents, other recent accidental situations or incidents), crisis exercises (experience feedback organization, improvements); 3 - post-accident management: environmental contamination and people exposure, management of contaminated territories, management of populations (additional protection, living conditions, medical-psychological follow up), indemnification, organization during the post-accident phase; 4 - conclusion and perspectives. (J.S.)

  8. Analytical criteria for fuel failure modes observed in reactivity initiated accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luxat, J.C.

    2005-01-01

    The behaviour of nuclear fuel subjected to a short duration power pulse is of relevance to LWR and CANDU reactor safety. A Reactivity Initiated Accident (RIA) in an LWR would subject fuel to a short duration power pulse of large amplitude, whereas in CANDU a large break Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) would subject fuel to a longer duration, lower amplitude power excursion. The energy generated in the fuel during the power pulse is a key parameter governing the fuel response. This paper reviews the various power pulse tests that have been conducted in research reactors over the past three decades and summarizes the fuel failure modes that that have been observed in these tests. A simple analytical model is developed to characterize fuel behaviour under power pulse conditions and the model is applied to assess the experimental data from the power pulse tests. It is shown that the simple model provides a good basis for establishing criteria that demarcate the observed fuel failure modes for the various fuel designs that have been used in these tests. (author)

  9. Relationship between Recent Flight Experience and Pilot Error General Aviation Accidents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Sarah J.

    Aviation insurance agents and fixed-base operation (FBO) owners use recent flight experience, as implied by the 90-day rule, to measure pilot proficiency in physical airplane skills, and to assess the likelihood of a pilot error accident. The generally accepted premise is that more experience in a recent timeframe predicts less of a propensity for an accident, all other factors excluded. Some of these aviation industry stakeholders measure pilot proficiency solely by using time flown within the past 90, 60, or even 30 days, not accounting for extensive research showing aeronautical decision-making and situational awareness training decrease the likelihood of a pilot error accident. In an effort to reduce the pilot error accident rate, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has seen the need to shift pilot training emphasis from proficiency in physical airplane skills to aeronautical decision-making and situational awareness skills. However, current pilot training standards still focus more on the former than on the latter. The relationship between pilot error accidents and recent flight experience implied by the FAA's 90-day rule has not been rigorously assessed using empirical data. The intent of this research was to relate recent flight experience, in terms of time flown in the past 90 days, to pilot error accidents. A quantitative ex post facto approach, focusing on private pilots of single-engine general aviation (GA) fixed-wing aircraft, was used to analyze National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) accident investigation archival data. The data were analyzed using t-tests and binary logistic regression. T-tests between the mean number of hours of recent flight experience of tricycle gear pilots involved in pilot error accidents (TPE) and non-pilot error accidents (TNPE), t(202) = -.200, p = .842, and conventional gear pilots involved in pilot error accidents (CPE) and non-pilot error accidents (CNPE), t(111) = -.271, p = .787, indicate there is no

  10. Barrier experiment: Shock initiation under complex loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menikoff, Ralph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-01-12

    The barrier experiments are a variant of the gap test; a detonation wave in a donor HE impacts a barrier and drives a shock wave into an acceptor HE. The question we ask is: What is the trade-off between the barrier material and threshold barrier thickness to prevent the acceptor from detonating. This can be viewed from the perspective of shock initiation of the acceptor subject to a complex pressure drive condition. Here we consider key factors which affect whether or not the acceptor undergoes a shock-to-detonation transition. These include the following: shock impedance matches for the donor detonation wave into the barrier and then the barrier shock into the acceptor, the pressure gradient behind the donor detonation wave, and the curvature of detonation front in the donor. Numerical simulations are used to illustrate how these factors affect the reaction in the acceptor.

  11. Reactivity initiated accident analyses for the safety assessment of upgraded JRR-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harami, Taikan; Uemura, Mutsumi; Ohnishi, Nobuaki

    1984-08-01

    JRR-3, currently a heavy water moderated and cooled 10 MW reactor, is to be upgraded to a light water moderated and cooled, heavy water reflected 20 MW reactor. This report describes the analytical results of reactivity initiated accidents for the safety assessment of upgraded JRR-3. The following five cases have been selected for the assessment; (1) uncontrolled control rod withdrawal from zero power, (2) uncontrolled control rod withdrawal from full power, (3) removal of irradiation samples, (4) increase of primary coolant flow, (5) failure of heavy water tank. Parameter studies have been made for each of the above cases to cover possible uncertainties. All analyses have been made by a computer code EUREKA-2. The results show that the safety criteria for upgraded JRR-3 are all met and the adequacy of the design is confirmed. (author)

  12. Out-of-pile test of zirconium cladding simulating reactivity initiated accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J. H.; Lee, M. H.; Choi, B. K.; Bang, J. K.; Jung, Y. H. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    Mechanical properties of zirconium cladding such as Zircaloy-4 and advanced cladding were evaluated by ring tension test to simulate Reactivity-Initiated Accident (RIA) as an out-pile test. Cladding was hydrided by means of charging hydrogen up to 1000ppm to simulate high-burnup situation, finally fabricated to circumferential tensile specimen. Ring tension test was carried out from 0.01 to 1/sec to keep pace with actual RIA event. The results showed that mechanical strength of zirconium cladding increased at the value of 7.8% but ductility decreased at the 34% as applied strain rate and absorbed hydrogen increased. Further activities regarding out-of-pile testing plans for simulated high-burnup cladding were discussed in this paper.

  13. The consequences of the Chernobyl accident - the radioecological database Redac of the French-German initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deville-Cavelin, G.; Biesold, H.; Chabanyuk, V. [Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety Institute (IRSN), Dir. of Environment and Intervention (DEI) - CEA Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2004-07-01

    The French-German Initiative for Chernobyl (FGI), implemented by IRSN and GRS from 1997 until the end of 2003, included the 'Project on the Radioecological Consequences of the Accident'. The most relevant fields of radioecology and post-accidental aspects have been studied, such as radionuclides transfers to plants, to animals, by surface runoff, in the aquatic environment and in the urban environment, wastes management and countermeasures. The main goal was to collect and harmonise, from Belarus, Russia and Ukraine, the highest possible amount of data and results on these different topics. These data have been verified, validated and organized in a common geo-referenced database REDAC (Radioecological Database After Chernobyl). For linking the different data, maps of initial and present contamination by {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr have been drawn up and relevant environmental non-radioactive data have been included. The operational database built will also allow the management of the wastes disposal sites. Countermeasures used after the accident for urban areas, natural and agricultural environment, have been described and classified. A methodology for evaluating their effectiveness has been developed. This database constitutes a tool for the development and validation of operational, assessment and explicative models. This allows the quantification and assessment of radionuclide transfer in the different compartments of ecosystems. So the main parameters influencing the transfers can be identified. REDAC should be completed by further investigations, for example on transuranic elements and extended to larger geographical zones. The database should also be combined with others provided by different organisations (IAEA, IRSN, UIR, ). (author)

  14. The consequences of the Chernobyl accident - the radioecological database Redac of the French-German initiative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deville-Cavelin, G.; Biesold, H.; Chabanyuk, V.

    2004-01-01

    The French-German Initiative for Chernobyl (FGI), implemented by IRSN and GRS from 1997 until the end of 2003, included the 'Project on the Radioecological Consequences of the Accident'. The most relevant fields of radioecology and post-accidental aspects have been studied, such as radionuclides transfers to plants, to animals, by surface runoff, in the aquatic environment and in the urban environment, wastes management and countermeasures. The main goal was to collect and harmonise, from Belarus, Russia and Ukraine, the highest possible amount of data and results on these different topics. These data have been verified, validated and organized in a common geo-referenced database REDAC (Radioecological Database After Chernobyl). For linking the different data, maps of initial and present contamination by 137 Cs and 90 Sr have been drawn up and relevant environmental non-radioactive data have been included. The operational database built will also allow the management of the wastes disposal sites. Countermeasures used after the accident for urban areas, natural and agricultural environment, have been described and classified. A methodology for evaluating their effectiveness has been developed. This database constitutes a tool for the development and validation of operational, assessment and explicative models. This allows the quantification and assessment of radionuclide transfer in the different compartments of ecosystems. So the main parameters influencing the transfers can be identified. REDAC should be completed by further investigations, for example on transuranic elements and extended to larger geographical zones. The database should also be combined with others provided by different organisations (IAEA, IRSN, UIR, ). (author)

  15. Initial medical management of criticality accident victim; Conduite a tenir aux victimes d'un accident de criticite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miele, A; Bebaron-Jacobs, L

    2005-07-01

    The extremely severe criticality accidents known to this day, and the subsequent deaths recorded (Sarov 1997 and Tokai Mura 1999), demonstrate the need for sustained surveillance and constant adapted training for the teams in charge of irradiated and/or contaminated victims. The aim of this work group, composed of occupational health services and associated medical biology laboratories, is to present, in leaflet format, the essential data on the documentation and the conduct to be held when facing the victims of a criticality accident. The studies of this work group confirm the difficulties involved in managing this type of accident, both from the dosimetric evaluation point of view and from the therapeutic management point of view. That is why several research themes and perspectives are developed. During the different phases of victim triage, the recommendations given on these leaflets describe the operational conducts to be held. This work will have to be updated according to the evolution in knowledge and means: short and long term effects of exposure to neutrons, multi-competence hospital cooperation, expertise networks related to dosimetric reconstitution. (authors)

  16. Initial medical management of criticality accident victim; Conduite a tenir aux victimes d'un accident de criticite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miele, A.; Bebaron-Jacobs, L

    2005-07-01

    The extremely severe criticality accidents known to this day, and the subsequent deaths recorded (Sarov 1997 and Tokai Mura 1999), demonstrate the need for sustained surveillance and constant adapted training for the teams in charge of irradiated and/or contaminated victims. The aim of this work group, composed of occupational health services and associated medical biology laboratories, is to present, in leaflet format, the essential data on the documentation and the conduct to be held when facing the victims of a criticality accident. The studies of this work group confirm the difficulties involved in managing this type of accident, both from the dosimetric evaluation point of view and from the therapeutic management point of view. That is why several research themes and perspectives are developed. During the different phases of victim triage, the recommendations given on these leaflets describe the operational conducts to be held. This work will have to be updated according to the evolution in knowledge and means: short and long term effects of exposure to neutrons, multi-competence hospital cooperation, expertise networks related to dosimetric reconstitution. (authors)

  17. Chemical and nuclear emergencies: Interchanging lessons learned from planning and accident experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adler, V.; Sorensen, J.H.; Rogers, G.O.

    1989-01-01

    Because the goal of emergency preparedness for both chemical and nuclear hazards is to reduce human exposure to hazardous materials, this paper examines the interchange of lessons learned from emergency planning and accident experience in both industries. While the concerns are slightly different, sufficient similarity is found for each to draw implications from the others experience. Principally the chemical industry can learn from the dominant planning experience associated with nuclear power plants, while the nuclear industry can chiefly learn from the chemical industry's accident experience. 23 refs

  18. Goiania radiation accident: activities carried out and lessons learned based on personal experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, F.C.A. da

    2017-01-01

    Goiânia Radiological Accident, on September 13, 1987, with a radioactive source of cesium-137 with 50.9 TBq, used in radiotherapy, is one of the most important accidents in the scientific area, representing a milestone for all workers in the areas of radiation protection and radiological emergency that worked during the event. A personal view of the Goiânia Radiological Accident is presented, showing some activities carried out in contaminated areas and lessons learned based on own experience during the event

  19. Commitment of involved actors in the preparation of accidental and post-accident situations: European experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Th.

    2010-01-01

    The author briefly describes some approaches developed within the EURANOS European research programme between 2004 and 2009 which aims at promoting the building up of a European network (NERIS) for the management of nuclear accidental and post-accident situations. Notably, he comments the experiment which took place in the Montbeliard district where two types of radiological events have been modelled and simulated: an accident in the Fessenheim nuclear power plant with two scenarios of release, and a transportation accident with a release of radioactive caesium 137. He also evokes the Norwegian experience and some other actions in Finland, Great-Britain, Spain and Slovakia where reflections on the management of accidental and post-accident situations or crisis exercises have been organized

  20. Radiation protection experience in Yugoslavia from the Vinca accident to nowadays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ninkovic, M.M

    2000-01-01

    This Paper is the expression of the author opinion about development of radiation protection in Yugoslavia from its beginning forty years ago, which might affect its status in the foreseeable future at the first decades of the 21st century. It focuses on key events in this field starting from the Vinca Accident, which happened in the October 1958, to nowadays. Shortly reviewed some of key events are: Vinca Accident; Foundation of the Radiation Protection Laboratory in the Vinca Institute; International Vinca Dosimetry Experiment; First National Symposium and foundation of the Yugoslav Radiation Protection Association; International Intercomparison Experiment on Nuclear Accident Dosimetry and, International Summer Schools and Symposium on Radiation Protection organized in Yugoslavia. Finally, some specific experimental data obtained during and after Chernobyl Accident up to nowadays in radiation protection action in Yugoslavia are presented also. (author)

  1. The 1987 radiation accident in Goiania: medical and organizational experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, A.R. de; Souza, P.C. de

    1989-12-01

    The present works describes the circumstances of the accident occurred on 13 September 1987, in Goiania (Brazil), when two scavengers removed a teletherapy device a 50.9 TB q (1375Ci) cesium source, from a clinic. They took the apparatus home and tried to dismantled it. The authors describe the circumstances of the event, the first aid measures taken on the site, and the medical structure organized to triage and treat the casualties. Aspects relating to hospital contamination control, the environment, and radioprotection and decontamination procedures are also discussed. (L.M.J.) [pt

  2. A study on posttraumatic experience of road traffic accident afflicted maxillofacial trauma patient at tertiary hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Santosh Kumar; Shrestha, Suraksha

    2017-01-01

    Patients are usually left in a vulnerable state after an accident. Because of this, they long for a good encounter when they are brought to the hospital. Physical impairment and psychological morbidities are some of the complications that can occur to them. Traditionally, surgeons tend to pay little attention to a patient's emotional and psychological perspective. The aim of this study was to understand the experience of oral and maxillofacial trauma patients due to road traffic accident right from immediate after the accident till the end of definitive treatment. Phenomenological approach of qualitative study was used to explore these patients' experience. Twenty subjects involved in road traffic accidents without any cognitive impairment aged 18 and above were recruited. Purposive sampling was used to include maximal variation sample regarding age, gender, types of injury, and types of treatment received. Semi-structured and open-ended interview approach was used to obtain in-depth information. Seven themes were identified to describe the patients' response to and experience after meeting with a road traffic accident; they are unreal experiences, emotional responses, need to inform and need for information, need for assistance, their perception toward the maxillofacial injury, their experience on treatment and staff-patient interaction. This qualitative study has provided an in-depth understanding of patients experience during maxillofacial trauma and treatment, which otherwise cannot be obtained by the use of surveys and test questions.

  3. Links between operating experience feedback of industrial accidents and nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eury, S.P.

    2012-01-01

    Since 1992, the bureau for analysis of industrial risks and pollutions (BARPI) collects, analyzes and publishes information on industrial accidents. The ARIA database lists over 40.000 accidents or incidents, most of which occurred in French classified facilities (ICPE). Events occurring in nuclear facilities are rarely reported in ARIA because they are reported in other databases. This paper describes the process of selection, characterization and review of these accidents, as well as the following consultation with industry trade groups. It is essential to publicize widely the lessons learned from analyzing industrial accidents. To this end, a web site (www.aria.developpement-durable.gouv.fr) gives free access to the accidents summaries, detailed sheets, studies, etc. to professionals and the general public. In addition, the accidents descriptions and characteristics serve as inputs to new regulation projects or risk analyses. Finally, the question of the links between operating experience feedback of industrial accidents and nuclear safety is explored: if the rigorous and well-documented methods of experience feedback in the nuclear field certainly set an example for other activities, nuclear safety can also benefit from inputs coming from the vast diversity of accidents arisen into industrial facilities because of common grounds. Among these common grounds we can find: -) the fuel cycle facilities use many chemicals and chemical processes that are also used by chemical industries; -) the problems resulting from the ageing of equipment affect both heavy and nuclear industries; -) the risk of hydrogen explosion; -) the risk of ammonia, ammonia is a gas used by nuclear power plants as an ingredient in the onsite production of mono-chloramine and ammonia is involved in numerous accidents in the industry: at least 900 entries can be found in the ARIA database. The paper is followed by the slides of the presentation

  4. Prostate brachytherapy in Ghana: our initial experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Edward Mensah

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study presents the experience of a brachytherapy team in Ghana with a focus on technology transfer and outcome. The team was initially proctored by experienced physicians from Europe and South Africa. Material and methods : A total of 90 consecutive patients underwent either brachytherapy alone or brachytherapy in combination with external beam radiotherapy for prostate carcinoma between July 2008 and February 2014 at Korle Bu Teaching Hospital, Accra, Ghana. Patients were classified as low-risk, intermediate, and high-risk according to the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN criteria. All low-risk and some intermediate risk group patients were treated with seed implantation alone. Some intermediate and all high-risk group patients received brachytherapy combined with external beam radiotherapy. Results: The median patient age was 64.0 years (range 46-78 years. The median follow-up was 58 months (range 18-74 months. Twelve patients experienced biochemical failure including one patient who had evidence of metastatic disease and died of prostate cancer. Freedom from biochemical failure rates for low, intermediate, and high-risk cases were 95.4%, 90.9%, and 70.8%, respectively. Clinical parameters predictive of biochemical outcome included: clinical stage, Gleason score, and risk group. Pre-treatment prostate specific antigen (PSA was not a statistically significant predictor of biochemical failure. Sixty-nine patients (76.6% experienced grade 1 urinary symptoms in the form of frequency, urgency, and poor stream. These symptoms were mostly self-limiting. Four patients needed catheterization for urinary retention (grade 2. One patient developed a recto urethral fistula (grade 3 following banding for hemorrhoids. Conclusions : Our results compare favorably with those reported by other institutions with more extensive experience. We believe therefore that, interstitial permanent brachytherapy can be safely and effectively

  5. Bibliography for nuclear criticality accident experience, alarm systems, and emergency management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putman, V.L.

    1995-09-01

    The characteristics, detection, and emergency management of nuclear criticality accidents outside reactors has been an important component of criticality safety for as long as the need for this specialized safety discipline has been recognized. The general interest and importance of such topics receives special emphasis because of the potentially lethal, albeit highly localized, effects of criticality accidents and because of heightened public and regulatory concerns for any undesirable event in nuclear and radiological fields. This bibliography lists references which are potentially applicable to or interesting for criticality alarm, detection, and warning systems; criticality accident emergency management; and their associated programs. The lists are annotated to assist bibliography users in identifying applicable: industry and regulatory guidance and requirements, with historical development information and comments; criticality accident characteristics, consequences, experiences, and responses; hazard-, risk-, or safety-analysis criteria; CAS design and qualification criteria; CAS calibration, maintenance, repair, and testing criteria; experiences of CAS designers and maintainers; criticality accident emergency management (planning, preparedness, response, and recovery) requirements and guidance; criticality accident emergency management experience, plans, and techniques; methods and tools for analysis; and additional bibliographies

  6. Liver transplantations in Bulgaria--initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladov, N; Mihaylov, V; Takorov, I; Vasilevski, I; Lukanova, T; Odisseeva, E; Katzarov, K; Simonova, M; Tomova, D; Konakchieva, M; Petrov, N; Mladenov, N; Sergeev, S; Mutafchiiski, V

    2014-01-01

    The filed of liver transplantation (LT) continues to evolve and is highly effective therapy for many patients with acute and chronic liver failure resulting from a variety of causes. Improvement of perioperative care, surgical technique and immunosuppression in recent years has led to its transformation into a safe and routine procedure with steadily improving results. The aim of this paper is to present the initial experience of the transplant team at Military Medical Academy - Sofia, Bulgaria. For the period of April 2007 - August 2014 the team performed 38 liver transplants in 37 patients (one retransplantation). Patients were followed up prospectively and retrospectively. In 36 (95%) patients a graft from a cadaveric donor was used and in two cases--a right liver grafts from live donor. The mean MELD score of the transplanted patients was 17 (9-40). The preferred surgical technique was "piggyback" with preservation of inferior vena cava in 33 (86%) of the cases and classical technique in 3 (8%) patients. The overall complication rate was 48%. Early mortality rate was 13% (5 patients). The overall 1- and 5-year survival is 81% and 77% respectivelly. The setting of a new LT program is a complex process which requires the effort and effective colaboration of a wide range of speciacialists (hepatologists, surgeons, anesthesiologists, psychologists, therapists, coordinators, etc.) and institutions. The good results are function of a proper selection of the donors and the recipients. Living donation is an alternative in the shortage of cadaveric donors.

  7. Nuclear accident dosimetry, Report on the Third IAEA intercomparison experiment at Vinca, Yugoslavia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1977-03-15

    The objective of this report is to present the results of the third IAEA intercomparison experiment held at the Boris Kidric Institute, Vinca, in May 1973. These experiments were a part of multi laboratory intercomparison programme sponsored by the IAEA for evaluation of nuclear accident dosimetry systems that ought to provide adequate information in the event of criticality accidents. This report deals with the data concerning the Third intercomparison experiments in which the RB reactor at Vinca was used as a source of mixed radiation.

  8. Assessment of Core Failure Limits for Light Water Reactor Fuel under Reactivity Initiated Accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jernkvist, Lars Olof; Massih, Ali R.

    2004-12-01

    Core failure limits for high-burnup light water reactor UO 2 fuel rods, subjected to postulated reactivity initiated accidents (RIAs), are here assessed by use of best-estimate computational methods. The considered RIAs are the hot zero power rod ejection accident (HZP REA) in pressurized water reactors and the cold zero power control rod drop accident (CZP CRDA) in boiling water reactors. Burnup dependent core failure limits for these events are established by calculating the fuel radial average enthalpy connected with incipient fuel pellet melting for fuel burnups in the range of 30 to 70 MWd/kgU. The postulated HZP REA and CZP CRDA result in lower enthalpies for pellet melting than RIAs that take place at rated power. Consequently, the enthalpy thresholds presented here are lower bounds to RIAs at rated power. The calculations are performed with best-estimate models, which are applied in the FRAPCON-3.2 and SCANAIR-3.2 computer codes. Based on the results of three-dimensional core kinetics analyses, the considered power transients are simulated by a Gaussian pulse shape, with a fixed width of either 25 ms (REA) or 45 ms (CRDA). Notwithstanding the differences in postulated accident scenarios between the REA and the CRDA, the calculated core failure limits for these two events are similar. The calculated enthalpy thresholds for fuel pellet melting decrease gradually with fuel burnup, from approximately 960 J/gUO 2 at 30 MWd/kgU to 810 J/gUO 2 at 70 MWd/kgU. The decline is due to depression of the UO 2 melting temperature with increasing burnup, in combination with burnup related changes to the radial power distribution within the fuel pellets. The presented fuel enthalpy thresholds for incipient UO 2 melting provide best-estimate core failure limits for low- and intermediate-burnup fuel. However, pulse reactor tests on high-burnup fuel rods indicate that the accumulation of gaseous fission products within the pellets may lead to fuel dispersal into the coolant at

  9. Categorization of PWR accident sequences and guidelines for fault trees: seismic initiators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, C.Y.

    1984-09-01

    This study developed a set of dominant accident sequences that could be applied generically to domestic commercial PWRs as a standardized basis for a probabilistic seismic risk assessment. This was accomplished by ranking the Zion 1 accident sequences. The pertinent PWR safety systems were compared on a plant-by-plant basis to determine the applicability of the dominant accident sequences of Zion 1 to other PWR plants. The functional event trees were developed to describe the system functions that must work or not work in order for a certain accident sequence to happen, one for pipe breaks and one for transients

  10. Driving force of PCMI failure under reactivity initiated accident conditions and influence of hydrogen embrittlement on failure limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomiyasu, Kunihiko; Sugiyama, Tomoyuki; Nakamura, Takehiko; Fuketa, Toyoshi

    2005-09-01

    In order to clarify the driving force of PCMI (Pellet/Cladding Mechanical Interaction) failure on high burnup fuels and to investigate the influence of hydrogen embrittlement on failure limit under RIA (Reactivity Initiated Accident) conditions, RIA-simulation experiments were performed on fresh fuel rods in the NSRR (Nuclear Safety Research Reactor). The driving force of PCMI was restricted only to thermal expansion of pellet by using fresh UO 2 pellets. Fresh claddings were pre-hydrided to simulate hydrogen absorption of high burnup fuel rods. In seven experiments out of fourteen, test rods resulted in PCMI failure, which has been observed in the NSRR tests on high burnup PWR fuels, in terms of the transient behavior and the fracture configuration. This indicates that the driving force of PCMI failure is sufficiently explained with thermal expansion of pellet and a contribution of fission gas on it is small. A large number of incipient cracks were generated in the outer surface of the cladding even on non-failed fuel rods, and they stopped at the boundary between hydride rim, which was a hydride layer localized in the periphery of the cladding, and metallic layer. It suggests that the integrity of the metallic layer except for the hydride rim has particular importance for failure limit. Fuel enthalpy at failure correlates with the thickness of hydride rim, and tends to decrease with thicker hydride layer. (author)

  11. Initial TMX central-cell ICRH experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molvik, A.W.; Coffield, F.E.; Falabella, S.; Griffin, D.; McVey, B.; Pickles, W.; P.

    1980-01-01

    Four topics are discussed in this report: the feasibility of applying ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) in the TMX central cell, some applications of heating, the results of preliminary experiments, and plans for further ICRH experiments

  12. Behaviour of rock-like oxide fuels under reactivity-initiated accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazuyuki, Kusagaya; Takehiko, Nakamura; Makio, Yoshinaga; Hiroshi, Akie; Toshiyuki, Yamashita; Hiroshi, Uetsuka

    2002-01-01

    Pulse irradiation tests of three types of un-irradiated rock-like oxide (ROX) fuel - yttria-stabilised zirconia (YSZ) single phase, YSZ and spinel (MgAl 2 O 4 ) homogeneous mixture and particle-dispersed YSZ/spinel - were conducted in the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor to investigate the fuel behaviour under reactivity-initiated accident conditions. The ROX fuels failed at fuel volumetric enthalpies above 10 GJ/m 3 , which was comparable to that of un-irradiated UO 2 fuel. The failure mode of the ROX fuels, however, was quite different from that of the UO 2 fuel. The ROX fuels failed with fuel pellet melting and a part of the molten fuel was released out to the surrounding coolant water. In spite of the release, no significant mechanical energy generation due to fuel/coolant thermal interaction was observed in the tested enthalpy range below∼12 GJ/m 3 . The YSZ type and homogenous YSZ/spinel type ROX fuels failed by cladding burst when their temperatures peaked, while the particle-dispersed YSZ/spinel type ROX fuel seemed to have failed by cladding local melting. (author)

  13. Status on development and verification of reactivity initiated accident analysis code for PWR (NODAL3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Hong Liem; Surian Pinem; Tagor Malem Sembiring; Tran Hoai Nam

    2015-01-01

    A coupled neutronics thermal-hydraulics code NODAL3 has been developed based on the nodal few-group neutron diffusion theory in 3-dimensional Cartesian geometry for a typical pressurized water reactor (PWR) static and transient analyses, especially for reactivity initiated accidents (RIA). The spatial variables are treated by using a polynomial nodal method (PNM) while for the neutron dynamic solver the adiabatic and improved quasi-static methods are adopted. A simple single channel thermal-hydraulics module and its steam table is implemented into the code. Verification works on static and transient benchmarks are being conducting to assess the accuracy of the code. For the static benchmark verification, the IAEA-2D, IAEA-3D, BIBLIS and KOEBERG light water reactor (LWR) benchmark problems were selected, while for the transient benchmark verification, the OECD NEACRP 3-D LWR Core Transient Benchmark and NEA-NSC 3-D/1-D PWR Core Transient Benchmark (Uncontrolled Withdrawal of Control Rods at Zero Power). Excellent agreement of the NODAL3 results with the reference solutions and other validated nodal codes was confirmed. (author)

  14. Out-of pile mechanical test: simulating reactivity initiated accident (RIA) of zircaloy-4 cladding tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Myung Ho; Kim, Jun Hwan; Choi, Byoung Kwon; Jeong, Young Hwan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    The ejection or drop of a control rod in a reactivity initiated accident (RIA) causes a sudden increase in reactor power and in turn deposits a large amount of energy into the fuel. In a RIA, cladding tubes bear thermal expansion due to sudden reactivity and may fail from the resulting mechanical damage. Thus, RIA can be one of the safety margin reducers because the oxide on the tubes makes their thickness to support the load less as well as hydrides from the corrosion reduce the ductility of the tubes. In a RIA, the peak of reactor power from reactivity change is about 0.1m second and the temperature of the cladding tubes increases up to 1000 .deg. C in several seconds. Although it is hard to fully simulate the situation, several attempts to measure the change of mechanical properties under a RIA situation has done using a reduction coil, ring tension tests with high speed. This research was done to see the effect of oxide on the change of circumferential strength and ductility of Zircaloy-4 tubes in a RIA. The ring stretch tensile tests were performed with the strain rate of 1/sec and 0.01/s to simulate a transient of the cladding tube under a RIA. Since the test results of the ring tensile test are very sensitive to the lubricant, the tests were also carried out to select a suitable lubricant before the test of oxided specimens.

  15. Reactivity initiated accident test series Test RIA 1-4 fuel behavior report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, B.A.; Martinson, Z.R.

    1984-09-01

    This report presents and discusses results from the final test in the Reactivity Initiated Accident (RIA) Test Series, Test RIA 1-4, conducted in the Power Burst Facility (PBF) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Nine preirradiated fuel rods in a 3 x 3 bundle configuration were subjected to a power burst while at boiling water reactor hot-startup system conditions. The test resulted in estimated axial peak, radial average fuel enthalpies of 234 cal/g UO 2 on the center rod, 255 cal/g UO 2 on the side rods, and 277 cal/g UO 2 on the corner rods. Test RIA 1-4 was conducted to investigate fuel coolability and channel blockage within a bundle of preirradiated rods near the present enthalpy limit of 280 cal/g UO 2 established by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The test design and conduct are described, and the bundle and individual rod thermal and mechanical responses are evaluated. Conclusions from this final test and the entire PBF RIA Test Series are presented

  16. A study on gap heat transfer of LWR fuel rods under reactivity initiated accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujishiro, Toshio

    1984-03-01

    Gap heat transfer between fuel pellet and cladding have a large influence on the LWR fuel behaviors under reactivity initiated accident (RIA) conditions. The objective of the present study is to investigate the effects of gap heat transfer on RIA fuel behaviors based on the results of the gap-gas parameter tests in NSRR and on their analysis with NSR-77 code. Through this study, transient variations of gap heat transfer, the effects of the gap heat transfer on fuel thermal behaviors and on fuel failure, effects of pellet-cladding sticking by eutectic formation, and the effects of cladding collapse under high external pressure have been clearified. The studies have also been performed on the applicability and its limit of modified Ross and Stoute equation which is extensively utilized to evaluate the gap heat transfer coefficient in the present fuel behavior codes. The method to evaluate the gap conductance to the conditions beyond the applicability limit of the Ross and Stoute equation has also been proposed. (author)

  17. Prediction of failure of highly irradiated Zircaloy clad tubes under reactivity initiated accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jernkvist, L.O.

    2003-01-01

    This paper deals with failure of irradiated Zircaloy tubes under the heat-up stage of a reactivity initiated accident (RIA). More precisely, by use of a model for plastic strain localization and necking failure, we theoretically analyse the effects of local surface defects on clad ductility and survivability under RIA. The results show that even very shallow surface defects, e.g. arising from a non-uniform or partially spilled oxide layer, have a strong limiting effect on clad ductility. Moreover, in presence of surface defects, the ability of the clad tube to expand radially without necking failure is found to be extremely sensitive to the stress biaxiality ratio σ zz /σ θθ , which is here assumed to be in the range from 0 to 1. The results of our analysis are compared with clad ductility data available in literature, and their consequences for clad failure prediction under RIA are discussed. In particular, the results raise serious concerns regarding the applicability of failure criteria, which are based on clad strain energy density. These criteria do not capture the observed sensitivity to stress biaxiality on clad failure propensity. (author)

  18. Accidents on board merchant ships. Suggestions based on Centro Internazionale Radio Medico (CIRM) experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napoleone, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    This statistical study was performed to find out the occurrence of accidents on board ships assisted by Centro Internazionale Radio Medico (CIRM) during the years 2010-2015, with the aim of providing suggestions in accident prevention, based on such a wide experience. The case histories of CIRM in the years 2010-2015 were examined. The total number of accidents per year was calculated and compared as a percentage with the total number of cases assisted by CIRM per year. The incidence of accidents on board in these years ranged between 14.4% and 18.4% of total cases assisted per year, which is constantly increasing. The most common injuries on board among cases treated by CIRM were contusions and wounds. Also burns and eye injuries were significantly represented. Multiple injuries and head injuries were found to be the most frequent cause of death on board due to an accident. More information on the occurrence and type of accidents and on the body injured areas should represent the basis for developing strategies and campaigns for their prevention.

  19. How perceptions of experience-based analysis influence explanations of work accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbaye, Safiétou; Kouabenan, Dongo Rémi

    2013-12-01

    This article looks into how perceptions of experience-based analysis (EBA) influence causal explanations of accidents given by managers and workers in the chemical industry (n=409) and in the nuclear industry (n=222). The approach is based on the model of naive explanations of accidents (Kouabenan, 1999, 2006, 2009), which recommends taking into account explanations of accidents spontaneously given by individuals, including laypersons, not only to better understand why accidents occur but also to design and implement the most appropriate prevention measures. The study reported here describes the impact of perceptions about EBA (perceived effectiveness, personal commitment, and the feeling of being involved in EBA practices) on managers' and workers' explanations of accidents likely to occur at the workplace. The results indicated that both managers and workers made more internal explanations than external ones when they perceived EBA positively. Moreover, the more the participants felt involved in EBA, were committed to it, and judged it effective, the more they explained accidents in terms of factors internal to the workers. Recommendations are proposed for reducing defensive reactions, increasing personal commitment to EBA, and improving EBA effectiveness. © 2013.

  20. Clinical experience of infective endocarditis complicated by acute cerebrovascular accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chan-Yang; Chi, Nai-Hsin; Wang, Shoei-Shen; Chen, Yih-Sharng; Yu, Hsi-Yu

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the clinical results of patients with infective endocarditis (IE) complicated by acute cerebrovascular accidents (CVAs). A total of 44 patients with IE complicated by CVA at admission were retrospectively analyzed in a single medical institute from 2005 to 2011. At the time of admission, 18 patients were diagnosed with hemorrhagic stroke, and 26 patients were diagnosed with ischemic stroke. Fifteen patients received surgical intervention during hospitalization. The hospital mortality rate was 38.9% for the hemorrhagic stroke group and 42.3% for the ischemic stroke group (p = 0.821). The mortality rate was 33.3% for the surgical group and 44.8% for the nonsurgical group (p = 0.531). At 30 days of hospitalization, 45.8% of the patients experienced an adverse event (defined as death due to organ failure, restroke, cardiogenic shock, or septic shock during the treatment period), and the attrition rate was 1.5% per day. Surgery performed after the adverse events increased mortality (80.0%) compared with surgery performed on patients with no adverse events (10.0%; p = 0.017). A Cox regression analysis revealed that creatinine > 2 mg/dL, diabetes, and staphylococcal infection were the risk factors of the adverse events. Early surgical intervention for IE with ischemic stroke may prevent adverse events, particularly in patients with impaired renal function, diabetes, or staphylococcal infection. A delay in operation of > 30 days is recommended after hemorrhagic stroke. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  1. Accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutz, R.J.; Monty, B.S.; Liparulo, N.J.; Desaedeleer, G.

    1989-01-01

    The foundation of the framework for a Severe Accident Management Program is the contained in the Probabilistic Safety Study (PSS) or the Individual Plant Evaluations (IPE) for a specific plant. The development of a Severe Accident Management Program at a plant is based on the use of the information, in conjunction with other applicable information. A Severe Accident Management Program must address both accident prevention and accident mitigation. The overall Severe Accident Management framework must address these two facets, as a living program in terms of gathering the evaluating information, the readiness to respond to an event. Significant international experience in the development of severe accident management programs exist which should provide some direction for the development of Severe Accident Management in the U.S. This paper reports that the two most important elements of a Severe Accident Management Program are the Emergency Consultation process and the standards for measuring the effectiveness of individual Severe Accident Management Programs at utilities

  2. Robotic repair of vesicovaginal fistula - initial experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankush Jairath

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective The most common acquired fistula of the urinary tract is Vesicovaginal fistulae (VVF (1 posing social stigmata for the patient as well as a surgical challenge for the urologist. Here we present our initial experience with Robotic assisted laparoscopic repair of VVF, its safety and efficacy. Materials and Methods Seven out of eight fistulas were post hysterectomy; five had undergone abdominal while two had laparoscopic hysterectomy while one was due to prolonged labour. Two had associated ureteric injury. All underwent robotic assisted laparoscopic trans abdominal extravesical approach. Three 8 mm ports for robotic arms, one 12 mm port for camera and another 12 mm for assistant were used in a fan shaped manner. All had preoperative ureteric catheter placed. Bladder was closed in two layers and vagina in one layer. Omental flap placed in all cases except two where it was not possible. Drain and per urethral catheter placed in all cases. Double J stents were placed in two cases requiring ureteric implantation additionally. Results The mean age of presentation was 39.25 years (26-47 range with mean BMI being 26.25 kg/m2 (21-32 range. Mean duration between insult and repair was 9.37 months (3-24 months. Only in single case there was history of previous repair attempt. On cystoscopy four had supratrigonal VVF and four were trigonal with mean size of 13.37 mm (7-20 mm. Mean operative time was 117.5 minutes (90-150. There were no intraoperative/postoperative complications or need for open conversion. Mean haemoglobin drop was 1.4 gm/dL (0.3-2 gm. Drain was removed once 24-48 hours output is negligible. One patient had post-operative urinary leak at 2 weeks which ceased with continuation of catheterisation for another 2 weeks. Catheter was removed after voiding cystourethrogram showed no leak at 2-3 weeks postoperatively. Mean duration of drain was 3.75 days (3-5 and per urethral catheterisation (which was removed after voiding

  3. Accident analyses in nuclear power plants following external initiating events and in the shutdown state. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loeffler, Horst; Kowalik, Michael; Mildenberger, Oliver; Hage, Michael

    2016-06-01

    The work which is documented here provides the methodological basis for improvement of the state of knowledge for accident sequences after plant external initiating events and for accident sequences which begin in the shutdown state. The analyses have been done for a PWR and for a BWR reference plant. The work has been supported by the German federal ministry BMUB under the label 3612R01361. Top objectives of the work are: - Identify relevant event sequences in order to define characteristic initial and boundary conditions - Perform accident analysis of selected sequences - Evaluate the relevance of accident sequences in a qualitative way The accident analysis is performed with the code MELCOR 1.8.6. The applied input data set has been significantly improved compared to previous analyses. The event tree method which is established in PSA level 2 has been applied for creating a structure for a unified summarization and evaluation of the results from the accident analyses. The computer code EVNTRE has been applied for this purpose. In contrast to a PSA level 2, the branching probabilities of the event tree have not been determined with the usual accuracy, but they are given in an approximate way only. For the PWR, the analyses show a considerable protective effect of the containment also in the case of beyond design events. For the BWR, there is a rather high probability for containment failure under core melt impact, but nevertheless the release of radionuclides into the environment is very limited because of plant internal retention mechanisms. This report concludes with remarks about existing knowledge gaps and with regard to core melt sequences, and about possible improvements of the plant safety.

  4. High temperature measurements in severe accident experiments on the PLINIUS Platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouyer, V.; Cassiaut-Louis, N.; Fouquart, P.; Journeau, C.; Piluso, P.; Parga, C.

    2013-06-01

    Severe accident experiments are conducted on the PLINIUS platform in Cadarache, using prototypic corium. During these experiments, it is essential to measure the temperature to know the thermo-physical state of the corium in static and dynamic conditions or to monitor the concrete ablation phenomenology. Temperature in the corium can reach about 2000 to 3000 K. Such aggressive conditions restrict the type of diagnostics that can be employed to do high temperature measurements during the experiments. We employ both non-intrusive (pyrometers) and intrusive (K-type and C-type thermocouples) diagnostics. In this paper, we present the different high temperature measurements techniques and the results that can be obtained in severe accident experiments as corium heating tests and molten core concrete interaction experiments. (authors)

  5. Initial Encounters : The Lived Experiences of Buyers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Wright; J.J. Dekker

    2012-01-01

    The initial encounter between a buyer and a seller has received much attention among practitioners. The first time a buyer interacts with a seller is thought to be highly influential. The premise is that buyers form an opinion during this first encounter, or even the first minutes of this encounter.

  6. The Special Education Story: Obituary, Accident Report, Conversion Experience, Reincarnation, or None of the Above?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffman, James M.

    2000-01-01

    The current status of special education and possible futures are examined through a true news story of current "reform" efforts in Washington, D.C. schools and in imaginary future news stories reporting on special education as an obituary, an accident, a conversion experience, and a reincarnation. The author urges special educators to reject…

  7. Mechanical energy release and fuel fragmentation in high energy deposition into fuel under a reactivity initiated accident condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuruta, Takaharu; Saito, Shinzo; Ochiai, Masaaki

    1985-01-01

    The fuel fragmentation is one of important subjects to be studied, since it is one of basic processes of molten fuel-coolant interaction (MFCI) and it has not yet been made clear enough. Accordingly, UO 2 fuel fragmentation was studied in the NSRR experiments simulating a reactivity initiated accident (RIA). As results of the experiments, the distribution of the size of fuel fragments was obtained and the mechanism of fuel fragmentation was discussed as described below. It was revealed that the distribution was well displayed in the form of logarithmic Rosin-Rammler's distribution law. It was shown that the conversion ratio from thermal energy to mechanical in the experiment was in inverse propotion to the volume-surface mean diameter defined as a ratio of the total volume of fragments to the total surface. Consequently, it was confirmed that the mean diameter was proper as an index for the degree of the fuel fragmentation. It was also pointed out that the Weber-type hydraulic instability model for fragmentation was consistent with the experimental results. The mechanism of the fuel fragmentation is understood as follows. Cladding tube is ruptured due to the increase in rod pressure when fuel is molten, and then molten fuel spouts through the openings in the form of jet. As a result of molten fuel spouting, fuel is fragmented by the Weber-type of hydraulic instability. The model well explains the effects of experimental parameters as heat deposition, subcooling of cooling water and capsule diameter, on the fuel fragmentation. According to the model, fuel fragments have to be spherical. There were many spherical particles which had hollow and burst crack. This may be due to internal burst during solidification process. The items which should be studied further are also described in the end of this report. (author)

  8. High burnup (41 - 61 GWd/tU) BWR fuel behavior under reactivity initiated accident conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Takehiko; Kusagaya, Kazuyuki; Yoshinaga, Makio; Uetsuka, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-12-01

    High burnup boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel was pulse irradiated in the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) to investigate fuel behavior under cold startup reactivity initiated accident (RIA) conditions. Temperature, deformation, failure, and fission gas release behavior under the simulated RIA condition was studied in the tests. Fuel failure due to pellet-cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI) did not occur in the tests with typical domestic BWR fuel at burnups up to 56 GWd/tU, because they had limited cladding embrittlement due to hydrogen absorption of about 100 ppm or less. However, the cladding failure occurred in tests with fuel at a burnup of 61 GWd/tU, in which the peak hydrogen content in the cladding was above 150 ppm. This type of failure was observed for the first time in BWR fuels. The cladding failure occurred at fuel enthalpies of 260 to 360 J/g (62 to 86 cal/g), which were higher than the PCMI failure thresholds decided by the Japanese Nuclear Safety Commission. From post-test examinations of the failed fuel, it was found that the crack in the BWR cladding progressed in a manner different from the one in PWR cladding failed in earlier tests, owing to its more randomly oriented hydride distribution. Because of these differences, the BWR fuel was judged to have failed at hydrogen contents lower than those of the PWR fuel. Comparison of the test results with code calculations revealed that the PCMI failure was caused by thermal expansion of pellets, rather than by the fission gas expansion in the pellets. The gas expansion, however, was found to cause large cladding hoop deformation later after the cladding temperature escalated. (author)

  9. Reactivity estimation during a reactivity-initiated accident using the extended Kalman filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busquim e Silva, R.; Marques, A.L.F.; Cruz, J.J.; Shirvan, K.; Kazimi, M.S.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The EKF is modeled using sophisticate strategies to make the algorithm robust and accurate. • For a supercritical reactor under RIA, the EKF presents better results compared to IPK method independent of magnitude of the noise loads. • A sensitivity for five distinct carry-over effects indicates that the EKF is less sensitive to the different set of noise. • Although the P3D/R5 simulates the reactivity using a spatial kinetics method, the use of PKRE to model the EKF provides accurate results. • The reactivity’s standard deviation is higher for the IKF method. • Under HZP (slow power response) the IPK reactivity varies widely from positive to negative values (add extra difficulty to controlling the supercritical reactor): the EKF method does not have similar behavior under the same conditions (better controlling the operation). - Abstract: This study implements the extended Kalman filter (EKF) to estimate the nuclear reactor reactivity behavior under a reactivity-initiated accident (RIA). A coupled neutronics/thermal hydraulics code PARCS/RELAP5 (P3D/R5) simulates a control rod assembly ejection (CRE) on a traditional 2272 MWt PWR to generate the reactor power profile. A MATLAB script adds random noise to the simulated reactor power. For comparison, the inverse point kinetics (IPK) deterministic method is also implemented. Three different cases of CRE are simulated and the EKF, IPK and the P3D/R5 reactivity are compared. It was found that the EKF method presents better results compared to the IPK method. Furthermore, under a RIA due to small reactivity insertion and slow power response, the IPK reactivity varies widely from positive to negative, which may add extra difficulty to the task of controlling a supercritical reactor. This feature is also confirmed by a sensitivity analysis for five different noise loads and three distinct noise measurements standard deviations (SD)

  10. Initial performance of the COSINE-100 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adhikari, G.; Adhikari, P. [Sejong University, Department of Physics, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Souza, E.B. de; Jo, J.H.; Lim, K.E.; Maruyama, R.H.; Pierpoint, Z.P.; Thompson, W.G. [Yale University, Department of Physics, New Haven, CT (United States); Carlin, N. [University of Sao Paulo, Physics Institute, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Choi, S.; Joo, H.W.; Kim, S.K. [Seoul National University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, W.Q. [Korea Institute of Science and Technology Information, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (KIT), Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Djamal, M.; Prihtiadi, H. [Bandung Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, Bandung (Indonesia); Ezeribe, A.C.; Kudryavtsev, V.A.; Lynch, W.A.; Mouton, F.; Spooner, N.J.C. [University of Sheffield, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Ha, C.; Jeon, E.J.; Kang, W.G.; Kim, B.H.; Kim, H.; Kim, K.W.; Kim, N.Y.; Lee, H.S.; Lee, J.; Lee, M.H.; Leonard, D.S.; Olsen, S.L.; Park, H.K.; Park, K.S.; Ra, S.; Yong, S.H. [Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Center for Underground Physics, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Hahn, I.S. [Ewha Womans University, Department of Science Education, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hubbard, A.J.F. [Yale University, Department of Physics, New Haven, CT (United States); Northwestern University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Evanston, IL (United States); Kang, W.; Rott, C. [Sungkyunkwan University, Department of Physics, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kauer, M. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Physics and Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophysics Center, Madison, WI (United States); Kim, H.J.; Lee, J.Y. [Kyungpook National University, Department of Physics, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kim, M.C. [Sungkyunkwan University, Department of Physics, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chiba University, Department of Physics, Chiba (Japan); Kim, Y.D. [Sejong University, Department of Physics, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Center for Underground Physics, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Y.H. [Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Center for Underground Physics, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, H.S. [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, J.S. [Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Center for Underground Physics, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Ibaraki (Japan); Pettus, W. [Yale University, Department of Physics, New Haven, CT (United States); University of Washington, Department of Physics, Center for Experimental Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics, Seattle, WA (United States); Rogers, F.R. [Yale University, Department of Physics, New Haven, CT (United States); Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, Cambridge, MA (United States); Scarff, A. [University of Sheffield, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Sheffield (United Kingdom); University of British Columbia, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Yang, L. [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Department of Physics, Urbana, IL (United States)

    2018-02-15

    COSINE is a dark matter search experiment based on an array of low background NaI(Tl) crystals located at the Yangyang underground laboratory. The assembly of COSINE-100 was completed in the summer of 2016 and the detector is currently collecting physics quality data aimed at reproducing the DAMA/LIBRA experiment that reported an annual modulation signal. Stable operation has been achieved and will continue for at least 2 years. Here, we describe the design of COSINE-100, including the shielding arrangement, the configuration of the NaI(Tl) crystal detection elements, the veto systems, and the associated operational systems, and we show the current performance of the experiment. (orig.)

  11. The assessment of containment codes by experiments simulating severe accident scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karwat, H.

    1992-01-01

    Hitherto, a generally applicable validation matrix for codes simulating the containment behaviour under severe accident conditions did not exist. Past code applications have shown that most problems may be traced back to inaccurate thermalhydraulic parameters governing gas- or aerosol-distribution events. A provisional code-validation matrix is proposed, based on a careful selection of containment experiments performed during recent years in relevant test facilities under various operating conditions. The matrix focuses on the thermalhydraulic aspects of the containment behaviour after severe accidents as a first important step. It may be supplemented in the future by additional suitable tests

  12. Experiments on natural circulation during PWR severe accidents and their analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sehgal, B.R.; Stewart, W.A.; Sha, W.T.

    1988-01-01

    Buoyancy-induced natural circulation flows will occur during the early-part of PWR high pressure accident scenarios. These flows affect several key parameters; in particular, the course of such accidents will most probably change due to local failures occurring in the primary coolant system (CS) before substantial core degradation. Natural circulation flow patterns were measured in a one-seventh scale PWR PCS facility at Westinghouse RandD laboratories. The measured flow and temperature distributions are report in this paper. The experiments were analyzed with the COMMIX code and good agreement was obtained between data and calculations. 10 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs

  13. Iterative ensemble Kalman filter for atmospheric dispersion in nuclear accidents: An application to Kincaid tracer experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X L; Su, G F; Chen, J G; Raskob, W; Yuan, H Y; Huang, Q Y

    2015-10-30

    Information about atmospheric dispersion of radionuclides is vitally important for planning effective countermeasures during nuclear accidents. Results of dispersion models have high spatial and temporal resolutions, but they are not accurate enough due to the uncertain source term and the errors in meteorological data. Environmental measurements are more reliable, but they are scarce and unable to give forecasts. In this study, our newly proposed iterative ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) data assimilation scheme is used to combine model results and environmental measurements. The system is thoroughly validated against the observations in the Kincaid tracer experiment. The initial first-guess emissions are assumed to be six magnitudes underestimated. The iterative EnKF system rapidly corrects the errors in the emission rate and wind data, thereby significantly improving the model results (>80% reduction of the normalized mean square error, r=0.71). Sensitivity tests are conducted to investigate the influence of meteorological parameters. The results indicate that the system is sensitive to boundary layer height. When the heights from the numerical weather prediction model are used, only 62.5% of reconstructed emission rates are within a factor two of the actual emissions. This increases to 87.5% when the heights derived from the on-site observations are used. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Proposed chemical plant initiated accident scenarios in a sulphur-iodine cycle plant coupled to a pebble bed modular reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, N.R.; Revankar, S.T.; Seker, V.; Downar, Th.J.

    2010-01-01

    In the sulphur-iodine (S-I) cycle nuclear hydrogen generation scheme the chemical plant acts as the heat sink for the very high temperature nuclear reactor (VHTR). Thus, any accident which occurs in the chemical plant must feedback to the nuclear reactor. There are many different types of accidents which can occur in a chemical plant. These accidents include intra-reactor piping failure, inter-reactor piping failure, reaction chamber failure and heat exchanger failure. Since the chemical plant acts as the heat sink for the nuclear reactor, any of these accidents induce a loss-of-heat-sink accident in the nuclear reactor. In this paper, several chemical plant initiated accident scenarios are presented. The following accident scenarios are proposed: i) failure of the Bunsen chemical reactor; ii) product flow failure from either the H 2 SO 4 decomposition section or HI decomposition section; iii) reactant flow failure from either the H 2 SO 4 decomposition section or HI decomposition section; iv) rupture of a reaction chamber. Qualitative analysis of these accident scenarios indicates that each result in either partial or total loss of heat sink accidents for the nuclear reactor. These scenarios are reduced to two types: i) discharge rate limited accidents; ii) discontinuous reaction chamber accidents. A discharge rate limited rupture of the SO 3 decomposition section of the SI cycle is proposed and modelled. Since SO 3 decomposition occurs in the gaseous phase, critical flow out of the rupture is calculated assuming ideal gas behaviour. The accident scenario is modelled using a fully transient control volume model of the S-I cycle coupled to a THERMIX model of a 268 MW pebble bed modular reactor (PBMR-268) and a point kinetics model. The Bird, Stewart and Lightfoot source model for choked gas flows from a pressurised chamber was utilised as a discharge rate model. A discharge coefficient of 0.62 was assumed. Feedback due to the rupture is observed in the nuclear

  15. Total Monte-Carlo method applied to the assessment of uncertainties in a reactivity-initiated accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz, D.F. da; Rochman, D.; Koning, A.J. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group NRG, Petten (Netherlands)

    2014-07-01

    The Total Monte-Carlo (TMC) method has been applied extensively since 2008 to propagate the uncertainties in nuclear data for reactor parameters and fuel inventory, and for several types of advanced nuclear systems. The analyses have been performed considering different levels of complexity, ranging from a single fuel rod to a full 3-D reactor core at steady-state. The current work applies the TMC method for a full 3-D pressurized water reactor core model under steady-state and transient conditions, considering thermal-hydraulic feedback. As a transient scenario the study focused on a reactivity-initiated accident, namely a control rod ejection accident initiated by a mechanical failure of the control rod drive mechanism. The uncertainties on the main reactor parameters due to variations in nuclear data for the isotopes {sup 235},{sup 238}U, {sup 239}Pu and thermal scattering data for {sup 1}H in water were quantified. (author)

  16. Liquid nitrogen - water interaction experiments for fusion reactor accident scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duckworth, R.; Murphy, J.; Pfotenhauer, J.; Corradini, M.

    2001-01-01

    With the implementation of superconducting magnets in fusion reactors, the possibility exists for the interaction between water and cryogenic systems. The interaction between liquid nitrogen and water was investigated experimentally and numerically. The rate of pressurization and peak pressure were found to be driven thermodynamically by the expansion of the water and the boil-off of the liquid nitrogen and did not have a vapor explosion nature. Since the peak pressure was small in comparison to previous work with stratified geometries, the role of the geometry of the interacting fluids has been shown to be significant. Comparisons of the peak pressure and the rate of pressurization with respect to the ratio of the liquid nitrogen mass to water mass reveal no functional dependence as was observed in the liquid helium-water experiments. A simple thermodynamic model provides a fairly good description of the pressure rise data. From the data, the model will allow one to extract the interaction area of the water. As with previous liquid helium-water interaction experiments, more extensive investigation of the mass ratio and interaction geometry is needed to define boundaries between explosive and non-explosive conditions. (authors)

  17. Initial experiments with Multiple Musical Gestures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristoffer; Graugaard, Lars

    2005-01-01

    The classic orchestra has a diminishing role in society, while hard-disc recorded music plays a predominant role today. A simple to use pointer interface in 2D for producing music is presented as a means for playing in a social situation. The sounds of the music are produced by a low-level...... synthesizer, and the music is produced by simple gestures that are repeated easily. The gestures include left-to-right and right-to-left motion shapes for spectral envelope and temporal envelope of the sounds, with optional backwards motion for the addition of noise; downward motion for note onset and several...... other manipulation gestures. The initial position controls which parameter is being affected, the notes intensity is controlled by the downward gesture speed, and a sequence is finalized instantly with one upward gesture. The synthesis employs a novel interface structure, the multiple musical gesture...

  18. An initial assessment of the Chernobyl-4 reactor accident release source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macdonald, H.F.; ApSimon, H.M.; Wilson, J.J.N.

    1986-07-01

    The long-range atmospheric dispersion model MESOS has been used to provide a preliminary evaluation of the effects over Western Europe of radioactivity released during the accident which occurred at the Chernobyl-4 reactor in the USSR in April 1986. The results of this analysis have been compared with observations during the first week or so following the accident of airborne contamination levels at a range of locations across Europe in order to obtain an estimate of accident release source. The work presented here was performed during the 6-8 weeks following the accident and the results obtained will be subject to refinement as more detailed data become available. However, at this early stage they indicate a release source for the Chernobyl accident, expressed as a fraction of the estimated reactor core inventory, of approx. 15-20% of the iodine and caesium isotopes, approx. 1% of the ruthenium and lesser amounts of the other fission products and actinides, together with an implied major fraction of the krypton and xenon noble gases. (author)

  19. Model experiments on depressurisation accidents in nuclear process heat plants (HTGR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritsching, G.; Wolf, G. [Internationale Atomreaktorbau G.m.b.H. (INTERATOM), Bergisch Gladbach (Germany, F.R.)

    1981-01-15

    The analysis of depressurisation accidents requires the use of digital computer programs to find out the dynamic loads acting on the plant structures. Because of the importance of such accidents in safety and licensing procedures of nuclear process heat plants, it is necessary to compare these computer results with suitable experiments to show the accuracy and the limits of the programs in question. For this purpose a series of depressurisation experiments has been started at INTERATOM on a small scale model of a primary loop of a nuclear process heat plant. Using the results of these experiments three different computer programs were tested with good success. The development of the experimental program and the estimation of the results was carried out in co-operation with KFA-Juelich and the Technische Hochschule Aachen.

  20. Model experiments on depressurisation accidents in nuclear process heat plants (HTGR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritsching, G.; Wolf, G.

    1981-01-01

    The analysis of depressurisation accidents requires the use of digital computer programs to find out the dynamic loads acting on the plant structures. Because of the importance of such accidents in safety and licensing procedures of nuclear process heat plants, it is necessary to compare these computer results with suitable experiments to show the accuracy and the limits of the programs in question. For this purpose a series of depressurisation experiments has been started at INTERATOM on a small scale model of a primary loop of a nuclear process heat plant. Using the results of these experiments three different computer programs were tested with good success. The development of the experimental program and the estimation of the results was carried out in co-operation with KFA-Juelich and the Technische Hochschule Aachen

  1. Radiological dose assessment for bounding accident scenarios at the Critical Experiment Facility, TA-18, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    A computer modeling code, CRIT8, was written to allow prediction of the radiological doses to workers and members of the public resulting from these postulated maximum-effect accidents. The code accounts for the relationships of the initial parent radionuclide inventory at the time of the accident to the growth of radioactive daughter products, and considers the atmospheric conditions at time of release. The code then calculates a dose at chosen receptor locations for the sum of radionuclides produced as a result of the accident. Both criticality and non-criticality accidents are examined

  2. SISCOM imaging : an initial South African experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warwick, J.; Rubow, S.; Van Heerden, B.; Ghoorun, S.; Butler, J.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Subtraction ictal SPECT co-registered with MRI (SISCOM) is a new technique utilized for the detection and localization of epileptogenic foci in patients with refractory focal epilepsy who are candidates for surgical resection. The technique requires many challenges to be overcome, in particular in relation to the administration of the radiopharmaceutical, acquisition of brain SPECT and the conversion, co-registration and fusion of brain SPECT and MRI studies. Furthermore the interpretation of the studies is complex and is ideally performed in a multidisciplinary context in cooperation with disciplines such as neurology, radiology, psychiatry and neurosurgery. Materials and methods: Two brain SPECT studies are performed using 99m Tc-ethylene cystinate dimer (ECD). An ictal study is performed after the administration of the 99m Tc-ECD during a seizure. An interictal SPECT, performed between seizures is then subtracted from the ictal SPECT, and the difference image fused with an MRI study to optimise localization of the epileptogenic focus. Image conversion, co-registration and fusion was performed using MRlcro and SPM software. Results: To date the Departments of Neurology and Nuclear Medicine have completed over 10 SISCOM studies. Conclusion: During this presentation this initial work will be presented. The methodology as well as the challenges involved in performing and interpreting these studies will be discussed. Individual cases will be used to illustrate the impact of this powerful technique on future patient management. (author)

  3. The COLIMA experiment on aerosol retention in containment leak paths under severe nuclear accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parozzi, Flavio, E-mail: flavio.parozzi@rse-web.it [RSE, Power Generation Department, via Rubattino 54, I-20134 Milano (Italy); Caracciolo, Eduardo D.J., E-mail: eduardo.caracciolo@rse-web.it [RSE, Power Generation Department, via Rubattino 54, I-20134 Milano (Italy); Journeau, Christophe, E-mail: christophe.journeau@cea.fr [CEA Cadarache (France); Piluso, Pascal, E-mail: pascal.piluso@cea.fr [CEA Cadarache (France)

    2013-08-15

    Highlights: ► Experiment investigating aerosol retention within concrete containment cracks under nuclear severe accident conditions. ► Provided representative conditions of the aerosols suspended inside the containment of PWRs under a severe accident. ► Prototypical aerosol particles generated with a thermite reaction and transported through the crack sample reproducing surface characteristics, temperature, pressure drop and gas leakage. ► The results indicate the significant retention due to zig-zag path. -- Abstract: CEA and RSE managed an experimental research concerning the investigation of aerosol retention within concrete containment cracks under severe accident conditions. The main experiment was carried out in November 2008 with aerosol generated from the COLIMA facility and a sample of cracked concrete with defined geometric characteristics manufactured by RSE. The facility provided representative conditions of the aerosols suspended inside the containment of PWRs under a severe accident. Prototypical aerosol particles were generated with a thermite reaction and transported through the crack sample, where surface characteristics, temperature, pressure drop and gas leakage were properly reproduced. The paper describes the approach adopted for the preparation of the cracked concrete sample and the dimensioning of the experimental apparatus, the test procedure and the measured parameters. The preliminary results, obtained from this single test, are also discussed in the light of the present knowledge about aerosol phenomena and the theoretical analyses of particle behaviour with the crack path.

  4. Initial clinical experience with the heartstring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazui, Toshinobu; Doi, Hirosato; Suzuki, Masato; Okamoto, Takashi; Koshima, Ryuji; Sugiki, Kenji; Ohno, Takemi

    2006-01-01

    The Heartstring is one of the devices that enable proximal anastomosis without clamping the aorta. We have applied the device not only to low-risk patients with normal aortas but also to high-risk patients with diseased aortas. The purpose of this study was to investigate the initial outcomes of using this device. The Heartstring was used on 87 patients between January and December 2004. The patients comprised 62 men and 25 women 48-86 years old (mean 68.4±8.4 years). The ascending aorta was evaluated by computed tomography (CT) scanning before surgery. If a patient's aorta was severely calcified, epiaortic echocardiography was performed. The aortas were ranked into four grades, and the preoperative patient's status were evaluated by the EuroSCORE. Angiography was performed on the third postoperative day. CT scanning revealed that 74 patients had no calcification in the ascending aorta, 10 patients had scattered calcification, and 3 patients had plate-like calcification. The EuroSCORE was 6.86±1.03. We performed 93 proximal anastomoses and 149 distal anastomoses. The average distal anastomosis was 1.6±0.6 sites per graft. Of the distal anastomoses, 74.2% were to the circumflex artery territory. Postoperative coronary angiography revealed that all grafts were patent. The Heartstring facilitates safe proximal anastomosis, even in high-risk patients. Their short-term outcome was good. The device assists in bypassing circumflex artery territory. Long-term follow-up is necessary. (author)

  5. Initial Educational Experiences of Tertiary Students. LSAY Briefing Number 14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillman, Kylie

    2008-01-01

    This "Briefing" presents information about the initial tertiary education experiences, such as satisfaction with aspects of student life and changes to initial enrolments, of two groups of young people, based on two recent Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth (LSAY) research reports. One study focused on the first year experiences of…

  6. Safety in New Zealand's adventure tourism industry: the client accident experience of adventure tourism operators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley , T A; Page, S J; Laird, I S

    2000-01-01

    Injuries and fatalities among participants of adventure tourism activities have the potential to seriously impact on New Zealand's tourism industry. However, the absence of statistics for tourist accidents in New Zealand, and the lack of detailed academic research into adventure tourism safety, means the extent of the problem is unknown. The aims of the present study were to determine the incidence of client injuries across a range of adventure tourism activity sectors, and to identify common accident events and contributory risk factors. A postal questionnaire survey of New Zealand adventure tourism operators was used. Operators were asked to provide information related to their business; the number of recorded client injuries during the preceding 12 month period, January to December 1998; common accident and injury events associated with their activity; and perceived risk factors for accidents in their sector of the adventure tourism industry. The survey was responded to by 142 New Zealand adventure tourism operators. The operators' reported client injury experience suggests the incidence of serious client injuries is very low. Highest client injury incidence rates were found for activities that involved the risk of falling from a moving vehicle or animal (e.g., cycle tours, quad biking, horse riding, and white-water rafting). Slips, trips, and falls on the level were common accident events across most sectors of the industry. Perceived accident/incident causes were most commonly related to the client, and in particular, failure to attend to and follow instructions. The prevalence of client injuries in activity sectors not presently covered by government regulation, suggests policy makers should look again at extending codes of practice to a wider range of adventure tourism activities. Further research considering adventure tourism involvement in overseas visitor hospitalized injuries in New Zealand, is currently in progress. This will provide supporting evidence

  7. Laparoscopic nephrectomy: initial experience with 120 cases.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cheema, I A

    2012-02-01

    Laparoscopic nephrectomy for both benign and malignant diseases of kidney is increasingly being performed. We report our experience with the first 120 consecutive laparoscopic nephrectomy performed in our hospital. It is the retrospective analysis of a prospectively maintained database of 4 years period. The parameters examined included age, gender, indications, operative time, blood loss, intraoperative and post operative complications. Mean age of surgery was 59 years (rang 19-84years). The indications for surgery included solid renal masses (71 patients), non-functioning kidneys (43), and collecting system tumours (6). The mean operating time was 132 minutes (range 75-270), average blood loss was 209 ml (range 0-1090) and average hospital stay was 4.7days (range 2-20). Bleeding, bowel injury and poor progression of laparoscopic procedure were the reasons in 7 (5.8%) cases converted to open surgery. There was 1 (0.8%) perioperative mortality. Eight (6.6%) patients developed post operative complications. Laparoscopic nephrectomy has inherent benefits and may be considered an alternate therapeutic option for kidney diseases with acceptable morbidity

  8. Laparoscopic nephrectomy: initial experience with 120 cases.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cheema, I A

    2010-02-01

    Laparoscopic nephrectomy for both benign and malignant diseases of kidney is increasingly being performed. We report our experience with the first 120 consecutive laparoscopic nephrectomy performed in our hospital. It is the retrospective analysis of a prospectively maintained database of 4 years period. The parameters examined included age, gender, indications, operative time, blood loss, intraoperative and post operative complications. Mean age of surgery was 59 years (rang 19-84years). The indications for surgery included solid renal masses (71 patients), non-functioning kidneys (43), and collecting system tumours (6). The mean operating time was 132 minutes (range 75-270), average blood loss was 209 ml (range 0-1090) and average hospital stay was 4.7days (range 2-20). Bleeding, bowel injury and poor progression of laparoscopic procedure were the reasons in 7 (5.8%) cases converted to open surgery. There was 1 (0.8%) perioperative mortality. Eight (6.6%) patients developed post operative complications. Laparoscopic nephrectomy has inherent benefits and may be considered an alternate therapeutic option for kidney diseases with acceptable morbidity

  9. Initial performance of the CUORE-0 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artusa, D.R. [University of South Carolina, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Columbia, SC (United States); INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, L' Aquila (Italy); Avignone, F.T.; Chott, N.; Creswick, R.J.; Farach, H.A.; Rosenfeld, C.; Wilson, J. [University of South Carolina, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Columbia, SC (United States); Azzolini, O.; Keppel, G.; Palmieri, V. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Padua (Italy); Balata, M.; Bucci, C.; Canonica, L.; Casali, N.; Di Vacri, M.L.; Goett, J.; Gorla, P.; Nisi, S.; Orlandi, D.; Pattavina, L.; Pirro, S.; Zarra, C. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, L' Aquila (Italy); Banks, T.I. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, L' Aquila (Italy); University of California, Department of Physics, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Nuclear Science Division, Berkeley, CA (United States); Bari, G.; Deninno, M.M.; Moggi, N. [INFN-Sezione di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Beeman, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Materials Science Division, Berkeley, CA (United States); Bellini, F.; Cardani, L.; Cosmelli, C.; Ferroni, F.; Piperno, G. [Sapienza Universita di Roma, Dipartimento di Fisica, Rome (Italy); INFN-Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy); Bersani, A. [INFN-Sezione di Genova, Genoa (Italy); Biassoni, M.; Brofferio, C.; Capelli, S.; Carrettoni, M.; Chiesa, D.; Clemenza, M.; Faverzani, M.; Ferri, E.; Fiorini, E.; Giachero, A.; Gironi, L.; Gotti, C.; Maiano, C.; Maino, M.; Nucciotti, A.; Pavan, M.; Sala, E.; Sisti, M.; Terranova, F.; Zanotti, L. [Universita di Milano-Bicocca, Dipartimento di Fisica, Milan (Italy); INFN-Sezione di Milano Bicocca, Milan (Italy); Cai, X.Z.; Cao, X.G.; Fang, D.Q.; Li, Y.L.; Ma, Y.G.; Tian, W.D.; Wang, H.W. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics (Chinese Academy of Sciences), Shanghai (China); Carbone, L.; Cremonesi, O.; Datskov, V.; Pessina, G.; Previtali, E.; Rusconi, C. [INFN-Sezione di Milano Bicocca, Milan (Italy); Dafinei, I.; Morganti, S.; Orio, F.; Pettinacci, V.; Tomei, C.; Vignati, M. [INFN-Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy); Dally, A.; Ejzak, L.; Wielgus, L. [University of Wisconsin, Department of Physics, Madison, WI (United States); Di Domizio, S.; Fernandes, G.; Pallavicini, M. [INFN-Sezione di Genova, Genoa (Italy); Universita di Genova, Dipartimento di Fisica, Genoa (Italy); Freedman, S.J. [University of California, Department of Physics, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Nuclear Science Division, Berkeley, CA (United States); Fujikawa, B.K.; Han, K.; Mei, Y. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Nuclear Science Division, Berkeley, CA (United States); Giuliani, A.; Tenconi, M. [Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et de Spectrometrie de Masse, Orsay Campus (France); Gutierrez, T.D. [California Polytechnic State University, Physics Department, San Luis Obispo, CA (United States); Haller, E.E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Materials Science Division, Berkeley, CA (United States); University of California, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Berkeley, CA (United States); Heeger, K.M.; Lim, K.E.; Maruyama, R.H. [Yale University, Department of Physics, New Haven, CT (United States); Hennings-Yeomans, R.; Ouellet, J.L. [University of California, Department of Physics, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Nuclear Science Division, Berkeley, CA (United States); Huang, H.Z.; Liu, X.; Trentalange, S.; Winslow, L.A.; Zhu, B.X. [University of California, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Kadel, R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Physics Division, Berkeley, CA (United States); Kazkaz, K.; Pedretti, M.; Sangiorgio, S.; Scielzo, N.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Kolomensky, Yu.G. [University of California, Department of Physics, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Physics Division, Berkeley, CA (United States); Martinez, M. [Universidad de Zaragoza, Laboratorio de Fisica Nuclear y Astroparticulas, Saragossa (Spain); Nones, C. [Service de Physique des Particules, CEA/Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Norman, E.B.; Wang, B.S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); University of California, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Berkeley, CA (United States); O' Donnell, T. [University of California, Department of Physics, Berkeley, CA (United States); Smith, A.R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, EH and S Division, Berkeley, CA (United States); Taffarello, L. [INFN-Sezione di Padova, Padua (Italy); Ventura, G. [Universita di Firenze, Dipartimento di Fisica, Florence (Italy); INFN-Sezione di Firenze, Florence (Italy); Wise, T. [University of Wisconsin, Department of Physics, Madison, WI (United States); Yale University, Department of Physics, New Haven, CT (United States); Zucchelli, S. [INFN-Sezione di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Universita di Bologna, Dipartimento di Fisica, Bologna (Italy)

    2014-08-15

    CUORE-0 is a cryogenic detector that uses an array of tellurium dioxide bolometers to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay of {sup 130}Te. We present the first data analysis with 7.1kg . y of total TeO{sub 2} exposure focusing on background measurements and energy resolution. The background rates in the neutrinoless double-beta decay region of interest (2.47 to 2.57MeV) and in the α backgrounddominated region (2.70 to 3.90 MeV) have been measured to be 0.071 ± 0.011 and 0.019 ± 0.002 counts/(keV . kg . y), respectively. The latter result represents a factor of 6 improvement from a predecessor experiment, Cuoricino. The results verify our understanding of the background sources in CUORE-0, which is the basis of extrapolations to the full CUORE detector. The obtained energy resolution (full width at half maximum) in the region of interest is 5.7 keV. Based on themeasured background rate and energy resolution in the region of interest, CUORE-0 half-life sensitivity is expected to surpass the observed lower bound of Cuoricino with one year of live time. (orig.)

  10. VIM: Initial ENDF/B-VI experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomquist, R.N.

    1997-01-01

    The VIM Monte Carlo particle transport code uses detailed continuous-energy cross sections produced from ENDF/B data by a set of specialized codes developed or adapted for use at Argonne National Laboratory. ENDF/B-IV data were used until about 1979, and Version V data since then. These VIM libraries were extensively benchmarked against the MC 2 -2 code and against ZPR and ZPPR criticals for fast spectrum calculations, as well as other fast and thermal experiments and calculations. Recently, the cross section processing codes have been upgraded to accommodate ENDF/B-VI files, and a small library has been tested. Several fundamental tasks comprise the construction of a faithful representation of ENDF data for VIM calculations: (1) The resolved resonance parameters are converted to Doppler-broadened continuous-energy cross sections with energy grids suitable for linear-linear interpolation. (2) The unresolved resonance parameter distributions are sampled to produce many (40-400) resonance ladders in each energy band. These are converted to Doppler-broadened continuous energy resonance cross sections that are then binned by cross section, accumulating ladders until statistical convergence, the result being probability tables of total cross sections and conditional mean scattering and fission cross sections. VIM samples these tables at run time, and File 3 back ground cross sections are added. (3) Anisotropic angular distribution data are converted to angular probability tables. All other ENDF data are unmodified, except for format

  11. Pilot program: NRC severe reactor accident incident response training manual: Public protective actions: Predetermined criteria and initial actions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, J.A. Jr.; McKenna, T.J.; Miller, C.W.; Hively, L.M.; Sharpe, R.W.; Giitter, J.G.; Watkins, R.M.

    1987-02-01

    This pilot training manual has been written to fill the need for a general text on NRC response to reactor accidents. The manual is intended to be the foundation for a course for all NRC response personnel. Public Protective Actions - Predetermined Criteria and Initial Actions is the fourth in a series of volumes that collectively summarize the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) emergency response during severe power reactor accidents and provide necessary background information. This volume reviews public protective action criteria and objectives, their bases and implementation, and the expected public response. Each volume serves, respectively, as the text for a course of instruction in a series of courses for NRC response personnel. These materials do not provide guidance or license requirements for NRC licensees. Each volume is accompanied by an appendix of slides that can be used to present this material. The slides are called out in the text

  12. Experiments on The Retention of The Fission Product Iodine in Nuclear Reactor Accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruchertseifer, H.; Cripps, R.; Guentay, S.; Jaeckel, B.

    2004-01-01

    The paper reports PSI participation in the ICHEMM Project (Iodine Chemistry and Mitigation Mechanisms) of the EU 5th Framework Programme, which has the objective of identifying new possible mitigation processes, or accident management measures, favouring the conversion of volatile iodine species, especially organic iodine released during a severe accident at a Nuclear Power Plant (NPP), into nonvolatile forms. Significant effort has been expended, firstly to develop analytical methods for determining concentrations of the common iodine species (iodide, iodate, molecular iodine and methyl iodide), and secondly to provide missing and important information on decomposition phenomena and involved reactions. Experiments have been conducted at PSI to obtain data on thermal (hydrolysis) and radiolytic decomposition of CH 3 I in aqueous solution under conditions as close as possible to those in an anticipated accident. Radioactive-labelled methyl iodide was used to monitor and quantify the decomposition and to determine the overall mass balance. Results have shown that CH 3 I hydrolysis at 90 o C will dominate over radiolysis at the dose rates (max. 0.4 Gy.s -1 ) employed in the experiments. Much increased decomposition rates of CH 3 I have been achieved with chemical reagents (additives), such as sodium thiosulphate or ammonium sulphide. After completion of the ICHEMM Project, further advances have been made from experiments carried out on additives (especially in combination with Aliquat 336) in terms of a fast and complete retention of iodine. The data from these experiments are of direct relevance to severe accident management for both PWR and BWR systems. The impact of the results on possible strategies for management of radioactive waste has also been investigated. (author)

  13. Experiments on The Retention of The Fission Product Iodine in Nuclear Reactor Accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruchertseifer, H.; Cripps, R.; Guentay, S.; Jaeckel, B

    2004-03-01

    The paper reports PSI participation in the ICHEMM Project (Iodine Chemistry and Mitigation Mechanisms) of the EU 5th Framework Programme, which has the objective of identifying new possible mitigation processes, or accident management measures, favouring the conversion of volatile iodine species, especially organic iodine released during a severe accident at a Nuclear Power Plant (NPP), into nonvolatile forms. Significant effort has been expended, firstly to develop analytical methods for determining concentrations of the common iodine species (iodide, iodate, molecular iodine and methyl iodide), and secondly to provide missing and important information on decomposition phenomena and involved reactions. Experiments have been conducted at PSI to obtain data on thermal (hydrolysis) and radiolytic decomposition of CH{sub 3}I in aqueous solution under conditions as close as possible to those in an anticipated accident. Radioactive-labelled methyl iodide was used to monitor and quantify the decomposition and to determine the overall mass balance. Results have shown that CH{sub 3}I hydrolysis at 90{sup o}C will dominate over radiolysis at the dose rates (max. 0.4 Gy.s{sup -1}) employed in the experiments. Much increased decomposition rates of CH{sub 3}I have been achieved with chemical reagents (additives), such as sodium thiosulphate or ammonium sulphide. After completion of the ICHEMM Project, further advances have been made from experiments carried out on additives (especially in combination with Aliquat 336) in terms of a fast and complete retention of iodine. The data from these experiments are of direct relevance to severe accident management for both PWR and BWR systems. The impact of the results on possible strategies for management of radioactive waste has also been investigated. (author)

  14. Experience with neutron flux monitoring systems qualified for post-accident monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shugars, H.G.; Miller, J.F.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the environmental requirements for excore neutron flux monitors that are qualified for use during and after postulated accidents in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). We emphasize PWRs designed in the United States, which are similar to those used also in parts of Western Europe and Eastern Asia. We then discuss design features of the flux monitoring systems necessary to address the environmental, functional, and regulatory requirements, and the experience with these systems. (author). 9 refs, 2 figs

  15. Preliminary experiment design of graphite dust emission measurement under accident conditions for HTGR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Wei, E-mail: pengwei@tsinghua.edu.cn [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University, Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology Cooperation Innovation Center, The Key Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Engineering and Safety, Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China); Chen, Tao; Sun, Qi; Wang, Jie [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University, Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology Cooperation Innovation Center, The Key Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Engineering and Safety, Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China); Yu, Suyuan, E-mail: suyuan@tsinghua.edu.cn [Center for Combustion Energy, The Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering, Ministry of Education, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • A theoretical analysis is used to predict the total graphite dust release for an AVR LOCA. • Similarity criteria must be satisfied between the experiment and the actual HTGR system. • Model experiments should be conducted to predict the graphite dust resuspension rate. - Abstract: The graphite dust movement behavior is significant for the safety analyses of high-temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR). The graphite dust release for accident conditions is an important source term for HTGR safety analyses. Depressurization release tests are not practical in HTGR because of a radioactivity release to the environment. Thus, a theoretical analysis and similarity principles were used to design a group of modeling experiments. Modeling experiments for fan start-up and depressurization process and actual experiments of helium circulator start-up in an HTGR were used to predict the rate of graphite dust resuspension and the graphite dust concentration, which can be used to predict the graphite dust release during accidents. The modeling experiments are easy to realize and the helium circulator start-up test does not harm the reactor system or the environment, so this experiment program is easily achieved. The revised Rock’n’Roll model was then used to calculate the AVR reactor release. The calculation results indicate that the total graphite dust releases during a LOCA will be about 0.65 g in AVR.

  16. Identification and initial assessment of candidate BWR late-phase in-vessel accident management strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodge, S.A.

    1991-01-01

    Work sponsored by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) to identify and perform preliminary assessments of candidate BWR [boiling water reactor] in-vessel accident management strategies was completed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during fiscal year 1990. Mitigative strategies for containment events have been the subject of a companion study at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The focus of this Oak Ridge effort was the development of new strategies for mitigation of the late phase events, that is, the events that would occur in-vessel after the onset of significant core damage. The work began with an investigation of the current status of BWR in-vessel accident management procedures and proceeded through a preliminary evaluation of several candidate new strategies. The steps leading to the identification of the candidate strategies are described. The four new candidate late-phase (in-vessel) accident mitigation strategies identified by this study and discussed in the report are: (1) keep the reactor vessel depressurized; (2) restore injection in a controlled manner; (3) inject boron if control blade damage has occurred; and (4) containment flooding to maintain core and structural debris in-vessel. Additional assessments of these strategies are proposed

  17. A Study on Measures of Safety and Health against Accidents in Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hikiji, Rikio; Matsuda, Tadahiro

    The purpose of this report is to exclude risk factors based on the instance of Hiyari Hatto (near-miss accidents) experienced by school personnel and students and to make the environment in which students can participate safely in the class and extracurricular activities. By means of the risk assessment and KYT (training for predicting dangers, K : Kiken, Y : Yochi, T : Training) , it has been considered how the college should control the students‧ experiments. As a result, the students have been able to work on the experiments without affecting the school facilities and the students‧ working site, and the number of injuries has decreased.

  18. Initially curved microplates under electrostatic actuation: theory and experiment

    KAUST Repository

    Saghir, Shahid; Bellaredj, Mohammed Lamine Faycal; Ramini, Abdallah; Younis, Mohammad I.

    2016-01-01

    Microplates are the building blocks of many micro-electro-mechanical systems. It is common for them to experience initial curvature imperfection due to residual stresses caused by the micro fabrication process. Such plates are essentially different

  19. Hawadith Street Initiative: A unique Sudanese childhood charity experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Awad Mohamed; A-Rahman, Nada Hassan Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Due to escalating conflicts and resultant economic constraints, different social services in low income and low-middle income countries have witnessed a decline in its standards, and increase in the costs. This situation has led to emergence of large numbers of patients and their families who cannot afford the costs of health services provided by public hospitals. On this background, and the old heritage of the Sudanese to help the needy, the Hawadith Street Initiative (HSI) was established. Named after the street on which it was founded - which translates indirectly to "Accidents Lane", HSI was established in 2012 by a group of youths, most of them in their twenties of age, and recently graduated. The main activity of the initiative is helping the needy hospital patients, especially with regards to their treatment costs, in Khartoum and other cities in Sudan. Starting with recreational programs for cancer patients, and public campaigns for donation of blood, the initiative's youths changed their activities. Using the social media, Facebook, they adopted the strategy of communication with potential donors, after sending posts containing brief anonymous presentations and call of help for needy cases. Currently HSI includes more than 2000 volunteers in Khartoum and 17 other cities. The most important achievement of HSI is the establishment of an intensive care unit at a children hospital in Omdurman city costing 435,880 US dollars. HSI demonstrates the possibility of delivering great services with minimum resources, and constitutes a unique organization, worldwide, in a new wave of Internet-based initiatives.

  20. 2010 Criticality Accident Alarm System Benchmark Experiments At The CEA Valduc SILENE Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Thomas Martin; Dunn, Michael E.; Wagner, John C.; McMahan, Kimberly L.; Authier, Nicolas; Jacquet, Xavier; Rousseau, Guillaume; Wolff, Herve; Piot, Jerome; Savanier, Laurence; Baclet, Nathalie; Lee, Yi-kang; Masse, Veronique; Trama, Jean-Christophe; Gagnier, Emmanuel; Naury, Sylvie; Lenain, Richard; Hunter, Richard; Kim, Soon; Dulik, George Michael; Reynolds, Kevin H.

    2011-01-01

    Several experiments were performed at the CEA Valduc SILENE reactor facility, which are intended to be published as evaluated benchmark experiments in the ICSBEP Handbook. These evaluated benchmarks will be useful for the verification and validation of radiation transport codes and evaluated nuclear data, particularly those that are used in the analysis of CAASs. During these experiments SILENE was operated in pulsed mode in order to be representative of a criticality accident, which is rare among shielding benchmarks. Measurements of the neutron flux were made with neutron activation foils and measurements of photon doses were made with TLDs. Also unique to these experiments was the presence of several detectors used in actual CAASs, which allowed for the observation of their behavior during an actual critical pulse. This paper presents the preliminary measurement data currently available from these experiments. Also presented are comparisons of preliminary computational results with Scale and TRIPOLI-4 to the preliminary measurement data.

  1. Proceedings of the International Workshop on Occupational Radiation Protection in Severe Accident Management 'sharing practices and experiences'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-06-01

    The objective of the Workshop on Occupational Radiation Protection in Severe Accident Management was to share practices and experiences in approaches to severe accident management. The workshop: provided an international forum for information and experience exchange amongst nuclear electricity utilities and national regulatory authorities on approaches to, and issues in severe accident management, including national and international implications. Focus was placed on sharing practices and experiences in many countries on approaches to severe accident management; identified best occupational radiation protection approaches in strategies, practices, as well as limitations for developing effective management. This included experiences in various countries; identified national experiences to be incorporated into the final version of ISOE EG-SAM report. The workshop included a series of plenary presentations that provided participants with an overview of practices and experiences in severe accident management from various countries. Furthermore, by taking into account the structure of the interim report, common themes and issues were discussed in follow-up breakout sessions. Sessions included invited speakers, moderated by designated experts, allowing participants to discuss their national experiences and possible inputs into the report. The outcomes of the breakout sessions were presented in plenary by the respective moderators followed by an open discussion, with a view towards elaborating ways forward to achieve more effective severe accident management. This document brings together the abstracts and the slides of the available presentations

  2. Optimization of the Severe Accident Management Strategy for Domestic Plants and Validation Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S. B.; Kim, H. D.; Koo, K. M.; Park, R. J.; Hong, S. H.; Cho, Y. R.; Kim, J. T.; Ha, K. S.; Kang, K. H.

    2007-04-01

    nuclear power plants, a technical basis report and computational aid tools were developed in parallel with the experimental and analytical works for the resolution of the uncertain safety issues. ELIAS experiments were carried out to quantify the boiling heat removal rate at the upper surface of a metallic layer for precise evaluations on the effect of a late in-vessel coolant injection. T-HERMES experiments were performed to examine the two-phase natural circulation phenomena through the gap between the reactor vessel and the insulator in the APR1400. Detailed analyses on the hydrogen control in the APR1400 containment were performed focused on the effect of spray system actuation on the hydrogen burning and the evaluation of the hydrogen behavior in the IRWST. To develop the technical basis report for the severe accident management, analyses using SCDAP/RELAP5 code were performed for the accident sequences of the OPR1000. Based on the experimental and analytical results performed in this study, the computational aids for the evaluations of hydrogen flammability in the containment, criteria of the in-vessel corium cooling, criteria of the external reactor vessel cooling were developed. An ASSA code was developed to validate the signal from the instrumentations during the severe accidents and to process the abnormal signal. Since ASSA can perform the signal processing from the direct input of the nuclear power plant during the severe accident, it can be platform of the computational aids. In this study, the ASSA was linked with the computaional aids for the hydrogen flammability

  3. Optimization of the Severe Accident Management Strategy for Domestic Plants and Validation Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S. B.; Kim, H. D.; Koo, K. M.; Park, R. J.; Hong, S. H.; Cho, Y. R.; Kim, J. T.; Ha, K. S.; Kang, K. H

    2007-04-15

    nuclear power plants, a technical basis report and computational aid tools were developed in parallel with the experimental and analytical works for the resolution of the uncertain safety issues. ELIAS experiments were carried out to quantify the boiling heat removal rate at the upper surface of a metallic layer for precise evaluations on the effect of a late in-vessel coolant injection. T-HERMES experiments were performed to examine the two-phase natural circulation phenomena through the gap between the reactor vessel and the insulator in the APR1400. Detailed analyses on the hydrogen control in the APR1400 containment were performed focused on the effect of spray system actuation on the hydrogen burning and the evaluation of the hydrogen behavior in the IRWST. To develop the technical basis report for the severe accident management, analyses using SCDAP/RELAP5 code were performed for the accident sequences of the OPR1000. Based on the experimental and analytical results performed in this study, the computational aids for the evaluations of hydrogen flammability in the containment, criteria of the in-vessel corium cooling, criteria of the external reactor vessel cooling were developed. An ASSA code was developed to validate the signal from the instrumentations during the severe accidents and to process the abnormal signal. Since ASSA can perform the signal processing from the direct input of the nuclear power plant during the severe accident, it can be platform of the computational aids. In this study, the ASSA was linked with the computaional aids for the hydrogen flammability.

  4. Study on the behavior of waterside corroded PWR fuel rods under reactivity initiated accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasajima, Hideo

    1989-06-01

    One of the highlighted problems from the fuel reliability point of view is a waterside corrosion of fuel cladding which becomes more significant at extended burnup stages. To date, at highly burned fuel, waterside corrosion was recognized as important because cladding oxidation increased with increasing burn-up. In experiments, as the basic research for the study of high burn-up fuel, the test fuel rods were prepressurized to ranges from 3.47 to 3.55 MPa, oxidized artificially to both 10 and 20 μm in thickness. Regarding fabricated oxide thickness of 10 μm, it is corresponded to be transition point from cubic law to linear law as a function of burn-up. Pulse irradiation experiments by NSRR were carried out to study the behavior of waterside corroded PWR type fuels under RIA conditions. Obtained results are: (1) The failure threshold of tested fuels was 110 cal/g·fuel (0.46 KJ/g·fuel) in enthalpy. This showed that the failure threshold of tested fuels was same as that of the past NSRR experimental data. (2) The failure mechanisms of the tested fuel rods was cladding rupture induced by ballooning. No differences in failure mechanisms existed between the past NSRR prepressurized standard fuel and the tested fuels. (3) Cracks were existed without propagating into cladding matrix, so that it was judged that these were not initiation of failure. (4) Whithin this experimental condition, reduction of cladding thickness being attributed to the increase of oxidation did not failure threshold. (author)

  5. The French-German initiative for Chernobyl: programme 3: Health consequences of the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tirmarche, M.; Kellerer, A.M.; Bazyka, D.

    2006-01-01

    - Goals: The main objectives of the health programme are collection and validation of existing data on cancer and non cancer diseases in the most highly contaminated regions of Ukraine, Russia and Belarus, common scientific expertise on main health indicators and reliable dosimetry, and finally communication of the results to the scientific community and to the public. - General Tasks: 1- Comparison between high and low exposed regions, 2- Description of trends over time, 3- Consideration of specific age groups. This methodological approach is applied on Solid cancer incidence and leukaemia incidence in different regions in Ukraine, Belarus and Russia, With a special focus on thyroid cancer in young exposed ages. - Thyroid cancer: Those exposed in very young ages continue to express a relatively high excess of thyroid cancer even though they have now reached the age group 15-29. Those exposed as young adults show a small increase, at least partly due to better screening conditions - Leukemia: Description of leukemia trends for various age groups show no clear difference between exposed and unexposed regions when focusing on those exposed at very young ages. The rates of childhood leukemia before and after the accident show no evidence of any increase (oblasts in Belarus over 1982-1998). - Specific studies: Incidence of congenital malformations in Belarus; Infant mortality and morbidity in the most highly contaminated regions; Potential effects of prenatal irradiation on the brain as a result of the Chernobyl accident; Nutritional status of population living in regions with different levels of contamination; Dosimetry of Chernobyl clean-up workers; Radiological passports in contaminated settlements. - Congenital malformations: As a national register was existing since the 1980's and gives the possibility to compare trends before and after the accident, results of congenital malformations describe large results collected over Belarus, There is no evidence of a

  6. PWR-related integral safety experiments in the PKL 111 test facility SBLOCA under beyond-design-basis accident conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, P.; Umminger, K.J.; Schoen, B. [Siemens AG Power Generation Group (KWU), Erlangen (France)

    1995-09-01

    The thermal hydraulic behavior of a PWR during beyond-design-basis accident scenarios is of vital interest for the verification and optimization of accident management procedures. Within the scope of the German reactor safety research program experiments were performed in the volumetrically scaled PKL 111 test facility by Siemens/KWU. This highly instrumented test rig simulates a KWU-design PWR (1300 MWe). In particular, the latest tests performed related to a SBLOCA with additional system failures, e.g. nitrogen entering the primary system. In the case of a SBLOCA, it is the goal of the operator to put the plant in a condition where the decay heat can be removed first using the low pressure emergency core cooling system and then the residual heat removal system. The experimental investigation presented assumed the following beyond-design-basis accident conditions: 0.5% break in a cold leg, 2 of 4 steam generators (SGs) isolated on the secondary side (feedwater- and steam line-valves closed), filled with steam on the primary side, cooldown of the primary system using the remaining two steam generators, high pressure injection system only in the two loops with intact steam generators, if possible no operator actions to reach the conditions for residual heat removal system activation. Furthermore, it was postulated that 2 of the 4 hot leg accumulators had a reduced initial water inventory (increased nitrogen inventory), allowing nitrogen to enter the primary system at a pressure of 15 bar and nearly preventing the heat transfer in the SGs ({open_quotes}passivating{close_quotes} U-tubes). Due to this the heat transfer regime in the intact steam generators changed remarkably. The primary system showed self-regulating system effects and heat transfer improved again (reflux-condenser mode in the U-tube inlet region).

  7. Initial Results from Coaxial Helicity Injection Experiments in NSTX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raman, R.; Jarboe, T.R.; Mueller, D.; Schaffer, M.J.; Maqueda, R.; Nelson, B.A.; Sabbagh, S.; Bell, M.; Ewig, R.; Fredrickson, E.; Gates, D.; Hosea, J.; Ji, H.; Kaita, R.; Kaye, S.M.; Kugel, H.; Maingi, R.; Menard, J.; Ono, M.; Orvis, D.; Paolette, F.; Paul, S.; Peng, M.; Skinner, C.H.; Wilgen, W.; Zweben, S.

    2001-01-01

    Coaxial Helicity Injection (CHI) has been investigated on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). Initial experiments produced 130 kA of toroidal current without the use of the central solenoid. The corresponding injector current was 20 kA. Discharges with pulse lengths up to 130 ms have been produced

  8. Operational accidents and radiation exposure experience within the United States Atomic Energy Commission, 1943--1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The occupational injury and fatality experience during 32 years of the development of the atomic energy industry under the direction of the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and its predecessor, the Manhattan Engineering District, is reviewed. Data are included on the cause of all accidents, including fires and transportation accidents, and the cost of AEC property damage. Fatalities of AEC and contractor personnel from all causes during the 32-year period totaled 321, of which 184 occurred in construction; 121 in AEC operations such as production, research, and services; and 16 in Government functions. There were 19,225 lost-time injuries attributable to all accidental causes, or a 32-year frequency rate of 2.75 based on the number of injuries per million man-hours. There were six deaths attributable to nuclear causes, thee of which were due to blast and flying missiles and three caused by whole-body radiation exposure. Forty-one workers were involved in lost-time radiation accidents, of whom 26 showed clinical manifestations attributable to radiation, resulting in permanent partial-disability of three workers and the loss of a digit by four workers, while the others did not develop evidence of radiation injury

  9. ACTIVITY OF HEALTH EDUCATION AIMED AT PREVENTING WORK ACCIDENTS WITH NEEDLESTICK MATERIALS: EXPERIENCE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prince Vangeris Silva Fernandes de Lima

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Health services are composed of complex work environments. For this reason, they present several risks to the health of workers and also of people being treated at these places. Among these risks, one that is peculiar to health services is the risk of occupational accidents with biological material involving sharps. Objective: This study aimed to describe a health education activity conducted in a Health Center of the Federal District, Brazil. Methods: This is an experience report that discusses the final paper of the discipline “Administration Applied to Nursing and Internship”, offered by the Department of Nursing, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Brasilia. A lecture was prepared, aimed at health workers and support staff, on general aspects of occupational accidents involving sharps, as well as preventive aspects. Results: In each clinical room of the Health Center were fixed two posters: the first discussing the proper disposal of sharps and the second, in turn, was a message of reflection. 31 professionals attended the lecture as listeners. Conclusion: We understand the validity of the lecture delivered, based on scientific studies that highlight the need and shortage of health education activities that address the prevention of occupational accidents involving sharps among Health Professionals. Additionally, it is important mentioning that such activity demand was estimated by the workers of the Health Center in study.

  10. The role of grain boundary fission gases in high burn-up fuel under reactivity initiated accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemoine, F.; Papin, J.; Frizonnet, J.M.; Cazalis, B.; Rigat, H.

    2002-01-01

    In the frame of reactivity-initiated accidents (RIA) studies, the CABRI REP-Na programme is currently performed, focused on high burn-up UO 2 and MOX fuel behaviour. From 1993 to 1998, seven tests were performed with UO 2 fuel and three with MOX fuel. In all these tests, particular attention has been devoted to the role of fission gases in transient fuel behaviour and in clad loading mechanisms. From the analysis of experimental results, some basic phenomena were identified and a better understanding of the transient fission gas behaviour was obtained in relation to the fuel and clad thermo-mechanical evolution in RIA, but also to the initial state of the fuel before the transient. A high burn-up effect linked to the increasing part of grain boundary gases is clearly evidenced in the final gas release, which would also significantly contribute to the clad loading mechanisms. (authors)

  11. The design of PSB-VVER experiments relevant to accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Nevo, Alessandro; D'auria, Francesco; Mazzini, Marino; Bykov, Michael; Elkin, Ilya V.; Suslov, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    Experimental programs carried-out in integral test facilities are relevant for validating the best estimate thermal-hydraulic codes, which are used for accident analyses, design of accident management procedures, licensing of nuclear power plants, etc. The validation process, in fact, is based on well designed experiments. It consists in the comparison of the measured and calculated parameters and the determination whether a computer code has an adequate capability in predicting the major phenomena expected to occur in the course of transient and/or accidents. University of Pisa was responsible of the numerical design of the 12 experiments executed in PSB-VVER facility, operated at Electrogorsk Research and Engineering Center (Russia), in the framework of the TACIS 2.03/97 Contract 3.03.03 Part A, EC financed. The paper describes the methodology adopted at University of Pisa, starting form the scenarios foreseen in the final test matrix until the execution of the experiments. This process considers three key topics: a) the scaling issue and the simulation, with unavoidable distortions, of the expected performance of the reference nuclear power plants; b) the code assessment process involving the identification of phenomena challenging the code models; c) the features of the concerned integral test facility (scaling limitations, control logics, data acquisition system, instrumentation, etc.). The activities performed in this respect are discussed, and emphasis is also given to the relevance of the thermal losses to the environment. This issue affects particularly the small scaled facilities and has relevance on the scaling approach related to the power and volume of the facility. (author)

  12. The Design of PSB-VVER Experiments Relevant to Accident Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevo, Alessandro Del; D'Auria, Francesco; Mazzini, Marino; Bykov, Michael; Elkin, Ilya V.; Suslov, Alexander

    Experimental programs carried-out in integral test facilities are relevant for validating the best estimate thermal-hydraulic codes(1), which are used for accident analyses, design of accident management procedures, licensing of nuclear power plants, etc. The validation process, in fact, is based on well designed experiments. It consists in the comparison of the measured and calculated parameters and the determination whether a computer code has an adequate capability in predicting the major phenomena expected to occur in the course of transient and/or accidents. University of Pisa was responsible of the numerical design of the 12 experiments executed in PSB-VVER facility (2), operated at Electrogorsk Research and Engineering Center (Russia), in the framework of the TACIS 2.03/97 Contract 3.03.03 Part A, EC financed (3). The paper describes the methodology adopted at University of Pisa, starting form the scenarios foreseen in the final test matrix until the execution of the experiments. This process considers three key topics: a) the scaling issue and the simulation, with unavoidable distortions, of the expected performance of the reference nuclear power plants; b) the code assessment process involving the identification of phenomena challenging the code models; c) the features of the concerned integral test facility (scaling limitations, control logics, data acquisition system, instrumentation, etc.). The activities performed in this respect are discussed, and emphasis is also given to the relevance of the thermal losses to the environment. This issue affects particularly the small scaled facilities and has relevance on the scaling approach related to the power and volume of the facility.

  13. HTGR accident initiation and progression analysis status report. Volume 1. Introduction and summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raabe, P.H.; Houghton, W.J.; Joksimovic, V.

    1976-01-01

    Probabilistic risk assessment techniques have been applied to obtain guidance in choosing nuclear safety research and development that is most worthwhile for high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) nuclear power plants. The probabilistic techniques used are similar to those employed in the Reactor Safety Study for light water reactors (LWRs), WASH-1400, directed by Dr. N. C. Rasmussen. The recommendations for research include studies related to core heatup even though this event poses a very low risk to the public. In fact, it was found that under the many conditions covered by the study to date, even very infrequent accidents in HTGRs (say, once in ten million years) will not produce fatalities. Potential cost reduction areas have been found where alternate design options protect the public and meet regulatory safety criteria

  14. The French-German initiative for Chernobyl: programme 3: Health consequences of the Chernobyl accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tirmarche, M. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), Radiological Protection and Human Health Div. (DRPH), Radiobiology and Epidemiology Dept., 92 - Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Kellerer, A.M. [Munchen Univ., Strahlenbiologisches Institut (Germany); Bazyka, D. [Chornobyl Center (CC), Kiev regoin (Ukraine)

    2006-07-01

    - Goals: The main objectives of the health programme are collection and validation of existing data on cancer and non cancer diseases in the most highly contaminated regions of Ukraine, Russia and Belarus, common scientific expertise on main health indicators and reliable dosimetry, and finally communication of the results to the scientific community and to the public. - General Tasks: 1- Comparison between high and low exposed regions, 2- Description of trends over time, 3- Consideration of specific age groups. This methodological approach is applied on Solid cancer incidence and leukaemia incidence in different regions in Ukraine, Belarus and Russia, With a special focus on thyroid cancer in young exposed ages. - Thyroid cancer: Those exposed in very young ages continue to express a relatively high excess of thyroid cancer even though they have now reached the age group 15-29. Those exposed as young adults show a small increase, at least partly due to better screening conditions - Leukemia: Description of leukemia trends for various age groups show no clear difference between exposed and unexposed regions when focusing on those exposed at very young ages. The rates of childhood leukemia before and after the accident show no evidence of any increase (oblasts in Belarus over 1982-1998). - Specific studies: Incidence of congenital malformations in Belarus; Infant mortality and morbidity in the most highly contaminated regions; Potential effects of prenatal irradiation on the brain as a result of the Chernobyl accident; Nutritional status of population living in regions with different levels of contamination; Dosimetry of Chernobyl clean-up workers; Radiological passports in contaminated settlements. - Congenital malformations: As a national register was existing since the 1980's and gives the possibility to compare trends before and after the accident, results of congenital malformations describe large results collected over Belarus, There is no evidence of a

  15. Experience and lessons learned from emergency disposal of Fukushima nuclear power station accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Xiegu; Zhen Bei; Yang Xiaoming; Chen Xiaohua

    2012-01-01

    After Fukushima nuclear accident, we visited the related medical aid agencies for nuclear accidents and conducted investigations in disaster-affected areas in Japan. This article summarizes the problems with emergency disposal of Fukushima nuclear accident while disclosing problems should be solved during the emergency force construction for nuclear accidents. (authors)

  16. ORNL experiments to characterize fuel release from the reactor primary containment in severe LMFBR accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, A.L.; Kress, T.S.; Smith, A.M.

    1980-01-01

    This paper presents results from aerosol source term experiments performed in the ORNL Aerosol Release and Transport (ART) Program sponsored by the US NRC. The tests described were performed to provide information on fuel release from an LMFBR primary containment as a result of a hypothetical core-disruptive accident (HCDA). The release path investigated in these tests assumes that a fuel/sodium bubble is formed after disassembly that transports fuel and fission products through the sodium coolant and cover gas to be relased into the reactor secondary containment. Due to the excellent heat transfer characteristics of the sodium, there is potential for large attenuation of the maximum release

  17. Analysis of metal fuel transient overpower experiments with the SAS4A accident analysis code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tentner, A.M.; Kalimullah; Miles, K.J.

    1990-01-01

    The results of the SAS4A analysis of the M7 TREAT Metal fuel experiment are presented. New models incorporated in the metal fuel version of SAS4A are described. The computational results are compared with the experimental observations and this comparison is used in the interpretation of physical phenomena. This analysis was performed using the integrated metal fuel SAS4A version and covers a wide range of events, providing an increased degree of confidence in the SAS4A metal fuel accident analysis capabilities

  18. Nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    On 27 May 1986 the Norwegian government appointed an inter-ministerial committee of senior officials to prepare a report on experiences in connection with the Chernobyl accident. The present second part of the committee's report describes proposals for measures to prevent and deal with similar accidents in the future. The committee's evaluations and proposals are grouped into four main sections: Safety and risk at nuclear power plants; the Norwegian contingency organization for dealing with nuclear accidents; compensation issues; and international cooperation

  19. LWR severe accident simulation: Iodine behaviour in FPT2 experiment and advances on containment iodine chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girault, N., E-mail: nathalie.girault@irsn.fr [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), BP3 - 13115 St.-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Bosland, L. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), BP3 - 13115 St.-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Dickinson, S. [National Nuclear Laboratory, Harwell, Oxon OX11 0QT (United Kingdom); Funke, F. [AREVA NP Gmbh, PO Box 1109, 91001 Erlangen (Germany); Guentay, S. [Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Herranz, L.E. [Centro des Investigaciones Energeticas, MedioAmbiantales y Tecnologicas, av. Complutense 2, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Powers, D. [Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, PO Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States)

    2012-02-15

    the iodine behaviour in the FPT2 containment vessel based on dedicated small-scale analytical experiments and computer codes calculations. Other investigations dealing with primary circuit and sump chemistry are also reported. These could help to scale the results of Phebus-FP tests to reactor accidents. Modelling studies were generally successful when a gaseous iodine injection from the primary circuit was assumed. Indeed, though each of the iodine codes has specific iodine chemistry features that should be further developed and each approach to the modelling is distinct, the overall iodine behaviour in the FPT2 containment is generally well reproduced by the models that predict: Bullet a low final gaseous iodine concentration in the containment atmosphere, Bullet a predominant iodine concentration in the sump and to a lesser extent a significant iodine deposition on containment surfaces. The main code-to-code differences, in the results obtained in gaseous iodine speciation, come from the various treatments of gaseous radiolytic reactions. Calculations that include the radiolytic conversion of volatile iodine into iodine oxide particulate show there is a persistence of both gaseous iodine and iodine oxide particles in the atmosphere. There are also some variations between the predicted organic iodine concentrations that depend mainly on the initial assumptions. A key aspect of the Phebus FPT2 test interpretation is that the long term iodine behaviour in the containment can be explained by exchanges between organic iodide released from painted surfaces and inorganic iodine released from deposited aerosol on the containment walls. Further studies of regulatory significance on sump chemistry showed that the gaseous iodine control that was evident in the Phebus tests through silver release and/or alkaline buffered sump solutions may not be assured. As most of the past iodine aqueous chemistry studies were done with rather pure systems and because of the uncompleted

  20. Advanced computational methods for the assessment of reactor core behaviour during reactivity initiated accidents. Final report; Fortschrittliche Rechenmethoden zum Kernverhalten bei Reaktivitaetsstoerfaellen. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pautz, A.; Perin, Y.; Pasichnyk, I.; Velkov, K.; Zwermann, W.; Seubert, A.; Klein, M.; Gallner, L.; Krzycacz-Hausmann, B.

    2012-05-15

    The document at hand serves as the final report for the reactor safety research project RS1183 ''Advanced Computational Methods for the Assessment of Reactor Core Behavior During Reactivity-Initiated Accidents''. The work performed in the framework of this project was dedicated to the development, validation and application of advanced computational methods for the simulation of transients and accidents of nuclear installations. These simulation tools describe in particular the behavior of the reactor core (with respect to neutronics, thermal-hydraulics and thermal mechanics) at a very high level of detail. The overall goal of this project was the deployment of a modern nuclear computational chain which provides, besides advanced 3D tools for coupled neutronics/ thermal-hydraulics full core calculations, also appropriate tools for the generation of multi-group cross sections and Monte Carlo models for the verification of the individual calculational steps. This computational chain shall primarily be deployed for light water reactors (LWR), but should beyond that also be applicable for innovative reactor concepts. Thus, validation on computational benchmarks and critical experiments was of paramount importance. Finally, appropriate methods for uncertainty and sensitivity analysis were to be integrated into the computational framework, in order to assess and quantify the uncertainties due to insufficient knowledge of data, as well as due to methodological aspects.

  1. Review of off-site emergency preparedness and response plan of Indian NPPs based on experience of Fukushima nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Hukum; Dash, M.; Shukla, Vikas; Vijayan, P.; Krishnamurthy, P.R.

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear power plants in India are designed, constructed and operated based on the principle of the highest priority to nuclear safety. To deal with any unlikely situation of radiological emergency, the emergency preparedness and response plans are ensured to be in place at all NPPs prior to their commissioning. These plans are periodically reviewed and tested by conducting emergency exercise with the participation of various agencies such as Nuclear Power Corporation of India Limited, NDMA, district authorities, regulatory body and general public. On March 11, 2011 an earthquake of magnitude 9.0 hit the Fukushima Dai-ichi and Dai-ni followed by tsunami waves of height 15 meters above reference sea level. This resulted in large scale release of radioactive material from Fukushima Dai-ichi NPS. This led to the evacuation of a large number of people from the areas surrounding the affected nuclear power plants. The event was rated as level 7 event in International Nuclear Event Scale (INES). The event also revealed the challenges in handling radiological emergency situation in adverse environmental conditions, The experience of managing radiological emergency situation during Fukushima nuclear accident provides opportunities to review and improve emergency preparedness and response programme. The present paper presents the chronology of the emergency situation, challenges faced and handled in Fukushima. Even though the possibility of a Fukushima type nuclear accident in India is very remote due to the low probability of a high intensity earthquake followed by tsunami at NPP sites, the efforts needs to be initiated from the regulatory point of view for an effective Nuclear and Radiological Emergency Preparedness and Response Plans. The Emergency Preparedness and Response Plans of NPP sites were reviewed in the light of unique challenges of accident at Fukushima. It is realized that multi unit events are the realities that must be addressed as part of Emergency

  2. Review of off-site emergency preparedness and response plan of Indian NPPs based on experience of Fukushima nuclear accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Hukum; Dash, M.; Shukla, Vikas; Vijayan, P.; Krishnamurthy, P.R., E-mail: vshukla@aerb.gov.in [Operating Plants Safety Division, Atomic Energy Regulatory Board, Mumbai (India)

    2012-07-01

    Nuclear power plants in India are designed, constructed and operated based on the principle of the highest priority to nuclear safety. To deal with any unlikely situation of radiological emergency, the emergency preparedness and response plans are ensured to be in place at all NPPs prior to their commissioning. These plans are periodically reviewed and tested by conducting emergency exercise with the participation of various agencies such as Nuclear Power Corporation of India Limited, NDMA, district authorities, regulatory body and general public. On March 11, 2011 an earthquake of magnitude 9.0 hit the Fukushima Dai-ichi and Dai-ni followed by tsunami waves of height 15 meters above reference sea level. This resulted in large scale release of radioactive material from Fukushima Dai-ichi NPS. This led to the evacuation of a large number of people from the areas surrounding the affected nuclear power plants. The event was rated as level 7 event in International Nuclear Event Scale (INES). The event also revealed the challenges in handling radiological emergency situation in adverse environmental conditions, The experience of managing radiological emergency situation during Fukushima nuclear accident provides opportunities to review and improve emergency preparedness and response programme. The present paper presents the chronology of the emergency situation, challenges faced and handled in Fukushima. Even though the possibility of a Fukushima type nuclear accident in India is very remote due to the low probability of a high intensity earthquake followed by tsunami at NPP sites, the efforts needs to be initiated from the regulatory point of view for an effective Nuclear and Radiological Emergency Preparedness and Response Plans. The Emergency Preparedness and Response Plans of NPP sites were reviewed in the light of unique challenges of accident at Fukushima. It is realized that multi unit events are the realities that must be addressed as part of Emergency

  3. Experimental investigation of void distribution in Suppression Pool during the initial blowdown period of a Loss of Coolant Accident using air–water two-phase mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rassame, Somboon; Griffiths, Matthew; Yang, Jun; Lee, Doo Yong; Ju, Peng; Choi, Sung Won; Hibiki, Takashi; Ishii, Mamoru

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Basic understanding of the venting phenomena in the SP during a LOCA was obtained. • A series of experiment is carried out using the PUMA-E test facility. • Two phases of experiments, namely, an initial and a quasi-steady phase were observed. • The maximum void penetration depth was experienced during the initial phase. - Abstract: During the initial blowdown period of a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA), the non-condensable gas initially contained in the BWR containment is discharged to the pressure suppression chamber through the blowdown pipes. The performance of Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS) can be degraded due to the released gas ingestion into the suction intakes of the ECCS pumps. The understanding of the relevant phenomena in the pressure suppression chamber is important in analyzing potential gas intrusion into the suction intakes of ECCS pumps. To obtain the basic understanding of the relevant phenomena and the generic data of void distribution in the pressure suppression chamber during the initial blowdown period of a LOCA, tests with various blowdown conditions were conducted using the existing Suppression Pool (SP) tank of the integral test facility, called Purdue University Multi-Dimensional Integral Test Assembly for ESBWR applications (PUMA-E) facility, a scaled downcomer pipe installed in the PUMA-E SP, and air discharge pipe system. Two different diameter sizes of air injection pipe (0.076 and 0.102 m), a range of air volumetric flux (7.9–24.7 m/s), initial void conditions in an air injection pipe (fully void, partially void, and fully filled with water) and different air velocity ramp rates (1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 s) are used to investigate the impact of the blowdown conditions to the void distribution in the SP. Two distinct phases of experiments, namely, an initial and a quasi-steady phase were observed. The maximum void penetration depth was experienced during the initial phase. The quasi-steady phase provided less void

  4. Large scale experiments simulating hydrogen distribution in a spent fuel pool building during a hypothetical fuel uncovery accident scenario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mignot, Guillaume; Paranjape, Sidharth; Paladino, Domenico; Jaeckel, Bernd; Rydl, Adolf [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland)

    2016-08-15

    Following the Fukushima accident and its extended station blackout, attention was brought to the importance of the spent fuel pools' (SFPs) behavior in case of a prolonged loss of the cooling system. Since then, many analytical works have been performed to estimate the timing of hypothetical fuel uncovery for various SFP types. Experimentally, however, little was done to investigate issues related to the formation of a flammable gas mixture, distribution, and stratification in the SFP building itself and to some extent assess the capability for the code to correctly predict it. This paper presents the main outcomes of the Experiments on Spent Fuel Pool (ESFP) project carried out under the auspices of Swissnuclear (Framework 2012–2013) in the PANDA facility at the Paul Scherrer Institut in Switzerland. It consists of an experimental investigation focused on hydrogen concentration build-up into a SFP building during a predefined scaled scenario for different venting positions. Tests follow a two-phase scenario. Initially steam is released to mimic the boiling of the pool followed by a helium/steam mixture release to simulate the deterioration of the oxidizing spent fuel. Results shows that while the SFP building would mainly be inerted by the presence of a high concentration of steam, the volume located below the level of the pool in adjacent rooms would maintain a high air content. The interface of the two-gas mixture presents the highest risk of flammability. Additionally, it was observed that the gas mixture could become stagnant leading locally to high hydrogen concentration while steam condenses. Overall, the experiments provide relevant information for the potentially hazardous gas distribution formed in the SFP building and hints on accident management and on eventual retrofitting measures to be implemented in the SFP building.

  5. HTGR accident initiation and progression analysis status report. Volume VIII. Responses to comments on AIPA status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raabe, P.H.

    1977-01-01

    The first seven volumes of the report series provide formal documentation of the status of the ERDA-sponsored Accident Initiation and Progression Analysis (AIPA) study as of the end of FY75. That portion of the report was given broad distribution to government agencies, industrial organizations, and academic institutions. Comments on the Status Report have been actively solicited from these and other organizations. The volume presented (the eighth in the AIPA Status Report) documents all of the formal written comments that have been received as of September 30, 1976, together with the responses to those comments. The comments as presented are direct quotations from the manuscripts as submitted by the reviewers; none have been paraphrased. The comments are presented in the same order as submitted by the reviewers and are generally addressed individually.

  6. Pellet-Cladding Mechanical Interaction Failure Threshold for Reactivity Initiated Accidents for Pressurized Water Reactors and Boiling Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyer, Carl E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Geelhood, Kenneth J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been requested by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission to evaluate the reactivity initiated accident (RIA) tests that have recently been performed in the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) and CABRI (French research reactor) on uranium dioxide (UO2) and mixed uranium and plutonium dioxide (MOX) fuels, and to propose pellet-cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI) failure thresholds for RIA events. This report discusses how PNNL developed PCMI failure thresholds for RIA based on least squares (LSQ) regression fits to the RIA test data from cold-worked stress relief annealed (CWSRA) and recrystallized annealed (RXA) cladding alloys under pressurized water reactor (PWR) hot zero power (HZP) conditions and boiling water reactor (BWR) cold zero power (CZP) conditions.

  7. HTGR accident initiation and progression analysis status report. Volume VIII. Responses to comments on AIPA status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raabe, P.H.

    1977-01-01

    The first seven volumes of the report series provide formal documentation of the status of the ERDA-sponsored Accident Initiation and Progression Analysis (AIPA) study as of the end of FY75. That portion of the report was given broad distribution to government agencies, industrial organizations, and academic institutions. Comments on the Status Report have been actively solicited from these and other organizations. The volume presented (the eighth in the AIPA Status Report) documents all of the formal written comments that have been received as of September 30, 1976, together with the responses to those comments. The comments as presented are direct quotations from the manuscripts as submitted by the reviewers; none have been paraphrased. The comments are presented in the same order as submitted by the reviewers and are generally addressed individually

  8. British Isles Field Experience: An Initiative in International Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, William J.

    The British Isles Field Experience (BIFE) program was initiated at Williamsport Area Community College (WACC) to provide a group of WACC faculty and staff members with individual and group activities of a personal, professional, and cultural nature in order to promote an international perspective that can be infused into student, collegiate, and…

  9. Protective Behaviour of Citizens to Transport Accidents Involving Hazardous Materials: A Discrete Choice Experiment Applied to Populated Areas nearby Waterways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther W de Bekker-Grob

    Full Text Available To improve the information for and preparation of citizens at risk to hazardous material transport accidents, a first important step is to determine how different characteristics of hazardous material transport accidents will influence citizens' protective behaviour. However, quantitative studies investigating citizens' protective behaviour in case of hazardous material transport accidents are scarce.A discrete choice experiment was conducted among subjects (19-64 years living in the direct vicinity of a large waterway. Scenarios were described by three transport accident characteristics: odour perception, smoke/vapour perception, and the proportion of people in the environment that were leaving at their own discretion. Subjects were asked to consider each scenario as realistic and to choose the alternative that was most appealing to them: staying, seeking shelter, or escaping. A panel error component model was used to quantify how different transport accident characteristics influenced subjects' protective behaviour.The response was 44% (881/1,994. The predicted probability that a subject would stay ranged from 1% in case of a severe looking accident till 62% in case of a mild looking accident. All three transport accident characteristics proved to influence protective behaviour. Particularly a perception of strong ammonia or mercaptan odours and visible smoke/vapour close to citizens had the strongest positive influence on escaping. In general, 'escaping' was more preferred than 'seeking shelter', although stated preference heterogeneity among subjects for these protective behaviour options was substantial. Males were less willing to seek shelter than females, whereas elderly people were more willing to escape than younger people.Various characteristics of transport accident involving hazardous materials influence subjects' protective behaviour. The preference heterogeneity shows that information needs to be targeted differently depending on

  10. Review of US accident/incident experience involving the transportation of radioactive material (RAM) 1971-1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McClure, J.D.; Emerson, E.L.

    1980-01-01

    This paper analyzes the transportation accidents and incidents which have occurred in the United States in the period 1971-1980 based upon the information in the Radioactive Material Transportation Accident/Incident Data Base developed by the Transportation Technology Center (TTC) at Sandia National Laboratories. The accident/incident data base incorporates the files of the Hazardous Material Incident Report (HMIR) system operated by the Material Transportation Bureau of the US Department of Transportation (DOT) with additional information obtained from the files of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). A principal objective of this paper is to summarize US accident/incident experience for the past ten years, providing a concise statement of radioactive material (RAM) package failure description for the transport modes of truck, rail and air

  11. International experience with a multidisciplinary table top exercise for response to a PWR accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakey, J.R.A.

    1996-01-01

    Table Top Exercises are used for the training of emergency response personnel from a wide range of disciplines whose duties range from strategic to tactical, from managerial to operational. The exercise reported in this paper simulates the first two or three hours of an imaginary accident on a generic PWR site (named Seaside or Lakeside depending on its location). It is designed to exercise the early response of staff of the utility, government, local authority and the media and some players represent the public. The relatively few scenarios used for this exercise are based on actual events scaled to give off-site consequences which demand early assessment and therefore stress the communication procedures. The exercise is applicable in different cultures and has been used in over 20 short courses held in the USA, UK, Sweden, Prague, and Hong Kong. There are two styles of support for players: a linear program which ensures that all players follow the desired path through the event and an open program which is triggered by umpires (who play the reactor crew from a script) and by requests from other players. In both cases the exercise ends with a Press Conference. Players have an initial briefing and are assigned to roles; those who must speak at interviews and at the Press Conference arc given separate briefing by an expert in Public Affairs. The exercise runs with up to six groups and the communication rate reaches about 30 to 40 messages per hour for each group. The exercise can be applied to test management and communication systems and to study human response to emergencies because the merits of individual players are highlighted in the relatively stressful conditions of the initial stage of an accident. For some players the exercise is the first time that they have been required to carry out their task in front of other people

  12. Derivation of soil to plant transfer factors of radiocaesium in Northern Greece after the Chernobyl accident, and comparison with greenhouse experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonoloulos-Domis, M.; Clouvas, A.; Gagianas, A.

    1990-01-01

    Radiocesium contamination of cereals, due to the Chernobyl accident, was systematically studied in two selected experimental agricultural farms in Northern Greece for the years 1987, 1988 and 1989. Radiocesium contamination of all annual crops is very low, of the order of 1 Bq kg -1 , and appears to be, for the first 3 years after the Chernobyl accident, time independent, the differences lying within the experimental error. Transfer factors, relating radiocesium deposition to contamination of crops, are deduced from the experimental results. Results are also discussed in the framework of UNSCEAR's empirical model, and the corresponding parameters are deduced. In addition greenhouse experiments show that the Transfer Factors obtained are independent of the initial radiocesium deposition and that radiocesium from the Chernobyl fallout behaves differently from usual experimental sources, such as 137 CsCl. (author)

  13. Simulation and analysis of severe accident experiment Phebus FPT3 with MECLOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Gaopeng; Zhou Zhe

    2014-01-01

    The severe accident experiment Phebus FPT3 was simulated and analyzed by using MECLOR1.8.6. The fuel rod behavior, the hydrogen production, the release, transport and deposition of fission products, and the thermo-hydraulic condition in the containment were calculated. The comparison between calculation results and experiment data shows that the rod behavior, the hydrogen production time and trend, and the thermo-hydraulic condition in the containment fit quite well. But the total quantity of hydrogen production and the fission product relative data have some differences between the calculation results and experiment data, because of some limits of the model in the code. The calculated total quantity of hydrogen production is smaller than that of the experiment, and most of the calculation results about the release and deposition of the fission products are a little bigger than those of the experiment. Besides, the accuracy quantification of the calculation was evaluated with the fast Fourier transform based method (FFTBM). (authors)

  14. Cause finding experiments and environmental analysis on the accident of the fire and explosion in TRP bituminization facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujine, Sachio; Murata, Mikio; Abe, Hitoshi

    1999-09-01

    This report is the summary of the cause finding experiments and environmental analysis on the accident of the fire and explosion occurred at March 11th, 1997, in TRP bituminization facility of PNC (Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation). Regarding the cause finding experiments, chemical components have been analyzed for the effluent samples taken from PNC's facility, bituminized mock waste has been produced using the simulated salt effluent prepared according to the results of chemical analysis, thermal analysis and experiment of runaway exothermic reaction have been conducted using the mock waste, and the component of flammable gases emitted from the heated waste have been collected and analyzed. Regarding environmental analysis on the accident, the amount of radioactive cesium released by the accident has been calculated by the comparative analysis using the atmospheric dispersion simulation code SPEEDI with the data of environmental monitoring and the public dose has been assessed. (author)

  15. Experience in health care organization for victims of Chernobyl accident under conditions of spatial hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadezhina, N.M.

    1990-01-01

    Experience in organization of health care for victims of Chernobyl accidents under conditions of spatial hospitals are discussed taking into account patients with residual contamination of skin and clothe. A necessity of well-adjusted organization activites, including an inpatient clinic with well-equipped reception, dosimetric, haryological and bacteriological laboratories, an intensive care department, a surgical (burn) department, a blood transfusion laboratory and equipment for plasmopheresis and hemosorption is marked. Therapy of such patients should be developed along the following lines: 1) prevention and therapy of infectious complications; 2) blood cell substitution therapy; 3) bone marrow transplantation; 4) detoxicating therapy; 5) correction of water-electrolyte metabolism; 6) therapy of local radiation injuries

  16. Simulant - water experiments to characterize the debris bed formed in severe core melt accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathai, Amala M.; Anandan, J.; Sharma, Anil Kumar; Murthy, S.S.; Malarvizhi, B.; Lydia, G.; Das, Sanjay Kumar; Nashine, B.K.; Selvaraj, P.

    2015-01-01

    Molten Fuel Coolant Interaction (WO) and debris bed configuration on the core catcher plate assumes importance in assessing the Post Accident Heat Removal (PARR) of a heat generating debris bed. The key factors affecting the coolability of the debris bed are the bed porosity, morphology of the fragmented particles, degree of spreading/heaping of the debris on the core catcher and the fraction of lump formed. Experiments are conducted to understand the fragmentation kinetics and subsequent debris bed formation of molten woods metal in water at interface temperatures near the spontaneous nucleation temperature of water. Morphology of the debris particles is investigated to understand the fragmentation mechanisms involved. The spreading behavior of the debris on the catcher plate and the particle size distribution are presented for 5 kg and 10 kg melt inventories. Porosity of the undisturbed bed on the catcher plate is evaluated using a LASER sensor technique. (author)

  17. Improved set of criticality accident detectors used in the intercomparison experiment in Valduc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jozefowicz, K.; Golnik, N.

    1996-01-01

    An improved set of critically accident detectors has been elaborated for the needs of the Inst. of Atomic Energy in Swierk. The sets, which consist of fission track detectors, wide-base silicon diodes and RPL glasses, were tested in the international intercomparison experiment in Valduc, France. Comparison of our results with the reference measurements showed a good agreement (within 25%) for both the neutron and gamma measurements. Additionally, the diode response to neutron kerma was investigated more extensively in the dose range between 2 and 10 Gy, where the dependence of the diode signal versus neutron kerma was not well known. A possibility of the multiple use of the diodes has been proved. (author)

  18. Experiments on the behaviour of ruthenium in air ingress accidents - Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaerkelae, T.; Backman, U.; Auvinen, A.; Ziliacus, R.; Lipponen, M.; Kekki, T.; Tapper, U.; Jokiniemi, J.

    2006-02-01

    During routine nuclear reactor operation, ruthenium will accumulate in the fuel in relatively high concentrations. In an accident in a nuclear power plant it is possible that air gets into contact with the reactor core. In this case ruthenium can oxidise and form volatile ruthenium species, RuO3 and RuO4, which can be transported into the containment. In order to estimate the amount of gaseous ruthenium species it is of interest to know, how it is formed and how it behaves. In our experiments RuO2 is exposed to diverse oxidising atmospheres at a relatively high temperature. In this report, the experimental system for the ruthenium behaviour study is presented. Also preliminary results from experiments carried out during year 2005 are reported. In the experiments gaseous ruthenium oxides were produced in a furnace. Upon cooling RuO2 aerosol particles were formed in the system. They were removed with plane filters from the gas stream. Gaseous ruthenium species were trapped in 1M NaOH-water solution, which is capable of trapping RuO4 totally. Ruthenium in the solution was filtered for analysis. The determination of ruthenium both in aerosol and in liquid filters was made using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). In order to close mass balance and achieve better time resolution three experiment using radioactive tracer were carried out. (au)

  19. Experiments on the behaviour of ruthenium in air ingress accidents - Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaerkelae, T.; Backman, U.; Auvinen, A.; Ziliacus, R.; Lipponen, M.; Kekki, T.; Tapper, U.; Jokiniemi, J. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland (Finland)

    2006-02-15

    During routine nuclear reactor operation, ruthenium will accumulate in the fuel in relatively high concentrations. In an accident in a nuclear power plant it is possible that air gets into contact with the reactor core. In this case ruthenium can oxidise and form volatile ruthenium species, RuO3 and RuO4, which can be transported into the containment. In order to estimate the amount of gaseous ruthenium species it is of interest to know, how it is formed and how it behaves. In our experiments RuO2 is exposed to diverse oxidising atmospheres at a relatively high temperature. In this report, the experimental system for the ruthenium behaviour study is presented. Also preliminary results from experiments carried out during year 2005 are reported. In the experiments gaseous ruthenium oxides were produced in a furnace. Upon cooling RuO2 aerosol particles were formed in the system. They were removed with plane filters from the gas stream. Gaseous ruthenium species were trapped in 1M NaOH-water solution, which is capable of trapping RuO4 totally. Ruthenium in the solution was filtered for analysis. The determination of ruthenium both in aerosol and in liquid filters was made using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). In order to close mass balance and achieve better time resolution three experiment using radioactive tracer were carried out. (au)

  20. Experimental data report for Test TS-2 reactivity initiated accident test in NSRR with pre-irradiated BWR fuel rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Takehiko; Yoshinaga, Makio; Sobajima, Makoto; Fujishiro, Toshio; Kobayashi, Shinsho; Yamahara, Takeshi; Sukegawa, Tomohide; Kikuchi, Teruo

    1993-02-01

    This report presents experimental data for Test TS-2 which was the second test in a series of Reactivity Initiated Accident (RIA) condition test using pre-irradiated BWR fuel rods, performed at the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) in February, 1990. Test fuel rod used in the Test TS-2 was a short sized BWR (7x7) type rod which was fabricated from a commercial rod irradiated at Tsuruga Unit 1 power reactor. The fuel had an initial enrichment of 2.79% and a burnup of 21.3Gwd/tU (bundle average). A pulse irradiation of the test fuel rod was performed under a cooling condition of stagnant water at atmospheric pressure and at ambient temperature which simulated a BWR's cold start-up RIA event. The energy deposition of the fuel rod in this test was evaluated to be 72±5cal/g·fuel (66±5cal/g·fuel in peak fuel enthalpy) and no fuel failure was observed. Descriptions on test conditions, test procedures, transient behavior of the test rod during the pulse irradiation, and, results of pre and post pulse irradiation examinations are described in this report. (author)

  1. Experimental data report for Test TS-1 Reactivity Initiated Accident Test in NSRR with pre-irradiated BWR fuel rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Takehiko; Yoshinaga, Makio; Sobajima, Makoto; Fujishiro, Toshio; Horiki, Ohichiro; Yamahara, Takeshi; Ichihashi, Yoshinori; Kikuchi, Teruo

    1992-01-01

    This report presents experimental data for Test TS-1 which was the first in a series of tests, simulating Reactivity Initiated Accident (RIA) conditions using pre-irradiated BWR fuel rods, performed in the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) in October, 1989. Test fuel rod used in the Test TS-1 was a short-sized BWR (7 x 7) type rod which was fabricated from a commercial rod provided from Tsuruga Unit 1 power reactor. The fuel had an initial enrichment of 2.79 % and burnup of 21.3 GWd/t (bundle average). Pulse irradiation was performed at a condition of stagnant water cooling, atmospheric pressure and ambient temperature using a newly developed double container-type capsule. Energy deposition of the rod in this test was evaluated to be about 61 cal/g·fuel (55 cal/g·fuel in peak fuel enthalpy) and no fuel failure was observed. Descriptions on test conditions, test procedures, fuel burnup measurements, transient behavior of the test rod during pulse irradiation and results of post pulse irradiation examinations are contained in this report. (author)

  2. Comprehensive and consistent interpretation of local fault experiments and application to hypothetical local overpower accident in Monju

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukano, Yoshitaka

    2013-01-01

    Experimental studies on local fault (LF) accidents in fast breeder reactors have been performed in many countries because LFs have been historically considered as one of the possible causes of severe accidents. Comprehensive and consistent interpretations of in-pile and out-of-pile experiments related to LF were arrived at in this study based on state-of-the-art review and data analysis techniques. Safety margins for a hypothetical local overpower accident, which was evaluated as a LF accident in the licensing document of the construction permit for a prototype fast breeder reactor called Monju, were also studied. Based on comprehensive interpretations of the latest experimental database, including those performed after the permission of Monju construction, it was clarified that the evaluation of the hypothetical local overpower accident in the Monju licensing was sufficiently conservative. Furthermore, it incorporated adequate safety margins in terms of failure thresholds of the fuel pin, molten fuel ejection, fuel sweep-out behavior after molten fuel ejection, and pin-to-pin failure propagation. Moreover, these comprehensive interpretations are valid and applicable to the safety evaluation of LF accidents of other fast breeder reactors with various fuel and core designs. (author)

  3. Safety Climate and Occupational Stress According to Occupational Accidents Experience and Employment Type in Shipbuilding Industry of Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung Woo; Park, Sung Jin; Lim, Hae Sun; Cho, Hm Hak

    2017-09-01

    Safety climate and occupational stress are related with occupational accident. The present study tried to identify the differences in safety climate and occupational stress according to occupational accidents experience and employment type (e.g., direct workers and subcontract workers). In this study, we conducted a survey using safety climate scale and Korean Occupational Stress Scale and classified the participants into four groups: direct workers working for accident-free departments, direct workers working for accident departments, subcontract workers working for accident-free departments, and subcontract workers working for accident departments for 2 years within the same workplace in the shipbuilding industry. The direct workers and subcontract workers showed diverse results in subscales of safety climate and occupational stress. This result is supported by existing studies; however, further study is necessary for more supporting evidence and elaborative methodological approach. The necessity of management for safety climate and psychosocial factor such as occupational stress for both direct workers and subcontract workers as a whole is suggested by this study.

  4. Radiation accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nenot, J.C.

    1996-01-01

    Analysis of radiation accidents over a 50 year period shows that simple cases, where the initiating events were immediately recognised, the source identified and under control, the medical input confined to current handling, were exceptional. In many cases, the accidents were only diagnosed when some injuries presented by the victims suggested the radiological nature of the cause. After large-scale accidents, the situation becomes more complicated, either because of management or medical problems, or both. The review of selected accidents which resulted in severe consequences shows that most of them could have been avoided; lack of regulations, contempt for rules, human failure and insufficient training have been identified as frequent initiating parameters. In addition, the situation was worsened because of unpreparedness, insufficient planning, unadapted resources, and underestimation of psychosociological aspects. (author)

  5. The consequences of the Chernobyl accident: REDAC, the radioecological database of the French-German Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deville-Cavelin, G. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, IRSN, BP 17, 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses Cedex (France); Biesold, H. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, GRS, mbH, Schwertnergasse 1, 50667 Koeln (Germany); Chabanyuk, V. [Intelligence Systems GEO, Chernobyl Centre for Nuclear Safety, Radioactive Wastes and Radioecology (Ukraine)

    2005-07-01

    The goal of this work is to built a database for integrating the results of Project 'Radioecology' of the French-German Initiative. This database incorporates: an ecological portrait, initial contamination, wastes management, soil-plants and animals transfers, by runoff and in the aquatic environment, countermeasures in urban and natural and agricultural environments. A specific methodology was applied, namely, the original 'Project Solutions Framework' which implies an information system developed as a soft integrated portal and a geo-information system (all spatial data geo-coded). The structure of database contains five packages of elements: Publications, all classical information, original data; Products, storage of open publications of the Project; Processes, management of the Project and Sub-projects; Services, information and software objects, help; Basics, information on system and organizational development. A table presents the REDAC content, implying the following sub-projects: Ecological portrait; Contamination; Wastes; Soil-plant transfers; Transfers to animals; Transfers by runoff; Transfers in aquatic ecosystem; Urban transfers, countermeasures; Countermeasures. The table identifies the nature of data and their number for each of the sub-project. As soft integration a cartography system is given. This comprises: Map from 'Ecological portrait' integrated with thematic databases loaded in a special category (by IS Geo Internet Map Server) with the cartographical functions: navigation, scaling, extracting, layer management, Databases arrangement independent of map system architecture. An example of map extraction for SP1 'initial contamination' is given. An additional soft integration is based on portlets and DDB. Portlets are mini-applications for business functions and processes, made of web parts. Digital Dashboards (DDB) mean Portlets plus web parts. DDB sites mean collections of DDB, adjustable by users. The

  6. Learning lessons from accidents with a human and organisational factors perspective: deficiencies and failures of operating experience feedback systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dechy, N.; Rousseau, J.M.; Jeffroy, F.

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims at reminding the failures of operating experience feedback (OEF) systems through the lessons of accidents and provides a framework for improving the efficiency of OEF processes. The risk is for example to miss lessons from other companies and industrial sectors, or to miss the implementation of adequate corrective actions with the risk to repeat accidents. Most of major accidents have been caused by a learning failure or other organisational factors as a contributing cause among several root causes. Some of the recurring organisational factors are: -) poor recognition of critical components, of critical activities or deficiency in anticipation and detection of errors, -) excessive production pressure, -) deficiency of communication or lack of quality of dialogue, -) Excessive formalism, -) organisational complexity, -) learning deficiencies (OEF, closing feedback loops, lack of listening of whistle-blowers). Some major accidents occurred in the nuclear industry. Although the Three Mile Island accident has multiple causes, in particular, an inappropriate design of the man-machine interface, it is a striking example of the loss of external lessons from incidents. As for Fukushima it is too early to have established evidence on learning failures. The systematic study and organisational analysis of OEF failures in industrial accidents whatever their sector has enabled us to provide a framework for OEF improvements. Five key OEF issues to improve in priority: 1) human and organisational factors analysis of the root causes of the events, 2) listening to the field staff, dissenting voices and whistle-blowers, 3) monitoring of the external events that provide generic lessons, 4) building an alive memory through a culture of accidents with people who become experiences pillars, and 5) the setting of external audit or organisational analysis of the OEF system by independent experts. The paper is followed by the slides of the presentation

  7. Experiments to quantify airborne release from packages with dispersible radioactive materials under accident conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martens, R.; Lange, F. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Schwertnergasse 1, 50667 Koeln (Germany); Koch, W.; Nolte, O. [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Toxikologie und Experimentelle Medizin (ITEM), Nikolai-Fuchs-Str.1, 30625 Hannover (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    For transport or handling accidents involving packages with radioactive materials and the assessment of potential radiological consequences, for the review of current requirements of the IAEA Transport Regulations, and for their possible further development reliable release data following mechanical impact are required. Within this context a research project was carried out which extends the basis for a well-founded examination of the contemporary system of requirements of 'Low Specific Activity' (LSA)-type materials and allows for its further development where appropriate. This project comprises a prior system-analytical examination and an experimental programme aiming at improving the general physical understanding of the release process as well as the quantity and the characteristics of airborne released material for non-fixed dispersible LSA-II material upon mechanical impact. Impaction experiments applying small, medium and real sized specimens of different dispersible materials revealed that the release behaviour of dispersible powders strongly depends upon material properties, e.g. particle size distribution and cohesion forces. The highest experimentally determined release fraction of respirable mass (AED < 10 {mu}m) amounted to about 2 % and was obtained for 2 kg of un-contained easily dispersible pulverized fly ash (PFA). For larger un-contained PFA specimen the release fraction decreases. However, packaging containing powdery material substantially reduces the airborne release fraction. The measured airborne release fractions for a 200 l drum with Type A certificate containing PFA were about a factor of 50 to 100 lower than for un-contained material. For a drop height of 9 m the airborne release fraction amounted to about 4 x 10{sup -5}. This value should be applicable for most of transport and handling accidents with mechanical impact. For a metal container of Type IP-2 or better which contains powder masses of 100 kg or more this release

  8. Main lessons based on the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident liquidation experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasil'chenko, V.N.; Nosovskij, A.V.

    2006-01-01

    The authors review the main lessons of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident and the liquidation of its consequences in the area of the nuclear reactors safety operation, any major accident management, liquidation accident consequences criteria, emergency procedures, preventative measures and treatment irradiated victims, the monitoring methods etc. The special emphasis is put on the questions of the emergency response and the antiaccidental measures planning in frame of international cooperation program

  9. Dynamic crack initiation toughness : experiments and peridynamic modeling.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foster, John T.

    2009-10-01

    This is a dissertation on research conducted studying the dynamic crack initiation toughness of a 4340 steel. Researchers have been conducting experimental testing of dynamic crack initiation toughness, K{sub Ic}, for many years, using many experimental techniques with vastly different trends in the results when reporting K{sub Ic} as a function of loading rate. The dissertation describes a novel experimental technique for measuring K{sub Ic} in metals using the Kolsky bar. The method borrows from improvements made in recent years in traditional Kolsky bar testing by using pulse shaping techniques to ensure a constant loading rate applied to the sample before crack initiation. Dynamic crack initiation measurements were reported on a 4340 steel at two different loading rates. The steel was shown to exhibit a rate dependence, with the recorded values of K{sub Ic} being much higher at the higher loading rate. Using the knowledge of this rate dependence as a motivation in attempting to model the fracture events, a viscoplastic constitutive model was implemented into a peridynamic computational mechanics code. Peridynamics is a newly developed theory in solid mechanics that replaces the classical partial differential equations of motion with integral-differential equations which do not require the existence of spatial derivatives in the displacement field. This allows for the straightforward modeling of unguided crack initiation and growth. To date, peridynamic implementations have used severely restricted constitutive models. This research represents the first implementation of a complex material model and its validation. After showing results comparing deformations to experimental Taylor anvil impact for the viscoplastic material model, a novel failure criterion is introduced to model the dynamic crack initiation toughness experiments. The failure model is based on an energy criterion and uses the K{sub Ic} values recorded experimentally as an input. The failure model

  10. Severe accident phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jokiniemi, J.; Kilpi, K.; Lindholm, I.; Maekynen, J.; Pekkarinen, E.; Sairanen, R.; Silde, A.

    1995-02-01

    Severe accidents are nuclear reactor accidents in which the reactor core is substantially damaged. The report describes severe reactor accident phenomena and their significance for the safety of nuclear power plants. A comprehensive set of phenomena ranging from accident initiation to containment behaviour and containment integrity questions are covered. The report is based on expertise gained in the severe accident assessment projects conducted at the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT). (49 refs., 32 figs., 12 tabs.)

  11. HTGR accident initiation and progression analysis status report. Volume VII. Occupational radiation exposures from gas-borne and plateout activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    As a part of the Accident Initiation and Progression Analysis (AIPA) program, calculations were performed of the occupational dose rates and man-rem exposures from gas-borne and plateout activities in a reference 3000-MW(t) HTGR plant. The study included a preliminary survey to determine the most important contributors by operation or radiation source to the man-rem exposures. This survey was followed by detailed calculations for the most important cases. Median and 95 percent-confidence-level man-rem exposures per year were obtained for the gaseous activity in the containment building, moisture monitor system, analytic instrumentation, helium regeneration system, gas waste system, and reflector-block shipping. Median and 95 percent-confidence-level man-rem exposures per operation were obtained for the main-circulator removal, steam-generator tube plugging, and steam-generator removal and replacement. For each of these cases, the contributions to the man-rem exposures were calculated for the important isotopes

  12. Fallout: The experiences of a medical team in the care of a Marshallese population accidently exposed to fallout radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conard, R.A.

    1992-09-01

    This report presents an historical account of the experiences of the Brookhaven Medical Team in the examination and treatment of the Marshallese people following their accidental exposure to radioactive fallout in 1954. This is the first time that a population has been heavily exposed to radioactive fallout, and even though this was a tragic mishap, the medical findings have provided valuable information for other accidents involving fallout such as the recent reactor accident at Chernobyl. Noteworthy has been the unexpected importance of radioactive iodine in the fallout in producing thyroid abnormalities

  13. Fallout: The experiences of a medical team in the care of a Marshallese population accidently exposed to fallout radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conard, R.A.

    1992-09-01

    This report presents an historical account of the experiences of the Brookhaven Medical Team in the examination and treatment of the Marshallese people following their accidental exposure to radioactive fallout in 1954. This is the first time that a population has been heavily exposed to radioactive fallout, and even though this was a tragic mishap, the medical findings have provided valuable information for other accidents involving fallout such as the recent reactor accident at Chernobyl. Noteworthy has been the unexpected importance of radioactive iodine in the fallout in producing thyroid abnormalities.

  14. Initial experience of tritium exposure control at JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, B.; Campling, D.C.; Schofield, P.A.; Macheta, P.; Sandland, K.

    1998-01-01

    Some of the safety procedures and controls in place for work with tritium are described, and initial operational experience of handling tritium is discussed. A description is given of work to rectify a water leak in a JET neutral beam heating component, which involved man-access to a confined volume to perform repairs, at tritium levels about 100 DAC (80 MBq/m 3 . HTO). Control measures involving use of purge and extract ventilation, and of personal protection using air-fed pressurized suits are described. Results are given of the internal doses to project staff and of atmospheric discharges of tritium during the repair outage. (P.A.)

  15. Experimental test accelerator: description and results of initial experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fessenden, T.; Birx, D.; Briggs, R.

    1980-01-01

    The ETA is a high current (10,000 Amp) linear induction accelerator that produces short (30 ns) pulses of electrons at 5 MeV twice per second or in bursts of 5 pulses separated by as little as one millisecond. At this time the machine has operated at 65% of its design current and 90% of the design voltage. This report contains a description of the accelerator and its diagnostics; the results of the initial year of operation; a comparison of design codes with experiments on beam transport; and a discussion of some of the special problems and their status

  16. Initial acceptance test experience with FFTF plant equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.K.; Coleman, K.A.; Mahaffey, M.K.; McCargar, C.G.; Young, M.W.

    1978-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the initial acceptance test experience of certain pieces of auxiliary equipment of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). The scope focuses on the DHX blowers and drive train, inert gas blowers, H and V containment isolation valves, and the Surveillance and In-service Inspection (SISI) transporter and trolley. For each type of equipment, the discussion includes a summary of the design and system function, installation history, preoperational acceptance testing procedures and results, and unusual events and resolutions

  17. Containment severe accident thermohydraulic phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frid, W.

    1991-08-01

    This report describes and discusses the containment accident progression and the important severe accident containment thermohydraulic phenomena. The overall objective of the report is to provide a rather detailed presentation of the present status of phenomenological knowledge, including an account of relevant experimental investigations and to discuss, to some extent, the modelling approach used in the MAAP 3.0 computer code. The MAAP code has been used in Sweden as the main tool in the analysis of severe accidents. The dependence of the containment accident progression and containment phenomena on the initial conditions, which in turn are heavily dependent on the in-vessel accident progression and phenomena as well as associated uncertainties, is emphasized. The report is in three parts dealing with: * Swedish reactor containments, the severe accident mitigation programme in Sweden and containment accident progression in Swedish PWRs and BWRs as predicted by the MAAP 3.0 code. * Key non-energetic ex-vessel phenomena (melt fragmentation in water, melt quenching and coolability, core-concrete interaction and high temperature in containment). * Early containment threats due to energetic events (hydrogen combustion, high pressure melt ejection and direct containment heating, and ex-vessel steam explosions). The report concludes that our understanding of the containment severe accident progression and phenomena has improved very significantly over the parts ten years and, thereby, our ability to assess containment threats, to quantify uncertainties, and to interpret the results of experiments and computer code calculations have also increased. (au)

  18. Initial experience with the NRC significance determination process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madison, A.L. [Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (United States)

    2001-07-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has revamped its inspection, assessment, and enforcement programs for commercial nuclear power plants. The new oversight process uses more objective, timely, and safety-significant criteria in assessing performance, while seeking to more effectively and efficiently regulate the industry. The NRC tested the new process at thirteen reactors at nine sites across the country on a pilot basis in 1999 to identify what things worked well and what improvements were called for before beginning Initial Implementation at all US nuclear power plants on April 2, 2000. After a year of experience has been gained with the new oversight process at all US plants, the NRC anticipates making further improvements based on this wider experience. (author)

  19. Initial experience with the NRC significance determination process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madison, A.L.

    2001-01-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has revamped its inspection, assessment, and enforcement programs for commercial nuclear power plants. The new oversight process uses more objective, timely, and safety-significant criteria in assessing performance, while seeking to more effectively and efficiently regulate the industry. The NRC tested the new process at thirteen reactors at nine sites across the country on a pilot basis in 1999 to identify what things worked well and what improvements were called for before beginning Initial Implementation at all US nuclear power plants on April 2, 2000. After a year of experience has been gained with the new oversight process at all US plants, the NRC anticipates making further improvements based on this wider experience. (author)

  20. Study of the impact on PSA success criteria of the variability of the initial liquid level in case of the loss of the RHR system accident scenario under mid-loop operating conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villanueva, J.F.; Carlos, S.; Martorell, S.; Serradell, V.; Pelayo, F.; Mendizabal, R.; Cirauqui, C.; Sol, I.

    2005-01-01

    Probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) is recognized nowadays as an important tool to support risk-informed decision-making aimed at providing both operational flexibility and plant safety [1]. Experience of current PSA studies shows the importance of some risky scenarios with the plant at low power and shutdown conditions as compared to the accident scenarios with the plant operating at full power. In particular, current low power and shutdown PSA (LPSA) studies shows that the loss of the Residual Heat Removal System (RHRS) transient is one of the most risk-significant events under low power conditions [2]. This accident type is supposed to occur for various plant operating states, of which mid-loop operation represents one of the main contributors [3]. LPSA has widely used methods for thermal-hydraulic analysis that play an important role in determining success criteria of safety-related functions involved to mitigate the severity of accident scenarios with the plant operating in such conditions. Various best estimate thermal-hydraulic analysis codes have been used to analyze the loss of the RHRS during low power and shutdown conditions [4, 5]. It is known that RELAP code can give good results as derived after a number of benchmark exercises using results from experiments at research facilities (e.g. ROSA-IV, BETHSY, PKL). [6] Previous research has shown how thermal-hydraulic phenomena after the loss of the RHRS, e.g. peak reactor coolant system pressure, are sensitive to the initial liquid level at the time of loss of the RHRS [2]. This paper presents the results of the study of the thermalhydraulic analysis of the accident scenarios after the loss of the RHRS under mid-loop conditions paying particular attention to the analysis of the effect of the variability of the initial liquid level on the success criteria of the safety-related functions considered in a typical LPSA [3]. (author)

  1. Initiation process of a thrust fault revealed by analog experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yasuhiro; Dotare, Tatsuya; Adam, Juergen; Hori, Takane; Sakaguchi, Hide

    2016-04-01

    We conducted 2D (cross-sectional) analog experiments with dry sand using a high resolution digital image correlation (DIC) technique to reveal initiation process of a thrust fault in detail, and identified a number of "weak shear bands" and minor uplift prior to the thrust initiation. The observations suggest that the process can be divided into three stages. Stage 1: characterized by a series of abrupt and short-lived weak shear bands at the location where the thrust will be generated later. Before initiation of the fault, the area to be the hanging wall starts to uplift. Stage 2: defined by the generation of the new thrust and its active displacement. The location of the new thrust seems to be constrained by its associated back-thrust, produced at the foot of the surface slope (by the previous thrust). The activity of the previous thrust turns to zero once the new thrust is generated, but the timing of these two events is not the same. Stage 3: characterized by a constant displacement along the (new) thrust. Similar minor shear bands can be seen in the toe area of the Nankai accretionary prism, SW Japan and we can correlate the along-strike variations in seismic profiles to the model results that show the characteristic features in each thrust development stage.

  2. Accident analyses in nuclear power plants following external initiating events and in the shutdown state. Final report; Unfallanalysen in Kernkraftwerken nach anlagenexternen ausloesenden Ereignissen und im Nichtleistungsbetrieb. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loeffler, Horst; Kowalik, Michael; Mildenberger, Oliver; Hage, Michael

    2016-06-15

    The work which is documented here provides the methodological basis for improvement of the state of knowledge for accident sequences after plant external initiating events and for accident sequences which begin in the shutdown state. The analyses have been done for a PWR and for a BWR reference plant. The work has been supported by the German federal ministry BMUB under the label 3612R01361. Top objectives of the work are: - Identify relevant event sequences in order to define characteristic initial and boundary conditions - Perform accident analysis of selected sequences - Evaluate the relevance of accident sequences in a qualitative way The accident analysis is performed with the code MELCOR 1.8.6. The applied input data set has been significantly improved compared to previous analyses. The event tree method which is established in PSA level 2 has been applied for creating a structure for a unified summarization and evaluation of the results from the accident analyses. The computer code EVNTRE has been applied for this purpose. In contrast to a PSA level 2, the branching probabilities of the event tree have not been determined with the usual accuracy, but they are given in an approximate way only. For the PWR, the analyses show a considerable protective effect of the containment also in the case of beyond design events. For the BWR, there is a rather high probability for containment failure under core melt impact, but nevertheless the release of radionuclides into the environment is very limited because of plant internal retention mechanisms. This report concludes with remarks about existing knowledge gaps and with regard to core melt sequences, and about possible improvements of the plant safety.

  3. Fatal accidents following changes in daylight savings time: the American experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varughese; Allen

    2001-01-01

    Objective: This study examines specific hypotheses that both sleep loss and behavioral changes occurring with the time shifts for Daylight Savings Time (DST) significantly effect the number of fatal traffic accidents in the United States of America.Background: It has been reported that there is a significant increase in the number of automobile accidents in the spring shift to DST due to the loss of 1 h of sleep. But the extra hour gained at night with the shift from DST in the fall has been variably reported to be associated with increases and decreases in the number of automobile accidents which may reflect either behavioral anticipation with an extended late night prior to the change or the benefit of extra sleep after the change.Methods: Data from 21 years of United States' fatal automobile accidents were gathered. The mean number of accidents on the days at the time of the shifts (Saturday, Sunday and Monday) was compared to the average of the corresponding mean number of accidents on the matching day of the weeks preceding and following the shift. This was repeated for each DST shift. The number of accidents for a particular shift was also correlated with the year of the accidents.Results: There was a significant increase in accidents for the Monday immediately following the spring shift to DST (t=1.92, P=0.034). There was also a significant increase in number of accidents on the Sunday of the fall shift from DST (P<0.002). No significant changes were observed for the other days. A significant negative correlation with the year was found between the number of accidents on the Saturdays and Sundays but not Mondays.Conclusions: The sleep deprivation on the Monday following shift to DST in the spring results in a small increase in fatal accidents. The behavioral adaptation anticipating the longer day on Sunday of the shift from DST in the fall leads to an increased number of accidents suggesting an increase in late night (early Sunday morning) driving when

  4. Integral large scale experiments on hydrogen combustion for severe accident code validation-HYCOM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breitung, W.; Dorofeev, S.; Kotchourko, A.; Redlinger, R.; Scholtyssek, W.; Bentaib, A.; L'Heriteau, J.-P.; Pailhories, P.; Eyink, J.; Movahed, M.; Petzold, K.-G.; Heitsch, M.; Alekseev, V.; Denkevits, A.; Kuznetsov, M.; Efimenko, A.; Okun, M.V.; Huld, T.; Baraldi, D.

    2005-01-01

    A joint research project was carried out in the EU Fifth Framework Programme, concerning hydrogen risk in a nuclear power plant. The goals were: Firstly, to create a new data base of results on hydrogen combustion experiments in the slow to turbulent combustion regimes. Secondly, to validate the partners CFD and lumped parameter codes on the experimental data, and to evaluate suitable parameter sets for application calculations. Thirdly, to conduct a benchmark exercise by applying the codes to the full scale analysis of a postulated hydrogen combustion scenario in a light water reactor containment after a core melt accident. The paper describes the work programme of the project and the partners activities. Significant progress has been made in the experimental area, where test series in medium and large scale facilities have been carried out with the focus on specific effects of scale, multi-compartent geometry, heat losses and venting. The data were used for the validation of the partners CFD and lumped parameter codes, which included blind predictive calculations and pre- and post-test intercomparison exercises. Finally, a benchmark exercise was conducted by applying the codes to the full scale analysis of a hydrogen combustion scenario. The comparison and assessment of the results of the validation phase and of the challenging containment calculation exercise allows a deep insight in the quality, capabilities and limits of the CFD and the lumped parameter tools which are currently in use at various research laboratories

  5. Fission-product chemistry in severe reactor accidents: Review of relevant integral experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, A.L.; Hueber, C.

    1992-01-01

    The attenuation of the radioactive fission-product emission from a severe reactor accident will depend on a combination of chemical, physical and thermal-hydraulic effects. Chemical species stabilised under the prevailing conditions will determine the extent of aerosol formation and any subsequent interaction, so defining the magnitude and physical forms of the eventual release into the environment. While several important integral tests have taken place in recent years, these experiments have tended to focus on the generation of mass-balance and aerosol-related data to test and validate materials-transport codes rather than study the impact of important chemical phenomena. This emphasis on thermal hydraulics, fuel behaviour and aerosol properties has occurred in many test (e.g. PBF, DEMONA, Marviken-V, LACE and ACE). Nevertheless, the generation and reaction of the chemical species in all of these programmes determined the transport properties of the resulting vapours and aerosols. Chemical effects have been studied in measurements somewhat subsidiary to the main aims of the tests. This work has been reviewed in detail with respect to Marviken-V, LACE, ACE and Falcon. Specific issues remain to be addressed, and these are discussed in terms of the proposed Phebus-FB programme. (author). 58 refs, 9 figs, 1 tab

  6. Accidents - Chernobyl accident; Accidents - accident de Tchernobyl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    This file is devoted to the Chernobyl accident. It is divided in four parts. The first part concerns the accident itself and its technical management. The second part is relative to the radiation doses and the different contaminations. The third part reports the sanitary effects, the determinists ones and the stochastic ones. The fourth and last part relates the consequences for the other European countries with the case of France. Through the different parts a point is tackled with the measures taken after the accident by the other countries to manage an accident, the cooperation between the different countries and the groups of research and studies about the reactors safety, and also with the international medical cooperation, specially for the children, everything in relation with the Chernobyl accident. (N.C.)

  7. The unique field experiments on the assessment of accident consequences at industrial enterprises of gas-chemical complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belov, N.S.; Trebin, I.S.; Sorokovikova, O.

    1998-01-01

    Sour natural gas fields are the unique raw material base for setting up such large enterprises as gas chemical complexes. The presence of high toxic H 2 S in natural gas results in widening a range of dangerous and harmful factors for biosphere. Emission of such gases into atmosphere during accidents at gas wells and gas pipelines is of especial danger for environment and first of all for people. Development of mathematical forecast models for assessment of accidents progression and consequences is one of the main elements of works on safety analysis and risk assessment. The critical step in development of such models is their validation using the experimental material. Full-scale experiments have been conducted by the All-Union Scientific-Research institute of Natural Gases and Gas Technology (VNIIGAZ) for grounding of sizes of hazard zones in case of the severe accidents with the gas pipelines. The source of emergency gas release was the working gas pipelines with 100 mm dia. And 110 km length. This pipeline was used for transportation of natural gas with significant amount of hydrogen sulphide. During these experiments significant quantities of the gas including H 2 S were released into the atmosphere and then concentrations of gas and H 2 S were measured in the accident region. The results of these experiments are used for validation of atmospheric dispersion models including the new Lagrangian trace stochastic model that takes into account a wide range of meteorological factors. This model was developed as a part of computer system for decision-making support in case of accident release of toxic gases into atmosphere at the enterprises of Russian gas industry. (authors)

  8. Effect of Casmo-5 cross-section data and doppler temperature definitions on LWR reactivity initiated accidents - 166

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grandi, G.; Smith, K.; Xu, Z.; Rhodes, J.

    2010-01-01

    During LWR Reactivity Initiated Accidents (RIA), the accurate evaluation of the Doppler reactivity feedback depends on the Doppler coefficient computed by the lattice physics code (e.g. CASMO-5), and on the effective Doppler temperature computed by the transient code (e.g. SIMULATE-3K) using the non-uniform intra-pellet temperature profile. CASMO-5 has many new features compared with its predecessor. Among them, the replacement of the L-library (based primarily on ENDF/B IV data) by the latest available nuclear data (ENDF/B VII.0), and the Monte Carlo based resonance elastic scattering model to overcome deficiencies in NJOY modeling have a significant impact on the fuel temperature coefficient, and hence on LWR RIA. The Doppler temperature effect in thermal reactors is driven by the 238 U absorption. The different effective Doppler temperature definitions, available in the literature, try to capture the considerable self-shielding of the 238 U absorption that occurs in the pellet surface by defining an appropriate fuel temperature to compute cross-sections. In this work, we investigate the effect of the nuclear data generated by CASMO-5 on RIA, as well as the impact of different effective Doppler temperature definitions, including one proposed by the authors. It is concluded: 1) LWR RIA evaluated using CASMO-5 cross section data will be milder because the energy released is ∼10% smaller; 2) the prompt enthalpy rise is barely affected by the choice of the Doppler temperature definition; and 3) the peak fuel enthalpy is affected by the choice of the Doppler temperature definition, the under-prediction of the Doppler reactivity by the 'NEA' Doppler temperature results in a conservative estimate of the peak fuel enthalpy. (authors)

  9. Application of thermal hydraulic and severe accident code SOCRAT/V3 to bottom water reflood experiment QUENCH-LOCA-0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasiliev, A.D.; Stuckert, J.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► QLOCA-0 test simulates a design basis LOCA NPP accident with maximum temperature 1300 K. ► Deep understanding of hydraulics and thermal mechanics under accident conditions is necessary. ► We model the test QLOCA-0 with bottom flooding using the Russian code SOCRAT/V3. ► Calculated and experimental data are in a good agreement. ► Experimental procedure is determined to reach a representative LOCA scenario in future tests. -- Abstract: The thermal hydraulic and SFD (severe fuel damage) best estimate computer modeling code SOCRAT/V3 has been used for the calculation of QUENCH-LOCA-0 experiment. The new QUENCH-LOCA bundle tests with different cladding materials will simulate a representative scenario of the LOCA (loss of coolant accident) nuclear power plant accident sequence in which the overheated up to 1300 K reactor core would be reflooded from the bottom by ECCS (emergency core cooling system). The first test QUENCH-LOCA-0 was successfully conducted at the KIT, Karlsruhe, Germany, in July 22, 2010, and was performed as the commissioning test for this series. The rod claddings are identical to that used in PWRs. The bundle was electrically heated in steam from 800 K to 1340 K with the heat-up rate of approximately 2.7 K/s. After cooling in the saturated steam the bottom flooding with water flow rate of about 100 g/s was initiated. The SOCRAT calculated results are in a good agreement with experimental data taking into account additional quenching due to water condensate entrainment at the steam cooling stage. SOCRAT/V3 has been used for estimation of further steps in experimental procedure to reach a representative LOCA scenario in future tests

  10. Discharge initiation experiments in the Tokapole II tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepard, D.A.

    1984-01-01

    Experiments in the Tokapole II tokamak demonstrate the benefits of high density (n/sub e//n/sub o/ greater than or equal to 0.01) preionization by reducing four quantities at startup: necessary toroidal loop voltage (V 1 ) (50%), volt-second consumption (40-50%), impurity radiation (25-50%), and runaway electron production (approx. 80-100%). A zero-dimensional code models the loop voltage reduction dependence on preionization density and predicts a similar result for reactor scale devices. The code shows low initial resistivity and a high resistivity time derivative contribute to loop voltage reduction. Microwaves at the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) frequency and plasma gun injection produce high density preionization, which reduces the initial V 1 , volt-second consumption, and runaways. The ECR preionization also reduces impurity radiation by shortening the time from voltage application to current channel formation. This, evidently, reduces the total plasma-wall interaction at startup. The power balance of the ECR plasma in a toroidal-field-only case was studied using Langmuir probes and impurity doping. The vertical electric field and current, which result from curvature drift, were measured as approx. 10 V/cm and 50 amps, respectively, and exceeded expected values for the bulk electron temperature (approx. 10 eV)

  11. Initially curved microplates under electrostatic actuation: theory and experiment

    KAUST Repository

    Saghir, Shahid

    2016-07-01

    Microplates are the building blocks of many micro-electro-mechanical systems. It is common for them to experience initial curvature imperfection due to residual stresses caused by the micro fabrication process. Such plates are essentially different from perfectly flat ones and cannot be modeled using flat plate models. In this paper, we adopt a dynamic analog of the von Karman governing equations of imperfect plates. These equations are then used to develop a reduced order model based on the Galerkin procedure, to simulate the static and dynamic behavior of the microplate under electrostatic actuation. To validate the simulation results, an initially curved imperfect microplate made of silicon nitride is fabricated and tested. The static behaviour of the microplate is investigated when applying a DC voltage Vdc. Then, the dynamic behaviour of the microplate is examined under the application of a harmonic AC voltage, Vac, superimposed to Vdc. The simulation results show good agreement with the experimentally measured responses. © 2016 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  12. The experience gives the Cuban program with children gives territories affected by the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, O.; Llanes, R.

    1998-01-01

    From 1990 it works in Cuba a program destined to offer medical attention you specialize and to develop a plan sanatoria gives rehabilitation with children provided the different areas affected by the contamination radioactive resultant to the Chernobyl accident

  13. [Characterization of photochemical smog chamber and initial experiments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Long; Xu, Yong-Fu; Shi, Yu-Zhen

    2011-02-01

    A self-made new indoor environmental chamber facility for the study of atmospheric processes leading to the formation of ozone and secondary organic aerosols has been introduced and characterized. The characterization experiments include the measurements of wall effects for reactive species and the determination of chamber dependent * OH radical sources by CO-NO(x) irradiation experiments. Preliminary ethene-NO(x) and benzene-NO(x) experiments were conducted as well. The results of characterization experiments show that the wall effects for O3 and NO2 in a new reactor are not obvious. Relative humidity has a great effect on the wall losses in the old reactor, especially for O3. In the old reactor, the rate constant for O3 wall losses is obtained to be 1.0 x 10(-5) s(-1) (RH = 5%) and 4.0 x10(-5) s(-1) (RH = 91%), whereas for NO2, it is 1.0 x 10(-6) s(-1) (RH = 5%) and 0.6 x 10(-6) s(-1) (RH = 75%). The value for k(NO2 --> HONO) determined by CO-NO(x) irradiation experiments is (4.2-5.2) x 10(-5) s(-1) and (2.3-2.5) x 10(-5) s(-1) at RH = 5% and RH 75% -77%, respectively. The average *OH concentration is estimated to be (2.1 +/- 0.4) x 10(6) molecules/cm3 by using a reaction rate coefficient of CO and * OH. The sensitivity of chamber dependent auxiliary reactions to the O3 formation is discussed. Results show that NO2 --> HONO has the greatest impact on the O3 formation during the initial stage, N2O5 + H2O --> 2HNO3 has a minus effect to maximum O3 concentration, and that the wall losses of both O3 and NO2 have little impact on the O3 formation. The results from the ethene-NO(x) and benzene-NO(x) experiments are in good agreement with those from the MCM simulation, which reflects that the facility for the study of the formation of secondary pollution of ozone and secondary organic aerosols is reliable. This demonstrates that our facility can be further used in the deep-going study of chemical processes in the atmosphere.

  14. Lessons learned from post-accident management at Chernobyl: the P.a.r.e.x. project; Retour d'experience sur la gestion post-accidentelle de Tchernobyl: le projet Parex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heriard Dubreuil, G. [Mutadis Consultants, 75 - Paris (France); Lochard, J.; Bataille, C. [CEPN, 92 - Fontenay aux Roses (France); Ollagnon, H. [AgroParisTech, 75 - Paris (France); Baude, St. [Mutadis, 75 - Paris (France)

    2008-07-15

    Return of experience on Chernobyl post-accident management: the PAREX study Belarus is the country the most affected by the Chernobyl fallouts and is among the most significant experiences in the nuclear post-accident field. Despite specificities inherent to the political and social situation in Belarus, the experience of post-accidental management in this country holds a wealth of lessons in the perspective of preparation to a post-accidental situation in the French and European context. Through the PAREX project (2005-2006), the French Nuclear Safety Authority analysed the return of experience of Chernobyl post-accident management from 1986 to 2005 in order to draw its lessons in the perspective of a preparation policy. The study was led by a group of experts and involved the participation of a pluralistic group of about thirty participants (public authorities, local governments, NGOs, experts, operators). PAREX highlighted the complexity of a situation of long-lasting radioactive contamination (diversity of stakeholders and of dimensions at stake: health, environment, economy, society...). Beyond traditional public crisis management tools and frameworks, post-accident strategies also involves in the longer term a territorial and social response, which relies on local capacities of initiative. Preparation to such process requires experimenting new modes of operation that allow a diversity of local actors to take part to the response to a situation of contamination and to the surveillance system, with the support of public authorities. The conclusions of PAREX include a set of recommendations in this perspective. (authors)

  15. Accident management insights after the Fukushima Daiichi NPP accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degueldre, Didier; Viktorov, Alexandre; Tuomainen, Minna; Ducamp, Francois; Chevalier, Sophie; Guigueno, Yves; Tasset, Daniel; Heinrich, Marcus; Schneider, Matthias; Funahashi, Toshihiro; Hotta, Akitoshi; Kajimoto, Mitsuhiro; Chung, Dae-Wook; Kuriene, Laima; Kozlova, Nadezhda; Zivko, Tomi; Aleza, Santiago; Jones, John; McHale, Jack; Nieh, Ho; Pascal, Ghislain; ); Nakoski, John; Neretin, Victor; Nezuka, Takayoshi; )

    2014-01-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (NPP) accident, that took place on 11 March 2011, initiated a significant number of activities at the national and international levels to reassess the safety of existing NPPs, evaluate the sufficiency of technical means and administrative measures available for emergency response, and develop recommendations for increasing the robustness of NPPs to withstand extreme external events and beyond design basis accidents. The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) is working closely with its member and partner countries to examine the causes of the accident and to identify lessons learnt with a view to the appropriate follow-up actions to be taken by the nuclear safety community. Accident management is a priority area of work for the NEA to address lessons being learnt from the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi NPP following the recommendations of Committee on Nuclear Regulatory Activities (CNRA), Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI), and Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health (CRPPH). Considering the importance of these issues, the CNRA authorised the formation of a task group on accident management (TGAM) in June 2012 to review the regulatory framework for accident management following the Fukushima Daiichi NPP accident. The task group was requested to assess the NEA member countries needs and challenges in light of the accident from a regulatory point of view. The general objectives of the TGAM review were to consider: - enhancements of on-site accident management procedures and guidelines based on lessons learnt from the Fukushima Daiichi NPP accident; - decision-making and guiding principles in emergency situations; - guidance for instrumentation, equipment and supplies for addressing long-term aspects of accident management; - guidance and implementation when taking extreme measures for accident management. The report is built on the existing bases for capabilities to respond to design basis

  16. [Theory and testing of an accident risk assessment system based on prior experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montresor, Michele; Ricci, Paolo; Giroletti, Elio

    2015-01-01

    to improve the "National Project: Integrated investigations for an indepth analysis of cases of Fatal Accidents", a project which, on one hand, is too open to interpretation of events, while, on the other, does not offer the possibility to analyse external factors which are often at the basis of accidents in the workplace. identification and weighting criteria regarding causes of accident have been established and correlated by means of a specific algorithm, with the aim of making them numerically measurable. This has made it possible to use them as indicators to identify lines of priority in prevention planning. The theoretical model has been tested in an analysis of 35 work accidents which occurred in a firm in Mantova. the model has been evaluated in comparison to the analysis which was previously used to examine cases of work-related accidents and it has proved to be more efficient in the move towards establishing preventative action at the beginning of a chain of events. While maintaining the "Learning from mistakes" model, the method here proposed represents an extension and an implementation of previous practices. It is an effective operative method for companies, offering both a qualitative and quantitative analysis of work-related accidents with a view to their prevention.

  17. Shock initiation experiments on ratchet grown PBX 9502

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustavsen, Richard L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Thompson, Darla G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Olinger, Barton W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Deluca, Racci [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bartram, Brian D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pierce, Timothy H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sanchez, Nathaniel J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    This study compares the shock initiation behavior of PBX 9502 pressed to less than nominal density (nominal density is 1.890 {+-} 0.005 g/cm{sup 3}) with PBX 9502 pressed to nominal density and then ''ratchet grown'' to low density. PBX 9502 is an insensitive plastic bonded explosive consisting of 95 weight % dry-aminated tri-amino-tri-nitro-benzene (TATB) and 5 weight % Kel-F 800 plastic binder. ''Ratchet growth'' - an irreversible increase in specific volume - occurs when an explosive based on TATB is temperature cycled. The design of our study is as follows: PBX 9502, all from the same lot, received the following four treatments. Samples in the first group were pressed to less than nominal density. These were not ratchet grown and used as a baseline. Samples in the second group were pressed to nominal density and then ratchet grown by temperature cycling 30 times between -54 C and +80 C. Samples in the final group were pressed to nominal density and cut into 100 mm by 25.4 mm diameter cylinders. During thermal cycling the cylinders were axially constrained by a 100 psi load. Samples for shock initiation experiments were cut perpendicular (disks) and parallel (slabs) to the axial load. The four sample groups can be summarized with the terms pressed low, ratchet grown/no load, axial load/disks, and axial load/slabs. All samples were shock initiated with nearly identical inputs in plate impact experiments carried out on a gas gun. Wave profiles were measured after propagation through 3, 4, 5, and 6 mm of explosive. Side by side comparison of wave profiles from different samples is used as a measure of relative sensitivity. All reduced density samples were more shock sensitive than nominal density PBX 9502. Differences in shock sensitivity between ratchet grown and pressed to low density PBX 9502 were small, but the low density pressings are slightly more sensitive than the ratchet grown samples.

  18. Discharge initiation experiments in the Tokapole II tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepard, D.A.

    1984-06-01

    Experiments in the Tokapole II tokamak demonstrate the benefits of high density (n/sub e//n 0 greater than or equal to 0.01) preionization by reducing four quantities at startup: necessary toroidal loop voltage (V 1 ) (50%), volt-second consumption (40 to 50%), impurity radiation (25 to 50%), and runaway electron production (approx. 80 to 100%). A zero-dimensional code models the loop voltage reduction dependence on preionization density and predicts a similar result for reactor scale devices. The code shows low initial resistivity and a high resistivity time derivative contribute to loop voltage reduction. The power balance of the ECR plasma in a toroidal-field-only case was studied. Langmuir probes and impurity doping were used. The vertical electric field (E/sub v/) and current (I/sub v/), which result from curvature drift, were measured (E/sub v/ approx. 10 V/cm and I/sub v/ approx. 50 Amps) and exceeded expected values for the bulk electron temperature (approx. 10 eV). A series of experiments with external windings to simulate field errors perpendicular to the toroidal field was done. The results imply that an error field of 0.1% of the toroidal field is deleterious to ECR plasma density

  19. Medical student perceptions of an initial collaborative immersion experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, Joseph B; Cedarbaum, Jacob; Haque, Fatema; Wheaton, Michael; Vredeveld, Jennifer; Purkiss, Joel; Moore, Laurel; Santen, Sally A; Daniel, Michelle

    2018-03-01

    Recent reviews of interprofessional education (IPE) highlight the need for innovative curricula focused on longitudinal clinical learning. We describe the development and early outcomes of the initial clinical experience (ICE), a longitudinal practice-based course for first-year medical students. While IPE courses focus on student-to-student interaction, ICE focuses on introducing students to interprofessional collaboration. Students attend 14 sessions at one of 18 different clinical sites. They work directly with different health professionals from among 17 possible professions, including nurses, pharmacists, social workers, and respiratory, occupational, and physical therapists. Between 2015 and 2016, 167 students completed the course, and 81 completed the end-of-course evaluation. Students agreed or strongly agreed that ICE meaningfully contributed to their understanding of healthcare teams and different professional roles (86%), improved their understanding of healthcare systems (84%), improved their ability to communicate with healthcare professionals (61%), and improved their ability to work on interprofessional teams (65%). Select themes from narrative comments suggest that clinical immersion improves understanding of professional roles, helps students understand their own future roles in healthcare teams, and increases awareness of and respect for other professionals, with the potential to change future practice. ICE may be a template for other schools wishing to expand their current educational offerings, by engaging learners in more authentic, longitudinal clinical experiences with practicing healthcare professionals.

  20. [Initiation, promotion, initiation experiments with radon and cigarette smoke: Lung tumors in rats]. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moolgavkar, S.H.

    1994-01-01

    During the past several years, the authors have made considerable progress in modeling carcinogenesis in general, and in modeling radiation carcinogenesis, in particular. They present an overview of their progress in developing stochastic carcinogenesis models and applying them to experimental and epidemiologic data sets. Traditionally, cancer models have been used for the analysis of incidence (or prevalence) data in epidemiology and time to tumor data in experimental studies. The relevant quantities for the analysis of these data are the hazard function and the probability of tumor. The derivation of these quantities is briefly described here. More recently, the authors began to use these models for the analysis of data on intermediate lesions on the pathway to cancer. Such data are available in experimental carcinogenesis studies, in particular in initiation and promotion studies on the mouse skin and the rat liver. If however, quantitative information on intermediate lesions on the pathway to lung cancer were to be come available at some future date, the methods that they have developed for the analysis of initiation-promotion experiments could easily be applied to the analysis of these lesions. The mathematical derivations here are couched in terms of a particular two-mutation model of carcinogenesis. Extension to models postulating more than two mutations is not always straightforward

  1. Neutronics and thermal-hydraulics coupling: some contributions toward an improved methodology to simulate the initiating phase of a severe accident in a sodium fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guyot, Maxime

    2014-01-01

    This project is dedicated to the analysis and the quantification of bias corresponding to the computational methodology for simulating the initiating phase of severe accidents on Sodium Fast Reactors. A deterministic approach is carried out to assess the consequences of a severe accident by adopting best estimate design evaluations. An objective of this deterministic approach is to provide guidance to mitigate severe accident developments and re-criticalities through the implementation of adequate design measures. These studies are generally based on modern simulation techniques to test and verify a given design. The new approach developed in this project aims to improve the safety assessment of Sodium Fast Reactors by decreasing the bias related to the deterministic analysis of severe accident scenarios. During the initiating phase, the subassembly wrapper tubes keep their mechanical integrity. Material disruption and dispersal is primarily one-dimensional. For this reason, evaluation methodology for the initiating phase relies on a multiple-channel approach. Typically a channel represents an average pin in a subassembly or a group of similar subassemblies. In the multiple-channel approach, the core thermal-hydraulics model is composed of 1 or 2 D channels. The thermal-hydraulics model is coupled to a neutronics module to provide an estimate of the reactor power level. In this project, a new computational model has been developed to extend the initiating phase modeling. This new model is based on a multi-physics coupling. This model has been applied to obtain information unavailable up to now in regards to neutronics and thermal-hydraulics models and their coupling. (author) [fr

  2. Simulation of experiment on aerosol behaviour at severe accident conditions in the LACE experimental facility with the ASTEC CPA code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kljenak, I.; Mavko, B.

    2007-01-01

    The experiment LACE LA4 on thermal-hydraulics and aerosol behavior in a nuclear power plant containment, which was performed in the LACE experimental facility, was simulated with the ASTEC CPA module of the severe accident computer code ASTEC V1.2. The specific purpose of the work was to assess the capability of the module (code) to simulate thermal-hydraulic conditions and aerosol behavior in the containment of a light-water-reactor nuclear power plant at severe accident conditions. The test was simulated with boundary conditions, described in the experiment report. Results of thermal-hydraulic conditions in the test vessel, as well as dry aerosol concentrations in the test vessel atmosphere, are compared to experimental results and analyzed. (author)

  3. Simulation of KAEVER experiments on aerosol behavior in a nuclear power plant containment at accident conditions with the ASTEC code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kljenak, I.; Mavko, B.

    2006-01-01

    Experiments on aerosol behaviour in saturated and non-saturated atmosphere, which were performed in the KAEVER experimental facility, were simulated with the severe accident computer code ASTEC CPA V1.2. The specific purpose of the work was to assess the capability of the code to model aerosol condensation and deposition in the containment of a light-water-reactor nuclear power plant at severe accident conditions, if the atmosphere saturation conditions are simulated adequately. Five different tests were first simulated with boundary conditions, obtained from the experiments. In all five tests, a non-saturated atmosphere was simulated, although, in four tests, the atmosphere was allegedly saturated. The simulations were repeated with modified boundary conditions, to obtain a saturated atmosphere in all tests. Results of dry and wet aerosol concentrations in the test vessel atmosphere for both sets of simulations are compared to experimental results. (author)

  4. FOREVER Experiments on Thermal and Mechanical Behavior of a Reactor Pressure Vessel during a Severe Accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sehgal, B.R.; Nourgaliev, R.R.; Dinh, T.N.; Karbojian, A.; Green, J.A.; Bui, V.A.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the FOREVER (Failure Of Reactor Vessel Retention) experimental program, which is currently underway at the Division of Nuclear Power Safety, Royal Institute of Technology (RIT/NPS). The objectives of the FOREVER experiments are to obtain data and develop validated models (i) on the melt coolability process inside the vessel, in the presence of water (in particular, on the efficacy of the postulated gap cooling to preclude vessel failure); and (ii) on the lower head failure due to the creep process in the absence of water inside and/or outside the lower head. The facility employs 1/10.-scale carbon steel vessels of 0.4 m diameter, 15 mm thickness and 600 mm height. Up to 20 liters of binary-oxide melts with 100-300 K superheat are employed, as a simulant for the prototypic corium melt, and internal heating is provided by electrical heaters of up to 20 kW power in order to maintain the vessel wall temperatures at 1100-1200 K. Auxiliary systems are designed to provide an overpressure up to 4 MPa in the test vessel. Thus, severe accident scenarios with RCS depressurization are modeled. Creep behavior of the three-dimensional vessel, formation of the gap between the melt pool crust and the creeping vessel, and mechanisms of the gap cooling by water ingression will be the subjects of study and measurements in the FOREVER experimental program. Scaling rationale as well as pre-test analyses of the thermal and mechanical behavior of the FOREVER test vessels are presented. (authors)

  5. [Cerebrovascular accidents in paediatric care. Our experience gained over an 18-year period].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz del Olmo-Izuzquiza, Ignacio; de Arriba-Muñoz, Antonio; López-Pisón, Javier; García-Iñiguez, Juan Pablo; Romero-Gil, Ruth; Monge-Galindo, Lorena; Pérez-Delgado, Raquel; Peña-Segura, José Luis

    This study reviews our experience over the last 18 years with paediatric patients diagnosed with non-haemorrhagic cerebrovascular accidents (CVA) after the perinatal period. Data were collected for the period between May 1990 and May 2008 (n = 10 270 children) and special attention was given to cases with no previous pathology. We found 41 cases that were diagnosed with post-natal non-haemorrhagic CVA, of which 13 did not present any known pathology at the onset of the symptoms. Nine patients were diagnosed as having ischaemic CVA (ICVA), three cases had thrombosis of the venous sinuses and there was one case of haemorrhagic infarction (HI). No causation was found in five cases, three of which were heterozygotic for the C677T mutation of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase. ICVA was caused by fibromuscular dysplasia, aneurysm of the auricular septum and patent foramen ovale, homocystinuria and chickenpox. A recent ear infection and diminished levels of protein C were noted in two cases of venous thrombosis. Five patients with ICVA and the case of HI were treated with oral antiaggregants, anticoagulants were administered in two of the thromboses, and the remaining cases did not receive any treatment. Seven patients (four ICVA, two thromboses and the HI) did not present any kind of sequelae, four ICVA presented different degrees of hemiparesis and two died (one ICVA and one thrombosis). The scarcity of studies and therapeutic clinical trials in the paediatric age makes it difficult to lay down clear guidelines of conduct, especially from the therapeutic point of view. The different specialists involved must collaborate with each other.

  6. Experience in training of health personnel for response to radiological and nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurmo, Alexandre M.; Leite, Teresa C.S.B.

    2013-01-01

    Eletronuclear Healthcare Foundation is the Institution responsible for the actions of health response involving ionizing radiation in the area of Nuclear Power Plant Almirante Alvaro Alberto in Angra dos Reis. Because of their specific assignments and references for being in training health manpower in the field of ionizing radiation developed a range of Training Courses for Professionals Area Health to prepare them for Response to Radiological and Nuclear Accidents. Modules are proposed specifically for the professional response of the Technical Level and Higher Level, the level Pre-hospital and hospital. These modules are further divided into specific levels or modules, Basic or Introductory, Intermediate and Advanced. Are applied pretests and post tests to monitor the content of fixing, maintaining a historical series of reviews. Your content is theoretical and practical applications developed in 30 to 48 hours, with simulations (drills) and distribution of educational materials. We already have more than 80 applications training, focusing on internal staff and external to the institution, developing interesting partner with the Armed Forces and Civil Defense. It still maintained a link on the institution seeking access and download over 400 titles on the subject and exchange of information and experiences. For improving the teaching material, the authors launched in 2011 the first manual in Portuguese on the subject with new revised edition in 2013: 'Manual of Medical Actions In Radiological Emergencies'. The results indicate increased knowledge and appropriateness of the themes and the strategy proposed for this activity, demonstrating yet passed that information can be multiplied and meets the growing demand of the country that has hosted and will host international events relevant at QBNRE risk. (author)

  7. Major workplace related accidents in Singapore: A major trauma centre's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Zhi Xu; Teo, Li Tserng; Go, Karen T S; Yeo, Yen Teng; Chiu, Ming Terk

    2010-12-01

    Major workplace related accidents pose a significant healthcare resource challenge in Singapore. Our study looks at the epidemiology of patients who were admitted for workplace related accidents, in a single institution, with an Injury Severity Score of >9. There were 196 cases of major workplace related accidents admitted between January 2006 and December 2007. The median age of patients admitted was 37 years with a large percentage being males (95.4%) and non-residents (57.1%). The most common ethnic group was Chinese (53.1%) followed by Indians (23.5%). The most common mechanism of injury was fall from height (66.3%) followed by injuries as a result of falling objects at work (21.9%). The percentage of patients who required surgical intervention was 69.9%. Patients admitted for major workplace related accidents had a median length of stay of 5 days in the hospital, a median length of 24 days of medical leave (ML), certifying them unfit for duty and the average cost of stay for each patient was S$11,000. We have a better understanding of the epidemiology and socio-economic impact of workplace related accidents through this study. Workplace related accidents result in significant number of man-days lost from work and monetary cost to employers, medical insurance and the hospital. With an improved understanding, we propose methods to prevent and reduce such accidents in future. A direct consequence of which will be the possible reduction of hospitalisation costs and better allocation of healthcare resources in the future.

  8. [Initial experience in robot-assisted colorectal surgery in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva-Sáenz, Eduardo; Ramírez-Ramírez, Moisés Marino; Zubieta-O'Farrill, Gregorio; García-Hernández, Luis

    Colorectal surgery has advanced notably since the introduction of the mechanical suture and the minimally invasive approach. Robotic surgery began in order to satisfy the needs of the patient-doctor relationship, and migrated to the area of colorectal surgery. An initial report is presented on the experience of managing colorectal disease using robot-assisted surgery, as well as an analysis of the current role of this platform. A retrospective study was conducted in order to review five patients with colorectal disease operated using a robot-assisted technique over one year in the initial phase of the learning curve. Gender, age, diagnosis and surgical indication, surgery performed, surgical time, conversion, bleeding, post-operative complications, and hospital stay, were analysed and described. A literature review was performed on the role of robotic assisted surgery in colorectal disease and cancer. The study included 5 patients, 3 men and 2 women, with a mean age of 62.2 years. Two of them were low anterior resections with colorectal primary anastomoses, one of them extended with a loop protection ileostomy, a Frykman-Goldberg procedure, and two left hemicolectomies with primary anastomoses. The mean operating time was 6hours and robot-assisted 4hours 20minutes. There were no conversions and the mean hospital stay was 5 days. This technology is currently being used worldwide in different surgical centres because of its advantages that have been clinically demonstrated by various studies. We report the first colorectal surgical cases in Mexico, with promising results. There is enough evidence to support and recommend the use of this technology as a viable and safe option. Copyright © 2016 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  9. Cardiac 82rubidium PET/CT: initial European experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groves, Ashley M.; Dickson, John C.; Kayani, Irfan; Endozo, Raymondo; Blanchard, Patty; Shastry, Manu; Prvulovich, Elizabeth; Waddington, Wendy A.; Ben-Haim, Simona; Bomanji, Jamshed B.; Ell, Peter J.; Speechly-Dick, Marie-Elsya; McEwan, Jean R.

    2007-01-01

    Myocardial perfusion with PET/CT has advantages over conventional SPECT. We describe our initial European experience using 82 Rubidium-PET/CT, as part of a clinical myocardial perfusion service. We studied the first 100 patients (64 male; 36 female, mean age = 60: SD +/-12.5y, mean body mass index = 30: SD +/-6.9kg/m 2 ) who underwent 82 Rubidium cardiac PET/CT in our institution. Thirty patients had recently undergone coronary angiography. Patients underwent imaging during adenosine infusion and at rest. Images were acquired over 5 minutes using a GE-PET/CT instrument. Image quality was described as good, adequate or inadequate. Images were reported patient-by-patient by a minimum of five nuclear medicine physicians. A segment-by-segment analysis (17-segment model) was also performed. Image quality was good in 77%, adequate 23% and inadequate 0%. There was no statistical difference in image quality between obese and non-obese patients (Fisher's exact test, p = 0.2864). 59% had normal perfusion studies, 29% had inducible ischaemia, 12% had myocardial infarction (11% with super added ischaemia). There was reduced 82 Rubidium uptake in 132/1700 segments during stress. There was reduced 82 Rubidium uptake at rest in 42/1700 segments. The 82 Rubidium PET/CT findings were consistent with the angiographic findings in 28/30 cases. We show that, even from initial use of 82 Rubidium, it is possible to perform myocardial perfusion studies quickly with good image quality, even in the obese. The PET findings correlated well in the third of the cases where angiography was available. As such, 82 Rubidium cardiac PET/CT is likely to be an exciting addition to the European nuclear physician/ cardiologist's radionuclide imaging arsenal. (orig.)

  10. Performance of core exit thermocouple for PWR accident management action in vessel top break LOCA simulation experiment at OECD/NEA ROSA project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Mitsuhiro; Takeda, Takeshi; Nakamura, Hideo

    2009-01-01

    Presented are experiment results of the Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF) conducted at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) with a focus on core exit thermocouple (CET) performance to detect core overheat during a vessel top break loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) simulation experiment. The CET temperatures are used to start accident management (AM) action to quickly depressurize steam generator (SG) secondary side in case of core temperature excursion. Test 6-1 is first test of the OECD/NEA ROSA Project started in 2005, simulating withdraw of a control rod drive mechanism penetration nozzle at the vessel top head. The break size is equivalent to 1.9% cold leg break. The AM action was initiated when CET temperature rose up to 623K. There was no reflux water fallback onto the CETs during the core heat-up period. The core overheat, however, was detected with a time delay of about 230s. In addition, a large temperature discrepancy was observed between the CETs and the hottest core region. This paper clarifies the reason of time delay and temperature discrepancy between the CETs and heated core during boil-off including three-dimensional steam flows in the core and core exit. The paper discusses applicability of the LSTF CET performance to pressurized water reactor (PWR) conditions and a possibility of alternative indicators for earlier AM action than in Test 6-1 is studied by using symptom-based plant parameters such as a reactor vessel water level detection. (author)

  11. The role of personality traits and driving experience in self-reported risky driving behaviors and accident risk among Chinese drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Da; Zhang, Rui; Qu, Xingda

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the role of personality traits and driving experience in the prediction of risky driving behaviors and accident risk among Chinese population. A convenience sample of drivers (n=511; mean (SD) age=34.2 (8.8) years) completed a self-report questionnaire that was designed based on validated scales for measuring personality traits, risky driving behaviors and self-reported accident risk. Results from structural equation modeling analysis demonstrated that the data fit well with our theoretical model. While showing no direct effects on accident risk, personality traits had direct effects on risky driving behaviors, and yielded indirect effects on accident risk mediated by risky driving behaviors. Both driving experience and risky driving behaviors directly predicted accident risk and accounted for 15% of its variance. There was little gender difference in personality traits, risky driving behaviors and accident risk. The findings emphasized the importance of personality traits and driving experience in the understanding of risky driving behaviors and accident risk among Chinese drivers and provided new insight into the design of evidence-based driving education and accident prevention interventions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The PIOTRON: initial performance, preparation and experience with pion therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Von Essen, C.F.; Blattmann, H.; Crawford, J.F.; Fessenden, P.; Pedroni, E.; Perret, C.; Salzmann, M.; Shortt, K.; Walder, E.

    1982-01-01

    The PIOTRON is a large solid angle superconducting channel built for the use of negative pi-mesons in radiotherapy. The pions are produced by protons of 590 MeV striking a target of molybdenum or beryllium. The pions are divided into 60 channels and deflected twice to enter the treatment volume radially. The momentum and the momentum band for all 60 channels can be chosen and the beam spot of Bragg peak pions at the isocenter of the applicator is a few centimeters in each direction. Dynamic scanning can thus achieve 3-dimensionally shaped treatment volumes. Two different methods are available: the ring scan, using changes of pion range; and the spot scan, involving translation of the patient through the fixed beam spot. Dose distributions of individual and multiple beams were plotted in a cylindrical water phantom. Radiobiological experiments with mammalian cells in gel and with mouse feet were performed. A special beam geometry using a sector of 15 beams was selected for the first treatments of patients with metastatic skin nodules. Six patients were treated. Acute skin reactions were scored and compared with those from orthovoltage therapy with comparable beam geometry. The RBE for 10 fractions is between 1.4 and 1.5. The next step involved treatment of patients inside water-bolus rings in preparation for dynamic therapy. Patients were then treated with the spot scan dynamic mode in the water bolus. The initial responses and reactions are favorable and confirm the feasibility and accuracy of dynamic pion therapy

  13. Initial Experience with ABO-incompatible Live Donor Renal Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Kun Tsai

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The serious shortage of cadaveric organs has prompted the development of ABO-incompatible live donor renal transplantation. We report our experience of the initial two live donor ABO incompatible renal transplants at our hospital. The first patient was a 55-year-old type A female who received a kidney from her AB type husband. The second patient was a 27-year-old type O male who received renal transplantation from his type A father. Preconditioning immunosuppressive therapy in the two patients with tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil and methylprednisolone was started 7 days before transplantation. During the period of preconditioning, double filtration plasmapheresis (DFPP was employed to remove anti-A and -B antibodies. Laparoscopic splenectomy and renal transplantation were performed after the anti-donor ABO antibodies were reduced to a titer of 1:4. Rituximab, a humanized monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody, was administered to the second patient due to a rebound in the anti-A antibody titer during the preconditioning period. Under a tacrolimus-based immunosuppressive regimen, both patients recovered very well without any evidence of rejection. Serum creatinine levels were 1.0 and 1.4 mg/dL at 6 and 3 months after transplantation, respectively. These cases illustrate that with new immunosuppressive agents, DFPP and splenectomy, ABO-incompatible renal transplantation can be successfully conducted in end-stage renal disease patients whose only available live donors are blood group incompatible.

  14. Initial Experience with the Machine Protection System for LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, Ruediger; Dehning, Bernd; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Goddard, Brennan; Lamont, Mike; Siemko, Andrzej; Uythoven, Jan; Wenninger, Jorg; Zerlauth, Markus

    2010-01-01

    For nominal beam parameters at 7 TeV/c each proton beam with a stored energy of 362 MJ threatens to damage accelerator equipment in case of uncontrolled beam loss. These parameters will only be reached after some years of operation, however, a small fraction of this energy is already sufficient to damage accelerator equipment or experiments. The correct functioning of the machine protection systems is vital during the different operational phases already for initial operation. When operating the complex magnet system, with and without beam, safe operation relies on the protection and interlock systems for the superconducting circuits. For safe injection and transfer of the beams from SPS to LHC, transfer line parameters are monitored, beam absorbers must be in the correct position and the LHC must be ready to accept beam. At the end of a fill and in case of failures beams must be properly extracted onto the dump blocks, for some types of failure within less than few hundred microseconds. Safe operation requir...

  15. [Aortic valve preservation in Marfan syndrome. Initial experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forteza, Alberto; Cortina, Jose M; Sánchez, Violeta; Centeno, Jorge; López, M Jesús; Pérez de la Sota, Enrique; Rufilanchas, Juan J

    2007-05-01

    Preservation of the aortic valve using the technique described by David has been shown to be as effective as the Bentall-De Bono procedure. It avoids both the need for long-term anticoagulation and the complications associated with mechanical prostheses. We report our initial experience using this technique in patients with Marfan syndrome. Between April 2004 and April 2006, we used the David reimplantation technique in 40 patients with an aortic root aneurysm. Eighteen patients had Marfan syndrome. Their median age was 29 years (13-55 years). Echocardiography showed that the median diameter of the aortic sinus was 53 mm (46-59 mm). In 17 patients, aortic valve preservation was possible. No patient died during hospitalization and there were no significant complications. On echocardiography at discharge, no patient had greater than grade-II aortic regurgitation. During a median follow-up period of 8 months (1-24 months), one patient died due to rupture of an abdominal aneurysm. The others are all in New York Heart Association class I. Preservation of the aortic valve by means of valve reimplantation produced excellent results. It avoided both the thromboembolic and hemorrhagic complications associated with prostheses and the need for long-term anticoagulation. If reimplanted valves continue to function adequately over the long term, this technique should become the treatment of choice for aneurysms of the ascending aorta in patients with Marfan syndrome.

  16. ADASIR system: a Cuban learning experience from accidents and promotion of radiation safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferro Fernandez, Ruben; Ilizastigui Perez, Fidel; Fuente Puch, Andres de la

    2010-01-01

    The Cuban Regulatory Authority is carrying out a National Program for fostering and development of Safety Culture taking into account the wide recognition of the Human factors contribution to radiological events. The program includes the introduction of new regulatory practices and initiatives in order to increase the safety culture in Cuban facilities. The most recent of those initiatives is the System for Radiological Event Analysis, Dissemination and Learning, called ADASIR (Initials of the System's name in Spanish). The main purpose of this system is to provide a better understanding and knowledge of any radiological event reported both in the country and abroad reducing, this way, the possibility of a new occurrence of a similar event in our facilities. A team of regulatory and external experts make together a detailed review of all available information about the event and identify possible root causes, failed barriers and other important data of national interest. The results of such review are documented and sent to any Cuban facility or organization with potential for similar occurrence according to the equipment and practices they have. The document includes an specific checklist which could be used by the facilities to make a self-assessment and evaluate theirs strength and weakness in regards to a similar event. This paper presents the main characteristics and results of this new experience of Cuban Regulatory Authority. (author)

  17. Initial experience of two national centers in transcatheter aortic prosthesis implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lluberas, Sebastián; Abizaid, Alexandre; Siqueira, Dimytri; Ramos, Auristela; Costa, J Ribamar; Arrais, Magaly; Kambara, Antônio; Bihan, David Le; Sousa, Amanda; Sousa, J Eduardo

    2014-04-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation is an effective alternative to surgical treatment of severe aortic stenosis in patients who are inoperable or at high surgical risk. To report the immediate and follow-up clinical and echocardiographic results of the initial experience of transcatheter aortic valve implantation. From 2009 June to 2013 February, 112 patients underwent transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Mean age was 82.5 ± 6.5 years, and the logistic EuroSCORE was 23.6 ± 13.5. Procedural success was 84%. After the intervention, a reduction in the mean systolic gradient was observed (pre: 54.7 ± 15.3 vs. post: 11.7 ± 4.0 mmHg; p < 0.01). Cerebrovascular accidents occurred in 3.6%, vascular complications in 19% and permanent pacemaker was required by 13% of the patients. Thirty-day mortality and at follow-up of 16 ± 11 months was 14% and 8.9% respectively. The presence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was the only predictor of mortality at 30 days and at follow-up. During follow up, aortic valve area and mean systolic gradient did not change significantly. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation is an effective and safe procedure for the treatment of aortic stenosis in high-surgical risk or inoperable patients. The presence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was the only independent predictor of mortality identified both in the first month post-intervention and at follow-up.

  18. Performance experiments on the in-vessel core catcher during severe accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Kyoung Ho; Park, Rae Joon; Cho, Young Rho; Kim, Sang Baik

    2004-01-01

    A US-Korean International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (INERI) project has been initiated by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Seoul National University (SNU), Pennsylvania State University (PSU), and the Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) to determine if IVR is feasible for high power reactors up to 1500 MWe by investigating the performance of enhanced ERVC and in-vessel core catcher. This program is initially focusing on the Korean Advanced Power Reactor 1400 MWe (APR1400) design. As for the enhancement of the coolability through the ERVC, boiling tests are conducted by using appropriate coating material on the vessel outer surface to promote downward facing boiling and selecting an improved vessel/insulation design to facilitate water flow and steam venting through the insulation in this program. Another approach for successful IVR are investigated by applying the in-vessel core catcher to provide an 'engineered gap' between the relocated core materials and the water-filled reactor vessel and a preliminary design for an in-vessel core catcher was developed during the first year of this program. Feasibility experiments using the LAVA facility, named LAVA-GAP experiments, are in progress to investigate the core catcher performance based on the conceptual design of the in-vessel core catcher proposed in this INERI project. The experiments were performed using 60kg of Al 2 O 3 thermite melt as a core material simulant with a 1/8 linear scale mock-up of the reactor vessel lower plenum. The hemispherical in-vessel core catcher was installed inside the lower head vessel maintaining a uniform gap of 10mm from the inner surface of the lower head vessel. Two types of the core catchers were used in these experiments. The first one was a single layered in-vessel core catcher without internal coating and the second one was a two layered in-vessel core catcher with an internal coating of 0.5mm-thick ZrO 2 via the plasma

  19. Scaling and design analyses of a scaled-down, high-temperature test facility for experimental investigation of the initial stages of a VHTR air-ingress accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arcilesi, David J.; Ham, Tae Kyu; Kim, In Hun; Sun, Xiaodong; Christensen, Richard N.; Oh, Chang H.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A 1/8th geometric-scale test facility that models the VHTR hot plenum is proposed. • Geometric scaling analysis is introduced for VHTR to analyze air-ingress accident. • Design calculations are performed to show that accident phenomenology is preserved. • Some analyses include time scale, hydraulic similarity and power scaling analysis. • Test facility has been constructed and shake-down tests are currently being carried out. - Abstract: A critical event in the safety analysis of the very high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR) is an air-ingress accident. This accident is initiated, in its worst case scenario, by a double-ended guillotine break of the coaxial cross vessel, which leads to a rapid reactor vessel depressurization. In a VHTR, the reactor vessel is located within a reactor cavity that is filled with air during normal operating conditions. Following the vessel depressurization, the dominant mode of ingress of an air–helium mixture into the reactor vessel will either be molecular diffusion or density-driven stratified flow. The mode of ingress is hypothesized to depend largely on the break conditions of the cross vessel. Since the time scales of these two ingress phenomena differ by orders of magnitude, it is imperative to understand under which conditions each of these mechanisms will dominate in the air ingress process. Computer models have been developed to analyze this type of accident scenario. There are, however, limited experimental data available to understand the phenomenology of the air-ingress accident and to validate these models. Therefore, there is a need to design and construct a scaled-down experimental test facility to simulate the air-ingress accident scenarios and to collect experimental data. The current paper focuses on the analyses performed for the design and operation of a 1/8th geometric scale (by height and diameter), high-temperature test facility. A geometric scaling analysis for the VHTR, a time

  20. Experiments for post accident hydrogen dispersion in F.M. vault using helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajaj, S.S.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Mishra, S.

    1994-01-01

    Under certain postulated accident scenarios involving a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) simultaneous with impairment of Emergency Core Cooling (ECC), generation of hydrogen due to reaction between the zirconium clad and coolant is predicted in the coolant channel. The hydrogen generated in the coolant channels would eventually get released either in Fuelling Machine (FM) vault or in the pump room atmosphere depending on the location of the break. Analytical studies carried out so far to estimate the time dependent hydrogen concentration in the accident FM Vault consider the entire vault as a single volume. Tests were, therefore, planned to assess the mixing within the FM vault atmosphere with and without the availability of cooling fan units by releasing a known quantity of helium (instead of hydrogen) at selected locations and monitoring the relative concentration of helium in air at various locations. Test was conducted by releasing about 360 1 helium over a period of to 4 minutes at preselected locations and by measuring the relative concentration (leak rates indicated by helium leak detectors) at various locations in the FM vault. The results of cases with fans operating indicate repeatable and consistent trends of good mixing in the vault. For other cases (non turbulent, still condition) the results are sensitive to various factors including orientation of release. The former set of cases (turbulent. fans operating) are more relevant for postulated accident conditions. (author). 1 tab., 18 figs

  1. Percutaneous MR-guided cryoablation of prostate cancer: initial experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gangi, Afshin; Tsoumakidou, Georgia; Abdelli, Omar; Buy, Xavier; Mathelin, Michel de; Jacqmin, Didier; Lang, Herve

    2012-01-01

    We report our initial experience and the technical feasibility of transperineal prostate cryoablation under MR guidance. Percutaneous MR-guided cryoablation was performed in 11 patients with prostatic adenocarcinoma contraindicated for surgery (mean age: 72 years, mean Gleason score: 6.45, mean prostate-specific antigen (PSA): 6.21 ng/ml, T1-2c/N0/M0, mean: prostate volume 36.44 ml). Free-hand probe positioning was performed under real-time MR imaging. Four to seven cryoprobes were inserted into the prostate, depending on gland volume. The ice ball was monitored using real-time and high-resolution BLADE multi-planar imaging. Patients were followed at 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months after the procedure with serum PSA level and post-ablation MRI. Prostate cryoablation was technically feasible in 10/11 patients. The ice ball was clearly and sharply visualised in all cases as a signal-void area. Mean ice-ball volume was 53.3 ml. Mean follow-up was 15 months (range: 1-25). Mean PSA nadir was 0.33 ng/ml (range: 0.02-0.94 ng/ml). Mean hospitalisation was 5 days (range: 3-13). Complications included a urethro-rectal fistula, urinary infection, transient dysuria and scrotal pain. MR-guided prostate cryoablation is feasible and promising, with excellent monitoring of the ice ball. Future perspectives could include the use of MR guidance for focal prostate cancer cryotherapy. (orig.)

  2. Percutaneous MR-guided cryoablation of prostate cancer: initial experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gangi, Afshin; Tsoumakidou, Georgia; Abdelli, Omar; Buy, Xavier [University Hospital of Strasbourg, Department of Interventional Radiology, Strasbourg (France); Mathelin, Michel de [University of Strasbourg, Lsiit, Strasbourg (France); Jacqmin, Didier; Lang, Herve [University Hospital of Strasbourg, Department of Urology, Strasbourg (France)

    2012-08-15

    We report our initial experience and the technical feasibility of transperineal prostate cryoablation under MR guidance. Percutaneous MR-guided cryoablation was performed in 11 patients with prostatic adenocarcinoma contraindicated for surgery (mean age: 72 years, mean Gleason score: 6.45, mean prostate-specific antigen (PSA): 6.21 ng/ml, T1-2c/N0/M0, mean: prostate volume 36.44 ml). Free-hand probe positioning was performed under real-time MR imaging. Four to seven cryoprobes were inserted into the prostate, depending on gland volume. The ice ball was monitored using real-time and high-resolution BLADE multi-planar imaging. Patients were followed at 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months after the procedure with serum PSA level and post-ablation MRI. Prostate cryoablation was technically feasible in 10/11 patients. The ice ball was clearly and sharply visualised in all cases as a signal-void area. Mean ice-ball volume was 53.3 ml. Mean follow-up was 15 months (range: 1-25). Mean PSA nadir was 0.33 ng/ml (range: 0.02-0.94 ng/ml). Mean hospitalisation was 5 days (range: 3-13). Complications included a urethro-rectal fistula, urinary infection, transient dysuria and scrotal pain. MR-guided prostate cryoablation is feasible and promising, with excellent monitoring of the ice ball. Future perspectives could include the use of MR guidance for focal prostate cancer cryotherapy. (orig.)

  3. An assessment of core wide coherency effects in the multichannel modeling of the initiating phase of a severe accident in a sodium fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guyot, M.; Gubernatis, P.; Suteau, C.; Le Tellier, R.; Lecerf, J.

    2014-01-01

    To consolidate the safety assessment for liquid-metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs), hypothetical core disruptive accident (HCDA) sequences have been extensively studied over the past decades. Numerous analyses of the so called initiating phase (or primary phase) of a HCDA have been made with the safety analysis system code SAS4A. The SAS4A accident analysis code requires that subassemblies or groups of subassemblies be represented together as independent channels. For simulating a severe accident sequence, a subassembly-to-channel assignment procedure has to be implemented to produce the consistent SAS4A input decks. Generally, one uses imposed criteria over relevant reactor parameters to determine the subassembly to- channel arrangement. The multiple-assembly-per-channel approach introduces core wide coherency effects, which can affect the reactivity balance and therefore the overall accident development. In this paper, a subassembly-to channel assignment procedure based on the subassembly power-to-flow ratio is presented and implemented to generate the SAS4A input decks over a range of parameter values. The corresponding SAS4A calculations have been performed on a large LMFBR. The purpose of the present series of calculations is to investigate the magnitude of errors encountered in the analysis of the initiating phase related to the subassembly-to-channel arrangement selection, by comparison with a one-subassembly-per-channel reference solution. It appears that a refinement in the channel arrangement substantially reduces core wide coherency effects. Analysis of the calculations also suggests that an accurate representation of the scenario requires the number of channels to be on approximately the same order of magnitude as the total number of subassemblies. Numerical results are examined to provide the reader with quantitative measurements of bias related to subassembly to- channel arrangement. (authors)

  4. Experience in the analysis of accidents and incidents involving the transport of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warner-Jones, S.M.; Hughes, J.S.; Shaw, K.B.

    2002-01-01

    Some half a million packages containing radioactive materials are transported to, from and within the UK annually. Accidents and incidents involving these shipments are rare. However, there is always the potential for such an event, which could lead to a release of the contents of a package or an increase in radiation level caused by damaged shielding. These events could result in radiological consequences for transport workers. As transport occurs in the public environment, such events could also lead to radiation exposures of members of the public. The UK Department for Transport (DfT), together with the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) have supported, for almost 20 years, work to compile, analyse and report on accidents and incidents that occur during the transport of radioactive materials. Annual reports on these events have been produced for twelve years. The details of these events are recorded in the Radioactive Materials Transport Event Database (RAMTED) maintained by the National Radiological Protection Board on behalf of the DfT and HSE. Information on accidents and incidents dates back to 1958. RAMTED currently includes information of 708 accidents and incidents, covering the period 1958 to 2000. This paper presents a summary of the data covering this period, identifying trends and lessons learned together with a discussion of some examples. It was found that, historically, the most significant exposures were received as a result of accidents involving the transport of industrial radiography sources. However, the frequency and severity of these events has decreased considerably in the later years of this study due to improvements in training, awareness and equipment. The International Atomic Energy Agency and the Nuclear Energy Agency, have established the international nuclear event scale (INES), which is described in detail in a users' guide. The INES has been revised to fully include transport events, and the information in RAMTED has been reviewed

  5. Initial experience with AcQsim CT simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michalski, Jeff M.; Gerber, Russell; Bosch, Walter R.; Harms, William; Matthews, John W.; Purdy, James A.; Perez, Carlos A.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: We recently replaced our university developed CT simulator prototype with a commercial grade spiral CT simulator (Picker AcQsim) that is networked with three independent virtual simulation workstations and our 3D radiation therapy planning (3D-RTP) system multiple workstations. This presentation will report our initial experience with this CT simulation device and define criteria for optimum clinical use as well as describe some potential drawbacks of the current system. Methods and Materials: Over a 10 month period, 210 patients underwent CT simulation using the AcQsim. An additional 127 patients had a volumetric CT scan done on the device with their CT data and target and normal tissue contours ultimately transferred to our 3D-RTP system. We currently perform the initial patient localization and immobilization in the CT simulation suite by using CT topograms and a fiducial laser marking system. Immobilization devices, required for all patients undergoing CT simulation, are constructed and registered to a device that defines the treatment table coordinates. Orthogonal anterior and lateral CT topograms document patient alignment and the position of a reference coordinate center. The volumetric CT scan with appropriate CT contrast materials administered is obtained while the patient is in the immobilization device. On average, more than 100 CT slices are obtained per study. Contours defining tumor, target, and normal tissues are drawn on a slice by slice basis. Isocenter definition can be automatically defined within the target volume and marked on the patient and immobilization device before leaving the initial CT simulation session. Virtual simulation is then performed on the patient data set with the assistance of predefined target volumes and normal tissue contours displayed on rapidly computed digital reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) in a manner similar to a conventional fluoroscopic radiotherapy simulator. Lastly, a verification simulation is

  6. Environmental consequences of the Chernobyl accident and their remediation: Twenty years of experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anspaugh, L.R.

    2005-01-01

    The explosion on 26 April 1986 at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant located just 100 km from the city of Kyiv in what was then the Soviet Union and now is Ukraine, and consequent ten days' reactor fire resulted in an unprecedented release of radiation and unpredicted adverse consequences both for the public and the environment. Indeed, the IAEA has characterized the event as the 'foremost nuclear catastrophe in human history' and the largest regional release of radionuclides into the atmosphere. Massive radioactive contamination forced the evacuation of more than 100,000 people from the affected region during 1986, and the relocation, after 1986, of another 200,000 from Belarus, the Russian Federation and Ukraine. Some five million people continue to live in areas contaminated by the accident and have to deal with its environmental, health, social and economic consequences. The national governments of the three affected countries, supported by international organizations, have undertaken costly efforts to remedy contamination, provide medical services and restore the region's social and economic well-being. The accident's consequences were not limited to the territories of Belarus, Russia and Ukraine but resulted in substantial transboundary atmospheric transfer and subsequent contamination of numerous European countries that also encountered problems of radiation protection of their populations, although to less extent than the three more affected countries. Although the accident occurred nearly two decades ago, controversy still surrounds the impact of the nuclear disaster. Therefore the IAEA, in cooperation with FAO, UNDP, UNEP, UNOCHA, UNSCEAR, WHO and The World Bank, as well as the competent authorities of Belarus, the Russian Federation and Ukraine, established the Chernobyl Forum in 2003. The mission of the Forum was - through a series of managerial and expert meetings to generate 'authoritative consensual statements' on the environmental consequences and

  7. Reconstruction of dose loads on population in the initial period of the Chernobyl accident and estimation of thyroid cancer risk in Belarus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krivoruchko, K.; Naumov, A.

    1997-01-01

    The Chernobyl accident caused significant long-term consequences to the environment, public health, and economic status of Belarus. The contamination from short-lived radionuclides, in particular iodine 131, was so high that the subsequent exposure of millions of people has been termed 'iodine shock'. During the first days of the accident, the majority of the dose of radiation received by the residents of Belarus was to the thyroid gland. This will affect the health of the population for a long time to come. The resulting epidemic of childhood thyroid cancer is the first indisputable health after-effect of the Chernobyl accident. Thyroid cancer morbidity among children increased more than 10 fold in the post-Chernobyl period. Maps of cesium 137, which has a half life of 37 years, have been published, but it is evident, that the distribution of thyroid cancer morbidity differs from the known distribution of cesium 137 in soil. Territorial distribution of thyroid cancer morbidity is often compared to distribution of cesium 137 in the soil. This practice is inaccurate but often utilized since no maps of iodine 131 contamination exist, due to its short half life of 8.04 days. Reconstruction of the spatial distribution of short-lived isotopes in the first days after the accident, could clarify the impact of radiation on human health and allow for a spatial and temporal prognosis of the development of the cancer epidemic, particularly, thyroid cancer. Due to the unfortunate fact that the measuring equipment was inadequate to properly monitor the scale of radiation exposure during the early period of the accident, detailed direct information on the deposition of the short-lived radionuclides and the doses to the population has been irretrievably lost. Now the only way to reconstruct the dynamics of the radioecological situation of the initial period of the Chernobyl accident is to make a retrospective assessment of radiation exposures related to the short

  8. ASSESSMENT OF RELIABILITY AND RISK DEGREE FOR ACCIDENT INITIATION AT SLIME STORAGES OF 4th MINING ADMINISTRATION, JSC “BELARUSKALI”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. M. Bohaslauchyk

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Definition of reliability for dams of slime storage embankment is given on the basis of reliability theory and characteristics of reliability and their analysis are presented in the paper. The paper specifies qualitative indices for earth dams which are subdivided in two groups: applicability factors and structural reliability factors. A short analysis of all possible causes for accident initiation at earth dams has been made and the analysis has permitted to pinpoint eleven main objects for diagnosis for slime storage dams. In order to assess risk degree of accident initiation at JSC “Belaruskali” slime storages all possible causes of emergency cases and their probability of occurrence have been analyzed in the paper. The paper acknowledges the fact that dam malfunction is possible, as a rule, due to violation of operational rules and regulations. Main parameters of slime storage state which are to be controlled regularly in the process of its operation have been noted in the paper. Observation results over slime storages, calculations of dam slope stability for normal operation (a principal calculation case and operating irregularities in water seals (a special calculation case. As a stability margin factor is close to 1.0 for a special calculation case, an extreme position of depression curve has been determined for all design sections. It has been recommended to carry out a constant control over its position, and in the case when it reaches its peak value it is necessary to undertake appropriate measures in order to reduce its value. Final expert estimations on probability of accident initiation at the investigated slime storage dams of the 4th Mining Administration, JSC “Belaruskali” have been prepared on the basis of the analysis comprising all the required factors. A conclusion has been made about low risk degree of their destruction.

  9. Experience with COSYMA in an international intercomparison of probabilistic accident consequence assessment codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasemann, I.; Jones, J.A.; Steen, J. van der; Wonderen, E. van

    1996-01-01

    The Commission of the European Communities and the Nuclear Energy Agency of the OECD have organized an international exercise to compare the predictions of accident consequence assessment codes, and to identify those features of the models which lead to differences in the predicted results. Alongside this, a further exercise was undertaken in which the COSYMA code was used independently by several different organizations. Some of the findings of the COSYMA users' exercise are described that have general applications to accident consequence assessments. A number of areas are identified in which further work on accident consequence models may be justified. These areas, which are also of interest for codes other than COSYMA, are (a) the calculation and averaging of doses and risks to people sheltered in different types of buildings, particularly with respect to the evaluation of early health effects; (b) the modeling of long-duration releases and their description as a series of shorter releases; (c) meteorological sampling for results at a certain location, specifically for use with trajectory models of atmospheric dispersion; and (d) aspects of calculating probabilities of consequences at a point

  10. Radiolysis of Fricke solution: initial experiments with the pelletron facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, S.B.; Rao, B.S.M.

    1994-01-01

    Experimental details of heavy ion irradiation of aqueous solutions using the Nuclear Science Centre (NSC) pelletron facility and the initial results from the radiolysis of Fricke solution using oxygen-16 ions are reported. (author). 4 refs., 1 fig

  11. Initial integration of accident safety, waste management, recycling, effluent, and maintenance considerations for low-activation materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piet, S.J.; Herring, J.S.; Cheng, E.T.; Fetter, S.

    1991-01-01

    A true low-activation material should ideally achieve all of the following objectives: 1. The possible prompt dose at the site boundary from 100% release of the inventory should be <2 Sv (200 rem); hence, the design would be inherently safe in that no possible accident could result in prompt radiation fatalities. 2. The possible cancers from realistic releases should be limited such that the accident risk is <0.1%/yr of the existing background cancer risk to local residents. This includes consideration of elemental volatility. 3. The decay heat should be limited so that active mitigative measures are not needed to protect the investment from cooling transients; hence, the design would be passively safe with respect to decay heat. 4. Used materials could be either recycled or disposed of as near- surface waste. 5. Hands-on maintenance should be possible around coolant system piping and components such as the heat exchanger. 6. Effluent of activation products should be minor compared to the major challenge of limiting tritium effluents. The most recent studies in these areas are used to determine which individual elements and engineering materials are low activation. Grades from A (best) to G (worst) are given to each element in the areas of accident safety, recycling, and waste management. Structure/fluid combinations are examined for low-activation effluents and out-of-blanket maintenance. The lowest activation structural materials are silicon carbide, vanadium alloys, and ferritic steels. Impurities and minor alloying constituents must be carefully considered. The lowest activation coolants are helium, water, FLiBe, and lithium. The lowest activation breeders are lithium, lithium oxide, lithium silicate, and FLiBe. Designs focusing on these truly low-activation materials will help achieve the excellent safety and environmental potential of fusion energy

  12. Informal Science: Family Education, Experiences, and Initial Interest in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabney, Katherine P.; Tai, Robert H.; Scott, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    Recent research and public policy have indicated the need for increasing the physical science workforce through development of interest and engagement with informal and formal science, technology, engineering, and mathematics experiences. This study examines the association of family education and physical scientists' informal experiences in…

  13. NARCISS critical stand experiments for studying the nuclear safety in accident water immersion of highly enriched uranium dioxide fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponomarev-Stepnoj, N.N.; Glushkov, E.S.; Bubelev, V.G.

    2005-01-01

    A brief description of the Topaz-2 SNPS designed under scientific supervision of RRC KI in Russia, and of the NARCISS critical facility, is given. At the NARCISS critical facility, neutronic peculiarities and nuclear safety issues of the Topaz-2 system reactor were studied experimentally. This work is devoted to a detailed description of experiments on investigation of criticality safety in accident water immersion og highly enriched uranium dioxide fuel elements, performed at the NARCISS facility. The experiments were carried out at water-moderated critical assemblies with varying height, number, and spacing of fuel elements. The results obtained in the critical experiments, computational models of the investigated critical configurations, and comparison of the computational and experimental results are given [ru

  14. Sensitivity analysis for CORSOR models simulating fission product release in LOFT-LP-FP-2 severe accident experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoseyni, Seyed Mohsen [Islamic Azad Univ., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Basic Sciences; Islamic Azad Univ., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Young Researchers and Elite Club; Pourgol-Mohammad, Mohammad [Sahand Univ. of Technology, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Yousefpour, Faramarz [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    This paper deals with simulation, sensitivity and uncertainty analysis of LP-FP-2 experiment of LOFT test facility. The test facility simulates the major components and system response of a pressurized water reactor during a LOCA. MELCOR code is used for predicting the fission product release from the core fuel elements in LOFT LP-FP-2 experiment. Moreover, sensitivity and uncertainty analysis is performed for different CORSOR models simulating release of fission products in severe accident calculations for nuclear power plants. The calculated values for the fission product release are compared under different modeling options to the experimental data available from the experiment. In conclusion, the performance of 8 CORSOR modeling options is assessed for available modeling alternatives in the code structure.

  15. Analysis of an out-of-pile experiment for materials redistribution under core disruptive accident condition of fast breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawada, Tetsuo; Ninokata, Hisashi; Shimizu, Akinao

    1995-01-01

    Calculation of one of the SIMBATH experiments was performed using the SIMMER-II code. The experiments were intended to simulate the fuel pin disintegration, the molten materials relocation and following materials redistribution that could occur during core disruptive accidents assumed in fast breeder reactors. The calculation by SIMMER-II showed that the incorporated step-wise fuel pin disintegration model and the modified particle jamming model were capable of reproducing the course of materials relocation within the identified ranges of the parameters which governed the blockages formation, i.e. the characteristic radius of solid particles jamming and/or sieving out in the flow and the effective particle viscosity. In particular the final materials redistribution calculated by SIMMER-II very well reproduced the experiment. This fact made it possible to interpret theoretically the mechanisms of flow blockages formation and related materials redistribution. (author)

  16. Accidents - Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This file is devoted to the Chernobyl accident. It is divided in four parts. The first part concerns the accident itself and its technical management. The second part is relative to the radiation doses and the different contaminations. The third part reports the sanitary effects, the determinists ones and the stochastic ones. The fourth and last part relates the consequences for the other European countries with the case of France. Through the different parts a point is tackled with the measures taken after the accident by the other countries to manage an accident, the cooperation between the different countries and the groups of research and studies about the reactors safety, and also with the international medical cooperation, specially for the children, everything in relation with the Chernobyl accident. (N.C.)

  17. Experience in Russia on information and analytical support of activities associated with recovering of radiation accidents consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linge, I.I.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: In spite of substantial practical experience on population protection against radiation that was obtained in the USSR by the moment of the Chernobyl accident it was not possible to implement it most efficiently because of institutional disconnection. Strong necessity of serious coordination of activities an accident consequences liquidation in the scale of the country became obvious by the end of 1980s. In 1990, a decision on a unique program on the Chernobyl accident consequences liquidation was taken. This program, in particular, provided for systematic analytical support of actions an accident consequences implementation. The present report describes the basic decisions on information support of the SU government bodies that were partly realized in 1991 and further developed in the following years. Since 1991, Goscomchernobyl of Russia and, since 1994, EMERCOM of Russia is the Federal body on the consequences minimization. Since 1991 till now, the information system UIS Chernobyl is functioning in the framework of the body. The system includes the Central bank of generalized data (CBGD) and appropriate software. Purposes, structure and contents of CBGD are described in detail in the report. One of the section of CBGD includes data on radiation hygienic characteristics of more then 10,000 settlements in Russia. UIS Chernobyl is the basis for objective estimation of a situation at contaminated after the Chernobyl accident territories, state programs construction, forecasts and preparation of national reports. Systematic data on radiation hygienic situation analysis indicates that the protective measures complex realized in Russia allowed decreasing population irradiation to the large extent. It is necessary to note that the majority of protective measures exhausted their efficiency far ago. For example, spending on the preventing of 1 man/Sv of collective dose in realization of such action as restriction and control of locally produced food in most

  18. [The accident at work and the occupational diseases in the construction industry: the experience of Inail].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemente, M; Goggiamani, A

    2012-01-01

    The authors analyze the budget accident at work and occupational diseases in the construction industry through the data banks Inail. This analysis is carried out by comparing the data for this sector of economic activity (classification of economic activities ATECO 2002) with those general with particular attention to how an event, occurrence, mortality, by plotting the trends of this phenomenon than in previous years. It also analyzes the phenomenon of the complaints of occupational diseases with the comparison with the general data as well as with the analysis of the most frequent types of occupational diseases in this sector in the last two years.

  19. Medical activities at nuclear disaster. Experience in the accident of Fukushima nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Arifumi

    2013-01-01

    The Great East Japan Earthquake brought multiple disaster resulting nuclear accident at Fukushima. Existing medical system for emergency radiation exposure did not work well. Present medical system for the nuclear disaster is maintained temporary with supports by teams from regions other than Fukushima Pref. The radiation protection action must be both for the public and the medical persons. Medical activities for nuclear disaster are still in progress now. Medical system for radiation exposure should be maintained in future for works of decommissioning of reactors. Problems, however, may exist in economy and education of medical personnel. (K.Y.)

  20. Initial experience with robotic pancreatic surgery in Singapore: single institution experience with 30 consecutive cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Brian K P; Low, Tze-Yi; Lee, Ser-Yee; Chan, Chung-Yip; Chung, Alexander Y F; Ooi, London L P J

    2018-05-24

    Presently, the worldwide experience with robotic pancreatic surgery (RPS) is increasing although widespread adoption remains limited. In this study, we report our initial experience with RPS. This is a retrospective review of a single institution prospective database of 72 consecutive robotic hepatopancreatobiliary surgeries performed between 2013 and 2017. Of these, 30 patients who underwent RPS were included in this study of which 25 were performed by a single surgeon. The most common procedure was robotic distal pancreatectomy (RDP) which was performed in 20 patients. This included eight subtotal pancreatectomies, two extended pancreatecto-splenectomies (en bloc gastric resection) and 10 spleen-saving-RDP. Splenic preservation was successful in 10/11 attempted spleen-saving-RDP. Eight patients underwent pancreaticoduodenectomies (five hybrid with open reconstruction), one patient underwent a modified Puestow procedure and one enucleation of uncinate tumour. Four patients had extended resections including two RDP with gastric resection and two pancreaticoduodenectomies with vascular resection. There was one (3.3%) open conversion and seven (23.3%) major (>Grade II) morbidities. Overall, there were four (13.3%) clinically significant (Grade B) pancreatic fistulas of which three required percutaneous drainage. These occurred after three RDP and one robotic enucleation. There was one reoperation for port-site hernia and no 30-day/in-hospital mortalities. The median post-operative stay was 6.5 (range: 3-36) days and there were six (20%) 30-day readmissions. Our initial experience showed that RPS can be adopted safely with a low open conversion rate for a wide variety of procedures including pancreaticoduodenectomy. © 2018 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  1. Effects of sodium fires on structures and materials. Practical experience with sodium leakage accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freudenstein, K.F.

    1989-01-01

    A few sodium leakage, incidents happened in SNR 300 nuclear power plant during pre-nuclear operation which were of minor importance with respect to sodium fires. The most important sodium fire accident in the past happened in the Almeria Solar platform in Spain during the attempt to repair a valve while leaving accidentally the circuit under 4 bar overpressure. Considerable damage to pipes, valves, its insulation and its support structures was observed in the influence zone of the fire. Post accident analysis gave a leaked mass of about 14 m 3 , at a sodium temperature of 225 deg. C, the leakage lasting approximately half an hour, and burning under convective heat exchange with the external air in a section of 40 m 2 up to a height of 6 m down to the catch pans. Some local temperatures were determined by metallurgical means, integral support temperatures estimated from mechanical deformation observed. From these temperatures it was concluded that a massive spray type fire must have happened. The results fall in the interpretation range of sodium-spray fire test results. (author)

  2. Use of radiological accident experience in establishing appropriate perspectives in emergency planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selby, J.M.; Vallario, E.J.; Moeller, D.W.; Stephan, J.G.

    1987-08-01

    Within a nuclear facility, an emergency can range from a situation that only involves the employees of that facility to a series of events that have both onsite and offsite consequences. Analyses of nuclear and non-nuclear emergencies can provide valuable information on the causes of, as well as the problems encountered during emergencies. Reports on facility emergencies indicate that up to 90% involve human error. Such events occur more frequently during the night shifts or on weekends. These occurrences may result from the absence of experienced personnel as well as the reduced alertness of onsite personnel. Therefore, this paper emphasizes the human element in a review of accidents that have occurred at nuclear facilities including Windscale, SL-1, the Recuplex criticality, the Wood River Junction criticality, the Browns Ferry fire, Three Mile Island, and Chernobyl. These accidents are described, and their consequences are evaluated. The information obtained from these evaluations may be useful for inclusion in nuclear plant operating and testing procedures. 21 refs

  3. Multi-detector CT knee arthrography - initial experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomson, J.M.Z.; Fallon, M.; Breidahl, W.H.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Traditional plain film arthrography can achieve reasonable accuracy and is an accepted method of investigation of patients with knee pain and possible meniscal tear. Multi-detector CT can potentially provide a more detailed and accurate examination due to its high-resolution crosssectional and multi-planar capabilities. The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of our technique. All patients who underwent a multi-detector CT knee arthrogram in an initial 8 month period were identified. Initially the referring clinician was contacted. If the patient was referred to an orthopaedic surgeon the outcome of orthopaedic review was recorded using clinical, arthroscopic and / or MRI follow-up of the patient population. One hundred and twelve patients had a Multi-detector CT knee arthrogram performed within and 8 month period. Follow-up information was received in 69.7% of patients. Of these 68.9% had orthopaedic assessment - of which 69.2% underwent a knee arthroscopy.There was total agreement of findings in 67%, agreement of meniscal findings in 67% and chondral findings in 100%. Overall, orthopaedic opinion agreed with CT findings in 76.9%. At this stage, all meniscal tears not described in the initial CT arthrogram report have in retrospect been visible. Multi-detector CT knee arthrography is an accurate and elegant technique for investigation of knee pain, providing information in a format familiar to those reporting knee MRI. There is an initial learning curve. The technique is particularly useful in chondral assessment. It is accurate for meniscal pathology, although caution and recognition of potential pitfalls is required. Copyright (2002) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  4. European Community initiatives and experience in scientific and technical information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven, G [Commission of the European Communities, Luxembourg (Luxembourg)

    1990-05-01

    Scientific and technical information (STI) is an increasingly important resource for R and D and industrial development. The rapid development of the market for electronic information and the increasing potential offered through new information technologies require new approaches for the collection and dissemination of STI. Activities of the Commission of the European Communities (CEC) in this area are reviewed. More recent CEC initiatives in the areas of biotechnology information and factual materials data banks have proved the need for international collaboration and for the implementation of infrastructural measures as a basis for such collaboration. The implementation of the EC Demonstrator Programme on materials property data systems has evaluated the potential of eleven European materials data banks against the market requirements and has helped to launch wide international collaboration. The concluding European workshop on materials data systems has developed a set of recommendations for future initiatives. These are shortly reviewed together with initial findings of a study aimed at developing a business plan for the establishment of a biotechnology information infrastructure for the bio-industries and research base in Europe. (author). 3 refs.

  5. European Community initiatives and experience in scientific and technical information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steven, G.

    1990-05-01

    Scientific and technical information (STI) is an increasingly important resource for R and D and industrial development. The rapid development of the market for electronic information and the increasing potential offered through new information technologies require new approaches for the collection and dissemination of STI. Activities of the Commission of the European Communities (CEC) in this area are reviewed. More recent CEC initiatives in the areas of biotechnology information and factual materials data banks have proved the need for international collaboration and for the implementation of infrastructural measures as a basis for such collaboration. The implementation of the EC Demonstrator Programme on materials property data systems has evaluated the potential of eleven European materials data banks against the market requirements and has helped to launch wide international collaboration. The concluding European workshop on materials data systems has developed a set of recommendations for future initiatives. These are shortly reviewed together with initial findings of a study aimed at developing a business plan for the establishment of a biotechnology information infrastructure for the bio-industries and research base in Europe. (author). 3 refs

  6. Postulated accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullrich, W.

    1980-01-01

    This lecture on 'Postulated Accidents' is the first of a series of lectures on the dynamic and transient behaviour of nuclear power plants, especially pressurized water reactors. The main points covered will be: Reactivity Accidents, Transients (Intact Loop) and Loss of Cooland Accidents (LOCA) including small leak. This lecture will discuss the accident analysis in general, the definition of the various operational phases, the accident classification, and, as an example, an accident sequence analysis on the basis of 'Postulated Accidents'. (orig./RW)

  7. Investigation of break location effects on thermal-hydraulics during intermediate break loss-of-coolant accident experiments at ROSA-III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koizumi, Yasuo; Tasaka, Kanji

    1986-01-01

    The rig of safety assessment (ROSA)-III facility is a volumetrically scaled (1/424) boiling water reactor (BWR/6) system with an electrically heated core designed for integral loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) and emergency core cooling system (ECCS) tests. Break location effects on thermal-hydraulics during intermediate LOCAs were investigated by using four experiments at the ROSA-III, the 15 and 25 % main recirculation pump suction line break (MRPS-B) experiments, the 21 % single-ended jet pump drive line break (JPD-B) experiment and the 15 % main steam line break (MSL-B) experiment. Water injection from the high pressure core spray (HPCS) was not used in any of the experiments. Failure of ECCS actuation by the high containment pressure was also assumed in the tests. In the MRPS-B experiments, the discharge flow turned from low quality fluid to high quality fluid when the downcomer water level dropped to the main recirculation line outlet elevation, which suppressed coolant loss from the vessel and the core. In the JPD-B experiment, the jet pump drive nozzle was covered with low quality fluid and low quality fluid discharge continued even after the downcomer water level reached the jet pump suction elevation. Low quality fluid discharge ceased after the ADS actuation. It suggestes that the JPD-B LOCA has the possibility of causing larger and more severe core dryout and cladding temperature excursion than the MRPS-B LOCA. The MSL-B LOCA was characterized by mixture level swell in the downcomer and the core. The core mixture level swell resulted in the much later core dryout initiation than that in the MRPS-B LOCA, however, ECCS actuation was also delayed because of slow downcomer water level drop. (author)

  8. Tchernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-06-01

    First, R.M.B.K type reactors are described. Then, safety problems are dealt with reactor control, behavior during transients, normal loss of power and behavior of the reactor in case of leak. A possible scenario of the accident of Tchernobyl is proposed: events before the explosion, possible initiators, possible scenario and events subsequent to the core meltdown (corium-concrete interaction, interaction with the groundwater table). An estimation of the source term is proposed first from the installation characteristics and the supposed scenario of the accident, and from the measurements in Europe; radiological consequences are also estimated. Radioactivity measurements (Europe, Scandinavia, Western Europe, France) are given in tables (meteorological maps and fallouts in Europe). Finally, a description of the site is given [fr

  9. CT guided percutaneous needle biopsy of the chest: initial experience

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this article is to report our first experience of CT guided percutaneous thoracic biopsy and to demonstrate the accuracy and safety of this procedure. This was a retrospective study of 28 CT-Guided Percutaneous Needle Biopsies of the Chest performed on 24 patients between November 2014 and April 2015.

  10. Young Asian Women Experiences of the Summer Activities Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Laura

    2002-01-01

    Interviews and observations focused on experiences of 15 young Asian women at a 5-day summer adventure program in southern England. Participants seemed bored with presentations about future career options, activities lost their challenge through repetition, and debriefing was weak. However, the women connected with the transferable skills of trust…

  11. The role of parental risk judgements, transport safety attitudes, transport priorities and accident experiences on pupils' walking to school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdizadeh, Milad; Nordfjaern, Trond; Mamdoohi, Amir Reza; Shariat Mohaymany, Afshin

    2017-05-01

    Walking to school could improve pupils' health condition and might also reduce the use of motorized transport modes, which leads to both traffic congestion and air pollution. The current study aims to examine the role of parental risk judgements (i.e. risk perception and worry), transport safety attitudes, transport priorities and accident experiences on pupils' walking and mode choices on school trips in Iran, a country with poor road safety records. A total of 1078 questionnaires were randomly distributed among pupils at nine public and private schools in January 2014 in Rasht, Iran. Results from valid observations (n=711) showed that parents with high probability assessments of accidents and strong worry regarding pupils' accident risk while walking were less likely to let their children walk to school. Parents with high safety knowledge were also more likely to allow their pupils to walk to school. Parents who prioritized convenience and accessibility in transport had a stronger tendency to choose motorized modes over walking modes. Also, parents who prioritized safety and security in transport were less likely to allow pupils to walk to school. Elasticities results showed that a one percent increase in priorities of convenience and accessibility, priorities of safety and security, car ownership and walking time from home to school reduced walking among pupils by a probability of 0.62, 0.20, 0.86 and 0.57%, respectively. A one percent increase in parental safety knowledge increased the walking probability by around 0.25%. A 1 unit increase in parental probability assessment and worry towards pupils' walking, decreased the probability of choosing walking mode by 0.11 and 0.05, respectively. Policy-makers who aim to promote walking to schools should improve safety and security of the walking facilities and increase parental safety knowledge. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Management of a radiological emergency. Experience feedback and post-accident management; Gestion d'une urgence radiologique. Retour d'experience et gestion post-accidentelle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubiau, Ph. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), 92 - Clamart (France)

    2007-07-15

    In France, the organization of crisis situations and the management of radiological emergency situations are regularly tested through simulation exercises for a continuous improvement. Past severe accidents represent experience feedback resources of prime importance which have led to deep changes in crisis organizations. However, the management of the post-accident phase is still the object of considerations and reflections between the public authorities and the intervening parties. This document presents, first, the nuclear crisis exercises organized in France, then, the experience feedback of past accidents and exercises, and finally, the main aspects to consider for the post-accident management of such events: 1 - Crisis exercises: objectives, types (local, national and international exercises), principles and progress, limits; 2 - Experience feedback: real crises (major accidents, other recent accidental situations or incidents), crisis exercises (experience feedback organization, improvements); 3 - post-accident management: environmental contamination and people exposure, management of contaminated territories, management of populations (additional protection, living conditions, medical-psychological follow up), indemnification, organization during the post-accident phase; 4 - conclusion and perspectives. (J.S.)

  13. Characteristics of initial deposition and behavior of radiocesium in forest ecosystems of different locations and species affected by the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komatsu, Masabumi; Kaneko, Shinji; Ohashi, Shinta; Kuroda, Katsushi; Sano, Tetsuya; Ikeda, Shigeto; Saito, Satoshi; Kiyono, Yoshiyuki; Tonosaki, Mario; Miura, Satoru; Akama, Akio; Kajimoto, Takuya; Takahashi, Masamichi

    2016-01-01

    After the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident, information about stand-level spatial patterns of radiocesium initially deposited in the surrounding forests was essential for predicting the future dynamics of radiocesium and suggesting a management plan for contaminated forests. In the first summer (approximately 6 months after the accident), we separately estimated the amounts of radiocesium ("1"3"4Cs and "1"3"7Cs; Bq m"−"2) in the major components (trees, organic layers, and soils) in forests of three sites with different contamination levels. For a Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica) forest studied at each of the three sites, the radiocesium concentration greatly differed among the components, with the needle and organic layer having the highest concentrations. For these cedar forests, the proportion of the "1"3"7Cs stock in the aboveground tree biomass varied from 22% to 44% of the total "1"3"7Cs stock; it was 44% in highly contaminated sites (7.0 × 10"5 Bq m"−"2) but reduced to 22% in less contaminated sites (1.1 × 10"4 Bq m"−"2). In the intermediate contaminated site (5.0–5.8 × 10"4 Bq m"−"2), 34% of radiocesium was observed in the aboveground tree biomass of the Japanese cedar stand. However, this proportion was considerably smaller (18–19%) in the nearby mixed forests of the Japanese red pine (Pinus densiflora) and deciduous broad-leaved trees. Non-negligible amounts of "1"3"4Cs and "1"3"7Cs were detected in both the sapwood and heartwood of all the studied tree species. This finding suggested that the uptake or translocation of radiocesium had already started within 6 months after the accident. The belowground compartments were mostly present in the organic layer and the uppermost (0–5 cm deep) mineral soil layer at all the study sites. We discussed the initial transfer process of radiocesium deposited in the forest and inferred that the type of initial deposition (i.e., dry versus wet radiocesium deposition

  14. Experiments to evaluate behavior of containment piping bellows under severe accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, L.D.; Parks, M.B.

    1993-01-01

    Bellows are an integral part of the containment pressure boundary in nuclear power plants. They are used at piping penetrations to allow relative movement between piping and the containment wall. In a severe accident they may be subjected to high pressure and temperature, and a combination of axial and lateral deflections. A test program to determine the leak-tight capacity of containment penetration bellows is being conducted at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico. Several different bellows geometries, representative of actual containment bellows, are being subjected to extreme deflections along with pressure and temperature loads. The bellows geometries and loading conditions are described along with the testing apparatus and procedures. A total of thirteen tests have been conducted. The tests showed that withstanding relatively large bellows are capable of deformations, up to, or near, the point of full compression before developing leakage. The test data is presented and discussed

  15. Fuel pin behaviour under conditions of control rod withdrawal accident in CABRI-2 experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papin, Joelle; Lemoine, Francette; Sato, Ikken; Struwe, Dankward; Pfrang, Werner

    1994-01-01

    Simulation of the control rod withdrawal accident has been performed in the international CABRI-2 experimental programme. The tests realized with industrial pins led to clarification of the influence of the pellet design and have shown the important role of fission products on the solid fuel swelling which promotes early pin failure with solid fuel pellet. With annular pellet design, large fuel swelling combined to low smear density leads to degradation of fuel thermal conductivity and thus reduces power to melt. However, the high margin to deterministic failure is confirmed with hollow pellets. Improvements of the modelling were necessary to describe such behaviours in computer codes as SAS-4A, PAPAS-2S and PHYSURAC. (author)

  16. An Initial Approach for Learning Objects from Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-05-02

    algorithm to delineate objects which are then fed to a simple feed-forward neural network without any other processes in the pipeline. Our neural network...These are the basic requirements for the pipeline and are discussed in more detail below. Additionally, we are interested in testing various parts...that continuously learning objects from experience requires mechanisms to do the following: 1) Focus attention on things and stuff of interest . 2

  17. Negative Interest Rates: Central Banks Initiated an Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Aleksey N. Burenin

    2016-01-01

    Negative interest rates appeared as a consequence of economic problems that countries with market economy came across after the crises of2007-2008. The attempts of monetary authorities to stimulate economies with the help of quantitative easing didn't bring the desired result. That's why the central banks once again resorted to a traditional tool of their monetary policy of changing interest rates. But this time they launched an experiment, they used negative interest rates. The European Cent...

  18. Computational fluid dynamics analysis of the initial stages of a VHTR air-ingress accident using a scaled-down model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ham, Tae K., E-mail: taekyu8@gmail.com [Nuclear Engineering Program, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Arcilesi, David J., E-mail: arcilesi.1@osu.edu [Nuclear Engineering Program, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Kim, In H., E-mail: ihkim0730@gmail.com [Nuclear Engineering Program, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Sun, Xiaodong, E-mail: sun.200@osu.edu [Nuclear Engineering Program, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Christensen, Richard N., E-mail: rchristensen@uidaho.edu [Nuclear Engineering Program, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Oh, Chang H. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83402 (United States); Kim, Eung S., E-mail: kes7741@snu.ac.kr [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83402 (United States)

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Uncertainty quantification and benchmark study are performed to validate an ANSYS FLUENT computer model for a depressurization process in a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. • An ANSYS FLUENT computer model of a 1/8th scaled-down geometry of a VHTR hot exit plenum is presented, which is similar to the experimental test facility that has been constructed at The Ohio State University. • Using the computer model of the scaled-down geometry, the effects of the depressurization process and flow oscillations on the subsequent density-driven stratified flow phenomenology are examined computationally. • The effects of the scaled-down hot exit plenum internal structure temperature on the density-driven stratified flow phenomenology are investigated numerically. - Abstract: An air-ingress accident is considered to be one of the design basis accidents of a very high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR). The air-ingress accident is initiated, in its worst-case scenario, by a complete break of the hot duct in what is referred to as a double-ended guillotine break. This leads to an initial loss of the primary helium coolant via depressurization. Following the depressurization process, the air–helium mixture in the reactor cavity could enter the reactor core via the hot duct and hot exit plenum. In the event that air ingresses into the reactor vessel, the high-temperature graphite structures in the reactor core and hot plenum will chemically react with the air, which could lead to damage of in-core graphite structures and fuel, release of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide, core heat up, failure of the structural integrity of the system, and eventually the release of radionuclides to the environment. Studies in the available literature focus on the phenomena of the air ingress accident that occur after the termination of the depressurization, such as density-driven stratified flow, molecular diffusion, and natural circulation. However, a recent study

  19. Cardiac biplane strain imaging: initial in vivo experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopata, R. G. P.; Nillesen, M. M.; Verrijp, C. N.; Singh, S. K.; Lammens, M. M. Y.; van der Laak, J. A. W. M.; van Wetten, H. B.; Thijssen, J. M.; Kapusta, L.; de Korte, C. L.

    2010-02-01

    In this study, first we propose a biplane strain imaging method using a commercial ultrasound system, yielding estimation of the strain in three orthogonal directions. Secondly, an animal model of a child's heart was introduced that is suitable to simulate congenital heart disease and was used to test the method in vivo. The proposed approach can serve as a framework to monitor the development of cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis. A 2D strain estimation technique using radio frequency (RF) ultrasound data was applied. Biplane image acquisition was performed at a relatively low frame rate (dogs with an aortic stenosis. Initial results reveal the feasibility of measuring large radial, circumferential and longitudinal cumulative strain (up to 70%) at a frame rate of 100 Hz. Mean radial strain curves of a manually segmented region-of-interest in the infero-lateral wall show excellent correlation between the measured strain curves acquired in two perpendicular planes. Furthermore, the results show the feasibility and reproducibility of assessing radial, circumferential and longitudinal strains simultaneously. In this preliminary study, three beagles developed an elevated pressure gradient over the aortic valve (Δp: 100-200 mmHg) and myocardial hypertrophy. One dog did not develop any sign of hypertrophy (Δp = 20 mmHg). Initial strain (rate) results showed that the maximum strain (rate) decreased with increasing valvular stenosis (-50%), which is in accordance with previous studies. Histological findings corroborated these results and showed an increase in fibrotic tissue for the hearts with larger pressure gradients (100, 200 mmHg), as well as lower strain and strain rate values.

  20. Cardiac biplane strain imaging: initial in vivo experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopata, R G P; Nillesen, M M; Thijssen, J M; De Korte, C L [Clinical Physics Laboratory, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Verrijp, C N; Lammens, M M Y; Van der Laak, J A W M [Department of Pathology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Singh, S K; Van Wetten, H B [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Kapusta, L [Pediatric Cardiology, Department of Pediatrics, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)], E-mail: R.Lopata@cukz.umcn.nl

    2010-02-21

    In this study, first we propose a biplane strain imaging method using a commercial ultrasound system, yielding estimation of the strain in three orthogonal directions. Secondly, an animal model of a child's heart was introduced that is suitable to simulate congenital heart disease and was used to test the method in vivo. The proposed approach can serve as a framework to monitor the development of cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis. A 2D strain estimation technique using radio frequency (RF) ultrasound data was applied. Biplane image acquisition was performed at a relatively low frame rate (<100 Hz) using a commercial platform with an RF interface. For testing the method in vivo, biplane image sequences of the heart were recorded during the cardiac cycle in four dogs with an aortic stenosis. Initial results reveal the feasibility of measuring large radial, circumferential and longitudinal cumulative strain (up to 70%) at a frame rate of 100 Hz. Mean radial strain curves of a manually segmented region-of-interest in the infero-lateral wall show excellent correlation between the measured strain curves acquired in two perpendicular planes. Furthermore, the results show the feasibility and reproducibility of assessing radial, circumferential and longitudinal strains simultaneously. In this preliminary study, three beagles developed an elevated pressure gradient over the aortic valve ({delta}p: 100-200 mmHg) and myocardial hypertrophy. One dog did not develop any sign of hypertrophy ({delta}p = 20 mmHg). Initial strain (rate) results showed that the maximum strain (rate) decreased with increasing valvular stenosis (-50%), which is in accordance with previous studies. Histological findings corroborated these results and showed an increase in fibrotic tissue for the hearts with larger pressure gradients (100, 200 mmHg), as well as lower strain and strain rate values.

  1. Cardiac biplane strain imaging: initial in vivo experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopata, R G P; Nillesen, M M; Thijssen, J M; De Korte, C L; Verrijp, C N; Lammens, M M Y; Van der Laak, J A W M; Singh, S K; Van Wetten, H B; Kapusta, L

    2010-01-01

    In this study, first we propose a biplane strain imaging method using a commercial ultrasound system, yielding estimation of the strain in three orthogonal directions. Secondly, an animal model of a child's heart was introduced that is suitable to simulate congenital heart disease and was used to test the method in vivo. The proposed approach can serve as a framework to monitor the development of cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis. A 2D strain estimation technique using radio frequency (RF) ultrasound data was applied. Biplane image acquisition was performed at a relatively low frame rate (<100 Hz) using a commercial platform with an RF interface. For testing the method in vivo, biplane image sequences of the heart were recorded during the cardiac cycle in four dogs with an aortic stenosis. Initial results reveal the feasibility of measuring large radial, circumferential and longitudinal cumulative strain (up to 70%) at a frame rate of 100 Hz. Mean radial strain curves of a manually segmented region-of-interest in the infero-lateral wall show excellent correlation between the measured strain curves acquired in two perpendicular planes. Furthermore, the results show the feasibility and reproducibility of assessing radial, circumferential and longitudinal strains simultaneously. In this preliminary study, three beagles developed an elevated pressure gradient over the aortic valve (Δp: 100-200 mmHg) and myocardial hypertrophy. One dog did not develop any sign of hypertrophy (Δp = 20 mmHg). Initial strain (rate) results showed that the maximum strain (rate) decreased with increasing valvular stenosis (-50%), which is in accordance with previous studies. Histological findings corroborated these results and showed an increase in fibrotic tissue for the hearts with larger pressure gradients (100, 200 mmHg), as well as lower strain and strain rate values.

  2. Management support to e-business initiatives: The Croatian experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Spremić

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available After defining e-business and explaining why an evolutionary aspect of moving to e-business is required, the dimensions of e-business is defined with respect to differences between traditional business, partial, or pure e-business. Also, a model for moving to e-business is illustrated. The e-business evolving model is divided into six stages and represents an evolutionary aspect of migrating to e-business. Finally, the results of the research study on current practices in evolving e-business in the most successful Croatian companies are given. In this research, some aspects of business process innovation and e-business usage have been investigated (general e-business issues with levels of e-business usage, key objectives of participating in e-business, alignment of business strategy with e-business initiatives, initiation of e-business projects and e-business planning issues, especially e-business funding. The questionnaire was sent to 400 CEOs or CIOs in Croatian companies selected from the Register of the ‘400 Biggest’ Croatian companies which were ranked according to their 2001 annual revenue and which were most likely to represent the structure of the Croatian economy. Although they represent less than 1% of the total number of registered companies in Croatia, the sampled companies hold 73% of the equity capital of the whole Croatian economy, they contribute with 65% in the total Croatian economy’s export balance and they employ 37% of the total number of people employed in Croatia.

  3. The Planeterrella experiment: from individual initiative to networking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garnier Pierre

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Space weather is a relatively new discipline, which is still largely unknown amongst the wider public despite its increasing importance in all of our daily lives. Outreach activities can promote awareness of space weather. In particular the visual beauty and excitement of the aurora make these lights a wonderful inspirational hook to enhance understanding of space weather in a general audience. A century ago, the Norwegian experimental physicist Kristian Birkeland, one of the founding fathers of modern space science, demonstrated with his Terrella experiment the formation of the aurora. Recently, a modernized version of the Terrella has been designed. This “Planeterrella” experiment allows the visualization of many phenomena that occur in our space environment. Although the Planeterrella was originally a local project, it has developed to become a very successful international public outreach experiment. We believe that its success is due to mainly two factors (i the Planeterrella is not patented and the plans are free to any public institute and (ii the project is widely advertised using national and European scientific networks such as COST ES 0803, as well as press releases, books and web sites. Today, seven Planeterrellas are in operation, four more are under construction in four different countries and several more are being planned. During the last five years, about 50 000 people in Europe have attended live Planeterrella demonstration on the formation of auroral light, the space environment and space weather. Many more have seen the Planeterrella being demonstrated on TV. The Planeterrella received the first international prize for outreach activities from the Europlanet Framework 7 program in 2010 and the French Ministry of Science outreach prize “Le goût des sciences” in November 2012. This paper describes the process that led to the construction of the first Planeterrella and discusses how the Planeterrella project developed

  4. The Planeterrella experiment: from individual initiative to networking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilensten, J.; Provan, G.; Barthelemy, M.; Simon Wedlund, C.; Gronoff, G.; Vanlommel, P.; Brekke, A.; Garnier, P.; Grimald Rochel, S.

    2013-12-01

    Space weather is a relatively new discipline, which is still largely unknown amongst the wider public despite its increasing importance in all of our daily lives. Outreach activities can promote awareness of space weather. In particular the visual beauty and excitement of the aurora make these lights a wonderful inspirational hook to enhance understanding of space weather in a general audience. A century ago, the Norwegian experimental physicist Kristian Birkeland, one of the founding fathers of modern space science, demonstrated with his Terrella experiment the formation of the aurora. Recently, a modernized version of the Terrella has been designed in France. This ';';Planeterrella'' experiment allows the visualization of many phenomena that occur in our space environment. Although the Planeterrella was originally a local project, it has developed to become a very successful international public outreach experiment. We believe that its success is due to mainly two factors (i) the Planeterrella is not patented and the plans are free to any public institute and (ii) the project is widely advertised using national and scientific networks, as well as press releases, books and web sites. Today, nine Planeterrellas are in operation, six more are under construction in five different countries including in the US and several more are being planned. During the last five years, about 55 000 people in Europe have attended live Planeterrella demonstration on the formation of auroral light, the space environment and space weather. Many more have seen the Planeterrella being demonstrated on TV. It is now used for education, outreach, scientific, and artistic purposes. We will describes this process and discuss how the Planeterrella project developed to become an international public outreach phenomenon. We also examine some of the lessons learnt along the way such as patented or not, big or small, automatized or hand-operated, and the cost of the overall project. A star (close

  5. Paediatric magnetic resonance enteroclysis under general anaesthesia - initial experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadigh, Sophie; Chopra, Mark; Olsen, Oeystein E.; Watson, Tom A.; Sury, Michael R.; Shah, Neil

    2017-01-01

    MR enterography is the accepted imaging reference standard for small bowel assessment in inflammatory bowel disease. There is an increasing cohort of children with inflammatory bowel disease presenting at an early age (<5 years) with severe disease. Younger children present a technical challenge for enterography because of the need for sedation/general anaesthesia to allow image optimisation and the need for oral contrast to allow adequate luminal assessment. Through our experiences, MR enteroclysis under general anaesthesia has proven to be a successful imaging technique for the work-up of these patients. In this paper, we present our institutional practice for performing MR enteroclysis under general anaesthesia. (orig.)

  6. Paediatric magnetic resonance enteroclysis under general anaesthesia - initial experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadigh, Sophie; Chopra, Mark; Olsen, Oeystein E.; Watson, Tom A. [Great Ormond Street Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Paediatric Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Sury, Michael R. [Great Ormond Street Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Paediatric Anaesthetics, London (United Kingdom); Shah, Neil [Great Ormond Street Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Paediatric Gastroenterology, London (United Kingdom)

    2017-06-15

    MR enterography is the accepted imaging reference standard for small bowel assessment in inflammatory bowel disease. There is an increasing cohort of children with inflammatory bowel disease presenting at an early age (<5 years) with severe disease. Younger children present a technical challenge for enterography because of the need for sedation/general anaesthesia to allow image optimisation and the need for oral contrast to allow adequate luminal assessment. Through our experiences, MR enteroclysis under general anaesthesia has proven to be a successful imaging technique for the work-up of these patients. In this paper, we present our institutional practice for performing MR enteroclysis under general anaesthesia. (orig.)

  7. Complications in paediatric craniofacial surgery: an initial four year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, B M; Jani, P; Bingham, R M; Mackersie, A M; Hayward, R

    1992-04-01

    107 children undergoing transcranial craniofacial surgery in a paediatric hospital have been reviewed to assess the incidence and type of complications which arose. This represents the first 4 years' experience of the craniofacial team. There were no deaths or permanent adverse sequelae of surgery. A total of 53 complications were seen in 42 patients. In 9.3% of patients they were potentially life-threatening, serious in 12.1% and of a minor nature in 28%. The more serious complications were related either to haemorrhage and/or vasovagal shock at operation or to infection post-operatively. Infants undergoing monoblock frontofacial advancements and those with tracheostomies were at particular risk.

  8. Improvement and evaluation of debris coolability analysis module in severe accident analysis code SAMPSON using LIVE experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Hongyang; Erkan, Nejdet; Okamoto, Koji; Gaus-Liu, Xiaoyang; Miassoedov, Alexei

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Debris coolability analysis module in SAMPSON is validated. • Model for heat transfer between melt pool and pressure vessel wall is modified. • Modified debris coolability analysis module is found to give reasonable results. - Abstract: The purpose of this work is to validate the debris coolability analysis (DCA) module in the severe accident analysis code SAMPSON by simulating the first steady stage of the LIVE-L4 test. The DCA module is used for debris cooling in the lower plenum and for predicting the safety margin of present reactor vessels during a severe accident. In the DCA module, the spreading and cooling of molten debris, gap cooling, heating of a three-dimensional reactor vessel, and natural convection heat transfer are all considered. The LIVE experiment is designed to investigate the formation and stability of melt pools in a reactor pressure vessel (RPV). By comparing the simulation results and experimental data in terms of the average melt pool temperature and the heat flux along the vessel wall, a bug is found in the code and the model for the heat transfer between the melt pool and RPV wall is modified. Based on the Asfia–Dhir and Jahn–Reineke correlations, the modified version of the DCA module is found to give reasonable results for the average melt pool temperature, crust thickness in the steady state, and crust growth rate.

  9. Cooling of particulate debris beds: analysis of the initial D-series experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivard, J.B.

    1978-01-01

    In an effort to provide basic data on the cooling of fast reactor debris, three in-pile experiments employing oxide fuel particulate in liquid sodium were completed in late 1977. Preliminary results from these experiments were reported shortly after their completion at the Third Post-Accident Heat Removal Information Exchange, at Argonne National Laboratory. In these experiments, a distribution of 100 μm to 1000 μm-sized particles of enriched UO 2 was fission-heated to simulate decay-heated debris. In each experiment, the UO 2 particles were contained in a closed, flat-bottomed vessel 012 mm in diameter which was insulated on the diameter and bottom. Sufficient sodium was included to saturate the bed of particles and to provide a volume of bulk sodium above the bed at a controlled temperature. Parameters of interest in the experiments are given

  10. Laparoscopic hand-assisted pancreaticoduodenectomy: initial UK experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammori, B J

    2004-04-01

    By and large, the limited world experience with laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) has been unfavorable, but the laparoscopic hand-assisted approach to PD has recently shown promising results. We report the first successful UK experience with laparoscopic hand-assisted PD (LHAPD). A 62-year-old man who presented with painless obstructive jaundice was found at endoscopy, to have an ampullary tumor. Preoperative biopsy specimens confirmed the diagnosis of an adenocarcinoma, and CT showed no evidence of either vascular involvement or metastatic disease. A staging laparoscopy showed no intraabdominal metastases, and an LHAPD was performed using a Gelport. The intraoperative course was uneventful. Two units of blood were transfused intraoperatively, but no postoperative blood transfusion was required. The operative time was 11 h (plus a 30-min break). The patients postoperative recovery was uneventful except for superficial pressure sores over the buttocks and elbows. The patient resumed oral fluid and dietary intake on the 1st and 3rd postoperative days, respectively, and was discharged from hospital on the 9th postoperative day. Histology demonstrated an ampullary adenocarcinoma with clear resection margins and involvement of two of the 13 lymph nodes examined. At 2-month follow-up, the patient remains well and is receiving adjuvant chemotherapy. LHAPD achieves good oncological clearance and can be performed safely in selected patients. The early promising results with this approach will undoubtedly encourage wider adoption of this procedure and are likely to widen the selection criteria.

  11. Commissioning and initial experience with the ALICE on-line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altini, V; Anticic, T; Carena, F; Carena, W; Chapeland, S; Barroso, V Chibante; Costa, F; Divia, R; Fuchs, U; Makhlyueva, I; Roukoutakis, F; Schossmaier, K; Soos, C; Vyvre, P Vande; Haller, B von; Denes, E; Kiss, T

    2010-01-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is the heavy-ion detector designed to study the physics of strongly interacting matter and the quark-gluon plasma at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). A large bandwidth and flexible Data Acquisition System (DAQ) has been designed and deployed to collect sufficient statistics in the short running time available per year for heavy ions and to accommodate very different requirements originated from the 18 sub-detectors. This paper will present the large scale tests conducted to assess the standalone DAQ performances, the interfaces with the other online systems and the extensive commissioning performed in order to be fully prepared for physics data taking. It will review the experience accumulated since May 2007 during the standalone commissioning of the main detectors and the global cosmic runs and the lessons learned from this exposure on the b attle field . It will also discuss the test protocol followed to integrate and validate each sub-detector with the online systems and it will conclude with the first results of the LHC injection tests and startup in September 2008. Several papers of the same conference present in more details some elements of the ALICE DAQ system.

  12. Commissioning and initial experience with the ALICE on-line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altini, V [INFN, Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita and Sezione INFN Bari (Italy); Anticic, T [Ruder Botkovic Institute, Zagreb (Croatia); Carena, F; Carena, W; Chapeland, S; Barroso, V Chibante; Costa, F; Divia, R; Fuchs, U; Makhlyueva, I; Roukoutakis, F; Schossmaier, K; Soos, C; Vyvre, P Vande; Haller, B von [CERN, Physics department, Geneva (Switzerland); Denes, E; Kiss, T, E-mail: pierre.vande.vyvre@cern.c [KFKI Research Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics, Budapest (Hungary)

    2010-04-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is the heavy-ion detector designed to study the physics of strongly interacting matter and the quark-gluon plasma at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). A large bandwidth and flexible Data Acquisition System (DAQ) has been designed and deployed to collect sufficient statistics in the short running time available per year for heavy ions and to accommodate very different requirements originated from the 18 sub-detectors. This paper will present the large scale tests conducted to assess the standalone DAQ performances, the interfaces with the other online systems and the extensive commissioning performed in order to be fully prepared for physics data taking. It will review the experience accumulated since May 2007 during the standalone commissioning of the main detectors and the global cosmic runs and the lessons learned from this exposure on the {sup b}attle field{sup .} It will also discuss the test protocol followed to integrate and validate each sub-detector with the online systems and it will conclude with the first results of the LHC injection tests and startup in September 2008. Several papers of the same conference present in more details some elements of the ALICE DAQ system.

  13. Commissioning and initial experience with the ALICE on-line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altini, V.; Anticic, T.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Chapeland, S.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Costa, F.; Dénes, E.; Divià, R.; Fuchs, U.; Kiss, T.; Makhlyueva, I.; Roukoutakis, F.; Schossmaier, K.; Soós, C.; Vande Vyvre, P.; von Haller, B.; ALICE Collaboration

    2010-04-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is the heavy-ion detector designed to study the physics of strongly interacting matter and the quark-gluon plasma at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). A large bandwidth and flexible Data Acquisition System (DAQ) has been designed and deployed to collect sufficient statistics in the short running time available per year for heavy ions and to accommodate very different requirements originated from the 18 sub-detectors. This paper will present the large scale tests conducted to assess the standalone DAQ performances, the interfaces with the other online systems and the extensive commissioning performed in order to be fully prepared for physics data taking. It will review the experience accumulated since May 2007 during the standalone commissioning of the main detectors and the global cosmic runs and the lessons learned from this exposure on the "battle field". It will also discuss the test protocol followed to integrate and validate each sub-detector with the online systems and it will conclude with the first results of the LHC injection tests and startup in September 2008. Several papers of the same conference present in more details some elements of the ALICE DAQ system.

  14. Initial experience with purely laparoscopic living-donor right hepatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, S K; Lee, K W; Choi, Y; Kim, H S; Ahn, S W; Yoon, K C; Kim, H; Yi, N J; Suh, K S

    2018-05-01

    There may be concerns about purely laparoscopic donor right hepatectomy (PLDRH) compared with open donor right hepatectomy, especially when performed by surgeons accustomed to open surgery. This study aimed to describe technical tips and pitfalls in PLDRH. Data from donors who underwent PLDRH at Seoul National University Hospital between December 2015 and July 2017 were analysed retrospectively. Endpoints analysed included intraoperative events and postoperative complications. All operations were performed by a single surgeon with considerable experience in open living donor hepatectomy. A total of 26 donors underwent purely laparoscopic right hepatectomy in the study interval. No donor required transfusion during surgery, whereas two underwent reoperation. In two donors, the dissection plane at the right upper deep portion of the midplane was not correct. One donor experienced portal vein injury during caudate lobe transection, and one developed remnant left hepatic duct stenosis. One donor experienced remnant portal vein angulation owing to a different approach angle, and one experienced arterial damage associated with the use of a laparoscopic energy device. One donor had postoperative bleeding due to masking of potential bleeding foci owing to intra-abdominal pressure during laparoscopy. Two donors experienced right liver surface damage caused by a xiphoid trocar. Purely laparoscopic donor hepatectomy differs from open donor hepatectomy in terms of angle and caudal view. Therefore, surgeons experienced in open donor hepatectomy must gain adequate experience in laparoscopic liver surgery and make adjustments when performing PLDRH. © 2018 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Severe accident experiments on PLINIUS platform. Results of first experiments on COLIMA facility related to VVER-440. Presentation of planned VULCANO and KROTOS tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piluso, P.; Boccaccio, E.; Bonnet, J.-M.; Journeau, C.; Fouquart, P.; Magallon, D.; Ivanov, I.; Mladenov, I.; Kalchev, S.; Grudev, P.; Alsmeyer, H.; Fluhrer, B.; Leskovar, M.

    2005-01-01

    In the hypothetical case of a nuclear reactor severe accident, the reactor core could melt and form a mixture of nuclear fuel (UO 2 + Fission Products), metallic or oxidized cladding + steel, called c orium , of highly refractory oxides (UO 2 , ZrO 2 ) and metallic or oxidized steel, that could eventually flow out of the vessel and mix with the substrate decomposition products (generally oxides such as SiO 2 , Al 2 O 3 , CaO, Fe 2 O 3 ). The French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) has launched a R and D programme aimed at providing the tools for improving the mastering of severe accidents. It encompasses the development of models and codes, performance of experiments in simulant and prototypic materials and the analysis of international experiments. The experiments with prototypic corium (i.e. material containing depleted UO 2 ) are performed in the PLINIUS experimental platform at CEA Cadarache. It comprises the VULCANO facility for 50-100 kg tests (corium-material interactions, corium solidification etc.), the COLIMA facility for smaller scale (∼1 kg) experiments, the VITI facility for corium properties measurement and the KROTOS facility for corium-water interaction (a few kg). In the framework of the 5 th European Framework Programme, free trans-national access to these facilities has been offered to EU and Associated States researchers. For the first PLINIUS access, COLIMA experiments have been conducted with a Bulgarian Team (TU/SOFIA, BAS/INRNE and NPP/KOZLODUY). This series of tests was devoted to experimental studies on fission products release and corium behaviour in the late phase in a hypothetic case of severe accident in a PWR type VVER-440. The COLIMA experimental results are consistent with previous experiments on irradiated fuels (VERCORS, PHEBUS) with small differences for some fission products and show new results for the remaining corium. For the second visit, scientific users from FZK in Germany were selected to validate the COMET core

  16. Robotic-assisted partial Nephrectomy: initial experience in South America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo C. Lemos

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE:To report the initial outcomes of robotic-assisted partial nephrectomy in a tertiary center in South America. MATERIAL AND METHODS: From 11/2008 to 12/2009, a total of 16 transperitoneal robotic-assisted partial nephrectomies were performed in 15 patients to treat 18 kidney tumors. One patient with bilateral tumor had two procedures, while two patients with two synchronous unilateral tumors had a single operation to remove them. Eleven (73% patients were male and the right kidney was affected in 7 (46% patients. The median patient age and tumor size were 57 years old and 30 mm, respectively. Five (28% tumors were hilar and/or centrally located. RESULTS: The median operative time, warm ischemia time and estimated blood loss was 140 min, 27 min and 120 mL, respectively. Blood transfusion was required in one patient with bilateral tumor, and one additional pyelolithotomy was performed due to a 15mm stone located in the renal pelvis. The histopathology analysis showed 15 (83% malignant tumors, which 10 (67% were clear cell carcinoma. The median hospital stay was 72 hrs and no major complication was observed. CONCLUSION: Robotic-assisted partial nephrectomy is safe and represents a valuable option to perform minimally invasive nephron-sparing surgery.

  17. Construction and Initial Validation of the Multiracial Experiences Measure (MEM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Hyung Chol; Jackson, Kelly; Guevarra, Rudy P.; Miller, Matthew J.; Harrington, Blair

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the development and validation of the Multiracial Experiences Measure (MEM): a new measure that assesses uniquely racialized risks and resiliencies experienced by individuals of mixed racial heritage. Across two studies, there was evidence for the validation of the 25-item MEM with 5 subscales including Shifting Expressions, Perceived Racial Ambiguity, Creating Third Space, Multicultural Engagement, and Multiracial Discrimination. The 5-subscale structure of the MEM was supported by a combination of exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses. Evidence of criterion-related validity was partially supported with MEM subscales correlating with measures of racial diversity in one’s social network, color-blind racial attitude, psychological distress, and identity conflict. Evidence of discriminant validity was supported with MEM subscales not correlating with impression management. Implications for future research and suggestions for utilization of the MEM in clinical practice with multiracial adults are discussed. PMID:26460977

  18. Initial results from the Wisconsin Spherically Convergent Ion Focus experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorson, T.A.; Durst, R.D.; Fonck, R.J.; Foucher, B.S.; Wainwright, L.P.

    1995-01-01

    The Spherically Convergent Ion Focus (SCIF) is an alternative plasma confinement scheme in which ions are electrostatically confined, accelerated, and concentrated at fusion-relevant energies. This concept has been recently promoted for various near-term applications including waste disposal, particle production, neutron radiography and tomography, plastic explosive detection, materials research, and medical isotope production. The Wisconsin SCIF experiments are designed to evaluate the practicality of the SCIF concept for given applications. In the experiment, a wire globe serves as a simple means of producing the trapping potential well and the ion source consists of a cold, uniform plasma at the edge. Hydrogen ions formed from the background neutral gas are typically accelerated to energies of 5--20 kV, and measured cathode grid currents approach the space-charge limit for concentric spheres. Core size measurements utilize spectrally-filtered CCD camera images of the visible emission from the core region, and the minimal observed core radius of 0.6 cm (HWHM) is within a factor of 2--3 of the theoretical convergence ratio for the device. Neutral particle interactions and potential asymmetries imposed by the grid lead to non-ideal convergence, as evidenced by measured potential asymmetries and core size dependence on cathode grid spacing. Floating probes with 30 kV isolation have allowed unique measurements of the density, electric potential and temperature in the converged core. The ratio of core to edge density is 10--20, which is in good agreement with scaling from radial flux conservation

  19. Initial Australian experience with daily ultrasound localisation for prostate radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kneebone, A.; Fuller, M.W.; Williams, M.J.

    2003-01-01

    Variability in prostate position is a major problem in the delivery of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Daily ultrasound localisation prior to radiotherapy has become popular in the United States but to date has not been used clinically in Australia or New Zealand. Daily transabdominal ultrasound images through the prostate were acquired using the BAT ultrasound system. Contour data from the planning system is reconstructed at the same locations/angles as the BAT images. By overlaying the planned contours with the newly acquired images, the isocentre is adjusted to ensure that the prostate will be within the irradiated volume. After commissioning by Medical Physics, an initial pre-clinical trial period was adopted. This involved performing BAT alignments daily but treating to the planned isocentre in 30 patients. Eighty three percent of patients (25/30) had images judged to be of good or excellent quality by the reviewing radiation oncologist. It was noted that for each operator there was a period needed to build confidence/competence in both imaging and interpreting the images for the moves. The median scan time in addition to the normal patient set-up was 3.2 minutes (range=1.5-12.0 mins) with the second 15 patients scanned quicker than the first 15 (2.9 minutes versus 3.8 minutes). A summary of the movements recommended by the BAT system is contained in the table. We feel that daily prostate ultrasound localization offers a significant advance in delivering EBRT for prostate cancer. The incorporation of the system into clinical use, however, was not without difficulty and requires significant time and effort from therapists, physicists and medical staff. Further clinical evaluation of the unit is ongoing

  20. Social Health Maintenance Organizations: assessing their initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcomer, R; Harrington, C; Friedlob, A

    1990-08-01

    The Social/Health Maintenance Organization (S/HMO) is a four-site national demonstration. This program combines Medicare Part A and B coverage, with various extended and chronic care benefits, into an integrated health plan. The provision of these services extends both the traditional roles of HMOs and that of long-term care community-service case management systems. During the initial 30 months of operation the four S/HMOs shared financial risk with the Health Care Financing Administration. This article reports on this developmental period. During this phase the S/HMOs had lower-than-expected enrollment levels due in part to market competition, underfunding of marketing efforts, the limited geographic area served, and an inability to differentiate the S/HMO product from that of other Medicare HMOs. The S/HMOs were allowed to conduct health screening of applicants prior to enrolling them. The number of nursing home-certifiable enrollees was controlled through this mechanism, but waiting lists were never very long. Persons joining S/HMOs and other Medicare HMOs during this period were generally aware of the alternatives available. S/HMO enrollees favored the more extensive benefits; HMO enrollees considerations of cost. The S/HMOs compare both newly formed HMOs and established HMOs. On the basis of administrator cost, it is more efficient to add chronic care benefits to an HMO than to add an HMO component to a community care provider. All plans had expenses greater than their revenues during the start-up period, but they were generally able to keep service expenditures within planned levels.

  1. PET/MRI in head and neck cancer: initial experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platzek, Ivan; Laniado, Michael [Dresden University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Dresden (Germany); Beuthien-Baumann, Bettina [Dresden University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Dresden (Germany); Schneider, Matthias [Dresden University Hospital, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Dresden (Germany); Gudziol, Volker [Dresden University Hospital, Department of Otolaryngology, Dresden (Germany); Langner, Jens; Schramm, Georg; Hoff, Joerg van den [Institute of Bioinorganic and Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Kotzerke, Joerg [Dresden University Hospital, Nuclear Medicine, Dresden (Germany)

    2013-01-15

    To evaluate the feasibility of PET/MRI (positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging) with FDG ({sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose) for initial staging of head and neck cancer. The study group comprised 20 patients (16 men, 4 women) aged between 52 and 81 years (median 64 years) with histologically proven squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck region. The patients underwent a PET scan on a conventional scanner and a subsequent PET/MRI examination on a whole-body hybrid system. FDG was administered intravenously prior to the conventional PET scan (267-395 MBq FDG, 348 MBq on average). The maximum standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max}) of the tumour and of both cerebellar hemispheres were determined for both PET datasets. The numbers of lymph nodes with increased FDG uptake were compared between the two PET datasets. No MRI-induced artefacts where observed in the PET images. The tumour was detected by PET/MRI in 17 of the 20 patients, by PET in 16 and by MRI in 14. The PET/MRI examination yielded significantly higher SUV{sub max} than the conventional PET scanner for both the tumour (p < 0.0001) and the cerebellum (p = 0.0009). The number of lymph nodes with increased FDG uptake detected using the PET dataset from the PET/MRI system was significantly higher the number detected by the stand-alone PET system (64 vs. 39, p = 0.001). The current study demonstrated that PET/MRI of the whole head and neck region is feasible with a whole-body PET/MRI system without impairment of PET or MR image quality. (orig.)

  2. Initial experience of the medical clinic of the education Casmu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musé, M.; Laureiro, E.; Musetti, C.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: What happens when a patient (p te) is faced once treatment Q T? We know that for p te involves both how their family; face a charge of myths and half-truths; causing the treatment is so vivid apprehension as the disease itself. In this context the concern of the Department of Oncology Casmu arises; of give patients an area where the p te to receive information contribute to reaching the treatment of Q T in better condition. All patients will start treatment Q T for the first time; are cited for an interview at the Polyclinic of Education. It is coordinated delayed with respect to the talks with the Treating oncologist, in order to allow the patient to develop their doubts and to raise them. In the interview also involved the p te and his family, Oncology Residents Department, and a member of Campus Nursing thereof. the interview is divided into five modules: 1) Administrative Aspects 2) Nursing Care 3) Potential side effects. 4) Social Benefits 5) Resources Information. Between January 2003 and August 2004, 70 interviews were conducted education. the average length thereof was 30 minutes. Is in progress writing a brochure based on the questions most frequently asked by patients and their families; well as an evaluation of the experience

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of the female pelvis: initial experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hricak, H.; Alpers, C.; Crooks, L.E.; Sheldon, P.E.

    1983-01-01

    The potential of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was evaluated in 21 female subjects: seven volunteers, 12 patients scanned for reasons unrelated to the lower genitourinary tract, and two patients referred with gynecologic disease. The uterus at several stages was examined; the premenarcheal uterus (one patient), the uterus of reproductive age (12 patients), the postmenopausal uterus (two patients), and in an 8 week pregnancy (one patient). The myometrium and cyclic endometrium in the reproductive age separated by a low-intensity line (probably stratum basale), which allows recognition of changes in thickness of the cyclic endometrium during the menstrual cycle. The corpus uteri can be distinguished from the cervix by the transitional zone of the isthmus. The anatomic relation of the uterus to bladder and rectum is easily outlined. The vagina can be distinguished from the cervix, and the anatomic display of the closely apposed bladder, vagina, and rectum is clear on axial and coronal images. The ovary is identified; the signal intensity from the ovary depends on the acquisition parameter used. Uterine leiomyoma, endometriosis, and dermoid cyst were depicted, but further experience is needed to ascertain the specificity of the findings

  4. Initial experience with a nuclear medicine viewing workstation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Robert M.; Burt, Robert W.

    1992-07-01

    Graphical User Interfaced (GUI) workstations are now available from commercial vendors. We recently installed a GUI workstation in our nuclear medicine reading room for exclusive use of staff and resident physicians. The system is built upon a Macintosh platform and has been available as a DELTAmanager from MedImage and more recently as an ICON V from Siemens Medical Systems. The workstation provides only display functions and connects to our existing nuclear medicine imaging system via ethernet. The system has some processing capabilities to create oblique, sagittal and coronal views from transverse tomographic views. Hard copy output is via a screen save device and a thermal color printer. The DELTAmanager replaced a MicroDELTA workstation which had both process and view functions. The mouse activated GUI has made remarkable changes to physicians'' use of the nuclear medicine viewing system. Training time to view and review studies has been reduced from hours to about 30-minutes. Generation of oblique views and display of brain and heart tomographic studies has been reduced from about 30-minutes of technician''s time to about 5-minutes of physician''s time. Overall operator functionality has been increased so that resident physicians with little prior computer experience can access all images on the image server and display pertinent patient images when consulting with other staff.

  5. Application of robotics in general surgery: initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Ninh T; Hinojosa, Marcelo W; Finley, David; Stevens, Melinda; Paya, Mahbod

    2004-10-01

    Robotic surgery was recently approved for clinical use in general abdominal surgery. The aim of this study was to review our experience with the da Vinci surgical system during laparoscopic general surgical procedures. Eighteen patients underwent robotically assisted laparoscopic abdominal surgery between June 2002 and March 2003. Main outcome measures were operative time, room setup time, robotic arm-positioning and surgical time, blood loss, conversion to laparoscopy, length of stay, and morbidity. The types of robotically assisted laparoscopic procedures were excision of gastric leiomyoma (n = 1), Heller myotomy (n = 1), cholecystectomy (n = 2), gastric banding (n = 2), Nissen fundoplication (n = 4), and gastric bypass (n = 8). The mean room setup time was 63 +/- 14 minutes, and the mean robotic arm-positioning time was 16 +/- 7 minutes. Conversion to laparoscopy occurred in two (11%) of 18 cases because of equipment difficulty (n = 1) and technical difficulty (n = 1). Estimated blood loss was 91 +/- 71 mL. The mean operative time was 156 +/- 42 minutes, and the robotic operative time was 27% of the total operative time. The mean length of hospital stay was 2.2 +/- 1.5 days. There was one postoperative wound infection and one anastomotic stricture. Robotically assisted laparoscopic abdominal surgery is feasible and safe; however, the theoretical advantages of the da Vinci surgical system were not clinically apparent.

  6. Breast vibro-acoustography: initial experience in benign lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alizad, Azra; Mehrmohammadi, Mohammad; Ghosh, Karthik; Glazebrook, Katrina N; Carter, Rickey E; Karaberkmez, Leman Gunbery; Whaley, Dana H; Fatemi, Mostafa

    2014-01-01

    Vibro-acoustography (VA) is a newly developed imaging technology that is based on low-frequency vibrations induced in the object by the radiation force of ultrasound. VA is sensitive to the dynamic characteristics of tissue. Here, we evaluate the performance of VA in identifying benign lesions and compare the results to those of mammography. An integrated mammography-VA system designed for in vivo breast imaging was tested on a group of female volunteers, age ≥ 18 years, with suspected breast lesions based on clinical examination. A set of VA scans was acquired after each corresponding mammography. Most lesions were classified as benign based on their histological results. However, in 4 cases, initial diagnosis based on clinical imaging determined that the lesions were cysts. These cysts were aspirated with needle aspiration and disappeared completely under direct ultrasound visualization. Therefore, no biopsies were performed on these cases and lesions were classified as benign based on clinical findings per clinical standards. To define the VA characteristics of benign breast masses, we adopted the features that are normally attributed to such masses in mammography. In a blinded assessment, three radiologists evaluated the VA images independently. The diagnostic accuracy of VA for detection of benign lesions was assessed by comparing the reviewers’ evaluations with clinical data. Out of a total 29 benign lesions in the group, the reviewers were able to locate all lesions on VA images and mammography, 100% with (95% confidence interval (CI): 88% to 100%). Two reviewers were also able to correctly classify 83% (95% CI: 65% to 92%), and the third reviewer 86% (95% CI: 65% to 95%) of lesions, as benign on VA images and 86% (95% CI: 69% to 95%) on mammography. The results suggest that the mammographic characteristics of benign lesion may also be used to identify such lesions in VA. Furthermore, the results show the ability of VA to detect benign breast

  7. Simulation and verification studies of reactivity initiated accident by comparative approach of NK/TH coupling codes and RELAP5 code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ud-Din Khan, Salah [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China). Inst. of Plasma Physics; King Saud Univ., Riyadh (Saudi Arabia). Sustainable Energy Technologies Center; Peng, Minjun [Harbin Engineering Univ. (China). College of Nuclear Science and Technology; Yuntao, Song; Ud-Din Khan, Shahab [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China). Inst. of Plasma Physics; Haider, Sajjad [King Saud Univ., Riyadh (Saudi Arabia). Sustainable Energy Technologies Center

    2017-02-15

    The objective is to analyze the safety of small modular nuclear reactors of 220 MWe power. Reactivity initiated accidents (RIA) were investigated by neutron kinetic/thermal hydraulic (NK/TH) coupling approach and thermal hydraulic code i.e., RELAP5. The results obtained by these approaches were compared for validation and accuracy of simulation. In the NK/TH coupling technique, three codes (HELIOS, REMARK, THEATRe) were used. These codes calculate different parameters of the reactor core (fission power, reactivity, fuel temperature and inlet/outlet temperatures). The data exchanges between the codes were assessed by running the codes simultaneously. The results obtained from both (NK/TH coupling) and RELAP5 code analyses complement each other, hence confirming the accuracy of simulation.

  8. Irradiated fuel behavior during reactivity initiated accidents in LWR's: Status of research and development studies in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papin, J.; Merle, J.P.

    1994-01-01

    There is much interest in the nuclear industry concerning the ability of training simulators to adequately model severe accident conditions, specifically Anticipated Transient Without Scram (ATWS) events. The Pennsylvania Power and Light Co. has recently installed a new simulator which was provided by S3 Technologies. As part of the licensed operator training program, PP ampersand L provides training on Emergency Operating Procedures (EOPs). Since the ATWS event is challenging from both a computational and operational point of view, the Engineering Department was asked to benchmark the new simulator performance. The purpose of this benchmark was to ensure simulator fidelity with EOP basis calculations which are numerically more rigorous. Once acceptable simulator fidelity had been demonstrated, EOPs were evaluated to ensure they could be implemented by the operators. This paper examines the details of the new simulator response for ATWS events, and exposes the PP ampersand L ATWS procedures to further examination. The simulator benchmark was carried out using the PP ampersand L-developed SABRE code which has been benchmarked against plant data and industry accepted codes. For many ATWS scenarios, the new simulator, which is based upon first principles, provides preditions consistent with SABRE. Reactor power levels, consistent with SABRE results, are significantly higher than predicted by the old simulator, and containment pressurization occurs much more rapidly than previously simulated. Additionally, the new simulated reactor water level, pressure and power are far more responsive to perturbations than predicted by the old simulator. This responsiveness is consistent with SABRE predictions and has helped to define modifications to the ATWS emergency operating procedures. The modified procedures enhance the operators ability to respond to ATWS given the much more realistic reactor model

  9. Barriers to learning from incidents and accidents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dechy, N.; Dien, Y.; Drupsteen, L.; Felicio, A.; Cunha, C.; Roed-Larsen, S.; Marsden, E.; Tulonen, T.; Stoop, J.; Strucic, M.; Vetere Arellano, A.L.; Vorm, J.K.J. van der; Benner, L.

    2015-01-01

    This document provides an overview of knowledge concerning barriers to learning from incidents and accidents. It focuses on learning from accident investigations, public inquiries and operational experience feedback, in industrial sectors that are exposed to major accident hazards. The document

  10. The Chernobyl accident - five years later

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueck, K.

    1991-06-01

    At the fifth anniversary of the Chernobyl accident the initial situation at that time, the control of the consequences to Austria in the present light, as well as the knowledge gained from the accident and its consequences are described. A final estimate and appraisal of the total population dose by the accident alloted according to the individual exposure pathways and the dose reductions due to countermeasures by the authorities are given. The dose reduction in the following years is described. Five years later the external exposure was reduced to about 6 % of the values of the first year, the ingestion dose to about 5 % of the first-year-values. Finally, the current radiation situation is described and the dose contribution by foodstuff with elevated activity concentration is estimated. Also the consequences from the experience and knowledge obtained by the accident are described. (author)

  11. Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT): initial experience in a clinical setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skaane, Per; Gullien, Randi; Eben, Ellen B.; Haakenaasen, Unni; Naess Jebsen, Ingvild; Krager, Mona; Bjoerndal, Hilde; Ekseth, Ulrika; Jahr, Gunnar

    2012-01-01

    false-positive findings. The side-by-side feature analysis showed higher conspicuity scores for tomosynthesis compared to conventional 2D for cancers presenting as spiculated masses and distortions. Conclusion: Tomosynthesis is a promising new technique. Our preliminary clinical experience shows that there is a potential for increasing the sensitivity using this new technique, especially for cancers manifesting as spiculated masses and distortions

  12. Simulation of reactivity-initiated accident transients on UO2-M5® fuel rods with ALCYONE V1.4 fuel performance code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Guénot-Delahaie

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The ALCYONE multidimensional fuel performance code codeveloped by the CEA, EDF, and AREVA NP within the PLEIADES software environment models the behavior of fuel rods during irradiation in commercial pressurized water reactors (PWRs, power ramps in experimental reactors, or accidental conditions such as loss of coolant accidents or reactivity-initiated accidents (RIAs. As regards the latter case of transient in particular, ALCYONE is intended to predictively simulate the response of a fuel rod by taking account of mechanisms in a way that models the physics as closely as possible, encompassing all possible stages of the transient as well as various fuel/cladding material types and irradiation conditions of interest. On the way to complying with these objectives, ALCYONE development and validation shall include tests on PWR-UO2 fuel rods with advanced claddings such as M5® under “low pressure–low temperature” or “high pressure–high temperature” water coolant conditions.This article first presents ALCYONE V1.4 RIA-related features and modeling. It especially focuses on recent developments dedicated on the one hand to nonsteady water heat and mass transport and on the other hand to the modeling of grain boundary cracking-induced fission gas release and swelling. This article then compares some simulations of RIA transients performed on UO2-M5® fuel rods in flowing sodium or stagnant water coolant conditions to the relevant experimental results gained from tests performed in either the French CABRI or the Japanese NSRR nuclear transient reactor facilities. It shows in particular to what extent ALCYONE—starting from base irradiation conditions it itself computes—is currently able to handle both the first stage of the transient, namely the pellet-cladding mechanical interaction phase, and the second stage of the transient, should a boiling crisis occur.Areas of improvement are finally discussed with a view to simulating and

  13. Radiation, accidents, society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This book is meant to be used as a reference book for information officers at the event of a nuclear accident. The main part is edited in alphabetical order to facilitate use under stress. The book gives a short review of the health risks of radiation, and descriptions of accidents that have occured. The index words that have been chosen for the main part of the book have been selected due to experiences in connection with incidents and accidents. (L.E.)

  14. How do user experiences with different transport modes affect the risk of traffic accidents? From the viewpoint of licence possession status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakai, Hiroshi; Usui, Shinnosuke

    2017-02-01

    Road accidents between different modes of transport-such as between automobiles and pedestrians, automobiles and bicycles, or automobiles and motorcycles-are frequent. In such cases, it is important to consider the other side's perspective. This involves the ability to correctly judge, for every given situation, how other people on the road perceive their surroundings and what they intend to do next. In this paper, we conduct two types of studies assuming that this kind of ability to consider perspectives is higher when the person is licenced to drive the mode of transport used by the other party. For Study 1, we analysed accidents involving senior citizens between the ages of 65 and 74 years, who collided with automobiles as pedestrians or cyclists (1656 and 3192 cases respectively), in terms of the accident category and type of road at the accident spot. The results indicate that possession or non-possession of a licence was irrelevant for accidents involving cyclists, but for accidents with pedestrians, senior citizens who did not possess a licence are likely to be involved in a greater number of accidents in places that require interaction with automobiles, such as while crossing at crosswalks or at intersections. For Study 2, we reviewed 875 ordinary first-class licence practical test examinees, categorised them according to their licence possession status (motorcycle licence, moped licence, or no licence), and made a category-wise comparison of the test instructor's assessment of their ability to make a left turn. The results showed that those who had a motorcycle or moped licence tended to make a left turn more safely. Thus, the results indicate that experience with different modes of transport is likely to reduce the risk of accidents. These findings may be used to popularise educational interventions encouraging users of various transport modes to consider the perspective of others (i.e. via perspective-taking). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  15. Negative Interest Rates: Central Banks Initiated an Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksey N. Burenin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Negative interest rates appeared as a consequence of economic problems that countries with market economy came across after the crises of2007-2008. The attempts of monetary authorities to stimulate economies with the help of quantitative easing didn't bring the desired result. That's why the central banks once again resorted to a traditional tool of their monetary policy of changing interest rates. But this time they launched an experiment, they used negative interest rates. The European Central Bank, the Swedish Riksbank, the Bank of Japan, and the National Bank of Hungary introduced negative rates in order to stimulate economic growth and fight the threat of deflation, the Danish National Bank and the Swiss National Bank tried to deter appreciation of their currencies. Negative rates of the central banks brought about negative yields of government and nongovernment securities in several countries. The problem acquires an aggravated form due to the fact that negative rates appeared in several European countries simultaneously at the moment when global financial markets were not in crises. Some questions arise concerning the negative rates, for example, how low can central banks bring down the rates in the future, what is their influence on the stock markets, what is the reaction of depositors to the introduction of negative deposit rates by commercial banks, must one consider a negative rate as a rate of interest or payment to store money of the depositor, in which circumstances negative rates can be justified to fight deflation. The last question plays an important role, because recent studies find that positive economic growth is possible during deflation. If central banks don't take this nuance into consideration, they can create economic imbalances by increasing liquidity. Negative rates are not as inoffensive as it may seem at first glance. Not far ago an investor, who tried to averse risk, was buying government securities. Their yields

  16. Experiments and analyses on melt-structure-water interactions during severe accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seghal, B.R.; Dinh, T.N.; Bui, V.A.; Green, J.A.; Nourgaliev, R.R.; Okkonen, T.O.; Dinh, A.T.

    1998-04-01

    This report is the final report for the research project Melt Structure Water Interactions (MSWI). It describes results of analytical and experimental studies concerning MSWI during the course of a hypothetical core meltdown accident in a LWR. Emphasis has been placed on phenomena which govern vessel failure mode and timing and the mechanisms and properties which govern the fragmentation and breakup of melt jets and droplets. It was found that: 2-D effects significantly diminished the focusing effect of an overlying metallic layer on top of an oxide melt pool. This result improves the feasibility of in-vessel retention of a melt pool through external cooling of the lower head; phenomena related to hole ablation and melt discharge, in the event of vessel failure, are affected significantly by crust formation; the jet fragmentation process is a function of many related phenomena. The fragmentation rate depends not only on the traditional parameters but also on the melt physical properties, which change as the melt cools down from liquid to solid temperature; film boiling was investigated by developing a two-phase flow model and inserting it in a multi-D fluid dynamics code. It was concluded that the thickness of the film on the surface of a melt jet would be small and that the effects of the film on the process should not be large. This conclusion is contrary to the modeling employed in some other codes. The computer codes were developed and validated against the data obtained in the MSWI Project. The melt vessel interaction thermal analysis code describes the process of melt pool formation and convection and the resulting vessel thermal loadings. In addition, several innovative models were developed to describe the melt-water interaction process. The code MELT-3D treats the melt jet as a collection of particles whose movement is described with a three-dimensional Eulerian formulation. The model (SIPHRA) tracks the melt jet with an additional equation, using the

  17. Commitment of involved actors in the preparation of accidental and post-accident situations: European experiments; Engagement des parties prenantes a la preparation aux situations accidentelles et post-accidentelles: experiences Europeennes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Th. [CEPN, 28 rue de la Redoute, 92260 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2010-07-01

    The author briefly describes some approaches developed within the EURANOS European research programme between 2004 and 2009 which aims at promoting the building up of a European network (NERIS) for the management of nuclear accidental and post-accident situations. Notably, he comments the experiment which took place in the Montbeliard district where two types of radiological events have been modelled and simulated: an accident in the Fessenheim nuclear power plant with two scenarios of release, and a transportation accident with a release of radioactive caesium 137. He also evokes the Norwegian experience and some other actions in Finland, Great-Britain, Spain and Slovakia where reflections on the management of accidental and post-accident situations or crisis exercises have been organized

  18. Federal guide for a radiological response: Supporting the Nuclear Regulatory Commission during the initial hours of a serious accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogan, R.T.

    1993-11-01

    This document is a planning guide for those Federal agencies that work with the Nuclear Regulatory commission (NRC) during the initial hours of response to a serious radiological emergency in which the NRC is the Lead Federal Agency (LFA). These Federal agencies are: DOE, EPA, USDA, HHS, NOAA, and FEMA. This guide is intended to help these agencies prepare for a prompt response. Instructions are provided on receiving the initial notification, the type of person to send to the scene, the facility at which people are needed, how to get them to that facility, and what they should do when they arrive. Federal agencies not specifically mentioned in this guide may also be asked to support the NRC

  19. In-core fuel disruption experiments simulating LOF accidents for homogeneous and heterogeneous core LMFBRs: FD2/4 series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, S.A.; Mast, P.K.; Schumacher, Gustav; Fischer, E.A.

    1982-01-01

    A series of Fuel Disruption (FD) experiments simulating LOF accidents transients for homogeneous- and heterogeneous-core LMFBRs is currently being performed in the Annular Core Research Reactor at SNL. The test fuel is observed with high-speed cinematography to determine the timing and the mode of the fuel disruption. The five experiments performed to date show that the timing and mode of fuel disruption depend on the power level, fuel temperature (after preheat and at disruption), and the fuel temperature gradient. Two basic modes of fuel disruption were observed; solid-state disruption and liquid-state swelling followed by slumping. Solid-state dispersive fuel behavior (several hundred degrees prior to fuel melting) is only observed at high power levels (6P 0 ), low preheat temperatures (2000 K), and high thermal gradients (2800 K/mm). The swelling/slumping behavior was observed in all cases near the time of fuel melting. Computational models have been developed that predict the fuel disruption modes and timing observed in the experiments

  20. Modelization of the initiator success of the accident of Fukushima Daiichi in the NPP of ZION by the code MAAP-5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kevin Fernandez, M.; Jimenez, G.; Batteira, P.

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of the project is the modeling of the accident with a code new in the industry, MAAP5, and in a different nuclear plant, as well as various parameters sensitivity analysis to assess their influence on the evolution of the accident. The paper presents the analysis of the evolution of the simulated accident, as well as the evaluation of different sensitivity analyses performed on different parameters influence on the evolution: pre-accident conditions, actions of operator, etc. Operator actions, not referred to in the emergency procedures, which could influence the behavior of the reactor vessel during severe accident progression were analyzed.

  1. [Experience in organization of joint actions of expert divisions during the accident at P.S. Podporozniy Sayano-Shushenskaya hydroelectric power station].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolkutin, V V; Ivanov, P L; Fetisov, V A; Afanas'ev, S A; Dorozhkin, O A; Vognerubov, R N; Kuznetsov, T L

    2010-01-01

    The authors illustrate positive experience in organization and coordination of joint actions of expert divisions of different sectors during the accident at P.S. Podporozniy Sayano-Shushenskaya hydroelectric power station in August 2009. Special emphasis is laid on the participation of experts of quick-reaction teams formed by territorial forensic medical bureaus, mobile and supporting forces from the adjacent regions.

  2. Unavoidable Accident

    OpenAIRE

    Grady, Mark F.

    2009-01-01

    In negligence law, "unavoidable accident" is the risk that remains when an actor has used due care. The counterpart of unavoidable accident is "negligent harm." Negligence law makes parties immune for unavoidable accident even when they have used less than due care. Courts have developed a number of methods by which they "sort" accidents to unavoidable accident or to negligent harm, holding parties liable only for the latter. These sorting techniques are interesting in their own right and als...

  3. Nursering assistance to the radiological accident patients in Goiania-an experience report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graciotti, M.E.

    1989-06-01

    In september, 1987, a caesium-137 source was disrupted and caused a serious radiological acident. The victims were hospitalized in the General Hospital in city of Goiania, Goias state, Brazil. This is a report of a personal experience, during the two months of nursering care. (author) [pt

  4. Overview of core disruptive accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchaterre, J.F.

    1977-01-01

    An overview of the analysis of core-disruptive accidents is given. These analyses are for the purpose of understanding and predicting fast reactor behavior in severe low probability accident conditions, to establish the consequences of such conditions and to provide a basis for evaluating consequence limiting design features. The methods are used to analyze core-disruptive accidents from initiating event to complete core disruption, the effects of the accident on reactor structures and the resulting radiological consequences are described

  5. Experimental data report for test TS-3 Reactivity Initiated Accident test in the NSRR with pre-irradiated BWR fuel rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Takehiko; Yoshinaga, Makio; Fujishiro, Toshio; Kobayashi, Shinsho; Yamahara, Takeshi; Sukegawa, Tomohide; Kikuchi, Teruo; Sobajima, Makoto.

    1993-09-01

    This report presents experimental data for Test TS-3 which was the third test in a series of Reactivity Initiated Accident (RIA) tests using pre-irradiated BWR fuel rods, performed in the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) in September, 1990. Test fuel rod used in the Test TS-3 was a short-sized BWR (7 x 7) type rod which was re-fabricated from a commercial rod irradiated in the Tsuruga Unit 1 power reactor of Japan Atomic Power Co. The fuel had an initial enrichment of 2.79 % and a burnup of 26 Gwd/tU. A pulse irradiation of the test fuel rod was performed under a cooling condition of stagnant water at atmospheric pressure and at ambient temperature which simulated a BWR's cold start-up RIA event. The energy deposition of the fuel rod in this test was evaluated to be 94 ± 4 cal/g · fuel (88 ± 4 cal/g · fuel in peak fuel enthalpy) and no fuel failure was observed. Descriptions on test conditions, test procedures, transient behavior of the test rod during the pulse irradiation, and results of pre-pulse and post-pulse irradiation examinations are described in this report. (author)

  6. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis in reactivity-initiated accident fuel modeling: synthesis of organisation for economic co-operation and development (OECD/nuclear energy agency (NEA benchmark on reactivity-initiated accident codes phase-II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Marchand

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of OECD/NEA Working Group on Fuel Safety, a RIA fuel-rod-code Benchmark Phase I was organized in 2010–2013. It consisted of four experiments on highly irradiated fuel rodlets tested under different experimental conditions. This benchmark revealed the need to better understand the basic models incorporated in each code for realistic simulation of the complicated integral RIA tests with high burnup fuel rods. A second phase of the benchmark (Phase II was thus launched early in 2014, which has been organized in two complementary activities: (1 comparison of the results of different simulations on simplified cases in order to provide additional bases for understanding the differences in modelling of the concerned phenomena; (2 assessment of the uncertainty of the results. The present paper provides a summary and conclusions of the second activity of the Benchmark Phase II, which is based on the input uncertainty propagation methodology. The main conclusion is that uncertainties cannot fully explain the difference between the code predictions. Finally, based on the RIA benchmark Phase-I and Phase-II conclusions, some recommendations are made. Keywords: RIA, Codes Benchmarking, Fuel Modelling, OECD

  7. The French-German initiative for Chernobyl: programme 2: REDAC, the radioecological database after the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deville-Cavelin, G.; Biesold, H.; Chabanyuk, V.

    2006-01-01

    Goals: to built a database for integrating the results of programme 'Radioecology' of the French-German Initiative: Ecological portrait, initial contamination, wastes management, soil-plants and animals transfer, transfer by runoff and in the aquatic environment, countermeasures in urban and natural and agricultural environments. Specific methodology: original 'Project Solutions Framework': Information system developed as a soft integrated portal, Geo-information system: all spatial data geo-coded. DB structure: Publications: all classical informations, original data; Products: storage of open publications of the Project; Processes: management of the Project and Sub-projects; Services: information and software objects, help; Basics: information on system and organizational development. - Soft integration: cartography system: Map from 'Ecological portrait' integrated with thematic databases, Loaded in a special category (by IS Geo Internet Map Server); Cartographical functions: navigation, scaling, extracting, layer management, Databases arrangement independent of map system architecture. - Soft integration: portlets and DDB: Portlets = mini-applications for business functions and processes, made of web parts; Digital Dashboards (DDB) Portlets + web parts DDB sites = collections of DDB, adjustable by users. - General conclusions: REDAC, powerful and useful radioecological tool: All elements easily accessible through the original tool, ProSF, developed by IS Geo; Relations constructed between the documents (files, databases, documentation, reports,...); All elements structured by a meta-information; Mechanisms of search; Global radioecological glossary; Spatial data geo-coded; Processes, tools and methodology suitable for similar projects; Data useful for scientific studies, modelling, operational purposes, communication with mass media. - Outlook: Addition of functionality, support and maintenance Strong integration: Thematic integration = merging of all DB in an

  8. The French-German initiative for Chernobyl: programme 2: REDAC, the radioecological database after the Chernobyl accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deville-Cavelin, G. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), Environment and Emergency Operations Div. - Dept. for the Study of Radionuclide Behaviour in Ecosystems, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Biesold, H. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit mbH (GRS), Braunschweig (Germany); Chabanyuk, V. [Chornobyl Center (CC), Kiev regoin (Ukraine)

    2006-07-01

    Goals: to built a database for integrating the results of programme 'Radioecology' of the French-German Initiative: Ecological portrait, initial contamination, wastes management, soil-plants and animals transfer, transfer by runoff and in the aquatic environment, countermeasures in urban and natural and agricultural environments. Specific methodology: original 'Project Solutions Framework': Information system developed as a soft integrated portal, Geo-information system: all spatial data geo-coded. DB structure: Publications: all classical informations, original data; Products: storage of open publications of the Project; Processes: management of the Project and Sub-projects; Services: information and software objects, help; Basics: information on system and organizational development. - Soft integration: cartography system: Map from 'Ecological portrait' integrated with thematic databases, Loaded in a special category (by IS Geo Internet Map Server); Cartographical functions: navigation, scaling, extracting, layer management, Databases arrangement independent of map system architecture. - Soft integration: portlets and DDB: Portlets = mini-applications for business functions and processes, made of web parts; Digital Dashboards (DDB) Portlets + web parts DDB sites = collections of DDB, adjustable by users. - General conclusions: REDAC, powerful and useful radioecological tool: All elements easily accessible through the original tool, ProSF, developed by IS Geo; Relations constructed between the documents (files, databases, documentation, reports,...); All elements structured by a meta-information; Mechanisms of search; Global radioecological glossary; Spatial data geo-coded; Processes, tools and methodology suitable for similar projects; Data useful for scientific studies, modelling, operational purposes, communication with mass media. - Outlook: Addition of functionality, support and maintenance Strong integration: Thematic

  9. Large-Scale Laboratory Experiments of Initiation of Motion and Burial of Objects under Currents and Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, B. J.; Wu, H.; Wenzel, S. P.; Gates, S. J.; Fytanidis, D. K.; Garcia, M. H.

    2017-12-01

    Unexploded ordnances (UXOs) can be found at the bottom of coastal areas as the residue of military wartime activities, training or accidents. These underwater objects are hazards for humans and the coastal environment increasing the need for addressing the knowledge gaps regarding the initiation of motion, fate and transport of UXOs under currents and wave conditions. Extensive experimental analysis was conducted for the initiation of motion of UXOs under various rigid bed roughness conditions (smooth PVC, pitted steel, marbles, gravels and bed of spherical particles) for both unidirectional and oscillatory flows. Particle image velocimetry measurements were conducted under both flow conditions to resolve the flow structure estimate the critical flow conditions for initiation of motion of UXOs. Analysis of the experimental observations shows that the geometrical characteristics of the UXOs, their properties (i.e. volume, mass) and their orientation with respect to the mean flow play an important role on the reorientation and mobility of the examined objects. A novel unified initiation of motion diagram is proposed using an effective/unified hydrodynamic roughness and a new length scale which includes the effect of the projected area and the bed-UXO contact area. Both unidirectional and oscillatory critical flow conditions collapsed into a single dimensionless diagram highlighting the importance and practical applicability of the proposed work. In addition to the rigid bed experiments, the burial dynamics of proud UXOs on a mobile sand bed were also examined. The complex flow-bedform-UXOs interactions were evaluated which highlighted the effect of munition density on burial rate and final burial depth. Burial dynamics and mechanisms for motion were examined for various UXOs types, and results show that, for the case of the low density UXOs under energetic conditions, lateral transport coexists with burial. Prior to burial, UXO re-orientation was also observed

  10. Analysis of clad motion observed in loss of flow accident simulation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henkel, P.R.

    1987-01-01

    The clad motion observed in the first two STAR experiments is analysed. The movies reveal that at moderate temperatures molten cladding does not wet fresh fuel (within an argon gas atmosphere). The prevailing flow regime consists of single waves contacting the fuel pins and entrained drops. Entrainment is possible already at gas velocities of order 40-50 m/s. A multichannel clad motion model is presented that accounts for both flow modes. (author)

  11. Noise analysis and mimic experiments for loose part accident in the primary coolant loop of PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Xiuzhou; Cheng Tingxiang; Zhang Bin

    1994-01-01

    The basic principle of loose part monitoring is to detect and measure the structure transfer sound generated by impacting of metal loose part with accelerators and to identify and diagnose by the micro-processor. This paper introduces the theoretical base of loose part monitoring, the location and mass estimation of loose part, and three mimic experiment applying noise analysis techniques. It provides some useful preparations for the development of loose part monitoring system

  12. The initial experience of trans-rectal ultrasound and biopsy in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The initial experience of trans-rectal ultrasound and biopsy in diagnosis of carcinoma prostate in Gezira Hospital for Renal Disease and Surgery (GHRDS). Walaa Eldin Ibraheem, Sami Mahjoub Taha, Mustafa Omran Mansour, Mohammed El Imam Mohamed Ahmed ...

  13. Experience in construction of new safe confinement over ChNPP-4 damages in beyond design-basis accident: view in 30 year

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nosovskij, A.V.

    2016-01-01

    Many organizations and institutions participated in the elimination of ChNPP-4 accident. However, the main efforts on conservation of the damaged unit and ChNPP-3 commissioning were performed in 1986-1987 by experts of the enterprises and organizations of the Ministry of Medium Machine Building of the Soviet Union, who have been sent to the staff of the specially created Construction Administration US-605. The paper presents the activity of US-605 experts, describes administrative and technical measures of radiation safety during construction of the Shelter in difficult radiation conditions. Such efforts enabled accumulation of significant and unique experience in mitigation of severe accident consequences, which shall be used to prevent any nuclear accidents and eliminate their consequences

  14. Application of FFTBM to severe accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prosek, A.; Leskovar, M.

    2005-01-01

    In Europe an initiative for the reduction of uncertainties in severe accident safety issues was initiated. Generally, the error made in predicting plant behaviour is called uncertainty, while the discrepancies between measured and calculated trends related to experimental facilities are called the accuracy of the prediction. The purpose of the work is to assess the accuracy of the calculations of the severe accident International Standard Problem ISP-46 (Phebus FPT1), performed with two versions of MELCOR 1.8.5 for validation purposes. For the quantitative assessment of calculations the improved fast Fourier transform based method (FFTBM) was used with the capability to calculate time dependent code accuracy. In addition, a new measure for the indication of the time shift between the experimental and the calculated signal was proposed. The quantitative results obtained with FFTBM confirm the qualitative conclusions made during the Jozef Stefan Institute participation in ISP-46. In general good agreement of thermal-hydraulic variables and satisfactory agreement of total releases for most radionuclide classes was obtained. The quantitative FFTBM results showed that for the Phebus FPT1 severe accident experiment the accuracy of thermal-hydraulic variables calculated with the MELCOR severe accident code is close to the accuracy of thermal-hydraulic variables for design basis accident experiments calculated with best-estimate system codes. (author)

  15. The Community Reclaims Control? Learning Experiences from Rural Broadband Initiatives in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salemink, Koen; Strijker, Dirk; Bosworth, Gary

    2017-01-01

    Based on four illustrative case studies from the Netherlands, this article discusses learning experiences gained from rural broadband initiatives. As an example of the big society' (or participatiesamenleving' in Dutch), initiatives try to step in where the market and the government fail. The main

  16. Probability of spent fuel transportation accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McClure, J.D.

    1981-07-01

    The transported volume of spent fuel, incident/accident experience and accident environment probabilities were reviewed in order to provide an estimate of spent fuel accident probabilities. In particular, the accident review assessed the accident experience for large casks of the type that could transport spent (irradiated) nuclear fuel. This review determined that since 1971, the beginning of official US Department of Transportation record keeping for accidents/incidents, there has been one spent fuel transportation accident. This information, coupled with estimated annual shipping volumes for spent fuel, indicated an estimated annual probability of a spent fuel transport accident of 5 x 10 -7 spent fuel accidents per mile. This is consistent with ordinary truck accident rates. A comparison of accident environments and regulatory test environments suggests that the probability of truck accidents exceeding regulatory test for impact is approximately 10 -9 /mile

  17. Recent experience with testing of parallel disc gate valves under accident flow conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaPointe, P.A.; Clayton, J.K.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents the nuclear valve industry's latest and most extensive valve qualification test program experience. The test program includes a variety of 25 different gate and globe valves. All the test valves are power operated using either air, electric, or gas/hydraulic operators. The valves are categorized in size and pressure class so as to form a group of appropriate parent valve assemblies. Parent valve assembly qualification is used as the basis for qualification of candidate valve assemblies. The parent and candidate valve assemblies are representative of a nuclear plant's safety-related valve applications. The test program was performed in accordance with ANSI B16.41-1983 'Functional Qualification Requirements for Power Operated Active Valve Assemblies for Nuclear Power Plants.' The focus of this paper is on functional valve qualification test experience and specifically flow interruption testing to Annex G of the aforementioned test standard. Results of the flow test are summarized, including the coefficient of friction for each of the gate type valves reported. Information on valve size, pressure class, and actuator are given for all valves in the program. Although all valves performed extremely well, only selected test data are presented. The effects of the speed of operation and the effects of different fluid flow rates as they relate to the coefficient of friction between the valve disc and seat are discussed. The variation in the coefficient of friction based on other variables in the thrust equation, namely, differential pressure area is cited

  18. The development of a model to study the thermal behaviour of the coolant in the blind elements of a fast sodium-cooled breeder in the case of a severe hypothetical accident during the initial phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genter, G.

    1981-03-01

    The enthalpy level of the coolant is studied in the interior of gaps and special elements of a fast sodium coded breeder reactor during the initial and the final stages of a hypothetical accident. For this purpose numerical models are presented to calculate the heat transport in the special element on the basis of heat conduction and axial convection. (orig./RW) [de

  19. Study on the behavior of unirradiated light water reactor fuel with iodine-127 under the reactivity initiated accident (RIA) conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasajima, Hideo; Yanagisawa, Kazuaki; Kanazawa, Hiroyuki

    1988-07-01

    In a light water reactor fuel, a stress arised from pellet-cladding interaction (PCI) will have possibility to cause stress corrosion claddling (PCI failure) under an environment of corrosive fission product ; line iodine. A pulse irradiation experiment by NSRR was carried out to examine whether or not an unirradiated NSRR standard fuel rod in which 1.3 mg (33 x 10 -6 g/cm 2 ) of iodine was artificially filled could cause the PCI failure. Obtained results are: (1) The fuel rods with iodine did not fail both at deposited energy levels of 268 and 280 cal/g · UO 2 . On the other hand, the fuel rods without iodine failed at the same energy levels due to thinning of the cladding wall thickness. Within this experimental scope, PCI-failure did not occur on iodine filled fuel rods. (2) At a periphery of the fuel pellet of iodine filled rod, an uniform torus ring was formed. The torus ring consisted of an equi-axed large grains at 268 cal/g · UO 2 and a columnar ones at 280 cal/g · UO 2 . The torus ring was not formed in the fuel without iodine. (author)

  20. Loss-of-coolant accident test series TC-1 experiment operating specifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yackle, T.R.

    1979-09-01

    The purpose of this document is to specify the experiment operating procedure for the test series TC-1. The effects of externally mounted cladding thermocouples on the fuel rod thermal behavior during LOCA blowdown and reflood cycles will be investigated in the test. Potential thermocouple effects include: (a) delayed DNB, (b) momentary cladding rewets following DNB, (c) premature cladding rewet during a blowdown two-phase slug period, and (d) early cladding rewet during reflood. The two-phase slug period will be controlled by momentarily opening the hot leg valve. The slug will consist of lower plenum liquid that is sent through the flow shrouds and will be designed to quench the fuel rods at a rate that is similar to the slug experienced early in the LOFT L2-2 and L2-3 tests

  1. Experience of rehabilitation of territories contaminated during Chernobyl NPP accident in Ukraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeleznyak, M.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Significant part of Ukraine territory, including agricultural lands, was subjected to radioactive contamination as a result of ChNPP emergency. In the initial period of emergency the main attention was given to averting of radioactivity propagation and irradiation of the population. Irradiation of the thyroid gland for a large contingent of human, especially children, became the hardest consequence of the emergency. The main problem of minimization of the emergency consequences consisted in a complete rehabilitation of contaminated areas. Resettlement of residents of contaminated territories was appeared effective only in cases, when expected effective dose of irradiation could exceed levels of interference. In the remote terms after emergency this measure was accompanied by an unjustifiable psychological stress for the population and considerable material expenses. The adopted organizational and technological countermeasures allowed to reduce significantly a dose of irradiation for thyroid gland, especially for population of Kiev urban agglomeration - about 4 mln. persons. The efficiency of countermeasures was insufficient due to hiding of the emergency firstly, and then because of the late announcement of a danger, after iodine attack already. The program of reconstruction of irradiation doses for different groups of population was realized, i.e. the liquidators of emergency, children, inhabitants of the contaminated zone. The sharp increase of thyroid gland cancer frequency and other types of pathologies was observed. The network of specialized medical entities for consulting and clinical examination of victims was created. Iodine radionuclides entered into human organism per os with foodstuffs predominantly. Prevention of milk contamination and its processing was the most effective measures of population protection. The big part of the territory of Ukraine was subjected to radioactive contamination with fallout predominantly the area of Ukrainian

  2. Medical preparedness and response in nuclear accidents. The health team's experience in joint work with the radiological protection area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurmo, Alexandre Mesquita

    2007-01-01

    The interaction between the health and the radiological protection areas has proved fundamental, in our work experience, for the quality of response to victims of accidents, involving ionizing radiation. The conceptions and basic needs comprehension of the adequate response, on these two areas, have brought changes to the essential behavior related to the victim's care, the protection response, the environment and waste production. The joint task of health professionals and radiological protection staff, as first responders, demonstrates that it is possible to adjust practices and procedures. The training of professionals of the radiological protection area by health workers, has qualified them on the basic notions of pre-hospital attendance, entitling the immediate response to the victim prior to the health team arrival, as well as the discussion on the basic concepts of radiological protection with the health professionals, along with the understanding of the health area with its specific needs on the quick response to imminent death risk, or even the necessary procedures of decontamination. (author)

  3. Analysis of ULOF accident in Monju reflecting the knowledge from CABRI in-pile experiments and others

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Ikken; Tobita, Yoshiharu; Suzuki, Tohru; Kawada, Ken-ichi; Fukano, Yoshitaka; Fujita, Satoshi; Kamiyama, Kenji; Ishikawa, Makoto; Nonaka, Nobuyuki; Usami, Shin

    2007-05-01

    In the safety evaluation in the original licensing procedure of the prototype FBR Monju, mechanical energy release during an unprotected loss-of-flow (ULOF) event, one of technically inconceivable events postulated beyond design basis, was evaluated and shown that the radiological consequence is suitably limited. Since the sodium leakage accident in the secondary heat-transport system, the Monju plant has been kept under the stand-by condition for more than ten years and the composition of fuel in the current reactor core has changed due to decay of a plutonium isotope into americium. This change in fuel composition affects the neutronic characteristics of the core, requiring assessment of its effect on safety. In this study, event sequences of ULOF were analyzed to assess the effect of the change in neutronic characteristics on the mechanical energy release during ULOF. A significant advance has been made in the safety analysis codes reflecting the knowledge obtained through extensive safety research programs in the last decades, notably the CABRI in-pile experiments. The present results with the advanced analysis codes showed that the mechanical energy release in the current Monju core with the changed neutronic characteristics would not exceed the value evaluated formerly. (author)

  4. Preventing accidents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-08-01

    As the most effective strategy for improving safety is to prevent accidents from occurring at all, the Volpe Center applies a broad range of research techniques and capabilities to determine causes and consequences of accidents and to identify, asses...

  5. Analysis of the experience in participation of army medical service in medical arrangement in case of radiation accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhilyaev, E.G.; Goncharov, S.F.; Vorontsov, I.V.; Legeza, V.I.; Berzin, I.A.

    1995-01-01

    The paper presented calculations of manpower and money funds for rendering aid to the injured persons in case of radiation accident. The authors offered a scheme of using medical anti-radial aids on various stages of radiation accident; immediately after the accident in case of non-predicted and controlled radiation exposure. Army Medical Service is capable of solving promptly the tasks of medical aid with the help of highly mobile specialized medical units, the use of which is stipulated in the system of the Russian Service of disaster medicine. 10 refs.; 1 tab

  6. Initial substantial reduction in air dose rates of Cs origin and personal doses for residents owing to the Fukushima nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Hiroko; Saito, Junko; Hirasawa, Noriyasu; Kobayashi, Ikuo

    2013-01-01

    The initial substantial reduction in the air dose rate and personal dose equivalent [Hp(10)] for residents were compared between the Marumori and Kosugo regions for the period from September 2011 to September 2012 after the occurrence of the Fukushima nuclear accident. Marumori is a rural settlement, and Kosugo is a suburban city along a freeway. A similar tendency was observed in the Hp(10) results for Marumori residents and in the air dose rates for both regions: values dropped during the heavy snow season and a faster reduction in the air dose rate than the radioactive decay of 134 Cs and 137 Cs was observed after the snow had thawed. These reductions are considered to be caused by the weathering and/or migration of radionuclides down the soil column. However, neither a drop due to an accumulation of snow nor faster reduction was observed in Hp(10) for Kosugo residents. This discrepancy between the air dose rate and Hp(10) for Marumori and Kosugo residents might be caused by differences in their living environment. (author)

  7. An advanced educational program for nuclear professionals with social scientific literacy. A collaborative initiative by UC Berkeley and Univ. of Tokyo on the Fukushima accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juraku, Kohta; Nagasaki, Shinya; Ahn, Joonhong; Carson, Cathryn; Jensen, Mikael

    2011-01-01

    The authors have collaborated for over three years in developing an advanced educational program to cultivate leading engineers who can productively interact with other stakeholders. The program is organized under a partnership between the Nuclear Engineering Department of University of California, Berkeley (UCBNE) and the Global COE Program 'Nuclear Education and Research Initiative' (GoNERI) of the University of Tokyo, and is funded by MEXT (Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology), Japan. We conducted two 'summer schools' in 2009 and 2010 as trial cases of the educational program. This year, in response to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident, we decided to make our third summer school a venue for preliminary, yet multi-dimensional learning from that event. This school was held in Berkeley, CA, in the first week of August, with 12 lecturers and 18 students from various fields and countries. In this paper, we will explain the concept, aim, and design of our program; do a preliminary assessment of its effectiveness; introduce a couple of intriguing discussions held by participants; and discuss the program's implications for the post-Fukushima nuclear context. (author)

  8. The philosophy of severe accident management in the US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baratta, A.J.

    1990-01-01

    The US NRC has put forth the initial steps in what is viewed as the resolution of the severe accident issue. Underlying this process is a fundamental philosophy that if followed will likely lead to an order of magnitude reduction in the risk of severe accidents. Thus far, this philosophy has proven cost effective through improved performance. This paper briefly examines this philosophy and the next step in closure of the severe accident issue, the IPE. An example of the authors experience with determinist. (author)

  9. SWR-1000 concept on control of severe accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, P.J.

    1998-01-01

    It is essential for the SWR-1000 probabilistic safety concept to consider the results from experiments and reliability system failure within the probabilistic safety analyses for passive systems. Active and passive safety features together reduce the probability of the occurrence of beyond design basis accidents in order to limit their consequences in accordance with the German law. As a reference case we analyzed the most probable core melt accident sequence with a very conservative assumption. An initial event, stuck open of safety and relief valves without the probability of active and passive feeding systems of the pressure vessel, was considered. Other sequences of the loss of coolant accidents lead to lower probability

  10. IRSN-Ancli seminar on the post-accident context

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Didier, Damien; Leroyer, Veronique; Gariel, Jean-Christophe; Meier, Christine; Petitfrere, Michael; Meraux-Netillard, Isabelle; Lerouxel, Roland; Gandouen, Gael; Boutin, Dominique; Charre, Jean-Pierre; Noe, Maite; Quenneville, Celine; Farandeau, Sebastien; Mouchet, Chantal; Pineau, Coralie; Rollinger, Francois; GARIEL, Jean-Christophe; Ando, Ryoko; Nishida, Shoshi; Miazaki, Makoto; Hayano, Ryugo; Lheureux, Yves; Lochard, Jacques; Boilley, David; Godet, Jean-Luc

    2014-10-01

    The first session addressed the context of post-accident management: main challenges of radiation protection in case of nuclear accident, management of energy situations (specific intervention plans of nuclear plants), elements of doctrine for the post-accident management of an accident. The second session addressed the preparedness of territories to post-accident management: preparation to post-accident management in the Montbeliard district, emergency and post-accidental situation (preparedness at the district scale, example of Loiret), and return on experience from the post-accident exercise in Cattenom. The third session addressed the action undertaken by the ANCCLI and IRSN for the awareness of post-accidental problematic (experiments in Saclay, Marcoule, Gravelines and Golfech, lessons learned from the pilot phase and perspectives). The last session addressed the post-accidental management of the Fukushima accident: approach of the IRSN to learn lessons from the dialogue initiative in Fukushima, round table on challenges on the long term of post-accidental management, Japanese witnesses

  11. Radiation Measurement Systems and Experiences in Japan after the Fukushima Accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    system to prove that rolls of grass harvested for animal feed meet the regulatory requirements. This document briefly describes the purpose of each measurement project, describes the instruments and assay method that used, and discusses some of the operational experiences from each of these projects. (authors)

  12. Radiation Measurement Systems and Experiences in Japan after the Fukushima Accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-07-01

    system to prove that rolls of grass harvested for animal feed meet the regulatory requirements. This document briefly describes the purpose of each measurement project, describes the instruments and assay method that used, and discusses some of the operational experiences from each of these projects. (authors)

  13. Fat embolism syndrome in long bone trauma following vehicular accidents: Experience from a tertiary care hospital in north India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvaiz A Koul

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fat embolism syndrome (FES is a clinical problem arising mainly due to fractures particularly of long bones and pelvis. Not much literature is available about FES from the Indian subcontinent. Materials and Methods: Thirty-five patients referred/admitted prospectively over a 3-year period for suspected FES to a north Indian tertiary care center and satisfying the clinical criteria proposed by Gurd and Wilson, and Schonfeld were included in the study. Clinical features, risk factors, complications, response to treatment and any sequelae were recorded. Results: The patients (all male presented with acute onset breathlessness, 36-120 hours following major bone trauma due to vehicular accidents. Associated features included features of cerebral dysfunction ( n = 24, 69%, petechial rash (14%, tachycardia (94% and fever (46%. Hypoxemia was demonstrable in 80% cases, thrombocytopenia in 91%, anemia in 94% and hypoalbuminemia in 59%. Bilateral alveolar infiltrates were seen on chest radiography in 28 patients and there was evidence of bilateral ground glass appearance in 5 patients on CT. Eleven patients required ventilatory assistance whereas others were treated with supportive management. Three patients expired due to associated sepsis and respiratory failure, whereas others recovered with a mean hospital stay of 9 days. No long term sequelae were observed. Conclusion: FES remains a clinical challenge and is a diagnosis of exclusion based only on clinical grounds because of the absence of any specific laboratory test. A high index of suspicion is required for diagnosis and initiating supportive management in patients with traumatic fractures, especially in those having undergone an invasive orthopedic procedure.

  14. Plans for longitudinal and transverse neutralized beam compression experiments, and initial results from solenoid transport experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidl, P.A.; Armijo, J.; Baca, D.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Coleman, J.; Davidson, R.C.; Efthimion, P.C.; Friedman, A.; Gilson, E.P.; Grote, D.; Haber, I.; Henestroza, E.; Kaganovich, I.; Leitner, M.; Logan, B.G.; Molvik, A.W.; Rose, D.V.; Roy, P.K.; Sefkow, A.B.; Sharp, W.M.; Vay, J.L.; Waldron, W.L.; Welch, D.R.; Yu, S.S.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents plans for neutralized drift compression experiments, precursors to future target heating experiments. The target-physics objective is to study warm dense matter (WDM) using short-duration (∼1 ns) ion beams that enter the targets at energies just above that at which dE/dx is maximal. High intensity on target is to be achieved by a combination of longitudinal compression and transverse focusing. This work will build upon recent success in longitudinal compression, where the ion beam was compressed lengthwise by a factor of more than 50 by first applying a linear head-to-tail velocity tilt to the beam, and then allowing the beam to drift through a dense, neutralizing background plasma. Studies on a novel pulse line ion accelerator were also carried out. It is planned to demonstrate simultaneous transverse focusing and longitudinal compression in a series of future experiments, thereby achieving conditions suitable for future WDM target experiments. Future experiments may use solenoids for transverse focusing of un-neutralized ion beams during acceleration. Recent results are reported in the transport of a high-perveance heavy ion beam in a solenoid transport channel. The principal objectives of this solenoid transport experiment are to match and transport a space-charge-dominated ion beam, and to study associated electron-cloud and gas effects that may limit the beam quality in a solenoid transport system. Ideally, the beam will establish a Brillouin-flow condition (rotation at one-half the cyclotron frequency). Other mechanisms that potentially degrade beam quality are being studied, such as focusing-field aberrations, beam halo, and separation of lattice focusing elements

  15. Considering lessons learned about safety culture and their reflection to activity. After Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obu, Etsuji; Hamada, Jun; Fukano, Takuya

    2011-01-01

    Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident forced neighboring residents to evacuate for a long time and gave Public anxieties greatly and significant effects to social activities in Japan. Public trust of nuclear power was lost by not preventing the accident and future of nuclear power became reconsidered, which nuclear industry people regretted deeply. Japan Nuclear Technology Institute (JANTI) had conducted activities enhancing safety culture in nuclear industry. It would be necessary to consider improvements of accident prevention and mitigation measures after evaluating the accident in a viewpoint of 'safety culture'. Based on published information and knowledge accumulated by activities of JANTI, the accident was examined taking account of greatness of nuclear accident and its effects from the side of safety culture. Lessons learned about safety culture were pointed out as; (1) reconfirmation of specialty of nuclear technology. (2) reinforcement of questioning and learning attitudes and (3) improvement of evaluation capability of nuclear safety and safety assurance against external event. These were reflected in activities such as; (1) reconsideration of safety culture assessment, (2) strengthening further support to improve safety culture consciousness and (3) improvement of peer review activity. (T. Tanaka)

  16. Accident management for severe accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bari, R.A.; Pratt, W.T.; Lehner, J.; Leonard, M.; Disalvo, R.; Sheron, B.

    1988-01-01

    The management of severe accidents in light water reactors is receiving much attention in several countries. The reduction of risk by measures and/or actions that would affect the behavior of a severe accident is discussed. The research program that is being conducted by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission focuses on both in-vessel accident management and containment and release accident management. The key issues and approaches taken in this program are summarized. 6 refs

  17. Accident Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tripputi, Ivo; Lund, Ingemar

    2002-01-01

    There is a general feeling that decommissioning is an activity involving limited risks, compared to NPP operation, and in particular risks involving the general public. This is technically confirmed by licensing analysis and evaluations, where, once the spent fuel has been removed from the plant, the radioactivity inventory available to be released to the environment is very limited. Decommissioning activities performed so far in the world have also confirmed the first assumptions and no specific issue has been identified, in this field, to justify a completely new approach. Commercial interests in international harmonization, which could drive an in-depth discussion about the bases of this approach, are weak at the moment. However, there are several reasons why a discussion in an international framework about the Safety Case for decommissioning (and, in particular, about Accident Assessment) may be considered necessary and important, and why it may show some specific and peculiar aspects. An effort for a comprehensive and systematic D and D accident safety assessment of the decommissioning process is justified. It is necessary also to explore in a holistic way the aspects of industrial safety, and develop tools for the decision-making process optimization. The expected results are the implementation of appropriate and optimized protective measures in any event and of adequate on/off-site emergency plans for optimal public and workers protection. The experience from other decommissioning projects and large-scale industrial activities is essential to balance provisions and an Operating Experience review process (specific for decommissioning) should help to focus on real issues

  18. Fast high-energy X-ray imaging for Severe Accidents experiments on the future PLINIUS-2 platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berge L.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The future PLINIUS-2 platform of CEA Cadarache will be dedicated to the study of corium interactions in severe nuclear accidents, and will host innovative large-scale experiments. The Nuclear Measurement Laboratory of CEA Cadarache is in charge of real-time high-energy X-ray imaging set-ups, for the study of the corium-water and corium-sodium interaction, and of the corium stratification process. Imaging such large and high-density objects requires a 15 MeV linear electron accelerator coupled to a tungsten target creating a high-energy Bremsstrahlung X-ray flux, with corresponding dose rate about 100 Gy/min at 1 m. The signal is detected by phosphor screens coupled to high-framerate scientific CMOS cameras. The imaging set-up is established using an experimentally-validated home-made simulation software (MODHERATO. The code computes quantitative radiographic signals from the description of the source, object geometry and composition, detector, and geometrical configuration (magnification factor, etc.. It accounts for several noise sources (photonic and electronic noises, swank and readout noise, and for image blur due to the source spot-size and to the detector unsharpness. In a view to PLINIUS-2, the simulation has been improved to account for the scattered flux, which is expected to be significant. The paper presents the scattered flux calculation using the MCNP transport code, and its integration into the MODHERATO simulation. Then the validation of the improved simulation is presented, through confrontation to real measurement images taken on a small-scale equivalent set-up on the PLINIUS platform. Excellent agreement is achieved. This improved simulation is therefore being used to design the PLINIUS-2 imaging set-ups (source, detectors, cameras, etc..

  19. Fast high-energy X-ray imaging for Severe Accidents experiments on the future PLINIUS-2 platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berge, L.; Estre, N.; Tisseur, D.; Payan, E.; Eck, D.; Bouyer, V.; Cassiaut-Louis, N.; Journeau, C.; Tellier, R. Le; Pluyette, E.

    2018-01-01

    The future PLINIUS-2 platform of CEA Cadarache will be dedicated to the study of corium interactions in severe nuclear accidents, and will host innovative large-scale experiments. The Nuclear Measurement Laboratory of CEA Cadarache is in charge of real-time high-energy X-ray imaging set-ups, for the study of the corium-water and corium-sodium interaction, and of the corium stratification process. Imaging such large and high-density objects requires a 15 MeV linear electron accelerator coupled to a tungsten target creating a high-energy Bremsstrahlung X-ray flux, with corresponding dose rate about 100 Gy/min at 1 m. The signal is detected by phosphor screens coupled to high-framerate scientific CMOS cameras. The imaging set-up is established using an experimentally-validated home-made simulation software (MODHERATO). The code computes quantitative radiographic signals from the description of the source, object geometry and composition, detector, and geometrical configuration (magnification factor, etc.). It accounts for several noise sources (photonic and electronic noises, swank and readout noise), and for image blur due to the source spot-size and to the detector unsharpness. In a view to PLINIUS-2, the simulation has been improved to account for the scattered flux, which is expected to be significant. The paper presents the scattered flux calculation using the MCNP transport code, and its integration into the MODHERATO simulation. Then the validation of the improved simulation is presented, through confrontation to real measurement images taken on a small-scale equivalent set-up on the PLINIUS platform. Excellent agreement is achieved. This improved simulation is therefore being used to design the PLINIUS-2 imaging set-ups (source, detectors, cameras, etc.).

  20. Risk Factors of Road Traffic Accidents Associated Mortality in Northern Iran; A Single Center Experience Utilizing Oaxaca Blinder Decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherafati, Faranak; Homaie-Rad, Enayatollah; Afkar, Abolhassan; Gholampoor-Sigaroodi, Ramin; Sirusbakht, Soheil

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the differences in death after receiving emergency services in traffic accidents between urban and rural regions, and decompose factors of the gap in Langerood, Northern Iran. This cross-sectional study was conducted in Langrood, Northern Iran during a 1-year period from 2013 to 2014. The hospital data of traffic crashes were used. Data contained those patients who survived at the scene of accident. Injury severity score, time to admission, age, gender, season of crash and type of collision were variables used in this study. Oaxaca decomposition technique was used to show the amount of inequity. In addition, three regression models were used to show the reason of inequity. Overall 1520 patients with road traffic accidents were admitted to our center during the study period. The mean age of the patients was 35.45 ± 17.9 years, and there were 1158 (76.1 %) men among the victims. Motorbike accidents accounted for 869 (57.1%) injuries and 833 (54.8 %) accidents occurred in rural regions. The in-hospital mortality rate was 60 (3.9%). The results of this study showed that 95% of inequity came from factors used in this study and 2.04% disadvantages were for rural crashes. Severity of crash and time to admission had relationship with death, while the effects of time to admission was higher in rural region and severity of the accident had more effect on mortality in urban regions in comparison with rural ones. The high rate of fatal accidents could be decreased by deleting the gap of access to health care services between urban and rural regions. This study suggested that more efforts of health system are needed to reduce the gap.

  1. African American women's experiences with the initial discovery, diagnosis, and treatment of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackey, N R; Gates, M F; Brown, G

    2001-04-01

    To describe the experiences of African American women living with breast cancer following the primary diagnosis and while undergoing initial treatment. Phenomenologic. 13 African American women (ages 30-66) purposefully selected from two oncology clinics in the mid-South. Phenomenologic interviews (transcribed verbatim) and field notes were analyzed using Colaizzi's method of phenomenologic description and analysis. Experience Trajectory, Femininity, and Spirituality were the three major themes. The Experience Trajectory subthemes were finding the lump, getting the diagnosis, undergoing surgery and adjuvant treatment. The Femininity subthemes were loss of all or part of the breast, loss of hair, and sexual attractiveness to a man. Spirituality was reflected as a reliance on God. Telling the story of their experience trajectory during their breast cancer experience is valuable in assessing African American women's feelings, emotions, and fears of body changes that occur during surgery and treatment. Their spirituality helps them through this experience. Research involving both African American women and their partners would provide greater insight into specific relationship patterns and communication related to sexuality during this experience. Nurses need to listen to the stories of African American women about the initial experience of discovery, diagnosis, and treatment of breast cancer so they can be more informed advocates for these women. African American women need more information from healthcare providers regarding the whole experience trajectory.

  2. Natural Circulation in the Blanket Heat Removal System During a Loss-of-Pumping Accident (LOFA) Based on Initial Conceptual Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamm, L.L.

    1998-01-01

    A transient natural convection model of the APT blanket primary heat removal (HR) system was developed to demonstrate that the blanket could be cooled for a sufficient period of time for long term cooling to be established following a loss-of-flow accident (LOFA). The particular case of interest in this report is a complete loss-of-pumping accident. For the accident scenario in which pumps are lost in both the target and blanket HR systems, natural convection provides effective cooling of the blanket for approximately 68 hours, and, if only the blanket HR systems are involved, natural convection is effective for approximately 210 hours. The heat sink for both of these accident scenarios is the assumed stagnant fluid and metal on the secondary sides of the heat exchangers

  3. APT Blanket System Loss-of-Flow Accident (LOFA) Analysis Based on Initial Conceptual Design - Case 1: with Beam Shutdown and Active RHR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamm, L.L.

    1998-01-01

    This report is one of a series of reports that document normal operation and accident simulations for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) blanket heat removal system. These simulations were performed for the Preliminary Safety Analysis Report

  4. Commissioning and initial experimental program of the BGO-OD experiment at ELSA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alef, S.; Bauer, P.; Bayadilov, D.; Beck, R.; Becker, M.; Bella, A.; Bielefeldt, P.; Böse, S.; Braghieri, A.; Brinkmann, K.; Cole, P.; Di Salvo, R.; Dutz, H.; Elsner, D.; Fantini, A.; Freyermuth, O.; Friedrich, S.; Frommberger, F.; Ganenko, V.; Geffers, D.; Gervino, G.; Ghio, F.; Görtz, S.; Gridnev, A.; Gutz, E.; Hammann, D.; Hannappel, J.; Hillert, W.; Ignatov, A.; Jahn, R.; Joosten, R.; Jude, T. C.; Klein, F.; Knaust, J.; Kohl, K.; Koop, K.; Krusche, B.; Lapik, A.; Levi Sandri, P.; Lopatin, I. V.; Mandaglio, G.; Messi, F.; Messi, R.; Metag, V.; Moricciani, D.; Mushkarenkov, A.; Nanova, M.; Nedorezov, V.; Novinskiy, D.; Pedroni, P.; Reitz, B.; Romaniuk, M.; Rostomyan, T.; Rudnev, N.; Schaerf, C.; Scheluchin, G.; Schmieden, H.; Stugelev, A.; Sumachev, V.; Tarakanov, V.; Vegna, V.; Walther, D.; Watts, D.; Zaunick, H.; Zimmermann, T.

    2016-11-01

    BGO-OD is a new meson photoproduction experiment at the ELSA facility of Bonn University. It aims at the investigation of non strange and strange baryon excitations, and is especially designed to be able to detect weekly bound meson-baryon type structures. The setup for the BGO-OD experiment is presented, the characteristics of the photon beam and the detector performances are shown and the initial experimental program is discussed.

  5. Experience in accident liquidation at the Chernobyl' NPP and problems of organization of the emergency-engineering service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreev, Yu.B.; Samojlenko, Yu.N.

    1989-01-01

    The efficiency of measures realized in order to eliminate the Chernobyl' accident effects is estimated. The principles of organization of the emergency-engineering service for accident elimination in nuclear power engineering are described. The automated information safety system should from the technical basis for this service. The information system structure is determined. The list of main directions of research and design works realized in the emergency-engineering service interests is given. It is noted that all parts of the emergency-engineering service must prepare the plants of works together with the USSR civil defense service, and they should interact in the process of accident elimination basing on coordinated organizational and technical solutions

  6. Terrorism-related injuries versus road traffic accident-related trauma: 5 years of experience in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peleg, Kobi; Savitsky, Bella

    2009-12-01

    Terrorism victims comprise the minority among trauma injured people, but this small population imposes a burden on the health care system. Thirty percent of the population injured in terrorist activities experienced severe trauma (injury severity score > or =16), more than half of them need a surgical procedure, and 25% of the population affected by terrorism had been admitted to intensive care. Furthermore, compared with patients with non-terrorism-related trauma, victims of terrorism often arrive in bulk, as part of a mass casualty event. This poses a sudden load on hospital resources and requires special organization and preparedness. The present study compared terrorism-related and road accident-related injuries and examined clinical characteristics of both groups of patients. This study is a retrospective study of all patients injured through terrorist acts and road traffic accidents from September 29, 2000 to December 31, 2005, and recorded in the Israel Trauma Registry. Data on the nature of injuries, treatment, and outcome were obtained from the registry. Medical diagnoses were extracted from the registry and classified based on International Classification of Diseases coding. Diagnoses were grouped to body regions, based on the Barell Injury Diagnosis Matrix. The study includes 2197 patients with terrorism-related injuries and 30,176 patients injured in road traffic accidents. All in all, 27% of terrorism-related casualties suffered severe to critical injuries, comparing to 17% among road traffic accident-related victims. Glasgow Coma Scale scores terrorism victims, in contrast with 7.4% among people injured on the roads. The terrorism victims had a significantly higher rate of use of intensive care facilities (24.2% vs 12.4%). The overall inpatient death rate was 6.0% among terrorism victims and 2.4% among those injured in road traffic accidents. Casualties from terrorist events are more severely injured and require more resources relative to casualties

  7. Blast experiments for the derivation of initial cloud dimensions after a ''Dirty Bomb'' event

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thielen, H.; Schroedl, E.

    2004-01-01

    Basis for the assessment of potential consequences of a ''dirty bomb'' event is the calculation of the atmospheric dispersion of airborne particles. The empirical derivation of parameters for the estimation of the initial pollutant cloud dimensions was the principal purpose for blast experiments performed in the training area Munster in summer 2003 with the participation of several highly engaged German organisations and institutions. The experiments were performed under variation of parameters like mass and kind of explosive, subsurface characteristics or meteorological conditions and were documented by digital video recording. The blasting experiments supplied significant results under reproducible conditions. The initial cloud dimension was primarily influenced by the explosive mass. The influence of other parameters was relatively small and within the range of the experimental uncertainties. Based on these experimental results a new correlation was determined for the empirical estimation of the initial cloud dimensions as a function of explosive mass. The observed initial cloud volumes were more than an order of magnitude smaller than those calculated with other widely-used formulas (e.g. HOTSPOT). As a smaller volume of the initial cloud leads to higher near-ground concentration maxima, our results support an appropriate adjustment of currently employed calculation methods. (orig.)

  8. "Elite" Career-Changers and Their Experience of Initial Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Chris

    2017-01-01

    This study explores the motivation of "high-status" professionals to change career and enter teaching, and their experience of undertaking initial teacher education (ITE) programmes in England. The study builds on previous research which found that career-changers are disproportionately more likely to fail to complete their ITE studies,…

  9. Initial experiences of simultaneous laparoscopic resection of colorectal cancer and liver metastases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, L. T.; Busch, O. R. C.; Bemelman, W. A.; van Gulik, T. M.; Tanis, P. J.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Simultaneous resection of primary colorectal carcinoma (CRC) and synchronous liver metastases (SLMs) is subject of debate with respect to morbidity in comparison to staged resection. The aim of this study was to evaluate our initial experience with this approach. Methods. Five patients

  10. High/Scope Preschool Key Experiences: Initiative and Social Relations. [with] Curriculum Videotape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Michelle

    As preschoolers develop the ability to carry out their ideas and play alone and with others, they are developing the foundation for social competence. This booklet and a companion videotape help teachers and parents recognize and support nine High/Scope key experiences in initiative and social relations: (1) making and expressing choices, plans,…

  11. HDR brachytherapy in carcinoma of cervix: initial experience at AWARE hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajendran, M.; Reddy, K.D.; Reddy, R.M.; Reddy, J.M.; Reddy, B.V.N.; Kiran Kumar; Gopi, S.; Dharaniraj; Janardhanan

    2002-01-01

    High dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy is well established in the management of gynaecological malignancies. A report on the initial results of one and half year experience with a consistent dose/fractionation schedule and procedure of planning with delivery of treatment schedule is presented

  12. Comparison of the initial ETA gas propagation experiments with theoretical models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chambers, F.W.; Clark, J.C.; Fessenden, T.J.

    1982-04-20

    This report contains a description of the initial ETA propagation experiments in air at a beam current of 4.5 kA. The beam was observed to propagate at the pressures anticipated on the basis of previous theory and experiment. A comparison of measured net current waveforms with predictions of the PHOENIX code showed good agreement over the pressure range 0.1 to 200 torr. However, the beam was observed to expand with Z at a faster rate than theory predicts. Excessive transverse beam modulation at injection complicated the experiments and limited their comparison with theory.

  13. Comparison of the initial ETA gas propagation experiments with theoretical models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chambers, F.W.; Clark, J.C.; Fessenden, T.J.

    1982-01-01

    This report contains a description of the initial ETA propagation experiments in air at a beam current of 4.5 kA. The beam was observed to propagate at the pressures anticipated on the basis of previous theory and experiment. A comparison of measured net current waveforms with predictions of the PHOENIX code showed good agreement over the pressure range 0.1 to 200 torr. However, the beam was observed to expand with Z at a faster rate than theory predicts. Excessive transverse beam modulation at injection complicated the experiments and limited their comparison with theory

  14. Initial experiment of focusing wiggler of MM wave Free Electron Laser on LAX-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Keishi; Maebara, Sunao; Watanabe, Akihiko; Kishimoto, Yasuaki; Nagashima, Takashi; Maeda, Hikosuke; Shiho, Makoto; Oda, Hisako; Kawasaki, Sunao.

    1991-03-01

    Initial results of Free Electron laser (FEL) Experiment in the mm wave region are presented. The experiment is carried out using a induction linac system (LAX-1: Large current Accelerator Experiment) of E b = 1 MeV, Ib = 1 ∼ 3 kA. The wiggler of FEL is composed of the curved surface magnets arrays (focusing wiggler), which is found to be effective for a transport of low energy and high current beam through the wiggler. The superradiance of the mm wave region (30 GHz ∼ 40 GHz) is observed. The growth rate of this radiation is 0.42 dB/cm. (author)

  15. Development of the BWR Dry Core Initial and Boundary Conditions for the SNL XR2 Experiments; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, L.J.

    1994-01-01

    The objectives of the Boiling Water Reactor Experimental Analysis and Model Development for Severe Accidents (BEAMD) Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) are: (1) the development of a sound quantitative understanding of boiling water reactor (BWR) core melt progression; this includes control blade and channel box effects, metallic melt relocation and possible blockage formation under severe accident conditions, and (2) provision of BWR melt progression modeling capabilities in SCDAP/RELAP5 (consistent with the BWR experimental data base). This requires the assessment of current modeling of BWR core melt progression against the expanding BWR data base. Emphasis is placed upon data from the BWR tests in the German CORA test facility and from the ex-reactor experiments[Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)] on metallic melt relocation and blockage formation in BWRs, as well as upon in-reactor data from the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) DF-4 BWR test (conducted in 1986 at SNL). The BEAMD Program is a derivative of the BWR Severe Accident Technology Programs at ORNL. The ORNL BWR programs have studied postulated severe accidents in BWRs and have developed a set of models specific to boiling water reactor response under severe accident conditions. These models, in an experiment-specific format, have been successfully applied to both pretest and posttest analyses of the DF-4 experiment, and the BWR severe fuel damage (SFD) experiments performed in the CORA facility at the Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (KfK) in Germany, resulting in excellent agreement between model prediction and experiment. The ORNL BWR models have provided for more precise predictions of the conditions in the BWR experiments than were previously available. This has provided a basis for more accurate interpretation of the phenomena for which the experiments are performed. The experiment-specific models, as used in the ORNL DF-4 and CORA BWR experimental analyses, also provide a basis

  16. The experiences of employees participating in organisational corporate social responsibility initiatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gretha Cook

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: This article is about the experiences of employees who actively participate in organisational corporate social responsibility (CSR initiatives.   Research purpose: The general aim of this study was to explore the experiences of employees who participate in CSR initiatives within an organisation where a well-developed framework exists.   Motivation for the study: Whilst an emergent number of studies have considered the various dimensions of CSR initiatives, the focus appears to be on stakeholders such as the recipients of CSR, organisations, consumers and shareholders but not the perspective of the employees who actively participate in CSR initiatives.   Research design, approach and method: A qualitative research approach was employed with the intent of exploring the experiences of employees participating in organisational CSR initiatives. Data were collected and analysed from a purposive sample of 12 employees, by means of interactive qualitative analysis.   Main findings: The study revealed that the primary driver that motivates employees to participate in CSR is love. Love sparks a sense of compassion. Compassion, coupled with an enabling environment, stimulates generosity. By being generous, a feeling of hope and inspiration is induced in both the givers and receivers of generosity. A secondary outcome of generosity and hope and inspiration is bringing about change to others, and whilst going through this journey and making a difference in the lives of others, participants experience a progressive change within themselves. This change evokes a feeling of fulfilment, and ultimately a feeling of complete joy.   Contributions or value-add: This research complements existing CSR literature by focussing and reporting on the experiences of the employee as an important stakeholder.

  17. Information-Analytic support of the programs of eliminating the consequences of the Chernobyl accident: gained experience and its future application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arutyunyan, R.V.; Bolshov, L.A.; Linge, I.I.; Abalkina, I.L.; Simonov, A.V.; Pavlovsky, O.A.

    1996-01-01

    On the initial stage of eliminating the consequences of the Chernobyl accident, the role of system-analytic and information support in the decision making process for protection of the population and rehabilitation of territories was. to a certain extent, underestimated. Starting from 1991, activity in system-analytic support was the part of the USSR (later on, Russian) stage programs. This activity covered three direction: development of the Central bank of the generalized data on the radiation catastrophes; development, implementation, and maintenance of the control informational system for the Federal bodies; computer-system integration

  18. Experience of using film-forming compositions for radiation situation improvement during initial period after the Chernobyl' accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karataev, B.A.; Konstantinov, E.A.; Sorokin, N.M.; Finogenov, V.A.

    1989-01-01

    Film-formiing (FF) compositions were used for radioactive contamination localization, for decontaminating surfaces of rooms and equipment and for their prevention from secondary contamination after decontamination. The FF compounds were used also for isolating reinforced-concrete plates after their laying at the operating site of the Chernobyl' NPP

  19. Initial experiences of family caregivers of survivors of a traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandi Broodryk

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: There seems to be a paucity of research on the initial subjective experiences of family caregivers of survivors of a traumatic brain injury (TBI. Objective: To explore the challenges that family caregivers face during the initial stages of recovery of a relative who has sustained a TBI. Methods: Thematic analysis was used to explore the findings from semi-structured interviews that were conducted with 12 female family caregivers of relatives who had sustained a TBI. Results: Family caregivers recalled their initial experiences of the shock at hearing the news about their relative’s TBI, negative experiences in hospital and frustrating interactions with healthcare professionals as particularly challenging. Conclusion: The findings of this study emphasise caregivers’ need for support, information and psycho-education, especially from healthcare professionals, from the very beginning stages of recovery from a TBI. Practical and physical needs with regard to admission to and care in the hospital were also highlighted. This research will hopefully contribute to creating awareness amongst healthcare professionals on how they can contribute to improvement of the services provided by the healthcare system based on the experiences of the caregivers who participated in this study.

  20. Results of Semiscale Mod-2C small-break (5%) loss-of-coolant accident. Experiments S-LH-1 and S-LH-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loomis, G.G.; Streit, J.E.

    1985-11-01

    Two experiments simulating small break (5%) loss-of-coolant accidents (5% SBLOCAs) were performed in the Semiscale Mod-2C facility. These experiments were identical except for downcomer-to-upper-head bypass flow (0.9% in Experiment S-LH-1 and 3.0% in Experiment S-LH-2) and were performed at high pressure and temperature [15.6 MPa (2262 psia) system pressure; 37 K (67 0 F) core differential temperature; 595 K(610 0 F) hot leg fluid temperature]. From the experimental results, the signature response and transient mass distribution are determined for a 5% SBLOCA. The core thermal-hydraulic response is characterized, including core void distribution maps, and the effect of core bypass flow on transient severity is assessed. Comparisons are made between postexperiment RELAP5 calculations and the experimental results, and the capability of RELAP5 to calculate the phenomena is assessed. 115 figs

  1. Radiation accidents in the former Soviet Union: Medical consequences and experience in the application of radiation protection measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2002-01-01

    The Institute of Biophysics of the Russian Federation is a scientific center which has extensive archives containing scientific studies and information on radiation safety problems and occurrences since the early days of nuclear science and research and nuclear weapons tests in the Soviet Union. Some of this classified, top secret material has recently been published by Prof. L.A. Iljin in a renowned Russian scientific journal in the form of a review of radiation accidents in the Soviet Union, general medical reports, case reports, and the effects of nuclear weapons tests. He also added his own expert view of the accidents and their effects, and his conclusions relating to public health effects and required radiation protection policy. The article in this issue of Strahlenschutz Praxis is a German translation of excerpts from the original journal article. (orig./CB) [de

  2. From learning from accidents to teaching about accident causation and prevention: Multidisciplinary education and safety literacy for all engineering students

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleh, Joseph H.; Pendley, Cynthia C.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we argue that system accident literacy and safety competence should be an essential part of the intellectual toolkit of all engineering students. We discuss why such competence should be taught and nurtured in engineering students, and provide one example for how this can be done. We first define the class of adverse events of interest as system accidents, distinct from occupational accidents, through their (1) temporal depth of causality and (2) diversity of agency or groups and individuals who influence or contribute to the accident occurrence/prevention. We then address the question of why the interest in this class of events and their prevention, and we expand on the importance of system safety literacy and the contributions that engineering students can make in the long-term towards accident prevention. Finally, we offer one model for an introductory course on accident causation and system safety, discuss the course logistics, material and delivery, and our experience teaching this subject. The course starts with the anatomy of accidents and is grounded in various case studies; these help illustrate the multidisciplinary nature of the subject, and provide the students with the important concepts to describe the phenomenology of accidents (e.g., initiating events, accident precursor or lead indicator, and accident pathogen). More importantly, the case studies invite a deep reflection on the underlying failure mechanisms, their generalizability, and the various safety levers for accident prevention. The course then proceeds to an exposition of defense-in-depth, safety barriers and principles, essential elements for an education in accident prevention, and it concludes with a presentation of basic concepts and tools for uncertainty and risk analysis. Educators will recognize the difficulties in designing a new course on such a broad subject. It is hoped that this work will invite comments and contributions from the readers, and that the journal will

  3. Preparing beginning reading teachers: An experimental comparison of initial early literacy field experiences

    OpenAIRE

    Al Otaiba, Stephanie; Lake, Vickie E.; Greulich, Luana; Folsom, Jessica S.; Guidry, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    This randomized-control trial examined the learning of preservice teachers taking an initial Early Literacy course in an early childhood education program and of the kindergarten or first grade students they tutored in their field experience. Preservice teachers were randomly assigned to one of two tutoring programs: Book Buddies and Tutor Assisted Intensive Learning Strategies (TAILS), which provided identical meaning-focused instruction (shared book reading), but differed ...

  4. SPINAL CORD STIMULATION IN TREATMENT OF THE NEUROPATHIC PAIN SYNDROMES: INITIAL EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Rzaev

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the article initial experience of spinal cord stimulation for chronic pain syndromes is described. The trial was done for 62 patients, in 52 cases trial was successful and subcutaneous pulse generator were implanated. Maximal follow-up is 26 months. The level of pain evaluates at VAS. Permanent pain-relieve results were achieved in 46 patients (74,2%. These results correspond to literature data.

  5. Noticeable aspects of selecting intervention measures for nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Yong; Shi Yuanming

    1993-01-01

    Referring to the experience of intervention measures taken for protecting the public after Chernobyl accident and to recent knowledge of source terms of reactor accidents, the noticeable aspects of selecting of intervention measures for nuclear accidents is discussed

  6. Radiological accidents: education for prevention and confrontation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardenas Herrera, Juan; Fernandez Gomez, Isis Maria

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to train and inform on radiological accidents as a preventive measure to improve the people life quality. Radiological accidents are part of the events of technological origin which are composed of nuclear and radiological accidents. As a notable figure is determined that there have been 423 radiological accidents from 1944 to 2005 and among the causes prevail industrial accidents, by irradiations, medical accidents and of laboratories, among others. Latin American countries such as Argentina, Brazil, Mexico and Peru are some where most accidents have occurred by radioactivity. The radiological accidents can have sociological, environmental, economic, social and political consequences. In addition, there are scenarios of potential nuclear accidents and in them the potential human consequences. Also, the importance of the organization and planning in a nuclear emergency is highlighted. Finally, the experience that Cuba has lived on the subject of radiological accidents is described [es

  7. Normal accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrow, C.

    1989-01-01

    The author has chosen numerous concrete examples to illustrate the hazardousness inherent in high-risk technologies. Starting with the TMI reactor accident in 1979, he shows that it is not only the nuclear energy sector that bears the risk of 'normal accidents', but also quite a number of other technologies and industrial sectors, or research fields. The author refers to the petrochemical industry, shipping, air traffic, large dams, mining activities, and genetic engineering, showing that due to the complexity of the systems and their manifold, rapidly interacting processes, accidents happen that cannot be thoroughly calculated, and hence are unavoidable. (orig./HP) [de

  8. Occupational accidents aboard merchant ships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, H.L.; Nielsen, D.; Frydenberg, Morten

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the frequency, circumstances, and causes of occupational accidents aboard merchant ships in international trade, and to identify risk factors for the occurrence of occupational accidents as well as dangerous working situations where possible preventive measures may...... be initiated. Methods: The study is a historical follow up on occupational accidents among crew aboard Danish merchant ships in the period 1993–7. Data were extracted from the Danish Maritime Authority and insurance data. Exact data on time at risk were available. Results: A total of 1993 accidents were...... aboard. Relative risks for notified accidents and accidents causing permanent disability of 5% or more were calculated in a multivariate analysis including ship type, occupation, age, time on board, change of ship since last employment period, and nationality. Foreigners had a considerably lower recorded...

  9. Thermophysical Property Estimation by Transient Experiments: The Effect of a Biased Initial Temperature Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Scarpa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The identification of thermophysical properties of materials in dynamic experiments can be conveniently performed by the inverse solution of the associated heat conduction problem (IHCP. The inverse technique demands the knowledge of the initial temperature distribution within the material. As only a limited number of temperature sensors (or no sensor at all are arranged inside the test specimen, the knowledge of the initial temperature distribution is affected by some uncertainty. This uncertainty, together with other possible sources of bias in the experimental procedure, will propagate in the estimation process and the accuracy of the reconstructed thermophysical property values could deteriorate. In this work the effect on the estimated thermophysical properties due to errors in the initial temperature distribution is investigated along with a practical method to quantify this effect. Furthermore, a technique for compensating this kind of bias is proposed. The method consists in including the initial temperature distribution among the unknown functions to be estimated. In this way the effect of the initial bias is removed and the accuracy of the identified thermophysical property values is highly improved.

  10. Experiences of pathways, outcomes and choice after severe traumatic brain injury under no-fault versus fault-based motor accident insurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Rosamund; Foster, Michele; Fleming, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    To explore experiences of pathways, outcomes and choice after motor vehicle accident (MVA) acquired severe traumatic brain injury (sTBI) under fault-based vs no-fault motor accident insurance (MAI). In-depth qualitative interviews with 10 adults with sTBI and 17 family members examined experiences of pathways, outcomes and choice and how these were shaped by both compensable status and interactions with service providers and service funders under a no-fault and a fault-based MAI scheme. Participants were sampled to provide variation in compensable status, injury severity, time post-injury and metropolitan vs regional residency. Interviews were recorded, transcribed and thematically analysed to identify dominant themes under each scheme. Dominant themes emerging under the no-fault scheme included: (a) rehabilitation-focused pathways; (b) a sense of security; and (c) bounded choices. Dominant themes under the fault-based scheme included: (a) resource-rationed pathways; (b) pressured lives; and (c) unknown choices. Participants under the no-fault scheme experienced superior access to specialist rehabilitation services, greater surety of support and more choice over how rehabilitation and life-time care needs were met. This study provides valuable insights into individual experiences under fault-based vs no-fault MAI. Implications for an injury insurance scheme design to optimize pathways, outcomes and choice after sTBI are discussed.

  11. Patients' Experiences of Performing Self-care of Stomas in the Initial Postoperative Period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Siew Hoon; Chan, Sally Wai Chi; He, Hong-Gu

    2015-01-01

    With the loss of an important bodily function and the distortion in body image, a stoma patient experiences physical, psychological, and social changes. With limited current studies exploring experiences of patients in the management of their stoma, there is a need to explore their experiences, their needs, and factors that influence their self-management. The aim of this study was to investigate patients' experiences of performing self-care of stomas in the initial postoperative period. This study adopted a descriptive qualitative approach from the interpretive paradigm. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 12 patients 1 month postoperatively in a colorectal ward in a hospital in Singapore. Thematic analysis was applied to the interview data. Five themes were identified: process of acceptance and self-management of stoma, physical limitations, psychological reactions, social support, and need for timely and sufficient stoma preparation and education. This study highlights the importance of health professionals' role in helping patients adjust preoperatively and postoperatively and accept the presence of a stoma. Health professionals need to be aware of the physical, psychological, and social impact of stoma on patients in the initial 30-day postoperative period. Research findings informed the type and level of assistance and support to be offered to patients by nurses and the importance of encouraging patients to be involved in stoma care at an early stage, which will ultimately contribute to effective and independent self-management. Patients can be prepared preoperatively to reduce the psychological and social impact of stoma after creation of their stoma.

  12. Initial cathode processing experiences and results for the treatment of spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westphal, B.R.; Laug, D.V.; Brunsvold, A.R.; Roach, P.D.

    1996-01-01

    As part of the spent fuel treatment demonstration at Argonne National Laboratory, a vacuum distillation process is being employed for the recovery of uranium following an electrorefining process. Distillation of a salt electrolyte, primarily consisting of a eutectic mixture of lithium and potassium chlorides, from uranium is achieved by a batch operation termed ''cathode processing.'' Cathode processing is performed in a retort furnace which enables the production of a stable uranium product that can be isotopically diluted and stored. To date, experiments have been performed with two distillation units; one for prototypical testing and the other for actual spent fuel treatment operations. The results and experiences from these initial experiments with both units will be discussed as well as problems encountered and their resolution

  13. Magnetohydrodynamic simulation of solid-deuterium-initiated Z-pinch experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheehey, P.T.

    1994-02-01

    Solid-deuterium-initiated Z-pinch experiments are numerically simulated using a two-dimensional resistive magnetohydrodynamic model, which includes many important experimental details, such as ''cold-start'' initial conditions, thermal conduction, radiative energy loss, actual discharge current vs. time, and grids of sufficient size and resolution to allow realistic development of the plasma. The alternating-direction-implicit numerical technique used meets the substantial demands presented by such a computational task. Simulations of fiber-initiated experiments show that when the fiber becomes fully ionized rapidly developing m=0 instabilities, which originated in the coronal plasma generated from the ablating fiber, drive intense non-uniform heating and rapid expansion of the plasma column. The possibility that inclusion of additional physical effects would improve stability is explored. Finite-Larmor-radius-ordered Hall and diamagnetic pressure terms in the magnetic field evolution equation, corresponding energy equation terms, and separate ion and electron energy equations are included; these do not change the basic results. Model diagnostics, such as shadowgrams and interferograms, generated from simulation results, are in good agreement with experiment. Two alternative experimental approaches are explored: high-current magnetic implosion of hollow cylindrical deuterium shells, and ''plasma-on-wire'' (POW) implosion of low-density plasma onto a central deuterium fiber. By minimizing instability problems, these techniques may allow attainment of higher temperatures and densities than possible with bare fiber-initiated Z-pinches. Conditions for significant D-D or D-T fusion neutron production may be realizable with these implosion-based approaches

  14. Accident Statistics

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Accident statistics available on the Coast Guard’s website by state, year, and one variable to obtain tables and/or graphs. Data from reports has been loaded for...

  15. Environmental consequences of the Chernobyl accident and their remediation: Twenty years of experience. Report of the UN Chernobyl Forum Expert Group 'Environment' (EGE). Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide an up-to-date evaluation of the environmental effects of the 26 April 1986 accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. Even though it is now nearly 20 years after the accident and substantial monies have been spent on such evaluations, there are still many conflicting reports and rumours. This joint report has been developed with the full cooperation of the United Nations (UN) family of relevant organisations and with political representatives from the three more affected countries: Ukraine, Belarus, and the Russian Federation. In addition, recognised scientific experts from the three countries and additional international experts provided the basis for the preparation of reports for review by the actual members of the Chernobyl Forum. The - Chernobyl Forum - is a high-level political forum whose suggestion for existence was initiated by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in cooperation with the Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO), the United Nations Office for Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA), the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR), the World Health Organisation (WHO), and the World Bank, as well as the competent authorities of Belarus, the Russian Federation, and Ukraine. The organisational meeting of the Chernobyl Forum was held on 3-5 February 2003, at which time the decision was reached to establish the Forum as an ongoing entity of the above named organisations. Thus, the organisational meeting of the Forum decided to establish the Chernobyl Forum as a series of managerial, expert and public meetings in order to generate authoritative consensual statements on the health effects attributable to radiation exposure arising from the accident and the environmental consequences induced by the released radioactive materials, to provide advice on

  16. Environmental consequences of the Chernobyl accident and their remediation: Twenty years of experience. Report of the UN Chernobyl Forum Expert Group 'Environment' (EGE). Working material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide an up-to-date evaluation of the environmental effects of the 26 April 1986 accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. Even though it is now nearly 20 years after the accident and substantial monies have been spent on such evaluations, there are still many conflicting reports and rumours. This joint report has been developed with the full cooperation of the United Nations (UN) family of relevant organisations and with political representatives from the three more affected countries: Ukraine, Belarus, and the Russian Federation. In addition, recognised scientific experts from the three countries and additional international experts provided the basis for the preparation of reports for review by the actual members of the Chernobyl Forum. The - Chernobyl Forum - is a high-level political forum whose suggestion for existence was initiated by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in cooperation with the Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO), the United Nations Office for Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA), the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR), the World Health Organisation (WHO), and the World Bank, as well as the competent authorities of Belarus, the Russian Federation, and Ukraine. The organisational meeting of the Chernobyl Forum was held on 3-5 February 2003, at which time the decision was reached to establish the Forum as an ongoing entity of the above named organisations. Thus, the organisational meeting of the Forum decided to establish the Chernobyl Forum as a series of managerial, expert and public meetings in order to generate authoritative consensual statements on the health effects attributable to radiation exposure arising from the accident and the environmental consequences induced by the released radioactive materials, to provide advice on

  17. Accident sequence quantification with KIRAP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae Un; Han, Sang Hoon; Kim, Kil You; Yang, Jun Eon; Jeong, Won Dae; Chang, Seung Cheol; Sung, Tae Yong; Kang, Dae Il; Park, Jin Hee; Lee, Yoon Hwan; Hwang, Mi Jeong.

    1997-01-01

    The tasks of probabilistic safety assessment(PSA) consists of the identification of initiating events, the construction of event tree for each initiating event, construction of fault trees for event tree logics, the analysis of reliability data and finally the accident sequence quantification. In the PSA, the accident sequence quantification is to calculate the core damage frequency, importance analysis and uncertainty analysis. Accident sequence quantification requires to understand the whole model of the PSA because it has to combine all event tree and fault tree models, and requires the excellent computer code because it takes long computation time. Advanced Research Group of Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute(KAERI) has developed PSA workstation KIRAP(Korea Integrated Reliability Analysis Code Package) for the PSA work. This report describes the procedures to perform accident sequence quantification, the method to use KIRAP's cut set generator, and method to perform the accident sequence quantification with KIRAP. (author). 6 refs

  18. Accident sequence quantification with KIRAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Un; Han, Sang Hoon; Kim, Kil You; Yang, Jun Eon; Jeong, Won Dae; Chang, Seung Cheol; Sung, Tae Yong; Kang, Dae Il; Park, Jin Hee; Lee, Yoon Hwan; Hwang, Mi Jeong

    1997-01-01

    The tasks of probabilistic safety assessment(PSA) consists of the identification of initiating events, the construction of event tree for each initiating event, construction of fault trees for event tree logics, the analysis of reliability data and finally the accident sequence quantification. In the PSA, the accident sequence quantification is to calculate the core damage frequency, importance analysis and uncertainty analysis. Accident sequence quantification requires to understand the whole model of the PSA because it has to combine all event tree and fault tree models, and requires the excellent computer code because it takes long computation time. Advanced Research Group of Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute(KAERI) has developed PSA workstation KIRAP(Korea Integrated Reliability Analysis Code Package) for the PSA work. This report describes the procedures to perform accident sequence quantification, the method to use KIRAP`s cut set generator, and method to perform the accident sequence quantification with KIRAP. (author). 6 refs.

  19. Sports Accidents

    CERN Multimedia

    Kiebel

    1972-01-01

    Le Docteur Kiebel, chirurgien à Genève, est aussi un grand ami de sport et de temps en temps médecin des classes genevoises de ski et également médecin de l'équipe de hockey sur glace de Genève Servette. Il est bien qualifié pour nous parler d'accidents de sport et surtout d'accidents de ski.

  20. Radiation accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poplavskij, K.K.; Smorodintseva, G.I.

    1978-01-01

    On the basis of a critical analysis of the available data on causes and consequences of radiation accidents (RA), a classification of RA by severity (five groups of accidents) according to biomedical consequences and categories of exposed personnel is proposed. A RA is defined and its main characteristics are described. Methods of RA prevention are proposed, as is a plan of specific measures to deal with RA in accordance with the proposed classification

  1. Development of Assessment Methodology of Chemical Behavior of Volatile Iodide under Severe Accident Conditions Using EPICUR Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Jae Yong; Yun, Jong Il; Kim, Do Sam; Han Chul

    2011-01-01

    Iodine is one of the most important fission products produced in nuclear power plants. Under severe accident condition, iodine exists as a variety of species in the containment such as aqueous iodide, gaseous iodide, iodide aerosol, etc. Following release of iodine from the reactor, mostly in the form of CsI aerosol, volatile iodine can be generated from the containment sump and release to the environment. Especially, volatile organic iodide can be produced from interaction between nonvolatile iodine and organic substances present in the containment. Volatile iodide could significantly influence the alienated residents surrounding the nuclear power plant. In particular, thyroid is vulnerable to radioiodine due to its high accumulation. Therefore, it is necessary for the Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS) to develop an evaluation model which can simulate iodine behavior in the containment following a severe accident. KINS also needs to make up its methodology for radiological consequence analysis, based on MELCOR-MACCS2 calculation, by coupling a simple iodine model which can conveniently deal with organic iodides. In the long term, such a model can contribute to develop an accident source term, which is one of urgent domestic needs. Our strategy for developing the model is as follows: 1. Review the existing methodologies, 2. Develop a simple stand-alone model, 3. Validate the model using ISTP-EPICUR (Experimental Program on Iodine Chemistry under Radiation) and OECD-BIP (Behavior of Iodine Project) experimental data. In this paper we present the context of development and validation of our model named RAIM (Radio-active iodine chemistry model)

  2. Development of Assessment Methodology of Chemical Behavior of Volatile Iodide under Severe Accident Conditions Using EPICUR Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Jae Yong; Yun, Jong Il [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Do Sam; Han Chul [Korea Institue of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    Iodine is one of the most important fission products produced in nuclear power plants. Under severe accident condition, iodine exists as a variety of species in the containment such as aqueous iodide, gaseous iodide, iodide aerosol, etc. Following release of iodine from the reactor, mostly in the form of CsI aerosol, volatile iodine can be generated from the containment sump and release to the environment. Especially, volatile organic iodide can be produced from interaction between nonvolatile iodine and organic substances present in the containment. Volatile iodide could significantly influence the alienated residents surrounding the nuclear power plant. In particular, thyroid is vulnerable to radioiodine due to its high accumulation. Therefore, it is necessary for the Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS) to develop an evaluation model which can simulate iodine behavior in the containment following a severe accident. KINS also needs to make up its methodology for radiological consequence analysis, based on MELCOR-MACCS2 calculation, by coupling a simple iodine model which can conveniently deal with organic iodides. In the long term, such a model can contribute to develop an accident source term, which is one of urgent domestic needs. Our strategy for developing the model is as follows: 1. Review the existing methodologies, 2. Develop a simple stand-alone model, 3. Validate the model using ISTP-EPICUR (Experimental Program on Iodine Chemistry under Radiation) and OECD-BIP (Behavior of Iodine Project) experimental data. In this paper we present the context of development and validation of our model named RAIM (Radio-active iodine chemistry model)

  3. Experience of Initial Symptoms of Breast Cancer and Triggers for Action in Ethiopia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dye, T.D.; Hobden, C.; Reeler, A.; Dye, T.D.; Bogale, S.; Tilahun, Y.; Deressa, T.

    2012-01-01

    Objective. This study assessed the initial experiences, symptoms, and actions of patients in Ethiopia ultimately determined to have breast cancer. Methods. 69 participants in a comprehensive breast cancer treatment program at the main national cancer hospital in Ethiopia were interviewed using mixed qualitative and quantitative approaches. Participants narratives of their initial cancer experience were coded and analyzed for themes around their symptoms, time to seeking advice, triggers for action, and contextual factors. The assessment was approved by the Addis Ababa University Faculty of Medicine Institutional Review Board. Results. Nearly all women first noticed lumps, though few sought medical advice within the first year (average time to action: 1.5 years). Eventually, changes in their symptoms motivated most participants to seek advice. Most participants did not think the initial lump would be cancer, nor was a lump of any particular concern until symptoms changed. Conclusion. Given the frequency with which lumps are the first symptom noticed, raising awareness among participants that lumps should trigger medical consultation could contribute significantly to more rapid medical advice-seeking among women in Ethiopia. Primary care sites should be trained and equipped to offer evaluation of lumps so that women can be referred appropriately for assessment if needed

  4. Experience in reconstruction of psychological reality for persons engaged in elimination of the Chernobyl' NPP accident effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salamatov, V.A.; Nyagu, A.T.

    1990-01-01

    The results of psichosemantic studies of adaptation process are discussed, i.e. the consciousness contents for personnel (120 persons) engaged in works connected with the Chernobyl' NPP accident effect elimination and reconstruction of the subjective image of the Chernobyl' NPP 30-km zone on this basis are described. The mental tension for the zone personnel is estimated. The results obtained testify to the presence of chronic stress and exceeding the level of psychoemotional tension. Increases in the uneasiness level and emotional instability for the personnel are revealed

  5. Initial Scaling Studies and Conceptual Thermal Fluids Experiments for the Prismatic NGNP Point Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. M. McEligot; G. E. McCreery

    2004-09-01

    The objective of this report is to document the initial high temperature gas reactor scaling studies and conceptual experiment design for gas flow and heat transfer. The general approach of the project is to develop new benchmark experiments for assessment in parallel with CFD and coupled CFD/ATHENA/RELAP5-3D calculations for the same geometry. Two aspects of the complex flow in an NGNP are being addressed: (1) flow and thermal mixing in the lower plenum ("hot streaking" issue) and (2) turbulence and resulting temperature distributions in reactor cooling channels ("hot channel" issue). Current prismatic NGNP concepts are being examined to identify their proposed flow conditions and geometries over the range from normal operation to decay heat removal in a pressurized cooldown. Approximate analyses are being applied to determine key non-dimensional parameters and their magnitudes over this operating range. For normal operation, the flow in the coolant channels can be considered to be dominant forced convection with slight transverse property variation. The flow in the lower plenum can locally be considered to be a situation of multiple buoyant jets into a confined density-stratified crossflow -- with obstructions. Experiments are needed for the combined features of the lower plenum flows. Missing from the typical jet experiments are interactions with nearby circular posts and with vertical posts in the vicinity of vertical walls - with near stagnant surroundings at one extreme and significant crossflow at the other. Two heat transfer experiments are being considered. One addresses the "hot channel" problem, if necessary. The second experiment will treat heated jets entering a model plenum. Unheated MIR (Matched-Index-of-Refraction) experiments are first steps when the geometry is complicated. One does not want to use a computational technique which will not even handle constant properties properly. The MIR experiment will simulate flow features of the paths of jets

  6. Severe accidents in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohai, Dumitru; Dumitrescu, Iulia; Tunaru, Mariana

    2004-01-01

    The likelihood of accidents leading to core meltdown in nuclear reactors is low. The consequences of such an event are but so severe that developing and implementing of adequate measures for preventing or diminishing the consequences of such events are of paramount importance. The analysis of major accidents requires sophisticated computation codes but necessary are also relevant experiments for checking the accuracy of the predictions and capability of these codes. In this paper an overview of the severe accidents worldwide with definitions, computation codes and relating experiments is presented. The experimental research activity of severe accidents was conducted in INR Pitesti since 2003, when the Institute jointed the SARNET Excellence Network. The INR activity within SARNET consists in studying scenarios of severe accidents by means of ASTEC and RELAP/SCDAP codes and conducting bench-scale experiments

  7. INITIAL AND PRESENT SITUATION OF FOOD CONTAMINATION IN JAPAN AFTER THE ACCIDENT AT THE FUKUSHIMA DAI-ICHI NUCLEAR POWER PLANT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aono, Tatsuo; Yoshida, Satoshi; Akashi, Makoto

    2016-09-01

    The accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) in March 2011 affected not only the terrestrial environment of Fukushima prefecture and the surrounding area, but also the marine area facing the NPP. Our present study is focused on the concentrations of radionuclides in agricultural products of Fukushima and sea-foods collected off Fukushima after the accident. The regulation value for radiocesium in vegetables, meat and fish was revised from 500 Bq/kg-wet to 100 Bq/kg-wet on 1 April 2012. The overall activity of radiocesium in these products was found to be within the limit of tolerance in respect to Japanese and also international regulations, but there is still radiocesium found at activities greater than this level in edible wild plants, wild mushrooms and game such as boar meat. Although the activities of radionuclides exceeding the regulatory limits were not detected in marine products collected off Fukushima after April 2015, the commercial marine fishery has not received approval in the affected areas except for certain species. We learned from the Fukushima accident that long-term kinetic studies of radionuclides in terrestrial and marine environments is extremely important for prevention of internal contamination, since contamination with radionuclides occurs via the food chain in the environment. © World Health Organisation 2016. All rights reserved. The World Health Organization has granted Oxford University Press permission for the reproduction of this article.

  8. Initial and present situation of food contamination in Japan after the accident at the Fukushima Dai-Ichi Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aono, Tatsuo; Yoshida, Satoshi; Akashi, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    The accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) in March 2011 affected not only the terrestrial environment of Fukushima prefecture and the surrounding area, but also the marine area facing the NPP. Our present study is focused on the concentrations of radionuclides in agricultural products of Fukushima and sea-foods collected off Fukushima after the accident. The regulation value for radiocesium in vegetables, meat and fish was revised from 500 Bq/kg-wet to 100 Bq/kg-wet on 1 April 2012. The overall activity of radiocesium in these products was found to be within the limit of tolerance in respect to Japanese and also international regulations, but there is still radiocesium found at activities greater than this level in edible wild plants, wild mushrooms and game such as boar meat. Although the activities of radionuclides exceeding the regulatory limits were not detected in marine products collected off Fukushima after April 2015, the commercial marine fishery has not received approval in the affected areas except for certain species. We learned from the Fukushima accident that long-term kinetic studies of radionuclides in terrestrial and marine environments is extremely important for prevention of internal contamination, since contamination with radionuclides occurs via the food chain in the environment. (authors)

  9. Experience in initial training required for the recognition of the qualified RP expert in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Suarez, M.; Marco Arboli, M.; Menarguez, J.

    2003-01-01

    An important point of the actions inside the European framework to achieve the harmonisation of the training programmes and recognition was included in the European directive 96/29/Euratom which includes definition and specific tasks of the European Qualified Expert on Radiation Protection (RP). Basic syllabus for training of those experts was developed in the communication 98/C 133/03 concerning BSS applications. Although, in the Spanish education system, the training and recognition requirements of the high level qualified experts on RP was defined since 1977, until 2001, the figure of the Technical Qualified Expert on RP does not appear in the legal framework. In December 2002, a new regulation of the Spanish Regulatory Body, CSN, about qualifications to obtain the recognition of RP Expert in Spain (both high qualified and technical RP experts) was published. Concerning the qualified expert on RP, (RP Officer), responsible of the RP Service, which takes charge of the effective protection and advise radioactive and nuclear facilities in Rp aspects,has to be authorised by the regulatory body. to obtain the RP officer diploma, conceded by the CSN, an initial training of 300 hours and a three-year minimum experience are required (for X-ray installation a 6-month experience is enough). The technical qualified expert on RP is the worker who carried out the tasks in the a RP Service under the supervision of the RP officer. A Technician Qualified Expert on RP does not need an specific accreditation of the Regulatory Body, but an initial RP training and a three-month minimum experience are required and has hold a certificate by the RP officer. Continuous training is also required and as well has to receive a certificate from the RP officer. Since 1977, The Institute for energy Studies has been implementing specific training courses for those professionals who want to obtain the diploma of RP officer (high degree qualified RP expert), conceded by the CSN. Since then

  10. Stress in accident and post-accident management at Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girard, P.; Dubreuil, G.H.

    1996-01-01

    The effects of the Chernobyl nuclear accident on the psychology of the affected population have been much discussed. The psychological dimension has been advanced as a factor explaining the emergence, from 1990 onwards, of a post-accident crisis in the main CIS countries affected. This article presents the conclusions of a series of European studies, which focused on the consequences of the Chernobyl accident. These studies show that the psychological and social effects associated with the post-accident situation arise from the interdependency of a number of complex factors exerting a deleterious effect on the population. We shall first attempt to characterise the stress phenomena observed among the population affected by the accident. Secondly, we will be presenting an anlysis of the various factors that have contributed to the emerging psychological and social features of population reaction to the accident and in post-accident phases, while not neglecting the effects of the pre-accident situation on the target population. Thirdly, we shall devote some initial consideration to the conditions that might be conducive to better management of post-accident stress. In conclusion, we shall emphasise the need to restore confidence among the population generally. (Author)

  11. Initial resident refractive surgical experience: outcomes of PRK and LASIK for myopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagoner, Michael D; Wickard, Joseph C; Wandling, George R; Milder, Lisa C; Rauen, Matthew P; Kitzmann, Anna S; Sutphin, John E; Goins, Kenneth M

    2011-03-01

    To evaluate and compare the outcome of initial resident surgical experience with photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) and LASIK. Retrospective review of all cases performed with the VISX Star S4 platform (Abbott Medical Optics) between July 1, 2003 and June 30, 2007. Inclusion criteria were spherical equivalent of -0.50 to -10.00 diopters (D), refractive astigmatic error of ≤3.00 D, intention to provide full distance correction, and minimum 3-month postoperative follow-up after initial ablation or retreatment (if performed). A total of 153 cases performed by 20 different residents met the inclusion criteria; 38 eyes underwent PRK and 115 eyes had LASIK. After initial treatment, mean Snellen uncorrected distance visual acuity (UDVA) after PRK was 20/17.3 and after LASIK was 20/19.5. Photorefractive keratectomy was associated with a significantly better approximation between preoperative corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA) and postoperative UDVA (ΔlogMAR 0.009 vs 0.091; P=.004) and a greater percentage of eyes that achieved UDVA of 20/20 or better (94.7% vs 78.3%; P=.02) or 20/30 or better (100% vs 87.8%; P=.02). There was a higher prevalence of retreatment in eyes that underwent LASIK (7.0% vs 0%; P=.20). One (0.9%) eye lost 2 lines of CDVA after LASIK. Supervised refractive surgery residents can achieve excellent visual outcomes in patients operated during their initial refractive experience. Photorefractive keratectomy was associated with better visual outcome than LASIK. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  12. Evaluation of the concrete shield compositions from the 2010 criticality accident alarm system benchmark experiments at the CEA Valduc SILENE facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Thomas Martin; Celik, Cihangir; Dunn, Michael E; Wagner, John C; McMahan, Kimberly L; Authier, Nicolas; Jacquet, Xavier; Rousseau, Guillaume; Wolff, Herve; Savanier, Laurence; Baclet, Nathalie; Lee, Yi-kang; Trama, Jean-Christophe; Masse, Veronique; Gagnier, Emmanuel; Naury, Sylvie; Blanc-Tranchant, Patrick; Hunter, Richard; Kim, Soon; Dulik, George Michael; Reynolds, Kevin H.

    2015-01-01

    In October 2010, a series of benchmark experiments were conducted at the French Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives (CEA) Valduc SILENE facility. These experiments were a joint effort between the United States Department of Energy Nuclear Criticality Safety Program and the CEA. The purpose of these experiments was to create three benchmarks for the verification and validation of radiation transport codes and evaluated nuclear data used in the analysis of criticality accident alarm systems. This series of experiments consisted of three single-pulsed experiments with the SILENE reactor. For the first experiment, the reactor was bare (unshielded), whereas in the second and third experiments, it was shielded by lead and polyethylene, respectively. The polyethylene shield of the third experiment had a cadmium liner on its internal and external surfaces, which vertically was located near the fuel region of SILENE. During each experiment, several neutron activation foils and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were placed around the reactor. Nearly half of the foils and TLDs had additional high-density magnetite concrete, high-density barite concrete, standard concrete, and/or BoroBond shields. CEA Saclay provided all the concrete, and the US Y-12 National Security Complex provided the BoroBond. Measurement data from the experiments were published at the 2011 International Conference on Nuclear Criticality (ICNC 2011) and the 2013 Nuclear Criticality Safety Division (NCSD 2013) topical meeting. Preliminary computational results for the first experiment were presented in the ICNC 2011 paper, which showed poor agreement between the computational results and the measured values of the foils shielded by concrete. Recently the hydrogen content, boron content, and density of these concrete shields were further investigated within the constraints of the previously available data. New computational results for the first experiment are now available

  13. Prototype radiographic system for emergency and intensive care units: Initial experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirvis, S.

    1986-01-01

    A prototype radiographic system has been developed for use in bedside examinations in multibed trauma or intensive care units and emergency rooms. The system features a single-phase, high-frequency 30-kW ceiling-mounted generator with an x-ray tube extending from a long counterbalanced arm. All movements are servo-assisted for ease of operation. Based on initial experience, the unit allows easier access to the patient around resuscitation and monitoring equipment, occupies less floor space, and yields better quality images than do standard mobile radiographic units

  14. Initial experience gained with the balance-group system of the Swiss power supply legislation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waldner, M.; Rechsteiner, S.

    2010-01-01

    This article takes a look at the initial experience gained with the Swiss balance-group system. This system was introduced within the framework of Swiss power supply legislation (StromVG - Stromversorgungsgesetz). The balance-group system was considered to be an essential precondition for the implementation of an energy trading business in a liberalised power market. The associated rights and responsibilities and the economic risks involved are discussed in detail. The partners and structures involved in such a balance-group are looked at and basic models for the associated contracts are examined. The relationship between balance-groups and the national power grid Swissgrid are discussed

  15. Pore Formation and Mobility Investigation (PFMI): Concept, Hardware Development and Initial Analysis of Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grugel, Richard N.

    2004-01-01

    Porosity in the form of "bubbles and pipes" can occur during controlled directional solidification processing of metal alloys. This is a consequence that 1) precludes obtaining any meaningful scientific results and 2) is detrimental to desired material properties. Unfortunately, several Microgravity experiments have been compromised by porosity. The intent of the PFMI investigation is to conduct a systematic effort directed towards understanding porosity formation and mobility during controlled directional solidification (DS) in a microgravity environment. PFMI uses a pure transparent material, succinonitrile (SCN), as well as SCN "alloyed" with water, in conjunction with a translating temperature gradient stage so that direct observation and recording of pore generation and mobility can be made. PFMI is investigating the role of thermocapillary forces and temperature gradients in affecting bubble dynamics as well as other solidification processes in a microgravity Environment. This presentation will cover the concept, hardware development, operations, and the initial results from experiments conducted aboard the International Space Station. .

  16. Simulation of rod drop experiments in the initial cores of Loviisa and Mochovce

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaloinen, E.; Kyrki-Rajamaeki, R.; Wasastjerna, F.

    1999-01-01

    Interpretation of rod drop measurements during startup tests of the Loviisa reactors has earlier been studied with two-dimensional core calculations using a spatial prompt jump approximation. In these calculations the prediction for the reactivity meter reading was lower than the measured values by 25%. Another approach to solve the problem is simulation of the rod drop experiment with dynamic core calculations coupled with out of core calculations to estimate the response of ex-core ionization chambers for the reactivity meter. This report described the calculations performed with the three-dimensional dynamic code HEXTRAN for prediction of the reactivity meter readings in rod drop experiments in initial cores of the WWER-440 reactors. (Authors)

  17. Expert software for accident identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobnikar, M.; Nemec, T.; Muehleisen, A.

    2003-01-01

    Each type of an accident in a Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) causes immediately after the start of the accident variations of physical parameters that are typical for that type of the accident thus enabling its identification. Examples of these parameter are: decrease of reactor coolant system pressure, increase of radiation level in the containment, increase of pressure in the containment. An expert software enabling a fast preliminary identification of the type of the accident in Krsko NPP has been developed. As input data selected typical parameters from Emergency Response Data System (ERDS) of the Krsko NPP are used. Based on these parameters the expert software identifies the type of the accident and also provides the user with appropriate references (past analyses and other documentation of such an accident). The expert software is to be used as a support tool by an expert team that forms in case of an emergency at Slovenian Nuclear Safety Administration (SNSA) with the task to determine the cause of the accident, its most probable scenario and the source term. The expert software should provide initial identification of the event, while the final one is still to be made after appropriate assessment of the event by the expert group considering possibility of non-typical events, multiple causes, initial conditions, influences of operators' actions etc. The expert software can be also used as an educational/training tool and even as a simple database of available accident analyses. (author)

  18. Mapping patients' experiences from initial symptoms to gout diagnosis: a qualitative exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddle, Jennifer; Roddy, Edward; Mallen, Christian D; Hider, Samantha L; Prinjha, Suman; Ziebland, Sue; Richardson, Jane C

    2015-09-14

    To explore patients' experiences from initial symptoms to receiving a diagnosis of gout. Data from in-depth semistructured interviews were used to construct themes to describe key features of patients' experiences of gout diagnosis. A maximum variation sample of 43 UK patients with gout (29 men; 14 women; age range 32-87 years) were recruited from general practices, rheumatology clinics, gout support groups and through online advertising. Severe joint pain, combined with no obvious signs of physical trauma or knowledge of injury, caused confusion for patients attempting to interpret their symptoms. Reasons for delayed consultation included self-diagnosis and/or self-medication, reluctance to seek medical attention, and financial/work pressures. Factors potentially contributing to delayed diagnosis after consultation included reported misdiagnosis, attacks in joints other than the first metatarsophalangeal joint, and female gender. The limitations in using serum uric acid (SUA) levels for diagnostic purposes were not always communicated effectively to patients, and led to uncertainty and lack of confidence in the accuracy of the diagnosis. Resistance to the diagnosis occurred in response to patients' beliefs about the causes of gout and characteristics of the people likely to be affected. Diagnosis prompted actions, such as changes in diet, and evidence was found of self-monitoring of SUA levels. This study is the first to report data specifically about patients' pathways to initial consultation and subsequent experiences of gout diagnosis. A more targeted approach to information provision at diagnosis would improve patients' experiences. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  19. Establishing a health demographic surveillance site in Bhaktapur district, Nepal: initial experiences and findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aryal Umesh

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A health demographic surveillance system (HDSS provides longitudinal data regarding health and demography in countries with coverage error and poor quality data on vital registration systems due to lack of public awareness, inadequate legal basis and limited use of data in health planning. The health system in Nepal, a low-income country, does not focus primarily on health registration, and does not conduct regular health data collection. This study aimed to initiate and establish the first HDSS in Nepal. Results We conducted a baseline survey in Jhaukhel and Duwakot, two villages in Bhaktapur district. The study surveyed 2,712 households comprising a total population of 13,669. The sex ratio in the study area was 101 males per 100 females and the average household size was 5. The crude birth and death rates were 9.7 and 3.9/1,000 population/year, respectively. About 11% of births occurred at home, and we found no mortality in infants and children less than 5 years of age. Various health problems were found commonly and some of them include respiratory problems (41.9%; headache, vertigo and dizziness (16.7%; bone and joint pain (14.4%; gastrointestinal problems (13.9%; heart disease, including hypertension (8.8%; accidents and injuries (2.9%; and diabetes mellitus (2.6%. The prevalence of non-communicable disease (NCD was 4.3% (95% CI: 3.83; 4.86 among individuals older than 30 years. Age-adjusted odds ratios showed that risk factors, such as sex, ethnic group, occupation and education, associated with NCD. Conclusion Our baseline survey demonstrated that it is possible to collect accurate and reliable data in a village setting in Nepal, and this study successfully established an HDSS site. We determined that both maternal and child health are better in the surveillance site compared to the entire country. Risk factors associated with NCDs dominated morbidity and mortality patterns.

  20. USA experiences in conducting and implementing the protective measures in a case of the nuclear accident and their possible implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jurkovic, I.-A.

    1999-01-01

    Looking at the field of emergency planning and preparedness, it can be noticed that the situation in Europe is more or less quite different than the one found in the USA, despite the fact that, for example, lots of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) material comes from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) material. Comparison between these two approaches was very interesting and instructive. Croatia, if looking at the particular country, can learn a lot from the overall organization of the Emergency Planning and Preparedness in USA (Louisiana). Everybody has his predefined place, plan and task to be fulfilled. Mutual cooperation between different organizations and Inst.ions involved is accordingly developed and on very high level. Geographic Information System (GIS), which is also available to us, showed its usefulness during the exercises and map development, and not so much during the actual accident.(author)

  1. Design of and experience with the gamma-detecting criticality accident alarm system at ALKEM MOX fuel fabrication plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kindleben, G.

    1988-01-01

    At ALKEM mixed oxide fuel fabrication plant there are two criticality accident alarm systems in operation and another one is planned for different buildings. They use ionization chambers for gamma-measuring. The measuring channels are self controlled with implemented test sources. The order of limit transgression at the detectors is registrated. The interpretation indicates the room of the radiation source, which is signaled by flash lights. Extensive radiation protection shieldings make detector-placing a complex problem with secondary gamma-radiation to be taken into account. Most of the appearing defects can easily be repaired by exchange of components. Some of them have been eliminated by technical modification. Redundancy prevents total system failure. Some false alarms occurred during the operation time of the alarm systems. The main reason is pulse induction, resulting from lightning strike. Measures to prevent such events have been taken, while further measures are being considered

  2. Intraoperative 3-tesla MRI in the management of paediatric cranial tumours - initial experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avula, Shivaram; Garlick, Deborah; Abernethy, Laurence J.; Mallucci, Connor L.; Pizer, Barry; Crooks, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Intraoperative MRI (ioMRI) has been gaining recognition because of its value in the neurosurgical management of cranial tumours. There is limited documentation of its value in children. To review the initial experience of a paediatric 3-Tesla ioMRI unit in the management of cranial tumours. Thirty-eight children underwent ioMRI during 40 cranial tumour resections using a 3-Tesla MR scanner co-located with the neurosurgical operating theatre. IoMRI was performed to assess the extent of tumour resection and/or to update neuronavigation. The intraoperative and follow-up scans, and the clinical records were reviewed. In 27/40 operations, complete resection was intended. IoMRI confirmed complete resection in 15/27 (56%). As a consequence, surgical resection was extended in 5/27 (19%). In 6/27 (22%), ioMRI was equivocal for residual tumour. In 13/40 (33%) operations, the surgical aim was to partially resect the tumour. In 7 of the 13 (54%), surgical resection was extended following ioMRI. In our initial experience, ioMRI has increased the rate of complete resection, with intraoperative surgical strategy being modified in 30% of procedures. Collaborative analysis of ioMRI by the radiologist and neurosurgeon is vital to avoid errors in interpretation. (orig.)

  3. Intraoperative 3-tesla MRI in the management of paediatric cranial tumours - initial experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avula, Shivaram; Garlick, Deborah; Abernethy, Laurence J. [Alder Hey Children' s NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Radiology, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Mallucci, Connor L. [Alder Hey Children' s Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Pizer, Barry [Alder Hey Children' s Hospital, Department of Oncology, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Crooks, Daniel [Walton Centre for Neurology and Neurosurgery, Department of Pathology, Liverpool (United Kingdom)

    2012-02-15

    Intraoperative MRI (ioMRI) has been gaining recognition because of its value in the neurosurgical management of cranial tumours. There is limited documentation of its value in children. To review the initial experience of a paediatric 3-Tesla ioMRI unit in the management of cranial tumours. Thirty-eight children underwent ioMRI during 40 cranial tumour resections using a 3-Tesla MR scanner co-located with the neurosurgical operating theatre. IoMRI was performed to assess the extent of tumour resection and/or to update neuronavigation. The intraoperative and follow-up scans, and the clinical records were reviewed. In 27/40 operations, complete resection was intended. IoMRI confirmed complete resection in 15/27 (56%). As a consequence, surgical resection was extended in 5/27 (19%). In 6/27 (22%), ioMRI was equivocal for residual tumour. In 13/40 (33%) operations, the surgical aim was to partially resect the tumour. In 7 of the 13 (54%), surgical resection was extended following ioMRI. In our initial experience, ioMRI has increased the rate of complete resection, with intraoperative surgical strategy being modified in 30% of procedures. Collaborative analysis of ioMRI by the radiologist and neurosurgeon is vital to avoid errors in interpretation. (orig.)

  4. F-18 FDG PET with coincidence detection, dual-head gamma camera, initial experience in oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, J.M.G.; Pocock, N.; Quach, T.; Camden, B.M.C. [Liverpool Health Services, Liverpool, NSW (Australia). Department of Nuclear Medicine and Clinical Ultrasound

    1998-06-01

    Full text: The development of Co-incidence Detection (CD) in gamma camera technology has allowed the use of positron radiopharmaceuticals in clinical practice without dedicated PET facilities. We report our initial experience of this technology in Oncological applications. All patients were administered 200 MBq of F- 18 FDG intravenously in a fasting state, with serum glucose below 8.9 mmol/L., and hydration well maintained. Tomography was performed using an ADAC Solus Molecular Co-incidence Detection (MCD) dual-head gamma camera, 60 minutes after administration and immediately after voiding. Tomography of the torso required up to three collections depending on the length of the patient, with each collection requiring 32 steps of 40 second duration, and a 50% overlap. Tomography of the brain required a single collection with 32 steps of 80 seconds. Patients were scanned in the supine position. An iterative reconstruction algorithm was employed without attenuation correction. All patients had histologically confirmed malignancy. Scan findings were correlated with results of all conventional diagnostic imaging procedures that were pertinent to the evaluation and management of each individual patient`s disease. Correlation with tumour type and treatment status was also undertaken. F-18 FDG uptake as demonstrated by CD-PET was increased in tumour bearing sites. The degree of increased uptake varied with tumour type and with treatment status. Our initial experience with CD-PET has been very encouraging, and has led us to undertake prospective short and long term studies to define its role in oncology

  5. Initial Experiences of Simultaneous Laparoscopic Resection of Colorectal Cancer and Liver Metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. T. Hoekstra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Simultaneous resection of primary colorectal carcinoma (CRC and synchronous liver metastases (SLMs is subject of debate with respect to morbidity in comparison to staged resection. The aim of this study was to evaluate our initial experience with this approach. Methods. Five patients with primary CRC and a clinical diagnosis of SLM underwent combined laparoscopic colorectal and liver surgery. Patient and tumor characteristics, operative variables, and postoperative outcomes were evaluated retrospectively. Results. The primary tumor was located in the colon in two patients and in the rectum in three patients. The SLM was solitary in four patients and multiple in the remaining patient. Surgical approach was total laparoscopic (2 patients or hand-assisted laparoscopic (3 patients. The midline umbilical or transverse suprapubic incision created for the hand port and/or extraction of the specimen varied between 5 and 10 cm. Median operation time was 303 (range 151–384 minutes with a total blood loss of 700 (range 200–850 mL. Postoperative hospital stay was 5, 5, 9, 14, and 30 days. An R0 resection was achieved in all patients. Conclusions. From this initial single-center experience, simultaneous laparoscopic colorectal and liver resection appears to be feasible in selected patients with CRC and SLM, with satisfying short-term results.

  6. The AGING Initiative experience: a call for sustained support for team science networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Tullika; Anzuoni, Kathryn; Landyn, Valentina; Hajduk, Alexandra; Waring, Stephen; Hanson, Leah R; Whitson, Heather E

    2018-05-18

    Team science, defined as collaborative research efforts that leverage the expertise of diverse disciplines, is recognised as a critical means to address complex healthcare challenges, but the practical implementation of team science can be difficult. Our objective is to describe the barriers, solutions and lessons learned from our team science experience as applied to the complex and growing challenge of multiple chronic conditions (MCC). MCC is the presence of two or more chronic conditions that have a collective adverse effect on health status, function or quality of life, and that require complex healthcare management, decision-making or coordination. Due to the increasing impact on the United States society, MCC research has been identified as a high priority research area by multiple federal agencies. In response to this need, two national research entities, the Healthcare Systems Research Network (HCSRN) and the Claude D. Pepper Older Americans Independence Centers (OAIC), formed the Advancing Geriatrics Infrastructure and Network Growth (AGING) Initiative to build nationwide capacity for MCC team science. This article describes the structure, lessons learned and initial outcomes of the AGING Initiative. We call for funding mechanisms to sustain infrastructures that have demonstrated success in fostering team science and innovation in translating findings to policy change necessary to solve complex problems in healthcare.

  7. Criticality accident:

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canavese, Susana I.

    2000-01-01

    A criticality accident occurred at 10:35 on September 30, 1999. It occurred in a precipitation tank in a Conversion Test Building at the JCO Tokai Works site in Tokaimura (Tokai Village) in the Ibaraki Prefecture of Japan. STA provisionally rated this accident a 4 on the seven-level, logarithmic International Nuclear Event Scale (INES). The September 30, 1999 criticality accident at the JCO Tokai Works Site in Tokaimura, Japan in described in preliminary, technical detail. Information is based on preliminary presentations to technical groups by Japanese scientists and spokespersons, translations by technical and non-technical persons of technical web postings by various nuclear authorities, and English-language non-technical reports from various news media and nuclear-interest groups. (author)

  8. Using Controlled Landslide Initiation Experiments to Test Limit-Equilibrium Analyses of Slope Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, M. E.; Iverson, R. M.; Brien, D. L.; Iverson, N. R.; Lahusen, R. G.; Logan, M.

    2004-12-01

    Most studies of landslide initiation employ limit equilibrium analyses of slope stability. Owing to a lack of detailed data, however, few studies have tested limit-equilibrium predictions against physical measurements of slope failure. We have conducted a series of field-scale, highly controlled landslide initiation experiments at the USGS debris-flow flume in Oregon; these experiments provide exceptional data to test limit equilibrium methods. In each of seven experiments, we attempted to induce failure in a 0.65m thick, 2m wide, 6m3 prism of loamy sand placed behind a retaining wall in the 31° sloping flume. We systematically investigated triggering of sliding by groundwater injection, by prolonged moderate-intensity sprinkling, and by bursts of high intensity sprinkling. We also used vibratory compaction to control soil porosity and thereby investigate differences in failure behavior of dense and loose soils. About 50 sensors were monitored at 20 Hz during the experiments, including nests of tiltmeters buried at 7 cm spacing to define subsurface failure geometry, and nests of tensiometers and pore-pressure sensors to define evolving pore-pressure fields. In addition, we performed ancillary laboratory tests to measure soil porosity, shear strength, hydraulic conductivity, and compressibility. In loose soils (porosity of 0.52 to 0.55), abrupt failure typically occurred along the flume bed after substantial soil deformation. In denser soils (porosity of 0.41 to 0.44), gradual failure occurred within the soil prism. All failure surfaces had a maximum length to depth ratio of about 7. In even denser soil (porosity of 0.39), we could not induce failure by sprinkling. The internal friction angle of the soils varied from 28° to 40° with decreasing porosity. We analyzed stability at failure, given the observed pore-pressure conditions just prior to large movement, using a 1-D infinite-slope method and a more complete 2-D Janbu method. Each method provides a static

  9. Phase 2 : evaluation of the national crash experience : comparison of CARDfile national motor vehicle accident projections with projections from other data bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this Phase 2 Study is to compare national motor vehicle accident projections : made from the Crash Avoidance Research Data base (CARDfile) with national motor : vehicle accident projections made from other data bases. For the most part...

  10. The Lusi seismic experiment: An initial study to understand the effect of seismic activity to Lusi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karyono, E-mail: karyonosu@gmail.com [Agency for Meteorology, Climatology and Geophysics (BMKG), Jakarta (Indonesia); OSLO University (Norway); Padjadjaran University (UNPAD), Bandung (Indonesia); Mazzini, Adriano; Sugiharto, Anton [OSLO University (Norway); Lupi, Matteo [ETH Zurich (Switzerland); Syafri, Ildrem [Padjadjaran University (UNPAD), Bandung (Indonesia); Masturyono,; Rudiyanto, Ariska; Pranata, Bayu; Muzli,; Widodo, Handi Sulistyo; Sudrajat, Ajat [Agency for Meteorology, Climatology and Geophysics (BMKG), Jakarta (Indonesia)

    2015-04-24

    The spectacular Lumpur Sidoarjo (Lusi) eruption started in northeast Java on the 29 of May 2006 following a M6.3 earthquake striking the island [1,2]. Initially, several gas and mud eruption sites appeared along the reactivated strike-slip Watukosek fault system [3] and within weeks several villages were submerged by boiling mud. The most prominent eruption site was named Lusi. The Lusi seismic experiment is a project aims to begin a detailed study of seismicity around the Lusi area. In this initial phase we deploy 30 seismometers strategically distributed in the area around Lusi and along the Watukosek fault zone that stretches between Lusi and the Arjuno Welirang (AW) complex. The purpose of the initial monitoring is to conduct a preliminary seismic campaign aiming to identify the occurrence and the location of local seismic events in east Java particularly beneath Lusi.This network will locate small event that may not be captured by the existing BMKG network. It will be crucial to design the second phase of the seismic experiment that will consist of a local earthquake tomography of the Lusi-AW region and spatial and temporal variations of vp/vs ratios. The goal of this study is to understand how the seismicity occurring along the Sunda subduction zone affects to the behavior of the Lusi eruption. Our study will also provide a large dataset for a qualitative analysis of earthquake triggering studies, earthquake-volcano and earthquake-earthquake interactions. In this study, we will extract Green’s functions from ambient seismic noise data in order to image the shallow subsurface structure beneath LUSI area. The waveform cross-correlation technique will be apply to all of recordings of ambient seismic noise at 30 seismographic stations around the LUSI area. We use the dispersive behaviour of the retrieved Rayleigh waves to infer velocity structures in the shallow subsurface.

  11. Joint release rate estimation and measurement-by-measurement model correction for atmospheric radionuclide emission in nuclear accidents: An application to wind tunnel experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinpeng; Li, Hong; Liu, Yun; Xiong, Wei; Fang, Sheng

    2018-03-05

    The release rate of atmospheric radionuclide emissions is a critical factor in the emergency response to nuclear accidents. However, there are unavoidable biases in radionuclide transport models, leading to inaccurate estimates. In this study, a method that simultaneously corrects these biases and estimates the release rate is developed. Our approach provides a more complete measurement-by-measurement correction of the biases with a coefficient matrix that considers both deterministic and stochastic deviations. This matrix and the release rate are jointly solved by the alternating minimization algorithm. The proposed method is generic because it does not rely on specific features of transport models or scenarios. It is validated against wind tunnel experiments that simulate accidental releases in a heterogonous and densely built nuclear power plant site. The sensitivities to the position, number, and quality of measurements and extendibility of the method are also investigated. The results demonstrate that this method effectively corrects the model biases, and therefore outperforms Tikhonov's method in both release rate estimation and model prediction. The proposed approach is robust to uncertainties and extendible with various center estimators, thus providing a flexible framework for robust source inversion in real accidents, even if large uncertainties exist in multiple factors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Radiation accidents and dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagstuen, E.; Theisen, H.; Henriksten, T.

    1982-12-01

    On September 2nd 1982 one of the employees of the gamma-irradiation facility at Institute for Energy Technology, Kjeller, Norway entered the irradiation cell with a 65.7 kCi *sp60*Co- source in unshielded position. The victim received an unknown radiation dose and died after 13 days. Using electron spin resonance spectroscopy, the radiation dose in this accident was subsequently determined based on the production of longlived free radicals in nitroglycerol tablets borne by the operator during the accident. He used nitroglycerol for heart problems and free radical are easily formed and trapped in sugar which is the main component of the tablets. Calibration experiments were carried out and the dose given to the tablets during the accident was determined to 37.2 +- 0.5 Gy. The general use of free radicals for dose determinations is discussed. (Auth.)

  13. Operation of the tokamak fusion test reactor tritium systems during initial tritium experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, J.L.; Gentile, C.; Kalish, M.; Kamperschroer, J.; Kozub, T.; LaMarche, P.; Murray, H.; Nagy, A.; Raftopoulos, S.; Rossmassler, R.; Sissingh, R.; Swanson, J.; Tulipano, F.; Viola, M.; Voorhees, D.; Walters, R.T.

    1995-01-01

    The high power D-T experiments on the tokamak fusion test reactor (TFTR) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory commenced in November 1993. During initial operation of the tritium systems a number of start-up problems surfaced and had to be corrected. These were corrected through a series of system modifications and upgrades and by repair of failed or inadequate components. Even as these operational concerns were being addressed, the tritium systems continued to support D-T operations on the tokamak. During the first six months of D-T operations more than 107kCi of tritium were processed successfully by the tritium systems. D-T experiments conducted at TFTR during this period provided significant new data. Fusion power in excess of 9MW was achieved in May 1994. This paper describes some of the early start-up issues, and reports on the operation of the tritium system and the tritium tracking and accounting system during the early phase of TFTR D-T experiments. (orig.)

  14. Measuring health systems strength and its impact: experiences from the African Health Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherr, Kenneth; Fernandes, Quinhas; Kanté, Almamy M; Bawah, Ayaga; Condo, Jeanine; Mutale, Wilbroad

    2017-12-21

    Health systems are essential platforms for accessible, quality health services, and population health improvements. Global health initiatives have dramatically increased health resources; however, funding to strengthen health systems has not increased commensurately, partially due to concerns about health system complexity and evidence gaps demonstrating health outcome improvements. In 2009, the African Health Initiative of the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation began supporting Population Health Implementation and Training Partnership projects in five sub-Saharan African countries (Ghana, Mozambique, Rwanda, Tanzania, and Zambia) to catalyze significant advances in strengthening health systems. This manuscript reflects on the experience of establishing an evaluation framework to measure health systems strength, and associate measures with health outcomes, as part of this Initiative. Using the World Health Organization's health systems building block framework, the Partnerships present novel approaches to measure health systems building blocks and summarize data across and within building blocks to facilitate analytic procedures. Three Partnerships developed summary measures spanning the building blocks using principal component analysis (Ghana and Tanzania) or the balanced scorecard (Zambia). Other Partnerships developed summary measures to simplify multiple indicators within individual building blocks, including health information systems (Mozambique), and service delivery (Rwanda). At the end of the project intervention period, one to two key informants from each Partnership's leadership team were asked to list - in rank order - the importance of the six building blocks in relation to their intervention. Though there were differences across Partnerships, service delivery and information systems were reported to be the most common focus of interventions, followed by health workforce and leadership and governance. Medical products, vaccines and technologies, and

  15. Initial clinical experience with a sac-anchoring endoprosthesis for aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donayre, Carlos E; Zarins, Christopher K; Krievins, Dainis K; Holden, Andrew; Hill, Andrew; Calderas, Carlos; Velez, Jaime; White, Rodney A

    2011-03-01

    All current aortic endografts depend on proximal and distal fixation to prevent migration. However, migration and rupture can occur, particularly in patients with aortic necks that are short or angulated, or both. We present our initial clinical experience with a new sac-anchoring endoprosthesis designed to anchor and seal the device within the aneurysm sac. The initial worldwide experience using a new endoprosthesis for the treatment of aortic aneurysms (Nellix Endovascular, Palo Alto, Calif) was reviewed. The endoprosthesis consists of dual balloon-expandable endoframes surrounded by polymer-filled endobags designed to obliterate the aneurysm sac and maintain endograft position. Clinical results and follow-up contrast computed tomography (CT) scans at 30 days and 6 and 12 months were reviewed. The endograft was successfully deployed in 21 patients with infrarenal aortic aneurysms measuring 5.7 ± 0.7 cm (range, 4.3-7.4 cm). Two patients with common iliac aneurysms were treated with sac-anchoring extenders that maintained patency of the internal iliac artery. Infusion of 71 ± 37 mL of polymer (range, 19-158 mL) into the aortic endobags resulted in complete aneurysm exclusion in all patients. Mean implant time was 76 ± 35 minutes, with 33 ± 17 minutes of fluoroscopy time and 180 ± 81 mL of contrast; estimated blood loss was 174 ± 116 mL. One patient died during the postoperative period (30-day mortality, 4.8%), and one died at 10 months from non-device-related causes. During a mean follow-up of 8.7 ± 3.1 months and a median of 6.3 months, there were no late aneurysm- or device-related adverse events and no secondary procedures. CT imaging studies at 6 months and 1 year revealed no increase in aneurysm size, no device migration, and no new endoleaks. One patient had a limited proximal type I endoleak at 30 days that resolved at 60 days and remained sealed. One patient has an ongoing distal type I endoleak near the iliac bifurcation, with no change in aneurysm

  16. Direct measurements of employees involved in the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station accident for internal dose estimates. JAEA's experiences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurihara, Osamu; Kanai, Katsuta; Nakagawa, Takahiro; Takada, Chie; Momose, Takumaro; Furuta, Sadaaki [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Nuclear Fuel Cycle Engineering Laboratories, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2012-11-15

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) performed internal dose measurements of employees involved in the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station accident. Nuclear Fuel Cycle Engineering Laboratories (NFCEL), one of the JAEA's core centers, examined 560 of these employees by direct (in vivo) measurements during the period from April 20 to August 5 in 2011. These measurements consisted of whole-body counting for radiocesium and thyroid counting for radioiodine. The whole-body counting was conducted with two types of whole-body counters (WBCs): a standing-type WBC with two large NaI(Tl) detectors (Fastscan{sup TM}, Canberra Inc.) and a chair-type WBC with HPGe detectors (GC5021, Canberra Inc.) installed in a shielded chamber made of 20-cm-thick steel. The thyroid counting was mainly performed using one of the two HPGe detectors equipped with the chair-type WBC. The subjects examined in this work were divided into two groups: Group 1 was the first 39 subjects who were measured up to June 17, 2011 and Group 2 was the remaining 521 subjects who were measured on and after June 18, 2011. The performance of our direct measurements was validated by comparing measurement results of the Group 1 subjects using two different methods (e.g., the standing-type WBC vs. the chair-type WBC). Tentative internal dose estimates of the subjects of Group 1 were also performed based on the assumption of a single intake scenario on either March 12, when the first hydrogen explosion occurred at the station or the first day of work after the accident. It was found that the contribution of {sup 131}I to the total internal dose greatly exceeded those of {sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs, the other major nuclides detected in the measurements. The maximum committed effective dose (CED) was found in a male subject whose thyroid content of {sup 131}I was 9760 Bq on May 23, 2011; the CED of this subject was estimated to be 600 mSv including a small contribution of {sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs. The typical

  17. Criticality accident alarm system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malenfant, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    The American National Standard ANSI/ANS-8.3-1986, Criticality Accident Alarm System provides guidance for the establishment and maintenance of an alarm system to initiate personnel evacuation in the event of inadvertent criticality. In addition to identifying the physical features of the components of the system, the characteristics of accidents of concern are carefully delineated. Unfortunately, this ANSI Standard has led to considerable confusion in interpretation, and there is evidence that the ''minimum accident of concern'' may not be appropriate. Furthermore, although intended as a guide, the provisions of the standard are being rigorously applied, sometimes with interpretations that are not consistent. Although the standard is clear in the use of absorbed dose in free air of 20 rad, at least one installation has interpreted the requirement to apply to dose in soft tissue. The standard is also clear in specifying the response to both neutrons and gamma rays. An assembly of uranyl fluoride enriched to 5% 235 U was operated to simulate a potential accident. The dose, delivered in a free run excursion 2 m from the surface of the vessel, was greater than 500 rad, without ever exceeding a rate of 20 rad/min, which is the set point for activating an alarm that meets the standard. The presence of an alarm system would not have prevented any of the five major accidents in chemical operations nor is it absolutely certain that the alarms were solely responsible for reducing personnel exposures following the accident. Nevertheless, criticality alarm systems are now the subject of great effort and expense. 13 refs

  18. Initiating events frequency determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simic, Z.; Mikulicic, V.; Vukovic, I.

    2004-01-01

    The paper describes work performed for the Nuclear Power Station (NPS). Work is related to the periodic initiating events frequency update for the Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA). Data for all relevant NPS initiating events (IE) were reviewed. The main focus was on events occurring during most recent operating history (i.e., last four years). The final IE frequencies were estimated by incorporating both NPS experience and nuclear industry experience. Each event was categorized according to NPS individual plant examination (IPE) initiating events grouping approach. For the majority of the IE groups, few, or no events have occurred at the NPS. For those IE groups with few or no NPS events, the final estimate was made by means of a Bayesian update with general nuclear industry values. Exceptions are rare loss-of-coolant-accidents (LOCA) events, where evaluation of engineering aspects is used in order to determine frequency.(author)

  19. Preliminary experiments using light-initiated high explosive for driving thin flyer plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benham, R.A.

    1980-02-01

    Light-initiated high explosive, silver acelytide - silver-nitrate (SASN), has been used to produce simulated x ray blow-off impulse loading on reentry vehicles to study the system structural response. SASN can be used to accelerate thin flyer plates to high terminal velocities which, in turn, can deliver a pressure pulse that can be tailored to the target material. This process is important for impulse tests where both structural and material response is desired. The theories used to calculate the dynamic state of the flyer plate prior to impact are summarized. Data from several experiments are presented which indicate that thin flyer plates can be properly accelerated and that there are predictive techniques available which are adequate to calculate the motion of the flyer plate. Recommendations are made for future study that must be undertaken to make the SASN flyer plate technique usable

  20. Highlight report local initiatives. Experiences with electric transport; Highlight report lokale initiatieven. Ervaringen met elektrisch vervoer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-06-15

    In March 2013 Linkingreen and XTNT started a survey on local electric transportation initiatives. The aim is to learn from the experiences, problems and obstacles of business users of electric vehicles: cars, vans or trucks, scooters, boats and special vehicles (e.g. garbage trucks) that are all-electric or plug-in (with plug). In this brief report, the main results are presented [Dutch] In maart 2013 is door Linkingreen en XTNT in opdracht van Agentschap NL een enquete uitgezet naar lokale initiatieven elektrisch vervoer. Doel is te leren wat de ervaringen, knelpunten en belemmeringen zijn van zakelijke gebruikers van elektrisch vervoer: personenauto's, bestel- of vrachtauto's, scooters, vaartuigen en bijzondere voertuigen (vuilniswagens etc.) die volledig elektrische of plug in (met stekker) zijn. In dit korte verslag zijn de belangrijkste resultaten opgenomen.

  1. Initial experience of using an active beam delivery technique at PSI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedroni, E.; Boehringer, T.; Coray, A.; Egger, E.; Grossmann, M.; Lin Shixiong; Lomax, A.; Goitein, G.; Roser, W.; Schaffner, B.

    1999-01-01

    At PSI a new proton therapy facility has been assembled and commissioned. The major features of the facility are the spot scanning technique and the very compact gantry. The operation of the facility was started in 1997 and the feasibility of the spot scanning technique has been demonstrated in practice with patient treatments. In this report we discuss the usual initial difficulties encountered in the commissioning of a new technology, the very positive preliminary experience with the system and the optimistic expectations for the future. The long range goal of this project is to parallel the recent developments regarding inverse planning for photons with a similar advanced technology optimized for a proton beam. (orig.)

  2. Initial operating experience and recent development on the TRIUMF optically pumped polarized H- ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmor, P.W.; Law, W.M.; Levy, C.D.P.; McDonald, M.

    1988-01-01

    A polarized H - ion source using optical pumping techniques has been developed at TRIUMF. This source was used to demonstrate (on an ion source test stand) the feasibility of producing 10- μA of ∼ 60% polarized H - ion beam in a dc mode suitable for injection into the TRIUMF cyclotron. The source has been installed in a 300 kV high voltage terminal connected to the cyclotron via a recently constructed beam transport line. A polarization of 80% is anticipated near the end of 1988 after the installation of a superconducting solenoid to the source. In this paper the authors describe the initial operating experience, recent developments, and the future plans for the TRIUMF optically pumped polarized ion source

  3. [A unit for emergency psychiatry and crisis intervention--concepts, structure and initial experiences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuerlein, W; Bronisch, T; Fürmaier, A

    1983-03-01

    The article reports on a ward with 12 beds which has been set up for emergency cases in psychiatry or for immediate intervention in case of a crisis experienced by a patient. In the theoretical part of this article, it is explained that crisis situations are present in most of the psychiatric emergency patients. The article then goes briefly into the fundamentals of therapeutic strategy in such patients: A therapy which helps to uncover hidden conflicts, the pros and cons of therapy focussed on conflict and on supportive measures; as well as a therapy which supports and promotes the ego. This is followed by a comparison of the ward with corresponding facilities in Germany and abroad and a description of their structure, their patients and their function within a psychiatric care system. The concluding part of the article is devoted to a description of the authors' initial experiences and impressions gained during their work with the ward patients, quoting several examples.

  4. Experience in treatment of the radiation syndrome in accident victims exposed with non-uniform distribution of the dose within a body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guskova, A.; Barabanova, A

    1996-01-01

    Experience in diagnosis and treatment of radiation accident victims undergone to radiation expose with non-uniform distribution of the dose within a body is presented and the most significant features of medical management of such patients are discussed. The term 'compound radiation injure' is proposed to use for this form of radiation disease. Treatment of compound radiation injure demands a participation of very qualified specialists. The first medical aid and management should include careful body surface monitoring. Beside daily haematological observation and cytogenetic study with corresponding treatment, careful observation and registration of skin reaction are necessary. Some features of treatment are the following: more early administration of anti infection means, including isolation in sterile room, timely surgical intervention, prophylacsis and treatment of endorganic intoxication improving of microcirculation, long time follow up study with pathogenic therapy. (author)

  5. The resuspension and redeposition of 137Cs in an urban area: the experience after the Goiania accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pires Do Rio, M.A.; Amaral, E.C.S.; Paretzke, H.G.

    1994-01-01

    In Goiania, Brazil, the accidental opening of a 137 Cs teletherapy source led to the contamination of an urban area of approximately 1 km 2 . The restricted, local contamination patterns without any significant influence from previous contaminations (Chernobyl reactor accident and atmospheric atomic bomb test fall-out) provided a unique opportunity to study the resuspension and redeposition mechanisms in an urban area under tropical climate characteristics. Air, total deposition, rainwater, surface soil and street dust were sampled over 2 years at a garden of a house and the surroundings and analysed for 137 Cs. The local meteorological conditions were recorded. In addition, some size fractionation measurements were performed. The data show a significant seasonality and a very slow long-term decrease with time for the activity concentration in air and deposition rate. The data as a whole suggest that in Goiania, resuspension and deposition are mainly local phenomena and no evidence was found for a significant spreading of 137 Cs from the place of primary contamination. (author)

  6. Academics and Learners’ Perceptions on Blended Learning as a Strategic Initiative to Improve Student Learning Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Adeline Ng Ling

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasingly tighter shift of socio-economic constraints on higher education sectors in the recent years has called for greater flexibilities in student learning experience both locally and abroad. To this end, we have recently implemented a Blended Learning Initiative in an attempt to provide better learning support and greater flexibility to our students. This initiative is also in line with the University’s aim of having 50% of our learning and teaching delivered on-line by 2020. In this report, we present our findings on academics and learners’ perceptions on the approach which were obtained through surveys. Results showed that blended learning approach was new to the academics and the factors for successful blended learning implementation were identified. Results also showed that learners appreciated the approach as it made learning more accessible and flexible. Furthermore, they also enjoyed the interesting online activities incorporated into their units. In addition, learners were also able to review and pace their own learning. They also perceived that they have the access to the resources and technical ability to cope with online learning materials and activities. Nonetheless, the survey also revealed that learners still prefer to have academics delivering information to them directly rather than a flipped classroom model. In conclusion, findings from this study provide insights that blended learning could be effective to supplement courses offered by the faculty.

  7. Bile Duct Anastomosis Supplied With Biodegradable Stent in Liver Transplantation: The Initial Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janousek, L; Maly, S; Oliverius, M; Kocik, M; Kucera, M; Fronek, J

    2016-12-01

    The most common biliary complications after orthotopic liver transplantation are bile leaks, anastomotic and intrahepatic strictures, stones, and ampullary dysfunction. These complications can occur in up to 10% to 30% of liver transplant recipients. Leaks occur early in the posttransplant period; the stricture formation typically graduates over time. Ten patients underwent transplantation in our preliminary study: 5 were randomized to the group with stent placement and 5 to the control group. We investigated the role of an absorbable biliary stent with the goal of proving patency of duct-to-duct biliary anastomosis. The stents are made of machine-knitted polydioxanone monofilaments. Our initial results show that duct-to-duct biliary reconstruction using an absorbable internal stent had good patency in all 5 patients. There were no signs of biliary leakage accompanying the anastomoses in any of the cases, and there was no stone formation observed after liver transplantation. The biliary stent was completely absorbed, with no adverse effects. Based on our initial experience and data, we concluded that biodegradable stents can be successfully and safely used in clinical practice. Further large prospective randomized studies are needed to estimate the efficacy of the bioabsorbable stents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Initial experience with the new da Vinci single-port robot-assisted platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballestero Diego, R; Zubillaga Guerrero, S; Truan Cacho, D; Carrion Ballardo, C; Velilla Diez, G; Calleja Hermosa, P; Gutiérrez Baños, J L

    2017-06-01

    To describe our experience in the first cases of urological surgeries performed with the da Vinci single-port robot-assisted platform. We performed 5 single-port robot-assisted surgeries (R-LESS) between May and October 2014. We performed 3 ureteral reimplant surgeries, one ureteropyeloplasty in an inverted kidney and 1 partial nephrectomy. The perioperative and postoperative results were collected, as well as a report of the complications according to the Clavien classification system. Of the 5 procedures, 4 were performed completely by LESS, while 1 procedure was reconverted to multiport robot-assisted surgery. There were no intraoperative complications. We observed perioperative complications in 4 patients, all of which were grade 1 or 2. The mean surgical time was 262minutes (range, 230-300). In our initial experience with the da Vinci device, R-LESS surgery was feasible and safe. There are still a number of limitations in its use, which require new and improved R-LESS platforms. Copyright © 2016 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Robotic resections in hepatobiliary oncology - initial experience with Xi da Vinci system in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandarana, M; Patkar, S; Tamhankar, A; Garg, S; Bhandare, M; Goel, M

    2017-01-01

    Minimal invasive surgery has proven its advantages over open surgeries in the perioperative period. Food and Drug Administration approved da Vinci robot in 2000. The latest version, da Vinci Xi system has a mobile tower-based robot with several modifications to improve the functionality, versatility, and operative ease. None of the centers have reported exclusively on hepatobiliary oncology using the da Vinci Xi system. We report our initial experience. To study the feasibility, advantages, and discuss the operative technique of da Vinci Xi system in hepatobiliary oncology. Data were analyzed retrospectively from a prospectively maintained database from June 2015 to October 2016. Twenty-five patients with suspected or proven hepatobiliary malignancies were operated. Total robotic technique using da Vinci Xi system was used. Demographic details and perioperative outcomes were noted. Of the 25 surgeries, 14 patients had a suspected gallbladder malignancy, 11 patients had primary or metastatic liver tumor. Median age was 53 years. The average duration of surgery was 225 min with a median blood loss 150 ml. The median postoperative stay was 4 days. The median nodal yield for radical cholecystectomy was seven. Five patients required conversion. Two of these developed postoperative morbidity. Robotic surgery for hepatobiliary oncology is feasible and can be performed safely in experienced hands. Increasing experience in this field may equal or even prove advantageous over conventional or laparoscopic approach in future. A cautious approach with judicious patient selection is the key to establishing robotic surgery as a standard surgical approach.

  10. Student Experiences: the 2013 Cascadia Initiative Expedition Team's Apply to Sail Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejia, H.; Hooft, E. E.; Fattaruso, L.

    2013-12-01

    During the summer of 2013, the Cascadia Initiative Expedition Team led six oceanographic expeditions to recover and redeploy ocean bottom seismometers (OBSs) across the Cascadia subduction zone and Juan de Fuca plate. The Cascadia Initiative (CI) is an onshore/offshore seismic and geodetic experiment to study questions ranging from megathrust earthquakes to volcanic arc structure to the formation, deformation and hydration of the Juan de Fuca and Gorda plates with the overarching goal of understanding the entire subduction zone system. The Cascadia Initiative Expedition Team is a team of scientists charged with leading the oceanographic expeditions to deploy and recover CI OBSs and developing the associated Education and Outreach effort. Students and early career scientists were encouraged to apply to join the cruises via the Cascadia Initiative Expedition Team's Apply to Sail Program. The goal of this call for open participation was to help expand the user base of OBS data by providing opportunities for students and scientists to directly experience at-sea acquisition of OBS data. Participants were required to have a strong interest in learning field techniques, be willing to work long hours at sea assisting in OBS deployment, recovery and preliminary data processing and have an interest in working with the data collected. In total, there were 51 applicants to the Apply to Sail Program from the US and 4 other countries; 21 graduate students as well as a few undergraduate students, postdocs and young scientists from the US and Canada were chosen to join the crew. The cruises lasted from 6 to 14 days in length. OBS retrievals comprised the three first legs, of which the first two were aboard the Research Vessel Oceanus. During each of the retrievals, multiple acoustic signals were sent while the vessel completed a semi-circle around the OBS to accurately determine its position, a final signal was sent to drop the seismometer's anchor, and finally the ship and crew

  11. In Their Own Words: Young Adults' Menthol Cigarette Initiation, Perceptions, Experiences and Regulation Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wackowski, Olivia A; Evans, Kiameesha R; Harrell, Melissa B; Loukas, Alexandra; Lewis, M Jane; Delnevo, Cristine D; Perry, Cheryl L

    2017-02-17

    Menthol cigarettes are disproportionately used by young people and have been called smoking starter products. However, limited qualitative research exists on young adults' perceptions of and experiences with these products, with much of it based on document reviews of the tobacco industry's research. We conducted six focus groups with young adult (ages 18-24) menthol smokers in New Jersey (half with black smokers) between December 2014 and March 2015. Participants were asked open-ended questions about their menthol smoking initiation, preference reasons, substitution behaviors, and perceptions of menthol cigarette risks and regulation. Participants' menthol cigarette initiation and preference were influenced by their perceived popularity, brand recognition, taste, smoothness, satisfaction and access (including as "loosies," typically available for Newport). Some believed menthol cigarettes were less harmful than non-menthol cigarettes when initiating smoking. Many currently believed menthol cigarettes were more harmful because they contained extra "additives," were stronger (ie, requiring fewer cigarettes to feel satisfied), and/or based on hearsay. Many had tried new brand Camel Crush, which was perceived to be especially minty, fun, and attractive for newer smokers. While some used non-menthol cigarettes when menthols were unavailable, many said they would never or almost never substitute. Many acknowledged a menthol cigarettes ban would likely help them quit smoking, even though they did not support the idea. Menthol cigarette initiation is influenced by an interplay of multiple factors including their sensory properties, marketing, perceived popularity and availability. The FDA should continue to pursue closing this flavored cigarette loophole. In this first qualitative study of menthol cigarette use among young adults, we found further evidence that menthol cigarettes can act as starter products because they are perceived as easier to smoke and taste and smell

  12. Initial clinical experience with frameless radiosurgery for patients with intracranial metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamath, Reena; Ryken, Timothy C.; Meeks, Sanford L.; Pennington, Edward C.; Ritchie, Justine; Buatti, John M.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To review the initial clinical experience with frameless stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for treating intracranial metastatic disease. Methods and Materials: Sixty-four patients received frameless SRS for intracranial metastatic disease. Minimum follow-up was 6 months with none lost to follow-up. Patients had a median of 2 metastases and a maximum of 4. The median number of isocenters was 2 with median arcs of 10 and median dose of 17.5 Gy. Thirteen patients were treated for progressive/recurrent disease after surgical resection or whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT). Fifty-one patients were treated with frameless SRS as an an adjunct to initial treatment. Of the total treated, 17 were treated with SRS alone, 20 were treated with WBRT plus SRS, 16 were treated with surgical resection plus SRS, and the remaining 11 were treated with surgical resection plus WBRT plus SRS. Results: With a median actuarial follow-up period of 8.2 months, ultimate local control was 88%. The median time to progression was 8.1 months. The median overall survival was 8.7 months. Of the 17 patients treated with SRS alone, 86% had ultimate local control with mean overall survival of 7.1 months. Of the 13 patients who received surgical resection plus SRS without WBRT as primary treatment, there was 85% ultimate local control with an overall survival of 10.3 months. Three patients treated with initial surgery alone had recurrence treated with SRS 2-3 months after resection. All these patients obtained local control and median survival was >10 months. Of the 13 patients who received WBRT followed by SRS as boost treatment, 92% had local control and mean overall survival was 7.3 months. Of 7 patients who received SRS after recurrence after WBRT, 100% had local control with median survival of 8.2 months. For 8 patients who received surgery followed by WBRT and SRS, local control was 50%; however, ultimate intracranial control was achieved in 7 of 8 patients with repeat SRS and surgical

  13. Applicability of simplified methods to evaluate consequences of criticality accident using past accident data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Ken

    2003-01-01

    Applicability of four simplified methods to evaluate the consequences of criticality accident was investigated. Fissions in the initial burst and total fissions were evaluated using the simplified methods and those results were compared with the past accident data. The simplified methods give the number of fissions in the initial burst as a function of solution volume; however the accident data did not show such tendency. This would be caused by the lack of accident data for the initial burst with high accuracy. For total fissions, simplified almost reproduced the upper envelope of the accidents. However several accidents, which were beyond the applicable conditions, resulted in the larger total fissions than the evaluations. In particular, the Tokai-mura accident in 1999 gave in the largest total specific fissions, because the activation of cooling system brought the relatively high power for a long time. (author)

  14. How to reduce the number of accidents

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    Among the safety objectives that the Director-General has established for CERN in 2012 is a reduction in the number of workplace accidents.   The best way to prevent workplace accidents is to learn from experience. This is why any accident, fire, instance of pollution, or even a near-miss, should be reported using the EDH form that can be found here. All accident reports are followed up. The departments investigate all accidents that result in sick leave, as well as all the more common categories of accidents at CERN, essentially falls (slipping, falling on stairs, etc.), regardless of whether or not they lead to sick leave. By studying the accident causes that come to light in this way, it is possible to take preventive action to avoid such accidents in the future. If you have any questions, the HSE Unit will be happy to answer them. Contact us at safety-general@cern.ch. HSE Unit

  15. [Evaluation of the influence of humidity and temperature on the drug stability by initial average rate experiment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ning; Sun, Hechun; Dai, Miaomiao

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate the influence of temperature and humidity on the drug stability by initial average rate experiment, and to obtained the kinetic parameters. The effect of concentration error, drug degradation extent, humidity and temperature numbers, humidity and temperature range, and average humidity and temperature on the accuracy and precision of kinetic parameters in the initial average rate experiment was explored. The stability of vitamin C, as a solid state model, was investigated by an initial average rate experiment. Under the same experimental conditions, the kinetic parameters obtained from this proposed method were comparable to those from classical isothermal experiment at constant humidity. The estimates were more accurate and precise by controlling the extent of drug degradation, changing humidity and temperature range, or by setting the average temperature closer to room temperature. Compared with isothermal experiments at constant humidity, our proposed method saves time, labor, and materials.

  16. Accident: Reminder

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    There is no left turn to Point 1 from the customs, direction CERN. A terrible accident happened last week on the Route de Meyrin just outside Entrance B because traffic regulations were not respected. You are reminded that when travelling from the customs, direction CERN, turning left to Point 1 is forbidden. Access to Point 1 from the customs is only via entering CERN, going down to the roundabout and coming back up to the traffic lights at Entrance B

  17. Radiocesium discharge from paddy fields with different initial scrapings for decontamination after the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakahara, Taeko; Onda, Yuich; Kato, Hiroaki; Sakaguchi, Aya; Yoshimura, Kazuya

    2014-11-01

    To explore the behavior of radionuclides released after the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident in March 2011, and the distribution of radiocesium in paddy fields, we monitored radiocesium (Cs) and suspended sediment (SS) discharge from paddy fields. We proposed a rating scale for measuring the effectiveness of surface soil removal. Our experimental plots in paddy fields were located ∼40 km from the FDNPP. Two plots were established: one in a paddy field where surface soil was not removed (the "normally cultivated paddy field") and the second in a paddy field where the top 5-10 cm of soil was removed before cultivation (the "surface-removed paddy field"). The amounts of Cs and SS discharge from the paddy fields were continuously measured from June to August 2011. The Cs soil inventory measured 3 months after the FDNPP accident was approximately 200 kBq m(-2). However, after removing the surface soil, the concentration of Cs-137 decreased to 5 kBq m(-2). SS discharged from the normally cultivated and surface-removed paddy fields after puddling (mixing of soil and water before planting rice) was 11.0 kg and 3.1 kg, respectively, and Cs-137 discharge was 630,000 Bq (1240 Bq m(-2)) and 24,800 Bq (47.8 Bq m(-2)), respectively. The total amount of SS discharge after irrigation (natural rainfall-runoff) was 5.5 kg for the normally cultivated field and 70 kg for the surface-removed field, and the total amounts of Cs-137 discharge were 51,900 Bq (102 Bq m(-2)) and 165,000 Bq (317 Bq m(-2)), respectively. During the irrigation period, discharge from the surface-removed plot showed a twofold greater inflow than that from the normally cultivated plot. Thus, Cs inflow may originate from the upper canal. The topsoil removal process eliminated at least approximately 95% of the Cs-137, but upstream water contaminated with Cs-137 flowed into the paddy field. Therefore, to accurately determine the Cs discharge, it is important to examine Cs inflow from the