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Sample records for initiate ros-dependent autophagy

  1. Oxidized low-density lipoproteins upregulate proline oxidase to initiate ROS-dependent autophagy.

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    Zabirnyk, Olga; Liu, Wei; Khalil, Shadi; Sharma, Anit; Phang, James M

    2010-03-01

    Epidemiological studies showed that high levels of oxidized low-density lipoproteins (oxLDLs) are associated with increased cancer risk. We examined the direct effect of physiologic concentrations oxLDL on cancer cells. OxLDLs were cytotoxic and activate both apoptosis and autophagy. OxLDLs have ligands for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma and upregulated proline oxidase (POX) through this nuclear receptor. We identified 7-ketocholesterol (7KC) as a main component responsible for the latter. To elucidate the role of POX in oxLDL-mediated cytotoxicity, we knocked down POX via small interfering RNA and found that this (i) further reduced viability of cancer cells treated with oxLDL; (ii) decreased oxLDL-associated reactive oxygen species generation; (iii) decreased autophagy measured via beclin-1 protein level and light-chain 3 protein (LC3)-I into LC3-II conversion. Using POX-expressing cell model, we established that single POX overexpression was sufficient to activate autophagy. Thus, it led to autophagosomes accumulation and increased conversion of LC3-I into LC3-II. Moreover, beclin-1 gene expression was directly dependent on POX catalytic activity, namely the generation of POX-dependent superoxide. We conclude that POX is critical in the cellular response to the noxious effects of oxLDL by activating protective autophagy.

  2. Oxidized low-density lipoproteins upregulate proline oxidase to initiate ROS-dependent autophagy

    OpenAIRE

    Zabirnyk, Olga; Liu, Wei; Khalil, Shadi; Sharma, Anit; Phang, James M.

    2009-01-01

    Epidemiological studies showed that high levels of oxidized low-density lipoproteins (oxLDLs) are associated with increased cancer risk. We examined the direct effect of physiologic concentrations oxLDL on cancer cells. OxLDLs were cytotoxic and activate both apoptosis and autophagy. OxLDLs have ligands for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma and upregulated proline oxidase (POX) through this nuclear receptor. We identified 7-ketocholesterol (7KC) as a main component responsible ...

  3. Inhibition of autophagy initiation potentiates chemosensitivity in mesothelioma.

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    Follo, Carlo; Cheng, Yao; Richards, William G; Bueno, Raphael; Broaddus, Virginia Courtney

    2018-03-01

    The benefits of inhibiting autophagy in cancer are still controversial, with differences in outcome based on the type of tumor, the context and the particular stage of inhibition. Here, we investigated the impact of inhibiting autophagy at different stages on chemosensitivity using 3-dimensional (3D) models of mesothelioma, including ex vivo human tumor fragment spheroids. As shown by LC3B accumulation, we successfully inhibited autophagy using either an early stage ULK1/2 inhibitor (MRT 68921) or a late stage inhibitor (hydroxychloroquine). We found that inhibition of autophagy at the early stage, but not at late stage, potentiated chemosensitivity. This effect was seen only in those spheroids with high autophagy and active initiation at steady state. Inhibition of autophagy alone, at either early or late stage, did not cause cell death, showing that the inhibitors were non-toxic and that mesothelioma did not depend on autophagy at baseline, at least over 24 h. Using ATG13 puncta analysis, we found that autophagy initiation identified tumors that are more chemosensitive at baseline and after autophagy inhibition. Our results highlight a potential role of autophagy initiation in supporting mesothelioma cells during chemotherapy. Our work also highlights the importance of testing the inhibition of different stages in order to uncover the role of autophagy and the potential of its modulation in the treatment of cancer. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Inducing autophagy

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    Harder, Lea M; Bunkenborg, Jakob; Andersen, Jens S.

    2014-01-01

    catabolism, which has recently been found to induce autophagy in an MTOR independent way and support cancer cell survival. In this study, quantitative phosphoproteomics was applied to investigate the initial signaling events linking ammonia to the induction of autophagy. The MTOR inhibitor rapamycin was used...... as a reference treatment to emphasize the differences between an MTOR-dependent and -independent autophagy-induction. By this means 5901 phosphosites were identified of which 626 were treatment-specific regulated and 175 were coregulated. Investigation of the ammonia-specific regulated sites supported that MTOR...

  5. TGF-β2 initiates autophagy via Smad and non-Smad pathway to promote glioma cells’ invasion

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    Chao Zhang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is characterized by lethal aggressiveness and patients with GBM are in urgent need for new therapeutic avenues to improve quality of life. Current studies on tumor invasion focused on roles of cytokines in tumor microenvironment and numerous evidence suggests that TGF-β2 is abundant in glioma microenvironment and vital for glioma invasion. Autopagy is also emerging as a critical factor in aggressive behaviors of cancer cells; however, the relationship between TGF-β2 and autophagy in glioma has been poorly understood. Methods U251, T98 and U87 GBM cell lines as well as GBM cells from a primary human specimen were used in vitro and in vivo to evaluate the effect of TGF-β2 on autophagy. Western blot, qPCR, immunofluorescence and transmission-electron microscope were used to detect target molecular expression. Lentivirus and siRNA vehicle were introduced to establish cell lines, as well as mitotracker and seahorse experiment to study the metabolic process in glioma. Preclinical therapeutic efficacy was evaluated in orthotopic xenograft mouse models. Results Here we demonstrated that TGF-β2 activated autophagy in human glioma cell lines and knockdown of Smad2 or inhibition of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase, attenuated TGF-β2-induced autophagy. TGF-β2-induced autophagy is important for glioma invasion due to the alteration of epithelial-mesenchymal transition and metabolism conversion, particularly influencing mitochondria trafficking and membrane potential (△Ψm. Autopaghy also initiated a feedback on TGF-β2 in glioma by keeping its autocrine loop and affecting Smad2/3/7 expression. A xenograft model provided additional confirmation on combination of TGF-β inhibitor (Galunisertib and autophagy inhibitor (CQ to better “turn off” tumor growth. Conclusion Our findings elucidated a potential mechanism of autophagy-associated glioma invasion that TGF-β2 could initiate autophagy via Smad and non

  6. Suppressed translation as a mechanism of initiation of CASP8 (caspase 8)-dependent apoptosis in autophagy-deficient NSCLC cells under nutrient limitation.

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    Allavena, Giulia; Cuomo, Francesca; Baumgartner, Georg; Bele, Tadeja; Sellgren, Alexander Yarar; Oo, Kyaw Soe; Johnson, Kaylee; Gogvadze, Vladimir; Zhivotovsky, Boris; Kaminskyy, Vitaliy O

    2018-01-01

    Macroautophagy/autophagy inhibition under stress conditions is often associated with increased cell death. We found that under nutrient limitation, activation of CASP8/caspase-8 was significantly increased in autophagy-deficient lung cancer cells, which precedes mitochondria outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP), CYCS/cytochrome c release, and activation of CASP9/caspase-9, indicating that under such conditions the activation of CASP8 is a primary event in the initiation of apoptosis as well as essential to reduce clonogenic survival of autophagy-deficient cells. Starvation leads to suppression of CFLAR proteosynthesis and accumulation of CASP8 in SQSTM1 puncta. Overexpression of CFLARs reduces CASP8 activation and apoptosis during starvation, while its silencing promotes efficient activation of CASP8 and apoptosis in autophagy-deficient U1810 lung cancer cells even under nutrient-rich conditions. Similar to starvation, inhibition of protein translation leads to efficient activation of CASP8 and cell death in autophagy-deficient lung cancer cells. Thus, here for the first time we report that suppressed translation leads to activation of CASP8-dependent apoptosis in autophagy-deficient NSCLC cells under conditions of nutrient limitation. Our data suggest that targeting translational machinery can be beneficial for elimination of autophagy-deficient cells via the CASP8-dependent apoptotic pathway.

  7. Chelerythrine induced cell death through ROS-dependent ER stress in human prostate cancer cells

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    Wu S

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Songjiang Wu, Yanying Yang, Feiping Li, Lifu Huang, Zihua Han, Guanfu Wang, Hongyuan Yu, Haiping Li Department of Urology, Enze Hospital of Taizhou Enze Medical Center (Group, Taizhou, China Introduction: Prostate cancer is the most common noncutaneous cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide and the third in USA in 2017. Chelerythrine (CHE, a naturalbenzo[c]phenanthridine alkaloid, formerly identified as a protein kinase C inhibitor, has also shown anticancer effect through a number of mechanisms. Herein, effect and mechanism of the CHE-induced apoptosis via reactive oxygen species (ROS-mediated endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress in prostate cancer cells were studied for the first time. Methods: In our present study, we investigated whether CHE induced cell viability decrease, colony formation inhibition, and apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner in PC-3 cells. In addition, we showed that CHE increases intracellular ROS and leads to ROS-dependent ER stress and cell apoptosis. Results: Pre-treatment with N-acetyl cysteine, an ROS scavenger, totally reversed the CHE-induced cancer cell apoptosis as well as ER stress activation, suggesting that the ROS generation was responsible for the anticancer effects of CHE. Conclusion: Taken together, our findings support one of the anticancer mechanisms by which CHE increased ROS accumulation in prostate cancer cells, thereby leading to ER stress and caused intrinsic apoptotic signaling. The study reveals that CHE could be a potential candidate for application in the treatment of prostate cancer. Keywords: chelerythrine, reactive oxygen species, endoplasmic reticulum stress, apoptosis, prostate cancer

  8. Bortezomib initiates endoplasmic reticulum stress, elicits autophagy and death in Echinococcus granulosus larval stage.

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    María Celeste Nicolao

    Full Text Available Cystic echinococcosis (CE is a worldwide distributed helminthic zoonosis caused by Echinococcus granulosus. Benzimidazole derivatives are currently the only drugs for chemotherapeutic treatment of CE. However, their low efficacy and the adverse effects encourage the search for new therapeutic targets. We evaluated the in vitro efficacy of Bortezomib (Bz, a proteasome inhibitor, in the larval stage of the parasite. After 96 h, Bz showed potent deleterious effects at a concentration of 5 μM and 0.5 μM in protoscoleces and metacestodes, respectively (P < 0.05. After 48 h of exposure to this drug, it was triggered a mRNA overexpression of chaperones (Eg-grp78 and Eg-calnexin and of Eg-ire2/Eg-xbp1 (the conserved UPR pathway branch in protoscoleces. No changes were detected in the transcriptional expression of chaperones in Bz-treated metacestodes, thus allowing ER stress to be evident and viability to highly decrease in comparison with protoscoleces. We also found that Bz treatment activated the autophagic process in both larval forms. These facts were evidenced by the increase in the amount of transcripts of the autophagy related genes (Eg-atg6, Eg-atg8, Eg-atg12, Eg-atg16 together with the increase in Eg-Atg8-II detected by western blot and by in toto immunofluorescence labeling. It was further confirmed by direct observation of autophagic structures by electronic microscopy. Finally, in order to determine the impact of autophagy induction on Echinococcus cell viability, we evaluated the efficacy of Bz in combination with rapamycin and a synergistic cytotoxic effect on protoscolex viability was observed when both drugs were used together. In conclusion, our findings demonstrated that Bz induced endoplasmic reticulum stress, autophagy and subsequent death allowing to identify unstudied parasite-host pathways that could provide a new insight for control of parasitic diseases.

  9. Bortezomib initiates endoplasmic reticulum stress, elicits autophagy and death in Echinococcus granulosus larval stage

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    Nicolao, María Celeste; Loos, Julia A.; Rodriguez Rodrigues, Christian; Beas, Viviana

    2017-01-01

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE) is a worldwide distributed helminthic zoonosis caused by Echinococcus granulosus. Benzimidazole derivatives are currently the only drugs for chemotherapeutic treatment of CE. However, their low efficacy and the adverse effects encourage the search for new therapeutic targets. We evaluated the in vitro efficacy of Bortezomib (Bz), a proteasome inhibitor, in the larval stage of the parasite. After 96 h, Bz showed potent deleterious effects at a concentration of 5 μM and 0.5 μM in protoscoleces and metacestodes, respectively (P Echinococcus cell viability, we evaluated the efficacy of Bz in combination with rapamycin and a synergistic cytotoxic effect on protoscolex viability was observed when both drugs were used together. In conclusion, our findings demonstrated that Bz induced endoplasmic reticulum stress, autophagy and subsequent death allowing to identify unstudied parasite-host pathways that could provide a new insight for control of parasitic diseases. PMID:28817601

  10. Autophagy suppresses RIP kinase-dependent necrosis enabling survival to mTOR inhibition.

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    Kevin Bray

    Full Text Available mTOR inhibitors are used clinically to treat renal cancer but are not curative. Here we show that autophagy is a resistance mechanism of human renal cell carcinoma (RCC cell lines to mTOR inhibitors. RCC cell lines have high basal autophagy that is required for survival to mTOR inhibition. In RCC4 cells, inhibition of mTOR with CCI-779 stimulates autophagy and eliminates RIP kinases (RIPKs and this is blocked by autophagy inhibition, which induces RIPK- and ROS-dependent necroptosis in vitro and suppresses xenograft growth. Autophagy of mitochondria is required for cell survival since mTOR inhibition turns off Nrf2 antioxidant defense. Thus, coordinate mTOR and autophagy inhibition leads to an imbalance between ROS production and defense, causing necroptosis that may enhance cancer treatment efficacy.

  11. Dengue Virus and Autophagy

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    Nicholas S. Heaton

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Several independent groups have published that autophagy is required for optimal RNA replication of dengue virus (DENV. Initially, it was postulated that autophagosomes might play a structural role in replication complex formation. However, cryo-EM tomography of DENV replication complexes showed that DENV replicates on endoplasmic reticulum (ER cisternae invaginations and not on classical autophagosomes. Recently, it was reported that autophagy plays an indirect role in DENV replication by modulating cellular lipid metabolism. DENV-induced autophagosomes deplete cellular triglycerides that are stored in lipid droplets, leading to increased β-oxidation and energy production. This is the first example of a virus triggering autophagy to modulate cellular physiology. In this review, we summarize these data and discuss new questions and implications for autophagy during DENV replication.

  12. Chemical Inhibition of Autophagy

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    Baek, Eric; Lin Kim, Che; Gyeom Kim, Mi

    2016-01-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells activate and undergo apoptosis and autophagy for various environmental stresses. Unlike apoptosis, studies on increasing the production of therapeutic proteins in CHO cells by targeting the autophagy pathway are limited. In order to identify the effects of chemical...... autophagy inhibitors on the specific productivity (qp), nine chemical inhibitors that had been reported to target three different phases of autophagy (metformin, dorsomorphin, resveratrol, and SP600125 against initiation and nucleation; 3-MA, wortmannin, and LY294002 against elongation, and chloroquine...... and bafilomycin A1 against autophagosome fusion) were used to treat three recombinant CHO (rCHO) cell lines: the Fc-fusion protein-producing DG44 (DG44-Fc) and DUKX-B11 (DUKX-Fc) and antibody-producing DG44 (DG44-Ab) cell lines. Among the nine chemical inhibitors tested, 3-MA, dorsomorphin, and SP600125...

  13. Intact initiation of autophagy and mitochondrial fission by acute exercise in skeletal muscle of patientswith type 2 diabetes

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    Kruse Sørensen, Rikke; Pedersen, Andreas James Thestrup; Kristensen, Jonas Møller

    2017-01-01

    AIMS: Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is characterized by insulin resistance, mitochondrial dysregulation, and, in some studies, exercise resistance in skeletal muscle. Regulation of autophagy and mitochondrial dynamics during exercise and recovery is important for skeletal muscle homeostasis......, and these responses may be altered in T2D. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We examined the effect of acute exercise on markers of autophagy and mitochondrial fusion and fission in skeletal muscle biopsies from patients with T2D (n=13) and weight-matched controls (n=14) before, immediately after and 3h after an acute bout...... of exercise. RESULTS: While mRNA levels of most markers of autophagy ( PIK3C, MAP1LC3B, SQSTM1, BNIP3, BNIP3L ) and mitochondrial dynamics ( OPA1, FIS1 ) remained unchanged, some either increased during and after exercise (GABARAPL1 ), decreased in the recovery period ( BECN1, ATG7, DNM1L ), or both ( MFN2...

  14. d,l-Sulforaphane Induces ROS-Dependent Apoptosis in Human Gliomablastoma Cells by Inactivating STAT3 Signaling Pathway

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    Ziwei Miao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available d,l-Sulforaphane (SFN, a synthetic analogue of broccoli-derived isomer l-SFN, exerts cytotoxic effects on multiple tumor cell types through different mechanisms and is more potent than the l-isomer at inhibiting cancer growth. However, the means by which SFN impairs glioblastoma (GBM cells remains poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the anti-cancer effect of SFN in GBM cells and determined the underlying molecular mechanisms. Cell viability assays, flow cytometry, immunofluorescence, and Western blot results revealed that SFN could induced apoptosis of GBM cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner, via up-regulation of caspase-3 and Bax, and down-regulation of Bcl-2. Mechanistically, SFN treatment led to increase the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS level in GBM cells. Meanwhile, SFN also suppressed both constitutive and IL-6-induced phosphorylation of STAT3, and the activation of upstream JAK2 and Src tyrosine kinases, dose- and time-dependently. Moreover, blockage of ROS production by using the ROS inhibitor N-acetyl-l-cysteine totally reversed SFN-mediated down-regulation of JAK2/Src-STAT3 signaling activation and the subsequent effects on apoptosis by blocking the induction of apoptosis-related genes in GBM cells. Taken together, our data suggests that SFN induces apoptosis in GBM cells via ROS-dependent inactivation of STAT3 phosphorylation. These findings motivate further evaluation of SFN as a cancer chemopreventive agent in GBM treatment.

  15. Proteomics Insights into Autophagy.

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    Cudjoe, Emmanuel K; Saleh, Tareq; Hawkridge, Adam M; Gewirtz, David A

    2017-10-01

    Autophagy, a conserved cellular process by which cells recycle their contents either to maintain basal homeostasis or in response to external stimuli, has for the past two decades become one of the most studied physiological processes in cell biology. The 2016 Nobel Prize in Medicine and Biology awarded to Dr. Ohsumi Yoshinori, one of the first scientists to characterize this cellular mechanism, attests to its importance. The induction and consequent completion of the process of autophagy results in wide ranging changes to the cellular proteome as well as the secretome. MS-based proteomics affords the ability to measure, in an unbiased manner, the ubiquitous changes that occur when autophagy is initiated and progresses in the cell. The continuous improvements and advances in mass spectrometers, especially relating to ionization sources and detectors, coupled with advances in proteomics experimental design, has made it possible to study autophagy, among other process, in great detail. Innovative labeling strategies and protein separation techniques as well as complementary methods including immuno-capture/blotting/staining have been used in proteomics studies to provide more specific protein identification. In this review, we will discuss recent advances in proteomics studies focused on autophagy. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. TNF-α mediates choroidal neovascularization by upregulating VEGF expression in RPE through ROS-dependent β-catenin activation.

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    Wang, Haibo; Han, Xiaokun; Wittchen, Erika S; Hartnett, M Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation, oxidative stress, and angiogenesis have been proposed to interact in age-related macular degeneration. It has been postulated that external stimuli that cause oxidative stress can increase production of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the inflammatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), contributed to choroidal neovascularization (CNV) by upregulating VEGF in RPE through intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent signaling and sought to understand the mechanisms involved. In a murine laser-induced CNV model, 7 days after laser treatment and intravitreal neutralizing mouse TNF-α antibody or isotype immunoglobulin G (IgG) control, the following measurements were made: 1) TNF-α protein and VEGF protein in RPE/choroids with western blot, 2) CNV volume in RPE/choroidal flatmounts, and 3) semiquantification of oxidized phospholipids stained with E06 antibody within CNV with immunohistochemistry (IHC). In cultured human RPE cells treated with TNF-α or PBS control, 1) ROS generation was measured using the 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFDA) fluorescence assay, and 2) NOX4 protein and VEGF protein or mRNA were measured with western blot or quantitative real-time PCR in cells pretreated with apocynin or nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase (NADPH) inhibitor, VAS 2870, or transfected with p22phox siRNA, and each was compared to its appropriate control. Western blots of phosphorylated p65 (p-p65), total p65 and β-actin, and quantitative real-time PCR of VEGF mRNA were measured in human RPE cells treated with TNF-α and pretreatment with the nuclear factor kappa B inhibitor, Bay 11-7082 or control. Western blots of β-catenin, VEGF, and p22phox and coimmunoprecipitation of β-catenin and T-cell transcriptional factor were performed in human RPE cells treated with TNF-α following pretreatment with

  17. Moringa oleifera's Nutritious Aqueous Leaf Extract Has Anticancerous Effects by Compromising Mitochondrial Viability in an ROS-Dependent Manner.

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    Madi, Niveen; Dany, Mohammed; Abdoun, Salah; Usta, Julnar

    2016-01-01

    Moringa oleifera (MO) is an important dietary component for many populations in West Africa and the Indian subcontinent. In addition to its highly nutritious value, almost all parts of this plant have been widely used in folk medicine in curing infectious, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, hepatic, and other diseases. Evidence-based research supported its versatile medicinal properties; however, more rigorous research is required to establish it in cancer therapy. As such, in this study we aim to investigate the in vitro anticancerous effect of Moringa oleifera's aqueous leaf extract. Moringa extract was prepared by soaking pulverized leaves in hot water mimicking the people's mode of the leaf drink preparation. Several assays were used to study the effect of different percentage concentrations of the extract on viability of A549 cells; levels of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), reactive oxygen species (ROS), and glutathione (GSH) generated; as well as percentage of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) released at different time points. In addition to mitochondrial membrane potential, apoptotic events were assessed using western blotting for apoptotic markers and immunoflourescent flourescent labeled inhibitor of caspases (FLICA) assay. MO extract treatment resulted in a significant decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential (1 hour) and ATP levels (3 hours), followed by an increase in (6 hours) ROS, caspase activation, proapoptotic proteins expression (p53, SMAC/Diablo, AIF), and PARP-1 cleavage. This eventually resulted in decreased GSH levels and a decrease in viability. The cytotoxic effect was prevented upon pretreatment with antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine. MO decreased as well the viability of HepG2, CaCo2, Jurkat, and HEK293 cells. Our findings identify a plant extract with an anticancerous effect on cancer cell lines. MO extract exerts its cytotoxic effect in A549 cancer cells by affecting mitochondrial viability and inducing apoptosis in an ROS-dependent manner.

  18. A ROS-dependent and Caspase-3-mediated apoptosis in sheep bronchial epithelial cells in response to Mycoplasma Ovipneumoniae infections.

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    Xue, Di; Li, Yanan; Jiang, Zhongjia; Deng, Guangcun; Li, Min; Liu, Xiaoming; Wang, Yujiong

    2017-05-01

    Mycoplasma Ovipneumoniae (M. ovipneumoniae) is a primary etiological agent of enzootic pneumonia in sheep and goats. It can enter and colonize ovine respiratory epithelial cells to establish an infection, which leads a serious cell death of epithelial cells. However, the nature of the interaction between pathogen of M. ovipneumoniae and host cells in the cell injury is currently not well understood. In this study, we investigated the epithelial cell apoptosis caused by an infection of M. ovipneumoniae in sheep primary air-liquid interface (ALI) epithelial cultures. The results showed that M. ovipneumoniae could specifically bind to ciliated cells at early stage of infection. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that an infection of M. ovipneumoniae induced a time-dependent cell apoptotic cell death, accompanied with an increased production of extracellular nitric oxide (NO), intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and activation of caspase-3 signaling in sheep bronchial epithelial cells. The induced cell apoptosis was further confirmed by a transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate-biotin nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay. Interestingly, the M. ovipneumoniae-induced apoptosis and activation of caspase-3 were correlated with the production of ROS but not NO. Mechanistically, M. ovipneumoniae-induced cell apoptosis was mediated by a mechanism by increasing the expression of phosphorylation of p38 and pro-apoptotic proteins, and activating caspase-3, caspase-8 and poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) cleavage. These results suggest a ROS-dependent and caspase-3-mediated cell apoptosis in sheep bronchial epithelial cells in response to M. ovipneumoniae infections. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Arterial Levels of Oxygen Stimulate Intimal Hyperplasia in Human Saphenous Veins via a ROS-Dependent Mechanism

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    Joddar, Binata; Firstenberg, Michael S.; Reen, Rashmeet K.; Varadharaj, Saradhadevi; Khan, Mahmood; Childers, Rachel C.; Zweier, Jay L.; Gooch, Keith J.

    2015-01-01

    Saphenous veins used as arterial grafts are exposed to arterial levels of oxygen partial pressure (pO2), which are much greater than what they experience in their native environment. The object of this study is to determine the impact of exposing human saphenous veins to arterial pO2. Saphenous veins and left internal mammary arteries from consenting patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting were cultured ex vivo for 2 weeks in the presence of arterial or venous pO2 using an established organ culture model. Saphenous veins cultured with arterial pO2 developed intimal hyperplasia as evidenced by 2.8-fold greater intimal area and 5.8-fold increase in cell proliferation compared to those freshly isolated. Saphenous veins cultured at venous pO2 or internal mammary arteries cultured at arterial pO2 did not develop intimal hyperplasia. Intimal hyperplasia was accompanied by two markers of elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS): increased dihydroethidium associated fluorescence (4-fold, ppO2 is suggested by the observation that chronic exposure to tiron, a ROS scavenger, during the two-week culture period, blocked intimal hyperplasia. Electron paramagnetic resonance based oximetry revealed that the pO2 in the wall of the vessel tracked that of the atmosphere with a ~30 mmHg offset, thus the cells in the vessel wall were directly exposed to variations in pO2. Monolayer cultures of smooth muscle cells isolated from saphenous veins exhibited increased proliferation when exposed to arterial pO2 relative to those cultured at venous pO2. This increased proliferation was blocked by tiron. Taken together, these data suggest that exposure of human SV to arterial pO2 stimulates IH via a ROS-dependent pathway. PMID:25799140

  20. Oxidative stress-induced autophagy: Role in pulmonary toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malaviya, Rama; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved catabolic process important in regulating the turnover of essential proteins and in elimination of damaged organelles and protein aggregates. Autophagy is observed in the lung in response to oxidative stress generated as a consequence of exposure to environmental toxicants. Whether autophagy plays role in promoting cell survival or cytotoxicity is unclear. In this article recent findings on oxidative stress-induced autophagy in the lung are reviewed; potential mechanisms initiating autophagy are also discussed. A better understanding of autophagy and its role in pulmonary toxicity may lead to the development of new strategies to treat lung injury associated with oxidative stress. - Highlights: • Exposure to pulmonary toxicants is associated with oxidative stress. • Oxidative stress is known to induce autophagy. • Autophagy is upregulated in the lung following exposure to pulmonary toxicants. • Autophagy may be protective or pathogenic

  1. Oxidative stress-induced autophagy: Role in pulmonary toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malaviya, Rama [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Laskin, Jeffrey D. [Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Laskin, Debra L., E-mail: laskin@eohsi.rutgers.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved catabolic process important in regulating the turnover of essential proteins and in elimination of damaged organelles and protein aggregates. Autophagy is observed in the lung in response to oxidative stress generated as a consequence of exposure to environmental toxicants. Whether autophagy plays role in promoting cell survival or cytotoxicity is unclear. In this article recent findings on oxidative stress-induced autophagy in the lung are reviewed; potential mechanisms initiating autophagy are also discussed. A better understanding of autophagy and its role in pulmonary toxicity may lead to the development of new strategies to treat lung injury associated with oxidative stress. - Highlights: • Exposure to pulmonary toxicants is associated with oxidative stress. • Oxidative stress is known to induce autophagy. • Autophagy is upregulated in the lung following exposure to pulmonary toxicants. • Autophagy may be protective or pathogenic.

  2. Autophagy and the nutritional signaling pathway

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    Long HE,Shabnam ESLAMFAM,Xi MA,Defa LI

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available During their growth and development, animals adapt to tremendous changes in order to survive. These include responses to both environmental and physiological changes and autophagy is one of most important adaptive and regulatory mechanisms. Autophagy is defined as an autolytic process to clear damaged cellular organelles and recycle the nutrients via lysosomic degradation. The process of autophagy responds to special conditions such as nutrient withdrawal. Once autophagy is induced, phagophores form and then elongate and curve to form autophagosomes. Autophagosomes then engulf cargo, fuse with endosomes, and finally fuse with lysosomes for maturation. During the initiation process, the ATG1/ULK1 (unc-51-like kinase 1 and VPS34 (which encodes a class III phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns 3-kinase complexes are critical in recruitment and assembly of other complexes required for autophagy. The process of autophagy is regulated by autophagy related genes (ATGs. Amino acid and energy starvation mediate autophagy by activating mTORC1 (mammalian target of rapamycin and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK. AMPK is the energy status sensor, the core nutrient signaling component and the metabolic kinase of cells. This review mainly focuses on the mechanism of autophagy regulated by nutrient signaling especially for the two important complexes, ULK1 and VPS34.

  3. A large-scale RNA interference screen identifies genes that regulate autophagy at different stages.

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    Guo, Sujuan; Pridham, Kevin J; Virbasius, Ching-Man; He, Bin; Zhang, Liqing; Varmark, Hanne; Green, Michael R; Sheng, Zhi

    2018-02-12

    Dysregulated autophagy is central to the pathogenesis and therapeutic development of cancer. However, how autophagy is regulated in cancer is not well understood and genes that modulate cancer autophagy are not fully defined. To gain more insights into autophagy regulation in cancer, we performed a large-scale RNA interference screen in K562 human chronic myeloid leukemia cells using monodansylcadaverine staining, an autophagy-detecting approach equivalent to immunoblotting of the autophagy marker LC3B or fluorescence microscopy of GFP-LC3B. By coupling monodansylcadaverine staining with fluorescence-activated cell sorting, we successfully isolated autophagic K562 cells where we identified 336 short hairpin RNAs. After candidate validation using Cyto-ID fluorescence spectrophotometry, LC3B immunoblotting, and quantitative RT-PCR, 82 genes were identified as autophagy-regulating genes. 20 genes have been reported previously and the remaining 62 candidates are novel autophagy mediators. Bioinformatic analyses revealed that most candidate genes were involved in molecular pathways regulating autophagy, rather than directly participating in the autophagy process. Further autophagy flux assays revealed that 57 autophagy-regulating genes suppressed autophagy initiation, whereas 21 candidates promoted autophagy maturation. Our RNA interference screen identifies identified genes that regulate autophagy at different stages, which helps decode autophagy regulation in cancer and offers novel avenues to develop autophagy-related therapies for cancer.

  4. Autophagy Proteins in Phagocyte Endocytosis and Exocytosis

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    Christian Münz

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy was initially described as a catabolic pathway that recycles nutrients of cytoplasmic constituents after lysosomal degradation during starvation. Since the immune system monitors products of lysosomal degradation via major histocompatibility complex (MHC class II restricted antigen presentation, autophagy was found to process intracellular antigens for display on MHC class II molecules. In recent years, however, it has become apparent that the molecular machinery of autophagy serves phagocytes in many more membrane trafficking pathways, thereby regulating immunity to infectious disease agents. In this minireview, we will summarize the recent evidence that autophagy proteins regulate phagocyte endocytosis and exocytosis for myeloid cell activation, pathogen replication, and MHC class I and II restricted antigen presentation. Selective stimulation and inhibition of the respective functional modules of the autophagy machinery might constitute valid therapeutic options in the discussed disease settings.

  5. Branched chain amino acid suppressed insulin-initiated proliferation of human cancer cells through induction of autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wubetu, Gizachew Yismaw; Utsunomiya, Tohru; Ishikawa, Daichi; Ikemoto, Tetsuya; Yamada, Shinichiro; Morine, Yuji; Iwahashi, Shuichi; Saito, Yu; Arakawa, Yusuke; Imura, Satoru; Arimochi, Hideki; Shimada, Mitsuo

    2014-09-01

    Branched chain amino acid (BCAA) dietary supplementation inhibits activation of the insulin-like growth factor (IGF)/IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR) axis in diabetic animal models. However, the in vitro effect of BCAA on human cancer cell lines under hyper-insulinemic conditions remains unclear. Colon (HCT-116) and hepatic (HepG2) tumor cells were treated with varying concentrations of BCAA with or without fluorouracil (5-FU). The effect of BCAA on insulin-initiated proliferation was determined. Gene and protein expression was analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and western blotting, respectively. BCAA supplementation had no significant effect on cell proliferation and did not show significant synergistic or antagonistic effects with 5-FU. However, BCAA significantly decreased insulin-initiated proliferation of human colon and hepatic cancer cell lines in vitro. BCAA supplementation caused a marked decrease in activated IGF-IR expression and significantly enhanced both mRNA and protein expression of LC3-II and BECN1 (BECLIN-1). BCAA could be a useful chemopreventive modality for cancer in hyperinsulinemic conditions. Copyright© 2014 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  6. Autophagy in photodynamic therapy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Autophagy is a conserved intracellular degradation process in which cellular organelles, proteins and invading microbes are degraded by lysosomes. There are three types of autophagy: macroautophagy, mitoautophagy and chaperone- mediated autophagy. This review is focused on macroautophagy which is referred to ...

  7. Cadmium induces carcinogenesis in BEAS-2B cells through ROS-dependent activation of PI3K/AKT/GSK-3β/β-catenin signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Young-Ok; Wang, Lei; Poyil, Pratheeshkumar; Budhraja, Amit; Hitron, J. Andrew; Zhang, Zhuo [Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States); Lee, Jeong-Chae [Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States); School of Dentistry and Institute of Oral Biosciences (BK21 program), Research Center of Bioactive Materials, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Shi, Xianglin, E-mail: xshi5@email.uky.edu [Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Cadmium has been widely used in industry and is known to be carcinogenic to humans. Although it is widely accepted that chronic exposure to cadmium increases the incidence of cancer, the mechanisms underlying cadmium-induced carcinogenesis are unclear. The main aim of this study was to investigate the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cadmium-induced carcinogenesis and the signal transduction pathways involved. Chronic exposure of human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells to cadmium induced cell transformation, as evidenced by anchorage-independent growth in soft agar and clonogenic assays. Chronic cadmium treatment also increased the potential of these cells to invade and migrate. Injection of cadmium-stimulated cells into nude mice resulted in the formation of tumors. In contrast, the cadmium-mediated increases in colony formation, cell invasion and migration were prevented by transfection with catalase, superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1), or SOD2. In particular, chronic cadmium exposure led to activation of signaling cascades involving PI3K, AKT, GSK-3β, and β-catenin and transfection with each of the above antioxidant enzymes markedly inhibited cadmium-mediated activation of these signaling proteins. Inhibitors specific for AKT or β-catenin almost completely suppressed the cadmium-mediated increase in total and active β-catenin proteins and colony formation. Moreover, there was a marked induction of AKT, GSK-3β, β-catenin, and carcinogenic markers in tumor tissues formed in mice after injection with cadmium-stimulated cells. Collectively, our findings suggest a direct involvement of ROS in cadmium-induced carcinogenesis and implicate a role of AKT/GSK-3β/β-catenin signaling in this process. -- Highlights: ► Chronic exposure to cadmium induces carcinogenic properties in BEAS-2B cells. ► ROS involved in cadmium-induced tumorigenicity of BEAS-2B cells. ► Cadmium activates ROS-dependent AKT/GSK-3β/β-catenin-mediated signaling. ► ROS-dependent

  8. Autophagy in Inflammatory Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander J. S. Choi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy provides a mechanism for the turnover of cellular organelles and proteins through a lysosome-dependent degradation pathway. During starvation, autophagy exerts a homeostatic function that promotes cell survival by recycling metabolic precursors. Additionally, autophagy can interact with other vital processes such as programmed cell death, inflammation, and adaptive immune mechanisms, and thereby potentially influence disease pathogenesis. Macrophages deficient in autophagic proteins display enhanced caspase-1-dependent proinflammatory cytokine production and the activation of the inflammasome. Autophagy provides a functional role in infectious diseases and sepsis by promoting intracellular bacterial clearance. Mutations in autophagy-related genes, leading to loss of autophagic function, have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease. Furthermore, autophagy-dependent mechanisms have been proposed in the pathogenesis of several pulmonary diseases that involve inflammation, including cystic fibrosis and pulmonary hypertension. Strategies aimed at modulating autophagy may lead to therapeutic interventions for diseases associated with inflammation.

  9. Hypoxia Downregulates MAPK/ERK but Not STAT3 Signaling in ROS-Dependent and HIF-1-Independent Manners in Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Kučera

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia is involved in the regulation of stem cell fate, and hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1 is the master regulator of hypoxic response. Here, we focus on the effect of hypoxia on intracellular signaling pathways responsible for mouse embryonic stem (ES cell maintenance. We employed wild-type and HIF-1α-deficient ES cells to investigate hypoxic response in the ERK, Akt, and STAT3 pathways. Cultivation in 1% O2 for 24 h resulted in the strong dephosphorylation of ERK and its upstream kinases and to a lesser extent of Akt in an HIF-1-independent manner, while STAT3 phosphorylation remained unaffected. Downregulation of ERK could not be mimicked either by pharmacologically induced hypoxia or by the overexpression. Dual-specificity phosphatases (DUSP 1, 5, and 6 are hypoxia-sensitive MAPK-specific phosphatases involved in ERK downregulation, and protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A regulates both ERK and Akt. However, combining multiple approaches, we revealed the limited significance of DUSPs and PP2A in the hypoxia-mediated attenuation of ERK signaling. Interestingly, we observed a decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS level in hypoxia and a similar phosphorylation pattern for ERK when the cells were supplemented with glutathione. Therefore, we suggest a potential role for the ROS-dependent attenuation of ERK signaling in hypoxia, without the involvement of HIF-1.

  10. The Mucosal Immune System and Its Regulation by Autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabat, Agnieszka M; Pott, Johanna; Maloy, Kevin J

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract presents a unique challenge to the mucosal immune system, which has to constantly monitor the vast surface for the presence of pathogens, while at the same time maintaining tolerance to beneficial or innocuous antigens. In the intestinal mucosa, specialized innate and adaptive immune components participate in directing appropriate immune responses toward these diverse challenges. Recent studies provide compelling evidence that the process of autophagy influences several aspects of mucosal immune responses. Initially described as a "self-eating" survival pathway that enables nutrient recycling during starvation, autophagy has now been connected to multiple cellular responses, including several aspects of immunity. Initial links between autophagy and host immunity came from the observations that autophagy can target intracellular bacteria for degradation. However, subsequent studies indicated that autophagy plays a much broader role in immune responses, as it can impact antigen processing, thymic selection, lymphocyte homeostasis, and the regulation of immunoglobulin and cytokine secretion. In this review, we provide a comprehensive overview of mucosal immune cells and discuss how autophagy influences many aspects of their physiology and function. We focus on cell type-specific roles of autophagy in the gut, with a particular emphasis on the effects of autophagy on the intestinal T cell compartment. We also provide a perspective on how manipulation of autophagy may potentially be used to treat mucosal inflammatory disorders.

  11. The sulfated laminarin triggers a stress transcriptome before priming the SA- and ROS-dependent defenses during grapevine's induced resistance against Plasmopara viticola.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrien Gauthier

    Full Text Available Grapevine (Vitis vinifera is susceptible to many pathogens which cause significant losses to viticulture worldwide. Chemical control is available, but agro-ecological concerns have raised interest in alternative methods, especially in triggering plant immunity by elicitor treatments. The β-glucan laminarin (Lam and its sulfated derivative (PS3 have been previously demonstrated to induce resistance in grapevine against downy mildew (Plasmopara viticola. However, if Lam elicits classical grapevine defenses such as oxidative burst, pathogenesis-related (PR-proteins and phytoalexin production, PS3 triggered grapevine resistance via a poorly understood priming phenomenon. The aim of this study was to identify the molecular mechanisms of the PS3-induced resistance. For this purpose we studied i the signaling events and transcriptome reprogramming triggered by PS3 treatment on uninfected grapevine, ii grapevine immune responses primed by PS3 during P. viticola infection. Our results showed that i PS3 was unable to elicit reactive oxygen species (ROS production, cytosolic Ca(2+ concentration variations, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK activation but triggered a long lasting plasma membrane depolarization in grapevine cells, ii PS3 and Lam shared a common stress-responsive transcriptome profile that partly overlapped the salicylate- (SA and jasmonate-(JA-dependent ones. After P. viticola inoculation, PS3 specifically primed the SA- and ROS-dependent defense pathways leading to grapevine induced resistance against this biotroph. Interestingly pharmacological approaches suggested that the plasma membrane depolarization and the downstream ROS production are key events of the PS3-induced resistance.

  12. The interplay between autophagy and ROS in tumorigenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kongara, Sameera [Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ (United States); The Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Karantza, Vassiliki, E-mail: karantva@umdnj.edu [Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ (United States); The Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ (United States)

    2012-11-21

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) at physiological levels are important cell signaling molecules. However, aberrantly high ROS are intimately associated with disease and commonly observed in cancer. Mitochondria are primary sources of intracellular ROS, and their maintenance is essential to cellular health. Autophagy, an evolutionarily conserved process whereby cytoplasmic components are delivered to lysosomes for degradation, is responsible for mitochondrial turnover and removal of damaged mitochondria. Impaired autophagy is implicated in many pathological conditions, including neurological disorders, inflammatory bowel disease, diabetes, aging, and cancer. The first reports connecting autophagy to cancer showed that allelic loss of the essential autophagy gene BECLIN1 (BECN1) is prevalent in human breast, ovarian, and prostate cancers and that Becn1{sup +/-} mice develop mammary gland hyperplasias, lymphomas, lung and liver tumors. Subsequent studies demonstrated that Atg5{sup -/-} and Atg7{sup -/-} livers give rise to adenomas, Atg4C{sup -/-} mice are susceptible to chemical carcinogenesis, and Bif1{sup -/-} mice are prone to spontaneous tumors, indicating that autophagy defects promote tumorigenesis. Due to defective mitophagy, autophagy-deficient cells accumulate damaged mitochondria and deregulated ROS levels, which likely contribute to their tumor-initiating capacity. However, the role of autophagy in tumorigenesis is complex, as more recent work also revealed tumor dependence on autophagy: autophagy-competent mutant-Ras-expressing cells form tumors more efficiently than their autophagy-deficient counterparts; similarly, FIP200 deficiency suppresses PyMT-driven mammary tumorigenesis. These latter findings are attributed to the fact that tumors driven by powerful oncogenes have high metabolic demands catered to by autophagy. In this review, we discuss the relationship between ROS and autophagy and summarize our current knowledge on their functional interactions

  13. The interplay between autophagy and ROS in tumorigenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kongara, Sameera; Karantza, Vassiliki

    2012-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) at physiological levels are important cell signaling molecules. However, aberrantly high ROS are intimately associated with disease and commonly observed in cancer. Mitochondria are primary sources of intracellular ROS, and their maintenance is essential to cellular health. Autophagy, an evolutionarily conserved process whereby cytoplasmic components are delivered to lysosomes for degradation, is responsible for mitochondrial turnover and removal of damaged mitochondria. Impaired autophagy is implicated in many pathological conditions, including neurological disorders, inflammatory bowel disease, diabetes, aging, and cancer. The first reports connecting autophagy to cancer showed that allelic loss of the essential autophagy gene BECLIN1 (BECN1) is prevalent in human breast, ovarian, and prostate cancers and that Becn1 +/- mice develop mammary gland hyperplasias, lymphomas, lung and liver tumors. Subsequent studies demonstrated that Atg5 -/- and Atg7 -/- livers give rise to adenomas, Atg4C -/- mice are susceptible to chemical carcinogenesis, and Bif1 -/- mice are prone to spontaneous tumors, indicating that autophagy defects promote tumorigenesis. Due to defective mitophagy, autophagy-deficient cells accumulate damaged mitochondria and deregulated ROS levels, which likely contribute to their tumor-initiating capacity. However, the role of autophagy in tumorigenesis is complex, as more recent work also revealed tumor dependence on autophagy: autophagy-competent mutant-Ras-expressing cells form tumors more efficiently than their autophagy-deficient counterparts; similarly, FIP200 deficiency suppresses PyMT-driven mammary tumorigenesis. These latter findings are attributed to the fact that tumors driven by powerful oncogenes have high metabolic demands catered to by autophagy. In this review, we discuss the relationship between ROS and autophagy and summarize our current knowledge on their functional interactions in tumorigenesis.

  14. Rosmarinic acid counteracts activation of hepatic stellate cells via inhibiting the ROS-dependent MMP-2 activity: Involvement of Nrf2 antioxidant system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Changfang; Zou, Yu; Liu, Yuzhang; Niu, Yingcai

    2017-01-01

    . • RA-mediated down-regulation of MMP-2 was ROS-dependent.

  15. Rosmarinic acid counteracts activation of hepatic stellate cells via inhibiting the ROS-dependent MMP-2 activity: Involvement of Nrf2 antioxidant system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Changfang; Zou, Yu; Liu, Yuzhang; Niu, Yingcai, E-mail: nyc1968@126.com

    2017-03-01

    . • RA-mediated down-regulation of MMP-2 was ROS-dependent.

  16. Cadmium induces matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression via ROS-dependent EGFR, NF-kB, and AP-1 pathways in human endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lian, Sen; Xia, Yong; Khoi, Pham Ngoc; Ung, Trong Thuan; Yoon, Hyun Joong; Kim, Nam Ho; Kim, Kyung Keun; Jung, Young Do

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Cadmium induces MMP-9 expression through NADPH oxidase-derived ROS. • Cadmium induces MMP-9 through EGFR-mediated Akt, Erk1/2 and JNK1/2 signaling pathways. • Akt, MAPKs (Erk1/2 and JNK1/2) functioned as upstream signals of NF-kB and AP-1 respectively, in cadmium-induced MMP-9 in endothelial cells. • ROS production by NADPH oxidase is the furthest upstream signal in MMP-9 expression in ECV304 cells. - Abstract: Cadmium (Cd), a widespread cumulative pollutant, is a known human carcinogen, associated with inflammation and tumors. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) plays a pivotal role in tumor metastasis; however, the mechanisms underlying the MMP-9 expression induced by Cd remain obscure in human endothelial cells. Here, Cd elevated MMP-9 expression in dose- and time-dependent manners in human endothelial cells. Cd increased ROS production and the ROS-producing NADPH oxidase. Cd translocates p47 phox , a key subunit of NADPH oxidase, to the cell membrane. Cd also activated the phosphorylation of EGFR, Akt, Erk1/2, and JNK1/2 in addition to promoting NF-kB and AP-1 binding activities. Specific inhibitor and mutagenesis studies showed that EGFR, Akt, Erk1/2, JNK1/2 and transcription factors NF-κB and AP-1 were related to Cd-induced MMP-9 expression in endothelial cells. Akt, Erk1/2, and JNK1/2 functioned as upstream signals in the activation of NF-κB and AP-1, respectively. In addition, N-acetyl-L-cystein (NAC), diphenyleneiodonium chloride (DPI) and apocynin (APO) inhibited the Cd-induced activation of EGFR, Akt, Erk1/2, JNK1/2, and p38 MAPK, indicating that ROS production by NADPH oxidase is the furthest upstream signal in MMP-9 expression. At present, it states that Cd displayed marked invasiveness in ECV304 cells, which was partially abrogated by MMP-9 neutralizing antibodies. These results demonstrated that Cd induces MMP-9 expression via ROS-dependent EGFR- > Erk1/2, JNK1/2- > AP-1 and EGFR- > Akt- > NF-κB signaling pathways and, in turn

  17. Glaucarubinone sensitizes KB cells to paclitaxel by inhibiting ABC transporters via ROS-dependent and p53-mediated activation of apoptotic signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikeyan, Subburayan; Hoti, Sugeerappa Laxmanappa; Nazeer, Yasin; Hegde, Harsha Vasudev

    2016-07-05

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is considered to be the major contributor to failure of chemotherapy in oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). This study was aimed to explore the effects and mechanisms of glaucarubinone (GLU), one of the major quassinoids from Simarouba glauca DC, in potentiating cytotoxicity of paclitaxel (PTX), an anticancer drug in KB cells. Our data showed that the administration of GLU pre-treatment significantly enhanced PTX anti-proliferative effect in ABCB1 over-expressing KB cells. The Rh 123 drug efflux studies revealed that there was a significant transport function inhibition by GLU-PTX treatment. Interestingly, it was also found that this enhanced anticancer efficacy of GLU was associated with PTX-induced cell arrest in the G2/M phase of cell cycle. Further, the combined treatment of GLU-PTX had significant decrease in the expression levels of P-gp, MRPs, and BCRP in resistant KB cells at both mRNA and protein levels. Furthermore, the combination treatments showed significant reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, chromatin condensation and reduced mitochondrial membrane potential in resistant KB cells. The results from DNA fragmentation analysis also demonstrated the GLU induced apoptosis in KB cells and its synergy with PTX. Importantly, GLU and/or PTX triggered apoptosis through the activation of pro-apoptotic proteins such as p53, Bax, and caspase-9. Our findings demonstrated for the first time that GLU causes cell death in human oral cancer cells via the ROS-dependent suppression of MDR transporters and p53-mediated activation of the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. Additionally, the present study also focussed on investigation of the protective effect of GLU and combination drugs in human normal blood lymphocytes. Normal blood lymphocytes assay indicated that GLU is able to induce selective toxicity in cancer cells and in silico molecular docking studies support the choice of GLU as ABC inhibitor to enhance PTX efficacy

  18. MRP8/14 induces autophagy to eliminate intracellular Mycobacterium bovis BCG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinli; Huang, Chunyu; Wu, Minhao; Zhong, Qiu; Yang, Kun; Li, Miao; Zhan, Xiaoxia; Wen, Jinsheng; Zhou, Lin; Huang, Xi

    2015-04-01

    To explore the role of myeloid-related protein 8/14 in mycobacterial infection. The mRNA and protein expression levels of MRP8 or MRP14 were measured by real-time PCR and flow cytometry, respectively. Role of MRP8/14 was tested by overexpression or RNA interference assays. Flow cytometry and colony forming unit were used to test the phagocytosis and the survival of intracellular Mycobacterium bovis BCG (BCG), respectively. Autophagy mediated by MRP8/14 was detected by Western blot and immunofluorescence. The colocalization of BCG phagosomes with autophagosomes or lysosomes was by detected by confocal microscopy. ROS production was detected by flow cytometry. MRP8/14 expressions were up-regulated in human monocytic THP1 cells and primary macrophages after mycobacterial challenge. Silencing of MRP8/14 suppressed bacterial killing, but had no influence on the phagocytosis of BCG. Importantly, silencing MRP8/14 decreased autophagy and BCG phagosome maturation in THP1-derived macrophages, thereby increasing the BCG survival. Additionally, we demonstrated that MRP8/14 promoted autophagy in a ROS-dependent manner. The present study revealed a novel role of MRP8/14 in the autophagy-mediated elimination of intracellular BCG by promoting ROS generation, which may provide a promising therapeutic target for tuberculosis and other intracellular bacterial infectious diseases. Copyright © 2014 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Immunologic manifestations of autophagy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deretic, Vojo; Kimura, Tomonori; Timmins, Graham

    2015-01-01

    The broad immunologic roles of autophagy span innate and adaptive immunity and are often manifested in inflammatory diseases. The immune effects of autophagy partially overlap with its roles in metabolism and cytoplasmic quality control but typically expand further afield to encompass unique...... immunologic adaptations. One of the best-appreciated manifestations of autophagy is protection against microbial invasion, but this is by no means limited to direct elimination of intracellular pathogens and includes a stratified array of nearly all principal immunologic processes. This Review summarizes...... the broad immunologic roles of autophagy. Furthermore, it uses the autophagic control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis as a paradigm to illustrate the breadth and complexity of the immune effects of autophagy....

  20. Autophagy in protists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duszenko, Michael; Ginger, Michael L; Brennand, Ana; Gualdrón-López, Melisa; Colombo, Maria-Isabel; Coombs, Graham H; Coppens, Isabelle; Jayabalasingham, Bamini; Langsley, Gordon; de Castro, Solange Lisboa; Menna-Barreto, Rubem; Mottram, Jeremy C; Navarro, Miguel; Rigden, Daniel J; Romano, Patricia S; Stoka, Veronika; Turk, Boris

    2011-01-01

    Autophagy is the degradative process by which eukaryotic cells digest their own components using acid hydrolases within the lysosome. Originally thought to function almost exclusively in providing starving cells with nutrients taken from their own cellular constituents, autophagy is in fact involved in numerous cellular events including differentiation, turnover of macromolecules and organelles and defense against parasitic invaders. During the past 10–20 years, molecular components of the autophagic machinery have been discovered, revealing a complex interactome of proteins and lipids, which, in a concerted way, induce membrane formation to engulf cellular material and target it for lysosomal degradation. Here, our emphasis is autophagy in protists. We discuss experimental and genomic data indicating that the canonical autophagy machinery characterized in animals and fungi appeared prior to the radiation of major eukaryotic lineages. Moreover, we describe how comparative bioinformatics revealed that this canonical machinery has been subject to moderation, outright loss or elaboration on multiple occasions in protist lineages, most probably as a consequence of diverse lifestyle adaptations. We also review experimental studies illustrating how several pathogenic protists either utilize autophagy mechanisms or manipulate host-cell autophagy in order to establish or maintain infection within a host. The essentiality of autophagy for the pathogenicity of many parasites, and the unique features of some of the autophagy-related proteins involved, suggest possible new targets for drug discovery. Further studies of the molecular details of autophagy in protists will undoubtedly enhance our understanding of the diversity and complexity of this cellular phenomenon and the opportunities it offers as a drug target. PMID:20962583

  1. MicroRNA regulation of Autophagy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frankel, Lisa B; Lund, Anders H

    2012-01-01

    recently contributed to our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of the autophagy machinery, yet several gaps remain in our knowledge of this process. The discovery of microRNAs (miRNAs) established a new paradigm of post-transcriptional gene regulation and during the past decade these small non......RNAs to regulation of the autophagy pathway. This regulation occurs both through specific core pathway components as well as through less well-defined mechanisms. Although this field is still in its infancy, we are beginning to understand the potential implications of these initial findings, both from a pathological...

  2. The cell on the edge of life and death: Crosstalk between autophagy and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasprowska-Liśkiewicz, Daniela

    2017-09-21

    Recently, the crosstalk between autophagy and apoptosis has attracted broader attention. Basal autophagy serves to maintain cell homeostasis, while the upregulation of this process is an element of stress response that enables the cell to survive under adverse conditions. Autophagy may also determine the fate of the cell through its interactions with cell death pathways. The protein networks that control the initiation and the execution phase of these two processes are highly interconnected. Several scenarios for the crosstalk between autophagy and apoptosis exist. In most cases, the activation of autophagy represents an attempt of the cell to cope with stress, and protects the cell from apoptosis or delays its initiation. Generally, the simultaneous activation of pro-survival and pro-death pathways is prevented by the mutual inhibitory crosstalk between autophagy and apoptosis. But in some circumstances, autophagy or the proteins of the core autophagic machinery may promote cellular demise through excessive self-digestion (so-called "autophagic cell death") or by stimulating the activation of other cell death pathways. It is controversial whether cells actually die via autophagy, which is why the term "autophagic cell death" has been under intense debate lately. This review summarizes the recent findings on the multilevel crosstalk between autophagy and apoptosis in aspects of common regulators, mutual inhibition of these processes, the stimulation of apoptosis by autophagy or autophagic proteins and finally the role of autophagy as a death-execution mechanism.

  3. Autophagy in Trypanosomatids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul A. M. Michels

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a ubiquitous eukaryotic process that also occurs in trypanosomatid parasites, protist organisms belonging to the supergroup Excavata, distinct from the supergroup Opistokontha that includes mammals and fungi. Half of the known yeast and mammalian AuTophaGy (ATG proteins were detected in trypanosomatids, although with low sequence conservation. Trypanosomatids such as Trypanosoma brucei, Trypanosoma cruzi and Leishmania spp. are responsible for serious tropical diseases in humans. The parasites are transmitted by insects and, consequently, have a complicated life cycle during which they undergo dramatic morphological and metabolic transformations to adapt to the different environments. Autophagy plays a major role during these transformations. Since inhibition of autophagy affects the transformation, survival and/or virulence of the parasites, the ATGs offer promise for development of drugs against tropical diseases. Furthermore, various trypanocidal drugs have been shown to trigger autophagy-like processes in the parasites. It is inferred that autophagy is used by the parasites in an—not always successful—attempt to cope with the stress caused by the toxic compounds.

  4. The inositol trisphosphate receptor in the control of autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criollo, Alfredo; Vicencio, José Miguel; Tasdemir, Ezgi; Maiuri, M Chiara; Lavandero, Sergio; Kroemer, Guido

    2007-01-01

    The second messenger myo-inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3)) acts on the IP(3) receptor (IP(3)R), an IP(3)-activated Ca(2+) channel of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The IP(3)R agonist IP(3) inhibits starvation-induced autophagy. The IP(3)R antagonist xestospongin B induces autophagy in human cells through a pathway that requires the obligate contribution of Beclin-1, Atg5, Atg10, Atg12 and hVps34, yet is inhibited by ER-targeted Bcl-2 or Bcl-XL, two proteins that physically interact with IP(3)R. Autophagy can also be induced by depletion of the IP(3)R by small interfering RNAs. Autophagy induction by IP(3)R blockade cannot be explained by changes in steady state levels of Ca(2+) in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the cytosol. Autophagy induction by IP(3)R blockade is effective in cells lacking the obligate mediator of ER stress IRE1. In contrast, IRE1 is required for autophagy induced by ER stress-inducing agents such a tunicamycin or thapsigargin. These findings suggest that there are several distinct pathways through which autophagy can be initiated at the level of the ER.

  5. Autophagy in plant pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-Hong; Xu, Fei; Snyder, John Hugh; Shi, Huan-Bin; Lu, Jian-Ping; Lin, Fu-Cheng

    2016-09-01

    Autophagy is a conserved cellular process that degrades cytoplasmic constituents in vacuoles. Plant pathogenic fungi develop special infection structures and/or secrete a range of enzymes to invade their plant hosts. It has been demonstrated that monitoring autophagy processes can be extremely useful in visualizing the sequence of events leading to pathogenicity of plant pathogenic fungi. In this review, we introduce the molecular mechanisms involved in autophagy. In addition, we explore the relationship between autophagy and pathogenicity in plant pathogenic fungi. Finally, we discuss the various experimental strategies available for use in the study of autophagy in plant pathogenic fungi. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Cell-Intrinsic Roles for Autophagy in Modulating CD4 T Cell Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elise Jacquin

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The catabolic process of autophagy plays important functions in inflammatory and immune responses by modulating innate immunity and adaptive immunity. Over the last decade, a cell-intrinsic role for autophagy in modulating CD4 T cell functions and differentiation was revealed. After the initial observation of autophagosomes in effector CD4 T cells, further work has shown that not only autophagy levels are modulated in CD4 T cells in response to environmental signals but also that autophagy critically affects the biology of these cells. Mouse models of autophagy deletion in CD4 T cells have indeed shown that autophagy is essential for CD4 T cell survival and homeostasis in peripheral lymphoid organs. Furthermore, autophagy is required for CD4 T cell proliferation and cytokine production in response to T cell receptor activation. Recent developments have uncovered that autophagy controls CD4 T cell differentiation and functions. While autophagy is required for the maintenance of immunosuppressive functions of regulatory T cells, it restrains the differentiation of TH9 effector cells, thus limiting their antitumor and pro-inflammatory properties. We will here discuss these findings that collectively suggest that therapeutic strategies targeting autophagy could be exploited for the treatment of cancer and inflammatory diseases.

  7. Dopamine Oxidation and Autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Muñoz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanisms involved in the neurodegenerative process of Parkinson's disease remain unclear. Currently, there is a general agreement that mitochondrial dysfunction, α-synuclein aggregation, oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, and impaired protein degradation are involved in the neurodegeneration of dopaminergic neurons containing neuromelanin in Parkinson's disease. Aminochrome has been proposed to play an essential role in the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons containing neuromelanin by inducing mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, the formation of neurotoxic α-synuclein protofibrils, and impaired protein degradation. Here, we discuss the relationship between the oxidation of dopamine to aminochrome, the precursor of neuromelanin, autophagy dysfunction in dopaminergic neurons containing neuromelanin, and the role of dopamine oxidation to aminochrome in autophagy dysfunction in dopaminergic neurons. Aminochrome induces the following: (i the formation of α-synuclein protofibrils that inactivate chaperone-mediated autophagy; (ii the formation of adducts with α- and β-tubulin, which induce the aggregation of the microtubules required for the fusion of autophagy vacuoles and lysosomes.

  8. DNA damage and autophagy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez-Rocha, Humberto; Garcia-Garcia, Aracely; Panayiotidis, Mihalis I.; Franco, Rodrigo

    2011-01-01

    Both exogenous and endogenous agents are a threat to DNA integrity. Exogenous environmental agents such as ultraviolet (UV) and ionizing radiation, genotoxic chemicals and endogenous byproducts of metabolism including reactive oxygen species can cause alterations in DNA structure (DNA damage). Unrepaired DNA damage has been linked to a variety of human disorders including cancer and neurodegenerative disease. Thus, efficient mechanisms to detect DNA lesions, signal their presence and promote their repair have been evolved in cells. If DNA is effectively repaired, DNA damage response is inactivated and normal cell functioning resumes. In contrast, when DNA lesions cannot be removed, chronic DNA damage triggers specific cell responses such as cell death and senescence. Recently, DNA damage has been shown to induce autophagy, a cellular catabolic process that maintains a balance between synthesis, degradation, and recycling of cellular components. But the exact mechanisms by which DNA damage triggers autophagy are unclear. More importantly, the role of autophagy in the DNA damage response and cellular fate is unknown. In this review we analyze evidence that supports a role for autophagy as an integral part of the DNA damage response.

  9. Autophagy in Measles Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurore Rozières

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a biological process that helps cells to recycle obsolete cellular components and which greatly contributes to maintaining cellular integrity in response to environmental stress factors. Autophagy is also among the first lines of cellular defense against invading microorganisms, including viruses. The autophagic destruction of invading pathogens, a process referred to as xenophagy, involves cytosolic autophagy receptors, such as p62/SQSTM1 (Sequestosome 1 or NDP52/CALCOCO2 (Nuclear Dot 52 KDa Protein/Calcium Binding And Coiled-Coil Domain 2, which bind to microbial components and target them towards growing autophagosomes for degradation. However, most, if not all, infectious viruses have evolved molecular tricks to escape from xenophagy. Many viruses even use autophagy, part of the autophagy pathway or some autophagy-associated proteins, to improve their infectious potential. In this regard, the measles virus, responsible for epidemic measles, has a unique interface with autophagy as the virus can induce multiple rounds of autophagy in the course of infection. These successive waves of autophagy result from distinct molecular pathways and seem associated with anti- and/or pro-measles virus consequences. In this review, we describe what the autophagy–measles virus interplay has taught us about both the biology of the virus and the mechanistic orchestration of autophagy.

  10. Autophagy in C. elegans development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmisano, Nicholas J; Meléndez, Alicia

    2018-04-27

    Autophagy involves the sequestration of cytoplasmic contents in a double-membrane structure referred to as the autophagosome and the degradation of its contents upon delivery to lysosomes. Autophagy activity has a role in multiple biological processes during the development of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Basal levels of autophagy are required to remove aggregate prone proteins, paternal mitochondria, and spermatid-specific membranous organelles. During larval development, autophagy is required for the remodeling that occurs during dauer development, and autophagy can selectively degrade components of the miRNA-induced silencing complex, and modulate miRNA-mediated silencing. Basal levels of autophagy are important in synapse formation and in the germ line, to promote the proliferation of proliferating stem cells. Autophagy activity is also required for the efficient removal of apoptotic cell corpses by promoting phagosome maturation. Finally, autophagy is also involved in lipid homeostasis and in the aging process. In this review, we first describe the molecular complexes involved in the process of autophagy, its regulation, and mechanisms for cargo recognition. In the second section, we discuss the developmental contexts where autophagy has been shown to be important. Studies in C. elegans provide valuable insights into the physiological relevance of this process during metazoan development. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Distinct temporal requirements for autophagy and the proteasome in yeast meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Fu-ping; Guo, Yue-shuai; Hu, Yang; Liu, Wei-xiao; Wang, Qian; Wang, Yuan-ting; Yu, Hai-Yan; Tang, Chao-ming; Yang, Jun; Zhou, Tao; Xie, Zhi-ping; Sha, Jia-hao; Guo, Xuejiang; Li, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Meiosis is a special type of cellular renovation that involves 2 successive cell divisions and a single round of DNA replication. Two major degradation systems, the autophagy-lysosome and the ubiquitin-proteasome, are involved in meiosis, but their roles have yet to be elucidated. Here we show that autophagy mainly affects the initiation of meiosis but not the nuclear division. Autophagy works not only by serving as a dynamic recycling system but also by eliminating some negative meiotic regulators such as Ego4 (Ynr034w-a). In a quantitative proteomics study, the proteasome was found to be significantly upregulated during meiotic divisions. We found that proteasomal activity is essential to the 2 successive meiotic nuclear divisions but not for the initiation of meiosis. Our study defines the roles of autophagy and the proteasome in meiosis: Autophagy mainly affects the initiation of meiosis, whereas the proteasome mainly affects the 2 successive meiotic divisions.

  12. Restoration of autophagy in endothelial cells from patients with diabetes mellitus improves nitric oxide signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetterman, Jessica L; Holbrook, Monica; Flint, Nir; Feng, Bihua; Bretón-Romero, Rosa; Linder, Erika A; Berk, Brittany D; Duess, Mai-Ann; Farb, Melissa G; Gokce, Noyan; Shirihai, Orian S; Hamburg, Naomi M; Vita, Joseph A

    2016-04-01

    Endothelial dysfunction contributes to cardiovascular disease in diabetes mellitus. Autophagy is a multistep mechanism for the removal of damaged proteins and organelles from the cell. Under diabetic conditions, inadequate autophagy promotes cellular dysfunction and insulin resistance in non-vascular tissue. We hypothesized that impaired autophagy contributes to endothelial dysfunction in diabetes mellitus. We measured autophagy markers and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation in freshly isolated endothelial cells from diabetic subjects (n = 45) and non-diabetic controls (n = 41). p62 levels were higher in cells from diabetics (34.2 ± 3.6 vs. 20.0 ± 1.6, P = 0.001), indicating reduced autophagic flux. Bafilomycin inhibited insulin-induced activation of eNOS (64.7 ± 22% to -47.8 ± 8%, P = 0.04) in cells from controls, confirming that intact autophagy is necessary for eNOS signaling. In endothelial cells from diabetics, activation of autophagy with spermidine restored eNOS activation, suggesting that impaired autophagy contributes to endothelial dysfunction (P = 0.01). Indicators of autophagy initiation including the number of LC3-bound puncta and beclin 1 expression were similar in diabetics and controls, whereas an autophagy terminal phase indicator, the lysosomal protein Lamp2a, was higher in diabetics. In endothelial cells under diabetic conditions, the beneficial effect of spermidine on eNOS activation was blocked by autophagy inhibitors bafilomycin or 3-methyladenine. Blocking the terminal stage of autophagy with bafilomycin increased p62 (P = 0.01) in cells from diabetics to a lesser extent than in cells from controls (P = 0.04), suggesting ongoing, but inadequate autophagic clearance. Inadequate autophagy contributes to endothelial dysfunction in patients with diabetes and may be a target for therapy of diabetic vascular disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Regulation of Autophagy by Kinases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sridharan, Savitha; Jain, Kirti; Basu, Alakananda

    2011-01-01

    Autophagy is a process of self-degradation that maintains cellular viability during periods of metabolic stress. Although autophagy is considered a survival mechanism when faced with cellular stress, extensive autophagy can also lead to cell death. Aberrations in autophagy are associated with several diseases, including cancer. Therapeutic exploitation of this process requires a clear understanding of its regulation. Although the core molecular components involved in the execution of autophagy are well studied there is limited information on how cellular signaling pathways, particularly kinases, regulate this complex process. Protein kinases are integral to the autophagy process. Atg1, the first autophagy-related protein identified, is a serine/threonine kinase and it is regulated by another serine/threonine kinase mTOR. Emerging studies suggest the participation of many different kinases in regulating various components/steps of this catabolic process. This review focuses on the regulation of autophagy by several kinases with particular emphasis on serine/threonine protein kinases such as mTOR, AMP-activated protein kinase, Akt, mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK, p38 and JNK) and protein kinase C that are often deregulated in cancer and are important therapeutic targets

  14. Regulation of Autophagy by Kinases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sridharan, Savitha; Jain, Kirti; Basu, Alakananda, E-mail: alakananda.basu@unthsc.edu [Department of Molecular Biology and Immunology, Institute for Cancer Research, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX 76107 (United States)

    2011-06-09

    Autophagy is a process of self-degradation that maintains cellular viability during periods of metabolic stress. Although autophagy is considered a survival mechanism when faced with cellular stress, extensive autophagy can also lead to cell death. Aberrations in autophagy are associated with several diseases, including cancer. Therapeutic exploitation of this process requires a clear understanding of its regulation. Although the core molecular components involved in the execution of autophagy are well studied there is limited information on how cellular signaling pathways, particularly kinases, regulate this complex process. Protein kinases are integral to the autophagy process. Atg1, the first autophagy-related protein identified, is a serine/threonine kinase and it is regulated by another serine/threonine kinase mTOR. Emerging studies suggest the participation of many different kinases in regulating various components/steps of this catabolic process. This review focuses on the regulation of autophagy by several kinases with particular emphasis on serine/threonine protein kinases such as mTOR, AMP-activated protein kinase, Akt, mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK, p38 and JNK) and protein kinase C that are often deregulated in cancer and are important therapeutic targets.

  15. Regulation of Autophagy by Kinases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridharan, Savitha; Jain, Kirti; Basu, Alakananda

    2011-01-01

    Autophagy is a process of self-degradation that maintains cellular viability during periods of metabolic stress. Although autophagy is considered a survival mechanism when faced with cellular stress, extensive autophagy can also lead to cell death. Aberrations in autophagy are associated with several diseases, including cancer. Therapeutic exploitation of this process requires a clear understanding of its regulation. Although the core molecular components involved in the execution of autophagy are well studied there is limited information on how cellular signaling pathways, particularly kinases, regulate this complex process. Protein kinases are integral to the autophagy process. Atg1, the first autophagy-related protein identified, is a serine/threonine kinase and it is regulated by another serine/threonine kinase mTOR. Emerging studies suggest the participation of many different kinases in regulating various components/steps of this catabolic process. This review focuses on the regulation of autophagy by several kinases with particular emphasis on serine/threonine protein kinases such as mTOR, AMP-activated protein kinase, Akt, mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK, p38 and JNK) and protein kinase C that are often deregulated in cancer and are important therapeutic targets. PMID:24212825

  16. Regulation of Autophagy by Kinases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savitha Sridharan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a process of self-degradation that maintains cellular viability during periods of metabolic stress. Although autophagy is considered a survival mechanism when faced with cellular stress, extensive autophagy can also lead to cell death. Aberrations in autophagy are associated with several diseases, including cancer. Therapeutic exploitation of this process requires a clear understanding of its regulation. Although the core molecular components involved in the execution of autophagy are well studied there is limited information on how cellular signaling pathways, particularly kinases, regulate this complex process. Protein kinases are integral to the autophagy process. Atg1, the first autophagy-related protein identified, is a serine/threonine kinase and it is regulated by another serine/threonine kinase mTOR. Emerging studies suggest the participation of many different kinases in regulating various components/steps of this catabolic process. This review focuses on the regulation of autophagy by several kinases with particular emphasis on serine/threonine protein kinases such as mTOR, AMP-activated kinase, Akt, mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK, p38 and JNK and protein kinase C that are often deregulated in cancer and are important therapeutic targets.

  17. MAP17, a ROS-dependent oncogene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carnero, Amancio

    2012-01-01

    MAP17 is a small 17 kDa non-glycosylated membrane protein previously identified as being overexpressed in carcinomas. Breast tumor cells that overexpress MAP17 show an increased tumoral phenotype with enhanced proliferative capabilities both in the presence or the absence of contact inhibition, decreased apoptotic sensitivity, and increased migration. MAP17-expressing clones also grow better in nude mice. The increased malignant cell behavior induced by MAP17 is associated with an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and the treatment of MAP17-expressing cells with antioxidants results in a reduction in the tumorigenic properties of these cells. The MAP17-dependent increase in ROS and tumorigenesis relies on its PDZ-binding domain because disruption of this sequence by point mutations abolishes the ability of MAP17 to enhance ROS production and tumorigenesis. MAP17 is overexpressed in a great variety of human carcinomas, including breast tumors. Immunohistochemical analysis of MAP17 during cancer progression demonstrates that overexpression of the protein strongly correlates with tumoral progression. Generalized MAP17 overexpression in human carcinomas indicates that MAP17 can be a good marker for tumorigenesis and, especially, for malignant progression.

  18. Autophagy and neurodegenerative disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Evangelia Kesidou; Roza Lagoudaki; Olga Touloumi; Kyriaki-Nefeli Poulatsidou; Constantina Simeonidou

    2013-01-01

    Accumulation of aberrant proteins and inclusion bodies are hallmarks in most neurodegenerative diseases. Consequently, these aggregates within neurons lead to toxic effects, overproduction of reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress. Autophagy is a significant intracel ular mechanism that removes damaged organelles and misfolded proteins in order to maintain cel homeostasis. Excessive or insufficient autophagic activity in neurons leads to altered homeostasis and influences their survival rate, causing neurodegeneration. The review article provides an update of the role of autophagic process in representative chronic and acute neurodegenerative disorders.

  19. Chemioxyexcitation (delta pO2/ROS)-dependent release of IL-1 beta, IL-6 and TNF-alpha: evidence of cytokines as oxygen-sensitive mediators in the alveolar epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, J J; Safieh-Garabedian, B; Saadé, N E; Kanaan, S A; Land, S C

    2001-02-07

    The signalling mechanisms in oxidative stress mediated by cytokines in the perinatal alveolar epithelium are not well known. In an in vitro model of fetal alveolar type II epithelial cells, we investigated the profile of cytokines in response to ascending Deltap O(2)regimen (oxyexcitation). The peak of TNF-alpha (4 h) preceded IL-1beta and IL-6 (6-9 h), indicating a positive feedback autocrine loop confirmed by exogenous rmTNF-alpha. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced a dose-dependent release of cytokines, an effect specifically obliterated by selective antioxidants of the hydroxyl radical (*OH) and superoxide anion (O(2)-). Actinomycin and cycloheximide blocked the induced production of cytokines, implicating transcriptional and translational control. Whilst the dismutating enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase were ineffective in reducing ROS-induced cytokines, MnP, a cell-permeating SOD mimetic, abrogated xanthine/xanthine oxidase-dependent cytokine release. Desferrioxamine mesylate, which inhibits the iron-catalysed generation of *OH via the Fenton reaction, exhibited a mild effect on the release of cytokines. Dynamic variation in alveolar p O(2)constitutes a potential signalling mechanism within the perinatal lung allowing upregulation of cytokines in an ROS-dependent manner. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  20. Knockdown of hepatoma-derived growth factor-related protein-3 induces apoptosis of H1299 cells via ROS-dependent and p53-independent NF-κB activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Hong Shik; Baek, Jeong-Hwa; Yim, Ji-Hye; Lee, Su-Jae; Lee, Chang-Woo; Song, Jie-Young; Um, Hong-Duck; Park, Jong Kuk; Park, In-Chul; Hwang, Sang-Gu

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • HRP-3 is a radiation- and anticancer drug-responsive protein in H1299 cells. • Depletion of HRP-3 induces apoptosis of radio- and chemoresistant H1299 cells. • Depletion of HRP-3 promotes ROS generation via inhibition of the Nrf2/HO-1 pathway. • ROS generation enhances NF-κB activity, which acts as an upstream signal in the c-Myc/Noxa apoptotic pathway. - Abstract: We previously identified hepatoma-derived growth factor-related protein-3 (HRP-3) as a radioresistant biomarker in p53 wild-type A549 cells and found that p53-dependent induction of the PUMA pathway was a critical event in regulating the radioresistant phenotype. Here, we found that HRP-3 knockdown regulates the radioresistance of p53-null H1299 cells through a distinctly different molecular mechanism. HRP-3 depletion was sufficient to cause apoptosis of H1299 cells by generating substantial levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) through inhibition of the Nrf2/HO-1 antioxidant pathway. Subsequent, ROS-dependent and p53-independent NF-κB activation stimulated expression of c-Myc and Noxa proteins, thereby inducing the apoptotic machinery. Our results thus extend the range of targets for the development of new drugs to treat both p53 wild-type or p53-null radioresistant lung cancer cells

  1. Autophagy: not good OR bad, but good AND bad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altman, Brian J; Rathmell, Jeffrey C

    2009-05-01

    Autophagy is a well-established mechanism to degrade intracellular components and provide a nutrient source to promote survival of cells in metabolic distress. Such stress can be caused by a lack of available nutrients or by insufficient rates of nutrient uptake. Indeed, growth factor deprivation leads to internalization and degradation of nutrient transporters, leaving cells with limited means to access extracellular nutrients even when plentiful.This loss of growth factor signaling and extracellular nutrients ultimately leads to apoptosis, but also activates autophagy, which may degrade intracellular components and provide fuel for mitochondrial bioenergetics. The precise metabolic role of autophagy and how it intersects with the apoptotic pathways in growth factor withdrawal, however, has been uncertain. Our recent findings ingrowth factor-deprived hematopoietic cells show that autophagy can simultaneously contribute to cell metabolism and initiate a pathway to sensitize cells to apoptotic death. This pathway may promote tissue homeostasis by ensuring that only cells with high resistance to apoptosis may utilize autophagy as a survival mechanism when growth factors are limiting and nutrient uptake decreases.

  2. Cytotoxic Autophagy in Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khushboo Sharma

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a process of cellular self-digestion, whereby the cell degrades subcellular materials in order to generate energy and metabolic precursors in order to prolong survival, classically under conditions of nutrient deprivation. Autophagy can also involve the degradation of damaged or aged organelles, and misfolded or damaged proteins to eliminate these components that might otherwise be deleterious to cellular survival. Consequently, autophagy has generally been considered a prosurvival response. Many, if not most chemotherapeutic drugs and radiation also promote autophagy, which is generally considered a cytoprotective response, in that its inhibition frequently promotes apoptotic cells death. Furthermore, it has been shown that conventional chemotherapeutic drugs and radiation alone rarely induce a form of autophagy that leads to cell death. However, there are multiple examples in the literature where newer chemotherapeutic agents, drug combinations or drugs in combination with radiation promote autophagic cell death. This review will describe autophagic cell death induced in breast tumor cells, lung cancer cells as well as glioblastoma, demonstrating that it cannot be concluded that stress induced autophagy is, of necessity, cytoprotective in function.

  3. Autophagy in DNA Damage Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Czarny

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA damage response (DDR involves DNA repair, cell cycle regulation and apoptosis, but autophagy is also suggested to play a role in DDR. Autophagy can be activated in response to DNA-damaging agents, but the exact mechanism underlying this activation is not fully understood, although it is suggested that it involves the inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1. mTORC1 represses autophagy via phosphorylation of the ULK1/2–Atg13–FIP200 complex thus preventing maturation of pre-autophagosomal structures. When DNA damage occurs, it is recognized by some proteins or their complexes, such as poly(ADPribose polymerase 1 (PARP-1, Mre11–Rad50–Nbs1 (MRN complex or FOXO3, which activate repressors of mTORC1. SQSTM1/p62 is one of the proteins whose levels are regulated via autophagic degradation. Inhibition of autophagy by knockout of FIP200 results in upregulation of SQSTM1/p62, enhanced DNA damage and less efficient damage repair. Mitophagy, one form of autophagy involved in the selective degradation of mitochondria, may also play role in DDR. It degrades abnormal mitochondria and can either repress or activate apoptosis, but the exact mechanism remains unknown. There is a need to clarify the role of autophagy in DDR, as this process may possess several important biomedical applications, involving also cancer therapy.

  4. Autophagy is required for efficient meiosis progression and proper meiotic chromosome segregation in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuhara, Hirotada; Yamamoto, Ayumu

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a conserved intracellular degradation system, which contributes to development and differentiation of various organisms. Yeast cells undergo meiosis under nitrogen-starved conditions and require autophagy for meiosis initiation. However, the precise roles of autophagy in meiosis remain unclear. Here, we show that autophagy is required for efficient meiosis progression and proper meiotic chromosome segregation in fission yeast. Autophagy-defective strains bearing a mutation in the autophagy core factor gene atg1, atg7, or atg14 exhibit deformed nuclear structures during meiosis. These mutant cells require an extracellular nitrogen supply for meiosis progression following their entry into meiosis and show delayed meiosis progression even with a nitrogen supply. In addition, they show frequent chromosome dissociation from the spindle together with spindle overextension, forming extra nuclei. Furthermore, Aurora kinase, which regulates chromosome segregation and spindle elongation, is significantly increased at the centromere and spindle in the mutant cells. Aurora kinase down-regulation eliminated delayed initiation of meiosis I and II, chromosome dissociation, and spindle overextension, indicating that increased Aurora kinase activity may cause these aberrances in the mutant cells. Our findings show a hitherto unrecognized relationship of autophagy with the nuclear structure, regulation of cell cycle progression, and chromosome segregation in meiosis. © 2015 The Molecular Biology Society of Japan and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  5. AMDE-1 is a dual function chemical for autophagy activation and inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Li

    Full Text Available Autophagy is the process by which cytosolic components and organelles are delivered to the lysosome for degradation. Autophagy plays important roles in cellular homeostasis and disease pathogenesis. Small chemical molecules that can modulate autophagy activity may have pharmacological value for treating diseases. Using a GFP-LC3-based high content screening assay we identified a novel chemical that is able to modulate autophagy at both initiation and degradation levels. This molecule, termed as Autophagy Modulator with Dual Effect-1 (AMDE-1, triggered autophagy in an Atg5-dependent manner, recruiting Atg16 to the pre-autophagosomal site and causing LC3 lipidation. AMDE-1 induced autophagy through the activation of AMPK, which inactivated mTORC1 and activated ULK1. AMDE-1did not affect MAP kinase, JNK or oxidative stress signaling for autophagy induction. Surprisingly, treatment with AMDE-1 resulted in impairment in autophagic flux and inhibition of long-lived protein degradation. This inhibition was correlated with a reduction in lysosomal degradation capacity but not with autophagosome-lysosome fusion. Further analysis indicated that AMDE-1 caused a reduction in lysosome acidity and lysosomal proteolytic activity, suggesting that it suppressed general lysosome function. AMDE-1 thus also impaired endocytosis-mediated EGF receptor degradation. The dual effects of AMDE-1 on autophagy induction and lysosomal degradation suggested that its net effect would likely lead to autophagic stress and lysosome dysfunction, and therefore cell death. Indeed, AMDE-1 triggered necroptosis and was preferentially cytotoxic to cancer cells. In conclusion, this study identified a new class of autophagy modulators with dual effects, which can be explored for potential uses in cancer therapy.

  6. Autophagy in human embryonic stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tra, Thien; Gong, Lan; Kao, Lin-Pin; Li, Xue-Lei; Grandela, Catarina; Devenish, Rodney J.; Wolvetang, Ernst; Prescott, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Autophagy (macroautophagy) is a degradative process that involves the sequestration of cytosolic material including organelles into double membrane vesicles termed autophagosomes for delivery to the lysosome. Autophagy is essential for preimplantation development of mouse embryos and cavitation of

  7. Enhanced myometrial autophagy in postpartum uterine involution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keng-Fu Hsu

    2014-09-01

    Conclusion: Autophagy of myocytes may play an important role in uterine involution. These results have implications for our understanding of myometrial functional adaptations during pregnancy and the physiological role of autophagy in the uterine remodeling events in the postpartum period.

  8. Elaborating the Role of Natural Products-Induced Autophagy in Cancer Treatment: Achievements and Artifacts in the State of the Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a homeostatic process that is highly conserved across different types of mammalian cells. Autophagy is able to relieve tumor cell from nutrient and oxidative stress during the rapid expansion of cancer. Excessive and sustained autophagy may lead to cell death and tumor shrinkage. It was shown in literature that many anticancer natural compounds and extracts could initiate autophagy in tumor cells. As summarized in this review, the tumor suppressive action of natural products-induced autophagy may lead to cell senescence, provoke apoptosis-independent cell death, and complement apoptotic cell death by robust or target-specific mechanisms. In some cases, natural products-induced autophagy could protect tumor cells from apoptotic death. Technical variations in detecting autophagy affect data quality, and study focus should be made on elaborating the role of autophagy in deciding cell fate. In vivo study monitoring of autophagy in cancer treatment is expected to be the future direction. The clinical-relevant action of autophagy-inducing natural products should be highlighted in future study. As natural products are an important resource in discovery of lead compound of anticancer drug, study on the role of autophagy in tumor suppressive effect of natural products continues to be necessary and emerging.

  9. Exploring autophagy with Gene Ontology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT Autophagy is a fundamental cellular process that is well conserved among eukaryotes. It is one of the strategies that cells use to catabolize substances in a controlled way. Autophagy is used for recycling cellular components, responding to cellular stresses and ridding cells of foreign material. Perturbations in autophagy have been implicated in a number of pathological conditions such as neurodegeneration, cardiac disease and cancer. The growing knowledge about autophagic mechanisms needs to be collected in a computable and shareable format to allow its use in data representation and interpretation. The Gene Ontology (GO) is a freely available resource that describes how and where gene products function in biological systems. It consists of 3 interrelated structured vocabularies that outline what gene products do at the biochemical level, where they act in a cell and the overall biological objectives to which their actions contribute. It also consists of ‘annotations’ that associate gene products with the terms. Here we describe how we represent autophagy in GO, how we create and define terms relevant to autophagy researchers and how we interrelate those terms to generate a coherent view of the process, therefore allowing an interoperable description of its biological aspects. We also describe how annotation of gene products with GO terms improves data analysis and interpretation, hence bringing a significant benefit to this field of study. PMID:29455577

  10. NADPH oxidase/ROS-dependent PYK2 activation is involved in TNF-α-induced matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression in rat heart-derived H9c2 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Chuen-Mao; Lee, I-Ta; Hsu, Ru-Chun; Chi, Pei-Ling; Hsiao, Li-Der

    2013-01-01

    MMP-9 expression via a NADPH oxidase/ROS-dependent NF-κB signaling. • TNF-α activates MAPK phosphorylation through NADPH oxidase/ROS generation

  11. Stress-induced self-cannibalism: on the regulation of autophagy by endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deegan, Shane; Saveljeva, Svetlana; Gorman, Adrienne M; Samali, Afshin

    2013-07-01

    Macroautophagy (autophagy) is a cellular catabolic process which can be described as a self-cannibalism. It serves as an essential protective response during conditions of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress through the bulk removal and degradation of unfolded proteins and damaged organelles; in particular, mitochondria (mitophagy) and ER (reticulophagy). Autophagy is genetically regulated and the autophagic machinery facilitates removal of damaged cell components and proteins; however, if the cell stress is acute or irreversible, cell death ensues. Despite these advances in the field, very little is known about how autophagy is initiated and how the autophagy machinery is transcriptionally regulated in response to ER stress. Some three dozen autophagy genes have been shown to be required for the correct assembly and function of the autophagic machinery; however; very little is known about how these genes are regulated by cellular stress. Here, we will review current knowledge regarding how ER stress and the unfolded protein response (UPR) induce autophagy, including description of the different autophagy-related genes which are regulated by the UPR.

  12. Ordered bulk degradation via autophagy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dengjel, Jörn; Kristensen, Anders Riis; Andersen, Jens S

    2008-01-01

    During amino acid starvation, cells undergo macroautophagy which is regarded as an unspecific bulk degradation process. Lately, more and more organelle-specific autophagy subtypes such as reticulophagy, mitophagy and ribophagy have been described and it could be shown, depending on the experimental...... at proteasomal and lysosomal degradation ample cross-talk between the two degradation pathways became evident. Degradation via autophagy appeared to be ordered and regulated at the protein complex/organelle level. This raises several important questions such as: can macroautophagy itself be specific and what...

  13. Autophagy, lipophagy and lysosomal lipid storage disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Carl; Martinez-Lopez, Nuria; Otten, Elsje G; Carroll, Bernadette; Maetzel, Dorothea; Singh, Rajat; Sarkar, Sovan; Korolchuk, Viktor I

    2016-04-01

    Autophagy is a catabolic process with an essential function in the maintenance of cellular and tissue homeostasis. It is primarily recognised for its role in the degradation of dysfunctional proteins and unwanted organelles, however in recent years the range of autophagy substrates has also been extended to lipids. Degradation of lipids via autophagy is termed lipophagy. The ability of autophagy to contribute to the maintenance of lipo-homeostasis becomes particularly relevant in the context of genetic lysosomal storage disorders where perturbations of autophagic flux have been suggested to contribute to the disease aetiology. Here we review recent discoveries of the molecular mechanisms mediating lipid turnover by the autophagy pathways. We further focus on the relevance of autophagy, and specifically lipophagy, to the disease mechanisms. Moreover, autophagy is also discussed as a potential therapeutic target in several key lysosomal storage disorders. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Modulation of pathogen recognition by autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Eun eOh

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is an ancient biological process for maintaining cellular homeostasis by degradation of long-lived cytosolic proteins and organelles. Recent studies demonstrated that autophagy is availed by immune cells to regulate innate immunity. On the one hand, cells exert direct effector function by degrading intracellular pathogens; on the other hand, autophagy modulates pathogen recognition and downstream signaling for innate immune responses. Pathogen recognition via pattern recognition receptors induces autophagy. The function of phagocytic cells is enhanced by recruitment of autophagy-related proteins. Moreover, autophagy acts as a delivery system for viral replication complexes to migrate to the endosomal compartments where virus sensing occurs. In another case, key molecules of the autophagic pathway have been found to negatively regulate immune signaling, thus preventing aberrant activation of cytokine production and consequent immune responses. In this review, we focus on the recent advances in the role of autophagy in pathogen recognition and modulation of innate immune responses.

  15. Neem oil limonoids induces p53-independent apoptosis and autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Pragya; Yadav, Neelu; Lella, Ravi; Schneider, Andrea; Jones, Anthony; Marlowe, Timothy; Lovett, Gabrielle; O'Loughlin, Kieran; Minderman, Hans; Gogada, Raghu; Chandra, Dhyan

    2012-11-01

    Azadirachta indica, commonly known as neem, has a wide range of medicinal properties. Neem extracts and its purified products have been examined for induction of apoptosis in multiple cancer cell types; however, its underlying mechanisms remain undefined. We show that neem oil (i.e., neem), which contains majority of neem limonoids including azadirachtin, induced apoptotic and autophagic cell death. Gene silencing demonstrated that caspase cascade was initiated by the activation of caspase-9, whereas caspase-8 was also activated late during neem-induced apoptosis. Pretreatment of cancer cells with pan caspase inhibitor, z-VAD inhibited activities of both initiator caspases (e.g., caspase-8 and -9) and executioner caspase-3. Neem induced the release of cytochrome c and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) from mitochondria, suggesting the involvement of both caspase-dependent and AIF-mediated apoptosis. p21 deficiency caused an increase in caspase activities at lower doses of neem, whereas p53 deficiency did not modulate neem-induced caspase activation. Additionally, neem treatment resulted in the accumulation of LC3-II in cancer cells, suggesting the involvement of autophagy in neem-induced cancer cell death. Low doses of autophagy inhibitors (i.e., 3-methyladenine and LY294002) did not prevent accumulation of neem-induced LC3-II in cancer cells. Silencing of ATG5 or Beclin-1 further enhanced neem-induced cell death. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) or autophagy inhibitors increased neem-induced caspase-3 activation and inhibition of caspases enhanced neem-induced autophagy. Together, for the first time, we demonstrate that neem induces caspase-dependent and AIF-mediated apoptosis, and autophagy in cancer cells.

  16. Neem oil limonoids induces p53-independent apoptosis and autophagy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Dhyan

    2012-01-01

    Azadirachta indica, commonly known as neem, has a wide range of medicinal properties. Neem extracts and its purified products have been examined for induction of apoptosis in multiple cancer cell types; however, its underlying mechanisms remain undefined. We show that neem oil (i.e., neem), which contains majority of neem limonoids including azadirachtin, induced apoptotic and autophagic cell death. Gene silencing demonstrated that caspase cascade was initiated by the activation of caspase-9, whereas caspase-8 was also activated late during neem-induced apoptosis. Pretreatment of cancer cells with pan caspase inhibitor, z-VAD inhibited activities of both initiator caspases (e.g., caspase-8 and -9) and executioner caspase-3. Neem induced the release of cytochrome c and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) from mitochondria, suggesting the involvement of both caspase-dependent and AIF-mediated apoptosis. p21 deficiency caused an increase in caspase activities at lower doses of neem, whereas p53 deficiency did not modulate neem-induced caspase activation. Additionally, neem treatment resulted in the accumulation of LC3-II in cancer cells, suggesting the involvement of autophagy in neem-induced cancer cell death. Low doses of autophagy inhibitors (i.e., 3-methyladenine and LY294002) did not prevent accumulation of neem-induced LC3-II in cancer cells. Silencing of ATG5 or Beclin-1 further enhanced neem-induced cell death. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) or autophagy inhibitors increased neem-induced caspase-3 activation and inhibition of caspases enhanced neem-induced autophagy. Together, for the first time, we demonstrate that neem induces caspase-dependent and AIF-mediated apoptosis, and autophagy in cancer cells. PMID:22915764

  17. Exocyst and autophagy-related membrane trafficking in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecenková, Tamara; Markovic, Vedrana; Sabol, Peter; Kulich, Ivan; Žárský, Viktor

    2017-12-18

    Endomembrane traffic in eukaryotic cells functions partially as a means of communication; delivery of membrane in one direction has to be balanced with a reduction at the other end. This effect is typically the case during the defence against pathogens. To combat pathogens, cellular growth and differentiation are suppressed, while endomembrane traffic is poised towards limiting the pathogen attack. The octameric exocyst vesicle-tethering complex was originally discovered as a factor facilitating vesicle-targeting and vesicle-plasma membrane (PM) fusion during exocytosis prior to and possibly during SNARE complex formation. Interestingly, it was recently implicated both in animals and plants in autophagy membrane traffic. In animal cells, the exocyst is integrated into the mTOR-regulated energy metabolism stress/starvation pathway, participating in the formation and especially initiation of an autophagosome. In plants, the first functional link was to autophagy-related anthocyanin import to the vacuole and to starvation. In this concise review, we summarize the current knowledge of exocyst functions in autophagy and defence in plants that might involve unconventional secretion and compare it with animal conditions. Formation of different exocyst complexes during undisturbed cell growth, as opposed to periods of cellular stress reactions involving autophagy, might contribute to the coordination of endomembrane trafficking pathways. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Nobel Prize Honors Autophagy Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Japanese cell biologist Yoshinori Ohsumi, PhD, was awarded this year's Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his discovery of autophagy. His groundbreaking studies in yeast cells illuminated how cells break down and recycle damaged material, a process that is critical to the survival of both normal cells and some cancer cells. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  19. Human Papilloma Virus and Autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Mattoscio

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Human papilloma viruses (HPVs are a group of double-stranded DNA viruses known to be the primary cause of cervical cancer. In addition, evidence has now established their role in non-melanoma skin cancers, head and neck cancer (HNC, and the development of other anogenital malignancies. The prevalence of HPV-related HNC, in particular oropharyngeal cancers, is rapidly increasing, foreseeing that HPV-positive oropharyngeal cancers will outnumber uterine cervical cancers in the next 15–20 years. Therefore, despite the successful advent of vaccines originally licensed for cervical cancer prevention, HPV burden is still very high, and a better understanding of HPV biology is urgently needed. Autophagy is the physiological cellular route that accounts for removal, degradation, and recycling of damaged organelles, proteins, and lipids in lysosomal vacuoles. In addition to this scavenger function, autophagy plays a fundamental role during viral infections and cancers and is, therefore, frequently exploited by viruses to their own benefit. Recently, a link between HPV and autophagy has clearly emerged, leading to the conceivable development of novel anti-viral strategies aimed at restraining HPV infectivity. Here, recent findings on how oncogenic HPV16 usurp autophagy are described, highlighting similarities and differences with mechanisms adopted by other oncoviruses.

  20. Diabetic retinopathy pathogenesis and the ameliorating effects of melatonin; involvement of autophagy, inflammation and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehdashtian, Ehsan; Mehrzadi, Saeed; Yousefi, Bahman; Hosseinzadeh, Azam; Reiter, Russel J; Safa, Majid; Ghaznavi, Habib; Naseripour, Masood

    2018-01-15

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR), a microvascular complication of diabetes mellitus (DM), remains as one of the major causes of vision loss worldwide. The release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and the adhesion of leukocytes to retinal capillaries are initial events in DR development. Inflammation, ER stress, oxidative stress and autophagy are major causative factors involved in the pathogenesis of DR. Diabetes associated hyperglycemia leads to mitochondrial electron transport chain dysfunction culminating in a rise in ROS generation. Since mitochondria are the major source of ROS production, oxidative stress induced by mitochondrial dysfunction also contributes to the development of diabetic retinopathy. Autophagy increases in the retina of diabetic patients and is regulated by ER stress, oxidative stress and inflammation-related pathways. Autophagy functions as a double-edged sword in DR. Under mild stress, autophagic activity can lead to cell survival while during severe stress, dysregulated autophagy results in massive cell death and may have a role in initiation and exacerbation of DR. Melatonin and its metabolites play protective roles against inflammation, ER stress and oxidative stress due to their direct free radical scavenger activities and indirect antioxidant activity via the stimulation antioxidant enzymes including glutathione reductase, glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and catalase. Melatonin also acts as a cell survival agent by modulating autophagy in various cell types and under different conditions through amelioration of oxidative stress, ER stress and inflammation. Herein, we review the possible effects of melatonin on diabetic retinopathy, focusing on its ability to regulate autophagy processes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. p53 inhibits autophagy by interacting with the human ortholog of yeast Atg17, RB1CC1/FIP200.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morselli, Eugenia; Shen, Shensi; Ruckenstuhl, Christoph; Bauer, Maria Anna; Mariño, Guillermo; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Criollo, Alfredo; Michaud, Mickael; Maiuri, Maria Chiara; Chano, Tokuhiro; Madeo, Frank; Kroemer, Guido

    2011-08-15

    The tumor suppressor protein p53 tonically suppresses autophagy when it is present in the cytoplasm. This effect is phylogenetically conserved from mammals to nematodes, and human p53 can inhibit autophagy in yeast, as we show here. Bioinformatic investigations of the p53 interactome in relationship to the autophagy-relevant protein network underscored the possible relevance of a direct molecular interaction between p53 and the mammalian ortholog of the essential yeast autophagy protein Atg17, namely RB1-inducible coiled-coil protein 1 (RB1CC1), also called FAK family kinase-interacting protein of 200 KDa (FIP200). Mutational analyses revealed that a single point mutation in p53 (K382R) abolished its capacity to inhibit autophagy upon transfection into p53-deficient human colon cancer or yeast cells. In conditions in which wild-type p53 co-immunoprecipitated with RB1CC1/FIP200, p53 (K382R) failed to do so, underscoring the importance of the physical interaction between these proteins for the control of autophagy. In conclusion, p53 regulates autophagy through a direct molecular interaction with RB1CC1/FIP200, a protein that is essential for the very apical step of autophagy initiation.

  2. Feedback regulation between autophagy and PKA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Quiroz, Francisco; Filteau, Marie; Landry, Christian R

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA) controls diverse cellular processes and homeostasis in eukaryotic cells. Many processes and substrates of PKA have been described and among them are direct regulators of autophagy. The mechanisms of PKA regulation and how they relate to autophagy remain to be fully understood. We constructed a reporter of PKA activity in yeast to identify genes affecting PKA regulation. The assay systematically measures relative protein-protein interactions between the regulatory and catalytic subunits of the PKA complex in a systematic set of genetic backgrounds. The candidate PKA regulators we identified span multiple processes and molecular functions (autophagy, methionine biosynthesis, TORC signaling, protein acetylation, and DNA repair), which themselves include processes regulated by PKA. These observations suggest the presence of many feedback loops acting through this key regulator. Many of the candidate regulators include genes involved in autophagy, suggesting that not only does PKA regulate autophagy but that autophagy also sends signals back to PKA.

  3. Autophagy is essential for hearing in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Chisato; Iwasaki, Shinichi; Urata, Shinji; Morishita, Hideaki; Sakamaki, Yuriko; Fujioka, Masato; Kondo, Kenji; Mizushima, Noboru; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2017-05-11

    Hearing loss is the most frequent sensory disorder in humans. Auditory hair cells (HCs) are postmitotic at late-embryonic differentiation and postnatal stages, and their damage is the major cause of hearing loss. There is no measurable HC regeneration in the mammalian cochlea, and the maintenance of cell function is crucial for preservation of hearing. Here we generated mice deficient in autophagy-related 5 (Atg5), a gene essential for autophagy, in the HCs to investigate the effect of basal autophagy on hearing acuity. Deletion of Atg5 resulted in HC degeneration and profound congenital hearing loss. In autophagy-deficient HCs, polyubiquitinated proteins and p62/SQSTM1, an autophagy substrate, accumulated as inclusion bodies during the first postnatal week, and these aggregates increased in number. These findings revealed that basal autophagy has an important role in maintenance of HC morphology and hearing acuity.

  4. Osteoporosis and autophagy: What is the relationship?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinaldo Florencio-Silva

    Full Text Available Summary Autophagy is a survival pathway wherein non-functional proteins and organelles are degraded in lysosomes for recycling and energy production. Therefore, autophagy is fundamental for the maintenance of cell viability, acting as a quality control process that prevents the accumulation of unnecessary structures and oxidative stress. Increasing evidence has shown that autophagy dysfunction is related to several pathologies including neurodegenerative diseases and cancer. Moreover, recent studies have shown that autophagy plays an important role for the maintenance of bone homeostasis. For instance, in vitro and animal and human studies indicate that autophagy dysfunction in bone cells is associated with the onset of bone diseases such as osteoporosis. This review had the purpose of discussing the issue to confirm whether a relationship between autophagy dysfunction and osteoporosis exits.

  5. Taxifolin synergizes Andrographolide-induced cell death by attenuation of autophagy and augmentation of caspase dependent and independent cell death in HeLa cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazen Alzaharna

    Full Text Available Andrographolide (Andro has emerged recently as a potential and effective anticancer agent with induction of apoptosis in some cancer cell lines while induction of G2/M arrest with weak apoptosis in others. Few studies have proved that Andro is also effective in combination therapy. The flavonoid Taxifolin (Taxi has showed anti-oxidant and antiproliferative effects against different cancer cells. Therefore, the present study investigated the cytotoxic effects of Andro alone or in combination with Taxi on HeLa cells. The combination of Andro with Taxi was synergistic at all tested concentrations and combination ratios. Andro alone induced caspase-dependent apoptosis which was enhanced by the combination with Taxi and attenuated partly by using Z-Vad-Fmk. Andro induced a protective reactive oxygen species (ROS-dependent autophagy which was attenuated by Taxi. The activation of p53 was involved in Andro-induced autophagy where the use of Taxi or pifithrin-α (PFT-α decreased it while the activation of JNK was involved in the cell death of HeLa cells but not in the induction of autophagy. The mitochondrial outer-membrane permeabilization (MOMP plays an important role in Andro-induced cell death in HeLa cells. Andro alone increased the MOMP which was further increased in the case of combination. This led to the increase in AIF and cytochrome c release from mitochondria which consequently increased caspase-dependent and independent cell death. In conclusion, Andro induced a protective autophagy in HeLa cells which was reduced by Taxi and the cell death was increased by increasing the MOMP and subsequently the caspase-dependent and independent cell death.

  6. Taxifolin synergizes Andrographolide-induced cell death by attenuation of autophagy and augmentation of caspase dependent and independent cell death in HeLa cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzaharna, Mazen; Alqouqa, Iyad; Cheung, Hon-Yeung

    2017-01-01

    Andrographolide (Andro) has emerged recently as a potential and effective anticancer agent with induction of apoptosis in some cancer cell lines while induction of G2/M arrest with weak apoptosis in others. Few studies have proved that Andro is also effective in combination therapy. The flavonoid Taxifolin (Taxi) has showed anti-oxidant and antiproliferative effects against different cancer cells. Therefore, the present study investigated the cytotoxic effects of Andro alone or in combination with Taxi on HeLa cells. The combination of Andro with Taxi was synergistic at all tested concentrations and combination ratios. Andro alone induced caspase-dependent apoptosis which was enhanced by the combination with Taxi and attenuated partly by using Z-Vad-Fmk. Andro induced a protective reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent autophagy which was attenuated by Taxi. The activation of p53 was involved in Andro-induced autophagy where the use of Taxi or pifithrin-α (PFT-α) decreased it while the activation of JNK was involved in the cell death of HeLa cells but not in the induction of autophagy. The mitochondrial outer-membrane permeabilization (MOMP) plays an important role in Andro-induced cell death in HeLa cells. Andro alone increased the MOMP which was further increased in the case of combination. This led to the increase in AIF and cytochrome c release from mitochondria which consequently increased caspase-dependent and independent cell death. In conclusion, Andro induced a protective autophagy in HeLa cells which was reduced by Taxi and the cell death was increased by increasing the MOMP and subsequently the caspase-dependent and independent cell death. PMID:28182713

  7. Autophagy in the control of food intake

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Rajat

    2012-01-01

    The cellular nutrient sensing apparatus detects nutritional depletion and transmits this information to downstream effectors that generate energy from alternate sources. Autophagy is a crucial catabolic pathway that turns over redundant cytoplasmic components in lysosomes to provide energy to the starved cell. Recent studies have described a role for hypothalamic autophagy in the control of food intake and energy balance. Activated autophagy in hypothalamic neurons during starvation mobilized...

  8. Regulation of cardiomyocyte autophagy by calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Soni; Troncoso, Rodrigo; Criollo, Alfredo; Bravo-Sagua, Roberto; García, Lorena; Morselli, Eugenia; Cifuentes, Mariana; Quest, Andrew F G; Hill, Joseph A; Lavandero, Sergio

    2016-04-15

    Calcium signaling plays a crucial role in a multitude of events within the cardiomyocyte, including cell cycle control, growth, apoptosis, and autophagy. With respect to calcium-dependent regulation of autophagy, ion channels and exchangers, receptors, and intracellular mediators play fundamental roles. In this review, we discuss calcium-dependent regulation of cardiomyocyte autophagy, a lysosomal mechanism that is often cytoprotective, serving to defend against disease-related stress and nutrient insufficiency. We also highlight the importance of the subcellular distribution of calcium and related proteins, interorganelle communication, and other key signaling events that govern cardiomyocyte autophagy. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  9. Emerging connections between RNA and autophagy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frankel, Lisa B; Lubas, Michal; Lund, Anders H

    2017-01-01

    in yeast, plants and animals, reviewing the molecular mechanisms and biological importance in normal physiology, stress and disease. In addition, we explore emerging evidence of core autophagy regulation mediated by RNA-binding proteins and noncoding RNAs, and point to gaps in our current knowledge......Macroautophagy/autophagy is a key catabolic process, essential for maintaining cellular homeostasis and survival through the removal and recycling of unwanted cellular material. Emerging evidence has revealed intricate connections between the RNA and autophagy research fields. While a majority...... of the connection between RNA and autophagy. Finally, we discuss the pathological implications of RNA-protein aggregation, primarily in the context of neurodegenerative disease....

  10. Involvement of Autophagy in Coronavirus Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Britton

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Coronaviruses are single stranded, positive sense RNA viruses, which induce the rearrangement of cellular membranes upon infection of a host cell. This provides the virus with a platform for the assembly of viral replication complexes, improving efficiency of RNA synthesis. The membranes observed in coronavirus infected cells include double membrane vesicles. By nature of their double membrane, these vesicles resemble cellular autophagosomes, generated during the cellular autophagy pathway. In addition, coronavirus infection has been demonstrated to induce autophagy. Here we review current knowledge of coronavirus induced membrane rearrangements and the involvement of autophagy or autophagy protein microtubule associated protein 1B light chain 3 (LC3 in coronavirus replication.

  11. Approaches for Studying Autophagy in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanfang Chen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Macroautophagy (hereafter referred to as autophagy is an intracellular degradative process, well conserved among eukaryotes. By engulfing cytoplasmic constituents into the autophagosome for degradation, this process is involved in the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. Autophagy induction triggers the formation of a cup-shaped double membrane structure, the phagophore, which progressively elongates and encloses materials to be removed. This double membrane vesicle, which is called an autophagosome, fuses with lysosome and forms the autolysosome. The inner membrane of the autophagosome, along with engulfed compounds, are degraded by lysosomal enzymes, which enables the recycling of carbohydrates, amino acids, nucleotides, and lipids. In response to various factors, autophagy can be induced for non-selective degradation of bulk cytoplasm. Autophagy is also able to selectively target cargoes and organelles such as mitochondria or peroxisome, functioning as a quality control system. The modification of autophagy flux is involved in developmental processes such as resistance to stress conditions, aging, cell death, and multiple pathologies. So, the use of animal models is essential for understanding these processes in the context of different cell types throughout the entire lifespan. For almost 15 years, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has emerged as a powerful model to analyze autophagy in physiological or pathological contexts. This review presents a rapid overview of physiological processes involving autophagy in Caenorhabditis elegans, the different assays used to monitor autophagy, their drawbacks, and specific tools for the analyses of selective autophagy.

  12. Autophagy Limits Endotoxemic Acute Kidney Injury and Alters Renal Tubular Epithelial Cell Cytokine Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy S Leventhal

    Full Text Available Sepsis related acute kidney injury (AKI is a common in-hospital complication with a dismal prognosis. Our incomplete understanding of disease pathogenesis has prevented the identification of hypothesis-driven preventive or therapeutic interventions. Increasing evidence in ischemia-reperfusion and nephrotoxic mouse models of AKI support the theory that autophagy protects renal tubular epithelial cells (RTEC from injury. However, the role of RTEC autophagy in septic AKI remains unclear. We observed that lipopolysaccharide (LPS, a mediator of gram-negative bacterial sepsis, induces RTEC autophagy in vivo and in vitro through TLR4-initiated signaling. We modeled septic AKI through intraperitoneal LPS injection in mice in which autophagy-related protein 7 was specifically knocked out in the renal proximal tubules (ATG7KO. Compared to control littermates, ATG7KO mice developed more severe renal dysfunction (24hr BUN 100.1mg/dl +/- 14.8 vs 54.6mg/dl +/- 11.3 and parenchymal injury. After injection with LPS, analysis of kidney lysates identified higher IL-6 expression and increased STAT3 activation in kidney lysates from ATG7KO mice compared to controls. In vitro experiments confirmed an altered response to LPS in RTEC with genetic or pharmacological impairment of autophagy. In conclusion, RTEC autophagy protects against endotoxin induced injury and regulates downstream effects of RTEC TLR4 signaling.

  13. 20-hydroxyecdysone upregulates Atg genes to induce autophagy in the Bombyx fat body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ling; Ma, Li; Guo, Enen; Deng, Xiaojuan; Ma, Sanyuan; Xia, Qingyou; Cao, Yang; Li, Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy is finely regulated at multiple levels and plays crucial roles in development and disease. In the fat body of the silkworm, Bombyx mori, autophagy occurs and Atg gene expression peaks during the nonfeeding molting and pupation stages when the steroid hormone (20-hydroxyecdysone; 20E) is high. Injection of 20E into the feeding larvae upregulated Atg genes and reduced TORC1 activity resulting in autophagy induction in the fat body. Conversely, RNAi knockdown of the 20E receptor partner (USP) or targeted overexpression of a dominant negative mutant of the 20E receptor (EcRDN) in the larval fat body reduced autophagy and downregulated the Atg genes, confirming the importance of 20E-induction of Atg gene expression during pupation. Moreover, in vitro treatments of the larval fat body with 20E upregulated the Atg genes. Five Atg genes were potentially 20E primary-responsive, and a 20E response element was identified in the Atg1 (ortholog of human ULK1) promoter region. Furthermore, RNAi knockdown of 4 key genes (namely Br-C, E74, HR3 and βftz-F1) in the 20E-triggered transcriptional cascade reduced autophagy and downregulated Atg genes to different levels. Taken together, we conclude that in addition to blocking TORC1 activity for autophagosome initiation, 20E upregulates Atg genes to induce autophagy in the Bombyx fat body. PMID:23674061

  14. Characterization of the autophagy marker protein Atg8 reveals atypical features of autophagy in Plasmodium falciparum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Navale

    Full Text Available Conventional autophagy is a lysosome-dependent degradation process that has crucial homeostatic and regulatory functions in eukaryotic organisms. As malaria parasites must dispose a number of self and host cellular contents, we investigated if autophagy in malaria parasites is similar to the conventional autophagy. Genome wide analysis revealed a partial autophagy repertoire in Plasmodium, as homologs for only 15 of the 33 yeast autophagy proteins could be identified, including the autophagy marker Atg8. To gain insights into autophagy in malaria parasites, we investigated Plasmodium falciparum Atg8 (PfAtg8 employing techniques and conditions that are routinely used to study autophagy. Atg8 was similarly expressed and showed punctate localization throughout the parasite in both asexual and sexual stages; it was exclusively found in the pellet fraction as an integral membrane protein, which is in contrast to the yeast or mammalian Atg8 that is distributed among cytosolic and membrane fractions, and suggests for a constitutive autophagy. Starvation, the best known autophagy inducer, decreased PfAtg8 level by almost 3-fold compared to the normally growing parasites. Neither the Atg8-associated puncta nor the Atg8 expression level was significantly altered by treatment of parasites with routinely used autophagy inhibitors (cysteine (E64 and aspartic (pepstatin protease inhibitors, the kinase inhibitor 3-methyladenine, and the lysosomotropic agent chloroquine, indicating an atypical feature of autophagy. Furthermore, prolonged inhibition of the major food vacuole protease activity by E64 and pepstatin did not cause accumulation of the Atg8-associated puncta in the food vacuole, suggesting that autophagy is primarily not meant for degradative function in malaria parasites. Atg8 showed partial colocalization with the apicoplast; doxycycline treatment, which disrupts apicoplast, did not affect Atg8 localization, suggesting a role, but not exclusive, in

  15. Regulation of autophagy by cytoplasmic p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasdemir, Ezgi; Maiuri, M Chiara; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Vitale, Ilio; Djavaheri-Mergny, Mojgan; D'Amelio, Marcello; Criollo, Alfredo; Morselli, Eugenia; Zhu, Changlian; Harper, Francis; Nannmark, Ulf; Samara, Chrysanthi; Pinton, Paolo; Vicencio, José Miguel; Carnuccio, Rosa; Moll, Ute M; Madeo, Frank; Paterlini-Brechot, Patrizia; Rizzuto, Rosario; Szabadkai, Gyorgy; Pierron, Gérard; Blomgren, Klas; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Codogno, Patrice; Cecconi, Francesco; Kroemer, Guido

    2008-06-01

    Multiple cellular stressors, including activation of the tumour suppressor p53, can stimulate autophagy. Here we show that deletion, depletion or inhibition of p53 can induce autophagy in human, mouse and nematode cells subjected to knockout, knockdown or pharmacological inhibition of p53. Enhanced autophagy improved the survival of p53-deficient cancer cells under conditions of hypoxia and nutrient depletion, allowing them to maintain high ATP levels. Inhibition of p53 led to autophagy in enucleated cells, and cytoplasmic, not nuclear, p53 was able to repress the enhanced autophagy of p53(-/-) cells. Many different inducers of autophagy (for example, starvation, rapamycin and toxins affecting the endoplasmic reticulum) stimulated proteasome-mediated degradation of p53 through a pathway relying on the E3 ubiquitin ligase HDM2. Inhibition of p53 degradation prevented the activation of autophagy in several cell lines, in response to several distinct stimuli. These results provide evidence of a key signalling pathway that links autophagy to the cancer-associated dysregulation of p53.

  16. Tumor Suppression and Promotion by Autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yenniffer Ávalos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a highly regulated catabolic process that involves lysosomal degradation of proteins and organelles, mostly mitochondria, for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis and reduction of metabolic stress. Problems in the execution of this process are linked to different pathological conditions, such as neurodegeneration, aging, and cancer. Many of the proteins that regulate autophagy are either oncogenes or tumor suppressor proteins. Specifically, tumor suppressor genes that negatively regulate mTOR, such as PTEN, AMPK, LKB1, and TSC1/2 stimulate autophagy while, conversely, oncogenes that activate mTOR, such as class I PI3K, Ras, Rheb, and AKT, inhibit autophagy, suggesting that autophagy is a tumor suppressor mechanism. Consistent with this hypothesis, the inhibition of autophagy promotes oxidative stress, genomic instability, and tumorigenesis. Nevertheless, autophagy also functions as a cytoprotective mechanism under stress conditions, including hypoxia and nutrient starvation, that promotes tumor growth and resistance to chemotherapy in established tumors. Here, in this brief review, we will focus the discussion on this ambiguous role of autophagy in the development and progression of cancer.

  17. Tumor suppression and promotion by autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ávalos, Yenniffer; Canales, Jimena; Bravo-Sagua, Roberto; Criollo, Alfredo; Lavandero, Sergio; Quest, Andrew F G

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy is a highly regulated catabolic process that involves lysosomal degradation of proteins and organelles, mostly mitochondria, for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis and reduction of metabolic stress. Problems in the execution of this process are linked to different pathological conditions, such as neurodegeneration, aging, and cancer. Many of the proteins that regulate autophagy are either oncogenes or tumor suppressor proteins. Specifically, tumor suppressor genes that negatively regulate mTOR, such as PTEN, AMPK, LKB1, and TSC1/2 stimulate autophagy while, conversely, oncogenes that activate mTOR, such as class I PI3K, Ras, Rheb, and AKT, inhibit autophagy, suggesting that autophagy is a tumor suppressor mechanism. Consistent with this hypothesis, the inhibition of autophagy promotes oxidative stress, genomic instability, and tumorigenesis. Nevertheless, autophagy also functions as a cytoprotective mechanism under stress conditions, including hypoxia and nutrient starvation, that promotes tumor growth and resistance to chemotherapy in established tumors. Here, in this brief review, we will focus the discussion on this ambiguous role of autophagy in the development and progression of cancer.

  18. Autophagy: A Sweet Process in Diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Alfred J.; Codogno, Patrice

    2008-01-01

    Autophagy is inhibited by the insulin-amino acid-mTOR signaling pathway. Two papers in this issue of Cell Metabolism (Ebato et al., 2008; Jung et al., 2008) provide evidence that basal autophagy is necessary to maintain the architecture and function of pancreatic beta cells and that its induction in

  19. High mobility group A1 protein modulates autophagy in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conte, Andrea; Paladino, Simona; Bianco, Gaia; Fasano, Dominga; Gerlini, Raffaele; Tornincasa, Mara; Renna, Maurizio; Fusco, Alfredo; Tramontano, Donatella; Pierantoni, Giovanna Maria

    2017-11-01

    High Mobility Group A1 (HMGA1) is an architectural chromatin protein whose overexpression is a feature of malignant neoplasias with a causal role in cancer initiation and progression. HMGA1 promotes tumor growth by several mechanisms, including increase of cell proliferation and survival, impairment of DNA repair and induction of chromosome instability. Autophagy is a self-degradative process that, by providing energy sources and removing damaged organelles and misfolded proteins, allows cell survival under stress conditions. On the other hand, hyper-activated autophagy can lead to non-apoptotic programmed cell death. Autophagy deregulation is a common feature of cancer cells in which has a complex role, showing either an oncogenic or tumor suppressor activity, depending on cellular context and tumor stage. Here, we report that depletion of HMGA1 perturbs autophagy by different mechanisms. HMGA1-knockdown increases autophagosome formation by constraining the activity of the mTOR pathway, a major regulator of autophagy, and transcriptionally upregulating the autophagy-initiating kinase Unc-51-like kinase 1 (ULK1). Consistently, functional experiments demonstrate that HMGA1 binds ULK1 promoter region and negatively regulates its transcription. On the other hand, the increase in autophagosomes is not associated to a proportionate increase in their maturation. Overall, the effects of HMGA1 depletion on autophagy are associated to a decrease in cell proliferation and ultimately impact on cancer cells viability. Importantly, silencing of ULK1 prevents the effects of HMGA1-knockdown on cellular proliferation, viability and autophagic activity, highlighting how these effects are, at least in part, mediated by ULK1. Interestingly, this phenomenon is not restricted to skin cancer cells, as similar results have been observed also in HeLa cells silenced for HMGA1. Taken together, these results clearly indicate HMGA1 as a key regulator of the autophagic pathway in cancer cells

  20. PICALM modulates autophagy activity and tau accumulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Kevin; Fleming, Angeleen; Imarisio, Sara; Lopez Ramirez, Ana; Mercer, Jacob L.; Jimenez-Sanchez, Maria; Bento, Carla F.; Puri, Claudia; Zavodszky, Eszter; Siddiqi, Farah; Lavau, Catherine P.; Betton, Maureen; O’Kane, Cahir J.; Wechsler, Daniel S.; Rubinsztein, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified several loci associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), including proteins involved in endocytic trafficking such as PICALM/CALM (phosphatidylinositol binding clathrin assembly protein). It is unclear how these loci may contribute to AD pathology. Here we show that CALM modulates autophagy and alters clearance of tau, a protein which is a known autophagy substrate and which is causatively linked to AD, both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, altered CALM expression exacerbates tau-mediated toxicity in zebrafish transgenic models. CALM influences autophagy by regulating the endocytosis of SNAREs, such as VAMP2, VAMP3 and VAMP8, which have diverse effects on different stages of the autophagy pathway, from autophagosome formation to autophagosome degradation. This study suggests that the AD genetic risk factor CALM modulates autophagy, and this may affect disease in a number of ways including modulation of tau turnover. PMID:25241929

  1. Autophagy in endometriosis: Friend or foe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Lei; Li, Jun; Wei, Bing

    2018-01-01

    Endometriosis is a chronic, estrogen-dependent disease and characterized by the implantation of endometrial glands and stroma deep and haphazardly into the outside the uterine cavity. It affects an estimated 10% of the female population of reproductive age and results in obvious reduction in health-related quality of life. Unfortunately, there is no a consistent theory for the etiology of endometriosis. Furthermore, the endometriosis is hard to diagnose in early stage and the treatment methods are limited. Importantly, emerging evidence has investigated that there is a close relationship between endometriosis and autophagy. However, autophagy is a friend or foe in endometriosis is puzzling, the precise mechanism underlying autophagy in endometriosis has not been fully elucidated yet. Here, we provide an integrated view on the acquired findings of the connections between endometriosis and autophagy. We also discuss which may contribute to the abnormal level of autophagy in endometriosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Lifespan extension without fertility reduction following dietary addition of the autophagy activator Torin1 in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Janet S; Wileman, Tom; Chapman, Tracey

    2018-01-01

    Autophagy is a highly conserved mechanism for cellular repair that becomes progressively down-regulated during normal ageing. Hence, manipulations that activate autophagy could increase lifespan. Previous reports show that manipulations to the autophagy pathway can result in longevity extension in yeast, flies, worms and mammals. Under standard nutrition, autophagy is inhibited by the nutrient sensing kinase Target of Rapamycin (TOR). Therefore, manipulations of TOR that increase autophagy may offer a mechanism for extending lifespan. Ideally, such manipulations should be specific and minimise off-target effects, and it is important to discover additional methods for 'clean' lifespan manipulation. Here we report an initial study into the effect of up-regulating autophagy on lifespan and fertility in Drosophila melanogaster by dietary addition of Torin1. Activation of autophagy using this selective TOR inhibitor was associated with significantly increased lifespan in both sexes. Torin1 induced a dose-dependent increase in lifespan in once-mated females. There was no evidence of a trade-off between longevity and fecundity or fertility. Torin1-fed females exhibited significantly elevated fecundity, but also elevated egg infertility, resulting in no net change in overall fertility. This supports the idea that lifespan can be extended without trade-offs in fertility and suggest that Torin1 may be a useful tool with which to pursue anti-ageing research.

  3. Hypercholesterolemia downregulates autophagy in the rat heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giricz, Zoltán; Koncsos, Gábor; Rajtík, Tomáš; Varga, Zoltán V; Baranyai, Tamás; Csonka, Csaba; Szobi, Adrián; Adameová, Adriana; Gottlieb, Roberta A; Ferdinandy, Péter

    2017-03-23

    We have previously shown that efficiency of ischemic conditioning is diminished in hypercholesterolemia and that autophagy is necessary for cardioprotection. However, it is unknown whether isolated hypercholesterolemia disturbs autophagy or the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathways. Therefore, we investigated whether isolated hypercholesterolemia modulates cardiac autophagy-related pathways or programmed cell death mechanisms such as apoptosis and necroptosis in rat heart. Male Wistar rats were fed either normal chow (NORM; n = 9) or with 2% cholesterol and 0.25% cholic acid-enriched diet (CHOL; n = 9) for 12 weeks. CHOL rats exhibited a 41% increase in plasma total cholesterol level over that of NORM rats (4.09 mmol/L vs. 2.89 mmol/L) at the end of diet period. Animals were sacrificed, hearts were excised and briefly washed out. Left ventricles were snap-frozen for determination of markers of autophagy, mTOR pathway, apoptosis, and necroptosis by Western blot. Isolated hypercholesterolemia was associated with a significant reduction in expression of cardiac autophagy markers such as LC3-II, Beclin-1, Rubicon and RAB7 as compared to controls. Phosphorylation of ribosomal S6, a surrogate marker for mTOR activity, was increased in CHOL samples. Cleaved caspase-3, a marker of apoptosis, increased in CHOL hearts, while no difference in the expression of necroptotic marker RIP1, RIP3 and MLKL was detected between treatments. This is the first comprehensive analysis of autophagy and programmed cell death pathways of apoptosis and necroptosis in hearts of hypercholesterolemic rats. Our data show that isolated hypercholesterolemia suppresses basal cardiac autophagy and that the decrease in autophagy may be a result of an activated mTOR pathway. Reduced autophagy was accompanied by increased apoptosis, while cardiac necroptosis was not modulated by isolated hypercholesterolemia. Decreased basal autophagy and elevated apoptosis may be responsible for the

  4. WNK1 is an unexpected autophagy inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallolu Kankanamalage, Sachith; Lee, A-Young; Wichaidit, Chonlarat; Lorente-Rodriguez, Andres; Shah, Akansha M.; Stippec, Steve; Whitehurst, Angelique W.; Cobb, Melanie H.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Autophagy is a cellular degradation pathway that is essential to maintain cellular physiology, and deregulation of autophagy leads to multiple diseases in humans. In a recent study, we discovered that the protein kinase WNK1 (WNK lysine deficient protein kinase 1) is an inhibitor of autophagy. The loss of WNK1 increases both basal and starvation-induced autophagy. In addition, the depletion of WNK1 increases the activation of the class III phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PtdIns3K) complex, which is required to induce autophagy. Moreover, the loss of WNK1 increases the expression of ULK1 (unc-51 like kinase 1), which is upstream of the PtdIns3K complex. It also increases the pro-autophagic phosphorylation of ULK1 at Ser555 and the activation of AMPK (AMP-activated protein kinase), which is responsible for that phosphorylation. The inhibition of AMPK by compound C decreases the magnitude of autophagy induction following WNK1 loss; however, it does not prevent autophagy induction. We found that the UVRAG (UV radiation resistance associated gene), which is a component of the PtdIns3K, binds to the N-terminal region of WNK1. Moreover, WNK1 partially colocalizes with UVRAG and this colocalization decreases when autophagy is stimulated in cells. The loss of WNK1 also alters the cellular distribution of UVRAG. The depletion of the downstream target of WNK1, OXSR1/OSR1 (oxidative-stress responsive 1) has no effect on autophagy, whereas the depletion of its relative STK39/SPAK (serine/threonine kinase 39) induces autophagy under nutrient-rich and starved conditions. PMID:28282258

  5. Non-canonical autophagy: an exception or an underestimated form of autophagy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarlatti, Francesca; Maffei, Roberta; Beau, Isabelle; Ghidoni, Riccardo; Codogno, Patrice

    2008-11-01

    Macroautophagy (hereafter called autophagy) is a dynamic and evolutionarily conserved process used to sequester and degrade cytoplasm and entire organelles in a sequestering vesicle with a double membrane, known as the autophagosome, which ultimately fuses with a lysosome to degrade its autophagic cargo. Recently, we have unraveled two distinct forms of autophagy in cancer cells, which we term canonical and non-canonical autophagy. In contrast to classical or canonical autophagy, non-canonical autophagy is a process that does not require the entire set of autophagy-related (Atg) proteins in particular Beclin 1, to form the autophagosome. Non-canonical autophagy is therefore not blocked by the knockdown of Beclin 1 or of its binding partner hVps34. Moreover overexpression of Bcl-2, which is known to block canonical starvation-induced autophagy by binding to Beclin 1, is unable to reverse the non-canonical autophagy triggered by the polyphenol resveratrol in the breast cancer MCF-7 cell line. In MCF-7 cells, at least, non-canonical autophagy is involved in the caspase-independent cell death induced by resveratrol.

  6. Autophagy and bacterial clearance: a not so clear picture

    OpenAIRE

    Mostowy, Serge

    2012-01-01

    Autophagy, an intracellular degradation process highly conserved from yeast to humans, is viewed as an important defence mechanism to clear intracellular bacteria. However, recent work has shown that autophagy may have different roles during different bacterial infections that restrict bacterial replication (antibacterial autophagy), act in cell autonomous signalling (non-bacterial autophagy) or support bacterial replication (pro-bacterial autophagy). This review will focus on newfound intera...

  7. Autophagy as a Molecular Target of Flavonoids Underlying their Protective Effects in Human Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto-Domínguez, Nestor; Garcia-Mediavilla, Maria V; Sanchez-Campos, Sonia; Mauriz, Jose L; Gonzalez-Gallego, Javier

    2018-01-01

    Autophagy is a cellular pathway with the ability to maintain cell homeostasis through the elimination of damaged or useless cellular components, and its deregulation may initiate or aggravate different human diseases. Flavonoids, a group of plant metabolites, are able to modulate different molecular and cellular processes including autophagy. To review the effects of flavonoids on autophagy pathway in both invasive and noninvasive human diseases, focusing on the global outcomes in their progression. Moreover, the efficacy of the combination of flavonoids with drugs or other natural nontoxic compounds was also reviewed. A literature search was performed to identify and analyze peer-reviewed publications containing in vitro and in vivo studies focused on autophagy deregulation in different proliferative and non-proliferative pathologies and the potential protective effects of flavonoids. Analyzed publications indicated that imbalance between cell death and survival induced by changes in autophagy play an important role in the pathophysiology of a number of human diseases. The use of different flavonoids as autophagy modulators, alone or in combination with other molecules, might be a worthy strategy in the treatment of cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, cardiovascular diseases, hepatic diseases, leishmaniasis, influenza, gastric ulcers produced by Helicobacter pylori infection, diabetes, asthma, age-related macular degeneration or osteoporosis. Flavonoids could potentially constitute important adjuvant agents of conventional therapies in the treatment of autophagy deregulation-related diseases. Moreover, combined therapy may help to diminish the doses of those conventional treatments, leading to reduced drug-derivative side effects and to improved patients' survival. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  8. Parkinson disease: a role for autophagy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qian; Mao, Zixu

    2010-08-01

    Autophagy is a term used to describe the process by which lysosomes degrade intracellular components. Known originally as an adaptive response to nutrient deprivation, autophagy has now been recognized to play important roles in several human disorders including neurodegenerative diseases. Experimental results from genetic, cellular, and toxicological studies indicate that many of the etiological factors associated with Parkinson disease (PD) can perturb the autophagic process in various model systems. Thus, the emerging data support the view that dysregulation of autophagy may play a critical role in the pathogenic process of PD.

  9. The dual role of autophagy under hypoxia-involvement of interaction between autophagy and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mengmeng; Tan, Jin; Miao, Yuyang; Lei, Ping; Zhang, Qiang

    2015-06-01

    Hypoxia is one of severe cellular stress and it is well known to be associated with a worse outcome since a lack of oxygen accelerates the induction of apoptosis. Autophagy, an important and evolutionarily conserved mechanism for maintaining cellular homeostasis, is closely related to the apoptosis caused by hypoxia. Generally autophagy blocks the induction of apoptosis and inhibits the activation of apoptosis-associated caspase which could reduce cellular injury. However, in special cases, autophagy or autophagy-relevant proteins may help to induce apoptosis, which could aggravate cell damage under hypoxia condition. In addition, the activation of apoptosis-related proteins-caspase can also degrade autophagy-related proteins, such as Atg3, Atg4, Beclin1 protein, inhibiting autophagy. Although the relationship between autophagy and apoptosis has been known for rather complex for more than a decade, the underlying regulatory mechanisms have not been clearly understood. This short review discusses and summarizes the dual role of autophagy and the interaction and molecular regulatory mechanisms between autophagy and apoptosis under hypoxia.

  10. BAG3-dependent noncanonical autophagy induced by proteasome inhibition in HepG2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bao-Qin; Du, Zhen-Xian; Zong, Zhi-Hong; Li, Chao; Li, Ning; Zhang, Qiang; Kong, De-Hui; Wang, Hua-Qin

    2013-06-01

    Emerging lines of evidence have shown that blockade of ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) activates autophagy. The molecular players that regulate the relationship between them remain to be elucidated. Bcl-2 associated athanogene 3 (BAG3) is a member of the BAG co-chaperone family that regulates the ATPase activity of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) chaperone family. Studies on BAG3 have demonstrated that it plays multiple roles in physiological and pathological processes, including antiapoptotic activity, signal transduction, regulatory role in virus infection, cell adhesion and migration. Recent studies have attracted much attention on its role in initiation of autophagy. The current study, for the first time, demonstrates that proteasome inhibitors elicit noncanonical autophagy, which was not suppressed by inhibitors of class III phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PtdIns3K) or shRNA against Beclin 1 (BECN1). In addition, we demonstrate that BAG3 is ascribed to activation of autophagy elicited by proteasome inhibitors and MAPK8/9/10 (also known as JNK1/2/3 respectively) activation is also implicated via upregulation of BAG3. Moreover, we found that noncanonical autophagy mediated by BAG3 suppresses responsiveness of HepG2 cells to proteasome inhibitors.

  11. How Parkinsonian Toxins Dysregulate the Autophagy Machinery

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    Ruben K. Dagda

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Since their discovery, Parkinsonian toxins (6-hydroxydopamine, MPP+, paraquat, and rotenone have been widely employed as in vivo and in vitro chemical models of Parkinson’s disease (PD. Alterations in mitochondrial homeostasis, protein quality control pathways, and more recently, autophagy/mitophagy have been implicated in neurotoxin models of PD. Here, we highlight the molecular mechanisms by which different PD toxins dysregulate autophagy/mitophagy and how alterations of these pathways play beneficial or detrimental roles in dopamine neurons. The convergent and divergent effects of PD toxins on mitochondrial function and autophagy/mitophagy are also discussed in this review. Furthermore, we propose new diagnostic tools and discuss how pharmacological modulators of autophagy/mitophagy can be developed as disease-modifying treatments for PD. Finally, we discuss the critical need to identify endogenous and synthetic forms of PD toxins and develop efficient health preventive programs to mitigate the risk of developing PD.

  12. Intersection of autophagy with pathways of antigen presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Natalie L; Mintern, Justine D

    2012-12-01

    Traditionally, macroautophagy (autophagy) is viewed as a pathway of cell survival. Autophagy ensures the elimination of damaged or unwanted cytosolic components and provides a source of cellular nutrients during periods of stress. Interestingly, autophagy can also directly intersect with, and impact, other major pathways of cellular function. Here, we will review the contribution of autophagy to pathways of antigen presentation. The autophagy machinery acts to modulate both MHCI and MHCII antigen presentation. As such autophagy is an important participant in pathways that elicit host cell immunity and the elimination of infectious pathogens.

  13. Sirtuin1 and autophagy protect cells from fluoride-induced cell stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Maiko; Bartlett, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Sirtuin1 (SIRT1) is an (NAD+)-dependent deacetylase functioning in the regulation of metabolism, cell survival and organismal lifespan. Active SIRT1 regulates autophagy during cell stress, including calorie restriction, endoplasmic reticulum stress and oxidative stress. Previously, we reported that fluoride induces endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in ameloblasts responsible for enamel formation, suggesting that ER-stress plays a role in dental fluorosis. However, the molecular mechanism of how cells respond to fluoride-induced cell stress is unclear. Here, we demonstrate that fluoride activates SIRT1 and initiates autophagy to protect cells from fluoride exposure. Fluoride treatment of ameloblast-derived cells (LS8) significantly increased Sirt1 expression and induced SIRT1 phosphorylation resulting in the augmentation of SIRT1 deacetylase activity. To demonstrate that fluoride exposure initiates autophagy, we characterized the expression of autophagy related genes (Atg); Atg5, Atg7 and Atg8/LC3 and showed that both their transcript and protein levels were significantly increased following fluoride treatment. To confirm that SIRT1 plays a protective role in fluoride toxicity, we used resveratrol (RES) to augmented SIRT1 activity in fluoride treated LS8 cells. RES increased autophagy, inhibited apoptosis, and decreased fluoride cytotoxicity. Rats treated with fluoride (0, 50 and 100 ppm) in drinking water for 6 weeks had significantly elevated expression levels of Sirt1, Atg5, Atg7 and Atg8/LC3 in their maturation stage enamel organs. Increased protein levels of p-SIRT1, ATG5 and ATG8/LC3 were present in fluoride-treated rat maturation stage ameloblasts. Therefore, the SIRT1/autophagy pathway may play a critical role as a protective response to help prevent dental fluorosis. PMID:24296261

  14. Sirtuin1 and autophagy protect cells from fluoride-induced cell stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Maiko; Bartlett, John D

    2014-02-01

    Sirtuin1 (SIRT1) is a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+))-dependent deacetylase functioning in the regulation of metabolism, cell survival and organismal lifespan. Active SIRT1 regulates autophagy during cell stress, including calorie restriction, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and oxidative stress. Previously, we reported that fluoride induces ER-stress in ameloblasts responsible for enamel formation, suggesting that ER-stress plays a role in dental fluorosis. However, the molecular mechanism of how cells respond to fluoride-induced cell stress is unclear. Here, we demonstrate that fluoride activates SIRT1 and initiates autophagy to protect cells from fluoride exposure. Fluoride treatment of ameloblast-derived cells (LS8) significantly increased Sirt1 expression and induced SIRT1 phosphorylation resulting in the augmentation of SIRT1 deacetylase activity. To demonstrate that fluoride exposure initiates autophagy, we characterized the expression of autophagy related genes (Atg); Atg5, Atg7 and Atg8/LC3 and showed that both their transcript and protein levels were significantly increased following fluoride treatment. To confirm that SIRT1 plays a protective role in fluoride toxicity, we used resveratrol (RES) to augment SIRT1 activity in fluoride treated LS8 cells. RES increased autophagy, inhibited apoptosis, and decreased fluoride cytotoxicity. Rats treated with fluoride (0, 50, 100 and 125ppm) in drinking water for 6weeks had significantly elevated expression levels of Sirt1, Atg5, Atg7 and Atg8/LC3 in their maturation stage enamel organs. Increased protein levels of p-SIRT1, ATG5 and ATG8/LC3 were present in fluoride-treated rat maturation stage ameloblasts. Therefore, the SIRT1/autophagy pathway may play a critical role as a protective response to help prevent dental fluorosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Autophagy: More Than a Nonselective Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fulvio Reggiori

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a catabolic pathway conserved among eukaryotes that allows cells to rapidly eliminate large unwanted structures such as aberrant protein aggregates, superfluous or damaged organelles, and invading pathogens. The hallmark of this transport pathway is the sequestration of the cargoes that have to be degraded in the lysosomes by double-membrane vesicles called autophagosomes. The key actors mediating the biogenesis of these carriers are the autophagy-related genes (ATGs. For a long time, it was assumed that autophagy is a bulk process. Recent studies, however, have highlighted the capacity of this pathway to exclusively eliminate specific structures and thus better fulfil the catabolic necessities of the cell. We are just starting to unveil the regulation and mechanism of these selective types of autophagy, but what it is already clearly emerging is that structures targeted to destruction are accurately enwrapped by autophagosomes through the action of specific receptors and adaptors. In this paper, we will briefly discuss the impact that the selective types of autophagy have had on our understanding of autophagy.

  16. Kinases Involved in Both Autophagy and Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Xin

    2017-08-31

    Both mitosis and autophagy are highly regulated dynamic cellular processes and involve various phosphorylation events catalysed by kinases, which play vital roles in almost all physiological and pathological conditions. Mitosis is a key event during the cell cycle, in which the cell divides into two daughter cells. Autophagy is a process in which the cell digests its own cellular contents. Although autophagy regulation has mainly been studied in asynchronous cells, increasing evidence indicates that autophagy is in fact tightly regulated in mitosis. Here in this review, we will discuss kinases that were originally identified to be involved in only one of either mitosis or autophagy, but were later found to participate in both processes, such as CDKs (cyclin-dependent kinases), Aurora kinases, PLK-1 (polo-like kinase 1), BUB1 (budding uninhibited by benzimidazoles 1), MAPKs (mitogen-activated protein kinases), mTORC1 (mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1), AMPK (AMP-activated protein kinase), PI3K (phosphoinositide-3 kinase) and protein kinase B (AKT). By focusing on kinases involved in both autophagy and mitosis, we will get a more comprehensive understanding about the reciprocal regulation between the two key cellular events, which will also shed light on their related therapeutic investigations.

  17. Kinases Involved in Both Autophagy and Mitosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyuan Li

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Both mitosis and autophagy are highly regulated dynamic cellular processes and involve various phosphorylation events catalysed by kinases, which play vital roles in almost all physiological and pathological conditions. Mitosis is a key event during the cell cycle, in which the cell divides into two daughter cells. Autophagy is a process in which the cell digests its own cellular contents. Although autophagy regulation has mainly been studied in asynchronous cells, increasing evidence indicates that autophagy is in fact tightly regulated in mitosis. Here in this review, we will discuss kinases that were originally identified to be involved in only one of either mitosis or autophagy, but were later found to participate in both processes, such as CDKs (cyclin-dependent kinases, Aurora kinases, PLK-1 (polo-like kinase 1, BUB1 (budding uninhibited by benzimidazoles 1, MAPKs (mitogen-activated protein kinases, mTORC1 (mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1, AMPK (AMP-activated protein kinase, PI3K (phosphoinositide-3 kinase and protein kinase B (AKT. By focusing on kinases involved in both autophagy and mitosis, we will get a more comprehensive understanding about the reciprocal regulation between the two key cellular events, which will also shed light on their related therapeutic investigations.

  18. The ubiquitin-proteasome system and autophagy are defective in the taurine-deficient heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jong, Chian Ju; Ito, Takashi; Schaffer, Stephen W

    2015-12-01

    Taurine depletion leads to impaired mitochondrial function, as characterized by reduced ATP production and elevated superoxide generation. These defects can fundamentally alter cardiomyocyte function and if left unchanged can result in cell death. To protect against these stresses, cardiomyocytes possess quality control processes, such as the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and autophagy, which can rejuvenate cells through the degradation of damaged proteins and organelles. Hence, the present study tested the hypothesis that reactive oxygen species generated by damaged mitochondria initiates UPS and autophagy in the taurine-deficient heart. Using transgenic mice lacking the taurine transporter (TauTKO) as a model of taurine deficiency, it was shown that the levels of ubiquitinated protein were elevated, an effect associated with a decrease in ATP-dependent 26S β5 proteasome activity. Treating the TauTKO mouse with the mitochondria-specific antioxidant, mitoTEMPO, largely abolished the increase in ubiquitinated protein content. The TauTKO heart was also associated with impaired autophagy, characterized by an increase in the initiator, Beclin-1, and autophagosome content, but a defect in the generation of active autophagolysosomes. Although mitoTEMPO treatment only restores the oxidative balance within the mitochondria, it appeared to completely disrupt the crosstalk between the damaged mitochondria and the quality control processes. Thus, mitochondrial oxidative stress is the main trigger initiating the quality control systems in the taurine-deficient heart. We conclude that the activation of the UPS and autophagy is another fundamental function of mitochondria.

  19. Agent-based modeling of autophagy reveals emergent regulatory behavior of spatio-temporal autophagy dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Börlin, Christoph S; Lang, Verena; Hamacher-Brady, Anne; Brady, Nathan R

    2014-09-10

    Autophagy is a vesicle-mediated pathway for lysosomal degradation, essential under basal and stressed conditions. Various cellular components, including specific proteins, protein aggregates, organelles and intracellular pathogens, are targets for autophagic degradation. Thereby, autophagy controls numerous vital physiological and pathophysiological functions, including cell signaling, differentiation, turnover of cellular components and pathogen defense. Moreover, autophagy enables the cell to recycle cellular components to metabolic substrates, thereby permitting prolonged survival under low nutrient conditions. Due to the multi-faceted roles for autophagy in maintaining cellular and organismal homeostasis and responding to diverse stresses, malfunction of autophagy contributes to both chronic and acute pathologies. We applied a systems biology approach to improve the understanding of this complex cellular process of autophagy. All autophagy pathway vesicle activities, i.e. creation, movement, fusion and degradation, are highly dynamic, temporally and spatially, and under various forms of regulation. We therefore developed an agent-based model (ABM) to represent individual components of the autophagy pathway, subcellular vesicle dynamics and metabolic feedback with the cellular environment, thereby providing a framework to investigate spatio-temporal aspects of autophagy regulation and dynamic behavior. The rules defining our ABM were derived from literature and from high-resolution images of autophagy markers under basal and activated conditions. Key model parameters were fit with an iterative method using a genetic algorithm and a predefined fitness function. From this approach, we found that accurate prediction of spatio-temporal behavior required increasing model complexity by implementing functional integration of autophagy with the cellular nutrient state. The resulting model is able to reproduce short-term autophagic flux measurements (up to 3

  20. Proximity Ligation In situ Assay is a Powerful Tool to Monitor Specific ATG Protein Interactions following Autophagy Induction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thierry Gauthier

    Full Text Available Macroautophagy is a highly regulated intracellular degradation process which has been extensively studied over the last decade. This pathway has been initially described as a non selective process inducing the degradation of parts of the cytoplasm as well as organelles at random. Nevertheless, over the last few years, new research highlighted the existence of a more selective autophagy pathway specifically recruiting some organelles or aggregates to the autophagosomes in order to induce their degradation. These selective autophagy pathways such as aggrephagy, mitophagy, pexophagy or xenophagy, involve the intervention of a cargo, the material to be degraded, cargo adapters, the molecules allowing the recruitment of the cargo to the autophagosome, and the proteins of the ATG8 family which link the cargo adapters to the autophagosome. One of the main questions which now remain is to develop new techniques and protocols able to discriminate between these different types of induced autophagy. In our work, we studied the possibility to use the P-LISA technique, which has been recently developed to study endogenous in vivo protein interactions, as a new technique to characterize the ATG proteins specifically involved in bulk or selective autophagy. In this manuscript, we indeed demonstrate that this technique allows the study of endogenous ATG protein interactions in cells following autophagy induction, but more interestingly that this technique might be used to characterize the ATG proteins involved in selective autophagy.

  1. SIRT6 reduces macrophage foam cell formation by inducing autophagy and cholesterol efflux under ox-LDL condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jiangping; Zhang, Guangya; Pang, Qi; Yu, Cong; Xiong, Jie; Zhu, Jing; Chen, Fengling

    2017-05-01

    SIRT6 is a pivotal regulator of lipid metabolism. It is also closely connected to cardiovascular diseases, which are the main cause of death in diabetic patients. We observed a decrease in the expression of SIRT6 and key autophagy effectors (ATG5, LC3B, and LAMP1) in ox-LDL-induced foam cells, a special form of lipid-laden macrophages. In these cells, SIRT6 WT but not SIRT6 H133Y overexpression markedly reduced foam cell formation, as shown by Oil Red O staining, while inducing autophagy flux, as determined by both mRFP-GFP-LC3 labeling and transmission electron microscopy. Silencing the key autophagy initiation gene ATG5, reversed the autophagy-promoting effect of SIRT6 in ox-LDL-treated THP1 cells, as evidenced by an increase in foam cells. Cholesterol efflux assays indicated that SIRT6 overexpression in foam cells promoted cholesterol efflux, increased the levels of ABCA1 and ABCG1, and reduced miR-33 levels. By transfecting miR-33 into cells overexpressing SIRT6, we observed that reduced foam cell formation and autophagy flux induction were largely reversed. These data imply that SIRT6 plays an essential role in protecting against atherosclerosis by reducing foam cell formation through an autophagy-dependent pathway. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  2. The Putative HORMA Domain Protein Atg101 Dimerizes and Is Required for Starvation-Induced and Selective Autophagy in Drosophila

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    Krisztina Hegedűs

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The large-scale turnover of intracellular material including organelles is achieved by autophagy-mediated degradation in lysosomes. Initiation of autophagy is controlled by a protein kinase complex consisting of an Atg1-family kinase, Atg13, FIP200/Atg17, and the metazoan-specific subunit Atg101. Here we show that loss of Atg101 impairs both starvation-induced and basal autophagy in Drosophila. This leads to accumulation of protein aggregates containing the selective autophagy cargo ref(2P/p62. Mapping experiments suggest that Atg101 binds to the N-terminal HORMA domain of Atg13 and may also interact with two unstructured regions of Atg1. Another HORMA domain-containing protein, Mad2, forms a conformational homodimer. We show that Drosophila Atg101 also dimerizes, and it is predicted to fold into a HORMA domain. Atg101 interacts with ref(2P as well, similar to Atg13, Atg8a, Atg16, Atg18, Keap1, and RagC, a known regulator of Tor kinase which coordinates cell growth and autophagy. These results raise the possibility that the interactions and dimerization of the putative HORMA domain protein Atg101 play critical roles in starvation-induced autophagy and proteostasis, by promoting the formation of protein aggregate-containing autophagosomes.

  3. Inhibition of autophagy enhances DNA damage-induced apoptosis by disrupting CHK1-dependent S phase arrest

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    Liou, Jong-Shian; Wu, Yi-Chen; Yen, Wen-Yen; Tang, Yu-Shuan [Institute of Cellular and Organismic Biology, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan, ROC (China); Kakadiya, Rajesh B.; Su, Tsann-Long [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan, ROC (China); Yih, Ling-Huei, E-mail: lhyih@gate.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Cellular and Organismic Biology, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2014-08-01

    DNA damage has been shown to induce autophagy, but the role of autophagy in the DNA damage response and cell fate is not fully understood. BO-1012, a bifunctional alkylating derivative of 3a-aza-cyclopenta[a]indene, is a potent DNA interstrand cross-linking agent with anticancer activity. In this study, BO-1012 was found to reduce DNA synthesis, inhibit S phase progression, and induce phosphorylation of histone H2AX on serine 139 (γH2AX) exclusively in S phase cells. Both CHK1 and CHK2 were phosphorylated in response to BO-1012 treatment, but only depletion of CHK1, but not CHK2, impaired BO-1012-induced S phase arrest and facilitated the entry of γH2AX-positive cells into G2 phase. CHK1 depletion also significantly enhanced BO-1012-induced cell death and apoptosis. These results indicate that BO-1012-induced S phase arrest is a CHK1-dependent pro-survival response. BO-1012 also resulted in marked induction of acidic vesicular organelle (AVO) formation and microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) processing and redistribution, features characteristic of autophagy. Depletion of ATG7 or co-treatment of cells with BO-1012 and either 3-methyladenine or bafilomycin A1, two inhibitors of autophagy, not only reduced CHK1 phosphorylation and disrupted S phase arrest, but also increased cleavage of caspase-9 and PARP, and cell death. These results suggest that cells initiate S phase arrest and autophagy as pro-survival responses to BO-1012-induced DNA damage, and that suppression of autophagy enhances BO-1012-induced apoptosis via disruption of CHK1-dependent S phase arrest. - Highlights: • Autophagy inhibitors enhanced the cytotoxicity of a DNA alkylating agent, BO-1012. • BO-1012-induced S phase arrest was a CHK1-dependent pro-survival response. • Autophagy inhibition enhanced BO-1012 cytotoxicity via disrupting the S phase arrest.

  4. Insulin receptor substrate-1 prevents autophagy-dependent cell death caused by oxidative stress in mouse NIH/3T3 cells

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    Chan Shih-Hung

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insulin receptor substrate (IRS-1 is associated with tumorigenesis; its levels are elevated in several human cancers. IRS-1 protein binds to several oncogene proteins. Oxidative stress and reactive oxygen species (ROS are involved in the initiation and progression of cancers. Cancer cells produce greater levels of ROS than normal cells do because of increased metabolic stresses. However, excessive production of ROS kills cancer cells. Autophagy usually serves as a survival mechanism in response to stress conditions, but excessive induction of autophagy results in cell death. In addition to inducing necrosis and apoptosis, ROS induces autophagic cell death. ROS inactivates IRS-1 mediated signaling and reduces intracellular IRS-1 concentrations. Thus, there is a complex relationship between IRS-1, ROS, autophagy, and cancer. It is not fully understood how cancer cells grow rapidly and survive in the presence of high ROS levels. Methods and results In this study, we established mouse NIH/3T3 cells that overexpressed IRS-1, so mimicking cancers with increased IRS-1 expression levels; we found that the IRS-1 overexpressing cells grow more rapidly than control cells do. Treatment of cells with glucose oxidase (GO provided a continuous source of ROS; low dosages of GO promoted cell growth, while high doses induced cell death. Evidence for GO induced autophagy includes increased levels of isoform B-II microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3, aggregation of green fluorescence protein-tagged LC3, and increased numbers of autophagic vacuoles in cells. Overexpression of IRS-1 resulted in inhibition of basal autophagy, and reduced oxidative stress-induced autophagy and cell death. ROS decreased the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR/p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinase signaling, while overexpression of IRS-1 attenuated this inhibition. Knockdown of autophagy-related gene 5 inhibited basal autophagy and diminished oxidative stress

  5. Neither eosinophils nor neutrophils require ATG5-dependent autophagy for extracellular DNA trap formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germic, Nina; Stojkov, Darko; Oberson, Kevin; Yousefi, Shida; Simon, Hans-Uwe

    2017-11-01

    The importance of extracellular traps (ETs) in innate immunity is well established, but the molecular mechanisms responsible for their formation remain unclear and in scientific dispute. ETs have been defined as extracellular DNA scaffolds associated with the granule proteins of eosinophils or neutrophils. They are capable of killing bacteria extracellularly. Based mainly on results with phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitors such as 3-methyladenine (3-MA) and wortmannin, which are commonly used to inhibit autophagy, several groups have reported that autophagy is required for neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation. We decided to investigate this apparent dependence on autophagy for ET release and generated genetically modified mice that lack, specifically in eosinophils or neutrophils, autophagy-related 5 (Atg5), a gene encoding a protein essential for autophagosome formation. Interestingly, neither eosinophils nor neutrophils from Atg5-deficient mice exhibited abnormalities in ET formation upon physiological activation or exposure to low concentrations of PMA, although we could confirm that human and mouse eosinophils and neutrophils, after pre-treatment with inhibitors of class III PI3K, show a block both in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and in ET formation. The so-called late autophagy inhibitors bafilomycin A1 and chloroquine, on the other hand, were without effect. These data indicate that ET formation occurs independently of autophagy and that the inhibition of ROS production and ET formation in the presence of 3-MA and wortmannin is probably owing to their additional ability to block the class I PI3Ks, which are involved in signalling cascades initiated by triggers of ET formation. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Regulation of Autophagy by Glucose in Mammalian Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Moruno, Félix; Pérez-Jiménez, Eva; Knecht, Erwin

    2012-01-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved process that contributes to maintain cell homeostasis. Although it is strongly regulated by many extracellular factors, induction of autophagy is mainly produced by starvation of nutrients. In mammalian cells, the regulation of autophagy by amino acids, and also by the hormone insulin, has been extensively investigated, but knowledge about the effects of other autophagy regulators, including another nutrient, glucose, is more limited. Here we will focu...

  7. Sorafenib-induced defective autophagy promotes cell death by necroptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Kharaziha, Pedram; Chioureas, Dimitris; Baltatzis, George; Fonseca, Pedro; Rodriguez, Patricia; Gogvadze, Vladimir; Lennartsson, Lena; Bj?rklund, Ann-Charlotte; Zhivotovsky, Boris; Grand?r, Dan; Egevad, Lars; Nilsson, Sten; Panaretakis, Theocharis

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is one of the main cytoprotective mechanisms that cancer cells deploy to withstand the cytotoxic stress and survive the lethal damage induced by anti-cancer drugs. However, under specific conditions, autophagy may, directly or indirectly, induce cell death. In our study, treatment of the Atg5-deficient DU145 prostate cancer cells, with the multi-tyrosine kinase inhibitor, sorafenib, induces mitochondrial damage, autophagy and cell death. Molecular inhibition of autophagy by silencin...

  8. Autophagy and Retromer Components in Plant Innate Immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch, David

    -hormone salicylic acid. Here, I present data that make it clear that NPR1 does not directly regulate autophagy, but instead control stress responses that indirectly activate autophagy. The observations presented will also clarify why autophagy has been described as being both a pro-death and pro-life pathway under...

  9. Antioxidant Supplement Inhibits Skeletal Muscle Constitutive Autophagy rather than Fasting-Induced Autophagy in Mice

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    Zhengtang Qi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we tested the hypothesis that NAC administration leads to reduced oxidative stress and thus to decreased expression of autophagy markers in young mice. Our results reveal that NAC administration results in reduced muscle mRNA levels of several autophagy markers, including Beclin-1, Atg7, LC3, Atg9, and LAMP2. However, NAC supplement fails to block the activation of skeletal muscle autophagy in response to fasting, because fasting significantly increases the mRNA level of several autophagy markers and LC3 lipidation. We further examined the effects of NAC administration on mitochondrial antioxidant capacity in fed and 24-hour fasted mice. Our results clearly show that NAC administration depresses the expression of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD and TP53-induced glycolysis and apoptosis regulator (TIGAR, both of which play a predominant antioxidant role in mitochondria by reducing ROS level. In addition, we found no beneficial effect of NAC supplement on muscle mass but it can protect from muscle loss in response to fasting. Collectively, our findings indicate that ROS is required for skeletal muscle constitutive autophagy, rather than starvation-induced autophagy, and that antioxidant NAC inhibits constitutive autophagy by the regulation of mitochondrial ROS production and antioxidant capacity.

  10. Hyperosmotic stress stimulates autophagy via polycystin-2.

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    Peña-Oyarzun, Daniel; Troncoso, Rodrigo; Kretschmar, Catalina; Hernando, Cecilia; Budini, Mauricio; Morselli, Eugenia; Lavandero, Sergio; Criollo, Alfredo

    2017-08-22

    Various intracellular mechanisms are activated in response to stress, leading to adaptation or death. Autophagy, an intracellular process that promotes lysosomal degradation of proteins, is an adaptive response to several types of stress. Osmotic stress occurs under both physiological and pathological conditions, provoking mechanical stress and activating various osmoadaptive mechanisms. Polycystin-2 (PC2), a membrane protein of the polycystin family, is a mechanical sensor capable of activating the cell signaling pathways required for cell adaptation and survival. Here we show that hyperosmotic stress provoked by treatment with hyperosmolar concentrations of sorbitol or mannitol induces autophagy in HeLa and HCT116 cell lines. In addition, we show that mTOR and AMPK, two stress sensor proteins involved modulating autophagy, are downregulated and upregulated, respectively, when cells are subjected to hyperosmotic stress. Finally, our findings show that PC2 is required to promote hyperosmotic stress-induced autophagy. Downregulation of PC2 prevents inhibition of hyperosmotic stress-induced mTOR pathway activation. In conclusion, our data provide new insight into the role of PC2 as a mechanosensor that modulates autophagy under hyperosmotic stress conditions.

  11. A Molecular View of Autophagy in Lepidoptera

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    Davide Romanelli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Metamorphosis represents a critical phase in the development of holometabolous insects, during which the larval body is completely reorganized: in fact, most of the larval organs undergo remodeling or completely degenerate before the final structure of the adult insect is rebuilt. In the past, increasing evidence emerged concerning the intervention of autophagy and apoptosis in the cell death processes that occur in larval organs of Lepidoptera during metamorphosis, but a molecular characterization of these pathways was undertaken only in recent years. In addition to developmentally programmed autophagy, there is growing interest in starvation-induced autophagy. Therefore we are now entering a new era of research on autophagy that foreshadows clarification of the role and regulatory mechanisms underlying this self-digesting process in Lepidoptera. Given that some of the most important lepidopteran species of high economic importance, such as the silkworm, Bombyx mori, belong to this insect order, we expect that this information on autophagy will be fully exploited not only in basic research but also for practical applications.

  12. Autophagy induction for the treatment of cancer.

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    Pietrocola, Federico; Pol, Jonathan; Vacchelli, Erika; Baracco, Elisa E; Levesque, Sarah; Castoldi, Francesca; Maiuri, Maria Chiara; Madeo, Frank; Kroemer, Guido

    2016-10-02

    Cancer can be viewed in 2 rather distinct ways, namely (i) as a cell-autonomous disease in which malignant cells have escaped control from cell-intrinsic barriers against proliferation and dissemination or (ii) as a systemic disease that involves failing immune control of aberrant cells. Since macroautophagy/autophagy generally increases the fitness of cells as well as their resistance against endogenous or iatrogenic (i.e., relating to illness due to medical intervention) stress, it has been widely proposed that inhibition of autophagy would constitute a valid strategy for sensitizing cancer cells to chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Colliding with this cell-autonomous vision, however, we found that immunosurveillance against transplantable, carcinogen-induced or genetically engineered cancers can be improved by pharmacologically inducing autophagy with caloric restriction mimetics. This positive effect depends on autophagy induction in cancer cells and is mediated by alterations in extracellular ATP metabolism, namely increased release of immunostimulatory ATP and reduced adenosine-dependent recruitment of immunosuppressive regulatory T cells into the tumor bed. The combination of autophagy inducers and chemotherapeutic agents is particularly efficient in reducing cancer growth through the stimulation of CD8 + T lymphocyte-dependent anticancer immune responses.

  13. Autophagy and Liver Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

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    Raffaele Cursio

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Liver ischemia-reperfusion (I-R injury occurs during liver resection, liver transplantation, and hemorrhagic shock. The main mode of liver cell death after warm and/or cold liver I-R is necrosis, but other modes of cell death, as apoptosis and autophagy, are also involved. Autophagy is an intracellular self-digesting pathway responsible for removal of long-lived proteins, damaged organelles, and malformed proteins during biosynthesis by lysosomes. Autophagy is found in normal and diseased liver. Although depending on the type of ischemia, warm and/or cold, the dynamic process of liver I-R results mainly in adenosine triphosphate depletion and in production of reactive oxygen species (ROS, leads to both, a local ischemic insult and an acute inflammatory-mediated reperfusion injury, and results finally in cell death. This process can induce liver dysfunction and can increase patient morbidity and mortality after liver surgery and hemorrhagic shock. Whether autophagy protects from or promotes liver injury following warm and/or cold I-R remains to be elucidated. The present review aims to summarize the current knowledge in liver I-R injury focusing on both the beneficial and the detrimental effects of liver autophagy following warm and/or cold liver I-R.

  14. Ubiquitin-coated nanodiamonds bind to autophagy receptors for entry into the selective autophagy pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kuang-Kai; Qiu, Wei-Ru; Naveen Raj, Emmanuel; Liu, Huei-Fang; Huang, Hou-Syun; Lin, Yu-Wei; Chang, Chien-Jen; Chen, Ting-Hua; Chen, Chinpiao; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Hwang, Jenn-Kang; Chao, Jui-I

    2017-01-02

    Selective macroautophagy/autophagy plays a pivotal role in the processing of foreign pathogens and cellular components to maintain homeostasis in human cells. To date, numerous studies have demonstrated the uptake of nanoparticles by cells, but their intracellular processing through selective autophagy remains unclear. Here we show that carbon-based nanodiamonds (NDs) coated with ubiquitin (Ub) bind to autophagy receptors (SQSTM1 [sequestosome 1], OPTN [optineurin], and CALCOCO2/NDP52 [calcium binding and coiled-coil domain 2]) and are then linked to MAP1LC3/LC3 (microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3) for entry into the selective autophagy pathway. NDs are ultimately delivered to lysosomes. Ectopically expressed SQSTM1-green fluorescence protein (GFP) could bind to the Ub-coated NDs. By contrast, the Ub-associated domain mutant of SQSTM1 (ΔUBA)-GFP did not bind to the Ub-coated NDs. Chloroquine, an autophagy inhibitor, prevented the ND-containing autophagosomes from fusing with lysosomes. Furthermore, autophagy receptors OPTN and CALCOCO2/NDP52, involved in the processing of bacteria, were found to be involved in the selective autophagy of NDs. However, ND particles located in the lysosomes of cells did not induce mitotic blockage, senescence, or cell death. Single ND clusters in the lysosomes of cells were observed in the xenografted human lung tumors of nude mice. This study demonstrated for the first time that Ub-coated nanoparticles bind to autophagy receptors for entry into the selective autophagy pathway, facilitating their delivery to lysosomes.

  15. The Cytoskeleton-Autophagy Connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kast, David J; Dominguez, Roberto

    2017-04-24

    Actin cytoskeleton dynamics play vital roles in most forms of intracellular trafficking by promoting the biogenesis and transport of vesicular cargoes. Mounting evidence indicates that actin dynamics and membrane-cytoskeleton scaffolds also have essential roles in macroautophagy, the process by which cellular waste is isolated inside specialized vesicles called autophagosomes for recycling and degradation. Branched actin polymerization is necessary for the biogenesis of autophagosomes from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane. Actomyosin-based transport is then used to feed the growing phagophore with pre-selected cargoes and debris derived from different membranous organelles inside the cell. Finally, mature autophagosomes detach from the ER membrane by an as yet unknown mechanism, undergo intracellular transport and then fuse with lysosomes, endosomes and multivesicular bodies through mechanisms that involve actin- and microtubule-mediated motility, cytoskeleton-membrane scaffolds and signaling proteins. In this review, we highlight the considerable progress made recently towards understanding the diverse roles of the cytoskeleton in autophagy. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Autophagy in health and disease: focus on the cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mialet-Perez, Jeanne; Vindis, Cécile

    2017-12-12

    Autophagy is a highly conserved mechanism of lysosome-mediated protein and organelle degradation that plays a crucial role in maintaining cellular homeostasis. In the last few years, specific functions for autophagy have been identified in many tissues and organs. In the cardiovascular system, autophagy appears to be essential to heart and vessel homeostasis and function; however defective or excessive autophagy activity seems to contribute to major cardiovascular disorders including heart failure (HF) or atherosclerosis. Here, we review the current knowledge on the role of cardiovascular autophagy in physiological and pathophysiological conditions. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  17. Emerging role of autophagy in kidney function, diseases and aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Tobias B.; Edelstein, Charles L.; Hartleben, Björn; Inoki, Ken; Jiang, Man; Koya, Daisuke; Kume, Shinji; Lieberthal, Wilfred; Pallet, Nicolas; Quiroga, Alejandro; Ravichandran, Kameswaran; Susztak, Katalin; Yoshida, Sei; Dong, Zheng

    2012-01-01

    Autophagy is a highly conserved process that degrades cellular long-lived proteins and organelles. Accumulating evidence indicates that autophagy plays a critical role in kidney maintenance, diseases and aging. Ischemic, toxic, immunological, and oxidative insults can cause an induction of autophagy in renal epithelial cells modifying the course of various kidney diseases. This review summarizes recent insights on the role of autophagy in kidney physiology and diseases alluding to possible novel intervention strategies for treating specific kidney disorders by modifying autophagy. PMID:22692002

  18. Autophagy in the light of sphingolipid metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harvald, Eva Bang; Olsen, Anne Sofie Braun; Færgeman, Nils J.

    2015-01-01

    Maintenance of cellular homeostasis requires tight and coordinated control of numerous metabolic pathways, which are governed by interconnected networks of signaling pathways and energy-sensing regulators. Autophagy, a lysosomal degradation pathway by which the cell self-digests its own components......, has over the past decade been recognized as an essential part of metabolism. Autophagy not only rids the cell of excessive or damaged organelles, misfolded proteins, and invading microorganisms, it also provides nutrients to maintain crucial cellular functions. Besides serving as essential structural...... moieties of biomembranes, lipids including sphingolipids are increasingly being recognized as central regulators of a number of important cellular processes, including autophagy. In the present review we describe how sphingolipids, with special emphasis on ceramides and sphingosine-1-phosphate, can act...

  19. Induction of autophagy by spermidine promotes longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Tobias; Knauer, Heide; Schauer, Alexandra; Büttner, Sabrina; Ruckenstuhl, Christoph; Carmona-Gutierrez, Didac; Ring, Julia; Schroeder, Sabrina; Magnes, Christoph; Antonacci, Lucia; Fussi, Heike; Deszcz, Luiza; Hartl, Regina; Schraml, Elisabeth; Criollo, Alfredo; Megalou, Evgenia; Weiskopf, Daniela; Laun, Peter; Heeren, Gino; Breitenbach, Michael; Grubeck-Loebenstein, Beatrix; Herker, Eva; Fahrenkrog, Birthe; Fröhlich, Kai-Uwe; Sinner, Frank; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Minois, Nadege; Kroemer, Guido; Madeo, Frank

    2009-11-01

    Ageing results from complex genetically and epigenetically programmed processes that are elicited in part by noxious or stressful events that cause programmed cell death. Here, we report that administration of spermidine, a natural polyamine whose intracellular concentration declines during human ageing, markedly extended the lifespan of yeast, flies and worms, and human immune cells. In addition, spermidine administration potently inhibited oxidative stress in ageing mice. In ageing yeast, spermidine treatment triggered epigenetic deacetylation of histone H3 through inhibition of histone acetyltransferases (HAT), suppressing oxidative stress and necrosis. Conversely, depletion of endogenous polyamines led to hyperacetylation, generation of reactive oxygen species, early necrotic death and decreased lifespan. The altered acetylation status of the chromatin led to significant upregulation of various autophagy-related transcripts, triggering autophagy in yeast, flies, worms and human cells. Finally, we found that enhanced autophagy is crucial for polyamine-induced suppression of necrosis and enhanced longevity.

  20. IKK connects autophagy to major stress pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criollo, Alfredo; Senovilla, Laura; Authier, Hélène; Maiuri, Maria Chiara; Morselli, Eugenia; Vitale, Ilio; Kepp, Oliver; Tasdemir, Ezgi; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Shen, Shensi; Tailler, Maximilien; Delahaye, Nicolas; Tesniere, Antoine; De Stefano, Daniela; Younes, Aména Ben; Harper, Francis; Pierron, Gérard; Lavandero, Sergio; Zitvogel, Laurence; Israel, Alain; Baud, Véronique; Kroemer, Guido

    2010-01-01

    Cells respond to stress by activating cytoplasmic mechanisms as well as transcriptional programs that can lead to adaptation or death. Autophagy represents an important cytoprotective response that is regulated by both transcriptional and transcription-independent pathways. NFkappaB is perhaps the transcription factor most frequently activated by stress and has been ascribed with either pro- or anti-autophagic functions, depending on the cellular context. Our results demonstrate that activation of the IKK (IkappaB kinase) complex, which is critical for the stress-elicited activation of NFkappaB, is sufficient to promote autophagy independent of NFkappaB, and that IKK is required for the optimal induction of autophagy by both physiological and pharmacological autophagic triggers.

  1. Myocardial Autophagy after Severe Burn in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiong; Shi, Xiao-hua; Huang, Yue-sheng

    2012-01-01

    Background Autophagy plays a major role in myocardial ischemia and hypoxia injury. The present study investigated the effects of autophagy on cardiac dysfunction in rats after severe burn. Methods Protein expression of the autophagy markers LC3 and Beclin 1 were determined at 0, 1, 3, 6, and 12 h post-burn in Sprague Dawley rats subjected to 30% total body surface area 3rd degree burns. Autophagic, apoptotic, and oncotic cell death were evaluated in the myocardium at each time point by immunofluorescence. Changes of cardiac function were measured in a Langendorff model of isolated heart at 6 h post-burn, and the autophagic response was measured following activation by Rapamycin and inhibition by 3-methyladenine (3-MA). The angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor enalaprilat, the angiotensin receptor I blocker losartan, and the reactive oxygen species inhibitor diphenylene iodonium (DPI) were also applied to the ex vivo heart model to examine the roles of these factors in post-burn cardiac function. Results Autophagic cell death was first observed in the myocardium at 3 h post-burn, occurring in 0.008 ± 0.001% of total cardiomyocytes, and continued to increase to a level of 0.022 ± 0.005% by 12 h post-burn. No autophagic cell death was observed in control hearts. Compared with apoptosis, autophagic cell death occurred earlier and in larger quantities. Rapamycin enhanced autophagy and decreased cardiac function in isolated hearts 6 h post-burn, while 3-MA exerted the opposite response. Enalaprilat, losartan, and DPI all inhibited autophagy and enhanced heart function. Conclusion Myocardial autophagy is enhanced in severe burns and autophagic cell death occurred early at 3 h post-burn, which may contribute to post-burn cardiac dysfunction. Angiotensin II and reactive oxygen species may play important roles in this process by regulating cell signaling transduction. PMID:22768082

  2. Autophagy in breast cancer and its implications for therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Kirti; Paranandi, Krishna S; Sridharan, Savitha; Basu, Alakananda

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved process of cellular self-digestion that serves as a mechanism to clear damaged organelles and recycle nutrients. Since autophagy can promote cell survival as well as cell death, it has been linked to different human pathologies, including cancer. Although mono-allelic deletion of autophagy-related gene BECN1 in breast tumors originally indicated a tumor suppressive role for autophagy in breast cancer, the intense research during the last decade suggests a role for autophagy in tumor progression. It is now recognized that tumor cells often utilize autophagy to survive various stresses, such as oncogene-induced transformation, hypoxia, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and extracellular matrix detachment. Induction of autophagy by tumor cells may also contribute to tumor dormancy and resistance to anticancer therapies, thus making autophagy inhibitors promising drug candidates for breast cancer treatment. The scientific endeavors continue to define a precise role for autophagy in breast cancer. In this article, we review the current literature on the role of autophagy during the development and progression of breast cancer, and discuss the potential of autophagy modulators for breast cancer treatment. PMID:23841025

  3. Polycystin-2-dependent control of cardiomyocyte autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criollo, Alfredo; Altamirano, Francisco; Pedrozo, Zully; Schiattarella, Gabriele G; Li, Dan L; Rivera-Mejías, Pablo; Sotomayor-Flores, Cristian; Parra, Valentina; Villalobos, Elisa; Battiprolu, Pavan K; Jiang, Nan; May, Herman I; Morselli, Eugenia; Somlo, Stefan; de Smedt, Humbert; Gillette, Thomas G; Lavandero, Sergio; Hill, Joseph A

    2018-05-01

    Considerable evidence points to critical roles of intracellular Ca 2+ homeostasis in the modulation and control of autophagic activity. Yet, underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. Mutations in the gene (pkd2) encoding polycystin-2 (PC2) are associated with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), the most common inherited nephropathy. PC2 has been associated with impaired Ca 2+ handling in cardiomyocytes and indirect evidence suggests that this protein may be involved in autophagic control. Here, we investigated the role for PC2 as an essential regulator of Ca 2+ homeostasis and autophagy. Activation of autophagic flux triggered by mTOR inhibition either pharmacologically (rapamycin) or by means of nutrient depletion was suppressed in cells depleted of PC2. Moreover, cardiomyocyte-specific PC2 knockout mice (αMhc-cre;Pkd2 F/F mice) manifested impaired autophagic flux in the setting of nutrient deprivation. Stress-induced autophagy was blunted by intracellular Ca 2+ chelation using BAPTA-AM, whereas removal of extracellular Ca 2+ had no effect, pointing to a role of intracellular Ca 2+ homeostasis in stress-induced cardiomyocyte autophagy. To determine the link between stress-induced autophagy and PC2-induced Ca 2+ mobilization, we over-expressed either wild-type PC2 (WT) or a Ca 2+ -channel deficient PC2 mutant (PC2-D509V). PC2 over-expression increased autophagic flux, whereas PC2-D509V expression did not. Importantly, autophagy induction triggered by PC2 over-expression was attenuated by BAPTA-AM, supporting a model of PC2-dependent control of autophagy through intracellular Ca 2+ . Furthermore, PC2 ablation was associated with impaired Ca 2+ handling in cardiomyocytes marked by partial depletion of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca 2+ stores. Finally, we provide evidence that Ca 2+ -mediated autophagy elicited by PC2 is a mechanism conserved across multiple cell types. Together, this study unveils PC2 as a novel regulator of autophagy acting

  4. Autophagy: one more Nobel Prize for yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Zimmermann

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The recent announcement of the 2016 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, awarded to Yoshinori Ohsumi for the discoveries of mechanisms governing autophagy, underscores the importance of intracellular degradation and recycling. At the same time, it further cements yeast, in which this field decisively developed, as a prolific model organism. Here we provide a quick historical overview that mirrors both the importance of autophagy as a conserved and essential process for cellular life and death as well as the crucial role of yeast in its mechanistic characterization.

  5. Molecular Interactions of Autophagy with the Immune System and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunho Jin

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a highly conserved catabolic mechanism that mediates the degradation of damaged cellular components by inducing their fusion with lysosomes. This process provides cells with an alternative source of energy for the synthesis of new proteins and the maintenance of metabolic homeostasis in stressful environments. Autophagy protects against cancer by mediating both innate and adaptive immune responses. Innate immune receptors and lymphocytes (T and B are modulated by autophagy, which represent innate and adaptive immune responses, respectively. Numerous studies have demonstrated beneficial roles for autophagy induction as well as its suppression of cancer cells. Autophagy may induce either survival or death depending on the cell/tissue type. Radiation therapy is commonly used to treat cancer by inducing autophagy in human cancer cell lines. Additionally, melatonin appears to affect cancer cell death by regulating programmed cell death. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of autophagy and its regulation in cancer.

  6. Role of autophagy in development and progression of acute pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YANG Shuli

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis is considered an autodigestive disorder in which inappropriate activation of trypsinogen to trypsin within pancreatic acinar cells leads to the development of pancreatitis. Autophagy is an evolutionarily preserved degradation process of cytoplasmic cellular constituents, and it is one of the early pathological processes in acute pancreatitis. Autophagic flux is impaired in acute pancreatitis, which mediates the key pathologic responses of this disease. Impaired autophagy, dysfunction of lysosomes, and dysregulation of autophagy suggest a disorder of the endolysosomal pathway in acute pancreatitis. The role of autophagy in acute pancreatitis is discussed from the aspects of autophagic process, autophagy and activation of trypsinogen, impaired autophagy and acute pancreatitis, and defective autophagy promoting inflammation.

  7. Dual-Ratiometric Fluorescent Nanoprobe for Visualizing the Dynamic Process of pH and Superoxide Anion Changes in Autophagy and Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Limin; Chen, Yuanyuan; Yu, Zhengze; Pan, Wei; Wang, Hongyu; Li, Na; Tang, Bo

    2017-08-23

    Autophagy and apoptosis are closely associated with various pathological and physiological processes in cell cycles. Investigating the dynamic changes of intracellular active molecules in autophagy and apoptosis is of great significance for clarifying their inter-relationship and regulating mechanism in many diseases. In this study, we develop a dual-ratiometric fluorescent nanoprobe for quantitatively differentiating the dynamic process of superoxide anion (O 2 •- ) and pH changes in autophagy and apoptosis in HeLa cells. A rhodamine B-loaded mesoporous silica core was used as the reference, and fluorescence probes for pH and O 2 •- measurement were doped in the outer layer shell of SiO 2 . Then, chitosan and triphenylphosphonium were modified on the surface of SiO 2 . The experimental results showed that the nanoprobe is able to simultaneously and precisely visualize the changes of mitochondrial O 2 •- and pH in HeLa cells. The kinetics data revealed that the changes of pH and O 2 •- during autophagy and apoptosis in HeLa cells were significantly different. The pH value was decreased at the early stage of apoptosis and autophagy, whereas the O 2 •- level was enhanced at the early stage of apoptosis and almost unchanged at the initial stage of autophagy. At the late stage of apoptosis and autophagy, the concentration of O 2 •- was increased, whereas the pH was decreased at the late stage of autophagy and almost unchanged at the late stage of apoptosis. We hope that the present results provide useful information for studying the effects of O 2 •- and pH in autophagy and apoptosis in various pathological conditions and diseases.

  8. Control of GABARAP-mediated autophagy by the Golgi complex, centrosome and centriolar satellites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joachim, Justin; Tooze, Sharon A

    2018-01-01

    Within minutes of induction of autophagy by amino-acid starvation in mammalian cells, multiple autophagosomes form throughout the cell cytoplasm. During their formation, the autophagosomes sequester cytoplasmic material and deliver it to lysosomes for degradation. How these organelles can be so rapidly formed and how their formation is acutely regulated are major questions in the autophagy field. Protein and lipid trafficking from diverse cell compartments contribute membrane to, or regulate the formation of the autophagosome. In addition, recruitment of Atg8 (in yeast), and the ATG8-family members (in mammalian cells) to autophagosomes is required for efficient autophagy. Recently, it was discovered that the centrosome and centriolar satellites regulate autophagosome formation by delivery of an ATG8-family member, GABARAP, to the forming autophagosome membrane, the phagophore. We propose that GABARAP regulates phagophore expansion by activating the ULK complex, the amino-acid controlled initiator complex. This finding reveals a previously unknown link between the centrosome, centriolar satellites and autophagy. © 2017 Société Française des Microscopies and Société de Biologie Cellulaire de France. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. LC3B is indispensable for selective autophagy of p62 but not basal autophagy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Yoko; Sou, Yu-Shin; Kageyama, Shun; Takahashi, Takao; Ueno, Takashi; Tanaka, Keiji; Komatsu, Masaaki; Ichimura, Yoshinobu

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Knockdown of LC3 or GABARAP families did not affect the basal autophagy. • LC3B has a higher affinity for the autophagy-specific substrate, p62, than GABARAPs. • siRNA-mediated knockdown of LC3B, but not that of GABARAPs, resulted in significant accumulation of p62. - Abstract: Autophagy is a unique intracellular protein degradation system accompanied by autophagosome formation. Besides its important role through bulk degradation in supplying nutrients, this system has an ability to degrade certain proteins, organelles, and invading bacteria selectively to maintain cellular homeostasis. In yeasts, Atg8p plays key roles in both autophagosome formation and selective autophagy based on its membrane fusion property and interaction with autophagy adaptors/specific substrates. In contrast to the single Atg8p in yeast, mammals have 6 homologs of Atg8p comprising LC3 and GABARAP families. However, it is not clear these two families have different or similar functions. The aim of this study was to determine the separate roles of LC3 and GABARAP families in basal/constitutive and/or selective autophagy. While the combined knockdown of LC3 and GABARAP families caused a defect in long-lived protein degradation through lysosomes, knockdown of each had no effect on the degradation. Meanwhile, knockdown of LC3B but not GABARAPs resulted in significant accumulation of p62/Sqstm1, one of the selective substrate for autophagy. Our results suggest that while mammalian Atg8 homologs are functionally redundant with regard to autophagosome formation, selective autophagy is regulated by specific Atg8 homologs

  10. LC3B is indispensable for selective autophagy of p62 but not basal autophagy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maruyama, Yoko [Protein Metabolism Project, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo 156-8506 (Japan); Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Keio University, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Sou, Yu-Shin; Kageyama, Shun [Protein Metabolism Project, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo 156-8506 (Japan); Takahashi, Takao [Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Keio University, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Ueno, Takashi [Division of Proteomics and Biomolecular Science, Center for Biomedical Research Resources, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Tanaka, Keiji [Laboratory of Protein Metabolism, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo 156-8506 (Japan); Komatsu, Masaaki, E-mail: komatsu-ms@igakuken.or.jp [Protein Metabolism Project, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo 156-8506 (Japan); Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Niigata University, Niigata 951-8510 (Japan); Ichimura, Yoshinobu, E-mail: ichimura-ys@igakuken.or.jp [Protein Metabolism Project, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo 156-8506 (Japan)

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • Knockdown of LC3 or GABARAP families did not affect the basal autophagy. • LC3B has a higher affinity for the autophagy-specific substrate, p62, than GABARAPs. • siRNA-mediated knockdown of LC3B, but not that of GABARAPs, resulted in significant accumulation of p62. - Abstract: Autophagy is a unique intracellular protein degradation system accompanied by autophagosome formation. Besides its important role through bulk degradation in supplying nutrients, this system has an ability to degrade certain proteins, organelles, and invading bacteria selectively to maintain cellular homeostasis. In yeasts, Atg8p plays key roles in both autophagosome formation and selective autophagy based on its membrane fusion property and interaction with autophagy adaptors/specific substrates. In contrast to the single Atg8p in yeast, mammals have 6 homologs of Atg8p comprising LC3 and GABARAP families. However, it is not clear these two families have different or similar functions. The aim of this study was to determine the separate roles of LC3 and GABARAP families in basal/constitutive and/or selective autophagy. While the combined knockdown of LC3 and GABARAP families caused a defect in long-lived protein degradation through lysosomes, knockdown of each had no effect on the degradation. Meanwhile, knockdown of LC3B but not GABARAPs resulted in significant accumulation of p62/Sqstm1, one of the selective substrate for autophagy. Our results suggest that while mammalian Atg8 homologs are functionally redundant with regard to autophagosome formation, selective autophagy is regulated by specific Atg8 homologs.

  11. Sec16 in conventional and unconventional exocytosis: Working at the interface of membrane traffic and secretory autophagy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Bor Luen

    2017-12-01

    Sec16 is classically perceived to be a scaffolding protein localized to the transitional endoplasmic reticulum (tER) or the ER exit sites (ERES), and has a conserved function in facilitating coat protein II (COPII) complex-mediated ER exit. Recent findings have, however, pointed toward a role for Sec16 in unconventional exocytosis of certain membrane proteins, such as the Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) in mammalian cells, and possibly also α-integrin in certain contexts of Drosophila development. In this regard, Sec16 interacts with components of a recently deciphered pathway of stress-induced unconventional exocytosis, which is dependent on the tether protein Golgi reassembly stacking proteins (GRASPs) and the autophagy pathway. Intriguingly, Sec16 also appears to be post-translationally modified by autophagy-related signaling processes. Sec16 is known to be phosphorylated by the atypical extracellular signal regulated kinase 7 (Erk7) upon serum and amino acid starvation, both represent conditions that trigger autophagy. Recent work has also shown that Sec16 is phosphorylated, and thus regulated by the prominent autophagy-initiating Unc-51-like autophagy activating kinase 1 (Ulk1), as well as another autophagy modulator Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (Lrrk2). The picture emerging from Sec16's network of physical and functional interactors allows the speculation that Sec16 is situated (and may in yet undefined ways function) at the interface between COPII-mediated exocytosis of conventional vesicular traffic and the GRASP/autophagy-dependent mode of unconventional exocytosis. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. CD4 T cell autophagy is integral to memory maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murera, Diane; Arbogast, Florent; Arnold, Johan; Bouis, Delphine; Muller, Sylviane; Gros, Frédéric

    2018-04-13

    Studies of mice deficient for autophagy in T cells since thymic development, concluded that autophagy is integral to mature T cell homeostasis. Basal survival and functional impairments in vivo, limited the use of these models to delineate the role of autophagy during the immune response. We generated Atg5 f/f distal Lck (dLck)-cre mice, with deletion of autophagy only at a mature stage. In this model, autophagy deficiency impacts CD8 + T cell survival but has no influence on CD4 + T cell number and short-term activation. Moreover, autophagy in T cells is dispensable during early humoral response but critical for long-term antibody production. Autophagy in CD4 + T cells is required to transfer humoral memory as shown by injection of antigen-experienced cells in naive mice. We also observed a selection of autophagy-competent cells in the CD4 + T cell memory compartment. We performed in vitro differentiation of memory CD4 + T cells, to better characterize autophagy-deficient memory cells. We identified mitochondrial and lipid load defects in differentiated memory CD4 + T cells, together with a compromised survival, without any collapse of energy production. We then propose that memory CD4 + T cells rely on autophagy for their survival to regulate toxic effects of mitochondrial activity and lipid overload.

  13. Mutant p53 protein localized in the cytoplasm inhibits autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morselli, Eugenia; Tasdemir, Ezgi; Maiuri, Maria Chiara; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Kepp, Oliver; Criollo, Alfredo; Vicencio, José Miguel; Soussi, Thierry; Kroemer, Guido

    2008-10-01

    The knockout, knockdown or chemical inhibition of p53 stimulates autophagy. Moreover, autophagy-inducing stimuli such as nutrient depletion, rapamycin or lithium cause the depletion of cytoplasmic p53, which in turn is required for the induction of autophagy. Here, we show that retransfection of p53(-/-) HCT 116 colon carcinoma cells with wild type p53 decreases autophagy down to baseline levels. Surprisingly, one third among a panel of 22 cancer-associated p53 single amino acid mutants also inhibited autophagy when transfected into p53(-/-) cells. Those variants of p53 that preferentially localize to the cytoplasm effectively repressed autophagy, whereas p53 mutants that display a prominently nuclear distribution failed to inhibit autophagy. The investigation of a series of deletion mutants revealed that removal of the DNA-binding domain from p53 fails to interfere with its role in the regulation of autophagy. Altogether, these results identify the cytoplasmic localization of p53 as the most important feature for p53-mediated autophagy inhibition. Moreover, the structural requirements for the two biological activities of extranuclear p53, namely induction of apoptosis and inhibition of autophagy, are manifestly different.

  14. Autophagy and Microglia: Novel Partners in Neurodegeneration and Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaza-Zabala, Ainhoa; Sierra-Torre, Virginia; Sierra, Amanda

    2017-03-09

    Autophagy is emerging as a core regulator of Central Nervous System (CNS) aging and neurodegeneration. In the brain, it has mostly been studied in neurons, where the delivery of toxic molecules and organelles to the lysosome by autophagy is crucial for neuronal health and survival. However, we propose that the (dys)regulation of autophagy in microglia also affects innate immune functions such as phagocytosis and inflammation, which in turn contribute to the pathophysiology of aging and neurodegenerative diseases. Herein, we first describe the basic concepts of autophagy and its regulation, discuss key aspects for its accurate monitoring at the experimental level, and summarize the evidence linking autophagy impairment to CNS senescence and disease. We focus on acute, chronic, and autoimmunity-mediated neurodegeneration, including ischemia/stroke, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's diseases, and multiple sclerosis. Next, we describe the actual and potential impact of autophagy on microglial phagocytic and inflammatory function. Thus, we provide evidence of how autophagy may affect microglial phagocytosis of apoptotic cells, amyloid-β, synaptic material, and myelin debris, and regulate the progression of age-associated neurodegenerative diseases. We also discuss data linking autophagy to the regulation of the microglial inflammatory phenotype, which is known to contribute to age-related brain dysfunction. Overall, we update the current knowledge of autophagy and microglia, and highlight as yet unexplored mechanisms whereby autophagy in microglia may contribute to CNS disease and senescence.

  15. Impairment of autophagy: From hereditary disorder to drug intoxication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aki, Toshihiko; Funakoshi, Takeshi; Unuma, Kana; Uemura, Koichi

    2013-01-01

    At first, the molecular mechanism of autophagy was unveiled in a unicellular organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae (budding yeast), followed by the discovery that the basic mechanism of autophagy is conserved in multicellular organisms including mammals. Although autophagy was considered to be a non-selective bulk protein degradation system to recycle amino acids during periods of nutrient starvation, it is also believed to be an essential mechanism for the selective elimination of proteins/organelles that are damaged under pathological conditions. Research advances made using autophagy-deficient animals have revealed that impairments of autophagy often underlie the pathogenesis of hereditary disorders such as Danon, Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, and Huntington's diseases, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. On the other hand, there are many reports that drugs and toxicants, including arsenic, cadmium, paraquat, methamphetamine, and ethanol, induce autophagy during the development of their toxicity on many organs including heart, brain, lung, kidney, and liver. Although the question as to whether autophagic machinery is involved in the execution of cell death or not remains controversial, the current view of the role of autophagy during cell/tissue injury is that it is an important, often essential, cytoprotective reaction; disturbances in cytoprotective autophagy aggravate cell/tissue injuries. The purpose of this review is to provide (1) a gross summarization of autophagy processes, which are becoming more important in the field of toxicology, and (2) examples of important studies reporting the involvement of perturbations in autophagy in cell/tissue injuries caused by acute as well as chronic intoxication

  16. Induction of cytoprotective autophagy in PC-12 cells by cadmium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Qiwen; Zhu, Jiaqiao; Zhang, Kangbao; Jiang, Chenyang; Wang, Yi; Yuan, Yan; Bian, Jianchun; Liu, Xuezhong; Gu, Jianhong; Liu, Zongping

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Cadmium can promote early upregulation of autophagy in PC-12 cells. •Autophagy precedes apoptosis in cadmium-treated PC-12 cells. •Cadmium-induced autophagy is cytoprotective in PC-12 cells. •Class III PI3K/beclin-1/Bcl-2 signaling pathway plays a positive role in cadmium-triggered autophagy. -- Abstract: Laboratory data have demonstrated that cadmium (Cd) may induce neuronal apoptosis. However, little is known about the role of autophagy in neurons. In this study, cell viability decreased in a dose- and time-dependent manner after treatment with Cd in PC-12 cells. As cells were exposed to Cd, the levels of LC3-II proteins became elevated, specific punctate distribution of endogenous LC3-II increased, and numerous autophagosomes appeared, which suggest that Cd induced a high level of autophagy. In the late stages of autophagy, an increase in the apoptosis ratio was observed. Likewise, pre-treatment with chloroquine (an autophagic inhibitor) and rapamycin (an autophagic inducer) resulted in an increased and decreased percentage of apoptosis in contrast to other Cd-treated groups, respectively. The results indicate that autophagy delayed apoptosis in Cd-treated PC-12 cells. Furthermore, co-treatment of cells with chloroquine reduced autophagy and cell activity. However, rapamycin had an opposite effect on autophagy and cell activity. Moreover, class III PI3 K/beclin-1/Bcl-2 signaling pathways served a function in Cd-induced autophagy. The findings suggest that Cd can induce cytoprotective autophagy by activating class III PI3 K/beclin-1/Bcl-2 signaling pathways. In sum, this study strongly suggests that autophagy may serve a positive function in the reduction of Cd-induced cytotoxicity

  17. Xeroderma Pigmentosum Group A Promotes Autophagy to Facilitate Cisplatin Resistance in Melanoma Cells through the Activation of PARP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Rui; Liu, Lin; Dai, Wei; Zhang, Weigang; Yang, Yuqi; Wang, Huina; Shi, Qiong; Guo, Sen; Yi, Xiuli; Wang, Gang; Gao, Tianwen; Luan, Qi; Li, Chunying

    2016-06-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XPA), a key protein in the nucleotide excision repair pathway, has been shown to promote the resistance of tumor cells to chemotherapeutic drugs by facilitating the DNA repair process. However, the role of XPA in the resistance of melanoma to platinum-based drugs like cisplatin is largely unknown. In this study, we initially found that XPA was expressed at higher levels in cisplatin-resistant melanoma cells than in cisplatin-sensitive ones. Furthermore, the knockdown of XPA not only increased cellular apoptosis but also inhibited cisplatin-induced autophagy, which rendered the melanoma cells more sensitive to cisplatin. Moreover, we discovered that the increased XPA in resistant melanoma cells promoted poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) activation and that the inhibition of PARP1 could attenuate the cisplatin-induced autophagy. Finally, we proved that the inhibition of PARP1 and the autophagy process made resistant melanoma cells more susceptible to cisplatin treatment. Our study shows that XPA can promote cell-protective autophagy in a DNA repair-independent manner by enhancing the activation of PARP1 in melanoma cells resistant to cisplatin and that the XPA-PARP1-mediated autophagy process can be targeted to overcome cisplatin resistance in melanoma chemotherapy. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Schwann cell autophagy, myelinophagy, initiates myelin clearance from injured nerves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gomez-Sanchez, Jose A.; Carty, Lucy; Iruarrizaga-Lejarreta, Marta; Palomo-Irigoyen, Marta; Varela-Rey, Marta; Griffith, Megan; Hantke, Janina; Macias-Camara, Nuria; Azkargorta, Mikel; Aurrekoetxea, Igor; de Juan, Virginia Gutiérrez; Jefferies, Harold B. J.; Aspichueta, Patricia; Elortza, Félix; Aransay, Ana M.; Martínez-Chantar, María L.; Baas, Frank; Mato, José M.; Mirsky, Rhona; Woodhoo, Ashwin; Jessen, Kristján R.

    2015-01-01

    Although Schwann cell myelin breakdown is the universal outcome of a remarkably wide range of conditions that cause disease or injury to peripheral nerves, the cellular and molecular mechanisms that make Schwann cell-mediated myelin digestion possible have not been established. We report that

  19. Cardiac-specific overexpression of catalase attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced myocardial contractile dysfunction: role of autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turdi, Subat; Han, Xuefeng; Huff, Anna F; Roe, Nathan D; Hu, Nan; Gao, Feng; Ren, Jun

    2012-09-15

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from gram-negative bacteria is a major initiator of sepsis, leading to cardiovascular collapse. Accumulating evidence has indicated a role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cardiovascular complications in sepsis. This study was designed to examine the effect of cardiac-specific overexpression of catalase in LPS-induced cardiac contractile dysfunction and the underlying mechanism(s) with a focus on autophagy. Catalase transgenic and wild-type FVB mice were challenged with LPS (6 mg/kg) and cardiac function was evaluated. Levels of oxidative stress, autophagy, apoptosis, and protein damage were examined using fluorescence microscopy, Western blot, TUNEL assay, caspase-3 activity, and carbonyl formation. A Kaplan-Meier curve was constructed for survival after LPS treatment. Our results revealed a lower mortality in catalase mice compared with FVB mice after LPS challenge. LPS injection led to depressed cardiac contractile capacity as evidenced by echocardiography and cardiomyocyte contractile function, the effect of which was ablated by catalase overexpression. LPS treatment induced elevated TNF-α level, autophagy, apoptosis (TUNEL, caspase-3 activation, cleaved caspase-3), production of ROS and O(2)(-), and protein carbonyl formation, the effects of which were significantly attenuated by catalase overexpression. Electron microscopy revealed focal myocardial damage characterized by mitochondrial injury after LPS treatment, which was less severe in catalase mice. Interestingly, LPS-induced cardiomyocyte contractile dysfunction was prevented by the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine and the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine. Taken together, our data revealed that catalase protects against LPS-induced cardiac dysfunction and mortality, which may be associated with inhibition of oxidative stress and autophagy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Cardiac-Specific Overexpression of Catalase Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Myocardial Contractile Dysfunction: Role of Autophagy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turdi, Subat; Han, Xuefeng; Huff, Anna F.; Roe, Nathan D.; Hu, Nan; Gao, Feng; Ren, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Gram-negative bacteria is a major initiator of sepsis, leading to cardiovascular collapse. Accumulating evidence has indicated a role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cardiovascular complication in sepsis. This study was designed to examine the effect of cardiac-specific overexpression of catalase in LPS-induced cardiac contractile dysfunction and the underlying mechanism(s) with a focus on autophagy. Catalase transgenic and wild-type FVB mice were challenged with LPS (6 mg/kg) and cardiac function was evaluated. Levels of oxidative stress, autophagy, apoptosis and protein damage were examined using fluorescence microscopy, Western blot, TUNEL assay, caspase-3 activity and carbonyl formation. Kaplan-Meier curve was constructed for survival following LPS treatment. Our results revealed a lower mortality in catalase mice compared with FVB mice following LPS challenge. LPS injection led to depressed cardiac contractile capacity as evidenced by echocardiography and cardiomyocyte contractile function, the effect of which was ablated by catalase overexpression. LPS treatment induced elevated TNF-α level, autophagy, apoptosis (TUNEL, caspase-3 activation, cleaved caspase-3), production of ROS and O2−, and protein carbonyl formation, the effects of which were significantly attenuated by catalase overexpression. Electron microscopy revealed focal myocardial damage characterized by mitochondrial injury following LPS treatment, which was less severe in catalase mice. Interestingly, LPS-induced cardiomyocyte contractile dysfunction was prevented by antioxidant NAC and the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine. Taken together, our data revealed that catalase protects against LPS-induced cardiac dysfunction and mortality, which may be associated with inhibition of oxidative stress and autophagy. PMID:22902401

  1. Facilitated ethanol metabolism promotes cardiomyocyte contractile dysfunction through autophagy in murine hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Rui; Hu, Nan; Kandadi, Machender R; Ren, Jun

    2012-04-01

    Chronic drinking leads to myocardial contractile dysfunction where ethanol metabolism plays an essential role. Acetaldehyde, the main ethanol metabolite, mediates alcohol-induced cell injury although the underlying mechanism is still elusive. This study was designed to examine the mechanism involved in accelerated ethanol metabolism-induced cardiac defect with a focus on autophagy. Wild-type FVB and cardiac-specific overexpression of alcohol dehydrogenase mice were placed on a 4% nutrition-balanced alcohol diet for 8 weeks. Myocardial histology, immunohistochemistry, autophagy markers and signal molecules were examined. Expression of micro RNA miR-30a, a potential target of Beclin 1, was evaluated by real-time PCR. Chronic alcohol intake led to cardiac acetaldehyde accumulation, hypertrophy and overt autophagosome accumulation (LC3-II and Atg7), the effect of which was accentuated by ADH. Signaling molecules governing autophagy initiation including class III PtdIns3K, phosphorylation of mTOR and p70S6K were enhanced and dampened, respectively, following alcohol intake. These alcohol-induced signaling responses were augmented by ADH. ADH accentuated or unmasked alcohol-induced downregulation of Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and MiR-30a. Interestingly, ADH aggravated alcohol-induced p62 accumulation. Autophagy inhibition using 3-MA abolished alcohol-induced cardiomyocyte contractile anomalies. Moreover, acetaldehyde led to cardiomyocyte contractile dysfunction and autophagy induction, which was ablated by 3-MA. Ethanol or acetaldehyde increased GFP-LC3 puncta in H9c2 cells, the effect of which was ablated by 3-MA but unaffected by lysosomal inhibition using bafilomycin A(1), E64D and pepstatin A. In summary, these data suggested that facilitated acetaldehyde production via ADH following alcohol intake triggered cardiac autophagosome formation along with impaired lysosomal degradation, en route to myocardial defect.

  2. Cardiac-Specific Overexpression of Catalase Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Myocardial Contractile Dysfunction: Role of Autophagy

    OpenAIRE

    Turdi, Subat; Han, Xuefeng; Huff, Anna F.; Roe, Nathan D.; Hu, Nan; Gao, Feng; Ren, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Gram-negative bacteria is a major initiator of sepsis, leading to cardiovascular collapse. Accumulating evidence has indicated a role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cardiovascular complication in sepsis. This study was designed to examine the effect of cardiac-specific overexpression of catalase in LPS-induced cardiac contractile dysfunction and the underlying mechanism(s) with a focus on autophagy. Catalase transgenic and wild-type FVB mice were challenged ...

  3. Methods for assessing autophagy and autophagic cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasdemir, Ezgi; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Maiuri, M Chiara; Criollo, Alfredo; Vitale, Ilio; Hangen, Emilie; Modjtahedi, Nazanine; Kroemer, Guido

    2008-01-01

    Autophagic (or type 2) cell death is characterized by the massive accumulation of autophagic vacuoles (autophagosomes) in the cytoplasm of cells that lack signs of apoptosis (type 1 cell death). Here we detail and critically assess a series of methods to promote and inhibit autophagy via pharmacological and genetic manipulations. We also review the techniques currently available to detect autophagy, including transmission electron microscopy, half-life assessments of long-lived proteins, detection of LC3 maturation/aggregation, fluorescence microscopy, and colocalization of mitochondrion- or endoplasmic reticulum-specific markers with lysosomal proteins. Massive autophagic vacuolization may cause cellular stress and represent a frustrated attempt of adaptation. In this case, cell death occurs with (or in spite of) autophagy. When cell death occurs through autophagy, on the contrary, the inhibition of the autophagic process should prevent cellular demise. Accordingly, we describe a strategy for discriminating cell death with autophagy from cell death through autophagy.

  4. Autophagy as a potential target for sarcoma treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Li; Choy, Edwin; Pollock, Raphael E; Tu, Chongqi; Hornicek, Francis; Duan, Zhenfeng

    2017-08-01

    Autophagy is a constitutively active, evolutionary conserved, catabolic process for maintaining homeostasis in cellular stress responses and cell survival. Although its mechanism has not been fully illustrated, recent work on autophagy in various types of sarcomas has demonstrated that autophagy exerts an important role in sarcoma cell growth and proliferation, in pro-survival response to therapies and stresses, and in therapeutic resistance of sarcoma. Thus, the autophagic process is being seen as a possibly novel therapeutic target of sarcoma. Additionally, some co-regulators of autophagy have also been investigated as promising biomarkers for the diagnosis and prognosis of sarcoma. In this review, we summarize contemporary advances in the role of autophagy in sarcoma and discuss the potential of autophagy as a new target for sarcoma treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Autophagy Facilitates Salmonella Replication in HeLa Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hong B.; Croxen, Matthew A.; Marchiando, Amanda M.; Ferreira, Rosana B. R.; Cadwell, Ken; Foster, Leonard J.; Finlay, B. Brett

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Autophagy is a process whereby a double-membrane structure (autophagosome) engulfs unnecessary cytosolic proteins, organelles, and invading pathogens and delivers them to the lysosome for degradation. We examined the fate of cytosolic Salmonella targeted by autophagy and found that autophagy-targeted Salmonella present in the cytosol of HeLa cells correlates with intracellular bacterial replication. Real-time analyses revealed that a subset of cytosolic Salmonella extensively associates with autophagy components p62 and/or LC3 and replicates quickly, whereas intravacuolar Salmonella shows no or very limited association with p62 or LC3 and replicates much more slowly. Replication of cytosolic Salmonella in HeLa cells is significantly decreased when autophagy components are depleted. Eventually, hyperreplication of cytosolic Salmonella potentiates cell detachment, facilitating the dissemination of Salmonella to neighboring cells. We propose that Salmonella benefits from autophagy for its cytosolic replication in HeLa cells. PMID:24618251

  6. Forms, Crosstalks, and the Role of Phospholipid Biosynthesis in Autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leanne Pereira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a highly conserved cellular process occurring during periods of stress to ensure a cell's survival by recycling cytosolic constituents and making products that can be used in energy generation and other essential processes. Three major forms of autophagy exist according to the specific mechanism through which cytoplasmic material is transported to a lysosome. Chaperone-mediated autophagy is a highly selective form of autophagy that delivers specific proteins for lysosomal degradation. Microautophagy is a less selective form of autophagy that occurs through lysosomal membrane invaginations, forming tubes and directly engulfing cytoplasm. Finally, macroautophagy involves formation of new membrane bilayers (autophagosomes that engulf cytosolic material and deliver it to lysosomes. This review provides new insights on the crosstalks between different forms of autophagy and the significance of bilayer-forming phospholipid synthesis in autophagosomal membrane formation.

  7. Induction of autophagy is essential for monocyte-macrophage differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yan; Morgan, Michael J.; Chen, Kun; Choksi, Swati; Liu, Zheng-gang

    2012-01-01

    Monocytes are programmed to undergo apoptosis in the absence of stimulation. Stimuli that promote monocyte-macrophage differentiation not only cause cellular changes, but also prevent the default apoptosis of monocytes. In the present study, we demonstrate that autophagy is induced when monocytes are triggered to differentiate and that the induction of autophagy is pivotal for the survival and differentiation of monocytes. We also show that inhibition of autophagy results in apoptosis of cell...

  8. Targeting Pediatric Glioma with Apoptosis and Autophagy Manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    that chloroquine treatments give the most reliable inhibition of autophagy without being directly cytotoxic. Bafilomycin can continue to be used for...in pediatric glioma and its interaction with RTK inhibition and apoptotic pathway activation will enable us to develop efficacious clinical trials...of autophagy, Rab7 and Lamp 2. We are now introducing siRNA against Rab7 and Lamp2 to reiterate the effects of Chloroquine inhibition of autophagy

  9. Autophagy adaptor protein p62/SQSTM1 and autophagy-related gene Atg5 mediate autophagosome formation in response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shintaro Seto

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis is an intracellular pathogen that can survive within phagocytic cells by inhibiting phagolysosome biogenesis. However, host cells can control the intracellular M. tuberculosis burden by the induction of autophagy. The mechanism of autophagosome formation to M. tuberculosis has been well studied in macrophages, but remains unclear in dendritic cells. We therefore characterized autophagosome formation in response to M. tuberculosis infection in dendritic cells. Autophagy marker protein LC3, autophagy adaptor protein p62/SQSTM1 (p62 and ubiquitin co-localized to M. tuberculosis in dendritic cells. Mycobacterial autophagosomes fused with lysosomes during infection, and major histcompatibility complex class II molecules (MHC II also localized to mycobacterial autophagosomes. The proteins p62 and Atg5 function in the initiation and progression of autophagosome formation to M. tuberculosis, respectively; p62 mediates ubiquitination of M. tuberculosis and Atg5 is involved in the trafficking of degradative vesicles and MHC II to mycobacterial autophagosomes. These results imply that the autophagosome formation to M. tuberculosis in dendritic cells promotes the antigen presentation of mycobacterial peptides to CD4(+ T lymphocytes via MHC II.

  10. Glucocorticoids induce autophagy in rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, L.; Fan, J.; Lin, Y. S.

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoidinduced osteoporosis (GIOP) is a widespread clinical complication following glucocorticoid therapy. This irreversible damage to boneforming and resorbing cells is essential in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis. Autophagy is a physiological process involved in the regulation of cells...... and their responses to diverse stimuli, however, the role of autophagy in glucocorticoidinduced damage to bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) remains unclear. The current study confirmed that glucocorticoid administration impaired the proliferation of BMSCs. Transmission electron microscopy...... that in response to glucocorticoid administration, induced autophagy aids to maintain proliferation and prevent apoptosis of BMSCs. Thus, it is hypothesized that autophagy may be a novel target in the treatment or prevention of osteoporosis....

  11. Brucella Melitensis 16M Regulates the Effect of AIR Domain on Inflammatory Factors, Autophagy, and Apoptosis in Mouse Macrophage through the ROS Signaling Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiansen Li

    Full Text Available Brucellosis is a highly contagious zoonosis caused by Brucella. Brucella can invade and persist inside host cells, which results in chronic infection. We constructed AIR interference and overexpression lentiviruses to acquire AIR interference, overexpression, and rescue stable expression cell lines. We also established a Brucella melitensis 16M-infected macrophage model, which was treated with either the vehicle control or NAC (ROS scavenger N-acetylcysteine (NAC for 0, 3, 6, 12, and 24 h. Confocal laser microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, fluorescence quantitative PCR, flow cytometry, ELISA, and Western blot were used to detect inflammation, cell autophagy and apoptosis-related protein expression levels, ROS levels, and the distribution of mitochondria. It was found that after interference and overexpression of AIR, ROS release was significantly changed, and mitochondria became abnormally aggregated. B. melitensis 16M activated the NLRP3/AIM2 inflammatory complex, and induced RAW264.7 cells to secrete IL-1β and IL-18 through the ROS pathway. B. melitensis 16M also altered autophagy-related gene expression, increased autophagy activity, and induced cell apoptosis through the ROS pathway. The results showed that after B. melitensis 16M infection, ROS induced apoptosis, inflammation, and autophagy while AIR inhibited autophagosome maturation and autophagy initiation. Autophagy negatively regulated the activation of inflammasomes and prevented inflammation from occurring. In addition, mitophagy could promote cell apoptosis.

  12. Autophagy Is a Protective Response to the Oxidative Damage to Endplate Chondrocytes in Intervertebral Disc: Implications for the Treatment of Degenerative Lumbar Disc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Low back pain (LBP is the leading cause of disability in the elderly. Intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD was considered as the main cause for LBP. Degeneration of cartilaginous endplate was a crucial harmful factor during the initiation and development of IDD. Oxidative stress was implicated in IDD. However, the underlying molecular mechanism for the degeneration of cartilaginous endplate remains elusive. Herein, we found that oxidative stress could induce apoptosis and autophagy in endplate chondrocytes evidenced by western blot analysis, flow cytometry, immunofluorescence staining, GFP-LC3B transfection, and MDC staining. In addition, we also found that the apoptosis of endplate chondrocytes was significantly increased after the inhibition of autophagy by bafilomycin A1 shown by flow cytometry. Furthermore, mTOR pathway upstream autophagy was greatly suppressed suggested by western blot assay. In conclusion, our study strongly revealed that oxidative stress could increase autophagy and apoptosis of endplate chondrocytes in intervertebral disc. The increase of autophagy activity could prevent endplate chondrocytes from apoptosis. The autophagy in endplate chondrocytes induced by oxidative stress was mTOR dependent. These findings might shed some new lights on the mechanism for IDD and provide new strategies for the treatments of IDD.

  13. Dysregulation of Autophagy Contributes to Anal Carcinogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evie H Carchman

    Full Text Available Autophagy is an intracellular catabolic process that removes and recycles unnecessary/dysfunctional cellular components, contributing to cellular health and survival. Autophagy is a highly regulated cellular process that responds to several intracellular signals, many of which are deregulated by human papillomavirus (HPV infection through the expression of HPV-encoded oncoproteins. This adaptive inhibitory response helps prevent viral clearance. A strong correlation remains between HPV infection and the development of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC of the anus, particularly in HIV positive and other immunosuppressed patients. We hypothesize that autophagy is inhibited by HPV-encoded oncoproteins thereby promoting anal carcinogenesis (Fig 1.HPV16 transgenic mice (K14E6/E7 and non-transgenic mice (FVB/N, both of which do not spontaneously develop anal tumors, were treated topically with the chemical carcinogen, 7,12-Dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA, to induce anal cancer. The anuses at different time points of treatment (5, 10, 15 and 20 weeks were analyzed using immunofluorescence (IF for two key autophagy marker proteins (LC3β and p62 in addition to histological grading. The anuses from the K14E6/E7 mice were also analyzed for visual evidence of autophagic activity by electron microscopy (EM. To see if there was a correlation to humans, archival anal specimens were assessed histologically for grade of dysplasia and then analyzed for LC3β and p62 protein content. To more directly examine the effect of autophagic inhibition on anal carcinogenesis, nontransgenic mice that do not develop anal cancer with DMBA treatment were treated with a known pharmacologic inhibitor of autophagy, chloroquine, and examined for tumor development and analyzed by IF for autophagic proteins.Histologically, we observed the progression of normal anoderm to invasive SCC with DMBA treatment in K14E6/E7 mice but not in nontransgenic, syngeneic FVB/N background control mice

  14. Autophagy and phagocytosis converge for better vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Thomas A; Green, Douglas R

    2014-01-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a single layer of nonregenerating cells essential to homeostasis in the retina and the preservation of vision. While the RPE perform a number of important functions, 2 essential processes are phagocytosis, which removes the most distal tips of the photoreceptors to support disk renewal, and the visual cycle, which maintains the supply of chromophore for regeneration of photo-bleached visual pigments. We recently reported that these processes are linked by a noncanonical form of autophagy termed LC3-associated phagocytosis (LAP) in which components of the autophagy pathway are co-opted by phagocytosis to recover vitamin A in support of optimal vision. Here we summarize these findings.

  15. Quiltophagy--autophagy as folk art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crumrine, Barbara M; Klionsky, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    Over the years macroautophagy (hereafter autophagy) has been depicted artistically through painting, music, dance, videos, and poetry. A unifying idea behind these different aesthetic approaches is that people learn in different ways. Thus, some learners may be engaged by a detailed, but static, painting, whereas others may find insight through the dynamic visualization provided by a dance. While each of these formats has advantages, they also have a common weakness--whether delivered through watercolor on a canvas, words on a paper, or movement captured in a video, they are all 2-dimensional. Yet, some people are tactile learners. In this paper, a quilter describes a project she created with the goal of demonstrating autophagy using a 3-dimensional approach, in which different fiber textures could be used to elaborate certain parts of the process.

  16. A Molecular View of Autophagy in Lepidoptera

    OpenAIRE

    Romanelli, Davide; Casati, Barbara; Franzetti, Eleonora; Tettamanti, Gianluca

    2014-01-01

    Metamorphosis represents a critical phase in the development of holometabolous insects, during which the larval body is completely reorganized: in fact, most of the larval organs undergo remodeling or completely degenerate before the final structure of the adult insect is rebuilt. In the past, increasing evidence emerged concerning the intervention of autophagy and apoptosis in the cell death processes that occur in larval organs of Lepidoptera during metamorphosis, but a molecular characteri...

  17. TRANSAUTOPHAGY: European network for multidisciplinary research and translation of autophagy knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Caty; Codogno, Patrice; Pinti, Marcello; Batoko, Henri; Morán, María; Proikas-Cezanne, Tassula; Reggiori, Fulvio; Sirko, Agnieszka; Soengas, María S; Velasco, Guillermo; Lafont, Frank; Lane, Jon; Faure, Mathias; Cossarizza, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    abstract A collaborative consortium, named “TRANSAUTOPHAGY,” has been created among European research groups, comprising more than 150 scientists from 21 countries studying diverse branches of basic and translational autophagy. The consortium was approved in the framework of the Horizon 2020 Program in November 2015 as a COST Action of the European Union (COST means: CO-operation in Science and Technology), and will be sponsored for 4 years. TRANSAUTOPHAGY will form an interdisciplinary platform for basic and translational researchers, enterprises and stakeholders of diverse disciplines (including nanotechnology, bioinformatics, physics, chemistry, biology and various medical disciplines). TRANSAUTOPHAGY will establish 5 different thematic working groups, formulated to cooperate in research projects, share ideas, and results through workshops, meetings and short term exchanges of personnel (among other initiatives). TRANSAUTOPHAGY aims to generate breakthrough multidisciplinary knowledge about autophagy regulation, and to boost translation of this knowledge into biomedical and biotechnological applications. PMID:27046256

  18. TRANSAUTOPHAGY: European network for multidisciplinary research and translation of autophagy knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Caty; Codogno, Patrice; Pinti, Marcello; Batoko, Henri; Morán, María; Proikas-Cezanne, Tassula; Reggiori, Fulvio; Sirko, Agnieszka; Soengas, María S; Velasco, Guillermo; Lafont, Frank; Lane, Jon; Faure, Mathias; Cossarizza, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    A collaborative consortium, named "TRANSAUTOPHAGY," has been created among European research groups, comprising more than 150 scientists from 21 countries studying diverse branches of basic and translational autophagy. The consortium was approved in the framework of the Horizon 2020 Program in November 2015 as a COST Action of the European Union (COST means: CO-operation in Science and Technology), and will be sponsored for 4 years. TRANSAUTOPHAGY will form an interdisciplinary platform for basic and translational researchers, enterprises and stakeholders of diverse disciplines (including nanotechnology, bioinformatics, physics, chemistry, biology and various medical disciplines). TRANSAUTOPHAGY will establish 5 different thematic working groups, formulated to cooperate in research projects, share ideas, and results through workshops, meetings and short term exchanges of personnel (among other initiatives). TRANSAUTOPHAGY aims to generate breakthrough multidisciplinary knowledge about autophagy regulation, and to boost translation of this knowledge into biomedical and biotechnological applications.

  19. β-Cell Autophagy in Diabetes Pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marasco, Michelle R; Linnemann, Amelia K

    2018-05-01

    Nearly 100 years have passed since Frederick Banting and Charles Best first discovered and purified insulin. Their discovery and subsequent improvements revolutionized the treatment of diabetes, and the field continues to move at an ever-faster pace with respect to unique treatments for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Despite these advances, we still do not fully understand how apoptosis of the insulin-producing β-cells is triggered, presenting a challenge in the development of preventative measures. In recent years, the process of autophagy has generated substantial interest in this realm due to discoveries highlighting its clear role in the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. As a result, the number of studies focused on islet and β-cell autophagy has increased substantially in recent years. In this review, we will discuss what is currently known regarding the role of β-cell autophagy in type 1 and type 2 diabetes pathogenesis, with an emphasis on new and exciting developments over the past 5 years. Further, we will discuss how these discoveries might be translated into unique treatments in the coming years.

  20. Autophagy: a new player in skeletal maintenance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocking, Lynne J; Whitehouse, Caroline; Helfrich, Miep H

    2012-07-01

    Imbalances between bone resorption and formation lie at the root of disorders such as osteoporosis, Paget's disease of bone (PDB), and osteopetrosis. Recently, genetic and functional studies have implicated proteins involved in autophagic protein degradation as important mediators of bone cell function in normal physiology and in pathology. Autophagy is the conserved process whereby aggregated proteins, intracellular pathogens, and damaged organelles are degraded and recycled. This process is important both for normal cellular quality control and in response to environmental or internal stressors, particularly in terminally-differentiated cells. Autophagic structures can also act as hubs for the spatial organization of recycling and synthetic process in secretory cells. Alterations to autophagy (reduction, hyperactivation, or impairment) are associated with a number of disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases and cancers, and are now being implicated in maintenance of skeletal homoeostasis. Here, we introduce the topic of autophagy, describe the new findings that are starting to emerge from the bone field, and consider the therapeutic potential of modifying this pathway for the treatment of age-related bone disorders. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  1. Autophagy in the eye: implications for ocular cell health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Laura S; Mitchell, Claire H; Boesze-Battaglia, Kathleen

    2014-07-01

    Autophagy, a catabolic process by which a cell "eats" itself, turning over its own cellular constituents, plays a key role in cellular homeostasis. In an effort to maintain normal cellular function, autophagy is often up-regulated in response to environmental stresses and excessive organelle damage to facilitate aggregated protein removal. In the eye, virtually all cell types from those comprising the cornea in the front of the eye to the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) providing a protective barrier for the retina at the back of the eye, rely on one or more aspects of autophagy to maintain structure and/or normal physiological function. In the lens autophagy plays a critical role in lens fiber cell maturation and the formation of the organelle free zone. Numerous studies delineating the role of Atg5, Vsp34 as well as FYCO1 in maintenance of lens transparency are discussed. Corneal endothelial dystrophies are also characterized as having elevated levels of autophagic proteins. Therefore, novel modulators of autophagy such as lithium and melatonin are proposed as new therapeutic strategies for this group of dystrophies. In addition, we summarize how corneal Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV-1) infection subverts the cornea's response to infection by inhibiting the normal autophagic response. Using glaucoma models we analyze the relative contribution of autophagy to cell death and cell survival. The cytoprotective role of autophagy is further discussed in an analysis of photoreceptor cell heath and function. We focus our analysis on the current understanding of autophagy in photoreceptor and RPE health, specifically on the diverse role of autophagy in rods and cones as well as its protective role in light induced degeneration. Lastly, in the RPE we highlight hybrid phagocytosis-autophagy pathways. This comprehensive review allows us to speculate on how alterations in various stages of autophagy contribute to glaucoma and retinal degenerations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd

  2. Combined effects of starvation and butyrate on autophagy-dependent gingival epithelial cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, M; Murofushi, T; Tsuda, H; Mikami, Y; Zhao, N; Ochiai, K; Kurita-Ochiai, T; Yamamoto, M; Otsuka, K; Suzuki, N

    2017-06-01

    induced LC3B production and the induction was attenuated by AMPK inhibition. LC3B knockdown, in turn, significantly decreased butyrate-induced cell death. Therefore, AMPK-dependent LC3B induction apparently plays an important role in butyrate-induced cell death. There was a lack of correspondence between the levels of AMPK activation and LC3B induction; this may reflect the histone deacetylase-inhibitory capacity of butyrate on histone proteins. Taken together, starvation and butyrate exposure promote autophagy via AMPK signaling, while the histone deacetylase-inhibitory effects of butyrate alter chromatin to transcriptionally active state, resulting in strong LC3B induction and subsequent cell death. These findings may help improve the understanding of the cellular processes underlying periodontal disease initiation. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Preservation of autophagy should not direct nutritional therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McClave, S.A.; Weijs, P.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Recent reports in the literature have proposed that forced mandatory feeding should be avoided in the first week of critical illness to preserve autophagy, in order to maximize responses to oxidative stress, preserve organ function, and improve outcomes. RECENT FINDINGS: Autophagy

  4. Regulation of Autophagy by Glucose in Mammalian Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erwin Knecht

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved process that contributes to maintain cell homeostasis. Although it is strongly regulated by many extracellular factors, induction of autophagy is mainly produced by starvation of nutrients. In mammalian cells, the regulation of autophagy by amino acids, and also by the hormone insulin, has been extensively investigated, but knowledge about the effects of other autophagy regulators, including another nutrient, glucose, is more limited. Here we will focus on the signalling pathways by which environmental glucose directly, i.e., independently of insulin and glucagon, regulates autophagy in mammalian cells, but we will also briefly mention some data in yeast. Although glucose deprivation mainly induces autophagy via AMPK activation and the subsequent inhibition of mTORC1, we will also comment other signalling pathways, as well as evidences indicating that, under certain conditions, autophagy can be activated by glucose. A better understanding on how glucose regulates autophagy not only will expand our basic knowledge of this important cell process, but it will be also relevant to understand common human disorders, such as cancer and diabetes, in which glucose levels play an important role.

  5. Anti- and pro-tumor functions of autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morselli, Eugenia; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Kepp, Oliver; Vicencio, José-Miguel; Criollo, Alfredo; Maiuri, Maria Chiara; Kroemer, Guido

    2009-09-01

    Autophagy constitutes one of the major responses to stress in eukaryotic cells, and is regulated by a complex network of signaling cascades. Not surprisingly, autophagy is implicated in multiple pathological processes, including infection by pathogens, inflammatory bowel disease, neurodegeneration and cancer. Both oncogenesis and tumor survival are influenced by perturbations of the molecular machinery that controls autophagy. Numerous oncoproteins, including phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, Akt1 and anti-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family suppress autophagy. Conversely, several tumor suppressor proteins (e.g., Atg4c; beclin 1; Bif-1; BH3-only proteins; death-associated protein kinase 1; LKB1/STK11; PTEN; UVRAG) promote the autophagic pathway. This does not entirely apply to p53, one of the most important tumor suppressor proteins, which regulates autophagy in an ambiguous fashion, depending on its subcellular localization. Irrespective of the controversial role of p53, basal levels of autophagy appear to inhibit tumor development. On the contrary, chemotherapy- and metabolic stress-induced activation of the autophagic pathway reportedly contribute to the survival of formed tumors, thereby favoring resistance. In this context, autophagy inhibition would represent a major therapeutic target for chemosensitization. Here, we will review the current knowledge on the dual role of autophagy as an anti- and pro-tumor mechanism.

  6. Autophagy mediates pharmacological lifespan extension by spermidine and resveratrol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morselli, Eugenia; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Kepp, Oliver; Criollo, Alfredo; Maiuri, Maria Chiara; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Madeo, Frank; Kroemer, Guido

    2009-12-23

    Although autophagy has widely been conceived as a self-destructive mechanism that causes cell death, accumulating evidence suggests that autophagy usually mediates cytoprotection, thereby avoiding the apoptotic or necrotic demise of stressed cells. Recent evidence produced by our groups demonstrates that autophagy is also involved in pharmacological manipulations that increase longevity. Exogenous supply of the polyamine spermidine can prolong the lifespan of (while inducing autophagy in) yeast, nematodes and flies. Similarly, resveratrol can trigger autophagy in cells from different organisms, extend lifespan in nematodes, and ameliorate the fitness of human cells undergoing metabolic stress. These beneficial effects are lost when essential autophagy modulators are genetically or pharmacologically inactivated, indicating that autophagy is required for the cytoprotective and/or anti-aging effects of spermidine and resveratrol. Genetic and functional studies indicate that spermidine inhibits histone acetylases, while resveratrol activates the histone deacetylase Sirtuin 1 to confer cytoprotection/longevity. Although it remains elusive whether the same histones (or perhaps other nuclear or cytoplasmic proteins) act as the downstream targets of spermidine and resveratrol, these results point to an essential role of protein hypoacetylation in autophagy control and in the regulation of longevity.

  7. Autophagy contributes to resistance of tumor cells to ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaachouay, Hassan; Ohneseit, Petra; Toulany, Mahmoud; Kehlbach, Rainer; Multhoff, Gabriele; Rodemann, H Peter

    2011-06-01

    Autophagy signaling is a novel important target to improve anticancer therapy. To study the role of autophagy on resistance of tumor cells to ionizing radiation (IR), breast cancer cell lines differing in their intrinsic radiosensitivity were used. Breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231 and HBL-100 were examined with respect to clonogenic cell survival and induction of autophagy after radiation exposure and pharmacological interference of the autophagic process. As marker for autophagy the appearance of LC3-I and LC3-II proteins was analyzed by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting. Formation of autophagic vacuoles was monitored by immunofluorescence staining of LC3. LC3-I and LC3-II formation differs markedly in radioresistant MDA-MB-231 versus radiosensitive HBL-100 cells. Western blot analyses of LC3-II/LC3-I ratio indicated marked induction of autophagy by IR in radioresistant MDA-MB-231 cells, but not in radiosensitive HBL-100 cells. Indirect immunofluorescence analysis of LC3-II positive vacuoles confirmed this differential effect. Pre-treatment with 3-methyladenine (3-MA) antagonized IR-induced autophagy. Likewise, pretreatment of radioresistant MDA-231 cells with autophagy inhibitors 3-MA or chloroquine (CQ) significantly reduced clonogenic survival of irradiated cells. Our data clearly indicate that radioresistant breast tumor cells show a strong post-irradiation induction of autophagy, which thus serves as a protective and pro-survival mechanism in radioresistance. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. VALSARTAN REGULATES MYOCARDIAL AUTOPHAGY AND MITOCHONDRIAL TURNOVER IN EXPERIMENTAL HYPERTENSION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Li, Zi-Lun; Crane, John A.; Jordan, Kyra L.; Pawar, Aditya S.; Textor, Stephen C.; Lerman, Amir; Lerman, Lilach O.

    2014-01-01

    Renovascular hypertension alters cardiac structure and function. Autophagy is activated during left ventricular hypertrophy and linked to adverse cardiac function. The Angiotensin II receptor blocker Valsartan lowers blood pressure and is cardioprotective, but whether it modulates autophagy in the myocardium is unclear. We hypothesized that Valsartan would alleviate autophagy and improve left ventricular myocardial mitochondrial turnover in swine renovascular hypertension. Domestic pigs were randomized to control, unilateral renovascular hypertension, and renovascular hypertension treated with Valsartan (320 mg/day) or conventional triple therapy (Reserpine+hydralazine+hydrochlorothiazide) for 4 weeks post 6-weeks of renovascular hypertension (n=7 each group). Left ventricular remodeling, function and myocardial oxygenation and microcirculation were assessed by multi-detector computer tomography, blood-oxygen-level-dependent magnetic resonance imaging and microcomputer tomography. Myocardial autophagy, markers for mitochondrial degradation and biogenesis, and mitochondrial respiratory-chain proteins were examined ex vivo. Renovascular hypertension induced left ventricular hypertrophy and myocardial hypoxia, enhanced cellular autophagy and mitochondrial degradation, and suppressed mitochondrial biogenesis. Valsartan and triple therapy similarly decreased blood pressure, but Valsartan solely alleviated left ventricular hypertrophy, ameliorated myocardial autophagy and mitophagy, and increased mitochondrial biogenesis. In contrast, triple therapy only slightly attenuated autophagy and preserved mitochondrial proteins, but elicited no improvement in mitophagy. These data suggest a novel potential role of Valsartan in modulating myocardial autophagy and mitochondrial turnover in renovascular hypertension-induced hypertensive heart disease, which may possibly bolster cardiac repair via a blood pressure-independent manner. PMID:24752430

  9. Autophagy in Negative-Strand RNA Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yupeng Wang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a homoeostatic process by which cytoplasmic material is targeted for degradation by the cell. Viruses have learned to manipulate the autophagic pathway to ensure their own replication and survival. Although much progress has been achieved in dissecting the interplay between viruses and cellular autophagic machinery, it is not well understood how the cellular autophagic pathway is utilized by viruses and manipulated to their own advantage. In this review, we briefly introduce autophagy, viral xenophagy and the interaction among autophagy, virus and immune response, then focus on the interplay between NS-RNA viruses and autophagy during virus infection. We have selected some exemplary NS-RNA viruses and will describe how these NS-RNA viruses regulate autophagy and the role of autophagy in NS-RNA viral replication and in immune responses to virus infection. We also review recent advances in understanding how NS-RNA viral proteins perturb autophagy and how autophagy-related proteins contribute to NS-RNA virus replication, pathogenesis and antiviral immunity.

  10. Autophagy-dependent secretion: contribution to tumor progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Keulers

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is best known as a lysosomal degradation and recycling pathway to maintain cellular homeostasis. During autophagy, cytoplasmic content is recognized and packed in autophagic vacuoles, or autophagosomes, and targeted for degradation. However, during the last years, it has become evident that the role of autophagy is not restricted to degradation alone but also mediates unconventional forms of secretion. Furthermore, cells with defects in autophagy apparently are able to reroute their cargo, like mitochondria, to the extracellular environment; effects that contribute to an array of pathologies. In this review we discuss the current knowledge of the physiological roles of autophagy-dependent secretion, i.e. the effect on inflammation and insulin/ hormone secretion. Finally, we focus on the effects of autophagy-dependent secretion on the tumour microenvironment and tumour progression. The autophagy mediated secreted factors may stimulate cellular proliferation via auto- and paracrine signaling. The autophagy mediated release of immune modulating proteins change the immunosuppresive tumor microenvironment and may promote an invasive phenotype. These effects may be either direct or indirect through facilitating formation of the mobilized vesicle, aid in anterograde trafficking or alterations in homeostasis and/or autonomous cell signaling.

  11. Role of Autophagy in the Control of Body Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenying Quan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy plays a crucial role in the maintenance of cellular nutrient balance and the function of organelles such as mitochondria or the endoplasmic reticulum, which are important in intracellular metabolism, insulin release, and insulin sensitivity. In the insulin-producing pancreatic β-cells, autophagy is important in the maintenance of β-cell mass, structure, and function. Mice with deficiencies in β-cell-specific autophagy show reduced β-cell mass and defects in insulin secretion that lead to hypoinsulinemia and hyperglycemia but not diabetes. However, these mice developed diabetes when bred with ob/ob mice, suggesting that autophagy-deficient β-cells have defects in dealing with the increased metabolic stress imposed by obesity. These results also imply that autophagy deficiency in β-cells could be a factor in the progression from obesity to diabetes. Another important function of autophagy is in hypothalamic neurons for the central control of energy expenditure, appetite, and body weight. In addition, mice with autophagy deficiencies in the target tissues of insulin have yielded diverse phenotypes. Taken together, these results suggest that autophagy is important in the control of whole body energy and nutrient homeostasis, and its dysregulation could play a role in the development of metabolic disorders and diabetes.

  12. The Nobel Prize for understanding autophagy, a cellular mechanism ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The lysosome was identified by Christian de Duve in the 1950s as a membrane bound organelle in thecell that contains degradative enzymes such as proteases, lipases, acid phosphatases, etc. (de Duve, 2005).The term autophagy was coined by Christian de Duve in 1963. Autophagy generally occurs at low level, butit ...

  13. Autophagy Primes Neutrophils for Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Formation during Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, So Young; Shrestha, Sanjeeb; Youn, Young-Jin; Kim, Jun-Kyu; Kim, Shin-Yeong; Kim, Hyun Jung; Park, So-Hee; Ahn, Won-Gyun; Kim, Shin; Lee, Myung Goo; Jung, Ki-Suck; Park, Yong Bum; Mo, Eun-Kyung; Ko, Yousang; Lee, Suh-Young; Koh, Younsuck; Park, Myung Jae; Song, Dong-Keun; Hong, Chang-Won

    2017-09-01

    Neutrophils are key effectors in the host's immune response to sepsis. Excessive stimulation or dysregulated neutrophil functions are believed to be responsible for sepsis pathogenesis. However, the mechanisms regulating functional plasticity of neutrophils during sepsis have not been fully determined. We investigated the role of autophagy in neutrophil functions during sepsis in patients with community-acquired pneumonia. Neutrophils were isolated from patients with sepsis and stimulated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). The levels of reactive oxygen species generation, neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation, and granule release, and the autophagic status were evaluated. The effect of neutrophil autophagy augmentation was further evaluated in a mouse model of sepsis. Neutrophils isolated from patients who survived sepsis showed an increase in autophagy induction, and were primed for NET formation in response to subsequent PMA stimulation. In contrast, neutrophils isolated from patients who did not survive sepsis showed dysregulated autophagy and a decreased response to PMA stimulation. The induction of autophagy primed healthy neutrophils for NET formation and vice versa. In a mouse model of sepsis, the augmentation of autophagy improved survival via a NET-dependent mechanism. These results indicate that neutrophil autophagy primes neutrophils for increased NET formation, which is important for proper neutrophil effector functions during sepsis. Our study provides important insights into the role of autophagy in neutrophils during sepsis.

  14. Inhibition of autophagy as a treatment strategy for p53 wild-type acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Folkerts, Hendrik; Hilgendorf, Susan; Wierenga, Albertus T J; Jaques, Jennifer; Mulder, André B; Coffer, Paul J; Schuringa, Jan Jacob; Vellenga, Edo

    2017-01-01

    Here we have explored whether inhibition of autophagy can be used as a treatment strategy for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Steady-state autophagy was measured in leukemic cell lines and primary human CD34(+) AML cells with a large variability in basal autophagy between AMLs observed. The autophagy

  15. Combination of Hydroxyl Acetylated Curcumin and Ultrasound Induces Macrophage Autophagy with Anti-Apoptotic and Anti-Lipid Aggregation Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longbin Zheng

    2016-10-01

    -methyladenine enhanced the HAC-SDT-induced apoptosis. Additionally, HAC-SDT-induced autophagy and apoptosis were both blocked by ROS scavenger N-acetyl-l-cysteine. Conclusion: The results suggested that autophagy not only played an inhibitory role in the process of apoptosis but also could effectively attenuate lipid aggregation in THP-1 macrophages during HAC-SDT. As important intracellular mediators, the ROS generated by HAC-SDT also played a crucial role in initiating apoptosis and autophagy.

  16. Autophagy in Drosophila: From Historical Studies to Current Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulakkal, Nitha C.; Nagy, Peter; Takats, Szabolcs; Tusco, Radu; Juhász, Gábor; Nezis, Ioannis P.

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of evolutionarily conserved Atg genes required for autophagy in yeast truly revolutionized this research field and made it possible to carry out functional studies on model organisms. Insects including Drosophila are classical and still popular models to study autophagy, starting from the 1960s. This review aims to summarize past achievements and our current knowledge about the role and regulation of autophagy in Drosophila, with an outlook to yeast and mammals. The basic mechanisms of autophagy in fruit fly cells appear to be quite similar to other eukaryotes, and the role that this lysosomal self-degradation process plays in Drosophila models of various diseases already made it possible to recognize certain aspects of human pathologies. Future studies in this complete animal hold great promise for the better understanding of such processes and may also help finding new research avenues for the treatment of disorders with misregulated autophagy. PMID:24949430

  17. Does autophagy work in synaptic plasticity and memory?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shehata, Mohammad; Inokuchi, Kaoru

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have reported the roles played by regulated proteolysis in neural plasticity and memory. Within this context, most of the research focused on the ubiquitin-proteasome system and the endosome-lysosome system while giving lesser consideration to another major protein degradation system, namely, autophagy. Although autophagy intersects with many of the pathways known to underlie synaptic plasticity and memory, only few reports related autophagy to synaptic remodeling. These pathways include PI3K-mTOR pathway and endosome-dependent proteolysis. In this review, we will discuss several lines of evidence supporting a physiological role of autophagy in memory processes, and the possible mechanistic scenarios for how autophagy could fulfill this function.

  18. Autophagy in Drosophila: From Historical Studies to Current Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitha C. Mulakkal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of evolutionarily conserved Atg genes required for autophagy in yeast truly revolutionized this research field and made it possible to carry out functional studies on model organisms. Insects including Drosophila are classical and still popular models to study autophagy, starting from the 1960s. This review aims to summarize past achievements and our current knowledge about the role and regulation of autophagy in Drosophila, with an outlook to yeast and mammals. The basic mechanisms of autophagy in fruit fly cells appear to be quite similar to other eukaryotes, and the role that this lysosomal self-degradation process plays in Drosophila models of various diseases already made it possible to recognize certain aspects of human pathologies. Future studies in this complete animal hold great promise for the better understanding of such processes and may also help finding new research avenues for the treatment of disorders with misregulated autophagy.

  19. Modulation of Autophagy-Like Processes by Tumor Viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Munger

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is an intracellular degradation pathway for long-lived proteins and organelles. This process is activated above basal levels upon cell intrinsic or environmental stress and dysregulation of autophagy has been linked to various human diseases, including those caused by viral infection. Many viruses have evolved strategies to directly interfere with autophagy, presumably to facilitate their replication or to escape immune detection. However, in some cases, modulation of autophagy appears to be a consequence of the virus disturbing the cell’s metabolic signaling networks. Here, we summarize recent advances in research at the interface of autophagy and viral infection, paying special attention to strategies that human tumor viruses have evolved.

  20. Autophagy-related genes in Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Shingo; Nagashima, Hiroyuki; Uotani, Takahiro; Graham, David Y; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2017-06-01

    In vitro studies have shown that Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection induces autophagy in gastric epithelial cells. However, prolonged exposure to H. pylori reduces autophagy by preventing maturation of the autolysosome. The alterations of the autophagy-related genes in H. pylori infection are not yet fully understood. We analyzed autophagy-related gene expression in H. pylori-infected gastric mucosa compared with uninfected gastric mucosa obtained from 136 Bhutanese volunteers with mild dyspeptic symptoms. We also studied single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of autophagy-related gene in 283 Bhutanese participants to identify the influence on susceptibility to H. pylori infection. Microarray analysis of 226 autophagy-related genes showed that 16 genes were upregulated (7%) and nine were downregulated (4%). We used quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction to measure mRNA levels of the downregulated genes (ATG16L1, ATG5, ATG4D, and ATG9A) that were core molecules of autophagy. ATG16L1 and ATG5 mRNA levels in H. pylori-positive specimens (n=86) were significantly less than those in H. pylori-negative specimens (n=50). ATG16L1 mRNA levels were inversely related to H. pylori density. We also compared SNPs of ATG16L1 (rs2241880) among 206 H. pylori-positive and 77 H. pylori-negative subjects. The odds ratio for the presence of H. pylori in the GG genotype was 0.40 (95% CI: 0.18-0.91) relative to the AA/AG genotypes. Autophagy-related gene expression profiling using high-throughput microarray analysis indicated that downregulation of core autophagy machinery genes may depress autophagy functions and possibly provide a better intracellular habit for H. pylori in gastric epithelial cells. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Pravastatin Protects Against Avascular Necrosis of Femoral Head via Autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yun; Zhang, Ping; Yuan, Bo; Li, Ling; Bao, Shisan

    2018-01-01

    Autophagy serves as a stress response and may contribute to the pathogenesis of avascular necrosis of the femoral head induced by steroids. Statins promote angiogenesis and ameliorate endothelial functions through apoptosis inhibition and necrosis of endothelial progenitor cells, however the process used by statins to modulate autophagy in avascular necrosis of the femoral head remains unclear. This manuscript determines whether pravastatin protects against dexamethasone-induced avascular necrosis of the femoral head by activating endothelial progenitor cell autophagy. Pravastatin was observed to enhance the autophagy activity in endothelial progenitor cells, specifically by upregulating LC3-II/Beclin-1 (autophagy related proteins), and autophagosome formation in vivo and in vitro . An autophagy inhibitor, 3-MA, reduced pravastatin protection in endothelial progenitor cells exposed to dexamethasone by attenuating pravastatin-induced autophagy. Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key autophagy regulator by sensing cellular energy changes, and indirectly suppressing activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). We found that phosphorylation of AMPK was upregulated however phosphorylation of mTOR was downregulated in pravastatin-treated endothelial progenitor cells, which was attenuated by AMPK inhibitor compound C. Furthermore, liver kinase B1 (a phosphorylase of AMPK) knockdown eliminated pravastatin regulated autophagy protein LC3-II in endothelial progenitor cells in vitro . We therefore demonstrated pravastatin rescued endothelial progenitor cells from dexamethasone-induced autophagy dysfunction through the AMPK-mTOR signaling pathway in a liver kinase B1-dependent manner. Our results provide useful information for the development of novel therapeutics for management of glucocorticoids-induced avascular necrosis of the femoral head.

  2. Does autophagy in the midgut epithelium of centipedes depend on the day/night cycle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rost-Roszkowska, M M; Chajec, Ł; Vilimova, J; Tajovský, K; Kszuk-Jendrysik, M

    2015-01-01

    The midgut epithelium of two centipedes, Lithobius forficatus and Scolopendra cingulata, is composed of digestive, secretory and regenerative cells. In L. forficatus, the autophagy occurred only in the cytoplasm of the digestive cells as a sporadic process, while in S. cingulata, it occurred intensively in the digestive, secretory and regenerative cells of the midgut epithelium. In both of the species that were analyzed, this process proceeded in a continuous manner and did not depend on the day/night cycle. Ultrastructural analysis showed that the autophagosomes and autolysosomes were located mainly in the apical and perinuclear cytoplasm of the digestive cells in L. forficatus. However, in S. cingulata, the entire cytoplasm was filled with autophagosomes and autolysosomes. Initially the membranes of phagophores surround organelles during autophagosome formation. Autolysosomes result from the fusion of autophagosomes and lysosomes. Residual bodies which are the last stage of autophagy were released into the midgut lumen due to necrosis. Autophagy in the midgut epithelia that were analyzed was confirmed using acid phosphatase and mono-dansyl-cadaverine stainings. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A synthetic ion transporter that disrupts autophagy and induces apoptosis by perturbing cellular chloride concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busschaert, Nathalie; Park, Seong-Hyun; Baek, Kyung-Hwa; Choi, Yoon Pyo; Park, Jinhong; Howe, Ethan N. W.; Hiscock, Jennifer R.; Karagiannidis, Louise E.; Marques, Igor; Félix, Vítor; Namkung, Wan; Sessler, Jonathan L.; Gale, Philip A.; Shin, Injae

    2017-07-01

    Perturbations in cellular chloride concentrations can affect cellular pH and autophagy and lead to the onset of apoptosis. With this in mind, synthetic ion transporters have been used to disturb cellular ion homeostasis and thereby induce cell death; however, it is not clear whether synthetic ion transporters can also be used to disrupt autophagy. Here, we show that squaramide-based ion transporters enhance the transport of chloride anions in liposomal models and promote sodium chloride influx into the cytosol. Liposomal and cellular transport activity of the squaramides is shown to correlate with cell death activity, which is attributed to caspase-dependent apoptosis. One ion transporter was also shown to cause additional changes in lysosomal pH, which leads to impairment of lysosomal enzyme activity and disruption of autophagic processes. This disruption is independent of the initiation of apoptosis by the ion transporter. This study provides the first experimental evidence that synthetic ion transporters can disrupt both autophagy and induce apoptosis.

  4. Interleukin-6 Reduces β-Cell Oxidative Stress by Linking Autophagy With the Antioxidant Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marasco, Michelle R; Conteh, Abass M; Reissaus, Christopher A; Cupit V, John E; Appleman, Evan M; Mirmira, Raghavendra G; Linnemann, Amelia K

    2018-05-21

    Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a key instigator of β-cell dysfunction in diabetes. The pleiotropic cytokine IL-6 has previously been linked to β-cell autophagy but has not been studied in the context of β-cell antioxidant response. We used a combination of animal models of diabetes and analysis of cultured human islets and rodent β-cells to study how IL-6 influences antioxidant response. We show that IL-6 couples autophagy to antioxidant response to reduce β-cell and human islet ROS. β cell-specific loss of IL-6 signaling in vivo renders mice more susceptible to oxidative damage and cell death by the selective β-cell toxins streptozotocin and alloxan. IL-6-driven ROS reduction is associated with an increase in the master antioxidant factor NRF2, which rapidly translocates to the mitochondria to decrease mitochondrial activity and stimulate mitophagy. IL-6 also initiates a robust transient drop in cellular cAMP, likely contributing to the stimulation of mitophagy for ROS mitigation. Our findings suggest that coupling autophagy to antioxidant response in the β cell leads to stress adaptation that can reduce cellular apoptosis. These findings have implications for β-cell survival under diabetogenic conditions and present novel targets for therapeutic intervention. © 2018 by the American Diabetes Association.

  5. Autophagy in retinal ganglion cells in a rhesus monkey chronic hypertensive glaucoma model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuifeng Deng

    Full Text Available Primary open angle glaucoma (POAG is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by physiological intraocular hypertension that causes damage to the retinal ganglion cells (RGCs. In the past, RGC damage in POAG was suggested to have been attributed to RGC apoptosis. However, in the present study, we applied a model closer to human POAG through the use of a chronic hypertensive glaucoma model in rhesus monkeys to investigate whether another mode of progressive cell death, autophagy, was activated in the glaucomatous retinas. First, in the glaucomatous retinas, the levels of LC3B-II, LC3B-II/LC3B-I and Beclin 1 increased as demonstrated by Western blot analyses, whereas early or initial autophagic vacuoles (AVi and late or degraded autophagic vacuoles (AVd accumulated in the ganglion cell layer (GCL and in the inner plexiform layer (IPL as determined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM analysis. Second, lysosome activity and autophagosome-lysosomal fusion increased in the RGCs of the glaucomatous retinas, as demonstrated by Western blotting against lysosome associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP1 and double labeling against LC3B and LAMP1. Third, apoptosis was activated in the glaucomatous eyes with increased levels of caspase-3 and cleaved caspase-3 and an increased number of TUNEL-positive RGCs. Our results suggested that autophagy was activated in RGCs in the chronic hypertensive glaucoma model of rhesus monkeys and that autophagy may have potential as a new target for intervention in glaucoma treatment.

  6. Salinomycin induces autophagy in colon and breast cancer cells with concomitant generation of reactive oxygen species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berlinda Verdoodt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Salinomycin is a polyether ionophore antibiotic that has recently been shown to induce cell death in human cancer cells displaying multiple mechanisms of drug resistance. The underlying mechanisms leading to cell death after salinomycin treatment have not been well characterized. We therefore investigated the role of salinomycin in caspase dependent and independent cell death in colon cancer (SW480, SW620, RKO and breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, T47D, MDA-MB-453. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We detected features of apoptosis in all cell lines tested, but the executor caspases 3 and 7 were only strongly activated in RKO and MDA-MB-453 cells. MCF-7 and SW620 cells instead presented features of autophagy such as cytoplasmic vacuolization and LC3 processing. Caspase proficient cell lines activated autophagy at lower salinomycin concentrations and before the onset of caspase activation. Salinomycin also led to the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS eliciting JNK activation and induction of the transcription factor JUN. Salinomycin mediated cell death could be partially inhibited by the free radical scavenger N-acetyl-cysteine, implicating ROS formation in the mechanism of salinomycin toxicity. CONCLUSIONS: Our data indicate that, in addition to its previously reported induction of caspase dependent apoptosis, the initiation of autophagy is an important and early effect of salinomycin in tumor cells.

  7. C9orf72’s interaction with Rab GTPases - modulation of membrane traffic and autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bor Luen Tang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Hexanucleotide repeat expansion in an intron of Chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9orf72 is the most common genetic cause of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS and Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD. While functional haploinsufficiency of C9orf72 resulting from the mutation may play a role in ALS/FTD, the actual cellular role of the protein has been unclear. Recent findings have now shown that C9orf72 physically and functionally interacts with multiple members of the Rab small GTPases family, consequently exerting important influences on cellular membrane traffic and the process of autophagy. Loss of C9orf72 impairs endocytosis in neuronal cell lines, and attenuated autophagosome formation. Interestingly, C9orf72 could influence autophagy both as part of a Guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF complex, or as a Rab effector that facilitates transport of the Unc-51-like Autophagy Activating Kinase 1 (Ulk1 autophagy initiation complex. The cellular function of C9orf72 is discussed in the light of these recent findings

  8. Curcumin protects neuronal cells against status-epilepticus-induced hippocampal damage through induction of autophagy and inhibition of necroptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin; Liu, Yuan; Li, Xiao-Hui; Zeng, Xiang-Chang; Li, Jian; Zhou, Jun; Xiao, Bo; Hu, Kai

    2017-05-01

    Status epilepticus, the most severe form of epilepsy, is characterized by progressive functional and structural damage in the hippocampus, ultimately leading to the development and clinical appearance of spontaneous, recurrent seizures. Although the pathogenesis underlying epileptogenesis processes remains unclear, a substantial body of evidence has shown that status epilepticus acts as an important initial factor in triggering epileptogenesis. Notably, besides classical cell death mechanisms such as apoptosis and necrosis, 2 novel regulators of cell fate known as necroptosis and autophagy, are demonstrated to be involved in neuronal damage in various neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders. However, whether necroptosis and autophagy play a role in post-status-epilepticus rat hippocampus and other epilepsy mechanisms deserves further research effort. In addition, research is needed to determine whether compounds from traditional Chinese herbs possess antiepileptic effects through the modulation of necroptosis and autophagy. In this study, we found that curcumin, a polyphenolic phytochemical extracted from the Curcuma longa plant, protects neuronal cells against status-epilepticus-induced hippocampal neuronal damage in the lithium-pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus rat model through induction of autophagy and inhibition of necroptosis.

  9. Autophagy inhibition synergistically enhances anti-cancer efficacy of RAMBA, VN/12-1 in SKBR-3 cells and tumor xenografts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godbole, Abhijit M.; Purushottamachar, Puranik; Martin, Marlena S.; Daskalakis, Constantine; Njar, Vincent C. O.

    2012-01-01

    VN/12-1 is a novel retinoic acid metabolism blocking agent (RAMBA) discovered in our laboratory. The purpose of the study was to elucidate the molecular mechanism of VN/12-1’s anticancer activity in breast cancer cell lines and in tumor xenografts. We investigated the effects of VN/12-1 on induction of autophagy andapoptosis in SKBR-3 cells. Further, we also examined the impact of pharmacological and genomic inhibition of autophagy on VN/12-1’s anti-cancer activity. Finally, the anti-tumor activity of VN/12-1 was evaluated as a single agent and in combination with autophagy inhibitor chloroquine (CHL) in an SKBR-3 mouse xenograft model. Short exposure of low dose (< 10 µM) of VN/12-1 induced endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS), autophagy and inhibits G1-S phase transition and caused a protective response. However, higher dose of VN/12-1 initiates apoptosis in vitro. Inhibition of autophagy using either pharmacological inhibitors or RNA interference of Beclin-1 enhanced anti-cancer activity induced by VN/12-1 in SKBR-3 cells by triggering apoptosis. Importantly, VN/12-1 (5 mg/kg twice weekly) and the combination of VN/12-1 (5 mg/kg twice weekly) + chloroquine (50 mg/kg twice weekly) significantly suppressed established SKBR-3 tumor growth by 81.4% (p < 0.001 vs. control) and 96.2% (p < 0.001 vs. control), respectively. Our novel findings suggest that VN/12-1 may be useful as a single agent or in combination with autophagy inhibitors for treating human breast cancers. Our data provides a strong rationale for clinical evaluation of VN/12-1 as single agent or in combination with autophagy inhibitors. PMID:22334589

  10. Canonical autophagy does not contribute to cellular radioresistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaaf, Marco B.E.; Jutten, Barry; Keulers, Tom G.; Savelkouls, Kim G.M.; Peeters, Hanneke J.M.; Beucken, Twan van den; Schooten, Frederik-Jan van; Godschalk, Roger W.; Vooijs, Marc; Rouschop, Kasper M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: (Pre)clinical studies indicate that autophagy inhibition increases response to anti-cancer therapies. Although promising, due to contradicting reports, it remains unclear if radiation therapy changes autophagy activity and if autophagy inhibition changes the cellular intrinsic radiosensitivity. Discrepancies may result from different assays and models through off-target effects and influencing other signaling routes. In this study, we directly compared the effects of genetic and pharmacological inhibition of autophagy after irradiation in human cancer cell lines. Materials and methods: Changes in autophagy activity after ionizing radiation (IR) were assessed by flux analysis in eight cell lines. Clonogenic survival, DNA damage (COMET-assay) and H2AX phosphorylation were assessed after chloroquine or 3-methyladenine pretreatment and after ATG7 or LC3b knockdown. Results: IR failed to induce autophagy and chloroquine failed to change intrinsic radiosensitivity of cells. Interestingly, 3-methyladenine and ATG7- or LC3b-deficiency sensitized cancer cells to irradiation. Surprisingly, the radiosensitizing effect of 3-methyladenine was also observed in ATG7 and LC3b deficient cells and was associated with attenuated γ-H2AX formation and DNA damage repair. Conclusion: Our data demonstrate that the anti-tumor effects of chloroquine are independent of changes in intrinsic radioresistance. Furthermore, ATG7 and LC3b support radioresistance independent of canonical autophagy that involves lysosomal degradation

  11. Distinct Contributions of Autophagy Receptors in Measles Virus Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petkova, Denitsa S; Verlhac, Pauline; Rozières, Aurore; Baguet, Joël; Claviere, Mathieu; Kretz-Remy, Carole; Mahieux, Renaud; Viret, Christophe; Faure, Mathias

    2017-05-22

    Autophagy is a potent cell autonomous defense mechanism that engages the lysosomal pathway to fight intracellular pathogens. Several autophagy receptors can recognize invading pathogens in order to target them towards autophagy for their degradation after the fusion of pathogen-containing autophagosomes with lysosomes. However, numerous intracellular pathogens can avoid or exploit autophagy, among which is measles virus (MeV). This virus induces a complete autophagy flux, which is required to improve viral replication. We therefore asked how measles virus interferes with autophagy receptors during the course of infection. We report that in addition to NDP52/CALCOCO₂ and OPTINEURIN/OPTN, another autophagy receptor, namely T6BP/TAXIBP1, also regulates the maturation of autophagosomes by promoting their fusion with lysosomes, independently of any infection. Surprisingly, only two of these receptors, NDP52 and T6BP, impacted measles virus replication, although independently, and possibly through physical interaction with MeV proteins. Thus, our results suggest that a restricted set of autophagosomes is selectively exploited by measles virus to replicate in the course of infection.

  12. The IKK complex contributes to the induction of autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criollo, Alfredo; Senovilla, Laura; Authier, Hélène; Maiuri, Maria Chiara; Morselli, Eugenia; Vitale, Ilio; Kepp, Oliver; Tasdemir, Ezgi; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Shen, Shensi; Tailler, Maximilien; Delahaye, Nicolas; Tesniere, Antoine; De Stefano, Daniela; Younes, Aména Ben; Harper, Francis; Pierron, Gérard; Lavandero, Sergio; Zitvogel, Laurence; Israel, Alain; Baud, Véronique; Kroemer, Guido

    2010-02-03

    In response to stress, cells start transcriptional and transcription-independent programs that can lead to adaptation or death. Here, we show that multiple inducers of autophagy, including nutrient depletion, trigger the activation of the IKK (IkappaB kinase) complex that is best known for its essential role in the activation of the transcription factor NF-kappaB by stress. Constitutively active IKK subunits stimulated autophagy and transduced multiple signals that operate in starvation-induced autophagy, including the phosphorylation of AMPK and JNK1. Genetic inhibition of the nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB or ablation of the p65/RelA NF-kappaB subunit failed to suppress IKK-induced autophagy, indicating that IKK can promote the autophagic pathway in an NF-kappaB-independent manner. In murine and human cells, knockout and/or knockdown of IKK subunits (but not that of p65) prevented the induction of autophagy in response to multiple stimuli. Moreover, the knockout of IKK-beta suppressed the activation of autophagy by food deprivation or rapamycin injections in vivo, in mice. Altogether, these results indicate that IKK has a cardinal role in the stimulation of autophagy by physiological and pharmacological stimuli.

  13. Laser stimulation can activate autophagy in HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yisen; Hu, Minglie; Wang, Chingyue; Lan, Bei; Cao, Youjia; He, Hao

    2014-01-01

    For decades, lasers have been a daily tool in most biological research for fluorescent excitation by confocal or multiphoton microscopy. More than 20 years ago, cell photodamage caused by intense laser stimulation was noticed by generating reactive oxygen species, which was then thought as the main damage effect by photons. In this study, we show that laser stimulation can induce autophagy, an important cell lysosomal pathway responding to immune stimulation and starvation, without any biochemical treatment. Two different types of laser stimulations are found to be capable of activating autophagy: continuous scanning by continuous-wave visible lasers and a short-time flash of femtosecond laser irradiation. The autophagy generation is independent from wavelength, power, and scanning duration of the visible lasers. In contrast, the power of femtosecond laser is very critical to autophagy because the multiphoton excited Ca 2+ dominates autophagy signaling. In general, we show here the different mechanisms of autophagy generation by such laser stimulation, which correspond to confocal microscopy and cell surgery, respectively. Those results can help further understanding of photodamage and autophagy signaling.

  14. Nanomaterials and Autophagy: New Insights in Cancer Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panzarini, Elisa; Inguscio, Valentina; Tenuzzo, Bernardetta Anna; Carata, Elisabetta; Dini, Luciana

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy represents a cell’s response to stress. It is an evolutionarily conserved process with diversified roles. Indeed, it controls intracellular homeostasis by degradation and/or recycling intracellular metabolic material, supplies energy, provides nutrients, eliminates cytotoxic materials and damaged proteins and organelles. Moreover, autophagy is involved in several diseases. Recent evidences support a relationship between several classes of nanomaterials and autophagy perturbation, both induction and blockade, in many biological models. In fact, the autophagic mechanism represents a common cellular response to nanomaterials. On the other hand, the dynamic nature of autophagy in cancer biology is an intriguing approach for cancer therapeutics, since during tumour development and therapy, autophagy has been reported to trigger both an early cell survival and a late cell death. The use of nanomaterials in cancer treatment to deliver chemotherapeutic drugs and target tumours is well known. Recently, autophagy modulation mediated by nanomaterials has become an appealing notion in nanomedicine therapeutics, since it can be exploited as adjuvant in chemotherapy or in the development of cancer vaccines or as a potential anti-cancer agent. Herein, we summarize the effects of nanomaterials on autophagic processes in cancer, also considering the therapeutic outcome of synergism between nanomaterials and autophagy to improve existing cancer therapies

  15. Autophagy as an Emerging Common Pathomechanism in Inherited Peripheral Neuropathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansour Haidar

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The inherited peripheral neuropathies (IPNs comprise a growing list of genetically heterogeneous diseases. With mutations in more than 80 genes being reported to cause IPNs, a wide spectrum of functional consequences is expected to follow this genotypic diversity. Hence, the search for a common pathomechanism among the different phenotypes has become the holy grail of functional research into IPNs. During the last decade, studies on several affected genes have shown a direct and/or indirect correlation with autophagy. Autophagy, a cellular homeostatic process, is required for the removal of cell aggregates, long-lived proteins and dead organelles from the cell in double-membraned vesicles destined for the lysosomes. As an evolutionarily highly conserved process, autophagy is essential for the survival and proper functioning of the cell. Recently, neuronal cells have been shown to be particularly vulnerable to disruption of the autophagic pathway. Furthermore, autophagy has been shown to be affected in various common neurodegenerative diseases of both the central and the peripheral nervous system including Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and Huntington’s diseases. In this review we provide an overview of the genes involved in hereditary neuropathies which are linked to autophagy and we propose the disruption of the autophagic flux as an emerging common pathomechanism. We also shed light on the different steps of the autophagy pathway linked to these genes. Finally, we review the concept of autophagy being a therapeutic target in IPNs, and the possibilities and challenges of this pathway-specific targeting.

  16. Human Diversity in a Cell Surface Receptor that Inhibits Autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Anu; Leite, Mara; Kulasekara, Bridget R; Altura, Melissa A; Ogahara, Cassandra; Weiss, Eli; Fu, Wenqing; Blanc, Marie-Pierre; O'Keeffe, Michael; Terhorst, Cox; Akey, Joshua M; Miller, Samuel I

    2016-07-25

    Mutations in genes encoding autophagy proteins have been associated with human autoimmune diseases, suggesting that diversity in autophagy responses could be associated with disease susceptibility or severity. A cellular genome-wide association study (GWAS) screen was performed to explore normal human diversity in responses to rapamycin, a microbial product that induces autophagy. Cells from several human populations demonstrated variability in expression of a cell surface receptor, CD244 (SlamF4, 2B4), that correlated with changes in rapamycin-induced autophagy. High expression of CD244 and receptor activation with its endogenous ligand CD48 inhibited starvation- and rapamycin-induced autophagy by promoting association of CD244 with the autophagy complex proteins Vps34 and Beclin-1. The association of CD244 with this complex reduced Vps34 lipid kinase activity. Lack of CD244 is associated with auto-antibody production in mice, and lower expression of human CD244 has previously been implicated in severity of human rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus, indicating that increased autophagy as a result of low levels of CD244 may alter disease outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Autophagy in the immune response to tuberculosis: clinical perspectives.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ní Cheallaigh, C

    2011-06-01

    A growing body of evidence points to autophagy as an essential component in the immune response to tuberculosis. Autophagy is a direct mechanism of killing intracellular Mycobacterium tuberculosis and also acts as a modulator of proinflammatory cytokine secretion. In addition, autophagy plays a key role in antigen processing and presentation. Autophagy is modulated by cytokines; it is stimulated by T helper type 1 (Th1) cytokines such as tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interferon (IFN)-γ, and is inhibited by the Th2 cytokines interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-13 and the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Vitamin D, via cathelicidin, can also induce autophagy, as can Toll-like receptor (TLR)-mediated signals. Autophagy-promoting agents, administered either locally to the lungs or systemically, could have a clinical application as adjunctive treatment of drug-resistant and drug-sensitive tuberculosis. Moreover, vaccines which effectively induce autophagy could be more successful in preventing acquisition or reactivation of latent tuberculosis.

  18. Laser stimulation can activate autophagy in HeLa cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yisen; Hu, Minglie; Wang, Chingyue [Ultrafast Laser Laboratory, Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Information Technology (Ministry of Education), College of Precision Instrument and Optoelectronics Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin (China); Lan, Bei; Cao, Youjia [Key Laboratory of Microbial Functional Genomics of Ministry of Education, College of Life Sciences, Nankai University, Tianjin (China); He, Hao, E-mail: haohe@tju.edu.cn [Ultrafast Laser Laboratory, Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Information Technology (Ministry of Education), College of Precision Instrument and Optoelectronics Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin (China); Med-X Research Institute, School of Biomedical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China)

    2014-10-27

    For decades, lasers have been a daily tool in most biological research for fluorescent excitation by confocal or multiphoton microscopy. More than 20 years ago, cell photodamage caused by intense laser stimulation was noticed by generating reactive oxygen species, which was then thought as the main damage effect by photons. In this study, we show that laser stimulation can induce autophagy, an important cell lysosomal pathway responding to immune stimulation and starvation, without any biochemical treatment. Two different types of laser stimulations are found to be capable of activating autophagy: continuous scanning by continuous-wave visible lasers and a short-time flash of femtosecond laser irradiation. The autophagy generation is independent from wavelength, power, and scanning duration of the visible lasers. In contrast, the power of femtosecond laser is very critical to autophagy because the multiphoton excited Ca{sup 2+} dominates autophagy signaling. In general, we show here the different mechanisms of autophagy generation by such laser stimulation, which correspond to confocal microscopy and cell surgery, respectively. Those results can help further understanding of photodamage and autophagy signaling.

  19. Autophagy contributes to gefitinib-induced glioma cell growth inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Cheng-Yi [Department of Surgery, Fong-Yuan Hospital, Taichung 420, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology, Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taichung 406, Taiwan (China); Kuan, Yu-Hsiang [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Department of Pharmacy, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Ou, Yen-Chuan; Li, Jian-Ri [Division of Urology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung 407, Taiwan (China); Wu, Chih-Cheng [Department of Anesthesiology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung 407, Taiwan (China); Department of Financial and Computational Mathematics, Providence University, Taichung 433, Taiwan (China); Pan, Pin-Ho [Department of Pediatrics, Tungs’ Taichung MetroHarbor Hospital, Taichung 435, Taiwan (China); Chen, Wen-Ying [Department of Veterinary Medicine, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Huang, Hsuan-Yi [Department of Surgery, Fong-Yuan Hospital, Taichung 420, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chun-Jung, E-mail: cjchen@vghtc.gov.tw [Department of Medical Research, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung 407, Taiwan (China); Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Rong Hsing Research Center for Translational Medicine, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Center for General Education, Tunghai University, Taichung 407, Taiwan (China); Department of Nursing, HungKuang University, Taichung 433, Taiwan (China)

    2014-09-10

    Epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors, including gefitinib, have been evaluated in patients with malignant gliomas. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in gefitinib-mediated anticancer effects against glioma are incompletely understood. In the present study, the cytostatic potential of gefitinib was demonstrated by the inhibition of glioma cell growth, long-term clonogenic survival, and xenograft tumor growth. The cytostatic consequences were accompanied by autophagy, as evidenced by monodansylcadaverine staining of acidic vesicle formation, conversion of microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain 3-II (LC3-II), degradation of p62, punctate pattern of GFP-LC3, and conversion of GFP-LC3 to cleaved-GFP. Autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenosine and chloroquine and genetic silencing of LC3 or Beclin 1 attenuated gefitinib-induced growth inhibition. Gefitinib-induced autophagy was not accompanied by the disruption of the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin signaling. Instead, the activation of liver kinase-B1/AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling correlated well with the induction of autophagy and growth inhibition caused by gefitinib. Silencing of AMPK suppressed gefitinib-induced autophagy and growth inhibition. The crucial role of AMPK activation in inducing glioma autophagy and growth inhibition was further supported by the actions of AMP mimetic AICAR. Gefitinib was shown to be capable of reducing the proliferation of glioma cells, presumably by autophagic mechanisms involving AMPK activation. - Highlights: • Gefitinib causes cytotoxic and cytostatic effect on glioma. • Gefitinib induces autophagy. • Gefitinib causes cytostatic effect through autophagy. • Gefitinib induces autophagy involving AMPK.

  20. The regulation of autophagy differentially affects Trypanosoma cruzi metacyclogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Cristina Vanrell

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a cellular process required for the removal of aged organelles and cytosolic components through lysosomal degradation. All types of eukaryotic cells from yeasts to mammalian cells have the machinery to activate autophagy as a result of many physiological and pathological situations. The most frequent stimulus of autophagy is starvation and the result, in this case, is the fast generation of utilizable food (e.g. amino acids and basic nutrients to maintain the vital biological processes. In some organisms, starvation also triggers other associated processes such as differentiation. The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi undergoes a series of differentiation processes throughout its complex life cycle. Although not all autophagic genes have been identified in the T. cruzi genome, previous works have demonstrated the presence of essential autophagic-related proteins. Under starvation conditions, TcAtg8, which is the parasite homolog of Atg8/LC3 in other organisms, is located in autophagosome-like vesicles. In this work, we have characterized the autophagic pathway during T. cruzi differentiation from the epimastigote to metacyclic trypomastigote form, a process called metacyclogenesis. We demonstrated that autophagy is stimulated during metacyclogenesis and that the induction of autophagy promotes this process. Moreover, with exception of bafilomycin, other classical autophagy modulators have similar effects on T. cruzi autophagy. We also showed that spermidine and related polyamines can positively regulate parasite autophagy and differentiation. We concluded that both polyamine metabolism and autophagy are key processes during T. cruzi metacyclogenesis that could be exploited as drug targets to avoid the parasite cycle progression.

  1. Autophagy contributes to gefitinib-induced glioma cell growth inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Cheng-Yi; Kuan, Yu-Hsiang; Ou, Yen-Chuan; Li, Jian-Ri; Wu, Chih-Cheng; Pan, Pin-Ho; Chen, Wen-Ying; Huang, Hsuan-Yi; Chen, Chun-Jung

    2014-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors, including gefitinib, have been evaluated in patients with malignant gliomas. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in gefitinib-mediated anticancer effects against glioma are incompletely understood. In the present study, the cytostatic potential of gefitinib was demonstrated by the inhibition of glioma cell growth, long-term clonogenic survival, and xenograft tumor growth. The cytostatic consequences were accompanied by autophagy, as evidenced by monodansylcadaverine staining of acidic vesicle formation, conversion of microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain 3-II (LC3-II), degradation of p62, punctate pattern of GFP-LC3, and conversion of GFP-LC3 to cleaved-GFP. Autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenosine and chloroquine and genetic silencing of LC3 or Beclin 1 attenuated gefitinib-induced growth inhibition. Gefitinib-induced autophagy was not accompanied by the disruption of the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin signaling. Instead, the activation of liver kinase-B1/AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling correlated well with the induction of autophagy and growth inhibition caused by gefitinib. Silencing of AMPK suppressed gefitinib-induced autophagy and growth inhibition. The crucial role of AMPK activation in inducing glioma autophagy and growth inhibition was further supported by the actions of AMP mimetic AICAR. Gefitinib was shown to be capable of reducing the proliferation of glioma cells, presumably by autophagic mechanisms involving AMPK activation. - Highlights: • Gefitinib causes cytotoxic and cytostatic effect on glioma. • Gefitinib induces autophagy. • Gefitinib causes cytostatic effect through autophagy. • Gefitinib induces autophagy involving AMPK

  2. Autophagy Is an Innate Mechanism Associated with Leprosy Polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Priscila Ribeiro; Ferreira, Helen; Nery, José Augusto da Costa; Côrte-Real, Suzana; da Silva, Gilberto Marcelo Sperandio; Rosa, Patricia Sammarco; Fabri, Mario; Sarno, Euzenir Nunes

    2017-01-01

    Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease that may present different clinical forms according to the immune response of the host. Levels of IFN-γ are significantly raised in paucibacillary tuberculoid (T-lep) when compared with multibacillary lepromatous (L-lep) patients. IFN-γ primes macrophages for inflammatory activation and induces the autophagy antimicrobial mechanism. The involvement of autophagy in the immune response against Mycobacterium leprae remains unexplored. Here, we demonstrated by different autophagic assays that LC3-positive autophagosomes were predominantly observed in T-lep when compared with L-lep lesions and skin-derived macrophages. Accumulation of the autophagic receptors SQSTM1/p62 and NBR1, expression of lysosomal antimicrobial peptides and colocalization analysis of autolysosomes revealed an impairment of the autophagic flux in L-lep cells, which was restored by IFN-γ or rapamycin treatment. Autophagy PCR array gene-expression analysis revealed a significantly upregulation of autophagy genes (BECN1, GPSM3, ATG14, APOL1, and TPR) in T-lep cells. Furthermore, an upregulation of autophagy genes (TPR, GFI1B and GNAI3) as well as LC3 levels was observed in cells of L-lep patients that developed type 1 reaction (T1R) episodes, an acute inflammatory condition associated with increased IFN-γ levels. Finally, we observed increased BCL2 expression in L-lep cells that could be responsible for the blockage of BECN1-mediated autophagy. In addition, in vitro studies demonstrated that dead, but not live M. leprae can induce autophagy in primary and lineage human monocytes, and that live mycobacteria can reduce the autophagy activation triggered by dead mycobacteria, suggesting that M. leprae may hamper the autophagic machinery as an immune escape mechanism. Together, these results indicate that autophagy is an important innate mechanism associated with the M. leprae control in skin macrophages. PMID:28056107

  3. Oxidative Stress, Redox Signaling, and Autophagy: Cell Death Versus Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Yepes, Juliana; Burns, Michaela; Anandhan, Annadurai; Khalimonchuk, Oleh; del Razo, Luz Maria; Quintanilla-Vega, Betzabet; Pappa, Aglaia; Panayiotidis, Mihalis I.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The molecular machinery regulating autophagy has started becoming elucidated, and a number of studies have undertaken the task to determine the role of autophagy in cell fate determination within the context of human disease progression. Oxidative stress and redox signaling are also largely involved in the etiology of human diseases, where both survival and cell death signaling cascades have been reported to be modulated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS). Recent Advances: To date, there is a good understanding of the signaling events regulating autophagy, as well as the signaling processes by which alterations in redox homeostasis are transduced to the activation/regulation of signaling cascades. However, very little is known about the molecular events linking them to the regulation of autophagy. This lack of information has hampered the understanding of the role of oxidative stress and autophagy in human disease progression. Critical Issues: In this review, we will focus on (i) the molecular mechanism by which ROS/RNS generation, redox signaling, and/or oxidative stress/damage alter autophagic flux rates; (ii) the role of autophagy as a cell death process or survival mechanism in response to oxidative stress; and (iii) alternative mechanisms by which autophagy-related signaling regulate mitochondrial function and antioxidant response. Future Directions: Our research efforts should now focus on understanding the molecular basis of events by which autophagy is fine tuned by oxidation/reduction events. This knowledge will enable us to understand the mechanisms by which oxidative stress and autophagy regulate human diseases such as cancer and neurodegenerative disorders. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 66–85. PMID:24483238

  4. ER stress, autophagy, and RNA viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Rong eJheng

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress is a general term for representing the pathway by which various stimuli affect ER functions. ER stress induces the evolutionarily conserved signaling pathways, called the unfolded protein response (UPR, which compromises the stimulus and then determines whether the cell survives or dies. In recent years, ongoing research has suggested that these pathways may be linked to the autophagic response, which plays a key role in the cell’s response to various stressors. Autophagy performs a self-digestion function, and its activation protects cells against certain pathogens. However, the link between the UPR and autophagy may be more complicated. These two systems may act dependently, or the induction of one system may interfere with the other. Experimental studies have found that different viruses modulate these mechanisms to allow them to escape the host immune response or, worse, to exploit the host’s defense to their advantage; thus, this topic is a critical area in antiviral research. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about how RNA viruses, including influenza virus, poliovirus, coxsackievirus, enterovirus 71, Japanese encephalitis virus, hepatitis C virus, and dengue virus, regulate these processes. We also discuss recent discoveries and how these will produce novel strategies for antiviral treatment.

  5. Autophagy in HCV Infection: Keeping Fat and Inflammation at Bay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiziana Vescovo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is one of the main causes of chronic liver disease. Viral persistence and pathogenesis rely mainly on the ability of HCV to deregulate specific host processes, including lipid metabolism and innate immunity. Recently, autophagy has emerged as a cellular pathway, playing a role in several aspects of HCV infection. This review summarizes current knowledge on the molecular mechanisms that link the HCV life cycle with autophagy machinery. In particular, we discuss the role of HCV/autophagy interaction in dysregulating inflammation and lipid homeostasis and its potential for translational applications in the treatment of HCV-infected patients.

  6. A large-scale RNA interference screen identifies genes that regulate autophagy at different stages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Sujuan; Pridham, Kevin J; Virbasius, Ching-Man

    2018-01-01

    Dysregulated autophagy is central to the pathogenesis and therapeutic development of cancer. However, how autophagy is regulated in cancer is not well understood and genes that modulate cancer autophagy are not fully defined. To gain more insights into autophagy regulation in cancer, we performed...... with fluorescence-activated cell sorting, we successfully isolated autophagic K562 cells where we identified 336 short hairpin RNAs. After candidate validation using Cyto-ID fluorescence spectrophotometry, LC3B immunoblotting, and quantitative RT-PCR, 82 genes were identified as autophagy-regulating genes. 20 genes...... have been reported previously and the remaining 62 candidates are novel autophagy mediators. Bioinformatic analyses revealed that most candidate genes were involved in molecular pathways regulating autophagy, rather than directly participating in the autophagy process. Further autophagy flux assays...

  7. Spermidine and resveratrol induce autophagy by distinct pathways converging on the acetylproteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morselli, Eugenia; Mariño, Guillermo; Bennetzen, Martin V; Eisenberg, Tobias; Megalou, Evgenia; Schroeder, Sabrina; Cabrera, Sandra; Bénit, Paule; Rustin, Pierre; Criollo, Alfredo; Kepp, Oliver; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Shen, Shensi; Malik, Shoaib Ahmad; Maiuri, Maria Chiara; Horio, Yoshiyuki; López-Otín, Carlos; Andersen, Jens S; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Madeo, Frank; Kroemer, Guido

    2011-02-21

    Autophagy protects organelles, cells, and organisms against several stress conditions. Induction of autophagy by resveratrol requires the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent deacetylase sirtuin 1 (SIRT1). In this paper, we show that the acetylase inhibitor spermidine stimulates autophagy independent of SIRT1 in human and yeast cells as well as in nematodes. Although resveratrol and spermidine ignite autophagy through distinct mechanisms, these compounds stimulate convergent pathways that culminate in concordant modifications of the acetylproteome. Both agents favor convergent deacetylation and acetylation reactions in the cytosol and in the nucleus, respectively. Both resveratrol and spermidine were able to induce autophagy in cytoplasts (enucleated cells). Moreover, a cytoplasm-restricted mutant of SIRT1 could stimulate autophagy, suggesting that cytoplasmic deacetylation reactions dictate the autophagic cascade. At doses at which neither resveratrol nor spermidine stimulated autophagy alone, these agents synergistically induced autophagy. Altogether, these data underscore the importance of an autophagy regulatory network of antagonistic deacetylases and acetylases that can be pharmacologically manipulated.

  8. Cigarette smoke induced autophagy-impairment regulates AMD pathogenesis mechanisms in ARPE-19 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viren Kumar Govindaraju

    Full Text Available Age related macular degeneration (AMD is one of the leading causes of blindness. Genetics, environmental insult, and age-related factors all play a key role in altering proteostasis, the homeostatic process regulating protein synthesis, degradation and processing. These factors also play a role in the pathogenesis of AMD and it has been well established that cigarette smoking (CS initiates AMD pathogenic mechanisms. The primary goal of this study is to elucidate whether CS can induce proteostasis/autophagy-impairment in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cells. In our preliminary analysis, it was found that cigarette smoke extract (CSE induces accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins in the insoluble protein fraction (p < 0.01, which was subsequently mitigated through cysteamine (p < 0.01 or fisetin (p < 0.05 treatment. Further, it was verified that these CSE induced ubiquitinated proteins accumulated in the peri-nuclear spaces (p<0.05 that were cleared- off with cysteamine (p < 0.05 or fisetin (p < 0.05. Moreover, CSE-induced aggresome-formation (LC3B-GFP and Ub-RFP co-localization and autophagy-flux impairment was significantly (p<0.01 mitigated by cysteamine (p<0.05 or fisetin (p<0.05 treatment, indicating the restoration of CSE-mediated autophagy-impairment. CSE treatment was also found to induce intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS, p < 0.001 while impacting cell viability (p < 0.001, which was quantified using CMH2DCFDA-dye (ROS and MTS (proliferation or propodium iodide staining (cell viability assays, respectively. Moreover, cysteamine and fisetin treatment ameliorated CS-mediated ROS production (p < 0.05 and diminished cell viability (p < 0.05. Lastly, CSE was found to induce cellular senescence (p < 0.001, which was significantly ameliorated by cysteamine (p < 0.001 or fisetin (p < 0.001. In conclusion, our study indicates that CS induced proteostasis/autophagy-impairment regulates mechanisms associated with AMD pathogenesis. Moreover

  9. Interplay between apoptosis and autophagy in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Hao-Ran; Shi, Zhao-Qi; Zhu, He-Pan; Gu, Li-Hu; Wang, Xian-Fa; Yang, Yi

    2017-09-22

    Autophagy and apoptosis are two pivotal mechanisms in mediating cell survival and death. Cross-talk of autophagy and apoptosis has been documented in the tumorigenesis and progression of cancer, while the interplay between the two pathways in colorectal cancer (CRC) has not yet been comprehensively summarized. In this study, we outlined the basis of apoptosis and autophagy machinery firstly, and then reviewed the recent evidence in cellular settings or animal studies regarding the interplay between them in CRC. In addition, several key factors that modulate the cross-talk between autophagy and apoptosis as well as its significance in clinical practice were discussed. Understanding of the interplay between the cell death mechanisms may benefit the translation of CRC treatment from basic research to clinical use.

  10. Autophagy-Related Deubiquitinating Enzymes Involved in Health and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fouzi El Magraoui

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is an evolutionarily-conserved process that delivers diverse cytoplasmic components to the lysosomal compartment for either recycling or degradation. This involves the removal of protein aggregates, the turnover of organelles, as well as the elimination of intracellular pathogens. In this situation, when only specific cargoes should be targeted to the lysosome, the potential targets can be selectively marked by the attachment of ubiquitin in order to be recognized by autophagy-receptors. Ubiquitination plays a central role in this process, because it regulates early signaling events during the induction of autophagy and is also used as a degradation-tag on the potential autophagic cargo protein. Here, we review how the ubiquitin-dependent steps of autophagy are balanced or counteracted by deubiquitination events. Moreover, we highlight the functional role of the corresponding deubiquitinating enzymes and discuss how they might be involved in the occurrence of cancer, neurodegenerative diseases or infection with pathogenic bacteria.

  11. Autophagy and Neurodegeneration: Pathogenic Mechanisms and Therapeutic Opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzies, Fiona M; Fleming, Angeleen; Caricasole, Andrea; Bento, Carla F; Andrews, Stephen P; Ashkenazi, Avraham; Füllgrabe, Jens; Jackson, Anne; Jimenez Sanchez, Maria; Karabiyik, Cansu; Licitra, Floriana; Lopez Ramirez, Ana; Pavel, Mariana; Puri, Claudia; Renna, Maurizio; Ricketts, Thomas; Schlotawa, Lars; Vicinanza, Mariella; Won, Hyeran; Zhu, Ye; Skidmore, John; Rubinsztein, David C

    2017-03-08

    Autophagy is a conserved pathway that delivers cytoplasmic contents to the lysosome for degradation. Here we consider its roles in neuronal health and disease. We review evidence from mouse knockout studies demonstrating the normal functions of autophagy as a protective factor against neurodegeneration associated with intracytoplasmic aggregate-prone protein accumulation as well as other roles, including in neuronal stem cell differentiation. We then describe how autophagy may be affected in a range of neurodegenerative diseases. Finally, we describe how autophagy upregulation may be a therapeutic strategy in a wide range of neurodegenerative conditions and consider possible pathways and druggable targets that may be suitable for this objective. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Autophagy as a Therapeutic Target in Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemchenko, Andriy; Chiong, Mario; Turer, Aslan; Lavandero, Sergio; Hill, Joseph A.

    2011-01-01

    The epidemic of heart failure continues apace, and development of novel therapies with clinical efficacy has lagged. Now, important insights into the molecular circuitry of cardiovascular autophagy have raised the prospect that this cellular pathway of protein quality control may be a target of clinical relevance. Whereas basal levels of autophagy are required for cell survival, excessive levels – or perhaps distinct forms of autophagic flux – contribute to disease pathogenesis. Our challenge will be to distinguish mechanisms that drive adaptive versus maladaptive autophagy and to manipulate those pathways for therapeutic gain. Recent evidence suggests this may be possible. Here, we review the fundamental biology of autophagy and its role in a variety of forms of cardiovascular disease. We discuss ways in which this evolutionarily conserved catabolic mechanism can be manipulated, discuss studies presently underway in heart disease, and provide our perspective on where this exciting field may lead in the future. PMID:21723289

  13. In Situ Immunofluorescent Staining of Autophagy in Muscle Stem Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Castagnetti, Francesco; Fiacco, Elisabetta; Imbriano, Carol; Latella, Lucia

    2017-01-01

    with productive muscle regeneration. These data uncover the crucial role of autophagy in satellite cell activation during muscle regeneration in both normal and pathological conditions, such as muscular dystrophies. Here, we provide a protocol to monitor

  14. Are mitochondrial reactive oxygen species required for autophagy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Jianfei, E-mail: jjf73@pitt.edu [Center for Free Radical and Antioxidant Health, Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, University of Pittsburgh (United States); Maeda, Akihiro; Ji, Jing [Center for Free Radical and Antioxidant Health, Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, University of Pittsburgh (United States); Baty, Catherine J.; Watkins, Simon C. [Center for Biologic Imaging, Department of Cell Biology and Physiology, University of Pittsburgh (United States); Greenberger, Joel S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh (United States); Kagan, Valerian E., E-mail: kagan@pitt.edu [Center for Free Radical and Antioxidant Health, Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, University of Pittsburgh (United States)

    2011-08-19

    Highlights: {yields} Autophageal and apoptotic pathways were dissected in cytochrome c deficient cells. {yields} Staurosporine (STS)-induced autophagy was not accompanied by ROS generation. {yields} Autophagy was detectable in mitochondrial DNA deficient {rho}{sup 0} cells. {yields} Mitochondrial ROS are not required for the STS-induced autophagy in HeLa cells. -- Abstract: Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are said to participate in the autophagy signaling. Supporting evidence is obscured by interference of autophagy and apoptosis, whereby the latter heavily relies on ROS signaling. To dissect autophagy from apoptosis we knocked down expression of cytochrome c, the key component of mitochondria-dependent apoptosis, in HeLa cells using shRNA. In cytochrome c deficient HeLa1.2 cells, electron transport was compromised due to the lack of electron shuttle between mitochondrial respiratory complexes III and IV. A rapid and robust LC3-I/II conversion and mitochondria degradation were observed in HeLa1.2 cells treated with staurosporine (STS). Neither generation of superoxide nor accumulation of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was detected in STS-treated HeLa1.2 cells. A membrane permeable antioxidant, PEG-SOD, plus catalase exerted no effect on STS-induced LC3-I/II conversion and mitochondria degradation. Further, STS caused autophagy in mitochondria DNA-deficient {rho}{sup o} HeLa1.2 cells in which both electron transport and ROS generation were completely disrupted. Counter to the widespread view, we conclude that mitochondrial ROS are not required for the induction of autophagy.

  15. Are mitochondrial reactive oxygen species required for autophagy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Jianfei; Maeda, Akihiro; Ji, Jing; Baty, Catherine J.; Watkins, Simon C.; Greenberger, Joel S.; Kagan, Valerian E.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Autophageal and apoptotic pathways were dissected in cytochrome c deficient cells. → Staurosporine (STS)-induced autophagy was not accompanied by ROS generation. → Autophagy was detectable in mitochondrial DNA deficient ρ 0 cells. → Mitochondrial ROS are not required for the STS-induced autophagy in HeLa cells. -- Abstract: Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are said to participate in the autophagy signaling. Supporting evidence is obscured by interference of autophagy and apoptosis, whereby the latter heavily relies on ROS signaling. To dissect autophagy from apoptosis we knocked down expression of cytochrome c, the key component of mitochondria-dependent apoptosis, in HeLa cells using shRNA. In cytochrome c deficient HeLa1.2 cells, electron transport was compromised due to the lack of electron shuttle between mitochondrial respiratory complexes III and IV. A rapid and robust LC3-I/II conversion and mitochondria degradation were observed in HeLa1.2 cells treated with staurosporine (STS). Neither generation of superoxide nor accumulation of H 2 O 2 was detected in STS-treated HeLa1.2 cells. A membrane permeable antioxidant, PEG-SOD, plus catalase exerted no effect on STS-induced LC3-I/II conversion and mitochondria degradation. Further, STS caused autophagy in mitochondria DNA-deficient ρ o HeLa1.2 cells in which both electron transport and ROS generation were completely disrupted. Counter to the widespread view, we conclude that mitochondrial ROS are not required for the induction of autophagy.

  16. Autophagy-Related Deubiquitinating Enzymes Involved in Health and Disease

    OpenAIRE

    El Magraoui, Fouzi; Reidick, Christina; Meyer, Hemut E.; Platta, Harald W.

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily-conserved process that delivers diverse cytoplasmic components to the lysosomal compartment for either recycling or degradation. This involves the removal of protein aggregates, the turnover of organelles, as well as the elimination of intracellular pathogens. In this situation, when only specific cargoes should be targeted to the lysosome, the potential targets can be selectively marked by the attachment of ubiquitin in order to be recognized by autophagy-recep...

  17. p53 and ARF: Unexpected players in autophagy

    OpenAIRE

    Balaburski, Gregor M.; Hontz, Robert D.; Murphy, Maureen E.

    2010-01-01

    p53 and ARF are well-established tumor suppressor proteins that function together in the negative regulation of cancer. Recently, both of these proteins were found to play surprising roles in autophagy. Autophagy (“self-eating”) is a critical response of eukaryotic cells to metabolic and other stress. During this process, portions of the cytosol are sequestered into characteristic double membrane vesicles that are delivered to the lysosome for degradation, leading to the release of free amino...

  18. p53-Mediated Molecular Control of Autophagy in Tumor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Mrakovcic

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is an indispensable mechanism of the eukaryotic cell, facilitating the removal and renewal of cellular components and thereby balancing the cell’s energy consumption and homeostasis. Deregulation of autophagy is now regarded as one of the characteristic key features contributing to the development of tumors. In recent years, the suppression of autophagy in combination with chemotherapeutic treatment has been approached as a novel therapy in cancer treatment. However, depending on the type of cancer and context, interference with the autophagic machinery can either promote or disrupt tumorigenesis. Therefore, disclosure of the major signaling pathways that regulate autophagy and control tumorigenesis is crucial. To date, several tumor suppressor proteins and oncogenes have emerged as eminent regulators of autophagy whose depletion or mutation favor tumor formation. The mammalian cell “janitor” p53 belongs to one of these tumor suppressors that are most commonly mutated in human tumors. Experimental evidence over the last decade convincingly reports that p53 can act as either an activator or an inhibitor of autophagy depending on its subcellular localization and its mode of action. This finding gains particular significance as p53 deficiency or mutant variants of p53 that accumulate in the cytoplasm of tumor cells enable activation of autophagy. Accordingly, we recently identified p53 as a molecular hub that regulates autophagy and apoptosis in histone deacetylase inhibitor-treated uterine sarcoma cells. In light of this novel experimental evidence, in this review, we focus on p53 signaling as a mediator of the autophagic pathway in tumor cells.

  19. Blue-Print Autophagy: Potential for Cancer Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Nadia Ruocco; Susan Costantini; Maria Costantini

    2016-01-01

    The marine environment represents a very rich source of biologically active compounds with pharmacological applications. This is due to its chemical richness, which is claiming considerable attention from the health science communities. In this review we give a general overview on the marine natural products involved in stimulation and inhibition of autophagy (a type of programmed cell death) linked to pharmacological and pathological conditions. Autophagy represents a complex multistep cellu...

  20. Autophagy as an essential cellular antioxidant pathway in neurodegenerative disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Giordano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress including DNA damage, increased lipid and protein oxidation, are important features of aging and neurodegeneration suggesting that endogenous antioxidant protective pathways are inadequate or overwhelmed. Importantly, oxidative protein damage contributes to age-dependent accumulation of dysfunctional mitochondria or protein aggregates. In addition, environmental toxins such as rotenone and paraquat, which are risk factors for the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, also promote protein oxidation. The obvious approach of supplementing the primary antioxidant systems designed to suppress the initiation of oxidative stress has been tested in animal models and positive results were obtained. However, these findings have not been effectively translated to treating human patients, and clinical trials for antioxidant therapies using radical scavenging molecules such as α-tocopherol, ascorbate and coenzyme Q have met with limited success, highlighting several limitations to this approach. These could include: (1 radical scavenging antioxidants cannot reverse established damage to proteins and organelles; (2 radical scavenging antioxidants are oxidant specific, and can only be effective if the specific mechanism for neurodegeneration involves the reactive species to which they are targeted and (3 since reactive species play an important role in physiological signaling, suppression of endogenous oxidants maybe deleterious. Therefore, alternative approaches that can circumvent these limitations are needed. While not previously considered an antioxidant system we propose that the autophagy-lysosomal activities, may serve this essential function in neurodegenerative diseases by removing damaged or dysfunctional proteins and organelles.

  1. Targeting autophagy in cancer management – strategies and developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozpolat, Bulent; Benbrook, Doris M

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is a highly regulated catabolic process involving lysosomal degradation of intracellular components, damaged organelles, misfolded proteins, and toxic aggregates, reducing oxidative stress and protecting cells from damage. The process is also induced in response to various conditions, including nutrient deprivation, metabolic stress, hypoxia, anticancer therapeutics, and radiation therapy to adapt cellular conditions for survival. Autophagy can function as a tumor suppressor mechanism in normal cells and dysregulation of this process (ie, monoallelic Beclin-1 deletion) may lead to malignant transformation and carcinogenesis. In tumors, autophagy is thought to promote tumor growth and progression by helping cells to adapt and survive in metabolically-challenged and harsh tumor microenvironments (ie, hypoxia and acidity). Recent in vitro and in vivo studies in preclinical models suggested that modulation of autophagy can be used as a therapeutic modality to enhance the efficacy of conventional therapies, including chemo and radiation therapy. Currently, more than 30 clinical trials are investigating the effects of autophagy inhibition in combination with cytotoxic chemotherapies and targeted agents in various cancers. In this review, we will discuss the role, molecular mechanism, and regulation of autophagy, while targeting this process as a novel therapeutic modality, in various cancers

  2. Retinoid receptor signaling and autophagy in acute promyelocytic leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orfali, Nina [Cork Cancer Research Center, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Department of Pharmacology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY 10065, USA. (United States); McKenna, Sharon L. [Cork Cancer Research Center, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Cahill, Mary R. [Department of Hematology, Cork University Hospital, Cork (Ireland); Gudas, Lorraine J., E-mail: ljgudas@med.cornell.edu [Department of Pharmacology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY 10065, USA. (United States); Mongan, Nigel P., E-mail: nigel.mongan@nottingham.ac.uk [Faculty of Medicine and Health Science, School of Veterinary Medicine and Science, University of Nottingham, LE12 5RD (United Kingdom); Department of Pharmacology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY 10065, USA. (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Retinoids are a family of signaling molecules derived from vitamin A with well established roles in cellular differentiation. Physiologically active retinoids mediate transcriptional effects on cells through interactions with retinoic acid (RARs) and retinoid-X (RXR) receptors. Chromosomal translocations involving the RARα gene, which lead to impaired retinoid signaling, are implicated in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). All-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA), alone and in combination with arsenic trioxide (ATO), restores differentiation in APL cells and promotes degradation of the abnormal oncogenic fusion protein through several proteolytic mechanisms. RARα fusion-protein elimination is emerging as critical to obtaining sustained remission and long-term cure in APL. Autophagy is a degradative cellular pathway involved in protein turnover. Both ATRA and ATO also induce autophagy in APL cells. Enhancing autophagy may therefore be of therapeutic benefit in resistant APL and could broaden the application of differentiation therapy to other cancers. Here we discuss retinoid signaling in hematopoiesis, leukemogenesis, and APL treatment. We highlight autophagy as a potential important regulator in anti-leukemic strategies. - Highlights: • Normal and aberrant retinoid signaling in hematopoiesis and leukemia is reviewed. • We suggest a novel role for RARα in the development of X-RARα gene fusions in APL. • ATRA therapy in APL activates transcription and promotes onco-protein degradation. • Autophagy may be involved in both onco-protein degradation and differentiation. • Pharmacologic autophagy induction may potentiate ATRA's therapeutic effects.

  3. Characterization of a novel autophagy-specific gene, ATG29

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamata, Tomoko; Kamada, Yoshiaki; Suzuki, Kuninori; Kuboshima, Norihiro; Akimatsu, Hiroshi; Ota, Shinichi; Ohsumi, Mariko; Ohsumi, Yoshinori

    2005-01-01

    Autophagy is a process whereby cytoplasmic proteins and organelles are sequestered for bulk degradation in the vacuole/lysosome. At present, 16 ATG genes have been found that are essential for autophagosome formation in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Most of these genes are also involved in the cytoplasm to vacuole transport pathway, which shares machinery with autophagy. Most Atg proteins are colocalized at the pre-autophagosomal structure (PAS), from which the autophagosome is thought to originate, but the precise mechanism of autophagy remains poorly understood. During a genetic screen aimed to obtain novel gene(s) required for autophagy, we identified a novel ORF, ATG29/YPL166w. atg29Δ cells were sensitive to starvation and induction of autophagy was severely retarded. However, the Cvt pathway operated normally. Therefore, ATG29 is an ATG gene specifically required for autophagy. Additionally, an Atg29-GFP fusion protein was observed to localize to the PAS. From these results, we propose that Atg29 functions in autophagosome formation at the PAS in collaboration with other Atg proteins

  4. Overweight in elderly people induces impaired autophagy in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potes, Yaiza; de Luxán-Delgado, Beatriz; Rodriguez-González, Susana; Guimarães, Marcela Rodrigues Moreira; Solano, Juan J; Fernández-Fernández, María; Bermúdez, Manuel; Boga, Jose A; Vega-Naredo, Ignacio; Coto-Montes, Ana

    2017-09-01

    Sarcopenia is the gradual loss of skeletal muscle mass, strength and quality associated with aging. Changes in body composition, especially in skeletal muscle and fat mass are crucial steps in the development of chronic diseases. We studied the effect of overweight on skeletal muscle tissue in elderly people without reaching obesity to prevent this extreme situation. Overweight induces a progressive protein breakdown reflected as a progressive withdrawal of anabolism against the promoted catabolic state leading to muscle wasting. Protein turnover is regulated by a network of signaling pathways. Muscle damage derived from overweight displayed by oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress induces inflammation and insulin resistance and forces the muscle to increase requirements from autophagy mechanisms. Our findings showed that failure of autophagy in the elderly deprives it to deal with the cell damage caused by overweight. This insufficiently efficient autophagy leads to an accumulation of p62 and NBR1, which are robust markers of protein aggregations. This impaired autophagy affects myogenesis activity. Depletion of myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs) without links to variations in myostatin levels in overweight patients suggest a possible reduction of satellite cells in muscle tissue, which contributes to declined muscle quality. This discovery has important implications that improve the understanding of aged-related atrophy caused by overweight and demonstrates how impaired autophagy is one of the main responsible mechanisms that aggravate muscle wasting. Therefore, autophagy could be an interesting target for therapeutic interventions in humans against muscle impairment diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Crosstalk between apoptosis and autophagy within the Beclin 1 interactome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiuri, Maria Chiara; Criollo, Alfredo; Kroemer, Guido

    2010-02-03

    Although the essential genes for autophagy (Atg) have been identified, the molecular mechanisms through which Atg proteins control 'self eating' in mammalian cells remain elusive. Beclin 1 (Bec1), the mammalian orthologue of yeast Atg6, is part of the class III phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) complex that induces autophagy. The first among an increasing number of Bec1-interacting proteins that has been identified is the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. The dissociation of Bec1 from Bcl-2 is essential for its autophagic activity, and Bcl-2 only inhibits autophagy when it is present in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). A paper in this issue of the EMBO Journal has identified a novel protein, NAF-1 (nutrient-deprivation autophagy factor-1), that binds Bcl-2 at the ER. NAF-1 is a component of the inositol-1,4,5 trisphosphate (IP3) receptor complex, which contributes to the interaction of Bcl-2 with Bec1 and is required for Bcl-2 to functionally antagonize Bec1-mediated autophagy. This work provides mechanistic insights into how autophagy- and apoptosis-regulatory molecules crosstalk at the ER.

  6. Autophagy and lysosomal dysfunction as emerging mechanisms of nanomaterial toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stern Stephan T

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The study of the potential risks associated with the manufacture, use, and disposal of nanoscale materials, and their mechanisms of toxicity, is important for the continued advancement of nanotechnology. Currently, the most widely accepted paradigms of nanomaterial toxicity are oxidative stress and inflammation, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly defined. This review will highlight the significance of autophagy and lysosomal dysfunction as emerging mechanisms of nanomaterial toxicity. Most endocytic routes of nanomaterial cell uptake converge upon the lysosome, making the lysosomal compartment the most common intracellular site of nanoparticle sequestration and degradation. In addition to the endo-lysosomal pathway, recent evidence suggests that some nanomaterials can also induce autophagy. Among the many physiological functions, the lysosome, by way of the autophagy (macroautophagy pathway, degrades intracellular pathogens, and damaged organelles and proteins. Thus, autophagy induction by nanoparticles may be an attempt to degrade what is perceived by the cell as foreign or aberrant. While the autophagy and endo-lysosomal pathways have the potential to influence the disposition of nanomaterials, there is also a growing body of literature suggesting that biopersistent nanomaterials can, in turn, negatively impact these pathways. Indeed, there is ample evidence that biopersistent nanomaterials can cause autophagy and lysosomal dysfunctions resulting in toxicological consequences.

  7. Retinoid receptor signaling and autophagy in acute promyelocytic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orfali, Nina; McKenna, Sharon L.; Cahill, Mary R.; Gudas, Lorraine J.; Mongan, Nigel P.

    2014-01-01

    Retinoids are a family of signaling molecules derived from vitamin A with well established roles in cellular differentiation. Physiologically active retinoids mediate transcriptional effects on cells through interactions with retinoic acid (RARs) and retinoid-X (RXR) receptors. Chromosomal translocations involving the RARα gene, which lead to impaired retinoid signaling, are implicated in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). All-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA), alone and in combination with arsenic trioxide (ATO), restores differentiation in APL cells and promotes degradation of the abnormal oncogenic fusion protein through several proteolytic mechanisms. RARα fusion-protein elimination is emerging as critical to obtaining sustained remission and long-term cure in APL. Autophagy is a degradative cellular pathway involved in protein turnover. Both ATRA and ATO also induce autophagy in APL cells. Enhancing autophagy may therefore be of therapeutic benefit in resistant APL and could broaden the application of differentiation therapy to other cancers. Here we discuss retinoid signaling in hematopoiesis, leukemogenesis, and APL treatment. We highlight autophagy as a potential important regulator in anti-leukemic strategies. - Highlights: • Normal and aberrant retinoid signaling in hematopoiesis and leukemia is reviewed. • We suggest a novel role for RARα in the development of X-RARα gene fusions in APL. • ATRA therapy in APL activates transcription and promotes onco-protein degradation. • Autophagy may be involved in both onco-protein degradation and differentiation. • Pharmacologic autophagy induction may potentiate ATRA's therapeutic effects

  8. Regulation of the autophagy protein LC3 by phosphorylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherra, Salvatore J.; Kulich, Scott M.; Uechi, Guy; Balasubramani, Manimalha; Mountzouris, John; Day, Billy W.

    2010-01-01

    Macroautophagy is a major catabolic pathway that impacts cell survival, differentiation, tumorigenesis, and neurodegeneration. Although bulk degradation sustains carbon sources during starvation, autophagy contributes to shrinkage of differentiated neuronal processes. Identification of autophagy-related genes has spurred rapid advances in understanding the recruitment of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) in autophagy induction, although braking mechanisms remain less understood. Using mass spectrometry, we identified a direct protein kinase A (PKA) phosphorylation site on LC3 that regulates its participation in autophagy. Both metabolic (rapamycin) and pathological (MPP+) inducers of autophagy caused dephosphorylation of endogenous LC3. The pseudophosphorylated LC3 mutant showed reduced recruitment to autophagosomes, whereas the nonphosphorylatable mutant exhibited enhanced puncta formation. Finally, autophagy-dependent neurite shortening induced by expression of a Parkinson disease–associated G2019S mutation in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 was inhibited by dibutyryl–cyclic adenosine monophosphate, cytoplasmic expression of the PKA catalytic subunit, or the LC3 phosphorylation mimic. These data demonstrate a role for phosphorylation in regulating LC3 activity. PMID:20713600

  9. Autophagy as a Possible Underlying Mechanism of Nanomaterial Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Cohignac

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The rapid development of nanotechnologies is raising safety concerns because of the potential effects of engineered nanomaterials on human health, particularly at the respiratory level. Since the last decades, many in vivo studies have been interested in the pulmonary effects of different classes of nanomaterials. It has been shown that some of them can induce toxic effects, essentially depending on their physico-chemical characteristics, but other studies did not identify such effects. Inflammation and oxidative stress are currently the two main mechanisms described to explain the observed toxicity. However, the exact underlying mechanism(s still remain(s unknown and autophagy could represent an interesting candidate. Autophagy is a physiological process in which cytoplasmic components are digested via a lysosomal pathway. It has been shown that autophagy is involved in the pathogenesis and the progression of human diseases, and is able to modulate the oxidative stress and pro-inflammatory responses. A growing amount of literature suggests that a link between nanomaterial toxicity and autophagy impairment could exist. In this review, we will first summarize what is known about the respiratory effects of nanomaterials and we will then discuss the possible involvement of autophagy in this toxicity. This review should help understand why autophagy impairment could be taken as a promising candidate to fully understand nanomaterials toxicity.

  10. The role of autophagy in microbial infection and immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desai M

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mayura Desai,1 Rong Fang,2 Jiaren Sun11Department of Microbiology and Immunology, 2Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, Galveston, TX, USAAbstract: The autophagy pathway represents an evolutionarily conserved cell recycling process that is activated in response to nutrient deprivation and other stress signals. Over the years, it has been linked to an array of cellular functions. Equally, a wide range of cell-intrinsic, as well as extracellular, factors have been implicated in the induction of the autophagy pathway. Microbial infections represent one such factor that can not only activate autophagy through specific mechanisms but also manipulate the response to the invading microbe's advantage. Moreover, in many cases, particularly among viruses, the pathway has been shown to be intricately involved in the replication cycle of the pathogen. Conversely, autophagy also plays a role in combating the infection process, both through direct destruction of the pathogen and as one of the key mediating factors in the host defense mechanisms of innate and adaptive immunity. Further, the pathway also plays a role in controlling the pathogenesis of infectious diseases by regulating inflammation. In this review, we discuss various interactions between pathogens and the cellular autophagic response and summarize the immunological functions of the autophagy pathway.Keywords: autophagy, xenophagy, antiviral, antibacterial

  11. Role of autophagy in disease resistance and hypersensitive response-associated cell death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofius, Daniel; Munch, David; Bressendorff, Simon

    2011-01-01

    Ancient autophagy pathways are emerging as key defense modules in host eukaryotic cells against microbial pathogens. Apart from actively eliminating intracellular intruders, autophagy is also responsible for cell survival, for example by reducing the deleterious effects of endoplasmic reticulum...

  12. Autophagy is essential for the differentiation of porcine PSCs into insulin-producing cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Lipeng; Yang, Hong; Cui, Yanhua; Xu, Shuanshuan; Sun, Fen; Tian, Na; Hua, Jinlian; Peng, Sha

    2017-07-01

    Porcine pancreatic stem cells (PSCs) are seed cells with potential use for diabetes treatment. Stem cell differentiation requires strict control of protein turnover and lysosomal digestion of organelles. Autophagy is a highly conserved process that controls the turnover of organelles and proteins within cells and contributes to the balance of cellular components. However, whether autophagy plays roles in PSC differentiation remains unknown. In this study, we successfully induced porcine PSCs into insulin-producing cells and found that autophagy was activated during the second induction stage. Inhibition of autophagy in the second stage resulted in reduced differentiational efficiency and impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Moreover, the expression of active β-catenin increased while autophagy was activated but was suppressed when autophagy was inhibited. Therefore, autophagy is essential to the formation of insulin-producing cells, and the effects of autophagy on differentiation may be regulated by canonical Wnt signalling pathway. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Caspase-3 controls AML1-ETO-driven leukemogenesis via autophagy modulation in a ULK1-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Na; Tan, Yurong; Sun, Xiao-Jian; Liu, Fan; Cheng, Guoyan; Greenblatt, Sarah M; Martinez, Camilo; Karl, Daniel L; Ando, Koji; Sun, Ming; Hou, Dan; Chen, Bingyi; Xu, Mingjiang; Yang, Feng-Chun; Chen, Zhu; Chen, Saijuan; Nimer, Stephen D; Wang, Lan

    2017-05-18

    AML1-ETO (AE), a fusion oncoprotein generated by t(8;21), can trigger acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in collaboration with mutations including c-Kit, ASXL1/2, FLT3, N-RAS, and K-RAS. Caspase-3, a key executor among its family, plays multiple roles in cellular processes, including hematopoietic development and leukemia progression. Caspase-3 was revealed to directly cleave AE in vitro, suggesting that AE may accumulate in a Caspase-3-compromised background and thereby accelerate leukemogenesis. Therefore, we developed a Caspase-3 knockout genetic mouse model of AML and found that loss of Caspase-3 actually delayed AML1-ETO9a (AE9a)-driven leukemogenesis, indicating that Caspase-3 may play distinct roles in the initiation and/or progression of AML. We report here that loss of Caspase-3 triggers a conserved, adaptive mechanism, namely autophagy (or macroautophagy), which acts to limit AE9a-driven leukemia. Furthermore, we identify ULK1 as a novel substrate of Caspase-3 and show that upregulation of ULK1 drives autophagy initiation in leukemia cells and that inhibition of ULK1 can rescue the phenotype induced by Caspase-3 deletion in vitro and in vivo. Collectively, these data highlight Caspase-3 as an important regulator of autophagy in AML and demonstrate that the balance and selectivity between its substrates can dictate the pace of disease. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  14. Omega-3 free fatty acids suppress macrophage inflammasome activation by inhibiting NF-κB activation and enhancing autophagy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda Williams-Bey

    Full Text Available The omega-3 (ω3 fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA can suppress inflammation, specifically IL-1β production through poorly understood molecular mechanisms. Here, we show that DHA reduces macrophage IL-1β production by limiting inflammasome activation. Exposure to DHA reduced IL-1β production by ligands that stimulate the NLRP3, AIM2, and NAIP5/NLRC4 inflammasomes. The inhibition required Free Fatty Acid Receptor (FFAR 4 (also known as GPR120, a G-protein coupled receptor (GPR known to bind DHA. The exposure of cells to DHA recruited the adapter protein β-arrestin1/2 to FFAR4, but not to a related lipid receptor. DHA treatment reduced the initial inflammasome priming step by suppressing the nuclear translocation of NF-κB. DHA also reduced IL-1β levels by enhancing autophagy in the cells. As a consequence macrophages derived from mice lacking the essential autophagy protein ATG7 were partially resistant to suppressive effects of DHA. Thus, DHA suppresses inflammasome activation by two distinct mechanisms, inhibiting the initial priming step and by augmenting autophagy, which limits inflammasome activity.

  15. Sinomenine Hydrochloride Protects against Polymicrobial Sepsis via Autophagy

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    Yu Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis, a systemic inflammatory response to infection, is the major cause of death in intensive care units (ICUs. The mortality rate of sepsis remains high even though the treatment and understanding of sepsis both continue to improve. Sinomenine (SIN is a natural alkaloid extracted from Chinese medicinal plant Sinomenium acutum, and its hydrochloride salt (Sinomenine hydrochloride, SIN-HCl is widely used to treat rheumatoid arthritis (RA. However, its role in sepsis remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the role of SIN-HCl in sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP in BALB/c mice and the corresponding mechanism. SIN-HCl treatment improved the survival of BALB/c mice that were subjected to CLP and reduced multiple organ dysfunction and the release of systemic inflammatory mediators. Autophagy activities were examined using Western blotting. The results showed that CLP-induced autophagy was elevated, and SIN-HCl treatment further strengthened the autophagy activity. Autophagy blocker 3-methyladenine (3-MA was used to investigate the mechanism of SIN-HCl in vitro. Autophagy activities were determined by examining the autophagosome formation, which was shown as microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3 puncta with green immunofluorescence. SIN-HCl reduced lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced inflammatory cytokine release and increased autophagy in peritoneal macrophages (PM. 3-MA significantly decreased autophagosome formation induced by LPS and SIN-HCl. The decrease of inflammatory cytokines caused by SIN-HCl was partially aggravated by 3-MA treatment. Taken together, our results indicated that SIN-HCl could improve survival, reduce organ damage, and attenuate the release of inflammatory cytokines induced by CLP, at least in part through regulating autophagy activities.

  16. The Effects of Kaempferol-Inhibited Autophagy on Osteoclast Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chang-Ju; Shin, Sang-Hun; Kim, Bok-Joo; Kim, Chul-Hoon; Kim, Jung-Han; Kang, Hae-Mi; Park, Bong-Soo; Kim, In-Ryoung

    2018-01-02

    Kaempferol, a flavonoid compound, is derived from the rhizome of Kaempferia galanga L ., which is used in traditional medicine in Asia. Autophagy has pleiotropic functions that are involved in cell growth, survival, nutrient supply under starvation, defense against pathogens, and antigen presentation. There are many studies dealing with the inhibitory effects of natural flavonoids in bone resorption. However, no studies have explained the relationship between the autophagic and inhibitory processes of osteoclastogenesis by natural flavonoids. The present study was undertaken to investigate the inhibitory effects of osteoclastogenesis through the autophagy inhibition process stimulated by kaempferol in murin macrophage (RAW 264.7) cells. The cytotoxic effect of Kaempferol was investigated by MTT assay. The osteoclast differentiation and autophagic process were confirmed via tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining, pit formation assay, western blot, and real-time PCR. Kaempferol controlled the expression of autophagy-related factors and in particular, it strongly inhibited the expression of p62/SQSTM1. In the western blot and real time-PCR analysis, when autophagy was suppressed with the application of 3-Methyladenine (3-MA) only, osteoclast and apoptosis related factors were not significantly affected. However, we found that after cells were treated with kaempferol, these factors inhibited autophagy and activated apoptosis. Therefore, we presume that kaempferol-inhibited autophagy activated apoptosis by degradation of p62/SQSTM1. Further study of the p62/SQSTM1 gene as a target in the autophagy mechanism, may help to delineate the potential role of kaempferol in the treatment of bone metabolism disorders.

  17. Increased autophagy in placentas of intrauterine growth-restricted pregnancies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai-Ho Hung

    Full Text Available Unexplained intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR may be a consequence of placental insufficiency; however, its etiology is not fully understood. We surmised that defective placentation in IUGR dysregulates cellular bioenergic homeostasis, leading to increased autophagy in the villous trophoblast. The aims of this work were (1 to compare the differences in autophagy, p53 expression, and apoptosis between placentas of women with normal or IUGR pregnancies; (2 to study the effects of hypoxia and the role of p53 in regulating trophoblast autophagy; and (3 to investigate the relationship between autophagy and apoptosis in hypoxic trophoblasts.Compared with normal pregnant women, women with IUGR had higher placental levels of autophagy-related proteins LC3B-II, beclin-1, and damage-regulated autophagy modulator (DRAM, with increased p53 and caspase-cleaved cytokeratin 18 (M30. Furthermore, cytotrophoblasts cultured under hypoxia (2% oxygen in the presence or absence of nutlin-3 (a p53 activity stimulator had higher levels of LC3B-II, DRAM, and M30 proteins and increased Bax mRNA expression compared with controls cultured under standard conditions. In contrast, administration of pifithrin-α (a p53 activity inhibitor during hypoxia resulted in protein levels that were similar to those of the control groups. Moreover, cytotrophoblasts transfected with LC3B, beclin-1, or DRAM siRNA had higher levels of M30 compared with the controls under hypoxia. However, transfection with Bcl-2 or Bax siRNA did not cause any significant change in the levels of LC3B-II in hypoxic cytotrophoblasts.Together, these results suggest that there is a crosstalk between autophagy and apoptosis in IUGR and that p53 plays a pivotal and complex role in regulating trophoblast cell turnover in response to hypoxic stress.

  18. Stimulation of autophagy by the p53 target gene Sestrin2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiuri, Maria Chiara; Malik, Shoaib Ahmad; Morselli, Eugenia; Kepp, Oliver; Criollo, Alfredo; Mouchel, Pierre-Luc; Carnuccio, Rosa; Kroemer, Guido

    2009-05-15

    The oncosuppressor protein p53 regulates autophagy in a dual fashion. The pool of cytoplasmic p53 protein represses autophagy in a transcription-independent fashion, while the pool of nuclear p53 stimulates autophagy through the transactivation of specific genes. Here we report the discovery that Sestrin2, a novel p53 target gene, is involved in the induction of autophagy. Depletion of Sestrin2 by RNA interference reduced the level of autophagy in a panel of p53-sufficient human cancer cell lines responding to distinct autophagy inducers. In quantitative terms, Sestrin2 depletion was as efficient in preventing autophagy induction as was the depletion of Dram, another p53 target gene. Knockout of either Sestrin2 or Dram reduced autophagy elicited by nutrient depletion, rapamycin, lithium or thapsigargin. Moreover, autophagy induction by nutrient depletion or pharmacological stimuli led to an increase in Sestrin2 expression levels in p53-proficient cells. In strict contrast, the depletion of Sestrin2 or Dram failed to affect autophagy in p53-deficient cells and did not modulate the inhibition of baseline autophagy by a cytoplasmic p53 mutant that was reintroduced into p53-deficient cells. We conclude that Sestrin2 acts as a positive regulator of autophagy in p53-proficient cells.

  19. Regulation of autophagy by sphingosine kinase 1 and its role in cell survival during nutrient starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavieu, Grégory; Scarlatti, Francesca; Sala, Giusy; Carpentier, Stéphane; Levade, Thierry; Ghidoni, Riccardo; Botti, Joëlle; Codogno, Patrice

    2006-03-31

    The sphingolipid ceramide induces macroautophagy (here called autophagy) and cell death with autophagic features in cancer cells. Here we show that overexpression of sphingosine kinase 1 (SK1), an enzyme responsible for the production of sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), in MCF-7 cells stimulates autophagy by increasing the formation of LC3-positive autophagosomes and the rate of proteolysis sensitive to the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine. Autophagy was blocked in the presence of dimethylsphingosine, an inhibitor of SK activity, and in cells expressing a catalytically inactive form of SK1. In SK1(wt)-overexpressing cells, however, autophagy was not sensitive to fumonisin B1, an inhibitor of ceramide synthase. In contrast to ceramide-induced autophagy, SK1(S1P)-induced autophagy is characterized by (i) the inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin signaling independently of the Akt/protein kinase B signaling arm and (ii) the lack of robust accumulation of the autophagy protein Beclin 1. In addition, nutrient starvation induced both the stimulation of autophagy and SK activity. Knocking down the expression of the autophagy protein Atg7 or that of SK1 by siRNA abolished starvation-induced autophagy and increased cell death with apoptotic hallmarks. In conclusion, these results show that SK1(S1P)-induced autophagy protects cells from death with apoptotic features during nutrient starvation.

  20. Distinct patterns of autophagy evoked by two benzoxazine derivatives in vascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Dong, ZhiWu; Huang, Bin; Zhao, BaoXiang; Wang, Hua; Zhao, Jing; Kung, HsiangFu; Zhang, ShangLi; Miao, JunYing

    2010-11-01

    Macroautophagy (referred to as autophagy) is an evolutionarily conserved, bulk-destruction process in eukaryotes. During this process, the cytoplasm containing long-lived proteins and organelles is engulfed into double-membrane autophagosomes, and ultimately undergoes enzymatic degradation within lysosomes. Autophagy serves as a prosurvival machinery, or it may contribute to cell death. Accumulating evidence indicates that autophagy is involved in the pathogenesis and intervention of various human diseases. Pharmacological autophagy modulators are arousing interest from biologists and clinical physicians in light of their potential for disease therapy and increasing our understanding of the mechanism of autophagy. In this study, we identified two autophagy enhancers, 6-amino-2,3-dihydro-3-hydroxymethyl-1,4-benzoxazine (ABO) and 6,8-dichloro-2,3-dihydro-3-hydroxymethyl-1,4-benzoxazine (DBO), in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC s) by autophagy assays, and demonstrate that ABO and DBO could stimulate autophagy in an mtor-independent and mtor-dependent manner, respectively; ABO-stimulated autophagy was attributed to the elevation of the Ca2+ channel annexin A7 (ANXA7), whereas DBO's effect was due to the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Importantly, we found that ANXA7 was essential for autophagy induction via modulating the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) in HUVEC s. In summary, our work introduced two distinct autophagy enhancers and highlighted the critical role of ANXA7 in endothelial autophagy.

  1. The 'selfish brain' is regulated by aquaporins and autophagy under nutrient deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Qiao; Wu, Yonghong; Gao, Yan; Li, Zhihui; Li, Weiguang; Zhang, Chenggang

    2016-05-01

    The brain maintains its mass and physiological functional capacity compared with other organs under harsh conditions such as starvation, a mechanism termed the 'selfish brain' theory. To further investigate this phenomenon, mice were examined following water and/or food deprivation. Although the body weights of the mice, the weight of the organs except the brain and blood glucose levels were significantly reduced in the absence of water and/or food, the brain weight maintained its original state. Furthermore, no significant differences in the water content of the brain or its energy balance were observed when the mice were subjected to water and/or food deprivation. To further investigate the mechanism underlying the brain maintenance of water and substance homeostasis, the expression levels of aquaporins (AQPs) and autophagy‑specific protein long‑chain protein 3 (LC3) were examined. During the process of water and food deprivation, no significant differences in the transcriptional levels of AQPs were observed. However, autophagy activity levels were initially stimulated, then suppressed in a time‑dependent manner. LC3 and AQPs have important roles for the survival of the brain under conditions of food and water deprivation, which provided further understanding of the mechanism underlying the 'selfish brain' phenomenon. Although not involved in the energy regulation of the 'selfish brain', AQPs were observed to have important roles in water and food deprivation, specifically with regards to the control of water content. Additionally, the brain exhibits an 'unselfish strategy' using autophagy during water and/or food deprivation. The present study furthered current understanding of the 'selfish brain' theory, and identified additional regulating target genes of AQPs and autophagy, with the aim of providing a basis for the prevention of nutrient shortage in humans and animals.

  2. Targeting autophagy in obesity: from pathophysiology to management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yingmei; Sowers, James R; Ren, Jun

    2018-04-23

    Obesity poses a severe threat to human health, including the increased prevalence of hypertension, insulin resistance, diabetes mellitus, cancer, inflammation, sleep apnoea and other chronic diseases. Current therapies focus mainly on suppressing caloric intake, but the efficacy of this approach remains poor. A better understanding of the pathophysiology of obesity will be essential for the management of obesity and its complications. Knowledge gained over the past three decades regarding the aetiological mechanisms underpinning obesity has provided a framework that emphasizes energy imbalance and neurohormonal dysregulation, which are tightly regulated by autophagy. Accordingly, there is an emerging interest in the role of autophagy, a conserved homeostatic process for cellular quality control through the disposal and recycling of cellular components, in the maintenance of cellular homeostasis and organ function by selectively ridding cells of potentially toxic proteins, lipids and organelles. Indeed, defects in autophagy homeostasis are implicated in metabolic disorders, including obesity, insulin resistance, diabetes mellitus and atherosclerosis. In this Review, the alterations in autophagy that occur in response to nutrient stress, and how these changes alter the course of obesogenesis and obesity-related complications, are discussed. The potential of pharmacological modulation of autophagy for the management of obesity is also addressed.

  3. The Role of Autophagy in the Pathogenesis of Diabetic Nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosuke Yamahara

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic nephropathy is a leading cause of end-stage renal disease worldwide. The multipronged drug approach targeting blood pressure and serum levels of glucose, insulin, and lipids fails to fully prevent the onset and progression of diabetic nephropathy. Therefore, a new therapeutic target to combat diabetic nephropathy is required. Autophagy is a catabolic process that degrades damaged proteins and organelles in mammalian cells and plays a critical role in maintaining cellular homeostasis. The accumulation of proteins and organelles damaged by hyperglycemia and other diabetes-related metabolic changes is highly associated with the development of diabetic nephropathy. Recent studies have suggested that autophagy activity is altered in both podocytes and proximal tubular cells under diabetic conditions. Autophagy activity is regulated by both nutrient state and intracellular stresses. Under diabetic conditions, an altered nutritional state due to nutrient excess may interfere with the autophagic response stimulated by intracellular stresses, leading to exacerbation of organelle dysfunction and diabetic nephropathy. In this review, we discuss new findings showing the relationships between autophagy and diabetic nephropathy and suggest the therapeutic potential of autophagy in diabetic nephropathy.

  4. Inhibition of autophagy by TAB2 and TAB3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criollo, Alfredo; Niso-Santano, Mireia; Malik, Shoaib Ahmad; Michaud, Mickael; Morselli, Eugenia; Mariño, Guillermo; Lachkar, Sylvie; Arkhipenko, Alexander V; Harper, Francis; Pierron, Gérard; Rain, Jean-Christophe; Ninomiya-Tsuji, Jun; Fuentes, José M; Lavandero, Sergio; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Maiuri, Maria Chiara; Kroemer, Guido

    2011-11-11

    Autophagic responses are coupled to the activation of the inhibitor of NF-κB kinase (IKK). Here, we report that the essential autophagy mediator Beclin 1 and TGFβ-activated kinase 1 (TAK1)-binding proteins 2 and 3 (TAB2 and TAB3), two upstream activators of the TAK1-IKK signalling axis, constitutively interact with each other via their coiled-coil domains (CCDs). Upon autophagy induction, TAB2 and TAB3 dissociate from Beclin 1 and bind TAK1. Moreover, overexpression of TAB2 and TAB3 suppresses, while their depletion triggers, autophagy. The expression of the C-terminal domain of TAB2 or TAB3 or that of the CCD of Beclin 1 competitively disrupts the interaction between endogenous Beclin 1, TAB2 and TAB3, hence stimulating autophagy through a pathway that requires endogenous Beclin 1, TAK1 and IKK to be optimally efficient. These results point to the existence of an autophagy-stimulatory 'switch' whereby TAB2 and TAB3 abandon inhibitory interactions with Beclin 1 to engage in a stimulatory liaison with TAK1.

  5. Autophagy is required for the activation of NFκB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criollo, Alfredo; Chereau, Fanny; Malik, Shoaib Ahmad; Niso-Santano, Mireia; Mariño, Guillermo; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Maiuri, Maria Chiara; Baud, Véronique; Kroemer, Guido

    2012-01-01

    It is well-established that the activation of the inhibitor of NFκB (IκBα) kinase (IKK) complex is required for autophagy induction by multiple stimuli. Here, we show that in autophagy-competent mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), distinct autophagic triggers, including starvation, mTOR inhibition with rapamycin and p53 inhibition with cyclic pifithrin α lead to the activation of IKK, followed by the phosphorylation-dependent degradation of IκBα and nuclear translocation of NFκB. Remarkably, the NFκB signaling pathway was blocked in MEFs lacking either the essential autophagy genes Atg5 or Atg7. In addition, we found that tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα)-induced NFκB nuclear translocation is abolished in both Atg5- and Atg7-deficient MEFs. Similarly, the depletion of essential autophagy modulators, including ATG5, ATG7, Beclin 1 and VPS34, by RNA interference inhibited TNFα-driven NFκB activation in two human cancer cell lines. In conclusion, it appears that, at least in some instances, autophagy is required for NFκB activation, highlighting an intimate crosstalk between these two stress response signaling pathways.

  6. In Situ Immunofluorescent Staining of Autophagy in Muscle Stem Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Castagnetti, Francesco

    2017-06-13

    Increasing evidence points to autophagy as a crucial regulatory process to preserve tissue homeostasis. It is known that autophagy is involved in skeletal muscle development and regeneration, and the autophagic process has been described in several muscular pathologies and agerelated muscle disorders. A recently described block of the autophagic process that correlates with the functional exhaustion of satellite cells during muscle repair supports the notion that active autophagy is coupled with productive muscle regeneration. These data uncover the crucial role of autophagy in satellite cell activation during muscle regeneration in both normal and pathological conditions, such as muscular dystrophies. Here, we provide a protocol to monitor the autophagic process in the adult Muscle Stem Cell (MuSC) compartment during muscle regenerative conditions. This protocol describes the setup methodology to perform in situ immunofluorescence imaging of LC3, an autophagy marker, and MyoD, a myogenic lineage marker, in muscle tissue sections from control and injured mice. The methodology reported allows for monitoring the autophagic process in one specific cell compartment, the MuSC compartment, which plays a central role in orchestrating muscle regeneration.

  7. Regorafenib delays the proliferation of hepatocellular carcinoma by inducing autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Rui; Li, Shixin

    2018-04-02

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of regorafenib on hepatocellular carcinoma autophagy, thereby supressing the malignancy of HCC. First, HepG2 and Hep3B cell autophagy was investigated using GFP-LC3 transfection after the treatment of regorafenib. Then, the activation of Akt/mTOR signaling was analyzed using western blot. Our data showed that liver cancer cell autophagy was significantly induced by 20 μM regorafenib using GFP-LC3 transfection. Meanwhile, regorafenib-induced cell death could largely be abolished by 3-MA or CQ treatment, suggesting that regorafenib-induced HepG2 cell death was partially dependent on autophagy. Moreover, the activation of Akt/mTOR signaling was inhibited by regorafenib pre-incubation. MTT assay showed the combination use of regorafenib and CDDP led to a stronger growth inhibitory effect on HepG2 and Hep3B cells. In summary, regorafenib may acts an adjunctive therapy for liver cancer patients via modulating autophagy-dependent cell death even when apoptosis resistance is induced in cancer cells.

  8. Staying young at heart: autophagy and adaptation to cardiac aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, Leonardo J; Gustafsson, Åsa B

    2016-06-01

    Aging is a predominant risk factor for developing cardiovascular disease. Therefore, the cellular processes that contribute to aging are attractive targets for therapeutic interventions that can delay or prevent the development of age-related diseases. Our understanding of the underlying mechanisms that contribute to the decline in cell and tissue functions with age has greatly advanced over the past decade. Classical hallmarks of aging cells include increased levels of reactive oxygen species, DNA damage, accumulation of dysfunctional organelles, oxidized proteins and lipids. These all contribute to a progressive decline in the normal physiological function of the cell and to the onset of age-related conditions. A major cause of the aging process is progressive loss of cellular quality control. Autophagy is an important quality control pathway and is necessary to maintain cardiac homeostasis and to adapt to stress. A reduction in autophagy has been observed in a number of aging models and there is compelling evidence that enhanced autophagy delays aging and extends life span. Enhancing autophagy counteracts age-associated accumulation of protein aggregates and damaged organelles in cells. In this review, we discuss the functional role of autophagy in maintaining homeostasis in the heart, and how a decline is associated with accelerated cardiac aging. We also evaluate therapeutic approaches being researched in an effort to maintain a healthy young heart. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Ammonia Induces Autophagy through Dopamine Receptor D3 and MTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhiyuan; Ji, Xinmiao; Wang, Wenchao; Liu, Juanjuan; Liang, Xiaofei; Wu, Hong; Liu, Jing; Eggert, Ulrike S.; Liu, Qingsong

    2016-01-01

    Hyperammonemia is frequently seen in tumor microenvironments as well as in liver diseases where it can lead to severe brain damage or death. Ammonia induces autophagy, a mechanism that tumor cells may use to protect themselves from external stresses. However, how cells sense ammonia has been unclear. Here we show that culture medium alone containing Glutamine can generate milimolar of ammonia at 37 degrees in the absence of cells. In addition, we reveal that ammonia acts through the G protein-coupled receptor DRD3 (Dopamine receptor D3) to induce autophagy. At the same time, ammonia induces DRD3 degradation, which involves PIK3C3/VPS34-dependent pathways. Ammonia inhibits MTOR (mechanistic target of Rapamycin) activity and localization in cells, which is mediated by DRD3. Therefore, ammonia has dual roles in autophagy: one to induce autophagy through DRD3 and MTOR, the other to increase autophagosomal pH to inhibit autophagic flux. Our study not only adds a new sensing and output pathway for DRD3 that bridges ammonia sensing and autophagy induction, but also provides potential mechanisms for the clinical consequences of hyperammonemia in brain damage, neurodegenerative diseases and tumors. PMID:27077655

  10. Ghrelin improves vascular autophagy in rats with vascular calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Mingming; Liu, Lin; Song, Chenfang; Chen, Wei; Gui, Shuyan

    2017-06-15

    This study aimed to investigate whether ghrelin ameliorated vascular calcification (VC) through improving autophagy. VC model was induced by nicotine plus vitamin D 3 in rats and β-glycerophosphate in vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC). Calcium deposition was detected by von Kossa staining or alizarin red S staining. ALP activity was also detected. Western blot was used to assess the protein expression. Ghrelin treatment attenuated the elevation of calcium deposition and ALP activity in VC model both in vivo and in vitro. Interesting, the protein levels of autophagy markers, LC3 and beclin1 were significantly upregulated by ghrelin in VC model. An autophagy inhibitor, 3-methyladenine blocks the ameliorative effect of ghrelin on VC. Furthermore, protein expressions of phosphate-AMPK were increased by ghrelin treatment both in calcified aorta and VSMC. The effect of ghrelin on autophagy induction and VC attenuation was prevented by AMPK inhibitor, compound C. Our results suggested that ghrelin improved autophagy through AMPK activation, which was resulted in VC amelioration. These data maybe throw light on prevention and therapy of VC. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Methods to Monitor and Manipulate TFEB Activity During Autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, D L; Settembre, C; Ballabio, A

    2017-01-01

    Macroautophagy is a catabolic process deputed to the turnover of intracellular components. Recent studies have revealed that transcriptional regulation is a major mechanism controlling autophagy. Currently, more than 20 transcription factors have been shown to modulate cellular autophagy levels. Among them, the transcription factor EB (TFEB) appears to have the broadest proautophagy role, given its capacity to control the biogenesis of lysosomes and autophagosomes, the two main organelles required for the autophagy pathway. TFEB has attracted major attention owing to its ability to enhance cellular clearance of pathogenic substrates in a variety of animal models of disease, such as lysosomal storage disorders, Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, α1-antitrypsin, obesity as well as others, suggesting that the TFEB pathway represents an extraordinary possibility for future development of innovative therapies. Importantly, the subcellular localization and activity of TFEB are regulated by its phosphorylation status, suggesting that TFEB activity can be pharmacologically targeted. Given the growing list of common and rare diseases in which manipulation of autophagy may be beneficial, in this chapter we describe a set of validated protocols developed to modulate and analyze TFEB-mediated enhancement of autophagy both in vitro and in vivo conditions. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Autophagy response in the liver of pigeon exposed to avermectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xian-Song; Liu, Ci; Khoso, Pervez Ahmed; Zheng, Weijia; Li, Ming; Li, Shu

    2017-05-01

    Pesticide residues are an important aspect of environmental pollution. Environmental avermectin residues have produced adverse effects in organisms. Many pesticides exert their toxic effects via the mechanism of autophagy. The purpose of this study was to examine the changes in autophagy levels and in autophagy-related genes, including LC3, Beclin 1, Dynein, ATG5, TORC1, and TORC2, resulting from exposure to subchronic levels of AVM in liver tissue in the king pigeon model. We observed abundant autophagic vacuoles with extensively degraded organelles, autophagosomal vacuoles, secondary lysosomes, and double-membrane structures in the liver. The expression levels of the autophagy-related genes LC3-I, LC3-II, Beclin 1, ATG5, and Dynein were up-regulated; however, TORC1 and TORC2 expression levels were down-regulated. These changes occurred in a concentration-dependent manner after AVM exposure for 30, 60, and 90 days in pigeons. Taken together, these results suggested that AVM increased the autophagic flux and that upregulation of autophagy might be closely related to the hepatotoxicity of AVM in birds.

  13. Enhanced Autophagy in Polycystic Kidneys of AQP11 Null Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuko Tanaka

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Aquaporin-11 (AQP11 is an intracellular water channel expressed at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER of the proximal tubule. Its gene disruption in mice leads to intracellular vacuole formation at one week and the subsequent development of polycystic kidneys by three weeks. As the damaged proximal tubular cells with intracellular vacuoles form cysts later, we postulated that autophagy may play a role in the cyst formation and examined autophagy activity before and after cyst development in AQP11(−/− kidneys. PCR analysis showed the increased expression of the transcript encoding LC3 (Map1lc3b as well as other autophagy-related genes in AQP11(−/− mice. Using green fluorescent protein (GFP-LC3 transgenic mice and AQP11(−/− mice, we found that the number of GFP-LC3–positive puncta was increased in the proximal tubule of AQP11(−/− mice before the cyst formation. Interestingly, they were also observed in the cyst-lining epithelial cell. Further PCR analyses revealed the enhanced expression of apoptosis-related and ER stress–related caspase genes before and after the cyst formation, which may cause the enhanced autophagy. These results suggest the involvement of autophagy in the development and maintenance of kidney cysts in AQP11(−/− mice.

  14. Pollination induces autophagy in petunia petals via ethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibuya, Kenichi; Niki, Tomoko; Ichimura, Kazuo

    2013-02-01

    Autophagy is one of the main mechanisms of degradation and remobilization of macromolecules, and it appears to play an important role in petal senescence. However, little is known about the regulatory mechanisms of autophagy in petal senescence. Autophagic processes were observed by electron microscopy and monodansylcadaverine staining of senescing petals of petunia (Petunia hybrida); autophagy-related gene 8 (ATG8) homologues were isolated from petunia and the regulation of expression was analysed. Nutrient remobilization was also examined during pollination-induced petal senescence. Active autophagic processes were observed in the mesophyll cells of senescing petunia petals. Pollination induced the expression of PhATG8 homologues and was accompanied by an increase in ethylene production. Ethylene inhibitor treatment in pollinated flowers delayed the induction of PhATG8 homologues, and ethylene treatment rapidly upregulated PhATG8 homologues in petunia petals. Dry weight and nitrogen content were decreased in the petals and increased in the ovaries after pollination in detached flowers. These results indicated that pollination induces autophagy and that ethylene is a key regulator of autophagy in petal senescence of petunia. The data also demonstrated the translocation of nutrients from the petals to the ovaries during pollination-induced petal senescence.

  15. Blue-Print Autophagy: Potential for Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Ruocco

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The marine environment represents a very rich source of biologically active compounds with pharmacological applications. This is due to its chemical richness, which is claiming considerable attention from the health science communities. In this review we give a general overview on the marine natural products involved in stimulation and inhibition of autophagy (a type of programmed cell death linked to pharmacological and pathological conditions. Autophagy represents a complex multistep cellular process, wherein a double membrane vesicle (the autophagosome captures organelles and proteins and delivers them to the lysosome. This natural and destructive mechanism allows the cells to degrade and recycle its cellular components, such as amino acids, monosaccharides, and lipids. Autophagy is an important mechanism used by cells to clear pathogenic organism and deal with stresses. Therefore, it has also been implicated in several diseases, predominantly in cancer. In fact, pharmacological stimulation or inhibition of autophagy have been proposed as approaches to develop new therapeutic treatments of cancers. In conclusion, this blue-print autophagy (so defined because it is induced and/or inhibited by marine natural products represents a new strategy for the future of biomedicine and of biotechnology in cancer treatment.

  16. System-wide Benefits of Intermeal Fasting by Autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Lopez, Nuria; Tarabra, Elena; Toledo, Miriam; Garcia-Macia, Marina; Sahu, Srabani; Coletto, Luisa; Batista-Gonzalez, Ana; Barzilai, Nir; Pessin, Jeffrey E; Schwartz, Gary J; Kersten, Sander; Singh, Rajat

    2017-12-05

    Autophagy failure is associated with metabolic insufficiency. Although caloric restriction (CR) extends healthspan, its adherence in humans is poor. We established an isocaloric twice-a-day (ITAD) feeding model wherein ITAD-fed mice consume the same food amount as ad libitum controls but at two short windows early and late in the diurnal cycle. We hypothesized that ITAD feeding will provide two intervals of intermeal fasting per circadian period and induce autophagy. We show that ITAD feeding modifies circadian autophagy and glucose/lipid metabolism that correlate with feeding-driven changes in circulating insulin. ITAD feeding decreases adiposity and, unlike CR, enhances muscle mass. ITAD feeding drives energy expenditure, lowers lipid levels, suppresses gluconeogenesis, and prevents age/obesity-associated metabolic defects. Using liver-, adipose-, myogenic-, and proopiomelanocortin neuron-specific autophagy-null mice, we mapped the contribution of tissue-specific autophagy to system-wide benefits of ITAD feeding. Our studies suggest that consuming two meals a day without CR could prevent the metabolic syndrome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Inhibition of autophagy induced by proteasome inhibition increases cell death in human SHG-44 glioma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Peng-Fei; Zhang, Ji-Zhou; Wang, Xiao-Fei; Meng, Fan-Kai; Li, Wen-Chen; Luan, Yong-Xin; Ling, Feng; Luo, Yi-Nan

    2009-07-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and lysosome-dependent macroautophagy (autophagy) are two major intracellular pathways for protein degradation. Recent studies suggest that proteasome inhibitors may reduce tumor growth and activate autophagy. Due to the dual roles of autophagy in tumor cell survival and death, the effect of autophagy on the destiny of glioma cells remains unclear. In this study, we sought to investigate whether inhibition of the proteasome can induce autophagy and the effects of autophagy on the fate of human SHG-44 glioma cells. The proteasome inhibitor MG-132 was used to induce autophagy in SHG-44 glioma cells, and the effect of autophagy on the survival of SHG-44 glioma cells was investigated using an autophagy inhibitor 3-MA. Cell viability was measured by MTT assay. Apoptosis and cell cycle were detected by flow cytometry. The expression of autophagy related proteins was determined by Western blot. MG-132 inhibited cell proliferation, induced cell death and cell cycle arrest at G(2)/M phase, and activated autophagy in SHG-44 glioma cells. The expression of autophagy-related Beclin-1 and LC3-I was significantly up-regulated and part of LC3-I was converted into LC3-II. However, when SHG-44 glioma cells were co-treated with MG-132 and 3-MA, the cells became less viable, but cell death and cell numbers at G(2)/M phase increased. Moreover, the accumulation of acidic vesicular organelles was decreased, the expression of Beclin-1 and LC3 was significantly down-regulated and the conversion of LC3-II from LC3-I was also inhibited. Inhibition of the proteasome can induce autophagy in human SHG-44 glioma cells, and inhibition of autophagy increases cell death. This discovery may shed new light on the effect of autophagy on modulating the fate of SHG-44 glioma cells.Acta Pharmacologica Sinica (2009) 30: 1046-1052; doi: 10.1038/aps.2009.71.

  18. SnRK1 activates autophagy via the TOR signaling pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Burgos, Junmarie; Bassham, Diane C

    2017-01-01

    Autophagy is a degradation process in which cells break down and recycle their cytoplasmic contents when subjected to environmental stress or during cellular remodeling. The Arabidopsis thaliana SnRK1 complex is a protein kinase that senses changes in energy levels and triggers downstream responses to enable survival. Its mammalian ortholog, AMPK, and yeast ortholog, Snf-1, activate autophagy in response to low energy conditions. We therefore hypothesized that SnRK1 may play a role in the regulation of autophagy in response to nutrient or energy deficiency in Arabidopsis. To test this hypothesis, we determined the effect of overexpression or knockout of the SnRK1 catalytic subunit KIN10 on autophagy activation by abiotic stresses, including nutrient deficiency, salt, osmotic, oxidative, and ER stress. While wild-type plants had low basal autophagy activity in control conditions, KIN10 overexpression lines had increased autophagy under these conditions, indicating activation of autophagy by SnRK1. A kin10 mutant had a basal level of autophagy under control conditions similar to wild-type plants, but activation of autophagy by most abiotic stresses was blocked, indicating that SnRK1 is required for autophagy induction by a wide variety of stress conditions. In mammals, TOR is a negative regulator of autophagy, and AMPK acts to activate autophagy both upstream of TOR, by inhibiting its activity, and in a parallel pathway. Inhibition of Arabidopsis TOR leads to activation of autophagy; inhibition of SnRK1 did not block this activation. Furthermore, an increase in SnRK1 activity was unable to induce autophagy when TOR was also activated. These results demonstrate that SnRK1 acts upstream of TOR in the activation of autophagy in Arabidopsis.

  19. TOR-Dependent and -Independent Pathways Regulate Autophagy in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Yunting; Luo, Xinjuan; Bassham, Diane C

    2017-01-01

    Autophagy is a critical process for recycling of cytoplasmic materials during environmental stress, senescence and cellular remodeling. It is upregulated under a wide range of abiotic stress conditions and is important for stress tolerance. Autophagy is repressed by the protein kinase target of rapamycin (TOR), which is activated in response to nutrients and in turn upregulates cell growth and translation and inhibits autophagy. Down-regulation of TOR in Arabidopsis thaliana leads to constitutive autophagy and to decreased growth, but the relationship to stress conditions is unclear. Here, we assess the extent to which TOR controls autophagy activation by abiotic stress. Overexpression of TOR inhibited autophagy activation by nutrient starvation, salt and osmotic stress, indicating that activation of autophagy under these conditions requires down-regulation of TOR activity. In contrast, TOR overexpression had no effect on autophagy induced by oxidative stress or ER stress, suggesting that activation of autophagy by these conditions is independent of TOR function. The plant hormone auxin has been shown previously to up-regulate TOR activity. To confirm the existence of two pathways for activation of autophagy, dependent on the stress conditions, auxin was added exogenously to activate TOR, and the effect on autophagy under different conditions was assessed. Consistent with the effect of TOR overexpression, the addition of the auxin NAA inhibited autophagy during nutrient deficiency, salt and osmotic stress, but not during oxidative or ER stress. NAA treatment was unable to block autophagy induced by a TOR inhibitor or by a mutation in the TOR complex component RAPTOR1B , indicating that auxin is upstream of TOR in the regulation of autophagy. We conclude that repression of auxin-regulated TOR activity is required for autophagy activation in response to a subset of abiotic stress conditions.

  20. Identification of small molecule inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and autophagy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farkas, Thomas; Daugaard, Mads; Jaattela, Marja

    2011-01-01

    Macroautophagy (hereafter autophagy) is a lysosomal catabolic pathway that controls cellular homeostasis and survival. It has recently emerged as an attractive target for the treatment of a variety of degenerative diseases and cancer. The targeting of autophagy has, however, been hampered...... for effective autophagy inhibition. Accordingly, they proved to be valuable tools for investigations of autophagy-associated cell death and survival. Employing KU55399, we demonstrated that autophagy protects amino acid-starved cells against both apoptosis and necroptosis. Taken together, our data introduce new...

  1. An effector of the Irish potato famine pathogen antagonizes a host autophagy cargo receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagdas, Yasin F; Belhaj, Khaoula; Maqbool, Abbas; Chaparro-Garcia, Angela; Pandey, Pooja; Petre, Benjamin; Tabassum, Nadra; Cruz-Mireles, Neftaly; Hughes, Richard K; Sklenar, Jan; Win, Joe; Menke, Frank; Findlay, Kim; Banfield, Mark J; Kamoun, Sophien; Bozkurt, Tolga O

    2016-01-01

    Plants use autophagy to safeguard against infectious diseases. However, how plant pathogens interfere with autophagy-related processes is unknown. Here, we show that PexRD54, an effector from the Irish potato famine pathogen Phytophthora infestans, binds host autophagy protein ATG8CL to stimulate autophagosome formation. PexRD54 depletes the autophagy cargo receptor Joka2 out of ATG8CL complexes and interferes with Joka2's positive effect on pathogen defense. Thus, a plant pathogen effector has evolved to antagonize a host autophagy cargo receptor to counteract host defenses. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10856.001 PMID:26765567

  2. Roles of autophagy in male reproductive development in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeru eHanamata

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy, a major catabolic pathway in eukaryotic cells, is essential in development, maintenance of cellular homeostasis, immunity and programmed cell death (PCD in multicellular organisms. In plant cells, autophagy plays roles in recycling of proteins and metabolites including lipids, and is involved in many physiological processes such as abiotic and biotic stress responses. However, its roles during reproductive development had remained poorly understood. Quantitative live cell imaging techniques for the autophagic flux and genetic studies in several plant species have recently revealed significant roles of autophagy in developmental processes, regulation of PCD and lipid metabolism. We here review the novel roles of autophagic fluxes in plant cells, and discuss their possible significance in PCD and metabolic regulation, with particular focus on male reproductive development during the pollen maturation.

  3. Characterization of early autophagy signaling by quantitative phosphoproteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rigbolt, Kristoffer Tg; Zarei, Mostafa; Sprenger, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    . To elucidate the regulation of early signaling events upon autophagy induction, we applied quantitative phosphoproteomics characterizing the temporal phosphorylation dynamics after starvation and rapamycin treatment. We obtained a comprehensive atlas of phosphorylation kinetics within the first 30 min upon...... revealing regulated phosphorylation sites on proteins involved in a wide range of cellular processes and an impact of the treatments on the kinome. To approach the potential function of the identified phosphorylation sites we performed a screen for MAP1LC3-interacting proteins and identified a group...... induction of autophagy with both treatments affecting widely different cellular processes. The identification of dynamic phosphorylation already after 2 min demonstrates that the earliest events in autophagy signaling occur rapidly after induction. The data was subjected to extensive bioinformatics analysis...

  4. Autophagy regulates the stemness of cervical cancer stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Y

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Yi Yang,1,2 Li Yu,1 Jin Li,1 Ya Hong Yuan,1 Xiao Li Wang,1 Shi Rong Yan,1 Dong Sheng Li,1 Yan Ding1 1Hubei Key Laboratory of Embryonic Stem Cell Research, 2Reproductive Center, Taihe Hospital, Hubei University of Medicine, Shiyan, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Cancer stem cells (CSCs are a rare population of multipotent cells with the capacity to self-renew. It has been reported that there are CSCs in cervical cancer cells. Pluripotency-associated (PA transcription factors such as Oct4, Sox2, Nanog and CD44 have been used to isolate CSCs subpopulations. In this study, we showed that autophagy plays an important role in the biological behavior of cervical cancer cells. The expression of the autophagy protein Beclin 1 and LC3B was higher in tumorspheres established from human cervical cancers cell lines (and CaSki than in the parental adherent cells. It was also observed that the basal and starvation-induced autophagy flux was higher in tumorspheres than in the bulk population. Autophagy could regulate the expression level of PA proteins in cervical CSCs. In addition, CRISPR/Cas 9-mediated Beclin 1 knockout enhanced the malignancy of HeLa cells, leading to accumulation of PA proteins and promoted tumorsphere formation. Our findings suggest that autophagy modulates homeostasis of PA proteins, and Beclin 1 is critical for CSC maintenance and tumor development in nude mice. This demonstrates that a prosurvival autophagic pathway is critical for CSC maintenance. Keywords: cervical cancer, autophagy, cancer stem cell, LC3, Oct4

  5. Shock Wave Therapy Promotes Cardiomyocyte Autophagy and Survival during Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Du

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Autophagy plays an important role in cardiovascular disease. Controversy still exists regarding the effect of autophagy on ischemic/hypoxic myocardium. Cardiac shock wave therapy (CSWT is an effective alternative treatment for refractory ischemic heart disease. Whether CSWT can regulate cardiomyocyte autophagy under hypoxic conditions is not clear. We established a myocardial hypoxia model using the H9c2 cell line and performed shock waves (SWs treatment to evaluate the effect of SW on autophagy. Methods: The H9c2 cells were incubated under hypoxic conditions, and SW treatment was then performed at energies of 0.02, 0.05, or 0.10 mJ/mm2. The cell viability and intracellular ATP level were examined. Western blot analysis was used to assess the expression of LC3B, AMPK, mTOR, Beclin-1, Sirt1, and HIF-1α. Autophagic vacuoles were visualized by monodansylcadaverine staining. Results: After the 24-hour hypoxic period, cardiomyocyte viability and ATP levels were decreased and autophagy was significantly increased in H9c2 cells. SW treatment with an energy of 0.05 mJ/mm2 significantly increased the cellular viability, ATP level, LC3B-II/I, and number of autophagic vacuoles. In addition, phosphorylated AMPK and Sirt1 were increased and phosphorylated mTOR and HIF-1α were decreased after SW treatment. Conclusion: SW treatment can potentially promote cardiomyocyte autophagy during hypoxia and protect cardiomyocyte function by regulating the AMPK/mTOR pathway.

  6. Tuning flux: autophagy as a target of heart disease therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Min; Morales, Cyndi R.; Lavandero, Sergio; Hill, Joseph A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review Despite maximum medical and mechanical support therapy, heart failure remains a relentlessly progressive disorder with substantial morbidity and mortality. Autophagy, an evolutionarily conserved process of cellular cannibalization, has been implicated in virtually all forms of cardiovascular disease. Indeed, its role is context dependent, antagonizing or promoting disease depending on the circumstance. Here, we review current understanding of the role of autophagy in the pathogenesis of heart failure and explore this pathway as a target of therapeutic intervention. Recent findings In preclinical models of heart disease, cardiomyocyte autophagic flux is activated; indeed, its role in disease pathogenesis is the subject of intense investigation to define mechanism. Similarly, in failing human heart of a variety of etiologies, cardiomyocyte autophagic activity is upregulated, and therapy, such as with mechanical support systems, elicits declines in autophagy activity. However, when suppression of autophagy is complete, rapid and catastrophic cell death occurs, consistent with a model in which basal autophagic flux is required for proteostasis. Thus, a narrow zone of ‘optimal’ autophagy seems to exist. The challenge moving forward is to tune the stress-triggered autophagic response within that ‘sweet spot’ range for therapeutic benefit. Summary Whereas we have known for some years of the participation of lysosomal mechanisms in heart disease, it is only recently that upstream mechanisms (autophagy) are being explored. The challenge for the future is to dissect the underlying circuitry and titrate the response into an optimal, proteostasis-promoting range in hopes of mitigating the ever-expanding epidemic of heart failure. PMID:21415729

  7. Paris saponin-induced autophagy promotes breast cancer cell apoptosis via the Akt/mTOR signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhan-Zhi; Li, Man-Mei; Deng, Peng-Fei; Wang, Sheng; Wang, Lei; Lu, Xue-Ping; Hu, Liu-Bing; Chen, Zui; Jie, Hui-Yang; Wang, Yi-Fei; Liu, Xiao-Xiao; Liu, Zhong

    2017-02-25

    Paris saponins possess anticancer, anti-inflammatory, and antiviral effects. However, the anticancer effect of Paris saponins has not been well elucidated and the mechanisms underlying the potential function of Paris saponins in cancer therapy are needed to be further identify. In this study, we report that saponin compounds isolated from Paris polyphylla exhibited antitumor activity against breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231. Paris saponin XA-2 induced apoptosis in both cell lines, as evidenced by the activation of caspases and cleavage of Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase. The ability of XA-2 to induce autophagy was confirmed by acridine orange staining, accumulation of autophagosome-bound Long chain 3 (LC3)-II, and measurement of autophagic flux. XA-2-induced autophagy was observed to promote apoptosis by the combined treatment of breast cancer cell lines with XA-2 and autophagy inhibitors 3-methyladenine and bafilomycin A1, respectively. Moreover, we report a decrease in the levels of Akt/mTOR signaling pathway proteins, such as the phosphorylated forms of Akt, mTOR, P70S6K, and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 (4EBP1). Taken together, these results provide important insights explaining the anticancer activity of Paris saponins and the potential development of XA-2 as a new therapeutic agent. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Hepatitis C Virus Infection Induces Autophagy as a Prosurvival Mechanism to Alleviate Hepatic ER-Stress Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Srikanta; Chava, Srinivas; Aydin, Yucel; Chandra, Partha K.; Ferraris, Pauline; Chen, Weina; Balart, Luis A.; Wu, Tong; Garry, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection frequently leads to chronic liver disease, liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The molecular mechanisms by which HCV infection leads to chronic liver disease and HCC are not well understood. The infection cycle of HCV is initiated by the attachment and entry of virus particles into a hepatocyte. Replication of the HCV genome inside hepatocytes leads to accumulation of large amounts of viral proteins and RNA replication intermediates in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), resulting in production of thousands of new virus particles. HCV-infected hepatocytes mount a substantial stress response. How the infected hepatocyte integrates the viral-induced stress response with chronic infection is unknown. The unfolded protein response (UPR), an ER-associated cellular transcriptional response, is activated in HCV infected hepatocytes. Over the past several years, research performed by a number of laboratories, including ours, has shown that HCV induced UPR robustly activates autophagy to sustain viral replication in the infected hepatocyte. Induction of the cellular autophagy response is required to improve survival of infected cells by inhibition of cellular apoptosis. The autophagy response also inhibits the cellular innate antiviral program that usually inhibits HCV replication. In this review, we discuss the physiological implications of the HCV-induced chronic ER-stress response in the liver disease progression. PMID:27223299

  9. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Affects Microbiota and Suppresses Autophagy in the Intestines of Pigs Challenged with Salmonella Infantis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Infantis (S. Infantis is a common source of foodborne gastroenteritis worldwide. Here, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG was administrated to weaned piglets for 1 week before S. Infantis challenge. S. Infantis caused decreased ileal mucosal microbiota diversity, a dramatic Lactobacillus amylovorus bloom, and decreased abundance of Arsenicicoccus, Janibacter, Kocuria, Nocardioides, Devosia, Paracoccus, Psychrobacter, and Weissella. The beneficial effect of LGG correlated with the moderate expansion of L. amylovorus, L. agilis, and several members of the phyla Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Bacteroidetes. S. Infantis translocation to the liver was decreased in the LGG-pretreated piglets. An in vitro model of LGG and S. Infantis co-incubation (involving the porcine intestinal epithelial cell line IPEC-J2 was established, and nalidixic acid was used to kill the extracellular S. Infantis. LGG suppressed the initial S. Infantis invasion in the IPEC-J2 cells and deceased the rate of cell death. LGG inhibited S. Infantis-induced autophagy and promoted epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR and Akt phosphorylation in both the ileum and IPEC-J2 cells. Our findings suggest that LGG inhibited S. Infantis-induced autophagy by promoting EGFR-mediated activation of the negative mediator Akt, which, in turn, suppressed intestinal epithelial cell death and thus restricted systemic S. Infantis infection. LGG can restore the gut microbiota balance and preserve the autophagy-related intestinal epithelial barrier, thereby controlling infections.

  10. Autophagy deficiency in macrophages enhances NLRP3 inflammasome activity and chronic lung disease following silica exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jessop, Forrest; Hamilton, Raymond F.; Rhoderick, Joseph F.; Shaw, Pamela K.; Holian, Andrij

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is an important metabolic mechanism that can promote cellular survival following injury. The specific contribution of autophagy to silica-induced inflammation and disease is not known. The objective of these studies was to determine the effects of silica exposure on the autophagic pathway in macrophages, as well as the general contribution of autophagy in macrophages to inflammation and disease. Silica exposure enhanced autophagic activity in vitro in Bone Marrow derived Macrophages and in vivo in Alveolar Macrophages isolated from silica-exposed mice. Impairment of autophagy in myeloid cells in vivo using Atg5 fl/fl LysM-Cre + mice resulted in enhanced cytotoxicity and inflammation after silica exposure compared to littermate controls, including elevated IL-18 and the alarmin HMGB1 in the whole lavage fluid. Autophagy deficiency caused some spontaneous inflammation and disease. Greater silica-induced acute inflammation in Atg5 fl/fl LysM-Cre + mice correlated with increased fibrosis and chronic lung disease. These studies demonstrate a critical role for autophagy in suppressing silica-induced cytotoxicity and inflammation in disease development. Furthermore, this data highlights the importance of basal autophagy in macrophages and other myeloid cells in maintaining lung homeostasis. - Highlights: • Silica exposure increases autophagy in macrophages. • Autophagy deficient mice have enhanced inflammation and silicosis. • Autophagy deficiency in macrophages results in greater silica-induced cytotoxicity. • Autophagy deficiency in macrophages increases extracellular IL-18 and HMGB1.

  11. The potential regulatory roles of NAD(+) and its metabolism in autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dong-Xia; Zhang, Jia-Ping; Hu, Jiong-Yu; Huang, Yue-Sheng

    2016-04-01

    (Macro)autophagy mediates the bulk degradation of defective organelles, long-lived proteins and protein aggregates in lysosomes and plays a critical role in cellular and tissue homeostasis. Defective autophagy processes have been found to contribute to a variety of metabolic diseases. However, the regulatory mechanisms of autophagy are not fully understood. Increasing data indicate that nicotinamide adenine nucleotide (NAD(+)) homeostasis correlates intimately with autophagy. NAD(+) is a ubiquitous coenzyme that functions primarily as an electron carrier of oxidoreductase in multiple redox reactions. Both NAD(+) homeostasis and its metabolism are thought to play critical roles in regulating autophagy. In this review, we discuss how the regulation of NAD(+) and its metabolism can influence autophagy. We focus on the regulation of NAD(+)/NADH homeostasis and the effects of NAD(+) consumption by poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), NAD(+)-dependent deacetylation by sirtuins and NAD(+) metabolites on autophagy processes and the underlying mechanisms. Future studies should provide more direct evidence for the regulation of autophagy processes by NAD(+). A better understanding of the critical roles of NAD(+) and its metabolites on autophagy will shed light on the complexity of autophagy regulation, which is essential for the discovery of new therapeutic tools for autophagy-related diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Autophagy Facilitates IFN-γ-induced Jak2-STAT1 Activation and Cellular Inflammation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yu-Ping; Tsai, Cheng-Chieh; Huang, Wei-Ching; Wang, Chi-Yun; Chen, Chia-Ling; Lin, Yee-Shin; Kai, Jui-In; Hsieh, Chia-Yuan; Cheng, Yi-Lin; Choi, Pui-Ching; Chen, Shun-Hua; Chang, Shih-Ping; Liu, Hsiao-Sheng; Lin, Chiou-Feng

    2010-01-01

    Autophagy is regulated for IFN-γ-mediated antimicrobial efficacy; however, its molecular effects for IFN-γ signaling are largely unknown. Here, we show that autophagy facilitates IFN-γ-activated Jak2-STAT1. IFN-γ induces autophagy in wild-type but not in autophagy protein 5 (Atg5−/−)-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), and, autophagy-dependently, IFN-γ induces IFN regulatory factor 1 and cellular inflammatory responses. Pharmacologically inhibiting autophagy using 3-methyladenine, a known inhibitor of class III phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, confirms these effects. Either Atg5−/− or Atg7−/− MEFs are, independent of changes in IFN-γ receptor expression, resistant to IFN-γ-activated Jak2-STAT1, which suggests that autophagy is important for IFN-γ signal transduction. Lentivirus-based short hairpin RNA for Atg5 knockdown confirmed the importance of autophagy for IFN-γ-activated STAT1. Without autophagy, reactive oxygen species increase and cause SHP2 (Src homology-2 domain-containing phosphatase 2)-regulated STAT1 inactivation. Inhibiting SHP2 reversed both cellular inflammation and the IFN-γ-induced activation of STAT1 in Atg5−/− MEFs. Our study provides evidence that there is a link between autophagy and both IFN-γ signaling and cellular inflammation and that autophagy, because it inhibits the expression of reactive oxygen species and SHP2, is pivotal for Jak2-STAT1 activation. PMID:20592027

  13. Autophagy induction under carbon starvation conditions is negatively regulated by carbon catabolite repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Atsuhiro; Koizumi, Michiko; Ohsumi, Yoshinori

    2017-12-01

    Autophagy is a conserved process in which cytoplasmic components are sequestered for degradation in the vacuole/lysosomes in eukaryotic cells. Autophagy is induced under a variety of starvation conditions, such as the depletion of nitrogen, carbon, phosphorus, zinc, and others. However, apart from nitrogen starvation, it remains unclear how these stimuli induce autophagy. In yeast, for example, it remains contentious whether autophagy is induced under carbon starvation conditions, with reports variously suggesting both induction and lack of induction upon depletion of carbon. We therefore undertook an analysis to account for these inconsistencies, concluding that autophagy is induced in response to abrupt carbon starvation when cells are grown with glycerol but not glucose as the carbon source. We found that autophagy under these conditions is mediated by nonselective degradation that is highly dependent on the autophagosome-associated scaffold proteins Atg11 and Atg17. We also found that the extent of carbon starvation-induced autophagy is positively correlated with cells' oxygen consumption rate, drawing a link between autophagy induction and respiratory metabolism. Further biochemical analyses indicated that maintenance of intracellular ATP levels is also required for carbon starvation-induced autophagy and that autophagy plays an important role in cell viability during prolonged carbon starvation. Our findings suggest that carbon starvation-induced autophagy is negatively regulated by carbon catabolite repression. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. The cochaperone BAG3 coordinates protein synthesis and autophagy under mechanical strain through spatial regulation of mTORC1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathage, Barbara; Gehlert, Sebastian; Ulbricht, Anna; Lüdecke, Laura; Tapia, Victor E; Orfanos, Zacharias; Wenzel, Daniela; Bloch, Wilhelm; Volkmer, Rudolf; Fleischmann, Bernd K; Fürst, Dieter O; Höhfeld, Jörg

    2017-01-01

    The cochaperone BAG3 is a central protein homeostasis factor in mechanically strained mammalian cells. It mediates the degradation of unfolded and damaged forms of the actin-crosslinker filamin through chaperone-assisted selective autophagy (CASA). In addition, BAG3 stimulates filamin transcription in order to compensate autophagic disposal and to maintain the actin cytoskeleton under strain. Here we demonstrate that BAG3 coordinates protein synthesis and autophagy through spatial regulation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). The cochaperone utilizes its WW domain to contact a proline-rich motif in the tuberous sclerosis protein TSC1 that functions as an mTORC1 inhibitor in association with TSC2. Interaction with BAG3 results in a recruitment of TSC complexes to actin stress fibers, where the complexes act on a subpopulation of mTOR-positive vesicles associated with the cytoskeleton. Local inhibition of mTORC1 is essential to initiate autophagy at sites of filamin unfolding and damage. At the same time, BAG3-mediated sequestration of TSC1/TSC2 relieves mTORC1 inhibition in the remaining cytoplasm, which stimulates protein translation. In human muscle, an exercise-induced association of TSC1 with the cytoskeleton coincides with mTORC1 activation in the cytoplasm. The spatial regulation of mTORC1 exerted by BAG3 apparently provides the basis for a simultaneous induction of autophagy and protein synthesis to maintain the proteome under mechanical strain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Computational analysis of an autophagy/translation switch based on mutual inhibition of MTORC1 and ULK1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Szymańska

    Full Text Available We constructed a mechanistic, computational model for regulation of (macroautophagy and protein synthesis (at the level of translation. The model was formulated to study the system-level consequences of interactions among the following proteins: two key components of MTOR complex 1 (MTORC1, namely the protein kinase MTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin and the scaffold protein RPTOR; the autophagy-initiating protein kinase ULK1; and the multimeric energy-sensing AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK. Inputs of the model include intrinsic AMPK kinase activity, which is taken as an adjustable surrogate parameter for cellular energy level or AMP:ATP ratio, and rapamycin dose, which controls MTORC1 activity. Outputs of the model include the phosphorylation level of the translational repressor EIF4EBP1, a substrate of MTORC1, and the phosphorylation level of AMBRA1 (activating molecule in BECN1-regulated autophagy, a substrate of ULK1 critical for autophagosome formation. The model incorporates reciprocal regulation of mTORC1 and ULK1 by AMPK, mutual inhibition of MTORC1 and ULK1, and ULK1-mediated negative feedback regulation of AMPK. Through analysis of the model, we find that these processes may be responsible, depending on conditions, for graded responses to stress inputs, for bistable switching between autophagy and protein synthesis, or relaxation oscillations, comprising alternating periods of autophagy and protein synthesis. A sensitivity analysis indicates that the prediction of oscillatory behavior is robust to changes of the parameter values of the model. The model provides testable predictions about the behavior of the AMPK-MTORC1-ULK1 network, which plays a central role in maintaining cellular energy and nutrient homeostasis.

  16. Involvement of apoptosis and autophagy in the death of RPMI 8226 multiple myeloma cells by two enantiomeric sigma receptor ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korpis, Katharina; Weber, Frauke; Brune, Stefanie; Wünsch, Bernhard; Bednarski, Patrick J

    2014-01-01

    Over-expression of σ receptors by many tumor cell lines makes ligands for these receptors attractive as potential chemotherapeutic drugs. Enantiomeric piperazines (S)-4 and (R)-4 were prepared as potential σ-receptor ligands in a chiral pool synthesis starting from (S)- and (R)-aspartate. Both compounds showed high affinities for the σ₁ and σ₂ receptors. In the human multiple myeloma cell line RPMI 8226, a line expressing high levels of σ receptors, both compounds inhibited cell proliferation with IC₅₀ values in the low μM range. No chiral differentiation between either the σ receptor binding affinity or the cytotoxicity of the two enantiomers was observed. Both compounds induced apoptosis, which was evidenced by nuclear condensation, binding of annexin-V to phosphatidylserine in the outer leaf of the cell membrane, cleavage products of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) and caspase-8 as well as the expression of bcl₂ family members bax, bad and bid. However, apoptosis appeared to be caspase independent. Increased levels of the phosphorylated form of the microtubule associated protein light chain 3-II (LC3-II), an autophagosome marker, gave evidence that both compounds induced autophagy. However, further data (e.g., treatment with wortmannin) indicate that autophagy is incomplete and not cytoprotective. Lipid peroxidation (LPO) was observed in RPMI 8226 cells treated with the two compounds, and the lipid antioxidant α-tocopherol attenuated LPO. Interestingly, α-tocopherol reduced significantly both apoptosis and autophagy induced by the compounds. These results provide evidence that, by initiating LPO and changes in mitochondrial membrane potential, both compounds induce apoptosis and autophagy in RPMI 8226 cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Crosstalk between autophagy and inflammatory signalling pathways: balancing defence and homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadwell, Ken

    2016-11-01

    Autophagy has broad functions in immunity, ranging from cell-autonomous defence to coordination of complex multicellular immune responses. The successful resolution of infection and avoidance of autoimmunity necessitates efficient and timely communication between autophagy and pathways that sense the immune environment. The recent literature indicates that a variety of immune mediators induce or repress autophagy. It is also becoming increasingly clear that immune signalling cascades are subject to regulation by autophagy, and that a return to homeostasis following a robust immune response is critically dependent on this pathway. Importantly, examples of non-canonical forms of autophagy in mediating immunity are pervasive. In this article, the progress in elucidating mechanisms of crosstalk between autophagy and inflammatory signalling cascades is reviewed. Improved mechanistic understanding of the autophagy machinery offers hope for treating infectious and inflammatory diseases.

  18. Autophagy: Friend or Foe in Breast Cancer Development, Progression, and Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berardi, D.E.; Campodonico, P.B.; Bessone, M.I.D.; Urtreger, A.J.; Todaro, L.B.

    2011-01-01

    Autophagy is a catabolic process responsible for the degradation and recycling of long-lived proteins and organelles by lysosomes. This degradative pathway sustains cell survival during nutrient deprivation, but in some circumstances, autophagy leads to cell death. Thereby, autophagy can serve as tumor suppressor, as the reduction in autophagic capacity causes malignant transformation and spontaneous tumors. On the other hand, this process also functions as a protective cell-survival mechanism against environmental stress causing resistance to antineoplastic therapies. Although autophagy inhibition, combined with anticancer agents, could be therapeutically beneficial in some cases, autophagy induction by itself could lead to cell death in some apoptosis-resistant cancers, indicating that autophagy induction may also be used as a therapy. This paper summarizes the most important findings described in the literature about autophagy and also discusses the importance of this process in clinical settings

  19. 3-Bromopyruvate induces endoplasmic reticulum stress, overcomes autophagy and causes apoptosis in human HCC cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganapathy-Kanniappan, Shanmugasundaram; Geschwind, Jean-Francois H; Kunjithapatham, Rani; Buijs, Manon; Syed, Labiq H; Rao, Pramod P; Ota, Shinichi; Kwak, Byung Kook; Loffroy, Romaric; Vali, Mustafa

    2010-03-01

    Autophagy, a cellular response to stress, plays a role in resistance to chemotherapy in cancer cells. Resistance renders systemic chemotherapy generally ineffective against human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Recently, we reported that the pyruvate analog 3-bromopyruvate (3-BrPA) promoted tumor cell death by targeting GAPDH. In continuance, we investigated the intracellular response of two human HCC cell lines (Hep3B and SK-Hep1) that differ in their status of key apoptotic regulators, p53 and Fas. 3-BrPA treatment induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, translation inhibition and apoptosis based on Western blot and qPCR, pulse labeling, Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay and active caspase-3 in both the cell lines. However, electron microscopy revealed that 3-BrPA treated SK-Hep1 cells underwent classical apoptotic cell death while Hep3B cells initially responded with the protective autophagy that failed to prevent eventual apoptosis. 3-BrPA treatment promotes apoptosis in human HCC cell lines, irrespective of the intracellular response.

  20. The lack of autophagy triggers precocious activation of Notch signaling during Drosophila oogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barth Julia MI

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The proper balance of autophagy, a lysosome-mediated degradation process, is indispensable for oogenesis in Drosophila. We recently demonstrated that egg development depends on autophagy in the somatic follicle cells (FC, but not in the germline cells (GCs. However, the lack of autophagy only affects oogenesis when FCs are autophagy-deficient but GCs are wild type, indicating that a dysfunctional signaling between soma and germline may be responsible for the oogenesis defects. Thus, autophagy could play an essential role in modulating signal transduction pathways during egg development. Results Here, we provide further evidence for the necessity of autophagy during oogenesis and demonstrate that autophagy is especially required in subsets of FCs. Generation of autophagy-deficient FCs leads to a wide range of phenotypes that are similar to mutants with defects in the classical cell-cell signaling pathways in the ovary. Interestingly, we observe that loss of autophagy leads to a precocious activation of the Notch pathway in the FCs as monitored by the expression of Cut and Hindsight, two downstream effectors of Notch signaling. Conclusion Our findings point to an unexpected function for autophagy in the modulation of the Notch signaling pathway during Drosophila oogenesis and suggest a function for autophagy in proper receptor activation. Egg development is affected by an imbalance of autophagy between signal sending (germline and signal receiving cell (FC, thus the lack of autophagy in the germline is likely to decrease the amount of active ligand and accordingly compensates for increased signaling in autophagy-defective follicle cells.

  1. A dual role of p53 in the control of autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasdemir, Ezgi; Chiara Maiuri, M; Morselli, Eugenia; Criollo, Alfredo; D'Amelio, Marcello; Djavaheri-Mergny, Mojgan; Cecconi, Francesco; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Kroemer, Guido

    2008-08-01

    Genotoxic stress can induce autophagy in a p53-dependent fashion and p53 can transactivate autophagy-inducing genes. We have observed recently that inactivation of p53 by deletion, depletion or inhibition can trigger autophagy. Thus, human and mouse cells subjected to knockout, knockdown or pharmacological inhibition of p53 manifest signs of autophagy such as depletion of p62/SQSTM1, LC3 lipidation, redistribution of GFP-LC3 in cytoplasmic puncta, and accumulation of autophagosomes and autolysosomes, both in vitro and in vivo. Inhibition of p53 causes autophagy in enucleated cells, indicating that the cytoplasmic, non-nuclear pool of p53 can regulate autophagy. Accordingly, retransfection of p53(-/-) cells with wild-type p53 as well as a p53 mutant that is excluded from the nucleus (due to the deletion of the nuclear localization sequence) can inhibit autophagy, whereas retransfection with a nucleus-restricted p53 mutant (in which the nuclear localization sequence has been deleted) does not inhibit autophagy. Several distinct autophagy inducers (e.g., starvation, rapamycin, lithium, tunicamycin and thapsigargin) stimulate the rapid degradation of p53. In these conditions, inhibition of the p53-specific E3 ubiquitin ligase HDM2 can avoid p53 depletion and simultaneously prevent the activation of autophagy. Moreover, a p53 mutant that lacks the HDM2 ubiquitinylation site and hence is more stable than wild-type p53 is particularly efficient in suppressing autophagy. In conclusion, p53 plays a dual role in the control of autophagy. On the one hand, nuclear p53 can induce autophagy through transcriptional effects. On the other hand, cytoplasmic p53 may act as a master repressor of autophagy.

  2. Prohibitin 1 modulates mitochondrial stress-related autophagy in human colonic epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arwa S Kathiria

    Full Text Available Autophagy is an adaptive response to extracellular and intracellular stress by which cytoplasmic components and organelles, including damaged mitochondria, are degraded to promote cell survival and restore cell homeostasis. Certain genes involved in autophagy confer susceptibility to Crohn's disease. Reactive oxygen species and pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα, both of which are increased during active inflammatory bowel disease, promote cellular injury and autophagy via mitochondrial damage. Prohibitin (PHB, which plays a role in maintaining normal mitochondrial respiratory function, is decreased during active inflammatory bowel disease. Restoration of colonic epithelial PHB expression protects mice from experimental colitis and combats oxidative stress. In this study, we investigated the potential role of PHB in modulating mitochondrial stress-related autophagy in intestinal epithelial cells.We measured autophagy activation in response to knockdown of PHB expression by RNA interference in Caco2-BBE and HCT116 WT and p53 null cells. The effect of exogenous PHB expression on TNFα- and IFNγ-induced autophagy was assessed. Autophagy was inhibited using Bafilomycin A(1 or siATG16L1 during PHB knockdown and the affect on intracellular oxidative stress, mitochondrial membrane potential, and cell viability were determined. The requirement of intracellular ROS in siPHB-induced autophagy was assessed using the ROS scavenger N-acetyl-L-cysteine.TNFα and IFNγ-induced autophagy inversely correlated with PHB protein expression. Exogenous PHB expression reduced basal autophagy and TNFα-induced autophagy. Gene silencing of PHB in epithelial cells induces mitochondrial autophagy via increased intracellular ROS. Inhibition of autophagy during PHB knockdown exacerbates mitochondrial depolarization and reduces cell viability.Decreased PHB levels coupled with dysfunctional autophagy renders intestinal epithelial cells

  3. Melatonin reverses H2 O2 -induced senescence in SH-SY5Y cells by enhancing autophagy via sirtuin 1 deacetylation of the RelA/p65 subunit of NF-κB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nopparat, Chutikorn; Sinjanakhom, Puritat; Govitrapong, Piyarat

    2017-08-01

    Autophagy, a degradation mechanism that plays a major role in maintaining cellular homeostasis and diminishes in aging, is considered an aging characteristic. Melatonin is an important hormone that plays a wide range of physiological functions, including the anti-aging effect, potentially via the regulation of the Sirtuin1 (SIRT1) pathway. The deacetylation ability of SIRT1 is important for controlling the function of several transcription factors, including nuclear factor kappa B (NF-ĸB). Apart from inflammation, NF-ĸB can regulate autophagy by inhibiting Beclin1, an initiator of autophagy. Although numerous studies have revealed the role of melatonin in regulating autophagy, very limited experiments have shown that melatonin can increase autophagic activity via SIRT1 in a senescent model. This study focuses on the effect of melatonin on autophagy via the deacetylation activity of SIRT1 on RelA/p65, a subunit of NF-ĸB, to determine whether melatonin can attenuate the aging condition. SH-SY5Y cells were treated with H 2 O 2 to induce the senescent state. These results demonstrated that melatonin reduced a number of beta-galactosidase (SA-βgal)-positive cells, a senescent marker. In addition, melatonin increased the protein levels of SIRT1, Beclin1, and LC3-II, a hallmark protein of autophagy, and reduced the levels of acetylated-Lys310 in the p65 subunit of NF-ĸB in SH-SY5Y cells treated with H 2 O 2 . Furthermore, in the presence of SIRT1 inhibitor, melatonin failed to increase autophagic markers. The present data indicate that melatonin enhances autophagic activity via the SIRT1 signaling pathway. Taken together, we propose that in modulating autophagy, melatonin may provide a therapeutically beneficial role in the anti-aging processes. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Inhibition of mammalian S6 kinase by resveratrol suppresses autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Sean M; Baur, Joseph A; Hsieh, Sherry N; Land-Bracha, Abigail; Thomas, Sheila M; Sinclair, David A

    2009-06-03

    Resveratrol is a plant-derived polyphenol that promotes health and disease resistance in rodent models, and extends lifespan in lower organisms. A major challenge is to understand the biological processes and molecular pathways by which resveratrol induces these beneficial effects. Autophagy is a critical process by which cells turn over damaged components and maintain bioenergetic requirements. Disruption of the normal balance between pro- and anti-autophagic signals is linked to cancer, liver disease, and neurodegenerative disorders. Here we show that resveratrol attenuates autophagy in response to nutrient limitation or rapamycin in multiple cell lines through a pathway independent of a known target, SIRT1. In a large-scalein vitro kinase screen we identified p70 S6 kinase (S6K1) as a target of resveratrol. Blocking S6K1 activity by expression of a dominant-negative mutant or RNA interference is sufficient to disrupt autophagy to a similar extent as resveratrol. Furthermore, co-administration of resveratrol with S6K1 knockdown does not produce an additive effect. These data indicate that S6K1 is important for the full induction of autophagy in mammals and raise the possibility that some of the beneficial effects of resveratrol are due to modulation of S6K1 activity.

  5. Autophagy Therapeutic Potential of Garlic in Human Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Lin Chu

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is one of the deadliest diseases against humans. To tackle this menace, humans have developed several high-technology therapies, such as chemotherapy, tomotherapy, targeted therapy, and antibody therapy. However, all these therapies have their own adverse side effects. Therefore, recent years have seen increased attention being given to the natural food for complementary therapy, which have less side effects. Garlic 大 蒜 Dà Suàn; Allium sativum, is one of most powerful food used in many of the civilizations for both culinary and medicinal purpose. In general, these foods induce cancer cell death by apoptosis, autophagy, or necrosis. Studies have discussed how natural food factors regulate cell survival or death by autophagy in cancer cells. From many literature reviews, garlic could not only induce apoptosis but also autophagy in cancer cells. Autophagy, which is called type-II programmed cell death, provides new strategy in cancer therapy. In conclusion, we wish that garlic could be the pioneer food of complementary therapy in clinical cancer treatment and increase the life quality of cancer patients.

  6. Autophagy: A Novel Therapeutic Target for Diabetic Nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kume, Shinji; Koya, Daisuke

    2015-12-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is a leading cause of end stage renal disease and its occurance is increasing worldwide. The most effective treatment strategy for the condition is intensive treatment to strictly control glycemia and blood pressure using renin-angiotensin system inhibitors. However, a fraction of patients still go on to reach end stage renal disease even under such intensive care. New therapeutic targets for diabetic nephropathy are, therefore, urgently needed. Autophagy is a major catabolic pathway by which mammalian cells degrade macromolecules and organelles to maintain intracellular homeostasis. The accumulation of damaged proteins and organelles is associated with the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. Autophagy in the kidney is activated under some stress conditions, such as oxidative stress and hypoxia in proximal tubular cells, and occurs even under normal conditions in podocytes. These and other accumulating findings have led to a hypothesis that autophagy is involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. Here, we review recent findings underpinning this hypothesis and discuss the advantages of targeting autophagy for the treatment of diabetic nephropathy.

  7. Autophagy: A Novel Therapeutic Target for Diabetic Nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinji Kume

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic nephropathy is a leading cause of end stage renal disease and its occurance is increasing worldwide. The most effective treatment strategy for the condition is intensive treatment to strictly control glycemia and blood pressure using renin-angiotensin system inhibitors. However, a fraction of patients still go on to reach end stage renal disease even under such intensive care. New therapeutic targets for diabetic nephropathy are, therefore, urgently needed. Autophagy is a major catabolic pathway by which mammalian cells degrade macromolecules and organelles to maintain intracellular homeostasis. The accumulation of damaged proteins and organelles is associated with the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. Autophagy in the kidney is activated under some stress conditions, such as oxidative stress and hypoxia in proximal tubular cells, and occurs even under normal conditions in podocytes. These and other accumulating findings have led to a hypothesis that autophagy is involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. Here, we review recent findings underpinning this hypothesis and discuss the advantages of targeting autophagy for the treatment of diabetic nephropathy.

  8. System-wide Benefits of Intermeal Fasting by Autophagy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinez-Lopez, Nuria; Tarabra, Elena; Toledo, Miriam; Garcia-Macia, Marina; Sahu, Srabani; Coletto, Luisa; Batista-Gonzalez, Ana; Barzilai, Nir; Pessin, Jeffrey E.; Schwartz, Gary J.; Kersten, Sander; Singh, Rajat

    2017-01-01

    Autophagy failure is associated with metabolic insufficiency. Although caloric restriction (CR) extends healthspan, its adherence in humans is poor. We established an isocaloric twice-a-day (ITAD) feeding model wherein ITAD-fed mice consume the same food amount as ad libitum controls but at two

  9. Chlorogenic acid alleviates autophagy and insulin resistance by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hua Yan

    2018-04-07

    Apr 7, 2018 ... In this study, a high-fat diet-induced NAFLD rat model was used to investigate the ... CG can improve lipid and glucose meta- ... Healthy female Sprague–Dawley rats (age, 8–9 weeks; .... NAFLD, the protein levels of autophagy-related markers .... adipose tissue dysfunction, vitamin D deficiency and the.

  10. Research progress of hydroxychloroquine and autophagy inhibitors on cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ting-Ting; Yu, Xiao-Xu; Yan, Li-Jun; Xiao, Hong-Tao

    2017-02-01

    Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ), the analog of chloroquine, augments the effect of chemotherapies and radiotherapy on various tumors identified in the current clinical trials. Meanwhile, the toxicity of HCQ retinopathy raises concern worldwide. Thus, the potent autophagy inhibitors are urgently needed. A systematic review was related to 'hydroxychloroquine' or 'chloroquine' with 'clinical trials,' 'retinopathy' and 'new autophagy inhibitors.' This led to many cross-references involving HCQ, and these data have been incorporated into the following study. Many preclinical studies indicate that the combination of HCQ with chemotherapies or radiotherapies may enhance the effect of anticancer, providing base for launching cancer clinical trials involving HCQ. The new and more sensitive diagnostic techniques report a prevalence of HCQ retinopathy up to 7.5%. Lys05, SAR405, verteporfin, VATG-027, mefloquine and spautin-1 may be potent autophagy inhibitors. Additional mechanistic studies of HCQ in preclinical models are still required in order to answer these questions whether HCQ actually inhibits autophagy in non-selective tumors and whether the extent of inhibition would be sufficient to alter chemotherapy or radiotherapy sensitivity.

  11. Retinoid receptor signaling and autophagy in acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Orfali, Nina

    2014-05-15

    Retinoids are a family of signaling molecules derived from vitamin A with well established roles in cellular differentiation. Physiologically active retinoids mediate transcriptional effects on cells through interactions with retinoic acid (RARs) and retinoid-X (RXR) receptors. Chromosomal translocations involving the RARα gene, which lead to impaired retinoid signaling, are implicated in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). All-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA), alone and in combination with arsenic trioxide (ATO), restores differentiation in APL cells and promotes degradation of the abnormal oncogenic fusion protein through several proteolytic mechanisms. RARα fusion-protein elimination is emerging as critical to obtaining sustained remission and long-term cure in APL. Autophagy is a degradative cellular pathway involved in protein turnover. Both ATRA and ATO also induce autophagy in APL cells. Enhancing autophagy may therefore be of therapeutic benefit in resistant APL and could broaden the application of differentiation therapy to other cancers. Here we discuss retinoid signaling in hematopoiesis, leukemogenesis, and APL treatment. We highlight autophagy as a potential important regulator in anti-leukemic strategies.

  12. microRNA-101 is a potent inhibitor of autophagy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frankel, Lisa B; Wen, Jiayu; Lees, Michael

    2011-01-01

    performed a functional screen in search of microRNAs (miRNAs), which regulate the autophagic flux in breast cancer cells. In this study, we identified the tumour suppressive miRNA, miR-101, as a potent inhibitor of basal, etoposide- and rapamycin-induced autophagy. Through transcriptome profiling, we...

  13. Exocyst and autophagy-related membrane trafficking in plants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pečenková, Tamara; Marković, Vedrana; Sabol, P.; Kulich, I.; Žárský, Viktor

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 69, č. 1 (2018), s. 47-57 ISSN 0022-0957 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-14886S Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Autophagy * endomembranes * exocyst * plant defence * secretory transport * ups Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Cell biology Impact factor: 5.830, year: 2016

  14. Autophagy: A double-edged sword in Alzheimer's disease

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... This article briefly summarizes seminal discoveries that are shedding new light on the critical and unique roles of autophagy in AD and potential therapeutic ... those of the staff, the journals, various programmes, and Current Science, has changed from 'ias.ernet.in' (or 'academy.ias.ernet.in') to 'ias.ac.in'.

  15. N-n-butyl haloperidol iodide protects cardiomyocytes against hypoxia/reoxygenation injury by inhibiting autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; Zhong, Shuping; Zheng, Fuchun; Zhang, Yanmei; Gao, Fenfei; Chen, Yicun; Lu, Binger; Xu, Han; Shi, Ganggang

    2015-09-22

    N-n-butyl haloperidol iodide (F2), a novel compound derived from haloperidol, protects against the damaging effects of ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we hypothesized the myocardial protection of F2 on cardiomyocyte hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) injury is mediated by inhibiting autophagy in H9c2 cells. The degree of autophagy by treatment with F2 exposed to H/R in H9c2 cell was characterized by monodansylcadaverine, transmission electron microscopy, and expression of autophagy marker protein LC3. Our results indicated that treatment with F2 inhibited autophagy in H9c2 cells exposed to H/R. 3-methyladenine, an inhibitor of autophagy, suppressed H/R-induced autophagy, and decreased apoptosis, whereas rapamycin, a classical autophagy sensitizer, increased autophagy and apoptosis. Mechanistically, macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) was inhibited by F2 treatment after H/R. Accordingly, small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated MIF knockdown decreased H/R-induced autophagy. In summary, F2 protects cardiomyocytes during H/R injury through suppressing autophagy activation. Our results provide a new mechanistic insight into a functional role of F2 against H/R-induced cardiomyocyte injury and death.

  16. Here, there be dragons: charting autophagy-related alterations in human tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebovitz, Chandra B; Bortnik, Svetlana B; Gorski, Sharon M

    2012-03-01

    Macroautophagy (or autophagy) is a catabolic cellular process that is both homeostatic and stress adaptive. Normal cells rely on basal levels of autophagy to maintain cellular integrity (via turnover of long-lived proteins and damaged organelles) and increased levels of autophagy to buoy cell survival during various metabolic stresses (via nutrient and energy provision through lysosomal degradation of cytoplasmic components). Autophagy can function in both tumor suppression and tumor progression, and is under investigation in clinical trials as a novel target for anticancer therapy. However, its role in cancer pathogenesis has yet to be fully explored. In particular, it remains unknown whether in vitro observations will be applicable to human cancer patients. Another outstanding question is whether there exists tumor-specific selection for alterations in autophagy function. In this review, we survey reported mutations in autophagy genes and key autophagy regulators identified in human tumor samples and summarize the literature regarding expression levels of autophagy genes and proteins in various cancer tissues. Although it is too early to draw inferences from this collection of in vivo studies of autophagy-related alterations in human cancers, their results highlight the challenges that must be overcome before we can accurately assess the scope of autophagy's predicted role in tumorigenesis.

  17. Calcium Homeostasis and ER Stress in Control of Autophagy in Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Kania

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a basic catabolic process, serving as an internal engine during responses to various cellular stresses. As regards cancer, autophagy may play a tumor suppressive role by preserving cellular integrity during tumor development and by possible contribution to cell death. However, autophagy may also exert oncogenic effects by promoting tumor cell survival and preventing cell death, for example, upon anticancer treatment. The major factors influencing autophagy are Ca2+ homeostasis perturbation and starvation. Several Ca2+ channels like voltage-gated T- and L-type channels, IP3 receptors, or CRAC are involved in autophagy regulation. Glucose transporters, mainly from GLUT family, which are often upregulated in cancer, are also prominent targets for autophagy induction. Signals from both Ca2+ perturbations and glucose transport blockage might be integrated at UPR and ER stress activation. Molecular pathways such as IRE 1-JNK-Bcl-2, PERK-eIF2α-ATF4, or ATF6-XBP 1-ATG are related to autophagy induced through ER stress. Moreover ER molecular chaperones such as GRP78/BiP and transcription factors like CHOP participate in regulation of ER stress-mediated autophagy. Autophagy modulation might be promising in anticancer therapies; however, it is a context-dependent matter whether inhibition or activation of autophagy leads to tumor cell death.

  18. Chloroquine inhibits autophagy and deteriorates the mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis in hypoxic rat neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng; Hao, Lei; Guo, Yan-Yan; Yang, Guang-Lu; Mei, Hua; Li, Xiao-Hua; Zhai, Qiong-Xiang

    2018-06-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction (MD) and apoptosis in the neurons are associated with neonatal hypoxic-ischemic (HI) encephalopathy (HIE). The present study was to explore the influence of autophagy on the induction of MD and apoptosis in the neurons in a neonatal HIE rats and in hypoxia-treated neurons in vitro. Ten-day-old HI rat pups were sacrificed for brain pathological examination and immunohistochemical analysis. The induction of autophagy, apoptosis and MD were also determined in the neurons under hypoxia, with or without autophagy inhibitor, chloroquine (CQ) treatment. HI treatment caused atrophy and apoptosis of neurons, with a significantly increased levels of apoptosis- and autophagy-associated proteins, such as cleaved caspase 3 and the B subunit of autophagy-related microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3-B). in vitro experiments demonstrated that the hypoxia induced autophagy in neurons, as was inhibited by CQ. The hypoxia-induced cytochrome c release, cleaved caspase 3 and cleaved caspase 9 were aggravated by CQ. Moreover, there were higher levels of reactive oxygen species, more mitochondrial superoxide and less mitochondrial membrane potential in the CQ-treated neurons under hypoxia than in the neurons singularly under hypoxia. Apoptosis and autophagy were induced in HI neonatal rat neurons, autophagy inhibition deteriorates the hypoxia-induced neuron MD and apoptosis. It implies a neuroprotection of autophagy in the hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Administration of autophagy inducer agents might be promising in HIE treatment. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. VMP1 related autophagy and apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells: VMP1 regulates cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian, Qinyi [Department of Ultrasonograph, Changshu No. 2 People’s Hospital, Changshu (China); Zhou, Hao; Chen, Yan [Department of General Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou (China); Shen, Chenglong [Department of General Surgery, Changshu No. 2 People’s Hospital, Changshu (China); He, Songbing; Zhao, Hua; Wang, Liang [Department of General Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou (China); Wan, Daiwei, E-mail: 372710369@qq.com [Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Gu, Wen, E-mail: 505339704@qq.com [Department of General Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou (China)

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •This research confirmed VMP1 as a regulator of autophagy in colorectal cancer cell lines. •We proved the pro-survival role of VMP1-mediated autophagy in colorectal cancer cell lines. •We found the interaction between VMP1 and BECLIN1 also existing in colorectal cancer cell lines. -- Abstract: Vacuole membrane protein 1 (VMP1) is an autophagy-related protein and identified as a key regulator of autophagy in recent years. In pancreatic cell lines, VMP1-dependent autophagy has been linked to positive regulation of apoptosis. However, there are no published reports on the role of VMP1 in autophagy and apoptosis in colorectal cancers. Therefore, to address this gap of knowledge, we decided to interrogate regulation of autophagy and apoptosis by VMP1. We have studied the induction of autophagy by starvation and rapamycin treatment in colorectal cell lines using electron microscopy, immunofluorescence, and immunoblotting. We found that starvation-induced autophagy correlated with an increase in VMP1 expression, that VMP1 interacted with BECLIN1, and that siRNA mediated down-regulation of VMP1-reduced autophagy. Next, we examined the relationship between VMP1-dependent autophagy and apoptosis and found that VMP1 down-regulation sensitizes cells to apoptosis and that agents that induce apoptosis down-regulate VMP1. In conclusion, similar to its reported role in other cell types, VMP1 is an important regulator of autophagy in colorectal cell lines. However, in contrast to its role in pancreatic cell lines, in colorectal cancer cells, VMP1-dependent autophagy appears to be pro-survival rather than pro-cell death.

  20. Diesel Exhaust Particles Contribute to Endothelia Apoptosis via Autophagy Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jhih-Syuan; Tseng, Chia-Yi; Chao, Ming-Wei

    2017-03-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest that an increase of PM2.5 diesel exhaust particles (DEP) in ambient air corresponds to increased myocardial infarctions and atherosclerosis. When exposed to DEP, endothelial cells exhibit increases in oxidative stress and apoptosis, but the role of autophagy in this DEP-induced cell death remains unclear. Here, we suggest that acute DEP exposure produces intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) leading to induction of DEP internalization, endothelial dysfunction, and pro-inflammation in an in vitro human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) model. This study found that increases in intracellular oxidative stress and cellular internalization of DEP occurred within 2 h of exposure to DEP. After 2 h of DEP exposure, Mdm2 expression was increased, which triggered cellular autophagy after 4 h of DEP exposure and suppressed cellular senescence. Unfortunately, phagocytized DEP could not be eliminated by cellular autophagy, which led to a continuous buildup of ROS, an increased release of cytokines, and an increased expression of anchoring molecules. After 12 h of DEP exposure, HUVEC reduced Mdm2 expression leading to increased p53 expression, which triggered apoptosis and ultimately resulted in endothelial dysfunction. On the other hand, when cells lacked the ability to induce autophagy, DEP was unable to induce cell senescence and most of the cells survived with only a small percentage of the cells undergoing necrosis. The results presented in this study clearly demonstrate the role cellular autophagy plays in DEP-induced atherosclerosis. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Autophagy involved in resveratrol increased radiosensitivity in glioma stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long Linmei; Zhang Qingqing; Yang Neng; Ji Wenjun; Song Yunzhen; Zhao Jianghu; Liang Zhongqin

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of Resveratrol combined with X-ray on radiosensitivity in glioma stem cells. Methods: The proliferation inhibition of glioma stem cells induced by X-rays and Resveratrol was assessed with MTT assay. The activation of proapoptotic effect was characterized by Hoechst 33258 stain. MDC stain and Western blot analysis were used to analyze the autophagy mechanism in X-rays-induced death of glioma stem cells. Results: MTT assay indicated that X-rays and Resveratrol decreased the viability of glioma stem cells (P<0.05); we found the proliferative inhibition of glioma stem cells was declined when we used 3-MA to inhibit autophagy(P<0.05). When the cells were treated by the Resveratrol and x-rays, their spherical shape were changed. Apoptosis was induced in glioma stem cells by combined X-rays and Resveratrol as detected by Hoechst 33258 staining. In addition, autophagy was induced in glioma stem cells in the combined treatment group as detected by MDC staining. Western blotting showed that Bcl-2 expression was decreased. in the combined treatment group (P<0.01), and the LC3-Ⅱ expression was increased in the combined treatment group (P<0.01). Conclusion: Resveratrol can increased the radiation sensitivity of glioma stem cells, the apoptosis and autophagy was induced in the glioma stem cells in the combined treatment X-rays and Resveratrol. Our results suggest that autophagy plays an essential role in the regulation of radiosensitization of glioma stem cells. (authors)

  2. SIRT5 regulation of ammonia-induced autophagy and mitophagy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polletta, Lucia; Vernucci, Enza; Carnevale, Ilaria; Arcangeli, Tania; Rotili, Dante; Palmerio, Silvia; Steegborn, Clemens; Nowak, Theresa; Schutkowski, Mike; Pellegrini, Laura; Sansone, Luigi; Villanova, Lidia; Runci, Alessandra; Pucci, Bruna; Morgante, Emanuela; Fini, Massimo; Mai, Antonello; Russo, Matteo A; Tafani, Marco

    2015-01-01

    In liver the mitochondrial sirtuin, SIRT5, controls ammonia detoxification by regulating CPS1, the first enzyme of the urea cycle. However, while SIRT5 is ubiquitously expressed, urea cycle and CPS1 are only present in the liver and, to a minor extent, in the kidney. To address the possibility that SIRT5 is involved in ammonia production also in nonliver cells, clones of human breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231 and mouse myoblast C2C12, overexpressing or silenced for SIRT5 were produced. Our results show that ammonia production increased in SIRT5-silenced and decreased in SIRT5-overexpressing cells. We also obtained the same ammonia increase when using a new specific inhibitor of SIRT5 called MC3482. SIRT5 regulates ammonia production by controlling glutamine metabolism. In fact, in the mitochondria, glutamine is transformed in glutamate by the enzyme glutaminase, a reaction producing ammonia. We found that SIRT5 and glutaminase coimmunoprecipitated and that SIRT5 inhibition resulted in an increased succinylation of glutaminase. We next determined that autophagy and mitophagy were increased by ammonia by measuring autophagic proteolysis of long-lived proteins, increase of autophagy markers MAP1LC3B, GABARAP, and GABARAPL2, mitophagy markers BNIP3 and the PINK1-PARK2 system as well as mitochondrial morphology and dynamics. We observed that autophagy and mitophagy increased in SIRT5-silenced cells and in WT cells treated with MC3482 and decreased in SIRT5-overexpressing cells. Moreover, glutaminase inhibition or glutamine withdrawal completely prevented autophagy. In conclusion we propose that the role of SIRT5 in nonliver cells is to regulate ammonia production and ammonia-induced autophagy by regulating glutamine metabolism. PMID:25700560

  3. Sorafenib-induced defective autophagy promotes cell death by necroptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharaziha, Pedram; Chioureas, Dimitris; Baltatzis, George; Fonseca, Pedro; Rodriguez, Patricia; Gogvadze, Vladimir; Lennartsson, Lena; Björklund, Ann-Charlotte; Zhivotovsky, Boris; Grandér, Dan; Egevad, Lars; Nilsson, Sten; Panaretakis, Theocharis

    2015-11-10

    Autophagy is one of the main cytoprotective mechanisms that cancer cells deploy to withstand the cytotoxic stress and survive the lethal damage induced by anti-cancer drugs. However, under specific conditions, autophagy may, directly or indirectly, induce cell death. In our study, treatment of the Atg5-deficient DU145 prostate cancer cells, with the multi-tyrosine kinase inhibitor, sorafenib, induces mitochondrial damage, autophagy and cell death. Molecular inhibition of autophagy by silencing ULK1 and Beclin1 rescues DU145 cells from cell death indicating that, in this setting, autophagy promotes cell death. Re-expression of Atg5 restores the lipidation of LC3 and rescues DU145 and MEF atg5-/- cells from sorafenib-induced cell death. Despite the lack of Atg5 expression and LC3 lipidation, DU145 cells form autophagosomes as demonstrated by transmission and immuno-electron microscopy, and the formation of LC3 positive foci. However, the lack of cellular content in the autophagosomes, the accumulation of long-lived proteins, the presence of GFP-RFP-LC3 positive foci and the accumulated p62 protein levels indicate that these autophagosomes may not be fully functional. DU145 cells treated with sorafenib undergo a caspase-independent cell death that is inhibited by the RIPK1 inhibitor, necrostatin-1. Furthermore, treatment with sorafenib induces the interaction of RIPK1 with p62, as demonstrated by immunoprecipitation and a proximity ligation assay. Silencing of p62 decreases the RIPK1 protein levels and renders necrostatin-1 ineffective in blocking sorafenib-induced cell death. In summary, the formation of Atg5-deficient autophagosomes in response to sorafenib promotes the interaction of p62 with RIPK leading to cell death by necroptosis.

  4. Assessment of Autophagy in Neurons and Brain Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benito-Cuesta, Irene; Diez, Héctor; Ordoñez, Lara; Wandosell, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    Autophagy is a complex process that controls the transport of cytoplasmic components into lysosomes for degradation. This highly conserved proteolytic system involves dynamic and complex processes, using similar molecular elements and machinery from yeast to humans. Moreover, autophagic dysfunction may contribute to a broad spectrum of mammalian diseases. Indeed, in adult tissues, where the capacity for regeneration or cell division is low or absent (e.g., in the mammalian brain), the accumulation of proteins/peptides that would otherwise be recycled or destroyed may have pathological implications. Indeed, such changes are hallmarks of pathologies, like Alzheimer’s, Prion or Parkinson’s disease, known as proteinopathies. However, it is still unclear whether such dysfunction is a cause or an effect in these conditions. One advantage when analysing autophagy in the mammalian brain is that almost all the markers described in different cell lineages and systems appear to be present in the brain, and even in neurons. By contrast, the mixture of cell types present in the brain and the differentiation stage of such neurons, when compared with neurons in culture, make translating basic research to the clinic less straightforward. Thus, the purpose of this review is to describe and discuss the methods available to monitor autophagy in neurons and in the mammalian brain, a process that is not yet fully understood, focusing primarily on mammalian macroautophagy. We will describe some general features of neuronal autophagy that point to our focus on neuropathologies in which macroautophagy may be altered. Indeed, we centre this review around the hypothesis that enhanced autophagy may be able to provide therapeutic benefits in some brain pathologies, like Alzheimer’s disease, considering this pathology as one of the most prevalent proteinopathies. PMID:28832529

  5. Ehrlichia secretes Etf-1 to induce autophagy and capture nutrients for its growth through RAB5 and class III phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Mingqun; Liu, Hongyan; Xiong, Qingming; Niu, Hua; Cheng, Zhihui; Yamamoto, Akitsugu; Rikihisa, Yasuko

    2016-11-01

    Ehrlichia chaffeensis is an obligatory intracellular bacterium that causes a potentially fatal emerging zoonosis, human monocytic ehrlichiosis. E. chaffeensis has a limited capacity for biosynthesis and metabolism and thus depends mostly on host-synthesized nutrients for growth. Although the host cell cytoplasm is rich with these nutrients, as E. chaffeensis is confined within the early endosome-like membrane-bound compartment, only host nutrients that enter the compartment can be used by this bacterium. How this occurs is unknown. We found that ehrlichial replication depended on autophagy induction involving class III phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PtdIns3K) activity, BECN1 (Beclin 1), and ATG5 (autophagy-related 5). Ehrlichia acquired host cell preincorporated amino acids in a class III PtdIns3K-dependent manner and ehrlichial growth was enhanced by treatment with rapamycin, an autophagy inducer. Moreover, ATG5 and RAB5A/B/C were routed to ehrlichial inclusions. RAB5A/B/C siRNA knockdown, or overexpression of a RAB5-specific GTPase-activating protein or dominant-negative RAB5A inhibited ehrlichial infection, indicating the critical role of GTP-bound RAB5 during infection. Both native and ectopically expressed ehrlichial type IV secretion effector protein, Etf-1, bound RAB5 and the autophagy-initiating class III PtdIns3K complex, PIK3C3/VPS34, and BECN1, and homed to ehrlichial inclusions. Ectopically expressed Etf-1 activated class III PtdIns3K as in E. chaffeensis infection and induced autophagosome formation, cleared an aggregation-prone mutant huntingtin protein in a class III PtdIns3K-dependent manner, and enhanced ehrlichial proliferation. These data support the notion that E. chaffeensis secretes Etf-1 to induce autophagy to repurpose the host cytoplasm and capture nutrients for its growth through RAB5 and class III PtdIns3K, while avoiding autolysosomal killing.

  6. Cloning, expression analysis, and RNA interference study of a HORMA domain containing autophagy-related gene 13 (ATG13) from the coleopteran beetle, Tenebrio molitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung Hee; Jo, Yong Hun; Patnaik, Bharat Bhusan; Park, Ki Beom; Tindwa, Hamisi; Seo, Gi Won; Chandrasekar, Raman; Lee, Yong Seok; Han, Yeon Soo

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is a process that is necessary during starvation, as it replenishes metabolic precursors by eliminating damaged organelles. Autophagy is mediated by more than 35 autophagy-related (Atg) proteins that participate in the nucleation, elongation, and curving of the autophagosome membrane. In a pursuit to address the role of autophagy during development and immune resistance of the mealworm beetle, Tenebrio molitor, we screened ATG gene sequences from the whole-larva transcriptome database. We identified a homolog of ATG13 gene in T. molitor (designated as TmATG13) that comprises a cDNA of 1176 bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding a protein of 391 amino acids. Analyses of the structure-specific features of TmAtg13 showed an intrinsically disordered middle and C-terminal region that was rich in regulatory phosphorylation sites. The N-terminal Atg13 domain had a HORMA (Hop1, Rev7, and Mad2) fold containing amino acid residues conserved across the Atg13 insect orthologs. A quantitative reverse-transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that TmATG13 was expressed ubiquitously during all developmental stages of the insect. TmATG13 mRNA expression was high in the fat body and gut of the larval and adult stages of the insect. The TmATG13 transcripts were expressed at a high level until 6 days of ovarian development, followed by a significant decline. Silencing of ATG13 transcripts in T. molitor larvae showed a reduced survivability of 39 and 38% in response to Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus infection. Furthermore, the role of TmAtg13 in initiating autophagy as a part of the host cell autophagic complex of the host cells against the intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes is currently under study and will be critical to unfold the structure-function relationships. PMID:26136688

  7. Genome-wide analysis of autophagy-related genes in banana highlights MaATG8s in cell death and autophagy in immune response to Fusarium wilt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yunxie; Liu, Wen; Hu, Wei; Liu, Guoyin; Wu, Chunjie; Liu, Wei; Zeng, Hongqiu; He, Chaozu; Shi, Haitao

    2017-08-01

    MaATG8s play important roles in hypersensitive-like cell death and immune response, and autophagy is essential for disease resistance against Foc in banana. Autophagy is responsible for the degradation of damaged cytoplasmic constituents in the lysosomes or vacuoles. Although the effects of autophagy have been extensively revealed in model plants, the possible roles of autophagy-related gene in banana remain unknown. In this study, 32 MaATGs were identified in the draft genome, and the profiles of several MaATGs in response to fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense (Foc) were also revealled. We found that seven MaATG8s were commonly regulated by Foc. Through transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves, we highlight the novel roles of MaATG8s in conferring hypersensitive-like cell death, and MaATG8s-mediated hypersensitive response-like cell death is dependent on autophagy. Notablly, autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA) treatment resulted in decreased disease resistance in response to Foc4, and the effect of 3-MA treatment could be rescued by exogenous salicylic acid, jasmonic acid and ethylene, indicating the involvement of autophagy-mediated plant hormones in banana resistance to Fusarium wilt. Taken together, this study may extend our understanding the putative role of MaATG8s in hypersensitive-like cell death and the essential role of autophagy in immune response against Foc in banana.

  8. Mitochondrial Dysfunction, Through Impaired Autophagy, Leads to Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress, Deregulated Lipid Metabolism, and Pancreatitis in Animal Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biczo, Gyorgy; Vegh, Eszter T; Shalbueva, Natalia; Mareninova, Olga A; Elperin, Jason; Lotshaw, Ethan; Gretler, Sophie; Lugea, Aurelia; Malla, Sudarshan R; Dawson, David; Ruchala, Piotr; Whitelegge, Julian; French, Samuel W; Wen, Li; Husain, Sohail Z; Gorelick, Fred S; Hegyi, Peter; Rakonczay, Zoltan; Gukovsky, Ilya; Gukovskaya, Anna S

    2018-02-01

    Little is known about the signaling pathways that initiate and promote acute pancreatitis (AP). The pathogenesis of AP has been associated with abnormal increases in cytosolic Ca 2+ , mitochondrial dysfunction, impaired autophagy, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. We analyzed the mechanisms of these dysfunctions and their relationships, and how these contribute to development of AP in mice and rats. Pancreatitis was induced in C57BL/6J mice (control) and mice deficient in peptidylprolyl isomerase D (cyclophilin D, encoded by Ppid) by administration of L-arginine (also in rats), caerulein, bile acid, or an AP-inducing diet. Parameters of pancreatitis, mitochondrial function, autophagy, ER stress, and lipid metabolism were measured in pancreatic tissue, acinar cells, and isolated mitochondria. Some mice with AP were given trehalose to enhance autophagic efficiency. Human pancreatitis tissues were analyzed by immunofluorescence. Mitochondrial dysfunction in pancreas of mice with AP was induced by either mitochondrial Ca 2+ overload or through a Ca 2+ overload-independent pathway that involved reduced activity of ATP synthase (80% inhibition in pancreatic mitochondria isolated from rats or mice given L-arginine). Both pathways were mediated by cyclophilin D and led to mitochondrial depolarization and fragmentation. Mitochondrial dysfunction caused pancreatic ER stress, impaired autophagy, and deregulation of lipid metabolism. These pathologic responses were abrogated in cyclophilin D-knockout mice. Administration of trehalose largely prevented trypsinogen activation, necrosis, and other parameters of pancreatic injury in mice with L-arginine AP. Tissues from patients with pancreatitis had markers of mitochondrial damage and impaired autophagy, compared with normal pancreas. In different animal models, we find a central role for mitochondrial dysfunction, and for impaired autophagy as its principal downstream effector, in development of AP. In particular, the

  9. Autophagy induced by silica nanoparticles protects RAW264.7 macrophages from cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquardt, Clarissa; Fritsch-Decker, Susanne; Al-Rawi, Marco; Diabaté, Silvia; Weiss, Carsten

    2017-03-15

    Although the technological and economic benefits of engineered nanomaterials are obvious, concerns have been raised about adverse effects if such material is inhaled, ingested, applied to the skin or even released into the environment. Here we studied the cytotoxic effects of the most abundant nanomaterial, silica nanoparticles (SiO 2 -NPs), in murine RAW264.7 macrophages. SiO 2 -NPs dose-dependently induce membrane leakage and cell death without obvious involvement of reactive oxygen species. Interestingly, at low concentrations SiO 2 -NPs trigger autophagy, evidenced by morphological and biochemical hallmarks such as autophagolysosomes or increased levels of LC3-II, which serves to protect cells from cytotoxicity. Hence SiO 2 -NPs initiate an adaptive stress response which dependent on dose serve to balance survival and death and ultimately dictates the cellular fate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Spermidine and resveratrol induce autophagy by distinct pathways converging on the acetylproteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morselli, Eugenia; Mariño, Guillermo; Bennetzen, Martin V

    2011-01-01

    Autophagy protects organelles, cells, and organisms against several stress conditions. Induction of autophagy by resveratrol requires the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent deacetylase sirtuin 1 (SIRT1). In this paper, we show that the acetylase inhibitor spermidine stimulates autophagy...... independent of SIRT1 in human and yeast cells as well as in nematodes. Although resveratrol and spermidine ignite autophagy through distinct mechanisms, these compounds stimulate convergent pathways that culminate in concordant modifications of the acetylproteome. Both agents favor convergent deacetylation...... and acetylation reactions in the cytosol and in the nucleus, respectively. Both resveratrol and spermidine were able to induce autophagy in cytoplasts (enucleated cells). Moreover, a cytoplasm-restricted mutant of SIRT1 could stimulate autophagy, suggesting that cytoplasmic deacetylation reactions dictate...

  11. Renal endoplasmic reticulum stress is coupled to impaired autophagy in a mouse model of GSD Ia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farah, Benjamin L; Landau, Dustin J; Wu, Yajun; Sinha, Rohit A; Loh, Alwin; Bay, Boon-Huat; Koeberl, Dwight D; Yen, Paul M

    2017-11-01

    GSD Ia (von Gierke Disease, Glycogen Storage Disease Type Ia) is a devastating genetic disorder with long-term sequelae, such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and renal failure. Down-regulated autophagy is involved in the development of hepatic metabolic dysfunction in GSD Ia; however, the role of autophagy in the renal pathology is unknown. Here we show that autophagy is impaired and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is increased in the kidneys of a mouse model of GSD Ia. Induction of autophagy by rapamycin also reduces this ER stress. Taken together, these results show an additional role for autophagy down-regulation in the pathogenesis of GSD Ia, and provide further justification for the use of autophagy modulators in GSD Ia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Autophagy sustains the replication of porcine reproductive and respiratory virus in host cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Qinghao; Qin, Yixian; Zhou, Lei; Kou, Qiuwen; Guo, Xin; Ge, Xinna; Yang, Hanchun; Hu, Hongbo

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we confirmed the autophagy induced by porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) in permissive cells and investigated the role of autophagy in the replication of PRRSV. We first demonstrated that PRRSV infection significantly results in the increased double-membrane vesicles, the accumulation of LC3 fluorescence puncta, and the raised ratio of LC3-II/β-actin, in MARC-145 cells. Then we discovered that induction of autophagy by rapamycin significantly enhances the viral titers of PRRSV, while inhibition of autophagy by 3-MA and silencing of LC3 gene by siRNA reduces the yield of PRRSV. The results showed functional autolysosomes can be formed after PRRSV infection and the autophagosome–lysosome-fusion inhibitor decreases the virus titers. We also examined the induction of autophagy by PRRSV infection in pulmonary alveolar macrophages. These findings indicate that autophagy induced by PRRSV infection plays a role in sustaining the replication of PRRSV in host cells.

  13. Autophagy sustains the replication of porcine reproductive and respiratory virus in host cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Qinghao; Qin, Yixian; Zhou, Lei; Kou, Qiuwen; Guo, Xin; Ge, Xinna [Key Laboratory of Animal Epidemiology and Zoonosis of Ministry of Agriculture, College of Veterinary Medicine and State Key Laboratory of Agribiotechnology, China Agricultural University, Beijing (China); Yang, Hanchun, E-mail: yanghanchun1@cau.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Animal Epidemiology and Zoonosis of Ministry of Agriculture, College of Veterinary Medicine and State Key Laboratory of Agribiotechnology, China Agricultural University, Beijing (China); Hu, Hongbo, E-mail: hongbo@cau.edu.cn [College of Food Science and Nutritional Engineering, China Agricultural University, Beijing (China)

    2012-08-01

    In this study, we confirmed the autophagy induced by porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) in permissive cells and investigated the role of autophagy in the replication of PRRSV. We first demonstrated that PRRSV infection significantly results in the increased double-membrane vesicles, the accumulation of LC3 fluorescence puncta, and the raised ratio of LC3-II/{beta}-actin, in MARC-145 cells. Then we discovered that induction of autophagy by rapamycin significantly enhances the viral titers of PRRSV, while inhibition of autophagy by 3-MA and silencing of LC3 gene by siRNA reduces the yield of PRRSV. The results showed functional autolysosomes can be formed after PRRSV infection and the autophagosome-lysosome-fusion inhibitor decreases the virus titers. We also examined the induction of autophagy by PRRSV infection in pulmonary alveolar macrophages. These findings indicate that autophagy induced by PRRSV infection plays a role in sustaining the replication of PRRSV in host cells.

  14. Autophagy downregulation contributes to insulin resistance mediated injury in insulin receptor knockout podocytes in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Xu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available It is unknown whether autophagy activity is altered in insulin resistant podocytes and whether autophagy could be a therapeutic target for diabetic nephropathy (DN. Here we used shRNA transfection to knockdown the insulin receptor (IR gene in cultured human immortalized podocytes as an in vitro insulin resistant model. Autophagy related proteins LC3, Beclin, and p62 as well as nephrin, a podocyte injury marker, were assessed using western blot and immunofluorescence staining. Our results show that autophagy is suppressed when podocytes lose insulin sensitivity and that treatment of rapamycin, an mTOR specific inhibitor, could attenuate insulin resistance induced podocytes injury via autophagy activation. The present study deepens our understanding of the role of autophagy in the pathogenesis of DN.

  15. Cell death and autophagy: Cytokines, drugs, and nutritional factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bursch, Wilfried; Karwan, Anneliese; Mayer, Miriam; Dornetshuber, Julia; Froehwein, Ulrike; Schulte-Hermann, Rolf; Fazi, Barbara; Di Sano, Federica; Piredda, Lucia; Piacentini, Mauro; Petrovski, Goran; Fesues, Laszlo; Gerner, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    Cells may use multiple pathways to commit suicide. In certain contexts, dying cells generate large amounts of autophagic vacuoles and clear large proportions of their cytoplasm, before they finally die, as exemplified by the treatment of human mammary carcinoma cells with the anti-estrogen tamoxifen (TAM, ≤1 μM). Protein analysis during autophagic cell death revealed distinct proteins of the nuclear fraction including GST-π and some proteasomal subunit constituents to be affected during autophagic cell death. Depending on the functional status of caspase-3, MCF-7 cells may switch between autophagic and apoptotic features of cell death [Fazi, B., Bursch, W., Fimia, G.M., Nardacci R., Piacentini, M., Di Sano, F., Piredda, L., 2008. Fenretinide induces autophagic cell death in caspase-defective breast cancer cells. Autophagy 4(4), 435-441]. Furthermore, the self-destruction of MCF-7 cells was found to be completed by phagocytosis of cell residues [Petrovski, G., Zahuczky, G., Katona, K., Vereb, G., Martinet, W., Nemes, Z., Bursch, W., Fesues, L., 2007. Clearance of dying autophagic cells of different origin by professional and non-professional phagocytes. Cell Death Diff. 14 (6), 1117-1128]. Autophagy also constitutes a cell's strategy of defense upon cell damage by eliminating damaged bulk proteins/organelles. This biological condition may be exemplified by the treatment of MCF-7 cells with a necrogenic TAM-dose (10 μM), resulting in the lysis of almost all cells within 24 h. However, a transient (1 h) challenge of MCF-7 cells with the same dose allowed the recovery of cells involving autophagy. Enrichment of chaperones in the insoluble cytoplasmic protein fraction indicated the formation of aggresomes, a potential trigger for autophagy. In a further experimental model HL60 cells were treated with TAM, causing dose-dependent distinct responses: 1-5 μM TAM, autophagy predominant; 7-9 μM, apoptosis predominant; 15 μM, necrosis. These phenomena might be

  16. Nuclear AMPK regulated CARM1 stabilization impacts autophagy in aged heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Chen; Yu, Lu; Xue, Han; Yang, Zheng; Yin, Yue; Zhang, Bo; Chen, Mai; Ma, Heng

    2017-01-01

    Senescence-associated autophagy downregulation leads to cardiomyocyte dysfunction. Coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1 (CARM1) participates in many cellular processes, including autophagy in mammals. However, the effect of CARM1 in aging-related cardiac autophagy decline remains undefined. Moreover, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key regulator in metabolism and autophagy, however, the role of nuclear AMPK in autophagy outcome in aged hearts still unclear. Hers we identify the correlation between nuclear AMPK and CARM1 in aging heart. We found that fasting could promote autophagy in young hearts but not in aged hearts. The CARM1 stabilization is markedly decrease in aged hearts, which impaired nucleus TFEB-CARM1 complex and autophagy flux. Further, S-phase kinase-associated protein 2(SKP2), responsible for CARM1 degradation, was increased in aged hearts. We further validated that AMPK dependent FoxO3 phosphorylation was markedly reduced in nucleus, the decreased nuclear AMPK-FoxO3 activity fails to suppress SKP2-E3 ubiquitin ligase. This loss of repression leads to The CARM1 level and autophagy in aged hearts could be restored through AMPK activation. Taken together, AMPK deficiency results in nuclear CARM1 decrease mediated in part by SKP2, contributing to autophagy dysfunction in aged hearts. Our results identified nuclear AMPK controlled CARM1 stabilization as a new actor that regulates cardiac autophagy. - Highlights: • AMPK-dependent CARM1 stabilization is an important nuclear mechanism in cardiac autophagy. • AMPK deficiency lead to SKP2-mediated decrease in CARM1. • AMPK–SKP2–CARM1 in the regulation of autophagy dysfunction in aged heart.

  17. Impaired Autophagy in the Lipid-Storage Disorder Niemann-Pick Type C1 Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Sarkar, Sovan; Carroll, Bernadette; Buganim, Yosef; Maetzel, Dorothea; Ng, Alex H.M.; Cassady, John P.; Cohen, Malkiel A.; Chakraborty, Souvik; Wang, Haoyi; Spooner, Eric; Ploegh, Hidde; Gsponer, Joerg; Korolchuk, Viktor I.; Jaenisch, Rudolf

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy dysfunction has been implicated in misfolded protein accumulation and cellular toxicity in several diseases. Whether alterations in autophagy also contribute to the pathology of lipid-storage disorders is not clear. Here, we show defective autophagy in Niemann-Pick type C1 (NPC1) disease associated with cholesterol accumulation, where the maturation of autophagosomes is impaired because of defective amphisome formation caused by failure in SNARE machinery, whereas the lysosomal prot...

  18. Autophagy in hypothalamic AgRP neurons regulates food intake and energy balance

    OpenAIRE

    Kaushik, Susmita; Rodriguez-Navarro, Jose Antonio; Arias, Esperanza; Kiffin, Roberta; Sahu, Srabani; Schwartz, Gary J.; Cuervo, Ana Maria; Singh, Rajat

    2011-01-01

    Macroautophagy is a lysosomal degradative pathway that maintains cellular homeostasis by turning over cellular components. Here, we demonstrate a role for autophagy in hypothalamic agouti-related peptide (AgRP) neurons in the regulation of food intake and energy balance. We show that starvation-induced hypothalamic autophagy mobilizes neuron-intrinsic lipids to generate endogenous free fatty acids, which in turn regulate AgRP levels. The functional consequences of inhibiting autophagy are the...

  19. Kaempferol induces hepatocellular carcinoma cell death via endoplasmic reticulum stress-CHOP-autophagy signaling pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Haiqing; Lin, Wei; Zhang, Xiangying; Zhang, Xiaohui; Hu, Zhongjie; Li, Liying; Duan, Zhongping; Zhang, Jing; Ren, Feng

    2017-01-01

    Kaempferol is a flavonoid compound that has gained widespread attention due to its antitumor functions. However, the underlying mechanisms are still not clear. The present study investigated the effect of kaempferol on hepatocellular carcinoma and its underlying mechanisms. Kaempferol induced autophagy in a concentration- and time-dependent manner in HepG2 or Huh7 cells, which was evidenced by the significant increase of autophagy-related genes. Inhibition of autophagy pathway, through 3-meth...

  20. Recycling to discover something new: the role of autophagy in kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leventhal, Jeremy S; Wyatt, Christina M; Ross, Michael J

    2017-01-01

    This year, the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded to Yoshinori Ohsumi for his groundbreaking work in dissecting the mechanisms of autophagy, a cellular process resulting in the organized degradation of cytoplasmic components. Ohsumi's work paved the way for subsequent studies that demonstrated critical roles for autophagy in modulating both acute and chronic kidney injury. This work may lead to future therapeutic approaches that target the autophagy system to prevent or treat kidney diseases. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Autophagy Mediates Interleukin-1β Secretion in Human Neutrophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Iula

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin-1β (IL-1β, a major pro-inflammatory cytokine, is a leaderless cytosolic protein whose secretion does not follow the classical endoplasmic reticulum-to-Golgi pathway, and for which a canonical mechanism of secretion remains to be established. Neutrophils are essential players against bacterial and fungi infections. These cells are rapidly and massively recruited from the circulation into infected tissues and, beyond of displaying an impressive arsenal of toxic weapons effective to kill pathogens, are also an important source of IL-1β in infectious conditions. Here, we analyzed if an unconventional secretory autophagy mechanism is involved in the exportation of IL-1β by these cells. Our findings indicated that inhibition of autophagy with 3-methyladenine and Wortmannin markedly reduced IL-1β secretion induced by LPS + ATP, as did the disruption of the autophagic flux with Bafilomycin A1 and E64d. These compounds did not noticeable affect neutrophil viability ruling out that the effects on IL-1β secretion were due to cell death. Furthermore, VPS34IN-1, a specific autophagy inhibitor, was still able to reduce IL-1β secretion when added after it was synthesized. Moreover, siRNA-mediated knockdown of ATG5 markedly reduced IL-1β secretion in neutrophil-differentiated PLB985 cells. Upon LPS + ATP stimulation, IL-1β was incorporated to an autophagic compartment, as was revealed by its colocalization with LC3B by confocal microscopy. Overlapping of IL-1β-LC3B in a vesicular compartment peaked before IL-1β increased in culture supernatants. On the other hand, stimulation of autophagy by cell starvation augmented the colocalization of IL-1β and LC3B and then promoted neutrophil IL-1β secretion. In addition, specific ELISAs indicated that although both IL-1β and pro-IL-1β are released to culture supernatants upon neutrophil stimulation, autophagy only promotes IL-1β secretion. Furthermore, the serine proteases inhibitor

  2. The role of autophagy in THP-1 macrophages resistance to HIV- vpr-induced apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Hua-ying, E-mail: zhouhuaying_2004@126.com; Zheng, Yu-huang; He, Yan; Chen, Zi; He, Bo

    2017-02-01

    Macrophages are resistant to cell death and are one of HIV reservoirs. HIV viral protein Vpr has the potential to promote infection of and survival of macrophages, which could be a highly significant factor in the development and/or maintenance of macrophage viral reservoirs. However, the impact of vpr on macrophages resistance to apoptosis is yet to be comprehended. Autophagy is a cell survival mechanism under stress state. In this study, we investigated whether autophagy is involved in macrophages resistant to vpr-induced apoptosis. Using the THP1 macrophages, we studied the interconnection between macrophages resistance to apoptosis and autophagy. We found that vpr is able to trigger autophagy in transfected THP-1 macrophages confirmed by electron microscopy (EM) and western blot analysis, and inhibition of autophagy with 3MA increased vpr-induced apoptosis. The results indicate that autophagy may be responsible for maintenance of macrophage HIV reservoirs. - Highlights: • HIV Vpr is able to trigger autophagy in transfected THP-1 macrophages. • Autophagy inhibition increases vpr-transfected THP1-macrophages apoptosis. • Autophagy is involved in THP-1 macrophages resistant to vpr-induced apoptosis.

  3. Multiple Roles of Autophagy in the Sorafenib Resistance of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Sun

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide, and prognosis remains unsatisfactory since the disease is often diagnosed at the advanced stages. Currently, the multikinase inhibitor sorafenib is the only drug approved for the treatment of advanced HCC. However, primary or acquired resistance to sorafenib develops, generating a roadblock in HCC therapy. Autophagy is an intracellular lysosomal pathway involved in protein and organelle degradation, with an astonishing number of connections to human disease and physiology. Current understanding of the role of autophagy in the progression of cancer and the response to cancer therapy remains controversial. Sorafenib is able to induce autophagy in HCC, but the effect of autophagy is indistinct. Some studies established that sorafenib-induced autophagy serves as a pro-survival response. However, other studies found that sorafenib-induced autophagy improves the lethality of sorafenib against HCC cells. The mechanisms underlying autophagy and sorafenib resistance remain elusive. The purpose of this review is to summarize the progress of research focused on autophagy and sorafenib resistance and to update current knowledge of how cellular autophagy impacts sorafenib sensitivity in HCC treatment.

  4. Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor-Induced Autophagy Contributes to Thrombin-Triggered Endothelial Hyperpermeability in Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Chiao-Hsuan; Chen, Hong-Ru; Chuang, Yung-Chun; Yeh, Trai-Ming

    2018-07-01

    Vascular leakage contributes to the high morbidity and mortality associated with sepsis. Exposure of the endothelium to inflammatory mediators, such as thrombin and cytokines, during sepsis leads to hyperpermeability. We recently observed that autophagy, a cellular process for protein turnover, is involved in macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF)-induced endothelial hyperpermeability. Even though it is known that thrombin induces endothelial cells to secrete MIF and to increase vascular permeability, the possible role of autophagy in this process is unknown. In this study, we proposed and tested the hypothesis that MIF-induced autophagy plays an important role in thrombin-induced endothelial hyperpermeability. We evaluated the effects of thrombin on endothelial permeability, autophagy induction, and MIF secretion in vitro using the human microvascular endothelial cell line-1 and human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Several mechanisms/read outs of endothelial permeability and autophagy formation were examined. We observed that blocking autophagy attenuated thrombin-induced endothelial hyperpermeability. Furthermore, thrombin-induced MIF secretion was involved in this process because MIF inhibition reduced thrombin-induced autophagy and hyperpermeability. Finally, we showed that blocking MIF or autophagy effectively alleviated vascular leakage and mortality in endotoxemic mice. Thus, MIF-induced autophagy may represent a common mechanism causing vascular leakage in sepsis.

  5. Mouse Norovirus infection promotes autophagy induction to facilitate replication but prevents final autophagosome maturation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O’Donnell, Tanya B.; Hyde, Jennifer L.; Mintern, Justine D.; Mackenzie, Jason M.

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a cellular process used to eliminate intracellular pathogens. Many viruses however are able to manipulate this cellular process for their own advantage. Here we demonstrate that Mouse Norovirus (MNV) infection induces autophagy but does not appear to utilise the autophagosomal membrane for establishment and formation of the viral replication complex. We have observed that MNV infection results in lipidation and recruitment of LC3 to the autophagosome membrane but prevents subsequent fusion of the autophagosomes with lysosomes, as SQSTM1 (an autophagy receptor) accumulates and Lysosome-Associated Membrane Protein1 is sequestered to the MNV replication complex (RC) rather than to autophagosomes. We have additionally observed that chemical modulation of autophagy differentially affects MNV replication. From this study we can conclude that MNV infection induces autophagy, however suppresses the final maturation step of this response, indicating that autophagy induction contributes to MNV replication independently of RC biogenesis. - Highlights: • MNV induces autophagy in infected murine macrophages. • MNV does not utilise autophagosomal membranes for replication. • The MNV-induced autophagosomes do not fuse with lysosomes. • MNV sequesters SQSTM1 to prevent autophagy degradation and turnover. • Chemical modulation of autophagy enhances MNV replication.

  6. Autophagy regulated by miRNAs in colorectal cancer progression and resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Fesler

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The catabolic process of autophagy is an essential cellular function that allows for the breakdown and recycling of cellular macromolecules. In recent years, the impact of epigenetic regulation of autophagy by noncoding miRNAs has been recognized in human cancer. In colorectal cancer, autophagy plays critical roles in cancer progression as well as resistance to chemotherapy, and recent evidence demonstrates that miRNAs are directly involved in mediating these functions. In this review, we focus on the recent advancements in the field of miRNA regulation of autophagy in colorectal cancer.

  7. Mouse Norovirus infection promotes autophagy induction to facilitate replication but prevents final autophagosome maturation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O’Donnell, Tanya B. [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, at the Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity, University of Melbourne, Melbourne 3010 (Australia); Hyde, Jennifer L. [School of Chemical and Biological Sciences, University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Brisbane, Queensland 4072 (Australia); Mintern, Justine D. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute, University of Melbourne, Melbourne 3010 (Australia); Mackenzie, Jason M., E-mail: jason.mackenzie@unimelb.edu.au [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, at the Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity, University of Melbourne, Melbourne 3010 (Australia)

    2016-05-15

    Autophagy is a cellular process used to eliminate intracellular pathogens. Many viruses however are able to manipulate this cellular process for their own advantage. Here we demonstrate that Mouse Norovirus (MNV) infection induces autophagy but does not appear to utilise the autophagosomal membrane for establishment and formation of the viral replication complex. We have observed that MNV infection results in lipidation and recruitment of LC3 to the autophagosome membrane but prevents subsequent fusion of the autophagosomes with lysosomes, as SQSTM1 (an autophagy receptor) accumulates and Lysosome-Associated Membrane Protein1 is sequestered to the MNV replication complex (RC) rather than to autophagosomes. We have additionally observed that chemical modulation of autophagy differentially affects MNV replication. From this study we can conclude that MNV infection induces autophagy, however suppresses the final maturation step of this response, indicating that autophagy induction contributes to MNV replication independently of RC biogenesis. - Highlights: • MNV induces autophagy in infected murine macrophages. • MNV does not utilise autophagosomal membranes for replication. • The MNV-induced autophagosomes do not fuse with lysosomes. • MNV sequesters SQSTM1 to prevent autophagy degradation and turnover. • Chemical modulation of autophagy enhances MNV replication.

  8. Impaired Autophagy in the Lipid-Storage Disorder Niemann-Pick Type C1 Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sovan Sarkar

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy dysfunction has been implicated in misfolded protein accumulation and cellular toxicity in several diseases. Whether alterations in autophagy also contribute to the pathology of lipid-storage disorders is not clear. Here, we show defective autophagy in Niemann-Pick type C1 (NPC1 disease associated with cholesterol accumulation, where the maturation of autophagosomes is impaired because of defective amphisome formation caused by failure in SNARE machinery, whereas the lysosomal proteolytic function remains unaffected. Expression of functional NPC1 protein rescues this defect. Inhibition of autophagy also causes cholesterol accumulation. Compromised autophagy was seen in disease-affected organs of Npc1 mutant mice. Of potential therapeutic relevance is that HP-β-cyclodextrin, which is used for cholesterol-depletion treatment, impedes autophagy, whereas stimulating autophagy restores its function independent of amphisome formation. Our data suggest that a low dose of HP-β-cyclodextrin that does not perturb autophagy, coupled with an autophagy inducer, may provide a rational treatment strategy for NPC1 disease.

  9. Impaired autophagy in the lipid-storage disorder Niemann-Pick type C1 disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Sovan; Carroll, Bernadette; Buganim, Yosef; Maetzel, Dorothea; Ng, Alex H M; Cassady, John P; Cohen, Malkiel A; Chakraborty, Souvik; Wang, Haoyi; Spooner, Eric; Ploegh, Hidde; Gsponer, Joerg; Korolchuk, Viktor I; Jaenisch, Rudolf

    2013-12-12

    Autophagy dysfunction has been implicated in misfolded protein accumulation and cellular toxicity in several diseases. Whether alterations in autophagy also contribute to the pathology of lipid-storage disorders is not clear. Here, we show defective autophagy in Niemann-Pick type C1 (NPC1) disease associated with cholesterol accumulation, where the maturation of autophagosomes is impaired because of defective amphisome formation caused by failure in SNARE machinery, whereas the lysosomal proteolytic function remains unaffected. Expression of functional NPC1 protein rescues this defect. Inhibition of autophagy also causes cholesterol accumulation. Compromised autophagy was seen in disease-affected organs of Npc1 mutant mice. Of potential therapeutic relevance is that HP-β-cyclodextrin, which is used for cholesterol-depletion treatment, impedes autophagy, whereas stimulating autophagy restores its function independent of amphisome formation. Our data suggest that a low dose of HP-β-cyclodextrin that does not perturb autophagy, coupled with an autophagy inducer, may provide a rational treatment strategy for NPC1 disease. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A role for autophagy in the extension of lifespan by dietary restriction in C. elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malene Hansen

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available In many organisms, dietary restriction appears to extend lifespan, at least in part, by down-regulating the nutrient-sensor TOR (Target Of Rapamycin. TOR inhibition elicits autophagy, the large-scale recycling of cytoplasmic macromolecules and organelles. In this study, we asked whether autophagy might contribute to the lifespan extension induced by dietary restriction in C. elegans. We find that dietary restriction and TOR inhibition produce an autophagic phenotype and that inhibiting genes required for autophagy prevents dietary restriction and TOR inhibition from extending lifespan. The longevity response to dietary restriction in C. elegans requires the PHA-4 transcription factor. We find that the autophagic response to dietary restriction also requires PHA-4 activity, indicating that autophagy is a transcriptionally regulated response to food limitation. In spite of the rejuvenating effect that autophagy is predicted to have on cells, our findings suggest that autophagy is not sufficient to extend lifespan. Long-lived daf-2 insulin/IGF-1 receptor mutants require both autophagy and the transcription factor DAF-16/FOXO for their longevity, but we find that autophagy takes place in the absence of DAF-16. Perhaps autophagy is not sufficient for lifespan extension because although it provides raw material for new macromolecular synthesis, DAF-16/FOXO must program the cells to recycle this raw material into cell-protective longevity proteins.

  11. Autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine protects against endothelial cell barrier dysfunction in acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, Spencer A; Leonard, Antony; Grose, Valerie; Fazal, Fabeha; Rahman, Arshad

    2018-03-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved cellular process that facilitates the continuous recycling of intracellular components (organelles and proteins) and provides an alternative source of energy when nutrients are scarce. Recent studies have implicated autophagy in many disorders, including pulmonary diseases. However, the role of autophagy in endothelial cell (EC) barrier dysfunction and its relevance in the context of acute lung injury (ALI) remain uncertain. Here, we provide evidence that autophagy is a critical component of EC barrier disruption in ALI. Using an aerosolized bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) inhalation mouse model of ALI, we found that administration of the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA), either prophylactically or therapeutically, markedly reduced lung vascular leakage and tissue edema. 3-MA was also effective in reducing the levels of proinflammatory mediators and lung neutrophil sequestration induced by LPS. To test the possibility that autophagy in EC could contribute to lung vascular injury, we addressed its role in the mechanism of EC barrier disruption. Knockdown of ATG5, an essential regulator of autophagy, attenuated thrombin-induced EC barrier disruption, confirming the involvement of autophagy in the response. Similarly, exposure of cells to 3-MA, either before or after thrombin, protected against EC barrier dysfunction by inhibiting the cleavage and loss of vascular endothelial cadherin at adherens junctions, as well as formation of actin stress fibers. 3-MA also reversed LPS-induced EC barrier disruption. Together, these data imply a role of autophagy in lung vascular injury and reveal the protective and therapeutic utility of 3-MA against ALI.

  12. GOLGA2 loss causes fibrosis with autophagy in the mouse lung and liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sungjin; Kim, Sanghwa; Kim, Min Jung; Hong, Youngeun; Lee, Ah Young; Lee, Hyunji; Tran, Quangdon; Kim, Minhee; Cho, Hyeonjeong; Park, Jisoo; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Park, Jongsun; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2018-01-01

    Autophagy is a biological recycling process via the self-digestion of organelles, proteins, and lipids for energy-consuming differentiation and homeostasis. The Golgi serves as a donor of the double-membraned phagophore for autophagosome assembly. In addition, recent studies have demonstrated that pulmonary and hepatic fibrosis is accompanied by autophagy. However, the relationships among Golgi function, autophagy, and fibrosis are unclear. Here, we show that the deletion of GOLGA2, encoding a cis-Golgi protein, induces autophagy with Golgi disruption. The induction of autophagy leads to fibrosis along with the reduction of subcellular lipid storage (lipid droplets and lamellar bodies) by autophagy in the lung and liver. GOLGA2 knockout mice clearly demonstrated fibrosis features such as autophagy-activated cells, densely packed hepatocytes, increase of alveolar macrophages, and decrease of alveolar surfactant lipids (dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine). Therefore, we confirmed the associations among Golgi function, fibrosis, and autophagy. Moreover, GOLGA2 knockout mice may be a potentially valuable animal model for studying autophagy-induced fibrosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The role of Runx2 in facilitating autophagy in metastatic breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandon, Manish; Othman, Ahmad H; Ashok, Vivek; Stein, Gary S; Pratap, Jitesh

    2018-01-01

    Breast cancer metastases cause significant patient mortality. During metastases, cancer cells use autophagy, a catabolic process to recycle nutrients via lysosomal degradation, to overcome nutritional stress for their survival. The Runt-related transcription factor, Runx2, promotes cell survival under metabolic stress, and regulates breast cancer progression and bone metastases. Here, we identify that Runx2 enhances autophagy in metastatic breast cancer cells. We defined Runx2 function in cellular autophagy by monitoring microtubule-associated protein light chain (LC3B-II) levels, an autophagy-specific marker. The electron and confocal microscopic analyses were utilized to identify alterations in autophagic vesicles. The Runx2 knockdown cells accumulate LC3B-II protein and autophagic vesicles due to reduced turnover. Interestingly, Runx2 promotes autophagy by enhancing trafficking of LC3B vesicles. Our mechanistic studies revealed that Runx2 promotes autophagy by increasing acetylation of α-tubulin sub-units of microtubules. Inhibiting autophagy decreased cell adhesion and survival of Runx2 knockdown cells. Furthermore, analysis of LC3B protein in clinical breast cancer specimens and tumor xenografts revealed significant association between high Runx2 and low LC3B protein levels. Our studies reveal a novel regulatory mechanism of autophagy via Runx2 and provide molecular insights into the role of autophagy in metastatic cancer cells. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Autophagy and leucine promote chronological longevity and respiration proficiency during calorie restriction in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aris, John P; Alvers, Ashley L; Ferraiuolo, Roy A; Fishwick, Laura K; Hanvivatpong, Amanda; Hu, Doreen; Kirlew, Christine; Leonard, Michael T; Losin, Kyle J; Marraffini, Michelle; Seo, Arnold Y; Swanberg, Veronica; Westcott, Jennifer L; Wood, Michael S; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan; Dunn, William A

    2013-10-01

    We have previously shown that autophagy is required for chronological longevity in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here we examine the requirements for autophagy during extension of chronological life span (CLS) by calorie restriction (CR). We find that autophagy is upregulated by two CR interventions that extend CLS: water wash CR and low glucose CR. Autophagy is required for full extension of CLS during water wash CR under all growth conditions tested. In contrast, autophagy was not uniformly required for full extension of CLS during low glucose CR, depending on the atg allele and strain genetic background. Leucine status influenced CLS during CR. Eliminating the leucine requirement in yeast strains or adding supplemental leucine to growth media extended CLS during CR. In addition, we observed that both water wash and low glucose CR promote mitochondrial respiration proficiency during aging of autophagy-deficient yeast. In general, the extension of CLS by water wash or low glucose CR was inversely related to respiration deficiency in autophagy-deficient cells. Also, autophagy is required for full extension of CLS under non-CR conditions in buffered media, suggesting that extension of CLS during CR is not solely due to reduced medium acidity. Thus, our findings show that autophagy is: (1) induced by CR, (2) required for full extension of CLS by CR in most cases (depending on atg allele, strain, and leucine availability) and, (3) promotes mitochondrial respiration proficiency during aging under CR conditions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Protein kinase C β inhibits autophagy and sensitizes cervical cancer Hela cells to cisplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Na; Zhang, Wei

    2017-04-28

    Recently, autophagy has been indicated to play an essential role in various biological events, such as the response of cervical cancer cells to chemotherapy. However, the exact signalling mechanism that regulates autophagy during chemotherapy remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the regulation by cisplatin on protein kinase C β (PKC β), on B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) and on apoptosis in cervical cancer Hela cells. And then we examined the regulation by cisplatin on autophagy and the role of autophagy on the chemotherapy in Hela cells. In addition, the regulation of the PKC β on the autophagy was also investigated. Our results indicated that cisplatin promoted PKC β in Hela cells. The PKC β inhibitor reduced the cisplatin-induced apoptosis, whereas increased the cisplatin-induced autophagy in Hela cells. On the other side, the PKC β overexpression aggravated the cisplatin-induced apoptosis, whereas down-regulated the cisplatin-induced autophagy. Taken together, our study firstly recognized the involvement of PKC β in the cytotoxicity of cisplatin via inhibiting autophagy in cervical cancer cells. We propose that PKC β would sensitize cervical cancer cells to chemotherapy via reducing the chemotherapy induced autophagy in cancer cells. © 2017 The Author(s).

  16. Chikungunya virus–induced autophagy delays caspase-dependent cell death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joubert, Pierre-Emmanuel; Werneke, Scott W.; de la Calle, Claire; Guivel-Benhassine, Florence; Giodini, Alessandra; Peduto, Lucie; Levine, Beth; Schwartz, Olivier; Lenschow, Deborah J.

    2012-01-01

    Autophagy is an important survival pathway and can participate in the host response to infection. Studying Chikungunya virus (CHIKV), the causative agent of a major epidemic in India, Southeast Asia, and southern Europe, we reveal a novel mechanism by which autophagy limits cell death and mortality after infection. We use biochemical studies and single cell multispectral assays to demonstrate that direct infection triggers both apoptosis and autophagy. CHIKV-induced autophagy is mediated by the independent induction of endoplasmic reticulum and oxidative stress pathways. These cellular responses delay apoptotic cell death by inducing the IRE1α–XBP-1 pathway in conjunction with ROS-mediated mTOR inhibition. Silencing of autophagy genes resulted in enhanced intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis, favoring viral propagation in cultured cells. Providing in vivo evidence for the relevance of our findings, Atg16LHM mice, which display reduced levels of autophagy, exhibited increased lethality and showed a higher sensitivity to CHIKV-induced apoptosis. Based on kinetic studies and the observation that features of apoptosis and autophagy were mutually exclusive, we conclude that autophagy inhibits caspase-dependent cell death but is ultimately overwhelmed by viral replication. Our study suggests that inducers of autophagy may limit the pathogenesis of acute Chikungunya disease. PMID:22508836

  17. BAG3 promoted starvation-induced apoptosis of thyroid cancer cells via attenuation of autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Si; Zhang, Hai-Yan; Wang, Tian; Meng, Xin; Zong, Zhi-Hong; Kong, De-Hui; Wang, Hua-Qin; Du, Zhen-Xian

    2014-11-01

    BAG3 plays a regulatory role in a number of cellular processes. Recent studies have attracted much attention on its role in activation of selective autophagy. In addition, we have very recently reported that BAG3 is implicated in a BECN1-independent autophagy, namely noncanonical autophagy. The current study aimed to investigate the potential involvement of BAG3 in canonical autophagy triggered by Earle's Balanced Salt Solution (EBSS) starvation. Replacement of complete medium with EBSS was used to trigger canonical autophagy. BAG3 expression was measured using real-time RT-PCR and Western blot. Autophagy was monitored using LC3-II transition and p62/SQSTM1 accumulation by Western blot, as well as punctate distribution of LC3 by immunofluorescence staining. Cell growth and apoptotic cell death was investigated using real-time cell analyzer and flowcytometry, respectively. BAG3 expression was potently reduced by EBSS starvation. Forced expression of BAG3 suppressed autophagy and promoted apoptotic cell death of thyroid cancer cells elicited by starvation. In addition, in the presence of autophagy inhibitor, the enhancing effect of BAG3 on apoptotic cell death was attenuated. These results suggest that BAG3 promotes apoptotic cell death in starved thyroid cancer cells, at least in part by autophagy attenuation.

  18. Longevity-relevant regulation of autophagy at the level of the acetylproteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mariño, Guillermo; Morselli, Eugenia; Bennetzen, Martin V

    2011-01-01

    and resveratrol-induced autophagy. The deacetylase sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) and its orthologs are required for the autophagy induction by resveratrol but dispensable for autophagy stimulation by spermidine in human cells, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and C. elegans. SIRT1 is also dispensable for life-span extension......The acetylase inhibitor, spermidine and the deacetylase activator, resveratrol, both induce autophagy and prolong life span of the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans in an autophagydependent fashion. Based on these premises, we investigated the differences and similarities in spermidine...

  19. Autophagy--A free meal in sickness-associated anorexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Niekerk, Gustav; Loos, Ben; Nell, Theo; Engelbrecht, Anna-Mart

    2016-01-01

    Activation of the immune system is metabolically costly, yet a hallmark of an infection is a reduction in appetite with a subsequent reduction in metabolite provision. What is the functional value of decreasing nutrient intake when an infection imposes large demands on metabolic parameters? Here, we propose that sickness-associated anorexia (SAA) upregulates the ancient process of autophagy systemically, thereby profoundly controlling not only immune- but also nonimmune-competent cells. This allows an advanced impact on the resolution of an infection through direct pathogen killing, enhancement of epitope presentation and the contribution toward the clearance of noxious factors. By rendering a 'free meal,' autophagy is thus most fundamentally harnessed during an anorexic response in order to promote both host tolerance and resistance. These findings strongly suggest a reassessment of numerous SAA-related clinical applications and a re-evaluation of current efforts in patient care.

  20. Autophagy interaction with herpes simplex virus type-1 infection

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    O'Connell, Douglas; Liang, Chengyu

    2016-01-01

    abstract More than 50% of the U.S. population is infected with herpes simplex virus type-I (HSV-1) and global infectious estimates are nearly 90%. HSV-1 is normally seen as a harmless virus but debilitating diseases can arise, including encephalitis and ocular diseases. HSV-1 is unique in that it can undermine host defenses and establish lifelong infection in neurons. Viral reactivation from latency may allow HSV-1 to lay siege to the brain (Herpes encephalitis). Recent advances maintain that HSV-1 proteins act to suppress and/or control the lysosome-dependent degradation pathway of macroautophagy (hereafter autophagy) and consequently, in neurons, may be coupled with the advancement of HSV-1-associated pathogenesis. Furthermore, increasing evidence suggests that HSV-1 infection may constitute a gradual risk factor for neurodegenerative disorders. The relationship between HSV-1 infection and autophagy manipulation combined with neuropathogenesis may be intimately intertwined demanding further investigation. PMID:26934628

  1. New Roles of the Primary Cilium in Autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ávalos, Yenniffer; Peña-Oyarzun, Daniel; Budini, Mauricio; Morselli, Eugenia; Criollo, Alfredo

    2017-01-01

    The primary cilium is a nonmotile organelle that emanates from the surface of multiple cell types and receives signals from the environment to regulate intracellular signaling pathways. The presence of cilia, as well as their length, is important for proper cell function; shortened, elongated, or absent cilia are associated with pathological conditions. Interestingly, it has recently been shown that the molecular machinery involved in autophagy, the process of recycling of intracellular material to maintain cellular and tissue homeostasis, participates in ciliogenesis. Cilium-dependent signaling is necessary for autophagosome formation and, conversely, autophagy regulates both ciliogenesis and cilium length by degrading specific ciliary proteins. Here, we will discuss the relationship that exists between the two processes at the cellular and molecular level, highlighting what is known about the effects of ciliary dysfunction in the control of energy homeostasis in some ciliopathies.

  2. Cell cycle-dependent induction of autophagy, mitophagy and reticulophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasdemir, Ezgi; Maiuri, M Chiara; Tajeddine, Nicolas; Vitale, Ilio; Criollo, Alfredo; Vicencio, José Miguel; Hickman, John A; Geneste, Olivier; Kroemer, Guido

    2007-09-15

    When added to cells, a variety of autophagy inducers that operate through distinct mechanisms and target different organelles for autophagic destruction (mitochondria in mitophagy, endoplasmic reticulum in reticulophagy) rarely induce autophagic vacuolization in more than 50% or the cells. Here we show that this heterogeneity may be explained by cell cycle-specific effects. The BH3 mimetic ABT737, lithium, rapamycin, tunicamycin or nutrient depletion stereotypically induce autophagy preferentially in the G(1) and S phases of the cell cycle, as determined by simultaneous monitoring of cell cycle markers and the cytoplasmic aggregation of GFP-LC3 in autophagic vacuoles. These results point to a hitherto neglected crosstalk between autophagic vacuolization and cell cycle regulation.

  3. THE ROLE OF AUTOPHAGY AND ANGIOGENESIS IN COLORECTAL CANCER

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    K. V. Rachkovsky

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was a review of available data on the role of autophagy and angiogenesis in the development, progression and prognosis of colorectal cancer. Material and methods. Databases searched were Medline, Cochrane Library and Elibrary. Of 340 studies, 48 were used to write a systematic review. Results. To date, there is a variety of prognostic markers used in the study of pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of colorectal cancer. The review describes the molecular mechanisms of the participation of various proteins of autophagy and angiogenesis in the pathogenesis and progression of colorectal cancer, and the potential importance of their use in clinical practice is presented. Conclusion. Many of the existing markers can be used not only in assessing the prognosis, but also sensitivity to chemotherapy. However, the contradictory results of studies with respect to certain proteins require further study, validation, and subsequent introduction into practice. 

  4. Membrane proteomics of phagosomes suggests a connection to autophagy

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    Shui, Wenqing; Sheu, Leslie; Liu, Jun; Smart, Brian; Petzold, Christopher J.; Hsieh, Tsung-yen; Pitcher, Austin; Keasling*, Jay D.; Bertozzi*, Carolyn R.

    2008-11-25

    Phagocytosis is the central process by which macrophage cellsinternalize and eliminate infectious microbes as well as apoptoticcells. During maturation, phagosomes containing engulfed particlesfuse with various endosomal compartments through theaction of regulatory molecules on the phagosomal membrane. Inthis study, we performed a proteomic analysis of the membranefraction from latex bead-containing (LBC) phagosomes isolatedfrom macrophages. The profile, which comprised 546 proteins,suggests diverse functions of the phagosome and potential connectionsto secretory processes, toll-like receptor signaling, andautophagy. Many identified proteins were not previously knownto reside in the phagosome. We characterized several proteins inLBC phagosomes that change in abundance on induction of autophagy,a process that has been previously implicated in the hostdefense against microbial pathogens. These observations suggestcrosstalk between autophagy and phagocytosis that may be relevantto the innate immune response of macrophages.

  5. Erythroid precursors from patients with low-risk myelodysplasia demonstrate ultrastructural features of enhanced autophagy of mitochondria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houwerzijl, E. J.; Pol, H-W D.; Blom, N. R.; van der Want, J. J. L.; de Wolf, J. Thm; Vellenga, E.

    Recent studies in erythroid cells have shown that autophagy is an important process for the physiological clearance of mitochondria during terminal differentiation. However, autophagy also plays an important role in removing damaged and dysfunctional mitochondria. Defective mitochondria and impaired

  6. Alpha Particles Induce Autophagy in Multiple Myeloma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorin, Jean-Baptiste; Gouard, Sébastien; Ménager, Jérémie; Morgenstern, Alfred; Bruchertseifer, Frank; Faivre-Chauvet, Alain; Guilloux, Yannick; Chérel, Michel; Davodeau, François; Gaschet, Joëlle

    2015-01-01

    Radiation emitted by the radionuclides in radioimmunotherapy (RIT) approaches induce direct killing of the targeted cells as well as indirect killing through the bystander effect. Our research group is dedicated to the development of α-RIT, i.e., RIT using α-particles especially for the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM). γ-irradiation and β-irradiation have been shown to trigger apoptosis in tumor cells. Cell death mode induced by (213)Bi α-irradiation appears more controversial. We therefore decided to investigate the effects of (213)Bi on MM cell radiobiology, notably cell death mechanisms as well as tumor cell immunogenicity after irradiation. Murine 5T33 and human LP-1 MM cell lines were used to study the effects of such α-particles. We first examined the effects of (213)Bi on proliferation rate, double-strand DNA breaks, cell cycle, and cell death. Then, we investigated autophagy after (213)Bi irradiation. Finally, a coculture of dendritic cells (DCs) with irradiated tumor cells or their culture media was performed to test whether it would induce DC activation. We showed that (213)Bi induces DNA double-strand breaks, cell cycle arrest, and autophagy in both cell lines, but we detected only slight levels of early apoptosis within the 120 h following irradiation in 5T33 and LP-1. Inhibition of autophagy prevented (213)Bi-induced inhibition of proliferation in LP-1 suggesting that this mechanism is involved in cell death after irradiation. We then assessed the immunogenicity of irradiated cells and found that irradiated LP-1 can activate DC through the secretion of soluble factor(s); however, no increase in membrane or extracellular expression of danger-associated molecular patterns was observed after irradiation. This study demonstrates that (213)Bi induces mainly necrosis in MM cells, low levels of apoptosis, and autophagy that might be involved in tumor cell death.

  7. Alpha-particles induce autophagy in multiple myeloma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joelle Marcelle Gaschet

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Radiations emitted by the radionuclides in radioimmunotherapy (RIT approaches induce direct killing of the targeted cells as well as indirect killing through bystander effect. Our research group is dedicated to the development of α-RIT, i.e RIT using α-particles especially for the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM. γ-irradiation and β-irradiation have been shown to trigger apoptosis in tumor cells. Cell death mode induced by 213Bi α-irradiation appears more controversial. We therefore decided to investigate the effects of 213Bi on MM cell radiobiology, notably cell death mechanisms as well as tumor cell immunogenicity after irradiation.Methods: Murine 5T33 and human LP-1 multiple myeloma (MM cell lines were used to study the effects of such α-particles. We first examined the effects of 213Bi on proliferation rate, double strand DNA breaks, cell cycle and cell death. Then, we investigated autophagy after 213Bi irradiation. Finally, a co-culture of dendritic cells (DC with irradiated tumour cells or their culture media was performed to test whether it would induce DC activation.Results: We showed that 213Bi induces DNA double strand breaks, cell cycle arrest and autophagy in both cell lines but we detected only slight levels of early apoptosis within the 120 hours following irradiation in 5T33 and LP-1. Inhibition of autophagy prevented 213Bi induced inhibition of proliferation in LP-1 suggesting that this mechanism is involved in cell death after irradiation. We then assessed the immunogenicity of irradiated cells and found that irradiated LP-1 can activate DC through the secretion of soluble factor(s, however no increase in membrane or extracellular expression of danger associated molecular patterns (DAMPs was observed after irradiation.Conclusion: This study demonstrates that 213Bi induces mainly necrosis in MM cells, low levels of apoptosis and also autophagy that might be involved in tumor cell death.

  8. Autophagy, inflammation and innate immunity in inflammatory myopathies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Cappelletti

    Full Text Available Autophagy has a large range of physiological functions and its dysregulation contributes to several human disorders, including autoinflammatory/autoimmune diseases such as inflammatory myopathies (IIMs. In order to better understand the pathogenetic mechanisms of these muscular disorders, we sought to define the role of autophagic processes and their relation with the innate immune system in the three main subtypes of IIM, specifically sporadic inclusion body myositis (sIBM, polymyositis (PM, dermatomyositis (DM and juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM. We found that although the mRNA transcript levels of the autophagy-related genes BECN1, ATG5 and FBXO32 were similar in IIM and controls, autophagy activation in all IIM subgroups was suggested by immunoblotting results and confirmed by immunofluorescence. TLR4 and TLR3, two potent inducers of autophagy, were highly increased in IIM, with TLR4 transcripts significantly more expressed in PM and DM than in JDM, sIBM and controls, and TLR3 transcripts highly up-regulated in all IIM subgroups compared to controls. Co-localization between autophagic marker, LC3, and TLR4 and TLR3 was observed not only in sIBM but also in PM, DM and JDM muscle tissues. Furthermore, a highly association with the autophagic processes was observed in all IIM subgroups also for some TLR4 ligands, endogenous and bacterial HSP60, other than the high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1. These findings indicate that autophagic processes are active not only in sIBM but also in PM, DM and JDM, probably in response to an exogenous or endogenous 'danger signal'. However, autophagic activation and regulation, and also interaction with the innate immune system, differ in each type of IIM. Better understanding of these differences may lead to new therapies for the different IIM types.

  9. Autophagy, Innate Immunity and Tissue Repair in Acute Kidney Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pu Duann

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Kidney is a vital organ with high energy demands to actively maintain plasma hemodynamics, electrolytes and water homeostasis. Among the nephron segments, the renal tubular epithelium is endowed with high mitochondria density for their function in active transport. Acute kidney injury (AKI is an important clinical syndrome and a global public health issue with high mortality rate and socioeconomic burden due to lack of effective therapy. AKI results in acute cell death and necrosis of renal tubule epithelial cells accompanied with leakage of tubular fluid and inflammation. The inflammatory immune response triggered by the tubular cell death, mitochondrial damage, associative oxidative stress, and the release of many tissue damage factors have been identified as key elements driving the pathophysiology of AKI. Autophagy, the cellular mechanism that removes damaged organelles via lysosome-mediated degradation, had been proposed to be renoprotective. An in-depth understanding of the intricate interplay between autophagy and innate immune response, and their roles in AKI pathology could lead to novel therapies in AKI. This review addresses the current pathophysiology of AKI in aspects of mitochondrial dysfunction, innate immunity, and molecular mechanisms of autophagy. Recent advances in renal tissue regeneration and potential therapeutic interventions are also discussed.

  10. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor induces vascular leakage via autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Ru Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vascular leakage is an important feature of acute inflammatory shock, which currently has no effective treatment. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF is a pro-inflammatory cytokine that can induce vascular leakage and plays an important role in the pathogenesis of shock. However, the mechanism of MIF-induced vascular leakage is still unclear. In this study, using recombinant MIF (rMIF, we demonstrated that MIF induced disorganization and degradation of junction proteins and increased the permeability of human endothelial cells in vitro. Western blotting analysis showed that rMIF treatment induced LC3 conversion and p62 degradation. Inhibition of autophagy with a PI3K inhibitor (3-MA, a ROS scavenger (NAC or autophagosomal-lysosomal fusion inhibitors (bafilomycin A1 and chloroquine rescued rMIF-induced vascular leakage, suggesting that autophagy mediates MIF-induced vascular leakage. The potential involvement of other signaling pathways was also studied using different inhibitors, and the results suggested that MIF-induced vascular leakage may occur through the ERK pathway. In conclusion, we showed that MIF triggered autophagic degradation of endothelial cells, resulting in vascular leakage. Inhibition of MIF-induced autophagy may provide therapeutic targets against vascular leakage in inflammatory shock.

  11. Spermidine: a novel autophagy inducer and longevity elixir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeo, Frank; Eisenberg, Tobias; Büttner, Sabrina; Ruckenstuhl, Christoph; Kroemer, Guido

    2010-01-01

    Spermidine is a ubiquitous polycation that is synthesized from putrescine and serves as a precursor of spermine. Putrescine, spermidine and spermine all are polyamines that participate in multiple known and unknown biological processes. Exogenous supply of spermidine prolongs the life span of several model organisms including yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), nematodes (Caenorhabditis elegans) and flies (Drosophila melanogaster) and significantly reduces age-related oxidative protein damage in mice, indicating that this agent may act as a universal anti-aging drug. Spermidine induces autophagy in cultured yeast and mammalian cells, as well as in nematodes and flies. Genetic inactivation of genes essential for autophagy abolishes the life span-prolonging effect of spermidine in yeast, nematodes and flies. These findings complement expanding evidence that autophagy mediates cytoprotection against a variety of noxious agents and can confer longevity when induced at the whole-organism level. We hypothesize that increased autophagic turnover of cytoplasmic organelles or long-lived proteins is involved in most if not all life span-prolonging therapies.

  12. Does autophagy have a license to kill mammalian cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarlatti, F; Granata, R; Meijer, A J; Codogno, P

    2009-01-01

    Macroautophagy is an evolutionarily conserved vacuolar, self-digesting mechanism for cellular components, which end up in the lysosomal compartment. In mammalian cells, macroautophagy is cytoprotective, and protects the cells against the accumulation of damaged organelles or protein aggregates, the loss of interaction with the extracellular matrix, and the toxicity of cancer therapies. During periods of nutrient starvation, stimulating macroautophagy provides the fuel required to maintain an active metabolism and the production of ATP. Macroautophagy can inhibit the induction of several forms of cell death, such as apoptosis and necrosis. However, it can also be part of the cascades of events that lead to cell death, either by collaborating with other cell death mechanisms or by causing cell death on its own. Loss of the regulation of bulk macroautophagy can prime self-destruction by cells, and some forms of selective autophagy and non-canonical forms of macroautophagy have been shown to be associated with cell demise. There is now mounting evidence that autophagy and apoptosis share several common regulatory elements that are crucial in any attempt to understand the dual role of autophagy in cell survival and cell death.

  13. Alix differs from ESCRT proteins in the control of autophagy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petiot, Anne; Strappazzon, Flavie; Chatellard-Causse, Christine; Blot, Beatrice; Torch, Sakina; Jean-Marc Verna; Sadoul, Remy

    2008-01-01

    Alix/AIP1 is a cytosolic protein that regulates cell death through mechanisms that remain unclear. Alix binds to two protein members of the so-called Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport (ESCRT), which facilitates membrane fission events during multivesicular endosome formation, enveloped virus budding and cytokinesis. Alix itself has been suggested to participate in these cellular events and is thus often considered to function in the ESCRT pathway. ESCRT proteins were recently implicated in autophagy, a process involved in bulk degradation of cytoplasmic constituents in lysosomes, which can also participate in cell death. In this study, we shown that, unlike ESCRT proteins, Alix is not involved in autophagy. These results strongly suggest that the capacity of several mutants of Alix to block both caspase-dependent and independent cell death does not relate to their capacity to modulate autophagy. Furthermore, they reinforce the conclusion of other studies demonstrating that the role of Alix is different from that of classical ESCRT proteins

  14. Stress granules at the intersection of autophagy and ALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monahan, Zachary; Shewmaker, Frank; Pandey, Udai Bhan

    2016-10-15

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive, fatal disease caused by loss of upper and lower motor neurons. The majority of ALS cases are classified as sporadic (80-90%), with the remaining considered familial based on patient history. The last decade has seen a surge in the identification of ALS-causing genes - including TARDBP (TDP-43), FUS, MATR3 (Matrin-3), C9ORF72 and several others - providing important insights into the molecular pathways involved in pathogenesis. Most of the protein products of ALS-linked genes fall into two functional categories: RNA-binding/homeostasis and protein-quality control (i.e. autophagy and proteasome). The RNA-binding proteins tend to be aggregation-prone with low-complexity domains similar to the prion-forming domains of yeast. Many also incorporate into stress granules (SGs), which are cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein complexes that form in response to cellular stress. Mutant forms of TDP-43 and FUS perturb SG dynamics, lengthening their cytoplasmic persistence. Recent evidence suggests that SGs are regulated by the autophagy pathway, suggesting a unifying connection between many of the ALS-linked genes. Persistent SGs may give rise to intractable aggregates that disrupt neuronal homeostasis, thus failure to clear SGs by autophagic processes may promote ALS pathogenesis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI:Autophagy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Mitochondria mediate septin cage assembly to promote autophagy of Shigella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirianni, Andrea; Krokowski, Sina; Lobato-Márquez, Damián; Buranyi, Stephen; Pfanzelter, Julia; Galea, Dieter; Willis, Alexandra; Culley, Siân; Henriques, Ricardo; Larrouy-Maumus, Gerald; Hollinshead, Michael; Sancho-Shimizu, Vanessa; Way, Michael; Mostowy, Serge

    2016-07-01

    Septins, cytoskeletal proteins with well-characterised roles in cytokinesis, form cage-like structures around cytosolic Shigella flexneri and promote their targeting to autophagosomes. However, the processes underlying septin cage assembly, and whether they influence S. flexneri proliferation, remain to be established. Using single-cell analysis, we show that the septin cages inhibit S. flexneri proliferation. To study mechanisms of septin cage assembly, we used proteomics and found mitochondrial proteins associate with septins in S. flexneri-infected cells. Strikingly, mitochondria associated with S. flexneri promote septin assembly into cages that entrap bacteria for autophagy. We demonstrate that the cytosolic GTPase dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) interacts with septins to enhance mitochondrial fission. To avoid autophagy, actin-polymerising Shigella fragment mitochondria to escape from septin caging. Our results demonstrate a role for mitochondria in anti-Shigella autophagy and uncover a fundamental link between septin assembly and mitochondria. © 2016 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  16. Midgut morphological changes and autophagy during metamorphosis in sand flies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malta, Juliana; Heerman, Matthew; Weng, Ju Lin; Fernandes, Kenner M; Martins, Gustavo Ferreira; Ramalho-Ortigão, Marcelo

    2017-06-01

    During metamorphosis, holometabolous insects undergo significant remodeling of their midgut and become able to cope with changes in dietary requirements between larval and adult stages. At this stage, insects must be able to manage and recycle available food resources in order to develop fully into adults, especially when no nutrients are acquired from the environment. Autophagy has been previously suggested to play a crucial role during metamorphosis of the mosquito. Here, we investigate the overall morphological changes of the midgut of the sand fly during metamorphosis and assess the expression profiles of the autophagy-related genes ATG1, ATG6, and ATG8, which are associated with various steps of the autophagic process. Morphological changes in the midgut start during the fourth larval instar, with epithelial degeneration followed by remodeling via the differentiation of regenerative cells in pre-pupal and pupal stages. The changes in the midgut epithelium are paired with the up-regulation of ATG1, ATG6 and ATG8 during the larva-adult transition. Vein, a putative epidermal growth factor involved in regulating epithelial midgut regeneration, is also up-regulated. Autophagy has further been confirmed in sand flies via the presence of autophagosomes residing within the cytoplasmic compartment of the pupal stages. An understanding of the underlying mechanisms of this process should aid the future management of this neglected tropical vector.

  17. Targeted deletion of Atg5 reveals differential roles of autophagy in keratin K5-expressing epithelia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sukseree, Supawadee [Research Division of Biology and Pathobiology of the Skin, Department of Dermatology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Srinakharinwirot University, Bangkok (Thailand); Rossiter, Heidemarie; Mildner, Michael [Research Division of Biology and Pathobiology of the Skin, Department of Dermatology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Pammer, Johannes [Institute of Clinical Pathology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Buchberger, Maria; Gruber, Florian [Research Division of Biology and Pathobiology of the Skin, Department of Dermatology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Watanapokasin, Ramida [Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Srinakharinwirot University, Bangkok (Thailand); Tschachler, Erwin [Research Division of Biology and Pathobiology of the Skin, Department of Dermatology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Eckhart, Leopold, E-mail: leopold.eckhart@meduniwien.ac.at [Research Division of Biology and Pathobiology of the Skin, Department of Dermatology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We generated mice lacking Atg5 and autophagy in keratin K5-positive epithelia. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Suppression of autophagy in thymic epithelium was not associated with signs of autoimmunity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Autophagy was required for normal terminal differentiation of preputial gland cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Autophagy-deficient cells of the preputial glands degraded nuclear DNA prematurely. -- Abstract: Autophagy contributes to the homeostasis of many tissues, yet its role in epithelia is incompletely understood. A recent report proposed that Atg5-dependent autophagy in thymic epithelial cells is essential for their function in the negative selection of self-reactive T-cells and, thus, for the suppression of tissue inflammation. Here we crossed mice carrying floxed alleles of the Atg5 gene with mice expressing the Cre recombinase under the control of the keratin K5 promoter to suppress autophagy in all K5-positive epithelia. The efficiency of autophagy abrogation was confirmed by immunoanalyses of LC3, which was converted to the autophagy-associated LC3-II form in normal but not Atg5-deficient cells, and of p62, which accumulated in Atg5-deficient cells. Mice carrying the epithelium-specific deletion of Atg5 showed normal weight gain, absence of tissue inflammation, and a normal morphology of the thymic epithelium. By contrast, autophagy-deficient epithelial cells of the preputial gland showed aberrant eosinophilic staining in histology and premature degradation of nuclear DNA during terminal differentiation. Taken together, the results of this study suggest that autophagy is dispensable for the suppression of autoimmunity by thymic epithelial cells but essential for normal differentiation of the preputial gland in mice.

  18. Idarubicin induces mTOR-dependent cytotoxic autophagy in leukemic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ristic, Biljana; Bosnjak, Mihajlo; Arsikin, Katarina; Mircic, Aleksandar; Suzin-Zivkovic, Violeta; Bogdanovic, Andrija; Perovic, Vladimir; Martinovic, Tamara; Kravic-Stevovic, Tamara; Bumbasirevic, Vladimir; Trajkovic, Vladimir; Harhaji-Trajkovic, Ljubica

    2014-01-01

    We investigated if the antileukemic drug idarubicin induces autophagy, a process of programmed cellular self-digestion, in leukemic cell lines and primary leukemic cells. Transmission electron microscopy and acridine orange staining demonstrated the presence of autophagic vesicles and intracellular acidification, respectively, in idarubicin-treated REH leukemic cell line. Idarubicin increased punctuation/aggregation of microtubule-associated light chain 3B (LC3B), enhanced the conversion of LC3B-I to autophagosome-associated LC3B-II in the presence of proteolysis inhibitors, and promoted the degradation of the selective autophagic target p62, thus indicating the increase in autophagic flux. Idarubicin inhibited the phosphorylation of the main autophagy repressor mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and its downstream target p70S6 kinase. The treatment with the mTOR activator leucine prevented idarubicin-mediated autophagy induction. Idarubicin-induced mTOR repression was associated with the activation of the mTOR inhibitor AMP-activated protein kinase and down-regulation of the mTOR activator Akt. The suppression of autophagy by pharmacological inhibitors or LC3B and beclin-1 genetic knockdown rescued REH cells from idarubicin-mediated oxidative stress, mitochondrial depolarization, caspase activation and apoptotic DNA fragmentation. Idarubicin also caused mTOR inhibition and cytotoxic autophagy in K562 leukemic cell line and leukocytes from chronic myeloid leukemia patients, but not healthy controls. By demonstrating mTOR-dependent cytotoxic autophagy in idarubicin-treated leukemic cells, our results warrant caution when considering combining idarubicin with autophagy inhibitors in leukemia therapy. - Highlights: • Idarubicin induces autophagy in leukemic cell lines and primary leukemic cells. • Idarubicin induces autophagy by inhibiting mTOR in leukemic cells. • mTOR suppression by idarubicin is associated with AMPK activation and Akt blockade.

  19. Idarubicin induces mTOR-dependent cytotoxic autophagy in leukemic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ristic, Biljana [Institute of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Dr. Subotica 1, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Bosnjak, Mihajlo [Institute of Histology and Embryology, School of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia); Arsikin, Katarina [Institute of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Dr. Subotica 1, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Mircic, Aleksandar; Suzin-Zivkovic, Violeta [Institute of Histology and Embryology, School of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia); Bogdanovic, Andrija [Clinic for Hematology, Clinical Centre of Serbia, School of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia); Perovic, Vladimir [Institute of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Dr. Subotica 1, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Martinovic, Tamara; Kravic-Stevovic, Tamara; Bumbasirevic, Vladimir [Institute of Histology and Embryology, School of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia); Trajkovic, Vladimir, E-mail: vtrajkovic@med.bg.ac.rs [Institute of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Dr. Subotica 1, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Harhaji-Trajkovic, Ljubica, E-mail: buajk@yahoo.com [Institute for Biological Research, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Despot Stefan Blvd. 142, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2014-08-01

    We investigated if the antileukemic drug idarubicin induces autophagy, a process of programmed cellular self-digestion, in leukemic cell lines and primary leukemic cells. Transmission electron microscopy and acridine orange staining demonstrated the presence of autophagic vesicles and intracellular acidification, respectively, in idarubicin-treated REH leukemic cell line. Idarubicin increased punctuation/aggregation of microtubule-associated light chain 3B (LC3B), enhanced the conversion of LC3B-I to autophagosome-associated LC3B-II in the presence of proteolysis inhibitors, and promoted the degradation of the selective autophagic target p62, thus indicating the increase in autophagic flux. Idarubicin inhibited the phosphorylation of the main autophagy repressor mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and its downstream target p70S6 kinase. The treatment with the mTOR activator leucine prevented idarubicin-mediated autophagy induction. Idarubicin-induced mTOR repression was associated with the activation of the mTOR inhibitor AMP-activated protein kinase and down-regulation of the mTOR activator Akt. The suppression of autophagy by pharmacological inhibitors or LC3B and beclin-1 genetic knockdown rescued REH cells from idarubicin-mediated oxidative stress, mitochondrial depolarization, caspase activation and apoptotic DNA fragmentation. Idarubicin also caused mTOR inhibition and cytotoxic autophagy in K562 leukemic cell line and leukocytes from chronic myeloid leukemia patients, but not healthy controls. By demonstrating mTOR-dependent cytotoxic autophagy in idarubicin-treated leukemic cells, our results warrant caution when considering combining idarubicin with autophagy inhibitors in leukemia therapy. - Highlights: • Idarubicin induces autophagy in leukemic cell lines and primary leukemic cells. • Idarubicin induces autophagy by inhibiting mTOR in leukemic cells. • mTOR suppression by idarubicin is associated with AMPK activation and Akt blockade.

  20. RITA plus 3-MA overcomes chemoresistance of head and neck cancer cells via dual inhibition of autophagy and antioxidant systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiha Shin

    2017-10-01

    Condensed abstract: This study revealed a novel RITA resistant mechanism associated with the sustained induction of autophagy, p62 overexpression, and Keap1-Nrf2 antioxidant system activation. The combined treatment of RITA with the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine overcomes RITA resistance via dual inhibition of autophagy and antioxidant systems in vitro and in vivo.

  1. BAG3 induces the sequestration of proteasomal clients into cytoplasmic puncta : Implications for a proteasome-to-autophagy switch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minoia, Melania; Boncoraglio, Alessandra; Vinet, Jonathan; Morelli, Federica F.; Brunsting, Jeanette F.; Poletti, Angelo; Krom, Sabine; Reits, Eric; Kampinga, Harm H.; Carra, Serena

    Eukaryotic cells use autophagy and the ubiquitin-proteasome system as their major protein degradation pathways. Upon proteasomal impairment, cells switch to autophagy to ensure proper clearance of clients (the proteasome-to-autophagy switch). The HSPA8 and HSPA1A cochaperone BAG3 has been suggested

  2. BAG3 induces the sequestration of proteasomal clients into cytoplasmic puncta: implications for a proteasome-to-autophagy switch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minoia, Melania; Boncoraglio, Alessandra; Vinet, Jonathan; Morelli, Federica F.; Brunsting, Jeanette F.; Poletti, Angelo; Krom, Sabine; Reits, Eric; Kampinga, Harm H.; Carra, Serena

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells use autophagy and the ubiquitin-proteasome system as their major protein degradation pathways. Upon proteasomal impairment, cells switch to autophagy to ensure proper clearance of clients (the proteasome-to-autophagy switch). The HSPA8 and HSPA1A cochaperone BAG3 has been suggested

  3. Acid-induced autophagy protects human lung cancer cells from apoptosis by activating ER stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wen-Yue; Zhou, Xiang-Dong; Li, Qi; Chen, Ling-Xiu; Ran, Dan-Hua

    2015-12-10

    An acidic tumor microenvironment exists widely in solid tumors. However, the detailed mechanism of cell survival under acidic stress remains unclear. The aim of this study is to clarify whether acid-induced autophagy exists and to determine the function and mechanism of autophagy in lung cancer cells. We have found that acute low pH stimulated autophagy by increasing LC3-positive punctate vesicles, increasing LC3 II expression levels and reducing p62 protein levels. Additionally, autophagy was inhibited by the addition of Baf or knockdown of Beclin 1, and cell apoptosis was increased markedly. In mouse tumors, the expression of cleaved caspase3 and p62 was enhanced by oral treatment with sodium bicarbonate, which can raise the intratumoral pH. Furthermore, the protein levels of ER stress markers, including p-PERK, p-eIF2α, CHOP, XBP-1s and GRP78, were also increased in response to acidic pH. The antioxidant NAC, which reduces ROS accumulation, alleviated acid-mediated ER stress and autophagy, and knocking down GRP78 reduced autophagy activation under acidic conditions, which suggests that autophagy was induced by acidic pH through ER stress. Taken together, these results indicate that the acidic microenvironment in non-small cell lung cancer cells promotes autophagy by increasing ROS-ER stress, which serves as a survival adaption in this setting. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Knockdown of autophagy enhances innate immune response in hepatitis C virus infected hepatocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Shubham; Raychoudhuri, Amit; Steele, Robert; Ray, Ranjit; Ray, Ratna B.

    2010-01-01

    The role of autophagy in disease pathogenesis following viral infection is beginning to be elucidated. We have previously reported that hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in hepatocytes induces autophagy. However, the biological significance of HCV induced autophagy has not been clarified. Autophagy has recently been identified as a novel component of innate immune system against viral infection. In the present study, we have shown that knockdown of autophagy related protein Beclin1 or ATG7 in immortalized human hepatocytes (IHH) inhibited HCV growth. Beclin1 or ATG7 knockdown IHH when infected with HCV exhibited an increased expression of IFN-β, OAS-1, IFN-α and IFI27 mRNAs of the interferon signaling pathways as compared to infection of control IHH. Subsequent study demonstrated that HCV infection in autophagy impaired IHH displayed caspase activation, PARP cleavage and apoptotic cell death. Conclusion The disruption of autophagy machinery in HCV infected hepatocytes activated IFN signaling pathway, and induced apoptosis. Together, these results suggest that HCV induced autophagy impairs innate immune response. PMID:21274862

  5. Preventing mutant huntingtin proteolysis and intermittent fasting promote autophagy in models of Huntington disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrnhoefer, Dagmar E; Martin, Dale D O; Schmidt, Mandi E; Qiu, Xiaofan; Ladha, Safia; Caron, Nicholas S; Skotte, Niels H; Nguyen, Yen T N; Vaid, Kuljeet; Southwell, Amber L; Engemann, Sabine; Franciosi, Sonia; Hayden, Michael R

    2018-03-06

    Huntington disease (HD) is caused by the expression of mutant huntingtin (mHTT) bearing a polyglutamine expansion. In HD, mHTT accumulation is accompanied by a dysfunction in basal autophagy, which manifests as specific defects in cargo loading during selective autophagy. Here we show that the expression of mHTT resistant to proteolysis at the caspase cleavage site D586 (C6R mHTT) increases autophagy, which may be due to its increased binding to the autophagy adapter p62. This is accompanied by faster degradation of C6R mHTT in vitro and a lack of mHTT accumulation the C6R mouse model with age. These findings may explain the previously observed neuroprotective properties of C6R mHTT. As the C6R mutation cannot be easily translated into a therapeutic approach, we show that a scheduled feeding paradigm is sufficient to lower mHTT levels in YAC128 mice expressing cleavable mHTT. This is consistent with a previous model, where the presence of cleavable mHTT impairs basal autophagy, while fasting-induced autophagy remains functional. In HD, mHTT clearance and autophagy may become increasingly impaired as a function of age and disease stage, because of gradually increased activity of mHTT-processing enzymes. Our findings imply that mHTT clearance could be enhanced by a regulated dietary schedule that promotes autophagy.

  6. A comprehensive glossary of autophagy-related molecules and processes (2nd edition)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klionsky, Daniel J; Baehrecke, Eric H; Brumell, John H

    2011-01-01

    for readers--even those who work in the field--to keep up with the ever-expanding terminology associated with the various autophagy-related processes. Accordingly, we have developed a comprehensive glossary of autophagy-related terms that is meant to provide a quick reference for researchers who need a brief...

  7. MicroRNA-155 promotes autophagy to eliminate intracellular mycobacteria by targeting Rheb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinli; Yang, Kun; Zhou, Lin; Minhaowu; Wu, Yongjian; Zhu, Min; Lai, Xiaomin; Chen, Tao; Feng, Lianqiang; Li, Meiyu; Huang, Chunyu; Zhong, Qiu; Huang, Xi

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a hard-to-eradicate intracellular pathogen that infects one-third of the global population. It can live within macrophages owning to its ability to arrest phagolysosome biogenesis. Autophagy has recently been identified as an effective way to control the intracellular mycobacteria by enhancing phagosome maturation. In the present study, we demonstrate a novel role of miR-155 in regulating the autophagy-mediated anti-mycobacterial response. Both in vivo and in vitro studies showed that miR-155 expression was significantly enhanced after mycobacterial infection. Forced expression of miR-155 accelerated the autophagic response in macrophages, thus promoting the maturation of mycobacterial phagosomes and decreasing the survival rate of intracellular mycobacteria, while transfection with miR-155 inhibitor increased mycobacterial survival. However, macrophage-mediated mycobacterial phagocytosis was not affected after miR-155 overexpression or inhibition. Furthermore, blocking autophagy with specific inhibitor 3-methyladenine or silencing of autophagy related gene 7 (Atg7) reduced the ability of miR-155 to promote autophagy and mycobacterial elimination. More importantly, our study demonstrated that miR-155 bound to the 3'-untranslated region of Ras homologue enriched in brain (Rheb), a negative regulator of autophagy, accelerated the process of autophagy and sequential killing of intracellular mycobacteria by suppressing Rheb expression. Our results reveal a novel role of miR-155 in regulating autophagy-mediated mycobacterial elimination by targeting Rheb, and provide potential targets for clinical treatment.

  8. MicroRNA-155 promotes autophagy to eliminate intracellular mycobacteria by targeting Rheb.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinli Wang

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a hard-to-eradicate intracellular pathogen that infects one-third of the global population. It can live within macrophages owning to its ability to arrest phagolysosome biogenesis. Autophagy has recently been identified as an effective way to control the intracellular mycobacteria by enhancing phagosome maturation. In the present study, we demonstrate a novel role of miR-155 in regulating the autophagy-mediated anti-mycobacterial response. Both in vivo and in vitro studies showed that miR-155 expression was significantly enhanced after mycobacterial infection. Forced expression of miR-155 accelerated the autophagic response in macrophages, thus promoting the maturation of mycobacterial phagosomes and decreasing the survival rate of intracellular mycobacteria, while transfection with miR-155 inhibitor increased mycobacterial survival. However, macrophage-mediated mycobacterial phagocytosis was not affected after miR-155 overexpression or inhibition. Furthermore, blocking autophagy with specific inhibitor 3-methyladenine or silencing of autophagy related gene 7 (Atg7 reduced the ability of miR-155 to promote autophagy and mycobacterial elimination. More importantly, our study demonstrated that miR-155 bound to the 3'-untranslated region of Ras homologue enriched in brain (Rheb, a negative regulator of autophagy, accelerated the process of autophagy and sequential killing of intracellular mycobacteria by suppressing Rheb expression. Our results reveal a novel role of miR-155 in regulating autophagy-mediated mycobacterial elimination by targeting Rheb, and provide potential targets for clinical treatment.

  9. Rapamycin regulates autophagy and cell adhesion in induced pluripotent stem cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sotthibundhu, Areechun

    2016-01-01

    Cellular reprogramming is a stressful process, which requires cells to engulf somatic features and produce and maintain stemness machineries. Autophagy is a process to degrade unwanted proteins and is required for the derivation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). However, the role of autophagy during iPSC maintenance remains undefined.

  10. A dual function for Deep orange in programmed autophagy in the Drosophila melanogaster fat body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindmo, Karine; Simonsen, Anne; Brech, Andreas; Finley, Kim; Rusten, Tor Erik; Stenmark, Harald

    2006-01-01

    Lysosomal degradation of cytoplasm by way of autophagy is essential for cellular amino acid homeostasis and for tissue remodeling. In insects such as Drosophila, autophagy is developmentally upregulated in the larval fat body prior to metamorphosis. Here, autophagy is induced by the hormone ecdysone through down-regulation of the autophagy-suppressive phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling pathway. In yeast, Vps18 and other members of the HOPS complex have been found essential for autophagic degradation. In Drosophila, the Vps18 homologue Deep orange (Dor) has previously been shown to mediate fusion of multivesicular endosomes with lysosomes. A requirement of Dor for ecdysone-mediated chromosome puffing has also been reported. In the present report, we have tested the hypothesis that Dor may control programmed autophagy at the level of ecdysone signaling as well as by mediating autophagosome-to-lysosome fusion. We show that dor mutants are defective in programmed autophagy and provide evidence that autophagy is blocked at two levels. First, PI3K activity was not down-regulated correctly in dor larvae, which correlated with a decrease in ecdysone reporter activity. The down-regulation of PI3K activity was restored by feeding ecdysone to the mutant larvae. Second, neither exogenous ecdysone nor overexpression of PTEN, a silencer of PI3K signaling, restored fusion of autophagosomes with lysosomes in the fat body of dor mutants. These results indicate that Dor controls autophagy indirectly, via ecdysone signaling, as well as directly, via autolysosomal fusion

  11. Autophagy in Neurodegeneration: Can't Digest It, Spit It Out!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthet, Valentin J A; Ryan, Kevin M

    2018-03-01

    The autophagy-lysosome pathway maintains cellular homeostasis and protects against neurodegenerative disorders. Recent findings show that autophagy can be impaired in these diseases, and that the cell activates an alternative Golgi-mediated degradation pathway, leading to expulsion of toxic protein aggregates. Ultimately this process leads to nuclear breakdown and neuronal cell death. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Avian metapneumovirus subgroup C induces autophagy through the ATF6 UPR pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Lei; Wei, Li; Zhu, Shanshan; Wang, Jing; Quan, Rong; Li, Zixuan; Liu, Jue

    2017-10-03

    An increasing number of studies have demonstrated that macroautophagy/autophagy plays an important role in the infectious processes of diverse pathogens. However, it remains unknown whether autophagy is induced in avian metapneumovirus (aMPV)-infected host cells, and, if so, how this occurs. Here, we report that aMPV subgroup C (aMPV/C) induces autophagy in cultured cells. We demonstrated this relationship by detecting classical autophagic features, including the formation of autophagsomes, the presence of GFP-LC3 puncta and the conversation of LC3-I into LC3-II. Also, we used pharmacological regulators and siRNAs targeting ATG7 or LC3 to examine the role of autophagy in aMPV/C replication. The results showed that autophagy is required for efficient replication of aMPV/C. Moreover, infection with aMPV/C promotes autophagosome maturation and induces a complete autophagic process. Finally, the ATF6 pathway, of which one component is the unfolded protein response (UPR), becomes activated in aMPV/C-infected cells. Knockdown of ATF6 inhibited aMPV/C-induced autophagy and viral replication. Collectively, these results not only show that autophagy promotes aMPV/C replication in the cultured cells, but also reveal that the molecular mechanisms underlying aMPV/C-induced autophagy depends on regulation of the ER stress-related UPR pathway.

  13. Ginsenoside compound K promotes β-amyloid peptide clearance in primary astrocytes via autophagy enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jinhui; Chang, Li; Zhang, Xin; Pei, Sujuan; Yu, Meishuang; Gao, Jianlian

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of ginsenoside compound K on β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide clearance in primary astrocytes. Aβ degradation in primary astrocytes was determined using an intracellular Aβ clearance assay. Aggregated LC3 in astrocyte cells, which is a marker for the level of autophagy, was detected using laser scanning confocal microscope. The effect of compound K on the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)/autophagy pathway was determined using western blot analysis, and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used for Aβ detection. The results demonstrated that compound K promoted the clearance of Aβ and enhanced autophagy in primary astrocytes. In addition, it was found that phosphorylation of mTOR was inhibited by compound K, which may have contributed to the enhanced autophagy. In conclusion, compound K promotes Aβ clearance by enhancing autophagy via the mTOR signaling pathway in primary astrocytes.

  14. Role of Autophagy and Apoptosis in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guangbo; Pei, Fen; Yang, Fengqing; Li, Lingxiao; Amin, Amit Dipak; Liu, Songnian; Buchan, J. Ross; Cho, William C.

    2017-01-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) constitutes 85% of all lung cancers, and is the leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. The poor prognosis and resistance to both radiation and chemotherapy warrant further investigation into the molecular mechanisms of NSCLC and the development of new, more efficacious therapeutics. The processes of autophagy and apoptosis, which induce degradation of proteins and organelles or cell death upon cellular stress, are crucial in the pathophysiology of NSCLC. The close interplay between autophagy and apoptosis through shared signaling pathways complicates our understanding of how NSCLC pathophysiology is regulated. The apoptotic effect of autophagy is controversial as both inhibitory and stimulatory effects have been reported in NSCLC. In addition, crosstalk of proteins regulating both autophagy and apoptosis exists. Here, we review the recent advances of the relationship between autophagy and apoptosis in NSCLC, aiming to provide few insights into the discovery of novel pathogenic factors and the development of new cancer therapeutics. PMID:28208579

  15. Autophagy is required for stem cell mobilization by G-CSF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leveque-El Mouttie, Lucie; Vu, Therese; Lineburg, Katie E.

    2015-01-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is widely used clinically to prevent neutropenia after cytotoxic chemotherapy and to mobilize hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) for transplantation. Autophagy, a process of cytoplasmic component recycling, maintains cellular homeostasis and protects...... the cell during periods of metabolic stress or nutrient deprivation. We have observed that G-CSF activates autophagy in neutrophils and HSCs from both mouse and human donors. Furthermore, G-CSF-induced neutrophil and HSC mobilization is impaired in the absence of autophagy. In contrast, autophagy...... is dispensable for direct HSC mobilization in response to the CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100. Altogether, these data demonstrate an important role for G-CSF in invoking autophagy within hematopoietic and myeloid cells and suggest that this pathway is critical for ensuring cell survival in response to clinically...

  16. Heavy ion irradiation induces autophagy in irradiated C2C12 myoblasts and their bystander cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hino, Mizuki; Tajika, Yuki; Hamada, Nobuyuki

    2010-01-01

    Autophagy is one of the major processes involved in the degradation of intracellular materials. Here, we examined the potential impact of heavy ion irradiation on the induction of autophagy in irradiated C2C12 mouse myoblasts and their non-targeted bystander cells. In irradiated cells, ultrastructural analysis revealed the accumulation of autophagic structures at various stages of autophagy (id est (i.e.) phagophores, autophagosomes and autolysosomes) within 20 min after irradiation. Multivesicular bodies (MVBs) and autolysosomes containing MVBs (amphisomes) were also observed. Heavy ion irradiation increased the staining of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 and LysoTracker Red (LTR). Such enhanced staining was suppressed by an autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine. In addition to irradiated cells, bystander cells were also positive with LTR staining. Altogether, these results suggest that heavy ion irradiation induces autophagy not only in irradiated myoblasts but also in their bystander cells. (author)

  17. Role of Autophagy in Glycogen Breakdown and Its Relevance to Chloroquine Myopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirin, Jonathan; Nieuwenhuis, Joppe; Perrimon, Norbert

    2013-01-01

    Several myopathies are associated with defects in autophagic and lysosomal degradation of glycogen, but it remains unclear how glycogen is targeted to the lysosome and what significance this process has for muscle cells. We have established a Drosophila melanogaster model to study glycogen autophagy in skeletal muscles, using chloroquine (CQ) to simulate a vacuolar myopathy that is completely dependent on the core autophagy genes. We show that autophagy is required for the most efficient degradation of glycogen in response to starvation. Furthermore, we show that CQ-induced myopathy can be improved by reduction of either autophagy or glycogen synthesis, the latter possibly due to a direct role of Glycogen Synthase in regulating autophagy through its interaction with Atg8. PMID:24265594

  18. Rejuvenation of MPTP-induced human neural precursor cell senescence by activating autophagy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Liang [East Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Dong, Chuanming [East Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, The Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Neuroregeneration, Nantong University, Nantong (China); Sun, Chenxi; Ma, Rongjie; Yang, Danjing [East Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Zhu, Hongwen, E-mail: hongwen_zhu@hotmail.com [Tianjin Hospital, Tianjin Academy of Integrative Medicine, Tianjin (China); Xu, Jun, E-mail: xunymc2000@yahoo.com [East Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China)

    2015-08-21

    Aging of neural stem cell, which can affect brain homeostasis, may be caused by many cellular mechanisms. Autophagy dysfunction was found in aged and neurodegenerative brains. However, little is known about the relationship between autophagy and human neural stem cell (hNSC) aging. The present study used 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1, 2, 3, 6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) to treat neural precursor cells (NPCs) derived from human embryonic stem cell (hESC) line H9 and investigate related molecular mechanisms involved in this process. MPTP-treated NPCs were found to undergo premature senescence [determined by increased senescence-associated-β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal) activity, elevated intracellular reactive oxygen species level, and decreased proliferation] and were associated with impaired autophagy. Additionally, the cellular senescence phenotypes were manifested at the molecular level by a significant increase in p21 and p53 expression, a decrease in SOD2 expression, and a decrease in expression of some key autophagy-related genes such as Atg5, Atg7, Atg12, and Beclin 1. Furthermore, we found that the senescence-like phenotype of MPTP-treated hNPCs was rejuvenated through treatment with a well-known autophagy enhancer rapamycin, which was blocked by suppression of essential autophagy gene Beclin 1. Taken together, these findings reveal the critical role of autophagy in the process of hNSC aging, and this process can be reversed by activating autophagy. - Highlights: • We successfully establish hESC-derived neural precursor cells. • MPTP treatment induced senescence-like state in hESC-derived NPCs. • MPTP treatment induced impaired autophagy of hESC-derived NPCs. • MPTP-induced hESC-derived NPC senescence was rejuvenated by activating autophagy.

  19. SAR405, a PIK3C3/Vps34 inhibitor that prevents autophagy and synergizes with MTOR inhibition in tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquier, Benoit

    2015-04-03

    Autophagy plays an important role in cancer and it has been suggested that it functions not only as a tumor suppressor pathway to prevent tumor initiation, but also as a prosurvival pathway that helps tumor cells endure metabolic stress and resist death triggered by chemotherapeutic agents. We recently described the discovery of inhibitors of PIK3C3/Vps34 (phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, catalytic subunit type 3), the lipid kinase component of the class III phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PtdIns3K). This PtdIns3K isoform has attracted significant attention in recent years because of its role in autophagy. Following chemical optimization we identified SAR405, a low molecular mass kinase inhibitor of PIK3C3, highly potent and selective with regard to other lipid and protein kinases. We demonstrated that inhibiting the catalytic activity of PIK3C3 disrupts vesicle trafficking from late endosomes to lysosomes. SAR405 treatment also inhibits autophagy induced either by starvation or by MTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin) inhibition. Finally our results show that combining SAR405 with everolimus, the FDA-approved MTOR inhibitor, results in a significant synergy on the reduction of cell proliferation using renal tumor cells. This result indicates a potential therapeutic application for PIK3C3 inhibitors in cancer.

  20. Transcriptome and proteome analyses and the role of atypical calpain protein and autophagy in the spliced leader silencing pathway in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hope, Ronen; Egarmina, Katarina; Voloshin, Konstantin; Waldman Ben-Asher, Hiba; Carmi, Shai; Eliaz, Dror; Drori, Yaron; Michaeli, Shulamit

    2016-10-01

    Under persistent ER stress, Trypanosoma brucei parasites induce the spliced leader silencing (SLS) pathway. In SLS, transcription of the SL RNA gene, the SL donor to all mRNAs, is extinguished, arresting trans-splicing and leading to programmed cell death (PCD). In this study, we investigated the transcriptome following silencing of SEC63, a factor essential for protein translocation across the ER membrane, and whose silencing induces SLS. The proteome of SEC63-silenced cells was analyzed with an emphasis on SLS-specific alterations in protein expression, and modifications that do not directly result from perturbations in trans-splicing. One such protein identified is an atypical calpain SKCRP7.1/7.2. Co-silencing of SKCRP7.1/7.2 and SEC63 eliminated SLS induction due its role in translocating the PK3 kinase. This kinase initiates SLS by migrating to the nucleus and phosphorylating TRF4 leading to shut-off of SL RNA transcription. Thus, SKCRP7.1 is involved in SLS signaling and the accompanying PCD. The role of autophagy in SLS was also investigated; eliminating autophagy through VPS34 or ATG7 silencing demonstrated that autophagy is not essential for SLS induction, but is associated with PCD. Thus, this study identified factors that are used by the parasite to cope with ER stress and to induce SLS and PCD. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Restarting stalled autophagy a potential therapeutic approach for the lipid storage disorder, Niemann-Pick type C1 disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Sovan; Maetzel, Dorothea; Korolchuk, Viktor I; Jaenisch, Rudolf

    2014-06-01

    Autophagy is essential for cellular homeostasis and its dysfunction in human diseases has been implicated in the accumulation of misfolded protein and in cellular toxicity. We have recently shown impairment in autophagic flux in the lipid storage disorder, Niemann-Pick type C1 (NPC1) disease associated with abnormal cholesterol sequestration, where maturation of autophagosomes is impaired due to defective amphisome formation caused by failure in SNARE machinery. Abrogation of autophagy also causes cholesterol accumulation, suggesting that defective autophagic flux in NPC1 disease may act as a primary causative factor not only by imparting its deleterious effects, but also by increasing cholesterol load. However, cholesterol depletion treatment with HP-β-cyclodextrin impedes autophagy, whereas pharmacologically stimulating autophagy restores its function independent of amphisome formation. Of potential therapeutic relevance is that a low dose of HP-β-cyclodextrin that does not perturb autophagy, coupled with an autophagy inducer, may rescue both the cholesterol and autophagy defects in NPC1 disease.

  2. Cisplatin induces protective autophagy through activation of BECN1 in human bladder cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ji-Fan; Lin, Yi-Chia; Tsai, Te-Fu; Chen, Hung-En; Chou, Kuang-Yu; Hwang, Thomas I-Sheng

    2017-01-01

    Cisplatin-based chemotherapy is the first line treatment for several cancers including bladder cancer (BC). Autophagy induction has been implied to contribute to cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer; and a high basal level of autophagy has been demonstrated in human bladder tumors. Therefore, it is reasonable to speculate that autophagy may account for the failure of cisplatin single treatment in BC. This study investigated whether cisplatin induces autophagy and the mechanism involved using human BC cell lines. Human BC cells (5637 and T24) were used in this study. Cell viability was detected using water soluble tetrazolium-8 reagents. Autophagy induction was detected by monitoring the levels of light chain 3 (LC3)-II and p62 by Western blot, LC3-positive puncta formation by immunofluorescence, and direct observation of the autophagolysosome (AL) formation by transmission electron microscopy. Inhibitors including bafilomycin A1 (Baf A1), chloroquine (CQ), and shRNA-based lentivirus against autophagy-related genes (ATG7 and ATG12) were utilized. Apoptosis level was detected by caspase 3/7 activity and DNA fragmentation. Cisplatin decreased cell viability and induced apoptosis of 5637 and T24 cells in a dose-and time-dependent manner. The increased LC3-II accumulation, p62 clearance, the number of LC3-positive puncta, and ALs in cisplatin-treated cells suggested that cisplatin indeed induces autophagy. Inhibition of cisplatin-induced autophagy using Baf A1, CQ, or ATG7/ATG12 shRNAs significantly enhanced cytotoxicity of cisplatin toward BC cells. These results indicated that cisplatin induced protective autophagy which may contribute to the development of cisplatin resistance and resulted in treatment failure. Mechanistically, upregulation of beclin-1 (BECN1) was detected in cisplatin-treated cells, and knockdown of BECN1 using shRNA attenuated cisplatin-induced autophagy and subsequently enhanced cisplatin-induced apoptosis. Collectively, the study results

  3. Cell apoptosis, autophagy and necroptosis in osteosarcoma treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongqi; Li, Huiling; Ren, Mingyan; Liao, Yedan; Yu, Shunling; Chen, Yanjin; Yang, Yihao; Zhang, Ya

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary bone tumor in children and adolescents. Although combined therapy including surgery and multi-agent chemotherapy have resulted in great improvements in the overall survival of patients, chemoresistance remains an obstacle for the treatment of osteosarcoma. Molecular targets or effective agents that are actively involved in cell death including apoptosis, autophagy and necroptosis have been studied. We summarized how these agents (novel compounds, miRNAs, or proteins) regulate apoptotic, autophagic and necroptotic pathways; and discussed the current knowledge on the role of these new agents in chemotherapy resistance in osteosarcoma. PMID:27007056

  4. Role of Autophagy and Apoptosis in the Postinfluenza Bacterial Pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Qin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The risk of influenza A virus (IAV is more likely caused by secondary bacterial infections. During the past decades, a great amount of studies have been conducted on increased morbidity from secondary bacterial infections following influenza and provide an increasing number of explanations for the mechanisms underlying the infections. In this paper, we first review the recent research progress that IAV infection increased susceptibility to bacterial infection. We then propose an assumption that autophagy and apoptosis manipulation are beneficial to antagonize post-IAV bacterial infection and discuss the clinical significance.

  5. Treatment-Induced Autophagy Associated with Tumor Dormancy and Relapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Monogr. 10021, 57e71. http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jncimonographs/lgh014. McWhinney, S.R., Goldberg , R.M., McLeod, H.L., 2009. Platinum neurotoxicity... variations on a common theme of self-eating? Nat Rev Mol Cell Biol 13: 7 – 12 Cohen-Kaplan V, Livneh I, Avni N, Fabre B, Ziv T, Kwon YT, Ciechanover A (2016...Hippo kinases STK3/STK4 is essential for autophagy. Mol Cell 57: 55 – 68 Wing SS, Chiang HL, Goldberg AL, Dice JF (1991) Proteins containing peptide

  6. EGFR overexpressing cells and tumors are dependent on autophagy for growth and survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jutten, Barry; Keulers, Tom G.; Schaaf, Marco B.E.; Savelkouls, Kim; Theys, Jan; Span, Paul N.; Vooijs, Marc A.; Bussink, Johan; Rouschop, Kasper M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is overexpressed, amplified or mutated in various human epithelial tumors, and is associated with tumor aggressiveness and therapy resistance. Autophagy activation provides a survival advantage for cells in the tumor microenvironment. In the current study, we assessed the potential of autophagy inhibition (using chloroquine (CQ)) in treatment of EGFR expressing tumors. Material and methods: Quantitative PCR, immunohistochemistry, clonogenic survival, proliferation assays and in vivo tumor growth were used to assess this potential. Results: We show that EGFR overexpressing xenografts are sensitive to CQ treatment and are sensitized to irradiation by autophagy inhibition. In HNSSC xenografts, a correlation between EGFR and expression of the autophagy marker LC3b is observed, suggesting a role for autophagy in EGFR expressing tumors. This observation was substantiated in cell lines, showing high EGFR expressing cells to be more sensitive to CQ addition as reflected by decreased proliferation and survival. Surprisingly high EGFR expressing cells display a lower autophagic flux. Conclusions: The EGFR high expressing cells and tumors investigated in this study are highly dependent on autophagy for growth and survival. Inhibition of autophagy may therefore provide a novel treatment opportunity for EGFR overexpressing tumors

  7. Autophagy suppression potentiates the anti-glioblastoma effect of asparaginase in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qicheng; Ye, Li; Fan, Jiajun; Zhang, Xuyao; Wang, Huan; Liao, Siyang; Song, Ping; Wang, Ziyu; Wang, Shaofei; Li, Yubin; Luan, Jingyun; Wang, Yichen; Chen, Wei; Zai, Wenjing; Yang, Ping; Cao, Zhonglian; Ju, Dianwen

    2017-01-01

    Asparaginase has been reported to be effective in the treatment of various leukemia and several malignant solid cancers. However, the anti-tumor effect of asparaginase is always restricted due to complicated mechanisms. Herein, we investigated the mechanisms of how glioblastoma resisted asparaginase treatment and reported a novel approach to enhance the anti-glioblastoma effect of asparaginase. We found that asparaginase could induce growth inhibition and caspase-dependent apoptosis in U87MG/U251MG glioblastoma cells. Meanwhile, autophagy was activated as indicated by autophagosomes formation and upregulated expression of LC3-II. Importantly, abolishing autophagy using chloroquine (CQ) and LY294002 enhanced the cytotoxicity and apoptosis induced by asparaginase in U87MG/U251MG cells. Further study proved that Akt/mTOR and Erk signaling pathways participated in autophagy induction, while reactive oxygen species (ROS) served as an intracellular regulator for both cytotoxicity and autophagy in asparaginase-treated U87MG/U251MG cells. Moreover, combination treatment with autophagy inhibitor CQ significantly enhanced anti-glioblastoma efficacy of asparaginase in U87MG cell xenograft model. Taken together, our results demonstrated that inhibition of autophagy potentiated the anti-tumor effect of asparagine depletion on glioblastoma, indicating that targeting autophagy and asparagine could be a potential approach for glioblastoma treatment. PMID:29207624

  8. The Role of Reactive Oxygen Species and Autophagy in Periodontitis and Their Potential Linkage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengcheng Liu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease that causes damage to periodontal tissues, which include the gingiva, periodontal ligament, and alveolar bone. The major cause of periodontal tissue destruction is an inappropriate host response to microorganisms and their products. Specifically, a homeostatic imbalance between reactive oxygen species (ROS and antioxidant defense systems has been implicated in the pathogenesis of periodontitis. Elevated levels of ROS acting as intracellular signal transducers result in autophagy, which plays a dual role in periodontitis by promoting cell death or blocking apoptosis in infected cells. Autophagy can also regulate ROS generation and scavenging. Investigations are ongoing to elucidate the crosstalk mechanisms between ROS and autophagy. Here, we review the physiological and pathological roles of ROS and autophagy in periodontal tissues. The redox-sensitive pathways related to autophagy, such as mTORC1, Beclin 1, and the Atg12-Atg5 complex, are explored in depth to provide a comprehensive overview of the crosstalk between ROS and autophagy. Based on the current evidence, we suggest that a potential linkage between ROS and autophagy is involved in the pathogenesis of periodontitis.

  9. Autophagy postpones apoptotic cell death in PRRSV infection through Bad-Beclin1 interaction.

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    Zhou, Ao; Li, Shuaifeng; Khan, Faheem Ahmed; Zhang, Shujun

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy and apoptosis play significant roles in PRRSV infection and replication. However, the interaction between these 2 processes in PRRSV replication is still far from been completely understood. In our studies, the exposure of MARC-145 cells to PRRSV confirmed the activation of autophagy and subsequent induction of apoptosis. The inhibition of autophagy by 3-methyladenine (3-MA) caused a significant increase in PRRSV-induced apoptosis, showing a potential connection between both mechanisms. Moreover, we observed an increase in Bad expression (a pro-apoptotic protein) and Beclin1 (an autophagy regulator) in virus-infected cells up to 36h. Co-immunoprecipitation assays showed the formation of Bad and Beclin1 complex in PRRSV infected cells. Accordingly, Bad co-localized with Beclin1 in MARC-145 infected cells. Knockdown of Beclin1 significantly decreased PRRSV replication and PRRSV-induced autophagy, while Bad silencing resulted in increased autophagy and enhanced viral replication. Furthermore, PRRSV infection phosphorylated Bad (Ser112) to promote cellular survival. These results demonstrate that autophagy can favor PRRSV replication by postponing apoptosis through the formation of a Bad-Beclin1 complex.

  10. Autophagy pathway induced by a plant virus facilitates viral spread and transmission by its insect vector.

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    Yong Chen

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Many viral pathogens are persistently transmitted by insect vectors and cause agricultural or health problems. Generally, an insect vector can use autophagy as an intrinsic antiviral defense mechanism against viral infection. Whether viruses can evolve to exploit autophagy to promote their transmission by insect vectors is still unknown. Here, we show that the autophagic process is triggered by the persistent replication of a plant reovirus, rice gall dwarf virus (RGDV in cultured leafhopper vector cells and in intact insects, as demonstrated by the appearance of obvious virus-containing double-membrane autophagosomes, conversion of ATG8-I to ATG8-II and increased level of autophagic flux. Such virus-containing autophagosomes seem able to mediate nonlytic viral release from cultured cells or facilitate viral spread in the leafhopper intestine. Applying the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine or silencing the expression of Atg5 significantly decrease viral spread in vitro and in vivo, whereas applying the autophagy inducer rapamycin or silencing the expression of Torc1 facilitate such viral spread. Furthermore, we find that activation of autophagy facilitates efficient viral transmission, whereas inhibiting autophagy blocks viral transmission by its insect vector. Together, these results indicate a plant virus can induce the formation of autophagosomes for carrying virions, thus facilitating viral spread and transmission by its insect vector. We believe that such a role for virus-induced autophagy is common for vector-borne persistent viruses during their transmission by insect vectors.

  11. Involvement of autophagy upregulation in 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine ('ecstasy')-induced serotonergic neurotoxicity.

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    Li, I-Hsun; Ma, Kuo-Hsing; Kao, Tzu-Jen; Lin, Yang-Yi; Weng, Shao-Ju; Yen, Ting-Yin; Chen, Lih-Chi; Huang, Yuahn-Sieh

    2016-01-01

    It has been suggested that autophagy plays pathogenetic roles in cerebral ischemia, brain trauma, and neurodegenerative disorders. 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA or ecstasy) is an illicit drug that causes long-term serotonergic neurotoxicity in the brain. Apoptosis and necrosis have been implicated in MDMA-induced neurotoxicity, but the role of autophagy in MDMA-elicited serotonergic toxicity has not been investigated. The present study aimed to examine the contribution of autophagy to neurotoxicity in serotonergic neurons in in vitro and in vivo animal models challenged with MDMA. Here, we demonstrated that in cultured rat serotonergic neurons, MDMA exposure induced LC3B-densely stained autophagosome formation, accompanying by a decrease in neurite outgrowth. Autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA) significantly attenuated MDMA-induced autophagosome accumulation, and ameliorated MDMA-triggered serotonergic neurite damage and neuron death. In contrast, enhanced autophagy flux by rapamycin or impaired autophagosome clearance by bafilomycin A1 led to more autophagosome accumulation in serotonergic neurons and aggravated neurite degeneration. In addition, MDMA-induced autophagy activation in cultured serotonergic neurons might be mediated by serotonin transporter (SERT). In an in vivo animal model administered MDMA, neuroimaging showed that 3-MA protected the serotonin system against MDMA-induced downregulation of SERT evaluated by animal-PET with 4-[(18)F]-ADAM, a SERT radioligand. Taken together, our results demonstrated that MDMA triggers upregulation of autophagy in serotonergic neurons, which appears to be detrimental to neuronal growth. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A Negative Feedback Loop Between Autophagy and Immune Responses in Mycobacterium leprae Infection.

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    Ma, Yuelong; Zhang, Li; Lu, Jie; Shui, Tiejun; Chen, Jia; Yang, Jun; Yuan, Joanna; Liu, Yeqiang; Yang, Degang

    2017-01-01

    The obligate intracellular bacterium Mycobacterium leprae is the causative agent of leprosy and primarily infects macrophages, leading to irreversible nerve damage and deformities. So far, the underlying reasons allowing M. leprae to persist and propagate in macrophages, despite the presence of cellular immunity, are still a mystery. Here, we investigated the role of autophagy, a cellular process that degrades cytosolic materials and intracellular pathogens, in M. leprae infection. We found that live M. leprae infection of macrophages resulted in significantly elevated autophagy level. However, macrophages with high autophagy levels preferentially expressed lower levels of proinflammatory cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-12, and tumor necrosis factor-α, and preferentially primed anti-inflammatory T cells responses, characterized by high IL-10 and low interferon-γ, granzyme B, and perforin responses. These anti-inflammatory T cells could suppress further induction of autophagy, leading to improved survival of intracellular M. leprae in infected macrophages. Therefore, these data demonstrated that although autophagy had a role in eliminating intracellular pathogens, the induction of autophagy resulted in anti-inflammatory immune responses, which suppressed autophagy in a negative feedback loop and allowed the persistence of M. leprae.

  13. The role of autophagy inhibition in the enhanced cytotoxicity of temozolomide on melanoma cell lines

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    O. O. Ryabaya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Despite advantages in treatment of metastatic melanoma it remains resistant to current therapy. Recent evidence indicates that tumor cells could overcome death through autophagy, a process that degrades cellular proteins and organelles to maintain cellular biosynthesis during nutrient deprivation or lack of energy. Objective: to investigate the involvement of autophagy inhibitors chloroquine (CQ and LY-294.002 (LY in temozolomide (TMZ cytotoxicity in human melanoma cell lines.Materials and methods. The study was performed on patient-derived melanoma cell lines Mel Z, Mel IL and Mel MTP. The antiproliferative activity of combined TMZ and autophagy inhibitors treatment was determined by MTT assay and colony-forming assay. Cell cycle analysis, apoptosis activation and expression analysis of key autophagy markers under combined treatment was evaluated.Results. CQ and LY enhanced the cytotoxicity of TMZ and reduced colony formation in 3 melanoma cell lines, moreover both inhibitors increased cell population in G0 / G1 phase of cell cycle in Mel Z, Mel IL cell lines, but not in Mel MTP. CQ and LY synergistically activated apoptosis in all cell lines. The matrix RNA expression analysis of key autophagy genes showed autophagy involvement in enhanced cytotoxicity.Conclusions. Thus, autophagy inhibition on different stages of this process could overcome resistance to TMZ and be applicable as potent target in metastatic melanoma treatment.

  14. Kaempferol induces hepatocellular carcinoma cell death via endoplasmic reticulum stress-CHOP-autophagy signaling pathway.

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    Guo, Haiqing; Lin, Wei; Zhang, Xiangying; Zhang, Xiaohui; Hu, Zhongjie; Li, Liying; Duan, Zhongping; Zhang, Jing; Ren, Feng

    2017-10-10

    Kaempferol is a flavonoid compound that has gained widespread attention due to its antitumor functions. However, the underlying mechanisms are still not clear. The present study investigated the effect of kaempferol on hepatocellular carcinoma and its underlying mechanisms. Kaempferol induced autophagy in a concentration- and time-dependent manner in HepG2 or Huh7 cells, which was evidenced by the significant increase of autophagy-related genes. Inhibition of autophagy pathway, through 3-methyladenine or Atg7 siRNA, strongly diminished kaempferol-induced apoptosis. We further hypothesized that kaempferol can induce autophagy via endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress pathway. Indeed, blocking ER stress by 4-phenyl butyric acid (4-PBA) or knockdown of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP) with siRNA alleviated kaempferol-induced HepG2 or Huh7 cells autophagy; while transfection with plasmid overexpressing CHOP reversed the effect of 4-PBA on kaempferol-induced autophagy. Our results demonstrated that kaempferol induced hepatocarcinoma cell death via ER stress and CHOP-autophagy signaling pathway; kaempferol may be used as a potential chemopreventive agent for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma.

  15. Autophagy regulates the therapeutic potential of mesenchymal stem cells in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

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    Dang, Shipeng; Xu, Huanbai; Xu, Congfeng; Cai, Wei; Li, Qian; Cheng, Yiji; Jin, Min; Wang, Ru-Xing; Peng, Yongde; Zhang, Yi; Wu, Changping; He, Xiaozhou; Wan, Bing; Zhang, Yanyun

    2014-07-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-based therapy is a promising approach to treat various inflammatory disorders including multiple sclerosis. However, the fate of MSCs in the inflammatory microenvironment is largely unknown. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is a well-studied animal model of multiple sclerosis. We demonstrated that autophagy occurred in MSCs during their application for EAE treatment. Inflammatory cytokines, e.g., interferon gamma and tumor necrosis factor, induced autophagy in MSCs synergistically by inducing expression of BECN1/Beclin 1. Inhibition of autophagy by knockdown of Becn1 significantly improved the therapeutic effects of MSCs on EAE, which was mainly attributable to enhanced suppression upon activation and expansion of CD4(+) T cells. Mechanistically, inhibition of autophagy increased reactive oxygen species generation and mitogen-activated protein kinase 1/3 activation in MSCs, which were essential for PTGS2 (prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 [prostaglandin G/H synthase and cyclooxygenase]) and downstream prostaglandin E2 expression to exert immunoregulatory function. Furthermore, pharmacological treatment of MSCs to inhibit autophagy increased their immunosuppressive effects on T cell-mediated EAE. Our findings indicate that inflammatory microenvironment-induced autophagy downregulates the immunosuppressive function of MSCs. Therefore, modulation of autophagy in MSCs would provide a novel strategy to improve MSC-based immunotherapy.

  16. Simultaneous activation of mitophagy and autophagy by staurosporine protects against dopaminergic neuronal cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Ji-Young; Kim, Ji-Soo; Kim, Seo-Eun; Son, Jin H

    2014-02-21

    Abnormal autophagy is frequently observed during dopaminergic neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease (PD). However, it is not yet firmly established whether active autophagy is beneficial or pathogenic with respect to dopaminergic cell loss. Staurosporine, a common inducer of apoptosis, is often used in mechanistic studies of dopaminergic cell death. Here we report that staurosporine activates both autophagy and mitophagy simultaneously during dopaminergic neuronal cell death, and evaluate the physiological significance of these processes during cell death. First, staurosporine treatment resulted in induction of autophagy in more than 75% of apoptotic cells. Pharmacological inhibition of autophagy by bafilomycin A1 decreased significantly cell viability. In addition, staurosporine treatment resulted in activation of the PINK1-Parkin mitophagy pathway, of which deficit underlies some familial cases of PD, in the dopaminergic neuronal cell line, SN4741. The genetic blockade of this pathway by PINK1 null mutation also dramatically increased staurosporine-induced cell death. Taken together, our data suggest that staurosporine induces both mitophagy and autophagy, and that these pathways exert a significant neuroprotective effect, rather than a contribution to autophagic cell death. This model system may therefore be useful for elucidating the mechanisms underlying crosstalk between autophagy, mitophagy, and cell death in dopaminergic neurons. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid sensitizes neuroblastoma to paclitaxel by inhibiting thioredoxin-related protein 14-mediated autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Zijun; Yang, Kaibin; Ye, Litong; You, Zhiyao; Chen, Rirong; Liu, Ying; He, Youjian

    2017-07-01

    Paclitaxel is not as effective for neuroblastoma as most of the front-line chemotherapeutics due to drug resistance. This study explored the regulatory mechanism of paclitaxel-associated autophagy and potential solutions to paclitaxel resistance in neuroblastoma. The formation of autophagic vesicles was detected by scanning transmission electron microscopy and flow cytometry. The autophagy-associated proteins were assessed by western blot. Autophagy was induced and the autophagy-associated proteins LC3-I, LC3-II, Beclin 1, and thioredoxin-related protein 14 (TRP14), were found to be upregulated in neuroblastoma cells that were exposed to paclitaxel. The inhibition of Beclin 1 or TRP14 by siRNA increased the sensitivity of the tumor cells to paclitaxel. In addition, Beclin 1-mediated autophagy was regulated by TRP14. Furthermore, the TRP14 inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) downregulated paclitaxel-induced autophagy and enhanced the anticancer effects of paclitaxel in normal control cancer cells but not in cells with upregulated Beclin 1 and TRP14 expression. Our findings showed that paclitaxel-induced autophagy in neuroblastoma cells was regulated by TRP14 and that SAHA could sensitize neuroblastoma cells to paclitaxel by specifically inhibiting TRP14. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  18. Autophagy and Alzheimer’s Disease: From Molecular Mechanisms to Therapeutic Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Sahab Uddin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is the most common cause of progressive dementia in the elderly. It is characterized by a progressive and irreversible loss of cognitive abilities and formation of senile plaques, composed mainly of amyloid β (Aβ, and neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs, composed of tau protein, in the hippocampus and cortex of afflicted humans. In brains of AD patients the metabolism of Aβ is dysregulated, which leads to the accumulation and aggregation of Aβ. Metabolism of Aβ and tau proteins is crucially influenced by autophagy. Autophagy is a lysosome-dependent, homeostatic process, in which organelles and proteins are degraded and recycled into energy. Thus, dysfunction of autophagy is suggested to lead to the accretion of noxious proteins in the AD brain. In the present review, we describe the process of autophagy and its importance in AD. Additionally, we discuss mechanisms and genes linking autophagy and AD, i.e., the mTOR pathway, neuroinflammation, endocannabinoid system, ATG7, BCL2, BECN1, CDK5, CLU, CTSD, FOXO1, GFAP, ITPR1, MAPT, PSEN1, SNCA, UBQLN1, and UCHL1. We also present pharmacological agents acting via modulation of autophagy that may show promise in AD therapy. This review updates our knowledge on autophagy mechanisms proposing novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of AD.

  19. Rhynchophylla total alkaloid rescues autophagy, decreases oxidative stress and improves endothelial vasodilation in spontaneous hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chao; Jiang, Feng; Li, Yun-Lun; Jiang, Yue-Hua; Yang, Wen-Qing; Sheng, Jie; Xu, Wen-Juan; Zhu, Qing-Jun

    2018-03-01

    Autophagy plays an important role in alleviating oxidative stress and stabilizing atherosclerotic plaques. However, the potential role of autophagy in endothelial vasodilation function has rarely been studied. This study aimed to investigate whether rhynchophylla total alkaloid (RTA) has a positive role in enhancing autophagy through decreasing oxidative stress, and improving endothelial vasodilation. In oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL)-treated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), RTA (200 mg/L) significantly suppressed ox-LDL-induced oxidative stress through rescuing autophagy, and decreased cell apoptosis. In spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHR), administration of RTA (50 mg·kg -1 ·d -1 , ip, for 6 weeks) improved endothelin-dependent vasodilation of thoracic aorta rings. Furthermore, RTA administration significantly increased the antioxidant capacity and alleviated oxidative stress through enhancing autophagy in SHR. In ox-LDL-treated HUVECs, we found that the promotion of autophagy by RTA resulted in activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling pathway. Our results show that RTA treatment rescues the ox-LDL-induced autophagy impairment in HUVECs and improves endothelium-dependent vasodilation function in SHR.

  20. Oxygen concentration modulates cellular senescence and autophagy in human trophoblast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seno, Kotomi; Tanikawa, Nao; Takahashi, Hironori; Ohkuchi, Akihide; Suzuki, Hirotada; Matsubara, Shigeki; Iwata, Hisataka; Kuwayama, Takehito; Shirasuna, Koumei

    2018-02-15

    We investigated the effect of oxygen concentrations on cellular senescence and autophagy and examined the role of autophagy in human trophoblast cells. Human first-trimester trophoblast cells (Sw.71) were incubated under 21%, 5%, or 1% O 2 concentrations for 24 hours. We examined the extent of senescence caused using senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-Gal) and senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) as markers. Moreover, we examined the role of autophagy in causing cellular senescence using an autophagy inhibitor (3-methyladenine, 3MA). Physiological normoxia (5% O 2 ) decreased SA-β-Gal-positive cells and SASP including interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-8 compared with cultured cells in 21% O 2 . Pathophysiological hypoxia (1% O 2 ) caused cytotoxicity, including extracellular release of ATP and lactate dehydrogenase, and decreased senescence phenotypes. 3MA-treated trophoblast cells significantly suppressed senescence markers (SA-β-Gal-positive cells and SASP secretion) in O 2 -independent manner. We conclude that O 2 concentration modulates cellular senescence phenotypes regulating autophagy in the human trophoblast cells. Moreover, inhibiting autophagy suppresses cellular senescence, suggesting that autophagy contributes to oxygen stress-induced cellular senescence. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Yeast chronological lifespan and proteotoxic stress: is autophagy good or bad?

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    Sampaio-Marques, Belém; Felgueiras, Carolina; Silva, Alexandra; Rodrigues, Fernando; Ludovico, Paula

    2011-10-01

    Autophagy, a highly conserved proteolytic mechanism of quality control, is essential for the maintenance of metabolic and cellular homoeostasis and for an efficient cellular response to stress. Autophagy declines with aging and is believed to contribute to different aspects of the aging phenotype. The nutrient-sensing pathways PKA (protein kinase A), Sch9 and TOR (target of rapamycin), involved in the regulation of yeast lifespan, also converge on a common targeted process: autophagy. The molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of autophagy and aging by these signalling pathways in yeast, with special attention to the TOR pathway, are discussed in the present paper. The question of whether or not autophagy could contribute to yeast cell death occurring during CLS (chronological lifespan) is discussed in the light of our findings obtained after autophagy activation promoted by proteotoxic stress. Autophagy progressively increases in cells expressing the aggregation-prone protein α-synuclein and seems to participate in the early cell death and shortening of CLS under these conditions, highlighting that autophagic activity should be maintained below physiological levels to exert its promising anti-aging effects.

  2. WW domain of BAG3 is required for the induction of autophagy in glioma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merabova, Nana; Sariyer, Ilker Kudret; Saribas, A Sami; Knezevic, Tijana; Gordon, Jennifer; Turco, M Caterina; Rosati, Alessandra; Weaver, Michael; Landry, Jacques; Khalili, Kamel

    2015-04-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved, selective degradation pathway of cellular components that is important for cell homeostasis under healthy and pathologic conditions. Here we demonstrate that an increase in the level of BAG3 results in stimulation of autophagy in glioblastoma cells. BAG3 is a member of a co-chaperone family of proteins that associates with Hsp70 through a conserved BAG domain positioned near the C-terminus of the protein. Expression of BAG3 is induced by a variety of environmental changes that cause stress to cells. Our results show that BAG3 overexpression induces autophagy in glioma cells. Interestingly, inhibition of the proteasome caused an increase in BAG3 levels and induced autophagy. Further analysis using specific siRNA against BAG3 suggests that autophagic activation due to proteosomal inhibition is mediated by BAG3. Analyses of BAG3 domain mutants suggest that the WW domain of BAG3 is crucial for the induction of autophagy. BAG3 overexpression also increased the interaction between Bcl2 and Beclin-1, instead of disrupting them, suggesting that BAG3 induced autophagy is Beclin-1 independent. These observations reveal a novel role for the WW domain of BAG3 in the regulation of autophagy. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Cocaine induces astrocytosis through ER stress-mediated activation of autophagy

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    Periyasamy, Palsamy; Guo, Ming-Lei; Buch, Shilpa

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cocaine is known to induce inflammation, thereby contributing in part, to the pathogenesis of neurodegeneration. A recent study from our lab has revealed a link between macroautophagy/autophagy and microglial activation. The current study was aimed at investigating whether cocaine could also mediate activation of astrocytes and, whether this process involved induction of autophagy. Our findings demonstrated that cocaine mediated the activation of astrocytes by altering the levels of autophagy markers, such as BECN1, ATG5, MAP1LC3B-II, and SQSTM1 in both human A172 astrocytoma cells and primary human astrocytes. Furthermore, cocaine treatment resulted in increased formation of endogenous MAP1LC3B puncta in human astrocytes. Additionally, astrocytes transfected with the GFP-MAP1LC3B plasmid also demonstrated cocaine-mediated upregulation of the green fluorescent MAP1LC3B puncta. Cocaine-mediated induction of autophagy involved upstream activation of ER stress proteins such as EIF2AK3, ERN1, ATF6 since blockage of autophagy using either pharmacological or gene-silencing approaches, had no effect on cocaine-mediated induction of ER stress. Using both pharmacological and gene-silencing approaches to block either ER stress or autophagy, our findings demonstrated that cocaine-induced activation of astrocytes (measured by increased levels of GFAP) involved sequential activation of ER stress and autophagy. Cocaine-mediated-increased upregulation of GFAP correlated with increased expression of proinflammatory mediators such as TNF, IL1B, and IL6. In conclusion, these findings reveal an association between ER stress-mediated autophagy and astrogliosis in cocaine-treated astrocytes. Intervention of ER stress and/or autophagy signaling would thus be promising therapeutic targets for abrogating cocaine-mediated neuroinflammation. PMID:27337297

  4. Inhibiting ROS-TFEB-Dependent Autophagy Enhances Salidroside-Induced Apoptosis in Human Chondrosarcoma Cells.

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    Zeng, Wei; Xiao, Tao; Cai, Anlie; Cai, Weiliang; Liu, Huanhuan; Liu, Jingling; Li, Jie; Tan, Miduo; Xie, Li; Liu, Ying; Yang, Xiangcheng; Long, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Autophagy modulation has been considered a potential therapeutic strategy for human chondrosarcoma, and a previous study indicated that salidroside exhibits significant anti-carcinogenic activity. However, the ability of salidroside to induce autophagy and its role in human chondrosarcoma cell death remains unclear. We exposed SW1353 cells to different concentrations of salidroside (0.5, 1 and 2 mM) for 24 h. RT-PCR, Western-blotting, Immunocytofluorescence, and Luciferase Reporter Assays were used to evaluate whether salidroside activated the TFEB-dependent autophagy. We show that salidroside induced significant apoptosis in the human chondrosarcoma cell line SW1353. In addition, we demonstrate that salidroside-induced an autophagic response in SW1353 cells, as evidenced by the upregulation of LC3-II and downregulation of P62. Moreover, pharmacological or genetic blocking of autophagy enhanced salidroside -induced apoptosis, indicating the cytoprotective role of autophagy in salidroside-treated SW1353 cells. Salidroside also induced TFEB (Ser142) dephosphorylation, subsequently to activated TFEB nuclear translocation and increase of TFEB reporter activity, which contributed to lysosomal biogenesis and the expression of autophagy-related genes. Importantly, we found that salidroside triggered the generation of ROS in SW1353 cells. Furthermore, NAC, a ROS scavenger, abrogated the effects of salidroside on TFEB-dependent autophagy. These data demonstrate that salidroside increased TFEB-dependent autophagy by activating ROS signaling pathways in human chondrosarcoma cells. These data also suggest that blocking ROS-TFEB-dependent autophagy to enhance the activity of salidroside warrants further attention in treatment of human chondrosarcoma cells. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Tetrandrine induces lipid accumulation through blockade of autophagy in a hepatic stellate cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamae, Yusaku; Nishito, Yukina; Nakai, Naomi; Nagumo, Yoko; Usui, Takeo; Masuda, Seiji; Kambe, Taiho; Nagao, Masaya

    2016-01-01

    Macroautophagy, or autophagy, is a cellular response in which unnecessary cytoplasmic components, including lipids and organelles, are self-degraded. Recent studies closely related autophagy to activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), a process critical in the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis. During HSC activation, cytoplasmic lipid droplets (LDs) are degraded as autophagic cargo, and then cells express fibrogenic genes. Thus, inhibition of autophagy in HSCs is a potential therapeutic approach for attenuating liver fibrosis. We found that tetrandrine, a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid isolated from Stephania tetrandra, induced lipid accumulation, a phenotype associated with quiescent HSCs, through blockade of autophagy in the rat-derived HSC line HSC-T6. Tetrandrine inhibited autophagic flux without affecting lysosomal function. A phenotypic comparison using siRNA knockdown suggested that tetrandrine may target regulators, involved in fusion between autophagosomes and lysosomes (e.g., syntaxin 17). Moreover, perilipin 1, an LD-coated protein, co-localized specifically with LC3, a marker protein for autophagosomes, in tetrandrine-treated HSC-T6 cells. This suggests a potential role for perilipin 1 in autophagy-mediated LD degradation in HSCs. Our results identified tetrandrine as a potential tool for prevention and treatment of HSC activation. - Highlights: • Autophagy is closely related to lipid degradation in hepatic stellate cells. • Tetrandrine (Tet) causes lipid accumulation via blockade of autophagy in HSC-T6 cells. • Tet blocked autophagy without affecting lysosomal function unlike bafilomycin A_1. • Perilipin 1 was specifically co-localized with LC3 in Tet-treated cells. • Perilipin 1 may play potential roles in autophagy-mediated lipid degradation.

  6. DRAM1 Protects Neuroblastoma Cells from Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation/Reperfusion-Induced Injury via Autophagy

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    Mengqiang Yu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available DNA damage-regulated autophagy modulator protein 1 (DRAM1, a multi-pass membrane lysosomal protein, is reportedly a tumor protein p53 (TP53 target gene involved in autophagy. During cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R injury, DRAM1 protein expression is increased, and autophagy is activated. However, the functional significance of DRAM1 and the relationship between DRAM1 and autophagy in brain I/R remains uncertain. The aim of this study is to investigate whether DRAM1 mediates autophagy activation in cerebral I/R injury and to explore its possible effects and mechanisms. We adopt the oxygen-glucose deprivation and reperfusion (OGD/R Neuro-2a cell model to mimic cerebral I/R conditions in vitro, and RNA interference is used to knock down DRAM1 expression in this model. Cell viability assay is performed using the LIVE/DEAD viability/cytotoxicity kit. Cell phenotypic changes are analyzed through Western blot assays. Autophagy flux is monitored through the tandem red fluorescent protein–Green fluorescent protein–microtubule associated protein 1 light chain 3 (RFP–GFP–LC3 construct. The expression levels of DRAM1 and microtubule associated protein 1 light chain 3II/I (LC3II/I are strongly up-regulated in Neuro-2a cells after OGD/R treatment and peaked at the 12 h reperfusion time point. The autophagy-specific inhibitor 3-Methyladenine (3-MA inhibits the expression of DRAM1 and LC3II/I and exacerbates OGD/R-induced cell injury. Furthermore, DRAM1 knockdown aggravates OGD/R-induced cell injury and significantly blocks autophagy through decreasing autophagosome-lysosome fusion. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that DRAM1 knockdown in Neuro-2a cells inhibits autophagy by blocking autophagosome-lysosome fusion and exacerbated OGD/R-induced cell injury. Thus, DRAM1 might constitute a new therapeutic target for I/R diseases.

  7. Autophagy inhibition enhances apigenin-induced apoptosis in human breast cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuchen Cao; Bowen Liu; Wenfeng Cao; Weiran Zhang; Fei Zhang; Hongmeng Zhao; Ran Meng

    2013-01-01

    Apigenin (4',5,7-trihydroxyflavone) is a member of the flavone subclass of flavonoids present in fruits and vegetables.The involvement of autophagy in the apigenin-induced apoptotic death of human breast cancer cells was investigated.Cell proliferation and viability were assessed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) and clonogenic assays.Flow cytometry,fluorescent staining and Western blot analysis were employed to detect apoptosis and autophagy,and the role of autophagy was assessed using autophagy inhibitors.Apigenin dose-and time-dependently repressed the proliferation and clonogenic survival of the human breast cancer T47D and MDA-MB-231 cell lines.The death of T47D and MDA-MB-231 cells was due to apoptosis associated with increased levels of Caspase3,PARP cleavage and Bax/Bcl-2 ratios.The results from flow cytometry and fluorescent staining also verified the occurrence of apoptosis.In addition,the apigenin-treated cells exhibited autophagy,as characterized by the appearance of autophagosomes under fluorescence microscopy and the accumulation of acidic vesicular organelles (AVOs)by flow cytometry.Furthermore,the results of the Western blot analysis revealed that the level of LC3-Ⅱ,the processed form of LC3-Ⅰ,was increased.Treatment with the autophagy inhibitor,3-methyladenine (3-MA),significantly enhanced the apoptosis induced by apigenin,which was accompanied by an increase in the level of PARP cleavage.Similar results were also confirmed by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy.These results indicate that apigenin has apoptosis-and autophagy-inducing effects in breast cancer cells.Autophagy plays a cyto-protective role in apigenin-induced apoptosis,and the combination of apigenin and an autophagy inhibitor may be a promising strategy for breast cancer control.

  8. Autophagy and senescence, stress responses induced by the DNA-damaging mycotoxin alternariol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solhaug, A.; Torgersen, M.L.; Holme, J.A.; Lagadic-Gossmann, D.; Eriksen, G.S.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • AOH induces autophagy, lamellar bodies and senescence in RAW264.7 macrophages. • DNA damage is suggested as a triggering signal. • The Sestrin2-AMPK-mTOR-S6K pathway is proposed to link DNA damage to autophagy. - Abstract: The mycotoxin alternariol (AOH), a frequent contaminant in fruit and grain, is known to induce cellular stress responses such as reactive oxygen production, DNA damage and cell cycle arrest. Cellular stress is often connected to autophagy, and we employed the RAW264.7 macrophage model to test the hypothesis that AOH induces autophagy. Indeed, AOH treatment led to a massive increase in acidic vacuoles often observed upon autophagy induction. Moreover, expression of the autophagy marker LC3 was markedly increased and there was a strong accumulation of LC3-positive puncta. Increased autophagic activity was verified biochemically by measuring the degradation rate of long-lived proteins. Furthermore, AOH induced expression of Sestrin2 and phosphorylation of AMPK as well as reduced phosphorylation of mTOR and S6 kinase, common mediators of signaling pathways involved in autophagy. Transmission electron microscopy analyzes of AOH treated cells not only clearly displayed structures associated with autophagy such as autophagosomes and autolysosomes, but also the appearance of lamellar bodies. Prolonged AOH treatment resulted in changed cell morphology from round into more star-shaped as well as increased β-galactosidase activity. This suggests that the cells eventually entered senescence. In conclusion, our data identify here AOH as an inducer of both autophagy and senescence. These effects are suggested to be to be linked to AOH-induced DSB (via a reported effect on topoisomerase activity), resulting in an activation of p53 and the Sestrin2-AMPK-mTOR-S6K signaling pathway

  9. Targeting Autophagy in the Tumor Microenvironment: New Challenges and Opportunities for Regulating Tumor Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bassam Janji

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells evolve in the tumor microenvironment, which is now well established as an integral part of the tumor and a determinant player in cancer cell adaptation and resistance to anti-cancer therapies. Despite the remarkable and fairly rapid progress over the past two decades regarding our understanding of the role of the tumor microenvironment in cancer development, its precise contribution to cancer resistance is still fragmented. This is mainly related to the complexity of the “tumor ecosystem” and the diversity of the stromal cell types that constitute the tumor microenvironment. Emerging data indicate that several factors, such as hypoxic stress, activate a plethora of resistance mechanisms, including autophagy, in tumor cells. Hypoxia-induced autophagy in the tumor microenvironment also activates several tumor escape mechanisms, which effectively counteract anti-tumor immune responses mediated by natural killer and cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Therefore, strategies aiming at targeting autophagy in cancer cells in combination with other therapeutic strategies have inspired significant interest to overcome immunological tolerance and promote tumor regression. However, a number of obstacles still hamper the application of autophagy inhibitors in clinics. First, the lack of selectivity of the current pharmacological inhibitors of autophagy makes difficult to draw a clear statement about its effective contribution in cancer. Second, autophagy has been also described as an important mechanism in tumor cells involved in presentation of antigens to T cells. Third, there is a circumstantial evidence that autophagy activation in some innate immune cells may support the maturation of these cells, and it is required for their anti-tumor activity. In this review, we will address these aspects and discuss our current knowledge on the benefits and the drawbacks of targeting autophagy in the context of anti-tumor immunity. We believe that it is

  10. Pachymic acid promotes induction of autophagy related to IGF-1 signaling pathway in WI-38 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Su-Gyeong; Kim, Moon-Moo

    2017-12-01

    The insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) signaling pathway has spotlighted as a mechanism to elucidate aging associated with autophagy in recent years. Therefore, we have tried to screen an effective compound capable of inducing autophagy to delay aging process. The aim of this study is to investigate whether pachymic acid, a main compound in Poria cocos, induces autophagy in the aged cells. The aging of young cells was induced by treatment with IGF-1 at 50 ng/ml three times every two days. The effect of pachymic acid on cell viability was evaluated in human lung fibroblasts, WI-38 cells, using MTT assay. The induction of autophagy was detected using autophagy detection kit. The expression of proteins related to autophagy and IGF-1 signaling pathway was examined by western blot analysis and immunofluorescence assay. In this study, pachymic acid showed cytotoxic effect in a dose dependent manner and remarkably induced autophagy at the same time. Moreover, pachymic acid increased the expression of proteins related to autophagy such as LC3-II and Beclin1 and decreased the levels of mTor phosphorylation and p70S6K in the aged cells. In particular, pachymic acid increased the expression of p-PI3K, p-FoxO and Catalase. In addition, pachymic acid remarkably increased the expression of IGFBP-3. Above results suggest that pachymic acid could induce autophagy related to IGF-1 signaling pathway in the aged cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. ESAT6 inhibits autophagy flux and promotes BCG proliferation through MTOR

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    Dong, Hu, E-mail: austhudong@126.com [Department of Medical Immunology, Medical School, Anhui University of Science and Technology (China); Medical Inspection Center, Anhui University of Science and Technology, Huainan (China); Jing, Wu, E-mail: wujing8008@126.com [Department of Medical Immunology, Medical School, Anhui University of Science and Technology (China); Medical Inspection Center, Anhui University of Science and Technology, Huainan (China); Runpeng, Zhao; Xuewei, Xu; Min, Mu; Ru, Cai [Department of Medical Immunology, Medical School, Anhui University of Science and Technology (China); Yingru, Xing; Shengfa, Ni [Affiliated Cancer Hospital, Anhui University of Science and Technology (China); Rongbo, Zhang [Department of Medical Immunology, Medical School, Anhui University of Science and Technology (China); Medical Inspection Center, Anhui University of Science and Technology, Huainan (China)

    2016-08-19

    In recent years, increasing studies have found that pathogenic Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) inhibits autophagy, which mediates the anti-mycobacterial response, but the mechanism is not clear. We previously reported that secretory acid phosphatase (SapM) of Mtb can negatively regulate autophagy flux. Recently, another virulence factor of Mtb, early secretory antigenic target 6 (ESAT6), has been found to be involved in inhibiting autophagy, but the mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we show that ESAT6 hampers autophagy flux to boost bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) proliferation and reveals a mechanism by which ESAT6 blocks autophagosome-lysosome fusion in a mammalian target of rapamycin (MTOR)-dependent manner. In both Raw264.7 cells and primary macrophages derived from the murine abdominal cavity (ACM), ESAT6 repressed autophagy flux by interfering with the autophagosome-lysosome fusion, which resulted in an increased load of BCG. Impaired degradation of LC3Ⅱ and SQSTM1 by ESAT6 was related to the upregulated activity of MTOR. Contrarily, inhibiting MTOR with Torin1 removed the ESAT6-induced autophagy block and lysosome dysfunction. Furthermore, in both Raw264.7 and ACM cells, MTOR inhibition significantly suppressed the survival of BCG. In conclusion, our study highlights how ESAT6 blocks autophagy and promotes BCG survival in a way that activates MTOR. - Highlights: • A mechanism for disruping autophagy flux induced by ESAT6. • ESAT6-inhibited autophagy is MTOR-dependent. • ESAT6-boosted BCG is MTOR-dependent.

  12. Tetrandrine induces lipid accumulation through blockade of autophagy in a hepatic stellate cell line

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    Miyamae, Yusaku, E-mail: ymiyamae@lif.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Biostudies, Kyoto University, Oiwakecho, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Nishito, Yukina; Nakai, Naomi [Graduate School of Biostudies, Kyoto University, Oiwakecho, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Nagumo, Yoko; Usui, Takeo [Faculty of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8572 (Japan); Masuda, Seiji; Kambe, Taiho [Graduate School of Biostudies, Kyoto University, Oiwakecho, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Nagao, Masaya, E-mail: mnagao@kais.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Biostudies, Kyoto University, Oiwakecho, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

    2016-08-12

    Macroautophagy, or autophagy, is a cellular response in which unnecessary cytoplasmic components, including lipids and organelles, are self-degraded. Recent studies closely related autophagy to activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), a process critical in the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis. During HSC activation, cytoplasmic lipid droplets (LDs) are degraded as autophagic cargo, and then cells express fibrogenic genes. Thus, inhibition of autophagy in HSCs is a potential therapeutic approach for attenuating liver fibrosis. We found that tetrandrine, a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid isolated from Stephania tetrandra, induced lipid accumulation, a phenotype associated with quiescent HSCs, through blockade of autophagy in the rat-derived HSC line HSC-T6. Tetrandrine inhibited autophagic flux without affecting lysosomal function. A phenotypic comparison using siRNA knockdown suggested that tetrandrine may target regulators, involved in fusion between autophagosomes and lysosomes (e.g., syntaxin 17). Moreover, perilipin 1, an LD-coated protein, co-localized specifically with LC3, a marker protein for autophagosomes, in tetrandrine-treated HSC-T6 cells. This suggests a potential role for perilipin 1 in autophagy-mediated LD degradation in HSCs. Our results identified tetrandrine as a potential tool for prevention and treatment of HSC activation. - Highlights: • Autophagy is closely related to lipid degradation in hepatic stellate cells. • Tetrandrine (Tet) causes lipid accumulation via blockade of autophagy in HSC-T6 cells. • Tet blocked autophagy without affecting lysosomal function unlike bafilomycin A{sub 1}. • Perilipin 1 was specifically co-localized with LC3 in Tet-treated cells. • Perilipin 1 may play potential roles in autophagy-mediated lipid degradation.

  13. DJ-1 as a Modulator of Autophagy: An Hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa A. González-Polo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The etiology of Parkinson's disease (PD is not completely defined, although environmental factors (for example, exposure to the herbicide paraquat [PQ] and genetic susceptibility (such as DJ-1 mutations that have been associated with an autosomal-recessive form of early-onset PD have been demonstrated to contribute. Alterations in macroautophagy have been described in the pathogenesis of this neurodegenerative disease. We have established a model system to study the involvement of the DJ-1 protein in PQ-induced autophagy. When we transfected cells exposed to PQ with DJ-1–specific siRNA, we observed an inhibition of the autophagic events induced by the herbicide, as well as sensitization additive with PQ-induced apoptotic cell death and exacerbation of this cell death in the presence of the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine. These results suggest, for the first time, an active role for DJ-1 in the autophagic response produced by PQ, opening the door to new strategies for PD therapy.

  14. Degradation of AF1Q by chaperone-mediated autophagy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Peng; Ji, Min; Lu, Fei; Zhang, Jingru; Li, Huanjie; Cui, Taixing; Li Wang, Xing; Tang, Dongqi; Ji, Chunyan

    2014-01-01

    AF1Q, a mixed lineage leukemia gene fusion partner, is identified as a poor prognostic biomarker for pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML), adult AML with normal cytogenetic and adult myelodysplastic syndrome. AF1Q is highly regulated during hematopoietic progenitor differentiation and development but its regulatory mechanism has not been defined clearly. In the present study, we used pharmacological and genetic approaches to influence chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) and explored the degradation mechanism of AF1Q. Pharmacological inhibitors of lysosomal degradation, such as chloroquine, increased AF1Q levels, whereas activators of CMA, including 6-aminonicotinamide and nutrient starvation, decreased AF1Q levels. AF1Q interacts with HSPA8 and LAMP-2A, which are core components of the CMA machinery. Knockdown of HSPA8 or LAMP-2A increased AF1Q protein levels, whereas overexpression showed the opposite effect. Using an amino acid deletion AF1Q mutation plasmid, we identified that AF1Q had a KFERQ-like motif which was recognized by HSPA8 for CMA-dependent proteolysis. In conclusion, we demonstrate for the first time that AF1Q can be degraded in lysosomes by CMA. - Highlights: • Chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) is involved in the degradation of AF1Q. • Macroautophagy does not contribute to the AF1Q degradation. • AF1Q has a KFERQ-like motif that is recognized by CMA core components

  15. Autophagy meets fused in sarcoma-positive stress granules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matus, Soledad; Bosco, Daryl A; Hetz, Claudio

    2014-12-01

    Mutations in fused in sarcoma and/or translocated in liposarcoma (FUS, TLS or FUS) are linked to familial cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Mutant FUS selectively accumulates into discrete cytosolic structures known as stress granules under various stress conditions. In addition, mutant FUS expression can alter the dynamics and morphology of stress granules. Although the link between mutant FUS and stress granules is well established, the mechanisms modulating stress granule formation and disassembly in the context of ALS are poorly understood. In this issue of Neurobiology of Aging, Ryu et al. uncover the impact of autophagy on the potential toxicity of mutant FUS-positive stress granules. The authors provide evidence indicating that enhanced autophagy activity reduces the number of stress granules, which in the case of cells containing mutant FUS-positive stress granules, is neuroprotective. Overall, this study identifies an intersection between the proteostasis network and alterations in RNA metabolism in ALS through the dynamic assembly and disassembly of stress granules. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Constitutive upregulation of chaperone-mediated autophagy in Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Hiroshi; Martinez-Vicente, Marta; Arias, Esperanza; Kaushik, Susmita; Sulzer, David; Cuervo, Ana Maria

    2011-12-14

    Autophagy contributes to the removal of prone-to-aggregate proteins, but in several instances these pathogenic proteins have been shown to interfere with autophagic activity. In the case of Huntington's disease (HD), a congenital neurodegenerative disorder resulting from mutation in the huntingtin protein, we have previously described that the mutant protein interferes with the ability of autophagic vacuoles to recognize cytosolic cargo. Growing evidence supports the existence of cross talk among autophagic pathways, suggesting the possibility of functional compensation when one of them is compromised. In this study, we have identified a compensatory upregulation of chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) in different cellular and mouse models of HD. Components of CMA, namely the lysosome-associated membrane protein type 2A (LAMP-2A) and lysosomal-hsc70, are markedly increased in HD models. The increase in LAMP-2A is achieved through both an increase in the stability of this protein at the lysosomal membrane and transcriptional upregulation of this splice variant of the lamp-2 gene. We propose that CMA activity increases in response to macroautophagic dysfunction in the early stages of HD, but that the efficiency of this compensatory mechanism may decrease with age and so contribute to cellular failure and the onset of pathological manifestations.

  17. Intracellular fate of Ureaplasma parvum entrapped by host cellular autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiumi, Fumiko; Ogawa, Michinaga; Nakura, Yukiko; Hamada, Yusuke; Nakayama, Masahiro; Mitobe, Jiro; Hiraide, Atsushi; Sakai, Norio; Takeuchi, Makoto; Yoshimori, Tamotsu; Yanagihara, Itaru

    2017-06-01

    Genital mycoplasmas, including Ureaplasma spp., are among the smallest human pathogenic bacteria and are associated with preterm birth. Electron microscopic observation of U. parvum showed that these prokaryotes have a regular, spherical shape with a mean diameter of 146 nm. U. parvum was internalized into HeLa cells by clathrin-mediated endocytosis and survived for at least 14 days around the perinuclear region. Intracellular U. parvum reached endosomes in HeLa cells labeled with EEA1, Rab7, and LAMP-1 within 1 to 3 hr. After 3 hr of infection, U. parvum induced the cytosolic accumulation of galectin-3 and was subsequently entrapped by the autophagy marker LC3. However, when using atg7 -/- MEF cells, autophagy was inadequate for the complete elimination of U. parvum in HeLa cells. U. parvum also colocalized with the recycling endosome marker Rab11. Furthermore, the exosomes purified from infected HeLa cell culture medium included U. parvum. In these purified exosomes ureaplasma lipoprotein multiple banded antigen, host cellular annexin A2, CD9, and CD63 were detected. This research has successfully shown that Ureaplasma spp. utilize the host cellular membrane compartments possibly to evade the host immune system. © 2017 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Exenatide Induces Impairment of Autophagy Flux to Damage Rat Pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhiqiang; Huang, Lihua; Yu, Xiao; Yu, Can; Zhu, Hongwei; Li, Xia; Han, Duo; Huang, Hui

    2017-01-01

    The study aimed to explore the alteration of autophagy in rat pancreas treated with exenatide. Normal Sprague-Dawley rats and diabetes-model rats induced by 2-month high-sugar and high-fat diet and streptozotocin injection were subcutaneously injected with exenatide, respectively, for 10 weeks, with homologous rats treated with saline as control. Meanwhile, AR42J cells, pancreatic acinar cell line, were cultured with exenatide at doses of 5 pM for 3 days. The pancreas was disposed, and several sections were stained with hematoxylin-eosin. Immunohistochemistry was used to measure the expressions of glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor (GLP-1R) and cysteine-aspartic acid protease-3 in rat pancreas, and Western blot was used to test the expressions of GLP-1R, light chain 3B-I and -II, and p62 in rat pancreas and AR42J cells. The data were expressed as mean (standard deviation) and analyzed by unpaired Student's t-test. Exenatide can induce pathological changes in rat pancreas. The GLP-1R, p62, light chain 3B-II, and cysteine-aspartic acid protease-3 in rat pancreas and AR42J cells treated with exenatide were significantly overexpressed. Exenatide can activate and upregulate its receptor, GLP-1R, then impair autophagy flux and activate apoptosis in the pancreatic acinar cell, thus damaging rat pancreas.

  19. Degradation of AF1Q by chaperone-mediated autophagy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Peng; Ji, Min; Lu, Fei; Zhang, Jingru [Department of Hematology, Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Li, Huanjie; Cui, Taixing; Li Wang, Xing [Research Center for Cell Therapy, Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Tang, Dongqi, E-mail: tangdq@sdu.edu.cn [Research Center for Cell Therapy, Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Center for Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine, The Second Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan 250033 (China); Ji, Chunyan, E-mail: jichunyan@sdu.edu.cn [Department of Hematology, Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China)

    2014-09-10

    AF1Q, a mixed lineage leukemia gene fusion partner, is identified as a poor prognostic biomarker for pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML), adult AML with normal cytogenetic and adult myelodysplastic syndrome. AF1Q is highly regulated during hematopoietic progenitor differentiation and development but its regulatory mechanism has not been defined clearly. In the present study, we used pharmacological and genetic approaches to influence chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) and explored the degradation mechanism of AF1Q. Pharmacological inhibitors of lysosomal degradation, such as chloroquine, increased AF1Q levels, whereas activators of CMA, including 6-aminonicotinamide and nutrient starvation, decreased AF1Q levels. AF1Q interacts with HSPA8 and LAMP-2A, which are core components of the CMA machinery. Knockdown of HSPA8 or LAMP-2A increased AF1Q protein levels, whereas overexpression showed the opposite effect. Using an amino acid deletion AF1Q mutation plasmid, we identified that AF1Q had a KFERQ-like motif which was recognized by HSPA8 for CMA-dependent proteolysis. In conclusion, we demonstrate for the first time that AF1Q can be degraded in lysosomes by CMA. - Highlights: • Chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) is involved in the degradation of AF1Q. • Macroautophagy does not contribute to the AF1Q degradation. • AF1Q has a KFERQ-like motif that is recognized by CMA core components.

  20. Autophagy and its effects: making sense of double-edged swords.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorburn, Andrew

    2014-10-01

    Autophagy is the mechanism by which cellular material is delivered to lysosomes and degraded. This process has become a major focus of biological and biomedical research with thousands of papers published each year and rapidly growing appreciation that autophagy affects many normal and pathological processes. However, as we learn more about this evolutionarily ancient process, we are discovering that autophagy's effects may work for both the good and the bad of an organism. Here, I discuss some of these context-dependent findings and how, as we make sense of them, we can try to apply our knowledge for practical purposes.

  1. Autophagy and its effects: making sense of double-edged swords.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Thorburn

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is the mechanism by which cellular material is delivered to lysosomes and degraded. This process has become a major focus of biological and biomedical research with thousands of papers published each year and rapidly growing appreciation that autophagy affects many normal and pathological processes. However, as we learn more about this evolutionarily ancient process, we are discovering that autophagy's effects may work for both the good and the bad of an organism. Here, I discuss some of these context-dependent findings and how, as we make sense of them, we can try to apply our knowledge for practical purposes.

  2. Autophagy Protects against CYP2E1/Chronic Ethanol-Induced Hepatotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongke Lu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is an intracellular pathway by which lysosomes degrade and recycle long-lived proteins and cellular organelles. The effects of ethanol on autophagy are complex but recent studies have shown that autophagy serves a protective function against ethanol-induced liver injury. Autophagy was found to also be protective against CYP2E1-dependent toxicity in vitro in HepG2 cells which express CYP2E1 and in vivo in an acute alcohol/CYPE1-dependent liver injury model. The goal of the current report was to extend the previous in vitro and acute in vivo experiments to a chronic ethanol model to evaluate whether autophagy is also protective against CYP2E1-dependent liver injury in a chronic ethanol-fed mouse model. Wild type (WT, CYP2E1 knockout (KO or CYP2E1 humanized transgenic knockin (KI, mice were fed an ethanol liquid diet or control dextrose diet for four weeks. In the last week, some mice received either saline or 3-methyladenine (3-MA, an inhibitor of autophagy, or rapamycin, which stimulates autophagy. Inhibition of autophagy by 3-MA potentiated the ethanol-induced increases in serum transaminase and triglyceride levels in the WT and KI mice but not KO mice, while rapamycin prevented the ethanol liver injury. Treatment with 3-MA enhanced the ethanol-induced fat accumulation in WT mice and caused necrosis in the KI mice; little or no effect was found in the ethanol-fed KO mice or any of the dextrose-fed mice. 3-MA treatment further lowered the ethanol-decrease in hepatic GSH levels and further increased formation of TBARS in WT and KI mice, whereas rapamycin blunted these effects of ethanol. Neither 3-MA nor rapamycin treatment affected CYP2E1 catalytic activity or content or the induction CYP2E1 by ethanol. The 3-MA treatment decreased levels of Beclin-1 and Atg 7 but increased levels of p62 in the ethanol-fed WT and KI mice whereas rapamycin had the opposite effects, validating inhibition and stimulation of autophagy, respectively. These

  3. Use of LysoTracker dyes: a flow cytometric study of autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikte, Shaheen; Panchal, Neelam; Warnes, Gary

    2014-02-01

    The flow cytometric use of LysoTracker dyes was employed to investigate the autophagic process and to compare this with the upregulation of autophagy marker, the microtubule-associated protein LC3B. Although the mechanism of action of LysoTracker dyes is not fully understood, they have been used in microscopy to image acidic spherical organelles, and their use in flow cytometry has not been thoroughly investigated in the study of autophagy. This investigation uses numerous autophagy-inducing agents including chloroquine (CQ), rapamycin, low serum (used to analyze patient cells as well as easier to use and significantly less costly. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  4. ROS dependent copper toxicity in Hydra-biochemical and molecular study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeeshan, Mohammed; Murugadas, Anbazhagan; Ghaskadbi, Surendra; Rajendran, Ramasamy Babu; Akbarsha, Mohammad Abdulkader

    2016-01-01

    Copper, an essential microelement, is known to be toxic to aquatic life at concentrations higher than that could be tolerated. Copper-induced oxidative stress has been documented in vitro, yet the in vivo effects of metal-induced oxidative stress have not been extensively studied in the lower invertebrates. The objective of the present study has been to find the effect of ROS-mediated toxicity of environmentally relevant concentrations of copper at organismal and cellular levels in Hydra magnipapillata. Exposure to copper at sublethal concentrations (0.06 and 0.1mg/L) for 24 or 48h resulted in generation of significant levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). We infer that the free radicals here originate predominantly at the lysosomes but partly at the mitochondria also as visualized by H2-DHCFDA staining. Quantitative real-time PCR of RNA extracted from copper-exposed polyps revealed dose-dependent up-regulation of all antioxidant response genes (CAT, SOD, GPx, GST, GR, G6PD). Concurrent increase of Hsp70 and FoxO genes suggests the ability of polyps to respond to stress, which at 48h was not the same as at 24h. Interestingly, the transcript levels of all genes were down-regulated at 48h as compared to 24h incubation period. Comet assay indicated copper as a powerful genotoxicant, and the DNA damage was dose- as well as duration-dependent. Western blotting of proteins (Bax, Bcl-2 and caspase-3) confirmed ROS-mediated mitochondrial cell death in copper-exposed animals. These changes correlated well with changes in morphology, regeneration and aspects of reproduction. Taken together, the results indicate increased production of intracellular ROS in Hydra on copper exposure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Menadione triggers cell death through ROS-dependent mechanisms involving PARP activation without requiring apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loor, Gabriel; Kondapalli, Jyothisri; Schriewer, Jacqueline M; Chandel, Navdeep S; Vanden Hoek, Terry L; Schumacker, Paul T

    2010-12-15

    Low levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) can function as redox-active signaling messengers, whereas high levels of ROS induce cellular damage. Menadione generates ROS through redox cycling, and high concentrations trigger cell death. Previous work suggests that menadione triggers cytochrome c release from mitochondria, whereas other studies implicate the activation of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore as the mediator of cell death. We investigated menadione-induced cell death in genetically modified cells lacking specific death-associated proteins. In cardiomyocytes, oxidant stress was assessed using the redox sensor RoGFP, expressed in the cytosol or the mitochondrial matrix. Menadione elicited rapid oxidation in both compartments, whereas it decreased mitochondrial potential and triggered cytochrome c redistribution to the cytosol. Cell death was attenuated by N-acetylcysteine and exogenous glutathione or by overexpression of cytosolic or mitochondria-targeted catalase. By contrast, no protection was observed in cells overexpressing Cu,Zn-SOD or Mn-SOD. Overexpression of antiapoptotic Bcl-X(L) protected against staurosporine-induced cell death, but it failed to confer protection against menadione. Genetic deletion of Bax and Bak, cytochrome c, cyclophilin D, or caspase-9 conferred no protection against menadione-induced cell death. However, cells lacking PARP-1 showed a significant decrease in menadione-induced cell death. Thus, menadione induces cell death through the generation of oxidant stress in multiple subcellular compartments, yet cytochrome c, Bax/Bak, caspase-9, and cyclophilin D are dispensable for cell death in this model. These studies suggest that multiple redundant cell death pathways are activated by menadione, but that PARP plays an essential role in mediating each of them. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Inhibition or Stimulation of Autophagy Affects Early Formation of Lipofuscin-Like Autofluorescence in the Retinal Pigment Epithelium Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Lei

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The accumulation of lipofuscin in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE is dependent on the effectiveness of photoreceptor outer segment material degradation. This study explored the role of autophagy in the fate of RPE lipofuscin degradation. After seven days of feeding with either native or modified rod outer segments, ARPE-19 cells were treated with enhancers or inhibitors of autophagy and the autofluorescence was detected by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Supplementation with different types of rod outer segments increased lipofuscin-like autofluorescence (LLAF after the inhibition of autophagy, while the induction of autophagy (e.g., application of rapamycin decreased LLAF. The effects of autophagy induction were further confirmed by Western blotting, which showed the conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II, and by immunofluorescence microscopy, which detected the lysosomal activity of the autophagy inducers. We also monitored LLAF after the application of several autophagy inhibitors by RNA-interference and confocal microscopy. The results showed that, in general, the inhibition of the autophagy-related proteins resulted in an increase in LLAF when cells were fed with rod outer segments, which further confirms the effect of autophagy in the fate of RPE lipofuscin degradation. These results emphasize the complex role of autophagy in modulating RPE autofluorescence and confirm the possibility of the pharmacological clearance of RPE lipofuscin by small molecules.

  7. Heme oxygenase-1 enhances autophagy in podocytes as a protective mechanism against high glucose-induced apoptosis

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    Dong, Chenglong [Department of Endocrinology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Zheng, Haining [Department of Hyperbaric Oxygen, Nanjing General Hospital of Nanjing Military Command, Nanjing (China); Huang, Shanshan; You, Na; Xu, Jiarong; Ye, Xiaolong; Zhu, Qun; Feng, Yamin; You, Qiang; Miao, Heng [Department of Endocrinology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Ding, Dafa, E-mail: dingdafa2004@aliyun.com [Department of Endocrinology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Lu, Yibing, E-mail: luyibing2004@126.com [Department of Endocrinology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China)

    2015-10-01

    Injury and loss of podocytes play vital roles in diabetic nephropathy progression. Emerging evidence suggests autophagy, which is induced by multiple stressors including hyperglycemia, plays a protective role. Meanwhile, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) possesses powerful anti-apoptotic properties. Therefore, we investigated the impact of autophagy on podocyte apoptosis under diabetic conditions and its association with HO-1. Mouse podocytes were cultured in vitro; apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry. Transmission electron microscopy and biochemical autophagic flux assays were used to measure the autophagy markers microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3-II (LC3-II) and beclin-1. LC3-II and beclin-1 expression peaked 12–24 h after exposing podocytes to high glucose. Inhibition of autophagy with 3-methyladenine or Beclin-1 siRNAs or Atg 5 siRNAs sensitized cells to apoptosis, suggesting autophagy is a survival mechanism. HO-1 inactivation inhibited autophagy, which aggravated podocyte injury in vitro. Hemin-induced autophagy also protected podocytes from hyperglycemia in vitro and was abrogated by HO-1 siRNA. Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase phosphorylation was higher in hemin-treated and lower in HO-1 siRNA-treated podocytes. Suppression of AMPK activity reversed HO-1-mediated Beclin-1 upregulation and autophagy, indicating HO-1-mediated autophagy is AMPK dependent. These findings suggest HO-1 induction and regulation of autophagy are potential therapeutic targets for diabetic nephropathy. - Highlights: • High glucose leads to increased autophagy in podocytes at an early stage. • The early autophagic response protects against high glucose-induced apoptosis. • Heme oxygenase-1 enhances autophagy and decreases high glucose -mediated apoptosis. • Heme oxygenase-1 induces autophagy through the activation of AMPK.

  8. Heme oxygenase-1 enhances autophagy in podocytes as a protective mechanism against high glucose-induced apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Chenglong; Zheng, Haining; Huang, Shanshan; You, Na; Xu, Jiarong; Ye, Xiaolong; Zhu, Qun; Feng, Yamin; You, Qiang; Miao, Heng; Ding, Dafa; Lu, Yibing

    2015-01-01

    Injury and loss of podocytes play vital roles in diabetic nephropathy progression. Emerging evidence suggests autophagy, which is induced by multiple stressors including hyperglycemia, plays a protective role. Meanwhile, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) possesses powerful anti-apoptotic properties. Therefore, we investigated the impact of autophagy on podocyte apoptosis under diabetic conditions and its association with HO-1. Mouse podocytes were cultured in vitro; apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry. Transmission electron microscopy and biochemical autophagic flux assays were used to measure the autophagy markers microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3-II (LC3-II) and beclin-1. LC3-II and beclin-1 expression peaked 12–24 h after exposing podocytes to high glucose. Inhibition of autophagy with 3-methyladenine or Beclin-1 siRNAs or Atg 5 siRNAs sensitized cells to apoptosis, suggesting autophagy is a survival mechanism. HO-1 inactivation inhibited autophagy, which aggravated podocyte injury in vitro. Hemin-induced autophagy also protected podocytes from hyperglycemia in vitro and was abrogated by HO-1 siRNA. Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase phosphorylation was higher in hemin-treated and lower in HO-1 siRNA-treated podocytes. Suppression of AMPK activity reversed HO-1-mediated Beclin-1 upregulation and autophagy, indicating HO-1-mediated autophagy is AMPK dependent. These findings suggest HO-1 induction and regulation of autophagy are potential therapeutic targets for diabetic nephropathy. - Highlights: • High glucose leads to increased autophagy in podocytes at an early stage. • The early autophagic response protects against high glucose-induced apoptosis. • Heme oxygenase-1 enhances autophagy and decreases high glucose -mediated apoptosis. • Heme oxygenase-1 induces autophagy through the activation of AMPK

  9. FKBP5/FKBP51 enhances autophagy to synergize with antidepressant action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gassen, Nils C; Hartmann, Jakob; Schmidt, Mathias V; Rein, Theo

    2015-01-01

    Levels of autophagy markers rise upon treatment of cells with antidepressants. However, it was not known whether this phenomenon might be linked to other antidepressant pathways or to any physiological effect. In this punctum, we summarize and discuss our recent findings that provide evidence for a role of the cochaperone FKBP5/FKBP51 (FK506 binding protein 5) in autophagy as a prerequisite for antidepressant action in cells, mice, and humans. FKBP5 associates with BECN1, changes its phosphorylation and protein levels and enhances markers of autophagy and autophagic flux. The effects of antidepressants on autophagy as well as their physiological effects in mice and human depend on FKBP5. PMID:25714272

  10. Regulation of autophagy by amino acids and MTOR-dependent signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijer, Alfred J; Lorin, Séverine; Blommaart, Edward F; Codogno, Patrice

    2015-10-01

    Amino acids not only participate in intermediary metabolism but also stimulate insulin-mechanistic target of rapamycin (MTOR)-mediated signal transduction which controls the major metabolic pathways. Among these is the pathway of autophagy which takes care of the degradation of long-lived proteins and of the elimination of damaged or functionally redundant organelles. Proper functioning of this process is essential for cell survival. Dysregulation of autophagy has been implicated in the etiology of several pathologies. The history of the studies on the interrelationship between amino acids, MTOR signaling and autophagy is the subject of this review. The mechanisms responsible for the stimulation of MTOR-mediated signaling, and the inhibition of autophagy, by amino acids have been studied intensively in the past but are still not completely clarified. Recent developments in this field are discussed.

  11. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of microviscosity changes during ER autophagy in live cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ying; Samanta, Soham; Gong, Wanjun; Liu, Wufan; Pan, Wenhui; Yang, Zhigang; Qu, Junle

    2018-02-01

    Unfolded or misfolded protein accumulation inside Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) will cause ER stress and subsequently will activate cellular autophagy to release ER stress, which would ultimately result in microviscosity changes. However, even though, it is highly significant to gain a quantitative assessment of microviscosity changes during ER autophagy to study ER stress and autophagy behaviors related diseases, it has rarely been reported yet. In this work, we have reported a BODIPY based fluorescent molecular rotor that can covalently bind with vicinal dithiols containing nascent proteins in ER and hence can result in ER stress through the inhibition of the folding of nascent proteins. The change in local viscosity, caused by the release of the stress in cells through autophagy, was quantified by the probe using fluorescence lifetime imaging. This work basically demonstrates the possibility of introducing synthetic chemical probe as a promising tool to diagnose ER-viscosity-related diseases.

  12. Mycobacterium tuberculosis induces the miR-33 locus to reprogram autophagy and host lipid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouimet, Mireille; Koster, Stefan; Sakowski, Erik; Ramkhelawon, Bhama; van Solingen, Coen; Oldebeken, Scott; Karunakaran, Denuja; Portal-Celhay, Cynthia; Sheedy, Frederick J; Ray, Tathagat Dutta; Cecchini, Katharine; Zamore, Philip D; Rayner, Katey J; Marcel, Yves L; Philips, Jennifer A; Moore, Kathryn J

    2016-06-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) survives in macrophages by evading delivery to the lysosome and promoting the accumulation of lipid bodies, which serve as a bacterial source of nutrients. We found that by inducing the microRNA (miRNA) miR-33 and its passenger strand miR-33*, Mtb inhibited integrated pathways involved in autophagy, lysosomal function and fatty acid oxidation to support bacterial replication. Silencing of miR-33 and miR-33* by genetic or pharmacological means promoted autophagy flux through derepression of key autophagy effectors (such as ATG5, ATG12, LC3B and LAMP1) and AMPK-dependent activation of the transcription factors FOXO3 and TFEB, which enhanced lipid catabolism and Mtb xenophagy. These data define a mammalian miRNA circuit used by Mtb to coordinately inhibit autophagy and reprogram host lipid metabolism to enable intracellular survival and persistence in the host.

  13. Autophagy Is a Promoter for Aerobic Exercise Performance during High Altitude Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available High altitude training is one of the effective strategies for improving aerobic exercise performance at sea level via altitude acclimatization, thereby improving oxygen transport and/or utilization. But its underlying molecular mechanisms on physiological functions and exercise performance of athletes are still vague. More recent evidence suggests that the recycling of cellular components by autophagy is an important process of the body involved in the adaptive responses to exercise. Whether high altitude training can activate autophagy or whether high altitude training can improve exercise performance through exercise-induced autophagy is still unclear. In this narrative review article, we will summarize current research advances in the improvement of exercise performance through high altitude training and its reasonable molecular mechanisms associated with autophagy, which will provide a new field to explore the molecular mechanisms of adaptive response to high altitude training.

  14. Xylitol induces cell death in lung cancer A549 cells by autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eunjoo; Park, Mi Hee; Na, Hee Sam; Chung, Jin

    2015-05-01

    Xylitol is a widely used anti-caries agent that has anti-inflammatory effects. We have evaluated the potential of xylitol in cancer treatment. It's effects on cell proliferation and cytotoxicity were measured by MTT assay and LDH assay. Cell morphology and autophagy were examined by immunostaining and immunoblotting. Xylitol inhibited cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner in these cancer cells: A549, Caki, NCI-H23, HCT-15, HL-60, K562, and SK MEL-2. The IC50 of xylitol in human gingival fibroblast cells was higher than in cancer cells, indicating that it is more specific for cancer cells. Moreover, xylitol induced autophagy in A549 cells that was inhibited by 3-methyladenine, an autophagy inhibitor. These results indicate that xylitol has potential in therapy against lung cancer by inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing autophagy of A549 cells.

  15. The intersection between growth factors, autophagy and ER stress: A new target to treat neurodegenerative diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Huerta, Paula; Troncoso-Escudero, Paulina; Jerez, Carolina; Hetz, Claudio; Vidal, Rene L

    2016-10-15

    One of the salient features of most neurodegenerative diseases is the aggregation of specific proteins in the brain. This proteostasis imbalance is proposed as a key event triggering the neurodegenerative cascade. The unfolded protein response (UPR) and autophagy pathways are emerging as critical processes implicated in handling disease-related misfolded proteins. However, in some conditions, perturbations in the buffering capacity of the proteostasis network may be part of the etiology of the disease. Thus, pharmacological or gene therapy strategies to enhance autophagy or UPR responses are becoming an attractive target for disease intervention. Here, we discuss current evidence depicting the complex involvement of autophagy and ER stress in brain diseases. Novel pathways to modulate protein misfolding are discussed including the relation between aging and growth factor signaling. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI:Autophagy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Exploiting cannabinoid-induced cytotoxic autophagy to drive melanoma cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Jane L; Hill, David S; McKee, Christopher S; Hernandez-Tiedra, Sonia; Lorente, Mar; Lopez-Valero, Israel; Eleni Anagnostou, Maria; Babatunde, Fiyinfoluwa; Corazzari, Marco; Redfern, Christopher P F; Velasco, Guillermo; Lovat, Penny E

    2015-06-01

    Although the global incidence of cutaneous melanoma is increasing, survival rates for patients with metastatic disease remain viability, and activation of apoptosis, whereas cotreatment with chloroquine or knockdown of Atg7, but not Beclin-1 or Ambra1, prevented THC-induced autophagy and cell death in vitro. Administration of Sativex-like (a laboratory preparation comprising equal amounts of THC and cannabidiol (CBD)) to mice bearing BRAF wild-type melanoma xenografts substantially inhibited melanoma viability, proliferation, and tumor growth paralleled by an increase in autophagy and apoptosis compared with standard single-agent temozolomide. Collectively, our findings suggest that THC activates noncanonical autophagy-mediated apoptosis of melanoma cells, suggesting that cytotoxic autophagy induction with Sativex warrants clinical evaluation for metastatic disease.

  17. The relationship between autophagy and apoptosis in the midgut epithelium of Myriapoda

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rost-Roszkowska, M.M.; Vilímová, J.; Tajovský, Karel; Płachno, B.J.; Pavlíček, T.; Sosinka, A.; Ostróžka, A.; Kaszuba, F.; Chajec, Ł.; Włodarczyk, A.; Marchewka, A.

    -, Suppl. 5 (2017), s. 24 ISSN 1513-9700. [International Congress of Myriapodology /17./. 23.07.2017-26.07.2017, Krabi] Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : millipedes * centipedes * midgut ultrastructure * autophagy * apoptosis Subject RIV: EG - Zoology OBOR OECD: Zoology

  18. Does autophagy in the midgut epithelium of centipedes depend on the day/night cycle?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rost-Roszkowska, M.M.; Chajec, Ł.; Vilímová, J.; Tajovský, Karel; Kszuk-Jendrysik, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 68, January (2015), s. 130-139 ISSN 0968-4328 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : centipede * midgut epithelium * digestive cells * ultrastructure * autophagy Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 1.838, year: 2015

  19. Autophagy sequesters damaged lysosomes to control lysosomal biogenesis and kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maejima, Ikuko; Takahashi, Atsushi; Omori, Hiroko; Kimura, Tomonori; Takabatake, Yoshitsugu; Saitoh, Tatsuya; Yamamoto, Akitsugu; Hamasaki, Maho; Noda, Takeshi; Isaka, Yoshitaka; Yoshimori, Tamotsu

    2013-08-28

    Diverse causes, including pathogenic invasion or the uptake of mineral crystals such as silica and monosodium urate (MSU), threaten cells with lysosomal rupture, which can lead to oxidative stress, inflammation, and apoptosis or necrosis. Here, we demonstrate that lysosomes are selectively sequestered by autophagy, when damaged by MSU, silica, or the lysosomotropic reagent L-Leucyl-L-leucine methyl ester (LLOMe). Autophagic machinery is recruited only on damaged lysosomes, which are then engulfed by autophagosomes. In an autophagy-dependent manner, low pH and degradation capacity of damaged lysosomes are recovered. Under conditions of lysosomal damage, loss of autophagy causes inhibition of lysosomal biogenesis in vitro and deterioration of acute kidney injury in vivo. Thus, we propose that sequestration of damaged lysosomes by autophagy is indispensable for cellular and tissue homeostasis.

  20. Crosstalk of Autophagy and the Secretory Pathway and Its Role in Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahoor, Muhammad; Farhan, Hesso

    2018-01-01

    The secretory and autophagic pathways are two fundamental, evolutionary highly conserved endomembrane processes. Typically, secretion is associated with biosynthesis and delivery of proteins. In contrast, autophagy is usually considered as a degradative pathway. Thus, an analogy to metabolic pathways is evident. Anabolic (biosynthetic) and catabolic (degradative) pathways are usually intimately linked and intertwined, and likewise, the secretory and autophagy pathways are intertwined. Investigation of this link is an emerging area of research, and we will provide an overview of some of the major advances that have been made to contribute to understanding of how secretion regulates autophagy and vice versa. Finally, we will highlight evidence that supports a potential involvement of the autophagy-secretion crosstalk in human diseases. © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Autophagy induction by SIRT6 is involved in oxidative stress-induced neuronal damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaxiang Shao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract SIRT6 is a NAD+-dependent histone deacetylase and has been implicated in the regulation of genomic stability, DNA repair, metabolic homeostasis and several diseases. The effect of SIRT6 in cerebral ischemia and oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD has been reported, however the role of SIRT6 in oxidative stress damage remains unclear. Here we used SH-SY5Y neuronal cells and found that overexpression of SIRT6 led to decreased cell viability and increased necrotic cell death and reactive oxygen species (ROS production under oxidative stress. Mechanistic study revealed that SIRT6 induced autophagy via attenuation of AKT signaling and treatment with autophagy inhibitor 3-MA or knockdown of autophagy-related protein Atg5 rescued H2O2-induced neuronal injury. Conversely, SIRT6 inhibition suppressed autophagy and reduced oxidative stress-induced neuronal damage. These results suggest that SIRT6 might be a potential therapeutic target for neuroprotection.

  2. Sodium Butyrate Induces Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Autophagy in Colorectal Cells: Implications for Apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jintao Zhang

    Full Text Available Butyrate, a short-chain fatty acid derived from dietary fiber, inhibits proliferation and induces cell death in colorectal cancer cells. However, clinical trials have shown mixed results regarding the anti-tumor activities of butyrate. We have previously shown that sodium butyrate increases endoplasmic reticulum stress by altering intracellular calcium levels, a well-known autophagy trigger. Here, we investigated whether sodium butyrate-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress mediated autophagy, and whether there was crosstalk between autophagy and the sodium butyrate-induced apoptotic response in human colorectal cancer cells.Human colorectal cancer cell lines (HCT-116 and HT-29 were treated with sodium butyrate at concentrations ranging from 0.5-5mM. Cell proliferation was assessed using MTT tetrazolium salt formation. Autophagy induction was confirmed through a combination of Western blotting for associated proteins, acridine orange staining for acidic vesicles, detection of autolysosomes (MDC staining, and electron microscopy. Apoptosis was quantified by flow cytometry using standard annexinV/propidium iodide staining and by assessing PARP-1 cleavage by Western blot.Sodium butyrate suppressed colorectal cancer cell proliferation, induced autophagy, and resulted in apoptotic cell death. The induction of autophagy was supported by the accumulation of acidic vesicular organelles and autolysosomes, and the expression of autophagy-associated proteins, including microtubule-associated protein II light chain 3 (LC3-II, beclin-1, and autophagocytosis-associated protein (Atg3. The autophagy inhibitors 3-methyladenine (3-MA and chloroquine inhibited sodium butyrate induced autophagy. Furthermore, sodium butyrate treatment markedly enhanced the expression of endoplasmic reticulum stress-associated proteins, including BIP, CHOP, PDI, and IRE-1a. When endoplasmic reticulum stress was inhibited by pharmacological (cycloheximide and mithramycin and genetic

  3. Autophagy resolves early retinal inflammation in Igf1-deficient mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana I. Arroba

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1 is a growth factor with differentiating, anti-apoptotic and metabolic functions in the periphery, and anti-inflammatory properties in the nervous system. Mice that have mutations in the Igf1 gene, rendering the gene product inactive (Igf1−/−, present with age-related visual loss accompanied by structural alterations in the first synapses of the retinal pathway. Recent advances have revealed a crucial role of autophagy in immunity and inflammation. Keeping in mind this close relationship, we aimed to decipher these processes in the context of the defects that occur during ageing in the retina of Igf1−/− mice. Tnfa and Il1b mRNAs, and phosphorylation of JNK and p38 MAPK were elevated in the retinas of 6- and 12-month old Igf1−/− mice compared to those in age-matched Igf1+/+ controls. In 6-month-old Igf1−/− retinas, increased mRNA levels of the autophagy mediators Becn1, Atg9, Atg5 and Atg4, decreased p62 (also known as SQSTM1 protein expression together with an increased LC3-II:LC3-I ratio reflected active autophagic flux. However, in retinas from 12-month-old Igf1−/− mice, Nlrp3 mRNA, processing of the IL1β pro-form and immunostaining of active caspase-1 were elevated compared to those in age-matched Igf1+/+ controls, suggesting activation of the inflammasome. This effect concurred with accumulation of autophagosomes and decreased autophagic flux in the retina. Microglia localization and status of activation in the retinas of 12-month-old Igf1+/+ and Igf1−/− mice, analyzed by immunostaining of Cd11b and Iba-1, showed a specific distribution pattern in the outer plexiform layer (OPL, inner plexiform layer (IPL and inner nuclear layer (INL, and revealed an increased number of activated microglia cells in the retina of 12-month-old blind Igf1−/− mice. Moreover, reactive gliosis was exclusively detected in the retinas from 12-month-old blind Igf1−/− mice. In conclusion, this study

  4. Kibra and aPKC regulate starvation-induced autophagy in Drosophila

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Ahrum [Department of Biological Sciences, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34141 (Korea, Republic of); Neufeld, Thomas P. [Department of Genetics, Cell Biology and Development, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Choe, Joonho, E-mail: jchoe@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Biological Sciences, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34141 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-04

    Autophagy is a bulk degradation system that functions in response to cellular stresses such as metabolic stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress, oxidative stress, and developmental processes. During autophagy, cytoplasmic components are captured in double-membrane vesicles called autophagosomes. The autophagosome fuses with the lysosome, producing a vacuole known as an autolysosome. The cellular components are degraded by lysosomal proteases and recycled. Autophagy is important for maintaining cellular homeostasis, and the process is evolutionarily conserved. Kibra is an upstream regulator of the hippo signaling pathway, which controls organ size by affecting cell growth, proliferation, and apoptosis. Kibra is mainly localized in the apical membrane domain of epithelial cells and acts as a scaffold protein. We found that Kibra is required for autophagy to function properly. The absence of Kibra caused defects in the formation of autophagic vesicles and autophagic degradation. We also found that the well-known cell polarity protein aPKC interacts with Kibra, and its activity affects autophagy upstream of Kibra. Constitutively active aPKC decreased autophagic vesicle formation and autophagic degradation. We confirmed the interaction between aPKC and Kibra in S2 cells and Drosophila larva. Taken together, our data suggest that Kibra and aPKC are essential for regulating starvation-induced autophagy. - Highlights: • Loss of Kibra causes defects in autophagosome formation and autophagic degradation. • Constitutively-active aPKCs negatively regulate autophagy. • Kibra interacts with aPKC in vitro and in vivo. • Kibra regulates autophagy downstream of aPKC.

  5. Endosomal protein sorting and autophagy genes contribute to the regulation of yeast life span.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Valter D; Nislow, Corey; Fabrizio, Paola

    2010-11-01

    Accumulating evidence from various organisms points to a role for autophagy in the regulation of life span. By performing a genome-wide screen to identify novel life span determinants in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we have obtained further insights into the autophagy-related and -unrelated degradation processes that may be important for preventing cellular senescence. The generation of multivesicular bodies and their fusion with the vacuole in the endosomal pathway emerged as novel cell functions involved in yeast chronological survival and longevity extension.

  6. The prosurvival role of autophagy in Resveratrol-induced cytotoxicity in human U251 glioma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jun; Qin, Zhenghong; Liang, Zhongqin

    2009-01-01

    Previous study reported that resveratrol has anti-tumor activity. In this study, we investigated the involvement of autophagy in the resveratrol-induced apoptotic death of human U251 glioma cells. The growth inhibition of U251 cells induced by resveratrol was assessed with methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT). The activation of autophagy and proapoptotic effect were characterized by monodansylcadaverine labeling and Hoechst stain, respectively. Mitochondrialtransmembrane potential (ΔΨm) was measured as a function of drug treatment using 5,5',6,6'-tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'-tetraethylbenzimidazolylcarbocyanine iodide (JC-1). The role of autophagy and apoptosis in the resveratrol-induced death of U251 cells was assessed using autophagic and caspase inhibitors. Immunofluorescence, flow cytometry, and Western blot analysis were used to study the apoptotic and autophagic mechanisms. Methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assays indicated that resveratrol decreased the viability of U251 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Flow cytometry analysis indicated that resveratrol increased cell population at sub-G1 phase, an index of apoptosis. Furthermore, resveratrol-induced cell death was associated with a collapse of the mitochondrial membrane potential. The pan-caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-fmk suppressed resveratrol-induced U251 cell death. Resveratrol stimulated autophagy was evidenced by punctuate monodansylcadaverine(MDC) staining and microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3) immunoreactivty. Resveratrol also increased protein levels of beclin 1 and membrane form LC3 (LC3-II). Autophagy inhibitors 3-methylademine (3-MA) and bafilomycin A1 sensitized the cytotoxicity of resveratrol. Together, these findings indicate that resveratrol induces autophagy in human U251 glioma cells and autophagy suppressed resveratrol-induced apoptosis. This study thus suggests that autophagy inhibitors can increase the cytotoxicity of resveratrol to glioma cells

  7. Guidelines for the use and interpretation of assays for monitoring autophagy

    OpenAIRE

    Klionsky, Daniel J; Abdalla, Fabio C; Abeliovich, Hagai; Abraham, Robert T; Acevedo-Arozena, Abraham; Adeli, Khosrow; Agholme, Lotta; Agnello, Maria; Agostinis, Patrizia; Aguirre-Ghiso, Julio A; Ahn, Hyung Jun; van Grunsven, Leo A; Ozpolat, Bulent; Paganetti, Paolo; Pagnini, Ugo

    2012-01-01

    In 2008 we published the first set of guidelines for standardizing research in autophagy. Since then, research on this topic has continued to accelerate, and many new scientists have entered the field. Our knowledge base and relevant new technologies have also been expanding. Accordingly, it is important to update these guidelines for monitoring autophagy in different organisms. Various reviews have described the range of assays that have been used for this purpose. Nevertheless, there contin...