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Sample records for inhibits mbnl protein

  1. Mechanistic determinants of MBNL activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sznajder, Łukasz J.; Michalak, Michał; Taylor, Katarzyna; Cywoniuk, Piotr; Kabza, Michał; Wojtkowiak-Szlachcic, Agnieszka; Matłoka, Magdalena; Konieczny, Patryk; Sobczak, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Muscleblind-like (MBNL) proteins are critical RNA processing factors in development. MBNL activity is disrupted in the neuromuscular disease myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1), due to the instability of a non-coding microsatellite in the DMPK gene and the expression of CUG expansion (CUGexp) RNAs. Pathogenic interactions between MBNL and CUGexp RNA lead to the formation of nuclear complexes termed foci and prevent MBNL function in pre-mRNA processing. The existence of multiple MBNL genes, as well as multiple protein isoforms, raises the question of whether different MBNL proteins possess unique or redundant functions. To address this question, we coexpressed three MBNL paralogs in cells at equivalent levels and characterized both specific and redundant roles of these proteins in alternative splicing and RNA foci dynamics. When coexpressed in the same cells, MBNL1, MBNL2 and MBNL3 bind the same RNA motifs with different affinities. While MBNL1 demonstrated the highest splicing activity, MBNL3 showed the lowest. When forming RNA foci, MBNL1 is the most mobile paralog, while MBNL3 is rather static and the most densely packed on CUGexp RNA. Therefore, our results demonstrate that MBNL paralogs and gene-specific isoforms possess inherent functional differences, an outcome that could be enlisted to improve therapeutic strategies for DM1. PMID:27733504

  2. MBNL142 and MBNL143 gene isoforms, overexpressed in DM1-patient muscle, encode for nuclear proteins interacting with Src family kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botta, A; Malena, A; Tibaldi, E; Rocchi, L; Loro, E; Pena, E; Cenci, L; Ambrosi, E; Bellocchi, M C; Pagano, M A; Novelli, G; Rossi, G; Monaco, H L; Gianazza, E; Pantic, B; Romeo, V; Marin, O; Brunati, A M; Vergani, L

    2013-08-15

    Myotonic dystrophy type-1 (DM1) is the most prevalent form of muscular dystrophy in adults. This disorder is an RNA-dominant disease, caused by expansion of a CTG repeat in the DMPK gene that leads to a misregulation in the alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs. The longer muscleblind-like-1 (MBNL1) transcripts containing exon 5 and the respective protein isoforms (MBNL142-43) were found to be overexpressed in DM1 muscle and localized exclusively in the nuclei. In vitro assays showed that MBNL142-43 bind the Src-homology 3 domain of Src family kinases (SFKs) via their proline-rich motifs, enhancing the SFK activity. Notably, this association was also confirmed in DM1 muscle and myotubes. The recovery, mediated by an siRNA target to Ex5-MBNL142-43, succeeded in reducing the nuclear localization of both Lyn and MBNL142-43 proteins and in decreasing the level of tyrosine phosphorylated proteins. Our results suggest an additional molecular mechanism in the DM1 pathogenesis, based on an altered phosphotyrosine signalling pathway.

  3. MiR674 inhibits the neuraminidase-stimulated immune response on dendritic cells via down-regulated Mbnl3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jian; Chen, Ya T; Xia, Jing; Yang, Qian

    2016-08-02

    Neuraminidase (NA), a structural protein of the H9N2 avian influenza virus (H9N2 AIV), can facilitate viral invasion of the upper airway by cleaving the sialic acid moieties on mucin. Dendritic cells (DCs) are major antigen-presenting cells whose immune functions, such as presenting antigens and activating lymphocytes, can be regulated by microRNAs. Here, we studied the molecular mechanism of miRNA-induced repression of immune responses in mouse DCs. First, we screened for and verified the miRNAs induced by NA. Then, we showed that, consistent with the H9N2 virus treatment, the viral NA up-regulated the expression of miR-155, miR-674, and miR-499 in DCs; however, unlike H9N2 virus treatment, the presence of NA was associated with reduced expression of miR-181b1. Our results suggest that NA significantly increased DC surface markers CD80 and MHCII and enhanced the ability of activating lymphocytes and secreting cytokines compared with HA, NP and M2. Meanwhile, we found that miR-674 and miR-155 over-expression increased all surface markers of DC. Nevertheless, by inhibiting the expression of miR-674 and miR-155, NA lost the ability to promote DC maturation. Furthermore, we predicted and demonstrated that Pgm2l1, Aldh18a1, Camk1d, and Mbnl3 were the target genes of miR-674. Among them, Mbnl3 interference strongly blocked the mature DCs. Collectively, our data shed new light on the roles of and mechanisms involved in the repression of DCs by miRNAs, which may contribute to efforts to develop a prophylaxis for the influenza virus.

  4. Conserved functional antagonism of CELF and MBNL proteins controls stem cell-specific alternative splicing in planarians.

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    Solana, Jordi; Irimia, Manuel; Ayoub, Salah; Orejuela, Marta Rodriguez; Zywitza, Vera; Jens, Marvin; Tapial, Javier; Ray, Debashish; Morris, Quaid; Hughes, Timothy R; Blencowe, Benjamin J; Rajewsky, Nikolaus

    2016-08-09

    In contrast to transcriptional regulation, the function of alternative splicing (AS) in stem cells is poorly understood. In mammals, MBNL proteins negatively regulate an exon program specific of embryonic stem cells; however, little is known about the in vivo significance of this regulation. We studied AS in a powerful in vivo model for stem cell biology, the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea. We discover a conserved AS program comprising hundreds of alternative exons, microexons and introns that is differentially regulated in planarian stem cells, and comprehensively identify its regulators. We show that functional antagonism between CELF and MBNL factors directly controls stem cell-specific AS in planarians, placing the origin of this regulatory mechanism at the base of Bilaterians. Knockdown of CELF or MBNL factors lead to abnormal regenerative capacities by affecting self-renewal and differentiation sets of genes, respectively. These results highlight the importance of AS interactions in stem cell regulation across metazoans.

  5. CUGBP1 and MBNL1 preferentially bind to 3 ' UTRs and facilitate mRNA decay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masuda, A.; Andersen, H. S.; Doktor, T. K.

    2012-01-01

    CUGBP1 and MBNL1 are developmentally regulated RNA-binding proteins that are causally associated with myotonic dystrophy type 1. We globally determined the in vivo RNA-binding sites of CUGBP1 and MBNL1. Interestingly, CUGBP1 and MBNL1 are both preferentially bound to 39 UTRs. Analysis of CUGBP1...... that CUGBP1 and MBNL1 regulate alternative splicing. Screening by exon array and validation by RT-PCR revealed position dependence of CUGBP1- and MBNL1-binding sites on the resulting alternative splicing pattern. This study suggests that regulation of CUGBP1 and MBNL1 is essential for accurate control...

  6. Structural insights into RNA recognition by the alternative-splicing regulator muscleblind-like MBNL1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teplova, Marianna; Patel, Dinshaw J. (MSKCC)

    2009-01-15

    Muscleblind-like (MBNL) proteins, regulators of developmentally programmed alternative splicing, harbor tandem CCCH zinc-finger (ZnF) domains that target pre-mRNAs containing YGCU(U/G)Y sequence elements (where Y is a pyrimidine). In myotonic dystrophy, reduced levels of MBNL proteins lead to aberrant alternative splicing of a subset of pre-mRNAs. The crystal structure of MBNL1 ZnF3/4 bound to r(CGCUGU) establishes that both ZnF3 and ZnF4 target GC steps, with site-specific recognition mediated by a network of hydrogen bonds formed primarily with main chain groups of the protein. The relative alignment of ZnF3 and ZnF4 domains is dictated by the topology of the interdomain linker, with a resulting antiparallel orientation of bound GC elements, supportive of a chain-reversal loop trajectory for MBNL1-bound pre-mRNA targets. We anticipate that MBNL1-mediated targeting of looped RNA segments proximal to splice-site junctions could contribute to pre-mRNA alternative-splicing regulation.

  7. A fly model for the CCUG-repeat expansion of myotonic dystrophy type 2 reveals a novel interaction with MBNL1.

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    Yu, Zhenming; Goodman, Lindsey D; Shieh, Shin-Yi; Min, Michelle; Teng, Xiuyin; Zhu, Yongqing; Bonini, Nancy M

    2015-02-15

    Expanded non-coding RNA repeats of CUG and CCUG are the underlying genetic causes for myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) and type 2 (DM2), respectively. A gain-of-function of these pathogenic repeat expansions is mediated at least in part by their abnormal interactions with RNA-binding proteins such as MBNL1 and resultant loss of activity of these proteins. To study pathogenic mechanisms of CCUG-repeat expansions in an animal model, we created a fly model of DM2 that expresses pure, uninterrupted CCUG-repeat expansions ranging from 16 to 720 repeats in length. We show that this fly model for DM2 recapitulates key features of human DM2 including RNA repeat-induced toxicity, ribonuclear foci formation and changes in alternative splicing. Interestingly, expression of two isoforms of MBNL1, MBNL135 and MBNL140, leads to cleavage and concurrent upregulation of the levels of the RNA-repeat transcripts, with MBNL140 having more significant effects than MBNL135. This property is shared with a fly CUG-repeat expansion model. Our results suggest a novel mechanism for interaction between the pathogenic RNA repeat expansions of myotonic dystrophy and MBNL1.

  8. MBNL Sequestration by Toxic RNAs and RNA Misprocessing in the Myotonic Dystrophy Brain.

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    Goodwin, Marianne; Mohan, Apoorva; Batra, Ranjan; Lee, Kuang-Yung; Charizanis, Konstantinos; Fernández Gómez, Francisco José; Eddarkaoui, Sabiha; Sergeant, Nicolas; Buée, Luc; Kimura, Takashi; Clark, H Brent; Dalton, Joline; Takamura, Kenji; Weyn-Vanhentenryck, Sebastien M; Zhang, Chaolin; Reid, Tammy; Ranum, Laura P W; Day, John W; Swanson, Maurice S

    2015-08-18

    For some neurological disorders, disease is primarily RNA mediated due to expression of non-coding microsatellite expansion RNAs (RNA(exp)). Toxicity is thought to result from enhanced binding of proteins to these expansions and depletion from their normal cellular targets. However, experimental evidence for this sequestration model is lacking. Here, we use HITS-CLIP and pre-mRNA processing analysis of human control versus myotonic dystrophy (DM) brains to provide compelling evidence for this RNA toxicity model. MBNL2 binds directly to DM repeat expansions in the brain, resulting in depletion from its normal RNA targets with downstream effects on alternative splicing and polyadenylation. Similar RNA processing defects were detected in Mbnl compound-knockout mice, highlighted by dysregulation of Mapt splicing and fetal tau isoform expression in adults. These results demonstrate that MBNL proteins are directly sequestered by RNA(exp) in the DM brain and introduce a powerful experimental tool to evaluate RNA-mediated toxicity in other expansion diseases. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. MBNL Sequestration by Toxic RNAs and RNA Misprocessing in the Myotonic Dystrophy Brain

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    Marianne Goodwin

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available For some neurological disorders, disease is primarily RNA mediated due to expression of non-coding microsatellite expansion RNAs (RNAexp. Toxicity is thought to result from enhanced binding of proteins to these expansions and depletion from their normal cellular targets. However, experimental evidence for this sequestration model is lacking. Here, we use HITS-CLIP and pre-mRNA processing analysis of human control versus myotonic dystrophy (DM brains to provide compelling evidence for this RNA toxicity model. MBNL2 binds directly to DM repeat expansions in the brain, resulting in depletion from its normal RNA targets with downstream effects on alternative splicing and polyadenylation. Similar RNA processing defects were detected in Mbnl compound-knockout mice, highlighted by dysregulation of Mapt splicing and fetal tau isoform expression in adults. These results demonstrate that MBNL proteins are directly sequestered by RNAexp in the DM brain and introduce a powerful experimental tool to evaluate RNA-mediated toxicity in other expansion diseases.

  10. RNA splicing is responsive to MBNL1 dose.

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    Sonali P Jog

    Full Text Available Myotonic dystrophy (DM1 is a highly variable, multi-system disorder resulting from the expansion of an untranslated CTG tract in DMPK. In DM1 expanded CUG repeat RNAs form hairpin secondary structures that bind and aberrantly sequester the RNA splice regulator, MBNL1. RNA splice defects resulting as a consequence of MBNL1 depletion have been shown to play a key role in the development of DM1 pathology. In patient populations, both the number and severity of DM1 symptoms increase broadly as a function of CTG tract length. However significant variability in the DM1 phenotype is observed in patients encoding similar CTG repeat numbers. Here we demonstrate that a gradual decrease in MBNL1 levels results both in the expansion of the repertoire of splice defects and an increase in the severity of the splice alterations. Thus, MBNL1 loss does not have an all or none outcome but rather shows a graded effect on the number and severity of the ensuing splice defects. Our results suggest that once a critical threshold is reached, relatively small dose variations of free MBNL1 levels, which may reflect modest changes in the size of the CUG tract or the extent of hairpin secondary structure formation, can significantly alter the number and severity of splice abnormalities and thus contribute to the phenotype variability observed in DM1 patients.

  11. RNA/MBNL1-containing foci in myoblast nuclei from patients affected by myotonic dystrophy type 2: an immunocytochemical study

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    F. Perdoni

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2 is a dominantly inherited autosomal disease with multi-systemic clinical features and it is caused by expansion of a CCTG tetranucleotide repeat in the first intron of the zinc finger protein 9 (ZNF9 gene in 3q21.The expanded-CCUG-containing transcripts are retained in the cell nucleus and accumulate in the form of focal aggregates which specifically sequester the muscleblind-like 1 (MBNL1 protein, a RNA binding factor involved in the regulation of alternative splicing. The structural organization and composition of the foci are still incompletely known. In this study, the nuclear foci occurring in cultured myoblasts from DM2 patients were characterised at fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy by using a panel of antibodies recognizing transcription and processing factors of pre-mRNAs. MBNL1 proved to co-locate in the nuclear foci with snRNPs and hnRNPs, whereas no co-location was observed with RNA polymerase II, the non-RNP splicing factor SC35, the cleavage factor CStF and the PML protein. At electron microscopy the MBNL1-containing nuclear foci appeared as roundish domains showing a rather homogeneous structure and proved to contain snRNPs and hnRNPs. The sequestration of splicing factors involved in early phases of pre-mRNA processing supports the hypothesis of a general alteration in the maturation of several mRNAs, which could lead to the multiple pathological dysfunctions observed in dystrophic patients.

  12. Muscleblind-like 1 (Mbnl1) regulates pre-mRNA alternative splicing during terminal erythropoiesis.

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    Cheng, Albert W; Shi, Jiahai; Wong, Piu; Luo, Katherine L; Trepman, Paula; Wang, Eric T; Choi, Heejo; Burge, Christopher B; Lodish, Harvey F

    2014-07-24

    The scope and roles of regulated isoform gene expression during erythroid terminal development are poorly understood. We identified hundreds of differentiation-associated isoform changes during terminal erythropoiesis. Sequences surrounding cassette exons of skipped exon events are enriched for motifs bound by the Muscleblind-like (MBNL) family of splicing factors. Knockdown of Mbnl1 in cultured murine fetal liver erythroid progenitors resulted in a strong block in erythroid differentiation and disrupted the developmentally regulated exon skipping of Ndel1 mRNA, which is bound by MBNL1 and critical for erythroid terminal proliferation. These findings reveal an unanticipated scope of the alternative splicing program and the importance of Mbnl1 during erythroid terminal differentiation.

  13. Mis-splicing of Tau exon 10 in myotonic dystrophy type 1 is reproduced by overexpression of CELF2 but not by MBNL1 silencing.

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    Dhaenens, C M; Tran, H; Frandemiche, M-L; Carpentier, C; Schraen-Maschke, S; Sistiaga, A; Goicoechea, M; Eddarkaoui, S; Van Brussels, E; Obriot, H; Labudeck, A; Gevaert, M H; Fernandez-Gomez, F; Charlet-Berguerand, N; Deramecourt, V; Maurage, C A; Buée, L; Lopez de Munain, A; Sablonnière, B; Caillet-Boudin, M L; Sergeant, N

    2011-07-01

    Tau is the proteinaceous component of intraneuronal aggregates common to neurodegenerative diseases called Tauopathies, including myotonic dystrophy type 1. In myotonic dystrophy type 1, the presence of microtubule-associated protein Tau aggregates is associated with a mis-splicing of Tau. A toxic gain-of-function at the ribonucleic acid level is a major etiological factor responsible for the mis-splicing of several transcripts in myotonic dystrophy type 1. These are probably the consequence of a loss of muscleblind-like 1 (MBNL1) function or gain of CUGBP1 and ETR3-like factor 1 (CELF1) splicing function. Whether these two dysfunctions occur together or separately and whether all mis-splicing events in myotonic dystrophy type 1 brain result from one or both of these dysfunctions remains unknown. Here, we analyzed the splicing of Tau exons 2 and 10 in the brain of myotonic dystrophy type 1 patients. Two myotonic dystrophy type 1 patients showed a mis-splicing of exon 10 whereas exon 2-inclusion was reduced in all myotonic dystrophy type 1 patients. In order to determine the potential factors responsible for exon 10 mis-splicing, we studied the effect of the splicing factors muscleblind-like 1 (MBNL1), CUGBP1 and ETR3-like factor 1 (CELF1), CUGBP1 and ETR3-like factor 2 (CELF2), and CUGBP1 and ETR3-like factor 4 (CELF4) or a dominant-negative CUGBP1 and ETR-3 like factor (CELF) factor on Tau exon 10 splicing by ectopic expression or siRNA. Interestingly, the inclusion of Tau exon 10 is reduced by CUGBP1 and ETR3-like factor 2 (CELF2) whereas it is insensitive to the loss-of-function of muscleblind-like 1 (MBNL1), CUGBP1 and ETR3-like factor 1 (CELF1) gain-of-function, or a dominant-negative of CUGBP1 and ETR-3 like factor (CELF) factor. Moreover, we observed an increased expression of CUGBP1 and ETR3-like factor 2 (CELF2) only in the brain of myotonic dystrophy type 1 patients with a mis-splicing of exon 10. Taken together, our results indicate the occurrence of a

  14. Inhibition of Retinoblastoma Protein Inactivation

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    2016-09-01

    phosphorylation, which dissociates the E2F transcription factor from Rb. Our goal is to find and characterize molecules that stabilize the complex...between phosphorylated Rb and E2F. In this second year of the project period, we further tested our proposed mechanism for how molecules enhance the...Retinoblastoma protein, E2F transcription factor, high throughput screen, drug discovery, x-ray crystallography 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17

  15. Anticancer Alkaloid Lamellarins Inhibit Protein Kinases

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    Laurent Meijer

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Lamellarins, a family of hexacyclic pyrrole alkaloids originally isolated from marine invertebrates, display promising anti-tumor activity. They induce apoptotic cell death through multi-target mechanisms, including inhibition of topoisomerase I, interaction with DNA and direct effects on mitochondria. We here report that lamellarins inhibit several protein kinases relevant to cancer such as cyclin-dependent kinases, dualspecificity tyrosine phosphorylation activated kinase 1A, casein kinase 1, glycogen synthase kinase-3 and PIM-1. A good correlation is observed between the effects of lamellarins on protein kinases and their action on cell death, suggesting that inhibition of specific kinases may contribute to the cytotoxicity of lamellarins. Structure/activity relationship suggests several paths for the optimization of lamellarins as kinase inhibitors.

  16. Brain hyaluronan binding protein inhibits tumor growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高锋; 曹曼林; 王蕾

    2004-01-01

    Background Great efforts have been made to search for the angiogenic inhibitors in avascular tissues. Several proteins isolated from cartilage have been proved to have anti-angiogenic or anti-tumour effects. Because cartilage contains a great amount of hyaluronic acid (HA) oligosaccharides and abundant HA binding proteins (HABP), therefore, we speculated that HABP might be one of the factors regulating vascularization in cartilage or anti-angiogenesis in tumours. The purpose of this research was to evaluale the effects of hyaluronan binding protein on inhibiting tumour growth both in vivo and vitro. Methods A unique protein termed human brain hyaluronan (HA) binding protein (b-HABP) was cloned from human brain cDNA library. MDA-435 human breast cancer cell line was chosen as a transfectant. The in vitro underlying mechanisms were investigated by determining the possibilities of MDA-435/b-HABP colony formation on soft agar, the effects of the transfectant on the proliferation of endothelial cells and the expression levels of caspase 3 and FasL from MDA-435/b-HABP. The in vivo study included tumour growth on the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) of chicken embryos and nude mice. Results Colony formation assay revealed that the colonies formed by MDA-435/b-HABP were greatly reduced compared to mock transfectants. The conditioned media from MDA-435/b-HABP inhibited the growth of endothelial cells in culture. Caspase 3 and FasL expressions were induced by MDA-435/b-HABP. The size of tumours of MDA-435/b-HABP in both CAM and nude mice was much smaller than that of MDA-435 alone. Conclusions Human brain hyaluronan binding protein (b-HABP) may represent a new kind of naturally existing anti-tumour substance. This brain-derived glycoprotein may block tumour growth by inducing apoptosis of cancer cells or by decreasing angiogenesis in tumour tissue via inhibiting proliferation of endothelial cells.

  17. Alternative splicing of the neurofibromatosis type 1 pre-mRNA is regulated by the muscleblind-like proteins and the CUG-BP and ELAV-like factors

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    Fleming Victoria A

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alternative splicing is often subjected to complex regulatory control that involves many protein factors and cis-acting RNA sequence elements. One major challenge is to identify all of the protein players and define how they control alternative expression of a particular exon in a combinatorial manner. The Muscleblind-like (MBNL and CUG-BP and ELAV-Like family (CELF proteins are splicing regulatory proteins, which function as antagonists in the regulation of several alternative exons. Currently only a limited number of common targets of MBNL and CELF are known that are antagonistically regulated by these two groups of proteins. Results Recently, we identified neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1 exon 23a as a novel target of negative regulation by CELF proteins. Here we report that MBNL family members are positive regulators of this exon. Overexpression of MBNL proteins promote exon 23a inclusion in a low MBNL-expressing cell line, and simultaneous siRNA-mediated knockdown of MBNL1 and MBNL2 family members in a high MBNL-expressing cell line promotes exon 23a skipping. Importantly, these two groups of proteins antagonize each other in regulating inclusion of exon 23a. Furthermore, we analyzed the binding sites of these proteins in the intronic sequences upstream of exon 23a by UV cross-linking assays. We show that in vitro, in addition to the previously identified preferred binding sequence UGCUGU, the MBNL proteins need the neighboring sequences for optimal binding. Conclusion This study along with our previous work that demonstrated roles for Hu, CELF, and TIA-1 and TIAR proteins in the regulation of NF1 exon 23a establish that this exon is under tight, complex control.

  18. Ribosome Inactivating Proteins from Plants Inhibiting Viruses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Inderdeep Kaur; R C Gupta; Munish Puri

    2011-01-01

    Many plants contain ribosome inactivating proteins (RIPs) with N-glycosidase activity,which depurinate large ribosomal RNA and arrest protein synthesis.RIPs so far tested inhibit replication of mRNA as well as DNA viruses and these proteins,isolated from plants,are found to be effective against a broad range of viruses such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV),hepatitis B virus (HBV) and herpes simplex virus (HSV).Most of the research work related to RIPs has been focused on antiviral activity against HIV; however,the exact mechanism of antiviral activity is still not clear.The mechanism of antiviral activity was thought to follow inactivation of the host cell ribosome,leading to inhibition of viral protein translation and host cell death.Enzymatic activity of RIPs is not hmited to depurination of the large rRNA,in addition they can depurinate viral DNA as well as RNA.Recently,Phase Ⅰ/Ⅱ clinical trials have demonstrated the potential use of RIPs for treating patients with HIV disease.The aim of this review is to focus on various RIPs from plants associated with anti-HIV activity.

  19. Compound loss of muscleblind-like function in myotonic dystrophy.

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    Lee, Kuang-Yung; Li, Moyi; Manchanda, Mini; Batra, Ranjan; Charizanis, Konstantinos; Mohan, Apoorva; Warren, Sonisha A; Chamberlain, Christopher M; Finn, Dustin; Hong, Hannah; Ashraf, Hassan; Kasahara, Hideko; Ranum, Laura P W; Swanson, Maurice S

    2013-12-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is a multi-systemic disease that impacts cardiac and skeletal muscle as well as the central nervous system (CNS). DM is unusual because it is an RNA-mediated disorder due to the expression of toxic microsatellite expansion RNAs that alter the activities of RNA processing factors, including the muscleblind-like (MBNL) proteins. While these mutant RNAs inhibit MBNL1 splicing activity in heart and skeletal muscles, Mbnl1 knockout mice fail to recapitulate the full-range of DM symptoms in these tissues. Here, we generate mouse Mbnl compound knockouts to test the hypothesis that Mbnl2 functionally compensates for Mbnl1 loss. Although Mbnl1(-/-) ; Mbnl2(-/-) double knockouts (DKOs) are embryonic lethal, Mbnl1(-/-) ; Mbnl2(+/-) mice are viable but develop cardinal features of DM muscle disease including reduced lifespan, heart conduction block, severe myotonia and progressive skeletal muscle weakness. Mbnl2 protein levels are elevated in Mbnl1(-/-) knockouts where Mbnl2 targets Mbnl1-regulated exons. These findings support the hypothesis that compound loss of MBNL function is a critical event in DM pathogenesis and provide novel mouse models to investigate additional pathways disrupted in this RNA-mediated disease.

  20. Hsp90 inhibition decreases mitochondrial protein turnover.

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    Daciana H Margineantu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cells treated with hsp90 inhibitors exhibit pleiotropic changes, including an expansion of the mitochondrial compartment, accompanied by mitochondrial fragmentation and condensed mitochondrial morphology, with ultimate compromise of mitochondrial integrity and apoptosis. FINDINGS: We identified several mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation complex subunits, including several encoded by mtDNA, that are upregulated by hsp90 inhibitors, without corresponding changes in mRNA abundance. Post-transcriptional accumulation of mitochondrial proteins observed with hsp90 inhibitors is also seen in cells treated with proteasome inhibitors. Detailed studies of the OSCP subunit of mitochondrial F1F0-ATPase revealed the presence of mono- and polyubiquitinated OSCP in mitochondrial fractions. We demonstrate that processed OSCP undergoes retrotranslocation to a trypsin-sensitive form associated with the outer mitochondrial membrane. Inhibition of proteasome or hsp90 function results in accumulation of both correctly targeted and retrotranslocated mitochondrial OSCP. CONCLUSIONS: Cytosolic turnover of mitochondrial proteins demonstrates a novel connection between mitochondrial and cytosolic compartments through the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Analogous to defective protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum, a mitochondrial unfolded protein response may play a role in the apoptotic effects of hsp90 and proteasome inhibitors.

  1. Stabilizer-Guided Inhibition of Protein-Protein Interactions.

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    Milroy, Lech-Gustav; Bartel, Maria; Henen, Morkos A; Leysen, Seppe; Adriaans, Joris M C; Brunsveld, Luc; Landrieu, Isabelle; Ottmann, Christian

    2015-12-21

    The discovery of novel protein-protein interaction (PPI) modulators represents one of the great molecular challenges of the modern era. PPIs can be modulated by either inhibitor or stabilizer compounds, which target different though proximal regions of the protein interface. In principle, protein-stabilizer complexes can guide the design of PPI inhibitors (and vice versa). In the present work, we combine X-ray crystallographic data from both stabilizer and inhibitor co-crystal complexes of the adapter protein 14-3-3 to characterize, down to the atomic scale, inhibitors of the 14-3-3/Tau PPI, a potential drug target to treat Alzheimer's disease. The most potent compound notably inhibited the binding of phosphorylated full-length Tau to 14-3-3 according to NMR spectroscopy studies. Our work sets a precedent for the rational design of PPI inhibitors guided by PPI stabilizer-protein complexes while potentially enabling access to new synthetically tractable stabilizers of 14-3-3 and other PPIs. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Zinc ions bind to and inhibit activated protein C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Tianqing; Ubhayasekera, Wimal; Nickolaus, Noëlle

    2010-01-01

    Zn2+ ions were found to efficiently inhibit activated protein C (APC), suggesting a potential regulatory function for such inhibition. APC activity assays employing a chromogenic peptide substrate demonstrated that the inhibition was reversible and the apparent K I was 13 +/- 2 microM. k cat was ...

  3. Aedes aegypti D7 Saliva Protein Inhibits Dengue Virus Infection

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    Conway, Michael J.; Londono-Renteria, Berlin; Troupin, Andrea; Watson, Alan M.; Klimstra, William B.; Fikrig, Erol; Colpitts, Tonya M.

    2016-01-01

    Aedes aegypti is the primary vector of several medically relevant arboviruses including dengue virus (DENV) types 1–4. Ae. aegypti transmits DENV by inoculating virus-infected saliva into host skin during probing and feeding. Ae. aegypti saliva contains over one hundred unique proteins and these proteins have diverse functions, including facilitating blood feeding. Previously, we showed that Ae. aegypti salivary gland extracts (SGEs) enhanced dissemination of DENV to draining lymph nodes. In contrast, HPLC-fractionation revealed that some SGE components inhibited infection. Here, we show that D7 proteins are enriched in HPLC fractions that are inhibitory to DENV infection, and that recombinant D7 protein can inhibit DENV infection in vitro and in vivo. Further, binding assays indicate that D7 protein can directly interact with DENV virions and recombinant DENV envelope protein. These data reveal a novel role for D7 proteins, which inhibits arbovirus transmission to vertebrates through a direct interaction with virions. PMID:27632170

  4. Aedes aegypti D7 Saliva Protein Inhibits Dengue Virus Infection.

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    Michael J Conway

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aedes aegypti is the primary vector of several medically relevant arboviruses including dengue virus (DENV types 1-4. Ae. aegypti transmits DENV by inoculating virus-infected saliva into host skin during probing and feeding. Ae. aegypti saliva contains over one hundred unique proteins and these proteins have diverse functions, including facilitating blood feeding. Previously, we showed that Ae. aegypti salivary gland extracts (SGEs enhanced dissemination of DENV to draining lymph nodes. In contrast, HPLC-fractionation revealed that some SGE components inhibited infection. Here, we show that D7 proteins are enriched in HPLC fractions that are inhibitory to DENV infection, and that recombinant D7 protein can inhibit DENV infection in vitro and in vivo. Further, binding assays indicate that D7 protein can directly interact with DENV virions and recombinant DENV envelope protein. These data reveal a novel role for D7 proteins, which inhibits arbovirus transmission to vertebrates through a direct interaction with virions.

  5. Development of an AP-FRET based analysis for characterizing RNA-protein interactions in myotonic dystrophy (DM1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shagufta Rehman

    Full Text Available Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET microscopy is a powerful tool used to identify molecular interactions in live or fixed cells using a non-radiative transfer of energy from a donor fluorophore in the excited state to an acceptor fluorophore in close proximity. FRET can be a very sensitive tool to study protein-protein and/or protein-nucleic acids interactions. RNA toxicity is implicated in a number of disorders; especially those associated with expanded repeat sequences, such as myotonic dystrophy. Myotonic dystrophy (DM1 is caused by a (CTGn repeat expansion in the 3' UTR of the DMPK gene which results in nuclear retention of mutant DMPK transcripts in RNA foci. This results in toxic gain-of-function effects mediated through altered functions of RNA-binding proteins (e.g. MBNL1, hnRNPH, CUGBP1. In this study we demonstrate the potential of a new acceptor photobleaching assay to measure FRET (AP-FRET between RNA and protein. We chose to focus on the interaction between MBNL1 and mutant DMPK mRNA in cells from DM1 patients due to the strong microscopic evidence of their co-localization. Using this technique we have direct evidence of intracellular interaction between MBNL1 and the DMPK RNA. Furthermore using the AP-FRET assay and MBNL1 mutants, we show that all four zinc-finger motifs in MBNL1 are crucial for MBNL1-RNA foci interactions. The data derived using this new assay provides compelling evidence for the interaction between RNA binding proteins and RNA foci, and mechanistic insights into MBNL1-RNA foci interaction demonstrating the power of AP-FRET in examining RNA-Protein interactions in DM1.

  6. Transcriptional inhibition by the retinoblastoma protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fattaey, A; Helin, K; Harlow, E

    1993-01-01

    The retinoblastoma protein, pRB, appears to play a key role in coordinating the regulation of cell cycle position and transcriptional events. pRB undergoes specific cell-cycle-dependent phosphorylation, being underphosphorylated in G1 and heavily phosphorylated in S, G2, and M......-mediated transcription would be lost by mutation in the retinoblastoma gene in human tumours, by pRB's interaction with DNA tumour virus oncoproteins, or by phosphorylation during the cell cycle....

  7. Mildiomycin: a nucleoside antibiotic that inhibits protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feduchi, E; Cosín, M; Carrasco, L

    1985-03-01

    Mildiomycin, a new nucleoside antibiotic, selectively inhibits protein synthesis in HeLa cells, and is less active in the inhibition of RNA or DNA synthesis. An increased inhibition of translation by mildiomycin is observed in cultured HeLa cells when they are permeabilized by encephalomyocarditis virus. This observation suggests that this antibiotic does not easily pass through the cell membrane, as occurs with other nucleoside and aminoglycoside antibiotics. The inhibition of translation is also observed in cell-free systems, such as endogenous protein synthesis in a rabbit reticulocyte lysate or the synthesis of polyphenylalanine directed by poly (U). Finally the mode of action of mildiomycin was investigated and the results suggest that the compound blocks the peptidyl-transferase center.

  8. Quassinoid inhibition of AP-1 function does not correlate with cytotoxicity or protein synthesis inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beutler, John A; Kang, Moon-Il; Robert, Francis; Clement, Jason A; Pelletier, Jerry; Colburn, Nancy H; McKee, Tawnya C; Goncharova, Ekaterina; McMahon, James B; Henrich, Curtis J

    2009-03-27

    Several quassinoids were identified in a high-throughput screening assay as inhibitors of the transcription factor AP-1. Further biological characterization revealed that while their effect was not specific to AP-1, protein synthesis inhibition and cell growth assays were inconsistent with a mechanism of simple protein synthesis inhibition. Numerous plant extracts from the plant family Simaroubaceae were also identified in the same screen; bioassay-guided fractionation of one extract (Ailanthus triphylla) yielded two known quassinoids, ailanthinone (3) and glaucarubinone (4), which were also identified in the pure compound screening procedure.

  9. Lupine protein hydrolysates inhibit enzymes involved in the inflammatory pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millán-Linares, María del Carmen; Yust, María del Mar; Alcaide-Hidalgo, Juan María; Millán, Francisco; Pedroche, Justo

    2014-05-15

    Lupine protein hydrolysates (LPHs) were obtained from a lupine protein isolate (LPI) by enzymatic hydrolysis using two proteases, Izyme AL and Alcalase 2.4 L, and their potential anti-inflammatory capacities were studied by determining their in vitro inhibition of the following enzymes that are involved in the inflammatory process: phospholipase A2 (PLA2), cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), thrombin, and transglutaminase (TG). The strongest inhibitory activities toward PLA2 and TG were found in the hydrolysates obtained by hydrolysis with Izyme and subsequently with Alcalase, with more than 70% inhibition obtained in some cases. All of the hydrolysates tested inhibited more than 60% of the COX-2 activity. In no case did the percentage of thrombin activity inhibition exceed 40%. The best inhibitory activities were found in the LPH obtained after 15 min of hydrolysis with Alcalase and in the LPH obtained after 60 min of hydrolysis with Izyme followed by 15 min of hydrolysis with Alcalase. Enzyme kinetic analyses were conducted to determine the Km and Vmax parameters of these two hydrolysates using the Lineweaver-Burk equation. Both hydrolysates competitively inhibited the thrombin and PLA2 activities. In the case of COX-2 and TG, the inhibition appeared to be the mixed type. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The Leader Protein of Cardioviruses Inhibits Stress Granule Assembly ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghese, Fabian; Michiels, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Stress granules (SG) are cytoplasmic aggregates of stalled translation preinitiation complexes that form in cells exposed to various environmental stresses. Here, we show that stress granules assemble in cells infected with Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) mutants carrying alterations in the leader (L) protein, but not in cells infected with wild-type TMEV. Stress granules also formed in STAT1-deficient cells, suggesting that SG formation was not a consequence of increased type I interferon (IFN) production when cells were infected with the mutant virus. Ectopic expression of the wild-type L protein was sufficient to inhibit stress granule formation induced by sodium arsenite or thapsigargin treatment. In conclusion, TMEV infection induces stress granule assembly, but this process is inhibited by the L protein. Unlike poliovirus-induced stress granules, TMEV-induced stress granules did not contain the nuclear protein Sam68 but contained polypyrimidine tract binding protein (PTB), an internal ribosome entry site (IRES)-interacting protein. Moreover, G3BP was not degraded and was found in SG after TMEV infection, suggesting that SG content could be virus specific. Despite the colocalization of PTB with SG and the known interaction of PTB with viral RNA, in situ hybridization and immunofluorescence assays failed to detect viral RNA trapped in infection-induced SG. Recombinant Theiler's viruses expressing the L protein of Saffold virus 2 (SAFV-2), a closely related human theilovirus, or the L protein of mengovirus, an encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) strain, also inhibited infection-induced stress granule assembly, suggesting that stress granule antagonism is a common feature of cardiovirus L proteins. PMID:21752908

  11. The leader protein of cardioviruses inhibits stress granule assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghese, Fabian; Michiels, Thomas

    2011-09-01

    Stress granules (SG) are cytoplasmic aggregates of stalled translation preinitiation complexes that form in cells exposed to various environmental stresses. Here, we show that stress granules assemble in cells infected with Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) mutants carrying alterations in the leader (L) protein, but not in cells infected with wild-type TMEV. Stress granules also formed in STAT1-deficient cells, suggesting that SG formation was not a consequence of increased type I interferon (IFN) production when cells were infected with the mutant virus. Ectopic expression of the wild-type L protein was sufficient to inhibit stress granule formation induced by sodium arsenite or thapsigargin treatment. In conclusion, TMEV infection induces stress granule assembly, but this process is inhibited by the L protein. Unlike poliovirus-induced stress granules, TMEV-induced stress granules did not contain the nuclear protein Sam68 but contained polypyrimidine tract binding protein (PTB), an internal ribosome entry site (IRES)-interacting protein. Moreover, G3BP was not degraded and was found in SG after TMEV infection, suggesting that SG content could be virus specific. Despite the colocalization of PTB with SG and the known interaction of PTB with viral RNA, in situ hybridization and immunofluorescence assays failed to detect viral RNA trapped in infection-induced SG. Recombinant Theiler's viruses expressing the L protein of Saffold virus 2 (SAFV-2), a closely related human theilovirus, or the L protein of mengovirus, an encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) strain, also inhibited infection-induced stress granule assembly, suggesting that stress granule antagonism is a common feature of cardiovirus L proteins.

  12. Desferrioxamine Inhibits Protein Tyrosine Nitration: Mechanisms and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adgent, Margaret A.; Squadrito, Giuseppe L.; Ballinger, Carol A.; Krzywanski, David M.; Lancaster, Jack R.; Postlethwait, Edward M.

    2012-01-01

    Tissues are exposed to exogenous and endogenous nitrogen dioxide (•NO2), which is the terminal agent in protein tyrosine nitration. Besides iron chelation, the hydroxamic acid (HA) desferrioxamine (DFO) shows multiple functionalities including nitration inhibition. To investigate mechanisms whereby DFO affects 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT) formation, we utilized gas phase •NO2 exposures, to limit introduction of other reactive species, and a lung surface model wherein red cell membranes (RCM) were immobilized under a defined aqueous film. When RCM were exposed to •NO2 covered by +/− DFO: (i) DFO inhibited 3-NT formation more effectively than other HA and non-HA chelators; (ii) 3-NT inhibition occurred at very low [DFO] for prolonged times; and (iii) 3-NT formation was iron independent but inhibition required DFO present. DFO poorly reacted with •NO2 compared to ascorbate, assessed via •NO2 reactive absorption and aqueous phase oxidation rates, yet limited 3-NT formation at far lower concentrations. DFO also inhibited nitration under aqueous bulk phase conditions, and inhibited 3-NT generated by active myeloperoxidase “bound” to RCM. Per the above and kinetic analyses suggesting preferential DFO versus •NO2 reaction within membranes, we conclude that DFO inhibits 3-NT formation predominantly by facile repair of the tyrosyl radical intermediate, which prevents •NO2 addition, and thus nitration, and potentially influences biochemical functionalities. PMID:22705369

  13. Inhibition of hepatitis C virus protein expression by RNA interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Adrish; Steele, Robert; Ghosh, Asish K; Basu, Arnab; Ray, Ranjit; Ray, Ratna B

    2003-10-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a serious human pathogen and an estimated 170 million people are infected worldwide. Current therapeutic regimens have shown limited efficacy against selected genotypes of the virus. The phenomenon of RNA interference can be used to selectively block homologous genes post-transcriptionally, and has revolutionized approaches to study gene function. In this report, we have demonstrated that small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeted against NS5A of HCV genotype 1a specifically inhibit NS5A RNA and protein expression in a human hepatoma (HepG2) cell line. Expression of endogenous alpha-actin and the ds-RNA activated serine/threonine kinase-PKR were unaltered, demonstrating that the inhibitory effect observed from siRNA was specific to the HCV NS5A protein. We next examined whether siRNA directed against NS5A could inhibit core protein expression, the first gene product synthesized in virus infected cells due to its localization at the 5' end of the HCV polyprotein. For this purpose, a full-length cDNA clone from HCV (H77, genotype 1a) was used, and results indicated that the introduction of NS5A targeted siRNA resulted in an inhibition of NS5A and core protein expression. Moreover, we observed that this siRNA effectively inhibited NS5A mediated activation of the IL-8 promoter. Taken together, our results demonstrated that siRNA was effective in inhibiting HCV protein expression, and may have therapeutic potential to limit HCV replication in chronically infected patients.

  14. S-layer proteins of Lactobacillus acidophilus inhibits JUNV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, María Guadalupe; Prado Acosta, Mariano; Candurra, Nélida A; Ruzal, Sandra M

    2012-06-15

    It has been previously described that S-layer binds to the C-type lectin DC-specific ICAM-3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN, CD209). It was also shown that DC-SIGN is a cell-surface adhesion factor that enhances viral entry of several virus families. Among those, Junin virus (JUNV) entry is enhanced in cells expressing DC-SIGN and for that reason surface-layer protein (S-layer) of Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 4365 was evaluated as a possible JUNV inhibitor. Experiments using 3T3 cells stably expressing DC-SIGN, showed an almost complete inhibition of JUNV infection when they were treated with S-layer in a similar extend as the inhibition shown by mannan. However no inhibition effect was observed in 3T3 wild type cells or in 3T3 cells expressing liver/lymph node-specific ICAM-3 grabbing nonintegrin (L-SIGN or DC-SIGNR or CD209L). Treatments with S-layer during different times in the infection demonstrated that inhibition was only observed when S-layer was presented in early stages of the viral infection. This inhibition does not involve the classic recognition of mannose by this C-type lectin as the S-layer showed no evidence to be glycosylated. In fact, the highly basic nature of the S-layer (pI>9.5) seems to be involved in electrostatic interactions between DC-SIGN and S-layer, since high pH abolished the inhibitory effect on infection cause by the S-layer. In silico analysis predicts a Ca(2+)-dependant carbohydrate recognition domain in the SlpA protein. This novel characteristic of the S-layer, a GRAS status protein, contribute to the pathogen exclusion reported for this probiotic strain and may be applied as an antiviral agent to inhibit several kinds of viruses.

  15. Computational design of protein interactions: designing proteins that neutralize influenza by inhibiting its hemagglutinin surface protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleishman, Sarel

    2012-02-01

    Molecular recognition underlies all life processes. Design of interactions not seen in nature is a test of our understanding of molecular recognition and could unlock the vast potential of subtle control over molecular interaction networks, allowing the design of novel diagnostics and therapeutics for basic and applied research. We developed the first general method for designing protein interactions. The method starts by computing a region of high affinity interactions between dismembered amino acid residues and the target surface and then identifying proteins that can harbor these residues. Designs are tested experimentally for binding the target surface and successful ones are affinity matured using yeast cell surface display. Applied to the conserved stem region of influenza hemagglutinin we designed two unrelated proteins that, following affinity maturation, bound hemagglutinin at subnanomolar dissociation constants. Co-crystal structures of hemagglutinin bound to the two designed binders were within 1Angstrom RMSd of their models, validating the accuracy of the design strategy. One of the designed proteins inhibits the conformational changes that underlie hemagglutinin's cell-invasion functions and blocks virus infectivity in cell culture, suggesting that such proteins may in future serve as diagnostics and antivirals against a wide range of pathogenic influenza strains. We have used this method to obtain experimentally validated binders of several other target proteins, demonstrating the generality of the approach. We discuss the combination of modeling and high-throughput characterization of design variants which has been key to the success of this approach, as well as how we have used the data obtained in this project to enhance our understanding of molecular recognition. References: Science 332:816 JMB, in press Protein Sci 20:753

  16. Chemical inhibition of bacterial protein tyrosine phosphatase suppresses capsule production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standish, Alistair J; Salim, Angela A; Zhang, Hua; Capon, Robert J; Morona, Renato

    2012-01-01

    Capsule polysaccharide is a major virulence factor for a wide range of bacterial pathogens, including Streptococcus pneumoniae. The biosynthesis of Wzy-dependent capsules in both gram-negative and -positive bacteria is regulated by a system involving a protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) and a protein tyrosine kinase. However, how the system functions is still controversial. In Streptococcus pneumoniae, a major human pathogen, the system is present in all but 2 of the 93 serotypes found to date. In order to study this regulation further, we performed a screen to find inhibitors of the phosphatase, CpsB. This led to the observation that a recently discovered marine sponge metabolite, fascioquinol E, inhibited CpsB phosphatase activity both in vitro and in vivo at concentrations that did not affect the growth of the bacteria. This inhibition resulted in decreased capsule synthesis in D39 and Type 1 S. pneumoniae. Furthermore, concentrations of Fascioquinol E that inhibited capsule also lead to increased attachment of pneumococci to a macrophage cell line, suggesting that this compound would inhibit the virulence of the pathogen. Interestingly, this compound also inhibited the phosphatase activity of the structurally unrelated gram-negative PTP, Wzb, which belongs to separate family of protein tyrosine phosphatases. Furthermore, incubation with Klebsiella pneumoniae, which contains a homologous phosphatase, resulted in decreased capsule synthesis. Taken together, these data provide evidence that PTPs are critical for Wzy-dependent capsule production across a spectrum of bacteria, and as such represents a valuable new molecular target for the development of anti-virulence antibacterials.

  17. Chemical inhibition of bacterial protein tyrosine phosphatase suppresses capsule production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alistair J Standish

    Full Text Available Capsule polysaccharide is a major virulence factor for a wide range of bacterial pathogens, including Streptococcus pneumoniae. The biosynthesis of Wzy-dependent capsules in both gram-negative and -positive bacteria is regulated by a system involving a protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP and a protein tyrosine kinase. However, how the system functions is still controversial. In Streptococcus pneumoniae, a major human pathogen, the system is present in all but 2 of the 93 serotypes found to date. In order to study this regulation further, we performed a screen to find inhibitors of the phosphatase, CpsB. This led to the observation that a recently discovered marine sponge metabolite, fascioquinol E, inhibited CpsB phosphatase activity both in vitro and in vivo at concentrations that did not affect the growth of the bacteria. This inhibition resulted in decreased capsule synthesis in D39 and Type 1 S. pneumoniae. Furthermore, concentrations of Fascioquinol E that inhibited capsule also lead to increased attachment of pneumococci to a macrophage cell line, suggesting that this compound would inhibit the virulence of the pathogen. Interestingly, this compound also inhibited the phosphatase activity of the structurally unrelated gram-negative PTP, Wzb, which belongs to separate family of protein tyrosine phosphatases. Furthermore, incubation with Klebsiella pneumoniae, which contains a homologous phosphatase, resulted in decreased capsule synthesis. Taken together, these data provide evidence that PTPs are critical for Wzy-dependent capsule production across a spectrum of bacteria, and as such represents a valuable new molecular target for the development of anti-virulence antibacterials.

  18. Synergistic inhibition of the intrinsic factor X activation by protein S and C4b-binding protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppelman, S.J.

    1995-01-01

    The complement protein C4b-binding protein plays an important role in the regulation of the protein C anticoagulant pathway. C4b-binding protein can bind to protein S, thereby inhibiting the cofactor activity of protein S for activated protein C. In this report, we describe a new role for

  19. Synergistic inhibition of the intrinsic factor X activation by protein S and C4b-binding protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppelman, S.J.

    1995-01-01

    The complement protein C4b-binding protein plays an important role in the regulation of the protein C anticoagulant pathway. C4b-binding protein can bind to protein S, thereby inhibiting the cofactor activity of protein S for activated protein C. In this report, we describe a new role for C4b-bindin

  20. TIM-family proteins inhibit HIV-1 release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Minghua; Ablan, Sherimay D; Miao, Chunhui; Zheng, Yi-Min; Fuller, Matthew S; Rennert, Paul D; Maury, Wendy; Johnson, Marc C; Freed, Eric O; Liu, Shan-Lu

    2014-09-02

    Accumulating evidence indicates that T-cell immunoglobulin (Ig) and mucin domain (TIM) proteins play critical roles in viral infections. Herein, we report that the TIM-family proteins strongly inhibit HIV-1 release, resulting in diminished viral production and replication. Expression of TIM-1 causes HIV-1 Gag and mature viral particles to accumulate on the plasma membrane. Mutation of the phosphatidylserine (PS) binding sites of TIM-1 abolishes its ability to block HIV-1 release. TIM-1, but to a much lesser extent PS-binding deficient mutants, induces PS flipping onto the cell surface; TIM-1 is also found to be incorporated into HIV-1 virions. Importantly, TIM-1 inhibits HIV-1 replication in CD4-positive Jurkat cells, despite its capability of up-regulating CD4 and promoting HIV-1 entry. In addition to TIM-1, TIM-3 and TIM-4 also block the release of HIV-1, as well as that of murine leukemia virus (MLV) and Ebola virus (EBOV); knockdown of TIM-3 in differentiated monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) enhances HIV-1 production. The inhibitory effects of TIM-family proteins on virus release are extended to other PS receptors, such as Axl and RAGE. Overall, our study uncovers a novel ability of TIM-family proteins to block the release of HIV-1 and other viruses by interaction with virion- and cell-associated PS. Our work provides new insights into a virus-cell interaction that is mediated by TIMs and PS receptors.

  1. 2-Bromopalmitate reduces protein deacylation by inhibition of acyl-protein thioesterase enzymatic activities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria P Pedro

    Full Text Available S-acylation, the covalent attachment of palmitate and other fatty acids on cysteine residues, is a reversible post-translational modification that exerts diverse effects on protein functions. S-acylation is catalyzed by protein acyltransferases (PAT, while deacylation requires acyl-protein thioesterases (APT, with numerous inhibitors for these enzymes having already been developed and characterized. Among these inhibitors, the palmitate analog 2-brompalmitate (2-BP is the most commonly used to inhibit palmitoylation in cells. Nevertheless, previous results from our laboratory have suggested that 2-BP could affect protein deacylation. Here, we further investigated in vivo and in vitro the effect of 2-BP on the acylation/deacylation protein machinery, with it being observed that 2-BP, in addition to inhibiting PAT activity in vivo, also perturbed the acylation cycle of GAP-43 at the level of depalmitoylation and consequently affected its kinetics of membrane association. Furthermore, 2-BP was able to inhibit in vitro the enzymatic activities of human APT1 and APT2, the only two thioesterases shown to mediate protein deacylation, through an uncompetitive mechanism of action. In fact, APT1 and APT2 hydrolyzed both the monomeric form as well as the micellar state of the substrate palmitoyl-CoA. On the basis of the obtained results, as APTs can mediate deacylation on membrane bound and unbound substrates, this suggests that the access of APTs to the membrane interface is not a necessary requisite for deacylation. Moreover, as the enzymatic activity of APTs was inhibited by 2-BP treatment, then the kinetics analysis of protein acylation using 2-BP should be carefully interpreted, as this drug also inhibits protein deacylation.

  2. 2-Bromopalmitate reduces protein deacylation by inhibition of acyl-protein thioesterase enzymatic activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedro, Maria P; Vilcaes, Aldo A; Tomatis, Vanesa M; Oliveira, Rafael G; Gomez, Guillermo A; Daniotti, Jose L

    2013-01-01

    S-acylation, the covalent attachment of palmitate and other fatty acids on cysteine residues, is a reversible post-translational modification that exerts diverse effects on protein functions. S-acylation is catalyzed by protein acyltransferases (PAT), while deacylation requires acyl-protein thioesterases (APT), with numerous inhibitors for these enzymes having already been developed and characterized. Among these inhibitors, the palmitate analog 2-brompalmitate (2-BP) is the most commonly used to inhibit palmitoylation in cells. Nevertheless, previous results from our laboratory have suggested that 2-BP could affect protein deacylation. Here, we further investigated in vivo and in vitro the effect of 2-BP on the acylation/deacylation protein machinery, with it being observed that 2-BP, in addition to inhibiting PAT activity in vivo, also perturbed the acylation cycle of GAP-43 at the level of depalmitoylation and consequently affected its kinetics of membrane association. Furthermore, 2-BP was able to inhibit in vitro the enzymatic activities of human APT1 and APT2, the only two thioesterases shown to mediate protein deacylation, through an uncompetitive mechanism of action. In fact, APT1 and APT2 hydrolyzed both the monomeric form as well as the micellar state of the substrate palmitoyl-CoA. On the basis of the obtained results, as APTs can mediate deacylation on membrane bound and unbound substrates, this suggests that the access of APTs to the membrane interface is not a necessary requisite for deacylation. Moreover, as the enzymatic activity of APTs was inhibited by 2-BP treatment, then the kinetics analysis of protein acylation using 2-BP should be carefully interpreted, as this drug also inhibits protein deacylation.

  3. Targeted in vivo inhibition of specific protein-protein interactions using recombinant antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matej Zábrady

    Full Text Available With the growing availability of genomic sequence information, there is an increasing need for gene function analysis. Antibody-mediated "silencing" represents an intriguing alternative for the precise inhibition of a particular function of biomolecules. Here, we describe a method for selecting recombinant antibodies with a specific purpose in mind, which is to inhibit intrinsic protein-protein interactions in the cytosol of plant cells. Experimental procedures were designed for conveniently evaluating desired properties of recombinant antibodies in consecutive steps. Our selection method was successfully used to develop a recombinant antibody inhibiting the interaction of ARABIDOPSIS HISTIDINE PHOSPHOTRANSFER PROTEIN 3 with such of its upstream interaction partners as the receiver domain of CYTOKININ INDEPENDENT HISTIDINE KINASE 1. The specific down-regulation of the cytokinin signaling pathway in vivo demonstrates the validity of our approach. This selection method can serve as a prototype for developing unique recombinant antibodies able to interfere with virtually any biomolecule in the living cell.

  4. Kinetic evaluation of the inhibition of protein glycation during heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akıllıoğlu, H Gül; Gökmen, Vural

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to investigate the kinetics of early stage of the Maillard reaction by a reversible bimolecular reaction mechanism and also to evaluate the compatibility of enzyme inhibition kinetics for calculating the inhibitory activity of protein anti-glycation agents. Model systems composed of ovalbumin, glucose, and anti-glycation agents (tannic acid or calcium ion) at different molar ratios were heated at 90 °C for different times in dry state or in solution. Heated samples were analysed for furosine, acid derivative of N-ε-fructoselysine (FL), to monitor the progression of the early glycation stage. Compared to a control, presence of calcium ions and tannic acid decreased FL formation significantly (pglycation of ovalbumin by a mixed non-competitive mechanism in both dry and in solution conditions; while the mode of inhibition by tannic acid was found to be purely non-competitive in the dry state.

  5. Acetazolamide inhibits aquaporin-1 protein expression and angiogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang XIANG; Bing MA; Tao LI; Jun-wei GAO; He-ming YU; Xue-jun LI

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To study effects of acetazolamide on aquaporin-1 (AQP1) protein expression and angiogenesis. METHODS:Establishing Lewis-lung-carcinoma model, the localization of AQP1 in tumor tissues was investigated by immunohistochemical methods; The biological activity of acetazolamide was detected by endothelial cells proliferation test (MTT) assay and chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) vascular inhibition test. RESULTS: Immunohistochemical localization of AQP1 in mice tumor was labeled in capillaries, post capillary venules endothelial cells. After being treated with acetazolamide, the number of capillaries and post capillary venules was significantly decreased in tumor tissue. Acetazolamide showed significant inhibitory effect on angiogenesis in CAM and endothelial cell proliferation.CONCLUSION: Acetazolamide might be identified and developed as one of potential lead compounds for a new therapeutic intervention in inhibiting cancer angiogenesis.

  6. HEPES inhibits the conversion of prion protein in cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delmouly, Karine; Belondrade, Maxime; Casanova, Danielle; Milhavet, Ollivier; Lehmann, Sylvain

    2011-05-01

    HEPES is a well-known buffering reagent used in cell-culture medium. Interestingly, this compound is also responsible for significant modifications of biological parameters such as uptake of organic molecules, alteration of oxidative stress mechanisms or inhibition of ion channels. While using cell-culture medium supplemented with HEPES on prion-infected cells, it was noticed that there was a significant concentration-dependent inhibition of accumulation of the abnormal isoform of the prion protein (PrP(Sc)). This effect was present only in live cells and was thought to be related to modification of the PrP environment or biology. These results could modify the interpretation of cell-culture assays of prion therapeutic agents, as well as of previous cell biology results obtained in the field using HEPES buffers. This inhibitory effect of HEPES could also be exploited to prevent contamination or propagation of prions in cell culture.

  7. Prediction and evaluation of protein farnesyltransferase inhibition by commercial drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGraw, Amanda J.; Keiser, Michael J.; Ochocki, Joshua D.; Shoichet, Brian K.; Distefano, Mark D.

    2010-01-01

    The Similarity Ensemble Approach (SEAa) relates proteins based on the set-wise chemical similarity among their ligands. It can be used to rapidly search large compound databases and to build cross-target similarity maps. The emerging maps relate targets in ways that reveal relationships one might not recognize based on sequence or structural similarities alone. SEA has previously revealed cross talk between drugs acting primarily on G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). Here we used SEA to look for potential off-target inhibition of the enzyme protein farnesyltransferase (PFTase) by commercially available drugs. The inhibition of PFTase has profound consequences for oncogenesis, as well as a number of other diseases. In the present study, two commercial drugs, Loratadine and Miconazole, were identified as potential ligands for PFTase and subsequently confirmed as such experimentally. These results point towards the applicability of SEA for the prediction of not only GPCR-GPCR drug cross talk, but also GPCR-enzyme and enzyme-enzyme drug cross talk. PMID:20180535

  8. Stabilization and inhibition of protein-protein interactions: the 14-3-3 case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milroy, Lech-Gustav; Brunsveld, Luc; Ottmann, Christian

    2013-01-18

    Small-molecule modulation of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) is one of the most exciting but also difficult fields in chemical biology and drug development. As one of the most important "hub" proteins with at least 200-300 interaction partners, the 14-3-3 proteins are an especially fruitful case for PPI intervention. Here, we summarize recent success stories in small-molecule modulation, both inhibition and stabilization, of 14-3-3 PPIs. The chemical breath of modulators includes natural products such as fusicoccin A and derivatives but also compounds identified via high-throughput and in silico screening, which has yielded a toolbox of useful inhibitors and stabilizers for this interesting class of adapter proteins. Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are involved in almost all biological processes, with any given protein typically engaged in complexes with other proteins for the majority of its lifetime. Hence, proteins function not simply as single, isolated entities but display their roles by interacting with other cellular components. These different interaction patterns are presumably as important as the intrinsic biochemical activity status of the protein itself. The biological role of a protein is therefore decisively dependent on the underlying PPI network that furthermore can show great spatial and temporal variations. A thorough appreciation and understanding of this concept and its regulation mechanisms could help to develop new therapeutic agents and concepts.

  9. The Transmembrane Adaptor Protein SIT Inhibits TCR-Mediated Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, Börge; Krieger, Tina; Kalinski, Thomas; Thielitz, Anja; Reinhold, Dirk; Roessner, Albert; Schraven, Burkhart; Simeoni, Luca

    2011-01-01

    Transmembrane adaptor proteins (TRAPs) organize signaling complexes at the plasma membrane, and thus function as critical linkers and integrators of signaling cascades downstream of antigen receptors. We have previously shown that the transmembrane adaptor protein SIT regulates the threshold for thymocyte selection. Moreover, T cells from SIT-deficient mice are hyperresponsive to CD3 stimulation and undergo enhanced lymphopenia-induced homeostatic proliferation, thus indicating that SIT inhibits TCR-mediated signaling. Here, we have further addressed how SIT regulates signaling cascades in T cells. We demonstrate that the loss of SIT enhances TCR-mediated Akt activation and increased phosphorylation/inactivation of Foxo1, a transcription factor of the Forkhead family that inhibits cell cycle progression and regulates T-cell homeostasis. We have also shown that CD4+ T cells from SIT-deficient mice display increased CD69 and CD40L expression indicating an altered activation status. Additional biochemical analyses further revealed that suppression of SIT expression by RNAi in human T cells resulted in an enhanced proximal TCR signaling. In summary, the data identify SIT as an important modulator of TCR-mediated signaling that regulates T-cell activation, homeostasis and tolerance. PMID:21957439

  10. Inhibition of Protein-Protein Interactions and Signaling by Small Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Ernesto

    2010-03-01

    Protein-protein interactions are at the core of cell signaling pathways as well as many bacterial and viral infection processes. As such, they define critical targets for drug development against diseases such as cancer, arthritis, obesity, AIDS and many others. Until now, the clinical inhibition of protein-protein interactions and signaling has been accomplished with the use of antibodies or soluble versions of receptor molecules. Small molecule replacements of these therapeutic agents have been extremely difficult to develop; either the necessary potency has been hard to achieve or the expected biological effect has not been obtained. In this presentation, we show that a rigorous thermodynamic approach that combines differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) provides a unique platform for the identification and optimization of small molecular weight inhibitors of protein-protein interactions. Recent advances in the development of cell entry inhibitors of HIV-1 using this approach will be discussed.

  11. Competitive inhibition reaction mechanisms for the two-step model of protein aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whidden, Mark; Ho, Allison; Ivanova, Magdalena I; Schnell, Santiago

    2014-01-01

    We propose three new reaction mechanisms for competitive inhibition of protein aggregation for the two-step model of protein aggregation. The first mechanism is characterized by the inhibition of native protein, the second is characterized by the inhibition of aggregation-prone protein and the third mechanism is characterized by the mixed inhibition of native and aggregation-prone proteins. Rate equations are derived for these mechanisms, and a method is described for plotting kinetic results to distinguish these three types of inhibitors. The derived rate equations provide a simple way of estimating the inhibition constant of native or aggregation-prone protein inhibitors in protein aggregation. The new approach is used to estimate the inhibition constants of different peptide inhibitors of insulin aggregation.

  12. Inhibition of protein kinase C phosphorylation of hepatitis B virus capsids inhibits virion formation and causes intracellular capsid accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittkop, Linda; Schwarz, Alexandra; Cassany, Aurelia; Grün-Bernhard, Stefanie; Delaleau, Mildred; Rabe, Birgit; Cazenave, Christian; Gerlich, Wolfram; Glebe, Dieter; Kann, Michael

    2010-07-01

    Capsids of hepatitis B virus and other hepadnaviruses contain a cellular protein kinase, which phosphorylates the capsid protein. Some phosphorylation sites are shown to be essential for distinct steps of viral replication as pregenome packaging or plus strand DNA synthesis. Although different protein kinases have been reported to phosphorylate the capsid protein, varying experimental approaches do not allow direct comparison. Furthermore, the activity of a specific protein kinase has not yet been correlated to steps in the hepadnaviral life cycle. In this study we show that capsids from various sources encapsidate active protein kinase Calpha, irrespective of hepatitis B virus genotype and host cell. Treatment of a virion expressing cell line with a pseudosubstrate inhibitor showed that inhibition of protein kinase C phosphorylation did not affect genome maturation but resulted in capsid accumulation and inhibited virion release to the medium. Our results imply that different protein kinases have distinct functions within the hepadnaviral life cycle.

  13. Cotranslational Coat Protein-Mediated Inhibition of Potyviral RNA Translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besong-Ndika, Jane; Ivanov, Konstantin I.; Hafrèn, Anders; Michon, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Potato virus A (PVA) is a single-stranded positive-sense RNA virus and a member of the family Potyviridae. The PVA coat protein (CP) has an intrinsic capacity to self-assemble into filamentous virus-like particles, but the mechanism responsible for the initiation of viral RNA encapsidation in vivo remains unclear. Apart from virion assembly, PVA CP is also involved in the inhibition of viral RNA translation. In this study, we show that CP inhibits PVA RNA translation in a dose-dependent manner, through a mechanism involving the CP-encoding region. Analysis of this region, however, failed to identify any RNA secondary structure(s) preferentially recognized by CP, suggesting that the inhibition depends on CP-CP rather than CP-RNA interactions. In agreement with this possibility, insertion of an in-frame stop codon upstream of the CP sequence led to a marked decrease in the inhibition of viral RNA translation. Based on these results, we propose a model in which the cotranslational interactions between excess CP accumulating in trans and CP translated from viral RNA in cis are required to initiate the translational repression. This model suggests a mechanism for how viral RNA can be sequestered from translation and specifically selected for encapsidation at the late stages of viral infection. IMPORTANCE The main functions of the CP during potyvirus infection are to protect viral RNA from degradation and to transport it locally, systemically, and from host to host. Although virion assembly is a key step in the potyviral infectious cycle, little is known about how it is initiated and how viral RNA is selected for encapsidation. The results presented here suggest that CP-CP rather than CP-RNA interactions are predominantly involved in the sequestration of viral RNA away from translation. We propose that the cotranslational nature of these interactions may represent a mechanism for the selection of viral RNA for encapsidation. A better understanding of the

  14. Thioredoxin interacting protein inhibits hypoxia-inducible factor transcriptional activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Michael R; Rogers, Lynette K; Liu, Yusen; Welty, Stephen E; Tipple, Trent E

    2010-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is required for proper lung development and is transcriptionally regulated in alveolar epithelial cells by hypoxia inducible factor (HIF). Previous findings in a newborn mouse model of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) suggest that thioredoxin interacting protein (Txnip) is a novel regulator of VEGF expression. The present studies were designed to test the hypothesis that Txnip negatively regulates VEGF through effects on HIF-mediated gene expression. To test this hypothesis, we first examined the levels of VEGF and Txnip protein in the lungs of 1 day-old newborn and E19 embryos and detected a significant inverse correlation. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying this relationship, we studied the effects of Txnip overexpression on HIF-mediated transcription using murine lung epithelial (MLE-12) cells. Overexpression of Txnip inhibited HIF-mediated reporter activity in both hypoxia and room air. Suppression of HIF activity by Txnip appeared to be independent of the ability of Txnip to bind to thioredoxin. Thus, our studies support a model in which Txnip is a potentially critical regulator of HIF-mediated gene transcription in the murine lung. Alterations in Txnip expression could alter lung VEGF expression in prematurely born human infants and contribute to the development of BPD. PMID:20692333

  15. Cross-Species Virus-Host Protein-Protein Interactions Inhibiting Innate Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    diseases are a regular occurrence globally (Figure 1). The Zika virus is the latest example gaining widespread attention. Many of the (re-)emerging...8725 John J. Kingman Road, MS 6201 Fort Belvoir, VA 22060-6201 T E C H N IC A L R E P O R T DTRA-TR-16-79 Cross-species virus -host...Cross-species virus -host protein-protein interactions inhibiting innate immunity What are the major goals of the project? List the major goals of

  16. The grapevine polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein (VvPGIP1) reduces Botrytis cinerea susceptibility in transgenic tobacco and differentially inhibits fungal polygalacturonases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joubert, D.A.; Slaughter, A.R.; Kemp, G.; Becker, J.V.W.; Krooshof, G.H.; Bergmann, C.; Benen, J.A.E.; Pretorius, I.S.; Vivier, M.A.

    2006-01-01

    Polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins (PGIPs) selectively inhibit polygalacturonases (PGs) secreted by invading plant pathogenic fungi. PGIPs display differential inhibition towards PGs from different fungi, also towards different isoforms of PGs originating from a specific pathogen. Recently, a PGI

  17. Microsomal protein synthesis inhibition: an early manifestation of gentamicin nephrotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, W.M.; Mela-Riker, L.M.; Houghton, D.C.; Gilbert, D.N.; Buss, W.C.

    1988-08-01

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics achieve bacterial killing by binding to bacterial ribosomes and inhibiting protein synthesis. To examine whether similar mechanisms could be present in renal tubular cells prior to the onset of overt proximal tubular necrosis due to these drugs, we isolated microsomes from Fischer rats given 20 mg/kg gentamicin every 12 h subcutaneously for 2 days and from vehicle-injected controls. Concomitant studies of renal structure, function, and mitochondrial respiration were carried out. (3H)leucine incorporation into renal microsomes of treated animals was reduced by 21.9% (P less than 0.01), whereas brain and liver microsomes from the same animals were unaffected. Gentamicin concentration in the renal microsomal preparation was 56 micrograms/ml, a value 7- to 10-fold above concentrations necessary to inhibit bacterial growth. Conventional renal function studies were normal (blood urea, serum creatinine, creatinine clearance). Treated animals showed only a mild reduction of inulin clearance, 0.71 compared with 0.93 ml.min-1.100 g-1 in controls (P less than 0.05), and an increase in urinary excretion of N-acetylglucosaminidase of 20 compared with 14.8 units/l (P less than 0.05). Renal slice transport of p-aminohippuric acid, tetraethylammonium, and the fractional excretion of sodium were well preserved. There was no evidence, as seen by light microscopy, of proximal tubular necrosis. Mitochondrial cytochrome concentrations were normal and respiratory activities only slightly reduced. Processes similar to those responsible for bacterial killing could be involved in experimental gentamicin nephrotoxicity before overt cellular necrosis.

  18. Macrocycles that inhibit the binding between heat shock protein 90 and TPR-containing proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardi, Veronica C; Alexander, Leslie D; Johnson, Victoria A; McAlpine, Shelli R

    2011-12-16

    Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) accounts for 1-2% of the total proteins in normal cells and functions as a molecular chaperone that folds, assembles, and stabilizes client proteins. Hsp90 is overexpressed (3- to 6-fold increase) in stressed cells, including cancer cells, and regulates over 200 client and co-chaperone proteins. Hsp90 client proteins are involved in a plethora of cellular signaling events including numerous growth and apoptotic pathways. Since pathway-specific inhibitors can be problematic in drug-resistant cancers, shutting down multiple pathways at once is a promising approach when developing new therapeutics. Hsp90's ability to modulate many growth and signaling pathways simultaneously makes this protein an attractive target in the field of cancer therapeutics. Herein we present evidence that a small molecule modulates Hsp90 via binding between the N and middle domain and allosterically inhibiting the binding interaction between Hsp90 and four C-terminal binding client proteins: IP6K2, FKBP38, FKBP52, and HOP. These last three clients contain a tetratricopeptide-repeat (TPR) region, which is known to interact with the MEEVD sequence on the C-terminus of Hsp90. Thus, this small molecule modulates the activity between co-chaperones that contain TPR motifs and Hsp90's MEEVD region. This mechanism of action is unique from that of all Hsp90 inhibitors currently in clinical trials where these molecules have no effect on proteins that bind to the C-terminus of Hsp90. Further, our small molecule induces a Caspase-3 dependent apoptotic event. Thus, we describe the mechanism of a novel scaffold that is a useful tool for studying cell-signaling events that result when blocking the MEEVD-TPR interaction between Hsp90 and co-chaperone proteins.

  19. Rheb Inhibits Protein Synthesis by Activating the PERK-eIF2α Signaling Cascade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richa Tyagi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Rheb, a ubiquitous small GTPase, is well known to bind and activate mTOR, which augments protein synthesis. Inhibition of protein synthesis is also physiologically regulated. Thus, with cell stress, the unfolded protein response system leads to phosphorylation of the initiation factor eIF2α and arrest of protein synthesis. We now demonstrate a major role for Rheb in inhibiting protein synthesis by enhancing the phosphorylation of eIF2α by protein kinase-like ER kinase (PERK. Interplay between the stimulatory and inhibitory roles of Rheb may enable cells to modulate protein synthesis in response to varying environmental stresses.

  20. Ribosome-inhibiting proteins from in vitro cultures of Phytolacca dodecandra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, S.; Hansen, Harald S.; Nyman, U.

    1991-01-01

    Phytolacca dodecandra (L'Herit) grown in cell cultures was investigated for content of ribosome-inhibiting proteins, which was evaluated hy measuring inhibition of protein synthesis in a cell-free rat liver extract. Calli initiated from leaf, cotyledon, radicle, and hypocotyl and suspension cells...

  1. Effect of Glucuronidation on the Potential of Kaempferol to Inhibit Serine/Threonine Protein Kinases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beekmann, Karsten; Haan, De Laura H.J.; Actis-Goretta, Lucas; Bladeren, Van Peter J.; Rietjens, Ivonne M.C.M.

    2016-01-01

    To study the effect of metabolic conjugation of flavonoids on the potential to inhibit protein kinase activity, the inhibitory effects of the dietary flavonol kaempferol and its major plasma conjugate kaempferol-3-O-glucuronide on protein kinases were studied. To this end, the inhibition of the p

  2. Rhizoctonia resistance conferred by a sugar beet polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins (PGIPs) are cell wall leucine-rich repeat (LRR) proteins recognized as having a role in plant defense. PGIPs inhibit fungal polygalacturonase (PG) enzymes that break down the polygalacturonate chain in plant cell walls to initiate disease development. The inte...

  3. Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (cetp) inhibition in the treatment of cancer

    KAUST Repository

    Kaur, Mandeep

    2016-09-01

    In one embodiment, the invention provides methods of treatment which use therapeutically effective amounts of Choleste ryl Ester Transfer Protein (CETP) inhibitors to treat a variety of cancers. In certain embodiments, the inhibitor is a CETP-inhibiting small molecule, CETP-inhibiting antisense oligonucleotide, CETP-inhibiting siRNA or a CETP- inhibiting antibody. Related pharmaceutical compositions, kits, diagnostics and screens are also provided.

  4. Inhibition of the intrinsic factor X activating complex by protein S: evidence for a specific binding of protein S to factor VIII

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppelman, S.J.

    1995-01-01

    Protein S is a vitamin K-dependent nonenzymatic anticoagulant protein that acts as a cofactor to activated protein C. Recently it was shown that protein S inhibits the prothrombinase reaction independent of activated protein C. In this study, we show that protein S can also inhibit the intrinsic

  5. Inhibition of the intrinsic factor X activating complex by protein S: evidence for a specific binding of protein S to factor VIII

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppelman, S.J.

    1995-01-01

    Protein S is a vitamin K-dependent nonenzymatic anticoagulant protein that acts as a cofactor to activated protein C. Recently it was shown that protein S inhibits the prothrombinase reaction independent of activated protein C. In this study, we show that protein S can also inhibit the intrinsic fac

  6. Transmembrane protein aptamers that inhibit CCR5 expression and HIV coreceptor function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheideman, Elizabeth H; Marlatt, Sara A; Xie, Yanhua; Hu, Yani; Sutton, Richard E; DiMaio, Daniel

    2012-10-01

    We have exploited the ability of transmembrane domains to engage in highly specific protein-protein interactions to construct a new class of small proteins that inhibit HIV infection. By screening a library encoding hundreds of thousands of artificial transmembrane proteins with randomized transmembrane domains (termed "traptamers," for transmembrane aptamers), we isolated six 44- or 45-amino-acid proteins with completely different transmembrane sequences that inhibited cell surface and total expression of the HIV coreceptor CCR5. The traptamers inhibited transduction of human T cells by HIV reporter viruses pseudotyped with R5-tropic gp120 envelope proteins but had minimal effects on reporter viruses with X4-tropic gp120. Optimization of two traptamers significantly increased their activity and resulted in greater than 95% inhibition of R5-tropic reporter virus transduction without inhibiting expression of CD4, the primary HIV receptor, or CXCR4, another HIV coreceptor. In addition, traptamers inhibited transduction mediated by a mutant R5-tropic gp120 protein resistant to maraviroc, a small-molecule CCR5 inhibitor, and they dramatically inhibited replication of an R5-tropic laboratory strain of HIV in a multicycle infection assay. Genetic experiments suggested that the active traptamers specifically interacted with the transmembrane domains of CCR5 and that some of the traptamers interacted with different portions of CCR5. Thus, we have constructed multiple proteins not found in nature that interfere with CCR5 expression and inhibit HIV infection. These proteins may be valuable tools to probe the organization of the transmembrane domains of CCR5 and their relationship to its biological activities, and they may serve as starting points to develop new strategies to inhibit HIV infection.

  7. Arginine Inhibits Adsorption of Proteins on Polystyrene Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikiya, Yui; Tomita, Shunsuke; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Shiraki, Kentaro

    2013-01-01

    Nonspecific adsorption of protein on solid surfaces causes a reduction of concentration as well as enzyme inactivation during purification and storage. However, there are no versatile inhibitors of the adsorption between proteins and solid surfaces at low concentrations. Therefore, we examined additives for the prevention of protein adsorption on polystyrene particles (PS particles) as a commonly-used material for vessels such as disposable test tubes and microtubes. A protein solution was mixed with PS particles, and then adsorption of protein was monitored by the concentration and activity of protein in the supernatant after centrifugation. Five different proteins bound to PS particles through electrostatic, hydrophobic, and aromatic interactions, causing a decrease in protein concentration and loss of enzyme activity in the supernatant. Among the additives, including arginine hydrochloride (Arg), lysine hydrochloride, guanidine hydrochloride, NaCl, glycine, and glucose, Arg was most effective in preventing the binding of proteins to PS particles as well as activity loss. Moreover, even after the mixing of protein and PS particles, the addition of Arg caused desorption of the bound protein from PS particles. This study demonstrated a new function of Arg, which expands the potential for application of Arg to proteins. PMID:23967100

  8. Mutant p53 protein localized in the cytoplasm inhibits autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morselli, Eugenia; Tasdemir, Ezgi; Maiuri, Maria Chiara; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Kepp, Oliver; Criollo, Alfredo; Vicencio, José Miguel; Soussi, Thierry; Kroemer, Guido

    2008-10-01

    The knockout, knockdown or chemical inhibition of p53 stimulates autophagy. Moreover, autophagy-inducing stimuli such as nutrient depletion, rapamycin or lithium cause the depletion of cytoplasmic p53, which in turn is required for the induction of autophagy. Here, we show that retransfection of p53(-/-) HCT 116 colon carcinoma cells with wild type p53 decreases autophagy down to baseline levels. Surprisingly, one third among a panel of 22 cancer-associated p53 single amino acid mutants also inhibited autophagy when transfected into p53(-/-) cells. Those variants of p53 that preferentially localize to the cytoplasm effectively repressed autophagy, whereas p53 mutants that display a prominently nuclear distribution failed to inhibit autophagy. The investigation of a series of deletion mutants revealed that removal of the DNA-binding domain from p53 fails to interfere with its role in the regulation of autophagy. Altogether, these results identify the cytoplasmic localization of p53 as the most important feature for p53-mediated autophagy inhibition. Moreover, the structural requirements for the two biological activities of extranuclear p53, namely induction of apoptosis and inhibition of autophagy, are manifestly different.

  9. Protein kinase A inhibition facilitates the antitumor activity of xanthohumol, a valosin-containing protein inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikata, Yuki; Yoshimaru, Tetsuro; Komatsu, Masato; Katoh, Hiroto; Sato, Reiko; Kanagaki, Shuhei; Okazaki, Yasumasa; Toyokuni, Shinya; Tashiro, Etsu; Ishikawa, Shumpei; Katagiri, Toyomasa; Imoto, Masaya

    2017-01-25

    Xanthohumol (XN), a simple prenylated chalcone, can be isolated from hops and has the potential to be a cancer chemopreventive agent against several human tumor cell lines. We previously identified valosin-containing protein (VCP) as a target of XN; VCP can also play crucial roles in cancer progression and prognosis. Therefore, we investigated the molecular mechanisms governing the contribution of VCP to the antitumor activity of XN. Several human tumor cell lines were treated with XN to investigate which human tumor cell lines are sensitive to XN. Several cell lines exhibited high sensitivity to XN both in vitro and in vivo. shRNA screening and bioinformatics analysis identified that the inhibition of the adenylate cyclase (AC) pathway synergistically facilitated apoptosis induced by VCP inhibition. These results suggest there is crosstalk between the AC pathway and VCP function, and targeting both VCP and the AC pathway is a potential chemotherapeutic strategy for a subset of tumor cells. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Protein disulfide isomerase interacts with tau protein and inhibits its fibrillization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Rong Xu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tau protein is implicated in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders such as tauopathies including Alzheimer disease, and Tau fibrillization is thought to be related to neuronal toxicity. Physiological inhibitors of Tau fibrillization hold promise for developing new strategies for treatment of Alzheimer disease. Because protein disulfide isomerase (PDI is both an enzyme and a chaperone, and implicated in neuroprotection against Alzheimer disease, we want to know whether PDI can prevent Tau fibrillization. In this study, we have investigated the interaction between PDI and Tau protein and the effect of PDI on Tau fibrillization. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: As evidenced by co-immunoprecipitation and confocal laser scanning microscopy, human PDI interacts and co-locates with some endogenous human Tau on the endoplasmic reticulum of undifferentiated SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. The results from isothermal titration calorimetry show that one full-length human PDI binds to one full-length human Tau (or human Tau fragment Tau244-372 monomer with moderate, micromolar affinity at physiological pH and near physiological ionic strength. As revealed by thioflavin T binding assays, Sarkosyl-insoluble SDS-PAGE, and transmission electron microscopy, full-length human PDI remarkably inhibits both steps of nucleation and elongation of Tau244-372 fibrillization in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, we find that two molecules of the a-domain of human PDI interact with one Tau244-372 molecule with sub-micromolar affinity, and inhibit both steps of nucleation and elongation of Tau244-372 fibrillization more strongly than full-length human PDI. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We demonstrate for the first time that human PDI binds to Tau protein mainly through its thioredoxin-like catalytic domain a, forming a 1∶1 complex and preventing Tau misfolding. Our findings suggest that PDI could act as a physiological inhibitor of Tau

  11. Alternatively spliced myeloid differentiation protein-2 (MD-2s) protein inhibits TLR4-mediated lung inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumurkhuu, Gantsetseg; Dagvadorj, Jargalsaikhan; Jones, Heather D.; Chen, Shuang; Shimada, Kenichi; Crother, Timothy R.; Arditi, Moshe

    2014-01-01

    We previously identified a novel alternatively spliced isoform of human myeloid differentiation protein-2 (MD-2s) that competitively inhibits binding of MD-2 to TLR4 in vitro. Here we investigated the protective role of MD-2s in LPS-induced acute lung injury by delivering intracheally (i.t.) an adenovirus construct that expressed MD-2s (Ad-MD-2s). After adenovirus-mediated gene transfer, MD-2s was strongly expressed in lung epithelial cells and readily detected in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Compared to Ad-EV control mice, Ad-MD-2s delivery resulted in significantly less LPS-induced inflammation in the lungs, including less protein leakage, cell recruitment, and expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, such as IL-6, KC, and MIP-2. BALF from Ad-MD-2s mice transferred into lungs of naive mice before i.t. LPS challenge diminished pro-inflammatory cytokine levels. As house dust mite (HDM) sensitization is dependent on TLR4 and HDM Der p 2, a structural homolog of MD-2, we also investigated the effect of MD-2s on house dust mite (HDM)-induced allergic airway inflammation. Ad-MD-2s given before HDM sensitization significantly inhibited subsequent allergic airway inflammation after HDM challenge, including reductions in eosinophils, goblet cell hyperplasia, and IL-5 levels. Our study indicates that the alternatively spliced short isoform of human MD-2 could be a potential therapeutic candidate to treat human diseases induced or exacerbated by TLR4 signaling, such as Gram-negative bacterial endotoxin-induced lung injury and house dust mite-triggered allergic lung inflammation. PMID:25576596

  12. Mechanism for CARMIL Protein Inhibition of Heterodimeric Actin-capping Protein*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taekyung; Ravilious, Geoffrey E.; Sept, David; Cooper, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Capping protein (CP) controls the polymerization of actin filaments by capping their barbed ends. In lamellipodia, CP dissociates from the actin cytoskeleton rapidly, suggesting the possible existence of an uncapping factor, for which the protein CARMIL (capping protein, Arp2/3 and myosin-I linker) is a candidate. CARMIL binds to CP via two motifs. One, the CP interaction (CPI) motif, is found in a number of unrelated proteins; the other motif is unique to CARMILs, the CARMIL-specific interaction motif. A 115-aa CARMIL fragment of CARMIL with both motifs, termed the CP-binding region (CBR), binds to CP with high affinity, inhibits capping, and causes uncapping. We wanted to understand the structural basis for this function. We used a collection of mutants affecting the actin-binding surface of CP to test the possibility of a steric-blocking model, which remained open because a region of CBR was not resolved in the CBR/CP co-crystal structure. The CP actin-binding mutants bound CBR normally. In addition, a CBR mutant with all residues of the unresolved region changed showed nearly normal binding to CP. Having ruled out a steric blocking model, we tested an allosteric model with molecular dynamics. We found that CBR binding induces changes in the conformation of the actin-binding surface of CP. In addition, ∼30-aa truncations on the actin-binding surface of CP decreased the affinity of CBR for CP. Thus, CARMIL promotes uncapping by binding to a freely accessible site on CP bound to a filament barbed end and inducing a change in the conformation of the actin-binding surface of CP. PMID:22411988

  13. Mitochondrial thiol modification by a targeted electrophile inhibits metabolism in breast adenocarcinoma cells by inhibiting enzyme activity and protein levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, M Ryan; Vayalil, Praveen K; Zhou, Fen; Benavides, Gloria A; Beggs, Reena R; Golzarian, Hafez; Nijampatnam, Bhavitavya; Oliver, Patsy G; Smith, Robin A J; Murphy, Michael P; Velu, Sadanandan E; Landar, Aimee

    2016-08-01

    Many cancer cells follow an aberrant metabolic program to maintain energy for rapid cell proliferation. Metabolic reprogramming often involves the upregulation of glutaminolysis to generate reducing equivalents for the electron transport chain and amino acids for protein synthesis. Critical enzymes involved in metabolism possess a reactive thiolate group, which can be modified by certain oxidants. In the current study, we show that modification of mitochondrial protein thiols by a model compound, iodobutyl triphenylphosphonium (IBTP), decreased mitochondrial metabolism and ATP in MDA-MB 231 (MB231) breast adenocarcinoma cells up to 6 days after an initial 24h treatment. Mitochondrial thiol modification also depressed oxygen consumption rates (OCR) in a dose-dependent manner to a greater extent than a non-thiol modifying analog, suggesting that thiol reactivity is an important factor in the inhibition of cancer cell metabolism. In non-tumorigenic MCF-10A cells, IBTP also decreased OCR; however the extracellular acidification rate was significantly increased at all but the highest concentration (10µM) of IBTP indicating that thiol modification can have significantly different effects on bioenergetics in tumorigenic versus non-tumorigenic cells. ATP and other adenonucleotide levels were also decreased by thiol modification up to 6 days post-treatment, indicating a decreased overall energetic state in MB231 cells. Cellular proliferation of MB231 cells was also inhibited up to 6 days post-treatment with little change to cell viability. Targeted metabolomic analyses revealed that thiol modification caused depletion of both Krebs cycle and glutaminolysis intermediates. Further experiments revealed that the activity of the Krebs cycle enzyme, aconitase, was attenuated in response to thiol modification. Additionally, the inhibition of glutaminolysis corresponded to decreased glutaminase C (GAC) protein levels, although other protein levels were unaffected. This study

  14. Mitochondrial thiol modification by a targeted electrophile inhibits metabolism in breast adenocarcinoma cells by inhibiting enzyme activity and protein levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ryan Smith

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Many cancer cells follow an aberrant metabolic program to maintain energy for rapid cell proliferation. Metabolic reprogramming often involves the upregulation of glutaminolysis to generate reducing equivalents for the electron transport chain and amino acids for protein synthesis. Critical enzymes involved in metabolism possess a reactive thiolate group, which can be modified by certain oxidants. In the current study, we show that modification of mitochondrial protein thiols by a model compound, iodobutyl triphenylphosphonium (IBTP, decreased mitochondrial metabolism and ATP in MDA-MB 231 (MB231 breast adenocarcinoma cells up to 6 days after an initial 24 h treatment. Mitochondrial thiol modification also depressed oxygen consumption rates (OCR in a dose-dependent manner to a greater extent than a non-thiol modifying analog, suggesting that thiol reactivity is an important factor in the inhibition of cancer cell metabolism. In non-tumorigenic MCF-10A cells, IBTP also decreased OCR; however the extracellular acidification rate was significantly increased at all but the highest concentration (10 µM of IBTP indicating that thiol modification can have significantly different effects on bioenergetics in tumorigenic versus non-tumorigenic cells. ATP and other adenonucleotide levels were also decreased by thiol modification up to 6 days post-treatment, indicating a decreased overall energetic state in MB231 cells. Cellular proliferation of MB231 cells was also inhibited up to 6 days post-treatment with little change to cell viability. Targeted metabolomic analyses revealed that thiol modification caused depletion of both Krebs cycle and glutaminolysis intermediates. Further experiments revealed that the activity of the Krebs cycle enzyme, aconitase, was attenuated in response to thiol modification. Additionally, the inhibition of glutaminolysis corresponded to decreased glutaminase C (GAC protein levels, although other protein levels were

  15. Glycation inhibits trichloroacetic acid (TCA)-induced whey protein precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Four different WPI saccharide conjugates were successfully prepared to test whether glycation could inhibit WPI precipitation induced by trichloroacetic acid (TCA). Conjugates molecular weights after glycation were analyzed with SDS-PAGE. No significant secondary structure change due to glycation wa...

  16. IFITM Proteins Inhibit Entry Driven by the MERS-Coronavirus Spike Protein: Evidence for Cholesterol-Independent Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Wrensch

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The interferon-inducible transmembrane (IFITM proteins 1, 2 and 3 inhibit the host cell entry of several enveloped viruses, potentially by promoting the accumulation of cholesterol in endosomal compartments. IFITM3 is essential for control of influenza virus infection in mice and humans. In contrast, the role of IFITM proteins in coronavirus infection is less well defined. Employing a retroviral vector system for analysis of coronavirus entry, we investigated the susceptibility of human-adapted and emerging coronaviruses to inhibition by IFITM proteins. We found that entry of the recently emerged Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV is sensitive to inhibition by IFITM proteins. In 293T cells, IFITM-mediated inhibition of cellular entry of the emerging MERS- and SARS-CoV was less efficient than blockade of entry of the globally circulating human coronaviruses 229E and NL63. Similar differences were not observed in A549 cells, suggesting that cellular context and/or IFITM expression levels can impact inhibition efficiency. The differential IFITM-sensitivity of coronaviruses observed in 293T cells afforded the opportunity to investigate whether efficiency of entry inhibition by IFITMs and endosomal cholesterol accumulation correlate. No such correlation was observed. Furthermore, entry mediated by the influenza virus hemagglutinin was robustly inhibited by IFITM3 but was insensitive to accumulation of endosomal cholesterol, indicating that modulation of cholesterol synthesis/transport did not account for the antiviral activity of IFITM3. Collectively, these results show that the emerging MERS-CoV is a target of the antiviral activity of IFITM proteins and demonstrate that mechanisms other than accumulation of endosomal cholesterol can contribute to viral entry inhibition by IFITMs.

  17. Activation of protein kinase C inhibits synthesis and release of decidual prolactin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harman, I.; Costello, A.; Ganong, B.; Bell, R.M.; Handwerger, S.

    1986-08-01

    Activation of calcium-activated, phospholipid-dependent protein kinase C by diacylglycerol and phorbol esters has been shown to mediate release of hormones in many systems. To determine whether protein kinase C activation is also involved in the regulation of prolactin release from human decidual, the authors have examined the effects of various acylglycerols and phorbol esters on the synthesis and release of prolactin from cultured human decidual cells. sn-1,2-Dioctanolyglycerol (diC8), which is known to stimulate protein kinase C in other systems, inhibited prolactin release in a dose-dependent manner with maximal inhibition of 53.1% at 100 M. Diolein (100 M), which also stimulates protein kinase C activity in some systems, inhibited prolactin release by 21.3%. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), phorbol 12,13-didecanoate, and 4US -phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate, which activate protein kinase C in other systems, also inhibited the release of prolactin, which the protein kinase C inactivate 4 -phorbol-12,13-didecanoate was without effect. The inhibition of prolactin release was secondary to a decrease in prolactin synthesis. Although diC8 and PMA inhibited the synthesis and release of prolactin, these agents had no effect on the synthesis or release of trichloroacetic acid-precipitable (TVS)methionine-labeled decidual proteins and did not cause the release of the cytosolic enzymes lactic dehydrogenase and alkaline phosphatase. DiC8 and PMA stimulates the specific activity of protein kinase C in decidual tissue by 14.6 and 14.0-fold, respectively. The inhibition of the synthesis and release of prolactin by diC8 and phorbol esters strongly implicates protein kinase C in the regulation of the production and release of prolactin from the decidua.

  18. Intracellular coagulation inhibits the extraction of proteins from Prochloron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fall, R.; Lewin, R. A.; Fall, L. R.

    1983-01-01

    Protein extraction from the prokaryotic alga Prochloron LP (isolated from the ascidian host Lissoclinum patella) was complicated by an irreversible loss of cell fragility in the isolated algae. Accompanying this phenomenon, which is termed intracellular coagulation, was a redistribution of thylakoids around the cell periphery, a loss of photosynthetic O2 production, and a drastic decrease in the extractability of cell proteins. Procedures are described for the successful preparation and transport of cell extracts yielding the enzymes glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase as well as other soluble proteins.

  19. Intracellular coagulation inhibits the extraction of proteins from Prochloron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fall, R.; Lewin, R. A.; Fall, L. R.

    1983-01-01

    Protein extraction from the prokaryotic alga Prochloron LP (isolated from the ascidian host Lissoclinum patella) was complicated by an irreversible loss of cell fragility in the isolated algae. Accompanying this phenomenon, which is termed intracellular coagulation, was a redistribution of thylakoids around the cell periphery, a loss of photosynthetic O2 production, and a drastic decrease in the extractability of cell proteins. Procedures are described for the successful preparation and transport of cell extracts yielding the enzymes glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase as well as other soluble proteins.

  20. Analog sensitive chemical inhibition of the DEAD-box protein DDX3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floor, Stephen N; Barkovich, Krister J; Condon, Kendall J; Shokat, Kevan M; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2016-03-01

    Proper maintenance of RNA structure and dynamics is essential to maintain cellular health. Multiple families of RNA chaperones exist in cells to modulate RNA structure, RNA-protein complexes, and RNA granules. The largest of these families is the DEAD-box proteins, named after their catalytic Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp motif. The human DEAD-box protein DDX3 is implicated in diverse biological processes including translation initiation and is mutated in numerous cancers. Like many DEAD-box proteins, DDX3 is essential to cellular health and exhibits dosage sensitivity, such that both decreases and increases in protein levels can be lethal. Therefore, chemical inhibition would be an ideal tool to probe the function of DDX3. However, most DEAD-box protein active sites are extremely similar, complicating the design of specific inhibitors. Here, we show that a chemical genetic approach best characterized in protein kinases, known as analog-sensitive chemical inhibition, is viable for DDX3 and possibly other DEAD-box proteins. We present an expanded active-site mutant that is tolerated in vitro and in vivo, and is sensitive to chemical inhibition by a novel bulky inhibitor. Our results highlight a course towards analog sensitive chemical inhibition of DDX3 and potentially the entire DEAD-box protein family.

  1. Computational insights into the suicide inhibition of Plasmodium falciparum Fk506-binding protein 35.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Corey A; Boyd, Russell J

    2015-08-15

    Malaria is a parasite affecting millions of people worldwide. With the risk of malarial resistance reaching catastrophic levels, novel methods into the inhibition of this disease need to be prioritized. The exploitation of active site differences between parasitic and human peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerases can be used for suicide inhibition, effectively poisoning the parasite without affecting the patient. This method of inhibition was explored using Plasmodium falciparum and Homo sapiens Fk506-binding proteins as templates for quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations. Modification of the natural substrate has shown suicide inhibition is a valid approach for novel anti-malarials with little risk for parasitic resistance.

  2. Sulforaphane, a cruciferous vegetable-derived isothiocyanate, inhibits protein synthesis in human prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiczk, Aleksandra; Hofman, Dagmara; Konopa, Grażyna; Herman-Antosiewicz, Anna

    2012-08-01

    Sulforaphane (SFN) is a compound derived from cruciferous plants. Its anticancer properties have been demonstrated both, in cancer cell lines as well as tumors in animal models. It has been shown that SFN inhibits cell proliferation, induces apoptosis, autophagy, and sensitizes cancer cells to therapies. As induction of catabolic processes is often related to perturbation in protein synthesis we aimed to investigate the impact of SFN on this process in PC-3 human prostate cancer cells. In the present study we show that SFN inhibits protein synthesis in PC-3 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner which is accompanied by a decreased phosphorylation of mTOR substrates. Translation inhibition is independent of mitochondria-derived ROS as it is observed in PC-3 derivatives devoid of functional mitochondrial respiratory chain (Rho0 cells). Although SFN affects mitochondria and slightly decreases glycolysis, the ATP level is maintained on the level characteristic for control cells. Inhibition of protein synthesis might be a protective response of prostate cancer cells to save energy. However, translation inhibition contributes to the death of PC-3 cells due to decreased level of a short-lived protein, survivin. Overexpression of this anti-apoptotic factor protects PC-3 cells against SFN cytotoxicity. Protein synthesis inhibition by SFN is not restricted to prostate cancer cells as we observed similar effect in SKBR-3 breast cancer cell line. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Divalent cation tolerance protein binds to β-secretase and inhibits the processing of amyloid precursor protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Runzhong Liu; Haibo Hou; Xuelian Yi; Shanwen Wu; Huan Zeng

    2013-01-01

    The deposition of amyloid-beta is a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. Amyloid-beta is derived from amyloid precursor protein through sequential proteolytic cleavages by β-secretase (beta-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1) and γ-secretase. To further elucidate the roles of beta-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1 in the development of Alzheimer's disease, a yeast two-hybrid system was used to screen a human embryonic brain cDNA library for proteins directly interacting with the intracellular domain of beta-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1. A potential beta-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1- interacting protein identified from the positive clones was divalent cation tolerance protein. Immunoprecipitation studies in the neuroblastoma cell line N2a showed that exogenous divalent cation tolerance protein interacts with endogenous beta-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1. The overexpression of divalent cation tolerance protein did not affect beta-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1 protein levels, but led to increased amyloid precursor protein levels in N2a/APP695 cells, with a concomitant reduction in the processing product amyloid precursor protein C-terminal fragment, indicating that divalent cation tolerance protein inhibits the processing of amyloid precursor protein. Our experimental findings suggest that divalent cation tolerance protein negatively regulates the function of beta-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1. Thus, divalent cation tolerance protein could play a protective role in Alzheimer's disease.

  4. Identification of Interferon-Stimulated Gene Proteins That Inhibit Human Parainfluenza Virus Type 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbani, M A G; Ribaudo, Michael; Guo, Ju-Tao; Barik, Sailen

    2016-12-15

    A major arm of cellular innate immunity is type I interferon (IFN), represented by IFN-α and IFN-β. Type I IFN transcriptionally induces a large number of cellular genes, collectively known as IFN-stimulated gene (ISG) proteins, which act as antivirals. The IFIT (interferon-induced proteins with tetratricopeptide repeats) family proteins constitute a major subclass of ISG proteins and are characterized by multiple tetratricopeptide repeats (TPRs). In this study, we have interrogated IFIT proteins for the ability to inhibit the growth of human parainfluenza virus type 3 (PIV3), a nonsegmented negative-strand RNA virus of the Paramyxoviridae family and a major cause of respiratory disease in children. We found that IFIT1 significantly inhibited PIV3, whereas IFIT2, IFIT3, and IFIT5 were less effective or not at all. In further screening a set of ISG proteins we discovered that several other such proteins also inhibited PIV3, including IFITM1, IDO (indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase), PKR (protein kinase, RNA activated), and viperin (virus inhibitory protein, endoplasmic reticulum associated, interferon inducible)/Cig5. The antiviral effect of IDO, the enzyme that catalyzes the first step of tryptophan degradation, could be counteracted by tryptophan. These results advance our knowledge of diverse ISG proteins functioning as antivirals and may provide novel approaches against PIV3.

  5. Inhibition of platelet (/sup 3/H)- imipramine binding by human plasma protein fractions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strijewski, A.; Chudzik, J.; Tang, S.W.

    1988-01-01

    Inhibition of high-affinity (/sup 3/H)-imipramine binding to platelet membranes by human plasma fractions and isolated plasma proteins was investigated. Several plasma proteins were found to contribute to the observed apparent inhibition and this contribution was assessed in terms of inhibitor units. Alpha/sub 1/ acid glycoprotein, high density and low density lipoprotein, IgG and ..cap alpha../sub 1/-antitrypsin were identified as effective non-specific inhibitors. Alpha-1-acid glycoprotein was confirmed to be the most potent plasma protein inhibitor. Cohn fractions were evaluated for the presence of the postulated endocoid of (/sup 3/H)-imipramine binding site.

  6. Effect of mitochondrial complex I inhibition on Fe-S cluster protein activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mena, Natalia P. [Department of Biology, Faculty of Sciences, Universidad de Chile, Las Palmeras 3425, Santiago (Chile); Millennium Institute of Cell Dynamics and Biotechnology, Santiago (Chile); Bulteau, Anne Laure [UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMRS 975 - UMR 7725, Centre de Recherche en Neurosciences, ICM, Therapeutique Experimentale de la Neurodegenerescence, Hopital de la Salpetriere, F-75005 Paris (France); Inserm, U 975, Centre de Recherche en Neurosciences, ICM, Therapeutique Experimentale de la Neurodegenerescence, Hopital de la Salpetriere, F-75005 Paris (France); CNRS, UMR 7225, Centre de Recherche en Neurosciences, ICM, Therapeutique Experimentale de la Neurodegenerescence, Hopital de la Salpetriere, F-75005 Paris (France); ICM, Therapeutique Experimentale de la Neurodegenerescence, Hopital de la Salpetriere, Paris 75013 (France); Salazar, Julio [Millennium Institute of Cell Dynamics and Biotechnology, Santiago (Chile); Hirsch, Etienne C. [UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMRS 975 - UMR 7725, Centre de Recherche en Neurosciences, ICM, Therapeutique Experimentale de la Neurodegenerescence, Hopital de la Salpetriere, F-75005 Paris (France); Inserm, U 975, Centre de Recherche en Neurosciences, ICM, Therapeutique Experimentale de la Neurodegenerescence, Hopital de la Salpetriere, F-75005 Paris (France); CNRS, UMR 7225, Centre de Recherche en Neurosciences, ICM, Therapeutique Experimentale de la Neurodegenerescence, Hopital de la Salpetriere, F-75005 Paris (France); ICM, Therapeutique Experimentale de la Neurodegenerescence, Hopital de la Salpetriere, Paris 75013 (France); Nunez, Marco T., E-mail: mnunez@uchile.cl [Department of Biology, Faculty of Sciences, Universidad de Chile, Las Palmeras 3425, Santiago (Chile); Millennium Institute of Cell Dynamics and Biotechnology, Santiago (Chile)

    2011-06-03

    Highlights: {yields} Mitochondrial complex I inhibition resulted in decreased activity of Fe-S containing enzymes mitochondrial aconitase and cytoplasmic aconitase and xanthine oxidase. {yields} Complex I inhibition resulted in the loss of Fe-S clusters in cytoplasmic aconitase and of glutamine phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate amidotransferase. {yields} Consistent with loss of cytoplasmic aconitase activity, an increase in iron regulatory protein 1 activity was found. {yields} Complex I inhibition resulted in an increase in the labile cytoplasmic iron pool. -- Abstract: Iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters are small inorganic cofactors formed by tetrahedral coordination of iron atoms with sulfur groups. Present in numerous proteins, these clusters are involved in key biological processes such as electron transfer, metabolic and regulatory processes, DNA synthesis and repair and protein structure stabilization. Fe-S clusters are synthesized mainly in the mitochondrion, where they are directly incorporated into mitochondrial Fe-S cluster-containing proteins or exported for cytoplasmic and nuclear cluster-protein assembly. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that inhibition of mitochondrial complex I by rotenone decreases Fe-S cluster synthesis and cluster content and activity of Fe-S cluster-containing enzymes. Inhibition of complex I resulted in decreased activity of three Fe-S cluster-containing enzymes: mitochondrial and cytosolic aconitases and xanthine oxidase. In addition, the Fe-S cluster content of glutamine phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate amidotransferase and mitochondrial aconitase was dramatically decreased. The reduction in cytosolic aconitase activity was associated with an increase in iron regulatory protein (IRP) mRNA binding activity and with an increase in the cytoplasmic labile iron pool. Since IRP activity post-transcriptionally regulates the expression of iron import proteins, Fe-S cluster inhibition may result in a false iron deficiency signal. Given that

  7. Cadmium inhibits the protein degradation of Sml1 by inhibiting the phosphorylation of Sml1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, In-Joon; Kang, Hyun-Jun; Chang, Miwha; Choi, Il-Dong; Kang, Chang-Min [School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Anam-dong, Sungbuk-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Cheol-Won, E-mail: cheolwony@korea.ac.kr [School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Anam-dong, Sungbuk-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cd inhibits Sml1-p formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cd affects cell cycle. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cd inhibits Sml1 ubiquitination. -- Abstract: Cadmium is a toxic metal, and the mechanism of cadmium toxicity in living organisms has been well studied. Here, we used Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system to examine the detailed molecular mechanism of cell growth defects caused by cadmium. Using a plate assay of a yeast deletion mutant collection, we found that deletion of SML1, which encodes an inhibitor of Rnr1, resulted in cadmium resistance. Sml1 protein levels increased when cells were treated with cadmium, even though the mRNA levels of SML1 remained unchanged. Using northern and western blot analyses, we found that cadmium inhibited Sml1 degradation by inhibiting Sml1 phosphorylation. Sml1 protein levels increased when cells were treated with cadmium due to disruption of the dependent protein degradation pathway. Furthermore, cadmium promoted cell cycle progression into the G2 phase. The same result was obtained using cells in which SML1 was overexpressed. Deletion of SML1 delayed cell cycle progression. These results are consistent with Sml1 accumulation and with growth defects caused by cadmium stress. Interestingly, although cadmium treatment led to increase Sml1 levels, intracellular dNTP levels also increased because of Rnr3 upregulation due to cadmium stress. Taken together, these results suggest that cadmium specifically affects the phosphorylation of Sml1 and that Sml1 accumulates in cells.

  8. Protein Synthesis Inhibition Blocks Consolidation of an Acrobatic Motor Skill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaelin-Lang, Alain; Dichgans, Johannes; Schulz, Jorg B.; Luft, Andreas R.; Buitrago, Manuel M.

    2004-01-01

    To investigate whether motor skill learning depends on de novo protein synthesis, adult rats were trained in an acrobatic locomotor task (accelerating rotarod) for 7 d. Animals were systemically injected with cycloheximide (CHX, 0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) 1 h before sessions 1 and 2 or sessions 2 and 3. Control rats received vehicle injections before…

  9. Inhibition of nonenzymatic protein glycation by pomegranate and other fruit juices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorsey, Pamela Garner; Greenspan, Phillip

    2014-04-01

    The nonenzymatic glycation of proteins and the formation of advanced glycation endproducts in diabetes leads to the crosslinking of proteins and disease complications. Our study sought to demonstrate the effect of commonly consumed juices (pomegranate, cranberry, black cherry, pineapple, apple, and Concord grape) on the fructose-mediated glycation of albumin. Albumin glycation decreased by 98% in the presence of 10 μL of pomegranate juice/mL; other juices inhibited glycation by only 20%. Pomegranate juice produced the greatest inhibition on protein glycation when incubated at both the same phenolic concentration and the same antioxidant potential. Both punicalagin and ellagic acid significantly inhibited the glycation of albumin by ~90% at 5 μg/mL. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that pomegranate, but not apple juice, protected albumin from modification. These results demonstrate that pomegranate juice and two of its major constituents are potent inhibitors of fructose-mediated protein glycation.

  10. Inhibition of thermal induced protein denaturation of extract/fractions of Withania somnifera and isolated withanolides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Murad Ali; Khan, Haroon; Rauf, Abdul; Ben Hadda, Taibi

    2015-01-01

    This study describes the in vitro inhibition of protein denaturation of extract/fractions of Withania somnifera and isolated withanolides including 20β hydroxy-1-oxo(22R)-witha-2,5,24 trienolide (1), (20R,22R-14α,20α)-dihydroxy-1-oxowitha-2,5,16,24 tetraenolide (2). The results showed that the extract/fractions of the plant evoked profound inhibitory effect on thermal-induced protein denaturation. The chloroform fraction caused the most dominant attenuation of 68% at 500 μg/mL. The bioactivity-guided isolation from chloroform fraction led to the isolation of compounds 1 and 2 that showed profound protein inhibition with 78.05% and 80.43% effect at 500 μg/mL and thus strongly complimented the activity of extract/fractions. In conclusion, extract/fractions of W. somnifera possessed strong inhibition of protein denaturation that can be attributed to these isolated withanolides.

  11. Overexpression of citrus polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein in citrus black rot pathogen Alternaria citri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoh, Hiroshi; Nalumpang, Sarunya; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Akimitsu, Kazuya

    2007-05-01

    The rough lemon (Citrus jambhiri) gene encoding polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein (RlemPGIPA) was overexpressed in the pathogenic fungus Alternaria citri. The overexpression mutant AcOPI6 retained the ability to utilize pectin as a sole carbon source, and the overexpression of polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein did not have any effect on the growth of AcOPI6 in potato dextrose and pectin medium. The pathogenicity of AcOPI6 to cause a black rot symptom in citrus fruits was also unchanged. Polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein was secreted together with endopolygalacturonase into culture filtrates of AcOPI6, and oligogalacturonides were digested from polygalacturonic acid by both proteins in the culture filtrates. The reaction mixture containing oligogalacturonides possessed activity for induction of defense-related gene, RlemLOX, in rough lemon leaves.

  12. Mechanism underlying carbon tetrachloride-inhibited protein synthesis in liver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To study the mechanism underlying carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced alterations of protein synthesis in liver. METHODS: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were given CCl4 (1 mL/100 g body weight) and 3H-leucine incorporation. Malondialdehyde (MDA) level in the liver, in vitro response of hepatocyte nuclei nucleotide triphosphatase (NTPase) to free radicals, and nuclear export of total mRNA with 3'-poly A+ were measured respectively. Survival response of HepG2 cells to CCl4 treatment was assessed by methyl thia...

  13. An update on polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein (PGIP), a leucine-rich repeat protein that protects crop plants against pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalunke, Raviraj M; Tundo, Silvio; Benedetti, Manuel; Cervone, Felice; De Lorenzo, Giulia; D'Ovidio, Renato

    2015-01-01

    Polygalacturonase inhibiting proteins (PGIPs) are cell wall proteins that inhibit the pectin-depolymerizing activity of polygalacturonases secreted by microbial pathogens and insects. These ubiquitous inhibitors have a leucine-rich repeat structure that is strongly conserved in monocot and dicot plants. Previous reviews have summarized the importance of PGIP in plant defense and the structural basis of PG-PGIP interaction; here we update the current knowledge about PGIPs with the recent findings on the composition and evolution of pgip gene families, with a special emphasis on legume and cereal crops. We also update the information about the inhibition properties of single pgip gene products against microbial PGs and the results, including field tests, showing the capacity of PGIP to protect crop plants against fungal, oomycetes and bacterial pathogens.

  14. Cross-species Virus-host Protein-Protein Interactions Inhibiting Innate Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    SUBJECTTERMS viral pathogen, zoonotic, arenavirus, host tropism, protein - protein interactions, RIG-I, Z protein , CARD domain, MAVS 16. SECURITY...individually subcloned into Checkmate M2H System (Promega) bait and prey reporter plasmids. The genes encoding the viral Z proteins were synthesized... viral proteins were calculated with PhyML. While several residue positions are highly conserved across Z proteins (Figure 8), significant sequence

  15. Inhibition of Methane Hydrate Formation by Ice-Structuring Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars; Ramløv, Hans; Thomsen, Kaj

    2010-01-01

    , assumed biodegradable, are capable of inhibiting the growth of methane hydrate (a structure I hydrate). The ISPs investigated were type III HPLC12 (originally identified in ocean pout) and ISP type III found in meal worm (Tenebrio molitor). These were compared to polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) a well...... of inhibitors. The profile of the nonlinear growth was concentration-dependent but also dependent on the stirring rate. ISP type III HPLC12 decreased the growth rate of methane hydrate during the linear growth period by 17−75% at concentrations of 0.01−0.1 wt % (0.014−0.14 mM) while ISP from Tenebrio molitor...... and PVP decreased the growth rate by 30% and 39% at concentrations of 0.004 wt % (0.005 mM) and 0.1 wt % (0.1 mM), respectively. Considering the low concentration of Tenebrio molitor ISP used, these results indicate that ISP from Tenebrio molitor is the most effective hydrate inhibitor among those...

  16. Cyclodextrins inhibit replication of scrapie prion protein in cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, Marguerite; Lehmann, Sylvain; Sy, Man-Sun; Molloy, Brendan; McMahon, Hilary E M

    2007-10-01

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders that are caused by the conversion of a normal host-encoded protein, PrP(C), to an abnormal, disease-causing form, PrP(Sc). This paper reports that cyclodextrins have the ability to reduce the pathogenic isoform of the prion protein PrP(Sc) to undetectable levels in scrapie-infected neuroblastoma cells. Beta-cyclodextrin removed PrP(Sc) from the cells at a concentration of 500 microM following 2 weeks of treatment. Structure activity studies revealed that antiprion activity was dependent on the size of the cyclodextrin. The half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) for beta-cyclodextrin was 75 microM, whereas alpha-cyclodextrin, which possessed less antiprion activity, had an IC(50) of 750 microM. This report presents cyclodextrins as a new class of antiprion compound. For decades, the pharmaceutical industry has successfully used cyclodextrins for their complex-forming ability; this ability is due to the structural orientation of the glucopyranose units, which generate a hydrophobic cavity that can facilitate the encapsulation of hydrophobic moieties. Consequently, cyclodextrins could be ideal candidates for the treatment of prion diseases.

  17. Reduced Protein Synthesis Fidelity Inhibits Flagellar Biosynthesis and Motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yongqiang; Evans, Christopher R; Ling, Jiqiang

    2016-07-29

    Accurate translation of the genetic information from DNA to protein is maintained by multiple quality control steps from bacteria to mammals. Genetic and environmental alterations have been shown to compromise translational quality control and reduce fidelity during protein synthesis. The physiological impact of increased translational errors is not fully understood. While generally considered harmful, translational errors have recently been shown to benefit cells under certain stress conditions. In this work, we describe a novel regulatory pathway in which reduced translational fidelity downregulates expression of flagellar genes and suppresses bacterial motility. Electron microscopy imaging shows that the error-prone Escherichia coli strain lacks mature flagella. Further genetic analyses reveal that translational errors upregulate expression of a small RNA DsrA through enhancing its transcription, and deleting DsrA from the error-prone strain restores motility. DsrA regulates expression of H-NS and RpoS, both of which regulate flagellar genes. We demonstrate that an increased level of DsrA in the error-prone strain suppresses motility through the H-NS pathway. Our work suggests that bacteria are capable of switching on and off the flagellar system by altering translational fidelity, which may serve as a previously unknown mechanism to improve fitness in response to environmental cues.

  18. Inhibition of infectious pancreatic necrosis virus replication by atlantic salmon Mx1 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Rannveig; Røkenes, Torunn P; Robertsen, Børre

    2004-08-01

    Mx proteins form a family of interferon (IFN)-induced GTPases with potent antiviral activity against various single-stranded RNA viruses in mammals and chickens. In fish, alpha/beta IFN has been reported to inhibit the replication of infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV), but the mode of action has not been elucidated. A correlation between the inhibition of IPNV and Mx protein expression has, however, been observed. To examine whether Atlantic salmon Mx1 protein (ASMx1) possesses antiviral activity against IPNV, CHSE-214 cells constitutively expressing ASMx1 were established. ASMx1 appeared to be localized in the cytoplasm. The ASMx1-expressing clone selected showed a severely reduced IPNV-induced cytopathic effect, which was confirmed by a 500-fold reduction in virus yield. The antiviral activity against IPNV was further confirmed by the inhibition of virus protein synthesis and the reduced accumulation of virus transcripts. The present work further adds to the body of evidence which suggests that antiviral activity is a major functional role of vertebrate Mx proteins. Moreover, the list of viruses inhibited by Mx proteins is extended to include double-stranded RNA viruses.

  19. Protein turnover and cellular autophagy in growing and growth-inhibited 3T3 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papadopoulos, T.; Pfeifer, U. (Univ. of Wuerzburg (West Germany))

    1987-07-01

    The relationship between growth, protein degradation, and cellular autophagy was tested in growing and in growth-inhibited 3T3 cell monolayers. For the biochemical evaluation of DNA and protein metabolism, growth-inhibited 3T3 cell monolayers with high cell density and growing 3T3 cell monolayers with low cell density were labeled simultaneously with ({sup 14}C)thymidine and ({sup 3}H)leucine. The evaluation of the DNA turnover and additional ({sup 3}H)thymidine autoradiography showed that 24 to 5% of 3T3 cells continue to replicate even in the growth-inhibited state, where no accumulation of protein and DNA can be observed. Cell loss, therefore, has to be assumed to compensate for the ongoing cell proliferation. When the data of protein turnover were corrected for cell loss, it was found that the rate constant of protein synthesis in nongrowing monolayers was reduced to half the value found in growing monolayers. Simultaneously, the rate constant of protein degradation in nongrowing monolayers was increased to about 1.5-fold the value of growing monolayers. These data are in agreement with the assumption that cellular autophagy represents a major pathway of regulating protein degradation in 3T3 cells and that the regulation of autophagic protein degradation is of relevance for the transition from a growing to a nongrowing state.

  20. Mechanism of apoptosis induction by inhibition of the anti-apoptotic BCL-2 proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipuk, Jerry E; Fisher, John C; Dillon, Christopher P; Kriwacki, Richard W; Kuwana, Tomomi; Green, Douglas R

    2008-12-23

    Normal cellular lifespan is contingent upon preserving outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) integrity, as permeabilization promotes apoptosis. BCL-2 family proteins control mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP) by regulating the activation of the pro-apoptotic BCL-2 effector molecules, BAX and BAK. Sustainable cellular stress induces proteins (e.g., BID, BIM, and cytosolic p53) capable of directly activating BAX and/or BAK, but these direct activators are sequestered by the anti-apoptotic BCL-2 proteins (e.g., BCL-2, BCL-xL, and MCL-1). In the event of accumulated or marked cellular stress, a coordinated effort between previously sequestered and nascent BH3-only proteins inhibits the anti-apoptotic BCL-2 repertoire to promote direct activator protein-mediated MOMP. We examined the effect of ABT-737, a BCL-2 antagonist, and PUMA, a BH3-only protein that inhibits the entire anti-apoptotic BCL-2 repertoire, with cells and mitochondria that sequestered direct activator proteins. ABT-737 and PUMA cooperated with sequestered direct activator proteins to promote MOMP and apoptosis, which in the absence of ABT-737 or PUMA did not influence OMM integrity or cellular survival. Our data show that the induction of apoptosis by inhibition of the anti-apoptotic BCL-2 repertoire requires "covert" levels of direct activators of BAX and BAK at the OMM.

  1. Antiviral Protein of Momordica charantia L. Inhibits Different Subtypes of Influenza A

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    Viroj Pongthanapisith

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The new antiviral activity of the protein extracted from Momordica charantia was determined with different subtypes of influenza A. The protein was purified from the seed of M. charantia using an anion exchanger and a Fast Protein Liquid Chromatography (FPLC system. At the concentration of 1.401 mg/mL, the protein did not exhibit cytotoxicity in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells (MDCK but inhibited FFU influenza A/PR/8/34 H1N1 virus at 56.50%, 65.72%, and 100% inhibition by the protein treated before the virus (pretreated, the protein treated alongside with the virus (simultaneously treated, and the protein treated after the virus (posttreated during incubation, respectively. Using 5, 25, and 100 TCID50 of influenza A/New Caledonia/20/99 H1N1, A/Fujian/411/01 H3N2 and A/Thailand/1(KAN-1/2004 H5N1, the IC50 was calculated to be 100, 150, and 200; 75, 175, and 300; and 40, 75, and 200 μg/mL, respectively. Our present finding indicated that the plant protein inhibited not only H1N1 and H3N2 but also H5N1 subtype. As a result of the broad spectrum of its antiviral activity, this edible plant can be developed as an effective therapeutic agent against various and even new emerging subtypes of influenza A.

  2. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate inhibits lactase but is alleviated by salivary proline-rich proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naz, Shahina; Siddiqi, Rahmanullah; Dew, Tristan P; Williamson, Gary

    2011-03-23

    Lactase phlorizin hydrolase is a small intestinal brush border enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of the milk sugar, lactose, and also many flavonoid glucosides. We demonstrate that epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), the principal flavonoid from green tea, inhibits in vitro hydrolysis of lactose by intestinal lactase. We then tested the hypothesis that salivary proline-rich proteins (PRPs) could modulate this inhibition and stabilize EGCG. Inhibition by EGCG of digestive enzymes (α-amylase>chymotrypsin>trypsin>lactase≫pepsin) was alleviated ∼2-6-fold by PRPs. Furthermore, PRPs appeared stable to proteolysis and also stabilized EGCG under digestive conditions in vitro. This is the first report on EGCG inhibition of lactase, and it quantifies the protective role of PRPs against EGCG inhibition of digestive enzymes.

  3. Surfactant protein D binds to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) envelope protein gp120 and inhibits HIV replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meschi, Joseph; Crouch, Erika C; Skolnik, Paul;

    2005-01-01

    The envelope protein (gp120) of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) contains highly conserved mannosylated oligosaccharides. These glycoconjugates contribute to resistance to antibody neutralization, and binding to cell surface lectins on macrophages and dendritic cells. Mannose-binding lectin (MBL......) binds to gp120 and plays a role in defence against the virus. In this study it is demonstrated that surfactant protein D (SP-D) binds to gp120 and inhibits HIV infectivity at significantly lower concentrations than MBL. The binding of SP-D was mediated by its calcium-dependent carbohydrate...... defence against HIV. A chimeric protein containing the N-terminal and collagen domains of SP-D linked to the neck and carbohydrate-recognition domains of MBL (called SP-D/MBL(neck+CRD)) had greater ability to bind to gp120 and inhibit virus replication than either SP-D or MBL. The enhanced binding of SP...

  4. Statins inhibit protein lipidation and induce the unfolded protein response in the non-sterol producing nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mörck, Catarina; Olsen, Louise Cathrine Braun; Kurth, Caroline;

    2009-01-01

    of lipid moieties for protein prenylation. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans possesses a mevalonate pathway that lacks the branch leading to cholesterol synthesis, and thus represents an ideal organism to specifically study the noncholesterol roles of the pathway. Inhibiting HMG-CoA reductase in C....... elegans using statins or RNAi leads to developmental arrest and loss of membrane association of a GFP-based prenylation reporter. The unfolded protein response (UPR) is also strongly activated, suggesting that impaired prenylation of small GTPases leads to the accumulation of unfolded proteins and ER...... and fatty acid composition were unaffected in statin-treated worms, even though they showed reduced staining with Nile red. We conclude that inhibitors of HMG-CoA reductase or of farnesyl transferases induce the UPR by inhibiting the prenylation of M57.2 substrates, resulting in developmental arrest in C...

  5. Momilactione B inhibits protein kinase A signaling and reduces tyrosinase-related proteins 1 and 2 expression in melanocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji Hae; Cho, Boram; Jun, Hee-jin; Seo, Woo-Duck; Kim, Dong-Woo; Cho, Kang-Jin; Lee, Sung-Joon

    2012-05-01

    Momilactone B (MB) is a terpenoid phytoalexin present in rice bran that exhibits several biological activities. MB reduced the melanin content in B16 melanocytes melanin content and inhibited tyrosinase activities. Using transcriptome analysis, the genes involved in protein kinase A (PKA) signaling were found to be markedly altered. B16 cells stimulated with MB had decreased concentrations of cAMP protein kinase A activity, and cAMP-response element-binding protein which is a key transcription factor for microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) expression. Accordingly, the expression of MITF and its target genes, which are essential for melanogenesis, were reduced. MB thus exhibits anti-melanogenic effects by repressing tyrosinase enzyme activity and inhibiting the PKA signaling pathway which, in turn, decreases melanogenic gene expression.

  6. Multiple mechanisms for CRISPR-Cas inhibition by anti-CRISPR proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondy-Denomy, Joseph; Garcia, Bianca; Strum, Scott; Du, Mingjian; Rollins, MaryClare F; Hidalgo-Reyes, Yurima; Wiedenheft, Blake; Maxwell, Karen L; Davidson, Alan R

    2015-10-01

    The battle for survival between bacteria and the viruses that infect them (phages) has led to the evolution of many bacterial defence systems and phage-encoded antagonists of these systems. Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and the CRISPR-associated (cas) genes comprise an adaptive immune system that is one of the most widespread means by which bacteria defend themselves against phages. We identified the first examples of proteins produced by phages that inhibit a CRISPR-Cas system. Here we performed biochemical and in vivo investigations of three of these anti-CRISPR proteins, and show that each inhibits CRISPR-Cas activity through a distinct mechanism. Two block the DNA-binding activity of the CRISPR-Cas complex, yet do this by interacting with different protein subunits, and using steric or non-steric modes of inhibition. The third anti-CRISPR protein operates by binding to the Cas3 helicase-nuclease and preventing its recruitment to the DNA-bound CRISPR-Cas complex. In vivo, this anti-CRISPR can convert the CRISPR-Cas system into a transcriptional repressor, providing the first example-to our knowledge-of modulation of CRISPR-Cas activity by a protein interactor. The diverse sequences and mechanisms of action of these anti-CRISPR proteins imply an independent evolution, and foreshadow the existence of other means by which proteins may alter CRISPR-Cas function.

  7. Two distinct mechanisms for actin capping protein regulation--steric and allosteric inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuichi Takeda

    Full Text Available The actin capping protein (CP tightly binds to the barbed end of actin filaments, thus playing a key role in actin-based lamellipodial dynamics. V-1 and CARMIL proteins directly bind to CP and inhibit the filament capping activity of CP. V-1 completely inhibits CP from interacting with the barbed end, whereas CARMIL proteins act on the barbed end-bound CP and facilitate its dissociation from the filament (called uncapping activity. Previous studies have revealed the striking functional differences between the two regulators. However, the molecular mechanisms describing how these proteins inhibit CP remains poorly understood. Here we present the crystal structures of CP complexed with V-1 and with peptides derived from the CP-binding motif of CARMIL proteins (CARMIL, CD2AP, and CKIP-1. V-1 directly interacts with the primary actin binding surface of CP, the C-terminal region of the alpha-subunit. Unexpectedly, the structures clearly revealed the conformational flexibility of CP, which can be attributed to a twisting movement between the two domains. CARMIL peptides in an extended conformation interact simultaneously with the two CP domains. In contrast to V-1, the peptides do not directly compete with the barbed end for the binding surface on CP. Biochemical assays revealed that the peptides suppress the interaction between CP and V-1, despite the two inhibitors not competing for the same binding site on CP. Furthermore, a computational analysis using the elastic network model indicates that the interaction of the peptides alters the intrinsic fluctuations of CP. Our results demonstrate that V-1 completely sequesters CP from the barbed end by simple steric hindrance. By contrast, CARMIL proteins allosterically inhibit CP, which appears to be a prerequisite for the uncapping activity. Our data suggest that CARMIL proteins down-regulate CP by affecting its conformational dynamics. This conceptually new mechanism of CP inhibition provides a

  8. Grape seed extract inhibits VEGF expression via reducing HIF-1alpha protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jianming; Zhang, Keqiang; Chen, Shiuan; Wen, Wei

    2009-04-01

    Grape seed extract (GSE) is a widely consumed dietary supplement that has antitumor activity. Here, we have investigated the inhibitory effect of GSE on the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and the mechanism underlying this action. We found that GSE inhibited VEGF messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression in U251 human glioma cells and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells. GSE inhibited transcriptional activation of the VEGF gene through reducing protein but not mRNA expression of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) 1alpha. The inhibitory effect of GSE on HIF-1alpha expression was mainly through inhibiting HIF-1alpha protein synthesis rather than promoting protein degradation. Consistent with this result, GSE-suppressed phosphorylation of several important components involved in HIF-1alpha protein synthesis, such as Akt, S6 kinase and S6 protein. Furthermore, in the MDA-MB-231 tumor, we found that GSE treatment inhibited the expression of VEGF and HIF-1alpha and the phosphorylation of S6 kinase without altering the subcellular localization of HIF-1alpha, correlating with reduced vessel density and tumor size. Depletion of polyphenol with polyvinylpyrrolidone abolished the inhibitory activity of GSE, suggesting a water-soluble fraction of polyphenol in GSE is responsible for the inhibitory activity. Taken together, our results indicate that GSE inhibits VEGF expression by reducing HIF-1alpha protein synthesis through blocking Akt activation. This finding provides new insight into the mechanisms of anticancer activity of GSE and reveals a novel molecular mechanism underlying the antiangiogenic action of GSE.

  9. Pharmacological inhibition of dynamin II reduces constitutive protein secretion from primary human macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maaike Kockx

    Full Text Available Dynamins are fission proteins that mediate endocytic and exocytic membrane events and are pharmacological therapeutic targets. These studies investigate whether dynamin II regulates constitutive protein secretion and show for the first time that pharmacological inhibition of dynamin decreases secretion of apolipoprotein E (apoE and several other proteins constitutively secreted from primary human macrophages. Inhibitors that target recruitment of dynamin to membranes (MiTMABs or directly target the GTPase domain (Dyngo or Dynole series, dose- and time- dependently reduced the secretion of apoE. SiRNA oligo's targeting all isoforms of dynamin II confirmed the involvement of dynamin II in apoE secretion. Inhibition of secretion was not mediated via effects on mRNA or protein synthesis. 2D-gel electrophoresis showed that inhibition occurred after apoE was processed and glycosylated in the Golgi and live cell imaging showed that inhibited secretion was associated with reduced post-Golgi movement of apoE-GFP-containing vesicles. The effect was not restricted to macrophages, and was not mediated by the effects of the inhibitors on microtubules. Inhibition of dynamin also altered the constitutive secretion of other proteins, decreasing the secretion of fibronectin, matrix metalloproteinase 9, Chitinase-3-like protein 1 and lysozyme but unexpectedly increasing the secretion of the inflammatory mediator cyclophilin A. We conclude that pharmacological inhibitors of dynamin II modulate the constitutive secretion of macrophage apoE as a class effect, and that their capacity to modulate protein secretion may affect a range of biological processes.

  10. Measles Virus Fusion Protein: Structure, Function and Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Plattet

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Measles virus (MeV, a highly contagious member of the Paramyxoviridae family, causes measles in humans. The Paramyxoviridae family of negative single-stranded enveloped viruses includes several important human and animal pathogens, with MeV causing approximately 120,000 deaths annually. MeV and canine distemper virus (CDV-mediated diseases can be prevented by vaccination. However, sub-optimal vaccine delivery continues to foster MeV outbreaks. Post-exposure prophylaxis with antivirals has been proposed as a novel strategy to complement vaccination programs by filling herd immunity gaps. Recent research has shown that membrane fusion induced by the morbillivirus glycoproteins is the first critical step for viral entry and infection, and determines cell pathology and disease outcome. Our molecular understanding of morbillivirus-associated membrane fusion has greatly progressed towards the feasibility to control this process by treating the fusion glycoprotein with inhibitory molecules. Current approaches to develop anti-membrane fusion drugs and our knowledge on drug resistance mechanisms strongly suggest that combined therapies will be a prerequisite. Thus, discovery of additional anti-fusion and/or anti-attachment protein small-molecule compounds may eventually translate into realistic therapeutic options.

  11. Strategies for inhibiting function of HIV-1 accessory proteins: a necessary route to AIDS therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, S N; Frasson, I; Palù, G

    2009-01-01

    The Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) genome encodes three major structural proteins common to all retroviruses (Gag, Pol and Env), two regulatory proteins (Tat and Rev) that are essential for viral replication, and four accessory proteins (Nef, Vif, Vpu, Vpr). While accessory proteins were initially reported to be unnecessary for viral growth, their importance as virulence factors is now being more and more appreciated: they can dramatically alter the course and severity of viral infection, replication and disease progression. None of the HIV accessory proteins display enzymatic activity: they rather act altering cellular pathways via multiple protein-protein interactions with a number of host cell factors. All currently approved anti-HIV drugs target pol and env encoded proteins. Therefore, widening the molecular targets of HIV therapy by additionally targeting accessory proteins may expand treatment options, resulting in high impact effective new therapy. In this review we present the state of the art of compounds that target HIV accessory proteins. Most of the research has focused on the inhibition of specific accessory proteins/host cell partner interactions. Promising compounds have been found within different classes of molecules: small natural and synthetic molecules, peptides and proteins, oligonucleotides, in particular those used as RNA interference (RNAi) tools. With the assortment of compounds available, especially against Nef and Vif functions, the demonstration of the clinical efficacy of the new anti-HIV-1 drugs targeting accessory proteins is next challenge.

  12. Structural aspects of small-molecule inhibition of methyllysine reader proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milosevich, Natalia; Warmerdam, Zoey; Hof, Fraser

    2016-09-01

    Methyl reader proteins recognize and bind to post-translationally methylated residues. They execute the commands issued by protein methyltransferases and play functional roles in diverse cellular processes including gene regulation, development and oncogenesis. Efforts to inhibit these proteins are relatively new. Only a small number of methyl reader proteins belonging to the chromodomain, malignant brain tumor domain, plant homeodomain finger and Tudor domain families have been targeted by chemical inhibitors. This review summarizes inhibitors that have been reported to date, and provides a perspective for future progress. Structural determinants for methyl reader inhibition will be presented, along with an analysis of the molecular interactions that control potency and selectivity for inhibitors of each family.

  13. Inhibition of Tcf3 binding by I-mfa domain proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snider, L; Thirlwell, H; Miller, J R; Moon, R T; Groudine, M; Tapscott, S J

    2001-03-01

    We have determined that I-mfa, an inhibitor of several basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins, and XIC, a Xenopus ortholog of human I-mf domain-containing protein that shares a highly conserved cysteine-rich C-terminal domain with I-mfa, inhibit the activity and DNA binding of the HMG box transcription factor XTcf3. Ectopic expression of I-mfa or XIC in early Xenopus embryos inhibited dorsal axis specification, the expression of the Tcf3/beta-catenin-regulated genes siamois and Xnr3, and the ability of beta-catenin to activate reporter constructs driven by Lef/Tcf binding sites. I-mfa domain proteins can regulate both the Wnt signaling pathway and a subset of bHLH proteins, possibly coordinating the activities of these two critical developmental pathways.

  14. The antituberculosis antibiotic capreomycin inhibits protein synthesis by disrupting interaction between ribosomal proteins L12 and L10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuan; Li, Yan; Zhu, Ningyu; Han, Yanxing; Jiang, Wei; Wang, Yanchang; Si, Shuyi; Jiang, Jiandong

    2014-01-01

    Capreomycin is a second-line drug for multiple-drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB). However, with increased use in clinics, the therapeutic efficiency of capreomycin is decreasing. To better understand TB resistance to capreomycin, we have done research to identify the molecular target of capreomycin. Mycobacterium tuberculosis ribosomal proteins L12 and L10 interact with each other and constitute the stalk of the 50S ribosomal subunit, which recruits initiation and elongation factors during translation. Hence, the L12-L10 interaction is considered to be essential for ribosomal function and protein synthesis. Here we provide evidence showing that capreomycin inhibits the L12-L10 interaction by using an established L12-L10 interaction assay. Overexpression of L12 and/or L10 in M. smegmatis, a species close to M. tuberculosis, increases the MIC of capreomycin. Moreover, both elongation factor G-dependent GTPase activity and ribosome-mediated protein synthesis are inhibited by capreomycin. When protein synthesis was blocked with thiostrepton, however, the bactericidal activity of capreomycin was restrained. All of these results suggest that capreomycin seems to inhibit TB by interrupting the L12-L10 interaction. This finding might provide novel clues for anti-TB drug discovery.

  15. In vitro inhibition of the replication of classical swine fever virus by porcine Mx1 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Dan-ni; Zhang, Xiao-min; Liu, Ke; Pang, Ran; Zhao, Jin; Zhou, Bin; Chen, Pu-yan

    2014-04-01

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is the causative pathogen of classical swine fever (CSF), a highly contagious disease of swine. Mx proteins are interferon-induced dynamin-like GTPases present in all vertebrates with a wide range of antiviral activities. Although Zhao et al. (2011) have reported that human MxA can inhibit CSFV replication, whether porcine Mx1 (poMx1) has anti-CSFV activity remains unknown. In this study, we generated a cell line designated PK-15/EGFP-poMx1 which expressed porcine Mx1 protein constitutively, and we observed that the proliferation of progeny virus in this cell line was significantly inhibited as measured by virus titration, indirect immune fluorescence assay, Q-PCR and Western blot. Furthermore, when PTD-poMx1 fusion protein expressed in Escherichia coli (Zhang et al., 2013) was used to treat CSFV-infected PK-15 cells, the results showed that PTD-poMx1 inhibited CSFV replication in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, the proliferation of progeny virus was inhibited as measured by virus titration and Q-PCR. Overall, the results demonstrated that poMx1 effectively inhibited CSFV replication, suggesting that poMx1 may be a valuable therapeutic agent against CSFV infection.

  16. Evasion of antiviral innate immunity by Theiler's virus L* protein through direct inhibition of RNase L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Sorgeloos

    Full Text Available Theiler's virus is a neurotropic picornavirus responsible for chronic infections of the central nervous system. The establishment of a persistent infection and the subsequent demyelinating disease triggered by the virus depend on the expression of L*, a viral accessory protein encoded by an alternative open reading frame of the virus. We discovered that L* potently inhibits the interferon-inducible OAS/RNase L pathway. The antagonism of RNase L by L* was particularly prominent in macrophages where baseline oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS and RNase L expression levels are elevated, but was detectable in fibroblasts after IFN pretreatment. L* mutations significantly affected Theiler's virus replication in primary macrophages derived from wild-type but not from RNase L-deficient mice. L* counteracted the OAS/RNase L pathway through direct interaction with the ankyrin domain of RNase L, resulting in the inhibition of this enzyme. Interestingly, RNase L inhibition was species-specific as Theiler's virus L* protein blocked murine RNase L but not human RNase L or RNase L of other mammals or birds. Direct RNase L inhibition by L* and species specificity were confirmed in an in vitro assay performed with purified proteins. These results demonstrate a novel viral mechanism to elude the antiviral OAS/RNase L pathway. By targeting the effector enzyme of this antiviral pathway, L* potently inhibits RNase L, underscoring the importance of this enzyme in innate immunity against Theiler's virus.

  17. Inhibition of Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus (TYLCV using whey proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawood Abdelgawad

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The antiviral activity of native and esterified whey proteins fractions (α-lactalbumin, β-lactoglobulin, and lactoferrin was studied to inhibit tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV on infected tomato plants. Whey proteins fractions and their esterified derivatives were sprayed into TYLCV-infected plants. Samples were collected from infected leaves before treatment, 7 and 15 days after treatment for DNA and molecular hybridization analysis. The most evident inhibition of virus replication was observed after 7 and 15 days using α-lactoferrin and α-lactalbumin, respectively. Native and esterified lactoferrin showed complete inhibition after 7 days. On the other hand, native β-lactoglobulin showed inhibition after 7 and 15 days whereas esterified β-lactoglobulin was comparatively more effective after 7 days. The relative amount of viral DNA was less affected by the esterified α-lactalbumin whereas native α-lactalbumin inhibited virus replication completely after 15 days. These results indicate that native or modified whey proteins fractions can be used for controlling the TYLCV-infected plants.

  18. 6-Thioguanine inhibition of parathyroid hormone-related protein expression is mediated by GLI2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Rachelle W; Merkel, Alyssa R; Danilin, Sabrina; Nguyen, Mai P; Mundy, Gregory R; Sterling, Julie A

    2011-09-01

    Breast cancer cells frequently metastasize to bone, where they up-regulate their expression of the transcription factor GLI2 and the downstream osteolytic factor parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP). The guanosine nucleotide 6-thioguanine (6-TG) inhibits PTHrP expression and blocks osteolytic bone destruction in mice inoculated with bone metastatic cells; however, the mechanism by which 6-TG inhibits PTHrP remains unclear. We hypothesized that 6-TG inhibition of PTHrP is mediated through GLI2 signaling. Human MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells and RWGT2 squamous-cell lung carcinoma cells were treated with 100 μM 6-TG and examined for GLI2 mRNA expression and stability by Q-PCR, promoter activity by luciferase assay, and protein expression by Western blot. 6-TG significantly blocked GLI2 mRNA and protein expression, but did not affect stability. Additionally, 6-TG directly inhibited GLI2 promoter activity, and when cells were transfected with constitutively expressed GLI2, the inhibitory effect of 6-TG on PTHrP expression was abolished. Taken together, these data indicate that 6-TG regulates PTHrP in part through GLI2 transcription, and therefore the clinical use of 6-TG or other guanosine nucleotides may be a viable therapeutic option in tumor types expressing elevated levels of GLI proteins.

  19. Small molecule inhibition of protein depalmitoylation as a new approach towards downregulation of oncogenic Ras signalling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, Frank J.; Hedberg, Christian

    2011-01-01

    The H- and N-Ras GTPases are prominent examples of proteins, whose localizations and signalling capacities are regulated by reversible palmitoylations and depalmitoylations. Recently, the novel small molecule inhibitor palmostatin B has been described to inhibit Ras depalmitoylation and to revert th

  20. Purification and Characterization of a Polygalacturonase-Inhibiting Protein from Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervone, F; De Lorenzo, G; Degrà, L; Salvi, G; Bergami, M

    1987-11-01

    Homogeneous endo-polygalacturonase (PG) was covalently bound to cyanogen-bromide-activated Sepharose, and the resulting PG-Sepharose conjugate was utilized to purify, by affinity chromatography, a protein from Phaseolus vulgaris hypocotyls that binds to and inhibits PG. Isoelectric focusing of the purified PG-inhibiting protein (PGIP) showed a major protein band that coincided with PG-inhibiting activity. PGIP formed a complex with PG at pH 5.0 and at low salt concentrations. The complex dissociated in 0.5 m Na-acetate and pH values lower than 4.5 or higher than 6.0. Formation of the PG-PGIP complex resulted in complete inhibition of PG activity. PG activity was restored upon dissociation of the complex. The protein exhibited inhibitory activity toward PGs from Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, Fusarium moniliforme and Aspergillus niger. The possible role of PGIP in regulating the activity of fungal PG's and their ability to elicit plant defense reactions are discussed.

  1. Purification and Characterization of a Polygalacturonase-Inhibiting Protein from Phaseolus vulgaris L. 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervone, Felice; De Lorenzo, Giulia; Degrà, Luisa; Salvi, Giovanni; Bergami, Mario

    1987-01-01

    Homogeneous endo-polygalacturonase (PG) was covalently bound to cyanogen-bromide-activated Sepharose, and the resulting PG-Sepharose conjugate was utilized to purify, by affinity chromatography, a protein from Phaseolus vulgaris hypocotyls that binds to and inhibits PG. Isoelectric focusing of the purified PG-inhibiting protein (PGIP) showed a major protein band that coincided with PG-inhibiting activity. PGIP formed a complex with PG at pH 5.0 and at low salt concentrations. The complex dissociated in 0.5 m Na-acetate and pH values lower than 4.5 or higher than 6.0. Formation of the PG-PGIP complex resulted in complete inhibition of PG activity. PG activity was restored upon dissociation of the complex. The protein exhibited inhibitory activity toward PGs from Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, Fusarium moniliforme and Aspergillus niger. The possible role of PGIP in regulating the activity of fungal PG's and their ability to elicit plant defense reactions are discussed. Images Fig. 3 PMID:16665751

  2. Cellular Binding of Anionic Nanoparticles is Inhibited by Serum Proteins Independent of Nanoparticle Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischer, Candace C; Kumar, Umesh; Payne, Christine K

    2013-09-01

    Nanoparticles used in biological applications encounter a complex mixture of extracellular proteins. Adsorption of these proteins on the nanoparticle surface results in the formation of a "protein corona," which can dominate the interaction of the nanoparticle with the cellular environment. The goal of this research was to determine how nanoparticle composition and surface modification affect the cellular binding of protein-nanoparticle complexes. We examined the cellular binding of a collection of commonly used anionic nanoparticles: quantum dots, colloidal gold nanoparticles, and low-density lipoprotein particles, in the presence and absence of extracellular proteins. These experiments have the advantage of comparing different nanoparticles under identical conditions. Using a combination of fluorescence and dark field microscopy, flow cytometry, and spectroscopy, we find that cellular binding of these anionic nanoparticles is inhibited by serum proteins independent of nanoparticle composition or surface modification. We expect these results will aid in the design of nanoparticles for in vivo applications.

  3. Inhibition of Multimolecular RNA-Protein Interactions Using Multitarget-Directed Nanohybrid System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Woo-Jin; Kye, Mahnseok; Han, So-Hee; Choi, Jun Shik; Lim, Yong-Beom

    2017-04-05

    Multitarget-directed ligands (MTDLs) are hybrid ligands obtained by covalently linking active pharmacophores that can act on different targets. We envision that the concept of MTDLs can also be applied to supramolecular bioinorganic nanohybrid systems. Here, we report the inhibition of multimolecular RNA-protein complexes using multitarget-directed peptide-carbon nanotube hybrids (SPCHs). One of the most well-characterized and important RNA-protein interactions, a Rev-response element (RRE) RNA:Rev protein:Crm1 protein interaction system in human immunodeficiency virus type-1, was used as a model of multimolecular RNA-protein interactions. Although all previous studies have targeted only one of the interaction interfaces, that is, either the RRE:Rev interface or the RRE-Rev complex:Crm1 interface, we here have developed multitarget-directed SPCHs that could target both interfaces because the supramolecular nanosystem could be best suited for inhibiting multimolecular RNA-protein complexes that are characterized by large and complex molecular interfaces. The results showed that the single target-directed SPCHs were inhibitory to the single interface comprised only of RNA and protein in vitro, whereas multitarget-directed SPCHs were inhibitory to the multimolecular RNA-protein interfaces both in vitro and in cellulo. The MTDL nanohybrids represent a novel nanotherapeutic system that could be used to treat complex disease targets.

  4. Berberine regulates AMP-activated protein kinase signaling pathways and inhibits colon tumorigenesis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weidong; Hua, Baojin; Saud, Shakir M; Lin, Hongsheng; Hou, Wei; Matter, Matthias S; Jia, Libin; Colburn, Nancy H; Young, Matthew R

    2015-10-01

    Colorectal cancer, a leading cause of cancer death, has been linked to inflammation and obesity. Berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid, possesses anti-inflammatory, anti-diabetes and anti-tumor properties. In the azoxymethane initiated and dextran sulfate sodium (AOM/DSS) promoted colorectal carcinogenesis mouse model, berberine treated mice showed a 60% reduction in tumor number (P = 0.009), a 48% reduction in tumors 4 mm (P = 0.02) compared to vehicle treated mice. Berberine also decreased AOM/DSS induced Ki-67 and COX-2 expression. In vitro analysis showed that in addition to its anti-proliferation activity, berberine also induced apoptosis in colorectal cancer cell lines. Berberine activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a major regulator of metabolic pathways, and inhibited mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a downstream target of AMPK. Furthermore, 4E-binding protein-1 and p70 ribosomal S6 kinases, downstream targets of mTOR, were down regulated by berberine treatment. Berberine did not affect Liver kinase B1 (LKB1) activity or the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. Berberine inhibited Nuclear Factor kappa-B (NF-κB) activity, reduced the expression of cyclin D1 and survivin, induced phosphorylation of p53 and increased caspase-3 cleavage in vitro. Berberine inhibition of mTOR activity and p53 phosphorylation was found to be AMPK dependent, while inhibition NF-κB was AMPK independent. In vivo, berberine also activated AMPK, inhibited mTOR and p65 phosphorylation and activated caspase-3 cleavage. Our data suggests that berberine suppresses colon epithelial proliferation and tumorigenesis via AMPK dependent inhibition of mTOR activity and AMPK independent inhibition of NF-κB.

  5. Discovery of a Structurally Unique Small Molecule that Inhibits Protein Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakral, Durga; Tae, Hyun Seop

    2017-01-01

    Identifying and characterizing natural products and synthetic small molecules that inhibit biochemical processes such as ribosomal translation can lead to novel sources of molecular probes and therapeutics. The search for new antibiotics has been invigorated by the increasing burden of drug-resistant bacteria and has identified many clinically essential prokaryote-specific ribosome inhibitors. However, the current cohort of antibiotics is limited with regards to bacterial resistance mechanisms because of structural similarity within classes. From a high-throughput screen for translation inhibitors, we discovered a new compound, T6102, which inhibits bacterial protein synthesis in vitro, inhibits bacterial growth of Bacillus subtilis in vivo, and has a chemical structure that appears to be unique among known classes of translation-inhibiting antibiotics. T6102’s unique structure compared to current clinically-utilized antibiotics makes it an exciting new candidate for the development of next-generation antibiotics.

  6. Asynchronous Cholinergic Drive Correlates with Excitation-Inhibition Imbalance via a Neuronal Ca2+ Sensor Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keming Zhou

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Excitation-inhibition imbalance in neural networks is widely linked to neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders. However, how genetic factors alter neuronal activity, leading to excitation-inhibition imbalance, remains unclear. Here, using the C. elegans locomotor circuit, we examine how altering neuronal activity for varying time periods affects synaptic release pattern and animal behavior. We show that while short-duration activation of excitatory cholinergic neurons elicits a reversible enhancement of presynaptic strength, persistent activation results to asynchronous and reduced cholinergic drive, inducing imbalance between endogenous excitation and inhibition. We find that the neuronal calcium sensor protein NCS-2 is required for asynchronous cholinergic release in an activity-dependent manner and dampens excitability of inhibitory neurons non-cell autonomously. The function of NCS-2 requires its Ca2+ binding and membrane association domains. These results reveal a synaptic mechanism implicating asynchronous release in regulation of excitation-inhibition balance.

  7. Basal lamina inhibition suppresses synthesis of calcium-dependent proteins associated with mammary epithelial cell spreading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, V; Hom, Y K; Marinkovich, M P

    1986-08-01

    Spreading of mouse mammary epithelial cells on collagen gels is closely correlated with the synthesis of a group of putative calcium-binding proteins (CBP) (Braslau et al., Exp cell res 155 (1984) 213). Collagen synthesis was shown to occur during cell spreading, while omission of serum prevented cell spreading and the synthesis of collagen. The proline analogues cis-hydroxyproline and L-azetidine-2-carboxylic acid were shown to inhibit epithelial cell spreading and to suppress the collagen synthesis that occurs during serum-supported cell spreading. Inhibition of collagen synthesis resulted in the inhibition of CBP synthesis associated with cell spreading. In contrast, the collagen cross-linking inhibitor B-aminopropionitrile did not inhibit cell spreading nor did it suppress collagen synthesis; CBP synthesis was also normal during treatment with this inhibitor. Thus, mammary epithelial cell spreading on collagen gels and CBP synthesis can both be suppressed by inhibition of collagen synthesis indicating that they may be integrated in some manner. It is suggested that inhibition of cell spreading during inhibition of collagen synthesis results from failure to assemble a normal basal lamina; this may in turn signal suppression of CBP synthesis.

  8. The Cytotoxicity of Elderberry Ribosome-Inactivating Proteins Is Not Solely Determined by Their Protein Translation Inhibition Activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenjing Shang

    Full Text Available Although the protein translation inhibition activity of ribosome inactivating proteins (RIPs is well documented, little is known about the contribution of the lectin chain to the biological activity of these proteins. In this study, we compared the in vitro and intracellular activity of several S. nigra (elderberry RIPs and non-RIP lectins. Our data demonstrate that RIPs from elderberry are much more toxic to HeLa cells than to primary fibroblasts. Differences in the cytotoxicity between the elderberry proteins correlated with differences in glycan specificity of their lectin domain, cellular uptake efficiency and intracellular destination. Despite the fact that the bulk of the RIPs accumulated in the lysosomes and partly in the Golgi apparatus, we could demonstrate effective inhibition of protein synthesis in cellula. As we also observed cytotoxicity for non-RIP lectins, it is clear that the lectin chain triggers additional pathways heralding cell death. Our data suggest that one of these pathways involves the induction of autophagy.

  9. 2-Bromopalmitate Reduces Protein Deacylation by Inhibition of Acyl-Protein Thioesterase Enzymatic Activities

    OpenAIRE

    Pedro, Maria P.; Vilcaes, Aldo A.; Vanesa M Tomatis; Oliveira, Rafael G.; Gomez, Guillermo A; Daniotti, Jose L.

    2013-01-01

    S-acylation, the covalent attachment of palmitate and other fatty acids on cysteine residues, is a reversible post-translational modification that exerts diverse effects on protein functions. S-acylation is catalyzed by protein acyltransferases (PAT), while deacylation requires acyl-protein thioesterases (APT), with numerous inhibitors for these enzymes having already been developed and characterized. Among these inhibitors, the palmitate analog 2-brompalmitate (2-BP) is the most commonly use...

  10. Domain a' of protein disulfide isomerase plays key role in inhibiting alpha-synuclein fibril formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Han; Wang, Lei; Wang, Chih-chen

    2010-07-01

    alpha-Synuclein (alpha Syn) is the main component of Lewy bodies formed in midbrain dopaminergic neurons which is a pathological characteristic of Parkinson's disease. It has been recently showed to induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and impair ER functions. However, the mechanism of how ER responds to alpha Syn toxicity is poorly understood. In the present study, we found that protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), a stress protein abundant in ER, effectively inhibits alpha Syn fibril formation in vitro. In PDI molecule with a structure of abb'xa'c, domain a' was found to be essential and sufficient for PDI to inhibit alpha Syn fibril formation. PDI was further found to be more avid for binding with intermediate species formed during alpha Syn fibril formation, and the binding was more intensive in the later lag phase. Our results provide new insight into the role of PDI in protecting ER from the deleterious effects of misfolded protein accumulation in many neurodegenerative diseases.

  11. Hydrogen sulfide inhibits development of atherosclerosis through up-regulating protein S-nitrosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yan; Chen, Yulong; Zhu, Ninghong; Zhao, Sihai; Fan, Jianglin; Liu, Enqi

    2016-10-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an important gaseous signaling molecule that serves many important regulatory roles in physiological and pathophysiological conditions. H2S exerts an anti-atherosclerotic effect through mediating the biological functions of nitric oxide (NO). However, its mechanism of action is unclear. The purpose of this study is to explore the effect mechanism of H2S on the development of atherosclerosis with regard to protein S-nitrosylation. A total of 45 male apoE(-/-) mice were randomly divided into three groups. Atherosclerosis was induced by Western diet (21% fat and 0.15% cholesterol) with/without administration of a H2S donor (NaHS) or an endogenous cystathionine γ-lyase inhibitor (d, l-propargylglycine) for 12 weeks. After 12 weeks, plasma lipid and plasma NO levels were measured. Aortic gross lesion area and histopathological features of aortic lesion were determined. Additionally, the level of S-nitrosylated proteins in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) was detected using immunofluorescence in aorta. Rat VSMCs were performed in an in vitro experiment. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) protein expression, NO generation, protein S-nitrosylation, and cell proliferation and migration were measured. We found that H2S significantly reduced the aortic atherosclerotic lesion area (P=0.006) and inhibited lipid and macrophage accumulation (P=0.004, P=0.002) and VSMC proliferation (P=0.019) in apoE(-/-) mice. H2S could up-regulate levels of plasma NO and protein S-nitrosylation in aorta VSMCs. However, d, l- propargylglycine had the opposite effect, increasing the lesion area and the content of lipids and macrophages in the lesions of apoE(-/-) mice and down-regulating plasma NO levels and protein S-nitrosylation in aorta VSMCs. In vitro experiments, H2S could significantly reverse the reduction of iNOS expression and NO generation induced by oxidized low-density lipoprotein in VSMCs. Moreover, H2S could increase the protein S

  12. HCV core protein promotes hepatocyte proliferation and chemoresistance by inhibiting NR4A1

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    Tan, Yongsheng, E-mail: yongshengtanwhu@126.com; Li, Yan, E-mail: liyansd2@163.com

    2015-10-23

    This study investigated the effect of HCV core protein on the proliferation of hepatocytes and hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HCC), the influence of HCV core protein on HCC apoptosis induced by the chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin, and the mechanism through which HCV core protein acts as a potential oncoprotein in HCV-related HCC by measuring the levels of NR4A1 and Runt-related transcription factor 3 (RUNX3), which are associated with tumor suppression and chemotherapy resistance. In the present study, PcDNA3.1-core and RUNX3 siRNA were transfected into LO2 and HepG2 cells using Lipofectamine 2000. LO2-core, HepG2-core, LO2-RUNX3 {sup low} and control cells were treated with different concentrations of cisplatin for 72 h, and cell proliferation and apoptosis were assayed using the CellTiter 96{sup ®}Aqueous Non-Radioactive Cell Proliferation Assay Kit. Western blot and real time PCR analyses were used to detect NR4A1, RUNX3, smad7, Cyclin D1 and BAX. Confocal microscopy was used to determine the levels of NR4A1 in HepG2 and HepG2-core cells. The growth rate of HepG2-core cells was considerably greater than that of HepG2 cells. HCV core protein increased the expression of cyclin D1 and decreased the expressions of NR4A1 and RUNX3. In LO2 – RUNX3 {sup low}, the rate of cell proliferation and the level of cisplatin resistance were the same as in the LO2 -core. These results suggest that HCV core protein decreases the sensitivity of hepatocytes to cisplatin by inhibiting the expression of NR4A1 and promoting the expression of smad7, which negatively regulates the TGF-β pathway. This effect results in down regulation of RUNX3, a target of the TGF-β pathway. Taken together, these findings indicate that in hepatocytes, HCV core protein increases drug resistance and inhibits cell apoptosis by inhibiting the expressions of NR4A1 and RUNX3. - Highlights: • HCV core protein inhibits HepG2 cell sensitivity to cisplatin. • Core expression in HepG2 decreases

  13. Protein acylation in the inhibition of insulin secretion by norepinephrine, somatostatin, galanin, and PGE2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Haiying; Straub, Susanne G; Sharp, Geoffrey W G

    2003-08-01

    The major physiological inhibitors of insulin secretion, norepinephrine, somatostatin, galanin, and prostaglandin E2, act via specific receptors that activate pertussis toxin (PTX)-sensitive G proteins. Four inhibitory mechanisms are known: 1) activation of ATP-sensitive K channels and repolarization of the beta-cell; 2) inhibition of L-type Ca2+ channels; 3) decreased activity of adenylyl cyclase; and 4) inhibition of exocytosis at a "distal" site in stimulus-secretion coupling. We have examined the underlying mechanisms of inhibition at this distal site. In rat pancreatic islets, 2-bromopalmitate, cerulenin, and polyunsaturated fatty acids, all of which suppress protein acyltransferase activity, blocked the distal inhibitory effects of norepinephrine in a concentration-dependent manner. In contrast, control compounds such as palmitate, 16-hydroxypalmitate, and etomoxir, which do not block protein acylation, had no effect. Furthermore, 2-bromopalmitate also blocked the distal inhibitory actions of somatostatin, galanin, and prostaglandin E2. Importantly, neither 2-bromopalmitate nor cerulenin affected the action of norepinephrine to decrease cAMP production. We also examined the effects of norepinephrine, 2-bromopalmitate, and cerulenin on palmitate metabolism. Palmitate oxidation and its incorporation into lipids seemed not to contribute to the effects of 2-bromopalmitate and cerulenin on norepinephrine action. These data suggest that protein acylation mediates the distal inhibitory effect on insulin secretion. We propose that the inhibitors of insulin secretion, acting via PTX-sensitive G proteins, activate a specific protein acyltransferase, causing the acylation of a protein or proteins critical to exocytosis. This particular acylation and subsequent disruption of the essential and precise interactions involved in core complex formation would block exocytosis.

  14. Host-Pathogen Interactions: VI. A Single Plant Protein Efficiently Inhibits Endopolygalacturonases Secreted by Colletotrichum Lindemuthianum and Aspergillus Niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, M L; Anderson, A J; Albersheim, P

    1973-03-01

    Endopolygalacturonases have been purified from the extracellular enzymes of Colletotrichum lindemuthianum and Aspergillus niger. A protein, purified from Red Kidney (Phaseolus vulgaris) beans for its ability to inhibit the endopolygalacturonase secreted by C. lindemuthianum, inhibits the A. niger endopolygalacturonase almost as efficiently as it inhibits the C. lindemuthianum enzyme.

  15. RNase P Ribozymes Inhibit the Replication of Human Cytomegalovirus by Targeting Essential Viral Capsid Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhu; Reeves, Michael; Ye, Jun; Trang, Phong; Zhu, Li; Sheng, Jingxue; Wang, Yu; Zen, Ke; Wu, Jianguo; Liu, Fenyong

    2015-06-24

    An engineered RNase P-based ribozyme variant, which was generated using the in vitro selection procedure, was used to target the overlapping mRNA region of two proteins essential for human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) replication: capsid assembly protein (AP) and protease (PR). In vitro studies showed that the generated variant, V718-A, cleaved the target AP mRNA sequence efficiently and its activity was about 60-fold higher than that of wild type ribozyme M1-A. Furthermore, we observed a reduction of 98%-99% in AP/PR expression and an inhibition of 50,000 fold in viral growth in cells with V718-A, while a 75% reduction in AP/PR expression and a 500-fold inhibition in viral growth was found in cells with M1-A. Examination of the antiviral effects of the generated ribozyme on the HCMV replication cycle suggested that viral DNA encapsidation was inhibited and as a consequence, viral capsid assembly was blocked when the expression of AP and PR was inhibited by the ribozyme. Thus, our study indicates that the generated ribozyme variant is highly effective in inhibiting HCMV gene expression and blocking viral replication, and suggests that engineered RNase P ribozyme can be potentially developed as a promising gene-targeting agent for anti-HCMV therapy.

  16. Inhibition of HIV type 1 infection with a RANTES-IgG3 fusion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challita-Eid, P M; Klimatcheva, E; Day, B T; Evans, T; Dreyer, K; Rimel, B J; Rosenblatt, J D; Planelles, V

    1998-12-20

    The natural ligands for the chemokine receptors CCR5 (RANTES, MIP-1alpha, and MIP-1beta) and CXCR4 (SDF-1) can act as potent inhibitors of infection by the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) at the level of viral entry. Unlike antibody-mediated inhibition, chemokine-mediated inhibition is broadly effective. Different HIV-1 strains can utilize the same coreceptor(s) for viral entry and, therefore, can be blocked by the same chemokine(s). HIV-1 strains that are highly resistant to neutralization by V3-specific antibodies are sensitive to inhibition by chemokines. Therefore, the use of chemokine-derived molecules constitutes a potential therapeutic approach to prevent infection by HIV-1. We have generated a fusion protein between RANTES and human IgG3 (RANTES-IgG3). The effectiveness of RANTES-IgG3 inhibition of infection by HIV-1 was similar to that of rRANTES. Inhibition of HIV-1 by RANTES-IgG3 was specific for CCR5-dependent but not CXCR4-dependent HIV-1 isolates. Fusion of a chemokine to an IgG moiety offers two desirable properties with respect to the recombinant chemokine alone. First, IgG fusion proteins have extended half-lives in vivo. Second, molecules with IgG heavy chain moieties may be able to cross the placenta and potentially induce fetal protection.

  17. Itraconazole Inhibits Enterovirus Replication by Targeting the Oxysterol-Binding Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeroen R.P.M. Strating

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Itraconazole (ITZ is a well-known antifungal agent that also has anticancer activity. In this study, we identify ITZ as a broad-spectrum inhibitor of enteroviruses (e.g., poliovirus, coxsackievirus, enterovirus-71, rhinovirus. We demonstrate that ITZ inhibits viral RNA replication by targeting oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP and OSBP-related protein 4 (ORP4. Consistently, OSW-1, a specific OSBP/ORP4 antagonist, also inhibits enterovirus replication. Knockdown of OSBP inhibits virus replication, whereas overexpression of OSBP or ORP4 counteracts the antiviral effects of ITZ and OSW-1. ITZ binds OSBP and inhibits its function, i.e., shuttling of cholesterol and phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate between membranes, thereby likely perturbing the virus-induced membrane alterations essential for viral replication organelle formation. ITZ also inhibits hepatitis C virus replication, which also relies on OSBP. Together, these data implicate OSBP/ORP4 as molecular targets of ITZ and point to an essential role of OSBP/ORP4-mediated lipid exchange in virus replication that can be targeted by antiviral drugs.

  18. Proteins in the Cocoon of Silkworm Inhibit the Growth of Beauveria bassiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Li, Youshan; Liu, Huawei; Xia, Qingyou; Zhao, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Silk cocoons are composed of fiber proteins (fibroins) and adhesive glue proteins (sericins), which provide a physical barrier to protect the inside pupa. Moreover, other proteins were identified in the cocoon silk, many of which are immune related proteins. In this study, we extracted proteins from the silkworm cocoon by Tris-HCl buffer (pH7.5), and found that they had a strong inhibitory activity against fungal proteases and they had higher abundance in the outer cocoon layers than in the inner cocoon layers. Moreover, we found that extracted cocoon proteins can inhibit the germination of Beauveria bassiana spores. Consistent with the distribution of protease inhibitors, we found that proteins from the outer cocoon layers showed better inhibitory effects against B. bassiana spores than proteins from the inner layers. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was used to reveal the extracted components in the scaffold silk, the outermost cocoon layer. A total of 129 proteins were identified, 30 of which were annotated as protease inhibitors. Protease inhibitors accounted for 89.1% in abundance among extracted proteins. These protease inhibitors have many intramolecular disulfide bonds to maintain their stable structure, and remained active after being boiled. This study added a new understanding to the antimicrobial function of the cocoon. PMID:27032085

  19. A single whey acidic protein domain containing protein (SWD) inhibits bacteria invasion and dissemination in shrimp Marsupenaeus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hai-Shan; Sun, Chen; Wang, Tong; Zhao, Xiao-Fan; Wang, Jin-Xing

    2013-08-01

    The single whey acidic protein (WAP) domain containing proteins (SWDs) in crustacean belong to type III crustins and have antiprotease activities and/or antimicrobial activities. Their functions in vivo in crustacean immunity need to be clarify. In this study, a new single WAP domain containing protein (SWD) was obtained from Marsupenaeus japonicus, designated as MjSWD. The full-length cDNA of MjSWD was 522 bp.The open reading frame of MjSWD encoded a protein of 79 amino acids, with a 24 amino acid signal peptide and a WAP domain. Tissue distribution analysis revealed that MjSWD transcripts were generally expressed in all the tested tissues, including hemocytes, heart, hepatopancreas, gill, stomach and intestine. The time course expression of MjSWD was analyzed by quantitative real time PCR, and the results exhibited that MjSWD was upregulated after bacteria (Vibrio anguillarum, Staphylococcus aureus) and white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) challenge in gills and stomach of the shrimp. The purified recombinant protein of MjSWD could bind to several Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria though binding to microbial polysaccharides (peptidoglycan). MjSWD could inhibit the activity of Subtilisin A and Proteinase K and bacteria-secreted proteases. The results of natural infection with MjSWD incubated bacteria showed that the inhibition of MjSWD against bacterial secreted proteases was contributed to inhibiting bacteria invasion and dissemination in the shrimp. The MjSWD is, thus, involved in the shrimp antibacterial innate immunity.

  20. Protein synthesis inhibition in the basolateral nucleus of amygdala facilitates extinction of auditory fear memory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN XinChun; QI XueLian; YANG XiaoFei; LI BaoMing

    2007-01-01

    It is known that consolidation of fear conditioning requires de novo protein synthesis in the amygdala. However, there is controversy about the role of protein synthesis in post-retrieval extinction of fear memory. The present study investigated the effect of protein synthesis inhibition (PSI) in the basolateral nucleus of amygdala (BLA) on post-retrieval extinction of auditory fear memory. Intra-BLA infusion of the protein synthesis inhibitor anisomycin '0' h post-retrieval facilitated the extinction, but was ineffective if the memory was not retrieved. Anisomycin had no effect on the extinction when it was infused 6 h post-retrieval. The present results suggest that there exists a protein-synthesis-dependent mechanism in the BLA that retards extinction of auditory fear memory.

  1. Inhibition by FK506 of formyl peptide-induced neutrophil activation and associated protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, D; Adams, D H; Martin, T J; Liu, Q; Grant, R A; Stockley, R A; Lord, J M

    1994-09-15

    The macrolide FK506 inhibited, by up to 50%, neutrophil migration and the production of the superoxide radical in response to the formyl peptide, formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP). The production of the superoxide radical in response to phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) was unaffected by FK506. The inhibition of neutrophil functions was accompanied by a partial reversal of FMLP-induced synthesis of cellular proteins, despite a rise in intracellular Ca2+. Neutrophils treated with FK506 demonstrated a small (average 23%) though significant decrease in formyl-peptide receptor numbers but receptor binding affinity was unaffected. The effects of FK506 on neutrophil activation appear to be analogous to those in T-lymphocytes. The incomplete inhibition, by FK506, of neutrophil responses suggests further that activation by FMLP is mediated via distinct multiple signalling pathways, including protein kinase activation and protein synthesis. The inability of FK506 to reduce FMLP-induced rises in cellular Ca2+ or PMA-induced activation of neutrophils suggests that its action is distal to Ca2+ mobilization and distinct from pathways relying on PKC activation. Thus the immunosuppressive effects of FK506 in vivo might be mediated through the inhibition of inflammatory cells other than lymphocytes and the drug therefore has therapeutic potential in a variety of inflammatory conditions. The drug also has potential in vitro for the characterization of signalling pathways from the plasma membrane to the nucleus.

  2. BCL-2 family protein, BAD is down-regulated in breast cancer and inhibits cell invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cekanova, Maria; Fernando, Romaine I; Siriwardhana, Nalin; Sukhthankar, Mugdha; De la Parra, Columba; Woraratphoka, Jirayus; Malone, Christine; Ström, Anders; Baek, Seung J; Wade, Paul A; Saxton, Arnold M; Donnell, Robert M; Pestell, Richard G; Dharmawardhane, Suranganie; Wimalasena, Jay

    2015-02-01

    We have previously demonstrated that the anti-apoptotic protein BAD is expressed in normal human breast tissue and shown that BAD inhibits expression of cyclin D1 to delay cell-cycle progression in breast cancer cells. Herein, expression of proteins in breast tissues was studied by immunohistochemistry and results were analyzed statistically to obtain semi-quantitative data. Biochemical and functional changes in BAD-overexpressing MCF7 breast cancer cells were evaluated using PCR, reporter assays, western blotting, ELISA and extracellular matrix invasion assays. Compared to normal tissues, Grade II breast cancers expressed low total/phosphorylated forms of BAD in both cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments. BAD overexpression decreased the expression of β-catenin, Sp1, and phosphorylation of STATs. BAD inhibited Ras/MEK/ERK and JNK signaling pathways, without affecting the p38 signaling pathway. Expression of the metastasis-related proteins, MMP10, VEGF, SNAIL, CXCR4, E-cadherin and TlMP2 was regulated by BAD with concomitant inhibition of extracellular matrix invasion. Inhibition of BAD by siRNA increased invasion and Akt/p-Akt levels. Clinical data and the results herein suggest that in addition to the effect on apoptosis, BAD conveys anti-metastatic effects and is a valuable prognostic marker in breast cancer.

  3. LINGO-1, a transmembrane signaling protein, inhibits oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination through intercellular self-interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jepson, Scott; Vought, Bryan; Gross, Christian H; Gan, Lu; Austen, Douglas; Frantz, J Daniel; Zwahlen, Jacque; Lowe, Derek; Markland, William; Krauss, Raul

    2012-06-22

    Overcoming remyelination failure is a major goal of new therapies for demyelinating diseases like multiple sclerosis. LINGO-1, a key negative regulator of myelination, is a transmembrane signaling protein expressed in both neurons and oligodendrocytes. In neurons, LINGO-1 is an integral component of the Nogo receptor complex, which inhibits axonal growth via RhoA. Because the only ligand-binding subunit of this complex, the Nogo receptor, is absent in oligodendrocytes, the extracellular signals that inhibit myelination through a LINGO-1-mediated mechanism are unknown. Here we show that LINGO-1 inhibits oligodendrocyte terminal differentiation through intercellular interactions and is capable of a self-association in trans. Consistent with previous reports, overexpression of full-length LINGO-1 inhibited differentiation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs). Unexpectedly, treatment with a soluble recombinant LINGO-1 ectodomain also had an inhibitory effect on OPCs and decreased myelinated axonal segments in cocultures with neurons from dorsal root ganglia. We demonstrated LINGO-1-mediated inhibition of OPCs through intercellular signaling by using a surface-bound LINGO-1 construct expressed ectopically in astrocytes. Further investigation showed that the soluble LINGO-1 ectodomain can interact with itself in trans by binding to CHO cells expressing full-length LINGO-1. Finally, we observed that soluble LINGO-1 could activate RhoA in OPCs. We propose that LINGO-1 acts as both a ligand and a receptor and that the mechanism by which it negatively regulates OPC differentiation and myelination is mediated by a homophilic intercellular interaction. Disruption of this protein-protein interaction could lead to a decrease of LINGO-1 inhibition and an increase in myelination.

  4. Protein kinase B/Akt1 inhibits autophagy by down-regulating UVRAG expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Wonseok; Ju, Ji-hyun; Lee, Kyung-min; Nam, KeeSoo; Oh, Sunhwa [Department of Life Science, College of Natural Science, Hanyang University, 17 Haengdang-dong, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Incheol, E-mail: incheol@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Life Science, College of Natural Science, Hanyang University, 17 Haengdang-dong, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-02-01

    Autophagy, or autophagocytosis, is a selective intracellular degradative process involving the cell's own lysosomal apparatus. An essential component in cell development, homeostasis, repair and resistance to stress, autophagy may result in either cell death or survival. The targeted region of the cell is sequestered within a membrane structure, the autophagosome, for regulation of the catabolic process. A key factor in both autophagosome formation and autophagosome maturation is a protein encoded by the ultraviolet irradiation resistance-associated gene (UVRAG). Conversely, the serine/threonine-specific protein kinase B (PKB, also known as Akt), which regulates survival in various cancers, inhibits autophagy through mTOR activation. We found that Akt1 may also directly inhibit autophagy by down-regulating UVRAG both in a 293T transient transfection system and breast cancer cells stably expressing Akt1. The UVRAG with mutations at putative Akt1-phosphorylation sites were still inhibited by Akt1, and dominant-negative Akt1 also inhibited UVRAG expression, suggesting that Akt1 down-regulates UVRAG by a kinase activity-independent mechanism. We showed that Akt1 overexpression in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells down-regulated UVRAG transcription. Cells over-expressing Akt1 were more resistant than control cells to ultraviolet light-induced autophagy and exhibited the associated reduction in cell viability. Levels of the autophagosome indicator protein LC3B-II and mRFP-GFP-LC3 were reduced in cells that over-expressing Akt1. Inhibiting Akt1 by siRNA or reintroducing UVRAG gene rescued the level of LC3B-II in UV-irradiation. Altogether, these data suggest that Akt1 may inhibit autophagy by decreasing UVRAG expression, which also sensitizes cancer cells to UV irradiation.

  5. Protein Synthesis Inhibition Activity by Strawberry Tissue Protein Extracts during Plant Life Cycle and under Biotic and Abiotic Stresses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walther Faedi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs, enzymes that are widely distributed in the plant kingdom, inhibit protein synthesis by depurinating rRNA and many other polynucleotidic substrates. Although RIPs show antiviral, antifungal, and insecticidal activities, their biological and physiological roles are not completely understood. Additionally, it has been described that RIP expression is augmented under stressful conditions. In this study, we evaluated protein synthesis inhibition activity in partially purified basic proteins (hereafter referred to as RIP activity from tissue extracts of Fragaria × ananassa (strawberry cultivars with low (Dora and high (Record tolerance to root pathogens and fructification stress. Association between the presence of RIP activity and the crop management (organic or integrated soil, growth stage (quiescence, flowering, and fructification, and exogenous stress (drought were investigated. RIP activity was found in every tissue tested (roots, rhizomes, leaves, buds, flowers, and fruits and under each tested condition. However, significant differences in RIP distribution were observed depending on the soil and growth stage, and an increase in RIP activity was found in the leaves of drought-stressed plants. These results suggest that RIP expression and activity could represent a response mechanism against biotic and abiotic stresses and could be a useful tool in selecting stress-resistant strawberry genotypes.

  6. Nutlin-3 down-regulates retinoblastoma protein expression and inhibits muscle cell differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, Erica M. [Department of Biochemistry, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Niu, MengMeng; Bergholz, Johann [Center of Growth, Metabolism and Aging, College of Life Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu, 610014 China (China); Jim Xiao, Zhi-Xiong, E-mail: jxiao@bu.edu [Department of Biochemistry, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Center of Growth, Metabolism and Aging, College of Life Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu, 610014 China (China)

    2015-05-29

    The p53 tumor suppressor gene plays a critical role in regulation of proliferation, cell death and differentiation. The MDM2 oncoprotein is a major negative regulator for p53 by binding to and targeting p53 for proteasome-mediated degradation. The small molecule inhibitor, nutlin-3, disrupts MDM2-p53 interaction resulting in stabilization and activation of p53 protein. We have previously shown that nutlin-3 activates p53, leading to MDM2 accumulation as concomitant of reduced retinoblastoma (Rb) protein stability. It is well known that Rb is important in muscle development and myoblast differentiation and that rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), or cancer of the skeletal muscle, typically harbors MDM2 amplification. In this study, we show that nutlin-3 inhibited myoblast proliferation and effectively prevented myoblast differentiation, as evidenced by lack of expression of muscle differentiation markers including myogenin and myosin heavy chain (MyHC), as well as a failure to form multinucleated myotubes, which were associated with dramatic increases in MDM2 expression and decrease in Rb protein levels. These results indicate that nutlin-3 can effectively inhibit muscle cell differentiation. - Highlights: • Nutlin-3 inhibits myoblast proliferation and prevents differentiation into myotubes. • Nutlin-3 increases MDM2 expression and down-regulates Rb protein levels. • This study has implication in nutlin-3 treatment of rhabdomyosarcomas.

  7. Haemophilus ducreyi targets Src family protein tyrosine kinases to inhibit phagocytic signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mock, Jason R; Vakevainen, Merja; Deng, Kaiping; Latimer, Jo L; Young, Jennifer A; van Oers, Nicolai S C; Greenberg, Steven; Hansen, Eric J

    2005-12-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi, the etiologic agent of the sexually transmitted disease chancroid, has been shown to inhibit phagocytosis of both itself and secondary targets in vitro. Immunodepletion of LspA proteins from H. ducreyi culture supernatant fluid abolished this inhibitory effect, indicating that the LspA proteins are necessary for the inhibition of phagocytosis by H. ducreyi. Fluorescence microscopy revealed that macrophages incubated with wild-type H. ducreyi, but not with a lspA1 lspA2 mutant, were unable to complete development of the phagocytic cup around immunoglobulin G-opsonized targets. Examination of the phosphotyrosine protein profiles of these two sets of macrophages showed that those incubated with wild-type H. ducreyi had greatly reduced phosphorylation levels of proteins in the 50-to-60-kDa range. Subsequent experiments revealed reductions in the catalytic activities of both Lyn and Hck, two members of the Src family of protein tyrosine kinases that are known to be involved in the proximal signaling steps of Fcgamma receptor-mediated phagocytosis. Additional experiments confirmed reductions in the levels of both active Lyn and active Hck in three different immune cell lines, but not in HeLa cells, exposed to wild-type H. ducreyi. This is the first example of a bacterial pathogen that suppresses Src family protein tyrosine kinase activity to subvert phagocytic signaling in hostcells.

  8. Eosinophil cationic protein stimulates and major basic protein inhibits airway mucus secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, J D; Davey, R T; Lundgren, B

    1991-01-01

    Possible roles of eosinophil (EO) products in modulating the release of mucus from airway explants were investigated. Cell- and membrane-free lysates from purified human EOs (1 to 20 x 10(5)) caused a dose-dependent release of respiratory glycoconjugates (RGC) from cultured feline tracheal explants...... chromatography. ECP (0.025 to 25 micrograms/ml) caused a dose-dependent increase in RGC release from both feline and human airway explants and also stimulated the release of the serous cell-marker, lactoferrin, from human bronchial explants. EO-derived neurotoxin (0.025 to 50 micrograms/ml) failed to affect RGC...... release, whereas MBP (50 micrograms/ml) significantly inhibited RGC release from feline explants. Thus, ECP stimulates RGC and lactoferrin release from airway explants, whereas MBP inhibits RGC release....

  9. Inhibition of Hsp70 by Methylene Blue Affects Signaling Protein Function and Ubiquitination and Modulates Polyglutamine Protein Degradation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Adrienne M.; Morishima, Yoshihiro; Clapp, Kelly M.; Peng, Hwei-Ming; Pratt, William B.; Gestwicki, Jason E.; Osawa, Yoichi; Lieberman, Andrew P.

    2010-01-01

    The Hsp90/Hsp70-based chaperone machinery regulates the activity and degradation of many signaling proteins. Cycling with Hsp90 stabilizes client proteins, whereas Hsp70 interacts with chaperone-dependent E3 ubiquitin ligases to promote protein degradation. To probe these actions, small molecule inhibitors of Hsp70 would be extremely useful; however, few have been identified. Here we test the effects of methylene blue, a recently described inhibitor of Hsp70 ATPase activity, in three well established systems of increasing complexity. First, we demonstrate that methylene blue inhibits the ability of the purified Hsp90/Hsp70-based chaperone machinery to enable ligand binding by the glucocorticoid receptor and show that this effect is due to specific inhibition of Hsp70. Next, we establish that ubiquitination of neuronal nitric-oxide synthase by the native ubiquitinating system of reticulocyte lysate is dependent upon both Hsp70 and the E3 ubiquitin ligase CHIP and is blocked by methylene blue. Finally, we demonstrate that methylene blue impairs degradation of the polyglutamine expanded androgen receptor, an Hsp90 client mutated in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy. In contrast, degradation of an amino-terminal fragment of the receptor, which lacks the ligand binding domain and, therefore, is not a client of the Hsp90/Hsp70-based chaperone machinery, is enhanced through homeostatic induction of autophagy that occurs when Hsp70-dependent proteasomal degradation is inhibited by methylene blue. Our data demonstrate the utility of methylene blue in defining Hsp70-dependent functions and reveal divergent effects on polyglutamine protein degradation depending on whether the substrate is an Hsp90 client. PMID:20348093

  10. Inhibition of hsp70 by methylene blue affects signaling protein function and ubiquitination and modulates polyglutamine protein degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Adrienne M; Morishima, Yoshihiro; Clapp, Kelly M; Peng, Hwei-Ming; Pratt, William B; Gestwicki, Jason E; Osawa, Yoichi; Lieberman, Andrew P

    2010-05-21

    The Hsp90/Hsp70-based chaperone machinery regulates the activity and degradation of many signaling proteins. Cycling with Hsp90 stabilizes client proteins, whereas Hsp70 interacts with chaperone-dependent E3 ubiquitin ligases to promote protein degradation. To probe these actions, small molecule inhibitors of Hsp70 would be extremely useful; however, few have been identified. Here we test the effects of methylene blue, a recently described inhibitor of Hsp70 ATPase activity, in three well established systems of increasing complexity. First, we demonstrate that methylene blue inhibits the ability of the purified Hsp90/Hsp70-based chaperone machinery to enable ligand binding by the glucocorticoid receptor and show that this effect is due to specific inhibition of Hsp70. Next, we establish that ubiquitination of neuronal nitric-oxide synthase by the native ubiquitinating system of reticulocyte lysate is dependent upon both Hsp70 and the E3 ubiquitin ligase CHIP and is blocked by methylene blue. Finally, we demonstrate that methylene blue impairs degradation of the polyglutamine expanded androgen receptor, an Hsp90 client mutated in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy. In contrast, degradation of an amino-terminal fragment of the receptor, which lacks the ligand binding domain and, therefore, is not a client of the Hsp90/Hsp70-based chaperone machinery, is enhanced through homeostatic induction of autophagy that occurs when Hsp70-dependent proteasomal degradation is inhibited by methylene blue. Our data demonstrate the utility of methylene blue in defining Hsp70-dependent functions and reveal divergent effects on polyglutamine protein degradation depending on whether the substrate is an Hsp90 client.

  11. Amot130 adapts atrophin-1 interacting protein 4 to inhibit yes-associated protein signaling and cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Jacob J; Heller, Brigitte L; Bringman, Lauren R; Ranahan, William P; Cocklin, Ross R; Goebl, Mark G; Oh, Misook; Lim, Hyun-Suk; Ingham, Robert J; Wells, Clark D

    2013-05-24

    The adaptor protein Amot130 scaffolds components of the Hippo pathway to promote the inhibition of cell growth. This study describes how Amot130 through binding and activating the ubiquitin ligase AIP4/Itch achieves these effects. AIP4 is found to bind and ubiquitinate Amot130 at residue Lys-481. This both stabilizes Amot130 and promotes its residence at the plasma membrane. Furthermore, Amot130 is shown to scaffold a complex containing overexpressed AIP4 and the transcriptional co-activator Yes-associated protein (YAP). Consequently, Amot130 promotes the ubiquitination of YAP by AIP4 and prevents AIP4 from binding to large tumor suppressor 1. Amot130 is found to reduce YAP stability. Importantly, Amot130 inhibition of YAP dependent transcription is reversed by AIP4 silencing, whereas Amot130 and AIP4 expression interdependently suppress cell growth. Thus, Amot130 repurposes AIP4 from its previously described role in degrading large tumor suppressor 1 to the inhibition of YAP and cell growth.

  12. Inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B by lignans from Myristica fragrans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Senugmi; Na, Min Kyun; Jang, Jun Pil; Kim, Kyung Ah; Kim, Bo Yeon; Sung, Nak Ju; Oh, Won Keun; Ahn, Jong Seog

    2006-08-01

    Inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) has been proposed as one of the drug targets for treating type 2 diabetes and obesity. Bioassay-guided fractionation of a MeOH extract of the semen of Myristica fragrans Houtt. (Myristicaceae) afforded PTP1B inhibitory compounds, meso-dihydroguaiaretic acid (1) and otobaphenol (2). Compounds 1 and 2 inhibited PTP1B with IC(50) values of 19.6 +/- 0.3 and 48.9 +/- 0.5 microM, respectively, in the manner of non-competitive inhibitors. Treatment with compound 1 on 32D cells overexpressing the insulin receptor (IR) resulted in a dose-dependent increase in the tyrosine phosphorylation of IR. These results indicate that compound 1 can act as an enhancing agent in intracellular insulin signaling, possibly through the inhibition of PTP1B activity.

  13. Xanthohumol, a prenylated chalcone from Humulus lupulus L., inhibits cholesteryl ester transfer protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Hiroshi; Takazumi, Koji; Segawa, Shuichi; Okada, Yukio; Kobayashi, Naoyuki; Shigyo, Tatsuro; Chiba, Hitoshi

    2012-10-01

    High density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol levels are correlated with a low risk of atherosclerosis. The inhibition of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP), which catalyses cholesterol transfer between lipoproteins, leads to an increase in HDL-cholesterol and is expected to be the next anti-atherogenic target. This study revealed that xanthohumol, a prenylated chalcone, showed the highest inhibition against CETP from screening of natural products in various plants. We investigated the inhibitory activity of some chalcones and flavanones. Naringenin chalcone showed weak CETP inhibition compared with xanthohumol. In addition, isoxanthohumol and naringenin drastically decreased the inhibitory activity. These results suggest that the prenyl group and chalcone structure of xanthohumol were responsible for the CETP inhibitory activity.

  14. Sulindac and its metabolites inhibit multiple transport proteins in rat and human hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin Kyung; Paine, Mary F; Brouwer, Kim L R

    2010-08-01

    Sulindac is a commonly used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug. This study tested the hypothesis that sulindac-mediated drug-drug interactions and/or hepatotoxicity may be caused, in part, by inhibition of proteins responsible for the hepatic transport of drugs and/or bile acids by sulindac and/or sulindac metabolites [sulindac sulfone (S-sulfone) and sulindac sulfide (S-sulfide)]. The uptake and excretion of model substrates, [(3)H]taurocholate (TC), [(3)H]estradiol 17-beta-glucuronide (E217G), and nitrofurantoin (NF), were investigated in rat and human suspended and sandwich-cultured hepatocytes (SCH). In suspended rat hepatocytes, S-sulfone and S-sulfide inhibited Na(+)-dependent TC initial uptake (IC(50) of 24.9 +/- 6.4 and 12.5 +/- 1.8 microM, respectively) and Na(+)-independent E217G initial uptake (IC(50) of 12.1 +/- 1.6 and 6.3 +/- 0.3 microM, respectively). In rat SCH, sulindac metabolites (100 microM) decreased the in vitro biliary clearance (Cl(biliary)) of TC, E217G, and NF by 38 to 83%, 81 to 97%, and 33 to 57%, respectively; S-sulfone and S-sulfide also decreased the TC and NF biliary excretion index by 39 to 55%. In suspended human hepatocytes, S-sulfone and S-sulfide inhibited Na(+)-dependent TC initial uptake (IC(50) of 42.2 and 3.1 microM, respectively); S-sulfide also inhibited the TC Cl(biliary) in human SCH. Sulindac/metabolites markedly inhibited hepatic uptake and biliary excretion of E217G by 51 to 100% in human SCH. In conclusion, sulindac and metabolites are potent inhibitors of the uptake and biliary clearance of bile acids in rat and human hepatocytes and also inhibit substrates of rat breast cancer resistance protein, rat and human organic anion-transporting polypeptides, and human multidrug resistance-associated protein 2. Inhibition of multiple hepatic transport proteins by sulindac/metabolites may play an important role in clinically significant sulindac-mediated drug-drug interactions and/or liver injury.

  15. Inhibition of collagen-induced platelet aggregation by anopheline antiplatelet protein, a saliva protein from a malaria vector mosquito.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Shigeto; Sudo, Toshiki; Niimi, Masashi; Tao, Lian; Sun, Bing; Kambayashi, Junichi; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Luo, Enjie; Matsuoka, Hiroyuki

    2008-02-15

    During blood feeding, mosquitoes inject saliva containing a mixture of molecules that inactivate or inhibit various components of the hemostatic response to the bite injury as well as the inflammatory reactions produced by the bite, to facilitate the ingestion of blood. However, the molecular functions of the individual saliva components remain largely unknown. Here, we describe anopheline antiplatelet protein (AAPP) isolated from the saliva of Anopheles stephensi, a human malaria vector mosquito. AAPP exhibited a strong and specific inhibitory activity toward collagen-induced platelet aggregation. The inhibitory mechanism involves direct binding of AAPP to collagen, which blocks platelet adhesion to collagen and inhibits the subsequent increase in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i). The binding of AAPP to collagen effectively blocked platelet adhesion via glycoprotein VI (GPVI) and integrin alpha(2)beta(1). Cell adhesion assay showed that AAPP inhibited the binding of GPVI to collagen type I and III without direct effect on GPVI. Moreover, intravenously administered recombinant AAPP strongly inhibited collagen-induced platelet aggregation ex vivo in rats. In summary, AAPP is a malaria vector mosquito-derived specific antagonist of receptors that mediate the adhesion of platelets to collagen. Our study may provide important insights for elucidating the effects of mosquito blood feeding against host hemostasis.

  16. Inhibition of ice recrystallization and cryoprotective activity of wheat proteins in liver and pancreatic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow-Shi-Yée, Mélanie; Briard, Jennie G; Grondin, Mélanie; Averill-Bates, Diana A; Ben, Robert N; Ouellet, François

    2016-05-01

    Efficient cryopreservation of cells at ultralow temperatures requires the use of substances that help maintain viability and metabolic functions post-thaw. We are developing new technology where plant proteins are used to substitute the commonly-used, but relatively toxic chemical dimethyl sulfoxide. Recombinant forms of four structurally diverse wheat proteins, TaIRI-2 (ice recrystallization inhibition), TaBAS1 (2-Cys peroxiredoxin), WCS120 (dehydrin), and TaENO (enolase) can efficiently cryopreserve hepatocytes and insulin-secreting INS832/13 cells. This study shows that TaIRI-2 and TaENO are internalized during the freeze-thaw process, while TaBAS1 and WCS120 remain at the extracellular level. Possible antifreeze activity of the four proteins was assessed. The "splat cooling" method for quantifying ice recrystallization inhibition activity (a property that characterizes antifreeze proteins) revealed that TaIRI-2 and TaENO are more potent than TaBAS1 and WCS120. Because of their ability to inhibit ice recrystallization, the wheat recombinant proteins TaIRI-2 and TaENO are promising candidates and could prove useful to improve cryopreservation protocols for hepatocytes and insulin-secreting cells, and possibly other cell types. TaENO does not have typical ice-binding domains, and the TargetFreeze tool did not predict an antifreeze capacity, suggesting the existence of nontypical antifreeze domains. The fact that TaBAS1 is an efficient cryoprotectant but does not show antifreeze activity indicates a different mechanism of action. The cryoprotective properties conferred by WCS120 depend on biochemical properties that remain to be determined. Overall, our results show that the proteins' efficiencies vary between cell types, and confirm that a combination of different protection mechanisms is needed to successfully cryopreserve mammalian cells.

  17. Identification and characterization of interferon-induced proteins that inhibit alphavirus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yugen; Burke, Crystal W; Ryman, Kate D; Klimstra, William B

    2007-10-01

    Alpha/beta interferon (IFN-alpha/beta) produces antiviral effects through upregulation of many interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) whose protein products are effectors of the antiviral state. Previous data from our laboratory have shown that IFN-alpha/beta can limit Sindbis virus (SB) replication through protein kinase R (PKR)-dependent and PKR-independent mechanisms and that one PKR-independent mechanism inhibits translation of the infecting virus genome (K. D. Ryman et al., J. Virol. 79:1487-1499, 2005). Further, using Affymetrix microarray technology, we identified 44 genes as candidates for PKR/RNase L-independent IFN-induced antiviral activities. In the current studies, we have begun analyzing these gene products for antialphavirus activity using three techniques: (i) overexpression of the protein from SB vectors and assessment of virulence attenuation in mice; (ii) overexpression of the proteins in a stable tetracycline-inducible murine fibroblast culture system and assessment of effects upon SB replication; and (iii) small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of gene mRNA in fibroblast cultures followed by SB replication assessment as above. Tested proteins included those we hypothesized had potential to affect virus genome translation and included murine ISG20, ISG15, the zinc finger antiviral protein (ZAP), viperin, p56, p54, and p49. Interestingly, the pattern of antiviral activity for some gene products was different between in vitro and in vivo assays. Viperin and ZAP attenuated virulence most profoundly in mice. However, ISG20 and ZAP potently inhibited SB replication in vitro, whereas and viperin, p56, and ISG15 exhibited modest replication inhibition in vitro. In contrast, p54 and p49 had little to no effect in any assay.

  18. BCL-2 family protein, BAD is down-regulated in breast cancer and inhibits cell invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cekanova, Maria, E-mail: mcekanov@utk.edu [Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Fernando, Romaine I. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Graduate School of Medicine, Medical Center, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Siriwardhana, Nalin [Department of Animal Science, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Sukhthankar, Mugdha [Department of Biomedical and Diagnostics Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Parra, Columba de la [Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, University of Puerto Rico, Medical Sciences Campus, San Juan, PR (United States); Woraratphoka, Jirayus [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Graduate School of Medicine, Medical Center, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Malone, Christine [Laboratory of Molecular Carcinogenesis, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Ström, Anders [Center for Nuclear Receptors and Cell Signaling, Department of Biology and Biochemistry, University of Houston, Houston, TX (United States); Baek, Seung J. [Department of Biomedical and Diagnostics Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Wade, Paul A. [Laboratory of Molecular Carcinogenesis, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Saxton, Arnold M. [Department of Animal Science, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Donnell, Robert M. [Department of Biomedical and Diagnostics Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Pestell, Richard G. [Department of Cancer Biology, Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); and others

    2015-02-01

    We have previously demonstrated that the anti-apoptotic protein BAD is expressed in normal human breast tissue and shown that BAD inhibits expression of cyclin D1 to delay cell-cycle progression in breast cancer cells. Herein, expression of proteins in breast tissues was studied by immunohistochemistry and results were analyzed statistically to obtain semi-quantitative data. Biochemical and functional changes in BAD-overexpressing MCF7 breast cancer cells were evaluated using PCR, reporter assays, western blotting, ELISA and extracellular matrix invasion assays. Compared to normal tissues, Grade II breast cancers expressed low total/phosphorylated forms of BAD in both cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments. BAD overexpression decreased the expression of β-catenin, Sp1, and phosphorylation of STATs. BAD inhibited Ras/MEK/ERK and JNK signaling pathways, without affecting the p38 signaling pathway. Expression of the metastasis-related proteins, MMP10, VEGF, SNAIL, CXCR4, E-cadherin and TlMP2 was regulated by BAD with concomitant inhibition of extracellular matrix invasion. Inhibition of BAD by siRNA increased invasion and Akt/p-Akt levels. Clinical data and the results herein suggest that in addition to the effect on apoptosis, BAD conveys anti-metastatic effects and is a valuable prognostic marker in breast cancer. - Highlights: • BAD and p-BAD expressions are decreased in breast cancer compared with normal breast tissue. • BAD impedes breast cancer invasion and migration. • BAD inhibits the EMT and transcription factors that promote cancer cell migration. • Invasion and migration functions of BAD are distinct from the BAD's role in apoptosis.

  19. Investigating isoquinoline derivatives for inhibition of inhibitor of apoptosis proteins for ovarian cancer treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen C

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Chen Chen,1,* Jie Wu,2,* Pengfei Zhu,3 Congjian Xu,1 Liangqing Yao1 1Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital and Shanghai Key Laboratory of Female Reproductive Endocrine Related Diseases, 2Department of Chemistry, Fudan University, Shanghai, 3Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Shangyu City Hospital, Shangyu, Zhejiang Province, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Objective: To discover novel isoquinoline derivatives for inhibition of inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAP for the treatment of ovarian cancer. Methods: We first synthesized 533 isoquinoline derivatives, and screened them using CCK-8 to measure their antiproliferative activity. These compounds were further tested by Hoechst staining and flow cytometric analysis to assess proapoptotic activity. The in vivo antitumor efficacy and safety of the screened compounds were evaluated on the xenograft mouse model. Ki-67 staining and TUNEL assay were used to evaluate proliferation and apoptosis in the resected tumors, respectively. Western blot and polymerase chain reaction (PCR were conducted to evaluate the levels of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, caspase-3, PARP, and IAP in resected tumors. Results: Compound B01002 and C26001 displayed antiproliferative and proapoptotic activity on SKOV3 ovarian cancer with an IC50 of 7.65 and 11.68 µg/mL, respectively. Both compounds inhibited tumor growth in a xenografted mouse model with good safety profiles, and tumor growth inhibition (TGI of B01002 and C26001 was 99.53% and 84.23%, respectively. Resected tumors showed that both compounds inhibited tumor cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in vivo. Caspase-3 and PARP were activated, whereas IAP proteins were downregulated at the protein level. Conclusion: Compound B01002 and C26001 could inhibit ovarian tumor growth and promote tumor apoptosis, partly by downregulating the IAPs, and, thus, might be promising candidates for treatment of ovarian

  20. Caspase-2 short isoform interacts with membrane-associated cytoskeleton proteins to inhibit apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunhua Han

    Full Text Available Caspase-2 (casp-2 is the most conserved caspase across species, and is one of the initiator caspases activated by various stimuli. The casp-2 gene produces several alternative splicing isoforms. It is believed that the long isoform, casp-2L, promotes apoptosis, whereas the short isoform, casp-2S, inhibits apoptosis. The actual effect of casp-2S on apoptosis is still controversial, however, and the underlying mechanism for casp-2S-mediated apoptosis inhibition is unclear. Here, we analyzed the effects of casp-2S on DNA damage induced apoptosis through "gain-of-function" and "loss-of-function" strategies in ovarian cancer cell lines. We clearly demonstrated that the over-expression of casp-2S inhibited, and the knockdown of casp-2S promoted, the cisplatin-induced apoptosis of ovarian cancer cells. To explore the mechanism by which casp-2S mediates apoptosis inhibition, we analyzed the proteins which interact with casp-2S in cells by using immunoprecipitation (IP and mass spectrometry. We have identified two cytoskeleton proteins, Fodrin and α-Actinin 4, which interact with FLAG-tagged casp-2S in HeLa cells and confirmed this interaction through reciprocal IP. We further demonstrated that casp-2S (i is responsible for inhibiting DNA damage-induced cytoplasmic Fodrin cleavage independent of cellular p53 status, and (ii prevents cisplatin-induced membrane blebbing. Taken together, our data suggests that casp-2S affects cellular apoptosis through its interaction with membrane-associated cytoskeletal Fodrin protein.

  1. Human-Phosphate-Binding-Protein inhibits HIV-1 gene transcription and replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Candolfi Ermanno

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Human Phosphate-Binding protein (HPBP is a serendipitously discovered lipoprotein that binds phosphate with high affinity. HPBP belongs to the DING protein family, involved in various biological processes like cell cycle regulation. We report that HPBP inhibits HIV-1 gene transcription and replication in T cell line, primary peripherical blood lymphocytes and primary macrophages. We show that HPBP is efficient in naïve and HIV-1 AZT-resistant strains. Our results revealed HPBP as a new and potent anti HIV molecule that inhibits transcription of the virus, which has not yet been targeted by HAART and therefore opens new strategies in the treatment of HIV infection.

  2. Spironolactone blocks Epstein-Barr virus production by inhibiting EBV SM protein function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Dinesh; Thompson, Jacob; Swaminathan, Sankar

    2016-03-29

    Clinically available drugs active against Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and other human herpesviruses are limited to those targeting viral DNA replication. To identify compounds directed against other steps in the viral life cycle, we searched for drugs active against the EBV SM protein, which is essential for infectious virus production. SM has a highly gene-specific mode of action and preferentially enhances expression of several late lytic cycle EBV genes. Here we demonstrate that spironolactone, a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist approved for clinical use, inhibits SM function and infectious EBV production. Expression of EBV viral capsid antigen is highly SM dependent, and spironolactone inhibits viral capsid antigen synthesis and capsid formation, blocking EBV virion production at a step subsequent to viral DNA replication. In addition, spironolactone inhibits expression of other SM-dependent genes necessary for infectious virion formation. We further demonstrate that molecules structurally related to spironolactone with similar antimineralocorticoid blocking activity do not inhibit EBV production. These findings pave the way for development of antiherpesvirus drugs with new mechanisms of action directed against SM and homologous essential proteins in other herpesviruses.

  3. Expression of the zinc-finger antiviral protein inhibits alphavirus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bick, Matthew J; Carroll, John-William N; Gao, Guangxia; Goff, Stephen P; Rice, Charles M; MacDonald, Margaret R

    2003-11-01

    The rat zinc-finger antiviral protein (ZAP) was recently identified as a host protein conferring resistance to retroviral infection. We analyzed ZAP's ability to inhibit viruses from other families and found that ZAP potently inhibits the replication of multiple members of the Alphavirus genus within the Togaviridae, including Sindbis virus, Semliki Forest virus, Ross River virus, and Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus. However, expression of ZAP did not induce a broad-spectrum antiviral state as some viruses, including vesicular stomatitis virus, poliovirus, yellow fever virus, and herpes simplex virus type 1, replicated to normal levels in ZAP-expressing cells. We determined that ZAP expression inhibits Sindbis virus replication after virus penetration and entry, but before the amplification of newly synthesized plus strand genomic RNA. Using a temperature-sensitive Sindbis virus mutant expressing luciferase, we further showed that translation of incoming viral RNA is blocked by ZAP expression. Elucidation of the antiviral mechanism by which ZAP inhibits Sindbis virus translation may lead to the development of agents with broad activity against alphaviruses.

  4. Inhibition of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase by peptide and protein peroxides generated by singlet oxygen attack

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgan, Philip E; Dean, Roger T; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2002-01-01

    the active-site thiol of the enzyme and the peroxide. A number of low-molecular-mass compounds including thiols and ascorbate, but not Trolox C, can prevent inhibition by removing the initial peroxide, or species derived from it. In contrast, glutathione reductase and lactate dehydrogenase are poorly......Reaction of certain peptides and proteins with singlet oxygen (generated by visible light in the presence of rose bengal dye) yields long-lived peptide and protein peroxides. Incubation of these peroxides with glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, in the absence of added metal ions, results...

  5. Sub-MIC tylosin inhibits Streptococcus suis biofilm formation and results in differential protein expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai eWang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus suis (S. suis is a crucial zoonotic pathogen which causes severe diseases in humans and pigs. Biofilms of S. suis can induce persistent infections which are harder to treat. Sub-minimal inhibitory concentration (sub-MIC of tylosin can inhibit biofilm formation in bacteria. By using iTRAQ strategy, we compared the protein expression profiles of S. suis grown with sub-MIC tylosin treatment or no treatement. The result showed that 96 proteins expression were changed with 77 up-regulated and 19 down-regulated proteins. Several metabolism proteins (such as phosphoglycerate kinase, as well as cell surface proteins (such as ABC transporter proteins, were found to be involved in biofilm formation. Overall, our results indicated that S. suis metabolic regulation, cell surface proteins, and virulence proteins appear to be of importance in biofilm growth by sub-MIC tylosin treated. Thus, our data analyzed rough regulation of biofilm formation that lay the foundation for the future research of mechanism and targets.

  6. Major Peptides from Amaranth (Amaranthus cruentus Protein Inhibit HMG-CoA Reductase Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana Aparecida Manólio Soares

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to identify the major peptides generated by the in vitro hydrolysis of Amaranthus cruentus protein and to verify the effect of these peptides on the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase (HMG-CoA reductase, a key enzyme in cholesterol biosynthesis. A protein isolate was prepared, and an enzymatic hydrolysis that simulated the in vivo digestion of the protein was performed. After hydrolysis, the peptide mixture was filtered through a 3 kDa membrane. The peptide profile of this mixture was determined by reversed phase high performance chromatography (RP-HPLC, and the peptide identification was performed by LC-ESI MS/MS. Three major peptides under 3 kDa were detected, corresponding to more than 90% of the peptides of similar size produced by enzymatic hydrolysis. The sequences identified were GGV, IVG or LVG and VGVI or VGVL. These peptides had not yet been described for amaranth protein nor are they present in known sequences of amaranth grain protein, except LVG, which can be found in amaranth α‑amylase. Their ability to inhibit the activity of HMG-CoA reductase was determined, and we found that the sequences GGV, IVG, and VGVL, significantly inhibited this enzyme, suggesting a possible hypocholesterolemic effect.

  7. Inhibition of Rho protein stimulates iNOS expression in rat vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniyappa, R; Xu, R; Ram, J L; Sowers, J R

    2000-06-01

    Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) is upregulated in arterial injury and plays a role in regulating VSMC proliferation and restenosis. Inflammatory cytokines [e.g., interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta)] released during vascular injury induce iNOS. Small GTP-binding proteins of the Ras superfamily play a major role in IL-1beta-dependent signaling pathways. In this study, we examined the role of Rho GTPases in regulating iNOS expression in VSMCs. Treatment of VSMCs with mevastatin, which inhibits isoprenylation of Rho and other small GTP-binding proteins, produced significantly higher amounts of IL-1beta-evoked NO and iNOS protein compared with control. Similarly, bacterial toxins [Toxin B from Clostridium difficile and C3 ADP-ribosyl transferase (C3) toxin from Clostridium botulinium] that specifically inactivate Rho proteins increased NOS products (NO and citrulline) and iNOS expression. Toxin B increased the activity of iNOS promoter-reporter construct in VSMCs. Both toxins enhanced IL-1beta-stimulated iNOS expression and NO production. These data demonstrate for the first time that inhibition of Rho induces iNOS and suggest a role for Rho protein in IL-1beta-stimulated NO production in VSMCs.

  8. KSHV latent protein LANA2 inhibits sumo2 modification of p53

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laura, Marcos-Villar; de la Cruz-Herrera, Carlos F; Ferreirós, Alba; Baz-Martínez, Maite; Lang, Valerie; Vidal, Anxo; Muñoz-Fontela, Cesar; Rodríguez, Manuel S; Collado, Manuel; Rivas, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Tumor suppressor p53 plays a crucial antiviral role and targeting of p53 by viral proteins is a common mechanism involved in virus oncogenesis. The activity of p53 is tightly regulated at the post-translational levels through a myriad of modifications. Among them, modification of p53 by SUMO has been associated with the onset of cellular senescence. Kaposi´s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) expresses several proteins targeting p53, including the latent protein LANA2 that regulates polyubiquitylation and phosphorylation of p53. Here we show that LANA2 also inhibits the modification of p53 by SUMO2. Furthermore, we show that the reduction of p53-SUMO2 conjugation by LANA2, as well as the p53-LANA2 interaction, both require the SUMOylation of the viral protein and its interaction with SUMO or SUMOylated proteins in a non-covalent manner. Finally, we show that the control of p53-SUMO2 conjugation by LANA2 correlates with its ability to inhibit SUMO2- and type I interferon-induced senescence. These results highlight the importance of p53 SUMOylation in the control of virus infection and suggest that viral oncoproteins could contribute to viral infection and cell transformation by abrogating p53 SUMOylation. PMID:25607652

  9. Inhibition of Protein Synthesis on the Ribosome by Tildipirosin Compared with Other Veterinary Macrolides

    OpenAIRE

    Andersen, Niels Møller; Poehlsgaard, Jacob; Warrass, Ralf; Douthwaite, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Tildipirosin is a 16-membered-ring macrolide developed to treat bacterial pathogens, including Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida, that cause respiratory tract infections in cattle and swine. Here we evaluated the efficacy of tildipirosin at inhibiting protein synthesis on the ribosome (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50], 0.23 ± 0.01 μM) and compared it with the established veterinary macrolides tylosin, tilmicosin, and tulathromycin. Mutation and methylation at key rRNA nucleo...

  10. Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) inhibits mitochondrial-dependent apoptosis through CK2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoumassoun, Liliane Eustache; Russo, Caterina; Denizeau, Francine; Averill-Bates, Diana; Henderson, Janet E

    2007-09-01

    Over the past decade, parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) has been identified as a key survival factor for cells subjected to apoptotic stimuli. Its anti-apoptotic activity has been attributed to nuclear accumulation of the intact protein, or a synthetic peptide corresponding to its nuclear targeting sequence (NTS), which promotes rapid exit of nutrient deprived cells from the cell cycle. Intracellular PTHrP also inhibited apoptosis by blocking tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha)-induced apoptosis by blocking signaling from the "death receptor" and preventing damage to the mitochondrial membrane. In both cases, the anti-apoptotic activity was significantly reduced in the presence of a nuclear deficient form of PTHrP with a (88)K/E K/E.K/I(91) mutation in the NTS. The current work was undertaken to determine the mechanism by which nuclear PTHrP blocked mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis. Using sub-cellular fractionation and functional assays we showed that pre-treatment of HEK293 cells with exogenous NTS peptide before inducing apoptosis with TNFalpha was as effective as expression of the full-length protein in inhibiting apoptosis. Inhibition of apoptosis was associated with increased expression of protein kinase casein kinase 2 (CK2) and in sustained CK2 accumulation and activity in the nuclear fraction. In primary chondrogenic cells harvested from the limb buds of PTHrP(+/-) and PTHrP(-/-) embryonic mice, there was a dose-dependent decrease in CK2 expression and activity that correlated with increased susceptibility to apoptosis. Taken together the results indicate that nuclear accumulation of PTHrP effectively inhibits mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis through regulation of the expression, activity, and sub-cellular trafficking of CK2.

  11. Effect of Emetine on T-2 Toxin-Induced Inhibition of Protein Synthesis in Mammalian Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Inhibition of protein synthesis by trichothecenes . WEI, C. M., HANSEN, B. S., VAUGHAN, M. H. AND McLAUGHLIN, C. S.: In Mycotoxina in Human and...dependent manner. The dose-response curves for these potent trichothecenes , deoxynivalenol, T-2 tetraol and verru- two effects were nearly identical... trichothecene mycotoxin times of toxin-challenged animals. Exceptions to this were the produced by several species of the genus Fusarium (Ueno, steroidal anti

  12. Detection and Quantitation of T-2 Mycotoxin Using a Simplified Protein Synthesis Inhibition Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-07-18

    cells to the exotoxins of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Corynebacterium diphtheriae . Can. J. Microbiol. 23, 175-182. Middlebrook, J. L., and Dorland, R. B...1977). Response of cultured mammalian cells to the exotoxins of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Corynebacterium diphtheria : differential cytotoxicity. Can...protein synthesis inhibition adapted from studies on diphtheria and pseudomonas exotoxins (Middlebrook et al, 1976a and 1976b) for the detection and

  13. Ca2+-dependent inhibition of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 by calmodulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haga, K; Tsuga, H; Haga, T

    1997-02-11

    Agonist- or light-dependent phosphorylation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor m2 subtypes (m2 receptors) or rhodopsin by G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) was found to be inhibited by calmodulin in a Ca2+-dependent manner. The phosphorylation was fully inhibited in the absence of G protein betagamma subunits and partially inhibited in the presence of betagamma subunits. The dose-response curve for stimulation by betagamma subunits of the m2 and rhodopsin phosphorylation was shifted to the higher concentration of betagamma subunits by addition of Ca2+-calmodulin. The phosphorylation by GRK2 of a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein containing a peptide corresponding to the central part of the third intracellular loop of m2 receptors (I3-GST) was not affected by Ca2+-calmodulin in the presence or absence of betagamma subunits, but the agonist-dependent stimulation of I3-GST phosphorylation by an I3-deleted m2 receptor mutant in the presence of betagamma subunits was suppressed by Ca2+-calmodulin. These results indicate that Ca2+-calmodulin does not directly interact with the catalytic site of GRK2 but inhibits the kinase activity of GRK2 by interfering with the activation of GRK2 by agonist-bound m2 receptors and G protein betagamma subunits. In agreement with the assumption that GRK2 activity is suppressed by the increase in intracellular Ca2+, the sequestration of m2 receptors expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells was found to be attenuated by the treatment with a Ca2+ ionophore, A23187.

  14. Non-human Primate Schlafen11 Inhibits Production of Both Host and Viral Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex C Stabell

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Schlafen11 (encoded by the SLFN11 gene has been shown to inhibit the accumulation of HIV-1 proteins. We show that the SLFN11 gene is under positive selection in simian primates and is species-specific in its activity against HIV-1. The activity of human Schlafen11 is relatively weak compared to that of some other primate versions of this protein, with the versions encoded by chimpanzee, orangutan, gibbon, and marmoset being particularly potent inhibitors of HIV-1 protein production. Interestingly, we find that Schlafen11 is functional in the absence of infection and reduces protein production from certain non-viral (GFP and even host (Vinculin and GAPDH transcripts. This suggests that Schlafen11 may just generally block protein production from non-codon optimized transcripts. Because Schlafen11 is an interferon-stimulated gene with a broad ability to inhibit protein production from many host and viral transcripts, its role may be to create a general antiviral state in the cell. Interestingly, the strong inhibitors such as marmoset Schlafen11 consistently block protein production better than weak primate Schlafen11 proteins, regardless of the virus or host target being analyzed. Further, we show that the residues to which species-specific differences in Schlafen11 potency map are distinct from residues that have been targeted by positive selection. We speculate that the positive selection of SLFN11 could have been driven by a number of different factors, including interaction with one or more viral antagonists that have yet to be identified.

  15. Inhibition of the 20S proteosome by a protein proteinase inhibitor: evidence that a natural serine proteinase inhibitor can inhibit a threonine proteinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabe, Kimihiko; Koide, Takehiko

    2009-02-01

    The 20S proteasome (20S) is an intracellular threonine proteinase (Mr 750,000) that plays important roles in many cellular regulations. Several synthetic peptide inhibitors and bacteria-derived inhibitors such as lactacystin and epoxomicin have been identified as potent proteasome inhibitors. However, essentially no protein proteinase inhibitor has been characterized. By examining several small size protein proteinase inhibitors, we found that a well-known serine proteinase inhibitor from bovine pancreas, basic pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI), inhibits the 20S in vitro and ex vivo. Inhibition of the 20S by BPTI was time- and concentration-dependent, and stoichiometric. To inhibit the 20S activity, BPTI needs to enter into the interior of the 20S molecule. The molar ratio of BPTI to the 20S in the complex was estimated as approximately six BPTI to one 20S, thereby two sets of three peptidase activities (trypsin-like, chymotrypsin-like and caspase-like) of the 20S were all inhibited. These results indicate that an entrance hole to the 20S formed by seven alpha-subunits is sufficiently large for BPTI to enter. This report is essentially the initial description of the inhibition of a threonine proteinase by a protein serine proteinase inhibitor, suggesting a common mechanism of inhibition between serine and threonine proteinases by a natural protein proteinase inhibitor.

  16. Biophysical inhibition of pulmonary surfactant function by polymeric nanoparticles: role of surfactant protein B and C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck-Broichsitter, Moritz; Ruppert, Clemens; Schmehl, Thomas; Günther, Andreas; Seeger, Werner

    2014-11-01

    The current study investigated the mechanisms involved in the process of biophysical inhibition of pulmonary surfactant by polymeric nanoparticles (NP). The minimal surface tension of diverse synthetic surfactants was monitored in the presence of bare and surface-decorated (i.e. poloxamer 407) sub-100 nm poly(lactide) NP. Moreover, the influence of NP on surfactant composition (i.e. surfactant protein (SP) content) was studied. Dose-elevations of SP advanced the biophysical activity of the tested surfactant preparation. Surfactant-associated protein C supplemented phospholipid mixtures (PLM-C) were shown to be more susceptible to biophysical inactivation by bare NP than phospholipid mixture supplemented with surfactant protein B (PLM-B) and PLM-B/C. Surfactant function was hindered owing to a drastic depletion of the SP content upon contact with bare NP. By contrast, surface-modified NP were capable of circumventing unwanted surfactant inhibition. Surfactant constitution influences the extent of biophysical inhibition by polymeric NP. Steric shielding of the NP surface minimizes unwanted NP-surfactant interactions, which represents an option for the development of surfactant-compatible nanomedicines.

  17. Potent inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatases by copper complexes with multi-benzimidazole derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Lu, Liping; Zhu, Miaoli; Wang, Qingming; Yuan, Caixia; Xing, Shu; Fu, Xueqi; Mei, Yuhua

    2011-12-01

    A series of copper complexes with multi-benzimidazole derivatives, including mono- and di-nuclear, were synthesized and characterized by Fourier transform IR spectroscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy, elemental analysis, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The speciation of Cu/NTB in aqueous solution was investigated by potentiometric pH titrations. Their inhibitory effects against human protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), T-cell protein tyrosine phosphatase (TCPTP), megakaryocyte protein tyrosine phosphatase 2 (PTP-MEG2), srchomology phosphatase 1 (SHP-1) and srchomology phosphatase 2 (SHP-2) were evaluated in vitro. The five copper complexes exhibit potent inhibition against PTP1B, TCPTP and PTP-MEG2 with almost same inhibitory effects with IC(50) at submicro molar level and about tenfold weaker inhibition versus SHP-1, but almost no inhibition against SHP-2. Kinetic analysis indicates that they are reversible competitive inhibitors of PTP1B. Fluorescence study on the interaction between PTP1B and complex 2 or 4 suggests that the complexes bind to PTP1B with the formation of a 1:1 complex. The binding constant are about 1.14 × 10(6) and 1.87 × 10(6) M(-1) at 310 K for 2 and 4, respectively.

  18. Expression of lysozymes from Erwinia amylovora phages and Erwinia genomes and inhibition by a bacterial protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Ina; Gernold, Marina; Schneider, Bernd; Geider, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Genes coding for lysozyme-inhibiting proteins (Ivy) were cloned from the chromosomes of the plant pathogens Erwinia amylovora and Erwinia pyrifoliae. The product interfered not only with activity of hen egg white lysozyme, but also with an enzyme from E. amylovora phage ΦEa1h. We have expressed lysozyme genes from the genomes of three Erwinia species in Escherichia coli. The lysozymes expressed from genes of the E. amylovora phages ΦEa104 and ΦEa116, Erwinia chromosomes and Arabidopsis thaliana were not affected by Ivy. The enzyme from bacteriophage ΦEa1h was fused at the N- or C-terminus to other peptides. Compared to the intact lysozyme, a His-tag reduced its lytic activity about 10-fold and larger fusion proteins abolished activity completely. Specific protease cleavage restored lysozyme activity of a GST-fusion. The bacteriophage-encoded lysozymes were more active than the enzymes from bacterial chromosomes. Viral lyz genes were inserted into a broad-host range vector, and transfer to E. amylovora inhibited cell growth. Inserted in the yeast Pichia pastoris, the ΦEa1h-lysozyme was secreted and also inhibited by Ivy. Here we describe expression of unrelated cloned 'silent' lyz genes from Erwinia chromosomes and a novel interference of bacterial Ivy proteins with a viral lysozyme.

  19. Osteoclast inhibitory peptide-1 (OIP-1) inhibits measles virus nucleocapsid protein stimulated osteoclast formation/activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugarajan, Srinivasan; Youssef, Rimon F; Pati, Parmita; Ries, William L; Rao, D Sudhaker; Reddy, Sakamuri V

    2008-07-01

    Paget's disease (PD) of bone is characterized by increased activity of large abnormal osteoclasts (OCLs) which contain paramyxoviral nuclear and cytoplasmic inclusions. MVNP gene expression has been shown to induce pagetic phenotype in OCLs. We previously characterized the osteoclast inhibitory peptide-1 (OIP-1/hSca) which inhibits OCL formation/bone resorption. OIP-1 is a glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI)-linked membrane protein containing a 79 amino acid extra cellular peptide and a 32 amino acid carboxy terminal GPI-linked peptide (c-peptide) which is critical for OCL inhibition. In this study, we demonstrate that OIP-1 c-peptide significantly decreased (43%) osteoclast differentiation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with PD. Also, OIP-1 treatment to normal human bone marrow mononuclear cells transduced with the MVNP inhibited (41%) osteoclast precursor (CFU-GM) growth in methyl-cellulose cultures. We further tested if OIP-1 overexpression in the OCL lineage in transgenic mice inhibits MVNP stimulated OCL formation. MVNP transduction and RANKL stimulation of OIP-1 mouse bone marrow cells showed a significant decrease (43%) in OCL formation and inhibition (38%) of bone resorption area compared to wild-type mice. Western blot analysis identified that OIP-1 decreased (3.5-fold) MVNP induced TRAF2 expression during OCL differentiation. MVNP or OIP-1 expression did not affect TRAF6 levels. Furthermore, OIP-1 expression resulted in a significant inhibition of MVNP stimulated ASK1, Rac1, c-Fos, p-JNK, and NFATc1 expression during OCL differentiation. These results suggest that OIP-1 inhibits MVNP induced pagetic OCL formation/activity through suppression of RANK signaling. Thus, OIP-1 may have therapeutic utility against excess bone resorption in patients with PD.

  20. Enhancements to the Rosetta Energy Function Enable Improved Identification of Small Molecules that Inhibit Protein-Protein Interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Bazzoli

    Full Text Available Protein-protein interactions are among today's most exciting and promising targets for therapeutic intervention. To date, identifying small-molecules that selectively disrupt these interactions has proven particularly challenging for virtual screening tools, since these have typically been optimized to perform well on more "traditional" drug discovery targets. Here, we test the performance of the Rosetta energy function for identifying compounds that inhibit protein interactions, when these active compounds have been hidden amongst pools of "decoys." Through this virtual screening benchmark, we gauge the effect of two recent enhancements to the functional form of the Rosetta energy function: the new "Talaris" update and the "pwSHO" solvation model. Finally, we conclude by developing and validating a new weight set that maximizes Rosetta's ability to pick out the active compounds in this test set. Looking collectively over the course of these enhancements, we find a marked improvement in Rosetta's ability to identify small-molecule inhibitors of protein-protein interactions.

  1. Rgg protein structure-function and inhibition by cyclic peptide compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parashar, Vijay; Aggarwal, Chaitanya; Federle, Michael J; Neiditch, Matthew B

    2015-04-21

    Peptide pheromone cell-cell signaling (quorum sensing) regulates the expression of diverse developmental phenotypes (including virulence) in Firmicutes, which includes common human pathogens, e.g., Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus pneumoniae. Cytoplasmic transcription factors known as "Rgg proteins" are peptide pheromone receptors ubiquitous in Firmicutes. Here we present X-ray crystal structures of a Streptococcus Rgg protein alone and in complex with a tight-binding signaling antagonist, the cyclic undecapeptide cyclosporin A. To our knowledge, these represent the first Rgg protein X-ray crystal structures. Based on the results of extensive structure-function analysis, we reveal the peptide pheromone-binding site and the mechanism by which cyclosporin A inhibits activation of the peptide pheromone receptor. Guided by the Rgg-cyclosporin A complex structure, we predicted that the nonimmunosuppressive cyclosporin A analog valspodar would inhibit Rgg activation. Indeed, we found that, like cyclosporin A, valspodar inhibits peptide pheromone activation of conserved Rgg proteins in medically relevant Streptococcus species. Finally, the crystal structures presented here revealed that the Rgg protein DNA-binding domains are covalently linked across their dimerization interface by a disulfide bond formed by a highly conserved cysteine. The DNA-binding domain dimerization interface observed in our structures is essentially identical to the interfaces previously described for other members of the XRE DNA-binding domain family, but the presence of an intermolecular disulfide bond buried in this interface appears to be unique. We hypothesize that this disulfide bond may, under the right conditions, affect Rgg monomer-dimer equilibrium, stabilize Rgg conformation, or serve as a redox-sensitive switch.

  2. Inhibition of Protein Aggregation: Supramolecular Assemblies of Arginine Hold the Key

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Utpal; Hariprasad, Gururao; Ethayathulla, Abdul S.; Manral, Pallavi; Das, Taposh K.; Pasha, Santosh; Mann, Anita; Ganguli, Munia; Verma, Amit K.; Bhat, Rajiv; Chandrayan, Sanjeev Kumar; Ahmed, Shubbir; Sharma, Sujata; Kaur, Punit; Singh, Tej P.; Srinivasan, Alagiri

    2007-01-01

    Background Aggregation of unfolded proteins occurs mainly through the exposed hydrophobic surfaces. Any mechanism of inhibition of this aggregation should explain the prevention of these hydrophobic interactions. Though arginine is prevalently used as an aggregation suppressor, its mechanism of action is not clearly understood. We propose a mechanism based on the hydrophobic interactions of arginine. Methodology We have analyzed arginine solution for its hydrotropic effect by pyrene solubility and the presence of hydrophobic environment by 1-anilino-8-naphthalene sulfonic acid fluorescence. Mass spectroscopic analyses show that arginine forms molecular clusters in the gas phase and the cluster composition is dependent on the solution conditions. Light scattering studies indicate that arginine exists as clusters in solution. In the presence of arginine, the reverse phase chromatographic elution profile of Alzheimer's amyloid beta 1-42 (Aβ1-42) peptide is modified. Changes in the hydrodynamic volume of Aβ1-42 in the presence of arginine measured by size exclusion chromatography show that arginine binds to Aβ1-42. Arginine increases the solubility of Aβ1-42 peptide in aqueous medium. It decreases the aggregation of Aβ1-42 as observed by atomic force microscopy. Conclusions Based on our experimental results we propose that molecular clusters of arginine in aqueous solutions display a hydrophobic surface by the alignment of its three methylene groups. The hydrophobic surfaces present on the proteins interact with the hydrophobic surface presented by the arginine clusters. The masking of hydrophobic surface inhibits protein-protein aggregation. This mechanism is also responsible for the hydrotropic effect of arginine on various compounds. It is also explained why other amino acids fail to inhibit the protein aggregation. PMID:18000547

  3. Inhibition of protein aggregation: supramolecular assemblies of arginine hold the key.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Utpal Das

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Aggregation of unfolded proteins occurs mainly through the exposed hydrophobic surfaces. Any mechanism of inhibition of this aggregation should explain the prevention of these hydrophobic interactions. Though arginine is prevalently used as an aggregation suppressor, its mechanism of action is not clearly understood. We propose a mechanism based on the hydrophobic interactions of arginine. METHODOLOGY: We have analyzed arginine solution for its hydrotropic effect by pyrene solubility and the presence of hydrophobic environment by 1-anilino-8-naphthalene sulfonic acid fluorescence. Mass spectroscopic analyses show that arginine forms molecular clusters in the gas phase and the cluster composition is dependent on the solution conditions. Light scattering studies indicate that arginine exists as clusters in solution. In the presence of arginine, the reverse phase chromatographic elution profile of Alzheimer's amyloid beta 1-42 (Abeta(1-42 peptide is modified. Changes in the hydrodynamic volume of Abeta(1-42 in the presence of arginine measured by size exclusion chromatography show that arginine binds to Abeta(1-42. Arginine increases the solubility of Abeta(1-42 peptide in aqueous medium. It decreases the aggregation of Abeta(1-42 as observed by atomic force microscopy. CONCLUSIONS: Based on our experimental results we propose that molecular clusters of arginine in aqueous solutions display a hydrophobic surface by the alignment of its three methylene groups. The hydrophobic surfaces present on the proteins interact with the hydrophobic surface presented by the arginine clusters. The masking of hydrophobic surface inhibits protein-protein aggregation. This mechanism is also responsible for the hydrotropic effect of arginine on various compounds. It is also explained why other amino acids fail to inhibit the protein aggregation.

  4. Molecular cloning and functional analysis of three genes encoding polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins from Capsicum annuum, and their relation to increased resistance to two fungal pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins (PGIPs) are plant cell wall glycoproteins that can inhibit fungal endopolygalacturonases (PGs). Inhibiting by PGIPs directly reduces potential PG activity in specific plant pathogenic fungi, reducing their aggressiveness. Here, we isolated and functionally chara...

  5. Genetic evidence for inhibition of bacterial division protein FtsZ by berberine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslaw M Boberek

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Berberine is a plant alkaloid that is widely used as an anti-infective in traditional medicine. Escherichia coli exposed to berberine form filaments, suggesting an antibacterial mechanism that involves inhibition of cell division. Berberine is a DNA ligand and may induce filamentation through induction of the SOS response. Also, there is biochemical evidence for berberine inhibition of the cell division protein FtsZ. Here we aimed to assess possible berberine mechanism(s of action in growing bacteria using genetics tools. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: First, we tested whether berberine inhibits bacterial growth through DNA damage and induction of the SOS response. The SOS response induced by berberine was much lower compared to that induced by mitomycin C in an SOS response reporter strain. Also, cell filamentation was observed in an SOS-negative E. coli strain. To test whether berberine inhibits FtsZ, we assessed its effects on formation of the cell division Z-rings, and observed a dramatic reduction in Z-rings in the presence of berberine. We next used two different strategies for RNA silencing of ftsZ and both resulted in sensitisation of bacteria to berberine, visible as a drop in the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC. Furthermore, Fractional Inhibitory Concentration Indices (FICIs showed a high level of synergy between ftsZ silencing and berberine treatment (FICI values of 0.23 and 0.25 for peptide nucleic acid- and expressed antisense RNA-based silencing of ftsZ, respectively. Finally, over-expression of ftsZ led to a mild rescue effect in berberine-treated cells. CONCLUSIONS: The results argue against DNA binding as the primary mechanism of action of berberine and support the hypothesis that its antibacterial properties are due to inhibition of the cell division protein FtsZ. In addition, the genetic approach used here provides a means to rapidly test the activity of other putative FtsZ inhibitors.

  6. Inhibiting p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase attenuates cerebral ischemic injury in Swedish mutant amyloid precursor protein transgenic mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liangyu Zou; Haiyan Qin; Yitao He; Heming Huang; Yi Lu; Xiaofan Chu

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia was induced using photothrombosis 1 hour after intraperitoneal injection of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor SB239063 into Swedish mutant amyloid precursor protein (APP/SWE) transgenic and non-transgenic mice. The number of surviving neurons in the penumbra was quantified using Nissl staining, and the activity of p38 MAPKs was measured by western blotting. The number of surviving neurons in the penumbra was significantly reduced in APP/SWE transgenic mice compared with non-transgenic controls 7 days after cerebral ischemia, but the activity of p38 MAPKs was significantly elevated compared with the non-ischemic hemisphere in the APP/SWE transgenic mice. SB239063 prevented these changes. The APP/SWE mutation exacerbated ischemic brain injury, and this could be alleviated by inhibiting p38 MAPK activity.

  7. Alpha-ketoglutarate inhibits glutamine degradation and enhances protein synthesis in intestinal porcine epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Kang; Yin, Yulong; Li, Xilong; Xi, Pengbin; Wang, Junjun; Lei, Jian; Hou, Yongqing; Wu, Guoyao

    2012-06-01

    α-Ketoglutarate (AKG) is a key intermediate in glutamine metabolism. Emerging evidence shows beneficial effects of AKG on clinical and experimental nutrition, particularly with respect to intestinal growth and integrity. However, the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Intestinal porcine epithelial cells (IPEC-1) were used to test the hypothesis that AKG inhibits glutamine degradation and enhances protein synthesis. IPEC-1 cells were cultured for 3 days in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's-F12 Ham medium (DMEM-F12) containing 0, 0.2, 0.5 or 2 mM of AKG. At the end of the 3-day culture, cells were used to determine L-[U-14C]glutamine utilization, protein concentration, protein synthesis, and the total and phosphorylated levels of the mammalian target of the rapamycin (mTOR), ribosomal protein S6 kinase-1 (S6K1) and eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 4E-binding protein-1 (4E-BP1). Compared with 0 mM of AKG (control), 0.2 and 0.5 mM of AKG dose-dependently reduced (P<0.05) glutamine degradation and the production of glutamate, alanine and aspartate in IPEC-1 cells. Addition of 0.5 and 2 mM of AKG to culture medium enhanced protein synthesis (P<0.05) by 78 and 101% without affecting protein degradation, compared to the control group. Rapamycin (50 nM; a potent inhibitor of mTOR) attenuated the stimulatory effect of AKG on protein synthesis. Consistent with these metabolic data, the addition of 0.5 or 2 mM of AKG to culture medium increased (P<0.05) the phosphorylated levels of mTOR, S6k1 and 4E-BP1 proteins. Collectively, these results indicate that AKG can spare glutamine and activate the mTOR signaling pathway to stimulate protein synthesis in intestinal epithelial cells.

  8. RAGE inhibits human respiratory syncytial virus syncytium formation by interfering with F-protein function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jane; Huang, Kelly; Krishnan, Subramaniam; Svabek, Catherine; Rowe, Daniel C; Brewah, Yambasu; Sanjuan, Miguel; Patera, Andriani C; Kolbeck, Roland; Herbst, Ronald; Sims, Gary P

    2013-08-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of severe lower respiratory tract infection. Infection is critically dependent on the RSV fusion (F) protein, which mediates fusion between the viral envelope and airway epithelial cells. The F protein is also expressed on infected cells and is responsible for fusion of infected cells with adjacent cells, resulting in the formation of multinucleate syncytia. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a pattern-recognition receptor that is constitutively highly expressed by type I alveolar epithelial cells. Here, we report that RAGE protected HEK cells from RSV-induced cell death and reduced viral titres in vitro. RAGE appeared to interact directly with the F protein, but, rather than inhibiting RSV entry into host cells, virus replication and budding, membrane-expressed RAGE or soluble RAGE blocked F-protein-mediated syncytium formation and sloughing. These data indicate that RAGE may contribute to protecting the lower airways from RSV by inhibiting the formation of syncytia, viral spread, epithelial damage and airway obstruction.

  9. Suramin Inhibits the In Vitro Expression of Encephalitis B Virus Proteins NS3 and E

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐可树; 任宏宇; 朱剑文; 杨昀; 廖芳

    2003-01-01

    In this study, the mechanism by which Suramin inhibits the replication of epidemic encephalitis B virus was explored to provide a theoretical basis for its further application in clinical practice. After viral infection of HepG2 and IMR-32 cells, different concentrations of Suramin were added to the culture media, and then the cultural supernatants and infected cells were collected 48 h later. For the evaluation of the curative effect, cytopathic effect (CPE), virus titers, the expression of viral protein and viral RNA were determined by Western blot, RT-PCR and in vitro RNA synthesis, respectively. At the concentration of 50 μg/ml of Suramin, HepG2 and IMR-32 infected with epidemic encephalitis B virus decreased by 51.8 % and 0.03 % respectively, as compared with controls. It was suggested that expression of encephalitis B virus proteins NS3 and E was notably reduced by Suramin. This is especially true of E protein. At RNA level, however, no difference in RNA virus was found between Suramin-treated virus and non-treated cells. Our results suggest that Suramin can inhibit viral replication by blocking the production of viral proteins.

  10. Inhibition of Japanese Encephalitis Virus Infection by Flavivirus Recombinant E Protein Domain Ⅲ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingjing Fan; Yi Liu; Xuping Xie; Bo Zhang; Zhiming Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus closely related to the human pathogens including yellow fever virus,dengue virus and West Nile virus.There are currently no effective antiviral therapies for all of the flavivirus and only a few highly effective vaccines are licensed for human use.In this paper,the E protein domain Ⅲ (DⅢ) of six heterologous flaviviruses (DENV1-4,WNV and JEV) was expressed in Escherichia coli successfully.The proteins were purified after a solubilization and refolding procedure,characterized by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting.Competitive inhibition showed that all recombinant flavivirus DⅢ proteins blocked the entry of JEV into BHK-21 cells.Further studies indicated that antibodies induced by the soluble recombinant flavivirus DⅢ partially protected mice against lethal JEV challenge.These results demonstrated that recombinant flavivirus DⅢ proteins could inhibit JEV infection competitively,and immunization with proper folding flavivirus DⅢ induced cross-protection against JEV infection in mice,implying a possible role of DⅢ for the cross-protection among flavivirus as well as its use in antigens for immunization in animal models.

  11. Pim-1 preserves mitochondrial morphology by inhibiting dynamin-related protein 1 translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Din, Shabana; Mason, Matthew; Völkers, Mirko; Johnson, Bevan; Cottage, Christopher T; Wang, Zeping; Joyo, Anya Y; Quijada, Pearl; Erhardt, Peter; Magnuson, Nancy S; Konstandin, Mathias H; Sussman, Mark A

    2013-04-09

    Mitochondrial morphological dynamics affect the outcome of ischemic heart damage and pathogenesis. Recently, mitochondrial fission protein dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) has been identified as a mediator of mitochondrial morphological changes and cell death during cardiac ischemic injury. In this study, we report a unique relationship between Pim-1 activity and Drp1 regulation of mitochondrial morphology in cardiomyocytes challenged by ischemic stress. Transgenic hearts overexpressing cardiac Pim-1 display reduction of total Drp1 protein levels, increased phosphorylation of Drp1-(S637), and inhibition of Drp1 localization to the mitochondria. Consistent with these findings, adenoviral-induced Pim-1 neonatal rat cardiomyocytes (NRCMs) retain a reticular mitochondrial phenotype after simulated ischemia (sI) and decreased Drp1 mitochondrial sequestration. Interestingly, adenovirus Pim-dominant negative NRCMs show increased expression of Bcl-2 homology 3 (BH3)-only protein p53 up-regulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA), which has been previously shown to induce Drp1 accumulation at mitochondria and increase sensitivity to apoptotic stimuli. Overexpression of the p53 up-regulated modulator of apoptosis-dominant negative adenovirus attenuates localization of Drp1 to mitochondria in adenovirus Pim-dominant negative NRCMs promotes reticular mitochondrial morphology and inhibits cell death during sI. Therefore, Pim-1 activity prevents Drp1 compartmentalization to the mitochondria and preserves reticular mitochondrial morphology in response to sI.

  12. Inhibition of prefrontal protein synthesis following recall does not disrupt memory for trace fear conditioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dash Pramod K

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The extent of similarity between consolidation and reconsolidation is not yet fully understood. One of the differences noted is that not every brain region involved in consolidation exhibits reconsolidation. In trace fear conditioning, the hippocampus and the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC are required for consolidation of long-term memory. We have previously demonstrated that trace fear memory is susceptible to infusion of the protein synthesis inhibitor anisomycin into the hippocampus following recall. In the present study, we examine whether protein synthesis inhibition in the mPFC following recall similarly results in the observation of reconsolidation of trace fear memory. Results Targeted intra-mPFC infusions of anisomycin or vehicle were performed immediately following recall of trace fear memory at 24 hours, or at 30 days, following training in a one-day or a two-day protocol. The present study demonstrates three key findings: 1 trace fear memory does not undergo protein synthesis dependent reconsolidation in the PFC, regardless of the intensity of the training, and 2 regardless of whether the memory is recent or remote, and 3 intra-mPFC inhibition of protein synthesis immediately following training impaired remote (30 days memory. Conclusion These results suggest that not all structures that participate in memory storage are involved in reconsolidation. Alternatively, certain types of memory-related information may reconsolidate, while other components of memory may not.

  13. Three cardiovirus Leader proteins equivalently inhibit four different nucleocytoplasmic trafficking pathways

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    Ciomperlik, Jessica J. [Institute for Molecular Virology, and Department of Biochemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Basta, Holly A. [Department of Biology, Rocky Mountain College, Billings, MT (United States); Palmenberg, Ann C., E-mail: acpalmen@wisc.edu [Institute for Molecular Virology, and Department of Biochemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Cardiovirus infections inhibit nucleocytoplasmic trafficking by Leader protein-induced phosphorylation of Phe/Gly-containing nucleoporins (Nups). Recombinant Leader from encephalomyocarditis virus, Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus and Saffold virus target the same subset of Nups, including Nup62 and Nup98, but not Nup50. Reporter cell lines with fluorescence mCherry markers for M9, RS and classical SV40 import pathways, as well as the Crm1-mediated export pathway, all responded to transfection with the full panel of Leader proteins, showing consequent cessation of path-specific active import/export. For this to happen, the Nups had to be presented in the context of intact nuclear pores and exposed to cytoplasmic extracts. The Leader phosphorylation cascade was not effective against recombinant Nup proteins. The findings support a model of Leader-dependent Nup phosphorylation with the purpose of disrupting Nup-transportin interactions. - Highlights: • Nup98, but not Nup50 becomes phosphorylated by cardiovirus Leader protein-dependent mechanisms. • At least four independent nucleocytoplasmic trafficking pathways are inhibited by this process. • Nups must be presented in a nuclear pore context for Leader-directed phosphorylation. • Leader, by itself, does not cause activation of cellular kinases.

  14. Hepatitis B virus core protein with hot-spot mutations inhibit MxA gene transcription but has no effect on inhibition of virus replication by interferon α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhijian, Yu; Zhen, Huang; Fan, Zhang; Jin, Yang; Qiwen, Deng; Zhongming, Zeng

    2010-10-20

    It has been reported that hepatitis B virus (HBV) core protein (HBc) can inhibit the transcription of human interferon-induced MxA gene. In this study, we investigated whether HBc protein mutations at hot spots (L60V, S87G and I97L) could still inhibit MxA transcription and the potential significance of this inhibition in virus replication in vitro. Our data indicated that the IFN-induced MxA mRNA expression level and MxA promoter activity was significantly down-regulated by mutant protein of HBc(I97L), compared to WT and the other two mutated HBc proteins(L60V or S87G). However, in Huh7 cells stably expressing WT or the mutated HBc proteins (L60V, S87G or I97L), IFN-α could inhibit the extra- and intracellular HBV DNA level and HBsAg secretion to a similar level compared to that in cells transfected with control plasmids. In conclusion, HBc protein with I97L mutation may play an special role in suppressing the transcription of MxA gene. Moreover, the inhibitory effect on MxA gene transcription by the WT or mutated HBc proteins (L60V, S87G and I97L) has no impact on inhibition of HBV replication by IFN-α in Huh7 cells. The clinical significance of the inhibitory effect of MxA gene transcription by HBc protein requires further study.

  15. Lucanthone and its derivative hycanthone inhibit apurinic endonuclease-1 (APE1 by direct protein binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamta D Naidu

    Full Text Available Lucanthone and hycanthone are thioxanthenone DNA intercalators used in the 1980s as antitumor agents. Lucanthone is in Phase I clinical trial, whereas hycanthone was pulled out of Phase II trials. Their potential mechanism of action includes DNA intercalation, inhibition of nucleic acid biosyntheses, and inhibition of enzymes like topoisomerases and the dual function base excision repair enzyme apurinic endonuclease 1 (APE1. Lucanthone inhibits the endonuclease activity of APE1, without affecting its redox activity. Our goal was to decipher the precise mechanism of APE1 inhibition as a prerequisite towards development of improved therapeutics that can counteract higher APE1 activity often seen in tumors. The IC(50 values for inhibition of APE1 incision of depurinated plasmid DNA by lucanthone and hycanthone were 5 µM and 80 nM, respectively. The K(D values (affinity constants for APE1, as determined by BIACORE binding studies, were 89 nM for lucanthone/10 nM for hycanthone. APE1 structures reveal a hydrophobic pocket where hydrophobic small molecules like thioxanthenones can bind, and our modeling studies confirmed such docking. Circular dichroism spectra uncovered change in the helical structure of APE1 in the presence of lucanthone/hycanthone, and notably, this effect was decreased (Phe266Ala or Phe266Cys or Trp280Leu or abolished (Phe266Ala/Trp280Ala when hydrophobic site mutants were employed. Reduced inhibition by lucanthone of the diminished endonuclease activity of hydrophobic mutant proteins (as compared to wild type APE1 supports that binding of lucanthone to the hydrophobic pocket dictates APE1 inhibition. The DNA binding capacity of APE1 was marginally inhibited by lucanthone, and not at all by hycanthone, supporting our hypothesis that thioxanthenones inhibit APE1, predominantly, by direct interaction. Finally, lucanthone-induced degradation was drastically reduced in the presence of short and long lived free radical scavengers, e

  16. Systematic identification of arsenic-binding proteins reveals that hexokinase-2 is inhibited by arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hai-Nan; Yang, Lina; Ling, Jian-Ya; Czajkowsky, Daniel M; Wang, Jing-Fang; Zhang, Xiao-Wei; Zhou, Yi-Ming; Ge, Feng; Yang, Ming-Kun; Xiong, Qian; Guo, Shu-Juan; Le, Huang-Ying; Wu, Song-Fang; Yan, Wei; Liu, Bingya; Zhu, Heng; Chen, Zhu; Tao, Sheng-Ce

    2015-12-01

    Arsenic is highly effective for treating acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) and has shown significant promise against many other tumors. However, although its mechanistic effects in APL are established, its broader anticancer mode of action is not understood. In this study, using a human proteome microarray, we identified 360 proteins that specifically bind arsenic. Among the most highly enriched proteins in this set are those in the glycolysis pathway, including the rate-limiting enzyme in glycolysis, hexokinase-1. Detailed biochemical and metabolomics analyses of the highly homologous hexokinase-2 (HK2), which is overexpressed in many cancers, revealed significant inhibition by arsenic. Furthermore, overexpression of HK2 rescued cells from arsenic-induced apoptosis. Our results thus strongly implicate glycolysis, and HK2 in particular, as a key target of arsenic. Moreover, the arsenic-binding proteins identified in this work are expected to serve as a valuable resource for the development of synergistic antitumor therapeutic strategies.

  17. Sub-MIC Tylosin Inhibits Streptococcus suis Biofilm Formation and Results in Differential Protein Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuai; Yang, Yanbei; Zhao, Yulin; Zhao, Honghai; Bai, Jingwen; Chen, Jianqing; Zhou, Yonghui; Wang, Chang; Li, Yanhua

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus suis (S.suis) is an important zoonotic pathogen that causes severe diseases in humans and pigs. Biofilms of S. suis can induce persistent infections that are difficult to treat. In this study, the effect of tylosin on biofilm formation of S. suis was investigated. 1/2 minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and 1/4 MIC of tylosin were shown to inhibit S. suis biofilm formation in vitro. By using the iTRAQ strategy, we compared the protein expression profiles of S. suis grown with sub-MIC tylosin treatment and with no treatment. A total of 1501 proteins were identified by iTRAQ. Ninety-six differentially expressed proteins were identified (Ratio > ±1.5, p MIC tylosin treatment. Thus, our data revealed the rough regulation of biofilm formation that may provide a foundation for future research into mechanisms and targets.

  18. Three cardiovirus Leader proteins equivalently inhibit four different nucleocytoplasmic trafficking pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciomperlik, Jessica J; Basta, Holly A; Palmenberg, Ann C

    2015-10-01

    Cardiovirus infections inhibit nucleocytoplasmic trafficking by Leader protein-induced phosphorylation of Phe/Gly-containing nucleoporins (Nups). Recombinant Leader from encephalomyocarditis virus, Theiler׳s murine encephalomyelitis virus and Saffold virus target the same subset of Nups, including Nup62 and Nup98, but not Nup50. Reporter cell lines with fluorescence mCherry markers for M9, RS and classical SV40 import pathways, as well as the Crm1-mediated export pathway, all responded to transfection with the full panel of Leader proteins, showing consequent cessation of path-specific active import/export. For this to happen, the Nups had to be presented in the context of intact nuclear pores and exposed to cytoplasmic extracts. The Leader phosphorylation cascade was not effective against recombinant Nup proteins. The findings support a model of Leader-dependent Nup phosphorylation with the purpose of disrupting Nup-transportin interactions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. 2-octynoic acid inhibits hepatitis C virus infection through activation of AMP-activated protein kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darong Yang

    Full Text Available Many chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV-infected patients with current therapy do not clear the virus. It is necessary to find novel treatments. The effect of 2-octynoic acid (2-OA on HCV infection in human hepatocytes was examined. The mechanism of 2-OA antiviral activity was explored. Our data showed that 2-OA abrogated lipid accumulation in HCV replicon cells and virus-infected hepatocytes. It suppressed HCV RNA replication and infectious virus production with no cytotoxicity to the host cells. 2-OA did not affect hepatitis B virus replication in HepG2.2.15 cells derived from HepG2 cells transfected with full genome of HBV. Further study demonstrated that 2-OA activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK and inhibited acetyl-CoA carboxylase in viral-infected cells. Compound C, a specific inhibitor of AMPK, inhibited AMPK activity and reversed the reduction of intracellular lipid accumulation and the antiviral effect of 2-OA. Knockdown of AMPK expression by RNA interference abolished the activation of AMPK by 2-OA and blocked 2-OA antiviral activity. Interestingly, 2-OA induced interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs and inhibited microRNA-122 (miR-122 expression in virus-infected hepatocytes. MiR-122 overexpression reversed the antiviral effect of 2-OA. Furthermore, knockdown of AMPK expression reversed both the induction of ISGs and suppression of miR-122 by 2-OA, implying that activated AMPK induces the intracellular innate response through the induction of ISGs and inhibiting miR-122 expression. 2-OA inhibits HCV infection through regulation of innate immune response by activated AMPK. These findings reveal a novel mechanism by which active AMPK inhibits HCV infection. 2-OA and its derivatives hold promise for novel drug development for chronic hepatitis C.

  20. Protein disulfide isomerase inhibition blocks thrombin generation in humans by interfering with platelet factor V activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stopa, Jack D.; Neuberg, Donna; Puligandla, Maneka; Furie, Bruce; Zwicker, Jeffrey I.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) is required for thrombus formation. We previously demonstrated that glycosylated quercetin flavonoids such as isoquercetin inhibit PDI activity and thrombus formation in animal models, but whether extracellular PDI represents a viable anticoagulant target in humans and how its inhibition affects blood coagulation remain unknown. METHODS: We evaluated effects of oral administration of isoquercetin on platelet-dependent thrombin generation in healthy subjects and patients with persistently elevated anti-phospholipid antibodies. RESULTS: Following oral administration of 1,000 mg isoquercetin to healthy adults, the measured peak plasma quercetin concentration (9.2 μM) exceeded its IC50 for inhibition of PDI by isoquercetin in vitro (2.5 ± 0.4 μM). Platelet-dependent thrombin generation decreased by 51% in the healthy volunteers compared with baseline (P = 0.0004) and by 64% in the anti-phospholipid antibody cohort (P = 0.015) following isoquercetin ingestion. To understand how PDI affects thrombin generation, we evaluated substrates of PDI identified using an unbiased mechanistic-based substrate trapping approach. These studies identified platelet factor V as a PDI substrate. Isoquercetin blocked both platelet factor Va and thrombin generation with an IC50 of ~5 μM. Inhibition of PDI by isoquercetin ingestion resulted in a 53% decrease in the generation of platelet factor Va (P = 0.001). Isoquercetin-mediated inhibition was reversed with addition of exogenous factor Va. CONCLUSION: These studies show that oral administration of isoquercetin inhibits PDI activity in plasma and diminishes platelet-dependent thrombin generation predominantly by blocking the generation of platelet factor Va. These pharmacodynamic and mechanistic observations represent an important step in the development of a novel class of antithrombotic agents targeting PDI. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01722669) FUNDING: National Heart

  1. Sorafenib enhances proteasome inhibitor-mediated cytotoxicity via inhibition of unfolded protein response and keratin phosphorylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honma, Yuichi; Harada, Masaru, E-mail: msrharada@med.uoeh-u.ac.jp

    2013-08-15

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is highly resistant to conventional systemic therapies and prognosis for advanced HCC patients remains poor. Recent studies of the molecular mechanisms responsible for tumor initiation and progression have identified several potential molecular targets in HCC. Sorafenib is a multi-kinase inhibitor shown to have survival benefits in advanced HCC. It acts by inhibiting the serine/threonine kinases and the receptor type tyrosine kinases. In preclinical experiments sorafenib had anti-proliferative activity in hepatoma cells and it reduced tumor angiogenesis and increased apoptosis. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that the cytotoxic mechanisms of sorafenib include its inhibitory effects on protein ubiquitination, unfolded protein response (UPR) and keratin phosphorylation in response to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Moreover, we show that combined treatment with sorafenib and proteasome inhibitors (PIs) synergistically induced a marked increase in cell death in hepatoma- and hepatocyte-derived cells. These observations may open the way to potentially interesting treatment combinations that may augment the effect of sorafenib, possibly including drugs that promote ER stress. Because sorafenib blocked the cellular defense mechanisms against hepatotoxic injury not only in hepatoma cells but also in hepatocyte-derived cells, we must be careful to avoid severe liver injury. -- Graphical abstract: Display Omitted -- Highlights: •We examined the cytotoxic mechanisms of sorafenib in hepatoma cells. •Sorafenib induces cell death via apoptotic and necrotic fashion. •Sorafenib inhibits protein ubiquitination and unfolded protein response. •Autophagy induced by sorafenib may affect its cytotoxicity. •Sorafenib inhibits keratin phosphorylation and cytoplasmic inclusion formation.

  2. Viral protein inhibits RISC activity by argonaute binding through conserved WG/GW motifs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Giner

    Full Text Available RNA silencing is an evolutionarily conserved sequence-specific gene-inactivation system that also functions as an antiviral mechanism in higher plants and insects. To overcome antiviral RNA silencing, viruses express silencing-suppressor proteins. These viral proteins can target one or more key points in the silencing machinery. Here we show that in Sweet potato mild mottle virus (SPMMV, type member of the Ipomovirus genus, family Potyviridae, the role of silencing suppressor is played by the P1 protein (the largest serine protease among all known potyvirids despite the presence in its genome of an HC-Pro protein, which, in potyviruses, acts as the suppressor. Using in vivo studies we have demonstrated that SPMMV P1 inhibits si/miRNA-programmed RISC activity. Inhibition of RISC activity occurs by binding P1 to mature high molecular weight RISC, as we have shown by immunoprecipitation. Our results revealed that P1 targets Argonaute1 (AGO1, the catalytic unit of RISC, and that suppressor/binding activities are localized at the N-terminal half of P1. In this region three WG/GW motifs were found resembling the AGO-binding linear peptide motif conserved in metazoans and plants. Site-directed mutagenesis proved that these three motifs are absolutely required for both binding and suppression of AGO1 function. In contrast to other viral silencing suppressors analyzed so far P1 inhibits both existing and de novo formed AGO1 containing RISC complexes. Thus P1 represents a novel RNA silencing suppressor mechanism. The discovery of the molecular bases of P1 mediated silencing suppression may help to get better insight into the function and assembly of the poorly explored multiprotein containing RISC.

  3. Computational and biophysical approaches to protein-protein interaction inhibition of Plasmodium falciparum AMA1/RON2 complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pihan, Emilie; Delgadillo, Roberto F.; Tonkin, Michelle L.; Pugnière, Martine; Lebrun, Maryse; Boulanger, Martin J.; Douguet, Dominique

    2015-06-01

    Invasion of the red blood cell by Plasmodium falciparum parasites requires formation of an electron dense circumferential ring called the Moving Junction (MJ). The MJ is anchored by a high affinity complex of two parasite proteins: Apical Membrane Antigen 1 ( PfAMA1) displayed on the surface of the parasite and Rhoptry Neck Protein 2 that is discharged from the parasite and imbedded in the membrane of the host cell. Structural studies of PfAMA1 revealed a conserved hydrophobic groove localized to the apical surface that coordinates RON2 and invasion inhibitory peptides. In the present work, we employed computational and biophysical methods to identify competitive P. falciparum AMA1-RON2 inhibitors with the goal of exploring the `druggability' of this attractive antimalarial target. A virtual screen followed by molecular docking with the PfAMA1 crystal structure was performed using an eight million compound collection that included commercial molecules, the ChEMBL malaria library and approved drugs. The consensus approach resulted in the selection of inhibitor candidates. We also developed a fluorescence anisotropy assay using a modified inhibitory peptide to experimentally validate the ability of the selected compounds to inhibit the AMA1-RON2 interaction. Among those, we identified one compound that displayed significant inhibition. This study offers interesting clues to improve the throughput and reliability of screening for new drug leads.

  4. Structural basis for the potent inhibition of the HIV integrase-LEDGF/p75 protein-protein interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribone, Sergio R; Quevedo, Mario A

    2017-08-01

    Integrase (IN) constitutes one of the key enzymes involved in the lifecycle of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), the etiological agent of AIDS. The biological role of IN strongly depends on the recognition and binding of cellular cofactors belonging to the infected host cell. Thus, the inhibition of the protein-protein interaction (PPI) between IN and cellular cofactors has been envisioned as a promising therapeutic target. In the present work we explore a structure-activity relationship for a set of 14 compounds reported as inhibitors of the PPI between IN and the lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75). Our results demonstrate that the possibility to adopt the bioactive conformation capable of interacting with the hotspots IN-LEDGF/p75 hotspots residues constitutes a critical feature to obtain a potent inhibition. A ligand efficiency (|Lig-Eff|) quantitative descriptor combining both interaction energetics and conformational requirements was developed and correlated with the reported biological activity. Our results contribute to the rational development of IN-LEDGF/p75 interaction inhibitors providing a solid quantitative structure-activity relationship aimed for the screening of new IN-LEDGF/p75 interaction inhibitors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Inhibition of protein kinase C affects on mode of synaptic vesicle exocytosis due to cholesterol depletion

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    Petrov, Alexey M., E-mail: fysio@rambler.ru; Zakyrjanova, Guzalija F., E-mail: guzik121192@mail.ru; Yakovleva, Anastasia A., E-mail: nastya1234qwer@mail.ru; Zefirov, Andrei L., E-mail: zefiroval@rambler.ru

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • We examine the involvement of PKC in MCD induced synaptic vesicle exocytosis. • PKC inhibitor does not decrease the effect MCD on MEPP frequency. • PKC inhibitor prevents MCD induced FM1-43 unloading. • PKC activation may switch MCD induced exocytosis from kiss-and-run to a full mode. • Inhibition of phospholipase C does not lead to similar change in exocytosis. - Abstract: Previous studies demonstrated that depletion of membrane cholesterol by 10 mM methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MCD) results in increased spontaneous exocytosis at both peripheral and central synapses. Here, we investigated the role of protein kinase C in the enhancement of spontaneous exocytosis at frog motor nerve terminals after cholesterol depletion using electrophysiological and optical methods. Inhibition of the protein kinase C by myristoylated peptide and chelerythrine chloride prevented MCD-induced increases in FM1-43 unloading, whereas the frequency of spontaneous postsynaptic events remained enhanced. The increase in FM1-43 unloading still could be observed if sulforhodamine 101 (the water soluble FM1-43 quencher that can pass through the fusion pore) was added to the extracellular solution. This suggests a possibility that exocytosis of synaptic vesicles under these conditions could occur through the kiss-and-run mechanism with the formation of a transient fusion pore. Inhibition of phospholipase C did not lead to similar change in MCD-induced exocytosis.

  6. Yokukansan inhibits neuronal death during ER stress by regulating the unfolded protein response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toru Hiratsuka

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recently, several studies have reported Yokukansan (Tsumura TJ-54, a traditional Japanese medicine, as a potential new drug for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress is known to play an important role in the pathogenesis of AD, particularly in neuronal death. Therefore, we examined the effect of Yokukansan on ER stress-induced neurotoxicity and on familial AD-linked presenilin-1 mutation-associated cell death. METHODS: We employed the WST-1 assay and monitored morphological changes to evaluate cell viability following Yokukansan treatment or treatment with its components. Western blotting and PCR were used to observe the expression levels of GRP78/BiP, caspase-4 and C/EBP homologous protein. RESULTS: Yokukansan inhibited neuronal death during ER stress, with Cnidii Rhizoma (Senkyu, a component of Yokukansan, being particularly effective. We also showed that Yokukansan and Senkyu affect the unfolded protein response following ER stress and that these drugs inhibit the activation of caspase-4, resulting in the inhibition of ER stress-induced neuronal death. Furthermore, we found that the protective effect of Yokukansan and Senkyu against ER stress could be attributed to the ferulic acid content of these two drugs. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that Yokukansan, Senkyu and ferulic acid are protective against ER stress-induced neuronal cell death and may provide a possible new treatment for AD.

  7. Whey protein inhibits iron overload-induced oxidative stress in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jungmi; Paik, Hyun-Dong; Yoon, Yoh-Chang; Park, Eunju

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the effects of whey protein on oxidative stress in rats that were subjected to oxidative stress induced by iron overload. Thirty male rats were assigned to 3 groups: the control group (regular [50 mg/kg diet] dose of iron+20% casein), iron overload group (high [2,000 mg/kg] dose of iron+20% casein, IO), and whey protein group (high dose of iron+10% casein+10% whey protein, IO+whey). After 6 wk, the IO group showed a reduction in the plasma total radical trapping antioxidant parameter and the activity of erythrocyte superoxide dismutase and an increase in lipid peroxidation (determined from the proportion of conjugated dienes). However, whey protein ameliorated the oxidative changes induced by iron overload. The concentration of erythrocyte glutathione was significantly higher in the IO+whey group than in the IO group. In addition, whey protein supplementation fully inhibited iron overload-induced DNA damage in leukocytes and colonocytes. A highly significant positive correlation was observed between plasma iron levels and DNA damage in leukocytes and colonocytes. These results show the antioxidative and antigenotoxic effects of whey protein in an in vivo model of iron overload-induced oxidative stress.

  8. Blocking an N-terminal acetylation–dependent protein interaction inhibits an E3 ligase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, Daniel C.; Hammill, Jared T.; Min, Jaeki; Rhee, David Y.; Connelly, Michele; Sviderskiy, Vladislav O.; Bhasin, Deepak; Chen, Yizhe; Ong, Su-Sien; Chai, Sergio C.; Goktug, Asli N.; Huang, Guochang; Monda, Julie K.; Low, Jonathan; Kim, Ho Shin; Paulo, Joao A.; Cannon, Joe R.; Shelat, Anang A.; Chen, Taosheng; Kelsall, Ian R.; Alpi, Arno F.; Pagala, Vishwajeeth; Wang, Xusheng; Peng, Junmin; Singh , Bhuvanesh; Harper, J. Wade; Schulman, Brenda A.; Guy, R. Kip (MSKCC); (Dundee); (SJCH); (Harvard-Med); (MXPL)

    2017-06-05

    N-terminal acetylation is an abundant modification influencing protein functions. Because ~80% of mammalian cytosolic proteins are N-terminally acetylated, this modification is potentially an untapped target for chemical control of their functions. Structural studies have revealed that, like lysine acetylation, N-terminal acetylation converts a positively charged amine into a hydrophobic handle that mediates protein interactions; hence, this modification may be a druggable target. We report the development of chemical probes targeting the N-terminal acetylation–dependent interaction between an E2 conjugating enzyme (UBE2M or UBC12) and DCN1 (DCUN1D1), a subunit of a multiprotein E3 ligase for the ubiquitin-like protein NEDD8. The inhibitors are highly selective with respect to other protein acetyl-amide–binding sites, inhibit NEDD8 ligation in vitro and in cells, and suppress anchorage-independent growth of a cell line with DCN1 amplification. Overall, our data demonstrate that N-terminal acetyl-dependent protein interactions are druggable targets and provide insights into targeting multiprotein E2–E3 ligases.

  9. Systems mechanobiology: tension-inhibited protein turnover is sufficient to physically control gene circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingal, P C Dave P; Discher, Dennis E

    2014-12-02

    Mechanotransduction pathways convert forces that stress and strain structures within cells into gene expression levels that impact development, homeostasis, and disease. The levels of some key structural proteins in the nucleus, cytoskeleton, or extracellular matrix have been recently reported to scale with tissue- and cell-level forces or mechanical properties such as stiffness, and so the mathematics of mechanotransduction becomes important to understand. Here, we show that if a given structural protein positively regulates its own gene expression, then stresses need only inhibit degradation of that protein to achieve stable, mechanosensitive gene expression. This basic use-it-or-lose-it module is illustrated by application to meshworks of nuclear lamin A, minifilaments of myosin II, and extracellular matrix collagen fibers—all of which possess filamentous coiled-coil/supercoiled structures. Past experiments not only suggest that tension suppresses protein degradation mediated and/or initiated by various enzymes but also that transcript levels vary with protein levels because key transcription factors are regulated by these structural proteins. Coupling between modules occurs within single cells and between cells in tissue, as illustrated during embryonic heart development where cardiac fibroblasts make collagen that cardiomyocytes contract. With few additional assumptions, the basic module has sufficient physics to control key structural genes in both development and disease.

  10. Microcystin-LR stabilizes c-myc protein by inhibiting protein phosphatase 2A in HEK293 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Huihui; Cai, Yan; Xie, Ping; Xiao, Wuhan; Chen, Jun; Ji, Wei; Zhao, Sujuan

    2014-05-07

    Microcystin-LR is the most toxic and the most frequently encountered toxin produced by the cyanobacteria in the contaminated aquatic environment. Previous studies have demonstrated that Microcystin-LR is a potential carcinogen for animals and humans, and the International Agency for Research on Cancer has classified Microcystin-LR as a possible human carcinogen. However, the precise molecular mechanisms of Microcystin-LR-induced carcinogenesis remain a mystery. C-myc is a proto-oncogene, abnormal expression of which contributes to the tumor development. Although several studies have demonstrated that Microcystin-LR could induce c-myc expression at the transcriptional level, the exact connection between Microcystin-LR toxicity and c-myc response remains unclear. In this study, we showed that the c-myc protein increased in HEK293 cells after exposure to Microcystin-LR. Coexpression of protein phosphatase 2A and two stable c-myc protein point mutants (either c-myc(T58A) or c-myc(S62A)) showed that Microcystin-LR increased c-myc protein level mainly through inhibiting protein phosphatase 2A activity which altered the phosphorylation status of serine 62 on c-myc. In addition, we also showed that Microcystin-LR could increase c-myc promoter activity as revealed by luciferase reporter assay. And the TATA box for P1 promoter of c-myc might be involved. Our results suggested that Microcystin-LR can stimulate c-myc transcription and stabilize c-myc protein, which might contribute to hepatic tumorigenesis in animals and humans.

  11. A Herpesvirus Protein Selectively Inhibits Cellular mRNA Nuclear Export.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Danyang; Kim, Yong Hoon; Xiao, Yuchen; Du, Yushen; Xie, Yafang; Lee, Kevin K; Feng, Jun; Farhat, Nisar; Zhao, Dawei; Shu, Sara; Dai, Xinghong; Chanda, Sumit K; Rana, Tariq M; Krogan, Nevan J; Sun, Ren; Wu, Ting-Ting

    2016-11-09

    Nuclear mRNA export is highly regulated to ensure accurate cellular gene expression. Viral inhibition of cellular mRNA export can enhance viral access to the cellular translation machinery and prevent anti-viral protein production but is generally thought to be nonselective. We report that ORF10 of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), a nuclear DNA virus, inhibits mRNA export in a transcript-selective manner to control cellular gene expression. Nuclear export inhibition by ORF10 requires an interaction with an RNA export factor, Rae1. Genome-wide analysis reveals a subset of cellular mRNAs whose nuclear export is blocked by ORF10 with the 3' UTRs of ORF10-targeted transcripts conferring sensitivity to export inhibition. The ORF10-Rae1 interaction is important for the virus to express viral genes and produce infectious virions. These results suggest that a nuclear DNA virus can selectively interfere with RNA export to restrict host gene expression for optimal replication. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Implication of unfolded protein response in resveratrol-induced inhibition of K562 cell proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Bao-Qin; Gao, Yan-Yan; Niu, Xiao-Fang [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Xie, Ji-Sheng [Youjiang Medical College for Nationalities, Guangxi 533000 (China); Meng, Xin; Guan, Yifu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Wang, Hua-Qin, E-mail: wanghq_doctor@hotmail.com [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China)

    2010-01-01

    Resveratrol (RES), a natural plant polyphenol, is an effective inducer of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in a variety of carcinoma cell types. In addition, RES has been reported to inhibit tumorigenesis in several animal models suggesting that it functions as a chemopreventive and anti-tumor agent in vivo. The chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic properties associated with resveratrol offer promise for the design of new chemotherapeutic agents. However, the mechanisms by which RES mediates its effects are not yet fully understood. In this study, we showed that RES caused cell cycle arrest and proliferation inhibition via induction of unfolded protein response (UPR) in human leukemia K562 cell line. Treatment of K562 cells with RES induced a number of signature UPR markers, including transcriptional induction of GRP78 and CHOP, phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2{alpha} (eIF2{alpha}), ER stress-specific XBP-1 splicing, suggesting the induction of UPR by RES. RES inhibited proliferation of K562 in a concentration-dependent manner. Flow cytometric analyses revealed that K562 cells were arrested in G1 phase upon RES treatment. Salubrinal, an eIF2{alpha} inhibitor, or overexpression of dominant negative mutants of PERK or eIF2{alpha}, effectively restored RES-induced cell cycle arrest, underscoring the important role of PERK/eIF2{alpha} branch of UPR in RES-induced inhibition of cell proliferation.

  13. Inhibition of fatty acid binding proteins elevates brain anandamide levels and produces analgesia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Kaczocha

    Full Text Available The endocannabinoid anandamide (AEA is an antinociceptive lipid that is inactivated through cellular uptake and subsequent catabolism by fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH. Fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs are intracellular carriers that deliver AEA and related N-acylethanolamines (NAEs to FAAH for hydrolysis. The mammalian brain expresses three FABP subtypes: FABP3, FABP5, and FABP7. Recent work from our group has revealed that pharmacological inhibition of FABPs reduces inflammatory pain in mice. The goal of the current work was to explore the effects of FABP inhibition upon nociception in diverse models of pain. We developed inhibitors with differential affinities for FABPs to elucidate the subtype(s that contributes to the antinociceptive effects of FABP inhibitors. Inhibition of FABPs reduced nociception associated with inflammatory, visceral, and neuropathic pain. The antinociceptive effects of FABP inhibitors mirrored their affinities for FABP5, while binding to FABP3 and FABP7 was not a predictor of in vivo efficacy. The antinociceptive effects of FABP inhibitors were mediated by cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα and FABP inhibition elevated brain levels of AEA, providing the first direct evidence that FABPs regulate brain endocannabinoid tone. These results highlight FABPs as novel targets for the development of analgesic and anti-inflammatory therapeutics.

  14. Mechanism of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B-mediated inhibition of leptin signalling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, I K; Hansen, J A; Andersen, H S

    2005-01-01

    Upon leptin binding, the leptin receptor is activated, leading to stimulation of the JAK/STAT signal transduction cascade. The transient character of the tyrosine phosphorylation of JAK2 and STAT3 suggests the involvement of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) as negative regulators...... of this signalling pathway. Specifically, recent evidence has suggested that PTP1B might be a key regulator of leptin signalling, based on the resistance to diet-induced obesity and increased leptin signalling observed in PTP1B-deficient mice. The present study was undertaken to investigate the mechanism by which...... PTP1B mediates the cessation of the leptin signal transduction. Leptin-induced activation of a STAT3 responsive reporter was dose-dependently inhibited by co-transfection with PTP1B. No inhibition was observed when a catalytically inactive mutant of PTP1B was used or when other PTPs were co...

  15. Inhibition of E2F-1 transactivation by direct binding of the retinoblastoma protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helin, K; Harlow, E; Fattaey, A

    1993-01-01

    to transcription factor E2F has provided a model for the mechanism of pRB-mediated growth regulation. Since adenovirus E1A proteins dissociate the pRB-E2F complexes and stimulate E2F-dependent transcription, it has been suggested that pRB inhibits E2F transactivation. Although some evidence for this hypothesis has...... been provided, it has not been possible to determine the mechanism of pRB-mediated inhibition of E2F transactivation. In this study, we constructed mutants of E2F-1 that do not bind to pRB yet retain the ability to transactivate the adenovirus E2 promoter through E2F DNA-binding sites. We demonstrated...

  16. Protective effects of inhibition of adenosine monophosphate activated protein kinase activity against cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    补娟

    2013-01-01

    Objective To observe the effect of inhibition of adenosine monophosphate activated protein kinase (AMPK) on shape,function and inflammatory factor of microglia for mice after cerebral ischemia-reperfusion

  17. VP22 fusion protein-based dominant negative mutant can inhibit hepatitis B virus replication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Yi; Wei-Dong Gong; Ling Wang; Rui Ling; Jiang-Hao Chen; Jun Yun

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the inhibitory effect of VP22 fusion protein-based dominant negative (DN) mutant on Hepatitis Bvrus (HBV) replication.METHODS: Full-length or truncated fragment of VP22 was fused to C terminal of HBV core protein (HBc), and subcloned into pcDNA3.1 (-) vector, yielding eukaryotic expression plasmids of DN mutant. After transfection into HepG2.2.15 cells, the expression of DN mutant was identified by immunofluorescence staining. The inhibitory effect of DN mutant on HBV replication was indexed as the supernatant HBsAg concentration determined by RIA and HBV-DNA content by fluorescent quantification-PCR (FQ-PCR). Meanwhile, metabolism of HepG2.2.15 cells was evaluated by MTT colorimetry.RESULTS: VP22-based DN mutants and its truncated fragment were expressed in HepG2.2.15 cells, and had no toxic effect on host cells. DN mutants could inhibit HBV replication and the transduction ability of mutantbearing protein had a stronger inhibitory effect on HBV replication. DN mutants with full length of VP22 had the strongest inhibitory effect on HBV replication, reducing the HBsAg concentration by 81.94%, and the HBV-DNA content by 72.30%. MTT assay suggested that there were no significant differences in cell metabolic activity between the groups.CONCLUSION: VP22-based DN mutant can inhibit HBV replication effectively.

  18. Farnesoid X Receptor Inhibits the Transcriptional Activity of Carbohydrate Response Element Binding Protein in Human Hepatocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, Sandrine; Huaman Samanez, Carolina; Dehondt, Hélène; Ploton, Maheul; Briand, Olivier; Lien, Fleur; Dorchies, Emilie; Dumont, Julie; Postic, Catherine; Cariou, Bertrand; Lefebvre, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    The glucose-activated transcription factor carbohydrate response element binding protein (ChREBP) induces the expression of hepatic glycolytic and lipogenic genes. The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a nuclear bile acid receptor controlling bile acid, lipid, and glucose homeostasis. FXR negatively regulates hepatic glycolysis and lipogenesis in mouse liver. The aim of this study was to determine whether FXR regulates the transcriptional activity of ChREBP in human hepatocytes and to unravel the underlying molecular mechanisms. Agonist-activated FXR inhibits glucose-induced transcription of several glycolytic genes, including the liver-type pyruvate kinase gene (L-PK), in the immortalized human hepatocyte (IHH) and HepaRG cell lines. This inhibition requires the L4L3 region of the L-PK promoter, known to bind the transcription factors ChREBP and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α). FXR interacts directly with ChREBP and HNF4α proteins. Analysis of the protein complex bound to the L4L3 region reveals the presence of ChREBP, HNF4α, FXR, and the transcriptional coactivators p300 and CBP at high glucose concentrations. FXR activation does not affect either FXR or HNF4α binding to the L4L3 region but does result in the concomitant release of ChREBP, p300, and CBP and in the recruitment of the transcriptional corepressor SMRT. Thus, FXR transrepresses the expression of genes involved in glycolysis in human hepatocytes. PMID:23530060

  19. Aspirin inhibits colon cancer cell and tumor growth and downregulates specificity protein (Sp transcription factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satya Pathi

    Full Text Available Acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin is highly effective for treating colon cancer patients postdiagnosis; however, the mechanisms of action of aspirin in colon cancer are not well defined. Aspirin and its major metabolite sodium salicylate induced apoptosis and decreased colon cancer cell growth and the sodium salt of aspirin also inhibited tumor growth in an athymic nude mouse xenograft model. Colon cancer cell growth inhibition was accompanied by downregulation of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 proteins and decreased expression of Sp-regulated gene products including bcl-2, survivin, VEGF, VEGFR1, cyclin D1, c-MET and p65 (NFκB. Moreover, we also showed by RNA interference that β-catenin, an important target of aspirin in some studies, is an Sp-regulated gene. Aspirin induced nuclear caspase-dependent cleavage of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 proteins and this response was related to sequestration of zinc ions since addition of zinc sulfate blocked aspirin-mediated apoptosis and repression of Sp proteins. The results demonstrate an important underlying mechanism of action of aspirin as an anticancer agent and, based on the rapid metabolism of aspirin to salicylate in humans and the high salicylate/aspirin ratios in serum, it is likely that the anticancer activity of aspirin is also due to the salicylate metabolite.

  20. Sodium arsenite induces chromosome endoreduplication and inhibits protein phosphatase activity in human fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rong-Nan Huang; I-Ching Ho; Ling-Hui Yih [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Taiwan (China)] [and others

    1995-08-01

    Arsenic, strongly associated with increased risks of human cancers, is a potent clastogen in a variety of mammalian cell systems. The effect of sodium arsenite (a trivalent arsenic compound) on chromatid separation was studied in human skin fibroblasts (HFW). Human fibroblasts were arrested in S phase by the aid of serum starvation and aphidicolin blocking and then these cells were allowed to synchronously progress into G2 phase. Treatment of the G2-enriched HFW cells with sodium arsenite (0-200 {mu}M) resulted in arrest of cells in the G2 phase, interference with mitotic division, inhibition of spindle assembly, and induction of chromosome endoreduplication in their second mitosis. Sodium arsenite treatment also inhibited the activities of serine/threonine protein phosphatases and enhanced phosphorylation levels of a small heat shock protein (HSP27). These results suggest that sodium arsenite may mimic okadaic acid to induce chromosome endoreduplication through its inhibitory effect on protein phosphatase activity. 61 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Isolation and characterization of two genes encoding polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein from Populus deltoides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins (PGIPs) are extracellular proteins that belong to the leucine-rich repeat (LRR) protein superfamily. PGIPs inhibit fungal polygalacturonases (PGs) and promote accumulation of oligogalacturonides, which activate plant defense responses. PGIPs play important roles in resistance to infection of pathogens. In this study, reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and RNA ligase-mediated rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RLM-RACE) were used to isolate the full-length PGIP cDNA from Populus deltoides (GenBank accession no. Of PdPGIP2 and PdPGIP4:EF684913 and EF684912). Domain analysis revealed that the deduced amino acid sequences of PdPGIP2 and PdPGIP4 had a typical POIP topology. Phylogenetic analysis of known PGIPs indicated that the two PdPGIPs were clustered to the defense-related PGIP clade. Using real-time RT-PCR, the expression patterns of the two PdPGIPs following treatment with a fungal pathogen and defense-related signaling molecules were studied. The expression levels of PdPGIP2 and PdPGIP4 were both up-regulated when inoculated with the phytopathogenic fungus Marssonina brunnea. Therefore, it was proposed that the two PGIPs might be involved in the resistance to Marssonina brunnea in P. Deltoides.

  2. AN INSIGHT INTO THE MOLECULAR STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION OF POLYGALACTURONASE INHIBITING PROTEIN (PGIP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anju Meshram

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Plants lack the system of circulating antibodies, thus defense mechanism in plants depends on the capability of recognition and interaction with the invading pathogenic microorganisms and neutralising their effect via specific interactions. The first barrier of defense in plants is the cell wall made up of pectin consisting of homogalacturonan, rhamnogalacturonan I and rhamnogalacturonan II. The major component of pectin is homogalacturonan. Pathogenic fungi secrete polygalacturonase (PG to degrade the homopolygalacturonan of cell wall. Thus plants have pathogenesis-related protein in the cell wall to neutralise the effect of PG known as polygalacturonase inhibiting protein (PGIP. The interaction between PGIP and PG is very specific and effective and differs in different pathogenic fungi and plant species due to the components of plant system. The article presents a critical review on the molecular association of PGIP with PG in nature. An insight has been provided for the use of PGIP in the extracellular localization of mature proteins, in the inhibition of fungal infection, as an elicitor of immune response in plants with great economic and agricultural importance across the world.

  3. Results of a screening programme to identify plants or plant extracts that inhibit ruminal protein degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selje, N; Hoffmann, E M; Muetzel, S; Ningrat, R; Wallace, R J; Becker, K

    2007-07-01

    One aim of the EC Framework V project, 'Rumen-up' (QLK5-CT-2001-00 992), was to find plants or plant extracts that would inhibit the nutritionally wasteful degradation of protein in the rumen. A total of 500 samples were screened in vitro using 14C-labelled casein in a 30-min incubation with ruminal digesta. Eight were selected for further investigation using a batch fermentation system and soya protein and bovine serum albumin as proteolysis substrates; proteolysis was monitored over 12 h by the disappearance of soluble protein and the production of branched SCFA and NH3. Freeze-dried, ground foliage of Peltiphyllum peltatum, Helianthemum canum, Arbutus unedo, Arctostaphylos uva-ursi and Knautia arvensis inhibited proteolysis (P fermentation. The effects showed some resemblance to those obtained in parallel incubations containing 3 mum-monensin, suggesting that K. arvensis may be a plant-derived feed additive that can suppress growth and activity of key proteolytic ruminal micro-organisms in a manner similar to that already well known for monensin.

  4. Spore germination of Trichoderma atroviride is inhibited by its LysM protein TAL6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidl-Seiboth, Verena; Zach, Simone; Frischmann, Alexa; Spadiut, Oliver; Dietzsch, Christian; Herwig, Christoph; Ruth, Claudia; Rodler, Agnes; Jungbauer, Alois; Kubicek, Christian P

    2013-03-01

    LysM motifs are carbohydrate-binding modules found in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. They have general N-acetylglucosamine binding properties and therefore bind to chitin and related carbohydrates. In plants, plasma-membrane-bound proteins containing LysM motifs are involved in plant defence responses, but also in symbiotic interactions between plants and microorganisms. Filamentous fungi secrete LysM proteins that contain several LysM motifs but no enzymatic modules. In plant pathogenic fungi, for LysM proteins roles in dampening of plant defence responses and protection from plant chitinases were shown. In this study, the carbohydrate-binding specificities and biological function of the LysM protein TAL6 from the plant-beneficial fungus Trichoderma atroviride were investigated. TAL6 contains seven LysM motifs and the sequences of its LysM motifs are very different from other fungal LysM proteins investigated so far. The results showed that TAL6 bound to some forms of polymeric chitin, but not to chito-oligosaccharides. Further, no binding to fungal cell wall preparations was detected. Despite these rather weak carbohydrate-binding properties, a strong inhibitory effect of TAL6 on spore germination was found. TAL6 was shown to specifically inhibit germination of Trichoderma spp., but interestingly not of other fungi. Thus, this protein is involved in self-signalling processes during fungal growth rather than fungal-plant interactions. These data expand the functional repertoire of fungal LysM proteins beyond effectors in plant defence responses and show that fungal LysM proteins are also involved in the self-regulation of fungal growth and development. © 2013 The Authors Journal compilation © 2013 FEBS.

  5. Rapamycin Inhibits Lymphatic Endothelial Cell Tube Formation by Downregulating Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor 3 Protein Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Luo

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR controls lymphangiogenesis. However, the underlying mechanism is not clear. Here we show that rapamycin suppressed insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1- or fetal bovine serum (FBS-stimulated lymphatic endothelial cell (LEC tube formation, an in vitro model of lymphangiogenesis. Expression of a rapamycin-resistant and kinase-active mTOR (S2035T, mTOR-T, but not a rapamycin-resistant and kinase-dead mTOR (S2035T/D2357E, mTOR-TE, conferred resistance to rapamycin inhibition of LEC tube formation, suggesting that rapamycin inhibition of LEC tube formation is mTOR kinase activity dependent. Also, rapamycin inhibited proliferation and motility in the LECs. Furthermore, we found that rapamycin inhibited protein expression of VEGF receptor 3 (VEGFR-3 by inhibiting protein synthesis and promoting protein degradation of VEGFR-3 in the cells. Down-regulation of VEGFR-3 mimicked the effect of rapamycin, inhibiting IGF-1- or FBS-stimulated tube formation, whereas over-expression of VEGFR-3 conferred high resistance to rapamycin inhibition of LEC tube formation. The results indicate that rapamycin inhibits LEC tube formation at least in part by downregulating VEGFR-3 protein expression.

  6. Structure and inhibition of the SARS coronavirus envelope protein ion channel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin Pervushin

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The envelope (E protein from coronaviruses is a small polypeptide that contains at least one alpha-helical transmembrane domain. Absence, or inactivation, of E protein results in attenuated viruses, due to alterations in either virion morphology or tropism. Apart from its morphogenetic properties, protein E has been reported to have membrane permeabilizing activity. Further, the drug hexamethylene amiloride (HMA, but not amiloride, inhibited in vitro ion channel activity of some synthetic coronavirus E proteins, and also viral replication. We have previously shown for the coronavirus species responsible for severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS-CoV that the transmembrane domain of E protein (ETM forms pentameric alpha-helical bundles that are likely responsible for the observed channel activity. Herein, using solution NMR in dodecylphosphatidylcholine micelles and energy minimization, we have obtained a model of this channel which features regular alpha-helices that form a pentameric left-handed parallel bundle. The drug HMA was found to bind inside the lumen of the channel, at both the C-terminal and the N-terminal openings, and, in contrast to amiloride, induced additional chemical shifts in ETM. Full length SARS-CoV E displayed channel activity when transiently expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK-293 cells in a whole-cell patch clamp set-up. This activity was significantly reduced by hexamethylene amiloride (HMA, but not by amiloride. The channel structure presented herein provides a possible rationale for inhibition, and a platform for future structure-based drug design of this potential pharmacological target.

  7. In silico analysis of the polygalacturonase inhibiting protein 1 from apple, Malus domestica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsaunyane, Lerato Bt; Oelofse, Dean; Dubery, Ian A

    2015-03-11

    The Malus domestica polygalacturonase inhibiting protein 1 (MdPGIP1) gene, encoding the M. domestica polygalacturonase inhibiting protein 1 (MdPGIP1), was isolated from the Granny Smith apple cultivar (GenBank accession no. DQ185063). The gene was used to transform tobacco and potato for enhanced resistance against fungal diseases. Analysis of the MdPGIP1 nucleotide sequence revealed that the gene comprises 993 nucleotides that encode a 330 amino acid polypeptide. In silico characterization of the MdPGIP1 polypeptide revealed domains typical of PGIP proteins, which include a 24 amino acid putative signal peptide, a potential cleavage site [Alanine-Leucine-Serine (ALS)] for the signal peptide, a 238 amino acid leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain, a 46 amino acid N-terminal domain and a 22 amino acid C-terminal domain. The hydropathic evaluation of MdPGIP1 indicated a repetitive hydrophobic motif in the LRR domain and a hydrophilic surface area consistent with a globular protein. The typical consensus glycosylation sequence of Asn-X-Ser/Thr was identified in MdPGIP1, indicating potential N-linked glycosylation of MdPGIP1. The molecular mass of non-glycosylated MdPGIP1 was calculated as 36.615 kDa and the theoretical isoelectric point as 6.98. Furthermore, the secondary and tertiary structure of MdPGIP1 was modelled, and revealed that MdPGIP1 is a curved and elongated molecule that contains sheet B1, sheet B2 and 310-helices on its LRR domain. The overall properties of the MdPGIP1 protein is similar to that of the prototypical Phaseolus vulgaris PGIP 2 (PvPGIP2), and the detected differences supported its use in biotechnological applications as an inhibitor of targeted fungal polygalacturonases (PGs).

  8. Leptin inhibits proliferation of breast cancer cells at supraphysiological concentrations by inhibiting mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weichhaus, Michael; Broom, John; Wahle, Klaus; Bermano, Giovanna

    2014-07-01

    Leptin is a hormone secreted by white fat tissue and signals the amount of overall body fat to the hypothalamus. The circulating concentration of leptin correlates with the level of obesity. Breast cancer risk is higher in obese postmenopausal women compared with postmenopausal women of a normal weight, and high leptin concentrations may contribute to this risk. In the present study, SK-BR-3 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines were treated with various concentrations (6.25-1,600 ng/ml) of recombinant leptin and changes in cell proliferation were assessed. The SK-BR-3 breast cancer cells exhibited a concentration-dependent increase in proliferation with physiological leptin concentrations (100 ng/ml) was observed. Cell proliferation was not affected at supraphysiological leptin concentrations (>800 ng/ml) in SK-BR-3 cells, whereas it decreased in MDA-MB-231 cells. Therefore, cell signaling and cell cycle changes were assessed at supraphysiological concentrations (1,600 ng/ml). In the two cell lines, leptin treatment decreased the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cell signaling pathway activation. Leptin treatment did not increase Akt phosphorylation or significantly alter the cell population distribution across cell cycle stages. To the best of our knowledge, leptin-induced growth inhibition of breast cancer cells at supraphysiological concentrations has not been reported in the literature to date, and the findings of this study suggest that reduced MAPK activity may be the underlying cause. Thus, the effect of leptin on breast cancer growth warrants further investigation since leptin is considered to be one of the main mediators in the obesity-breast cancer connection.

  9. P body-associated protein Mov10 inhibits HIV-1 replication at multiple stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdick, Ryan; Smith, Jessica L; Chaipan, Chawaree; Friew, Yeshitila; Chen, Jianbo; Venkatachari, Narasimhan J; Delviks-Frankenberry, Krista A; Hu, Wei-Shau; Pathak, Vinay K

    2010-10-01

    Recent studies have shown that APOBEC3G (A3G), a potent inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication, is localized to cytoplasmic mRNA-processing bodies (P bodies). However, the functional relevance of A3G colocalization with P body marker proteins has not been established. To explore the relationship between HIV-1, A3G, and P bodies, we analyzed the effects of overexpression of P body marker proteins Mov10, DCP1a, and DCP2 on HIV-1 replication. Our results show that overexpression of Mov10, a putative RNA helicase that was previously reported to belong to the DExD superfamily and was recently reported to belong to the Upf1-like group of helicases, but not the decapping enzymes DCP1a and DCP2, leads to potent inhibition of HIV-1 replication at multiple stages. Mov10 overexpression in the virus producer cells resulted in reductions in the steady-state levels of the HIV-1 Gag protein and virus production; Mov10 was efficiently incorporated into virions and reduced virus infectivity, in part by inhibiting reverse transcription. In addition, A3G and Mov10 overexpression reduced proteolytic processing of HIV-1 Gag. The inhibitory effects of A3G and Mov10 were additive, implying a lack of functional interaction between the two inhibitors. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of endogenous Mov10 by 80% resulted in a 2-fold reduction in virus production but no discernible impact on the infectivity of the viruses after normalization for the p24 input, suggesting that endogenous Mov10 was not required for viral infectivity. Overall, these results show that Mov10 can potently inhibit HIV-1 replication at multiple stages.

  10. Rational design of allosteric-inhibition sites in classical protein tyrosine phosphatases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chio, Cynthia M.; Yu, Xiaoling; Bishop, Anthony C.

    2015-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), which catalyze the dephosphorylation of phosphotyrosine in protein substrates, are critical regulators of metazoan cell signaling and have emerged as potential drug targets for a range of human diseases. Strategies for chemically targeting the function of individual PTPs selectively could serve to elucidate the signaling roles of these enzymes and would potentially expedite validation of the therapeutic promise of PTP inhibitors. Here we report a novel strategy for the design of non-natural allosteric-inhibition sites in PTPs; these sites, which can be introduced into target PTPs through protein engineering, serve to sensitize target PTPs to potent and selective inhibition by a biarsenical small molecule. Building on the recent discovery of a naturally occurring cryptic allosteric site in wild-type Src-homology-2 domain containing PTP (Shp2) that can be targeted by biarsenical compounds, we hypothesized that Shp2’s unusual sensitivity to biarsenicals could be strengthened through rational design and that the Shp2-specific site could serve as a blueprint for the introduction of non-natural inhibitor sensitivity in other PTPs. Indeed, we show here that the strategic introduction of a cysteine residue at a position removed from the Shp2 active site can serve to increase the potency and selectivity of the interaction between Shp2’s allosteric site and the biarsenical inhibitor. Moreover, we find that “Shp2-like” allosteric sites can be installed de novo in PTP enzymes that do not possess naturally occurring sensitivity to biarsenical compounds. Using primary-sequence alignments to guide our enzyme engineering, we have successfully introduced allosteric-inhibition sites in four classical PTPs—PTP1B, PTPH-1, FAP-1, and HePTP—from four different PTP subfamilies, suggesting that our sensitization approach can likely be applied widely across the classical PTP family to generate biarsenical-responsive PTPs. PMID:25828055

  11. Inhibition of ER stress and unfolding protein response pathways causes skeletal muscle wasting during cancer cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, Kyle R; Gallot, Yann S; Sato, Shuichi; Xiong, Guangyan; Hindi, Sajedah M; Kumar, Ashok

    2016-09-01

    Cachexia is a devastating syndrome that causes morbidity and mortality in a large number of patients with cancer. However, the mechanisms of cancer cachexia remain poorly understood. Accumulation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) causes stress. The ER responds to this stress through activating certain pathways commonly known as the unfolding protein response (UPR). The main function of UPR is to restore homeostasis, but excessive or prolonged activation of UPR can lead to pathologic conditions. In this study, we examined the role of ER stress and UPR in regulation of skeletal muscle mass in naïve conditions and during cancer cachexia. Our results demonstrate that multiple markers of ER stress are highly activated in skeletal muscle of Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) and Apc(Min/+) mouse models of cancer cachexia. Treatment of mice with 4-phenylbutyrate (4-PBA), a chemical chaperon and a potent inhibitor of ER stress, significantly reduced skeletal muscle strength and mass in both control and LLC-bearing mice. Blocking the UPR also increased the proportion of fast-type fibers in soleus muscle of both control and LLC-bearing mice. Inhibition of UPR reduced the activity of Akt/mTOR pathway and increased the expression of the components of the ubiquitin-proteasome system and autophagy in LLC-bearing mice. Moreover, we found that the inhibition of UPR causes severe atrophy in cultured myotubes. Our study provides initial evidence that ER stress and UPR pathways are essential for maintaining skeletal muscle mass and strength and for protection against cancer cachexia.-Bohnert, K. R., Gallot, Y. S., Sato, S., Xiong, G., Hindi, S. M., Kumar, A. Inhibition of ER stress and unfolding protein response pathways causes skeletal muscle wasting during cancer cachexia.

  12. Discovery of Small Molecules that Inhibit the Disordered Protein, p27Kip1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iconaru, Luigi I.; Ban, David; Bharatham, Kavitha; Ramanathan, Arvind; Zhang, Weixing; Shelat, Anang A.; Zuo, Jian; Kriwacki, Richard W.

    2015-01-01

    Disordered proteins are highly prevalent in biological systems, they control myriad signaling and regulatory processes, and their levels and/or cellular localization are often altered in human disease. In contrast to folded proteins, disordered proteins, due to conformational heterogeneity and dynamics, are not considered viable drug targets. We challenged this paradigm by identifying through NMR-based screening small molecules that bound specifically, albeit weakly, to the disordered cell cycle regulator, p27Kip1 (p27). Two groups of molecules bound to sites created by transient clusters of aromatic residues within p27. Conserved chemical features within these two groups of small molecules exhibited complementarity to their binding sites within p27, establishing structure-activity relationships for small molecule:disordered protein interactions. Finally, one compound counteracted the Cdk2/cyclin A inhibitory function of p27 in vitro, providing proof-of-principle that small molecules can inhibit the function of a disordered protein (p27) through sequestration in a conformation incapable of folding and binding to a natural regulatory target (Cdk2/cyclin A). PMID:26507530

  13. Schisandrae fructus enhances myogenic differentiation and inhibits atrophy through protein synthesis in human myotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Cy Hyun; Shin, Jin-Hong; Hwang, Sung Jun; Choi, Yung Hyun; Kim, Dae-Seong; Kim, Cheol Min

    2016-01-01

    Schisandrae fructus (SF) has recently been reported to increase skeletal muscle mass and inhibit atrophy in mice. We investigated the effect of SF extract on human myotube differentiation and its acting pathway. Various concentrations (0.1–10 μg/mL) of SF extract were applied on human skeletal muscle cells in vitro. Myotube area and fusion index were measured to quantify myotube differentiation. The maximum effect was observed at 0.5 μg/mL of SF extract, enhancing differentiation up to 1.4-fold in fusion index and 1.6-fold in myotube area at 8 days after induction of differentiation compared to control. Phosphorylation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 and 70 kDa ribosomal protein S6 kinase, which initiate translation as downstream of mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, was upregulated in early phases of differentiation after SF treatment. SF also attenuated dexamethasone-induced atrophy. In conclusion, we show that SF augments myogenic differentiation and attenuates atrophy by increasing protein synthesis through mammalian target of rapamycin/70 kDa ribosomal protein S6 kinase and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 signaling pathway in human myotubes. SF can be a useful natural dietary supplement in increasing skeletal muscle mass, especially in the aged with sarcopenia and the patients with disuse atrophy. PMID:27330287

  14. Galectin-3 Binding Protein Secreted by Breast Cancer Cells Inhibits Monocyte-Derived Fibrocyte Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Michael J V; Roife, David; Gomer, Richard H

    2015-08-15

    To metastasize, tumor cells often need to migrate through a layer of collagen-containing scar tissue which encapsulates the tumor. A key component of scar tissue and fibrosing diseases is the monocyte-derived fibrocyte, a collagen-secreting profibrotic cell. To test the hypothesis that invasive tumor cells may block the formation of the fibrous sheath, we determined whether tumor cells secrete factors that inhibit monocyte-derived fibrocyte differentiation. We found that the human metastatic breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 secretes activity that inhibits human monocyte-derived fibrocyte differentiation, whereas less aggressive breast cancer cell lines secrete less of this activity. Purification indicated that Galectin-3 binding protein (LGALS3BP) is the active factor. Recombinant LGALS3BP inhibits monocyte-derived fibrocyte differentiation, and immunodepletion of LGALS3BP from MDA-MB 231 conditioned media removes the monocyte-derived fibrocyte differentiation-inhibiting activity. LGALS3BP inhibits the differentiation of monocyte-derived fibrocytes from wild-type mouse spleen cells, but not from SIGN-R1(-/-) mouse spleen cells, suggesting that CD209/SIGN-R1 is required for the LGALS3BP effect. Galectin-3 and galectin-1, binding partners of LGALS3BP, potentiate monocyte-derived fibrocyte differentiation. In breast cancer biopsies, increased levels of tumor cell-associated LGALS3BP were observed in regions of the tumor that were invading the surrounding stroma. These findings suggest LGALS3BP and galectin-3 as new targets to treat metastatic cancer and fibrosing diseases.

  15. Inhibition of protein synthesis on the ribosome by tildipirosin compared with other veterinary macrolides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Niels Møller; Poehlsgaard, Jacob; Warrass, Ralf; Douthwaite, Stephen

    2012-11-01

    Tildipirosin is a 16-membered-ring macrolide developed to treat bacterial pathogens, including Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida, that cause respiratory tract infections in cattle and swine. Here we evaluated the efficacy of tildipirosin at inhibiting protein synthesis on the ribosome (50% inhibitory concentration [IC(50)], 0.23 ± 0.01 μM) and compared it with the established veterinary macrolides tylosin, tilmicosin, and tulathromycin. Mutation and methylation at key rRNA nucleotides revealed differences in the interactions of these macrolides within their common ribosomal binding site.

  16. How anacetrapib inhibits the activity of the cholesteryl ester transfer protein? Perspective through atomistic simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aijanen, T.; Koivuniemi, A.; Javanainen, M.

    2014-01-01

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) mediates the reciprocal transfer of neutral lipids (cholesteryl esters, triglycerides) and phospholipids between different lipoprotein fractions in human blood plasma. A novel molecular agent known as anacetrapib has been shown to inhibit CETP activity...... of anacetrapib turns out to reside in the tunnel inside CETP, near the residues surrounding the N-terminal opening. Free energy calculations show that when anacetrapib resides in this area, it hinders the ability of cholesteryl ester to diffuse out from CETP. The simulations further bring out the ability...

  17. Chloroquine inhibits accessory cell presentation of soluble natural and synthetic protein antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, S; Werdelin, O

    1984-01-01

    was time- and dose-dependent. A brief treatment solely of the accessory cells with the drug compromised their ability to stimulate primed T cells in a subsequent culture provided the accessory cells were treated with chloroquine before their exposure to the antigen. These results suggest that chloroquine......We have studied the in vitro effect of the lysosomotrophic agent, chloroquine, on the presentation of soluble protein antigens by guinea pig accessory cells. Chloroquine inhibited the capacity of antigen-pulsed accessory cells to stimulate proliferation in appropriately primed T cells. The effect...

  18. An Engineered Arginase FC Protein Inhibits Tumor Growth In Vitro and In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihua Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Arginine is a semiessential amino acid required for the growth of melanoma and hepatocellular carcinoma, and the enzymatic removal of arginine by pegylated arginine deiminase (ADI or arginase is being tested clinically. Here, we report a genetically engineered arginase FC fusion protein exhibiting a prolonged half-life and enhanced efficacy. The use of this enzyme to treat different tumor lines both inhibited cell proliferation and impaired cellular migration in vitro and in vivo. Our data reinforce the hypothesis that nutritional depletion is a key strategy for cancer treatment.

  19. Phyllostachys edulis compounds inhibit palmitic acid-induced monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1 production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason K Higa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Phyllostachys edulis Carriere (Poaceae is a bamboo species that is part of the traditional Chinese medicine pharmacopoeia. Compounds and extracts from this species have shown potential applications towards several diseases. One of many complications found in obesity and diabetes is the link between elevated circulatory free fatty acids (FFAs and chronic inflammation. This study aims to present a possible application of P. edulis extract in relieving inflammation caused by FFAs. Monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1/CCL2 is a pro-inflammatory cytokine implicated in chronic inflammation. Nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB and activator protein 1 (AP-1 are transcription factors activated in response to inflammatory stimuli, and upregulate pro-inflammatory cytokines such as MCP-1. This study examines the effect of P. edulis extract on cellular production of MCP-1 and on the NF-κB and AP-1 pathways in response to treatment with palmitic acid (PA, a FFA. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: MCP-1 protein was measured by cytometric bead assay. NF-κB and AP-1 nuclear localization was detected by colorimetric DNA-binding ELISA. Relative MCP-1 mRNA was measured by real-time quantitative PCR. Murine cells were treated with PA to induce inflammation. PA increased expression of MCP-1 mRNA and protein, and increased nuclear localization of NF-κB and AP-1. Adding bamboo extract (BEX inhibited the effects of PA, reduced MCP-1 production, and inhibited nuclear translocation of NF-κB and AP-1 subunits. Compounds isolated from BEX inhibited MCP-1 secretion with different potencies. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: PA induced MCP-1 production in murine adipose, muscle, and liver cells. BEX ameliorated PA-induced production of MCP-1 by inhibiting nuclear translocation of NF-κB and AP-1. Two O-methylated flavones were isolated from BEX with functional effects on MCP-1 production. These results may represent a possible

  20. The host antimicrobial peptide Bac71-35 binds to bacterial ribosomal proteins and inhibits protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardirossian, Mario; Grzela, Renata; Giglione, Carmela; Meinnel, Thierry; Gennaro, Renato; Mergaert, Peter; Scocchi, Marco

    2014-12-18

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are molecules from innate immunity with high potential as novel anti-infective agents. Most of them inactivate bacteria through pore formation or membrane barrier disruption, but others cross the membrane without damages and act inside the cells, affecting vital processes. However, little is known about their intracellular bacterial targets. Here we report that Bac71-35, a proline-rich AMP belonging to the cathelicidin family, can reach high concentrations (up to 340 μM) inside the E. coli cytoplasm. The peptide specifically and completely inhibits in vitro translation in the micromolar concentration range. Experiments of incorporation of radioactive precursors in macromolecules with E. coli cells confirmed that Bac71-35 affects specifically protein synthesis. Ribosome coprecipitation and crosslinking assays showed that the peptide interacts with ribosomes, binding to a limited subset of ribosomal proteins. Overall, these results indicate that the killing mechanism of Bac71-35 is based on a specific block of protein synthesis.

  1. Small heat shock proteins inhibit amyloid-beta protein aggregation and cerebrovascular amyloid-beta protein toxicity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilhelmus, M.M.; Boelens, W.C.; Otte-Holler, I.; Kamps, B.; Waal, R.M.W. de; Verbeek, M.M.

    2006-01-01

    Small heat shock proteins Hsp20 and HspB2/B3 co-localize with Abeta deposition in senile plaques and cerebral amyloid angiopathy in Alzheimer's disease brains, respectively. It was the aim of our study to investigate if these and other sHsps bind to wild-type Abeta1-42 or the more toxic Abeta1-40

  2. A viral suppressor protein inhibits host RNA silencing by hooking up with Argonautes

    KAUST Repository

    Jin, Hailing

    2010-05-01

    RNA viruses are particularly vulnerable to RNAi-based defenses in the host, and thus have evolved specific proteins, known as viral suppressors of RNA silencing (VSRs), as a counterdefense. In this issue of Genes & Development, Azevedo and colleagues (pp. 904-915) discovered that P38, the VSR of Turnip crinkle virus, uses its glycine/tryptophane (GW) motifs as an ARGONAUTE (AGO) hook to attract and disarm the host\\'s essential effector of RNA silencing. Several GW motif-containing cellular proteins are known to be important partners of AGOs in RNA silencing effector complexes in yeast, plants, and animals. The GW motif appears to be a versatile and effective tool for regulating the activities of RNA silencing pathways, and the use of GW mimicry to compete for and inhibit host AGOs may be a strategy used by many pathogens to counteract host RNAi-based defenses. © 2010 by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  3. Inhibition of beta cell growth and function by bone morphogenetic proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Christine; Christensen, Gitte Lund; Jacobsen, Marie L B

    2014-01-01

    of diabetes, there is an increase in the expression of inhibitory factors that prevent the beta cells from adapting to the increased need for insulin. We evaluated the effects of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) 2 and -4 on beta cells. METHODS: The effects of BMP2 and -4 on beta cell proliferation, apoptosis......: BMP2 and -4 were found to inhibit basal as well as growth factor-stimulated proliferation of primary beta cells from rats and mice. Bmp2 and Bmp4 mRNA and protein were expressed in islets and regulated by inflammatory cytokines. Neutralisation of endogenous BMP activity resulted in enhanced....../INTERPRETATION: These data show that BMP2 and -4 exert inhibitory actions on beta cells in vitro and suggest that BMPs exert regulatory roles of beta cell growth and function....

  4. Inhibition of HIV-1 replication by balsamin, a ribosome inactivating protein of Momordica balsamina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Inderdeep; Puri, Munish; Ahmed, Zahra; Blanchet, Fabien P; Mangeat, Bastien; Piguet, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) are endowed with several medicinal properties, including antiviral activity. We demonstrate here that the recently identified type I RIP from Momordica balsamina also possesses antiviral activity, as determined by viral growth curve assays and single-round infection experiments. Importantly, this activity is at play even as doses where the RIP has no cytotoxic effect. In addition, balsamin inhibits HIV-1 replication not only in T cell lines but also in human primary CD4(+) T cells. This antiviral compound exerts its activity at a viral replicative step occurring later than reverse-transcription, most likely on viral protein translation, prior to viral budding and release. Finally, we demonstrate that balsamin antiviral activity is broad since it also impedes influenza virus replication. Altogether our results demonstrate that type I RIP can exert a potent anti-HIV-1 activity which paves the way for new therapeutic avenues for the treatment of viral infections.

  5. Kinetics of radiation-induced apoptosis in neonatal urogenital tissues with and without protein synthesis inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gobe, G.C.; Harmon, B.; Schoch, E.; Allan, D.J. [Queensland Univ., St. Lucia, QLD (Australia). Dept. of Chemistry

    1996-12-31

    The difference in incidence of radiation-induced apoptosis between two neonatal urogenital tissues, kidney and testis, was analysed over a 24h period. Concurrent administration of cycloheximide (10mg/kg body weight), a protein synthesis inhibitor, with radiation treatment was used to determine whether new protein synthesis had a role in induction of apoptosis in this in vivo model. Many chemotherapeutic drugs act via protein synthesis inhibition, and we believe that the results of this latter analysis may provide information for the planning of concurrent radio and chemotherapy. Apoptosis was quantified using morphological parameters, and verified by DNA gel electrophoresis for the typical banding pattern, and by electron microscopy. The proliferative index in tissues was studied, using [6-{sup 3}H]-thymidine uptake ( 1h prior to euthanasia and collection of tissues) and autoradiography as indicators of cell proliferation (S-phase). Tissue was collected 2, 4, 6, 8, and 24h after radiation treatment. Expression of one of the apoptosis-associated genes, Bcl-2 (an apoptosis inhibitor/cell survival gene), was studied using immunohistochemistry. Apoptosis peaked at 4h in the testis and 6h in the kidney, emphasising the necessity of knowing tissue differences in radiation response if comparing changes at a particular time. A higher proportion (almost five fold) of the apoptotic cells died in S-phase in the kidney than the testis, over the 24h. Protein synthesis inhibition completely negated induction of apoptosis in both tissues. Necrosis was not identified at any time. Cycloheximide treatment greatly diminished Bcl-2 expression. The differences in response of the two tissues to irradiation relates to their innate cell (genetic) controls, which may be determined by their state of differentiation at time of treatment, or the tissue type. This in vivo study also suggests the model may be useful for analysis of other cancer therapies for example polychemotherapies or chemo

  6. The feed contaminant deoxynivalenol affects the intestinal barrier permeability through inhibition of protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Wageha A; Zentek, Jürgen

    2015-06-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) has critical health effects if the contaminated grains consumed by humans or animals. DON can have negative effects on the active transport of glucose and amino acids in the small intestine of chickens. As the underlying mechanisms are not fully elucidated, the present study was performed to delineate more precisely the effects of cycloheximide (protein synthesis inhibitor, CHX) and DON on the intestinal absorption of nutrients. This was to confirm whether DON effects on nutrient absorption are due to an inhibition of protein synthesis. Changes in ion transport and barrier function were assessed by short-circuit current (Isc) and transepithelial ion conductance (Gt) in Ussing chambers. Addition of D-glucose or L-glutamine to the luminal side of the isolated mucosa of the jejunum increased (P < 0.001) the Isc compared with basal conditions in the control tissues. However, the Isc was not increased by the glucose or glutamine addition after pre-incubation of tissues with DON or CHX. Furthermore, both DON and CHX reduced Gt, indicating that the intestinal barrier is compromised and consequently induced a greater impairment of the barrier function. The remarkable similarity between the activity of CHX and DON on nutrient uptake is consistent with their common ability to inhibit protein synthesis. It can be concluded that the decreases in transport activity by CHX was evident in this study using the chicken as experimental model. Similarly, DON has negative effects on the active transport of some nutrients, and these can be explained by its influence on protein synthesis.

  7. Mammalian Tead proteins regulate cell proliferation and contact inhibition as transcriptional mediators of Hippo signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Mitsunori; Sasaki, Hiroshi

    2008-12-01

    Regulation of organ size is important for development and tissue homeostasis. In Drosophila, Hippo signaling controls organ size by regulating the activity of a TEAD transcription factor, Scalloped, through modulation of its co-activator protein Yki. Here, we show that mouse Tead proteins regulate cell proliferation by mediating Hippo signaling. In NIH3T3 cells, cell density and Hippo signaling regulated the activity of endogenous Tead proteins by modulating nuclear localization of a Yki homolog, Yap1, and the resulting change in Tead activity altered cell proliferation. Tead2-VP16 mimicked Yap1 overexpression, including increased cell proliferation, reduced cell death, promotion of EMT, lack of cell contact inhibition and promotion of tumor formation. Growth-promoting activities of various Yap1 mutants correlated with their Tead-co-activator activities. Tead2-VP16 and Yap1 regulated largely overlapping sets of genes. However, only a few of the Tead/Yap1-regulated genes in NIH3T3 cells were affected in Tead1(-/-);Tead2(-/-) or Yap1(-/-) embryos. Most of the previously identified Yap1-regulated genes were not affected in NIH3T3 cells or mutant mice. In embryos, levels of nuclear Yap1 and Tead1 varied depending on cell type. Strong nuclear accumulation of Yap1 and Tead1 were seen in myocardium, correlating with requirements of Tead1 for proliferation. However, their distribution did not always correlate with proliferation. Taken together, mammalian Tead proteins regulate cell proliferation and contact inhibition as a transcriptional mediator of Hippo signaling, but the mechanisms by which Tead/Yap1 regulate cell proliferation differ depending on the cell type, and Tead, Yap1 and Hippo signaling may play multiple roles in mouse embryos.

  8. Growth-arrest-specific protein 2 inhibits cell division in Xenopus embryos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Growth-arrest-specific 2 gene was originally identified in murine fibroblasts under growth arrest conditions. Furthermore, serum stimulation of quiescent, non-dividing cells leads to the down-regulation of gas2 and results in re-entry into the cell cycle. Cytoskeleton rearrangements are critical for cell cycle progression and cell division and the Gas2 protein has been shown to co-localize with actin and microtubules in interphase mammalian cells. Despite these findings, direct evidence supporting a role for Gas2 in the mechanism of cell division has not been reported. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To determine whether the Gas2 protein plays a role in cell division, we over-expressed the full-length Gas2 protein and Gas2 truncations containing either the actin-binding CH domain or the tubulin-binding Gas2 domain in Xenopus laevis embryos. We found that both the full-length Gas2 protein and the Gas2 domain, but not the CH domain, inhibited cell division and resulted in multinucleated cells. The observation that Gas2 domain alone can arrest cell division suggests that Gas2 function is mediated by microtubule binding. Gas2 co-localized with microtubules at the cell cortex of Gas2-injected Xenopus embryos using cryo-confocal microscopy and co-sedimented with microtubules in cytoskeleton co-sedimentation assays. To investigate the mechanism of Gas2-induced cell division arrest, we showed, using a wound-induced contractile array assay, that Gas2 stabilized microtubules. Finally, electron microscopy studies demonstrated that Gas2 bundled microtubules into higher-order structures. CONCLUSION AND SIGNIFICANCE: Our experiments show that Gas2 inhibits cell division in Xenopus embryos. We propose that Gas2 function is mediated by binding and bundling microtubules, leading to cell division arrest.

  9. Andrographolide inhibits hepatoma cells growth and affects the expression of cell cycle related proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Kai-Kai; Liu, Tian-Yu; Xu, Chong; Ji, Li-Li; Wang, Zheng-Tao

    2009-09-01

    The present study is aimed to investigate the toxic effects of andrographolide (Andro) on hepatoma cells and elucidate its preliminary mechanisms. After cells were treated with different concentrations of Andro (0-50 micromol x L(-1)) for 24 h, cell viability was evaluated with 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl) 2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Furthermore, after hepatoma cells (Hep3B and HepG2) were treated with different concentrations of Andro (0-30 micromol x L(-1)) for 14 d, the number of colony formation was accounted under microscope. Cell cycle related proteins such as Cdc-2, phosphorylated-Cdc-2, Cyclin B and Cyclin D1 were detected with Western blotting assay and the cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry using propidium iodide staining. MTT results showed that Andro induced growth inhibition of hepatoma cells in a concentration-dependent manner but had no significant effects on human normal liver L-02 cells. Andro dramatically decreased the colony formation of hepatoma cells in the concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, Andro induced a decrease of Hep3B cells at the G0-G1 phase and a concomitant accumulation of cells at G2-M phase. At the molecular level, Western blotting results showed that Andro decreased the expression of Cdc-2, phosphorylated-Cdc-2, Cyclin D1 and Cyclin B proteins in a time-dependent manner, which are all cell cycle related proteins. Taken together, the results demonstrated that Andro specifically inhibited the growth of hepatoma cells and cellular cell cycle related proteins were possibly involved in this process.

  10. Carboxy terminus of heat shock protein (HSP) 70-interacting protein (CHIP) inhibits HSP70 in the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bijun; Sun, Guocheng; Feng, Guanli; Duan, Weixun; Zhu, Xiaoling; Chen, Shaoyang; Hou, Lichao; Jin, Zhenxiao; Yi, Dinghua

    2012-12-01

    Heat shock protein (HSP) 70 plays a critical role in protecting the heart from various stressor-induced cell injuries; the mechanism remains to be further understood. The present study aims to elucidate the effect of a probiotics-derived protein, LGG-derived protein p75 (LGP), in alleviating the ischemia/reperfusion (I/R)-induced heart injury. We treated rats with the I/R with or without preadministration with LGP. The levels of HSP70 and carboxy terminus of HSP70-interacting protein (CHIP) in the heart tissue were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Western blotting. The effect of CHIP on suppression of HSP70 and the effect of LGP on suppression of CHIP were investigated with an I/R rat model and a cell culture model. The results showed that I/R-induced infarction in the heart could be alleviated by pretreatment with LGP. HSP70 was detected in naïve rat heart tissue extracts. I/R treatment significantly suppressed the level of HSP70 and increased the levels of CHIP in the heart. A complex of CHIP/HSP70 was detected in heart tissue extracts. The addition of recombinant CHIP to culture inhibited HSP70 in heart cells. LGP was bound CHIP in heart cells and prevented the CHIP from binding HSP70. In summary, I/R can suppress HSP70 and increase CHIP in heart cells. CHIP can suppress HSP70 that can be prevented by pretreatment with LGP. The results imply that CHIP may be a potential target in the prevention of I/R-induced heart cell injury.

  11. The Cellular Prion Protein Prevents Copper-Induced Inhibition of P2X4 Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramón A. Lorca

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the physiological function of the cellular prion protein (PrPC remains unknown, several evidences support the notion of its role in copper homeostasis. PrPC binds Cu2+ through a domain composed by four to five repeats of eight amino acids. Previously, we have shown that the perfusion of this domain prevents and reverses the inhibition by Cu2+ of the adenosine triphosphate (ATP-evoked currents in the P2X4 receptor subtype, highlighting a modulatory role for PrPC in synaptic transmission through regulation of Cu2+ levels. Here, we study the effect of full-length PrPC in Cu2+ inhibition of P2X4 receptor when both are coexpressed. PrPC expression does not significantly change the ATP concentration-response curve in oocytes expressing P2X4 receptors. However, the presence of PrPC reduces the inhibition by Cu2+ of the ATP-elicited currents in these oocytes, confirming our previous observations with the Cu2+ binding domain. Thus, our observations suggest a role for PrPC in modulating synaptic activity through binding of extracellular Cu2+.

  12. The Cladosporium fulvum virulence protein Avr2 inhibits host proteases required for basal defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Esse, H Peter; Van't Klooster, John W; Bolton, Melvin D; Yadeta, Koste A; van Baarlen, Peter; Boeren, Sjef; Vervoort, Jacques; de Wit, Pierre J G M; Thomma, Bart P H J

    2008-07-01

    Cladosporium fulvum (syn. Passalora fulva) is a biotrophic fungal pathogen that causes leaf mold of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). During growth in the apoplast, the fungus establishes disease by secreting effector proteins, 10 of which have been characterized. We have previously shown that the Avr2 effector interacts with the apoplastic tomato Cys protease Rcr3, which is required for Cf-2-mediated immunity. We now show that Avr2 is a genuine virulence factor of C. fulvum. Heterologous expression of Avr2 in Arabidopsis thaliana causes enhanced susceptibility toward extracellular fungal pathogens, including Botrytis cinerea and Verticillium dahliae, and microarray analysis showed that Avr2 expression triggers a global transcriptome reflecting pathogen challenge. Cys protease activity profiling showed that Avr2 inhibits multiple extracellular Arabidopsis Cys proteases. In tomato, Avr2 expression caused enhanced susceptibility toward Avr2-defective C. fulvum strains and also toward B. cinerea and V. dahliae. Cys protease activity profiling in tomato revealed that, in this plant also, Avr2 inhibits multiple extracellular Cys proteases, including Rcr3 and its close relative Pip1. Finally, silencing of Avr2 significantly compromised C. fulvum virulence on tomato. We conclude that Avr2 is a genuine virulence factor of C. fulvum that inhibits several Cys proteases required for plant basal defense.

  13. Alzheimer's associated β-amyloid protein inhibits influenza A virus and modulates viral interactions with phagocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitchell R White

    Full Text Available Accumulation of β-Amyloid (βA is a key pathogenetic factor in Alzheimer's disease; however, the normal function of βA is unknown. Recent studies have shown that βA can inhibit growth of bacteria and fungi. In this paper we show that βA also inhibits replication of seasonal and pandemic strains of H3N2 and H1N1 influenza A virus (IAV in vitro. The 42 amino acid fragment of βA (βA42 had greater activity than the 40 amino acid fragment. Direct incubation of the virus with βA42 was needed to achieve optimal inhibition. Using quantitative PCR assays βA42 was shown to reduce viral uptake by epithelial cells after 45 minutes and to reduce supernatant virus at 24 hours post infection. βA42 caused aggregation of IAV particles as detected by light transmission assays and electron and confocal microscopy. βA42 did not stimulate neutrophil H2O2 production or extracellular trap formation on its own, but it increased both responses stimulated by IAV. In addition, βA42 increased uptake of IAV by neutrophils. βA42 reduced viral protein synthesis in monocytes and reduced IAV-induced interleukin-6 production by these cells. Hence, we demonstrate for the first time that βA has antiviral activity and modulates viral interactions with phagocytes.

  14. The Cellular Prion Protein Prevents Copper-Induced Inhibition of P2X4 Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorca, Ramón A.; Varela-Nallar, Lorena; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.; Huidobro-Toro, J. Pablo

    2011-01-01

    Although the physiological function of the cellular prion protein (PrPC) remains unknown, several evidences support the notion of its role in copper homeostasis. PrPC binds Cu2+ through a domain composed by four to five repeats of eight amino acids. Previously, we have shown that the perfusion of this domain prevents and reverses the inhibition by Cu2+ of the adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-evoked currents in the P2X4 receptor subtype, highlighting a modulatory role for PrPC in synaptic transmission through regulation of Cu2+ levels. Here, we study the effect of full-length PrPC in Cu2+ inhibition of P2X4 receptor when both are coexpressed. PrPC expression does not significantly change the ATP concentration-response curve in oocytes expressing P2X4 receptors. However, the presence of PrPC reduces the inhibition by Cu2+ of the ATP-elicited currents in these oocytes, confirming our previous observations with the Cu2+ binding domain. Thus, our observations suggest a role for PrPC in modulating synaptic activity through binding of extracellular Cu2+. PMID:22114745

  15. Immunotoxin targeting glypican-3 regresses liver cancer via dual inhibition of Wnt signalling and protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wei; Tang, Zhewei; Zhang, Yi-Fan; Feng, Mingqian; Qian, Min; Dimitrov, Dimiter S; Ho, Mitchell

    2015-03-11

    Glypican-3 is a cell surface glycoprotein that associates with Wnt in liver cancer. We develop two antibodies targeting glypican-3, HN3 and YP7. The first antibody recognizes a functional epitope and inhibits Wnt signalling, whereas the second antibody recognizes a C-terminal epitope but does not inhibit Wnt signalling. Both are fused to a fragment of Pseudomonas exotoxin A (PE38) to create immunotoxins. Interestingly, the immunotoxin based on HN3 (HN3-PE38) has superior antitumor activity as compared with YP7 (YP7-PE38) both in vitro and in vivo. Intravenous administration of HN3-PE38 alone, or in combination with chemotherapy, induces regression of Hep3B and HepG2 liver tumour xenografts in mice. This study establishes glypican-3 as a promising candidate for immunotoxin-based liver cancer therapy. Our results demonstrate immunotoxin-induced tumour regression via dual mechanisms: inactivation of cancer signalling via the antibody and inhibition of protein synthesis via the toxin.

  16. Effective Inhibition of Bone Morphogenetic Protein Function by Highly Specific Llama-Derived Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calpe, Silvia; Wagner, Koen; El Khattabi, Mohamed; Rutten, Lucy; Zimberlin, Cheryl; Dolk, Edward; Verrips, C Theo; Medema, Jan Paul; Spits, Hergen; Krishnadath, Kausilia K

    2015-11-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMP) have important but distinct roles in tissue homeostasis and disease, including carcinogenesis and tumor progression. A large number of BMP inhibitors are available to study BMP function; however, as most of these antagonists are promiscuous, evaluating specific effects of individual BMPs is not feasible. Because the oncogenic role of the different BMPs varies for each neoplasm, highly selective BMP inhibitors are required. Here, we describe the generation of three types of llama-derived heavy chain variable domains (VHH) that selectively bind to either BMP4, to BMP2 and 4, or to BMP2, 4, 5, and 6. These generated VHHs have high affinity to their targets and are able to inhibit BMP signaling. Epitope binning and docking modeling have shed light into the basis for their BMP specificity. As opposed to the wide structural reach of natural inhibitors, these small molecules target the grooves and pockets of BMPs involved in receptor binding. In organoid experiments, specific inhibition of BMP4 does not affect the activation of normal stem cells. Furthermore, in vitro inhibition of cancer-derived BMP4 noncanonical signals results in an increase of chemosensitivity in a colorectal cancer cell line. Therefore, because of their high specificity and low off-target effects, these VHHs could represent a therapeutic alternative for BMP4(+) malignancies.

  17. Inhibition of host protein synthesis by Sindbis virus: correlation with viral RNA replication and release of nuclear proteins to the cytoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, Miguel A; García-Moreno, Manuel; Carrasco, Luis

    2015-04-01

    Infection of mammalian cells by Sindbis virus (SINV) profoundly blocks cellular mRNA translation. Experimental evidence points to viral non-structural proteins (nsPs), in particular nsP2, as the mediator of this inhibition. However, individual expression of nsP1, nsP2, nsP3 or nsP1-4 does not block cellular protein synthesis in BHK cells. Trans-complementation of a defective SINV replicon lacking most of the coding region for nsPs by the co-expression of nsP1-4 propitiates viral RNA replication at low levels, and inhibition of cellular translation is not observed. Exit of nuclear proteins including T-cell intracellular antigen and polypyrimidine tract-binding protein is clearly detected in SINV-infected cells, but not upon the expression of nsPs, even when the defective replicon was complemented. Analysis of a SINV variant with a point mutation in nsP2, exhibiting defects in the shut-off of host protein synthesis, indicates that both viral RNA replication and the release of nuclear proteins to the cytoplasm are greatly inhibited. Furthermore, nucleoside analogues that inhibit cellular and viral RNA synthesis impede the blockade of host mRNA translation, in addition to the release of nuclear proteins. Prevention of the shut-off of host mRNA translation by nucleoside analogues is not due to the inhibition of eIF2α phosphorylation, as this prevention is also observed in PKR(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts that do not phosphorylate eIF2α after SINV infection. Collectively, our observations are consistent with the concept that for the inhibition of cellular protein synthesis to occur, viral RNA replication must take place at control levels, leading to the release of nuclear proteins to the cytoplasm.

  18. Soy protein isolate inhibits hepatic tumor promotion in mice fed a high-fat liquid diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Kelly E; Pulliam, Casey F; Pedersen, Kim B; Hennings, Leah; Ronis, Martin Jj

    2017-03-01

    Alcoholic and nonalcoholic fatty liver diseases are risk factors for development of hepatocellular carcinoma, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. On the other hand, ingestion of soy-containing diets may oppose the development of certain cancers. We previously reported that replacing casein with a soy protein isolate reduced tumor promotion in the livers of mice with alcoholic liver disease after feeding a high fat ethanol liquid diet following initiation with diethylnitrosamine. Feeding soy protein isolate inhibited processes that may contribute to tumor promotion including inflammation, sphingolipid signaling, and Wnt/β-catenin signaling. We have extended these studies to characterize liver tumor promotion in a model of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease produced by chronic feeding of high-fat liquid diets in the absence of ethanol. Mice treated with diethylnitrosamine on postnatal day 14 were fed a high-fat liquid diet made with casein or SPI as the sole protein source for 16 weeks in adulthood. Relative to mice fed normal chow, a high fat/casein diet led to increased tumor promotion, hepatocyte proliferation, steatosis, and inflammation. Replacing casein with soy protein isolate counteracted these effects. The high fat diets also resulted in a general increase in transcripts for Wnt/β-catenin pathway components, which may be an important mechanism, whereby hepatic tumorigenesis is promoted. However, soy protein isolate did not block Wnt signaling in this nonalcoholic fatty liver disease model. We conclude that replacing casein with soy protein isolate blocks development of steatosis, inflammation, and tumor promotion in diethylnitrosamine-treated mice fed high fat diets. Impact statement The impact of dietary components on cancer is a topic of great interest for both the general public and the scientific community. Liver cancer is currently the second leading form of cancer deaths worldwide. Our study has addressed the effect of the protein

  19. Cardiovirus Leader proteins bind exportins: Implications for virus replication and nucleocytoplasmic trafficking inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciomperlik, Jessica J. [Institute for Molecular Virology and Department of Biochemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Basta, Holly A. [Department of Biology, Rocky Mountain College, Billings, MT (United States); Palmenberg, Ann C., E-mail: acpalmen@wisc.edu [Institute for Molecular Virology and Department of Biochemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Cardiovirus Leader proteins (L{sub X}) inhibit cellular nucleocytoplasmic trafficking by directing host kinases to phosphorylate Phe/Gly-containing nuclear pore proteins (Nups). Resolution of the Mengovirus L{sub M} structure bound to Ran GTPase, suggested this complex would further recruit specific exportins (karyopherins), which in turn mediate kinase selection. Pull-down experiments and recombinant complex reconstitution now confirm that Crm1 and CAS exportins form stable dimeric complexes with encephalomyocarditis virus L{sub E}, and also larger complexes with L{sub E}:Ran. shRNA knockdown studies support this idea. Similar activities could be demonstrated for recombinant L{sub S} and L{sub T} from Theiloviruses. When mutations were introduced to alter the L{sub E} zinc finger domain, acidic domain, or dual phosphorylation sites, there was reduced exportin selection. These regions are not involved in Ran interactions, so the Ran and Crm1 binding sites on L{sub E} must be non-overlapping. The involvement of exportins in this mechanism is important to viral replication and the observation of trafficking inhibition by L{sub E}.

  20. A new rapid and sensitive bioluminescence assay for antibiotics that inhibit protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naveh, A; Potasman, I; Bassan, H; Ulitzur, S

    1984-06-01

    A new sensitive, rapid and simple bioluminescence assay for antibiotics inhibiting protein synthesis is described. In this assay the ability of the tested antibiotic to inhibit the de novo synthesis of the enzymes participating in the bacterial luminescence system is determined by means of a dark variant of a luminous bacterium that undergoes prompt induction of the luminescence system with certain DNA-intercalating agents. Upon induction, the in vivo luminescence of the dark variant is increased more than 50-fold within 30 min. Antibiotics that block the de novo synthesis of protein limit the development of luminescence at a level that was found to be a function of the antibiotic concentration. The minimum detectable concentration of antibiotics in the bioluminescence test, after 45-60 min of incubation, was 0.1 microgram/ml for streptomycin, gentamicin, kanamycin, lincomycin and chloramphenicol and 0.3 microgram/ml for neomycin, clindamycin and spectinomycin. The new bioluminescence test has been used to assay these antibiotics in serum.

  1. Cytokine-mediated inhibition of ketogenesis is unrelated to nitric oxide or protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pailla, K; El-Mir, M Y; Cynober, L; Blonde-Cynober, F

    2001-08-01

    Cytokines play an important role in the lipid disturbances commonly associated with sepsis. Ketogenesis is inhibited during sepsis, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) have been suggested to mediate this impairment, irrespective of the ketogenic substrate (fatty acid or branched chain ketoacid). However, the underlying mechanism of cytokine action is still unknown. First we investigated the possible role of the induction of nitric oxide (NO) synthesis, using rat hepatocyte monolayers. Hepatocytes were incubated for 6 h, with either alpha -ketoisocaproate (KIC) (1 mM) or oleic acid (0.5 mM) in the presence or absence of TNF alpha (25 microg/L) and IL-6 (15 microg/L). In some experiments, cells were incubated with NO synthase (NOS) inhibitors. The ketone body (beta -hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate) production and nitrite production were measured in the incubation medium. Our results indicated no involvement of nitric oxide in the inhibitory action of cytokines on ketogenesis. Secondly, we showed that cycloheximide (10(-4)M) did not counteract the cytokine-mediated ketogenesis decrease; hence, the effects of cytokines on ketogenesis are not protein synthesis-dependent. The cytokine-mediated inhibition of ketogenesis is therefore unrelated to either NO production or protein synthesis.

  2. Cardiovirus Leader proteins bind exportins: Implications for virus replication and nucleocytoplasmic trafficking inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciomperlik, Jessica J; Basta, Holly A; Palmenberg, Ann C

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovirus Leader proteins (LX) inhibit cellular nucleocytoplasmic trafficking by directing host kinases to phosphorylate Phe/Gly-containing nuclear pore proteins (Nups). Resolution of the Mengovirus LM structure bound to Ran GTPase, suggested this complex would further recruit specific exportins (karyopherins), which in turn mediate kinase selection. Pull-down experiments and recombinant complex reconstitution now confirm that Crm1 and CAS exportins form stable dimeric complexes with encephalomyocarditis virus LE, and also larger complexes with LE:Ran. shRNA knockdown studies support this idea. Similar activities could be demonstrated for recombinant LS and LT from Theiloviruses. When mutations were introduced to alter the LE zinc finger domain, acidic domain, or dual phosphorylation sites, there was reduced exportin selection. These regions are not involved in Ran interactions, so the Ran and Crm1 binding sites on LE must be non-overlapping. The involvement of exportins in this mechanism is important to viral replication and the observation of trafficking inhibition by LE.

  3. The inhibition effect of non-protein thiols on dentinal matrix metalloproteinase activity and HEMA cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassar, Mohannad; Hiraishi, Noriko; Shimokawa, Hitoyata; Tamura, Yukihiko; Otsuki, Masayuki; Kasugai, Shohei; Ohya, Keiichi; Tagami, Junji

    2014-03-01

    Phosphoric acid (PA) etching used in etch-and-rinse adhesives is known to activate host-derived dentinal matrix-metalloproteinases (MMPs) and increase dentinal permeability. These two phenomena will result, respectively; in degradation of dentine-adhesive bond and leaching of some monomers especially 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) into the pulp that would negatively affect the viability of pulpal cells. This study is the first to investigate the inhibitory effect of non-protein thiols (NPSH); namely reduced glutathione (GSH) and N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on dentinal MMPs and compare their effects on HEMA cytotoxicity. Dentine powder was prepared from human teeth, demineralized with 1% PA and then treated with 2% GSH, 2% NAC or 2% chlorhexidine (CHX). Zymographic analysis of extracted proteins was performed. To evaluate the effect of GSH, NAC and CHX on HEMA cytotoxicity, solutions of these compounds were prepared with or without HEMA and rat pulpal cells were treated with the tested solutions for (6 and 24h). Cells viability was measured by means of 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Cytotoxicity data were analysed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey post hoc tests (pcytotoxicity inhibition. NPSH were effective to inhibit dentinal MMPs and HEMA cytotoxicity. The tested properties of NPSH provide promising clinical use of these agents which would enhance dentine-bond durability and decrease post-operative sensitivity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Mineralocorticoid receptor degradation is promoted by Hsp90 inhibition and the ubiquitin-protein ligase CHIP.

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    Faresse, Nourdine; Ruffieux-Daidie, Dorothée; Salamin, Mélanie; Gomez-Sanchez, Celso E; Staub, Olivier

    2010-12-01

    The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) plays a crucial role in the regulation of Na(+) balance and blood pressure, as evidenced by gain of function mutations in the MR of hypertensive families. In the kidney, aldosterone binds to the MR, induces its nuclear translocation, and promotes a transcriptional program leading to increased transepithelial Na(+) transport via the epithelial Na(+) channel. In the unliganded state, MR is localized in the cytosol and part of a multiprotein complex, including heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90), which keeps it ligand-binding competent. 17-Allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG) is a benzoquinone ansamycin antibiotic that binds to Hsp90 and alters its function. We investigated whether 17-AAG affects the stability and transcriptional activity of MR and consequently Na(+) reabsorption by renal cells. 17-AAG treatment lead to reduction of MR protein level in epithelial cells in vitro and in vivo, thereby interfering with aldosterone-dependent transcription. Moreover, 17-AAG inhibited aldosterone-induced Na(+) transport, possibly by interfering with MR availability for the ligand. Finally, we identified the ubiquitin-protein ligase, COOH terminus of Hsp70-interacting protein, as a novel partner of the cytosolic MR, which is responsible for its polyubiquitylation and proteasomal degradation in presence of 17-AAG. In conclusion, 17-AAG may represent a novel pharmacological tool to interfere with Na(+) reabsorption and hypertension.

  5. Inhibition of myeloperoxidase-mediated protein nitration by tempol: Kinetics, mechanism, and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz, Sandra M; Augusto, Ohara

    2008-06-17

    Despite the therapeutic potential of tempol (4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetra-methyl-1-piperidinyloxy) and related nitroxides as antioxidants, their effects on peroxidase-mediated protein tyrosine nitration remain unexplored. This posttranslational protein modification is a biomarker of nitric oxide-derived oxidants, and, relevantly, it parallels tissue injury in animal models of inflammation and is attenuated by tempol treatment. Here, we examine tempol effects on ribonuclease (RNase) nitration mediated by myeloperoxidase (MPO), a mammalian enzyme that plays a central role in various inflammatory processes. Some experiments were also performed with horseradish peroxidase (HRP). We show that tempol efficiently inhibits peroxidase-mediated RNase nitration. For instance, 10 muM tempol was able to inhibit by 90% the yield of 290 muM 3-nitrotyrosine produced from 370 muM RNase. The effect of tempol was not completely catalytic because part of it was consumed by recombination with RNase-tyrosyl radicals. The second-order rate constant of the reaction of tempol with MPO compound I and II were determined by stopped-flow kinetics as 3.3 x 10(6) and 2.6 x 10(4) M(-1) s(-1), respectively (pH 7.4, 25 degrees C); the corresponding HRP constants were orders of magnitude smaller. Time-dependent hydrogen peroxide and nitrite consumption and oxygen production in the incubations were quantified experimentally and modeled by kinetic simulations. The results indicate that tempol inhibits peroxidase-mediated RNase nitration mainly because of its reaction with nitrogen dioxide to produce the oxammonium cation, which, in turn, recycles back to tempol by reacting with hydrogen peroxide and superoxide radical to produce oxygen and regenerate nitrite. The implications for nitroxide antioxidant mechanisms are discussed.

  6. WNK4 inhibits NCC protein expression through MAPK ERK1/2 signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bo; Wang, Dexuan; Feng, Xiuyan; Zhang, Yiqian; Wang, Yanhui; Zhuang, Jieqiu; Zhang, Xuemei; Chen, Guangping; Delpire, Eric; Gu, Dingying; Cai, Hui

    2012-03-01

    WNK [with no lysine (K)] kinase is a subfamily of serine/threonine kinases. Mutations in two members of this family (WNK1 and WNK4) cause pseudohypoaldosteronism type II featuring hypertension, hyperkalemia, and metabolic acidosis. WNK1 and WNK4 were shown to regulate sodium chloride cotransporter (NCC) activity through phosphorylating SPAK and OSR1. Previous studies including ours have also shown that WNK4 inhibits NCC function and its protein expression. A recent study reported that a phorbol ester inhibits NCC function via activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 kinase. In the current study, we investigated whether WNK4 affects NCC via the MAPK ERK1/2 signaling pathway. We found that WNK4 increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation in a dose-dependent manner in mouse distal convoluted tubule (mDCT) cells, whereas WNK4 mutants with the PHA II mutations (E562K and R1185C) lost the ability to increase the ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Hypertonicity significantly increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation in mDCT cells. Knock-down of WNK4 expression by siRNA resulted in a decrease of ERK1/2 phosphorylation. We further showed that WNK4 knock-down significantly increases the cell surface and total NCC protein expressions and ERK1/2 knock-down also significantly increases cell surface and total NCC expression. These data suggest that WNK4 inhibits NCC through activating the MAPK ERK1/2 signaling pathway.

  7. Glioblastoma Inhibition by Cell Surface Immunoglobulin Protein EWI-2, In Vitro and In Vivo

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    Tatiana V. Kolesnikova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available EWI-2, a cell surface IgSF protein, is highly expressed in normal human brain but is considerably diminished in glioblastoma tumors and cell lines. Moreover, loss of EWI-2 expression correlated with a shorter survival time in human glioma patients, suggesting that EWI-2 might be a natural inhibitor of glioblastoma. In support of this idea, EWI-2 expression significantly impaired both ectopic and orthotopic tumor growth in nude mice in vivo. In vitro assays provided clues regarding EWI-2 functions. Expression of EWI-2 in T98G and/or U87-MG malignant glioblastoma cell lines failed to alter two-dimensional cell proliferation but inhibited glioblastoma colony formation in soft agar and caused diminished cell motility and invasion. At the biochemical level, EWI-2 markedly affects the organization of four molecules (tetraspanin proteins CD9 and CD81 and matrix metalloproteinases MMP-2 and MT1-MMP, which play key roles in the biology of astrocytes and gliomas. EWI-2 causes CD9 and CD81 to become more associated with each other, whereas CD81 and other tetraspanins become less associated with MMP-2 and MT1-MMP. We propose that EWI-2 inhibition of glioblastoma growth in vivo is at least partly explained by the capability of EWI-2 to inhibit growth and/or invasion in vitro. Underlying these functional effects, EWI-2 causes a substantial molecular reorganization of multiple molecules (CD81, CD9, MMP-2, and MT1-MMP known to affect proliferation and/or invasion of astrocytes and/or glioblastomas.

  8. INHIBITION OF IN VITRO FERTILIZATION IN THE HAMSTER BY ANTIBODIES RAISED AGAINST THE RAT SPERM PROTEIN SP22

    Science.gov (United States)

    INHIBITION OF IN VITRO FERTILIZATION IN THE HAMSTER BY ANTIBODIES RAISED AGAINST THE RAT SPERM PROTEIN SP22. SC Jeffay*, SD Perreault, KL Bobseine*, JE Welch*, GR Klinefelter, US EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC. SP22, a rat sperm membrane protein that is highly-correlated w...

  9. Mechanism of Sirt1 NAD+-dependent Protein Deacetylase Inhibition by Cysteine S-Nitrosation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalous, Kelsey S; Wynia-Smith, Sarah L; Olp, Michael D; Smith, Brian C

    2016-12-02

    The sirtuin family of proteins catalyze the NAD(+)-dependent deacylation of acyl-lysine residues. Humans encode seven sirtuins (Sirt1-7), and recent studies have suggested that post-translational modification of Sirt1 by cysteine S-nitrosation correlates with increased acetylation of Sirt1 deacetylase substrates. However, the mechanism of Sirt1 inhibition by S-nitrosation was unknown. Here, we show that Sirt1 is transnitrosated and inhibited by the physiologically relevant nitrosothiol S-nitrosoglutathione. Steady-state kinetic analyses and binding assays were consistent with Sirt1 S-nitrosation inhibiting binding of both the NAD(+) and acetyl-lysine substrates. Sirt1 S-nitrosation correlated with Zn(2+) release from the conserved sirtuin Zn(2+)-tetrathiolate and a loss of α-helical structure without overall thermal destabilization of the enzyme. Molecular dynamics simulations suggested that Zn(2+) loss due to Sirt1 S-nitrosation results in repositioning of the tetrathiolate subdomain away from the rest of the catalytic domain, thereby disrupting the NAD(+) and acetyl-lysine-binding sites. Sirt1 S-nitrosation was reversed upon exposure to the thiol-based reducing agents, including physiologically relevant concentrations of the cellular reducing agent glutathione. Reversal of S-nitrosation resulted in full restoration of Sirt1 activity only in the presence of Zn(2+), consistent with S-nitrosation of the Zn(2+)-tetrathiolate as the primary source of Sirt1 inhibition upon S-nitrosoglutathione treatment. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Inhibition of G protein-activated inwardly rectifying K+ channels by different classes of antidepressants.

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    Toru Kobayashi

    Full Text Available Various antidepressants are commonly used for the treatment of depression and several other neuropsychiatric disorders. In addition to their primary effects on serotonergic or noradrenergic neurotransmitter systems, antidepressants have been shown to interact with several receptors and ion channels. However, the molecular mechanisms that underlie the effects of antidepressants have not yet been sufficiently clarified. G protein-activated inwardly rectifying K(+ (GIRK, Kir3 channels play an important role in regulating neuronal excitability and heart rate, and GIRK channel modulation has been suggested to have therapeutic potential for several neuropsychiatric disorders and cardiac arrhythmias. In the present study, we investigated the effects of various classes of antidepressants on GIRK channels using the Xenopus oocyte expression assay. In oocytes injected with mRNA for GIRK1/GIRK2 or GIRK1/GIRK4 subunits, extracellular application of sertraline, duloxetine, and amoxapine effectively reduced GIRK currents, whereas nefazodone, venlafaxine, mianserin, and mirtazapine weakly inhibited GIRK currents even at toxic levels. The inhibitory effects were concentration-dependent, with various degrees of potency and effectiveness. Furthermore, the effects of sertraline were voltage-independent and time-independent during each voltage pulse, whereas the effects of duloxetine were voltage-dependent with weaker inhibition with negative membrane potentials and time-dependent with a gradual decrease in each voltage pulse. However, Kir2.1 channels were insensitive to all of the drugs. Moreover, the GIRK currents induced by ethanol were inhibited by sertraline but not by intracellularly applied sertraline. The present results suggest that GIRK channel inhibition may reveal a novel characteristic of the commonly used antidepressants, particularly sertraline, and contributes to some of the therapeutic effects and adverse effects.

  11. Inhibition of dopamine transporter activity by G protein βγ subunits.

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    Jennie Garcia-Olivares

    Full Text Available Uptake through the Dopamine Transporter (DAT is the primary mechanism of terminating dopamine signaling within the brain, thus playing an essential role in neuronal homeostasis. Deregulation of DAT function has been linked to several neurological and psychiatric disorders including ADHD, schizophrenia, Parkinson's disease, and drug addiction. Over the last 15 years, several studies have revealed a plethora of mechanisms influencing the activity and cellular distribution of DAT; suggesting that fine-tuning of dopamine homeostasis occurs via an elaborate interplay of multiple pathways. Here, we show for the first time that the βγ subunits of G proteins regulate DAT activity. In heterologous cells and brain tissue, a physical association between Gβγ subunits and DAT was demonstrated by co-immunoprecipitation. Furthermore, in vitro pull-down assays using purified proteins established that this association occurs via a direct interaction between the intracellular carboxy-terminus of DAT and Gβγ. Functional assays performed in the presence of the non-hydrolyzable GTP analog GTP-γ-S, Gβγ subunit overexpression, or the Gβγ activator mSIRK all resulted in rapid inhibition of DAT activity in heterologous systems. Gβγ activation by mSIRK also inhibited dopamine uptake in brain synaptosomes and dopamine clearance from mouse striatum as measured by high-speed chronoamperometry in vivo. Gβγ subunits are intracellular signaling molecules that regulate a multitude of physiological processes through interactions with enzymes and ion channels. Our findings add neurotransmitter transporters to the growing list of molecules regulated by G-proteins and suggest a novel role for Gβγ signaling in the control of dopamine homeostasis.

  12. Surfactant Protein-A inhibits Aspergillus fumigatus-induced allergic T-cell responses

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    Russo Scott J

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pulmonary surfactant protein (SP-A has potent immunomodulatory activities but its role and regulation during allergic airway inflammation is unknown. Methods We studied changes in SP-A expression in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL using a murine model of single Aspergillus fumigatus (Af challenge of sensitized animals. Results SP-A protein levels in the BAL fluid showed a rapid, transient decline that reached the lowest values (25% of controls 12 h after intranasal Af provocation of sensitized mice. Decrease of SP-A was associated with influx of inflammatory cells and increase of IL-4 and IL-5 mRNA and protein levels. Since levels of SP-A showed a significant negative correlation with these BAL cytokines (but not with IFN-γ, we hypothesized that SP-A exerts an inhibitory effect on Th2-type immune responses. To study this hypothesis, we used an in vitro Af-rechallenge model. Af-induced lymphocyte proliferation of cells isolated from sensitized mice was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by addition of purified human SP-A (0.1–10 μg/ml. Flow cytometric studies on Af-stimulated lymphocytes indicated that the numbers of CD4+ (but not CD8+ T cells were significantly increased in the parental population and decreased in the third and fourth generation in the presence of SP-A. Further, addition of SP-A to the tissue culture inhibited Af-induced IL-4 and IL-5 production suggesting that SP-A directly suppressed allergen-stimulated CD4+ T cell function. Conclusion We speculate that a transient lack of this lung collectin following allergen exposure of the airways may significantly contribute to the development of a T-cell dependent allergic immune response.

  13. Histophilus somni Stimulates Expression of Antiviral Proteins and Inhibits BRSV Replication in Bovine Respiratory Epithelial Cells.

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    C Lin

    Full Text Available Our previous studies showed that bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV followed by Histophilus somni causes more severe bovine respiratory disease and a more permeable alveolar barrier in vitro than either agent alone. However, microarray analysis revealed the treatment of bovine alveolar type 2 (BAT2 epithelial cells with H. somni concentrated culture supernatant (CCS stimulated up-regulation of four antiviral protein genes as compared with BRSV infection or dual treatment. This suggested that inhibition of viral infection, rather than synergy, may occur if the bacterial infection occurred before the viral infection. Viperin (or radical S-adenosyl methionine domain containing 2--RSAD2 and ISG15 (IFN-stimulated gene 15--ubiquitin-like modifier were most up-regulated. CCS dose and time course for up-regulation of viperin protein levels were determined in treated bovine turbinate (BT upper respiratory cells and BAT2 lower respiratory cells by Western blotting. Treatment of BAT2 cells with H. somni culture supernatant before BRSV infection dramatically reduced viral replication as determined by qRT PCR, supporting the hypothesis that the bacterial infection may inhibit viral infection. Studies of the role of the two known H. somni cytotoxins showed that viperin protein expression was induced by endotoxin (lipooligosaccharide but not by IbpA, which mediates alveolar permeability and H. somni invasion. A naturally occurring IbpA negative asymptomatic carrier strain of H. somni (129Pt does not cause BAT2 cell retraction or permeability of alveolar cell monolayers, so lacks virulence in vitro. To investigate initial steps of pathogenesis, we showed that strain 129Pt attached to BT cells and induced a strong viperin response in vitro. Thus colonization of the bovine upper respiratory tract with an asymptomatic carrier strain lacking virulence may decrease viral infection and the subsequent enhancement of bacterial respiratory infection in vivo.

  14. Inhibition of arachidonate 15-lipoxygenase prevents 4-hydroxynonenal-induced protein damage in male germ cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromfield, Elizabeth G; Mihalas, Bettina P; Dun, Matthew D; Aitken, R John; McLaughlin, Eileen A; Walters, Jessica L H; Nixon, Brett

    2017-03-01

    Lipid peroxidation products, such as 4-hydroxynonenal (4HNE), are causative agents responsible for extensive protein damage within the male and female germlines. Recently, we have demonstrated that 4HNE production can initiate the proteolytic degradation of the molecular chaperone Heat Shock Protein A2 (HSPA2) in male germ cells. These events may be partially responsible for HSPA2 deficiency in the spermatozoa of patients that repeatedly fail in vitro fertilization. Given this, mechanisms that limit the production of 4HNE will be highly advantageous for the preservation of male fertility. The propagation of 4HNE in somatic cells has been linked to the enzymatic actions of arachidonate 15-lipoxygenase (ALOX15), a member of the lipoxygenase family of proteins. In view of this association, this study sought to explore ALOX15 as a physiological target to manipulate the levels of 4HNE produced in the male germline. Herein, we have demonstrated that ALOX15 is markedly upregulated in response to oxidative stress in round spermatids and the GC-2 cell line. Pharmacological inhibition of ALOX15 in GC-2 cells resulted in a significant reduction in both mitochondrial and cytoplasmic reactive oxygen species, as well as a dramatic reduction in 4HNE. Importantly, the reduced bioavailability of this aldehyde appears to confer positive downstream effects to its target proteins such that HSPA2 could be protected from damage by 4HNE. Taken together, these results suggest that the actions of ALOX15 are intimately tied to the production of 4HNE. Thus, the ALOX15 protein may be a promising new target for the mitigation of germline oxidative stress. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Society for the Study of Reproduction. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Coagulation factor V mediates inhibition of tissue factor signaling by activated protein C in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hai Po H; Kerschen, Edward J; Basu, Sreemanti; Hernandez, Irene; Zogg, Mark; Jia, Shuang; Hessner, Martin J; Toso, Raffaella; Rezaie, Alireza R; Fernández, José A; Camire, Rodney M; Ruf, Wolfram; Griffin, John H; Weiler, Hartmut

    2015-11-19

    The key effector molecule of the natural protein C pathway, activated protein C (aPC), exerts pleiotropic effects on coagulation, fibrinolysis, and inflammation. Coagulation-independent cell signaling by aPC appears to be the predominant mechanism underlying its highly reproducible therapeutic efficacy in most animal models of injury and infection. In this study, using a mouse model of Staphylococcus aureus sepsis, we demonstrate marked disease stage-specific effects of the anticoagulant and cell signaling functions of aPC. aPC resistance of factor (f)V due to the R506Q Leiden mutation protected against detrimental anticoagulant effects of aPC therapy but also abrogated the anti-inflammatory and mortality-reducing effects of the signaling-selective 5A-aPC variant that has minimal anticoagulant function. We found that procofactor V (cleaved by aPC at R506) and protein S were necessary cofactors for the aPC-mediated inhibition of inflammatory tissue-factor signaling. The anti-inflammatory cofactor function of fV involved the same structural features that govern its cofactor function for the anticoagulant effects of aPC, yet its anti-inflammatory activities did not involve proteolysis of activated coagulation factors Va and VIIIa. These findings reveal a novel biological function and mechanism of the protein C pathway in which protein S and the aPC-cleaved form of fV are cofactors for anti-inflammatory cell signaling by aPC in the context of endotoxemia and infection.

  16. LegC3, an effector protein from Legionella pneumophila, inhibits homotypic yeast vacuole fusion in vivo and in vitro.

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    Terry L Bennett

    Full Text Available During infection, the intracellular pathogenic bacterium Legionella pneumophila causes an extensive remodeling of host membrane trafficking pathways, both in the construction of a replication-competent vacuole comprised of ER-derived vesicles and plasma membrane components, and in the inhibition of normal phagosome:endosome/lysosome fusion pathways. Here, we identify the LegC3 secreted effector protein from L. pneumophila as able to inhibit a SNARE- and Rab GTPase-dependent membrane fusion pathway in vitro, the homotypic fusion of yeast vacuoles (lysosomes. This vacuole fusion inhibition appeared to be specific, as similar secreted coiled-coiled domain containing proteins from L. pneumophila, LegC7/YlfA and LegC2/YlfB, did not inhibit vacuole fusion. The LegC3-mediated fusion inhibition was reversible by a yeast cytosolic extract, as well as by a purified soluble SNARE, Vam7p. LegC3 blocked the formation of trans-SNARE complexes during vacuole fusion, although we did not detect a direct interaction of LegC3 with the vacuolar SNARE protein complexes required for fusion. Additionally, LegC3 was incapable of inhibiting a defined synthetic model of vacuolar SNARE-driven membrane fusion, further suggesting that LegC3 does not directly inhibit the activity of vacuolar SNAREs, HOPS complex, or Sec17p/18p during membrane fusion. LegC3 is likely utilized by Legionella to modulate eukaryotic membrane fusion events during pathogenesis.

  17. Wogonin inhibits tumor angiogenesis via degradation of HIF-1α protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Xiuming; Yao, Jing; Wang, Fei; Zhou, Mi; Zhou, Yuxin; Wang, Hu; Wei, Libin; Zhao, Li; Li, Zhiyu; Lu, Na, E-mail: luna555@163.com; Guo, Qinglong, E-mail: anticancer_drug@yahoo.com.cn

    2013-09-01

    Wogonin, a plant-derived flavone, has been shown recently to have antitumor effects. However, the mechanisms that wogonin inhibits tumor angiogenesis are not well known. In this study, we investigated the effects of wogonin on expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in tumor cells. We found that wogonin decreased the expression of HIF-1α by affecting its stability and reduced the secretion of VEGF, which suppressed angiogenesis in cancer. Wogonin promoted the degradation of HIF-1α by increasing its prolyl hydroxylation, which depended on prolyl hydroxylase (PHD) and the von Hippel–Lindau tumor suppressor (VHL). Intriguingly, wogonin impeded the binding between heat-shock protein 90 (Hsp90) and HIF-1α. In addition, wogonin down-regulated the Hsp90 client proteins EGFR, Cdk4 and survivin, but did not affect the level of Hsp90. Wogonin also increased ubiquitination of HIF-1α and promoted its degradation in proteasome. We also found that wogonin could inhibit nuclear translocation of HIF-1α. Electrophoresis mobility shift assay (EMSA) showed that wogonin decreased the binding activity of exogenous consensus DNA oligonucleotide with HIF-1α in nuclear extracts from MCF-7 cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay also revealed that HIF-1α directly binded to endogenous hypoxia-responsive element (HRE) and this binding was significantly decreased in MCF-7 cells treated with wogonin. Preliminary results indicated in vivo activity of wogonin against xenograft-induced angiogenesis in nude mice. Taken together, the results suggested that wogonin was a potent inhibitor of HIF-1α and provided a new insight into the mechanisms of wogonin against cancers. - Highlights: • Wogonin is an all around inhibitor of VEGF signaling. • We firstly demonstrate that wogonin inhibits secretion of VEGF by decreasing HIF-1α. • Wogonin enhances PDH and VHL expression and inhibits Hsp90 function.

  18. Cinnamic Acid and Its Derivatives Inhibit Fructose-Mediated Protein Glycation

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    Sirintorn Yibchok-anun

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Cinnamic acid and its derivatives have shown a variety of pharmacologic properties. However, little is known about the antiglycation properties of cinnamic acid and its derivatives. The present study sought to characterize the protein glycation inhibitory activity of cinnamic acid and its derivatives in a bovine serum albumin (BSA/fructose system. The results demonstrated that cinnamic acid and its derivatives significantly inhibited the formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs by approximately 11.96–63.36% at a concentration of 1 mM. The strongest inhibitory activity against the formation of AGEs was shown by cinnamic acid. Furthermore, cinnamic acid and its derivatives reduced the level of fructosamine, the formation of Nε-(carboxymethyl lysine (CML, and the level of amyloid cross β-structure. Cinnamic acid and its derivatives also prevented oxidative protein damages, including effects on protein carbonyl formation and thiol oxidation of BSA. Our findings may lead to the possibility of using cinnamic acid and its derivatives for preventing AGE-mediated diabetic complications.

  19. Inhibition of macrophage activation by the myxoma virus M141 protein (vCD200).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Leiliang; Stanford, Marianne; Liu, Jia; Barrett, Catherine; Jiang, Lei; Barclay, A Neil; McFadden, Grant

    2009-09-01

    The M141 protein of myxoma virus (MYXV) is a viral CD200 homolog (also called vOX-2) that inhibits macrophage activation in infected rabbits. Here, we show that murine myeloid RAW 264.7 cells became activated when infected with MYXV in which the M141 gene was deleted (vMyx-M141KO) but not with the parental wild-type MYXV. Moreover, transcript and protein levels of tumor necrosis factor and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor were rapidly upregulated in an NF-kappaB-dependent fashion in the RAW 264.7 cells infected with vMyx-M141KO. M141 protein is present in the virion and counteracts this NF-kappaB activation pathway upon infection with the wild-type MYXV. Our data suggest that upregulation of these classic macrophage-related proinflammatory cytokine markers following infection of myeloid cells with the M141-knockout MYXV is mediated via the rapid activation of the cellular NF-kappaB pathway.

  20. LRRK2 kinase inhibition prevents pathological microglial phagocytosis in response to HIV-1 Tat protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marker Daniel F

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 (HIV-1 associated neurocognitive disorders (HANDs are accompanied by significant morbidity, which persists despite the use of combined antiretroviral therapy (cART. While activated microglia play a role in pathogenesis, changes in their immune effector functions, including phagocytosis and proinflammatory signaling pathways, are not well understood. We have identified leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2 as a novel regulator of microglial phagocytosis and activation in an in vitro model of HANDs, and hypothesize that LRRK2 kinase inhibition will attenuate microglial activation during HANDs. Methods We treated BV-2 immortalized mouse microglia cells with the HIV-1 trans activator of transcription (Tat protein in the absence or presence of LRRK2 kinase inhibitor (LRRK2i. We used Western blot, qRT-PCR, immunocytochemistry and latex bead engulfment assays to analyze LRRK2 protein levels, proinflammatory cytokine and phagocytosis receptor expression, LRRK2 cellular distribution and phagocytosis, respectively. Finally, we utilized ex vivo microfluidic chambers containing primary hippocampal neurons and BV-2 microglia cells to investigate microglial phagocytosis of neuronal axons. Results We found that Tat-treatment of BV-2 cells induced kinase activity associated phosphorylation of serine 935 on LRRK2 and caused the formation of cytoplasmic LRRK2 inclusions. LRRK2i decreased Tat-induced phosphorylation of serine 935 on LRRK2 and inhibited the formation of Tat-induced cytoplasmic LRRK2 inclusions. LRRK2i also decreased Tat-induced process extension in BV-2 cells. Furthermore, LRRK2i attenuated Tat-induced cytokine expression and latex bead engulfment. We examined relevant cellular targets in microfluidic chambers and found that Tat-treated BV-2 microglia cells cleared axonal arbor and engulfed neuronal elements, whereas saline treated controls did not. LRRK2i was found to protect axons in the presence

  1. Acute inhibition of myostatin-family proteins preserves skeletal muscle in mouse models of cancer cachexia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benny Klimek, Margaret E.; Aydogdu, Tufan [Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL (United States); Link, Majik J.; Pons, Marianne [Molecular Oncology Program, Division of Surgical Oncology, DeWitt Daughtry Family Department of Surgery, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL (United States); Koniaris, Leonidas G. [Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL (United States); Molecular Oncology Program, Division of Surgical Oncology, DeWitt Daughtry Family Department of Surgery, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL (United States); Molecular Oncology and Experimental Therapeutics Program, Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL (United States); Zimmers, Teresa A., E-mail: tzimmers@med.miami.edu [Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL (United States); Molecular Oncology Program, Division of Surgical Oncology, DeWitt Daughtry Family Department of Surgery, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL (United States); Molecular Oncology and Experimental Therapeutics Program, Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL (United States)

    2010-01-15

    Cachexia, progressive loss of fat and muscle mass despite adequate nutrition, is a devastating complication of cancer associated with poor quality of life and increased mortality. Myostatin is a potent tonic muscle growth inhibitor. We tested how myostatin inhibition might influence cancer cachexia using genetic and pharmacological approaches. First, hypermuscular myostatin null mice were injected with Lewis lung carcinoma or B16F10 melanoma cells. Myostatin null mice were more sensitive to tumor-induced cachexia, losing more absolute mass and proportionately more muscle mass than wild-type mice. Because myostatin null mice lack expression from development, however, we also sought to manipulate myostatin acutely. The histone deacetylase inhibitor Trichostatin A has been shown to increase muscle mass in normal and dystrophic mice by inducing the myostatin inhibitor, follistatin. Although Trichostatin A administration induced muscle growth in normal mice, it failed to preserve muscle in colon-26 cancer cachexia. Finally we sought to inhibit myostatin and related ligands by administration of the Activin receptor extracellular domain/Fc fusion protein, ACVR2B-Fc. Systemic administration of ACVR2B-Fc potently inhibited muscle wasting and protected adipose stores in both colon-26 and Lewis lung carcinoma cachexia, without affecting tumor growth. Enhanced cachexia in myostatin knockouts indicates that host-derived myostatin is not the sole mediator of muscle wasting in cancer. More importantly, skeletal muscle preservation with ACVR2B-Fc establishes that targeting myostatin-family ligands using ACVR2B-Fc or related molecules is an important and potent therapeutic avenue in cancer cachexia.

  2. How anacetrapib inhibits the activity of the cholesteryl ester transfer protein? Perspective through atomistic simulations.

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    Tarja Äijänen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP mediates the reciprocal transfer of neutral lipids (cholesteryl esters, triglycerides and phospholipids between different lipoprotein fractions in human blood plasma. A novel molecular agent known as anacetrapib has been shown to inhibit CETP activity and thereby raise high density lipoprotein (HDL-cholesterol and decrease low density lipoprotein (LDL-cholesterol, thus rendering CETP inhibition an attractive target to prevent and treat the development of various cardiovascular diseases. Our objective in this work is to use atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to shed light on the inhibitory mechanism of anacetrapib and unlock the interactions between the drug and CETP. The results show an evident affinity of anacetrapib towards the concave surface of CETP, and especially towards the region of the N-terminal tunnel opening. The primary binding site of anacetrapib turns out to reside in the tunnel inside CETP, near the residues surrounding the N-terminal opening. Free energy calculations show that when anacetrapib resides in this area, it hinders the ability of cholesteryl ester to diffuse out from CETP. The simulations further bring out the ability of anacetrapib to regulate the structure-function relationships of phospholipids and helix X, the latter representing the structural region of CETP important to the process of neutral lipid exchange with lipoproteins. Altogether, the simulations propose CETP inhibition to be realized when anacetrapib is transferred into the lipid binding pocket. The novel insight gained in this study has potential use in the development of new molecular agents capable of preventing the progression of cardiovascular diseases.

  3. Atheroprotective effects of antioxidants through inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Moe KYAW; Masanori YOSHIZUMI; Koichiro TSUCHIYA; Yuki IZAWA; Yasuhisa KANEMATSU; Toshiaki TAMAKI

    2004-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been known to play an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and several other cardiovascular diseases. It is now apparent that ROS induce endothelial cell damage and vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) growth and cardiac remodeling, which are associated with hypertension,atherosclerosis, heart failure, and restenosis. Several lines of evidence have indicated that ROS and mitogenactivated protein (MAP) kinases were involved in vascular remodeling under various pathological conditions. Recenfiy,it was also reported that MAP kinases were sensitive to oxidative stress. MAP kinases play an important role in cell differentiation, growth, apoptosis, and the regulation of a variety of transcription factors and gene expressions.Bioflavonoids and polyphenolic compounds are believed to be beneficial for the prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases. One of the most widely distributed bioflavonoids, 3,3',4',5,7-pentahydroxyflavone (quercetin) and its metabolite quercetin 3-O-β-D-glucuronide (Q3GA) inhibited Angiotensin Ⅱstimulated JNK activation and resultant hypertrophy of VSMC. Several studies have suggested that various antioxidants including probucol, N-acetyl-L-cysteine, diphenylene iodonium, Trolox C (vitamin E analogue), and vitamin C inhibit VSMC growth, which is associated with pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, inhibition of MAP kinases by antioxidant treatment may prove to be a therapeutic strategy for cardiovascular diseases. In contrast, some clinical studies have reported that antioxidant vitamins did not show beneficial effects in coronary artery disease or in a number of high-risk people. Thus, further studies are needed to clarify why antioxidants showed beneficial effects in vitro, whereas less satisfactory results were obtained in some clinical conditions.

  4. Antifreeze protein-induced superheating of ice inside Antarctic notothenioid fishes inhibits melting during summer warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cziko, Paul A; DeVries, Arthur L; Evans, Clive W; Cheng, Chi-Hing Christina

    2014-10-07

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) of polar marine teleost fishes are widely recognized as an evolutionary innovation of vast adaptive value in that, by adsorbing to and inhibiting the growth of internalized environmental ice crystals, they prevent death by inoculative freezing. Paradoxically, systemic accumulation of AFP-stabilized ice could also be lethal. Whether or how fishes eliminate internal ice is unknown. To investigate if ice inside high-latitude Antarctic notothenioid fishes could melt seasonally, we measured its melting point and obtained a decadal temperature record from a shallow benthic fish habitat in McMurdo Sound, Antarctica. We found that AFP-stabilized ice resists melting at temperatures above the expected equilibrium freezing/melting point (eqFMP), both in vitro and in vivo. Superheated ice was directly observed in notothenioid serum samples and in solutions of purified AFPs, and ice was found to persist inside live fishes at temperatures more than 1 °C above their eqFMP for at least 24 h, and at a lower temperature for at least several days. Field experiments confirmed that superheated ice occurs naturally inside wild fishes. Over the long-term record (1999-2012), seawater temperature surpassed the fish eqFMP in most summers, but never exceeded the highest temperature at which ice persisted inside experimental fishes. Thus, because of the effects of AFP-induced melting inhibition, summer warming may not reliably eliminate internal ice. Our results expose a potentially antagonistic pleiotropic effect of AFPs: beneficial freezing avoidance is accompanied by melting inhibition that may contribute to lifelong accumulation of detrimental internal ice crystals.

  5. RNA-binding protein Dnd1 inhibits microRNA access to target mRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kedde, Martijn; Strasser, Markus J; Boldajipour, Bijan

    2007-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are inhibitors of gene expression capable of controlling processes in normal development and cancer. In mammals, miRNAs use a seed sequence of 6-8 nucleotides (nt) to associate with 3' untranslated regions (3'UTRs) of mRNAs and inhibit their expression. Intriguingly, occasionally...... not only the miRNA-targeting site but also sequences in its vicinity are highly conserved throughout evolution. We therefore hypothesized that conserved regions in mRNAs may serve as docking platforms for modulators of miRNA activity. Here we demonstrate that the expression of dead end 1 (Dnd1......), an evolutionary conserved RNA-binding protein (RBP), counteracts the function of several miRNAs in human cells and in primordial germ cells of zebrafish by binding mRNAs and prohibiting miRNAs from associating with their target sites. These effects of Dnd1 are mediated through uridine-rich regions present...

  6. Monoclonal antibody targeting chikungunya virus envelope 1 protein inhibits virus release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masrinoul, Promsin; Puiprom, Orapim; Tanaka, Atsushi; Kuwahara, Miwa; Chaichana, Panjaporn; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi; Ramasoota, Pongrama; Okabayashi, Tamaki

    2014-09-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) causes an acute clinical illness characterized by sudden high fever, intense joint pain, and skin rash. Recent outbreaks of chikungunya disease in Africa and Asia are a major public health concern; however, there is currently no effective licensed vaccine or specific treatment. This study reported the development of a mouse monoclonal antibody (MAb), CK47, which recognizes domain III within the viral envelope 1 protein and inhibited the viral release process, thereby preventing the production of progeny virus. The MAb had no effect on virus entry and replication processes. Thus, CK47 may be a useful tool for studying the mechanisms underlying CHIKV release and may show potential as a therapeutic agent.

  7. Inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B by lupeol and lupenone isolated from Sorbus commixta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Minkyun; Kim, Bo Yeon; Osada, Hiroyuki; Ahn, Jong Seog

    2009-08-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) appears to be an attractive target for the development of new drugs for type 2 diabetes and obesity. In our preliminary test, a MeOH extract of the stem barks of Sorbus commixta Hedl. (Rosaceae) showed strong PTP1B inhibitory activity. Bioassay-guided fractionation of the MeOH extract resulted in the isolation of two lupane-type triterpenes, lupenone (1) and lupeol (2). Compounds 1 and 2 inhibited PTP1B with IC(50) values of 13.7 +/- 2.1 and 5.6 +/- 0.9 microM, respectively. Kinetic studies revealed that both the compounds 1 and 2 are non-competitive inhibitors of PTP1B that decrease V(max) values with no effect on K(m) values.

  8. Pachastrissamine (jaspine B) and its stereoisomers inhibit sphingosine kinases and atypical protein kinase C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimitsu, Yuji; Oishi, Shinya; Miyagaki, Jun; Inuki, Shinsuke; Ohno, Hiroaki; Fujii, Nobutaka

    2011-09-15

    Sphingosine kinases (SphKs) are oncogenic enzymes that regulate the critical balance between ceramide and sphingosine-1-phosphate. Much effort has been dedicated to develop inhibitors against these enzymes. Naturally occurring pachastrissamine (jaspine B) and all its stereoisomers were prepared and evaluated for their inhibitory effects against SphKs. All eight stereoisomers exhibited moderate to potent inhibitory activity against SphK1 and SphK2. Inhibitory effects were profiled against protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms by in vitro experiments. Atypical PKCs (PKCζ and PKCι) were inhibited by several pachastrissamine stereoisomers. The improved activity over N,N-dimethylsphingosine suggests that the cyclic scaffold in pachastrissamines facilitates potential favorable interactions with SphKs and PKCs.

  9. Drugs for hypercholesterolaemia - from statins to pro-protein convertase subtilisin kexin 9 (PCSK9) inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierzbicki, Anthony S; Grant, Paul

    2016-08-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains one of the commonest sources of morbidity and mortality in the world. Lipids and especially low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) contribute to the risk of CVD events. Statins are the primary therapy for hypercholesterolaemia and recent evidence supports the use of ezetimibe as a second-line agent. Pro-protein convertase subtilisin kexin 9 (PCSK9) is a regulator of LDL receptor expression. Activating mutations in PCSK9 give rise to a form of familial hypercholesterolaemia, while inactivating mutations lead to lower LDL-C levels and fewer CVD events. Therapies to inhibit PCSK9 are in development and two antibody-based therapies - alirocumab and evolocumab - have recently been licensed. This article reviews the actions of PCSK9, the novel therapeutics targeted on this molecule and how they are likely to be used in clinical practice until large scale CVD outcome studies with PCSK9 inhibitors are published. © 2016 Royal College of Physicians.

  10. Isoferulic Acid, a New Anti-Glycation Agent, Inhibits Fructose- and Glucose-Mediated Protein Glycation in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirichai Adisakwattana

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The inhibitory activity of isoferulic acid (IFA on fructose- and glucose-mediated protein glycation and oxidation of bovine serum albumin (BSA was investigated. Our data showed that IFA (1.25–5 mM inhibited the formation of fluorescent advanced glycation end products (AGEs and non-fluorescent AGE [Nε-(carboxymethyl lysine: CML], as well as the level of fructosamine. IFA also prevented protein oxidation of BSA indicated by decreasing protein carbonyl formation and protein thiol modification. Furthermore, IFA suppressed the formation of β-cross amyloid structures of BSA. Therefore, IFA might be a new promising anti-glycation agent for the prevention of diabetic complications via inhibition of AGEs formation and oxidation-dependent protein damage.

  11. Specific Inhibition of β-Secretase Processing of the Alzheimer Disease Amyloid Precursor Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Halima, Saoussen; Mishra, Sabyashachi; Raja, K Muruga Poopathi; Willem, Michael; Baici, Antonio; Simons, Kai; Brüstle, Oliver; Koch, Philipp; Haass, Christian; Caflisch, Amedeo; Rajendran, Lawrence

    2016-03-08

    Development of disease-modifying therapeutics is urgently needed for treating Alzheimer disease (AD). AD is characterized by toxic β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides produced by β- and γ-secretase-mediated cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). β-secretase inhibitors reduce Aβ levels, but mechanism-based side effects arise because they also inhibit β-cleavage of non-amyloid substrates like Neuregulin. We report that β-secretase has a higher affinity for Neuregulin than it does for APP. Kinetic studies demonstrate that the affinities and catalytic efficiencies of β-secretase are higher toward non-amyloid substrates than toward APP. We show that non-amyloid substrates are processed by β-secretase in an endocytosis-independent manner. Exploiting this compartmentalization of substrates, we specifically target the endosomal β-secretase by an endosomally targeted β-secretase inhibitor, which blocked cleavage of APP but not non-amyloid substrates in many cell systems, including induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived neurons. β-secretase inhibitors can be designed to specifically inhibit the Alzheimer process, enhancing their potential as AD therapeutics without undesired side effects. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Specific Inhibition of β-Secretase Processing of the Alzheimer Disease Amyloid Precursor Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saoussen Ben Halima

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Development of disease-modifying therapeutics is urgently needed for treating Alzheimer disease (AD. AD is characterized by toxic β-amyloid (Aβ peptides produced by β- and γ-secretase-mediated cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP. β-secretase inhibitors reduce Aβ levels, but mechanism-based side effects arise because they also inhibit β-cleavage of non-amyloid substrates like Neuregulin. We report that β-secretase has a higher affinity for Neuregulin than it does for APP. Kinetic studies demonstrate that the affinities and catalytic efficiencies of β-secretase are higher toward non-amyloid substrates than toward APP. We show that non-amyloid substrates are processed by β-secretase in an endocytosis-independent manner. Exploiting this compartmentalization of substrates, we specifically target the endosomal β-secretase by an endosomally targeted β-secretase inhibitor, which blocked cleavage of APP but not non-amyloid substrates in many cell systems, including induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC-derived neurons. β-secretase inhibitors can be designed to specifically inhibit the Alzheimer process, enhancing their potential as AD therapeutics without undesired side effects.

  13. H2O2 inhibits ABA-signaling protein phosphatase HAB1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhuri Sridharamurthy

    Full Text Available Due to its ability to be rapidly generated and propagated over long distances, H2O2 is an important second messenger for biotic and abiotic stress signaling in plants. In response to low water potential and high salt concentrations sensed in the roots of plants, the stress hormone abscisic acid (ABA activates NADPH oxidase to generate H2O2, which is propagated in guard cells in leaves to induce stomatal closure and prevent water loss from transpiration. Using a reconstituted system, we demonstrate that H2O2 reversibly prevents the protein phosphatase HAB1, a key component of the core ABA-signaling pathway, from inhibiting its main target in guard cells, SnRK2.6/OST1 kinase. We have identified HAB1 C186 and C274 as H2O2-sensitive thiols and demonstrate that their oxidation inhibits both HAB1 catalytic activity and its ability to physically associate with SnRK2.6 by formation of intermolecular dimers.

  14. Metformin directly inhibits ghrelin secretion through AMP-activated protein kinase in rat primary gastric cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, J; Sheppard, E; Anini, Y

    2013-03-01

    The antidiabetic drug Metformin causes weight loss in both diabetic and non-diabetic individuals. Metformin treatment is also associated with lower circulating levels of the orexigenic hormone ghrelin. To test whether Metformin directly affects ghrelin cells, rat primary stomach cells were treated with Metformin and the levels of ghrelin secretion, proghrelin gene expression and activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) were examined. Metformin significantly reduced ghrelin secretion and proghrelin mRNA production and both these effects were blocked by co-incubation with the AMPK inhibitor compound C. Furthermore, the AMPK activator 5-amino-1-β-D-ribofuranosyl-imidazole-4-carboxamide (AICAR) significantly inhibited ghrelin secretion. Additionally, ghrelin cells were shown to express AMPK. Finally, Metformin treatment caused a significant increase in the level of phosphorylated (active) AMPK. Our results show that Metformin directly inhibits stomach ghrelin production and secretion through AMPK. This reduction in ghrelin secretion may be one of the key components in Metformin's mechanism of weight loss.

  15. Consequences of Inhibiting Amyloid Precursor Protein Processing Enzymes on Synaptic Function and Plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is a neurodegenerative disease, one of whose major pathological hallmarks is the accumulation of amyloid plaques comprised of aggregated β-amyloid (Aβ peptides. It is now recognized that soluble Aβ oligomers may lead to synaptic dysfunctions early in AD pathology preceding plaque deposition. Aβ is produced by a sequential cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP by the activity of β- and γ-secretases, which have been identified as major candidate therapeutic targets of AD. This paper focuses on how Aβ alters synaptic function and the functional consequences of inhibiting the activity of the two secretases responsible for Aβ generation. Abnormalities in synaptic function resulting from the absence or inhibition of the Aβ-producing enzymes suggest that Aβ itself may have normal physiological functions which are disrupted by abnormal accumulation of Aβ during AD pathology. This interpretation suggests that AD therapeutics targeting the β- and γ-secretases should be developed to restore normal levels of Aβ or combined with measures to circumvent the associated synaptic dysfunction(s in order to have minimal impact on normal synaptic function.

  16. An inhibition of p38 mitogen activated protein kinase delays the platelet storage lesion.

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    Andrey Skripchenko

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Platelets during storage undergo diverse alterations collectively known as the platelet storage lesion, including metabolic, morphological, functional and structural changes. Some changes correlate with activation of p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK. Another MAPK, extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK, is involved in PLT activation. The aim of this study was to compare the properties of platelets stored in plasma in the presence or absence of p38 and ERK MAPK inhibitors. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A single Trima apheresis platelet unit (n = 12 was aliquoted into five CLX storage bags. Two aliquots were continuously agitated with or without MAPK inhibitors. Two aliquots were subjected to 48 hours of interruption of agitation with or without MAPK inhibitors. One aliquot contained the same amount of solvent vehicle used to deliver the inhibitor. Platelets were stored at 20-24°C for 7 days and sampled on Days 1, 4, and 7 for 18 in vitro parameters. RESULTS: Inhibition of p38 MAPK by VX-702 leads to better maintenance of all platelet in vitro storage parameters including platelet mitochondrial function. Accelerated by interruption of agitation, the platelet storage lesion of units stored with VX-702 was diminished to that of platelets stored with continuous agitation. Inhibition of ERK MAPK did not ameliorate decrements in any in vitro platelet properties. CONCLUSION: Signaling through p38 MAPK, but not ERK, is associated with platelet deterioration during storage.

  17. Atu027, a liposomal small interfering RNA formulation targeting protein kinase N3, inhibits cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleku, Manuela; Schulz, Petra; Keil, Oliver; Santel, Ansgar; Schaeper, Ute; Dieckhoff, Britta; Janke, Oliver; Endruschat, Jens; Durieux, Birgit; Röder, Nadine; Löffler, Kathrin; Lange, Christian; Fechtner, Melanie; Möpert, Kristin; Fisch, Gerald; Dames, Sibylle; Arnold, Wolfgang; Jochims, Karin; Giese, Klaus; Wiedenmann, Bertram; Scholz, Arne; Kaufmann, Jörg

    2008-12-01

    We have previously described a small interfering RNA (siRNA) delivery system (AtuPLEX) for RNA interference (RNAi) in the vasculature of mice. Here we report preclinical data for Atu027, a siRNA-lipoplex directed against protein kinase N3 (PKN3), currently under development for the treatment of advanced solid cancer. In vitro studies revealed that Atu027-mediated inhibition of PKN3 function in primary endothelial cells impaired tube formation on extracellular matrix and cell migration, but is not essential for proliferation. Systemic administration of Atu027 by repeated bolus injections or infusions in mice, rats, and nonhuman primates results in specific, RNAi-mediated silencing of PKN3 expression. We show the efficacy of Atu027 in orthotopic mouse models for prostate and pancreatic cancers with significant inhibition of tumor growth and lymph node metastasis formation. The tumor vasculature of Atu027-treated animals showed a specific reduction in lymph vessel density but no significant changes in microvascular density.

  18. Genipin inhibits mitochondrial uncoupling protein 2 expression and ameliorates podocyte injury in diabetic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjing Qiu

    Full Text Available Diabetic nephropathy (DN is one of the most common causes of end stage renal disease (ESRD in China, which requires renal replacement therapy. Recent investigations have suggested an essential role of podocyte injury in the initial stage of DN. This study investigated the potential therapeutic role of genipin, an active extract from a traditional Chinese medicine, on progression of DN in diabetic mice induced by intraperitoneally injection of streptozocin (STZ. In diabetic mice, orally administration of genipin postponed the progression of DN, as demonstrated by ameliorating body weight loss and urine albumin leakage, attenuating glomerular basement membrane thickness, restoring the podocyte expression of podocin and WT1 in diabetic mice. The protective role of genipin on DN is probably through suppressing the up-regulation of mitochondrial uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2 in diabetic kidneys. Meanwhile, through inhibiting the up-regulation of UCP2, genipin restores podocin and WT1 expression in cultured podocytes and attenuates glucose-induced albumin leakage through podocytes monolayer. Therefore, these results revealed that genipin inhibited UCP2 expression and ameliorated podocyte injury in DN mice.

  19. Alternatively spliced myeloid differentiation protein-2 inhibits TLR4-mediated lung inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumurkhuu, Gantsetseg; Dagvadorj, Jargalsaikhan; Jones, Heather D; Chen, Shuang; Shimada, Kenichi; Crother, Timothy R; Arditi, Moshe

    2015-02-15

    We previously identified a novel alternatively spliced isoform of human myeloid differentiation protein-2 (MD-2s) that competitively inhibits binding of MD-2 to TLR4 in vitro. In this study, we investigated the protective role of MD-2s in LPS-induced acute lung injury by delivering intratracheally an adenovirus construct that expressed MD-2s (Ad-MD-2s). After adenovirus-mediated gene transfer, MD-2s was strongly expressed in lung epithelial cells and readily detected in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Compared to adenovirus serotype 5 containing an empty vector lacking a transgene control mice, Ad-MD-2s delivery resulted in significantly less LPS-induced inflammation in the lungs, including less protein leakage, cell recruitment, and expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, such as IL-6, keratinocyte chemoattractant, and MIP-2. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from Ad-MD-2s mice transferred into lungs of naive mice before intratracheal LPS challenge diminished proinflammatory cytokine levels. As house dust mite (HDM) sensitization is dependent on TLR4 and HDM Der p 2, a structural homolog of MD-2, we also investigated the effect of MD-2s on HDM-induced allergic airway inflammation. Ad-MD-2s given before HDM sensitization significantly inhibited subsequent allergic airway inflammation after HDM challenge, including reductions in eosinophils, goblet cell hyperplasia, and IL-5 levels. Our study indicates that the alternatively spliced short isoform of human MD-2 could be a potential therapeutic candidate to treat human diseases induced or exacerbated by TLR4 signaling, such as Gram-negative bacterial endotoxin-induced lung injury and HDM-triggered allergic lung inflammation.

  20. Activation of AMP-activated protein kinase inhibits ER stress and renal fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyosang; Moon, Soo Young; Kim, Joon-Seok; Baek, Chung Hee; Kim, Miyeon; Min, Ji Yeon; Lee, Sang Koo

    2015-02-01

    It has been suggested that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress facilitates fibrotic remodeling. Therefore, modulation of ER stress may serve as one of the possible therapeutic approaches to renal fibrosis. We examined whether and how activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) suppressed ER stress induced by chemical ER stress inducers [tunicamycin (TM) and thapsigargin (TG)] and also nonchemical inducers in tubular HK-2 cells. We further investigated the in vivo effects of AMPK on ER stress and renal fibrosis. Western blot analysis, immunofluorescence, small interfering (si)RNA experiments, and immunohistochemical staining were performed. Metformin (the best known clinical activator of AMPK) suppressed TM- or TG-induced ER stress, as shown by the inhibition of TM- or TG-induced upregulation of glucose-related protein (GRP)78 and phosphorylated eukaryotic initiation factor-2α through induction of heme oxygenase-1. Metformin inhibited TM- or TG-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transitions as well. Compound C (AMPK inhibitor) blocked the effect of metformin, and 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1β riboside (another AMPK activator) exerted the same effects as metformin. Transfection with siRNA targeting AMPK blocked the effect of metformin. Consistent with the results of cell culture experiments, metformin reduced renal cortical GRP78 expression and increased heme oxygenase-1 expression in a mouse model of ER stress-induced acute kidney injury by TM. Activation of AMPK also suppressed ER stress by transforming growth factor-β, ANG II, aldosterone, and high glucose. Furthermore, metformin reduced GRP78 expression and renal fibrosis in a mouse model of unilateral ureteral obstruction. In conclusion, AMPK may serve as a promising therapeutic target through reducing ER stress and renal fibrosis.

  1. Inhibition of CRM1-mediated nuclear export of transcription factors by leukemogenic NUP98 fusion proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Akiko; Sarma, Nayan J; Abdul-Nabi, Anmaar M; Yaseen, Nabeel R

    2010-05-21

    NUP98 is a nucleoporin that plays complex roles in the nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of macromolecules. Rearrangements of the NUP98 gene in human leukemia result in the expression of numerous fusion oncoproteins whose effect on nucleocytoplasmic trafficking is poorly understood. The present study was undertaken to determine the effects of leukemogenic NUP98 fusion proteins on CRM1-mediated nuclear export. NUP98-HOXA9, a prototypic NUP98 fusion, inhibited the nuclear export of two known CRM1 substrates: mutated cytoplasmic nucleophosmin and HIV-1 Rev. In vitro binding assays revealed that NUP98-HOXA9 binds CRM1 through the FG repeat motif in a Ran-GTP-dependent manner similar to but stronger than the interaction between CRM1 and its export substrates. Two NUP98 fusions, NUP98-HOXA9 and NUP98-DDX10, whose fusion partners are structurally and functionally unrelated, interacted with endogenous CRM1 in myeloid cells as shown by co-immunoprecipitation. These leukemogenic NUP98 fusion proteins interacted with CRM1, Ran, and the nucleoporin NUP214 in a manner fundamentally different from that of wild-type NUP98. NUP98-HOXA9 and NUP98-DDX10 formed characteristic aggregates within the nuclei of a myeloid cell line and primary human CD34+ cells and caused aberrant localization of CRM1 to these aggregates. These NUP98 fusions caused nuclear accumulation of two transcription factors, NFAT and NFkappaB, that are regulated by CRM1-mediated export. The nuclear entrapment of NFAT and NFkappaB correlated with enhanced transcription from promoters responsive to these transcription factors. Taken together, the results suggest a new mechanism by which NUP98 fusions dysregulate transcription and cause leukemia, namely, inhibition of CRM1-mediated nuclear export with aberrant nuclear retention of transcriptional regulators.

  2. Silver nanoparticles inhibit fish gill cell proliferation in protein-free culture medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Yang; Behra, Renata; Sigg, Laura; Schirmer, Kristin

    2016-10-01

    While short-term exposures of vertebrate cells, such as from fish, can be performed in defined, serum-free media, long-term cultures generally require addition of growth factors and proteins, normally supplied with a serum supplement. However, proteins are known to alter nanoparticle properties by binding to nanoparticles. Therefore, in order to be able to study nanoparticle-cell interactions for extended periods, the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) gill cell line, RTgill-W1, was adapted to proliferate in a commercial, serum-free medium, InVitrus VP-6. The newly adapted cell strain was named RTgill-W1-pf (protein free). These cells proliferate at a speed similar to the RTgill-W1 cells cultured in a fully supplemented medium containing 5% fetal bovine serum. As well, they were successfully cryopreserved in liquid nitrogen and fully recovered after thawing. Yet, senescence set in after about 10 passages in InVitrus VP-6 medium, revealing that this medium cannot fully support long-term culture of the RTgill-W1 strain. The RTgill-W1-pf cell line was subsequently applied to investigate the effect of silver nanoparticles (AgNP) on cell proliferation over a period of 12 days. Indeed, cell proliferation was inhibited by 10 μM AgNP. This effect correlated with high levels of silver being associated with the cells. The new cell line, RTgill-W1-pf, can serve as a unique representation of the gill cell-environment interface, offering novel opportunities to study nanoparticle-cell interactions without serum protein interference.

  3. Plin2 inhibits cellular glucose uptake through interactions with SNAP23, a SNARE complex protein.

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    Subramanian Senthivinayagam

    Full Text Available Although a link between excess lipid storage and aberrant glucose metabolism has been recognized for many years, little is known what role lipid storage droplets and associated proteins such as Plin2 play in managing cellular glucose levels. To address this issue, the influence of Plin2 on glucose uptake was examined using 2-NBD-Glucose and [(3H]-2-deoxyglucose to show that insulin-mediated glucose uptake was decreased 1.7- and 1.8-fold, respectively in L cell fibroblasts overexpressing Plin2. Conversely, suppression of Plin2 levels by RNAi-mediated knockdown increased 2-NBD-Glucose uptake several fold in transfected L cells and differentiated 3T3-L1 cells. The effect of Plin2 expression on proteins involved in glucose uptake and transport was also examined. Expression of the SNARE protein SNAP23 was increased 1.6-fold while levels of syntaxin-5 were decreased 1.7-fold in Plin2 overexpression cells with no significant changes observed in lipid droplet associated proteins Plin1 or FSP27 or with the insulin receptor, GLUT1, or VAMP4. FRET experiments revealed a close proximity of Plin2 to SNAP23 on lipid droplets to within an intramolecular distance of 51 Å. The extent of targeting of SNAP23 to lipid droplets was determined by co-localization and co-immunoprecipitation experiments to show increased partitioning of SNAP23 to lipid droplets when Plin2 was overexpressed. Taken together, these results suggest that Plin2 inhibits glucose uptake by interacting with, and regulating cellular targeting of SNAP23 to lipid droplets. In summary, the current study for the first time provides direct evidence for the role of Plin2 in mediating cellular glucose uptake.

  4. Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase modulates nociception: evidence from genetic deletion and pharmacological inhibition.

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    Azkona, Garikoitz; Saavedra, Ana; Aira, Zigor; Aluja, David; Xifró, Xavier; Baguley, Tyler; Alberch, Jordi; Ellman, Jonathan A; Lombroso, Paul J; Azkue, Jon J; Pérez-Navarro, Esther

    2016-02-01

    The information from nociceptors is processed in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord by complex circuits involving excitatory and inhibitory interneurons. It is well documented that GluN2B and ERK1/2 phosphorylation contributes to central sensitization. Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) dephosphorylates GluN2B and ERK1/2, promoting internalization of GluN2B and inactivation of ERK1/2. The activity of STEP was modulated by genetic (STEP knockout mice) and pharmacological (recently synthesized STEP inhibitor, TC-2153) approaches. STEP(61) protein levels in the lumbar spinal cord were determined in male and female mice of different ages. Inflammatory pain was induced by complete Freund's adjuvant injection. Behavioral tests, immunoblotting, and electrophysiology were used to analyze the effect of STEP on nociception. Our results show that both genetic deletion and pharmacological inhibition of STEP induced thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia, which were accompanied by increased pGluN2B(Tyr1472) and pERK1/2(Thr202/Tyr204)levels in the lumbar spinal cord. Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase heterozygous and knockout mice presented a similar phenotype. Furthermore, electrophysiological experiments showed that TC-2153 increased C fiber-evoked spinal field potentials. Interestingly, we found that STEP(61) protein levels in the lumbar spinal cord inversely correlated with thermal hyperalgesia associated with age and female gender in mice. Consistently, STEP knockout mice failed to show age-related thermal hyperalgesia, although gender-related differences were preserved. Moreover, in a model of inflammatory pain, hyperalgesia was associated with increased phosphorylation-mediated STEP(61) inactivation and increased pGluN2B(Tyr1472) and pERK1/2(Thr202/Tyr204)levels in the lumbar spinal cord. Collectively, the present results underscore an important role of spinal STEP activity in the modulation of nociception.

  5. Metabolic adaptation to chronic inhibition of mitochondrial protein synthesis in acute myeloid leukemia cells.

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    Bozhena Jhas

    Full Text Available Recently, we demonstrated that the anti-bacterial agent tigecycline preferentially induces death in leukemia cells through the inhibition of mitochondrial protein synthesis. Here, we sought to understand mechanisms of resistance to tigecycline by establishing a leukemia cell line resistant to the drug. TEX leukemia cells were treated with increasing concentrations of tigecycline over 4 months and a population of cells resistant to tigecycline (RTEX+TIG was selected. Compared to wild type cells, RTEX+TIG cells had undetectable levels of mitochondrially translated proteins Cox-1 and Cox-2, reduced oxygen consumption and increased rates of glycolysis. Moreover, RTEX+TIG cells were more sensitive to inhibitors of glycolysis and more resistant to hypoxia. By electron microscopy, RTEX+TIG cells had abnormally swollen mitochondria with irregular cristae structures. RNA sequencing demonstrated a significant over-representation of genes with binding sites for the HIF1α:HIF1β transcription factor complex in their promoters. Upregulation of HIF1α mRNA and protein in RTEX+TIG cells was confirmed by Q-RTPCR and immunoblotting. Strikingly, upon removal of tigecycline from RTEX+TIG cells, the cells re-established aerobic metabolism. Levels of Cox-1 and Cox-2, oxygen consumption, glycolysis, mitochondrial mass and mitochondrial membrane potential returned to wild type levels, but HIF1α remained elevated. However, upon re-treatment with tigecycline for 72 hours, the glycolytic phenotype was re-established. Thus, we have generated cells with a reversible metabolic phenotype by chronic treatment with an inhibitor of mitochondrial protein synthesis. These cells will provide insight into cellular adaptations used to cope with metabolic stress.

  6. Inhibition of tyrosine phosphorylation of sperm flagellar proteins, outer dense fiber protein-2 and tektin-2, is associated with impaired motility during capacitation of hamster spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariappa, Daniel; Aladakatti, Ravindranath H; Dasari, Santosh K; Sreekumar, Arun; Wolkowicz, Michael; van der Hoorn, Frans; Seshagiri, Polani B

    2010-02-01

    In mammals, acquisition of fertilization competence of spermatozoa is dependent on the phenomenon of sperm capacitation. One of the critical molecular events of sperm capacitation is protein tyrosine phosphorylation. In a previous study, we demonstrated that a specific epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-tyrosine kinase inhibitor, tyrphostin-A47, inhibited hamster sperm capacitation, accompanied by a reduced sperm protein tyrosine phosphorylation. Interestingly, a high percentage of tyrphostin-A47-treated spermatozoa exhibited circular motility, which was associated with a distinct hypo-tyrosine phosphorylation of flagellar proteins, predominantly of Mr 45,000-60,000. In this study, we provide evidence on the localization of capacitation-associated tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins to the nonmembranous, structural components of the sperm flagellum. Consistent with this, we show their ultrastructural localization in the outer dense fiber, axoneme, and fibrous sheath of spermatozoa. Among hypo-tyrosine phosphorylated major proteins of tyrphostin-A47-treated spermatozoa, we identified the 45 kDa protein as outer dense fiber protein-2 and the 51 kDa protein as tektin-2, components of the sperm outer dense fiber and axoneme, respectively. This study shows functional association of hypo-tyrosine-phosphorylation status of outer dense fiber protein-2 and tektin-2 with impaired flagellar bending of spermatozoa, following inhibition of EGFR-tyrosine kinase, thereby showing the critical importance of flagellar protein tyrosine phosphorylation during capacitation and hyperactivation of hamster spermatozoa.

  7. Structural basis of response regulator inhibition by a bacterial anti-activator protein.

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    Melinda D Baker

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The complex interplay between the response regulator ComA, the anti-activator RapF, and the signaling peptide PhrF controls competence development in Bacillus subtilis. More specifically, ComA drives the expression of genetic competence genes, while RapF inhibits the interaction of ComA with its target promoters. The signaling peptide PhrF accumulates at high cell density and upregulates genetic competence by antagonizing the interaction of RapF and ComA. How RapF functions mechanistically to inhibit ComA activity and how PhrF in turn antagonizes the RapF-ComA interaction were unknown. Here we present the X-ray crystal structure of RapF in complex with the ComA DNA binding domain. Along with biochemical and genetic studies, the X-ray crystal structure reveals how RapF mechanistically regulates ComA function. Interestingly, we found that a RapF surface mimics DNA to block ComA binding to its target promoters. Furthermore, RapF is a monomer either alone or in complex with PhrF, and it undergoes a conformational change upon binding to PhrF, which likely causes the dissociation of ComA from the RapF-ComA complex. Finally, we compare the structure of RapF complexed with the ComA DNA binding domain and the structure of RapH complexed with Spo0F. This comparison reveals that RapF and RapH have strikingly similar overall structures, and that they have evolved different, non-overlapping surfaces to interact with diverse cellular targets. To our knowledge, the data presented here reveal the first atomic level insight into the inhibition of response regulator DNA binding by an anti-activator. Compounds that affect the interaction of Rap and Rap-like proteins with their target domains could serve to regulate medically and commercially important phenotypes in numerous Bacillus species, such as sporulation in B. anthracis and sporulation and the production of Cry protein endotoxin in B. thuringiensis.

  8. Inhibition of protein palmitoylation, raft localization, and T cell signaling by 2-bromopalmitate and polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Y; Hermida-Matsumoto, L; Resh, M D

    2000-01-07

    The ability of the Src family kinases Fyn and Lck to participate in signaling through the T cell receptor is critically dependent on their dual fatty acylation with myristate and palmitate. Here we identify a palmitate analog, 2-bromopalmitate, that effectively blocks Fyn fatty acylation in general and palmitoylation in particular. Treatment of COS-1 cells with 2-bromopalmitate blocked myristoylation and palmitoylation of Fyn and inhibited membrane binding and localization of Fyn to detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs). In Jurkat T cells, 2-bromopalmitate blocked localization of the endogenous palmitoylated proteins Fyn, Lck, and LAT to DRMs. This resulted in impaired signaling through the T cell receptor as evidenced by reductions in tyrosine phosphorylation, calcium release, and activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase. We also examined the ability of long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) to inhibit protein fatty acylation. PUFAs have been reported to inhibit T cell signaling by excluding Src family kinases from DRMs. Here we show that the PUFAs arachidonic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid inhibit Fyn palmitoylation and consequently block Fyn localization to DRMs. We propose that inhibition of protein palmitoylation represents a novel mechanism by which PUFAs exert their immunosuppressive effects.

  9. The apoptosis-inducing protein kinase DRAK2 is inhibited in a calcium-dependent manner by the calcium-binding protein CHP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwahara, Hiroshi; Kamei, Jun-ichi; Nakamura, Norihiro; Matsumoto, Miho; Inoue, Hiroki; Kanazawa, Hiroshi

    2003-08-01

    Calcineurin homologous protein (CHP) is an EF-hand Ca(2+)-binding protein capable of interacting with various cellular proteins including Na(+)/H(+) exchangers, kinesin-related proteins, and apoptosis-inducing protein kinase DRAK2. We investigated the role of CHP on the DRAK2 protein kinase in vitro. CHP significantly reduced (approximately 85% inhibition) the kinase activity of DRAK2 for both autophosphorylation and phosphorylation of exogenous substrate (myosin light chain). The inhibitory effect of CHP was dependent on the presence of Ca(2+), whereas the interaction between CHP and DRAK2 was not Ca(2+)-dependent. These observations suggest that CHP negatively regulates the apoptosis-inducing protein kinase DRAK2 in a manner that depends on intracellular Ca(2+)-concentration.

  10. Host-Pathogen Interactions: VII. Plant Pathogens Secrete Proteins which Inhibit Enzymes of the Host Capable of Attacking the Pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albersheim, P; Valent, B S

    1974-05-01

    The results presented demonstrate that microbial pathogens of plants have the ability to secrete proteins which effectively inhibit an enzyme synthesized by the host; an enzyme whose substrate is a constituent of the cell wall of the pathogen. The system in which this was discovered is the anthracnose-causing fungal pathogen (Colletotrichum lindemuthianum) and its host, the French bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). An endo-beta-1, 3-glucanase present in the bean leaves is specifically inhibited by a protein secreted by C. lindemuthianum. The cell walls of C. lindemuthianum are shown to be composed largely of a 1, 3-glucan.

  11. Pine pollen inhibits cell apoptosis-related protein expression in the cerebral cortex of mice with arsenic poisoning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanhong Luo; Yaodong Wei; Taizhong Wang; Dongzhu Chen; Tiansheng Lu; Ruibo Wu; Keke Si

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that pine pollen can inhibit cerebral cortical cell apoptosis in mice with arsenic poisoning. The present study sought to detect the influence of pine pollen on apoptosis-related proteins. Immunohistochemistry, western blotting and enzyme-linked immuno-sorbent assays were used to measure the levels of apoptosis-related proteins in the cerebral cortex of mice with arsenic poisoning. Results indicated that pine pollen suppressed cell apoptosis in the cerebral cortex of arsenic-poisoned mice by reducing Bax, Bcl-2 protein expression and increasing p53 protein expression.

  12. Inhibiting C-Reactive Protein for the Treatment of Cardiovascular Disease: Promising Evidence from Rodent Models

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    Alexander J. Szalai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Raised blood C-reactive protein (CRP level is a predictor of cardiovascular events, but whether blood CRP is causal in the disease process is unknown. The latter would best be defined by pharmacological inhibition of the protein in the context of a randomized case-control study. However, no CRP specific drug is currently available so such a prospective study cannot be performed. Blood CRP is synthesized primarily in the liver and the liver is an organ where antisense oligonucleotide (ASO drugs accumulate. Taking advantage of this we evaluated the efficacy of CRP specific ASOs in rodents with experimentally induced cardiovascular damage. Treating rats for 4 weeks with a rat CRP-specific ASO achieved >60% reduction of blood CRP. Notably, this effect was associated with improved heart function and pathology following myocardial infarction (induced by ligation of the left anterior descending artery. Likewise in human CRP transgenic mice treated for 2 weeks with a human CRP-specific ASO, blood human CRP was reduced by >70% and carotid artery patency was improved (2 weeks after surgical ligation. CRP specific ASOs might pave the way towards a placebo-controlled trial that could clarify the role of CRP in cardiovascular disease.

  13. The methyl-CpG-binding protein CIBZ suppresses myogenic differentiation by directly inhibiting myogenin expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Oikawa; Reiko Omori; Tomonori Nishii; Yasumasa Ishida; Masashi Kawaichi; Eishou Matsuda

    2011-01-01

    Postnatal growth and regeneration of skeletal muscle are carried out mainly by satellite cells,which,upon stimulation,begin to express myogenin (Myog),the critical determinant of myogenic differentiation.DNA methylation status has been associated with the expression of Myog,but the causative mechanism remains almost unknown.Here,we report that the level of CIBZ,a methyI-CpG-binding protein,decreases upon myogenic differentiation of satellitederived C2C12 cells,and during skeletal muscle regeneration in mice.We present data showing that the loss of CIBZ promotes myogenic differentiation,whereas exogenous expression of CIBZ impairs it,in cultured cells.CIBZ binds to a Myog promoter-proximal region and inhibits Myog transcription in a methylation-dependent manner.These data suggest that the suppression of myogenic differentiation by CIBZ is dependent,at least in part,on the regulation of Myog.Our data show that the methylation status of this proximal Myog promoter inversely correlates with Myog transcription in cells and tissues,and during postnatal growth of skeletal muscle.Notably,induction of Myog transcription by CIBZ suppression is independent of the demethylation of CpG sites in the Myog promoter.These observations provide the first reported molecular mechanism illustrating how Myog transcription is coordinately regulated by a methyI-CpG-binding protein and the methylation status of the proximal Myog promoter.

  14. Boron Stress Activates the General Amino Acid Control Mechanism and Inhibits Protein Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uluisik, Irem; Kaya, Alaattin; Fomenko, Dmitri E.; Karakaya, Huseyin C.; Carlson, Bradley A.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.; Koc, Ahmet

    2011-01-01

    Boron is an essential micronutrient for plants, and it is beneficial for animals. However, at high concentrations boron is toxic to cells although the mechanism of this toxicity is not known. Atr1 has recently been identified as a boron efflux pump whose expression is upregulated in response to boron treatment. Here, we found that the expression of ATR1 is associated with expression of genes involved in amino acid biosynthesis. These mechanisms are strictly controlled by the transcription factor Gcn4 in response to boron treatment. Further analyses have shown that boron impaired protein synthesis by promoting phosphorylation of eIF2α in a Gcn2 kinase dependent manner. The uncharged tRNA binding domain (HisRS) of Gcn2 is necessary for the phosphorylation of eIF2α in the presence of boron. We postulate that boron exerts its toxic effect through activation of the general amino acid control system and inhibition of protein synthesis. Since the general amino acid control pathway is conserved among eukaryotes, this mechanism of boron toxicity may be of general importance. PMID:22114689

  15. Subunit-specific inhibition of acid sensing ion channels by stomatin-like protein 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlenkov, Alexey; Lapatsina, Liudmila; Lewin, Gary R; Smith, Ewan St John

    2014-01-01

    There are five mammalian stomatin-domain genes, all of which encode peripheral membrane proteins that can modulate ion channel function. Here we examined the ability of stomatin-like protein 1 (STOML1) to modulate the proton-sensitive members of the acid-sensing ion channel (ASIC) family. STOML1 profoundly inhibits ASIC1a, but has no effect on the splice variant ASIC1b. The inactivation time constant of ASIC3 is also accelerated by STOML1. We examined STOML1 null mutant mice with a β-galactosidase-neomycin cassette gene-trap reporter driven from the STOML1 gene locus, which indicated that STOML1 is expressed in at least 50% of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurones. Patch clamp recordings from mouse DRG neurones identified a trend for larger proton-gated currents in neurones lacking STOML1, which was due to a contribution of effects upon both transient and sustained currents, at different pH, a finding consistent with an endogenous inhibitory function for STOML1. PMID:24247984

  16. AMOTL2 interaction with TAZ causes the inhibition of surfactant proteins expression in lung cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucci, Valeria; Di Palma, Tina; D'Ambrosio, Chiara; Scaloni, Andrea; Zannini, Mariastella

    2013-10-25

    TAZ (Transcriptional co-Activator with PDZ-binding motif), is a biologically potent transcriptional coactivator and functions by binding to the PPXY motif present in several transcription factors. Notably, TAZ behaves as a transducer linking cytoplasmic signaling events to transcriptional regulation in the nucleus. Several different factors regulate TAZ expression and/or function. In particular, a major regulation of TAZ activity occurs through the Hippo pathway by a phosphorylation-mediated mechanism that causes its cytoplasmic sequestration or degradation. Here we demonstrate that AMOTL2 robustly co-immunoprecipitates with TAZ, and their interaction is dependent on the WW domain of TAZ and the PPXY motif in the N-terminus of AMOTL2. Furthermore, we show that AMOTL2 colocalizes with TAZ in the cytoplasm of H441 human lung cells and regulates TAZ cytoplasm-to-nucleus translocation through direct protein-protein interaction. Interestingly, the overexpression of AMOTL2 inhibits the functional cooperation between the transcription factor TTF-1 and TAZ on the Surfactant C gene promoter, as well as the expression of other known target genes of these regulatory factors. Taken together, our results suggest an inhibitory role of AMOTL2 on TAZ ability to co-activate transcription and describe a different mechanism, Hippo pathway-independent, that modulates the activity of TAZ in lung cells through the interaction with Angiomotin-like 2 (AMOTL2). © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Cardiopulmonary bypass reduces peripheral microvascular contractile function by inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Tanveer A; Bianchi, Cesario; Araujo, Eugenio G; Ruel, Marc; Voisine, Pierre; Li, Jianyi; Liddicoat, John R; Sellke, Frank W

    2003-08-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) have been implicated in pathophysiologic responses to cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). MAPK are deactivated by phosphatases, such as MAPK phosphatase-1 (MKP-1). We hypothesized that MAPK mediate peripheral microvascular contractile dysfunction caused by CPB in humans. Skeletal muscle was harvested before and after CPB. Protein levels of MKP-1 and activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and p38 were measured. MKP-1 gene expression was measured. Peripheral microvessel responses to vasopressors were studied by videomicroscopy. Contractile function also was measured after MAPK inhibition with PD98059 (ERK1/2) and SB203580 (p38). ERK1/2, p38, and MKP-1 were localized by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. ERK1/2 and p38 activity was decreased in peripheral tissue after CPB. MKP-1 was increased after CPB. Contractile responses of peripheral arterioles to phenylephrine and vasopressin were decreased after CPB. Microvessel reactivity also was reduced after treatment with PD98059 and SB203580. ERK1/2, p38, and MKP-1 localized to peripheral arterioles in tissue sections. CPB reduces ERK1/2 and p38 activity in peripheral tissue, potentially by MKP-1. Contractile responses of peripheral arterioles to phenylephrine and vasopressin are dependent on ERK1/2 and p38 and are decreased after CPB. These results suggest that alterations in MAPK pathways in part regulate peripheral microvascular dysfunction after CPB in humans.

  18. Lamprey buccal gland secretory protein-2 (BGSP-2 inhibits human T lymphocyte proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing SUN, Shuiyan YU, Zhuang XUE, Cenjie LIU, Yu WU, Xin LIU, Qingwei LI

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Lamprey is a representative of the agnathans, the most ancient class of vertebrates. Parasitic lampreys secrete anticoagulant from their buccal glands and prevent blood coagulation of host fishes. We identified a buccal gland secretory protein-2 (BGSP-2 from a buccal gland cDNA library of Lampetra japonica. The full-length BGSP-2 gene was cloned and the recombinant BGSP-2 protein was generated. The role of BGSP-2 on lymphocyte proliferation was studied by examining its effects on human T lymphocytes. We found that lamprey BGSP-2 was able to effectively block the proliferation of T cells in vitro by inducing G1/S cell cycle arrest. Furthermore, it inhibited the proliferation of human T lymphocytes stimulated by phytohemagglutinin (PHA at a minimum concentration of 0.1μg/ml. Our data suggest that lamprey BGSP-2 is able to block the mitosis of human T lymphocytes at the G1/S point, and has the potential of anti-proliferative effect on PHA-activated T lymphocytes [Current Zoology 56 (2: 252–258, 2010].

  19. Protodioscin ameliorates fructose-induced renal injury via inhibition of the mitogen activated protein kinase pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jinyang; Yang, Xiaolin; Meng, Zhaoqing; Guo, Changrun

    2016-11-15

    High dietary fructose can cause metabolic syndrome and renal injury. The effects of protodioscin on metabolic syndrome and renal injury were investigated in mice receiving high-dose fructose. Mice received 30% (w/v) fructose in water and standard chow for 6 weeks to induce metabolic syndrome and were divided into four groups to receive carboxymethylcellulose sodium, allopurinol (5 mg/kg) and protodioscin (5 and 10 mg/kg) continuously for 6 weeks, respectively. The glucose intolerance, serum uric acid (UA), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine (Cr), total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were determined. Protodioscin significantly improved glucose intolerance and reduced the levels of serum UA, BUN, Cr, TC and TG. Histological examinations showed that protodioscin ameliorated glomerular and tubular pathological changes. Protodioscin significantly reduced renal concentrations of IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α by inhibiting the activation of nuclear factor-κB, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase. In addition, the effect of protodioscin on the mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK) pathway was examined. Taken together, protodioscin is a potential drug candidate for high dietary fructose-induced metabolic syndrome and renal injury. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. PRRT2 inhibits the proliferation of glioma cells by modulating unfolded protein response pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Guanghui; Yan, Jingfeng; Sun, Shuzhen; Qu, Xinhua

    2017-02-10

    Accumulating studies reported mutations in the gene encoding the proline-rich transmembrane protein 2 (PRRT2) to be causative for several paroxysmal neurological disorders, including paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD), PKD combined with infantile seizures (ICCA), and benign familial infantile seizures (BFIS). However, the impact of PRRT2 in tumorigenesis is not known. Based on a large-scale data analysis, we found that PRRT2 was down-regulated in glioma tumor tissues compared with normal brain tissue. Dysregulation of PRRT2 was not induced by mutation, copy number variation and epigenetic modification, but modulated by microRNA-30a-5p. Overexpression of PRRT2 strongly impaired the cell viability and promoted cell apoptosis and these anti-tumor effects could be largely reversed by microRNA-30a-5p. Mechanistically, PRRT2 expression was closely correlated genes involved in unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway and introduction of PRRT2 inhibited gene expression in the three branches of UPR, including PERK axis, IRE1 axis and ATF6 axis. Taken together, our findings identify PRRT2 as a tumor suppressor in glioma and provide a promising target for potential therapeutic intervention.

  1. Prenatal protein deprivation in rats induces changes in prepulse inhibition and NMDA receptor binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Abraham A; Printz, David J; Butler, Pamela D; Dulawa, Stephanie C; Printz, Morton P

    2004-01-23

    Epidemiological studies suggest that prenatal malnutrition increases the risk of developing schizophrenia. Animal models indicate that prenatal protein deprivation (PPD) affects many aspects of adult brain function. We tested the hypothesis that PPD in rats would alter prepulse inhibition (PPI), which is an operational measure of sensorimotor gating that is deficient in schizophrenia patients. Additionally, we examined dopaminergic and glutaminergic receptor binding in the striatum and hippocampus, which have been suggested to play a role in the etiology of schizophrenia. Rat dams were fed normal (25%) or low (6%) protein diets beginning 5 weeks prior to, and throughout pregnancy. The pups were tested at postnatal days (PND) 35 and 56 for PPI. Striatal and hippocampal NMDA receptor, and striatal dopamine receptor binding were quantified post-mortem in a subset of these rats. Female rats exposed to PPD had reduced levels of PPI at PND 56, but not PND 35, suggesting the emergence of a sensorimotor gating deficit in early adulthood. Striatal NMDA receptor binding was increased in PPD females. A decrease in initial startle response (SR) was also observed in all PPD rats relative to control rats. These results suggest that PPD causes age- and sex-dependent decreases in PPI and increases in NMDA receptor binding. This animal model may be useful for the investigation of neurodevelopmental changes that are associated with schizophrenia in humans.

  2. Protein arginine deiminase 4 inhibition is sufficient for the amelioration of collagen-induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, V C; Banda, N K; Cordova, K N; Chandra, P E; Robinson, W H; Cooper, D C; Lugo, D; Mehta, G; Taylor, S; Tak, P P; Prinjha, R K; Lewis, H D; Holers, V M

    2017-01-27

    Citrullination of joint proteins by the protein arginine deiminase (PAD) family of enzymes is recognized increasingly as a key process in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. This present study was undertaken to explore the efficacy of a novel PAD4-selective inhibitor, GSK199, in the murine collagen-induced arthritis model of rheumatoid arthritis. Mice were dosed daily from the time of collagen immunization with GSK199. Efficacy was assessed against a wide range of end-points, including clinical disease scores, joint histology and immunohistochemistry, serum and joint citrulline levels and quantification of synovial autoantibodies using a proteomic array containing joint peptides. Administration of GSK199 at 30 mg/kg led to significant effects on arthritis, assessed both by global clinical disease activity and by histological analyses of synovial inflammation, pannus formation and damage to cartilage and bone. In addition, significant decreases in complement C3 deposition in both synovium and cartilage were observed robustly with GSK199 at 10 mg/kg. Neither the total levels of citrulline measurable in joint and serum, nor levels of circulating collagen antibodies, were affected significantly by treatment with GSK199 at any dose level. In contrast, a subset of serum antibodies reactive against citrullinated and non-citrullinated joint peptides were reduced with GSK199 treatment. These data extend our previous demonstration of efficacy with the pan-PAD inhibitor Cl-amidine and demonstrate robustly that PAD4 inhibition alone is sufficient to block murine arthritis clinical and histopathological end-points.

  3. Ice-surface adsorption enhanced colligative effect of antifreeze proteins in ice growth inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yougang; Ba, Yong

    2006-09-01

    This Communication describes a mechanism to explain antifreeze protein's function to inhibit the growth of ice crystals. We propose that the adsorption of antifreeze protein (AFP) molecules on an ice surface induces a dense AFP-water layer, which can significantly decrease the mole fraction of the interfacial water and, thus, lower the temperature for a seed ice crystal to grow in a super-cooled AFP solution. This mechanism can also explain the nearly unchanged melting point for the ice crystal due to the AFP's ice-surface adsorption. A mathematical model combining the Langmuir theory of adsorption and the colligative effect of thermodynamics has been proposed to find the equilibrium constants of the ice-surface adsorptions, and the interfacial concentrations of AFPs through fitting the theoretical curves to the experimental thermal hysteresis data. This model has been demonstrated by using the experimental data of serial size-mutated beetle Tenebrio molitor (Tm) AFPs. It was found that the AFP's ice-surface adsorptions could increase the interfacial AFP's concentrations by 3 to 4 orders compared with those in the bulk AFP solutions.

  4. Boron stress activates the general amino acid control mechanism and inhibits protein synthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irem Uluisik

    Full Text Available Boron is an essential micronutrient for plants, and it is beneficial for animals. However, at high concentrations boron is toxic to cells although the mechanism of this toxicity is not known. Atr1 has recently been identified as a boron efflux pump whose expression is upregulated in response to boron treatment. Here, we found that the expression of ATR1 is associated with expression of genes involved in amino acid biosynthesis. These mechanisms are strictly controlled by the transcription factor Gcn4 in response to boron treatment. Further analyses have shown that boron impaired protein synthesis by promoting phosphorylation of eIF2α in a Gcn2 kinase dependent manner. The uncharged tRNA binding domain (HisRS of Gcn2 is necessary for the phosphorylation of eIF2α in the presence of boron. We postulate that boron exerts its toxic effect through activation of the general amino acid control system and inhibition of protein synthesis. Since the general amino acid control pathway is conserved among eukaryotes, this mechanism of boron toxicity may be of general importance.

  5. Modulation of cartilage differentiation by melanoma inhibiting activity/cartilage-derived retinoic acid-sensitive protein (MIA/CD-RAP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Thomas; Schlegel, Jacqueline; Schmid, Rainer; Opolka, Alfred; Grassel, Susanne; Humphries, Martin; Bosserhoff, Anja-Katrin

    2010-03-31

    Melanoma inhibiting activity/cartilage-derived retinoic acid-sensitive protein (MIA/CD-RAP) is a small soluble protein secreted from malignant melanoma cells and from chondrocytes. Recently, we revealed that MIA/CD-RAP can modulate bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)2-induced osteogenic differentiation into a chondrogenic direction. In the current study we aimed to find the molecular details of this MIA/CD-RAP function. Direct influence of MIA on BMP2 by protein-protein-interaction or modulating SMAD signaling was ruled out experimentally. Instead, we revealed inhibition of ERK signaling by MIA/CD-RAP. This inhibition is regulated via binding of MIA/CD-RAP to integrin alpha5 and abolishing its activity. Active ERK signaling is known to block chondrogenic differentiation and we revealed induction of aggrecan expression in chondrocytes by treatment with MIA/CD-RAP or PD098059, an ERK inhibitor. In in vivo models we could support the role of MIA/CD-RAP in influencing osteogenic differentiation negatively. Further, MIA/CD-RAP-deficient mice revealed an enhanced calcified cartilage layer of the articular cartilage of the knee joint and disordered arrangement of chondrocytes. Taken together, our data indicate that MIA/CD-RAP stabilizes cartilage differentiation and inhibits differentiation into bone potentially by regulating signaling processes during differentiation.

  6. A Novel Benzodiazepine Compound Inhibits Yellow Fever Virus Infection by Specifically Targeting NS4B Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Fang; Wu, Shuo; Julander, Justin; Ma, Julia; Zhang, Xuexiang; Kulp, John; Cuconati, Andrea; Block, Timothy M; Du, Yanming; Guo, Ju-Tao; Chang, Jinhong

    2016-09-21

    Although a highly effective vaccine is available, the number of yellow fever cases has increased over the past two decades, which highlights the pressing need for antiviral therapeutics. In a high throughput screening campaign, we identified an acetic acid benzodiazepine (BDAA) compound, which potently inhibits yellow fever virus (YFV). Interestingly, while treatment of YFV infected cultures with 2 μM of BDAA reduced the virion production by greater than 2 logs, the compound is not active against 21 other viruses from 14 different viral families. Selection and genetic analysis of drug resistant viruses revealed that substitution of proline at amino acid 219 (P219) of the nonstructural protein 4B (NS4B) with serine, threonine or alanine confers YFV resistance to BDAA without apparent loss of replication fitness in cultured mammalian cells. However, substitution of P219 with glycine confers BDAA resistance with significant loss of replication ability. Bioinformatics analysis predicts that the P219 localizes at the endoplasmic reticulum lumen side of the fifth putative trans-membrane domain of NS4B and the mutation may render the viral protein incapable of interacting with BDAA. Our studies thus revealed important role and structural basis for NS4B protein in supporting YFV replication. Moreover, in YFV-infected hamsters, oral administration of BDAA protected 90% of the animals from death, significantly reduced viral load by greater than 2 logs and attenuated viral infection-induced liver injury and body weight loss. The encouraging preclinical results thus warrant further development of BDAA or its derivatives as antiviral agents to treat yellow fever.

  7. Post-streptococcal auto-antibodies inhibit protein disulfide isomerase and are associated with insulin resistance.

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    Adi Aran

    Full Text Available Post-streptococcal autoimmunity affects millions worldwide, targeting multiple organs including the heart, brain, and kidneys. To explore the post-streptococcal autoimmunity spectrum, we used western blot analyses, to screen 310 sera from healthy subjects with (33% and without (67% markers of recent streptococcal infections [anti-Streptolysin O (ASLO or anti-DNAse B (ADB]. A 58 KDa protein, reacting strongly with post-streptococcal sera, was identified as Protein Disulfide Isomerase (PDI, an abundant protein with pleiotropic metabolic, immunologic, and thrombotic effects. Anti-PDI autoantibodies, purified from human sera, targeted similar epitopes in Streptolysin O (SLO, P51-61 and PDI (P328-338. The correlation between post-streptococcal status and anti-human PDI auto-immunity was further confirmed in a total of 2987 samples (13.6% in 530 ASLO positive versus 5.6% in 2457 ASLO negative samples, p<0.0001. Finally, anti-PDI auto-antibodies inhibited PDI-mediated insulin degradation in vitro (n = 90, p<0.001, and correlated with higher serum insulin (14.1 iu/ml vs. 12.2 iu/ml, n = 1215, p = 0.039 and insulin resistance (Homeostatic Model Assessment (HOMA 4.1 vs. 3.1, n = 1215, p = 0.004, in a population-based cohort. These results identify PDI as a major target of post-streptococcal autoimmunity, and establish a new link between infection, autoimmunity, and metabolic disturbances.

  8. Hydrogen sulfide inhibits high glucose-induced matrix protein synthesis by activating AMP-activated protein kinase in renal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hak Joo; Mariappan, Meenalakshmi M; Feliers, Denis; Cavaglieri, Rita C; Sataranatarajan, Kavithalakshmi; Abboud, Hanna E; Choudhury, Goutam Ghosh; Kasinath, Balakuntalam S

    2012-02-10

    Hydrogen sulfide, a signaling gas, affects several cell functions. We hypothesized that hydrogen sulfide modulates high glucose (30 mm) stimulation of matrix protein synthesis in glomerular epithelial cells. High glucose stimulation of global protein synthesis, cellular hypertrophy, and matrix laminin and type IV collagen content was inhibited by sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), an H(2)S donor. High glucose activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1 (mTORC1), shown by phosphorylation of p70S6 kinase and 4E-BP1, was inhibited by NaHS. High glucose stimulated mTORC1 to promote key events in the initiation and elongation phases of mRNA translation: binding of eIF4A to eIF4G, reduction in PDCD4 expression and inhibition of its binding to eIF4A, eEF2 kinase phosphorylation, and dephosphorylation of eEF2; these events were inhibited by NaHS. The role of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), an inhibitor of protein synthesis, was examined. NaHS dose-dependently stimulated AMPK phosphorylation and restored AMPK phosphorylation reduced by high glucose. Compound C, an AMPK inhibitor, abolished NaHS modulation of high glucose effect on events in mRNA translation as well as global and matrix protein synthesis. NaHS induction of AMPK phosphorylation was inhibited by siRNA for calmodulin kinase kinase β, but not LKB1, upstream kinases for AMPK; STO-609, a calmodulin kinase kinase β inhibitor, had the same effect. Renal cortical content of cystathionine β-synthase and cystathionine γ-lyase, hydrogen sulfide-generating enzymes, was significantly reduced in mice with type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes, coinciding with renal hypertrophy and matrix accumulation. Hydrogen sulfide is a newly identified modulator of protein synthesis in the kidney, and reduction in its generation may contribute to kidney injury in diabetes.

  9. Functional domains of wild-type and mutant p53 proteins involved in transcriptional regulation, transdominant inhibition, and transformation suppression.

    OpenAIRE

    1993-01-01

    The wild-type (wt) p53 protein has transcriptional activation functions which may be linked to its tumor suppressor activity. Many mutant p53 proteins expressed in cancers have lost the ability to function as transcriptional activators and furthermore may inhibit wt p53 function. To study the mechanisms by which mutant forms of p53 have lost their transactivation function and can act in a dominant negative manner, a structure-function analysis of both mutant and engineered truncated forms of ...

  10. Inhibition of the Expression of the Small Heat Shock Protein αB-Crystallin Inhibits Exosome Secretion in Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells in Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangalum, Rajendra K; Bhat, Ankur M; Kohan, Sirus A; Bhat, Suraj P

    2016-06-17

    Exosomes carry cell type-specific molecular cargo to extracellular destinations and therefore act as lateral vectors of intercellular communication and transfer of genetic information from one cell to the other. We have shown previously that the small heat shock protein αB-crystallin (αB) is exported out of the adult human retinal pigment epithelial cells (ARPE19) packaged in exosomes. Here, we demonstrate that inhibition of the expression of αB via shRNA inhibits exosome secretion from ARPE19 cells indicating that exosomal cargo may have a role in exosome biogenesis (synthesis and/or secretion). Sucrose density gradient fractionation of the culture medium and cellular extracts suggests continued synthesis of exosomes but an inhibition of exosome secretion. In cells where αB expression was inhibited, the distribution of CD63 (LAMP3), an exosome marker, is markedly altered from the normal dispersed pattern to a stacked perinuclear presence. Interestingly, the total anti-CD63(LAMP3) immunofluorescence in the native and αB-inhibited cells remains unchanged suggesting continued exosome synthesis under conditions of impaired exosome secretion. Importantly, inhibition of the expression of αB results in a phenotype of the RPE cell that contains an increased number of vacuoles and enlarged (fused) vesicles that show increased presence of CD63(LAMP3) and LAMP1 indicating enhancement of the endolysosomal compartment. This is further corroborated by increased Rab7 labeling of this compartment (RabGTPase 7 is known to be associated with late endosome maturation). These data collectively point to a regulatory role for αB in exosome biogenesis possibly via its involvement at a branch point in the endocytic pathway that facilitates secretion of exosomes.

  11. Inhibition of advanced protein glycation by a Schiff base between aminoguanidine and pyridoxal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, T; Sugiura, M; Hamada, Y; Miwa, I

    1999-08-13

    Aminoguanidine is a well-known inhibitor of the formation of advanced glycation end products and is considered to be promising for the treatment of diabetic complications. We recently reported, however, that administration of aminoguanidine caused the formation of a Schiff base adduct between aminoguanidine and pyridoxal phosphate in the liver and kidney of mice and a concomitant decrease in the amount of liver pyridoxal phosphate. Our study led us to hypothesize that the Schiff base adduct and/or another Schiff base adduct formed from aminoguanidine and pyridoxal might be a better compound than aminoguanidine. In the present study, we examined the in vitro inhibitory potency of the latter adduct against advanced glycation end product formation and its effect on the tissue contents of pyridoxal and its phosphate. Aminoguanidine-pyridoxal phosphate adduct was not employed in this study because of its poor solubility in water. Aminoguanidine-pyridoxal adduct was hydrolyzed by only about 15% during 10 days at pH 7.4 and 37 degrees C. The adduct at 1 mM did not inhibit Amadori product formation induced by incubation of albumin with 100 mM mannose for 10 days. The adduct, when tested at 1 and 2 mM, dose-dependently inhibited advanced glycation end product formation induced by incubation of albumin with mannose; and the inhibitory potency of the adduct was similar to or higher than that of aminoguanidine. The presence of an appreciable amount of aminoguanidine-pyridoxal adduct in the kidney of mice given the adduct suggested that at least part of the adduct administered was absorbed from the gastrointestinal duct. The amounts of pyridoxal and its phosphate in tissues were not at all decreased by administration of the aminoguanidine-pyridoxal Schiff base. We conclude that the Schiff base may be a more promising inhibitor of advanced protein glycation than aminoguanidine.

  12. Restoration of Brain Acid Soluble Protein 1 Inhibits Proliferation and Migration of Thyroid Cancer Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Run-Sheng Guo; Yue Yu; Jun Chen; Yue-Yu Chen; Na Shen; Ming Qiu

    2016-01-01

    Background:Brain acid soluble protein 1 (BASP1) is identified as a novel potential tumor suppressor in several cancers.However,its role in thyroid cancer has not been investigated yet.In the present study,the antitumor activities of BASP1 against the growth and migration of thyroid cancer cells were evaluated.Methods:BASP1 expression in thyroid cancer tissues and normal tissues were examined by immunohistochemical staining and the association between its expression and prognosis was analyzed,pcDNA-BASP 1 carrying full length ofBASP1 cDNA was constructed to restore the expression ofBASP 1 in thyroid cancer cell lines (BHT-101 and KMH-2).The cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo was evaluated by WST-1 assay and xenograft tumor models,respectively.Cell cycle distribution after transfection was analyzed using flow cytometry.Cell apoptosis after transfection was examined by annexin V/propidium iodide assay.The migration was examined using transwell assay.Results:BASP 1 expression was abundant in normal tissues while it is significantly decreased in cancer tissues (P =0.000).pcDNA-BASP1 restored the expression of BASP1 and significantly inhibited the growth of BHT-101 and KMH-2 cells as well as xenograft tumors in nude mice (P =0.000).pcDNA-BASP1 induced G1 arrest and apoptosis in BHT-101 and KMH-2 cells.In addition,pcDNA-BASP1 significantly inhibited the cell migration.Conclusions:Downregnlation of BASP1 expression may play a role in the tumorigenesis of thyroid cancer.Restoration of BASP1 expression exerted extensive antitumor activities against growth and migration of thyroid cancer cells,which suggested that BASP1 gene might act as a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of thyroid cancer.

  13. Inhibition of neuraminidase inhibitor-resistant influenza virus by DAS181, a novel sialidase fusion protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gallen B Triana-Baltzer

    Full Text Available Antiviral drug resistance for influenza therapies remains a concern due to the high prevalence of H1N1 2009 seasonal influenza isolates which display H274Y associated oseltamivir-resistance. Furthermore, the emergence of novel H1N1 raises the potential that additional reassortments can occur, resulting in drug resistant virus. Thus, additional antiviral approaches are urgently needed. DAS181 (Fludase, a sialidase fusion protein, has been shown to have inhibitory activity against a large number of seasonal influenza strains and a highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI strain (H5N1. Here, we examine the in vitro activity of DAS181 against a panel of 2009 oseltamivir-resistant seasonal H1N1 clinical isolates. The activity of DAS181 against nine 2009, two 2007, and two 2004 clinical isolates of seasonal IFV H1N1 was examined using plaque number reduction assay on MDCK cells. DAS181 strongly inhibited all tested isolates. EC50 values remained constant against isolates from 2004, 2007, and 2009, suggesting that there was no change in DAS181 sensitivity over time. As expected, all 2007 and 2009 isolates were resistant to oseltamivir, consistent with the identification of the H274Y mutation in the NA gene of all these isolates. Interestingly, several of the 2007 and 2009 isolates also exhibited reduced sensitivity to zanamivir, and accompanying HA mutations near the sialic acid binding site were observed. DAS181 inhibits IFV that is resistant to NAIs. Thus, DAS181 may offer an alternative therapeutic option for seasonal or pandemic IFVs that become resistant to currently available antiviral drugs.

  14. Receptor interacting protein kinase-2 inhibition by CYLD impairs anti-bacterial immune responses in macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina eWex

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Upon infection with intracellular bacteria, nucleotide oligomerization domain protein 2 (NOD2 recognizes bacterial muramyl dipeptide and binds, subsequently, to receptor-interacting serine/threonine kinase 2 (RIPK2. RIPK2 mediates the activation of immune responses via the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB and extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK pathways. Previously, it has been shown that RIPK2 activation dependens on its K63-ubiquitination by the E3 ligases pellino-3 and ITCH, whereas the deubiquitinating enzyme A20 counter-regulates RIPK2 activity by cleaving K63-polyubiquitin chains from RIPK2. Here, we newly identify the deubiquitinating enzyme CYLD as a new interacting partner and inhibitor of RIPK2. We show that CYLD binds to and removes K63-polyubiquitin chains from RIPK2 in Listeria monocytogenes (Lm infected bone-marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM. CYLD-mediated K63-deubiquitination of RIPK2 resulted in an impaired activation of both NF-κB and ERK1/2 pathways, reduced production of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-12, anti-listerial ROS and NO, and, finally, impaired pathogen control. In turn, RIPK2 inhibition by siRNA prevented activation of NF-κB and ERK1/2 and completely abolished the protective effect of CYLD-deficiency with respect to the production of IL-6, NO, ROS and pathogen control. Noteworthy, CYLD also inhibited autophagy of Listeria in a RIPK2-ERK1/2 dependent manner.The protective function of CYLD-deficiency was dependent on IFN-γ pre-stimulation of infected macrophages. Interestingly, the reduced NF-κB activation in CYLD-expressing macrophages limited the protective effect of IFN-γ by reducing NF-κB-dependent STAT1 activation. Taken together, our study identifies CYLD as an important inhibitor of RIPK2-dependent anti-bacterial immune responses in macrophages.

  15. Cyclophilin A binds to the viral RNA and replication proteins, resulting in inhibition of tombusviral replicase assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalev, Nikolay; Nagy, Peter D

    2013-12-01

    Replication of plus-stranded RNA viruses is greatly affected by numerous host-encoded proteins that act as restriction factors. Cyclophilins, which are a large family of cellular prolyl isomerases, have been found to inhibit Tomato bushy stunt tombusvirus (TBSV) replication in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae model based on genome-wide screens and global proteomics approaches. In this report, we further characterize single-domain cyclophilins, including the mammalian cyclophilin A and plant Roc1 and Roc2, which are orthologs of the yeast Cpr1p cyclophilin, a known inhibitor of TBSV replication in yeast. We found that recombinant CypA, Roc1, and Roc2 strongly inhibited TBSV replication in a cell-free replication assay. Additional in vitro studies revealed that CypA, Roc1, and Roc2 cyclophilins bound to the viral replication proteins, and CypA and Roc1 also bound to the viral RNA. These interactions led to inhibition of viral RNA recruitment, the assembly of the viral replicase complex, and viral RNA synthesis. A catalytically inactive mutant of CypA was also able to inhibit TBSV replication in vitro due to binding to the replication proteins and the viral RNA. Overexpression of CypA and its mutant in yeast or plant leaves led to inhibition of tombusvirus replication, confirming that CypA is a restriction factor for TBSV. Overall, the current work has revealed a regulatory role for the cytosolic single-domain Cpr1-like cyclophilins in RNA virus replication.

  16. Ondansetron can enhance cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity via inhibition of multiple toxin and extrusion proteins (MATEs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Qing [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland at Baltimore, MD (United States); Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Central South University, Hunan 410078 (China); Guo, Dong [Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Central South University, Hunan 410078 (China); Dong, Zhongqi [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland at Baltimore, MD (United States); Zhang, Wei [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland at Baltimore, MD (United States); Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Central South University, Hunan 410078 (China); Zhang, Lei; Huang, Shiew-Mei [Office of Clinical Pharmacology, Office of Translational Sciences, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, MD (United States); Polli, James E. [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland at Baltimore, MD (United States); Shu, Yan, E-mail: yshu@rx.umaryland.edu [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland at Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2013-11-15

    The nephrotoxicity limits the clinical application of cisplatin. Human organic cation transporter 2 (OCT2) and multidrug and toxin extrusion proteins (MATEs) work in concert in the elimination of cationic drugs such as cisplatin from the kidney. We hypothesized that co-administration of ondansetron would have an effect on cisplatin nephrotoxicity by altering the function of cisplatin transporters. The inhibitory potencies of ondansetron on metformin accumulation mediated by OCT2 and MATEs were determined in the stable HEK-293 cells expressing these transporters. The effects of ondansetron on drug disposition in vivo were examined by conducting the pharmacokinetics of metformin, a classical substrate for OCTs and MATEs, in wild-type and Mate1−/− mice. The nephrotoxicity was assessed in the wild-type and Mate1−/− mice received cisplatin with and without ondansetron. Both MATEs, including human MATE1, human MATE2-K, and mouse Mate1, and OCT2 (human and mouse) were subject to ondansetron inhibition, with much greater potencies by ondansetron on MATEs. Ondansetron significantly increased tissue accumulation and pharmacokinetic exposure of metformin in wild-type but not in Mate1−/− mice. Moreover, ondansetron treatment significantly enhanced renal accumulation of cisplatin and cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity which were indicated by increased levels of biochemical and molecular biomarkers and more severe pathohistological changes in mice. Similar increases in nephrotoxicity were caused by genetic deficiency of MATE function in mice. Therefore, the potent inhibition of MATEs by ondansetron enhances the nephrotoxicity associated with cisplatin treatment in mice. Potential nephrotoxic effects of combining the chemotherapeutic cisplatin and the antiemetic 5-hydroxytryptamine-3 (5-HT{sub 3}) receptor antagonists, such as ondansetron, should be investigated in patients. - Highlights: • Nephrotoxicity significantly limits clinical use of the chemotherapeutic

  17. Selective inhibition of Sarcocystis neurona calcium-dependent protein kinase 1 for equine protozoal myeloencephalitis therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojo, Kayode K; Dangoudoubiyam, Sriveny; Verma, Shiv K; Scheele, Suzanne; DeRocher, Amy E; Yeargan, Michelle; Choi, Ryan; Smith, Tess R; Rivas, Kasey L; Hulverson, Matthew A; Barrett, Lynn K; Fan, Erkang; Maly, Dustin J; Parsons, Marilyn; Dubey, Jitender P; Howe, Daniel K; Van Voorhis, Wesley C

    2016-12-01

    Sarcocystis neurona is the most frequent cause of equine protozoal myeloencephalitis, a debilitating neurological disease of horses that can be difficult to treat. We identified SnCDPK1, the S. neurona homologue of calcium-dependent protein kinase 1 (CDPK1), a validated drug target in Toxoplasma gondii. SnCDPK1 shares the glycine "gatekeeper" residue of the well-characterized T. gondii enzyme, which allows the latter to be targeted by bumped kinase inhibitors. This study presents detailed molecular and phenotypic evidence that SnCDPK1 can be targeted for rational drug development. Recombinant SnCDPK1 was tested against four bumped kinase inhibitors shown to potently inhibit both T. gondii (Tg) CDPK1 and T. gondii tachyzoite growth. SnCDPK1 was inhibited by low nanomolar concentrations of these BKIs and S. neurona growth was inhibited at 40-120nM concentrations. Thermal shift assays confirmed these bumped kinase inhibitors bind CDPK1 in S. neurona cell lysates. Treatment with bumped kinase inhibitors before or after invasion suggests that bumped kinase inhibitors interfere with S. neurona mammalian host cell invasion in the 0.5-2.5μM range but interfere with intracellular division at 2.5μM. In vivo proof-of-concept experiments were performed in a murine model of S. neurona infection. The experimental infected groups treated for 30days with compound BKI-1553 (n=10 mice) had no signs of disease, while the infected control group had severe signs and symptoms of infection. Elevated antibody responses were found in 100% of control infected animals, but only 20% of BKI-1553 treated infected animals. Parasites were found in brain tissues of 100% of the control infected animals, but only in 10% of the BKI-1553 treated animals. The bumped kinase inhibitors used in these assays have been chemically optimized for potency, selectivity and pharmacokinetic properties, and hence are good candidates for treatment of equine protozoal myeloencephalitis. Copyright © 2016

  18. Vaccinia virus protein C6 is a virulence factor that binds TBK-1 adaptor proteins and inhibits activation of IRF3 and IRF7.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonie Unterholzner

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Recognition of viruses by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs causes interferon-β (IFN-β induction, a key event in the anti-viral innate immune response, and also a target of viral immune evasion. Here the vaccinia virus (VACV protein C6 is identified as an inhibitor of PRR-induced IFN-β expression by a functional screen of select VACV open reading frames expressed individually in mammalian cells. C6 is a member of a family of Bcl-2-like poxvirus proteins, many of which have been shown to inhibit innate immune signalling pathways. PRRs activate both NF-κB and IFN regulatory factors (IRFs to activate the IFN-β promoter induction. Data presented here show that C6 inhibits IRF3 activation and translocation into the nucleus, but does not inhibit NF-κB activation. C6 inhibits IRF3 and IRF7 activation downstream of the kinases TANK binding kinase 1 (TBK1 and IκB kinase-ε (IKKε, which phosphorylate and activate these IRFs. However, C6 does not inhibit TBK1- and IKKε-independent IRF7 activation or the induction of promoters by constitutively active forms of IRF3 or IRF7, indicating that C6 acts at the level of the TBK1/IKKε complex. Consistent with this notion, C6 immunoprecipitated with the TBK1 complex scaffold proteins TANK, SINTBAD and NAP1. C6 is expressed early during infection and is present in both nucleus and cytoplasm. Mutant viruses in which the C6L gene is deleted, or mutated so that the C6 protein is not expressed, replicated normally in cell culture but were attenuated in two in vivo models of infection compared to wild type and revertant controls. Thus C6 contributes to VACV virulence and might do so via the inhibition of PRR-induced activation of IRF3 and IRF7.

  19. Inhibition of Gas Hydrate Nucleation and Growth: Efficacy of an Antifreeze Protein from the Longhorn BeetleRhagium mordax

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perfeldt, Christine Malmos; Chua, Pei Cheng; Daraboina, Nagu

    2014-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are characterized by their ability to protect organisms from subfreezing temperatures by preventing tiny ice crystals in solution from growing as the solution is cooled below its freezing temperature. This inhibition of ice growth is called antifreeze activity, and in p......Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are characterized by their ability to protect organisms from subfreezing temperatures by preventing tiny ice crystals in solution from growing as the solution is cooled below its freezing temperature. This inhibition of ice growth is called antifreeze activity......, and in particular, certain insect AFPs show very high antifreeze activity. Recent studies have shown AFPs to be promising candidates as green and environmentally benign inhibitors for gas hydrate formation. Here we show that an insect antifreeze protein from the longhorn beetle, Rhagium mordax (RmAFP1), the most...... potent protein yet found for freezing inhibition, can inhibit methane hydrates as effectively as the synthetic polymeric inhibitor polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). In high pressure rocking cell experiments, onset hydrate nucleation temperatures and growth profiles showed repeatable results. RmAFP1 clearly...

  20. Phenolics from Garcinia mangostana Inhibit Advanced Glycation Endproducts Formation: Effect on Amadori Products, Cross-Linked Structures and Protein Thiols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossam M. Abdallah

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Accumulation of Advanced Glycation Endproducts (AGEs in body tissues plays a major role in the development of diabetic complications. Here, the inhibitory effect of bioactive metabolites isolated from fruit hulls of Garcinia mangostana on AGE formation was investigated through bio-guided approach using aminoguanidine (AG as a positive control. Including G. mangostana total methanol extract (GMT in the reaction mixture of bovine serum albumin (BSA and glucose or ribose inhibited the fluorescent and non-fluorescent AGEs formation in a dose dependent manner. The bioassay guided fractionation of GMT revealed isolation of four bioactive constituents from the bioactive fraction; which were identified as: garcimangosone D (1, aromadendrin-8-C-glucopyranoside (2, epicatechin (3, and 2,3′,4,5′,6-pentahydroxybenzophenone (4. All the tested compounds significantly inhibited fluorescent and non-fluorescent AGEs formation in a dose dependent manner whereas compound 3 (epicatechin was found to be the most potent. In search for the level of action, addition of GMT, and compounds 2–4 inhibited fructosamine (Amadori product and protein aggregation formation in both glucose and ribose. To explore the mechanism of action, it was found that addition of GMT and only compound (3 to reaction mixture increased protein thiol in both glucose and ribose while compounds 1, 2 and 4 only increased thiol in case of ribose. In conclusion, phenolic compounds 1–4 inhibited AGEs formation at the levels of Amadori product and protein aggregation formation through saving protein thiol.

  1. Quantitative structure activity relationship studies on the flavonoid mediated inhibition of multidrug resistance proteins 1 and 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zanden, J.J. van; Wortelboer, H.M.; Bijlsma, S.; Punt, A.; Usta, M.; Bladeren, P.J.V.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Cnubben, N.H.P.

    2005-01-01

    In the present study, the effects of a large series of flavonoids on multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs) were studied in MRP1 and MRP2 transfected MDCKII cells. The results were used to define the structural requirements of flavonoids necessary for potent inhibition of MRP1- and MRP2-mediated calce

  2. Design and Testing of an Assessment Instrument to Measure Understanding of Protein Structure and Enzyme Inhibition in a New Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villafañe, Sachel M.; Heyen, Bruce J.; Lewis, Jennifer E.; Loertscher, Jennifer; Minderhout, Vicky; Murray, Tracey Arnold

    2016-01-01

    Assessment instruments designed to measure student conceptual understanding and skills proficiency related to biochemistry are important to transform undergraduate biochemistry education. The purpose of this study was to develop an assessment instrument to measure student understanding of protein structure and enzyme inhibition in a new context,…

  3. Quantitative structure activity relationship studies on the flavonoid mediated inhibition of multidrug resistance proteins 1 and 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zanden, J.J. van; Wortelboer, H.M.; Bijlsma, S.; Punt, A.; Usta, M.; Bladeren, P.J.V.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Cnubben, N.H.P.

    2005-01-01

    In the present study, the effects of a large series of flavonoids on multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs) were studied in MRP1 and MRP2 transfected MDCKII cells. The results were used to define the structural requirements of flavonoids necessary for potent inhibition of MRP1- and MRP2-mediated

  4. Expression of bovine Mx1 protein inhibits the replication of foot-and-mouth disease virus in BHK-21 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, K J; Meng, Q L; Qiao, J; Huang, J; Zhang, Z C; Wang, G C; Wang, J W; Chen, C F

    2013-01-01

    Mx proteins belonging to the dynamin superfamily of large GTPases inhibit replication of a wide range of RNA viruses. In this study, we examined whether bovine Mx1 protein could interfere with the replication of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). For this purpose we established cloned BHK-21 cells expressing bovine Mx1 protein (BM1 cells) and infected them with FMDV serotype O. Cloned BHK-21 cells expressing neomycin resistance instead of Mx1 protein (BH1 cells) and original BHK-21 cells served as negative controls. The results showed that the expression of bovine Mx1 protein reduced viral yields by 90% and levels of viral VP1 mRNA by 60%. These findings correlated with a significant reduction of viral antigen detectable in infected cells by immunofluorescent assay. These results demonstrate that bovine Mx1 protein interferes with the replication of FMDV.

  5. Lactobacillus acidophilus S-layer protein-mediated inhibition of Salmonella-induced apoptosis in Caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pengcheng; Yin, Yinyan; Yu, Qinghua; Yang, Qian

    2011-05-27

    Surface layer (S-layer) proteins are crystalline arrays of proteinaceous subunits present as the outermost component of the cell wall in several Lactobacillus species. The underlying mechanism for how S-layer proteins inhibit pathogen infections remains unclear. To gain insights into the mechanism of the antimicrobial activity of Lactobacillus S-layer proteins, we examined how Lactobacillus S-layer proteins impact Salmonella Typhimurium-induced apoptosis in vitro in Caco-2 human colon epithelial cells. When Caco-2 cells infected with Salmonella Typhimurium SL1344, we found that apoptosis was mediated by activation of caspase-3, but not caspase-1. When Salmonella Typhimurium SL1344 and S-layer proteins were coincubated simultaneously, Caco-2 cell apoptosis was markedly decreased and the cell damage was modified, as evaluated by flow cytometry and microscopy. Detailed analyses showed that the S-layer proteins inhibited the caspase-3 activity and activated the extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) signaling pathway. Taken together, these findings suggest that Lactobacillus S-layer proteins protected against Salmonella-induced apoptosis through reduced caspase-3 activation. In addition, Salmonella-induced apoptotic cell damage was modified by S-layer proteins through the ERK1/2 signaling pathway. This mechanism may represent a novel approach for antagonizing Salmonella infection.

  6. Ricin Inhibits Activation of the Unfolded Protein Response by Preventing Splicing of the HAC1 mRNA*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Bijal A.; Tortora, Andrew; Li, Xiao-Ping; Tumer, Nilgun E.

    2011-01-01

    Ricin A chain (RTA) inhibits protein synthesis by removing a specific adenine from the highly conserved α-sarcin/ricin loop in the large rRNA. Expression of RTA with its own signal sequence in yeast resulted in its translocation into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and subsequent glycosylation. Because RTA must unfold within the ER, it may be vulnerable to host defenses, such as the unfolded protein response (UPR). UPR was induced in cells expressing an active site mutant but not the wild type RTA, indicating that the active site of RTA played a role in perturbing the ER stress response. The inactive RTA without the signal sequence did not induce UPR, indicating that translocation into the ER was critical for induction of UPR. The wild type RTA inhibited activation of UPR not only due to ER stress induced by the protein itself but also by global effectors such as tunicamycin and dithiothreitol. Mature RTA without the signal sequence also inhibited UPR, providing evidence that inhibition of UPR occurred on the cytosolic face of the ER. RTA could not inhibit UPR when the spliced form of HAC1 mRNA was provided in trans, indicating that it had a direct effect on UPR upstream of HAC1-dependent transcriptional activation. Only the precursor form of HAC1 mRNA was detected in cells expressing RTA after exposure to ER stress, demonstrating that ricin inhibits activation of UPR by preventing HAC1 mRNA splicing. The RTA mutants that depurinated ribosomes but did not kill cells were not able to inhibit activation of UPR by tunicamycin, providing evidence that the inability to activate UPR in response to ER stress contributes to the cytotoxicity of ricin. PMID:18180297

  7. Autophagy is induced through the ROS-TP53-DRAM1 pathway in response to mitochondrial protein synthesis inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiaolei; Le, Li; Fan, Yanxin; Lv, Lin; Zhang, Junjie

    2012-07-01

    Mitoribosome in mammalian cells is responsible for synthesis of 13 mtDNA-encoded proteins, which are integral parts of four mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes (I, III, IV and V). ERAL1 is a nuclear-encoded GTPase important for the formation of the 28S small mitoribosomal subunit. Here, we demonstrate that knockdown of ERAL1 by RNA interference inhibits mitochondrial protein synthesis and promotes reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, leading to autophagic vacuolization in HeLa cells. Cells that lack ERAL1 expression showed a significant conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II and an enhanced accumulation of autophagic vacuoles carrying the LC3 marker, all of which were blocked by the autophagy inhibitor 3-MA as well as by the ROS scavenger NAC. Inhibition of mitochondrial protein synthesis either by ERAL1 siRNA or chloramphenicol (CAP), a specific inhibitor of mitoribosomes, induced autophagy in HTC-116 TP53 (+/+) cells, but not in HTC-116 TP53 (-/-) cells, indicating that tumor protein 53 (TP53) is essential for the autophagy induction. The ROS elevation resulting from mitochondrial protein synthesis inhibition induced TP53 expression at transcriptional levels by enhancing TP53 promoter activity, and increased TP53 protein stability by suppressing TP53 ubiquitination through MAPK14/p38 MAPK-mediated TP53 phosphorylation. Upregulation of TP53 and its downstream target gene DRAM1, but not CDKN1A/p21, was required for the autophagy induction in ERAL1 siRNA or CAP-treated cells. Altogether, these data indicate that autophagy is induced through the ROS-TP53-DRAM1 pathway in response to mitochondrial protein synthesis inhibition.

  8. Inhibition of tumorigenesis driven by different Wnt proteins requires blockade of distinct ligand-binding regions by LRP6 antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettenberg, Seth A.; Charlat, Olga; Daley, Michael P.; Liu, Shanming; Vincent, Karen J.; Stuart, Darrin D.; Schuller, Alwin G.; Yuan, Jing; Ospina, Beatriz; Green, John; Yu, Qunyan; Walsh, Renee; Schmitz, Rita; Heine, Holger; Bilic, Sanela; Ostrom, Lance; Mosher, Rebecca; Hartlepp, K. Felix; Zhu, Zhenping; Fawell, Stephen; Yao, Yung-Mae; Stover, David; Finan, Peter M.; Porter, Jeffery A.; Sellers, William R.; Klagge, Ingo M.; Cong, Feng

    2010-01-01

    Disregulated Wnt/β-catenin signaling has been linked to various human diseases, including cancers. Inhibitors of oncogenic Wnt signaling are likely to have a therapeutic effect in cancers. LRP5 and LRP6 are closely related membrane coreceptors for Wnt proteins. Using a phage-display library, we identified anti-LRP6 antibodies that either inhibit or enhance Wnt signaling. Two classes of LRP6 antagonistic antibodies were discovered: one class specifically inhibits Wnt proteins represented by Wnt1, whereas the second class specifically inhibits Wnt proteins represented by Wnt3a. Epitope-mapping experiments indicated that Wnt1 class-specific antibodies bind to the first propeller and Wnt3a class-specific antibodies bind to the third propeller of LRP6, suggesting that Wnt1- and Wnt3a-class proteins interact with distinct LRP6 propeller domains. This conclusion is further supported by the structural functional analysis of LRP5/6 and the finding that the Wnt antagonist Sclerostin interacts with the first propeller of LRP5/6 and preferentially inhibits the Wnt1-class proteins. We also show that Wnt1 or Wnt3a class-specific anti-LRP6 antibodies specifically block growth of MMTV-Wnt1 or MMTV-Wnt3 xenografts in vivo. Therapeutic application of these antibodies could be limited without knowing the type of Wnt proteins expressed in cancers. This is further complicated by our finding that bivalent LRP6 antibodies sensitize cells to the nonblocked class of Wnt proteins. The generation of a biparatopic LRP6 antibody blocks both Wnt1- and Wnt3a-mediated signaling without showing agonistic activity. Our studies provide insights into Wnt-induced LRP5/6 activation and show the potential utility of LRP6 antibodies in Wnt-driven cancer. PMID:20713706

  9. Interferon-inducible protein Mx1 inhibits influenza virus by interfering with functional viral ribonucleoprotein complex assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhelst, Judith; Parthoens, Eef; Schepens, Bert; Fiers, Walter; Saelens, Xavier

    2012-12-01

    Mx1 is a GTPase that is part of the antiviral response induced by type I and type III interferons in the infected host. It inhibits influenza virus infection by blocking viral transcription and replication, but the molecular mechanism is not known. Polymerase basic protein 2 (PB2) and nucleoprotein (NP) were suggested to be the possible target of Mx1, but a direct interaction between Mx1 and any of the viral proteins has not been reported. We investigated the interplay between Mx1, NP, and PB2 to identify the mechanism of Mx1's antiviral activity. We found that Mx1 inhibits the PB2-NP interaction, and the strength of this inhibition correlated with a decrease in viral polymerase activity. Inhibition of the PB2-NP interaction is an active process requiring enzymatically active Mx1. We also demonstrate that Mx1 interacts with the viral proteins NP and PB2, which indicates that Mx1 protein has a direct effect on the viral ribonucleoprotein complex. In a minireplicon system, avian-like NP from swine virus isolates was more sensitive to inhibition by murine Mx1 than NP from human influenza A virus isolates. Likewise, murine Mx1 displaced avian NP from the viral ribonucleoprotein complex more easily than human NP. The stronger resistance of the A/H1N1 pandemic 2009 virus against Mx1 also correlated with reduced inhibition of the PB2-NP interaction. Our findings support a model in which Mx1 interacts with the influenza ribonucleoprotein complex and interferes with its assembly by disturbing the PB2-NP interaction.

  10. Targeting Rac1 signaling inhibits streptococcal M1 protein-induced CXC chemokine formation, neutrophil infiltration and lung injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songen Zhang

    Full Text Available Infections with Streptococcus pyogenes exhibit a wide spectrum of infections ranging from mild pharyngitis to severe Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS. The M1 serotype of Streptococcus pyogenes is most commonly associated with STSS. In the present study, we hypothesized that Rac1 signaling might regulate M1 protein-induced lung injury. We studied the effect of a Rac1 inhibitor (NSC23766 on M1 protein-provoked pulmonary injury. Male C57BL/6 mice received NSC23766 prior to M1 protein challenge. Bronchoalveolar fluid and lung tissue were harvested for quantification of neutrophil recruitment, edema and CXC chemokine formation. Neutrophil expression of Mac-1 was quantified by use of flow cytometry. Quantitative RT-PCR was used to determine gene expression of CXC chemokines in alveolar macrophages. Treatment with NSC23766 decreased M1 protein-induced neutrophil infiltration, edema formation and tissue injury in the lung. M1 protein challenge markedly enhanced Mac-1 expression on neutrophils and CXC chemokine levels in the lung. Inhibition of Rac1 activity had no effect on M1 protein-induced expression of Mac-1 on neutrophils. However, Rac1 inhibition markedly decreased M1 protein-evoked formation of CXC chemokines in the lung. Moreover, NSC23766 completely inhibited M1 protein-provoked gene expression of CXC chemokines in alveolar macrophages. We conclude that these novel results suggest that Rac1 signaling is a significant regulator of neutrophil infiltration and CXC chemokine production in the lung. Thus, targeting Rac1 activity might be a potent strategy to attenuate streptococcal M1 protein-triggered acute lung damage.

  11. Cold-inducible RNA-binding protein inhibits neuron apoptosis through the suppression of mitochondrial apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hai-Tao; Xue, Jing-Hui; Zhang, Zhi-Wen; Kong, Hai-Bo; Liu, Ai-Jun; Li, Shou-Chun; Xu, Dong-Gang

    2015-10-01

    Cold-inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRP) is induced by mild hypothermia in several mammals, but the precise mechanism by which CIRP mediates hypothermia-induced neuroprotection remains unknown. We aimed to investigate the molecular mechanisms by which CIRP protects the nervous system during mild hypothermia. Rat cortical neurons were isolated and cultured in vitro under mild hypothermia (32°C). Apoptosis was measured by annexin V and propidium iodide staining, visualized by flow cytometry. Neuron ultrastructure was visualized by transmission electron microscopy. CIRP overexpression and knockdown were achieved via infection with pL/IRES/GFP-CIRP and pL/shRNA/F-CIRP-A lentivirus. RT(2) Profiler PCR Array Pathway Analysis and western blotting were used to evaluate the effects of CIRP overexpresion/knockdown on the neurons׳ transcriptome. Neuron late apoptosis was significantly reduced at day 7 of culture by 12h hypothermia, but neuron ultrastructure remained relatively intact. RT(2) Profiler PCR Array Pathway Analysis of 84 apoptosis pathway-associated factors revealed that mild hypothermia and CIRP overexpression induce similar gene expression profiles, specifically alterations of genes implicated in the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway. Mild hypothermia-treated neurons up-regulated 12 and down-regulated 38 apoptosis pathway-associated genes. CIRP-overexpressing neurons up-regulated 15 and down-regulated 46 genes. CIRP-knocked-down hypothermia-treated cells up-regulated 9 and down-regulated 40 genes. Similar results were obtained at the protein level. In conclusion, CIRP may inhibit neuron apoptosis through the suppression of the mitochondria apoptosis pathway during mild hypothermia.

  12. Dynamin Binding Protein (Tuba) Deficiency Inhibits Ciliogenesis and Nephrogenesis in Vitro and in Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Jeong-In; Kwon, Sang-Ho; Zuo, Xiaofeng; Choi, Soo Young; Kim, Seok-Hyung; Lipschutz, Joshua H

    2016-04-15

    Dysfunction of renal primary cilia leads to polycystic kidney disease. We previously showed that the exocyst, a protein trafficking complex, is essential for ciliogenesis and regulated by multiple Rho and Rab family GTPases, such as Cdc42. Cdc42 deficiency resulted in a disruption of renal ciliogenesis and a polycystic kidney disease phenotype in zebrafish and mice. Here we investigate the role of Dynamin binding protein (also known as Tuba), a Cdc42-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor, in ciliogenesis and nephrogenesis using Tuba knockdown Madin-Darby canine kidney cells and tuba knockdown in zebrafish. Tuba depletion resulted in an absence of cilia, with impaired apical polarization and inhibition of hepatocyte growth factor-induced tubulogenesis in Tuba knockdown Madin-Darby canine kidney cell cysts cultured in a collagen gel. In zebrafish, tuba was expressed in multiple ciliated organs, and, accordingly, tuba start and splice site morphants showed various ciliary mutant phenotypes in these organs. Co-injection of tuba and cdc42 morpholinos at low doses, which alone had no effect, resulted in genetic synergy and led to abnormal kidney development with highly disorganized pronephric duct cilia. Morpholinos targeting two other guanine nucleotide exchange factors not known to be in the Cdc42/ciliogenesis pathway and a scrambled control morpholino showed no phenotypic effect. Given the molecular nature of Cdc42 and Tuba, our data strongly suggest that tuba and cdc42 act in the same ciliogenesis pathway. Our study demonstrates that Tuba deficiency causes an abnormal renal ciliary and morphogenetic phenotype. Tuba most likely plays a critical role in ciliogenesis and nephrogenesis by regulating Cdc42 activity.

  13. Src-like adaptor protein 2 (SLAP2) binds to and inhibits FLT3 signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moharram, Sausan A.; Chougule, Rohit A.; Su, Xianwei; Li, Tianfeng; Sun, Jianmin; Zhao, Hui; Rönnstrand, Lars; Kazi, Julhash U.

    2016-01-01

    Fms-like tyrosine kinase (FLT3) is a frequently mutated oncogene in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). FLT3 inhibitors display promising results in a clinical setting, but patients relapse after short-term treatment due to the development of resistant disease. Therefore, a better understanding of FLT3 downstream signal transduction pathways will help to identify an alternative target for the treatment of AML patients carrying oncogenic FLT3. Activation of FLT3 results in phosphorylation of FLT3 on several tyrosine residues that recruit SH2 domain-containing signaling proteins. We screened a panel of SH2 domain-containing proteins and identified SLAP2 as a potent interacting partner of FLT3. We demonstrated that interaction occurs when FLT3 is activated, and also, an intact SH2 domain of SLAP2 is required for binding. SLAP2 binding sites in FLT3 mainly overlap with those of SRC. SLAP2 over expression in murine proB cells or myeloid cells inhibited oncogenic FLT3-ITD-mediated cell proliferation and colony formation in vitro, and tumor formation in vivo. Microarray analysis suggests that higher SLAP2 expression correlates with a gene signature similar to that of loss of oncogene function. Furthermore, FLT3-ITD positive AML patients with higher SLAP2 expression displayed better prognosis compared to those with lower expression of SLAP2. Expression of SLAP2 blocked FLT3 downstream signaling cascades including AKT, ERK, p38 and STAT5. Finally, SLAP2 accelerated FLT3 degradation through enhanced ubiquitination. Collectively, our data suggest that SLAP2 acts as a negative regulator of FLT3 signaling and therefore, modulation of SLAP2 expression levels may provide an alternative therapeutic approach for FLT3-ITD positive AML. PMID:27458164

  14. Apoptotic cells activate AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and inhibit epithelial cell growth without change in intracellular energy stores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Vimal A; Massenburg, Donald; Vujicic, Snezana; Feng, Lanfei; Tang, Meiyi; Litbarg, Natalia; Antoni, Angelika; Rauch, Joyce; Lieberthal, Wilfred; Levine, Jerrold S

    2015-09-11

    Apoptosis plays an indispensable role in the maintenance and development of tissues. We have shown that receptor-mediated recognition of apoptotic target cells by viable kidney proximal tubular epithelial cells (PTECs) inhibits the proliferation and survival of PTECs. Here, we examined the effect of apoptotic targets on PTEC cell growth (cell size during G1 phase of the cell cycle). Using a cell culture model, we show that apoptotic cells potently activate AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a highly sensitive sensor of intracellular energy stores. AMPK activation leads to decreased activity of its downstream target, ribosomal protein p70 S6 kinase (p70S6K), and concomitant inhibition of cell growth. Importantly, these events occur without detectable change in intracellular levels of AMP, ADP, or ATP. Inhibition of AMPK, either pharmacologically by compound C or molecularly by shRNA, diminishes the effects of apoptotic targets and largely restores p70S6K activity and cell size to normal levels. Apoptotic targets also inhibit Akt, a second signaling pathway regulating cell growth. Expression of a constitutively active Akt construct partially relieved cell growth inhibition but was less effective than inhibition of AMPK. Inhibition of cell growth by apoptotic targets is dependent on physical interaction between apoptotic targets and PTECs but independent of phagocytosis. We conclude that receptor-mediated recognition of apoptotic targets mimics the effects of intracellular energy depletion, activating AMPK and inhibiting cell growth. By acting as sentinels of environmental change, apoptotic death may enable nearby viable cells, especially nonmigratory epithelial cells, to monitor and adapt to local stresses.

  15. Zinc finger antiviral protein inhibits coxsackievirus B3 virus replication and protects against viral myocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Yan, Kepeng; Wei, Lin; Yang, Jie; Lu, Chenyu; Xiong, Fei; Zheng, Chunfu; Xu, Wei

    2015-11-01

    The host Zinc finger antiviral protein (ZAP) has been reported exhibiting antiviral activity against positive-stranded RNA viruses (Togaviridae), negative-stranded RNA viruses (Filoviridae) and retroviruses (Retroviridae). However, whether ZAP restricts the infection of enterovirus and the development of enterovirus mediated disease remains unknown. Here, we reported the antiviral properties of ZAP against coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3), a single-stranded RNA virus of the Enterovirus genus within the Picornaviridae as a major causative agent of viral myocarditis (VMC). We found that the expression of ZAP was significantly induced after CVB3 infection in heart tissues of VMC mice. ZAP potently inhibited CVB3 replication in cells after infection, while overexpression of ZAP in mice significantly increased the resistance to CVB3 replication and viral myocarditis by significantly reducing cardiac inflammatory cytokine production. The ZAP-responsive elements (ZREs) were mapped to the 3'UTR and 5'UTR of viral RNA. Taken together, ZAP confers resistance to CVB3 infection via directly targeting viral RNA and protects mice from acute myocarditis by suppressing viral replication and cardiac inflammatory cytokine production. Our finding further expands ZAP's range of viral targets, and suggests ZAP as a potential therapeutic target for viral myocarditis caused by CVB3.

  16. Inhibition of cholesterol ester transfer protein CGS 25159 and changes in lipoproteins in hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothari, H V; Poirier, K J; Lee, W H; Satoh, Y

    1997-01-03

    As a result of screening, several isoflavans were identified to be antagonists of cholesterol ester transfer protein (CETP) activity. The present study evaluates CGS 25159, a synthetic isoflavan, as a putative inhibitor of CETP activity of human and hamster plasma. Determined by [3]CE transfer from HDL to VLDL + LDL fraction or by fluorescent-CE transfer assay, CGS 25159 inhibited CETP in both human plasma bottom fraction (d = 1.21 g/ml) and in plasma from Golden Syrian Hamsters with an IC50 time dependent changes in CETP activity. After two weeks of treatment at 10 mg/kg, the changes in VLDL + LDL cholesterol, total triglycerides and HDL cholesterol were -22 +/- 4.6*, -23 +/- 7.5 and +10 +/- 2.8%, respectively. The corresponding changes at 30 mg/kg were -28 +/- 5.5*, -38 +/- 6.8* and +29 +/-4.4.*%, (*, P, 0.05; mean +/- S.E.M., n = 6). A single spin gradient density ultracentrifugation of plasma lipoproteins and treated animals showed an increase in HDL cholesterol and a redistribution to larger HDL particles. These data support the contention that pharmacological down regulation of CETP activity could result in favorable changes in lipoprotein profile.

  17. Activation of GABAB receptors inhibits protein kinase B /Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Frances Fangjia

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Accumulated evidence has suggested that potentiation of cortical GABAergic inhibitory neurotransmission may be a key mechanism in the treatment of schizophrenia. However, the downstream molecular mechanisms related to GABA potentiation remain unexplored. Recent studies have suggested that dopamine D2 receptor antagonists, which are used in the clinical treatment of schizophrenia, modulate protein kinase B (Akt/glycogen synthase kinase (GSK-3 signaling. Here we report that activation of GABAB receptors significantly inhibits Akt/GSK-3 signaling in a β-arrestin-dependent pathway. Agonist stimulation of GABAB receptors enhances the phosphorylation of Akt (Thr-308 and enhances the phosphorylation of GSK-3α (Ser-21/β (Ser-9 in both HEK-293T cells expressing GABAB receptors and rat hippocampal slices. Furthermore, knocking down the expression of β-arrestin2 using siRNA abolishes the GABAB receptor-mediated modulation of GSK-3 signaling. Our data may help to identify potentially novel targets through which GABAB receptor agents may exert therapeutic effects in the treatment of schizophrenia.

  18. Activation of GABA(B) receptors inhibits protein kinase B/glycogen synthase kinase 3 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Frances Fangjia; Su, Ping; Liu, Fang; Daskalakis, Zafiris J

    2012-11-28

    Accumulated evidence has suggested that potentiation of cortical GABAergic inhibitory neurotransmission may be a key mechanism in the treatment of schizophrenia. However, the downstream molecular mechanisms related to GABA potentiation remain unexplored. Recent studies have suggested that dopamine D2 receptor antagonists, which are used in the clinical treatment of schizophrenia, modulate protein kinase B (Akt)/glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3 signaling. Here we report that activation of GABA(B) receptors significantly inhibits Akt/GSK-3 signaling in a β-arrestin-dependent pathway. Agonist stimulation of GABA(B) receptors enhances the phosphorylation of Akt (Thr-308) and enhances the phosphorylation of GSK-3α (Ser-21)/β (Ser-9) in both HEK-293T cells expressing GABA(B) receptors and rat hippocampal slices. Furthermore, knocking down the expression of β-arrestin2 using siRNA abolishes the GABA(B) receptor-mediated modulation of GSK-3 signaling. Our data may help to identify potentially novel targets through which GABA(B) receptor agents may exert therapeutic effects in the treatment of schizophrenia.

  19. Membrane Tension Inhibits Deformation by Coat Proteins in Clathrin-Mediated Endocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassinger, Julian; Drubin, David; Oster, George; Rangamani, Padmini

    2016-02-01

    In clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME), clathrin and various adaptor proteins coat a patch of the plasma membrane, which is reshaped to form a budded vesicle. Experimental studies have demonstrated that elevated membrane tension can inhibit bud formation by a clathrin coat. In this study, we investigate the impact of membrane tension on the mechanics of membrane budding by simulating clathrin coats that either grow in area or progressively induce greater curvature. At low membrane tension, progressively increasing the area of a curvature-generating coat causes the membrane to smoothly evolve from a flat to budded morphology, whereas the membrane remains essentially flat at high membrane tensions. Interestingly, at physiologically relevant, intermediate membrane tensions, the shape evolution of the membrane undergoes a snapthrough instability in which increasing coat area causes the membrane to "snap" from an open, U-shaped bud to a closed, $\\Omega$-shaped bud. This instability is accompanied by a large energy barrier, which could cause a developing endocytic pit to stall if the binding energy of additional coat is insufficient to overcome this barrier. Similar results were found for a coat of constant area in which the spontaneous curvature progressively increases. Additionally, a pulling force on the bud, simulating a force from actin polymerization, is sufficient to drive a transition from an open to closed bud, overcoming the energy barrier opposing this transition.

  20. Inhibition of Diethylnitrosamine-Induced Hepatocarcinogenesis in Mice by a High Dietary Protein Intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shou, Qiyang; Chen, Fangming; Cai, Yueqin; Zhang, Shanxin; Tu, Jue; Zhang, Lizong; Wang, Dejun; Wang, Jianchao; Chen, Minli; Fu, Huiying

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological and experimental evidence supports the key role of diet in the development of many types of cancer. Recent studies have suggested that dietary modifications may be beneficial for individuals at high risk for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In this study, we investigated the effect of a high-protein (HP; 20% casein) dietondiethylnitrosamine (DEN)-induced hepatocarcinogenesis. Mice were given free access to water with 30 μg/ml DEN and fed a normal or HP diet for 22 wk. The results showed mice consuming HP diets had reduced mortality rates and body weights and lower hepatic enzyme activity compared to DEN-treated mice on a normal diet. HP consumption also promoted collagen accumulation in the liver, and reduced numbers of proliferating hepatocytes and infiltrating inflammatory cells, as well as decreased expression of inflammatory factor interleukin-1β, and nuclear factor κB activation. These data indicate that HP diets can inhibit DEN-induced hepatocarcinogenesis via suppression of the inflammatory response and provide a new evidence for the dietary management of clinical patients with hepatocellular carcinoma.

  1. Cloning and sequence analysis of a gene encoding polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein from cotton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins (PGIP) play important roles in plant defense of pathogen, especially fungi. A pair of degenerated primers is designed based on the conserved sequence of 20 other known pgip genes and used to amplify Gossypium barbadense cultivation 7124 cDNA library by touch-down PCR. A 561 bp internal fragment of the pgip gene is obtained and used to design the primers for rapid amplification of cDNA ends. A composite pgip gene sequence is constructed from the products of 5′ and 3′ RACE, which are 666 bp and 906 bp respectively. Analysis of nucleic acid sequence shows 69.2% and 68.7% similarity to Citrus and Poncirus pgip genes, respectively. Its open reading frame of the gene encodes a polypeptide of 330 amino acids, in which 10 leucine-rich repeats arrange tandemly. A new set of primers is designed to the 5′ and 3′ ends of the gene, which allows amplification of the full-length gene from the cotton cDNA library. Genomic DNA analysis reveals that this gene has no intron.

  2. Ribosomal protein mutations induce autophagy through S6 kinase inhibition of the insulin pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry F Heijnen

    Full Text Available Mutations affecting the ribosome lead to several diseases known as ribosomopathies, with phenotypes that include growth defects, cytopenia, and bone marrow failure. Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA, for example, is a pure red cell aplasia linked to the mutation of ribosomal protein (RP genes. Here we show the knock-down of the DBA-linked RPS19 gene induces the cellular self-digestion process of autophagy, a pathway critical for proper hematopoiesis. We also observe an increase of autophagy in cells derived from DBA patients, in CD34+ erythrocyte progenitor cells with RPS19 knock down, in the red blood cells of zebrafish embryos with RP-deficiency, and in cells from patients with Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SDS. The loss of RPs in all these models results in a marked increase in S6 kinase phosphorylation that we find is triggered by an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS. We show that this increase in S6 kinase phosphorylation inhibits the insulin pathway and AKT phosphorylation activity through a mechanism reminiscent of insulin resistance. While stimulating RP-deficient cells with insulin reduces autophagy, antioxidant treatment reduces S6 kinase phosphorylation, autophagy, and stabilization of the p53 tumor suppressor. Our data suggest that RP loss promotes the aberrant activation of both S6 kinase and p53 by increasing intracellular ROS levels. The deregulation of these signaling pathways is likely playing a major role in the pathophysiology of ribosomopathies.

  3. Ribosomal protein mutations induce autophagy through S6 kinase inhibition of the insulin pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry F Heijnen

    Full Text Available Mutations affecting the ribosome lead to several diseases known as ribosomopathies, with phenotypes that include growth defects, cytopenia, and bone marrow failure. Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA, for example, is a pure red cell aplasia linked to the mutation of ribosomal protein (RP genes. Here we show the knock-down of the DBA-linked RPS19 gene induces the cellular self-digestion process of autophagy, a pathway critical for proper hematopoiesis. We also observe an increase of autophagy in cells derived from DBA patients, in CD34+ erythrocyte progenitor cells with RPS19 knock down, in the red blood cells of zebrafish embryos with RP-deficiency, and in cells from patients with Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SDS. The loss of RPs in all these models results in a marked increase in S6 kinase phosphorylation that we find is triggered by an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS. We show that this increase in S6 kinase phosphorylation inhibits the insulin pathway and AKT phosphorylation activity through a mechanism reminiscent of insulin resistance. While stimulating RP-deficient cells with insulin reduces autophagy, antioxidant treatment reduces S6 kinase phosphorylation, autophagy, and stabilization of the p53 tumor suppressor. Our data suggest that RP loss promotes the aberrant activation of both S6 kinase and p53 by increasing intracellular ROS levels. The deregulation of these signaling pathways is likely playing a major role in the pathophysiology of ribosomopathies.

  4. Inhibition of Receptor Interacting Protein Kinases Attenuates Cardiomyocyte Hypertrophy Induced by Palmitic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Mingyue; Lu, Lihui; Lei, Song; Chai, Hua; Wu, Siyuan; Tang, Xiaoju; Bao, Qinxue; Chen, Li; Wu, Wenchao; Liu, Xiaojing

    2016-01-01

    Palmitic acid (PA) is known to cause cardiomyocyte dysfunction. Cardiac hypertrophy is one of the important pathological features of PA-induced lipotoxicity, but the mechanism by which PA induces cardiomyocyte hypertrophy is still unclear. Therefore, our study was to test whether necroptosis, a receptor interacting protein kinase 1 and 3 (RIPK1 and RIPK3-) dependent programmed necrosis, was involved in the PA-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. We used the PA-treated primary neonatal rat cardiac myocytes (NCMs) or H9c2 cells to study lipotoxicity. Our results demonstrated that cardiomyocyte hypertrophy was induced by PA treatment, determined by upregulation of hypertrophic marker genes and cell surface area enlargement. Upon PA treatment, the expression of RIPK1 and RIPK3 was increased. Pretreatment with the RIPK1 inhibitor necrostatin-1 (Nec-1), the PA-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, was attenuated. Knockdown of RIPK1 or RIPK3 by siRNA suppressed the PA-induced myocardial hypertrophy. Moreover, a crosstalk between necroptosis and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress was observed in PA-treated cardiomyocytes. Inhibition of RIPK1 with Nec-1, phosphorylation level of AKT (Ser473), and mTOR (Ser2481) was significantly reduced in PA-treated cardiomyocytes. In conclusion, RIPKs-dependent necroptosis might be crucial in PA-induced myocardial hypertrophy. Activation of mTOR may mediate the effect of necroptosis in cardiomyocyte hypertrophy induced by PA.

  5. Griffithsin binds to the glycosylated proteins (E and prM) of Japanese encephalitis virus and inhibit its infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishag, Hassan Z A; Li, Chen; Wang, Fengjuan; Mao, Xiang

    2016-04-02

    Griffithsin (GRFT) is a broad-spectrum antiviral protein against several glycosylated viruses. In our previous publication, we have shown that GRFT exerted antiviral activity against Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) infection. Herein, we further elucidated the mechanism by which GRFT inhibits JEV infection in BHK-21 cells. In vitro experiments using Pull-down assay and Co-immunoprecipitation (CO-IP) assay showed that GRFT binds to the JEV glycosylated viral proteins, specifically the enveloped (E) and premature (prM) glycoproteins. The binding of GRFT to the JEV was competitively inhibited by increasing concentrations of mannose; in turns abolished anti-JEV activity of GRFT. We suggested that, the binding of GRFT to the glycosylated viral proteins may contribute to its anti-JEV activity. Collectively, our data indicated a possible mechanism by which GRFT exerted its anti-JEV activity. This observation suggests GRFT's potentials in the development of therapeutics against JEV or other flavivirus infection.

  6. The structure of a contact-dependent growth-inhibition (CDI) immunity protein from Neisseria meningitidis MC58

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    Tan, Kemin; Johnson, Parker M.; Stols, Lucy; Boubion, Bryan; Eschenfeldt, William; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Hayes, Christopher S.; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Goulding, Celia W.

    2015-06-01

    Contact-dependent growth inhibition (CDI) is an important mechanism of intercellular competition between neighboring Gram-negative bacteria. CDI systems encode large surface-exposed CdiA effector proteins that carry a variety of C-terminal toxin domains (CdiA-CTs). All CDI+ bacteria also produce CdiI immunity proteins that specifically bind to the cognate CdiA-CT and neutralize its toxin activity to prevent auto-inhibition. Here, the X-ray crystal structure of a CdiI immunity protein from Neisseria meningitidis MC58 is presented at 1.45 angstrom resolution. The CdiI protein has structural homology to the Whirly family of RNA-binding proteins, but appears to lack the characteristic nucleic acid-binding motif of this family. Sequence homology suggests that the cognate CdiA-CT is related to the eukaryotic EndoU family of RNA-processing enzymes. A homology model is presented of the CdiA-CT based on the structure of the XendoU nuclease from Xenopus laevis. Molecular-docking simulations predict that the CdiA-CT toxin active site is occluded upon binding to the CdiI immunity protein. Together, these observations suggest that the immunity protein neutralizes toxin activity by preventing access to RNA substrates.

  7. eIF4A inhibition allows translational regulation of mRNAs encoding proteins involved in Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Bottley

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is the main cause of dementia in our increasingly aging population. The debilitating cognitive and behavioral symptoms characteristic of AD make it an extremely distressing illness for patients and carers. Although drugs have been developed to treat AD symptoms and to slow disease progression, there is currently no cure. The incidence of AD is predicted to increase to over one hundred million by 2050, placing a heavy burden on communities and economies, and making the development of effective therapies an urgent priority. Two proteins are thought to have major contributory roles in AD: the microtubule associated protein tau, also known as MAPT; and the amyloid-beta peptide (A-beta, a cleavage product of amyloid precursor protein (APP. Oxidative stress is also implicated in AD pathology from an early stage. By targeting eIF4A, an RNA helicase involved in translation initiation, the synthesis of APP and tau, but not neuroprotective proteins, can be simultaneously and specifically reduced, representing a novel avenue for AD intervention. We also show that protection from oxidative stress is increased upon eIF4A inhibition. We demonstrate that the reduction of these proteins is not due to changes in mRNA levels or increased protein degradation, but is a consequence of translational repression conferred by inhibition of the helicase activity of eIF4A. Inhibition of eIF4A selectively and simultaneously modulates the synthesis of proteins involved in Alzheimer's disease: reducing A-beta and tau synthesis, while increasing proteins predicted to be neuroprotective.

  8. A mutant of SWAP-70, a phosphatidylinositoltrisphosphate binding protein, transforms mouse embryo fibroblasts, which is inhibited by sanguinarine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhisa Fukui

    Full Text Available SWAP-70, a phosphatidylinositol trisphosphate (PtdIns(3,4,5P(3 binding protein, has been suggested to be involved in transformation of mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs as well as membrane ruffling after growth factor stimulation of the cells. A mutant, SWAP-70-374, was found to be able to bind to F-actin in vitro, whereas wild-type SWAP-70 failed to do so. This mutant was present at the plasma membrane without any stimulation while the wild-type protein was present only in the cytosol unless cells were stimulated with EGF. Expression of this mutant in MEFs resulted in morphologic transformation, fast growth, and loss of contact inhibition, suggesting that SWAP-70 with this mutation can transform the cells. ERK1/2 was activated in SWAP-70-374-transformed cells. Use of MEK inhibitors revealed that the ERK1/2 pathway does not affect the cell growth of MEFs but is responsible for loss of contact inhibition. To investigate the function of SWAP-70 further, drugs that can inhibit SWAP-70-dependent cell responses were screened. Among various drugs, sanguinarine was found to inhibit transformation of MEFs by SWAP-70-374. This drug was able to inhibit SWAP-70-mediated membrane ruffling as well, suggesting that its effect was closely related to the SWAP-70 signaling pathway. These results suggest that SWAP-70-374 can activate some signaling pathways, including the ERK1/2 pathway, to transform MEFs.

  9. GCN-2 dependent inhibition of protein synthesis activates osmosensitive gene transcription via WNK and Ste20 kinase signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Elaine Choung-Hee; Strange, Kevin

    2012-12-15

    Increased gpdh-1 transcription is required for accumulation of the organic osmolyte glycerol and survival of Caenorhabditis elegans during hypertonic stress. Our previous work has shown that regulators of gpdh-1 (rgpd) gene knockdown constitutively activates gpdh-1 expression. Fifty-five rgpd genes play essential roles in translation suggesting that inhibition of protein synthesis is an important signal for regulating osmoprotective gene transcription. We demonstrate here that translation is reduced dramatically by hypertonic stress or knockdown of rgpd genes encoding aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases and eukaryotic translation initiation factors (eIFs). Toxin-induced inhibition of translation also activates gpdh-1 expression. Hypertonicity-induced translation inhibition is mediated by general control nonderepressible (GCN)-2 kinase signaling and eIF-2α phosphoryation. Loss of gcn-1 or gcn-2 function prevents eIF-2α phosphorylation, completely blocks reductions in translation, and inhibits gpdh-1 transcription. gpdh-1 expression is regulated by the highly conserved with-no-lysine kinase (WNK) and Ste20 kinases WNK-1 and GCK-3, which function in the GCN-2 signaling pathway downstream from eIF-2α phosphorylation. Our previous work has shown that hypertonic stress causes rapid and dramatic protein damage in C. elegans and that inhibition of translation reduces this damage. The current studies demonstrate that reduced translation also serves as an essential signal for activation of WNK-1/GCK-3 kinase signaling and subsequent transcription of gpdh-1 and possibly other osmoprotective genes.

  10. Adhesive ability means inhibition activities for lactobacillus against pathogens and S-layer protein plays an important role in adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenming; Wang, Haifeng; Liu, Jianxin; Zhao, Yunhao; Gao, Kan; Zhang, Juan

    2013-08-01

    Eighty-five strains of lactobacillus were isolated from the pig intestine and identified by sequencing analysis based on 16S rRNA gene, from which five lactobacillus strains with high adhesive ability were selected. The inhibition ability of the five lactobacillus strains with or without S-layer proteins against adherence of Escherichia coli K88 and Salmonella enteritidis 50335 to Caco-2 was evaluated in vitro with Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG strain (LGG) as a positive control. In addition, tolerance of lactobacilli to heat, acid, bile, Zn(2+) and Cu(2+) were assessed. All five selected strains, Lactobacillus salivarius ZJ614 (JN981856), Lactobacillus reuteri ZJ616 (JN981858), L. reuteri ZJ617 (JN981859), L. reuteri ZJ621 (JN981863) and L. reuteri ZJ623 (JN981865), showed inhibition against the two pathogens, E. coli K88 and S. enteritidis 50335. L. reuteri ZJ621 showed higher inhibition ability than the others to S. enteritidis 50335 (P S-layer protein, the inhibition activities of the lactobacilli against pathogens decreased significantly (P S-layer proteins plays an important role.

  11. Inhibiting heat-shock protein 90 reverses sensory hypoalgesia in diabetic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian S J Blagg

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Increasing the expression of Hsp70 (heat-shock protein 70 can inhibit sensory neuron degeneration after axotomy. Since the onset of DPN (diabetic peripheral neuropathy is associated with the gradual decline of sensory neuron function, we evaluated whether increasing Hsp70 was sufficient to improve several indices of neuronal function. Hsp90 is the master regulator of the heat-shock response and its inhibition can up-regulate Hsp70. KU-32 (N-{7-[(2R,3R,4S,5R-3,4-dihydroxy-5-methoxy-6,6-dimethyl-tetrahydro-2H-pyran-2-yloxy]-8-methyl-2-oxo-2H-chromen-3-yl}acetamide was developed as a novel, novobiocin-based, C-terminal inhibitor of Hsp90 whose ability to increase Hsp70 expression is linked to the presence of an acetamide substitution of the prenylated benzamide moiety of novobiocin. KU-32 protected against glucose-induced death of embryonic DRG (dorsal root ganglia neurons cultured for 3 days in vitro. Similarly, KU-32 significantly decreased neuregulin 1-induced degeneration of myelinated Schwann cell DRG neuron co-cultures prepared from WT (wild-type mice. This protection was lost if the co-cultures were prepared from Hsp70.1 and Hsp70.3 KO (knockout mice. KU-32 is readily bioavailable and was administered once a week for 6 weeks at a dose of 20 mg/kg to WT and Hsp70 KO mice that had been rendered diabetic with streptozotocin for 12 weeks. After 12 weeks of diabetes, both WT and Hsp70 KO mice developed deficits in NCV (nerve conduction velocity and a sensory hypoalgesia. Although KU-32 did not improve glucose levels, HbA1c (glycated haemoglobin or insulin levels, it reversed the NCV and sensory deficits in WT but not Hsp70 KO mice. These studies provide the first evidence that targeting molecular chaperones reverses the sensory hypoalgesia associated with DPN.

  12. Inhibiting heat-shock protein 90 reverses sensory hypoalgesia in diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Michael J; Li, Chengyuan; Yu, Cuijuan; Lu, Yuanming; Krise, Joanna M; McIntosh, Michelle P; Rajewski, Roger A; Blagg, Brian S J; Dobrowsky, Rick T

    2010-08-11

    Increasing the expression of Hsp70 (heat-shock protein 70) can inhibit sensory neuron degeneration after axotomy. Since the onset of DPN (diabetic peripheral neuropathy) is associated with the gradual decline of sensory neuron function, we evaluated whether increasing Hsp70 was sufficient to improve several indices of neuronal function. Hsp90 is the master regulator of the heat-shock response and its inhibition can up-regulate Hsp70. KU-32 (N-{7-[(2R,3R,4S,5R)-3,4-dihydroxy-5-methoxy-6,6-dimethyl-tetrahydro-2H-pyran-2-yloxy]-8-methyl-2-oxo-2H-chromen-3-yl}acetamide) was developed as a novel, novobiocin-based, C-terminal inhibitor of Hsp90 whose ability to increase Hsp70 expression is linked to the presence of an acetamide substitution of the prenylated benzamide moiety of novobiocin. KU-32 protected against glucose-induced death of embryonic DRG (dorsal root ganglia) neurons cultured for 3 days in vitro. Similarly, KU-32 significantly decreased neuregulin 1-induced degeneration of myelinated Schwann cell DRG neuron co-cultures prepared from WT (wild-type) mice. This protection was lost if the co-cultures were prepared from Hsp70.1 and Hsp70.3 KO (knockout) mice. KU-32 is readily bioavailable and was administered once a week for 6 weeks at a dose of 20 mg/kg to WT and Hsp70 KO mice that had been rendered diabetic with streptozotocin for 12 weeks. After 12 weeks of diabetes, both WT and Hsp70 KO mice developed deficits in NCV (nerve conduction velocity) and a sensory hypoalgesia. Although KU-32 did not improve glucose levels, HbA1c (glycated haemoglobin) or insulin levels, it reversed the NCV and sensory deficits in WT but not Hsp70 KO mice. These studies provide the first evidence that targeting molecular chaperones reverses the sensory hypoalgesia associated with DPN.

  13. Inhibition of hepatitis B virus replication by pokeweed antiviral protein in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-Wen He; Chun-Xia Guo; Yan-Feng Pan; Cheng Peng; Zhi-Hong Weng

    2008-01-01

    AIM:To explore the inhibitory effects of pokeweed antiviral protein seed(PAP-S)and PAP encoded by a eukaryotic expression plasmid on hepatitis B virus(HBV)replication in vitro.METHODS:HepG2 2.2.15 cells in cultured medium were treated with different concentrations of PAP-S.HBsAg,HBeAg and HBV DNA in supernatants were determined by ELISA and fluorescent quantitative PCR respectively.MTT method was used to assay for cytotoxicity.HepG2 were cotransfected with various amounts of PAP encoded by a eukaryotic expression plasmid and replication competent wild-type HBV 1.3 fold overlength plasmid.On d 3 after transfection,HBsAg and HBeAg were determined by using ELISA.Levels of HBV core-associated DNA and RNA were detected by using Southern and Northern blot,respectively.RESULTS:The inhibitory effects of PAP-S on HBsAg,HBeAg and HBV DNA were gradually enhanced with the increase of PAP concentration.When the concentration of PAP-S was 10 μg/mL,the inhibition rates of HBsAg,HBeAg and HBV DNA were 20.9%,30.2% and 50%,respectively.After transfection of 1.0μg and 2.0μg plasmid pXF3H-PAP,the levels of HBV nucleocapsideassociated DNA were reduced by 38.0% and 74.0% respectively,the levels of HBsAg in the media by 76.8% and 99.7% respectively,and the levels of HBeAg by 72.7% and 99.3% respectively as compared with controls.Transfection with 2μg plasmid pXF3H-PAP reduced the levels of HBV nucleocapside-associated RNA by 69.0%.CONCLUSION:Both PAP-S and PAP encoded by a eukaryotic expression plasmid could effectively inhibit HBV replication and antigen expression in vitro,and the inhibitory effects were dose-dependent.

  14. Assessment of Novel Anti-thrombotic Fusion Proteins for Inhibition of Stenosis in a Porcine Model of Arteriovenous Graft.

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    Christi M Terry

    Full Text Available Hemodialysis arteriovenous synthetic grafts (AVG provide high volumetric blood flow rates shortly after surgical placement. However, stenosis often develops at the vein-graft anastomosis contributing to thrombosis and early graft failure. Two novel fusion proteins, ANV-6L15 and TAP-ANV, inhibit the tissue factor/factor VIIa coagulation complex and the factor Xa/factor Va complex, respectively. Each inhibitor domain is fused to an annexin V domain that targets the inhibitor activity to sites of vascular injury to locally inhibit thrombosis. This study's objective was to determine if these antithrombotic proteins are safe and effective in inhibiting AVG stenosis.A bolus of either TAP-ANV or ANV-6L15 fusion protein was administered intravenously immediately prior to surgical placement of a synthetic graft between the external jugular vein and common carotid artery in a porcine model. At surgery, the vein and artery were irrigated with the anti-thrombotic fusion protein. Control animals received intravenous heparin. At 4 weeks, MRI was performed to evaluate graft patency, the pigs were then euthanized and grafts and attached vessels were explanted for histomorphometric assessment of neointimal hyperplasia at the vein-graft anastomosis. Blood was collected at surgery, immediately after surgery and at euthanasia for serum metabolic panels and coagulation chemistries.No acute thrombosis occurred in the control group or in either experimental group. No abnormal serum chemistries, activated clotting times or PT, PTT values were observed after treatment in experimental or control animals. However, at the vein-graft anastomosis, there was no difference between the control and experimental groups in cross-sectional lumen areas, as measured on MRI, and no difference in hyperplasia areas as determined by histomorphometry. These results suggest that local irrigation of TAP-ANV or ANV-6L15 intra-operatively was as effective in inhibiting acute graft thrombosis

  15. Ubiquinol (QH(2)) functions as a negative regulator of purine nucleotide inhibition of Acanthamoeba castellanii mitochondrial uncoupling protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woyda-Ploszczyca, Andrzej; Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa

    2011-01-01

    We compared the influence of different adenine and guanine nucleotides on the free fatty acid-induced uncoupling protein (UCP) activity in non-phosphorylating Acanthamoeba castellanii mitochondria when the membranous ubiquinone (Q) redox state was varied. The purine nucleotides exhibit an inhibitory effect in the following descending order: GTP>ATP>GDP>ADP≫GMP>AMP. The efficiency of guanine and adenine nucleotides to inhibit UCP-sustained uncoupling in A. castellanii mitochondria depends on the Q redox state. Inhibition by purine nucleotides can be increased with decreasing Q reduction level (thereby ubiquinol, QH₂ concentration) even with nucleoside monophosphates that are very weak inhibitors at the initial respiration. On the other hand, the inhibition can be alleviated with increasing Q reduction level (thereby QH₂ concentration). The most important finding was that ubiquinol (QH₂) but not oxidised Q functions as a negative regulator of UCP inhibition by purine nucleotides. For a given concentration of QH₂, the linoleic acid-induced GTP-inhibited H(+) leak was the same for two types of A. castellanii mitochondria that differ in the endogenous Q content. When availability of the inhibitor (GTP) or the negative inhibition modulator (QH₂) was changed, a competitive influence on the UCP activity was observed. QH₂ decreases the affinity of UCP for GTP and, vice versa, GTP decreases the affinity of UCP for QH₂. These results describe the kinetic mechanism of regulation of UCP affinity for purine nucleotides by endogenous QH₂ in the mitochondria of a unicellular eukaryote.

  16. Bilirubin scavenges chloramines and inhibits myeloperoxidase-induced protein/lipid oxidation in physiologically relevant hyperbilirubinemic serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boon, A C; Hawkins, C L; Coombes, J S; Wagner, K H; Bulmer, A C

    2015-09-01

    Hypochlorous acid (HOCl), an oxidant produced by myeloperoxidase (MPO), induces protein and lipid oxidation, which is implicated in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Individuals with mildly elevated bilirubin concentrations (i.e., Gilbert syndrome; GS) are protected from atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease, and related mortality. We aimed to investigate whether exogenous/endogenous unconjugated bilirubin (UCB), at physiological concentrations, can protect proteins/lipids from oxidation induced by reagent and enzymatically generated HOCl. Serum/plasma samples supplemented with exogenous UCB (≤250µM) were assessed for their susceptibility to HOCl and MPO/H2O2/Cl(-) oxidation, by measuring chloramine, protein carbonyl, and malondialdehyde (MDA) formation. Serum/plasma samples from hyperbilirubinemic Gunn rats and humans with GS were also exposed to MPO/H2O2/Cl(-) to: (1) validate in vitro data and (2) determine the relevance of endogenously elevated UCB in preventing protein and lipid oxidation. Exogenous UCB dose-dependently (P<0.05) inhibited HOCl and MPO/H2O2/Cl(-)-induced chloramine formation. Albumin-bound UCB efficiently and specifically (3.9-125µM; P<0.05) scavenged taurine, glycine, and N-α-acetyllysine chloramines. These results were translated into Gunn rat and GS serum/plasma, which showed significantly (P<0.01) reduced chloramine formation after MPO-induced oxidation. Protein carbonyl and MDA formation was also reduced after MPO oxidation in plasma supplemented with UCB (P<0.05; 25 and 50µM, respectively). Significant inhibition of protein and lipid oxidation was demonstrated within the physiological range of UCB, providing a hypothetical link to protection from atherosclerosis in hyperbilirubinemic individuals. These data demonstrate a novel and physiologically relevant mechanism whereby UCB could inhibit protein and lipid modification by quenching chloramines induced by MPO-induced HOCl.

  17. Inhibition of the protein kinase PKR by the internal ribosome entry site of hepatitis C virus genomic RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Jashmin; Elia, Androulla; Clemens, Michael J

    2003-07-01

    Translation of the hepatitis C genome is mediated by internal ribosome entry on the structurally complex 5' untranslated region of the large viral RNA. Initiation of protein synthesis by this mechanism is independent of the cap-binding factor eIF4E, but activity of the initiator Met-tRNA(f)-binding factor eIF2 is still required. HCV protein synthesis is thus potentially sensitive to the inhibition of eIF2 activity that can result from the phosphorylation of the latter by the interferon-inducible, double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase PKR. Two virally encoded proteins, NS5A and E2, have been shown to reduce this inhibitory effect of PKR by impairing the activation of the kinase. Here we present evidence for a third viral strategy for PKR inhibition. A region of the viral RNA comprising part of the internal ribosome entry site (IRES) is able to bind to PKR in competition with double-stranded RNA and can prevent autophosphorylation and activation of the kinase in vitro. The HCV IRES itself has no PKR-activating ability. Consistent with these findings, cotransfection experiments employing a bicistronic reporter construct and wild-type PKR indicate that expression of the protein kinase is less inhibitory towards HCV IRES-driven protein synthesis than towards cap-dependent protein synthesis. These data suggest a dual function for the viral IRES, with both a structural role in promoting initiation complex formation and a regulatory role in preventing inhibition of initiation by PKR.

  18. Inhibition of Protein Farnesylation Arrests Adipogenesis and Affects PPARγ Expression and Activation in Differentiating Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas, Daniel; Akter, Rahima; Duque, Gustavo

    2007-01-01

    Protein farnesylation is required for the activation of multiple proteins involved in cell differentiation and function. In white adipose tissue protein, farnesylation has shown to be essential for the successful differentiation of preadipocytes into adipocytes. We hypothesize that protein farnesylation is required for PPARγ2 expression and activation, and therefore for the differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into adipocytes. MSCs were plated and induced to differentiate into adipocytes for three weeks. Differentiating cells were treated with either an inhibitor of farnesylation (FTI-277) or vehicle alone. The effect of inhibition of farnesylation in differentiating adipocytes was determined by oil red O staining. Cell survival was quantified using MTS Formazan. Additionally, nuclear extracts were obtained and prelamin A, chaperon protein HDJ-2, PPARγ, and SREBP-1 were determined by western blot. Finally, DNA binding PPARγ activity was determined using an ELISA-based PPARγ activation quantification method. Treatment with an inhibitor of farnesylation (FTI-277) arrests adipogenesis without affecting cell survival. This effect was concomitant with lower levels of PPARγ expression and activity. Finally, accumulation of prelamin A induced an increased proportion of mature SREBP-1 which is known to affect PPARγ activity. In summary, inhibition of protein farnesylation arrests the adipogenic differentiation of MSCs and affects PPARγ expression and activity. PMID:18274630

  19. Inhibition of Protein Farnesylation Arrests Adipogenesis and Affects PPARgamma Expression and Activation in Differentiating Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas, Daniel; Akter, Rahima; Duque, Gustavo

    2007-01-01

    Protein farnesylation is required for the activation of multiple proteins involved in cell differentiation and function. In white adipose tissue protein, farnesylation has shown to be essential for the successful differentiation of preadipocytes into adipocytes. We hypothesize that protein farnesylation is required for PPARgamma2 expression and activation, and therefore for the differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into adipocytes. MSCs were plated and induced to differentiate into adipocytes for three weeks. Differentiating cells were treated with either an inhibitor of farnesylation (FTI-277) or vehicle alone. The effect of inhibition of farnesylation in differentiating adipocytes was determined by oil red O staining. Cell survival was quantified using MTS Formazan. Additionally, nuclear extracts were obtained and prelamin A, chaperon protein HDJ-2, PPARgamma, and SREBP-1 were determined by western blot. Finally, DNA binding PPARgamma activity was determined using an ELISA-based PPARgamma activation quantification method. Treatment with an inhibitor of farnesylation (FTI-277) arrests adipogenesis without affecting cell survival. This effect was concomitant with lower levels of PPARgamma expression and activity. Finally, accumulation of prelamin A induced an increased proportion of mature SREBP-1 which is known to affect PPARgamma activity. In summary, inhibition of protein farnesylation arrests the adipogenic differentiation of MSCs and affects PPARgamma expression and activity.

  20. Methylprednisolone Inhibits the Expression of Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein and Chondroitin Sulfate Proteoglycans in Reactivated Astrocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI-LIN LIU; YI-HSUAN LEE; SHIH-YING TSAI; CHUNG YI HSU; YU-YO SUN; LIANG-YO YANG; SHING-HAN TSAI; WEI-CHUNG VIVIAN YANG

    2008-01-01

    创伤后的神经胶质增生导致硫酸软骨素蛋白聚糖(CSPG)的显著表达,从而抑制轴突生长和再生.甲基强地松龙(MP),一种合成的糖皮质激素,在急性脊髓损伤(SCI)的治疗中有神经保护作用和抗炎效应.但是,MP对于CSPG在活性胶质细胞中的表达的作用尚不清楚.本文用a-氨基-3-羟基-5-甲基-4-异恶唑丙酸酯(AM-PA)诱导星形胶质细胞再活化,用环噻嗪模拟SCI的兴奋性中毒刺激.AMPA治疗后,星形胶质细胞再活化的标志物-胶质纤维酸性蛋白(GFAP)、CSPG神经聚糖和磷酸盐的表达都显著上调.AMPA治疗星形胶质细胞的条件培养液强烈抑制大鼠背根神经节中神经元的轴突生长,但这种作用能被MP的预处理所逆转.此外,MP下调成年SCI大鼠中GFAP和CSPG的表达,对抗RU486的糖皮质激素受体(GR)和GR siRNA能逆转MP对GFAP和神经聚糖表达的抑制作用.这些结果提示,MP能在兴奋性中毒损伤后通过GR介导的星形胶质细胞再活化下调和GSPG表达抑制来改善神经修复,促进轴突生长.%Reactive gliosis caused by post-traumatic injury often results in marked expression of chondroitin sul-fate proteoglycan(CSPG), which inhibits neurite outgrowth and regeneration. Methylprednisolone (MP), a synthet-ic glucocorticoid, has been shown to have neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects for the treatment of acute spinal cord injury (SCI). However, the effect of MP on CSPG expression in reactive glial cells remains unclear. In our study, we induced astrocyte reactivation using a-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionate (AMPA) and cyclothiazide to mimic the exciotoxic stimuli of SCI. The expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), a marker of astrocyte reactivation, and CSPG neurocan and phosphacan were significantly elevated by AMPA treat-ment. The conditioned media from AMPA-treated astrocytes strongly inhibited neurite outgrowth of rat dorsal root ganglion neurons, and this

  1. An Impermeant Ganetespib Analog Inhibits Extracellular Hsp90-Mediated Cancer Cell Migration that Involves Lysyl Oxidase 2-like Protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCready, Jessica [Department of Natural Sciences, Assumption College, Worcester, MA 01609 (United States); Wong, Daniel S. [Department of Developmental Molecular and Chemical Biology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02111 (United States); Cell and Molecular Physiology Program, Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences, Tufts University, Boston, MA 02111 (United States); Burlison, Joseph A.; Ying, Weiwen [Synta Pharmaceuticals, Lexington, MA 02421 (United States); Jay, Daniel G., E-mail: daniel.jay@tufts.edu [Department of Developmental Molecular and Chemical Biology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02111 (United States); Cell and Molecular Physiology Program, Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences, Tufts University, Boston, MA 02111 (United States)

    2014-04-30

    Extracellular Hsp90 (eHsp90) activates a number of client proteins outside of cancer cells required for migration and invasion. Therefore, eHsp90 may serve as a novel target for anti-metastatic drugs as its inhibition using impermeant Hsp90 inhibitors would not affect the numerous vital intracellular Hsp90 functions in normal cells. While some eHsp90 clients are known, it is important to establish other proteins that act outside the cell to validate eHsp90 as a drug target to limit cancer spread. Using mass spectrometry we identified two precursor proteins Galectin 3 binding protein (G3BP) and Lysyl oxidase 2-like protein (LOXL2) that associate with eHsp90 in MDA-MB231 breast cancer cell conditioned media and confirmed that LOXL2 binds to eHsp90 in immunoprecipitates. We introduce a novel impermeant Hsp90 inhibitor STA-12-7191 derived from ganetespib and show that it is markedly less toxic to cells and can inhibit cancer cell migration in a dose dependent manner. We used STA-12-7191 to test if LOXL2 and G3BP are potential eHsp90 clients. We showed that while LOXL2 can increase wound healing and compensate for STA-12-7191-mediated inhibition of wound closure, addition of G3BP had no affect on this assay. These findings support of role for LOXL2 in eHsp90 stimulated cancer cell migration and provide preliminary evidence for the use of STA-12-7191 to inhibit eHsp90 to limit cancer invasion.

  2. A novel human immunoglobulin Fc gamma Fc epsilon bifunctional fusion protein inhibits Fc epsilon RI-mediated degranulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Daocheng; Kepley, Christopher L; Zhang, Min; Zhang, Ke; Saxon, Andrew

    2002-05-01

    Human mast cells and basophils that express the high-affinity immunoglobulin E (IgE) receptor, Fc epsilon receptor 1 (Fc epsilon RI), have key roles in allergic diseases. Fc epsilon RI cross-linking stimulates the release of allergic mediators. Mast cells and basophils co-express Fc gamma RIIb, a low affinity receptor containing an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif and whose co-aggregation with Fc epsilon RI can block Fc epsilon RI-mediated reactivity. Here we designed, expressed and tested the human basophil and mast-cell inhibitory function of a novel chimeric fusion protein, whose structure is gamma Hinge-CH gamma 2-CH gamma 3-15aa linker-CH epsilon 2-CH epsilon 3-CH epsilon 4. This Fc gamma Fc epsilon fusion protein was expressed as the predicted 140-kappa D dimer that reacted with anti-human epsilon- and gamma-chain specific antibodies. Fc gamma Fc epsilon bound to both human Fc epsilon RI and Fc gamma RII. It also showed dose- and time-dependent inhibition of antigen-driven IgE-mediated histamine release from fresh human basophils sensitized with IgE directed against NIP (4-hydroxy-3-iodo-5-nitrophenylacetyl). This was associated with altered Syk signaling. The fusion protein also showed increased inhibition of human anti-NP (4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenylacetyl) and anti-dansyl IgE-mediated passive cutaneous anaphylaxis in transgenic mice expressing human Fc epsilon RI alpha. Our results show that this chimeric protein is able to form complexes with both Fc epsilon RI and Fc gamma RII, and inhibit mast-cell and basophil function. This approach, using a Fc gamma Fc epsilon fusion protein to co-aggregate Fc epsilon RI with a receptor containing an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibition motif, has therapeutic potential in IgE- and Fc epsilon RI-mediated diseases.

  3. Volatile of alkyd varnish inhibits the expression of neuronal growth associated protein-43 in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qian Huang; Hongxia Wang; Wei Zou

    2007-01-01

    varnish, and the poisoning method was the same as that of chronic poisoning group.②Experimental evaluation: content of protein in the cortex, cerebellum and hippocampus of mice was measured separately by Bradford method. GAP-43 expression in the hippocampus and cortex was observed separately by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE).MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Content of protein and expression of GAP-43 in different brain regions of mice.RESULTS: Twenty mice were involved in the final analysis.①Content of protein in the cerebellum and hippocampus of mice in the chronic poisoning group was decreased a little, separately (P>0.05).②GAP-43 expression in the hippocampus of mice of the chronic poisoning group was significantly lower than that of the control group(P<0.05).CONCLUSION: Long-term action of volatile of alkyd varnish can inhibit the brain functions of mice by depressing the GAP-43 expression in hippocampus of mice.

  4. Cauliflower mosaic virus protein P6 inhibits signaling responses to salicylic acid and regulates innate immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Love

    Full Text Available Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV encodes a multifunctional protein P6 that is required for translation of the 35S RNA and also acts as a suppressor of RNA silencing. Here we demonstrate that P6 additionally acts as a pathogenicity effector of an unique and novel type, modifying NPR1 (a key regulator of salicylic acid (SA- and jasmonic acid (JA-dependent signaling and inhibiting SA-dependent defence responses We find that that transgene-mediated expression of P6 in Arabidopsis and transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana has profound effects on defence signaling, suppressing expression of representative SA-responsive genes and increasing expression of representative JA-responsive genes. Relative to wild-type Arabidopsis P6-expressing transgenics had greatly reduced expression of PR-1 following SA-treatment, infection by CaMV or inoculation with an avirulent bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato (Pst. Similarly transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana of P6 (including a mutant form defective in translational transactivation activity suppressed PR-1a transcript accumulation in response to Agrobacterium infiltration and following SA-treatment. As well as suppressing the expression of representative SA-regulated genes, P6-transgenic Arabidopsis showed greatly enhanced susceptibility to both virulent and avirulent Pst (titres elevated 10 to 30-fold compared to non-transgenic controls but reduced susceptibility to the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea. Necrosis following SA-treatment or inoculation with avirulent Pst was reduced and delayed in P6-transgenics. NPR1 an important regulator of SA/JA crosstalk, was more highly expressed in the presence of P6 and introduction of the P6 transgene into a transgenic line expressing an NPR1:GFP fusion resulted in greatly increased fluorescence in nuclei even in the absence of SA. Thus in the presence of P6 an inactive form of NPR1 is mislocalized in the nucleus even in uninduced plants

  5. Mitochondrial triglyceride transfer protein inhibition: new achievements in the treatment of dyslipidemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostapanos, Michael S; Rizos, Evangelos C; Papanas, Nikolaos; Maltezos, Efstratios; Elisaf, Moses S

    2013-01-01

    Current lipid-lowering drugs are often unable to achieve low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) goals. Moreover, despite LDL-C lowering mostly by statins, a considerable residual vascular risk remains. This is partly associated with atherogenic dyslipidemia where apolipoprotein (apo) B-containing lipoproteins predominate. Mitochondrial Triglyceride (TG) transfer protein (MTP) is a key enzyme for apoB-containing lipoprotein assembly and secretion. This is mostly attributed to its capacity to transfer lipid components (TGs, cholesterol esters and phospholipids) to the endoplasmic reticulum lumen, where these lipoproteins are assembled. Several agents were developed to inhibit MTP wherever it is expressed, namely the liver and/or the intestine. Liver-specific MTP inhibitors reduce secretion of very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) mostly containing apoB100, while the intestine-specific ones reduce secretion of chylomicrons containing apoB48. These drugs can significantly reduce total cholesterol, LDL-C, TGs, VLDL cholesterol, as well as apoB levels in vivo. They may also exert anti-atherosclerotic and insulin-sensitizing effects. Limited clinical data suggest that these compounds can also improve the serum lipid profile in patients with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HoFH). The accumulation of unsecreted fat in the liver and intestinal lumen is associated with elevation of aminotransferases and steatorrhea. Liver steatosis can be avoided by the use of intestine-specific MTP inhibitors, while steatorrhea by low-fat diet. Future indications for these developing drugs may include dyslipidemia associated with insulin resistant states, familial combined hyperlipidemia and HoFH. Future clinical trials are warranted to assess the efficacy and safety of MTP inhibitors in various clinical states.

  6. Quantification of malaria parasite release from infected erythrocytes: inhibition by protein-free media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zimmerberg Joshua

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intracellular malaria parasites leave their host erythrocytes to infect neighbouring cells after each cycle of asexual replication. No method is currently available for the direct quantification of parasite release. Method and results To quantify parasite release process, human erythrocytes infected with Plasmodium falciparum were injected into sealed chambers at optimal density, where they progressed through the end of the erythrocyte cycle. Each event of parasite release inside the chamber at the site of erythrocyte rupture leaves on the chamber wall a footprint, composed of 1 separated parasites, 2 a digestive vacuole with haemozoin, and 3 fragments of the ruptured membranes. These footprints are stable for hours, allowing precise identification using differential interference contrast (DIC microscopy. The relative rate of parasite release is defined as the percent of such footprints out of all schizonts injected and incubated into chamber at 37°C for two hours. The method is highly reproducible, easy to perform, and does not require expensive equipment. Additionally, this method allows one to analyse cell and release site morphology, which adds information about the release process and the quality of the culture. The method is used here to show that swelling of schizonts caused by protein-free media inhibits parasite release. Conclusion In this study, a novel method is described to count sites of parasite release by microscopy. Besides the direct estimation of parasite release from infected erythrocytes, this method provides a morphological evaluation of normal infected cells approaching the end of the plasmodial life cycle, or pathological forms accumulated as the result of experimental intervention in the parasite release process. One may now accurately estimate the relative parasite release rate at the time of cycle transition, without any obligatory coupling to parasite invasion.

  7. Targeting proapoptotic protein BAD inhibits survival and self-renewal of cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sastry, K S R; Al-Muftah, M A; Li, Pu; Al-Kowari, M K; Wang, E; Ismail Chouchane, A; Kizhakayil, D; Kulik, G; Marincola, F M; Haoudi, A; Chouchane, L

    2014-12-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that the resistance of cancer stem cells (CSC) to many conventional therapies is one of the major limiting factors of cancer therapy efficacy. Identification of mechanisms responsible for survival and self-renewal of CSC will help design new therapeutic strategies that target and eliminate both differentiated cancer cells and CSC. Here we demonstrated the potential role of proapoptotic protein BAD in the biology of CSC in melanoma, prostate and breast cancers. We enriched CD44(+)/CD24(-) cells (CSC) by tumorosphere formation and purified this population by FACS. Both spheres and CSC exhibited increased potential for proliferation, migration, invasion, sphere formation, anchorage-independent growth, as well as upregulation of several stem cell-associated markers. We showed that the phosphorylation of BAD is essential for the survival of CSC. Conversely, ectopic expression of a phosphorylation-deficient mutant BAD induced apoptosis in CSC. This effect was enhanced by treatment with a BH3-mimetic, ABT-737. Both pharmacological agents that inhibit survival kinases and growth factors that are involved in drug resistance delivered their respective cytotoxic and protective effects by modulating the BAD phosphorylation in CSC. Furthermore, the frequency and self-renewal capacity of CSC was significantly reduced by knocking down the BAD expression. Consistent with our in vitro results, significant phosphorylation of BAD was found in CD44(+) CSC of 83% breast tumor specimens. In addition, we also identified a positive correlation between BAD expression and disease stage in prostate cancer, suggesting a role of BAD in tumor advancement. Our studies unveil the role of BAD in the survival and self-renewal of CSC and propose BAD not only as an attractive target for cancer therapy but also as a marker of tumor progression.

  8. Identification of a myeloid-derived suppressor cell cystatin-like protein that inhibits metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutté, Angela M; Friedman, David B; Bogyo, Matthew; Min, Yongfen; Yang, Li; Lin, P Charles

    2011-08-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are significantly increased in cancer patients and tumor bearing-animals. MDSCs infiltrate into tumors and promote tumor invasion and metastasis. To identify the mediator responsible for the prometastatic property of MDSCs, we used proteomics. We found neutrophilic granule protein (NGP) was decreased >2-fold in MDSCs from metastatic 4T1 tumor-bearing mice compared to nonmetastatic 67NR controls. NGP mRNA levels were decreased in bone marrow and in tumor-infiltrating MDSCs by 45 and 66%, respectively, in 4T1 tumor-bearing mice compared to 67NR controls. Interestingly, 4T1-conditioned medium reduced myeloid cell NGP expression by ∼ 40%, suggesting that a secreted factor mediates gene reduction. Sequence analysis shows a putative cystatin domain in NGP, and biochemical analysis confirms NGP a novel cathepsin inhibitor. It inhibited cathepsin B activity by nearly 40% in vitro. NGP expression in 4T1 tumor cells suppressed cell invasion, delayed primary tumor growth, and greatly reduced lung metastasis in vivo. A 2.8-fold reduction of cathepsin activity was found in tumors expressing NGP compared to controls. NGP significantly reduced tumor angiogenesis to 12.6 from 19.6 and lymphangiogenesis to 4.6 from 9.1 vessels/field. Necrosis was detectable only in NGP-expressing tumors, and the number of apoptotic cells increased to 22.4 from 8.3 in controls. Taken together, this study identifies a negative regulator of tumor metastasis in MDSCs, NGP, which is down-regulated in metastatic conditions. The finding suggests that malignant tumors promote invasion/metastasis not only through up-regulation of proteases but also down-regulation of protease inhibitors.

  9. L-Alanylglutamine inhibits signaling proteins that activate protein degradation, but does not affect proteins that activate protein synthesis after an acute resistance exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wanyi; Choi, Ran Hee; Solares, Geoffrey J; Tseng, Hung-Min; Ding, Zhenping; Kim, Kyoungrae; Ivy, John L

    2015-07-01

    Sustamine™ (SUS) is a dipeptide composed of alanine and glutamine (AlaGln). Glutamine has been suggested to increase muscle protein accretion; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms of glutamine on muscle protein metabolism following resistance exercise have not been fully addressed. In the present study, 2-month-old rats climbed a ladder 10 times with a weight equal to 75 % of their body mass attached at the tail. Rats were then orally administered one of four solutions: placebo (PLA-glycine = 0.52 g/kg), whey protein (WP = 0.4 g/kg), low dose of SUS (LSUS = 0.1 g/kg), or high dose of SUS (HSUS = 0.5 g/kg). An additional group of sedentary (SED) rats was intubated with glycine (0.52 g/kg) at the same time as the ladder-climbing rats. Blood samples were collected immediately after exercise and at either 20 or 40 min after recovery. The flexor hallucis longus (FHL), a muscle used for climbing, was excised at 20 or 40 min post exercise and analyzed for proteins regulating protein synthesis and degradation. All supplements elevated the phosphorylation of FOXO3A above SED at 20 min post exercise, but only the SUS supplements significantly reduced the phosphorylation of AMPK and NF-kB p65. SUS supplements had no effect on mTOR signaling, but WP supplementation yielded a greater phosphorylation of mTOR, p70S6k, and rpS6 compared with PLA at 20 min post exercise. However, by 40 min post exercise, phosphorylation of mTOR and rpS6 in PLA had risen to levels not different than WP. These results suggest that SUS blocks the activation of intracellular signals for MPB, whereas WP accelerates mRNA translation.

  10. Interleukin-32α downregulates the activity of the B-cell CLL/lymphoma 6 protein by inhibiting protein kinase Cε-dependent SUMO-2 modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yun Sun; Kang, Jeong-Woo; Lee, Dong Hun; Kim, Man Sub; Bak, Yesol; Yang, Young; Lee, Hee Gu; Hong, JinTae; Yoon, Do-Young

    2014-09-30

    A proinflammatory cytokine IL-32 acts as an intracellular mediator. IL-32α interacts with many intracellular molecules, but there are no reports of interaction with a transcriptional repressor BCL6. In this study, we showed that PMA induces an interaction between IL-32α, PKCε, and BCL6, forming a trimer. To identify the mechanism of the interaction, we treated cells with various inhibitors. In HEK293 and THP-1 cell lines, treatment with a pan-PKC inhibitor, PKCε inhibitor, and PKCδ inhibitor decreased BCL6 and IL-32α protein expression. MAPK inhibitors and classical PKC inhibitor did not decrease PMA-induced BCL6 and IL-32α protein expression. Further, the pan-PKC inhibitor and PKCε inhibitor disrupted PMA-induced interaction between IL-32α and BCL6. These data demonstrate that the intracellular interaction between IL-32α and BCL6 is induced by PMA-activated PKCε. PMA induces post-translational modification of BCL6 by conjugation to SUMO-2, while IL-32α inhibits. PKCε inhibition eliminated PMA-induced SUMOylation of BCL6. Inhibition of BCL6 SUMOylation by IL-32α affected the cellular function and activity of the transcriptional repressor BCL6 in THP-1 cells. Thus, we showed that IL-32α is a negative regulator of the transcriptional repressor BCL6. IL-32α inhibits BCL6 SUMOylation by activating PKCε, resulting in the modulation of BCL6 target genes and cellular functions of BCL6.

  11. Structural basis of metallo-β-lactamase, serine-β-lactamase and penicillin-binding protein inhibition by cyclic boronates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brem, Jürgen; Cain, Ricky; Cahill, Samuel; McDonough, Michael A.; Clifton, Ian J.; Jiménez-Castellanos, Juan-Carlos; Avison, Matthew B.; Spencer, James; Fishwick, Colin W. G.; Schofield, Christopher J.

    2016-08-01

    β-Lactamases enable resistance to almost all β-lactam antibiotics. Pioneering work revealed that acyclic boronic acids can act as `transition state analogue' inhibitors of nucleophilic serine enzymes, including serine-β-lactamases. Here we report biochemical and biophysical analyses revealing that cyclic boronates potently inhibit both nucleophilic serine and zinc-dependent β-lactamases by a mechanism involving mimicking of the common tetrahedral intermediate. Cyclic boronates also potently inhibit the non-essential penicillin-binding protein PBP 5 by the same mechanism of action. The results open the way for development of dual action inhibitors effective against both serine- and metallo-β-lactamases, and which could also have antimicrobial activity through inhibition of PBPs.

  12. Inhibition of Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm formation by rabbit polyclonal antibodies against the SesC protein.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shahrooei, M.; Hira, V.; Stijlemans, B.; Merckx, R.; Hermans, P.W.M.; Eldere, J. van

    2009-01-01

    Several well-studied proteins with defined roles in Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm formation are LPXTG motif-containing proteins. Here, we investigate the possible use of the LPXTG motif-containing protein SesC (S. epidermidis surface protein C; accession no. NP_765787) as a target for antibodie

  13. Inhibition of Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm formation by rabbit polyclonal antibodies against the SesC protein.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shahrooei, M.; Hira, V.; Stijlemans, B.; Merckx, R.; Hermans, P.W.M.; Eldere, J. van

    2009-01-01

    Several well-studied proteins with defined roles in Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm formation are LPXTG motif-containing proteins. Here, we investigate the possible use of the LPXTG motif-containing protein SesC (S. epidermidis surface protein C; accession no. NP_765787) as a target for

  14. Inhibition of the acetyl lysine-binding pocket of bromodomain and extraterminal domain proteins interferes with adipogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goupille, Olivier [CEA, Institute of Emerging Diseases and Innovative Therapies (IMETI), Fontenay-aux-Roses and Université Paris-Saclay, UMR-E 007 (France); Penglong, Tipparat [CEA, Institute of Emerging Diseases and Innovative Therapies (IMETI), Fontenay-aux-Roses and Université Paris-Saclay, UMR-E 007 (France); Thalassemia Research Center, Mahidol University (Thailand); Kadri, Zahra; Granger-Locatelli, Marine [CEA, Institute of Emerging Diseases and Innovative Therapies (IMETI), Fontenay-aux-Roses and Université Paris-Saclay, UMR-E 007 (France); Fucharoen, Suthat [Thalassemia Research Center, Mahidol University (Thailand); Maouche-Chrétien, Leila [CEA, Institute of Emerging Diseases and Innovative Therapies (IMETI), Fontenay-aux-Roses and Université Paris-Saclay, UMR-E 007 (France); INSERM, Paris (France); Prost, Stéphane [CEA, Institute of Emerging Diseases and Innovative Therapies (IMETI), Fontenay-aux-Roses and Université Paris-Saclay, UMR-E 007 (France); Leboulch, Philippe [CEA, Institute of Emerging Diseases and Innovative Therapies (IMETI), Fontenay-aux-Roses and Université Paris-Saclay, UMR-E 007 (France); Thalassemia Research Center, Mahidol University (Thailand); Chrétien, Stany, E-mail: stany.chretien@cea.fr [CEA, Institute of Emerging Diseases and Innovative Therapies (IMETI), Fontenay-aux-Roses and Université Paris-Saclay, UMR-E 007 (France); INSERM, Paris (France)

    2016-04-15

    The bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) domain family proteins are epigenetic modulators involved in the reading of acetylated lysine residues. The first BET protein inhibitor to be identified, (+)-JQ1, a thienotriazolo-1, 4-diazapine, binds selectively to the acetyl lysine-binding pocket of BET proteins. We evaluated the impact on adipogenesis of this druggable targeting of chromatin epigenetic readers, by investigating the physiological consequences of epigenetic modifications through targeting proteins binding to chromatin. JQ1 significantly inhibited the differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes into white and brown adipocytes by down-regulating the expression of genes involved in adipogenesis, particularly those encoding the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR-γ), the CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBPα) and, STAT5A and B. The expression of a constitutively activated STAT5B mutant did not prevent inhibition by JQ1. Thus, the association of BET/STAT5 is required for adipogenesis but STAT5 transcription activity is not the only target of JQ1. Treatment with JQ1 did not lead to the conversion of white adipose tissue into brown adipose tissue (BAT). BET protein inhibition thus interferes with generation of adipose tissue from progenitors, confirming the importance of the connections between epigenetic mechanisms and specific adipogenic transcription factors. - Highlights: • JQ1 prevented the differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes into white adipocytes. • JQ1 affected clonal cell expansion and abolished lipid accumulation. • JQ1 prevented the differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes into brown adipocytes. • JQ1 treatment did not lead to the conversion of white adipose tissue into brown adipose tissue. • JQ1 decreased STAT5 expression, but STAT5B{sup ca} expression did not restore adipogenesis.

  15. Inhibition of Hsp70 by Methylene Blue Affects Signaling Protein Function and Ubiquitination and Modulates Polyglutamine Protein Degradation*

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Adrienne M; Morishima, Yoshihiro; Clapp, Kelly M.; Peng, Hwei-Ming; Pratt, William B.; Gestwicki, Jason E.; Osawa, Yoichi; Lieberman, Andrew P.

    2010-01-01

    The Hsp90/Hsp70-based chaperone machinery regulates the activity and degradation of many signaling proteins. Cycling with Hsp90 stabilizes client proteins, whereas Hsp70 interacts with chaperone-dependent E3 ubiquitin ligases to promote protein degradation. To probe these actions, small molecule inhibitors of Hsp70 would be extremely useful; however, few have been identified. Here we test the effects of methylene blue, a recently described inhibitor of Hsp70 ATPase activity, in three well est...

  16. A new synthetic protein, TAT-RH, inhibits tumor growth through the regulation of NFκB activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leggiero Eleonora

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Based on its role in angiogenesis and apoptosis, the inhibition of NFκB activity is considered an effective treatment for cancer, hampered by the lack of selective and safe inhibitors. We recently demonstrated that the RH domain of GRK5 (GRK5-RH inhibits NFκB, thus we evaluated its effects on cancer growth. Methods The role of GRK5-RH on tumor growth was assessed in a human cancer cell line (KAT-4. RH overexpression was induced by adenovirus mediated gene transfer; alternatively we administered a synthetic protein reproducing the RH domain of GRK5 (TAT-RH, actively transported into the cells. Results In vitro, adenovirus mediated GRK5-RH overexpression (AdGRK5-NT in human tumor cells (KAT-4 induces IκB accumulation and inhibits NFκB transcriptional activity leading to apoptotic events. In BALB/c nude mice harboring KAT-4 induced neoplasias, intra-tumor delivery of AdGRK5-NT reduces in a dose-dependent fashion tumor growth, with the highest doses completely inhibiting it. This phenomenon is paralleled by a decrease of NFκB activity, an increase of IκB levels and apoptotic events. To move towards a pharmacological setup, we synthesized the TAT-RH protein. In cultured KAT-4 cells, different dosages of TAT-RH reduced cell survival and increased apoptosis. In BALB/c mice, the anti-proliferative effects of TAT-RH appear to be dose-dependent and highest dose completely inhibits tumor growth. Conclusion Our data suggest that GRK5-RH inhibition of NFκB is a novel and effective anti-tumoral strategy and TAT-RH could be an useful tool in the fighting of cancer.

  17. Molecular Mechanism for Inhibition of G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 2 by a Selective RNA Aptamer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tesmer, Valerie M.; Lennarz, Sabine; Mayer, Günter; Tesmer, John J.G. (Bonn); (Michigan)

    2012-08-31

    Cardiovascular homeostasis is maintained in part by the rapid desensitization of activated heptahelical receptors that have been phosphorylated by G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2). However, during chronic heart failure GRK2 is upregulated and believed to contribute to disease progression. We have determined crystallographic structures of GRK2 bound to an RNA aptamer that potently and selectively inhibits kinase activity. Key to the mechanism of inhibition is the positioning of an adenine nucleotide into the ATP-binding pocket and interactions with the basic {alpha}F-{alpha}G loop region of the GRK2 kinase domain. Constraints imposed on the RNA by the terminal stem of the aptamer also play a role. These results highlight how a high-affinity aptamer can be used to selectively trap a novel conformational state of a protein kinase.

  18. Algal partner regulates fungal urease in the lichen Evernia prunastri by producing a protein which inhibits urease synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Urria, E; Rodriguez, M; Vicente, C

    1989-12-01

    Occurrence of a protein controlling urease synthesis (PIUS) at the transcriptional level in the lichen Evernia prunastri has been previously reported (Perez-Urria & Vicente, Physiol Plant 65: 433-438, 1985; id. Endocyt C Res 3: 311-316, 1986). In this work it was found that 0.1 mM cycloheximide seems to inhibit PIUS synthesis when lichen thalli are incubated on PIUS inducer, L-arginine. PIUS has been purified and characterized by PAGE, electrofocusing and amino acid analysis. It is a glycoprotein containing a homopolymer of fructose bound to the protein. PIUS has been located in whole thallus and lichenized mycobiont but remains undetectable in cultured fungi. PIUS is only detected in photobiont cells when they are axenically cultured on arginine. Thus, it is postulated that PIUS could be synthesized by lichenized photobionts from which it moves to mycobionts where it inhibits the production of fungal urease.

  19. Inhibition of protein glycation by procyanidin-B2 enriched fraction of cinnamon: delay of diabetic cataract in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthenna, Puppala; Raghu, Ganugula; Akileshwari, Chandrasekhar; Sinha, Sukesh Narayana; Suryanarayana, Palla; Reddy, Geereddy Bhanuprakash

    2013-11-01

    Accumulation of advanced glycation endproducts (AGE) from nonenzymatic glycation of proteins has been implicated in several diabetic complications including diabetic cataract. Previously, we have reported that extracts of dietary agents such as cinnamon have the potential to inhibit AGE formation. In this study, we have shown procyanidin-B2 as the active component of cinnamon that is involved in AGE inhibition using bioassay-guided fractionation of eye lens proteins under in vitro conditions. The data indicate that procyanidin-B2 enriched fraction scavenges dicarbonyls. Further, procyanidin-B2 fraction of cinnamon inhibited the formation of glycosylated hemoglobin in human blood under ex vivo conditions. We have also demonstrated the physiological significance of procyanidin-B2 fraction in terms of delay of diabetic cataract through inhibition of AGE in diabetic rats. These findings establish the antiglycating potential of procyanidin-B2 fraction of cinnamon which suggests a scope for controlling AGE-mediated diabetic complications by food sources that are rich in proanthocyanidins like procyanidin-B2.

  20. Inhibition of bacterial conjugation by phage M13 and its protein g3p: quantitative analysis and model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham Lin

    Full Text Available Conjugation is the main mode of horizontal gene transfer that spreads antibiotic resistance among bacteria. Strategies for inhibiting conjugation may be useful for preserving the effectiveness of antibiotics and preventing the emergence of bacterial strains with multiple resistances. Filamentous bacteriophages were first observed to inhibit conjugation several decades ago. Here we investigate the mechanism of inhibition and find that the primary effect on conjugation is occlusion of the conjugative pilus by phage particles. This interaction is mediated primarily by phage coat protein g3p, and exogenous addition of the soluble fragment of g3p inhibited conjugation at low nanomolar concentrations. Our data are quantitatively consistent with a simple model in which association between the pili and phage particles or g3p prevents transmission of an F plasmid encoding tetracycline resistance. We also observe a decrease in the donor ability of infected cells, which is quantitatively consistent with a reduction in pili elaboration. Since many antibiotic-resistance factors confer susceptibility to phage infection through expression of conjugative pili (the receptor for filamentous phage, these results suggest that phage may be a source of soluble proteins that slow the spread of antibiotic resistance genes.

  1. The Staphylococcus aureus Protein IsdH Inhibits Host Hemoglobin Scavenging to Promote Heme Acquisition by the Pathogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saederup, Kirstine Lindhardt; Stødkilde-Jørgensen, Kristian; Graversen, Jonas Heilskov;

    2016-01-01

    Hemolysis is a complication in septic infections with Staphylococcus aureus, which utilizes the released Hb as an iron source. S. aureus can acquire heme in vitro from hemoglobin (Hb) by a heme-sequestering mechanism that involves proteins from the S. aureus iron-regulated surface determinant (Isd....... By binding and uptake studies, we now show that the IsdH protein, which serves as an Hb receptor in the Isd system, directly interferes with the CD163-mediated clearance by binding the Hb-Hp complex and inhibiting CD163 recognition. Analysis of truncated IsdH variants including one or more of three near iron...

  2. Interferon-Inducible Protein Mx1 Inhibits Influenza Virus by Interfering with Functional Viral Ribonucleoprotein Complex Assembly

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Mx1 is a GTPase that is part of the antiviral response induced by type I and type III interferons in the infected host. It inhibits influenza virus infection by blocking viral transcription and replication, but the molecular mechanism is not known. Polymerase basic protein 2 (PB2) and nucleoprotein (NP) were suggested to be the possible target of Mx1, but a direct interaction between Mx1 and any of the viral proteins has not been reported. We investigated the interplay between Mx1, NP, and PB...

  3. Inhibition of HIV-1 replication by small interfering RNAs directed against Glioma Pathogenesis Related Protein (GliPR expression

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    Ottmann Oliver G

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previously, we showed that glioma pathogenesis related protein (GliPR is induced in CEM T cells upon HIV-1 infection in vitro. To examine whether GliPR plays a role as HIV dependency factor (HDF, we tested the effect of GliPR suppression by siRNA on HIV-1 replication. Results Induction of GliPR expression by HIV-1 was confirmed in P4-CCR5 cells. When GliPR was suppressed by siRNA, HIV-1 replication was significantly reduced as measured by HIV-1 transcript levels, HIV-1 p24 protein levels, and HIV-1 LTR-driven reporter gene expression, suggesting that GliPR is a cellular co-factor of HIV-1. Microarray analysis of uninfected HeLa cells following knockdown of GliPR revealed, among a multitude of gene expression alterations, a down-regulation of syndecan-1, syndecan-2, protein kinase C alpha (PRKCA, the catalytic subunit β of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PRKACB, nuclear receptor co-activator 3 (NCOA3, and cell surface protein CD59 (protectin, all genes having relevance for HIV-1 pathology. Conclusions The up-regulation of GliPR by HIV-1 and the early significant inhibition of HIV-1 replication mediated by knockdown of GliPR reveal GliPR as an important HIV-1 dependency factor (HDF, which may be exploited for HIV-1 inhibition.

  4. Latent Ice Recrystallization Inhibition Activity in Nonantifreeze Proteins: Ca2+-Activated Plant Lectins and Cation-Activated Antimicrobial Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Daniel E; Gibson, Matthew I

    2015-10-12

    Organisms living in polar regions have evolved a series of antifreeze (glyco) proteins (AFGPs) to enable them to survive by modulating the structure of ice. These proteins have huge potential for use in cellular cryopreservation, ice-resistant surfaces, frozen food, and cryosurgery, but they are limited by their relatively low availability and questions regarding their mode of action. This has triggered the search for biomimetic materials capable of reproducing this function. The identification of new structures and sequences capable of inhibiting ice growth is crucial to aid our understanding of these proteins. Here, we show that plant c-type lectins, which have similar biological function to human c-type lectins (glycan recognition) but no sequence homology to AFPs, display calcium-dependent ice recrystallization inhibition (IRI) activity. This IRI activity can be switched on/off by changing the Ca2+ concentration. To show that more (nonantifreeze) proteins may exist with the potential to display IRI, a second motif was considered, amphipathicity. All known AFPs have defined hydrophobic/hydrophilic domains, rationalizing this choice. The cheap, and widely used, antimicrobial Nisin was found to have cation-dependent IRI activity, controlled by either acid or addition of histidine-binding ions such as zinc or nickel, which promote its amphipathic structure. These results demonstrate a new approach in the identification of antifreeze protein mimetic macromolecules and may help in the development of synthetic mimics of AFPs.

  5. A novel acidic matrix protein, PfN44, stabilizes magnesium calcite to inhibit the crystallization of aragonite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Cong; Fang, Dong; Xu, Guangrui; Liang, Jian; Zhang, Guiyou; Wang, Hongzhong; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2014-01-31

    Magnesium is widely used to control calcium carbonate deposition in the shell of pearl oysters. Matrix proteins in the shell are responsible for nucleation and growth of calcium carbonate crystals. However, there is no direct evidence supporting a connection between matrix proteins and magnesium. Here, we identified a novel acidic matrix protein named PfN44 that affected aragonite formation in the shell of the pearl oyster Pinctada fucata. Using immunogold labeling assays, we found PfN44 in both the nacreous and prismatic layers. In shell repair, PfN44 was repressed, whereas other matrix proteins were up-regulated. Disturbing the function of PfN44 by RNAi led to the deposition of porous nacreous tablets with overgrowth of crystals in the nacreous layer. By in vitro circular dichroism spectra and fluorescence quenching, we found that PfN44 bound to both calcium and magnesium with a stronger affinity for magnesium. During in vitro calcium carbonate crystallization and calcification of amorphous calcium carbonate, PfN44 regulated the magnesium content of crystalline carbonate polymorphs and stabilized magnesium calcite to inhibit aragonite deposition. Taken together, our results suggested that by stabilizing magnesium calcite to inhibit aragonite deposition, PfN44 participated in P. fucata shell formation. These observations extend our understanding of the connections between matrix proteins and magnesium.

  6. Qushi Huayu Decoction Inhibits Hepatic Lipid Accumulation by Activating AMP-Activated Protein Kinase In Vivo and In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Feng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Qushi Huayu Decoction (QHD, a Chinese herbal formula, has been proven effective on alleviating nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD in human and rats. The present study was conducted to investigate whether QHD could inhibit hepatic lipid accumulation by activating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK in vivo and in vitro. Nonalcoholic fatty liver (NAFL model was duplicated with high-fat diet in rats and with free fatty acid (FFA in L02 cells. In in vivo experimental condition, QHD significantly decreased the accumulation of fatty droplets in livers, lowered low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c, alanine aminotransferase (ALT, and aspartate aminotransferase (AST levels in serum. Moreover, QHD supplementation reversed the HFD-induced decrease in the phosphorylation levels of AMPK and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC and decreased hepatic nuclear protein expression of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 (SREBP-1 and carbohydrate-responsive element-binding protein (ChREBP in the liver. In in vitro, QHD-containing serum decreased the cellular TG content and alleviated the accumulation of fatty droplets in L02 cells. QHD supplementation reversed the FFA-induced decrease in the phosphorylation levels of AMPK and ACC and decreased the hepatic nuclear protein expression of SREBP-1 and ChREBP. Overall results suggest that QHD has significant effect on inhibiting hepatic lipid accumulation via AMPK pathway in vivo and in vitro.

  7. Prokaryotic expression, purification, and production of polyclonal antibody against novel human serum inhibited related protein I (SI1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Mingxing; Ma, Jie; Shi, Yinghui; Wu, Hong; Zhao, Wenxiu; Huang, Weiwei; Jiao, Yang; Tan, Deyong

    2010-02-01

    A novel serum inhibited related gene (SI1) has been cloned in our lab by using mRNA differential display analysis of U251 cells in the presence or absence of serum, the expression of SI1 was dramatically inhibited by the addition of serum to serum starved cells. Previous reports suggested the potential significance of SI1 in regulating the cell cycle. In this study, the plasmid construction, protein expression and purification, as well as the generation of anti-SI1 polyclonal antibody are described. A full-length cDNA of Si1 was inserted in a prokaryotic expression plasmid pET28-b(+) and efficiently expressed in E. coli Rosetta (DE3) strain after induction by isopropyl-b-D: -thiogalactoside. The expressed 6His-tagged SI1 fusion protein was purified by Ni(+) affinity column and then used to immunize Balb/C mice, and the anti-SI1 polyclonal antibody was purified by protein A column. To determine the sensitivity and specificity of the antibody against SI1, a cell lysate of pEGFP-N2-SI1 plasmid transiently transfected Hela cell was identified by anti-GFP monoclonal antibody and anti-SI1 polyclonal antibody. Both the GFP-SI1 fusion protein and endogenous SI1 protein in Hela cell can be recognized by the anti-SI1 polyclonal antibody. The anti-SI1 polyclonal antibody will provide a useful tool for further characterization of SI1.

  8. Inhibition of host protein synthesis and degradation of cellular mRNAs during infection by influenza and herpes simplex virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inglis, S.C.

    1982-12-01

    Cloned DNA copies of two cellular genes were used to monitor, by blot hybridization, the stability of particular cell mRNAs after infection by influenza virus and herpes virus. The results indicated that the inhibition of host cell protein synthesis that accompanied infection by each virus could be explained by a reduction in the amounts of cellular mRN As in the cytoplasm, and they suggested that this decrease was due to virus-mediated mRNA degradation.

  9. Radicicol, a heat shock protein 90 inhibitor, inhibits differentiation and adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Yonghan [Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, Public Health College, Harbin Medical University, 157 Baojian Road, Harbin 150081 (China); Aquatic and Crop Resource Development, Life Sciences Branch, National Research Council Canada, Charlottetown, PE, Canada C1A 4P3 (Canada); State Key Laboratory of Genetic Resources and Evolution, Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650223 (China); Li, Ying [Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, Public Health College, Harbin Medical University, 157 Baojian Road, Harbin 150081 (China); Zhang, Shuocheng [Aquatic and Crop Resource Development, Life Sciences Branch, National Research Council Canada, Charlottetown, PE, Canada C1A 4P3 (Canada); Perry, Ben [Aquatic and Crop Resource Development, Life Sciences Branch, National Research Council Canada, Charlottetown, PE, Canada C1A 4P3 (Canada); Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Prince Edward Island, 550 University Avenue, Charlottetown, PE, Canada C1A 4P3 (Canada); Zhao, Tiantian [Aquatic and Crop Resource Development, Life Sciences Branch, National Research Council Canada, Charlottetown, PE, Canada C1A 4P3 (Canada); Department of Psychology, University of Toronto, 1265 Military Trail, Toronto, ON, Canada M1C 1A4 (Canada); Wang, Yanwen, E-mail: yanwen.wang@nrc.ca [Aquatic and Crop Resource Development, Life Sciences Branch, National Research Council Canada, Charlottetown, PE, Canada C1A 4P3 (Canada); Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Prince Edward Island, 550 University Avenue, Charlottetown, PE, Canada C1A 4P3 (Canada); Sun, Changhao, E-mail: sun2002changhao@yahoo.com [Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, Public Health College, Harbin Medical University, 157 Baojian Road, Harbin 150081 (China)

    2013-06-28

    Highlights: •Radicicol suppressed intracellular fat accumulation in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. •Radicicol inhibited the expression of FAS and FABP4. •Radicicol blocked cell cycle at the G1-S phase during cell differentiation. •Radicicol inhibited the PDK1/Akt pathway in adipocyte differentiation. -- Abstract: Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is involved in various cellular processes, such as cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. As adipocyte differentiation plays a critical role in obesity development, the present study investigated the effect of an Hsp90 inhibitor radicicol on the differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes and potential mechanisms. The cells were treated with different concentrations of radicicol during the first 8 days of cell differentiation. Adipogenesis, the expression of adipogenic transcriptional factors, differentiation makers and cell cycle were determined. It was found that radicicol dose-dependently decreased intracellular fat accumulation through down-regulating the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPAR{sub γ}) and CCAAT element binding protein α (C/EBP{sub α}), fatty acid synthase (FAS) and fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4). Flow cytometry analysis revealed that radicicol blocked cell cycle at G1-S phase. Radicicol redcued the phosphorylation of Akt while showing no effect on β-catenin expression. Radicicol decreased the phosphorylation of phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1 (PDK1). The results suggest that radicicol inhibited 3T3-L1 preadipocyte differentiation through affecting the PDK1/Akt pathway and subsequent inhibition of mitotic clonal expansion and the expression/activity of adipogenic transcriptional factors and their downstream adipogenic proteins.

  10. GCN-2 dependent inhibition of protein synthesis activates osmosensitive gene transcription via WNK and Ste20 kinase signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Elaine Choung-Hee; Strange, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Increased gpdh-1 transcription is required for accumulation of the organic osmolyte glycerol and survival of Caenorhabditis elegans during hypertonic stress. Our previous work has shown that regulators of gpdh-1 (rgpd) gene knockdown constitutively activates gpdh-1 expression. Fifty-five rgpd genes play essential roles in translation suggesting that inhibition of protein synthesis is an important signal for regulating osmoprotective gene transcription. We demonstrate here that translation is ...

  11. Chemical Genomics Identifies the PERK-Mediated Unfolded Protein Stress Response as a Cellular Target for Influenza Virus Inhibition

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    Sara Landeras-Bueno

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A viruses generate annual epidemics and occasional pandemics of respiratory disease with important consequences for human health and the economy. Therefore, a large effort has been devoted to the development of new anti-influenza virus drugs directed to viral targets, as well as to the identification of cellular targets amenable to anti-influenza virus therapy. Here we have addressed the identification of such potential cellular targets by screening collections of drugs approved for human use. We reasoned that screening with a green fluorescent protein-based recombinant replicon system would identify cellular targets involved in virus transcription/replication and/or gene expression and hence address an early stage of virus infection. By using such a strategy, we identified Montelukast (MK as an inhibitor of virus multiplication. MK inhibited virus gene expression but did not alter viral RNA synthesis in vitro or viral RNA accumulation in vivo. The low selectivity index of MK prevented its use as an antiviral, but it was sufficient to identify a new cellular pathway suitable for anti-influenza virus intervention. By deep sequencing of RNA isolated from mock- and virus-infected human cells, treated with MK or left untreated, we showed that it stimulates the PERK-mediated unfolded protein stress response. The phosphorylation of PERK was partly inhibited in virus-infected cells but stimulated in MK-treated cells. Accordingly, pharmacological inhibition of PERK phosphorylation led to increased viral gene expression, while inhibition of PERK phosphatase reduced viral protein synthesis. These results suggest the PERK-mediated unfolded protein response as a potential cellular target to modulate influenza virus infection.

  12. Species-specific inhibition of RIG-I ubiquitination and IFN induction by the influenza A virus NS1 protein.

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    Ricardo Rajsbaum

    Full Text Available Influenza A viruses can adapt to new host species, leading to the emergence of novel pathogenic strains. There is evidence that highly pathogenic viruses encode for non-structural 1 (NS1 proteins that are more efficient in suppressing the host immune response. The NS1 protein inhibits type-I interferon (IFN production partly by blocking the TRIM25 ubiquitin E3 ligase-mediated Lys63-linked ubiquitination of the viral RNA sensor RIG-I, required for its optimal downstream signaling. In order to understand possible mechanisms of viral adaptation and host tropism, we examined the ability of NS1 encoded by human (Cal04, avian (HK156, swine (SwTx98 and mouse-adapted (PR8 influenza viruses to interact with TRIM25 orthologues from mammalian and avian species. Using co-immunoprecipitation assays we show that human TRIM25 binds to all tested NS1 proteins, whereas the chicken TRIM25 ortholog binds preferentially to the NS1 from the avian virus. Strikingly, none of the NS1 proteins were able to bind mouse TRIM25. Since NS1 can inhibit IFN production in mouse, we tested the impact of TRIM25 and NS1 on RIG-I ubiquitination in mouse cells. While NS1 efficiently suppressed human TRIM25-dependent ubiquitination of RIG-I 2CARD, NS1 inhibited the ubiquitination of full-length mouse RIG-I in a mouse TRIM25-independent manner. Therefore, we tested if the ubiquitin E3 ligase Riplet, which has also been shown to ubiquitinate RIG-I, interacts with NS1. We found that NS1 binds mouse Riplet and inhibits its activity to induce IFN-β in murine cells. Furthermore, NS1 proteins of human but not swine or avian viruses were able to interact with human Riplet, thereby suppressing RIG-I ubiquitination. In conclusion, our results indicate that influenza NS1 protein targets TRIM25 and Riplet ubiquitin E3 ligases in a species-specific manner for the inhibition of RIG-I ubiquitination and antiviral IFN production.

  13. Flavone inhibits nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity, nitric oxide production and protein S-nitrosylation in breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Wenzhen; Yang, Bingwu; Fu, Huiling; Ma, Long; Liu, Tingting; Chai, Rongfei; Zheng, Zhaodi [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Animal Resistant Biology, School of Life Sciences, Shandong Normal University, Jinan 250014 (China); Zhang, Qunye, E-mail: wz.zhangqy@sdu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research Chinese Ministry of Education and Ministry of Public Health, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong (China); Li, Guorong, E-mail: grli@sdnu.edu.cn [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Animal Resistant Biology, School of Life Sciences, Shandong Normal University, Jinan 250014 (China)

    2015-03-13

    As the core structure of flavonoids, flavone has been proved to possess anticancer effects. Flavone's growth inhibitory functions are related to NO. NO is synthesized by nitric oxide synthase (NOS), and generally increased in a variety of cancer cells. NO regulates multiple cellular responses by S-nitrosylation. In this study, we explored flavone-induced regulations on nitric oxide (NO)-related cellular processes in breast cancer cells. Our results showed that, flavone suppresses breast cancer cell proliferation and induces apoptosis. Flavone restrains NO synthesis by does-dependent inhibiting NOS enzymatic activity. The decrease of NO generation was detected by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Flavone-induced inhibitory effect on NOS activity is dependent on intact cell structure. For the NO-induced protein modification, flavone treatment significantly down-regulated protein S-nitrosylation, which was detected by “Biotin-switch” method. The present study provides a novel, NO-related mechanism for the anticancer function of flavone. - Highlights: • Flavone inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in MCF-7 cells. • Flavone decreases nitric oxide production by inhibiting NOS enzymatic activity in breast cancer cells. • Flavone down-regulates protein S-nitrosylation.

  14. Molecular and Functional Characterization of a Polygalacturonase-Inhibiting Protein from Cynanchum komarovii That Confers Fungal Resistance in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nana Liu

    Full Text Available Compliance with ethical standards: This study did not involve human participants and animals, and the plant of interest is not an endangered species. Polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins (PGIPs are leucine-rich repeat proteins that plants produce against polygalacturonase, a key virulence agent in pathogens. In this paper, we cloned and purified CkPGIP1, a gene product from Cynanchum komarovii that effectively inhibits polygalacturonases from Botrytis cinerea and Rhizoctonia solani. We found the expression of CkPGIP1 to be induced in response to salicylic acid, wounding, and infection with B. cinerea and R. solani. In addition, transgenic overexpression in Arabidopsis enhanced resistance against B. cinerea. Furthermore, CkPGIP1 obtained from transgenic Arabidopsis inhibited the activity of B. cinerea and R. solani polygalacturonases by 62.7-66.4% and 56.5-60.2%, respectively. Docking studies indicated that the protein interacts strongly with the B1-sheet at the N-terminus of the B. cinerea polygalacturonase, and with the C-terminus of the polygalacturonase from R. solani. This study highlights the significance of CkPGIP1 in plant disease resistance, and its possible application to manage fungal pathogens.

  15. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 inhibition and angiotensin II converting inhibition in mice with cardiomyopathy caused by lamin A/C gene mutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muchir, Antoine, E-mail: a.muchir@institut-myologie.org [Department of Medicine, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States); Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States); Wu, Wei [Department of Medicine, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States); Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States); Sera, Fusako; Homma, Shunichi [Department of Medicine, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States); Worman, Howard J., E-mail: hjw14@columbia.edu [Department of Medicine, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States); Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-10-03

    Highlights: • Both ACE and MEK1/2 inhibition are beneficial on cardiac function in Lmna cardiomyopathy. • MEK1/2 inhibitor has beneficial effects beyond ACE inhibition for Lmna cardiomyopathy. • These results provide further preclinical rationale for a clinical trial of a MEK1/2 inhibitor. - Abstract: Background: Mutations in the LMNA gene encoding A-type nuclear lamins can cause dilated cardiomyopathy with or without skeletal muscular dystrophy. Previous studies have shown abnormally increased extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 activity in hearts of Lmna{sup H222P/H222P} mice, a small animal model. Inhibition of this abnormal signaling activity with a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 (MEK1/2) inhibitor has beneficial effects on heart function and survival in these mice. However, such treatment has not been examined relative to any standard of care intervention for dilated cardiomyopathy or heart failure. We therefore examined the effects of an angiotensin II converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor on left ventricular function in Lmna{sup H222P/H222P} mice and assessed if adding a MEK1/2 inhibitor would provide added benefit. Methods: Male Lmna{sup H222P/H222P} mice were treated with the ACE inhibitor benazepril, the MEK1/2 inhibitor selumetinib or both. Transthoracic echocardiography was used to measure left ventricular diameters and fractional shortening was calculated. Results: Treatment of Lmna{sup H222P/H222P} mice with either benazepril or selumetinib started at 8 weeks of age, before the onset of detectable left ventricular dysfunction, lead to statistically significantly increased fractional shortening compared to placebo at 16 weeks of age. There was a trend towards a great value for fractional shortening in the selumetinib-treated mice. When treatment was started at 16 weeks of age, after the onset of left ventricular dysfunction, the addition of selumetinib treatment to benazepril lead to a statistically significant increase in left

  16. Inhibition of breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2 in human myeloid dendritic cells induces potent tolerogenic functions during LPS stimulation.

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    Jun-O Jin

    Full Text Available Breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2, a member of the ATP-binding cassette transporters has been identified as a major determinant of multidrug resistance (MDR in cancer cells, but ABC transporter inhibition has limited therapeutic value in vivo. In this research, we demonstrated that inhibition of efflux transporters ABCG2 induced the generation of tolerogenic DCs from human peripheral blood myeloid DCs (mDCs. ABCG2 expression was present in mDCs and was further increased by LPS stimulation. Treatment of CD1c+ mDCs with an ABCG2 inhibitor, Ko143, during LPS stimulation caused increased production of IL-10 and decreased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and decreased expression of CD83 and CD86. Moreover, inhibition of ABCG2 in monocyte-derived DCs (MDDCs abrogated the up-regulation of co-stimulatory molecules and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in these cells in response to LPS. Furthermore, CD1c+ mDCs stimulated with LPS plus Ko143 inhibited the proliferation of allogeneic and superantigen-specific syngenic CD4+ T cells and promoted expansion of CD25+FOXP3+ regulatory T (Treg cells in an IL-10-dependent fashion. These tolerogenic effects of ABCG2 inhibition could be abolished by ERK inhibition. Thus, we demonstrated that inhibition of ABCG2 in LPS-stimulated mDCs can potently induce tolerogenic potentials in these cells, providing crucial new information that could lead to development of better strategies to combat MDR cancer.

  17. Sesamin increases heme oxygenase-1 protein in RAW 264.7 macrophages through inhibiting its ubiquitination process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukunaga, Mizuki; Ohnishi, Masatoshi; Shiratsuchi, Ayano; Kawakami, Takuya; Takahashi, Madoka; Motomura, Misato; Egusa, Kyohei; Urasaki, Tomoka; Inoue, Atsuko

    2014-10-15

    Sesamin is a major component in lignans of sesame seed oil, known to possess potent anti-oxidative capacity. In this study, the variation of heme oxygenase (HO)-1, a kind of anti-oxidative enzyme, by sesamin in murine macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 cells was investigated. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 10μg/ml) exposure tended to increase HO-1 protein expression. Co-treatment with 100μM sesamin for 12h up-regulated the HO-1 protein level increased by LPS; however, HO-1 mRNA was unaffected. Sesamin delayed the reversal, by the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide (1μM), of the LPS-induced increase of HO-1 protein level. Meanwhile, sesamin suppressed LPS-induced expression of inducible nitric oxide (NO) synthase (iNOS) protein and associated NO release. LPS-induced increase of iNOS protein expression was also reversed by cycloheximide, which was not affected by sesamin, unlike HO-1. To clarify the mechanisms that underlie the up-regulation of HO-1 protein level by sesamin, the human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293T cell line transfected with Flag-tagged HO-1 was used. A proteasome inhibitor, MG-132 (10μM), stabilized HO-1 protein in HEK 293T cells. Co-treatment with sesamin decreased ubiquitinated HO-1 protein accumulation by MG-132. However, sesamin did not affect the proteasome activity. These findings suggest that sesamin disturbs the degradation of HO-1 protein through inhibiting its ubiquitination, resulting in HO-1 protein up-regulation.

  18. Moringa oleifera aqueous leaf extract inhibits reducing monosaccharide-induced protein glycation and oxidation of bovine serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunthanawanich, Pornpimon; Sompong, Weerachat; Sirikwanpong, Sukrit; Mäkynen, Kittana; Adisakwattana, Sirichai; Dahlan, Winai; Ngamukote, Sathaporn

    2016-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) play an important factor for pathophysiology of diabetes and its complications. Moringa oleifera is one of the medicinal plants that have anti-hyperglycemic activity. However, anti-glycation property of Moringa oleifera leaf extract on the different types of reducing monosaccharides-induced protein glycation has not been investigated. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the protective effect of Moringa oleifera aqueous leaf extract (MOE) on reducing sugars-induced protein glycation and protein oxidation. Total phenolic content of MOE was measured using the Folin-Ciocalteu method. Bovine serum albumin was incubated with 0.5 M of reducing sugars (glucose or fructose) with or without MOE (0.5-2.0 mg/mL) for 1, 2, 3 and 4 weeks. The results found that total phenolic content was 38.56 ± 1.50 mg gallic acid equivalents/g dry extract. The formation of fluorescent and non-fluorescent AGEs [N (ε)-(carboxymethyl) lysine (CML)] and the level of fructosamine were determined to indicate protein glycation, whereas the level of protein carbonyl content and thiol group were examined for protein oxidation. MOE (0.5-2.0 mg/mL) significantly inhibited the formation of fluorescent, N (ε)-CML and markedly decreased fructosamine level (P < 0.05). Moreover, MOE significantly prevented protein oxidation manifested by reducing protein carbonyl and the depletion of protein thiol in a dose-dependent manner (P < 0.05). Thus, the findings indicated that polyphenols containing in MOE have high potential for decreasing protein glycation and protein oxidation that may delay or prevent AGE-related diabetic complications.

  19. Nuclear Factor 90, a cellular dsRNA binding protein inhibits the HIV Rev-export function

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    St-Laurent Georges

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The HIV Rev protein is known to facilitate export of incompletely spliced and unspliced viral transcripts to the cytoplasm, a necessary step in virus life cycle. The Rev-mediated nucleo-cytoplasmic transport of nascent viral transcripts, dependents on interaction of Rev with the RRE RNA structural element present in the target RNAs. The C-terminal variant of dsRNA-binding nuclear protein 90 (NF90ctv has been shown to markedly attenuate viral replication in stably transduced HIV-1 target cell line. Here we examined a mechanism of interference of viral life cycle involving Rev-NF90ctv interaction. Results Since Rev:RRE complex formations depend on protein:RNA and protein:protein interactions, we investigated whether the expression of NF90ctv might interfere with Rev-mediated export of RRE-containing transcripts. When HeLa cells expressed both NF90ctv and Rev protein, we observed that NF90ctv inhibited the Rev-mediated RNA transport. In particular, three regions of NF90ctv protein are involved in blocking Rev function. Moreover, interaction of NF90ctv with the RRE RNA resulted in the expression of a reporter protein coding sequences linked to the RRE structure. Moreover, Rev influenced the subcellular localization of NF90ctv, and this process is leptomycin B sensitive. Conclusion The dsRNA binding protein, NF90ctv competes with HIV Rev function at two levels, by competitive protein:protein interaction involving Rev binding to specific domains of NF90ctv, as well as by its binding to the RRE-RNA structure. Our results are consistent with a model of Rev-mediated HIV-1 RNA export that envisions Rev-multimerization, a process interrupted by NF90ctv.

  20. In vitro inhibition of vesicular stomatitis virus replication by purified porcine Mx1 protein fused to HIV-1 Tat protein transduction domain (PTD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-min; He, Dan-Ni; Zhou, Bin; Pang, Ran; Liu, Ke; Zhao, Jin; Chen, Pu-yan

    2013-08-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is the causative agent of Vesicular stomatitis (VS), a highly contagious fatal disease of human and pigs. Few effective antiviral drugs are currently available against VSV infection. Mx proteins are interferon (IFN)-induced dynamin-like GTPases present in all vertebrates with a range of antiviral activities. Previous studies have shown that the transfected cell lines expressing either porcine Mx1 or human MxA acquired a high degree of resistance to VSV. To explore the feasibility of taking porcine Mx1 protein expressed in Escherichia coli as an antiviral agent, we applied the pCold system to express this fusion protein (PTD-poMx1), which consisted of an N-terminal HIV-1 Tat protein transduction domain (PTD) and the full-length porcine Mx1, and investigated its effects on the replication of VSV in Vero cells. The results demonstrated that the purified PTD-poMx1 fusion proteins could transduct into cells after incubated for 5h and had no cytotoxic. Furthermore, plaque reduction assay, determination of TCID50, real-time PCR and Western blot analyses were carried out to confirm the antiviral activity of purified fusion proteins in VSV-infected Vero cells. Altogether, these data suggested that PTD-poMx1 fusion proteins might be applicable to inhibit VSV replication as a novel antiviral therapeutic agent.

  1. Protein Kinase C-Independent Inhibition of Organic Cation Transporter 1 Activity by the Bisindolylmaleimide Ro 31-8220.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Mayati

    Full Text Available Ro 31-8220 is a potent protein kinase C (PKC inhibitor belonging to the chemical class of bisindolylmaleimides (BIMs. Various PKC-independent effects of Ro 31-8220 have however been demonstrated, including inhibition of the ATP-binding cassette drug transporter breast cancer resistance protein. In the present study, we reported that the BIM also blocks activity of the solute carrier organic cation transporter (OCT 1, involved in uptake of marketed drugs in the liver, in a PKC-independent manner. Ro 31-8220, in contrast to other pan-PKC inhibitors such as staurosporine and chelerythrine, was thus shown to cis-inhibit uptake of the reference OCT1 substrate tetraethylammonium in OCT1-transfected HEK293 cells in a concentration-dependent manner (IC50 = 0.18 μM and without altering membrane expression of OCT1. This blockage of OCT1 was also observed in human hepatic HepaRG cells that constitutionally express OCT1. It likely occurred through a mixed mechanism of inhibition. Ro 31-8220 additionally trans-inhibited TEA uptake in OCT1-transfected HEK293 cells, which likely discards a transport of Ro 31-8220 by OCT1. Besides Ro 31-8220, 7 additional BIMs, including the PKC inhibitor LY 333531, inhibited OCT1 activity, whereas 4 other BIMs were without effect. In silico analysis of structure-activity relationships next revealed that various molecular descriptors, especially 3D-WHIM descriptors related to total size, correspond to key physico-chemical parameters for inhibition of OCT1 activity by BIMs. In addition to activity of OCT1, Ro 31-8220 inhibited those of other organic cation transporters such as multidrug and toxin extrusion protein (MATE 1 and MATE2-K, whereas, by contrast, it stimulated that of OCT2. Taken together, these data extend the nature of cellular off-targets of the BIM Ro 31-8220 to OCT1 and other organic cation transporters, which has likely to be kept in mind when using Ro 31-8220 and other BIMs as PKC inhibitors in experimental or

  2. Vaccinia virus K1 ankyrin repeat protein inhibits NF-κB activation by preventing RelA acetylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo Cruz, Ariana G; Shisler, Joanna L

    2016-10-01

    The vaccinia virus (VACV) K1 protein inhibits dsRNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) activation. A consequence of this function is that K1 inhibits PKR-induced NF-κB activation during VACV infection. However, transient expression of K1 also inhibits Toll-like receptor (TLR)-induced NF-κB activation. This suggests that K1 has a second NF-κB inhibitory mechanism that is PKR-independent. This possibility was explored by expressing K1 independently of infection and stimulating NF-κB under conditions that minimized or excluded PKR activation. K1 inhibited both TNF- and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-induced NF-κB activation, as detected by transcription of synthetic (e.g. luciferase) and natural (e.g. CXCL8) genes controlled by NF-κB. K1 also inhibited NF-κB activity in PKRkd cells, cells that have greatly decreased amounts of PKR. K1 no longer prevented IκBα degradation or NF-κB nuclear translocation in the absence of PKR, suggesting that K1 acted on a nuclear event. Indeed, K1 was present in the nucleus and cytoplasm of stimulated and unstimulated cells. K1 inhibited acetylation of the RelA (p65) subunit of NF-κB, a nuclear event known to be required for NF-κB activation. Moreover, p65-CBP (CREB-binding protein) interactions were blocked in the presence of K1. However, K1 did not preclude NF-κB binding to oligonucleotides containing κB-binding sites. The current interpretation of these data is that NF-κB-promoter interactions still occur in the presence of K1, but NF-κB cannot properly trigger transcriptional activation because K1 antagonizes acetylation of RelA. Thus, in comparison to all known VACV NF-κB inhibitory proteins, K1 acts at one of the most downstream events of NF-κB activation.

  3. Apoptosis induction in human leukemic cells by a novel protein Bengalin, isolated from Indian black scorpion venom: through mitochondrial pathway and inhibition of heat shock proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shubho Das; Gomes, Antony; Debnath, Anindita; Saha, Archita; Gomes, Aparna

    2010-01-27

    Scorpion venom possesses protein toxins having numerous biological activities, some of which are potentially anticancerous. Previously we had reported antiproliferative activity of the venom of Indian black scorpion, Heterometrus bengalensis Koch. Here we have isolated and purified a novel protein named Bengalin (72kDa) from the venom, responsible for antiproliferative and apoptogenic activities against human leukemic cells U937 (histiocytic lymphoma) and K562 (chronic myelogenous leukemia). N-terminal sequence of first 20 amino acids of Bengalin was G-P-L-T-I-L-H-I-N-D-V-H-A-A/R-F-E-Q/G-F/G-N-T. Bengalin induced cell growth inhibition at IC(50) values of 3.7 and 4.1 microg/ml for U937 and K562 cells respectively did not significantly affect normal human lymphocytes. Inhibition of U937 and K562 cell proliferation occurred by apoptosis as evidenced from damaged nuclei, cell cycle arrest at sub G1 phase, increase of early apoptotic cells, augmentation of DNA fragmentation and also a reduction of telomerase activity. Further insights revealed that Bax:Bcl2 ratio was elevated after Bengalin treatment. Moreover Bengalin elicited loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) which commenced cytochrome c release in cytosol, decreased heat shock protein (HSP) 70 and 90 expression, activated caspase-9, caspase-3 and induced poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage. We have also determined that HSP70 and 90 inhibitions correlated with Bengalin induced antiproliferation, caspase-3 upregulation, apoptogenesis and increased DNA fragmentation. These results hypothesize that Bengalin might provide a putative molecular mechanism for their anticancer effect on human leukemic cells which might be mediated by mitochondrial death cascade. Inhibition of HSPs might also play a crucial role in induction of apoptosis.

  4. Influence of Block Copolymerization on the Antifreeze Protein Mimetic Ice Recrystallization Inhibition Activity of Poly(vinyl alcohol).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congdon, Thomas R; Notman, Rebecca; Gibson, Matthew I

    2016-09-12

    Antifreeze (glyco) proteins are produced by many cold-acclimatized species to enable them to survive subzero temperatures. These proteins have multiple macroscopic effects on ice crystal growth which makes them appealing for low-temperature applications-from cellular cryopreservation to food storage. Poly(vinyl alcohol) has remarkable ice recrystallization inhibition activity, but its mode of action is uncertain as is the extent at which it can be incorporated into other high-order structures. Here the synthesis and characterization of well-defined block copolymers containing poly(vinyl alcohol) and poly(vinylpyrrolidone) by RAFT/MADIX polymerization is reported, as new antifreeze protein mimetics. The effect of adding a large second hydrophilic block is studied across a range of compositions, and it is found to be a passive component in ice recrystallization inhibition assays, enabling retention of all activity. In the extreme case, a block copolymer with only 10% poly(vinyl alcohol) was found to retain all activity, where statistical copolymers of PVA lose all activity with very minor changes to composition. These findings present a new method to increase the complexity of antifreeze protein mimetic materials, while retaining activity, and also to help understand the underlying mechanisms of action.

  5. S-layer proteins from Lactobacillus sp. inhibit bacterial infection by blockage of DC-SIGN cell receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado Acosta, Mariano; Ruzal, Sandra M; Cordo, Sandra M

    2016-11-01

    Many species of Lactobacillus sp. possess Surface(s) layer proteins in their envelope. Among other important characteristics S-layer from Lactobacillus acidophilus binds to the cellular receptor DC-SIGN (Dendritic Cell-Specific Intercellular adhesion molecule-3-Grabbing Non-integrin; CD209), which is involved in adhesion and infection of several families of bacteria. In this report we investigate the activity of new S-layer proteins from the Lactobacillus family (Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus helveticus and Lactobacillus kefiri) over the infection of representative microorganisms important to human health. After the treatment of DC-SIGN expressing cells with these proteins, we were able to diminish bacterial infection by up to 79% in both gram negative and mycobacterial models. We discovered that pre-treatment of the bacteria with S-layers from Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus brevis reduced bacteria viability but also prevent infection by the pathogenic bacteria. We also proved the importance of the glycosylation of the S-layer from Lactobacillus kefiri in the binding to the receptor and thus inhibition of infection. This novel characteristic of the S-layers proteins may contribute to the already reported pathogen exclusion activity for these Lactobacillus probiotic strains; and might be also considered as a novel enzymatic antimicrobial agents to inhibit bacterial infection and entry to host cells.

  6. Light-regulated stapled peptides to inhibit protein-protein interactions involved in clathrin-mediated endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevola, Laura; Martín-Quirós, Andrés; Eckelt, Kay; Camarero, Núria; Tosi, Sébastien; Llobet, Artur; Giralt, Ernest; Gorostiza, Pau

    2013-07-22

    Control of membrane traffic: Photoswitchable inhibitors of protein-protein interactions were applied to photoregulate clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) in living cells. Traffic light (TL) peptides acting as "stop" and "go" signals for membrane traffic can be used to dissect the role of CME in receptor internalization and in cell growth, division, and differentiation. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Thiopental inhibits global protein synthesis by repression of eukaryotic elongation factor 2 and protects from hypoxic neuronal cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian I Schwer

    Full Text Available Ischemic and traumatic brain injury is associated with increased risk for death and disability. The inhibition of penumbral tissue damage has been recognized as a target for therapeutic intervention, because cellular injury evolves progressively upon ATP-depletion and loss of ion homeostasis. In patients, thiopental is used to treat refractory intracranial hypertension by reducing intracranial pressure and cerebral metabolic demands; however, therapeutic benefits of thiopental-treatment are controversially discussed. In the present study we identified fundamental neuroprotective molecular mechanisms mediated by thiopental. Here we show that thiopental inhibits global protein synthesis, which preserves the intracellular energy metabolite content in oxygen-deprived human neuronal SK-N-SH cells or primary mouse cortical neurons and thus ameliorates hypoxic cell damage. Sensitivity to hypoxic damage was restored by pharmacologic repression of eukaryotic elongation factor 2 kinase. Translational inhibition was mediated by calcium influx, activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase, and inhibitory phosphorylation of eukaryotic elongation factor 2. Our results explain the reduction of cerebral metabolic demands during thiopental treatment. Cycloheximide also protected neurons from hypoxic cell death, indicating that translational inhibitors may generally reduce secondary brain injury. In conclusion our study demonstrates that therapeutic inhibition of global protein synthesis protects neurons from hypoxic damage by preserving energy balance in oxygen-deprived cells. Molecular evidence for thiopental-mediated neuroprotection favours a positive clinical evaluation of barbiturate treatment. The chemical structure of thiopental could represent a pharmacologically relevant scaffold for the development of new organ-protective compounds to ameliorate tissue damage when oxygen availability is limited.

  8. Understanding peptide competitive inhibition of botulinum neurotoxin A binding to SV2 protein via molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shan; He, Hong-Qiu; Shen, Lin; Wan, Hua

    2015-10-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are known as the most toxic natural substances. Synaptic vesicle protein 2 (SV2) has been proposed to be a protein receptor for BoNT/A. Recently, two short peptides (BoNT/A-A2 and SV2C-A3) were designed to inhibit complex formation between the BoNT/A receptor-binding domain (BoNT/A-RBD) and the synaptic vesicle protein 2C luminal domain (SV2C-LD). In this article, the two peptide complex systems are studied by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The structural stability analysis indicates that BoNT/A-A2 system is more stable than SV2C-A3 system. The conformational analysis implies that the β-sheet in BoNT/A-A2 system maintains its secondary structure but the two β-strands in SV2C-A3 system have remarkable conformational changes. Based on the calculation of hydrogen bonds, hydrophobic interactions and cation-π interactions, it is found that the internal hydrogen bonds play crucial roles in the structural stability of the peptides. Because of the stable secondary structure, the β-sheet in BoNT/A-A2 system establishes effective interactions at the interface and inhibits BoNT/A-RBD binding to SV2C-LD. In contrast, without other β-strands forming internal hydrogen bonds, the two isolated β-strands in SV2C-A3 system become the random coil. This conformational change breaks important hydrogen bonds and weakens cation-π interaction in the interface, so the complex formation is only partially inhibited by the two β-strands. These results are consistent with experimental studies and may be helpful in understanding the inhibition mechanisms of peptide inhibitors.

  9. Role of ID Proteins in BMP4 Inhibition of Profibrotic Effects of TGF-β2 in Human TM Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mody, Avani A.; Wordinger, Robert J.; Clark, Abbot F.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Increased expression of TGF-β2 in primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) aqueous humor (AH) and trabecular meshwork (TM) causes deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) in the TM and elevated IOP. Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) regulate TGF-β2–induced ECM production. The underlying mechanism for BMP4 inhibition of TGF-β2–induced fibrosis remains undetermined. Bone morphogenic protein 4 induces inhibitor of DNA binding proteins (ID1, ID3), which suppress transcription factor activities to regulate gene expression. Our study will determine whether ID1and ID3 proteins are downstream targets of BMP4, which attenuates TGF-β2 induction of ECM proteins in TM cells. Methods Primary human TM cells were treated with BMP4, and ID1 and ID3 mRNA, and protein expression was determined by quantitative PCR (Q-PCR) and Western immunoblotting. Intracellular ID1 and ID3 protein localization was studied by immunocytochemistry. Transformed human TM cells (GTM3 cells) were transfected with ID1 or ID3 expression vectors to determine their potential inhibitory effects on TGF-β2–induced fibronectin and plasminogen activator inhibitor-I (PAI-1) protein expression. Results Basal expression of ID1-3 was detected in primary human TM cells. Bone morphogenic protein 4 significantly induced early expression of ID1 and ID3 mRNA (P < 0.05) and protein in primary TM cells, and a BMP receptor inhibitor blocked this induction. Overexpression of ID1 and ID3 significantly inhibited TGF-β2–induced expression of fibronectin and PAI-1 in TM cells (P < 0.01). Conclusions Bone morphogenic protein 4 induced ID1 and ID3 expression suppresses TGF-β2 profibrotic activity in human TM cells. In the future, targeting specific regulators may control the TGF-β2 profibrotic effects on the TM, leading to disease modifying IOP lowering therapies. PMID:28159972

  10. Mutant Forms of the Azotobacter vinelandii Transcriptional Activator NifA Resistant to Inhibition by the NifL Regulatory Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Reyes-Ramirez, Francisca; Little, Richard; Dixon, Ray

    2002-01-01

    The Azotobacter vinelandii σ54-dependent transcriptional activator protein NifA is regulated by the NifL protein in response to redox, carbon, and nitrogen status. Under conditions inappropriate for nitrogen fixation, NifL inhibits transcription activation by NifA through the formation of the NifL-NifA protein complex. NifL inhibits the ATPase activity of the central AAA+ domain of NifA required to drive open complex formation by σ54-RNA polymerase and may also inhibit the activator-polymeras...

  11. Mutant Forms of the Azotobacter vinelandii Transcriptional Activator NifA Resistant to Inhibition by the NifL Regulatory Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Reyes-Ramirez, Francisca; Little, Richard; Dixon, Ray

    2002-01-01

    The Azotobacter vinelandii σ54-dependent transcriptional activator protein NifA is regulated by the NifL protein in response to redox, carbon, and nitrogen status. Under conditions inappropriate for nitrogen fixation, NifL inhibits transcription activation by NifA through the formation of the NifL-NifA protein complex. NifL inhibits the ATPase activity of the central AAA+ domain of NifA required to drive open complex formation by σ54-RNA polymerase and may also inhibit the activator-polymeras...

  12. The potent, indirect adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase activator R419 attenuates mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling, inhibits nociceptor excitability, and reduces pain hypersensitivity in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galo L. Mejia

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. There is a great need for new therapeutics for the treatment of pain. A possible avenue to development of such therapeutics is to interfere with signaling pathways engaged in peripheral nociceptors that cause these neurons to become hyperexcitable. There is strong evidence that mitogen-activated protein kinases and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K/mechanistic target of rapamycin signaling pathways are key modulators of nociceptor excitability in vitro and in vivo. Activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK can inhibit signaling in both of these pathways, and AMPK activators have been shown to inhibit nociceptor excitability and pain hypersensitivity in rodents. R419 is one of, if not the most potent AMPK activator described to date. We tested whether R419 activates AMPK in dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons and if this leads to decreased pain hypersensitivity in mice. We find that R419 activates AMPK in DRG neurons resulting in decreased mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling, decreased nascent protein synthesis, and enhanced P body formation. R419 attenuates nerve growth factor (NGF-induced changes in excitability in DRG neurons and blocks NGF-induced mechanical pain amplification in vivo. Moreover, locally applied R419 attenuates pain hypersensitivity in a model of postsurgical pain and blocks the development of hyperalgesic priming in response to both NGF and incision. We conclude that R419 is a promising lead candidate compound for the development of potent and specific AMPK activation to inhibit pain hypersensitivity as a result of injury.

  13. Retinal degeneration 3 (RD3) protein inhibits catalytic activity of retinal membrane guanylyl cyclase (RetGC) and its stimulation by activating proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peshenko, Igor V; Olshevskaya, Elena V; Azadi, Seifollah; Molday, Laurie L; Molday, Robert S; Dizhoor, Alexander M

    2011-11-08

    Retinal membrane guanylyl cyclase (RetGC) in the outer segments of vertebrate photoreceptors is controlled by guanylyl cyclase activating proteins (GCAPs), responding to light-dependent changes of the intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations. We present evidence that a different RetGC binding protein, retinal degeneration 3 protein (RD3), is a high-affinity allosteric modulator of the cyclase which inhibits RetGC activity at submicromolar concentrations. It suppresses the basal activity of RetGC in the absence of GCAPs in a noncompetitive manner, and it inhibits the GCAP-stimulated RetGC at low intracellular Ca(2+) levels. RD3 opposes the allosteric activation of the cyclase by GCAP but does not significantly change Ca(2+) sensitivity of the GCAP-dependent regulation. We have tested a number of mutations in RD3 implicated in human retinal degenerative disorders and have found that several mutations prevent the stable expression of RD3 in HEK293 cells and decrease the affinity of RD3 for RetGC1. The RD3 mutant lacking the carboxy-terminal half of the protein and associated with Leber congenital amaurosis type 12 (LCA12) is unable to suppress the activity of the RetGC1/GCAP complex. Furthermore, the inhibitory activity of the G57V mutant implicated in cone-rod degeneration is strongly reduced. Our results suggest that inhibition of RetGC by RD3 may be utilized by photoreceptors to block RetGC activity during its maturation and/or incorporation into the photoreceptor outer segment rather than participate in dynamic regulation of the cyclase by Ca(2+) and GCAPs.

  14. Transduced Tat-DJ-1 protein inhibits cytokines-induced pancreatic RINm5F cell death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Hyo Sang; Yeo, Hyeon Ji; Cha, Hyun Ju; Kim, Sang Jin; Cho, Su Bin; Park, Jung Hwan; Lee, Chi Hern; Yeo, Eun Ji; Choi, Yeon Joo; Eum, Won Sik; Choi, Soo Young

    2016-01-01

    Loss of pancreatic β-cells by oxidative stress or cytokines is associated with diabetes mellitus (DM). DJ-1 is known to as a multifunctional protein, which plays an important role in cell survival. We prepared cell permeable wild type (WT) and mutant type (M26I) Tat-DJ-1 proteins to investigate the effects of DJ-1 against combined cytokines (IL-1β, IFN-γ and TNF-α)-induced RINm5F cell death. Both Tat-DJ-1 proteins were transduced into RINm5F cells. WT Tat-DJ-1 proteins significantly protected against cell death from cytokines by reducing intracellular toxicities. Also, WT Tat-DJ-1 proteins markedly regulated cytokines-induced pro- and anti-apoptosis proteins. However, M26I Tat-DJ-1 protein showed relatively low protective effects, as compared to WT Tat-DJ-1 protein. Our experiments demonstrated that WT Tat-DJ-1 protein protects against cytokine-induced RINm5F cell death by suppressing intracellular toxicities and regulating apoptosisrelated protein expression. Thus, WT Tat-DJ-1 protein could potentially serve as a therapeutic agent for DM and cytokine related diseases. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(5): 297-302] PMID:26996344

  15. The Campoletis sonorensis ichnovirus vankyrin protein P-vank-1 inhibits apoptosis in insect Sf9 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fath-Goodin, A; Kroemer, J A; Webb, B A

    2009-08-01

    The Campoletis sonorensis ichnovirus (CsIV) vankyrin genes encode proteins containing truncated ankyrin repeat domains with sequence homology to the inhibitory domains of NF-kappaB transcription factor inhibitors, IkappaBs. The CsIV vankyrin proteins are thought to be involved in the suppression of NF-kappaB activity during immune response and/or developmental events in the parasitized host. Here we report that when P-vank-1 was expressed stably from Sf9 cells, prolonged survival of these cells was observed after baculovirus infection, UV irradiation, and treatment with the apoptosis-inducing chemical camptothecin compared to untransformed Sf9 cells. Furthermore, P-vank-1 inhibited nuclear and internucleosomal degradation and caspase activity after induction of apoptosis in Sf9 cells stably expressing P-vank-1. This is the first report of a polydnavirus protein with anti-apoptotic function.

  16. In vivo inhibition of incorporation of (U-/sup 14/C)glucose into proteins in experimental focal epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coutinho-Netto, J.; Boyar, M.M.; Abdul-Ghani, A.S.; Bradford, H.F.

    1982-08-01

    The in vivo incorporation of (/sup 14/C) from (U-/sup 14/C)-glucose into rat brain proteins from different cortical areas was examined in three different experimental focal epilepsies: cobalt, freeze-lesions, and tityustoxin. When (U-/sup 14/C)-glucose was injected intraperitoneally into awake and unrestrained animals with marked signs of epileptic hyperactivity, the inhibition of incorporation of (/sup 14/C)-amino acids into trichloracetic acid (TCA)-insoluble proteins was highest in the focal (sensorimotor) area when compared with distant regions (approx. 60%), but less when compared with the contralateral (sensorimotor) region (approx. 23%). Greatly decreased incorporation caused by both cobalt and freeze-lesion-induced epilepsies was also observed in the contralateral area when a comparison was made with distant regions (approx. 50%), but there were no significant differences in protein-specific radioactivity between the different distant areas.

  17. Truncated SSX protein suppresses synovial sarcoma cell proliferation by inhibiting the localization of SS18-SSX fusion protein.

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    Yasushi Yoneda

    Full Text Available Synovial sarcoma is a relatively rare high-grade soft tissue sarcoma that often develops in the limbs of young people and induces the lung and the lymph node metastasis resulting in poor prognosis. In patients with synovial sarcoma, specific chromosomal translocation of t(X; 18 (p11.2;q11.2 is observed, and SS18-SSX fusion protein expressed by this translocation is reported to be associated with pathogenesis. However, role of the fusion protein in the pathogenesis of synovial sarcoma has not yet been completely clarified. In this study, we focused on the localization patterns of SS18-SSX fusion protein. We constructed expression plasmids coding for the full length SS18-SSX, the truncated SS18 moiety (tSS18 and the truncated SSX moiety (tSSX of SS18-SSX, tagged with fluorescent proteins. These plasmids were transfected in synovial sarcoma SYO-1 cells and we observed the expression of these proteins using a fluorescence microscope. The SS18-SSX fusion protein showed a characteristic speckle pattern in the nucleus. However, when SS18-SSX was co-expressed with tSSX, localization of SS18-SSX changed from speckle patterns to the diffused pattern similar to the localization pattern of tSSX and SSX. Furthermore, cell proliferation and colony formation of synovial sarcoma SYO-1 and YaFuSS cells were suppressed by exogenous tSSX expression. Our results suggest that the characteristic speckle localization pattern of SS18-SSX is strongly involved in the tumorigenesis through the SSX moiety of the SS18-SSX fusion protein. These findings could be applied to further understand the pathogenic mechanisms, and towards the development of molecular targeting approach for synovial sarcoma.

  18. Glutamine supplementation stimulates protein-synthetic and inhibits protein-degradative signaling pathways in skeletal muscle of diabetic rats.

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    Adriana C Lambertucci

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated the effect of glutamine (Gln supplementation on the signaling pathways regulating protein synthesis and protein degradation in the skeletal muscle of rats with streptozotocin (STZ-induced diabetes. The expression levels of key regulatory proteins in the synthetic pathways (Akt, mTOR, GSK3 and 4E-BP1 and the degradation pathways (MuRF-1 and MAFbx were determined using real-time PCR and Western blotting in four groups of male Wistar rats; 1 control, non-supplemented with glutamine; 2 control, supplemented with glutamine; 3 diabetic, non-supplemented with glutamine; and 4 diabetic, supplemented with glutamine. Diabetes was induced by the intravenous injection of 65 mg/kg bw STZ in citrate buffer (pH 4.2; the non-diabetic controls received only citrate buffer. After 48 hours, diabetes was confirmed in the STZ-treated animals by the determination of blood glucose levels above 200 mg/dL. Starting on that day, a solution of 1 g/kg bw Gln in phosphate buffered saline (PBS was administered daily via gavage for 15 days to groups 2 and 4. Groups 1 and 3 received only PBS for the same duration. The rats were euthanized, and the soleus muscles were removed and homogenized in extraction buffer for the subsequent measurement of protein and mRNA levels. The results demonstrated a significant decrease in the muscle Gln content in the diabetic rats, and this level increased toward the control value in the diabetic rats receiving Gln. In addition, the diabetic rats exhibited a reduced mRNA expression of regulatory proteins in the protein synthesis pathway and increased expression of those associated with protein degradation. A reduction in the skeletal muscle mass in the diabetic rats was observed and was alleviated partially with Gln supplementation. The data suggest that glutamine supplementation is potentially useful for slowing the progression of muscle atrophy in patients with diabetes.

  19. Cloning, expression analysis and recombinant expression of a gene encoding a polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein from tobacco, Nicotiana tabacum

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    Chengsheng Zhang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Polygalacturonase inhibiting proteins (PGIPs are major defensive proteins produced by plant cell walls that play a crucial role in pathogen resistance by reducing polygalacturonase (PG activity. In the present study, a novel PGIP gene was isolated from tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum, hereafter referred as NtPGIP. A full-length NtPGIP cDNA of 1,412 bp with a 186 bp 5′-untranslated region (UTR, and 209 bp 3′-UTR was cloned from tobacco, NtPGIP is predicted to encode a protein of 338 amino acids. The NtPGIP sequence from genomic DNA showed no introns and sequence alignments of NtPGIP’s deduced amino acid sequence showed high homology with known PGIPs from other plant species. Moreover, the putative NtPGIP protein was closely clustered with several Solanaceae PGIPs. Further, the expression profile of NtPGIP was examined in tobacco leaves following stimulation with the oomycete Phytophthora nicotianae and other stressors, including salicylic acid (SA, abscisic acid (ABA, salt, and cold treatment. The results showed that all of the treatments up-regulated the expression of NtPGIP at different times. To understand the biochemical activity of NtPGIP gene, a full-length NtPGIP cDNA sequence was subcloned into a pET28a vector and transformed into E. coli BL21 (DE3. Recombinant proteins were successfully induced by 1.0 nmol/L IPTG and the purified proteins effectively inhibited Phytophthora capsici PG activity. The results of this study suggest that NtPGIP may be a new candidate gene with properties that could be exploited in plant breeding.

  20. The splicing factor U2AF65 stabilizes TRF1 protein by inhibiting its ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeonghee; Chung, In Kwon, E-mail: topoviro@yonsei.ac.kr

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •Identification of U2AF65 as a novel TRF1-interacting protein. •U2AF65 stabilizes TRF1 protein by inhibiting its ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis. •U2AF65 interferes with the interaction between TRF1 and Fbx4. •U2AF65 represents a new route for modulating TRF1 function at telomeres. -- Abstract: The human telomeric protein TRF1 is a component of the six-subunit protein complex shelterin, which provides telomere protection by organizing the telomere into a high-order structure. TRF1 functions as a negative regulator of telomere length by controlling the access of telomerase to telomeres. Thus, the cellular abundance of TRF1 at telomeres should be maintained and tightly regulated to ensure proper telomere function. Here, we identify U2 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) auxiliary factor 65 (U2AF65), an essential pre-mRNA splicing factor, as a novel TRF1-interacting protein. U2AF65 interacts with TRF1 in vitro and in vivo and is capable of stabilizing TRF1 protein by inhibiting its ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis. We also found that U2AF65 interferes with the interaction between TRF1 and Fbx4, an E3 ubiquitin ligase for TRF1. Depletion of endogenous U2AF65 expression by short interfering RNA (siRNA) reduced the stability of endogenous TRF1 whereas overexpression of U2AF65 significantly extended the half-life of TRF1. These findings demonstrate that U2AF65 plays a critical role in regulating the level of TRF1 through physical interaction and ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis. Hence, U2AF65 represents a new route for modulating TRF1 function at telomeres.

  1. The Adenovirus E4orf4 Protein Provides a Novel Mechanism for Inhibition of the DNA Damage Response.

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    Anna Brestovitsky

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The DNA damage response (DDR is a conglomerate of pathways designed to detect DNA damage and signal its presence to cell cycle checkpoints and to the repair machinery, allowing the cell to pause and mend the damage, or if the damage is too severe, to trigger apoptosis or senescence. Various DDR branches are regulated by kinases of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-like protein kinase family, including ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM and ATM- and Rad3-related (ATR. Replication intermediates and linear double-stranded genomes of DNA viruses are perceived by the cell as DNA damage and activate the DDR. If allowed to operate, the DDR will stimulate ligation of viral genomes and will inhibit virus replication. To prevent this outcome, many DNA viruses evolved ways to limit the DDR. As part of its attack on the DDR, adenovirus utilizes various viral proteins to cause degradation of DDR proteins and to sequester the MRN damage sensor outside virus replication centers. Here we show that adenovirus evolved yet another novel mechanism to inhibit the DDR. The E4orf4 protein, together with its cellular partner PP2A, reduces phosphorylation of ATM and ATR substrates in virus-infected cells and in cells treated with DNA damaging drugs, and causes accumulation of damaged DNA in the drug-treated cells. ATM and ATR are not mutually required for inhibition of their signaling pathways by E4orf4. ATM and ATR deficiency as well as E4orf4 expression enhance infection efficiency. Furthermore, E4orf4, previously reported to induce cancer-specific cell death when expressed alone, sensitizes cells to killing by sub-lethal concentrations of DNA damaging drugs, likely because it inhibits DNA damage repair. These findings provide one explanation for the cancer-specificity of E4orf4-induced cell death as many cancers have DDR deficiencies leading to increased reliance on the remaining intact DDR pathways and to enhanced susceptibility to DDR inhibitors such as E4orf4

  2. The Adenovirus E4orf4 Protein Provides a Novel Mechanism for Inhibition of the DNA Damage Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brestovitsky, Anna; Nebenzahl-Sharon, Keren; Kechker, Peter; Sharf, Rakefet; Kleinberger, Tamar

    2016-02-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) is a conglomerate of pathways designed to detect DNA damage and signal its presence to cell cycle checkpoints and to the repair machinery, allowing the cell to pause and mend the damage, or if the damage is too severe, to trigger apoptosis or senescence. Various DDR branches are regulated by kinases of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-like protein kinase family, including ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and ATM- and Rad3-related (ATR). Replication intermediates and linear double-stranded genomes of DNA viruses are perceived by the cell as DNA damage and activate the DDR. If allowed to operate, the DDR will stimulate ligation of viral genomes and will inhibit virus replication. To prevent this outcome, many DNA viruses evolved ways to limit the DDR. As part of its attack on the DDR, adenovirus utilizes various viral proteins to cause degradation of DDR proteins and to sequester the MRN damage sensor outside virus replication centers. Here we show that adenovirus evolved yet another novel mechanism to inhibit the DDR. The E4orf4 protein, together with its cellular partner PP2A, reduces phosphorylation of ATM and ATR substrates in virus-infected cells and in cells treated with DNA damaging drugs, and causes accumulation of damaged DNA in the drug-treated cells. ATM and ATR are not mutually required for inhibition of their signaling pathways by E4orf4. ATM and ATR deficiency as well as E4orf4 expression enhance infection efficiency. Furthermore, E4orf4, previously reported to induce cancer-specific cell death when expressed alone, sensitizes cells to killing by sub-lethal concentrations of DNA damaging drugs, likely because it inhibits DNA damage repair. These findings provide one explanation for the cancer-specificity of E4orf4-induced cell death as many cancers have DDR deficiencies leading to increased reliance on the remaining intact DDR pathways and to enhanced susceptibility to DDR inhibitors such as E4orf4. Thus DDR inhibition

  3. Expression of CCAAT/Enhancer Binding Protein Beta in Muscle Satellite Cells Inhibits Myogenesis in Cancer Cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchildon, François; Lamarche, Émilie; Lala-Tabbert, Neena; St-Louis, Catherine; Wiper-Bergeron, Nadine

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cachexia is a paraneoplastic syndrome that causes profound weight loss and muscle mass atrophy and is estimated to be the cause of up to 30% of cancer deaths. Though the exact cause is unknown, patients with cancer cachexia have increased muscle protein catabolism. In healthy muscle, injury activates skeletal muscle stem cells, called satellite cells, to differentiate and promote regeneration. Here, we provide evidence that this mechanism is inhibited in cancer cachexia due to persistent expression of CCAAT/Enhancer Binding Protein beta (C/EBPβ) in muscle myoblasts. C/EBPβ is a bzip transcription factor that is expressed in muscle satellite cells and is normally downregulated upon differentiation. However, in myoblasts exposed to a cachectic milieu, C/EBPβ expression remains elevated, despite activation to differentiate, resulting in the inhibition of myogenin expression and myogenesis. In vivo, cancer cachexia results in increased number of Pax7+ cells that also express C/EBPβ and the inhibition of normal repair mechanisms. Loss of C/EBPβ expression in primary myoblasts rescues differentiation under cachectic conditions without restoring myotube size, indicating that C/EBPβ is an important inhibitor of myogenesis in cancer cachexia.

  4. [Reversed effect of valproic acid on transcription inhibition of AML1-ETO fusion protein of kasumi-1 leukemic cell line].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lei; Zhu, Cui-Min; Zhang, Zhi-Hua; Tian, Wen-Liang; Hao, Chang-Lai

    2009-04-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the mechanism of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, valproic acid (VPA), reversing transcription inhibition of AML1-ETO fusion protein in Kasumi-1 cell line. The mRNA expressions of AML1-ETO, AML1 and cyclin D2 were detected by semi-quantitation RT-PCR after treating kasumi-1 cells with VPA at different doses/and different time points. The results indicated that the mRNA expression of AML1-ETO showed no obvious change, when kasumi-1 cells were treated with VPA. Compared with control group, the expression level of AML1 mRNA significantly increased in a dose-dependent manner. Compared with control group, the expression level of cyclin D2 mRNA significantly decreased when kasumi-1 cells had been treated with 3 mmol/L VPA as well as kasumi-1 cells were treated with different concentrations of VPA for 3 days. In conclusion, VPA could remove transcription inhibition of AML1-ETO fusion protein, increase transcription of AML1 and down-regulate mRNA expression of AML1 target gene cyclin D2 through HDAC inhibiting activity.

  5. Characterization of the complex locus of bean encoding polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins reveals subfunctionalization for defense against fungi and insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ovidio, Renato; Raiola, Alessandro; Capodicasa, Cristina; Devoto, Alessandra; Pontiggia, Daniela; Roberti, Serena; Galletti, Roberta; Conti, Eric; O'Sullivan, Donal; De Lorenzo, Giulia

    2004-08-01

    Polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins (PGIPs) are extracellular plant inhibitors of fungal endopolygalacturonases (PGs) that belong to the superfamily of Leu-rich repeat proteins. We have characterized the full complement of pgip genes in the bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) genotype BAT93. This comprises four clustered members that span a 50-kb region and, based on their similarity, form two pairs (Pvpgip1/Pvpgip2 and Pvpgip3/Pvpgip4). Characterization of the encoded products revealed both partial redundancy and subfunctionalization against fungal-derived PGs. Notably, the pair PvPGIP3/PvPGIP4 also inhibited PGs of two mirid bugs (Lygus rugulipennis and Adelphocoris lineolatus). Characterization of Pvpgip genes of Pinto bean showed variations limited to single synonymous substitutions or small deletions. A three-amino acid deletion encompassing a residue previously identified as crucial for recognition of PG of Fusarium moniliforme was responsible for the inability of BAT93 PvPGIP2 to inhibit this enzyme. Consistent with the large variations observed in the promoter sequences, reverse transcription-PCR expression analysis revealed that the different family members differentially respond to elicitors, wounding, and salicylic acid. We conclude that both biochemical and regulatory redundancy and subfunctionalization of pgip genes are important for the adaptation of plants to pathogenic fungi and phytophagous insects.

  6. Manuka honey inhibits the development of Streptococcus pyogenes biofilms and causes reduced expression of two fibronectin binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddocks, Sarah E; Lopez, Marta Salinas; Rowlands, Richard S; Cooper, Rose A

    2012-03-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (group A Streptococcus; GAS) is always of clinical significance in wounds where it can initiate infection, destroy skin grafts and persist as a biofilm. Manuka honey has broad spectrum antimicrobial activity and its use in the clinical setting is beginning to gain acceptance with the continuing emergence of antibiotic resistance and the inadequacy of established systemic therapies; novel inhibitors may affect clinical practice. In this study, the effect of manuka honey on S. pyogenes (M28) was investigated in vitro with planktonic and biofilm cultures using MIC, MBC, microscopy and aggregation efficiency. Bactericidal effects were found in both planktonic cultures and biofilms, although higher concentrations of manuka honey were needed to inhibit biofilms. Abrogation of adherence and intercellular aggregation was observed. Manuka honey permeated 24 h established biofilms of S. pyogenes, resulting in significant cell death and dissociation of cells from the biofilm. Sublethal concentrations of manuka honey effectively prevented the binding of S. pyogenes to the human tissue protein fibronectin, but did not inhibit binding to fibrinogen. The observed inhibition of fibronectin binding was confirmed by a reduction in the expression of genes encoding two major fibronectin-binding streptococcal surface proteins, Sof and SfbI. These findings indicate that manuka honey has potential in the topical treatment of wounds containing S. pyogenes.

  7. Ice recrystallization inhibition proteins (IRIPs) and freeze tolerance in the cryophilic Antarctic hair grass Deschampsia antarctica E. Desv.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Ulrik P; Polotnianka, Renatam M; Sivakumaran, Kailayapillai A; Chew, Orinda; Mackin, Leanne; Kuiper, Micheal J; Talbot, Jonathan P; Nugent, Gregory D; Mautord, Julie; Schrauf, Gustavo E; Spangenberg, German C

    2009-04-01

    Antarctic hair grass (Deschampsia antarctica E. Desv.), the only grass indigenous to Antarctica, has well-developed freezing tolerance, strongly induced by cold acclimation. Here, we show that in response to low temperatures, D. antarctica expresses potent recrystallization inhibition (RI) activity that, inhibits the growth of small ice crystals into potentially damaging large ones, is proteinaceous and localized to the apoplasm. A gene family from D. antarctica encoding putative homologs of an ice recrystallization inhibition protein (IRIP) has been isolated and characterized. IRIPs are apoplastically targeted proteins with two potential ice-binding motifs: 1-9 leucine-rich repeats (LRRs) and c. 16 'IRIP' repeats. IRIP genes appear to be confined to the grass subfamily Pooideae and their products, exhibit sequence similarity to phytosulphokine receptors and are predicted to adopt conformations with two ice-binding surfaces. D. antarctica IRIP (DaIRIP) transcript levels are greatly enhanced in leaf tissue following cold acclimation. Transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana expressing a DaIRIP has novel RI activity, and purified DaIRIP, when added back to extracts of leaves from non-acclimated D. antarctica, can reconstitute the activity found in acclimated plants. We propose that IRIP-mediated RI activity may contribute to the cryotolerance of D. antarctica, and thus to its unique ability to have colonized Antarctica.

  8. Chikungunya virus nonstructural protein 2 inhibits type I/II interferon-stimulated JAK-STAT signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fros, Jelke J; Liu, Wen Jun; Prow, Natalie A; Geertsema, Corinne; Ligtenberg, Maarten; Vanlandingham, Dana L; Schnettler, Esther; Vlak, Just M; Suhrbier, Andreas; Khromykh, Alexander A; Pijlman, Gorben P

    2010-10-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an emerging human pathogen transmitted by mosquitoes. Like that of other alphaviruses, CHIKV replication causes general host shutoff, leading to severe cytopathicity in mammalian cells, and inhibits the ability of infected cells to respond to interferon (IFN). Recent research, however, suggests that alphaviruses may have additional mechanisms to circumvent the host's antiviral IFN response. Here we show that CHIKV replication is resistant to inhibition by interferon once RNA replication has been established and that CHIKV actively suppresses the antiviral IFN response by preventing IFN-induced gene expression. Both CHIKV infection and CHIKV replicon RNA replication efficiently blocked STAT1 phosphorylation and/or nuclear translocation in mammalian cells induced by either type I or type II IFN. Expression of individual CHIKV nonstructural proteins (nsPs) showed that nsP2 was a potent inhibitor of IFN-induced JAK-STAT signaling. In addition, mutations in CHIKV-nsP2 (P718S) and Sindbis virus (SINV)-nsP2 (P726S) that render alphavirus replicons noncytopathic significantly reduced JAK-STAT inhibition. This host shutoff-independent inhibition of IFN signaling by CHIKV is likely to have an important role in viral pathogenesis.

  9. Molecular mechanism: the human dopamine transporter histidine 547 regulates basal and HIV-1 Tat protein-inhibited dopamine transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quizon, Pamela M; Sun, Wei-Lun; Yuan, Yaxia; Midde, Narasimha M; Zhan, Chang-Guo; Zhu, Jun

    2016-12-14

    Abnormal dopaminergic transmission has been implicat