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Sample records for inhibits mbnl protein

  1. Conserved functional antagonism of CELF and MBNL proteins controls stem cell-specific alternative splicing in planarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solana, Jordi; Irimia, Manuel; Ayoub, Salah; Orejuela, Marta Rodriguez; Zywitza, Vera; Jens, Marvin; Tapial, Javier; Ray, Debashish; Morris, Quaid; Hughes, Timothy R; Blencowe, Benjamin J; Rajewsky, Nikolaus

    2016-08-09

    In contrast to transcriptional regulation, the function of alternative splicing (AS) in stem cells is poorly understood. In mammals, MBNL proteins negatively regulate an exon program specific of embryonic stem cells; however, little is known about the in vivo significance of this regulation. We studied AS in a powerful in vivo model for stem cell biology, the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea. We discover a conserved AS program comprising hundreds of alternative exons, microexons and introns that is differentially regulated in planarian stem cells, and comprehensively identify its regulators. We show that functional antagonism between CELF and MBNL factors directly controls stem cell-specific AS in planarians, placing the origin of this regulatory mechanism at the base of Bilaterians. Knockdown of CELF or MBNL factors lead to abnormal regenerative capacities by affecting self-renewal and differentiation sets of genes, respectively. These results highlight the importance of AS interactions in stem cell regulation across metazoans.

  2. Sequestration of MBNL1 Protein by Mutant ZNF9 mRNA in Lymphocytes of Patients with Myotonic Dystrophy Type 2

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Souček, O.; Voháňka, S.; Zaorálková, J.; Falková, I.; Hrabálková, R.; Falk, Martin; Lukáš, Z.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 75, č. 5 (2012), s. 606-609 ISSN 1210-7859 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : myotonic dystrophy * lymphocytes * MBNL1 sequestration Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 0.366, year: 2012

  3. RNA/MBNL1-containing foci in myoblast nuclei from patients affected by myotonic dystrophy type 2: an immunocytochemical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Pellicciari

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2 is a dominantly inherited autosomal disease with multi-systemic clinical features and it is caused by expansion of a CCTG tetranucleotide repeat in the first intron of the zinc finger protein 9 (ZNF9 gene in 3q21.The expanded-CCUG-containing transcripts are retained in the cell nucleus and accumulate in the form of focal aggregates which specifically sequester the muscleblind-like 1 (MBNL1 protein, a RNA binding factor involved in the regulation of alternative splicing. The structural organization and composition of the foci are still incompletely known. In this study, the nuclear foci occurring in cultured myoblasts from DM2 patients were characterised at fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy by using a panel of antibodies recognizing transcription and processing factors of pre-mRNAs. MBNL1 proved to co-locate in the nuclear foci with snRNPs and hnRNPs, whereas no co-location was observed with RNA polymerase II, the non-RNP splicing factor SC35, the cleavage factor CStF and the PML protein. At electron microscopy the MBNL1-containing nuclear foci appeared as roundish domains showing a rather homogeneous structure and proved to contain snRNPs and hnRNPs. The sequestration of splicing factors involved in early phases of pre-mRNA processing supports the hypothesis of a general alteration in the maturation of several mRNAs, which could lead to the multiple pathological dysfunctions observed in dystrophic patients.

  4. Inhibiting Translation One Protein at a Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disney, Matthew D

    2017-06-01

    Historically, translational inhibitors have been confined to anti-bacterials that globally affect translation. Lintner et al. demonstrate that small molecules can specifically inhibit translation of a single disease-associated protein by stalling the ribosome's nascent chain [1], opening up a new therapeutic strategy for 'undruggable' proteins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Inhibition of Retinoblastoma Protein Inactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-01

    cleft is a well characterized binding site for viral and cellular proteins that contain an LxCxE amino acid sequence. From a structural alignment ...a structural alignment (Figure 2a), the binding of the LxCxE peptide and interdomain docking appear incompatible. We reasoned that molecules that...phosphorylated Rb demonstrates that molecules that interfere with the structural changes induced by Rb phosphorylation can act as Rb activators. We note that

  6. Somatomedins inhibit protein degradation in muscle cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roeder, R.A.; Blann, D.L.; Bauer, C.A.; Hossner, K.L.

    1986-01-01

    Protein degradation has been measured in cultures of L6 myotubes as the rate of release of trichloroacetic acid-soluble radioactivity after prelabeling cell protein with [ 3 H] leucine. Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-1), ovine somatomedin (oSM) and insulin (I), at concentrations from 10 -11 M to 10 -7 M (5 x 10 -7 M-oSM) were added at the beginning of a 4-hour degradation period to determine the effects of these hormones on inducible proteolysis occurring in serum-free media. In addition the effects of fetal bovine serum, at concentrations from 1% to 30%, on protein degradation were determined in parallel experiments to relate serum inhibition of proteolysis to somatomedin actions. Results from this study indicate the apparent half maximal inhibition of proteolysis (18%, 15%, 11%) occurred at .4nM-IGF-1, .6nM-oSM and 4nM-I, respectively. Thus protein degradation was approximately 10 times more sensitive to somatomedins than insulin. The half maximal inhibition of proteolysis (15%) observed with serum occurred at 7.7%. The magnitude of the response between IFG-I and serum (37% vs. 31%) was similar. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that somatomedins are important factors in regulating growth and development of muscle

  7. Silkworm Apolipophorin Protein Inhibits Staphylococcus aureus Virulence*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanada, Yuichi; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa; Kaito, Chikara

    2011-01-01

    Silkworm hemolymph inhibits hemolysin production by Staphylococcus aureus. We purified a factor in the silkworm hemolymph responsible for this inhibitory activity. The final fraction with the greatest specific activity contained 220- and 74-kDa proteins. Determination of the N-terminal amino acid sequence revealed that the 220- and 74-kDa proteins were apolipophorin I and apolipophorin II, respectively, indicating that the factor was apolipophorin (ApoLp). The purified ApoLp fraction showed decreased expression of S. aureus hla encoding α-hemolysin, hlb encoding β-hemolysin, saeRS, and RNAIII, which activate the expression of these hemolysin genes. Injection of an anti-ApoLp antibody into the hemolymph increased the sensitivity of silkworms to the lethal effect of S. aureus. Hog gastric mucin, a mammalian homologue of ApoLp, decreased the expression of S. aureus hla and hlb. These findings suggest that ApoLp in the silkworm hemolymph inhibits S. aureus virulence and contributes to defense against S. aureus infection and that its activity is conserved in mammalian mucin. PMID:21937431

  8. Aedes aegypti D7 Saliva Protein Inhibits Dengue Virus Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Conway

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aedes aegypti is the primary vector of several medically relevant arboviruses including dengue virus (DENV types 1-4. Ae. aegypti transmits DENV by inoculating virus-infected saliva into host skin during probing and feeding. Ae. aegypti saliva contains over one hundred unique proteins and these proteins have diverse functions, including facilitating blood feeding. Previously, we showed that Ae. aegypti salivary gland extracts (SGEs enhanced dissemination of DENV to draining lymph nodes. In contrast, HPLC-fractionation revealed that some SGE components inhibited infection. Here, we show that D7 proteins are enriched in HPLC fractions that are inhibitory to DENV infection, and that recombinant D7 protein can inhibit DENV infection in vitro and in vivo. Further, binding assays indicate that D7 protein can directly interact with DENV virions and recombinant DENV envelope protein. These data reveal a novel role for D7 proteins, which inhibits arbovirus transmission to vertebrates through a direct interaction with virions.

  9. Overcoming heat shock protein inhibition at critical temperature vital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Our results show that the inhibition process is a functional variance of time and genetic variability characterized by differential down-regulation of housekeeping proteins (HKPs) of about 55.7 and 43.5 KD in some cultivars and complete inhibition of a prominent 19.9 KD HKP in Kufri Jyoti at all stressed time. Furthermore, the ...

  10. [Activity of polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein of banana fruit tissues].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulantseva, E A; Thang, Nguen; Buza, N L; Krinitsyna, A A; Protsenko, M A

    2005-01-01

    The activity of polygalacturonase and the protein inhibiting this enzyme, which affected polygalacturonases of phytopathogenic fungi Verticillium dahliae and Gloesporium musarium, were detected in banana (Musa acumthata L.) fruit of cultivars Cavendish and Korolevskii. The polygalacturonase from banana fruit was inhibited by the preparations of the protein inhibitor not only from bananas but also from potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tubers and pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) fruit.

  11. Potent protein glycation inhibition of plantagoside in Plantago major seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Nobuyasu; Aradate, Tadashi; Kurosaka, Chihiro; Ubukata, Makoto; Kittaka, Shiho; Nakaminami, Yuri; Gamo, Kanae; Kojima, Hiroyuki; Ohara, Mitsuharu

    2014-01-01

    Plantagoside (5,7,4',5'-tetrahydroxyflavanone-3'-O-glucoside) and its aglycone (5,7,3',4',5'-pentahydroxyflavanone), isolated from a 50% ethanol extract of Plantago major seeds (Plantaginaceae), were established to be potent inhibitors of the Maillard reaction. These compounds also inhibited the formation of advanced glycation end products in proteins in physiological conditions and inhibited protein cross-linking glycation. These results indicate that P. major seeds have potential therapeutic applications in the prevention of diabetic complications.

  12. Antifreeze Protein Mimetic Metallohelices with Potent Ice Recrystallization Inhibition Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Daniel E; Clarkson, Guy; Fox, David J; Vipond, Rebecca A; Scott, Peter; Gibson, Matthew I

    2017-07-26

    Antifreeze proteins are produced by extremophile species to control ice formation and growth, and they have potential applications in many fields. There are few examples of synthetic materials which can reproduce their potent ice recrystallization inhibition property. We report that self-assembled enantiomerically pure, amphipathic metallohelicies inhibited ice growth at just 20 μM. Structure-property relationships and calculations support the hypothesis that amphipathicity is the key motif for activity. This opens up a new field of metallo-organic antifreeze protein mimetics and provides insight into the origins of ice-growth inhibition.

  13. Transcriptional inhibition by the retinoblastoma protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fattaey, A; Helin, K; Harlow, E

    1993-01-01

    The retinoblastoma protein, pRB, appears to play a key role in coordinating the regulation of cell cycle position and transcriptional events. pRB undergoes specific cell-cycle-dependent phosphorylation, being underphosphorylated in G1 and heavily phosphorylated in S, G2, and M. The underphosphory......The retinoblastoma protein, pRB, appears to play a key role in coordinating the regulation of cell cycle position and transcriptional events. pRB undergoes specific cell-cycle-dependent phosphorylation, being underphosphorylated in G1 and heavily phosphorylated in S, G2, and M......-mediated transcription would be lost by mutation in the retinoblastoma gene in human tumours, by pRB's interaction with DNA tumour virus oncoproteins, or by phosphorylation during the cell cycle....

  14. Inhibiting TRK Proteins in Clinical Cancer Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Allison M. Lange; Hui-Wen Lo

    2018-01-01

    Gene rearrangements resulting in the aberrant activity of tyrosine kinases have been identified as drivers of oncogenesis in a variety of cancers. The tropomyosin receptor kinase (TRK) family of tyrosine receptor kinases is emerging as an important target for cancer therapeutics. The TRK family contains three members, TRKA, TRKB, and TRKC, and these proteins are encoded by the genes NTRK1, NTRK2, and NTRK3, respectively. To activate TRK receptors, neurotrophins bind to the extracellular regio...

  15. Potent Protein Glycation Inhibition of Plantagoside in Plantago major Seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuyasu Matsuura

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Plantagoside (5,7,4′,5′-tetrahydroxyflavanone-3′-O-glucoside and its aglycone (5,7,3′,4′,5′-pentahydroxyflavanone, isolated from a 50% ethanol extract of Plantago major seeds (Plantaginaceae, were established to be potent inhibitors of the Maillard reaction. These compounds also inhibited the formation of advanced glycation end products in proteins in physiological conditions and inhibited protein cross-linking glycation. These results indicate that P. major seeds have potential therapeutic applications in the prevention of diabetic complications.

  16. Inhibition of protein kinase C by alcohols and anaesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, S J; Cox, K J; Lombardi, J V; Ho, C; Kelly, M B; Rubin, E; Stubbs, C D

    1993-07-01

    Despite almost a century of research, the mechanism of anaesthesia remains obscure and there is still no agreement on the location of the site(s) of action. Because the potencies of general anaesthetics increase in proportion to their solubility in olive oil, this led to a consensus that the site is within the cell membrane. This led to theories that lipid bilayer perturbation was the primary event, which was then transmitted to a membrane protein. But at the concentrations used clinically, such perturbations are small. A plausible site would be in or on ion channels at the synapse, where a number of modulatory effects have been described. A possible location for such a site would be at the protein-lipid interface. We report here that anaesthetics inhibit protein kinase C, a key component in signal transduction. The potency is a linear function of the octanol-water partition coefficient (the Meyer-Overton rule of anaesthesia). The effect was obtained in a lipid-free assay, implicating a hydrophobic site in the protein, supporting the contention that a (membrane) protein may be a target for anaesthetic interactions. In a lipid-dependent assay, a potential role of lipids in the protein-site model was demonstrated. The inhibition was absent in the isolated catalytic domain, suggesting that the site of inhibition is on the regulatory subunit, which is unique to protein kinase C.

  17. Synergistic inhibition of the intrinsic factor X activation by protein S and C4b-binding protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppelman, S. J.; van't Veer, C.; Sixma, J. J.; Bouma, B. N.

    1995-01-01

    The complement protein C4b-binding protein plays an important role in the regulation of the protein C anticoagulant pathway. C4b-binding protein can bind to protein S, thereby inhibiting the cofactor activity of protein S for activated protein C. In this report, we describe a new role for

  18. Spectroscopic studies on native proteins, glycated and inhibited nonenzymatically

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil, H; Otero, V; Contreras, S

    1995-01-01

    The nonenzymatic glucation is an irreversible process whose speed depends on the concentration reducer sugar in plasma. The glycated albumins is higher in diabetic people. Up to now, this has been indicated as an important mechanism in the pathology of the the secondary complications associated with diabetes and the normal aging. Recently a lot of interest has been focused on the search of certain compounds (inhibitors) to prevent the glucation and / or the formation of ending products of advanced glucation, AGE. The reaction of glucose with the human albumin and γ globulins and the effects of acid acetylsalicylic and ascorbic acid were studied. The proteins were incubated with glucose in absence and in presence of inhibitors for one month. The solutions were dialysed and then lyophilizated. The absorption spectra were taken for native proteins, glycated and inhibited (2 mg/ml) in phosphate 10 mM buffer, p H 7.3. It is observed that the spectra of the acetylate proteins and native proteins are practically same. This can be interpreted as an inhibitor effect of acid acetylsalicylic on glucation. In all the observed cases the glycated proteins absorb more than the native ones and they present a line toward the visible region. The ascorbic acid absorbs below the native proteins and it doesn't present the same characteristics. The increase and / or the decrease in the absorption picks can be associated with environmental changes affecting the groups involved in the absorption process [es

  19. Protein G, Protein A and Protein-A-Derived Peptides Inhibit the Agitation Induced Aggregation of IgG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Topp, Elizabeth M.

    2012-01-01

    Controlling and preventing aggregation is critical to the development of safe and effective antibody drug products. The studies presented here test the hypothesis that Protein A and Protein G inhibit the agitation-induced aggregation of IgG. The hypothesis is motivated by the enhanced conformational stability of proteins upon ligand binding and the specific binding affinity of Protein A and Protein G to the Fc region of IgG. The aggregation of mixed human IgG from pooled human plasma was induced by agitation alone or in the presence of: (i) Protein A, (ii) Protein G or (iii) a library of 24 peptides derived from the IgG-binding domain of Protein A. Aggregation was assessed by UV spectroscopy, SDS-PAGE, high performance size-exclusion chromatography (HP-SEC), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and fluorescence spectroscopy. Additional information on IgG-ligand interactions was obtained using differential scanning fluorimetry (DSF) and competitive binding studies. The results demonstrate that Protein A provides near-complete inhibition of agitation-induced aggregation, while Protein G and two peptides from the peptide library show partial inhibition. The findings indicate that the IgG Protein A binding site is involved in the agitation-induced aggregation of IgG, and suggest a dominant role of colloidal interactions. PMID:22304418

  20. A Salmonella virulence protein that inhibits cellular trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiya, K; Barbieri, M A; Funato, K; Shah, A H; Stahl, P D; Groisman, E A

    1999-07-15

    Salmonella enterica requires a type III secretion system, designated Spi/Ssa, to survive and proliferate within macrophages. The Spi/Ssa system is encoded within the SPI-2 pathogenicity island and appears to function intracellularly. Here, we establish that the SPI-2-encoded SpiC protein is exported by the Spi/Ssa type III secretion system into the host cell cytosol where it interferes with intracellular trafficking. In J774 macrophages, wild-type Salmonella inhibited fusion of Salmonella-containing phagosomes with lysosomes and endosomes, and interfered with trafficking of vesicles devoid of the microorganism. These inhibitory activities required living Salmonella and a functional spiC gene. Purified SpiC protein inhibited endosome-endosome fusion in vitro. A Sindbis virus expressing the SpiC protein interfered with normal trafficking of the transferrin receptor in vivo. A spiC mutant was attenuated for virulence, suggesting that the ability to interfere with intracellular trafficking is essential for Salmonella pathogenesis.

  1. A Salmonella virulence protein that inhibits cellular trafficking.

    OpenAIRE

    Uchiya, K; Barbieri, M A; Funato, K; Shah, A H; Stahl, P D; Groisman, E A

    1999-01-01

    Salmonella enterica requires a type III secretion system, designated Spi/Ssa, to survive and proliferate within macrophages. The Spi/Ssa system is encoded within the SPI-2 pathogenicity island and appears to function intracellularly. Here, we establish that the SPI-2-encoded SpiC protein is exported by the Spi/Ssa type III secretion system into the host cell cytosol where it interferes with intracellular trafficking. In J774 macrophages, wild-type Salmonella inhibited fusion of Salmonella-con...

  2. Zinc-finger antiviral protein inhibits XMRV infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinlu Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The zinc-finger antiviral protein (ZAP is a host factor that specifically inhibits the replication of certain viruses, including Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV, HIV-1, and certain alphaviruses and filoviruses. ZAP binds to specific viral mRNAs and recruits cellular mRNA degradation machinery to degrade the target RNA. The common features of ZAP-responsive RNA sequences remain elusive and thus whether a virus is susceptible to ZAP can only be determined experimentally. Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV is a recently identified γ-retrovirus that was originally thought to be involved in prostate cancer and chronic fatigue syndrome but recently proved to be a laboratory artefact. Nonetheless, XMRV as a new retrovirus has been extensively studied. Since XMRV and MoMLV share only 67.9% sequence identity in the 3'UTRs, which is the target sequence of ZAP in MoMLV, whether XMRV is susceptible to ZAP remains to be determined. FINDINGS: We constructed an XMRV-luc vector, in which the coding sequences of Gag-Pol and part of Env were replaced with luciferase-coding sequence. Overexpression of ZAP potently inhibited the expression of XMRV-luc in a ZAP expression-level-dependent manner, while downregulation of endogenous ZAP rendered cells more sensitive to infection. Furthermore, ZAP inhibited the spreading of replication-competent XMRV. Consistent with the previously reported mechanisms by which ZAP inhibits viral infection, ZAP significantly inhibited the accumulation of XMRV-luc mRNA in the cytoplasm. The ZAP-responsive element in XMRV mRNA was mapped to the 3'UTR. CONCLUSIONS: ZAP inhibits XMRV replication by preventing the accumulation of viral mRNA in the cytoplasm. Documentation of ZAP inhibiting XMRV helps to broaden the spectrum of ZAP's antiviral activity. Comparison of the target sequences of ZAP in XMRV and MoMLV helps to better understand the features of ZAP-responsive elements.

  3. Protein C inhibitor acts as a procoagulant by inhibiting the thrombomodulin-induced activation of protein C in human plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elisen, M. G.; von dem Borne, P. A.; Bouma, B. N.; Meijers, J. C.

    1998-01-01

    Protein C inhibitor (PCI), which was originally identified as an inhibitor of activated protein C, also efficiently inhibits coagulation factors such as factor Xa and thrombin. Recently it was found, using purified proteins, that the anticoagulant thrombin-thrombomodulin complex was also inhibited

  4. Specific inhibition of GPCR-independent G protein signaling by a rationally engineered protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyme, Anthony; Marivin, Arthur; Maziarz, Marcin; DiGiacomo, Vincent; Papakonstantinou, Maria P; Patel, Prachi P; Blanco-Canosa, Juan B; Walawalkar, Isha A; Rodriguez-Davila, Gonzalo; Dominguez, Isabel; Garcia-Marcos, Mikel

    2017-11-28

    Activation of heterotrimeric G proteins by cytoplasmic nonreceptor proteins is an alternative to the classical mechanism via G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). A subset of nonreceptor G protein activators is characterized by a conserved sequence named the Gα-binding and activating (GBA) motif, which confers guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) activity in vitro and promotes G protein-dependent signaling in cells. GBA proteins have important roles in physiology and disease but remain greatly understudied. This is due, in part, to the lack of efficient tools that specifically disrupt GBA motif function in the context of the large multifunctional proteins in which they are embedded. This hindrance to the study of alternative mechanisms of G protein activation contrasts with the wealth of convenient chemical and genetic tools to manipulate GPCR-dependent activation. Here, we describe the rational design and implementation of a genetically encoded protein that specifically inhibits GBA motifs: GBA inhibitor (GBAi). GBAi was engineered by introducing modifications in Gαi that preclude coupling to every known major binding partner [GPCRs, Gβγ, effectors, guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitors (GDIs), GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs), or the chaperone/GEF Ric-8A], while favoring high-affinity binding to all known GBA motifs. We demonstrate that GBAi does not interfere with canonical GPCR-G protein signaling but blocks GBA-dependent signaling in cancer cells. Furthermore, by implementing GBAi in vivo, we show that GBA-dependent signaling modulates phenotypes during Xenopus laevis embryonic development. In summary, GBAi is a selective, efficient, and convenient tool to dissect the biological processes controlled by a GPCR-independent mechanism of G protein activation mediated by cytoplasmic factors.

  5. Bitter taste inhibiting agents for whey protein hydrolysate and whey protein hydrolysate beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leksrisompong, Pattarin; Gerard, Patrick; Lopetcharat, Kannapon; Drake, MaryAnne

    2012-08-01

    Whey protein hydrolysates (WPH) are known for bioactivity and functionality, but WPH also have a distinct bitter taste. Identification of effective bitter taste inhibiting agents for WPH would broaden the use of this ingredient. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of 24 documented bitter taste inhibitors for WPH. Two spray-dried WPH with different levels of hydrolysis (DH) were evaluated with each potential inhibitor. Quinine hydrochloride (quinine) was presented as a control with each WPH. Percent bitter taste inhibition was reported relative to quinine bitterness. Effective bitter taste inhibitors were subsequently evaluated in WPH beverages with vanilla and chocolate flavoring followed by descriptive analysis. The compounds evaluated did not inhibit bitter taste of quinine and the 2 WPH in a similar manner (P sucralose, fructose, sucrose, adenosine 5' monophosphate (5'AMP), adenosine 5'monophosphate disodium (5'AMP Na(2) ), sodium acetate, monosodium glutamate, and sodium gluconate. Sodium chloride inhibited bitter taste of WPH with high DH but not WPH with low DH. Amino acids (l-Lysine, l-arginine) inhibited bitter taste of quinine but not WPH. All effective inhibitors in rehydrated WPH were also effective in the beverage applications. Sweeteners (fructose, sucralose, and sucrose) enhanced vanilla and chocolate flavors in beverages. Most salts and a nucleotide, while effective for bitter taste inhibition, suppressed vanilla and chocolate flavors and potentiated other flavors (that is, sour aromatic), and basic tastes (salty, sour). The bitter taste of whey protein hydrolysates (WPH) limits their use as ingredients. This study identified effective bitter taste inhibitors of WPH with different peptide composition and provides insights for effective bitter inhibitors for product applications with WPH. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists®

  6. Protein tyrosine kinase but not protein kinase C inhibition blocks receptor induced alveolar macrophage activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Pollock

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available The selective enzyme inhibitors genistein and Ro 31-8220 were used to assess the importance of protein tyrosine kinase (PTK and protein kinase C (PKC, respectively, in N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP induced generation of superoxide anion and thromboxane B2 (TXB2 in guinea-pig alveolar macrophages (AM. Genistein (3–100 μM dose dependently inhibited FMLP (3 nM induced superoxide generation in non-primed AM and TXB2 release in non-primed or in lipopolysaccharide (LPS (10 ng/ml primed AM to a level > 80% but had litle effect up to 100 μM on phorbol myristate acetate (PMA (10 nM induced superoxide release. Ro 31-8220 inhibited PMA induced superoxide generation (IC50 0.21 ± 0.10 μM but had no effect on or potentiated (at 3 and 10 μM FMLP responses in non-primed AM. In contrast, when present during LPS priming as well as during FMLP challenge Ro 31-8220 (10 μM inhibited primed TXB2 release by > 80%. The results indicate that PTK activation is required for the generation of these inflammatory mediators by FMLP in AM. PKC activation appears to be required for LPS priming but not for transducing the FMLP signal; rather, PKC activation may modulate the signal by a negative feedback mechanism.

  7. Rheb Inhibits Protein Synthesis by Activating the PERK-eIF2α Signaling Cascade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richa Tyagi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Rheb, a ubiquitous small GTPase, is well known to bind and activate mTOR, which augments protein synthesis. Inhibition of protein synthesis is also physiologically regulated. Thus, with cell stress, the unfolded protein response system leads to phosphorylation of the initiation factor eIF2α and arrest of protein synthesis. We now demonstrate a major role for Rheb in inhibiting protein synthesis by enhancing the phosphorylation of eIF2α by protein kinase-like ER kinase (PERK. Interplay between the stimulatory and inhibitory roles of Rheb may enable cells to modulate protein synthesis in response to varying environmental stresses.

  8. Effect of Glucuronidation on the Potential of Kaempferol to Inhibit Serine/Threonine Protein Kinases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beekmann, Karsten; Haan, De Laura H.J.; Actis-Goretta, Lucas; Bladeren, Van Peter J.; Rietjens, Ivonne M.C.M.

    2016-01-01

    To study the effect of metabolic conjugation of flavonoids on the potential to inhibit protein kinase activity, the inhibitory effects of the dietary flavonol kaempferol and its major plasma conjugate kaempferol-3-O-glucuronide on protein kinases were studied. To this end, the inhibition of the

  9. Ribosome-inhibiting proteins from in vitro cultures of Phytolacca dodecandra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, S.; Hansen, Harald S.; Nyman, U.

    1991-01-01

    Phytolacca dodecandra (L'Herit) grown in cell cultures was investigated for content of ribosome-inhibiting proteins, which was evaluated hy measuring inhibition of protein synthesis in a cell-free rat liver extract. Calli initiated from leaf, cotyledon, radicle, and hypocotyl and suspension cells...

  10. Inhibition of the intrinsic factor X activating complex by protein S: evidence for a specific binding of protein S to factor VIII

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppelman, S.J.

    1995-01-01

    Protein S is a vitamin K-dependent nonenzymatic anticoagulant protein that acts as a cofactor to activated protein C. Recently it was shown that protein S inhibits the prothrombinase reaction independent of activated protein C. In this study, we show that protein S can also inhibit the intrinsic

  11. Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (cetp) inhibition in the treatment of cancer

    KAUST Repository

    Kaur, Mandeep

    2016-09-01

    In one embodiment, the invention provides methods of treatment which use therapeutically effective amounts of Choleste ryl Ester Transfer Protein (CETP) inhibitors to treat a variety of cancers. In certain embodiments, the inhibitor is a CETP-inhibiting small molecule, CETP-inhibiting antisense oligonucleotide, CETP-inhibiting siRNA or a CETP- inhibiting antibody. Related pharmaceutical compositions, kits, diagnostics and screens are also provided.

  12. Annotating activation/inhibition relationships to protein-protein interactions using gene ontology relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Soorin; Yu, Hasun; Jang, Dongjin; Lee, Doheon

    2018-04-11

    Signaling pathways can be reconstructed by identifying 'effect types' (i.e. activation/inhibition) of protein-protein interactions (PPIs). Effect types are composed of 'directions' (i.e. upstream/downstream) and 'signs' (i.e. positive/negative), thereby requiring directions as well as signs of PPIs to predict signaling events from PPI networks. Here, we propose a computational method for systemically annotating effect types to PPIs using relations between functional information of proteins. We used regulates, positively regulates, and negatively regulates relations in Gene Ontology (GO) to predict directions and signs of PPIs. These relations indicate both directions and signs between GO terms so that we can project directions and signs between relevant GO terms to PPIs. Independent test results showed that our method is effective for predicting both directions and signs of PPIs. Moreover, our method outperformed a previous GO-based method that did not consider the relations between GO terms. We annotated effect types to human PPIs and validated several highly confident effect types against literature. The annotated human PPIs are available in Additional file 2 to aid signaling pathway reconstruction and network biology research. We annotated effect types to PPIs by using regulates, positively regulates, and negatively regulates relations in GO. We demonstrated that those relations are effective for predicting not only signs, but also directions of PPIs. The usefulness of those relations suggests their potential applications to other types of interactions such as protein-DNA interactions.

  13. PROTEIN SYNTHESIS INHIBITION AND MEMORY: FORMATION VS AMNESIA1

    OpenAIRE

    Gold, Paul E.

    2007-01-01

    Studies using protein synthesis inhibitors have provided key support for the prevalent view that memory formation requires the initiation of protein synthesis as a primary element of the molecular biology of memory. However, many other interpretations of the amnesia data have received far less attention. These include: a) Protein synthesis may play a constitutive role in memory formation, providing proteins prior to an experience that can be activated by training; b) Protein synthesis may be ...

  14. Arginine inhibits adsorption of proteins on polystyrene surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yui Shikiya

    Full Text Available Nonspecific adsorption of protein on solid surfaces causes a reduction of concentration as well as enzyme inactivation during purification and storage. However, there are no versatile inhibitors of the adsorption between proteins and solid surfaces at low concentrations. Therefore, we examined additives for the prevention of protein adsorption on polystyrene particles (PS particles as a commonly-used material for vessels such as disposable test tubes and microtubes. A protein solution was mixed with PS particles, and then adsorption of protein was monitored by the concentration and activity of protein in the supernatant after centrifugation. Five different proteins bound to PS particles through electrostatic, hydrophobic, and aromatic interactions, causing a decrease in protein concentration and loss of enzyme activity in the supernatant. Among the additives, including arginine hydrochloride (Arg, lysine hydrochloride, guanidine hydrochloride, NaCl, glycine, and glucose, Arg was most effective in preventing the binding of proteins to PS particles as well as activity loss. Moreover, even after the mixing of protein and PS particles, the addition of Arg caused desorption of the bound protein from PS particles. This study demonstrated a new function of Arg, which expands the potential for application of Arg to proteins.

  15. Molecular mechanisms of viral immune evasion proteins to inhibit MHC class I antigen processing and presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Fang

    2009-01-01

    Viral products inhibit MHC class I antigen processing and presentation via three major pathways: inhibition of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I expression on cells, blockade of peptide trafficking and loading on MHC class I molecules, and inhibition of peptide generation in host cells. Viral products also interfere with IFN-gamma -mediated JAK/STAT signal transduction in cells. These results imply that viral proteins probably inhibit the function of IFN-gamma in MHC class I antigen presentation via inactivation of JAK/STAT signal transduction in host cells. Mechanisms of viral products to inhibit IFN-gamma -mediated MHC class I antigen presentation were summarized in this literature review.

  16. Protein disulfide isomerase interacts with tau protein and inhibits its fibrillization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Rong Xu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tau protein is implicated in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders such as tauopathies including Alzheimer disease, and Tau fibrillization is thought to be related to neuronal toxicity. Physiological inhibitors of Tau fibrillization hold promise for developing new strategies for treatment of Alzheimer disease. Because protein disulfide isomerase (PDI is both an enzyme and a chaperone, and implicated in neuroprotection against Alzheimer disease, we want to know whether PDI can prevent Tau fibrillization. In this study, we have investigated the interaction between PDI and Tau protein and the effect of PDI on Tau fibrillization. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: As evidenced by co-immunoprecipitation and confocal laser scanning microscopy, human PDI interacts and co-locates with some endogenous human Tau on the endoplasmic reticulum of undifferentiated SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. The results from isothermal titration calorimetry show that one full-length human PDI binds to one full-length human Tau (or human Tau fragment Tau244-372 monomer with moderate, micromolar affinity at physiological pH and near physiological ionic strength. As revealed by thioflavin T binding assays, Sarkosyl-insoluble SDS-PAGE, and transmission electron microscopy, full-length human PDI remarkably inhibits both steps of nucleation and elongation of Tau244-372 fibrillization in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, we find that two molecules of the a-domain of human PDI interact with one Tau244-372 molecule with sub-micromolar affinity, and inhibit both steps of nucleation and elongation of Tau244-372 fibrillization more strongly than full-length human PDI. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We demonstrate for the first time that human PDI binds to Tau protein mainly through its thioredoxin-like catalytic domain a, forming a 1∶1 complex and preventing Tau misfolding. Our findings suggest that PDI could act as a physiological inhibitor of Tau

  17. Mitochondrial thiol modification by a targeted electrophile inhibits metabolism in breast adenocarcinoma cells by inhibiting enzyme activity and protein levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ryan Smith

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Many cancer cells follow an aberrant metabolic program to maintain energy for rapid cell proliferation. Metabolic reprogramming often involves the upregulation of glutaminolysis to generate reducing equivalents for the electron transport chain and amino acids for protein synthesis. Critical enzymes involved in metabolism possess a reactive thiolate group, which can be modified by certain oxidants. In the current study, we show that modification of mitochondrial protein thiols by a model compound, iodobutyl triphenylphosphonium (IBTP, decreased mitochondrial metabolism and ATP in MDA-MB 231 (MB231 breast adenocarcinoma cells up to 6 days after an initial 24 h treatment. Mitochondrial thiol modification also depressed oxygen consumption rates (OCR in a dose-dependent manner to a greater extent than a non-thiol modifying analog, suggesting that thiol reactivity is an important factor in the inhibition of cancer cell metabolism. In non-tumorigenic MCF-10A cells, IBTP also decreased OCR; however the extracellular acidification rate was significantly increased at all but the highest concentration (10 µM of IBTP indicating that thiol modification can have significantly different effects on bioenergetics in tumorigenic versus non-tumorigenic cells. ATP and other adenonucleotide levels were also decreased by thiol modification up to 6 days post-treatment, indicating a decreased overall energetic state in MB231 cells. Cellular proliferation of MB231 cells was also inhibited up to 6 days post-treatment with little change to cell viability. Targeted metabolomic analyses revealed that thiol modification caused depletion of both Krebs cycle and glutaminolysis intermediates. Further experiments revealed that the activity of the Krebs cycle enzyme, aconitase, was attenuated in response to thiol modification. Additionally, the inhibition of glutaminolysis corresponded to decreased glutaminase C (GAC protein levels, although other protein levels were

  18. Inhibition of protein synthesis on the ribosome by tildipirosin compared with other veterinary macrolides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Niels Møller; Poehlsgaard, Jacob; Warrass, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    Tildipirosin is a 16-membered-ring macrolide developed to treat bacterial pathogens, including Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida, that cause respiratory tract infections in cattle and swine. Here we evaluated the efficacy of tildipirosin at inhibiting protein synthesis...

  19. Treatment with PTEN-Long protein inhibits hepatitis C virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qi; Li, Zhubing; Liu, Qiang

    2017-11-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a confirmed risk factor for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) possesses tumor suppression function that is frequently defective in HCC tumors. PTEN-Long, a translation isoform of PTEN, functions in a cell non-autonomous manner. In this study, we demonstrated that intracellular overexpression of PTEN-Long inhibits HCV replication. More importantly, we showed that treatment with extracellular PTEN-Long protein inhibits HCV replication in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, we showed that PTEN-Long interacts with HCV core protein and this interaction is required for HCV replication inhibition by PTEN-Long. In summary, we demonstrated, for the first time, that PTEN-Long protein, an isoform of the canonical PTEN and in the form of extracellular protein treatment, inhibits HCV replication. Our study offers an opportunity for developing additional anti-HCV agents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Inhibition of epithelial Na+ transport by atriopeptin, protein kinase c, and pertussis toxin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohrmann, M.; Cantiello, H.F.; Ausiello, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    The authors have recently shown the selective inhibition of an amiloride-sensitive, conductive pathway for Na + by atrial natriuretic peptide and 8-bromoguanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-BrcGMP) in the renal epithelial cell line, LLC-PK i . Using 22 Na + fluxes, they further investigated the modulation of Na + transport by atrial natriuretic peptide and by agents that increase cGMP production, activate protein kinase c, or modulate guanine nucleotide regulatory protein function. Sodium nitroprusside increases intracellular cGMP concentrations without affecting cAMP concentrations and completely inhibits amiloride-sensitive Na + uptake in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Oleoyl 2-acetylglycerol and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, activators of protein kinase c, inhibit Na + uptake by 93 ± 13 and 51 ± 10%, respectively. Prolonged incubation with phorbol ester results in the downregulation of protein kinase c activity and reduces the inhibitory effect of atrial natriuretic peptide, suggesting that the action of this peptide involves stimulation of protein kinase c. Pertussis toxin, which induces the ADP-ribosylation of a 41-kDa guanine nucleotide regulatory protein in LLC-PK i cells, inhibits 22 Na + influx to the same extent as amiloride. Thus, increasing cGMP, activating protein kinase c, and ADP-ribosylating a guanine nucleotide regulatory protein all inhibit Na + uptake. These events may be sequentially involved in the action of atrial natriuretic peptide

  1. Oral protein kinase c β inhibition using ruboxistaurin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aiello, Lloyd Paul; Vignati, Louis; Sheetz, Matthew J

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate efficacy, safety, and causes of vision loss among 813 patients (1,392 eyes) with moderately severe to very severe nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy from the Protein Kinase C β Inhibitor-Diabetic Retinopathy Study and Protein Kinase C β Inhibitor-Diabetic Retinopathy Study 2 ruboxi...

  2. Heat Shock Protein 27 Inhibits Apoptosis by Binding Cytochrome C

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carper, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    ...) and cytochrome c in the inhibition of apoptosis. The scope of the study will include: measuring the binding of hsp27to cytochrome c in vivo, determining why hsp27 binds to cytochrome c and determining the fate of the hsp27...

  3. Heat Shock Protein 27 Inhibits Apoptosis by Binding Cytochrome c

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carper, Stephen

    2003-01-01

    ...) and cytochrome c in the inhibition of apoptosis. The scope of the study was to include: measuring the binding of hsp27 to cytochrome c in vivo, determining why hsp27 binds to cytochrome c and determining the fate of the hsp27...

  4. Glycation inhibits trichloroacetic acid (TCA)-induced whey protein precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Four different WPI saccharide conjugates were successfully prepared to test whether glycation could inhibit WPI precipitation induced by trichloroacetic acid (TCA). Conjugates molecular weights after glycation were analyzed with SDS-PAGE. No significant secondary structure change due to glycation wa...

  5. Activation of protein kinase C inhibits synthesis and release of decidual prolactin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harman, I.; Costello, A.; Ganong, B.; Bell, R.M.; Handwerger, S.

    1986-01-01

    Activation of calcium-activated, phospholipid-dependent protein kinase C by diacylglycerol and phorbol esters has been shown to mediate release of hormones in many systems. To determine whether protein kinase C activation is also involved in the regulation of prolactin release from human decidual, the authors have examined the effects of various acylglycerols and phorbol esters on the synthesis and release of prolactin from cultured human decidual cells. sn-1,2-Dioctanolyglycerol (diC 8 ), which is known to stimulate protein kinase C in other systems, inhibited prolactin release in a dose-dependent manner with maximal inhibition of 53.1% at 100 μM. Diolein (100 μM), which also stimulates protein kinase C activity in some systems, inhibited prolactin release by 21.3%. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), phorbol 12,13-didecanoate, and 4β-phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate, which activate protein kinase C in other systems, also inhibited the release of prolactin, which the protein kinase C inactivate 4α-phorbol-12,13-didecanoate was without effect. The inhibition of prolactin release was secondary to a decrease in prolactin synthesis. Although diC 8 and PMA inhibited the synthesis and release of prolactin, these agents had no effect on the synthesis or release of trichloroacetic acid-precipitable [ 35 S]methionine-labeled decidual proteins and did not cause the release of the cytosolic enzymes lactic dehydrogenase and alkaline phosphatase. DiC 8 and PMA stimulates the specific activity of protein kinase C in decidual tissue by 14.6 and 14.0-fold, respectively. The inhibition of the synthesis and release of prolactin by diC 8 and phorbol esters strongly implicates protein kinase C in the regulation of the production and release of prolactin from the decidua

  6. Manzamenones Inhibit T-Cell Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun'ichi Kobayashi

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Manzamenones A~C (1~3 and E~F (5~6, unique oxylipin metabolites isolated from a marine sponge Plakortis sp., have been found to exhibit inhibitory activity against Tcell protein tyrosine phosphatase (TCPTP. The inhibitory activity of 2 and 5 against TCPTP was 4 times more potent than that against protein tyrosine phosphatase-1B (PTP1B.

  7. Protein Kinase G May Exert Pro-Degradation Inhibition on Nitric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) is regulated by protein-protein interactions. We had earlier shown that PKG inhibits activated NOS in endothelial cells and speculated that PKG phosphorylation of NOS terminates its activity. The present work examines if PKG activation increases breakdown of NOS. Diamino-fluorescein ...

  8. Mechanism of inhibition of growth hormone receptor signaling by suppressor of cytokine signaling proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J A; Lindberg, K; Hilton, D J

    1999-01-01

    In this study we have investigated the role of suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) proteins in GH receptor-mediated signaling. GH-induced transcription was inhibited by SOCS-1 and SOCS-3, while SOCS-2 and cytokine inducible SH2-containing protein (CIS) had no effect By using chimeric SOCS pro...

  9. Statins inhibit protein lipidation and induce the unfolded protein response in the non-sterol producing nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mörck, Catarina; Elmelund-Præstekær, Louise Cathrine Braun; Kurth, Caroline

    2009-01-01

    of lipid moieties for protein prenylation. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans possesses a mevalonate pathway that lacks the branch leading to cholesterol synthesis, and thus represents an ideal organism to specifically study the noncholesterol roles of the pathway. Inhibiting HMG-CoA reductase in C...... stress. UPR induction was also observed upon pharmacological inhibition of farnesyl transferases or RNAi inhibition of a specific isoprenoid transferase (M57.2) and found to be dependent on both ire-1 and xbp-1 but not on pek-1 or atf-6, which are all known regulators of the UPR. The lipid stores...

  10. Inhibition of platelet [3H]- imipramine binding by human plasma protein fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strijewski, A.; Chudzik, J.; Tang, S.W.

    1988-01-01

    Inhibition of high-affinity [ 3 H]-imipramine binding to platelet membranes by human plasma fractions and isolated plasma proteins was investigated. Several plasma proteins were found to contribute to the observed apparent inhibition and this contribution was assessed in terms of inhibitor units. Alpha 1 acid glycoprotein, high density and low density lipoprotein, IgG and α 1 -antitrypsin were identified as effective non-specific inhibitors. Alpha-1-acid glycoprotein was confirmed to be the most potent plasma protein inhibitor. Cohn fractions were evaluated for the presence of the postulated endocoid of [ 3 H]-imipramine binding site

  11. Effect of mitochondrial complex I inhibition on Fe-S cluster protein activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mena, Natalia P. [Department of Biology, Faculty of Sciences, Universidad de Chile, Las Palmeras 3425, Santiago (Chile); Millennium Institute of Cell Dynamics and Biotechnology, Santiago (Chile); Bulteau, Anne Laure [UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMRS 975 - UMR 7725, Centre de Recherche en Neurosciences, ICM, Therapeutique Experimentale de la Neurodegenerescence, Hopital de la Salpetriere, F-75005 Paris (France); Inserm, U 975, Centre de Recherche en Neurosciences, ICM, Therapeutique Experimentale de la Neurodegenerescence, Hopital de la Salpetriere, F-75005 Paris (France); CNRS, UMR 7225, Centre de Recherche en Neurosciences, ICM, Therapeutique Experimentale de la Neurodegenerescence, Hopital de la Salpetriere, F-75005 Paris (France); ICM, Therapeutique Experimentale de la Neurodegenerescence, Hopital de la Salpetriere, Paris 75013 (France); Salazar, Julio [Millennium Institute of Cell Dynamics and Biotechnology, Santiago (Chile); Hirsch, Etienne C. [UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMRS 975 - UMR 7725, Centre de Recherche en Neurosciences, ICM, Therapeutique Experimentale de la Neurodegenerescence, Hopital de la Salpetriere, F-75005 Paris (France); Inserm, U 975, Centre de Recherche en Neurosciences, ICM, Therapeutique Experimentale de la Neurodegenerescence, Hopital de la Salpetriere, F-75005 Paris (France); CNRS, UMR 7225, Centre de Recherche en Neurosciences, ICM, Therapeutique Experimentale de la Neurodegenerescence, Hopital de la Salpetriere, F-75005 Paris (France); ICM, Therapeutique Experimentale de la Neurodegenerescence, Hopital de la Salpetriere, Paris 75013 (France); Nunez, Marco T., E-mail: mnunez@uchile.cl [Department of Biology, Faculty of Sciences, Universidad de Chile, Las Palmeras 3425, Santiago (Chile); Millennium Institute of Cell Dynamics and Biotechnology, Santiago (Chile)

    2011-06-03

    Highlights: {yields} Mitochondrial complex I inhibition resulted in decreased activity of Fe-S containing enzymes mitochondrial aconitase and cytoplasmic aconitase and xanthine oxidase. {yields} Complex I inhibition resulted in the loss of Fe-S clusters in cytoplasmic aconitase and of glutamine phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate amidotransferase. {yields} Consistent with loss of cytoplasmic aconitase activity, an increase in iron regulatory protein 1 activity was found. {yields} Complex I inhibition resulted in an increase in the labile cytoplasmic iron pool. -- Abstract: Iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters are small inorganic cofactors formed by tetrahedral coordination of iron atoms with sulfur groups. Present in numerous proteins, these clusters are involved in key biological processes such as electron transfer, metabolic and regulatory processes, DNA synthesis and repair and protein structure stabilization. Fe-S clusters are synthesized mainly in the mitochondrion, where they are directly incorporated into mitochondrial Fe-S cluster-containing proteins or exported for cytoplasmic and nuclear cluster-protein assembly. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that inhibition of mitochondrial complex I by rotenone decreases Fe-S cluster synthesis and cluster content and activity of Fe-S cluster-containing enzymes. Inhibition of complex I resulted in decreased activity of three Fe-S cluster-containing enzymes: mitochondrial and cytosolic aconitases and xanthine oxidase. In addition, the Fe-S cluster content of glutamine phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate amidotransferase and mitochondrial aconitase was dramatically decreased. The reduction in cytosolic aconitase activity was associated with an increase in iron regulatory protein (IRP) mRNA binding activity and with an increase in the cytoplasmic labile iron pool. Since IRP activity post-transcriptionally regulates the expression of iron import proteins, Fe-S cluster inhibition may result in a false iron deficiency signal. Given that

  12. Inhibition of Nonenzymatic Protein Glycation by Pomegranate and Other Fruit Juices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorsey, Pamela Garner; Greenspan, Phillip

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The nonenzymatic glycation of proteins and the formation of advanced glycation endproducts in diabetes leads to the crosslinking of proteins and disease complications. Our study sought to demonstrate the effect of commonly consumed juices (pomegranate, cranberry, black cherry, pineapple, apple, and Concord grape) on the fructose-mediated glycation of albumin. Albumin glycation decreased by 98% in the presence of 10 μL of pomegranate juice/mL; other juices inhibited glycation by only 20%. Pomegranate juice produced the greatest inhibition on protein glycation when incubated at both the same phenolic concentration and the same antioxidant potential. Both punicalagin and ellagic acid significantly inhibited the glycation of albumin by ∼90% at 5 μg/mL. Sodium dodecyl sulfate–polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that pomegranate, but not apple juice, protected albumin from modification. These results demonstrate that pomegranate juice and two of its major constituents are potent inhibitors of fructose-mediated protein glycation. PMID:24433074

  13. Inhibition of thermal induced protein denaturation of extract/fractions of Withania somnifera and isolated withanolides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Murad Ali; Khan, Haroon; Rauf, Abdul; Ben Hadda, Taibi

    2015-01-01

    This study describes the in vitro inhibition of protein denaturation of extract/fractions of Withania somnifera and isolated withanolides including 20β hydroxy-1-oxo(22R)-witha-2,5,24 trienolide (1), (20R,22R-14α,20α)-dihydroxy-1-oxowitha-2,5,16,24 tetraenolide (2). The results showed that the extract/fractions of the plant evoked profound inhibitory effect on thermal-induced protein denaturation. The chloroform fraction caused the most dominant attenuation of 68% at 500 μg/mL. The bioactivity-guided isolation from chloroform fraction led to the isolation of compounds 1 and 2 that showed profound protein inhibition with 78.05% and 80.43% effect at 500 μg/mL and thus strongly complimented the activity of extract/fractions. In conclusion, extract/fractions of W. somnifera possessed strong inhibition of protein denaturation that can be attributed to these isolated withanolides.

  14. Overcoming heat shock protein inhibition at critical temperature vital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bengyella

    2012-06-12

    Jun 12, 2012 ... (http://cpri.ernet.in/varieties.html). The prevailing temperature increase during potato farming seasons is more threatening when heat-stress coincides with senescence stages of growth. Heat stress proteins (HSPs) expression and related cognates are geared to protect cells or organisms from harmful stress.

  15. Protein Synthesis Inhibition Blocks Consolidation of an Acrobatic Motor Skill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaelin-Lang, Alain; Dichgans, Johannes; Schulz, Jorg B.; Luft, Andreas R.; Buitrago, Manuel M.

    2004-01-01

    To investigate whether motor skill learning depends on de novo protein synthesis, adult rats were trained in an acrobatic locomotor task (accelerating rotarod) for 7 d. Animals were systemically injected with cycloheximide (CHX, 0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) 1 h before sessions 1 and 2 or sessions 2 and 3. Control rats received vehicle injections before…

  16. Inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A induces serine/threonine phosphorylation, subcellular redistribution, and functional inhibition of STAT3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woetmann, A; Nielsen, M; Christensen, S T

    1999-01-01

    STAT3. We show that an inhibitor of protein phosphatases (PPs) PP1/PP2A, calyculin A, induces (i) phosphorylation of STAT3 on serine and threonine residues, (ii) inhibition of STAT3 tyrosine phosphorylation and DNA binding activity, and (iii) relocation of STAT3 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm......, whereas inhibitors of serine/threonine kinases, such as mitogen-activated protein kinase-1 extracellular-regulated kinase-kinase, mitogen-activated protein p38 kinase, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, did not. In conclusion, we provide evidence that PP2A plays a crucial role in the regulation of STAT3....... Similar results were obtained with other PP2A inhibitors (okadaic acid, endothall thioanhydride) but not with inhibitors of PP1 (tautomycin) or PP2B (cyclosporine A). Pretreatment with the broad serine/threonine kinase inhibitor staurosporine partly blocked the calyculin A-induced STAT3 phosphorylation...

  17. Inhibition of Methane Hydrate Formation by Ice-Structuring Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars; Ramløv, Hans; Thomsen, Kaj

    2010-01-01

    , assumed biodegradable, are capable of inhibiting the growth of methane hydrate (a structure I hydrate). The ISPs investigated were type III HPLC12 (originally identified in ocean pout) and ISP type III found in meal worm (Tenebrio molitor). These were compared to polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) a well......-known kinetic hydrate inhibitor. The results revealed that adding ISP in sufficient amounts caused the appearance of an initial nonlinear growth period. At a certain point during the growth process the growth pattern changed to linear which is identical to the growth observed for methane hydrate in the absence...... of inhibitors. The profile of the nonlinear growth was concentration-dependent but also dependent on the stirring rate. ISP type III HPLC12 decreased the growth rate of methane hydrate during the linear growth period by 17−75% at concentrations of 0.01−0.1 wt % (0.014−0.14 mM) while ISP from Tenebrio molitor...

  18. The C protein of measles virus inhibits the type I interferon response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaffer, Jessica A.; Bellini, William J.; Rota, Paul A.

    2003-01-01

    Type I interferons (IFNα/β) are an important part of innate immunity to viral infections because they induce an antiviral response and limit viral replication until the adaptive response clears the infection. Since the nonstructural proteins of several paramyxoviruses inhibit the IFNα/β response, we chose to explore the role of the C protein of measles virus (MV) in such inhibition. Previous studies have suggested that the MV C protein may serve as a virulence factor, but its role in the pathogenesis of MV remains undefined. In the present study, a recombinant MV strain that does not express the C protein (MV C-) and its parental strain (Ed Tag) were used. Growth of MV C- was restricted in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and HeLa cells, but in the presence of neutralizing antibodies to IFNα/β, MV C- produced titers that were equivalent to those of Ed Tag. In addition, expression of the MV C protein from plasmid DNA inhibited the production of an IFNα/β responsive reporter gene and, to a lesser extent, inhibited an IFNγ responsive reporter gene. The ability of the MV C protein to suppress the IFNα/β response was confirmed using a biologic assay. After IFNβ stimulation, HeLa cells infected with Ed Tag produced five-fold less IFNα/β than cells infected with MV C-. While the mechanism of inhibition remains unclear, these data suggest that the MV C protein plays an important role in the pathogenesis of MV by inhibiting IFNα/β signaling

  19. Antiviral Protein of Momordica charantia L. Inhibits Different Subtypes of Influenza A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viroj Pongthanapisith

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The new antiviral activity of the protein extracted from Momordica charantia was determined with different subtypes of influenza A. The protein was purified from the seed of M. charantia using an anion exchanger and a Fast Protein Liquid Chromatography (FPLC system. At the concentration of 1.401 mg/mL, the protein did not exhibit cytotoxicity in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells (MDCK but inhibited FFU influenza A/PR/8/34 H1N1 virus at 56.50%, 65.72%, and 100% inhibition by the protein treated before the virus (pretreated, the protein treated alongside with the virus (simultaneously treated, and the protein treated after the virus (posttreated during incubation, respectively. Using 5, 25, and 100 TCID50 of influenza A/New Caledonia/20/99 H1N1, A/Fujian/411/01 H3N2 and A/Thailand/1(KAN-1/2004 H5N1, the IC50 was calculated to be 100, 150, and 200; 75, 175, and 300; and 40, 75, and 200 μg/mL, respectively. Our present finding indicated that the plant protein inhibited not only H1N1 and H3N2 but also H5N1 subtype. As a result of the broad spectrum of its antiviral activity, this edible plant can be developed as an effective therapeutic agent against various and even new emerging subtypes of influenza A.

  20. Protein turnover and cellular autophagy in growing and growth-inhibited 3T3 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papadopoulos, T.; Pfeifer, U. (Univ. of Wuerzburg (West Germany))

    1987-07-01

    The relationship between growth, protein degradation, and cellular autophagy was tested in growing and in growth-inhibited 3T3 cell monolayers. For the biochemical evaluation of DNA and protein metabolism, growth-inhibited 3T3 cell monolayers with high cell density and growing 3T3 cell monolayers with low cell density were labeled simultaneously with ({sup 14}C)thymidine and ({sup 3}H)leucine. The evaluation of the DNA turnover and additional ({sup 3}H)thymidine autoradiography showed that 24 to 5% of 3T3 cells continue to replicate even in the growth-inhibited state, where no accumulation of protein and DNA can be observed. Cell loss, therefore, has to be assumed to compensate for the ongoing cell proliferation. When the data of protein turnover were corrected for cell loss, it was found that the rate constant of protein synthesis in nongrowing monolayers was reduced to half the value found in growing monolayers. Simultaneously, the rate constant of protein degradation in nongrowing monolayers was increased to about 1.5-fold the value of growing monolayers. These data are in agreement with the assumption that cellular autophagy represents a major pathway of regulating protein degradation in 3T3 cells and that the regulation of autophagic protein degradation is of relevance for the transition from a growing to a nongrowing state.

  1. Adenovirus DNA binding protein inhibits SrCap-activated CBP and CREB-mediated transcription

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Xiequn; Tarakanova, Vera; Chrivia, John; Yaciuk, Peter

    2003-01-01

    The SNF2-related CBP activator protein (SrCap) is a potent activator of transcription mediated by CBP and CREB. We have previously demonstrated that the Adenovirus 2 DNA Binding Protein (DBP) binds to SrCap and inhibits the transcription mediated by the carboxyl-terminal region of SrCap (amino acids 1275-2971). We report here that DBP inhibits the ability of full-length SrCap (1-2971) to activate transcription mediated by Gal-CREB and Gal-CBP. In addition, DBP also inhibits the ability of SrCap to enhance Protein Kinase A (PKA) activated transcription of the enkaphalin promoter. DBP was found to dramatically inhibit transcription of a mammalian two-hybrid system that was dependent on the interaction of SrCap and CBP binding domains. We also found that DBP has no effect on transcription mediated by a transcriptional activator that is not related to SrCap, indicating that our reported transcriptional inhibition is specific for SrCap and not due to nonspecific effects of DBP's DNA binding activity on the CAT reporter plasmid. Taken together, these results suggest a model in which DBP inhibits cellular transcription mediated by the interaction between SrCap and CBP

  2. Surfactant protein D binds to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) envelope protein gp120 and inhibits HIV replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meschi, Joseph; Crouch, Erika C; Skolnik, Paul

    2005-01-01

    The envelope protein (gp120) of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) contains highly conserved mannosylated oligosaccharides. These glycoconjugates contribute to resistance to antibody neutralization, and binding to cell surface lectins on macrophages and dendritic cells. Mannose-binding lectin (MBL......) binds to gp120 and plays a role in defence against the virus. In this study it is demonstrated that surfactant protein D (SP-D) binds to gp120 and inhibits HIV infectivity at significantly lower concentrations than MBL. The binding of SP-D was mediated by its calcium-dependent carbohydrate...... defence against HIV. A chimeric protein containing the N-terminal and collagen domains of SP-D linked to the neck and carbohydrate-recognition domains of MBL (called SP-D/MBL(neck+CRD)) had greater ability to bind to gp120 and inhibit virus replication than either SP-D or MBL. The enhanced binding of SP...

  3. Eosinophil cationic protein stimulates and major basic protein inhibits airway mucus secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, J D; Davey, R T; Lundgren, B

    1991-01-01

    . Crude extracts from isolated EO granules also stimulated RGC release, suggesting that a granular protein might be responsible. Three proteins derived from EO granules, EO-derived neurotoxin, EO cationic protein (ECP), and major basic protein (MBP) were separated by sequential sizing and affinity...

  4. Multiple mechanisms for CRISPR-Cas inhibition by anti-CRISPR proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondy-Denomy, Joseph; Garcia, Bianca; Strum, Scott; Du, Mingjian; Rollins, MaryClare F; Hidalgo-Reyes, Yurima; Wiedenheft, Blake; Maxwell, Karen L; Davidson, Alan R

    2015-10-01

    The battle for survival between bacteria and the viruses that infect them (phages) has led to the evolution of many bacterial defence systems and phage-encoded antagonists of these systems. Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and the CRISPR-associated (cas) genes comprise an adaptive immune system that is one of the most widespread means by which bacteria defend themselves against phages. We identified the first examples of proteins produced by phages that inhibit a CRISPR-Cas system. Here we performed biochemical and in vivo investigations of three of these anti-CRISPR proteins, and show that each inhibits CRISPR-Cas activity through a distinct mechanism. Two block the DNA-binding activity of the CRISPR-Cas complex, yet do this by interacting with different protein subunits, and using steric or non-steric modes of inhibition. The third anti-CRISPR protein operates by binding to the Cas3 helicase-nuclease and preventing its recruitment to the DNA-bound CRISPR-Cas complex. In vivo, this anti-CRISPR can convert the CRISPR-Cas system into a transcriptional repressor, providing the first example-to our knowledge-of modulation of CRISPR-Cas activity by a protein interactor. The diverse sequences and mechanisms of action of these anti-CRISPR proteins imply an independent evolution, and foreshadow the existence of other means by which proteins may alter CRISPR-Cas function.

  5. Two distinct mechanisms for actin capping protein regulation--steric and allosteric inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Shuichi; Minakata, Shiho; Koike, Ryotaro; Kawahata, Ichiro; Narita, Akihiro; Kitazawa, Masashi; Ota, Motonori; Yamakuni, Tohru; Maéda, Yuichiro; Nitanai, Yasushi

    2010-07-06

    The actin capping protein (CP) tightly binds to the barbed end of actin filaments, thus playing a key role in actin-based lamellipodial dynamics. V-1 and CARMIL proteins directly bind to CP and inhibit the filament capping activity of CP. V-1 completely inhibits CP from interacting with the barbed end, whereas CARMIL proteins act on the barbed end-bound CP and facilitate its dissociation from the filament (called uncapping activity). Previous studies have revealed the striking functional differences between the two regulators. However, the molecular mechanisms describing how these proteins inhibit CP remains poorly understood. Here we present the crystal structures of CP complexed with V-1 and with peptides derived from the CP-binding motif of CARMIL proteins (CARMIL, CD2AP, and CKIP-1). V-1 directly interacts with the primary actin binding surface of CP, the C-terminal region of the alpha-subunit. Unexpectedly, the structures clearly revealed the conformational flexibility of CP, which can be attributed to a twisting movement between the two domains. CARMIL peptides in an extended conformation interact simultaneously with the two CP domains. In contrast to V-1, the peptides do not directly compete with the barbed end for the binding surface on CP. Biochemical assays revealed that the peptides suppress the interaction between CP and V-1, despite the two inhibitors not competing for the same binding site on CP. Furthermore, a computational analysis using the elastic network model indicates that the interaction of the peptides alters the intrinsic fluctuations of CP. Our results demonstrate that V-1 completely sequesters CP from the barbed end by simple steric hindrance. By contrast, CARMIL proteins allosterically inhibit CP, which appears to be a prerequisite for the uncapping activity. Our data suggest that CARMIL proteins down-regulate CP by affecting its conformational dynamics. This conceptually new mechanism of CP inhibition provides a structural basis for the

  6. Pharmacological inhibition of dynamin II reduces constitutive protein secretion from primary human macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maaike Kockx

    Full Text Available Dynamins are fission proteins that mediate endocytic and exocytic membrane events and are pharmacological therapeutic targets. These studies investigate whether dynamin II regulates constitutive protein secretion and show for the first time that pharmacological inhibition of dynamin decreases secretion of apolipoprotein E (apoE and several other proteins constitutively secreted from primary human macrophages. Inhibitors that target recruitment of dynamin to membranes (MiTMABs or directly target the GTPase domain (Dyngo or Dynole series, dose- and time- dependently reduced the secretion of apoE. SiRNA oligo's targeting all isoforms of dynamin II confirmed the involvement of dynamin II in apoE secretion. Inhibition of secretion was not mediated via effects on mRNA or protein synthesis. 2D-gel electrophoresis showed that inhibition occurred after apoE was processed and glycosylated in the Golgi and live cell imaging showed that inhibited secretion was associated with reduced post-Golgi movement of apoE-GFP-containing vesicles. The effect was not restricted to macrophages, and was not mediated by the effects of the inhibitors on microtubules. Inhibition of dynamin also altered the constitutive secretion of other proteins, decreasing the secretion of fibronectin, matrix metalloproteinase 9, Chitinase-3-like protein 1 and lysozyme but unexpectedly increasing the secretion of the inflammatory mediator cyclophilin A. We conclude that pharmacological inhibitors of dynamin II modulate the constitutive secretion of macrophage apoE as a class effect, and that their capacity to modulate protein secretion may affect a range of biological processes.

  7. Identification of compounds with anti-human cytomegalovirus activity that inhibit production of IE2 proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beelontally, Rooksarr; Wilkie, Gavin S; Lau, Betty; Goodmaker, Charles J; Ho, Catherine M K; Swanson, Chad M; Deng, Xianming; Wang, Jinhua; Gray, Nathanael S; Davison, Andrew J; Strang, Blair L

    2017-02-01

    Using a high throughput screening methodology we surveyed a collection of largely uncharacterized validated or suspected kinase inhibitors for anti-human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) activity. From this screen we identified three structurally related 5-aminopyrazine compounds (XMD7-1, -2 and -27) that inhibited HCMV replication in virus yield reduction assays at low micromolar concentrations. Kinase selectivity assays indicated that each compound was a kinase inhibitor capable of inhibiting a range of cellular protein kinases. Western blotting and RNA sequencing demonstrated that treatment of infected cells with XMD7 compounds resulted in a defect in the production of the major HCMV transcriptional transactivator IE2 proteins (IE2-86, IE2-60 and IE2-40) and an overall reduction in transcription from the viral genome. However, production of certain viral proteins was not compromised by treatment with XMD7 compounds. Thus, these novel anti-HCMV compounds likely inhibited transcription from the viral genome and suppressed production of a subset of viral proteins by inhibiting IE2 protein production. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Aptamer-Conjugated Calcium Phosphate Nanoparticles for Reducing Diabetes Risk via Retinol Binding Protein 4 Inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torabi, Raheleh; Ghourchian, Hedayatollah; Amanlou, Massoud; Pasalar, Parvin

    2017-06-01

    Inhibition of the binding of retinol to its carrier, retinol binding protein 4, is a new strategy for treating type 2 diabetes; for this purpose, we have provided an aptamer-functionalized multishell calcium phosphate nanoparticle. First, calcium phosphate nanoparticles were synthesized and conjugated to the aptamer. The cytotoxicity of nanoparticles releases the process of aptamer from nanoparticles and their inhibition function of binding retinol to retinol binding protein 4. After synthesizing and characterizing the multishell calcium phosphate nanoparticles and observing the noncytotoxicity of conjugate, the optimum time (48 hours) and the pH (7.4) for releasing the aptamer from the nanoparticles was determined. The half-maximum inhibitory concentration (IC 50 ) value for inhibition of retinol binding to retinol binding protein 4 was 210 femtomolar (fmol). The results revealed that the aptamer could prevent connection between retinol and retinol binding protein 4 at a very low IC 50 value (210 fmol) compared to other reported inhibitors. It seems that this aptamer could be used as an efficient candidate not only for decreasing the insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes, but also for inhibiting the other retinol binding protein 4-related diseases. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes Canada. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Measles Virus Fusion Protein: Structure, Function and Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Plattet

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Measles virus (MeV, a highly contagious member of the Paramyxoviridae family, causes measles in humans. The Paramyxoviridae family of negative single-stranded enveloped viruses includes several important human and animal pathogens, with MeV causing approximately 120,000 deaths annually. MeV and canine distemper virus (CDV-mediated diseases can be prevented by vaccination. However, sub-optimal vaccine delivery continues to foster MeV outbreaks. Post-exposure prophylaxis with antivirals has been proposed as a novel strategy to complement vaccination programs by filling herd immunity gaps. Recent research has shown that membrane fusion induced by the morbillivirus glycoproteins is the first critical step for viral entry and infection, and determines cell pathology and disease outcome. Our molecular understanding of morbillivirus-associated membrane fusion has greatly progressed towards the feasibility to control this process by treating the fusion glycoprotein with inhibitory molecules. Current approaches to develop anti-membrane fusion drugs and our knowledge on drug resistance mechanisms strongly suggest that combined therapies will be a prerequisite. Thus, discovery of additional anti-fusion and/or anti-attachment protein small-molecule compounds may eventually translate into realistic therapeutic options.

  10. Antroquinonol blocks Ras and Rho signaling via the inhibition of protein isoprenyltransferase activity in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Ching-Liang; Wang, Jui-Ling; Lee, Cheng-Chung; Cheng, Hsiu-Yi; Wen, Wu-Che; Cheng, Howard Hao-Yu; Chen, Miles Chih-Ming

    2014-10-01

    Antroquinonol is the smallest anticancer molecule isolated from Antrodia camphorata thus far. The ubiquinone-like structure of Antroquinonol exhibits a broad spectrum of activity against malignancies in vivo and in vitro. However, the mechanism of action of Antroquinonol remains unclear. Here, we provide evidence that Antroquinonol plays a role in the inhibition of Ras and Ras-related small GTP-binding protein functions through the inhibition of protein isoprenyl transferase activity in cancer cells. Using cell line-based assays, we found that the inactive forms of Ras and Rho proteins were significantly elevated after treatment with Antroquinonol. We also demonstrated that Antroquinonol binds directly to farnesyltransferase and geranylgeranyltransferase-I, which are key enzymes involved in activation of Ras-related proteins, and inhibits enzymes activities in vitro. Furthermore, a molecular docking analysis illustrated that the isoprenoid moiety of Antroquinonol binds along the hydrophobic cavity of farnesyltransferase similar to its natural substrate, farnesyl pyrophosphate. In contrast, the ring structure of Antroquinonol lies adjacent to the Ras-CAAX motif-binding site on farnesyltransferase. The molecular docking study also showed a reasonable correlation with the IC50 values of Antroquinonol analogues. We also found that the levels of LC3B-II and the autophagosome-associated LC3 form were also significantly increased in H838 after Antroquinonol administration. In conclusion, Antroquinonol inhibited Ras and Ras-related GTP-binding protein activation through inhibition of protein isoprenyl transferase activity, leading to activation of autophagy and associated mode of cell death in cancer cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Evasion of antiviral innate immunity by Theiler's virus L* protein through direct inhibition of RNase L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Sorgeloos

    Full Text Available Theiler's virus is a neurotropic picornavirus responsible for chronic infections of the central nervous system. The establishment of a persistent infection and the subsequent demyelinating disease triggered by the virus depend on the expression of L*, a viral accessory protein encoded by an alternative open reading frame of the virus. We discovered that L* potently inhibits the interferon-inducible OAS/RNase L pathway. The antagonism of RNase L by L* was particularly prominent in macrophages where baseline oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS and RNase L expression levels are elevated, but was detectable in fibroblasts after IFN pretreatment. L* mutations significantly affected Theiler's virus replication in primary macrophages derived from wild-type but not from RNase L-deficient mice. L* counteracted the OAS/RNase L pathway through direct interaction with the ankyrin domain of RNase L, resulting in the inhibition of this enzyme. Interestingly, RNase L inhibition was species-specific as Theiler's virus L* protein blocked murine RNase L but not human RNase L or RNase L of other mammals or birds. Direct RNase L inhibition by L* and species specificity were confirmed in an in vitro assay performed with purified proteins. These results demonstrate a novel viral mechanism to elude the antiviral OAS/RNase L pathway. By targeting the effector enzyme of this antiviral pathway, L* potently inhibits RNase L, underscoring the importance of this enzyme in innate immunity against Theiler's virus.

  12. Non-human Primate Schlafen11 Inhibits Production of Both Host and Viral Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stabell, Alex C; Hawkins, John; Li, Manqing; Gao, Xia; David, Michael; Press, William H; Sawyer, Sara L

    2016-12-01

    Schlafen11 (encoded by the SLFN11 gene) has been shown to inhibit the accumulation of HIV-1 proteins. We show that the SLFN11 gene is under positive selection in simian primates and is species-specific in its activity against HIV-1. The activity of human Schlafen11 is relatively weak compared to that of some other primate versions of this protein, with the versions encoded by chimpanzee, orangutan, gibbon, and marmoset being particularly potent inhibitors of HIV-1 protein production. Interestingly, we find that Schlafen11 is functional in the absence of infection and reduces protein production from certain non-viral (GFP) and even host (Vinculin and GAPDH) transcripts. This suggests that Schlafen11 may just generally block protein production from non-codon optimized transcripts. Because Schlafen11 is an interferon-stimulated gene with a broad ability to inhibit protein production from many host and viral transcripts, its role may be to create a general antiviral state in the cell. Interestingly, the strong inhibitors such as marmoset Schlafen11 consistently block protein production better than weak primate Schlafen11 proteins, regardless of the virus or host target being analyzed. Further, we show that the residues to which species-specific differences in Schlafen11 potency map are distinct from residues that have been targeted by positive selection. We speculate that the positive selection of SLFN11 could have been driven by a number of different factors, including interaction with one or more viral antagonists that have yet to be identified.

  13. The murine gammaherpesvirus-68 chemokine-binding protein M3 inhibits experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Millward, Jason M; Holst, Peter J; Høgh-Petersen, Mette

    2010-01-01

    M3 (AdM3) directly to the CNS to evaluate the capacity of this protein to inhibit neuroinflammation using the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model. Treatment with the AdM3 vector significantly reduced the clinical severity of EAE, attenuated CNS histopathology, and reduced numbers...

  14. Asynchronous Cholinergic Drive Correlates with Excitation-Inhibition Imbalance via a Neuronal Ca2+ Sensor Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keming Zhou

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Excitation-inhibition imbalance in neural networks is widely linked to neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders. However, how genetic factors alter neuronal activity, leading to excitation-inhibition imbalance, remains unclear. Here, using the C. elegans locomotor circuit, we examine how altering neuronal activity for varying time periods affects synaptic release pattern and animal behavior. We show that while short-duration activation of excitatory cholinergic neurons elicits a reversible enhancement of presynaptic strength, persistent activation results to asynchronous and reduced cholinergic drive, inducing imbalance between endogenous excitation and inhibition. We find that the neuronal calcium sensor protein NCS-2 is required for asynchronous cholinergic release in an activity-dependent manner and dampens excitability of inhibitory neurons non-cell autonomously. The function of NCS-2 requires its Ca2+ binding and membrane association domains. These results reveal a synaptic mechanism implicating asynchronous release in regulation of excitation-inhibition balance.

  15. Tubule urate and PAH transport: sensitivity and specificity of serum protein inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grantham, J.J.; Kennedy, J.; Cowley, B.

    1987-01-01

    Macromolecules in rabbit serum inhibit the cellular uptake and transepithelial secretion of [ 14 C]urate and p-[ 3 H]aminohippurate ([ 3 H]PAH) in rabbit S 2 proximal tubule segments. To understand better the potential role these inhibitors may have in the regulation of renal organic anion excretion, the authors examined the specificity and relative inhibitory effects on tubule urate and PAH transport of albumin and γ-globulin, the major inhibitory proteins in rabbit serum. Native rabbit serum markedly inhibited the cellular accumulation or urate and PAH by isolated nonperfused segments. Urate and PAH transport was also inhibited by bovine serum, human serum, Cohn-fractionated rabbit albumin, and rabbit γ-globulin, but not by Cohn-fractionated bovine serum albumin. α-Lactalbumin and β-lactoglobulin, derived from milk, also inhibited urate and PAH transport, but to a lesser extent than albumin and γ-globulin. The transport inhibitory effects of proteins were independent of their binding to urate and PAH. Unidirectional influx and the steady-state intracellular accumulation of urate and PAH in suspensions of proximal tubules were decreased by rabbit serum proteins, suggesting that these inhibitors act on the external face of the cells to diminish the uptake of the organic anions. These studies indicate that the principal plasma proteins (albumin and γ-globulin) significantly inhibit urate and PAH transporters in the basolateral membranes of S 2 proximal tubules. They suggest that circulating plasma proteins that can penetrate the basement membrane of proximal tubules may directly modulate the renal excretion of urate and PAH

  16. The Cytotoxicity of Elderberry Ribosome-Inactivating Proteins Is Not Solely Determined by Their Protein Translation Inhibition Activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenjing Shang

    Full Text Available Although the protein translation inhibition activity of ribosome inactivating proteins (RIPs is well documented, little is known about the contribution of the lectin chain to the biological activity of these proteins. In this study, we compared the in vitro and intracellular activity of several S. nigra (elderberry RIPs and non-RIP lectins. Our data demonstrate that RIPs from elderberry are much more toxic to HeLa cells than to primary fibroblasts. Differences in the cytotoxicity between the elderberry proteins correlated with differences in glycan specificity of their lectin domain, cellular uptake efficiency and intracellular destination. Despite the fact that the bulk of the RIPs accumulated in the lysosomes and partly in the Golgi apparatus, we could demonstrate effective inhibition of protein synthesis in cellula. As we also observed cytotoxicity for non-RIP lectins, it is clear that the lectin chain triggers additional pathways heralding cell death. Our data suggest that one of these pathways involves the induction of autophagy.

  17. Salbutamol inhibits ubiquitin-mediated survival motor neuron protein degradation in spinal muscular atrophy cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harahap, Nur Imma Fatimah; Nurputra, Dian Kesumapramudya; Ar Rochmah, Mawaddah; Shima, Ai; Morisada, Naoya; Takarada, Toru; Takeuchi, Atsuko; Tohyama, Yumi; Yanagisawa, Shinichiro; Nishio, Hisahide

    2015-12-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a common autosomal recessive neuromuscular disorder that is currently incurable. SMA is caused by decreased levels of the survival motor neuron protein (SMN), as a result of loss or mutation of SMN1 . Although the SMN1 homolog SMN2 also produces some SMN protein, it does not fully compensate for the loss or dysfunction of SMN1 . Salbutamol, a β2-adrenergic receptor agonist and well-known bronchodilator used in asthma patients, has recently been shown to ameliorate symptoms in SMA patients. However, the precise mechanism of salbutamol action is unclear. We treated SMA fibroblast cells lacking SMN1 and HeLa cells with salbutamol and analyzed SMN2 mRNA and SMN protein levels in SMA fibroblasts, and changes in SMN protein ubiquitination in HeLa cells. Salbutamol increased SMN protein levels in a dose-dependent manner in SMA fibroblast cells lacking SMN1 , though no significant changes in SMN2 mRNA levels were observed. Notably, the salbutamol-induced increase in SMN was blocked by a protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor and deubiquitinase inhibitor, respectively. Co-immunoprecipitation assay using HeLa cells showed that ubiquitinated SMN levels decreased in the presence of salbutamol, suggesting that salbutamol inhibited ubiquitination. The results of this study suggest that salbutamol may increase SMN protein levels in SMA by inhibiting ubiquitin-mediated SMN degradation via activating β2-adrenergic receptor-PKA pathways.

  18. HCV core protein promotes hepatocyte proliferation and chemoresistance by inhibiting NR4A1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Yongsheng; Li, Yan

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of HCV core protein on the proliferation of hepatocytes and hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HCC), the influence of HCV core protein on HCC apoptosis induced by the chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin, and the mechanism through which HCV core protein acts as a potential oncoprotein in HCV-related HCC by measuring the levels of NR4A1 and Runt-related transcription factor 3 (RUNX3), which are associated with tumor suppression and chemotherapy resistance. In the present study, PcDNA3.1-core and RUNX3 siRNA were transfected into LO2 and HepG2 cells using Lipofectamine 2000. LO2-core, HepG2-core, LO2-RUNX3 low and control cells were treated with different concentrations of cisplatin for 72 h, and cell proliferation and apoptosis were assayed using the CellTiter 96 ® Aqueous Non-Radioactive Cell Proliferation Assay Kit. Western blot and real time PCR analyses were used to detect NR4A1, RUNX3, smad7, Cyclin D1 and BAX. Confocal microscopy was used to determine the levels of NR4A1 in HepG2 and HepG2-core cells. The growth rate of HepG2-core cells was considerably greater than that of HepG2 cells. HCV core protein increased the expression of cyclin D1 and decreased the expressions of NR4A1 and RUNX3. In LO2 – RUNX3 low , the rate of cell proliferation and the level of cisplatin resistance were the same as in the LO2 -core. These results suggest that HCV core protein decreases the sensitivity of hepatocytes to cisplatin by inhibiting the expression of NR4A1 and promoting the expression of smad7, which negatively regulates the TGF-β pathway. This effect results in down regulation of RUNX3, a target of the TGF-β pathway. Taken together, these findings indicate that in hepatocytes, HCV core protein increases drug resistance and inhibits cell apoptosis by inhibiting the expressions of NR4A1 and RUNX3. - Highlights: • HCV core protein inhibits HepG2 cell sensitivity to cisplatin. • Core expression in HepG2 decreases expression of NR4A1.

  19. HCV core protein promotes hepatocyte proliferation and chemoresistance by inhibiting NR4A1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Yongsheng, E-mail: yongshengtanwhu@126.com; Li, Yan, E-mail: liyansd2@163.com

    2015-10-23

    This study investigated the effect of HCV core protein on the proliferation of hepatocytes and hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HCC), the influence of HCV core protein on HCC apoptosis induced by the chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin, and the mechanism through which HCV core protein acts as a potential oncoprotein in HCV-related HCC by measuring the levels of NR4A1 and Runt-related transcription factor 3 (RUNX3), which are associated with tumor suppression and chemotherapy resistance. In the present study, PcDNA3.1-core and RUNX3 siRNA were transfected into LO2 and HepG2 cells using Lipofectamine 2000. LO2-core, HepG2-core, LO2-RUNX3 {sup low} and control cells were treated with different concentrations of cisplatin for 72 h, and cell proliferation and apoptosis were assayed using the CellTiter 96{sup ®}Aqueous Non-Radioactive Cell Proliferation Assay Kit. Western blot and real time PCR analyses were used to detect NR4A1, RUNX3, smad7, Cyclin D1 and BAX. Confocal microscopy was used to determine the levels of NR4A1 in HepG2 and HepG2-core cells. The growth rate of HepG2-core cells was considerably greater than that of HepG2 cells. HCV core protein increased the expression of cyclin D1 and decreased the expressions of NR4A1 and RUNX3. In LO2 – RUNX3 {sup low}, the rate of cell proliferation and the level of cisplatin resistance were the same as in the LO2 -core. These results suggest that HCV core protein decreases the sensitivity of hepatocytes to cisplatin by inhibiting the expression of NR4A1 and promoting the expression of smad7, which negatively regulates the TGF-β pathway. This effect results in down regulation of RUNX3, a target of the TGF-β pathway. Taken together, these findings indicate that in hepatocytes, HCV core protein increases drug resistance and inhibits cell apoptosis by inhibiting the expressions of NR4A1 and RUNX3. - Highlights: • HCV core protein inhibits HepG2 cell sensitivity to cisplatin. • Core expression in HepG2 decreases

  20. Proteins in the Cocoon of Silkworm Inhibit the Growth of Beauveria bassiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Li, Youshan; Liu, Huawei; Xia, Qingyou; Zhao, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Silk cocoons are composed of fiber proteins (fibroins) and adhesive glue proteins (sericins), which provide a physical barrier to protect the inside pupa. Moreover, other proteins were identified in the cocoon silk, many of which are immune related proteins. In this study, we extracted proteins from the silkworm cocoon by Tris-HCl buffer (pH7.5), and found that they had a strong inhibitory activity against fungal proteases and they had higher abundance in the outer cocoon layers than in the inner cocoon layers. Moreover, we found that extracted cocoon proteins can inhibit the germination of Beauveria bassiana spores. Consistent with the distribution of protease inhibitors, we found that proteins from the outer cocoon layers showed better inhibitory effects against B. bassiana spores than proteins from the inner layers. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was used to reveal the extracted components in the scaffold silk, the outermost cocoon layer. A total of 129 proteins were identified, 30 of which were annotated as protease inhibitors. Protease inhibitors accounted for 89.1% in abundance among extracted proteins. These protease inhibitors have many intramolecular disulfide bonds to maintain their stable structure, and remained active after being boiled. This study added a new understanding to the antimicrobial function of the cocoon. PMID:27032085

  1. Synergistic Inhibition of Protein Fibrillation by Proline and Sorbitol: Biophysical Investigations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinjan Choudhary

    Full Text Available We report here interesting synergistic effects of proline and sorbitol, two well-known chemical chaperones, in the inhibition of fibrillation of two proteins, insulin and lysozyme. A combination of many biophysical techniques has been used to understand the structural morphology and modes of interaction of the chaperones with the proteins during fibrillation. Both the chaperones establish stronger polar interactions in the elongation and saturation stages of fibrillation compared to that in the native stage. However, when presented as a mixture, we also see contribution of hydrophobic interactions. Thus, a co-operative adjustment of polar and hydrophobic interactions between the chaperones and the protein surface seems to drive the synergistic effects in the fibrillation process. In insulin, this synergy is quantitatively similar in all the stages of the fibrillation process. These observations would have significant implications for understanding protein folding concepts, in general, and for designing combination therapies against protein fibrillation, in particular.

  2. Protein kinase B/Akt1 inhibits autophagy by down-regulating UVRAG expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Wonseok; Ju, Ji-hyun; Lee, Kyung-min; Nam, KeeSoo; Oh, Sunhwa [Department of Life Science, College of Natural Science, Hanyang University, 17 Haengdang-dong, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Incheol, E-mail: incheol@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Life Science, College of Natural Science, Hanyang University, 17 Haengdang-dong, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-02-01

    Autophagy, or autophagocytosis, is a selective intracellular degradative process involving the cell's own lysosomal apparatus. An essential component in cell development, homeostasis, repair and resistance to stress, autophagy may result in either cell death or survival. The targeted region of the cell is sequestered within a membrane structure, the autophagosome, for regulation of the catabolic process. A key factor in both autophagosome formation and autophagosome maturation is a protein encoded by the ultraviolet irradiation resistance-associated gene (UVRAG). Conversely, the serine/threonine-specific protein kinase B (PKB, also known as Akt), which regulates survival in various cancers, inhibits autophagy through mTOR activation. We found that Akt1 may also directly inhibit autophagy by down-regulating UVRAG both in a 293T transient transfection system and breast cancer cells stably expressing Akt1. The UVRAG with mutations at putative Akt1-phosphorylation sites were still inhibited by Akt1, and dominant-negative Akt1 also inhibited UVRAG expression, suggesting that Akt1 down-regulates UVRAG by a kinase activity-independent mechanism. We showed that Akt1 overexpression in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells down-regulated UVRAG transcription. Cells over-expressing Akt1 were more resistant than control cells to ultraviolet light-induced autophagy and exhibited the associated reduction in cell viability. Levels of the autophagosome indicator protein LC3B-II and mRFP-GFP-LC3 were reduced in cells that over-expressing Akt1. Inhibiting Akt1 by siRNA or reintroducing UVRAG gene rescued the level of LC3B-II in UV-irradiation. Altogether, these data suggest that Akt1 may inhibit autophagy by decreasing UVRAG expression, which also sensitizes cancer cells to UV irradiation.

  3. Fundamental role of the fostriecin unsaturated lactone and implications for selective protein phosphatase inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Suzanne B; Hardouin, Christophe; Ichikawa, Satoshi; Soenen, Danielle R; Gauss, C-M; Hwang, Inkyu; Swingle, Mark R; Bonness, Kathy M; Honkanen, Richard E; Boger, Dale L

    2003-12-24

    Key derivatives and analogues of fostriecin were prepared and examined that revealed a fundamental role for the unsaturated lactone and confirmed the essential nature of the phosphate monoester. Thus, an identical 200-fold reduction in protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) inhibition is observed with either the saturated lactone (7) or with an analogue that lacks the entire lactone (15). This 200-fold increase in PP2A inhibition attributable to the unsaturated lactone potentially may be due to reversible C269 alkylation within the PP beta12-beta13 active site loop accounting for PP2A/4 potency and selectivity.

  4. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein B1 protein impairs DNA repair mediated through the inhibition of DNA-dependent protein kinase activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwanaga, Kentaro; Sueoka, Naoko; Sato, Akemi; Hayashi, Shinichiro; Sueoka, Eisaburo

    2005-01-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein B1, an RNA binding protein, is overexpressed from the early stage of lung cancers; it is evident even in bronchial dysplasia, a premalignant lesion. We evaluated the proteins bound with hnRNP B1 and found that hnRNP B1 interacted with DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) complex, and recombinant hnRNP B1 protein dose-dependently inhibited DNA-PK activity in vitro. To test the effect of hnRNP B1 on DNA repair, we performed comet assay after irradiation, using normal human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells treated with siRNA for hnRNP A2/B1: reduction of hnRNP B1 treated with siRNA for hnRNP A2/B1 induced faster DNA repair in normal HBE cells. Considering these results, we assume that overexpression of hnRNP B1 occurring in the early stage of carcinogenesis inhibits DNA-PK activity, resulting in subsequent accumulation of erroneous rejoining of DNA double-strand breaks, causing tumor progression

  5. Free Fatty Acids Inhibit Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B and Activate Akt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eisuke Shibata

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Accumulating evidence has suggested that free fatty acids (FFAs interact with protein kinases and protein phosphatases. The present study examined the effect of FFAs on protein phosphatases and Akt. Methods: Activities of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1, protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A, and protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B were assayed under the cell-free conditions. Phosphorylation of Akt was monitored in MSTO-211H human malignant pleural mesothelioma cells without and with knocking-down phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K or 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 (PDK1. Results: In the cell-free assay, unsaturated FFAs (uFFAs such as oleic, linoleic and linolenic acid and saturated FFAs (sFFAs such as stearic, palmitic, myristic, and behenic acid markedly reduced PTP1B activity, with the potential for uFFAs greater than that for sFFAs. All the investigated sFFAs inhibited PP2A activity, but otherwise no inhibition was obtained with uFFAs. Both uFFAs and sFFAs had no effect on PP1 activity. Oleic acid phosphorylated Akt both on Thr308 and Ser473, while stearic acid phosphorylated Akt on Thr308 alone. The effects of oleic and stearic acid on Akt phosphorylation were abrogated by the PI3K inhibitor wortmannin or the PDK1 inhibitor BX912 and also by knocking-down PI3K or PDK1. Conclusion: The results of the present study indicate that uFFAs and sFFAs could activate Akt through a pathway along a PI3K/PDK1/Akt axis in association with PTP1B inhibition.

  6. Inhibition of ice recrystallization and cryoprotective activity of wheat proteins in liver and pancreatic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow-Shi-Yée, Mélanie; Briard, Jennie G; Grondin, Mélanie; Averill-Bates, Diana A; Ben, Robert N; Ouellet, François

    2016-05-01

    Efficient cryopreservation of cells at ultralow temperatures requires the use of substances that help maintain viability and metabolic functions post-thaw. We are developing new technology where plant proteins are used to substitute the commonly-used, but relatively toxic chemical dimethyl sulfoxide. Recombinant forms of four structurally diverse wheat proteins, TaIRI-2 (ice recrystallization inhibition), TaBAS1 (2-Cys peroxiredoxin), WCS120 (dehydrin), and TaENO (enolase) can efficiently cryopreserve hepatocytes and insulin-secreting INS832/13 cells. This study shows that TaIRI-2 and TaENO are internalized during the freeze-thaw process, while TaBAS1 and WCS120 remain at the extracellular level. Possible antifreeze activity of the four proteins was assessed. The "splat cooling" method for quantifying ice recrystallization inhibition activity (a property that characterizes antifreeze proteins) revealed that TaIRI-2 and TaENO are more potent than TaBAS1 and WCS120. Because of their ability to inhibit ice recrystallization, the wheat recombinant proteins TaIRI-2 and TaENO are promising candidates and could prove useful to improve cryopreservation protocols for hepatocytes and insulin-secreting cells, and possibly other cell types. TaENO does not have typical ice-binding domains, and the TargetFreeze tool did not predict an antifreeze capacity, suggesting the existence of nontypical antifreeze domains. The fact that TaBAS1 is an efficient cryoprotectant but does not show antifreeze activity indicates a different mechanism of action. The cryoprotective properties conferred by WCS120 depend on biochemical properties that remain to be determined. Overall, our results show that the proteins' efficiencies vary between cell types, and confirm that a combination of different protection mechanisms is needed to successfully cryopreserve mammalian cells. © 2016 The Protein Society.

  7. Mechanisms of HIV-1 Nucleocapsid Protein Inhibition by Lysyl-Peptidyl-Anthraquinone Conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosic, Alice; Sinigaglia, Laura; Cappellini, Marta; Carli, Ilaria; Parolin, Cristina; Zagotto, Giuseppe; Sabatino, Giuseppina; Rovero, Paolo; Fabris, Dan; Gatto, Barbara

    2016-01-20

    The Nucleocapsid protein NCp7 (NC) is a nucleic acid chaperone responsible for essential steps of the HIV-1 life cycle and an attractive candidate for drug development. NC destabilizes nucleic acid structures and promotes the formation of annealed substrates for HIV-1 reverse transcription elongation. Short helical nucleic acid segments bordered by bulges and loops, such as the Trans-Activation Response element (TAR) of HIV-1 and its complementary sequence (cTAR), are nucleation elements for helix destabilization by NC and also preferred recognition sites for threading intercalators. Inspired by these observations, we have recently demonstrated that 2,6-disubstituted peptidyl-anthraquinone-conjugates inhibit the chaperone activities of recombinant NC in vitro, and that inhibition correlates with the stabilization of TAR and cTAR stem-loop structures. We describe here enhanced NC inhibitory activity by novel conjugates that exhibit longer peptidyl chains ending with a conserved N-terminal lysine. Their efficient inhibition of TAR/cTAR annealing mediated by NC originates from the combination of at least three different mechanisms, namely, their stabilizing effects on nucleic acids dynamics by threading intercalation, their ability to target TAR RNA substrate leading to a direct competition with the protein for the same binding sites on TAR, and, finally, their effective binding to the NC protein. Our results suggest that these molecules may represent the stepping-stone for the future development of NC-inhibitors capable of targeting the protein itself and its recognition site in RNA.

  8. Nutlin-3 down-regulates retinoblastoma protein expression and inhibits muscle cell differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, Erica M. [Department of Biochemistry, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Niu, MengMeng; Bergholz, Johann [Center of Growth, Metabolism and Aging, College of Life Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu, 610014 China (China); Jim Xiao, Zhi-Xiong, E-mail: jxiao@bu.edu [Department of Biochemistry, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Center of Growth, Metabolism and Aging, College of Life Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu, 610014 China (China)

    2015-05-29

    The p53 tumor suppressor gene plays a critical role in regulation of proliferation, cell death and differentiation. The MDM2 oncoprotein is a major negative regulator for p53 by binding to and targeting p53 for proteasome-mediated degradation. The small molecule inhibitor, nutlin-3, disrupts MDM2-p53 interaction resulting in stabilization and activation of p53 protein. We have previously shown that nutlin-3 activates p53, leading to MDM2 accumulation as concomitant of reduced retinoblastoma (Rb) protein stability. It is well known that Rb is important in muscle development and myoblast differentiation and that rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), or cancer of the skeletal muscle, typically harbors MDM2 amplification. In this study, we show that nutlin-3 inhibited myoblast proliferation and effectively prevented myoblast differentiation, as evidenced by lack of expression of muscle differentiation markers including myogenin and myosin heavy chain (MyHC), as well as a failure to form multinucleated myotubes, which were associated with dramatic increases in MDM2 expression and decrease in Rb protein levels. These results indicate that nutlin-3 can effectively inhibit muscle cell differentiation. - Highlights: • Nutlin-3 inhibits myoblast proliferation and prevents differentiation into myotubes. • Nutlin-3 increases MDM2 expression and down-regulates Rb protein levels. • This study has implication in nutlin-3 treatment of rhabdomyosarcomas.

  9. [Inhibition of aggregation of dissociated embryonic Amphibian cells by inhibitors of protein and RNA synthesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunz, Horst

    1969-06-01

    1. Aggregation of embryonic Amphibian cells dissociated by Trypsin or EDTA is supressed reversibly by actidion (cycloheximid 0.5-2 Μg/ml), an inhibitor of protein synthesis. Protein synthesis is inhibited more than 90% at these concentrations. The inhibition by actidion was still reversible after 48 hours, when the cells were transferred to normal medium. Actidion added to cells, cultured in Flickinger solution for 3 h, was no longer able to stop further aggregation. 2. Puromycin reversibly suppresses aggregation at a concentration of 20 (Μg/ml, when protein synthesis is inhibited to 66 %. 3. After EDTA-dissociation the formation of initial small clusters of 5-10 cells (primary aggregation) occurred even in the presence of inhibitors of protein synthesis. The primary aggregation is however suppressed if actidion or puromycin are already added during the dissociation procedure. 4. In the presence of actinomycin-D (1-2 Μg/ml) the cells continue to aggregate like the controls. After 30 h further aggregation is stopped and the aggregates loose single cells. 5. Differences in the aggregation of cells after EDTA and Trypsin treatment are discussed.

  10. Merlin inhibits growth hormone-regulated Raf-ERKs pathways by binding to Grb2 protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Jung Yeon; Kim, Hongtae; Jeun, Sin-Soo; Kang, Seok-Gu; Lee, Kyung-Jin

    2006-01-01

    Numerous studies have suggested that the NF2 protein merlin is involved in the regulation of abnormal cell growth and proliferation. In this study, to better understand the merlin's mechanisms that contribute to the inhibition of tumorigenesis, we examined the potential action of merlin on the cell proliferative signaling pathways in response to growth hormone (GH). Merlin effectively attenuated the GH-induced serum response element (SRE) and Elk-1-mediated transcriptional activation, as well as the endogenous SRE-regulated gene c-fos expression in NIH3T3 cells. In addition, merlin prevented the Raf-1 complex activation process, which resulted in the suppression of MAP kinase/ERK, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERKs), and Elk-1 phosphorylation, which are the downstream signals of Raf-1. Moreover, it was shown that merlin interacted with endogenous growth factor receptor bound 2 (Grb2) protein and inhibited its expression. These results suggest that merlin contributes, via its protein-to-protein interaction with Grb2 and consequent inhibition of the MAPK pathways, to the regulation of the abnormal cell proliferation, and this provides a further mechanism underlying the tumor suppressor function of merlin

  11. Microtubule protein ADP-ribosylation in vitro leads to assembly inhibition and rapid depolymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scaife, R.M. (Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA (United States)); Wilson, L. (Univ. of California, Santa Barbara (United States)); Purich, D.L. (Univ. of Florida, Gainesville (United States))

    1992-01-14

    Bovine brain microtubule protein, containing both tubulin and microtubule-associated proteins, undergoes ADP-ribosylation in the presence of ({sup 14}C)NAD{sup +} and a turkey erythrocyte mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase in vitro. The modification reaction could be demonstrated in crude brain tissue extracts where selective ADP-ribosylation of both the {alpha} and {beta} chains of tubulin and of the high molecular weight microtubule-associated protein MAP-2 occurred. In experiments with purified microtubule protein, tubulin dimer, the high molecular weight microtubule-associated protein MAP-2, and another high molecular weight microtubule-associated protein which may be a MAP-1 species were heavily labeled. Tubulin and MAP-2 incorporated ({sup 14}C)ADP-ribose to an average extent of approximately 2.4 and 30 mol of ADP-ribose/mol of protein, respectively. Assembly of microtubule protein into microtubules in vitro was inhibited by ADP-ribosylation, and incubation of assembled steady-state microtubules with ADP-ribosyltransferase and NAD{sup +} resulted in rapid depolymerization of the microtubules. Thus, the eukaryotic enzyme can ADP-ribosylate tubulin and microtubule-associated proteins to much greater extents than previously observed with cholera and pertussis toxins, and the modification can significantly modulate microtubule assembly and disassembly.

  12. Inhibition of retrograde transport modulates misfolded protein accumulation and clearance in motoneuron diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristofani, Riccardo; Crippa, Valeria; Rusmini, Paola; Cicardi, Maria Elena; Meroni, Marco; Licata, Nausicaa V; Sala, Gessica; Giorgetti, Elisa; Grunseich, Christopher; Galbiati, Mariarita; Piccolella, Margherita; Messi, Elio; Ferrarese, Carlo; Carra, Serena; Poletti, Angelo

    2017-08-03

    Motoneuron diseases, like spinal bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), are associated with proteins that because of gene mutation or peculiar structures, acquire aberrant (misfolded) conformations toxic to cells. To prevent misfolded protein toxicity, cells activate a protein quality control (PQC) system composed of chaperones and degradative pathways (proteasome and autophagy). Inefficient activation of the PQC system results in misfolded protein accumulation that ultimately leads to neuronal cell death, while efficient macroautophagy/autophagy-mediated degradation of aggregating proteins is beneficial. The latter relies on an active retrograde transport, mediated by dynein and specific chaperones, such as the HSPB8-BAG3-HSPA8 complex. Here, using cellular models expressing aggregate-prone proteins involved in SBMA and ALS, we demonstrate that inhibition of dynein-mediated retrograde transport, which impairs the targeting to autophagy of misfolded species, does not increase their aggregation. Rather, dynein inhibition correlates with a reduced accumulation and an increased clearance of mutant ARpolyQ, SOD1, truncated TARDBP/TDP-43 and expanded polyGP C9ORF72 products. The enhanced misfolded protein clearance is mediated by the proteasome, rather than by autophagy and correlates with the upregulation of the HSPA8 cochaperone BAG1. In line, overexpression of BAG1 increases the proteasome-mediated clearance of these misfolded proteins. Our data suggest that when the misfolded proteins cannot be efficiently transported toward the perinuclear region of the cells, where they are either degraded by autophagy or stored into the aggresome, the cells activate a compensatory mechanism that relies on the induction of BAG1 to target the HSPA8-bound cargo to the proteasome in a dynein-independent manner.

  13. The motor protein KIF14 inhibits tumor growth and cancer metastasis in lung adenocarcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Fang Hung

    Full Text Available The motor protein kinesin superfamily proteins (KIFs are involved in cancer progression. The depletion of one of the KIFs, KIF14, might delay the metaphase-to-anaphase transition, resulting in a binucleated status, which enhances tumor progression; however, the exact correlation between KIF14 and cancer progression remains ambiguous. In this study, using loss of heterozygosity and array comparative genomic hybridization analyses, we observed a 30% loss in the regions surrounding KIF14 on chromosome 1q in lung adenocarcinomas. In addition, the protein expression levels of KIF14 in 122 lung adenocarcinomas also indicated that approximately 30% of adenocarcinomas showed KIF14 down-regulation compared with the expression in the bronchial epithelial cells of adjacent normal counterparts. In addition, the reduced expression of KIF14 mRNA or proteins was correlated with poor overall survival (P = 0.0158 and <0.0001, respectively, and the protein levels were also inversely correlated with metastasis (P<0.0001. The overexpression of KIF14 in lung adenocarcinoma cells inhibited anchorage-independent growth in vitro and xenograft tumor growth in vivo. The overexpression and silencing of KIF14 also inhibited or enhanced cancer cell migration, invasion and adhesion to the extracellular matrix proteins laminin and collagen IV. Furthermore, we detected the adhesion molecules cadherin 11 (CDH11 and melanoma cell adhesion molecule (MCAM as cargo on KIF14. The overexpression and silencing of KIF14 enhanced or reduced the recruitment of CDH11 in the membrane fraction, suggesting that KIF14 might act through recruiting adhesion molecules to the cell membrane and modulating cell adhesive, migratory and invasive properties. Thus, KIF14 might inhibit tumor growth and cancer metastasis in lung adenocarcinomas.

  14. BCL-2 family protein, BAD is down-regulated in breast cancer and inhibits cell invasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cekanova, Maria; Fernando, Romaine I.; Siriwardhana, Nalin; Sukhthankar, Mugdha; Parra, Columba de la; Woraratphoka, Jirayus; Malone, Christine; Ström, Anders; Baek, Seung J.; Wade, Paul A.; Saxton, Arnold M.; Donnell, Robert M.; Pestell, Richard G.

    2015-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that the anti-apoptotic protein BAD is expressed in normal human breast tissue and shown that BAD inhibits expression of cyclin D1 to delay cell-cycle progression in breast cancer cells. Herein, expression of proteins in breast tissues was studied by immunohistochemistry and results were analyzed statistically to obtain semi-quantitative data. Biochemical and functional changes in BAD-overexpressing MCF7 breast cancer cells were evaluated using PCR, reporter assays, western blotting, ELISA and extracellular matrix invasion assays. Compared to normal tissues, Grade II breast cancers expressed low total/phosphorylated forms of BAD in both cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments. BAD overexpression decreased the expression of β-catenin, Sp1, and phosphorylation of STATs. BAD inhibited Ras/MEK/ERK and JNK signaling pathways, without affecting the p38 signaling pathway. Expression of the metastasis-related proteins, MMP10, VEGF, SNAIL, CXCR4, E-cadherin and TlMP2 was regulated by BAD with concomitant inhibition of extracellular matrix invasion. Inhibition of BAD by siRNA increased invasion and Akt/p-Akt levels. Clinical data and the results herein suggest that in addition to the effect on apoptosis, BAD conveys anti-metastatic effects and is a valuable prognostic marker in breast cancer. - Highlights: • BAD and p-BAD expressions are decreased in breast cancer compared with normal breast tissue. • BAD impedes breast cancer invasion and migration. • BAD inhibits the EMT and transcription factors that promote cancer cell migration. • Invasion and migration functions of BAD are distinct from the BAD's role in apoptosis

  15. BCL-2 family protein, BAD is down-regulated in breast cancer and inhibits cell invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cekanova, Maria, E-mail: mcekanov@utk.edu [Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Fernando, Romaine I. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Graduate School of Medicine, Medical Center, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Siriwardhana, Nalin [Department of Animal Science, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Sukhthankar, Mugdha [Department of Biomedical and Diagnostics Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Parra, Columba de la [Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, University of Puerto Rico, Medical Sciences Campus, San Juan, PR (United States); Woraratphoka, Jirayus [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Graduate School of Medicine, Medical Center, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Malone, Christine [Laboratory of Molecular Carcinogenesis, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Ström, Anders [Center for Nuclear Receptors and Cell Signaling, Department of Biology and Biochemistry, University of Houston, Houston, TX (United States); Baek, Seung J. [Department of Biomedical and Diagnostics Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Wade, Paul A. [Laboratory of Molecular Carcinogenesis, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Saxton, Arnold M. [Department of Animal Science, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Donnell, Robert M. [Department of Biomedical and Diagnostics Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Pestell, Richard G. [Department of Cancer Biology, Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); and others

    2015-02-01

    We have previously demonstrated that the anti-apoptotic protein BAD is expressed in normal human breast tissue and shown that BAD inhibits expression of cyclin D1 to delay cell-cycle progression in breast cancer cells. Herein, expression of proteins in breast tissues was studied by immunohistochemistry and results were analyzed statistically to obtain semi-quantitative data. Biochemical and functional changes in BAD-overexpressing MCF7 breast cancer cells were evaluated using PCR, reporter assays, western blotting, ELISA and extracellular matrix invasion assays. Compared to normal tissues, Grade II breast cancers expressed low total/phosphorylated forms of BAD in both cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments. BAD overexpression decreased the expression of β-catenin, Sp1, and phosphorylation of STATs. BAD inhibited Ras/MEK/ERK and JNK signaling pathways, without affecting the p38 signaling pathway. Expression of the metastasis-related proteins, MMP10, VEGF, SNAIL, CXCR4, E-cadherin and TlMP2 was regulated by BAD with concomitant inhibition of extracellular matrix invasion. Inhibition of BAD by siRNA increased invasion and Akt/p-Akt levels. Clinical data and the results herein suggest that in addition to the effect on apoptosis, BAD conveys anti-metastatic effects and is a valuable prognostic marker in breast cancer. - Highlights: • BAD and p-BAD expressions are decreased in breast cancer compared with normal breast tissue. • BAD impedes breast cancer invasion and migration. • BAD inhibits the EMT and transcription factors that promote cancer cell migration. • Invasion and migration functions of BAD are distinct from the BAD's role in apoptosis.

  16. Heterologous Expression of Chaperones from Hyperthermophilic Archaea Inhibits Aminoglycoside-Induced Protein Misfolding in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, S; Chu, Z; Lu, J; Li, D; Wang, Y; Yang, S; Zhang, Y

    2017-10-01

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics affect protein translation fidelity and lead to protein aggregation and an increase in intracellular oxidative stress level as well. The overexpression of the chaperonin GroEL/GroES system promotes short-term tolerance to aminoglycosides in Escherichia coli. Here, we demonstrated that the coexpression of prefoldin or Hsp60 originating from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus in E. coli cells can rescue cell growth and inhibit protein aggregation induced by streptomycin exposure. The results of our study show that hyperthermophilic chaperones endow E. coli with a higher tolerance to streptomycin than the GroEL/GroES system, and that they exert better effects on the reduction of intracellular protein misfolding, indicating that these chaperones have unique features and functions.

  17. Curcumin ameliorates skeletal muscle atrophy in type 1 diabetic mice by inhibiting protein ubiquitination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Taisuke; Takada, Shingo; Kinugawa, Shintaro; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki

    2015-09-01

    What is the central question of this study? We sought to examine whether curcumin could ameliorate skeletal muscle atrophy in diabetic mice by inhibiting protein ubiquitination, inflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress. What is the main finding and its importance? We found that curcumin ameliorated skeletal muscle atrophy in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice by inhibiting protein ubiquitination without affecting protein synthesis. This favourable effect of curcumin was possibly due to the inhibition of inflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress. Curcumin may be beneficial for the treatment of muscle atrophy in type 1 diabetes mellitus. Skeletal muscle atrophy develops in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM), especially in type 1 DM, which is associated with chronic inflammation. Curcumin, the active ingredient of turmeric, has various biological actions, including anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. We hypothesized that curcumin could ameliorate skeletal muscle atrophy in mice with streptozotocin-induced type 1 DM. C57BL/6 J mice were injected with streptozotocin (200 mg kg(-1) i.p.; DM group) or vehicle (control group). Each group of mice was randomly subdivided into two groups of 10 mice each and fed a diet with or without curcumin (1500 mg kg(-1) day(-1)) for 2 weeks. There were significant decreases in body weight, skeletal muscle weight and cellular cross-sectional area of the skeletal muscle in DM mice compared with control mice, and these changes were significantly attenuated in DM+Curcumin mice without affecting plasma glucose and insulin concentrations. Ubiquitination of protein was increased in skeletal muscle from DM mice and decreased in DM+Curcumin mice. Gene expressions of muscle-specific ubiquitin E3 ligase atrogin-1/MAFbx and MuRF1 were increased in DM and inhibited in DM+Curcumin mice. Moreover, nuclear factor-κB activation, concentrations of the inflammatory cytokines tumour necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β and oxidative

  18. Human-Phosphate-Binding-Protein inhibits HIV-1 gene transcription and replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Candolfi Ermanno

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Human Phosphate-Binding protein (HPBP is a serendipitously discovered lipoprotein that binds phosphate with high affinity. HPBP belongs to the DING protein family, involved in various biological processes like cell cycle regulation. We report that HPBP inhibits HIV-1 gene transcription and replication in T cell line, primary peripherical blood lymphocytes and primary macrophages. We show that HPBP is efficient in naïve and HIV-1 AZT-resistant strains. Our results revealed HPBP as a new and potent anti HIV molecule that inhibits transcription of the virus, which has not yet been targeted by HAART and therefore opens new strategies in the treatment of HIV infection.

  19. Knockdown of Pokemon protein expression inhibits hepatocellular carcinoma cell proliferation by suppression of AKT activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaosan; Dai, Yichen; Chen, Zhangxin; Xie, Junpei; Zeng, Wei; Lin, Yuanyuan

    2013-01-01

    Overexpression of Pokemon, which is an erythroid myeloid ontogenic factor protein, occurs in different cancers, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Pokemon is also reported to have an oncogenic activity in various human cancers. This study investigated the effect of Pokemon knockdown on the regulation of HCC growth. POK shRNA suppressed the expression of Pokemon protein in HepG2 cells compared to the negative control vector-transfected HCC cells. Pokemon knockdown also reduced HCC cell viability and enhanced cisplatin-induced apoptosis in HCC cells. AKT activation and the expression of various cell cycle-related genes were inhibited following Pokemon knockdown. These data demonstrate that Pokemon may play a role in HCC progression, suggesting that inhibition of Pokemon expression using Pokemon shRNA should be further evaluated as a novel target for the control of HCC.

  20. Inhibition of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase by peptide and protein peroxides generated by singlet oxygen attack

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgan, Philip E; Dean, Roger T; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2002-01-01

    Reaction of certain peptides and proteins with singlet oxygen (generated by visible light in the presence of rose bengal dye) yields long-lived peptide and protein peroxides. Incubation of these peroxides with glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, in the absence of added metal ions, results......, with a stoichiometry of two thiols lost per peroxide consumed. Blocking the thiol residues prevents reaction with the peroxide. This stoichiometry, the lack of metal-ion dependence, and the absence of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)-detectable species, is consistent with a molecular (nonradical) reaction between...... inhibited by these peroxides in the absence of added Fe2+-EDTA. The presence of this metal-ion complex enhanced the inhibition observed with these enzymes consistent with the occurrence of radical-mediated reactions. Overall, these studies demonstrate that singlet oxygen-mediated damage to an initial target...

  1. AMP-activated protein kinase-independent inhibition of hepatic mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation by AICA riboside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guigas, Bruno; Taleux, Nellie; Foretz, Marc; Detaille, Dominique; Andreelli, Fabrizio; Viollet, Benoit; Hue, Louis

    2007-06-15

    AICA riboside (5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-beta-D-ribofuranoside) has been extensively used in cells to activate the AMPK (AMP-activated protein kinase), a metabolic sensor involved in cell energy homoeostasis. In the present study, we investigated the effects of AICA riboside on mitochondrial oxidative; phosphorylation. AICA riboside was found to dose-dependently inhibit the oligomycin-sensitive JO2 (oxygen consumption rate) of isolated rat hepatocytes. A decrease in P(i) (inorganic phosphate), ATP, AMP and total adenine nucleotide contents was also observed with AICA riboside concentrations >0.1 mM. Interestingly, in hepatocytes from mice lacking both alpha1 and alpha2 AMPK catalytic subunits, basal JO2 and expression of several mitochondrial proteins were significantly reduced compared with wild-type mice, suggesting that mitochondrial biogenesis was perturbed. However, inhibition of JO2 by AICA riboside was still present in the mutant mice and thus was clearly not mediated by AMPK. In permeabilized hepatocytes, this inhibition was no longer evident, suggesting that it could be due to intracellular accumulation of Z nucleotides and/or loss of adenine nucleotides and P(i). ZMP did indeed inhibit respiration in isolated rat mitochondria through a direct effect on the respiratory-chain complex I. In addition, inhibition of JO2 by AICA riboside was also potentiated in cells incubated with fructose to deplete adenine nucleotides and P(i). We conclude that AICA riboside inhibits cellular respiration by an AMPK-independent mechanism that likely results from the combined intracellular P(i) depletion and ZMP accumulation. Our data also demonstrate that the cellular effects of AICA riboside are not necessarily caused by AMPK activation and that their interpretation should be taken with caution.

  2. Sub-MIC tylosin inhibits Streptococcus suis biofilm formation and results in differential protein expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai eWang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus suis (S. suis is a crucial zoonotic pathogen which causes severe diseases in humans and pigs. Biofilms of S. suis can induce persistent infections which are harder to treat. Sub-minimal inhibitory concentration (sub-MIC of tylosin can inhibit biofilm formation in bacteria. By using iTRAQ strategy, we compared the protein expression profiles of S. suis grown with sub-MIC tylosin treatment or no treatement. The result showed that 96 proteins expression were changed with 77 up-regulated and 19 down-regulated proteins. Several metabolism proteins (such as phosphoglycerate kinase, as well as cell surface proteins (such as ABC transporter proteins, were found to be involved in biofilm formation. Overall, our results indicated that S. suis metabolic regulation, cell surface proteins, and virulence proteins appear to be of importance in biofilm growth by sub-MIC tylosin treated. Thus, our data analyzed rough regulation of biofilm formation that lay the foundation for the future research of mechanism and targets.

  3. Decatransin, a new natural product inhibiting protein translocation at the Sec61/SecYEG translocon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junne, Tina; Wong, Joanne; Studer, Christian; Aust, Thomas; Bauer, Benedikt W.; Beibel, Martin; Bhullar, Bhupinder; Bruccoleri, Robert; Eichenberger, Jürg; Estoppey, David; Hartmann, Nicole; Knapp, Britta; Krastel, Philipp; Melin, Nicolas; Oakeley, Edward J.; Oberer, Lukas; Riedl, Ralph; Roma, Guglielmo; Schuierer, Sven; Petersen, Frank; Tallarico, John A.; Rapoport, Tom A.; Spiess, Martin; Hoepfner, Dominic

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT A new cyclic decadepsipeptide was isolated from Chaetosphaeria tulasneorum with potent bioactivity on mammalian and yeast cells. Chemogenomic profiling in S. cerevisiae indicated that the Sec61 translocon complex, the machinery for protein translocation and membrane insertion at the endoplasmic reticulum, is the target. The profiles were similar to those of cyclic heptadepsipeptides of a distinct chemotype (including HUN-7293 and cotransin) that had previously been shown to inhibit cotranslational translocation at the mammalian Sec61 translocon. Unbiased, genome-wide mutagenesis followed by full-genome sequencing in both fungal and mammalian cells identified dominant mutations in Sec61p (yeast) or Sec61α1 (mammals) that conferred resistance. Most, but not all, of these mutations affected inhibition by both chemotypes, despite an absence of structural similarity. Biochemical analysis confirmed inhibition of protein translocation into the endoplasmic reticulum of both co- and post-translationally translocated substrates by both chemotypes, demonstrating a mechanism independent of a translating ribosome. Most interestingly, both chemotypes were found to also inhibit SecYEG, the bacterial Sec61 translocon homolog. We suggest ‘decatransin’ as the name for this new decadepsipeptide translocation inhibitor. PMID:25616894

  4. The antitumor natural product tanshinone IIA inhibits protein kinase C and acts synergistically with 17-AAG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Chao; Zeng, Hua-Wu; Wang, Jin-Xin; Yuan, Xing; Zhang, Chuang; Fang, Ting; Yang, Pei-Ming; Wu, Tong; Zhou, Yu-Dong; Nagle, Dale G; Zhang, Wei-Dong

    2018-02-07

    Tanshinone IIA (Tan IIA), the primary bioactive compound derived from the traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge, has been reported to possess antitumor activity. However, its antitumor mechanisms are not fully understood. To resolve the potential antitumor mechanism(s) of Tan IIA, its gene expression profiles from our database was analyzed by connectivity map (CMAP) and the CMAP-based mechanistic predictions were confirmed/validated in further studies. Specifically, Tan IIA inhibited total protein kinase C (PKC) activity and selectively suppressed the expression of cytosolic and plasma membrane PKC isoforms ζ and ε. The Ras/MAPK pathway that is closely regulated by the PKC signaling is also inhibited by Tan IIA. While Tan IIA did not inhibit heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90), it synergistically enhanced the antitumor efficacy of the Hsp90 inhibitors 17-AAG and ganetespib in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells. In addition, Tan IIA significantly inhibited PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling, and induced both cell cycle arrest and autophagy. Collectively, these studies provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms responsible for antitumor activity of Tan IIA.

  5. Simultaneous inhibition of aberrant cancer kinome using rationally designed polymer-protein core-shell nanomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Parwathy; Gupta, Neha; Retnakumari, Archana Payickattu; Malarvizhi, Giridharan Loghanathan; Keechilat, Pavithran; Nair, Shantikumar; Koyakutty, Manzoor

    2013-11-01

    Simultaneous inhibition of deregulated cancer kinome using rationally designed nanomedicine is an advanced therapeutic approach. Herein, we have developed a polymer-protein core-shell nanomedicine to inhibit critically aberrant pro-survival kinases (mTOR, MAPK and STAT5) in primitive (CD34(+)/CD38(-)) Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) cells. The nanomedicine consists of poly-lactide-co-glycolide core (~250 nm) loaded with mTOR inhibitor, everolimus, and albumin shell (~25 nm thick) loaded with MAPK/STAT5 inhibitor, sorafenib and the whole construct was surface conjugated with monoclonal antibody against CD33 receptor overexpressed in AML. Electron microscopy confirmed formation of core-shell nanostructure (~290 nm) and flow cytometry and confocal studies showed enhanced cellular uptake of targeted nanomedicine. Simultaneous inhibition of critical kinases causing synergistic lethality against leukemic cells, without affecting healthy blood cells, was demonstrated using immunoblotting, cytotoxicity and apoptosis assays. This cell receptor plus multi-kinase targeted core-shell nanomedicine was found better specific and tolerable compared to current clinical regime of cytarabine and daunorubicin. These authors demonstrate simultaneous inhibition of critical kinases causing synergistic lethality against leukemic cells, without affecting healthy blood cells by using rationally designed polymer-protein core-shell nanomedicine, provoding an advanced method to eliminate cancer cells, with the hope of future therapeutic use. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Solithromycin Inhibition of Protein Synthesis and Ribosome Biogenesis in Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Haemophilus influenzae

    OpenAIRE

    Rodgers, Ward; Frazier, Ashley D.; Champney, W. Scott

    2013-01-01

    The continuing increase in antibiotic-resistant microorganisms is driving the search for new antibiotic targets and improved antimicrobial agents. Ketolides are semisynthetic derivatives of macrolide antibiotics, which are effective against certain resistant organisms. Solithromycin (CEM-101) is a novel fluoroketolide with improved antimicrobial effectiveness. This compound binds to the large 50S subunit of the ribosome and inhibits protein biosynthesis. Like other ketolides, it should impair...

  7. Tissue-engineered cells producing complex recombinant proteins inhibit ovarian cancer in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Stephen, Antonia E.; Masiakos, Peter T.; Segev, Dorry L.; Vacanti, Joseph P.; Donahoe, Patricia K.; MacLaughlin, David T.

    2001-01-01

    Techniques of tissue engineering and cell and molecular biology were used to create a biodegradable scaffold for transfected cells to produce complex proteins. Mullerian Inhibiting Substance (MIS) causes regression of Mullerian ducts in the mammalian embryo. MIS also causes regression in vitro of ovarian tumor cell lines and primary cells from ovarian carcinomas, which derive from Mullerian structures. In a strategy to circumvent the complicated purification protoc...

  8. The Viral Protein Tat Can Inhibit the Establishment of HIV-1 Latency

    OpenAIRE

    Donahue, Daniel A.; Kuhl, Björn D.; Sloan, Richard D.; Wainberg, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    The establishment of HIV-1 latency can result from limiting levels of transcription initiation or elongation factors, restrictive chromatin modifications, transcriptional interference, and insufficient Tat activity. Since the viral protein Tat can counteract many of these factors, we hypothesized that the presence of exogenous Tat during infection might inhibit the establishment of latency. This was explored using a Jurkat model of latency establishment and reactivation. PCR and reverse trans...

  9. Red cell autoantibodies characterized by competitive inhibition of iodine 125 Rh alloantibody binding and by immunoprecipitation of membrane proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierce, S.W.; Victoria, E.J.; Masouredis, S.P.

    1990-01-01

    The relationship between determinants recognized by warm-type immunoglobulin G red cell autoantibodies and the Rh antigens was characterized by autoantibody competitive inhibition of iodine 125 Rh alloantibody binding and autoantibody immunoprecipitation of iodine 125 red blood cell membrane proteins. The majority of blood donor autoantibody recognized epitopes that are closely related to Rh antigens as determined by competitive inhibition studies. Eighteen of 20 (90%) autoantibodies inhibited anti-Rh(c) binding, 15 inhibited anti-Rh(E), 5 inhibited anti-Rh(D), and only 2 failed to inhibit any of the three Rh alloantibodies tested. Autoantibodies that inhibited anti-Rh(D) also inhibited anti-Rh(c) and anti-Rh(E) and all those that inhibited anti-Rh(E) also inhibited anti-Rh(c). Autoantibodies that inhibited all three Rh alloantibodies immunoprecipitated 30 kd membrane polypeptides, as did two of the three autoantibodies that inhibited only anti-Rh(c) and anti-Rh(E). One autoantibody in this group and two autoantibodies that inhibited only anti-Rh(c), as well as an autoantibody that did not inhibit any of the Rh alloantibodies, immunoprecipitated only a single membrane polypeptide identified as band 3. The majority of normal donor red blood cell autoantibodies inhibited the binding of Rh alloantibodies, which indicates that they either bound to the Rh polypeptides or to epitopes on band 3 that were closely associated with the Rh complex

  10. Effects on DPPH inhibition of egg-white protein polypeptides treated by pulsed electric field technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ke; Wang, Jia; Liu, Bolong; Lin, Songyi; Zhao, Ping; Liu, Jingbo; Jones, Gregory; Huang, Hsiang-Chi

    2013-05-01

    Egg-white protein polypeptides are potentially used as a functional ingredient in food products. In this study, the effects on DPPH inhibition of egg-white protein polypeptides ranging from 10 to 30 kDa treated by pulsed electric field (PEF) technology were investigated. 2, 2-Diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) inhibition (%) was used to evaluate the antioxidant activity of polypeptides. In order to develop and optimize a pulsed electric field (PEF) mathematical model for improving the antioxidant activity, we have investigated three variables, including concentration (6, 8 and 10 mg mL(-1)), electric field intensity (10, 20 and 30 kV cm(-1)) and pulse frequency (2000, 2350 and 2700 Hz) and subsequently optimized them by response surface methodology (RSM). The concentration (8 mg mL(-1)), electric field intensity (10 kV cm(-1)) and pulse frequency (2000 Hz) were found to be the optimal conditions under which the DPPH inhibition increased 28.44%, compared to the sample without PEF treatment. Both near-infrared spectroscopy (NIR) and mid-infrared spectroscopy (MIR) were used to analyze the change of functional groups. The results showed that PEF technology could improve the antioxidant activity of antioxidant polypeptides from egg-white protein under the optimized conditions. © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. Cardiac glycosides induce cell death in human cells by inhibiting general protein synthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Perne

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac glycosides are Na(+/K(+-pump inhibitors widely used to treat heart failure. They are also highly cytotoxic, and studies have suggested specific anti-tumor activity leading to current clinical trials in cancer patients. However, a definitive demonstration of this putative anti-cancer activity and the underlying molecular mechanism has remained elusive.Using an unbiased transcriptomics approach, we found that cardiac glycosides inhibit general protein synthesis. Protein synthesis inhibition and cytotoxicity were not specific for cancer cells as they were observed in both primary and cancer cell lines. These effects were dependent on the Na(+/K(+-pump as they were rescued by expression of a cardiac glycoside-resistant Na(+/K(+-pump. Unlike human cells, rodent cells are largely resistant to cardiac glycosides in vitro and mice were found to tolerate extremely high levels.The physiological difference between human and mouse explains the previously observed sensitivity of human cancer cells in mouse xenograft experiments. Thus, published mouse xenograft models used to support anti-tumor activity for these drugs require reevaluation. Our finding that cardiac glycosides inhibit protein synthesis provides a mechanism for the cytotoxicity of CGs and raises concerns about ongoing clinical trials to test CGs as anti-cancer agents in humans.

  12. Human papillomavirus type 16 E7 protein inhibits DNA binding by the retinoblastoma gene product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stirdivant, S M; Huber, H E; Patrick, D R; Defeo-Jones, D; McAvoy, E M; Garsky, V M; Oliff, A; Heimbrook, D C

    1992-05-01

    The human papillomavirus E7 gene can transform murine fibroblasts and cooperate with other viral oncogenes in transforming primary cell cultures. One biochemical property associated with the E7 protein is binding to the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor gene product (pRB). Biochemical properties associated with pRB include binding to viral transforming proteins (E1A, large T, and E7), binding to cellular proteins (E2F and Myc), and binding to DNA. The mechanism by which E7 stimulates cell growth is uncertain. However, E7 binding to pRB inhibits binding of cellular proteins to pRB and appears to block the growth-suppressive activity of pRB. We have found that E7 also inhibits binding of pRB to DNA. A 60-kDa version of pRB (pRB60) produced in reticulocyte translation reactions or in bacteria bound quantitatively to DNA-cellulose. Recombinant E7 protein used at a 1:1 or 10:1 molar ratio with pRB60 blocked 50 or greater than 95% of pRB60 DNA-binding activity, respectively. A mutant E7 protein (E7-Ala-24) with reduced pRB60-binding activity exhibited a parallel reduction in its blocking of pRB60 binding to DNA. An E7(20-29) peptide that blocks binding of E7 protein to pRB60 restored the DNA-binding activity of pRB60 in the presence of E7. Peptide E7(2-32) did not block pRB60 binding to DNA, while peptide E7(20-57) and an E7 fragment containing residues 1 to 60 partially blocked DNA binding. E7 species containing residues 3 to 75 were fully effective at blocking pRB60 binding to DNA. These studies indicate that E7 protein specifically blocks pRB60 binding to DNA and suggest that the E7 region responsible for this property lies between residues 32 and 75. The functional significance of these observations is unclear. However, we have found that a point mutation in pRB60 that impairs DNA-binding activity also blocks the ability of pRB60 to inhibit cell growth. This correlation suggests that the DNA-binding activity of retinoblastoma proteins contributes to their biological

  13. Isolation and identification of a sodium channel-inhibiting protein from eggs of black widow spiders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianjun; Yan, Yizhong; Yu, Hai; Peng, Xiaozhen; Zhang, Yiya; Hu, Weijun; Duan, Zhigui; Wang, Xianchun; Liang, Songping

    2014-04-01

    The eggs of black widow spider (L. tredecimguttatus) have been demonstrated to be rich in biologically active components that exhibit great research value and application foreground. In the present study, a protein toxin, named Latroeggtoxin-II, was isolated from the eggs using the combination of gel filtration, ion exchange chromatography and reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography. Electrospray mass spectrometric analysis indicated that the molecular weight of the protein was 28.69 kDa, and Edman degradation revealed that its N-terminal sequence was ESIQT STYVP NTPNQ KFDYE VGKDY-. After being abdominally injected into mice and P. americana, the protein could make the animals especially P. americana display a series of poisoning symptoms. Electrophysiological experiments demonstrated that the protein could selectively inhibit tetrodotoxin-resistant Na(+) channel currents in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons, without significant effect on the tetrodotoxin-sensitive Na(+) channel currents. Using multiple proteomic strategies, the purified protein was shown to have only a few similarities to the existing proteins in the databases, suggesting that it was a novel protein isolated from the eggs of black widow spiders. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Three cardiovirus Leader proteins equivalently inhibit four different nucleocytoplasmic trafficking pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciomperlik, Jessica J. [Institute for Molecular Virology, and Department of Biochemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Basta, Holly A. [Department of Biology, Rocky Mountain College, Billings, MT (United States); Palmenberg, Ann C., E-mail: acpalmen@wisc.edu [Institute for Molecular Virology, and Department of Biochemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Cardiovirus infections inhibit nucleocytoplasmic trafficking by Leader protein-induced phosphorylation of Phe/Gly-containing nucleoporins (Nups). Recombinant Leader from encephalomyocarditis virus, Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus and Saffold virus target the same subset of Nups, including Nup62 and Nup98, but not Nup50. Reporter cell lines with fluorescence mCherry markers for M9, RS and classical SV40 import pathways, as well as the Crm1-mediated export pathway, all responded to transfection with the full panel of Leader proteins, showing consequent cessation of path-specific active import/export. For this to happen, the Nups had to be presented in the context of intact nuclear pores and exposed to cytoplasmic extracts. The Leader phosphorylation cascade was not effective against recombinant Nup proteins. The findings support a model of Leader-dependent Nup phosphorylation with the purpose of disrupting Nup-transportin interactions. - Highlights: • Nup98, but not Nup50 becomes phosphorylated by cardiovirus Leader protein-dependent mechanisms. • At least four independent nucleocytoplasmic trafficking pathways are inhibited by this process. • Nups must be presented in a nuclear pore context for Leader-directed phosphorylation. • Leader, by itself, does not cause activation of cellular kinases.

  15. Inhibition of prefrontal protein synthesis following recall does not disrupt memory for trace fear conditioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dash Pramod K

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The extent of similarity between consolidation and reconsolidation is not yet fully understood. One of the differences noted is that not every brain region involved in consolidation exhibits reconsolidation. In trace fear conditioning, the hippocampus and the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC are required for consolidation of long-term memory. We have previously demonstrated that trace fear memory is susceptible to infusion of the protein synthesis inhibitor anisomycin into the hippocampus following recall. In the present study, we examine whether protein synthesis inhibition in the mPFC following recall similarly results in the observation of reconsolidation of trace fear memory. Results Targeted intra-mPFC infusions of anisomycin or vehicle were performed immediately following recall of trace fear memory at 24 hours, or at 30 days, following training in a one-day or a two-day protocol. The present study demonstrates three key findings: 1 trace fear memory does not undergo protein synthesis dependent reconsolidation in the PFC, regardless of the intensity of the training, and 2 regardless of whether the memory is recent or remote, and 3 intra-mPFC inhibition of protein synthesis immediately following training impaired remote (30 days memory. Conclusion These results suggest that not all structures that participate in memory storage are involved in reconsolidation. Alternatively, certain types of memory-related information may reconsolidate, while other components of memory may not.

  16. Cross-species Virus-host Protein-Protein Interactions Inhibiting Innate Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    joule (J) kiloton (kt) (TNT equivalent) 4.184 × 1012 joule (J) British thermal unit (Btu) (thermochemical) 1.054 350 × 10 3 joule (J) foot-pound...Orthomyxoviridae influenza A has an extensively tracked history of host species jumps, including birds, pigs and other mammals , and humans... biology , and protein chemistry, and he presented his research studies at the HWI-UB-RPCI Summer Undergraduate Biomedical Research Day (August 1, 2014

  17. The bisphosphonate zoledronic acid effectively targets lung cancer cells by inhibition of protein prenylation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Fan; Li, Pengcheng; Gong, Jianhua; Zhang, Jiahong; Ma, Jingping

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant activation of oncoproteins such as members of the Ras family is common in human lung cancers. The proper function of Ras largely depends on a post-translational modification termed prenylation. Bisphosphonates have been shown to inhibit prenylation in cancer cells. In this study, we show that zoledronic acid, a third generation bisphosphonate, is effective in targeting lung cancer cells. This is achieved by the induction of apoptosis and inhibition of proliferation, through suppressing the activation of downstream Ras and EGFR signalling by zoledronic acid. The combination of zoledronic acid and paclitaxel or cisplatin (commonly used chemotherapeutic drugs for lung cancer) augmented the activity of either drug alone in in vitro lung cancer cellular system and in vivo lung xenograft mouse model. Importantly, zoledronic acid inhibits protein prenylation as shown by the increased levels of unprenylated Ras and Rap1A. In addition, the effects of zoledronic acid were reversed in the presence of geranylgeraniol and farnesol, further confirming that mechanism of zoledroinc acid's action in lung cancer cells is through prenylation inhibition. Since zoledronic acid is already available for clinic use, these results suggest that it may be an effective addition to the armamentarium of drugs for the treatment of lung cancer. - Highlights: • Zoledronic acid (ZA) is effectively against lung cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. • ZA acts on lung cancer cells through inhibition of protein prenylation. • ZA suppresses global downstream phosphorylation of Ras signalling. • ZA enhances the effects of chemotherapeutic drugs in lung cancer cells.

  18. The bisphosphonate zoledronic acid effectively targets lung cancer cells by inhibition of protein prenylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Fan [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Jingzhou Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (HUST), Jingzhou (China); Li, Pengcheng [Department of Oncology, Wuhan Union Hospital Affiliated to Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Gong, Jianhua; Zhang, Jiahong [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Jingzhou Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (HUST), Jingzhou (China); Ma, Jingping, E-mail: mjpjzhospital@hotmail.com [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Jingzhou Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (HUST), Jingzhou (China)

    2015-11-27

    Aberrant activation of oncoproteins such as members of the Ras family is common in human lung cancers. The proper function of Ras largely depends on a post-translational modification termed prenylation. Bisphosphonates have been shown to inhibit prenylation in cancer cells. In this study, we show that zoledronic acid, a third generation bisphosphonate, is effective in targeting lung cancer cells. This is achieved by the induction of apoptosis and inhibition of proliferation, through suppressing the activation of downstream Ras and EGFR signalling by zoledronic acid. The combination of zoledronic acid and paclitaxel or cisplatin (commonly used chemotherapeutic drugs for lung cancer) augmented the activity of either drug alone in in vitro lung cancer cellular system and in vivo lung xenograft mouse model. Importantly, zoledronic acid inhibits protein prenylation as shown by the increased levels of unprenylated Ras and Rap1A. In addition, the effects of zoledronic acid were reversed in the presence of geranylgeraniol and farnesol, further confirming that mechanism of zoledroinc acid's action in lung cancer cells is through prenylation inhibition. Since zoledronic acid is already available for clinic use, these results suggest that it may be an effective addition to the armamentarium of drugs for the treatment of lung cancer. - Highlights: • Zoledronic acid (ZA) is effectively against lung cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. • ZA acts on lung cancer cells through inhibition of protein prenylation. • ZA suppresses global downstream phosphorylation of Ras signalling. • ZA enhances the effects of chemotherapeutic drugs in lung cancer cells.

  19. Inhibition of host cell translation elongation by Legionella pneumophila blocks the host cell unfolded protein response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hempstead, Andrew D; Isberg, Ralph R

    2015-12-08

    Cells of the innate immune system recognize bacterial pathogens by detecting common microbial patterns as well as pathogen-specific activities. One system that responds to these stimuli is the IRE1 branch of the unfolded protein response (UPR), a sensor of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Activation of IRE1, in the context of Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling, induces strong proinflammatory cytokine induction. We show here that Legionella pneumophila, an intravacuolar pathogen that replicates in an ER-associated compartment, blocks activation of the IRE1 pathway despite presenting pathogen products that stimulate this response. L. pneumophila TLR ligands induced the splicing of mRNA encoding XBP1s, the main target of IRE1 activity. L. pneumophila was able to inhibit both chemical and bacterial induction of XBP1 splicing via bacterial translocated proteins that interfere with host protein translation. A strain lacking five translocated translation elongation inhibitors was unable to block XBP1 splicing, but this could be rescued by expression of a single such inhibitor, consistent with limitation of the response by translation elongation inhibitors. Chemical inhibition of translation elongation blocked pattern recognition receptor-mediated XBP1 splicing, mimicking the effects of the bacterial translation inhibitors. In contrast, host cell-promoted inhibition of translation initiation in response to the pathogen was ineffective in blocking XBP1 splicing, demonstrating the need for the elongation inhibitors for protection from the UPR. The inhibition of host translation elongation may be a common strategy used by pathogens to limit the innate immune response by interfering with signaling via the UPR.

  20. Tryptophan-containing milk protein-derived dipeptides inhibit xanthine oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nongonierma, Alice B; Fitzgerald, Richard J

    2012-10-01

    Of twelve dipeptides tested, only the Trp containing peptides Val-Trp and its reverse peptide Trp-Val showed a xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibitory activity. Studies with Val and Trp revealed that XO inhibition was mainly attributed to the Trp residue. No significant difference (P ≥ 0.05) was found for the XO inhibitory potency (IC(50)) values for Trp, Val-Trp and Trp-Val, which were about 200 times higher than that for Allopurinol. Lineweaver and Burke analysis demonstrated that Trp, Val-Trp and Trp-Val were non-competitive inhibitors while Allopurinol was a competitive inhibitor. Of the different milk-protein substrates hydrolyzed with gastro-intestinal enzyme activities, only lactoferrin (LF) hydrolyzates displayed XO inhibition. Peptides present in a LF hydrolyzate (GLF-240 min) were adsorbed onto activated carbon followed by subsequent desorption with stepwise elution using acetonitrile (ACN). Separation and detection of Trp containing peptides within the different fractions were achieved using RP-HPLC coupled with fluorescence detection. The desorbed fractions displayed different XO inhibitory properties, with no inhibition in the unbound fraction and highest inhibition in fractions eluted with 30, 40 and 70% ACN. The fraction eluting at 40% ACN was significantly more potent (19.1±2.3% inhibition at 1.25 mg mL(-1)) than the GLF-240 min hydrolyzate (13.4 ± 0.4% inhibition at 1.25 mg mL(-1)), showing the potential for enrichment of the bioactive peptides on fractionation with activated carbon. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Sorafenib enhances proteasome inhibitor-mediated cytotoxicity via inhibition of unfolded protein response and keratin phosphorylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honma, Yuichi; Harada, Masaru, E-mail: msrharada@med.uoeh-u.ac.jp

    2013-08-15

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is highly resistant to conventional systemic therapies and prognosis for advanced HCC patients remains poor. Recent studies of the molecular mechanisms responsible for tumor initiation and progression have identified several potential molecular targets in HCC. Sorafenib is a multi-kinase inhibitor shown to have survival benefits in advanced HCC. It acts by inhibiting the serine/threonine kinases and the receptor type tyrosine kinases. In preclinical experiments sorafenib had anti-proliferative activity in hepatoma cells and it reduced tumor angiogenesis and increased apoptosis. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that the cytotoxic mechanisms of sorafenib include its inhibitory effects on protein ubiquitination, unfolded protein response (UPR) and keratin phosphorylation in response to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Moreover, we show that combined treatment with sorafenib and proteasome inhibitors (PIs) synergistically induced a marked increase in cell death in hepatoma- and hepatocyte-derived cells. These observations may open the way to potentially interesting treatment combinations that may augment the effect of sorafenib, possibly including drugs that promote ER stress. Because sorafenib blocked the cellular defense mechanisms against hepatotoxic injury not only in hepatoma cells but also in hepatocyte-derived cells, we must be careful to avoid severe liver injury. -- Graphical abstract: Display Omitted -- Highlights: •We examined the cytotoxic mechanisms of sorafenib in hepatoma cells. •Sorafenib induces cell death via apoptotic and necrotic fashion. •Sorafenib inhibits protein ubiquitination and unfolded protein response. •Autophagy induced by sorafenib may affect its cytotoxicity. •Sorafenib inhibits keratin phosphorylation and cytoplasmic inclusion formation.

  2. Plant-derived phenolics inhibit the accrual of structurally characterised protein and lipid oxidative modifications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arantza Soler-Cantero

    Full Text Available Epidemiological data suggest that plant-derived phenolics beneficial effects include an inhibition of LDL oxidation. After applying a screening method based on 2,4-dinitrophenyl hydrazine-protein carbonyl reaction to 21 different plant-derived phenolic acids, we selected the most antioxidant ones. Their effect was assessed in 5 different oxidation systems, as well as in other model proteins. Mass-spectrometry was then used, evidencing a heterogeneous effect on the accumulation of the structurally characterized protein carbonyl glutamic and aminoadipic semialdehydes as well as for malondialdehyde-lysine in LDL apoprotein. After TOF based lipidomics, we identified the most abundant differential lipids in Cu(++-incubated LDL as 1-palmitoyllysophosphatidylcholine and 1-stearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine. Most of selected phenolic compounds prevented the accumulation of those phospholipids and the cellular impairment induced by oxidized LDL. Finally, to validate these effects in vivo, we evaluated the effect of the intake of a phenolic-enriched extract in plasma protein and lipid modifications in a well-established model of atherosclerosis (diet-induced hypercholesterolemia in hamsters. This showed that a dietary supplement with a phenolic-enriched extract diminished plasma protein oxidative and lipid damage. Globally, these data show structural basis of antioxidant properties of plant-derived phenolic acids in protein oxidation that may be relevant for the health-promoting effects of its dietary intake.

  3. Injury-induced inhibition of small intestinal protein and nucleic acid synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, E.A.; Hatz, R.A.; Yarmush, M.L.; Tompkins, R.G.

    1990-01-01

    Small intestinal mucosal weight and nutrient absorption are significantly diminished early after cutaneous thermal injuries. Because these intestinal properties are highly dependent on rates of nucleic acid and protein synthesis, in vivo incorporation of thymidine, uridine, and leucine into small intestinal deoxyribonucleic acid, ribonucleic acid, and proteins were measured. Deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis was markedly decreased with the lowest thymidine incorporation in the jejunum (p less than 0.01); these findings were confirmed by autoradiographic identification of radiolabeled nuclei in the intestinal crypts. Protein synthesis was decreased by 6 h postinjury (p less than 0.01) but had returned to normal by 48 h. Consistent with a decreased rate of protein synthesis, ribonucleic acid synthesis was also decreased 18 h postinjury (p less than 0.01). These decreased deoxyribonucleic acid, ribonucleic acid, and protein synthesis rates are not likely a result of ischemia because in other studies of this injury model, intestinal blood flow was not significantly changed by the burn injury. Potentially, factors initiating the acute inflammatory reaction may directly inhibit nucleic acid and protein synthesis and lead to alterations in nutrient absorption and intestinal barrier function after injury

  4. Blocking an N-terminal acetylation–dependent protein interaction inhibits an E3 ligase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, Daniel C.; Hammill, Jared T.; Min, Jaeki; Rhee, David Y.; Connelly, Michele; Sviderskiy, Vladislav O.; Bhasin, Deepak; Chen, Yizhe; Ong, Su-Sien; Chai, Sergio C.; Goktug, Asli N.; Huang, Guochang; Monda, Julie K.; Low, Jonathan; Kim, Ho Shin; Paulo, Joao A.; Cannon, Joe R.; Shelat, Anang A.; Chen, Taosheng; Kelsall, Ian R.; Alpi, Arno F.; Pagala, Vishwajeeth; Wang, Xusheng; Peng, Junmin; Singh , Bhuvanesh; Harper, J. Wade; Schulman, Brenda A.; Guy, R. Kip (MSKCC); (Dundee); (SJCH); (Harvard-Med); (MXPL)

    2017-06-05

    N-terminal acetylation is an abundant modification influencing protein functions. Because ~80% of mammalian cytosolic proteins are N-terminally acetylated, this modification is potentially an untapped target for chemical control of their functions. Structural studies have revealed that, like lysine acetylation, N-terminal acetylation converts a positively charged amine into a hydrophobic handle that mediates protein interactions; hence, this modification may be a druggable target. We report the development of chemical probes targeting the N-terminal acetylation–dependent interaction between an E2 conjugating enzyme (UBE2M or UBC12) and DCN1 (DCUN1D1), a subunit of a multiprotein E3 ligase for the ubiquitin-like protein NEDD8. The inhibitors are highly selective with respect to other protein acetyl-amide–binding sites, inhibit NEDD8 ligation in vitro and in cells, and suppress anchorage-independent growth of a cell line with DCN1 amplification. Overall, our data demonstrate that N-terminal acetyl-dependent protein interactions are druggable targets and provide insights into targeting multiprotein E2–E3 ligases.

  5. Proteolysis inhibition by hibernating bear serum leads to increased protein content in human muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanon, Stéphanie; Chazarin, Blandine; Toubhans, Benoit; Durand, Christine; Chery, Isabelle; Robert, Maud; Vieille-Marchiset, Aurélie; Swenson, Jon E; Zedrosser, Andreas; Evans, Alina L; Brunberg, Sven; Arnemo, Jon M; Gauquelin-Koch, Guillemette; Storey, Kenneth B; Simon, Chantal; Blanc, Stéphane; Bertile, Fabrice; Lefai, Etienne

    2018-04-03

    Muscle atrophy is one of the main characteristics of human ageing and physical inactivity, with resulting adverse health outcomes. To date, there are still no efficient therapeutic strategies for its prevention and/or treatment. However, during hibernation, bears exhibit a unique ability for preserving muscle in conditions where muscle atrophy would be expected in humans. Therefore, our objective was to determine whether there are components of bear serum which can control protein balance in human muscles. In this study, we exposed cultured human differentiated muscle cells to bear serum collected during winter and summer periods, and measured the impact on cell protein content and turnover. In addition, we explored the signalling pathways that control rates of protein synthesis and degradation. We show that the protein turnover of human myotubes is reduced when incubated with winter bear serum, with a dramatic inhibition of proteolysis involving both proteasomal and lysosomal systems, and resulting in an increase in muscle cell protein content. By modulating intracellular signalling pathways and inducing a protein sparing phenotype in human muscle cells, winter bear serum therefore holds potential for developing new tools to fight human muscle atrophy and related metabolic disorders.

  6. Inhibition of cell proliferation by p107, a relative of the retinoblastoma protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, L; van den Heuvel, S; Helin, K; Fattaey, A; Ewen, M; Livingston, D; Dyson, N; Harlow, E

    1993-07-01

    The cellular protein p107 shares many structural and biochemical features with the retinoblastoma gene product, pRB. We have isolated a full-length cDNA for human p107 and have used this clone to study the function of p107. We show that, like pRB, p107 is a potent inhibitor of E2F-mediated trans-activation, and overexpression of p107 can inhibit proliferation in certain cell types, arresting sensitive cells in G1. Several experiments, however, showed that growth inhibition by pRB and p107 did not occur through the same mechanism. First, in the cervical carcinoma cell line C33A, p107 was able to block cell proliferation, whereas pRB could not, even though both proteins were potent inhibitors of E2F-mediated transcription in this cell line. Second, growth arrest by pRB and p107 was rescued differentially by various cell cycle regulators. Third, some mutants of p107 that cannot associate with adenovirus E1A were still able to inhibit cell proliferation, whereas analogous mutants in pRB are known to be unable to block cell growth. Together, these results suggest a biological role of p107 that is related, but not identical, to that of pRB.

  7. Inhibition of protein kinase C affects on mode of synaptic vesicle exocytosis due to cholesterol depletion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrov, Alexey M., E-mail: fysio@rambler.ru; Zakyrjanova, Guzalija F., E-mail: guzik121192@mail.ru; Yakovleva, Anastasia A., E-mail: nastya1234qwer@mail.ru; Zefirov, Andrei L., E-mail: zefiroval@rambler.ru

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • We examine the involvement of PKC in MCD induced synaptic vesicle exocytosis. • PKC inhibitor does not decrease the effect MCD on MEPP frequency. • PKC inhibitor prevents MCD induced FM1-43 unloading. • PKC activation may switch MCD induced exocytosis from kiss-and-run to a full mode. • Inhibition of phospholipase C does not lead to similar change in exocytosis. - Abstract: Previous studies demonstrated that depletion of membrane cholesterol by 10 mM methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MCD) results in increased spontaneous exocytosis at both peripheral and central synapses. Here, we investigated the role of protein kinase C in the enhancement of spontaneous exocytosis at frog motor nerve terminals after cholesterol depletion using electrophysiological and optical methods. Inhibition of the protein kinase C by myristoylated peptide and chelerythrine chloride prevented MCD-induced increases in FM1-43 unloading, whereas the frequency of spontaneous postsynaptic events remained enhanced. The increase in FM1-43 unloading still could be observed if sulforhodamine 101 (the water soluble FM1-43 quencher that can pass through the fusion pore) was added to the extracellular solution. This suggests a possibility that exocytosis of synaptic vesicles under these conditions could occur through the kiss-and-run mechanism with the formation of a transient fusion pore. Inhibition of phospholipase C did not lead to similar change in MCD-induced exocytosis.

  8. Structural Insights into Inhibition of Escherichia coli Penicillin-binding Protein 1B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Dustin T; Wasney, Gregory A; Nosella, Michael; Fong, Anita; Strynadka, Natalie C J

    2017-01-20

    In Escherichia coli, the peptidoglycan cell wall is synthesized by bifunctional penicillin-binding proteins such as PBP1b that have both transpeptidase and transglycosylase activities. The PBP1b transpeptidase domain is a major target of β-lactams, and therefore it is important to attain a detailed understanding of its inhibition. The peptidoglycan glycosyltransferase domain of PBP1b is also considered an excellent antibiotic target yet is not exploited by any clinically approved antibacterials. Herein, we adapt a pyrophosphate sensor assay to monitor PBP1b-catalyzed glycosyltransfer and present an improved crystallographic model for inhibition of the PBP1b glycosyltransferase domain by the potent substrate analog moenomycin. We elucidate the structure of a previously disordered region in the glycosyltransferase active site and discuss its implications with regards to peptidoglycan polymerization. Furthermore, we solve the crystal structures of E. coli PBP1b bound to multiple different β-lactams in the transpeptidase active site and complement these data with gel-based competition assays to provide a detailed structural understanding of its inhibition. Taken together, these biochemical and structural data allow us to propose new insights into inhibition of both enzymatic domains in PBP1b. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. Implication of unfolded protein response in resveratrol-induced inhibition of K562 cell proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Bao-Qin; Gao, Yan-Yan; Niu, Xiao-Fang [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Xie, Ji-Sheng [Youjiang Medical College for Nationalities, Guangxi 533000 (China); Meng, Xin; Guan, Yifu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Wang, Hua-Qin, E-mail: wanghq_doctor@hotmail.com [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China)

    2010-01-01

    Resveratrol (RES), a natural plant polyphenol, is an effective inducer of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in a variety of carcinoma cell types. In addition, RES has been reported to inhibit tumorigenesis in several animal models suggesting that it functions as a chemopreventive and anti-tumor agent in vivo. The chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic properties associated with resveratrol offer promise for the design of new chemotherapeutic agents. However, the mechanisms by which RES mediates its effects are not yet fully understood. In this study, we showed that RES caused cell cycle arrest and proliferation inhibition via induction of unfolded protein response (UPR) in human leukemia K562 cell line. Treatment of K562 cells with RES induced a number of signature UPR markers, including transcriptional induction of GRP78 and CHOP, phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2{alpha} (eIF2{alpha}), ER stress-specific XBP-1 splicing, suggesting the induction of UPR by RES. RES inhibited proliferation of K562 in a concentration-dependent manner. Flow cytometric analyses revealed that K562 cells were arrested in G1 phase upon RES treatment. Salubrinal, an eIF2{alpha} inhibitor, or overexpression of dominant negative mutants of PERK or eIF2{alpha}, effectively restored RES-induced cell cycle arrest, underscoring the important role of PERK/eIF2{alpha} branch of UPR in RES-induced inhibition of cell proliferation.

  10. Inhibition of fatty acid binding proteins elevates brain anandamide levels and produces analgesia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Kaczocha

    Full Text Available The endocannabinoid anandamide (AEA is an antinociceptive lipid that is inactivated through cellular uptake and subsequent catabolism by fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH. Fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs are intracellular carriers that deliver AEA and related N-acylethanolamines (NAEs to FAAH for hydrolysis. The mammalian brain expresses three FABP subtypes: FABP3, FABP5, and FABP7. Recent work from our group has revealed that pharmacological inhibition of FABPs reduces inflammatory pain in mice. The goal of the current work was to explore the effects of FABP inhibition upon nociception in diverse models of pain. We developed inhibitors with differential affinities for FABPs to elucidate the subtype(s that contributes to the antinociceptive effects of FABP inhibitors. Inhibition of FABPs reduced nociception associated with inflammatory, visceral, and neuropathic pain. The antinociceptive effects of FABP inhibitors mirrored their affinities for FABP5, while binding to FABP3 and FABP7 was not a predictor of in vivo efficacy. The antinociceptive effects of FABP inhibitors were mediated by cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα and FABP inhibition elevated brain levels of AEA, providing the first direct evidence that FABPs regulate brain endocannabinoid tone. These results highlight FABPs as novel targets for the development of analgesic and anti-inflammatory therapeutics.

  11. Calorimetric determination of inhibition of ice crystal growth by antifreeze protein in hydroxyethyl starch solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, T N; Carpenter, J F

    1993-01-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry and cryomicroscopy were used to investigate the effects of type I antifreeze protein (AFP) from winter flounder on 58% solutions of hydroxyethyl starch. The glass, devitrification, and melt transitions noted during rewarming were unaffected by 100 micrograms/ml AFP. Isothermal annealing experiments were undertaken to detect the effects of AFP-induced inhibition of ice crystal growth using calorimetry. A premelt endothermic peak was detected during warming after the annealing procedure. Increasing the duration or the temperature of the annealing for the temperature range from -28 and -18 degrees C resulted in a gradual increase in the enthalpy of the premelt endotherm. This transition was unaffected by 100 micrograms/ml AFP. Annealing between -18 and -10 degrees C resulted in a gradual decrease in the premelt peak enthalpy. This process was inhibited by 100 micrograms/ml AFP. Cryomicroscopic examination of the samples revealed that AFP inhibited ice recrystallization during isothermal annealing at -10 degrees C. Annealing at lower temperatures resulted in minimal ice recrystallization and no visible effect of AFP. Thus, the 100 micrograms/ml AFP to have a detectable influence on thermal events in the calorimeter, conditions must be used that result in significant ice growth without AFP and visible inhibition of this process by AFP. Images FIGURE 8 PMID:7690257

  12. Antidepressants and protein kinases: inhibition of Ca2+-regulated myosin phosphorylation by fluoxetine and iprindole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, P J; Sigg, E B; Moyer, J A

    1986-02-11

    The effects of several antidepressant and antipsychotic agents on Ca2+-calmodulin-regulated myosin light chain phosphorylation were evaluated. At a concentration of 100 microM, the antidepressant agents buproprion, mianserin and maprotiline were ineffective; zimelidine, desipramine and imipramine produced 40-50% inhibition; and iprindole and fluoxetine produced 75-90% inhibition. The efficacies of iprindole and fluoxetine were similar to the phenothiazine antipsychotics chlorpromazine and trifluoperazine. Clozapine, an atypical antipsychotic and the butyrophenone haloperidol were relatively ineffective as myosin light chain phosphorylation inhibitors. IC50 values of the most effective agents were: trifluoperazine 16 microM, fluoxetine 28 microM, chlorpromazine and iprindole 56 microM. As with trifluoperazine, inhibition of myosin phosphorylation by iprindole was completely attenuated in the presence of exogenous calmodulin. However, a significant component (30%) of the inhibitory effect of fluoxetine was not reversible with calmodulin. These results show that some antidepressant agents, most notably iprindole and fluoxetine, are capable of antagonizing a calmodulin-regulated protein kinase through calmodulin inhibition; and in the case of fluoxetine, through an additional calmodulin-independent mechanism.

  13. Chloroquine inhibits accessory cell presentation of soluble natural and synthetic protein antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, S; Werdelin, O

    1984-01-01

    We have studied the in vitro effect of the lysosomotrophic agent, chloroquine, on the presentation of soluble protein antigens by guinea pig accessory cells. Chloroquine inhibited the capacity of antigen-pulsed accessory cells to stimulate proliferation in appropriately primed T cells. The effect...... was time- and dose-dependent. A brief treatment solely of the accessory cells with the drug compromised their ability to stimulate primed T cells in a subsequent culture provided the accessory cells were treated with chloroquine before their exposure to the antigen. These results suggest that chloroquine...... acts on an early event in the antigen handling by accessory cells. Chloroquine is a well known inhibitor of lysosomal proteolysis, and it is likely that its effect on antigen presentation is caused by an inhibition of antigen degradation....

  14. Inhibition of E2F-1 transactivation by direct binding of the retinoblastoma protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helin, K; Harlow, E; Fattaey, A

    1993-01-01

    to transcription factor E2F has provided a model for the mechanism of pRB-mediated growth regulation. Since adenovirus E1A proteins dissociate the pRB-E2F complexes and stimulate E2F-dependent transcription, it has been suggested that pRB inhibits E2F transactivation. Although some evidence for this hypothesis has...... been provided, it has not been possible to determine the mechanism of pRB-mediated inhibition of E2F transactivation. In this study, we constructed mutants of E2F-1 that do not bind to pRB yet retain the ability to transactivate the adenovirus E2 promoter through E2F DNA-binding sites. We demonstrated...

  15. Aspirin Inhibits Colon Cancer Cell and Tumor Growth and Downregulates Specificity Protein (Sp) Transcription Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathi, Satya; Jutooru, Indira; Chadalapaka, Gayathri; Nair, Vijayalekshmi; Lee, Syng-Ook; Safe, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) is highly effective for treating colon cancer patients postdiagnosis; however, the mechanisms of action of aspirin in colon cancer are not well defined. Aspirin and its major metabolite sodium salicylate induced apoptosis and decreased colon cancer cell growth and the sodium salt of aspirin also inhibited tumor growth in an athymic nude mouse xenograft model. Colon cancer cell growth inhibition was accompanied by downregulation of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 proteins and decreased expression of Sp-regulated gene products including bcl-2, survivin, VEGF, VEGFR1, cyclin D1, c-MET and p65 (NFκB). Moreover, we also showed by RNA interference that β-catenin, an important target of aspirin in some studies, is an Sp-regulated gene. Aspirin induced nuclear caspase-dependent cleavage of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 proteins and this response was related to sequestration of zinc ions since addition of zinc sulfate blocked aspirin-mediated apoptosis and repression of Sp proteins. The results demonstrate an important underlying mechanism of action of aspirin as an anticancer agent and, based on the rapid metabolism of aspirin to salicylate in humans and the high salicylate/aspirin ratios in serum, it is likely that the anticancer activity of aspirin is also due to the salicylate metabolite. PMID:23110215

  16. Insig proteins mediate feedback inhibition of cholesterol synthesis in the intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarlane, Matthew R; Liang, Guosheng; Engelking, Luke J

    2014-01-24

    Enterocytes are the only cell type that must balance the de novo synthesis and absorption of cholesterol, although the coordinate regulation of these processes is not well understood. Our previous studies demonstrated that enterocytes respond to the pharmacological blockade of cholesterol absorption by ramping up de novo sterol synthesis through activation of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-2 (SREBP-2). Here, we genetically disrupt both Insig1 and Insig2 in the intestine, two closely related proteins that are required for the feedback inhibition of SREBP and HMG-CoA reductase (HMGR). This double knock-out was achieved by generating mice with an intestine-specific deletion of Insig1 using Villin-Cre in combination with a germ line deletion of Insig2. Deficiency of both Insigs in enterocytes resulted in constitutive activation of SREBP and HMGR, leading to an 11-fold increase in sterol synthesis in the small intestine and producing lipidosis of the intestinal crypts. The intestine-derived cholesterol accumulated in plasma and liver, leading to secondary feedback inhibition of hepatic SREBP2 activity. Pharmacological blockade of cholesterol absorption was unable to further induce the already elevated activities of SREBP-2 or HMGR in Insig-deficient enterocytes. These studies confirm the essential role of Insig proteins in the sterol homeostasis of enterocytes.

  17. Fatty acid oxidation promotes reprogramming by enhancing oxidative phosphorylation and inhibiting protein kinase C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhaoyu; Liu, Fei; Shi, Peiliang; Song, Anying; Huang, Zan; Zou, Dayuan; Chen, Qin; Li, Jianxin; Gao, Xiang

    2018-02-26

    Changes in metabolic pathway preferences are key events in the reprogramming process of somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). The optimization of metabolic conditions can enhance reprogramming; however, the detailed underlying mechanisms are largely unclear. By comparing the gene expression profiles of somatic cells, intermediate-phase cells, and iPSCs, we found that carnitine palmitoyltransferase (Cpt)1b, a rate-limiting enzyme in fatty acid oxidation, was significantly upregulated in the early stage of the reprogramming process. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts isolated from transgenic mice carrying doxycycline (Dox)-inducible Yamanaka factor constructs were used for reprogramming. Various fatty acid oxidation-related metabolites were added during the reprogramming process. Colony counting and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) were used to calculate reprogramming efficiency. Fatty acid oxidation-related metabolites were measured by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Seahorse was used to measure the level of oxidative phosphorylation. We found that overexpression of cpt1b enhanced reprogramming efficiency. Furthermore, palmitoylcarnitine or acetyl-CoA, the primary and final products of Cpt1-mediated fatty acid oxidation, also promoted reprogramming. In the early reprogramming process, fatty acid oxidation upregulated oxidative phosphorylation and downregulated protein kinase C activity. Inhibition of protein kinase C also promoted reprogramming. We demonstrated that fatty acid oxidation promotes reprogramming by enhancing oxidative phosphorylation and inhibiting protein kinase C activity in the early stage of the reprogramming process. This study reveals that fatty acid oxidation is crucial for the reprogramming efficiency.

  18. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid sensitizes neuroblastoma to paclitaxel by inhibiting thioredoxin-related protein 14-mediated autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Zijun; Yang, Kaibin; Ye, Litong; You, Zhiyao; Chen, Rirong; Liu, Ying; He, Youjian

    2017-07-01

    Paclitaxel is not as effective for neuroblastoma as most of the front-line chemotherapeutics due to drug resistance. This study explored the regulatory mechanism of paclitaxel-associated autophagy and potential solutions to paclitaxel resistance in neuroblastoma. The formation of autophagic vesicles was detected by scanning transmission electron microscopy and flow cytometry. The autophagy-associated proteins were assessed by western blot. Autophagy was induced and the autophagy-associated proteins LC3-I, LC3-II, Beclin 1, and thioredoxin-related protein 14 (TRP14), were found to be upregulated in neuroblastoma cells that were exposed to paclitaxel. The inhibition of Beclin 1 or TRP14 by siRNA increased the sensitivity of the tumor cells to paclitaxel. In addition, Beclin 1-mediated autophagy was regulated by TRP14. Furthermore, the TRP14 inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) downregulated paclitaxel-induced autophagy and enhanced the anticancer effects of paclitaxel in normal control cancer cells but not in cells with upregulated Beclin 1 and TRP14 expression. Our findings showed that paclitaxel-induced autophagy in neuroblastoma cells was regulated by TRP14 and that SAHA could sensitize neuroblastoma cells to paclitaxel by specifically inhibiting TRP14. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  19. 17β-Estradiol inhibits estrogen binding protein-mediated hypha formation in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurakado, Sanae; Kurogane, Rie; Sugita, Takashi

    2017-08-01

    Candida albicans is one of the most prevalent and clinically important fungal pathogens. The ability to change form depending on environmental stress is an important microbial virulence factor. A survey of compounds that inhibit this morphological change identified various steroids, including 17β-estradiol. Interestingly, C. albicans has proteins capable of binding to steroids, including estrogen binding protein (Ebp1). Estrogens regulate cell differentiation and proliferation in humans through estrogen receptor proteins. To determine whether EBP1 regulates a virulence factor, we investigated the effect of 17β-estradiol on the morphological transition of C. albicans using an ebp1 deletion mutant. Treatment with 10 μg/mL of 17β-estradiol inhibited hypha formation, whereas its effect on the ebp1 deletion mutant was decreased compared to that on the wild-type and revertant strains. These data suggest a new pathway for the yeast-to-hypha transition via EBP1 in C. albicans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Yeast Endosulfines Control Entry into Quiescence and Chronological Life Span by Inhibiting Protein Phosphatase 2A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Séverine Bontron

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The TORC1 and PKA protein kinases are central elements of signaling networks that regulate eukaryotic cell proliferation in response to growth factors and/or nutrients. In yeast, attenuation of signaling by these kinases following nitrogen and/or carbon limitation activates the protein kinase Rim15, which orchestrates the initiation of a reversible cellular quiescence program to ensure normal chronological life span. The molecular elements linking Rim15 to distal readouts including the expression of Msn2/4- and Gis1-dependent genes involve the endosulfines Igo1/2. Here, we show that Rim15, analogous to the greatwall kinase in Xenopus, phosphorylates endosulfines to directly inhibit the Cdc55-protein phosphatase 2A (PP2ACdc55. Inhibition of PP2ACdc55 preserves Gis1 in a phosphorylated state and consequently promotes its recruitment to and activation of transcription from promoters of specific nutrient-regulated genes. These results close a gap in our perception of and delineate a role for PP2ACdc55 in TORC1-/PKA-mediated regulation of quiescence and chronological life span.

  1. In silico analysis of the polygalacturonase inhibiting protein 1 from apple, Malus domestica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsaunyane, Lerato Bt; Oelofse, Dean; Dubery, Ian A

    2015-03-11

    The Malus domestica polygalacturonase inhibiting protein 1 (MdPGIP1) gene, encoding the M. domestica polygalacturonase inhibiting protein 1 (MdPGIP1), was isolated from the Granny Smith apple cultivar (GenBank accession no. DQ185063). The gene was used to transform tobacco and potato for enhanced resistance against fungal diseases. Analysis of the MdPGIP1 nucleotide sequence revealed that the gene comprises 993 nucleotides that encode a 330 amino acid polypeptide. In silico characterization of the MdPGIP1 polypeptide revealed domains typical of PGIP proteins, which include a 24 amino acid putative signal peptide, a potential cleavage site [Alanine-Leucine-Serine (ALS)] for the signal peptide, a 238 amino acid leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain, a 46 amino acid N-terminal domain and a 22 amino acid C-terminal domain. The hydropathic evaluation of MdPGIP1 indicated a repetitive hydrophobic motif in the LRR domain and a hydrophilic surface area consistent with a globular protein. The typical consensus glycosylation sequence of Asn-X-Ser/Thr was identified in MdPGIP1, indicating potential N-linked glycosylation of MdPGIP1. The molecular mass of non-glycosylated MdPGIP1 was calculated as 36.615 kDa and the theoretical isoelectric point as 6.98. Furthermore, the secondary and tertiary structure of MdPGIP1 was modelled, and revealed that MdPGIP1 is a curved and elongated molecule that contains sheet B1, sheet B2 and 310-helices on its LRR domain. The overall properties of the MdPGIP1 protein is similar to that of the prototypical Phaseolus vulgaris PGIP 2 (PvPGIP2), and the detected differences supported its use in biotechnological applications as an inhibitor of targeted fungal polygalacturonases (PGs).

  2. Structure and inhibition of the SARS coronavirus envelope protein ion channel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin Pervushin

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The envelope (E protein from coronaviruses is a small polypeptide that contains at least one alpha-helical transmembrane domain. Absence, or inactivation, of E protein results in attenuated viruses, due to alterations in either virion morphology or tropism. Apart from its morphogenetic properties, protein E has been reported to have membrane permeabilizing activity. Further, the drug hexamethylene amiloride (HMA, but not amiloride, inhibited in vitro ion channel activity of some synthetic coronavirus E proteins, and also viral replication. We have previously shown for the coronavirus species responsible for severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS-CoV that the transmembrane domain of E protein (ETM forms pentameric alpha-helical bundles that are likely responsible for the observed channel activity. Herein, using solution NMR in dodecylphosphatidylcholine micelles and energy minimization, we have obtained a model of this channel which features regular alpha-helices that form a pentameric left-handed parallel bundle. The drug HMA was found to bind inside the lumen of the channel, at both the C-terminal and the N-terminal openings, and, in contrast to amiloride, induced additional chemical shifts in ETM. Full length SARS-CoV E displayed channel activity when transiently expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK-293 cells in a whole-cell patch clamp set-up. This activity was significantly reduced by hexamethylene amiloride (HMA, but not by amiloride. The channel structure presented herein provides a possible rationale for inhibition, and a platform for future structure-based drug design of this potential pharmacological target.

  3. Inhibition of interleukin-6 expression by the V protein of parainfluenza virus 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Yuan; Sun Minghao; Fuentes, Sandra M.; Keim, Celia D.; Rothermel, Terri; He Biao

    2007-01-01

    The V protein of parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) plays an important role in the evasion of host immune responses. The V protein blocks interferon (IFN) signaling in human cells by causing degradation of the STAT1 protein, a key component of IFN signaling, and blocks IFN-β production by preventing nuclear translocation of IRF3, a key transcription factor for activating IFN-β promoter. Interleukin-6 (IL-6), along with tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and IL-1β, is a major proinflammatory cytokine that plays important roles in clearing virus infection through inflammatory responses. Many viruses have developed strategies to block IL-6 expression. Wild-type PIV5 infection induces little, if any, expression of cytokines such as IL-6 or TNF-α, whereas infection by a mutant PIV5 lacking the conserved C-terminal cysteine rich domain (rPIV5VΔC) induced high levels of IL-6 expression. Examination of mRNA levels of IL-6 indicated that the transcription activation of IL-6 played an important role in the increased IL-6 expression. Co-infection with wild-type PIV5 prevented the activation of IL-6 transcription by rPIV5VΔC, and a plasmid encoding the full-length PIV5 V protein prevented the activation of IL-6 promoter-driven reporter gene expression by rPIV5VΔC, indicating that the V protein played a role in inhibiting IL-6 transcription. The activation of IL-6 was independent of IFN-β even though rPIV5VΔC-infected cells produced IFN-β. Using reporter gene assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), it was found that NF-κB played an important role in activating expression of IL-6. We have proposed a model of activating and inhibiting IL-6 transcription by PIV5

  4. D-Glucosamine down-regulates HIF-1{alpha} through inhibition of protein translation in DU145 prostate cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jee-Young; Park, Jong-Wook; Suh, Seong-Il [Chronic Disease Research Center, School of Medicine, Keimyung University, 194 Dongsan-Dong, Jung-Gu, Daegu 700-712 (Korea, Republic of); Baek, Won-Ki, E-mail: wonki@dsmc.or.kr [Chronic Disease Research Center, School of Medicine, Keimyung University, 194 Dongsan-Dong, Jung-Gu, Daegu 700-712 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-04-24

    D-Glucosamine has been reported to inhibit proliferation of cancer cells in culture and in vivo. In this study we report a novel response to D-glucosamine involving the translation regulation of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1{alpha} expression. D-Glucosamine caused a decreased expression of HIF-1{alpha} under normoxic and hypoxic conditions without affecting HIF-1{alpha} mRNA expression in DU145 prostate cancer cells. D-Glucosamine inhibited HIF-1{alpha} accumulation induced by proteasome inhibitor MG132 and prolyl hydroxylase inhibitor DMOG suggesting D-glucosamine reduces HIF-1{alpha} protein expression through proteasome-independent pathway. Metabolic labeling assays indicated that D-glucosamine inhibits translation of HIF-1{alpha} protein. In addition, D-glucosamine inhibited HIF-1{alpha} expression induced by serum stimulation in parallel with inhibition of p70S6K suggesting D-glucosamine inhibits growth factor-induced HIF-1{alpha} expression, at least in part, through p70S6K inhibition. Taken together, these results suggest that D-glucosamine inhibits HIF-1{alpha} expression through inhibiting protein translation and provide new insight into a potential mechanism of the anticancer properties of D-glucosamine.

  5. Complexes of vesicular stomatitis virus matrix protein with host Rae1 and Nup98 involved in inhibition of host transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajani, Karishma R; Pettit Kneller, Elizabeth L; McKenzie, Margie O; Horita, David A; Chou, Jeff W; Lyles, Douglas S

    2012-09-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) suppresses antiviral responses in infected cells by inhibiting host gene expression at multiple levels, including transcription, nuclear cytoplasmic transport, and translation. The inhibition of host gene expression is due to the activity of the viral matrix (M) protein. Previous studies have shown that M protein interacts with host proteins Rae1 and Nup98 that have been implicated in regulating nuclear-cytoplasmic transport. However, Rae1 function is not essential for host mRNA transport, raising the question of how interaction of a viral protein with a host protein that is not essential for gene expression causes a global inhibition at multiple levels. We tested the hypothesis that there may be multiple M protein-Rae1 complexes involved in inhibiting host gene expression at multiple levels. Using size exclusion chromatography and sedimentation velocity analysis, it was determined that Rae1 exists in high, intermediate, and low molecular weight complexes. The intermediate molecular weight complexes containing Nup98 interacted most efficiently with M protein. The low molecular weight form also interacted with M protein in cells that overexpress Rae1 or cells in which Nup98 expression was silenced. Silencing Rae1 expression had little if any effect on nuclear accumulation of host mRNA in VSV-infected cells, nor did it affect VSV's ability to inhibit host translation. Instead, silencing Rae1 expression reduced the ability of VSV to inhibit host transcription. M protein interacted efficiently with Rae1-Nup98 complexes associated with the chromatin fraction of host nuclei, consistent with an effect on host transcription. These results support the idea that M protein-Rae1 complexes serve as platforms to promote the interaction of M protein with other factors involved in host transcription. They also support the idea that Rae1-Nup98 complexes play a previously under-appreciated role in regulation of transcription.

  6. Complexes of vesicular stomatitis virus matrix protein with host Rae1 and Nup98 involved in inhibition of host transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karishma R Rajani

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV suppresses antiviral responses in infected cells by inhibiting host gene expression at multiple levels, including transcription, nuclear cytoplasmic transport, and translation. The inhibition of host gene expression is due to the activity of the viral matrix (M protein. Previous studies have shown that M protein interacts with host proteins Rae1 and Nup98 that have been implicated in regulating nuclear-cytoplasmic transport. However, Rae1 function is not essential for host mRNA transport, raising the question of how interaction of a viral protein with a host protein that is not essential for gene expression causes a global inhibition at multiple levels. We tested the hypothesis that there may be multiple M protein-Rae1 complexes involved in inhibiting host gene expression at multiple levels. Using size exclusion chromatography and sedimentation velocity analysis, it was determined that Rae1 exists in high, intermediate, and low molecular weight complexes. The intermediate molecular weight complexes containing Nup98 interacted most efficiently with M protein. The low molecular weight form also interacted with M protein in cells that overexpress Rae1 or cells in which Nup98 expression was silenced. Silencing Rae1 expression had little if any effect on nuclear accumulation of host mRNA in VSV-infected cells, nor did it affect VSV's ability to inhibit host translation. Instead, silencing Rae1 expression reduced the ability of VSV to inhibit host transcription. M protein interacted efficiently with Rae1-Nup98 complexes associated with the chromatin fraction of host nuclei, consistent with an effect on host transcription. These results support the idea that M protein-Rae1 complexes serve as platforms to promote the interaction of M protein with other factors involved in host transcription. They also support the idea that Rae1-Nup98 complexes play a previously under-appreciated role in regulation of transcription.

  7. Polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins (PGIPs) with different specificities are expressed in Phaseolus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desiderio, A; Aracri, B; Leckie, F; Mattei, B; Salvi, G; Tigelaar, H; Van Roekel, J S; Baulcombe, D C; Melchers, L S; De Lorenzo, G; Cervone, F

    1997-09-01

    The pgip-1 gene of Phaseolus vulgaris, encoding a polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein (PGIP), PGIP-1 (P. Toubart, A. Desiderio, G. Salvi, F. Cervone, L. Daroda, G. De Lorenzo, C. Bergmann, A. G. Darvill, and P. Albersheim, Plant J. 2:367-373, 1992), was expressed under control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter in tomato plants via Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Transgenic tomato plants with different expression levels of PGIP-1 were used in infection experiments with the pathogenic fungi Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici, Botrytis cinerea, and Alternaria solani. No evident enhanced resistance, compared with the resistance of untransformed plants, was observed. The pgip-1 gene was also transiently expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana with potato virus X (PVX) as a vector. PGIP-1 purified from transgenic tomatoes and PGIP-1 in crude protein extracts of PVX-infected N. benthamiana plants were tested with several fungal polygalacturonases (PGs). PGIP-1 from both plant sources exhibited a specificity different from that of PGIP purified from P. vulgaris (bulk bean PGIP). Notably, PGIP-1 was unable to interact with a homogeneous PG from Fusarium moniliforme, as determined by surface plasmon resonance analysis, while the bulk bean PGIP interacted with and inhibited this enzyme. Moreover, PGIP-1 expressed in tomato and N. benthamiana had only a limited capacity to inhibit crude PG preparations from F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici, B. cinerea, and A. solani. Differential affinity chromatography was used to separate PGIP proteins present in P. vulgaris extracts. A PGIP-A with specificity similar to that of PGIP-1 was separated from a PGIP-B able to interact with both Aspergillus niger and F. moniliforme PGs. Our data show that PGIPs with different specificities are expressed in P. vulgaris and that the high-level expression of one member (pgip-1) of the PGIP gene family in transgenic plants is not sufficient to confer general, enhanced

  8. Inhibition of ER stress and unfolding protein response pathways causes skeletal muscle wasting during cancer cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, Kyle R; Gallot, Yann S; Sato, Shuichi; Xiong, Guangyan; Hindi, Sajedah M; Kumar, Ashok

    2016-09-01

    Cachexia is a devastating syndrome that causes morbidity and mortality in a large number of patients with cancer. However, the mechanisms of cancer cachexia remain poorly understood. Accumulation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) causes stress. The ER responds to this stress through activating certain pathways commonly known as the unfolding protein response (UPR). The main function of UPR is to restore homeostasis, but excessive or prolonged activation of UPR can lead to pathologic conditions. In this study, we examined the role of ER stress and UPR in regulation of skeletal muscle mass in naïve conditions and during cancer cachexia. Our results demonstrate that multiple markers of ER stress are highly activated in skeletal muscle of Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) and Apc(Min/+) mouse models of cancer cachexia. Treatment of mice with 4-phenylbutyrate (4-PBA), a chemical chaperon and a potent inhibitor of ER stress, significantly reduced skeletal muscle strength and mass in both control and LLC-bearing mice. Blocking the UPR also increased the proportion of fast-type fibers in soleus muscle of both control and LLC-bearing mice. Inhibition of UPR reduced the activity of Akt/mTOR pathway and increased the expression of the components of the ubiquitin-proteasome system and autophagy in LLC-bearing mice. Moreover, we found that the inhibition of UPR causes severe atrophy in cultured myotubes. Our study provides initial evidence that ER stress and UPR pathways are essential for maintaining skeletal muscle mass and strength and for protection against cancer cachexia.-Bohnert, K. R., Gallot, Y. S., Sato, S., Xiong, G., Hindi, S. M., Kumar, A. Inhibition of ER stress and unfolding protein response pathways causes skeletal muscle wasting during cancer cachexia. © FASEB.

  9. Genetically engineered endostatin-lidamycin fusion proteins effectively inhibit tumor growth and metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Wen-guo; Zhen, Yong-su; Lu, Xin-an; Shang, Bo-yang; Fu, Yan; Zhang, Sheng-hua; Zhou, Daifu; Li, Liang; Li, Yi; Luo, Yongzhang

    2013-01-01

    Endostatin (ES) inhibits endothelial cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and tube formation. It also shows antiangiogenesis and antitumor activities in several animal models. Endostatin specifically targets tumor vasculature to block tumor growth. Lidamycin (LDM), which consists of an active enediyne chromophore (AE) and a non-covalently bound apo-protein (LDP), is a member of chromoprotein family of antitumor antibiotics with extremely potent cytotoxicity to cancer cells. Therefore, we reasoned that endostatin-lidamycin (ES-LDM) fusion proteins upon energizing with enediyne chromophore may obtain the combined capability targeting tumor vasculature and tumor cell by respective ES and LDM moiety. In this study, we designed and obtained two new endostatin-based fusion proteins, endostatin-LDP (ES-LDP) and LDP-endostatin (LDP-ES). In vitro, the antiangiogenic effect of fusion proteins was determined by the wound healing assay and tube formation assay and the cytotoxicity of their enediyne-energized analogs was evaluated by CCK-8 assay. Tissue microarray was used to analyze the binding affinity of LDP, ES or ES-LDP with specimens of human lung tissue and lung tumor. The in vivo efficacy of the fusion proteins was evaluated with human lung carcinoma PG-BE1 xenograft and the experimental metastasis model of 4T1-luc breast cancer. ES-LDP and LDP-ES disrupted the formation of endothelial tube structures and inhibited endothelial cell migration. Evidently, ES-LDP accumulated in the tumor and suppressed tumor growth and metastasis. ES-LDP and ES show higher binding capability than LDP to lung carcinoma; in addition, ES-LDP and ES share similar binding capability. Furthermore, the enediyne-energized fusion protein ES-LDP-AE demonstrated significant efficacy against lung carcinoma xenograft in athymic mice. The ES-based fusion protein therapy provides some fundamental information for further drug development. Targeting both tumor vasculature and tumor cells by endostatin

  10. Recrystallization inhibition in ice due to ice binding protein activity detected by nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jennifer R; Seymour, Joseph D; Brox, Timothy I; Skidmore, Mark L; Wang, Chen; Christner, Brent C; Luo, Bing-Hao; Codd, Sarah L

    2014-09-01

    Liquid water present in polycrystalline ice at the interstices between ice crystals results in a network of liquid-filled veins and nodes within a solid ice matrix, making ice a low porosity porous media. Here we used nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation and time dependent self-diffusion measurements developed for porous media applications to monitor three dimensional changes to the vein network in ices with and without a bacterial ice binding protein (IBP). Shorter effective diffusion distances were detected as a function of increased irreversible ice binding activity, indicating inhibition of ice recrystallization and persistent small crystal structure. The modification of ice structure by the IBP demonstrates a potential mechanism for the microorganism to enhance survivability in ice. These results highlight the potential of NMR techniques in evaluation of the impact of IBPs on vein network structure and recrystallization processes; information useful for continued development of ice-interacting proteins for biotechnology applications.

  11. A viral suppressor protein inhibits host RNA silencing by hooking up with Argonautes

    KAUST Repository

    Jin, Hailing

    2010-05-01

    RNA viruses are particularly vulnerable to RNAi-based defenses in the host, and thus have evolved specific proteins, known as viral suppressors of RNA silencing (VSRs), as a counterdefense. In this issue of Genes & Development, Azevedo and colleagues (pp. 904-915) discovered that P38, the VSR of Turnip crinkle virus, uses its glycine/tryptophane (GW) motifs as an ARGONAUTE (AGO) hook to attract and disarm the host\\'s essential effector of RNA silencing. Several GW motif-containing cellular proteins are known to be important partners of AGOs in RNA silencing effector complexes in yeast, plants, and animals. The GW motif appears to be a versatile and effective tool for regulating the activities of RNA silencing pathways, and the use of GW mimicry to compete for and inhibit host AGOs may be a strategy used by many pathogens to counteract host RNAi-based defenses. © 2010 by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  12. Kinetics of radiation-induced apoptosis in neonatal urogenital tissues with and without protein synthesis inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gobe, G.C.; Harmon, B.; Schoch, E.; Allan, D.J.

    1996-01-01

    The difference in incidence of radiation-induced apoptosis between two neonatal urogenital tissues, kidney and testis, was analysed over a 24h period. Concurrent administration of cycloheximide (10mg/kg body weight), a protein synthesis inhibitor, with radiation treatment was used to determine whether new protein synthesis had a role in induction of apoptosis in this in vivo model. Many chemotherapeutic drugs act via protein synthesis inhibition, and we believe that the results of this latter analysis may provide information for the planning of concurrent radio and chemotherapy. Apoptosis was quantified using morphological parameters, and verified by DNA gel electrophoresis for the typical banding pattern, and by electron microscopy. The proliferative index in tissues was studied, using [6- 3 H]-thymidine uptake ( 1h prior to euthanasia and collection of tissues) and autoradiography as indicators of cell proliferation (S-phase). Tissue was collected 2, 4, 6, 8, and 24h after radiation treatment. Expression of one of the apoptosis-associated genes, Bcl-2 (an apoptosis inhibitor/cell survival gene), was studied using immunohistochemistry. Apoptosis peaked at 4h in the testis and 6h in the kidney, emphasising the necessity of knowing tissue differences in radiation response if comparing changes at a particular time. A higher proportion (almost five fold) of the apoptotic cells died in S-phase in the kidney than the testis, over the 24h. Protein synthesis inhibition completely negated induction of apoptosis in both tissues. Necrosis was not identified at any time. Cycloheximide treatment greatly diminished Bcl-2 expression. The differences in response of the two tissues to irradiation relates to their innate cell (genetic) controls, which may be determined by their state of differentiation at time of treatment, or the tissue type. This in vivo study also suggests the model may be useful for analysis of other cancer therapies for example polychemotherapies or chemo

  13. Kinetics of radiation-induced apoptosis in neonatal urogenital tissues with and without protein synthesis inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gobe, G.C.; Harmon, B.; Schoch, E.; Allan, D.J. [Queensland Univ., St. Lucia, QLD (Australia). Dept. of Chemistry

    1996-12-31

    The difference in incidence of radiation-induced apoptosis between two neonatal urogenital tissues, kidney and testis, was analysed over a 24h period. Concurrent administration of cycloheximide (10mg/kg body weight), a protein synthesis inhibitor, with radiation treatment was used to determine whether new protein synthesis had a role in induction of apoptosis in this in vivo model. Many chemotherapeutic drugs act via protein synthesis inhibition, and we believe that the results of this latter analysis may provide information for the planning of concurrent radio and chemotherapy. Apoptosis was quantified using morphological parameters, and verified by DNA gel electrophoresis for the typical banding pattern, and by electron microscopy. The proliferative index in tissues was studied, using [6-{sup 3}H]-thymidine uptake ( 1h prior to euthanasia and collection of tissues) and autoradiography as indicators of cell proliferation (S-phase). Tissue was collected 2, 4, 6, 8, and 24h after radiation treatment. Expression of one of the apoptosis-associated genes, Bcl-2 (an apoptosis inhibitor/cell survival gene), was studied using immunohistochemistry. Apoptosis peaked at 4h in the testis and 6h in the kidney, emphasising the necessity of knowing tissue differences in radiation response if comparing changes at a particular time. A higher proportion (almost five fold) of the apoptotic cells died in S-phase in the kidney than the testis, over the 24h. Protein synthesis inhibition completely negated induction of apoptosis in both tissues. Necrosis was not identified at any time. Cycloheximide treatment greatly diminished Bcl-2 expression. The differences in response of the two tissues to irradiation relates to their innate cell (genetic) controls, which may be determined by their state of differentiation at time of treatment, or the tissue type. This in vivo study also suggests the model may be useful for analysis of other cancer therapies for example polychemotherapies or chemo

  14. Genetic inhibition of protein kinase Cε attenuates necrosis in experimental pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yannan; Tan, Tanya; Jia, Wenzhuo; Lugea, Aurelia; Mareninova, Olga; Waldron, Richard T.; Pandol, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the regulation of death pathways, necrosis and apoptosis, in pancreatitis is important for developing therapies directed to the molecular pathogenesis of the disease. Protein kinase Cε (PKCε) has been previously shown to regulate inflammatory responses and zymogen activation in pancreatitis. Furthermore, we demonstrated that ethanol specifically activated PKCε in pancreatic acinar cells and that PKCε mediated the sensitizing effects of ethanol on inflammatory response in pancreatitis. Here we investigated the role of PKCε in the regulation of death pathways in pancreatitis. We found that genetic deletion of PKCε resulted in decreased necrosis and severity in the in vivo cerulein-induced pancreatitis and that inhibition of PKCε protected the acinar cells from CCK-8 hyperstimulation-induced necrosis and ATP reduction. These findings were associated with upregulation of mitochondrial Bak and Bcl-2/Bcl-xL, proapoptotic and prosurvival members in the Bcl-2 family, respectively, as well as increased mitochondrial cytochrome c release, caspase activation, and apoptosis in pancreatitis in PKCε knockout mice. We further confirmed that cerulein pancreatitis induced a dramatic mitochondrial translocation of PKCε, suggesting that PKCε regulated necrosis in pancreatitis via mechanisms involving mitochondria. Finally, we showed that PKCε deletion downregulated inhibitors of apoptosis proteins, c-IAP2, survivin, and c-FLIPs while promoting cleavage/inactivation of receptor-interacting protein kinase (RIP). Taken together, our findings provide evidence that PKCε activation during pancreatitis promotes necrosis through mechanisms involving mitochondrial proapoptotic and prosurvival Bcl-2 family proteins and upregulation of nonmitochondrial pathways that inhibit caspase activation and RIP cleavage/inactivation. Thus PKCε is a potential target for prevention and/or treatment of acute pancreatitis. PMID:25035113

  15. Growth-arrest-specific protein 2 inhibits cell division in Xenopus embryos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Zhang

    Full Text Available Growth-arrest-specific 2 gene was originally identified in murine fibroblasts under growth arrest conditions. Furthermore, serum stimulation of quiescent, non-dividing cells leads to the down-regulation of gas2 and results in re-entry into the cell cycle. Cytoskeleton rearrangements are critical for cell cycle progression and cell division and the Gas2 protein has been shown to co-localize with actin and microtubules in interphase mammalian cells. Despite these findings, direct evidence supporting a role for Gas2 in the mechanism of cell division has not been reported.To determine whether the Gas2 protein plays a role in cell division, we over-expressed the full-length Gas2 protein and Gas2 truncations containing either the actin-binding CH domain or the tubulin-binding Gas2 domain in Xenopus laevis embryos. We found that both the full-length Gas2 protein and the Gas2 domain, but not the CH domain, inhibited cell division and resulted in multinucleated cells. The observation that Gas2 domain alone can arrest cell division suggests that Gas2 function is mediated by microtubule binding. Gas2 co-localized with microtubules at the cell cortex of Gas2-injected Xenopus embryos using cryo-confocal microscopy and co-sedimented with microtubules in cytoskeleton co-sedimentation assays. To investigate the mechanism of Gas2-induced cell division arrest, we showed, using a wound-induced contractile array assay, that Gas2 stabilized microtubules. Finally, electron microscopy studies demonstrated that Gas2 bundled microtubules into higher-order structures.Our experiments show that Gas2 inhibits cell division in Xenopus embryos. We propose that Gas2 function is mediated by binding and bundling microtubules, leading to cell division arrest.

  16. Grouper iridovirus GIV66 is a Bcl-2 protein that inhibits apoptosis by exclusively sequestering Bim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banjara, Suresh; Mao, Jiahao; Ryan, Timothy M; Caria, Sofia; Kvansakul, Marc

    2018-04-13

    Programmed cell death or apoptosis is a critical mechanism for the controlled removal of damaged or infected cells, and proteins of the Bcl-2 family are important arbiters of this process. Viruses have been shown to encode functional and structural homologs of Bcl-2 to counter premature host-cell apoptosis and ensure viral proliferation or survival. Grouper iridovirus (GIV) is a large DNA virus belonging to the Iridoviridae family and harbors GIV66, a putative Bcl-2-like protein and mitochondrially localized apoptosis inhibitor. However, the molecular and structural basis of GIV66-mediated apoptosis inhibition is currently not understood. To gain insight into GIV66's mechanism of action, we systematically evaluated its ability to bind peptides spanning the BH3 domain of pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members. Our results revealed that GIV66 harbors an unusually high level of specificity for pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 and displays affinity only for Bcl-2-like 11 (Bcl2L11 or Bim). Using crystal structures of both apo-GIV66 and GIV66 bound to the BH3 domain from Bim, we unexpectedly found that GIV66 forms dimers via an interface that results in occluded access to the canonical Bcl-2 ligand-binding groove, which breaks apart upon Bim binding. This observation suggests that GIV66 dimerization may affect GIV66's ability to bind host pro-death Bcl-2 proteins and enables highly targeted virus-directed suppression of host apoptosis signaling. Our findings provide a mechanistic understanding for the potent anti-apoptotic activity of GIV66 by identifying it as the first single-specificity, pro-survival Bcl-2 protein and identifying a pivotal role of Bim in GIV-mediated inhibition of apoptosis. © 2018 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Mammalian Tead proteins regulate cell proliferation and contact inhibition as transcriptional mediators of Hippo signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Mitsunori; Sasaki, Hiroshi

    2008-12-01

    Regulation of organ size is important for development and tissue homeostasis. In Drosophila, Hippo signaling controls organ size by regulating the activity of a TEAD transcription factor, Scalloped, through modulation of its co-activator protein Yki. Here, we show that mouse Tead proteins regulate cell proliferation by mediating Hippo signaling. In NIH3T3 cells, cell density and Hippo signaling regulated the activity of endogenous Tead proteins by modulating nuclear localization of a Yki homolog, Yap1, and the resulting change in Tead activity altered cell proliferation. Tead2-VP16 mimicked Yap1 overexpression, including increased cell proliferation, reduced cell death, promotion of EMT, lack of cell contact inhibition and promotion of tumor formation. Growth-promoting activities of various Yap1 mutants correlated with their Tead-co-activator activities. Tead2-VP16 and Yap1 regulated largely overlapping sets of genes. However, only a few of the Tead/Yap1-regulated genes in NIH3T3 cells were affected in Tead1(-/-);Tead2(-/-) or Yap1(-/-) embryos. Most of the previously identified Yap1-regulated genes were not affected in NIH3T3 cells or mutant mice. In embryos, levels of nuclear Yap1 and Tead1 varied depending on cell type. Strong nuclear accumulation of Yap1 and Tead1 were seen in myocardium, correlating with requirements of Tead1 for proliferation. However, their distribution did not always correlate with proliferation. Taken together, mammalian Tead proteins regulate cell proliferation and contact inhibition as a transcriptional mediator of Hippo signaling, but the mechanisms by which Tead/Yap1 regulate cell proliferation differ depending on the cell type, and Tead, Yap1 and Hippo signaling may play multiple roles in mouse embryos.

  18. Orf virus 002 protein targets ovine protein S100A4 and inhibits NF-kappa B signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daxiang Chen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Orf virus (ORFV, a member of Parapoxvirus, has evolved various strategies to modulate the immune responses of host cells. The ORFV-encoded protein ORFV002, a regulator factor, has been found to inhibit the acetylation of NF-κB-p65 by blocking phosphorylation of NF-kB-p65 at Ser276 and also to disrupt the binding of NF-kB-p65 and p300. To explore the mechanism by which ORFV002 regulates NF-κB signaling, the understanding of ORFV002 potential binding partners in host cells is critical. In this study, ovine S100 calcium binding protein A4 (S100A4, prolylendopeptidase-like (PREPL and NADH dehydrogenase (ubiquinone 1 alpha subcomplex 8 (NDUFA8 were found to interact with ORFV002 based on the yeast two-hybrid (Y2H assay using a cDNA library derived from primary ovine fetal turbinate cells (OFTu. GST pull-down and bidirectional co-immunoprecipitation assay results demonstrate that ORFV002 interacts with S100A4 directly. Following the pEGFP-ORFV002 (p002GFP transfection, we found that cytoplasmic S100A4 translocates into the nucleus and co-localizes with ORFV002. Furthermore, the inhibitory effect of ORFV002 on NF-κB signaling was significantly restored by S100A4 knock-down phenotype, suggesting ovine S100A4 participating in the ORFV002-mediated NF-κB signaling. These data demonstrate that ORFV002 inhibits the NF-κB activation through its interaction with S100A4 along with its nucleus translocation.

  19. Characterization of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B Inhibition by Chlorogenic Acid and Cichoric Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipchock, James M; Hendrickson, Heidi P; Douglas, Bonnie B; Bird, Kelly E; Ginther, Patrick S; Rivalta, Ivan; Ten, Nicholas S; Batista, Victor S; Loria, J Patrick

    2017-01-10

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is a known regulator of the insulin and leptin signaling pathways and is an active target for the design of inhibitors for the treatment of type II diabetes and obesity. Recently, cichoric acid (CHA) and chlorogenic acid (CGA) were predicted by docking methods to be allosteric inhibitors that bind distal to the active site. However, using a combination of steady-state inhibition kinetics, solution nuclear magnetic resonance experiments, and molecular dynamics simulations, we show that CHA is a competitive inhibitor that binds in the active site of PTP1B. CGA, while a noncompetitive inhibitor, binds in the second aryl phosphate binding site, rather than the predicted benzfuran binding pocket. The molecular dynamics simulations of the apo enzyme and cysteine-phosphoryl intermediate states with and without bound CGA suggest CGA binding inhibits PTP1B by altering hydrogen bonding patterns at the active site. This study provides a mechanistic understanding of the allosteric inhibition of PTP1B.

  20. Inhibition of cell proliferation by p107, a relative of the retinoblastoma protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, L; van den Heuvel, S; Helin, K

    1993-01-01

    The cellular protein p107 shares many structural and biochemical features with the retinoblastoma gene product, pRB. We have isolated a full-length cDNA for human p107 and have used this clone to study the function of p107. We show that, like pRB, p107 is a potent inhibitor of E2F-mediated trans......-activation, and overexpression of p107 can inhibit proliferation in certain cell types, arresting sensitive cells in G1. Several experiments, however, showed that growth inhibition by pRB and p107 did not occur through the same mechanism. First, in the cervical carcinoma cell line C33A, p107 was able to block cell proliferation...... to inhibit cell proliferation, whereas analogous mutants in pRB are known to be unable to block cell growth. Together, these results suggest a biological role of p107 that is related, but not identical, to that of pRB....

  1. Alzheimer's associated β-amyloid protein inhibits influenza A virus and modulates viral interactions with phagocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitchell R White

    Full Text Available Accumulation of β-Amyloid (βA is a key pathogenetic factor in Alzheimer's disease; however, the normal function of βA is unknown. Recent studies have shown that βA can inhibit growth of bacteria and fungi. In this paper we show that βA also inhibits replication of seasonal and pandemic strains of H3N2 and H1N1 influenza A virus (IAV in vitro. The 42 amino acid fragment of βA (βA42 had greater activity than the 40 amino acid fragment. Direct incubation of the virus with βA42 was needed to achieve optimal inhibition. Using quantitative PCR assays βA42 was shown to reduce viral uptake by epithelial cells after 45 minutes and to reduce supernatant virus at 24 hours post infection. βA42 caused aggregation of IAV particles as detected by light transmission assays and electron and confocal microscopy. βA42 did not stimulate neutrophil H2O2 production or extracellular trap formation on its own, but it increased both responses stimulated by IAV. In addition, βA42 increased uptake of IAV by neutrophils. βA42 reduced viral protein synthesis in monocytes and reduced IAV-induced interleukin-6 production by these cells. Hence, we demonstrate for the first time that βA has antiviral activity and modulates viral interactions with phagocytes.

  2. Inhibition of Mutant αB Crystallin-Induced Protein Aggregation by a Molecular Tweezer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Na; Bitan, Gal; Schrader, Thomas; Klärner, Frank-Gerrit; Osinska, Hanna; Robbins, Jeffrey

    2017-08-08

    Compromised protein quality control causes the accumulation of misfolded proteins and intracellular aggregates, contributing to cardiac disease and heart failure. The development of therapeutics directed at proteotoxicity-based pathology in heart disease is just beginning. The molecular tweezer CLR01 is a broad-spectrum inhibitor of abnormal self-assembly of amyloidogenic proteins, including amyloid β-protein, tau, and α-synuclein. This small molecule interferes with aggregation by binding selectively to lysine side chains, changing the charge distribution of aggregation-prone proteins and thereby disrupting aggregate formation. However, the effects of CLR01 in cardiomyocytes undergoing proteotoxic stress have not been explored. Here we assess whether CLR01 can decrease cardiac protein aggregation catalyzed by cardiomyocyte-specific expression of mutated αB-crystallin (CryAB R 120G ). A proteotoxic model of desmin-related cardiomyopathy caused by cardiomyocyte-specific expression of CryAB R 120G was used to test the efficacy of CLR01 therapy in the heart. Neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were infected with adenovirus expressing either wild-type CryAB or CryAB R 120G . Subsequently, the cells were treated with different doses of CLR01 or a closely related but inactive derivative, CLR03. CLR01 decreased aggregate accumulation and attenuated cytotoxicity caused by CryAB R 120G expression in a dose-dependent manner, whereas CLR03 had no effect. Ubiquitin-proteasome system function was analyzed using a ubiquitin-proteasome system reporter protein consisting of a short degron, CL1, fused to the COOH-terminus of green fluorescent protein. CLR01 improved proteasomal function in CryAB R 120G cardiomyocytes but did not alter autophagic flux. In vivo, CLR01 administration also resulted in reduced protein aggregates in CryAB R 120G transgenic mice. CLR01 can inhibit CryAB R 120G aggregate formation and decrease cytotoxicity in cardiomyocytes undergoing proteotoxic stress

  3. Soy protein isolate inhibits hepatic tumor promotion in mice fed a high-fat liquid diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Kelly E; Pulliam, Casey F; Pedersen, Kim B; Hennings, Leah; Ronis, Martin Jj

    2017-03-01

    Alcoholic and nonalcoholic fatty liver diseases are risk factors for development of hepatocellular carcinoma, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. On the other hand, ingestion of soy-containing diets may oppose the development of certain cancers. We previously reported that replacing casein with a soy protein isolate reduced tumor promotion in the livers of mice with alcoholic liver disease after feeding a high fat ethanol liquid diet following initiation with diethylnitrosamine. Feeding soy protein isolate inhibited processes that may contribute to tumor promotion including inflammation, sphingolipid signaling, and Wnt/β-catenin signaling. We have extended these studies to characterize liver tumor promotion in a model of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease produced by chronic feeding of high-fat liquid diets in the absence of ethanol. Mice treated with diethylnitrosamine on postnatal day 14 were fed a high-fat liquid diet made with casein or SPI as the sole protein source for 16 weeks in adulthood. Relative to mice fed normal chow, a high fat/casein diet led to increased tumor promotion, hepatocyte proliferation, steatosis, and inflammation. Replacing casein with soy protein isolate counteracted these effects. The high fat diets also resulted in a general increase in transcripts for Wnt/β-catenin pathway components, which may be an important mechanism, whereby hepatic tumorigenesis is promoted. However, soy protein isolate did not block Wnt signaling in this nonalcoholic fatty liver disease model. We conclude that replacing casein with soy protein isolate blocks development of steatosis, inflammation, and tumor promotion in diethylnitrosamine-treated mice fed high fat diets. Impact statement The impact of dietary components on cancer is a topic of great interest for both the general public and the scientific community. Liver cancer is currently the second leading form of cancer deaths worldwide. Our study has addressed the effect of the protein

  4. Dickkopf-related protein 1 inhibits the WNT signaling pathway and improves pig oocyte maturation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee D Spate

    Full Text Available The ability to mature oocytes in vitro provides a tool for creating embryos by parthenogenesis, fertilization, and cloning. Unfortunately the quality of oocytes matured in vitro falls behind that of in vivo matured oocytes. To address this difference, transcriptional profiling by deep sequencing was conducted on pig oocytes that were either matured in vitro or in vivo. Alignment of over 18 million reads identified 1,316 transcripts that were differentially represented. One pathway that was overrepresented in the oocytes matured in vitro was for Wingless-type MMTV integration site (WNT signaling. In an attempt to inhibit the WNT pathway, Dickkopf-related protein 1 was added to the in vitro maturation medium. Addition of Dickkopf-related protein 1 improved the percentage of oocytes that matured to the metaphase II stage, increased the number of nuclei in the resulting blastocyst stage embryos, and reduced the amount of disheveled segment polarity protein 1 protein in oocytes. It is concluded that transcriptional profiling is a powerful method for detecting differences between in vitro and in vivo matured oocytes, and that the WNT signaling pathway is important for proper oocyte maturation.

  5. Human cytomegalovirus inhibits a DNA damage response by mislocalizing checkpoint proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspar, Miguel; Shenk, Thomas

    2006-02-01

    The DNA damage checkpoint pathway responds to DNA damage and induces a cell cycle arrest to allow time for DNA repair. Several viruses are known to activate or modulate this cellular response. Here we show that the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated checkpoint pathway, which responds to double-strand breaks in DNA, is activated in response to human cytomegalovirus DNA replication. However, this activation does not propagate through the pathway; it is blocked at the level of the effector kinase, checkpoint kinase 2 (Chk2). Late after infection, several checkpoint proteins, including ataxia-telangiectasia mutated and Chk2, are mislocalized to a cytoplasmic virus assembly zone, where they are colocalized with virion structural proteins. This colocalization was confirmed by immunoprecipitation of virion proteins with an antibody that recognizes Chk2. Virus replication was resistant to ionizing radiation, which causes double-strand breaks in DNA. We propose that human CMV DNA replication activates the checkpoint response to DNA double-strand breaks, and the virus responds by altering the localization of checkpoint proteins to the cytoplasm and thereby inhibiting the signaling pathway. ionizing radiation | ataxia-telangiectasia mutated pathway

  6. Cytokine-mediated inhibition of ketogenesis is unrelated to nitric oxide or protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pailla, K; El-Mir, M Y; Cynober, L; Blonde-Cynober, F

    2001-08-01

    Cytokines play an important role in the lipid disturbances commonly associated with sepsis. Ketogenesis is inhibited during sepsis, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) have been suggested to mediate this impairment, irrespective of the ketogenic substrate (fatty acid or branched chain ketoacid). However, the underlying mechanism of cytokine action is still unknown. First we investigated the possible role of the induction of nitric oxide (NO) synthesis, using rat hepatocyte monolayers. Hepatocytes were incubated for 6 h, with either alpha -ketoisocaproate (KIC) (1 mM) or oleic acid (0.5 mM) in the presence or absence of TNF alpha (25 microg/L) and IL-6 (15 microg/L). In some experiments, cells were incubated with NO synthase (NOS) inhibitors. The ketone body (beta -hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate) production and nitrite production were measured in the incubation medium. Our results indicated no involvement of nitric oxide in the inhibitory action of cytokines on ketogenesis. Secondly, we showed that cycloheximide (10(-4)M) did not counteract the cytokine-mediated ketogenesis decrease; hence, the effects of cytokines on ketogenesis are not protein synthesis-dependent. The cytokine-mediated inhibition of ketogenesis is therefore unrelated to either NO production or protein synthesis. Copyright 2001 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

  7. Inhibition of SNW1 association with spliceosomal proteins promotes apoptosis in breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Naoki; Maeda, Masao; Sugiyama, Mai; Ito, Satoko; Hyodo, Toshinori; Masuda, Akio; Tsunoda, Nobuyuki; Kokuryo, Toshio; Hamaguchi, Michinari; Nagino, Masato; Senga, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    RNA splicing is a fundamental process for protein synthesis. Recent studies have reported that drugs that inhibit splicing have cytotoxic effects on various tumor cell lines. In this report, we demonstrate that depletion of SNW1, a component of the spliceosome, induces apoptosis in breast cancer cells. Proteomics and biochemical analyses revealed that SNW1 directly associates with other spliceosome components, including EFTUD2 (Snu114) and SNRNP200 (Brr2). The SKIP region of SNW1 interacted with the N-terminus of EFTUD2 as well as two independent regions in the C-terminus of SNRNP200. Similar to SNW1 depletion, knockdown of EFTUD2 increased the numbers of apoptotic cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that exogenous expression of either the SKIP region of SNW1 or the N-terminus region of EFTUD2 significantly promoted cellular apoptosis. Our results suggest that the inhibition of SNW1 or its associating proteins may be a novel therapeutic strategy for cancer treatment

  8. Solithromycin inhibition of protein synthesis and ribosome biogenesis in Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Haemophilus influenzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Ward; Frazier, Ashley D; Champney, W Scott

    2013-04-01

    The continuing increase in antibiotic-resistant microorganisms is driving the search for new antibiotic targets and improved antimicrobial agents. Ketolides are semisynthetic derivatives of macrolide antibiotics, which are effective against certain resistant organisms. Solithromycin (CEM-101) is a novel fluoroketolide with improved antimicrobial effectiveness. This compound binds to the large 50S subunit of the ribosome and inhibits protein biosynthesis. Like other ketolides, it should impair bacterial ribosomal subunit formation. This mechanism of action was examined in strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, and Haemophilus influenzae. The mean 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) for solithromycin inhibition of cell viability, protein synthesis, and growth rate were 7.5, 40, and 125 ng/ml for Streptococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, and Haemophilus influenzae, respectively. The net formation of the 50S subunit was reduced in all three organisms, with IC50s similar to those given above. The rates of 50S subunit formation measured by a pulse-chase labeling procedure were reduced by 75% in cells growing at the IC50 of solithromycin. Turnover of 23S rRNA was stimulated by solithromycin as well. Solithromycin was found to be a particularly effective antimicrobial agent, with IC50s comparable to those of telithromycin and significantly better than those of azithromycin and clarithromycin in these three microorganisms.

  9. Cardiovirus Leader proteins bind exportins: Implications for virus replication and nucleocytoplasmic trafficking inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciomperlik, Jessica J. [Institute for Molecular Virology and Department of Biochemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Basta, Holly A. [Department of Biology, Rocky Mountain College, Billings, MT (United States); Palmenberg, Ann C., E-mail: acpalmen@wisc.edu [Institute for Molecular Virology and Department of Biochemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Cardiovirus Leader proteins (L{sub X}) inhibit cellular nucleocytoplasmic trafficking by directing host kinases to phosphorylate Phe/Gly-containing nuclear pore proteins (Nups). Resolution of the Mengovirus L{sub M} structure bound to Ran GTPase, suggested this complex would further recruit specific exportins (karyopherins), which in turn mediate kinase selection. Pull-down experiments and recombinant complex reconstitution now confirm that Crm1 and CAS exportins form stable dimeric complexes with encephalomyocarditis virus L{sub E}, and also larger complexes with L{sub E}:Ran. shRNA knockdown studies support this idea. Similar activities could be demonstrated for recombinant L{sub S} and L{sub T} from Theiloviruses. When mutations were introduced to alter the L{sub E} zinc finger domain, acidic domain, or dual phosphorylation sites, there was reduced exportin selection. These regions are not involved in Ran interactions, so the Ran and Crm1 binding sites on L{sub E} must be non-overlapping. The involvement of exportins in this mechanism is important to viral replication and the observation of trafficking inhibition by L{sub E}.

  10. Estrogen inhibits glucocorticoid action via protein phosphatase 5 (PP5)-mediated glucocorticoid receptor dephosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Leung, Donald Y M; Nordeen, Steven K; Goleva, Elena

    2009-09-04

    Although glucocorticoids suppress proliferation of many cell types and are used in the treatment of certain cancers, trials of glucocorticoid therapy in breast cancer have been a disappointment. Another suggestion that estrogens may affect glucocorticoid action is that the course of some inflammatory diseases tends to be more severe and less responsive to corticosteroid treatment in females. To date, the molecular mechanism of cross-talk between estrogens and glucocorticoids is poorly understood. Here we show that, in both MCF-7 and T47D breast cancer cells, estrogen inhibits glucocorticoid induction of the MKP-1 (mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1) and serum/glucocorticoid-regulated kinase genes. Estrogen did not affect glucocorticoid-induced glucocorticoid receptor (GR) nuclear translocation but reduced ligand-induced GR phosphorylation at Ser-211, which is associated with the active form of GR. We show that estrogen increases expression of protein phosphatase 5 (PP5), which mediates the dephosphorylation of GR at Ser-211. Gene knockdown of PP5 abolished the estrogen-mediated suppression of GR phosphorylation and induction of MKP-1 and serum/glucocorticoid-regulated kinase. More importantly, after PP5 knockdown estrogen-promoted cell proliferation was significantly suppressed by glucocorticoids. This study demonstrates cross-talk between estrogen-induced PP5 and GR action. It also reveals that PP5 inhibition may antagonize estrogen-promoted events in response to corticosteroid therapy.

  11. A monocyte chemotaxis inhibiting factor in serum of HIV infected men shares epitopes with the HIV transmembrane protein gp41

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tas, M.; Drexhage, H. A.; Goudsmit, J.

    1988-01-01

    This report describes that gp41, the transmembranous envelope protein of HIV, is able to inhibit monocyte chemotaxis (measured as FMLP-induced polarization). To study the presence of such immunosuppressive HIV env proteins in the circulation of HIV-infected men, fractions were prepared from serum

  12. The tumor suppressor PTEN positively regulates macroautophagy by inhibiting the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arico, S.; Petiot, A.; Bauvy, C.; Dubbelhuis, P. F.; Meijer, A. J.; Codogno, P.; Ogier-Denis, E.

    2001-01-01

    The tumor suppressor PTEN is a dual protein and phosphoinositide phosphatase that negatively controls the phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase/protein kinase B (Akt/PKB) signaling pathway. Interleukin-13 via the activation of the class I PI 3-kinase has been shown to inhibit the macroautophagic

  13. Cysteine-Rich Intestinal Protein 1 Silencing Inhibits Migration and Invasion in Human Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Guoyang; Zou, Liyuan; Zhou, Lin; Gao, Peiqiong; Qian, Xinlai; Cui, Jing

    2017-01-01

    Cysteine-rich intestinal protein 1 (CRIP1), a member of the LIM/double zinc finger protein family, is abnormally expressed in several tumour types. However, few data are available on the role of CRIP1 in cancer. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the expression profile and functions of CRIP1 in colorectal cancer. To examine the protein expression level of CRIP1, immunohistochemistry (IHC) was performed on 56 pairs of colon cancer tissue samples. Western blotting was performed to investigate CRIP1 protein expression in four colon cancer cell lines. The endogenous expression of CRIP1 was suppressed using short interfering RNAs (siRNAs). Cell proliferation assays were used to determine whether CRIP1 silencing affected cell proliferation. Flow cytometry analysis was used to detect cell apoptosis. The effects of silencing CRIP1 on cell migration and invasion was detected using the transwell and wound-healing assays. IHC analysis showed that protein level of CRIP1 was significantly higher in tumour tissue samples than in paired non-tumour tissue samples and that the CRIP1 level was higher in metastatic tissue samples than in non-metastatic tissue samples. In addition, protein levels of CRIP1 were higher in highly metastatic colon cancer cell lines than in colon cancer cell lines with low metastasis. Further, CRIP1 silencing had no effect on cell proliferation or apoptosis in SW620 and HT29 cells. CRIP1 silencing suppressed cell migration and invasion obviously in SW620 and HT29 cells. The present study provides new evidence that abnormal expression of CRIP1 might be related to the degree of metastasis in colorectal cancer and that CRIP1 silencing could effectively inhibit migration and invasion during colorectal cancer development. These findings might aid the development of a biomarker for colon cancer prognosis and metastasis, and thus help to treat this common type of cancer. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. RYBP Is a K63-Ubiquitin-Chain-Binding Protein that Inhibits Homologous Recombination Repair

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    Mohammad A.M. Ali

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Ring1-YY1-binding protein (RYBP is a member of the non-canonical polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1, and like other PRC1 members, it is best described as a transcriptional regulator. However, several PRC1 members were recently shown to function in DNA repair. Here, we report that RYBP preferentially binds K63-ubiquitin chains via its Npl4 zinc finger (NZF domain. Since K63-linked ubiquitin chains are assembled at DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs, we examined the contribution of RYBP to DSB repair. Surprisingly, we find that RYBP is K48 polyubiquitylated by RNF8 and rapidly removed from chromatin upon DNA damage by the VCP/p97 segregase. High expression of RYBP competitively inhibits recruitment of BRCA1 repair complex to DSBs, reducing DNA end resection and homologous recombination (HR repair. Moreover, breast cancer cell lines expressing high endogenous RYBP levels show increased sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents and poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP inhibition. These data suggest that RYBP negatively regulates HR repair by competing for K63-ubiquitin chain binding. : Ali et al. find that RYBP binds K63-linked ubiquitin chains and is removed from DNA damage sites. This K63-ubiquitin binding allows RYBP to hinder the recruitment of BRCA1 and Rad51 to DNA double-strand breaks, thus inhibiting homologous recombination repair. Accordingly, cancer cells expressing high RYBP are more sensitive to DNA-damaging therapies. Keywords: DNA damage response, homologous recombination, ubiquitylation, RYBP, polycomb proteins, double-strand break repair, chromatin, histone modification

  15. Glioblastoma Inhibition by Cell Surface Immunoglobulin Protein EWI-2, In Vitro and In Vivo

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    Tatiana V. Kolesnikova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available EWI-2, a cell surface IgSF protein, is highly expressed in normal human brain but is considerably diminished in glioblastoma tumors and cell lines. Moreover, loss of EWI-2 expression correlated with a shorter survival time in human glioma patients, suggesting that EWI-2 might be a natural inhibitor of glioblastoma. In support of this idea, EWI-2 expression significantly impaired both ectopic and orthotopic tumor growth in nude mice in vivo. In vitro assays provided clues regarding EWI-2 functions. Expression of EWI-2 in T98G and/or U87-MG malignant glioblastoma cell lines failed to alter two-dimensional cell proliferation but inhibited glioblastoma colony formation in soft agar and caused diminished cell motility and invasion. At the biochemical level, EWI-2 markedly affects the organization of four molecules (tetraspanin proteins CD9 and CD81 and matrix metalloproteinases MMP-2 and MT1-MMP, which play key roles in the biology of astrocytes and gliomas. EWI-2 causes CD9 and CD81 to become more associated with each other, whereas CD81 and other tetraspanins become less associated with MMP-2 and MT1-MMP. We propose that EWI-2 inhibition of glioblastoma growth in vivo is at least partly explained by the capability of EWI-2 to inhibit growth and/or invasion in vitro. Underlying these functional effects, EWI-2 causes a substantial molecular reorganization of multiple molecules (CD81, CD9, MMP-2, and MT1-MMP known to affect proliferation and/or invasion of astrocytes and/or glioblastomas.

  16. Statins induce apoptosis in rat and human myotube cultures by inhibiting protein geranylgeranylation but not ubiquinone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Timothy E.; Zhang, Xiaohua; Bleicher, Kimberly B.; Dysart, Gary; Loughlin, Amy F.; Schaefer, William H.; Umbenhauer, Diane R.

    2004-01-01

    Statins are widely used to treat lipid disorders. These drugs are safe and well tolerated; however, in <1% of patients, myopathy and/or rhabdomyolysis can develop. To better understand the mechanism of statin-induced myopathy, we examined the ability of structurally distinct statins to induce apoptosis in an optimized rat myotube model. Compound A (a lactone) and Cerivastatin (an open acid) induced apoptosis, as measured by TUNEL and active caspase 3 staining, in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. In contrast, an epimer of Compound A (Compound B) exhibited a much weaker apoptotic response. Statin-induced apoptosis was completely prevented by mevalonate or geranylgeraniol, but not by farnesol. Zaragozic acid A, a squalene synthase inhibitor, caused no apoptosis on its own and had no effect on Compound-A-induced myotoxicity, suggesting the apoptosis was not a result of cholesterol synthesis inhibition. The geranylgeranyl transferase inhibitors GGTI-2133 and GGTI-2147 caused apoptosis in myotubes; the farnesyl transferase inhibitor FTI-277 exhibited a much weaker effect. In addition, the prenylation of rap1a, a geranylgeranylated protein, was inhibited by Compound A in myotubes at concentrations that induced apoptosis. A similar statin-induced apoptosis profile was seen in human myotube cultures but primary rat hepatocytes were about 200-fold more resistant to statin-induced apoptosis. Although the statin-induced hepatotoxicity could be attenuated with mevalonate, no effect was found with either geranylgeraniol or farnesol. In studies assessing ubiquinone levels after statin treatment in rat and human myotubes, there was no correlation between ubiquinone levels and apoptosis. Taken together, these observations suggest that statins cause apoptosis in myotube cultures in part by inhibiting the geranylgeranylation of proteins, but not by suppressing ubiquinone concentration. Furthermore, the data from primary hepatocytes suggests a cell-type differential

  17. Inhibition of G protein-activated inwardly rectifying K+ channels by different classes of antidepressants.

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    Toru Kobayashi

    Full Text Available Various antidepressants are commonly used for the treatment of depression and several other neuropsychiatric disorders. In addition to their primary effects on serotonergic or noradrenergic neurotransmitter systems, antidepressants have been shown to interact with several receptors and ion channels. However, the molecular mechanisms that underlie the effects of antidepressants have not yet been sufficiently clarified. G protein-activated inwardly rectifying K(+ (GIRK, Kir3 channels play an important role in regulating neuronal excitability and heart rate, and GIRK channel modulation has been suggested to have therapeutic potential for several neuropsychiatric disorders and cardiac arrhythmias. In the present study, we investigated the effects of various classes of antidepressants on GIRK channels using the Xenopus oocyte expression assay. In oocytes injected with mRNA for GIRK1/GIRK2 or GIRK1/GIRK4 subunits, extracellular application of sertraline, duloxetine, and amoxapine effectively reduced GIRK currents, whereas nefazodone, venlafaxine, mianserin, and mirtazapine weakly inhibited GIRK currents even at toxic levels. The inhibitory effects were concentration-dependent, with various degrees of potency and effectiveness. Furthermore, the effects of sertraline were voltage-independent and time-independent during each voltage pulse, whereas the effects of duloxetine were voltage-dependent with weaker inhibition with negative membrane potentials and time-dependent with a gradual decrease in each voltage pulse. However, Kir2.1 channels were insensitive to all of the drugs. Moreover, the GIRK currents induced by ethanol were inhibited by sertraline but not by intracellularly applied sertraline. The present results suggest that GIRK channel inhibition may reveal a novel characteristic of the commonly used antidepressants, particularly sertraline, and contributes to some of the therapeutic effects and adverse effects.

  18. Lignans and norlignans inhibit multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1/ABCC1)-mediated transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wróbel, Anna; Eklund, Patrik; Bobrowska-Hägerstrand, Malgorzata; Hägerstrand, Henry

    2010-11-01

    Multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1/ABCC1) is one of the drug efflux pumps mediating multidrug resistance in several cancer types. Efficient nontoxic inhibitors of MRP1-mediated transport are sought to potentially sensitise cancer cells to anticancer drugs. This study examined the potency of a series of plant lignans and norlignans of various structures to inhibit MRP1-mediated transport from human erythrocytes. The occurrence of MRP1 in the human erythrocyte membrane makes this cell a useful model in searching for efficient MRP1inhibitors. The inhibition of 2',7'-bis-(carboxypropyl)-5(6)-carboxyfluorescein (BCPCF) transport from human erythrocytes was measured fluorymetrically. In order to study possible membrane-perturbing effects of lignans and norlignans, the potency of these compounds to induce haemolysis, erythrocyte shape change, and phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure in the external layer of the erythrocyte membrane was examined. Nine compounds (six norlignans and three lignans) of the fourteen that were tested inhibited BCPCF transport from human erythrocytes. The most efficient inhibitor, the norlignan coded L1, had IC(50)=50 μM. Structure-activity relationship analysis showed that the strongest inhibitors were found among lignans and norlignans bearing a carbonyl function at position C-9. The highly oxidised structures and the presence of an ionisable group such as the carboxylic acid function enhance activity. All compounds that significantly decreased BCPCF transport were non-haemolytic, did not cause PS exposure and did not have any effect on erythrocyte shapes up to 200 μM. Lignans and norlignans can inhibit MRP1-mediated transport from human erythrocytes and should be further investigated as possible agents reversing multidrug resistance.

  19. Hepatitis C Virus Core Protein Promotes miR-122 Destabilization by Inhibiting GLD-2.

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    Geon-Woo Kim

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The liver-specific microRNA miR-122, which has essential roles in liver development and metabolism, is a key proviral factor for hepatitis C virus (HCV. Despite its crucial role in the liver and HCV life cycle, little is known about the molecular mechanism of miR-122 expression regulation by HCV infection. Here, we show that the HCV core protein downregulates the abundance of miR-122 by promoting its destabilization via the inhibition of GLD-2, a non-canonical cytoplasmic poly(A polymerase. The decrease in miR-122 expression resulted in the dysregulation of the known functions of miR-122, including its proviral activity for HCV. By high-throughput sequencing of small RNAs from human liver biopsies, we found that the 22-nucleotide (nt prototype miR-122 is modified at its 3' end by 3'-terminal non-templated and templated nucleotide additions. Remarkably, the proportion of miR-122 isomers bearing a single nucleotide tail of any ribonucleotide decreased in liver specimens from patients with HCV. We found that these single-nucleotide-tailed miR-122 isomers display increased miRNA activity and stability over the 22-nt prototype miR-122 and that the 3'-terminal extension is catalyzed by the unique terminal nucleotidyl transferase activity of GLD-2, which is capable of adding any single ribonucleotide without preference of adenylate to the miR-122 3' end. The HCV core protein specifically inhibited GLD-2, and its interaction with GLD-2 in the cytoplasm was found to be responsible for miR-122 downregulation. Collectively, our results provide new insights into the regulatory role of the HCV core protein in controlling viral RNA abundance and miR-122 functions through miR-122 stability modulation.

  20. Hepatitis C Virus Core Protein Promotes miR-122 Destabilization by Inhibiting GLD-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Geon-Woo; Lee, Seung-Hoon; Cho, Hee; Kim, Minwoo; Shin, Eui-Cheol; Oh, Jong-Won

    2016-07-01

    The liver-specific microRNA miR-122, which has essential roles in liver development and metabolism, is a key proviral factor for hepatitis C virus (HCV). Despite its crucial role in the liver and HCV life cycle, little is known about the molecular mechanism of miR-122 expression regulation by HCV infection. Here, we show that the HCV core protein downregulates the abundance of miR-122 by promoting its destabilization via the inhibition of GLD-2, a non-canonical cytoplasmic poly(A) polymerase. The decrease in miR-122 expression resulted in the dysregulation of the known functions of miR-122, including its proviral activity for HCV. By high-throughput sequencing of small RNAs from human liver biopsies, we found that the 22-nucleotide (nt) prototype miR-122 is modified at its 3' end by 3'-terminal non-templated and templated nucleotide additions. Remarkably, the proportion of miR-122 isomers bearing a single nucleotide tail of any ribonucleotide decreased in liver specimens from patients with HCV. We found that these single-nucleotide-tailed miR-122 isomers display increased miRNA activity and stability over the 22-nt prototype miR-122 and that the 3'-terminal extension is catalyzed by the unique terminal nucleotidyl transferase activity of GLD-2, which is capable of adding any single ribonucleotide without preference of adenylate to the miR-122 3' end. The HCV core protein specifically inhibited GLD-2, and its interaction with GLD-2 in the cytoplasm was found to be responsible for miR-122 downregulation. Collectively, our results provide new insights into the regulatory role of the HCV core protein in controlling viral RNA abundance and miR-122 functions through miR-122 stability modulation.

  1. Surfactant Protein-A inhibits Aspergillus fumigatus-induced allergic T-cell responses

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    Russo Scott J

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pulmonary surfactant protein (SP-A has potent immunomodulatory activities but its role and regulation during allergic airway inflammation is unknown. Methods We studied changes in SP-A expression in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL using a murine model of single Aspergillus fumigatus (Af challenge of sensitized animals. Results SP-A protein levels in the BAL fluid showed a rapid, transient decline that reached the lowest values (25% of controls 12 h after intranasal Af provocation of sensitized mice. Decrease of SP-A was associated with influx of inflammatory cells and increase of IL-4 and IL-5 mRNA and protein levels. Since levels of SP-A showed a significant negative correlation with these BAL cytokines (but not with IFN-γ, we hypothesized that SP-A exerts an inhibitory effect on Th2-type immune responses. To study this hypothesis, we used an in vitro Af-rechallenge model. Af-induced lymphocyte proliferation of cells isolated from sensitized mice was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by addition of purified human SP-A (0.1–10 μg/ml. Flow cytometric studies on Af-stimulated lymphocytes indicated that the numbers of CD4+ (but not CD8+ T cells were significantly increased in the parental population and decreased in the third and fourth generation in the presence of SP-A. Further, addition of SP-A to the tissue culture inhibited Af-induced IL-4 and IL-5 production suggesting that SP-A directly suppressed allergen-stimulated CD4+ T cell function. Conclusion We speculate that a transient lack of this lung collectin following allergen exposure of the airways may significantly contribute to the development of a T-cell dependent allergic immune response.

  2. Protein-repellent and antibacterial dental composite to inhibit biofilms and caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ning; Ma, Jianfeng; Melo, Mary A S; Weir, Michael D; Bai, Yuxing; Xu, Hockin H K

    2015-02-01

    Biofilm acids contribute to secondary caries, which is a main reason for dental restoration failures. The objectives of this study were to: (1) develop a protein-repellent and antibacterial composite, and (2) investigate the effects of combining 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) with quaternary ammonium dimethylaminohexadecyl methacrylate (DMAHDM) on composite mechanical properties and biofilm response for the first time. MPC, DMAHDM and glass particles were mixed into a dental resin composite. Mechanical properties were measured in three-point flexure. Protein adsorption onto the composites was measured by a micro bicinchoninic acid method. A human saliva microcosm model was used to grow biofilms on composites. Colony-forming unit (CFU) counts, live/dead assay, metabolic activity, and lactic acid production of biofilms were determined. Incorporation of 3% MPC and 1.5% DMAHDM into composite achieved protein-repellent and antibacterial capabilities without compromising the mechanical properties. Composite with 3% MPC+1.5% DMAHDM had protein adsorption that was 1/10 that of a commercial composite (pbiofilm growth than using MPC or DMAHDM alone (pBiofilm CFU counts on composite with 3% MPC+1.5% DMAHDM were more than three orders of magnitude lower than that of commercial control. Dental composite with a combination of strong protein-repellent and antibacterial capabilities was developed for the first time. Composite containing MPC and DMAHDM greatly reduced biofilm growth and lactic acid production, without compromising mechanical properties of the composite. Novel composite with MPC and DMAHDM greatly reduced biofilm activity and is promising to inhibit secondary caries. The dual agents of MPC plus DMAHDM may have wide applicability to other dental materials. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Methyl-CpG binding domain proteins inhibit interspecies courtship and promote aggression in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Tarun; Morgan, Hannah R; Andrews, Jonathan C; Brewer, Edmond R; Certel, Sarah J

    2017-07-14

    Reproductive isolation and speciation are driven by the convergence of environmental and genetic variation. The integration of these variation sources is thought to occur through epigenetic marks including DNA methylation. Proteins containing a methyl-CpG-binding domain (MBD) bind methylated DNA and interpret epigenetic marks, providing a dynamic yet evolutionarily adapted cellular output. Here, we report the Drosophila MBD-containing proteins, dMBD-R2 and dMBD2/3, contribute to reproductive isolation and survival behavioral strategies. Drosophila melanogaster males with a reduction in dMBD-R2 specifically in octopamine (OA) neurons exhibit courtship toward divergent interspecies D. virilis and D. yakuba females and a decrease in conspecific mating success. Conspecific male-male courtship is increased between dMBD-R2-deficient males while aggression is reduced. These changes in adaptive behavior are separable as males with a hypermethylated OA neuronal genome exhibited a decrease in aggression without altering male-male courtship. These results suggest Drosophila MBD-containing proteins are required within the OA neural circuitry to inhibit interspecies and conspecific male-male courtship and indicate that the genetically hard-wired neural mechanisms enforcing behavioral reproductive isolation include the interpretation of the epigenome.

  4. TATA binding protein associated factor 3 (TAF3 interacts with p53 and inhibits its function

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    Tora Laszlo

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The tumour suppressor protein p53 is a sequence specific DNA-binding transcription regulator, which exerts its versatile roles in genome protection and apoptosis by affecting the expression of a large number of genes. In an attempt to obtain a better understanding of the mechanisms by which p53 transcription function is regulated, we studied p53 interactions. Results We identified BIP2 (Bric-à-brac interacting protein 2, the fly homolog of TAF3, a histone fold and a plant homeodomain containing subunit of TFIID, as an interacting partner of Drosophila melanogaster p53 (Dmp53. We detected physical interaction between the C terminus of Dmp53 and the central region of TAF3 both in yeast two hybrid assays and in vitro. Interestingly, DmTAF3 can also interact with human p53, and mammalian TAF3 can bind to both Dmp53 and human p53. This evolutionarily conserved interaction is functionally significant, since elevated TAF3 expression severely and selectively inhibits transcription activation by p53 in human cell lines, and it decreases the level of the p53 protein as well. Conclusion We identified TAF3 as an evolutionarily conserved negative regulator of p53 transcription activation function.

  5. Mapping the binding interface between an HIV-1 inhibiting intrabody and the viral protein Rev.

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    Thomas Vercruysse

    Full Text Available HIV-1 Rev is the key protein in the nucleocytoplasmic export and expression of the late viral mRNAs. An important aspect for its function is its ability to multimerize on these mRNAs. We have recently identified a llama single-domain antibody (Nb190 as the first inhibitor targeting the Rev multimerization function in cells. This nanobody is a potent intracellular antibody that efficiently inhibits HIV-1 viral production. In order to gain insight into the Nb190-Rev interaction interface, we performed mutational and docking studies to map the interface between the nanobody paratope and the Rev epitope. Alanine mutants of the hyper-variable domains of Nb190 and the Rev multimerization domains were evaluated in different assays measuring Nb190-Rev interaction or viral production. Seven residues within Nb190 and five Rev residues are demonstrated to be crucial for epitope recognition. These experimental data were used to perform docking experiments and map the Nb190-Rev structural interface. This Nb190-Rev interaction model can guide further studies of the Nb190 effect on HIV-1 Rev function and could serve as starting point for the rational development of smaller entities binding to the Nb190 epitope, aimed at interfering with protein-protein interactions of the Rev N-terminal domain.

  6. Dietary egg white protein inhibits lymphatic lipid transport in thoracic lymph duct-cannulated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Ryosuke; Shirouchi, Bungo; Kawamura, Sayaka; Baba, Sanae; Shiratake, Sawako; Nagata, Kazuko; Imaizumi, Katsumi; Sato, Masao

    2014-11-05

    Dietary egg white protein (EWP) decreases serum cholesterol levels. We previously showed that EWP decreased cholesterol absorption in the intestine. Rats subjected to permanent lymph duct cannulation were used to investigate the effects of dietary EWP on lipid transport. They were fed diets with 20% EWP and casein, and their lymph was collected to quantify lymphatic lipid levels. Dietary EWP decreased lymphatic cholesterol transport compared with casein. It was previously shown that EWP excluded cholesterol from bile acid micelles. Therefore, pepsin-hydrolyzed EWP and casein were prepared. EWP was not completely digested. Ovalbumin, which is the most abundant protein in EWP, showed resistance to digestion by pepsin. This study investigated the effects of EWP pepsin hydrolysate (EWP-ph) on cholesterol micellar solubility, cholesterol transfer from the micellar to the oil phase, water-holding capacity (WHC), settling volume in water (SV), and relative viscosity and compared them with the effects of casein pepsin hydrolysate (C-ph). EWP-ph significantly decreased the micellar solubility and transfer rate and increased the WHC, SV, and relative viscosity compared with C-ph. Moreover, the pepsin hydrolysate of ovalbumin, a major protein in EWP, played a role in decreasing cholesterol micellar solubility, leading to the inhibition of cholesterol absorption. In conclusion, dietary EWP decreased cholesterol intestinal absorption by exerting combined effects of these physicochemical properties in the gut.

  7. LRRK2 kinase inhibition prevents pathological microglial phagocytosis in response to HIV-1 Tat protein

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    Marker Daniel F

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 (HIV-1 associated neurocognitive disorders (HANDs are accompanied by significant morbidity, which persists despite the use of combined antiretroviral therapy (cART. While activated microglia play a role in pathogenesis, changes in their immune effector functions, including phagocytosis and proinflammatory signaling pathways, are not well understood. We have identified leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2 as a novel regulator of microglial phagocytosis and activation in an in vitro model of HANDs, and hypothesize that LRRK2 kinase inhibition will attenuate microglial activation during HANDs. Methods We treated BV-2 immortalized mouse microglia cells with the HIV-1 trans activator of transcription (Tat protein in the absence or presence of LRRK2 kinase inhibitor (LRRK2i. We used Western blot, qRT-PCR, immunocytochemistry and latex bead engulfment assays to analyze LRRK2 protein levels, proinflammatory cytokine and phagocytosis receptor expression, LRRK2 cellular distribution and phagocytosis, respectively. Finally, we utilized ex vivo microfluidic chambers containing primary hippocampal neurons and BV-2 microglia cells to investigate microglial phagocytosis of neuronal axons. Results We found that Tat-treatment of BV-2 cells induced kinase activity associated phosphorylation of serine 935 on LRRK2 and caused the formation of cytoplasmic LRRK2 inclusions. LRRK2i decreased Tat-induced phosphorylation of serine 935 on LRRK2 and inhibited the formation of Tat-induced cytoplasmic LRRK2 inclusions. LRRK2i also decreased Tat-induced process extension in BV-2 cells. Furthermore, LRRK2i attenuated Tat-induced cytokine expression and latex bead engulfment. We examined relevant cellular targets in microfluidic chambers and found that Tat-treated BV-2 microglia cells cleared axonal arbor and engulfed neuronal elements, whereas saline treated controls did not. LRRK2i was found to protect axons in the presence

  8. How anacetrapib inhibits the activity of the cholesteryl ester transfer protein? Perspective through atomistic simulations.

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    Tarja Äijänen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP mediates the reciprocal transfer of neutral lipids (cholesteryl esters, triglycerides and phospholipids between different lipoprotein fractions in human blood plasma. A novel molecular agent known as anacetrapib has been shown to inhibit CETP activity and thereby raise high density lipoprotein (HDL-cholesterol and decrease low density lipoprotein (LDL-cholesterol, thus rendering CETP inhibition an attractive target to prevent and treat the development of various cardiovascular diseases. Our objective in this work is to use atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to shed light on the inhibitory mechanism of anacetrapib and unlock the interactions between the drug and CETP. The results show an evident affinity of anacetrapib towards the concave surface of CETP, and especially towards the region of the N-terminal tunnel opening. The primary binding site of anacetrapib turns out to reside in the tunnel inside CETP, near the residues surrounding the N-terminal opening. Free energy calculations show that when anacetrapib resides in this area, it hinders the ability of cholesteryl ester to diffuse out from CETP. The simulations further bring out the ability of anacetrapib to regulate the structure-function relationships of phospholipids and helix X, the latter representing the structural region of CETP important to the process of neutral lipid exchange with lipoproteins. Altogether, the simulations propose CETP inhibition to be realized when anacetrapib is transferred into the lipid binding pocket. The novel insight gained in this study has potential use in the development of new molecular agents capable of preventing the progression of cardiovascular diseases.

  9. How Anacetrapib Inhibits the Activity of the Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein? Perspective through Atomistic Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Äijänen, Tarja; Koivuniemi, Artturi; Javanainen, Matti; Rissanen, Sami; Rog, Tomasz; Vattulainen, Ilpo

    2014-01-01

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) mediates the reciprocal transfer of neutral lipids (cholesteryl esters, triglycerides) and phospholipids between different lipoprotein fractions in human blood plasma. A novel molecular agent known as anacetrapib has been shown to inhibit CETP activity and thereby raise high density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol and decrease low density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol, thus rendering CETP inhibition an attractive target to prevent and treat the development of various cardiovascular diseases. Our objective in this work is to use atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to shed light on the inhibitory mechanism of anacetrapib and unlock the interactions between the drug and CETP. The results show an evident affinity of anacetrapib towards the concave surface of CETP, and especially towards the region of the N-terminal tunnel opening. The primary binding site of anacetrapib turns out to reside in the tunnel inside CETP, near the residues surrounding the N-terminal opening. Free energy calculations show that when anacetrapib resides in this area, it hinders the ability of cholesteryl ester to diffuse out from CETP. The simulations further bring out the ability of anacetrapib to regulate the structure-function relationships of phospholipids and helix X, the latter representing the structural region of CETP important to the process of neutral lipid exchange with lipoproteins. Altogether, the simulations propose CETP inhibition to be realized when anacetrapib is transferred into the lipid binding pocket. The novel insight gained in this study has potential use in the development of new molecular agents capable of preventing the progression of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25412509

  10. A Novel Benzodiazepine Compound Inhibits Yellow Fever Virus Infection by Specifically Targeting NS4B Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Fang; Wu, Shuo; Julander, Justin; Ma, Julia; Zhang, Xuexiang; Kulp, John; Cuconati, Andrea; Block, Timothy M; Du, Yanming; Guo, Ju-Tao; Chang, Jinhong

    2016-09-21

    Although a highly effective vaccine is available, the number of yellow fever cases has increased over the past two decades, which highlights the pressing need for antiviral therapeutics. In a high throughput screening campaign, we identified an acetic acid benzodiazepine (BDAA) compound, which potently inhibits yellow fever virus (YFV). Interestingly, while treatment of YFV infected cultures with 2 μM of BDAA reduced the virion production by greater than 2 logs, the compound is not active against 21 other viruses from 14 different viral families. Selection and genetic analysis of drug resistant viruses revealed that substitution of proline at amino acid 219 (P219) of the nonstructural protein 4B (NS4B) with serine, threonine or alanine confers YFV resistance to BDAA without apparent loss of replication fitness in cultured mammalian cells. However, substitution of P219 with glycine confers BDAA resistance with significant loss of replication ability. Bioinformatics analysis predicts that the P219 localizes at the endoplasmic reticulum lumen side of the fifth putative trans-membrane domain of NS4B and the mutation may render the viral protein incapable of interacting with BDAA. Our studies thus revealed important role and structural basis for NS4B protein in supporting YFV replication. Moreover, in YFV-infected hamsters, oral administration of BDAA protected 90% of the animals from death, significantly reduced viral load by greater than 2 logs and attenuated viral infection-induced liver injury and body weight loss. The encouraging preclinical results thus warrant further development of BDAA or its derivatives as antiviral agents to treat yellow fever. Yellow fever is an acute viral hemorrhagic disease which threatens approximately one billion people living in tropical areas of Africa and Latin America. Although a highly effective yellow fever vaccine has been available for more than seven decades, the low vaccination rate fails to prevent outbreaks in at

  11. Nuclear protein IκB-ζ inhibits the activity of STAT3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Zhihao; Zhang, Xiaoai; Yang, Juntao; Wu, Guangzhou; Zhang, Ying; Yuan, Yanzhi; Jin, Chaozhi; Chang, Zhijie; Wang, Jian; Yang, Xiaoming; He, Fuchu

    2009-01-01

    STAT3 (Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3) is a key transcription factor of the JAK-STAT (Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription) pathway that regulates cell proliferation and apoptosis. Activation of STAT3 is under tight regulation, and yet the different signaling pathways and the mechanisms that regulate its activity remain to be elucidated. Using a yeast two-hybrid screening, we have identified a nuclear protein IκB-ζ that interacts in a novel way with STAT3. This physical interaction was further confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation assays. The interaction regions were mapped to the coiled-coil domain of STAT3 and the C-terminal of IκB-ζ. Overexpression of IκB-ζ inhibited the transcriptional activity of STAT3. It also suppressed cell growth and induced cell apoptosis in SRC-simulated cells, which is partially mediated by down-regulation of expression of a known STAT3 target gene, MCL1. Our results suggest that IκB-ζ is a negative regulator of STAT3, and demonstrate a novel mechanism in which a component of the NF-κB signaling pathway inhibits the activation of STAT3.

  12. Zinc finger protein 598 inhibits cell survival by promoting UV-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qiaohong; Gupta, Romi

    2018-01-19

    UV is one of the major causes of DNA damage induced apoptosis. However, cancer cells adopt alternative mechanisms to evade UV-induced apoptosis. To identify factors that protect cancer cells from UV-induced apoptosis, we performed a genome wide short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) screen, which identified Zinc finger protein 598 (ZNF598) as a key regulator of UV-induced apoptosis. Here, we show that UV irradiation transcriptionally upregulates ZNF598 expression. Additionally, ZNF598 knockdown in cancer cells inhibited UV-induced apoptosis. In our study, we observe that ELK1 mRNA level as well as phosphorylated ELK1 levels was up regulated upon UV irradiation, which was necessary for UV irradiation induced upregulation of ZNF598. Cells expressing ELK1 shRNA were also resistant to UV-induced apoptosis, and phenocopy ZNF598 knockdown. Upon further investigation, we found that ZNF598 knockdown inhibits UV-induced apoptotic gene expression, which matches with decrease in percentage of annexin V positive cell. Similarly, ectopic expression of ZNF598 promoted apoptotic gene expression and also increased annexin V positive cells. Collectively, these results demonstrate that ZNF598 is a UV irradiation regulated gene and its loss results in resistance to UV-induced apoptosis.

  13. Brazilin inhibits amyloid β-protein fibrillogenesis, remodels amyloid fibrils and reduces amyloid cytotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Wen-Jie; Guo, Jing-Jing; Gao, Ming-Tao; Hu, Sheng-Quan; Dong, Xiao-Yan; Han, Yi-Fan; Liu, Fu-Feng; Jiang, Shaoyi; Sun, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Soluble amyloid β-protein (Aβ) oligomers, the main neurotoxic species, are predominantly formed from monomers through a fibril-catalyzed secondary nucleation. Herein, we virtually screened an in-house library of natural compounds and discovered brazilin as a dual functional compound in both Aβ42 fibrillogenesis inhibition and mature fibril remodeling, leading to significant reduction in Aβ42 cytotoxicity. The potent inhibitory effect of brazilin was proven by an IC50 of 1.5 +/- 0.3 μM, which was smaller than that of (-)-epigallocatechin gallate in Phase III clinical trials and about one order of magnitude smaller than those of curcumin and resveratrol. Most importantly, it was found that brazilin redirected Aβ42 monomers and its mature fibrils into unstructured Aβ aggregates with some β-sheet structures, which could prevent both the primary nucleation and the fibril-catalyzed secondary nucleation. Molecular simulations demonstrated that brazilin inhibited Aβ42 fibrillogenesis by directly binding to Aβ42 species via hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonding and remodeled mature fibrils by disrupting the intermolecular salt bridge Asp23-Lys28 via hydrogen bonding. Both experimental and computational studies revealed a different working mechanism of brazilin from that of known inhibitors. These findings indicate that brazilin is of great potential as a neuroprotective and therapeutic agent for Alzheimer's disease.

  14. Calcineurin A (Ca Inhibition Supresses Protein Synthesis Via Amp Dependent Kinase (Ampk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Franch

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes stimulates CA activity in the kidney and CA inhibitor cyclosporine A (CYA or CAβ isoform knock-out (CAβ -/- block diabetic renal hypertrophy.CA regulates the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR to reduce protein synthesis (PS during cardiac hypertrophy.To study this pathway, NRK-52E and SV40 transformed CAβ +/+ and -/- proximal tubule cell lines were treated with 10 nM epidermal growth factor (EGF and/or 8 μM CYA. After 48 hrs of CYA in NRK-52E cells, EGF-induced protein/well was 30±4% lower with decreased PS (49±2% rather than increased protein breakdown. In CAβ -/- cells, protein/well (20+2% and PS (16 ±1% were lower and CYA did not decrease PS further. In CAβ+/+ cells, CYA reduced PS 20+2%. However, CYA did not block mTOR signaling as measured by phosphorylation (P at S2448 or by p70S6 kinase P at T389. CYA also did not alter the mTOR dependent pathway of macroautophagy. However, CYA in NRK-52E or CAβ -/- cells showed increased activation of the metformin-sensitive energy sensor, AMPK, as measured by P of T172 by ∼5- or>10-fold, respectively. AMPK reduces PS via P of eukaryotic elongation factor 2 (eEF2 at T356 and CYA increased eEF2 P by∼3 fold.We conclude CA inhibition reduces PS in renal hypertrophy via a novel pathway involving AMPK and eEF2 rather than by mTOR and p70S6 kinase. Activation of AMPK or altered energy metabolism via CAβ may be important in CA inhibitor nephrotoxicity.

  15. Metabolic adaptation to chronic inhibition of mitochondrial protein synthesis in acute myeloid leukemia cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bozhena Jhas

    Full Text Available Recently, we demonstrated that the anti-bacterial agent tigecycline preferentially induces death in leukemia cells through the inhibition of mitochondrial protein synthesis. Here, we sought to understand mechanisms of resistance to tigecycline by establishing a leukemia cell line resistant to the drug. TEX leukemia cells were treated with increasing concentrations of tigecycline over 4 months and a population of cells resistant to tigecycline (RTEX+TIG was selected. Compared to wild type cells, RTEX+TIG cells had undetectable levels of mitochondrially translated proteins Cox-1 and Cox-2, reduced oxygen consumption and increased rates of glycolysis. Moreover, RTEX+TIG cells were more sensitive to inhibitors of glycolysis and more resistant to hypoxia. By electron microscopy, RTEX+TIG cells had abnormally swollen mitochondria with irregular cristae structures. RNA sequencing demonstrated a significant over-representation of genes with binding sites for the HIF1α:HIF1β transcription factor complex in their promoters. Upregulation of HIF1α mRNA and protein in RTEX+TIG cells was confirmed by Q-RTPCR and immunoblotting. Strikingly, upon removal of tigecycline from RTEX+TIG cells, the cells re-established aerobic metabolism. Levels of Cox-1 and Cox-2, oxygen consumption, glycolysis, mitochondrial mass and mitochondrial membrane potential returned to wild type levels, but HIF1α remained elevated. However, upon re-treatment with tigecycline for 72 hours, the glycolytic phenotype was re-established. Thus, we have generated cells with a reversible metabolic phenotype by chronic treatment with an inhibitor of mitochondrial protein synthesis. These cells will provide insight into cellular adaptations used to cope with metabolic stress.

  16. Silver nanoparticles inhibit fish gill cell proliferation in protein-free culture medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Yang; Behra, Renata; Sigg, Laura; Schirmer, Kristin

    2016-10-01

    While short-term exposures of vertebrate cells, such as from fish, can be performed in defined, serum-free media, long-term cultures generally require addition of growth factors and proteins, normally supplied with a serum supplement. However, proteins are known to alter nanoparticle properties by binding to nanoparticles. Therefore, in order to be able to study nanoparticle-cell interactions for extended periods, the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) gill cell line, RTgill-W1, was adapted to proliferate in a commercial, serum-free medium, InVitrus VP-6. The newly adapted cell strain was named RTgill-W1-pf (protein free). These cells proliferate at a speed similar to the RTgill-W1 cells cultured in a fully supplemented medium containing 5% fetal bovine serum. As well, they were successfully cryopreserved in liquid nitrogen and fully recovered after thawing. Yet, senescence set in after about 10 passages in InVitrus VP-6 medium, revealing that this medium cannot fully support long-term culture of the RTgill-W1 strain. The RTgill-W1-pf cell line was subsequently applied to investigate the effect of silver nanoparticles (AgNP) on cell proliferation over a period of 12 days. Indeed, cell proliferation was inhibited by 10 μM AgNP. This effect correlated with high levels of silver being associated with the cells. The new cell line, RTgill-W1-pf, can serve as a unique representation of the gill cell-environment interface, offering novel opportunities to study nanoparticle-cell interactions without serum protein interference.

  17. Inhibition of CRM1-mediated nuclear export of transcription factors by leukemogenic NUP98 fusion proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Akiko; Sarma, Nayan J; Abdul-Nabi, Anmaar M; Yaseen, Nabeel R

    2010-05-21

    NUP98 is a nucleoporin that plays complex roles in the nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of macromolecules. Rearrangements of the NUP98 gene in human leukemia result in the expression of numerous fusion oncoproteins whose effect on nucleocytoplasmic trafficking is poorly understood. The present study was undertaken to determine the effects of leukemogenic NUP98 fusion proteins on CRM1-mediated nuclear export. NUP98-HOXA9, a prototypic NUP98 fusion, inhibited the nuclear export of two known CRM1 substrates: mutated cytoplasmic nucleophosmin and HIV-1 Rev. In vitro binding assays revealed that NUP98-HOXA9 binds CRM1 through the FG repeat motif in a Ran-GTP-dependent manner similar to but stronger than the interaction between CRM1 and its export substrates. Two NUP98 fusions, NUP98-HOXA9 and NUP98-DDX10, whose fusion partners are structurally and functionally unrelated, interacted with endogenous CRM1 in myeloid cells as shown by co-immunoprecipitation. These leukemogenic NUP98 fusion proteins interacted with CRM1, Ran, and the nucleoporin NUP214 in a manner fundamentally different from that of wild-type NUP98. NUP98-HOXA9 and NUP98-DDX10 formed characteristic aggregates within the nuclei of a myeloid cell line and primary human CD34+ cells and caused aberrant localization of CRM1 to these aggregates. These NUP98 fusions caused nuclear accumulation of two transcription factors, NFAT and NFkappaB, that are regulated by CRM1-mediated export. The nuclear entrapment of NFAT and NFkappaB correlated with enhanced transcription from promoters responsive to these transcription factors. Taken together, the results suggest a new mechanism by which NUP98 fusions dysregulate transcription and cause leukemia, namely, inhibition of CRM1-mediated nuclear export with aberrant nuclear retention of transcriptional regulators.

  18. Identification of a myeloid-derived suppressor cell cystatin-like protein that inhibits metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutté, Angela M.; Friedman, David B.; Bogyo, Matthew; Min, Yongfen; Yang, Li; Lin, P. Charles

    2011-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are significantly increased in cancer patients and tumor bearing-animals. MDSCs infiltrate into tumors and promote tumor invasion and metastasis. To identify the mediator responsible for the prometastatic property of MDSCs, we used proteomics. We found neutrophilic granule protein (NGP) was decreased >2-fold in MDSCs from metastatic 4T1 tumor-bearing mice compared to nonmetastatic 67NR controls. NGP mRNA levels were decreased in bone marrow and in tumor-infiltrating MDSCs by 45 and 66%, respectively, in 4T1 tumor-bearing mice compared to 67NR controls. Interestingly, 4T1-conditioned medium reduced myeloid cell NGP expression by ∼40%, suggesting that a secreted factor mediates gene reduction. Sequence analysis shows a putative cystatin domain in NGP, and biochemical analysis confirms NGP a novel cathepsin inhibitor. It inhibited cathepsin B activity by nearly 40% in vitro. NGP expression in 4T1 tumor cells suppressed cell invasion, delayed primary tumor growth, and greatly reduced lung metastasis in vivo. A 2.8-fold reduction of cathepsin activity was found in tumors expressing NGP compared to controls. NGP significantly reduced tumor angiogenesis to 12.6 from 19.6 and lymphangiogenesis to 4.6 from 9.1 vessels/field. Necrosis was detectable only in NGP-expressing tumors, and the number of apoptotic cells increased to 22.4 from 8.3 in controls. Taken together, this study identifies a negative regulator of tumor metastasis in MDSCs, NGP, which is down-regulated in metastatic conditions. The finding suggests that malignant tumors promote invasion/metastasis not only through up-regulation of proteases but also down-regulation of protease inhibitors.—Boutté, A. M., Friedman, D. B., Bogyo, M., Min, Y., Yang, L., Lin, P. C. Identification of a myeloid-derived suppressor cell cystatin-like protein that inhibits metastasis. PMID:21518852

  19. Revisiting the mechanistic basis of the French Paradox: Red wine inhibits the activity of protein disulfide isomerase in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galinski, Christine N; Zwicker, Jeffrey I; Kennedy, Daniel R

    2016-01-01

    Although epidemiologic evidence points to cardioprotective activity of red wine, the mechanistic basis for antithrombotic activity has not been established. Quercetin and related flavonoids are present in high concentrations in red but not white wine. Quercetin-glycosides were recently shown to prevent thrombosis in animal models through the inhibition of extracellular protein disulfide isomerase (PDI). We evaluated whether red or white wine inhibited PDI activity in vitro. Quercetin levels in red and white wines were measured by HPLC analysis. Inhibition of PDI activity by red and white wines was assessed by an insulin reduction turbidity assay at various concentrations of wine. PDI inhibition was confirmed using a reduced peptide that contained a disulfide containing peptide as a substrate. The inhibition of PDI related thiol isomerases ERp5 and ERp57 was also assessed. We observed a dose-dependent decrease of PDI activity for a variety of red but not white wines. Red wine diluted to 3% final concentration resulted in over 80% inhibition of PDI activity by insulin reductase assay for all varieties tested. This inhibition was also observed in the peptide based assay. Red grape juice yielded similar results but ethanol alone did not affect PDI activity. Interestingly, red wine also inhibited the PDI related thiol isomerases ERp5 and ERp57, albeit to a lesser degree than PDI. PDI activity is inhibited by red wine and grape juice, identifying a potentially novel mechanism underlying the cardiovascular benefits attributed to wine consumption. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Quercetin suppresses hypoxia-induced accumulation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha) through inhibiting protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dae-Hee; Lee, Yong J

    2008-10-01

    Quercetin, a ubiquitous bioactive plant flavonoid, has been shown to inhibit the proliferation of cancer cells and induce the accumulation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha) in normoxia. In this study, under hypoxic conditions (1% O(2)), we examined the effect of quercetin on the intracellular level of HIF-1alpha and extracellular level of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in a variety of human cancer cell lines. Surprisingly, we observed that quercetin suppressed the HIF-1alpha accumulation during hypoxia in human prostate cancer LNCaP, colon cancer CX-1, and breast cancer SkBr3 cells. Quercetin treatment also significantly reduced hypoxia-induced secretion of VEGF. Suppression of HIF-1alpha accumulation during treatment with quercetin in hypoxia was not prevented by treatment with 26S proteasome inhibitor MG132 or PI3K inhibitor LY294002. Interestingly, hypoxia (1% O(2)) in the presence of 100 microM quercetin inhibited protein synthesis by 94% during incubation for 8 h. Significant quercetin concentration-dependent inhibition of protein synthesis and suppression of HIF-1alpha accumulation were observed under hypoxic conditions. Treatment with 100 microM cycloheximide, a protein synthesis inhibitor, replicated the effect of quercetin by inhibiting HIF-1alpha accumulation during hypoxia. These results suggest that suppression of HIF-1alpha accumulation during treatment with quercetin under hypoxic conditions is due to inhibition of protein synthesis. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Gene- and protein-delivered zinc finger-staphylococcal nuclease hybrid for inhibition of DNA replication of human papillomavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mino, Takashi; Mori, Tomoaki; Aoyama, Yasuhiro; Sera, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Previously, we reported that artificial zinc-finger proteins (AZPs) inhibited virus DNA replication in planta and in mammalian cells by blocking binding of a viral replication protein to its replication origin. However, the replication mechanisms of viruses of interest need to be disentangled for the application. To develop more widely applicable methods for antiviral therapy, we explored the feasibility of inhibition of HPV-18 replication as a model system by cleaving its viral genome. To this end, we fused the staphylococcal nuclease cleaving DNA as a monomer to an AZP that binds to the viral genome. The resulting hybrid nuclease (designated AZP-SNase) cleaved its target DNA plasmid efficiently and sequence-specifically in vitro. Then, we confirmed that transfection with a plasmid expressing AZP-SNase inhibited HPV-18 DNA replication in transient replication assays using mammalian cells. Linker-mediated PCR analysis revealed that the AZP-SNase cleaved an HPV-18 ori plasmid around its binding site. Finally, we demonstrated that the protein-delivered AZP-SNase inhibited HPV-18 DNA replication as well and did not show any significant cytotoxicity. Thus, both gene- and protein-delivered hybrid nucleases efficiently inhibited HPV-18 DNA replication, leading to development of a more universal antiviral therapy for human DNA viruses.

  2. Inhibition of TRAIL-induced apoptosis and forced internalization of TRAIL receptor 1 by adenovirus proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tollefson, A E; Toth, K; Doronin, K; Kuppuswamy, M; Doronina, O A; Lichtenstein, D L; Hermiston, T W; Smith, C A; Wold, W S

    2001-10-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) induces apoptosis through two receptors, TRAIL-R1 (also known as death receptor 4) and TRAIL-R2 (also known as death receptor 5), that are members of the TNF receptor superfamily of death domain-containing receptors. We show that human adenovirus type 5 encodes three proteins, named RID (previously named E3-10.4K/14.5K), E3-14.7K, and E1B-19K, that independently inhibit TRAIL-induced apoptosis of infected human cells. This conclusion was derived from studies using wild-type adenovirus, adenovirus replication-competent mutants that lack one or more of the RID, E3-14.7K, and E1B-19K genes, and adenovirus E1-minus replication-defective vectors that express all E3 genes, RID plus E3-14.7K only, RID only, or E3-14.7K only. RID inhibits TRAIL-induced apoptosis when cells are sensitized to TRAIL either by adenovirus infection or treatment with cycloheximide. RID induces the internalization of TRAIL-R1 from the cell surface, as shown by flow cytometry and indirect immunofluorescence for TRAIL-R1. TRAIL-R1 was internalized in distinct vesicles which are very likely to be endosomes and lysosomes. TRAIL-R1 is degraded, as indicated by the disappearance of the TRAIL-R1 immunofluorescence signal. Degradation was inhibited by bafilomycin A1, a drug that prevents acidification of vesicles and the sorting of receptors from late endosomes to lysosomes, implying that degradation occurs in lysosomes. RID was also shown previously to internalize and degrade another death domain receptor, Fas, and to prevent apoptosis through Fas and the TNF receptor. RID was shown previously to force the internalization and degradation of the epidermal growth factor receptor. E1B-19K was shown previously to block apoptosis through Fas, and both E1B-19K and E3-14.7K were found to prevent apoptosis through the TNF receptor. These findings suggest that the receptors for TRAIL, Fas ligand, and TNF play a role in limiting virus

  3. Inhibiting C-Reactive Protein for the Treatment of Cardiovascular Disease: Promising Evidence from Rodent Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander J. Szalai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Raised blood C-reactive protein (CRP level is a predictor of cardiovascular events, but whether blood CRP is causal in the disease process is unknown. The latter would best be defined by pharmacological inhibition of the protein in the context of a randomized case-control study. However, no CRP specific drug is currently available so such a prospective study cannot be performed. Blood CRP is synthesized primarily in the liver and the liver is an organ where antisense oligonucleotide (ASO drugs accumulate. Taking advantage of this we evaluated the efficacy of CRP specific ASOs in rodents with experimentally induced cardiovascular damage. Treating rats for 4 weeks with a rat CRP-specific ASO achieved >60% reduction of blood CRP. Notably, this effect was associated with improved heart function and pathology following myocardial infarction (induced by ligation of the left anterior descending artery. Likewise in human CRP transgenic mice treated for 2 weeks with a human CRP-specific ASO, blood human CRP was reduced by >70% and carotid artery patency was improved (2 weeks after surgical ligation. CRP specific ASOs might pave the way towards a placebo-controlled trial that could clarify the role of CRP in cardiovascular disease.

  4. Ice-surface adsorption enhanced colligative effect of antifreeze proteins in ice growth inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yougang; Ba, Yong

    2006-09-01

    This Communication describes a mechanism to explain antifreeze protein's function to inhibit the growth of ice crystals. We propose that the adsorption of antifreeze protein (AFP) molecules on an ice surface induces a dense AFP-water layer, which can significantly decrease the mole fraction of the interfacial water and, thus, lower the temperature for a seed ice crystal to grow in a super-cooled AFP solution. This mechanism can also explain the nearly unchanged melting point for the ice crystal due to the AFP's ice-surface adsorption. A mathematical model combining the Langmuir theory of adsorption and the colligative effect of thermodynamics has been proposed to find the equilibrium constants of the ice-surface adsorptions, and the interfacial concentrations of AFPs through fitting the theoretical curves to the experimental thermal hysteresis data. This model has been demonstrated by using the experimental data of serial size-mutated beetle Tenebrio molitor (Tm) AFPs. It was found that the AFP's ice-surface adsorptions could increase the interfacial AFP's concentrations by 3 to 4 orders compared with those in the bulk AFP solutions.

  5. Inhibition of the SOS response of Escherichia coli by the Ada protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vericat, J.A.; Guerrero, R.; Barbe, J.

    1988-01-01

    Induction of the adaptive response by N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) caused a decrease in the UV-mediated expression of both recA and sfiA genes but not of the umuDC gene. On the other hand, the adaptive response did not affect the temperature-promoted induction of SOS response in a RecA441 mutant. The inhibitory effect on the UV-triggered expression of the recA and sfiA genes was not dependent on either the alkA gene or the basal level of RecA protein, but rather required the ada gene. Furthermore, an increase in the level of the Ada protein, caused by the runaway plasmid pYN3059 in which the ada gene is regulated by the lac promoter, inhibited UV-mediated recA gene expression even in cells to which the MNNG-adaptive treatment had not been applied. This inhibitory effect of the adaptive pretreatment was not observed either in RecBC- strains or in RecBC mutants lacking exonuclease V-related nuclease activity. However, RecF- mutants showed an adaptive response-mediated decrease in UV-promoted induction of the recA gene

  6. Boron Stress Activates the General Amino Acid Control Mechanism and Inhibits Protein Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uluisik, Irem; Kaya, Alaattin; Fomenko, Dmitri E.; Karakaya, Huseyin C.; Carlson, Bradley A.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.; Koc, Ahmet

    2011-01-01

    Boron is an essential micronutrient for plants, and it is beneficial for animals. However, at high concentrations boron is toxic to cells although the mechanism of this toxicity is not known. Atr1 has recently been identified as a boron efflux pump whose expression is upregulated in response to boron treatment. Here, we found that the expression of ATR1 is associated with expression of genes involved in amino acid biosynthesis. These mechanisms are strictly controlled by the transcription factor Gcn4 in response to boron treatment. Further analyses have shown that boron impaired protein synthesis by promoting phosphorylation of eIF2α in a Gcn2 kinase dependent manner. The uncharged tRNA binding domain (HisRS) of Gcn2 is necessary for the phosphorylation of eIF2α in the presence of boron. We postulate that boron exerts its toxic effect through activation of the general amino acid control system and inhibition of protein synthesis. Since the general amino acid control pathway is conserved among eukaryotes, this mechanism of boron toxicity may be of general importance. PMID:22114689

  7. Inhibition of uncoupling protein 2 with genipin exacerbates palmitate-induced hepatic steatosis

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    Ma Shuangtao

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2 was reported to be involved in lipid metabolism through regulating the production of superoxide anion. However, the role of UCP2 in hepatocytes steatosis has not been determined. We hypothesized that UCP2 might regulate hepatic steatosis via suppressing oxidative stress. Results We tested this hypothesis in an in vitro model of hepatocytic steatosis in HepG2 cell lines induced by palmitic acid (PA. We found that treatment with PA induced an obvious lipid accumulation in HepG2 cells and a significant increase in intracellular triglyceride content. Moreover, the specific inhibition of UCP2 by genipin remarkably exacerbated PA-induced hepatocytes steatosis. Interestingly, the PA-induced superoxide overproduction can also be enhanced by incubation with genipin. In addition, administration with the antioxidant tempol abolished genipin-induced increase in intracellular lipid deposition. We further found that genipin significantly increased the protein expression of fatty acid translocase (FAT/CD36. Conclusions These findings suggest that UCP2 plays a protective role in PA-induced hepatocytic steatosis through ameliorating oxidative stress.

  8. Post-streptococcal auto-antibodies inhibit protein disulfide isomerase and are associated with insulin resistance.

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    Adi Aran

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Post-streptococcal autoimmunity affects millions worldwide, targeting multiple organs including the heart, brain, and kidneys. To explore the post-streptococcal autoimmunity spectrum, we used western blot analyses, to screen 310 sera from healthy subjects with (33% and without (67% markers of recent streptococcal infections [anti-Streptolysin O (ASLO or anti-DNAse B (ADB]. A 58 KDa protein, reacting strongly with post-streptococcal sera, was identified as Protein Disulfide Isomerase (PDI, an abundant protein with pleiotropic metabolic, immunologic, and thrombotic effects. Anti-PDI autoantibodies, purified from human sera, targeted similar epitopes in Streptolysin O (SLO, P51-61 and PDI (P328-338. The correlation between post-streptococcal status and anti-human PDI auto-immunity was further confirmed in a total of 2987 samples (13.6% in 530 ASLO positive versus 5.6% in 2457 ASLO negative samples, p<0.0001. Finally, anti-PDI auto-antibodies inhibited PDI-mediated insulin degradation in vitro (n = 90, p<0.001, and correlated with higher serum insulin (14.1 iu/ml vs. 12.2 iu/ml, n = 1215, p = 0.039 and insulin resistance (Homeostatic Model Assessment (HOMA 4.1 vs. 3.1, n = 1215, p = 0.004, in a population-based cohort. These results identify PDI as a major target of post-streptococcal autoimmunity, and establish a new link between infection, autoimmunity, and metabolic disturbances.

  9. Schisandrae fructus enhances myogenic differentiation and inhibits atrophy through protein synthesis in human myotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim CH

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Cy Hyun Kim,1,2,* Jin-Hong Shin,1,3,* Sung Jun Hwang,1,2 Yung Hyun Choi,4 Dae-Seong Kim,1,3 Cheol Min Kim2,51Research Institute of Convergence of Biomedical Science and Technology, Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital, Yangsan, 2Center for Anti-Aging Industry, Pusan National University, Busan, 3Department of Neurology, Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital, Yangsan, 4Department of Biochemistry, Dong-eui University College of Korean Medicine, Busan, 5Department of Biomedical Informatics, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Yangsan, Republic of Korea*These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Schisandrae fructus (SF has recently been reported to increase skeletal muscle mass and inhibit atrophy in mice. We investigated the effect of SF extract on human myotube differentiation and its acting pathway. Various concentrations (0.1–10 µg/mL of SF extract were applied on human skeletal muscle cells in vitro. Myotube area and fusion index were measured to quantify myotube differentiation. The maximum effect was observed at 0.5 µg/mL of SF extract, enhancing differentiation up to 1.4-fold in fusion index and 1.6-fold in myotube area at 8 days after induction of differentiation compared to control. Phosphorylation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 and 70 kDa ribosomal protein S6 kinase, which initiate translation as downstream of mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, was upregulated in early phases of differentiation after SF treatment. SF also attenuated dexamethasone-induced atrophy. In conclusion, we show that SF augments myogenic differentiation and attenuates atrophy by increasing protein synthesis through mammalian target of rapamycin/70 kDa ribosomal protein S6 kinase and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 signaling pathway in human myotubes. SF can be a useful natural dietary supplement in increasing skeletal muscle mass, especially in the aged

  10. Receptor interacting protein kinase-2 inhibition by CYLD impairs anti-bacterial immune responses in macrophages

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    Katharina eWex

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Upon infection with intracellular bacteria, nucleotide oligomerization domain protein 2 (NOD2 recognizes bacterial muramyl dipeptide and binds, subsequently, to receptor-interacting serine/threonine kinase 2 (RIPK2. RIPK2 mediates the activation of immune responses via the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB and extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK pathways. Previously, it has been shown that RIPK2 activation dependens on its K63-ubiquitination by the E3 ligases pellino-3 and ITCH, whereas the deubiquitinating enzyme A20 counter-regulates RIPK2 activity by cleaving K63-polyubiquitin chains from RIPK2. Here, we newly identify the deubiquitinating enzyme CYLD as a new interacting partner and inhibitor of RIPK2. We show that CYLD binds to and removes K63-polyubiquitin chains from RIPK2 in Listeria monocytogenes (Lm infected bone-marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM. CYLD-mediated K63-deubiquitination of RIPK2 resulted in an impaired activation of both NF-κB and ERK1/2 pathways, reduced production of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-12, anti-listerial ROS and NO, and, finally, impaired pathogen control. In turn, RIPK2 inhibition by siRNA prevented activation of NF-κB and ERK1/2 and completely abolished the protective effect of CYLD-deficiency with respect to the production of IL-6, NO, ROS and pathogen control. Noteworthy, CYLD also inhibited autophagy of Listeria in a RIPK2-ERK1/2 dependent manner.The protective function of CYLD-deficiency was dependent on IFN-γ pre-stimulation of infected macrophages. Interestingly, the reduced NF-κB activation in CYLD-expressing macrophages limited the protective effect of IFN-γ by reducing NF-κB-dependent STAT1 activation. Taken together, our study identifies CYLD as an important inhibitor of RIPK2-dependent anti-bacterial immune responses in macrophages.

  11. Inhibition of the activity of pro-inflammatory secretory phospholipase A2 by acute phase proteins

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    W. Pruzanski

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Pro-Inflammatory non-pancreatic phospholipase A2 (sPLA2 is markedly over-expressed in acute systemic and chronic local inflammatory processes. Since in acute phase reaction sPLA2 is often over-expressed simultaneously with acute phase proteins (APP, it is important to determine whether APP interacts with sPLA2. We tested ten APPs for interaction with sPLA2 using as a substrate multilamellar Hposomes composed either of PC:Lyso PC or PE:Lyso PE. Using PC:Lyso PC substrate, CRP, lactoferrin and SAP were found to inhibit sPLA2 activity with an IC50 of 25 μg/ml, 7.5 μg/ml and 50 μg/ml, respectively, corresponding to 0.21 μM, 0.1 μM and 0.21 μM respectively. Using PE:Lyso PE substrate only SAP was inhibitory, with an IC50 of 10 μg/ml (0.04 μM. Phosphorylcholine abolished the inhibitory activity of CRP but not of SAP or lactoferrin. Addition of phosphorylethanolamine or of excess calcium had no effect on the inhibitory activity of APP. Limulin, lysozyme, transferrin, β2-microglobulin, α2-macroglobulin, human and bovine albumins had no effect on sPLA2 activity. Therefore neither the structure of pentraxins, or ironbinding, bacteriostatic property or amyloidogenic property preclude whether APP modulates sPLA2 activity. Inhibition of pro-inflammatory sPLA2 by APP may be one of the protective mechanisms of the acute phase reaction.

  12. Vaccinia virus protein C6 is a virulence factor that binds TBK-1 adaptor proteins and inhibits activation of IRF3 and IRF7.

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    Leonie Unterholzner

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Recognition of viruses by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs causes interferon-β (IFN-β induction, a key event in the anti-viral innate immune response, and also a target of viral immune evasion. Here the vaccinia virus (VACV protein C6 is identified as an inhibitor of PRR-induced IFN-β expression by a functional screen of select VACV open reading frames expressed individually in mammalian cells. C6 is a member of a family of Bcl-2-like poxvirus proteins, many of which have been shown to inhibit innate immune signalling pathways. PRRs activate both NF-κB and IFN regulatory factors (IRFs to activate the IFN-β promoter induction. Data presented here show that C6 inhibits IRF3 activation and translocation into the nucleus, but does not inhibit NF-κB activation. C6 inhibits IRF3 and IRF7 activation downstream of the kinases TANK binding kinase 1 (TBK1 and IκB kinase-ε (IKKε, which phosphorylate and activate these IRFs. However, C6 does not inhibit TBK1- and IKKε-independent IRF7 activation or the induction of promoters by constitutively active forms of IRF3 or IRF7, indicating that C6 acts at the level of the TBK1/IKKε complex. Consistent with this notion, C6 immunoprecipitated with the TBK1 complex scaffold proteins TANK, SINTBAD and NAP1. C6 is expressed early during infection and is present in both nucleus and cytoplasm. Mutant viruses in which the C6L gene is deleted, or mutated so that the C6 protein is not expressed, replicated normally in cell culture but were attenuated in two in vivo models of infection compared to wild type and revertant controls. Thus C6 contributes to VACV virulence and might do so via the inhibition of PRR-induced activation of IRF3 and IRF7.

  13. Selective inhibition of Sarcocystis neurona calcium-dependent protein kinase 1 for equine protozoal myeloencephalitis therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojo, Kayode K; Dangoudoubiyam, Sriveny; Verma, Shiv K; Scheele, Suzanne; DeRocher, Amy E; Yeargan, Michelle; Choi, Ryan; Smith, Tess R; Rivas, Kasey L; Hulverson, Matthew A; Barrett, Lynn K; Fan, Erkang; Maly, Dustin J; Parsons, Marilyn; Dubey, Jitender P; Howe, Daniel K; Van Voorhis, Wesley C

    2016-12-01

    Sarcocystis neurona is the most frequent cause of equine protozoal myeloencephalitis, a debilitating neurological disease of horses that can be difficult to treat. We identified SnCDPK1, the S. neurona homologue of calcium-dependent protein kinase 1 (CDPK1), a validated drug target in Toxoplasma gondii. SnCDPK1 shares the glycine "gatekeeper" residue of the well-characterized T. gondii enzyme, which allows the latter to be targeted by bumped kinase inhibitors. This study presents detailed molecular and phenotypic evidence that SnCDPK1 can be targeted for rational drug development. Recombinant SnCDPK1 was tested against four bumped kinase inhibitors shown to potently inhibit both T. gondii (Tg) CDPK1 and T. gondii tachyzoite growth. SnCDPK1 was inhibited by low nanomolar concentrations of these BKIs and S. neurona growth was inhibited at 40-120nM concentrations. Thermal shift assays confirmed these bumped kinase inhibitors bind CDPK1 in S. neurona cell lysates. Treatment with bumped kinase inhibitors before or after invasion suggests that bumped kinase inhibitors interfere with S. neurona mammalian host cell invasion in the 0.5-2.5μM range but interfere with intracellular division at 2.5μM. In vivo proof-of-concept experiments were performed in a murine model of S. neurona infection. The experimental infected groups treated for 30days with compound BKI-1553 (n=10 mice) had no signs of disease, while the infected control group had severe signs and symptoms of infection. Elevated antibody responses were found in 100% of control infected animals, but only 20% of BKI-1553 treated infected animals. Parasites were found in brain tissues of 100% of the control infected animals, but only in 10% of the BKI-1553 treated animals. The bumped kinase inhibitors used in these assays have been chemically optimized for potency, selectivity and pharmacokinetic properties, and hence are good candidates for treatment of equine protozoal myeloencephalitis. Copyright © 2016

  14. Homologous recombination in mammalian cells: effect of p53 and Bcl-2 proteins, replication inhibition and ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saintigny, Yannick

    1999-01-01

    The control of cell cycle, associated with the mechanisms of replication, DNA repair/recombination allows the cells to maintain their genetic integrity. The p53 protein ensures the control of G1/S transition. Its inactivation would allow to initial replication on damaged matrix and lead to the block of replication forks followed by DNA strand breaks, good substrates for recombination. This work shows that the expression of mutant p53 protein stimulates both spontaneous and radio-induced homologous recombination, independently of the control of cell cycle. Moreover, the use of a set of replication inhibitors show that inhibition of the replication elongation stimulates recombination more strongly than the initiation inhibition. Replication arrest by these inhibitors also significantly increases the number of DNA strand breaks. These results highlighted a point of action of p53 protein on the ultimate stages of the homologous recombination mechanism. Lastly, the expression of Bcl-2 protein inhibits apoptosis and increases survival, but specifically inhibits conservative recombination, after radiation as well as in absence of apoptotic stress. The extinction of this mechanism of DNA repair is associated with an increase of mutagenesis. Taken together, these results allow ta consider the maintenance of the genetic stability as a cellular network involving different pathways. A multiple stages model for tumoral progression can be deduced. (author) [fr

  15. Camel Milk Attenuates Rheumatoid Arthritis Via Inhibition of Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arab, Hany H; Salama, Samir A; Abdelghany, Tamer M; Omar, Hany A; Arafa, El-Shaimaa A; Alrobaian, Majed M; Maghrabi, Ibrahim A

    2017-01-01

    Camel milk (CM) has shown beneficial anti-inflammatory actions in several experimental and clinical settings. So far, its effect on rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has not been previously explored. Thus, the current work aimed to evaluate the effects of CM in Adjuvant-induced arthritis and air pouch edema models in rats, which mimic human RA. CM was administered at 10 ml/kg orally for 3 weeks starting on the day of Freund's adjuvant paw inoculation. The levels of TNF-α and IL-10 were measured by ELISA while the protein expression of NF-κBp65, COX-2 and iNOS was detected by immunohistochemistry. The expression of MAPK target proteins was assessed by Western blotting. CM attenuated paw edema, arthritic index and gait score along with dorsal pouch inflammatory cell migration. CM lowered the TNF-α and augmented the anti-inflammatory IL-10 levels in sera and exudates of arthritic rats. It also attenuated the expression of activated NF-κBp65, COX-2 and iNOS in the lining of the dorsal pouch. Notably, CM inhibited the MAPK pathway signal transduction via lowering the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, ERK1/2 and JNK1/2 in rat hind paws. Additionally, CM administration lowered the lipid peroxide and nitric oxide levels and boosted glutathione and total anti-oxidant capacity in sera and exudates of animals. The observed CM downregulation of the arthritic process may support the interest of CM consumption as an adjunct approach for the management of RA. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. The ribosome inhibiting protein riproximin shows antineoplastic activity in experimental pancreatic cancer liver metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murtaja, Ahmed; Eyol, Ergül; Xiaoqi, Jiang; Berger, Martin R; Adwan, Hassan

    2018-02-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) has one of the poorest prognoses of all malignancy types. To improve the survival of patients with PDAC, the development of novel anticancer agents is warranted. Riproximin (Rpx) is a newly identified plant lectin, which was isolated from Ximenia americana . The ribosome inactivating protein of type II exhibits potent anticancer activity as recently demonstrated. The rat PDAC cell line ASML was used for in vitro and in vivo studies. The antiproliferative effect of Rpx was assessed using an MTT assay. The modulation of proteins involved in apoptosis was evaluated using western blotting. Tumor-bearing nude rats were treated with Rpx, gemcitabine (GEM) or dinaline (DIN) as single agents, or a combination of Rpx with GEM, or DIN. Rpx was administered intraperitoneally at doses of 1.7-5.4 µg/kg, three times/week, GEM was administered intravenously (50 mg/kg/week) and DIN perorally (10 mg/kg, 5 times/week). Rpx inhibited ASML cell proliferation at IC 50 -values of 0.8-172 pM, caused apoptosis and reduced tumor growth significantly by 90% (P<0.05). The survival rate of rats was significantly increased (21.8 days for Rpx treated vs. 17.6 days for control rats; P=0.05). Higher doses of Rpx caused no further reduction in tumor size when compared with the low dose of Rpx or a combination of Rpx with GEM, or DIN. The standard drug GEM alone was less effective compared with Rpx. In addition, DIN was ineffective, and in combination, reduced the activity of Rpx. These results suggest that Rpx has an evident potential for use in pancreatic cancer treatment. Further experiments are required in order to elucidate its affinity for certain cancer cells and to optimize the combination therapy with other antineoplastic agents.

  17. Camel Milk Attenuates Rheumatoid Arthritis Via Inhibition of Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hany H. Arab

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Camel milk (CM has shown beneficial anti-inflammatory actions in several experimental and clinical settings. So far, its effect on rheumatoid arthritis (RA has not been previously explored. Thus, the current work aimed to evaluate the effects of CM in Adjuvant-induced arthritis and air pouch edema models in rats, which mimic human RA. Methods: CM was administered at 10 ml/kg orally for 3 weeks starting on the day of Freund’s adjuvant paw inoculation. The levels of TNF-α and IL-10 were measured by ELISA while the protein expression of NF-κBp65, COX-2 and iNOS was detected by immunohistochemistry. The expression of MAPK target proteins was assessed by Western blotting. Results: CM attenuated paw edema, arthritic index and gait score along with dorsal pouch inflammatory cell migration. CM lowered the TNF-α and augmented the anti-inflammatory IL-10 levels in sera and exudates of arthritic rats. It also attenuated the expression of activated NF-κBp65, COX-2 and iNOS in the lining of the dorsal pouch. Notably, CM inhibited the MAPK pathway signal transduction via lowering the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, ERK1/2 and JNK1/2 in rat hind paws. Additionally, CM administration lowered the lipid peroxide and nitric oxide levels and boosted glutathione and total anti-oxidant capacity in sera and exudates of animals. Conclusion: The observed CM downregulation of the arthritic process may support the interest of CM consumption as an adjunct approach for the management of RA.

  18. Pulmonary surfactant proteins and polymer combinations reduce surfactant inhibition by serum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Karen W.; Pérez-Gil, Jesús; Echaide, Mercedes; Taeusch, H. William

    2011-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is an inflammatory condition that can be associated with capillary leak of serum into alveoli causing inactivation of surfactant. Resistance to inactivation is affected by types and concentrations of surfactant proteins, lipids, and polymers. Our aim was to investigate the effects of different combinations of these three components. A simple lipid mixture (DPPC/POPG) or a more complex lipid mixture (DPPC/POPC/POPG/cholesterol) was used. Native surfactant proteins SP-B and SP-C obtained from pig lung lavage were added either singly or combined at two concentrations. Also, non-ionic polymers polyethylene glycol and dextran and the anionic polymer hyaluronan were added either singly or in pairs with hyaluronan included. Non-ionic polymers work by different mechanisms than anionic polymers, thus the purpose of placing them together in the same surfactant mixture was to evaluate if the combination would show enhanced beneficial effects. The resulting surfactant mixtures were studied in the presence or absence of serum. A modified bubble surfactometer was used to evaluate surface activities. Mixtures that included both SP-B and SP-C plus hyaluronan and either dextran or polyethylene glycol were found to be the most resistant to inhibition by serum. These mixtures, as well as some with either SP-B or SP-C with combined polymers were as or more resistant to inactivation than native surfactant. These results suggest that improved formulations of lung surfactants are possible and may be useful in reducing some types of surfactant inactivation in treating lung injuries. PMID:21741354

  19. Clustering of double strand break-containing chromosome domains is not inhibited by inactivation of major repair proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krawczyk, P. M.; Stap, C.; Van Oven, C.; Hoebe, R.; Aten, J. A.

    2006-01-01

    For efficient repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) cells rely on a process that involves the Mre11/Rad50/Nbs1 complex, which may help to protect non-repaired DNA ends from separating until they can be rejoined by DNA repair proteins. It has been observed that as a secondary effect, this process can lead to unintended clustering of multiple, initially separate, DSB-containing chromosome domains. This work demonstrates that neither inactivation of the major repair proteins XRCC3 and the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) nor inhibition of DNA-PK by vanillin influences the aggregation of DSB-containing chromosome domains. (authors)

  20. Inhibition of Hepatitis C virus (HCV Core protein- induced Cell Growth by Non-structural Protein 4A (NS4A is Mediated by Mitochondrial Dysregulation

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    Denis Selimović

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV is a significant health problem facing the world. More than 170 million people are infected with HCV worldwide. HCV encodes a large polyprotein precursor that is processed into at least 10 distinct products including structural (core, E1 and E2 and non-structural (NS2, NS3, NS4A, NS4B, NS5A and NS5B. Besides its importance in virus replication, NS4A functions as a cofactor for NS3 and contributes to viral pathogenesis by influencing cellular functions. Here, we investigated the effect of NS4A protein on the growth rate induced by core protein in liver cells. Using our established tetracycline inducible system, we demonstrated the ability of NS4A protein to inhibit core protein-induced cell growth in Hepatoma cell line, HepG2. Induction of both core and NS4A proteins in HepG2- core/NS4A transfectants inhibited core-induced growth advantage in HepG2-core transfectants and blocked NS4A protein-induced cell growth inhibition in HepG2-NS4A transfectants. Using both immune fluorescence staining and Western blot analysis, we confirmed the localization of NS4A protein to the mitochondria in HepG2-NS4A transfectants expressing NS4A protein. Data obtained from flow cytometry analysis, using JC-1 demonstrated the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ^ by the expression of NS4A protein in HepG2-NS4A transfectants, but not by the expression of core protein in HepG2-core transfectants. Whereas, the induction of the expression of both core and NS4A proteins in HepG2-core/NS4A transfectants blocked NS4A-induced loss of ΔΨm in HepG2 cells. Taken together, our data suggest an important role for mitochondria in the modulation HCV NS4A-induced inhibition of HCV core-mediated cell growth.

  1. Inhibition of Receptor Interacting Protein Kinases Attenuates Cardiomyocyte Hypertrophy Induced by Palmitic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Mingyue; Lu, Lihui; Lei, Song; Chai, Hua; Wu, Siyuan; Tang, Xiaoju; Bao, Qinxue; Chen, Li; Wu, Wenchao; Liu, Xiaojing

    2016-01-01

    Palmitic acid (PA) is known to cause cardiomyocyte dysfunction. Cardiac hypertrophy is one of the important pathological features of PA-induced lipotoxicity, but the mechanism by which PA induces cardiomyocyte hypertrophy is still unclear. Therefore, our study was to test whether necroptosis, a receptor interacting protein kinase 1 and 3 (RIPK1 and RIPK3-) dependent programmed necrosis, was involved in the PA-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. We used the PA-treated primary neonatal rat cardiac myocytes (NCMs) or H9c2 cells to study lipotoxicity. Our results demonstrated that cardiomyocyte hypertrophy was induced by PA treatment, determined by upregulation of hypertrophic marker genes and cell surface area enlargement. Upon PA treatment, the expression of RIPK1 and RIPK3 was increased. Pretreatment with the RIPK1 inhibitor necrostatin-1 (Nec-1), the PA-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, was attenuated. Knockdown of RIPK1 or RIPK3 by siRNA suppressed the PA-induced myocardial hypertrophy. Moreover, a crosstalk between necroptosis and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress was observed in PA-treated cardiomyocytes. Inhibition of RIPK1 with Nec-1, phosphorylation level of AKT (Ser473), and mTOR (Ser2481) was significantly reduced in PA-treated cardiomyocytes. In conclusion, RIPKs-dependent necroptosis might be crucial in PA-induced myocardial hypertrophy. Activation of mTOR may mediate the effect of necroptosis in cardiomyocyte hypertrophy induced by PA.

  2. Hsp70-GlcNAc-binding activity is released by stress, proteasome inhibition, and protein misfolding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guinez, Celine; Mir, Anne-Marie; Leroy, Yves; Cacan, Rene; Michalski, Jean-Claude; Lefebvre, Tony

    2007-01-01

    Numerous recent works strengthen the idea that the nuclear and cytosolic-specific O-GlcNAc glycosylation protects cells against injuries. We have first investigated O-GlcNAc level and Hsp70-GlcNAc-binding activity (HGBA) behaviour after exposure of HeLa and HepG 2 cells to a wide variety of stresses. O-GlcNAc and HGBA responses were different according to the stress and according to the cell. HGBA was released for almost all stresses, while O-GlcNAc level was modified either upwards or downwards, depending to the stress. Against all expectations, we demonstrated that energy charge did not significantly vary with stress whereas UDP-GlcNAc pools were more dramatically affected even if differences in UDP-GlcNAc contents were not correlated with O-GlcNAc variations suggesting that O-GlcNAc transferase is itself finely regulated during cell injury. Finally, HGBA could be triggered by proteasome inhibition and by L-azetidine-2-carboxylic acid (a proline analogue) incorporation demonstrating that protein misfolding is one of the key-activator of this Hsp70 property

  3. Liposomal C6 Ceramide Activates Protein Phosphatase 1 to Inhibit Melanoma Cells.

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    Fangzhen Jiang

    Full Text Available Melanoma is one common skin cancer. In the present study, the potential anti-melanoma activity by a liposomal C6 ceramide was tested in vitro. We showed that the liposomal C6 (ceramide was cytotoxic and anti-proliferative against a panel of human melanoma cell lines (SK-Mel2, WM-266.4 and A-375 and WM-115. In addition, liposomal C6 induced caspase-dependent apoptotic death in the melanoma cells. Reversely, its cytotoxicity was attenuated by several caspase inhibitors. Intriguingly, liposomal C6 was non-cytotoxic to B10BR mouse melanocytes and primary human melanocytes. Molecularly, liposomal C6 activated protein phosphatase 1 (PP1 to inactivate Akt-mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR signaling in melanoma cells. On the other hand, PP1 shRNA knockdown or exogenous expression of constitutively activate Akt1 (CA-Akt1 restored Akt-mTOR activation and significantly attenuated liposomal C6-mediated cytotoxicity and apoptosis in melanoma cells. Our results suggest that liposomal C6 activates PP1 to inhibit melanoma cells.

  4. Protein kinase C β inhibits autophagy and sensitizes cervical cancer Hela cells to cisplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Na; Zhang, Wei

    2017-04-28

    Recently, autophagy has been indicated to play an essential role in various biological events, such as the response of cervical cancer cells to chemotherapy. However, the exact signalling mechanism that regulates autophagy during chemotherapy remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the regulation by cisplatin on protein kinase C β (PKC β), on B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) and on apoptosis in cervical cancer Hela cells. And then we examined the regulation by cisplatin on autophagy and the role of autophagy on the chemotherapy in Hela cells. In addition, the regulation of the PKC β on the autophagy was also investigated. Our results indicated that cisplatin promoted PKC β in Hela cells. The PKC β inhibitor reduced the cisplatin-induced apoptosis, whereas increased the cisplatin-induced autophagy in Hela cells. On the other side, the PKC β overexpression aggravated the cisplatin-induced apoptosis, whereas down-regulated the cisplatin-induced autophagy. Taken together, our study firstly recognized the involvement of PKC β in the cytotoxicity of cisplatin via inhibiting autophagy in cervical cancer cells. We propose that PKC β would sensitize cervical cancer cells to chemotherapy via reducing the chemotherapy induced autophagy in cancer cells. © 2017 The Author(s).

  5. Tec protein tyrosine kinase inhibits CD25 expression in human T-lymphocyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susaki, Kentaro; Kitanaka, Akira; Dobashi, Hiroaki; Kubota, Yoshitsugu; Kittaka, Katsuharu; Kameda, Tomohiro; Yamaoka, Genji; Mano, Hiroyuki; Mihara, Keichiro; Ishida, Toshihiko

    2010-01-04

    The Tec protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) belongs to a group of structurally related nonreceptor PTKs that also includes Btk, Itk, Rlk, and Bmx. Previous studies have suggested that these kinases play important roles in hematopoiesis and in the lymphocyte signaling pathway. Despite evidence suggesting the involvement of Tec in the T-lymphocyte activation pathway via T-cell receptor (TCR) and CD28, Tec's role in T-lymphocytes remains unclear because of the lack of apparent defects in T-lymphocyte function in Tec-deficient mice. In this study, we investigated the role of Tec in human T-lymphocyte using the Jurkat T-lymphoid cell line stably transfected with a cDNA encoding Tec. We found that the expression of wild-type Tec inhibited the expression of CD25 induced by TCR cross-linking. Second, we observed that LFM-A13, a selective inhibitor of Tec family PTK, rescued the suppression of TCR-induced CD25 expression observed in wild-type Tec-expressing Jurkat cells. In addition, expression of kinase-deleted Tec did not alter the expression level of CD25 after TCR ligation. We conclude that Tec PTK mediates signals that negatively regulate CD25 expression induced by TCR cross-linking. This, in turn, implies that this PTK plays a role in the attenuation of IL-2 activity in human T-lymphocytes.

  6. Inhibition of RNA and protein synthesis in pollen tube development of Pinus bungeana by actinomycin D and cycloheximide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Huaiqing; Li, Yiqin; Hu, Yuxi; Lin, Jinxing

    2005-03-01

    * The effects of actinomycin D and cycloheximide on RNA and protein synthesis were investigated during pollen tube development of Pinus bungeana. * RNA and protein contents, protein expression patterns, cell wall components and ultrastructural changes of pollen tubes were studied using spectrophotometry, SDS-PAGE electrophoresis, Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). * Pollen grains germinated in the presence of actinomycin D, but tube elongation and RNA synthesis were inhibited. By contrast, cycloheximide inhibited pollen germination and protein synthesis, induced abnormal tube morphology, and retarded the tube growth rate. SDS-PAGE analysis showed that protein expression patterns changed distinctly, with some proteins being specific for each phase. FTIR microspectroscopy established significant changes in the chemical composition of pollen tube walls. TEM analysis revealed the inhibitors caused disintegration of organelles involved in the secretory system. * These results suggested RNA necessary for pollen germination and early tube growth were present already in the pollen grains before germination, while the initiation of germination and the maintenance of pollen tube elongation depended on continuous protein synthesis.

  7. Role of Protein Phosphatase 1 and Inhibitor of Protein Phosphatase-1 in Nitric Oxide-Dependent Inhibition of the DNA Damage Response in Pancreatic β-Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleson, Bryndon J; Naatz, Aaron; Proudfoot, Sarah C; Yeo, Chay Teng; Corbett, John A

    2018-02-14

    Nitric oxide is produced at micromolar levels by pancreatic β-cells during exposure to proinflammatory cytokines. While classically viewed as damaging, nitric oxide also activates pathways that promote β-cell survival. We have shown that nitric oxide, in a cell type selective manner, inhibits the DNA damage response (DDR) and, in doing so, protects β-cells from DNA damage-induced apoptosis. This study explores potential mechanisms by which nitric oxide inhibits DDR signaling. We show that inhibition of DDR signaling (measured by γH2AX formation and the phosphorylation of KAP1) is selective for nitric oxide, as other forms of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species do not impair DDR signaling. The kinetics and broad range of DDR substrates that are inhibited suggest that protein phosphatase activation may be one mechanism by which nitric oxide attenuates DDR signaling in β-cells. While protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) is a primary regulator of DDR signaling and an inhibitor of protein phosphatase-1 (IPP-1) is selectively expressed only in β-cells, disruption of either IPP-1 or PP1 does not modify the inhibitory actions of nitric oxide on DDR signaling in β-cells. These findings support a PP1-independent mechanism by which nitric oxide selectively impairs DDR signaling and protects β-cells from DNA damage-induced apoptosis. © 2018 by the American Diabetes Association.

  8. eIF4A inhibition allows translational regulation of mRNAs encoding proteins involved in Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Bottley

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is the main cause of dementia in our increasingly aging population. The debilitating cognitive and behavioral symptoms characteristic of AD make it an extremely distressing illness for patients and carers. Although drugs have been developed to treat AD symptoms and to slow disease progression, there is currently no cure. The incidence of AD is predicted to increase to over one hundred million by 2050, placing a heavy burden on communities and economies, and making the development of effective therapies an urgent priority. Two proteins are thought to have major contributory roles in AD: the microtubule associated protein tau, also known as MAPT; and the amyloid-beta peptide (A-beta, a cleavage product of amyloid precursor protein (APP. Oxidative stress is also implicated in AD pathology from an early stage. By targeting eIF4A, an RNA helicase involved in translation initiation, the synthesis of APP and tau, but not neuroprotective proteins, can be simultaneously and specifically reduced, representing a novel avenue for AD intervention. We also show that protection from oxidative stress is increased upon eIF4A inhibition. We demonstrate that the reduction of these proteins is not due to changes in mRNA levels or increased protein degradation, but is a consequence of translational repression conferred by inhibition of the helicase activity of eIF4A. Inhibition of eIF4A selectively and simultaneously modulates the synthesis of proteins involved in Alzheimer's disease: reducing A-beta and tau synthesis, while increasing proteins predicted to be neuroprotective.

  9. Development of a phosphorylated Momordica charantia protein system for inhibiting susceptible dose-dependent C. albicans to available antimycotics: An allosteric regulation of protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Yuanbiao; Song, Li; Zhu, Chenchen; Wang, Qian; Guo, Tianyan; Yan, Yanhua; Li, Qingshan

    2017-11-15

    A regulatory Momordica charantia protein system was constructed allosterically by in vitro protein phosphorylation, in an attempt to evaluate antimycological pluripotency against dose-dependent susceptibilities in C. albicans. Fungal strain lineages susceptible to ketoconazole, econazole, miconazole, 5-flucytosine, nystatin and amphotericin B were prepared in laboratory, followed by identification via antifungal susceptibility testing. Protein phosphorylation was carried out in reactions with 5'-adenylic, guanidylic, cytidylic and uridylic acids and cyclic adenosine triphosphate, through catalysis of cyclin-dependent kinase 1, protein kinase A and protein kinase C respectively. Biochemical analysis of enzymatic reactions indicated the apparent Michaelis-Menten constants and maximal velocity values of 16.57-91.97mM and 55.56-208.33μM·min -1 , together with an approximate 1:1 reactant stoichiometric ratio. Three major protein phosphorylation sites were theoretically predicted at Thr255, Thr102 and Thr24 by a KinasePhos tool. Additionally, circular dichroism spectroscopy demonstrated that upon phosphorylation, protein folding structures were decreased in random coil, β6-sheet and α1-helix partial regions. McFarland equivalence standard testing yielded the concentration-dependent inhibition patterns, while fungus was grown in Sabouraud's dextrose agar. The minimal inhibitory concentrations of 0.16-0.51μM (at 50% response) were obtained for free protein and phosphorylated counterparts. With respect to the 3-cycling susceptibility testing regimen, individuals of total protein forms were administrated in-turn at 0.14μM/cycle. Relative inhibition ratios were retained to 66.13-81.04% of initial ones regarding the ketoconazole-susceptible C. albicans growth. An inhibitory protein system, with an advantage of decreasing antifungal susceptibilities to diverse antimycotics, was proposed because of regulatory pluripotency whereas little contribution to susceptibility in

  10. Arctigenin inhibits triple-negative breast cancers by targeting CIP2A to reactivate protein phosphatase 2A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qiuyue; Qin, Shanshan; Yuan, Xiaoning; Zhang, Liang; Ji, Juanli; Liu, Xuewen; Ma, Wenjing; Zhang, Yunfei; Liu, Pengfei; Sun, Zhiting; Zhang, Jingxuan; Liu, Ying

    2017-07-01

    We have shown that a novel STAT3 inhibitor arctigenin (Atn) induces significant cytotoxicity in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells. This study further delineated molecular mechanisms where by Atn triggered cytotoxicity in TNBC cells. We found Atn can also inhibit metastasis in TNBC cells through cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A (CIP2A) pathway. CIP2A is an endogenous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), which can increase the migration and invasion of various cancer cells. PP2A is a tumor suppressor, which is functionally defective in various cancers. Atn-induced metastasis inhibition was associated with reactivation of PP2A, downregulation of CIP2A and Akt phosphorylation. Silencing CIP2A enhanced Atn-induced metastasis inhibition and apoptosis in TNBCs. Furthermore, ectopic expression of CIP2A or inhibition of PP2A in TNBC cells abolished the effects of Atn. In conclusion, we found that enhancement of PP2A activity by inhibition of CIP2A, at least in part, promotes the anti-metastasis effect induced by Atn. Our findings disclose the novel therapeutic mechanism of this targeted agent, and suggest the therapeutic potential and feasibility of developing PP2A enhancers as a novel anticancer strategy.

  11. A mutant of SWAP-70, a phosphatidylinositoltrisphosphate binding protein, transforms mouse embryo fibroblasts, which is inhibited by sanguinarine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhisa Fukui

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available SWAP-70, a phosphatidylinositol trisphosphate (PtdIns(3,4,5P(3 binding protein, has been suggested to be involved in transformation of mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs as well as membrane ruffling after growth factor stimulation of the cells. A mutant, SWAP-70-374, was found to be able to bind to F-actin in vitro, whereas wild-type SWAP-70 failed to do so. This mutant was present at the plasma membrane without any stimulation while the wild-type protein was present only in the cytosol unless cells were stimulated with EGF. Expression of this mutant in MEFs resulted in morphologic transformation, fast growth, and loss of contact inhibition, suggesting that SWAP-70 with this mutation can transform the cells. ERK1/2 was activated in SWAP-70-374-transformed cells. Use of MEK inhibitors revealed that the ERK1/2 pathway does not affect the cell growth of MEFs but is responsible for loss of contact inhibition. To investigate the function of SWAP-70 further, drugs that can inhibit SWAP-70-dependent cell responses were screened. Among various drugs, sanguinarine was found to inhibit transformation of MEFs by SWAP-70-374. This drug was able to inhibit SWAP-70-mediated membrane ruffling as well, suggesting that its effect was closely related to the SWAP-70 signaling pathway. These results suggest that SWAP-70-374 can activate some signaling pathways, including the ERK1/2 pathway, to transform MEFs.

  12. Inhibition of protein degradation induces apoptosis through a microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3-mediated activation of caspase-8 at intracellular membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Ji-An; Ullman, Erica; Dou, Zhixun; Zong, Wei-Xing

    2011-08-01

    The accumulation of damaged or misfolded proteins, if unresolved, can lead to a detrimental consequence within cells termed proteotoxicity. Since cancerous cells often display elevated protein synthesis and by-product disposal, inhibition of the protein degradation pathways is an emerging approach for cancer therapy. However, the molecular mechanism underlying proteotoxicity remains largely unclear. We show here that inhibition of proteasomal degradation results in an increased oligomerization and activation of caspase-8 on the cytosolic side of intracellular membranes. This enhanced caspase-8 oligomerization and activation are promoted through its interaction with the ubiquitin-binding protein SQSTM1/p62 and the microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3), which are enriched at intracellular membranes in response to proteotoxic stress. Silencing LC3 by shRNA, or the LC3 mutants defective in membrane localization or p62 interaction fail to induce caspase-8 activation and apoptosis. Our results unveiled a previously unknown mechanism through which disruption of protein homeostasis induces caspase-8 oligomerization, activation, and apoptosis.

  13. Inhibition of HCV replication by oxysterol-binding protein-related protein 4 (ORP4 through interaction with HCV NS5B and alteration of lipid droplet formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In-Woo Park

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV RNA replication involves complex interactions among the 3'x RNA element within the HCV 3' untranslated region, viral and host proteins. However, many of the host proteins remain unknown. In this study, we devised an RNA affinity chromatography /2D/MASS proteomics strategy and identified nine putative 3' X-associated host proteins; among them is oxysterol-binding protein-related protein 4 (ORP4, a cytoplasmic receptor for oxysterols. We determined the relationship between ORP4 expression and HCV replication. A very low level of constitutive ORP4 expression was detected in hepatocytes. Ectopically expressed ORP4 was detected in the endoplasmic reticulum and inhibited luciferase reporter gene expression in HCV subgenomic replicon cells and HCV core expression in JFH-1-infected cells. Expression of ORP4S, an ORP4 variant that lacked the N-terminal pleckstrin-homology domain but contained the C-terminal oxysterol-binding domain also inhibited HCV replication, pointing to an important role of the oxysterol-binding domain in ORP4-mediated inhibition of HCV replication. ORP4 was found to associate with HCV NS5B and its expression led to inhibition of the NS5B activity. ORP4 expression had little effect on intracellular lipid synthesis and secretion, but it induced lipid droplet formation in the context of HCV replication. Taken together, these results demonstrate that ORP4 is a negative regulator of HCV replication, likely via interaction with HCV NS5B in the replication complex and regulation of intracellular lipid homeostasis. This work supports the important role of lipids and their metabolism in HCV replication and pathogenesis.

  14. Nimesulide inhibits protein kinase C epsilon and substance P in sensory neurons – comparison with paracetamol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vellani V

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Vittorio Vellani1, Silvia Franchi2, Massimiliano Prandini1, Sarah Moretti2, Giorgia Pavesi1, Chiara Giacomoni3, Paola Sacerdote21Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche, Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy; 2Dipartimento di Farmacologia Chemioterapia e Tossicologia Medica, Università degli Studi di Milano, Italy; 3Dipartimento di Economia e Tecnologia, Università degli Studi della Repubblica di San Marino, Montegiardino, Repubblica di San MarinoAbstract: In this paper we describe new actions of nimesulide and paracetamol in cultured peripheral neurons isolated from rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG. Both drugs were able to decrease in a dose-dependent fashion the number of cultured DRG neurons showing translocation of protein kinase C epsilon (PKCε caused by exposure to 1 µM bradykinin or 100 nM thrombin. In addition, the level of substance P (SP released by DRG neurons and the level of preprotachykinin mRNA expression were measured in basal conditions and after 70 minutes or 36 hours of stimulation with nerve growth factor (NGF or with an inflammatory soup containing bradykinin, thrombin, endothelin-1, and KCl. Nimesulide (10 µM significantly decreased the mRNA levels of the SP precursor preprotachykinin in basal and in stimulated conditions, and decreased the amount of SP released in the medium during stimulation of neurons with NGF or with the inflammatory soup. The effects of paracetamol (10 µM on such response was lower. Nimesulide completely inhibited the release of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 from DRG neurons, either basal or induced by NGF and by inflammatory soup, while paracetamol decreased PGE2 release only partially. Our data demonstrate, for the first time, a direct effect of two drugs largely used as analgesics on DRG neurons. The present results suggest that PKCε might be a target for the effect of nimesulide and paracetamol, while inhibition of SP synthesis and release is clearly more relevant for nimesulide than for

  15. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibition by the KLF6 tumor suppressor protein through interaction with cyclin D1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzeno, Sharon; Narla, Goutham; Allina, Jorge; Cheng, George Z; Reeves, Helen L; Banck, Michaela S; Odin, Joseph A; Diehl, J Alan; Germain, Doris; Friedman, Scott L

    2004-06-01

    Kruppel-like factor 6 (KLF6) is a tumor suppressor gene inactivated in prostate and colon cancers, as well as in astrocytic gliomas. Here, we establish that KLF6 mediates growth inhibition through an interaction with cyclin D1, leading to reduced phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma protein (Rb) at Ser(795). Furthermore, introduction of KLF6 disrupts cyclin D1-cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) 4 complexes and forces the redistribution of p21(Cip/Kip) onto cdk2, which promotes G(1) cell cycle arrest. Our data suggest that KLF6 converges with the Rb pathway to inhibit cyclin D1/cdk4 activity, resulting in growth suppression.

  16. Digestibility of Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) Protein Concentrate and Its Potential to Inhibit Lipid Peroxidation in the Zebrafish Larvae Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilcacundo, R; Barrio, D; Carpio, C; García-Ruiz, A; Rúales, J; Hernández-Ledesma, B; Carrillo, W

    2017-09-01

    Quinoa protein concentrate (QPC) was extracted and digested under in vitro gastrointestinal conditions. The protein content of QPC was in the range between 52.40 and 65.01% depending on the assay used. Quinoa proteins were almost completely hydrolyzed by pepsin at pH of 1.2, 2.0, and 3.2. At high pH, only partial hydrolysis was observed. During the duodenal phase, no intact proteins were visible, indicating their susceptibility to the in vitro simulated digestive conditions. Zebrafish larvae model was used to evaluate the in vivo ability of gastrointestinal digests to inhibit lipid peroxidation. Gastric digestion at pH 1.2 showed the highest lipid peroxidation inhibition percentage (75.15%). The lipid peroxidation activity increased after the duodenal phase. The digest obtained at the end of the digestive process showed an inhibition percentage of 82.10%, comparable to that showed when using BHT as positive control (87.13%).

  17. An Impermeant Ganetespib Analog Inhibits Extracellular Hsp90-Mediated Cancer Cell Migration that Involves Lysyl Oxidase 2-like Protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCready, Jessica; Wong, Daniel S.; Burlison, Joseph A.; Ying, Weiwen; Jay, Daniel G.

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular Hsp90 (eHsp90) activates a number of client proteins outside of cancer cells required for migration and invasion. Therefore, eHsp90 may serve as a novel target for anti-metastatic drugs as its inhibition using impermeant Hsp90 inhibitors would not affect the numerous vital intracellular Hsp90 functions in normal cells. While some eHsp90 clients are known, it is important to establish other proteins that act outside the cell to validate eHsp90 as a drug target to limit cancer spread. Using mass spectrometry we identified two precursor proteins Galectin 3 binding protein (G3BP) and Lysyl oxidase 2-like protein (LOXL2) that associate with eHsp90 in MDA-MB231 breast cancer cell conditioned media and confirmed that LOXL2 binds to eHsp90 in immunoprecipitates. We introduce a novel impermeant Hsp90 inhibitor STA-12-7191 derived from ganetespib and show that it is markedly less toxic to cells and can inhibit cancer cell migration in a dose dependent manner. We used STA-12-7191 to test if LOXL2 and G3BP are potential eHsp90 clients. We showed that while LOXL2 can increase wound healing and compensate for STA-12-7191-mediated inhibition of wound closure, addition of G3BP had no affect on this assay. These findings support of role for LOXL2 in eHsp90 stimulated cancer cell migration and provide preliminary evidence for the use of STA-12-7191 to inhibit eHsp90 to limit cancer invasion

  18. An Impermeant Ganetespib Analog Inhibits Extracellular Hsp90-Mediated Cancer Cell Migration that Involves Lysyl Oxidase 2-like Protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCready, Jessica [Department of Natural Sciences, Assumption College, Worcester, MA 01609 (United States); Wong, Daniel S. [Department of Developmental Molecular and Chemical Biology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02111 (United States); Cell and Molecular Physiology Program, Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences, Tufts University, Boston, MA 02111 (United States); Burlison, Joseph A.; Ying, Weiwen [Synta Pharmaceuticals, Lexington, MA 02421 (United States); Jay, Daniel G., E-mail: daniel.jay@tufts.edu [Department of Developmental Molecular and Chemical Biology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02111 (United States); Cell and Molecular Physiology Program, Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences, Tufts University, Boston, MA 02111 (United States)

    2014-04-30

    Extracellular Hsp90 (eHsp90) activates a number of client proteins outside of cancer cells required for migration and invasion. Therefore, eHsp90 may serve as a novel target for anti-metastatic drugs as its inhibition using impermeant Hsp90 inhibitors would not affect the numerous vital intracellular Hsp90 functions in normal cells. While some eHsp90 clients are known, it is important to establish other proteins that act outside the cell to validate eHsp90 as a drug target to limit cancer spread. Using mass spectrometry we identified two precursor proteins Galectin 3 binding protein (G3BP) and Lysyl oxidase 2-like protein (LOXL2) that associate with eHsp90 in MDA-MB231 breast cancer cell conditioned media and confirmed that LOXL2 binds to eHsp90 in immunoprecipitates. We introduce a novel impermeant Hsp90 inhibitor STA-12-7191 derived from ganetespib and show that it is markedly less toxic to cells and can inhibit cancer cell migration in a dose dependent manner. We used STA-12-7191 to test if LOXL2 and G3BP are potential eHsp90 clients. We showed that while LOXL2 can increase wound healing and compensate for STA-12-7191-mediated inhibition of wound closure, addition of G3BP had no affect on this assay. These findings support of role for LOXL2 in eHsp90 stimulated cancer cell migration and provide preliminary evidence for the use of STA-12-7191 to inhibit eHsp90 to limit cancer invasion.

  19. Surfactant protein B inhibits secretory phospholipase A2 hydrolysis of surfactant phospholipids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grier, Bonnie L.; Waite, B. Moseley; Veldhuizen, Ruud A.; Possmayer, Fred; Yao, Li-Juan; Seeds, Michael C.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrolysis of surfactant phospholipids (PL) by secretory phospholipases A2 (sPLA2) contributes to surfactant damage in inflammatory airway diseases such as acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome. We and others have reported that each sPLA2 exhibits specificity in hydrolyzing different PLs in pulmonary surfactant and that the presence of hydrophilic surfactant protein A (SP-A) alters sPLA2-mediated hydrolysis. This report tests the hypothesis that hydrophobic SP-B also inhibits sPLA2-mediated surfactant hydrolysis. Three surfactant preparations were used containing varied amounts of SP-B and radiolabeled tracers of phosphatidylcholine (PC) or phosphatidylglycerol (PG): 1) washed ovine surfactant (OS) (pre- and postorganic extraction) compared with Survanta (protein poor), 2) Survanta supplemented with purified bovine SP-B (1–5%, wt/wt), and 3) a mixture of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (POPC), and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylglycerol (POPG) (DPPC:POPC:POPG, 40:40:20) prepared as vesicles and monomolecular films in the presence or absence of SP-B. Hydrolysis of PG and PC by Group IB sPLA2 (PLA2G1A) was significantly lower in the extracted OS, which contains SP-B, compared with Survanta (P = 0.005), which is SP-B poor. Hydrolysis of PG and PC in nonextracted OS, which contains all SPs, was lower than both Survanta and extracted OS. When Survanta was supplemented with 1% SP-B, PG and PC hydrolysis by PLA2G1B was significantly lower (P hydrolysis by both PLA2G1B and Group IIA sPLA2 (PLA2G2A). In films, PLA2G1B hydrolyzed surfactant PL monolayers at surface pressures ≤30 mN/m (P hydrolysis can occur. These results suggest the hydrophobic SP, SP-B, protects alveolar surfactant PL from hydrolysis mediated by multiple sPLA2 in both vesicles (alveolar subphase) and monomolecular films (air-liquid interface). PMID:22037357

  20. Cauliflower mosaic virus protein P6 inhibits signaling responses to salicylic acid and regulates innate immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Love

    Full Text Available Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV encodes a multifunctional protein P6 that is required for translation of the 35S RNA and also acts as a suppressor of RNA silencing. Here we demonstrate that P6 additionally acts as a pathogenicity effector of an unique and novel type, modifying NPR1 (a key regulator of salicylic acid (SA- and jasmonic acid (JA-dependent signaling and inhibiting SA-dependent defence responses We find that that transgene-mediated expression of P6 in Arabidopsis and transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana has profound effects on defence signaling, suppressing expression of representative SA-responsive genes and increasing expression of representative JA-responsive genes. Relative to wild-type Arabidopsis P6-expressing transgenics had greatly reduced expression of PR-1 following SA-treatment, infection by CaMV or inoculation with an avirulent bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato (Pst. Similarly transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana of P6 (including a mutant form defective in translational transactivation activity suppressed PR-1a transcript accumulation in response to Agrobacterium infiltration and following SA-treatment. As well as suppressing the expression of representative SA-regulated genes, P6-transgenic Arabidopsis showed greatly enhanced susceptibility to both virulent and avirulent Pst (titres elevated 10 to 30-fold compared to non-transgenic controls but reduced susceptibility to the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea. Necrosis following SA-treatment or inoculation with avirulent Pst was reduced and delayed in P6-transgenics. NPR1 an important regulator of SA/JA crosstalk, was more highly expressed in the presence of P6 and introduction of the P6 transgene into a transgenic line expressing an NPR1:GFP fusion resulted in greatly increased fluorescence in nuclei even in the absence of SA. Thus in the presence of P6 an inactive form of NPR1 is mislocalized in the nucleus even in uninduced plants

  1. Inhibition of protein kinase Cbeta does not improve endothelial function in type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckman, Joshua A; Goldfine, Allison B; Goldin, Alison; Prsic, Adnan; Kim, Sora; Creager, Mark A

    2010-08-01

    Antagonism of protein kinase Cbeta (PKCbeta) restores endothelial function in experimental models of diabetes and prevents vascular dysfunction in response to hyperglycemia in healthy humans. We tested the hypothesis that PKCbeta antagonism would improve vascular function in subjects with type 2 diabetes compared with healthy control subjects. The effect of PKCbeta was evaluated in a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded crossover trial. The study was performed in the outpatient setting of a university medical center. Thirteen subjects with type 2 diabetes without evidence of cardiovascular disease and 15 healthy control subjects were recruited via newspaper advertisement. Subjects underwent a randomized, double-blind, crossover, placebo-controlled trial of the selective PKCbeta antagonist ruboxistaurin mesylate. Subjects received each treatment for 14 d. Endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent vasodilation of forearm resistance vessels was measured with mercury-in-silastic, strain-gauge plethysmography during intraarterial administration of methacholine chloride and verapamil, respectively. Markers of inflammation, fibrinolysis, endothelial damage, and oxidative stress were measured after each treatment. Endothelium-dependent vasodilation of forearm resistance vessels was attenuated in diabetic subjects when compared with healthy subjects (P=0.001). Endothelium-independent vasodilation did not differ between groups (P value not significant). Ruboxistaurin did not significantly change endothelium-dependent or endothelium-independent vasodilation or blood-based markers of inflammation, fibrinolysis, endothelial damage, and oxidative stress in either diabetic or healthy subjects. Endothelial dysfunction of forearm resistance vessels was not improved by 2 wk of selective PKCbeta inhibition in patients with diabetes. These results suggest that PKCbeta does not contribute significantly to vascular dysfunction in otherwise healthy patients with type 2

  2. The Scaffolding Protein IQGAP1 Interacts with NLRC3 and Inhibits Type I IFN Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tocker, Aaron M; Durocher, Emily; Jacob, Kimberly D; Trieschman, Kate E; Talento, Suzanna M; Rechnitzer, Alma A; Roberts, David M; Davis, Beckley K

    2017-10-15

    Sensing of cytosolic nucleotides is a critical initial step in the elaboration of type I IFN. One of several upstream receptors, cyclic GMP-AMP synthase, binds to cytosolic DNA and generates dicyclic nucleotides that act as secondary messengers. These secondary messengers bind directly to stimulator of IFN genes (STING). STING recruits TNFR-associated NF-κB kinase-binding kinase 1 which acts as a critical node that allows for efficient activation of IFN regulatory factors to drive the antiviral transcriptome. NLRC3 is a recently characterized nucleotide-binding domain, leucine-rich repeat containing protein (NLR) that negatively regulates the type I IFN pathway by inhibiting subcellular redistribution and effective signaling of STING, thus blunting the transcription of type I IFNs. NLRC3 is predominantly expressed in lymphoid and myeloid cells. IQGAP1 was identified as a putative interacting partner of NLRC3 through yeast two-hybrid screening. In this article, we show that IQGAP1 associates with NLRC3 and can disrupt the NLRC3-STING interaction in the cytosol of human epithelial cells. Furthermore, knockdown of IQGAP1 in THP1 and HeLa cells causes significantly more IFN-β production in response to cytosolic nucleic acids. This result phenocopies NLRC3-deficient macrophages and fibroblasts and short hairpin RNA knockdown of NLRC3 in THP1 cells. Our findings suggest that IQGAP1 is a novel regulator of type I IFN production, possibly via interacting with NLRC3 in human monocytic and epithelial cells. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  3. Retracted: Resveratrol inhibits oesophageal adenocarcinoma cell proliferation via AMP-activated protein kinase signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-24

    Retraction: Retracted:Resveratrol inhibits oesophageal adenocarcinoma cell proliferation via AMP-activated protein kinase signaling Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention (APJCP) has retracted the article titled “Resveratrol Inhibits Oesophageal Adenocarcinoma Cell Proliferation via AMP-activated Protein Kinase Signaling”(1) for reason of having duplicated contents brought to the attention of APJCP’s editorial office by the following email content: “Dear Editors of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Acta Pharmacologica Sinica, Asian Pac J Cancer Prev, Clinical and Experimental Hypertension, I write to you from the editorial office of PLOS ONE to inform you of concerns related to duplicated content in articles published by your journals. We have been following up on concerns of overlapping text and duplicate Western blots within the following PLOS ONE article: [1] Berberine Improves Kidney Function in Diabetic Mice via AMPK Activation https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0113398 Received: June 9, 2014; Accepted: October 23, 2014; Published: November 19, 2014 It was initially brought to our attention that there is duplication of Western blot images between the PLOS ONE article and the following published papers: [2] Brain Injury (Received 28 Oct 2013, Accepted 4 Jan 2015, Published online 20 Mar 2015) doi: 10.3109/02699052.2015.1004746: Figure 6b GAPDH is similar to Figure 2A AMPK in [1] [3] Exp Mol Pathol (Received 24 Feb 2014, Accepted 10 Sep 2014, Available online 16 Sep 2014) doi:10.1016/j.yexmp.2014.09.006: Figure 5B GAPDH is similar to Figure 2A AMPK in [1]; Figure 5C Occludin is similar to Figure 2A LKB1 in [1] [4] Korean J Physiol Pharmacol, (Received 7 Nov 2013, Accepted 3 Jan 2016) doi: 10.4196/kjpp.2016.20.4.325 RETRACTED: Figure 6B GAPDH is similar to Figure 2A AMPK [1] Please note that the KJPP paper has been retracted as a result of the content duplication issues. During the course of our follow up, we have discovered additional instances of

  4. Structural basis of metallo-β-lactamase, serine-β-lactamase and penicillin-binding protein inhibition by cyclic boronates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brem, Jürgen; Cain, Ricky; Cahill, Samuel; McDonough, Michael A.; Clifton, Ian J.; Jiménez-Castellanos, Juan-Carlos; Avison, Matthew B.; Spencer, James; Fishwick, Colin W. G.; Schofield, Christopher J.

    2016-08-01

    β-Lactamases enable resistance to almost all β-lactam antibiotics. Pioneering work revealed that acyclic boronic acids can act as `transition state analogue' inhibitors of nucleophilic serine enzymes, including serine-β-lactamases. Here we report biochemical and biophysical analyses revealing that cyclic boronates potently inhibit both nucleophilic serine and zinc-dependent β-lactamases by a mechanism involving mimicking of the common tetrahedral intermediate. Cyclic boronates also potently inhibit the non-essential penicillin-binding protein PBP 5 by the same mechanism of action. The results open the way for development of dual action inhibitors effective against both serine- and metallo-β-lactamases, and which could also have antimicrobial activity through inhibition of PBPs.

  5. Human metapneumovirus M2-2 protein inhibits innate immune response in monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junping Ren

    Full Text Available Human metapneumovirus (hMPV is a leading cause of lower respiratory infection in young children, the elderly and immunocompromised patients. Repeated hMPV infections occur throughout life. However, immune evasion mechanisms of hMPV infection are largely unknown. Recently, our group has demonstrated that hMPV M2-2 protein, an important virulence factor, contributes to immune evasion in airway epithelial cells by targeting the mitochondrial antiviral-signaling protein (MAVS. Whether M2-2 regulates the innate immunity in human dendritic cells (DC, an important family of immune cells controlling antigen presenting, is currently unknown. We found that human DC infected with a virus lacking M2-2 protein expression (rhMPV-ΔM2-2 produced higher levels of cytokines, chemokines and IFNs, compared to cells infected with wild-type virus (rhMPV-WT, suggesting that M2-2 protein inhibits innate immunity in human DC. In parallel, we found that myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88, an essential adaptor for Toll-like receptors (TLRs, plays a critical role in inducing immune response of human DC, as downregulation of MyD88 by siRNA blocked the induction of immune regulatory molecules by hMPV. Since M2-2 is a cytoplasmic protein, we investigated whether M2-2 interferes with MyD88-mediated antiviral signaling. We found that indeed M2-2 protein associated with MyD88 and inhibited MyD88-dependent gene transcription. In this study, we also identified the domains of M2-2 responsible for its immune inhibitory function in human DC. In summary, our results demonstrate that M2-2 contributes to hMPV immune evasion by inhibiting MyD88-dependent cellular responses in human DC.

  6. Inhibition of the acetyl lysine-binding pocket of bromodomain and extraterminal domain proteins interferes with adipogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goupille, Olivier [CEA, Institute of Emerging Diseases and Innovative Therapies (IMETI), Fontenay-aux-Roses and Université Paris-Saclay, UMR-E 007 (France); Penglong, Tipparat [CEA, Institute of Emerging Diseases and Innovative Therapies (IMETI), Fontenay-aux-Roses and Université Paris-Saclay, UMR-E 007 (France); Thalassemia Research Center, Mahidol University (Thailand); Kadri, Zahra; Granger-Locatelli, Marine [CEA, Institute of Emerging Diseases and Innovative Therapies (IMETI), Fontenay-aux-Roses and Université Paris-Saclay, UMR-E 007 (France); Fucharoen, Suthat [Thalassemia Research Center, Mahidol University (Thailand); Maouche-Chrétien, Leila [CEA, Institute of Emerging Diseases and Innovative Therapies (IMETI), Fontenay-aux-Roses and Université Paris-Saclay, UMR-E 007 (France); INSERM, Paris (France); Prost, Stéphane [CEA, Institute of Emerging Diseases and Innovative Therapies (IMETI), Fontenay-aux-Roses and Université Paris-Saclay, UMR-E 007 (France); Leboulch, Philippe [CEA, Institute of Emerging Diseases and Innovative Therapies (IMETI), Fontenay-aux-Roses and Université Paris-Saclay, UMR-E 007 (France); Thalassemia Research Center, Mahidol University (Thailand); Chrétien, Stany, E-mail: stany.chretien@cea.fr [CEA, Institute of Emerging Diseases and Innovative Therapies (IMETI), Fontenay-aux-Roses and Université Paris-Saclay, UMR-E 007 (France); INSERM, Paris (France)

    2016-04-15

    The bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) domain family proteins are epigenetic modulators involved in the reading of acetylated lysine residues. The first BET protein inhibitor to be identified, (+)-JQ1, a thienotriazolo-1, 4-diazapine, binds selectively to the acetyl lysine-binding pocket of BET proteins. We evaluated the impact on adipogenesis of this druggable targeting of chromatin epigenetic readers, by investigating the physiological consequences of epigenetic modifications through targeting proteins binding to chromatin. JQ1 significantly inhibited the differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes into white and brown adipocytes by down-regulating the expression of genes involved in adipogenesis, particularly those encoding the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR-γ), the CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBPα) and, STAT5A and B. The expression of a constitutively activated STAT5B mutant did not prevent inhibition by JQ1. Thus, the association of BET/STAT5 is required for adipogenesis but STAT5 transcription activity is not the only target of JQ1. Treatment with JQ1 did not lead to the conversion of white adipose tissue into brown adipose tissue (BAT). BET protein inhibition thus interferes with generation of adipose tissue from progenitors, confirming the importance of the connections between epigenetic mechanisms and specific adipogenic transcription factors. - Highlights: • JQ1 prevented the differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes into white adipocytes. • JQ1 affected clonal cell expansion and abolished lipid accumulation. • JQ1 prevented the differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes into brown adipocytes. • JQ1 treatment did not lead to the conversion of white adipose tissue into brown adipose tissue. • JQ1 decreased STAT5 expression, but STAT5B{sup ca} expression did not restore adipogenesis.

  7. Inhibition of the acetyl lysine-binding pocket of bromodomain and extraterminal domain proteins interferes with adipogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goupille, Olivier; Penglong, Tipparat; Kadri, Zahra; Granger-Locatelli, Marine; Fucharoen, Suthat; Maouche-Chrétien, Leila; Prost, Stéphane; Leboulch, Philippe; Chrétien, Stany

    2016-01-01

    The bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) domain family proteins are epigenetic modulators involved in the reading of acetylated lysine residues. The first BET protein inhibitor to be identified, (+)-JQ1, a thienotriazolo-1, 4-diazapine, binds selectively to the acetyl lysine-binding pocket of BET proteins. We evaluated the impact on adipogenesis of this druggable targeting of chromatin epigenetic readers, by investigating the physiological consequences of epigenetic modifications through targeting proteins binding to chromatin. JQ1 significantly inhibited the differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes into white and brown adipocytes by down-regulating the expression of genes involved in adipogenesis, particularly those encoding the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR-γ), the CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBPα) and, STAT5A and B. The expression of a constitutively activated STAT5B mutant did not prevent inhibition by JQ1. Thus, the association of BET/STAT5 is required for adipogenesis but STAT5 transcription activity is not the only target of JQ1. Treatment with JQ1 did not lead to the conversion of white adipose tissue into brown adipose tissue (BAT). BET protein inhibition thus interferes with generation of adipose tissue from progenitors, confirming the importance of the connections between epigenetic mechanisms and specific adipogenic transcription factors. - Highlights: • JQ1 prevented the differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes into white adipocytes. • JQ1 affected clonal cell expansion and abolished lipid accumulation. • JQ1 prevented the differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes into brown adipocytes. • JQ1 treatment did not lead to the conversion of white adipose tissue into brown adipose tissue. • JQ1 decreased STAT5 expression, but STAT5B ca expression did not restore adipogenesis.

  8. Inhibition of the Membrane Attack Complex by Dengue Virus NS1 through Interaction with Vitronectin and Terminal Complement Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conde, Jonas Nascimento; da Silva, Emiliana Mandarano; Allonso, Diego; Coelho, Diego Rodrigues; Andrade, Iamara da Silva; de Medeiros, Luciano Neves; Menezes, Joice Lima; Barbosa, Angela Silva; Mohana-Borges, Ronaldo

    2016-11-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infects millions of people worldwide and is a major public health problem. DENV nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) is a conserved glycoprotein that associates with membranes and is also secreted into the plasma in DENV-infected patients. The present study describes a novel mechanism by which NS1 inhibits the terminal complement pathway. We first identified the terminal complement regulator vitronectin (VN) as a novel DENV2 NS1 binding partner by using a yeast two-hybrid system. This interaction was further assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) assay. The NS1-VN complex was also detected in plasmas from DENV-infected patients, suggesting that this interaction occurs during DENV infection. We also demonstrated that the DENV2 NS1 protein, either by itself or by interacting with VN, hinders the formation of the membrane attack complex (MAC) and C9 polymerization. Finally, we showed that DENV2, West Nile virus (WNV), and Zika virus (ZIKV) NS1 proteins produced in mammalian cells inhibited C9 polymerization. Taken together, our results points to a role for NS1 as a terminal pathway inhibitor of the complement system. Dengue is the most important arthropod-borne viral disease nowadays and is caused by dengue virus (DENV). The flavivirus NS1 glycoprotein has been characterized functionally as a complement evasion protein that can attenuate the activation of the classical, lectin, and alternative pathways. The present study describes a novel mechanism by which DENV NS1 inhibits the terminal complement pathway. We identified the terminal complement regulator vitronectin (VN) as a novel DENV NS1 binding partner, and the NS1-VN complex was detected in plasmas from DENV-infected patients, suggesting that this interaction occurs during DENV infection. We also demonstrated that the NS1-VN complex inhibited membrane attack complex (MAC) formation, thus interfering with the complement terminal pathway. Interestingly

  9. Inhibition of protein synthesis in maize and wheat by trichothecene mycotoxins and hybridoma-based enzyme immunoassay for deoxynivalenol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casale, W.L.

    1987-01-01

    The 12,13-epoxytrichothecene mycotoxins deoxynivalenol (DON, vomitoxin) and T-2 toxin inhibited protein synthesis in vivo and in cell-free systems from wheat and maize, host plants of trichothecene-producing Fusarium spp.Protein synthesis in tissue (leaf discs and kernel sections) was measured by incorporation of /sup 3/H-leucine into acetone:ethanol insoluble material, and in cell-free translation systems from wheat embryos and maize seedling plumules by incorporation of /sup 3/H-leucine into trichloroacetic acid-insoluble material. The toxin concentration inhibiting 50% of /sup 3/H-leucine incorporation (ID/sub 50/) by several maize varieties were 0.9 ..mu..M (T-2 toxin) and 9-22 ..mu..M (DON). ID/sub 50/ values for wheat were 0.25 ..mu..M (T-2 toxin) and 4.5 ..mu..M (DON).

  10. Qushi Huayu Decoction Inhibits Hepatic Lipid Accumulation by Activating AMP-Activated Protein Kinase In Vivo and In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Feng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Qushi Huayu Decoction (QHD, a Chinese herbal formula, has been proven effective on alleviating nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD in human and rats. The present study was conducted to investigate whether QHD could inhibit hepatic lipid accumulation by activating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK in vivo and in vitro. Nonalcoholic fatty liver (NAFL model was duplicated with high-fat diet in rats and with free fatty acid (FFA in L02 cells. In in vivo experimental condition, QHD significantly decreased the accumulation of fatty droplets in livers, lowered low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c, alanine aminotransferase (ALT, and aspartate aminotransferase (AST levels in serum. Moreover, QHD supplementation reversed the HFD-induced decrease in the phosphorylation levels of AMPK and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC and decreased hepatic nuclear protein expression of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 (SREBP-1 and carbohydrate-responsive element-binding protein (ChREBP in the liver. In in vitro, QHD-containing serum decreased the cellular TG content and alleviated the accumulation of fatty droplets in L02 cells. QHD supplementation reversed the FFA-induced decrease in the phosphorylation levels of AMPK and ACC and decreased the hepatic nuclear protein expression of SREBP-1 and ChREBP. Overall results suggest that QHD has significant effect on inhibiting hepatic lipid accumulation via AMPK pathway in vivo and in vitro.

  11. A Novel Acidic Matrix Protein, PfN44, Stabilizes Magnesium Calcite to Inhibit the Crystallization of Aragonite*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Cong; Fang, Dong; Xu, Guangrui; Liang, Jian; Zhang, Guiyou; Wang, Hongzhong; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2014-01-01

    Magnesium is widely used to control calcium carbonate deposition in the shell of pearl oysters. Matrix proteins in the shell are responsible for nucleation and growth of calcium carbonate crystals. However, there is no direct evidence supporting a connection between matrix proteins and magnesium. Here, we identified a novel acidic matrix protein named PfN44 that affected aragonite formation in the shell of the pearl oyster Pinctada fucata. Using immunogold labeling assays, we found PfN44 in both the nacreous and prismatic layers. In shell repair, PfN44 was repressed, whereas other matrix proteins were up-regulated. Disturbing the function of PfN44 by RNAi led to the deposition of porous nacreous tablets with overgrowth of crystals in the nacreous layer. By in vitro circular dichroism spectra and fluorescence quenching, we found that PfN44 bound to both calcium and magnesium with a stronger affinity for magnesium. During in vitro calcium carbonate crystallization and calcification of amorphous calcium carbonate, PfN44 regulated the magnesium content of crystalline carbonate polymorphs and stabilized magnesium calcite to inhibit aragonite deposition. Taken together, our results suggested that by stabilizing magnesium calcite to inhibit aragonite deposition, PfN44 participated in P. fucata shell formation. These observations extend our understanding of the connections between matrix proteins and magnesium. PMID:24302723

  12. Inhibition of bacterial conjugation by phage M13 and its protein g3p: quantitative analysis and model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Abraham; Jimenez, Jose; Derr, Julien; Vera, Pedro; Manapat, Michael L; Esvelt, Kevin M; Villanueva, Laura; Liu, David R; Chen, Irene A

    2011-01-01

    Conjugation is the main mode of horizontal gene transfer that spreads antibiotic resistance among bacteria. Strategies for inhibiting conjugation may be useful for preserving the effectiveness of antibiotics and preventing the emergence of bacterial strains with multiple resistances. Filamentous bacteriophages were first observed to inhibit conjugation several decades ago. Here we investigate the mechanism of inhibition and find that the primary effect on conjugation is occlusion of the conjugative pilus by phage particles. This interaction is mediated primarily by phage coat protein g3p, and exogenous addition of the soluble fragment of g3p inhibited conjugation at low nanomolar concentrations. Our data are quantitatively consistent with a simple model in which association between the pili and phage particles or g3p prevents transmission of an F plasmid encoding tetracycline resistance. We also observe a decrease in the donor ability of infected cells, which is quantitatively consistent with a reduction in pili elaboration. Since many antibiotic-resistance factors confer susceptibility to phage infection through expression of conjugative pili (the receptor for filamentous phage), these results suggest that phage may be a source of soluble proteins that slow the spread of antibiotic resistance genes.

  13. Inhibition of bacterial conjugation by phage M13 and its protein g3p: quantitative analysis and model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham Lin

    Full Text Available Conjugation is the main mode of horizontal gene transfer that spreads antibiotic resistance among bacteria. Strategies for inhibiting conjugation may be useful for preserving the effectiveness of antibiotics and preventing the emergence of bacterial strains with multiple resistances. Filamentous bacteriophages were first observed to inhibit conjugation several decades ago. Here we investigate the mechanism of inhibition and find that the primary effect on conjugation is occlusion of the conjugative pilus by phage particles. This interaction is mediated primarily by phage coat protein g3p, and exogenous addition of the soluble fragment of g3p inhibited conjugation at low nanomolar concentrations. Our data are quantitatively consistent with a simple model in which association between the pili and phage particles or g3p prevents transmission of an F plasmid encoding tetracycline resistance. We also observe a decrease in the donor ability of infected cells, which is quantitatively consistent with a reduction in pili elaboration. Since many antibiotic-resistance factors confer susceptibility to phage infection through expression of conjugative pili (the receptor for filamentous phage, these results suggest that phage may be a source of soluble proteins that slow the spread of antibiotic resistance genes.

  14. Radicicol, a heat shock protein 90 inhibitor, inhibits differentiation and adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Yonghan [Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, Public Health College, Harbin Medical University, 157 Baojian Road, Harbin 150081 (China); Aquatic and Crop Resource Development, Life Sciences Branch, National Research Council Canada, Charlottetown, PE, Canada C1A 4P3 (Canada); State Key Laboratory of Genetic Resources and Evolution, Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650223 (China); Li, Ying [Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, Public Health College, Harbin Medical University, 157 Baojian Road, Harbin 150081 (China); Zhang, Shuocheng [Aquatic and Crop Resource Development, Life Sciences Branch, National Research Council Canada, Charlottetown, PE, Canada C1A 4P3 (Canada); Perry, Ben [Aquatic and Crop Resource Development, Life Sciences Branch, National Research Council Canada, Charlottetown, PE, Canada C1A 4P3 (Canada); Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Prince Edward Island, 550 University Avenue, Charlottetown, PE, Canada C1A 4P3 (Canada); Zhao, Tiantian [Aquatic and Crop Resource Development, Life Sciences Branch, National Research Council Canada, Charlottetown, PE, Canada C1A 4P3 (Canada); Department of Psychology, University of Toronto, 1265 Military Trail, Toronto, ON, Canada M1C 1A4 (Canada); Wang, Yanwen, E-mail: yanwen.wang@nrc.ca [Aquatic and Crop Resource Development, Life Sciences Branch, National Research Council Canada, Charlottetown, PE, Canada C1A 4P3 (Canada); Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Prince Edward Island, 550 University Avenue, Charlottetown, PE, Canada C1A 4P3 (Canada); Sun, Changhao, E-mail: sun2002changhao@yahoo.com [Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, Public Health College, Harbin Medical University, 157 Baojian Road, Harbin 150081 (China)

    2013-06-28

    Highlights: •Radicicol suppressed intracellular fat accumulation in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. •Radicicol inhibited the expression of FAS and FABP4. •Radicicol blocked cell cycle at the G1-S phase during cell differentiation. •Radicicol inhibited the PDK1/Akt pathway in adipocyte differentiation. -- Abstract: Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is involved in various cellular processes, such as cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. As adipocyte differentiation plays a critical role in obesity development, the present study investigated the effect of an Hsp90 inhibitor radicicol on the differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes and potential mechanisms. The cells were treated with different concentrations of radicicol during the first 8 days of cell differentiation. Adipogenesis, the expression of adipogenic transcriptional factors, differentiation makers and cell cycle were determined. It was found that radicicol dose-dependently decreased intracellular fat accumulation through down-regulating the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPAR{sub γ}) and CCAAT element binding protein α (C/EBP{sub α}), fatty acid synthase (FAS) and fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4). Flow cytometry analysis revealed that radicicol blocked cell cycle at G1-S phase. Radicicol redcued the phosphorylation of Akt while showing no effect on β-catenin expression. Radicicol decreased the phosphorylation of phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1 (PDK1). The results suggest that radicicol inhibited 3T3-L1 preadipocyte differentiation through affecting the PDK1/Akt pathway and subsequent inhibition of mitotic clonal expansion and the expression/activity of adipogenic transcriptional factors and their downstream adipogenic proteins.

  15. Radicicol, a heat shock protein 90 inhibitor, inhibits differentiation and adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Yonghan; Li, Ying; Zhang, Shuocheng; Perry, Ben; Zhao, Tiantian; Wang, Yanwen; Sun, Changhao

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Radicicol suppressed intracellular fat accumulation in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. •Radicicol inhibited the expression of FAS and FABP4. •Radicicol blocked cell cycle at the G1-S phase during cell differentiation. •Radicicol inhibited the PDK1/Akt pathway in adipocyte differentiation. -- Abstract: Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is involved in various cellular processes, such as cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. As adipocyte differentiation plays a critical role in obesity development, the present study investigated the effect of an Hsp90 inhibitor radicicol on the differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes and potential mechanisms. The cells were treated with different concentrations of radicicol during the first 8 days of cell differentiation. Adipogenesis, the expression of adipogenic transcriptional factors, differentiation makers and cell cycle were determined. It was found that radicicol dose-dependently decreased intracellular fat accumulation through down-regulating the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPAR γ ) and CCAAT element binding protein α (C/EBP α ), fatty acid synthase (FAS) and fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4). Flow cytometry analysis revealed that radicicol blocked cell cycle at G1-S phase. Radicicol redcued the phosphorylation of Akt while showing no effect on β-catenin expression. Radicicol decreased the phosphorylation of phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1 (PDK1). The results suggest that radicicol inhibited 3T3-L1 preadipocyte differentiation through affecting the PDK1/Akt pathway and subsequent inhibition of mitotic clonal expansion and the expression/activity of adipogenic transcriptional factors and their downstream adipogenic proteins

  16. Chemical Genomics Identifies the PERK-Mediated Unfolded Protein Stress Response as a Cellular Target for Influenza Virus Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Landeras-Bueno

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A viruses generate annual epidemics and occasional pandemics of respiratory disease with important consequences for human health and the economy. Therefore, a large effort has been devoted to the development of new anti-influenza virus drugs directed to viral targets, as well as to the identification of cellular targets amenable to anti-influenza virus therapy. Here we have addressed the identification of such potential cellular targets by screening collections of drugs approved for human use. We reasoned that screening with a green fluorescent protein-based recombinant replicon system would identify cellular targets involved in virus transcription/replication and/or gene expression and hence address an early stage of virus infection. By using such a strategy, we identified Montelukast (MK as an inhibitor of virus multiplication. MK inhibited virus gene expression but did not alter viral RNA synthesis in vitro or viral RNA accumulation in vivo. The low selectivity index of MK prevented its use as an antiviral, but it was sufficient to identify a new cellular pathway suitable for anti-influenza virus intervention. By deep sequencing of RNA isolated from mock- and virus-infected human cells, treated with MK or left untreated, we showed that it stimulates the PERK-mediated unfolded protein stress response. The phosphorylation of PERK was partly inhibited in virus-infected cells but stimulated in MK-treated cells. Accordingly, pharmacological inhibition of PERK phosphorylation led to increased viral gene expression, while inhibition of PERK phosphatase reduced viral protein synthesis. These results suggest the PERK-mediated unfolded protein response as a potential cellular target to modulate influenza virus infection.

  17. SPARC overexpression inhibits cell proliferation in neuroblastoma and is partly mediated by tumor suppressor protein PTEN and AKT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen Bhoopathi

    Full Text Available Secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC is also known as BM-40 or Osteonectin, a multi-functional protein modulating cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. In cancer, SPARC is not only linked with a highly aggressive phenotype, but it also acts as a tumor suppressor. In the present study, we sought to characterize the function of SPARC and its role in sensitizing neuroblastoma cells to radio-therapy. SPARC overexpression in neuroblastoma cells inhibited cell proliferation in vitro. Additionally, SPARC overexpression significantly suppressed the activity of AKT and this suppression was accompanied by an increase in the tumor suppressor protein PTEN both in vitro and in vivo. Restoration of neuroblastoma cell radio-sensitivity was achieved by overexpression of SPARC in neuroblastoma cells in vitro and in vivo. To confirm the role of the AKT in proliferation inhibited by SPARC overexpression, we transfected neuroblastoma cells with a plasmid vector carrying myr-AKT. Myr-AKT overexpression reversed SPARC-mediated PTEN and increased proliferation of neuroblastoma cells in vitro. PTEN overexpression in parallel with SPARC siRNA resulted in decreased AKT phosphorylation and proliferation in vitro. Taken together, these results establish SPARC as an effector of AKT-PTEN-mediated inhibition of proliferation in neuroblastoma in vitro and in vivo.

  18. Flavone inhibits nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity, nitric oxide production and protein S-nitrosylation in breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Wenzhen; Yang, Bingwu; Fu, Huiling; Ma, Long; Liu, Tingting; Chai, Rongfei; Zheng, Zhaodi [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Animal Resistant Biology, School of Life Sciences, Shandong Normal University, Jinan 250014 (China); Zhang, Qunye, E-mail: wz.zhangqy@sdu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research Chinese Ministry of Education and Ministry of Public Health, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong (China); Li, Guorong, E-mail: grli@sdnu.edu.cn [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Animal Resistant Biology, School of Life Sciences, Shandong Normal University, Jinan 250014 (China)

    2015-03-13

    As the core structure of flavonoids, flavone has been proved to possess anticancer effects. Flavone's growth inhibitory functions are related to NO. NO is synthesized by nitric oxide synthase (NOS), and generally increased in a variety of cancer cells. NO regulates multiple cellular responses by S-nitrosylation. In this study, we explored flavone-induced regulations on nitric oxide (NO)-related cellular processes in breast cancer cells. Our results showed that, flavone suppresses breast cancer cell proliferation and induces apoptosis. Flavone restrains NO synthesis by does-dependent inhibiting NOS enzymatic activity. The decrease of NO generation was detected by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Flavone-induced inhibitory effect on NOS activity is dependent on intact cell structure. For the NO-induced protein modification, flavone treatment significantly down-regulated protein S-nitrosylation, which was detected by “Biotin-switch” method. The present study provides a novel, NO-related mechanism for the anticancer function of flavone. - Highlights: • Flavone inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in MCF-7 cells. • Flavone decreases nitric oxide production by inhibiting NOS enzymatic activity in breast cancer cells. • Flavone down-regulates protein S-nitrosylation.

  19. Antisense oligonucleotide inhibition of Heat Shock Protein (HSP 47 improves bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noguchi Takayuki

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The most common pathologic form of pulmonary fibrosis arises from excessive deposition of extracellular matrix proteins such as collagen. The 47 kDa heat shock protein 47 (HSP47 is a collagen-specific molecular chaperone that has been shown to play a major role during the processing and/or secretion of procollagen. Objectives To determine whether inhibition of HSP47 could have beneficial effects in mitigating bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rats. Methods All experiments were performed with 250–300 g male Wistar rats. Animals were randomly divided into five experimental groups that were administered: 1 saline alone, 2 bleomycin alone, 3 antisense HSP47 oligonucleotides alone, 4 bleomycin + antisense HSP47 oligonucleotides, and 5 bleomycin + sense control oligonucleotides. We investigated lung histopathology and performed immunoblot and immunohistochemistry analyses. Results In rats treated with HSP47 antisense oligonucleotides, pulmonary fibrosis was significantly reduced. In addition, treatment with HSP47 antisense oligonucleotides significantly improved bleomycin-induced morphological changes. Treatment with HSP47 antisense oligonucleotides alone did not produce any significant changes to lung morphology. Immunoblot analyses of lung homogenates confirmed the inhibition of HSP47 protein by antisense oligonucleotides. The bleo + sense group, however, did not exhibit any improvement in lung pathology compared to bleomycin alone groups, and also had no effect on HSP47 expression. Conclusion These findings suggest that HSP47 antisense oligonucleotide inhibition of HSP47 improves bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis pathology in rats.

  20. Photoactivated CRY1 and phyB Interact Directly with AUX/IAA Proteins to Inhibit Auxin Signaling in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Feng; He, Shengbo; Zhang, Jingyi; Mao, Zhilei; Wang, Wenxiu; Li, Ting; Hua, Jie; Du, Shasha; Xu, Pengbo; Li, Ling; Lian, Hongli; Yang, Hong-Quan

    2017-12-19

    Light is a key environmental cue that inhibits hypocotyl cell elongation through the blue and red/far-red light photoreceptors cryptochrome- and phytochrome-mediated pathways in Arabidopsis. In contrast, as a pivotal endogenous phytohormone auxin promotes hypocotyl elongation through the auxin receptors TIR1/AFBs-mediated degradation of AUX/IAA proteins (AUX/IAAs). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the antagonistic interaction of light and auxin signaling remain unclear. Here, we report that light inhibits auxin signaling through stabilization of AUX/IAAs by blue and red light-dependent interactions of cryptochrome 1 (CRY1) and phytochrome B with AUX/IAAs, respectively. Blue light-triggered interactions of CRY1 with AUX/IAAs inhibit the associations of TIR1 with AUX/IAAs, leading to the repression of auxin-induced degradation of these proteins. Our results indicate that photoreceptors share AUX/IAAs with auxin receptors as the same direct downstream signaling components. We propose that antagonistic regulation of AUX/IAA protein stability by photoreceptors and auxin receptors allows plants to balance light and auxin signals to optimize their growth. Copyright © 2017 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Nuclear Factor 90, a cellular dsRNA binding protein inhibits the HIV Rev-export function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    St-Laurent Georges

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The HIV Rev protein is known to facilitate export of incompletely spliced and unspliced viral transcripts to the cytoplasm, a necessary step in virus life cycle. The Rev-mediated nucleo-cytoplasmic transport of nascent viral transcripts, dependents on interaction of Rev with the RRE RNA structural element present in the target RNAs. The C-terminal variant of dsRNA-binding nuclear protein 90 (NF90ctv has been shown to markedly attenuate viral replication in stably transduced HIV-1 target cell line. Here we examined a mechanism of interference of viral life cycle involving Rev-NF90ctv interaction. Results Since Rev:RRE complex formations depend on protein:RNA and protein:protein interactions, we investigated whether the expression of NF90ctv might interfere with Rev-mediated export of RRE-containing transcripts. When HeLa cells expressed both NF90ctv and Rev protein, we observed that NF90ctv inhibited the Rev-mediated RNA transport. In particular, three regions of NF90ctv protein are involved in blocking Rev function. Moreover, interaction of NF90ctv with the RRE RNA resulted in the expression of a reporter protein coding sequences linked to the RRE structure. Moreover, Rev influenced the subcellular localization of NF90ctv, and this process is leptomycin B sensitive. Conclusion The dsRNA binding protein, NF90ctv competes with HIV Rev function at two levels, by competitive protein:protein interaction involving Rev binding to specific domains of NF90ctv, as well as by its binding to the RRE-RNA structure. Our results are consistent with a model of Rev-mediated HIV-1 RNA export that envisions Rev-multimerization, a process interrupted by NF90ctv.

  2. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 inhibition and angiotensin II converting inhibition in mice with cardiomyopathy caused by lamin A/C gene mutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muchir, Antoine, E-mail: a.muchir@institut-myologie.org [Department of Medicine, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States); Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States); Wu, Wei [Department of Medicine, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States); Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States); Sera, Fusako; Homma, Shunichi [Department of Medicine, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States); Worman, Howard J., E-mail: hjw14@columbia.edu [Department of Medicine, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States); Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-10-03

    Highlights: • Both ACE and MEK1/2 inhibition are beneficial on cardiac function in Lmna cardiomyopathy. • MEK1/2 inhibitor has beneficial effects beyond ACE inhibition for Lmna cardiomyopathy. • These results provide further preclinical rationale for a clinical trial of a MEK1/2 inhibitor. - Abstract: Background: Mutations in the LMNA gene encoding A-type nuclear lamins can cause dilated cardiomyopathy with or without skeletal muscular dystrophy. Previous studies have shown abnormally increased extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 activity in hearts of Lmna{sup H222P/H222P} mice, a small animal model. Inhibition of this abnormal signaling activity with a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 (MEK1/2) inhibitor has beneficial effects on heart function and survival in these mice. However, such treatment has not been examined relative to any standard of care intervention for dilated cardiomyopathy or heart failure. We therefore examined the effects of an angiotensin II converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor on left ventricular function in Lmna{sup H222P/H222P} mice and assessed if adding a MEK1/2 inhibitor would provide added benefit. Methods: Male Lmna{sup H222P/H222P} mice were treated with the ACE inhibitor benazepril, the MEK1/2 inhibitor selumetinib or both. Transthoracic echocardiography was used to measure left ventricular diameters and fractional shortening was calculated. Results: Treatment of Lmna{sup H222P/H222P} mice with either benazepril or selumetinib started at 8 weeks of age, before the onset of detectable left ventricular dysfunction, lead to statistically significantly increased fractional shortening compared to placebo at 16 weeks of age. There was a trend towards a great value for fractional shortening in the selumetinib-treated mice. When treatment was started at 16 weeks of age, after the onset of left ventricular dysfunction, the addition of selumetinib treatment to benazepril lead to a statistically significant increase in left

  3. MEK Inhibition Leads To Lysosome-Mediated Na+/I- Symporter Protein Degradation In Human Breast Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhaoxia; Beyer, Sasha; Jhiang, Sissy M

    2013-01-01

    The Na+/I- symporter (NIS) is a transmembrane glycoprotein that mediates active iodide uptake into thyroid follicular cells. NIS-mediated iodide uptake in thyroid cells is the basis for targeted radionuclide imaging and treatment of differentiated thyroid carcinomas and their metastases. Furthermore, NIS is expressed in many human breast tumors but not in normal non-lactating breast tissue, suggesting that NIS-mediated radionuclide uptake may also allow the imaging and targeted therapy of breast cancer. However, functional cell surface NIS expression is often low in breast cancer, making it important to uncover signaling pathways that modulate NIS expression at multiple levels, from gene transcription to post-translational processing and cell surface trafficking. In this study, we investigated NIS regulation in breast cancer by MEK (MAPK/ERK kinase) signaling, an important cell signaling pathway involved in oncogenic transformation. We found that MEK inhibition decreased NIS protein levels in all-trans retinoic acid (tRA)/hydrocortisone treated MCF-7 cells as well as human breast cancer cells expressing exogenous NIS. The decrease in NIS protein levels by MEK inhibition was not accompanied by a decrease in NIS mRNA or a decrease in NIS mRNA export from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. NIS protein degradation upon MEK inhibition was prevented by lysosome inhibitors, but not by proteasome inhibitors. Interestingly, NIS protein level was correlated with MEK/ERK activation in human breast tumors from a tissue microarray. Taken together, MEK activation appears to play an important role in maintaining NIS protein stability in human breast cancers. PMID:23404856

  4. FXYD proteins reverse inhibition of the Na+-K+ pump mediated by glutathionylation of its beta1 subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibert, Stéphanie; Liu, Chia-Chi; Figtree, Gemma A; Garcia, Alvaro; Hamilton, Elisha J; Marassi, Francesca M; Sweadner, Kathleen J; Cornelius, Flemming; Geering, Käthi; Rasmussen, Helge H

    2011-05-27

    The seven members of the FXYD protein family associate with the Na(+)-K(+) pump and modulate its activity. We investigated whether conserved cysteines in FXYD proteins are susceptible to glutathionylation and whether such reactivity affects Na(+)-K(+) pump function in cardiac myocytes and Xenopus oocytes. Glutathionylation was detected by immunoblotting streptavidin precipitate from biotin-GSH loaded cells or by a GSH antibody. Incubation of myocytes with recombinant FXYD proteins resulted in competitive displacement of native FXYD1. Myocyte and Xenopus oocyte pump currents were measured with whole-cell and two-electrode voltage clamp techniques, respectively. Native FXYD1 in myocytes and FXYD1 expressed in oocytes were susceptible to glutathionylation. Mutagenesis identified the specific cysteine in the cytoplasmic terminal that was reactive. Its reactivity was dependent on flanking basic amino acids. We have reported that Na(+)-K(+) pump β(1) subunit glutathionylation induced by oxidative signals causes pump inhibition in a previous study. In the present study, we found that β(1) subunit glutathionylation and pump inhibition could be reversed by exposing myocytes to exogenous wild-type FXYD3. A cysteine-free FXYD3 derivative had no effect. Similar results were obtained with wild-type and mutant FXYD proteins expressed in oocytes. Glutathionylation of the β(1) subunit was increased in myocardium from FXYD1(-/-) mice. In conclusion, there is a dependence of Na(+)-K(+) pump regulation on reactivity of two specifically identified cysteines on separate components of the multimeric Na(+)-K(+) pump complex. By facilitating deglutathionylation of the β(1) subunit, FXYD proteins reverse oxidative inhibition of the Na(+)-K(+) pump and play a dynamic role in its regulation.

  5. Protein Kinase C-Independent Inhibition of Organic Cation Transporter 1 Activity by the Bisindolylmaleimide Ro 31-8220.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayati, Abdullah; Bruyere, Arnaud; Moreau, Amélie; Jouan, Elodie; Denizot, Claire; Parmentier, Yannick; Fardel, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Ro 31-8220 is a potent protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor belonging to the chemical class of bisindolylmaleimides (BIMs). Various PKC-independent effects of Ro 31-8220 have however been demonstrated, including inhibition of the ATP-binding cassette drug transporter breast cancer resistance protein. In the present study, we reported that the BIM also blocks activity of the solute carrier organic cation transporter (OCT) 1, involved in uptake of marketed drugs in the liver, in a PKC-independent manner. Ro 31-8220, in contrast to other pan-PKC inhibitors such as staurosporine and chelerythrine, was thus shown to cis-inhibit uptake of the reference OCT1 substrate tetraethylammonium in OCT1-transfected HEK293 cells in a concentration-dependent manner (IC50 = 0.18 μM) and without altering membrane expression of OCT1. This blockage of OCT1 was also observed in human hepatic HepaRG cells that constitutionally express OCT1. It likely occurred through a mixed mechanism of inhibition. Ro 31-8220 additionally trans-inhibited TEA uptake in OCT1-transfected HEK293 cells, which likely discards a transport of Ro 31-8220 by OCT1. Besides Ro 31-8220, 7 additional BIMs, including the PKC inhibitor LY 333531, inhibited OCT1 activity, whereas 4 other BIMs were without effect. In silico analysis of structure-activity relationships next revealed that various molecular descriptors, especially 3D-WHIM descriptors related to total size, correspond to key physico-chemical parameters for inhibition of OCT1 activity by BIMs. In addition to activity of OCT1, Ro 31-8220 inhibited those of other organic cation transporters such as multidrug and toxin extrusion protein (MATE) 1 and MATE2-K, whereas, by contrast, it stimulated that of OCT2. Taken together, these data extend the nature of cellular off-targets of the BIM Ro 31-8220 to OCT1 and other organic cation transporters, which has likely to be kept in mind when using Ro 31-8220 and other BIMs as PKC inhibitors in experimental or clinical

  6. Ascorbate attenuates pulmonary emphysema by inhibiting tobacco smoke and Rtp801-triggered lung protein modification and proteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Indranil; Ganguly, Souradipta; Rozanas, Christine R; Stuehr, Dennis J; Panda, Koustubh

    2016-07-19

    Cigarette smoking causes emphysema, a fatal disease involving extensive structural and functional damage of the lung. Using a guinea pig model and human lung cells, we show that oxidant(s) present in tobacco smoke not only cause direct oxidative damage of lung proteins, contributing to the major share of lung injury, but also activate Rtp801, a key proinflammatory cellular factor involved in tobacco smoke-induced lung damage. Rtp801 triggers nuclear factor κB and consequent inducible NOS (iNOS)-mediated overproduction of NO, which in combination with excess superoxide produced during Rtp801 activation, contribute to increased oxido-nitrosative stress and lung protein nitration. However, lung-specific inhibition of iNOS with a iNOS-specific inhibitor, N6-(1-iminoethyl)-L-lysine, dihydrochloride (L-NIL) solely restricts lung protein nitration but fails to prevent or reverse the major tobacco smoke-induced oxidative lung injury. In comparison, the dietary antioxidant, ascorbate or vitamin C, can substantially prevent such damage by inhibiting both tobacco smoke-induced lung protein oxidation as well as activation of pulmonary Rtp801 and consequent iNOS/NO-induced nitration of lung proteins, that otherwise lead to increased proteolysis of such oxidized or nitrated proteins by endogenous lung proteases, resulting in emphysematous lung damage. Vitamin C also restricts the up-regulation of matrix-metalloproteinase-9, the major lung protease involved in the proteolysis of such modified lung proteins during tobacco smoke-induced emphysema. Overall, our findings implicate tobacco-smoke oxidant(s) as the primary etiopathogenic factor behind both the noncellular and cellular damage mechanisms governing emphysematous lung injury and demonstrate the potential of vitamin C to accomplish holistic prevention of such damage.

  7. Inhibition of Cartilage Acidic Protein 1 Reduces Ultraviolet B Irradiation Induced-Apoptosis through P38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase and Jun Amino-Terminal Kinase Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinghong Ji

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Ultraviolet B (UVB irradiation can easily induce apoptosis in human lens epithelial cells (HLECs and further lead to various eye diseases including cataract. Here for the first time, we investigated the role of cartilage acidic protein 1 (CRTAC1 gene in UVB irradiation induced-apoptosis in HLECs. Methods: Three groups of HLECs were employed including model group, empty vector group, and CRTAC1 interference group. Results: After UVB irradiation, the percentage of primary apoptotic cells was obviously fewer in CRTAC1 interference group. Meanwhile, inhibition of CRTAC1 also reduced both reactive oxygen species (ROS production and intracellular Ca2+ concentration, but the level of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm was increased in HLECs. Further studies indicated that superoxide dismutase (SOD activity and total antioxidative (T-AOC level were significantly increased in CRTAC1-inhibited cells, while the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH were significantly decreased. ELISA analysis of CRTAC1-inhibited cells showed that the concentrations of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α and interleukin-6 (IL-6 were significantly decreased, but the concentration of interleukin-10 (IL-10 was significantly increased. Western blot analyses of eight apoptosis-associated proteins including Bax, Bcl-2, p38, phospho-p38 (p-p38, Jun amino-terminal kinases (JNK1/2, phospho-JNK1/2 (p-JNK1/2, calcium-sensing receptor (CasR, and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII indicated that the inhibition of CRTAC1 alleviated oxidative stress and inflammation response, inactivated calcium-signaling pathway, p38 and JNK1/2 signal pathways, and eventually reduced UVB irradiation induced-apoptosis in HLECs. Conclusion: These results provided new insights into the mechanism of cataract development, and demonstrated that CRTAC1 could be a potentially novel target for cataract treatment.

  8. Inhibition of Cartilage Acidic Protein 1 Reduces Ultraviolet B Irradiation Induced-Apoptosis through P38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase and Jun Amino-Terminal Kinase Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yinghong; Rong, Xianfang; Li, Dan; Cai, Lei; Rao, Jun; Lu, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation can easily induce apoptosis in human lens epithelial cells (HLECs) and further lead to various eye diseases including cataract. Here for the first time, we investigated the role of cartilage acidic protein 1 (CRTAC1) gene in UVB irradiation induced-apoptosis in HLECs. Three groups of HLECs were employed including model group, empty vector group, and CRTAC1 interference group. After UVB irradiation, the percentage of primary apoptotic cells was obviously fewer in CRTAC1 interference group. Meanwhile, inhibition of CRTAC1 also reduced both reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and intracellular Ca2+ concentration, but the level of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) was increased in HLECs. Further studies indicated that superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and total antioxidative (T-AOC) level were significantly increased in CRTAC1-inhibited cells, while the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were significantly decreased. ELISA analysis of CRTAC1-inhibited cells showed that the concentrations of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were significantly decreased, but the concentration of interleukin-10 (IL-10) was significantly increased. Western blot analyses of eight apoptosis-associated proteins including Bax, Bcl-2, p38, phospho-p38 (p-p38), Jun amino-terminal kinases (JNK1/2), phospho-JNK1/2 (p-JNK1/2), calcium-sensing receptor (CasR), and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) indicated that the inhibition of CRTAC1 alleviated oxidative stress and inflammation response, inactivated calcium-signaling pathway, p38 and JNK1/2 signal pathways, and eventually reduced UVB irradiation induced-apoptosis in HLECs. These results provided new insights into the mechanism of cataract development, and demonstrated that CRTAC1 could be a potentially novel target for cataract treatment. © 2016 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Study on reducing antigenic response and IgE-binding inhibitions of four milk proteins of Lactobacillus casei 1134.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Minjing; Xu, Qian; Luo, Yongkang; Shi, Jing; Li, Zheng

    2015-04-01

    Cow's milk allergy has aroused public concern. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of fermentation by Lactobacillus casei 1134 on the antigenicity and allergenicity (IgE-binding inhibitions) of milk proteins. The effects of pH value on the antigenicity and allergenicity of four milk proteins (α-lactalbumin, β-lactoglobulin, α-casein and β-casein) were examined by indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The free amino acids which were produced in the fermentation process were analysed and the proteolysis of milk proteins was detected. Fermentation by L. casei 1134 could significantly reduce the antigenicity and allergenicity of the four proteins in reconstituted milk. The allergenicity of milk proteins was further reduced in the process of simulated gastrointestinal digestion. Moreover, we could deduce that one of the potential factors of antigenicity was lactic acid with the comparison of the antigenicity of the four proteins between L. casei 1134 fermented milk and lactic acid milk at different pH values. There are many factors which can affect the milk proteins allergen, including lactic acid and proteolytic enzymes. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  10. SFS, a Novel Fibronectin-Binding Protein from Streptococcus equi, Inhibits the Binding between Fibronectin and Collagen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindmark, Hans; Guss, Bengt

    1999-01-01

    The obligate parasitic bacterium Streptococcus equi subsp. equi is the causative agent of strangles, a serious disease of the upper respiratory tract in horses. In this study we have, using shotgun phage display, cloned from S. equi subsp. equi and characterized a gene, called sfs, encoding a protein termed SFS, representing a new type of fibronectin (Fn)-binding protein. The sfs gene was found to be present in all 50 isolates of S. equi subsp. equi tested and in 41 of 48 S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus isolates tested. The sfs gene is down-regulated during growth in vitro compared to fnz, a previously characterized gene encoding an Fn-binding protein from S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus. Sequence comparisons revealed no similarities to previously characterized Fn-binding proteins, but high scores were obtained against collagen. Besides similarity due to the high content of glycine, serine, and proline residues present in both proteins, there was a nine-residue motif present both in collagen and in the Fn-binding domain of SFS. By searching the Oklahoma S. pyogenes database, we found that this motif is also present in a potential cell surface protein from S. pyogenes. Protein SFS was found to inhibit the binding between Fn and collagen in a concentration-dependent way. PMID:10225899

  11. Non-structural protein 1 of influenza viruses inhibits rapid mRNA degradation mediated by double-stranded RNA-binding protein, staufen1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hana; Ahn, Sang Ho; Kim, Kyoung Mi; Kim, Yoon Ki

    2013-07-11

    Although non-structural protein 1 (NS1) of influenza viruses is not essential for virulence, this protein is involved in host-virus interactions, viral replication, and translation. In particular, NS1 is known to interact with the host protein, staufen1 (Stau1). This interaction is important for efficient viral replication. However, the underlying molecular mechanism by which NS1 influences the viral life cycle remains obscure. Here, we show using immunoprecipitation and artificial tethering that the N-terminus of NS1, NS1(1-73), interacts with Stau1, blocks the Stau1-Upf1 interaction, and consequently inhibits the efficiency of Stau1-mediated mRNA decay (SMD), but not nonsense-mediatedmRNA decay (NMD). The regulation of SMD efficiency by NS1 may contribute to building a more favorable cellular environment for viral replication. Copyright © 2013 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. DNA-dependent protein kinase and its inhibition in support of radiotherapy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novotná, E.; Tichý, Adam; Pejchal, J.; Lukášová, Emilie; Salovská, B.; Vávrová, J.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 89, č. 6 (2013), s. 416-423 ISSN 0955-3002 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : DOUBLE-STRAND BREAK * CANCER-CELLS * REPAIR INHIBITION Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.837, year: 2013

  13. Mutant Forms of the Azotobacter vinelandii Transcriptional Activator NifA Resistant to Inhibition by the NifL Regulatory Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Reyes-Ramirez, Francisca; Little, Richard; Dixon, Ray

    2002-01-01

    The Azotobacter vinelandii σ54-dependent transcriptional activator protein NifA is regulated by the NifL protein in response to redox, carbon, and nitrogen status. Under conditions inappropriate for nitrogen fixation, NifL inhibits transcription activation by NifA through the formation of the NifL-NifA protein complex. NifL inhibits the ATPase activity of the central AAA+ domain of NifA required to drive open complex formation by σ54-RNA polymerase and may also inhibit the activator-polymeras...

  14. TRIM39 is a MOAP-1-binding protein that stabilizes MOAP-1 through inhibition of its poly-ubiquitination process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, San San; Fu, Nai Yang; Sukumaran, Sunil K; Wan, Kah Fei; Wan, Qian; Yu, Victor C

    2009-04-15

    Bax, a multi-domain pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family member, is a key regulator for the release of apoptogenic factors from mitochondria. MOAP-1, which was first isolated from a screen for Bax-associating proteins, interacts with Bax upon apoptotic induction. MOAP-1 is a short-lived protein that is constitutively degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Apoptotic stimuli upregulate MOAP-1 rapidly through inhibition of its poly-ubiquitination process. However, cellular factors that regulate the stability of MOAP-1 have not yet been identified. In this study, we report the identification of TRIM39 as a MOAP-1-binding protein. TRIM39 belongs to a family of proteins characterized by a Tripartite Motif (TRIM), consisting of RING domain, B-box and coiled-coil domain. Several TRIM family members are known to demonstrate E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. Surprisingly, TRIM39 significantly extends the half-life of MOAP-1 by inhibiting its poly-ubiquitination process. In agreement with its effect on enhancing MOAP-1 stability, TRIM39 sensitizes cells to etoposide-induced apoptosis. Conversely, knockdown of TRIM39 reduces the sensitivity of cells to etoposide-stimulated apoptosis. Furthermore, TRIM39 elevates the level of MOAP-1 in mitochondria and promotes cytochrome c release from isolated mitochondria stimulated by recombinant Bax. Together, these data suggest that TRIM39 can promote apoptosis signalling through stabilization of MOAP-1.

  15. S-layer proteins from Lactobacillus sp. inhibit bacterial infection by blockage of DC-SIGN cell receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado Acosta, Mariano; Ruzal, Sandra M; Cordo, Sandra M

    2016-11-01

    Many species of Lactobacillus sp. possess Surface(s) layer proteins in their envelope. Among other important characteristics S-layer from Lactobacillus acidophilus binds to the cellular receptor DC-SIGN (Dendritic Cell-Specific Intercellular adhesion molecule-3-Grabbing Non-integrin; CD209), which is involved in adhesion and infection of several families of bacteria. In this report we investigate the activity of new S-layer proteins from the Lactobacillus family (Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus helveticus and Lactobacillus kefiri) over the infection of representative microorganisms important to human health. After the treatment of DC-SIGN expressing cells with these proteins, we were able to diminish bacterial infection by up to 79% in both gram negative and mycobacterial models. We discovered that pre-treatment of the bacteria with S-layers from Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus brevis reduced bacteria viability but also prevent infection by the pathogenic bacteria. We also proved the importance of the glycosylation of the S-layer from Lactobacillus kefiri in the binding to the receptor and thus inhibition of infection. This novel characteristic of the S-layers proteins may contribute to the already reported pathogen exclusion activity for these Lactobacillus probiotic strains; and might be also considered as a novel enzymatic antimicrobial agents to inhibit bacterial infection and entry to host cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Influence of Block Copolymerization on the Antifreeze Protein Mimetic Ice Recrystallization Inhibition Activity of Poly(vinyl alcohol).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congdon, Thomas R; Notman, Rebecca; Gibson, Matthew I

    2016-09-12

    Antifreeze (glyco) proteins are produced by many cold-acclimatized species to enable them to survive subzero temperatures. These proteins have multiple macroscopic effects on ice crystal growth which makes them appealing for low-temperature applications-from cellular cryopreservation to food storage. Poly(vinyl alcohol) has remarkable ice recrystallization inhibition activity, but its mode of action is uncertain as is the extent at which it can be incorporated into other high-order structures. Here the synthesis and characterization of well-defined block copolymers containing poly(vinyl alcohol) and poly(vinylpyrrolidone) by RAFT/MADIX polymerization is reported, as new antifreeze protein mimetics. The effect of adding a large second hydrophilic block is studied across a range of compositions, and it is found to be a passive component in ice recrystallization inhibition assays, enabling retention of all activity. In the extreme case, a block copolymer with only 10% poly(vinyl alcohol) was found to retain all activity, where statistical copolymers of PVA lose all activity with very minor changes to composition. These findings present a new method to increase the complexity of antifreeze protein mimetic materials, while retaining activity, and also to help understand the underlying mechanisms of action.

  17. Thermotolerance and protein glycosylation: Inhibition studies with sodium fluoride, azauridine and tunicamycin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bursey, D.L.; Henle, K.J.; Nagle, W.A.; Moss, A.J.

    1987-01-01

    The glycosylation hypothesis predicts increased incorporation of monosaccharides into 0-linked glycoproteins during thermotolerance development and inhibition of thermotolerance when this process is blocked. Specific inhibitors of 0-linked glycosylation are not available. The authors examined the effect of non-specific inhibition of glycosylation on thermotolerance development by: 1. restriction of both exogenous sugars and endogeneous sugar synthesis with NaF to block glycolysis while providing L-glutamine as a substrate for ATP synthesis in the TCA cycle; or 2. inhibition of UDP-sugar synthesis using azauridine and tunicamycin. Inhibitors were added to cell cultures after heat conditioning (10 min, 45 0 ) and removed after 6 hr prior to 45 0 -test heating. Sugar deprivation was achieved with 10mM NaF in glucose-free EBSS, supplemented with 2mM L-glutamine. Synthesis of UDP-sugars was inhibited with 1mM azauridine + 1μg/ml tunicamycin. Thermotolerance development was inhibited 87% by NaF/glutamine and 47% by azauridine/tunicamycin. For example, the D/sub o/ of the thermotolerant cells was 42.5 min (control D/sub o/ = 3 min), but only 5.5 min with inhibition by the NaF solution. These results support the absolute requirement of sugar precursors for thermotolerance development as predicted by the glycosylation hypothesis

  18. The potent, indirect adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase activator R419 attenuates mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling, inhibits nociceptor excitability, and reduces pain hypersensitivity in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galo L. Mejia

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. There is a great need for new therapeutics for the treatment of pain. A possible avenue to development of such therapeutics is to interfere with signaling pathways engaged in peripheral nociceptors that cause these neurons to become hyperexcitable. There is strong evidence that mitogen-activated protein kinases and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K/mechanistic target of rapamycin signaling pathways are key modulators of nociceptor excitability in vitro and in vivo. Activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK can inhibit signaling in both of these pathways, and AMPK activators have been shown to inhibit nociceptor excitability and pain hypersensitivity in rodents. R419 is one of, if not the most potent AMPK activator described to date. We tested whether R419 activates AMPK in dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons and if this leads to decreased pain hypersensitivity in mice. We find that R419 activates AMPK in DRG neurons resulting in decreased mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling, decreased nascent protein synthesis, and enhanced P body formation. R419 attenuates nerve growth factor (NGF-induced changes in excitability in DRG neurons and blocks NGF-induced mechanical pain amplification in vivo. Moreover, locally applied R419 attenuates pain hypersensitivity in a model of postsurgical pain and blocks the development of hyperalgesic priming in response to both NGF and incision. We conclude that R419 is a promising lead candidate compound for the development of potent and specific AMPK activation to inhibit pain hypersensitivity as a result of injury.

  19. In vivo inhibition of incorporation of (U-/sup 14/C)glucose into proteins in experimental focal epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coutinho-Netto, J.; Boyar, M.M.; Abdul-Ghani, A.S.; Bradford, H.F.

    1982-08-01

    The in vivo incorporation of (/sup 14/C) from (U-/sup 14/C)-glucose into rat brain proteins from different cortical areas was examined in three different experimental focal epilepsies: cobalt, freeze-lesions, and tityustoxin. When (U-/sup 14/C)-glucose was injected intraperitoneally into awake and unrestrained animals with marked signs of epileptic hyperactivity, the inhibition of incorporation of (/sup 14/C)-amino acids into trichloracetic acid (TCA)-insoluble proteins was highest in the focal (sensorimotor) area when compared with distant regions (approx. 60%), but less when compared with the contralateral (sensorimotor) region (approx. 23%). Greatly decreased incorporation caused by both cobalt and freeze-lesion-induced epilepsies was also observed in the contralateral area when a comparison was made with distant regions (approx. 50%), but there were no significant differences in protein-specific radioactivity between the different distant areas.

  20. The effect of surface charge on the thermal stability and ice recrystallization inhibition activity of antifreeze protein III (AFP III).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deller, R C; Carter, B M; Zampetakis, I; Scarpa, F; Perriman, A W

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of chemical cationization on the structure and function of antifreeze protein III (AFP III) over an extreme temperature range (-40°C to +90°C) using far-UV synchrotron radiation circular dichroism (SRCD) and ice recrystallization inhibition (IRI) assays. Chemical cationization was able to produce a modified AFP III with a net cationic charge at physiological pH that had enhanced resistance to denaturation at elevated temperatures, with no immediate negative impact on protein structure at subzero temperatures. Furthermore, cationized AFP III retained an IRI activity similar to that of native AFP III. Consequently, chemical cationization may provide a pathway to the development of more robust antifreeze proteins as supplementary cryoprotectants in the cryopreservation of clinically relevant cells. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Mitochondrial remodeling following fission inhibition by 15d-PGJ2 involves molecular changes in mitochondrial fusion protein OPA1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kar, Rekha; Mishra, Nandita; Singha, Prajjal K.; Venkatachalam, Manjeri A.; Saikumar, Pothana

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Chemical inhibition of fission protein Drp1 leads to mitochondrial fusion. → Increased fusion stimulates molecular changes in mitochondrial fusion protein OPA1. → Proteolysis of larger isoforms, new synthesis and ubiquitination of OPA1 occur. → Loss of mitochondrial tubular rigidity and disorganization of cristae. → Generation of large swollen dysfunctional mitochondria. -- Abstract: We showed earlier that 15 deoxy Δ 12,14 prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2) inactivates Drp1 and induces mitochondrial fusion . However, prolonged incubation of cells with 15d-PGJ2 resulted in remodeling of fused mitochondria into large swollen mitochondria with irregular cristae structure. While initial fusion of mitochondria by 15d-PGJ2 required the presence of both outer (Mfn1 and Mfn2) and inner (OPA1) mitochondrial membrane fusion proteins, later mitochondrial changes involved increased degradation of the fusion protein OPA1 and ubiquitination of newly synthesized OPA1 along with decreased expression of Mfn1 and Mfn2, which likely contributed to the loss of tubular rigidity, disorganization of cristae, and formation of large swollen degenerated dysfunctional mitochondria. Similar to inhibition of Drp1 by 15d-PGJ2, decreased expression of fission protein Drp1 by siRNA also resulted in the loss of fusion proteins. Prevention of 15d-PGJ2 induced mitochondrial elongation by thiol antioxidants prevented not only loss of OPA1 isoforms but also its ubiquitination. These findings provide novel insights into unforeseen complexity of molecular events that modulate mitochondrial plasticity.

  2. Regulating gonad inhibition and vitellogenin/vitellin induction in Penaeus monodon using mature GIH fusion protein and polyclonal antisera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    S, Vrinda; C, Jasmin; K C, Sivakumar; Jose, Seena; Jose, Blessy; Philip, Rosamma; I S, Bright Singh

    2017-01-01

    Gonad inhibiting hormone (GIH), type II class of the CHH family neuropeptides, is released by the neurohaemal XO-SG complex of the eyestalk. The inhibitory function of GIH has a pivotal role in gonad development and reproduction. In this study, we report the expression and production of a thioredoxin-fused mature GIH protein (mf-PmGIH) of Penaeus monodon in a bacterial system and its use as antigen to raise polyclonal antiserum (anti-mf-PmGIH). The mature GIH gene of 237bp that codes for 79 amino acids, was cloned into the Escherichia coli thioredoxin gene fusion expression system. The expression vector construct (mf-PmGIH+pEt32a+) upon induction produced 32.16kDa mature GIH fusion protein (mf-PmGIH)·The purified fusion protein was used as exogenous GIH and as antigen to raise polyclonal antisera. The fusion protein when injected into juvenile shrimp significantly reduced vitellogenin/vitellin levels by 31.55% within 72h in comparison to the controls showing the gonad inhibiting property. Vitellogenin/vitellin levels were significantly induced by 74.10% within 6h when polyclonal antiserum (anti-mf-PmGIH - 1:500) was injected in P. monodon. Anti-mf-PmGIH immunolocalized GIH producing neurosecretory cells in the eyestalk of P. monodon. The present manuscript reports an innovative means of gonad inhibition and vitellogenin/vitellin induction with thioredoxin fused GIH and antisera developed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. TRIM45, a novel human RBCC/TRIM protein, inhibits transcriptional activities of ElK-1 and AP-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yuequn; Li Yongqing; Qi Xinzhu; Yuan Wuzhou; Ai Jianping; Zhu Chuanbing; Cao Lei; Yang Hong; Liu Fang; Wu Xiushan; Liu Mingyao

    2004-01-01

    The tripartite motif (TRIM) proteins play important roles in a variety of cellular functions including cell proliferation, differentiation, development, oncogenesis, and apoptosis. In this study, we report the identification and characterization of the human tripartite motif-containing protein 45 (TRIM45), a novel member of the TRIM family, from a human embryonic heart cDNA library. TRIM45 has a predicted 580 amino acid open reading frame, encoding a putative 64-kDa protein. The N-terminal region harbors a RING finger, two B-boxes, and a predicted α-helical coiled-coil domain, which together form the RBCC/TRIM motif found in a large family of proteins, whereas the C-terminal region contains a filamin-type immunoglobulin (IG-FLMN) domain. Northern blot analysis indicates that TRIM45 is expressed in a variety of human adult and embryonic tissues. In the cell, TRIM45 protein is expressed both in cytoplasm and in cell nucleus. Overexpression of TRIM45 in COS-7 cells inhibits the transcriptional activities of ElK-1 and AP-1. These results suggest that TRIM45 may act as a new transcriptional repressor in mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway

  4. The Adenovirus E4orf4 Protein Provides a Novel Mechanism for Inhibition of the DNA Damage Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brestovitsky, Anna; Nebenzahl-Sharon, Keren; Kechker, Peter; Sharf, Rakefet; Kleinberger, Tamar

    2016-02-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) is a conglomerate of pathways designed to detect DNA damage and signal its presence to cell cycle checkpoints and to the repair machinery, allowing the cell to pause and mend the damage, or if the damage is too severe, to trigger apoptosis or senescence. Various DDR branches are regulated by kinases of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-like protein kinase family, including ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and ATM- and Rad3-related (ATR). Replication intermediates and linear double-stranded genomes of DNA viruses are perceived by the cell as DNA damage and activate the DDR. If allowed to operate, the DDR will stimulate ligation of viral genomes and will inhibit virus replication. To prevent this outcome, many DNA viruses evolved ways to limit the DDR. As part of its attack on the DDR, adenovirus utilizes various viral proteins to cause degradation of DDR proteins and to sequester the MRN damage sensor outside virus replication centers. Here we show that adenovirus evolved yet another novel mechanism to inhibit the DDR. The E4orf4 protein, together with its cellular partner PP2A, reduces phosphorylation of ATM and ATR substrates in virus-infected cells and in cells treated with DNA damaging drugs, and causes accumulation of damaged DNA in the drug-treated cells. ATM and ATR are not mutually required for inhibition of their signaling pathways by E4orf4. ATM and ATR deficiency as well as E4orf4 expression enhance infection efficiency. Furthermore, E4orf4, previously reported to induce cancer-specific cell death when expressed alone, sensitizes cells to killing by sub-lethal concentrations of DNA damaging drugs, likely because it inhibits DNA damage repair. These findings provide one explanation for the cancer-specificity of E4orf4-induced cell death as many cancers have DDR deficiencies leading to increased reliance on the remaining intact DDR pathways and to enhanced susceptibility to DDR inhibitors such as E4orf4. Thus DDR inhibition

  5. The cytotoxic effects of regorafenib in combination with protein kinase D inhibition in human colorectal cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ning; Chu, Edward; Wu, Shao-yu; Wipf, Peter; Schmitz, John C.

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) remains a major public health problem, and diagnosis of metastatic disease is usually associated with poor prognosis. The multi-kinase inhibitor regorafenib was approved in 2013 in the U.S. for the treatment of mCRC patients who progressed after standard therapies. However, the clinical efficacy of regorafenib is quite limited. One potential strategy to improve mCRC therapy is to combine agents that target key cellular signaling pathways, which may lead to synergistic enhancement of antitumor efficacy and overcome cellular drug resistance. Protein kinase D (PKD), a family of serine/threonine kinases, mediates key signaling pathways implicated in multiple cellular processes. Herein, we evaluated the combination of regorafenib with a PKD inhibitor in several human CRC cells. Using the Chou-Talalay model, the combination index values for this combination treatment demonstrated synergistic effects on inhibition of cell proliferation and clonal formation. This drug combination resulted in induction of apoptosis as determined by flow cytometry, increased PARP cleavage, and decreased activation of the anti-apoptotic protein HSP27. This combination also yielded enhanced inhibition of ERK, AKT, and NF-κB signaling. Taken together, PKD inhibition in combination with regorafenib appears to be a promising strategy for the treatment of mCRC. PMID:25544765

  6. Humanin decreases mitochondrial membrane permeability by inhibiting the membrane association and oligomerization of Bax and Bid proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ze-Wei; Liu, Dong-Xiang

    2017-12-21

    Humanin (HN) is a 24-residue peptide identified from the brain of a patient with Alzheimer's disease (AD). HN has been found to protect against neuronal insult caused by Aβ peptides or transfection of familial AD mutant genes. In order to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of HN neuroprotection, we explored the effects of HN on the association of Bax or Bid with lipid bilayers and their oligomerization in the membrane. By using single-molecule fluorescence and Förster resonance energy transfer techniques, we showed that Bax was mainly present as monomers, dimers and tetramers in lipid bilayers, while truncated Bid (tBid) enhanced the membrane association and tetramerization of Bax. HN (100 nmol/L) inhibited the self-association and tBid-activated association of Bax with the bilayers, and significantly decreased the proportion of Bax in tetramers. Furthermore, HN inhibited Bid translocation to lipid bilayers. HN could bind with Bax and Bid either in solution or in the membrane. However, HN could not pull the proteins out of the membrane. Based on these results, we propose that HN binds to Bax and cBid in solution and inhibits their translocation to the membrane. Meanwhile, HN interacts with the membrane-bound Bax and tBid, preventing the recruitment of cytosolic Bax and its oligomerization in the membrane. In this way, HN inhibits Bax pore formation in mitochondrial outer membrane and suppresses cytochrome c release and mitochondria-dependent apoptosis.

  7. The antibiotic thiostrepton inhibits a functional transition within protein L11 at the ribosomal GTPase centre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porse, B T; Leviev, I; Mankin, A S

    1998-01-01

    A newly identified class of highly thiostrepton-resistant mutants of the archaeon Halobacterium halobium carry a missense mutation at codon 18 within the gene encoding ribosomal protein L11. In the mutant proteins, a proline, conserved in archaea and bacteria, is converted to either serine...... or threonine. The mutations do not impair either the assembly of the mutant L11 into 70 S ribosomes in vivo or the binding of thiostrepton to ribosomes in vitro. Moreover, the corresponding mutations at proline 22, in a fusion protein of L11 from Escherichia coli with glutathione-S-transferase, did not reduce...... the binding affinities of the mutated L11 fusion proteins for rRNA of of thiostrepton for the mutant L11-rRNA complexes at rRNA concentrations lower than those prevailing in vivo. Probing the structure of the fusion protein of wild-type L11, from E. coli, using a recently developed protein footprinting...

  8. P38 mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitor, FR167653, inhibits parathyroid hormone related protein-induced osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiren Tao

    Full Text Available p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK acts downstream in the signaling pathway that includes receptor activator of NF-κB (RANK, a powerful inducer of osteoclast formation and activation. We investigated the role of p38 MAPK in parathyroid hormone related protein (PTHrP-induced osteoclastogenesis in vitro and PTHrP-induced bone resorption in vivo. The ability of FR167653 to inhibit osteoclast formation was evaluated by counting the number of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase positive multinucleated cells (TRAP-positive MNCs in in vitro osteoclastgenesis assays. Its mechanisms were evaluated by detecting the expression level of c-Fos and nuclear factor of activated T cells c1 (NFATc1 in bone marrow macrophages (BMMs stimulated with sRANKL and M-CSF, and by detecting the expression level of osteoprotegerin (OPG and RANKL in bone marrow stromal cells stimulated with PTHrP in the presence of FR167653. The function of FR167653 on bone resorption was assessed by measuring the bone resorption area radiographically and by counting osteoclast number per unit bone tissue area in calvaria in a mouse model of bone resorption by injecting PTHrP subcutaneously onto calvaria. Whole blood ionized calcium levels were also recorded. FR167653 inhibited PTHrP-induced osteoclast formation and PTHrP-induced c-Fos and NFATc1 expression in bone marrow macrophages, but not the expression levels of RANKL and OPG in primary bone marrow stromal cells treated by PTHrP. Furthermore, bone resorption area and osteoclast number in vivo were significantly decreased by the treatment of FR167653. Systemic hypercalcemia was also partially inhibited. Inhibition of p38 MAPK by FR167653 blocks PTHrP-induced osteoclastogenesis in vitro and PTHrP-induced bone resorption in vivo, suggesting that the p38 MAPK signaling pathway plays a fundamental role in PTHrP-induced osteoclastic bone resorption.

  9. The PCNA-associated protein PARI negatively regulates homologous recombination via the inhibition of DNA repair synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burkovics, Peter; Dome, Lili; Juhasz, Szilvia

    2016-01-01

    Successful and accurate completion of the replication of damage-containing DNA requires mainly recombination and RAD18-dependent DNA damage tolerance pathways. RAD18 governs at least two distinct mechanisms: translesion synthesis (TLS) and template switching (TS)-dependent pathways. Whereas TS...... is mainly error-free, TLS can work in an error-prone manner and, as such, the regulation of these pathways requires tight control to prevent DNA errors and potentially oncogenic transformation and tumorigenesis. In humans, the PCNA-associated recombination inhibitor (PARI) protein has recently been shown...... to inhibit homologous recombination (HR) events. Here, we describe a biochemical mechanism in which PARI functions as an HR regulator after replication fork stalling and during double-strand break repair. In our reconstituted biochemical system, we show that PARI inhibits DNA repair synthesis during...

  10. Inhibition of TRF1 Telomere Protein Impairs Tumor Initiation and Progression in Glioblastoma Mouse Models and Patient-Derived Xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejarano, Leire; Schuhmacher, Alberto J; Méndez, Marinela; Megías, Diego; Blanco-Aparicio, Carmen; Martínez, Sonia; Pastor, Joaquín; Squatrito, Massimo; Blasco, Maria A

    2017-11-13

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a deadly and common brain tumor. Poor prognosis is linked to high proliferation and cell heterogeneity, including glioma stem cells (GSCs). Telomere genes are frequently mutated. The telomere binding protein TRF1 is essential for telomere protection, and for adult and pluripotent stem cells. Here, we find TRF1 upregulation in mouse and human GBM. Brain-specific Trf1 genetic deletion in GBM mouse models inhibited GBM initiation and progression, increasing survival. Trf1 deletion increased telomeric DNA damage and reduced proliferation and stemness. TRF1 chemical inhibitors mimicked these effects in human GBM cells and also blocked tumor sphere formation and tumor growth in xenografts from patient-derived primary GSCs. Thus, targeting telomeres throughout TRF1 inhibition is an effective therapeutic strategy for GBM. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Transgenic peas (Pisum sativum) expressing polygalacturonase inhibiting protein from raspberry (Rubus idaeus) and stilbene synthase from grape (Vitis vinifera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, A; Jacobsen, H-J; de Kathen, A; de Lorenzo, G; Briviba, K; Hain, R; Ramsay, G; Kiesecker, H

    2006-11-01

    The pea (Pisum sativum L.) varieties Baroness (United Kingdome) and Baccara (France) were transformed via Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated gene transfer with pGPTV binary vectors containing the bar gene in combination with two different antifungal genes coding for polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein (PGIP) from raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.) driven by a double 35S promoter, or the stilbene synthase (Vst1) from grape (Vitis vinifera L.) driven by its own elicitor-inducible promoter. Transgenic lines were established and transgenes combined via conventional crossing. Resveratrol, produced by Vst1 transgenic plants, was detected using HPLC and the PGIP expression was determined in functional inhibition assays against fungal polygalacturonases. Stable inheritance of the antifungal genes in the transgenic plants was demonstrated.

  12. Inhibition of nucleoside diphosphate kinase activity by in vitro phosphorylation by protein kinase CK2. Differential phosphorylation of NDP kinases in HeLa cells in culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biondi, R M; Engel, M; Sauane, M

    1996-01-01

    that in vitro protein kinase CK2 catalyzed phosphorylation of human NDPK A inhibits its enzymatic activity by inhibiting the first step of its ping-pong mechanism of catalysis: its autophosphorylation. Upon in vivo 32P labeling of HeLa cells, we observed that both human NDPKs, A and B, were autophosphorylated...

  13. Upregulation of astrocytes protein phosphatase-2A stimulates astrocytes migration via inhibiting p38 MAPK in tg2576 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiu-Ping; Zheng, Hong-Yun; Qu, Min; Zhang, Yao; Cao, Fu-Yuan; Wang, Qun; Ke, Dan; Liu, Gong-Ping; Wang, Jian-Zhi

    2012-09-01

    One of the earliest neuropathological changes in Alzheimer disease (AD) is the accumulation of astrocytes at sites of β-amyloid (Aβ) deposits, but the cause of this cellular response is unclear. As the activity of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is significantly decreased in the AD brains, we studied the role of PP2A in astrocytes migration. We observed unexpectedly that PP2A activity associated with glial fibrillary acidic protein, an astrocyte marker, was significantly upregulated in tg2576 mice, demonstrated by an increased enzyme activity, a decreased demethylation at leucine-309 (DM-PP2Ac), and a decreased phosphorylation at tyrosine-307 of PP2A (pY307-PP2Ac). Further studies by using in vitro wound-healing model and transwell assay demonstrated that upregulation of PP2A pharmacologically and genetically could stimulate astrocytes migration. Activation of PP2A promotes actin organization and inhibits p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (p38 MAPK), while simultaneous activation of p38 MAPK partially abolishes the PP2A-induced astrocytes migration. Our data suggest that activation of astrocytes PP2A in tg2567 mice may stimulate the migration of astrocytes to the amyloid plaques by p38 MAPK inhibition, implying that PP2A deficits observed in AD may cause Aβ accumulation via hindering the astrocytes migration. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Intracellular expression of IRF9 Stat fusion protein overcomes the defective Jak-Stat signaling and inhibits HCV RNA replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balart Luis A

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Interferon alpha (IFN-α binds to a cell surface receptor that activates the Jak-Stat signaling pathway. A critical component of this pathway is the translocation of interferon stimulated gene factor 3 (a complex of three proteins Stat1, Stat2 and IRF9 to the nucleus to activate antiviral genes. A stable sub-genomic replicon cell line resistant to IFN-α was developed in which the nuclear translocation of Stat1 and Stat2 proteins was prevented due to the lack of phosphorylation; whereas the nuclear translocation of IRF9 protein was not affected. In this study, we sought to overcome defective Jak-Stat signaling and to induce an antiviral state in the IFN-α resistant replicon cell line by developing a chimera IRF9 protein fused with the trans activating domain (TAD of either a Stat1 (IRF9-S1C or Stat2 (IRF9-S2C protein. We show here that intracellular expression of fusion proteins using the plasmid constructs of either IRF9-S1C or IRF9-S2C, in the IFN-α resistant cells, resulted in an increase in Interferon Stimulated Response Element (ISRE luciferase promoter activity and significantly induced HLA-1 surface expression. Moreover, we show that transient transfection of IRF9-S1C or IRF9-S2C plasmid constructs into IFN-α resistant replicon cells containing sub-genomic HCV1b and HCV2a viruses resulted in an inhibition of viral replication and viral protein expression independent of IFN-α treatment. The results of this study indicate that the recombinant fusion proteins of IRF9-S1C, IRF9-S2C alone, or in combination, have potent antiviral properties against the HCV in an IFN-α resistant cell line with a defective Jak-Stat signaling.

  15. Non-enzymatic action of RRM1 protein upregulates PTEN leading to inhibition of colorectal cancer metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Hongyan; Lou, Meng; Chen, Yuexia; Liu, Xiyong; Chen, Naiming; Shan, Jianzhen; Ling, Zhiqiang; Shen, Jing; Zhu, Lijun; Yen, Yun; Zheng, Shu; Shao, Jimin

    2015-06-01

    Ribonucleotide reductase large subunit M1 (RRM1) forms a holoenzyme with small subunits to provide deoxyribonucleotides for DNA synthesis and cell proliferation. Here, we reported a non-RR role of the catalytic subunit protein RRM1 and related pathway in inhibiting colorectal cancer (CRC) metastasis. Ectopic overexpression of the wild-type RRM1, and importantly, its Y738F mutant that lacks RR enzymatic activity, prevented the migration and invasion of CRC cells by promoting phosphatase and tensin homolog on chromosome 10 (PTEN) transactivation. Furthermore, overexpression of the wild-type and RR-inactive mutant RRM1 similarly reduced the phosphorylation of Akt and increased the E-cadherin expression in CRC cells, which were blocked by PTEN knockdown attenuation. Examination of clinical CRC specimens demonstrated that both RRM1 protein expression and RR activity were elevated in most cancer tissues compared to the paired normal tissues. However, while RR activity did not change significantly in different cancer stages, the RRM1 protein level was significantly increased at stages T1-3 but decreased at stage T4, in parallel with the PTEN expression level and negatively correlated with invasion and liver metastasis. Thus, we propose that RRM1 protein can inhibit CRC invasion and metastasis at the advanced stage by regulating PTEN transactivation and its downstream pathways in addition to forming an RR holoenzyme for supporting cancer proliferation. Understanding of the seemingly contrary dual roles of RRM1 protein may further help to explain the complex mechanisms by which this key enzyme and its components are involved in cancer development.

  16. Interactions between L-arginine/L-arginine derivatives and lysozyme and implications to their inhibition effects on protein aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ming-Tao; Dong, Xiao-Yan; Sun, Yan

    2013-01-01

    L-arginine (Arg), L-homoarginine (HArg), L-arginine ethylester (ArgEE), and L-arginine methylester (ArgME) were found effective in inhibiting protein aggregation, but the molecular mechanisms are not clear. Herein, stopped-flow fluorescence spectroscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry, and mass spectroscopy were used to investigate the folding kinetics of lysozyme and the interactions of the additives with lysozyme. It was found that the interactions of ArgME and ArgEE with lysozyme were similar to that of guanidine hydrochloride and were much stronger than those of Arg and HArg. The binding forces were all mainly hydrogen bonding and cation-π interaction from the guanidinium group, but their differences in molecular states led to the significantly different binding strengths. The additives formed molecular clusters in an increasing order of ArgEE, ArgME, HArg, and Arg. Arg and HArg mainly formed annular clusters with head-to-tail bonding, while ArgME and ArgEE formed linear clusters with guanidinium groups stacking. The interactions between the additives and lysozyme were positively related to the monomer contents. That is, the monomers were the primary species that participated in the direct interactions due to their intact guanidinium groups and small sizes, while the clusters performed as barriers to crowd out the protein-protein interactions for aggregation. Thus, it is concluded that the effects of Arg and its derivatives on protein aggregation stemmed from the direct interactions by the monomers and the crowding effects by the clusters. Interplay of the two effects led to the differences in their inhibition effects on protein aggregation. © 2013 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  17. Inhibition of the NAD-dependent protein deacetylase SIRT2 induces granulocytic differentiation in human leukemia cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshitaka Sunami

    Full Text Available Sirtuins, NAD-dependent protein deacetylases, play important roles in cellular functions such as metabolism and differentiation. Whether sirtuins function in tumorigenesis is still controversial, but sirtuins are aberrantly expressed in tumors, which may keep cancerous cells undifferentiated. Therefore, we investigated whether the inhibition of sirtuin family proteins induces cellular differentiation in leukemic cells. The sirtuin inhibitors tenovin-6 and BML-266 induce granulocytic differentiation in the acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL cell line NB4. This differentiation is likely caused by an inhibition of SIRT2 deacetylase activity, judging from the accumulation of acetylated α-tubulin, a major SIRT2 substrate. Unlike the clinically used differentiation inducer all-trans retinoic acid, tenovin-6 shows limited effects on promyelocytic leukemia-retinoic acid receptor α (PML-RAR-α stability and promyelocytic leukemia nuclear body formation in NB4 cells, suggesting that tenovin-6 does not directly target PML-RAR-α activity. In agreement with this, tenovin-6 induces cellular differentiation in the non-APL cell line HL-60, where PML-RAR-α does not exist. Knocking down SIRT2 by shRNA induces granulocytic differentiation in NB4 cells, which demonstrates that the inhibition of SIRT2 activity is sufficient to induce cell differentiation in NB4 cells. The overexpression of SIRT2 in NB4 cells decreases the level of granulocytic differentiation induced by tenovin-6, which indicates that tenovin-6 induces granulocytic differentiation by inhibiting SIRT2 activity. Taken together, our data suggest that targeting SIRT2 is a viable strategy to induce leukemic cell differentiation.

  18. A CD13-targeting peptide integrated protein inhibits human liver cancer growth by killing cancer stem cells and suppressing angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yan-Bo; Gong, Jian-Hua; Liu, Xiu-Jun; Li, Yi; Zhen, Yong-Su

    2017-05-01

    CD13 is a marker of angiogenic endothelial cells, and recently it is proved to be a biomarker of human liver cancer stem cells (CSCs). Herein, the therapeutic effects of NGR-LDP-AE, a fusion protein composed of CD13-targeting peptide NGR and antitumor antibiotic lidamycin, on human liver cancer and its mechanism were studied. Western blot and immunofluorescence assay demonstrated that CD13 (WM15 epitope) was expressed in both human liver cancer cell lines and vascular endothelial cells, while absent in normal liver cells. MTT assay showed that NGR-LDP-AE displayed potent cytotoxicity to cultured tumor cell lines with IC 50 values at low nanomolar level. NGR-LDP-AE inhibited tumorsphere formation of liver cancer cells, and the IC 50 values were much lower than that in MTT assay, indicating selectively killing of CSCs. In endothelial tube formation assay, NGR-LDP-AE at low cytotoxic dose significantly inhibited the formation of intact tube networks. Animal experiment demonstrated that NGR-LDP-AE inhibited the growth of human liver cancer xenograft. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that NGR-LDP-AE induced the down-regulation of CD13. In vitro experiment using cultured tumor cells also confirmed this result. NGR-LDP-AE activated both apoptotic and autophagic pathways in cultured tumor cells, while the induced autophagy protected cells from death. Conclusively, NGR-LDP-AE exerts its antitumor activity via killing liver CSCs and inhibiting angiogenesis. With one targeting motif, NGR-LDP-AE acts on both liver CSCs and angiogenic endothelial cells. It is a promising dual targeting fusion protein for liver cancer therapy, especially for advanced or relapsed cancers. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Ethanol and Other Short-Chain Alcohols Inhibit NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation through Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyt, Laura R.; Ather, Jennifer L.; Randall, Matthew J.; DePuccio, Daniel P.; Landry, Christopher C.; Wewers, Mark D.; Gavrilin, Mikhail A.; Poynter, Matthew E.

    2016-01-01

    Immunosuppression is a major complication of alcoholism that contributes to increased rates of opportunistic infections and sepsis in alcoholics. The NLRP3 inflammasome, a multi-protein intracellular pattern recognition receptor complex that facilitates the cleavage and secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-18, can be inhibited by ethanol and we sought to better understand the mechanism through which this occurs and whether chemically similar molecules exert comparable effects. We show that ethanol can specifically inhibit activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome, resulting in attenuated IL-1β and caspase-1 cleavage and secretion, as well as diminished ASC speck formation, without affecting potassium efflux, in a mouse macrophage cell line (J774), mouse bone marrow derived dendritic cells, mouse neutrophils, and human PBMCs. The inhibitory effects on the Nlrp3 inflammasome were independent of GABAA receptor activation or NMDA receptor inhibition, but was associated with decreased oxidant production. Ethanol treatment markedly decreased cellular tyrosine phosphorylation, while administration of the tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor sodium orthovanadate prior to ethanol restored tyrosine phosphorylation and IL-1β secretion subsequent to ATP stimulation. Furthermore, sodium orthovanadate-induced phosphorylation of ASC Y144, necessary and sufficient for Nlrp3 inflammasome activation, and secretion of phosphorylated ASC, were inhibited by ethanol. Finally, multiple alcohol-containing organic compounds exerted inhibitory effects on the Nlrp3 inflammasome, whereas 2-methylbutane (isopentane), the analogous alkane of the potent inhibitor isoamyl alcohol (isopentanol), did not. Our results demonstrate that ethanol antagonizes the NLRP3 inflammasome at an apical event in its activation through the stimulation of protein tyrosine phosphatases, an effect shared by other short-chain alcohols. PMID:27421477

  20. Recombinant nematode anticoagulant protein c2 inhibits cell invasion by decreasing uPA expression in NSCLC cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Yu; Yue, Jun; Mao, Meng; Liu, Qingqing; Zhou, Jing; Yang, Jiyun

    2015-04-01

    Nematode anticoagulant protein c2 (NAPc2) is an 85-residue polypeptide originally isolated from the hematophagous hookworm, Ancylostoma caninum. Several studies have shown that rNAPc2 inhibits the growth of primary and metastatic tumors in mice independently of its ability to initiate coagulation. We obtained bioactive recombinant rNAPc2 by splicing of the rNAPc2-intein-CBD fusion proteins expressed in E. coli ER2566. In the in vitro assay, rNAPc2 obviously inhibited the invasive ability of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, rNAPc2 suppressed tumor growth in vivo by daily intraperitoneal injection of rNAPc2 in an NSCLC cell xenograft model of nude mice. Respectively, rNAPc2 downregulated the production of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) (P<0.05) and suppressed nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activity. We also identified that inhibition of NF-κB activity impaired cell invasion and reduced the uPA production in NSCLC cells. Meanwhile, NF-κB was found to directly bind to the uPA promoter in vitro. These results demonstrated that rNAPc2 inhibits cell invasion at least in part through the downregulation of the NF-κB-dependent metastasis-related gene expression in NSCLC. Our results also suggest that uPA, a known metastasis-promoting gene, is indirectly regulated by rNAPc2 through NF-κB activation. These results indicate that rNAPc2 may be a potent agent for the prevention of NSCLC progression.

  1. Congo red, an amyloid-inhibiting compound, alleviates various types of cellular dysfunction triggered by mutant protein kinase cγ that causes spinocerebellar ataxia type 14 (SCA14) by inhibiting oligomerization and aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, Takahiro; Takahashi, Hideyuki; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Ogawa, Kota; Onji, Tomoya; Adachi, Naoko; Tanaka, Shigeru; Hide, Izumi; Saito, Naoaki; Sakai, Norio

    2010-01-01

    Several missense mutations in the protein kinase Cγ (γPKC) gene have been found to cause spinocerebellar ataxia type 14 (SCA14), an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease. We previously demonstrated that the mutant γPKC found in SCA14 is susceptible to aggregation that induces apoptotic cell death. Congo red is widely used as a histological dye for amyloid detection. Recent evidence has revealed that Congo red has the property to inhibit amyloid oligomers and fibril formation of misfolded proteins. In the present study, we examine whether Congo red inhibits aggregate formation and cytotoxicity of mutant γPKC. Congo red likely inhibits aggregate formation of mutant γPKC – green fluorescent protein (GFP) without affecting its expression level in SH-SY5Y cells. Congo red counteracts the insolubilization of recombinant mutant γPKC, suggesting that the dye inhibits aggregation of mutant γPKC by a direct mechanism. Congo red also inhibits aggregation and oligomerization of mutant γPKC-GFP in primary cultured cerebellar Purkinje cells. Moreover, the dye reverses the improper development of dendrites and inhibits apoptotic cell death in Purkinje cells that express mutant γPKC-GFP. These results indicate that amyloid-inhibiting compounds like Congo red may be novel therapeutics for SCA14.

  2. Dimerization inhibits the activity of receptor-like protein-tyrosine phosphatase-alpha

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, G; den Hertog, J; Su, J

    1999-01-01

    that dimerization can negatively regulate activity, through the interaction of an inhibitory 'wedge' on one monomer with the catalytic cleft of domain 1 in the other monomer. Here we show that dimerization inhibits the activity of a full-length RPTP in vivo. We generated stable disulphide-bonded full...

  3. Inhibition of beta cell growth and function by bone morphogenetic proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Christine; Christensen, Gitte Lund; Jacobsen, Marie L B

    2014-01-01

    proliferation of rodent beta cells. The expression of Id mRNAs was induced by BMP4 in rat and human islets. Finally, glucose-induced insulin secretion was significantly impaired in rodent and human islets pre-treated with BMP4, and inhibition of BMP activity resulted in enhanced insulin release. CONCLUSIONS...

  4. RNA-binding protein Dnd1 inhibits microRNA access to target mRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kedde, Martijn; Strasser, Markus J; Boldajipour, Bijan

    2007-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are inhibitors of gene expression capable of controlling processes in normal development and cancer. In mammals, miRNAs use a seed sequence of 6-8 nucleotides (nt) to associate with 3' untranslated regions (3'UTRs) of mRNAs and inhibit their expression. Intriguingly, occasional...

  5. Analysis of HIV-1 fusion peptide inhibition by synthetic peptides from E1 protein of GB virus C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Martín, Maria Jesús; Hristova, Kalina; Pujol, Montserrat; Gómara, Maria J; Haro, Isabel; Alsina, M Asunción; Busquets, M Antònia

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study was to identify proteins that could inhibit the activity of the peptide sequence representing the N-terminal of the surface protein gp41 of HIV, corresponding to the fusion peptide of the virus (HIV-1 FP). To do this we synthesized and studied 58 peptides corresponding to the envelope protein E1 of the hepatitis G virus (GBV-C). Five of the E1 synthetic peptides: NCCAPEDIGFCLEGGCLV (P7), APEDIGFCLEGGCLVALG (P8), FCLEGGCLVALGCTICTD (P10), QAGLAVRPGKSAAQLVGE (P18) and AQLVGELGSLYGPLSVSA (P22) were capable of inhibiting the leakage of vesicular contents caused by HIV-1 FP. A series of experiments were carried out to determine how these E1 peptides interact with HIV-1 FP. Our studies analyzed the interactions with and without the presence of lipid membranes. Isothermal titration calorimetry revealed that the binding of P7, P18 and P22 peptides to HIV-1 FP is strongly endothermic, and that binding is entropy-driven. Gibbs energy for the process indicates a spontaneous binding between E1 peptides and HIV-1 FP. Moreover, confocal microscopy of Giant Unilamellar Vesicles revealed that the disruption of the lipid bilayer by HIV-1 FP alone was inhibited by the presence of any of the five selected peptides. Our results highlight that these E1 synthetic peptides could be involved in preventing the entry of HIV-1 by binding to the HIV-1 FP. Therefore, the continued study into the interaction between GBV-C peptides and HIV-1 FP could lead to the development of new therapeutic agents for the treatment of AIDS. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Exploiting the MDM2-CK1α Protein-Protein Interface to Develop Novel Biologics That Induce UBL-Kinase-Modification and Inhibit Cell Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huart, Anne-Sophie; MacLaine, Nicola J.; Narayan, Vikram; Hupp, Ted R.

    2012-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions forming dominant signalling events are providing ever-growing platforms for the development of novel Biologic tools for controlling cell growth. Casein Kinase 1 α (CK1α) forms a genetic and physical interaction with the murine double minute chromosome 2 (MDM2) oncoprotein resulting in degradation of the p53 tumour suppressor. Pharmacological inhibition of CK1 increases p53 protein level and induces cell death, whilst small interfering RNA-mediated depletion of CK1α stabilizes p53 and induces growth arrest. We mapped the dominant protein-protein interface that stabilizes the MDM2 and CK1α complex in order to determine whether a peptide derived from the core CK1α-MDM2 interface form novel Biologics that can be used to probe the contribution of the CK1-MDM2 protein-protein interaction to p53 activation and cell viability. Overlapping peptides derived from CK1α were screened for dominant MDM2 binding sites using (i) ELISA with recombinant MDM2; (ii) cell lysate pull-down towards endogenous MDM2; (iii) MDM2-CK1α complex-based competition ELISA; and (iv) MDM2-mediated ubiquitination. One dominant peptide, peptide 35 was bioactive in all four assays and its transfection induced cell death/growth arrest in a p53-independent manner. Ectopic expression of flag-tagged peptide 35 induced a novel ubiquitin and NEDD8 modification of CK1α, providing one of the first examples whereby NEDDylation of a protein kinase can be induced. These data identify an MDM2 binding motif in CK1α which when isolated as a small peptide can (i) function as a dominant negative inhibitor of the CK1α-MDM2 interface, (ii) be used as a tool to study NEDDylation of CK1α, and (iii) reduce cell growth. Further, this approach provides a technological blueprint, complementing siRNA and chemical biology approaches, by exploiting protein-protein interactions in order to develop Biologics to manipulate novel types of signalling pathways such as cross-talk between

  7. Systemic Monocyte Chemotactic Protein-1 Inhibition Modifies Renal Macrophages and Restores Glomerular Endothelial Glycocalyx and Barrier Function in Diabetic Nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boels, Margien G S; Koudijs, Angela; Avramut, M Cristina; Sol, Wendy M P J; Wang, Gangqi; van Oeveren-Rietdijk, Annemarie M; van Zonneveld, Anton Jan; de Boer, Hetty C; van der Vlag, Johan; van Kooten, Cees; Eulberg, Dirk; van den Berg, Bernard M; IJpelaar, Daphne H T; Rabelink, Ton J

    2017-11-01

    Inhibition of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) with the Spiegelmer emapticap pegol (NOX-E36) shows long-lasting albuminuria-reducing effects in diabetic nephropathy. MCP-1 regulates inflammatory cell recruitment and differentiation of macrophages. Because the endothelial glycocalyx is also reduced in diabetic nephropathy, we hypothesized that MCP-1 inhibition restores glomerular barrier function through influencing macrophage cathepsin L secretion, thus reducing activation of the glycocalyx-degrading enzyme heparanase. Four weeks of treatment of diabetic Apoe knockout mice with the mouse-specific NOX-E36 attenuated albuminuria without any change in systemic hemodynamics, despite persistent loss of podocyte function. MCP-1 inhibition, however, increased glomerular endothelial glycocalyx coverage, with preservation of heparan sulfate. Mechanistically, both glomerular cathepsin L and heparanase expression were reduced. MCP-1 inhibition resulted in reduced CCR2-expressing Ly6C hi monocytes in the peripheral blood, without affecting overall number of kidney macrophages at the tissue level. However, the CD206 + /Mac3 + cell ratio, as an index of presence of anti-inflammatory macrophages, increased in diabetic mice after treatment. Functional analysis of isolated renal macrophages showed increased release of IL-10, whereas tumor necrosis factor and cathepsin L release was reduced, further confirming polarization of tissue macrophages toward an anti-inflammatory phenotype during mouse-specific NOX-E36 treatment. We show that MCP-1 inhibition restores glomerular endothelial glycocalyx and barrier function and reduces tissue inflammation in the presence of ongoing diabetic injury, suggesting a therapeutic potential for NOX-E36 in diabetic nephropathy. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Structure-Based Design and Synthesis of Potent Cyclic Peptides Inhibiting the YAP-TEAD Protein-Protein Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhisen; Lin, Zhaohu; Zhou, Zheng; Shen, Hong C; Yan, S Frank; Mayweg, Alexander V; Xu, Zhiheng; Qin, Ning; Wong, Jason C; Zhang, Zhenshan; Rong, Yiping; Fry, David C; Hu, Taishan

    2014-09-11

    The YAP-TEAD protein-protein interaction (PPI) mediates the oncogenic function of YAP, and inhibitors of this PPI have potential usage in treatment of YAP-involved cancers. Here we report the design and synthesis of potent cyclic peptide inhibitors of the YAP-TEAD interaction. A truncation study of YAP interface 3 peptide identified YAP(84-100) as a weak peptide inhibitor (IC50 = 37 μM), and an alanine scan revealed a beneficial mutation, D94A. Subsequent replacement of a native cation-π interaction with an optimized disulfide bridge for conformational constraint and synergistic effect between macrocyclization and modification at positions 91 and 93 greatly boosted inhibitory activity. Peptide 17 was identified with an IC50 of 25 nM, and the binding affinity (K d = 15 nM) of this 17mer peptide to TEAD1 proved to be stronger than YAP(50-171) (K d = 40 nM).

  9. Dual orexin receptor antagonist 12 inhibits expression of proteins in neurons and glia implicated in peripheral and central sensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cady, R J; Denson, J E; Sullivan, L Q; Durham, P L

    2014-06-06

    Sensitization and activation of trigeminal nociceptors is implicated in prevalent and debilitating orofacial pain conditions including temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders. Orexins are excitatory neuropeptides that function to regulate many physiological processes and are reported to modulate nociception. To determine the role of orexins in an inflammatory model of trigeminal activation, the effects of a dual orexin receptor antagonist (DORA-12) on levels of proteins that promote peripheral and central sensitization and changes in nocifensive responses were investigated. In adult male Sprague-Dawley rats, mRNA for orexin receptor 1 (OX₁R) and receptor 2 (OX₂R) were detected in trigeminal ganglia and spinal trigeminal nucleus (STN). OX₁R immunoreactivity was localized primarily in neuronal cell bodies in the V3 region of the ganglion and in laminas I-II of the STN. Animals injected bilaterally with complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) in the TMJ capsule exhibited increased expression of P-p38, P-ERK, and lba1 in trigeminal ganglia and P-ERK and lba1 in the STN at 2 days post injection. However, levels of each of these proteins in rats receiving daily oral DORA-12 were inhibited to near basal levels. Similarly, administration of DORA-12 on days 3 and 4 post CFA injection in the TMJ effectively inhibited the prolonged stimulated expression of protein kinase A, NFkB, and Iba1 in the STN on day 5 post injection. While injection of CFA mediated a nocifensive response to mechanical stimulation of the orofacial region at 2h and 3 and 5 days post injection, treatment with DORA-12 suppressed the nocifensive response on day 5. Somewhat surprisingly, nocifensive responses were again observed on day 10 post CFA stimulation in the absence of daily DORA-12 administration. Our results provide evidence that DORA-12 can inhibit CFA-induced stimulation of trigeminal sensory neurons by inhibiting expression of proteins associated with sensitization of peripheral and central

  10. Moult-inhibiting fusion protein augments while polyclonal antisera attenuate moult stages and duration in Penaeus monodon

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Vrinda, S.; Jasmin, C.; Sivakumar, K.C.; Jose, B.; Philip, R.; BrightSingh, I.S.

    the late pre-moult stage (D2 and D3) was opted, the mf-PmMIH I injected shall compensate for the reduced levels of the endogenous MIH and thereby cause effective moult inhibition. The rapid degradation of exogenous Fig. 10. Molt duration observed post... for comparisons of e Endocrinology 233 (2016) 32–42 41two-dimensional maps of proteins from different human cell types defined in a pH scale where isoelectric points correlate with polypeptide compositions. Electrophoresis 15, 529–539. Chan, S.-M., Rankin, S...

  11. Androgens upregulate Cdc25C protein by inhibiting its proteasomal and lysosomal degradation pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Wei Chou

    Full Text Available Cdc25C is a cell cycle protein of the dual specificity phosphatase family essential for activating the cdk1/Cyclin B1 complex in cells entering into mitosis. Since altered cell cycle is a hallmark of human cancers, we investigated androgen regulation of Cdc25C protein in human prostate cancer (PCa cells, including androgen-sensitive (AS LNCaP C-33 cells and androgen-independent (AI LNCaP C-81 as well as PC-3 cells. In the regular culture condition containing fetal bovine serum (FBS, Cdc25C protein levels were similar in these PCa cells. In a steroid-reduced condition, Cdc25C protein was greatly decreased in AS C-33 cells but not AI C-81 or PC-3 cells. In androgen-treated C-33 cells, the Cdc25C protein level was greatly elevated, following a dose- and a time-dependent manner, correlating with increased cell proliferation. This androgen effect was blocked by Casodex, an androgen receptor blocker. Nevertheless, epidermal growth factor (EGF, a growth stimulator of PCa cells, could only increase Cdc25C protein level by about 1.5-fold. Altered expression of Cdc25C in C-33 cells and PC-3 cells by cDNA and/or shRNA transfection is associated with the corresponding changes of cell growth and Cyclin B1 protein level. Actinomycin D and cycloheximide could only partially block androgen-induced Cdc25C protein level. Treatments with both proteasomal and lysosomal inhibitors resulted in elevated Cdc25C protein levels. Immunoprecipitation revealed that androgens reduced the ubiquitination of Cdc25C proteins. These results show for the first time that Cdc25C protein plays a role in regulating PCa cell growth, and androgen treatments, but not EGF, greatly increase Cdc25C protein levels in AS PCa cells, which is in part by decreasing its degradation. These results can lead to advanced PCa therapy via up-regulating the degradation pathways of Cdc25C protein.

  12. Polyplex exposure inhibits cell cycle, increases inflammatory response, and can cause protein expression without cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matz, Rebecca L; Erickson, Blake; Vaidyanathan, Sriram; Kukowska-Latallo, Jolanta F; Baker, James R; Orr, Bradford G; Banaszak Holl, Mark M

    2013-04-01

    We sought to evaluate the relationship between cell division and protein expression when using commercial poly(ethylenimine) (PEI)-based polyplexes. The membrane dye PKH26 was used to assess cell division, and cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) was used to monitor protein expression. When analyzed at the whole population level, a greater number of cells divided than expressed protein, regardless of the level of protein expression observed, giving apparent consistency with the hypothesis that protein expression requires cells to pass through mitosis in order for the transgene to overcome the nuclear membrane. However, when the polyplex-exposed population was evaluated for the amount of division in the protein-expressing subpopulation, it was observed that substantial amounts of expression had occurred in the absence of division. Indeed, in HeLa S3 cells, this represented the majority of expressing cells. Of interest, the doubling time for both cell lines was slowed by ~2-fold upon exposure to polyplexes. This change was not altered by the origin of the plasmid DNA (pDNA) transgene promoter (cytomegalovirus (CMV) or elongation factor-1 alpha (EF1α)). Gene expression arrays in polyplex-exposed HeLa S3 cells showed upregulation of cell cycle arrest genes and downregulation of genes related to mitosis. Chemokine, interleukin, and toll-like receptor genes were also upregulated, suggesting activation of proinflammatory pathways. In summary, we find evidence that a cell division-independent expression pathway exists, and that polyplex exposure slows cell division and increases inflammatory response.

  13. Inhibition of skeletal muscle protein synthesis in septic intra-abdominal abscess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vary, T.C.; Siegel, J.H.; Tall, B.D.; Morris, J.G.; Smith, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    Chronic sepsis is always associated with profound wasting leading to increased release of amino acids from skeletal muscle. Net protein catabolism may be due to decreased rate of synthesis, increased rate of degradation, or both. To determine whether protein synthesis is altered in chronic sepsis, the rate of protein synthesis in vivo was estimated by measuring the incorporation of [ 3 H]-phenylalanine in skeletal muscle protein in a chronic (5-day) septic rat model induced by creation of a stable intra-abdominal abscess using an E. coli + B. fragilis-infected sterile fecal-agar pellet as foreign body nidus. Septic rats failed to gain weight at rates similar to control animals, therefore control animals were weight matched to the septic animals. The skeletal muscle protein content in septic animals was significantly reduced relative to control animals (0.18 +/- 0.01 vs. 0.21 +/- 0.01 mg protein/gm wet wt; p less than 0.02). The rate of incorporation of [ 3 H]-phenylalanine into skeletal muscle protein from control animals was 39 +/- 4 nmole/gm wet wt/hr or a fractional synthetic rate of 5.2 +/- 0.5%/day. In contrast to control animals, the fractional synthetic rate in septic animals (2.6 +/- 0.2%/day) was reduced by 50% compared to control animals (p less than 0.005). The decreased rate of protein synthesis in sepsis was not due to an energy deficit, as high-energy phosphates and ATP/ADP ratio were not altered. This decrease in protein synthesis occurred even though septic animals consumed as much food as control animals

  14. Human papillomavirus type 16 E7 protein inhibits DNA binding by the retinoblastoma gene product.

    OpenAIRE

    Stirdivant, S M; Huber, H E; Patrick, D R; Defeo-Jones, D; McAvoy, E M; Garsky, V M; Oliff, A; Heimbrook, D C

    1992-01-01

    The human papillomavirus E7 gene can transform murine fibroblasts and cooperate with other viral oncogenes in transforming primary cell cultures. One biochemical property associated with the E7 protein is binding to the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor gene product (pRB). Biochemical properties associated with pRB include binding to viral transforming proteins (E1A, large T, and E7), binding to cellular proteins (E2F and Myc), and binding to DNA. The mechanism by which E7 stimulates cell growt...

  15. Amino acid containing thapsigargin analogues deplete androgen receptor protein via synthesis inhibition and induce the death of prostate cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Griend, Donald J Vander; Antony, Lizamma; Dalrymple, Susan L

    2009-01-01

    There are quantitative and/or qualitative mechanisms allowing androgen receptor (AR) growth signaling in androgen ablation refractory prostate cancer cells. Regardless of the mechanism, agents that deplete AR protein expression prevent such AR growth signaling. Thapsigargin (TG) is a highly cell......-penetrant sequiterpene-lactone that once inside cells inhibits (IC(50), approximately 10 nmol/L) critically important housekeeping SERCA 2b calcium pumps in the endoplasmic reticulum. Using a series of five genetically diverse androgen ablation refractory human prostate cancer lines (LNCaP, LAPC-4, VCaP, MDA-PCa-2b......-specific proteases, such as prostate-specific antigen and prostate-specific membrane antigen, or cancer-specific proteases, such as fibroblast activation protein, so that toxicity of these prodrugs is selectively targeted to metastatic sites of prostate cancer. Based on these results, these prodrugs are undergoing...

  16. Limonene Arrests Parasite Development and Inhibits Isoprenylation of Proteins in Plasmodium falciparum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Ivan Cruz; Wunderlich, Gerhard; Uhrig, Maria L.; Couto, Alicia S.; Peres, Valnice J.; Katzin, Alejandro M.; Kimura, Emília A.

    2001-01-01

    Isoprenylation is an essential protein modification in eukaryotic cells. Herein, we report that in Plasmodium falciparum, a number of proteins were labeled upon incubation of intraerythrocytic forms with either [3H]farnesyl pyrophosphate or [3H]geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate. By thin-layer chromatography, we showed that attached isoprenoids are partially modified to dolichol and other, uncharacterized, residues, confirming active isoprenoid metabolism in this parasite. Incubation of blood-stage P. falciparum treated with the isoprenylation inhibitor limonene significantly decreased the parasites' progression from the ring stage to the trophozoite stage and at 1.22 mM, 50% of the parasites died after the first cycle. Using Ras- and Rap-specific monoclonal antibodies, putative Rap and Ras proteins of P. falciparum were immunoprecipitated. Upon treatment with 0.5 mM limonene, isoprenylation of these proteins was significantly decreased, possibly explaining the observed arrest of parasite development. PMID:11502528

  17. The antibiotic thiostrepton inhibits a functional transition within protein L11 at the ribosomal GTPase centre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porse, B T; Leviev, I; Mankin, A S

    1998-01-01

    the binding affinities of the mutated L11 fusion proteins for rRNA of of thiostrepton for the mutant L11-rRNA complexes at rRNA concentrations lower than those prevailing in vivo. Probing the structure of the fusion protein of wild-type L11, from E. coli, using a recently developed protein footprinting...... or threonine. The mutations do not impair either the assembly of the mutant L11 into 70 S ribosomes in vivo or the binding of thiostrepton to ribosomes in vitro. Moreover, the corresponding mutations at proline 22, in a fusion protein of L11 from Escherichia coli with glutathione-S-transferase, did not reduce...

  18. Structural Bioinformatics and Protein Docking Analysis of the Molecular Chaperone-Kinase Interactions: Towards Allosteric Inhibition of Protein Kinases by Targeting the Hsp90-Cdc37 Chaperone Machinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gennady Verkhivker

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A fundamental role of the Hsp90-Cdc37 chaperone system in mediating maturation of protein kinase clients and supporting kinase functional activity is essential for the integrity and viability of signaling pathways involved in cell cycle control and organism development. Despite significant advances in understanding structure and function of molecular chaperones, the molecular mechanisms and guiding principles of kinase recruitment to the chaperone system are lacking quantitative characterization. Structural and thermodynamic characterization of Hsp90-Cdc37 binding with protein kinase clients by modern experimental techniques is highly challenging, owing to a transient nature of chaperone-mediated interactions. In this work, we used experimentally-guided protein docking to probe the allosteric nature of the Hsp90-Cdc37 binding with the cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (Cdk4 kinase clients. The results of docking simulations suggest that the kinase recognition and recruitment to the chaperone system may be primarily determined by Cdc37 targeting of the N-terminal kinase lobe. The interactions of Hsp90 with the C-terminal kinase lobe may provide additional “molecular brakes” that can lock (or unlock kinase from the system during client loading (release stages. The results of this study support a central role of the Cdc37 chaperone in recognition and recruitment of the kinase clients. Structural analysis may have useful implications in developing strategies for allosteric inhibition of protein kinases by targeting the Hsp90-Cdc37 chaperone machinery.

  19. Inhibition of cellular protein secretion by norwalk virus nonstructural protein p22 requires a mimic of an endoplasmic reticulum export signal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler M Sharp

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Protein trafficking between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER and Golgi apparatus is central to cellular homeostasis. ER export signals are utilized by a subset of proteins to rapidly exit the ER by direct uptake into COPII vesicles for transport to the Golgi. Norwalk virus nonstructural protein p22 contains a YXΦESDG motif that mimics a di-acidic ER export signal in both sequence and function. However, unlike normal ER export signals, the ER export signal mimic of p22 is necessary for apparent inhibition of normal COPII vesicle trafficking, which leads to Golgi disassembly and antagonism of Golgi-dependent cellular protein secretion. This is the first reported function for p22. Disassembly of the Golgi apparatus was also observed in cells replicating Norwalk virus, which may contribute to pathogenesis by interfering with cellular processes that are dependent on an intact secretory pathway. These results indicate that the ER export signal mimic is critical to the antagonistic function of p22, shown herein to be a novel antagonist of ER/Golgi trafficking. This unique and well-conserved human norovirus motif is therefore an appealing target for antiviral drug development.

  20. Antioxidative, DPP-IV and ACE inhibiting peptides from fish protein hydrolysed with intestinal proteases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falkenberg, Susan Skanderup; Stagsted, Jan; Nielsen, Henrik Hauch

    and pancreatin + mucosa hydrolysates. No DH was obtained for tissues hydrolysed with only intestinal mucosa extract. Preliminary results showed antioxidant activity and intestinal DPP-IV and ACE inhibiting activity in 10 kDa fraction from both belly flap and skin hydrolysates but with a higher antioxidative...... of secondary marine products. The approach in this study is to hydrolyse skin and belly flap tissue from Salmon with the use of mammalian digestive proteases from pancreas and intestinal mucosa and test hydrolysates for antioxidative capacity, intestinal DPP-IV and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE......) inhibiting properties. 10kDa dialysis bags containing 10ml water were added to homogenized fish tissues, which were subsequently hydrolysed for 24 hours at 37˚C and pH 8 with intestinal mucosa extract and/or pancreatin solution from pig. Dialysis bags were then removed and content were analyzed for free...

  1. Inhibition of BCR/ABL protein expression by miR-203 sensitizes for imatinib mesylate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yajuan Li

    Full Text Available Selective inhibition of BCR/ABL expression by RNA interference has been demonstrated as an effective strategy in CML treatment and a reversal to imatinib resistance. microRNAs (miRNAs are small regulatory RNAs involved in post-transcriptional gene regulation. miR-203 is supposed to directly regulate ABL and BCR/ABL expression, however, the role of miR-203 in imatinib-resistant cells is not clear. Here, we report that overexpression of miR-203 in BaF3-BCR/ABL cells with T315I mutant inhibited cell growth and colony formation ability. Furthermore, miR-203 increased sensitivity to imatinib in BaF3-BCR/ABL(T315I cells, thereby antagonizing the main mechanism of resistance to imatinib.

  2. Growth Inhibition by Bupivacaine Is Associated with Inactivation of Ribosomal Protein S6 Kinase 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beigh, Mushtaq Ahmad; Showkat, Mehvish; Bashir, Basharat; Bashir, Asma; Hussain, Mahboob ul; Andrabi, Khurshid Iqbal

    2014-01-01

    Bupivacaine is an amide type long acting local anesthetic used for epidural anesthesia and nerve blockade in patients. Use of bupivacaine is associated with severe cytotoxicity and apoptosis along with inhibition of cell growth and proliferation. Although inhibition of Erk, Akt, and AMPK seemingly appears to mediate some of the bupivacaine effects, potential downstream targets that mediate its effect remain unknown. S6 kinase 1 is a common downstream effector of several growth regulatory pathways involved in cell growth and proliferation known to be affected by bupivacaine. We have accordingly attempted to relate the growth inhibitory effects of bupivacaine with the status of S6K1 activity and we present evidence that decrease in cell growth and proliferation by bupivacaine is mediated through inactivation of S6 kinase 1 in a concentration and time dependent manner. We also show that ectopic expression of constitutively active S6 kinase 1 imparts substantial protection from bupivacaine induced cytotoxicity. Inactivation of S6K1 though associated with loss of putative mTOR mediated phosphorylation did not correspond with loss of similar phosphorylations in 4EBP1 indicating that S6K1 inhibition was not mediated through inactivation of mTORC1 signaling pathway or its down regulation. PMID:24605337

  3. The structure of F₁-ATPase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae inhibited by its regulatory protein IF₁.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Graham C; Bason, John V; Montgomery, Martin G; Fearnley, Ian M; Mueller, David M; Leslie, Andrew G W; Walker, John E

    2013-02-13

    The structure of F₁-ATPase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae inhibited by the yeast IF₁ has been determined at 2.5 Å resolution. The inhibitory region of IF₁ from residues 1 to 36 is entrapped between the C-terminal domains of the α(DP)- and β(DP)-subunits in one of the three catalytic interfaces of the enzyme. Although the structure of the inhibited complex is similar to that of the bovine-inhibited complex, there are significant differences between the structures of the inhibitors and their detailed interactions with F₁-ATPase. However, the most significant difference is in the nucleotide occupancy of the catalytic β(E)-subunits. The nucleotide binding site in β(E)-subunit in the yeast complex contains an ADP molecule without an accompanying magnesium ion, whereas it is unoccupied in the bovine complex. Thus, the structure provides further evidence of sequential product release, with the phosphate and the magnesium ion released before the ADP molecule.

  4. The structure of F1-ATPase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae inhibited by its regulatory protein IF1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Graham C.; Bason, John V.; Montgomery, Martin G.; Fearnley, Ian M.; Mueller, David M.; Leslie, Andrew G. W.; Walker, John E.

    2013-01-01

    The structure of F1-ATPase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae inhibited by the yeast IF1 has been determined at 2.5 Å resolution. The inhibitory region of IF1 from residues 1 to 36 is entrapped between the C-terminal domains of the αDP- and βDP-subunits in one of the three catalytic interfaces of the enzyme. Although the structure of the inhibited complex is similar to that of the bovine-inhibited complex, there are significant differences between the structures of the inhibitors and their detailed interactions with F1-ATPase. However, the most significant difference is in the nucleotide occupancy of the catalytic βE-subunits. The nucleotide binding site in βE-subunit in the yeast complex contains an ADP molecule without an accompanying magnesium ion, whereas it is unoccupied in the bovine complex. Thus, the structure provides further evidence of sequential product release, with the phosphate and the magnesium ion released before the ADP molecule. PMID:23407639

  5. A comprehensive protein-protein interactome for yeast PAS kinase 1 reveals direct inhibition of respiration through the phosphorylation of Cbf1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMille, Desiree; Bikman, Benjamin T; Mathis, Andrew D; Prince, John T; Mackay, Jordan T; Sowa, Steven W; Hall, Tacie D; Grose, Julianne H

    2014-07-15

    Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) kinase is a sensory protein kinase required for glucose homeostasis in yeast, mice, and humans, yet little is known about the molecular mechanisms of its function. Using both yeast two-hybrid and copurification approaches, we identified the protein-protein interactome for yeast PAS kinase 1 (Psk1), revealing 93 novel putative protein binding partners. Several of the Psk1 binding partners expand the role of PAS kinase in glucose homeostasis, including new pathways involved in mitochondrial metabolism. In addition, the interactome suggests novel roles for PAS kinase in cell growth (gene/protein expression, replication/cell division, and protein modification and degradation), vacuole function, and stress tolerance. In vitro kinase studies using a subset of 25 of these binding partners identified Mot3, Zds1, Utr1, and Cbf1 as substrates. Further evidence is provided for the in vivo phosphorylation of Cbf1 at T211/T212 and for the subsequent inhibition of respiration. This respiratory role of PAS kinase is consistent with the reported hypermetabolism of PAS kinase-deficient mice, identifying a possible molecular mechanism and solidifying the evolutionary importance of PAS kinase in the regulation of glucose homeostasis. © 2014 DeMille et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  6. Inhibition of HMC-1 mast cell proliferation by vitamin E: involvement of the protein kinase B pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempná, Petra; Reiter, Elke; Arock, Michel; Azzi, Angelo; Zingg, Jean-Marc

    2004-12-03

    The effects of four natural tocopherols on the proliferation and signaling pathways were examined in the human mastocytoma cell line (HMC-1). The four tocopherols inhibited HMC-1 cell proliferation with different potency (delta > alpha = gamma > beta). Growth inhibition correlated with the reduction of PKB (protein kinase B) phosphorylation by the different tocopherols. The reduction of PKB phosphorylation led to a decrease of its activity, as judged from a parallel reduction of GSKalpha/beta phosphorylation. The translocation of PKB to the membrane, as a response to receptor stimulation by NGFbeta, is also prevented by treatment with tocopherols. In the presence of PKC or PP2A inhibitors, the reduction of PKB phosphorylation by tocopherols was still observed, thus excluding the direct involvement of these enzymes. Other pathways, such as the Ras-stimulated ERK1/2 (extracellular signal responsive kinase) pathway, were not affected by tocopherol treatment. The tocopherols did not significantly change oxidative stress in HMC-1 cells, suggesting that the observed effects are not the result of a general reduction of oxidative stress. Thus, the tocopherols interfere with PKB phosphorylation and reduce proliferation of HMC-1 cells, possibly by modulating either phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, a kinase phosphorylating PKB (PDK1/2), or a phosphatase that dephosphorylates it. Inhibition of proliferation and PKB signaling in HMC-1 cells by vitamin E suggests a role in preventing diseases with mast cell involvement, such as allergies, atherosclerosis, and tumorigenesis.

  7. Splice variants of the forkhead box protein AFX exhibit dominant negative activity and inhibit AFXalpha-mediated tumor cell apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Jig Lee

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Loss-of-function in the apoptosis-inducing genes is known to facilitate tumorigenesis. AFX (FOXO4, a member of forkhead transcription factors functions as a tumor suppressor and has 2 isoforms, AFXalpha (505 a.a. and AFXzeta (450 a.a.. In human cancer cells, we identified an N-terminally deleted form of AFXalpha (alpha198-505, translated from a downstream start and 2 short N-terminal AFX proteins (90, and 101 a.a. produced by aberrant splicing.We investigated the expression and role of these AFX variants. Cell transduction study revealed that short N-terminal AFX proteins were not stable. Though alpha(198-505 protein expression was detected in the cytoplasm and nucleus, alpha(198-505 expressing cells did not show a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling mediated by PI3 kinase signaling. Whereas, we observed this shuttling in cells expressing either AFXalpha or AFXzeta protein. AFXzeta and alpha(198-505 lost the ability to transactivate BCL6 or suppress cyclin D2 gene expression. These variants did not induce cancer cell death whereas AFXalpha resulted in apoptosis. We found that AFXzeta and alpha(198-505 suppress the AFXalpha stimulation of BCL6 promoter in a dose dependent manner, indicating dominant negative activity. These variants also inhibited AFXalpha induction of apoptosis.Loss of function by aberrant splicing and the dominant negative activity of AFX variants may provide a mechanism for enhanced survival of neoplastic cells.

  8. The actin cytoskeleton inhibits pore expansion during PIV5 fusion protein-promoted cell-cell fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wurth, Mark A.; Schowalter, Rachel M.; Smith, Everett Clinton; Moncman, Carole L.; Ellis Dutch, Rebecca; McCann, Richard O.

    2010-01-01

    Paramyxovirus fusion (F) proteins promote both virus-cell fusion, required for viral entry, and cell-cell fusion, resulting in syncytia formation. We used the F-actin stabilizing drug, jasplakinolide, and the G-actin sequestrant, latrunculin A, to examine the role of actin dynamics in cell-cell fusion mediated by the parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) F protein. Jasplakinolide treatment caused a dose-dependent increase in cell-cell fusion as measured by both syncytia and reporter gene assays, and latrunculin A treatment also resulted in fusion stimulation. Treatment with jasplakinolide or latrunculin A partially rescued a fusion pore opening defect caused by deletion of the PIV5 F protein cytoplasmic tail, but these drugs had no effect on fusion inhibited at earlier stages by either temperature arrest or by a PIV5 heptad repeat peptide. These data suggest that the cortical actin cytoskeleton is an important regulator of fusion pore enlargement, an energetically costly stage of viral fusion protein-mediated membrane merger.

  9. Ice Recrystallization in a Solution of a Cryoprotector and Its Inhibition by a Protein: Synchrotron X-Ray Diffraction Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharov, Boris; Fisyuk, Alexander; Fitch, Andy; Watier, Yves; Kostyuchenko, Anastasia; Varshney, Dushyant; Sztucki, Michael; Boldyreva, Elena; Shalaev, Evgenyi

    2016-07-01

    Ice formation and recrystallization is a key phenomenon in freezing and freeze-drying of pharmaceuticals and biopharmaceuticals. In this investigation, high-resolution synchrotron X-ray diffraction is used to quantify the extent of disorder of ice crystals in binary aqueous solutions of a cryoprotectant (sorbitol) and a protein, bovine serum albumin. Ice crystals in more dilute (10 wt%) solutions have lower level of microstrain and larger crystal domain size than these in more concentrated (40 wt%) solutions. Warming the sorbitol-water mixtures from 100 to 228 K resulted in partial ice melting, with simultaneous reduction in the microstrain and increase in crystallite size, that is, recrystallization. In contrast to sorbitol solutions, ice crystals in the BSA solutions preserved both the microstrain and smaller crystallite size on partial melting, demonstrating that BSA inhibits ice recrystallization. The results are consistent with BSA partitioning into quasi-liquid layer on ice crystals but not with a direct protein-ice interaction and protein sorption on ice surface. The study shows for the first time that a common (i.e., not-antifreeze) protein can have a major impact on ice recrystallization and also presents synchrotron X-ray diffraction as a unique tool for quantification of crystallinity and disorder in frozen aqueous systems. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Bone Morphogenetic Protein-7 Ameliorates Cerebral Ischemia and Reperfusion Injury via Inhibiting Oxidative Stress and Neuronal Apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haitao Pei

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have indicated that bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP-7 is neuroprotective against cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (IR injury. The present study was undertaken to determine the molecular mechanisms involved in this effect. Adult male Wistar rats were subjected to 2 h of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO, followed by 24 h of reperfusion. BMP-7 (10−4 g/kg or vehicle was infused into rats at the onset of reperfusion via the tail vein. Neurological deficits, infarct volume, histopathological changes, oxidative stress-related biochemical parameters, neuronal apoptosis, and apoptosis-related proteins were assessed. BMP-7 significantly improved neurological and histological deficits, reduced the infarct volume, and decreased apoptotic cells after cerebral ischemia. BMP-7 also markedly enhanced the activities of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX, and reduced the level of malondialdehyde (MDA in IR rats. In addition, Western blot analysis indicated that BMP-7 prevented cytochrome c release, inhibited activation of caspase-3, caspase-9 and caspase-8. Our data suggested that BMP-7 has protective effects against cerebral IR injury in rats, and the neuroprotective effects may be attributed to attenuating oxidative stress and inhibiting neuronal apoptosis.

  11. 6-Hydroxydopamine Inhibits the Hepatitis C Virus through Alkylation of Host and Viral Proteins and the Induction of Oxidative Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafreniere, Matthew A; Powdrill, Megan H; Singaravelu, Ragunath; Pezacki, John Paul

    2016-11-11

    Many viruses, including the hepatitis C virus (HCV), are dependent on the host RNA silencing pathway for replication. In this study, we screened small molecule probes, previously reported to disrupt loading of the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC), including 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), suramin (SUR), and aurintricarboxylic acid (ATA), to examine their effects on viral replication. We found that 6-OHDA inhibited HCV replication; however, 6-OHDA was a less potent inhibitor of RISC than either SUR or ATA. By generating a novel chemical probe (6-OHDA-yne), we determined that 6-OHDA covalently modifies host and virus proteins. Moreover, 6-OHDA was shown to be an alkylating agent that is capable of generating adducts with a number of enzymes involved in the oxidative stress response. Furthermore, modification of viral enzymes with 6-OHDA and 6-OHDA-yne was found to inhibit their enzymatic activity. Our findings suggest that 6-OHDA is a probe for oxidative stress as well as protein alkylation, and these properties together contribute to the antiviral effects of this compound.

  12. A cytosolic protein factor from the naked mole-rat activates proteasomes of other species and protects these from inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Karl A.; Osmulski, Pawel A.; Pierce, Anson; Weintraub, Susan T.; Gaczynska, Maria; Buffenstein, Rochelle

    2015-01-01

    The naked mole-rat maintains robust proteostasis and high levels of proteasome-mediated proteolysis for most of its exceptional (~31y) life span. Here, we report that the highly active proteasome from the naked mole-rat liver resists attenuation by a diverse suite of proteasome-specific small molecule inhibitors. Moreover, mouse, human, and yeast proteasomes exposed to the proteasome-depleted, naked mole-rat cytosolic fractions, recapitulate the observed inhibition resistance, and mammalian proteasomes also show increased activity. Gel filtration coupled with mass spectrometry and atomic force microscopy indicates that these traits are supported by a protein factor that resides in the cytosol. This factor interacts with the proteasome and modulates its activity. Although HSP72 and HSP40 (Hdj1) are among the constituents of this factor, the observed phenomenon, such as increasing peptidase activity and protecting against inhibition cannot be reconciled with any known chaperone functions. This novel function may contribute to the exceptional protein homeostasis in the naked mole-rat and allow it to successfully defy aging. PMID:25018089

  13. Silkworm Apolipophorin Protein Inhibits Hemolysin Gene Expression of Staphylococcus aureus via Binding to Cell Surface Lipoteichoic Acids*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omae, Yosuke; Hanada, Yuichi; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa; Kaito, Chikara

    2013-01-01

    We previously reported that a silkworm hemolymph protein, apolipophorin (ApoLp), binds to the cell surface of Staphylococcus aureus and inhibits expression of the saePQRS operon encoding a two-component system, SaeRS, and hemolysin genes. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory mechanism of ApoLp on S. aureus hemolysin gene expression. ApoLp bound to lipoteichoic acids (LTA), an S. aureus cell surface component. The addition of purified LTA to liquid medium abolished the inhibitory effect of ApoLp against S. aureus hemolysin production. In an S. aureus knockdown mutant of ltaS encoding LTA synthetase, the inhibitory effects of ApoLp on saeQ expression and hemolysin production were attenuated. Furthermore, the addition of anti-LTA monoclonal antibody to liquid medium decreased the expression of S. aureus saeQ and hemolysin genes. In S. aureus strains expressing SaeS mutant proteins with a shortened extracellular domain, ApoLp did not decrease saeQ expression. These findings suggest that ApoLp binds to LTA on the S. aureus cell surface and inhibits S. aureus hemolysin gene expression via a two-component regulatory system, SaeRS. PMID:23873929

  14. Silkworm apolipophorin protein inhibits hemolysin gene expression of Staphylococcus aureus via binding to cell surface lipoteichoic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omae, Yosuke; Hanada, Yuichi; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa; Kaito, Chikara

    2013-08-30

    We previously reported that a silkworm hemolymph protein, apolipophorin (ApoLp), binds to the cell surface of Staphylococcus aureus and inhibits expression of the saePQRS operon encoding a two-component system, SaeRS, and hemolysin genes. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory mechanism of ApoLp on S. aureus hemolysin gene expression. ApoLp bound to lipoteichoic acids (LTA), an S. aureus cell surface component. The addition of purified LTA to liquid medium abolished the inhibitory effect of ApoLp against S. aureus hemolysin production. In an S. aureus knockdown mutant of ltaS encoding LTA synthetase, the inhibitory effects of ApoLp on saeQ expression and hemolysin production were attenuated. Furthermore, the addition of anti-LTA monoclonal antibody to liquid medium decreased the expression of S. aureus saeQ and hemolysin genes. In S. aureus strains expressing SaeS mutant proteins with a shortened extracellular domain, ApoLp did not decrease saeQ expression. These findings suggest that ApoLp binds to LTA on the S. aureus cell surface and inhibits S. aureus hemolysin gene expression via a two-component regulatory system, SaeRS.

  15. Cissampelos sympodialis has anti-viral effect inhibiting dengue non-structural viral protein-1 and pro-inflammatory mediators

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    Fagner Carvalho Leite

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Dengue is the most important viral infection transmitted among humans by arthropod-borne. There are currently no vaccines or specific therapeutical treatment. Therefore, immunomodulatory compounds from plants have been widely examined for their antiviral effects. Cissampelos sympodialis Eichler, Menispermaceae, has scientifically proven to present immunomodulatory activities. Here we assessed the antiviral activity of leaf hydroalcoholic extract, warifteine or methylwarifteine from C. sympodialis in an in vitro dengue virus infection model. The results demonstrated that leaf hydroalcoholic extract or warifteine/methylwarifteine treatment did not reduce dengue virus-Ag+ hepatocyte (Huh-7 cell rates in present experimental conditions. However, we assessed the potential antiviral effect of leaf hydroalcoholic extract or warifteine/methylwarifteine on dengue virus-infection by the production of inflammatory molecules, TNF-α, MIF, IL-8 and PGE2. Dengue virus infection enhanced TNF-α, MIF, IL-8 and PGE2 production in infected Huh-7 cells and leaf hydroalcoholic extract but not warifteine/methylwarifteine treatments, significantly reduced these molecules in infected cells. In dengue virus-infected Huh-7 cells, non-structural protein-1 is produced and leaf hydroalcoholic extract significantly inhibited it independently of alkaloids. Our findings imply that leaf hydroalcoholic extract may attenuate dengue virus infection in Huh-7 cells by inhibiting the enhanced of pro-inflammatory mediators and non-structural protein-1 production induce by dengue virus independently of warifteine/methywarifteine its major compound.

  16. Protein Arginine Methyltransferase 5 Inhibition Upregulates Foxp3+ Regulatory T Cells Frequency and Function during the Ulcerative Colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingxia Zheng

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Ulcerative colitis (UC pathogenesis is related to imbalance of immune responses, and the equilibrium between inflammatory T cells and Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs plays an important role in the intestinal homeostasis. Protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs regulate chromatin remodeling and gene expression. Here, we investigated whether inhibition of PRMTs affects colitis pathogenesis in mice and inflammatory bowel disease patients and further explored the underlying mechanisms. In this study, we found that protein arginine N-methyltransferase inhibitor 1 (AMI-1 treatments increased Tregs frequency, function, and reduced colitis incidence. Adoptive transfer of AMI-1-treated Tregs could reduce the colitis incidence. Colitis was associated with increased local PRMT5 expression, which was inhibited by AMI-1 treatment. Additionally, PRMT5 knockdown T cells produced a better response to TGFβ and promoted Tregs differentiation through decreased DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1 expression. PRMT5 also enhanced H3K27me3 and DNMT1 binding to Foxp3 promoter, which restricted Tregs differentiation. Furthermore, PRMT5 knockdown led to decreased Foxp3 promoter methylation during Tregs induction. PRMT5 expression had a negative relationship with Tregs in UC patients, knockdown of PRMT5 expression increased Tregs frequency and decreased TNFα, IL-6, and IL-13 levels. Our study outlines a novel regulation of PRMT5 on Tregs development and function. Strategies to decrease PRMT5 expression might have therapeutic potential to control UC.

  17. Inhibition of tumor metastasis by a growth factor receptor bound protein 2 Src homology 2 domain-binding antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giubellino, Alessio; Gao, Yang; Lee, Sunmin; Lee, Min-Jung; Vasselli, James R; Medepalli, Sampath; Trepel, Jane B; Burke, Terrence R; Bottaro, Donald P

    2007-07-01

    Metastasis, the primary cause of death in most forms of cancer, is a multistep process whereby cells from the primary tumor spread systemically and colonize distant new sites. Blocking critical steps in this process could potentially inhibit tumor metastasis and dramatically improve cancer survival rates; however, our understanding of metastasis at the molecular level is still rudimentary. Growth factor receptor binding protein 2 (Grb2) is a widely expressed adapter protein with roles in epithelial cell growth and morphogenesis, as well as angiogenesis, making it a logical target for anticancer drug development. We have previously shown that a potent antagonist of Grb2 Src homology-2 domain-binding, C90, blocks growth factor-driven cell motility in vitro and angiogenesis in vivo. We now report that C90 inhibits metastasis in vivo in two aggressive tumor models, without affecting primary tumor growth rate. These results support the potential efficacy of this compound in reducing the metastatic spread of primary solid tumors and establish a critical role for Grb2 Src homology-2 domain-mediated interactions in this process.

  18. Inhibition of NF-κB activity by the porcine epidemic diarrhea virus nonstructural protein 1 for innate immune evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qingzhan; Ma, Jinyou; Yoo, Dongwan

    2017-10-01

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus emerged in the US is known to suppress the type I interferons response during infection. In the present study using porcine epithelial cells, we showed that PEDV inhibited both NF-κB and proinflammatory cytokines. PEDV blocked the p65 activation in infected cells and suppressed the PRD II-mediated NF-κB activity. Of the total of 22 viral proteins, nine proteins were identified as NF-κB antagonists, and nsp1 was the most potent suppressor of proinflammatory cytokines. Nsp1 interfered the phosphorylation and degradation of IκBα, and thus blocked the p65 activation. Mutational studies demonstrated the essential requirements of the conserved residues of nsp1 for NF-κB suppression. Our study showed that PEDV inhibited NF-κB activity and nsp1 was a potent NF-κB antagonist for suppression of both IFN and early production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Human cytomegalovirus tegument protein pUL83 inhibits IFI16-mediated DNA sensing for immune evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tuo; Chen, Jin; Cristea, Ileana M

    2013-11-13

    Nuclear sensing of viral DNA has emerged as an essential step in innate immune responses against herpesviruses. Here, we provide mechanistic insight into host recognition of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) and subsequent immune evasion by this prominent DNA virus. We establish that the interferon-inducible protein IFI16 acts as a nuclear DNA sensor following HCMV infection, binding viral DNA and triggering expression of antiviral cytokines via the STING-TBK1-IRF3 signaling pathway. The HCMV tegument protein pUL83 inhibits this response by interacting with the IFI16 pyrin domain, blocking its oligomerization upon DNA sensing and subsequent immune signals. pUL83 disrupts IFI16 by concerted action of its N- and C-terminal domains, in which an evolutionarily conserved N-terminal pyrin association domain (PAD) binds IFI16. Additionally, phosphorylation of the N-terminal domain modulates pUL83-mediated inhibition of pyrin aggregation. Collectively, our data elucidate the interplay between host DNA sensing and HCMV immune evasion, providing targets for restoring antiviral immunity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Inhibition of H9N2 virus invasion into dendritic cells by the S-layer protein from L. acidophilus ATCC 4356

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Gao

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Probiotics are essential for the prevention of virus invasion and the maintenance of the immune balance. However, the mechanism of competition between probiotics and virus are unknown. The objectives of this study were to isolate the surface layer (S-layer protein from L. acidophilus ATCC 4356 as a new antiviral material, to evaluate the stimulatory effects of the S-layer protein on mouse dendritic cells (DCs and to verify its ability to inhibit the invasion of H9N2 avian influenza virus (AIV in DCs. We found that the S-layer protein induced DCs activation and up-regulated the IL-10 secretion. The invasion and replication of the H9N2 virus in mouse DCs was successfully demonstrated. However, the invasion of H9N2 virus into DCs could be inhibited by treatment with the S-layer protein prior to infection, which was verified by the reduced hemagglutinin (HA and neuraminidase (NA mRNA expression, and nucleoprotein (NP protein expression in the DCs. Furthermore, treatment with the S-layer protein increases the Mx1, Isg15, and Ddx58 mRNA expressions, and remits the inflammatory process to inhibit H9N2 AIV infection. In conclusion, the S-layer protein stimulates the activation of mouse DCs, inhibits H9N2 virus invasion of DCs, and stimulates the IFN-I signalling pathway. Thus, the S-layer protein from Lactobacillus is a promising biological antiviral material for AIV prevention.

  1. Thermodynamic Stabilization of the Folded Domain of Prion Protein Inhibits Prion Infection in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingzhong Kong

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Prion diseases, or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs, are associated with the conformational conversion of the cellular prion protein, PrPC, into a protease-resistant form, PrPSc. Here, we show that mutation-induced thermodynamic stabilization of the folded, α-helical domain of PrPC has a dramatic inhibitory effect on the conformational conversion of prion protein in vitro, as well as on the propagation of TSE disease in vivo. Transgenic mice expressing a human prion protein variant with increased thermodynamic stability were found to be much more resistant to infection with the TSE agent than those expressing wild-type human prion protein, in both the primary passage and three subsequent subpassages. These findings not only provide a line of evidence in support of the protein-only model of TSEs but also yield insight into the molecular nature of the PrPC→PrPSc conformational transition, and they suggest an approach to the treatment of prion diseases.

  2. Inhibition of enterovirus 71 (EV-71 infections by a novel antiviral peptide derived from EV-71 capsid protein VP1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chee Wah Tan

    Full Text Available Enterovirus 71 (EV-71 is the main causative agent of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD. In recent years, EV-71 infections were reported to cause high fatalities and severe neurological complications in Asia. Currently, no effective antiviral or vaccine is available to treat or prevent EV-71 infection. In this study, we have discovered a synthetic peptide which could be developed as a potential antiviral for inhibition of EV-71. Ninety five synthetic peptides (15-mers overlapping the entire EV-71 capsid protein, VP1, were chemically synthesized and tested for antiviral properties against EV-71 in human Rhabdomyosarcoma (RD cells. One peptide, SP40, was found to significantly reduce cytopathic effects of all representative EV-71 strains from genotypes A, B and C tested, with IC(50 values ranging from 6-9.3 µM in RD cells. The in vitro inhibitory effect of SP40 exhibited a dose dependent concentration corresponding to a decrease in infectious viral particles, total viral RNA and the levels of VP1 protein. The antiviral activity of SP40 peptide was not restricted to a specific cell line as inhibition of EV-71 was observed in RD, HeLa, HT-29 and Vero cells. Besides inhibition of EV-71, it also had antiviral activities against CV-A16 and poliovirus type 1 in cell culture. Mechanism of action studies suggested that the SP40 peptide was not virucidal but was able to block viral attachment to the RD cells. Substitutions of arginine and lysine residues with alanine in the SP40 peptide at positions R3A, R4A, K5A and R13A were found to significantly decrease antiviral activities, implying the importance of positively charged amino acids for the antiviral activities. The data demonstrated the potential and feasibility of SP40 as a broad spectrum antiviral agent against EV-71.

  3. Receptor-like protein-tyrosine phosphatase alpha specifically inhibits insulin-increased prolactin gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacob, K K; Sap, J; Stanley, F M

    1998-01-01

    A physiologically relevant response to insulin, stimulation of prolactin promoter activity in GH4 pituitary cells, was used as an assay to study the specificity of protein-tyrosine phosphatase function. Receptor-like protein-tyrosine phosphatase alpha (RPTPalpha) blocks the effect of insulin...... to increase prolactin gene expression but potentiates the effects of epidermal growth factor and cAMP on prolactin promoter activity. RPTPalpha was the only protein-tyrosine phosphatase tested that did this. Thus, the effect of RPTPalpha on prolactin-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) promoter activity...... is specific by two criteria. A number of potential RPTPalpha targets were ruled out by finding (a) that they are not affected or (b) that they are not on the pathway to insulin-increased prolactin-CAT activity. The negative effect of RPTPalpha on insulin activation of the prolactin promoter is not due...

  4. Sublethal doses of neonicotinoid imidacloprid can interact with honey bee chemosensory protein 1 (CSP1) and inhibit its function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongliang; Tan, Jing; Song, Xinmi; Wu, Fan; Tang, Mingzhu; Hua, Qiyun; Zheng, Huoqing; Hu, Fuliang

    2017-04-29

    As a frequently used neonicotinoid insecticide, imidacloprid can impair the chemoreceptive behavior of honey bees even at sublethal doses, while the physiochemical mechanism has not been further revealed. Here, multiple fluorescence spectra, thermodynamic method, and molecular docking were used to study the interaction and the functional inhibition of imidacloprid to the recombinant CSP1 protein in Asian honey bee, Apis cerana. The results showed that the fluorescence intensity (λ em  = 332 nm) of CSP1 could be significantly quenched by imidacloprid in a dynamic mode. During the quenching process, ΔH > 0, ΔS > 0, indicating that the acting forces of imidacloprid with CSP1 are mainly hydrophobic interactions. Synchronous fluorescence showed that the fluorescence of CSP1 was mainly derived from tryptophan, and the hydrophobicity of tryptophan decreased with the increase of imidacloprid concentration. Molecular docking predicted the optimal pose and the amino acid composition of the binding process. Circular dichroism (CD) spectra showed that imidacloprid reduced the α-helix of CSP1 and caused the extension of the CSP1 peptide chain. In addition, the binding of CSP1 to floral scent β-ionone was inhibited by nearly 50% of the apparent association constant (K A ) in the presence of 0.28-2.53 ng/bee of imidacloprid, and the inhibition rate of nearly 95% at 3.75 ng/bee of imidacloprid at sublethal dose level. This study initially revealed the molecular physiochemical mechanism that sublethal doses of neonicotinoid still interact and inhibit the physiological function of the honey bees' chemoreceptive system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Antitumor effects of the antiparasitic agent ivermectin via inhibition of Yes-associated protein 1 expression in gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambara, Sho; Masuda, Takaaki; Nishio, Miki; Kuramitsu, Shotaro; Tobo, Taro; Ogawa, Yushi; Hu, Qingjiang; Iguchi, Tomohiro; Kuroda, Yousuke; Ito, Shuhei; Eguchi, Hidetoshi; Sugimachi, Keishi; Saeki, Hiroshi; Oki, Eiji; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Suzuki, Akira; Mimori, Koshi

    2017-12-08

    Yes-associated protein 1 (YAP1) acts as an oncogene through dephosphorylation and nuclear translocation, and nuclear accumulation of YAP1 is associated with poor prognosis in gastric cancer (GC). We previously identified ivermectin, an antiparasitic drug, as a YAP1 inhibitor. Here, we aimed to clarify whether ivermectin had antitumor effects on GC through inhibition of YAP1. First, we evaluated the antiproliferative effects of ivermectin on human GC cells using in vitro proliferation assays and a xenograft mouse model. YAP1-knockdown assays were performed to assess whether the sensitivity to ivermectin depended on YAP1 expression. Next, we explored the mechanism through which ivermectin regulated YAP1 expression or localization by immunoblotting and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction for YAP1 and the downstream gene CTGF . Finally, the clinical significance of YAP1 expression was examined using three independent GC datasets. We found that MKN1 GC cells were most sensitive to ivermectin, whereas MKN7 cells were most resistant. In MKN1 xenografts, ivermectin suppressed tumor growth, and the sensitivity of MKN1 cells to ivermectin was decreased by YAP1 knockdown. Ivermectin inhibited YAP1 nuclear expression and CTGF expression in MKN1 cells but not MKN7 cells. Moreover, ivermectin decreased YAP1 mRNA expression, thereby inhibiting nuclear accumulation of YAP1 in MKN1 cells. In survival analysis, low YAP1 mRNA expression was associated with a better prognosis in three independent GC datasets. In conclusion, we identified ivermectin as a potential antitumor agent and found a promising novel therapeutic strategy for inhibition of GC progression by blocking YAP1 expression.

  6. The human multidrug resistance protein MRP4 functions as a prostaglandin efflux transporter and is inhibited by nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Glen; Wielinga, Peter; Zelcer, Noam; van der Heijden, Ingrid; Kuil, Annemieke; de Haas, Marcel; Wijnholds, Jan; Borst, Piet

    2003-01-01

    Prostaglandins are involved in a wide variety of physiological and pathophysiological processes, but the mechanism of prostaglandin release from cells is not completely understood. Although poorly membrane permeable, prostaglandins are believed to exit cells by passive diffusion. We have investigated the interaction between prostaglandins and members of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter ABCC [multidrug resistance protein (MRP)] family of membrane export pumps. In inside-out membrane vesicles derived from insect cells or HEK293 cells, MRP4 catalyzed the time- and ATP-dependent uptake of prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) and PGE2. In contrast, MRP1, MRP2, MRP3, and MRP5 did not transport PGE1 or PGE2. The MRP4-mediated transport of PGE1 and PGE2 displayed saturation kinetics, with Km values of 2.1 and 3.4 μM, respectively. Further studies showed that PGF1α, PGF2α, PGA1, and thromboxane B2 were high-affinity inhibitors (and therefore presumably substrates) of MRP4. Furthermore, several nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs were potent inhibitors of MRP4 at concentrations that did not inhibit MRP1. In cells expressing the prostaglandin transporter PGT, the steady-state accumulation of PGE1 and PGE2 was reduced proportional to MRP4 expression. Inhibition of MRP4 by an MRP4-specific RNA interference construct or by indomethacin reversed this accumulation deficit. Together, these data suggest that MRP4 can release prostaglandins from cells, and that, in addition to inhibiting prostaglandin synthesis, some nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs might also act by inhibiting this release. PMID:12835412

  7. Over-expression of mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein inhibits coxsackievirus B3 infection by enhancing type-I interferons production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Qing-Meng

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies have revealed that Mitochondrial Antiviral Signaling (MAVS protein plays an essential role in the inhibition of viral infection through type I interferon (IFN pathway. It has been shown that 3C (pro cysteine protease of coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3 cleaves MAVS to inhibit type I IFNs induction. Other workers also found that MAVS knock-out mice suffered CVB3 susceptibility and severe histopathological change. Accordingly,our experiments were designed to explore the protection of over-expressing MAVS against CVB3 infection and the possible mechanism. Results In this study, HeLa cells (transfected with MAVS constructs pre- or post- exposure to CVB3 were used to analyze the function of exogenous MAVS on CVB3 infection. The results revealed that though CVB3 infection induced production of type I IFNs, viral replication and cell death were not effectively inhibited. Similarly, exogenous MAVS increased type I IFNs moderately. Morever, we observed robust production of type I IFNs in CVB3 post-infected HeLa cells thereby successfully inhibiting CVB3 infection, as well formation of cytopathic effect (CPE and cell death. Finally, introduction of exogenous MAVS into CVB3 pre-infected cells also restricted viral infection efficiently by greatly up-regulating IFNs. Conclusions In summary, exogenous MAVS effectively prevents and controls CVB3 infection by modulating and promoting the production of type I IFNs. The IFNs level in MAVS over-expressing cells is still tightly regulated by CVB3 infection. Thus, the factors that up-regulate MAVS might be an alternative prescription in CVB3-related syndromes by enhancing IFNs production.

  8. Allosteric inhibition of a stem cell RNA-binding protein by an intermediary metabolite

    OpenAIRE

    Clingman, Carina C; Deveau, Laura M; Hay, Samantha A; Genga, Ryan M; Shandilya, Shivender MD; Massi, Francesca; Ryder, Sean P

    2014-01-01

    eLife digest When an embryo is developing, stem cells must divide and develop into many specialized types of cells. However, if cell division doesn't stop, or if it restarts later in life, it can cause tumors to form. Musashi-1 is a protein that binds to molecules of RNA and helps to promote cell growth during development: mice that lack this protein have serious brain defects and die shortly after birth. Musashi-1 is usually turned off in adult cells that are not dividing. Sometimes, however...

  9. Natural Products at Work: Structural Insights into Inhibition of the Bacterial Membrane Protein MraY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppermann, Stefan; Ducho, Christian

    2016-09-19

    Natural(ly) fit: The X-ray crystal structure of the bacterial membrane protein MraY in complex with its natural product inhibitor muraymycin D2 is discussed. MraY catalyzes one of the membrane-associated steps in peptidoglycan biosynthesis and, therefore, represents a promising target for novel antibiotics. Structural insights derived from the protein-inhibitor complex might now pave the way for the development of new antimicrobial drugs. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Kaempferol induces DNA damage and inhibits DNA repair associated protein expressions in human promyelocytic leukemia HL-60 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lung-Yuan; Lu, Hsu-Feng; Chou, Yu-Cheng; Shih, Yung-Luen; Bau, Da-Tian; Chen, Jaw-Chyun; Hsu, Shu-Chun; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-01-01

    Numerous evidences have shown that plant flavonoids (naturally occurring substances) have been reported to have chemopreventive activities and protect against experimental carcinogenesis. Kaempferol, one of the flavonoids, is widely distributed in fruits and vegetables, and may have cancer chemopreventive properties. However, the precise underlying mechanism regarding induced DNA damage and suppressed DNA repair system are poorly understood. In this study, we investigated whether kaempferol induced DNA damage and affected DNA repair associated protein expression in human leukemia HL-60 cells in vitro. Percentages of viable cells were measured via a flow cytometry assay. DNA damage was examined by Comet assay and DAPI staining. DNA fragmentation (ladder) was examined by DNA gel electrophoresis. The changes of protein levels associated with DNA repair were examined by Western blotting. Results showed that kaempferol dose-dependently decreased the viable cells. Comet assay indicated that kaempferol induced DNA damage (Comet tail) in a dose-dependent manner and DAPI staining also showed increased doses of kaempferol which led to increased DNA condensation, these effects are all of dose-dependent manners. Western blotting indicated that kaempferol-decreased protein expression associated with DNA repair system, such as phosphate-ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (p-ATM), phosphate-ataxia-telangiectasia and Rad3-related (p-ATR), 14-3-3 proteins sigma (14-3-3σ), DNA-dependent serine/threonine protein kinase (DNA-PK), O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), p53 and MDC1 protein expressions, but increased the protein expression of p-p53 and p-H2AX. Protein translocation was examined by confocal laser microscopy, and we found that kaempferol increased the levels of p-H2AX and p-p53 in HL-60 cells. Taken together, in the present study, we found that kaempferol induced DNA damage and suppressed DNA repair and inhibited DNA repair associated protein expression in HL-60

  11. How anacetrapib inhibits the activity of the cholesteryl ester transfer protein? Perspective through atomistic simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aijanen, T.; Koivuniemi, A.; Javanainen, M.

    2014-01-01

    simulations to shed light on the inhibitory mechanism of anacetrapib and unlock the interactions between the drug and CETP. The results show an evident affinity of anacetrapib towards the concave surface of CETP, and especially towards the region of the N-terminal tunnel opening. The primary binding site...... of anacetrapib to regulate the structure-function relationships of phospholipids and helix X, the latter representing the structural region of CETP important to the process of neutral lipid exchange with lipoproteins. Altogether, the simulations propose CETP inhibition to be realized when anacetrapib...

  12. Immune responses elicited against rotavirus middle layer protein VP6 inhibit viral replication in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappalainen, Suvi; Pastor, Ana Ruth; Tamminen, Kirsi; López-Guerrero, Vanessa; Esquivel-Guadarrama, Fernando; Palomares, Laura A; Vesikari, Timo; Blazevic, Vesna

    2014-01-01

    Rotavirus (RV) is a common cause of severe gastroenteritis (GE) in children worldwide. Live oral RV vaccines protect against severe RVGE, but the immune correlates of protection are not yet clearly defined. Inner capsid VP6 protein is a highly conserved, abundant, and immunogenic RV protein, and VP6-specific mucosal antibodies, especially IgA, have been implicated to protect against viral challenge in mice. In the present study systemic and mucosal IgG and IgA responses were induced by immunizing BALB/c mice intranasally with a combination of recombinant RV VP6 protein (subgroup II [SGII]) and norovirus (NoV) virus-like particles (VLPs) used in a candidate vaccine. Following immunization mice were challenged orally with murine RV strain EDIMwt (SG non-I-non-II, G3P10[16]). In order to determine neutralizing activity of fecal samples, sera, and vaginal washes (VW) against human Wa RV (SGII, G1P1A[8]) and rhesus RV (SGI, G3P5B[3]), the RV antigen production was measured with an ELISA-based antigen reduction neutralization assay. Only VWs of immunized mice inhibited replication of both RVs, indicating heterotypic protection of induced antibodies. IgA antibody depletion and blocking experiments using recombinant VP6 confirmed that neutralization was mediated by anti-VP6 IgA antibodies. Most importantly, after the RV challenge significant reduction in viral shedding was observed in feces of immunized mice. These results suggest a significant role for mucosal RV VP6-specific IgA for the inhibition of RV replication in vitro and in vivo. In addition, these results underline the importance of non-serotype-specific immunity induced by the conserved subgroup-specific RV antigen VP6 in clearance of RV infection. PMID:25424814

  13. Red photon treatment inhibits apoptosis via regulation of bcl-2 proteins and ROS levels, alleviating hypoxic-ischemic brain damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, W; Chen, L; Zhang, X J; Chen, J; Li, X C; Hou, W S; Xiao, N

    2014-05-30

    Therapeutic options for hypoxic-ischemic brain damage (HIBD) are scarce and inefficient. Recently, many studies have demonstrated that red photon plays an important role in anti-inflammatory processes as well as apoptosis, the main trait of HIBD. In this study, we investigated whether red photon can protect from HIBD in SD rats and oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) in PC12 cells. Apoptosis, mitochondrial transmembrane potential (MMP), and reactive oxygen species (ROS) rates were assessed in PC12 cells. We found that 6-h irradiation resulted in decreased MMP, ROS and apoptosis rates, although these changes were reversible with prolonged irradiation. Importantly, these effects were sustained for 2-8h upon quenching of the red photon. Similar trends were observed for protein and mRNA expression of bax and bcl-2, with short-term irradiation (6h) inhibiting apoptosis in PC12 Cells. However, long-term (>6h) irradiation caused cell damage. In vivo experiments, bax mRNA and protein levels were reduced after 7days in HIBD model rats treated with red photon, in contrast to bcl-2. Furthermore, we found that bax and bcl-2 were mainly expressed in pyramidal cells of the hippocampus CA1 and CA3. Importantly, Morris Water Maze test results revealed an improvement in learning ability and spatial memory in rats after irradiation. Overall, our data showed that short-term irradiation with red photon in the acute phase inhibits the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway via regulation of bcl-2-related proteins and reduction of ROS levels, thereby decreasing apoptosis in nerve cells and improving the neurological prognosis of HIBD. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Genipin-induced inhibition of uncoupling protein-2 sensitizes drug-resistant cancer cells to cytotoxic agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan J Mailloux

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Uncoupling protein-2 (UCP2 is known to suppress mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS production and is employed by drug-resistant cancer cells to mitigate oxidative stress. Using the drug-sensitive HL-60 cells and the drug-resistant MX2 subline as model systems, we show that genipin, a UCP2 inhibitor, sensitizes drug-resistant cells to cytotoxic agents. Increased MX2 cell death was observed upon co-treatment with genipin and different doses of menadione, doxorubicin, and epirubicin. DCFH-DA fluorimetry revealed that the increase in MX2 cell death was accompanied by enhanced cellular ROS levels. The drug-induced increase in ROS was linked to genipin-mediated inhibition of mitochondrial proton leak. State 4 and resting cellular respiratory rates were higher in the MX2 cells in comparison to the HL-60 cells, and the increased respiration was readily suppressed by genipin in the MX2 cells. UCP2 accounted for a remarkable 37% of the resting cellular oxygen consumption indicating that the MX2 cells are functionally reliant on this protein. Higher amounts of UCP2 protein were detected in the MX2 versus the HL-60 mitochondria. The observed effects of genipin were absent in the HL-60 cells pointing to the selectivity of this natural product for drug-resistant cells. The specificity of genipin for UCP2 was confirmed using CHO cells stably expressing UCP2 in which genipin induced an ∼22% decrease in state 4 respiration. These effects were absent in empty vector CHO cells expressing no UCP2. Thus, the chemical inhibition of UCP2 with genipin sensitizes multidrug-resistant cancer cells to cytotoxic agents.

  15. Inhibition of the plasma SCUBE1, a novel platelet adhesive protein, protects mice against thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Meng-Ying; Lin, Yuh-Charn; Liao, Wei-Ju; Tu, Cheng-Fen; Chen, Ming-Huei; Roffler, Steve R; Yang, Ruey-Bing

    2014-07-01

    Signal peptide-CUB-EGF domain-containing protein 1 (SCUBE1), a secreted and surface-exposed glycoprotein on activated platelets, promotes platelet-platelet interaction and supports platelet-matrix adhesion. Its plasma level is a biomarker of platelet activation in acute thrombotic diseases. However, the exact roles of plasma SCUBE1 in vivo remain undefined. We generated new mutant (Δ) mice lacking the soluble but retaining the membrane-bound form of SCUBE1. Plasma SCUBE1-depleted Δ/Δ mice showed normal hematologic and coagulant features and expression of major platelet receptors, but Δ/Δ platelet-rich plasma showed impaired platelet aggregation in response to ADP and collagen treatment. The addition of purified recombinant SCUBE1 protein restored the aggregation of platelets in Δ/Δ platelet-rich plasma and further enhanced platelet aggregation in +/+ platelet-rich plasma. Plasma deficiency of SCUBE1 diminished arterial thrombosis in mice and protected against lethal thromboembolism induced by collagen-epinephrine treatment. Last, antibodies directed against the epidermal growth factor-like repeats of SCUBE1, which are involved in trans-homophilic protein-protein interactions, protected mice against fatal thromboembolism without causing bleeding in vivo. We conclude that plasma SCUBE1 participates in platelet aggregation by bridging adjacent activated platelets in thrombosis. Blockade of soluble SCUBE1 might represent a novel antithrombotic strategy. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Mechanism of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B-mediated inhibition of leptin signalling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, I K; Hansen, J A; Andersen, H S

    2005-01-01

    Upon leptin binding, the leptin receptor is activated, leading to stimulation of the JAK/STAT signal transduction cascade. The transient character of the tyrosine phosphorylation of JAK2 and STAT3 suggests the involvement of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) as negative regulators of this sign...

  17. Inhibition of histone deacetylases stimulates HBV replication independent of protein X

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Klundert, Maarten A. A.; Swart, Marjolein; Zaaijer, Hans L.; Kootstra, Neeltje A.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: HBV expresses an accessory protein called X (HBx), which supports HBV replication by increasing transcription from episomal templates. Here, we investigate whether HBx augments HBV replication by interfering with the deacetylation of HBV DNA associated histones by histone deacetylases (HDACs).

  18. Protein Hydrolysates from Beta-Conglycinin Enriched Soybean Genotypes Inhibit Lipid Accumulation and Inflammation in Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obesity is a worldwide health concern and a well recognized predictor of premature mortality associated with a state of chronic inflammation. The objective was to evaluate the effect of soy protein hydrolysates (SPH) produced from different soybean genotypes by alcalase (SAH) or simulated gastroint...

  19. Inhibition of twisting of a green fluorescent protein-like chromophore by metal complexation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldridge, Anthony; Solntsev, Kyril M; Song, Charles; Tanioka, Tatsuro; Kowalik, Janusz; Hardcastle, Kenneth; Tolbert, Laren M

    2010-08-21

    Substitution of a pyridyl for the hydroxyphenyl moiety in the Green Fluorescent Protein analog p-hydroxybenzylidene-dimethylimidiazolinone produces a chromophore which "turns on" fluorescence in the presence of Zn(2+) or Cd(2+) ions. Such a phenomenon provides "proof of principle" for using GFP chromophores in a variety of sensing applications.

  20. Bone morphogenetic protein 7 inhibits tumor growth of human uveal melanoma in vivo.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Notting, I.C.; Buijs, J.; Mintardjo, R.E.; Horst, G. ter; Vukicevic, S.; Lowik, C.W.G.M.; Schalij-Delfos, N.E.; Keunen, J.E.E.; Pluijm, G. van der

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: Bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP7), a member of the TGF-beta superfamily, is essential for early ocular morphogenesis, and lack of BMP7 causes epithelial development disturbances in the eye. In the present study, the association of tumorigenicity and malignant behavior of human uveal

  1. Selective inhibition of Sarcocystis neurona calcium-dependent protein kinase 1 for equine protozoal myeloencephalitis therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarcocystis neurona is the most frequent cause of Equine Protozoal Myeloencephalitis (EPM), a debilitating neurologic disease of horses that can be difficult to treat. We identified SnCDPK1, the S. neurona homologue of calcium dependent protein kinase 1 (CDPK1), a validated drug target in Toxoplasma...

  2. The ubiquitin-like protein PLIC-1 or ubiquilin 1 inhibits TLR3-Trif signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabanita Biswas

    Full Text Available The innate immune responses to virus infection are initiated by either Toll-like receptors (TLR3/7/8/9 or cytoplasmic double-stranded RNA (dsRNA-recognizing RNA helicases RIG-I and MDA5. To avoid causing injury to the host, these signaling pathways must be switched off in time by negative regulators.Through yeast-two hybrid screening, we found that an ubiquitin-like protein named protein linking integrin-associated protein to cytoskeleton 1(PLIC-1 or Ubiquilin 1 interacted with the Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR domain of TLR4. Interestingly, PLIC-1 had modest effect on TLR4-mediated signaling, but strongly suppressed the transcriptional activation of IFN-β promoter through the TLR3-Trif-dependent pathway. Concomitantly, reduction of endogenous PLIC-1 by short-hairpin interfering RNA (shRNA enhanced TLR3 activation both in luciferase reporter assays as well as in new castle disease virus (NDV infected cells. An interaction between PLIC-1 and Trif was confirmed in co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP and GST-pull-down assays. Subsequent confocal microscopic analysis revealed that PLIC-1 and Trif colocalized with the autophagosome marker LC3 in punctate subcellular structures. Finally, overexpression of PLIC-1 decreased Trif protein abundance in a Nocodazole-sensitive manner.Our results suggest that PLIC-1 is a novel inhibitor of the TLR3-Trif antiviral pathway by reducing the abundance of Trif.

  3. LOCALIZATION OF THE SPERM PROTEIN SP22 AND INHIBITION OF FERTILITY IN VIVO AND IN VITRO

    Science.gov (United States)

    We previously established that the levels sperm membrane protein SP22 are highly correlated with the fertility of sperm from the cauda epididymidis of rats exposed to both epididymal and testicular toxicants, and that a testis-specific SP22 transcript is expressed in post-meiotic...

  4. Histone H1 Differentially Inhibits DNA Bending by Reduced and Oxidized HMGB1 Protein

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štros, Michal; Muselíková Polanská, Eva; Kučírek, Martin; Pospíšilová, Š.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 9 (2015) E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/12/2475; GA ČR GA15-01354S Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : GROUP BOX DOMAINS * BINDING PROTEIN S * LINKER HISTONES Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.057, year: 2015

  5. Human TFDP3, a novel DP protein, inhibits DNA binding and transactivation by E2F

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qiao, Huan; Di Stefano, Luisa; Tian, Chan

    2006-01-01

    The two known DP proteins, TFDP1 and -2, bind E2Fs to form heterodimers essential for high affinity DNA binding and efficient transcriptional activation/repression. Here we report the identification of a new member of the DP family, human TFDP3. Despite the high degree of sequence similarity, TFD...

  6. GNF-2 Inhibits Dengue Virus by Targeting Abl Kinases and the Viral E Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Margaret J; Miduturu, Chandra; Schmidt, Aaron G; Zhu, Xuling; Pitts, Jared D; Wang, Jinhua; Potisopon, Supanee; Zhang, Jianming; Wojciechowski, Amy; Hann Chu, Justin Jang; Gray, Nathanael S; Yang, Priscilla L

    2016-04-21

    Dengue virus infects more than 300 million people annually, yet there is no widely protective vaccine or drugs against the virus. Efforts to develop antivirals against classical targets such as the viral protease and polymerase have not yielded drugs that have advanced to the clinic. Here, we show that the allosteric Abl kinase inhibitor GNF-2 interferes with dengue virus replication via activity mediated by cellular Abl kinases but additionally blocks viral entry via an Abl-independent mechanism. To characterize this newly discovered antiviral activity, we developed disubstituted pyrimidines that block dengue virus entry with structure-activity relationships distinct from those driving kinase inhibition. We demonstrate that biotin- and fluorophore-conjugated derivatives of GNF-2 interact with the dengue glycoprotein, E, in the pre-fusion conformation that exists on the virion surface, and that this interaction inhibits viral entry. This study establishes GNF-2 as an antiviral compound with polypharmacological activity and provides "lead" compounds for further optimization efforts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Mechanical Strength and Inhibition of the Staphylococcus aureus Collagen-Binding Protein Cna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Herman-Bausier

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial pathogen Staphylococcus aureus expresses a variety of cell surface adhesion proteins that bind to host extracellular matrix proteins. Among these, the collagen (Cn-binding protein Cna plays important roles in bacterium-host adherence and in immune evasion. While it is well established that the A region of Cna mediates ligand binding, whether the repetitive B region has a dedicated function is not known. Here, we report the direct measurement of the mechanical strength of Cna-Cn bonds on living bacteria, and we quantify the antiadhesion activity of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs targeting this interaction. We demonstrate that the strength of Cna-Cn bonds in vivo is very strong (~1.2 nN, consistent with the high-affinity “collagen hug” mechanism. The B region is required for strong ligand binding and has been found to function as a spring capable of sustaining high forces. This previously undescribed mechanical response of the B region is of biological significance as it provides a means to project the A region away from the bacterial surface and to maintain bacterial adhesion under conditions of high forces. We further quantified the antiadhesion activity of MAbs raised against the A region of Cna directly on living bacteria without the need for labeling or purification. Some MAbs are more efficient in blocking single-cell adhesion, suggesting that they act as competitive inhibitors that bind Cna residues directly involved in ligand binding. This report highlights the role of protein mechanics in activating the function of staphylococcal adhesion proteins and emphasizes the potential of antibodies to prevent staphylococcal adhesion and biofilm formation.

  8. Kinetic analysis of the inhibition of the drug efflux protein AcrB using surface plasmon resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowla, Rumana; Wang, Yinhu; Ma, Shutao; Venter, Henrietta

    2018-04-01

    Multidrug efflux protein complexes such as AcrAB-TolC from Escherichia coli are paramount in multidrug resistance in Gram-negative bacteria and are also implicated in other processes such as virulence and biofilm formation. Hence efflux pump inhibition, as a means to reverse antimicrobial resistance in clinically relevant pathogens, has gained increased momentum over the past two decades. Significant advances in the structural and functional analysis of AcrB have informed the selection of efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs). However, an accurate method to determine the kinetics of efflux pump inhibition was lacking. In this study we standardised and optimised surface plasmon resonance (SPR) to probe the binding kinetics of substrates and inhibitors to AcrB. The SPR method was also combined with a fluorescence drug binding method by which affinity of two fluorescent AcrB substrates were determined using the same conditions and controls as for SPR. Comparison of the results from the fluorescent assay to those of the SPR assay showed excellent correlation and provided validation for the methods and conditions used for SPR. The kinetic parameters of substrate (doxorubicin, novobiocin and minocycline) binding to AcrB were subsequently determined. Lastly, the kinetics of inhibition of AcrB were probed for two established inhibitors (phenylalanine arginyl β-naphthylamide and 1-1-naphthylmethyl-piperazine) and three novel EPIs: 4-isobutoxy-2-naphthamide (A2), 4-isopentyloxy-2-naphthamide (A3) and 4-benzyloxy-2-naphthamide (A9) have also been probed. The kinetic data obtained could be correlated with inhibitor efficacy and mechanism of action. This study is the first step in the quantitative analysis of the kinetics of inhibition of the clinically important RND-class of multidrug efflux pumps and will allow the design of improved and more potent inhibitors of drug efflux pumps. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Beyond the Structure-Function Horizon of Membrane

  9. Identification of domains mediating transcription activation, repression, and inhibition in the paired-related homeobox protein, Prx2 (S8).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, R A; Kern, M J

    2001-02-01

    Despite the growing information concerning the developmental importance of the Prx2 protein, the structural determinants of Prx2 function are poorly understood. To gain insight into the transcription regulatory regions of the Prx2 protein, we generated a series of truncation mutants. Both the Prx2 response element (PRE) and a portion of the tenascin promoter, a downstream target of Prx2, were used as reporters in transient transfection assays. This analysis showed that a conserved domain (PRX), found in both Prx1 and Prx2, activated transcription in NIH 3T3 cells. This PRX domain, as well as other functional regions of Prx2, demonstrated both cell-specific and promoter-dependent transcriptional regulation. A second important region, the OAR (aristaless) domain, which is conserved among 35 Paired-type homeodomain proteins, was observed to inhibit transcription. Deletion of this element resulted in a 20-fold increase of transcription from the tenascin reporter in NIH 3T3 cells but not in C2C12 cells. The OAR domain did not function as a repressor in chimeric fusions with the Gal4 DNA binding domain in either cell type, characterizing it as an inhibitor instead of a repressor. These results give insight into the function of the Prx2 transcription factor while establishing the framework for comparison with the two isoforms of Prx1.

  10. The putative multidrug resistance protein MRP-7 inhibits methylmercury-associated animal toxicity and dopaminergic neurodegeneration in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDuyn, Natalia; Nass, Richard

    2014-03-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the most prevalent neurodegenerative motor disorder worldwide, and results in the progressive loss of dopamine (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. Gene-environment interactions are believed to play a significant role in the vast majority of PD cases, yet the toxicants and the associated genes involved in the neuropathology are largely ill-defined. Recent epidemiological and biochemical evidence suggests that methylmercury (MeHg) may be an environmental toxicant that contributes to the development of PD. Here, we report that a gene coding for the putative multidrug resistance protein MRP-7 in Caenorhabditis elegans modulates whole animal and DA neuron sensitivity to MeHg. In this study, we demonstrate that genetic knockdown of MRP-7 results in a twofold increase in Hg levels and a dramatic increase in stress response proteins associated with the endoplasmic reticulum, golgi apparatus, and mitochondria, as well as an increase in MeHg-associated animal death. Chronic exposure to low concentrations of MeHg induces MRP-7 gene expression, while exposures in MRP-7 genetic knockdown animals results in a loss of DA neuron integrity without affecting whole animal viability. Furthermore, transgenic animals expressing a fluorescent reporter behind the endogenous MRP-7 promoter indicate that the transporter is expressed in DA neurons. These studies show for the first time that a multidrug resistance protein is expressed in DA neurons, and its expression inhibits MeHg-associated DA neuron pathology. © 2013 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  11. Proteasome inhibition induces DNA damage and reorganizes nuclear architecture and protein synthesis machinery in sensory ganglion neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanca, Ana; Casafont, Iñigo; Berciano, María T; Lafarga, Miguel

    2014-05-01

    Bortezomib is a reversible proteasome inhibitor used as an anticancer drug. However, its clinical use is limited since it causes peripheral neurotoxicity. We have used Sprague-Dawley rats as an animal model to investigate the cellular mechanisms affected by both short-term and chronic bortezomib treatments in sensory ganglia neurons. Proteasome inhibition induces dose-dependent alterations in the architecture, positioning, shape and polarity of the neuronal nucleus. It also produces DNA damage without affecting neuronal survival, and severe disruption of the protein synthesis machinery at the central cytoplasm accompanied by decreased expression of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor. As a compensatory or adaptive survival response against proteotoxic stress caused by bortezomib treatment, sensory neurons preserve basal levels of transcriptional activity, up-regulate the expression of proteasome subunit genes, and generate a new cytoplasmic perinuclear domain for protein synthesis. We propose that proteasome activity is crucial for controlling nuclear architecture, DNA repair and the organization of the protein synthesis machinery in sensory neurons. These neurons are primary targets of bortezomib neurotoxicity, for which reason their dysfunction may contribute to the pathogenesis of the bortezomib-induced peripheral neuropathy in treated patients.

  12. A study on poly (N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone covalently bonded NiTi surface for inhibiting protein adsorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyan Yu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Near equiatomic NiTi alloys have been extensively applied as biomaterials owing to its unique shape memory effect, superelasticity and biocompatibility. It has been demonstrated that surfaces capable of preventing plasma protein adsorption could reduce the reactivity of biomaterials with human blood. This motivated a lot of researches on the surface modification of NiTi alloy. In the present work, following heat and alkaline treatment and silanization by trichlorovinylsilane (TCVS, coating of poly (N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone (PVP was produced on the NiTi alloy by gamma ray induced chemical bonding. The structures and properties of modified NiTi were characterized and in vitro biocompatibility of plasma protein adsorption was investigated. The results indicated that heat treatment at 823 K for 1 h could result in the formation of a protective TiO2 layer with “Ni-free” zone on NiTi surface. It was found that PVP was covalently bonded on NiTi surface to create a hydrophilic layer for inhibiting protein adsorption on the surface. The present work offers a green approach to introduce a bioorganic surface on metal and other polymeric or inorganic substrates by gamma irradiation.

  13. Bean polygalacturonase inhibitor protein-1 (PGIP-1) inhibits polygalacturonases from Stenocarpella maydis

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Berger, DK

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available mM sodium acetate pH 5.0as buC128er. When necessary, the puri?ed bean PGIP was incorporated in the overlay gel at a ?nal concentration of 0.425 mg ml?1. Western blotting method Proteins were separated by electrophoresis on a 12 % SDS?PAGE gel using... - 46 - 30 - 14.3 FIG. 3. SDS?PAGE gel (a) and Western blot analysis (b) of puri?ed bean PGIP. (a) SDS?PAGE gel was stained with Coomassie blue. Lane 1, Rainbow protein markers (Amersham, U.K.), molecular weights in kDa are indicated. Lanes 2?4 contain 1...

  14. HDAC inhibition induces HIV-1 protein and enables immune-based clearance following latency reversal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Guoxin; Swanson, Michael; Talla, Aarthi

    2017-01-01

    Promising therapeutic approaches for eradicating HIV include transcriptional activation of provirus from latently infected cells using latency-reversing agents (LRAs) and immune-mediated clearance to purge reservoirs. Accurate detection of cells capable of producing viral antigens and virions......, and the measurement of clearance of infected cells, is essential to assessing therapeutic efficacy. Here, we apply enhanced methodology extending the sensitivity limits for the rapid detection of subfemtomolar HIV gag p24 capsid protein in CD4+ T cells from ART-suppressed HIV+ individuals, and we show viral protein...... induction following treatment with LRAs. Importantly, we demonstrate that clinical administration of histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACis; vorinostat and panobinostat) induced HIV gag p24, and ex vivo stimulation produced sufficient viral antigen to elicit immune-mediated cell killing using anti-gp120/CD3...

  15. Growth inhibition in rats fed inadequate and incomplete proteins: repercussion on mandibular biomechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Bozzini, Clarisa; Champin, Graciela Monica; Bozzini, Carlos Eduardo Jose; Alippi, Rosa Maria

    2015-01-01

    This study describes the effects of feeding growing rats with a diet containing inadequate and incomplete proteins on both the morphological and the biomechanical properties of the mandible. Female rats aged 30 d were fed freely with one of two diets, control (CD, 301 Cal/100g) and experimental (ED, 359 Cal/100g). CD was a standard laboratory diet, while ED was a synthetic diet containing cornflower supplemented with vitamins and minerals. Both diets had the same physical characteristics. Con...

  16. Crustin protein Amk1 from black tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon inhibits Vibrio harveyi and Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moltira Tonganunt1*

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available A crustin gene (Amk1 was identified from a haemocyte library of the black tiger shrimp, Penaeus monodon. The full-length cDNA consists of 411 bp encoding a deduced precursor of 136 amino acids with a signal peptide of 17 aminoacids. Amk1 contains a hydrophobic and a Gly-rich region at the N-terminus and a 12 conserved cysteine domain (6-DSC at the C-terminus. Transcripts of Amk1 are mainly detected in haemocytes and gills by RT-PCR analysis. A recombinant Amk1was overexpressed and purified from Escherichia coli. This has a molecular mass of 43.66 kDa with a predicted pI of 8.23. Antibacterial assays demonstrated that recombinant Amk1 exhibited antibacterial activity against Gram-positive and Gramnegativebacteria with strong inhibition against Staphylococcus aureus and Vibrio harveyi.

  17. Inhibition of membrane lipid-independent protein kinase Calpha activity by phorbol esters, diacylglycerols, and bryostatin-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, S J; Taddeo, F J; Mazurek, A; Stagliano, B A; Milano, S K; Kelly, M B; Ho, C; Stubbs, C D

    1998-09-04

    The activity of membrane-associated protein kinase C (PKC) has previously been shown to be regulated by two discrete high and low affinity binding regions for diacylglycerols and phorbol esters (Slater, S. J., Ho, C., Kelly, M. B., Larkin, J. D., Taddeo, F. J., Yeager, M. D., and Stubbs, C. D. (1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 4627-4631). PKC is also known to interact with both cytoskeletal and nuclear proteins; however, less is known concerning the mode of activation of this non-membrane form of PKC. By using the fluorescent phorbol ester, sapintoxin D (SAPD), PKCalpha, alone, was found to possess both low and high affinity phorbol ester-binding sites, showing that interaction with these sites does not require association with the membrane. Importantly, a fusion protein containing the isolated C1A/C1B (C1) domain of PKCalpha also bound SAPD with low and high affinity, indicating that the sites may be confined to this domain rather than residing elsewhere on the enzyme molecule. Both high and low affinity interactions with native PKCalpha were enhanced by protamine sulfate, which activates the enzyme without requiring Ca2+ or membrane lipids. However, this "non-membrane" PKC activity was inhibited by the phorbol ester 4beta-12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and also by the fluorescent analog, SAPD, opposite to its effect on membrane-associated PKCalpha. Bryostatin-1 and the soluble diacylglycerol, 1-oleoyl-2-acetylglycerol, both potent activators of membrane-associated PKC, also competed for both low and high affinity SAPD binding and inhibited protamine sulfate-induced activity. Furthermore, the inactive phorbol ester analog 4alpha-TPA (4alpha-12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate) also inhibited non-membrane-associated PKC. In keeping with these observations, although TPA could displace high affinity SAPD binding from both forms of the enzyme, 4alpha-TPA was only effective at displacing high affinity SAPD binding from non-membrane-associated PKC. 4alpha-TPA also

  18. A Cell-Permeable Hairpin Peptide Inhibits Hepatitis C Viral Nonstructural Protein 5A Mediated Translation and Virus Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khachatoorian, Ronik; Arumugaswami, Vaithilingaraja; Ruchala, Piotr; Raychaudhuri, Santanu; Maloney, Eden M.; Miao, Edna; Dasgupta, Asim; French, Samuel W.

    2012-01-01

    NS5A is a key regulator of hepatitis C virus (HCV) life cycle including RNA replication, assembly, and translation. We and others have shown NS5A to augment HCV IRES-mediated translation. Further, Quercetin treatment and heat shock protein (HSP) 70 knockdown inhibit NS5A-driven augmentation of IRES-mediated translation and infectious virus production. We have also co-immunoprecipitated HSP70 with NS5A and demonstrated cellular colocalization leading to the hypothesis that the NS5A/HSP70 complex formation is important for IRES-mediated translation. Here, we have identified the NS5A region responsible for complex formation through in vitro deletion analyses. Deletion of NS5A domains II and III failed to reduce HSP70 binding, whereas domain I deletion eliminated complex formation. NS5A domain I alone also bound HSP70. Deletion mapping of domain I identified the C-terminal 34 amino acids (C34) to be the interaction site. Further, addition of C34 to domains II and III restored complex formation. C34 expression significantly reduced intracellular viral protein levels, in contrast to same size control peptides from other NS5A domains. C34 also competitively inhibited NS5A-augmented IRES-mediated translation, while controls did not. Triple-alanine scan mutagenesis identified an exposed beta-sheet hairpin in C34 to be primarily responsible for NS5A-augmented IRES-mediated translation. Moreover, treatment with a 10 amino acid peptide derivative of C34 suppressed NS5A-augmented IRES-mediated translation and significantly inhibited intracellular viral protein synthesis, with no associated cytotoxicity. Conclusion: These results support the hypothesis that the NS5A/HSP70 complex augments viral IRES-mediated translation, identify a sequence-specific hairpin element in NS5A responsible for complex formation, and demonstrate the functional significance of C34 hairpin-mediated NS5A/HSP70 interaction. Identification of this element may allow for further interrogation of NS5A

  19. Inhibiting Heat Shock Proteins Can Potentiate the Cytotoxic Effect of Cannabidiol in Human Glioma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Katherine A; Dennis, Jayne L; Dalgleish, Angus G; Liu, Wai M

    2015-11-01

    Cannabinoids possess a number of characteristics that make them putative anticancer drugs, and their value as such is currently being explored in a number of clinical studies. To further understand the roles that cannabinoids may have, we performed gene expression profiling in glioma cell lines cultured with cannabidiol (CBD) and/or Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), and pursued targets identified by this screening. Results showed that a large number of genes belonging to the heat shock protein (HSP) super-family were up-regulated following treatment, specifically with CBD. Increases were observed both at the gene and protein levels and arose as a consequence of increased generation of ROS by CBD, and correlated with an increase in a number of HSP client proteins. Furthermore, increases impeded the cytotoxic effect of CBD; an effect that was improved by co-culture with pharmacalogical inhibitors of HSPs. Similarly, culturing glioma cells with CBD and HSP inhibitors increased radiosensitivity when compared to CBD-alone. Taken together, these data indicate that the cytotoxic effects of CBD can be diminished by HSPs that indirectly rise as a result of CBD use, and that the inclusion of HSP inhibitors in CBD treatment regimens can enhance the overall effect. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  20. Conformational dynamics of human protein kinase CK2α and its effect on function and inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Ashutosh; Hirota, Tsuyoshi; Irle, Stephan; Tama, Florence

    2018-03-01

    Protein kinase, casein kinase II (CK2), is ubiquitously expressed and highly conserved protein kinase that shows constitutive activity. It phosphorylates a diverse set of proteins and plays crucial role in several cellular processes. The catalytic subunit of this enzyme (CK2α) shows remarkable flexibility as evidenced in numerous crystal structures determined till now. Here, using analysis of multiple crystal structures and long timescale molecular dynamics simulations, we explore the conformational flexibility of CK2α. The enzyme shows considerably higher flexibility in the solution as compared to that observed in crystal structure ensemble. Multiple conformations of hinge region, located near the active site, were observed during the dynamics. We further observed that among these multiple conformations, the most populated conformational state was inadequately represented in the crystal structure ensemble. The catalytic spine, was found to be less dismantled in this state as compared to the "open" hinge/αD state crystal structures. The comparison of dynamics in unbound (Apo) state and inhibitor (CX4945) bound state exhibits inhibitor induced suppression in the overall dynamics of the enzyme. This is especially true for functionally important glycine-rich loop above the active site. Together, this work gives novel insights into the dynamics of CK2α in solution and relates it to the function. This work also explains the effect of inhibitor on the dynamics of CK2α and paves way for development of better inhibitors. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Dengue virus capsid protein binds core histones and inhibits nucleosome formation in human liver cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonya M Colpitts

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV is a member of the Flaviviridae and a globally (reemerging pathogen that causes serious human disease. There is no specific antiviral or vaccine for dengue virus infection. Flavivirus capsid (C is a structural protein responsible for gathering the viral RNA into a nucleocapsid that forms the core of a mature virus particle. Flaviviral replication is known to occur in the cytoplasm yet a large portion of capsid protein localizes to the nucleus during infection. The reasons for the nuclear presences of capsid are not completely understood. Here, we expressed mature DENV C in a tandem affinity purification assay to identify potential binding partners in human liver cells. DENV C targeted the four core histones, H2A, H2B, H3 and H4. DENV C bound recombinant histones in solution and colocalized with histones in the nucleus and cytoplasm of liver cells during DENV infection. We show that DENV C acts as a histone mimic, forming heterodimers with core histones, binding DNA and disrupting nucleosome formation. We also demonstrate that DENV infection increases the amounts of core histones in livers cells, which may be a cellular response to C binding away the histone proteins. Infection with DENV additionally alters levels of H2A phosphorylation in a time-dependent manner. The interactions of C and histones add an interesting new role for the presence of C in the nucleus during DENV infection.

  2. Dengue virus capsid protein binds core histones and inhibits nucleosome formation in human liver cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colpitts, Tonya M; Barthel, Sebastian; Wang, Penghua; Fikrig, Erol

    2011-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a member of the Flaviviridae and a globally (re)emerging pathogen that causes serious human disease. There is no specific antiviral or vaccine for dengue virus infection. Flavivirus capsid (C) is a structural protein responsible for gathering the viral RNA into a nucleocapsid that forms the core of a mature virus particle. Flaviviral replication is known to occur in the cytoplasm yet a large portion of capsid protein localizes to the nucleus during infection. The reasons for the nuclear presences of capsid are not completely understood. Here, we expressed mature DENV C in a tandem affinity purification assay to identify potential binding partners in human liver cells. DENV C targeted the four core histones, H2A, H2B, H3 and H4. DENV C bound recombinant histones in solution and colocalized with histones in the nucleus and cytoplasm of liver cells during DENV infection. We show that DENV C acts as a histone mimic, forming heterodimers with core histones, binding DNA and disrupting nucleosome formation. We also demonstrate that DENV infection increases the amounts of core histones in livers cells, which may be a cellular response to C binding away the histone proteins. Infection with DENV additionally alters levels of H2A phosphorylation in a time-dependent manner. The interactions of C and histones add an interesting new role for the presence of C in the nucleus during DENV infection.

  3. Blockade of the SNARE protein syntaxin 1 inhibits glioblastoma tumor growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fausto Ulloa

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma (GBM is the most prevalent adult brain tumor, with virtually no cure, and with a median overall survival of 15 months from diagnosis despite of the treatment. SNARE proteins mediate membrane fusion events in cells and are essential for many cellular processes including exocytosis and neurotransmission, intracellular trafficking and cell migration. Here we show that the blockade of the SNARE protein Syntaxin 1 (Stx1 function impairs GBM cell proliferation. We show that Stx1 loss-of-function in GBM cells, through ShRNA lentiviral transduction, a Stx1 dominant negative and botulinum toxins, dramatically reduces the growth of GBM after grafting U373 cells into the brain of immune compromised mice. Interestingly, Stx1 role on GBM progression may not be restricted just to cell proliferation since the blockade of Stx1 also reduces in vitro GBM cell invasiveness suggesting a role in several processes relevant for tumor progression. Altogether, our findings indicate that the blockade of SNARE proteins may represent a novel therapeutic tool against GBM.

  4. Blockade of the SNARE Protein Syntaxin 1 Inhibits Glioblastoma Tumor Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulloa, Fausto; Gonzàlez-Juncà, Alba; Meffre, Delphine; Barrecheguren, Pablo José; Martínez-Mármol, Ramón; Pazos, Irene; Olivé, Núria; Cotrufo, Tiziana; Seoane, Joan; Soriano, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most prevalent adult brain tumor, with virtually no cure, and with a median overall survival of 15 months from diagnosis despite of the treatment. SNARE proteins mediate membrane fusion events in cells and are essential for many cellular processes including exocytosis and neurotransmission, intracellular trafficking and cell migration. Here we show that the blockade of the SNARE protein Syntaxin 1 (Stx1) function impairs GBM cell proliferation. We show that Stx1 loss-of-function in GBM cells, through ShRNA lentiviral transduction, a Stx1 dominant negative and botulinum toxins, dramatically reduces the growth of GBM after grafting U373 cells into the brain of immune compromised mice. Interestingly, Stx1 role on GBM progression may not be restricted just to cell proliferation since the blockade of Stx1 also reduces in vitro GBM cell invasiveness suggesting a role in several processes relevant for tumor progression. Altogether, our findings indicate that the blockade of SNARE proteins may represent a novel therapeutic tool against GBM. PMID:25803850

  5. Dengue Virus Capsid Protein Binds Core Histones and Inhibits Nucleosome Formation in Human Liver Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colpitts, Tonya M.; Barthel, Sebastian; Wang, Penghua; Fikrig, Erol

    2011-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a member of the Flaviviridae and a globally (re)emerging pathogen that causes serious human disease. There is no specific antiviral or vaccine for dengue virus infection. Flavivirus capsid (C) is a structural protein responsible for gathering the viral RNA into a nucleocapsid that forms the core of a mature virus particle. Flaviviral replication is known to occur in the cytoplasm yet a large portion of capsid protein localizes to the nucleus during infection. The reasons for the nuclear presences of capsid are not completely understood. Here, we expressed mature DENV C in a tandem affinity purification assay to identify potential binding partners in human liver cells. DENV C targeted the four core histones, H2A, H2B, H3 and H4. DENV C bound recombinant histones in solution and colocalized with histones in the nucleus and cytoplasm of liver cells during DENV infection. We show that DENV C acts as a histone mimic, forming heterodimers with core histones, binding DNA and disrupting nucleosome formation. We also demonstrate that DENV infection increases the amounts of core histones in livers cells, which may be a cellular response to C binding away the histone proteins. Infection with DENV additionally alters levels of H2A phosphorylation in a time-dependent manner. The interactions of C and histones add an interesting new role for the presence of C in the nucleus during DENV infection. PMID:21909430

  6. Ice recrystallization inhibition in ice cream as affected by ice structuring proteins from winter wheat grass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regand, A; Goff, H D

    2006-01-01

    Ice recrystallization in quiescently frozen sucrose solutions that contained some of the ingredients commonly found in ice cream and in ice cream manufactured under commercial conditions, with or without ice structuring proteins (ISP) from cold-acclimated winter wheat grass extract (AWWE), was assessed by bright field microscopy. In sucrose solutions, critical differences in moisture content, viscosity, ionic strength, and other properties derived from the presence of other ingredients (skim milk powder, corn syrup solids, locust bean gum) caused a reduction in ice crystal growth. Significant ISP activity in retarding ice crystal growth was observed in all solutions (44% for the most complex mix) containing 0.13% total protein from AWWE. In heat-shocked ice cream, ice recrystallization rates were significantly reduced 40 and 46% with the addition of 0.0025 and 0.0037% total protein from AWWE. The ISP activity in ice cream was not hindered by its inclusion in mix prior to pasteurization. A synergistic effect between ISP and stabilizer was observed, as ISP activity was reduced in the absence of stabilizer in ice cream formulations. A remarkably smoother texture for ice creams containing ISP after heat-shock storage was evident by sensory evaluation. The efficiency of ISP from AWWE in controlling ice crystal growth in ice cream has been demonstrated.

  7. Stanniocalcin-1 Potently Inhibits the Proteolytic Activity of the Metalloproteinase Pregnancy-associated Plasma Protein-A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kløverpris, Søren; Mikkelsen, Jakob Hauge; Pedersen, Josefine Hvidkjær

    2015-01-01

    regulation in these species. Several physiological functions of STC1 have been reported, although many molecular details are still lacking. We here demonstrate that STC1 is an inhibitor of the metzincin metalloproteinase, pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A), which modulates insulin-like growth...... that the homologous STC2 inhibits PAPP-A proteolytic activity, and that this depends on the formation of a covalent complex between the inhibitor and the proteinase, mediated by Cys-120 of STC2. We find that STC1 is unable to bind covalently to PAPP-A, in agreement with the absence of a corresponding cysteine residue....... It rather binds to PAPP-A with high affinity (KD = 75 pm). We further demonstrate that both STC1 and STC2 show inhibitory activity toward PAPP-A2, but not selected serine proteinases and metalloproteinases. We therefore conclude that the STCs are proteinase inhibitors, probably restricted in specificity...

  8. Short hairpin RNA targeting of fibroblast activation protein inhibits tumor growth and improves the tumor microenvironment in a mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Cai

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Fibroblast activation protein (FAP is a specific serine proteaseexpressed in tumor stroma proven to be a stimulatory factor inthe progression of some cancers. The purpose of this studywas to investigate the effects of FAP knockdown on tumorgrowth and the tumor microenvironment. Mice bearing 4T1subcutaneous tumors were treated with liposome-shRNAcomplexes targeting FAP. Tumor volumes and weights weremonitored, and FAP, collagen, microvessel density (MVD,and apoptosis were measured. Our studies showed thatshRNA targeting of FAP in murine breast cancer reduces FAPexpression, inhibits tumor growth, promotes collagenaccumulation (38%, and suppresses angiogenesis (71.7%, aswell as promoting apoptosis (by threefold. We suggest thatFAP plays a role in tumor growth and in altering the tumormicroenvironment. Targeting FAP may therefore represent asupplementary therapy for breast cancer. [BMB Reports 2013;46(5: 252-257

  9. MDM2 Antagonist Nutlin-3a Reverses Mitoxantrone Resistance by Inhibiting Breast Cancer Resistance Protein Mediated Drug Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fan; Throm, Stacy L.; Murley, Laura L.; Miller, Laura A.; Zatechka, D. Steven; Guy, R. Kiplin; Kennedy, Rachel; Stewart, Clinton F.

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP; ABCG2), a clinical marker for identifying the side population (SP) cancer stem cell subgroup, affects intestinal absorption, brain penetration, hepatobiliary excretion, and multidrug resistance of many anti-cancer drugs. Nutlin-3a is currently under pre-clinical investigation in a variety of solid tumor and leukemia models as a p53 reactivation agent, and has been recently demonstrated to also have p53 independent actions in cancer cells. In the present study, we first report that nutlin-3a can inhibit the efflux function of BCRP. We observed that although the nutlin-3a IC50 did not differ between BCRP over-expressing and vector control cells, nutlin-3a treatment significantly potentiated the cells to treatment with the BCRP substrate mitoxantrone. Combination index calculations suggested synergism between nutlin-3a and mitoxantrone in cell lines over-expressing BCRP. Upon further investigation, it was confirmed that nutlin-3a increased the intracellular accumulation of BCRP substrates such as mitoxantrone and Hoechst 33342 in cells expressing functional BCRP without altering the expression level or localization of BCRP. Interestingly, nutlin-3b, considered virtually “inactive” in disrupting the MDM2/p53 interaction, reversed Hoechst 33342 efflux with the same potency as nutlin-3a. Intracellular accumulation and bi-directional transport studies using MDCKII cells suggested that nutlin-3a is not a substrate of BCRP. Additionally, an ATPase assay using Sf9 insect cell membranes over-expressing wild-type BCRP indicated that nutlin-3a inhibits BCRP ATPase activity in a dose-dependent fashion. In conclusion, our studies demonstrate that nutlin-3a inhibits BCRP efflux function, which consequently reverses BCRP-related drug resistance. PMID:21459080

  10. Trehalose-6-phosphate and SNF1-related protein kinase 1 are involved in the first-fruit inhibition of cucumber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, ZhiPing; Deng, Yukun; Song, Xingxing; Miao, Minmin

    2015-04-01

    In cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.), the preexisting fruits inhibit the growth of subsequent fruits. To study the mechanism underlying this phenomenon, we examined the sink activity, the level of free sugars, and the activity of SNF1-related protein kinase 1 (SnRK1) in the peduncles of two types of fruits. In the two-fruit cucumber plants, the growth rate and sink activity [evaluated by alkaline alpha-galactosidase (CsAGA) activity in the peduncle] of the first fruit were greater than those of the second fruit. The (14)C-labeling experiment revealed that assimilates produced by the leaves closer to the second fruit tended to move to the first fruit. Sucrose and trehalose-6-phosphate (T6P) levels in the peduncle of the first fruit were higher than those in the peduncle of the second fruit. The SnRK1 activity was lower in the peduncle of the first fruit than in that of the second fruit at 0-8 days after anthesis. The growth rate and sink activity of the second fruit were enhanced after the removal of the first fruit or after treatment with 6-benzyl aminopurine, as determined by comparison with an increase in the sucrose and T6P levels and a decrease in the SnRK1 activity in its peduncle. The SnRK1 activity was inhibited by T6P in an in vitro kinase assay, and the mRNA level of CsAGA1 in cucumber calli was up-regulated by exogenous trehalose treatment, confirming that the SnRK1 activity and CsAGA1 expression can be regulated by T6P levels. Our results suggest that the T6P- and SnRK1-mediated signaling functions are involved in the regulation of first-fruit inhibition in cucumber plants. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  11. Blockade of Vascular Adhesion Protein-1 Inhibits Lymphocyte Infiltration in Rat Liver Allograft Rejection

    OpenAIRE

    Martelius, Timi; Salaspuro, Ville; Salmi, Marko; Krogerus, Leena; Höckerstedt, Krister; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Lautenschlager, Irmeli

    2004-01-01

    Vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) has been shown to mediate lymphocyte adhesion to endothelia at sites of inflammation, but its functional role in vivo has not been tested in any rodent model. Here we report the effects of VAP-1 blockade on rat liver allograft rejection. BN recipients of PVG liver allografts (known to develop acute rejection by day 7) were treated with 2 mg/kg anti-VAP-1 (a new anti-rat VAP-1 mAb 174–5) or isotype-matched irrelevant antibody (NS1) every other day (n = 6/gro...

  12. Structural Basis for the 14-3-3 Protein-Dependent Inhibition of Phosducin Function

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kacířová, Miroslava; Nováček, J.; Man, Petr; Obšilová, Veronika; Obšil, Tomáš

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 112, č. 7 (2017), s. 1339-1349 ISSN 0006-3495 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-02739S; GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1604; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 ; RVO:61388971 Keywords : phosducin * 14-3-3 protein * NMR spectroscopy * limited proteolysis Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology; CE - Biochemistry (MBU-M) OBOR OECD: Biochemical research methods; Biochemistry and molecular biology (MBU-M) Impact factor: 3.656, year: 2016

  13. Acupuncture inhibits Notch1 and Hes1 protein expression in the basal ganglia of rats with cerebral hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Notch pathway activation maintains neural stem cells in a proliferating state and increases nerve repair capacity. To date, studies have rarely focused on changes or damage to signal transduction pathways during cerebral hemorrhage. Here, we examined the effect of acupuncture in a rat model of cerebral hemorrhage. We examined four groups: in the control group, rats received no treatment. In the model group, cerebral hemorrhage models were established by infusing non-heparinized blood into the brain. In the acupuncture group, modeled rats had Baihui (DU20 and Qubin (GB7 acupoints treated once a day for 30 minutes. In the DAPT group, modeled rats had 0.15 μg/mL DAPT solution (10 mL infused into the brain. Immunohistochemistry and western blot results showed that acupuncture effectively inhibits Notch1 and Hes1 protein expression in rat basal ganglia. These inhibitory effects were identical to DAPT, a Notch signaling pathway inhibitor. Our results suggest that acupuncture has a neuroprotective effect on cerebral hemorrhage by inhibiting Notch-Hes signaling pathway transduction in rat basal ganglia after cerebral hemorrhage.

  14. Gabapentin Inhibits Protein Kinase C Epsilon Translocation in Cultured Sensory Neurons with Additive Effects When Coapplied with Paracetamol (Acetaminophen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vittorio Vellani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Gabapentin is a well-established anticonvulsant drug which is also effective for the treatment of neuropathic pain. Although the exact mechanism leading to relief of allodynia and hyperalgesia caused by neuropathy is not known, the blocking effect of gabapentin on voltage-dependent calcium channels has been proposed to be involved. In order to further evaluate its analgesic mechanisms, we tested the efficacy of gabapentin on protein kinase C epsilon (PKCε translocation in cultured peripheral neurons isolated from rat dorsal root ganglia (DRGs. We found that gabapentin significantly reduced PKCε translocation induced by the pronociceptive peptides bradykinin and prokineticin 2, involved in both inflammatory and chronic pain. We recently showed that paracetamol (acetaminophen, a very commonly used analgesic drug, also produces inhibition of PKCε. We tested the effect of the combined use of paracetamol and gabapentin, and we found that the inhibition of translocation adds up. Our study provides a novel mechanism of action for gabapentin in sensory neurons and suggests a mechanism of action for the combined use of paracetamol and gabapentin, which has recently been shown to be effective, with a cumulative behavior, in the control of postoperative pain in human patients.

  15. Inhibition of protein translation by the DISC1-Boymaw fusion gene from a Scottish family with major psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Baohu; Higa, Kerin K; Kim, Minjung; Zhou, Lynn; Young, Jared W; Geyer, Mark A; Zhou, Xianjin

    2014-11-01

    The t(1; 11) translocation appears to be the causal genetic lesion with 70% penetrance for schizophrenia, major depression and other psychiatric disorders in a Scottish family. Molecular studies identified the disruption of the disrupted-in-schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) gene by chromosome translocation at chromosome 1q42. Our previous studies, however, revealed that the translocation also disrupted another gene, Boymaw (also termed DISC1FP1), on chromosome 11. After translocation, two fusion genes [the DISC1-Boymaw (DB7) and the Boymaw-DISC1 (BD13)] are generated between the DISC1 and Boymaw genes. In the present study, we report that expression of the DB7 fusion gene inhibits both intracellular NADH oxidoreductase activities and protein translation. We generated humanized DISC1-Boymaw mice with gene targeting to examine the in vivo functions of the fusion genes. Consistent with the in vitro studies on the DB7 fusion gene, protein translation activity is decreased in the hippocampus and in cultured primary neurons from the brains of the humanized mice. Expression of Gad67, Nmdar1 and Psd95 proteins are also reduced. The humanized mice display prolonged and increased responses to the NMDA receptor antagonist, ketamine, on various mouse genetic backgrounds. Abnormal information processing of acoustic startle and depressive-like behaviors are also observed. In addition, the humanized mice display abnormal erythropoiesis, which was reported to associate with depression in humans. Expression of the DB7 fusion gene may reduce protein translation to impair brain functions and thereby contribute to the pathogenesis of major psychiatric disorders. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Inhibition of the liver enriched protein FOXA2 recovers HNF6 activity in human colon carcinoma and liver hepatoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Lehner

    Full Text Available Recently, we demonstrated that the transcription factors HNF6 and FOXA2 function as key regulators in human colorectal liver metastases. To better understand their proposed inhibitory crosstalk, the consequences of functional knockdown of FOXA2 on HNF6 and C/EBPα activity were investigated in the human colon Caco-2 and HepG2 carcinoma cell lines. Specifically, siRNA-mediated gene silencing of FOXA2 repressed transcript expression by >80%. This resulted in a statistically significant 6-, 3-, 4-, and 8-fold increase in mRNA expression of HNF6 and of genes targeted by this transcription factor, e.g., HSP105B, CYP51, and C/EBPα, as determined by qRT-PCR. Thus, functional knockdown of FOXA2 recovered HNF6 activity. Furthermore, with nuclear extracts of Caco-2 cells no HNF6 DNA binding was observed, but expression of HNF1α, FOXA2, FOXA3, and HNF4α protein was abundant. We therefore transfected a plasmid encoding HNF6 into Caco-2 cells but also employed a retroviral vector to transfect HNF6 into HepG2 cells. This resulted in HNF6 protein expression with DNA binding activity being recovered as determined by EMSA band shift assays. Furthermore, by flow cytometry the consequences of HNF6 expression on cell cycle regulation in transfected cells was studied. Essentially, HNF6 inhibited cell cycle progression in the G2/M and G1 phase in Caco-2 and HepG2 cell lines, respectively. Here, proliferation was reduced by 80% and 50% in Caco-2 and HepG2 cells, respectively, as determined by the BrdU labeling assay. Therefore functional knockdown of FOXA2 recovered HNF6 activity and inhibited growth of tumor-cells and may possibly represent a novel therapeutic target in primary and secondary liver malignancies.

  17. Inhibition of the Staphylococcus aureus NADPH-dependent enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase by triclosan and hexachlorophene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, R J; Li, J; Roland, G E; Rock, C O

    2000-02-18

    Enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (FabI) plays a determinant role in completing cycles of elongation in type II fatty acid synthase systems and is an important target for antibacterial drugs. The FabI component of Staphylococcus aureus (saFabI) was identified, and its properties were compared with Escherichia coli FabI (ecFabI). ecFabI and saFabI had similar specific activities, and saFabI expression complemented the E. coli fabI(Ts) mutant, illustrating that the Gram-positive FabI was interchangeable with the Gram-negative FabI enzyme. However, ecFabI was specific for NADH, whereas saFabI exhibited specific and positive cooperative binding of NADPH. Triclosan and hexachlorophene inhibited both ecFabI and saFabI. The triclosan-resistant ecFabI(G93V) protein was also refractory to hexachlorophene inhibition, illustrating that both drugs bind at the FabI active site. Both the introduction of a plasmid expressing the safabI gene or a missense mutation in the chromosomal safabI gene led to triclosan resistance in S. aureus; however, these strains did not exhibit cross-resistance to hexachlorophene. The replacement of the ether linkage in triclosan by a carbon bridge in hexachlorophene prevented the formation of a stable FabI-NAD(P)(+)-drug ternary complex. Thus, the formation of this ternary complex is a key determinant of the antibacterial activity of FabI inhibitors.

  18. Curcumin Attenuates Opioid Tolerance and Dependence by Inhibiting Ca2+/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II α Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaoyu; Huang, Fang; Szymusiak, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Chronic use of opioid analgesics has been hindered by the development of opioid addiction and tolerance. We have reported that curcumin, a natural flavonoid from the rhizome of Curcuma longa, attenuated opioid tolerance, although the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that curcumin may inhibit Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II α (CaMKIIα), a protein kinase that has been previously proposed to be critical for opioid tolerance and dependence. In this study, we used state-of-the-art polymeric formulation technology to produce poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA)-curcumin nanoparticles (nanocurcumin) to overcome the drug’s poor solubility and bioavailability, which has made it extremely difficult for studying in vivo pharmacological actions of curcumin. We found that PLGA-curcumin nanoparticles reduced the dose requirement by 11- to 33-fold. Pretreatment with PLGA-curcumin (by mouth) prevented the development of opioid tolerance and dependence in a dose-dependent manner, with ED50 values of 3.9 and 3.2 mg/kg, respectively. PLGA-curcumin dose-dependently attenuated already-established opioid tolerance (ED50 = 12.6 mg/kg p.o.) and dependence (ED50 = 3.1 mg/kg p.o.). Curcumin or PLGA-curcumin did not produce antinociception by itself or affect morphine (1–10 mg/kg) antinociception. Moreover, we found that the behavioral effects of curcumin on opioid tolerance and dependence correlated with its inhibition of morphine-induced CaMKIIα activation in the brain. These results suggest that curcumin may attenuate opioid tolerance and dependence by suppressing CaMKIIα activity. PMID:25515789

  19. Cap-independent translation ensures mTOR expression and function upon protein synthesis inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques-Ramos, Ana; Candeias, Marco M; Menezes, Juliane; Lacerda, Rafaela; Willcocks, Margaret; Teixeira, Alexandre; Locker, Nicolas; Romão, Luísa

    2017-11-01

    The mechanistic/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a conserved serine/threonine kinase that integrates cellular signals from the nutrient and energy status to act, namely, on the protein synthesis machinery. While major advances have emerged regarding the regulators and effects of the mTOR signaling pathway, little is known about the regulation of mTOR gene expression. Here, we show that the human mTOR transcript can be translated in a cap-independent manner, and that its 5' untranslated region (UTR) is a highly folded RNA scaffold capable of binding directly to the 40S ribosomal subunit. We further demonstrate that mTOR is able to bypass the cap requirement for translation both in normal and hypoxic conditions. Moreover, our data reveal that the cap-independent translation of mTOR is necessary for its ability to induce cell-cycle progression into S phase. These results suggest a novel regulatory mechanism for mTOR gene expression that integrates the global protein synthesis changes induced by translational inhibitory conditions. © 2017 Marques-Ramos et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  20. DNA-dependent protein kinase inhibits AID-induced antibody gene conversion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam J L Cook

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Affinity maturation and class switching of antibodies requires activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID-dependent hypermutation of Ig V(DJ rearrangements and Ig S regions, respectively, in activated B cells. AID deaminates deoxycytidine bases in Ig genes, converting them into deoxyuridines. In V(DJ regions, subsequent excision of the deaminated bases by uracil-DNA glycosylase, or by mismatch repair, leads to further point mutation or gene conversion, depending on the species. In Ig S regions, nicking at the abasic sites produced by AID and uracil-DNA glycosylases results in staggered double-strand breaks, whose repair by nonhomologous end joining mediates Ig class switching. We have tested whether nonhomologous end joining also plays a role in V(DJ hypermutation using chicken DT40 cells deficient for Ku70 or the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs. Inactivation of the Ku70 or DNA-PKcs genes in DT40 cells elevated the rate of AID-induced gene conversion as much as 5-fold. Furthermore, DNA-PKcs-deficiency appeared to reduce point mutation. The data provide strong evidence that double-strand DNA ends capable of recruiting the DNA-dependent protein kinase complex are important intermediates in Ig V gene conversion.

  1. Inhibition of Uncoupling Protein 2 Attenuates Cardiac Hypertrophy Induced by Transverse Aortic Constriction in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Bing Ji

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2 is critical in regulating energy metabolism. Due to the significant change in energy metabolism of myocardium upon pressure overload, we hypothesize that UCP2 could contribute to the etiology of cardiac hypertrophy. Methods: Adult male C57BL/6J mice were subjected to pressure overload by using transverse aortic constriction (TAC, and then received genipin (a UCP2 selective inhibitor; 25 mg/kg/d, ip or vehicle for three weeks prior to histologic assessment of myocardial hypertrophy. ATP concentration, ROS level, and myocardial apoptosis were also examined. A parallel set of experiments was also conducted in UCP2-/- mice. Results: TAC induced left ventricular hypertrophy, as reflected by increased ventricular weight/thickness and increased size of myocardial cell (vs. sham controls. ATP concentration was decreased; ROS level was increased. Apoptosis and fibrosis markers were increased. TAC increased mitochondrial UCP2 expression in the myocardium at both mRNA and protein levels. Genipin treatment attenuated cardiac hypertrophy and the histologic/biochemical changes described above. Hypertrophy and associated changes induced by TAC in UCP2-/- mice were much less pronounced than in WT mice. Conclusions: Blocking UCP2 expression attenuates cardiac hypertrophy induced by pressure overload.

  2. In vitro and in vivo α-amylase and α-glucosidase inhibiting activities of the protein extracts from two varieties of bitter gourd (Momordica charantia L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poovitha, Sundar; Parani, Madasamy

    2016-07-18

    α-amylase and α-glucosidase digest the carbohydrates and increase the postprandial glucose level in diabetic patients. Inhibiting the activity of these two enzymes can control postprandial hyperglycemia, and reduce the risk of developing diabetes. Bitter gourd or balsam pear is one of the important medicinal plants used for controlling postprandial hyperglycemia in diabetes patients. However, there is limited information available on the presence of α-amylase and α-glucosidase inhibiting compounds. In the current study, the protein extracts from the fruits of M. charantia var. charantia (MCC) and M. charantia var. muricata (MCM) were tested for α-amylase and α-glucosidase inhibiting activities in vitro, and glucose lowering activity after oral administration in vivo. The protein extract from both MCC and MCM inhibited the activity of α-amylase and α-glucosidase through competitive inhibition, which was on par with Acarbose as indicated by in vitro percentage of inhibition (66 to 69 %) and IC50 (0.26 to 0.29 mg/ml). Both the protein extracts significantly reduced peak blood glucose and area under the curve in Streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats, which were orally challenged with starch and sucrose. Protein extracts from the fruits of the two varieties of bitter gourd inhibited α-amylase and α-glucosidase in vitro and lowered the blood glucose level in vivo on par with Acarbose when orally administrated to Streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Further studies on mechanism of action and methods of safe and biologically active delivery will help to develop an anti-diabetic oral protein drug from these plants.

  3. Diabetes Impairs Wnt3 Protein-induced Neurogenesis in Olfactory Bulbs via Glutamate Transporter 1 Inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Tamami; Hidaka, Ryo; Fujimaki, Shin; Asashima, Makoto; Kuwabara, Tomoko

    2016-07-15

    Diabetes is associated with impaired cognitive function. Streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats exhibit a loss of neurogenesis and deficits in behavioral tasks involving spatial learning and memory; thus, impaired adult hippocampal neurogenesis may contribute to diabetes-associated cognitive deficits. Recent studies have demonstrated that adult neurogenesis generally occurs in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, the subventricular zone, and the olfactory bulbs (OB) and is defective in patients with diabetes. We hypothesized that OB neurogenesis and associated behaviors would be affected in diabetes. In this study, we show that inhibition of Wnt3-induced neurogenesis in the OB causes several behavioral deficits in STZ-induced diabetic rats, including impaired odor discrimination, cognitive dysfunction, and increased anxiety. Notably, the sodium- and chloride-dependent GABA transporters and excitatory amino acid transporters that localize to GABAergic and glutamatergic terminals decreased in the OB of diabetic rats. Moreover, GAT1 inhibitor administration also hindered Wnt3-induced neurogenesis in vitro Collectively, these data suggest that STZ-induced diabetes adversely affects OB neurogenesis via GABA and glutamate transporter systems, leading to functional impairments in olfactory performance. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. Inhibiting amyloid β-protein assembly: Size-activity relationships among grape seed-derived polyphenols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, Eric Y; Yamin, Ghiam; Beroukhim, Shiela; Chen, Benson; Kibalchenko, Mikhail; Jiang, Lin; Ho, Lap; Wang, Jun; Pasinetti, Giulio M; Teplow, David B

    2015-10-01

    Epidemiological evidence that red wine consumption negatively correlates with risk of Alzheimer's disease has led to experimental studies demonstrating that grape seed extracts inhibit the aggregation and oligomerization of Aβ in vitro and ameliorate neuropathology and behavioral deficits in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. The active agent in the extracts is a mixed population of polyphenolic compounds. To evaluate the relative potency of each of these compounds, HPLC was used to fractionate the mixture into monomers, dimers, and oligomers. Each fraction was analyzed for its effect on Aβ conformational dynamics (circular dichroism), oligomerization (zero-length photochemical cross-linking), aggregation kinetics (Thioflavin T fluorescence), and morphology (electron microscopy). The relative activities of each fraction were determined on the basis of molar concentration (mol/L) or mass concentration (g/L). When molar concentration, the number concentration of each polyphenolic compound, was considered, the oligomer fraction was the most potent inhibitor of Aβ oligomerization and aggregation. However, when mass concentration, the number concentration of phenolic groups, was considered, monomers were the most potent inhibitors. To understand these ostensibly contradictory results, a model of polyphenol:Aβ complexation was developed. This model, which was found to be consistent with published X-ray crystallographic studies, offers an explanation for the effects of functional group polyvalency on inhibitor activity. Our data emphasize the importance of an in-depth understanding of the mechanism(s) underlying 'concentration dependence' in inhibitor systems involving polyfunctional agents. © 2015 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  5. A fusion protein consisting of IL-16 and the encephalitogenic peptide of myelin basic protein constitutes an antigen-specific tolerogenic vaccine that inhibits experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannie, Mark D; Abbott, Derek J

    2007-08-01

    To test a novel concept for the generation of tolerogenic vaccines, fusion proteins were constructed encompassing a tolerogenic or biasing cytokine and the major encephalitogenic peptide of guinea pig myelin basic protein (GPMBP; i.e., neuroantigen or NAg). The cytokine domain was predicted to condition APC while simultaneously targeting the covalently linked encephalitogenic peptide to the MHC class II Ag processing pathway of those conditioned APC. Rats were given three s.c. injections of cytokine-NAg in saline 1-2 wk apart and then at least 1 wk later were challenged with NAg in CFA. The rank order of tolerogenic activity in the Lewis rat model of EAE was NAgIL16 > IL2NAg > IL1RA-NAg, IL13NAg >or= IL10NAg, GPMBP, GP69-88, and saline. NAgIL16 was also an effective inhibitor of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis when administered after an encephalitogenic challenge during the onset of clinical signs. Covalent linkage of the NAg and IL-16 was required for inhibition of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. These data identify IL-16 as an optimal cytokine partner for the generation of tolerogenic vaccines and indicate that such vaccines may serve as Ag-specific tolerogens for the treatment of autoimmune disease.

  6. The Vertebrate Protein Dead End Maintains Primordial Germ Cell Fate by Inhibiting Somatic Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross-Thebing, Theresa; Yigit, Sargon; Pfeiffer, Jana; Reichman-Fried, Michal; Bandemer, Jan; Ruckert, Christian; Rathmer, Christin; Goudarzi, Mehdi; Stehling, Martin; Tarbashevich, Katsiaryna; Seggewiss, Jochen; Raz, Erez

    2017-12-18

    Maintaining cell fate relies on robust mechanisms that prevent the differentiation of specified cells into other cell types. This is especially critical during embryogenesis, when extensive cell proliferation, patterning, and migration events take place. Here we show that vertebrate primordial germ cells (PGCs) are protected from reprogramming into other cell types by the RNA-binding protein Dead end (Dnd). PGCs knocked down for Dnd lose their characteristic morphology and adopt various somatic cell fates. Concomitantly, they gain a gene expression profile reflecting differentiation into cells of different germ layers, in a process that we could direct by expression of specific cell-fate determinants. Importantly, we visualized these events within live zebrafish embryos, which provide temporal information regarding cell reprogramming. Our results shed light on the mechanisms controlling germ cell fate maintenance and are relevant for the formation of teratoma, a tumor class composed of cells from more than one germ layer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Inhibition of immune responses and related proteins in Rhamdia quelen exposed to diclofenac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribas, João L C; Sherry, James P; Zampronio, Aleksander R; Silva de Assis, Helena C; Simmons, Denina B D

    2017-08-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are among the most widely detected pharmaceuticals in surface water worldwide. The nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac is used to treat many types of pain and inflammation. Diclofenac's potential to cause adverse effects in exposed wildlife is a growing concern. To evaluate the effects of waterborne diclofenac on the immune response in Rhamdia quelen (South American catfish), fish were exposed to 3 concentrations of diclofenac (0.2, 2.0, and 20.0 μg/L) for 14 d. Some of the exposed fish were also given an intraperitoneal injection on day 14 of 1 mg/kg of carrageenan to evaluate cell migration to the peritoneum. Total blood leukocyte count and carrageenan-induced leukocyte migration to the peritoneal cavity, particularly of polymorphonuclear cells, were significantly affected for all diclofenac exposure groups. Nitric oxide production was significantly reduced in the diclofenac-treated fish. Plasma and kidney proteins were analyzed by means of liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in a shotgun proteomic approach. In both plasma and kidney of diclofenac-exposed R. quelen, the expression of 20 proteins related to the inflammatory process, nitric oxide production, leukocyte migration, and the complement cascade was significantly altered. In addition, class I major histocompatibility complex was significantly decreased in plasma of diclofenac-treated fish. Thus, waterborne exposure to diclofenac could lead to suppression of the innate immune system in R. quelen. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:2092-2107. © 2017 SETAC. © 2017 SETAC.

  8. Targeting angiogenesis inhibits tumor infiltration and expression of the pro-invasive protein SPARC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vajkoczy, P; Menger, M D; Goldbrunner, R; Ge, S; Fong, T A; Vollmar, B; Schilling, L; Ullrich, A; Hirth, K P; Tonn, J C; Schmiedek, P; Rempel, S A

    2000-07-15

    The solid growth of high-grade glioma appears to be critically dependent on tumor angiogenesis. It remains unknown, however, whether the diffuse infiltration of glioma cells into healthy adjacent tissue is also dependent on the formation of new tumor vessels. Here, we analyze the relationship between tumor angiogenesis and tumor cell infiltration in an experimental glioma model. C6 cells were implanted into the dorsal skinfold chamber of nude mice, and tumor angiogenesis was monitored by intravital fluorescence videomicroscopy. Glioma infiltration was assessed by the extent of tumor cell invasion into the adjacent chamber tissue and by expression of SPARC, a cellular marker of glioma invasiveness. To test the hypothesis that glioma angiogenesis and glioma infiltration are codependent, we assessed tumor infiltration in both the presence and the absence of the angiogenesis inhibitor SU5416. SU5416 is a selective inhibitor of the VEGF/Flk-1 signal-transduction pathway, a critical pathway implicated in angiogenesis. Control tumors demonstrated both high angiogenic activity and tumor cell invasion accompanied by strong expression of SPARC in invading tumor cells at the tumor-host tissue border. SU5416-treated tumors demonstrated reduced vascular density and vascular surface in the tumor periphery accompanied by marked inhibition of glioma invasion and decreased SPARC expression. A direct effect of SU5416 on glioma cell motility and invasiveness was excluded by in vitro migration and invasion assays. These results suggest a crucial role for glioma-induced angiogenesis as a prerequisite for diffuse tumor invasion and a possible therapeutic role for anti-angiogenic compounds as inhibitors of both solid and diffuse infiltrative tumor growth. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Laminin 211 inhibits protein kinase A in Schwann cells to modulate neuregulin 1 type III-driven myelination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghidinelli, Monica; Poitelon, Yannick; Shin, Yoon Kyoung; Ameroso, Dominique; Williamson, Courtney; Ferri, Cinzia; Pellegatta, Marta; Espino, Kevin; Mogha, Amit; Monk, Kelly; Podini, Paola; Taveggia, Carla; Nave, Klaus-Armin; Wrabetz, Lawrence; Park, Hwan Tae

    2017-01-01

    Myelin is required for proper nervous system function. Schwann cells in developing nerves depend on extrinsic signals from the axon and from the extracellular matrix to first sort and ensheathe a single axon and then myelinate it. Neuregulin 1 type III (Nrg1III) and laminin α2β1γ1 (Lm211) are the key axonal and matrix signals, respectively, but how their signaling is integrated and if each molecule controls both axonal sorting and myelination is unclear. Here, we use a series of epistasis experiments to show that Lm211 modulates neuregulin signaling to ensure the correct timing and amount of myelination. Lm211 can inhibit Nrg1III by limiting protein kinase A (PKA) activation, which is required to initiate myelination. We provide evidence that excessive PKA activation amplifies promyelinating signals downstream of neuregulin, including direct activation of the neuregulin receptor ErbB2 and its effector Grb2-Associated Binder-1 (Gab1), thereby elevating the expression of the key transcription factors Oct6 and early growth response protein 2 (Egr2). The inhibitory effect of Lm211 is seen only in fibers of small caliber. These data may explain why hereditary neuropathies associated with decreased laminin function are characterized by focally thick and redundant myelin. PMID:28636612

  10. Whey protein increases muscle weight gain through inhibition of oxidative effects induced by resistance exercise in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Kely R; Silva, Marcelo E; de Lima, Wanderson G; Pedrosa, Maria L; Haraguchi, Fabiano K

    2016-10-01

    Whey protein (WP) is known for its nutritional value and antioxidant properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the antioxidant properties of WP could contribute to muscle weight gain in response to resistance exercise (RE). We hypothesized that WP ingestion could increase muscle weight gain in rats subjected to an RE program, through inhibition of oxidative effects induced by high-intensity RE. Thirty-two male Fischer rats were randomly assigned to control sedentary, control exercised, WP sedentary, and WP exercised groups (n=8/group). The RE consisted of inducing the rats to perform sets of jumps for 8 weeks. Body and muscle weight gains, muscle glutathione content, histopathology, muscle antioxidant enzyme activities, and gene expression were evaluated. Body and muscle weight gains of exercised rats fed WP were higher than those of control exercised rats. Concomitantly, RE induced an increase in phagocyte infiltration, protein oxidation, and down-regulation of glutathione peroxidase and gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase messenger RNA expression in gastrocnemius muscle (Pmuscle glutathione content was increased only by WP (P.05). These findings suggest that differences in body and muscle weight gain in exercised rats fed control or WP diets were mediated, in part, by the antioxidant properties of WP, and indicate that when associated with RE, WP represents a nutritional aid to support muscle growth. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Low Protein Diet Inhibits Uric Acid Synthesis and Attenuates Renal Damage in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianmin Ran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Several studies indicated that hyperuricemia may link to the worsening of diabetic nephropathy (DN. Meanwhile, low protein diet (LPD retards exacerbation of renal damage in chronic kidney disease. We then assessed whether LPD influences uric acid metabolism and benefits the progression of DN in streptozotocin- (STZ- induced diabetic rats. Methods. STZ-induced and control rats were both fed with LPD (5% and normal protein diet (18%, respectively, for 12 weeks. Vital signs, blood and urinary samples for UA metabolism were taken and analyzed every 3 weeks. Kidneys were removed at the end of the experiment. Results. Diabetic rats developed into constantly high levels of serum UA (SUA, creatinine (SCr and 24 h amounts of urinary albumin excretion (UAE, creatintine (UCr, urea nitrogen (UUN, and uric acid (UUA. LPD significantly decreased SUA, UAE, and blood glucose, yet left SCr, UCr, and UUN unchanged. A stepwise regression showed that high UUA is an independent risk factor for DN. LPD remarkably ameliorated degrees of enlarged glomeruli, proliferated mesangial cells, and hyaline-degenerated tubular epithelial cells in diabetic rats. Expression of TNF-α in tubulointerstitium significantly decreased in LPD-fed diabetic rats. Conclusion. LPD inhibits endogenous uric acid synthesis and might accordingly attenuate renal damage in STZ-induced diabetic rats.

  12. Faox enzymes inhibited Maillard reaction development during storage both in protein glucose model system and low lactose UHT milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troise, Antonio Dario; Dathan, Nina A; Fiore, Alberto; Roviello, Giovanni; Di Fiore, Anna; Caira, Simonetta; Cuollo, Marina; De Simone, Giuseppina; Fogliano, Vincenzo; Monti, Simona M

    2014-02-01

    Fructosamines, also known as Amadori products, are formed by the condensation of glucose with the amino group of amino acids or proteins. These compounds are precursors of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) that can be formed either endogenously during aging and diabetes, and exogenously in heat-processed food. The negative effects of dietary AGEs on human health as well as their negative impact on the quality of dairy products have been widely described, therefore specific tools able to prevent the formation of glycation products are needed. Two fructosamine oxidase enzymes isolated from Aspergillus sp. namely, Faox I and Faox II catalyze the oxidative deglycation of Amadori products representing a potential tool for inhibiting the Maillard reaction in dairy products. In this paper, the ability of recombinant Faox I and II in limiting the formation of carboxy-methyl lysine (CML) and protein-bound hydroxymethyl furfurol (b-HMF) in a commercial UHT low lactose milk and a beta-lactoglobulin (β-LG) glucose model system was investigated. Results show a consistent reduction of CML and b-HMF under all conditions. Faox effects were particularly evident on b-HMF formation in low lactose commercial milk. Peptide analysis of the β-LG glucose system identified some peptides, derived from cyanogen bromide hydrolysis, as suitable candidates to monitor Faox action in milk-based products. All in all data suggested that non-enzymatic reactions in dairy products might be strongly reduced by implementing Faox enzymes.

  13. Inhibition of mTORC1 Enhances the Translation of Chikungunya Proteins via the Activation of the MnK/eIF4E Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre-Emmanuel Joubert

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Chikungunya virus (CHIKV, the causative agent of a major epidemic spanning five continents, is a positive stranded mRNA virus that replicates using the cell's cap-dependent translation machinery. Despite viral infection inhibiting mTOR, a metabolic sensor controls cap-dependent translation, viral proteins are efficiently translated. Rapalog treatment, silencing of mtor or raptor genes, but not rictor, further enhanced CHIKV infection in culture cells. Using biochemical assays and real time imaging, we demonstrate that this effect is independent of autophagy or type I interferon production. Providing in vivo evidence for the relevance of our findings, mice treated with mTORC1 inhibitors exhibited increased lethality and showed a higher sensitivity to CHIKV. A systematic evaluation of the viral life cycle indicated that inhibition of mTORC1 has a specific positive effect on viral proteins, enhancing viral replication by increasing the translation of both structural and nonstructural proteins. Molecular analysis defined a role for phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K and MAP kinase-activated protein kinase (MnKs activation, leading to the hyper-phosphorylation of eIF4E. Finally, we demonstrated that in the context of CHIKV inhibition of mTORC1, viral replication is prioritized over host translation via a similar mechanism. Our study reveals an unexpected bypass pathway by which CHIKV protein translation overcomes viral induced mTORC1 inhibition.

  14. CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein beta inhibits proliferation in monocytic cells by affecting the retinoblastoma protein/E2F/cyclin E pathway but is not directly required for macrophage morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutsch, Romina; Kandemir, Judith D; Pietsch, Daniel; Cappello, Christian; Meyer, Johann; Simanowski, Kathrin; Huber, René; Brand, Korbinian

    2011-07-01

    Monocytic differentiation is orchestrated by complex networks that are not fully understood. This study further elucidates the involvement of transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBPβ). Initially, we demonstrated a marked increase in nuclear C/EBPβ-liver-enriched activating protein* (LAP*)/liver-enriched activating protein (LAP) levels and LAP/liver-enriched inhibiting protein (LIP) ratios in phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-treated differentiating THP-1 premonocytic cells accompanied by reduced proliferation. To directly study C/EBPβ effects on monocytic cells, we generated novel THP-1-derived (low endogenous C/EBPβ) cell lines stably overexpressing C/EBPβ isoforms. Most importantly, cells predominantly overexpressing LAP* (C/EBPβ-long), but not those overexpressing LIP (C/EBPβ-short), exhibited a reduced proliferation, with no effect on morphology. PMA-induced inhibition of proliferation was attenuated in C/EBPβ-short cells. In C/EBPβ(WT) macrophage-like cells (high endogenous C/EBPβ), we measured a reduced proliferation/cycling index compared with C/EBPβ(KO). The typical macrophage morphology was only observed in C/EBPβ(WT), whereas C/EBPβ(KO) stayed round. C/EBPα did not compensate for C/EBPβ effects on proliferation/morphology. Serum reduction, an independent approach known to inhibit proliferation, induced macrophage morphology in C/EBPβ(KO) macrophage-like cells but not THP-1. In PMA-treated THP-1 and C/EBPβ-long cells, a reduced phosphorylation of cell cycle repressor retinoblastoma was found. In addition, C/EBPβ-long cells showed reduced c-Myc expression accompanied by increased CDK inhibitor p27 and reduced cyclin D1 levels. Finally, C/EBPβ-long and C/EBPβ(WT) cells exhibited low E2F1 and cyclin E levels, and C/EBPβ overexpression was found to inhibit cyclin E1 promoter-dependent transcription. Our results suggest that C/EBPβ reduces monocytic proliferation by affecting the retinoblastoma/E2F/cyclin E

  15. Evaluations of in vitro metabolism, drug-drug interactions mediated by reversible and time-dependent inhibition of CYPs, and plasma protein binding of MMB4 DMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, S Peter; Lusiak, Bozena D; Burback, Brian L; Johnson, Jerry D

    2013-01-01

    1,1'-Methylenebis[4-[(hydroxyimino)methyl]-pyridinium] (MMB4) dimethanesulfonate (DMS) is a bisquaternary pyridinium aldoxime that reactivates acetylcholinesterase inhibited by organophosphorus nerve agent. Drug metabolism and plasma protein binding for MMB4 DMS were examined using various techniques and a wide range of species. When (14)C-MMB4 DMS was incubated in liver microsomes, 4-pyridine aldoxime (4-PA) and an additional metabolite were detected in all species tested. Identity of the additional metabolite was postulated to be isonicotinic acid (INA) based on liquid chromatography with a tandem mass spectrometry analysis, which was confirmed by comparison with authentic INA. Formation of INA was dependent on species, with the highest level found in monkey liver microsomes. The MMB4 DMS exhibited reversible inhibition in a concentration-dependent manner toward cytochrome P450 1A2 (CYP1A2), CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, and CYP3A4 in human liver microsomes showing the highest inhibition for CYP2D6. Human recombinant CYPs were used to evaluate inhibitory curves more adequately and determine detailed kinetic constants for reversible inhibition and potential time-dependent inhibition (TDI). The MMB4 DMS exhibited reversible inhibition toward human-recombinant CYP2D6 with an inhibition constant (K i) value of 66.6 µmol/L. Based on the k inact/K I values, MMB4 DMS was found to exhibit the most potent TDI toward CYP2D6. The MMB4 DMS at 5 different concentrations was incubated in plasma for 5 hours using an equilibrium dialysis device. For all species tested, there were no concentration-dependent changes in plasma protein binding, ranging from 10% to 17%. These results suggest that MMB4 was not extensively bound to plasma protein, and there were no overt species-related differences in the extent of MMB4 bound to plasma protein.

  16. A public antibody lineage that potently inhibits malaria infection through dual binding to the circumsporozoite protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Joshua; Sack, Brandon K; Oyen, David; Zenklusen, Isabelle; Piccoli, Luca; Barbieri, Sonia; Foglierini, Mathilde; Fregni, Chiara Silacci; Marcandalli, Jessica; Jongo, Said; Abdulla, Salim; Perez, Laurent; Corradin, Giampietro; Varani, Luca; Sallusto, Federica; Sim, Betty Kim Lee; Hoffman, Stephen L; Kappe, Stefan H I; Daubenberger, Claudia; Wilson, Ian A; Lanzavecchia, Antonio

    2018-03-19

    Immunization with attenuated Plasmodium falciparum sporozoites (PfSPZs) has been shown to be protective against malaria, but the features of the antibody response induced by this treatment remain unclear. To investigate this response in detail, we isolated IgM and IgG monoclonal antibodies from Tanzanian volunteers who were immunized with repeated injection of Sanaria PfSPZ Vaccine and who were found to be protected from controlled human malaria infection with infectious homologous PfSPZs. All isolated IgG monoclonal antibodies bound to P. falciparum circumsporozoite protein (PfCSP) and recognized distinct epitopes in its N terminus, NANP-repeat region, and C terminus. Strikingly, the most effective antibodies, as determined in a humanized mouse model, bound not only to the repeat region, but also to a minimal peptide at the PfCSP N-terminal junction that is not in the RTS,S vaccine. These dual-specific antibodies were isolated from different donors and were encoded by VH3-30 or VH3-33 alleles that encode tryptophan or arginine at position 52. Using structural and mutational data, we describe the elements required for germline recognition and affinity maturation. Our study provides potent neutralizing antibodies and relevant information for lineage-targeted vaccine design and immunization strategies.

  17. Structural basis for G9a-like protein lysine methyltransferase inhibition by BIX-01294

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Yanqi; Zhang, Xing; Horton, John R.; Upadhyay, Anup K.; Spannhoff, Astrid; Liu, Jin; Synder, James P.; Bedford, Mark T.; Cheng, Xiaodong; (Emory-MED); (Emory); (Texas)

    2009-03-26

    Histone lysine methylation is an important epigenetic mark that regulates gene expression and chromatin organization. G9a and G9a-like protein (GLP) are euchromatin-associated methyltransferases that repress transcription by methylating histone H3 Lys9. BIX-01294 was originally identified as a G9a inhibitor during a chemical library screen of small molecules and has previously been used in the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells. Here we present the crystal structure of the catalytic SET domain of GLP in complex with BIX-01294 and S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine. The inhibitor is bound in the substrate peptide groove at the location where the histone H3 residues N-terminal to the target lysine lie in the previously solved structure of the complex with histone peptide. The inhibitor resembles the bound conformation of histone H3 Lys4 to Arg8, and is positioned in place by residues specific for G9a and GLP through specific interactions.

  18. Blockade of vascular adhesion protein-1 inhibits lymphocyte infiltration in rat liver allograft rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelius, Timi; Salaspuro, Ville; Salmi, Marko; Krogerus, Leena; Höckerstedt, Krister; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Lautenschlager, Irmeli

    2004-12-01

    Vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) has been shown to mediate lymphocyte adhesion to endothelia at sites of inflammation, but its functional role in vivo has not been tested in any rodent model. Here we report the effects of VAP-1 blockade on rat liver allograft rejection. BN recipients of PVG liver allografts (known to develop acute rejection by day 7) were treated with 2 mg/kg anti-VAP-1 (a new anti-rat VAP-1 mAb 174-5) or isotype-matched irrelevant antibody (NS1) every other day (n = 6/group) and one group with anti-VAP-1 2 mg/kg daily (n = 7). On day 7, samples were collected for transplant aspiration cytology, histology, and immunohistochemistry. Lymphocyte infiltration to the graft was clearly affected by VAP-blockade. The total inflammation, mainly the number of active lymphoid cells, in transplant aspiration cytology was significantly decreased in animals treated with anti-VAP-1 (4.7 +/- 1.0 and 2.4 +/- 1.0 corrected increment units, respectively) compared to control (6.6 +/- 1.0) (P VAP-1 plays an important role in lymphocyte infiltration to sites of inflammation, and, in particular, liver allograft rejection.

  19. AT-406, an orally active antagonist of multiple inhibitor of apoptosis proteins, inhibits progression of human ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunckhorst, Melissa K; Lerner, Dimitry; Wang, Shaomeng; Yu, Qin

    2012-07-01

    Ovarian carcinoma is the most deadly gynecological malignancy. Current chemotherapeutic drugs are only transiently effective and patients with advance disease often develop resistance despite significant initial responses. Mounting evidence suggests that anti-apoptotic proteins, including those of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP) family, play important roles in the chemoresistance. There has been a recent emergence of compounds that block the IAP functions. Here, we evaluated AT-406, a novel and orally active antagonist of multiple IAP proteins, in ovarian cancer cells as a single agent and in the combination with carboplatin for therapeutic efficacy and mechanism of action. We demonstrate that AT-406 has significant single agent activity in 60% of human ovarian cancer cell lines examined in vitro and inhibits ovarian cancer progression in vivo and that 3 out of 5 carboplatin-resistant cell lines are sensitive to AT-406, highlighting the therapeutic potential of AT-406 for patients with inherent or acquired platinum resistance. Additionally, our in vivo studies show that AT-406 enhances the carboplatin-induced ovarian cancer cell death and increases survival of the experimental mice, suggesting that AT-406 sensitizes the response of these cells to carboplatin. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that AT-406 induced apoptosis is correlated with its ability to down-regulate XIAP whereas AT-406 induces cIAP1 degradation in both AT-406 sensitive and resistance cell lines. Together, these results demonstrate, for the first time, the anti-ovarian cancer efficacy of AT-406 as a single agent and in the combination with carboplatin, suggesting that AT-406 has potential as a novel therapy for ovarian cancer patients, especially for patients exhibiting resistance to the platinum-based therapies.

  20. Human Genetic Relevance and Potent Antitumor Activity of Heat Shock Protein 90 Inhibition in Canine Lung Adenocarcinoma Cell Lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Clemente-Vicario

    Full Text Available It has been an open question how similar human and canine lung cancers are. This has major implications in availability of human treatments for dogs and in establishing translational models to test new therapies in pet dogs. The prognosis for canine advanced lung cancer is poor and new treatments are needed. Heat shock protein 90 (HSP90 is an ATPase-dependent molecular chaperone ubiquitously expressed in eukaryotic cells. HSP90 is essential for posttranslational conformational maturation and stability of client proteins including protein kinases and transcription factors, many of which are important for the proliferation and survival of cancer cells. We investigated the activity of STA-1474, a HSP90 inhibitor, in two canine lung cancer cell lines, BACA and CLAC.Comparative genomic hybridization analysis of both cell lines revealed genetic relevance to human non-small cell lung cancer. STA-1474 inhibited growth and induced apoptosis of both cell lines in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The ICs50 after 72 h treatment with STA-1474 were 0.08 and 0.11 μM for BACA and CLAC, respectively. When grown as spheroids, the IC50 of STA-1474 for BACA cells was approximately two-fold higher than when grown as a monolayer (0.348 μM vs. 0.168 μM, whereas CLAC spheroids were relatively drug resistant. Treatment of tumor-stromal fibroblasts with STA-1474 resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in their relative cell viability with a low IC50 of 0.28 μM.Here we first established that lung adenocarcinoma in people and dogs are genetically and biochemically similar. STA1474 demonstrated biological activity in both canine lung cancer cell lines and tumor-stromal fibroblasts. As significant decreases in relative cell viability can be achieved with nanomolar concentrations of STA-1474, investigation into the clinical efficacy of this drug in canine lung cancer patients is warranted.

  1. Triptolide inhibits transcription of hTERT through down-regulation of transcription factor specificity protein 1 in primary effusion lymphoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, Cong; Wang, Jingchao; Guo, Wei; Wang, Huan; Wang, Chao; Liu, Yu; Sun, Xiaoping

    2016-01-01

    Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) is a rare and aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), a key component responsible for the regulation of telomerase activity, plays important roles in cellular immortalization and cancer development. Triptolide purified from Tripterygium extracts displays a broad-spectrum bioactivity profile, including immunosuppressive, anti-inflammatory, and anti-tumor. In this study, it is investigated whether triptolide reduces hTERT expression and suppresses its activity in PEL cells. The mRNA and protein levels of hTERT were examined by real time-PCR and Western blotting, respectively. The activity of hTERT promoter was determined by Dual luciferase reporter assay. Our results demonstrated that triptolide decreased expression of hTERT at both mRNA and protein levels. Further gene sequence analysis indicated that the activity of hTERT promoter was suppressed by triptolide. Triptolide also reduced the half-time of hTERT. Additionally, triptolide inhibited the expression of transcription factor specificity protein 1(Sp1) in PEL cells. Furthermore, knock-down of Sp1 by using specific shRNAs resulted in down-regulation of hTERT transcription and protein expression levels. Inhibition of Sp1 by specific shRNAs enhanced triptolide-induced cell growth inhibition and apoptosis. Collectively, our results demonstrate that the inhibitory effect of triptolide on hTERT transcription is possibly mediated by inhibition of transcription factor Sp1 in PEL cells. - Highlights: • Triptolide reduces expression of hTERT by decreasing its transcription level. • Triptolide reduces promoter activity and stability of hTERT. • Triptolide down-regulates expression of Sp1. • Special Sp1 shRNAs inhibit transcription and protein expression of hTERT. • Triptolide and Sp1 shRNA2 induce cell proliferation inhibition and apoptosis.

  2. THE COMPARING OF ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY OF CSN1S2 PROTEIN OF FRESH MILK AND YOGHURT GOAT BREED ETHAWAH INHIBITED THE PATHOGENIC BACTERIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triprisila, Lidwina Faraline; Suharjono, Suharjono; Christianto, Antonius; Fatchiyah, Fatchiyah

    2016-07-24

    Goat milk is reported to have antimicrobial activity of several pathogen bacteria that contained on food materials. The research related with antimicrobial activity of Alpha-S2 casein from goat milk is relatively less than other casein components. Herein, we reported the antimicrobial activity of caprine Alpha-S2 Casein (CSN1S2) protein from Ethawah breed goat milk and yoghurt in Gram positive ( Listeria monocytogenes , Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus ) and negative pathogen bacteria ( Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhi and Shigella flexneri ). Those bacteria were known as pathogens that caused gastrointestinal infection. Serial dilution and agar diffusion analysis with three different concentrations of caprine CSN1S2, 1.25 mg/ml, 2.5 mg/ml, and 5 mg/ml were used to test the inhibition effect of protein on the viability of bacteria cells. The inhibitory activity of caprine CSN1S2 was based on dose dependent manner. Agar diffusion analysis was showed the larger diameter of clear zone at B. cereus and S. flexneri . The serial dilution analysis was shown the inhibition of almost in all groups of bacteria with concentration 5 mg/ml higher by CSN1S2 protein of goat fresh milk than yogurt. The inhibitory activity caprine CSN1S2 protein of fresh milk was shown a vary inhibition clear zone with optimal concentration 5 mg/ml, however CSN1S2 protein of goat yogurt intermediate effectively was only in gram negative bacteria. The weakness bacteria against inhibition activity caprine CSN1S2 protein was B. cereus (Gram positive) and S. flexneri (Gram negative). Meanwhile the strongest bacteria against inhibition activity caprine CSN1S2 protein was S. typhi (Gram negative), may cause in this bacteria has lipopolysaccharide prevent to interact with that protein as proper. This study result concluded that the caprine CSN1S2 protein has inhibition activity in opposition to pathogenic bacteria by optimal concentration 5 mg/ml in all bacteria and indicated caprine CSN1S2

  3. Inhibition of Bcl-2 or IAP proteins does not provoke mutations in surviving cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shekhar, Tanmay M. [Department of Biochemistry, La Trobe Institute for Molecular Science, La Trobe University, Bundoora 3083 (Australia); Green, Maja M. [Department of Biochemistry, La Trobe Institute for Molecular Science, La Trobe University, Bundoora 3083 (Australia); Department of Anatomy & Neuroscience, The University of Melbourne, Parkville 3010 (Australia); Rayner, David M.; Miles, Mark A.; Cutts, Suzanne M. [Department of Biochemistry, La Trobe Institute for Molecular Science, La Trobe University, Bundoora 3083 (Australia); Hawkins, Christine J., E-mail: c.hawkins@latrobe.edu.au [Department of Biochemistry, La Trobe Institute for Molecular Science, La Trobe University, Bundoora 3083 (Australia)

    2015-07-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Mutagenicities of anti-cancer drugs were tested using HPRT, γH2AX and comet assays. • TRAIL, doxorubicin and etoposide were more mutagenic than BH3- or Smac-mimetics. • Physiologically achievable levels of the BH3-mimetic ABT-737 were not mutagenic. • High concentrations of ABT-737 provoked mutations via an off-target mechanism. • Even very high concentrations of IAP antagonists were not mutagenic. - Abstract: Chemotherapy and radiotherapy can cause permanent damage to the genomes of surviving cells, provoking severe side effects such as second malignancies in some cancer survivors. Drugs that mimic the activity of death ligands, or antagonise pro-survival proteins of the Bcl-2 or IAP families have yielded encouraging results in animal experiments and early phase clinical trials. Because these agents directly engage apoptosis pathways, rather than damaging DNA to indirectly provoke tumour cell death, we reasoned that they may offer another important advantage over conventional therapies: minimisation or elimination of side effects such as second cancers that result from mutation of surviving normal cells. Disappointingly, however, we previously found that concentrations of death receptor agonists like TRAIL that would be present in vivo in clinical settings provoked DNA damage in surviving cells. In this study, we used cell line model systems to investigate the mutagenic capacity of drugs from two other classes of direct apoptosis-inducing agents: the BH3-mimetic ABT-737 and the IAP antagonists LCL161 and AT-406. Encouragingly, our data suggest that IAP antagonists possess negligible genotoxic activity. Doses of ABT-737 that were required to damage DNA stimulated Bax/Bak-independent signalling and exceeded concentrations detected in the plasma of animals treated with this drug. These findings provide hope that cancer patients treated by BH3-mimetics or IAP antagonists may avoid mutation-related illnesses that afflict

  4. Pharmacological Inhibition of Protein Kinase G1 Enhances Bone Formation by Human Skeletal Stem Cells Through Activation of RhoA-Akt Signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kermani, Abbas Jafari; Siersbaek, Majken S; Chen, Li

    2015-01-01

    Development of novel approaches to enhance bone regeneration is needed for efficient treatment of bone defects. Protein kinases play a key role in regulation of intracellular signal transduction pathways, and pharmacological targeting of protein kinases has led to development of novel treatments...... that pharmacological inhibition of PRKG1 in hMSC implanted at the site of bone defect can enhance bone regeneration. Stem Cells 2015....

  5. The Hemoglobin Receptor Protein of Porphyromonas gingivalis Inhibits Receptor Activator NF-κB Ligand-Induced Osteoclastogenesis from Bone Marrow Macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Fujimura, Yuji; Hotokezaka, Hitoshi; Ohara, Naoya; Naito, Mariko; Sakai, Eiko; Yoshimura, Mamiko; Narita, Yuka; Kitaura, Hideki; Yoshida, Noriaki; Nakayama, Koji

    2006-01-01

    Extracellular proteinaceous factors of Porphyromonas gingivalis, a periodontal pathogen, that influence receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclastogenesis from bone marrow macrophages were investigated. The culture supernatant of P. gingivalis had the ability to inhibit RANKL-induced in vitro osteoclastogenesis. A major protein of the culture supernatant, hemoglobin receptor protein (HbR), suppressed RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in a dose-dependent f...

  6. Metformin reduces lipid accumulation in macrophages by inhibiting FOXO1-mediated transcription of fatty acid-binding protein 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Jun; Ren, Pingping; Zhang, Lin; Wang, Xing Li; Chen, Li; Shen, Ying H.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The accumulation of lipids in macrophages contributes to the development of atherosclerosis. Strategies to reduce lipid accumulation in macrophages may have therapeutic potential for preventing and treating atherosclerosis and cardiovascular complications. The antidiabetic drug metformin has been reported to reduce lipid accumulation in adipocytes. In this study, we examined the effects of metformin on lipid accumulation in macrophages and investigated the mechanisms involved. Methods and results: We observed that metformin significantly reduced palmitic acid (PA)-induced intracellular lipid accumulation in macrophages. Metformin promoted the expression of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT-1), while reduced the expression of fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4) which was involved in PA-induced lipid accumulation. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that metformin regulates FABP4 expression at the transcriptional level. We identified forkhead transcription factor FOXO1 as a positive regulator of FABP4 expression. Inhibiting FOXO1 expression with FOXO1 siRNA significantly reduced basal and PA-induced FABP4 expression. Overexpression of wild-type FOXO1 and constitutively active FOXO1 significantly increased FABP4 expression, whereas dominant negative FOXO1 dramatically decreased FABP4 expression. Metformin reduced FABP4 expression by promoting FOXO1 nuclear exclusion and subsequently inhibiting its activity. Conclusions: Taken together, these results suggest that metformin reduces lipid accumulation in macrophages by repressing FOXO1-mediated FABP4 transcription. Thus, metformin may have a protective effect against lipid accumulation in macrophages and may serve as a therapeutic agent for preventing and treating atherosclerosis in metabolic syndrome.

  7. MIR144* inhibits antimicrobial responses against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in human monocytes and macrophages by targeting the autophagy protein DRAM2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Kyung; Lee, Hye-Mi; Park, Ki-Sun; Shin, Dong-Min; Kim, Tae Sung; Kim, Yi Sak; Suh, Hyun-Woo; Kim, Soo Yeon; Kim, In Soo; Kim, Jin-Man; Son, Ji-Woong; Sohn, Kyung Mok; Jung, Sung Soo; Chung, Chaeuk; Han, Sang-Bae; Yang, Chul-Su; Jo, Eun-Kyeong

    2017-02-01

    Autophagy is an important antimicrobial effector process that defends against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the human pathogen causing tuberculosis (TB). MicroRNAs (miRNAs), endogenous noncoding RNAs, are involved in various biological functions and act as post-transcriptional regulators to target mRNAs. The process by which miRNAs affect antibacterial autophagy and host defense mechanisms against Mtb infections in human monocytes and macrophages is largely uncharacterized. In this study, we show that Mtb significantly induces the expression of MIR144*/hsa-miR-144-5p, which targets the 3'-untranslated region of DRAM2 (DNA damage regulated autophagy modulator 2) in human monocytes and macrophages. Mtb infection downregulated, whereas the autophagy activators upregulated, DRAM2 expression in human monocytes and macrophages by activating AMP-activated protein kinase. In addition, overexpression of MIR144* decreased DRAM2 expression and formation of autophagosomes in human monocytes, whereas inhibition of MIR144* had the opposite effect. Moreover, the levels of MIR144* were elevated, whereas DRAM2 levels were reduced, in human peripheral blood cells and tissues in TB patients, indicating the clinical significance of MIR144* and DRAM2 in human TB. Notably, DRAM2 interacted with BECN1 and UVRAG, essential components of the autophagic machinery, leading to displacement of RUBCN from the BECN1 complex and enhancement of Ptdlns3K activity. Furthermore, MIR144* and DRAM2 were critically involved in phagosomal maturation and enhanced antimicrobial effects against Mtb. Our findings identify a previously unrecognized role of human MIR144* in the inhibition of antibacterial autophagy and the innate host immune response to Mtb. Additionally, these data reveal that DRAM2 is a key coordinator of autophagy activation that enhances antimicrobial activity against Mtb.

  8. Knockdown of MAGEA6 Activates AMP-Activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) Signaling to Inhibit Human Renal Cell Carcinoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xueting; Xie, Jing; Huang, Hang; Deng, Zhexian

    2018-01-01

    Melanoma antigen A6 (MAGEA6) is a cancer-specific ubiquitin ligase of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). The current study tested MAGEA6 expression and potential function in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). MAGEA6 and AMPK expression in human RCC tissues and RCC cells were tested by Western blotting assay and qRT-PCR assay. shRNA method was applied to knockdown MAGEA6 in human RCC cells. Cell survival and proliferation were tested by MTT assay and BrdU ELISA assay, respectively. Cell apoptosis was tested by the TUNEL assay and single strand DNA ELISA assay. The 786-O xenograft in nude mouse model was established to test RCC cell growth in vivo. MAGEA6 is specifically expressed in RCC tissues as well as in the established (786-O and A498) and primary human RCC cells. MAGEA6 expression is correlated with AMPKα1 downregulation in RCC tissues and cells. It is not detected in normal renal tissues nor in the HK-2 renal epithelial cells. MAGEA6 knockdown by targeted-shRNA induced AMPK stabilization and activation, which led to mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) in-activation and RCC cell death/apoptosis. AMPK inhibition, by AMPKα1 shRNA or the dominant negative AMPKα1 (T172A), almost reversed MAGEA6 knockdown-induced RCC cell apoptosis. Conversely, expression of the constitutive-active AMPKα1 (T172D) mimicked the actions by MAGEA6 shRNA. In vivo, MAGEA6 shRNA-bearing 786-O tumors grew significantly slower in nude mice than the control tumors. AMPKα1 stabilization and activation as well as mTORC1 in-activation were detected in MAGEA6 shRNA tumor tissues. MAGEA6 knockdown inhibits human RCC cells via activating AMPK signaling. © 2018 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Pterostilbene acts through metastasis-associated protein 1 to inhibit tumor growth, progression and metastasis in prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Li

    Full Text Available The development of natural product agents with targeted strategies holds promise for enhanced anticancer therapy with reduced drug-associated side effects. Resveratrol found in red wine, has anticancer activity in various tumor types. We reported earlier on a new molecular target of resveratrol, the metastasis-associated protein 1 (MTA1, which is a part of nucleosome remodeling and deacetylation (NuRD co-repressor complex that mediates gene silencing. We identified resveratrol as a regulator of MTA1/NuRD complex and re-activator of p53 acetylation in prostate cancer (PCa. In the current study, we addressed whether resveratrol analogues also possess the ability to inhibit MTA1 and to reverse p53 deacetylation. We demonstrated that pterostilbene (PTER, found in blueberries, had greater increase in MTA1-mediated p53 acetylation, confirming superior potency over resveratrol as dietary epigenetic agent. In orthotopic PCa xenografts, resveratrol and PTER significantly inhibited tumor growth, progression, local invasion and spontaneous metastasis. Furthermore, MTA1-knockdown sensitized cells to these agents resulting in additional reduction of tumor progression and metastasis. The reduction was dependent on MTA1 signaling showing increased p53 acetylation, higher apoptotic index and less angiogenesis in vivo in all xenografts treated with the compounds, and particularly with PTER. Altogether, our results indicate MTA1 as a major contributor in prostate tumor malignant progression, and support the use of strategies targeting MTA1. Our strong pre-clinical data indicate PTER as a potent, selective and pharmacologically safe natural product that may be tested in advanced PCa.

  10. Role of Smad proteins in resistance to BMP-induced growth inhibition in B-cell lymphoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanutte Huse

    Full Text Available Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP expression and signaling are altered in a variety of cancers, but the functional impact of these alterations is uncertain. In this study we investigated the impact of expression of multiple BMPs and their signaling pathway components in human B-cell lymphoma. BMP messages, in particular BMP7, were detected in normal and malignant B cells. Addition of exogenous BMPs inhibited DNA synthesis in most lymphoma cell lines examined, but some cell lines were resistant. Tumor specimens from three out of five lymphoma patients were also resistant to BMPs, as determined by no activation of the BMP effectors Smad1/5/8. We have previously shown that BMP-7 potently induced apoptosis in normal B cells, which was in contrast to no or little inhibitory effect of this BMP in the lymphoma cells tested. BMP-resistance mechanisms were investigated by comparing sensitive and resistant cell lines. While BMP receptors are downregulated in many cancers, we documented similar receptor levels in resistant and sensitive lymphoma cells. We found a positive correlation between activation of Smad1/5/8 and inhibition of DNA synthesis. Gene expression analysis of two independent data sets showed that the levels of inhibitory Smads varied across different B-cell lymphoma. Furthermore, stable overexpression of Smad7 in two different BMP-sensitive cell lines with low endogenous levels of SMAD7, rendered them completely resistant to BMPs. This work highlights the role of Smads in determining the sensitivity to BMPs and shows that upregulation of Smad7 in cancer cells is sufficient to escape the negative effects of BMPs.

  11. Activation of double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase inhibits proliferation of pancreatic β-cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Shan-Shan [Key Laboratory of Human Functional Genomics of Jiangsu Province, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Jiang, Teng [Department of Neurology, Qingdao Municipal Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Wang, Yi; Gu, Li-Ze [Key Laboratory of Human Functional Genomics of Jiangsu Province, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Wu, Hui-Wen [Laboratory Center for Basic Medical Sciences, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Tan, Lan [Department of Neurology, Qingdao Municipal Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Guo, Jun, E-mail: Guoj@njmu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Human Functional Genomics of Jiangsu Province, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China)

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •PKR can be activated by glucolipitoxicity and pro-inflammatory cytokines in β-cells. •Activated PKR inhibited β-cell proliferation by arresting cell cycle at G1 phase. •Activated PKR fully abrogated the pro-proliferative effects of IGF-I on β-cells. -- Abstract: Double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) is revealed to participate in the development of insulin resistance in peripheral tissues in type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Meanwhile, PKR is also characterized as a critical regulator of cell proliferation. To date, no study has focused on the impact of PKR on the proliferation of pancreatic β-cells. Here, we adopted insulinoma cell lines and mice islet β-cells to investigate: (1) the effects of glucolipotoxicity and pro-inflammatory cytokines on PKR activation; (2) the effects of PKR on proliferation of pancreatic β-cells and its underlying mechanisms; (3) the actions of PKR on pro-proliferative effects of IGF-I and its underlying pathway. Our results provided the first evidence that PKR can be activated by glucolipitoxicity and pro-inflammatory cytokines in pancreatic β-cells, and activated PKR significantly inhibited cell proliferation by arresting cell cycle at G1 phase. Reductions in cyclin D1 and D2 as well as increases in p27 and p53 were associated with the anti-proliferative effects of PKR, and proteasome-dependent degradation took part in the reduction of cyclin D1 and D2. Besides, PKR activation abrogated the pro-proliferative effects of IGF-I by activating JNK and disrupting IRS1/PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. These findings indicate that the anti-proliferative actions of PKR on pancreatic β-cells may contribute to the pathogenesis of T2DM.

  12. Inhibition of the neutrophil oxidative burst by sphingoid long-chain bases: role of protein kinase C in the activation of the burst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, E.; Olcott, M.C.; Bell, R.M.; Merrill, A.H.; Lambeth, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    The neutrophil oxidative burst is triggered by a variety of both particulate (opsonized zymosan) and soluble agonists [formylmethionylleucylphenylalanine (FMLP), arachidonate, short-chained diacylglycerols (DAG) and phorbol myristate acetate (PMA)]. The authors show that the long-chain lipid bases sphinganine and sphingosine block activation of the burst in human neutrophils. Inhibition is reversible, does not alter cell viability, and does not affect phagocytosis. The inhibition affects the activation mechanism rather than the NADPH-oxidase enzyme. The structural requirements for inhibition include a hydrophobic carbon chain and an amino-containing headgroup, and the naturally occurring erythro sphinganine was more potent than the threo isomer. Activation of the oxidative burst by a variety of agonists was blocked by the same concentration of sphinganine indicating a common inhibited step. The authors suggest that the common step is protein kinase C, as evidenced by the following: 1) long-chain bases inhibit PKC in a micelle reconstituted system, 2) PMA-induced phophorylation is inhibited by sphinganine, and 3) sphinganine competes with ( 3 H)-phorbol dibutyrate for its cytosolic receptor (i.e. protein kinase C). The authors suggest that sphingoid long-chain bases play a role in the cellular regulations

  13. Protein kinase C-delta inactivation inhibits the proliferation and survival of cancer stem cells in culture and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Zhihong; Forman, Lora W; Williams, Robert M; Faller, Douglas V

    2014-01-01

    A subpopulation of tumor cells with distinct stem-like properties (cancer stem-like cells, CSCs) may be responsible for tumor initiation, invasive growth, and possibly dissemination to distant organ sites. CSCs exhibit a spectrum of biological, biochemical, and molecular features that are consistent with a stem-like phenotype, including growth as non-adherent spheres (clonogenic potential), ability to form a new tumor in xenograft assays, unlimited self-renewal, and the capacity for multipotency and lineage-specific differentiation. PKCδ is a novel class serine/threonine kinase of the PKC family, and functions in a number of cellular activities including cell proliferation, survival or apoptosis. PKCδ has previously been validated as a synthetic lethal target in cancer cells of multiple types with aberrant activation of Ras signaling, using both genetic (shRNA and dominant-negative PKCδ mutants) and small molecule inhibitors. In contrast, PKCδ is not required for the proliferation or survival of normal cells, suggesting the potential tumor-specificity of a PKCδ-targeted approach. shRNA knockdown was used validate PKCδ as a target in primary cancer stem cell lines and stem-like cells derived from human tumor cell lines, including breast, pancreatic, prostate and melanoma tumor cells. Novel and potent small molecule PKCδ inhibitors were employed in assays monitoring apoptosis, proliferation and clonogenic capacity of these cancer stem-like populations. Significant differences among data sets were determined using two-tailed Student’s t tests or ANOVA. We demonstrate that CSC-like populations derived from multiple types of human primary tumors, from human cancer cell lines, and from transformed human cells, require PKCδ activity and are susceptible to agents which deplete PKCδ protein or activity. Inhibition of PKCδ by specific genetic strategies (shRNA) or by novel small molecule inhibitors is growth inhibitory and cytotoxic to multiple types of human

  14. Discovery of a novel mode of protein kinase inhibition characterized by the mechanism of inhibition of human mesenchymal-epithelial transition factor (c-Met) protein autophosphorylation by ARQ 197.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eathiraj, Sudharshan; Palma, Rocio; Volckova, Erika; Hirschi, Marscha; France, Dennis S; Ashwell, Mark A; Chan, Thomas C K

    2011-06-10

    A number of human malignancies exhibit sustained stimulation, mutation, or gene amplification of the receptor tyrosine kinase human mesenchymal-epithelial transition factor (c-Met). ARQ 197 is a clinically advanced, selective, orally bioavailable, and well tolerated c-Met inhibitor, currently in Phase 3 clinical testing in non-small cell lung cancer patients. Herein, we describe the molecular and structural basis by which ARQ 197 selectively targets c-Met. Through our analysis we reveal a previously undisclosed, novel inhibitory mechanism that utilizes distinct regulatory elements of the c-Met kinase. The structure of ARQ 197 in complex with the c-Met kinase domain shows that the inhibitor binds a conformation that is distinct from published kinase structures. ARQ 197 inhibits c-Met autophosphorylation and is highly selective for the inactive or unphosphorylated form of c-Met. Through our analysis of the interplay between the regulatory and catalytic residues of c-Met, and by comparison between the autoinhibited canonical conformation of c-Met bound by ARQ 197 to previously described kinase domains of type III receptor tyrosine kinases, we believe this to be the basis of a powerful new in silico approach for the design of similar inhibitors for other protein kinases of therapeutic interest.

  15. Correlation between survival, ability to rejoin DNA and stability of DNA after preirradiation inhibition of protein synthesis in a rec- mutant of Escherichia coli K12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pirsel, M.; Slezarikova, V.

    1977-01-01

    A 90 min inhibition of protein synthesis induced by starvation for amino acids (AA - ) or by chloramphenicol (CAP) treatment prior to UV irradiation (2.5 J m -2 ) increased more than tenfold the resistance of the strain Escherichia coli K12 SR19 to UV radiation. Under these conditions, cultures in which protein synthesis was inhibited before the UV irradiation rejoin short regions of DNA synthesized after the irradiation to a normal-size molecule, whereas an exponentially growing culture does not rejoin DNA synthesized after UV irradiation to a molecule of a normal size. In the exponentially growing culture both the parental and the newly synthesized DNA are unstable after the irradiation. In cultures with inhibited protein synthesis only the parental DNA is somewhat unstable. In Escherichia coli K12 SR19 where protein synthesis was inhibited before the irradiation, a correlation between the survival of cells, the ability to rejoin short regions of DNA synthesized after UV irradiation, and a higher stability of both parental and newly synthesized DNAs could be demonstrated. (author)

  16. Human promyelocytic leukemia HL-60 cell proliferation and c-myc protein expression are inhibited by an antisense pentadecadeoxynucleotide targeted against c-myc mRNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wickstrom, E.L.; Bacon, T.A.; Gonzalez, A.; Freeman, D.L.; Lyman, G.H.; Wickstrom, E.

    1988-01-01

    The human promyelocytic leukemia cell line HL-60 overexpresses the c-myc protooncogene. A calculated secondary structure for c-myc mRNA placed the initiation codon in a bulge of a weakly based-paired region. Treatment of HL-60 cells with 5' d(AACGTTGAGGGGCAT) 3', complementary to the initiation codon and the next four codons of c-myc mRNA, inhibited c-myc protein expression in a dose-dependent manner. However, treatment of HL-60 cells with 5' d(TTGGGATAACACTTA) 3', complementary to nucleotides 17-31 of vesicular stomatits virus matrix protein mRNA, displayed no such effects. These results agree with analogous studies of normal human T lymphocytes, except that only one-third as much oligomer was needed for a comparable effect. Proliferation of HL-60 cells in culture was inhibited in a sequence-specific, dose-dependent manner by the c-myc-complementary oligomer, but neither the oligomer complementary to vesicular stomatitis virus matrix protein mRNA nor 5' d(CATTTCTTGCTCTCC) 3', complementary to nucleotides 5399-5413 of human immunodeficiency virus tat gene mRNA, inhibited proliferation. It thus appears that antisense oligodeoxynucleotides added to myc-transformed cells via culture medium are capable of eliciting sequence-specific, dose-dependent inhibition of c-myc protein expression and cell proliferation

  17. Plasmodium falciparum spermidine synthase inhibition results in unique perturbation-specific effects observed on transcript, protein and metabolite levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louw Abraham I

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of severe human malaria, has evolved to become resistant to previously successful antimalarial chemotherapies, most notably chloroquine and the antifolates. The prevalence of resistant strains has necessitated the discovery and development of new chemical entities with novel modes-of-action. Although much effort has been invested in the creation of analogues based on existing drugs and the screening of chemical and natural compound libraries, a crucial shortcoming in current Plasmodial drug discovery efforts remains the lack of an extensive set of novel, validated drug targets. A requirement of these targets (or the pathways in which they function is that they prove essential for parasite survival. The polyamine biosynthetic pathway, responsible for the metabolism of highly abundant amines crucial for parasite growth, proliferation and differentiation, is currently under investigation as an antimalarial target. Chemotherapeutic strategies targeting this pathway have been successfully utilized for the treatment of Trypanosomes causing West African sleeping sickness. In order to further evaluate polyamine depletion as possible antimalarial intervention, the consequences of inhibiting P. falciparum spermidine synthase (PfSpdSyn were examined on a morphological, transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolic level. Results Morphological analysis of P. falciparum 3D7 following application of the PfSpdSyn inhibitor cyclohexylamine confirmed that parasite development was completely arrested at the early trophozoite stage. This is in contrast to untreated parasites which progressed to late trophozoites at comparable time points. Global gene expression analyses confirmed a transcriptional arrest in the parasite. Several of the differentially expressed genes mapped to the polyamine biosynthetic and associated metabolic pathways. Differential expression of corresponding parasite proteins involved in

  18. BZLF1, an Epstein-Barr virus immediate-early protein, induces p65 nuclear translocation while inhibiting p65 transcriptional function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, Thomas E.; Kenney, Shannon C.

    2004-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that the Epstein-Barr virus immediate-early BZLF1 protein interacts with, and is inhibited by, the NF-κB family member p65. However, the effects of BZLF1 on NF-κB activity have not been intensively studied. Here we show that BZLF1 inhibits p65-dependent gene expression. BZLF1 inhibited the ability of IL-1, as well as transfected p65, to activate the expression of two different NF-κB-responsive genes, ICAM-1 and IκB-α. BZLF1 also reduced the constitutive level of IκB-α protein in HeLa and A549 cells, and increased the amount of nuclear NF-κB to a similar extent as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) treatment. In spite of this BZLF1-associated increase in the nuclear form of NF-κB, BZLF1 did not induce binding of NF-κB to NF-κB responsive promoters (as determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay) in vivo, although TNF-α treatment induced NF-κB binding as expected. Overexpression of p65 dramatically inhibited the lytic replication cycle of EBV in 293-EBV cells, confirming that NF-κB also inhibits BZLF1 transcriptional function. Our results are consistent with a model in which BZLF1 inhibits the transcriptional function of p65, resulting in decreased transcription of IκB-α, decreased expression of IκB-α protein, and subsequent translocation of NF-κB to the nucleus. This nuclear translocation of NF-κB may promote viral latency by negatively regulating BZLF1 transcriptional activity. In situations where p65 activity is limiting in comparison to BZLF1, the ability of BZLF1 to inhibit p65 transcriptional function may protect the virus from the host immune system during the lytic form of infection

  19. Pirfenidone inhibits TGF-β1-induced over-expression of collagen type I and heat shock protein 47 in A549 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisatomi Keiko

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pirfenidone is a novel anti-fibrotic and anti-inflammatory agent that inhibits the progression of fibrosis in animal models and in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF. We previously showed that pirfenidone inhibits the over-expression of collagen type I and of heat shock protein (HSP 47, a collagen-specific molecular chaperone, in human lung fibroblasts stimulated with transforming growth factor (TGF-β1 in vitro. The increased numbers of HSP47-positive type II pneumocytes as well as fibroblasts were also diminished by pirfenidone in an animal model of pulmonary fibrosis induced by bleomycin. The present study evaluates the effects of pirfenidone on collagen type I and HSP47 expression in the human alveolar epithelial cell line, A549 cells in vitro. Methods The expression of collagen type I, HSP47 and E-cadherin mRNAs in A549 cells stimulated with TGF-β1 was evaluated by Northern blotting or real-time PCR. The expression of collagen type I, HSP47 and fibronectin proteins was assessed by immunocytochemical staining. Results TGF-β1 stimulated collagen type I and HSP47 mRNA and protein expression in A549 cells, and pirfenidone significantly inhibited this process. Pirfenidone also inhibited over-expression of the fibroblast phenotypic marker fibronectin in A549 cells induced by TGF-β1. Conclusion We concluded that the anti-fibrotic effects of pirfenidone might be mediated not only through the direct inhibition of collagen type I expression but also through the inhibition of HSP47 expression in alveolar epithelial cells, which results in reduced collagen synthesis in lung fibrosis. Furthermore, pirfenidone might partially inhibit the epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

  20. Vaccinia Virus Protein C6 Inhibits Type I IFN Signalling in the Nucleus and Binds to the Transactivation Domain of STAT2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer H Stuart

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The type I interferon (IFN response is a crucial innate immune signalling pathway required for defense against viral infection. Accordingly, the great majority of mammalian viruses possess means to inhibit this important host immune response. Here we show that vaccinia virus (VACV strain Western Reserve protein C6, is a dual function protein that inhibits the cellular response to type I IFNs in addition to its published function as an inhibitor of IRF-3 activation, thereby restricting type I IFN production from infected cells. Ectopic expression of C6 inhibits the induction of interferon stimulated genes (ISGs in response to IFNα treatment at both the mRNA and protein level. C6 inhibits the IFNα-induced Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK/STAT signalling pathway at a late stage, downstream of STAT1 and STAT2 phosphorylation, nuclear translocation and binding of the interferon stimulated gene factor 3 (ISGF3 complex to the interferon stimulated response element (ISRE. Mechanistically, C6 associates with the transactivation domain of STAT2 and this might explain how C6 inhibits the type I IFN signalling very late in the pathway. During virus infection C6 reduces ISRE-dependent gene expression despite the presence of the viral protein phosphatase VH1 that dephosphorylates STAT1 and STAT2. The ability of a cytoplasmic replicating virus to dampen the immune response within the nucleus, and the ability of viral immunomodulators such as C6 to inhibit multiple stages of the innate immune response by distinct mechanisms, emphasizes the intricacies of host-pathogen interactions and viral immune evasion.

  1. Diminazene aceturate (Berenil) modulates LPS induced pro-inflammatory cytokine production by inhibiting phosphorylation of MAPKs and STAT proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriakose, Shiby; Muleme, Helen; Onyilagha, Chukwunonso; Okeke, Emeka; Uzonna, Jude E

    2014-10-01

    Although diminazene aceturate (Berenil) is widely used as a trypanolytic agent in livestock, its mechanisms of action remain poorly understood. We previously showed that Berenil treatment suppresses pro-inflammatory cytokine production by splenic and liver macrophages leading to a concomitant reduction in serum cytokine levels in mice infected with Trypanosoma congolense or challenged with LPS. Here, we investigated the molecular mechanisms through which Berenil alters pro-inflammatory cytokine production by macrophages. We show that pre-treatment of macrophages with Berenil dramatically suppressed IL-6, IL-12 and TNF-α production following LPS, CpG and Poly I:C stimulation without altering the expression of TLRs. Instead, it significantly down-regulated phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (p38, extracellular signal-regulated kinase and c-Jun N-terminal kinases), signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) proteins (STAT1 and STAT3) and NF-кB p65 activity both in vitro and in vivo. Interestingly, Berenil treatment up-regulated the phosphorylation of STAT5 and the expression of suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS1) and SOCS3, which are negative regulators of innate immune responses, including MAPKs and STATs. Collectively, these results show that Berenil down-regulates macrophage pro-inflammatory cytokine production by inhibiting key signaling pathways associated with cytokine production and suggest that this drug may be used to treat conditions caused by excessive production of inflammatory cytokines. © The Author(s) 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  2. Mmu-miR-615-3p regulates lipoapoptosis by inhibiting C/EBP homologous protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Miyamoto

    Full Text Available Lipoapoptosis occurring due to an excess of saturated free fatty acids such as palmitate is a key pathogenic event in the initiation of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Palmitate loading of cells activates the endoplasmic reticulum stress response, including induction of the proapoptotic transcription factor C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP. Furthermore, the loss of microRNAs is implicated in regulating apoptosis under conditions of endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress. The aim of this study was to identify specific microRNAs regulating CHOP expression during palmitate-induced ER stress. Five microRNAs were repressed under palmitate-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress conditions in hepatocyte cell lines (miR-92b-3p, miR-328-3p, miR-484, miR-574-5p, and miR-615-3p. We identified miR-615-3p as a candidate microRNA which was repressed by palmitate treatment and regulated CHOP protein expression, by RNA sequencing and in silico analyses, respectively. There is a single miR-615-3p binding site in the 3'untranslated region (UTR of the Chop transcript. We characterized this as a functional binding site using a reporter gene-based assay. Augmentation of miR-615-3p levels, using a precursor molecule, repressed CHOP expression; and under these conditions palmitate- or tunicamycin-induced cell death were significantly reduced. Our results suggest that palmitate-induced apoptosis requires maximal expression of CHOP which is achieved via the downregulation of its repressive microRNA, miR-615-3p. We speculate that enhancement of miR-615-3p levels may be of therapeutic benefit by inhibiting palmitate-induced hepatocyte lipoapoptosis.

  3. Non–SCF-type F-box protein Roy1/Ymr258c interacts with a Rab5-like GTPase Ypt52 and inhibits Ypt52 function

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Yuan; Nakatsukasa, Kunio; Kotera, Michiko; Kanada, Akira; Nishimura, Takashi; Kishi, Tsutomu; Mimura, Satoru; Kamura, Takumi

    2011-01-01

    Skp1/Cul1/F-box (SCF)–type F-box proteins are a component of the Cullin-RING SCF ubiquitin E3 ligase, which is involved in numerous cellular processes. However, the function of non–SCF-type F-box proteins remains largely unknown. The Rab5-like small guanosine 5′-triphosphatase Vps21/Ypt51 is a key regulator of intracellular transportation; however, deletion of its isoforms, Ypt52 and Ypt53, results in only a modest inhibition of intracellular trafficking. The function of these proteins theref...

  4. Solute carrier protein family 11 member 1 (Slc11a1) activation efficiently inhibits Leishmania donovani survival in host macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nisha; Gedda, Mallikarjuna Rao; Tiwari, Neeraj; Singh, Suya P; Bajpai, Surabhi; Singh, Rakesh K

    2017-09-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (kala-azar), a life threatening disease caused by L. donovani , is a latent threat to more than 147 million people living in disease endemic South East Asia region of the Indian subcontinent. The therapeutic option to control leishmanial infections are very limited, and at present comprise only two drugs, an antifungal amphotericin B and an antitumor miltefosine, which are also highly vulnerable for parasitic resistance. Therefore, identification and development of alternate control measures is an exigent requirement to control leishmanial infections. In this study, we report that functionally induced expression of solute carrier protein family 11 member 1 ( Slc11a1), a transmembrane divalent cationic transporter recruited on the surface of phagolysosomes after phagocytosis of parasites, effectively inhibits Leishmania donovani growth in host macrophages. Further, the increased Slc11a1 functionality also resulted in increased production of NOx, TNF-α and IL-12 by activated macrophages. The findings of this study signify the importance of interplay between Slc11a1 expression and macrophages activation that can be effectively used to control of Leishmania growth and survival.

  5. Inflammation in the CNS and Th17 Responses Are Inhibited by IFN-{gamma}-Induced IL-18 Binding Protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Millward, Jason M; Pedersen, Morten Løbner; Wheeler, Rachel D

    2010-01-01

    Inflammatory responses are essential for immune protection but may also cause pathology and must be regulated. Both Th1 and Th17 cells are implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune inflammatory diseases, such as multiple sclerosis. We show in this study that IL-18-binding protein (IL-18bp......), the endogenous inhibitor of the Th1-promoting cytokine IL-18, is upregulated by IFN-gamma in resident microglial cells in the CNS during multiple sclerosis-like disease in mice. Test of function by overexpression of IL-18bp in the CNS using a viral vector led to marked reduction in Th17 responses and robust...... inhibition of incidence, severity, and histopathology of disease, independently of IFN-gamma. The disease-limiting action of IL-18bp included suppression of APC-derived Th17-polarizing cytokines. IL-18bp thus acts as a sensor for IFN-gamma and can regulate both Th1 and Th17 responses in the CNS....

  6. The structure of a contact-dependent growth-inhibition (CDI) immunity protein from Neisseria meningitidis MC58

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Kemin; Johnson, Parker M.; Stols, Lucy; Boubion, Bryan; Eschenfeldt, William; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Hayes, Christopher S.; Joachimiak, Andrezj; Goulding, Celia W.

    2015-05-20

    Contact-dependent growth inhibition (CDI) is an important mechanism of intercellular competition between neighboring Gram-negative bacteria. CDI systems encode large surface-exposed CdiA effector proteins that carry a variety of C-terminal toxin domains (CdiA-CTs). All CDI+bacteria also produce CdiI immunity proteins that specifically bind to the cognate CdiA-CT and neutralize its toxin activity to prevent auto-inhibition. Here, the X-ray crystal structure of a CdiI immunity protein fromNeisseria meningitidisMC58 is presented at 1.45 Å resolution. The CdiI protein has structural homology to the Whirly family of RNA-binding proteins, but appears to lack the characteristic nucleic acid-binding motif of this family. Sequence homology suggests that the cognate CdiA-CT is related to the eukaryotic EndoU family of RNA-processing enzymes. A homology model is presented of the CdiA-CT based on the structure of the XendoU nuclease fromXenopus laevis. Molecular-docking simulations predict that the CdiA-CT toxin active site is occluded upon binding to the CdiI immunity protein. Together, these observations suggest that the immunity protein neutralizes toxin activity by preventing access to RNA substrates.

  7. Silencing of ribosomal protein S9 elicits a multitude of cellular responses inhibiting the growth of cancer cells subsequent to p53 activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikael S Lindström

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Disruption of the nucleolus often leads to activation of the p53 tumor suppressor pathway through inhibition of MDM2 that is mediated by a limited set of ribosomal proteins including RPL11 and RPL5. The effects of ribosomal protein loss in cultured mammalian cells have not been thoroughly investigated. Here we characterize the cellular stress response caused by depletion of ribosomal protein S9 (RPS9. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Depletion of RPS9 impaired production of 18S ribosomal RNA and induced p53 activity. It promoted p53-dependent morphological differentiation of U343MGa Cl2:6 glioma cells as evidenced by intensified expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein and profound changes in cell shape. U2OS osteosarcoma cells displayed a limited senescence response with increased expression of DNA damage response markers, whereas HeLa cervical carcinoma cells underwent cell death by apoptosis. Knockdown of RPL11 impaired p53-dependent phenotypes in the different RPS9 depleted cell cultures. Importantly, knockdown of RPS9 or RPL11 also markedly inhibited cell proliferation through p53-independent mechanisms. RPL11 binding to MDM2 was retained despite decreased levels of RPL11 protein following nucleolar stress. In these settings, RPL11 was critical for maintaining p53 protein stability but was not strictly required for p53 protein synthesis. CONCLUSIONS: p53 plays an important role in the initial restriction of cell proliferation that occurs in response to decreased level of RPS9. Our results do not exclude the possibility that other nucleolar stress sensing molecules act upstream or in parallel to RPL11 to activate p53. Inhibiting the expression of certain ribosomal proteins, such as RPS9, could be one efficient way to reinitiate differentiation processes or to induce senescence or apoptosis in rapidly proliferating tumor cells.

  8. Pertussis toxin-sensitive G-protein mediates the alpha 2-adrenergic receptor inhibition of melatonin release in photoreceptive chick pineal cell cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pratt, B.L.; Takahashi, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    The avian pineal gland is a photoreceptive organ that has been shown to contain postjunctional alpha 2-adrenoceptors that inhibit melatonin synthesis and/or release upon receptor activation. Physiological response and [32P]ADP ribosylation experiments were performed to investigate whether pertussis toxin-sensitive guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G-proteins) were involved in the transduction of the alpha 2-adrenergic signal. For physiological response studies, the effects of pertussis toxin on melatonin release in dissociated cell cultures exposed to norepinephrine were assessed. Pertussis toxin blocked alpha 2-adrenergic receptor-mediated inhibition in a dose-dependent manner. Pertussis toxin-induced blockade appeared to be noncompetitive. One and 10 ng/ml doses of pertussis toxin partially blocked and a 100 ng/ml dose completely blocked norepinephrine-induced inhibition. Pertussis toxin-catalyzed [32P]ADP ribosylation of G-proteins in chick pineal cell membranes was assessed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. Membranes were prepared from cells that had been pretreated with 0, 1, 10, or 100 ng/ml pertussis toxin. In the absence of pertussis toxin pretreatment, two major proteins of 40K and 41K mol wt (Mr) were labeled by [32P]NAD. Pertussis toxin pretreatment of pineal cells abolished [32P] radiolabeling of the 40K Mr G-protein in a dose-dependent manner. The norepinephrine-induced inhibition of both cAMP efflux and melatonin release, as assessed by RIA of medium samples collected before membrane preparation, was also blocked in a dose-dependent manner by pertussis toxin. Collectively, these results suggest that a pertussis toxin-sensitive 40K Mr G-protein labeled by [32P]NAD may be functionally associated with alpha 2-adrenergic signal transduction in chick pineal cells

  9. Extracts Obtained from Pterocarpus angolensis DC and Ziziphus mucronata Exhibit Antiplasmodial Activity and Inhibit Heat Shock Protein 70 (Hsp70 Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tawanda Zininga

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Malaria parasites are increasingly becoming resistant to currently used antimalarial therapies, therefore there is an urgent need to expand the arsenal of alternative antimalarial drugs. In addition, it is also important to identify novel antimalarial drug targets. In the current study, extracts of two plants, Pterocarpus angolensis and Ziziphus mucronata were obtained and their antimalarial functions were investigated. Furthermore, we explored the capability of the extracts to inhibit Plasmodium falciparum heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70 function. Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70 are molecular chaperones whose function is to facilitate protein folding. Plasmodium falciparum the main agent of malaria, expresses two cytosol-localized Hsp70s: PfHsp70-1 and PfHsp70-z. The PfHsp70-z has been reported to be essential for parasite survival, while inhibition of PfHsp70-1 function leads to parasite death. Hence both PfHsp70-1 and PfHsp70-z are potential antimalarial drug targets. Extracts of P. angolensis and Z. mucronata inhibited the basal ATPase and chaperone functions of the two parasite Hsp70s. Furthermore, fractions of P. angolensis and Z. mucronata inhibited P. falciparum 3D7 parasite growth in vitro. The extracts obtained in the current study exhibited antiplasmodial activity as they killed P. falciparum parasites maintained in vitro. In addition, the findings further suggest that some of the compounds in P. angolensis and Z. mucronata may target parasite Hsp70 function.

  10. Upregulation of heat shock protein 70 and the differential protein expression induced by tumor necrosis factor-alpha enhances migration and inhibits apoptosis of hepatocellular carcinoma cell HepG2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bee-Piao; Lin, Chun-Shiang; Wang, Chau-Jong; Kao, Shao-Hsuan

    2017-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) plays diverse roles in liver damage and hepatocarcinogenesis with its multipotent bioactivity. However, the influence of TNFα on protein expression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is incompletely understood. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the differential protein expression of HCC in response to TNFα stimulus. We observed that HepG2 cell revealed a higher resistance to TNFα-induced apoptosis as compared to the non-tumorigenic hepatocyte THLE-2. By using a label-free quantitative proteomic analysis, we found that 520 proteins were differentially expressed in the HepG2 cells exposed to TNFα, including 211 up-regulated and 309 down-regulated proteins. We further confirmed several proteins with significant expression change (TNFα/control ratio>2.0 or expressed proteins using Gene ontology and KEGG annotations, and the results implicated that TNFα might regulate ribosome, spliceosome, antigen processing and presentation, and energy metabolism in HepG2 cells. Moreover, we demonstrated that upregulation of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) was involved in both the promoted migration and the inhibited apoptosis of HepG2 cells in response to TNFα. Collectively, these findings indicate that TNFα alters protein expression such as HSP70, which triggering specific molecular processes and signaling cascades that promote migration and inhibit apoptosis of HepG2 cells.

  11. Proteome-wide analysis of the amino terminal status of Escherichia coli proteins at the steady-state and upon deformylation inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienvenut, Willy V; Giglione, Carmela; Meinnel, Thierry

    2015-07-01

    A proteome wide analysis was performed in Escherichia coli to identify the impact on protein N-termini of actinonin, an antibiotic specifically inhibiting peptide deformylase (PDF). A strategy and tool suite (SILProNaQ) was employed to provide large-scale quantitation of N-terminal modifications. In control conditions, more than 1000 unique N-termini were identified with 56% showing initiator methionine removal. Additional modifications corresponded to partial or complete Nα-acetylation (10%) and N-formyl retention (5%). Among the proteins undergoing these N-terminal modifications, 140