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Sample records for inhibits glioma growth

  1. Autophagy contributes to gefitinib-induced glioma cell growth inhibition

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    Chang, Cheng-Yi [Department of Surgery, Fong-Yuan Hospital, Taichung 420, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology, Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taichung 406, Taiwan (China); Kuan, Yu-Hsiang [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Department of Pharmacy, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Ou, Yen-Chuan; Li, Jian-Ri [Division of Urology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung 407, Taiwan (China); Wu, Chih-Cheng [Department of Anesthesiology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung 407, Taiwan (China); Department of Financial and Computational Mathematics, Providence University, Taichung 433, Taiwan (China); Pan, Pin-Ho [Department of Pediatrics, Tungs’ Taichung MetroHarbor Hospital, Taichung 435, Taiwan (China); Chen, Wen-Ying [Department of Veterinary Medicine, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Huang, Hsuan-Yi [Department of Surgery, Fong-Yuan Hospital, Taichung 420, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chun-Jung, E-mail: cjchen@vghtc.gov.tw [Department of Medical Research, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung 407, Taiwan (China); Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Rong Hsing Research Center for Translational Medicine, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Center for General Education, Tunghai University, Taichung 407, Taiwan (China); Department of Nursing, HungKuang University, Taichung 433, Taiwan (China)

    2014-09-10

    Epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors, including gefitinib, have been evaluated in patients with malignant gliomas. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in gefitinib-mediated anticancer effects against glioma are incompletely understood. In the present study, the cytostatic potential of gefitinib was demonstrated by the inhibition of glioma cell growth, long-term clonogenic survival, and xenograft tumor growth. The cytostatic consequences were accompanied by autophagy, as evidenced by monodansylcadaverine staining of acidic vesicle formation, conversion of microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain 3-II (LC3-II), degradation of p62, punctate pattern of GFP-LC3, and conversion of GFP-LC3 to cleaved-GFP. Autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenosine and chloroquine and genetic silencing of LC3 or Beclin 1 attenuated gefitinib-induced growth inhibition. Gefitinib-induced autophagy was not accompanied by the disruption of the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin signaling. Instead, the activation of liver kinase-B1/AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling correlated well with the induction of autophagy and growth inhibition caused by gefitinib. Silencing of AMPK suppressed gefitinib-induced autophagy and growth inhibition. The crucial role of AMPK activation in inducing glioma autophagy and growth inhibition was further supported by the actions of AMP mimetic AICAR. Gefitinib was shown to be capable of reducing the proliferation of glioma cells, presumably by autophagic mechanisms involving AMPK activation. - Highlights: • Gefitinib causes cytotoxic and cytostatic effect on glioma. • Gefitinib induces autophagy. • Gefitinib causes cytostatic effect through autophagy. • Gefitinib induces autophagy involving AMPK.

  2. Autophagy contributes to gefitinib-induced glioma cell growth inhibition

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    Chang, Cheng-Yi; Kuan, Yu-Hsiang; Ou, Yen-Chuan; Li, Jian-Ri; Wu, Chih-Cheng; Pan, Pin-Ho; Chen, Wen-Ying; Huang, Hsuan-Yi; Chen, Chun-Jung

    2014-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors, including gefitinib, have been evaluated in patients with malignant gliomas. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in gefitinib-mediated anticancer effects against glioma are incompletely understood. In the present study, the cytostatic potential of gefitinib was demonstrated by the inhibition of glioma cell growth, long-term clonogenic survival, and xenograft tumor growth. The cytostatic consequences were accompanied by autophagy, as evidenced by monodansylcadaverine staining of acidic vesicle formation, conversion of microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain 3-II (LC3-II), degradation of p62, punctate pattern of GFP-LC3, and conversion of GFP-LC3 to cleaved-GFP. Autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenosine and chloroquine and genetic silencing of LC3 or Beclin 1 attenuated gefitinib-induced growth inhibition. Gefitinib-induced autophagy was not accompanied by the disruption of the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin signaling. Instead, the activation of liver kinase-B1/AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling correlated well with the induction of autophagy and growth inhibition caused by gefitinib. Silencing of AMPK suppressed gefitinib-induced autophagy and growth inhibition. The crucial role of AMPK activation in inducing glioma autophagy and growth inhibition was further supported by the actions of AMP mimetic AICAR. Gefitinib was shown to be capable of reducing the proliferation of glioma cells, presumably by autophagic mechanisms involving AMPK activation. - Highlights: • Gefitinib causes cytotoxic and cytostatic effect on glioma. • Gefitinib induces autophagy. • Gefitinib causes cytostatic effect through autophagy. • Gefitinib induces autophagy involving AMPK

  3. Glutamate/glutamine metabolism coupling between astrocytes and glioma cells: neuroprotection and inhibition of glioma growth.

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    Yao, Pei-Sen; Kang, De-Zhi; Lin, Ru-Ying; Ye, Bing; Wang, Wei; Ye, Zu-Cheng

    2014-07-18

    Glioma glutamate release has been shown to promote the growth of glioma cells and induce neuronal injuries from epilepsy to neuronal death. However, potential counteractions from normal astrocytes against glioma glutamate release have not been fully evaluated. In this study, we investigated the glutamate/glutamine cycling between glioma cells and astrocytes and their impact on neuronal function. Co-cultures of glioma cells with astrocytes (CGA) in direct contact were established under different mix ratio of astrocyte/glioma. Culture medium conditioned in these CGAs were sampled for HPLC measurement, for neuronal ratiometric calcium imaging, and for neuronal survival assay. We found: (1) High levels of glutaminase expression in glioma cells, but not in astrocytes, glutaminase enables glioma cells to release large amount of glutamate in the presence of glutamine. (2) Glutamate levels in CGAs were directly determined by the astrocyte/glioma ratios, indicating a balance between glioma glutamate release and astrocyte glutamate uptake. (3) Culture media from CGAs of higher glioma/astrocyte ratios induced stronger neuronal Ca(2+) response and more severe neuronal death. (4) Co-culturing with astrocytes significantly reduced the growth rate of glioma cells. These results indicate that normal astrocytes in the brain play pivotal roles in glioma growth inhibition and in reducing neuronal injuries from glioma glutamate release. However, as tumor growth, the protective role of astrocytes gradually succumb to glioma cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Isthmin inhibits glioma growth through antiangiogenesis in vivo.

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    Yuan, Bangqing; Xian, Ronghua; Ma, Jianfang; Chen, Yujian; Lin, Chuangan; Song, Yaoming

    2012-09-01

    Among glioma treatment strategies, antiangiogenesis emerges as a meaningful and feasible treatment approach for inducing long-term survival. Isthmin is a gene highly expressed in the isthmus of the midbrain-hindbrain organizer in Xenopus, and has recently been identified as a novel angiogenesis inhibitor. However, the potential of isthmin on the glioma angiogenesis has not been well studied. In the present study, we demonstrated that the recombinant adenovirus isthmin (Ad-isthmin) could inhibit VEGF-stimulated endothelial cell proliferation and induce apoptosis through a caspase-dependent pathway. In addition, Ad-isthmin significantly suppressed glioma growth through antiangiogenesis without apparent side effects. Taken together, our results demonstrated that isthmin could act as a novel angiogenesis inhibitor and might be utilized in the glioma antiangiogenesis therapy.

  5. Hydroxyapatite nanoparticles inhibit the growth of human glioma cells in vitro and in vivo

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    Chu SH

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Sheng-Hua Chu,1 Dong-Fu Feng,1 Yan-Bin Ma,1 Zhi-Qiang Li21Department of Neurosurgery, No 3 People's Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China; 2Department of Neurosurgery, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, ChinaAbstract: Hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (nano-HAPs have been reported to exhibit antitumor effects on various human cancers, but the effects of nano-HAPs on human glioma cells remain unclear. The aim of this study was to explore the inhibitory effect of nano-HAPs on the growth of human glioma U251 and SHG44 cells in vitro and in vivo. Nano-HAPs could inhibit the growth of U251 and SHG44 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner, according to methyl thiazoletetrazolium assay and flow cytometry. Treated with 120 mg/L and 240 mg/L nano-HAPs for 48 hours, typical apoptotic morphological changes were noted under Hoechst staining and transmission electron microscopy. The tumor growth of cells was inhibited after the injection in vivo, and the related side effects significantly decreased in the nano-HAP-and-drug combination group. Because of the function of nano-HAPs, the expression of c-Met, SATB1, Ki-67, and bcl-2 protein decreased, and the expression of SLC22A18 and caspase-3 protein decreased noticeably. The findings indicate that nano-HAPs have an evident inhibitory action and induce apoptosis of human glioma cells in vitro and in vivo. In a drug combination, they can significantly reduce the adverse reaction related to the chemotherapeutic drug 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl-1-nitrosourea (BCNU.Keywords: glioma, hydroxyapatite nanoparticles, growth mechanism

  6. Gefitinib Radiosensitizes Stem-Like Glioma Cells: Inhibition of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-Akt-DNA-PK Signaling, Accompanied by Inhibition of DNA Double-Strand Break Repair

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    Kang, Khong Bee; Zhu Congju; Wong Yinling; Gao Qiuhan; Ty, Albert; Wong, Meng Cheong

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: We compared radiosensitivity of brain tumor stem cells (BTSCs) with matched nonstem glioma cells, and determined whether gefitinib enhanced BTSC radiosensitivity by inhibiting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)–Akt-DNA–dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) signaling, followed by enhanced DNA double-stand breaks (DSBs) and inhibition of DSB repair. Methods and Materials: Radiosensitivity of stem-like gliomaspheres and nonstem glioma cells (obtained at patient neurosurgical resection) were evaluated by clonogenic assays, γ-H 2 AX immunostaining and cell cycle distribution. Survival of irradiated and nonirradiated NOD-SCID mice intracranially implanted with stem-like gliomaspheres were monitored. Glioma cells treated with gefitinib, irradiation, or both were assayed for clonogenic survival, γ-H 2 AX immunostaining, DNA-PKcs expression, and phosphorylation of EGFR and Akt. Results: Stem-like gliomaspheres displayed BTSC characteristics of self-renewal; differentiation into lineages of neurons, oligodendrocytes, and astrocytes; and initiation of glioma growth in NOD-SCID mice. Irradiation dose-dependently reduced clonogenic survival, induced G 2 /M arrest and increased γ-H 2 AX immunostaining of nonstem glioma cells, but not stem-like gliomaspheres. There was no difference in survival of irradiated and nonirradiated mice implanted with stem-like gliomaspheres. The addition of gefitinib significantly inhibited clonogenic survival, increased γ-H 2 AX immunostaining, and reduced DNA-PKcs expression of irradiated stem-like gliomaspheres, without affecting irradiated-nonstem glioma cells. Gefitinib alone, and when combined with irradiation, inhibited phosphorylation of EGFR (Y1068 and Y1045) and Akt (S473) in stem-like gliomaspheres. In nonstem glioma cells, gefitinib alone inhibited EGFR Y1068 phosphorylation, with further inhibition by combined gefitinib and irradiation. Conclusions: Stem-like gliomaspheres are resistant to irradiation

  7. Gefitinib radiosensitizes stem-like glioma cells: inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor-Akt-DNA-PK signaling, accompanied by inhibition of DNA double-strand break repair.

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    Kang, Khong Bee; Zhu, Congju; Wong, Yin Ling; Gao, Qiuhan; Ty, Albert; Wong, Meng Cheong

    2012-05-01

    We compared radiosensitivity of brain tumor stem cells (BTSCs) with matched nonstem glioma cells, and determined whether gefitinib enhanced BTSC radiosensitivity by inhibiting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-Akt-DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) signaling, followed by enhanced DNA double-stand breaks (DSBs) and inhibition of DSB repair. Radiosensitivity of stem-like gliomaspheres and nonstem glioma cells (obtained at patient neurosurgical resection) were evaluated by clonogenic assays, γ-H(2)AX immunostaining and cell cycle distribution. Survival of irradiated and nonirradiated NOD-SCID mice intracranially implanted with stem-like gliomaspheres were monitored. Glioma cells treated with gefitinib, irradiation, or both were assayed for clonogenic survival, γ-H(2)AX immunostaining, DNA-PKcs expression, and phosphorylation of EGFR and Akt. Stem-like gliomaspheres displayed BTSC characteristics of self-renewal; differentiation into lineages of neurons, oligodendrocytes, and astrocytes; and initiation of glioma growth in NOD-SCID mice. Irradiation dose-dependently reduced clonogenic survival, induced G(2)/M arrest and increased γ-H(2)AX immunostaining of nonstem glioma cells, but not stem-like gliomaspheres. There was no difference in survival of irradiated and nonirradiated mice implanted with stem-like gliomaspheres. The addition of gefitinib significantly inhibited clonogenic survival, increased γ-H(2)AX immunostaining, and reduced DNA-PKcs expression of irradiated stem-like gliomaspheres, without affecting irradiated-nonstem glioma cells. Gefitinib alone, and when combined with irradiation, inhibited phosphorylation of EGFR (Y1068 and Y1045) and Akt (S473) in stem-like gliomaspheres. In nonstem glioma cells, gefitinib alone inhibited EGFR Y1068 phosphorylation, with further inhibition by combined gefitinib and irradiation. Stem-like gliomaspheres are resistant to irradiation-induced cytotoxicity, G(2)/M arrest, and DNA DSBs, compared with nonstem

  8. Gefitinib Radiosensitizes Stem-Like Glioma Cells: Inhibition of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-Akt-DNA-PK Signaling, Accompanied by Inhibition of DNA Double-Strand Break Repair

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    Kang, Khong Bee, E-mail: dmskkb@nccs.com.sg [Brain Tumour Research Laboratory, Division of Medical Sciences, National Cancer Centre Singapore (Singapore); Zhu Congju; Wong Yinling; Gao Qiuhan; Ty, Albert; Wong, Meng Cheong [Brain Tumour Research Laboratory, Division of Medical Sciences, National Cancer Centre Singapore (Singapore)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: We compared radiosensitivity of brain tumor stem cells (BTSCs) with matched nonstem glioma cells, and determined whether gefitinib enhanced BTSC radiosensitivity by inhibiting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-Akt-DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) signaling, followed by enhanced DNA double-stand breaks (DSBs) and inhibition of DSB repair. Methods and Materials: Radiosensitivity of stem-like gliomaspheres and nonstem glioma cells (obtained at patient neurosurgical resection) were evaluated by clonogenic assays, {gamma}-H{sub 2}AX immunostaining and cell cycle distribution. Survival of irradiated and nonirradiated NOD-SCID mice intracranially implanted with stem-like gliomaspheres were monitored. Glioma cells treated with gefitinib, irradiation, or both were assayed for clonogenic survival, {gamma}-H{sub 2}AX immunostaining, DNA-PKcs expression, and phosphorylation of EGFR and Akt. Results: Stem-like gliomaspheres displayed BTSC characteristics of self-renewal; differentiation into lineages of neurons, oligodendrocytes, and astrocytes; and initiation of glioma growth in NOD-SCID mice. Irradiation dose-dependently reduced clonogenic survival, induced G{sub 2}/M arrest and increased {gamma}-H{sub 2}AX immunostaining of nonstem glioma cells, but not stem-like gliomaspheres. There was no difference in survival of irradiated and nonirradiated mice implanted with stem-like gliomaspheres. The addition of gefitinib significantly inhibited clonogenic survival, increased {gamma}-H{sub 2}AX immunostaining, and reduced DNA-PKcs expression of irradiated stem-like gliomaspheres, without affecting irradiated-nonstem glioma cells. Gefitinib alone, and when combined with irradiation, inhibited phosphorylation of EGFR (Y1068 and Y1045) and Akt (S473) in stem-like gliomaspheres. In nonstem glioma cells, gefitinib alone inhibited EGFR Y1068 phosphorylation, with further inhibition by combined gefitinib and irradiation. Conclusions: Stem-like gliomaspheres are

  9. Insulin-like Growth Factor Binding Protein 7 Mediates Glioma Cell Growth and Migration

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    Wei Jiang

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 7 (IGFBP-7 is the only member of the IGFBP superfamily that binds strongly to insulin, suggesting that IGFBP-7 may have different functions from other IGFBPs. Unlike other IGFBPs, the expression and functions of IGFBP-7 in glioma tumors have not been reported. Using cDNA microarray analysis, we found that expression of IGFBP-7 correlated with the grade of glioma tumors and the overall patient survival. This finding was further validated by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis. We used RNAi to examine the role of IGFBP-7 in glioma cells, inhibiting IGFBP-7 expression by short interfering RNA transfection. Cell proliferation was suppressed after IGFBP-7 expression was inhibited for 5 days, and glioma cell growth was stimulated consistently by the addition of recombinant IGFBP-7 protein. Moreover, glioma cell migration was attenuated by IGFBP-7 depletion but enhanced by IGFBP-7 overexpression and addition. Overexpression of AKT1 in IGFBP-7-overxpressed cells attenuated the IGFBP-7-promoted migration and further enhanced inhibition of IGFBP-7 depletion on the migration. Phosphorylation of AKT and Erk1/2 was also inversely regulated by IGFBP-7 expression. These two factors together suggest that IGFBP-7 can regulate glioma cell migration through the AKT-ERK pathway, thereby playing an important role in glioma growth and migration.

  10. Overexpression of high molecular weight FGF-2 forms inhibits glioma growth by acting on cell-cycle progression and protein translation

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    Lemiere, Sylvie; Azar, Rania; Belloc, Francis; Guersel, Demir; Pyronnet, Stephane; Bikfalvi, Andreas; Auguste, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    In order to clarify the role of HMW FGF-2 in glioma development and angiogenesis, we over-expressed different human FGF-2 isoforms in C6 rat glioma cell line using a tetracycline-regulated expression system. Phenotypic modifications were analyzed in vitro and compared to untransfected cells or to cells over-expressing 18 kDa FGF-2 or all FGF-2 isoforms. In particular, we demonstrate that HMW FGF-2 has unique features in inhibiting glioma cell proliferation. HMW FGF-2 expressing cells showed a cell-cycle arrest at the G2M, demonstrating a role of HMW FGF-2 in controlling the entry in mitosis. Moreover, hydroxyurea was ineffective in blocking cells at the G1S boundary when HMW FGF-2 was expressed. We also show that the HMW FGF-2 isoforms inhibit 4E-BP1 phosphorylation at critical sites restoring the translation inhibitory activity of 4E-BP1. In vivo, inhibition of tumor growth was observed when cells expressed HMW FGF-2. This indicates that HMW FGF-2 inhibits tumor growth in glioma cells by acting on cell-cycle progression and protein translation

  11. Light-controlled inhibition of malignant glioma by opsin gene transfer

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    Yang, F; Tu, J; Pan, J-Q; Luo, H-L; Liu, Y-H; Wan, J; Zhang, J; Wei, P-F; Jiang, T; Chen, Y-H; Wang, L-P

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastomas are aggressive cancers with low survival rates and poor prognosis because of their highly proliferative and invasive capacity. In the current study, we describe a new optogenetic strategy that selectively inhibits glioma cells through light-controlled membrane depolarization and cell death. Transfer of the engineered opsin ChETA (engineered Channelrhodopsin-2 variant) gene into primary human glioma cells or cell lines, but not normal astrocytes, unexpectedly decreased cell proliferation and increased mitochondria-dependent apoptosis, upon light stimulation. These optogenetic effects were mediated by membrane depolarization-induced reductions in cyclin expression and mitochondrial transmembrane potential. Importantly, the ChETA gene transfer and light illumination in mice significantly inhibited subcutaneous and intracranial glioma growth and increased the survival of the animals bearing the glioma. These results uncover an unexpected effect of opsin ion channels on glioma cells and offer the opportunity for the first time to treat glioma using a light-controllable optogenetic approach. PMID:24176851

  12. Dopamine induces growth inhibition and vascular normalization through reprogramming M2-polarized macrophages in rat C6 glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, Tian; Wang, Chenlong; Chen, Xuewei; Duan, Chenfan; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Jing; Chai, Hongyan; Tang, Tian; Chen, Honglei; Yue, Jiang; Li, Ying; Yang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Dopamine (DA), a monoamine catecholamine neurotransmitter with antiangiogenic activity, stabilizes tumor vessels in colon, prostate and ovarian cancers, thus increases chemotherapeutic efficacy. Here, in the rat C6 glioma models, we investigated the vascular normalization effects of DA and its mechanisms of action. DA (25, 50 mg/kg) inhibited tumor growth, while a precursor of DA (levodopa) prolonged the survival time of rats bearing orthotopic C6 glioma. DA improved tumor perfusion, with significant effects from day 3, and a higher level at days 5 to 7. In addition, DA decreased microvessel density and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α expression in tumor tissues, while increasing the coverage of pericyte. Conversely, an antagonist of dopamine receptor 2 (DR2) (eticlopride) but not DR1 (butaclamol) abrogated DA-induced tumor regression and vascular normalization. Furthermore, DA improved the delivery and efficacy of temozolomide therapy. Importantly, DA increased representative M1 markers (iNOS, CXCL9, etc.), while decreasing M2 markers (CD206, arginase-1, etc.). Depletion of macrophages by clodronate or zoledronic acid attenuated the effects of DA. Notably, DA treatment induced M2-to-M1 polarization in RAW264.7 cells and mouse peritoneal macrophages, and enhanced the migration of pericyte-like cells (10T1/2), which was reversed by eticlopride or DR2-siRNA. Such changes were accompanied by the downregulation of VEGF/VEGFR2 signaling. In summary, DA induces growth inhibition and vascular normalization through reprogramming M2-polarized macrophages. Thus, targeting the tumor microvasculature by DA represents a promising strategy for human glioma therapy. - Highlights: • Dopamine induces tumor growth inhibition and vascular normalization in rat C6 glioma. • Dopamine switches macrophage phenotype from M2 to M1. • Dopamine-induced vascular normalization is mediated by macrophage polarization. • Dopamine is a promising agent targeting the microvasculature in tumor

  13. Dopamine induces growth inhibition and vascular normalization through reprogramming M2-polarized macrophages in rat C6 glioma

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    Qin, Tian; Wang, Chenlong; Chen, Xuewei; Duan, Chenfan; Zhang, Xiaoyan [Department of Pharmacology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Zhang, Jing [Animal Experimental Center of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Chai, Hongyan [Center for Gene Diagnosis, Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Tang, Tian [Department of Oncology, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430060 (China); Chen, Honglei [Department of Pathology and Pathophysiology, School of Medicine, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Yue, Jiang [Department of Pharmacology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Li, Ying, E-mail: lyying0@163.com [Department of Pharmacology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Yang, Jing, E-mail: yangjingliu2013@163.com [Department of Pharmacology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China)

    2015-07-15

    Dopamine (DA), a monoamine catecholamine neurotransmitter with antiangiogenic activity, stabilizes tumor vessels in colon, prostate and ovarian cancers, thus increases chemotherapeutic efficacy. Here, in the rat C6 glioma models, we investigated the vascular normalization effects of DA and its mechanisms of action. DA (25, 50 mg/kg) inhibited tumor growth, while a precursor of DA (levodopa) prolonged the survival time of rats bearing orthotopic C6 glioma. DA improved tumor perfusion, with significant effects from day 3, and a higher level at days 5 to 7. In addition, DA decreased microvessel density and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α expression in tumor tissues, while increasing the coverage of pericyte. Conversely, an antagonist of dopamine receptor 2 (DR2) (eticlopride) but not DR1 (butaclamol) abrogated DA-induced tumor regression and vascular normalization. Furthermore, DA improved the delivery and efficacy of temozolomide therapy. Importantly, DA increased representative M1 markers (iNOS, CXCL9, etc.), while decreasing M2 markers (CD206, arginase-1, etc.). Depletion of macrophages by clodronate or zoledronic acid attenuated the effects of DA. Notably, DA treatment induced M2-to-M1 polarization in RAW264.7 cells and mouse peritoneal macrophages, and enhanced the migration of pericyte-like cells (10T1/2), which was reversed by eticlopride or DR2-siRNA. Such changes were accompanied by the downregulation of VEGF/VEGFR2 signaling. In summary, DA induces growth inhibition and vascular normalization through reprogramming M2-polarized macrophages. Thus, targeting the tumor microvasculature by DA represents a promising strategy for human glioma therapy. - Highlights: • Dopamine induces tumor growth inhibition and vascular normalization in rat C6 glioma. • Dopamine switches macrophage phenotype from M2 to M1. • Dopamine-induced vascular normalization is mediated by macrophage polarization. • Dopamine is a promising agent targeting the microvasculature in tumor

  14. Specific Inhibition of SRC Kinase Impairs Malignant Glioma Growth In Vitro and In Vivo

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    Hanna Stedt

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant glioma is a severe cancer with a poor prognosis. Local occurrence and rare metastases of malignant glioma make it a suitable target for gene therapy. Several studies have demonstrated the importance of Src kinase in different cancers. However, these studies have focused mainly on Src-deficient mice or pharmacological inhibitors of Src. In this study we have used Src small hairpin RNAs (shRNAs in a lentiviral backbone to mimic a long-term stable treatment and determined the role of Src in tumor tissues. Efficacy of Src shRNAs was confirmed in vitro demonstrating up to 90% target gene inhibition. In a mouse malignant glioma model, Src shRNA tumors were almost 50-fold smaller in comparison to control tumors and had significantly reduced vascularity. In a syngenic rat intracranial glioma model, Src shRNA-transduced tumors were smaller and these rats had a survival benefit over the control rats. In vivo treatment was enhanced by chemotherapy and histone deacetylase inhibition. Our results emphasise the importance of Src in tumorigenesis and demonstrate that it can be efficiently inhibited in vitro and in vivo in two independent malignant glioma models. In conclusion, Src is a potential target for RNA interference-mediated treatment of malignant glioma.

  15. The melatonin-MT1 receptor axis modulates tumor growth in PTEN-mutated gliomas.

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    Ma, Huihui; Wang, Zhen; Hu, Lei; Zhang, Shangrong; Zhao, Chenggang; Yang, Haoran; Wang, Hongzhi; Fang, Zhiyou; Wu, Lijun; Chen, Xueran

    2018-02-19

    More than 40% of glioma patients have tumors that harbor PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome ten) mutations; this disease is associated with poor therapeutic resistance and outcome. Such mutations are linked to increased cell survival and growth, decreased apoptosis, and drug resistance; thus, new therapeutic strategies focusing on inhibiting glioma tumorigenesis and progression are urgently needed. Melatonin, an indolamine produced and secreted predominantly by the pineal gland, mediates a variety of physiological functions and possesses antioxidant and antitumor properties. Here, we analyzed the relationship between PTEN and the inhibitory effect of melatonin in primary human glioma cells and cultured glioma cell lines. The results showed that melatonin can inhibit glioma cell growth both in culture and in vivo. This inhibition was associated with PTEN levels, which significantly correlated with the expression level of MT1 in patients. In fact, c-fos-mediated MT1 was shown to be a key modulator of the effect of melatonin on gliomas that harbor wild type PTEN. Taken together, these data suggest that melatonin-MT1 receptor complexes represent a potential target for the treatment of glioma. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. AS1411-Induced Growth Inhibition of Glioma Cells by Up-Regulation of p53 and Down-Regulation of Bcl-2 and Akt1 via Nucleolin.

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    Ye Cheng

    Full Text Available AS1411 binds nucleolin (NCL and is the first oligodeoxynucleotide aptamer to reach phase I and II clinical trials for the treatment of several cancers. However, the mechanisms by which AS1411 targets and kills glioma cells and tissues remain unclear. Here we report that AS1411 induces cell apoptosis and cycle arrest, and inhibits cell viability by up-regulation of p53 and down-regulation of Bcl-2 and Akt1 in human glioma cells. NCL was overexpressed in both nucleus and cytoplasm in human glioma U87, U251 and SHG44 cells compared to normal human astrocytes (NHA. AS1411 bound NCL and inhibited the proliferation of glioma cells but not NHA, which was accompanied with up-regulation of p53 and down-regulation of Bcl-2 and Akt1. Moreover, AS1411 treatment resulted in the G2/M cell cycle arrest in glioma cells, which was however abolished by overexpression of NCL. Further, AS1411 induced cell apoptosis, which was prevented by silencing of p53 and overexpression of Bcl-2. In addition, AS1411 inhibited the migration and invasion of glioma cells in an Akt1-dependent manner. Importantly, AS1411 inhibited the growth of glioma xenograft and prolonged the survival time of glioma tumor-bearing mice. These results revealed a promising treatment of glioma by oligodeoxynucleotide aptamer.

  17. Single-wall carbon nanohorns (SWNHs) inhibited proliferation of human glioma cells and promoted its apoptosis

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    Li, Yunjun [The Military General Hospital of Beijing PLA, Affiliated Bayi Brain Hospital (China); Zhang, Jinqian, E-mail: jingwanghou@yahoo.com.cn [Capital Medical University, Institute of Infectious Diseases, Beijing Ditan Hospital (China); Zhao, Ming [Peking University, Department of Chemical Biology, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences (China); Shi, Zujin [Peking University, Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Materials Chemistry and Applications, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering (China); Chen, Xin; He, Xihui; Han, Nanyin, E-mail: jingwanghou@sina.com [Peking University, Department of Chemical Biology, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences (China); Xu, Ruxiang, E-mail: everbright999@163.com [The Military General Hospital of Beijing PLA, Affiliated Bayi Brain Hospital (China)

    2013-08-15

    Although single-wall carbon nanohorns (SWNHs) have been demonstrated to accumulate to cytotoxic levels within organs of various animal models and cell types, they have been exploited for cancer therapies. The role of SWNHs in human glioma cell lines was unclear. To address this question, the research about direct role of SWNHs on the growth, proliferation, and apoptosis of human glioma cell lines (U87, U251, and U373) had been performed. Our results indicate that particle size of SWNHs in water is between 342 and 712 nm, the films of SEM show that SWNHs on PS surface are individual particles. SWNHs significantly delayed mitotic entry of human glioma cell lines cells, and inhibited its proliferation in a time- and dose-dependent manner. SWNHs induced a significant increase in G1 phase and inhibition of S phase followed the gradually increasing concentrations. SWNHs in human glioma cell lines cells significantly induced apoptosis followed by their gradually increasing concentrations. The TEM images showed that individual spherical SWNHs particles smaller than 100 nm in diameters were localized inside lysosomes of human glioma cell lines. SWNHs inhibited mitotic entry, growth, and proliferation of human glioma cell lines, and promoted its apoptosis. SWNHs may be a novel opportunity or method for the research on treatment of human glioma.

  18. Single-wall carbon nanohorns (SWNHs) inhibited proliferation of human glioma cells and promoted its apoptosis

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    Li, Yunjun; Zhang, Jinqian; Zhao, Ming; Shi, Zujin; Chen, Xin; He, Xihui; Han, Nanyin; Xu, Ruxiang

    2013-08-01

    Although single-wall carbon nanohorns (SWNHs) have been demonstrated to accumulate to cytotoxic levels within organs of various animal models and cell types, they have been exploited for cancer therapies. The role of SWNHs in human glioma cell lines was unclear. To address this question, the research about direct role of SWNHs on the growth, proliferation, and apoptosis of human glioma cell lines (U87, U251, and U373) had been performed. Our results indicate that particle size of SWNHs in water is between 342 and 712 nm, the films of SEM show that SWNHs on PS surface are individual particles. SWNHs significantly delayed mitotic entry of human glioma cell lines cells, and inhibited its proliferation in a time- and dose-dependent manner. SWNHs induced a significant increase in G1 phase and inhibition of S phase followed the gradually increasing concentrations. SWNHs in human glioma cell lines cells significantly induced apoptosis followed by their gradually increasing concentrations. The TEM images showed that individual spherical SWNHs particles smaller than 100 nm in diameters were localized inside lysosomes of human glioma cell lines. SWNHs inhibited mitotic entry, growth, and proliferation of human glioma cell lines, and promoted its apoptosis. SWNHs may be a novel opportunity or method for the research on treatment of human glioma.

  19. TGF-β promotes glioma cell growth via activating Nodal expression through Smad and ERK1/2 pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Jing; Liu, Su-zhi; Lin, Yan; Cao, Xiao-pan; Liu, Jia-ming

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •TGF-β promoted Nodal expression in glioma cells. •TGF-β promoted Nodal expression via activating Smad and ERK1/2 pathways. •TGF-β promotes glioma cell growth via activating Nodal expression. -- Abstract: While there were certain studies focusing on the mechanism of TGF-β promoting the growth of glioma cells, the present work revealed another novel mechanism that TGF-β may promote glioma cell growth via enhancing Nodal expression. Our results showed that Nodal expression was significantly upregulated in glioma cells when TGF-β was added, whereas the TGF-β-induced Nodal expression was evidently inhibited by transfection Smad2 or Smad3 siRNAs, and the suppression was especially significant when the Smad3 was downregulated. Another, the attenuation of TGF-β-induced Nodal expression was observed with blockade of the ERK1/2 pathway also. Further detection of the proliferation, apoptosis, and invasion of glioma cells indicated that Nodal overexpression promoted the proliferation and invasion of tumor cells and inhibited their apoptosis, resembling the effect of TGF-β addition. Downregulation of Nodal expression via transfection Nodal-specific siRNA in the presence of TGF-β weakened the promoting effect of the latter on glioma cells growth, and transfecting Nodal siRNA alone in the absence of exogenous TGF-β more profoundly inhibited the growth of glioma cells. These results demonstrated that while both TGF-β and Nodal promoted glioma cells growth, the former might exert such effect by enhancing Nodal expression, which may form a new target for glioma therapy

  20. Inhibition of autophagy induced by proteasome inhibition increases cell death in human SHG-44 glioma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Peng-Fei; Zhang, Ji-Zhou; Wang, Xiao-Fei; Meng, Fan-Kai; Li, Wen-Chen; Luan, Yong-Xin; Ling, Feng; Luo, Yi-Nan

    2009-07-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and lysosome-dependent macroautophagy (autophagy) are two major intracellular pathways for protein degradation. Recent studies suggest that proteasome inhibitors may reduce tumor growth and activate autophagy. Due to the dual roles of autophagy in tumor cell survival and death, the effect of autophagy on the destiny of glioma cells remains unclear. In this study, we sought to investigate whether inhibition of the proteasome can induce autophagy and the effects of autophagy on the fate of human SHG-44 glioma cells. The proteasome inhibitor MG-132 was used to induce autophagy in SHG-44 glioma cells, and the effect of autophagy on the survival of SHG-44 glioma cells was investigated using an autophagy inhibitor 3-MA. Cell viability was measured by MTT assay. Apoptosis and cell cycle were detected by flow cytometry. The expression of autophagy related proteins was determined by Western blot. MG-132 inhibited cell proliferation, induced cell death and cell cycle arrest at G(2)/M phase, and activated autophagy in SHG-44 glioma cells. The expression of autophagy-related Beclin-1 and LC3-I was significantly up-regulated and part of LC3-I was converted into LC3-II. However, when SHG-44 glioma cells were co-treated with MG-132 and 3-MA, the cells became less viable, but cell death and cell numbers at G(2)/M phase increased. Moreover, the accumulation of acidic vesicular organelles was decreased, the expression of Beclin-1 and LC3 was significantly down-regulated and the conversion of LC3-II from LC3-I was also inhibited. Inhibition of the proteasome can induce autophagy in human SHG-44 glioma cells, and inhibition of autophagy increases cell death. This discovery may shed new light on the effect of autophagy on modulating the fate of SHG-44 glioma cells.Acta Pharmacologica Sinica (2009) 30: 1046-1052; doi: 10.1038/aps.2009.71.

  1. ROS accumulation and IGF-IR inhibition contribute to fenofibrate/PPARα -mediated inhibition of Glioma cell motility in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Del Valle Luis

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glioblastomas are characterized by rapid cell growth, aggressive CNS infiltration, and are resistant to all known anticancer regimens. Recent studies indicate that fibrates and statins possess anticancer potential. Fenofibrate is a potent agonist of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARα that can switch energy metabolism from glycolysis to fatty acid β-oxidation, and has low systemic toxicity. Fenofibrate also attenuates IGF-I-mediated cellular responses, which could be relevant in the process of glioblastoma cell dispersal. Methods The effects of fenofibrate on Glioma cell motility, IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR signaling, PPARα activity, reactive oxygen species (ROS metabolism, mitochondrial potential, and ATP production were analyzed in human glioma cell lines. Results Fenofibrate treatment attenuated IGF-I signaling responses and repressed cell motility of LN-229 and T98G Glioma cell lines. In the absence of fenofibrate, specific inhibition of the IGF-IR had only modest effects on Glioma cell motility. Further experiments revealed that PPARα-dependent accumulation of ROS is a strong contributing factor in Glioma cell lines responses to fenofibrate. The ROS scavenger, N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC, restored cell motility, improved mitochondrial potential, and increased ATP levels in fenofibrate treated Glioma cell lines. Conclusions Our results indicate that although fenofibrate-mediated inhibition of the IGF-IR may not be sufficient in counteracting Glioma cell dispersal, PPARα-dependent metabolic switch and the resulting ROS accumulation strongly contribute to the inhibition of these devastating brain tumor cells.

  2. Gamma-glutamylcyclotransferase promotes the growth of human glioma cells by activating Notch-Akt signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Shang-Hang; Yu, Ning; Liu, Xi-Yao; Tan, Guo-Wei; Wang, Zhan-Xiang, E-mail: md_wzx7189@163.com

    2016-03-18

    Glioma as an aggressive type tumor is rapidly growing and has become one of the leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. γ-Glutamylcyclotransferase (GGCT) has been shown as a diagnostic marker in various cancers. To reveal whether there is a correlation between GGCT and human glioma, GGCT expression in human glioma tissues and cell lines was first determined. We found that GGCT expression was up-regulated in human glioma tissues and cell lines. Further, we demonstrate that GGCT knockdown inhibits glioma cell T98G and U251 proliferation and colony formation, whereas GGCT overexpression leads to oppose effects. GGCT overexpression promotes the expression of Notch receptors and activates Akt signaling in glioma cells, and Notch-Akt signaling is activated in glioma tissues with high expression of GGCT. Finally, we show that inhibition of Notch-Akt signaling with Notch inhibitor MK-0752 blocks the effects of GGCT on glioma proliferation and colony formation. In conclusion, GGCT plays a critical role in glioma cell proliferation and may be a potential cancer therapeutic target. - Highlights: • GGCT expression is up-regulated in human glioma tissues and cell lines. • GGCT promotes glioma cell growth and colony formation. • GGCT promotes the activation of Notch-Akt signaling in glioma cells and tissues. • Notch inhibition blocks the role of GGCT in human glioma cells.

  3. Experimental radioimmunotherapy of a xenografted human glioma using [sup 131]I-labeled monoclonal antibody to epidermal growth factor receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Hiroshi; Nakazawa, Shozo [Nippon Medical School, Tokyo (Japan); Herlyn, D

    1993-09-01

    [sup 131]I-labeled F (ab')[sub 2] fragments of murine monoclonal antibodies (MAb) 425 specific to the epidermal growth factor receptor expressed on human gliomas were used in experimental human malignant glioma immunotherapy. Two injections of 150 [mu]Ci [sup 131]I-labeled 425 F(ab')[sub 2] achieved growth inhibition of U-87MG human malignant glioma xenografts in nude mice. This radiolabeled specific MAb F(ab')[sub 2] was significantly superior to radiolabeled fragments of an anti-hepatitis virus control MAb A5C3 in influencing tumor growth. However, similar treatment of established human malignant glioma xenografts did not inhibit progressive tumor growth significantly. No clear tumor inhibition was produced by unlabeled MAb 425F(ab')[sub 2]. These studies suggest that [sup 131]I-labeled MAbs have a significant antitumor effect where unmodified antibody is ineffective. Multiple doses of antibody may achieve an increase in labeled MAb concentration in tumors. (author).

  4. Inhibition of cell growth by EGR-1 in human primary cultures from malignant glioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagliardi Franco

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this work was to investigate in vitro the putative role of EGR-1 in the growth of glioma cells. EGR-1 expression was examined during the early passages in vitro of 17 primary cell lines grown from 3 grade III and from 14 grade IV malignant astrocytoma explants. The explanted tumors were genetically characterized at the p53, MDM2 and INK4a/ARF loci, and fibronectin expression and growth characteristics were examined. A recombinant adenovirus overexpressing EGR-1 was tested in the primary cell lines. Results Low levels of EGR-1 protein were found in all primary cultures examined, with lower values present in grade IV tumors and in cultures carrying wild-type copies of p53 gene. The levels of EGR-1 protein were significantly correlated to the amount of intracellular fibronectin, but only in tumors carrying wild-type copies of the p53 gene (R = 0,78, p = 0.0082. Duplication time, plating efficiency, colony formation in agarose, and contact inhibition were also altered in the p53 mutated tumor cultures compared to those carrying wild-type p53. Growth arrest was achieved in both types of tumor within 1–2 weeks following infection with a recombinant adenovirus overexpressing EGR-1 but not with the control adenovirus. Conclusions Suppression of EGR-1 is a common event in gliomas and in most cases this is achieved through down-regulation of gene expression. Expression of EGR-1 by recombinant adenovirus infection almost completely abolishes the growth of tumor cells in vitro, regardless of the mutational status of the p53 gene.

  5. Dimethyl phenyl piperazine iodide (DMPP) induces glioma regression by inhibiting angiogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Yan-qing; Li, Yan; Wang, Xiao-yu; He, Xiao-dong; Jun, Li; Chuai, Manli; Lee, Kenneth Ka Ho; Wang, Ju; Wang, Li-jing; Yang, Xuesong

    2014-01-01

    1,1-Dimethyl-4-phenyl piperazine iodide (DMPP) is a synthetic nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonist that could reduce airway inflammation. In this study, we demonstrated that DMPP could dramatically inhibit glioma size maintained on the chick embryonic chorioallantoic membrane (CAM). We first performed MTT and BrdU incorporation experiments on U87 glioma cells in vitro to understand the mechanism involved. We established that DMPP did not significantly affect U87 cell proliferation and survival. We speculated that DMPP directly caused the tumor to regress by affecting the vasculature in and around the implanted tumor on our chick CAM model. Hence, we conducted detailed analysis of DMPP's inhibitory effects on angiogenesis. Three vasculogenesis and angiogenesis in vivo models were used in the study which included (1) early chick blood islands formation, (2) chick yolk-sac membrane (YSW) and (3) CAM models. The results revealed that DMPP directly suppressed all developmental stages involved in vasculogenesis and angiogenesis – possibly by acting through Ang-1 and HIF-2α signaling. In sum, our results show that DMPP could induce glioma regression grown on CAM by inhibiting vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. - Highlights: ●We demonstrated that DMPP inhibited the growth of glioma cells on chick CAM. ●DMPP did not significantly affect the proliferation and survival of U87 cells. ●We revealed that DMPP suppressed vasculogenesis and angiogenesis in chick embryo. ●Angiogenesis in chick CAM was inhibited by DMPP via most probably Ang-1 and HIF-2α. ●DMPP could be potentially developed as an anti-tumor drug in the future

  6. Effect of inhibition of the ROCK isoform on RT2 malignant glioma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaba, Nobuharu; Ishizawa, Sho; Kimura, Masaki; Fujioka, Kouki; Watanabe, Michiko; Shibasaki, Toshiaki; Manome, Yoshinobu

    2010-09-01

    Malignant glioma is one of the most intractable diseases in the human body. Rho-kinase (ROCK) is overexpressed and has been proposed as the main cause for the refractoriness of the disease. Since efficacious treatment is required, this study investigated the effect of inhibition of ROCK isoforms. The short hairpin RNA transcription vector was transfected into the RT2 rat glioma cell line and the characteristics of the cells were investigated. The effect of nimustine hydrochloride (ACNU) anti-neoplastic agent on cells was also measured. Inhibition of ROCK isoforms did not alter cell growth. Cell cycle analysis revealed that ROCK1 down-regulation reduced the G(0) phase population and ROCK2 down-regulation reduced the G(2)/M phase population. When ROCK1-down-regulated cells were exposed to ACNU, they demonstrated susceptibility to the agent. The roles of ROCK1 and ROCK2 may be different in glioma cells. Furthermore, the combination of ROCK1 down-regulation and an anti-neoplastic agent may be useful for the therapy of malignant glioma.

  7. Sustained Angiopoietin-2 Expression Disrupts Vessel Formation and Inhibits Glioma Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ok-Hee Lee

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Systematic analyses of the expression of angiogenic regulators in cancer models should yield useful information for the development of novel therapies for malignant gliomas. In this study, we analyzed tumor growth, vascularization, and angiopoietin-2 (Ang2 expression during the development of U-87 MG xenografts. We found that tumoral angiogenesis in this model follows a multistage process characterized by avascular, prolific peripheral angiogenesis, and late vascular phases. On day 4, we observed an area of central necrosis, a peripheral ring of Ang2-positive glioma cells, and reactive Ang2-positive vascular structures in the tumor/brain interface. When the tumor had developed a vascular network, Ang2 was expressed only in peripheral vascular structures. Because Ang2 expression was downmodulated in the late stages of development, probably to maintain a stable tumoral vasculature, we next studied whether sustained Ang2 expression might impair vascular development and, ultimately, tumor growth. Ang2 prevented the formation of capillary-like structures and impaired angiogenesis in a chorioallantoic membrane chicken model. Finally, we tested the effect of sustained Ang2 expression on U-87 MG xenograff development. Ang2 significantly prolonged the survival of intracranial U-87 MG tumor-bearing animals. Examination of Ang2treated xenograffs revealed areas of tumor necrosis and vascular damage. We therefore conclude that deregulated Ang2 expression during gliomagenesis hindered successful angiogenesis and that therapies that sustain Ang2 expression might be effective against malignant gliomas.

  8. Dimethyl phenyl piperazine iodide (DMPP) induces glioma regression by inhibiting angiogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Yan-qing; Li, Yan; Wang, Xiao-yu [Key Laboratory for Regenerative Medicine of the Ministry of Education, Division of Histology and Embryology, Medical College, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); He, Xiao-dong [Institute of Vascular Biological Sciences, Guangdong Pharmaceutical University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Jun, Li [Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Bioengineering Medicine, National Engineering Research Centre of Genetic Medicine, College of Life Science and Technology, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Chuai, Manli [Division of Cell and Developmental Biology, University of Dundee, Dundee, DD1 5EH (United Kingdom); Lee, Kenneth Ka Ho [Key Laboratory for Regenerative Medicine of the Ministry of Education, School of Biomedical Sciences, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin (Hong Kong); Wang, Ju [Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Bioengineering Medicine, National Engineering Research Centre of Genetic Medicine, College of Life Science and Technology, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Wang, Li-jing, E-mail: wanglijing62@163.com [Institute of Vascular Biological Sciences, Guangdong Pharmaceutical University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Yang, Xuesong, E-mail: yang_xuesong@126.com [Key Laboratory for Regenerative Medicine of the Ministry of Education, Division of Histology and Embryology, Medical College, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China)

    2014-01-15

    1,1-Dimethyl-4-phenyl piperazine iodide (DMPP) is a synthetic nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonist that could reduce airway inflammation. In this study, we demonstrated that DMPP could dramatically inhibit glioma size maintained on the chick embryonic chorioallantoic membrane (CAM). We first performed MTT and BrdU incorporation experiments on U87 glioma cells in vitro to understand the mechanism involved. We established that DMPP did not significantly affect U87 cell proliferation and survival. We speculated that DMPP directly caused the tumor to regress by affecting the vasculature in and around the implanted tumor on our chick CAM model. Hence, we conducted detailed analysis of DMPP's inhibitory effects on angiogenesis. Three vasculogenesis and angiogenesis in vivo models were used in the study which included (1) early chick blood islands formation, (2) chick yolk-sac membrane (YSW) and (3) CAM models. The results revealed that DMPP directly suppressed all developmental stages involved in vasculogenesis and angiogenesis – possibly by acting through Ang-1 and HIF-2α signaling. In sum, our results show that DMPP could induce glioma regression grown on CAM by inhibiting vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. - Highlights: ●We demonstrated that DMPP inhibited the growth of glioma cells on chick CAM. ●DMPP did not significantly affect the proliferation and survival of U87 cells. ●We revealed that DMPP suppressed vasculogenesis and angiogenesis in chick embryo. ●Angiogenesis in chick CAM was inhibited by DMPP via most probably Ang-1 and HIF-2α. ●DMPP could be potentially developed as an anti-tumor drug in the future.

  9. Frequent Nek1 overexpression in human gliomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Jun [School of Biomedical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Neurosurgery Department, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Cai, Yu, E-mail: aihaozuqiu22@163.com [School of Biomedical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Neurosurgery Department, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Liu, Pin [Med-X Research Institute, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Zhao, Weiguo [Neurosurgery Department, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China)

    2016-08-05

    Never in mitosis A (NIMA)-related kinase 1 (Nek1) regulates cell cycle progression to mitosis. Its expression and potential functions in human gliomas have not been studied. Here, our immunohistochemistry (IHC) assay and Western blot assay results showed that Nek1 expression was significantly upregulated in fresh and paraffin-embedded human glioma tissues. Its level in normal brain tissues was low. Nek1 overexpression in human gliomas was correlated with the proliferation marker (Ki-67), tumor grade, Karnofsky performance scale (KPS) and more importantly, patients’ poor survival. Further studies showed that Nek1 expression level was also increased in multiple human glioma cell lines (U251-MG, U87-MG, U118, H4 and U373). Significantly, siRNA-mediated knockdown of Nek1 inhibited glioma cell (U87-MG/U251-MG) growth. Nek1 siRNA also sensitized U87-MG/U251-MG cells to temozolomide (TMZ), causing a profound apoptosis induction and growth inhibition. The current study indicates Nek1 might be a novel and valuable oncotarget of glioma, it is important for glioma cell growth and TMZ-resistance. - Highlights: • Nek1 is upregulated in multiple human glioma tissues and cell lines. • Nek1 overexpression correlates with glioma grades and patients’ KPS score. • Nek1 overexpression correlates with patients’ poor overall survival. • siRNA knockdown of Nek1 inhibits glioma cell growth. • siRNA knockdown of Nek1 sensitizes human glioma cells to temozolomide.

  10. Frequent Nek1 overexpression in human gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Jun; Cai, Yu; Liu, Pin; Zhao, Weiguo

    2016-01-01

    Never in mitosis A (NIMA)-related kinase 1 (Nek1) regulates cell cycle progression to mitosis. Its expression and potential functions in human gliomas have not been studied. Here, our immunohistochemistry (IHC) assay and Western blot assay results showed that Nek1 expression was significantly upregulated in fresh and paraffin-embedded human glioma tissues. Its level in normal brain tissues was low. Nek1 overexpression in human gliomas was correlated with the proliferation marker (Ki-67), tumor grade, Karnofsky performance scale (KPS) and more importantly, patients’ poor survival. Further studies showed that Nek1 expression level was also increased in multiple human glioma cell lines (U251-MG, U87-MG, U118, H4 and U373). Significantly, siRNA-mediated knockdown of Nek1 inhibited glioma cell (U87-MG/U251-MG) growth. Nek1 siRNA also sensitized U87-MG/U251-MG cells to temozolomide (TMZ), causing a profound apoptosis induction and growth inhibition. The current study indicates Nek1 might be a novel and valuable oncotarget of glioma, it is important for glioma cell growth and TMZ-resistance. - Highlights: • Nek1 is upregulated in multiple human glioma tissues and cell lines. • Nek1 overexpression correlates with glioma grades and patients’ KPS score. • Nek1 overexpression correlates with patients’ poor overall survival. • siRNA knockdown of Nek1 inhibits glioma cell growth. • siRNA knockdown of Nek1 sensitizes human glioma cells to temozolomide.

  11. MTSS1 is epigenetically regulated in glioma cells and inhibits glioma cell motility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Luxen

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetic silencing by DNA methylation in brain tumors has been reported for many genes, however, their function on pathogenesis needs to be evaluated. We investigated the MTSS1 gene, identified as hypermethylated by differential methylation hybridization (DMH. Fifty-nine glioma tissue samples and seven glioma cell lines were examined for hypermethylation of the MTSS1 promotor, MTSS1 expression levels and gene dosage. GBM cell lines were treated with demethylating agents and interrogated for functional consequences of MTSS1 expression after transient transfection. Hypermethylation was significantly associated with IDH1/2 mutation. Comparative SNP analysis indicates higher incidence of loss of heterozygosity of MTSS1 in anaplastic astrocytomas and secondary glioblastomas as well as hypermethylation of the remaining allele. Reversal of promoter hypermethylation results in an increased MTSS1 expression. Cell motility was significantly inhibited by MTSS1 overexpression without influencing cell growth or apoptosis. Immunofluorescence analysis of MTSS1 in human astrocytes indicates co-localization with actin filaments. MTSS1 is down-regulated by DNA methylation in glioblastoma cell lines and is part of the G-CIMP phenotype in primary glioma tissues. Our data on normal astrocytes suggest a function of MTSS1 at focal contact structures with an impact on migratory capacity but no influence on apoptosis or cellular proliferation.

  12. Overexpressed KDM5B is associated with the progression of glioma and promotes glioma cell growth via downregulating p21

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Bin [Department of Neurosurgery, Beijing Shijitan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100038 (China); Hu, Zhiqiang, E-mail: zhiqhutg@126.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Beijing Shijitan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100038 (China); Huang, Hui; Zhu, Guangtong; Xiao, Zhiyong [Department of Neurosurgery, Beijing Shijitan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100038 (China); Wan, Weiqing; Zhang, Peng; Jia, Wang; Zhang, Liwei [Department of Neurosurgery, Beijing Tian Tan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100050 (China)

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • KDM5B is overexpressed in glioma samples. • KDM5B stimulated proliferation of glioma cells. • Inhibition of p21contributes to KDM5B-induced proliferation. - Abstract: Epigenetic alterations such as aberrant expression of histone-modifying enzymes have been implicated in tumorigenesis. Upregulation of lysine (K)-specific demethylase 5B (KDM5B) has been reported in a variety of malignant tumors. However, the impact of KDM5B in glioma remains unclear. The objective of this study was to investigate the expression and prognostic value of KDM5B in glioma. In clinical glioma samples, we found that KDM5B expression was significantly upregulated in cancer lesions compared with normal brain tissues. Kaplan–Meier analysis showed that patients with glioma and higher KDM5B expression tend to have shorter overall survival time. By silencing or overexpressing KDM5B in glioma cells, we found that KDM5B could promote cell growth both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, we demonstrated that KDM5B promoted glioma proliferation partly via regulation of the expression of p21. Our study provided evidence that KDM5B functions as a novel tumor oncogene in glioma and may be a potential therapeutic target for glioma management.

  13. MicroRNA-195 inhibits the proliferation of human glioma cells by directly targeting cyclin D1 and cyclin E1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Hui

    Full Text Available Glioma proliferation is a multistep process during which a sequence of genetic and epigenetic alterations randomly occur to affect the genes controlling cell proliferation, cell death and genetic stability. microRNAs are emerging as important epigenetic modulators of multiple target genes, leading to abnormal cellular signaling involving cellular proliferation in cancers.In the present study, we found that expression of miR-195 was markedly downregulated in glioma cell lines and human primary glioma tissues, compared to normal human astrocytes and matched non-tumor associated tissues. Upregulation of miR-195 dramatically reduced the proliferation of glioma cells. Flow cytometry analysis showed that ectopic expression of miR-195 significantly decreased the percentage of S phase cells and increased the percentage of G1/G0 phase cells. Overexpression of miR-195 dramatically reduced the anchorage-independent growth ability of glioma cells. Furthermore, overexpression of miR-195 downregulated the levels of phosphorylated retinoblastoma (pRb and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA in glioma cells. Conversely, inhibition of miR-195 promoted cell proliferation, increased the percentage of S phase cells, reduced the percentage of G1/G0 phase cells, enhanced anchorage-independent growth ability, upregulated the phosphorylation of pRb and PCNA in glioma cells. Moreover, we show that miR-195 inhibited glioma cell proliferation by downregulating expression of cyclin D1 and cyclin E1, via directly targeting the 3'-untranslated regions (3'-UTR of cyclin D1 and cyclin E1 mRNA. Taken together, our results suggest that miR-195 plays an important role to inhibit the proliferation of glioma cells, and present a novel mechanism for direct miRNA-mediated suppression of cyclin D1 and cyclin E1 in glioma.

  14. Berberine enhances inhibition of glioma tumor cell migration and invasiveness mediated by arsenic trioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Tseng-Hsi; Kuo, Hsing-Chun; Chou, Fen-Pi; Lu, Fung-Jou

    2008-01-01

    Arsenic trioxide (As 2 O 3 ) exhibits promising anticarcinogenic activity in acute promyelocytic leukemic patients and induces apoptosis in various tumor cells in vitro. Here, we investigated the effect of the natural alkaloid berberine on As 2 O 3 -mediated inhibition of cancer cell migration using rat and human glioma cell lines. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay was used to determine the viability of rat C6 and human U-87 glioma cells after treatment with As 2 O 3 or berberine, and after co-treatment with As 2 O 3 and berberine. The wound scratch and Boyden chamber assays were applied to determine the effect of As 2 O 3 and berberine on the migration capacity and invasiveness of glioma cancer cells. Zymography and Western blot analyses provided information on the effect of As 2 O 3 and berberine on the intracellular translocation and activation of protein kinase C (PKC), and some PKC-related downstream factors. Most assays were performed three times, independently, and data were analyzed using ANOVA. The cell viability studies demonstrated that berberine enhances As 2 O 3 -mediated inhibition of glioma cell growth after 24 h incubation. Untreated control cells formed a confluent layer, the formation of which was inhibited upon incubation with 5 μM As 2 O 3 . The latter effect was even more pronounced in the presence of 10 μM berberine. The As 2 O 3 -mediated reduction in motility and invasion of glioma cells was enhanced upon co-treatment with berberine. Furthermore, it has been reported that PKC isoforms influence the morphology of the actin cytoskeleton, as well as the activation of metalloproteases MT1-MMP and MMP-2, reported to be involved in cancer cell migration. Treatment of glioma cells with As 2 O 3 and berberine significantly decreased the activation of PKC α and ε and led to actin cytoskeleton rearrangements. The levels of two downstream transcription factors, myc and jun, and MT1-MMP and MMP-2 were also

  15. 3-Bromopyruvate inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in CD133+ population in human glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dong-Qiang; Tan, Xiao-Yu; Zhang, Bao-Wei; Wu, Tao; Liu, Ping; Sun, Shao-Jun; Cao, Yin-Guang

    2016-03-01

    The study was aimed to investigate the role of 3-bromopyruvate in inhibition of CD133+ U87 human glioma cell population growth. The results demonstrated that 3-bromopyruvate inhibited the viability of both CD133+ and parental cells derived from U87 human glioma cell line. However, the 3-bromopyruvate-induced inhibition in viability was more prominent in CD133+ cells at 10 μM concentration after 48 h. Treatment of CD133+ cells with 3-bromopyruvate caused reduction in cell population and cell size, membrane bubbling, and degradation of cell membranes. Hoechst 33258 staining showed condensation of chromatin material and fragmentation of DNA in treated CD133+ cells after 48 h. 3-Bromopyruvate inhibited the migration rate of CD133+ cells significantly compared to the parental cells. Flow cytometry revealed that exposure of CD133+ cells to 3-bromopyruvate increased the cell population in S phase from 24.5 to 37.9 % with increase in time from 12 to 48 h. In addition, 3-bromopyruvate significantly enhanced the expression of Bax and cleaved caspase 3 in CD133+ cells compared to the parental cells. Therefore, 3-bromopyruvate is a potent chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of glioma by targeting stem cells selectively.

  16. Growth inhibition and chemosensitization of exogenous nitric oxide released from NONOates in glioma cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyerbrock, Astrid; Baumer, Brunhilde; Papazoglou, Anna

    2009-01-01

    Exogenous nitric oxide (NO) from NO donors has cytotoxic, chemosensitizing, and radiosensitizing effects, and increases vascular permeability and blood flow in tumors. Yet little is known about whether these cytotoxic and chemosensitizing effects can be observed in glioma cells at doses that alter tumor physiological characteristics in vivo and whether these effects are tumor selective. The effect of NO released from proline NONOate, diethylamine NONOate, spermine NONOate, and sodium nitrite on cell proliferation, apoptosis, and chemosensitivity to carboplatin of cultured glioma cells was studied in C6, U87 glioma cells, human glioblastoma cells, and human astrocytes and fibroblasts. Although proline NONOate failed to induce cell death, the other NO donors induced growth arrest when present in high concentrations (10(-2) M) in all cell lines. Chemosensitization was observed after concomitant incubation with spermine NONOate and carboplatin in C6 and human glioblastoma cells. There is strong evidence that cell death occurs primarily by necrosis and to a lesser degree by apoptosis. The NO doses, which altered tumor physiology in vivo, were not cytotoxic, indicating that NO alters vascular permeability and cell viability in vivo by different mechanisms. The authors found that NO-generating agents at high concentrations are potent growth inhibitors and might also be useful as chemosensitizers in glioma cells. These data corroborate the theory that the use of NOgenerating agents may play a role in the multimodal treatment of malignant gliomas but that the NO release must be targeted more specifically to tumor cells to improve selectivity and efficacy.

  17. Melatonin inhibits proliferation and invasion via repression of miRNA-155 in glioma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Junyi; Lu, Zhongsheng; Ji, Chenghong; Chen, Yuchao; Liu, Yuzhao; Lei, Zhe; Wang, Longqiang; Zhang, Hong-Tao; Li, Xiangdong

    2017-09-01

    Melatonin, an indolamine mostly synthesized in the pineal gland, exerts the anti-cancer effect by various mechanisms in glioma cells. Our previous study showed that miR-155 promoted glioma cell proliferation and invasion. However, the question of whether melatonin may inhibit glioma by regulating miRNAs has not yet been addressed. In this study, we found that melatonin (100μM, 1μM and 1nM) significantly inhibited the expression of miR-155 in human glioma cell lines U87, U373 and U251. Especially, the lowest expression of miR-155 was detected in 1μM melatonin-treated glioma cells. Melatonin (1μM) inhibits cell proliferation of U87 by promoting cell apoptosis. Nevertheless, melatonin had no effect on cell cycle distribution of U87 cells. Moreover, U87 cells treated with 1μM melatonin presented significantly lower migration and invasion ability when compared with control cells. Importantly, melatonin inhibited c-MYB expression, and c-MYB knockdown reduced miR-155 expression and migration and invasion in U87 cells. Taken together, for the first time, our findings show that melatonin inhibits miR-155 expression and thereby represses glioma cell proliferation, migration and invasion, and suggest that melatonin may downregulate the expression of miR-155 via repression of c-MYB. This will provide a theoretical basis for revealing the anti-glioma mechanisms of melatonin. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  18. Saw Palmetto Extract Inhibits Metastasis and Antiangiogenesis through STAT3 Signal Pathway in Glioma Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Hong; Shen, Jinglian; Yang, Yang; Che, Yuqin

    2015-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription factor 3 (STAT3) plays an important role in the proliferation and angiogenesis in human glioma. Previous research indicated that saw palmetto extract markedly inhibited the proliferation of human glioma cells through STAT3 signal pathway. But its effect on tumor metastasis and antiangiogenesis is not clear. This study is to further clear the impact of saw palmetto extract on glioma cell metastasis, antiangiogenesis, and its mechanism. TUNEL assay indicated that the apoptotic cells in the saw palmetto treated group are higher than that in the control group (p saw palmetto extract inhibits the proliferation of human glioma. Meanwhile pSTAT3 is lower in the experimental group and CD34 is also inhibited in the saw palmetto treated group. This means that saw palmetto extract could inhibit the angiogenesis in glioma. We found that saw palmetto extract was an important phytotherapeutic drug against the human glioma through STAT3 signal pathway. Saw palmetto extract may be useful as an adjunctive therapeutic agent for treatment of individuals with glioma and other types of cancer in which STAT3 signaling is activated.

  19. PERK silence inhibits glioma cell growth under low glucose stress by blockage of p-AKT and subsequent HK2's mitochondria translocation

    KAUST Repository

    Hou, Xu; Liu, Yaohua; Liu, Huailei; Chen, Xin; Liu, Min; Che, Hui; Guo, Fei; Wang, Chunlei; Zhang, Daming; Wu, Jianing; Chen, Xiaofeng; Shen, Chen; Li, Chenguang; Peng, Fei; Bi, Yunke; Yang, Zhuowen; Yang, Guang; Ai, Jing; Gao, Xin; Zhao, Shiguang

    2015-01-01

    Glioma relies on glycolysis to obtain energy and sustain its survival under low glucose microenvironment in vivo. The mechanisms on glioma cell glycolysis regulation are still unclear. Signaling mediated by Double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase (PKR) - like ER kinase (PERK) is one of the important pathways of unfolded protein response (UPR) which is comprehensively activated in cancer cells upon the hypoxic and low glucose stress. Here we show that PERK is significantly activated in human glioma tissues. PERK silencing results in decreased glioma cell viability and ATP/lactate production upon low glucose stress, which is mediated by partially blocked AKT activation and subsequent inhibition of Hexokinase II (HK2)'s mitochondria translocation. More importantly, PERK silenced glioma cells show decreased tumor formation capacity. Our results reveal that PERK activation is involved in glioma glycolysis regulation and may be a potential molecular target for glioma treatment.

  20. PERK silence inhibits glioma cell growth under low glucose stress by blockage of p-AKT and subsequent HK2's mitochondria translocation

    KAUST Repository

    Hou, Xu

    2015-03-12

    Glioma relies on glycolysis to obtain energy and sustain its survival under low glucose microenvironment in vivo. The mechanisms on glioma cell glycolysis regulation are still unclear. Signaling mediated by Double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase (PKR) - like ER kinase (PERK) is one of the important pathways of unfolded protein response (UPR) which is comprehensively activated in cancer cells upon the hypoxic and low glucose stress. Here we show that PERK is significantly activated in human glioma tissues. PERK silencing results in decreased glioma cell viability and ATP/lactate production upon low glucose stress, which is mediated by partially blocked AKT activation and subsequent inhibition of Hexokinase II (HK2)\\'s mitochondria translocation. More importantly, PERK silenced glioma cells show decreased tumor formation capacity. Our results reveal that PERK activation is involved in glioma glycolysis regulation and may be a potential molecular target for glioma treatment.

  1. Silencing Nrf2 impairs glioma cell proliferation via AMPK-activated mTOR inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Yue [Department of Neurosurgery, Jinling Hospital, School of Medicine, Nanjing University, 305 East Zhongshan Road, Nanjing 210002, Jiangsu Province (China); Wang, Handong, E-mail: njhdwang@hotmail.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Jinling Hospital, School of Medicine, Nanjing University, 305 East Zhongshan Road, Nanjing 210002, Jiangsu Province (China); Wang, Qiang [Department of Neurosurgery, Jinling Hospital, School of Medicine, Nanjing University, 305 East Zhongshan Road, Nanjing 210002, Jiangsu Province (China); Ding, Hui [Department of Neurosurgery, Jinling Hospital, School of Medicine, Southern Medical University (Guangzhou), 305 East Zhongshan Road, Nanjing 210002, Jiangsu Province (China); Wu, Heming [Department of Neurosurgery, Nanjing Jingdu Hospital, No. 34, Biao 34, Yanggongjing Road, Nanjing 210002, Jiangsu Province (China); Pan, Hao [Department of Neurosurgery, Jinling Hospital, School of Medicine, Nanjing University, 305 East Zhongshan Road, Nanjing 210002, Jiangsu Province (China)

    2016-01-15

    Gliomas are the leading cause of death among adults with primary brain malignancies. Treatment for malignant gliomas remains limited, and targeted therapies have been incompletely explored. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), a key transcription regulator for antioxidant and detoxification enzymes, is abundantly expressed in cancer cells. In this study, the role and mechanism of Nrf2 in cancer cell proliferation was investigated in multiple glioma cell lines. We first evaluated the expression patterns of Nrf2 in four glioma cell lines and found all four cell lines expressed Nrf2, but the highest level was observed in U251 cells. We further evaluated the biological functions of Nrf2 in U251 glioma cell proliferation by specific inhibition of Nrf2 using short hairpin RNA (shRNA). We found that Nrf2 depletion inhibited glioma cell proliferation. Nrf2 depletion also decreased colony formation in U251 cells stably expressing Nrf2 shRNA compared to scrambled control shRNA. Moreover, suppression of Nrf2 expression could lead to ATP depletion (with concomitant rise in AMP/ATP ratio) and consequently to AMPK-activated mTOR inhibition. Finally, activation of adenosine monophosphate–activated protein kinase (AMPK) by treated with phenformin, an AMPK agonist, can mimic the inhibitory effect of Nrf2 knockdown in U251 cells. In conclusion, our findings will shed light to the role and mechanism of Nrf2 in regulating glioma proliferation via ATP-depletion-induced AMPK activation and consequent mTOR inhibition, a novel insight into our understanding the role and mechanism of Nrf2 in glioma pathoetiology. To our knowledge, this is also the first report to provide a rationale for the implication of cross-linking between Nrf2 and mTOR signaling.

  2. Saw Palmetto Extract Inhibits Metastasis and Antiangiogenesis through STAT3 Signal Pathway in Glioma Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Ding

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Signal transducer and activator of transcription factor 3 (STAT3 plays an important role in the proliferation and angiogenesis in human glioma. Previous research indicated that saw palmetto extract markedly inhibited the proliferation of human glioma cells through STAT3 signal pathway. But its effect on tumor metastasis and antiangiogenesis is not clear. This study is to further clear the impact of saw palmetto extract on glioma cell metastasis, antiangiogenesis, and its mechanism. TUNEL assay indicated that the apoptotic cells in the saw palmetto treated group are higher than that in the control group (p<0.05. The apoptosis related protein is detected and the results revealed that saw palmetto extract inhibits the proliferation of human glioma. Meanwhile pSTAT3 is lower in the experimental group and CD34 is also inhibited in the saw palmetto treated group. This means that saw palmetto extract could inhibit the angiogenesis in glioma. We found that saw palmetto extract was an important phytotherapeutic drug against the human glioma through STAT3 signal pathway. Saw palmetto extract may be useful as an adjunctive therapeutic agent for treatment of individuals with glioma and other types of cancer in which STAT3 signaling is activated.

  3. Type I collagen gene suppresses tumor growth and invasion of malignant human glioma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyata Teruo

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Invasion is a hallmark of a malignant tumor, such as a glioma, and the progression is followed by the interaction of tumor cells with an extracellular matrix (ECM. This study examined the role of type I collagen in the invasion of the malignant human glioma cell line T98G by the introduction of the human collagen type I α1 (HCOL1A1 gene. Results The cells overexpressing HCOL1A1 were in a cluster, whereas the control cells were scattered. Overexpression of HCOL1A1 significantly suppressed the motility and invasion of the tumor cells. The glioma cell growth was markedly inhibited in vitro and in vivo by the overexpression of HCOL1A1; in particular, tumorigenicity completely regressed in nude mice. Furthermore, the HCOL1A1 gene induced apoptosis in glioma cells. Conclusion These results indicate that HCOL1A1 have a suppressive biological function in glioma progression and that the introduction of HCOL1A1 provides the basis of a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of malignant human glioma.

  4. Efficacy of the HSP90 inhibitor 17-AAG in human glioma cell lines and tumorigenic glioma stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauvageot, Claire Marie-Elisabeth; Weatherbee, Jessica Leigh; Kesari, Santosh; Winters, Susan Elizabeth; Barnes, Jessica; Dellagatta, Jamie; Ramakrishna, Naren Raj; Stiles, Charles Dean; Kung, Andrew Li-Jen; Kieran, Mark W; Wen, Patrick Yung Chih

    2009-04-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) arises from genetic and signaling abnormalities in components of signal transduction pathways involved in proliferation, survival, and the cell cycle axis. Studies to date with single-agent targeted molecular therapy have revealed only modest effects in attenuating the growth of these tumors, suggesting that targeting multiple aberrant pathways may be more beneficial. Heat-shock protein 90 (HSP90) is a molecular chaperone that is involved in the conformational maturation of a defined group of client proteins, many of which are deregulated in GBM. 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG) is a well-characterized HSP90 inhibitor that should be able to target many of the aberrant signal transduction pathways in GBM. We assessed the ability of 17-AAG to inhibit the growth of glioma cell lines and glioma stem cells both in vitro and in vivo and assessed its ability to synergize with radiation and/or temozolomide, the standard therapies for GBM. Our results reveal that 17-AAG is able to inhibit the growth of both human glioma cell lines and glioma stem cells in vitro and is able to target the appropriate proteins within these cells. In addition, 17-AAG can inhibit the growth of intracranial tumors and can synergize with radiation both in tissue culture and in intracranial tumors. This compound was not found to synergize with temozolomide in any of our models of gliomas. Our results suggest that HSP90 inhibitors like 17-AAG may have therapeutic potential in GBM, either as a single agent or in combination with radiation.

  5. Targeting the erythropoietin receptor on glioma cells reduces tumour growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peres, Elodie A.; Valable, Samuel; Guillamo, Jean-Sebastien; Marteau, Lena; Bernaudin, Jean-Francois; Roussel, Simon; Lechapt-Zalcman, Emmanuele; Bernaudin, Myriam; Petit, Edwige

    2011-01-01

    Hypoxia has been shown to be one of the major events involved in EPO expression. Accordingly, EPO might be expressed by cerebral neoplastic cells, especially in glioblastoma, known to be highly hypoxic tumours. The expression of EPOR has been described in glioma cells. However, data from the literature remain descriptive and controversial. On the basis of an endogenous source of EPO in the brain, we have focused on a potential role of EPOR in brain tumour growth. In the present study, with complementary approaches to target EPO/EPOR signalling, we demonstrate the presence of a functional EPO/EPOR system on glioma cells leading to the activation of the ERK pathway. This EPO/EPOR system is involved in glioma cell proliferation in vitro. In vivo, we show that the down-regulation of EPOR expression on glioma cells reduces tumour growth and enhances animal survival. Our results support the hypothesis that EPOR signalling in tumour cells is involved in the control of glioma growth.

  6. PAR1 inhibition suppresses the self-renewal and growth of A2B5-defined glioma progenitor cells and their derived gliomas in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Auvergne, R.; Wu, C.; Connell, A.

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) remains the most common and lethal intracranial tumor. In a comparison of gene expression by A2B5-defined tumor-initiating progenitor cells (TPCs) to glial progenitor cells derived from normal adult human brain, we found that the F2R gene encoding PAR1 was differentially...... overexpressed by A2B5-sorted TPCs isolated from gliomas at all stages of malignant development. In this study, we asked if PAR1 is causally associated with glioma progression. Lentiviral knockdown of PAR1 inhibited the expansion and self-renewal of human GBM-derived A2B5(+) TPCs in vitro, while pharmacological...

  7. KDM2B overexpression correlates with poor prognosis and regulates glioma cell growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Y

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Yiwei Wang,1 Jin Zang,1 Dongyong Zhang,2 Zhenxiang Sun,1 Bo Qiu,2 Xiaojie Wang1 1Department of Human Anatomy, Shenyang Medical College, Huanggu District, Shenyang City, 2Department of Neurosurgery, First Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University, Heping District, Shenyang City, Liaoning Province, ChinaBackground: Gliomas are one of the most lethal cancers in the human central nervous system. Despite clinical treatment advancements, the prognosis of patients with glioma remains poor. KDM2B is a histone lysine demethylase, which has been observed in multiple tumors. But the concrete role of KDM2B in gliomas remains to be further illustrated.Methods: The KDM2B expression in gliomas was detected with immunohistochemistry and Western blot assay. Furthermore, knockdown of KDM2B in U87 and U251 glioma cell lines, the proliferation capacity was evaluated by cell viability assay, colon formation assay and flow cytometry in vitro. Western blot assay was used to analyze the p21, EZH2 and cyclinD1 changes followed by knockdown of KDM2B.Results: KDM2B was upregulated in tissues of glioma patients, and the expression was correlated to cancer progression. Downregulation of KDM2B in U87 and U251 glioma cell lines inhibited cell proliferation and arrested cell cycle in G0/G1 phase. In addition, silencing KDM2B promoted the upregulation of p21 while reduced the expression of EZH2 and cyclinD1.Conclusion: Taken together, our results revealed that KDM2B might influence gliomas growth and act as a novel therapeutic target for glioma patients.Keywords: EZH2, glioma, KDM2B, P21

  8. Induction of reactive oxygen intermediates-dependent programmed cell death in human malignant ex vivo glioma cells and inhibition of the vascular endothelial growth factor production by taurolidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodak, Roksana; Kubota, Hisashi; Ishihara, Hideyuki; Eugster, Hans-Pietro; Könü, Dilek; Möhler, Hanns; Yonekawa, Yasuhiro; Frei, Karl

    2005-06-01

    Taurolidine, a derivative of the amino acid taurin, was recently found to display a potent antineoplastic effect both in vitro and in vivo. The authors therefore initiated studies to assess the potential antineoplastic activity of taurolidine in human glioma cell lines and in ex vivo malignant cell cultures. They also studied the mechanisms that induce cell death and the impact of taurolidine on tumor-derived vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production. Cytotoxicity and clonogenic assays were performed using crystal violet staining. In the cytotoxicity assay 100% of glioma cell lines (eight of eight) and 74% of ex vivo glioma cultures (14 of 19) demonstrated sensitivity to taurolidine, with a mean median effective concentration (EC50) of 51 +/- 28 microg/ml and 56 +/- 23 microg/ml, respectively. Colony formation was inhibited by taurolidine, with a mean EC50 of 7 +/- 3 microg/ml for the cell lines and a mean EC50 of 3.5 +/- 1.7 microg/ml for the ex vivo glioma cultures. On observing this high activity of taurolidine in both assays, the authors decided to evaluate its cell death mechanisms. Fragmentation of DNA, externalization of phosphatidylserine, activation of poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase, loss of the mitochondrial membrane potential followed by a release of apoptosis-inducing factor, and typical apoptotic features were found after taurolidine treatment. Cell death was preceded by the generation of reactive O2 intermediates, which was abrogated by N-acetylcysteine but not by benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethylketone. Moreover, taurolidine also induced suppression of VEGF production on the protein and messenger RNA level, as shown by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Given all these findings, taurolidine may be a promising new agent in the treatment of malignant gliomas; it displays a combination of antineoplastic and antiangiogenic activities, inducing tumor cell

  9. Phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C inhibition down- regulates CXCR4 expression and interferes with proliferation, invasion and glycolysis in glioma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Mercurio

    Full Text Available The chemokine receptor CXCR4 plays a crucial role in tumors, including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, the most aggressive glioma. Phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC, a catabolic enzyme of PC metabolism, is involved in several aspects of cancer biology and its inhibition down-modulates the expression of growth factor membrane receptors interfering with their signaling pathways. In the present work we investigated the possible interplay between CXCR4 and PC-PLC in GBM cells.Confocal microscopy, immunoprecipitation, western blot analyses, and the evaluation of migration and invasion potential were performed on U87MG cells after PC-PLC inhibition with the xanthate D609. The intracellular metabolome was investigated by magnetic resonance spectroscopy; lactate levels and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH activity were analyzed by colorimetric assay.Our studies demonstrated that CXCR4 and PC-PLC co-localize and are associated on U87MG cell membrane. D609 reduced CXCR4 expression, cell proliferation and invasion, interfering with AKT and EGFR activation and expression. Metabolic analyses showed a decrease in intracellular lactate concentration together with a decrement in LDH activity.Our data suggest that inhibition of PC-PLC could represent a new molecular approach in glioma biology not only for its ability in modulating cell metabolism, glioma growth and motility, but also for its inhibitory effect on crucial molecules involved in cancer progression.

  10. Mechanisms of Glioma Formation: Iterative Perivascular Glioma Growth and Invasion Leads to Tumor Progression, VEGF-Independent Vascularization, and Resistance to Antiangiogenic Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory J. Baker

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available As glioma cells infiltrate the brain they become associated with various microanatomic brain structures such as blood vessels, white matter tracts, and brain parenchyma. How these distinct invasion patterns coordinate tumor growth and influence clinical outcomes remain poorly understood. We have investigated how perivascular growth affects glioma growth patterning and response to antiangiogenic therapy within the highly vascularized brain. Orthotopically implanted rodent and human glioma cells are shown to commonly invade and proliferate within brain perivascular space. This form of brain tumor growth and invasion is also shown to characterize de novo generated endogenous mouse brain tumors, biopsies of primary human glioblastoma (GBM, and peripheral cancer metastasis to the human brain. Perivascularly invading brain tumors become vascularized by normal brain microvessels as individual glioma cells use perivascular space as a conduit for tumor invasion. Agent-based computational modeling recapitulated biological perivascular glioma growth without the need for neoangiogenesis. We tested the requirement for neoangiogenesis in perivascular glioma by treating animals with angiogenesis inhibitors bevacizumab and DC101. These inhibitors induced the expected vessel normalization, yet failed to reduce tumor growth or improve survival of mice bearing orthotopic or endogenous gliomas while exacerbating brain tumor invasion. Our results provide compelling experimental evidence in support of the recently described failure of clinically used antiangiogenics to extend the overall survival of human GBM patients.

  11. Quercetin-induced downregulation of phospholipase D1 inhibits proliferation and invasion in U87 glioma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Mi Hee [Department of Molecular Biology, College of Natural Science, Pusan National University, 30 Jangjeon dong, Geumjeong gu, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Min, Do Sik, E-mail: minds@pusan.ac.kr [Department of Molecular Biology, College of Natural Science, Pusan National University, 30 Jangjeon dong, Geumjeong gu, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-09

    Highlights: {yields} Quercetin, a bioactive flavonoid, suppresses expression and enzymatic activity of phospholipase D1. {yields} Quercetin abolishes NFkB-induced phospholipase D1 expression via inhibition of NFkB transactivation. {yields} Quercetin-induced suppression of phospholipase D1 inhibits invasion and proliferation of human glioma cells. -- Abstract: Phospholipase D (PLD) has been recognized as a regulator of cell proliferation and tumorigenesis, but little is known about the molecules regulating PLD expression. Thus, the identification of small molecules inhibiting PLD expression would be an important advance in PLD-mediated physiology. Quercetin, a ubiquitous bioactive flavonoid, is known to inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis in a variety of cancer cells. In the present study, we examined the effect of quercetin on the expression of PLD in U87 glioma cells. Quercetin significantly suppressed the expression of PLD1 at the transcriptional level. Moreover, quercetin abolished the protein expression of PLD1 in a time and dose-dependent manner, as well as inhibited PLD activity. Quercetin suppressed NF{kappa}B-induced PLD1 expression via inhibition of NFkB transactivation. Furthermore, quercetin inhibited activation and invasion of metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), a key modulator of glioma cell invasion, induced by phosphatidic acid (PA), a product of PLD activity. Taken together these data demonstrate that quercetin abolishes PLD1 expression and subsequently inhibits invasion and proliferation of glioma cells.

  12. Sirt2 suppresses glioma cell growth through targeting NF-κB–miR-21 axis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Ya’nan; Dai, Dongwei; Lu, Qiong; Fei, Mingyu; Li, Mengmeng; Wu, Xi

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Sirt2 expression is down-regulated in human glioma tissues and cell lines. •Sirt2 regresses glioma cell growth and colony formation via inducing apoptosis. •miR-21 is essential for the functions of Sirt2 in glioma cells. •Sirt2 deacetylates p65 to decrease miR-21 expression. -- Abstract: Sirtuins are NAD + -dependent deacetylases that regulate numerous cellular processes including aging, DNA repair, cell cycle, metabolism, and survival under stress conditions. The roles of sirtuin family members are widely studied in carcinogenesis. However, their roles in glioma remain unclear. Here we report that Sir2 was under expressed in human glioma tissues and cell lines. We found that Sirt2 overexpression decreased cell proliferation and colony formation capacity. In addition, Sirt2 overexpression induced cellular apoptosis via up-regulating cleaved caspase 3 and Bax, and down-regulating anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. Sirt2 knockdown obtained opposing results. We showed that Sirt2 overexpression inhibited miR-21 expression, and Sirt2 was not sufficient to reduce cell proliferation and colony formation as well as to induce apoptosis when miR-21 was knocked down in glioma cells. Mechanically, we demonstrated that Sirt2 deacetylated p65 at K310 and blocked p65 binding to the promoter region of miR-21, thus regressing the transcription of miR-21. In summary, Sirt2 is critical in human glioma via NF-κB–miR-21 pathway and Sirt2 activator may serve as candidate drug for glioma therapy

  13. Targeting ανβ3 and ανβ5 inhibits photon-induced hypermigration of malignant glioma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieken, Stefan; Habermehl, Daniel; Mohr, Angela; Wuerth, Lena; Lindel, Katja; Weber, Klaus; Debus, Jürgen; Combs, Stephanie E

    2011-01-01

    Sublethal photon irradiation was recently suspected to increase tumor cell motility and promote locoregional recurrence of disease. This study was set up to describe mechanisms underlying increased glioma cell migration through photon irradiation and to analyse the modifiability of photon-altered glioma cell motility by integrin inhibition. Eight μm pore size membranes were coated with vitronectin (VN), collagen I and collagen IV. U87 and Ln229 glioma cells were analysed in migration experiments with and without radiotherapy (RT), serum stimulation and addition of monoclonal antibodies directed to human integrins α ν β 3 and α ν β 5 . Quantitative FACS analysis of integrins was performed in U87 and Ln229 glioma cells following RT. Statistical analysis was performed using Student's t-test. Glioma cell migration is serum-dependent and can be increased by photon RT which leads to enhanced expression of Vn receptor integrins. Blocking of either α ν β 3 or α ν β 5 integrins by antibodies inhibits Vn-based migration of both untreated and photon-irradiated glioma cells. Peripheral glioma cells are at risk of attraction into the adjacent healthy brain by serum components leaking through the blood brain barrier (BBB). Radiation therapy is associated with upregulation of Vn receptor integrins and enhanced glioma cell migration at sublethal doses. This effect can be inhibited by specific integrin blockade. Future therapeutical benefit may be derived from pharmacological integrin inhibition in combination with photon irradiation

  14. Myc inhibition is effective against glioma and reveals a role for Myc in proficient mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annibali, Daniela; Whitfield, Jonathan R; Favuzzi, Emilia; Jauset, Toni; Serrano, Erika; Cuartas, Isabel; Redondo-Campos, Sara; Folch, Gerard; Gonzàlez-Juncà, Alba; Sodir, Nicole M; Massó-Vallés, Daniel; Beaulieu, Marie-Eve; Swigart, Lamorna B; Mc Gee, Margaret M; Somma, Maria Patrizia; Nasi, Sergio; Seoane, Joan; Evan, Gerard I; Soucek, Laura

    2014-08-18

    Gliomas are the most common primary tumours affecting the adult central nervous system and respond poorly to standard therapy. Myc is causally implicated in most human tumours and the majority of glioblastomas have elevated Myc levels. Using the Myc dominant negative Omomyc, we previously showed that Myc inhibition is a promising strategy for cancer therapy. Here, we preclinically validate Myc inhibition as a therapeutic strategy in mouse and human glioma, using a mouse model of spontaneous multifocal invasive astrocytoma and its derived neuroprogenitors, human glioblastoma cell lines, and patient-derived tumours both in vitro and in orthotopic xenografts. Across all these experimental models we find that Myc inhibition reduces proliferation, increases apoptosis and remarkably, elicits the formation of multinucleated cells that then arrest or die by mitotic catastrophe, revealing a new role for Myc in the proficient division of glioma cells.

  15. FK506 Binding Protein Mediates Glioma Cell Growth and Sensitivity to Rapamycin Treatment by Regulating NF-κB Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Jiang

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available FK506 binding protein 5 (FKBP5 belongs to a family of immunophilins named for their ability to bind immunosuppressive drugs, also known as peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerases, and also with chaperones to help protein folding. Using glioma cDNA microarray analysis, we found that FKBP5 was overexpressed in glioma tumors. This finding was further validated by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis. The roles of FKBP5 in glioma cells were then examined. We found that cell growth was suppressed after FKBP5 expression was inhibited by short interfering RNA transfection and enhanced by FKBP5 overexpression. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed that nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB and DNA binding was enhanced by FKBP5 overexpression. The expression level of I-kappa B alpha and phosphorylated NF-κB was regulated by the expression of FKBP5. These data suggest that FKBP5 is involved in NF-κB pathway activation in glioma cells. In addition, FKBP5 overexpression in rapamycin-sensitive U87 cells blocked the cells' response to rapamycin treatment, whereas rapamycin-resistant glioma cells, both PTEN-positive and -negative, were synergistically sensitive to rapamycin after FKBP5 was knocked down, suggesting that the FKBP5 regulates glioma cell response to rapamycin treatment. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that FKBP5 plays an important role in glioma growth and chemoresistance through regulating signal transduction of the NF-κB pathway.

  16. Saw Palmetto Extract Inhibits Metastasis and Antiangiogenesis through STAT3 Signal Pathway in Glioma Cell

    OpenAIRE

    Ding, Hong; Shen, Jinglian; Yang, Yang; Che, Yuqin

    2015-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription factor 3 (STAT3) plays an important role in the proliferation and angiogenesis in human glioma. Previous research indicated that saw palmetto extract markedly inhibited the proliferation of human glioma cells through STAT3 signal pathway. But its effect on tumor metastasis and antiangiogenesis is not clear. This study is to further clear the impact of saw palmetto extract on glioma cell metastasis, antiangiogenesis, and its mechanism. TUNEL ass...

  17. SNAI2/Slug promotes growth and invasion in human gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Hong Wei; Menon, Lata G; Black, Peter M; Carroll, Rona S; Johnson, Mark D

    2010-01-01

    Numerous factors that contribute to malignant glioma invasion have been identified, but the upstream genes coordinating this process are poorly known. To identify genes controlling glioma invasion, we used genome-wide mRNA expression profiles of primary human glioblastomas to develop an expression-based rank ordering of 30 transcription factors that have previously been implicated in the regulation of invasion and metastasis in cancer. Using this approach, we identified the oncogenic transcriptional repressor, SNAI2/Slug, among the upper tenth percentile of invasion-related transcription factors overexpressed in glioblastomas. SNAI2 mRNA expression correlated with histologic grade and invasive phenotype in primary human glioma specimens, and was induced by EGF receptor activation in human glioblastoma cells. Overexpression of SNAI2/Slug increased glioblastoma cell proliferation and invasion in vitro and promoted angiogenesis and glioblastoma growth in vivo. Importantly, knockdown of endogenous SNAI2/Slug in glioblastoma cells decreased invasion and increased survival in a mouse intracranial human glioblastoma transplantation model. This genome-scale approach has thus identified SNAI2/Slug as a regulator of growth and invasion in human gliomas

  18. NUMB does not impair growth and differentiation status of experimental gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Euskirchen, Philipp; Skaftnesmo, Kai-Ove; Huszthy, Peter C.; Brekkå, Narve; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Jacobs, Andreas H.; Miletic, Hrvoje

    2011-01-01

    The cell fate determinant NUMB orchestrates asymmetric cell division in flies and mammals and has lately been suggested to have a tumor suppressor function in breast and lung cancer. Here, we studied NUMB in the context of malignant gliomas. We used ectopic expression of NUMB in order to inhibit proliferation and induce differentiation in glioma cells by alteration of Notch, Hedgehog and p53 signaling. We found that NUMB is consistently expressed in glioma biopsies with predominance of NUMB2/4 isoforms as determined by isoform-specific real-time PCR and Western blotting. Upon lentiviral overexpression, in vitro proliferation rate and the grade of differentiation as assessed by morphology and expression of neural and glial markers remained unchanged. Orthotopic xenografts of NUMB-transduced human U87 glioma cells could be established in nude rats without impairing engraftment or causing significant changes in morphology based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The previously reported alteration of Hedgehog and p53 signaling by NUMB could not be recapitulated in glioma cells. We thus show that in experimental gliomas, NUMB overexpression most likely does not exert a tumor suppressor function such as seen in epithelial cancers.

  19. Combinatorial therapy with adenoviral-mediated PTEN and a PI3K inhibitor suppresses malignant glioma cell growth in vitro and in vivo by regulating the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nan, Yang; Guo, Liyun; Song, Yunpeng; Wang, Le; Yu, Kai; Huang, Qiang; Zhong, Yue

    2017-08-01

    Glioblastoma is a highly invasive and challenging tumor of the central nervous system. The mutation/deletion of the tumor suppressor phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) gene is the main genetic change identified in glioblastomas. PTEN plays a critical role in tumorigenesis and has been shown to be an important therapeutic target. The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor LY294002 is commonly used to inhibit glioma cell growth via regulation of the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway. In this study, we examined the growth inhibitory effects of a combinatorial therapy of adenoviral-mediated PTEN (Ad-PTEN) and LY294002 on LN229 and U251 glioma cells in vitro and on tumor xenografts in vivo. In vitro, LN229 and U251 glioma cells were treated by combinatorial therapy with Ad-PTEN and LY294002. The growth ability was determined by MTT assay. The cell cycle distribution was analyzed by flow cytometry. Cell invasive ability was analyzed by transwell invasion assay and cell apoptosis analysis via FITC-Annexin V analysis. In vivo, U251 subcutaneous glioblastoma xenograft was used to assay anti-tumor effect of combinatorial therapy with Ad-PTEN and LY294002 by mean volume of tumors, immunohistochemistry and TUNEL method. The combinatorial treatment clearly suppressed cell proliferation, arrested the cell cycle, reduced cell invasion and promoted cell apoptosis compared with the Ad-PTEN or LY294002 treatment alone. The treatment worked by inhibiting the PI3K/AKT pathway. In addition, the growth of U251 glioma xenografts treated with the combination of Ad-PTEN and LY294002 was significantly inhibited compared with those treated with Ad-PTEN or LY294002 alone. Our data indicated that the combination of Ad-PTEN and LY294002 effectively suppressed the malignant growth of human glioma cells in vitro and in tumor xenografts, suggesting a promising new approach for glioma gene therapy that warrants further investigation.

  20. Inhibition of HSP27 alone or in combination with pAKT inhibition as therapeutic approaches to target SPARC-induced glioma cell survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schultz Chad R

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The current treatment regimen for glioma patients is surgery, followed by radiation therapy plus temozolomide (TMZ, followed by 6 months of adjuvant TMZ. Despite this aggressive treatment regimen, the overall survival of all surgically treated GBM patients remains dismal, and additional or different therapies are required. Depending on the cancer type, SPARC has been proposed both as a therapeutic target and as a therapeutic agent. In glioma, SPARC promotes invasion via upregulation of the p38 MAPK/MAPKAPK2/HSP27 signaling pathway, and promotes tumor cell survival by upregulating pAKT. As HSP27 and AKT interact to regulate the activity of each other, we determined whether inhibition of HSP27 was better than targeting SPARC as a therapeutic approach to inhibit both SPARC-induced glioma cell invasion and survival. Results Our studies found the following. 1 SPARC increases the expression of tumor cell pro-survival and pro-death protein signaling in balance, and, as a net result, tumor cell survival remains unchanged. 2 Suppressing SPARC increases tumor cell survival, indicating it is not a good therapeutic target. 3 Suppressing HSP27 decreases tumor cell survival in all gliomas, but is more effective in SPARC-expressing tumor cells due to the removal of HSP27 inhibition of SPARC-induced pro-apoptotic signaling. 4 Suppressing total AKT1/2 paradoxically enhanced tumor cell survival, indicating that AKT1 or 2 are poor therapeutic targets. 5 However, inhibiting pAKT suppresses tumor cell survival. 6 Inhibiting both HSP27 and pAKT synergistically decreases tumor cell survival. 7 There appears to be a complex feedback system between SPARC, HSP27, and AKT. 8 This interaction is likely influenced by PTEN status. With respect to chemosensitization, we found the following. 1 SPARC enhances pro-apoptotic signaling in cells exposed to TMZ. 2 Despite this enhanced signaling, SPARC protects cells against TMZ. 3 This protection can be reduced

  1. Nitrosoureas inhibit the stathmin-mediated migration and invasion of malignant glioma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xing-Jie; Choi, Yong; Sackett, Dan L; Park, John K

    2008-07-01

    Malignant gliomas are the most common primary intrinsic brain tumors and are highly lethal. The widespread migration and invasion of neoplastic cells from the initial site of tumor formation into the surrounding brain render these lesions refractory to definitive surgical treatment. Stathmin, a microtubule-destabilizing protein that mediates cell cycle progression, can also regulate directed cell movement. Nitrosoureas, traditionally viewed as DNA alkylating agents, can also covalently modify proteins such as stathmin. We therefore sought to establish a role for stathmin in malignant glioma cell motility, migration, and invasion and determine the effects of nitrosoureas on these cell movement-related processes. Scratch wound-healing recovery, Boyden chamber migration, Matrigel invasion, and organotypic slice invasion assays were performed before and after the down-regulation of cellular stathmin levels and in the absence and presence of sublethal nitrosourea ([1-(2-chloroethyl)-3-cyclohexyl-l-nitrosourea]; CCNU) concentrations. We show that decreases in stathmin expression lead to significant decreases in malignant glioma cell motility, migration, and invasion. CCNU, at a concentration of 10 micromol/L, causes similar significant decreases, even in the absence of any effects on cell viability. The direct inhibition of stathmin by CCNU is likely a contributing factor. These findings suggest that the inhibition of stathmin expression and function may be useful in limiting the spread of malignant gliomas within the brain, and that nitrosoureas may have therapeutic benefits in addition to their antiproliferative effects.

  2. Nitrosoureas Inhibit the Stathmin Mediated Migration and Invasion of Malignant Glioma Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xing-Jie; Choi, Yong; Sackett, Dan L.; Park, John K.

    2008-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are the most common primary intrinsic brain tumors and are highly lethal. The widespread migration and invasion of neoplastic cells from the initial site of tumor formation into the surrounding brain render these lesions refractory to definitive surgical treatment. Stathmin, a microtubule destabilizing protein that mediates cell cycle progression, can also regulate directed cell movement. Nitrosoureas, traditionally viewed as DNA alkylating agents, can also covalently modify proteins such as stathmin. We therefore sought to establish a role for stathmin in malignant glioma cell motility, migration, and invasion and determine the effects of nitrosoureas on these cell movement related processes. Scratch-wound healing recovery, Boyden chamber migration, Matrigel invasion, and organotypic slice invasion assays were performed before and after the down regulation of cellular stathmin levels and in the absence and presence of sub-lethal nitrosourea (CCNU; [1-(2-chloroethyl)-3-cyclohexyl-l-nitrosourea]) concentrations. We demonstrate that decreases in stathmin expression lead to significant decreases in malignant glioma cell motility, migration, and invasion. CCNU, at a concentration of 10 μM, causes similar significant decreases, even in the absence of any effects on cell viability. The direct inhibition of stathmin by CCNU is likely a contributing factor. These findings suggest that the inhibition of stathmin expression and function may be useful in limiting the spread of malignant gliomas within the brain and that nitrosoureas may have therapeutic benefits in addition to their anti-proliferative effects. PMID:18593927

  3. High epiregulin expression in human U87 glioma cells relies on IRE1α and promotes autocrine growth through EGF receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auf, Gregor; Vajkoczy, Peter; Seno, Masaharu; Bikfalvi, Andreas; Minchenko, Dmitri; Minchenko, Oleksandr; Moenner, Michel; Jabouille, Arnaud; Delugin, Maylis; Guérit, Sylvaine; Pineau, Raphael; North, Sophie; Platonova, Natalia; Maitre, Marlène; Favereaux, Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptors contribute to the development of malignant glioma. Here we considered the possible implication of the EGFR ligand epiregulin (EREG) in glioma development in relation to the activity of the unfolded protein response (UPR) sensor IRE1α. We also examined EREG status in several glioblastoma cell lines and in malignant glioma. Expression and biological properties of EREG were analyzed in human glioma cells in vitro and in human tumor xenografts with regard to the presence of ErbB proteins and to the blockade of IRE1α. Inactivation of IRE1α was achieved by using either the dominant-negative strategy or siRNA-mediated knockdown. EREG was secreted in high amounts by U87 cells, which also expressed its cognate EGF receptor (ErbB1). A stimulatory autocrine loop mediated by EREG was evidenced by the decrease in cell proliferation using specific blocking antibodies directed against either ErbB1 (cetuximab) or EREG itself. In comparison, anti-ErbB2 antibodies (trastuzumab) had no significant effect. Inhibition of IRE1α dramatically reduced EREG expression both in cell culture and in human xenograft tumor models. The high-expression rate of EREG in U87 cells was therefore linked to IRE1α, although being modestly affected by chemical inducers of the endoplasmic reticulum stress. In addition, IRE1-mediated production of EREG did not depend on IRE1 RNase domain, as neither the selective dominant-negative invalidation of the RNase activity (IRE1 kinase active) nor the siRNA-mediated knockdown of XBP1 had significant effect on EREG expression. Finally, chemical inhibition of c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK) using the SP600125 compound reduced the ability of cells to express EREG, demonstrating a link between the growth factor production and JNK activation under the dependence of IRE1α. EREG may contribute to glioma progression under the control of IRE1α, as exemplified here by the autocrine proliferation loop mediated in U87 cells by the

  4. Comparison of vitamins K1, K2 and K3 effects on growth of rat glioma and human glioblastoma multiforme cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oztopçu, Pinar; Kabadere, Selda; Mercangoz, Ayşe; Uyar, Ruhi

    2004-09-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is characterized as highly invasive and rapidly growing astrocytomas, and scientists have sought for efficient treatment against malignant gliomas for a long time. Therefore, we compared the respond of rat glioma (C6) and glioblastoma multiforme cells derived from two patients to vitamins K1, K2 and K3. The cells were exposed to 100, 250, 500, 750 and 1000 microM of vitamins K1 and K2, and 1, 10, 25, 50, 75 and 100 microM of vitamin K3 for 24 hours in an incubator atmosphere of 5% CO2, 37 degrees C and 100% humidity. Cell viability was estimated by MTT assay. Vitamin K1 showed no growth effect on all the glioma cells examined. Vitamin K2 did not cause any change in number of C6, however induced growth inhibition in a dose-dependent manner on glioblastoma multiforme. The IC50 values of vitamin K2 were 960 microM and 970 microM for glioblastoma multiforme, respectively. Vitamin K3 had also growth inhibitory effect in a dose-dependent manner on both C6 and glioblastoma multiforme. The IC50 values were 41 microM, 24 microM and 23 microM for vitamin K3, respectively. We concluded that vitamin K3 is more effective than vitamin K2 for inhibition of cancer cell growth, and might have an alternative value as an anticancer drug against glioblastoma multiforme.

  5. Senescence from glioma stem cell differentiation promotes tumor growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouchi, Rie; Okabe, Sachiko; Migita, Toshiro; Nakano, Ichiro; Seimiya, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a lethal brain tumor composed of heterogeneous cellular populations including glioma stem cells (GSCs) and differentiated non-stem glioma cells (NSGCs). While GSCs are involved in tumor initiation and propagation, NSGCs' role remains elusive. Here, we demonstrate that NSGCs undergo senescence and secrete pro-angiogenic proteins, boosting the GSC-derived tumor formation in vivo. We used a GSC model that maintains stemness in neurospheres, but loses the stemness and differentiates into NSGCs upon serum stimulation. These NSGCs downregulated telomerase, shortened telomeres, and eventually became senescent. The senescent NSGCs released pro-angiogenic proteins, including vascular endothelial growth factors and senescence-associated interleukins, such as IL-6 and IL-8. Conditioned medium from senescent NSGCs promoted proliferation of brain microvascular endothelial cells, and mixed implantation of GSCs and senescent NSGCs into mice enhanced the tumorigenic potential of GSCs. The senescent NSGCs seem to be clinically relevant, because both clinical samples and xenografts of GBM contained tumor cells that expressed the senescence markers. Our data suggest that senescent NSGCs promote malignant progression of GBM in part via paracrine effects of the secreted proteins. - Highlights: • Non-stem glioma cells (NSGCs) lose telomerase and eventually become senescent. • Senescent NSGCs secrete pro-angiogenic proteins, such as VEGFs, IL-6, and IL-8. • Senescent NSGCs enhance the growth of brain microvascular endothelial cells. • Senescent NSGCs enhance the tumorigenic potential of glioma stem cells in vivo.

  6. Senescence from glioma stem cell differentiation promotes tumor growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouchi, Rie [Division of Molecular Biotherapy, Cancer Chemotherapy Center, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, 3-8-31 Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan); Laboratory of Molecular Target Therapy of Cancer, Department of Computational Biology and Medical Sciences, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-31 Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan); Okabe, Sachiko; Migita, Toshiro [Division of Molecular Biotherapy, Cancer Chemotherapy Center, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, 3-8-31 Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan); Nakano, Ichiro [Department of Neurosurgery, Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1824 6th Avenue South, Birmingham, AL 35233 (United States); Seimiya, Hiroyuki, E-mail: hseimiya@jfcr.or.jp [Division of Molecular Biotherapy, Cancer Chemotherapy Center, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, 3-8-31 Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan); Laboratory of Molecular Target Therapy of Cancer, Department of Computational Biology and Medical Sciences, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-31 Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan)

    2016-02-05

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a lethal brain tumor composed of heterogeneous cellular populations including glioma stem cells (GSCs) and differentiated non-stem glioma cells (NSGCs). While GSCs are involved in tumor initiation and propagation, NSGCs' role remains elusive. Here, we demonstrate that NSGCs undergo senescence and secrete pro-angiogenic proteins, boosting the GSC-derived tumor formation in vivo. We used a GSC model that maintains stemness in neurospheres, but loses the stemness and differentiates into NSGCs upon serum stimulation. These NSGCs downregulated telomerase, shortened telomeres, and eventually became senescent. The senescent NSGCs released pro-angiogenic proteins, including vascular endothelial growth factors and senescence-associated interleukins, such as IL-6 and IL-8. Conditioned medium from senescent NSGCs promoted proliferation of brain microvascular endothelial cells, and mixed implantation of GSCs and senescent NSGCs into mice enhanced the tumorigenic potential of GSCs. The senescent NSGCs seem to be clinically relevant, because both clinical samples and xenografts of GBM contained tumor cells that expressed the senescence markers. Our data suggest that senescent NSGCs promote malignant progression of GBM in part via paracrine effects of the secreted proteins. - Highlights: • Non-stem glioma cells (NSGCs) lose telomerase and eventually become senescent. • Senescent NSGCs secrete pro-angiogenic proteins, such as VEGFs, IL-6, and IL-8. • Senescent NSGCs enhance the growth of brain microvascular endothelial cells. • Senescent NSGCs enhance the tumorigenic potential of glioma stem cells in vivo.

  7. Interaction of hematoporphyrin derivative, light, and ionizing radiation in a rat glioma model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostron, H.; Swartz, M.R.; Miller, D.C.; Martuza, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of hematoporphyrin derivative, light, and cobalt 60 ( 60 Co) irradiation were studied in a rat glioma model using an in vivo and an in vitro clonogenic assay. There was no effect on tumor growth by visible light or by a single dose of 60 Co irradiation at 4 Gy or 8 Gy, whereas 16 Gy inhibited tumor growth to 40% versus the control. Hematoporphyrin derivative alone slightly stimulated growth (P less than 0.1). Light in the presence of 10 mg hematoporphyrin derivative/kg inhibited tumor growth to 32%. 60 Co irradiation in the presence of hematoporphyrin derivative produced a significant tumor growth inhibition (P less than 0.02). This growth inhibition was directly related to the concentration of hematoporphyrin derivative. The addition of 60 Co to light in the presence of hematoporphyrin derivative produced a greater growth inhibition than light or 60 Co irradiation alone. This effect was most pronounced when light was applied 30 minutes before 60 Co irradiation. Our experiments in a subcutaneous rat glioma model suggest a radiosensitizing effect of hematoporphyrin derivative. Furthermore, the photodynamic inactivation is enhanced by the addition of 60 Co irradiation. These findings may be of importance in planning new treatment modalities in malignant brain tumors

  8. Inhibition of tumor growth in a glioma model treated with boron neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, J.H.; McGregor, J.M.; Clendenon, N.R.; Gahbauer, R.A.; Barth, R.F.; Soloway, A.H.; Fairchild, R.G.

    1990-01-01

    This investigation attempts to determine whether increased survival time seen when the F98 glioma model is treated with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a result of inhibition of tumor growth caused by radiation-induced alterations in endothelial cells and normal tissue components. This indirect effect of radiation has been called the tumor bed effect. A series of tumor-bearing rats was studied, using a standardized investigational BNCT protocol consisting of 50 mg/kg of Na2B12H11SH injected intravenously 14 to 17 hours before neutron irradiation at 4 x 10(12) n/cm2. Ten rats, serving as controls, received no treatment either before or after tumor implantation. A second group of 10 rats was treated with BNCT 4 days before tumor implantation; these animals received no further treatment. The remaining group of 10 rats received no pretreatment but was treated with BNCT 10 days after implantation. Histological and ultrastructural analyses were performed in 2 animals from each group 17 days after implantation. Survival times of the untreated control animals (mean, 25.8 days) did not differ statistically from the survival times of the rats in the pretreated group (mean, 25.5 days). The rats treated with BNCT after implantation survived significantly longer (P less than 0.02; mean, 33.2 days) than the controls and the preirradiated animals. Tumor size indices calculated from measurements taken at the time of death were similar in all groups. These results indicate that, with this tumor model, BNCT does not cause a tumor bed effect in cerebral tissue. The therapeutic gains observed with BNCT result from direct effects on tumor cells or on the peritumoral neovascularity

  9. Monitoring Oxygen Levels in Orthotopic Human Glioma Xenograft Following Carbogen Inhalation and Chemotherapy by Implantable Resonator Based Oximetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Huagang; Nemani, Venkata Krishnamurthy; Du, Gaixin; Montano, Ryan; Song, Rui; Gimi, Barjor; Swartz, Harold M.; Eastman, Alan; Khan, Nadeem

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia is a critical hallmark of glioma, and significantly compromises treatment efficacy. Unfortunately, techniques for monitoring glioma pO2 to facilitate translational research are lacking. Furthermore, poor prognoses of patients with malignant glioma, in particular glioblastoma multiforme, warrant effective strategies that can inhibit hypoxia and improve treatment outcome. EPR oximetry using implantable resonators was implemented for monitoring pO2 in normal cerebral tissue and U251 glioma in mice. Breathing carbogen (95% O2 + 5% CO2) was tested for hyperoxia in the normal brain and glioma xenografts. A new strategy to inhibit glioma growth by rationally combining gemcitabine and MK-8776, a cell cycle checkpoint inhibitor, was also investigated. The mean pO2 of left and right hemisphere were approximately 56 – 69 mmHg in the normal cerebral tissue of mice. The mean baseline pO2 of U251 glioma on the first and fifth day of measurement was 21.9 ± 3.7 and 14.1 ± 2.4 mmHg, respectively. The mean brain pO2 including glioma increased by at least 100% on carbogen inhalation, although the response varied between the animals over days. Treatment with gemcitabine + MK-8776 significantly increased pO2 and inhibited glioma growth assessed by MRI. In conclusion, EPR oximetry with implantable resonators can be used to monitor the efficacy of carbogen inhalation and chemotherapy on orthotopic glioma in mice. The increase in glioma pO2 of mice breathing carbogen can be used to improve treatment outcome. The treatment with gemcitabine + MK-8776 is a promising strategy that warrants further investigation. PMID:25111969

  10. Monitoring oxygen levels in orthotopic human glioma xenograft following carbogen inhalation and chemotherapy by implantable resonator-based oximetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Huagang; Krishnamurthy Nemani, Venkata; Du, Gaixin; Montano, Ryan; Song, Rui; Gimi, Barjor; Swartz, Harold M; Eastman, Alan; Khan, Nadeem

    2015-04-01

    Hypoxia is a critical hallmark of glioma, and significantly compromises treatment efficacy. Unfortunately, techniques for monitoring glioma pO2 to facilitate translational research are lacking. Furthermore, poor prognosis of patients with malignant glioma, in particular glioblastoma multiforme, warrant effective strategies that can inhibit hypoxia and improve treatment outcome. EPR oximetry using implantable resonators was implemented for monitoring pO2 in normal cerebral tissue and U251 glioma in mice. Breathing carbogen (95% O2 + 5% CO2 ) was tested for hyperoxia in the normal brain and glioma xenografts. A new strategy to inhibit glioma growth by rationally combining gemcitabine and MK-8776, a cell cycle checkpoint inhibitor, was also investigated. The mean pO2 of left and right hemisphere were ∼56-69 mmHg in the normal cerebral tissue of mice. The mean baseline pO2 of U251 glioma on the first and fifth day of measurement was 21.9 ± 3.7 and 14.1 ± 2.4 mmHg, respectively. The mean brain pO2 including glioma increased by at least 100% on carbogen inhalation, although the response varied between the animals over days. Treatment with gemcitabine + MK-8776 significantly increased pO2 and inhibited glioma growth assessed by MRI. In conclusion, EPR oximetry with implantable resonators can be used to monitor the efficacy of carbogen inhalation and chemotherapy on orthotopic glioma in mice. The increase in glioma pO2 of mice breathing carbogen can be used to improve treatment outcome. The treatment with gemcitabine + MK-8776 is a promising strategy that warrants further investigation. © 2014 UICC.

  11. JS-K, a glutathione S-transferase-activated nitric oxide donor with antineoplastic activity in malignant gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyerbrock, Astrid; Osterberg, Nadja; Psarras, Nikolaos; Baumer, Brunhilde; Kogias, Evangelos; Werres, Anna; Bette, Stefanie; Saavedra, Joseph E; Keefer, Larry K; Papazoglou, Anna

    2012-02-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) control multidrug resistance and are upregulated in many cancers, including malignant gliomas. The diazeniumdiolate JS-K generates nitric oxide (NO) on enzymatic activation by glutathione and GST, showing promising NO-based anticancer efficacy. To evaluate the role of NO-based antitumor therapy with JS-K in U87 gliomas in vitro and in vivo. U87 glioma cells and primary glioblastoma cell lines were exposed to JS-K and a variety of inhibitors to study cell death by necrosis, apoptosis, and other mechanisms. GST expression was evaluated by immunocytochemistry, polymerase chain reaction, and Western blot, and NO release from JS-K was studied with a NO assay. The growth-inhibitory effect of JS-K was studied in a U87 xenograft model in vivo. Dose-dependent inhibition of cell proliferation was observed in human U87 glioma cells and primary glioblastoma cells in vitro. Cell death was partially induced by caspase-dependent apoptosis, which could be blocked by Z-VAD-FMK and Q-VD-OPH. Inhibition of GST by sulfasalazine, cGMP inhibition by ODQ, and MEK1/2 inhibition by UO126 attenuated the antiproliferative effect of JS-K, suggesting the involvement of various intracellular death signaling pathways. Response to JS-K correlated with mRNA and protein expression of GST and the amount of NO released by the glioma cells. Growth of U87 xenografts was reduced significantly, with immunohistochemical evidence for increased necrosis and apoptosis and reduced proliferation. Our data show for the first time the potent antiproliferative effect of JS-K in gliomas in vitro and in vivo. These findings warrant further investigation of this novel NO-releasing prodrug in gliomas.

  12. N-acetylaspartate (NAA) and N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG) promote growth and inhibit differentiation of glioma stem-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Patrick M; Moffett, John R; Namboodiri, Aryan M A; Viapiano, Mariano S; Lawler, Sean E; Jaworski, Diane M

    2013-09-06

    Metabolic reprogramming is a pathological feature of cancer and a driver of tumor cell transformation. N-Acetylaspartate (NAA) is one of the most abundant amino acid derivatives in the brain and serves as a source of metabolic acetate for oligodendrocyte myelination and protein/histone acetylation or a precursor for the synthesis of the neurotransmitter N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG). NAA and NAAG as well as aspartoacylase (ASPA), the enzyme responsible for NAA degradation, are significantly reduced in glioma tumors, suggesting a possible role for decreased acetate metabolism in tumorigenesis. This study sought to examine the effects of NAA and NAAG on primary tumor-derived glioma stem-like cells (GSCs) from oligodendroglioma as well as proneural and mesenchymal glioblastoma, relative to oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (Oli-Neu). Although the NAA dicarboxylate transporter NaDC3 is primarily thought to be expressed by astrocytes, all cell lines expressed NaDC3 and, thus, are capable of NAA up-take. Treatment with NAA or NAAG significantly increased GSC growth and suppressed differentiation of Oli-Neu cells and proneural GSCs. Interestingly, ASPA was expressed in both the cytosol and nuclei of GSCs and exhibited greatest nuclear immunoreactivity in differentiation-resistant GSCs. Both NAA and NAAG elicited the expression of a novel immunoreactive ASPA species in select GSC nuclei, suggesting differential ASPA regulation in response to these metabolites. Therefore, this study highlights a potential role for nuclear ASPA expression in GSC malignancy and suggests that the use of NAA or NAAG is not an appropriate therapeutic approach to increase acetate bioavailability in glioma. Thus, an alternative acetate source is required.

  13. FANCD2 re-expression is associated with glioma grade and chemical inhibition of the Fanconi Anaemia pathway sensitises gliomas to chemotherapeutic agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Abhijit A.; Sayal, Parag; Depondt, Marie-Lise; Beveridge, Ryan D.; Roylance, Anthony; Kriplani, Deepti H.; Myers, Katie N.; Cox, Angela; Jellinek, David; Fernando, Malee; Carroll, Thomas A.; Collis, Spencer J.

    2014-01-01

    Brain tumours kill more children and adults under 40 than any other cancer. Around half of primary brain tumours are glioblastoma multiforme (GBMs) where treatment remains a significant challenge. GBM survival rates have improved little over the last 40 years, thus highlighting an unmet need for the identification/development of novel therapeutic targets and agents to improve GBM treatment. Using archived and fresh glioma tissue, we show that in contrast to normal brain or benign schwannomas GBMs exhibit re-expression of FANCD2, a key protein of the Fanconi Anaemia (FA) DNA repair pathway, and possess an active FA pathway. Importantly, FANCD2 expression levels are strongly associated with tumour grade, revealing a potential exploitable therapeutic window to allow inhibition of the FA pathway in tumour cells, whilst sparing normal brain tissue. Using several small molecule inhibitors of the FA pathway in combination with isogenic FA-proficient/deficient glioma cell lines as well as primary GBM cultures, we demonstrate that inhibition of the FA pathway sensitises gliomas to the chemotherapeutic agents Temozolomide and Carmustine. Our findings therefore provide a strong rationale for the development of novel and potent inhibitors of the FA pathway to improve the treatment of GBMs, which may ultimately impact on patient outcome. PMID:25071006

  14. Dynamic stroma reorganization drives blood vessel dysmorphia during glioma growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathivet, Thomas; Bouleti, Claire; Van Woensel, Matthias; Stanchi, Fabio; Verschuere, Tina; Phng, Li-Kun; Dejaegher, Joost; Balcer, Marly; Matsumoto, Ken; Georgieva, Petya B; Belmans, Jochen; Sciot, Raf; Stockmann, Christian; Mazzone, Massimiliano; De Vleeschouwer, Steven; Gerhardt, Holger

    2017-12-01

    Glioma growth and progression are characterized by abundant development of blood vessels that are highly aberrant and poorly functional, with detrimental consequences for drug delivery efficacy. The mechanisms driving this vessel dysmorphia during tumor progression are poorly understood. Using longitudinal intravital imaging in a mouse glioma model, we identify that dynamic sprouting and functional morphogenesis of a highly branched vessel network characterize the initial tumor growth, dramatically changing to vessel expansion, leakage, and loss of branching complexity in the later stages. This vascular phenotype transition was accompanied by recruitment of predominantly pro-inflammatory M1-like macrophages in the early stages, followed by in situ repolarization to M2-like macrophages, which produced VEGF-A and relocate to perivascular areas. A similar enrichment and perivascular accumulation of M2 versus M1 macrophages correlated with vessel dilation and malignancy in human glioma samples of different WHO malignancy grade. Targeting macrophages using anti-CSF1 treatment restored normal blood vessel patterning and function. Combination treatment with chemotherapy showed survival benefit, suggesting that targeting macrophages as the key driver of blood vessel dysmorphia in glioma progression presents opportunities to improve efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents. We propose that vessel dysfunction is not simply a general feature of tumor vessel formation, but rather an emergent property resulting from a dynamic and functional reorganization of the tumor stroma and its angiogenic influences. © 2017 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  15. ER stress inducer tunicamycin suppresses the self-renewal of glioma-initiating cell partly through inhibiting Sox2 translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yang; Ge, Yuqing; Liu, Chanjuan; Zhang, Xiaobiao; Jiang, Jianhai; Wei, Yuanyan

    2016-06-14

    Glioma-initiating cells possess tumor-initiating potential and are relatively resistant to conventional chemotherapy and irradiation. Therefore, their elimination is an essential factor for the development of efficient therapy. Here, we report that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress inducer tunicamycin inhibits glioma-initiating cell self-renewal as determined by neurosphere formation assay. Moreover, tunicamycin decreases the efficiency of glioma-initiating cell to initiate tumor formation. Although tunicamycin induces glioma-initiating cell apoptosis, apoptosis inhibitor z-VAD-fmk only partly abrogates the reduction in glioma-initiating cell self-renewal induced by tunicamycin. Indeed, tunicamycin reduces the expression of self-renewal regulator Sox2 at translation level. Overexpression of Sox2 obviously abrogates the reduction in glioma-initiating cell self-renewal induced by tunicamycin. Taken together, tunicamycin suppresses the self-renewal and tumorigenic potential of glioma-initiating cell partly through reducing Sox2 translation. This finding provides a cue to potential effective treatment of glioblastoma through controlling stem cells.

  16. Tricyclic Neovibsanin Scaffold Inhibits Glioma by Targeting Glioma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pharmacotherapy Group, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Benin, Benin City, 300001 Nigeria. ... median survival time of mice bearing glioma to 34 days compared to 22 days in untreated mice. .... CX22 microscope (Olympus Corp, Inc, Tokyo,.

  17. Bex2 regulates cell proliferation and apoptosis in malignant glioma cells via the c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Xiuping; Meng, Qingming; Xu, Xuebin; Zhi, Tongle; Shi, Qiong; Wang, Yong; Yu, Rutong

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The expression levels of Bex2 markedly increased in glioma tissues. ► Bex2 over-expression promoted cell proliferation, while its down-regulation inhibited cell growth. ► Bex2 down-regulation promoted cell apoptosis via JNK/c-Jun signaling pathway. -- Abstract: The function of Bex2, a member of the Brain Expressed X-linked gene family, in glioma is controversial and its mechanism is largely unknown. We report here that Bex2 regulates cell proliferation and apoptosis in malignant glioma cells via the c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway. The expression level of Bex2 is markedly increased in glioma tissues. We observed that Bex2 over-expression promotes cell proliferation, while down-regulation of Bex2 inhibits cell growth. Furthermore, Bex2 down-regulation promotes cell apoptosis and activates the JNK pathway; these effects were abolished by administration of the JNK specific inhibitor, (SP600125). Thus, Bex2 may be an important player during the development of glioma.

  18. N-Acetylaspartate (NAA) and N-Acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG) Promote Growth and Inhibit Differentiation of Glioma Stem-like Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Patrick M.; Moffett, John R.; Namboodiri, Aryan M. A.; Viapiano, Mariano S.; Lawler, Sean E.; Jaworski, Diane M.

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic reprogramming is a pathological feature of cancer and a driver of tumor cell transformation. N-Acetylaspartate (NAA) is one of the most abundant amino acid derivatives in the brain and serves as a source of metabolic acetate for oligodendrocyte myelination and protein/histone acetylation or a precursor for the synthesis of the neurotransmitter N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG). NAA and NAAG as well as aspartoacylase (ASPA), the enzyme responsible for NAA degradation, are significantly reduced in glioma tumors, suggesting a possible role for decreased acetate metabolism in tumorigenesis. This study sought to examine the effects of NAA and NAAG on primary tumor-derived glioma stem-like cells (GSCs) from oligodendroglioma as well as proneural and mesenchymal glioblastoma, relative to oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (Oli-Neu). Although the NAA dicarboxylate transporter NaDC3 is primarily thought to be expressed by astrocytes, all cell lines expressed NaDC3 and, thus, are capable of NAA up-take. Treatment with NAA or NAAG significantly increased GSC growth and suppressed differentiation of Oli-Neu cells and proneural GSCs. Interestingly, ASPA was expressed in both the cytosol and nuclei of GSCs and exhibited greatest nuclear immunoreactivity in differentiation-resistant GSCs. Both NAA and NAAG elicited the expression of a novel immunoreactive ASPA species in select GSC nuclei, suggesting differential ASPA regulation in response to these metabolites. Therefore, this study highlights a potential role for nuclear ASPA expression in GSC malignancy and suggests that the use of NAA or NAAG is not an appropriate therapeutic approach to increase acetate bioavailability in glioma. Thus, an alternative acetate source is required. PMID:23884408

  19. Paradoxical effect of aspirin on the growth of C6 rat glioma and on time of development of ENU-induced tumors of the nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrieta, O; Guevara, P; Reyes, S; Palencia, G; Rivera, E; Sotelo, J

    2001-11-01

    Administration of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), an inhibitor of the synthesis of prostaglandins and thrombzoxanes, decreases the incidence of colorectal cancer and other neoplasms and inhibits in vitro some tumor growth. We studied the effect of various doses of ASA on the growth of C6 glioma implanted in rats as well as the effect of chronic administration of ASA on time of development and incidence of tumors of the central nervous system (CNS) induced by prenatal exposure to ethylnitrosourea (ENU). In a controlled study, various doses of ASA, 12.5, 25, 50, 100, 200, 300, and 400 mg/kg per day, were administered to Wistar rats in whom a subcutaneous C6 glioma had been transplanted. Changes in tumor size, histologic characteristics, mitotic index, cell proliferation, and vascular density were studied. In a parallel experiment, we administered ASA (70 mg/kg per day) to rats who were prenatally exposed to ENU; treatment started on day 50 of age, and continued until the end of the experiment at day 400. The time of tumor development as well as incidence, localization, and histological diagnosis were compared with matched controls. A paradoxical effect of ASA administration was observed on the dynamics of cell proliferation of C6 glioma. When high ASA doses were administered (200 or 400 mg/kg per day), tumor volume, cell proliferation, vascular density, and mitotic index increased. In contrast, when low doses were administered (12.5 or 25 mg/kg per day) the tumor size diminished. In the second experiment, localization and incidence of CNS tumors induced by ENU were similar in animals treated with ASA and in controls; however, in rats treated with ASA the time of tumor development was shortened. The growth-promoting effects of high doses of ASA found in the present study in both transplanted and chemically-induced brain tumors, might be due to the blockage of autocrine inhibitory factors dependent on the cyclooxygenase pathway or by increased vascular permeability and

  20. EGFRvIII promotes glioma angiogenesis and growth through the NF-κB, interleukin-8 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonavia, R; Inda, M M; Vandenberg, S; Cheng, S-Y; Nagane, M; Hadwiger, P; Tan, P; Sah, D W Y; Cavenee, W K; Furnari, F B

    2012-09-06

    Sustaining a high growth rate requires tumors to exploit resources in their microenvironment. One example of this is the extensive angiogenesis that is a typical feature of high-grade gliomas. Here, we show that expression of the constitutively active mutant epidermal growth factor receptor, ΔEGFR (EGFRvIII, EGFR*, de2-7EGFR) is associated with significantly higher expression levels of the pro-angiogenic factor interleukin (IL)-8 in human glioma specimens and glioma stem cells. Furthermore, the ectopic expression of ΔEGFR in different glioma cell lines caused up to 60-fold increases in the secretion of IL-8. Xenografts of these cells exhibit increased neovascularization, which is not elicited by cells overexpressing wild-type (wt)EGFR or ΔEGFR with an additional kinase domain mutation. Analysis of the regulation of IL-8 by site-directed mutagenesis of its promoter showed that ΔEGFR regulates its expression through the transcription factors nuclear factor (NF)-κB, activator protein 1 (AP-1) and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP). Glioma cells overexpressing ΔEGFR showed constitutive activation and DNA binding of NF-κB, overexpression of c-Jun and activation of its upstream kinase c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and overexpression of C/EBPβ. Selective pharmacological or genetic targeting of the NF-κB or AP-1 pathways efficiently blocked promoter activity and secretion of IL-8. Moreover, RNA interference-mediated knock-down of either IL-8 or the NF-κB subunit p65, in ΔEGFR-expressing cells attenuated their ability to form tumors and to induce angiogenesis when injected subcutaneously into nude mice. On the contrary, the overexpression of IL-8 in glioma cells lacking ΔEGFR potently enhanced their tumorigenicity and produced highly vascularized tumors, suggesting the importance of this cytokine and its transcription regulators in promoting glioma angiogenesis and tumor growth.

  1. Hypoxic regulation of the expression of genes encoded estrogen related proteins in U87 glioma cells: eff ect of IRE1 inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minchenko, D O; Riabovol, O O; Ratushna, O O; Minchenko, O H

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum stress signaling, mediated by IRE1 (inositol requiring enzyme 1), which is a central mediator of the unfolded protein response on the expression of genes encoded estrogen related proteins (NRIP1/RIP140, TRIM16/EBBP, ESRRA/NR3B1, FAM162A/E2IG5, PGRMC2/PMBP, and SLC39A6/LIV-1) and their hypoxic regulation in U87 glioma cells for evaluation of their possible significance in the control of glioma cells proliferation. The expression of NRIP1, EBBP, ESRRA, E2IG5, PGRMC2, and SLC39A6 genes in U87 glioma cells, transfected by empty vector pcDNA3.1 (control) and cells without IRE1 signaling enzyme function (transfected by dnIRE1) upon hypoxia, was studied by a quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Inhibition of both enzymatic activities (kinase and endoribonuclease) of IRE1 signaling enzyme function up-regulates the expression of EBBP, E2IG5, PGRMC2, and SLC39A6 genes is in U87 glioma cells in comparison with the control glioma cells, with more significant changes for E2IG5 and PGRMC2 genes. At the same time, the expression of NRIP1 and ESRRA genes is strongly down-regulated in glioma cells upon inhibition of IRE1. We also showed that hypoxia increases the expression of E2IG5, PGRMC2, and EBBP genes and decreases NRIP1 and ESRRA genes expression in control glioma cells. Furthermore, the inhibition of IRE1 in U87 glioma cells decreases the eff ect of hypoxia on the expression of E2IG5 and PGRMC2 genes, eliminates hypoxic regulation of NRIP1 gene, and enhances the sensitivity of ESRRA gene to hypoxic condition. Furthermore, the expression of SLC39A6 gene is resistant to hypoxia in both the glioma cells with and without IRE1 signaling enzyme function. Results of this investigation demonstrate that inhibition of IRE1 signaling enzyme function affects the expression of NRIP1, EBBP, ESRRA, E2IG5, PGRMC2, and SLC39A6 genes in U87 glioma cells in gene specific manner and these changes

  2. Forkhead box K2 inhibits the proliferation, migration, and invasion of human glioma cells and predicts a favorable prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Zhang, XueBin; Wang, Wei; Zhu, ZhiZhong; Tang, Fan; Wang, Dong; Liu, Xi; Zhuang, Hao; Yan, XiaoLing

    2018-01-01

    Forkhead box K2 (FOXK2) is a member of the forkhead box family of transcription factors. Recently, researchers discovered that overexpression of FOXK2 inhibits the proliferation and metastasis of breast cancer, non-small cell lung cancer, and colorectal cancer, and is related to the clinical prognosis. However, in hepatocellular carcinoma, FOXK2 results in the opposite phenotypes. Currently, the contribution of FOXK2 to glioma pathogenesis is not clear. We evaluated the expression of FOXK2 in 151 glioma patients using immunohistochemistry assays. The associations among the expression of FOXK2, clinicopathological parameters, and the prognosis of glioma patients were statistically analyzed. We downregulated and upregulated the level of FOXK2 in glioma cells by transfections with small interfering RNA and plasmids. Then, we investigated the effects on tumor cell behavior in vitro by Cell Counting Kit-8 assays, colony-formation assay, transwell assay, and the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) biomarker levels. The clinical data showed that expression of FOXK2 gradually decreased with increasing World Health Organization (WHO) grades and a low level of FOXK2 indicates a poor prognosis. FOXK2 expression is negatively correlated with Ki67 expression and the WHO degree but is not correlated with other clinicopathological parameters, including sex, age, Karnofsky Performance Status, tumor diameter, O -6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase, and glutathione S -transferase pi. FOXK2 knockdown enhances glioma cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and EMT process, and, in contrast, FOXK2 overexpression inhibits glioma cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and the EMT process. Expression of FOXK2 gradually decreases with increasing WHO grades. FOXK2 inhibits tumor proliferation, migration, and invasion. FOXK2 is a critical mediator of the EMT process.

  3. A new anti-glioma therapy, AG119: pre-clinical assessment in a mouse GL261 glioma model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towner, Rheal A; Ihnat, Michael; Saunders, Debra; Bastian, Anja; Smith, Nataliya; Pavana, Roheeth Kumar; Gangjee, Aleem

    2015-07-17

    High grade gliomas (HGGs; grades III and IV) are the most common primary brain tumors in adults, and their malignant nature ranks them fourth in incidence of cancer death. Standard treatment for glioblastomas (GBM), involving surgical resection followed by radiation and chemotherapy with temozolomide (TMZ) and the anti-angiogenic therapy bevacizumab, have not substantially improved overall survival. New therapeutic agents are desperately needed for this devastating disease. Here we study the potential therapeutic agent AG119 in a pre-clinical model for gliomas. AG119 possesses both anti-angiogenic (RTK inhibition) and antimicrotubule cytotoxic activity in a single molecule. GL261 glioma-bearing mice were either treated with AG119, anti-VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) antibody, anti c-Met antibody or TMZ, and compared to untreated tumor-bearing mice. Animal survival was assessed, and tumor volumes and vascular alterations were monitored with morphological magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and perfusion-weighted imaging, respectively. Percent survival of GL261 HGG-bearing mice treated with AG119 was significantly higher (p mouse GL261 glioma model, and that AG119 is also not subject to methyl guanine transferase (MGMT) mediated resistance, as is the case with TMZ, indicating that AG119 may be potentially useful in treating resistant gliomas.

  4. mir-300 promotes self-renewal and inhibits the differentiation of glioma stem-like cells

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Daming

    2014-01-28

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs that have been critically implicated in several human cancers. miRNAs are thought to participate in various biological processes, including proliferation, cell cycle, apoptosis, and even the regulation of the stemness properties of cancer stem cells. In this study, we explore the potential role of miR-300 in glioma stem-like cells (GSLCs). We isolated GSLCs from glioma biopsy specimens and identified the stemness properties of the cells through neurosphere formation assays, multilineage differentiation ability analysis, and immunofluorescence analysis of glioma stem cell markers. We found that miR-300 is commonly upregulated in glioma tissues, and the expression of miR-300 was higher in GSLCs. The results of functional experiments demonstrated that miR-300 can enhance the self-renewal of GSLCs and reduce differentiation toward both astrocyte and neural fates. In addition, LZTS2 is a direct target of miR-300. In conclusion, our results demonstrate the critical role of miR-300 in GSLCs and its functions in LZTS2 inhibition and describe a new approach for the molecular regulation of tumor stem cells. © 2014 Springer Science+Business Media.

  5. HIF-1α inhibition by siRNA or chetomin in human malignant glioma cells: effects on hypoxic radioresistance and monitoring via CA9 expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bache Matthias

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hypoxia induces activation of the HIF-1 pathway and is an essential characteristic of malignant gliomas. Hypoxia has been linked to tumor progression, therapy resistance and poor prognosis. However, little is known about the impact of HIF-1α inhibition on radioresistance of malignant glioma. Methods In this study, we investigated the effects of the inhibition of HIF-1α on cell survival and radiosensitivity in U251MG and U343MG glioma cells, using two different strategies. HIF-1α inhibition was achieved by siRNA targeting of HIF-1α or via chetomin, a disruptor of interactions between HIF-1α and p300. The inhibition of the HIF-1 pathway was monitored by quantitative real-time PCR and Western blot analyses of the expression levels of HIF-1α and CA9. CA9 expression was investigated as a potential indicator of the efficacy of HIF-1 inhibition and the resulting radiosensitivity of malignant glioma cell lines was determined by clonogenic assay after irradiation under normoxic (2-10 Gy or hypoxic (2-15 Gy conditions. Results Although siRNA and chetomin show distinct modes of action, both attenuated the hypoxia-induced radioresistance of malignant glioma cell lines U251MG (DMF10: 1.35 and 1.18 and U343MG (DMF10: 1.78 and 1.48. However, siRNA and chetomin showed diverse effects on radiosensitivity under normoxic conditions in U251MG (DMF10: 0.86 and 1.35 and U343MG (DMF10: 1.33 and 1.02 cells. Conclusions Results from this in vitro study suggest that inhibition of HIF-1α is a promising strategy to sensitize human malignant gliomas to radiotherapy and that CA9 could serve as an indicator of effective HIF-1-related radiosensitization.

  6. Metabolic targeting of lactate efflux by malignant glioma inhibits invasiveness and induces necrosis: an in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colen, Chaim B; Shen, Yimin; Ghoddoussi, Farhad; Yu, Pingyang; Francis, Todd B; Koch, Brandon J; Monterey, Michael D; Galloway, Matthew P; Sloan, Andrew E; Mathupala, Saroj P

    2011-07-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) are the most malignant among brain tumors. They are frequently refractory to chemotherapy and radiotherapy with mean patient survival of approximately 6 months, despite surgical intervention. The highly glycolytic nature of glioblastomas describes their propensity to metabolize glucose to lactic acid at an elevated rate. To survive, GBMs efflux lactic acid to the tumor microenvironment through transmembrane transporters denoted monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs). We hypothesized that inhibition of MCT function would impair the glycolytic metabolism and affect both glioma invasiveness and survival. We examined the effect on invasiveness with α-cyano-4-hydroxy-cinnamic acid (ACCA, 4CIN, CHCA), a small-molecule inhibitor of lactate transport, through Matrigel-based and organotypic (brain) slice culture invasive assays using U87-MG and U251-MG glioma cells. We then conducted studies in immunodeficient rats by stereotaxic intracranial implantation of the glioma cells followed by programmed orthotopic application of ACCA through osmotic pumps. Effect on the implanted tumor was monitored by small-animal magnetic resonance imaging. Our assays indicated that glioma invasion was markedly impaired when lactate efflux was inhibited. Convection-enhanced delivery of inhibitor to the tumor bed caused tumor necrosis, with 50% of the animals surviving beyond the experimental end points (3 months after inhibitor exhaustion). Most importantly, control animals did not display any adverse neurologic effects during orthotopic administration of ACCA to brain through programmed delivery. These results indicate the clinical potential of targeting lactate efflux in glioma through delivery of small-molecule inhibitors of MCTs either to the tumor bed or to the postsurgical resection cavity.

  7. Metabolic Targeting of Lactate Efflux by Malignant Glioma Inhibits Invasiveness and Induces Necrosis: An In Vivo Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaim B Colen

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM are the most malignant among brain tumors. They are frequently refractory to chemotherapy and radiotherapy with mean patient survival of approximately 6 months, despite surgical intervention. The highly glycolytic nature of glioblastomas describes their propensity to metabolize glucose to lactic acid at an elevated rate. To survive, GBMs efflux lactic acid to the tumor microenvironment through transmembrane transporters denoted monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs. We hypothesized that inhibition of MCT function would impair the glycolytic metabolism and affect both glioma invasiveness and survival. We examined the effect on invasiveness with α-cyano-4-hydroxy-cinnamic acid (ACCA, 4CIN, CHCA, a small-molecule inhibitor of lactate transport, through Matrigel-based and organotypic (brain slice culture invasive assays using U87-MG and U251-MG glioma cells. We then conducted studies in immunodeficient rats by stereotaxic intracranial implantation of the glioma cells followed by programmed orthotopic application of ACCA through osmotic pumps. Effect on the implanted tumor was monitored by small-animal magnetic resonance imaging. Our assays indicated that glioma invasion was markedly impaired when lactate efflux was inhibited. Convection-enhanced delivery of inhibitor to the tumor bed caused tumor necrosis, with 50% of the animals surviving beyond the experimental end points (3 months after inhibitor exhaustion. Most importantly, control animals did not display any adverse neurologic effects during orthotopic administration of ACCA to brain through programmed delivery. These results indicate the clinical potential of targeting lactate efflux in glioma through delivery of small-molecule inhibitors of MCTs either to the tumor bed or to the postsurgical resection cavity.

  8. Anti-invasive and antiangiogenic effects of MMI-166 on malignant glioma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakabayashi, Hiromichi; Yawata, Toshio; Shimizu, Keiji

    2010-01-01

    The constitutive overexpression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) is frequently observed in malignant tumours. In particular, MMP-2 and MMP-9 have been reported to be closely associated with invasion and angiogenesis in malignant gliomas. Our study aimed to evaluate the antitumour effects of MMI-166 (Nalpha-[4-(2-Phenyl-2H- tetrazole-5-yl) phenyl sulfonyl]-D-tryptophan), a third generation MMP inhibitor, on three human glioma cell lines (T98G, U87MG, and ONS12) in vitro and in vivo. The effects of MMI-166 on the gelatinolytic activity was analysed by gelatine zymography. The anti-invasive effect of MMI-166 was analysed by an in vitro invasion assay. An in vitro angiogenesis assay was also performed. In vitro growth inhibition of glioma cells by MMI-166 was determined by the MTT assay. The effect of MMI-166 on an orthotropic implantation model using athymic mice was also evaluated. Gelatine zymography revealed that MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities were suppressed by MMI-166. The invasion of glioma cells was suppressed by MMI-166. The angiogenesis assay showed that MMI-166 had a suppressive effect on glioma cell-induced angiogenesis. However, MMI-166 did not suppress glioma cell proliferation in the MTT assay. In vivo, MMI-166 suppressed tumour growth in athymic mice implanted orthotropically with T98G cells and showed an inhibitory effect on tumour-induced angiogenesis and tumour growth. This is the first report of the effect of a third generation MMP inhibitor on malignant glioma cells. These results suggest that MMI-166 may have potentially suppressive effects on the invasion and angiogenesis of malignant gliomas

  9. Resveratrol induces cellular senescence with attenuated mono-ubiquitination of histone H2B in glioma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Zhen; Xu, Michael S.; Barnett, Tamara L.; Xu, C. Wilson

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Resveratrol induces cellular senescence in glioma cell. → Resveratrol inhibits mono-ubiquitination of histone H2B at K120. → Depletion of RNF20, phenocopies the inhibitory effects of resveratrol. → Mono-ubiquitination of histone H2B at K120 is a novel target of resveratrol. → RNF20 inhibits cellular senescence in proliferating glioma cells. -- Abstract: Resveratrol (3,4',5-trihydroxy-trans-stilbene), a polyphenol naturally occurring in grapes and other plants, has cancer chemo-preventive effects and therapeutic potential. Although resveratrol modulates multiple pathways in tumor cells, how resveratrol or its affected pathways converge on chromatin to mediate its effects is not known. Using glioma cells as a model, we showed here that resveratrol inhibited cell proliferation and induced cellular hypertrophy by transforming spindle-shaped cells to enlarged, irregular and flatten-shaped ones. We further showed that resveratrol-induced hypertrophic cells expressed senescence-associated-β-galactosidase, suggesting that resveratrol-induced cellular senescence in glioma cells. Consistent with these observations, we demonstrated that resveratrol inhibited clonogenic efficiencies in vitro and tumor growth in a xenograft model. Furthermore, we found that acute treatment of resveratrol inhibited mono-ubiquitination of histone H2B at K120 (uH2B) in breast, prostate, pancreatic, lung, brain tumor cells as well as primary human cells. Chronic treatment with low doses of resveratrol also inhibited uH2B in the resveratrol-induced senescent glioma cells. Moreover, we showed that depletion of RNF20, a ubiquitin ligase of histone H2B, inhibited uH2B and induced cellular senescence in glioma cells in vitro, thereby recapitulated the effects of resveratrol. Taken together, our results suggest that uH2B is a novel direct or indirect chromatin target of resveratrol and RNF20 plays an important role in inhibiting cellular senescence programs that are

  10. Resveratrol induces cellular senescence with attenuated mono-ubiquitination of histone H2B in glioma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Zhen; Xu, Michael S.; Barnett, Tamara L. [Nevada Cancer Institute, Las Vegas, NV 89135 (United States); Xu, C. Wilson, E-mail: wxu@nvcancer.org [Nevada Cancer Institute, Las Vegas, NV 89135 (United States)

    2011-04-08

    Research highlights: {yields} Resveratrol induces cellular senescence in glioma cell. {yields} Resveratrol inhibits mono-ubiquitination of histone H2B at K120. {yields} Depletion of RNF20, phenocopies the inhibitory effects of resveratrol. {yields} Mono-ubiquitination of histone H2B at K120 is a novel target of resveratrol. {yields} RNF20 inhibits cellular senescence in proliferating glioma cells. -- Abstract: Resveratrol (3,4',5-trihydroxy-trans-stilbene), a polyphenol naturally occurring in grapes and other plants, has cancer chemo-preventive effects and therapeutic potential. Although resveratrol modulates multiple pathways in tumor cells, how resveratrol or its affected pathways converge on chromatin to mediate its effects is not known. Using glioma cells as a model, we showed here that resveratrol inhibited cell proliferation and induced cellular hypertrophy by transforming spindle-shaped cells to enlarged, irregular and flatten-shaped ones. We further showed that resveratrol-induced hypertrophic cells expressed senescence-associated-{beta}-galactosidase, suggesting that resveratrol-induced cellular senescence in glioma cells. Consistent with these observations, we demonstrated that resveratrol inhibited clonogenic efficiencies in vitro and tumor growth in a xenograft model. Furthermore, we found that acute treatment of resveratrol inhibited mono-ubiquitination of histone H2B at K120 (uH2B) in breast, prostate, pancreatic, lung, brain tumor cells as well as primary human cells. Chronic treatment with low doses of resveratrol also inhibited uH2B in the resveratrol-induced senescent glioma cells. Moreover, we showed that depletion of RNF20, a ubiquitin ligase of histone H2B, inhibited uH2B and induced cellular senescence in glioma cells in vitro, thereby recapitulated the effects of resveratrol. Taken together, our results suggest that uH2B is a novel direct or indirect chromatin target of resveratrol and RNF20 plays an important role in inhibiting cellular

  11. Knockdown of NF-E2-related factor 2 inhibits the proliferation and growth of U251MG human glioma cells in a mouse xenograft model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xiang-Jun; Chen, Sui-Hua; Zhu, Lin; Pan, Hao; Zhou, Yuan; Li, Wei; You, Wan-Chun; Gao, Chao-Chao; Zhu, Jian-Hong; Jiang, Kuan; Wang, Han-Dong

    2013-07-01

    NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a pivotal transcription factor of cellular responses to oxidative stress and recent evidence suggests that Nrf2 plays an important role in cancer pathobiology. However, the underlying mechanism has yet to be elucidated, particularly in glioma. In the present study, we investigated the role of Nrf2 in the clinical prognosis, cell proliferation and tumor growth of human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). We detected overexpression of Nrf2 protein levels in GBM compared to normal brain tissues. Notably, higher protein levels of Nrf2 were significantly associated with poorer overall survival and 1-year survival for GBM patients. Furthermore, we constructed the plasmid Si-Nrf2 and transduced it into U251MG cells to downregulate the expression of Nrf2 and established stable Nrf2 knockdown cells. The downregulation of Nrf2 suppressed cell proliferation in vitro and tumor growth in mouse xenograft models. We performed immunohistochemistry staining to detect the protein levels of Nrf2, Ki-67, caspase-3 and CD31 in the xenograft tumors and found that the expression levels of Nrf2 and Ki-67 were much lower in the Si-Nrf2 group compared to the Si-control group. In addition, the number of caspase-3-positive cells was significantly increased in the Si-Nrf2 group. By analysis of microvessel density (MVD) assessed by CD31, the MVD value in the Si-Nrf2 group decreased significantly compared to the Si-control group. These findings indicate that the knockdown of Nrf2 may suppress tumor growth by inhibiting cell proliferation, increasing cell apoptosis and inhibiting angiogenesis. These results highlight the potential of Nrf2 as a candidate molecular target to control GBM cell proliferation and tumor growth.

  12. Electrophysiology of glioma: a Rho GTPase-activating protein reduces tumor growth and spares neuron structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannini, Eleonora; Olimpico, Francesco; Middei, Silvia; Ammassari-Teule, Martine; de Graaf, Erik L; McDonnell, Liam; Schmidt, Gudula; Fabbri, Alessia; Fiorentini, Carla; Baroncelli, Laura; Costa, Mario; Caleo, Matteo

    2016-12-01

    Glioblastomas are the most aggressive type of brain tumor. A successful treatment should aim at halting tumor growth and protecting neuronal cells to prevent functional deficits and cognitive deterioration. Here, we exploited a Rho GTPase-activating bacterial protein toxin, cytotoxic necrotizing factor 1 (CNF1), to interfere with glioma cell growth in vitro and vivo. We also investigated whether this toxin spares neuron structure and function in peritumoral areas. We performed a microarray transcriptomic and in-depth proteomic analysis to characterize the molecular changes triggered by CNF1 in glioma cells. We also examined tumor cell senescence and growth in vehicle- and CNF1-treated glioma-bearing mice. Electrophysiological and morphological techniques were used to investigate neuronal alterations in peritumoral cortical areas. Administration of CNF1 triggered molecular and morphological hallmarks of senescence in mouse and human glioma cells in vitro. CNF1 treatment in vivo induced glioma cell senescence and potently reduced tumor volumes. In peritumoral areas of glioma-bearing mice, neurons showed a shrunken dendritic arbor and severe functional alterations such as increased spontaneous activity and reduced visual responsiveness. CNF1 treatment enhanced dendritic length and improved several physiological properties of pyramidal neurons, demonstrating functional preservation of the cortical network. Our findings demonstrate that CNF1 reduces glioma volume while at the same time maintaining the physiological and structural properties of peritumoral neurons. These data indicate a promising strategy for the development of more effective antiglioma therapies. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Gene expression of fibroblast growth factors in human gliomas and meningiomas: Demonstration of cellular source of basic fibroblast growth factor mRNA and peptide in tumor tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, J.A.; Mori, Hirotaka; Fukumoto, Manabu; Oda, Yoshifumi; Kikuchi, Haruhiko; Hatanaka, Masakazu; Igarashi, Koichi; Jaye, M.

    1990-01-01

    The growth autonomy of human tumor cells is considered due to the endogenous production of growth factors. Transcriptional expression of candidates for autocrine stimulatory factors such as basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF), acidic FGF, and transforming growth factor type β were determined in human brain tumors. Basic FGF was expressed abundantly in 17 of 18 gliomas, 20 of 22 meningiomas, and 0 of 5 metastatic brain tumors. The level of mRNA expression of acidic FGF in gliomas was significant. In contrast, transforming growth factor type β1 was expressed in all the samples investigated. The mRNA for basic FGF and its peptide were localized in tumor cells in vivo by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry, showing that basic FGF is actually produced in tumor cells. The results suggest that tumor-derived basic FGF is involved in the progression of gliomas and meningiomas in vivo, whereas acidic FGF is expressed in a tumor origin-specific manner, suggesting that acidic FGF works in tandem with basic FGF in glioma tumorigenesis

  14. Metabolic Targeting of Lactate Efflux by Malignant Glioma Inhibits Invasiveness and Induces Necrosis: An In Vivo Study1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colen, Chaim B; Shen, Yimin; Ghoddoussi, Farhad; Yu, Pingyang; Francis, Todd B; Koch, Brandon J; Monterey, Michael D; Galloway, Matthew P; Sloan, Andrew E; Mathupala, Saroj P

    2011-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) are the most malignant among brain tumors. They are frequently refractory to chemotherapy and radiotherapy with mean patient survival of approximately 6 months, despite surgical intervention. The highly glycolytic nature of glioblastomas describes their propensity to metabolize glucose to lactic acid at an elevated rate. To survive, GBMs efflux lactic acid to the tumor microenvironment through transmembrane transporters denoted monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs). We hypothesized that inhibition of MCT function would impair the glycolytic metabolism and affect both glioma invasiveness and survival. We examined the effect on invasiveness with α-cyano-4-hydroxy-cinnamic acid (ACCA, 4CIN, CHCA), a small-molecule inhibitor of lactate transport, through Matrigel-based and organotypic (brain) slice culture invasive assays using U87-MG and U251-MG glioma cells. We then conducted studies in immunodeficient rats by stereotaxic intracranial implantation of the glioma cells followed by programmed orthotopic application of ACCA through osmotic pumps. Effect on the implanted tumor was monitored by small-animal magnetic resonance imaging. Our assays indicated that glioma invasion was markedly impaired when lactate efflux was inhibited. Convection-enhanced delivery of inhibitor to the tumor bed caused tumor necrosis, with 50% of the animals surviving beyond the experimental end points (3 months after inhibitor exhaustion). Most importantly, control animals did not display any adverse neurologic effects during orthotopic administration of ACCA to brain through programmed delivery. These results indicate the clinical potential of targeting lactate efflux in glioma through delivery of small-molecule inhibitors of MCTs either to the tumor bed or to the postsurgical resection cavity. PMID:21750656

  15. The Inhibition of microRNA-128 on IGF-1-Activating mTOR Signaling Involves in Temozolomide-Induced Glioma Cell Apoptotic Death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng-Hsu Chen

    Full Text Available Temozolomide (TMZ, an alkylating agent of the imidazotetrazine series, is a first-line chemotherapeutic drug used in the clinical therapy of glioblastoma multiforme, the most common and high-grade primary glioma in adults. Micro (miRNAs, which are small noncoding RNAs, post-transcriptionally regulate gene expressions and are involved in gliomagenesis. However, no studies have reported relationships between TMZ and miRNA gene regulation. We investigated TMZ-mediated miRNA profiles and its molecular mechanisms underlying the induction of glioma cell death. By performing miRNA microarray and bioinformatics analyses, we observed that expression of 248 miRNAs was altered, including five significantly upregulated and 17 significantly downregulated miRNAs, in TMZ-treated U87MG cells. miR-128 expression levels were lower in different glioma cells and strongly associated with poor survival. TMZ treatment significantly upregulated miR-128 expression. TMZ significantly enhanced miR-128-1 promoter activity and transcriptionally regulated miR-128 levels through c-Jun N-terminal kinase 2/c-Jun pathways. The overexpression and knockdown of miR-128 expression significantly affected TMZ-mediated cell viability and apoptosis-related protein expression. Furthermore, the overexpression of miR-128 alone enhanced apoptotic death of glioma cells through caspase-3/9 activation, poly(ADP ribose polymerase degradation, reactive oxygen species generation, mitochondrial membrane potential loss, and non-protective autophagy formation. Finally, we identified that key members in mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR signaling including mTOR, rapamycin-insensitive companion of mTOR, insulin-like growth factor 1, and PIK3R1, but not PDK1, were direct target genes of miR-128. TMZ inhibited mTOR signaling through miR-128 regulation. These results indicate that miR-128-inhibited mTOR signaling is involved in TMZ-mediated cytotoxicity. Our findings may provide a better understanding

  16. β-Elemene Selectively Inhibits the Proliferation of Glioma Stem-Like Cells Through the Downregulation of Notch1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Hai-Bin; Wang, Jing; Jiang, Hao-Ran; Mei, Xin; Zhao, Yi-Ying; Chen, Fu-Rong; Qu, Yue; Sai, Ke; Guo, Cheng-Cheng; Yang, Qun-Ying; Zhang, Zong-Ping; Chen, Zhong-Ping

    2017-03-01

    Glioma is the most frequent primary central nervous system tumor. Although the current first-line medicine, temozolomide (TMZ), promotes patient survival, drug resistance develops easily. Thus, it is important to investigate novel therapeutic reagents to solidify the treatment effect. β-Elemene (bELE) is a compound from a Chinese herb whose anticancer effect has been shown in various types of cancer. However, its role in the inhibition of glioma stem-like cells (GSLCs) has not yet been reported. We studied both the in vitro and the in vivo inhibitory effect of bELE and TMZ in GSLCs and parental cells and their combined effects. The molecular mechanisms were also investigated. We also optimized the delivery methods of bELE. We found that bELE selectively inhibits the proliferation and sphere formation of GSLCs, other than parental glioma cells, and TMZ exerts its effects on parental cells instead of GSLCs. The in vivo data confirmed that the combination of bELE and TMZ worked better in the xenografts of GSLCs, mimicking the situation of tumorigenesis of human cancer. Notch1 was downregulated with bELE treatment. Our data also demonstrated that the continuous administration of bELE produces an ideal effect to control tumor progression. Our findings have demonstrated, for the first time, that bELE could compensate for TMZ to kill both GSLCs and nonstem-like cancer cells, probably improving the prognosis of glioma patients tremendously. Notch1 might be a downstream target of bELE. Therefore, our data shed light on improving the outcomes of glioma patients by combining bELE and TMZ. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:830-839. © 2016 The Authors Stem Cells Translational Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press.

  17. β‐Elemene Selectively Inhibits the Proliferation of Glioma Stem‐Like Cells Through the Downregulation of Notch1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Hai‐bin; Wang, Jing; Jiang, Hao‐ran; Mei, Xin; Zhao, Yi‐ying; Chen, Fu‐rong; Qu, Yue; Sai, Ke; Guo, Cheng‐cheng; Yang, Qun‐ying; Zhang, Zong‐ping

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Glioma is the most frequent primary central nervous system tumor. Although the current first‐line medicine, temozolomide (TMZ), promotes patient survival, drug resistance develops easily. Thus, it is important to investigate novel therapeutic reagents to solidify the treatment effect. β‐Elemene (bELE) is a compound from a Chinese herb whose anticancer effect has been shown in various types of cancer. However, its role in the inhibition of glioma stem‐like cells (GSLCs) has not yet been reported. We studied both the in vitro and the in vivo inhibitory effect of bELE and TMZ in GSLCs and parental cells and their combined effects. The molecular mechanisms were also investigated. We also optimized the delivery methods of bELE. We found that bELE selectively inhibits the proliferation and sphere formation of GSLCs, other than parental glioma cells, and TMZ exerts its effects on parental cells instead of GSLCs. The in vivo data confirmed that the combination of bELE and TMZ worked better in the xenografts of GSLCs, mimicking the situation of tumorigenesis of human cancer. Notch1 was downregulated with bELE treatment. Our data also demonstrated that the continuous administration of bELE produces an ideal effect to control tumor progression. Our findings have demonstrated, for the first time, that bELE could compensate for TMZ to kill both GSLCs and nonstem‐like cancer cells, probably improving the prognosis of glioma patients tremendously. Notch1 might be a downstream target of bELE. Therefore, our data shed light on improving the outcomes of glioma patients by combining bELE and TMZ. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:830–839 PMID:28297578

  18. Effect of epidermal growth factor receptor gene polymorphisms on prognosis in glioma patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingjie; Yan, Mengdan; Xie, Zhilan; Zhu, Yuanyuan; Chen, Chao; Jin, Tianbo

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies suggested that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are associated with risk of glioma. However, the associations between these SNPs and glioma patient prognosis have not yet been fully investigated. Therefore, the present study was aimed to evaluate the effects of EGFR polymorphisms on the glioma patient prognosis. We retrospectively evaluated 269 glioma patients and investigated associations between EGFR SNPs and patient prognosis using Cox proportional hazard models and Kaplan-Meier curves. Univariate analysis revealed that age, gross-total resection and chemotherapy were associated with the prognosis of glioma patients (p < 0.05). In addition, four EGFR SNPs (rs11506105, rs3752651, rs1468727 and rs845552) correlated with overall survival (OS) (Log-rank p = 0.011, 0.020, 0.008, and 0.009, respectively) and progression-free survival PFS (Log-rank p = 0.026, 0.024, 0.019 and 0.009, respectively). Multivariate analysis indicated that the rs11506105 G/G genotype, the rs3752651 and rs1468727 C/C genotype and the rs845552 A/A genotype correlated inversely with OS and PFS. In addition, OS among patients with the rs730437 C/C genotype (p = 0.030) was significantly lower OS than among patients with A/A genotype. These data suggest that five EGFR SNPs (rs11506105, rs3752651, rs1468727, rs845552 and rs730437) correlated with glioma patient prognosis, and should be furthered validated in studies of ethnically diverse patients. PMID:27437777

  19. Cord blood stem cell-mediated induction of apoptosis in glioma downregulates X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkata Ramesh Dasari

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available XIAP (X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein is one of the most important members of the apoptosis inhibitor family. XIAP is upregulated in various malignancies, including human glioblastoma. It promotes invasion, metastasis, growth and survival of malignant cells. We hypothesized that downregulation of XIAP by human umbilical cord blood mesenchymal stem cells (hUCBSC in glioma cells would cause them to undergo apoptotic death.We observed the effect of hUCBSC on two malignant glioma cell lines (SNB19 and U251 and two glioma xenograft cell lines (4910 and 5310. In co-cultures of glioma cells with hUCBSC, proliferation of glioma cells was significantly inhibited. This is associated with increased cytotoxicity of glioma cells, which led to glioma cell death. Stem cells induced apoptosis in glioma cells, which was evaluated by TUNEL assay, FACS analyses and immunoblotting. The induction of apoptosis is associated with inhibition of XIAP in co-cultures of hUCBSC. Similar results were obtained by the treatment of glioma cells with shRNA to downregulate XIAP (siXIAP. Downregulation of XIAP resulted in activation of caspase-3 and caspase-9 to trigger apoptosis in glioma cells. Apoptosis is characterized by the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and upregulation of mitochondrial apoptotic proteins Bax and Bad. Cell death of glioma cells was marked by downregulation of Akt and phospho-Akt molecules. We observed similar results under in vivo conditions in U251- and 5310-injected nude mice brains, which were treated with hUCBSC. Under in vivo conditions, Smac/DIABLO was found to be colocalized in the nucleus, showing that hUCBSC induced apoptosis is mediated by inhibition of XIAP and activation of Smac/DIABLO.Our results indicate that downregulation of XIAP by hUCBSC treatment induces apoptosis, which led to the death of the glioma cells and xenograft cells. This study demonstrates the therapeutic potential of XIAP and hUCBSC to treat malignant

  20. Fisetin suppresses ADAM9 expression and inhibits invasion of glioma cancer cells through increased phosphorylation of ERK1/2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chien-Min; Hsieh, Yi-Hsien; Hwang, Jin-Ming; Jan, Hsun-Jin; Hsieh, Shu-Ching; Lin, Shin-Huey; Lai, Chung-Yu

    2015-05-01

    Fisetin (3,3',4',7-tetrahydroxyflavone) is a naturally occurring flavonoid which is widely distributed in plants. It has been reported to possess some anticancer and anti-invasive capabilities. We set out to explore the effects of fisetin on antimetastatic and its mechanism of action in GBM8401 cells. The results indicated that fisetin exhibited effective inhibition of cell migration and inhibited the invasion of GBM8401 cells under non-cytotoxic concentrations. To identify the potential targets of fisetin, human proteinase antibody array analysis was performed, and the results indicated that the fisetin treatment inhibited the expression of ADAM9 protein and mRNA, which are known to contribute to the progression of glioma cancer. Our results showed that fisetin phosphorylated ERK1/2 in a sustained way that contributed to the inhibited ADAM9 protein and mRNA expression determined by Western blot and RT-PCR. Moreover, inhibition of ERK1/2 by U0126 or transfection with the siERK plasmid significantly abolished the fisetin-inhibited migration and invasion through activation of the ERK1/2 pathway. In summary, our results suggest that fisetin might be a potential therapeutic agent against human glioma cells based on its capacity to activate ERK1/2 and to inhibit ADAM9 expression.

  1. Arctigenin, a natural lignan compound, induces G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human glioma cells

    OpenAIRE

    Maimaitili, Aisha; Shu, Zunhua; Cheng, Xiaojiang; Kaheerman, Kadeer; Sikandeer, Alifu; Li, Weimin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to investigate the anticancer potential of arctigenin, a natural lignan compound, in malignant gliomas. The U87MG and T98G human glioma cell lines were treated with various concentrations of arctigenin for 48 h and the effects of arctigenin on the aggressive phenotypes of glioma cells were assessed. The results demonstrated that arctigenin dose-dependently inhibited the growth of U87MG and T98G cells, as determined using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphen...

  2. The microRNA-302b-inhibited insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 2 signaling pathway induces glioma cell apoptosis by targeting nuclear factor IA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Cheng Lee

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs are small noncoding RNAs that post-transcriptionally control the expression of genes involved in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM development. Although miR-302b functions as a tumor suppressor, its role in GBM is still unclear. Therefore, this study comprehensively explored the roles of miR-302b-mediated gene networks in GBM cell death. We found that miR-302b levels were significantly higher in primary astrocytes than in GBM cell lines. miR-302b overexpression dose dependently reduced U87-MG cell viability and induced apoptosis through caspase-3 activation and poly(ADP ribose polymerase degradation. A transcriptome microarray revealed 150 downregulated genes and 380 upregulated genes in miR-302b-overexpressing cells. Nuclear factor IA (NFIA, higher levels of which were significantly related to poor survival, was identified as a direct target gene of miR-302b and was involved in miR-302b-induced glioma cell death. Higher NFIA levels were observed in GBM cell lines and human tumor sections compared with astrocytes and non-tumor tissues, respectively. NFIA knockdown significantly enhanced apoptosis. We found high levels of insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 2 (IGFBP2, another miR-302b-downregulated gene, in patients with poor survival. We verified that NFIA binds to the IGFBP2 promoter and transcriptionally enhances IGFBP2 expression levels. We identified that NFIA-mediated IGFBP2 signaling pathways are involved in miR-302b-induced glioma cell death. The identification of a regulatory loop whereby miR-302b inhibits NFIA, leading to a decrease in expression of IGFBP-2, may provide novel directions for developing therapies to target glioblastoma tumorigenesis.

  3. Autophagy involved in resveratrol increased radiosensitivity in glioma stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long Linmei; Zhang Qingqing; Yang Neng; Ji Wenjun; Song Yunzhen; Zhao Jianghu; Liang Zhongqin

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of Resveratrol combined with X-ray on radiosensitivity in glioma stem cells. Methods: The proliferation inhibition of glioma stem cells induced by X-rays and Resveratrol was assessed with MTT assay. The activation of proapoptotic effect was characterized by Hoechst 33258 stain. MDC stain and Western blot analysis were used to analyze the autophagy mechanism in X-rays-induced death of glioma stem cells. Results: MTT assay indicated that X-rays and Resveratrol decreased the viability of glioma stem cells (P<0.05); we found the proliferative inhibition of glioma stem cells was declined when we used 3-MA to inhibit autophagy(P<0.05). When the cells were treated by the Resveratrol and x-rays, their spherical shape were changed. Apoptosis was induced in glioma stem cells by combined X-rays and Resveratrol as detected by Hoechst 33258 staining. In addition, autophagy was induced in glioma stem cells in the combined treatment group as detected by MDC staining. Western blotting showed that Bcl-2 expression was decreased. in the combined treatment group (P<0.01), and the LC3-Ⅱ expression was increased in the combined treatment group (P<0.01). Conclusion: Resveratrol can increased the radiation sensitivity of glioma stem cells, the apoptosis and autophagy was induced in the glioma stem cells in the combined treatment X-rays and Resveratrol. Our results suggest that autophagy plays an essential role in the regulation of radiosensitization of glioma stem cells. (authors)

  4. Retinoids in the treatment of glioma: a new perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mawson AR

    2012-08-01

    late stage of the disease, ie, to combine the use of a RARα antagonist and a RARβ agonist. According to this hypothesis, the RAR α antagonist would be expected to inhibit RARa-induced gliomas, while the RARβ agonist would suppress tumor growth and possibly contribute to the regeneration of normal glia. Keywords: glioma, retinoids, pathogenesis, epidemiology, hypervitaminosis A

  5. Retinoids in the treatment of glioma: a new perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mawson, Anthony R

    2012-01-01

    Primary brain tumors are among the top ten causes of cancer-related deaths in the US. Malignant gliomas account for approximately 70% of the 22,500 new cases of malignant primary brain tumors diagnosed in adults each year and are associated with high morbidity and mortality. Despite optimal treatment, the prognosis for patients with gliomas remains poor. The use of retinoids (vitamin A and its congeners) in the treatment of certain tumors was originally based on the assumption that these conditions were associated with an underlying deficiency of vitamin A and that supplementation with pharmacological doses would correct the deficiency. Yet the results of retinoid treatment have been only modestly beneficial and usually short-lived. Studies also indicate that vitamin A excess and supplementation have pro-oxidant effects and are associated with increased risks of mortality from cancer and other diseases. The therapeutic role of vitamin A in cancer thus remains uncertain and a new perspective on the facts is needed. The modest and temporary benefits of retinoid treatment could result from a process of feedback inhibition, whereby exogenous retinoid temporarily inhibits the endogenous synthesis of these compounds. In fact, repeated and/or excessive exposure of the tissues to endogenous retinoic acid may contribute to carcinogenesis. Gliomas, in particular, may result from an imbalance in retinoid receptor expression initiated by environmental factors that increase the endogenous production of retinoic acid in glia. At the receptor level, it is proposed that this imbalance is characterized by excessive expression of retinoic acid receptor-α (RARα) and reduced expression of retinoic acid receptor-β (RARβ). This suggests a potential new treatment strategy for gliomas, possibly even at a late stage of the disease, ie, to combine the use of a RARα antagonist and a RARβ agonist. According to this hypothesis, the RARα antagonist would be expected to inhibit RAR

  6. Retinoids in the treatment of glioma: a new perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mawson, Anthony R

    2012-01-01

    Primary brain tumors are among the top ten causes of cancer-related deaths in the US. Malignant gliomas account for approximately 70% of the 22,500 new cases of malignant primary brain tumors diagnosed in adults each year and are associated with high morbidity and mortality. Despite optimal treatment, the prognosis for patients with gliomas remains poor. The use of retinoids (vitamin A and its congeners) in the treatment of certain tumors was originally based on the assumption that these conditions were associated with an underlying deficiency of vitamin A and that supplementation with pharmacological doses would correct the deficiency. Yet the results of retinoid treatment have been only modestly beneficial and usually short-lived. Studies also indicate that vitamin A excess and supplementation have pro-oxidant effects and are associated with increased risks of mortality from cancer and other diseases. The therapeutic role of vitamin A in cancer thus remains uncertain and a new perspective on the facts is needed. The modest and temporary benefits of retinoid treatment could result from a process of feedback inhibition, whereby exogenous retinoid temporarily inhibits the endogenous synthesis of these compounds. In fact, repeated and/or excessive exposure of the tissues to endogenous retinoic acid may contribute to carcinogenesis. Gliomas, in particular, may result from an imbalance in retinoid receptor expression initiated by environmental factors that increase the endogenous production of retinoic acid in glia. At the receptor level, it is proposed that this imbalance is characterized by excessive expression of retinoic acid receptor-α (RARα) and reduced expression of retinoic acid receptor-β (RARβ). This suggests a potential new treatment strategy for gliomas, possibly even at a late stage of the disease, ie, to combine the use of a RARα antagonist and a RARβ agonist. According to this hypothesis, the RARα antagonist would be expected to inhibit RAR

  7. Mutant IDH1 Promotes Glioma Formation In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice Philip

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1 is the most commonly mutated gene in grade II–III glioma and secondary glioblastoma (GBM. A causal role for IDH1R132H in gliomagenesis has been proposed, but functional validation in vivo has not been demonstrated. In this study, we assessed the role of IDH1R132H in glioma development in the context of clinically relevant cooperating genetic alterations in vitro and in vivo. Immortal astrocytes expressing IDH1R132H exhibited elevated (R-2-hydroxyglutarate levels, reduced NADPH, increased proliferation, and anchorage-independent growth. Although not sufficient on its own, IDH1R132H cooperated with PDGFA and loss of Cdkn2a, Atrx, and Pten to promote glioma development in vivo. These tumors resembled proneural human mutant IDH1 GBM genetically, histologically, and functionally. Our findings support the hypothesis that IDH1R132H promotes glioma development. This model enhances our understanding of the biology of IDH1R132H-driven gliomas and facilitates testing of therapeutic strategies designed to combat this deadly disease. : Philip et al. show that mutant IDH1 cooperates with PDGFA and loss of Cdkn2a, Atrx, and Pten to promote gliomagenesis in vivo in a mouse model of glioma. These tumors resemble proneural human mutant IDH1 glioblastoma and exhibit enhanced sensitivity to PARP inhibition in combination with chemotherapy. Keywords: IDH1, Cdkn2a, Atrx, Pten, glioma, mouse model, RCAS/TVA

  8. Predicting in vivo glioma growth with the reaction diffusion equation constrained by quantitative magnetic resonance imaging data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hormuth II, David A; Weis, Jared A; Barnes, Stephanie L; Miga, Michael I; Yankeelov, Thomas E; Rericha, Erin C; Quaranta, Vito

    2015-01-01

    Reaction–diffusion models have been widely used to model glioma growth. However, it has not been shown how accurately this model can predict future tumor status using model parameters (i.e., tumor cell diffusion and proliferation) estimated from quantitative in vivo imaging data. To this end, we used in silico studies to develop the methods needed to accurately estimate tumor specific reaction–diffusion model parameters, and then tested the accuracy with which these parameters can predict future growth. The analogous study was then performed in a murine model of glioma growth. The parameter estimation approach was tested using an in silico tumor ‘grown’ for ten days as dictated by the reaction–diffusion equation. Parameters were estimated from early time points and used to predict subsequent growth. Prediction accuracy was assessed at global (total volume and Dice value) and local (concordance correlation coefficient, CCC) levels. Guided by the in silico study, rats (n = 9) with C6 gliomas, imaged with diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging, were used to evaluate the model’s accuracy for predicting in vivo tumor growth. The in silico study resulted in low global (tumor volume error 0.92) and local (CCC values >0.80) level errors for predictions up to six days into the future. The in vivo study showed higher global (tumor volume error >11.7%, Dice <0.81) and higher local (CCC <0.33) level errors over the same time period. The in silico study shows that model parameters can be accurately estimated and used to accurately predict future tumor growth at both the global and local scale. However, the poor predictive accuracy in the experimental study suggests the reaction–diffusion equation is an incomplete description of in vivo C6 glioma biology and may require further modeling of intra-tumor interactions including segmentation of (for example) proliferative and necrotic regions. (paper)

  9. MiR-26b Mimic Inhibits Glioma Proliferation In Vitro and In Vivo Suppressing COX-2 Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zheng-Gang; Zheng, Chuan-Yi; Cai, Wang-Qing; Li, Da-Wei; Ye, Fu-Yue; Zhou, Jian; Wu, Ran; Yang, Kun

    2017-08-11

    Glioma is the most common malignant tumor of the nervous system. Studies have shown the microRNA (miR)-26b/cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 axis in the development and progression in many tumor cells. Our study aims to investigate the effect and mechanism of miR-26b/COX-2 axis in glioma. Decreased expression of miR-26b with increased level of COX-2 was found in glioma tissues compared with matched normal tissues. A strong negative correlation was observed between the level of miR-26b and COX-2 in 30 glioma tissues. The miR-26b was then overexpressed by transfecting miR-26b mimic into U-373 cells. The invasive cell number and wounld closing rate were reduced in U-373 cells transfected with miR-26b mimic. Besides, COX2 siRNA enhanced the effect of miR-26b mimic in suppressing the expression of p-ERK1 and p-JNK. Finally, the in vivo experiment revealed that miR-26b mimic transfection strongly reduced the tumor growth, tumor volume and the expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, MMP-9). Taken together, our research indicated a miR-26b/COX-2/ERK/JNK axis in regulating the motility of glioma in vitro and in vivo, providing a new sight for treatment of glioma.

  10. Opposite Interplay Between the Canonical WNT/β-Catenin Pathway and PPAR Gamma: A Potential Therapeutic Target in Gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallée, Alexandre; Lecarpentier, Yves; Guillevin, Rémy; Vallée, Jean-Noël

    2018-06-01

    In gliomas, the canonical Wingless/Int (WNT)/β-catenin pathway is increased while peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ) is downregulated. The two systems act in an opposite manner. This review focuses on the interplay between WNT/β-catenin signaling and PPAR-γ and their metabolic implications as potential therapeutic target in gliomas. Activation of the WNT/β-catenin pathway stimulates the transcription of genes involved in proliferation, invasion, nucleotide synthesis, tumor growth, and angiogenesis. Activation of PPAR-γ agonists inhibits various signaling pathways such as the JAK/STAT, WNT/β-catenin, and PI3K/Akt pathways, which reduces tumor growth, cell proliferation, cell invasiveness, and angiogenesis. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, curcumin, antipsychotic drugs, adiponectin, and sulforaphane downregulate the WNT/β-catenin pathway through the upregulation of PPAR-γ and thus appear to provide an interesting therapeutic approach for gliomas. Temozolomide (TMZ) is an antiangiogenic agent. The downstream action of this opposite interplay may explain the TMZ-resistance often reported in gliomas.

  11. Cetuximab insufficiently inhibits glioma cell growth due to persistent EGFR downstream signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselbalch, Benedikte; Lassen, Ulrik; Poulsen, Hans S

    2010-01-01

    Overexpression and/or amplification of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is present in 35-45% of primary glioblastoma multiforme tumors and has been correlated with a poor prognosis. In this study, we investigated the effect of cetuximab and intracellular signaling pathways downstream...... of EGFR, important for cell survival and proliferation. We show insufficient EGFR downregulation and competition with endogenous EGFR ligands upon cetuximab treatment. Dose-response experiments showed inhibition of EGFR phosphorylation without affecting two of the prominent downstream signaling pathways....... Our results indicate that amplification and/or overexpression of EGFR is an unsatisfactory predictor for response to cetuximab....

  12. Forkhead box K2 inhibits the proliferation, migration, and invasion of human glioma cells and predicts a favorable prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang B

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Bo Wang,1–3,* XueBin Zhang,2–4,* Wei Wang,1–3 ZhiZhong Zhu,5 Fan Tang,2–4 Dong Wang,6–8 Xi Liu,9 Hao Zhuang,10 XiaoLing Yan2–4 1Department of Neurosurgery, Tianjin Huanhu Hospital, Tianjin, China; 2Tianjin Key Laboratory of Cerebral Vascular and Neurodegenerative Diseases, Tianjin, China; 3Tianjin Neurosurgical Institute, Tianjin, China; 4Department of Pathology, Tianjin Huanhu Hospital, Tianjin, China; 5Department of Rehabilitation, Tianjin Huanhu Hospital, Tianjin, China; 6Department of Neurosurgery, Tianjin Medical University, General Hospital, Tianjin, China; 7Tianjin Key Laboratory of Injuries, Variations and Regeneration of Nervous System, Tianjin, China; 8Tianjin Neurological Institute, Tianjin, China; 9Department of Gastroenterology, Tianjin NanKai Hospital, Tianjin, China; 10Department of Hepatic Biliary Pancreatic Surgery, Cancer Hospital Affiliated to Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, China *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: Forkhead box K2 (FOXK2 is a member of the forkhead box family of transcription factors. Recently, researchers discovered that overexpression of FOXK2 inhibits the proliferation and metastasis of breast cancer, non-small cell lung cancer, and colorectal cancer, and is related to the clinical prognosis. However, in hepatocellular carcinoma, FOXK2 results in the opposite phenotypes. Currently, the contribution of FOXK2 to glioma pathogenesis is not clear. Patients and methods: We evaluated the expression of FOXK2 in 151 glioma patients using immunohistochemistry assays. The associations among the expression of FOXK2, clinicopathological parameters, and the prognosis of glioma patients were statistically analyzed. We downregulated and upregulated the level of FOXK2 in glioma cells by transfections with small interfering RNA and plasmids. Then, we investigated the effects on tumor cell behavior in vitro by Cell Counting Kit-8 assays, colony-formation assay, transwell assay, and the

  13. Aptamer-conjugated PEGylated quantum dots targeting epidermal growth factor receptor variant III for fluorescence imaging of glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jiaze; Huang, Ning; Zhang, Xiang; Zhou, Tao; Tan, Ying; Pi, Jiangli; Pi, Li; Cheng, Si; Zheng, Huzhi; Cheng, Yuan

    2017-01-01

    The extent of resection is a significant prognostic factor in glioma patients. However, the maximum safe resection level is difficult to determine due to the inherent infiltrative character of tumors. Recently, fluorescence-guided surgery has emerged as a new technique that allows safe resection of glioma. In this study, we constructed a new kind of quantum dot (QD)-labeled aptamer (QD-Apt) nanoprobe by conjugating aptamer 32 (A32) to the QDs surface, which can specially bind to the tumors. A32 is a single-stranded DNA capable of binding to the epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (EGFRvIII) specially distributed on the surface of glioma cells. To detect the expression of EGFRvIII in human brain tissues, 120 specimens, including 110 glioma tissues and 10 normal brain tissues, were examined by immunohistochemistry, and the results showed that the rate of positive expression of EGFRvIII in the glioma tissues was 41.82%, and 0.00% in normal brain tissues. Besides, the physiochemical properties of QD-Apt nanoparticles (NPs) were thoroughly characterized. Biocompatibility of the NPs was evaluated, and the results suggested that the QD-Apt was nontoxic in vivo and vitro. Furthermore, the use of the QD-Apt in labeling glioma cell lines and human brain glioma tissues, and target gliomas in situ was also investigated. We found that not only could QD-Apt specially bind to the U87-EGFRvIII glioma cells but also bind to human glioma tissues in vitro. Fluorescence imaging in vivo with orthotopic glioma model mice bearing U87-EGFRvIII showed that QD-Apt could penetrate the blood-brain barrier and then selectively accumulate in the tumors through binding to EGFRvIII, and consequently, generate a strong fluorescence, which contributed to the margins of gliomas that were visualized clearly, and thus, help the surgeons realize the maximum safe resection of glioma. In addition, QD-Apt can also be applied in preoperative diagnosis and postoperative examination of glioma

  14. Upregulation of Long Noncoding RNA Small Nucleolar RNA Host Gene 18 Promotes Radioresistance of Glioma by Repressing Semaphorin 5A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Rong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Fujian Medical University Union Hospital, Fuzhou, Fujian (China); Yao, Qiwei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Teaching Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fujian Provincial Cancer Hospital, Fuzhou, Fujian (China); Ren, Chen; Liu, Ying; Yang, Hongli; Xie, Guozhu; Du, Shasha [Department of Radiation Oncology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Yang, Kaijun [Department of Neurosurgery, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Yuan, Yawei, E-mail: yuanyawei2015@outlook.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital Center of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China)

    2016-11-15

    Purpose: Although increasing evidence has shown that long noncoding RNAs play an important regulatory role in carcinogenesis and tumor progression, little is known about the role of small nucleolar RNA host gene 18 (SNHG18) in cancer. The goal of this study was to investigate the expression of SNHG18 and its clinical significance in glioma. Methods and Materials: Differences in the lncRNA expression profile between M059K and M059J cells were assessed by lncRNA expression microarray analysis. The expression and localization of SNHG18 in glioma cells or tissues was evaluated by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and in situ hybridization (ISH), respectively. the clinical associations of SNHG18 in glioma was evaluated by qRT-PCR, ISH and immunohistochemistry. The role of SNHG18 in glioma radiosensitivity was evaluated by colony formation assays, immunofluorescence, Western blot and tumor growth inhibition study. Results: The present study investigated the clinical associations of SNHG18 and its role in glioma. Our results showed that the expression of SNHG18 was remarkably upregulated in clinical glioma tissues compared with normal brain tissues. SNHG18 expression was associated with the clinical tumor grade and correlated negatively with isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 mutation. In addition, knockdown of SNHG18 with short hairpin RNA suppressed the radioresistance of glioma cells, and transgenic expression of SNHG18 had the opposite effect. Furthermore, xenograft tumors grown from cells with SNHG18 deletion were more radiosensitive than tumors grown from control cells. Further studies revealed that SNHG18 promotes radioresistance by inhibiting semaphorin 5A and that inhibition of semaphorin 5A expression abrogated the radiosensitizing effect caused by SNHG18 deletion. Conclusions: Our findings provide new insights into the role of SNHG18 in glioma and suggest its potential as a target for glioma therapy.

  15. Upregulation of Long Noncoding RNA Small Nucleolar RNA Host Gene 18 Promotes Radioresistance of Glioma by Repressing Semaphorin 5A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Rong; Yao, Qiwei; Ren, Chen; Liu, Ying; Yang, Hongli; Xie, Guozhu; Du, Shasha; Yang, Kaijun; Yuan, Yawei

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Although increasing evidence has shown that long noncoding RNAs play an important regulatory role in carcinogenesis and tumor progression, little is known about the role of small nucleolar RNA host gene 18 (SNHG18) in cancer. The goal of this study was to investigate the expression of SNHG18 and its clinical significance in glioma. Methods and Materials: Differences in the lncRNA expression profile between M059K and M059J cells were assessed by lncRNA expression microarray analysis. The expression and localization of SNHG18 in glioma cells or tissues was evaluated by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and in situ hybridization (ISH), respectively. the clinical associations of SNHG18 in glioma was evaluated by qRT-PCR, ISH and immunohistochemistry. The role of SNHG18 in glioma radiosensitivity was evaluated by colony formation assays, immunofluorescence, Western blot and tumor growth inhibition study. Results: The present study investigated the clinical associations of SNHG18 and its role in glioma. Our results showed that the expression of SNHG18 was remarkably upregulated in clinical glioma tissues compared with normal brain tissues. SNHG18 expression was associated with the clinical tumor grade and correlated negatively with isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 mutation. In addition, knockdown of SNHG18 with short hairpin RNA suppressed the radioresistance of glioma cells, and transgenic expression of SNHG18 had the opposite effect. Furthermore, xenograft tumors grown from cells with SNHG18 deletion were more radiosensitive than tumors grown from control cells. Further studies revealed that SNHG18 promotes radioresistance by inhibiting semaphorin 5A and that inhibition of semaphorin 5A expression abrogated the radiosensitizing effect caused by SNHG18 deletion. Conclusions: Our findings provide new insights into the role of SNHG18 in glioma and suggest its potential as a target for glioma therapy.

  16. Anti-Cancer Effect of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 1 Inhibition in Human Glioma U87 Cells: Involvement of PI3K/Akt/mTOR Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs are G-protein-coupled receptors that mediate neuronal excitability and synaptic plasticity in the central nervous system, and emerging evidence suggests a role of mGluRs in the biology of cancer. Previous studies showed that mGluR1 was a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of breast cancer and melanoma, but its role in human glioma has not been determined. Methods: In the present study, we investigated the effects of mGluR1 inhibition in human glioma U87 cells using specific targeted small interfering RNA (siRNA or selective antagonists Riluzole and BAY36-7620. The anti-cancer effects of mGluR1 inhibition were measured by cell viability, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH release, TUNEL staining, cell cycle assay, cell invasion and migration assays in vitro, and also examined in a U87 xenograft model in vivo. Results: Inhibition of mGluR1 significantly decreased the cell viability but increased the LDH release in a dose-dependent fashion in U87 cells. These effects were accompanied with the induction of caspase-dependent apoptosis and G0/G1 cell cycle arrest. In addition, the results of Matrigel invasion and cell tracking assays showed that inhibition of mGluR1 apparently attenuated cell invasion and migration in U87 cells. All these anti-cancer effects were ablated by the mGluR1 agonist L-quisqualic acid. The results of western blot analysis showed that mGluR1 inhibition overtly decreased the phosphorylation of PI3K, Akt, mTOR and P70S6K, indicating the mitigated activation of PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway. Moreover, the anti-tumor activity of mGluR1 inhibition in vivo was also demonstrated in a U87 xenograft glioma model in athymic nude mice. Conclusion: The remarkable efficiency of mGluR1 inhibition to induce cell death in U87 cells may find therapeutic application for the treatment of glioma patients.

  17. Toll-like receptor triggered dendritic cell maturation and IL-12 secretion are necessary to overcome T-cell inhibition by glioma-associated TGF-beta2.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grauer, O.M.; Poschl, P.; Lohmeier, A.; Adema, G.J.; Bogdahn, U.

    2007-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are able to secrete large amounts of immunosuppressive cytokines like transforming growth factor beta 2 (TGF-beta2) and regularly escape from immune surveillance. Many strategies have been developed to induce potent anti-glioma responses, among those the use of dendritic cells (DC)

  18. Inhibitory effect of calcium channel blockers on proliferation of human glioma cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunert-Radek, J.; Stepien, H.; Lyson, K.; Pawlikowski, M.; Radek, A.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of 2 specific calcium channel blockers, verapamil and nimodipine, on the proliferation of human glioma tumour cells were investigated in vitro. Tumour tissues for primary cell cultures were obtained bioptically from 3 patients with the histopathological diagnosis of glioblastoma. The [ 3 H]-thymidine incorporation into glioma tumour cells DNA was used as a sensitive index of the cell proliferation. It was found that varapamil (10 4 -10 5 M) and nimodipine (10 4 -10 6 M) significantly inhibited the [ 3 H]-thymidine uptake in a dose-related manner. The inhibitory effect of both calcium channel antagonists was reversed by stimultancous addition of calcium chloride (5x10 3 M). These results indicate that verapamil and nimodipine may exert an antiproliferative effect on glioma cells growth acting through a blokade of specific voltage-dependent calcium channels. (author)

  19. Impact of pEGFP mediated ING4 gene on growth of glioma U251 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-06-22

    Jun 22, 2011 ... Full Length Research Paper. Impact of pEGFP mediated ING4 gene on growth of glioma U251 cells and its potential molecular mechanism. Yuefei Deng*, Bingxi Lei and Yiying Zhao. Department of Neurosurgery, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510120, China.

  20. Recombinant epidermal growth factor-like domain-1 from coagulation factor VII functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles for targeted glioma magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Heng; Chen, Xiao; Xue, Wei; Chu, Chengchao; Liu, Yu; Tong, Haipeng; Du, Xuesong; Xie, Tian; Liu, Gang; Zhang, Weiguo

    The highly infiltrative and invasive nature of glioma cells often leads to blurred tumor margins, resulting in incomplete tumor resection and tumor recurrence. Accurate detection and precise delineation of glioma help in preoperative delineation, surgical planning and survival prediction. In this study, recombinant epidermal growth factor-like domain-1, derived from human coagulation factor VII, was conjugated to iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) for targeted glioma magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The synthesized EGF1-EGFP-IONPs exhibited excellent targeting ability toward tissue factor (TF)-positive U87MG cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells in vitro, and demonstrated persistent and efficient MR contrast enhancement up to 12 h for preclinical glioma models with high targeting specificity in vivo. They hold great potential for clinical translation and developing targeted theranostics against brain glioma.

  1. In Vitro Responsiveness of Glioma Cell Lines to Multimodality Treatment With Radiotherapy, Temozolomide, and Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Inhibition With Cetuximab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combs, Stephanie E.; Schulz-Ertner, Daniela; Roth, Wilfried; Herold-Mende, Christel; Debus, Juergen; Weber, Klaus-Josef

    2007-01-01

    Background: The majority of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells express the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). The present study evaluates the combination of temozolomide (TMZ), EGFR inhibition, and radiotherapy (RT) in GBM cell lines. Methods and Materials: Human GBM cell lines U87, LN229, LN18, NCH 82, and NCH 89 were treated with various combinations of TMZ, RT, and the monoclonal EGFR antibody cetuximab. Responsiveness of glioma cells to the combination treatment was measured by clonogenic survival. Results: Overall, double and triple combinations of RT, TMZ, and cetuximab lead to additive cytotoxic effects (independent toxicity). A notable exception was observed for U87 and LN 18 cell lines, where the combination of TMZ and cetuximab showed substantial antagonism. Interestingly, in these two cell lines, the combination of RT with cetuximab resulted in a substantial increase in cell killing over that expected for independent toxicity. The triple combination with RT, cetuximab, and TMZ was nearly able to overcome the antagonism for the TMZ/cetuximab combination in U87, however only marginally in LN18, GBM cell lines. Conclusion: It appears that EGFR expression is not correlated with cytotoxic effects exerted by cetuximab. Combination treatment with TMZ, cetuximab and radiation resulted in independent toxicity in three out of five cell lines evaluated, the antagonistic effect of the TMZ/cetuximab combination in two cell lines could indicate that TMZ preferentially kills cetuximab-resistant cells, suggesting for some cross-talk between toxicity mechanisms. Expression of EGFR was no surrogate marker for responsiveness to cetuximab, alone or in combination with RT and TMZ

  2. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) as a potential targeting agent for delivery of boron to malignant gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capala, J.; Barth, R.F.; Adams, D.M.; Bailey, M.Q.; Soloway, A.H.; Carlsson, J.

    1994-01-01

    The majority of high grade gliomas express an amplified epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene, and this often is associated with an increase in cell surface receptor expression. The rapid internalization and degradation of EGF-EGFR complexes, as well as their high affinity make EGF a potential targeting agent for delivery of 10 B to tumor cells with an amplified number of EGFR. Human glioma cells can expresses as many as 10 5 -10 6 EGF receptors per cell, and if these could be saturated with boronated EGF, then > 10 8 boron atoms would be delivered per cell. Since EGF has a comparatively low molecular weight (∼ 6 kD), this has allowed us to construct relatively small bioconjugates containing ∼ 900 boron atoms per EGF molecule 3 , which also had high affinity for EGFR on tumor cells. In the present study, the feasibility of using EGF receptors as a potential target for therapy of gliomas was investigated by in vivo scintigraphic studies using 131 I- or 99m T c -labeled EGF in a rat brain tumor model. Our results indicate that intratumorally delivered boron- EGF conjugates might be useful for targeting EGFR on glioma cells if the boron containing moiety of the conjugates persisted intracellularly. Further studies are required, however, to determine if this approach can be used for BNCT of the rat glioma

  3. Therapeutic Strategy for Targeting Aggressive Malignant Gliomas by Disrupting Their Energy Balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegazy, Ahmed M; Yamada, Daisuke; Kobayashi, Masahiko; Kohno, Susumu; Ueno, Masaya; Ali, Mohamed A E; Ohta, Kumiko; Tadokoro, Yuko; Ino, Yasushi; Todo, Tomoki; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Takahashi, Chiaki; Hirao, Atsushi

    2016-10-07

    Although abnormal metabolic regulation is a critical determinant of cancer cell behavior, it is still unclear how an altered balance between ATP production and consumption contributes to malignancy. Here we show that disruption of this energy balance efficiently suppresses aggressive malignant gliomas driven by mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) hyperactivation. In a mouse glioma model, mTORC1 hyperactivation induced by conditional Tsc1 deletion increased numbers of glioma-initiating cells (GICs) in vitro and in vivo Metabolic analysis revealed that mTORC1 hyperactivation enhanced mitochondrial biogenesis, as evidenced by elevations in oxygen consumption rate and ATP production. Inhibition of mitochondrial ATP synthetase was more effective in repressing sphere formation by Tsc1-deficient glioma cells than that by Tsc1-competent glioma cells, indicating a crucial function for mitochondrial bioenergetic capacity in GIC expansion. To translate this observation into the development of novel therapeutics targeting malignant gliomas, we screened drug libraries for small molecule compounds showing greater efficacy in inhibiting the proliferation/survival of Tsc1-deficient cells compared with controls. We identified several compounds able to preferentially inhibit mitochondrial activity, dramatically reducing ATP levels and blocking glioma sphere formation. In human patient-derived glioma cells, nigericin, which reportedly suppresses cancer stem cell properties, induced AMPK phosphorylation that was associated with mTORC1 inactivation and induction of autophagy and led to a marked decrease in sphere formation with loss of GIC marker expression. Furthermore, malignant characteristics of human glioma cells were markedly suppressed by nigericin treatment in vivo Thus, targeting mTORC1-driven processes, particularly those involved in maintaining a cancer cell's energy balance, may be an effective therapeutic strategy for glioma patients. © 2016 by The American

  4. Local delivery of cannabinoid-loaded microparticles inhibits tumor growth in a murine xenograft model of glioblastoma multiforme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolores Hernán Pérez de la Ossa

    Full Text Available Cannabinoids, the active components of marijuana and their derivatives, are currently investigated due to their potential therapeutic application for the management of many different diseases, including cancer. Specifically, Δ(9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC and Cannabidiol (CBD - the two major ingredients of marijuana - have been shown to inhibit tumor growth in a number of animal models of cancer, including glioma. Although there are several pharmaceutical preparations that permit the oral administration of THC or its analogue nabilone or the oromucosal delivery of a THC- and CBD-enriched cannabis extract, the systemic administration of cannabinoids has several limitations in part derived from the high lipophilicity exhibited by these compounds. In this work we analyzed CBD- and THC-loaded poly-ε-caprolactone microparticles as an alternative delivery system for long-term cannabinoid administration in a murine xenograft model of glioma. In vitro characterization of THC- and CBD-loaded microparticles showed that this method of microencapsulation facilitates a sustained release of the two cannabinoids for several days. Local administration of THC-, CBD- or a mixture (1:1 w:w of THC- and CBD-loaded microparticles every 5 days to mice bearing glioma xenografts reduced tumour growth with the same efficacy than a daily local administration of the equivalent amount of those cannabinoids in solution. Moreover, treatment with cannabinoid-loaded microparticles enhanced apoptosis and decreased cell proliferation and angiogenesis in these tumours. Our findings support that THC- and CBD-loaded microparticles could be used as an alternative method of cannabinoid delivery in anticancer therapies.

  5. Gallic acid suppresses cell viability, proliferation, invasion and angiogenesis in human glioma cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Yong; Jiang, Feng; Jiang, Hao; Wu, Kalina; Zheng, Xuguang; Cai, Yizhong; Katakowski, Mark; Chopp, Michael; To, Shing-Shun Tony

    2010-01-01

    Gallic acid, an organic acid, also known as 3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid, is cytotoxic against certain cancer cells, without harming normal cells. The objective of this study is to evaluate whether gallic acid can inhibit glioma cell viability, proliferation, invasion and reduce glioma cell mediated angiogenesis. Treatment of U87 and U251n glioma cells with gallic acid inhibited cell viability in a dose- and time-dependent manner. BrdU and tube formation assays indicated that gallic acid sign...

  6. Comparison of numerical change of epidermal growth factor receptor gene among pre- and postradiation glioma, and gliosis, and its clinical use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Yoshifumi; Ohno, Chihiro; Ueki, Keisuke; Ogino, Masahiro; Kawamoto, Shunsuke; Kim, Phyo

    2007-01-01

    Surgery with following chemoradiotherapy is the mainstream glioma treatment. In the course of postradiation events, however, it is sometimes difficult for neurosurgeons, radiologists, and pathologists to discriminate tumor recurrence from radiation necrosis. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene, on chromosome 7, is known to gain in copy number frequently in high-grade gliomas. The authors applied the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) method to observe the gene's numerical status in pre- and postradiation glioma samples to elucidate whether this technique is useful in the discrimination of glioma recurrence from radiation necrosis. When 15 postradiation glioma samples and 4 postradiation nonglioma samples were tested, all the recurrent glioma tissue harbored numerical aberrations of the gene, whereas no abnormality could be observed in necrosis or in nonglioma gliosis. FISH could even prove a residual glioma cell in a gliotic tissue taken by needle biopsy after gamma-knife radiosurgery, which had been executed on a supposed metastatic brain tumor. FISH is considered to be of help in accurate diagnosis, especially when the usual histopathological diagnosis is difficult because of radiation effects or small sample size. (author)

  7. Aptamer-conjugated PEGylated quantum dots targeting epidermal growth factor receptor variant III for fluorescence imaging of glioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang J

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Jiaze Tang,1 Ning Huang,1 Xiang Zhang,1,2 Tao Zhou,3 Ying Tan,1,4 Jiangli Pi,5 Li Pi,1 Si Cheng,6 Huzhi Zheng,5 Yuan Cheng1 1Department of Neurosurgery, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, 2Chongqing Key Laboratory of Ultrasound Molecular Imaging, Institute of Ultrasound Imaging, 3Chongqing Key Laboratory of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, 4Institute of Life Sciences, Chongqing Medical University, 5Key Laboratory on Luminescent and Real-Time Analytical Chemistry, Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, 6Department of Orthopaedics, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, People’s Republic of China Abstract: The extent of resection is a significant prognostic factor in glioma patients. However, the maximum safe resection level is difficult to determine due to the inherent infiltrative character of tumors. Recently, fluorescence-guided surgery has emerged as a new technique that allows safe resection of glioma. In this study, we constructed a new kind of quantum dot (QD-labeled aptamer (QD-Apt nanoprobe by conjugating aptamer 32 (A32 to the QDs surface, which can specially bind to the tumors. A32 is a single-stranded DNA capable of binding to the epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (EGFRvIII specially distributed on the surface of glioma cells. To detect the expression of EGFRvIII in human brain tissues, 120 specimens, including 110 glioma tissues and 10 normal brain tissues, were examined by immunohistochemistry, and the results showed that the rate of positive expression of EGFRvIII in the glioma tissues was 41.82%, and 0.00% in normal brain tissues. Besides, the physiochemical properties of QD-Apt nanoparticles (NPs were thoroughly characterized. Biocompatibility of the NPs was evaluated, and the results suggested that the QD-Apt was nontoxic in vivo and vitro. Furthermore, the use of the QD-Apt in labeling

  8. Molecular Diagnostics of Gliomas Using Next Generation Sequencing of a Glioma-Tailored Gene Panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacher, Angela; Kaulich, Kerstin; Stepanow, Stefanie; Wolter, Marietta; Köhrer, Karl; Felsberg, Jörg; Malzkorn, Bastian; Reifenberger, Guido

    2017-03-01

    Current classification of gliomas is based on histological criteria according to the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumors of the central nervous system. Over the past years, characteristic genetic profiles have been identified in various glioma types. These can refine tumor diagnostics and provide important prognostic and predictive information. We report on the establishment and validation of gene panel next generation sequencing (NGS) for the molecular diagnostics of gliomas. We designed a glioma-tailored gene panel covering 660 amplicons derived from 20 genes frequently aberrant in different glioma types. Sensitivity and specificity of glioma gene panel NGS for detection of DNA sequence variants and copy number changes were validated by single gene analyses. NGS-based mutation detection was optimized for application on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue specimens including small stereotactic biopsy samples. NGS data obtained in a retrospective analysis of 121 gliomas allowed for their molecular classification into distinct biological groups, including (i) isocitrate dehydrogenase gene (IDH) 1 or 2 mutant astrocytic gliomas with frequent α-thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked (ATRX) and tumor protein p53 (TP53) gene mutations, (ii) IDH mutant oligodendroglial tumors with 1p/19q codeletion, telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter mutation and frequent Drosophila homolog of capicua (CIC) gene mutation, as well as (iii) IDH wildtype glioblastomas with frequent TERT promoter mutation, phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) mutation and/or epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) amplification. Oligoastrocytic gliomas were genetically assigned to either of these groups. Our findings implicate gene panel NGS as a promising diagnostic technique that may facilitate integrated histological and molecular glioma classification. © 2016 International Society of Neuropathology.

  9. The indolinone MAZ51 induces cell rounding and G2/M cell cycle arrest in glioma cells without the inhibition of VEGFR-3 phosphorylation: involvement of the RhoA and Akt/GSK3β signaling pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joo-Hee Park

    Full Text Available MAZ51 is an indolinone-based molecule originally synthesized as a selective inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR-3 tyrosine kinase. This study shows that exposure of two glioma cell lines, rat C6 and human U251MG, to MAZ51 caused dramatic shape changes, including the retraction of cellular protrusions and cell rounding. These changes were caused by the clustering and aggregation of actin filaments and microtubules. MAZ51 also induced G2/M phase cell cycle arrest. This led to an inhibition of cellular proliferation, without triggering significant cell death. These alterations induced by MAZ51 occurred with similar dose- and time-dependent patterns. Treatment of glioma cells with MAZ51 resulted in increased levels of phosphorylated GSK3β through the activation of Akt, as well as increased levels of active RhoA. Interestingly, MAZ51 did not affect the morphology and cell cycle patterns of rat primary cortical astrocytes, suggesting it selectively targeted transformed cells. Immunoprecipitation-western blot analyses indicated that MAZ51 did not decrease, but rather increased, tyrosine phosphorylation of VEGFR-3. To confirm this unanticipated result, several additional experiments were conducted. Enhancing VEGFR-3 phosphorylation by treatment of glioma cells with VEGF-C affected neither cytoskeleton arrangements nor cell cycle patterns. In addition, the knockdown of VEGFR-3 in glioma cells did not cause morphological or cytoskeletal alterations. Furthermore, treatment of VEGFR-3-silenced cells with MAZ51 caused the same alterations of cell shape and cytoskeletal arrangements as that observed in control cells. These data indicate that MAZ51 causes cytoskeletal alterations and G2/M cell cycle arrest in glioma cells. These effects are mediated through phosphorylation of Akt/GSK3β and activation of RhoA. The anti-proliferative activity of MAZ51 does not require the inhibition of VEGFR-3 phosphorylation, suggesting that it is

  10. EG-03EXPRESSION OF PRMT5 CORRELATES WITH MALIGNANT GRADE IN GLIOMAS AND PLAYS A PIVOTAL ROLE IN TUMOR GROWTH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiaosi; Li, Rong; Zhang, Wenbin; Yang, Xiuhua; Fathallah-Shaykh, Hassan; Gillespie, Yancey; Nabors, Burt

    2014-01-01

    Protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) catalyzes the formation of ω-NG,N′G-symmetric dimethylarginine residues on histones as well as other proteins. The modification play an important role in cell differentiation and tumor cell growth. However, the role of PRMT5 in human glioma cells has not been characterized. In this study, we assessed protein expression profiles of PRMT5 in control brain, WHO grade II astrocytomas, anaplastic astrocytomas, and glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) by immunohistochemistry. PRMT5 was low in glial cells in control brain tissues and low grade astrocytomas. Its expression increased in parallel with malignant progression, and was highly expressed in GBM. Knockdown of PRMT5 by small hairpin RNA caused alterations of p-ERK1/2 and significantly repressed the clonogenic potential and viability of glioma cells. These findings indicate that PRMT5 is a marker of malignant progression in glioma tumors and plays a pivotal role in tumor growth.

  11. Arctigenin, a natural lignan compound, induces G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human glioma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maimaitili, Aisha; Shu, Zunhua; Cheng, Xiaojiang; Kaheerman, Kadeer; Sikandeer, Alifu; Li, Weimin

    2017-02-01

    The aim of the current study was to investigate the anticancer potential of arctigenin, a natural lignan compound, in malignant gliomas. The U87MG and T98G human glioma cell lines were treated with various concentrations of arctigenin for 48 h and the effects of arctigenin on the aggressive phenotypes of glioma cells were assessed. The results demonstrated that arctigenin dose-dependently inhibited the growth of U87MG and T98G cells, as determined using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and bromodeoxyuridine incorporation assays. Arctigenin exposure also induced a 60-75% reduction in colony formation compared with vehicle-treated control cells. However, arctigenin was not observed to affect the invasiveness of glioma cells. Arctigenin significantly increased the proportion of cells in the G 0 /G 1 phase and reduced the number of cells in the S phase, as compared with the control group (Parctigenin increased the expression levels of p21, retinoblastoma and p53 proteins, and significantly decreased the expression levels of cyclin D1 and cyclin-dependent kinase 4 proteins. Additionally, arctigenin was able to induce apoptosis in glioma cells, coupled with increased expression levels of cleaved caspase-3 and the pro-apoptotic BCL2-associated X protein. Furthermore, arctigenin-induced apoptosis was significantly suppressed by the pretreatment of cells with Z-DEVD-FMK, a caspase-3 inhibitor. In conclusion, the results suggest that arctigenin is able to inhibit cell proliferation and may induce apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at the G 0 /G 1 phase in glioma cells. These results warrant further investigation of the anticancer effects of arctigenin in animal models of gliomas.

  12. MicroRNAs let-7b/i suppress human glioma cell invasion and migration by targeting IKBKE directly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Yuan; Hao, Shaobo [Department of Neurosurgery, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin 300052 (China); Laboratory of Neuro-Oncology, Tianjin Neurological Institute, Tianjin 300052 (China); Key Laboratory of Neurotrauma, Variation and Regeneration, Ministry of Education and Tianjin Municipal Government (China); Ye, Minhua [Department of Neurosurgery, Second Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi Province 330006 (China); Zhang, Anling [Laboratory of Neuro-Oncology, Tianjin Neurological Institute, Tianjin 300052 (China); Key Laboratory of Neurotrauma, Variation and Regeneration, Ministry of Education and Tianjin Municipal Government (China); Nan, Yang [Department of Neurosurgery, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin 300052 (China); Wang, Guangxiu; Jia, Zhifan [Laboratory of Neuro-Oncology, Tianjin Neurological Institute, Tianjin 300052 (China); Key Laboratory of Neurotrauma, Variation and Regeneration, Ministry of Education and Tianjin Municipal Government (China); Yu, Kai; Guo, Lianmei [Department of Neurosurgery, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin 300052 (China); Pu, Peiyu [Laboratory of Neuro-Oncology, Tianjin Neurological Institute, Tianjin 300052 (China); Key Laboratory of Neurotrauma, Variation and Regeneration, Ministry of Education and Tianjin Municipal Government (China); Huang, Qiang, E-mail: huangqiang209@163.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin 300052 (China); Zhong, Yue, E-mail: zhongyue2457@sina.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin 300052 (China)

    2015-03-06

    We demonstrated that IKBKE is overexpressed in human gliomas and that the downregulation of IKBKE markedly inhibits the proliferative and invasive abilities of glioma cells, which is consistent with the results reported by several different research groups. Therefore, IKBKE represents a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of glioma. In the present study, we verified that the microRNAs let-7b and let-7i target IKBKE through luciferase assays and found that let-7b/i mimics can knock down IKBKE and upregulate E-cadherin through western blot analysis. Moreover, the expression levels of let-7b/i were significantly lower in glioma cell lines than that in normal brain tissues, as determined by quantitative real-time PCR. Furthermore, let-7b/i inhibit the invasion and migration of glioma cells, as determined through wound healing and Transwell assays. The above-mentioned data suggest that let-7b/i inhibit the invasive ability of glioma cells by directly downregulating IKBKE and indirectly upregulating E-cadherin. - Highlights: • Let-7b and let-7i are downregulated in glioma cell lines. • IKBKE is a target gene of let-7b/i. • Let-7b/i inhibit the invasion and migration of glioma cells. • Let-7b/i upregulate E-cadherin by downregulating IKBKE.

  13. MicroRNAs let-7b/i suppress human glioma cell invasion and migration by targeting IKBKE directly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, Yuan; Hao, Shaobo; Ye, Minhua; Zhang, Anling; Nan, Yang; Wang, Guangxiu; Jia, Zhifan; Yu, Kai; Guo, Lianmei; Pu, Peiyu; Huang, Qiang; Zhong, Yue

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrated that IKBKE is overexpressed in human gliomas and that the downregulation of IKBKE markedly inhibits the proliferative and invasive abilities of glioma cells, which is consistent with the results reported by several different research groups. Therefore, IKBKE represents a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of glioma. In the present study, we verified that the microRNAs let-7b and let-7i target IKBKE through luciferase assays and found that let-7b/i mimics can knock down IKBKE and upregulate E-cadherin through western blot analysis. Moreover, the expression levels of let-7b/i were significantly lower in glioma cell lines than that in normal brain tissues, as determined by quantitative real-time PCR. Furthermore, let-7b/i inhibit the invasion and migration of glioma cells, as determined through wound healing and Transwell assays. The above-mentioned data suggest that let-7b/i inhibit the invasive ability of glioma cells by directly downregulating IKBKE and indirectly upregulating E-cadherin. - Highlights: • Let-7b and let-7i are downregulated in glioma cell lines. • IKBKE is a target gene of let-7b/i. • Let-7b/i inhibit the invasion and migration of glioma cells. • Let-7b/i upregulate E-cadherin by downregulating IKBKE

  14. Roles of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptors in malignant behavior of glioma cells. Differential effects of S1P2 on cell migration and invasiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, Nicholas; Van Brocklyn, James R.

    2007-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive lipid that signals through a family of five G-protein-coupled receptors, termed S1P 1-5 . S1P stimulates growth and invasiveness of glioma cells, and high expression levels of the enzyme that forms S1P, sphingosine kinase-1, correlate with short survival of glioma patients. In this study we examined the mechanism of S1P stimulation of glioma cell proliferation and invasion by either overexpressing or knocking down, by RNA interference, S1P receptor expression in glioma cell lines. S1P 1 , S1P 2 and S1P 3 all contribute positively to S1P-stimulated glioma cell proliferation, with S1P 1 being the major contributor. Stimulation of glioma cell proliferation by these receptors correlated with activation of ERK MAP kinase. S1P 5 blocks glioma cell proliferation, and inhibits ERK activation. S1P 1 and S1P 3 enhance glioma cell migration and invasion. S1P 2 inhibits migration through Rho activation, Rho kinase signaling and stress fiber formation, but unexpectedly, enhances glioma cell invasiveness by stimulating cell adhesion. S1P 2 also potently enhances expression of the matricellular protein CCN1/Cyr61, which has been implicated in tumor cell adhesion, and invasion as well as tumor angiogenesis. A neutralizing antibody to CCN1 blocked S1P 2 -stimulated glioma invasion. Thus, while S1P 2 decreases glioma cell motility, it may enhance invasion through induction of proteins that modulate glioma cell interaction with the extracellular matrix

  15. Ibuprofen and Diclofenac Restrict Migration and Proliferation of Human Glioma Cells by Distinct Molecular Mechanisms

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    Leidgens, Verena; Seliger, Corinna; Jachnik, Birgit; Welz, Tobias; Leukel, Petra; Vollmann-Zwerenz, Arabel; Bogdahn, Ulrich; Kreutz, Marina; Grauer, Oliver M.; Hau, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been associated with anti-tumorigenic effects in different tumor entities. For glioma, research has generally focused on diclofenac; however data on other NSAIDs, such as ibuprofen, is limited. Therefore, we performed a comprehensive investigation of the cellular, molecular, and metabolic effects of ibuprofen and diclofenac on human glioblastoma cells. Methods Glioma cell lines were treated with ibuprofen or diclofenac to investigate functional effects on proliferation and cell motility. Cell cycle, extracellular lactate levels, lactate dehydrogenase-A (LDH-A) expression and activity, as well as inhibition of the Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT-3) signaling pathway, were determined. Specific effects of diclofenac and ibuprofen on STAT-3 were investigated by comparing their effects with those of the specific STAT-3 inhibitor STATTIC. Results Ibuprofen treatment led to a stronger inhibition of cell growth and migration than treatment with diclofenac. Proliferation was affected by cell cycle arrest at different checkpoints by both agents. In addition, diclofenac, but not ibuprofen, decreased lactate levels in all concentrations used. Both decreased STAT-3 phosphorylation; however, diclofenac led to decreased c-myc expression and subsequent reduction in LDH-A activity, whereas treatment with ibuprofen in higher doses induced c-myc expression and less LDH-A alteration. Conclusions This study indicates that both ibuprofen and diclofenac strongly inhibit glioma cells, but the subsequent metabolic responses of both agents are distinct. We postulate that ibuprofen may inhibit tumor cells also by COX- and lactate-independent mechanisms after long-term treatment in physiological dosages, whereas diclofenac mainly acts by inhibition of STAT-3 signaling and downstream modulation of glycolysis. PMID:26485029

  16. MicroRNA-145 is downregulated in glial tumors and regulates glioma cell migration by targeting connective tissue growth factor.

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    Lee, Hae Kyung; Bier, Ariel; Cazacu, Simona; Finniss, Susan; Xiang, Cunli; Twito, Hodaya; Poisson, Laila M; Mikkelsen, Tom; Slavin, Shimon; Jacoby, Elad; Yalon, Michal; Toren, Amos; Rempel, Sandra A; Brodie, Chaya

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastomas (GBM), the most common and aggressive type of malignant glioma, are characterized by increased invasion into the surrounding brain tissues. Despite intensive therapeutic strategies, the median survival of GBM patients has remained dismal over the last decades. In this study we examined the expression of miR-145 in glial tumors and its function in glioma cells. Using TCGA analysis and real-time PCR we found that the expression of miR-145/143 cluster was downregulated in astrocytic tumors compared to normal brain specimens and in glioma cells and glioma stem cells (GSCs) compared to normal astrocytes and neural stem cells. Moreover, the low expression of both miR-145 and miR-143 in GBM was correlated with poor patient prognosis. Transfection of glioma cells with miR-145 mimic or transduction with a lentivirus vector expressing pre-miR 145 significantly decreased the migration and invasion of glioma cells. We identified connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) as a novel target of miR-145 in glioma cells; transfection of the cells with this miRNA decreased the expression of CTGF as determined by Western blot analysis and the expression of its 3'-UTR fused to luciferase. Overexpression of a CTGF plasmid lacking the 3'-UTR and administration of recombinant CTGF protein abrogated the inhibitory effect of miR-145 on glioma cell migration. Similarly, we found that silencing of CTGF decreased the migration of glioma cells. CTGF silencing also decreased the expression of SPARC, phospho-FAK and FAK and overexpression of SPARC abrogated the inhibitory effect of CTGF silencing on cell migration. These results demonstrate that miR-145 is downregulated in glial tumors and its low expression in GBM predicts poor patient prognosis. In addition miR-145 regulates glioma cell migration by targeting CTGF which downregulates SPARC expression. Therefore, miR-145 is an attractive therapeutic target for anti-invasive treatment of astrocytic tumors.

  17. MicroRNA-145 is downregulated in glial tumors and regulates glioma cell migration by targeting connective tissue growth factor.

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    Hae Kyung Lee

    Full Text Available Glioblastomas (GBM, the most common and aggressive type of malignant glioma, are characterized by increased invasion into the surrounding brain tissues. Despite intensive therapeutic strategies, the median survival of GBM patients has remained dismal over the last decades. In this study we examined the expression of miR-145 in glial tumors and its function in glioma cells. Using TCGA analysis and real-time PCR we found that the expression of miR-145/143 cluster was downregulated in astrocytic tumors compared to normal brain specimens and in glioma cells and glioma stem cells (GSCs compared to normal astrocytes and neural stem cells. Moreover, the low expression of both miR-145 and miR-143 in GBM was correlated with poor patient prognosis. Transfection of glioma cells with miR-145 mimic or transduction with a lentivirus vector expressing pre-miR 145 significantly decreased the migration and invasion of glioma cells. We identified connective tissue growth factor (CTGF as a novel target of miR-145 in glioma cells; transfection of the cells with this miRNA decreased the expression of CTGF as determined by Western blot analysis and the expression of its 3'-UTR fused to luciferase. Overexpression of a CTGF plasmid lacking the 3'-UTR and administration of recombinant CTGF protein abrogated the inhibitory effect of miR-145 on glioma cell migration. Similarly, we found that silencing of CTGF decreased the migration of glioma cells. CTGF silencing also decreased the expression of SPARC, phospho-FAK and FAK and overexpression of SPARC abrogated the inhibitory effect of CTGF silencing on cell migration. These results demonstrate that miR-145 is downregulated in glial tumors and its low expression in GBM predicts poor patient prognosis. In addition miR-145 regulates glioma cell migration by targeting CTGF which downregulates SPARC expression. Therefore, miR-145 is an attractive therapeutic target for anti-invasive treatment of astrocytic tumors.

  18. The immunohistochemical expression of calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CRLR) in human gliomas.

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    Benes, L; Kappus, C; McGregor, G P; Bertalanffy, H; Mennel, H D; Hagner, S

    2004-02-01

    Gliomas are the most common primary tumours of the central nervous system and exhibit rapid growth that is associated with neovascularisation. Adrenomedullin is an important tumour survival factor in human carcinogenesis. It has growth promoting effects on gliomas, and blockade of its actions has been experimentally shown to reduce the growth of glioma tissues and cell lines. There is some evidence that the calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CRLR) mediates the tumorigenic actions of adrenomedullin. To determine whether CRLR is expressed in human gliomas and the probable cellular targets of adrenomedullin. Biopsies from 95 human gliomas of varying grade were processed for immunohistochemical analysis using a previously developed and characterised antibody to CRLR. All tumour specimens were positive for CRLR. As previously found in normal peripheral tissues, CRLR immunostaining was particularly intense in the endothelial cells. This was evident in all the various vascular conformations that were observed, and which are typical of gliomas. In addition, clear immunostaining of tumour cells with astrocyte morphology was observed. These were preferentially localised around vessels. This study has shown for the first time that the CRLR protein is present in human glioma tissue. The expression of the receptor in endothelial cells and in astrocytic tumour cells is consistent with the evidence that its endogenous ligand, adrenomedullin, may influence glioma growth by means of both direct mitogenic and indirect angiogenic effects. CRLR may be a valuable target for effective therapeutic intervention in these malignant tumours.

  19. Demethoxycurcumin Retards Cell Growth and Induces Apoptosis in Human Brain Malignant Glioma GBM 8401 Cells

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    Tzuu-Yuan Huang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Demethoxycurcumin (DMC; a curcumin-related demethoxy compound has been recently shown to display antioxidant and antitumor activities. It has also produced a potent chemopreventive action against cancer. In the present study, the antiproliferation (using the MTT assay, DMC was found to have cytotoxic activities against GBM 8401 cell with IC50 values at 22.71 μM and induced apoptosis effects of DMC have been investigated in human brain malignant glioma GBM 8401 cells. We have studied the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP, DNA fragmentation, caspase activation, and NF-κB transcriptional factor activity. By these approaches, our results indicated that DMC has produced an inhibition of cell proliferation as well as the activation of apoptosis in GBM 8401 cells. Both effects were observed to increase in proportion with the dosage of DMC treatment, and the apoptosis was induced by DMC in human brain malignant glioma GBM 8401 cells via mitochondria- and caspase-dependent pathways.

  20. Discovery of Power-Law Growth in the Self-Renewal of Heterogeneous Glioma Stem Cell Populations.

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    Michiya Sugimori

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence indicates that cancer stem cells (CSCs drive tumorigenesis. This suggests that CSCs should make ideal therapeutic targets. However, because CSC populations in tumors appear heterogeneous, it remains unclear how CSCs might be effectively targeted. To investigate the mechanisms by which CSC populations maintain heterogeneity during self-renewal, we established a glioma sphere (GS forming model, to generate a population in which glioma stem cells (GSCs become enriched. We hypothesized, based on the clonal evolution concept, that with each passage in culture, heterogeneous clonal sublines of GSs are generated that progressively show increased proliferative ability.To test this hypothesis, we determined whether, with each passage, glioma neurosphere culture generated from four different glioma cell lines become progressively proliferative (i.e., enriched in large spheres. Rather than monitoring self-renewal, we measured heterogeneity based on neurosphere clone sizes (#cells/clone. Log-log plots of distributions of clone sizes yielded a good fit (r>0.90 to a straight line (log(% total clones = k*log(#cells/clone indicating that the system follows a power-law (y = xk with a specific degree exponent (k = -1.42. Repeated passaging of the total GS population showed that the same power-law was maintained over six passages (CV = -1.01 to -1.17. Surprisingly, passage of either isolated small or large subclones generated fully heterogeneous populations that retained the original power-law-dependent heterogeneity. The anti-GSC agent Temozolomide, which is well known as a standard therapy for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, suppressed the self-renewal of clones, but it never disrupted the power-law behavior of a GS population.Although the data above did not support the stated hypothesis, they did strongly suggest a novel mechanism that underlies CSC heterogeneity. They indicate that power-law growth governs the self-renewal of heterogeneous

  1. The D Domain of LRRC4 anchors ERK1/2 in the cytoplasm and competitively inhibits MEK/ERK activation in glioma cells

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    Zeyou Wang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As a well-characterized key player in various signal transduction networks, extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2 has been widely implicated in the development of many malignancies. We previously found that Leucine-rich repeat containing 4 (LRRC4 was a tumor suppressor and a negative regulator of the ERK/MAPK pathway in glioma tumorigenesis. However, the precise molecular role of LRRC4 in ERK signal transmission is unclear. Methods The interaction between LRRC4 and ERK1/2 was assessed by co-immunoprecipitation and GST pull-down assays in vivo and in vitro. We also investigated the interaction of LRRC4 and ERK1/2 and the role of the D domain in ERK activation in glioma cells. Results Here, we showed that LRRC4 and ERK1/2 interact via the D domain and CD domain, respectively. Following EGF stimuli, the D domain of LRRC4 anchors ERK1/2 in the cytoplasm and abrogates ERK1/2 activation and nuclear translocation. In glioblastoma cells, ectopic LRRC4 expression competitively inhibited the interaction of endogenous mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK and ERK1/2. Mutation of the D domain decreased the LRRC4-mediated inhibition of MAPK signaling and its anti-proliferation and anti-invasion roles. Conclusions Our results demonstrated that the D domain of LRRC4 anchors ERK1/2 in the cytoplasm and competitively inhibits MEK/ERK activation in glioma cells. These findings identify a new mechanism underlying glioblastoma progression and suggest a novel therapeutic strategy by restoring the activity of LRRC4 to decrease MAPK cascade activation.

  2. Angiogenesis in gliomas.

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    Elzbieta Czykier

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Brain gliomas are characterized by invasive growth and neovascularisation potential. Angiogenesis plays a major role in the progression of gliomas and its determination has a great prognostic value. The aim of the study was to assess the vascularisation of chosen brain gliomas and to estimate how it is correlated with tumour histological type, malignancy grade, location and size, and with age and sex of patients. Tumour vascularisation analysis was based on the determination of microvascular proliferation (MVP and microvessel density (MVD. Microvascular proliferation was measured with immunohistochemical methods using mouse monoclonal antibodies to detect cell proliferation antigens. The following antibodies were used Ki-67 and PCNA (DAKO. Identification of vessels was performed by CD31 antibody and anti-human von Willebrand factor (DAKO. The highest microvascular proliferation and microvascular density were observed in multiform glioblastomas and the lowest in oligodendrogliomas. Significant correlation was observed between the vascularisation and malignancy grade.

  3. Effect of brain- and tumor-derived connective tissue growth factor on glioma invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Lincoln A; Woolard, Kevin; Son, Myung Jin; Li, Aiguo; Lee, Jeongwu; Ene, Chibawanye; Mantey, Samuel A; Maric, Dragan; Song, Hua; Belova, Galina; Jensen, Robert T; Zhang, Wei; Fine, Howard A

    2011-08-03

    Tumor cell invasion is the principal cause of treatment failure and death among patients with malignant gliomas. Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) has been previously implicated in cancer metastasis and invasion in various tumors. We explored the mechanism of CTGF-mediated glioma cell infiltration and examined potential therapeutic targets. Highly infiltrative patient-derived glioma tumor-initiating or tumor stem cells (TIC/TSCs) were harvested and used to explore a CTGF-induced signal transduction pathway via luciferase reporter assays, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), real-time polymerase chain reaction, and immunoblotting. Treatment of TIC/TSCs with small-molecule inhibitors targeting integrin β1 (ITGB1) and the tyrosine kinase receptor type A (TrkA), and short hairpin RNAs targeting CTGF directly were used to reduce the levels of key protein components of CTGF-induced cancer infiltration. TIC/TSC infiltration was examined in real-time cell migration and invasion assays in vitro and by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization in TIC/TSC orthotopic xenograft mouse models (n = 30; six mice per group). All statistical tests were two-sided. Treatment of TIC/TSCs with CTGF resulted in CTGF binding to ITGB1-TrkA receptor complexes and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) transcriptional activation as measured by luciferase reporter assays (mean relative luciferase activity, untreated vs CTGF(200 ng/mL): 0.53 vs 1.87, difference = 1.34, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.69 to 2, P < .001). NF-κB activation resulted in binding of ZEB-1 to the E-cadherin promoter as demonstrated by ChIP analysis with subsequent E-cadherin suppression (fold increase in ZEB-1 binding to the E-cadherin promoter region: untreated + ZEB-1 antibody vs CTGF(200 ng/mL) + ZEB-1 antibody: 1.5 vs 6.4, difference = 4.9, 95% CI = 4.8 to 5.0, P < .001). Immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization revealed that TrkA is selectively expressed in the most infiltrative glioma cells in situ

  4. Enhancement of Temozolomide and radiation induced damage in malignant glioma cell lines by 2-deoxy-D-glucose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumari, Kalyani; Shyam, Sai; Chandrasekhar Sagar, B.K.; Jagath Lal, G.; Kalia, Vijay Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Malignant Gliomas are the most common and aggressive CNS tumors. The current standard treatment includes surgery, followed by Temozolomide (TMZ)-Radiotherapy. It leads to increased survival as compared to radiotherapy alone. However hematological toxicities are also increased by the combination treatments. Therefore, it is important to carry out further preclinical studies, to develop more effective treatment for these tumors. 2-deoxy-D-Glucose (2-DG), an inhibitor of glycolytic energy metabolism, has been shown earlier to differentially inhibit growth and survival of tumor cells in vitro. It also increases tumor regression in experimental models; and has been used in a few clinical studies as radiosensitizer. In the present study, effects of combining 2-DG with TMZ on radiation induced damage were studied in established malignant glioma cell lines (U251MG and U87MG); and primary cultures derived from malignant glioma biopsies. Exponentially growing cells were exposed to drugs and radiation. Drugs were removed 4 hours later and cultures were processed further for different assays of damage. Effects on proliferation response, viability and total cellular damage (TCD; micronuclei + apoptosis) were studied after post-treatment growth for 1, 2, 4 or 6 days. Our results showed that combination of 2-DG with TMZ ± Radiation significantly inhibited tumor cell proliferation up to 6 days, at low drug concentrations in primary as well as in established cell lines. The TCD at 24 and 48 hours after Gamma irradiation was also significantly increased by the combination of drugs as compared to individual treatments. Experiments to study proliferation kinetics by flow cytometry and cell survival are in progress. These studies suggest that 2-DG significantly enhances the cytotoxic effect of TMZ + radiation without increasing toxic side effects. Therefore, combining 2-DG with TMZ+ radiation therapy could be a potential strategy to improve the therapeutic outcome for Malignant

  5. A new anti-glioma therapy, AG119: pre-clinical assessment in a mouse GL261 glioma model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Towner, Rheal A.; Ihnat, Michael; Saunders, Debra; Bastian, Anja; Smith, Nataliya; Pavana, Roheeth Kumar; Gangjee, Aleem

    2015-01-01

    High grade gliomas (HGGs; grades III and IV) are the most common primary brain tumors in adults, and their malignant nature ranks them fourth in incidence of cancer death. Standard treatment for glioblastomas (GBM), involving surgical resection followed by radiation and chemotherapy with temozolomide (TMZ) and the anti-angiogenic therapy bevacizumab, have not substantially improved overall survival. New therapeutic agents are desperately needed for this devastating disease. Here we study the potential therapeutic agent AG119 in a pre-clinical model for gliomas. AG119 possesses both anti-angiogenic (RTK inhibition) and antimicrotubule cytotoxic activity in a single molecule. GL261 glioma-bearing mice were either treated with AG119, anti-VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) antibody, anti c-Met antibody or TMZ, and compared to untreated tumor-bearing mice. Animal survival was assessed, and tumor volumes and vascular alterations were monitored with morphological magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and perfusion-weighted imaging, respectively. Percent survival of GL261 HGG-bearing mice treated with AG119 was significantly higher (p < 0.001) compared to untreated tumors. Tumor volumes (21–31 days following intracerebral implantation of GL261 cells) were found to be significantly lower for AG119 (p < 0.001), anti-VEGF (p < 0.05) and anti-c-Met (p < 0.001) antibody treatments, and TMZ-treated (p < 0.05) mice, compared to untreated controls. Perfusion data indicated that both AG119 and TMZ were able to reduce the effect of decreasing perfusion rates significantly (p < 0.05 for both), when compared to untreated tumors. It was also found that IC 50 values for AG119 were much lower than those for TMZ in T98G and U251 cells. These data support further exploration of the anticancer activity AG119 in HGG, as this compound was able to increase animal survival and decrease tumor volumes in a mouse GL261 glioma model, and that AG119 is also not subject to methyl guanine

  6. [Overexpressed miRNA-134b inhibits proliferation and invasion of CD133+ U87 glioma stem cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yifeng; Zhang, Baochao; Wen, Changming; Wen, Gongling; Zhou, Guoping; Zhang, Jingwei; He, Haifa; Wang, Ning; Li, Wei

    2017-05-01

    Objective To investigate the role of microRNA-134b (miR-134b) in the tumorigenesis of glioma stem cells (GSCs) and the possible molecular mechanism. Methods Real-time quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) was used to evalate the expression of miR-134b in CD133 + and CD133 - U87 GSCs. A lentiviral vector overexpressing miR-134b in U87 GSCs was constructed, and the effect of miR-134b overexpression on matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), MMP-9 and MMP-12 expressions at both mRNA and protein levels were detected by qRT-PCR and Western blotting, respectively. Transwell TM assay was performed to determine the effect of miR-134b overexpression on GSCs invasion ability. Tumor xenograft models in nude mice were established to evaluate the effect of miR-134b overexpression on tumorgenesis in vivo. Results The qRT-PCR showed that, compared with CD133 - cells, miR-134b was significantly down-regulated in CD133 + cells. Cell line over-expressing miR-134b was successfully established, and miR-134b was up-regulated significantly compared with empty vector control. Overexpression of miR-134b remarkably inhibited the invasion of U87 GSCs and the expression of MMP-12. However, overexpression of miR-134b did not affect MMP-2 and MMP-9 expressions. miR-134b also suppressed U87 GSCs xenograft growth in vivo. Tumor volume in tumor xenograft model group was significantly lower than that in control group, and tumor weight decreased by 42% in the former group. Conclusion Overexpression of miR-134b inhibits the growth and invasion of CD133 + GSCs.

  7. Glioma cell fate decisions mediated by Dll1-Jag1-Fringe in Notch1 signaling pathway.

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    Shi, Xiaofei; Wang, Ruiqi

    2017-09-21

    The Notch family of proteins plays a vital role in determining cell fates, such as proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. It has been shown that Notch1 and its ligands, Dll1 and Jag1, are overexpressed in many glioma cell lines and primary human gliomas. The roles of Notch1 in some cancers have been firmly established, and recent data implicate that it plays important roles in glioma cell fate decisions. This paper focuses on devising a specific theoretical framework that incorporates Dll1, Jag1, and Fringe in Notch1 signaling pathway to explore their functional roles of these proteins in glioma cells in the tumorigenesis and progression of human gliomas, and to study how glioma cell fate decisions are modulated by both trans-activation and cis-inhibition. This paper presents a computational model for Notch1 signaling pathway in glioma cells. Based on the bifurcation analysis of the model, we show that how the glioma cell fate decisions are modulated by both trans-activation and cis-inhibition mediated by the Fringe protein, providing insight into the design and control principles of the Notch signaling system and the gliomas. This paper presents a computational model for Notch1 signaling pathway in glioma cells based on intertwined dynamics with cis-inhibition and trans-activation involving the proteins Notch1, Dll1, Jag1, and Fringe. The results show that how the glioma cell fate transitions are performed by the Notch1 signaling. Transition from grade III ∼ IV with significantly high Notch1 to grade I ∼ II with high Notch1, and then to normal cells by repressing the Fringe levels or decreasing the strength of enhancement induced by Fringe.

  8. Glioma cells on the run – the migratory transcriptome of 10 human glioma cell lines

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    Holz David

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most common primary intracranial tumor and despite recent advances in treatment regimens, prognosis for affected patients remains poor. Active cell migration and invasion of GBM cells ultimately lead to ubiquitous tumor recurrence and patient death. To further understand the genetic mechanisms underlying the ability of glioma cells to migrate, we compared the matched transcriptional profiles of migratory and stationary populations of human glioma cells. Using a monolayer radial migration assay, motile and stationary cell populations from seven human long term glioma cell lines and three primary GBM cultures were isolated and prepared for expression analysis. Results Gene expression signatures of stationary and migratory populations across all cell lines were identified using a pattern recognition approach that integrates a priori knowledge with expression data. Principal component analysis (PCA revealed two discriminating patterns between migrating and stationary glioma cells: i global down-regulation and ii global up-regulation profiles that were used in a proband-based rule function implemented in GABRIEL to find subsets of genes having similar expression patterns. Genes with up-regulation pattern in migrating glioma cells were found to be overexpressed in 75% of human GBM biopsy specimens compared to normal brain. A 22 gene signature capable of classifying glioma cultures based on their migration rate was developed. Fidelity of this discovery algorithm was assessed by validation of the invasion candidate gene, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF. siRNA mediated knockdown yielded reduced in vitro migration and ex vivo invasion; immunohistochemistry on glioma invasion tissue microarray confirmed up-regulation of CTGF in invasive glioma cells. Conclusion Gene expression profiling of migratory glioma cells induced to disperse in vitro affords discovery of genomic signatures; selected

  9. PTEN-induction in U251 glioma cells decreases the expression of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levitt, Randy J.; Georgescu, Maria-Magdalena; Pollak, Michael

    2005-01-01

    PTEN is a tumor suppressor gene whose loss of function is observed in ∼40-50% of human cancers. Although insulin-like growth factor binding protein-2 (IGFBP-2) was classically described as a growth inhibitor, multiple recent reports have shown an association of overexpression and/or high serum levels of IGFBP-2 with poor prognosis of several malignancies, including gliomas. Using an inducible PTEN expression system in the PTEN-null glioma cell line U251, we demonstrate that PTEN-induction is associated with reduced proliferation, increased apoptosis, and a substantial reduction of the high levels of IGFBP-2 expression. The PTEN-induced decrease in IGFBP-2 expression could be mimicked with the PI3-kinase inhibitor LY294002, indicating that the lipid phosphatase activity of PTEN is responsible for the observed effect. However, the rapamycin analog CCI-779 did not affect IGFBP-2 expression, suggesting that the PTEN-induced decrease in IGFBP-2 expression is not attributable to decreased mTOR signalling. Recombinant human IGFBP-2 was unable to rescue U251-PTEN cells from the antiproliferative effects of PTEN, and IGFBP-2 siRNA did not affect the IGF-dependent or -independent growth of this cell line. These results suggest that the clinical data linking IGFBP-2 expression to poor prognosis may arise, at least in part, because high levels of IGFBP-2 expression correlate with loss of function of PTEN, which is well known to lead to aggressive behavior of gliomas. Our results motivate translational research regarding the relationship between IGFBP-2 expression and loss of function of PTEN

  10. USP1 targeting impedes GBM growth by inhibiting stem cell maintenance and radioresistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin-Ku; Chang, Nakho; Yoon, Yeup; Yang, Heekyoung; Cho, Heejin; Kim, Eunhee; Shin, Yongjae; Kang, Wonyoung; Oh, Young Taek; Mun, Gyeong In; Joo, Kyeung Min; Nam, Do-Hyun; Lee, Jeongwu

    2016-01-01

    Clinical benefits from standard therapies against glioblastoma (GBM) are limited in part due to intrinsic radio- and chemoresistance of GBM and inefficient targeting of GBM stem-like cells (GSCs). Novel therapeutic approaches that overcome treatment resistance and diminish stem-like properties of GBM are needed. We determined the expression levels of ubiquitination-specific proteases (USPs) by transcriptome analysis and found that USP1 is highly expressed in GBM. Using the patient GBM-derived primary tumor cells, we inhibited USP1 by shRNA-mediated knockdown or its specific inhibitor pimozide and evaluated the effects on stem cell marker expression, proliferation, and clonogenic growth of tumor cells. USP1 was highly expressed in gliomas relative to normal brain tissues and more preferentially in GSC enrichment marker (CD133 or CD15) positive cells. USP1 positively regulated the protein stability of the ID1 and CHEK1, critical regulators of DNA damage response and stem cell maintenance. Targeting USP1 by RNA interference or treatment with a chemical USP1 inhibitor attenuated clonogenic growth and survival of GSCs and enhanced radiosensitivity of GBM cells. Finally, USP1 inhibition alone or in combination with radiation significantly prolonged the survival of tumor-bearing mice. USP1-mediated protein stabilization promotes GSC maintenance and treatment resistance, thereby providing a rationale for USP1 inhibition as a potential therapeutic approach against GBM. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Low dose radiation enhance the anti-tumor effect of high dose radiation on human glioma cell U251

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Chang; Wang Guanjun; Tan Yehui; Jiang Hongyu; Li Wei

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To detect the effect on the growth of human glioma cell U251 induced by low dose irradiation and low dose irradiation combined with large dose irradiation. Methods: Human glioma cell line U251 and nude mice carried with human glioma were used. The tumor cells and the mice were treated with low dose, high dose, and low dose combined high dose radiation. Cells growth curve, MTT and flow cytometry were used to detect the proliferation, cell cycle and apoptosis of the cells; and the tumor inhibition rate was used to assess the growth of tumor in vivo. Results: After low dose irradiation, there was no difference between experimental group and control group in cell count, MTT and flow cytometry. Single high dose group and low dose combined high dose group both show significantly the suppressing effect on tumor cells, the apoptosis increased and there was cell cycle blocked in G 2 period, but there was no difference between two groups. In vivo apparent anti-tumor effect in high dose radiation group and the combining group was observed, and that was more significant in the combining group; the prior low dose radiation alleviated the injury of hematological system. There was no difference between single low dose radiation group and control. Conclusions: There is no significant effect on human glioma cell induced by low dose radiation, and low dose radiation could not induce adaptive response. But in vivo experience, low dose radiation could enhance the anti-tumor effect of high dose radiation and alleviated the injury of hematological system. (authors)

  12. Nimotuzumab enhances temozolomide?induced growth suppression of glioma cells expressing mutant EGFR in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Nitta, Yusuke; Shimizu, Saki; Shishido?Hara, Yukiko; Suzuki, Kaori; Shiokawa, Yoshiaki; Nagane, Motoo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A mutant form of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), EGFRvIII, is common in glioblastoma (GBM) and confers enhanced tumorigenic activity and drug resistance. Nimotuzumab, an anti?EGFR antibody, has shown preclinical and clinical activity to GBM, but its specific activity against EGFRvIII has not been fully investigated. Human glioma U87MG or LNZ308 cells overexpressing either wild?type (wt) EGFR or EGFRvIII were treated with nimotuzumab, temozolomide, or both. Expression and pho...

  13. Safety and Efficacy of Bevacizumab With Hypofractionated Stereotactic Irradiation for Recurrent Malignant Gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutin, Philip H.; Iwamoto, Fabio M.; Beal, Kathryn; Mohile, Nimish A.; Karimi, Sasan; Hou, Bob L.; Lymberis, Stella; Yamada, Yoshiya; Chang, Jenghwa

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Preclinical studies suggest that inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) improves glioma response to radiotherapy. Bevacizumab, a monoclonal antibody against VEGF, has shown promise in recurrent gliomas, but the safety and efficacy of concurrent bevacizumab with brain irradiation has not been extensively studied. The objectives of this study were to determine the safety and activity of this combination in malignant gliomas. Methods and Materials: After prior treatment with standard radiation therapy patients with recurrent glioblastoma (GBM) and anaplastic gliomas (AG) received bevacizumab (10 mg/kg intravenous) every 2 weeks of 28-day cycles until tumor progression. Patients also received 30 Gy of hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (HFSRT) in five fractions after the first cycle of bevacizumab. Results: Twenty-five patients (20 GBM, 5 AG; median age 56 years; median Karnofsky Performance Status 90) received a median of seven cycles of bevacizumab. One patient did not undergo HFSRT because overlap with prior radiotherapy would exceed the safe dose allowed to the optic chiasm. Three patients discontinued treatment because of Grade 3 central nervous system intratumoral hemorrhage, wound dehiscence, and bowel perforation. Other nonhematologic and hematologic toxicities were transient. No radiation necrosis was seen in these previously irradiated patients. For the GBM cohort, overall response rate was 50%, 6-month progression-free survival was 65%; median overall survival was 12.5 months, and 1-year survival was 54%. Discussion: Bevacizumab with HFSRT is safe and well tolerated. Radiographic responses, duration of disease control, and survival suggest that this regimen is active in recurrent malignant glioma.

  14. Neurotrophin Signaling via TrkB and TrkC Receptors Promotes the Growth of Brain Tumor-initiating Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawn, Samuel; Krishna, Niveditha; Pisklakova, Alexandra; Qu, Xiaotao; Fenstermacher, David A.; Fournier, Michelle; Vrionis, Frank D.; Tran, Nam; Chan, Jennifer A.; Kenchappa, Rajappa S.; Forsyth, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Neurotrophins and their receptors are frequently expressed in malignant gliomas, yet their functions are largely unknown. Previously, we have shown that p75 neurotrophin receptor is required for glioma invasion and proliferation. However, the role of Trk receptors has not been examined. In this study, we investigated the importance of TrkB and TrkC in survival of brain tumor-initiating cells (BTICs). Here, we show that human malignant glioma tissues and also tumor-initiating cells isolated from fresh human malignant gliomas express the neurotrophin receptors TrkB and TrkC, not TrkA, and they also express neurotrophins NGF, BDNF, and neurotrophin 3 (NT3). Specific activation of TrkB and TrkC receptors by ligands BDNF and NT3 enhances tumor-initiating cell viability through activation of ERK and Akt pathways. Conversely, TrkB and TrkC knockdown or pharmacologic inhibition of Trk signaling decreases neurotrophin-dependent ERK activation and BTIC growth. Further, pharmacological inhibition of both ERK and Akt pathways blocked BDNF, and NT3 stimulated BTIC survival. Importantly, attenuation of BTIC growth by EGFR inhibitors could be overcome by activation of neurotrophin signaling, and neurotrophin signaling is sufficient for long term BTIC growth as spheres in the absence of EGF and FGF. Our results highlight a novel role for neurotrophin signaling in brain tumor and suggest that Trks could be a target for combinatorial treatment of malignant glioma. PMID:25538243

  15. Neurotrophin signaling via TrkB and TrkC receptors promotes the growth of brain tumor-initiating cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawn, Samuel; Krishna, Niveditha; Pisklakova, Alexandra; Qu, Xiaotao; Fenstermacher, David A; Fournier, Michelle; Vrionis, Frank D; Tran, Nam; Chan, Jennifer A; Kenchappa, Rajappa S; Forsyth, Peter A

    2015-02-06

    Neurotrophins and their receptors are frequently expressed in malignant gliomas, yet their functions are largely unknown. Previously, we have shown that p75 neurotrophin receptor is required for glioma invasion and proliferation. However, the role of Trk receptors has not been examined. In this study, we investigated the importance of TrkB and TrkC in survival of brain tumor-initiating cells (BTICs). Here, we show that human malignant glioma tissues and also tumor-initiating cells isolated from fresh human malignant gliomas express the neurotrophin receptors TrkB and TrkC, not TrkA, and they also express neurotrophins NGF, BDNF, and neurotrophin 3 (NT3). Specific activation of TrkB and TrkC receptors by ligands BDNF and NT3 enhances tumor-initiating cell viability through activation of ERK and Akt pathways. Conversely, TrkB and TrkC knockdown or pharmacologic inhibition of Trk signaling decreases neurotrophin-dependent ERK activation and BTIC growth. Further, pharmacological inhibition of both ERK and Akt pathways blocked BDNF, and NT3 stimulated BTIC survival. Importantly, attenuation of BTIC growth by EGFR inhibitors could be overcome by activation of neurotrophin signaling, and neurotrophin signaling is sufficient for long term BTIC growth as spheres in the absence of EGF and FGF. Our results highlight a novel role for neurotrophin signaling in brain tumor and suggest that Trks could be a target for combinatorial treatment of malignant glioma. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. The effects of CD147 on the cell proliferation, apoptosis, invasion, and angiogenesis in glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Haoyuan; Shao, Ying; Chen, Xuan

    2017-01-01

    To analyze the effects of extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (CD147) on glioma proliferation, apoptosis, invasion, and angiogenesis. Tissue samples were obtained from 101 glioma cases while normal brain tissues were obtained from 30 brain injury cases. Immunohistochemical assay was performed to detect the expressions of CD147, CD34, and VEGF in tissue samples. QRT-PCR was performed to detect the relative expression of CD147 mRNA in human glioma cell lines. CD147 siRNA was transfected into glioma cell line U251. Cell proliferation, apoptosis, invasion, and angiogenesis were tested by MTT, flow cytometry, Transwell assay, and vasculogenic mimicry assay, respectively. Expressions of relative proteins were analyzed with western blot. CD147 was positively expressed with the percentage of 0, 37.5, 44.8, 67.9, and 85.7 % in normal tissues and glioma tissues with WHO grades I-IV, respectively, and the scores of MVDand VEGF were associated with the expression of CD147. CD147 was significantly upregulated in the human glioma cell lines (P CD147 suppressed cell proliferation, blocked cell cycle, induced apoptosis, inhibited cell invasion and angiogenesis in glioma cells in vitro. The expression of CD147 was significantly associated with WHO tumor grade and angiogenesis; silencing of CD147 contributed to inhibition of glioma proliferation, invasion, and angiogenesis. Our study provided firm evidence that CD 147 is a potential glioma target for anti-angiogenic therapies.

  17. The relationship between Cho/NAA and glioma metabolism: implementation for margin delineation of cerebral gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jun; Yao, Chengjun; Chen, Hong; Zhuang, Dongxiao; Tang, Weijun; Ren, Guang; Wang, Yin; Wu, Jinsong; Huang, Fengping; Zhou, Liangfu

    2012-08-01

    The marginal delineation of gliomas cannot be defined by conventional imaging due to their infiltrative growth pattern. Here we investigate the relationship between changes in glioma metabolism by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging ((1)H-MRSI) and histopathological findings in order to determine an optimal threshold value of choline/N-acetyl-aspartate (Cho/NAA) that can be used to define the extent of glioma spread. Eighteen patients with different grades of glioma were examined using (1)H-MRSI. Needle biopsies were performed under the guidance of neuronavigation prior to craniotomy. Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed to evaluate the accuracy of sampling. Haematoxylin and eosin, and immunohistochemical staining with IDH1, MIB-1, p53, CD34 and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) antibodies were performed on all samples. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine the relationship between Cho/NAA and MIB-1, p53, CD34, and the degree of tumour infiltration. The clinical threshold ratio distinguishing tumour tissue in high-grade (grades III and IV) glioma (HGG) and low-grade (grade II) glioma (LGG) was calculated. In HGG, higher Cho/NAA ratios were associated with a greater probability of higher MIB-1 counts, stronger CD34 expression, and tumour infiltration. Ratio threshold values of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 appeared to predict the specimens containing the tumour with respective probabilities of 0.38, 0.60, 0.79, 0.90 in HGG and 0.16, 0.39, 0.67, 0.87 in LGG. HGG and LGG exhibit different spectroscopic patterns. Using (1)H-MRSI to guide the extent of resection has the potential to improve the clinical outcome of glioma surgery.

  18. Targeting Pediatric Glioma with Apoptosis and Autophagy Manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    that chloroquine treatments give the most reliable inhibition of autophagy without being directly cytotoxic. Bafilomycin can continue to be used for...in pediatric glioma and its interaction with RTK inhibition and apoptotic pathway activation will enable us to develop efficacious clinical trials...of autophagy, Rab7 and Lamp 2. We are now introducing siRNA against Rab7 and Lamp2 to reiterate the effects of Chloroquine inhibition of autophagy

  19. T-lymphokine-activated killer cell-originated protein kinase (TOPK) as a prognostic factor and a potential therapeutic target in glioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Qiuhong; Yuan, Ping; Xue, Peipei; Lu, Hui; Yan, Meng; Guo, Dongsheng; Xu, Sanpeng; Zhang, Xiaohui; Lin, Xuan; Wang, Yong; Dogan, Soner; Zhang, Jianmin; Zhu, Feng; Ke, Changshu; Liu, Lin

    2018-01-01

    TOPK is overexpressed in various types of cancer and associated with poor outcomes in different types of cancer. In this study, we first found that the expression of T-lymphokine-activated killer cell-originated protein kinase (TOPK) was significantly higher in Grade III or Grade IV than that in Grade II in glioma (P = 0.007 and P < 0.001, respectively). Expression of TOPK was positively correlated with Ki67 (P < 0.001). Knockdown of TOPK significantly inhibited cell growth, colony formation and increased sensitivities to temozolomide (TMZ) in U-87 MG or U-251 cells, while TOPK overexpression promoted cell growth and colony formation in Hs 683 or A-172 cells. Glioma patients expressing high levels of TOPK have poor survival compared with those expressing low levels of TOPK in high-grade or low-grade gliomas (hazard ratio = 0.2995; 95% CI, 0.1262 to 0.7108; P = 0.0063 and hazard ratio = 0.1509; 95% CI, 0.05928 to 0.3842; P < 0.0001, respectively). The level of TOPK was low in TMZ-sensitive patients compared with TMZ-resistant patients (P = 0.0056). In TMZ-resistant population, patients expressing high TOPK have two months’ shorter survival time than those expressing low TOPK. Our findings demonstrated that TOPK might represent as a promising prognostic and predictive factor and potential therapeutic target for glioma. PMID:29487691

  20. Characterization of infectivity of knob-modified adenoviral vectors in glioma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.P.L. Paul (C. P L); M. Everts (M.); J.N. Glasgow (J.); P. Dent (P.); P.B. Fisher (P.); I.V. Ulasov (I.); M.S. Lesniak (M.); M.A. Stoff-Khalili (M.); J.C. Roth (J.); M. Preuss (Michael); C.M.F. Dirven (Clemens); M.L.M. Lamfers (Martine); T. Siegal (Tali); Z.B. Zhu (Z.); R.E. Curiel (Rafael E.)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractMalignant glioma continues to be a major target for gene therapy and virotherapy due to its aggressive growth and the current lack of effective treatment. However, these approaches have been hampered by inefficient infection of glioma cells by viral vectors, particularly vectors derived

  1. Dual Inhibition of PI3K/AKT and MEK/ERK Pathways Induces Synergistic Antitumor Effects in Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Linda Wu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG is a devastating disease with an extremely poor prognosis. Recent studies have shown that platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR and its downstream effector pathway, PI3K/AKT/mTOR, are frequently amplified in DIPG, and potential therapies targeting this pathway have emerged. However, the addition of targeted single agents has not been found to improve clinical outcomes in DIPG, and targeting this pathway alone has produced insufficient clinical responses in multiple malignancies investigated, including lung, endometrial, and bladder cancers. Acquired resistance also seems inevitable. Activation of the Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK pathway, which shares many nodes of cross talk with the PI3K/AKT pathway, has been implicated in the development of resistance. In the present study, perifosine, a PI3K/AKT pathway inhibitor, and trametinib, a MEK inhibitor, were combined, and their therapeutic efficacy on DIPG cells was assessed. Growth delay assays were performed with each drug individually or in combination. Here, we show that dual inhibition of PI3K/AKT and MEK/ERK pathways synergistically reduced cell viability. We also reveal that trametinib induced AKT phosphorylation in DIPG cells that could not be effectively attenuated by the addition of perifosine, likely due to the activation of other compensatory mechanisms. The synergistic reduction in cell viability was through the pronounced induction of apoptosis, with some effect from cell cycle arrest. We conclude that the concurrent inhibition of the PI3K/AKT and MEK/ERK pathways may be a potential therapeutic strategy for DIPG.

  2. Undersulfation of proteoglycans and proteins alter C6 glioma cells proliferation, adhesion and extracellular matrix organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes de Aguiar, Claudia B N; Garcez, Ricardo Castilho; Alvarez-Silva, Marcio; Trentin, Andréa Gonçalves

    2002-11-01

    Proteoglycans are considered to be important molecule in cell-microenvironment interactions. They are overexpressed in neoplastic cells modifying their growth and migration in hosts. In this work we verified that undersulfation of proteoglycans and other sulfated molecules, induced by sodium chlorate treatment, inhibited C6 glioma cells proliferation in a dose-dependent way. This effect was restored by the addition of exogenous heparin. We could not detect significant cell mortality in our culture condition. The treatment also impaired in a dose-dependent manner, C6 cell adhesion to extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins (collagen IV, laminin and fibronectin). In addition, sodium chlorate treatment altered C6 glioma cell morphology, from the fibroblast-like to a more rounded one. This effect was accompanied by increased synthesis of fibronectin and alterations in its extracellular network organization. However, we could not observe modifications on laminin organization and synthesis. The results suggest an important connection between sulfation degree with important tumor functions, such as proliferation and adhesion. We suggest that proteoglycans may modulate the glioma microenvironment network during tumor cell progression and invasion.

  3. Antiangiogenic Therapy and Mechanisms of Tumor Resistance in Malignant Glioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruman Rahman

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite advances in surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapeutics, patients with malignant glioma have a dismal prognosis. The formations of aberrant tumour vasculature and glioma cell invasion are major obstacles for effective treatment. Angiogenesis is a key event in the progression of malignant gliomas, a process involving endothelial cell proliferation, migration, reorganization of extracellular matrix and tube formation. Such processes are regulated by the homeostatic balance between proangiogenic and antiangiogenic factors, most notably vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGFs produced by glioma cells. Current strategies targeting VEGF-VEGF receptor signal transduction pathways, though effective in normalizing abnormal tumor vasculature, eventually result in tumor resistance whereby a highly infiltrative and invasive phenotype may be adopted. Here we review recent anti-angiogenic therapy for malignant glioma and highlight implantable devices and nano/microparticles as next-generation methods for chemotherapeutic delivery. Intrinsic and adaptive modes of glioma resistance to anti-angiogenic therapy will be discussed with particular focus on the glioma stem cell paradigm.

  4. Triacetin-based acetate supplementation as a chemotherapeutic adjuvant therapy in glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsen, Andrew R; Long, Patrick M; Driscoll, Heather E; Davies, Matthew T; Teasdale, Benjamin A; Penar, Paul L; Pendlebury, William W; Spees, Jeffrey L; Lawler, Sean E; Viapiano, Mariano S; Jaworski, Diane M

    2014-03-15

    Cancer is associated with epigenetic (i.e., histone hypoacetylation) and metabolic (i.e., aerobic glycolysis) alterations. Levels of N-acetyl-L-aspartate (NAA), the primary storage form of acetate in the brain, and aspartoacylase (ASPA), the enzyme responsible for NAA catalysis to generate acetate, are reduced in glioma; yet, few studies have investigated acetate as a potential therapeutic agent. This preclinical study sought to test the efficacy of the food additive Triacetin (glyceryl triacetate, GTA) as a novel therapy to increase acetate bioavailability in glioma cells. The growth-inhibitory effects of GTA, compared to the histone deacetylase inhibitor Vorinostat (SAHA), were assessed in established human glioma cell lines (HOG and Hs683 oligodendroglioma, U87 and U251 glioblastoma) and primary tumor-derived glioma stem-like cells (GSCs), relative to an oligodendrocyte progenitor line (Oli-Neu), normal astrocytes, and neural stem cells (NSCs) in vitro. GTA was also tested as a chemotherapeutic adjuvant with temozolomide (TMZ) in orthotopically grafted GSCs. GTA-induced cytostatic growth arrest in vitro comparable to Vorinostat, but, unlike Vorinostat, GTA did not alter astrocyte growth and promoted NSC expansion. GTA alone increased survival of mice engrafted with glioblastoma GSCs and potentiated TMZ to extend survival longer than TMZ alone. GTA was most effective on GSCs with a mesenchymal cell phenotype. Given that GTA has been chronically administered safely to infants with Canavan disease, a leukodystrophy due to ASPA mutation, GTA-mediated acetate supplementation may provide a novel, safe chemotherapeutic adjuvant to reduce the growth of glioma tumors, most notably the more rapidly proliferating, glycolytic and hypoacetylated mesenchymal glioma tumors. © 2013 UICC.

  5. Mathematical modeling of efficient protocols to control glioma growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branco, J R; Ferreira, J A; de Oliveira, Paula

    2014-09-01

    In this paper we propose a mathematical model to describe the evolution of glioma cells taking into account the viscoelastic properties of brain tissue. The mathematical model is established considering that the glioma cells are of two phenotypes: migratory and proliferative. The evolution of the migratory cells is described by a diffusion-reaction equation of non Fickian type deduced considering a mass conservation law with a non Fickian migratory mass flux. The evolution of the proliferative cells is described by a reaction equation. A stability analysis that leads to the design of efficient protocols is presented. Numerical simulations that illustrate the behavior of the mathematical model are included. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A high 18F-FDOPA uptake is associated with a slow growth rate in diffuse Grade II-III gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isal, Sibel; Gauchotte, Guillaume; Rech, Fabien; Blonski, Marie; Planel, Sophie; Chawki, Mohammad B; Karcher, Gilles; Marie, Pierre-Yves; Taillandier, Luc; Verger, Antoine

    2018-04-01

    In diffuse Grade II-III gliomas, a high 3,4-dihydroxy-6-( 18 F)-fluoro-L-phenylalanine ( 18 F-FDOPA) positron emission tomography (PET) uptake, with a standardized uptake value (SUV max )/contralateral brain tissue ratio greater than 1.8, was previously found to be consistently associated with the presence of an isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) mutation, whereas this mutation is typically associated with a better prognosis. This pilot study was aimed to ascertain the prognostic value of this high 18 F-FDOPA uptake in diffuse Grade II-III gliomas with regard to the velocity of diameter expansion (VDE), which represents an established landmark of better prognosis when below 4 mm per year. 20 patients (42 ± 10 years, 10 female) with newly-diagnosed diffuse Grade II-III gliomas (17 with IDH mutation) were retrospectively included. All had a 18 F-FDOPA PET, quantified with SUV max ratio, along with a serial MRI enabling VDE determination. SUV max ratio was above 1.8 in 5 patients (25%) all of whom had a VDE VDE <4 mm/year in the overall population (45 vs 0%, p = 0.04) and also in the subgroup of patients with IDH mutation (45 vs 0%, p = 0.10). This pilot study shows that in diffuse Grade II-III gliomas, a high 18 F-FDOPA uptake would be predictive of low tumour growth, with a different prognostic significance than IDH mutation. Advances in knowledge: 18 F-FDOPA PET in a single session imaging could have prognostic value in initial diagnosis of diffuse Grade II-III gliomas.

  7. TGF-β2 initiates autophagy via Smad and non-Smad pathway to promote glioma cells’ invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Zhang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is characterized by lethal aggressiveness and patients with GBM are in urgent need for new therapeutic avenues to improve quality of life. Current studies on tumor invasion focused on roles of cytokines in tumor microenvironment and numerous evidence suggests that TGF-β2 is abundant in glioma microenvironment and vital for glioma invasion. Autopagy is also emerging as a critical factor in aggressive behaviors of cancer cells; however, the relationship between TGF-β2 and autophagy in glioma has been poorly understood. Methods U251, T98 and U87 GBM cell lines as well as GBM cells from a primary human specimen were used in vitro and in vivo to evaluate the effect of TGF-β2 on autophagy. Western blot, qPCR, immunofluorescence and transmission-electron microscope were used to detect target molecular expression. Lentivirus and siRNA vehicle were introduced to establish cell lines, as well as mitotracker and seahorse experiment to study the metabolic process in glioma. Preclinical therapeutic efficacy was evaluated in orthotopic xenograft mouse models. Results Here we demonstrated that TGF-β2 activated autophagy in human glioma cell lines and knockdown of Smad2 or inhibition of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase, attenuated TGF-β2-induced autophagy. TGF-β2-induced autophagy is important for glioma invasion due to the alteration of epithelial-mesenchymal transition and metabolism conversion, particularly influencing mitochondria trafficking and membrane potential (△Ψm. Autopaghy also initiated a feedback on TGF-β2 in glioma by keeping its autocrine loop and affecting Smad2/3/7 expression. A xenograft model provided additional confirmation on combination of TGF-β inhibitor (Galunisertib and autophagy inhibitor (CQ to better “turn off” tumor growth. Conclusion Our findings elucidated a potential mechanism of autophagy-associated glioma invasion that TGF-β2 could initiate autophagy via Smad and non

  8. Thermodynamics in Gliomas: Interactions between the Canonical WNT/Beta-Catenin Pathway and PPAR Gamma

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    Alexandre Vallée

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Gliomas cells are the site of numerous metabolic and thermodynamics abnormalities with an increasing entropy rate which is characteristic of irreversible processes driven by changes in Gibbs energy, heat production, intracellular acidity, membrane potential gradient, and ionic conductance. We focus our review on the opposing interactions observed in glioma between the canonical WNT/beta-catenin pathway and PPAR gamma and their metabolic and thermodynamic implications. In gliomas, WNT/beta-catenin pathway is upregulated while PPAR gamma is downregulated. Upregulation of WNT/beta-catenin signaling induces changes in key metabolic enzyme that modify their thermodynamics behavior. This leads to activation pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1(PDK-1 and monocarboxylate lactate transporter 1 (MCT-1. Consequently, phosphorylation of PDK-1 inhibits pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDH. Thus, a large part of pyruvate cannot be converted into acetyl-CoA in mitochondria and in TCA (tricarboxylic acid cycle. This leads to aerobic glycolysis despite the availability of oxygen, named Warburg effect. Cytoplasmic pyruvate is, in major part, converted into lactate. The WNT/beta-catenin pathway induces also the transcription of genes involved in cell proliferation, cell invasiveness, nucleotide synthesis, tumor growth, and angiogenesis, such as c-Myc, cyclin D1, PDK. In addition, in gliomas cells, PPAR gamma is downregulated, leading to a decrease in insulin sensitivity and an increase in neuroinflammation. Moreover, PPAR gamma contributes to regulate some key circadian genes. Abnormalities in the regulation of circadian rhythms and dysregulation in circadian clock genes are observed in gliomas. Circadian rhythms are dissipative structures, which play a key role in far-from-equilibrium thermodynamics through their interactions with WNT/beta-catenin pathway and PPAR gamma. In gliomas, metabolism, thermodynamics, and circadian rhythms are tightly interrelated.

  9. LncRNA TUG1 acts as a tumor suppressor in human glioma by promoting cell apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Zhang, Meng; An, Gang; Ma, Qingfang

    2016-03-01

    Previous studies have revealed multiple functional roles of long non-coding RNA taurine upregulated gene 1 in different types of malignant tumors, except for human glioma. Here, it was designed to study the potential function of taurine upregulated gene 1 in glioma pathogenesis focusing on its regulation on cell apoptosis. The expression of taurine upregulated gene 1 in glioma tissues was detected by quantitative RT-PCR and compared with that in adjacent normal tissues. Further correlation analysis was conducted to show the relationship between taurine upregulated gene 1 expression and different clinicopathologic parameters. Functional studies were performed to investigate the influence of taurine upregulated gene 1 on apoptosis and cell proliferation by using Annexin V/PI staining and cell counting kit-8 assays, respectively. And, caspase activation and Bcl-2 expression were analyzed to explore taurine upregulated gene 1-induced mechanism. taurine upregulated gene 1 expression was significantly inhibited in glioma and showed significant correlation with WHO Grade, tumor size and overall survival. Further experiments revealed that the dysregulation of taurine upregulated gene 1 affected the apoptosis and cell proliferation of glioma cells. Moreover, taurine upregulated gene 1 could induce the activation of caspase-3 and-9, with inhibited expression of Bcl-2, implying the mechanism in taurine upregulated gene 1-induced apoptosis. taurine upregulated gene 1 promoted cell apoptosis of glioma cells by activating caspase-3 and -9-mediated intrinsic pathways and inhibiting Bcl-2-mediated anti-apoptotic pathways, acting as a tumor suppressor in human glioma. This study provided new insights for the function of taurine upregulated gene 1 in cancer biology, and suggested a potent application of taurine upregulated gene 1 overexpression for glioma therapy. © 2016 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  10. Molecular Mechanisms Involved in the Antitumor Activity of Cannabinoids on Gliomas: Role for Oxidative Stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massi, Paola; Valenti, Marta; Solinas, Marta; Parolaro, Daniela

    2010-01-01

    Cannabinoids, the active components of Cannabis sativa, have been shown to exert antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects on a wide spectrum of tumor cells and tissues. Of interest, cannabinoids have displayed great potency in reducing the growth of glioma tumors, one of the most aggressive CNS tumors, either in vitro or in animal experimental models curbing the growth of xenografts generated by subcutaneous or intrathecal injection of glioma cells in immune-deficient mice. Cannabinoids appear to be selective antitumoral agents as they kill glioma cells without affecting the viability of non-transformed cells. This review will summarize the anti-cancer properties that cannabinoids exert on gliomas and discuss their potential action mechanisms that appear complex, involving modulation of multiple key cell signaling pathways and induction of oxidative stress in glioma cells

  11. Molecular Mechanisms Involved in the Antitumor Activity of Cannabinoids on Gliomas: Role for Oxidative Stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massi, Paola [Department of Pharmacology, Chemotherapy and Toxicology, University of Milan, Via Vanvitelli 32, 20129 Milan (Italy); Valenti, Marta; Solinas, Marta; Parolaro, Daniela [Department of Structural and Functional Biology, Section of Pharmacology, Center of Neuroscience, University of Insubria, Via A. da Giussano 10, 20152 Busto Arsizio, Varese (Italy)

    2010-05-26

    Cannabinoids, the active components of Cannabis sativa, have been shown to exert antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects on a wide spectrum of tumor cells and tissues. Of interest, cannabinoids have displayed great potency in reducing the growth of glioma tumors, one of the most aggressive CNS tumors, either in vitro or in animal experimental models curbing the growth of xenografts generated by subcutaneous or intrathecal injection of glioma cells in immune-deficient mice. Cannabinoids appear to be selective antitumoral agents as they kill glioma cells without affecting the viability of non-transformed cells. This review will summarize the anti-cancer properties that cannabinoids exert on gliomas and discuss their potential action mechanisms that appear complex, involving modulation of multiple key cell signaling pathways and induction of oxidative stress in glioma cells.

  12. Molecular Mechanisms Involved in the Antitumor Activity of Cannabinoids on Gliomas: Role for Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Massi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Cannabinoids, the active components of Cannabis sativa, have been shown to exert antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects on a wide spectrum of tumor cells and tissues. Of interest, cannabinoids have displayed great potency in reducing the growth of glioma tumors, one of the most aggressive CNS tumors, either in vitro or in animal experimental models curbing the growth of xenografts generated by subcutaneous or intrathecal injection of glioma cells in immune-deficient mice. Cannabinoids appear to be selective antitumoral agents as they kill glioma cells without affecting the viability of non-transformed cells. This review will summarize the anti-cancer properties that cannabinoids exert on gliomas and discuss their potential action mechanisms that appear complex, involving modulation of multiple key cell signaling pathways and induction of oxidative stress in glioma cells.

  13. Extracellular Vesicles As Modulators of Tumor Microenvironment and Disease Progression in Glioma

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    Abir Mondal

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse gliomas are lethal tumors of the central nervous system (CNS characterized by infiltrative growth, aggressive nature, and therapeutic resistance. The recent 2016 WHO classification for CNS tumors categorizes diffuse glioma into two major types that include IDH wild-type glioblastoma, which is the predominant type and IDH-mutant glioblastoma, which is less common and displays better prognosis. Recent studies suggest presence of a distinct cell population with stem cell features termed as glioma stem cells (GSCs to be causal in driving tumor growth in glioblastoma. The presence of a stem and progenitor population possibly makes glioblastoma highly heterogeneous. Significantly, tumor growth is driven by interaction of cells residing within the tumor with the surrounding milieu termed as the tumor microenvironment. It comprises of various cell types such as endothelial cells, secreted factors, and the surrounding extracellular matrix, which altogether help perpetuate the proliferation of GSCs. One of the important mediators critical to the cross talk is extracellular vesicles (EVs. These nano-sized vesicles play important roles in intercellular communication by transporting bioactive molecules into the surrounding milieu, thereby altering cellular functions and/or reprogramming recipient cells. With the growing information on the contribution of EVs in modulation of the tumor microenvironment, it is important to determine their role in both supporting as well as promoting tumor growth in glioma. In this review, we provide a comprehensive overview of the role of EVs in tumor progression and glioma pathogenesis.

  14. Possible novel therapy for malignant gliomas with secretable trimeric TRAIL.

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    Moonsup Jeong

    Full Text Available Malignant gliomas are the most common primary brain tumors. Despite intensive clinical investigation and many novel therapeutic approaches, average survival for the patients with malignant gliomas is only about 1 year. Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL has shown potent and cancer-selective killing activity and drawn considerable attention as a promising therapy for cancers, but concerns over delivery and toxicity have limited progress. We have developed a secretable trimeric TRAIL (stTRAIL and here evaluated the therapeutic potential of this stTRAIL-based gene therapy in brain tumors. An adenovirus (Ad-stTRAIL delivering stTRAIL was injected into intra-cranial human glioma tumors established in nude mice and tumor growth monitored using the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Ad-stTRAIL gene therapy showed potent tumor suppressor activity with no toxic side effects at therapeutically effective doses. When compared with 1, 3-bis(2-chloroethyl-1-nitrosourea (BCNU, a conventional therapy for malignant gliomas, Ad-stTRAIL suppressed tumor growth more potently. The combination of Ad-stTRAIL and BCNU significantly increased survival compared to the control mice or mice receiving Ad-stTRAIL alone. Our data indicate that Ad-stTRAIL, either alone or combined with BCNU, has promise as a novel therapy for malignant gliomas.

  15. Radiation effects on human glia and glioma cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, S.

    1983-01-01

    The radiosensitivity of human glia and glioma cells has been studied in vitro, and a new cloning method has been developed to overcome the difficulties due to the very low cloning efficiency of these cells. The cells were confined to small palladium areas surrounded by agarose, which increased the cell density, but kept the clones separated. Using this method, the glia cells were found to be very sensitive to gamma irradiation (D 0 =1.0-1.5 Gy and n=1) in comparision with the glioma cells (D 0 =1.5-2.5 Gy and n=3.5). The induction and repair of DNA strand breaks were studied with two DNA unwinding techniques. No differences between the two cell-lines were detected when induction and fast repair were studied with the single-labelling method, while the glioma cells showed less unrepaired DNA strand breaks than the glia cells after 1, 2 and 3 hours, when the double-labelling method was used. Detachment, attachment and growth kinetics were studied using the palladium-agarose cloning method. All of the glioma cell-lines studied, detached and attached themselves at rates higher than the normal diploid glia cell-lines. All of the cell-lines contained clones with different properties. Some clones were rapidly growing, others maintained a nearly constant number of cells or even decreased. The effects of chronic hypoxia were tested in a few experiments. Low oxygen tension in the culture medium reduced the rate of growth and the DNA synthesis of the glioma cells. The present study indicates that cultured human glioma cells are less radiosensitive than cultured glia cells. The palladium-agarose technique, enable studying growth kinetics detachment, attachment and radiosensitivity in a quantitative manner for cells with low cloning efficiency. (author)

  16. MiRNA-125a-5p inhibits glioblastoma cell proliferation and promotes cell differentiation by targeting TAZ

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    Yuan, Jian; Xiao, Gelei [Department of Neurosurgery, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410008 (China); The Institute of Skull Base Surgery & Neuro-oncology at Hunan, Changsha, Hunan 410008 (China); Peng, Gang [Department of Neurosurgery, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410008 (China); Liu, Dingyang [Department of Neurosurgery, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410008 (China); The Institute of Skull Base Surgery & Neuro-oncology at Hunan, Changsha, Hunan 410008 (China); Wang, Zeyou [Cancer Research Institute, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410008 (China); Liao, Yiwei; Liu, Qing [Department of Neurosurgery, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410008 (China); The Institute of Skull Base Surgery & Neuro-oncology at Hunan, Changsha, Hunan 410008 (China); Wu, Minghua [The Institute of Skull Base Surgery & Neuro-oncology at Hunan, Changsha, Hunan 410008 (China); Cancer Research Institute, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410008 (China); Yuan, Xianrui, E-mail: xry69@163.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410008 (China); The Institute of Skull Base Surgery & Neuro-oncology at Hunan, Changsha, Hunan 410008 (China)

    2015-02-06

    Highlights: • Expression of miR-125a-5p is inversely correlated with that of TAZ in glioma cells. • MiR-125a-5p represses TAZ expression in glioma cells. • MiR-125a-5p directly targets the 3′ UTR of TAZ mRNA and promotes its degradation. • MiR-125a-5p represses CTGF and survivin via TAZ, and inhibits glioma cell growth. • MiR-125a-5p inhibits the stem cell features of HFU-251 MG cells. - Abstract: Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most lethal brain tumor due to the resistance to conventional therapies, such as radiotherapy and chemotherapy. TAZ, an important mediator of the Hippo pathway, was found to be up-regulated in diverse cancers, including in GBM, and plays important roles in tumor initiation and progression. However, little is known about the regulation of TAZ expression in tumors. In this study, we found that miR-125a-5p is an important regulator of TAZ in glioma cells by directly targeting the TAZ 3′ UTR. MiR-125a-5p levels are inversely correlated with that of TAZ in normal astrocytes and a panel of glioma cell lines. MiR-125a-5p represses the expression of TAZ target genes, including CTGF and survivin, and inhibits cell proliferation and induces the differentiation of GBM cells; whereas over-expression of TAZ rescues the effects of miR-125a-5p. This study revealed a mechanism for TAZ deregulation in glioma cells, and also demonstrated a tumor suppressor role of miR-125a-5p in glioblastoma cells.

  17. MiRNA-125a-5p inhibits glioblastoma cell proliferation and promotes cell differentiation by targeting TAZ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Jian; Xiao, Gelei; Peng, Gang; Liu, Dingyang; Wang, Zeyou; Liao, Yiwei; Liu, Qing; Wu, Minghua; Yuan, Xianrui

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Expression of miR-125a-5p is inversely correlated with that of TAZ in glioma cells. • MiR-125a-5p represses TAZ expression in glioma cells. • MiR-125a-5p directly targets the 3′ UTR of TAZ mRNA and promotes its degradation. • MiR-125a-5p represses CTGF and survivin via TAZ, and inhibits glioma cell growth. • MiR-125a-5p inhibits the stem cell features of HFU-251 MG cells. - Abstract: Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most lethal brain tumor due to the resistance to conventional therapies, such as radiotherapy and chemotherapy. TAZ, an important mediator of the Hippo pathway, was found to be up-regulated in diverse cancers, including in GBM, and plays important roles in tumor initiation and progression. However, little is known about the regulation of TAZ expression in tumors. In this study, we found that miR-125a-5p is an important regulator of TAZ in glioma cells by directly targeting the TAZ 3′ UTR. MiR-125a-5p levels are inversely correlated with that of TAZ in normal astrocytes and a panel of glioma cell lines. MiR-125a-5p represses the expression of TAZ target genes, including CTGF and survivin, and inhibits cell proliferation and induces the differentiation of GBM cells; whereas over-expression of TAZ rescues the effects of miR-125a-5p. This study revealed a mechanism for TAZ deregulation in glioma cells, and also demonstrated a tumor suppressor role of miR-125a-5p in glioblastoma cells

  18. Inhibition of nuclear factor kappa-B signaling reduces growth in medulloblastoma in vivo

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    Deckard Lindsey A

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medulloblastoma is a highly malignant pediatric brain tumor that requires surgery, whole brain and spine irradiation, and intense chemotherapy for treatment. A more sophisticated understanding of the pathophysiology of medulloblastoma is needed to successfully reduce the intensity of treatment and improve outcomes. Nuclear factor kappa-B (NFκB is a signaling pathway that controls transcriptional activation of genes important for tight regulation of many cellular processes and is aberrantly expressed in many types of cancer. Methods To test the importance of NFκB to medulloblastoma cell growth, the effects of multiple drugs that inhibit NFκB, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate, diethyldithiocarbamate, sulfasalazine, curcumin and bortezomib, were studied in medulloblastoma cell lines compared to a malignant glioma cell line and normal neurons. Expression of endogenous NFκB was investigated in cultured cells, xenograft flank tumors, and primary human tumor samples. A dominant negative construct for the endogenous inhibitor of NFκB, IκB, was prepared from medulloblastoma cell lines and flank tumors were established to allow specific pathway inhibition. Results We report high constitutive activity of the canonical NFκB pathway, as seen by Western analysis of the NFκB subunit p65, in medulloblastoma tumors compared to normal brain. The p65 subunit of NFκB is extremely highly expressed in xenograft tumors from human medulloblastoma cell lines; though, conversely, the same cells in culture have minimal expression without specific stimulation. We demonstrate that pharmacological inhibition of NFκB in cell lines halts proliferation and leads to apoptosis. We show by immunohistochemical stain that phosphorylated p65 is found in the majority of primary tumor cells examined. Finally, expression of a dominant negative form of the endogenous inhibitor of NFκB, dnIκB, resulted in poor xenograft tumor growth, with average tumor volumes

  19. Gene expression of manganese superoxide dismutase in human glioma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novi S. Hardiany

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim This study analyze the MnSOD gene expression as endogenous antioxidant in human glioma cells compared with leucocyte cells as control.Methods MnSOD gene expression of 20 glioma patients was analyzed by measuring the relative expression of mRNA and enzyme activity of MnSOD in brain and leucocyte cells. The relative expression of mRNA MnSOD was determined by using quantitative Real Time RT-PCR and the enzyme activity of MnSOD using biochemical kit assay (xantine oxidase inhibition. Statistic analysis for mRNA and enzyme activity of MnSOD was performed using Kruskal Wallis test.Results mRNA of MnSOD in glioma cells of 70% sample was 0.015–0.627 lower, 10% was 1.002-1.059 and 20% was 1.409-6.915 higher than in leucocyte cells. Also the specific activity of MnSOD enzyme in glioma cells of 80% sample showed 0,064-0,506 lower and 20% sample was 1.249-2.718 higher than in leucocyte cells.Conclusion MnSOD gene expression in human glioma cells are significantly lower than its expression in leucocytes cells. (Med J Indones 2010; 19:21-5Keywords : MnSOD, glioma, gene expression

  20. Downregulation of the long non-coding RNA taurine-upregulated gene 1 inhibits glioma cell proliferation and invasion and promotes apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhijun; Wang, Bin; Hao, Junhai; Man, Weitao; Chang, Yongkai; Ma, Shunchang; Hu, Yeshuai; Liu, Fusheng; Yang, Jun

    2018-03-01

    Expression of the long non-coding RNA taurine-upregulated gene 1 (TUG1) is associated with various aggressive tumors. The present study aimed to investigate the biological function of TUG1 in regulating apoptosis, proliferation, invasion and cell cycle distribution in human glioma U251 cells. Lentivirus-mediated TUG1-specific microRNA was transfected into U251 cells to abrogate the expression of TUG1. Flow cytometry analysis was used to examine the cell cycle distribution and apoptosis of U251 cells. Cellular proliferation was examined using Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assays and invasion was examined by Transwell assays. The apoptotic rate of cells in the TUG1-knockdown group was significantly higher than in the negative control (NC) group (11.58 vs. 9.14%, PTUG1-knockdown group was lower compared with that of the NC group. A Transwell invasion assay was performed, which revealed that the number of invaded cells from the TUG1-knockdown group was the less compared with that of the NC group. In addition, the G 0 /G 1 phase population was significantly increased within the treated group (44.85 vs. 38.45%, PTUG1 may inhibit proliferation and invasion, and promote glioma U251 cell apoptosis. In addition, knockdown of TUG1 may have an effect on cell cycle arrest. The data presented in the current study indicated that TUG1 may be a novel therapeutic target for glioma.

  1. Decreased miR-106a inhibits glioma cell glucose uptake and proliferation by targeting SLC2A3 in GBM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Dong-Wei; Lu, Qiong; Wang, Lai-Xing; Zhao, Wen-Yuan; Cao, Yi-Qun; Li, Ya-Nan; Han, Guo-Sheng; Liu, Jian-Min; Yue, Zhi-Jian

    2013-10-14

    MiR-106a is frequently down-regulated in various types of human cancer. However the underlying mechanism of miR-106a involved in glioma remains elusive. The association of miR-106a with glioma grade and patient survival was analyzed. The biological function and target of miR-106a were determined by bioinformatic analysis and cell experiments (Western blot, luciferase reporter, cell cycle, ntracellular ATP production and glucose uptake assay). Finally, rescue expression of its target SLC2A3 was used to test the role of SLC2A3 in miR-106a-mediated cell glycolysis and proliferation. Here we showed that miR-106a was a tumor suppressor miRNA was involved in GBM cell glucose uptake and proliferation. Decreased miR-106a in GBM tissues and conferred a poor survival of GBM patients. SLC2A3 was identified as a core target of miR-106a in GBM cells. Inhibition of SLC2A3 by miR-106a attenuated cell proliferation and inhibited glucose uptake. In addition, for each biological process we identified ontology-associated transcripts that significantly correlated with SLC2A3 expression. Finally, the expression of SLC2A3 largely abrogated miR-106a-mediated cell proliferation and glucose uptake in GBM cells. Taken together, miR-106a and SLC2A3 could be potential therapeutic approaches for GBM.

  2. Interactions between glioma and pregnancy: insight from a 52-case multicenter series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, Sophie; Pagès, Mélanie; Gauchotte, Guillaume; Miquel, Catherine; Cartalat-Carel, Stéphanie; Guillamo, Jean-Sébastien; Capelle, Laurent; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Beauchesne, Patrick; Debouverie, Marc; Fontaine, Denys; Jouanneau, Emmanuel; Stecken, Jean; Menei, Philippe; De Witte, Olivier; Colin, Philippe; Frappaz, Didier; Lesimple, Thierry; Bauchet, Luc; Lopes, Manuel; Bozec, Laurence; Moyal, Elisabeth; Deroulers, Christophe; Varlet, Pascale; Zanello, Marc; Chretien, Fabrice; Oppenheim, Catherine; Duffau, Hugues; Taillandier, Luc; Pallud, Johan

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The goal of this study was to provide insight into the influence of gliomas on gestational outcomes, the impact of pregnancy on gliomas, and the identification of patients at risk. METHODS In this multiinstitutional retrospective study, the authors identified 52 pregnancies in 50 women diagnosed with a glioma. RESULTS For gliomas known prior to pregnancy (n = 24), we found the following: 1) An increase in the quantified imaging growth rates occurred during pregnancy in 87% of cases. 2) Clinical deterioration occurred in 38% of cases, with seizures alone resolving after delivery in 57.2% of cases. 3) Oncological treatments were immediately performed after delivery in 25% of cases. For gliomas diagnosed during pregnancy (n = 28), we demonstrated the following: 1) The tumor was discovered during the second and third trimesters in 29% and 54% of cases, respectively, with seizures being the presenting symptom in 68% of cases. 2) The quantified imaging growth rates did not significantly decrease after delivery and before oncological treatment. 3) Clinical deterioration resolved after delivery in 21.4% of cases. 4) Oncological treatments were immediately performed after delivery in 70% of cases. Gliomas with a high grade of malignancy, negative immunoexpression of alpha-internexin, or positive immunoexpression for p53 were more likely to be associated with tumor progression during pregnancy. Deliveries were all uneventful (cesarean section in 54.5% of cases and vaginal delivery in 45.5%), and the infants were developmentally normal. CONCLUSIONS When a woman harboring a glioma envisions a pregnancy, or when a glioma is discovered in a pregnant patient, the authors suggest informing her and her partner that pregnancy may impact the evolution of the glioma clinically and radiologically. They strongly advise a multidisciplinary approach to management. ■ CLASSIFICATION OF EVIDENCE Type of question: association; study design: case series; evidence: Class IV.

  3. GCN5 Potentiates Glioma Proliferation and Invasion via STAT3 and AKT Signaling Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Liu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The general control of nucleotide synthesis 5 (GCN5, which is one kind of lysine acetyltransferases, regulates a number of cellular processes, such as cell proliferation, differentiation, cell cycle and DNA damage repair. However, its biological role in human glioma development remains elusive. In the present study, we firstly reported that GCN5 was frequently overexpressed in human glioma tissues and GCN5 was positively correlated with proliferation of cell nuclear antigen PCNA and matrix metallopeptidase MMP9. Meanwhile, down-regulation of GCN5 by siRNA interfering inhibited glioma cell proliferation and invasion. In addition, GCN5 knockdown reduced expression of p-STAT3, p-AKT, PCNA and MMP9 and increased the expression of p21 in glioma cells. In conclusion, GCN5 exhibited critical roles in glioma development by regulating cell proliferation and invasion, which suggested that GCN5 might be a potential molecular target for glioma treatment.

  4. The effect of γ-tocopherol on proliferation, integrin expression, adhesion, and migration of human glioma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samandari, Elika; Visarius, Theresa; Zingg, Jean-Marc; Azzi, Angelo

    2006-01-01

    The effect of vitamin E on proliferation, integrin expression, adhesion, and migration in human glioma cells has been studied. γ-tocopherol at 50 μM concentration exerted more inhibitory effect than α-tocopherol at the same concentration on glioma cell proliferation. Integrin α5 and β1 protein levels were increased upon both α- and γ-tocopherol treatments. In parallel, an increase in the α5β1 heterodimer cell surface expression was observed. The tocopherols inhibited glioma cell-binding to fibronectin where γ-tocopherol treatment induced glioma cell migration. Taken together, the data reported here are consistent with the notion that the inhibition of glioma cell proliferation induced by tocopherols may be mediated, at least in part, by an increase in integrin α5 and β1 expression. Cell adhesion is also negatively affected by tocopherols, despite a small increase in the surface appearance of the α5β1 heterodimer. Cell migration is stimulated by γ-tocopherol. It is concluded that α5 and β1 integrin expression and surface appearance are not sufficient to explain all the observations and that other integrins or in general other factors may be associated with these events

  5. Characterization of glioma stem cells through multiple stem cell markers and their specific sensitization to double-strand break-inducing agents by pharmacological inhibition of ataxia telangiectasia mutated protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raso, Alessandro; Vecchio, Donatella; Cappelli, Enrico; Ropolo, Monica; Poggi, Alessandro; Nozza, Paolo; Biassoni, Roberto; Mascelli, Samantha; Capra, Valeria; Kalfas, Fotios; Severi, Paolo; Frosina, Guido

    2012-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that tumor-driving glioma stem cells (GSC) may promote radio-resistance by constitutive activation of the DNA damage response started by the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein. We have investigated whether GSC may be specifically sensitized to ionizing radiation by inhibiting the DNA damage response. Two grade IV glioma cell lines (BORRU and DR177) were characterized for a number of immunocytochemical, karyotypic, proliferative and differentiative parameters. In particular, the expression of a panel of nine stem cell markers was quantified by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and flow cytometry. Overall, BORRU and DR177 displayed pronounced and poor stem phenotypes, respectively. In order to improve the therapeutic efficacy of radiation on GSC, the cells were preincubated with a nontoxic concentration of the ATM inhibitors KU-55933 and KU-60019 and then irradiated. BORRU cells were sensitized to radiation and radio-mimetic chemicals by ATM inhibitors whereas DR177 were protected under the same conditions. No sensitization was observed after cell differentiation or to drugs unable to induce double-strand breaks (DSB), indicating that ATM inhibitors specifically sensitize glioma cells possessing stem phenotype to DSB-inducing agents. In conclusion, pharmacological inhibition of ATM may specifically sensitize GSC to DSB-inducing agents while sparing nonstem cells. © 2012 The Authors; Brain Pathology © 2012 International Society of Neuropathology.

  6. Protein tyrosine phosphatases in glioma biology.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Navis, A.C.; Eijnden, M. van den; Schepens, J.T.G.; Hooft van Huijsduijnen, R.; Wesseling, P.; Hendriks, W.J.A.J.

    2010-01-01

    Gliomas are a diverse group of brain tumors of glial origin. Most are characterized by diffuse infiltrative growth in the surrounding brain. In combination with their refractive nature to chemotherapy this makes it almost impossible to cure patients using combinations of conventional therapeutic

  7. Silencing of mitochondrial NADP+-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase gene enhances glioma radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung Youl; Yoo, Young Hyun; Park, Jeen-Woo

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Silencing of the IDPm gene enhances IR-induced autophagy in glioma cells. •Autophagy inhibition augmented apoptosis of irradiated glioma cells. •Results offer a redox-active therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cancer. -- Abstract: Reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels are elevated in organisms that have been exposed to ionizing radiation and are protagonists in the induction of cell death. Recently, we demonstrated that the control of mitochondrial redox balance and the cellular defense against oxidative damage are primary functions of mitochondrial NADP + -dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDPm) via the supply of NADPH for antioxidant systems. In the present study, we report an autophagic response to ionizing radiation in A172 glioma cells transfected with small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting the IDPm gene. Autophagy in A172 transfectant cells was associated with enhanced autophagolysosome formation and GFP–LC3 punctuation/aggregation. Furthermore, we found that the inhibition of autophagy by chloroquine augmented apoptotic cell death of irradiated A172 cells transfected with IDPm siRNA. Taken together, our data suggest that autophagy functions as a survival mechanism in A172 cells against ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis and the sensitizing effect of IDPm siRNA and autophagy inhibitor on the ionizing radiation-induced apoptotic cell death of glioma cells offers a novel redox-active therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cancer

  8. Pseudomonas aeruginosa inhibits the growth of Cryptococcus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rella, Antonella; Yang, Mo Wei; Gruber, Jordon; Montagna, Maria Teresa; Luberto, Chiara; Zhang, Yong-Mei; Del Poeta, Maurizio

    2012-06-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a ubiquitous and opportunistic bacterium that inhibits the growth of different microorganisms, including Gram-positive bacteria and fungi such as Candida spp. and Aspergillus fumigatus. In this study, we investigated the interaction between P. aeruginosa and Cryptococcus spp. We found that P. aeruginosa PA14 and, to a lesser extent, PAO1 significantly inhibited the growth of Cryptococcus spp. The inhibition of growth was observed on solid medium by the visualization of a zone of inhibition of yeast growth and in liquid culture by viable cell counting. Interestingly, such inhibition was only observed when P. aeruginosa and Cryptococcus were co-cultured. Minimal inhibition was observed when cell-cell contact was prevented using a separation membrane, suggesting that cell contact is required for inhibition. Using mutant strains of Pseudomonas quinoline signaling, we showed that P. aeruginosa inhibited the growth of Cryptococcus spp. by producing antifungal molecules pyocyanin, a redox-active phenazine, and 2-heptyl-3,4-dihydroxyquinoline (PQS), an extracellular quorum-sensing signal. Because both P. aeruginosa and Cryptococcus neoformans are commonly found in lung infections of immunocompromised patients, this study may have important implication for the interaction of these microbes in both an ecological and a clinical point of view.

  9. miRNA-21 is developmentally regulated in mouse brain and is co-expressed with SOX2 in glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Põlajeva, Jelena; Swartling, Fredrik J; Jiang, Yiwen; Singh, Umashankar; Pietras, Kristian; Uhrbom, Lene; Westermark, Bengt; Roswall, Pernilla

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) and their role during tumor development have been studied in great detail during the last decade, albeit their expression pattern and regulation during normal development are however not so well established. Previous studies have shown that miRNAs are differentially expressed in solid human tumors. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) signaling is known to be involved in normal development of the brain as well as in malignant primary brain tumors, gliomas, but the complete mechanism is still lacking. We decided to investigate the expression of the oncogenic miR-21 during normal mouse development and glioma, focusing on PDGF signaling as a potential regulator of miR-21. We generated mouse glioma using the RCAS/tv-a system for driving PDGF-BB expression in a cell-specific manner. Expression of miR-21 in mouse cell cultures and mouse brain were assessed using Northern blot analysis and in situ hybridization. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis were used to investigate SOX2 expression. LNA-modified siRNA was used for irreversible depletion of miR-21. For inhibition of PDGF signaling Gleevec (imatinib mesylate), Rapamycin and U0126, as well as siRNA were used. Statistical significance was calculated using double-sided unpaired Student´s t-test. We identified miR-21 to be highly expressed during embryonic and newborn brain development followed by a gradual decrease until undetectable at postnatal day 7 (P7), this pattern correlated with SOX2 expression. Furthermore, miR-21 and SOX2 showed up-regulation and overlapping expression pattern in RCAS/tv-a generated mouse brain tumor specimens. Upon irreversible depletion of miR-21 the expression of SOX2 was strongly diminished in both mouse primary glioma cultures and human glioma cell lines. Interestingly, in normal fibroblasts the expression of miR-21 was induced by PDGF-BB, and inhibition of PDGF signaling in mouse glioma primary cultures resulted in suppression of miR-21 suggesting that mi

  10. Inhibition of mitochondria- and endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated autophagy augments temozolomide-induced apoptosis in glioma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Ju Lin

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a crucial process for cells to maintain homeostasis and survival through degradation of cellular proteins and organelles, including mitochondria and endoplasmic reticula (ER. We previously demonstrated that temozolomide (TMZ, an alkylating agent for brain tumor chemotherapy, induced reactive oxygen species (ROS/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK-mediated autophagy to protect glioma cells from apoptosis. In this study, we investigated the role of mitochondrial damage and ER stress in TMZ-induced cytotoxicity. Mitochondrial depolarization and mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP opening were observed as a prelude to TMZ-induced autophagy, and these were followed by the loss of mitochondrial mass. Electron transport chain (ETC inhibitors, such as rotenone (a complex I inhibitor, sodium azide (a complex IV inhibitor, and oligomycin (a complex V inhibitor, or the MPTP inhibitor, cyclosporine A, decreased mitochondrial damage-mediated autophagy, and therefore increased TMZ-induced apoptosis. TMZ treatment triggered ER stress with increased expression of GADD153 and GRP78 proteins, and deceased pro-caspase 12 protein. ER stress consequently induced autophagy through c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK and Ca(2+ signaling pathways. Combination of TMZ with 4-phenylbutyrate (4-PBA, an ER stress inhibitor, augmented TMZ-induced cytotoxicity by inhibiting autophagy. Taken together, our data indicate that TMZ induced autophagy through mitochondrial damage- and ER stress-dependent mechanisms to protect glioma cells. This study provides evidence that agents targeting mitochondria or ER may be potential anticancer strategies.

  11. Expression of REST4 in human gliomas in vivo and influence of pioglitazone on REST in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Huan [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410008 (China); Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Central South University, Hunan Key Laboratory of Pharmacogenetics, Changsha 410078 (China); Gao, Zhangfeng [Department of Neurosurgery, Second Xiangya Hospital of Central South University, Changsha 410008 (China); Wu, Nayiyuan; Zeng, Liu; Tang, Xinyue; Chen, Xiaoping; Liu, Zhaoqian; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Liansheng [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410008 (China); Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Central South University, Hunan Key Laboratory of Pharmacogenetics, Changsha 410078 (China); Li, Zhi, E-mail: lizhi489@163.com [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410008 (China); Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Central South University, Hunan Key Laboratory of Pharmacogenetics, Changsha 410078 (China)

    2015-08-07

    The repressor element-1 (RE1) silencing transcription factor/neuron-restrictive silencer factor (REST/NRSF) has an irreplaceable role during the differentiation of neurons. REST has multiple splice variants which link to various types of cancer. Previous work had highlighted the role of REST in glioma, where the expression of REST is enhanced. But whether alternative splicing of REST is expressed in glioma has not been described. Here, we show that a specific isoform REST4 is expressed in glioma specimens, and will influence the mRNA level of REST in vivo. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) agonists have a role of antineoplastic in various tumor cells, which including glioma cells. Moreover, study indicated that PPARγ agonist pioglitazone can promote alternative splicing of REST pre-mRNA. In this study, we selected pioglitazone as a tool drug to explore whether the role of pioglitazone in anti-glioma is mediated by regulating REST expression or promoting alternative splicing of REST in glioma cells. Results show that pioglitazone can inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis of glioma cell in vitro, which may be mediated by down-regulating REST mRNA level but not by inducing alternative splicing of REST pre-mRNA. Our study firstly reports the expression of REST4 in glioma tissue samples. And we recommend that pioglitazone, which can reduce the expression level of REST, represents a promising drug for therapy of glioma. - Highlights: • A specific isoform REST4 is expressed in glioma specimens in vivo. • REST4 will influence the mRNA level of REST in vivo. • Pioglitazone can inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis of glioma cells. • The role of pioglitazone in anti-glioma may be mediated by down-regulating REST.

  12. Expression of REST4 in human gliomas in vivo and influence of pioglitazone on REST in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren, Huan; Gao, Zhangfeng; Wu, Nayiyuan; Zeng, Liu; Tang, Xinyue; Chen, Xiaoping; Liu, Zhaoqian; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Liansheng; Li, Zhi

    2015-01-01

    The repressor element-1 (RE1) silencing transcription factor/neuron-restrictive silencer factor (REST/NRSF) has an irreplaceable role during the differentiation of neurons. REST has multiple splice variants which link to various types of cancer. Previous work had highlighted the role of REST in glioma, where the expression of REST is enhanced. But whether alternative splicing of REST is expressed in glioma has not been described. Here, we show that a specific isoform REST4 is expressed in glioma specimens, and will influence the mRNA level of REST in vivo. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) agonists have a role of antineoplastic in various tumor cells, which including glioma cells. Moreover, study indicated that PPARγ agonist pioglitazone can promote alternative splicing of REST pre-mRNA. In this study, we selected pioglitazone as a tool drug to explore whether the role of pioglitazone in anti-glioma is mediated by regulating REST expression or promoting alternative splicing of REST in glioma cells. Results show that pioglitazone can inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis of glioma cell in vitro, which may be mediated by down-regulating REST mRNA level but not by inducing alternative splicing of REST pre-mRNA. Our study firstly reports the expression of REST4 in glioma tissue samples. And we recommend that pioglitazone, which can reduce the expression level of REST, represents a promising drug for therapy of glioma. - Highlights: • A specific isoform REST4 is expressed in glioma specimens in vivo. • REST4 will influence the mRNA level of REST in vivo. • Pioglitazone can inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis of glioma cells. • The role of pioglitazone in anti-glioma may be mediated by down-regulating REST

  13. Repurposing phenformin for the targeting of glioma stem cells and the treatment of glioblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wei; Finniss, Susan; Cazacu, Simona; Xiang, Cunli; Brodie, Ziv; Mikkelsen, Tom; Poisson, Laila; Shackelford, David B.; Brodie, Chaya

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most aggressive primary brain tumor with poor prognosis. Here, we studied the effects of phenformin, a mitochondrial complex I inhibitor and more potent chemical analog of the diabetes drug metformin on the inhibition of cell growth and induction of apoptosis of glioma stem cells (GSCs) using both in vitro and in vivo models. Phenformin inhibited the self-renewal of GSCs, decreased the expression of stemness and mesenchymal markers and increased the expression of miR-124, 137 and let-7. Silencing of let-7 abrogated phenformin effects on the self-renewal of GSCs via a pathway associated with inhibition of H19 and HMGA2 expression. Moreover, we demonstrate that phenformin inhibited tumor growth and prolonged the overall survival of mice orthotopically transplanted with GSCs. Combined treatments of phenformin and temozolomide exerted an increased antitumor effect on GSCs in vitro and in vivo. In addition, dichloroacetate, an inhibitor of the glycolysis enzyme pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase, that decreases lactic acidosis induced by biguanides, enhanced phenformin effects on the induction of cell death in GSCs and prolonged the survival of xenograft-bearing mice. Our results demonstrate for the first time that phenformin targets GSCs and can be efficiently combined with current therapies for GBM treatment and GSC eradication. PMID:27486821

  14. D-Amino acid oxidase-induced oxidative stress, 3-bromopyruvate and citrate inhibit angiogenesis, exhibiting potent anticancer effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Sayed, S M; El-Magd, R M Abou; Shishido, Y; Yorita, K; Chung, S P; Tran, D H; Sakai, T; Watanabe, H; Kagami, S; Fukui, K

    2012-10-01

    Angiogenesis is critical for cancer growth and metastasis. Steps of angiogenesis are energy consuming, while vascular endothelial cells are highly glycolytic. Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a highly vascular tumor and this enhances its aggressiveness. D-amino acid oxidase (DAO) is a promising therapeutic protein that induces oxidative stress upon acting on its substrates. Oxidative stress-energy depletion (OSED) therapy was recently reported (El Sayed et al., Cancer Gene Ther, 19, 1-18, 2012). OSED combines DAO-induced oxidative stress with energy depletion caused by glycolytic inhibitors such as 3-bromopyruvate (3BP), a hexokinase II inhibitor that depleted ATP in cancer cells and induced production of hydrogen peroxide. 3BP disturbs the Warburg effect and antagonizes effects of lactate and pyruvate (El Sayed et al., J Bioenerg Biomembr, 44, 61-79, 2012). Citrate is a natural organic acid capable of inhibiting glycolysis by targeting phosphofructokinase. Here, we report that DAO, 3BP and citrate significantly inhibited angiogenesis, decreased the number of vascular branching points and shortened the length of vascular tubules. OSED delayed the growth of C6/DAO glioma cells. 3BP combined with citrate delayed the growth of C6 glioma cells and decreased significantly the number and size of C6 glioma colonies in soft agar. Human GBM cells (U373MG) were resistant to chemotherapy e.g. cisplatin and cytosine arabinoside, while 3BP was effective in decreasing the viability and disturbing the morphology of U373MG cells.

  15. Thermoresponsive nanocomposite gel for local drug delivery to suppress the growth of glioma by inducing autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Li; Wang, Qi; Shen, Ming; Sun, Ying; Zhang, Xiangyu; Huang, Can; Chen, Jianhua; Li, Rongxin; Duan, Yourong

    2017-07-03

    Although the treatments of malignant glioma include surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy by oral drug administration, the prognosis of patients with glioma remains very poor. We developed a polyethylene glycol-dipalmitoylphosphatidyle- thanoiamine (mPEG-DPPE) calcium phosphate nanoparticles (NPs) injectable thermoresponsive hydrogel (nanocomposite gel) that could provide a sustained and local delivery of paclitaxel (PTX) and temozolomide (TMZ). In addition, the proportion of PTX and TMZ for the optimal synergistic antiglioma effect on C6 cells was determined to be 1:100 (w/w) by the Chou and Talalay method. Our results clearly indicated that the autophagy induced by PTX:TMZ NPs plays an important role in regulating tumor cell death, while autophagy inhibition dramatically reverses the antitumor effect of PTX:TMZ NPs, suggesting that antiproliferative autophagy occurs in response to PTX:TMZ NPs treatment. The antitumor efficacy of the PTX:TMZ NP-loaded gel was evaluated in situ using C6 tumor-bearing rats, and the PTX:TMZ NP-loaded gel exhibited superior antitumor performance. The antitumor effects of the nanocomposite gel in vivo were shown to correlate with autophagic cell death in this study. The in vivo results further confirmed the advantages of such a strategy. The present study may provide evidence supporting the development of nanomedicine for potential clinical application.

  16. Flavonoid glycosides from Hosta longipes, their inhibition on NO production, and nerve growth factor inductive effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chung Sub; Lee, Kang Ro; Kwon, Oh Wook; Kim, Sun Yeou

    2014-01-01

    An extended phytochemical investigation of the leaves of Hosta longipes identified the new flavonoid glycoside, kaempferol-3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)- [6 ' -O-acetyl-β-D-glucopyranoside]-7-O-β-D-glucopyranoside and five known flavonoid derivatives. The structures of two compounds were revealed by extensive NMR methods ( 1 H and 13 C NMR, 1 H- 1 H COSY, HMQC and HMBC) and chemical hydrolysis. NMR data of one of them are published for the first time. Bioactivities of six compounds revealed that five strongly inhibited the production of nitric oxide (NO) with IC 50 values of 11.56-15.97 μm in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated BV-2 cells without cell toxicity. Two compounds showed moderate induction of secretion of nerve growth factor (NGF) in C6 glioma cells (124.70 ± 7.71% and 117.02 ± 3.60%, respectively). (author)

  17. Metabolic remodeling precedes mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization in human glioma xenograft cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponnala, Shivani; Chetty, Chandramu; Veeravalli, Krishna Kumar; Dinh, Dzung H; Klopfenstein, Jeffrey D; Rao, Jasti S

    2012-02-01

    Glioma cancer cells adapt to changing microenvironment and shift from mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation to aerobic glycolysis for their metabolic needs irrespective of oxygen availability. In the present study, we show that silencing MMP-9 in combination with uPAR/cathepsin B switch the glycolytic metabolism of glioma cells to oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) and generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) to predispose glioma cells to mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization. shRNA for MMP-9 and uPAR (pMU) as well as shRNA for MMP-9 and cathepsin B (pMC) activated complexes of mitochondria involved in OXPHOS and inhibited glycolytic hexokinase expression. The decreased interaction of hexokinase 2 with mitochondria in the treated cells indicated the inhibition of glycolysis activation. Overexpression of Akt reversed the pMU- and pMC-mediated OXPHOS to glycolysis switch. The OXPHOS un-coupler oligomycin A altered the expression levels of the Bcl-2 family of proteins; treatment with pMU or pMC reversed this effect and induced mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization. In addition, our results show changes in mitochondrial pore transition to release cytochrome c due to changes in the VDAC-Bcl-XL and BAX-BAK interaction with pMU and pMC treatments. Taken together, our results suggest that pMU and pMC treatments switch glioma cells from the glycolytic to the OXPHOS pathway through an inhibitory effect on Akt, ROS induction and an increase of cytosolic cytochrome c accumulation. These results demonstrate the potential of pMU and pMC as therapeutic candidates for the treatment of glioma.

  18. Epidemiology of glioma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Birthe Krogh; Hansen, Steinbjorn; Laursen, Rene J.

    2017-01-01

    in 15%. The overall male:female ratio was 3:2 and the mean age at onset was 60 years. Data for WHO grade I, II, III and IV glioma showed several important differences regarding age and sex distribution and symptomatology at presentation. The mean age increased with the grade of glioma and males...... duration, and headache rates for glioma grade I-IV showed decreasing survival with increasing grade. Glioma grade I-IV showed...

  19. Overexpression of ceramide synthase 1 increases C18-ceramide and leads to lethal autophagy in human glioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zheng; Wen, Lijun; Zhu, Fei; Wang, Yanping; Xie, Qing; Chen, Zijun; Li, Yunsen

    2017-01-01

    Ceramide synthase 1 (CERS1) is the most highly expressed CERS in the central nervous system, and ceramide with an 18-carbon–containing fatty acid chain (C18-ceramide) in the brain plays important roles in signaling and sphingolipid development. However, the roles of CERS1 and C18-ceramide in glioma are largely unknown. In the present study, measured by electrospray ionization linear ion trap mass spectrometry, C18-ceramide was significantly lower in glioma tumor tissues compared with controls (P overexpression of CERS1, which has been shown to specifically induce the generation of C18-ceramide. Overexpression of CERS1 or adding exogenous C18-ceramide inhibited cell viability and induced cell death by activating endoplasmic reticulum stress, which induced lethal autophagy and inhibited PI3K/AKT signal pathway in U251 and A172 glioma cells. Moreover, overexpression of CERS1 or adding exogenous C18-ceramide increased the sensitivity of U251 and A172 glioma cells to teniposide (VM-26). Thus, the combined therapy of CERS1/C18-ceramide and VM-26 may be a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of human glioma. PMID:29262618

  20. Loss of heterozygosity of TRIM3 in malignant gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulay, Jean-Louis; Stiefel, Urs; Taylor, Elisabeth; Dolder, Béatrice; Merlo, Adrian; Hirth, Frank

    2009-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are frequent primary brain tumors associated with poor prognosis and very limited response to conventional chemo- and radio-therapies. Besides sharing common growth features with other types of solid tumors, gliomas are highly invasive into adjacent brain tissue, which renders them particularly aggressive and their surgical resection inefficient. Therefore, insights into glioma formation are of fundamental interest in order to provide novel molecular targets for diagnostic purposes and potential anti-cancer drugs. Human Tripartite motif protein 3 (TRIM3) encodes a structural homolog of Drosophila brain tumor (brat) implicated in progenitor cell proliferation control and cancer stem cell suppression. TRIM3 is located within the loss of allelic heterozygosity (LOH) hotspot of chromosome segment 11p15.5, indicating a potential role in tumor suppression. ... Here we analyze 70 primary human gliomas of all types and grades and report somatic deletion mapping as well as single nucleotide polymorphism analysis together with quantitative real-time PCR of chromosome segment 11p15.5. Our analysis identifies LOH in 17 cases (24%) of primary human glioma which defines a common 130 kb-wide interval within the TRIM3 locus as a minimal area of loss. We further detect altered genomic dosage of TRIM3 in two glioma cases with LOH at 11p15.5, indicating homozygous deletions of TRIM3. Loss of heterozygosity of chromosome segment 11p15.5 in malignant gliomas suggests TRIM3 as a candidate brain tumor suppressor gene

  1. Polysaccharide peptide isolated from grass-cultured Ganoderma lucidum induces anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects in the human U251 glioma cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunhua; Lin, Dongmei; Chen, Quan; Lin, Shuqian; Shi, Songsheng; Chen, Chunmei

    2018-04-01

    The Ganoderma lucidum ( G. lucidum ) mushroom is one of the most extensively studied functional foods, known for its numerous health benefits, including the inhibition of tumor cell growth. The present study assessed the anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activity of a novel G. lucidum polysaccharide peptide (GL-PP) in human glioma U251 cells, which was purified from grass-cultured G. lucidum . GL-PP is a glycopeptide with an average molecular weight of 42,635 Da and a polysaccharide-to-peptide ratio of 88.70:11.30. The polysaccharides were composed of l-arabinose, d-mannose and d-glucose at a molar ratio of 1.329:0.372:2.953 and a total of 17 amino acids were detected. The results of the current study demonstrated that GL-PP significantly inhibited U251 cellular proliferation. The proportion of G 0 /G 1 phase cells and sub-G 1 phase cells significantly increased as the concentration of GL-PP increased, as did the activity of caspase-3. These results indicate that GL-PP directly inhibited human glioma U251 proliferation by inducing cell cycle arrest and promoting apoptosis.

  2. The combination of cannabidiol and Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol enhances the anticancer effects of radiation in an orthotopic murine glioma model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Katherine A; Dalgleish, Angus G; Liu, Wai M

    2014-12-01

    High-grade glioma is one of the most aggressive cancers in adult humans and long-term survival rates are very low as standard treatments for glioma remain largely unsuccessful. Cannabinoids have been shown to specifically inhibit glioma growth as well as neutralize oncogenic processes such as angiogenesis. In an attempt to improve treatment outcome, we have investigated the effect of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) both alone and in combination with radiotherapy in a number of glioma cell lines (T98G, U87MG, and GL261). Cannabinoids were used in two forms, pure (P) and as a botanical drug substance (BDS). Results demonstrated a duration- and dose-dependent reduction in cell viability with each cannabinoid and suggested that THC-BDS was more efficacious than THC-P, whereas, conversely, CBD-P was more efficacious than CBD-BDS. Median effect analysis revealed all combinations to be hyperadditive [T98G 48-hour combination index (CI) at FU50, 0.77-1.09]. Similarly, pretreating cells with THC-P and CBD-P together for 4 hours before irradiation increased their radiosensitivity when compared with pretreating with either of the cannabinoids individually. The increase in radiosensitivity was associated with an increase in markers of autophagy and apoptosis. These in vitro results were recapitulated in an orthotopic murine model for glioma, which showed dramatic reductions in tumor volumes when both cannabinoids were used with irradiation (day 21: 5.5 ± 2.2 mm(3) vs. 48.7 ± 24.9 mm(3) in the control group; P < 0.01). Taken together, our data highlight the possibility that these cannabinoids can prime glioma cells to respond better to ionizing radiation, and suggest a potential clinical benefit for glioma patients by using these two treatment modalities. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  3. Regulation of Glioma Cell Migration by Seri ne-Phosphorylated P3111

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy S. McDonough

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available P311, an 8-kDa polypeptide, was previously shown to be highly expressed in invasive glioma cells. Here, we report the functional characteristics of P311 with regard to influencing glioma cell migration. P311 is constitutively serine-phosphorylated; decreased phosphorylation is observed in migration-activated glioma cells. The primary amino acid sequence of P311 indicates a putative serine phosphorylation site (S59 near the PEST domain. Site-directed mutagenesis of S59A retarded P311 degradation, induced glioma cell motility. In contrast, S59D mutation resulted in the rapid degradation of P311, reduced glioma cell migration. Coimmunoprecipitation coupled with matrixassisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis identified Filamin A as a binding partner of P311, immunofluorescence studies showed that both proteins colocalized at the cell periphery. Moreover, P311-induced cell migration was abrogated by inhibition of β1 integrin function using TACβ1A, a dominant-negative inhibitor of β1 integrin signaling, suggesting that P311 acts downstream of β1 signaling. Finally, overexpression of P311 or P311 S59A mutant protein activates Raci GTPase; small interfering RNA-mediated depletion of Raci suppresses P311-induced motility. Collectively, these results suggest a role for levels of P311 in regulating glioma motility, invasion through the reorganization of actin cytoskeleton at the cell periphery.

  4. UPA-sensitive ACPP-conjugated nanoparticles for multi-targeting therapy of brain glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Yujie; Liao, Ziwei; Jiang, Ting; Zhao, Jingjing; Tuo, Yanyan; She, Xiaojian; Shen, Shun; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Qizhi; Jiang, Xinguo; Hu, Yu; Pang, Zhiqing

    2015-01-01

    Now it is well evidenced that tumor growth is a comprehensive result of multiple pathways, and glioma parenchyma cells and stroma cells are closely associated and mutually compensatory. Therefore, drug delivery strategies targeting both of them simultaneously might obtain more promising therapeutic benefits. In the present study, we developed a multi-targeting drug delivery system modified with uPA-activated cell-penetrating peptide (ACPP) for the treatment of brain glioma (ANP). In vitro experiments demonstrated nanoparticles (NP) decorated with cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) or ACPP could significantly improve nanoparticles uptake by C6 glioma cells and nanoparticles penetration into glioma spheroids as compared with traditional NP and thus enhanced the therapeutic effects of its payload when paclitaxel (PTX) was loaded. In vivo imaging experiment revealed that ANP accumulated more specifically in brain glioma site than NP decorated with or without CPP. Brain slides further showed that ACPP contributed to more nanoparticles accumulation in glioma site, and ANP could co-localize not only with glioma parenchyma cells, but also with stroma cells including neo-vascular cells and tumor associated macrophages. The pharmacodynamics results demonstrated ACPP could significantly improve the therapeutic benefits of nanoparticles by significantly prolonging the survival time of glioma bearing mice. In conclusion, the results suggested that nanoparticles modified with uPA-sensitive ACPP could reach multiple types of cells in glioma tissues and provide a novel strategy for glioma targeted therapy.

  5. KDM2B overexpression correlates with poor prognosis and regulates glioma cell growth

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yiwei; Zang, Jin; Zhang, Dongyong; Sun, Zhenxiang; Qiu, Bo; Wang, Xiaojie

    2018-01-01

    Yiwei Wang,1 Jin Zang,1 Dongyong Zhang,2 Zhenxiang Sun,1 Bo Qiu,2 Xiaojie Wang1 1Department of Human Anatomy, Shenyang Medical College, Huanggu District, Shenyang City, 2Department of Neurosurgery, First Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University, Heping District, Shenyang City, Liaoning Province, ChinaBackground: Gliomas are one of the most lethal cancers in the human central nervous system. Despite clinical treatment advancements, the prognosis of patients with glioma remains ...

  6. Aberrant Methylation and Reduced Expression of LHX9 in Malignant Gliomas of Childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Vladimirova

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available High-grade gliomas (HGGs of childhood represent approximately 7% of pediatric brain tumors. They are highly invasive tumors and respond poorly to conventional treatments in contrast to pilocytic astrocytomas, which usually are well demarcated and frequently can be cured by surgery. The molecular events for this clinical relevant finding are only partially understood. In the current study, to identify aberrantly methylated genes that may be involved in the tumorigenesis of pediatric HGGs, we performed a microarray-based differential methylation hybridization approach and found frequent hypermethylation of the LHX9 (human Lim-homebox 9 gene encoding a transcription factor involved in brain development. Bisulfite genomic sequencing and combined bisulfite restriction analysis showed that HGGs were frequently methylated at two CpG-rich LHX9 regions in comparison to benign, nondiffuse pilocytic astrocytomas and normal brain tissues. The LHX9 hypermethylation was associated with reduced messenger RNA expression in pediatric HGG samples and corresponding cell lines. This epigenetic modification was reversible by pharmacological inhibition (5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine, and reexpression of LHX9 transcript was induced in pediatric glioma cell lines. Exogenous expression of LHX9 in glioma cell lines did not directly affect cell proliferation and apoptosis but specifically inhibited glioma cell migration and invasion in vitro, suggesting a possible implication of LHX9 in the migratory phenotype of HGGs. Our results demonstrate that the LHX9 gene is frequently silenced in pediatric malignant astrocytomas by hypermethylation and that this epigenetic alteration is involved in glioma cell migration and invasiveness.

  7. Loss of heterozygosity of TRIM3 in malignant gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolder Béatrice

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malignant gliomas are frequent primary brain tumors associated with poor prognosis and very limited response to conventional chemo- and radio-therapies. Besides sharing common growth features with other types of solid tumors, gliomas are highly invasive into adjacent brain tissue, which renders them particularly aggressive and their surgical resection inefficient. Therefore, insights into glioma formation are of fundamental interest in order to provide novel molecular targets for diagnostic purposes and potential anti-cancer drugs. Human Tripartite motif protein 3 (TRIM3 encodes a structural homolog of Drosophila brain tumor (brat implicated in progenitor cell proliferation control and cancer stem cell suppression. TRIM3 is located within the loss of allelic heterozygosity (LOH hotspot of chromosome segment 11p15.5, indicating a potential role in tumor suppression. ... Methods Here we analyze 70 primary human gliomas of all types and grades and report somatic deletion mapping as well as single nucleotide polymorphism analysis together with quantitative real-time PCR of chromosome segment 11p15.5. Results Our analysis identifies LOH in 17 cases (24% of primary human glioma which defines a common 130 kb-wide interval within the TRIM3 locus as a minimal area of loss. We further detect altered genomic dosage of TRIM3 in two glioma cases with LOH at 11p15.5, indicating homozygous deletions of TRIM3. Conclusion Loss of heterozygosity of chromosome segment 11p15.5 in malignant gliomas suggests TRIM3 as a candidate brain tumor suppressor gene.

  8. Vasculogenesis and angiogenesis initiation under normoxic conditions through Wnt/β-catenin pathway in gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallée, Alexandre; Guillevin, Rémy; Vallée, Jean-Noël

    2018-01-26

    The canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway is up-regulated in gliomas and involved in proliferation, invasion, apoptosis, vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. Nuclear β-catenin accumulation correlates with malignancy. Hypoxia activates hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α by inhibiting HIF-1α prolyl hydroxylation, which promotes glycolytic energy metabolism, vasculogenesis and angiogenesis, whereas HIF-1α is degraded by the HIF prolyl hydroxylase under normoxic conditions. We focus this review on the links between the activated Wnt/β-catenin pathway and the mechanisms underlying vasculogenesis and angiogenesis through HIF-1α under normoxic conditions in gliomas. Wnt-induced epidermal growth factor receptor/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling, Wnt-induced signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling, and Wnt/β-catenin target gene transduction (c-Myc) can activate HIF-1α in a hypoxia-independent manner. The PI3K/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway activates HIF-1α through eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 and STAT3. The β-catenin/T-cell factor 4 complex directly binds to STAT3 and activates HIF-1α, which up-regulates the Wnt/β-catenin target genes cyclin D1 and c-Myc in a positive feedback loop. Phosphorylated STAT3 by interleukin-6 or leukemia inhibitory factor activates HIF-1α even under normoxic conditions. The activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway induces, via the Wnt target genes c-Myc and cyclin D1 or via HIF-1α, gene transactivation encoding aerobic glycolysis enzymes, such as glucose transporter, hexokinase 2, pyruvate kinase M2, pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 and lactate dehydrogenase-A, leading to lactate production, as the primary alternative of ATP, at all oxygen levels, even in normoxic conditions. Lactate released by glioma cells via the monocarboxylate lactate transporter-1 up-regulated by HIF-1α and lactate anion activates HIF-1α in normoxic endothelial cells by

  9. Flavonoid glycosides from Hosta longipes, their inhibition on NO production, and nerve growth factor inductive effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chung Sub; Lee, Kang Ro, E-mail: krlee@skku.edu [Natural Products Laboratory, School of Pharmacy, Sungkyunkwan University (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Oh Wook [Graduate School of East-West Medical Science, Kyung Hee University Global Campus (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sun Yeou [College of Pharmacy, Gachon University (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    An extended phytochemical investigation of the leaves of Hosta longipes identified the new flavonoid glycoside, kaempferol-3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)- [6{sup '}-O-acetyl-β-D-glucopyranoside]-7-O-β-D-glucopyranoside and five known flavonoid derivatives. The structures of two compounds were revealed by extensive NMR methods ({sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR, {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H COSY, HMQC and HMBC) and chemical hydrolysis. NMR data of one of them are published for the first time. Bioactivities of six compounds revealed that five strongly inhibited the production of nitric oxide (NO) with IC{sub 50} values of 11.56-15.97 μm in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated BV-2 cells without cell toxicity. Two compounds showed moderate induction of secretion of nerve growth factor (NGF) in C6 glioma cells (124.70 ± 7.71% and 117.02 ± 3.60%, respectively). (author)

  10. Long Non-coding RNA LINC00339 Stimulates Glioma Vasculogenic Mimicry Formation by Regulating the miR-539-5p/TWIST1/MMPs Axis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junqing Guo

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Glioma is recognized as a highly angiogenic malignant brain tumor. Vasculogenic mimicry (VM greatly restricts the therapeutic effect of anti-angiogenic tumor therapy for glioma patients. However, the molecular mechanisms of VM formation in glioma remain unclear. Here, we demonstrated that LINC00339 was upregulated in glioma tissue as well as in glioma cell lines. The expression of LINC00339 in glioma tissues was positively correlated with glioma VM formation. Knockdown of LINC00339 inhibited glioma cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and tube formation, meanwhile downregulating the expression of VM-related molecular MMP-2 and MMP-14. Furthermore, knockdown of LINC00339 significantly increased the expression of miR-539-5p. Both bioinformatics and luciferase reporter assay revealed that LINC00339 regulated the above effects via binding to miR-539-5p. Besides, overexpression of miR-539-5p resulted in decreased expression of TWIST1, a transcription factor known to play an oncogenic role in glioma and identified as a direct target of miR-539-5p. TWIST1 upregulated the promoter activities of MMP-2 and MMP-14. The in vivo study showed that nude mice carrying tumors with knockdown of LINC00339 and overexpression of miR-539-5p exhibited the smallest tumor volume through inhibiting VM formation. In conclusion, LINC00339 may be used as a novel therapeutic target for VM formation in glioma.

  11. Establishment of SHG-44 human glioma model in brain of wistar rat with stereotactic technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong Xinyu; Luo Yi'nan; Fu Shuanglin; Wang Zhanfeng; Bie Li; Cui Jiale

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To establish solid intracerebral human glioma model in Wistar rat with xenograft methods. Methods: The SHG-44 cells were injected into brain right caudate nucleus of previous immuno-inhibitory Wistar rats with stereotactic technique. The MRI scans were performed at 1 week and 2 weeks later after implantation. After 2 weeks the rats were killed and pathological examination and immunohistologic stain for human GFAP were used. Results: The MRI scan after 1 week of implantation showed the glioma was growing, pathological histochemical examination demonstrated the tumor was glioma. Human GFAP stain was positive. The growth rate of glioma model was about 60%. Conclusion: Solid intracerebral human glioma model in previous immuno-inhibitory Wistar rat is successfully established

  12. Quantitative morphological magnetic resonance imaging follow-up of low-grade glioma: a plea for systematic measurement of growth rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallud, Johan; Taillandier, Luc; Capelle, Laurent; Fontaine, Denys; Peyre, Matthieu; Ducray, François; Duffau, Hugues; Mandonnet, Emmanuel

    2012-09-01

    Supratentorial hemispheric diffuse low-grade gliomas (LGGs), i.e., World Health Organization grade II gliomas, are a heterogeneous group of tumors. During their natural course, LGGs tend to progress to a higher grade of malignancy, leading to neurological disability and ultimately to death. In this review, we will show, that during their low-grade period, these tumors exhibit systematically a spontaneous and continuous radiological growth, whatever their histological subtypes. The radiological tumor growth is easily quantified by measuring the evolution of the equivalent tumor diameter (calculated from the tumor volume), obtaining the velocity of diametric expansion (VDE). The spontaneous VDE of LGGs varies markedly with an average VDE of about 4 mm/year. It depends on intrinsic factors (1p19q codeletion status, P53 overexpression status) and can be modified by extrinsic factors (pregnancy). The spontaneous VDE carries a strong prognostic significance regarding progression-free and overall survivals. As a consequence, VDE should be integrated along with the other "static" parameters (multimodal imaging, histological and molecular analyses) in the initial investigations. In addition, the assessment of VDE obtained before, during, and after a particular oncological treatment helps in analyzing their effects on LGGs on an individual basis, helping to guide the decision making.

  13. Jasmonic Acid Enhances Al-Induced Root Growth Inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhong-Bao; He, Chunmei; Ma, Yanqi; Herde, Marco; Ding, Zhaojun

    2017-02-01

    Phytohormones such as ethylene and auxin are involved in the regulation of the aluminum (Al)-induced root growth inhibition. Although jasmonate (JA) has been reported to play a crucial role in the regulation of root growth and development in response to environmental stresses through interplay with ethylene and auxin, its role in the regulation of root growth response to Al stress is not yet known. In an attempt to elucidate the role of JA, we found that exogenous application of JA enhanced the Al-induced root growth inhibition. Furthermore, phenotype analysis with mutants defective in either JA biosynthesis or signaling suggests that JA is involved in the regulation of Al-induced root growth inhibition. The expression of the JA receptor CORONATINE INSENSITIVE1 (COI1) and the key JA signaling regulator MYC2 was up-regulated in response to Al stress in the root tips. This process together with COI1-mediated Al-induced root growth inhibition under Al stress was controlled by ethylene but not auxin. Transcriptomic analysis revealed that many responsive genes under Al stress were regulated by JA signaling. The differential responsive of microtubule organization-related genes between the wild-type and coi1-2 mutant is consistent with the changed depolymerization of cortical microtubules in coi1 under Al stress. In addition, ALMT-mediated malate exudation and thus Al exclusion from roots in response to Al stress was also regulated by COI1-mediated JA signaling. Together, this study suggests that root growth inhibition is regulated by COI1-mediated JA signaling independent from auxin signaling and provides novel insights into the phytohormone-mediated root growth inhibition in response to Al stress. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Bortezomib-induced sensitization of malignant human glioma cells to vorinostat-induced apoptosis depends on reactive oxygen species production, mitochondrial dysfunction, Noxa upregulation, Mcl-1 cleavage, and DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premkumar, Daniel R; Jane, Esther P; Agostino, Naomi R; DiDomenico, Joseph D; Pollack, Ian F

    2013-02-01

    Glioblastomas are invasive tumors with poor prognosis despite current therapies. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) represent a class of agents that can modulate gene expression to reduce tumor growth, and we and others have noted some antiglioma activity from HDACIs, such as vorinostat, although insufficient to warrant use as monotherapy. We have recently demonstrated that proteasome inhibitors, such as bortezomib, dramatically sensitized highly resistant glioma cells to apoptosis induction, suggesting that proteasomal inhibition may be a promising combination strategy for glioma therapeutics. In this study, we examined whether bortezomib could enhance response to HDAC inhibition in glioma cells. Although primary cells from glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients and established glioma cell lines did not show significant induction of apoptosis with vorinostat treatment alone, the combination of vorinostat plus bortezomib significantly enhanced apoptosis. The enhanced efficacy was due to proapoptotic mitochondrial injury and increased generation of reactive oxygen species. Our results also revealed that combination of bortezomib with vorinostat enhanced apoptosis by increasing Mcl-1 cleavage, Noxa upregulation, Bak and Bax activation, and cytochrome c release. Further downregulation of Mcl-1 using shRNA enhanced cell killing by the bortezomib/vorinostat combination. Vorinostat induced a rapid and sustained phosphorylation of histone H2AX in primary GBM and T98G cells, and this effect was significantly enhanced by co-administration of bortezomib. Vorinostat/bortezomib combination also induced Rad51 downregulation, which plays an important role in the synergistic enhancement of DNA damage and apoptosis. The significantly enhanced antitumor activity that results from the combination of bortezomib and HDACIs offers promise as a novel treatment for glioma patients. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. TLR9 expression in glioma tissues correlated to glioma progression and the prognosis of GBM patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Chao; Cao, Shouqiang; Yan, Ying; Ying, Qiao; Jiang, Tao; Xu, Ke; Wu, Anhua

    2010-01-01

    Our study aims to evaluate the expression of TLR9 in glioma tissues, examine the association between TLR9 expression, clinicopathological variables, and glioma patient outcome, we further characterized the direct effects of TLR9 agonist CpG ODN upon the proliferation and invasion of glioma cells in vitro. RT-PCR and immunofluorescence were used to determine the expression of TLR9 in glioma cell lines and clinical glioma samples. Tissue microarry and immunohistochemistry were applied to evaluated TLR9 expression in 292 newly diagnosed glioma and 13 non-neoplastic brain tissues. We further investigated the effect of CpG ODN on the proliferation and invasion of glioma cells in vitro with MTT assays and matrigel transwell assay respectively. RT-PCR showed that TLR9 expressed in all the glioma samples and glioma cell lines we examined. The tissue array analysis indicated that TLR9 expression is correlated with malignancy of glioma (p < 0.01). Multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that TLR9 expression is an independent prognostic factor for PFS of GBM patients(P = 0.026). TLR9 agonist CpG ODN has no significant effect on glioma proliferation, but matrigel transwell analysis showed that TLR9 agonist CpG ODN can significantly enhance glioma invasion in vitro. Our data indicated that TLR9 expression increases according to the histopathological grade of glioma, and the TLR9 expression level is related to the PFS of GBM patients. In addition, our findings warrant caution in the directly injection of TLR9 agonist CpG ODN into glioma tissues for the glioma immunotherapy

  16. Tumor Metabolism of Malignant Gliomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ru, Peng; Williams, Terence M.; Chakravarti, Arnab; Guo, Deliang, E-mail: deliang.guo@osumc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center & Arthur G James Cancer Hospital, Columbus, OH 43012 (United States)

    2013-11-08

    Constitutively activated oncogenic signaling via genetic mutations such as in the EGFR/PI3K/Akt and Ras/RAF/MEK pathways has been recognized as a major driver for tumorigenesis in most cancers. Recent insights into tumor metabolism have further revealed that oncogenic signaling pathways directly promote metabolic reprogramming to upregulate biosynthesis of lipids, carbohydrates, protein, DNA and RNA, leading to enhanced growth of human tumors. Therefore, targeting cell metabolism has become a novel direction for drug development in oncology. In malignant gliomas, metabolism pathways of glucose, glutamine and lipid are significantly reprogrammed. Moreover, molecular mechanisms causing these metabolic changes are just starting to be unraveled. In this review, we will summarize recent studies revealing critical gene alterations that lead to metabolic changes in malignant gliomas, and also discuss promising therapeutic strategies via targeting the key players in metabolic regulation.

  17. Tumor Metabolism of Malignant Gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ru, Peng; Williams, Terence M.; Chakravarti, Arnab; Guo, Deliang

    2013-01-01

    Constitutively activated oncogenic signaling via genetic mutations such as in the EGFR/PI3K/Akt and Ras/RAF/MEK pathways has been recognized as a major driver for tumorigenesis in most cancers. Recent insights into tumor metabolism have further revealed that oncogenic signaling pathways directly promote metabolic reprogramming to upregulate biosynthesis of lipids, carbohydrates, protein, DNA and RNA, leading to enhanced growth of human tumors. Therefore, targeting cell metabolism has become a novel direction for drug development in oncology. In malignant gliomas, metabolism pathways of glucose, glutamine and lipid are significantly reprogrammed. Moreover, molecular mechanisms causing these metabolic changes are just starting to be unraveled. In this review, we will summarize recent studies revealing critical gene alterations that lead to metabolic changes in malignant gliomas, and also discuss promising therapeutic strategies via targeting the key players in metabolic regulation

  18. Targeted therapy in the treatment of malignant gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rimas V Lukas

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Rimas V Lukas1, Adrienne Boire2, M Kelly Nicholas1,2 1Department of Neurology; 2Department of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USAAbstract: Malignant gliomas are invasive tumors with the potential to progress through current available therapies. These tumors are characterized by a number of abnormalities in molecular signaling that play roles in tumorigenesis, spread, and survival. These pathways are being actively investigated in both the pre-clinical and clinical settings as potential targets in the treatment of malignant gliomas. We will review many of the therapies that target the cancer cell, including the epidermal growth factor receptor, mammalian target of rapamycin, histone deacetylase, and farnesyl transferase. In addition, we will discuss strategies that target the extracellular matrix in which these cells reside as well as angiogenesis, a process emerging as central to tumor development and growth. Finally, we will briefly touch on the role of neural stem cells as both potential targets as well as delivery vectors for other therapies. Interdependence between these varied pathways, both in maintaining health and in causing disease, is clear. Thus, attempts to easily classify some targeted therapies are problematic.Keywords: glioma, EGFR, mTOR, HDAC, Ras, angiogenesis

  19. Monoamine oxidase A (MAO A) inhibitors decrease glioma progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaikari, Vijaya Pooja; Kota, Rajesh; Chen, Kevin; Yeh, Tzu-Shao; Jhaveri, Niyati; Groshen, Susan L.; Olenyuk, Bogdan Z.; Chen, Thomas C.; Hofman, Florence M.; Shih, Jean C.

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is an aggressive brain tumor which is currently treated with temozolomide (TMZ). Tumors usually become resistant to TMZ and recur; no effective therapy is then available. Monoamine Oxidase A (MAO A) oxidizes monoamine neurotransmitters resulting in reactive oxygen species which cause cancer. This study shows that MAO A expression is increased in human glioma tissues and cell lines. MAO A inhibitors, clorgyline or the near-infrared-dye MHI-148 conjugated to clorgyline (NMI), were cytotoxic for glioma and decreased invasion in vitro. Using the intracranial TMZ-resistant glioma model, clorgyline or NMI alone or in combination with low-dose TMZ reduced tumor growth and increased animal survival. NMI was localized specifically to the tumor. Immunocytochemistry studies showed that the MAO A inhibitor reduced proliferation, microvessel density and invasion, and increased macrophage infiltration. In conclusion, we have identified MAO A inhibitors as potential novel stand-alone drugs or as combination therapy with low dose TMZ for drug-resistant gliomas. NMI can also be used as a non-invasive imaging tool. Thus has a dual function for both therapy and diagnosis. PMID:26871599

  20. Oleic Acid and Hydroxytyrosol Inhibit Cholesterol and Fatty Acid Synthesis in C6 Glioma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Priore

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the discovery of natural compounds capable of modulating nervous system function has revealed new perspectives for a healthier brain. Here, we investigated the effects of oleic acid (OA and hydroxytyrosol (HTyr, two important extra virgin olive oil compounds, on lipid synthesis in C6 glioma cells. OA and HTyr inhibited both de novo fatty acid and cholesterol syntheses without affecting cell viability. The inhibitory effect of the individual compounds was more pronounced if OA and HTyr were administered in combination. A reduction of polar lipid biosynthesis was also detected, while triglyceride synthesis was marginally affected. To clarify the lipid-lowering mechanism of these compounds, their effects on the activity of key enzymes of fatty acid biosynthesis (acetyl-CoA carboxylase-ACC and fatty acid synthase-FAS and cholesterologenesis (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase-HMGCR were investigated in situ by using digitonin-permeabilized C6 cells. ACC and HMGCR activities were especially reduced after 4 h of 25 μM OA and HTyr treatment. No change in FAS activity was observed. Inhibition of ACC and HMGCR activities is corroborated by the decrease of their mRNA abundance and protein level. Our results indicate a direct and rapid downregulatory effect of the two olive oil compounds on lipid synthesis in C6 cells.

  1. Critical role of the FERM domain in Pyk2 stimulated glioma cell migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipinski, Christopher A.; Tran, Nhan L.; Dooley, Andrea; Pang, Yuan-Ping; Rohl, Carole; Kloss, Jean; Yang, Zhongbo; McDonough, Wendy; Craig, David; Berens, Michael E.; Loftus, Joseph C.

    2006-01-01

    The strong tendency of malignant glioma cells to invade locally into surrounding normal brain precludes effective surgical resection, reduces the efficacy of radiotherapy, and is associated with increased resistance to chemotherapy regimens. We report that the N-terminal FERM domain of Pyk2 regulates its promigratory function. A 3-dimensional model of the Pyk2 FERM domain was generated and mutagenesis studies identified residues essential for Pyk2 promigratory function. Model-based targeted mutations within the FERM domain decreased Pyk2 phosphorylation and reduced the capacity of Pyk2 to stimulate glioma cell migration but did not significantly alter the intracellular distribution of Pyk2. Expression of autonomous Pyk2 FERM domain fragments containing analogous mutations exhibited reduced capacity to inhibit glioma cell migration and Pyk2 phosphorylation relative to expression of an autonomous wild type FERM domain fragment. These results indicate that the FERM domain plays an important role in regulating the functional competency of Pyk2 as a promigratory factor in glioma

  2. Comparison of Allogeneic and Syngeneic Rat Glioma Models by Using MRI and Histopathologic Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biasibetti, Elena; Valazza, Alberto; Capucchio, Maria T; Annovazzi, Laura; Battaglia, Luigi; Chirio, Daniela; Gallarate, Marina; Mellai, Marta; Muntoni, Elisabetta; Peira, Elena; Riganti, Chiara; Schiffer, Davide; Panciani, Pierpaolo; Lanotte, Michele

    2017-03-01

    Research in neurooncology traditionally requires appropriate in vivo animal models, on which therapeutic strategies are tested before human trials are designed and proceed. Several reproducible animal experimental models, in which human physiologic conditions can be mimicked, are available for studying glioblastoma multiforme. In an ideal rat model, the tumor is of glial origin, grows in predictable and reproducible patterns, closely resembles human gliomas histopathologically, and is weakly or nonimmunogenic. In the current study, we used MRI and histopathologic evaluation to compare the most widely used allogeneic rat glioma model, C6-Wistar, with the F98-Fischer syngeneic rat glioma model in terms of percentage tumor growth or regression and growth rate. In vivo MRI demonstrated considerable variation in tumor volume and frequency between the 2 rat models despite the same stereotactic implantation technique. Faster and more reproducible glioma growth occurred in the immunoresponsive environment of the F98-Fischer model, because the immune response is minimized toward syngeneic cells. The marked inability of the C6-Wistar allogeneic system to generate a reproducible model and the episodes of spontaneous tumor regression with this system may have been due to the increased humoral and cellular immune responses after tumor implantation.

  3. A population-based study of low-grade gliomas and mutated isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlrot, Rikke H; Kristensen, Bjarne W; Hjelmborg, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    Low-grade gliomas (LGG) have a slow growth rate, but transformations into malignant gliomas with a rapid deterioration occur in many patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate clinical prognostic factors in a population-based cohort of patients with LGG. In addition we investigated the expre...

  4. Eckol suppresses maintenance of stemness and malignancies in glioma stem-like cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyun, Kyung-Hwan; Yoon, Chang-Hwan; Kim, Rae-Kwon; Lim, Eun-Jung; An, Sungkwan; Park, Myung-Jin; Hyun, Jin-Won; Suh, Yongjoon; Kim, Min-Jung; Lee, Su-Jae

    2011-01-01

    A subpopulation of cancer cells with stem cell properties is responsible for tumor maintenance and progression, and may contribute to resistance to anticancer treatments. Thus, compounds that target cancer stem-like cells could be usefully applied to destroy cancer. In this study, we investigated the effect of Eckol, a phlorotannin compound, on stemness and malignancies in glioma stem-like cells. To determine whether Eckol targets glioma stem-like cells, we examined whether Eckol treatment could change the expression levels of glioma stem-like cell markers and self-renewal-related proteins as well as the sphere forming ability, and the sensitivity to anticancer treatments. Alterations in the malignant properties of sphere-derived cells by Eckol were also investigated by soft-agar colony forming assay, by xenograft assay in nude mice, and by cell invasion assay. Treatment of sphere-forming glioma cells with Eckol effectively decreased the sphere formation as well as the CD133 + cell population. Eckol treatment suppressed expression of the glioma stem-like cell markers and the self-renewal-related proteins without cell death. Moreover, treatment of glioma stem-like cells with Eckol significantly attenuated anchorage-independent growth on soft agar and tumor formation in xenograft mice. Importantly, Eckol treatment effectively reduced the resistance of glioma stem-like cells to ionizing radiation and temozolomide. Treatment of glioma stem-like cells with Eckol markedly blocked both phosphoinositide 3-kinase-Akt and Ras-Raf-1-Erk signaling pathways. These results indicate that the natural phlorotannin Eckol suppresses stemness and malignancies in glioma stem-like cells, and thereby makes glioma stem-like cells more sensitive to anticancer treatments, providing novel therapeutic strategies targeting specifically cancer stem-like cells.

  5. Glioma stem cells targeted by oncolytic virus carrying endostatin-angiostatin fusion gene and the expression of its exogenous gene in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guidong; Su, Wei; Jin, Guishan; Xu, Fujian; Hao, Shuyu; Guan, Fangxia; Jia, William; Liu, Fusheng

    2011-05-16

    The development of the cancer stem cell (CSCs) niche theory has provided a new target for the treatment of gliomas. Gene therapy using oncolytic viral vectors has shown great potential for the therapeutic targeting of CSCs. To explore whether a viral vector carrying an exogenous Endo-Angio fusion gene (VAE) can infect and kill glioma stem cells (GSCs), as well as inhibit their vascular niche in vitro, we have collected surgical specimens of human high-grade glioma (world health organization, WHO Classes III-VI) from which we isolated and cultured GSCs under conditions originally designed for the selective expansion of neural stem cells. Our results demonstrate the following: (1) Four lines of GSCs (isolated from 20 surgical specimens) could grow in suspension, were multipotent, had the ability to self-renew and expressed the neural stem cell markers, CD133 and nestin. (2) VAE could infect GSCs and significantly inhibit their viability. (3) The Endo-Angio fusion gene was expressed in GSCs 48 h after VAE infection and could inhibit the proliferation of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC). (4) Residual viable cells lose the ability of self-renewal and adherent differentiation. In conclusion, VAE can significantly inhibit the activity of GSCs in vitro and the expression of exogenous Endo-Angio fusion gene can inhibit HBMEC proliferation. VAE can be used as a novel virus-gene therapy strategy for glioma. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Regrowth patterns of supratentorial gliomas: estimation from computed tomographic scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuboi, K.; Yoshii, Y.; Nakagawa, K.; Maki, Y.

    1986-01-01

    To clarify the regrowth patterns of benign and malignant gliomas, we chose 27 intervals (between two operations or between an operation and autopsy) from 21 patients with pathologically verified recurrent supratentorial gliomas. Serial computed tomographic (CT) scans of these cases were analyzed to determine the doubling time (Td) calculated from the change in volume of enhanced and low density areas, the enhancement effect graded from 0 to 4 according to the Hounsfield number, and the presence of dissemination and contralateral extension. We studied 5 benign gliomas (including 1 case of radiation necrosis), 8 malignant astrocytomas, and 8 glioblastomas. The Td's of enhanced areas on CT scans of benign gliomas, malignant astrocytomas, and glioblastomas were 937 +/- 66.5 days, 65.1 +/- 29.4 days, and 48.1 +/- 20.9 days, respectively. The Td's of low density areas were 895 +/- 130.6 days, 70.8 +/- 22.2 days, and 50.5 +/- 14.7 days. There was a significant correlation between the Td's of the enhanced and low density areas (0.97). The enhancement effect increased at recurrence in 55% of the cases, with an average increase of 1.1 grades. The increase in enhancement effect at recurrence showed a tendency to become smaller as the tumor's degree of anaplasia increased. Radiotherapy was effective in significantly retarding the growth rate of malignant gliomas, whose Td's were doubled. Although the Td's of both enhanced and low density areas of benign gliomas were significantly longer than those of malignant gliomas, there was no significant difference in the Td's of enhanced areas between malignant astrocytomas and glioblastomas

  7. Nicotine enhances proliferation, migration, and radioresistance of human malignant glioma cells through EGFR activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil, A.A.; Jameson, M.J.; Broaddus, W.C.; Lin, P.S.; Chung, T.D.

    2013-01-01

    It has been suggested that continued tobacco use during radiation therapy contributes to maintenance of neoplastic growth despite treatment with radiation. Nicotine is a cigarette component that is an established risk factor for many diseases, neoplastic and otherwise. The hypothesis of this work is that nicotine promotes the proliferation, migration, and radioresistance of human malignant glioma cells. The effect of nicotine on cellular proliferation, migration, signaling, and radiation sensitivity were evaluated for malignant glioma U87 and GBM12 cells by use of the AlamarBlue, scratch healing, and clonogenic survival assays. Signal transduction was assessed by immunoblotting for activated EGFR, extracellular regulated kinase (ERK), and AKT. At concentrations comparable with those found in chronic smokers, nicotine induced malignant glioma cell migration, growth, colony formation, and radioresistance. Nicotine increased phosphorylation of EGFR tyr992 , AKT ser473 , and ERK. These molecular effects were reduced by pharmacological inhibitors of EGFR, PI3K, and MEK. It was therefore concluded that nicotine stimulates the malignant behavior of glioma cells in vitro by activation of the EGFR and downstream AKT and ERK pathways. (author)

  8. Astroglial c-Myc overexpression predisposes mice to primary malignant gliomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Niels Aagaard; Pedersen, Karen-Marie; Lihme, Frederikke

    2003-01-01

    Malignant astrocytomas are common human primary brain tumors that result from neoplastic transformation of astroglia or their progenitors. Here we show that deregulation of the c-Myc pathway in developing astroglia predisposes mice to malignant astrocytomas within 2-3 weeks of age. The genetically...... engineered murine (GEM) gliomas harbor a molecular signature resembling that of human primary glioblastoma multiforme, including up-regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor and Mdm2. The GEM gliomas seem to originate in an abnormal population of glial fibrillary acidic protein-expressing cells...... the neoplastic process, presumably by inducing the sustained growth of early astroglial cells. This is in contrast to most other transgenic studies in which c-Myc overexpression requires co-operating transgenes for rapid tumor induction....

  9. Upregulation of B23 promotes tumor cell proliferation and predicts poor prognosis in glioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jianguo [Department of Neurosurgery, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, 1055 Sanxiang Road, Suzhou, 215004, Jiangsu Province (China); Department of Neurosurgery, Affiliated Hospital of Nantong University, 20 Xisi Road, Nantong, 226001, Jiangsu Province (China); Sun, Jie; Yang, Liu; Yan, Yaohua; Shi, Wei; Shi, Jinlong; Huang, Qingfeng; Chen, Jian [Department of Neurosurgery, Affiliated Hospital of Nantong University, 20 Xisi Road, Nantong, 226001, Jiangsu Province (China); Lan, Qing, E-mail: lanqingsj@163.com [Department of Neurosurgery, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, 1055 Sanxiang Road, Suzhou, 215004, Jiangsu Province (China)

    2015-10-09

    B23 (also known as Nucleophosmin, NPM, numatrin or NO38) is a ubiquitously expressed phosphoprotein belonging to the nucleoplasmin family of chaperones. In this study we intended to investigate the clinical significance of B23 expression in human glioma and its biological function in glioma cells. Western blot and immunohistochemistry analysis showed that B23 was overexpressed in glioma tissues and glioma cell lines. In addition, the expression level of B23 was positively correlated with glioma pathological grade and Ki-67 expression. Kaplan–Meier analysis revealed that a higher B23 expression in patients with glioma was associated with a poorer prognosis. In vitro, after the release of glioma cell lines from serum starvation, the expression of B23 was upregulated, as well as PCNA (Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen) and cyclin A. In addition, knockdown of B23 by small interfering RNA transfection diminished the expression of PCNA, cyclin D1 and arrested cell growth at G1 phase. Taken together, our results implied that B23 could be a candidate prognostic biomarker as well as a potential therapeutical target of glioma. - Highlights: • B23 expression increased as the malignant degree of glioma increased, which was consistent with Ki-67 expression. • High expression of B23 could be a strong determinant of poor prognosis in glioma. • B23 may be involved in the proliferation of glioma in a cell-cycle-dependent pathway. • Knockdown of B23 expression by siRNA could affect the progression of glioma. • B23 may be a potential prognosis biomarker and a possible therapeutic target for glioma.

  10. Glioblastoma Inhibition by Cell Surface Immunoglobulin Protein EWI-2, In Vitro and In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana V. Kolesnikova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available EWI-2, a cell surface IgSF protein, is highly expressed in normal human brain but is considerably diminished in glioblastoma tumors and cell lines. Moreover, loss of EWI-2 expression correlated with a shorter survival time in human glioma patients, suggesting that EWI-2 might be a natural inhibitor of glioblastoma. In support of this idea, EWI-2 expression significantly impaired both ectopic and orthotopic tumor growth in nude mice in vivo. In vitro assays provided clues regarding EWI-2 functions. Expression of EWI-2 in T98G and/or U87-MG malignant glioblastoma cell lines failed to alter two-dimensional cell proliferation but inhibited glioblastoma colony formation in soft agar and caused diminished cell motility and invasion. At the biochemical level, EWI-2 markedly affects the organization of four molecules (tetraspanin proteins CD9 and CD81 and matrix metalloproteinases MMP-2 and MT1-MMP, which play key roles in the biology of astrocytes and gliomas. EWI-2 causes CD9 and CD81 to become more associated with each other, whereas CD81 and other tetraspanins become less associated with MMP-2 and MT1-MMP. We propose that EWI-2 inhibition of glioblastoma growth in vivo is at least partly explained by the capability of EWI-2 to inhibit growth and/or invasion in vitro. Underlying these functional effects, EWI-2 causes a substantial molecular reorganization of multiple molecules (CD81, CD9, MMP-2, and MT1-MMP known to affect proliferation and/or invasion of astrocytes and/or glioblastomas.

  11. Antibody guided diagnosis and therapy of brain gliomas using radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies against epidermal growth factor receptor and placental alkaline phosphatase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalofonos, H.P.; Pawlikowska, T.R.; Hemingway, A.

    1989-01-01

    Twenty-seven patients with brain glioma were scanned using 123 I-labeled monoclonal antibodies against epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR1) or placental alkaline phosphatase (H17E2). Successful localization was achieved in 18 out of 27 patients. Eleven out of 27 patients were also studied using a nonspecific control antibody (11.4.1) of the same immunoglobulin subclass and observable tumor localization was also achieved in five patients. The specificity of targeting was assessed by comparing images obtained with specific and nonspecific antibodies and by examining tumor and normal tissue biopsies after dual antibody administration. Ten patients with recurrent grade III or IV glioma who showed good localization of radiolabeled antibody were treated with 40-140 mCi of 131 I-labeled antibody delivered to the tumor area intravenously (n = 5) or by infusion into the internal carotid artery (n = 5). Six patients showed clinical improvement lasting from 6 mo to 3 yr. One patient continues in remission (3 yr after therapy), but the other five who responded initially relapsed 6-9 mo after therapy and died. No major toxicity was attributable to antibody-guided irradiation. Targeted irradiation by monoclonal antibody may be clinically useful and should be explored further in the treatment of brain gliomas resistant to conventional forms of treatment

  12. Sulindac Sulfide, but Not Sulindac Sulfone, Inhibits Colorectal Cancer Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher S. Williams

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Sulindac sulfide, a metabolite of the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID sulindac sulfoxide, is effective at reducing tumor burden in both familial adenomatous polyposis patients and in animals with colorectal cancer. Another sulindac sulfoxide metabolite, sulindac sulfone, has been reported to have antitumor properties without inhibiting cyclooxygenase activity. Here we report the effect of sulindac sulfone treatment on the growth of colorectal carcinoma cells. We observed that sulindac sulfide or sulfone treatment of HCA-7 cells led to inhibition of prostaglandin E2 production. Both sulindac sulfide and sulfone inhibited HCA-7 and HCT-116 cell growth in vitro. Sulindac sulfone had no effect on the growth of either HCA-7 or HCT-116 xenografts, whereas the sulfide derivative inhibited HCA-7 growth in vivo. Both sulindac sulfide and sulfone inhibited colon carcinoma cell growth and prostaglandin production in vitro, but sulindac sulfone had no effect on the growth of colon cancer cell xenografts in nude mice.

  13. Equol inhibits growth, induces atresia, and inhibits steroidogenesis of mouse antral follicles in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahalingam, Sharada; Gao, Liying; Gonnering, Marni; Helferich, William; Flaws, Jodi A.

    2016-01-01

    Equol is a non-steroidal estrogen metabolite produced by microbial conversion of daidzein, a major soy isoflavone, in the gut of some humans and many animal species. Isoflavones and their metabolites can affect endogenous estradiol production, action, and metabolism, potentially influencing ovarian follicle function. However, no studies have examined the effects of equol on intact ovarian antral follicles, which are responsible for sex steroid synthesis and further development into ovulatory follicles. Thus, the present study tested the hypothesis that equol inhibits antral follicle growth, increases follicle atresia, and inhibits steroidogenesis in the adult mouse ovary. To test this hypothesis, antral follicles isolated from adult CD-1 mice were cultured with vehicle control (dimethyl sulfoxide; DMSO) or equol (600 nM, 6 μM, 36 μM, and 100 μM) for 48 and 96 h. Every 24 h, follicle diameters were measured to monitor growth. At 48 and 96 h, the culture medium was subjected to measurement of hormone levels, and the cultured follicles were subjected to gene expression analysis. Additionally, follicles were histologically evaluated for signs of atresia after 96 h of culture. The results indicate that equol (100 μM) inhibited follicle growth, altered the mRNA levels of bcl2-associated X protein and B cell leukemia/lymphoma 2, and induced follicle atresia. Further, equol decreased the levels of estradiol, testosterone, androstenedione, and progesterone, and it decreased mRNA levels of cholesterol side-chain cleavage, steroid 17-α-hydroxalase, and aromatase. Collectively, these data indicate that equol inhibits growth, increases atresia, and inhibits steroidogenesis of cultured mouse antral follicles. - Highlights: • Equol exposure inhibits antral follicle growth. • Equol exposure increases follicle atresia. • Equol exposure inhibits sex steroid hormone levels. • Equol exposure inhibits mRNA levels of certain steroidogenic enzymes.

  14. Equol inhibits growth, induces atresia, and inhibits steroidogenesis of mouse antral follicles in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahalingam, Sharada, E-mail: mahalin2@illinois.edu [Department of Comparative Biosciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, 2001 S. Lincoln Ave, Urbana, IL 61802 (United States); Gao, Liying, E-mail: lgao@uiuc.edu [Department of Comparative Biosciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, 2001 S. Lincoln Ave, Urbana, IL 61802 (United States); Gonnering, Marni, E-mail: mgonne2@illinois.edu [Department of Comparative Biosciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, 2001 S. Lincoln Ave, Urbana, IL 61802 (United States); Helferich, William, E-mail: helferic@illinois.edu [Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, University of Illinois, 905 S. Goodwin, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Flaws, Jodi A., E-mail: jflaws@illinois.edu [Department of Comparative Biosciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, 2001 S. Lincoln Ave, Urbana, IL 61802 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Equol is a non-steroidal estrogen metabolite produced by microbial conversion of daidzein, a major soy isoflavone, in the gut of some humans and many animal species. Isoflavones and their metabolites can affect endogenous estradiol production, action, and metabolism, potentially influencing ovarian follicle function. However, no studies have examined the effects of equol on intact ovarian antral follicles, which are responsible for sex steroid synthesis and further development into ovulatory follicles. Thus, the present study tested the hypothesis that equol inhibits antral follicle growth, increases follicle atresia, and inhibits steroidogenesis in the adult mouse ovary. To test this hypothesis, antral follicles isolated from adult CD-1 mice were cultured with vehicle control (dimethyl sulfoxide; DMSO) or equol (600 nM, 6 μM, 36 μM, and 100 μM) for 48 and 96 h. Every 24 h, follicle diameters were measured to monitor growth. At 48 and 96 h, the culture medium was subjected to measurement of hormone levels, and the cultured follicles were subjected to gene expression analysis. Additionally, follicles were histologically evaluated for signs of atresia after 96 h of culture. The results indicate that equol (100 μM) inhibited follicle growth, altered the mRNA levels of bcl2-associated X protein and B cell leukemia/lymphoma 2, and induced follicle atresia. Further, equol decreased the levels of estradiol, testosterone, androstenedione, and progesterone, and it decreased mRNA levels of cholesterol side-chain cleavage, steroid 17-α-hydroxalase, and aromatase. Collectively, these data indicate that equol inhibits growth, increases atresia, and inhibits steroidogenesis of cultured mouse antral follicles. - Highlights: • Equol exposure inhibits antral follicle growth. • Equol exposure increases follicle atresia. • Equol exposure inhibits sex steroid hormone levels. • Equol exposure inhibits mRNA levels of certain steroidogenic enzymes.

  15. Genetic Alterations in Glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bralten, Linda B. C.; French, Pim J.

    2011-01-01

    Gliomas are the most common type of primary brain tumor and have a dismal prognosis. Understanding the genetic alterations that drive glioma formation and progression may help improve patient prognosis by identification of novel treatment targets. Recently, two major studies have performed in-depth mutation analysis of glioblastomas (the most common and aggressive subtype of glioma). This systematic approach revealed three major pathways that are affected in glioblastomas: The receptor tyrosine kinase signaling pathway, the TP53 pathway and the pRB pathway. Apart from frequent mutations in the IDH1/2 gene, much less is known about the causal genetic changes of grade II and III (anaplastic) gliomas. Exceptions include TP53 mutations and fusion genes involving the BRAF gene in astrocytic and pilocytic glioma subtypes, respectively. In this review, we provide an update on all common events involved in the initiation and/or progression across the different subtypes of glioma and provide future directions for research into the genetic changes

  16. Cortical GABAergic excitation contributes to epileptic activities around human glioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallud, Johan; Varlet, Pascale; Cresto, Noemie; Baulac, Michel; Duyckaerts, Charles; Kourdougli, Nazim; Chazal, Geneviève; Devaux, Bertrand; Rivera, Claudio; Miles, Richard; Capelle, Laurent; Huberfeld, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Diffuse brain gliomas induce seizures in a majority of patients. As in most epileptic disorders, excitatory glutamatergic mechanisms are involved in the generation of epileptic activities in the neocortex surrounding gliomas. However, chloride homeostasis is known to be perturbed in glial tumor cells. Thus the contribution of GABAergic mechanisms which depend on intracellular chloride and which are defective or pro-epileptic in other structural epilepsies merits closer study. Objective We studied in neocortical slices from the peritumoral security margin resected around human brain gliomas, the occurrence, networks, cells and signaling basis of epileptic activities. Results Postoperative glioma tissue from 69% of patients spontaneously generated interictal-like discharges. These events were synchronized, with a high frequency oscillation signature, in superficial layers of neocortex around glioma areas with tumor infiltration. Interictal-like events depended on both glutamatergic transmission and on depolarizing GABAergic signaling. About 65% of pyramidal cells were depolarized by GABA released by interneurons. This effect was related to perturbations in Chloride homeostasis, due to changes in expression of chloride co-transporters: KCC2 was reduced and expression of NKCC1 increased. Ictal-like activities were initiated by convulsant stimuli exclusively in these epileptogenic areas. Conclusions Epileptic activities are sustained by excitatory effects of GABA in the peritumoral human neocortex, as in temporal lobe epilepsies. Glutamate and GABA signaling are involved in oncogenesis and chloride homeostasis is perturbed. These same factors, induce an imbalance between synaptic excitatory and inhibition underly epileptic discharges in tumor patients. PMID:25009229

  17. Neutron capture therapy of epidermal growth factor (+) gliomas using boronated cetuximab (IMC-C225) as a delivery agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barth, Rolf F. E-mail: barth.1@osu.edu; Wu Gong; Yang Weilian; Binns, Peter J.; Riley, Kent J.; Patel, Hemant; Coderre, Jeffrey A.; Tjarks, Werner; Bandyopadhyaya, A.K.; Thirumamagal, B.T.S.; Ciesielski, Michael J.; Fenstermaker, Robert A

    2004-11-01

    Cetuximab (IMC-C225) is a monoclonal antibody directed against both the wild-type and mutant vIII isoform of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the monoclonal antibody (MoAb), cetuximab, as a boron delivery agent for neutron capture therapy (NCT) of brain tumors. Twenty-four hours following intratumoral (i.t.) administration of boronated cetuximab (C225-G5-B{sub 1100}), the mean boron concentration in rats bearing either F98{sub EGFR} or F98{sub WT} gliomas were 92.3{+-}23.3 {mu}g/g and 36.5{+-}18.8 {mu}g/g, respectively. In contrast, the uptake of boronated dendrimer (G5-B{sub 1000}) was 6.7{+-}3.6 {mu}g/g. Based on its favorable in vivo uptake, C225-G5-B{sub 1100} was evaluated as a delivery agent for BNCT in F98{sub EGFR} glioma bearing rats. The mean survival time (MST) of rats that received C225-G5-B{sub 1100}, administered by convection enhanced delivery (CED), was 45{+-}3 d compared to 25{+-}3 d for untreated control animals. A further enhancement in MST to >59 d was obtained by administering C225-G5-B{sub 1100} in combination with i.v. boronophenylalanine (BPA). These data are the first to demonstrate the efficacy of a boronated MoAb for BNCT of an intracerebral (i.c.) glioma and are paradigmatic for future studies using a combination of boronated MoAbs and low molecular weight delivery agents.

  18. TGF-b and a specific TGF-b inhibitor regulate pericentrin B and MYH9 in glioma cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Óscar Álzate

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant gliomas are heterogeneous, highly invasive vascular tumours. The multifunctional cytokine, transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-P, is expressed by grade III/IV gliomas and promotes tumour angiogenesis, invasión and immune escape. It has been shown previously that a small TGF-P receptor type I (TGF-(3-RI molecule inhibitor (SB-431542 blocks TGF-(3-mediated signal transduction, induction of angiogenic factor expression and cellular motility. As glioma cell lines display differential sensitivity to TGF-P, it was expected that they would also be differentially impacted by disruption of TGF-P signalling. Differential in gel expression (DIGE analysis and mass spectrometry was used in this work for determining protein regulation effects of both TGF-P and SB-431542 on human glioma cell lines. It was found that pericentrin B and non muscle myosin were differentially expressed in fragments which likely resulted from protease activation by the tumour growth mechanism. These results suggest that both pericentrin B and non-muscle myosin might be potential glioma biomarkers. Key words: DIGE, proteomics, glioma, TGF-P, mass spectrometry, non muscle myosin, pericentrin B.

  19. Gliomas and the vascular fragility of the blood brain barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Gustavo eDubois

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Astrocytes, members of the glial family, interact through the exchange of soluble factors or by directly contacting neurons and other brain cells, such as microglia and endothelial cells. Astrocytic projections interact with vessels and act as additional elements of the Blood Brain Barrier (BBB. By mechanisms not fully understood, astrocytes can undergo oncogenic transformation and give rise to gliomas. The tumors take advantage of the BBB to ensure survival and continuous growth. A glioma can develop into a very aggressive tumor, the glioblastoma (GBM, characterized by a highly heterogeneous cell population (including tumor stem cells, extensive proliferation and migration. Nevertheless, gliomas can also give rise to slow growing tumors and in both cases, the afflux of blood, via BBB is crucial. Glioma cells migrate to different regions of the brain guided by the extension of blood vessels, colonizing the healthy adjacent tissue. In the clinical context, GBM can lead to tumor-derived seizures, which represent a challenge to patients and clinicians, since drugs used for its treatment must be able to cross the BBB. Uncontrolled and fast growth also leads to the disruption of the chimeric and fragile vessels in the tumor mass resulting in peritumoral edema. Although hormonal therapy is currently used to control the edema, it is not always efficient. In this review we comment the points cited above, considering the importance of the blood brain barrier and the concerns that arise when this barrier is affected.

  20. Transcriptional differences between normal and glioma-derived glial progenitor cells identify a core set of dysregulated genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auvergne, Romane M; Sim, Fraser J; Wang, Su; Chandler-Militello, Devin; Burch, Jaclyn; Al Fanek, Yazan; Davis, Danielle; Benraiss, Abdellatif; Walter, Kevin; Achanta, Pragathi; Johnson, Mahlon; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Natesan, Sridaran; Ford, Heide L; Goldman, Steven A

    2013-06-27

    Glial progenitor cells (GPCs) are a potential source of malignant gliomas. We used A2B5-based sorting to extract tumorigenic GPCs from human gliomas spanning World Health Organization grades II-IV. Messenger RNA profiling identified a cohort of genes that distinguished A2B5+ glioma tumor progenitor cells (TPCs) from A2B5+ GPCs isolated from normal white matter. A core set of genes and pathways was substantially dysregulated in A2B5+ TPCs, which included the transcription factor SIX1 and its principal cofactors, EYA1 and DACH2. Small hairpin RNAi silencing of SIX1 inhibited the expansion of glioma TPCs in vitro and in vivo, suggesting a critical and unrecognized role of the SIX1-EYA1-DACH2 system in glioma genesis or progression. By comparing the expression patterns of glioma TPCs with those of normal GPCs, we have identified a discrete set of pathways by which glial tumorigenesis may be better understood and more specifically targeted. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Premature Senescence Induced by Ionizing Radiation Requires AKT Activity and Reactive Oxygen Species in Glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Je Jung; Kim, Bong Cho; Yoo, Hee Jung; Lee, Jae Seon

    2010-01-01

    Loss of PTEN, a tumor suppressor gene has frequently observed in human gliomas, which conferred AKT activation and resistance to ionizing radiation (IR) and anti-cancer drugs. Recent reports have shown that AKT activation induces premature senescence through increase of oxygen consumption and inhibition of expression of ROS scavenging enzymes. In this study, we compared cellular response to IR in the PTEN-deficient U87, U251, U373 or PTEN-proficient LN18, LN428 glioma cells

  2. Decreased expression of LATS1 is correlated with the progression and prognosis of glioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Tianhai

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background LATS1 is a tumor suppressor genes implicated in the pathogenesis of certain types of tumors, but its role is not known in human glioma. Methods Using real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry, we detected the mRNA and protein expression of LATS1 in glioma. The effect of LATS1 on cell growth and invasion were investigated. Results We found that mRNA and protein of LATS1 expression is significantly downregulated in glioma compared with normal control brain tissues. Furthermore, reduced LATS1 expression was markedly negatively correlated with WHO grade and KPS (p Conclusion These results indicate that LATS1 is an important candidate tumor suppressor and its downregulated expression may contribute to glioma progression.

  3. Products of cells from gliomas: VIII. Multiple-well immunoperoxidase assay of immunoreactivity of primary hybridoma supernatants with human glioma and brain tissue and cultured glioma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeever, P E; Wahl, R L; Shakui, P; Jackson, G A; Letica, L H; Liebert, M; Taren, J A; Beierwaltes, W H; Hoff, J T

    1990-06-01

    To test the feasibility of primary screening of hybridoma supernatants against human glioma tissue, over 5000 combinations of hybridoma supernatants with glioma tissue, cultured glioma cells, and normal central neural tissue were screened with a new multiple-well (M-well) screening system. This is an immunoperoxidase assay system with visual endpoints for screening 20-30 hybridoma supernatants per single microscope slide. There were extensive differences between specificities to tissue and to cultured glioma cells when both were screened with M-wells and when cultured cells were screened with standard semi-automated fluorescence. Primary M-well screening with glioma tissue detected seven hybridoma supernatants that specifically identified parenchymal cells of glioma tissue and that were not detected with cultured cells. Immunoreactivities of individual supernatants for vascular components (nine supernatants), necrosis (five supernatants), and nuclei (three supernatants) were detected. Other supernatants bound multiple sites on glioma tissue and/or subpopulations of neurons and glia of normal tissue. The results show that primary screening with glioma tissue detects a number of different specificities of hybridoma supernatants to gliomas not detected by conventional screening with cultured cells. These are potentially applicable to diagnosis and therapy.

  4. Regrowth patterns of supratentorial gliomas: estimation from computed tomographic scans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuboi, K.; Yoshii, Y.; Nakagawa, K.; Maki, Y.

    1986-12-01

    To clarify the regrowth patterns of benign and malignant gliomas, we chose 27 intervals (between two operations or between an operation and autopsy) from 21 patients with pathologically verified recurrent supratentorial gliomas. Serial computed tomographic (CT) scans of these cases were analyzed to determine the doubling time (Td) calculated from the change in volume of enhanced and low density areas, the enhancement effect graded from 0 to 4 according to the Hounsfield number, and the presence of dissemination and contralateral extension. We studied 5 benign gliomas (including 1 case of radiation necrosis), 8 malignant astrocytomas, and 8 glioblastomas. The Td's of enhanced areas on CT scans of benign gliomas, malignant astrocytomas, and glioblastomas were 937 +/- 66.5 days, 65.1 +/- 29.4 days, and 48.1 +/- 20.9 days, respectively. The Td's of low density areas were 895 +/- 130.6 days, 70.8 +/- 22.2 days, and 50.5 +/- 14.7 days. There was a significant correlation between the Td's of the enhanced and low density areas (0.97). The enhancement effect increased at recurrence in 55% of the cases, with an average increase of 1.1 grades. The increase in enhancement effect at recurrence showed a tendency to become smaller as the tumor's degree of anaplasia increased. Radiotherapy was effective in significantly retarding the growth rate of malignant gliomas, whose Td's were doubled. Although the Td's of both enhanced and low density areas of benign gliomas were significantly longer than those of malignant gliomas, there was no significant difference in the Td's of enhanced areas between malignant astrocytomas and glioblastomas.

  5. Antibody guided irradiation of brain glioma by arterial infusion of radioactive monoclonal antibody against epidermal growth factor receptor and blood group A antigen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epenetos, A.A.; Courtenay-Luck, N.; Pickering, D.; Hooker, G.; Lavender, J.P.; McKenzie, C.G. (Hammersmith Hospital, London (UK)); Durbin, H. (Imperial Cancer Research Fund, London (UK). Labs.)

    1985-05-18

    In a patient with recurrent grade IV glioma of the brain resistant to conventional treatment an antibody guided isotopic scan showed uptake by the tumour of a monoclonal antibody (9A) that was developed against epidermal growth factor receptor but cross reacted with blood group A antigen. As a therapeutic attempt antibody labelled with 1665 MBq (45.0 mCi) iodine-131 was delivered to the tumour area by infusion into the internal carotid artery. Computed tomography showed regression of the tumour after treatment, and an appreciable and sustained clinical improvement was noted without any toxicity. Delivery of irradiation guided by monoclonal antibody delivered by arterial infusion of the tumour area may be of clinical value in the treatment of brain gliomas resistant to conventional forms of treatment.

  6. Fenofibrate dose not protect glioma cells from irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ro, Jae Lim; Kim, Won Dong; Park, Woo Yoon

    2012-01-01

    Fenofibrate(FF) is a ligand for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α and used clinically as a hypolipidemic drug. FF has been reported to have a radioprotective effect of newborn cells in the dentate gyrus 1) and inhibit radiation-induced microglial pro-inflammatory response 2). However, if FF also protect tumor cells, it can not be used clinically during radiotherapy. Thus, we're interested in whether FF has an radioprotective effect of brain tumor cells or not Although the radiosensitive G0/G1 phase cells were increased, radiosensitization by FF was not observed in three human glioma cells. This may be due to counterbalance of radiosensitizing and radioprotecting proteins increased by FF. Taken together, FF neither radiosensitize nor radioprotect glioma cells, so it can be used to protect normal neural cells from radiation damage

  7. MicroRNA in Human Glioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Mengfeng, E-mail: limf@mail.sysu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Tropical Disease Control (Sun Yat-sen University), Chinese Ministry of Education, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Department of Microbiology, Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Li, Jun [Key Laboratory of Tropical Disease Control (Sun Yat-sen University), Chinese Ministry of Education, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Department of Biochemistry, Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Liu, Lei; Li, Wei [Key Laboratory of Tropical Disease Control (Sun Yat-sen University), Chinese Ministry of Education, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Department of Microbiology, Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Yang, Yi [Key Laboratory of Tropical Disease Control (Sun Yat-sen University), Chinese Ministry of Education, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Department of Pharmacology, Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Yuan, Jie [Key Laboratory of Tropical Disease Control (Sun Yat-sen University), Chinese Ministry of Education, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Key Laboratory of Functional Molecules from Oceanic Microorganisms (Sun Yat-sen University), Department of Education of Guangdong Province, Guangzhou 510080 (China)

    2013-10-23

    Glioma represents a serious health problem worldwide. Despite advances in surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and targeting therapy, the disease remains one of the most lethal malignancies in humans, and new approaches to improvement of the efficacy of anti-glioma treatments are urgently needed. Thus, new therapeutic targets and tools should be developed based on a better understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of glioma. In this context, microRNAs (miRNAs), a class of small, non-coding RNAs, play a pivotal role in the development of the malignant phenotype of glioma cells, including cell survival, proliferation, differentiation, tumor angiogenesis, and stem cell generation. This review will discuss the biological functions of miRNAs in human glioma and their implications in improving clinical diagnosis, prediction of prognosis, and anti-glioma therapy.

  8. MicroRNA in Human Glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Mengfeng; Li, Jun; Liu, Lei; Li, Wei; Yang, Yi; Yuan, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Glioma represents a serious health problem worldwide. Despite advances in surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and targeting therapy, the disease remains one of the most lethal malignancies in humans, and new approaches to improvement of the efficacy of anti-glioma treatments are urgently needed. Thus, new therapeutic targets and tools should be developed based on a better understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of glioma. In this context, microRNAs (miRNAs), a class of small, non-coding RNAs, play a pivotal role in the development of the malignant phenotype of glioma cells, including cell survival, proliferation, differentiation, tumor angiogenesis, and stem cell generation. This review will discuss the biological functions of miRNAs in human glioma and their implications in improving clinical diagnosis, prediction of prognosis, and anti-glioma therapy

  9. Proposal for development of a system for planning radiotherapy of gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldeira, Alexandre D.

    2015-01-01

    In the last three years, discussions were held on several topics in Nuclear Medicine area, starting with the nuclear data processing, passing by deterministic and stochastic mathematical methods, and finalizing with computer simulations of the following phenomena: neutron transport, applied to boron neutron capture therapy, and neutron diffusion, to study growth of tumor cells. From a mathematical model applied to radiotherapy of gliomas available in literature, it is proposed a strategy for development of a computer system to assist the planning radiotherapy of gliomas. (author)

  10. Tumor Restrictive Suicide Gene Therapy for Glioma Controlled by the FOS Promoter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianqing Pan

    Full Text Available Effective suicide gene delivery and expression are crucial to achieving successful effects in gene therapy. An ideal tumor-specific promoter expresses therapeutic genes in tumor cells with minimal normal tissue expression. We compared the activity of the FOS (FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homolog promoter with five alternative tumor-specific promoters in glioma cells and non-malignant astrocytes. The FOS promoter caused significantly higher transcriptional activity in glioma cell lines than all alternative promoters with the exception of CMV. The FOS promoter showed 13.9%, 32.4%, and 70.8% of the transcriptional activity of CMV in three glioma cell lines (U87, U251, and U373. Importantly, however, the FOS promoter showed only 1.6% of the transcriptional activity of CMV in normal astrocytes. We also tested the biologic activity of recombinant adenovirus containing the suicide gene herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk driven by the FOS promoter, including selective killing efficacy in vitro and tumor inhibition rate in vivo. Adenoviral-mediated delivery of the HSV-tk gene controlled by the FOS promoter conferred a cytotoxic effect on human glioma cells in vitro and in vivo. This study suggests that use of the FOS-tk adenovirus system is a promising strategy for glioma-specific gene therapy but still much left for improvement.

  11. Immunohistochemical expression of stem cell, endothelial cell, and chemosensitivity markers in primary glioma spheroids cultured in serum-containing and serum-free medium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Karina; Aaberg-Jessen, Charlotte; Andersen, Claus

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the influence of serum-free medium (SFM) supplemented with epidermal growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor compared with conventional serum-containing medium (SCM) on the phenotype of organotypic primary spheroids from seven gliomas.......To investigate the influence of serum-free medium (SFM) supplemented with epidermal growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor compared with conventional serum-containing medium (SCM) on the phenotype of organotypic primary spheroids from seven gliomas....

  12. Perspectives in Intraoperative Diagnostics of Human Gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Tyurikova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Amongst large a variety of oncological diseases, malignant gliomas represent one of the most severe types of tumors. They are also the most common type of the brain tumors and account for over half of the astrocytic tumors. According to different sources, the average life expectancy of patients with various glioblastomas varies between 10 and 12 months and that of patients with anaplastic astrocytic tumors between 20 and 24 months. Therefore, studies of the physiology of transformed glial cells are critical for the development of treatment methods. Modern medical approaches offer complex procedures, including the microsurgical tumor removal, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy, supplemented with photodynamic therapy and immunotherapy. The most radical of them is surgical resection, which allows removing the largest part of the tumor, reduces the intracranial hypertension, and minimizes the degree of neurological deficit. However, complete removal of the tumor remains impossible. The main limitations are insufficient visualization of glioma boundaries, due to its infiltrative growth, and the necessity to preserve healthy tissue. This review is devoted to the description of advantages and disadvantages of modern intraoperative diagnostics of human gliomas and highlights potential perspectives for development of their treatment.

  13. Prevention of 5-fluorouracil-caused growth inhibition in Sordaria fimicola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoen, H F; Berech, J

    1977-02-01

    Growth (dry weight accumulation) of Sordaria fimicola in standing liquid culture (sucrose-nitrate-salts-vitamins) is inhibited by the presence of 5 muM 5-fluorouracil in the medium. This inhibition is completely prevented by uracil, deoxyuridine, and 5-bromouracil, partly prevented (40 to 90% of growth observed without 5-fluorouracil) by uridine, thymidine, and 5-bromodeoxyuridine, and slightly prevented by trifluorothymine, cytosine, cytidine, deoxycytidine, and 5-methylcytosine (all at 0.5 to 1 mM). Thymidine and thymine riboside were without any apparent effect. Growth is also inhibited by 0.2 mM 6-azauracil, and this inhibition was completely prevented by uracil and uridine, partly prevented by deoxyuridine, 5-bromouracil, cytidine, and 5-methylcytosine, and slightly prevented by thymine, thymidine, 5-bromodeoxyuridine, cytosine, and deoxycytidine. The data suggest that the observed inhibition of growth by 5-fluorouracil is due to inhibition of both ribonucleic acid and deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis. The data also allow inferences concerning pyrimidine interconversions in S. fimicola; i.e., thymine can be anabolized to thymidylic acid without first being demethylated, although demethylation appears to occur also.

  14. The neural stem cell fate determinant TLX promotes tumorigenesis and genesis of cells resembling glioma stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyo-Jung; Kim, Jun-Kyum; Jeon, Hye-Min; Oh, Se-Yeong; Kim, Sung-Hak; Nam, Do-Hyun; Kim, Hyunggee

    2010-11-01

    A growing body of evidence indicates that deregulation of stem cell fate determinants is a hallmark of many types of malignancies. The neural stem cell fate determinant TLX plays a pivotal role in neurogenesis in the adult brain by maintaining neural stem cells. Here, we report a tumorigenic role of TLX in brain tumor initiation and progression. Increased TLX expression was observed in a number of glioma cells and glioma stem cells, and correlated with poor survival of patients with gliomas. Ectopic expression of TLX in the U87MG glioma cell line and Ink4a/Arf-deficient mouse astrocytes (Ink4a/Arf(-/-) astrocytes) induced cell proliferation with a concomitant increase in cyclin D expression, and accelerated foci formation in soft agar and tumor formation in in vivo transplantation assays. Furthermore, overexpression of TLX in Ink4a/Arf(-/-) astrocytes inhibited cell migration and invasion and promoted neurosphere formation and Nestin expression, which are hallmark characteristics of glioma stem cells, under stem cell culture conditions. Our results indicate that TLX is involved in glioma stem cell genesis and represents a potential therapeutic target for this type of malignancy.

  15. Known glioma risk loci are associated with glioma with a family history of brain tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melin, Beatrice; Dahlin, Anna M; Andersson, Ulrika

    2013-01-01

    significantly associated with glioma risk, rs6010620 (ORtrend for the minor (A) allele, 0.39; 95% CI: 0.25-0.61; Bonferroni adjusted ptrend , 1.7 × 10(-4) ). In conclusion, as previously shown for glioma regardless of family history of brain tumours, rs6010620 (RTEL1) was associated with an increased risk...... family history of brain tumours, defined as having at least one first- or second-degree relative with a history of brain tumour, are associated with known glioma risk loci. One thousand four hundred and thirty-one glioma cases and 2,868 cancer-free controls were identified from four case-control studies...... and two prospective cohorts from USA, Sweden and Denmark and genotyped for seven SNPs previously reported to be associated with glioma risk in case-control designed studies. Odds ratios were calculated by unconditional logistic regression. In analyses including glioma cases with a family history of brain...

  16. Fluoxetine regulates cell growth inhibition of interferon-α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Min; Yu, Bu-Chin; Chiu, Wen-Tai; Sun, Hung-Yu; Chien, Yu-Chieh; Su, Hui-Chen; Yen, Shu-Yang; Lai, Hsin-Wen; Bai, Chyi-Huey; Young, Kung-Chia; Tsao, Chiung-Wen

    2016-10-01

    Fluoxetine, a well-known anti-depression agent, may act as a chemosensitizer to assist and promote cancer therapy. However, how fluoxetine regulates cellular signaling to enhance cellular responses against tumor cell growth remains unclear. In the present study, addition of fluoxetine promoted growth inhibition of interferon-alpha (IFN-α) in human bladder carcinoma cells but not in normal uroepithelial cells through lessening the IFN-α-induced apoptosis but switching to cause G1 arrest, and maintaining the IFN-α-mediated reduction in G2/M phase. Activations and signal transducer and transactivator (STAT)-1 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR-α) were involved in this process. Chemical inhibitions of STAT-1 or PPAR-α partially rescued bladder carcinoma cells from IFN-α-mediated growth inhibition via blockades of G1 arrest, cyclin D1 reduction, p53 downregulation and p27 upregulation in the presence of fluoxetine. However, the functions of both proteins were not involved in the control of fluoxetine over apoptosis and maintained the declined G2/M phase of IFN-α. These results indicated that activation of PPAR-α and STAT-1 participated, at least in part, in growth inhibition of IFN-α in the presence of fluoxetine.

  17. Antitumor effects of cannabidiol, a nonpsychoactive cannabinoid, on human glioma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massi, Paola; Vaccani, Angelo; Ceruti, Stefania; Colombo, Arianna; Abbracchio, Maria P; Parolaro, Daniela

    2004-03-01

    Recently, cannabinoids (CBs) have been shown to possess antitumor properties. Because the psychoactivity of cannabinoid compounds limits their medicinal usage, we undertook the present study to evaluate the in vitro antiproliferative ability of cannabidiol (CBD), a nonpsychoactive cannabinoid compound, on U87 and U373 human glioma cell lines. The addition of CBD to the culture medium led to a dramatic drop of mitochondrial oxidative metabolism [3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H tetrazolium bromide test] and viability in glioma cells, in a concentration-dependent manner that was already evident 24 h after CBD exposure, with an apparent IC(50) of 25 microM. The antiproliferative effect of CBD was partially prevented by the CB2 receptor antagonist N-[(1S)-endo-1,3,3-trimethylbicyclo[2,2,1]heptan-2-yl]-5-(4-chloro-3-methylphenyl)-1-(4-methylbenzyl)-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (SR144528; SR2) and alpha-tocopherol. By contrast, the CB1 cannabinoid receptor antagonist N-(piperidin-1-yl)-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboximide hydrochloride (SR141716; SR1), capsazepine (vanilloid receptor antagonist), the inhibitors of ceramide generation, or pertussis toxin did not counteract CBD effects. We also show, for the first time, that the antiproliferative effect of CBD was correlated to induction of apoptosis, as determined by cytofluorimetric analysis and single-strand DNA staining, which was not reverted by cannabinoid antagonists. Finally, CBD, administered s.c. to nude mice at the dose of 0.5 mg/mouse, significantly inhibited the growth of subcutaneously implanted U87 human glioma cells. In conclusion, the nonpsychoactive CBD was able to produce a significant antitumor activity both in vitro and in vivo, thus suggesting a possible application of CBD as an antineoplastic agent.

  18. Decreased FOXD3 Expression Is Associated with Poor Prognosis in Patients with High-Grade Gliomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Du

    Full Text Available The transcription factor forkhead box D3 (FOXD3 plays important roles in the development of neural crest and has been shown to suppress the development of various cancers. However, the expression and its potential biological roles of FOXD3 in high-grade gliomas (HGGs remain unknown.The mRNA and protein expression levels of FOXD3 were examined using real-time quantitative PCR and western blotting in 23 HGG and 13 normal brain samples, respectively. Immunohistochemistry was used to validate the expression FOXD3 protein in 184 HGG cases. The association between FOXD3 expression and the prognosis of HGG patients were analyzed using Kaplan-Meier survival curves and Cox proportional hazards regression models. In addition, we further examined the effects of FOXD3 on the proliferation and serum starvation-induced apoptosis of glioma cells.In comparison to normal brain tissues, FOXD3 expression was significantly decreased in HGG tissues at both mRNA and protein levels. Immunohistochemistry further validated the expression of FOXD3 in HGG tissues. Moreover, low FOXD3 expression was significantly associated with poor prognosis in HGG patients. Depletion of FOXD3 expression promoted glioma cell proliferation and inhibited serum starvation-induced apoptosis, whereas overexpression of FOXD3 inhibited glioma cell proliferation and promoted serum starvation-induced apoptosis.Our results indicated that FOXD3 might serve as an independent prognostic biomarker and a potential therapeutic target for HGGs, which warrant further investigation.

  19. TCGA_LowerGradeGliomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    TCGA researchers analyzed nearly 300 cases of diffuse low- and intermediate-grade gliomas, which together comprise lower-grade gliomas. LGGs occur mainly in adults and include astrocytomas, oligodendrogliomas and oligoastrocytomas.

  20. E-cadherin homophilic ligation inhibits cell growth and epidermal growth factor receptor signaling independently of other cell interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perrais, Michaël; Chen, Xiao; Perez-Moreno, Mirna

    2007-01-01

    growth inhibitory signals. To address this question, we have selectively formed E-cadherin homophilic bonds at the cell surface of isolated epithelial cells by using functionally active recombinant E-cadherin protein attached to microspheres. We find that E-cadherin ligation alone reduces the frequency...... of cells entering the S phase, demonstrating that E-cadherin ligation directly transduces growth inhibitory signals. E-cadherin binding to beta-catenin is required for cell growth inhibition, but beta-catenin/T-cell factor transcriptional activity is not involved in growth inhibition resulting from...... homophilic binding. Neither E-cadherin binding to p120-catenin nor beta-catenin binding to alpha-catenin, and thereby the actin cytoskeleton, is required for growth inhibition. E-cadherin ligation also inhibits epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor-mediated growth signaling by a beta...

  1. Osteopontin and splice variant expression level in human malignant glioma: Radiobiologic effects and prognosis after radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Güttler, Antje; Giebler, Maria; Cuno, Peter; Wichmann, Henri; Keßler, Jacqueline; Ostheimer, Christian; Söling, Ariane; Strauss, Christian; Illert, Jörg; Kappler, Matthias; Vordermark, Dirk; Bache, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: We investigated the role of the hypoxia-associated secreted glycoprotein osteopontin (OPN) in the response of malignant glioma to radiotherapy by characterizing OPN and its splice variants in vitro and in patient material. Material and methods: The effect of siRNA knockdown of OPN splice variants on cellular and radiobiologic behavior was analyzed in U251MG cells using OpnS siRNA (inhibition of all OPN splice variants) and OpnAC siRNA (knockdown only of OPNa and OPNc). OPN and splice variant mRNA levels were quantified in archival material of 41 glioblastoma tumor samples. Plasma OPN was prospectively measured in 33 malignant glioma patients. Results: Inhibition of OPNa and OPNc (OpnAC) reduced clonogenic survival in U251MG cells but did not affect proliferation, migration or apoptosis. Knockdown of all OPN splice variants (OpnS) resulted in an even stronger inhibition of clonogenic survival, while cell proliferation and migration were reduced and rate of apoptosis was increased. Additional irradiation had additive effects with both siRNAs. Plasma OPN increased continuously in malignant glioma patients and was associated with poor survival. Conclusions: OPNb is partially able to compensate the effects of OPNa and OPNc knockdown in U251MG cells. High OPN plasma levels at the end of radiotherapy are associated with poor survival

  2. DSGOST inhibits tumor growth by blocking VEGF/VEGFR2-activated angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyeong Sim; Lee, Kangwook; Kim, Min Kyoung; Lee, Kang Min; Shin, Yong Cheol; Cho, Sung-Gook; Ko, Seong-Gyu

    2016-04-19

    Tumor growth requires a process called angiogenesis, a new blood vessel formation from pre-existing vessels, as newly formed vessels provide tumor cells with oxygen and nutrition. Danggui-Sayuk-Ga-Osuyu-Saenggang-Tang (DSGOST), one of traditional Chinese medicines, has been widely used in treatment of vessel diseases including Raynaud's syndrome in Northeast Asian countries including China, Japan and Korea. Therefore, we hypothesized that DSGOST might inhibit tumor growth by targeting newly formed vessels on the basis of its historical prescription. Here, we demonstrate that DSGOST inhibits tumor growth by inhibiting VEGF-induced angiogenesis. DSGOST inhibited VEGF-induced angiogenic abilities of endothelial cells in vitro and in vivo, which resulted from its inhibition of VEGF/VEGFR2 interaction. Furthermore, DSGOST attenuated pancreatic tumor growth in vivo by reducing angiogenic vessel numbers, while not affecting pancreatic tumor cell viability. Thus, our data conclude that DSGOST inhibits VEGF-induced tumor angiogenesis, suggesting a new indication for DSGOST in treatment of cancer.

  3. Binding of cetuximab to the EGFRvIII deletion mutant and its biological consequences in malignant glioma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jutten, Barry; Dubois, Ludwig; Li Younan; Aerts, Hugo; Wouters, Bradly G.; Lambin, Philippe; Theys, Jan; Lammering, Guido

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Despite the clinical use of cetuximab, a chimeric antibody against EGFR, little is known regarding its interaction with EGFRvIII, a frequently expressed deletion mutant of EGFR. Therefore, we investigated the interaction and the functional consequences of cetuximab treatment on glioma cells stably expressing EGFRvIII. Materials and methods: The human glioma cell line U373 genetically modified to express EGFRvIII was used to measure the binding of cetuximab and its internalization using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Proliferation and cell survival were analyzed by cell growth and clonogenic survival assays. Results: Cetuximab is able to bind to EGFRvIII and causes an internalization of the receptor and decreases its expression levels. Furthermore, in contrast to EGF, cetuximab was able to activate EGFRvIII which was evidenced by multiple phosphorylation sites and its downstream signaling targets. Despite this activation, the growth rate and the radiosensitivity of the EGFRvIII-expressing glioma cells were not modulated. Conclusions: Cetuximab binds to EGFRvIII and leads to the initial activation, internalization and subsequent downregulation of EGFRvIII, but it does not seem to modulate the proliferation or radiosensitivity of EGFRvIII-expressing glioma cells. Thus, approaches to treat EGFRvIII-expressing glioma cells should be evaluated more carefully.

  4. Gradient microfluidics enables rapid bacterial growth inhibition testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bing; Qiu, Yong; Glidle, Andrew; McIlvenna, David; Luo, Qian; Cooper, Jon; Shi, Han-Chang; Yin, Huabing

    2014-03-18

    Bacterial growth inhibition tests have become a standard measure of the adverse effects of inhibitors for a wide range of applications, such as toxicity testing in the medical and environmental sciences. However, conventional well-plate formats for these tests are laborious and provide limited information (often being restricted to an end-point assay). In this study, we have developed a microfluidic system that enables fast quantification of the effect of an inhibitor on bacteria growth and survival, within a single experiment. This format offers a unique combination of advantages, including long-term continuous flow culture, generation of concentration gradients, and single cell morphology tracking. Using Escherichia coli and the inhibitor amoxicillin as one model system, we show excellent agreement between an on-chip single cell-based assay and conventional methods to obtain quantitative measures of antibiotic inhibition (for example, minimum inhibition concentration). Furthermore, we show that our methods can provide additional information, over and above that of the standard well-plate assay, including kinetic information on growth inhibition and measurements of bacterial morphological dynamics over a wide range of inhibitor concentrations. Finally, using a second model system, we show that this chip-based systems does not require the bacteria to be labeled and is well suited for the study of naturally occurring species. We illustrate this using Nitrosomonas europaea, an environmentally important bacteria, and show that the chip system can lead to a significant reduction in the period required for growth and inhibition measurements (<4 days, compared to weeks in a culture flask).

  5. Monstrous cell in malignant gliomas. In relation to radiation and chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogashiwa, M; Takeuchi, K; Akai, K [Kyorin Univ., Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1981-06-01

    The pathological effects of irradiation and chemotherapy have been studied in 9 autopsy cases of malignant and low grade gliomas. The brains have been examined by means of the complete study technique. Many histological features have been related to surgery, grading of histological classification of gliomas, irradiation and chemotherapy. Following irradiation and chemotherapy, in addition to increased necrosis and vascular response, a variety of characteristic changes were observed in cell and nuclear morphology with prominent formation of monstrous cells in all of 5 malignant gliomas treated with nitrosourea. These monstrous cells had irregular and hyperchromatic multinuclei and showed cytoplasmic degeneration. These cells which had no direct relationship to vessels distributed both in the periphery of tumor or necrosis and in the white matter remote from the main tumor. These changes were more pronounced in autopsy than in biopsy. The features showed here indicate that the monstrous cells may appear due to the result of inhibition of tumor cell division at the late mitotic phase after irradiation and chemotherapy.

  6. Nitrosoureas Inhibit the Stathmin Mediated Migration and Invasion of Malignant Glioma Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Xing-Jie; Choi, Yong; Sackett, Dan L.; Park, John K.

    2008-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are the most common primary intrinsic brain tumors and are highly lethal. The widespread migration and invasion of neoplastic cells from the initial site of tumor formation into the surrounding brain render these lesions refractory to definitive surgical treatment. Stathmin, a microtubule destabilizing protein that mediates cell cycle progression, can also regulate directed cell movement. Nitrosoureas, traditionally viewed as DNA alkylating agents, can also covalently modify...

  7. Glioma-related seizures in relation to histopathological subtypes: a report from the glioma international case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berntsson, Shala G; Merrell, Ryan T; Amirian, E Susan; Armstrong, Georgina N; Lachance, Daniel; Smits, Anja; Zhou, Renke; Jacobs, Daniel I; Wrensch, Margaret R; Olson, Sara H; Il'yasova, Dora; Claus, Elizabeth B; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S; Schildkraut, Joellen; Sadetzki, Siegal; Johansen, Christoffer; Houlston, Richard S; Jenkins, Robert B; Bernstein, Jonine L; Lai, Rose; Shete, Sanjay; Amos, Christopher I; Bondy, Melissa L; Melin, Beatrice S

    2018-04-23

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the distribution of glioma-related seizures and seizure control at the time of tumor diagnosis with respect to tumor histologic subtypes, tumor treatment and patient characteristics, and to compare seizure history preceding tumor diagnosis (or study enrollment) between glioma patients and healthy controls. The Glioma International Case Control study (GICC) risk factor questionnaire collected information on demographics, past medical/medication history, and occupational history. Cases from eight centers were also asked detailed questions on seizures in relation to glioma diagnosis; cases (n = 4533) and controls (n = 4171) were also asked about seizures less than 2 years from diagnosis and previous seizure history more than 2 years prior to tumor diagnosis, including childhood seizures. Low-grade gliomas (LGGs), particularly oligodendrogliomas/oligoastrocytomas, had the highest proportion of glioma-related seizures. Patients with low-grade astrocytoma demonstrated the most medically refractory seizures. A total of 83% of patients were using only one antiepileptic drug (AED), which was levetiracetam in 71% of cases. Gross total resection was strongly associated with reduced seizure frequency (p related seizures were most common in low-grade gliomas. Gross total resection was associated with lower seizure frequency. Additionally, having a history of childhood seizures is not a risk factor ***for developing glioma-related seizures or glioma.

  8. The anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) monoclonal antibody, C225, enhances radiation-induced apoptosis in primary glioma cell lines through mediation of MAPK/JNK/p38 signaling pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakravarti, A.; Noll, E.; Black, P.M.; Loeffler, J.S.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Increasing evidence suggests that signaling mediated by the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway contributes to radiation resistance. The anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody, C225, has been shown to enhance radiation response for several tumor types in preclinical models. Malignant gliomas are known to express, and quite frequently overexpress, EGFR. Our objectives in this study were to 1) Evaluate the efficacy of C225 as a radiation response modifier in EGFR-expressing glioma cell lines and to 2) Investigate the underlying molecular mechanisms mediating C225-induced enhancement of radiation response. Materials and Methods: Twelve EGFR-expressing glioma cells lines, established from patient tumors, were used for this study. Cells were incubated with C225, irradiated, and then evaluated for radiation response. Assays used to evaluate efficacy of C225-mediated radiosensitization included time-course apoptosis assays (Annexin V and TUNEL), viability assays (MTT), and clonogenic survival assays. The changes along MAPK (p44/p42)/JNK/p38-MAPK signal transduction pathways were then investigated using quantitative Western analysis with phospho-specific antibodies to determine the molecular mechanisms by which C225 mediates a given response. Results: C225 clearly enhanced radiation response for 7 of the 12 primary glioma cell lines studied. Enhancement of both immediate and delayed apoptotic responses was evident in these 7 responsive cell lines after C225 administration. The average apoptosis index at 6 hours post-RT+C225 for the 7 responsive lines was 9.5%, compared to 1.2% for the RT-only controls. A pattern of delayed apoptosis was evident in these 7 lines, with secondary apoptotic peaks (∼ 8.0%) occurring at 24 hours post-RT+C225. Time course viability measurements revealed a steady decrease in viable tumor cells in these responsive cell lines from 75% at 6 hours post-RT+C225 to 20% at 7 days. Clonogenic survival was also diminished in these 7 lines

  9. Phase I Pharmacokinetic Study of the VEGFR Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Vatalanib (PTK787) plus Imatinib and Hydroxyurea for Malignant Glioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, David A.; Egorin, Merrill J.; Desjardins, Annick; Vredenburgh, James J.; Beumer, Jan H.; Lagattuta, Theodore F.; Gururangan, Sridharan; Herndon, James E.; Salvado, August J.; Friedman, Henry S.

    2009-01-01

    Background We determined the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and dose-limiting toxicities (DLT) of the oral vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) inhibitor, vatalanib, when administered with imatinib and hydroxyurea on a continuous daily schedule among recurrent malignant glioma patients. Methods All patients received 500 mg of hydroxyurea twice daily. Imatinib was dosed at 400 mg per day for patients not taking enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs (EIAEDs; stratum A) and at 500 mg twice-a-day for patients taking EIAEDs (stratum B). Vatalanib was escalated from 500 mg to 1250 mg twice daily in successive cohorts, independently for each stratum. Pharmacokinetics of each drug were assessed. Results Thirty-seven recurrent patients, including 34 (92%) with glioblastoma and 3 (8%) with grade 3 malignant glioma, were enrolled. Nineteen patients (51%) were taking EIAEDs. The MTD of vatalanib for all patients was 1000 mg twice-a-day. DLTs were hematologic, gastrointestinal, renal and hepatic. No patients developed intracranial hemorrhage. Concurrent administration of imatinib and hydroxyurea did not affect vatalanib exposure, but EIAEDs decreased vatalanib and imatinib plasma exposures. Conclusion Vatalanib doses up to 1000 mg twice-a-day combined with imatinib and hydroxyurea are well tolerated. Strategies to target tumor blood vessel endothelial cells and pericytes by inhibiting VEGFR and PDGFR, respectively, are safe among recurrent malignant glioma patients and may enhance anti-angiogenesis activity. PMID:19248046

  10. Canine tracheal epithelial cells are more sensitive than rat tracheal epithelial cells to transforming growth factor beta induced growth inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubbs, A.F.; Hahn, F.F.; Kelly, G.; Thomassen, D.G.

    1988-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) markedly inhibited growth of canine tracheal epithelial (CTE) cells. Reduced responsiveness to TGFβ-induced growth inhibition accompanied neoplastic progression of these cells from primary to transformed to neoplastic. This was similar to the relationship between neoplastic progression and increased resistance to TGFβ-induced growth inhibition seen for rat tracheal epithelial (RTE) cells. The canine cells were more sensitive than rat cells to TGFβ-induced growth inhibition at all stages in the neoplastic process. (author)

  11. DDX3X Biomarker Correlates with Poor Survival in Human Gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dueng-Yuan Hueng

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Primary high-grade gliomas possess invasive growth and lead to unfavorable survival outcome. The investigation of biomarkers for prediction of survival outcome in patients with gliomas is important for clinical assessment. The DEAD (Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp box helicase 3, X-linked (DDX3X controls tumor migration, proliferation, and progression. However, the role of DDX3X in defining the pathological grading and survival outcome in patients with human gliomas is not yet clarified. We analyzed the DDX3X gene expression, WHO pathological grading, and overall survival from de-linked data. Further validation was done using quantitative RT-PCR of cDNA from normal brain and glioma, and immunohistochemical (IHC staining of tissue microarray. Statistical analysis of GEO datasets showed that DDX3X mRNA expression demonstrated statistically higher in WHO grade IV (n = 81 than in non-tumor controls (n = 23, p = 1.13 × 10−10. Moreover, DDX3X level was also higher in WHO grade III (n = 19 than in non-tumor controls (p = 2.43 × 10−5. Kaplan–Meier survival analysis showed poor survival in patients with high DDX3X mRNA levels (n = 24 than in those with low DDX3X expression (n = 53 (median survival, 115 vs. 58 weeks, p = 0.0009, by log-rank test, hazard ratio: 0.3507, 95% CI: 0.1893–0.6496. Furthermore, DDX3X mRNA expression and protein production significantly increased in glioma cells compared with normal brain tissue examined by quantitative RT-PCR, and Western blot. IHC staining showed highly staining of high-grade glioma in comparison with normal brain tissue. Taken together, DDX3X expression level positively correlates with WHO pathologic grading and poor survival outcome, indicating that DDX3X is a valuable biomarker in human gliomas.

  12. Flavopiridol induces apoptosis in glioma cell lines independent of retinoblastoma and p53 tumor suppressor pathway alterations by a caspase-independent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Michelle; Tamasdan, Cristina; Miller, Douglas C; Newcomb, Elizabeth W

    2003-02-01

    Flavopiridol is a synthetic flavone, which inhibits growth in vitro and in vivo of several solid malignancies such as renal, prostate, and colon cancers. It is a potent cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor presently in clinical trials. In this study, we examined the effect of flavopiridol on a panel of glioma cell lines having different genetic profiles: five of six have codeletion of p16(INK4a) and p14(ARF); three of six have p53 mutations; and one of six shows overexpression of mouse double minute-2 (MDM2) protein. Independent of retinoblastoma and p53 tumor suppressor pathway alterations, flavopiridol induced apoptosis in all cell lines but through a caspase-independent mechanism. No cleavage products for caspase 3 or its substrate poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase or caspase 8 were detected. The pan-caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-fmk did not inhibit flavopiridol-induced apoptosis. Mitochondrial damage measured by cytochrome c release and transmission electron microscopy was not observed in drug-treated glioma cells. In contrast, flavopiridol treatment induced translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor from the mitochondria to the nucleus. The proteins cyclin D(1) and MDM2 involved in the regulation of retinoblastoma and p53 activity, respectively, were down-regulated early after flavopiridol treatment. Given that MDM2 protein can confer oncogenic properties under certain circumstances, loss of MDM2 expression in tumor cells could promote increased chemosensitivity. After drug treatment, a low Bcl-2/Bax ratio was observed, a condition that may favor apoptosis. Taken together, the data indicate that flavopiridol has activity against glioma cell lines in vitro and should be considered for clinical development in the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme.

  13. Small gliomas; Metabolism and blood flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamura, Masaru; Shibasaki, Takashi; Horikoshi, Satoru; Ono, Nobuo; Zama, Akira; Kakegawa, Tohru; Ishiuchi, Shogo [Gunma Univ., Maebashi (Japan). School of Medicine

    1994-02-01

    Eight patients with small gliomas (6 low-grade and 2 high-grade) localized in a single gyrus or less than 2 cm diameter were investigated using positron tomography and single photon emission computed tomography. All three tumors examined demonstrated hypermetabolism of amino acids. High-grade gliomas demonstrated hypermetabolism of glucose and high blood flow, but normal or low oxygen metabolism. High-grade gliomas also showed accumulation of [sup 201]Tl chloride and high or low accumulation of [sup 123]I-isopropyl iodoamphetamine. These indications allow preoperative diagnosis of the malignancy of small gliomas, which is important because small gliomas with high-grade malignancy need more extensive removal and adjuvant therapy. (author).

  14. The Role of Molecular Diagnostics in the Management of Patients with Gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirsching, Hans-Georg; Weller, Michael

    2016-10-01

    The revised World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumors of the central nervous system of 2016 combines biology-driven molecular marker diagnostics with classical histological cancer diagnosis. Reclassification of gliomas by molecular similarity beyond histological boundaries improves outcome prediction and will increasingly guide treatment decisions. This change in paradigms implies more personalized and eventually more efficient therapeutic approaches, but the era of molecular targeted therapies for gliomas is yet at its onset. Promising results of molecularly targeted therapies in genetically less complex gliomas with circumscribed growth such as subependymal giant cell astrocytoma or pilocytic astrocytoma support further development of molecularly targeted therapies. In diffuse gliomas, several molecular markers that predict benefit from alkylating agent chemotherapy have been identified in recent years. For example, co-deletion of chromosome arms 1p and 19q predicts benefit from polychemotherapy with procarbazine, CCNU (lomustine), and vincristine (PCV) in patients with anaplastic oligodendroglioma, and the presence of 1p/19q co-deletion was integrated as a defining feature of oligodendroglial tumors in the revised WHO classification. However, the tremendous increase in knowledge of molecular drivers of diffuse gliomas on genomic, epigenetic, and gene expression levels has not yet translated into effective molecular targeted therapies. Multiple reasons account for the failure of early clinical trials of molecularly targeted therapies in diffuse gliomas, including the lack of molecular entry controls as well as pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamics issues, but the key challenge of specifically targeting the molecular backbone of diffuse gliomas is probably extensive clonal heterogeneity. A more profound understanding of clonal selection, alternative activation of oncogenic signaling pathways, and genomic instability is warranted to identify effective

  15. Antitumor Activity of Rat Mesenchymal Stem Cells during Direct or Indirect Co-Culturing with C6 Glioma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabashvili, A N; Baklaushev, V P; Grinenko, N F; Mel'nikov, P A; Cherepanov, S A; Levinsky, A B; Chehonin, V P

    2016-02-01

    The tumor-suppressive effect of rat mesenchymal stem cells against low-differentiated rat C6 glioma cells during their direct and indirect co-culturing and during culturing of C6 glioma cells in the medium conditioned by mesenchymal stem cells was studied in an in vitro experiment. The most pronounced antitumor activity of mesenchymal stem cells was observed during direct co-culturing with C6 glioma cells. The number of live C6 glioma cells during indirect co-culturing and during culturing in conditioned medium was slightly higher than during direct co-culturing, but significantly differed from the control (C6 glioma cells cultured in medium conditioned by C6 glioma cells). The cytotoxic effect of medium conditioned by mesenchymal stem cells was not related to medium depletion by glioma cells during their growth. The medium conditioned by other "non-stem" cells (rat astrocytes and fibroblasts) produced no tumor-suppressive effect. Rat mesenchymal stem cells, similar to rat C6 glioma cells express connexin 43, the main astroglial gap junction protein. During co-culturing, mesenchymal stem cells and glioma C6 cells formed functionally active gap junctions. Gap junction blockade with connexon inhibitor carbenoxolone attenuated the antitumor effect observed during direct co-culturing of C6 glioma cells and mesenchymal stem cells to the level produced by conditioned medium. Cell-cell signaling mediated by gap junctions can be a mechanism of the tumor-suppressive effect of mesenchymal stem cells against C6 glioma cells. This phenomenon can be used for the development of new methods of cell therapy for high-grade malignant gliomas.

  16. EPID-28. PROGNOSTIC AND PREDICTIVE BIOMARKERS IN RECURRENT WHO GRADE 3 GLIOMA PATIENTS TREATED WITH BEVACIZUMAB AND IRINOTECAN

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Anders; Urup, Thomas; Grunnet, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bevacizumab, a monoclonal antibody targeting vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) has shown activity in the treatment of recurrent malignant glioma. Predictive markers and prognostic models are required in order to individualize treatment for grade 3 glioma patients. The prim......BACKGROUND: Bevacizumab, a monoclonal antibody targeting vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) has shown activity in the treatment of recurrent malignant glioma. Predictive markers and prognostic models are required in order to individualize treatment for grade 3 glioma patients...... response MRI (RANO criteria). Responders had significantly prolonged OS (p ¼ 0.007) and trended toward longer PFS (p ¼ 0.067) as compared to non-responders (OS: 12.4 vs 4.3 months, PFS: 5.6 vs 3.2 months). A favorable WHO performance status (PS) and absence of necrosis were significantly more common...... in responders than nonresponders. Multivariate analysis also identified a poor PS as the only prognostic factor for PFS, while an unfavorable PS and immunohistochemical p53 accumulation were prognostic of reducedOS.CONCLUSIONS:Apoor baseline PS and the presence of necrosis were negatively associated...

  17. Anatomical location differences between mutated and wild-type isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 in low-grade gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jinhua; Shi, Zhifeng; Ji, Chunhong; Lian, Yuxi; Wang, Yuanyuan; Chen, Liang; Mao, Ying

    2017-10-01

    Anatomical location of gliomas has been considered as a factor implicating the contributions of a specific precursor cells during the tumor growth. Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) is a pathognomonic biomarker with a significant impact on the development of gliomas and remarkable prognostic effect. The correlation between anatomical location of tumor and IDH1 states for low-grade gliomas was analyzed quantitatively in this study. Ninety-two patients diagnosed of low-grade glioma pathologically were recruited in this study, including 65 patients with IDH1-mutated glioma and 27 patients with wide-type IDH1. A convolutional neural network was designed to segment the tumor from three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging images. Voxel-based lesion symptom mapping was then employed to study the tumor location distribution differences between gliomas with mutated and wild-type IDH1. In order to characterize the location differences quantitatively, the Automated Anatomical Labeling Atlas was used to partition the standard brain atlas into 116 anatomical volumes of interests (AVOIs). The percentages of tumors with different IDH1 states in 116 AVOIs were calculated and compared. Support vector machine and AdaBoost algorithms were used to estimate the IDH1 status based on the 116 location features of each patient. Experimental results proved that the quantitative tumor location measurement could be a very important group of imaging features in biomarker estimation based on radiomics analysis of glioma.

  18. The Glioma International Case-Control Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amirian, E. Susan; Armstrong, Georgina N; Zhou, Renke

    2016-01-01

    Decades of research have established only a few etiological factors for glioma, which is a rare and highly fatal brain cancer. Common methodological challenges among glioma studies include small sample sizes, heterogeneity of tumor subtypes, and retrospective exposure assessment. Here, we briefly...... describe the Glioma International Case-Control (GICC) Study (recruitment, 2010-2013), a study being conducted by the Genetic Epidemiology of Glioma International Consortium that integrates data from multiple data collection sites, uses a common protocol and questionnaire, and includes biospecimen...

  19. Fibroblast growth factor-2 up-regulates the expression of nestin through the Ras–Raf–ERK–Sp1 signaling axis in C6 glioma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Kai-Wei; Huang, Yuan-Li; Wong, Zong-Ruei; Su, Peng-Han; Huang, Bu-Miin; Ju, Tsai-Kai; Yang, Hsi-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Nestin expression in C6 glioma cells is induced by FGF-2. •Nestin expression is induced by FGF-2 via de novo RNA and protein synthesis. •The FGFR inhibitor SU5402 blocks the FGF-2-induced nestin expression. •The mRNA of FGFR1 and 3 are detected in C6 glioma cells. •Ras–Raf–ERK–Sp1 signaling pathway is responsibe for FGF-2-induced nestin expression. -- Abstract: Nestin is a 240-kDa intermediate filament protein expressed mainly in neural and myogenic stem cells. Although a substantial number of studies have focused on the expression of nestin during development of the central nervous system, little is known about the factors that induce and regulate its expression. Fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) is an effective mitogen and stimulates the proliferation and differentiation of a subset of nestin-expressing cells, including neural progenitor cells, glial precursor cells, and smooth muscle cells. To assess whether FGF-2 is a potent factor that induces the expression of nestin, C6 glioma cells were used. The results showed that nestin expression was up-regulated by FGF-2 via de novo RNA and protein synthesis. Our RT-PCR results showed that C6 glioma cells express FGFR1/3, and FGFRs is required for FGF-2-induced nestin expression. Further signaling analysis also revealed that FGF-2-induced nestin expression is mediated through FGFR–MAPK–ERK signaling axis and the transcriptional factor Sp1. These findings provide new insight into the regulation of nestin in glial system and enable the further studies on the function of nestin in glial cells

  20. Fibroblast growth factor-2 up-regulates the expression of nestin through the Ras–Raf–ERK–Sp1 signaling axis in C6 glioma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Kai-Wei [Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biology, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Huang, Yuan-Li [Department of Biotechnology, College of Health Science, Asia University, Taichung 413, Taiwan (China); Wong, Zong-Ruei; Su, Peng-Han [Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biology, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Huang, Bu-Miin [Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Ju, Tsai-Kai [Instrumentation Center, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Technology Commons, College of Life Science, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Yang, Hsi-Yuan, E-mail: hyhy@ntu.edu.tw [Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biology, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China)

    2013-05-17

    Highlights: •Nestin expression in C6 glioma cells is induced by FGF-2. •Nestin expression is induced by FGF-2 via de novo RNA and protein synthesis. •The FGFR inhibitor SU5402 blocks the FGF-2-induced nestin expression. •The mRNA of FGFR1 and 3 are detected in C6 glioma cells. •Ras–Raf–ERK–Sp1 signaling pathway is responsibe for FGF-2-induced nestin expression. -- Abstract: Nestin is a 240-kDa intermediate filament protein expressed mainly in neural and myogenic stem cells. Although a substantial number of studies have focused on the expression of nestin during development of the central nervous system, little is known about the factors that induce and regulate its expression. Fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) is an effective mitogen and stimulates the proliferation and differentiation of a subset of nestin-expressing cells, including neural progenitor cells, glial precursor cells, and smooth muscle cells. To assess whether FGF-2 is a potent factor that induces the expression of nestin, C6 glioma cells were used. The results showed that nestin expression was up-regulated by FGF-2 via de novo RNA and protein synthesis. Our RT-PCR results showed that C6 glioma cells express FGFR1/3, and FGFRs is required for FGF-2-induced nestin expression. Further signaling analysis also revealed that FGF-2-induced nestin expression is mediated through FGFR–MAPK–ERK signaling axis and the transcriptional factor Sp1. These findings provide new insight into the regulation of nestin in glial system and enable the further studies on the function of nestin in glial cells.

  1. The ketogenic diet reverses gene expression patterns and reduces reactive oxygen species levels when used as an adjuvant therapy for glioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stafford Phillip

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malignant brain tumors affect people of all ages and are the second leading cause of cancer deaths in children. While current treatments are effective and improve survival, there remains a substantial need for more efficacious therapeutic modalities. The ketogenic diet (KD - a high-fat, low-carbohydrate treatment for medically refractory epilepsy - has been suggested as an alternative strategy to inhibit tumor growth by altering intrinsic metabolism, especially by inducing glycopenia. Methods Here, we examined the effects of an experimental KD on a mouse model of glioma, and compared patterns of gene expression in tumors vs. normal brain from animals fed either a KD or a standard diet. Results Animals received intracranial injections of bioluminescent GL261-luc cells and tumor growth was followed in vivo. KD treatment significantly reduced the rate of tumor growth and prolonged survival. Further, the KD reduced reactive oxygen species (ROS production in tumor cells. Gene expression profiling demonstrated that the KD induces an overall reversion to expression patterns seen in non-tumor specimens. Notably, genes involved in modulating ROS levels and oxidative stress were altered, including those encoding cyclooxygenase 2, glutathione peroxidases 3 and 7, and periredoxin 4. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that the KD improves survivability in our mouse model of glioma, and suggests that the mechanisms accounting for this protective effect likely involve complex alterations in cellular metabolism beyond simply a reduction in glucose.

  2. Spinal metastases of malignant gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Materlik, B.; Steidle-Katic, U.; Feyerabend, T.; Richter, E.; Wauschkuhn, B.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Extracranial metastases of malignant gliomas are rare. We report 2 cases with spinal metastases in patients suffering from glioma. Patients and Method: Two patients (33 and 57 years old) developed spinal canal metastases of a glioblastoma multiforme and anaplastic astrocytoma Grade III respectively 25 and 9 months after surgical resection and radiotherapy. Both metastases were confirmed pathohistologically. Results: Intraspinal metastases were irradiated with a total dose of 12.6 Gy and 50 Gy. Treatment withdrawal was necessary in one patient due to reduced clinical condition. Regression of neurological symptoms was observed in the second patient. Conclusions: Spinal spread of malignant glioma should be considered during care and follow-up in glioma patients with spinal symptoms. (orig.) [de

  3. Molecular markers in glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Kirsten; Kornblum, Harley I

    2017-09-01

    Gliomas are the most malignant and aggressive form of brain tumors, and account for the majority of brain cancer related deaths. Malignant gliomas, including glioblastoma are treated with radiation and temozolomide, with only a minor benefit in survival time. A number of advances have been made in understanding glioma biology, including the discovery of cancer stem cells, termed glioma stem cells (GSC). Some of these advances include the delineation of molecular heterogeneity both between tumors from different patients as well as within tumors from the same patient. Such research highlights the importance of identifying and validating molecular markers in glioma. This review, intended as a practical resource for both clinical and basic investigators, summarizes some of the more well-known molecular markers (MGMT, 1p/19q, IDH, EGFR, p53, PI3K, Rb, and RAF), discusses how they are identified, and what, if any, clinical relevance they may have, in addition to discussing some of the specific biology for these markers. Additionally, we discuss identification methods for studying putative GSC's (CD133, CD15, A2B5, nestin, ALDH1, proteasome activity, ABC transporters, and label-retention). While much research has been done on these markers, there is still a significant amount that we do not yet understand, which may account for some conflicting reports in the literature. Furthermore, it is unlikely that the investigator will be able to utilize one single marker to prospectively identify and isolate GSC from all, or possibly, any gliomas.

  4. Neuronavigator-guided glioma surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Guhong; Zhou, Liangfu; Mao, Ying

    2003-10-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of neuronavigator-guided surgery for the resection of gliomas. A total of 80 patients with gliomas underwent surgical treatment under the StealthStation neuronavigator to estimate the extent of the tumors. In 27 cases, the measurements of brain shifts at the dura, cortical surface and lesion margin were recorded during the operations. A technique termed "micro-catheter fence post" was used in superficial gliomas to compensate for brain shift. Mean fiducial error and predicted accuracy in the 80 cases were 2.03 mm +/- 0.89 mm and 2.43 mm +/- 0.99 mm, respectively. The shifts at the dura, cortical surface and lesion margin were 3.44 mm +/- 2.39 mm, 7.58 mm +/- 3.75 mm, and 6.55 mm +/- 3.19 mm, respectively. Although neuronavigation revealed residual tumors, operations were discontinued in 5 cases of deep-seated gliomas. In the other 75 cases, total tumor removals were achieved in 62 (82.7%), and subtotal removals were achieved in 13 (17.3%). Post-operation, neurological symptoms were improved or unchanged in 68 cases (85.0%), and worsened in 12 (15.0%). No deaths occurred during the operations and post-operations. Intraoperative brain shifts mainly contribute to the fail of spatial accuracy during neuronavigator-guided glioma surgery. The "micro-catheter fence post" technique used for glioma surgery is shown to be useful for compensating for intraoperative brain shifts. This technique, thus, contributes to an increase in total tumor removal and a decrease in surgical complications.

  5. Dicumarol inhibition of NADPH:quinone oxidoreductase induces growth inhibition of pancreatic cancer via a superoxide-mediated mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Joseph J; Hinkhouse, Marilyn M; Grady, Matthew; Gaut, Andrew W; Liu, Jingru; Zhang, Yu Ping; Weydert, Christine J Darby; Domann, Frederick E; Oberley, Larry W

    2003-09-01

    NADPH:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO(1)), a homodimeric, ubiquitous, flavoprotein, catalyzes the two-electron reduction of quinones to hydroquinones. This reaction prevents the one-electron reduction of quinones by cytochrome P450 reductase and other flavoproteins that would result in oxidative cycling with generation of superoxide (O(2)(.-)). NQO(1) gene regulation may be up-regulated in some tumors to accommodate the needs of rapidly metabolizing cells to regenerate NAD(+). We hypothesized that pancreatic cancer cells would exhibit high levels of this enzyme, and inhibiting it would suppress the malignant phenotype. Reverse transcription-PCR, Western blots, and activity assays demonstrated that NQO(1) was up-regulated in the pancreatic cancer cell lines tested but present in very low amounts in the normal human pancreas. To determine whether inhibition of NQO(1) would alter the malignant phenotype, MIA PaCa-2 pancreatic cancer cells were treated with a selective inhibitor of NQO(1), dicumarol. Dicumarol increased intracellular production of O(2)(.-), as measured by hydroethidine staining, and inhibited cell growth. Both of these effects were blunted with infection of an adenoviral vector containing the cDNA for manganese superoxide dismutase. Dicumarol also inhibited cell growth, plating efficiency, and growth in soft agar. We conclude that inhibition of NQO(1) increases intracellular O(2)(.-) production and inhibits the in vitro malignant phenotype of pancreatic cancer. These mechanisms suggest that altering the intracellular redox environment of pancreatic cancer cells may inhibit growth and delineate a potential strategy directed against pancreatic cancer.

  6. Inactivation of the DNA-repair gene MGMT and the clinical response of gliomas to alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteller, M; Garcia-Foncillas, J; Andion, E; Goodman, S N; Hidalgo, O F; Vanaclocha, V; Baylin, S B; Herman, J G

    2000-11-09

    The DNA-repair enzyme O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) inhibits the killing of tumor cells by alkylating agents. MGMT activity is controlled by a promoter; methylation of the promoter silences the gene in cancer, and the cells no longer produce MGMT. We examined gliomas to determine whether methylation of the MGMT promoter is related to the responsiveness of the tumor to alkylating agents. We analyzed the MGMT promoter in tumor DNA by a methylation-specific polymerase-chain-reaction assay. The gliomas were obtained from patients who had been treated with carmustine (1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea, or BCNU). The molecular data were correlated with the clinical outcome. The MGMT promoter was methylated in gliomas from 19 of 47 patients (40 percent). This finding was associated with regression of the tumor and prolonged overall and disease-free survival. It was an independent and stronger prognostic factor than age, stage, tumor grade, or performance status. Methylation of the MGMT promoter in gliomas is a useful predictor of the responsiveness of the tumors to alkylating agents.

  7. 3-Bromopyruvate antagonizes effects of lactate and pyruvate, synergizes with citrate and exerts novel anti-glioma effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Sayed, S M; El-Magd, R M Abou; Shishido, Y; Chung, S P; Diem, T H; Sakai, T; Watanabe, H; Kagami, S; Fukui, K

    2012-02-01

    Oxidative stress-energy depletion therapy using oxidative stress induced by D-amino acid oxidase (DAO) and energy depletion induced by 3-bromopyruvate (3BP) was reported recently (El Sayed et al., Cancer Gene Ther., 19, 1-18, 2012). Even in the presence of oxygen, cancer cells oxidize glucose preferentially to produce lactate (Warburg effect) which seems vital for cancer microenvironment and progression. 3BP is a closely related structure to lactate and pyruvate and may antagonize their effects as a novel mechanism of its action. Pyruvate exerted a potent H(2)O(2) scavenging effect to exogenous H(2)O(2), while lactate had no scavenging effect. 3BP induced H(2)O(2) production. Pyruvate protected against H(2)O(2)-induced C6 glioma cell death, 3BP-induced C6 glioma cell death but not against DAO/D-serine-induced cell death, while lactate had no protecting effect. Lactate and pyruvate protected against 3BP-induced C6 glioma cell death and energy depletion which were overcome with higher doses of 3BP. Lactate and pyruvate enhanced migratory power of C6 glioma which was blocked by 3BP. Pyruvate and lactate did not protect against C6 glioma cell death induced by other glycolytic inhibitors e.g. citrate (inhibitor of phosphofructokinase) and sodium fluoride (inhibitor of enolase). Serial doses of 3BP were synergistic with citrate in decreasing viability of C6 glioma cells and spheroids. Glycolysis subjected to double inhibition using 3BP with citrate depleted ATP, clonogenic power and migratory power of C6 glioma cells. 3BP induced a caspase-dependent cell death in C6 glioma. 3BP was powerful in decreasing viability of human glioblastoma multiforme cells (U373MG) and C6 glioma in a dose- and time-dependent manner.

  8. Numerical simulation of brain tumor growth model using two-stage ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the recent years, the study of glioma growth to be an active field of research Mathematical models that describe the proliferation and diffusion properties of the growth have been developed by many researchers. In this work, the performance analysis of two-stage Gauss-Seidel (TSGS) method to solve the glioma growth ...

  9. Characterization and response of newly developed high-grade glioma cultures to the tyrosine kinase inhibitors, erlotinib, gefitinib and imatinib.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kinsella, Paula

    2012-03-10

    High-grade gliomas (HGG), are the most common aggressive brain tumours in adults. Inhibitors targeting growth factor signalling pathways in glioma have shown a low clinical response rate. To accurately evaluate response to targeted therapies further in vitro studies are necessary. Growth factor pathway expression using epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), mutant EGFR (EGFRvIII), platelet derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR), C-Kit and C-Abl together with phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) expression and downstream activation of AKT and phosphorylated ribosomal protein S6 (P70S6K) was analysed in 26 primary glioma cultures treated with the tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) erlotinib, gefitinib and imatinib. Response to TKIs was assessed using 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC(50)). Response for each culture was compared with the EGFR\\/PDGFR immunocytochemical pathway profile using hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and principal component analysis (PCA). Erlotinib response was not strongly associated with high expression of the growth factor pathway components. PTEN expression did not correlate with response to any of the three TKIs. Increased EGFR expression was associated with gefitinib response; increased PDGFR-α expression was associated with imatinib response. The results of this in vitro study suggest gefitinib and imatinib may have therapeutic potential in HGG tumours with a corresponding growth factor receptor expression profile.

  10. Cognitive impairments in patients with low grade gliomas and high grade gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane C. Miotto

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The relationship between brain tumors and cognitive deficits is well established in the literature. However, studies investigating the cognitive status in low and high-grade gliomas patients are scarce, particularly in patients with average or lower educational level. This study aimed at investigating the cognitive functioning in a sample of patients with low and high-grade gliomas before surgical intervention. METHOD: The low-grade (G1, n=19 and high-grade glioma (G2, n=8 patients underwent a detailed neuropsychological assessment of memory, executive functions, visuo-perceptive and visuo-spatial abilities, intellectual level and language. RESULTS: There was a significant impairment on verbal and visual episodic memory, executive functions including mental flexibility, nominal and categorical verbal fluency and speed of information processing in G2. G1 showed only specific deficits on verbal and visual memory recall, mental flexibility and processing speed. CONCLUSION: These findings demonstrated different levels of impairments in the executive and memory domains in patients with low and high grade gliomas.

  11. Predicting the dynamics of bacterial growth inhibition by ribosome-targeting antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greulich, Philip; Doležal, Jakub; Scott, Matthew; Evans, Martin R.; Allen, Rosalind J.

    2017-12-01

    Understanding how antibiotics inhibit bacteria can help to reduce antibiotic use and hence avoid antimicrobial resistance—yet few theoretical models exist for bacterial growth inhibition by a clinically relevant antibiotic treatment regimen. In particular, in the clinic, antibiotic treatment is time-dependent. Here, we use a theoretical model, previously applied to steady-state bacterial growth, to predict the dynamical response of a bacterial cell to a time-dependent dose of ribosome-targeting antibiotic. Our results depend strongly on whether the antibiotic shows reversible transport and/or low-affinity ribosome binding (‘low-affinity antibiotic’) or, in contrast, irreversible transport and/or high affinity ribosome binding (‘high-affinity antibiotic’). For low-affinity antibiotics, our model predicts that growth inhibition depends on the duration of the antibiotic pulse, and can show a transient period of very fast growth following removal of the antibiotic. For high-affinity antibiotics, growth inhibition depends on peak dosage rather than dose duration, and the model predicts a pronounced post-antibiotic effect, due to hysteresis, in which growth can be suppressed for long times after the antibiotic dose has ended. These predictions are experimentally testable and may be of clinical significance.

  12. SCCRO Promotes Glioma Formation and Malignant Progression in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen R. Broderick

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Originally identified as an oncogene activated by amplification in squamous cell carcinomas, several lines of evidence now suggest that squamous cell carcinoma-related oncogene (SCCRO; aka DCUN1D1 may play a role in the pathogenesis of a wide range of human cancers including gliomas. SCCRO's oncogenic function is substantiated by its ectopic expression, resulting in transformation of cells in culture and xenograft formation in nude mice. The aim of this study was to assess the in vivo oncogenicity of SCCRO in a murine model. Ubiquitous expression of SCCRO resulted in early embryonic lethality. Because SCCRO overexpression was detected in human gliomas, its in vivo oncogenic activity was assessed in an established murine glioma model. Conditional expression of SCCRO using a replication-competent ASLV long terminal repeat with splice acceptor/nestin-(tumor virus-A tv-a model system was not sufficient to induce tumor formation in a wild-type genetic background, but tumors formed with increasing frequency and decreasing latency in facilitated background containing Ink4a deletion alone or in combination with PTEN loss. Ectopic expression of SCCRO in glial progenitor cells resulted in lower-grade gliomas in Ink4a-/- mice, whereas its expression in Ink4a-/-/PTEN-/- background produced high-grade glioblastoma-like lesions that were indistinguishable from human tumors. Expression of SCCRO with platelet-derived growth factor-beta (PDGF-β resulted in an increased proportion of mice forming glioblastoma-like tumors compared with those induced by PDGF-β alone. This work substantiates SCCRO's function as an oncogene by showing its ability to facilitate malignant transformation and carcinogenic progression in vivo and supports a role for SCCRO in the pathogenesis of gliomas and other human cancers.

  13. Dipeptidyl peptidase IV in two human glioma cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Sedo

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available There is growing evidence that dipeptidyl peptidase IV [DPP-IV, EC 3.4.14.5] takes part in the metabolism of biologically active peptides participating in the regulation of growth and transformation of glial cells. However, the knowledge on the DPP-IV expression in human glial and glioma cells is still very limited. In this study, using histochemical and biochemical techniques, the DPP-IV activity was demonstrated in two commercially available human glioma cell lines of different transformation degree, as represented by U373 astrocytoma (Grade III and U87 glioblastoma multiforme (Grade IV lines. Higher total activity of the enzyme, as well as its preferential localisation in the plasma membrane, was observed in U87 cells. Compared to U373 population, U87 cells were morphologically more pleiomorphic, they were cycling at lower rate and expressing less Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein. The data revealed positive correlation between the degree of transformation of cells and activity of DPP-IV. Great difference in expression of this enzyme, together with the phenotypic differences of cells, makes these lines a suitable standard model for further 57 studies of function of this enzyme in human glioma cells.

  14. Quinacrine enhances carmustine therapy of experimental rat glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, S; Herrera, L A; Ostrosky, P; Sotelo, J

    2001-10-01

    The high rate of mutagenesis in malignant cells has been considered to be a primary factor in the appearance of chemotherapy-resistant cell clones in glioblastomas. Quinacrine binds strongly to deoxyribonucleic acid, preventing mutagenesis. We investigated whether quinacrine could improve carmustine therapy in C6 cell cultures and in C6 malignant gliomas implanted subcutaneously into Wistar rats. A potential chemopreventive effect of quinacrine on acquired resistance to carmustine therapy was studied in vitro and in vivo. Deoxyribonucleic acid damage was measured in cultured C6 cells by using the micronucleus test. Wistar rats with subcutaneously implanted C6 gliomas were treated with carmustine, quinacrine, or carmustine plus quinacrine, using pharmacological schemes similar to those used for human patients. The addition of quinacrine to cultured C6 cells did not modify carmustine-induced cytotoxicity; however, the deoxyribonucleic acid damage in surviving cells was minor, as indicated by the frequency of micronucleated cells. The surviving cells continued to be susceptible to a second exposure to carmustine, in contrast to non-quinacrine-treated control cells, which developed resistance to carmustine in a subsequent exposure (P < 0.05). The rate of tumor remission was higher for glioma-bearing rats treated with quinacrine plus carmustine, compared with rats treated with carmustine alone (P < 0.01). The addition of quinacrine to carmustine therapy increases the antineoplastic effect of the carmustine therapy. Our results suggest that chemical inhibition of mutagenesis in malignant glial cells during chemotherapy prevents the appearance of resistant clones.

  15. Growth of antarctic cyanobacteria under ultraviolet radiation: UVA counteracts UVB inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quesada, A.; Mouget, J.L.; Vincent, W.F.

    1995-01-01

    A mat-forming cyanobacterium (Phormidium murayi West and West) isolated from an ice-shelf pond in Antarctica was grown under white light combined with a range of UVA and UVB irradiance. The 4-day growth rate decreased under increasing ultraviolet (UV) radiation, with a ninefold greater response to UVB relative to UVA. In vivo absorbance spectra showed that UVA and to a greater extent UVB caused a decrease in phycocyanin/chlorophyll a and an increase in carotenoids/chlorophyll a. The phycocyanin/chlorophyll a ratio was closely and positively correlated to the UVB-inhibited growth rate. Under fixed spectral gradients of UV radiation, the growth inhibition effect was dominated by UVB. However, at specific UVB irradiances the inhibition of growth depended on the ratio of UVB to UVA, and growth rates increased linearly with increasing UVA. These results are consistent with the view that UVB inhibition represents the balance between damage and repair processes that are each controlled by separate wavebands. They also underscore the need to consider UV spectral balance in laboratory and field assays of UVB toxicity. 49 refs., 6 figs

  16. Mesenchymal stem cells derived from adipose tissue vs bone marrow: in vitro comparison of their tropism towards gliomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Courtney Pendleton

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Glioblastoma is the most common primary malignant brain tumor, and is refractory to surgical resection, radiation, and chemotherapy. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC may be harvested from bone marrow (BMSC and adipose (AMSC tissue. These cells are a promising avenue of investigation for the delivery of adjuvant therapies. Despite extensive research into putative mechanisms for the tumor tropism of MSCs, there remains no direct comparison of the efficacy and specificity of AMSC and BMSC tropism towards glioma. METHODS: Under an IRB-approved protocol, intraoperative human Adipose MSCs (hAMSCs were established and characterized for cell surface markers of mesenchymal stem cell origin in conjunction with the potential for tri-lineage differentiation (adipogenic, chondrogenic, and osteogenic. Validated experimental hAMSCs were compared to commercially derived hBMSCs (Lonza and hAMSCs (Invitrogen for growth responsiveness and glioma tropism in response to glioma conditioned media obtained from primary glioma neurosphere cultures. RESULTS: Commercial and primary culture AMSCs and commercial BMSCs demonstrated no statistically significant difference in their migration towards glioma conditioned media in vitro. There was statistically significant difference in the proliferation rate of both commercial AMSCs and BMSCs as compared to primary culture AMSCs, suggesting primary cultures have a slower growth rate than commercially available cell lines. CONCLUSIONS: Adipose- and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells have similar in vitro glioma tropism. Given the well-documented ability to harvest larger numbers of AMSCs under local anesthesia, adipose tissue may provide a more efficient source of MSCs for research and clinical applications, while minimizing patient morbidity during cell harvesting.

  17. Improving Seroreactivity-Based Detection of Glioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Ludwig

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Seroreactivity profiling emerges as valuable technique for minimal invasive cancer detection. Recently, we provided first evidence for the applicability of serum profiling of glioma using a limited number of immunogenic antigens. Here, we screened 57 glioma and 60 healthy sera for autoantibodies against 1827 Escherichia coli expressed clones, including 509 in-frame peptide sequences. By a linear support vector machine approach, we calculated mean specificity, sensitivity, and accuracy of 100 repetitive classifications. We were able to differentiate glioma sera from sera of the healthy controls with a specificity of 90.28%, a sensitivity of 87.31% and an accuracy of 88.84%. We were also able to differentiate World Health Organization grade IV glioma sera from healthy sera with a specificity of 98.45%, a sensitivity of 80.93%, and an accuracy of 92.88%. To rank the antigens according to their information content, we computed the area under the receiver operator characteristic curve value for each clone. Altogether, we found 46 immunogenic clones including 16 in-frame clones that were informative for the classification of glioma sera versus healthy sera. For the separation of glioblastoma versus healthy sera, we found 91 informative clones including 26 in-frame clones. The best-suited in-frame clone for the classification glioma sera versus healthy sera corresponded to the vimentin gene (VIM that was previously associated with glioma. In the future, autoantibody signatures in glioma not only may prove useful for diagnosis but also offer the prospect for a personalized immune-based therapy.

  18. Growth Inhibition of Breast Cancer in Rat by AAV Mediated Angiostatin Gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ran; CHEN Hong; REN Chang-shan

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To observe growth inhibition effect of adeno-associated viral vectors (AAV) mediated angiostatin (ANG) gene on implanted breast cancer in rat and its mechanism. Methods: Gene transfer technique was used to transfer AAV-ANG to the tumor. Growth curves were drawn to observe the growth of breast cancer implanted in rat, and immunohistochemical method was used to detect the effects of angiostatin on microvesel density (MVD) of breast cancer implanted in rat. Results: Angiostatin inhibited the growth of breast cancer implanted in rat and decreased the microvessel density of tumor. Conclusion: Expression of an angiostatin transgene can suppress the growth of breast cancer implanted in rat through the inhibition of the growth of microvessels, surggesting that angiostatin gene transfer technique may be effective against breast cancer.

  19. Natural history of de novo High Grade Glioma: first description of growth parabola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altieri, Roberto; Hirono, Seiichiro; Duffau, Hugues; Ducati, Alessandro; Fontanella, Marco; LA Rocca, Giuseppe; Melcarne, Antonio; Panciani, Pier P; Spena, Giannantonio; Garbossa, Diego

    2017-07-26

    Etiopathogenesis and physiopathology of gliomas are largely unknown. Recently, many authors have proved a strict correlation between the velocity of diametric expansion (VDE) on the Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and the biological behavior of these tumors, especially in Low Grade Gliomas (LGGs). Unfortunately, natural history of High Grade Gliomas (HGGs) has not been well clarified because of its fast progression, late diagnoses and early surgical intervention. We describe, for the first time to our knowledge, the case of asymptomatic patient with an incidentally discovered de novo HGG with a total of 17 months of follow-up. A male patient was referred to our consultation for routinely follow-up after meningioma resection 5 years before. He underwent MRI every year without any neuroradiological alterations. A new MRI image presented a non-enhancing lesion in the right temporal lobe with 3.55 cm of Mean Tumor Diameter (MTD) and 35.6 mm/year of VDE. After two months interval, the lesion had 3.97 cm of MTD and 27.8 mm/year of VDE. Although we have strongly suggested surgical resection, patient have delayed the operation for personal issues. After other 3 months, the tumor showed enhancement with 4.5 of MTD and 17.4 mm/year of VDE. We speculate that the descending parabola is due to initial mass effect and hypoxia of the tumor core. We also underline the crucial role of the VDE determining, in order to predict the nature of the lesion and address the most effective treatment for each patient.

  20. Imaging of adult brainstem gliomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purohit, Bela, E-mail: purohitbela@yahoo.co.in; Kamli, Ali A.; Kollias, Spyros S.

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: •BSG are classified on MRI into diffuse low-grade, malignant, focal tectal and exophytic subtypes. •Their prognosis and treatment is variable and is almost similar to adult supratentorial gliomas. •This article illustrates the imaging of adult BSGs on MRI and FET-PET. •We also describe prognostic factors and the treatment options of these tumours. -- Abstract: Brainstem gliomas (BSGs) are uncommon in adults accounting for about 2% of all intracranial neoplasms. They are often phenotypically low-grade as compared to their more common paediatric counterparts. Since brainstem biopsies are rarely performed, these tumours are commonly classified according to their MR imaging characteristics into 4 subgroups: (a) diffuse intrinsic low-grade gliomas, (b) enhancing malignant gliomas, (c) focal tectal gliomas and (d) exophytic gliomas/other subtypes. The prognosis and treatment is variable for the different types and is almost similar to adult supratentorial gliomas. Radiotherapy (RT) with adjuvant chemotherapy is the standard treatment of diffuse low-grade and malignant BSGs, whereas, surgical resection is limited to the exophytic subtypes. Review of previous literature shows that the detailed imaging of adult BSGs has not received significant attention. This review illustrates in detail the imaging features of adult BSGs using conventional and advanced MR techniques like diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), MR perfusion weighted imaging (PWI), MR spectroscopy (MRS), as well as {sup 18}F-fluoro-ethyl-tyrosine positron emission tomography ({sup 18}F-FET/PET). We have discussed the pertinent differences between childhood and adult BSGs, imaging mimics, prognostic factors and briefly reviewed the treatment options of these tumours.

  1. Transmigration of neural stem cells across the blood brain barrier induced by glioma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Díaz-Coránguez

    Full Text Available Transit of human neural stem cells, ReNcell CX, through the blood brain barrier (BBB was evaluated in an in vitro model of BBB and in nude mice. The BBB model was based on rat brain microvascular endothelial cells (RBMECs cultured on Millicell inserts bathed from the basolateral side with conditioned media (CM from astrocytes or glioma C6 cells. Glioma C6 CM induced a significant transendothelial migration of ReNcells CX in comparison to astrocyte CM. The presence in glioma C6 CM of high amounts of HGF, VEGF, zonulin and PGE2, together with the low abundance of EGF, promoted ReNcells CX transmigration. In contrast cytokines IFN-α, TNF-α, IL-12p70, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10, as well as metalloproteinases -2 and -9 were present in equal amounts in glioma C6 and astrocyte CMs. ReNcells expressed the tight junction proteins occludin and claudins 1, 3 and 4, and the cell adhesion molecule CRTAM, while RBMECs expressed occludin, claudins 1 and 5 and CRTAM. Competing CRTAM mediated adhesion with soluble CRTAM, inhibited ReNcells CX transmigration, and at the sites of transmigration, the expression of occludin and claudin-5 diminished in RBMECs. In nude mice we found that ReNcells CX injected into systemic circulation passed the BBB and reached intracranial gliomas, which overexpressed HGF, VEGF and zonulin/prehaptoglobin 2.

  2. Transmigration of neural stem cells across the blood brain barrier induced by glioma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Coránguez, Mónica; Segovia, José; López-Ornelas, Adolfo; Puerta-Guardo, Henry; Ludert, Juan; Chávez, Bibiana; Meraz-Cruz, Noemi; González-Mariscal, Lorenza

    2013-01-01

    Transit of human neural stem cells, ReNcell CX, through the blood brain barrier (BBB) was evaluated in an in vitro model of BBB and in nude mice. The BBB model was based on rat brain microvascular endothelial cells (RBMECs) cultured on Millicell inserts bathed from the basolateral side with conditioned media (CM) from astrocytes or glioma C6 cells. Glioma C6 CM induced a significant transendothelial migration of ReNcells CX in comparison to astrocyte CM. The presence in glioma C6 CM of high amounts of HGF, VEGF, zonulin and PGE2, together with the low abundance of EGF, promoted ReNcells CX transmigration. In contrast cytokines IFN-α, TNF-α, IL-12p70, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10, as well as metalloproteinases -2 and -9 were present in equal amounts in glioma C6 and astrocyte CMs. ReNcells expressed the tight junction proteins occludin and claudins 1, 3 and 4, and the cell adhesion molecule CRTAM, while RBMECs expressed occludin, claudins 1 and 5 and CRTAM. Competing CRTAM mediated adhesion with soluble CRTAM, inhibited ReNcells CX transmigration, and at the sites of transmigration, the expression of occludin and claudin-5 diminished in RBMECs. In nude mice we found that ReNcells CX injected into systemic circulation passed the BBB and reached intracranial gliomas, which overexpressed HGF, VEGF and zonulin/prehaptoglobin 2.

  3. Resveratrol Represses Pokemon Expression in Human Glioma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yutao; Cui, Jiajun; Xue, Feng; Overstreet, Anne-Marie; Zhan, Yiping; Shan, Dapeng; Li, Hui; Li, Hui; Wang, Yongjun; Zhang, Mengmeng; Yu, Chunjiang; Xu, Zhi-Qing David

    2016-03-01

    POK erythroid myeloid ontogenic factor (Pokemon), an important proto-oncoprotein, is a transcriptional repressor that regulates the expression of many genes and plays an important role in tumorigenesis. Resveratrol (RSV), a natural polyphenolic compound, has many beneficial biological effects on health. In this study, we investigated the role of Pokemon in RSV-induced biological effects and the effect of RSV on the expression of Pokemon in glioma cells. We found that overexpression of Pokemon decreased RSV-induced cell apoptosis, senescence, and anti-proliferative effects. Moreover, we showed that RSV could efficiently decrease the activity of the Pokemon promoter and the expression of Pokemon. Meanwhile, RSV also inhibited Sp1 DNA binding activity to the Pokemon promoter; whereas, it did not influence the expression and nuclear translocation of Sp1. In addition, we found that RSV could increase the recruitment of HDAC1, but decreased p300 to the Pokemon promoter. Taken together, all these results extended our understanding on the anti-cancer mechanism of RSV in glioma cells.

  4. Prolyl oligopeptidase inhibition-induced growth arrest of human gastric cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Kanayo [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Osaka University of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 4-20-1 Nasahara, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-1094 (Japan); Sakaguchi, Minoru, E-mail: sakaguti@gly.oups.ac.jp [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Osaka University of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 4-20-1 Nasahara, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-1094 (Japan); Tanaka, Satoshi [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Osaka University of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 4-20-1 Nasahara, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-1094 (Japan); Yoshimoto, Tadashi [Department of Life Science, Setsunan University, 17-8 Ikeda-Nakamachi, Neyagawa, Osaka 572-8508 (Japan); Takaoka, Masanori [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Osaka University of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 4-20-1 Nasahara, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-1094 (Japan)

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •We examined the effects of prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) inhibition on p53 null gastric cancer cell growth. •POP inhibition-induced cell growth suppression was associated with an increase in a quiescent G{sub 0} state. •POP might regulate the exit from and/or reentry into the cell cycle. -- Abstract: Prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) is a serine endopeptidase that hydrolyzes post-proline peptide bonds in peptides that are <30 amino acids in length. We recently reported that POP inhibition suppressed the growth of human neuroblastoma cells. The growth suppression was associated with pronounced G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} cell cycle arrest and increased levels of the CDK inhibitor p27{sup kip1} and the tumor suppressor p53. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of POP inhibition-induced cell growth arrest using a human gastric cancer cell line, KATO III cells, which had a p53 gene deletion. POP specific inhibitors, 3-((4-[2-(E)-styrylphenoxy]butanoyl)-L-4-hydroxyprolyl)-thiazolidine (SUAM-14746) and benzyloxycarbonyl-thioprolyl-thioprolinal, or RNAi-mediated POP knockdown inhibited the growth of KATO III cells irrespective of their p53 status. SUAM-14746-induced growth inhibition was associated with G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} cell cycle phase arrest and increased levels of p27{sup kip1} in the nuclei and the pRb2/p130 protein expression. Moreover, SUAM-14746-mediated cell cycle arrest of KATO III cells was associated with an increase in the quiescent G{sub 0} state, defined by low level staining for the proliferation marker, Ki-67. These results indicate that POP may be a positive regulator of cell cycle progression by regulating the exit from and/or reentry into the cell cycle by KATO III cells.

  5. The combination of novel targeted molecular agents and radiation in the treatment of pediatric gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina eDasgupta

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Brain tumors are the most common solid pediatric malignancy. For high-grade, recurrent or refractory pediatric brain tumors, radiation therapy (XRT is an integral treatment modality. In the era of personalized cancer therapy, molecularly targeted agents have been designed to inhibit pathways critical to tumorigenesis. Our evolving knowledge of genetic aberrations in low-grade gliomas is being exploited with targeted inhibitors. These agents are also being combined with XRT to increase their efficacy. In this review, we discuss novel agents targeting three different pathways in low-grade gliomas, and their potential combination with XRT. B-Raf is a kinase in the Ras/Raf/MAPK kinase pathway, which is integral to cellular division, survival and metabolism. In low-grade pediatric gliomas, point mutations in BRAF (BRAF V600E or a BRAF fusion mutation (KIAA1549:BRAF causes overactivation of the MEK/MAPK pathway. Pre-clinical data shows cooperation between XRT and tagrgeted inhibitors of BRAF V600E, and MEK and mTOR inhibitors in the gliomas with the BRAF fusion. A second important signaling cascade in pediatric glioma pathogenesis is the PI3 kinase (PI3K/mTOR pathway. Dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitors are poised to enter studies of pediatric tumors. Finally, many brain tumors express potent stimulators of angiogenesis. Several inhibitors of immunomodulators are currently being evaluated in in clinical trials for the treatment of recurrent or refractory pediatric central nervous system (CNS tumors. In summary, combinations of these targeted inhibitors with radiation are currently under investigation in both translational bench research and early clinical trials. We summarize the molecular rationale for, and the pre-clinical data supporting the combinations of these targeted agents with other anti-cancer agents and XRT in pediatric gliomas. Parallels are drawn to adult gliomas, and the molecular mechanisms underlying the efficacy of these agents is discussed

  6. Solid lipid nanoparticles by coacervation loaded with a methotrexate prodrug: preliminary study for glioma treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, Luigi; Muntoni, Elisabetta; Chirio, Daniela; Peira, Elena; Annovazzi, Laura; Schiffer, Davide; Mellai, Marta; Riganti, Chiara; Salaroglio, Iris Chiara; Lanotte, Michele; Panciani, Pierpaolo; Capucchio, Maria Teresa; Valazza, Alberto; Biasibetti, Elena; Gallarate, Marina

    2017-03-01

    Methotrexate-loaded biocompatible nanoparticles were tested for preliminary efficacy in glioma treatment. Behenic acid nanoparticles, prepared by the coacervation method, were loaded with the ester prodrug didodecylmethotrexate, which was previously tested in vitro against glioblastoma human primary cultures. Nanoparticle conjugation with an ApoE mimicking chimera peptide was performed to obtain active targeting to the brain. Biodistribution studies in healthy rats assessed the superiority of ApoE-conjugated formulation, which was tested on an F98/Fischer glioma model. Differences were observed in tumor growth rate (measured by MRI) between control and treated rats. In vitro tests on F98 cultured cells assessed their susceptibility to treatment, with consequent apoptosis, and allowed us to explain the apoptosis observed in glioma models.

  7. Type 1 IGF Receptor Localization in Paediatric Gliomas: Significant Association with WHO Grading and Clinical Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clément, Florencia; Martin, Ayelen; Venara, Marcela; de Luján Calcagno, Maria; Mathó, Cecilia; Maglio, Silvana; Lombardi, Mercedes García; Bergadá, Ignacio; Pennisi, Patricia A

    2018-06-01

    Nuclear localization of insulin-like growth factor receptor type 1 (IGF-1R) has been described as adverse prognostic factor in some cancers. We studied the expression and localization of IGF-1R in paediatric patients with gliomas, as well as its association with World Health Organization (WHO) grading and survival. We conducted a single cohort, prospective study of paediatric patients with gliomas. Samples were taken at the time of the initial surgery; IGF-1R expression and localization were characterized by immunohistochemistry (IHC), subcellular fractionation and western blotting. Tumours (47/53) showed positive staining for IGF-1R by IHC. IGF-1R nuclear labelling was observed in 10/47 cases. IGF-1R staining was mostly non-nuclear in low-grade tumours, while IGF-1R nuclear labelling was predominant in high-grade gliomas (p = 0.0001). Survival was significantly longer in patients with gliomas having non-nuclear IGF-1R localization than in patients with nuclear IGF-1R tumours (p = 0.016). In gliomas, IGF-1R nuclear localization was significantly associated with both high-grade tumours and increased risk of death. Based on a prospective design, we provide evidence of a potential usefulness of intracellular localization of IGF-1R as prognostic factor in paediatric patients with gliomas.

  8. Long non-coding RNA TUG1 acts as a miR-26a sponge in human glioma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; An, Gang; Zhang, Meng; Ma, Qingfang

    2016-09-02

    Long non-coding RNA taurine upregulated gene 1 (TUG1) acts as an important regulator in cancer pathogenesis; however, its functional mechanism in glioma development remains unclear. This study aims to explore the potential function of TUG1 in glioma by sponging miR-26a. The expression of TUG1, miR-26a, and phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) in 20 paired glioma tissues was detected by quantitative real-time PCR and subjected to correlation analysis. Bioinformatics analysis was performed by using DIANA Tools. Abnormal TUG1 expression was conducted in two glioma cells to analyze its regulation on miR-26a and PTEN using real-time PCR, western blot, and luciferase reporter assay. TUG1 expression was confirmed to be upregulated in glioma tissues, and showed an inverse correlation with downregulated miR-26a. TUG1 could negatively regulate the expression of miR-26a in glioma cells. The bioinformatics prediction revealed putative miR-26a binding sites within TUG1 transcripts. Further experiments demonstrated the positive regulation of TUG1 on the miR-26a target, PTEN, wherein TUG1 could inhibit the negative regulation of miR-26a on PTEN by binding its 3'UTR. Additionally, the expression of PTEN was also upregulated in glioma tissues, showing a positive or negative correlation with TUG1 or miR-26a, respectively. TUG1 could serve as a miR-26a sponge in human glioma cells, contributing to the upregulation of PTEN. This study revealed a new TUG1/miR-26a/PTEN regulatory mechanism and provided a further understanding of the tumor-suppressive role of TUG1 in glioma development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Microarray Analysis in a Cell Death Resistant Glioma Cell Line to Identify Signaling Pathways and Novel Genes Controlling Resistance and Malignancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seznec, Janina; Naumann, Ulrike, E-mail: ulrike.naumann@uni-tuebingen.de [Laboratory of Molecular Neuro-Oncology, Department of General Neurology, Hertie-Institute for Clinical Brain Research and Center Neurology, University of Tuebingen, Otfried-Mueller-Str. 27, Tuebingen 72076 (Germany)

    2011-06-27

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a lethal type of cancer mainly resistant to radio- and chemotherapy. Since the tumor suppressor p53 functions as a transcription factor regulating the expression of genes involved in growth inhibition, DNA repair and apoptosis, we previously assessed whether specific differences in the modulation of gene expression are responsible for the anti-tumor properties of a dominant positive p53, chimeric tumor suppressor (CTS)-1. CTS-1 is based on the sequence of p53 and designed to resist various mechanisms of inactivation which limit the activity of p53. To identify CTS-1-regulated cell death-inducing genes, we generated a CTS-1-resistant glioma cell line (229R). We used Affymetrix whole-genome microarray expression analysis to analyze alterations in gene expression and identified a variety of CTS-1 regulated genes involved in cancer-linked processes. 313 genes were differentially expressed in Adeno-CTS-1 (Ad-CTS-1)-infected and 700 genes in uninfected 229R cells compared to matching parental cells. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) determined a variety of differentially expressed genes in Ad-CTS-1-infected cells that were members of the intracellular networks with central tumor-involved players such as nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), protein kinase B (PKB/AKT) or transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β). Differentially regulated genes include secreted factors as well as intracellular proteins and transcription factors regulating not only cell death, but also processes such as tumor cell motility and immunity. This work gives an overview of the pathways differentially regulated in the resistant versus parental glioma cells and might be helpful to identify candidate genes which could serve as targets to develop novel glioma specific therapy strategies.

  10. Microarray Analysis in a Cell Death Resistant Glioma Cell Line to Identify Signaling Pathways and Novel Genes Controlling Resistance and Malignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seznec, Janina; Naumann, Ulrike

    2011-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a lethal type of cancer mainly resistant to radio- and chemotherapy. Since the tumor suppressor p53 functions as a transcription factor regulating the expression of genes involved in growth inhibition, DNA repair and apoptosis, we previously assessed whether specific differences in the modulation of gene expression are responsible for the anti-tumor properties of a dominant positive p53, chimeric tumor suppressor (CTS)-1. CTS-1 is based on the sequence of p53 and designed to resist various mechanisms of inactivation which limit the activity of p53. To identify CTS-1-regulated cell death-inducing genes, we generated a CTS-1-resistant glioma cell line (229R). We used Affymetrix whole-genome microarray expression analysis to analyze alterations in gene expression and identified a variety of CTS-1 regulated genes involved in cancer-linked processes. 313 genes were differentially expressed in Adeno-CTS-1 (Ad-CTS-1)-infected and 700 genes in uninfected 229R cells compared to matching parental cells. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) determined a variety of differentially expressed genes in Ad-CTS-1-infected cells that were members of the intracellular networks with central tumor-involved players such as nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), protein kinase B (PKB/AKT) or transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β). Differentially regulated genes include secreted factors as well as intracellular proteins and transcription factors regulating not only cell death, but also processes such as tumor cell motility and immunity. This work gives an overview of the pathways differentially regulated in the resistant versus parental glioma cells and might be helpful to identify candidate genes which could serve as targets to develop novel glioma specific therapy strategies

  11. A phase 1–2, prospective, double blind, randomized study of the safety and efficacy of Sulfasalazine for the treatment of progressing malignant gliomas: study protocol of [ISRCTN45828668

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robe, Pierre A; Martin, Didier; Albert, Adelin; Deprez, Manuel; Chariot, Alain; Bours, Vincent

    2006-01-01

    The prognosis of patients suffering from WHO grade 3 and 4 astrocytic glioma remains poor despite surgery, radiation therapy and the use of current chemotherapy regimen. Indeed, the median survival of glioblastoma multiforme (WHO grade 4) patients is at best 14.6 month with only 26.5 percents of the patients still alive after 2 years and the median survival of anaplastic astrocytomas (WHO grade 3) is 19.2 month. Recent evidence suggests that the transcription factor NF-kappaB is constitutively expressed in malignant gliomas and that its inhibition by drugs like Sulfasalazine may block the growth of astrocytic tumors in vitro and in experimental models of malignant gliomas. ULg-GBM-04/1 is a prospective, randomized, double blind single-center phase 1–2 study. A total of twenty patients with progressive malignant glioma despite surgery, radiation therapy and a first line of chemotherapy will be recruited and assigned to four dosage regimen of Sulfasalazine. This medication will be taken orally t.i.d. at a daily dose of 1.5–3–4 or 6 g, continuously until complete remission, evidence of progression or drug intolerance. Primary endpoints are drug safety in the setting of malignant gliomas and tumor response as measured according to MacDonald's criteria. An interim analysis of drug safety will be conducted after the inclusion of ten patients. The complete evaluation of primary endpoints will be conducted two years after the enrolment of the last patient or after the death of the last patient should this occur prematurely. The aim of this study is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of Sulfasalazine as a treatment for recurring malignant gliomas. The safety and efficacy of this drug are analyzed as primary endpoints. Overall survival and progression-free survival are secondary endpoint

  12. Hypothalamic glioma masquerading as craniopharyngioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameer Vyas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypothalamic glioma account for 10-15% of supratentorial tumors in children. They usually present earlier (first 5 years of age than craniopharyngioma. Hypothalamic glioma poses a diagnostic dilemma with craniopharyngioma and other hypothalamic region tumors, when they present with atypical clinical or imaging patterns. Neuroimaging modalities especially MRI plays a very important role in scrutinizing the lesions in the hypothalamic region. We report a case of a hypothalamic glioma masquerading as a craniopharyngioma on imaging along with brief review of both the tumors.

  13. Use of statins and risk of glioma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaist, David; Andersen, L; Hallas, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory studies and a single case-control study have suggested a protective effect of statins on the risk of glioma. We wished to investigate the influence of statin use on the risk of glioma in a population-based setting.......Laboratory studies and a single case-control study have suggested a protective effect of statins on the risk of glioma. We wished to investigate the influence of statin use on the risk of glioma in a population-based setting....

  14. In vivo detection of c-Met expression in a rat C6 glioma model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towner, R A; Smith, N; Doblas, S; Tesiram, Y; Garteiser, P; Saunders, D; Cranford, R; Silasi-Mansat, R; Herlea, O; Ivanciu, L; Wu, D; Lupu, F

    2008-01-01

    The tyrosine kinase receptor, c-Met, and its substrate, the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), are implicated in the malignant progression of glioblastomas. In vivo detection of c-Met expression may be helpful in the diagnosis of malignant tumours. The C6 rat glioma model is a widely used intracranial brain tumour model used to study gliomas experimentally. We used a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) molecular targeting agent to specifically tag the cell surface receptor, c-Met, with an anti-c-Met antibody (Ab) linked to biotinylated Gd (gadolinium)-DTPA (diethylene triamine penta acetic acid)-albumin in rat gliomas to detect overexpression of this antigen in vivo. The anti-c-Met probe (anti-c-Met-Gd-DTPA-albumin) was administered intravenously, and as determined by an increase in MRI signal intensity and a corresponding decrease in regional T(1) relaxation values, this probe was found to detect increased expression of c-Met protein levels in C6 gliomas. In addition, specificity for the binding of the anti-c-Met contrast agent was determined by using fluorescence microscopic imaging of the biotinylated portion of the targeting agent within neoplastic and 'normal'brain tissues following in vivo administration of the anti-c-Met probe. Controls with no Ab or with a normal rat IgG attached to the contrast agent component indicated no non-specific binding to glioma tissue. This is the first successful visualization of in vivo overexpression of c-Met in gliomas.

  15. The effects of gene polymorphisms on glioma prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Ying; Li, Guolin; Yan, Mengdan; Li, Jing; Jin, Tianbo; Li, Shanqu; Mu, Shijie

    2017-11-01

    Malignant gliomas are the most common primary brain tumors. Various genetic factors play important roles in the development and prognosis of glioma. The present study focuses on the impact of MPHOSPH6, TNIP1 and several other genes (ACYP2, NAF1, TERC, TERT, OBFC1, ZNF208 and RTEL1) on telomere length and how this affects the prognosis of glioma. Forty-three polymorphisms in nine genes from 605 glioma patients were selected. The association between genotype and survival outcome was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method, Cox regression analysis and the log-rank test. The 1-year overall survival (OS) rates of patients younger than 40 years of age was higher compared to those in patients older than 40 years of age. The 1-year OS rate of patients who underwent total resection was higher than that of patients whose gliomas were not completely resected. The 1-year OS rates of patients undergoing chemotherapy and of patients who did not undergo chemotherapy were 39.90% and 26.80%, respectively. Univariate analyses showed that ACYP2 rs12615793 and TERT rs2853676 loci affected progression-free survival in glioma patients; both ZNF208 rs8105767 and ACYP2 rs843720 affected the OS of patients with low-grade gliomas. Multivariate analyses suggested that MPHOSPH6 rs1056629 and rs1056654, and TERT rs2853676 loci were associated with good prognoses of patients with glioma or high-grade gliomas, whereas ZNF208 rs8105767 was associated with good prognosis of patients with low-grade glioma. Age, surgical resection and chemotherapy influenced the survival rates of glioma patients. TERT, MPHOSPH6, ACYP2 and ZNF208 genes were found to affect glioma prognosis. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. CXCR7 is induced by hypoxia and mediates glioma cell migration towards SDF-1α

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esencay, Mine; Sarfraz, Yasmeen; Zagzag, David

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastomas, the most common and malignant brain tumors of the central nervous system, exhibit high invasive capacity, which hinders effective therapy. Therefore, intense efforts aimed at improved therapeutics are ongoing to delineate the molecular mechanisms governing glioma cell migration and invasion. In order to perform the studies, we employed optimal cell culture methods and hypoxic conditions, lentivirus-mediated knockdown of protein expression, Western Blot analysis, migration assays and immunoprecipitation. We determined statistical significance by unpaired t-test. In this report, we show that U87MG, LN229 and LN308 glioma cells express CXCR7 and that exposure to hypoxia upregulates CXCR7 protein expression in these cell lines. CXCR7-expressing U87MG, LN229 and LN308 glioma cells migrated towards stromal-derived factor (SDF)-1α/CXCL12 in hypoxic conditions in the Boyden chamber assays. While shRNA-mediated knockdown of CXCR7 expression did not affect the migration of any of the three cell lines in normoxic conditions, we observed a reduction in the migration of LN229 and LN308, but not U87MG, glioma cells towards SDF-1α in hypoxic conditions. In addition, knockdown of CXCR7 expression in LN229 and LN308 glioma cells decreased levels of SDF-1α-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Akt. Inhibiting CXCR4 in LN229 and LN308 glioma cells that were knocked down for CXCR7 did not further reduce migration towards SDF-1α in hypoxic conditions and did not affect the levels of phosphorylated ERK1/2 and Akt. Analysis of immunoprecipitated CXCR4 from LN229 and LN308 glioma cells revealed co-precipitated CXCR7. Taken together, our findings indicate that both CXCR4 and CXCR7 mediate glioma cell migration towards SDF-1α in hypoxic conditions and support the development of therapeutic agents targeting these receptors

  17. Inhibition of GLO1 in Glioblastoma Multiforme Increases DNA-AGEs, Stimulates RAGE Expression, and Inhibits Brain Tumor Growth in Orthotopic Mouse Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Jandial

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancers that exhibit the Warburg effect may elevate expression of glyoxylase 1 (GLO1 to detoxify the toxic glycolytic byproduct methylglyoxal (MG and inhibit the formation of pro-apoptotic advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs. Inhibition of GLO1 in cancers that up-regulate glycolysis has been proposed as a therapeutic targeting strategy, but this approach has not been evaluated for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, the most aggressive and difficult to treat malignancy of the brain. Elevated GLO1 expression in GBM was established in patient tumors and cell lines using bioinformatics tools and biochemical approaches. GLO1 inhibition in GBM cell lines and in an orthotopic xenograft GBM mouse model was examined using both small molecule and short hairpin RNA (shRNA approaches. Inhibition of GLO1 with S-(p-bromobenzyl glutathione dicyclopentyl ester (p-BrBzGSH(Cp2 increased levels of the DNA-AGE N2-1-(carboxyethyl-2′-deoxyguanosine (CEdG, a surrogate biomarker for nuclear MG exposure; substantially elevated expression of the immunoglobulin-like receptor for AGEs (RAGE; and induced apoptosis in GBM cell lines. Targeting GLO1 with shRNA similarly increased CEdG levels and RAGE expression, and was cytotoxic to glioma cells. Mice bearing orthotopic GBM xenografts treated systemically with p-BrBzGSH(Cp2 exhibited tumor regression without significant off-target effects suggesting that GLO1 inhibition may have value in the therapeutic management of these drug-resistant tumors.

  18. Inhibition of GLO1 in Glioblastoma Multiforme Increases DNA-AGEs, Stimulates RAGE Expression, and Inhibits Brain Tumor Growth in Orthotopic Mouse Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandial, Rahul; Neman, Josh; Lim, Punnajit P; Tamae, Daniel; Kowolik, Claudia M; Wuenschell, Gerald E; Shuck, Sarah C; Ciminera, Alexandra K; De Jesus, Luis R; Ouyang, Ching; Chen, Mike Y; Termini, John

    2018-01-30

    Cancers that exhibit the Warburg effect may elevate expression of glyoxylase 1 (GLO1) to detoxify the toxic glycolytic byproduct methylglyoxal (MG) and inhibit the formation of pro-apoptotic advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs). Inhibition of GLO1 in cancers that up-regulate glycolysis has been proposed as a therapeutic targeting strategy, but this approach has not been evaluated for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most aggressive and difficult to treat malignancy of the brain. Elevated GLO1 expression in GBM was established in patient tumors and cell lines using bioinformatics tools and biochemical approaches. GLO1 inhibition in GBM cell lines and in an orthotopic xenograft GBM mouse model was examined using both small molecule and short hairpin RNA (shRNA) approaches. Inhibition of GLO1 with S -( p -bromobenzyl) glutathione dicyclopentyl ester ( p- BrBzGSH(Cp)₂) increased levels of the DNA-AGE N ²-1-(carboxyethyl)-2'-deoxyguanosine (CEdG), a surrogate biomarker for nuclear MG exposure; substantially elevated expression of the immunoglobulin-like receptor for AGEs (RAGE); and induced apoptosis in GBM cell lines. Targeting GLO1 with shRNA similarly increased CEdG levels and RAGE expression, and was cytotoxic to glioma cells. Mice bearing orthotopic GBM xenografts treated systemically with p -BrBzGSH(Cp)₂ exhibited tumor regression without significant off-target effects suggesting that GLO1 inhibition may have value in the therapeutic management of these drug-resistant tumors.

  19. Approaching a Scientific Consensus on the Association between Allergies and Glioma Risk: A Report from the Glioma International Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirian, E Susan; Zhou, Renke; Wrensch, Margaret R; Olson, Sara H; Scheurer, Michael E; Il'yasova, Dora; Lachance, Daniel; Armstrong, Georgina N; McCoy, Lucie S; Lau, Ching C; Claus, Elizabeth B; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S; Schildkraut, Joellen; Ali-Osman, Francis; Sadetzki, Siegal; Johansen, Christoffer; Houlston, Richard S; Jenkins, Robert B; Bernstein, Jonine L; Merrell, Ryan T; Davis, Faith G; Lai, Rose; Shete, Sanjay; Amos, Christopher I; Melin, Beatrice S; Bondy, Melissa L

    2016-02-01

    Several previous studies have found inverse associations between glioma susceptibility and a history of allergies or other atopic conditions. Some evidence indicates that respiratory allergies are likely to be particularly relevant with regard to glioma risk. Using data from the Glioma International Case-Control Study (GICC), we examined the effects of respiratory allergies and other atopic conditions on glioma risk. The GICC contains detailed information on history of atopic conditions for 4,533 cases and 4,171 controls, recruited from 14 study sites across five countries. Using two-stage random-effects restricted maximum likelihood modeling to calculate meta-analysis ORs, we examined the associations between glioma and allergy status, respiratory allergy status, asthma, and eczema. Having a history of respiratory allergies was associated with an approximately 30% lower glioma risk, compared with not having respiratory allergies (mOR, 0.72; 95% confidence interval, 0.58-0.90). This association was similar when restricting to high-grade glioma cases. Asthma and eczema were also significantly protective against glioma. A substantial amount of data on the inverse association between atopic conditions and glioma has accumulated, and findings from the GICC study further strengthen the existing evidence that the relationship between atopy and glioma is unlikely to be coincidental. As the literature approaches a consensus on the impact of allergies in glioma risk, future research can begin to shift focus to what the underlying biologic mechanism behind this association may be, which could, in turn, yield new opportunities for immunotherapy or cancer prevention. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  20. The prosurvival role of autophagy in Resveratrol-induced cytotoxicity in human U251 glioma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jun; Qin, Zhenghong; Liang, Zhongqin

    2009-01-01

    Previous study reported that resveratrol has anti-tumor activity. In this study, we investigated the involvement of autophagy in the resveratrol-induced apoptotic death of human U251 glioma cells. The growth inhibition of U251 cells induced by resveratrol was assessed with methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT). The activation of autophagy and proapoptotic effect were characterized by monodansylcadaverine labeling and Hoechst stain, respectively. Mitochondrialtransmembrane potential (ΔΨm) was measured as a function of drug treatment using 5,5',6,6'-tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'-tetraethylbenzimidazolylcarbocyanine iodide (JC-1). The role of autophagy and apoptosis in the resveratrol-induced death of U251 cells was assessed using autophagic and caspase inhibitors. Immunofluorescence, flow cytometry, and Western blot analysis were used to study the apoptotic and autophagic mechanisms. Methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assays indicated that resveratrol decreased the viability of U251 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Flow cytometry analysis indicated that resveratrol increased cell population at sub-G1 phase, an index of apoptosis. Furthermore, resveratrol-induced cell death was associated with a collapse of the mitochondrial membrane potential. The pan-caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-fmk suppressed resveratrol-induced U251 cell death. Resveratrol stimulated autophagy was evidenced by punctuate monodansylcadaverine(MDC) staining and microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3) immunoreactivty. Resveratrol also increased protein levels of beclin 1 and membrane form LC3 (LC3-II). Autophagy inhibitors 3-methylademine (3-MA) and bafilomycin A1 sensitized the cytotoxicity of resveratrol. Together, these findings indicate that resveratrol induces autophagy in human U251 glioma cells and autophagy suppressed resveratrol-induced apoptosis. This study thus suggests that autophagy inhibitors can increase the cytotoxicity of resveratrol to glioma cells

  1. Known glioma risk loci are associated with glioma with a family history of brain tumours -- a case-control gene association study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melin, Beatrice; Dahlin, Anna M; Andersson, Ulrika; Wang, Zhaoming; Henriksson, Roger; Hallmans, Göran; Bondy, Melissa L; Johansen, Christoffer; Feychting, Maria; Ahlbom, Anders; Kitahara, Cari M; Wang, Sophia S; Ruder, Avima M; Carreón, Tania; Butler, Mary Ann; Inskip, Peter D; Purdue, Mark; Hsing, Ann W; Mechanic, Leah; Gillanders, Elizabeth; Yeager, Meredith; Linet, Martha; Chanock, Stephen J; Hartge, Patricia; Rajaraman, Preetha

    2013-05-15

    Familial cancer can be used to leverage genetic association studies. Recent genome-wide association studies have reported independent associations between seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and risk of glioma. The aim of this study was to investigate whether glioma cases with a positive family history of brain tumours, defined as having at least one first- or second-degree relative with a history of brain tumour, are associated with known glioma risk loci. One thousand four hundred and thirty-one glioma cases and 2,868 cancer-free controls were identified from four case-control studies and two prospective cohorts from USA, Sweden and Denmark and genotyped for seven SNPs previously reported to be associated with glioma risk in case-control designed studies. Odds ratios were calculated by unconditional logistic regression. In analyses including glioma cases with a family history of brain tumours (n = 104) and control subjects free of glioma at baseline, three of seven SNPs were associated with glioma risk: rs2736100 (5p15.33, TERT), rs4977756 (9p21.3, CDKN2A-CDKN2B) and rs6010620 (20q13.33, RTEL1). After Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons, only one marker was statistically significantly associated with glioma risk, rs6010620 (ORtrend for the minor (A) allele, 0.39; 95% CI: 0.25-0.61; Bonferroni adjusted ptrend , 1.7 × 10(-4) ). In conclusion, as previously shown for glioma regardless of family history of brain tumours, rs6010620 (RTEL1) was associated with an increased risk of glioma when restricting to cases with family history of brain tumours. These findings require confirmation in further studies with a larger number of glioma cases with a family history of brain tumours. Copyright © 2012 UICC.

  2. The nontoxic natural compound Curcumin exerts anti-proliferative, anti-migratory, and anti-invasive properties against malignant gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senft, Christian; Polacin, Margareth; Priester, Maike; Seifert, Volker; Kögel, Donat; Weissenberger, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    New drugs are constantly sought after to improve the survival of patients with malignant gliomas. The ideal substance would selectively target tumor cells without eliciting toxic side effects. Here, we report on the anti-proliferative, anti-migratory, and anti-invasive properties of the natural, nontoxic compound Curcumin observed in five human glioblastoma (GBM) cell lines in vitro. We used monolayer wound healing assays, modified Boyden chamber trans-well assays, and cell growth assays to quantify cell migration, invasion, and proliferation in the absence or presence of Curcumin at various concentrations. Levels of the transcription factor phospho-STAT3, a potential target of Curcumin, were determined by sandwich-ELISA. Subsequent effects on transcription of genes regulating the cell cycle were analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR. Effects on apoptosis were determined by caspase assays. Curcumin potently inhibited GBM cell proliferation as well as migration and invasion in all cell lines contingent on dose. Simultaneously, levels of the biologically active phospho-STAT3 were decreased and correlated with reduced transcription of the cell cycle regulating gene c-Myc and proliferation marking Ki-67, pointing to a potential mechanism by which Curcumin slows tumor growth. Curcumin is part of the diet of millions of people every day and is without known toxic side effects. Our data show that Curcumin bears anti-proliferative, anti-migratory, and anti-invasive properties against GBM cells in vitro. These results warrant further in vivo analyses and indicate a potential role of Curcumin in the treatment of malignant gliomas

  3. ITE inhibits growth of human pulmonary artery endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Ling-Pin; Li, Yan; Zou, Qing-Yun; Zhou, Chi; Lei, Wei; Zheng, Jing; Huang, Shi-An

    2017-10-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), a deadly disorder is associated with excessive growth of human pulmonary artery endothelial (HPAECs) and smooth muscle (HPASMCs) cells. Current therapies primarily aim at promoting vasodilation, which only ameliorates clinical symptoms without a cure. 2-(1'H-indole-3'-carbonyl)-thiazole-4-carboxylic acid methyl ester (ITE) is an endogenous aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) ligand, and mediates many cellular function including cell growth. However, the roles of ITE in human lung endothelial cells remain elusive. Herein, we tested a hypothesis that ITE inhibits growth of human pulmonary artery endothelial cells via AhR. Immunohistochemistry was performed to localize AhR expression in human lung tissues. The crystal violet method and MTT assay were used to determine ITE's effects on growth of HPAECs. The AhR activation in HPAECs was confirmed using Western blotting and RT-qPCR. The role of AhR in ITE-affected proliferation of HPAECs was assessed using siRNA knockdown method followed by the crystal violet method. Immunohistochemistry revealed that AhR was present in human lung tissues, primarily in endothelial and smooth muscle cells of pulmonary veins and arteries, as well as in bronchial and alveolar sac epithelia. We also found that ITE dose- and time-dependently inhibited proliferation of HPAECs with a maximum inhibition of 83% at 20 µM after 6 days of treatment. ITE rapidly decreased AhR protein levels, while it increased mRNA levels of cytochrome P450 (CYP), family 1, member A1 (CYP1A1) and B1 (CYP1B1), indicating activation of the AhR/CYP1A1 and AhR/CYP1B1 pathways in HPAECs. The AhR siRNA significantly suppressed AhR protein expression, whereas it did not significantly alter ITE-inhibited growth of HPAECs. ITE suppresses growth of HPAECs independent of AhR, suggesting that ITE may play an important role in preventing excessive growth of lung endothelial cells.

  4. Evaluation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) by chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) in archival gliomas using bright-field microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquez, Abbey; Wu, Rina; Zhao, Jianxin; Tao, Jianhua; Shi, Zuorong

    2004-03-01

    Overexpression of EGFR secondary to EGFR gene amplification is a common feature in primary malignant gliomas. To correctly assess EGFR protein and gene level as possible prognostic and predictive markers in gliomas, straightforward assays, which can be used routinely in the pathology laboratory to evaluate EGFR status, becomes critical. EGFR gene amplification and chromosome 7 aneuploidy was detected in 34 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded benign and malignant gliomas by chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH) using digoxigenin-labeled EGFR and biotin-labeled chromosome 7 centromeric probes. The results were evaluated by bright-field microscopy under a 40x objective lens. EGFR protein level was detected by immunohistochemistry (IHC) using monoclonal antibody 31G7. Five cases, 3 astrocytoma grade III (33%) and 2 glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) (33%), had EGFR amplification displayed as diaminobenzidine-stained multiple dots suggesting the pattern of double-minute chromosomes. Chromosome 7 polysomy was found in 68% gliomas, 100% GBM, 67% astrocytoma grade III, 42% astrocytoma grade II, 50% astrocytoma grade I, 100% ependymoma, and the 1 case of mixed glioma III. High expression of EGFR protein was present in 62% gliomas and displayed membrane and cytoplasmic staining. All tumors with EGFR gene amplification showed EGFR high expression. High expression of EGFR without gene amplification was observed in all grades of gliomas. Simultaneous detection of EGFR gene copies or chromosome 7 centromere signals along with tissue morphology allows us to compare CISH results easily with IHC results. Our results show that CISH is an objective, practical, and accurate assay to screen for EGFR gene status in gliomas.

  5. Antitumor effect of a new nano-vector with miRNA-135a on malignant glioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang C

    2017-12-01

    evaluated by CCK8 assay. The cell experiments in vitro indicated that mPEG-g-PEI could significantly improve miR-135a transfection by enhancing uptake effect of both normal glial and glioma cells. Given the C6 implanted in situ model, we discovered that the mPEG-g-PEI/miR-135a could obviously increase the survival period and inhibit the growth of glioma confirmed by MRI and histochemistry. In addition, the transfection efficiency of mPEG-g-PEI was better than that of other transfection agents either in vitro or in vivo confirmed by RT-PCR. Moreover, the expressions of the targeted proteins of miR-135a were consistent with the in vitro results. Conclusion: These results suggest that mPEG-g-PEI is expected to provide a new effective intracellular miRNA delivery system with low toxicity for glioma therapy. Keywords: nano-vector, miRNA-135a, malignant glioma, gene delivery, Micro RNA

  6. Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapy-induced glioma invasion is associated with accumulation of Tie2-expressing monocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Mohammad B.; Conrad, Charles A.; Aldape, Kenneth D.; Fuller, Gregory N.; Marini, Frank C.; Alonso, Marta M.; Idoate, Miguel Angel; Gilbert, Mark R.; Fueyo, Juan; Gomez-Manzano, Candelaria

    2014-01-01

    The addition of anti-angiogenic therapy to the few treatments available to patients with malignant gliomas was based on the fact that these tumors are highly vascularized and on encouraging results from preclinical and clinical studies. However, tumors that initially respond to this therapy invariably recur with the acquisition of a highly aggressive and invasive phenotype. Although several myeloid populations have been associated to this pattern of recurrence, a specific targetable population has not been yet identified. Here, we present evidence for the accumulation of Tie2-expressing monocytes/macrophages (TEMs) at the tumor/normal brain interface of mice treated with anti-VEGF therapies in regions with heightened tumoral invasion. Furthermore, we describe the presence of TEMs in malignant glioma surgical specimens that recurred after bevacizumab treatment. Our studies showed that TEMs enhanced the invasive properties of glioma cells and secreted high levels of gelatinase enzymatic proteins. Accordingly, Tie2+MMP9+ monocytic cells were consistently detected in the invasive tumor edge upon anti-VEGF therapies. Our results suggest the presence of a specific myeloid/monocytic subpopulation that plays a pivotal role in the mechanism of escape of malignant gliomas from anti-VEGF therapies and therefore constitutes a new cellular target for combination therapies in patients selected for anti-angiogenesis treatment. PMID:24809734

  7. Facing Contrast-Enhancing Gliomas: Perfusion MRI in Grade III and Grade IV Gliomas according to Tumor Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Luisa Di Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumoral neoangiogenesis characterizes high grade gliomas. Relative Cerebral Blood Volume (rCBV, calculated with Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast (DSC Perfusion-Weighted Imaging (PWI, allows for the estimation of vascular density over the tumor bed. The aim of the study was to characterize putative tumoral neoangiogenesis via the study of maximal rCBV with a Region of Interest (ROI approach in three tumor areas—the contrast-enhancing area, the nonenhancing tumor, and the high perfusion area on CBV map—in patients affected by contrast-enhancing glioma (grades III and IV. Twenty-one patients were included: 15 were affected by grade IV and 6 by grade III glioma. Maximal rCBV values for each patient were averaged according to glioma grade. Although rCBV from contrast-enhancement and from nonenhancing tumor areas was higher in grade IV glioma than in grade III (5.58 and 2.68; 3.01 and 2.2, resp., the differences were not significant. Instead, rCBV recorded in the high perfusion area on CBV map, independently of tumor compartment, was significantly higher in grade IV glioma than in grade III (7.51 versus 3.78, P=0.036. In conclusion, neoangiogenesis encompasses different tumor compartments and CBV maps appear capable of best characterizing the degree of neovascularization. Facing contrast-enhancing brain tumors, areas of high perfusion on CBV maps should be considered as the reference areas to be targeted for glioma grading.

  8. Phytotoxicity of nanoparticles: Inhibition of seed germination and root growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin Daohui [Department of Environmental Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310028 (China); Department of Plant, Soil and Insect Sciences, University of Massachusetts, Stockbridge Hall, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Xing Baoshan [Department of Plant, Soil and Insect Sciences, University of Massachusetts, Stockbridge Hall, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States)], E-mail: bx@pssci.umass.edu

    2007-11-15

    Plants need to be included to develop a comprehensive toxicity profile for nanoparticles. Effects of five types of nanoparticles (multi-walled carbon nanotube, aluminum, alumina, zinc, and zinc oxide) on seed germination and root growth of six higher plant species (radish, rape, ryegrass, lettuce, corn, and cucumber) were investigated. Seed germination was not affected except for the inhibition of nanoscale zinc (nano-Zn) on ryegrass and zinc oxide (nano-ZnO) on corn at 2000 mg/L. Inhibition on root growth varied greatly among nanoparticles and plants. Suspensions of 2000 mg/L nano-Zn or nano-ZnO practically terminated root elongation of the tested plant species. Fifty percent inhibitory concentrations (IC{sub 50}) of nano-Zn and nano-ZnO were estimated to be near 50 mg/L for radish, and about 20 mg/L for rape and ryegrass. The inhibition occurred during the seed incubation process rather than seed soaking stage. These results are significant in terms of use and disposal of engineered nanoparticles. - Engineered nanoparticles can inhibit the seed germination and root growth.

  9. Phytotoxicity of nanoparticles: Inhibition of seed germination and root growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Daohui; Xing Baoshan

    2007-01-01

    Plants need to be included to develop a comprehensive toxicity profile for nanoparticles. Effects of five types of nanoparticles (multi-walled carbon nanotube, aluminum, alumina, zinc, and zinc oxide) on seed germination and root growth of six higher plant species (radish, rape, ryegrass, lettuce, corn, and cucumber) were investigated. Seed germination was not affected except for the inhibition of nanoscale zinc (nano-Zn) on ryegrass and zinc oxide (nano-ZnO) on corn at 2000 mg/L. Inhibition on root growth varied greatly among nanoparticles and plants. Suspensions of 2000 mg/L nano-Zn or nano-ZnO practically terminated root elongation of the tested plant species. Fifty percent inhibitory concentrations (IC 50 ) of nano-Zn and nano-ZnO were estimated to be near 50 mg/L for radish, and about 20 mg/L for rape and ryegrass. The inhibition occurred during the seed incubation process rather than seed soaking stage. These results are significant in terms of use and disposal of engineered nanoparticles. - Engineered nanoparticles can inhibit the seed germination and root growth

  10. Transient increase in neuronal chloride concentration by neuroactive amino acids released from glioma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina eBertollini

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal chloride concentration ([Cl-]i is known to be dynamically modulated and alterations in Cl- homeostasis may occur in the brain at physiological and pathological conditions, being also likely involved in glioma-related seizures. However, the mechanism leading to changes in neuronal [Cl-]i during glioma invasion are still unclear. To characterize the potential effect of glioma released soluble factors on neuronal [Cl-]i, we used genetically encoded CFP/YFP-based ratiometric Cl-Sensor transiently expressed in cultured hippocampal neurons. Exposition of neurons to glioma conditioned medium (GCM caused rapid and transient elevation of [Cl-]i, resulting in the increase of fluorescence ratio, which was strongly reduced by blockers of ionotropic glutamate receptors APV and NBQX. Furthermore, in HEK cells expressing GluR1-AMPA receptors, GCM activated ionic current with efficacy similar to those caused by glutamate, supporting the notion that GCM contains glutamate or glutamatergic agonists, which cause neuronal depolarization, activation of NMDA and AMPA/KA receptors leading to elevation of [Cl-]i. Chromatographic analysis of the GCM showed that it contained several aminoacids, including glutamate, whose release from glioma cells did not occur via the most common glial mechanisms of transport, or in response to hypoosmotic stress. GCM also contained glycine, whose action contrasted the glutamate effect. Indeed, strychnine application significantly increased GCM-induced depolarization and [Cl-]i rise. GCM-evoked [Cl-]i elevation was not inhibited by antagonists of Cl- transporters and significantly reduced in the presence of anion channels blocker NPPB, suggesting that Cl-selective channels are a major route for GCM-induced Cl- influx. Altogether, these data show that glioma released aminoacids may dynamically alter Cl- equilibrium in surrounding neurons, deeply interfering with their inhibitory balance, likely leading to physiological and

  11. TGF-b y un inhibidor específico de TGF-b regulan pericentrina B y MYH9 en células de glioma TGF-b and a specific TGF-b inhibitor regulate pericentrin B and MYH9 in glioma cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rich Jeremy N.

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Malignant gliomas are heterogeneous, highly invasive vascular tumours. The multifunctional cytokine, transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-P, is expressed by grade III/IV gliomas and promotes tumour angiogenesis, invasión and immune escape. It has been shown previously that a small TGF-P receptor type I (TGF-(3-RI molecule inhibitor (SB-431542 blocks TGF-(3-mediated signal transduction, induction of angiogenic factor expression and cellular motility. As glioma cell lines display differential sensitivity to TGF-P, it was expected that they would also be differentially impacted by disruption of TGF-P signalling. Differential in gel expression (DIGE analysis and mass spectrometry was used in this work for determining protein regulation effects of both TGF-P and SB-431542 on human glioma cell lines. It was found that pericentrin B and non muscle myosin were differentially expressed in fragments which likely resulted from protease activation by the tumour growth mechanism. These results suggest that both pericentrin B and non-muscle myosin might be potential glioma biomarkers. Key words: DIGE, proteomics, glioma, TGF-P, mass spectrometry, non muscle myosin, pericentrin B.Los gliomas malignos son tumores vasculares heterogéneos altamente invasivos. El factor de transformación de creci­miento P (TGF-P es una citoquina multifuncional que es expresada por gliomas de grado III /IV y promueve angiogenesis de tumores, invasión y escape inmunológico. Recientemente se demostró que una pequeña molécula inhibidora (SB-431542 del receptor de TGF-P tipo I (TGF-P-RI, bloquea la señal de transducción mediada por TGF-P, la inducción del factor angiogénico de expresión y la movilidad celular. Ya que las líneas celulares de gliomas mues­tran sensitividad diferencial a TGF-P, se esperaba que también mostrarían impacto diferencial por el bloqueo de la señal de TGF-p. En el presente trabajo se usó un análisis diferencial en gel (DIGE, por sus

  12. Nasal Glioma: Case report

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    Ozgur Surmelioglu

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Nasal gliomas are rare, benign, congenital tumors that are thought to be result of abnormality in embryonic development. Three types of clinical presentations have been recognized; extranasal, intranasal and combined. Clinically, these masses are non-pulsatile, gray or purple lesions that obstruct the nasal cavity and cause deformity extranasaly. Histologically, they are made up of astrocytic cells, fibrous and vascular connective tissue that is covered with nasal respiratory mucosa. Treatment of the nasal glioma requires a multidisciplinary approach including an radiologist, neurosurgeon and otorhinolaryngologist. Radiological investigation should be performed to describe intracranial extension. In this case, a 2 years old boy with nasal mass that was diagnosed as nasal glioma is reported. . [Cukurova Med J 2011; 36(1.000: 34-36

  13. Nasal Glioma: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozgur Surmelioglu

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Nasal gliomas are rare, benign, congenital tumors that are thought to be result of abnormality in embryonic development. Three types of clinical presentations have been recognized; extranasal, intranasal and combined. Clinically, these masses are non-pulsatile, gray or purple lesions that obstruct the nasal cavity and cause deformity extranasaly. Histologically, they are made up of astrocytic cells, fibrous and vascular connective tissue that is covered with nasal respiratory mucosa. Treatment of the nasal glioma requires a multidisciplinary approach including an radiologist, neurosurgeon and otorhinolaryngologist. Radiological investigation should be performed to describe intracranial extension. In this case, a 2 years old boy with nasal mass that was diagnosed as nasal glioma is reported. . [Cukurova Med J 2011; 36(1: 34-36

  14. Human gliomas contain morphine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Peter; Rasmussen, Mads; Zhu, Wei

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Morphine has been found in cancer cell lines originating from human and animal cells. Thus, it became important to demonstrate whether or not actual tumours contain this opiate alkaloid. MATERIAL/METHODS: Human glioma tissues were biochemically treated to isolate and separate endogeno...... of the solutions used in the study nor was it present as a residual material in blank HPLC runs. CONCLUSIONS: Morphine is present in human gliomas, suggesting that it may exert an action that effects tumour physiology/pathology.......BACKGROUND: Morphine has been found in cancer cell lines originating from human and animal cells. Thus, it became important to demonstrate whether or not actual tumours contain this opiate alkaloid. MATERIAL/METHODS: Human glioma tissues were biochemically treated to isolate and separate endogenous...

  15. Forkhead box P3 regulates ARHGAP15 expression and affects migration of glioma cells through the Rac1 signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhen; Zhang, Biao; Wang, Chen; Fu, Tao; Li, Lianling; Wu, Qiaoli; Cai, Ying; Wang, Jinhuan

    2017-01-01

    Forkhead box P3 (FOXP3) plays a crucial role in the development and function of regulatory T cells and was recently identified as a tumor suppressor in different cancer types. Forkhead box P3 is expressed in normal brain tissues, but is strongly downregulated or absent in glioblastomas. In order to understand the FOXP3 adjustment mechanisms in glioma cells, we performed a DNA microarray in U87 cells overexpressing FOXP3 and validated the differences using quantitative real-time PCR, Western blot analysis, and immunohistochemistry in vitro and in vivo. We found that FOXP3 can regulate the expression of ARHGAP15. Expression of FOXP3 was also correlated with ARHGAP15 in glioma samples. Overexpression of FOXP3 inhibited glioma cell migration through ARHGAP15 upregulation and Rac1 inactivation. Silencing of FOXP3 promoted migration through ARHGAP15 downregulation and Rac1 activation. ARHGAP15, a GTPase-activating protein for Rac1, inhibits small GTPase signaling in a dual negative manner. We found that there is a correlation between expression of ARHGAP15 and glioma level. The small GTPase Rac1 plays an important role in cell migration. In addition, we found that FOXP3 regulates expression of epithelial-mesenchymal transition markers E-cadherin and N-cadherin, which is important given that epithelial-mesenchymal transition is critically involved in tumor spreading and dissemination. Thus, FOXP3 or ARHGAP15 may serve as a new molecular target for antimetastatic therapies in treating glioma. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  16. Platelet-derived growth factor inhibits platelet activation in heparinized whole blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selheim, F; Holmsen, H; Vassbotn, F S

    1999-08-15

    We previously have demonstrated that human platelets have functionally active platelet-derived growth factor alpha-receptors. Studies with gel-filtered platelets showed that an autocrine inhibition pathway is transduced through this tyrosine kinase receptor during platelet activation. The physiological significance of this inhibitory effect of platelet-derived growth factor on gel-filtered platelets activation is, however, not known. In the present study, we investigated whether platelet-derived growth factor inhibits platelet activation under more physiological conditions in heparinized whole blood, which represents a more physiological condition than gel-filtered platelets. Using flow cytometric assays, we demonstrate here that platelet-derived growth factor inhibits thrombin-, thrombin receptor agonist peptide SFLLRN-, and collagen-induced platelet aggregation and shedding of platelet-derived microparticles from the platelet plasma membrane during platelet aggregation in stirred heparinized whole blood. The inhibitory effect of platelet-derived growth factor was dose dependent. However, under nonaggregating conditions (no stirring), we could not demonstrate any significant effect of platelet-derived growth factor on thrombin- and thrombin receptor agonist peptide-induced platelet surface expression of P-selectin. Our results demonstrate that platelet-derived growth factor appears to be a true antithrombotic agent only under aggregating conditions in heparinized whole blood.

  17. Effects of irradiation and cisplatin on human glioma spheroids: inhibition of cell proliferation and cell migration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fehlauer, Fabian; Muench, Martina; Rades, Dirk; Stalpers, Lukas J. A.; Leenstra, Sieger; van der Valk, Paul; Slotman, Ben; Smid, Ernst J.; Sminia, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Investigation of cell migration and proliferation of human glioma cell line spheroids (CLS) and evaluation of morphology, apoptosis, and immunohistochemical expression of MIB-1, p53, and p21 of organotypic muticellular spheroids (OMS) following cisplatin (CDDP) and irradiation (RT). Spheroids of the

  18. Cortical and Subcortical Structural Plasticity Associated with the Glioma Volumes in Patients with Cerebral Gliomas Revealed by Surface-Based Morphometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinping Xu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Postlesional plasticity has been identified in patients with cerebral gliomas by inducing a large functional reshaping of brain networks. Although numerous non-invasive functional neuroimaging methods have extensively investigated the mechanisms of this functional redistribution in patients with cerebral gliomas, little effort has been made to investigate the structural plasticity of cortical and subcortical structures associated with the glioma volume. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether the contralateral cortical and subcortical structures are able to actively reorganize by themselves in these patients. The compensation mechanism following contralateral cortical and subcortical structural plasticity is considered. We adopted the surface-based morphometry to investigate the difference of cortical and subcortical gray matter (GM volumes in a cohort of 14 healthy controls and 13 patients with left-hemisphere cerebral gliomas [including 1 patients with World Health Organization (WHO I, 8 WHO II, and 4 WHO III]. The glioma volume ranges from 5.1633 to 208.165 cm2. Compared to healthy controls, we found significantly increased GM volume of the right cuneus and the left thalamus, as well as a trend toward enlargement in the right globus pallidus in patients with cerebral gliomas. Moreover, the GM volumes of these regions were positively correlated with the glioma volumes of the patients. These results provide evidence of cortical and subcortical enlargement, suggesting the usefulness of surface-based morphometry to investigate the structural plasticity. Moreover, the structural plasticity might be acted as the compensation mechanism to better fulfill its functions in patients with cerebral gliomas as the gliomas get larger.

  19. Celastrol inhibits TGF-β1-induced epithelial–mesenchymal transition by inhibiting Snail and regulating E-cadherin expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Hyereen; Lee, Minjae [Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Sung-Wuk, E-mail: swjang@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-08-09

    Highlights: •We investigated the effects of celastrol on TGF-β1-induced EMT in epithelial cells. •Celastrol regulates TGF-β1-induced morphological changes and E-cadherin expression. •Celastrol inhibits TGF-β1-induced Snail expression. •Celastrol strongly suppresses TGF-β1-induced invasion in MDCK and A549 cells. -- Abstract: The epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a pivotal event in the invasive and metastatic potentials of cancer progression. Celastrol inhibits the proliferation of a variety of tumor cells including leukemia, glioma, prostate, and breast cancer; however, the possible role of celastrol in the EMT is unclear. We investigated the effect of celastrol on the EMT. Transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1) induced EMT-like morphologic changes and upregulation of Snail expression. The downregulation of E-cadherin expression and upregulation of Snail in Madin–Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) and A549 cell lines show that TGF-β1-mediated the EMT in epithelial cells; however, celastrol markedly inhibited TGF-β1-induced morphologic changes, Snail upregulation, and E-cadherin expression. Migration and invasion assays revealed that celastrol completely inhibited TGF-β1-mediated cellular migration in both cell lines. These findings indicate that celastrol downregulates Snail expression, thereby inhibiting TGF-β1-induced EMT in MDCK and A549 cells. Thus, our findings provide new evidence that celastrol suppresses lung cancer invasion and migration by inhibiting TGF-β1-induced EMT.

  20. Molecular Therapeutic Targets for Glioma Angiogenesis

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    Shingo Takano

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the prominent angiogenesis that occurs in malignant glioma, antiangiogenic therapy has been attempted. There have been several molecular targets that are specific to malignant gliomas, as well as more broadly in systemic cancers. In this review, I will focus on some topics related to molecular therapeutic targets for glioma angiogenesis. First, important angiogenic factors that could be considered molecular targets are VEGF, VEGF-induced proteins on endothelial cells, tissue factor, osteopontin, v3 integrin, and thymidine phosphorylase as well as endogenous inhibitors, soluble Flt1, and thrombospondin 1. Second, hypoxic areas are also decreased by metronomic CPT11 treatment as well as temozolomide. Third, glioma-derived endothelial cells that are genetically and functionally distinct from normal endothelial cells should be targeted, for example, with SDF-1 and CXCR7 chemokine. Fourth, endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs likely contribute towards glioma angiogenesis in the brain and could be useful as a drug delivery tool. Finally, blockade of delta-like 4 (Dll4 results in a nonfunctioning vasculature and could be another important target distinct from VEGF.

  1. Use of tricyclic antidepressants and risk of glioma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pottegård, Anton; García Rodríguez, Luis Alberto; Rasmussen, Lotte

    2016-01-01

    glioma (cases) in Denmark between 2000 and 2012 and matched these 1 : 20 to population controls. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for glioma associated with long-term (⩾3 years) use of TCAs. Similar analyses were performed for selective serotonin reuptake...... inhibitors (SSRIs). RESULTS: We identified 3767 glioma cases and 75 340 population controls. Long-term use of TCAs was inversely associated with risk of glioma (OR 0.72, 95% CI: 0.41-1.25). Long-term SSRI use was not associated with glioma risk (OR 0.93, 95% CI: 0.75-1.16). CONCLUSIONS: Our study indicated...

  2. Long-term culture of organotypic multicellular glioma spheroids: a good culture model for studying gliomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaaijk, P.; Troost, D.; Das, P. K.; Leenstra, S.; Bosch, D. A.

    1995-01-01

    Gliomas, as well as other solid tumours, contain tumour stroma composed of connective tissue, macrophages, capillaries and other non-cellular constituents. Therefore, a homogeneous culture of tumour cells alone, as is often used as a culture model for gliomas, is not ideal to study all aspects of

  3. FTIR spectro-imaging of collagen scaffold formation during glioma tumor development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noreen, Razia; Chien, Chia-Chi; Chen, Hsiang-Hsin; Bobroff, Vladimir; Moenner, Michel; Javerzat, Sophie; Hwu, Yeukuang; Petibois, Cyril

    2013-11-01

    Evidence has recently emerged that solid and diffuse tumors produce a specific extracellular matrix (ECM) for division and diffusion, also developing a specific interface with microvasculature. This ECM is mainly composed of collagens and their scaffolding appears to drive tumor growth. Although collagens are not easily analyzable by UV-fluorescence means, FTIR imaging has appeared as a valuable tool to characterize collagen contents in tissues, specially the brain, where ECM is normally devoid of collagen proteins. Here, we used FTIR imaging to characterize collagen content changes in growing glioma tumors. We could determine that C6-derived solid tumors presented high content of triple helix after 8-11 days of growth (typical of collagen fibrils formation; 8/8 tumor samples; 91 % of total variance), and further turned to larger α-helix (days 12-15; 9/10 of tumors; 94 % of variance) and β-turns (day 18-21; 7/8 tumors; 97 % of variance) contents, which suggest the incorporation of non-fibrillar collagen types in ECM, a sign of more and more organized collagen scaffold along tumor progression. The growth of tumors was also associated to the level of collagen produced (P < 0.05). This study thus confirms that collagen scaffolding is a major event accompanying the angiogenic shift and faster tumor growth in solid glioma phenotypes.

  4. A report on radiation-induced gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvati, M.; Artico, M.; Caruso, R.; Rocchi, G.; Orlando, E.R.; Nucci, F.

    1991-01-01

    Radiation-induced gliomas are uncommon, with only 73 cases on record to date. The disease that most frequently occasioned radiation therapy has been acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Three more cases are added here, two after irradiation for ALL and one after irradiation for tinea capitis. In a review of the relevant literature, the authors stress the possibility that the ALL-glioma and the retinoblastoma-glioma links point to syndromes in their own right that may occur without radiation therapy.56 references

  5. Fascin-1 knock-down of human glioma cells reduces their microvilli/filopodia while improving their susceptibility to lymphocyte-mediated cytotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoa, Neil T; Ge, Lisheng; Erickson, Kate L; Kruse, Carol A; Cornforth, Andrew N; Kuznetsov, Yurii; McPherson, Alex; Martini, Filippo; Jadus, Martin R

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells derived from Glioblastoma multiforme possess membranous protrusions allowing these cells to infiltrate surrounding tissue, while resisting lymphocyte cytotoxicity. Microvilli and filopodia are supported by actin filaments cross-linked by fascin. Fascin-1 was genetically silenced within human U251 glioma cells; these knock-down glioma cells lost their microvilli/filopodia. The doubling time of these fascin-1 knock-down cells was doubled that of shRNA control U251 cells. Fascin-1 knock-down cells lost their transmigratory ability responding to interleukin-6 or insulin-like growth factor-1. Fascin-1 silenced U251 cells were more easily killed by cytolytic lymphocytes. Fascin-1 knock-down provides unique opportunities to augment glioma immunotherapy by simultaneously targeting several key glioma functions: like cell transmigration, cell division and resisting immune responses. PMID:25901196

  6. Mathematical modeling of human glioma growth based on brain topological structures: study of two clinical cases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Suarez

    Full Text Available Gliomas are the most common primary brain tumors and yet almost incurable due mainly to their great invasion capability. This represents a challenge to present clinical oncology. Here, we introduce a mathematical model aiming to improve tumor spreading capability definition. The model consists in a time dependent reaction-diffusion equation in a three-dimensional spatial domain that distinguishes between different brain topological structures. The model uses a series of digitized images from brain slices covering the whole human brain. The Talairach atlas included in the model describes brain structures at different levels. Also, the inclusion of the Brodmann areas allows prediction of the brain functions affected during tumor evolution and the estimation of correlated symptoms. The model is solved numerically using patient-specific parametrization and finite differences. Simulations consider an initial state with cellular proliferation alone (benign tumor, and an advanced state when infiltration starts (malign tumor. Survival time is estimated on the basis of tumor size and location. The model is used to predict tumor evolution in two clinical cases. In the first case, predictions show that real infiltrative areas are underestimated by current diagnostic imaging. In the second case, tumor spreading predictions were shown to be more accurate than those derived from previous models in the literature. Our results suggest that the inclusion of differential migration in glioma growth models constitutes another step towards a better prediction of tumor infiltration at the moment of surgical or radiosurgical target definition. Also, the addition of physiological/psychological considerations to classical anatomical models will provide a better and integral understanding of the patient disease at the moment of deciding therapeutic options, taking into account not only survival but also life quality.

  7. 3-Bromopyruvate inhibits human gastric cancer tumor growth in nude mice via the inhibition of glycolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xian, Shu-Lin; Cao, Wei; Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Lu, Yun-Fei

    2015-02-01

    Tumor cells primarily depend upon glycolysis in order to gain energy. Therefore, the inhibition of glycolysis may inhibit tumor growth. Our previous study demonstrated that 3-bromopyruvate (3-BrPA) inhibited gastric cancer cell proliferation in vitro . However, the ability of 3-BrPA to suppress tumor growth in vivo, and its underlying mechanism, have yet to be elucidated. The aim of the present study was to investigate the inhibitory effect of 3-BrPA in an animal model of gastric cancer. It was identified that 3-BrPA exhibited strong inhibitory effects upon xenograft tumor growth in nude mice. In addition, the antitumor function of 3-BrPA exhibited a dose-effect association, which was similar to that of the chemotherapeutic agent, 5-fluorouracil. Furthermore, 3-BrPA exhibited low toxicity in the blood, liver and kidneys of the nude mice. The present study hypothesized that the inhibitory effect of 3-BrPA is achieved through the inhibition of hexokinase activity, which leads to the downregulation of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) expression, the upregulation of Bcl-2-associated X protein expression and the subsequent activation of caspase-3. These data suggest that 3-BrPA may be a novel therapy for the treatment of gastric cancer.

  8. The Art of Intraoperative Glioma Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoe Z Zhang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A major dilemma in brain tumor surgery is the identification of tumor boundaries to maximize tumor excision and minimize postoperative neurological damage. Gliomas, especially low-grade tumors, and normal brain have a similar color and texture which poses a challenge to the neurosurgeon. Advances in glioma resection techniques combine the experience of the neurosurgeon and various advanced technologies. Intraoperative methods to delineate gliomas from normal tissue consist of 1 image-based navigation, 2 intraoperative sampling, 3 electrophysiological monitoring, and 4 enhanced visual tumor demarcation. The advantages and disadvantages of each technique are discussed. A combination of these methods is becoming widely accepted in routine glioma surgery. Gross total resection in conjunction with radiation, chemotherapy, or immune/gene therapy may increase the rates of cure in this devastating disease.

  9. Glioma Association and Balancing Selection of ZFPM2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shui-Ying Tsang

    Full Text Available ZFPM2, encoding a zinc finger protein and abundantly expressed in the brain, uterus and smooth muscles, plays important roles in cardiac and gonadal development. Abnormal expression of ZFPM2 in ovarian tumors and neuroblastoma has been reported but hitherto its genetic association with cancer and effects on gliomas have not been studied. In the present study, the hexamer insertion-deletion polymorphism rs71305152, located within a large haplotype block spanning intron 1 to intron 3 of ZFPM2, was genotyped in Chinese cohorts of glioma (n = 350, non-glioma cancer (n = 354 and healthy control (n = 463 by direct sequencing and length polymorphism in gel electrophoresis, and ZFPM2 expression in glioma tissues (n = 69 of different grades was quantified by real-time RT-PCR. Moreover, potential natural selection pressure acting on the gene was investigated. Disease-association analysis showed that the overall genotype of rs71305152 was significantly associated with gliomas (P = 0.016, and the heterozygous genotype compared to the combined homozygous genotypes was less frequent in gliomas than in controls (P = 0.005 or non-glioma cancers (P = 0.020. ZFPM2 mRNA expression was negatively correlated with the grades of gliomas (P = 0.002, with higher expression levels in the low-grade gliomas. In the astrocytoma subtype, higher ZFPM2 expression was also correlated with the rs71305152 heterozygous genotype (P = 0.028. In addition, summary statistics tests gave highly positive values, demonstrating that the gene is under the influence of balancing selection. These findings suggest that ZFPM2 is a glioma susceptibility gene, its genotype and expression showing associations with incidence and severity, respectively. Moreover, the balancing selection acting on ZFPM2 may be related to the important roles it has to play in multiple organ development or associated disease etiology.

  10. Inhibition of ice crystal growth in ice cream mix by gelatin hydrolysate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damodaran, Srinivasan

    2007-12-26

    The inhibition of ice crystal growth in ice cream mix by gelatin hydrolysate produced by papain action was studied. The ice crystal growth was monitored by thermal cycling between -14 and -12 degrees C at a rate of one cycle per 3 min. It is shown that the hydrolysate fraction containing peptides in the molecular weight range of about 2000-5000 Da exhibited the highest inhibitory activity on ice crystal growth in ice cream mix, whereas fractions containing peptides greater than 7000 Da did not inhibit ice crystal growth. The size distribution of gelatin peptides formed in the hydrolysate was influenced by the pH of hydrolysis. The optimum hydrolysis conditions for producing peptides with maximum ice crystal growth inhibitory activity was pH 7 at 37 degrees C for 10 min at a papain to gelatin ratio of 1:100. However, this may depend on the type and source of gelatin. The possible mechanism of ice crystal growth inhibition by peptides from gelatin is discussed. Molecular modeling of model gelatin peptides revealed that they form an oxygen triad plane at the C-terminus with oxygen-oxygen distances similar to those found in ice nuclei. Binding of this oxygen triad plane to the prism face of ice nuclei via hydrogen bonding appears to be the mechanism by which gelatin hydrolysate might be inhibiting ice crystal growth in ice cream mix.

  11. Current status of cerebral glioma surgery in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jin-song; Zhang, Jie; Zhuang, Dong-xiao; Yao, Cheng-jun; Qiu, Tian-ming; Lu, Jun-feng; Zhu, Feng-ping; Mao, Ying; Zhou, Liang-fu

    2011-09-01

    The treatment of gliomas is highly individualized. Surgery for gliomas is essentially for histological diagnosis, to alleviate mass effect, and most importantly, to favor longer survival expectancy. During the past two decades, many surgical techniques and adjuvants have been applied to glioma surgery in China, which lead to a rapid development in the field of cerebral glioma surgery. This article broadly and critically reviewed the existing studies on cerebral glioma surgery and to portrait the current status of glioma surgery in China. A literature search was conducted covering major innovative surgical techniques and adjuvants for glioma surgery in China. The following databases were searched: the Pubmed (January 1995 to date); China Knowledge Resource Integrated Database (January 1995 to date) and VIP Database for Chinese Technical Periodicals (January 1995 to date). A selection criterion was established to exclude duplicates and irrelevant studies. The outcome measures were extracted from included studies. A total of 3307 articles were initially searched. After excluded by abstracts and full texts, 69 studies conducted in the mainland of China were included and went through further analysis. The philosophy of surgical strategies for cerebral gliomas in China is undergoing tremendous change. Nowadays Chinese neurosurgeons pay more attention to the postoperative neurofunctional status of the patients. The aim of the glioma surgery is not only the more extensive tumor resection but also the maximal safety of intervention. The well balance of longer overall survival and higher quality of life should be judged with respect to each individual patient.

  12. Mullerian Inhibiting Substance (MIS) Augments IFN-gamma Mediated Inhibition of Breast Cancer Cell Growth

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gupta, Vandana

    2004-01-01

    Mullerian Inhibiting Substance (MIS), a member of the TGFB family regulates growth, differentiation, and apoptosis in many cell types In the male embryo, MIS causes regression of the Mullerian duct...

  13. Conditioned Media from Human Adipose Tissue-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Umbilical Cord-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Efficiently Induced the Apoptosis and Differentiation in Human Glioma Cell Lines In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have an intrinsic property for homing towards tumor sites and can be used as tumor-tropic vectors for tumor therapy. But very limited studies investigated the antitumor properties of MSCs themselves. In this study we investigated the antiglioma properties of two easily accessible MSCs, namely, human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs and umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs. We found (1 MSC conditioned media can significantly inhibit the growth of human U251 glioma cell line; (2 MSC conditioned media can significantly induce apoptosis in human U251 cell line; (3 real-time PCR experiments showed significant upregulation of apoptotic genes of both caspase-3 and caspase-9 and significant downregulation of antiapoptotic genes such as survivin and XIAP after MSC conditioned media induction in U 251 cells; (4 furthermore, MSCs conditioned media culture induced rapid and complete differentiation in U251 cells. These results indicate MSCs can efficiently induce both apoptosis and differentiation in U251 human glioma cell line. Whereas UC-MSCs are more efficient for apoptosis induction than ASCs, their capability of differentiation induction is not distinguishable from each other. Our findings suggest MSCs themselves have favorable antitumor characteristics and should be further explored in future glioma therapy.

  14. The discussion of method for survey the radiosensitivity of human glioma cell line SHG-44

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Li; Xu Changshao; Zhou Juying; Xu Xiaoting; Luo Jialin

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate if thiazolyl blue colorimetric assay (MTT) and cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) can replace clone forming assay for survey the radiosensitivity of SHG-44. Methods; Three assays was applied to examine the growth inhibition of human glioma cell line SHG-44 in eight dose groups of 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8 and 10 Gy, and statistical research was applied to analyze the correlation between survival fraction and various doses. Results: Dose was associated with survival fraction in these three assays at some range of irradiation doseage (dose≤3 Gy). If out of the range, the relation is poor. CCK-8 has no rather superiority than MTT. Conclusion: By now clone forming assay is still the 'gold standard'. In some cases, MTT and other assays can give us some reference, but these assays still can not replace clone forming assay. (authors)

  15. A ketogenic diet increases transport and oxidation of ketone bodies in RG2 and 9L gliomas without affecting tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Feyter, Henk M; Behar, Kevin L; Rao, Jyotsna U; Madden-Hennessey, Kirby; Ip, Kevan L; Hyder, Fahmeed; Drewes, Lester R; Geschwind, Jean-François; de Graaf, Robin A; Rothman, Douglas L

    2016-08-01

    The dependence of tumor cells, particularly those originating in the brain, on glucose is the target of the ketogenic diet, which creates a plasma nutrient profile similar to fasting: increased levels of ketone bodies and reduced plasma glucose concentrations. The use of ketogenic diets has been of particular interest for therapy in brain tumors, which reportedly lack the ability to oxidize ketone bodies and therefore would be starved during ketosis. Because studies assessing the tumors' ability to oxidize ketone bodies are lacking, we investigated in vivo the extent of ketone body oxidation in 2 rodent glioma models. Ketone body oxidation was studied using (13)C MR spectroscopy in combination with infusion of a (13)C-labeled ketone body (beta-hydroxybutyrate) in RG2 and 9L glioma models. The level of ketone body oxidation was compared with nontumorous cortical brain tissue. The level of (13)C-beta-hydroxybutyrate oxidation in 2 rat glioma models was similar to that of contralateral brain. In addition, when glioma-bearing animals were fed a ketogenic diet, the ketone body monocarboxylate transporter was upregulated, facilitating uptake and oxidation of ketone bodies in the gliomas. These results demonstrate that rat gliomas can oxidize ketone bodies and indicate upregulation of ketone body transport when fed a ketogenic diet. Our findings contradict the hypothesis that brain tumors are metabolically inflexible and show the need for additional research on the use of ketogenic diets as therapy targeting brain tumor metabolism. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. The expression of cytoglobin as a prognostic factor in gliomas: a retrospective analysis of 88 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Hong-Wu; Huang, Hai-Hua; Wei, Xiao-Long; Man, Kwan; Zhang, Guo-Jun; Huang, Yue-Jun; Xie, Ze-Yu; Lin, Lan; Guo, Yan-Chun; Zhuang, Ze-Rui; Lin, Xin-Peng; Zhou, Wen; Li, Mu

    2013-01-01

    Evidence suggests that cytoglobin (Cygb) may function as a tumor suppressor gene. We immunohistochemically evaluated the expression of Cygb, phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI-3K), phosphorylated (p)-Akt, Interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in 88 patients with 41 high-grade gliomas and 47 low-grade gliomas. Intratumoral microvessel density (IMD) was also determined and associated with clinicopathological factors. Low expression of Cygb was significantly associated with the higher histological grading and tumor recurrence. A significant negative correlation emerged between Cygb expression and PI3K, p-Akt, IL-6, TNFα or VEGF expression. Cygb expression was negatively correlated with IMD. There was a positive correlation between PI3K, p-Akt, IL-6, TNFα and VEGF expression with IMD.High histologic grade, tumor recurrence, decreased Cygb expression, increased PI3K expression, increased p-Akt expression and increased VEGF expression correlated with patients’ overall survival in univariate analysis. However, only histological grading and Cygb expression exhibited a relationship with survival of patients as independent prognostic factors of glioma by multivariate analysis. Cygb loss may contribute to tumor recurrence and a worse prognosis in gliomas. Cygb may serve as an independent predictive factor for prognosis of glioma patients

  17. Bmi-1 promotes the aggressiveness of glioma via activating the NF-kappaB/MMP-9 signaling pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Lili; Wu, Jueheng; Yang, Yi; Liu, Liping; Song, Libing; Li, Jun; Li, Mengfeng

    2012-01-01

    The prognosis of human glioma is poor, and the highly invasive nature of the disease represents a major impediment to current therapeutic modalities. The oncoprotein B-cell-specific Moloney murine leukemia virus integration site 1 protein (Bmi-1) has been linked to the development and progression of glioma; however, the biological role of Bmi-1 in the invasion of glioma remains unclear. A172 and LN229 glioma cells were engineered to overexpress Bmi-1 via stable transfection or to be silenced for Bmi-1 expression using RNA interfering method. Migration and invasiveness of the engineered cells were assessed using wound healing assay, Transwell migration assay, Transwell matrix penetration assay and 3-D spheroid invasion assay. MMP-9 expression and activity were measured using real-time PCR, ELISA and the gelatin zymography methods. Expression of NF-kappaB target genes was quantified using real-time PCR. NF-kappaB transcriptional activity was assessed using an NF-kappaB luciferase reporter system. Expression of Bmi-1 and MMP-9 in clinical specimens was analyzed using immunohistochemical assay. Ectopic overexpression of Bmi-1 dramatically increased, whereas knockdown of endogenous Bmi-1 reduced, the invasiveness and migration of glioma cells. NF-kappaB transcriptional activity and MMP-9 expression and activity were significantly increased in Bmi-1-overexpressing but reduced in Bmi-1-silenced cells. The reporter luciferase activity driven by MMP-9 promoter in Bmi-1-overexpressing cells was dependent on the presence of a functional NF-kappaB binding site, and blockade of NF-kappaB signaling inhibited the upregulation of MMP-9 in Bmi-1 overexpressing cells. Furthermore, expression of Bmi-1 correlated with NF-kappaB nuclear translocation as well as MMP-9 expression in clinical glioma samples. Bmi-1 may play an important role in the development of aggressive phenotype of glioma via activating the NF-kappaB/MMP-9 pathway and therefore might represent a novel therapeutic

  18. Bmi-1 promotes the aggressiveness of glioma via activating the NF-kappaB/MMP-9 signaling pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Lili

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prognosis of human glioma is poor, and the highly invasive nature of the disease represents a major impediment to current therapeutic modalities. The oncoprotein B-cell-specific Moloney murine leukemia virus integration site 1 protein (Bmi-1 has been linked to the development and progression of glioma; however, the biological role of Bmi-1 in the invasion of glioma remains unclear. Methods A172 and LN229 glioma cells were engineered to overexpress Bmi-1 via stable transfection or to be silenced for Bmi-1 expression using RNA interfering method. Migration and invasiveness of the engineered cells were assessed using wound healing assay, Transwell migration assay, Transwell matrix penetration assay and 3-D spheroid invasion assay. MMP-9 expression and activity were measured using real-time PCR, ELISA and the gelatin zymography methods. Expression of NF-kappaB target genes was quantified using real-time PCR. NF-kappaB transcriptional activity was assessed using an NF-kappaB luciferase reporter system. Expression of Bmi-1 and MMP-9 in clinical specimens was analyzed using immunohistochemical assay. Results Ectopic overexpression of Bmi-1 dramatically increased, whereas knockdown of endogenous Bmi-1 reduced, the invasiveness and migration of glioma cells. NF-kappaB transcriptional activity and MMP-9 expression and activity were significantly increased in Bmi-1-overexpressing but reduced in Bmi-1-silenced cells. The reporter luciferase activity driven by MMP-9 promoter in Bmi-1-overexpressing cells was dependent on the presence of a functional NF-kappaB binding site, and blockade of NF-kappaB signaling inhibited the upregulation of MMP-9 in Bmi-1 overexpressing cells. Furthermore, expression of Bmi-1 correlated with NF-kappaB nuclear translocation as well as MMP-9 expression in clinical glioma samples. Conclusions Bmi-1 may play an important role in the development of aggressive phenotype of glioma via activating the NF

  19. Monensin, a polyether ionophore antibiotic, overcomes TRAIL resistance in glioma cells via endoplasmic reticulum stress, DR5 upregulation and c-FLIP downregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Mi Jin; Kang, You Jung; Kim, In Young; Kim, Eun Hee; Lee, Ju Ahn; Lim, Jun Hee; Kwon, Taeg Kyu; Choi, Kyeong Sook

    2013-08-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-induced ligand (TRAIL) is preferentially cytotoxic to cancer cells over normal cells. However, many cancer cells, including malignant glioma cells, tend to be resistant to TRAIL. Monensin (a polyether ionophore antibiotic that is widely used in veterinary medicine) and salinomycin (a compound that is structurally related to monensin and shows cancer stem cell-inhibiting activity) are currently recognized as anticancer drug candidates. In this study, we show that monensin effectively sensitizes various glioma cells, but not normal astrocytes, to TRAIL-mediated apoptosis; this occurs at least partly via monensin-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, CHOP-mediated DR5 upregulation and proteasome-mediated downregulation of c-FLIP. Interestingly, other polyether antibiotics, such as salinomycin, nigericin, narasin and lasalocid A, also stimulated TRAIL-mediated apoptosis in glioma cells via ER stress, CHOP-mediated DR5 upregulation and c-FLIP downregulation. Taken together, these results suggest that combined treatment of glioma cells with TRAIL and polyether ionophore antibiotics may offer an effective therapeutic strategy.

  20. PCI-24781 down-regulates EZH2 expression and then promotes glioma apoptosis by suppressing the PIK3K/Akt/mTOR pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Lv, Shengqing; Liu, Jun; Zang, Zhenle; Yin, Junyi; An, Ning; Yang, Hui; Song, Yechun

    2014-10-01

    PCI-24781 is a novel histone deacetylase inhibitor that inhibits tumor proliferation and promotes cell apoptosis. However, it is unclear whether PCI-24781 inhibits Enhancer of Zeste 2 (EZH2) expression in malignant gliomas. In this work, three glioma cell lines were incubated with various concentrations of PCI-24781 (0, 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2.5 and 5 μM) and analyzed for cell proliferation by the MTS [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium] assay and colony formation, and cell cycle and apoptosis were assessed by flow cytometry. The expression of EZH2 and apoptosis-related proteins was assessed by western blotting. Malignant glioma cells were also transfected with EZH2 siRNA to examine how PCI-24781 suppresses tumor cells. EZH2 was highly expressed in the three glioma cell lines. Incubation with PCI-24781 reduced cell proliferation and increased cell apoptosis by down-regulating EZH2 in a concentration-dependent manner. These effects were simulated by EZH2 siRNA. In addition, PCI-24781 or EZH2 siRNA accelerated cell apoptosis by down-regulating the expression of AKT, mTOR, p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinase (p70s6k), glycogen synthase kinase 3A and B (GSK3a/b) and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 (4E-BP1). These data suggest that PCI-24781 may be a promising therapeutic agent for treating gliomas by down-regulating EZH2 which promotes cell apoptosis by suppressing the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mammalian target of the rapamycin (mTOR) pathway.

  1. EEG controls for detecting the recurrence of supratentorial gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leblhuber, F.; Olschowski, A.; Deisenhammer, E.; Hammer, B.; Knauer, W.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to find out the value of postoperative EEG controls in the early detection of recurrence of supratentorial gliomas (the majority being astrocytomas, stage II to IV). 29 cases with verified tumour recurrence were examined and in all but one the EEG showed a reactivation of the focus in accordance with the development of the glioma. At least one of the following parameters had to be established: 1. a further spreading of the focal changes, 2. a reduction in frequency, 3. an increase in amplitudes and 4. focal depression and amplitudes. At least 3 postoperative EEG controls were made in each case. The duration of tumour treatment was 3 to 59 months. In 3 cases temporary focus activation was found without evidence of tumour recurrence; in one of these cases the activation was preceded by an epileptic seizure. Epileptic seizures, thus, seem to have a focus activating effect. Focus activation as a result of radiotherapy or cytostatic treatment was not observed. On the basis of our findings it appears that regularly conducted postoperative EEG controls seem to be highly suited as a non-invasive and economical method for the early detection of recurrence of this type of tumour. In the case of malignant types of gliomas involving rapid growth EEG controls should be made monthly. (Author)

  2. The PD-1/B7-H1 pathway modulates the natural killer cells versus mouse glioma stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bo Yuan; Zhan, Yi Ping; Zong, Wen Jing; Yu, Chun Jiang; Li, Jun Fa; Qu, Yan Ming; Han, Song

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most malignant primary type of brain tumor in adults. There has been increased focus on the immunotherapies to treat GBM patients, the therapeutic value of natural killer (NK) cells is still unknown. Programmed death-1 (PD-1) is a major immunological checkpoint that can negatively regulate the T-cell-mediated immune response. We tested the combination of the inhibiting the PD-1/B7H1 pathway with a NK-cell mediated immune response in an orthotopic mouse model of GBM. Mouse glioma stem cells (GL261GSCs) and mouse NK cells were isolated and identified. A lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay was perfomed to detect the cytotoxicity of NK cells against GL261GSCs. GL261GSCs were intracranially implanted into mice, and the mice were stratified into 3 treatment groups: 1) control, 2) NK cells treatment, and 3) PD-1 inhibited NK cells treatment group. Overall survival was quantified, and animal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed to determine tumor growth. The brains were harvested after the mice were euthanized, and immunohistochemistry against CD45 and PCNA was performed. The mouse NK cells were identified as 90% CD3- NK1.1+CD335+ by flow cytometric analysis. In the LDH assay, the ratios of the damaged GL261GSCs, with the E:T ratios of 2.5:1, 5:1, and 10:1, were as follows: 1) non-inhibited group: 7.42%, 11.31%, and 15.1%, 2) B7H1 inhibited group: 14.75%, 18.25% and 29.1%, 3) PD-1 inhibited group: 15.53%, 19.21% and 29.93%, 4) double inhibited group: 33.24%, 42.86% and 54.91%. In the in vivo experiments, the mice in the PD-1 inhibited NK cells treatment group and IL-2-stimulated-NK cells treatment group displayed a slowest tumor growth (F = 308.5, Pmouse NK cells to kill the GL261GSCs, and the PD-1-inhibited NK cells could be a feasible immune therapeutic approach against GBM.

  3. Glioma-secreted soluble factors stimulate microglial activation: The role of interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Ji-Sun; Jung, Eun-Hye; Kwon, Mi-Youn; Han, Inn-Oc

    2016-09-15

    We aimed to elucidate the effect of soluble factors secreted by glioma on microglial activation. Conditioned medium (CM) from glioma cells, CRT-MG and C6, significantly induced nitric oxide (NO) production and stimulated the mRNA expression of inducible NO synthase (iNOS), interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) in BV2 cells. Glioma CM stimulated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation, and a p38 MAPK inhibitor, SB203580, suppressed CM-induced NO production in BV2 cells. In addition, CM stimulated nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) DNA binding and transcriptional activity, which was repressed by SB203580. Gliomas displayed higher mRNA expression and release of TNF-α and IL-1β than primary astrocyte cells. Neutralization of TNF-α and IL-1β in C6-CM using a neutralizing antibody inhibited NO/iNOS expression in BV-2 cells. These results indicate potential contribution of diffusible tumor-derived factors to regulate microglial activation and subsequent tumor microenvironment. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Targeting fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling inhibits prostate cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Shu; Shao, Longjiang; Yu, Wendong; Gavine, Paul; Ittmann, Michael

    2012-07-15

    Extensive correlative studies in human prostate cancer as well as studies in vitro and in mouse models indicate that fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) signaling plays an important role in prostate cancer progression. In this study, we used a probe compound for an FGFR inhibitor, which potently inhibits FGFR-1-3 and significantly inhibits FGFR-4. The purpose of this study is to determine whether targeting FGFR signaling from all four FGFRs will have in vitro activities consistent with inhibition of tumor progression and will inhibit tumor progression in vivo. Effects of AZ8010 on FGFR signaling and invasion were analyzed using immortalized normal prostate epithelial (PNT1a) cells and PNT1a overexpressing FGFR-1 or FGFR-4. The effect of AZ8010 on invasion and proliferation in vitro was also evaluated in prostate cancer cell lines. Finally, the impact of AZ8010 on tumor progression in vivo was evaluated using a VCaP xenograft model. AZ8010 completely inhibits FGFR-1 and significantly inhibits FGFR-4 signaling at 100 nmol/L, which is an achievable in vivo concentration. This results in marked inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation and invasion in PNT1a cells expressing FGFR-1 and FGFR-4 and all prostate cancer cell lines tested. Treatment in vivo completely inhibited VCaP tumor growth and significantly inhibited angiogenesis and proliferation and increased cell death in treated tumors. This was associated with marked inhibition of ERK phosphorylation in treated tumors. Targeting FGFR signaling is a promising new approach to treating aggressive prostate cancer.

  5. Low intensity ultrasound promotes the sensitivity of rat brain glioma to Doxorubicin by down-regulating the expressions of p-glucoprotein and multidrug resistance protein 1 in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Zhang

    Full Text Available The overall prognosis for malignant glioma is extremely poor, and treatment options are limited in part because of multidrug resistant proteins. Our previous findings suggest low intensity ultrasound (LIUS can induce apoptosis of glioma cells. Given this finding, we were interested in determining if LIUS could help treat glioma by inhibiting multidrug resistant proteins, and if so, which pathways are involved. In this study, the toxicity sensitivity and multidrug resistance proteins of glioma induced by LIUS were investigated using CCK-8, immunohistochemistry, immunofluorency, and RT-PCR in tissue samples and cultured cells. LIUS inhibited increase of C6 cells in an intensity- and time-dependent manner. The toxicity sensitivity of C6 cells increased significantly after LIUS sonication (intensity of 142.0 mW/cm(2 or Doxorubicin (DOX at different concentration, particularly by the combination of LIUS sonication and DOX. The expressions of P-gp and MRP1 decreased significantly post-sonication at intensity of 142.0 mW/cm(2 both in vitro and in vivo. The expressions of p110 delta (PI3K, NF-κB-p65, Akt/PKB, and p-Akt/PKB were downregulated by LIUS sonication and DOX treatment separately or in combination at the same parameters in rat glioma. These results indicate that LIUS could increase the toxicity sensitivity of glioma by down-regulating the expressions of P-gp and MRP1, which might be mediated by the PI3K/Akt/NF-κB pathway.

  6. Comprehensive, Integrative Genomic Analysis of Diffuse Lower-Grade Gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brat, Daniel J; Verhaak, Roel G W; Aldape, Kenneth D; Yung, W K Alfred; Salama, Sofie R; Cooper, Lee A D; Rheinbay, Esther; Miller, C Ryan; Vitucci, Mark; Morozova, Olena; Robertson, A Gordon; Noushmehr, Houtan; Laird, Peter W; Cherniack, Andrew D; Akbani, Rehan; Huse, Jason T; Ciriello, Giovanni; Poisson, Laila M; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S; Berger, Mitchel S; Brennan, Cameron; Colen, Rivka R; Colman, Howard; Flanders, Adam E; Giannini, Caterina; Grifford, Mia; Iavarone, Antonio; Jain, Rajan; Joseph, Isaac; Kim, Jaegil; Kasaian, Katayoon; Mikkelsen, Tom; Murray, Bradley A; O'Neill, Brian Patrick; Pachter, Lior; Parsons, Donald W; Sougnez, Carrie; Sulman, Erik P; Vandenberg, Scott R; Van Meir, Erwin G; von Deimling, Andreas; Zhang, Hailei; Crain, Daniel; Lau, Kevin; Mallery, David; Morris, Scott; Paulauskis, Joseph; Penny, Robert; Shelton, Troy; Sherman, Mark; Yena, Peggy; Black, Aaron; Bowen, Jay; Dicostanzo, Katie; Gastier-Foster, Julie; Leraas, Kristen M; Lichtenberg, Tara M; Pierson, Christopher R; Ramirez, Nilsa C; Taylor, Cynthia; Weaver, Stephanie; Wise, Lisa; Zmuda, Erik; Davidsen, Tanja; Demchok, John A; Eley, Greg; Ferguson, Martin L; Hutter, Carolyn M; Mills Shaw, Kenna R; Ozenberger, Bradley A; Sheth, Margi; Sofia, Heidi J; Tarnuzzer, Roy; Wang, Zhining; Yang, Liming; Zenklusen, Jean Claude; Ayala, Brenda; Baboud, Julien; Chudamani, Sudha; Jensen, Mark A; Liu, Jia; Pihl, Todd; Raman, Rohini; Wan, Yunhu; Wu, Ye; Ally, Adrian; Auman, J Todd; Balasundaram, Miruna; Balu, Saianand; Baylin, Stephen B; Beroukhim, Rameen; Bootwalla, Moiz S; Bowlby, Reanne; Bristow, Christopher A; Brooks, Denise; Butterfield, Yaron; Carlsen, Rebecca; Carter, Scott; Chin, Lynda; Chu, Andy; Chuah, Eric; Cibulskis, Kristian; Clarke, Amanda; Coetzee, Simon G; Dhalla, Noreen; Fennell, Tim; Fisher, Sheila; Gabriel, Stacey; Getz, Gad; Gibbs, Richard; Guin, Ranabir; Hadjipanayis, Angela; Hayes, D Neil; Hinoue, Toshinori; Hoadley, Katherine; Holt, Robert A; Hoyle, Alan P; Jefferys, Stuart R; Jones, Steven; Jones, Corbin D; Kucherlapati, Raju; Lai, Phillip H; Lander, Eric; Lee, Semin; Lichtenstein, Lee; Ma, Yussanne; Maglinte, Dennis T; Mahadeshwar, Harshad S; Marra, Marco A; Mayo, Michael; Meng, Shaowu; Meyerson, Matthew L; Mieczkowski, Piotr A; Moore, Richard A; Mose, Lisle E; Mungall, Andrew J; Pantazi, Angeliki; Parfenov, Michael; Park, Peter J; Parker, Joel S; Perou, Charles M; Protopopov, Alexei; Ren, Xiaojia; Roach, Jeffrey; Sabedot, Thaís S; Schein, Jacqueline; Schumacher, Steven E; Seidman, Jonathan G; Seth, Sahil; Shen, Hui; Simons, Janae V; Sipahimalani, Payal; Soloway, Matthew G; Song, Xingzhi; Sun, Huandong; Tabak, Barbara; Tam, Angela; Tan, Donghui; Tang, Jiabin; Thiessen, Nina; Triche, Timothy; Van Den Berg, David J; Veluvolu, Umadevi; Waring, Scot; Weisenberger, Daniel J; Wilkerson, Matthew D; Wong, Tina; Wu, Junyuan; Xi, Liu; Xu, Andrew W; Yang, Lixing; Zack, Travis I; Zhang, Jianhua; Aksoy, B Arman; Arachchi, Harindra; Benz, Chris; Bernard, Brady; Carlin, Daniel; Cho, Juok; DiCara, Daniel; Frazer, Scott; Fuller, Gregory N; Gao, JianJiong; Gehlenborg, Nils; Haussler, David; Heiman, David I; Iype, Lisa; Jacobsen, Anders; Ju, Zhenlin; Katzman, Sol; Kim, Hoon; Knijnenburg, Theo; Kreisberg, Richard Bailey; Lawrence, Michael S; Lee, William; Leinonen, Kalle; Lin, Pei; Ling, Shiyun; Liu, Wenbin; Liu, Yingchun; Liu, Yuexin; Lu, Yiling; Mills, Gordon; Ng, Sam; Noble, Michael S; Paull, Evan; Rao, Arvind; Reynolds, Sheila; Saksena, Gordon; Sanborn, Zack; Sander, Chris; Schultz, Nikolaus; Senbabaoglu, Yasin; Shen, Ronglai; Shmulevich, Ilya; Sinha, Rileen; Stuart, Josh; Sumer, S Onur; Sun, Yichao; Tasman, Natalie; Taylor, Barry S; Voet, Doug; Weinhold, Nils; Weinstein, John N; Yang, Da; Yoshihara, Kosuke; Zheng, Siyuan; Zhang, Wei; Zou, Lihua; Abel, Ty; Sadeghi, Sara; Cohen, Mark L; Eschbacher, Jenny; Hattab, Eyas M; Raghunathan, Aditya; Schniederjan, Matthew J; Aziz, Dina; Barnett, Gene; Barrett, Wendi; Bigner, Darell D; Boice, Lori; Brewer, Cathy; Calatozzolo, Chiara; Campos, Benito; Carlotti, Carlos Gilberto; Chan, Timothy A; Cuppini, Lucia; Curley, Erin; Cuzzubbo, Stefania; Devine, Karen; DiMeco, Francesco; Duell, Rebecca; Elder, J Bradley; Fehrenbach, Ashley; Finocchiaro, Gaetano; Friedman, William; Fulop, Jordonna; Gardner, Johanna; Hermes, Beth; Herold-Mende, Christel; Jungk, Christine; Kendler, Ady; Lehman, Norman L; Lipp, Eric; Liu, Ouida; Mandt, Randy; McGraw, Mary; Mclendon, Roger; McPherson, Christopher; Neder, Luciano; Nguyen, Phuong; Noss, Ardene; Nunziata, Raffaele; Ostrom, Quinn T; Palmer, Cheryl; Perin, Alessandro; Pollo, Bianca; Potapov, Alexander; Potapova, Olga; Rathmell, W Kimryn; Rotin, Daniil; Scarpace, Lisa; Schilero, Cathy; Senecal, Kelly; Shimmel, Kristen; Shurkhay, Vsevolod; Sifri, Suzanne; Singh, Rosy; Sloan, Andrew E; Smolenski, Kathy; Staugaitis, Susan M; Steele, Ruth; Thorne, Leigh; Tirapelli, Daniela P C; Unterberg, Andreas; Vallurupalli, Mahitha; Wang, Yun; Warnick, Ronald; Williams, Felicia; Wolinsky, Yingli; Bell, Sue; Rosenberg, Mara; Stewart, Chip; Huang, Franklin; Grimsby, Jonna L; Radenbaugh, Amie J; Zhang, Jianan

    2015-06-25

    Diffuse low-grade and intermediate-grade gliomas (which together make up the lower-grade gliomas, World Health Organization grades II and III) have highly variable clinical behavior that is not adequately predicted on the basis of histologic class. Some are indolent; others quickly progress to glioblastoma. The uncertainty is compounded by interobserver variability in histologic diagnosis. Mutations in IDH, TP53, and ATRX and codeletion of chromosome arms 1p and 19q (1p/19q codeletion) have been implicated as clinically relevant markers of lower-grade gliomas. We performed genomewide analyses of 293 lower-grade gliomas from adults, incorporating exome sequence, DNA copy number, DNA methylation, messenger RNA expression, microRNA expression, and targeted protein expression. These data were integrated and tested for correlation with clinical outcomes. Unsupervised clustering of mutations and data from RNA, DNA-copy-number, and DNA-methylation platforms uncovered concordant classification of three robust, nonoverlapping, prognostically significant subtypes of lower-grade glioma that were captured more accurately by IDH, 1p/19q, and TP53 status than by histologic class. Patients who had lower-grade gliomas with an IDH mutation and 1p/19q codeletion had the most favorable clinical outcomes. Their gliomas harbored mutations in CIC, FUBP1, NOTCH1, and the TERT promoter. Nearly all lower-grade gliomas with IDH mutations and no 1p/19q codeletion had mutations in TP53 (94%) and ATRX inactivation (86%). The large majority of lower-grade gliomas without an IDH mutation had genomic aberrations and clinical behavior strikingly similar to those found in primary glioblastoma. The integration of genomewide data from multiple platforms delineated three molecular classes of lower-grade gliomas that were more concordant with IDH, 1p/19q, and TP53 status than with histologic class. Lower-grade gliomas with an IDH mutation either had 1p/19q codeletion or carried a TP53 mutation. Most

  7. Effect of flupirtine on the growth and viability of U373 malignant glioma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panchanathan, Elango; Ramanathan, Gnanasambandan; Lakkakula, Bhaskar Venkata Kameswara Subrahmanya

    2013-01-01

    Flupirtine is a non-opioid analgesic without antipyretic or antiphlogistic properties but with favorable tolerability in humans. This analgesic also exhibits neuroprotective activities. Furthermore, flupirtine antagonizes glutamate- and NMDA-induced intracellular levels of Ca 2+ and counteracts the effects of focal cerebral ischemia. Although flupirtine has been used to relieve pain caused by different diseases and clinical procedures, information on the safety and efficacy of flupirtine is limited. The present study was conducted to investigate the neuroprotective effects of flupirtine on U373 malignant glioma (MG) cell lines. Cell viability and cell cycle analysis was performed by MTT assay and flow cytometry, respectively. Variations in the growth of U373 MG cells in 5 mM N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), 1 mM flupirtine, and combined treatment indicated the antagonistic effects of NMDA and flupirtine on MG cell lines. The variation in the percentage of gated cell population in different cell cycle phases showed significant variations after 48 h of treatment. Flupirtine has neuroprotective effect of on U373 MG cells, which limits its use in the pain management of brain tumors. This property warrants further studies using animal models and large-scale clinical trials

  8. Differential chlorate inhibition of Chaetomium globosum germination, hyphal growth, and perithecia synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biles, Charles L; Wright, Desiree; Fuego, Marianni; Guinn, Angela; Cluck, Terry; Young, Jennifer; Martin, Markie; Biles, Josiah; Poudyal, Shubhra

    2012-12-01

    Chaetomium globosum Kunze:Fr is a dermatophytic, dematiaceous fungus that is ubiquitous in soils, grows readily on cellulolytic materials, and is commonly found on water-damaged building materials. Chlorate affects nitrogen metabolism in fungi and is used to study compatibility among anamorphic fungi by inducing nit mutants. The effect of chlorate toxicity on C. globosum was investigated by amending a modified malt extract agar (MEA), oat agar, and carboxymethyl cellulose agar (CMC) with various levels of potassium chlorate (KClO(3)). C. globosum perithecia production was almost completely inhibited (90-100 %) at low levels of KClO(3) (0.1 mM) in amended MEA. Inhibition of perithecia production was also observed on oat agar and CMC at 1 and 10 mM, respectively. However, hyphal growth in MEA was only inhibited 20 % by 0.1-100 mM KClO(3) concentrations. Hyphal growth was never completely inhibited at the highest levels tested (200 mM). Higher levels of KClO(3) were needed on gypsum board to inhibit perithecia synthesis. In additional experiments, KClO(3) did not inhibit C. globosum, Fusarium oxysporum, Aspergillus niger, Penicillum expansum, and airborne fungal spore germination. The various fungal spores were not inhibited by KClO(3) at 1-100 mM levels. These results suggest that C. globosum perithecia synthesis is more sensitive to chlorate toxicity than are hyphal growth and spore germination. This research provides basic information that furthers our understanding about perithecia formation and may help in developing control methods for fungal growth on building materials.

  9. Tubeimoside-1 induces glioma apoptosis through regulation of Bax/Bcl-2 and the ROS/Cytochrome C/Caspase-3 pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia G

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Geng Jia,1,* Qiang Wang,2,* Rong Wang,2,* Danni Deng,2 Lian Xue,2 Naiyuan Shao,1 Yi Zhang,1 Xiwei Xia,1 Feng Zhi,2 Yilin Yang1,2 1Department of Neurosurgery, Third Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Jiangsu, People’s Republic of China; 2Modern Medical Research Center, Third Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Jiangsu, People’s Republic of China * These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: Tubeimoside-1 (TBMS1 is a natural compound isolated from tubeimoside, which has been widely used as a traditional Chinese herbal medicine. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the anti-tumor effect and the underling mechanism of TBMS1 on glioma cancer cells.Methods: The MTT assay was performed to evaluate the effect of TBMS1 on glioma cell proliferation. The fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry analysis were performed to evaluate the effect of TBMS1 on glioma cell apoptosis. The Western blot analysis was used to evaluate the protein change.Results: TBMS1 inhibited glioma cancer cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry analysis demonstrated that TBMS1 induced glioma cell apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner. Western blotting showed that TBMS1 induced apoptosis by increasing the expression of Bax and downregulating the level of Bcl-2. Furthermore, we found that TBMS1 induced apoptosis by increasing the concentration of reactive oxygen species through the release of Cytochrome C and activation of Caspase-3.Conclusion: These findings indicate that TBMS1 may be developed as a possible therapeutic agent for the management of glioma. Keywords: Tubeimoside-1, glioma, proliferation, apoptosis

  10. Microglia immunophenotyping in gliomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annovazzi, Laura; Mellai, Marta; Bovio, Enrica; Mazzetti, Samanta; Pollo, Bianca; Schiffer, Davide

    2018-01-01

    Microglia, once assimilated to peripheral macrophages, in gliomas has long been discussed and currently it is hypothesized to play a pro-tumor role in tumor progression. Uncertain between M1 and M2 polarization, it exchanges signals with glioma cells to create an immunosuppressive microenvironment and stimulates cell proliferation and migration. Four antibodies are currently used for microglia/macrophage identification in tissues that exhibit different cell forms and cell localization. The aim of the present work was to describe the distribution of the different cell forms and to deduce their significance on the basis of what is known on their function from the literature. Normal resting microglia, reactive microglia, intermediate and bumpy forms and macrophage-like cells can be distinguished by Iba1, CD68, CD16 and CD163 and further categorized by CD11b, CD45, c-MAF and CD98. The number of microglia/macrophages strongly increased from normal cortex and white matter to infiltrating and solid tumors. The ramified microglia accumulated in infiltration areas of both high- and low-grade gliomas, when hypertrophy and hyperplasia occur. In solid tumors, intermediate and bumpy forms prevailed and there is a large increase of macrophage-like cells in glioblastoma. The total number of microglia cells did not vary among the three grades of malignancy, but macrophage-like cells definitely prevailed in high-grade gliomas and frequently expressed CD45 and c-MAF. CD98+ cells were present. Microglia favors tumor progression, but many aspects suggest that the phagocytosing function is maintained. CD98+ cells can be the product of fusion, but also of phagocytosis. Microglia correlated with poorer survival in glioblastoma, when considering CD163+ cells, whereas it did not change prognosis in isocitrate dehydrogenase-mutant low grade gliomas. PMID:29399160

  11. A comparative study of ethylene growth response kinetics in eudicots and monocots reveals a role for gibberellin in growth inhibition and recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joonyup; Wilson, Rebecca L; Case, J Brett; Binder, Brad M

    2012-11-01

    Time-lapse imaging of dark-grown Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) hypocotyls has revealed new aspects about ethylene signaling. This study expands upon these results by examining ethylene growth response kinetics of seedlings of several plant species. Although the response kinetics varied between the eudicots studied, all had prolonged growth inhibition for as long as ethylene was present. In contrast, with continued application of ethylene, white millet (Panicum miliaceum) seedlings had a rapid and transient growth inhibition response, rice (Oryza sativa 'Nipponbare') seedlings had a slow onset of growth stimulation, and barley (Hordeum vulgare) had a transient growth inhibition response followed, after a delay, by a prolonged inhibition response. Growth stimulation in rice correlated with a decrease in the levels of rice ETHYLENE INSENSTIVE3-LIKE2 (OsEIL2) and an increase in rice F-BOX DOMAIN AND LRR CONTAINING PROTEIN7 transcripts. The gibberellin (GA) biosynthesis inhibitor paclobutrazol caused millet seedlings to have a prolonged growth inhibition response when ethylene was applied. A transient ethylene growth inhibition response has previously been reported for Arabidopsis ethylene insensitive3-1 (ein3-1) eil1-1 double mutants. Paclobutrazol caused these mutants to have a prolonged response to ethylene, whereas constitutive GA signaling in this background eliminated ethylene responses. Sensitivity to paclobutrazol inversely correlated with the levels of EIN3 in Arabidopsis. Wild-type Arabidopsis seedlings treated with paclobutrazol and mutants deficient in GA levels or signaling had a delayed growth recovery after ethylene removal. It is interesting to note that ethylene caused alterations in gene expression that are predicted to increase GA levels in the ein3-1 eil1-1 seedlings. These results indicate that ethylene affects GA levels leading to modulation of ethylene growth inhibition kinetics.

  12. C-MET overexpression and amplification in gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Yoonjin; Kim, Seong-Ik; Park, Chul-Kee; Paek, Sun Ha; Lee, Soon-Tae; Park, Sung-Hye

    2015-01-01

    We investigated c-Met overexpression and MET gene amplification in gliomas to determine their incidence and prognostic significance. c-Met immunohistochemistry and MET gene fluorescence in situ hybridization were carried out on tissue microarrays from 250 patients with gliomas (137 grade IV GBMs and 113 grade II and III diffuse gliomas). Clinicopathological features of these cases were reviewed. c-Met overexpression and MET gene amplification were detected in 13.1% and 5.1% of the GBMs, respectively. All the MET-amplified cases showed c-Met overexpression, but MET amplification was not always concordant with c-Met overexpression. None of grade II and III gliomas demonstrated c-Met overexpression or MET gene amplification. Mean survival of the GBM patients with MET amplification was not significantly different from patients without MET amplification (P=0.155). However, GBM patients with c-Met overexpression survived longer than patients without c-Met overexpression (P=0.035). Although MET amplification was not related to poor GBM prognosis, it is partially associated with the aggressiveness of gliomas, as MET amplification was found only in grade IV, not in grade II and III gliomas. We suggest that MET inhibitor therapy may be beneficial in about 5% GBMs, which was the incidence of MET gene amplification found in the patients included in this study.

  13. CD147 and glioma: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Xi, Zhouhuan; Dai, Xuejiao; Wu, Wenyue; Li, Yanwen; Liu, Yanting; Zhang, Hanwen

    2017-08-01

    Gliomas are the most common primary brain tumors. This meta-analysis aimed to systematically evaluate the relationship between CD147 expression in tissues and the clinicopathological features of patients with glioma. We searched PubMed (1966-2016), EMBASE (1980-2016), Cochrane Library (1996-2016), Web of Science (1945-2016), China National Knowledge Infrastructure (1982-2016), and Wan Fang databases (1988-2016). Quality assessment of the literature was performed using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale, with Revman 5.3 and Stata 14.0 for analysis. In total, 1806 glioma patients from 19 studies were included, and patients with CD147 overexpression had poorer overall survival [hazard ratio (HR) = 2.211, P CD147 expression when comparing glioma tissues versus non-cancerous brain tissues (OR 20.42; 95% CI 13.94-29.91; P CD147 expression did not differ based on patient's age (young vs. old, P = 0.89) or gender (female vs. male, P = 0.57). CD147 expression may be a potential prognostic biomarker for poorer overall and relapse-free survival, and may affect the 5-year survival rate in glioma patients. CD147 expression is also closely correlated with poor clinical characteristics in glioma patients.

  14. PANC-1 pancreatic cancer cell growth inhibited by cucurmosin alone and in combination with an epidermal growth factor receptor-targeted drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Congfei; Yang, Aiqin; Zhang, Baoming; Yin, Qiang; Huang, Heguang; Chen, Minghuang; Xie, Jieming

    2014-03-01

    To investigate the inhibition of PANC-1 pancreatic cancer cell growth by cucurmosin (CUS) and its possible mechanism. We observed the inhibition of PANC-1 cell growth by sulforhodamine B and colony-forming experiments in vitro and established nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency mouse subcutaneous tumor models in vivo. We used Western blot to analyze protein levels related to apoptosis and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling pathways after drug intervention, whereas the messenger RNA expression of EGFR was analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Sulforhodamine B and colony-forming experiments indicated that CUS inhibited PANC-1 cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. A stronger inhibitory effect was observed when CUS was combined with gefitinib. The subcutaneous tumor growth was also inhibited. Western blot showed that all the examined proteins decreased, except for 4E-BP1 and the active fragments of caspase 3 and caspase 9 increased. Epidermal growth factor receptor expression did not change significantly in quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Cucurmosin can strongly inhibit the growth of PANC-1 cells in vitro and in vivo. Cucurmosin can down-regulate EGFR protein expression, but not at the messenger RNA level. Cucurmosin can also inhibit the ras/raf and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt downstream signaling pathways and enhance the sensitivity of the EGFR-targeted drug gefitinib.

  15. MRI features can predict EGFR expression in lower grade gliomas. A voxel-based radiomic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yiming; Liu, Xing; Qian, Zenghui; Fan, Xing; Li, Shaowu; Jiang, Tao [Capital Medical University, Beijing Neurosurgical Institute, Beijing (China); Xu, Kaibin [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Automation, Beijing (China); Wang, Kai [Beijing Tiantan Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Beijing (China); Wang, Yinyan [Beijing Tiantan Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Beijing (China); Beijing Tiantan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Department of Neurosurgery, Beijing (China)

    2018-01-15

    To identify the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features associated with epidermal growth factor (EGFR) expression level in lower grade gliomas using radiomic analysis. 270 lower grade glioma patients with known EGFR expression status were randomly assigned into training (n=200) and validation (n=70) sets, and were subjected to feature extraction. Using a logistic regression model, a signature of MRI features was identified to be predictive of the EGFR expression level in lower grade gliomas in the training set, and the accuracy of prediction was assessed in the validation set. A signature of 41 MRI features achieved accuracies of 82.5% (area under the curve [AUC] = 0.90) in the training set and 90.0% (AUC = 0.95) in the validation set. This radiomic signature consisted of 25 first-order statistics or related wavelet features (including range, standard deviation, uniformity, variance), one shape and size-based feature (spherical disproportion), and 15 textural features or related wavelet features (including sum variance, sum entropy, run percentage). A radiomic signature allowing for the prediction of the EGFR expression level in patients with lower grade glioma was identified, suggesting that using tumour-derived radiological features for predicting genomic information is feasible. (orig.)

  16. Inhibition of placenta growth factor with TB-403

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Dorte Lisbet; Sengeløv, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: There is clinical evidence that therapies targeting the vascular endothelial growth factor pathway are effective in delaying cancer progression. However, tumors may be either intrinsically resistant or evolve resistance to such therapies. Hence, there is a need for new therapies...... targeting angiogenesis. AREAS COVERED: The data are obtained by searching in the PubMed database. The search terms used included antiangiogenic therapy, TB-403 (RO5323441), placenta growth factor (PlGF) and VEGFR-1 (Flt-1). We review preclinical data concerning the function and inhibition of Pl......GF and summarize data on expression of PlGF in cancer patients. Data from early-phase clinical trials of TB-403 (RO5323441), a monoclonal antibody inhibiting PlGF, are discussed. Future development strategies, therapeutic potentials and limitations of TB-403 are further evaluated. EXPERT OPINION: There are some...

  17. EZH2 is a potential therapeutic target for H3K27M-mutant pediatric gliomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohammad, Faizaan; Weissmann, Simon; Leblanc, Benjamin Olivier

    2017-01-01

    Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) is an aggressive brain tumor that is located in the pons and primarily affects children. Nearly 80% of DIPGs harbor mutations in histone H3 genes, wherein lysine 27 is substituted with methionine (H3K27M). H3K27M has been shown to inhibit polycomb repressiv...

  18. Synergistic anti-glioma effect of a coloaded nano-drug delivery system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu H

    2016-12-01

    compared to cells treated by the combination of free drugs. Tem/Res-coloaded particles caused more effective inhibition of phosphor-Akt, leading to upregulation of the downstream apoptotic proteins. In addition, the in vivo study showed the superior tumor delaying effect of coloaded nanoparticles than that of free drug combination. These results suggest that Tem/Res-coloaded nanoparticles could be a potential useful chemotherapeutic formulation for glioma therapy. Keywords: resveratrol, temozolomide, synergy, mPEG-PCL, polymeric, drug delivery

  19. Paediatric and adult malignant glioma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Chris; Perryman, Lara; Hargrave, Darren

    2012-01-01

    Gliomas in children differ from their adult counterparts by their distribution of histological grade, site of presentation and rate of malignant transformation. Although rare in the paediatric population, patients with high-grade gliomas have, for the most part, a comparably dismal clinical outcome...... to older patients with morphologically similar lesions. Molecular profiling data have begun to reveal the major genetic alterations underpinning these malignant tumours in children. Indeed, the accumulation of large datasets on adult high-grade glioma has revealed key biological differences between...... the adult and paediatric disease. Furthermore, subclassifications within the childhood age group can be made depending on age at diagnosis and tumour site. However, challenges remain on how to reconcile clinical data from adult patients to tailor novel treatment strategies specifically for paediatric...

  20. Nimotuzumab enhances temozolomide-induced growth suppression of glioma cells expressing mutant EGFR in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitta, Yusuke; Shimizu, Saki; Shishido-Hara, Yukiko; Suzuki, Kaori; Shiokawa, Yoshiaki; Nagane, Motoo

    2016-01-01

    A mutant form of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), EGFRvIII, is common in glioblastoma (GBM) and confers enhanced tumorigenic activity and drug resistance. Nimotuzumab, an anti-EGFR antibody, has shown preclinical and clinical activity to GBM, but its specific activity against EGFRvIII has not been fully investigated. Human glioma U87MG or LNZ308 cells overexpressing either wild-type (wt) EGFR or EGFRvIII were treated with nimotuzumab, temozolomide, or both. Expression and phosphorylation status of molecules were determined by Western blot analysis. Methylation status of promoter region of O 6 -methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) was detected by methylation-specific PCR. Antitumor activity was tested using nude mice bearing either subcutaneous or intracerebral xenografts along with analyses of EGFR phosphorylation status, proliferation, apoptosis, and vessel density. Nimotuzumab treatment resulted in reduction of EGFRvIII tyrosine phosphorylation with a decrease in Akt phosphorylation that was greater than that of wtEGFR. Correspondingly, antitumor effects, growth suppression and survival elongation, were more significant in mice bearing either subcutaneous or intracerebral tumor expressing EGFRvIII than in those expressing wtEGFR. These effects were markedly increased when temozolomide was combined with nimotuzumab. The post-treatment recurrent brain tumors exhibited a decrease in expression of the mismatch repair (MMR) proteins, MSH6 and MLH1, but their methylated MGMT status did not changed. Nimotuzumab has in vivo antitumor activity against GBM, especially those expressing EGFRvIII, when combined with temozolomide. This could provide a basis for preselection of patients with GBM by EGFR status who might benefit from the nimotuzumab and temozolomide combination therapy

  1. Flavonoids apigenin and quercetin inhibit melanoma growth and metastatic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caltagirone, S; Rossi, C; Poggi, A; Ranelletti, F O; Natali, P G; Brunetti, M; Aiello, F B; Piantelli, M

    2000-08-15

    Flavonoids are a class of polyphenolic compounds widely distributed in the plant kingdom, which display a variety of biological activities, including chemoprevention and tumor growth inhibition. Our aim was to investigate the effects of several polyphenols on the growth and metastatic potential of B16-BL6 melanoma cells in vivo. Intraperitoneal administration of quercetin, apigenin, (-)-epigallocathechin-3-gallate (EGCG), resveratrol, and the anti-estrogen tamoxifen, at the time of i.m. injection of B16-BL6 cells into syngeneic mice, resulted in a significant, dose-dependent delay of tumor growth, without toxicity. The relative descending order of potency was EGCG > apigenin = quercetin = tamoxifen > resveratrol > control. Furthermore, polyphenols significantly potentiated the inhibitory effect of a non-toxic dose of cisplatin. When tested for the ability to inhibit lung colonization, quercetin, apigenin, and tamoxifen (but not EGCG or resveratrol) significantly decreased the number of B16-BL6 colonies in the lungs in a dose-dependent manner, with quercetin and apigenin being more effective than tamoxifen. Interestingly, quercetin, apigenin, and tamoxifen (but not EGCG or resveratrol) significantly decreased the invasion of B16-BL6 cells in vitro, with quercetin and apigenin being more effective than tamoxifen. This suggests that anti-invasive activity is one of the mechanisms underlying inhibition of lung colonization by quercetin and apigenin. In conclusion, quercetin and apigenin inhibit melanoma growth and invasive and metastatic potential; therefore, they may constitute a valuable tool in the combination therapy of metastatic melanoma. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. D-Tagatose inhibits the growth and biofilm formation of Streptococcus mutans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasibul, Khaleque; Nakayama-Imaohji, Haruyuki; Hashimoto, Masahito; Yamasaki, Hisashi; Ogawa, Takaaki; Waki, Junpei; Tada, Ayano; Yoneda, Saori; Tokuda, Masaaki; Miyake, Minoru; Kuwahara, Tomomi

    2018-01-01

    Dental caries is an important global health concern and Streptococcus mutans has been established as a major cariogenic bacterial species. Reports indicate that a rare sugar, D-tagatose, is not easily catabolized by pathogenic bacteria. In the present study, the inhibitory effects of D-tagatose on the growth and biofilm formation of S. mutans GS-5 were examined. Monitoring S. mutans growth over a 24 h period revealed that D-tagatose prolonged the lag phase without interfering with the final cell yield. This growth retardation was also observed in the presence of 1% sucrose, although it was abolished by the addition of D-fructose. S. mutans biofilm formation was significantly inhibited by growth in sucrose media supplemented with 1 and 4% D-tagatose compared with that in a culture containing sucrose alone, while S. mutans formed granular biofilms in the presence of this rare sugar. The inhibitory effect of D-tagatose on S. mutans biofilm formation was significantly more evident than that of xylitol. Growth in sucrose media supplemented with D-tagatose significantly decreased the expression of glucosyltransferase, exo-β-fructosidase and D-fructose-specific phosphotransferase genes but not the expression of fructosyltransferase compared with the culture containing sucrose only. The activity of cell-associated glucosyltransferase in S. mutans was inhibited by 4% D-tagatose. These results indicate that D-tagatose reduces water-insoluble glucan production from sucrose by inhibiting glucosyltransferase activities, which limits access to the free D-fructose released during this process and retards the growth of S. mutans. Therefore, foods and oral care products containing D-tagatose are anticipated to reduce the risk of caries by inhibiting S. mutans biofilm formation. PMID:29115611

  3. Radiobiological effect of different irradiation fractionated regimens in human brain glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gai Xue; Yang Weizhi; Gao Li; Jiang Heng; Wang Mianrong; Shi Huizhen

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the radiobiological effect of different irradiation fractionated regimens in human glioma cells (BT 325 cell line). Methods: The xenografts in Balb/c-nude mice were irradiated with different single and fractionated regimens. The single fraction dose was 10, 20, 30, 40 and 60 Gy, respectively. The fractionated regimens were 2 Gy x 5 fractions ( irradiated every day), and 3 Gy x 3 fractions (irradiated every other day), 3 Gy x 5 fractions (irradiated every day) and 4 Gy x 3 fractions (irradiated every other day), with total doses of 125 Gy, 114 Gy, 126 Gy and 112 Gy, respectively. The growth curve was used to evaluate the tumor doubling time. clonogenic assays was performed to draw the cell survival curve and analyze the radiobiological parameters with doses of 1, 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 Gy. T 1/2 was measured by comet assay. Results: Tumor regression were not observed by single fraction irradiation, 2 Gy x 5 fractions and 3 Gy x 3 fractions irradiation regimens. The tumor regress was more significant with the increas of fraction dose. The 4 Gy x 3 fractions inhibited tumor more though not curing tumor. The cell doubling time of the BT 325 cell was 30. 16 h and the tumor doubling time of the xenograft was 43 days.When fitted with L-Q model, α was 0. 36 Gy -1 and β was 0. 057 Gy -2 . When fitted with the single-hit multi target model, D 0 was 1. 394 Gy, Dq was 2. 127 Gy and SF 2 was 0.714, respectively. The T 1/2 was 9.999 min. Conclusions: Glioma is a radioresistant tumor. Increase of the fraction dose improves recent effect.Further study is needed to control the tumor stem cells. (authors)

  4. Pembrolizumab in Treating Younger Patients With Recurrent, Progressive, or Refractory High-Grade Gliomas, Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Gliomas, Hypermutated Brain Tumors, Ependymoma or Medulloblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-06-18

    Constitutional Mismatch Repair Deficiency Syndrome; Lynch Syndrome; Malignant Glioma; Progressive Ependymoma; Progressive Medulloblastoma; Recurrent Brain Neoplasm; Recurrent Childhood Ependymoma; Recurrent Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma; Recurrent Medulloblastoma; Refractory Brain Neoplasm; Refractory Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma; Refractory Ependymoma; Refractory Medulloblastoma

  5. p8 inhibits the growth of human pancreatic cancer cells and its expression is induced through pathways involved in growth inhibition and repressed by factors promoting cell growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasseur Sophie

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background p8 is a stress-induced protein with multiple functions and biochemically related to the architectural factor HMG-I/Y. We analyzed the expression and function of p8 in pancreatic cancer-derived cells. Methods Expression of p8 was silenced in the human pancreatic cancer cell lines Panc-1 and BxPc-3 by infection with a retrovirus expressing p8 RNA in the antisense orientation. Cell growth was measured in control and p8-silenced cells. Influence on p8 expression of the induction of intracellular pathways promoting cellular growth or growth arrest was monitored. Results p8-silenced cells grew more rapidly than control cells transfected with the empty retrovirus. Activation of the Ras→Raf→MEK→ERK and JNK intracellular pathways down-regulated p8 expression. In addition, the MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126 and the JNK inhibitor SP600125 up-regulates expression of p8. Conversely, p38 or TGFβ-1 induced p8 expression whereas the specific p38 inhibitor SB203580 down-regulated p8 expression. Finally, TGFβ-1 induction was in part mediated through p38. Conclusions p8 inhibits the growth of human pancreatic cancer cells. p8 expression is induced through pathways involved in growth inhibition and repressed by factors that promote cell growth. These results suggest that p8 belongs to a pathway regulating the growth of pancreatic cancer cells.

  6. Contrast ultrasound targeted treatment of gliomas in mice via drug-bearing nanoparticle delivery and microvascular ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Caitlin W; Price, Richard J

    2010-12-15

    We are developing minimally-invasive contrast agent microbubble based therapeutic approaches in which the permeabilization and/or ablation of the microvasculature are controlled by varying ultrasound pulsing parameters. Specifically, we are testing whether such approaches may be used to treat malignant brain tumors through drug delivery and microvascular ablation. Preliminary studies have been performed to determine whether targeted drug-bearing nanoparticle delivery can be facilitated by the ultrasound mediated destruction of "composite" delivery agents comprised of 100nm poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLAGA) nanoparticles that are adhered to albumin shelled microbubbles. We denote these agents as microbubble-nanoparticle composite agents (MNCAs). When targeted to subcutaneous C6 gliomas with ultrasound, we observed an immediate 4.6-fold increase in nanoparticle delivery in MNCA treated tumors over tumors treated with microbubbles co-administered with nanoparticles and a 8.5 fold increase over non-treated tumors. Furthermore, in many cancer applications, we believe it may be desirable to perform targeted drug delivery in conjunction with ablation of the tumor microcirculation, which will lead to tumor hypoxia and apoptosis. To this end, we have tested the efficacy of non-theramal cavitation-induced microvascular ablation, showing that this approach elicits tumor perfusion reduction, apoptosis, significant growth inhibition, and necrosis. Taken together, these results indicate that our ultrasound-targeted approach has the potential to increase therapeutic efficiency by creating tumor necrosis through microvascular ablation and/or simultaneously enhancing the drug payload in gliomas.

  7. A new diatom growth inhibition assay using the XTT colorimetric method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Weina; Akagi, Takuya; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Takimoto, Ayaka; Nagai, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Marine biofouling, which leads to significant operational stress and economic damage on marine infrastructures, is a major problem in marine related industries. Currently, the most common way to avoid marine biofouling involves the use of biocidal products in surface coatings. However, the need for environmentally friendly antibiofouling compounds has increased rapidly with the recent global prohibition of harmful antifoulants, such as tributyltin (TBT). In particular, periphytic diatoms have been shown to contribute significantly to biofilms, which play an important role in biofouling. Therefore, inhibiting the proliferation of fouling diatoms is a very important step in the prevention of marine biofouling. In this study, we developed a new, rapid, accurate, and convenient growth inhibition assay using the XTT colorimetric method to prevent the growth of the fouling periphytic diatom, Nitzschia amabilis Hidek. Suzuki (replaced synonym, Nitzschia laevis Hustedt). The feasibility of this method was verified by determining the growth inhibition activities of two standard photosynthetic inhibitors, DCMU and CuSO4. However, neither inhibitor had any cytotoxic activities at the range of concentrations tested. Moreover, this method was applied by screening and purification of herbicidic but non-cytotoxic compounds from cyanobacteria extracts. Our results demonstrate the utility of this newly established growth inhibition assay for the identification of marine anti-biofouling compounds. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The progress of radiosensitive genes of human brain glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xi; Liu Qiang

    2008-01-01

    Human gliomas are one of the most aggressive tumors in brain which grow infiltrativly. Surgery is the mainstay of treatment. But as the tumor could not be entirely cut off, it is easy to relapse. Radiotherapy plays an important role for patients with gliomas after surgery. The efficacy of radiotherapy is associated with radio sensitivity of human gliomas. This paper makes a summary of current situation and progress for radiosensitive genes of human brain gliomas. (authors)

  9. Terahertz reflectometry imaging for low and high grade gliomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Young Bin; Oh, Seung Jae; Kang, Seok-Gu; Heo, Jung; Kim, Sang-Hoon; Choi, Yuna; Song, Seungri; Son, Hye Young; Kim, Se Hoon; Lee, Ji Hyun; Haam, Seung Joo; Huh, Yong Min; Chang, Jong Hee; Joo, Chulmin; Suh, Jin-Suck

    2016-01-01

    Gross total resection (GTR) of glioma is critical for improving the survival rate of glioma patients. One of the greatest challenges for achieving GTR is the difficulty in discriminating low grade tumor or peritumor regions that have an intact blood brain barrier (BBB) from normal brain tissues and delineating glioma margins during surgery. Here we present a highly sensitive, label-free terahertz reflectometry imaging (TRI) that overcomes current key limitations for intraoperative detection of World Health Organization (WHO) grade II (low grade), and grade III and IV (high grade) gliomas. We demonstrate that TRI provides tumor discrimination and delineation of tumor margins in brain tissues with high sensitivity on the basis of Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained image. TRI may help neurosurgeons to remove gliomas completely by providing visualization of tumor margins in WHO grade II, III, and IV gliomas without contrast agents, and hence, improve patient outcomes. PMID:27782153

  10. Selective uptake of boronophenylalanine by glioma stem/progenitor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Ting; Zhou, Youxin; Xie, Xueshun; Chen, Guilin; Li, Bin; Wei, Yongxin; Chen, Jinming; Huang, Qiang; Du, Ziwei

    2012-01-01

    The success of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) depends on the amount of boron in cells and the tumor/blood and tumor/(normal tissue) boron concentration ratios. For the first time, measurements of boron uptake in both stem/progenitor and differentiated glioma cells were performed along with measurements of boron biodistribution in suitable animal models. In glioma stem/progenitor cells, the selective accumulation of boronophenylalanine (BPA) was lower, and retention of boron after BPA removal was longer than in differentiated glioma cells in vitro. However, boron biodistribution was not statistically significantly different in mice with xenografts. - Highlights: ► Uptake of BPA was analyzed in stem/progenitor and differentiated glioma cells. ► Selective accumulation of BPA was lower in glioma stem/progenitor cells. ► Retention of boron after BPA removal was longer in glioma stem/progenitor cells. ► Boron biodistribution was not statistically different in mice with xenografts.

  11. Mixed metal oxide nanoparticles inhibit growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis into THP-1 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A R Jafari

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Although Ag NPs exhibited low cytotoxicity, they were unable to inhibit Mtb growth in vitro. ZnO NPs exhibited strong anti-Mtb activity and inhibited bacterial growth, but exhibited high cytotoxicity to human macrophage cells. By mixing Ag and ZnO NPs at a ratio of 8ZnO/2Ag, we acquired a mixture that exhibited potent antibacterial activity against Mtb and no cytotoxic effects on THP-1 cells, resulting in inhibition of both in vitro and ex vivo Mtb growth [Figure 1],[Figure 2],[Figure 3], [Table 1],[Table 2],[Table 3].{Figure 1}{Figure 2}{Figure 3} {Table 1}{Table 2}{Table 3}

  12. Inhibitors of GLUT/SLC2A Enhance the Action of BCNU and Temozolomide against High-Grade Gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Azzalin

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Glucose transport across glioblastoma membranes plays a crucial role in maintaining the enhanced glycolysis typical of high-grade gliomas and glioblastoma. We tested the ability of two inhibitors of the glucose transporters GLUT/SLC2A superfamily, indinavir (IDV and ritonavir (RTV, and of one inhibitor of the Na/glucose antiporter type 2 (SGLT2/SLC5A2 superfamily, phlorizin (PHZ, in decreasing glucose consumption and cell proliferation of human and murine glioblastoma cells. We found in vitro that RTV, active on at least three different GLUT/SLC2A transporters, was more effective than IDV, a specific inhibitor of GLUT4/SLC2A4, both in decreasing glucose consumption and lactate production and in inhibiting growth of U87MG and Hu197 human glioblastoma cell lines and primary cultures of human glioblastoma. PHZ was inactive on the same cells. Similar results were obtained when cells were grown in adherence or as 3D multicellular tumor spheroids. RTV treatment but not IDV treatment induced AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPKα phosphorylation that paralleled the decrease in glycolytic activity and cell growth. IDV, but not RTV, induced an increase in GLUT1/SLC2A1 whose activity could compensate for the inhibition of GLUT4/SLC2A4 by IDV. RTV and IDV pass poorly the blood brain barrier and are unlikely to reach sufficient liquoral concentrations in vivo to inhibit glioblastoma growth as single agents. Isobologram analysis of the association of RTV or IDV and 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl-1-nitrosourea (BCNU or 4-methyl-5-oxo-2,3,4,6,8-pentazabicyclo[4.3.0]nona-2,7,9-triene-9-carboxamide (TMZ indicated synergy only with RTV on inhibition of glioblastoma cells. Finally, we tested in vivo the combination of RTV and BCNU on established GL261 tumors. This drug combination increased the overall survival and allowed a five-fold reduction in the dose of BCNU.

  13. Epstein–Barr Virus in Gliomas: Cause, Association, or Artifact?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saghir Akhtar

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Gliomas are the most common malignant brain tumors and account for around 60% of all primary central nervous system cancers. Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is a grade IV glioma associated with a poor outcome despite recent advances in chemotherapy. The etiology of gliomas is unknown, but neurotropic viruses including the Epstein–Barr virus (EBV that is transmitted via salivary and genital fluids have been implicated recently. EBV is a member of the gamma herpes simplex family of DNA viruses that is known to cause infectious mononucleosis (glandular fever and is strongly linked with the oncogenesis of several cancers, including B-cell lymphomas, nasopharyngeal, and gastric carcinomas. The fact that EBV is thought to be the causative agent for primary central nervous system (CNS lymphomas in immune-deficient patients has led to its investigations in other brain tumors including gliomas. Here, we provide a review of the clinical literature pertaining to EBV in gliomas and discuss the possibilities of this virus being simply associative, causative, or even an experimental artifact. We searched the PubMed/MEDLINE databases using the following key words such as: glioma(s, glioblastoma multiforme, brain tumors/cancers, EBV, and neurotropic viruses. Our literature analysis indicates conflicting results on the presence and role of EBV in gliomas. Further comprehensive studies are needed to fully implicate EBV in gliomagenesis and oncomodulation. Understanding the role of EBV and other oncoviruses in the etiology of gliomas, would likely open up new avenues for the treatment and management of these, often fatal, CNS tumors.

  14. Activation of glioma cells generates immune tolerant NKT cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Bo; Wu, Wei; Wei, Xiaowei; Li, Yang; Ren, Gang; Fan, Wenhai

    2014-12-12

    Therapeutic outcomes of glioma are currently not encouraging. Tumor tolerance plays an important role in the pathogenesis of glioma. It is reported that micro RNAs (miR) are associated with tumor development. This study aims to investigate the role of miR-92a in the development of tolerant natural killer T (NKT) cells. In this study, U87 cells (a human glioma cell line) and primary glioma cells were prepared. The assessment of miR-92a was performed by real time RT-PCR. The expression of interleukin (IL)-10 and IL-6 in NKT cells was evaluated by flow cytometry. Results showed that abundant IL-6(+) IL-10(+) NKT cells were detected in glioma tissue. Cultures of glioma cells and NKT cells induced the expression of IL-6 and IL-10 in NKT cells. Glioma cells expressed miR-92a; the latter played a critical role in the induction of IL-6 and IL-10 expression in NKT cells. The expression of the antitumor molecules, including perforin, Fas ligand, and interferon-γ, was significantly attenuated compared with control NKT cells. The IL-6(+) IL-10(+) NKT cells showed less capability in the induction of apoptosis in glioma cells, but showed the immune suppressor functions on CD8(+) T cell activities. We conclude that glioma-derived miR-92a induces IL-6(+) IL-10(+) NKT cells; this fraction of NKT cells can suppress cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Platelet-Derived Growth Factor-Receptor α Strongly Inhibits Melanoma Growth In Vitro and In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debora Faraone

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous melanoma is the most aggressive skin cancer; it is highly metastatic and responds poorly to current therapies. The expression of platelet-derived growth factor receptors (PDGF-Rs is reported to be reduced in metastatic melanoma compared with benign nevi or normal skin; we then hypothesized that PDGF-Rα may control growth of melanoma cells. We show here that melanoma cells overexpressing PDGF-Rα respond to serum with a significantly lower proliferation compared with that of controls. Apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, pRb dephosphorylation, and DNA synthesis inhibition were also observed in cells overexpressing PDGF-Rα. Proliferation was rescued by PDGF-Rα inhibitors, allowing to exclude nonspecific toxic effects and indicating that PDGF-Rα mediates autocrine antiproliferation signals in melanoma cells. Accordingly, PDGF-Rα was found to mediate staurosporine cytotoxicity. A protein array-based analysis of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway revealed that melanoma cells overexpressing PDGF-Rα show a strong reduction of c-Jun phosphorylated in serine 63 and of protein phosphatase 2A/Bα and a marked increase of p38γ, mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 3, and signal regulatory protein α1 protein expression. In a mouse model of primary melanoma growth, infection with the Ad-vector overexpressing PDGF-Rα reached a significant 70% inhibition of primary melanoma growth (P < .001 and a similar inhibition of tumor angiogenesis. All together, these data demonstrate that PDGF-Rα strongly impairs melanoma growth likely through autocrine mechanisms and indicate a novel endogenous mechanism involved in melanoma control.

  16. Mullerian Inhibiting Substances (MIS) Augments IFN-gamma Mediated Inhibition of Breast Cancer Cell Growth

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gupta, Vandana

    2006-01-01

    MIS is a member of the TGF family. The purpose of this study is to test the hypothesis that MIS and IFN-gamma might be more effective in the inhibition of breast cancer cell growth than either agent alone...

  17. Down-regulation of 14-3-3β exerts anti-cancer effects through inducing ER stress in human glioma U87 cells: Involvement of CHOP–Wnt pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Lei; Lei, Hui; Chang, Ming-Ze; Liu, Zhi-Qin [Department of Neurological Disease, Xi' an Central Hospital, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710000 (China); Bie, Xiao-Hua, E-mail: biexiaohua_xjtu@126.com [Department of Functional Neurosurgery, Xi' an Red Cross Hospital, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710054 (China)

    2015-07-10

    We previously identified 14-3-3β as a tumor-specific isoform of 14-3-3 protein in astrocytoma, but its functional role in glioma cells and underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated the effects of 14-3-3β inhibition in human glioma U87 cells using specific targeted small interfering RNA (siRNA). The results showed that 14-3-3β is highly expressed in U87 cells but not in normal astrocyte SVGp12 cells. Knockdown of 14-3-3β by Si-14-3-3β transfection significantly decreased the cell viability but increased the LDH release in a time-dependent fashion in U87 cells, and these effects were accompanied with G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. In addition, 14-3-3β knockdown induced ER stress in U87 cells, as evidenced by ER calcium release, increased expression of XBP1S mRNA and induction of ER related pro-apoptotic factors. Down-regulation of 14-3-3β significantly decreased the nuclear localization of β-catenin and inhibited Topflash activity, which was shown to be reversely correlated with CHOP. Furthermore, Si-CHOP and sFRP were used to inhibit CHOP and Wnt, respectively. The results showed that the anti-cancer effects of 14-3-3β knockdown in U87 cells were mediated by increased expression of CHOP and followed inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin pathway. In summary, the remarkable efficiency of 14-3-3β knockdown to induce apoptotic cell death in U87 cells may find therapeutic application for the treatment of glioma patients. - Highlights: • Knockdown of 14-3-3β leads to cytotoxicity in human glioma U87 cells. • Knockdown of 14-3-3β induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in U87 cells. • Knockdown of 14-3-3β results in ER stress in U87 cells. • Knockdown of 14-3-3β inhibits Wnt/β-catenin pathway via CHOP activation.

  18. Down-regulation of 14-3-3β exerts anti-cancer effects through inducing ER stress in human glioma U87 cells: Involvement of CHOP–Wnt pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Lei; Lei, Hui; Chang, Ming-Ze; Liu, Zhi-Qin; Bie, Xiao-Hua

    2015-01-01

    We previously identified 14-3-3β as a tumor-specific isoform of 14-3-3 protein in astrocytoma, but its functional role in glioma cells and underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated the effects of 14-3-3β inhibition in human glioma U87 cells using specific targeted small interfering RNA (siRNA). The results showed that 14-3-3β is highly expressed in U87 cells but not in normal astrocyte SVGp12 cells. Knockdown of 14-3-3β by Si-14-3-3β transfection significantly decreased the cell viability but increased the LDH release in a time-dependent fashion in U87 cells, and these effects were accompanied with G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. In addition, 14-3-3β knockdown induced ER stress in U87 cells, as evidenced by ER calcium release, increased expression of XBP1S mRNA and induction of ER related pro-apoptotic factors. Down-regulation of 14-3-3β significantly decreased the nuclear localization of β-catenin and inhibited Topflash activity, which was shown to be reversely correlated with CHOP. Furthermore, Si-CHOP and sFRP were used to inhibit CHOP and Wnt, respectively. The results showed that the anti-cancer effects of 14-3-3β knockdown in U87 cells were mediated by increased expression of CHOP and followed inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin pathway. In summary, the remarkable efficiency of 14-3-3β knockdown to induce apoptotic cell death in U87 cells may find therapeutic application for the treatment of glioma patients. - Highlights: • Knockdown of 14-3-3β leads to cytotoxicity in human glioma U87 cells. • Knockdown of 14-3-3β induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in U87 cells. • Knockdown of 14-3-3β results in ER stress in U87 cells. • Knockdown of 14-3-3β inhibits Wnt/β-catenin pathway via CHOP activation

  19. MRI and morphological observation in C6 glioma model rats and significance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Ying; Yuan Bo; Wang Hao; Lu Jin; Yuan Changji; Ma Yue; Tong Dan; Zhang Kun; Gao Feng; Wu Xiaogang

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To establish stable and reliable rat C6 glioma model, and to perform MRI dynamic observation and pathomorphological observation in model animal brain, and to provide experimental basis for pharmaceutical research on anti-glioma drugs. Methods: The C6 glioma cells were cultured and 20 μL cultural fluid containing 1×10 6 C6 cells was sterotactically implanted into the left caudate nuclei in 10 male Wistar rats, respectively. The changes in the behavior of the rats after implantation were observed and recorded. MRI dynamic scanning was performed in 10 rats 2, 3 and 4 weeks after implantation and the brain tissues were taken for general and pathological examination when the 10 rats were naturally dead. The survival period of tumor-bearing rats was calculated. Results: 2 weeks after implantation the rats showed decreased activities and food intake, fur lackluster, and conjunctival congestion and so on; 3 weeks later, some rats appeared nerve symptoms such as body twitch, body hemiplegy, body distortion, rotation and so on. All the 10 rats died in 8-30 d. The median survival period of the tumor-bearing rats was 18 d, the average survival period was (18.3±7.3) d. The pathological examination showed that the tumor cells were arranged irregularly closely and karyokinesis was easy to see; tumor vascular tissue proliferation and tumor invasive growth into surrounding normal tissues were found. The expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) was positive in the tumors. Conclusion: A stable animal model of intracranial glioma is successfully established by stereotactic implantation of C6 cells into the rat caudate nucleus. The results of MRI dynamic observation and pathohistological observation on the model animal brain tissue. Can provide experimental basis for selecting the appropriate time window to perform the pharmaceutical research on anti-glioma drugs. (authors)

  20. Ultrasound-mediated interferon β gene transfection inhibits growth of malignant melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Kazuki; Feril, Loreto B.; Tachibana, Katsuro; Takahashi, Akira; Matsuo, Miki; Endo, Hitomi; Harada, Yoshimi; Nakayama, Juichiro

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Successful ultrasound-mediated transfection of melanoma (C32) cells with IFN-β genes both in vitro and in vivo. → Ultrasound-mediated IFN-β transfection inhibited proliferation of melanoma cells in vitro. → Ultrasound-mediated IFN-β transfection inhibited melanoma tumor growth in vivo. -- Abstract: We investigated the effects of ultrasound-mediated transfection (sonotransfection) of interferon β (IFN-β) gene on melanoma (C32) both in vitro and in vivo. C32 cells were sonotransfected with IFN-β in vitro. Subcutaneous C32 tumors in mice were sonicated weekly immediately after intra-tumor injection with IFN-β genes mixed with microbubbles. Successful sonotransfection with IFN-β gene in vitro was confirmed by ELISA, which resulted in C32 growth inhibition. In vivo, the growth ratio of tumors transfected with IFN-β gene was significantly lower than the other experimental groups. These results may lead to a new method of treatment against melanoma and other hard-to-treat cancers.

  1. Osteoclast inhibition impairs chondrosarcoma growth and bone destruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero, Jesse E; Stevens, Jeff W; Malandra, Allison E; Fredericks, Douglas C; Odgren, Paul R; Buckwalter, Joseph A; Morcuende, Jose

    2014-12-01

    Because Chondrosarcoma is resistant to available chemotherapy and radiation regimens, wide resection is the mainstay in treatment, which frequently results in high morbidity and which may not prevent local recurrence. There is a clear need for improved adjuvant treatment of this malignancy. We have observed the presence of osteoclasts in the microenvironment of chondrosarcoma in human pathological specimens. We utilized the Swarm rat chondrosarcoma (SRC) model to test the hypothesis that osteoclasts affect chondrosarcoma pathogenesis. We implanted SRC tumors in tibia of Sprague-Dawley rats and analyzed bone histologically and radiographically for bone destruction and tumor growth. At three weeks, tumors invaded local bone causing cortical disruption and trabecular resorption. Bone destruction was accompanied by increased osteoclast number and resorbed bone surface. Treatment of rats with the zoledronic acid prevented cortical destruction, inhibited trabecular resorption, and resulted in decreased tumor volume in bone. To confirm that inhibition of osteoclasts per se, and not off-target effects of drug, was responsible for the prevention of tumor growth and bone destruction, we implanted SRC into osteopetrotic rat tibia. SRC-induced bone destruction and tumor growth were impaired in osteopetrotic bone compared with control bone. The results from our animal model demonstrate that osteoclasts contribute to chondrosarcoma-mediated bone destruction and tumor growth and may represent a therapeutic target in particular chondrosarcoma patients. © 2014 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Genistein exposure inhibits growth and alters steroidogenesis in adult mouse antral follicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Shreya; Peretz, Jackye; Pan, Yuan-Xiang; Helferich, William G.; Flaws, Jodi A.

    2016-01-01

    Genistein is a naturally occurring isoflavone phytoestrogen commonly found in plant products such as soybeans, lentils, and chickpeas. Genistein, like other phytoestrogens, has the potential to mimic, enhance, or impair the estradiol biosynthesis pathway, thereby potentially altering ovarian follicle growth. Previous studies have inconsistently indicated that genistein exposure may alter granulosa cell proliferation and hormone production, but no studies have examined the effects of genistein on intact antral follicles. Thus, this study was designed to test the hypothesis that genistein exposure inhibits follicle growth and steroidogenesis in intact antral follicles. To test this hypothesis, antral follicles isolated from CD-1 mice were cultured with vehicle (dimethyl sulfoxide; DMSO) or genistein (6.0 and 36 μM) for 18–96 h. Every 24 h, follicle diameters were measured to assess growth. At the end of each culture period, the media were pooled to measure hormone levels, and the cultured follicles were collected to measure expression of cell cycle regulators and steroidogenic enzymes. The results indicate that genistein (36 μM) inhibits growth of mouse antral follicles. Additionally, genistein (6.0 and 36 μM) increases progesterone, testosterone, and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) levels, but decreases estrone and estradiol levels. The results also indicate that genistein alters the expression of steroidogenic enzymes at 24, 72 and 96 h, and the expression of cell cycle regulators at 18 h. These data indicate that genistein exposure inhibits antral follicle growth by inhibiting the cell cycle, alters sex steroid hormone levels, and dysregulates steroidogenic enzymes in cultured mouse antral follicles. - Highlights: • Genistein exposure inhibits antral follicle growth. • Genistein exposure alters expression of cell cycle regulators. • Genistein exposure alters sex steroid hormones. • Genistein exposure alters expression of steroidogenic enzymes.

  3. Genistein exposure inhibits growth and alters steroidogenesis in adult mouse antral follicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Shreya, E-mail: Shreya.patel214@gmail.com [Department of Comparative Biosciences, University of Illinois, 2001 S. Lincoln Ave, Urbana, IL 61802 (United States); Peretz, Jackye, E-mail: Jackye.peretz@gmail.com [Department of Comparative Biosciences, University of Illinois, 2001 S. Lincoln Ave, Urbana, IL 61802 (United States); Pan, Yuan-Xiang, E-mail: yxpan@illinois.edu [Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, University of Illinois, 905 S. Goodwin, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Helferich, William G., E-mail: helferic@illinois.edu [Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, University of Illinois, 905 S. Goodwin, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Flaws, Jodi A., E-mail: jflaws@illinois.edu [Department of Comparative Biosciences, University of Illinois, 2001 S. Lincoln Ave, Urbana, IL 61802 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Genistein is a naturally occurring isoflavone phytoestrogen commonly found in plant products such as soybeans, lentils, and chickpeas. Genistein, like other phytoestrogens, has the potential to mimic, enhance, or impair the estradiol biosynthesis pathway, thereby potentially altering ovarian follicle growth. Previous studies have inconsistently indicated that genistein exposure may alter granulosa cell proliferation and hormone production, but no studies have examined the effects of genistein on intact antral follicles. Thus, this study was designed to test the hypothesis that genistein exposure inhibits follicle growth and steroidogenesis in intact antral follicles. To test this hypothesis, antral follicles isolated from CD-1 mice were cultured with vehicle (dimethyl sulfoxide; DMSO) or genistein (6.0 and 36 μM) for 18–96 h. Every 24 h, follicle diameters were measured to assess growth. At the end of each culture period, the media were pooled to measure hormone levels, and the cultured follicles were collected to measure expression of cell cycle regulators and steroidogenic enzymes. The results indicate that genistein (36 μM) inhibits growth of mouse antral follicles. Additionally, genistein (6.0 and 36 μM) increases progesterone, testosterone, and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) levels, but decreases estrone and estradiol levels. The results also indicate that genistein alters the expression of steroidogenic enzymes at 24, 72 and 96 h, and the expression of cell cycle regulators at 18 h. These data indicate that genistein exposure inhibits antral follicle growth by inhibiting the cell cycle, alters sex steroid hormone levels, and dysregulates steroidogenic enzymes in cultured mouse antral follicles. - Highlights: • Genistein exposure inhibits antral follicle growth. • Genistein exposure alters expression of cell cycle regulators. • Genistein exposure alters sex steroid hormones. • Genistein exposure alters expression of steroidogenic enzymes.

  4. Childhood Brain Stem Glioma Treatment (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childhood brain stem glioma presents as a diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG; a fast-growing tumor that is difficult to treat and has a poor prognosis) or a focal glioma (grows more slowly, is easier to treat, and has a better prognosis). Learn about the diagnosis, cellular classification, staging, treatment, and clinical trials for pediatric brain stem glioma in this expert-reviewed summary.

  5. PAI-1 and EGFR expression in adult glioma tumors: toward a molecular prognostic classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muracciole, Xavier; Romain, Sylvie; Dufour, Henri; Palmari, Jacqueline; Chinot, Olivier; Ouafik, L'Houcine; Grisoli, Francois; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Martin, Pierre-Marie

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Molecular classification of gliomas is a major challenge in the effort to improve therapeutic decisions. The plasminogen activator system, including plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1), plays a key role in tumor invasion and neoangiogenesis. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is involved in the control of proliferation. The contribution of PAI-1 and EGFR to the survival of gliomas was retrospectively investigated. Methods and Materials: Fifty-nine adult gliomas treated by neurosurgery and conventional irradiation were analyzed, including 9 low-grade (2) and 50 high-grade (3-4) tumors (WHO classification). PAI-1 was measured on cytosols and EGFR on solubilized membranes using ELISA methods. Results: High PAI-1 levels were strongly associated with high histologic grade (p<0.001) and histologic necrosis (p<0.001). PAI-1 also correlated positively with patient age (p=0.05) and negatively with Karnofsky index (p=0.01). By univariate analysis of the high-grade population, higher PAI-1 (p<0.0001) and EGFR values (p=0.02) were associated with shorter overall survival. Only PAI-1 was an independent factor in multivariate analysis. Grade 3 tumors with low PAI-1 (100% 3-year overall survival rate) presented the same clinical outcome as the low-grade tumors. Conclusions: In this prognostic study, PAI-1 and EGFR expression revealed similarities and differences between high-grade gliomas that were not apparent by traditional clinical criteria. These data strongly support that biologic factors should be included in glioma classification and the design of clinical trials to treat more homogeneous populations

  6. MEG network differences between low- and high-grade glioma related to epilepsy and cognition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin van Dellen

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To reveal possible differences in whole brain topology of epileptic glioma patients, being low-grade glioma (LGG and high-grade glioma (HGG patients. We studied functional networks in these patients and compared them to those in epilepsy patients with non-glial lesions (NGL and healthy controls. Finally, we related network characteristics to seizure frequency and cognitive performance within patient groups. METHODS: We constructed functional networks from pre-surgical resting-state magnetoencephalography (MEG recordings of 13 LGG patients, 12 HGG patients, 10 NGL patients, and 36 healthy controls. Normalized clustering coefficient and average shortest path length as well as modular structure and network synchronizability were computed for each group. Cognitive performance was assessed in a subset of 11 LGG and 10 HGG patients. RESULTS: LGG patients showed decreased network synchronizability and decreased global integration compared to healthy controls in the theta frequency range (4-8 Hz, similar to NGL patients. HGG patients' networks did not significantly differ from those in controls. Network characteristics correlated with clinical presentation regarding seizure frequency in LGG patients, and with poorer cognitive performance in both LGG and HGG glioma patients. CONCLUSION: Lesion histology partly determines differences in functional networks in glioma patients suffering from epilepsy. We suggest that differences between LGG and HGG patients' networks are explained by differences in plasticity, guided by the particular lesional growth pattern. Interestingly, decreased synchronizability and decreased global integration in the theta band seem to make LGG and NGL patients more prone to the occurrence of seizures and cognitive decline.

  7. Glioma cell death induced by irradiation or alkylating agent chemotherapy is independent of the intrinsic ceramide pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothee Gramatzki

    Full Text Available Resistance to genotoxic therapy is a characteristic feature of glioma cells. Acid sphingomyelinase (ASM hydrolyzes sphingomyelin to ceramide and glucosylceramide synthase (GCS catalyzes ceramide metabolism. Increased ceramide levels have been suggested to enhance chemotherapy-induced death of cancer cells.Microarray and clinical data for ASM and GCS in astrocytomas WHO grade II-IV were acquired from the Rembrandt database. Moreover, the glioblastoma database of the Cancer Genome Atlas network (TCGA was used for survival data of glioblastoma patients. For in vitro studies, increases in ceramide levels were achieved either by ASM overexpression or by the GCS inhibitor DL-threo-1-phenyl-2-palmitoylamino-3-morpholino-1-propanol (PPMP in human glioma cell lines. Combinations of alkylating chemotherapy or irradiation and ASM overexpression, PPMP or exogenous ceramide were applied in parental cells. The anti-glioma effects were investigated by assessing proliferation, metabolic activity, viability and clonogenicity. Finally, viability and clonogenicity were assessed in temozolomide (TMZ-resistant cells upon treatment with PPMP, exogenous ceramide, alkylating chemotherapy, irradiation or their combinations.Interrogations from the Rembrandt and TCGA database showed a better survival of glioblastoma patients with low expression of ASM or GCS. ASM overexpression or PPMP treatment alone led to ceramide accumulation but did not enhance the anti-glioma activity of alkylating chemotherapy or irradiation. PPMP or exogenous ceramide induced acute cytotoxicity in glioblastoma cells. Combined treatments with chemotherapy or irradiation led to additive, but not synergistic effects. Finally, no synergy was found when TMZ-resistant cells were treated with exogenous ceramide or PPMP alone or in combination with TMZ or irradiation.Modulation of intrinsic glioma cell ceramide levels by ASM overexpression or GCS inhibition does not enhance the anti-glioma activity of

  8. Nuclear FABP7 immunoreactivity is preferentially expressed in infiltrative glioma and is associated with poor prognosis in EGFR-overexpressing glioblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Yu; Bollen, Andrew W; Aldape, Ken D; Gupta, Nalin

    2006-01-01

    We previously identified brain type fatty acid-binding protein (FABP7) as a prognostic marker for patients with glioblastoma (GBM). Increased expression of FABP7 is associated with reduced survival. To investigate possible molecular mechanisms underlying this association, we compared the expression and subcellular localization of FABP7 in non-tumor brain tissues with different types of glioma, and examined the expression of FABP7 and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in GBM tumors. Expression of FABP7 in non-tumor brain and glioma specimens was examined using immunohistochemistry, and its correlation to the clinical behavior of the tumors was analyzed. We also analyzed the association between FABP7 and EGFR expression in different sets of GBM specimens using published DNA microarray datasets and semi-quantitative immunohistochemistry. In vitro migration was examined using SF763 glioma cell line. FABP7 was present in a unique population of glia in normal human brain, and its expression was increased in a subset of reactive astrocytes. FABP7 immunoreactivity in grade I pilocytic astrocytoma was predominantly cytoplasmic, whereas nuclear FABP7 was detected in other types of infiltrative glioma. Nuclear, not cytoplasmic, FABP7 immunoreactivity was associated with EGFR overexpression in GBM (N = 61, p = 0.008). Expression of the FABP7 gene in GBM also correlated with the abundance of EGFR mRNA in our previous microarray analyses (N = 34, p = 0.016) and an independent public microarray dataset (N = 28, p = 0.03). Compared to those negative for both markers, nuclear FABP7-positive/EGFR-positive and nuclear FABP7-positive/EGFR-negative GBM tumors demonstrated shortest survival, whereas those only positive for EGFR had intermediate survival. EGFR activation increased nuclear FABP7 immunoreactivity in a glioma cell line in vitro, and inhibition of FABP7 expression suppressed EGF-induced glioma-cell migration. Our data suggested that in EGFR-positive GBM the presence of

  9. Glyphosate and AMPA inhibit cancer cell growth through inhibiting intracellular glycine synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingli; Lambrechts, Mark J; Zhang, Qiuyang; Liu, Sen; Ge, Dongxia; Yin, Rutie; Xi, Mingrong; You, Zongbing

    2013-01-01

    Glycine is a nonessential amino acid that is reversibly converted from serine intracellularly by serine hydroxymethyltransferase. Glyphosate and its degradation product, aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA), are analogs to glycine, thus they may inhibit serine hydroxymethyltransferase to decrease intracellular glycine synthesis. In this study, we found that glyphosate and AMPA inhibited cell growth in eight human cancer cell lines but not in two immortalized human normal prostatic epithelial cell lines. AMPA arrested C4-2B and PC-3 cancer cells in the G1/G0 phase and inhibited entry into the S phase of the cell cycle. AMPA also promoted apoptosis in C4-2B and PC-3 cancer cell lines. AMPA upregulated p53 and p21 protein levels as well as procaspase 9 protein levels in C4-2B cells, whereas it downregulated cyclin D3 protein levels. AMPA also activated caspase 3 and induced cleavage of poly (adenosine diphosphate [ADP]-ribose) polymerase. This study provides the first evidence that glyphosate and AMPA can inhibit proliferation and promote apoptosis of cancer cells but not normal cells, suggesting that they have potentials to be developed into a new anticancer therapy.

  10. Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate inhibits antral follicle growth, induces atresia, and inhibits steroid hormone production in cultured mouse antral follicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannon, Patrick R., E-mail: phannon2@illinois.edu; Brannick, Katherine E., E-mail: kbran@illinois.edu; Wang, Wei, E-mail: Wei.Wang2@covance.com; Gupta, Rupesh K., E-mail: drrupesh@yahoo.com; Flaws, Jodi A., E-mail: jflaws@illinois.edu

    2015-04-01

    Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is a ubiquitous environmental toxicant found in consumer products that causes ovarian toxicity. Antral follicles are the functional ovarian units and must undergo growth, survival from atresia, and proper regulation of steroidogenesis to ovulate and produce hormones. Previous studies have determined that DEHP inhibits antral follicle growth and decreases estradiol levels in vitro; however, the mechanism by which DEHP elicits these effects is unknown. The present study tested the hypothesis that DEHP directly alters regulators of the cell cycle, apoptosis, and steroidogenesis to inhibit antral follicle functionality. Antral follicles from adult CD-1 mice were cultured with vehicle control or DEHP (1–100 μg/ml) for 24–96 h to establish the temporal effects of DEHP on the follicle. Following 24–96 h of culture, antral follicles were subjected to gene expression analysis, and media were subjected to measurements of hormone levels. DEHP increased the mRNA levels of cyclin D2, cyclin dependent kinase 4, cyclin E1, cyclin A2, and cyclin B1 and decreased the levels of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A prior to growth inhibition. Additionally, DEHP increased the mRNA levels of BCL2-associated agonist of cell death, BCL2-associated X protein, BCL2-related ovarian killer protein, B-cell leukemia/lymphoma 2, and Bcl2-like 10, leading to an increase in atresia. Further, DEHP decreased the levels of progesterone, androstenedione, and testosterone prior to the decrease in estradiol levels, with decreased mRNA levels of side-chain cleavage, 17α-hydroxylase-17,20-desmolase, 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, and aromatase. Collectively, DEHP directly alters antral follicle functionality by inhibiting growth, inducing atresia, and inhibiting steroidogenesis. - Highlights: • DEHP inhibits antral follicle growth by dysregulating cell cycle regulators. • DEHP induces antral follicle atresia by dysregulating apoptosis regulators. • DEHP

  11. Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate inhibits antral follicle growth, induces atresia, and inhibits steroid hormone production in cultured mouse antral follicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannon, Patrick R.; Brannick, Katherine E.; Wang, Wei; Gupta, Rupesh K.; Flaws, Jodi A.

    2015-01-01

    Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is a ubiquitous environmental toxicant found in consumer products that causes ovarian toxicity. Antral follicles are the functional ovarian units and must undergo growth, survival from atresia, and proper regulation of steroidogenesis to ovulate and produce hormones. Previous studies have determined that DEHP inhibits antral follicle growth and decreases estradiol levels in vitro; however, the mechanism by which DEHP elicits these effects is unknown. The present study tested the hypothesis that DEHP directly alters regulators of the cell cycle, apoptosis, and steroidogenesis to inhibit antral follicle functionality. Antral follicles from adult CD-1 mice were cultured with vehicle control or DEHP (1–100 μg/ml) for 24–96 h to establish the temporal effects of DEHP on the follicle. Following 24–96 h of culture, antral follicles were subjected to gene expression analysis, and media were subjected to measurements of hormone levels. DEHP increased the mRNA levels of cyclin D2, cyclin dependent kinase 4, cyclin E1, cyclin A2, and cyclin B1 and decreased the levels of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A prior to growth inhibition. Additionally, DEHP increased the mRNA levels of BCL2-associated agonist of cell death, BCL2-associated X protein, BCL2-related ovarian killer protein, B-cell leukemia/lymphoma 2, and Bcl2-like 10, leading to an increase in atresia. Further, DEHP decreased the levels of progesterone, androstenedione, and testosterone prior to the decrease in estradiol levels, with decreased mRNA levels of side-chain cleavage, 17α-hydroxylase-17,20-desmolase, 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, and aromatase. Collectively, DEHP directly alters antral follicle functionality by inhibiting growth, inducing atresia, and inhibiting steroidogenesis. - Highlights: • DEHP inhibits antral follicle growth by dysregulating cell cycle regulators. • DEHP induces antral follicle atresia by dysregulating apoptosis regulators. • DEHP

  12. 'Dipeptidyl peptidase-IV activity and/or structure homologs' (DASH) in growth-modulated glioma cell lines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šedo, Aleksi; Bušek, P.; Scholzová, E.; Malík, Radek; Vlašicová, K.; Janáčková, S.; Mareš, Vladislav

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 385, č. 6 (2004), s. 557-559 ISSN 1431-6730 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA301/02/0962 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : brain tumors * glioma cells * DPP-IV Subject RIV: FD - Oncology ; Hematology Impact factor: 3.598, year: 2004

  13. Molecular and Genetic Determinants of Glioma Cell Invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenta Masui

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A diffusely invasive nature is a major obstacle in treating a malignant brain tumor, “diffuse glioma”, which prevents neurooncologists from surgically removing the tumor cells even in combination with chemotherapy and radiation. Recently updated classification of diffuse gliomas based on distinct genetic and epigenetic features has culminated in a multilayered diagnostic approach to combine histologic phenotypes and molecular genotypes in an integrated diagnosis. However, it is still a work in progress to decipher how the genetic aberrations contribute to the aggressive nature of gliomas including their highly invasive capacity. Here we depict a set of recent discoveries involving molecular genetic determinants of the infiltrating nature of glioma cells, especially focusing on genetic mutations in receptor tyrosine kinase pathways and metabolic reprogramming downstream of common cancer mutations. The specific biology of glioma cell invasion provides an opportunity to explore the genotype-phenotype correlation in cancer and develop novel glioma-specific therapeutic strategies for this devastating disease.

  14. miR-21 Is Linked to Glioma Angiogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermansen, Simon Kjær; Nielsen, Boye Schnack; Aaberg-Jessen, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNA-21 (miR-21) is the most consistently over-expressed microRNA (miRNA) in malignant gliomas. We have previously reported that miR-21 is upregulated in glioma vessels and subsets of glioma cells. To better understand the role of miR-21 in glioma angiogenesis and to characterize miR-21......-localized with the hypoxia- and angiogenesis-associated markers HIF-1α (p=0.0020) and VEGF (p=0.0096), whereas the putative miR-21 target, PTEN, was expressed independently of miR-21. Expression of stem cell markers Oct4, Sox2 and CD133 was not associated with miR-21. In six glioblastoma cultures, miR-21 did not correlate...... with the six markers. These findings suggest that miR-21 is linked to glioma angiogenesis, that miR-21 is unlikely to regulate PTEN, and that miR-21-positive tumor cells do not possess stem cell characteristics....

  15. Characterization and response of newly developed high-grade glioma cultures to the tyrosine kinase inhibitors, erlotinib, gefitinib and imatinib

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinsella, Paula; Howley, Rachel; Doolan, Padraig; Clarke, Colin; Madden, Stephen F.; Clynes, Martin; Farrell, Michael; Amberger-Murphy, Verena

    2012-01-01

    High-grade gliomas (HGG), are the most common aggressive brain tumours in adults. Inhibitors targeting growth factor signalling pathways in glioma have shown a low clinical response rate. To accurately evaluate response to targeted therapies further in vitro studies are necessary. Growth factor pathway expression using epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), mutant EGFR (EGFRvIII), platelet derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR), C-Kit and C-Abl together with phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) expression and downstream activation of AKT and phosphorylated ribosomal protein S6 (P70S6K) was analysed in 26 primary glioma cultures treated with the tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) erlotinib, gefitinib and imatinib. Response to TKIs was assessed using 50% inhibitory concentr